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Sample records for a-induced hepatitis model

  1. Immunological aspects and therapeutic significance of an autoantibody against histone H1 in a rat model of concanavalin A-induced hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Toshiaki; Goto, Shigeru; Lai, Chia-Yun; Hsu, Li-Wen; Takaoka, Yuki; Kawamoto, Seiji; Chiang, Kuei-Chen; Shimada, Yayoi; Ohmori, Naoya; Goto, Takeshi; Sato, Shuji; Ono, Kazuhisa; Cheng, Yu-Fan; Chen, Chao-Long

    2010-04-01

    We previously demonstrated the immunosuppressive activity of anti-histone H1 autoantibody induced in experimental and clinical liver allograft tolerance. This study aimed to explore the immunological aspects of anti-histone H1 autoantibody in liver injury induced by concanavalin A (Con A). To establish a Con A-hepatitis model, 20 mg/kg Con A was intravenously injected into rats, after which liver function and histopathological analyses were performed. In this model, anti-histone H1 autoantibody was transiently induced in the sera during the natural recovery stage, 3-7 days after Con A injection. To evaluate the therapeutic significance of anti-histone H1 autoantibody, a polyclonal antibody against histone H1 was intraperitoneally injected immediately after Con A injection. We found that injection of anti-histone H1 antibody could reduce Con A-induced liver damage. Further mechanical analyses revealed that anti-histone H1 antibody altered the intracellular activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase, nuclear factor-kappaB and calcineurin via T-cell receptor signalling, suggesting that anti-histone H1 antibody may protect the liver from Con A-induced injury by inhibiting activation of effector T cells. These findings suggest that anti-histone H1 autoantibody may be a natural immune regulatory factor that protects inflamed livers suffering from autoimmune hepatitis and may lead to T-cell unresponsiveness through the selective regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase/nuclear factor-kappaB and calcineurin signalling.

  2. Hepatic NK cell-mediated hypersensitivity to ConA-induced liver injury in mouse liver expressing hepatitis C virus polyprotein.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiuxia; Yan, Shaoduo; Wang, Licui; Duan, Xiangguo; Wang, Lei; Wang, Yue; Wu, Tao; Wang, Xiaohui; An, Jie; Zhang, Yulong; Zhou, Qianqian; Zhan, Linsheng

    2016-08-04

    The role of hepatic NK cells in the pathogenesis of HCV-associated hepatic failure is incompletely understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of HCV on ConA-induced immunological hepatic injury and the influence of HCV on hepatic NK cell activation in the liver after ConA administration. An immunocompetent HCV mouse model that encodes the entire viral polyprotein in a liver-specific manner based on hydrodynamic injection and φC31o integrase was used to study the role of hepatic NK cells. Interestingly, the frequency of hepatic NK cells was reduced in HCV mice, whereas the levels of other intrahepatic lymphocytes remained unaltered. Next, we investigated whether the reduction in NK cells within HCV mouse livers might elicit an effect on immune-mediated liver injury. HCV mice were subjected to acute liver injury models upon ConA administration. We observed that HCV mice developed more severe ConA-induced immune-mediated hepatitis, which was dependent on the accumulated intrahepatic NK cells. Our results indicated that after the administration of ConA, NK cells not only mediated liver injury through the production of immunoregulatory cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α and perforin) with direct antiviral activity, but they also killed target cells directly through the TRAIL/DR5 and NKG2D/NKG2D ligand signaling pathway in HCV mice. Our findings suggest a critical role for NK cells in oversensitive liver injury during chronic HCV infection.

  3. Atg7 Knockdown Augments Concanavalin A-Induced Acute Hepatitis through an ROS-Mediated p38/MAPK Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuefeng; Xie, Qing; Wu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Concanavalin A (ConA), a T-cell mitogen that induces acute autoimmune hepatitis, is widely used to model pathophysiological processes of human acute autoimmune liver disease. Although autophagy has been extensively studied in the past decade, little is known about its molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of ConA-induced acute hepatitis. In this study, we used a Cre-conditional atg7 KO mouse to investigate the effects of Atg7-associated autophagy on ConA-induced murine hepatitis. Our results demonstrated that atg7 deficiency in mice enhanced macrophage activation and increased pro-inflammatory cytokines upon ConA stimulation. Atg7 silencing resulted in accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria, disruption of reactive oxygen species (ROS) degradation, and increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines in Raw264.7 cells. p38/MAPK and NF-κB levels were increased upon ConA induction due to Atg7 deficiency. Blocking ROS production inhibited ConA-induced p38/IκB phosphorylation and subsequent intracellular inflammatory responses. Hence, this study demonstrated that atg7 knockout in mice or Atg7 knockdown in cell culture augmented ConA-induced acute hepatitis and related cellular malfunction, indicating protective effects of Atg7 on regulating mitochondrial ROS via a p38/MAPK-mediated pathway. Collectively, our findings reveal that autophagy may attenuate macrophage-mediated inflammatory response to ConA and may be the potential therapeutic targets for acute liver injury. PMID:26939081

  4. CRISPR/Cas9 Technology Targeting Fas Gene Protects Mice From Concanavalin-A Induced Fulminant Hepatic Failure.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wei-Cheng; Liang, Pu-Ping; Wong, Cheuk-Wa; Ng, Tzi-Bun; Huang, Jun-Jiu; Zhang, Jin-Fang; Waye, Mary Miu-Yee; Fu, Wei-Ming

    2017-03-01

    Fulminant hepatic failure is a life-threatening disease which occurs in patients without preexisting liver disease. Nowadays, there is no ideal therapeutic tool in the treatment of fulminant hepatic failure. Recent studies suggested that a novel technology termed CRISPR/Cas9 may be a promising approach for the treatment of fulminant hepatic failure. In this project, we have designed single chimeric guide RNAs specifically targeting the genomic regions of mouse Fas gene. The in vitro and in vivo effects of sgRNAs on the production of Fas protein were examined in cultured mouse cells and in a hydrodynamic injection-based mouse model, respectively. The in vivo delivery of CRISPR/Cas9 could maintain liver homeostasis and protect hepatocytes from Fas-mediated cell apoptosis in the fulminant hepatic failure model. Our study indicates the clinical potential of developing the CRISPR/Cas9 system as a novel therapeutic strategy to rescue Concanavalin-A-induced fulminant hepatic failure in the mouse model. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 530-536, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Protective effect of galangin in Concanavalin A-induced hepatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Luo, Qingqiong; Zhu, Liping; Ding, Jieying; Zhuang, Xing; Xu, Lili; Chen, Fuxiang

    2015-01-01

    Galangin is an active pharmacological ingredient from propolis and Alpinia officinarum Hance, and has been reported to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties. The present study aims to reveal the effect of galangin on Concanavalin A (ConA)-induced hepatitis (CIH), a well-established animal model of immune-mediated liver injury, and to clarify the related mechanism. C57BL/6 mice were pretreated with galangin followed by ConA challenge. Results indicated that galangin inhibited ConA-induced liver damage. Mice pretreated with galangin showed more reduction of liver damage when compared with control mice pretreated with vehicle solution. In galangin-pretreated mice with induced CIH, increases in serum levels of several inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α, interferon-γ, and interleukin-12 were dramatically attenuated, and chemokines and adhesion molecules like interferon inducible protein-10, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α, and inter-cellular adhesion molecule-1 messenger RNA expressions in liver were decreased. Moreover, CIH mice pretreated with galangin showed less leukocyte infiltration and T-cell activation in the liver. Further, the mechanism of the anti-inflammatory effects of galangin may be attributed to its modulation of crucial inflammatory signaling pathways, including nuclear factor kappa B and interferon-gamma/signal transducer and activator of transcription 1. Collectively, these findings suggest the preventive and therapeutic potential of galangin in immune-mediated liver injury in vivo.

  6. Glutathione peroxidase 1 deficiency attenuates concanavalin A-induced hepatic injury by modulation of T-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, D H; Son, D J; Park, M H; Yoon, D Y; Han, S B; Hong, J T

    2016-01-01

    Concanavalin A (Con A)-induced hepatitis model is well-established experimental T cell-mediated liver disease. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) is associated with T-cell activation and proliferation, but continued ROS exposure induces T-cell hyporesponsiveness. Because glutathione peroxidase 1 (Gpx1) is an antioxidant enzyme and is involved in T-cell development, we investigated the role of Gpx1 during Con A-induced liver injury in Gpx1 knockout (KO) mice. Male wild-type (WT) mice and Gpx1 KO mice were intravenously injected with Con A (10 mg/kg), and then killed after 8 h after Con A injection. Serum levels of aspartate transaminase and alanine transaminase were measured to assess hepatic injury. To identify that Gpx1 affects T cell-mediated inflammation, we pretreated Gpx1 inhibitor to Human Jurkat T cells then treated Con A. Con A-induced massive liver damage in WT mice but its damage was attenuated in Gpx1 KO mice. Con A-induced Th1 cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin (IL)-2 were also decreased in the liver and spleen of Gpx1 KO mice compared with WT mice. In Jurkat T cells, Con A-induced mRNA levels of IL-2, IFN-γ and TNF-α were downregulated by pretreatment of Gpx inhibitor, mercaptosuccinic acid. We also observed that Gpx1 KO mice showed increasing oxidative stress in the liver and spleen compared with WT mice. These results suggest that Gpx1 deficiency attenuates Con A-induced liver injury by induction of T-cell hyporesponsiveness through chronic ROS exposure. PMID:27124582

  7. Modeling Hepatitis C treatment policy.

    SciTech Connect

    Kuypers, Marshall A.; Lambert, Gregory Joseph; Moore, Thomas W.; Glass, Robert John,; Finley, Patrick D.; Ross, David; Chartier, Maggie

    2013-09-01

    Chronic infection with Hepatitis C virus (HCV) results in cirrhosis, liver cancer and death. As the nations largest provider of care for HCV, US Veterans Health Administration (VHA) invests extensive resources in the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. This report documents modeling and analysis of HCV treatment dynamics performed for the VHA aimed at improving service delivery efficiency. System dynamics modeling of disease treatment demonstrated the benefits of early detection and the role of comorbidities in disease progress and patient mortality. Preliminary modeling showed that adherence to rigorous treatment protocols is a primary determinant of treatment success. In depth meta-analysis revealed correlations of adherence and various psycho-social factors. This initial meta-analysis indicates areas where substantial improvement in patient outcomes can potentially result from VA programs which incorporate these factors into their design.

  8. Sophocarpine Protects Mice from ConA-Induced Hepatitis via Inhibition of the IFN-Gamma/STAT1 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Xiu-Xiu; Wang, Rui-Lin; Zhang, Cong-En; Liu, Shi-Jing; Shen, Hong-Hui; Guo, Yu-Ming; Zhang, Ya-Ming; Niu, Ming; Wang, Jia-Bo; Bai, Zhao-Fang; Xiao, Xiao-He

    2017-01-01

    Sophocarpine is the major pharmacologically active compound of the traditional Chinese herbal medicine Radix Sophorae Subprostratae which has been used in treating hepatitis for years in China. It has been demonstrated that Sophocarpine exerts an activity in immune modulation and significantly decreases the production of inflammatory cytokines. However, the protective effects of Sophocarpine in T cell-dependent immune hepatitis remained unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the protective effects and pharmacological mechanisms of Sophocarpine on Concanavalin A (ConA)-induced hepatitis, an experimental model of T cell-mediated liver injury. BALB/C mice were pretreated with Sophocarpine or Bicyclol for five consecutive days. Thirty minutes after the final administration, the mice were injected with 15 mg⋅kg-1 of ConA intravenously. The results indicated that pretreatment with Sophocarpine significantly ameliorated liver inflammation and injury as evidenced by both biochemical and histopathological observations. Moreover, in Sophocarpine-pretreated mice, liver messenger RNA expression levels of chemokines and adhesion molecules, such as macrophage inflammatory protein-1α, CXC chemokine ligand 10, and Intercellular adhesion molecule-1, were markedly reduced. Further studies revealed that Sophocarpine significantly downregulated the expression of T-bet via inhibition of signal transducers and activators of transcription1 (STAT1) activation and overexpression of suppressor of cytokine signaling1, inhibiting the activation of Th1 cells and the expression of Interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Altogether, these results suggest new opportunities to use Sophocarpine in the treatment of T cell-mediated liver disease. In summary, Sophocarpine could attenuate ConA-induced liver injury, and the protective effect of Sophocarpine was associated with its inhibition effect of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and the IFN-γ/STAT1 signaling pathway. PMID:28377718

  9. Activin A induces growth arrest through a SMAD- dependent pathway in hepatic progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Activin A, an important member of transforming growth factor-β superfamily, is reported to inhibit proliferation of mature hepatocyte. However, the effect of activin A on growth of hepatic progenitor cells is not fully understood. To that end, we attempted to evaluate the potential role of activin A in the regulation of hepatic progenitor cell proliferation. Results Using the 2-acetaminofluorene/partial hepatectomy model, activin A expression decreased immediately after partial hepatectomy and then increased from the 9th to 15th day post surgery, which is associated with the attenuation of oval cell proliferation. Activin A inhibited oval cell line LE6 growth via activating the SMAD signaling pathway, which manifested as the phosphorylation of SMAD2/3, the inhibition of Rb phosphorylation, the suppression of cyclinD1 and cyclinE, and the promotion of p21WAF1/Cip1 and p15INK4B expression. Treatment with activin A antagonist follistatin or blocking SMAD signaling could diminish the anti-proliferative effect of activin A. By contrast, inhibition of the MAPK pathway did not contribute to this effect. Antagonizing activin A activity by follistatin administration enhanced oval cell proliferation in the 2-acetylaminofluorene/partial hepatectomy model. Conclusion Activin A, acting through the SMAD pathway, negatively regulates the proliferation of hepatic progenitor cells. PMID:24628936

  10. Zhankuic acid A as a novel JAK2 inhibitor for the treatment of concanavalin A-induced hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Fon; Wang, Sheng-Hung; Chang, Sue-Joan; Shiau, Ai-Li; Her, Lu-Shiun; Shieh, Gia-Shing; Chen, Chin-Fu; Chang, Chao-Ching; Su, Yu-Chu; Wu, Chao-Liang; Wu, Tian-Shung

    2014-09-15

    Fruiting bodies of Taiwanofungus camphoratus have been widely used as an antidote for food poisoning and considered to be a precious folk medicine for anti-inflammation and hepatoprotection. Zhankuic acid A (ZAA) is its major pharmacologically active compound. Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), whose activation is involved in cytokine signaling, plays critical roles in the development and biology of the hematopoietic system. JAK2 has been implicated as a therapeutic target in inflammatory diseases. The HotLig modeling approach was used to generate the binding model for ZAA with JAK2, showing that ZAA could bind to the ATP-binding pocket of JAK2 exclusively via the H-bond. The interaction between ZAA and JAK2 was verified by antibody competition assay. Binding of ZAA to JAK2 reduced antibody recognition of native JAK2. The expressions of phosphorylated JAK2 and STATs were analyzed by immuno-blotting. ZAA reduced the phosphorylation and downstream signaling of JAK2, and inhibited the interferon (IFN)-γ/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 1/interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-1 pathway. The protective effect of ZAA on liver injury was evaluated in mice by Con-A-induced acute hepatitis. Pre-treatment with ZAA also significantly ameliorated acute liver injury in mice. Therefore, ZAA can inhibit JAK2 phosphorylation and protect against liver injury during acute hepatitis in mice. In this study, we present data that ZAA exerts anti-inflammatory effects through the JAK2 signaling pathway. As such, ZAA may be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  11. γδ T cells are indispensable for interleukin-23-mediated protection against Concanavalin A-induced hepatitis in hepatitis B virus transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ziyu; Wang, Jingya; Yuan, Yifang; Cao, Guangchao; Fan, Shuobing; Gao, Chao; Wang, Li; Li, Zheng; Wu, Xiaoli; Wu, Zhenzhou; Zhao, Liqing; Yin, Zhinan

    2017-05-01

    Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) carriers are highly susceptible to liver injury triggered by environmental biochemical stimulation. Previously, we have reported an inverse correlation between γδ T cells and liver damage in patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV). However, whether γδ T cells play a role in regulating the hypersensitivity of HBsAg carriers to biochemical stimulation-induced hepatitis is unknown. In this study, using HBV transgenic (HBs-Tg) and HBs-Tg T-cell receptor-δ-deficient (TCR-δ(-/-) ) mice, we found that mice genetically deficient in γδ T cells exhibited more severe liver damage upon Concanavalin A (Con A) treatment, as indicated by substantially higher serum alanine aminotransferase levels, further elevated interferon-γ (IFN-γ) levels and more extensive necrosis. γδ T-cell deficiency resulted in elevated IFN-γ in CD4(+) T cells but not in natural killer or natural killer T cells. The depletion of CD4(+) T cells and neutralization of IFN-γ reduced liver damage in HBs-Tg and HBs-Tg-TCR-δ(-/-) mice to a similar extent. Further investigation revealed that HBs-Tg mice showed an enhanced interleukin-17 (IL-17) signature. The administration of exogenous IL-23 enhanced IL-17A production from Vγ4 γδ T cells and ameliorated liver damage in HBs-Tg mice, but not in HBs-Tg-TCR-δ(-/-) mice. In summary, our results demonstrated that γδ T cells played a protective role in restraining Con A-induced hepatitis by inhibiting IFN-γ production from CD4(+) T cells and are indispensable for IL-23-mediated protection against Con A-induced hepatitis in HBs-Tg mice. These results provided a potential therapeutic approach for treating the hypersensitivity of HBV carriers to biochemical stimulation-induced liver damage.

  12. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Hepatitis KidsHealth > For Teens > Hepatitis Print A A A ... to a liver condition called hepatitis . What Is Hepatitis? The liver is one of the body's powerhouses. ...

  13. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... de los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Hepatitis KidsHealth > For Kids > Hepatitis Print A A A ... an important digestive liquid called bile . What Is Hepatitis? Hepatitis is an inflammation (say: in-fluh-MAY- ...

  14. A rat model for hepatitis E virus

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Niraj; Verbeken, Erik; Ramaekers, Kaat; Dallmeier, Kai

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is one of the prime causes of acute viral hepatitis, and chronic hepatitis E is increasingly recognized as an important problem in the transplant setting. Nevertheless, the fundamental understanding of the biology of HEV replication is limited and there are few therapeutic options. The development of such therapies is partially hindered by the lack of a robust and convenient animal model. We propose the infection of athymic nude rats with the rat HEV strain LA-B350 as such a model. A cDNA clone, pLA-B350, was constructed and the infectivity of its capped RNA transcripts was confirmed in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, a subgenomic replicon, pLA-B350/luc, was constructed and validated for in vitro antiviral studies. Interestingly, rat HEV proved to be less sensitive to the antiviral activity of α-interferon, ribavirin and mycophenolic acid than genotype 3 HEV (a strain that infects humans). As a proof-of-concept, part of the C-terminal polymerase sequence of pLA-B350/luc was swapped with its genotype 3 HEV counterpart: the resulting chimeric replicon replicated with comparable efficiency as the wild-type construct, confirming that LA-B350 strain is amenable to humanization (replacement of certain sequences or motifs by their counterparts from human HEV strains). Finally, ribavirin effectively inhibited LA-B350 replication in athymic nude rats, confirming the suitability of the rat model for antiviral studies. PMID:27483350

  15. Analysis of Arg-Gly-Asp mimetics and soluble receptor of tumour necrosis factor as therapeutic modalities for concanavalin A induced hepatitis in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Bruck, R; Shirin, H; Hershkoviz, R; Lider, O; Kenet, G; Aeed, H; Matas, Z; Zaidel, L; Halpern, Z

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: It has been shown that synthetic non-peptidic analogues of Arg-Gly-Asp, a major cell adhesive ligand of extracellular matrix, prevented an increase in serum aminotransferase activity, as a manifestation of concanavalin A induced liver damage in mice. This study examined the effects of an Arg-Gly-Asp mimetic on liver histology and cytokine release in response to concanavalin A administration, and the efficacy of soluble receptor of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) alpha in preventing hepatitis in this model of liver injury. METHODS: Mice were pretreated with either the Arg-Gly-Asp mimetic SF-6,5 or recombinant soluble receptor of TNF alpha before their inoculation with 10 mg/kg concanavalin A. Liver enzymes, histology, and the serum values of TNF alpha and interleukin (IL)6 were examined. RESULTS: The histopathological damage in the liver, and the concanavalin A induced release of TNF alpha and IL6 were significantly inhibited by the synthetic Arg-Gly-Asp mimetic (p < 0.001). Liver injury, manifested by the increase in serum aminotransferase and cytokines, as well as by histological manifestations of hepatic damage, was effectively prevented by pretreatment of the mice with the soluble TNF receptor (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms the efficacy of a synthetic Arg-Gly-Asp mimetic and soluble TNF receptor in the prevention of immune mediated liver damage in mice. Images PMID:9155591

  16. Murine Bioluminescent Hepatic Tumour Model

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Simon; Salwa, Slawomir; Gao, Xuefeng; Tabirca, Sabin; O'Hanlon, Deirdre; O'Sullivan, Gerald C.; Tangney, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This video describes the establishment of liver metastases in a mouse model that can be subsequently analysed by bioluminescent imaging. Tumour cells are administered specifically to the liver to induce a localised liver tumour, via mobilisation of the spleen and splitting into two, leaving intact the vascular pedicle for each half of the spleen. Lewis lung carcinoma cells that constitutively express the firefly luciferase gene (luc1) are inoculated into one hemi-spleen which is then resected 10 minutes later. The other hemi-spleen is left intact and returned to the abdomen. Liver tumour growth can be monitored by bioluminescence imaging using the IVIS whole body imaging system. Quantitative imaging of tumour growth using IVIS provides precise quantitation of viable tumour cells. Tumour cell death and necrosis due to drug treatment is indicated early by a reduction in the bioluminescent signal. This mouse model allows for investigating the mechanisms underlying metastatic tumour-cell survival and growth and can be used for the evaluation of therapeutics of liver metastasis. PMID:20689502

  17. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... clotting problems or chronic liver disease. previous continue Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C Although hep A is a ... does — through direct contact with infected body fluids. Hepatitis B and C are even more easily passed in ...

  18. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... A if they've been vaccinated against it. Hepatitis B Hepatitis B is a more serious infection. It may lead ... of which cause severe illness and even death. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is transmitted from person to person ...

  19. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Hepatitis Page Content Article Body Hepatitis means “inflammation of ... it has been associated with drinking contaminated water. Hepatitis Viruses Type Transmission Prognosis A Fecal-oral (stool ...

  20. Betulin from Hedyotis hedyotidea ameliorates concanavalin A-induced and T cell-mediated autoimmune hepatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong-Qin; Weng, Xiu-Fang; Dou, Rui; Tan, Xiao-Sheng; Zhang, Tian-Tian; Fang, Jin-Bo; Wu, Xiong-Wen

    2017-02-01

    Hedyotis hedyotidea has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. However, the mechanisms underlying for the effect remain unknown. We previously showed that, among 11 compounds extracted from H hedyotidea, betulin produced the strongest suppressive effect on T cell activation. Here, we examined the hepatoprotective effects of betulin against acute autoimmune hepatitis in mice and the mechanisms underlying the effects. Freshly isolated mouse splenocytes were stimulated with concanavalin A (Con A, 5 μg/mL) in the presence of betulin, the cell proliferation was assessed with CSFE-dilution assay. Mice were injected with betulin (10, 20 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1), ip) for 3 d. One hour after the last injection, the mice were injected with Con A (15 mg/kg, iv) to induce acute hepatitis. Blood samples and liver tissues were harvested at 10 h after Con A injection, and serum transaminase levels and liver histopathology were detected; serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines, hepatic T lymphocyte ratios, and functional statuses of conventional T and NKT cells were also analyzed. Betulin (16 and 32 μmol/L) dose-dependently suppressed the proliferation of Con A-stimulated mouse splenocytes in vitro. In Con A-challenged mice, preinjection with betulin (20 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)) significantly decreased the levels of proinflammatory cytokines IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-6, and ameliorated liver injury. Furthermore, pretreatment with betulin (20 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)) significantly inhibited the Con A-induced activation of NKT and conventional T cells, and decreased production of proinflammatory cytokines IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-6 in these two cell populations. Betulin has immunomodulatory effect on overly activated conventional T and NKT cells and exerts hepatoprotective action in mouse autoimmune hepatitis. The findings provide evidence for the use of H hedyotidea and its constituent betulin in the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  1. Theoretical Modeling for Hepatic Microwave Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Punit

    2010-01-01

    Thermal tissue ablation is an interventional procedure increasingly being used for treatment of diverse medical conditions. Microwave ablation is emerging as an attractive modality for thermal therapy of large soft tissue targets in short periods of time, making it particularly suitable for ablation of hepatic and other tumors. Theoretical models of the ablation process are a powerful tool for predicting the temperature profile in tissue and resultant tissue damage created by ablation devices. These models play an important role in the design and optimization of devices for microwave tissue ablation. Furthermore, they are a useful tool for exploring and planning treatment delivery strategies. This review describes the status of theoretical models developed for microwave tissue ablation. It also reviews current challenges, research trends and progress towards development of accurate models for high temperature microwave tissue ablation. PMID:20309393

  2. Mathematical modelling of hepatic lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Adrian C; Wattis, Jonathan A D; Salter, Andrew M

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop a mathematical model capable of simulating the metabolic response to a variety of mixed meals in fed and fasted conditions with particular emphasis placed on the hepatic triglyceride element of the model. Model validation is carried out using experimental data for the ingestion of three mixed composition meals over a 24-h period. Comparison with experimental data suggests the model predicts key plasma lipids accurately given a prescribed insulin profile. One counter-intuitive observation to arise from simulations is that liver triglyceride initially decreases when a high fat meal is ingested, a phenomenon potentially explained by the carbohydrate portion of the meal raising plasma insulin.

  3. Immune mechanisms of Concanavalin A model of autoimmune hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai-Xia; Liu, Man; Weng, Shun-Yan; Li, Jing-Jing; Xie, Chao; He, Hong-Lin; Guan, Wen; Yuan, Yun-Sheng; Gao, Jin

    2012-01-01

    As a chronic inflammatory disease of the liver, the pa-thogenic mechanisms of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) have not yet been elucidated, with prognosis and diagnosis remaining unsatisfied. Currently the only viable treatments of AIH are immunosuppressant application and liver transplantation. It is considered that lack of good animal AIH models is the main reason for the shortage of a simple and efficient cure. The Concanavalin A (Con A) model is a typical and well established model for investigating T-cell and macrophage dependent liver injury in mice, which closely mimics the pathogenesis mechanisms and pathological changes of patients, and is regarded as the best experimental model for AIH research so far. In this paper we elucidated the pathogenic mechanisms of AIH and the evolution of relative animal models. We go on to further focus on Con A-induced liver injury from the point of immunological mechanisms and the change of cytokine levels. Finally, we manifested the clinical significance of the AIH animal models and the challenges they would meet during their future development. PMID:22253517

  4. Betulin from Hedyotis hedyotidea ameliorates concanavalin A-induced and T cell-mediated autoimmune hepatitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yong-qin; Weng, Xiu-fang; Dou, Rui; Tan, Xiao-sheng; Zhang, Tian-tian; Fang, Jin-bo; Wu, Xiong-wen

    2017-01-01

    Hedyotis hedyotidea has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. However, the mechanisms underlying for the effect remain unknown. We previously showed that, among 11 compounds extracted from H hedyotidea, betulin produced the strongest suppressive effect on T cell activation. Here, we examined the hepatoprotective effects of betulin against acute autoimmune hepatitis in mice and the mechanisms underlying the effects. Freshly isolated mouse splenocytes were stimulated with concanavalin A (Con A, 5 μg/mL) in the presence of betulin, the cell proliferation was assessed with CSFE-dilution assay. Mice were injected with betulin (10, 20 mg·kg−1·d−1, ip) for 3 d. One hour after the last injection, the mice were injected with Con A (15 mg/kg, iv) to induce acute hepatitis. Blood samples and liver tissues were harvested at 10 h after Con A injection, and serum transaminase levels and liver histopathology were detected; serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines, hepatic T lymphocyte ratios, and functional statuses of conventional T and NKT cells were also analyzed. Betulin (16 and 32 μmol/L) dose-dependently suppressed the proliferation of Con A-stimulated mouse splenocytes in vitro. In Con A-challenged mice, preinjection with betulin (20 mg·kg−1·d−1) significantly decreased the levels of proinflammatory cytokines IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-6, and ameliorated liver injury. Furthermore, pretreatment with betulin (20 mg·kg−1·d−1) significantly inhibited the Con A-induced activation of NKT and conventional T cells, and decreased production of proinflammatory cytokines IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-6 in these two cell populations. Betulin has immunomodulatory effect on overly activated conventional T and NKT cells and exerts hepatoprotective action in mouse autoimmune hepatitis. The findings provide evidence for the use of H hedyotidea and its constituent betulin in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:27796295

  5. Animal model for study of human hepatitis viruses.

    PubMed

    Chayama, Kazuaki; Hayes, C Nelson; Hiraga, Nobuhiko; Abe, Hiromi; Tsuge, Masataka; Imamura, Michio

    2011-01-01

    Human hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infect only chimpanzees and humans. Analysis of both viruses has long been hampered by the absence of a small animal model. The recent development of human hepatocyte chimeric mice has enabled us to carry out studies on viral replication and cellular changes induced by replication of human hepatitis viruses. Various therapeutic agents have also been tested using this model. In the present review, we summarize published studies using chimeric mice and discuss the merits and shortcomings of this model.

  6. National treatment programme of hepatitis C in Egypt: Hepatitis C virus model of care.

    PubMed

    El-Akel, W; El-Sayed, M H; El Kassas, M; El-Serafy, M; Khairy, M; Elsaeed, K; Kabil, K; Hassany, M; Shawky, A; Yosry, A; Shaker, M K; ElShazly, Y; Waked, I; Esmat, G; Doss, W

    2017-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major health problem in Egypt as the nation bears the highest prevalence rate worldwide. This necessitated establishing a novel model of care (MOC) to contain the epidemic, deliver patient care and ensure global treatment access. In this review, we describe the process of development of the Egyptian model and future strategies for sustainability. Although the magnitude of the HCV problem was known for many years, the HCV MOC only came into being in 2006 with the establishment of the National Committee for Control of Viral Hepatitis (NCCVH) to set up and implement a national control strategy for the disease and other causes of viral hepatitis. The strategy outlines best practices for patient care delivery by applying a set of service principles through identified clinical streams and patient flow continuums. The Egyptian national viral hepatitis treatment programme is considered one of the most successful and effective public health programmes. To date, more than one million patients were evaluated and more than 850 000 received treatment under the umbrella of the programme since 2006. The NCCVH has been successful in establishing a strong infrastructure for controlling viral hepatitis in Egypt. It established a nationwide network of digitally connected viral hepatitis-specialized treatment centres covering the country map to enhance treatment access. Practice guidelines suiting local circumstances were issued and regularly updated and are applied in all affiliated centres. This review illustrates the model and the successful Egyptian experience. It sets an exemplar for states, organizations and policy-makers setting up programmes for care and management of people with hepatitis C.

  7. Quercetin Protects Mice from ConA-Induced Hepatitis by Inhibiting HMGB1-TLR Expression and Down-Regulating the Nuclear Factor Kappa B Pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Xi; Liu, Hong-chun; Yao, Qun-yan; Xu, Bei-li; Zhang, Shun-cai; Tu, Chuan-tao

    2016-02-01

    The dietary flavonoid quercetin has hepatoprotective effects. We analyzed the effects of quercetin on concanavalin A (ConA)-induced hepatitis in mice and its underlying molecular mechanisms of action. Mice were administered quercetin (50 mg/kg body weight, i.p.) or vehicle 30 min before intravenous administration of ConA. Quercetin pretreatment significantly reduced the ConA-induced elevations in plasma aminotransferase concentrations and liver necrosis, as well as reducing serum concentrations of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon-γ, and interleukin-4. Quercetin pretreatment also reduced expression of high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) and toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 and TLR-4 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein in liver tissues. Quercetin pretreatment significantly inhibited degradation of inhibitory kappa B alpha and modulated ConA-induced nuclear translocation in the liver of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65. These results demonstrate that quercetin protects against ConA-mediated hepatitis in mice by attenuating the HMGB1-TLRs-NF-κB signaling pathway.

  8. Methane-rich saline protects against concanavalin A-induced autoimmune hepatitis in mice through anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative pathways.

    PubMed

    He, Rong; Wang, Liping; Zhu, Jiali; Fei, Miaomiao; Bao, Suhong; Meng, Yan; Wang, Yuanyuan; Li, Jinbao; Deng, Xiaoming

    2016-01-29

    Methane is a common gas which has been reported to play a protective role in organ injury and presents an anti-inflammatory property. However, its effects on Concanavalin A (Con A)-induced autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) remain unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of methane on Con A-induced autoimmune hepatitis in mice and its underlying mechanism. Autoimmune hepatitis was induced by Con A (15 mg/kg) in healthy C57BL/6 mice and methane-rich saline (MS) (20 ml/kg) was intraperitoneally injected 30 min after the challenge with Con A. We found that methane treatment significantly reduced the elevated serum aminotransferase levels and ameliorated liver pathological damage. Furthermore, methane treatment obviously suppressed the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and increased anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10). Moreover, we found that the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) were highly increased while the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were decreased in liver with the injection of Con A, which was reversed by methane. Also, the data demonstrated that the phosphorylated IκB, NF-κB and P38 MAPK in liver were significantly down-regulated by methane. These results suggested that methane protected liver against Con A-induced injury through anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative pathways.

  9. A Macaca mulatta model of fulminant hepatic failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ping; Xia, Jie; Guo, Gang; Huang, Zi-Xing; Lu, Qiang; Li, Li; Li, Hong-Xia; Shi, Yu-Jun; Bu, Hong

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To establish an appropriate primate model of fulminant hepatic failure (FHF). METHODS: We have, for the first time, established a large animal model of FHF in Macaca mulatta by intraperitoneal infusion of amatoxin and endotoxin. Clinical features, biochemical indexes, histopathology and iconography were examined to dynamically investigate the progress and outcome of the animal model. RESULTS: Our results showed that the enzymes and serum bilirubin were markedly increased and the enzyme-bilirubin segregation emerged 36 h after toxin administration. Coagulation activity was significantly decreased. Gradually deteriorated parenchymal abnormality was detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography at 48 h. The liver biopsy showed marked hepatocyte steatosis and massive parenchymal necrosis at 36 h and 49 h, respectively. The autopsy showed typical yellow atrophy of the liver. Hepatic encephalopathy of the models was also confirmed by hepatic coma, MRI and pathological changes of cerebral edema. The lethal effects of the extrahepatic organ dysfunction were ruled out by their biochemical indices, imaging and histopathology. CONCLUSION: We have established an appropriate large primate model of FHF, which is closely similar to clinic cases, and can be used for investigation of the mechanism of FHF and for evaluation of potential medical therapies. PMID:22346249

  10. Associative learning deficit in two experimental models of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Marta; Méndez-López, Magdalena; López, Laudino; Aller, María Angeles; Arias, Jaime; Arias, Jorge L

    2009-03-17

    People with hepatic insufficiency can develop hepatic encephalopathy (HE), a complex neuropsychological syndrome covering a wide range of neurological and cognitive and motor alterations. The cognitive deficits include disturbances in intellectual functions such as memory and learning. In spite of its high prevalence in western societies, the causes of HE have not yet been clearly established. For this reason, experimental models of HE are used to study this condition. In this work, two experimental models were used, one Type B HE (portacaval shunt) and the other Type C HE (cirrhosis by intoxication with thioacetamide), to evaluate its effect on two tasks of associative learning: two-way active avoidance and step-through passive avoidance. The results show an impediment both in acquisition and retention of active avoidance in both models of HE. However, in passive avoidance, only the rats with portacaval shunt presented a memory deficit for the aversive event. In our opinion, these results can be explained by alterations in the neurotransmission system presented by animals with hepatic insufficiency, which are mainly caused by a rise in cerebral histamine and a dysfunction of the glutamatergic system.

  11. Advancement in the development of models for hepatitis C research.

    PubMed

    Carcamo, Wendy C; Nguyen, Cuong Q

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a pandemic disease affecting an estimated 180 million individuals worldwide and infecting each year another ~3-4 million people making HCV a global public health issue. HCV is the main cause for chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. In the United States, HCV-related chronic liver disease is a leading cause of liver transplantation. Despite significant improvements in antiviral drugs, only ~50% of treated patients with HCV have viral clearance after treatment. Showing unique species specificity, HCV has a narrow range of potential hosts infecting only chimpanzees and humans. For decades, the chimpanzee model has been the only and instrumental primate for studying HCV infection; however, availability, economic, and ethical issues make the chimpanzee an unsuitable animal model today. Thus, significant research has been devoted to explore different models that are suitable in studying the biology of the virus and application in the clinical research for developing efficient and tolerable treatments for patients. This review focuses on experimental models that have been developed to date and their findings related to HCV.

  12. Hepatitis C Virus Experimental Model Systems and Antiviral drug Research*

    PubMed Central

    Uprichard, Susan L.

    2010-01-01

    An estimated 130 million people worldwide are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) making it a leading cause of liver disease worldwide. Because the currently available therapy of pegylated interferon-alpha and ribavirin is only effective in a subset of patients, the development of new HCV antivirals is a healthcare imperative. This review discusses the experimental models available for HCV antiviral drug research, recent advances in HCV antiviral drug development, as well as active research being pursued to facilitate development of new HCV-specific therapeutics. PMID:20960298

  13. Chinese medicinal herbs in treating model rats with hepatic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yun-Xiao; Chen, Jiu; Li, Jian-Ping; Wang, Yan-Li; Jin, Xiao-Dong

    2009-12-30

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of Chinese medicine formula-Yu Zhang Dan (YZD, composed of Herba Lysimachiae, Rhizoma Polygoni Cuspidati, Radix Curcumae) on the model rats with hepatic fibrosis. Forty male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were used in the present study, and they were separated randomly into 4 groups: a normal control group (Group A, n=5), a model control (Group B, n=15), a high dose of YZD (Group C, n=10), and a low dose of YZD (Group D, n=10). Hepatic fibrosis in rats was induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)). The variation of the serum alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), hyaluronate acid (HA), laminin (LN), type • • procollagen peptide (P• •NP), L-Glutathione (GSH) was respectively measured with radioimmunoassay (RIA) and detection of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) and smooth muscle alpha actin (α-SMA) was conducted with immunohistochemistry. The ALT, AST HA, LN and PIII NP levels in the serum of the model control group were significantly higher than those of the normal control group (P<0.05), and both of the high dose of YZD and low dose of YZD significantly decreased the ALT, AST HA, LN and PIII NP levels of the model rats (P<0.05). The TGF-β1 and α-SMA levels of the model control group were significantly higher than those of the normal control group (P<0.05), and both of the high dose of YZD and low dose of YZD significantly decreased the TGF-β1 levels of the model rats (P<0.05) , and only the high dose of YZD significantly decreased the α-SMA levels of the model rats (P<0.05). The expression of TGF-β1 and α-SMA in the liver tissues of the rats were in the cytoplasm of the cells. It may be through decreasing the ALT, AST, HA, LN and PIII NP levels in the serum of the model rats and decreasing the expression of TGF-β1 and α-SMA in the liver tissues of the model rats that YZD significantly relieved the hepatic fibrosis.

  14. Model-based optimal planning of hepatic radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiyong; Müftü, Sinan; Meral, Faik Can; Tuncali, Kemal; Akçakaya, Murat

    2016-07-19

    This article presents a model-based pre-treatment optimal planning framework for hepatic tumour radiofrequency (RF) ablation. Conventional hepatic radiofrequency (RF) ablation methods rely on pre-specified input voltage and treatment length based on the tumour size. Using these experimentally obtained pre-specified treatment parameters in RF ablation is not optimal to achieve the expected level of cell death and usually results in more healthy tissue damage than desired. In this study we present a pre-treatment planning framework that provides tools to control the levels of both the healthy tissue preservation and tumour cell death. Over the geometry of tumour and surrounding tissue, we formulate the RF ablation planning as a constrained optimization problem. With specific constraints over the temperature profile (TP) in pre-determined areas of the target geometry, we consider two different cost functions based on the history of the TP and Arrhenius index (AI) of the target location, respectively. We optimally compute the input voltage variation to minimize the damage to the healthy tissue while ensuring a complete cell death in the tumour and immediate area covering the tumour. As an example, we use a simulation of a 1D symmetric target geometry mimicking the application of single electrode RF probe. Results demonstrate that compared to the conventional methods both cost functions improve the healthy tissue preservation.

  15. Evaluation of two experimental models of hepatic encephalopathy in rats.

    PubMed

    García-Moreno, L M; Conejo, N M; González-Pardo, H; Aller, M A; Nava, M P; Arias, J; Arias, J L

    2005-01-01

    The serious neuropsychological repercussions of hepatic encephalopathy have led to the creation of several experimental models in order to better understand the pathogenesis of the disease. In the present investigation, two possible causes of hepatic encephalopathy, cholestasis and portal hypertension, were chosen to study the behavioral impairments caused by the disease using an object recognition task. This working memory test is based on a paradigm of spontaneous delayed non-matching to sample and was performed 60 days after surgery. Male Wistar rats (225-250 g) were divided into three groups: two experimental groups, microsurgical cholestasis (N = 20) and extrahepatic portal hypertension (N = 20), and a control group (N = 20). A mild alteration of the recognition memory occurred in rats with cholestasis compared to control rats and portal hypertensive rats. The latter group showed the poorest performance on the basis of the behavioral indexes tested. In particular, only the control group spent significantly more time exploring novel objects compared to familiar ones (P < 0.001). In addition, the portal hypertension group spent the shortest time exploring both the novel and familiar objects (P < 0.001). These results suggest that the existence of portosystemic collateral circulation per se may be responsible for subclinical encephalopathy.

  16. A Thermodynamic Model for Genome Packaging in Hepatitis B Virus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jehoon; Wu, Jianzhong

    2015-10-20

    Understanding the fundamentals of genome packaging in viral capsids is important for finding effective antiviral strategies and for utilizing benign viral particles for gene therapy. While the structure of encapsidated genomic materials has been routinely characterized with experimental techniques such as cryo-electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction, much less is known about the molecular driving forces underlying genome assembly in an intracellular environment and its in vivo interactions with the capsid proteins. Here we study the thermodynamic basis of the pregenomic RNA encapsidation in human Hepatitis B virus in vivo using a coarse-grained molecular model that captures the essential components of nonspecific intermolecular interactions. The thermodynamic model is used to examine how the electrostatic interaction between the packaged RNA and the highly charged C-terminal domains (CTD) of capsid proteins regulate the nucleocapsid formation. The theoretical model predicts optimal RNA content in Hepatitis B virus nucleocapsids with different CTD lengths in good agreement with mutagenesis measurements, confirming the predominant role of electrostatic interactions and molecular excluded-volume effects in genome packaging. We find that the amount of encapsidated RNA is not linearly correlated with the net charge of CTD tails as suggested by earlier theoretical studies. Our thermodynamic analysis of the nucleocapsid structure and stability indicates that ∼10% of the CTD residues are free from complexation with RNA, resulting in partially exposed CTD tails. The thermodynamic model also predicts the free energy of complex formation between macromolecules, which corroborates experimental results for the impact of CTD truncation on the nucleocapsid stability.

  17. Magnolol Attenuates Concanavalin A-induced Hepatic Fibrosis, Inhibits CD4(+) T Helper 17 (Th17) Cell Differentiation and Suppresses Hepatic Stellate Cell Activation: Blockade of Smad3/Smad4 Signalling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongjun; Ju, Baoling; Zhang, Xiaoli; Zhu, Yanfei; Nie, Ying; Xu, Yuanhong; Lei, Qiuxia

    2016-12-29

    Magnolol is a pharmacological biphenolic compound extracted from Chinese herb Magnolia officinalis, which displays anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. This study was aimed at exploring the potential effect of magnolol on immune-related liver fibrosis. Herein, BALB/c mice were injected with concanavalin A (ConA, 8 mg/kg/week) up to 6 weeks to establish hepatic fibrosis, and magnolol (10, 20, 30 mg/kg/day) was given to these mice orally throughout the whole experiment. We found that magnolol preserved liver function and attenuated liver fibrotic injury in vivo. In response to ConA stimulation, the CD4(+) T cells preferred to polarizing towards CD4(+) T helper 17 (Th17) cells in liver. Magnolol was observed to inhibit Th17 cell differentiation in ConA-treated liver in addition to suppressing interleukin (IL)-17A generation. Hepatic stellate cells were activated in fibrotic liver as demonstrated by increased alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and desmin. More transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and activin A were secreted into the serum. Magnolol suppressed this abnormal HSC activation. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of Smad3 in its linker area (Thr179, Ser 204/208/213) was inhibited by magnolol. In vitro, the recombinant IL-17A plus TGF-β1 or activin A induced activation of human LX2 HSCs and promoted their collagen production. Smad3/Smad4 signalling pathway was activated in LX2 cells exposed to the fibrotic stimuli, as illustrated by the up-regulated phospho-Smad3 and the enhanced interaction between Smad3 and Smad4. These alterations were suppressed by magnolol. Collectively, our study reveals a novel antifibrotic effect of magnolol on Th17 cell-mediated fibrosis.

  18. Transmission model of hepatitis B virus with the migration effect.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Altaf; Islam, Saeed; Arif, Muhammad; ul Haq, Zahoor

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis B is a globally infectious disease. Mathematical modeling of HBV transmission is an interesting research area. In this paper, we present characteristics of HBV virus transmission in the form of a mathematical model. We analyzed the effect of immigrants in the model to study the effect of immigrants for the host population. We added the following flow parameters: "the transmission between migrated and exposed class" and "the transmission between migrated and acute class." With these new features, we obtained a compartment model of six differential equations. First, we find the basic threshold quantity Ro and then find the local asymptotic stability of disease-free equilibrium and endemic equilibrium. Furthermore, we find the global stability of the disease-free and endemic equilibria. Previous similar publications have not added the kind of information about the numerical results of the model. In our case, from numerical simulation, a detailed discussion of the parameters and their numerical results is presented. We claim that with these assumptions and by adding the migrated class, the model informs policy for governments, to be aware of the immigrants and subject them to tests about the disease status. Immigrants for short visits and students should be subjected to tests to reduce the number of immigrants with disease.

  19. Mapping Metabolic Brain Activity in Three Models of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, Marta; Fidalgo, Camino; Aller, María Ángeles; Arias, Jaime; Arias, Jorge L.

    2013-01-01

    Cirrhosis is a common disease in Western countries. Liver failure, hyperammonemia, and portal hypertension are the main factors that contribute to human cirrhosis that frequently leads to a neuropsychiatric disorder known as hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In this study, we examined the differential contribution of these leading factors to the oxidative metabolism of diverse brain limbic system regions frequently involved in memory process by histochemical labelling of cytochrome oxidase (COx). We have analyzed cortical structures such as the infralimbic and prelimbic cotices, subcortical structures such as hippocampus and ventral striatum, at thalamic level like the anterodorsal, anteroventral, and mediodorsal thalamus, and, finally, the hypothalamus, where the mammillary nuclei (medial and lateral) were measured. The severest alteration is found in the model that mimics intoxication by ammonia, followed by the thioacetamide-treated group and the portal hypertension group. No changes were found at the mammillary bodies for any of the experimental groups. PMID:23573412

  20. Empirical fitness models for hepatitis C virus immunogen design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Gregory R.; Ferguson, Andrew L.

    2015-12-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) afflicts 170 million people worldwide, 2%-3% of the global population, and kills 350 000 each year. Prophylactic vaccination offers the most realistic and cost effective hope of controlling this epidemic in the developing world where expensive drug therapies are not available. Despite 20 years of research, the high mutability of the virus and lack of knowledge of what constitutes effective immune responses have impeded development of an effective vaccine. Coupling data mining of sequence databases with spin glass models from statistical physics, we have developed a computational approach to translate clinical sequence databases into empirical fitness landscapes quantifying the replicative capacity of the virus as a function of its amino acid sequence. These landscapes explicitly connect viral genotype to phenotypic fitness, and reveal vulnerable immunological targets within the viral proteome that can be exploited to rationally design vaccine immunogens. We have recovered the empirical fitness landscape for the HCV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (protein NS5B) responsible for viral genome replication, and validated the predictions of our model by demonstrating excellent accord with experimental measurements and clinical observations. We have used our landscapes to perform exhaustive in silico screening of 16.8 million T-cell immunogen candidates to identify 86 optimal formulations. By reducing the search space of immunogen candidates by over five orders of magnitude, our approach can offer valuable savings in time, expense, and labor for experimental vaccine development and accelerate the search for a HCV vaccine. Abbreviations: HCV—hepatitis C virus, HLA—human leukocyte antigen, CTL—cytotoxic T lymphocyte, NS5B—nonstructural protein 5B, MSA—multiple sequence alignment, PEG-IFN—pegylated interferon.

  1. Capsaicin affects brain function in a model of hepatic encephalopathy associated with fulminant hepatic failure in mice

    PubMed Central

    Avraham, Y; Grigoriadis, NC; Magen, I; Poutahidis, T; Vorobiav, L; Zolotarev, O; Ilan, Y; Mechoulam, R; Berry, EM

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Hepatic encephalopathy is a neuropsychiatric syndrome caused by liver failure. In view of the effects of cannabinoids in a thioacetamide-induced model of hepatic encephalopathy and liver disease and the beneficial effect of capsaicin (a TRPV1 agonist) in liver disease, we assumed that capsaicin may also affect hepatic encephalopathy. Experimental approach: Fulminant hepatic failure was induced in mice by thioacetamide and 24 h later, the animals were injected with one of the following compound(s): 2-arachidonoylglycerol (CB1, CB2 and TRPV1 receptor agonist); HU308 (CB2 receptor agonist), SR141716A (CB1 receptor antagonist); SR141716A+2-arachidonoylglycerol; SR144528 (CB2 receptor antagonist); capsaicin; and capsazepine (TRPV1 receptor agonist and antagonist respectively). Their neurological effects were evaluated on the basis of activity in the open field, cognitive function in an eight-arm maze and a neurological severity score. The mice were killed 3 or 14 days after thioacetamide administration. 2-arachidonoylglycerol and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) levels were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection, respectively. Results: Capsaicin had a neuroprotective effect in this animal model as shown by the neurological score, activity and cognitive function. The effect of capsaicin was blocked by capsazepine. Thioacetamide induced astrogliosis in the hippocampus and the cerebellum and raised brain 5-hydroxytryptamine levels, which were decreased by capsaicin, SR141716A and HU-308. Thioacetamide lowered brain 2-arachidonoylglycerol levels, an effect reversed by capsaicin. Conclusions: Capsaicin improved both liver and brain dysfunction caused by thioacetamide, suggesting that both the endocannabinoid and the vanilloid systems play important roles in hepatic encephalopathy. Modulation of these systems may have therapeutic value. PMID:19764982

  2. Novel robust hepatitis C virus mouse efficacy model.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qing; Oei, Yoko; Mendel, Dirk B; Garrett, Evelyn N; Patawaran, Montesa B; Hollenbach, Paul W; Aukerman, Sharon L; Weiner, Amy J

    2006-10-01

    The lack of a robust small-animal model for hepatitis C virus (HCV) has hindered the discovery and development of novel drug treatments for HCV infections. We developed a reproducible and easily accessible xenograft mouse efficacy model in which HCV RNA replication is accurately monitored in vivo by real-time, noninvasive whole-body imaging of gamma-irradiated SCID mice implanted with a mouse-adapted luciferase replicon-containing Huh-7 cell line (T7-11). The model was validated by demonstrating that both a small-molecule NS3/4A protease inhibitor (BILN 2061) and human alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) decreased HCV RNA replication and that treatment withdrawal resulted in a rebound in replication, which paralleled clinical outcomes in humans. We further showed that protease inhibitor and IFN-alpha combination therapy was more effective in reducing HCV RNA replication than treatment with each compound alone and supports testing in humans. This robust mouse efficacy model provides a powerful tool for rapid evaluation of potential anti-HCV compounds in vivo as part of aggressive drug discovery efforts.

  3. Novel Robust Hepatitis C Virus Mouse Efficacy Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qing; Oei, Yoko; Mendel, Dirk B.; Garrett, Evelyn N.; Patawaran, Montesa B.; Hollenbach, Paul W.; Aukerman, Sharon L.; Weiner, Amy J.

    2006-01-01

    The lack of a robust small-animal model for hepatitis C virus (HCV) has hindered the discovery and development of novel drug treatments for HCV infections. We developed a reproducible and easily accessible xenograft mouse efficacy model in which HCV RNA replication is accurately monitored in vivo by real-time, noninvasive whole-body imaging of gamma-irradiated SCID mice implanted with a mouse-adapted luciferase replicon-containing Huh-7 cell line (T7-11). The model was validated by demonstrating that both a small-molecule NS3/4A protease inhibitor (BILN 2061) and human alpha interferon (IFN-α) decreased HCV RNA replication and that treatment withdrawal resulted in a rebound in replication, which paralleled clinical outcomes in humans. We further showed that protease inhibitor and IFN-α combination therapy was more effective in reducing HCV RNA replication than treatment with each compound alone and supports testing in humans. This robust mouse efficacy model provides a powerful tool for rapid evaluation of potential anti-HCV compounds in vivo as part of aggressive drug discovery efforts. PMID:17005803

  4. Restorative effects of hydroxysafflor yellow A on hepatic function in an experimental regression model of hepatic fibrosis induced by carbon tetrachloride

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanuo; Shi, Yan; Sun, Yan; Liu, Luying; Bai, Xianyong; Wang, Dong; Li, Hongxing

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is a reversible pathological process, in which fibrotic tissue is excessively deposited in the liver during the repair process that follows hepatic injury. Early prevention or treatment of hepatic fibrosis has great significance on the treatment of chronic hepatic diseases. Hydroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA) is a water-soluble monomer extracted from safflower, which serves numerous pharmacological roles. However, it remains to be elucidated how HSYA regulates hepatic fibrogenesis. The aim of the present study was to reveal the possible mechanisms underlying the effects of HSYA on the prevention and treatment of hepatic fibrosis. A rat model of hepatic fibrosis was established in the present study, and the rats were administered various doses of HSYA. The effects of HSYA on pathological alterations of the liver tissue in rats with hepatic fibrosis were observed using hematoxylin-eosin staining and Masson staining. In order to explore the anti-hepatic fibrosis effects and underlying mechanisms of HSYA, serum levels, and hepatic function and hepatic fibrosis indices were evaluated. The results demonstrated that HSYA can improve the general condition of rats with hepatic fibrosis and relieve cellular swelling of the liver, fatty degeneration, necrosis, inflammatory cell infiltration and fibroplastic proliferation. Subsequent to administration of HSYA, globulin was increased during hepatic fibrosis caused by tetrachloromethane. However, total cholesterol, triglyceride, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and levels of hyaluronic acid, laminin, procollagen III N-terminal peptide, collagen type IV and hydroxyproline were significantly reduced. The results additionally demonstrated that HSYA could enhance superoxide dismutase activity and reduce malondialdehyde levels, inhibiting lipid peroxidation caused by free radicals. PMID:27909717

  5. Cannabidiol improves brain and liver function in a fulminant hepatic failure-induced model of hepatic encephalopathy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Avraham, Y; Grigoriadis, NC; Poutahidis, T; Vorobiev, L; Magen, I; Ilan, Y; Mechoulam, R; Berry, EM

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Hepatic encephalopathy is a neuropsychiatric disorder of complex pathogenesis caused by acute or chronic liver failure. We investigated the effects of cannabidiol, a non-psychoactive constituent of Cannabis sativa with anti-inflammatory properties that activates the 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 5-HT1A, on brain and liver functions in a model of hepatic encephalopathy associated with fulminant hepatic failure induced in mice by thioacetamide. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Female Sabra mice were injected with either saline or thioacetamide and were treated with either vehicle or cannabidiol. Neurological and motor functions were evaluated 2 and 3 days, respectively, after induction of hepatic failure, after which brains and livers were removed for histopathological analysis and blood was drawn for analysis of plasma liver enzymes. In a separate group of animals, cognitive function was tested after 8 days and brain 5-HT levels were measured 12 days after induction of hepatic failure. KEY RESULTS Neurological and cognitive functions were severely impaired in thioacetamide-treated mice and were restored by cannabidiol. Similarly, decreased motor activity in thioacetamide-treated mice was partially restored by cannabidiol. Increased plasma levels of ammonia, bilirubin and liver enzymes, as well as enhanced 5-HT levels in thioacetamide-treated mice were normalized following cannabidiol administration. Likewise, astrogliosis in the brains of thioacetamide-treated mice was moderated after cannabidiol treatment. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Cannabidiol restores liver function, normalizes 5-HT levels and improves brain pathology in accordance with normalization of brain function. Therefore, the effects of cannabidiol may result from a combination of its actions in the liver and brain. PMID:21182490

  6. A noninvasive diagnostic model to assess nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Hongjie; Cai, Shaohang; Liu, Ying; Xia, Muye; Peng, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to develop a noninvasive diagnostic test for nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) by using routinely available clinical markers. Methods: A retrospective study of patients with CHB, with or without hepatic steatosis (fatty change) who were diagnosed with controlled attenuation parameter (CAP) measured by transient elastography were included. Patient information was analyzed on lifestyle; laboratory tests, including serum lipid levels; blood pressure; blood uric acid; and medical history of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Results: A total of 1312 patients were included in the study; 618 patients had confirmed hepatic steatosis. The CAP levels were significantly correlated with patient height (p < 0.001), weight (p < 0.001), waistline measurement (p < 0.001), hipline measurement (p < 0.001), and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (p < 0.001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis resulted in the development of an equation for the diagnostic of simple steatosis: the fatty liver (FL) test. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve of the FL test was 0.79 (p < 0.001) in the training group and 0.82 in the validation group. When the FL test was >−0.425, the sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio (LR) and negative LR were 74.72%, 72.12%, 2.68, and 0.35 respectively. The average FL test result was −0.54 ± 1.26 in patients with CHB without hypertension, and 0.42 ± 1.35, 1.12 ± 1.65, and 1.98 ± 1.22 in patients with hypertension grade 1, 2, and 3, respectively (p < 0.001). Conclusion: This study has demonstrated a noninvasive test for hepatic steatosis in patients with CHB. PMID:28203279

  7. Manifestation of psychiatric behaviors in a mouse model of griseofulvin-induced hepatic porphyria.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Yoko; Iwadate, Reiko; Watanabe, Yukino; Kawai, Hiroshi; Kudo, Naomi; Kawashima, Yoichi; Mitsumoto, Atsushi

    2008-12-01

    Most patients with hepatic porphyria exhibit neuropsychiatric symptoms, including abdominal pain, peripheral neuropathy, confusion, insomnia and mental disturbances such as anxiety and depression. Although heme deficiency and accumulation of heme precursors are thought to be responsible for neuropsychiatric manifestations in patients with acute porphyria, the pathogenetic mechanisms remain poorly understood. In the present study, we observed psychiatric behaviors in mice with hepatic porphyria induced by the ingestion of a griseofulvin (GF)-containing diet over a period of 12 weeks. GF ingestion by the mice caused an accumulation of porphyrins in the feces and a decrease in heme in the liver; these effects were observed throughout the entire duration of the experiment, with maximum levels observed after circa 1 week of ingestion of this diet. In addition, the mice developed enlargement of the liver, hepatocyte injury, and cholestasis. Mice with hepatic porphyria manifested an anxiety-like behavior by the long-term treatment (over 5 weeks) in a GF-dose and duration dependent manner. The hepatic porphyria mice also manifested depression-like behaviors by the short-term treatment (3 weeks) of GF2.0, which was reversed by administration of anti-depressant, imipramine. In conclusion, this study for the first time demonstrated psychiatric manifestations in GF-induced hepatic porphyria mice. The present results suggest that model animals could be useful for elucidating the mechanisms underlying psychiatric manifestations in syndromes such as hepatic porphyria and hepatic encephalopathy that are associated with the impairment of hepatic function.

  8. The Impact of Acute Matriptase Inhibition in Hepatic Inflammatory Models

    PubMed Central

    Szombath, Gergely; Rokonál, Patrik; Mátis, Gábor; Neogrády, Zsuzsanna

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Dysfunction of matriptase-2 can be involved in iron regulatory disorder via downregulation of hepcidin expression. In the present study, we investigated the effects of 3-amidinophenylalanine-derived matriptase inhibitors on porcine hepatic inflammatory cell models. Methods. Hepatocyte-Kupffer cell cocultures (ratio of 2 : 1 and 6 : 1) were treated with four structurally related matriptase inhibitors at 50 μM. Cell cytotoxicity and relative expressions of IL-6 and IL-8 and the levels of hepcidin were determined by MTS and porcine-specific ELISA. The extracellular H2O2 contents were analyzed by Amplex Red method. Results. Matriptase inhibitors at 50 µM for 24 h did not increase cell death rate. The elevated ROS production observed after short-term application of inhibitor MI-441 could be correlated with lowered hepcidin expression. MI-460 could significantly enhance hepcidin levels in the supernatants of cocultures (by 62.21 ± 26.8% in hepatocyte-Kupffer cell, 2 : 1, and by 42.6 ± 14.3% in hepatocyte-Kupffer cell, 6 : 1, cocultures, resp.). No significant changes were found in IL-6 and IL-8 levels in cocultures exposed to matriptase inhibitors. Conclusions. Based on in vitro findings, administration of MI-460 via modulation of hepcidin expression without cytotoxic and oxidative stress inducing properties might be a reliable alternative to treat iron overload in human and veterinary clinical practice. PMID:27642598

  9. [Development of a hepatitis B virus carrier transgenic mice model].

    PubMed

    Caner, Müge; Arat, Sezen; Bircan, Rifat

    2008-01-01

    The studies for the development of transgenic mice models which provide important profits for the studies concerning immunopathogenesis of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections are in progress since 20 years. For this purpose different lineages bearing whole HBV genome or selected viral genes have been developed and their usage in clarifying the HBV replication and pathogenesis mechanisms have been emphasized. The aim of this study was to develop and breed a HBV carrier mice model. In the study the full HBV genome has been transferred to mouse embryos by microinjection procedure. Following transgenic manipulation, the HBV carriers among the daughter mice have been detected by molecular methods in which HBV-DNA replication and expression have been shown. The manipulations for transgene transfers have been performed in TUBITAK Marmara Research Center Transgene Laboratory, Gebze, Istanbul. The HBV-DNA carrier mice have been demonstrated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using the DNA samples obtained from tail tissues and also by dot-blot hybridization of the mice sera. Integrated HBV-DNA has been detected by applying in-situ hybridization to the liver tissue sections. HBV-DNA expression has been shown by reverse transcriptase PCR method with total RNA molecules that have been isolated from the liver tissues of the HBV-DNA carrier mice. HBsAg has been detected in the liver by immunohistochemical method, and HBsAg and HBeAg have additionally been demonstrated by ELISA. HBV genome, expression of the genome and the expression products have been determined in approximately 10% of the mice of which HBV-DNA have been transferred. By inbreeding heterozygote carrier mice, homozygote HBV transgenic mice line have been obtained. These HBV transgenic mice are the first lineages developed in our country. It is hopefully thought that this HBV carrier transgenic mouse model may contribute to the studies on the pathogenesis of HBV infections which are important health problems in the

  10. The tree shrews: useful animal models for the viral hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Er-Bin; Cao, Ji; Su, Jian-Jia; Chow, Pierce

    2005-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV)-induced hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are major diseases worldwide. HBV infection and chemical carcinogens such as aflatoxin B1 are known to be two key factors in the development of HCC. Animal models for hepatitis and HCC are very useful in the in vivo studies of mechanism involved in the development and prevention of these diseases and the pre-clinical research of drugs for the treatment of these diseases. Now, several animals, such as woodchucks, ground squirrels, chimpanzees, ducks and tree shrews, have been used to establish hepatitis and HCC models. HCC occurs in some woodchucks and ground squirrels that are infected with their own hepatitis viruses and exposed to carcinogens. Chimpanzees and ducks can be infected with human and duck hepatitis B viruses, respectively, but HCC is rarely observed in these animals. The tree shrews are non-rodent, small animals and close to primates in evolution. This review focuses on the establishment of human HBV-induced hepatitis and human HBV-associated HCC in tree shrews and their applications in the study of HCC development.

  11. Diurnal locomotor activity and oxidative metabolism of the suprachiasmatic nucleus in two models of hepatic insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Laudino; Cimadevilla, Jose M; Aller, Maria A; Arias, Jaime; Nava, M Paz; Arias, Jorge L

    2003-08-15

    Subjects with hepatic cirrhosis develop alterations of several rhythmic behavioural and biochemical patterns. Since most cirrhotic patients combine portal hypertension and hepatic impairment, our work aims to assess the extent to which rhythmical changes can be due to hepatic insufficiency or portal hypertension. This was done using two experimental models in rats, portacaval shunt model (PC) and portal hypertension by a triple stenosing ligature of the portal vein (PH). We assess diurnal locomotor activity and determine the oxidative metabolism of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) by histochemical determination of cytochrome oxidase (COX). The results show that animals with PC have altered diurnal locomotor rhythm compared to control and PH rats (p<0.001). They also present lower COX activity in the SCN (p<0.05). We conclude that rhythmic alterations are due to hepatic insufficiency and not to portal hypertension.

  12. Protective effect of ellagic acid on concanavalin A-induced hepatitis via toll-like receptor and mitogen-activated protein kinase/nuclear factor κB signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Hong; Won, Jong Hoon; Choi, Jong Min; Cha, Hye Hyeon; Jang, Yeo Jin; Park, Seohyeon; Kim, Han Gyeol; Kim, Hyung Chul; Kim, Dae Kyong

    2014-10-15

    Ellagic acid (EA) is present in certain fruits and nuts, including raspberries, pomegranates, and walnuts, and has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. The aims of this study were to examine the protective effect of EA on concanavalin A (Con A)-induced hepatitis and to elucidate its underlying molecular mechanisms in mice. Mice were orally administered EA at different doses before the intravenous delivery of Con A; the different experimental groups were as follows: (i) vehicle control, (ii) Con A alone without EA, (iii) EA at 50 mg/kg, (iv) EA at 100 mg/kg, and (v) EA at 200 mg/kg. We found that EA pretreatment significantly reduced the levels of plasma aminotransferase and liver necrosis in Con A-induced hepatitis. Also, EA significantly decreased the expression levels of the toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and TLR4 mRNA and protein in liver tissues. Further, EA decreased the phosphorylation of JNK, ERK1/2, and p38. EA-treated groups showed suppressions of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and IκB-α degradation levels in liver tissues. In addition, EA pretreatment decreased the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and interleukin 1β (IL-1β). These results suggest that EA protects against T-cell-mediated hepatitis through TLR and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/NF-κB signaling pathways.

  13. Dysplastic Hepatocytes Develop Nuclear Inclusions in a Mouse Model of Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Priyanka; Lamoke, Folami; Chaffin, Joanna M.; Bartoli, Manuela; Lee, Jeffrey R.; Duncan, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Viral hepatitis resulting in chronic liver disease is an important clinical challenge and insight into the cellular processes that drive pathogenesis will be critical in order to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic options. Nuclear inclusions in viral and non-viral hepatitis are well documented and have diagnostic significance in some disease contexts. However, the origins and functional consequences of these nuclear inclusions remain elusive. To date the clinical observation of nuclear inclusions in viral and non-viral hepatitis has not been explored at depth in murine models of liver disease. Herein, we report that in a transgenic model of hepatitis B surface antigen mediated hepatitis, murine hepatocytes exhibit nuclear inclusions. Cells bearing nuclear inclusions were more likely to express markers of cell proliferation. We also established a correlation between these inclusions and oxidative stress. N-acetyl cysteine treatment effectively reduced oxidative stress levels, relieved endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and the number of nuclear inclusions we observed in the transgenic mice. Our results suggest that the presence of nuclear inclusions in hepatocytes correlates with oxidative stress and cellular proliferation in a model of antigen mediated hepatitis. PMID:24932583

  14. Physiologically based modeling of hepatic and gastrointestinal biotransformation in fish

    EPA Science Inventory

    In fish, as in mammals, the liver generally viewed as the principal site of chemical biotransformation. For waterborne exposures, such as those conducted in support of standardized BCF testing, the effects of hepatic metabolism on chemical accumulation can be simulated using rela...

  15. Macrophage Stimulating Protein Enhances Hepatic Inflammation in a NASH Model

    PubMed Central

    van Gorp, Patrick J.; Jeurissen, Mike L. J.; Houben, Tom; Walenbergh, Sofie M. A.; Debets, Jacques; Oligschlaeger, Yvonne; Gijbels, Marion J. J.; Neumann, Dietbert; Shiri-Sverdlov, Ronit

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a common liver disease characterized by hepatic lipid accumulation (steatosis) and inflammation. Currently, therapeutic options are poor and the long-term burden to society is constantly increasing. Previously, macrophage stimulating protein (MSP)—a serum protein mainly secreted by liver—was shown to inhibit oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL)/lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-induced inflammation in mouse macrophages. Additionally, MSP could reduce palmitic acid (PA)-induced lipid accumulation and lipogenesis in the HepG2 cell line. Altogether, these data suggest MSP as a suppressor for metabolic inflammation. However, so far the potential of MSP to be used as a treatment for NASH was not investigated. We hypothesized that MSP reduces lipid accumulation and hepatic inflammation. To investigate the effects of MSP in the early stage of NASH, low-density lipoprotein receptor (Ldlr-/-) mice were fed either a regular chow or a high fat, high cholesterol (HFC) diet for 7 days. Recombinant MSP or saline (control) was administrated to the mice by utilizing subcutaneously-implanted osmotic mini-pumps for the last 4 days. As expected, mice fed an HFC diet showed increased plasma and hepatic lipid accumulation, as well as enhanced hepatic inflammation, compared with chow-fed controls. Upon MSP administration, the rise in cholesterol and triglyceride levels after an HFC diet remained unaltered. Surprisingly, while hepatic macrophage and neutrophil infiltration was similar between the groups, MSP-treated mice showed increased gene expression of pro-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic mediators in the liver, compared with saline-treated controls. Contrary to our expectations, MSP did not ameliorate NASH. Observed changes in inflammatory gene expression suggest that further research is needed to clarify the long-term effects of MSP. PMID:27685150

  16. Randomized, Controlled Comparison of Advanced Hemostatic Pads in Hepatic Surgical Models

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    Blood loss during hepatic surgery leads to poor patient outcomes. This study investigates the hemostatic efficacy of a novel sealing hemostatic pad (polyethylene glycol-coated collagen, PCC) and a fibrin sealant pad (fibrin-thrombin coated collagen, FTC) in a leporine hepatic segmentectomy and a porcine hepatic abrasion model. A segmentectomy was used to compare hemostatic success and hematoma incidence in 20 rabbits (10/group). Hepatic abrasions were used to compare hemostatic success up to 10 min after application in six pigs (42 lesions/group). In the segmentectomy model, PCC achieved 100% hemostatic success within 2 min (95% CI: 72.3% to 100%) and FTC achieved 80% hemostatic success within 3 min (49.0% to 94.3%). PCC had lower hematoma incidence at 15 min (0.0 versus 11.1%) and 24 h (20.0 versus 66.7%). In the abrasion model, PCC provided superior hemostatic success at 3 (odds ratio: 24.8, 95% CI: 8.86 to 69.2, P < 0.001), 5 (66.3, 28.5 to 153.9, P < 0.001), 7 (177.5, 64.4 to 489.1, P < 0.001), and 10 min (777.6, 148.2 to 4078, P < 0.001) leading to statistically significant less blood loss. The novel sealing hemostat provides faster and more sustained hemostasis than a fibrin sealant pad in a leporine hepatic segmentectomy and a porcine hepatic abrasion model of hepatic surgery. PMID:24729905

  17. An Evaluation of the Venous Equilibrium Model for Hepatic Clearance using Isolated Perfused Rainbow Trout Livers

    EPA Science Inventory

    The venous equilibrium model is widely used to describe hepatic clearance (CLH) of chemicals metabolized by the liver. If chemical delivery to the tissue does not limit CLH, this model predicts that CLH will approximately equal the product of intrinsic metabolic clearance and a t...

  18. Acetylcholinesterase activity in an experimental rat model of Type C hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Marta; Méndez-López, Magdalena; López, Laudino; Aller, María A; Arias, Jaime; Arias, Jorge L

    2011-05-01

    Patients with liver malfunction often suffer from hepatic encephalopathy, a neurological complication which can affect attention and cognition. Diverse experimental models have been used to study brain alterations that may be responsible for hepatic encephalopathy symptoms. The aim of the study was to determine whether cognitive impairment found in cirrhosis could be due to disturbance of acetylcholinesterase activity. Acetylcholinesterase activity was assessed in the brains of Wistar rats with thioacetamide-induced cirrhosis. The cirrhotic group displayed up-regulation of acetylcholinesterase levels in the entorrhinal cortex, anterodorsal and anteroventral thalamus and accumbens, whereas down-regulation was found in the CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Our results indicate that the experimental model of hepatic encephalopathy by chronic administration of thioacetamide presents alterations of acetylcholinesterase activity in brain limbic system regions, which play a role in attention and memory.

  19. Bile duct warmer in hepatic cryosurgery--a pig liver model.

    PubMed

    Seifert, J K; Dutkowski, P; Junginger, T; Morris, D L

    1997-11-01

    Freezing of the common bile duct resulted in injury, stenosis, or perforation of the bile duct in a dog model. Biliary cutaneous fistulas and bile leaks are reported as complications of hepatic cryosurgery in man. In an ex vivo pig liver model we compared freezing close to the bile duct with and without warming the bile duct with warmed saline solution via an inserted catheter ("bile duct warmer"). The recorded temperatures at the outer wall of the bile duct were -50 degrees C after 10 min of freezing without and 5. 8 degrees C with the use of the warmer (P < 0.001, two-way ANOVA). The bile duct warmer system may be a simple and inexpensive device in reducing perioperative morbidity after hepatic cryosurgery of hepatic liver lesions close to a bile duct.

  20. Integrated internist - addiction medicine - hepatology model for hepatitis C management for individuals on methadone maintenance.

    PubMed

    Martinez, A D; Dimova, R; Marks, K M; Beeder, A B; Zeremski, M; Kreek, M J; Talal, A H

    2012-01-01

    Despite a high prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) among drug users, HCV evaluation and treatment acceptance are extremely low among these patients when referred from drug treatment facilities for HCV management. We sought to increase HCV treatment effectiveness among patients from a methadone maintenance treatment program (MMTP) by maintaining continuity of care. We developed, instituted and retrospectively assessed the effectiveness of an integrated, co-localized care model in which an internist-addiction medicine specialist from MMTP was embedded in the hepatitis clinic. Methadone maintenance treatment program patients were referred, evaluated by the internist and hepatologist in hepatitis clinic and provided HCV treatment with integration between both sites. Of 401 evaluated patients, anti-HCV antibody was detected in 257, 86% of whom were older than 40 years. Hepatitis C virus RNA levels were measured in 222 patients, 65 of whom were aviremic. Of 157 patients with detectable HCV RNA, 125 were eligible for referral to the hepatitis clinic, 76 (61%) of whom accepted and adhered with the referral. Men engaged in MMTP <36 months were significantly less likely to be seen in hepatitis clinic than men in MMTP more than 36 months (odds ratio = 7.7; 95% confidence interval 2.6-22.9) or women. We evaluated liver histology in 63 patients, and 83% had moderate to advanced liver disease. Twenty-four patients initiated treatment with 19 completing and 13 (54%) achieving sustained response. In conclusion, integrated care between the MMTP and the hepatitis clinic improves adherence with HCV evaluation and treatment compared to standard referral practices.

  1. Implementation of the ECHO(®) telementoring model for the treatment of patients with hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Marciano, Sebastián; Haddad, Leila; Plazzotta, Fernando; Mauro, Ezequiel; Terraza, Sergio; Arora, Sanjeev; Thornton, Karla; Ríos, Beatriz; García Dans, Carlos; Ratusnu, Natalia; Calanni, Liliana; Allevato, José; Sirotinsky, María Ester; Pedrosa, Marcos; Gadano, Adrián

    2017-04-01

    We aimed to implement the Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes (ECHO) telementoring model for hepatitis C and to evaluate its outcomes in the health providers. Following the ECHO model, an hepatitis C teleECHO clinic was established at the Hospital Italiano in Argentina. The teleECHO clinic provides support and training to physicians from Patagonia who treat patients with hepatitis C. In order to evaluate the teleECHO clinic outcomes, physicians completed a survey focused on skills and competence in hepatitis C before and after 6 months of participating in the project. The survey consisted of 10 questions, which participants rated from 1 to 7 (1 no ability; 7 highest ability). To analyze the difference before and after participation in the project, Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used. During the first 6 months of implementation of the model, a total of 14 physicians from 12 sites in Patagonia agreed to participate in the survey. The median age of the participants was 42 years. Participants' primary specialties were Hepatology (55%), Infectious Diseases (25%), General Practice (10%), and other (10%). A significant improvement was observed in all the evaluated fields after 6 month of the participation in the teleECHO clinic, namely fibrosis staging, determining appropriate candidates for treatment, and selecting appropriate HCV treatment. In addition, their general interest in hepatitis C increased. We successfully replicated and implemented the first teleECHO clinic in Argentina. Physicians improved their ability to provide best practice care for patients with Hepatitis C. J. Med. Virol. 89:660-664, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Flow cytometric quantification of T cell proliferation and division kinetics in woodchuck model of hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Gujar, Shashi A; Michalak, Tomasz I

    2005-01-01

    Woodchucks infected with woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) represent the closest natural animal model to study the immunopathogenesis of liver injury caused by essentially noncytopathic, highly human specific hepatitis B virus (HBV). The importance of antiviral T cell response in induction of hepatitis and in control of HBV replication has been demonstrated. However, the understanding of how these responses contribute to the development of different immunomorphological forms of liver disease and their outcomes remain elusive. In this study, we established and standardized a flow cytometry assay using peripheral blood mononuclear cells labeled with carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) to assess WHV-specific and mitogen-driven T lymphocyte proliferative responses in woodchucks. The assay is of significantly greater sensitivity than the adenine incorporation assay currently used when applied to measure either WHV-specific T cell responses in acute (P < 0.001) and chronic (P < 0.03) viral hepatitis or those induced by mitogens in both healthy and WHV-infected animals. It also provides a new type of information, not previously available, characterizing the strength of woodchuck T cell proliferative reactivity by measuring cell division rates. The study shows that woodchuck PBMC labeled with CFSE exhibit light scatter and fluorescence profiles compatible to those of human PBMC, allowing quantitation and deconvolution of the flow cytometric data by applying the existing analytical softwares. The availability of this novel assay should facilitate a more precise and comprehensive evaluation of hepadnavirus-specific and generalized T cell responses in experimental WHV hepatitis.

  3. Mathematical Modeling of Transmission Dynamics and Optimal Control of Vaccination and Treatment for Hepatitis B Virus

    PubMed Central

    Kamyad, Ali Vahidian; Heydari, Ali Akbar; Heydari, Aghileh

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a worldwide public health problem. In this paper, we study the dynamics of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection which can be controlled by vaccination as well as treatment. Initially we consider constant controls for both vaccination and treatment. In the constant controls case, by determining the basic reproduction number, we study the existence and stability of the disease-free and endemic steady-state solutions of the model. Next, we take the controls as time and formulate the appropriate optimal control problem and obtain the optimal control strategy to minimize both the number of infectious humans and the associated costs. Finally at the end numerical simulation results show that optimal combination of vaccination and treatment is the most effective way to control hepatitis B virus infection. PMID:24812572

  4. Comparisons of forecasting for hepatitis in Guangxi Province, China by using three neural networks models

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Ruijing; Chen, Ni

    2016-01-01

    This study compares and evaluates the prediction of hepatitis in Guangxi Province, China by using back propagation neural networks based genetic algorithm (BPNN-GA), generalized regression neural networks (GRNN), and wavelet neural networks (WNN). In order to compare the results of forecasting, the data obtained from 2004 to 2013 and 2014 were used as modeling and forecasting samples, respectively. The results show that when the small data set of hepatitis has seasonal fluctuation, the prediction result by BPNN-GA will be better than the two other methods. The WNN method is suitable for predicting the large data set of hepatitis that has seasonal fluctuation and the same for the GRNN method when the data increases steadily. PMID:27843718

  5. Comparisons of forecasting for hepatitis in Guangxi Province, China by using three neural networks models.

    PubMed

    Gan, Ruijing; Chen, Ni; Huang, Daizheng

    2016-01-01

    This study compares and evaluates the prediction of hepatitis in Guangxi Province, China by using back propagation neural networks based genetic algorithm (BPNN-GA), generalized regression neural networks (GRNN), and wavelet neural networks (WNN). In order to compare the results of forecasting, the data obtained from 2004 to 2013 and 2014 were used as modeling and forecasting samples, respectively. The results show that when the small data set of hepatitis has seasonal fluctuation, the prediction result by BPNN-GA will be better than the two other methods. The WNN method is suitable for predicting the large data set of hepatitis that has seasonal fluctuation and the same for the GRNN method when the data increases steadily.

  6. Comparative Testing of Hemostatic Dressing in a Large Animal Model (Sus Scorofa) with Severe hepatic Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-02

    hemostatic dressings in a large animal model (Sus scrofa ) with severe hepatic injuries PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR (PI) / TRAINING COORDINATOR (TC): Capt...to Date Sus scrofa 36 18 18 Note. Many fewer animals than approved were used because one of the original treatment groups (Lypressin- soaked gauze

  7. Dynamical modeling of liver Aquaporin-9 expression and glycerol permeability in hepatic glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gena, Patrizia; Buono, Nicoletta Del; D'Abbicco, Marcello; Mastrodonato, Maria; Berardi, Marco; Svelto, Maria; Lopez, Luciano; Calamita, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Liver is crucial in the homeostasis of glycerol, an important metabolic intermediate. Plasma glycerol is imported by hepatocytes mainly through Aquaporin-9 (AQP9), an aquaglyceroporin channel negatively regulated by insulin in rodents. AQP9 is of critical importance in glycerol metabolism since hepatic glycerol utilization is rate-limited at the hepatocyte membrane permeation step. Glycerol kinase catalyzes the initial step for the conversion of the imported glycerol into glycerol-3-phosphate, a major substrate for de novo synthesis of glucose (gluconeogenesis) and/or triacyglycerols (lipogenesis). A model addressing the glucose-insulin system to describe the hepatic glycerol import and metabolism and the correlation with the glucose homeostasis is lacking so far. Here we consider a system of first-order ordinary differential equations delineating the relevance of hepatocyte AQP9 in liver glycerol permeability. Assuming the hepatic glycerol permeability as depending on the protein levels of AQP9, a mathematical function is designed describing the time course of the involvement of AQP9 in mouse hepatic glycerol metabolism in different nutritional states. The resulting theoretical relationship is derived fitting experimental data obtained with murine models at the fed, fasted or re-fed condition. While providing useful insights into the dynamics of liver AQP9 involvement in male rodent glycerol homeostasis our model may be adapted to the human liver serving as an important module of a whole body-model of the glucose metabolism both in health and metabolic diseases.

  8. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home » Hepatitis B » Hepatitis B Entire Lesson Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Hepatitis B Entire Lesson for Veterans and the Public ...

  9. In Vivo MRI Assessment of Hepatic and Splenic Disease in a Murine Model of Schistosmiasis

    PubMed Central

    Laprie, Caroline; Dessein, Helia; Bernard, Monique; Dessein, Alain; Viola, Angèle

    2015-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis (or bilharzia), a major parasitic disease, affects more than 260 million people worldwide. In chronic cases of intestinal schistosomiasis caused by trematodes of the Schistosoma genus, hepatic fibrosis develops as a host immune response to the helminth eggs, followed by potentially lethal portal hypertension. In this study, we characterized hepatic and splenic features of a murine model of intestinal schistosomiasis using in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and evaluated the transverse relaxation time T2 as a non-invasive imaging biomarker for monitoring hepatic fibrogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings CBA/J mice were imaged at 11.75T two, six and ten weeks after percutaneous infection with Schistosoma mansoni. In vivo imaging studies were completed with histology at the last two time points. Anatomical MRI allowed detection of typical manifestations of the intestinal disease such as significant hepato- and splenomegaly, and dilation of the portal vein as early as six weeks, with further aggravation at 10 weeks after infection. Liver multifocal lesions observed by MRI in infected animals at 10 weeks post infection corresponded to granulomatous inflammation and intergranulomatous fibrosis with METAVIR scores up to A2F2. While most healthy hepatic tissue showed T2 values below 14 ms, these lesions were characterized by a T2 greater than 16 ms. The area fraction of increased T2 correlated (rS = 0.83) with the area fraction of Sirius Red stained collagen in histological sections. A continuous liver T2* decrease was also measured while brown pigments in macrophages were detected at histology. These findings suggest accumulation of hematin in infected livers. Conclusions/Significance Our multiparametric MRI approach confirms that this murine model replicates hepatic and splenic manifestations of human intestinal schistosomiasis. Quantitative T2 mapping proved sensitive to assess liver fibrogenesis non-invasively and may therefore

  10. The Current State of Knowledge of Hepatic Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury Based on Its Study in Experimental Models

    PubMed Central

    Mendes-Braz, M.; Elias-Miró, M.; Jiménez-Castro, M. B.; Casillas-Ramírez, A.; Ramalho, F. S.; Peralta, C.

    2012-01-01

    The present review focuses on the numerous experimental models used to study the complexity of hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Although experimental models of hepatic I/R injury represent a compromise between the clinical reality and experimental simplification, the clinical transfer of experimental results is problematic because of anatomical and physiological differences and the inevitable simplification of experimental work. In this review, the strengths and limitations of the various models of hepatic I/R are discussed. Several strategies to protect the liver from I/R injury have been developed in animal models and, some of these, might find their way into clinical practice. We also attempt to highlight the fact that the mechanisms responsible for hepatic I/R injury depend on the experimental model used, and therefore the therapeutic strategies also differ according to the model used. Thus, the choice of model must therefore be adapted to the clinical question being answered. PMID:22649277

  11. Modeling toxicodynamic effects of trichloroethylene on liver in mouse model of autoimmune hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Kathleen M.; Reisfeld, Brad; Zurlinden, Todd; Kreps, Meagan N.; Erickson, Stephen W.; Blossom, Sarah J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic exposure to industrial solvent and water pollutant trichloroethylene (TCE) in female MRL+/+ mice generates disease similar to human autoimmune hepatitis. The current study was initiated to investigate why TCE-induced autoimmunity targeted the liver. Compared to other tissues the liver has an unusually robust capacity for repair and regeneration. This investigation examined both time-dependent and dose-dependent effects of TCE on hepatoprotective and pro-inflammatory events in liver and macrophages from female MRL+/+ mice. After a 12-week exposure to TCE in drinking water a dose-dependent decrease in macrophage production of IL-6 at both the transcriptional and protein level was observed. A longitudinal study similarly showed that TCE inhibited macrophage IL-6 production. In terms of the liver, TCE had little effect on expression of pro-inflammatory genes (Tnfa, Saa2 or Cscl1) until the end of the 40-week exposure. Instead, TCE suppressed hepatic expression of genes involved in IL-6 signaling (Il6r, gp130, and Egr1). Linear regression analysis confirmed liver histopathology in the TCE-treated mice correlated with decreased expression of Il6r. A toxicodynamic model was developed to estimate the effects of TCE on IL-6 signaling and liver pathology under different levels of exposure and rates of repair. This study underlined the importance of longitudinal studies in mechanistic evaluations of immuntoxicants. It showed that later-occurring liver pathology caused by TCE was associated with early suppression of hepatoprotection rather than an increase in conventional pro-inflammatory events. This information was used to create a novel toxicodynamic model of IL-6-mediated TCE-induced liver inflammation. PMID:25026505

  12. Modeling toxicodynamic effects of trichloroethylene on liver in mouse model of autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Kathleen M; Reisfeld, Brad; Zurlinden, Todd J; Kreps, Meagan N; Erickson, Stephen W; Blossom, Sarah J

    2014-09-15

    Chronic exposure to industrial solvent and water pollutant trichloroethylene (TCE) in female MRL+/+mice generates disease similar to human autoimmune hepatitis. The current study was initiated to investigate why TCE-induced autoimmunity targeted the liver. Compared to other tissues the liver has an unusually robust capacity for repair and regeneration. This investigation examined both time-dependent and dose-dependent effects of TCE on hepatoprotective and pro-inflammatory events in liver and macrophages from female MRL+/+mice. After a 12-week exposure to TCE in drinking water a dose-dependent decrease in macrophage production of IL-6 at both the transcriptional and protein level was observed. A longitudinal study similarly showed that TCE inhibited macrophage IL-6 production. In terms of the liver, TCE had little effect on expression of pro-inflammatory genes (Tnfa, Saa2 or Cscl1) until the end of the 40-week exposure. Instead, TCE suppressed hepatic expression of genes involved in IL-6 signaling (Il6r, gp130, and Egr1). Linear regression analysis confirmed liver histopathology in the TCE-treated mice correlated with decreased expression of Il6r. A toxicodynamic model was developed to estimate the effects of TCE on IL-6 signaling and liver pathology under different levels of exposure and rates of repair. This study underlined the importance of longitudinal studies in mechanistic evaluations of immuntoxicants. It showed that later-occurring liver pathology caused by TCE was associated with early suppression of hepatoprotection rather than an increase in conventional pro-inflammatory events. This information was used to create a novel toxicodynamic model of IL-6-mediated TCE-induced liver inflammation.

  13. Immunopathogenic Mechanisms of Autoimmune Hepatitis: How Much Do We Know from Animal Models?

    PubMed Central

    Christen, Urs; Hintermann, Edith

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is characterized by a progressive destruction of the liver parenchyma and a chronic fibrosis. The current treatment of autoimmune hepatitis is still largely dependent on the administration of corticosteroids and cytostatic drugs. For a long time the development of novel therapeutic strategies has been hampered by a lack of understanding the basic immunopathogenic mechanisms of AIH and the absence of valid animal models. However, in the past decade, knowledge from clinical observations in AIH patients and the development of innovative animal models have led to a situation where critical factors driving the disease have been identified and alternative treatments are being evaluated. Here we will review the insight on the immunopathogenesis of AIH as gained from clinical observation and from animal models. PMID:27916939

  14. Immunopathogenic Mechanisms of Autoimmune Hepatitis: How Much Do We Know from Animal Models?

    PubMed

    Christen, Urs; Hintermann, Edith

    2016-12-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is characterized by a progressive destruction of the liver parenchyma and a chronic fibrosis. The current treatment of autoimmune hepatitis is still largely dependent on the administration of corticosteroids and cytostatic drugs. For a long time the development of novel therapeutic strategies has been hampered by a lack of understanding the basic immunopathogenic mechanisms of AIH and the absence of valid animal models. However, in the past decade, knowledge from clinical observations in AIH patients and the development of innovative animal models have led to a situation where critical factors driving the disease have been identified and alternative treatments are being evaluated. Here we will review the insight on the immunopathogenesis of AIH as gained from clinical observation and from animal models.

  15. Computer Modeling of Yttrium-90-Microsphere Transport in the Hepatic Arterial Tree to Improve Clinical Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, Andrew S.; Kleinstreuer, Clement; Basciano, Christopher A.; Dezarn, William A.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: Radioembolization (RE) via yttrium-90 ({sup 90}Y) microspheres is an effective and safe treatment for unresectable liver malignancies. However, no data are available regarding the impact of local blood flow dynamics on {sup 90}Y-microsphere transport and distribution in the human hepatic arterial system. Methods and Materials: A three-dimensional (3-D) computer model was developed to analyze and simulate blood-microsphere flow dynamics in the hepatic arterial system with tumor. Supplemental geometric and flow data sets from patients undergoing RE were also available to validate the accuracy of the computer simulation model. Specifically, vessel diameters, curvatures, and branching patterns, as well as blood flow velocities/pressures and microsphere characteristics (i.e., diameter and specific gravity), were measured. Three-dimensional computer-aided design software was used to create the vessel geometries. Initial trials, with 10,000 noninteracting microspheres released into the hepatic artery, used resin spheres 32-{mu}m in diameter with a density twice that of blood. Results: Simulations of blood flow subject to different branch-outlet pressures as well as blood-microsphere transport were successfully carried out, allowing testing of two types of microsphere release distributions in the inlet plane of the main hepatic artery. If the inlet distribution of microspheres was uniform (evenly spaced particles), a greater percentage would exit into the vessel branch feeding the tumor. Conversely, a parabolic inlet distribution of microspheres (more particles around the vessel center) showed a high percentage of microspheres exiting the branch vessel leading to the normal liver. Conclusions: Computer simulations of both blood flow patterns and microsphere dynamics have the potential to provide valuable insight on how to optimize {sup 90}Y-microsphere implantation into hepatic tumors while sparing normal tissue.

  16. Repeated transplantation of hepatocytes prevents fulminant hepatitis in a rat model of Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Vanessa; Siaj, Ramsi; Stöppeler, Sandra; Bahde, Ralf; Spiegel, Hans-Ullrich; Köhler, Gabriele; Zibert, Andree; Schmidt, Hartmut H J

    2012-02-01

    The outcome of consecutive hepatocyte transplants was explored in a rat model of Wilson's disease before the onset of fulminant hepatitis without preconditioning regimens. Rats received a high-copper diet in order to induce a rapid induction of liver failure. Sham-operated rats (15/15) developed jaundice and fulminant hepatitis, and they died within 4 weeks of first transplantation. Despite the continuation of a high dietary copper challenge, long-term survival was observed for a notable proportion of the transplanted animals (7/18). All survivors displayed normalized levels of hepatitis-associated serum markers and ceruloplasmin oxidase activity by posttransplant days 50 and 98, respectively. The liver copper concentrations, the liver histology, and the expression of marker genes were significantly restored within 4 months of transplantation in comparison with the control group. The high expression of a copper transporter gene (ATPase Cu++ transporting beta polypeptide) in the livers of the survivors indicated a high rate of repopulation by donor hepatocytes. Our data suggest that repeated cell transplantation can overcome the limitations of a single therapy session in rats with severe hepatic disease by functionally restoring the host liver without preconditioning.

  17. Isoflurane and Sevoflurane Induce Severe Hepatic Insulin Resistance in a Canine Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Stella P.; Broussard, Josiane L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Anesthesia induces insulin resistance, which may contribute to elevated blood glucose and adverse post-operative outcomes in critically ill patients, and impair glycemic control in surgical patients with diabetes. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which anesthesia impairs insulin sensitivity. Here we investigate the effects of anesthesia on insulin sensitivity in metabolic tissues. Methods Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps were performed in 32 lean (control diet; n = 16 conscious versus n = 16 anesthetized) and 24 fat-fed (6 weeks fat-feeding; n = 16 conscious versus n = 8 anesthetized) adult male mongrel dogs in conjunction with tracer methodology to differentiate hepatic versus peripheral insulin sensitivity. Propofol was administered as an intravenous bolus (3mg/kg) to initiate anesthesia, which was then maintained with inhaled sevoflurane or isoflurane (2–3%) for the duration of the procedure. Results Anesthesia reduced peripheral insulin sensitivity by approximately 50% in both lean and fat-fed animals as compared to conscious animals, and insulin action at the liver was almost completely suppressed during anesthesia such that hepatic insulin sensitivity was decreased by 75.5% and; 116.2% in lean and fat-fed groups, respectively. Conclusion Inhaled anesthesia induces severe hepatic insulin resistance in a canine model. Countermeasures that preserve hepatic insulin sensitivity may represent a therapeutic target that could improve surgical outcomes in both diabetic and healthy patients. PMID:27802272

  18. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis A Hepatitis A Hepatitis A is a contagious viral infection that can easily affect children and adults. It is one of the most common types of hepatitis virus. Often when you hear about hepatitis A ...

  19. [Mathematical models in epidemiology: Study on viral hepatitis in Italy (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Jovine, R; Ghezzo, F; Orecchio, F

    1979-01-01

    In this paper a mathematical approach to the epidemics is proposed. The method is based upon a model able to describe any time-depending phenomena using the following elements: "class", "transition" and "related probability". The solution of the differential equations describing the model are obtained: first, by numerical techniques; second, by a Montecarlo simulation method. Deterministic and stochastic solutions which have been obtained, by applying the model to the study of viral hepatitis in Italy during 1960--1970, have been compared each other, to improve the model itself.

  20. Modeling toxicodynamic effects of trichloroethylene on liver in mouse model of autoimmune hepatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Kathleen M.; Reisfeld, Brad; Zurlinden, Todd J.; Kreps, Meagan N.; Erickson, Stephen W.; Blossom, Sarah J.

    2014-09-15

    Chronic exposure to industrial solvent and water pollutant trichloroethylene (TCE) in female MRL +/+ mice generates disease similar to human autoimmune hepatitis. The current study was initiated to investigate why TCE-induced autoimmunity targeted the liver. Compared to other tissues the liver has an unusually robust capacity for repair and regeneration. This investigation examined both time-dependent and dose-dependent effects of TCE on hepatoprotective and pro-inflammatory events in liver and macrophages from female MRL +/+ mice. After a 12-week exposure to TCE in drinking water a dose-dependent decrease in macrophage production of IL-6 at both the transcriptional and protein level was observed. A longitudinal study similarly showed that TCE inhibited macrophage IL-6 production. In terms of the liver, TCE had little effect on expression of pro-inflammatory genes (Tnfa, Saa2 or Cscl1) until the end of the 40-week exposure. Instead, TCE suppressed hepatic expression of genes involved in IL-6 signaling (Il6r, gp130, and Egr1). Linear regression analysis confirmed liver histopathology in the TCE-treated mice correlated with decreased expression of Il6r. A toxicodynamic model was developed to estimate the effects of TCE on IL-6 signaling and liver pathology under different levels of exposure and rates of repair. This study underlined the importance of longitudinal studies in mechanistic evaluations of immuntoxicants. It showed that later-occurring liver pathology caused by TCE was associated with early suppression of hepatoprotection rather than an increase in conventional pro-inflammatory events. This information was used to create a novel toxicodynamic model of IL-6-mediated TCE-induced liver inflammation. - Highlights: • We developed a toxicodynamic model to study effects of trichloroethylene on liver. • We examined protective as well as pro-inflammatory events in the liver. • Trichloroethylene inhibits IL-6 production by macrophages. • Trichloroethylene

  1. Prediction models of hepatocellular carcinoma development in chronic hepatitis B patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye Won; Ahn, Sang Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Applying the same strategies for antiviral therapy and HCC surveillance to all chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients would be a burden worldwide. To properly manage CHB patients, it is necessary to identify and classify the risk for HCC development in such patients. Several HCC risk scores based on risk factors such as cirrhosis, age, male gender, and high viral load have been used, and have negative predictive values of ≥ 95%. Most of these have been derived from, and internally validated in, treatment-naïve Asian CHB patients. Herein, we summarized various HCC prediction models, including IPM (Individual Prediction Model), CU-HCC (Chinese University-HCC), GAG-HCC (Guide with Age, Gender, HBV DNA, Core Promoter Mutations and Cirrhosis-HCC), NGM-HCC (Nomogram-HCC), REACH-B (Risk Estimation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Chronic Hepatitis B), and Page-B score. To develop a noninvasive test of liver fibrosis, we also introduced a new scoring system that uses liver stiffness values from transient elastography, including an LSM (Liver Stiffness Measurement)-based model, LSM-HCC, and mREACH-B (modified REACH-B). PMID:27729738

  2. Modeling the Health and Economic Burden of Hepatitis C Virus in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Müllhaupt, Beat; Bruggmann, Philip; Bihl, Florian; Blach, Sarah; Lavanchy, Daniel; Razavi, Homie; Semela, David; Negro, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic hepatitis C virus infection is a major cause of liver disease in Switzerland and carries a significant cost burden. Currently, only conservative strategies are in place to mitigate the burden of hepatitis C in Switzerland. This study expands on previously described modeling efforts to explore the impact of: no treatment, and treatment to reduce HCC and mortality. Furthermore, the costs associated with untreated HCV were modeled. Methods Hepatitis C disease progression and mortality were modeled. Baseline historical assumptions were collected from the literature and expert interviews and strategies were developed to show the impact of different levels of intervention (improved drug cure rates, treatment and diagnosis) until 2030. Results Under the historical standard of care, the number of advanced stage cases was projected to increase until 2030, at which point the annual economic burden of untreated viremic infections was projected to reach €96.8 (95% Uncertainty Interval: €36 – €232) million. Scenarios to reduce HCV liver-related mortality by 90% by 2030 required treatment of 4,190 ≥F2 or 3,200 ≥F3 patients annually by 2018 using antivirals with a 95% efficacy rate. Delaying the implementation of these scenarios by 2 or 5 years reduced the impact on mortality to 75% and 57%, respectively. Conclusions With today’s treatment efficacy and uptake rates, hepatitis C disease burden is expected to increase through 2030. A substantial reduction in disease burden can be achieved by means of both higher efficacy drugs and increased treatment uptake. However, these efforts cannot be undertaken without a simultaneous effort to diagnose more infections. PMID:26107467

  3. Modeling hepatic insulin sensitivity during a meal: validation against the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp

    PubMed Central

    Dalla Man, Chiara; Piccinini, Francesca; Basu, Rita; Basu, Ananda; Rizza, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we proposed a model describing the suppression of endogenous glucose production (EGP) during a meal. It assumes that EGP suppression depends on glucose concentration and its rate of change and on delayed insulin action. Hepatic insulin sensitivity (SILmeal) can be derived from EGP model parameters. This model was shown to adequately describe EGP profiles measured with multiple tracer techniques; however, SILmeal has never been compared directly with its euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp counterpart (SILclamp). To do so, 62 subjects with different degrees of glucose tolerance underwent a triple-tracer mixed meal. Fifty-seven subjects also underwent a labeled ([3-3H]glucose) euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp. From the triple-tracer meal data, virtually model-independent estimates of EGP were obtained using the tracer-to-tracee clamp technique, and the EGP model was identified in each subject. Model fit was satisfactory, and SILmeal was estimated with good precision. Correlation between SILclamp and SILmeal was good (r = 0.72, P < 0.001); however, SILmeal was lower than SILclamp (4.60 ± 0.64 vs. 8.73 ± 1.07 10−4 dl·kg−1·min−1 per μU/ml, P < 0.01). This difference may be due to different ranges of insulin explored during the two tests (ΔIclamp = 15.60 ± 1.61 vs. ΔImeal= 83.37 ± 10.71 μU/ml) as well as steady- vs. non-steady-state glucose and insulin profiles. In conclusion, the new EGP model provides an estimate of hepatic insulin sensitivity during a meal that is in good agreement with that derived in the same individuals with a hyperinsulinemic clamp. When used in conjunction with the minimal model, the approach potentially enables estimation of hepatic insulin sensitivity from a single-tracer labeled meal or oral glucose tolerance test. PMID:23443923

  4. Quantifying the contribution of the liver to glucose homeostasis: a detailed kinetic model of human hepatic glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    König, Matthias; Bulik, Sascha; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2012-01-01

    Despite the crucial role of the liver in glucose homeostasis, a detailed mathematical model of human hepatic glucose metabolism is lacking so far. Here we present a detailed kinetic model of glycolysis, gluconeogenesis and glycogen metabolism in human hepatocytes integrated with the hormonal control of these pathways by insulin, glucagon and epinephrine. Model simulations are in good agreement with experimental data on (i) the quantitative contributions of glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and glycogen metabolism to hepatic glucose production and hepatic glucose utilization under varying physiological states. (ii) the time courses of postprandial glycogen storage as well as glycogen depletion in overnight fasting and short term fasting (iii) the switch from net hepatic glucose production under hypoglycemia to net hepatic glucose utilization under hyperglycemia essential for glucose homeostasis (iv) hormone perturbations of hepatic glucose metabolism. Response analysis reveals an extra high capacity of the liver to counteract changes of plasma glucose level below 5 mM (hypoglycemia) and above 7.5 mM (hyperglycemia). Our model may serve as an important module of a whole-body model of human glucose metabolism and as a valuable tool for understanding the role of the liver in glucose homeostasis under normal conditions and in diseases like diabetes or glycogen storage diseases.

  5. Anti-fibrotic effects of the Masson pine pollen aqueous extract on hepatic fibrosis rat model

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Tao; Jin, Xue-Yuan; Zhao, Lin; Ma, Long; Li, Rui-Sheng; Zhao, Ping; Guo, Chang-Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To observe the antifibrotic effects of Masson Pine Pollen aqueous extract. Methods: Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into control (CG), hepatic fibrosis model (MG), MPPAE low dose (LG), MPPAE high dose (HG), and MPP original powder (MPPOP; OG) groups. Each group was treated with specific protocols and sacrificed 8 weeks later. Multiple indicators such as serum transaminase, HE staining of the liver tissue, and relevant indexes to fibrosis were determined. Results: Severe hyperplasia of fibrous connective tissues was observed in livers of the MG group rats, while aspartate transaminase and alanine transaminase levels and collagen content obviously increased, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities and MMPs expression decreased, malondialdehyde (MDA) and 8-hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine concentrations increased, while mRNA expressions of hepatic stellate cell (HSC)-related cytokines such as transforming growth factor-β1 and platelet-derived growth factor, transcription factors such as nuclear factor-κB p65, and signaling protein α-smooth muscle actin were all increased significantly. Conclusions: MPPAE effectively inhibited the fibrotic process in this CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis rat model. It may be associated with synergic functions of antioxidant activity, inhibitory activity on HSC proliferation, collagen synthesis, and MMPs expression induction. PMID:26191155

  6. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... Châu và vùng Thái Bình Dương Hepatitis C Hepatitis C What is hepatitis C? Hepatitis C is a viral infection that ... can cure most cases of hepatitis C. Acute hepatitis C Acute hepatitis C is a short-term ...

  7. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... Châu và vùng Thái Bình Dương Hepatitis C Hepatitis A What is hepatitis A? Hepatitis A is a viral infection that ... spreading hepatitis A to others . How common is hepatitis A? In the United States, hepatitis A has ...

  8. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... Châu và vùng Thái Bình Dương Hepatitis C Hepatitis B What is hepatitis B? Hepatitis B is a viral infection that ... to prevent spreading hepatitis B to others . Acute hepatitis B Acute hepatitis B is a short-term ...

  9. Fulminant liver failure model with hepatic encephalopathy in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Tomohide; Chen, Feng; Baine, Ann-Marie T.; Gardner, Lindsay B.; Nguyen, Justin H.

    2011-01-01

    Aim To develop a reliable murine model for fulminant liver failure (FLF). Material and Methods We treated three groups of male C57BL/6 mice:as controls, with azoxymethane (AOM), and with galactosamine (Gal) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα). Effects of body temperature (BT) control on survival, in all three groups were investigated. Using BT control, survival, histopathological findings and biochemical/coagulation profiles were compared between the experimental groups. Effects of hydration on international normalized ratios of prothrombin time (PT-INR) were also checked. Dose-dependent survival curves were made for both experimental groups. Neurological behaviors were assessed using a coma scale. Results No unexpected BT effects were seen in the control group. The AOM group, but not the Gal+TNFα group, showed significant differences in survival curves between those with and without BT care. Histopathological assessment showed consistent FLF findings in both experimental groups with BT care. Between the experimental groups, there were significant differences in aspartate aminotransferase levels and PT-INR; and significant differences in PT-INRs between sufficiently- and insufficiently-hydrated groups. There were significant differences between FLF models, in the duration of each coma stage, with significant differences in stages 1 and 3 as percentages of the diseased state (stages 1-4). The two FLF models with BT care showed different survival curves in the dose-dependent survival study. Conclusion Azoxymethane can provide a good FLF model, but requires a specialized environment and careful BT control. Other FLF models may also be useful, depending on research purpose. Thoughtful attention to caregiving and close observation are indispensable for successful FLF models. PMID:24713795

  10. Blockade of Tim-3 Pathway Ameliorates Interferon-γ Production from Hepatic CD8+ T Cells in a Mouse Model of Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Ying; Hou, Nan; Zhang, Xiaoning; Zhao, Di; Liu, Ying; Wang, Jinjin; Luan, Fang; Shi, Wei; Zhu, Faliang; Sun, Wensheng; Zhang, Lining; Gao, Chengjiang; Gao, Lifen; Liang, Xiaohong; Ma, Chunhong

    2009-01-01

    T cell immunoglobulin- and mucin-domain-containing molecule-3 (Tim-3) has been reported to participate in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. However, whether Tim-3 is involved in hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains unknown. Here, we studied the expression and function of Tim-3 in a hydrodynamics-based mouse model of HBV infection. A significant increase of Tim-3 expression on hepatic T lymphocytes, especially on CD8+ T cells, was demonstrated in HBV model mice from day 7 to day 18. After Tim-3 knockdown by specific shRNAs, significantly increased IFN-γ production from hepatic CD8+ T cells in HBV model mice was observed. Very interestingly, we found Tim-3 expression on CD8+ T cells was higher in HBV model mice with higher serum anti-HBs production. Moreover, Tim-3 knockdown influenced anti-HBs production in vivo. Collectively, our data suggested that Tim-3 might act as a potent regulator of antiviral T-cell responses in HBV infection. PMID:19254478

  11. An overview of animal models for investigating the pathogenesis and therapeutic strategies in acute hepatic failure

    PubMed Central

    Tuñón, María Jesús; Alvarez, Marcelino; Culebras, Jesús M; González-Gallego, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Acute hepatic failure (AHF) is a severe liver injury accompanied by hepatic encephalopathy which causes multiorgan failure with an extremely high mortality rate, even if intensive care is provided. Management of severe AHF continues to be one of the most challenging problems in clinical medicine. Liver transplantation has been shown to be the most effective therapy, but the procedure is limited by shortage of donor organs. Although a number of clinical trials testing different liver assist devices are under way, these systems alone have no significant effect on patient survival and are only regarded as a useful approach to bridge patients with AHF to liver transplantation. As a result, reproducible experimental animal models resembling the clinical conditions are still needed. The three main approaches used to create an animal model for AHF are: surgical procedures, toxic liver injury and infective procedures. Most common models are based on surgical techniques (total/partial hepatectomy, complete/transient devascularization) or the use of hepatotoxic drugs (acetaminophen, galactosamine, thioacetamide, and others), and very few satisfactory viral models are available. We have recently developed a viral model of AHF by means of the inoculation of rabbits with the virus of rabbit hemorrhagic disease. This model displays biochemical and histological characteristics, and clinical features that resemble those in human AHF. In the present article an overview is given of the most widely used animal models of AHF, and their main advantages and disadvantages are reviewed. PMID:19575487

  12. History, ethics, advantages and limitations of experimental models for hepatic ablation

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Seok Ling; Gravante, Gianpiero; Metcalfe, Matthew S; Dennison, Ashley R

    2013-01-01

    Numerous techniques developed in medicine require careful evaluation to determine their indications, limitations and potential side effects prior to their clinical use. At present this generally involves the use of animal models which is undesirable from an ethical standpoint, requires complex and time-consuming authorization, and is very expensive. This process is exemplified in the development of hepatic ablation techniques, starting experiments on explanted livers and progressing to safety and efficacy studies in living animals prior to clinical studies. The two main approaches used are ex vivo isolated non-perfused liver models and in vivo animal models. Ex vivo non perfused models are less expensive, easier to obtain but not suitable to study the heat sink effect or experiments requiring several hours. In vivo animal models closely resemble clinical subjects but often are expensive and have small sample sizes due to ethical guidelines. Isolated perfused ex vivo liver models have been used to study drug toxicity, liver failure, organ transplantation and hepatic ablation and combine advantages of both previous models. PMID:23345935

  13. Model-Based Evaluation of Higher Doses of Rifampin Using a Semimechanistic Model Incorporating Autoinduction and Saturation of Hepatic Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Chirehwa, Maxwell T.; Rustomjee, Roxana; Mthiyane, Thuli; Onyebujoh, Philip; Smith, Peter; McIlleron, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Rifampin is a key sterilizing drug in the treatment of tuberculosis (TB). It induces its own metabolism, but neither the onset nor the extent of autoinduction has been adequately described. Currently, the World Health Organization recommends a rifampin dose of 8 to 12 mg/kg of body weight, which is believed to be suboptimal, and higher doses may potentially improve treatment outcomes. However, a nonlinear increase in exposure may be observed because of saturation of hepatic extraction and hence this should be taken into consideration when a dose increase is implemented. Intensive pharmacokinetic (PK) data from 61 HIV-TB-coinfected patients in South Africa were collected at four visits, on days 1, 8, 15, and 29, after initiation of treatment. Data were analyzed by population nonlinear mixed-effects modeling. Rifampin PKs were best described by using a transit compartment absorption and a well-stirred liver model with saturation of hepatic extraction, including a first-pass effect. Autoinduction was characterized by using an exponential-maturation model: hepatic clearance almost doubled from the baseline to steady state, with a half-life of around 4.5 days. The model predicts that increases in the dose of rifampin result in more-than-linear drug exposure increases as measured by the 24-h area under the concentration-time curve. Simulations with doses of up to 35 mg/kg produced results closely in line with those of clinical trials. PMID:26552972

  14. Modeling hepatitis C virus kinetics under therapy using pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic information

    SciTech Connect

    Perelson, Alan S; Shudo, Emi; Ribeiro, Ruy M

    2008-01-01

    Mathematical models have proven helpful in analyzing the virological response to antiviral therapy in hepatitis C virus (HCY) infected subjects. Objective: To summarize the uses and limitations of different models for analyzing HCY kinetic data under pegylated interferon therapy. Methods: We formulate mathematical models and fit them by nonlinear least square regression to patient data in order estimate model parameters. We compare the goodness of fit and parameter values estimated by different models statistically. Results/Conclusion: The best model for parameter estimation depends on the availability and the quality of data as well as the therapy used. We also discuss the mathematical models that will be needed to analyze HCV kinetic data from clinical trials with new antiviral drugs.

  15. Modelling hepatitis C therapy—predicting effects of treatment

    DOE PAGES

    Perelson, Alan S.; Guedj, Jeremie

    2015-06-30

    Mathematically modelling changes in HCV RNA levels measured in patients who receive antiviral therapy has yielded many insights into the pathogenesis and effects of treatment on the virus. By determining how rapidly HCV is cleared when viral replication is interrupted by a therapy, one can deduce how rapidly the virus is produced in patients before treatment. This knowledge, coupled with estimates of the HCV mutation rate, enables one to estimate the frequency with which drug resistant variants arise. Modelling HCV also permits the deduction of the effectiveness of an antiviral agent at blocking HCV replication from the magnitude of themore » initial viral decline. One can also estimate the lifespan of an HCV-infected cell from the slope of the subsequent viral decline and determine the duration of therapy needed to cure infection. The original understanding of HCV RNA decline under interferon-based therapies obtained by modelling needed to be revised in order to interpret the HCV RNA decline kinetics seen when using direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs). In addition, there also exist unresolved issues involving understanding therapies with combinations of DAAs, such as the presence of detectable HCV RNA at the end of therapy in patients who nonetheless have a sustained virologic response.« less

  16. Modelling hepatitis C therapy—predicting effects of treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Perelson, Alan S.; Guedj, Jeremie

    2015-06-30

    Mathematically modelling changes in HCV RNA levels measured in patients who receive antiviral therapy has yielded many insights into the pathogenesis and effects of treatment on the virus. By determining how rapidly HCV is cleared when viral replication is interrupted by a therapy, one can deduce how rapidly the virus is produced in patients before treatment. This knowledge, coupled with estimates of the HCV mutation rate, enables one to estimate the frequency with which drug resistant variants arise. Modelling HCV also permits the deduction of the effectiveness of an antiviral agent at blocking HCV replication from the magnitude of the initial viral decline. One can also estimate the lifespan of an HCV-infected cell from the slope of the subsequent viral decline and determine the duration of therapy needed to cure infection. The original understanding of HCV RNA decline under interferon-based therapies obtained by modelling needed to be revised in order to interpret the HCV RNA decline kinetics seen when using direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs). In addition, there also exist unresolved issues involving understanding therapies with combinations of DAAs, such as the presence of detectable HCV RNA at the end of therapy in patients who nonetheless have a sustained virologic response.

  17. Methodological quality of economic modelling studies. A case study with hepatitis B vaccines.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, T; Demicheli, V

    1998-09-01

    The notable increase in the quantity of economic evaluations in the last 2 decades has not been matched by good methodological standards. This problem is particularly evident in the field of economic evaluations of hepatitis B vaccines. The results of 2 systematic reviews conducted by us in 1993 and 1996 showed three problem areas. A sizeable minority of study reports failed to provide a clear study aim, showing a basic ignorance of the first rule of conducting scientific research. The basic epidemiological assumptions upon which the economic models were based showed variability which persisted even after stratification, raising the question of the accuracy of the epidemiological knowledge base of hepatitis B infection and its progression. Lastly, many of the studies showed weaknesses in basic methods of conducting and reporting economic evaluations. Examination of these problem areas led us to conclude that no conclusions about the efficiency of hepatitis B vaccines could be drawn from the available evidence. Addressing the problem of poor methodological standards concerns the whole research community. However, as a proportion of economic evaluations are published, one obvious means of exerting pressure to increase and maintain methodological standards is the editorial and peer review process. Editors of specialist and general medical journals should agree on and enforce common explicit guidelines for study conduct and reporting, following the example of the British Medical Journal.

  18. The hepatic role in carcinogenesis and its early detection--the vinyl chloride model.

    PubMed

    Tamburro, C H

    1978-01-01

    The liver's role in vinyl chloride toxicity and carcinogenicity is providing a better understanding of the chemical carcinogenesis mechanism. A variety of both malignant and benign hepatic tumors has been demonstrated with prolonged exposure to vinyl chloride. The multi-system involvment of this carcinogen and toxin has provided a model for the study of chemical carcinogenesis common to both man and animal. Clinical studies have shown the usefulness of biochemical, radioisotopic, and radiological studies in the detection of toxic and carcinogenic lesions. Animal studies have demonstrated the biochemical metabolism by the liver of vinyl chloride-produced intermediates which are mutagenic in bacterial systems and may be the ultimate carcinogens. Hepatic subcellular enzyme studies prove preliminary evidence of cellular adaptation and increased detoxification. Disruption of this oxidization and detoxification balance may be the key to the malignant transformation of cells. A working hypothesis is presented which may explain the metabolism of vinyl chloride into mutagenic intermediates by the liver cell and the development of malignant transformation by extra hepatic sinusoidal lining cells, lung cells, and brain tissue.

  19. (18)F-FBHGal for asialoglycoprotein receptor imaging in a hepatic fibrosis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kao, Hao-Wen; Chen, Chuan-Lin; Chang, Wen-Yi; Chen, Jenn-Tzong; Lin, Wuu-Jyh; Liu, Ren-Shyan; Wang, Hsin-Ell

    2013-02-15

    Quantification of the expression of asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR), which is located on the hepatocyte membrane with high-affinity for galactose residues, can help assess ASGPR-related liver diseases. A hepatic fibrosis mouse model with lower asialoglycoprotein receptor expression was established by dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) administration. This study developed and demonstrated that 4-(18)F-fluoro-N-(6-((3,4,5-trihydroxy-6-(hydroxymethyl)tetrahydro-2H-pyran-2-yl)oxy)hexyl)benzamide ((18)F-FBHGal), a new (18)F-labeled monovalent galactose derivative, is an asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR)-specific PET probe in a normal and a hepatic fibrosis mouse models. Immunoassay exhibited a linear correlation between the accumulation of GalH-FITC, a fluorescent surrogate of FBHGal, and the amount of ASGPR. A significant reduction in HepG2 cellular uptake (P <0.0001) was observed using confocal microscopy when co-incubated with 0.5μM of asialofetuin, a well known ASGPR blocking agent. Animal studies showed the accumulation of (18)F-FBHGal in fibrosis liver (14.84±1.10 %ID/g) was appreciably decreased compared with that in normal liver (20.50±1.51 %ID/g, P <0.01) at 30min post-injection. The receptor indexes (liver/liver-plus-heart ratio at 30min post-injection) of hepatic fibrosis mice derived from both microPET imaging and biodistribution study were significantly lower (P <0.01) than those of normal mice. The pharmacokinetic parameters (T(1/2)α, T(1/2)β, AUC and Cl) derived from microPET images revealed prolonged systemic circulation of (18)F-FBHGal in hepatic fibrosis mice compared to that in normal mice. The findings in biological characterizations suggest that (18)F-FBHGal is a feasible agent for PET imaging of hepatic fibrosis in mice and may provide new insights into ASGPR-related liver dysfunction.

  20. Transposon mouse models to elucidate the genetic mechanisms of hepatitis B viral induced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Amy P; Tschida, Barbara R; Lo, Lilian H; Moriarity, Branden S; Rowlands, Dewi K; Largaespada, David A; Keng, Vincent W

    2015-01-01

    The major type of human liver cancer is hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and there are currently many risk factors that contribute to this deadly disease. The majority of HCC occurrences are associated with chronic hepatitis viral infection, and hepatitis B viral (HBV) infection is currently a major health problem in Eastern Asia. Elucidating the genetic mechanisms associated with HBV-induced HCC has been difficult due to the heterogeneity and genetic complexity associated with this disease. A repertoire of animal models has been broadly used to study the pathophysiology and to develop potential treatment regimens for HBV-associated HCC. The use of these animal models has provided valuable genetic information and has been an important contributor to uncovering the factors involved in liver malignant transformation, invasion and metastasis. Recently, transposon-based mouse models are becoming more widely used in liver cancer research to interrogate the genome by forward genetics and also used to validate genes rapidly in a reverse genetic manner. Importantly, these transposon-based rapid reverse genetic mouse models could become crucial in testing potential therapeutic agents before proceeding to clinical trials in human. Therefore, this review will cover the use of transposon-based mouse models to address the problems of liver cancer, especially HBV-associated HCC occurrences in Asia. PMID:26576100

  1. Generation of a murine hepatic angiosarcoma cell line and reproducible mouse tumor model.

    PubMed

    Rothweiler, Sonja; Dill, Michael T; Terracciano, Luigi; Makowska, Zuzanna; Quagliata, Luca; Hlushchuk, Ruslan; Djonov, Valentin; Heim, Markus H; Semela, David

    2015-03-01

    Hepatic angiosarcoma (AS) is a rare and highly aggressive tumor of endothelial origin with dismal prognosis. Studies of the molecular biology of AS and treatment options are limited as animal models are rare. We have previously shown that inducible knockout of Notch1 in mice leads to spontaneous formation of hepatic AS. The aims of this study were to: (1) establish and characterize a cell line derived from this murine AS, (2) identify molecular pathways involved in the pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targets, and (3) generate a tumor transplantation model. AS cells retained specific endothelial properties such as tube formation activity, as well as expression of CD31 and Von Willebrand factor. However, electron microscopy analysis revealed signs of dedifferentiation with loss of fenestrae and loss of contact inhibition. Microarray and pathway analysis showed substantial changes in gene expression and revealed activation of the Myc pathway. Exposing the AS cells to sorafenib reduced migration, filopodia dynamics, and cell proliferation but did not induce apoptosis. In addition, sorafenib suppressed ERK phosphorylation and expression of cyclin D2. Injection of AS cells into NOD/SCID mice resulted in formation of undifferentiated tumors, confirming the tumorigenic potential of these cells. In summary, we established and characterized a murine model of spontaneous AS formation and hepatic AS cell lines as a useful in vitro tool. Our data demonstrate antitumor activity of sorafenib in AS cells with potent inhibition of migration, filopodia formation, and cell proliferation, supporting further evaluation of sorafenib as a novel treatment strategy. In addition, AS cell transplantation provides a subcutaneous tumor model useful for in vivo preclinical drug testing.

  2. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Public Home » For Veterans and the Public Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... the Public Veterans and Public Home How is Hepatitis C Treated? Find the facts about the newest ...

  3. Autoimmune Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cholangitis Wilson Disease Liver Disease A-Z Autoimmune Hepatitis What is autoimmune hepatitis? Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic—or long lasting— ... bacteria, viruses, toxins, and medications. What causes autoimmune hepatitis? A combination of autoimmunity, environmental triggers, and a ...

  4. Effect of Green Tea Extract Encapsulated Into Chitosan Nanoparticles on Hepatic Fibrosis Collagen Fibers Assessed by Atomic Force Microscopy in Rat Hepatic Fibrosis Model.

    PubMed

    Safer, Abdel-Majeed A; Hanafy, Nomany A; Bharali, Dhruba J; Cui, Huadong; Mousa, Shaker A

    2015-09-01

    The present study examined the effect of Green Tea Extract (GTE) encapsulated into Chitosan Nanoparticles (CS-NPs) on hepatic fibrosis in rat model as determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The bioactive compounds in GTE encapsulated into CS-NPs were determined using LC-MS/MS method. Additionally, the uptake of GTE-CS NPs in HepG2 cells showed enhanced uptake. In experimental fibrosis model, AFM was used as a high resolution microscopic tool to investigate collagen fibers as an indicator of hepatic fibrosis induced by treatment with CCl4. Paraffin sections of fibrotic liver tissues caused by CC4 treatment of rats and the effect of GTE-CS NPs treatment with or without CCl4 on hepatic fibrosis were examined. Liver tissues from the different groups of animals were de-waxed and processed as for normal H/E staining and Masson's trichrome staining to locate the proper area of ECM collagen in the CCl4 group versus collagen in liver tissues treated with the GTE-CS NPs with or without CCl4. Selected areas of paraffin sections were trimmed off and fixed flat on top of mica and inserted in the AFM stage. H/E staining, Masson's trichrome stained slides, and AFM images revealed that collagen fibers of 250 to 300 nm widths were abundant in the fibrotic liver samples while those of GTE-CS NPs were clear as in the control group. Data confirmed the hypothesis that GTE-CS NPs are effective in removing all the extracellular collagen caused by CCl4 in the hepatic fibrosis rat liver.

  5. The woodchuck as an animal model for pathogenesis and therapy of chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Menne, Stephan; Cote, Paul J

    2007-01-07

    This review describes the woodchuck and the woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) as an animal model for pathogenesis and therapy of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and disease in humans. The establishment of woodchuck breeding colonies, and use of laboratory-reared woodchucks infected with defined WHV inocula, have enhanced our understanding of the virology and immunology of HBV infection and disease pathogenesis, including major sequelae like chronic hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The role of persistent WHV infection and of viral load on the natural history of infection and disease progression has been firmly established along the way. More recently, the model has shed new light on the role of host immune responses in these natural processes, and on how the immune system of the chronic carrier can be manipulated therapeutically to reduce or delay serious disease sequelae through induction of the recovery phenotype. The woodchuck is an outbred species and is not well defined immunologically due to a limitation of available host markers. However, the recent development of several key host response assays for woodchucks provides experimental opportunities for further mechanistic studies of outcome predictors in neonatal- and adult-acquired infections. Understanding the virological and immunological mechanisms responsible for resolution of self-limited infection, and for the onset and maintenance of chronic infection, will greatly facilitate the development of successful strategies for the therapeutic eradication of established chronic HBV infection. Likewise, the results of drug efficacy and toxicity studies in the chronic carrier woodchucks are predictive for responses of patients chronically infected with HBV. Therefore, chronic WHV carrier woodchucks provide a well-characterized mammalian model for preclinical evaluation of the safety and efficacy of drug candidates, experimental therapeutic vaccines, and immunomodulators for the treatment and

  6. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... with hepatitis? How does a pregnant woman pass hepatitis B virus to her baby? If I have hepatitis B, what does my baby need so that she ... Can I breastfeed my baby if I have hepatitis B? More information on viral hepatitis What is hepatitis? ...

  7. A review of the long-term protection after hepatitis A and B vaccination.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, Pierre; Van Herck, Koen

    2007-03-01

    on early projections of observed antibody levels. However, recent follow-up studies with up to 12 year observation, as well as studies employing mathematical models predict that following primary vaccination, antibodies will persist for at least 25 years. In addition, experimental studies confirm that vaccination against hepatitis A induces immunological memory. Therefore hepatitis A booster vaccination is presently considered as unnecessary in fully vaccinated individuals. The above findings are of importance in the context of administering combined hepatitis A and B vaccine for which similar long-term data have been observed. All available data on monovalent and combined hepatitis A and hepatitis B vaccines indicates that there is no support for a hepatitis A or hepatitis B booster when a complete primary vaccination course is offered to immunocompetent individuals.

  8. Statewide hepatitis C model of care for rural and remote regions.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wendy; Nazareth, Saroj; Flexman, James Patrick

    2015-03-01

    The evolution of management of hepatitis C virus (HCV) has seen a majority of patients treated being regarded as cured. Despite this development, uptake of treatment remains low in Australia, and this is particularly true in rural and remote areas. The largest state in Australia, Western Australia (WA), covers an area of 2500 km(2). As the rural and remote population of WA is scattered in small areas rather than major centers, poor accessibility to remote areas and lack of adequate of medical and nursing resources pose major problems in providing equity of care to patients with chronic HCV. A statewide hepatitis model of care, established in 2009, has led to an increase in identification and treatment of patients living with HCV. Strategies used to facilitate these changes include telehealth, a nurse practitioner model, and general practitioner shared-care model. The statewide program will be modified to meet the changing needs of patients as all-oral treatment regimens become available, with further emphasis being placed on the role of rural and remote health professionals in identifying patients with HCV and initiating and monitoring treatment.

  9. Modeling hepatic insulin sensitivity during a meal: validation against the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp.

    PubMed

    Dalla Man, Chiara; Piccinini, Francesca; Basu, Rita; Basu, Ananda; Rizza, Robert A; Cobelli, Claudio

    2013-04-15

    Recently, we proposed a model describing the suppression of endogenous glucose production (EGP) during a meal. It assumes that EGP suppression depends on glucose concentration and its rate of change and on delayed insulin action. Hepatic insulin sensitivity (S(I)(Lmeal)) can be derived from EGP model parameters. This model was shown to adequately describe EGP profiles measured with multiple tracer techniques; however, S(I)(Lmeal) has never been compared directly with its euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp counterpart (S(I)(Lclamp)). To do so, 62 subjects with different degrees of glucose tolerance underwent a triple-tracer mixed meal. Fifty-seven subjects also underwent a labeled ([3-(3)H]glucose) euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp. From the triple-tracer meal data, virtually model-independent estimates of EGP were obtained using the tracer-to-tracee clamp technique, and the EGP model was identified in each subject. Model fit was satisfactory, and S(I)(Lmeal) was estimated with good precision. Correlation between S(I)(Lclamp) and S(I)(Lmeal) was good (r = 0.72, P < 0.001); however, S(I)(Lmeal) was lower than S(I)(Lclamp) (4.60 ± 0.64 vs. 8.73 ± 1.07 10(-4) dl·kg(-1)·min(-1) per μU/ml, P < 0.01). This difference may be due to different ranges of insulin explored during the two tests (ΔI(clamp) = 15.60 ± 1.61 vs. ΔI(meal)= 83.37 ± 10.71 μU/ml) as well as steady- vs. non-steady-state glucose and insulin profiles. In conclusion, the new EGP model provides an estimate of hepatic insulin sensitivity during a meal that is in good agreement with that derived in the same individuals with a hyperinsulinemic clamp. When used in conjunction with the minimal model, the approach potentially enables estimation of hepatic insulin sensitivity from a single-tracer labeled meal or oral glucose tolerance test.

  10. New models of hepatitis E virus replication in human and porcine hepatocyte cell lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) causes acute, enterically-transmitted hepatitis. It is associated with large epidemics in tropical and subtropical regions where it is endemic or with sporadic cases in non-endemic regions. Unlike other hepatitis viruses, HEV has several animal reservoirs. Phylogenetic studie...

  11. Cell Culture Models for the Investigation of Hepatitis B and D Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Verrier, Eloi R.; Colpitts, Che C.; Schuster, Catherine; Zeisel, Mirjam B.; Baumert, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis D virus (HDV) infections are major causes of liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide. Despite the presence of an efficient preventive vaccine, more than 250 million patients are chronically infected with HBV. Current antivirals effectively control but only rarely cure chronic infection. While the molecular biology of the two viruses has been characterized in great detail, the absence of robust cell culture models for HBV and/or HDV infection has limited the investigation of virus-host interactions. Native hepatoma cell lines do not allow viral infection, and the culture of primary hepatocytes, the natural host cell for the viruses, implies a series of constraints restricting the possibilities of analyzing virus-host interactions. Recently, the discovery of the sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP) as a key HBV/HDV cell entry factor has opened the door to a new era of investigation, as NTCP-overexpressing hepatoma cells acquire susceptibility to HBV and HDV infections. In this review, we summarize the major cell culture models for HBV and HDV infection, discuss their advantages and limitations and highlight perspectives for future developments. PMID:27657111

  12. Dynamic analysis of a hepatitis B model with three-age-classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Suxia; Zhou, Yicang

    2014-07-01

    Based on the fact that the likelihood of becoming chronically infected is dependent on age at primary infection Kane (1995) [2], Edmunds et al. (1993) [3], Medley et al. (2001) [4], and Ganem and Prince (2004) [6], we formulate a hepatitis B transmission model with three age classes. The reproduction number, R0 is defined and the dynamical behavior of the model is analyzed. It is proved that the disease-free equilibrium is globally stable if R0<1, and there exists at least one endemic equilibrium and that the disease is uniformly persistent if R0>1. The unique endemic equilibrium and its global stability is obtained in a special case. Simulations are also conducted to compare the dynamical behavior of the model with and without age classes.

  13. UNFEASIBLE EXPERIMENTAL MODEL OF NORMOTHERMIC HEPATIC ISCHEMIA AND REPERFUSION IN RATS USING THE PRINGLE MANEUVER

    PubMed Central

    GOMES, Helbert Minuncio Pereira; SERIGIOLLE, Leonardo Carvalho; RODRIGUES, Daren Athiê Boy; LOPES, Carolina Marques; STUDART, Sarah do Valle; LEME, Pedro Luiz Squilacci

    2014-01-01

    Background The negative result of a research does not always indicate failure, and when the data do not permit a proper conclusion, or are contrary to the initial project, should not simply be discarded and archived. Aim To report failure after performing experimental model of liver ischemia and reperfusion normothermic, continuous or intermittent, in small animals aiming at the study of biochemical and histological parameters after postoperative recovery. Methods Fifteen Wistar rats were divided into three groups of five animals each; all underwent surgery, the abdomen was sutured after the proposed procedures for each group and the animals were observed for 6 h or until they died, and then were reoperated. In Group 1, control (sham-operated): dissection of the hepatic hilum was performed; in Group 2: clamping of the hepatic hilum for 30 m; in Group 3: clamping of the hepatic hilum for 15 m, reperfusion for 5 m and another 15 m of clamping. Data from Groups 2 and 3 were compared with Student's t test. Results All animals of Group 1 survived for 6 h. Two animals in Group 2 died before the 6 h needed to validate the experiment; two did not recover from anesthesia and one survived until the end. In Group 3, four animals died before the 6 h established and one of them survived the required time. Only one animal in Group 2 and one in Group 3 survived and were able to accomplish the study. There was no statistical significance when the results of Groups 2 and 3 were compared (p>0.05). Conclusion The death of six animals before the necessary period of observation turned the initial proposal of the experiment unfeasible. PMID:25184771

  14. Modelling the Impact of Cell-To-Cell Transmission in Hepatitis B Virus

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cell-free virus is a well-recognized and efficient mechanism for the spread of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in the liver. Cell-to-cell transmission (CCT) can be a more efficient means of virus propagation. Despite experimental evidence implying CCT occurs in HBV, its relative impact is uncertain. We develop a 3-D agent-based model where each hepatocyte changes its viral state according to a dynamical process driven by cell-free virus infection, CCT and intracellular replication. We determine the relative importance of CCT in the development and resolution of acute HBV infection in the presence of cytolytic (CTL) and non-CTL mechanisms. T cell clearance number is defined as the minimum number of infected cells needed to be killed by each T cell at peak infection that results in infection clearance within 12 weeks with hepatocyte turnover (HT, number of equivalent livers) ≤3. We find that CCT has very little impact on the establishment of infection as the mean cccDNA copies/cell remains between 15 to 20 at the peak of the infection regardless of CCT strength. In contrast, CCT inhibit immune-mediated clearance of acute HBV infection as higher CCT strength requires higher T cell clearance number and increases the probability of T cell exhaustion. An effective non-CTL inhibition can counter these negative effects of higher strengths of CCT by supporting rapid, efficient viral clearance and with little liver destruction. This is evident as the T cell clearance number drops by approximately 50% when non-CTL inhibition is increased from 10% to 80%. Higher CCT strength also increases the probability of the incidence of fulminant hepatitis with this phenomenon being unlikely to arise for no CCT. In conclusion, we report the possibility of CCT impacting HBV clearance and its contribution to fulminant hepatitis. PMID:27560827

  15. Hepatic drug metabolizing profile of Flinders Sensitive Line rat model of depression.

    PubMed

    Kotsovolou, Olga; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Lang, Matti A; Marselos, Marios; Overstreet, David H; Papadopoulou-Daifoti, Zoi; Johanson, Inger; Fotopoulos, Andrew; Konstandi, Maria

    2010-08-16

    The Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rat model of depression exhibits some behavioral, neurochemical, and pharmacological features that have been reported in depressed patients and has been very effective in screening antidepressants. Major factor that determines the effectiveness and toxicity of a drug is the drug metabolizing capacity of the liver. Therefore, in order to discriminate possible differentiation in the hepatic drug metabolism between FSL rats and Sprague-Dawley (SD) controls, their hepatic metabolic profile was investigated in this study. The data showed decreased glutathione (GSH) content and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and lower expression of certain major CYP enzymes, including the CYP2B1, CYP2C11 and CYP2D1 in FSL rats compared to SD controls. In contrast, p-nitrophenol hydroxylase (PNP), 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase (EROD) and 16alpha-testosterone hydroxylase activities were higher in FSL rats. Interestingly, the wide spread environmental pollutant benzo(alpha)pyrene (B(alpha)P) induced CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2B1/2 and ALDH3c at a lesser extend in FSL than in SD rats, whereas the antidepressant mirtazapine (MIRT) up-regulated CYP1A1/2, CYP2C11, CYP2D1, CYP2E1 and CYP3A1/2, mainly, in FSL rats. The drug also further increased ALDH3c whereas suppressed GSH content in B(alpha)P-exposed FSL rats. In conclusion, several key enzymes of the hepatic biotransformation machinery are differentially expressed in FSL than in SD rats, a condition that may influence the outcome of drug therapy. The MIRT-induced up-regulation of several drug-metabolizing enzymes indicates the critical role of antidepressant treatment that should be always taken into account in the designing of treatment and interpretation of insufficient pharmacotherapy or drug toxicity.

  16. Deterministically patterned biomimetic human iPSC-derived hepatic model via rapid 3D bioprinting.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xuanyi; Qu, Xin; Zhu, Wei; Li, Yi-Shuan; Yuan, Suli; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Justin; Wang, Pengrui; Lai, Cheuk Sun Edwin; Zanella, Fabian; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Sheikh, Farah; Chien, Shu; Chen, Shaochen

    2016-02-23

    The functional maturation and preservation of hepatic cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are essential to personalized in vitro drug screening and disease study. Major liver functions are tightly linked to the 3D assembly of hepatocytes, with the supporting cell types from both endodermal and mesodermal origins in a hexagonal lobule unit. Although there are many reports on functional 2D cell differentiation, few studies have demonstrated the in vitro maturation of hiPSC-derived hepatic progenitor cells (hiPSC-HPCs) in a 3D environment that depicts the physiologically relevant cell combination and microarchitecture. The application of rapid, digital 3D bioprinting to tissue engineering has allowed 3D patterning of multiple cell types in a predefined biomimetic manner. Here we present a 3D hydrogel-based triculture model that embeds hiPSC-HPCs with human umbilical vein endothelial cells and adipose-derived stem cells in a microscale hexagonal architecture. In comparison with 2D monolayer culture and a 3D HPC-only model, our 3D triculture model shows both phenotypic and functional enhancements in the hiPSC-HPCs over weeks of in vitro culture. Specifically, we find improved morphological organization, higher liver-specific gene expression levels, increased metabolic product secretion, and enhanced cytochrome P450 induction. The application of bioprinting technology in tissue engineering enables the development of a 3D biomimetic liver model that recapitulates the native liver module architecture and could be used for various applications such as early drug screening and disease modeling.

  17. Deterministically patterned biomimetic human iPSC-derived hepatic model via rapid 3D bioprinting

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xuanyi; Qu, Xin; Zhu, Wei; Li, Yi-Shuan; Yuan, Suli; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Justin; Wang, Pengrui; Lai, Cheuk Sun Edwin; Zanella, Fabian; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Sheikh, Farah; Chien, Shu; Chen, Shaochen

    2016-01-01

    The functional maturation and preservation of hepatic cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are essential to personalized in vitro drug screening and disease study. Major liver functions are tightly linked to the 3D assembly of hepatocytes, with the supporting cell types from both endodermal and mesodermal origins in a hexagonal lobule unit. Although there are many reports on functional 2D cell differentiation, few studies have demonstrated the in vitro maturation of hiPSC-derived hepatic progenitor cells (hiPSC-HPCs) in a 3D environment that depicts the physiologically relevant cell combination and microarchitecture. The application of rapid, digital 3D bioprinting to tissue engineering has allowed 3D patterning of multiple cell types in a predefined biomimetic manner. Here we present a 3D hydrogel-based triculture model that embeds hiPSC-HPCs with human umbilical vein endothelial cells and adipose-derived stem cells in a microscale hexagonal architecture. In comparison with 2D monolayer culture and a 3D HPC-only model, our 3D triculture model shows both phenotypic and functional enhancements in the hiPSC-HPCs over weeks of in vitro culture. Specifically, we find improved morphological organization, higher liver-specific gene expression levels, increased metabolic product secretion, and enhanced cytochrome P450 induction. The application of bioprinting technology in tissue engineering enables the development of a 3D biomimetic liver model that recapitulates the native liver module architecture and could be used for various applications such as early drug screening and disease modeling. PMID:26858399

  18. Modelling Hepatitis B Virus Antiviral Therapy and Drug Resistant Mutant Strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, Julie; Dix, Trevor; Allison, Lloyd; Bartholomeusz, Angeline; Yuen, Lilly

    Despite the existence of vaccines, the Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is still a serious global health concern. HBV targets liver cells. It has an unusual replication process involving an RNA pre-genome that the reverse transcriptase domain of the viral polymerase protein translates into viral DNA. The reverse transcription process is error prone and together with the high replication rates of the virus, allows the virus to exist as a heterogeneous population of mutants, known as a quasispecies, that can adapt and become resistant to antiviral therapy. This study presents an individual-based model of HBV inside an artificial liver, and associated blood serum, undergoing antiviral therapy. This model aims to provide insights into the evolution of the HBV quasispecies and the individual contribution of HBV mutations in the outcome of therapy.

  19. Decreasing mitochondrial fission alleviates hepatic steatosis in a murine model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Galloway, Chad A; Lee, Hakjoo; Brookes, Paul S; Yoon, Yisang

    2014-09-15

    Mitochondria produce the majority of cellular ATP through oxidative phosphorylation, and their capacity to do so is influenced by many factors. Mitochondrial morphology is recently suggested as an important contributor in controlling mitochondrial bioenergetics. Mitochondria divide and fuse continuously, which is affected by environmental factors, including metabolic alterations. Underscoring its bioenergetic influence, altered mitochondrial morphology is reported in tissues of patients and in animal models of metabolic dysfunction. In this study, we found that mitochondrial fission plays a vital role in the progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The development of hepatic steatosis, oxidative/nitrative stress, and hepatic tissue damage, induced by a high-fat diet, were alleviated in genetically manipulated mice suppressing mitochondrial fission. The alleviation of steatosis was recapitulated in primary hepatocytes with the inhibition of mitochondrial fission. Mechanistically, our study indicates that fission inhibition enhances proton leak under conditions of free fatty acid incubation, implicating bioenergetic change through manipulating mitochondrial fission. Taken together, our results suggest a mechanistic role for mitochondrial fission in the etiology of NAFLD. The efficacy of decreasing mitochondrial fission in the suppression of NAFLD suggests that mitochondrial fission represents a novel target for therapeutic treatment of NAFLD.

  20. IL-12-based vaccination therapy reverses liver-induced systemic tolerance in a mouse model of hepatitis B virus carrier.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhutian; Kong, Xiaohui; Li, Fenglei; Wei, Haiming; Sun, Rui; Tian, Zhigang

    2013-10-15

    Liver-induced systemic immune tolerance that occurs during chronic hepadnavirus infection is the biggest obstacle for effective viral clearance. Immunotherapeutic reversal of this tolerance is a promising strategy in the clinic but remains to be explored. In this study, using a hepatitis B virus (HBV)-carrier mouse model, we report that IL-12-based vaccination therapy can efficiently reverse systemic tolerance toward HBV. HBV-carrier mice lost responsiveness to hepatitis B surface Ag (HBsAg) vaccination, and IL-12 alone could not reverse this liver-induced immune tolerance. However, after IL-12-based vaccination therapy, the majority of treated mice became HBsAg(-) in serum; hepatitis B core Ag was also undetectable in hepatocytes. HBV clearance was dependent on HBsAg vaccine-induced anti-HBV immunity. Further results showed that IL-12-based vaccination therapy strongly enhanced hepatic HBV-specific CD8(+) T cell responses, including proliferation and IFN-γ secretion. Systemic HBV-specific CD4(+) T cell responses were also restored in HBV-carrier mice, leading to the arousal of HBsAg-specific follicular Th-germinal center B cell responses and anti-hepatitis B surface Ag Ab production. Recovery of HBsAg-specific responses also correlated with both reduced CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cell frequency and an enhanced capacity of effector T cells to overcome inhibition by regulatory T cells. In conclusion, IL-12-based vaccination therapy may reverse liver-induced immune tolerance toward HBV by restoring systemic HBV-specific CD4(+) T cell responses, eliciting robust hepatic HBV-specific CD8(+) T cell responses, and facilitating the generation of HBsAg-specific humoral immunity; thus, this therapy may become a viable approach to treating patients with chronic hepatitis B.

  1. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... your doctor may want you to get the hepatitis B vaccine (and maybe the hepatitis A vaccine, too), if you don't already have these viruses. If you have hepatitis C, you are more likely to catch hepatitis A or hepatitis B, which would cause more damage to your liver. ...

  2. Morphometric characterization of the human portal and hepatic venous trees: A quantitative support to the liver micro-anatomic models free of subunits.

    PubMed

    Almenar-Medina, Sergio; Palomar-De Lucas, Brenda; Guerrero-Albors, Ester; Ruiz-Sauri, Amparo

    2017-06-01

    Conventional models of liver microanatomy assume the presence of subunits. Nevertheless, some researchers propose that the liver is a continuous structure, free of these subunits, but with a characteristic vascular pattern. The present study describes a morphometric analysis of portal and hepatic veins in 50 human autopsy non-pathological liver samples. The main objective was to measure three proportions: 1. portal tracts / hepatic veins, 2. distributing portal veins / distributing hepatic veins and 3. terminal portal veins / terminal hepatic veins. These ratios were compared with the traditional microcirculatory liver models. Our material comprised 3,665 portal veins and 3,761 hepatic veins. The minimum diameter of half of the venous vessels of both types belongs to the interval (25μm , 60μm), given that 1881 portal veins (49.434%) and 1924 hepatic veins (50.565%) fall within this interval. We have statistically shown with the χ² test (α=0.990) that the portal and hepatic veins belonging to the interval (25μm , 400μm) (distributing veins) had an identical proportion. If the portal and hepatic veins are arranged according to the principle of interdigitation of Takashasi (1970), there should be an almost identical number of both types of veins. Our results contradict the presumably numeric preponderance of distributing portal veins with regard to the distributing hepatic veins that is inherent in the models of Kiernan, Matsumoto and Rappaport.

  3. Computational model of hepatitis B virus DNA polymerase: Molecular dynamics and docking to understand resistant mutations

    PubMed Central

    Daga, Pankaj R; Duan, Jinsong; Doerksen, Robert J

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA polymerase (HDP) is a pharmacological target of intense interest. Of the seven agents approved in USA for the treatment of HBV infections, five are HDP inhibitors. However, resistance development against HDP inhibitors, such as lamivudine and adefovir, has severely hurt their efficacy to treat HBV. As a step toward understanding the mechanism of resistance development and for gaining detailed insights about the active site of the enzyme, we have built a homology model of HDP which is an advance over previously reported ones. Validation using various techniques, including PROSTAT, PROCHECK, and Verify-3D profile, proved the model to be stereochemically significant. The stability of the model was studied using a 5 ns molecular dynamics simulation. The model was found to be sufficiently stable after the initial 2.5 ns with overall root mean squared deviation (RMSD) of 4.13 Å. The homology model matched the results of experimental mutation studies of HDP reported in the literature, including those of antiviral-resistant mutations. Our model suggests the significant role of conserved residues, such as rtLys32, in binding of the inhibitors, contrary to previous studies. The model provides an explanation for the inactivity of some anti-HIV molecules which are inactive against HDP. Conformational changes which occurred in certain binding pocket amino acids helped to explain the better binding of some of the inhibitors in comparison to the substrates. PMID:20162615

  4. AIC649 Induces a Bi-Phasic Treatment Response in the Woodchuck Model of Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, Daniela; Weber, Olaf; Ruebsamen-Schaeff, Helga; Tennant, Bud C.; Menne, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    AIC649 has been shown to directly address the antigen presenting cell arm of the host immune defense leading to a regulated cytokine release and activation of T cell responses. In the present study we analyzed the antiviral efficacy of AIC649 as well as its potential to induce functional cure in animal models for chronic hepatitis B. Hepatitis B virus transgenic mice and chronically woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) infected woodchucks were treated with AIC649, respectively. In the mouse system AIC649 decreased the hepatitis B virus titer as effective as the “gold standard”, Tenofovir. Interestingly, AIC649-treated chronically WHV infected woodchucks displayed a bi-phasic pattern of response: The marker for functional cure—hepatitis surface antigen—first increased but subsequently decreased even after cessation of treatment to significantly reduced levels. We hypothesize that the observed bi-phasic response pattern to AIC649 treatment reflects a physiologically “concerted”, reconstituted immune response against WHV and therefore may indicate a potential for inducing functional cure in HBV-infected patients. PMID:26656974

  5. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) potentiates autoimmune hepatitis in the CYP2D6 mouse model.

    PubMed

    Müller, Peter; Messmer, Marie; Bayer, Monika; Pfeilschifter, Josef M; Hintermann, Edith; Christen, Urs

    2016-05-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and its more severe development non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are increasing worldwide. In particular NASH, which is characterized by an active hepatic inflammation, has often severe consequences including progressive fibrosis, cirrhosis, and eventually hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here we investigated how metabolic liver injury is influencing the pathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). We used the CYP2D6 mouse model in which wild type C57BL/6 mice are infected with an Adenovirus expressing the major liver autoantigen cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6). Such mice display several features of human AIH, including interface hepatitis, formation of LKM-1 antibodies and CYP2D6-specific T cells, as well as hepatic fibrosis. NAFLD was induced with a high-fat diet (HFD). We found that pre-existing NAFLD potentiates the severity of AIH. Mice fed for 12 weeks with a HFD displayed increased cellular infiltration of the liver, enhanced hepatic fibrosis and elevated numbers of liver autoantigen-specific T cells. Our data suggest that a pre-existing metabolic liver injury constitutes an additional risk for the severity of an autoimmune condition of the liver, such as AIH.

  6. Application of a hybrid method combining grey model and back propagation artificial neural networks to forecast hepatitis B in china.

    PubMed

    Gan, Ruijing; Chen, Xiaojun; Yan, Yu; Huang, Daizheng

    2015-01-01

    Accurate incidence forecasting of infectious disease provides potentially valuable insights in its own right. It is critical for early prevention and may contribute to health services management and syndrome surveillance. This study investigates the use of a hybrid algorithm combining grey model (GM) and back propagation artificial neural networks (BP-ANN) to forecast hepatitis B in China based on the yearly numbers of hepatitis B and to evaluate the method's feasibility. The results showed that the proposal method has advantages over GM (1, 1) and GM (2, 1) in all the evaluation indexes.

  7. From whole body to cellular models of hepatic triglyceride metabolism: man has got to know his limitations

    PubMed Central

    Green, Charlotte J.; Pramfalk, Camilla; Morten, Karl J.

    2014-01-01

    The liver is a main metabolic organ in the human body and carries out a vital role in lipid metabolism. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common liver diseases, encompassing a spectrum of conditions from simple fatty liver (hepatic steatosis) through to cirrhosis. Although obesity is a known risk factor for hepatic steatosis, it remains unclear what factor(s) is/are responsible for the primary event leading to retention of intrahepatocellular fat. Studying hepatic processes and the etiology and progression of disease in vivo in humans is challenging, not least as NAFLD may take years to develop. We present here a review of experimental models and approaches that have been used to assess liver triglyceride metabolism and discuss their usefulness in helping to understand the aetiology and development of NAFLD. PMID:25352434

  8. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis C Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Hepatitis C is a viral infection that causes liver inflammation, sometimes leading to serious liver damage. The hepatitis C virus (HCV) spreads through contaminated ...

  9. Toxic Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Toxic hepatitis Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Toxic hepatitis is an inflammation of your liver in reaction to certain substances to which you're exposed. Toxic hepatitis can be caused by alcohol, chemicals, drugs or ...

  10. Use of labeled oral minimal model to measure hepatic insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Man, Chiara Dalla; Toffolo, Gianna; Basu, Rita; Rizza, Robert A; Cobelli, Claudio

    2008-11-01

    The ability to accurately quantify indexes of the individual role of glucose (GE(L)) and insulin (S(I)(L)) in the suppression of endogenous glucose production (EGP) would improve the understanding of liver metabolism. Measuring these indexes during an IVGTT by minimal modeling of tracer labeled and unlabeled glucose data is often unreliable, possibly due to an inadequate description of EGP included in the Minimal Model. Moreover, a validation of the assumptions of the Minimal Model on EGP data has never been done. Recently, Krudys et al. (Krudys KM, Dodds MG, Nissen SM, Vicini P. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 288: E1038-E1046, 2005) have proposed a PK/PD (pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic) model of the EGP profile that occurs during an intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT); however, this model has also not been validated. The aim of this study was thus to test the Minimal Model, the PK/PD model, and six alternative EGP descriptions on recent model-independent EGP data of 20 subjects obtained with a triple-tracer meal protocol. Model performance was compared in terms of data fit, precision of the estimated parameters, and physiological plausibility. Neither the PK/PD nor the traditional Minimal Model were able to accurately describe EGP data or provide reliable estimates of the indexes. In contrast, one of the new models performed best by showing a good fit and providing accurate and precise estimates of hepatic sensitivity indexes: GE(L) = 0.013 +/- 0.001 dl x kg(-1) x min(-1); S(I)(L) = 5.34 +/- 0.47 10(-4) dl x kg(-1) x min(-1) per microU/ml (42 and 34%, respectively, of total sensitivity indexes GE(TOT) and S(I)(TOT)). Although this model requires further validation, it has the potential to improve our understanding of the role of the liver in pathophysiological states.

  11. Multi-scale model for hepatitis C viral load kinetics under treatment with direct acting antivirals.

    PubMed

    Clausznitzer, Diana; Harnisch, Julia; Kaderali, Lars

    2016-06-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections are a global health problem, and extensive research over the last decades has been targeted at understanding its molecular biology and developing effective antiviral treatments. Recently, a number of potent direct acting antiviral drugs have been developed targeting specific processes in the viral life cycle. Here, we developed a mathematical multi-scale model of the within-host dynamics of HCV infection by integrating a standard model for viral infection with a detailed model of the viral replication cycle inside infected cells. We use this model to study patient time courses of viral load under treatment with daclatasvir, an inhibitor of the viral non-structural protein NS5A. Model analysis predicts that treatment efficacy can be increased by combining daclatasvir with dedicated viral polymerase inhibitors, corresponding to promising current strategies in drug development. Hence, our model presents a predictive tool for in silico simulations, which can be used to study and optimize direct acting antiviral drug treatment.

  12. Serological validation of an alveolar echinococcosis rat model with a single hepatic lesion

    PubMed Central

    YAMASHITA, Masamichi; IMAGAWA, Tomohiro; SAKO, Yasuhito; OKAMOTO, Munehiro; YANAGIDA, Tetsuya; OKAMOTO, Yoshiharu; TSUKA, Takeshi; OSAKI, Tomohiro; ITO, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Serology is important for the diagnosis and follow-up of human alveolar echinococcosis (AE). However, patient conditions are highly variable among those with AE, and antibody responses in serological follow-up have not been well-defined. We recently described a new AE rat model established by implantation of small AE tissue into a single arbitrary location in the liver; no metastasis and dissemination were observed. In the present study, we examined the serological characteristics in our rat model before and after surgical treatment. The results showed that antibody responses against crude antigens were increased at one month after transplantation and similar to those of other model animals. For the antigen Em18, antibody responses were slower in our rat model than in other animal models. After surgical resection, changes in antibody responses against Em18 were similar to those observed in human patients with AE. Because of the slow growth of lesions, establishment of a single hepatic lesion and patterns of antibody responses, our rat model may be useful for clarifying follow-up serodiagnoses in human AE and determining the mechanisms of multi-organ involvement by primary infection with oncospheres rather than metastasis. PMID:27890868

  13. Selective cytoprotective effect of histamine on doxorubicin-induced hepatic and cardiac toxicity in animal models

    PubMed Central

    Lamas, DJMartinel; Nicoud, MB; Sterle, HA; Carabajal, E; Tesan, F; Perazzo, JC; Cremaschi, GA; Rivera, ES; Medina, VA

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to evaluate the potential protective effect of histamine on Doxorubicin (Dox)-induced hepatic and cardiac toxicity in different rodent species and in a triple-negative breast tumor-bearing mice model. Male Sprague Dawley rats and Balb/c mice were divided into four groups: control (received saline), histamine (5 mg/kg for rats and 1 mg/kg for mice, daily subcutaneous injection starting 24 h before treatment with Dox), Dox (2 mg/kg, intraperitoneally injected three times a week for 2 weeks) and Dox+histamine (received both treatments). Tissue toxicity was evaluated by histopathological studies and oxidative stress and biochemical parameters. The combined effect of histamine and Dox was also investigated in vitro and in vivo in human MDA-MB-231 triple-negative breast cancer model. Heart and liver of Dox-treated animals displayed severe histological damage, loss of tissue weight, increased TBARS levels and DNA damage along with an augment in serum creatine kinase-myocardial band. Pretreatment with histamine prevented Dox-induced tissue events producing a significant preservation of the integrity of both rat and mouse myocardium and liver, through the reduction of Dox-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis. Histamine treatment preserved anti-tumor activity of Dox, exhibiting differential cytotoxicity and increasing the Dox-induced inhibition of breast tumor growth. Findings provide preclinical evidence indicating that histamine could be a promising candidate as a selective cytoprotective agent for the treatment of Dox-induced cardiac and hepatic toxicity, and encourage the translation to clinical practice. PMID:27551485

  14. Genistein Alleviates Neuroinflammation and Restores Cognitive Function in Rat Model of Hepatic Encephalopathy: Underlying Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ganai, Ajaz Ahmad; Husain, Mohammad

    2017-02-21

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric syndrome resulting from acute liver failure. Previously, we demonstrated hepatoprotective effects of genistein in D-galactosamine (D-GalN)-induced fulminant hepatic failure (FHF). In this study, we evaluated behavioural and neuroprotective effects of genistein in rat model of HE. HE was induced by intraperitonial administration of D-GalN (250 mg/kg BW) twice a week for 30 days Genistein was given as co-treatment through oral gavage daily at dose of 5 mg/kg BW. D-GalN administration significantly resulted in acute liver failure which was further associated with hyperammonemia, neurological dysfunction, as evident from behavioural and functional impairment and reduced learning ability in Morris water maze. Genistein significantly alleviated behavioural and functional impairment and restored learning ability in Morris water maze. Considerable histopathological changes, including portal inflammation, sinusoidal dilation, necrotic lesions and swelled astrocytes with pale nuclei, were seen in the liver and brain sections of D-GalN-challenged rats while genistein co-treated rats revealed normal cellular and morphological architecture as no pathological features were seen. Furthermore, pro-inflammatory markers (interleukin (IL)-10, IL-4, IL-1β and TNF-α) and membrane expression of subunits α1 of GABAA receptor and GluR2 of AMPA marked significant increase, while subunits GluR1 of AMPA receptors showed reduced expression in D-GalN-challenged rats leading to neuroinflammation and dysregulated neurotransmission. Genistein significantly normalized altered expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and membrane receptor of GABA and GluR. Our study suggests strong therapeutic potential of genistein in animal model of HE. Genistein can be used a strong anti-oxidant to attenuate neurotoxic effects of xenobiotics.

  15. Design evaluation and optimization for models of hepatitis C viral dynamics.

    PubMed

    Guedj, Jeremie; Bazzoli, Caroline; Neumann, Avidan U; Mentré, France

    2011-05-10

    Mathematical modeling of hepatitis C viral (HCV) kinetics is widely used for understanding viral pathogenesis and predicting treatment outcome. The standard model is based on a system of five non-linear ordinary differential equations (ODE) that describe both viral kinetics and changes in drug concentration after treatment initiation. In such complex models parameter estimation is challenging and requires frequent sampling measurements on each individual. By borrowing information between study subjects, non-linear mixed effect models can deal with sparser sampling from each individual. However, the search for optimal designs in this context has been limited by the numerical difficulty of evaluating the Fisher information matrix (FIM). Using the software PFIM, we show that a linearization of the statistical model avoids most of the computational burden, while providing a good approximation to the FIM. We then compare the precision of the parameters that can be expected using five study designs from the literature. We illustrate the usefulness of rationalizing data sampling by showing that, for a given level of precision, optimal design could reduce the total number of measurements by up 50 per cent. Our approach can be used by a statistician or a clinician aiming at designing an HCV viral kinetics study.

  16. Experimental in vitro and in vivo models for the study of human hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Allweiss, Lena; Dandri, Maura

    2016-04-01

    Chronic infection with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) affects an estimate of 240 million people worldwide despite the availability of a preventive vaccine. Medication to repress viral replication is available but a cure is rarely achieved. The narrow species and tissue tropism of the virus and the lack of reliable in vitro models and laboratory animals susceptible to HBV infection, have limited research progress in the past. As a result, several aspects of the HBV life cycle as well as the network of virus host interactions occurring during the infection are not yet understood. Only recently, the identification of the functional cellular receptor enabling HBV entry has opened new possibilities to establish innovative infection systems. Regarding the in vivo models of HBV infection, the classical reference was the chimpanzee. However, because of the strongly restricted use of great apes for HBV research, major efforts have focused on the development of mouse models of HBV replication and infection such as the generation of humanized mice. This review summarizes the animal and cell culture based models currently available for the study of HBV biology. We will discuss the benefits and caveats of each model and present a selection of the most important findings that have been retrieved from the respective systems.

  17. Zebrafish as a Potential Model Organism for Drug Test Against Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Cun-Bao; Zhang, Jing-Pu; Zhao, Ye; Peng, Zong-Gen; Song, Dan-Qing; Jiang, Jian-Dong

    2011-01-01

    Screening and evaluating anti- hepatitis C virus (HCV) drugs in vivo is difficult worldwide, mainly because of the lack of suitable small animal models. We investigate whether zebrafish could be a model organism for HCV replication. To achieve NS5B-dependent replication an HCV sub-replicon was designed and created with two vectors, one with HCV ns5b and fluorescent rfp genes, and the other containing HCV's 5′UTR, core, 3′UTR and fluorescent gfp genes. The vectors containing sub-replicons were co-injected into zebrafish zygotes. The sub-replicon amplified in liver showing a significant expression of HCV core RNA and protein. The sub-replicon amplification caused no abnormality in development and growth of zebrafish larvae, but induced gene expression change similar to that in human hepatocytes. As the amplified core fluorescence in live zebrafish was detectable microscopically, it rendered us an advantage to select those with replicating sub-replicon for drug experiments. Ribavirin and oxymatrine, two known anti-HCV drugs, inhibited sub-replicon amplification in this model showing reduced levels of HCV core RNA and protein. Technically, this method had a good reproducibility and is easy to operate. Thus, zebrafish might be a model organism to host HCV, and this zebrafish/HCV (sub-replicon) system could be an animal model for anti-HCV drug screening and evaluation. PMID:21857967

  18. Hepatic 3D spheroid models for the detection and study of compounds with cholestatic liability

    PubMed Central

    Hendriks, Delilah F. G.; Fredriksson Puigvert, Lisa; Messner, Simon; Mortiz, Wolfgang; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Drug-induced cholestasis (DIC) is poorly understood and its preclinical prediction is mainly limited to assessing the compound’s potential to inhibit the bile salt export pump (BSEP). Here, we evaluated two 3D spheroid models, one from primary human hepatocytes (PHH) and one from HepaRG cells, for the detection of compounds with cholestatic liability. By repeatedly co-exposing both models to a set of compounds with different mechanisms of hepatotoxicity and a non-toxic concentrated bile acid (BA) mixture for 8 days we observed a selective synergistic toxicity of compounds known to cause cholestatic or mixed cholestatic/hepatocellular toxicity and the BA mixture compared to exposure to the compounds alone, a phenomenon that was more pronounced after extending the exposure time to 14 days. In contrast, no such synergism was observed after both 8 and 14 days of exposure to the BA mixture for compounds that cause non-cholestatic hepatotoxicity. Mechanisms behind the toxicity of the cholestatic compound chlorpromazine were accurately detected in both spheroid models, including intracellular BA accumulation, inhibition of ABCB11 expression and disruption of the F-actin cytoskeleton. Furthermore, the observed synergistic toxicity of chlorpromazine and BA was associated with increased oxidative stress and modulation of death receptor signalling. Combined, our results demonstrate that the hepatic spheroid models presented here can be used to detect and study compounds with cholestatic liability. PMID:27759057

  19. A molecular thermodynamic model for the stability of hepatitis B capsids

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jehoon; Wu, Jianzhong

    2014-06-21

    Self-assembly of capsid proteins and genome encapsidation are two critical steps in the life cycle of most plant and animal viruses. A theoretical description of such processes from a physiochemical perspective may help better understand viral replication and morphogenesis thus provide fresh insights into the experimental studies of antiviral strategies. In this work, we propose a molecular thermodynamic model for predicting the stability of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids either with or without loading nucleic materials. With the key components represented by coarse-grained thermodynamic models, the theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with experimental data for the formation free energies of empty T4 capsids over a broad range of temperature and ion concentrations. The theoretical model predicts T3/T4 dimorphism also in good agreement with the capsid formation at in vivo and in vitro conditions. In addition, we have studied the stability of the viral particles in response to physiological cellular conditions with the explicit consideration of the hydrophobic association of capsid subunits, electrostatic interactions, molecular excluded volume effects, entropy of mixing, and conformational changes of the biomolecular species. The course-grained model captures the essential features of the HBV nucleocapsid stability revealed by recent experiments.

  20. A molecular thermodynamic model for the stability of hepatitis B capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jehoon; Wu, Jianzhong

    2014-06-01

    Self-assembly of capsid proteins and genome encapsidation are two critical steps in the life cycle of most plant and animal viruses. A theoretical description of such processes from a physiochemical perspective may help better understand viral replication and morphogenesis thus provide fresh insights into the experimental studies of antiviral strategies. In this work, we propose a molecular thermodynamic model for predicting the stability of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids either with or without loading nucleic materials. With the key components represented by coarse-grained thermodynamic models, the theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with experimental data for the formation free energies of empty T4 capsids over a broad range of temperature and ion concentrations. The theoretical model predicts T3/T4 dimorphism also in good agreement with the capsid formation at in vivo and in vitro conditions. In addition, we have studied the stability of the viral particles in response to physiological cellular conditions with the explicit consideration of the hydrophobic association of capsid subunits, electrostatic interactions, molecular excluded volume effects, entropy of mixing, and conformational changes of the biomolecular species. The course-grained model captures the essential features of the HBV nucleocapsid stability revealed by recent experiments.

  1. Ethyl pyruvate reduces hepatic mitochondrial swelling and dysfunction in a rat model of sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhiyi; Li, Xiaoyue; Lin, Zongqin; Chen, Juan; Guan, Xiangdong; Chen, Minying

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis causes mitochondrial oxidative injury and swelling. Ethyl pyruvate (EP) is a cytoprotective agent, while aquaporin-8 (AQP8) is a mitochondrial water channel that can induce mitochondrial swelling. We assessed whether EP protects mitochondria during sepsis, and whether AQP8 contributes to the underlying mechanisms. A cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) sepsis model was established in Sprague-Dawley rats, randomized to 3 groups: sham (n=20), CLP (n=59) and CLP+EP (n=51). All rats received postoperative intraperitoneal fluid resuscitation (30 ml/kg); the CLP+EP group also received intraperitoneal EP (100 mg/kg). Survival was assessed at 24 hours. Hepatic mitochondrial ultrastructure was characterized by electron microscopy. The membrane potential of isolated hepatic mitochondria was determined using JC-1 and flow cytometry. Mitochondrial AQP8 expression and cytochrome C (Cyt C) release were measured by Western blotting (values normalized to ß-actin). Survival in the sham, CLP and CLP+EP groups was 100%, 21% and 41%, respectively. Mitochondrial cross-sectional area was smaller in the CLP+EP group than in the CLP group (0.231±0.110 vs. 0.641±0.460 µm2; P<0.001), with a tendency for a lower form factor (a measure of contour irregularity) in the CLP+EP group. Mitochondrial depolarization by CLP was inhibited by EP. Mitochondrial Cyt C release was higher in the CLP group than in the sham (1.211±0.24 vs. 0.48±0.03) or CLP+EP (0.35±0.39) groups. AQP8 expression was similar between groups, with a trend for lower expression in the CLP+EP group compared with the CLP group. EP improves sepsis outcome by targeting the mitochondrion, possibly through modulation of AQP8 expression. PMID:26339342

  2. ELEVATED COPPER REMODELS HEPATIC RNA PROCESSING MACHINERY IN THE MOUSE MODEL OF WILSON'S DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Burkhead, Jason L.; Ralle, Martina; Wilmarth, Phillip; David, Larry; Lutsenko, Svetlana

    2011-01-01

    Copper is essential to mammalian physiology and its homeostasis is tightly regulated. In humans, genetic defects in copper excretion result in copper overload and Wilson's disease (WD). Previous studies in the mouse model for WD (Atp7b-/-) revealed copper accumulation in hepatic nuclei and specific changes in the mRNA profile prior to pathology onset. To find a molecular link between nuclear copper elevation and changes in hepatic transcriptome we utilized quantitative ionomic and proteomic approaches. X-ray fluorescence and ICP-MS analysis indicate that copper in Atp7b-/- nucleus, while highly elevated, does not markedly alter nuclear ion content. Widespread protein oxidation is also not observed, although glutathione reductase SelH is upregulated, likely to maintain redox balance. We further demonstrate that accumulating copper affects abundance and/or modification of a distinct subset of nuclear proteins. These proteins populate pathways most significantly associated with RNA processing. An alteration in the splicing pattern was observed for hnRNP A2/B1, itself the RNA shuttling factor and spliceosome component. Analysis of hnRNP A2/B1 mRNA and protein revealed an increased retention of exon 2 and a selective 2-fold upregulation of a corresponding protein spliced variant. Mass-spectrometry measurements suggest that the nucleo-cytoplasmic distribution of RNA binding proteins, including A2/B1, is altered in the Atp7b-/- liver. We conclude that remodeling of RNA processing machinery is an important component in cells’ response to elevated copper that may guide pathology development in early stages of WD. PMID:21146535

  3. Diagnostic non-invasive model of large risky esophageal varices in cirrhotic hepatitis C virus patients

    PubMed Central

    Elalfy, Hatem; Elsherbiny, Walid; Abdel Rahman, Ashraf; Elhammady, Dina; Shaltout, Shaker Wagih; Elsamanoudy, Ayman Z; El Deek, Bassem

    2016-01-01

    AIM To build a diagnostic non-invasive model for screening of large varices in cirrhotic hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients. METHODS This study was conducted on 124 post-HCV cirrhotic patients presenting to the clinics of the Endemic Medicine Department at Mansoura University Hospital for evaluation before HCV antiviral therapy: 78 were Child A and 46 were Child B (score ≤ 8). Inclusion criteria for patients enrolled in this study was presence of cirrhotic HCV (diagnosed by either biopsy or fulfillment of clinical basis). Exclusion criteria consisted of patients with other etiologies of liver cirrhosis, e.g., hepatitis B virus and patients with high MELD score on transplant list. All patients were subjected to full medical record, full basic investigations, endoscopy, and computed tomography (CT), and then divided into groups with no varices, small varices, or large risky varices. In addition, values of Fibrosis-4 score (FIB-4), aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI), and platelet count/splenic diameter ratio (PC/SD) were also calculated. RESULTS Detection of large varies is a multi-factorial process, affected by many variables. Choosing binary logistic regression, dependent factors were either large or small varices while independent factors included CT variables such coronary vein diameter, portal vein (PV) diameter, lieno-renal shunt and other laboratory non-invasive variables namely FIB-4, APRI, and platelet count/splenic diameter. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was plotted to determine the accuracy of non-invasive parameters for predicting the presence of large esophageal varices and the area under the ROC curve for each one of these parameters was obtained. A model was established and the best model for prediction of large risky esophageal varices used both PC/SD and PV diameter (75% accuracy), while the logistic model equation was shown to be (PV diameter × -0.256) plus (PC/SD × -0.006) plus (8.155). Values nearing 2 or more denote

  4. Peromyscus as a model system for human hepatitis C: An opportunity to advance our understanding of a complex host parasite system.

    PubMed

    Vandegrift, Kurt J; Critchlow, Justin T; Kapoor, Amit; Friedman, David A; Hudson, Peter J

    2017-01-01

    Worldwide, there are 185 million people infected with hepatitis C virus and approximately 350,000 people die each year from hepatitis C associated liver diseases. Human hepatitis C research has been hampered by the lack of an appropriate in vivo model system. Most of the in vivo research has been conducted on chimpanzees, which is complicated by ethical concerns, small sample sizes, high costs, and genetic heterogeneity. The house mouse system has led to greater understanding of a wide variety of human pathogens, but it is unreasonable to expect Mus musculus to be a good model system for every human pathogen. Alternative animal models can be developed in these cases. Ferrets (influenza), cotton rats (human respiratory virus), and woodchucks (hepatitis B) are all alternative models that have led to a greater understanding of human pathogens. Rodent models are tractable, genetically amenable and inbred and outbred strains can provide homogeneity in results. Recently, a rodent homolog of hepatitis C was discovered and isolated from the liver of a Peromyscus maniculatus. This represents the first small mammal (mouse) model system for human hepatitis C and it offers great potential to contribute to our understanding and ultimately aid in our efforts to combat this serious public health concern. Peromyscus are available commercially and can be used to inform questions about the origin, transmission, persistence, pathology, and rational treatment of hepatitis C. Here, we provide a disease ecologist's overview of this new virus and some suggestions for useful future experiments.

  5. Hepatitis B and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Problems : Hepatitis B Subscribe Translate Text Size Print Hepatitis B What is Hepatitis? Hepatitis means inflammation of the liver. This condition ... our related pages, Hepatitis A and Hepatitis C . Hepatitis B and HIV About 10% of people living ...

  6. Retrospective analysis of hepatitis C infected patients treated through an integrated care model

    PubMed Central

    Levin, James M; Dabirshahsahebi, Shabnam; Bauer, Mindy; Huckins, Eric

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine if our health system’s integrated model reflects sustained virologic response (SVR) outcomes similar to those in clinical trial data, maximizes adherence, and averts drug interactions. METHODS Subjects with chronic hepatitis C had their medical records reviewed from November 1st, 2014 through March 1st, 2016. Patients eligible for treatment were entered into an integrated care model therapy algorithm. The primary outcome was SVR12 based on intention to treat (ITT) analysis. Inclusion criteria consisted of both treatment naïve and experienced patients over the age of 18 who were at least twelve weeks post-therapy completion with any genotype (GT) or METAVIR score. Secondary outcomes included adherence, adverse events, and number of drug interaction interventions. RESULTS At the time of analysis, 133 patients had reached twelve weeks post therapy with ITT. In the ITT analysis 70 patients were GT 1a, 26 GT 1b, 23 could not be differentiated between GT 1a or 1b, 8 GT 2, 4 GT 3, and 2 patients with multiple genotypes. The ITT treatment regimens consisted of 97 sofosbuvir (SOF)/ledipasvir (LDV), 8 SOF/LDV and ribavirin (RBV), 7 SOF and Simeprevir (SMV), 6 3D and RBV, 1 3D, 11 SOF and RBV, and 1 SOF, peg interferon alpha, and RBV. The overall SVR12 rate was 93% in the ITT analysis with a total of 6 patients relapsing. In patients with cirrhosis, 89% obtained SVR12. All 33 patients who were previous treatment failures achieved SVR12. Drug-drug interactions were identified in 56.4% of our patient population, 69 of which required interventions made by the pharmacist. The most common side effects were fatigue (41.4%), headache (28.6%), nausea (18.1%), and diarrhea (8.3%). No serious adverse effects were reported. CONCLUSION Dean Health System’s integrated care model successfully managed patients being treated for hepatitis C virus (HCV). The integrated care model demonstrates high SVR rates amongst patients with different levels of fibrosis, genotypes

  7. Computational design of hepatitis C vaccines using maximum entropy models and population dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Gregory; Ferguson, Andrew

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) afflicts 170 million people and kills 350,000 annually. Vaccination offers the most realistic and cost effective hope of controlling this epidemic. Despite 20 years of research, no vaccine is available. A major obstacle is the virus' extreme genetic variability and rapid mutational escape from immune pressure. Improvements in the vaccine design process are urgently needed. Coupling data mining with spin glass models and maximum entropy inference, we have developed a computational approach to translate sequence databases into empirical fitness landscapes. These landscapes explicitly connect viral genotype to phenotypic fitness and reveal vulnerable targets that can be exploited to rationally design immunogens. Viewing these landscapes as the mutational ''playing field'' over which the virus is constrained to evolve, we have integrated them with agent-based models of the viral mutational and host immune response dynamics, establishing a data-driven immune simulator of HCV infection. We have employed this simulator to perform in silico screening of HCV immunogens. By systematically identifying a small number of promising vaccine candidates, these models can accelerate the search for a vaccine by massively reducing the experimental search space.

  8. Hepatocellular carcinoma mouse models: Hepatitis B virus-associated hepatocarcinogenesis and haploinsufficient tumor suppressor genes

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Yuan-Chi; Shen, Zhao-Qing; Kao, Cheng-Heng; Tsai, Ting-Fen

    2016-01-01

    The multifactorial and multistage pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has fascinated a wide spectrum of scientists for decades. While a number of major risk factors have been identified, their mechanistic roles in hepatocarcinogenesis still need to be elucidated. Many tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) have been identified as being involved in HCC. These TSGs can be classified into two groups depending on the situation with respect to allelic mutation/loss in the tumors: the recessive TSGs with two required mutated alleles and the haploinsufficient TSGs with one required mutated allele. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is one of the most important risk factors associated with HCC. Although mice cannot be infected with HBV due to the narrow host range of HBV and the lack of a proper receptor, one advantage of mouse models for HBV/HCC research is the numerous and powerful genetic tools that help investigate the phenotypic effects of viral proteins and allow the dissection of the dose-dependent action of TSGs. Here, we mainly focus on the application of mouse models in relation to HBV-associated HCC and on TSGs that act either in a recessive or in a haploinsufficient manner. Discoveries obtained using mouse models will have a great impact on HCC translational medicine. PMID:26755878

  9. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... transaminase enzyme levels Treatment There is no specific treatment for hepatitis A. You should rest when the symptoms are ... and have not had hepatitis A or the hepatitis A vaccine. Common reasons for getting one or both of these treatments include: You live with someone who has hepatitis ...

  10. A Computational Model of Hepatic Energy Metabolism: Understanding Zonated Damage and Steatosis in NAFLD

    PubMed Central

    Ashworth, William B.; Bogle, I. David L.

    2016-01-01

    In non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), lipid build-up and the resulting damage is known to occur more severely in pericentral cells. Due to the complexity of studying individual regions of the sinusoid, the causes of this zone specificity and its implications on treatment are largely ignored. In this study, a computational model of liver glucose and lipid metabolism is presented which treats the sinusoid as the repeating unit of the liver rather than the single hepatocyte. This allows for inclusion of zonated enzyme expression by splitting the sinusoid into periportal to pericentral compartments. By simulating insulin resistance (IR) and high intake diets leading to the development of steatosis in the model, we identify key differences between periportal and pericentral cells accounting for higher susceptibility to pericentral steatosis. Secondly, variation between individuals is seen in both susceptibility to steatosis and in its development across the sinusoid. Around 25% of obese individuals do not show excess liver fat, whilst 16% of lean individuals develop NAFLD. Furthermore, whilst pericentral cells tend to show higher lipid levels, variation is seen in the predominant location of steatosis from pericentral to pan-sinusoidal or azonal. Sensitivity analysis was used to identify the processes which have the largest effect on both total hepatic triglyceride levels and on the sinusoidal location of steatosis. As is seen in vivo, steatosis occurs when simulating IR in the model, predominantly due to increased uptake, along with an increase in de novo lipogenesis. Additionally, concentrations of glucose intermediates including glycerol-3-phosphate increased when simulating IR due to inhibited glycogen synthesis. Several differences between zones contributed to a higher susceptibility to steatosis in pericentral cells in the model simulations. Firstly, the periportal zonation of both glycogen synthase and the oxidative phosphorylation enzymes meant that the

  11. Impaired hepatic function and central dopaminergic denervation in a rodent model of Parkinson's disease: a self-perpetuating crosstalk?

    PubMed

    Vairetti, Mariapia; Ferrigno, Andrea; Rizzo, Vittoria; Ambrosi, Giulia; Bianchi, Alberto; Richelmi, Plinio; Blandini, Fabio; Armentero, Marie-Therese

    2012-02-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), aside from the central lesion, involvement of visceral organs has been proposed as part of the complex clinical picture of the disease. The issue is still poorly understood and relatively unexplored. In this study we used a classic rodent model of nigrostriatal degeneration, induced by the intrastriatal injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), to investigate whether and how a PD-like central dopaminergic denervation may influence hepatic functions. Rats received an intrastriatal injection of 6-OHDA or saline (sham), and blood, cerebrospinal fluid, liver and brain samples were obtained for up to 8 weeks after surgery. Specimens were analyzed for changes in cytokine and thyroid hormone levels, as well as liver mitochondrial alterations. Hepatic mitochondria isolated from animals bearing extended nigrostriatal lesion displayed increased ROS production, while membrane potential (ΔΨ) and ATP production were significantly decreased. Reduced ATP production correlated with nigral neuronal loss. Thyroid hormone levels were significantly increased in serum of PD rats compared to sham animals while steady expression of selected cytokines was detected in all groups. Hepatic enzyme functions were comparable in all animals. Our study indicates for the first time that in a rodent model of PD, hepatic mitochondria dysfunctions arise as a consequence of nigrostriatal degeneration, and that thyroid hormone represents a key interface in this CNS-liver interaction. Liver plays a fundamental detoxifying function and a better understanding of PD-related hepatic mitochondrial alterations, which might further promote neurodegeneration, may represent an important step for the development of novel therapeutic strategies.

  12. Efficacy of a topical bovine-derived thrombin solution as a hemostatic agent in a rodent model of hepatic injury

    PubMed Central

    Rosselli, Desiree D.; Brainard, Benjamin M.; Schmiedt, Chad W.

    2015-01-01

    Hemorrhage is a major concern in patients undergoing hepatic surgery or in those with hepatic trauma. In these cases, employing traditional hemostatic strategies can be problematic due to the diffuse nature of hepatic hemorrhage and limited opportunities for direct hemostasis. This study assessed the efficacy of a bovine-derived thrombin solution, (BT), as a topical liquid agent to augment hemostasis and survival following severe hepatic hemorrhage in a rat model. Heart rate (HR), arterial blood pressure (ABP), packed cell volume (PCV), and overall survival were evaluated in 54 rats randomly assigned to receive topical application of BT, saline, or suture ligation applied immediately to a liver lobe following controlled laceration. Six additional rats received liver laceration with no applied treatment. Intravenous fluid resuscitation was initiated and HR and ABP were recorded for 60 min, after which survivors were recovered from anesthesia. Rats were then monitored for 72 h, after which survivors were euthanized. There was no significant difference in survival time, percentage survival, intra-operative ABP or HR, or post-operative PCV between treatment groups. There is insufficient evidence to recommend BT as the sole therapy using this delivery method for mitigating severe hemorrhage from liver injury. PMID:26424911

  13. FXR agonist obeticholic acid reduces hepatic inflammation and fibrosis in a rat model of toxic cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Verbeke, Len; Mannaerts, Inge; Schierwagen, Robert; Govaere, Olivier; Klein, Sabine; Vander Elst, Ingrid; Windmolders, Petra; Farre, Ricard; Wenes, Mathias; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Nevens, Frederik; van Grunsven, Leo A.; Trebicka, Jonel; Laleman, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic inflammation drives hepatic stellate cells (HSC), resulting in liver fibrosis. The Farnesoid-X receptor (FXR) antagonizes inflammation through NF-κB inhibition. We investigated preventive and therapeutic effects of FXR agonist obeticholic acid (OCA) on hepatic inflammation and fibrosis in toxic cirrhotic rats. Cirrhosis was induced by thioacetamide (TAA) intoxication. OCA was given during or after intoxication with vehicle-treated rats as controls. At sacrifice, fibrosis, hemodynamic and biochemical parameters were assessed. HSC activation, cell turn-over, hepatic NF-κB activation, pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic cytokines were determined. The effect of OCA was further evaluated in isolated HSC, Kupffer cells, hepatocytes and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC). OCA decreased hepatic inflammation and fibrogenesis during TAA-administration and reversed fibrosis in established cirrhosis. Portal pressure decreased through reduced intrahepatic vascular resistance. This was paralleled by decreased expression of pro-fibrotic cytokines (transforming growth-factor β, connective tissue growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor β-receptor) as well as markers of hepatic cell turn-over, by blunting effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g. monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1). In vitro, OCA inhibited both LSEC and Kupffer cell activation; while HSC remained unaffected. This related to NF-κB inhibition via up-regulated IκBα. In conclusion, OCA inhibits hepatic inflammation in toxic cirrhotic rats resulting in decreased HSC activation and fibrosis. PMID:27634375

  14. Coordinating Role of RXRα in Downregulating Hepatic Detoxification during Inflammation Revealed by Fuzzy-Logic Modeling.

    PubMed

    Keller, Roland; Klein, Marcus; Thomas, Maria; Dräger, Andreas; Metzger, Ute; Templin, Markus F; Joos, Thomas O; Thasler, Wolfgang E; Zell, Andreas; Zanger, Ulrich M

    2016-01-01

    During various inflammatory processes circulating cytokines including IL-6, IL-1β, and TNFα elicit a broad and clinically relevant impairment of hepatic detoxification that is based on the simultaneous downregulation of many drug metabolizing enzymes and transporter genes. To address the question whether a common mechanism is involved we treated human primary hepatocytes with IL-6, the major mediator of the acute phase response in liver, and characterized acute phase and detoxification responses in quantitative gene expression and (phospho-)proteomics data sets. Selective inhibitors were used to disentangle the roles of JAK/STAT, MAPK, and PI3K signaling pathways. A prior knowledge-based fuzzy logic model comprising signal transduction and gene regulation was established and trained with perturbation-derived gene expression data from five hepatocyte donors. Our model suggests a greater role of MAPK/PI3K compared to JAK/STAT with the orphan nuclear receptor RXRα playing a central role in mediating transcriptional downregulation. Validation experiments revealed a striking similarity of RXRα gene silencing versus IL-6 induced negative gene regulation (rs = 0.79; P<0.0001). These results concur with RXRα functioning as obligatory heterodimerization partner for several nuclear receptors that regulate drug and lipid metabolism.

  15. Pharmaceutical Metabolism in Fish: Using a 3-D Hepatic In Vitro Model to Assess Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Matthew G.; Mintram, Kate S.; Owen, Stewart F.; Hetheridge, Malcolm J.; Moody, A. John; Purcell, Wendy M.; Jackson, Simon K.; Jha, Awadhesh N.

    2017-01-01

    At high internal doses, pharmaceuticals have the potential for inducing biological/pharmacological effects in fish. One particular concern for the environment is their potential to bioaccumulate and reach pharmacological levels; the study of these implications for environmental risk assessment has therefore gained increasing attention. To avoid unnecessary testing on animals, in vitro methods for assessment of xenobiotic metabolism could aid in the ecotoxicological evaluation. Here we report the use of a 3-D in vitro liver organoid culture system (spheroids) derived from rainbow trout to measure the metabolism of seven pharmaceuticals using a substrate depletion assay. Of the pharmaceuticals tested, propranolol, diclofenac and phenylbutazone were metabolised by trout liver spheroids; atenolol, metoprolol, diazepam and carbamazepine were not. Substrate depletion kinetics data was used to estimate intrinsic hepatic clearance by this spheroid model, which was similar for diclofenac and approximately 5 fold higher for propranolol when compared to trout liver microsomal fraction (S9) data. These results suggest that liver spheroids could be used as a relevant and metabolically competent in vitro model with which to measure the biotransformation of pharmaceuticals in fish; and propranolol acts as a reproducible positive control. PMID:28045944

  16. Coordinating Role of RXRα in Downregulating Hepatic Detoxification during Inflammation Revealed by Fuzzy-Logic Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Maria; Dräger, Andreas; Metzger, Ute; Templin, Markus F.; Joos, Thomas O.; Thasler, Wolfgang E.; Zell, Andreas; Zanger, Ulrich M.

    2016-01-01

    During various inflammatory processes circulating cytokines including IL-6, IL-1β, and TNFα elicit a broad and clinically relevant impairment of hepatic detoxification that is based on the simultaneous downregulation of many drug metabolizing enzymes and transporter genes. To address the question whether a common mechanism is involved we treated human primary hepatocytes with IL-6, the major mediator of the acute phase response in liver, and characterized acute phase and detoxification responses in quantitative gene expression and (phospho-)proteomics data sets. Selective inhibitors were used to disentangle the roles of JAK/STAT, MAPK, and PI3K signaling pathways. A prior knowledge-based fuzzy logic model comprising signal transduction and gene regulation was established and trained with perturbation-derived gene expression data from five hepatocyte donors. Our model suggests a greater role of MAPK/PI3K compared to JAK/STAT with the orphan nuclear receptor RXRα playing a central role in mediating transcriptional downregulation. Validation experiments revealed a striking similarity of RXRα gene silencing versus IL-6 induced negative gene regulation (rs = 0.79; P<0.0001). These results concur with RXRα functioning as obligatory heterodimerization partner for several nuclear receptors that regulate drug and lipid metabolism. PMID:26727233

  17. Activation of farnesoid X receptor attenuates hepatic injury in a murine model of alcoholic liver disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Weibin; Zhu, Bo; Peng, Xiaomin; Zhou, Meiling; Jia, Dongwei; Gu, Jianxin

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •FXR activity was impaired by chronic ethanol ingestion in a murine model of ALD. •Activation of FXR attenuated alcohol-induced liver injury and steatosis. •Activation of FXR attenuated cholestasis and oxidative stress in mouse liver. -- Abstract: Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a common cause of advanced liver disease, and considered as a major risk factor of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Hepatic cholestasis is a pathophysiological feature observed in all stages of ALD. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, and plays an essential role in the regulation of bile acid, lipid and glucose homeostasis. However, the role of FXR in the pathogenesis and progression of ALD remains largely unknown. Mice were fed Lieber-DeCarli ethanol diet or an isocaloric control diet. We used a specific agonist of FXR WAY-362450 to study the effect of pharmacological activation of FXR in alcoholic liver disease. In this study, we demonstrated that FXR activity was impaired by chronic ethanol ingestion in a murine model of ALD. Activation of FXR by specific agonist WAY-362450 protected mice from the development of ALD. We also found that WAY-362450 treatment rescued FXR activity, suppressed ethanol-induced Cyp2e1 up-regulation and attenuated oxidative stress in liver. Our results highlight a key role of FXR in the modulation of ALD development, and propose specific FXR agonists for the treatment of ALD patients.

  18. Comparison of TGF-β, PDGF, and CTGF in hepatic fibrosis models using DMN, CCl4, and TAA.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye-Jung; Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Wang, Jing-Hua; Choi, Min-Kyung; Han, Jong-Min; Lee, Jin-Seok; Son, Chang-Gue

    2016-01-01

    Three chemotoxins including dimethylnitrosamine (DMN), carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), and thioacetamide (TAA) are commonly used in hepatofibrotic models. We aimed to draw characteristics of histopathology and pro-fibrogenic cytokines including TGF-β, PDGF and CTGF among three models. Rats were divided into six groups and intra-peritoneally injected with DMN (10 mg/kg, for three weeks, three consecutive days weekly), CCl4 (1.6 g/kg, for 10 weeks, twice weekly), TAA (200 mg/kg, for 12 weeks, twice weekly) or their corresponded treatment for each control group. The liver weights were decreased in DMN model, but not other models. Ascites were occurred as 3-, 2-, and 7-rats in DMN, CCl4, and TAA model, respectively. The lipid peroxidation was highest in CCl4 model, serum levels of liver enzymes were increased as similar severity. The hepatofibrotic alterations were remarkable in DMN and TAA model, but not CCl4 as evidenced by the Masson trichrome staining and hydroxyproline. The immunohistochemistry for α-SAM showed that the DMN model was most severely enhanced than other models. On the other hand, hepatic tissue levels of pro-fibrogenic cytokines including TGF-β, PDGF, and CTGF were generally increased in three models, but totally different among models or measurement resources. Especially, serum levels of three cytokines were remarkably increased by CCl4 injection and CTGF levels in both hepatic tissue and serum were highest in CCl4 group. Our results firstly demonstrated comparative study for features of morphological finding and pro-fibrogenic cytokines in serum and hepatic protein levels among three models. Above results would be a helpful reference for hepatofibrotic studies.

  19. Differential Fmo3 Gene Expression in Various Liver Injury Models Involving Hepatic Oxidative Stress in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rudraiah, Swetha; Moscovitz, Jamie E.; Donepudi, Ajay C.; Campion, Sarah N.; Slitt, Angela L.; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Manautou, José E.

    2015-01-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenase-3 (FMO3) catalyzes metabolic reactions similar to cytochrome P450 monooxygenase however, most metabolites of FMO3 are considered non-toxic. Recent findings in our laboratory demonstrated Fmo3gene induction following toxic acetaminophen (APAP) treatment in mice.The goal of this study was to evaluate Fmo3gene expression in diverseother mouse models of hepatic oxidative stress and injury. Fmo3 gene regulation by Nrf2 was also investigated using Nrf2 knockout (Nrf2 KO) mice. In our studies, male C57BL/6J mice were treated with toxic dosesof hepatotoxicants or underwent bile duct ligation (BDL, 10d). Hepatotoxicants included APAP (400 mg/kg, 24 to 72h), alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT; 50 mg/kg, 2 to 48h), carbontetrachloride (CCl4;10 or 30 μL/kg, 24 and 48h) and allyl alcohol (AlOH; 30 or 60 mg/kg, 6 and 24h). Because oxidative stress activates nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), additional studies investigated Fmo3 gene regulation by Nrf2 using Nrf2 knockout (Nrf2 KO) mice. At appropriate time-points, blood and liver samples were collected for assessment of plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity, plasma and hepatic bile acid levels, as well as liver Fmo3 mRNA and protein expression. Fmo3 mRNA expression increased significantly by 43-fold at 12h after ANIT treatment,and this increase translates to a 4-fold change in protein levels. BDL also increased Fmo3 mRNA expression by 1899-fold, but with no change in protein levels. Treatment of mice with CCl4decreased liver Fmo3gene expression, whileno change in expression was detected with AlOH treatment. Nrf2 KO mice are more susceptible to APAP (400 mg/kg, 72h) treatment compared to their wild-type (WT) counterparts, which is evidenced by greater plasma ALT activity. Fmo3 mRNA and protein expression increased in Nrf2 KO mice after APAP treatment. Collectively, not all hepatotoxicantsthat produce oxidative stress alter Fmo3gene expression. Along with APAP, toxic ANIT

  20. Hepatic phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy in primary biliary cirrhosis and its relation to prognostic models.

    PubMed Central

    Jalan, R; Sargentoni, J; Coutts, G A; Bell, J D; Rolles, K; Burroughs, A K; Taylor Robinson, S D

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In vivo hepatic phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS) provides biochemical information about phosphorus metabolism. AIM: To assess 31P MRS as a prognostic marker in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) in relation to the current clinical prognostic models. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Twenty three patients with PBC of varying functional severity and 16 matched healthy volunteers were studied using in vivo 31P MRS. Spectra were acquired using a 1.5 T spectroscopy system. Peak area ratios of phosphomonoesters (PME), inorganic phosphate (Pi), and phosphodiesters (PDE) and nucleotide triphosphate (NTP) were calculated. Pugh score, Christensen prognostic index, and R value according to the Mayo model were calculated from the clinical data. RESULTS: The PME/NTP, Pi/NTP, PME/PDE, and PME/Pi ratios and the PME signal height ratio (SHR) were significantly higher, while the PDE/NTP and PDE/SHR were significantly lower in PBC patients compared with healthy volunteers (p < 0.01). Significant correlations were seen between PME/Pi ratio and the prognostic index according to Christensen (r = 0.63, p < 0.001), R value according to the Mayo model (r = 0.45, p < 0.03), and with the Pugh score (r = 0.55, p < 0.007). CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that PME/Pi ratio obtained from 31P MRS correlates well with all three of the commonly used models of prognosis in patients with PBC. A longitudinal study with larger number of patients is required to confirm these findings and elucidate the biochemical changes underlying this phenomenon. PMID:8881826

  1. Histopathological characteristics of glutamine synthetase-positive hepatic tumor lesions in a mouse model of spontaneous metabolic syndrome (TSOD mouse)

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Tetsuyuki; Nishida, Takeshi; Baba, Hayato; Hatta, Hideki; Imura, Johji; Sutoh, Mitsuko; Toyohara, Syunji; Hokao, Ryoji; Watanabe, Syunsuke; Ogawa, Hirohisa; Uehara, Hisanori; Tsuneyama, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that Tsumura-Suzuki obese diabetic (TSOD) mice, a polygenic model of spontaneous type 2 diabetes, is a valuable model of hepatic carcinogenesis via non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). One of the characteristics of tumors in these mice is the diffuse expression of glutamine synthetase (GS), which is a diagnostic marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this study, we performed detailed histopathological examinations and found that GS expression was diffusely positive in >70% of the hepatic tumors from 15-month-old male TSOD mice. Translocation of β-catenin into nuclei with enhanced membranous expression also occurred in GS-positive tumors. Small lesions (<1 mm) in GS-positive cases exhibited dysplastic nodules, with severe nuclear atypia, whereas large lesions (>3 mm) bore the characteristics of human HCC, exhibiting nuclear and structural atypia with invasive growth. By contrast, the majority of GS-negative tumors were hepatocellular adenomas with advanced fatty change and low nuclear grade. In GS-negative tumors, loss of liver fatty acid-binding protein expression was observed. These results suggest that the histological characteristics of GS-positive hepatic tumors in TSOD mice resemble human HCC; thus, this model may be a useful tool in translational research targeting the NAFLD/NASH-HCC sequence. PMID:27446562

  2. Histopathological characteristics of glutamine synthetase-positive hepatic tumor lesions in a mouse model of spontaneous metabolic syndrome (TSOD mouse).

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Tetsuyuki; Nishida, Takeshi; Baba, Hayato; Hatta, Hideki; Imura, Johji; Sutoh, Mitsuko; Toyohara, Syunji; Hokao, Ryoji; Watanabe, Syunsuke; Ogawa, Hirohisa; Uehara, Hisanori; Tsuneyama, Koichi

    2016-08-01

    We previously reported that Tsumura-Suzuki obese diabetic (TSOD) mice, a polygenic model of spontaneous type 2 diabetes, is a valuable model of hepatic carcinogenesis via non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). One of the characteristics of tumors in these mice is the diffuse expression of glutamine synthetase (GS), which is a diagnostic marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this study, we performed detailed histopathological examinations and found that GS expression was diffusely positive in >70% of the hepatic tumors from 15-month-old male TSOD mice. Translocation of β-catenin into nuclei with enhanced membranous expression also occurred in GS-positive tumors. Small lesions (<1 mm) in GS-positive cases exhibited dysplastic nodules, with severe nuclear atypia, whereas large lesions (>3 mm) bore the characteristics of human HCC, exhibiting nuclear and structural atypia with invasive growth. By contrast, the majority of GS-negative tumors were hepatocellular adenomas with advanced fatty change and low nuclear grade. In GS-negative tumors, loss of liver fatty acid-binding protein expression was observed. These results suggest that the histological characteristics of GS-positive hepatic tumors in TSOD mice resemble human HCC; thus, this model may be a useful tool in translational research targeting the NAFLD/NASH-HCC sequence.

  3. A Comprehensive Screening And Treatment Model For Reducing Disparities In Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Pollack, Henry; Wang, Su; Wyatt, Laura; Peng, Chia-hui; Wan, Kejia; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau; Chun, Kay; Kwon, Simona

    2012-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B affects Asian Americans at a much higher rate than the general US population. Appropriate care can limit morbidity and mortality from hepatitis B. However, access to care for many Asian Americans and other immigrant groups is limited by their lack of knowledge about the disease, as well as cultural, linguistic, and financial challenges. This article describes the results of BfreeNYC, a New York City pilot program that, from 2004 to 2008, provided hepatitis B community education and awareness, free screening and vaccinations, and free or low-cost treatment primarily to immigrants from Asia, but also to residents from other racial and ethnic minority groups. The program was the largest citywide screening program in the United States, reaching nearly 9,000 people, and the only one providing comprehensive care to those who were infected. During the program, new hepatitis B cases reported annually from predominantly Asian neighborhoods in the city increased 34 percent. More than two thousand people were vaccinated; 57 percent of the 1,162 patients who tested positive for hepatitis B and were evaluated by program clinical services were still in care at the end of the program. Our analysis found that the program was effective in reaching the target population and providing care. Although follow-up care data will be needed to demonstrate long-term costeffectiveness, the program may serve as a useful prototype for addressing hepatitis B disparities in communities across the United States. PMID:21976342

  4. Modeling chronic hepatitis B or C virus infection during antiviral therapy using an analogy to enzyme kinetics: long-term viral dynamics without rebound and oscillation.

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Toshiaki

    2013-12-01

    The basic model for chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection during therapy enables us to analyze short-term viral kinetics. However, the model is not useful for analyzing long-term viral kinetics. Here, I suggest a new model that was obtained by introducing Michaelis-Menten kinetics into the basic model. The new model can exhibit long-term viral kinetics without rebound and oscillation, unlike the basic model. The value of the parameter K in the new model is analogous to the Michaelis constant Km and is predicted to be approximately less than 10(10)/ml.

  5. Optical fluorescence spectroscopy to detect hepatic necrosis after normothermic ischemia: animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Renan A.; Vollet-Filho, Jose D.; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Fernandez, Jorge L.; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Castro-e-Silva, Orlando; Sankarankutty, Ajith K.

    2015-06-01

    Liver transplantation is a well-established treatment for liver failure. However, the success of the transplantation procedure depends on liver graft conditions. The tissue function evaluation during the several transplantation stages is relevant, in particular during the organ harvesting, when a decision is made concerning the viability of the graft. Optical fluorescence spectroscopy is a good option because it is a noninvasive and fast technique. A partial normothermic hepatic ischemia was performed in rat livers, with a vascular occlusion of both median and left lateral lobes, allowing circulation only for the right lateral lobe and the caudate lobe. Fluorescence spectra under excitation at 532 nm (doubled frequency Nd:YAG laser) were collected using a portable spectrometer (USB2000, Ocean Optics, USA). The fluorescence emission was collected before vascular occlusion, after ischemia, and 24 hours after reperfusion. A morphometric histology analysis was performed as the gold standard evaluation - liver samples were analyzed, and the percentage of necrotic tissue was obtained. The results showed that changes in the fluorescence emission after ischemia can be correlated with the amount of necrosis evaluated by a morphometric analysis, the Pearson correlation coefficient of the generated model was 0.90 and the root mean square error was around 20%. In this context, the laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy technique after normothermic ischemia showed to be a fast and efficient method to differentiate ischemic injury from viable tissues.

  6. Hepatic Mitochondrial Alterations and Increased Oxidative Stress in Nutritional Diabetes-Prone Psammomys obesus Model

    PubMed Central

    Bouderba, Saida; Sanz, M. Nieves; Sánchez-Martín, Carlos; El-Mir, M. Yehia; Villanueva, Gloria R.; Detaille, Dominique; Koceïr, E. Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is considered to be a pivotal component of insulin resistance and associated metabolic diseases. Psammomys obesus is a relevant model of nutritional diabetes since these adult animals exhibit a state of insulin resistance when fed a standard laboratory chow, hypercaloric for them as compared to their natural food. In this context, alterations in bioenergetics were studied. Using liver mitochondria isolated from these rats fed such a diet for 18 weeks, oxygen consumption rates, activities of respiratory complexes, and content in cytochromes were examined. Levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and gluthatione (GSH) were measured in tissue homogenates. Diabetic Psammomys showed a serious liver deterioration (hepatic mass accretion, lipids accumulation), accompanied by an enhanced oxidative stress (MDA increased, GSH depleted). On the other hand, both ADP-dependent and uncoupled respirations greatly diminished below control values, and the respiratory flux to cytochrome oxydase was mildly lowered. Furthermore, an inhibition of complexes I and III together with an activation of complex II were found. With emergence of oxidative stress, possibly related to a defect in oxidative phosphorylation, some molecular adjustments could contribute to alleviate, at least in part, the deleterious outcomes of insulin resistance in this gerbil species. PMID:22675340

  7. Anti-hepatitis C virus potency of a new autophagy inhibitor using human liver slices model

    PubMed Central

    Lagaye, Sylvie; Brun, Sonia; Gaston, Jesintha; Shen, Hong; Stranska, Ruzena; Camus, Claire; Dubray, Clarisse; Rousseau, Géraldine; Massault, Pierre-Philippe; Courcambeck, Jerôme; Bassisi, Firas; Halfon, Philippe; Pol, Stanislas

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the antiviral potency of a new anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) antiviral agent targeting the cellular autophagy machinery. METHODS: Non-infected liver slices, obtained from human liver resection and cut in 350 μm-thick slices (2.7 × 106 cells per slice) were infected with cell culture-grown HCV Con1b/C3 supernatant (multiplicity of infection = 0.1) cultivated for up to ten days. HCV infected slices were treated at day 4 post-infection with GNS-396 for 6 d at different concentrations. HCV replication was evaluated by strand-specific real-time quantitative reverse transcription - polymerase chain reaction. The infectivity titers of supernatants were evaluated by foci formation upon inoculation into naive Huh-7.5.1 cells. The cytotoxic effect of the drugs was evaluated by lactate dehydrogenase leakage assays. RESULTS: The antiviral efficacy of a new antiviral drug, GNS-396, an autophagy inhibitor, on HCV infection of adult human liver slices was evidenced in a dose-dependent manner. At day 6 post-treatment, GNS-396 EC50 was 158 nmol/L without cytotoxic effect (compared to hydroxychloroquine EC50 = 1.17 μmol/L). CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrated that our ex vivo model is efficient for evaluation the potency of autophagy inhibitors, in particular a new quinoline derivative GNS-396 as antiviral could inhibit HCV infection in a dose-dependent manner without cytotoxic effect. PMID:27478540

  8. An IL28B Genotype-Based Clinical Prediction Model for Treatment of Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Thomas R.; Everhart, James E.; Morgan, Timothy R.; Lok, Anna S.; Chung, Raymond T.; Shao, Yongwu; Shiffman, Mitchell L.; Dotrang, Myhanh; Sninsky, John J.; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Genetic variation in IL28B and other factors are associated with sustained virological response (SVR) after pegylated-interferon/ribavirin treatment for chronic hepatitis C (CHC). Using data from the HALT-C Trial, we developed a model to predict a patient's probability of SVR based on IL28B genotype and clinical variables. Methods HALT-C enrolled patients with advanced CHC who had failed previous interferon-based treatment. Subjects were re-treated with pegylated-interferon/ribavirin during trial lead-in. We used step-wise logistic regression to calculate adjusted odds ratios (aOR) and create the predictive model. Leave-one-out cross-validation was used to predict a priori probabilities of SVR and determine area under the receiver operator characteristics curve (AUC). Results Among 646 HCV genotype 1-infected European American patients, 14.2% achieved SVR. IL28B rs12979860-CC genotype was the strongest predictor of SVR (aOR, 7.56; p<.0001); the model also included HCV RNA (log10 IU/ml), AST∶ALT ratio, Ishak fibrosis score and prior ribavirin treatment. For this model AUC was 78.5%, compared to 73.0% for a model restricted to the four clinical predictors and 60.0% for a model restricted to IL28B genotype (p<0.001). Subjects with a predicted probability of SVR <10% had an observed SVR rate of 3.8%; subjects with a predicted probability >10% (43.3% of subjects) had an SVR rate of 27.9% and accounted for 84.8% of subjects actually achieving SVR. To verify that consideration of both IL28B genotype and clinical variables is required for treatment decisions, we calculated AUC values from published data for the IDEAL Study. Conclusion A clinical prediction model based on IL28B genotype and clinical variables can yield useful individualized predictions of the probability of treatment success that could increase SVR rates and decrease the frequency of futile treatment among patients with CHC. PMID:21760886

  9. Reversibility of Hepatic Histological Damage after Surgical Temporary Obstruction of the Common Bile Duct in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Olguín, H. Juárez; Hernández, J. L. Figueroa; Guzman, D. Calderón; Medina, R. Alemón

    2011-01-01

    The reversibility of hepatic histological damage after restoring bile flow in a murine model was assessed. 25 male Balb C mice (25-35 g, age 6 weeks) were divided into 5 groups and their common bile duct (CBD) fastened to obstruct the release of gall bladder and liver contents. Group I, CBD untied at day 10, group II at day 15, and groups III and IV at days 20 and 30, respectively. Hematoxilin-eosin stained liver slices were analysed 0, 5, 10 and 20 days after restoring bile flow. Group I showed slight histological lesions (second stage), as cholangiolar bile pigment concretion, pericholangiolar and portal collagen accumulation; group II, mild lesions (third stage), as cholangiolar hamartomatous proliferation and bile duct portal fibrosis; group III showed severe lesions (fourth stage), as loss of functional parenchyma, and also the second and first stage lesions. Group IV died before 30 days. First stage corresponds to absent lesions (control group). Group I recovered totally, group II recovered only from slight lesions and group III had irreversible damage. Severity of lesions increased gradually and accumulatively, irreversible hepatic damage was achieved at 20 days and is deadly at 30 days. Our model of temporary CBD obstruction was suitable to assess reversibility of hepatic histological damage. PMID:23675215

  10. Cutthroat trout virus as a surrogate in vitro infection model for testing inhibitors of hepatitis E virus replication.

    PubMed

    Debing, Yannick; Winton, James; Neyts, Johan; Dallmeier, Kai

    2013-10-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is one of the most important causes of acute hepatitis worldwide. Although most infections are self-limiting, mortality is particularly high in pregnant women. Chronic infections can occur in transplant and other immune-compromised patients. Successful treatment of chronic hepatitis E has been reported with ribavirin and pegylated interferon-alpha, however severe side effects were observed. We employed the cutthroat trout virus (CTV), a non-pathogenic fish virus with remarkable similarities to HEV, as a potential surrogate for HEV and established an antiviral assay against this virus using the Chinook salmon embryo (CHSE-214) cell line. Ribavirin and the respective trout interferon were found to efficiently inhibit CTV replication. Other known broad-spectrum inhibitors of RNA virus replication such as the nucleoside analog 2'-C-methylcytidine resulted only in a moderate antiviral activity. In its natural fish host, CTV levels largely fluctuate during the reproductive cycle with the virus detected mainly during spawning. We wondered whether this aspect of CTV infection may serve as a surrogate model for the peculiar pathogenesis of HEV in pregnant women. To that end the effect of three sex steroids on in vitro CTV replication was evaluated. Whereas progesterone resulted in marked inhibition of virus replication, testosterone and 17β-estradiol stimulated viral growth. Our data thus indicate that CTV may serve as a surrogate model for HEV, both for antiviral experiments and studies on the replication biology of the Hepeviridae.

  11. Cutthroat trout virus as a surrogate in vitro infection model for testing inhibitors of hepatitis E virus replication

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Debing, Yannick; Winton, James; Neyts, Johan; Dallmeier, Kai

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is one of the most important causes of acute hepatitis worldwide. Although most infections are self-limiting, mortality is particularly high in pregnant women. Chronic infections can occur in transplant and other immune-compromised patients. Successful treatment of chronic hepatitis E has been reported with ribavirin and pegylated interferon-alpha, however severe side effects were observed. We employed the cutthroat trout virus (CTV), a non-pathogenic fish virus with remarkable similarities to HEV, as a potential surrogate for HEV and established an antiviral assay against this virus using the Chinook salmon embryo (CHSE-214) cell line. Ribavirin and the respective trout interferon were found to efficiently inhibit CTV replication. Other known broad-spectrum inhibitors of RNA virus replication such as the nucleoside analog 2′-C-methylcytidine resulted only in a moderate antiviral activity. In its natural fish host, CTV levels largely fluctuate during the reproductive cycle with the virus detected mainly during spawning. We wondered whether this aspect of CTV infection may serve as a surrogate model for the peculiar pathogenesis of HEV in pregnant women. To that end the effect of three sex steroids on in vitro CTV replication was evaluated. Whereas progesterone resulted in marked inhibition of virus replication, testosterone and 17β-estradiol stimulated viral growth. Our data thus indicate that CTV may serve as a surrogate model for HEV, both for antiviral experiments and studies on the replication biology of the Hepeviridae.

  12. Immunization with hepatitis B vaccine accelerates SLE-like disease in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Arango, María-Teresa; Kivity, Shaye; Katzav, Aviva; Gilburd, Boris; Blank, Miri; Tomer, Nir; Volkov, Alex; Barshack, Iris; Chapman, Joab; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2014-11-01

    Hepatitis-B vaccine (HBVv) can prevent HBV-infection and associated liver diseases. However, concerns regarding its safety, particularly among patients with autoimmune diseases (i.e. SLE) were raised. Moreover, the aluminum adjuvant in HBVv was related to immune mediated adverse events. Therefore, we examined the effects of immunization with HBVv or alum on SLE-like disease in a murine model. NZBWF1 mice were immunized with HBVv (Engerix), or aluminum hydroxide (alum) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) at 8 and 12 weeks of age. Mice were followed for weight, autoantibodies titers, blood counts, proteinuria, kidney histology, neurocognitive functions (novel object recognition, staircase, Y-maze and the forced swimming tests) and brain histology. Immunization with HBVv induced acceleration of kidney disease manifested by high anti-dsDNA antibodies (p < 0.01), early onset of proteinuria (p < 0.05), histological damage and deposition of HBs antigen in the kidney. Mice immunized with HBVv and/or alum had decreased cells counts mainly of the red cell lineage (p < 0.001), memory deficits (p < 0.01), and increased activated microglia in different areas of the brain compare with mice immunized with PBS. Anxiety-like behavior was more pronounced among mice immunized with alum. In conclusion, herein we report that immunization with the HBVv aggravated kidney disease in an animal model of SLE. Immunization with either HBVv or alum affected blood counts, neurocognitive functions and brain gliosis. Our data support the concept that different component of vaccines may be linked with immune and autoimmune mediated adverse events.

  13. Verapamil hepatic clearance in four preclinical rat models: towards activity-based scaling.

    PubMed

    Nicolaï, J; De Bruyn, T; Van Veldhoven, P P; Keemink, J; Augustijns, P; Annaert, P

    2015-10-01

    The current study was designed to cross-validate rat liver microsomes (RLM), suspended rat hepatocytes (SRH) and the isolated perfused rat liver (IPRL) model against in vivo pharmacokinetic data, using verapamil as a model drug. Michaelis-Menten constants (Km), for the metabolic disappearance kinetics of verapamil in RLM and SRH (freshly isolated and cryopreserved), were determined and corrected for non-specific binding. The 'unbound' Km determined with RLM (2.8 µM) was divided by the 'unbound' Km determined with fresh and cryopreserved SRH (3.9 µM and 2.1 µM, respectively) to calculate the ratio of intracellular to extracellular unbound concentration (Kpu,u). Kpu,u was significantly different between freshly isolated (0.71) and cryopreserved (1.31) SRH, but intracellular capacity for verapamil metabolism was maintained after cryopreservation (200 vs. 191 µl/min/million cells). Direct comparison of intrinsic clearance values (Clint) in RLM versus SRH, yielded an activity-based scaling factor (SF) of 0.28-0.30 mg microsomal protein/million cells (MPPMC). Merging the IPRL-derived Clint with the MPPMC and SRH data, resulted in scaling factors for MPPGL (80 and 43 mg microsomal protein/g liver) and HPGL (269 and 153 million cells/g liver), respectively. Likewise, the hepatic blood flow (61 ml/min/kg b.wt) was calculated using IPRL Clint and the in vivo Cl. The scaling factors determined here are consistent with previously reported CYP450-content based scaling factors. Overall, the results show that integrated interpretation of data obtained with multiple preclinical tools (i.e. RLM, SRH, IPRL) can contribute to more reliable estimates for scaling factors and ultimately to improved in vivo clearance predictions based on in vitro experimentation.

  14. Hepatitis C: Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Public Home » Hepatitis C » Hepatitis C Treatment Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Hepatitis C Treatment for Veterans and the Public Treatment ...

  15. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis A, is caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). The disease spreads through contact with ... washed in untreated water Putting into your mouth a finger or object that came into contact with ...

  16. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... commonly used with viral hepatitis and related conditions. Web Resources American Liver Foundation A national nonprofit organization ... other liver diseases through research, education, and advocacy. Web site features a database directory of hepatitis clinical ...

  17. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000279.htm Hepatitis B To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hepatitis B is irritation and swelling (inflammation) of the ...

  18. Autoimmune hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Lupoid hepatitis; Chronic acute liver disease ... This form of hepatitis is an autoimmune disease . The body's immune system cannot tell the difference between healthy body tissue and harmful, outside ...

  19. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... times more infectious than HIV. Which adults need hepatitis B vaccine? Any sexually active adult who is not in ... share needles, syringes, or other drug-injection equipment. Hepatitis B vaccine is available alone or in a combination with ...

  20. Hepatic Arterial Embolization with Doxorubicin-Loaded Superabsorbent Polymer Microspheres in a Rabbit Liver Tumor Model

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Sanjay Wright, Kenneth C.; Ensor, Joe; Van Pelt, Carolyn S.; Dixon, Katherine A.; Kundra, Vikas

    2011-10-15

    Objectives: The pharmacokinetic profile after hepatic arterial embolization with superabsorbent microspheres (QuadraSpheres) loaded with doxorubicin was studied. Methods: Rabbits with hepatic VX2 tumors were treated with intra-arterial administration of QuadraSpheres loaded with doxorubicin, or transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) using doxorubicin, Lipiodol and Embospheres, or hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) of doxorubicin. Tumor specimens were evaluated by fluorescence microscopy, and plasma and tumor concentrations of doxorubicin were measured. Results: The peak plasma concentration of doxorubicin was lower in the QuadraSphere group (309.9 ng/ml) than in the HAI (673.4 ng/ml) or TACE (360.5 ng/ml) groups, suggesting higher tumor retention in the QuadraSphere group. Intratumoral doxorubicin levels declined to negligible levels at 1 and 3 days after treatment, respectively, in the HAI and TACE groups. In the QuadraSphere groups, intratumoral doxorubicin level declined after day 1, but was still detectable at 14 days after treatment and was higher than that in the other groups at 1, 3, and 7 days. Intratumoral doxorubicin fluorescence was detected at all time points in the QuadraSphere group, but only at 1 day after treatment in the TACE group. Conclusions: Hepatic arterial administration of doxorubicin-loaded QuadraSpheres enables the sustained release of doxorubicin to hepatic tumors.

  1. Pre-acute hepadnaviral infection is associated with activation-induced apoptotic death of lymphocytes in the woodchuck (Marmota monax) model of hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Gujar, Shashi A; Jenkins, Adam K M; Macparland, Sonya A; Michalak, Tomasz I

    2010-09-01

    Woodchucks (Marmota monax) infected with woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) represent a highly valuable immunopathogenic model of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Both WHV and HBV are noncytopathic hepadnaviruses which induce a strong but delayed virus-specific cellular immune response believed to be a cause of hepatitis. The reason behind this postponement is not well understood and its dissection in the woodchuck model has been hampered by the lack of appropriate research tools. In this study, we applied an assay for the simultaneous detection of cell apoptosis and proliferation to determine the fate of T lymphocytes after WHV infection leading to acute hepatitis. The results revealed that pre-acute WHV infection is associated with the significantly heightened susceptibility of T lymphocytes to activation-induced apoptotic death. This suggests that T lymphocyte function is compromised very early in the course of hepadnaviral infection and this may directly contribute to the postponement of virus-specific T cell response.

  2. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis C, is caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV). It usually spreads through contact with ... childbirth. Most people who are infected with hepatitis C don't have any symptoms for years. If ...

  3. Comfrey (Symphytum Officinale. l.) and Experimental Hepatic Carcinogenesis: A Short-term Carcinogenesis Model Study

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Maria Fernanda Pereira Lavieri; de Oliveira Massoco, Cristina; Xavier, José Guilherme

    2010-01-01

    Comfrey or Symphytum officinale (L.) (Boraginaceae) is a very popular plant used for therapeutic purposes. Since the 1980s, its effects have been studied in long-term carcinogenesis studies, in which Comfrey extract is administered at high doses during several months and the neoplastic hepatic lesions are evaluated. However, the literature on this topic is very poor considering the studies performed under short-term carcinogenesis protocols, such as the ‘resistant hepatocyte model’ (RHM). In these studies, it is possible to observe easily the phenomena related to the early phases of tumor development, since pre-neoplastic lesions (PNLs) rise in about 1–2 months of chemical induction. Herein, the effects of chronic oral treatment of rats with 10% Comfrey ethanolic extract were evaluated in a RHM. Wistar rats were sequentially treated with N-nitrosodiethylamine (ip) and 2-acetilaminofluorene (po), and submitted to hepatectomy to induce carcinogenesis promotion. Macroscopic/microscopic quantitative analysis of PNL was performed. Non-parametric statistical tests (Mann–Whitney and χ2) were used, and the level of significance was set at P ≤ 0.05. Comfrey treatment reduced the number of pre-neoplastic macroscopic lesions up to 1 mm (P ≤ 0.05), the percentage of oval cells (P = 0.0001) and mitotic figures (P = 0.007), as well as the number of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) positive cells (P = 0.0001) and acidophilic pre-neoplastic nodules (P = 0.05). On the other hand, the percentage of cells presenting megalocytosis (P = 0.0001) and vacuolar degeneration (P = 0.0001) was increased. Scores of fibrosis, glycogen stores and the number of nucleolus organizing regions were not altered. The study indicated that oral treatment of rats with 10% Comfrey alcoholic extract reduced cell proliferation in this model. PMID:18955295

  4. Gradually softening hydrogels for modeling hepatic stellate cell behavior during fibrosis regression.

    PubMed

    Caliari, Steven R; Perepelyuk, Maryna; Soulas, Elizabeth M; Lee, Gi Yun; Wells, Rebecca G; Burdick, Jason A

    2016-06-13

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) presents an evolving set of mechanical cues to resident cells. We developed methacrylated hyaluronic acid (MeHA) hydrogels containing both stable and hydrolytically degradable crosslinks to provide cells with a gradually softening (but not fully degradable) milieu, mimicking physiological events such as fibrosis regression. To demonstrate the utility of this cell culture system, we studied the phenotype of rat hepatic stellate cells, the major liver precursors of fibrogenic myofibroblasts, within this softening environment. Stellate cells that were mechanically primed on tissue culture plastic attained a myofibroblast phenotype, which persisted when seeded onto stiff (∼20 kPa) hydrogels. However, mechanically primed stellate cells on stiff-to-soft (∼20 to ∼3 kPa) hydrogels showed reversion of the myofibroblast phenotype over 14 days, with reductions in cell area, expression of the myofibroblast marker alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and Yes-associated protein/Transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (YAP/TAZ) nuclear localization when compared to stellate cells on stiff hydrogels. Cells on stiff-to-soft hydrogels did not fully revert, however. They displayed reduced expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and underwent abnormally rapid re-activation to myofibroblasts in response to re-stiffening of the hydrogels through introduction of additional crosslinks. These features are typical of stellate cells with an intermediate phenotype, reported to occur in vivo with fibrosis regression and re-injury. Together, these data suggest that mechanics play an important role in fibrosis regression and that integrating dynamic mechanical cues into model systems helps capture cell behaviors observed in vivo.

  5. Effects of melatonin on liver function and lipid peroxidation in a rat model of hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    DENG, WEN-SHENG; XU, QING; LIU, YE; JIANG, CHUN-HUI; ZHOU, HONG; GU, LEI

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of melatonin (MT) on liver function and lipid peroxidation following hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). A total of 66 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned into three groups: Normal control (N) group, ischemia-reperfusion (IR) group and the MT-treated group. A hepatic IRI model was developed by blocking the first porta hepatis, and subsequently restoring hepatic blood inflow after 35 min. Following reperfusion, changes in the levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) were detected by a chemical method at various time points. In the MT group, the MDA levels were significantly reduced (P<0.05) at all time points, as compared with the IR group. Furthermore, SOD activity was significantly increased (P<0.05) in the MT group, as compared with the IR group at all time points; and the levels of GSH in the MT group were significantly higher (P<0.05) than those of the IR group at 2, 4, and 8 h post-reperfusion. The levels of ALT, AST and LDH were significantly reduced in the MT group at each time point, as compared with that of the IR group (P<0.05). In conclusion, MT exhibits potent antioxidant properties that may create favorable conditions for the recovery of liver function following IRI. PMID:27168834

  6. Probiotics Supplemented with Omega-3 Fatty Acids are More Effective for Hepatic Steatosis Reduction in an Animal Model of Obesity.

    PubMed

    Kobyliak, Nazarii; Falalyeyeva, Tetyana; Bodnar, Petro; Beregova, Tetyana

    2016-09-22

    Today probiotics have been suggested as a treatment for the prevention of NAFLD. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation may have beneficial effects in regulating hepatic lipid metabolism, adipose tissue function and inflammation. The present study was designed to determine whether probiotics plus omega-3 are superior to probiotics alone on the monosodium glutamate (MSG)-induced NAFLD model in rats. We included 60 rats divided into four groups, 15 animals in each. Rats of group I were intact. Newborn rats of groups II-IV were injected with MSG. The III (Symbiter) group received 2.5 ml/kg of multiprobiotic "Symbiter" containing concentrated biomass of 14 probiotic bacteria genera. The IV (Symbiter-Omega) groups received "Symbiter-Omega" combination of probiotic biomass supplemented with flax and wheat germ oil (250 mg of each, concentration of omega-3 fatty acids 1-5 %). In both interventional groups reduction in total NAS score was observed. Supplementation of alive probiotic mixture with omega-3 fatty acids lead to 20 % higher decrease in steatosis score (0.73 ± 0.11 vs 0.93 ± 0.22, p = 0.848) and reduction by 16.6 % of triglycerides content in liver as compared to probiotic alone. Our study demonstrated more pronounced reduction in hepatic steatosis and hepatic lipid accumulation after treatment with combination of alive probiotics and omega-3 as compared to probiotics alone.

  7. Experimental chronic hepatitis B infection of neonatal tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri chinensis): A model to study molecular causes for susceptibility and disease progression to chronic hepatitis in humans

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection continues to be an escalating global health problem. Feasible and effective animal models for HBV infection are the prerequisite for developing novel therapies for this disease. The tree shrew (Tupaia) is a small animal species evolutionary closely related to humans, and thus is permissive to certain human viral pathogens. Whether tree shrews could be chronically infected with HBV in vivo has been controversial for decades. Most published research has been reported on adult tree shrews, and only small numbers of HBV infected newborn tree shrews had been observed over short time periods. We investigated susceptibility of newborn tree shrews to experimental HBV infection as well as viral clearance over a protracted time period. Results Forty-six newborn tree shrews were inoculated with the sera from HBV-infected patients or tree shrews. Serum and liver samples of the inoculated animals were periodically collected and analyzed using fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Southern blot, and immunohistochemistry. Six tree shrews were confirmed and four were suspected as chronically HBV-infected for more than 48 (up to 228) weeks after inoculation, including three that had been inoculated with serum from a confirmed HBV-infected tree shrew. Conclusions Outbred neonatal tree shrews can be long-term chronically infected with HBV at a frequency comparable to humans. The model resembles human disease where also a smaller proportion of infected individuals develop chronic HBV related disease. This model might enable genetic and immunologic investigations which would allow determination of underlying molecular causes favoring susceptibility for chronic HBV infection and disease establishment vs. viral clearance. PMID:22913805

  8. Pathological and MR-DWI study of the acute hepatic injury model after stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Quan-Liang; Xiao, En-Hua; Zhou, Qi-Chang; Luo, Jian-Guang; Wu, Hai-Jun

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values as an indication of reconditioning of acute hepatic injury (AHI) after allogeneic mononuclear bone marrow cell (MBMC) transplantation. METHODS: Three groups were used in our study: a cell transplantation group (n = 21), transplantation control group (n = 21) and normal control group (n = 10). AHI model rabbits in the cell transplantation group were injected with 5 mL of MBMC suspension at multiple sites in the liver and the transplantation controls were injected with 5 mL D-Hanks solution. At the end of the 1st, 2nd and 4th wk, 7 rabbits were randomly selected from the cell transplantation group and transplantation control group for magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging (MR-DWI) and measurement of the mean ADC values of injured livers. After MR-DWI examination, the rabbits were sacrificed and the livers subjected to pathological examination. Ten healthy rabbits from the normal control group were used for MR-DWI examination and measurement of the mean ADC value of normal liver. RESULTS: At all time points, the liver pathological scores from the cell transplantation group were significantly lower than those in the transplantation control group (27.14 ± 1.46 vs 69.29 ± 6.16, 22.29 ± 2.29 vs 57.00 ± 1.53, 19.00 ± 2.31 vs 51.86 ± 6.04, P = 0.000). The mean ADC values of the cell transplantation group were significantly higher than the transplantation control group ((1.07 ± 0.07) × 10-3 mm2/s vs (0.69 ± 0.05) × 10-3 mm2/s, (1.41 ± 0.04) × 10-3 mm2/s vs (0.84 ± 0.06) × 10-3 mm2/s, (1.68 ± 0.04) × 10-3 mm2/s vs (0.86 ± 0.04) × 10-3 mm2/s, P = 0.000). The pathological scores of the cell transplantation group and transplantation control group gradually decreased. However, their mean ADC values gradually increased to near that of the normal control. At the end of the 1st wk, the mean ADC values of the cell transplantation group and transplantation control group were significantly lower

  9. Analysis of Hepatitis C Virus Decline during Treatment with the Protease Inhibitor Danoprevir Using a Multiscale Model

    SciTech Connect

    Rong, Libin; Guedj, Jeremie; Dahari, Harel; Coffield, Daniel J.; Levi, Micha; Smith, Patrick; Perelson, Alan S.

    2013-03-14

    The current paradigm for studying hepatitis C virus (HCV) dynamics in patients utilizes a standard viral dynamic model that keeps track of uninfected (target) cells, infected cells, and virus. The model does not account for the dynamics of intracellular viral replication, which is the major target of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs). In this paper, we describe and study a recently developed multiscale age-structured model that explicitly considers the potential effects of DAAs on intracellular viral RNA production, degradation, and secretion as virus into the circulation. We show that when therapy significantly blocks both intracellular viral RNA production and virus secretion, the serum viral load decline has three phases, with slopes reflecting the rate of serum viral clearance, the rate of loss of intracellular viral RNA, and the rate of loss of intracellular replication templates and infected cells, respectively. We also derive analytical approximations of the multiscale model and use one of them to analyze data from patients treated for 14 days with the HCV protease inhibitor danoprevir. Analysis suggests that danoprevir significantly blocks intracellular viral production (with mean effectiveness 99.2%), enhances intracellular viral RNA degradation about 5-fold, and moderately inhibits viral secretion (with mean effectiveness 56%). Finally, the multiscale model can be used to study viral dynamics in patients treated with other DAAs and explore their mechanisms of action in treatment of hepatitis C.

  10. Analysis of Hepatitis C Virus Decline during Treatment with the Protease Inhibitor Danoprevir Using a Multiscale Model

    DOE PAGES

    Rong, Libin; Guedj, Jeremie; Dahari, Harel; ...

    2013-03-14

    The current paradigm for studying hepatitis C virus (HCV) dynamics in patients utilizes a standard viral dynamic model that keeps track of uninfected (target) cells, infected cells, and virus. The model does not account for the dynamics of intracellular viral replication, which is the major target of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs). In this paper, we describe and study a recently developed multiscale age-structured model that explicitly considers the potential effects of DAAs on intracellular viral RNA production, degradation, and secretion as virus into the circulation. We show that when therapy significantly blocks both intracellular viral RNA production and virus secretion,more » the serum viral load decline has three phases, with slopes reflecting the rate of serum viral clearance, the rate of loss of intracellular viral RNA, and the rate of loss of intracellular replication templates and infected cells, respectively. We also derive analytical approximations of the multiscale model and use one of them to analyze data from patients treated for 14 days with the HCV protease inhibitor danoprevir. Analysis suggests that danoprevir significantly blocks intracellular viral production (with mean effectiveness 99.2%), enhances intracellular viral RNA degradation about 5-fold, and moderately inhibits viral secretion (with mean effectiveness 56%). Finally, the multiscale model can be used to study viral dynamics in patients treated with other DAAs and explore their mechanisms of action in treatment of hepatitis C.« less

  11. [Effects of calcitriol and alfacalcidol on an osteoporosis model in rats with hepatic failure].

    PubMed

    Yamanishi, A; Ishibashi, Y; Kuriyama, K; Tachiiri, T; Kusajima, H; Kojima, E; Momo, K

    1999-01-01

    To predict the potential utility of calcitriol in human osteoporosis with hepatic dysfunction, we examined the effects of calcitriol and alfacalcidol in ovariectomized (OVX) aged-rats with CCl4-induced hepatic failure. In OVX+CCl4 rats, GOT, GTP, alkaline phosphatase and total bilirubin increased and hepatic enzyme activity (cytochrome b5 and P450) decreased. Repeated oral doses of calcitriol (0.1 and 0.2 microgram/kg) for 51 days inhibited a decrease in serum calcium concentration. This effect was more potent than that of alfacalcidol at the same dose. Both drugs tended to inhibit a decrease in femoral calcium contents. Calcitriol (0.2 microgram/kg) prevented a decrease in femoral bone density (dry and ash weight per volume), unlike alfacalcidol. Soft X-ray imaging analysis revealed that both drugs tended to inhibit the decrease in femoral bone density. There were no differences in the femoral bone strength between OVX+CCl4 and sham-operated rats. The serum calcitriol concentrations increased after the last doses of calcitriol, while they did not increase after the last dose of alfacalcidol. All these effects of calcitriol were related to the serum calcitriol levels. These results suggest that calcitriol, unlike alfacalcidol, may have a clinical therapeutic effect in osteoporosis with hepatic dysfunction.

  12. Experimental transmission of equine hepacivirus in horses as a model for hepatitis C virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Equine hepacivirus (EHCV; non-primate hepacivirus) is a hepatotropic member of the Flaviviridae family that infects horses. Although EHCV is the closest known relative to hepatitis C virus (HCV), its complete replication kinetics in vivo have not been described, and direct evidence that it causes he...

  13. OVERVIEW OF AN INTERLABORATORY COLLABORATION ON EVALUATING THE EFFECTS OF MODEL HEPATOTOXICANTS ON HEPATIC GENE EXPRESSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluating the Effects of Methapyrilene and Clofibrate on Hepatic Gene Expression: A Collaboration Between Laboratories and a Comparison of Platform and Analytical Approaches

    Roger G. Ulrich1, John C. Rockett2, G. Gordon Gibson3 and Syril Pettit4

    1 Rosetta Inpharmat...

  14. Impact of calcineurin inhibitors with or without interferon on hepatitis C virus titers in a chimeric mouse model of hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Kneteman, Norman M; Asthana, Sonal; Lewis, Jamie; Dibben, Chelcey; Douglas, Donna; Nourbakhsh, Mahra; Tyrrell, Lorne J; Lund, Garry

    2012-01-01

    Cyclosporine A (CSA) has potent effects against hepatitis C virus (HCV) in vitro, but its clinical efficacy after liver transplantation (LT) is uncertain. We evaluated the impact of CSA and tacrolimus (TAC) with or without concomitant interferon (IFN) therapy on serum HCV titers in a chimeric mouse model of HCV infection. Six groups of HCV-infected mice received only the vehicle, IFN, CSA, CSA and IFN, TAC, or TAC and IFN for 4 weeks. The quantitative HCV polymerase chain reaction levels were determined after 1, 2, and 4 weeks of drug administration. There were no significant differences in the HCV titers after 4 weeks of treatment between the non-IFN-treated groups (log HCV titers: 3.5 ± 0.3 for the vehicle group, 4.4 ± 0.6 for the CSA group, and 4.3 ± 0.4 for the TAC group, P = 0.3). Although IFN had a consistent effect of reducing HCV titers across the groups, there was no significant impact of CSA on HCV levels when it was used alone or in combination with IFN at any time point. The 4-week HCV titers were as follows: 3.2 ± 0.3 for the IFN group, 4.7 ± 0.4 for the CSA/IFN group, and 4.0 ± 0.5 for the TAC/IFN group (P = 0.07). The CSA/IFN and TAC/IFN groups did not differ significantly (P = 0.6). Six of the 7 animals in the IFN group (85.7%) had an HCV titer decline ≥ 1 log, whereas in the test groups (CSA/IFN and TAC/IFN), 6 of 9 animals (66.7%) achieved a 1-log decline in the HCV titer (P = 1). Using this animal model, we could find no evidence supporting the routine use of CSA after LT in HCV-infected patients.

  15. Reversal learning impairment and alterations in the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus in a model of portosystemic hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Marta; Méndez-López, Magdalena; López, Laudino; Begega, Azucena; Aller, María Angeles; Arias, Jaime; Arias, Jorge L

    2010-09-01

    Patients with liver dysfunction often suffer from hepatic encephalopathy (HE), a neurological complication that affects attention and memory. Various experimental animal models have been used to study HE, the most frequently used being the portocaval shunt (PCS). In order to determine brain substrates of cognitive impairment in this model, we assessed reversal learning and c-Fos expression in a rat model of portosystemic derivation. PCS and sham-operated rats (SHAM) were tested for reversal learning. Brains were processed for c-Fos immunocytochemistry. The total number of c-Fos positive nuclei was quantified in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. The spatial reference memory task showed no differences between groups in escape latencies. The no-platform probe test showed that both the PCS and the SHAM learned the location of platform. However, the PCS group perseverated in the old target during reversal. The PCS group presented less c-Fos- positive cells in prelimbic cortex, CA1 and dentate gyrus of the dorsal hippocampus than SHAM. Overall, these results suggest that this specific model of portosystemic hepatic encephalopathy produces reversal learning impairment that could be linked to dysfunction in neuronal activity in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus.

  16. Hepatitis Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ogholikhan, Sina; Schwarz, Kathleen B.

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is a serious health problem all over the world. However, the reduction of the morbidity and mortality due to vaccinations against hepatitis A and hepatitis B has been a major component in the overall reduction in vaccine preventable diseases. We will discuss the epidemiology, vaccine development, and post-vaccination effects of the hepatitis A and B virus. In addition, we discuss attempts to provide hepatitis D vaccine for the 350 million individuals infected with hepatitis B globally. Given the lack of a hepatitis C vaccine, the many challenges facing the production of a hepatitis C vaccine will be shown, along with current and former vaccination trials. As there is no current FDA-approved hepatitis E vaccine, we will present vaccination data that is available in the rest of the world. Finally, we will discuss the existing challenges and questions facing future endeavors for each of the hepatitis viruses, with efforts continuing to focus on dramatically reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with these serious infections of the liver. PMID:26978406

  17. Application of a Combined Model with Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) and Generalized Regression Neural Network (GRNN) in Forecasting Hepatitis Incidence in Heng County, China

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Hao; Gao, Lian; Liang, Bingyu; Huang, Jiegang; Zang, Ning; Liao, Yanyan; Yu, Jun; Lai, Jingzhen; Qin, Fengxiang; Su, Jinming; Ye, Li; Chen, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatitis is a serious public health problem with increasing cases and property damage in Heng County. It is necessary to develop a model to predict the hepatitis epidemic that could be useful for preventing this disease. Methods The autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model and the generalized regression neural network (GRNN) model were used to fit the incidence data from the Heng County CDC (Center for Disease Control and Prevention) from January 2005 to December 2012. Then, the ARIMA-GRNN hybrid model was developed. The incidence data from January 2013 to December 2013 were used to validate the models. Several parameters, including mean absolute error (MAE), root mean square error (RMSE), mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) and mean square error (MSE), were used to compare the performance among the three models. Results The morbidity of hepatitis from Jan 2005 to Dec 2012 has seasonal variation and slightly rising trend. The ARIMA(0,1,2)(1,1,1)12 model was the most appropriate one with the residual test showing a white noise sequence. The smoothing factor of the basic GRNN model and the combined model was 1.8 and 0.07, respectively. The four parameters of the hybrid model were lower than those of the two single models in the validation. The parameters values of the GRNN model were the lowest in the fitting of the three models. Conclusions The hybrid ARIMA-GRNN model showed better hepatitis incidence forecasting in Heng County than the single ARIMA model and the basic GRNN model. It is a potential decision-supportive tool for controlling hepatitis in Heng County. PMID:27258555

  18. Hepatic arterial administration of sorafenib and iodized oil effectively attenuates tumor growth and intrahepatic metastasis in rabbit VX2 hepatocellular carcinoma model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Liu, Feng-Yong; Fu, Jin-Xin; Duan, Feng; Fan, Qing-Sheng; Wang, Mao-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the therapeutic effect of the hepatic arterial administration of sorafenib in rabbit VX-2 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) model. Methods: Rabbit VX-2 HCC models were established via implanting VX-2 tumors into the livers, and randomly divided into four groups, respectively treated with (1) The hepatic arterial administration of iodized oil alone (TACE-i), (2) The hepatic arterial administration of iodized oil and pharmorubicin (TACE-ip), (3) The hepatic arterial administration of iodized and cis-DDP (TACE-ic), (4) The hepatic arterial administration of iodized and sorafenib (TACE-is). The growth rate and intrahepatic metastasis of implanted VX-2 tumor in each rabbit were measured. Microvessel density (MVD) in the adjacent tissues of implanted VX-2 tumor were estimated by detecting the expression of CD34 and VEGF level in tumor adjacent tissues were also examined by Immunohistochemistry. Results: Compared with other groups, TACE-is treatment group presented a better effect on inhibiting tumor growth rate and intrahepatic metastasis in rabbit VX-2 HCC model. The angiogenesis (assessed by MVD) in the adjacent tissues were suppressed more dramatically in TACE-is treated group. Moreover, TACE-is treatment did not significantly increase the levels of alanine transaminase and creatinine compared to the group with TACE-i treatment. Conclusion: The hepatic arterial administration of sorafenib and iodized oil (TACE-is) effectively attenuates tumor growth and intrahepatic metastasis in rabbit VX-2 HCC model without obvious hepatic and renal toxicity. One of the related mechanisms may be due to the inhibition of angiogenesis in the adjacent tissues. Our data indicated that TACE-is may be a secure and effective treatment for HCC. PMID:25550815

  19. Impact of input parameters on the prediction of hepatic plasma clearance using the well-stirred model.

    PubMed

    Wan, Hong; Bold, Peter; Larsson, Lars-Olof; Ulander, Johan; Peters, Sheila; Löfberg, Boel; Ungell, Anna-Lena; Någård, Mats; Llinàs, Antonio

    2010-09-01

    The in vitro metabolic stability assays are indispensable for screening the metabolic liability of new chemical entities (NCEs) in drug discovery. Intrinsic clearance (CL(int)) values from liver microsomes and/or hepatocytes are frequently used to assess metabolic stability as well as to quantitatively predict in vivo hepatic plasma clearance (CL(H)). An often used approximation is the so called well-stirred model which has gained widespread use. The applications of the well-stirred model are typically dependent on several measured parameters and hence with potential for error-propagation. Despite widespread use, it was recently suggested that the well-stirred model in some circumstances has been misused for in vitro in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE). In this work, we follow up that discussion and present a retrospective analysis of IVIVE for hepatic clearance prediction from in vitro metabolic stability data. We focus on the impact of input parameters on the well stirred model; in particular comparing "reference model" (with all experimentally determined values as input parameters) versus simplified models (with incomplete input parameters in the models). Based on a systematic comparative analysis and model comparison using datasets of diverse drug-like compounds and NCEs from rat and human, we conclude that simplified models, disregarding binding data, may be sufficiently good for IVIVE evaluation and compound ranking at early stage for cost-effective screening. Factors that can influence prediction accuracy are discussed, including in vitro intrinsic clearance (CL(int)) and in vivo CL(int) scaling factor used, non-specific binding to microsomes (fu(m)), blood to plasma ratio (C(B)/C(P)) and in particular fraction unbound in plasma (fu). In particular, the fu discrepancies between literature data and in-house values and between two different compound concentrations 1 and 10 µM are exemplified and its potential impact on prediction performance is demonstrated using a

  20. Inactivation of Viruses and Bacteriophages as Models for Swine Hepatitis E Virus in Food Matrices.

    PubMed

    Emmoth, Eva; Rovira, Jordi; Rajkovic, Andreja; Corcuera, Elena; Wilches Pérez, Diego; Dergel, Irene; Ottoson, Jakob R; Widén, Frederik

    2017-03-01

    Hepatitis E virus has been recognised as a food-borne virus hazard in pork products, due to its zoonotic properties. This risk can be reduced by adequate treatment of the food to inactivate food-borne viruses. We used a spectrum of viruses and bacteriophages to evaluate the effect of three food treatments: high pressure processing (HPP), lactic acid (LA) and intense light pulse (ILP) treatments. On swine liver at 400 MPa for 10 min, HPP gave log10 reductions of ≥4.2, ≥5.0 and 3.4 for feline calicivirus (FCV) 2280, FCV wildtype (wt) and murine norovirus 1 (MNV 1), respectively. Escherichia coli coliphage ϕX174 displayed a lower reduction of 1.1, while Escherichia coli coliphage MS2 was unaffected. For ham at 600 MPa, the corresponding reductions were 4.1, 4.4, 2.9, 1.7 and 1.3 log10. LA treatment at 2.2 M gave log10 reductions in the viral spectrum of 0.29-2.1 for swine liver and 0.87-3.1 for ham, with ϕX174 and MNV 1, respectively, as the most stable microorganisms. The ILP treatment gave log10 reductions of 1.6-2.8 for swine liver, 0.97-2.2 for ham and 1.3-2.3 for sausage, at 15-60 J cm(-2), with MS2 as the most stable microorganism. The HPP treatment gave significantly (p < 0.05) greater virus reduction on swine liver than ham for the viruses at equivalent pressure/time combinations. For ILP treatment, reductions on swine liver were significantly (p < 0.05) greater than on ham for all microorganisms. The results presented here could be used in assessments of different strategies to protect consumers against virus contamination and in advice to food producers. Conservative model indicators for the pathogenic viruses could be suggested.

  1. A lipidomics study reveals hepatic lipid signatures associating with deficiency of the LDL receptor in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Chao; Hu, Chunxiu; Xie, Bingxian; Du, Yinan; Chen, Liang; Yang, Wei; Yang, Liu; Chen, Qiaoli; Shen, Bin; Hu, Bian; Zheng, Zhihong; Zhu, Haibo; Huang, Xingxu; Xu, Guowang; Chen, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) plays a critical role in the liver for the clearance of plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Its deficiency causes hypercholesterolemia in many models. To facilitate the usage of rats as animal models for the discovery of cholesterol-lowering drugs, we took a genetic approach to delete the LDLR in rats aiming to increase plasma LDL cholesterol (LDL-C). An LDLR knockout rat was generated via zinc-finger nuclease technology, which harbors a 19-basepair deletion in the seventh exon of the ldlr gene. As expected, deletion of the LDLR elevated total cholesterol and total triglyceride in the plasma, and caused a tenfold increase of plasma LDL-C and a fourfold increase of plasma very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL-C). A lipidomics analysis revealed that deletion of the LDLR affected hepatic lipid metabolism, particularly lysophosphatidylcholines, free fatty acids and sphingolipids in the liver. Cholesterol ester (CE) 20:4 also displayed a significant increase in the LDLR knockout rats. Taken together, the LDLR knockout rat offers a new model of hypercholesterolemia, and the lipidomics analysis reveals hepatic lipid signatures associating with deficiency of the LDL receptor. PMID:27378433

  2. Comparison of trout hepatocytes and liver S9 fractions as in vitro models for predicting hepatic clearance in fish.

    PubMed

    Fay, Kellie A; Fitzsimmons, Patrick N; Hoffman, Alex D; Nichols, John W

    2017-02-01

    Isolated hepatocytes and liver S9 fractions have been used to collect in vitro biotransformation data for fish as a means of improving modeled estimates of chemical bioaccumulation. To date, however, there have been few direct comparisons of these 2 methods. In the present study, cryopreserved trout hepatocytes were used to measure in vitro intrinsic clearance rates for 6 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). These rates were extrapolated to estimates of in vivo intrinsic clearance and used as inputs to a well stirred liver model to predict hepatic clearance. Predicted rates of hepatic clearance were then evaluated by comparison with measured rates determined previously using isolated perfused livers. Hepatic clearance rates predicted using hepatocytes were in good agreement with measured values (<2.1-fold difference for 5 of 6 compounds) under 2 competing binding assumptions. These findings, which may be attributed in part to high rates of PAH metabolism, are similar to those obtained previously using data from liver S9 fractions. For 1 compound (benzo[a]pyrene), the in vivo intrinsic clearance rate calculated using S9 data was 10-fold higher than that determined using hepatocytes, possibly due to a diffusion limitation on cellular uptake. Generally, however, there was good agreement between calculated in vivo intrinsic clearance rates obtained using either in vitro test system. These results suggest that both systems can be used to improve bioaccumulation assessments for fish, particularly when vitro rates of activity are relatively high, although additional work is needed to determine if the chemical domain of applicability for each system differs. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:463-471. Published 2016 SETAC. This article is a US government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

  3. Taurine treatment preserves brain and liver mitochondrial function in a rat model of fulminant hepatic failure and hyperammonemia.

    PubMed

    Jamshidzadeh, Akram; Heidari, Reza; Abasvali, Mozhgan; Zarei, Mehdi; Ommati, Mohammad Mehdi; Abdoli, Narges; Khodaei, Forouzan; Yeganeh, Yasaman; Jafari, Faezeh; Zarei, Azita; Latifpour, Zahra; Mardani, Elnaz; Azarpira, Negar; Asadi, Behnam; Najibi, Asma

    2017-02-01

    Ammonia-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and energy crisis is known as a critical consequence of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Hence, mitochondria are potential targets of therapy in HE. The current investigation was designed to evaluate the role of taurine treatment on the brain and liver mitochondrial function in a rat model of hepatic encephalopathy and hyperammonemia. The animals received thioacetamide (400mg/kg, i.p, for three consecutive days at 24-h intervals) as a model of acute liver failure and hyperammonemia. Several biochemical parameters were investigated in the serum, while the animals' cognitive function and locomotor activity were monitored. Mitochondria was isolated from the rats' brain and liver and several indices were assessed in isolated mitochondria. Liver failure led to cognitive dysfunction and impairment in locomotor activity in the rats. Plasma and brain ammonia was high and serum markers of liver injury were drastically elevated in the thioacetamide-treated group. An assessment of brain and liver mitochondrial function in the thioacetamide-treated animals revealed an inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase activity (SDA), collapsed mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial swelling, and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, a significant decrease in mitochondrial ATP was detected in the brain and liver mitochondria isolated from thioacetamide-treated animals. Taurine treatment (250, 500, and 1000mg/kg) decreased mitochondrial swelling, ROS, and LPO. Moreover, the administration of this amino acid restored brain and liver mitochondrial ATP. These data suggest taurine to be a potential protective agent with therapeutic capability against hepatic encephalopathy and hyperammonemia-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and energy crisis.

  4. Feature Hepatitis: Hepatitis Can Strike Anyone

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature Hepatitis Hepatitis Can Strike Anyone Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table ... from all walks of life are affected by hepatitis, especially hepatitis C, the most common form of ...

  5. Hepatitis A through E (Viral Hepatitis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... travelers How can hepatitis B be prevented? The hepatitis B vaccine offers the best protection. All infants and unvaccinated ... should receive hepatitis B immune globulin and the hepatitis B vaccine within 12 hours of birth to help prevent ...

  6. Hepatitis C Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hepatitis C Antibody; Anti-HCV; HCV-PCR; HCV-RNA; Hepatitis C Viral Load Formal name: Viral Hepatitis C Antibody Screen; Viral Hepatitis C RNA by PCR; Hepatitis C Virus Genotype Related tests: ...

  7. Alcohol and Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home » Living with Hepatitis » Daily Living: Alcohol Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... Alcohol for Veterans and the Public Alcohol and Hepatitis: Entire Lesson Overview Alcohol is one of the ...

  8. Hepatitis C: Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Public Home » Hepatitis C » Treatment Decisions Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... can I find out about participating in a hepatitis C clinical trial? Many trials are being conducted ...

  9. Hepatitis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Hepatitis KidsHealth > For Parents > Hepatitis Print A A A ... to Call the Doctor en español Hepatitis About Hepatitis The word hepatitis simply means an inflammation of ...

  10. Travelers' Health: Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chapter 3 - Hepatitis A Chapter 3 - Hepatitis C Hepatitis B Francisco Averhoff INFECTIOUS AGENT Hepatitis B is ... their exposures. Map 3-04. Prevalence of chronic hepatitis B virus infection among adults PDF Version (printable) ...

  11. Akt2 is required for hepatic lipid accumulation in models of insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Leavens, Karla F.; Easton, Rachael M.; Shulman, Gerald I.; Previs, Stephen F.; Birnbaum, Morris J.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Insulin drives the global anabolic response to nutrient ingestion, regulating both carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Previous studies have demonstrated that Akt2/protein kinase B is critical to insulin’s control of glucose metabolism, but its role in lipid metabolism has remained controversial. Here we show that Akt2 is required for hepatic lipid accumulation in obese, insulin-resistant states induced by either leptin-deficiency or high fat diet feeding. Lepob/ob mice lacking hepatic Akt2 failed to amass triglycerides in their livers, associated with and most likely due to a decrease in lipogenic gene expression and de novo lipogenesis. However, Akt2 is also required for steatotic pathways unrelated to fatty acid synthesis, as mice fed high fat diet had reduced liver triglycerides in the absence of hepatic Akt2 but did not exhibit changes in lipogenesis. These data demonstrate that Akt2 is a requisite component of the insulin-dependent regulation of lipid metabolism during insulin resistance. PMID:19883618

  12. Brain concentrations of benzodiazepines are elevated in an animal model of hepatic encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Basile, A.S.; Pannell, L.; Jaouni, T.; Gammal, S.H.; Fales, H.M.; Jones, E.A.; Skolnick, P. )

    1990-07-01

    Brain extracts from rats with hepatic encephalopathy due to thioacetamide-induced fulminant hepatic failure contained 4- to 6-fold higher concentrations of substances that inhibit radioligand binding to benzodiazepine receptors than corresponding control rat extracts. Both isocratic and gradient-elution HPLC indicated that this inhibitory activity was localized in 3-8 peaks with retention times corresponding to deschlorodiazepam, deschlorolorazepam, lorazepam, oxazepam, diazepam, and N-desmethyldiazepam. The presence of diazepam and N-desmethyldiazepam was confirmed by mass spectroscopy. Both mass spectroscopic and radiometric techniques indicated that the concentrations of N-desmethyldiazepam and diazepam in brain extracts from encephalopathic rats were 2-9 and 5-7 times higher, respectively, than in control brain extracts. While benzodiazepines have been identified previously in mammalian and plant tissues, this report demonstrates that concentrations of these substances are increased in a pathophysiological condition. These findings provide a rational basis for the use of benzodiazepine receptor antagonists in the management of hepatic encephalopathy in humans.

  13. Lineage tracing demonstrates no evidence of cholangiocyte epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in murine models of hepatic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Andrew S.; Diaz, Rosalyn; Hui, Jia-Ji; Yanger, Kilangsungla; Zong, Yiwei; Alpini, Gianfranco; Stanger, Ben Z.; Wells, Rebecca G.

    2011-01-01

    Whether or not cholangiocytes or their hepatic progenitors undergo an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) to become matrix-producing myofibroblasts during biliary fibrosis is a significant ongoing controversy. To assess whether EMT is active during biliary fibrosis, we used Alfp-Cre x Rosa26-YFP mice, in which the epithelial cells of the liver (hepatocytes, cholangiocytes, and their bipotential progenitors) are heritably labeled at high efficiency with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Primary cholangiocytes isolated from our reporter strain were able to undergo EMT in vitro when treated with transforming growth factor-β1 alone or in combination with tumor necrosis factor-α, as indicated by adoption of fibroblastoid morphology, intracellular relocalization of E-cadherin, and expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). To determine whether EMT occurs in vivo, we induced liver fibrosis in Alfp-Cre x Rosa26-YFP mice using the bile duct ligation (BDL; 2, 4, and 8 weeks), carbon tetrachloride (CCl4, 3 weeks), and 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC; 2 and 3 weeks) models. In no case did we find evidence of co-localization of YFP with the mesenchymal markers S100A4, vimentin, α-SMA, or pro-collagen 1α2, although these proteins were abundant in the peribiliary regions. Conclusion Hepatocytes and cholangiocytes do not undergo EMT in murine models of hepatic fibrosis. PMID:21520179

  14. Generation and characterization of a transgenic mouse model with hepatic expression of human CYP2A6.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing-Yu; Gu, Jun; Su, Ting; Cui, Huadong; Zhang, Xiuling; D'Agostino, Jaime; Zhuo, Xiaoliang; Yang, Weizhu; Swiatek, Pamela J; Ding, Xinxin

    2005-12-09

    The aim of this study was to prepare and characterize a transgenic mouse model in which CYP2A6, a human P450 enzyme, is expressed specifically in the liver. CYP2A6, which is mainly expressed in human liver, is active toward many xenobiotics. Our transgene construct contained the mouse transthyretin promoter/enhancer, a full-length CYP2A6 cDNA, and a downstream neomycin-resistance gene for positive selection in embryonic stem cells. Hepatic expression of the CYP2A6 transgene was demonstrated by immunoblotting, whereas tissue specificity of CYP2A6 expression was confirmed by RNA-PCR. The transgenic mouse was further characterized after being backcrossed to the B6 strain for six generations. Hepatic microsomes from homozygous transgenic mice had activities significantly higher than those of B6 mice toward coumarin. The in vivo activity of transgenic CYP2A6 was also determined. Systemic clearance of coumarin was significantly higher in the transgenic mice than in B6 controls, consistent with the predicted role of CYP2A6 as the major coumarin hydroxylase in human liver. The CYP2A6-transgenic mouse model should be valuable for studying the in vivo function of this polymorphic human enzyme in drug metabolism and chemical toxicity.

  15. Treatment of hepatitis C virus infection with interferon and small molecule direct antivirals: viral kinetics and modeling

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Libin; Perelson, Alan S.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection remains a threat to global public health. Treatment with pegylated interferon (IFN) plus ribavirin leads to a sustained virologic response in about 50% of patients. New therapies using direct antiviral agents have the potential to cure patients unresponsive to IFN-based therapies. Mathematical modeling has played an important role in studying HCV kinetics. Using models one can evaluate the effectiveness of new treatment agents, estimate important parameters that govern virus-host interactions, explore possible mechanisms of drug action against HCV, investigate the development of drug resistance and study quasispecies dynamics during therapy. Here we review our current knowledge of HCV kinetics under IFN-based therapy and newly developed antiviral agents specifically targeted to attack HCV, and show how mathematical models have helped improve our understanding of HCV infection and treatment. PMID:20370626

  16. Recapitulation of treatment response patterns in a novel humanized mouse model for chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Winer, Benjamin Y; Huang, Tiffany; Low, Benjamin E; Avery, Cindy; Pais, Mihai-Alexandru; Hrebikova, Gabriela; Siu, Evelyn; Chiriboga, Luis; Wiles, Michael V; Ploss, Alexander

    2017-02-01

    There are ~350 million chronic carriers of hepatitis B (HBV). While a prophylactic vaccine and drug regimens to suppress viremia are available, chronic HBV infection is rarely cured. HBV's limited host tropism leads to a scarcity of susceptible small animal models and is a hurdle to developing curative therapies. Mice that support engraftment with human hepatoctyes have traditionally been generated through crosses of murine liver injury models to immunodeficient backgrounds. Here, we describe the disruption of fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase directly in the NOD Rag1(-/-) IL2RγNULL (NRG) background using zinc finger nucleases. The resultant human liver chimeric mice sustain persistent HBV viremia for >90 days. When treated with standard of care therapy, HBV DNA levels decrease below detection but rebound when drug suppression is released, mimicking treatment response observed in patients. Our study highlights the utility of directed gene targeting approaches in zygotes to create new humanized mouse models for human diseases.

  17. Analysis of hepatic gene expression profile in a spontaneous mouse model of type 2 diabetes under a high sucrose diet.

    PubMed

    Nojima, Koji; Sugimoto, Ken; Ueda, Hironori; Babaya, Naru; Ikegami, Hiroshi; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2013-01-01

    Both genetic factors and diabetogenic environmental factors, such as a high-sucrose diet (HSD), are involved in the development of type 2 diabetes. In this study, the Nagoya-Shibata-Yasuda (NSY) mouse, an animal model of type 2 diabetes and C3H mice used as controls, were fed a HSD, a high-fat diet (HFD) or a regular diet (RD) from weaning. In C3H mice, HFD significantly increased body weight gain, but maintained glucose tolerance. In contrast, in NSY mice, HSD resulted in increased body weight gain and liver steatosis and increased glucose intolerance to a greater extent than HFD. Furthermore, we performed DNA microarray analysis to detect differences in hepatic gene expression levels in both strains under HSD. We then performed RT-PCR analysis on selected genes to evaluate basal expression level under RD and changes under HSD conditions. HSD-fed NSY, but not C3H mice, exhibited increased hepatic expression levels of Pparg2, an isoform of Pparg as well as G0s2, a target of Pparg, which are known to be adipocyte-specific genes. Compared to RD-fed C3H mice, hepatic expression levels of Kat2b (transcriptional regulation), Hsd3b5 (steroid hormone metabolism) and Cyp7b1 (bile acid metabolism) were initially lower in RD-fed NSY mice, and were further decreased in HSD-fed NSY mice. Expression of Metallothionein (Mt1) and Metallothionein 2 (Mt2) was significantly lower in NSY mice compared to C3H mice, irrespective of dietary condition. These data suggest that elucidation of this heterogeneity in response to HSD might contribute to further understanding of the gene-environment interactions leading to diabetes in humans.

  18. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... inflammation of the liver.” This inflammation can be caused by a wide variety of toxins, drugs, and metabolic diseases, as well as infection. There are at least 5 hepatitis viruses. Hepatitis A is contracted when a child eats food or drinks water that is contaminated with the virus or has ...

  19. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... B to come back?Should I get the hepatitis B vaccine?What are the side effects of antiviral medicines?Will my liver ever be normal again? Last Updated: October 1996 This article ... B, hepatitis virus, Interferon alpha-2b, jaundice, Lamivudine, liver ...

  20. Green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-gallate inhibits oxidative damage and preventive effects on carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Mao-Chuan; Wang, Qian; Huang, Xiao-Hui; Cao, Liang-Qi; Chen, Xi-Ling; Sun, Kai; Liu, Yun-Jian; Li, Wen; Zhang, Long-Juan

    2007-12-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effects of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on hepatic fibrogenesis and on cultured hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). The rat model of carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4))-induced hepatic fibrosis was used to assess the effect of daily intraperitoneal injections of EGCG on the indexes of fibrosis. Histological and hepatic hydroxyproline examination revealed that EGCG significantly arrested progression of hepatic fibrosis. EGCG caused significant amelioration of liver injury (reduced activities of serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase). The development of CCl(4)-induced hepatic fibrosis altered the redox state with a decreased hepatic glutathione and increased the formation of lipid peroxidative products, which were partially normalized by treatment with EGCG, respectively. Moreover, EGCG markedly attenuated HSC activation as well as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 activity. In cultured stellate cell, the expression of MMP-2 mRNA and protein were substantially reduced by EGCG treatment. Concanavalin A-induced activation of secreted MMP-2 was inhibited by EGCG through the influence of membrane type 1-MMP activity. These results demonstrate that administration of EGCG may be useful in the treatment and prevention of hepatic fibrosis.

  1. In vivo transfer of hepatocyte growth factor gene accelerates proliferation of hepatic oval cells in a 2-acetylaminofluorene/partial hepatectomy model in rats.

    PubMed

    Shiota, G; Kunisada, T; Oyama, K; Udagawa, A; Nomi, T; Tanaka, K; Tsutsumi, A; Isono, M; Nakamura, T; Hamada, H; Sakatani, T; Sell, S; Sato, K; Ito, H; Kawasaki, H

    2000-03-31

    To clarify the effect of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) on proliferation of hepatic oval cells, we transferred HGF gene into liver of the Solt-Farber rat model. Male Fisher 344 rats were infected with a recombinant adenovirus carrying the cDNA for HGF (pAxCAHGF) from tail vein. HGF mRNA showed its peak at 4 days, and diminished thereafter. The total and proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive hepatic oval cells were significantly elevated in HGF-transferred rats, in which stem cell factor and c-kit mRNA increased at each time point. Our results suggest that in vivo transfer of the HGF gene into liver accelerates proliferation of hepatic oval cells in the Solt-Farber model in rats.

  2. A Proteomic Investigation of Hepatic Resistance to Ascaris in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Deslyper, Gwendoline; Colgan, Thomas J.; Cooper, Andrew J. R.; Holland, Celia V.; Carolan, James C.

    2016-01-01

    The helminth Ascaris causes ascariasis in both humans and pigs. Humans, especially children, experience significant morbidity including respiratory complications, growth deficits and intestinal obstruction. Given that 800 million people worldwide are infected by Ascaris, this represents a significant global public health concern. The severity of the symptoms and associated morbidity are related to the parasite burden and not all hosts are infected equally. While the pathology of the disease has been extensively examined, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance and susceptibility to this nematode infection is poor. In order to investigate host differences associated with heavy and light parasite burden, an experimental murine model was developed utilising Ascaris-susceptible and -resistant mice strains, C57BL/6J and CBA/Ca, respectively, which experience differential burdens of migratory Ascaris larvae in the host lungs. Previous studies identified the liver as the site where this difference in susceptibility occurs. Using a label free quantitative proteomic approach, we analysed the hepatic proteomes of day four post infection C57BL/6J and CBA/Ca mice with and without Ascaris infection to identify proteins changes potentially linked to both resistance and susceptibility amongst the two strains, respectively. Over 3000 proteins were identified in total and clear intrinsic differences were elucidated between the two strains. These included a higher abundance of mitochondrial proteins, particularly those associated with the oxidative phosphorylation pathway and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the relatively resistant CBA/Ca mice. We hypothesise that the increased ROS levels associated with higher levels of mitochondrial activity results in a highly oxidative cellular environment that has a dramatic effect on the nematode’s ability to successfully sustain a parasitic association with its resistant host. Under infection, both

  3. A Proteomic Investigation of Hepatic Resistance to Ascaris in a Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Deslyper, Gwendoline; Colgan, Thomas J; Cooper, Andrew J R; Holland, Celia V; Carolan, James C

    2016-08-01

    The helminth Ascaris causes ascariasis in both humans and pigs. Humans, especially children, experience significant morbidity including respiratory complications, growth deficits and intestinal obstruction. Given that 800 million people worldwide are infected by Ascaris, this represents a significant global public health concern. The severity of the symptoms and associated morbidity are related to the parasite burden and not all hosts are infected equally. While the pathology of the disease has been extensively examined, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance and susceptibility to this nematode infection is poor. In order to investigate host differences associated with heavy and light parasite burden, an experimental murine model was developed utilising Ascaris-susceptible and -resistant mice strains, C57BL/6J and CBA/Ca, respectively, which experience differential burdens of migratory Ascaris larvae in the host lungs. Previous studies identified the liver as the site where this difference in susceptibility occurs. Using a label free quantitative proteomic approach, we analysed the hepatic proteomes of day four post infection C57BL/6J and CBA/Ca mice with and without Ascaris infection to identify proteins changes potentially linked to both resistance and susceptibility amongst the two strains, respectively. Over 3000 proteins were identified in total and clear intrinsic differences were elucidated between the two strains. These included a higher abundance of mitochondrial proteins, particularly those associated with the oxidative phosphorylation pathway and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the relatively resistant CBA/Ca mice. We hypothesise that the increased ROS levels associated with higher levels of mitochondrial activity results in a highly oxidative cellular environment that has a dramatic effect on the nematode's ability to successfully sustain a parasitic association with its resistant host. Under infection, both

  4. Estimating Functional Liver Reserve Following Hepatic Irradiation: Adaptive Normal Tissue Response Models

    PubMed Central

    Stenmark, Matthew H.; Cao, Yue; Wang, Hesheng; Jackson, Andrew; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Feng, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To estimate the limit of functional liver reserve for safe application of hepatic irradiation using changes in indocyanine green, an established assay of liver function. Materials and Methods From 2005–2011, 60 patients undergoing hepatic irradiation were enrolled in a prospective study assessing the plasma retention fraction of indocyanine green at 15-min (ICG-R15) prior to, during (at 60% of planned dose), and after radiotherapy (RT). The limit of functional liver reserve was estimated from the damage fraction of functional liver (DFL) post-RT [1−(ICG-R15pre-RT/ICG-R15post-RT)] where no toxicity was observed using a beta distribution function. Results Of 48 evaluable patients, 3 (6%) developed RILD, all within 2.5 months of completing RT. The mean ICG-R15 for non-RILD patients pre-RT, during-RT and 1-month post-RT was 20.3%(SE 2.6), 22.0%(3.0), and 27.5%(2.8), and for RILD patients was 6.3%(4.3), 10.8%(2.7), and 47.6%(8.8). RILD was observed at post-RT damage fractions of ≥78%. Both DFL assessed by during-RT ICG and MLD predicted for DFL post-RT (p<0.0001). Limiting the post-RT DFL to 50%, predicted a 99% probability of a true complication rate <15%. Conclusion The DFL as assessed by changes in ICG during treatment serves as an early indicator of a patient’s tolerance to hepatic irradiation. PMID:24813090

  5. Chronic intermittent hypoxia causes hepatitis in a mouse model of diet-induced fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Savransky, Vladimir; Bevans, Shannon; Nanayakkara, Ashika; Li, Jianguo; Smith, Philip L; Torbenson, Michael S; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y

    2007-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) causes chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) during sleep. OSA is associated with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in obese individuals and may contribute to progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease from steatosis to NASH. The purpose of this study was to examine whether CIH induces inflammatory changes in the liver in mice with diet-induced hepatic steatosis. C57BL/6J mice (n = 8) on a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet were exposed to CIH for 6 mo and were compared with mice on the same diet exposed to intermittent air (control; n = 8). CIH caused liver injury with an increase in serum ALT (461 +/- 58 U/l vs. 103 +/- 16 U/l in the control group; P < 0.01) and AST (637 +/- 37 U/l vs. 175 +/- 13 U/l in the control group; P < 0.001), whereas alkaline phosphatase and total bilirubin levels were unchanged. Histology revealed hepatic steatosis in both groups, with mild accentuation of fat staining in the zone 3 hepatocytes in mice exposed to CIH. Animals exposed to CIH exhibited lobular inflammation and fibrosis in the liver, which were not evident in control mice. CIH caused significant increases in lipid peroxidation in serum and liver tissue; significant increases in hepatic levels of myeloperoxidase and proinflammatory cytokines IL-1beta, IL-6, and CXC chemokine MIP-2; a trend toward an increase in TNF-alpha; and an increase in alpha1(I)-collagen mRNA. We conclude that CIH induces lipid peroxidation and inflammation in the livers of mice on a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet.

  6. Hepatic Overexpression of Hemopexin Inhibits Inflammation and Vascular Stasis in Murine Models of Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vercellotti, Gregory M; Zhang, Ping; Nguyen, Julia; Abdulla, Fuad; Chen, Chunsheng; Nguyen, Phong; Nowotny, Carlos; Steer, Clifford J; Smith, Ann; Belcher, John D

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) patients have low serum hemopexin (Hpx) levels due to chronic hemolysis. We hypothesized that in SCD mice, hepatic overexpression of hemopexin would scavenge the proximal mediator of vascular activation, heme, and inhibit inflammation and microvascular stasis. To examine the protective role of Hpx in SCD, we transplanted bone marrow from NY1DD SCD mice into Hpx-/- or Hpx+/+ C57BL/6 mice. Dorsal skin fold chambers were implanted 13 wks post-transplant, and microvascular stasis (% nonflowing venules) was evaluated in response to heme infusion. Hpx-/- sickle mice had significantly greater microvascular stasis in response to heme infusion than Hpx+/+ sickle mice (p < 0.05), demonstrating the protective effect of Hpx in SCD. We utilized Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-mediated gene transfer to overexpress wild-type rat Hpx (wt-Hpx) in NY1DD and Townes-SS SCD mice. Control SCD mice were treated with lactated Ringer’s solution (LRS) or a luciferase (Luc) plasmid. Plasma and hepatic Hpx were significantly increased compared with LRS and Luc controls. Microvascular stasis in response to heme infusion in NY1DD and Townes-SS mice overexpressing wt-Hpx had significantly less stasis than controls (p < 0.05). Wt-Hpx overexpression markedly increased hepatic nuclear Nrf2 expression, HO-1 activity and protein, and the heme-Hpx binding protein and scavenger receptor CD91/LRP1, and decreased NF-κB activation. Two missense (ms)-Hpx SB constructs that bound neither heme nor the Hpx receptor CD91/LRP1 did not prevent heme-induced stasis. In conclusion, increasing Hpx levels in transgenic sickle mice via gene transfer activates the Nrf2/HO-1 antioxidant axis and ameliorates inflammation and vasoocclusion. PMID:27451971

  7. Protective Effect of Baccharis trimera Extract on Acute Hepatic Injury in a Model of Inflammation Induced by Acetaminophen

    PubMed Central

    Pádua, Bruno da Cruz; Rossoni Júnior, Joamyr Victor; de Brito Magalhães, Cíntia Lopes; Chaves, Míriam Martins; Silva, Marcelo Eustáquio; Pedrosa, Maria Lucia; de Souza, Gustavo Henrique Bianco; Brandão, Geraldo Célio; Rodrigues, Ivanildes Vasconcelos; Lima, Wanderson Geraldo; Costa, Daniela Caldeira

    2014-01-01

    Background. Acetaminophen (APAP) is a commonly used analgesic and antipyretic. When administered in high doses, APAP is a clinical problem in the US and Europe, often resulting in severe liver injury and potentially acute liver failure. Studies have demonstrated that antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents effectively protect against the acute hepatotoxicity induced by APAP overdose. Methods. The present study attempted to investigate the protective effect of B. trimera against APAP-induced hepatic damage in rats. The liver-function markers ALT and AST, biomarkers of oxidative stress, antioxidant parameters, and histopathological changes were examined. Results. The pretreatment with B. trimera attenuated serum activities of ALT and AST that were enhanced by administration of APAP. Furthermore, pretreatment with the extract decreases the activity of the enzyme SOD and increases the activity of catalase and the concentration of total glutathione. Histopathological analysis confirmed the alleviation of liver damage and reduced lesions caused by APAP. Conclusions. The hepatoprotective action of B. trimera extract may rely on its effect on reducing the oxidative stress caused by APAP-induced hepatic damage in a rat model. General Significance. These results make the extract of B. trimera a potential candidate drug capable of protecting the liver against damage caused by APAP overdose. PMID:25435714

  8. Reduction of hepatic fibrosis by overexpression of von Hippel–Lindau protein in experimental models of chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jizhou; Lu, Zhaoyang; Xu, Zhilin; Tian, Pei; Miao, Hui; Pan, Shangha; Song, Ruipeng; Sun, Xueying; Zhao, Baolei; Wang, Dawei; Ma, Yong; Song, Xuan; Zhang, Shugeng; Liu, Lianxin; Jiang, Hongchi

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and HIF-2α play an important role in liver fibrosis. von Hippel–Lindau protein (VHL), a key mediator of HIF-α, regulates fibrosis in an organ- and cell-specific way. In this study, human liver samples were collected from hepatitis C-, alcoholic-, and cholestatic-associated fibrotic and healthy individuals. Two mouse models of liver fibrosis were established: bile duct ligation and carbon tetrachloride injection. We constructed adenovirus vectors to overexpress VHL, normoxia-active HIF-α, and lentiviral vectors to silence HIF-α. The results showed that liver sections from fibrosis patients had a lower level of VHL and higher levels of HIF-1α and HIF-2α compared with healthy sections, a finding which was confirmed in mice. Overexpression of VHL attenuated liver fibrosis, downregulated fibrogenic genes, and inhibited liver inflammation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. Overexpression of VHL was more successful at inhibiting fibrosis compared with silencing HIF-1α plus HIF-2α. Normoxia-active HIF-1α or HIF-2α prevented the inhibitory effect of VHL on liver fibrosis, indicating that attenuating fibrosis via VHL is HIF-1α- and HIF-2α-dependent to some extent. In addition, overexpression of VHL inhibited mouse hepatic stellate cells activation and proliferation and promoted apoptosis. Taken together, VHL may be considered a new target to inhibit liver fibrosis. PMID:28112200

  9. Oral administered particulate yeast-derived glucan promotes hepatitis B virus clearance in a hydrodynamic injection mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Dandan; Shi, Bisheng; Ren, Guangxu; Peng, Xiuhua; Fang, Zhong; Kozlowski, Maya; Zhou, Xiaohui; Zhang, Xiaonan; Wu, Min; Wang, Cong; Yuan, Zhenghong

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) persistent infection is associated with ineffective immune response for the clearance of virus. Immunomodulators represent an important class of therapeutics, which potentially could be beneficial for the treatment of HBV infection. The particulate yeast-derived glucan (PYDG) has been shown to enhance the innate and adaptive immune responses. We therefore, assessed the efficacy of PYDG in enhancing HBV specific immune responses by employing the hydrodynamic injection-based (HDI) HBV transfection mouse model. Mice were intragatric administered PYDG daily for 9 weeks post pAAV/HBV1.2 hydrodynamic injection. PYDG treatment significantly promoted HBV DNA clearance and production of HBsAb compared to control mice. PYDG treatment resulted in recruitment of macrophages, dendritic cells (DCs) and effector T cells to the liver microenvironment, accompanied by a significantly augmented DCs maturation and HBV-specific IFN-γ and TNF-α production by T cell. In addition, enhanced production of Th1 cytokines in liver tissue interstitial fluid (TIF) was associated with PYDG administration. Live imaging showed the accumulation of PYDG in the mouse liver. Our results demonstrate that PYDG treatment significantly enhances HBV-specific Th1 immune responses, accompanied by clearance of HBV DNA, and therefore holds promise for further development of therapeutics against chronic hepatitis B.

  10. Transplacental Transfer of Hepatitis B Neutralizing Antibody during Pregnancy in an Animal Model: Implications for Newborn and Maternal Health

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li; Norton, Malgorzata G.; Mahmood, Iftekhar; Zhao, Zhong; Zhong, Lilin; Zhang, Pei; Struble, Evi B.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the success of postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) of the newborn in preventing mother-to-child transmission of hepatitis B virus), in non-US clinical trials, administering hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG) to mothers at the end of pregnancy (in addition to passive-active PEP of the newborn) only partially improved outcomes. That is, a significant percentage of newborns became infected during their first year of life. We used a relevant animal model for human IgG transplacental transfer to study dose, time and subclass dependence of HBV neutralizing antibody (nAb) maternal, and fetal levels at the end of pregnancy. Pregnant guinea pigs received 50 or 100 IU/kg HBIGIV 2–5 days before delivery. Human total IgG, IgG subclasses, and nAb in mothers and their litters were measured. In vitro analyses of guinea pig Fc neonatal receptor binding to HBIGIV, as well as to all human IgG subclasses, were also performed. Our study showed that nAb transferred transplacentally from the pregnant guinea pigs to their litters; no transfer occurred during parturition. The amount of the transferred nAb was dose and time dependent. Thus, selection of an efficacious dose in the clinic is important: microdosing may be underdosing, particularly in cases of high viraemia. PMID:24800066

  11. Shear Wave Elastography for Assessment of Steatohepatitis and Hepatic Fibrosis in Rat Models of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Kang, Bo-Kyeong; Lee, Seung Soo; Cheong, Hyunhee; Hong, Seung Mo; Jang, Kiseok; Lee, Moon-Gyu

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate shear wave elastography (SWE) as a method for determining the severity of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and the stage of hepatic fibrosis, as well as the major determinants of liver elasticity among the various histologic and biomolecular changes associated with NAFLD. Rat NAFLD models with various degrees of NAFLD severity were created and imaged using SWE. The explanted livers were subjected to histopathologic evaluation and RNA expression analysis. Among the histologic and biomolecular findings, the fibrosis stage and the collagen RNA level were significant independent factors associated with liver elasticity (p < 0.001). Liver elasticity was effective in detecting non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and in determining fibrosis stage, and the corresponding areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves were 0.963 and 0.927-0.997, respectively. In conclusion, SWE is a potential non-invasive method for the detection of NASH and staging of hepatic fibrosis in patients with NAFLD.

  12. Airway oxidative stress causes vascular and hepatic inflammation via upregulation of IL-17A in a murine model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Al-Harbi, Naif O; Nadeem, Ahmed; Al-Harbi, Mohammed M; Ansari, Mushtaq A; AlSharari, Shakir D; Bahashwan, Saleh A; Attia, Sabry M; Al-Hosaini, Khaled A; Al Hoshani, Ali R; Ahmad, Sheikh F

    2016-05-01

    Oxidants are generated in asthmatic airways due to infiltration of inflammatory leukocytes and resident cells in the lung. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide and superoxide radical may leak into systemic circulation when generated in uncontrolled manner and may impact vasculature. Our previous studies have shown an association between airway inflammation and systemic inflammation; however so far none has investigated the impact of airway oxidative inflammation on hepatic oxidative stress and Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokine markers in liver/vasculature in a murine model of asthma. Therefore, this study investigated the contribution of oxidative stress encountered in asthmatic airways in modulation of systemic/hepatic Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines balance and hepatic oxidative stress. Mice were sensitized intraperitoneally with cockroach extract (CE) in the presence of aluminum hydroxide followed by several intranasal (i.n.) challenges with CE. Mice were then assessed for systemic/hepatic inflammation through assessment of Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines and oxidative stress (iNOS, protein nitrotyrosine, lipid peroxides and myeloperoxidase activity). Challenge with CE led to increased Th2/Th17 cytokines in blood/liver and hepatic oxidative stress. However, only Th17 related pro-inflammatory markers were upregulated by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) inhalation in vasculature and liver, whereas antioxidant treatment, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) downregulated them. Hepatic oxidative stress was also upregulated by H2O2 inhalation, whereas NAC attenuated it. Therefore, our study shows that airway oxidative inflammation may contribute to systemic inflammation through upregulation of Th17 immune responses in blood/liver and hepatic oxidative stress. This might predispose these patients to increased risk for the development of cardiovascular disorders.

  13. Validation of Ten Noninvasive Diagnostic Models for Prediction of Liver Fibrosis in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jieyao; Hou, Jinlin; Ding, Huiguo; Chen, Guofeng; Xie, Qing; Wang, Yuming; Zeng, Minde; Ou, Xiaojuan; Ma, Hong; Jia, Jidong

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Noninvasive models have been developed for fibrosis assessment in patients with chronic hepatitis B. However, the sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy in evaluating liver fibrosis of these methods have not been validated and compared in the same group of patients. The aim of this study was to verify the diagnostic performance and reproducibility of ten reported noninvasive models in a large cohort of Asian CHB patients. Methods The diagnostic performance of ten noninvasive models (HALF index, FibroScan, S index, Zeng model, Youyi model, Hui model, APAG, APRI, FIB-4 and FibroTest) was assessed against the liver histology by ROC curve analysis in CHB patients. The reproducibility of the ten models were evaluated by recalculating the diagnostic values at the given cut-off values defined by the original studies. Results Six models (HALF index, FibroScan, Zeng model, Youyi model, S index and FibroTest) had AUROCs higher than 0.70 in predicting any fibrosis stage and 2 of them had best diagnostic performance with AUROCs to predict F≥2, F≥3 and F4 being 0.83, 0.89 and 0.89 for HALF index, 0.82, 0.87 and 0.87 for FibroScan, respectively. Four models (HALF index, FibroScan, Zeng model and Youyi model) showed good diagnostic values at given cut-offs. Conclusions HALF index, FibroScan, Zeng model, Youyi model, S index and FibroTest show a good diagnostic performance and all of them, except S index and FibroTest, have good reproducibility for evaluating liver fibrosis in CHB patients. Registration Number ChiCTR-DCS-07000039. PMID:26709706

  14. Tumor-induced CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells exacerbate immune-mediated hepatitis in mice in a CD40-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kapanadze, Tamar; Medina-Echeverz, José; Gamrekelashvili, Jaba; Weiss, Jonathan M; Wiltrout, Robert H; Kapoor, Veena; Hawk, Nga; Terabe, Masaki; Berzofsky, Jay A; Manns, Michael P; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F

    2015-04-01

    Immunosuppressive CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) accumulate in the livers of tumor-bearing (TB) mice. We studied hepatic MDSCs in two murine models of immune-mediated hepatitis. Unexpectedly, treatment of TB mice with Concanavalin A (Con A) or α-galactosylceramide resulted in increased alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) serum levels in comparison to tumor-free mice. Adoptive transfer of hepatic MDSCs into naïve mice exacerbated Con A induced liver damage. Hepatic CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) cells revealed a polarized proinflammatory gene signature after Con A treatment. An IFN-γ-dependent upregulation of CD40 on hepatic CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) cells along with an upregulation of CD80, CD86, and CD1d after Con A treatment was observed. Con A treatment resulted in a loss of suppressor function by tumor-induced CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) MDSCs as well as enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated hepatotoxicity. CD40 knockdown in hepatic MDSCs led to increased arginase activity upon Con A treatment and lower ALT/AST serum levels. Finally, blockade of arginase activity in Cd40(-/-) tumor-induced myeloid cells resulted in exacerbation of hepatitis and increased ROS production in vivo. Our findings indicate that in a setting of acute hepatitis, tumor-induced hepatic MDSCs act as proinflammatory immune effector cells capable of killing hepatocytes in a CD40-dependent manner.

  15. Chunggan extract, a traditional herbal formula, ameliorated alcohol-induced hepatic injury in rat model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Kim, Jung-Min; Han, Jong-Min; Lee, Jin-Seok; Choi, Min-Kyung; Lee, Dong-Soo; Park, Yeon-Hwa; Son, Chang-Gue

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate protective effects of Chunggan extract (CGX), a traditional herbal formula, under 4 wk of alcohol consumption-induced liver injury. METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley Rats were orally administered 30% ethanol daily for 4 wk with or without CGX. The pharmaceutical properties were assessed through liver enzymes, histopathology, fibrogenic cytokines, and alcohol metabolism in hepatic tissues as well as by in vitro experiment using HSC-T6 cells. RESULTS: Four weeks of alcohol consumption notably increased liver enzymes and malondialdehyde levels in serum and hepatic tissue. CGX not only prevented the collagen deposition determined by histopathology and hydroxyproline content, but also normalized transforming growth factor-beta, platelet-derived growth factor-beta and connective tissue growth factor at the gene expression and protein levels in liver tissue. Moreover, CGX treatment also significantly normalized the abnormal changes in gene expression profiles of extracellular matrix proteins, matrix metalloproteinase and their inhibitors, alcohol metabolism, and inflammatory reactions. In the acetaldehyde-stimulated HSC-T6 cells, CGX considerably inhibited collagen production and normalized fibrogenic cytokines in both gene expression and protein levels. CONCLUSION: The present study evidenced that CGX has hepatoprotective properties via modulation of fibrogenic cytokines and alcohol metabolism in alcoholic liver injury. PMID:25400454

  16. Polymyxin B protects against hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury in a rat model of obstructive jaundice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Dai, Chao-Liu; Peng, Song-Lin; Zhao, Yang; Jia, Chang-Jun; Xu, Yong-Qing; Zhao, Chuang

    2014-08-01

    This study was conducted in order to investigate the effects of polymyxin B (PMB) against hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in rats with obstructive jaundice. Thirty-six Wistar rats (eighteen each) with induced hepatic I/R injury by biliary tract ligation and recanalization were assigned to a control group (reperfused with normal saline) and a PMB group (reperfused with PMB). Indicators involving liver function, oxidation resistance, pro-inflammatory state, and anti-apoptosis effect were determined following the instructions. Compared with normal saline, PMB reperfusion resulted in a significant improvement of liver function (increase of glutathione and reduction of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and lactate dehydrogenase), oxidation resistance (decreased malondialdehyde and myeloperoxidase activity), alleviation of pro-inflammatory state (less tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) mRNA, and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1), and anti-apoptosis effect (more Bcl-2 and less Bax). PMB protects the liver from I/R injury mainly through reducing cellular oncosis and apoptosis and regulating the expression of NF-κB, TNF-α, IL-1β, and ICAM-1.

  17. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha induced by hepatitis B virus core mediating the immune response for hepatitis B viral clearance in mice model.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Horng-Tay; Tsai, Hwei-Fang; Chyuan, I-Tsu; Liao, Hsiu-Jung; Chen, Chun-Jen; Chen, Pei-Jer; Hsu, Ping-Ning

    2014-01-01

    Persistent hepatitis B viral (HBV) infection results in chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). An efficient control of virus infections requires the coordinated actions of both innate and adaptive immune responses. In order to define the role of innate immunity effectors against HBV, viral clearance was studied in a panel of immunodeficient mouse strains by the hydrodynamic injection approach. Our results demonstrate that HBV viral clearance is not changed in IFN-α/β receptor (IFNAR), RIG-I, MDA5, MYD88, NLRP3, ASC, and IL-1R knock-out mice, indicating that these innate immunity effectors are not required for HBV clearance. In contrast, HBV persists in the absence of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) or in mice treated with the soluble TNF receptor blocker, Etanercept. In these mice, there was an increase in PD-1-expressing CD8+ T-cells and an increase of serum HBV DNA, HBV core, and surface antigen expression as well as viral replication within the liver. Furthermore, the induction of TNF-α in clearing HBV is dependent on the HBV core, and TNF blockage eliminated HBV core-induced viral clearance effects. Finally, the intra-hepatic leukocytes (IHLs), but not the hepatocytes, are the cell source responsible for TNF-α production induced by HBcAg. These results provide evidences for TNF-α mediated innate immune mechanisms in HBV clearance and explain the mechanism of HBV reactivation during therapy with TNF blockage agents.

  18. Establishing a new animal model for hepadnaviral infection: susceptibility of Chinese Marmota-species to woodchuck hepatitis virus infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bao-Ju; Tian, Yong-Jun; Meng, Zhong-Ji; Jiang, Min; Wei, Bo-Qing; Tao, Yuan-Qing; Fan, Wei; Li, An-Yi; Bao, Jun-Jie; Li, Xin-Yu; Zhang, Zheng-Mao; Wang, Zhong-Dong; Wang, Hu; Roggendorf, Michael; Lu, Meng-Ji; Yang, Dong-Liang

    2011-03-01

    Hepatitis B virus infection (HBV) is a major medical problem in China. The lack of a suitable infection model in China is recognized as an obstacle for research on HBV in China. Chinese Marmota-species is phylogenetically closely related to Marmota monax, thus, it might be suitable to serve as an animal model for HBV infection. Therefore, we attempted to prove the claim about the existence of woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV)-like viruses in Chinese Marmota-species and to determine the susceptibility of these species to experimental WHV infection. In the present study, 653 sera from three Chinese Marmota-species, Marmota himalayana, Marmota baibacina and Marmota bobak, were screened for WHV-like viruses by serological and molecular assays. The susceptibility to WHV of three species was investigated by experimental infection and monitored by testing of anti-WHc and WHsAg by ELISA, detection of WHV DNA by PCR, and detection of WHV replication intermediates and antigens in liver samples. No evidence for the existence of a genetically closely related virus to WHV in three Chinese Marmota-species was found by serological assays and PCR. M. himalayana was susceptible to WHV infection as inoculated animals became positive for anti-WHc, WHsAg and WHV DNA. Further, WHV replication intermediates and proteins were detected in liver samples. In contrast, M. baibacina remained negative for tested virological parameters. M. bobak species showed a limited susceptibility to WHV. Our data do not support early reports about WHV-like viruses in China. M. himalayana is suitable for the establishment of a model for hepadnaviral infection.

  19. Mathematical Modeling of Hepatitis C Prevalence Reduction with Antiviral Treatment Scale-Up in Persons Who Inject Drugs in Metropolitan Chicago

    DOE PAGES

    Echevarria, Desarae; Gutfraind, Alexander; Boodram, Basmattee; ...

    2015-08-21

    New direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) provide an opportunity to combat hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in persons who inject drugs (PWID). Here we use a mathematical model to predict the impact of a DAA-treatment scale-up on HCV prevalence among PWID and the estimated cost in metropolitan Chicago.

  20. Antitumor effects of FP3 in combination with capecitabine on PDTT xenograft models of primary colon carcinoma and related lymphatic and hepatic metastases.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ketao; Lan, Huanrong; Xie, Bojian; He, Kuifeng; Xu, Zhenzhen; Li, Guangliang; Han, Na; Teng, Lisong; Cao, Feilin

    2012-07-01

    FP3 is an engineered protein which contains the extracellular domain 2 of VEGF receptor 1 (Flt-1) and extracellular domain 3 and 4 of VEGF receptor 2 (Flk-1, KDR) fused to the Fc portion of human immunoglobulin G 1. Previous studies demonstrated its antiangiogenic effects in vitro and in vivo, and its antitumor activity in vivo. In this study, patient-derived tumor tissue (PDTT) xenograft models of primary colon carcinoma and lymphatic and hepatic metastases were established for assessment of the antitumor activity of FP3 in combination with capecitabine. Xenografts were treated with FP3, capecitabine, alone or in combination. After tumor growth was confirmed, volume and microvessel density in tumors were evaluated. Levels of VEGF, and PCNA in the tumor were examined by immunohistonchamical staining, level of thymidine phosphorylase (TP) was examined by ELISA, and levels of related cell signaling pathways proteins expression were examined by western blotting. FP3 in combination with capecitabine showed significant antitumor activity in three xenograft models (primary colon carcinoma, lymphatic metastasis, and hepatic metastasis). The microvessel density in tumor tissues treated with FP3 in combination with capecitabine was lower than that of the control. Antitumor activity of FP3 in combination with capecitabine was significantly higher than that of each agent alone in three xenograft models (primary colon carcinoma, lymphatic metastasis, and hepatic metastasis). This study indicated that addition of FP3 to capecitabine significantly improved tumor growth inhibition in the PDTT xenograft models of primary colon carcinoma and lymphatic and hepatic metastases.

  1. The Efficacy of Social Role Models to Increase Motivation to Obtain Vaccination against Hepatitis B among Men Who Have Sex with Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vet, R.; de Wit, J. B. F.; Das, E.

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of role models in persuasive messages about risk and social norms to increase motivation to obtain hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination in men who have sex with men (MSM). MSM at risk for HBV in The Netherlands (N = 168) were recruited online via a range of websites and were randomly assigned to one of four…

  2. A mathematical model for HIV and hepatitis C co-infection and its assessment from a statistical perspective.

    PubMed

    Castro Sanchez, Amparo Yovanna; Aerts, Marc; Shkedy, Ziv; Vickerman, Peter; Faggiano, Fabrizio; Salamina, Guiseppe; Hens, Niel

    2013-03-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are a clear threat for public health, with high prevalences especially in high risk groups such as injecting drug users. People with HIV infection who are also infected by HCV suffer from a more rapid progression to HCV-related liver disease and have an increased risk for cirrhosis and liver cancer. Quantifying the impact of HIV and HCV co-infection is therefore of great importance. We propose a new joint mathematical model accounting for co-infection with the two viruses in the context of injecting drug users (IDUs). Statistical concepts and methods are used to assess the model from a statistical perspective, in order to get further insights in: (i) the comparison and selection of optional model components, (ii) the unknown values of the numerous model parameters, (iii) the parameters to which the model is most 'sensitive' and (iv) the combinations or patterns of values in the high-dimensional parameter space which are most supported by the data. Data from a longitudinal study of heroin users in Italy are used to illustrate the application of the proposed joint model and its statistical assessment. The parameters associated with contact rates (sharing syringes) and the transmission rates per syringe-sharing event are shown to play a major role.

  3. [Joint application of mathematic models in assessing the residual risk of hepatitis C virus transmitted through blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xun; Jia, Yao; Xie, Yun-zheng; Li, Xiu-mei; Liu, Xiao-ying; Wu, Xiao-fei

    2011-09-01

    The practicable and effective methods for residual risk assessment on transfusion-transmitted disease was to establish the mathematic models. Based on the characteristics of the repeat donors which donated their blood on a regular base, a model of sero-conversion during the interval of donations was established to assess the incidence of the repeat donors. Based on the characteristics of the prevalence in the population, a model of 'prevalence increased with the age of the donor' was established to assess the incidence of those first-time donors. And based on the impact of the windows period through blood screening program, a model of residual risk associated with the incidence and the length of the windows period was established to assess the residual risk of blood transfusion. In this paper, above said 3 kinds of mathematic models were jointly applied to assess the residual risk of hepatitis C virus (HCV) which was transmitted through blood transfusion in Shanghai, based on data from the routine blood collection and screening program. All the anti-HCV unqualified blood donations were confirmed before assessment. Results showed that the residual risk of HCV transmitted through blood transfusion during Jan. 1(st), 2007 to Dec. 31(st), 2008 in Shanghai was 1:101 000. Data showed that the results of residual risk assessment with mathematic models was valuable. The residual risk of transfusion-transmitted HCV in Shanghai was at a safe level, according to the results in this paper.

  4. Efficient Delivery of DOX to Nuclei of Hepatic Carcinoma Cells in the Subcutaneous Tumor Model Using pH-Sensitive Pullulan-DOX Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Li, Huanan; Cui, Yani; Sui, Junhui; Bian, Shaoquan; Sun, Yong; Liang, Jie; Fan, Yujiang; Zhang, Xingdong

    2015-07-29

    A series of pullulan-doxorubicin conjugates (Pu-DOXs) were investigated for effectively delivering DOX to nuclei of hepatic carcinoma cells in subcutaneous tumor model. These Pu-DOXs were prepared by conjugating DOX onto pullulan molecule via pH-responsive hydrazone bond using spacers with different alkane chain length. The highest drug loading content of Pu-DOXs went up to nearly 50%, and the diameter of Pu-DOX nanoparticles ranged from 50 to 170 nm, as measured by DLS and TEM. These Pu-DOX nanoparticles could rapidly release DOX in the acidic environment at pH = 5.0 while being kept relatively stable in neural conditions. The in vitro cell coculture experiments revealed that these Pu-DOX nanoparticles were selectively internalized by hepatic carcinoma cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis via asialoglycoprotein receptor on the hepatic carcinoma cell surface. DOX was rapidly released from Pu-DOX nanoparticles in acidic endosome/lysosome, diffused into cell nuclei due to its strong affinity to nucleic acid, inhibited the cell proliferation, and accelerated the cell apoptosis. In the nude mice subcutaneous hepatic carcinoma model, Pu-DOX nanoparticles efficiently accumulated in the tumor site through the enhanced permeation and retention effect. Then DOX was specifically internalized by hepatic carcinoma cells and rapidly diffused into the nuclei of cells. Compared with the control group in in vivo experiments, these Pu-DOX nanoparticles effectively inhibited solid tumor growth, prolonging the lifetime of the experimental animal. These pH sensitive nanoparticles might provide an important clinical implication for targeted hepatic carcinoma therapy with high efficiency and low systematic toxicity.

  5. Metabolic Profiling of Human Long-Term Liver Models and Hepatic Clearance Predictions from In Vitro Data Using Nonlinear Mixed-Effects Modeling.

    PubMed

    Kratochwil, Nicole A; Meille, Christophe; Fowler, Stephen; Klammers, Florian; Ekiciler, Aynur; Molitor, Birgit; Simon, Sandrine; Walter, Isabelle; McGinnis, Claudia; Walther, Johanna; Leonard, Brian; Triyatni, Miriam; Javanbakht, Hassan; Funk, Christoph; Schuler, Franz; Lavé, Thierry; Parrott, Neil J

    2017-03-01

    Early prediction of human clearance is often challenging, in particular for the growing number of low-clearance compounds. Long-term in vitro models have been developed which enable sophisticated hepatic drug disposition studies and improved clearance predictions. Here, the cell line HepG2, iPSC-derived hepatocytes (iCell®), the hepatic stem cell line HepaRG™, and human hepatocyte co-cultures (HμREL™ and HepatoPac®) were compared to primary hepatocyte suspension cultures with respect to their key metabolic activities. Similar metabolic activities were found for the long-term models HepaRG™, HμREL™, and HepatoPac® and the short-term suspension cultures when averaged across all 11 enzyme markers, although differences were seen in the activities of CYP2D6 and non-CYP enzymes. For iCell® and HepG2, the metabolic activity was more than tenfold lower. The micropatterned HepatoPac® model was further evaluated with respect to clearance prediction. To assess the in vitro parameters, pharmacokinetic modeling was applied. The determination of intrinsic clearance by nonlinear mixed-effects modeling in a long-term model significantly increased the confidence in the parameter estimation and extended the sensitive range towards 3% of liver blood flow, i.e., >10-fold lower as compared to suspension cultures. For in vitro to in vivo extrapolation, the well-stirred model was used. The micropatterned model gave rise to clearance prediction in man within a twofold error for the majority of low-clearance compounds. Further research is needed to understand whether transporter activity and drug metabolism by non-CYP enzymes, such as UGTs, SULTs, AO, and FMO, is comparable to the in vivo situation in these long-term culture models.

  6. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... bowel movements Loss of appetite Low-grade fever Dark urine Joint pain Yellowing of the skin and ... person ingests even tiny amounts of contaminated fecal matter. The hepatitis A virus infects liver cells and ...

  7. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... is a condition that causes temporary worsening of brain function in people with advanced liver disease. When ... travel through your body until they reach your brain, causing mental and physical symptoms of HE. Hepatic ...

  8. Hepatitis E

    MedlinePlus

    ... with a positive-sense, single-stranded ribonucleic acid (RNA) genome. The virus has at least 4 different ... RT-PCR) to detect the hepatitis E virus RNA in blood and/or stool; this assay requires ...

  9. Autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Heneghan, Michael A; Yeoman, Andrew D; Verma, Sumita; Smith, Alastair D; Longhi, Maria Serena

    2013-10-26

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a disease of the hepatic parenchyma that can present in acute or chronic forms. In common with many autoimmune diseases, autoimmune hepatitis is associated with non-organ-specific antibodies in the context of hepatic autoimmunity. This dichotomy has made definition of a unifying hypothesis in the pathophysiology of the disease difficult, although data from the past 8 years have drawn attention to the role of regulatory T cells. Several triggers have been identified, and the disease arises in genetically susceptible individuals. Clinical and biochemical remission is achievable in up to 85% of cases. For the remaining patients, alternative immunosuppression strategies are an option. Liver transplantation provides an excellent outcome for patients with acute liver failure or complications of end-stage liver disease, including hepatocellular carcinoma. Variant or overlapping syndromes are worthy of consideration when unexpected disease features arise.

  10. Effect of Traumatic Brain Injury, Erythropoietin, and Anakinra on Hepatic Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters in an Experimental Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Gail D; Peterson, Todd C; Vonder Haar, Cole; Farin, Fred M; Bammler, Theo K; MacDonald, James W; Kantor, Eric D; Hoane, Michael R

    2015-09-01

    In contrast to considerable data demonstrating a decrease in cytochrome P450 (CYP) activity in inflammation and infection, clinically, traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in an increase in CYP and UDP glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) activity. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of TBI alone and with treatment with erythropoietin (EPO) or anakinra on the gene expression of hepatic inflammatory proteins, drug-metabolizing enzymes, and transporters in a cortical contusion impact (CCI) injury model. Microarray-based transcriptional profiling was used to determine the effect on gene expression at 24 h, 72 h, and 7 days post-CCI. Plasma cytokine and liver protein concentrations of CYP2D4, CYP3A1, EPHX1, and UGT2B7 were determined. There was no effect of TBI, TBI + EPO, or TBI + anakinra on gene expression of the inflammatory factors shown to be associated with decreased expression of hepatic metabolic enzymes in models of infection and inflammation. IL-6 plasma concentrations were increased in TBI animals and decreased with EPO and anakinra treatment. There was no significant effect of TBI and/or anakinra on gene expression of enzymes or transporters known to be involved in drug disposition. TBI + EPO treatment decreased the gene expression of Cyp2d4 at 72 h with a corresponding decrease in CYP2D4 protein at 72 h and 7 days. CYP3A1 protein was decreased at 24 h. In conclusion, EPO treatment may result in a significant decrease in the metabolism of Cyp-metabolized drugs. In contrast to clinical TBI, there was not a significant effect of experimental TBI on CYP or UGT metabolic enzymes.

  11. Linagliptin alleviates hepatic steatosis and inflammation in a mouse model of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Klein, Thomas; Fujii, Masato; Sandel, Jan; Shibazaki, Yuichiro; Wakamatsu, Kyoko; Mark, Michael; Yoneyama, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a primary cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitors are established therapies for type 2 diabetes and although DPP-4 inhibitors can reduce hepatic steatosis, their impact on local inflammation and fibrosis in NASH remains unknown. Using two different experimental treatment regimens (4- and 2-week treatments) in streptozotocin-treated neonatal mice on a high-fat diet, we show that the DPP-4 inhibitor linagliptin (10 and 30 mg/kg) significantly attenuated the NAS score from 4.9 ± 0.6 to 3.7 ± 0.4 and 3.6 ± 0.3, respectively, in the 4-week study. In the 2-week study, linagliptin 10 mg/kg significantly reduced NAS score from 4.1 ± 0.4 to 2.4 ± 0.4. Telmisartan was used as a positive control in both studies and lowered NAS score to 1.9 ± 0.7 and 1.4 ± 0.3, respectively. Due to streptozotocin treatment, elevated glucose levels were unchanged by either drug treatment. Further, linagliptin 10 mg/kg significantly reduced mRNA levels of SOCS-3 (from 1.68 ± 0.2 to 0.83 ± 0.08), IFN-γ (from 4.0 ± 0.5 to 2.3 ± 0.3), and TNF-α (from 5.7 ± 0.5 to 2.13 ± 0.3). The latter observation was confirmed by immunohistochemistry of TNF-α in liver specimens. In addition, using microautoradiography, we showed that the distribution of radiolabeled linagliptin was heterogeneous with the highest density associated with interlobular bile ducts and portal tracts (acini). In conclusion, these studies confirm that linagliptin has high exposure in hepatic tissue and has both anti-inflammatory and anti-steatotic activity in NASH.

  12. Cutthroat Trout Virus—Towards a Virus Model to Support Hepatitis E Research

    PubMed Central

    von Nordheim, Marcus; Boinay, Michel; Leisi, Remo; Kempf, Christoph; Ros, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Cutthroat trout virus (CTV) is a non-pathogenic fish virus belonging to the Hepeviridae family, and it is distantly related to hepatitis E virus (HEV). Here, we report the development of an efficient cell culture system where CTV can consistently replicate to titers never observed before with a hepevirus. By using the rainbow trout gill (RTGill-W1) cell line, CTV reaches 1010 geq/mL intracellularly and 109 geq/mL extracellularly within 5–6 days in culture. We additionally established a qPCR system to investigate CTV infectivity, and developed a specific antibody directed against the viral capsid protein encoded by ORF2. With these methods, we were able to follow the progressive accumulation of viral RNA and the capsid protein, and their intracellular distribution during virus replication. Virus progeny purified through iodixanol density gradients indicated—that similar to HEV—CTV produced in cell culture is also lipid-associated. The lack of an efficient cell culture system has greatly impeded studies with HEV, a major human pathogen that causes hepatitis worldwide. Although several cell culture systems have recently been established, the replication efficiency of HEV is not robust enough to allow studies on different aspects of the virus replication cycle. Therefore, a surrogate virus that can replicate easily and efficiently in cultured cells would be helpful to boost research studies with hepeviruses. Due to its similarities, but also its key differences to HEV, CTV represents a promising tool to elucidate aspects of the replication cycle of Hepeviridae in general, and HEV in particular. PMID:27775612

  13. Cutthroat Trout Virus-Towards a Virus Model to Support Hepatitis E Research.

    PubMed

    von Nordheim, Marcus; Boinay, Michel; Leisi, Remo; Kempf, Christoph; Ros, Carlos

    2016-10-20

    Cutthroat trout virus (CTV) is a non-pathogenic fish virus belonging to the Hepeviridae family, and it is distantly related to hepatitis E virus (HEV). Here, we report the development of an efficient cell culture system where CTV can consistently replicate to titers never observed before with a hepevirus. By using the rainbow trout gill (RTGill-W1) cell line, CTV reaches 10(10) geq/mL intracellularly and 10⁸ geq/mL extracellularly within 5-6 days in culture. We additionally established a qPCR system to investigate CTV infectivity, and developed a specific antibody directed against the viral capsid protein encoded by ORF2. With these methods, we were able to follow the progressive accumulation of viral RNA and the capsid protein, and their intracellular distribution during virus replication. Virus progeny purified through iodixanol density gradients indicated-that similar to HEV-CTV produced in cell culture is also lipid-associated. The lack of an efficient cell culture system has greatly impeded studies with HEV, a major human pathogen that causes hepatitis worldwide. Although several cell culture systems have recently been established, the replication efficiency of HEV is not robust enough to allow studies on different aspects of the virus replication cycle. Therefore, a surrogate virus that can replicate easily and efficiently in cultured cells would be helpful to boost research studies with hepeviruses. Due to its similarities, but also its key differences to HEV, CTV represents a promising tool to elucidate aspects of the replication cycle of Hepeviridae in general, and HEV in particular.

  14. Fucoidan reduces inflammatory response in a rat model of hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Jing; Ye, Qi-Fa

    2015-11-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury after a liver transplant is a major cause of severe complications that lead to graft dysfunction. Fucoidan, a complex of sulfated polysaccharides derived from marine brown algae, demonstrated antiapoptotic as well as potential anti-inflammatory properties in previous studies. Fucoidan has also shown protective effects on I/R-injured kidney and heart. However, whether fucoidan can attenuate hepatic I/R injury has not been examined. To clarify the role of fucoidan in hepatic I/R injury, Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to sham operation or ischemia followed by reperfusion with treatment of saline or fucoidan (50, 100, or 200 mg·(kg body mass)(-1)·d(-1)). The fucoidan-treated group showed decreased levels of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase compared with the control group. Myeloperoxidase and malondialdehyde activities and mRNA levels of CD11b in the fucoidan-treated group were significantly decreased. Hepatocellular swelling/necrosis, sinusoidal/vascular congestion, and inflammatory cell infiltration were also attenuated in the fucoidan group. The expression of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, CXCL-10, VCAM-1, and ICAM-1 were markedly decreased in the samples from the fucoidan-treated group. Fucoidan largely prevented activation of the inflammatory signaling pathway, compared with the control group. In summary, fucoidan can protect the liver from I/R injury through suppressing activation of the inflammatory signaling pathway, as well as the expression of inflammatory mediators, and inflammatory cell infiltration.

  15. Hepatitis E.

    PubMed

    Krawczynski, K; Aggarwal, R; Kamili, S

    2000-09-01

    Hepatitis E, previously known as enterically transmitted non-A, non-B hepatitis, is an infectious viral disease with clinical and morphologic features of acute hepatitis. Its causative agent, hepatitis E virus, consists of small, 32- to 34-nm diameter, icosahedral, nonenveloped particles with a single-stranded, positive-sense, 7.5-kb RNA. The virus has two main geographically distinct strains, Asian and Mexican; recently, novel isolates from nonendemic areas and a genetically related swine HEV have been described. HEV is responsible for large epidemics of acute hepatitis and a proportion of sporadic hepatitis cases in the Indian subcontinent, southeast and central Asia, the Middle East, parts of Africa, and Mexico. The virus is excreted in feces and is transmitted predominantly by fecal-oral route, usually through contaminated water. Person-to-person transmission is uncommon. Clinical attack rates are the highest among young adults. Recent evidence suggests that humans with subclinical HEV infection and animals may represent reservoirs of HEV; however, further data are needed. Diagnosis of hepatitis E is usually made by detection of specific IgM antibody, which disappears rapidly over a few months; IgG anti-HEV persists for at least a few years. Clinical illness is similar to other forms of acute viral hepatitis except in pregnant women, in whom illness is particularly severe with a high mortality rate. Subclinical and unapparent infections may occur; however, chronic infection is unknown. No specific treatment is yet available. Use of clean drinking water and proper sanitation is currently the most effective method of prevention. Passive immunization has not been proved to be effective, and recombinant vaccines for travelers to disease-endemic areas and for pregnant women currently are being developed.

  16. Hepatitis A Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Hepatitis A Testing Share this page: Was this page ... HAV-Ab total; Anti-HAV Formal name: Viral Hepatitis A Antibody Related tests: Hepatitis B Testing ; Hepatitis ...

  17. Travelers' Health: Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3 - Helminths, Soil-Transmitted Chapter 3 - Hepatitis B Hepatitis A Noele P. Nelson, Trudy V. Murphy INFECTIOUS ... hepatitis/HAV Table 3-02. Vaccines to prevent hepatitis A VACCINE TRADE NAME (MANUFACTURER) AGE (Y) DOSE ...

  18. Hepatitis B Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... worldwide 2 Billion People have been infected with Hepatitis B Worldwide The Hepatitis B Foundation is working ... of people living with hepatitis B. Learn About Hepatitis B in 11 Other Languages . Resource Video See ...

  19. Hepatitis A FAQs

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    ... Professional Resources Patient Education Resources Quick Links to Hepatitis … A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home ... Grantees Policy and Programs Resource Center Viral Hepatitis Hepatitis A Questions and Answers for the Public Recommend ...

  20. Hepatitis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... people at risk for contracting hepatitis. But frequent hand washing and good hygiene practices can reduce this risk. ... After Having Hepatitis B? Hepatitis B (HBV) Hepatitis Hand Washing Blood Transfusions Body Piercing Tattoos Contact Us Print ...

  1. Developmental changes in hepatic glucose metabolism in a newborn piglet model: A comparative analysis for suckling period and early weaning period.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chunyan; Wang, Qinhua; Wang, Jing; Tan, Bie; Fan, Zhiyong; Deng, Ze-yuan; Wu, Xin; Yin, Yulong

    2016-02-19

    The liver glucose metabolism, supplying sufficient energy for glucose-dependent tissues, is important in suckling or weaned animals, although there are few studies with piglet model. To better understand the development of glucose metabolism in the piglets during suckling period and early weaning period, we determined the hepatic glycogen content, and investigated the relative protein expression of key enzymes of glucogenesis (GNG) and mRNA levels of some glucose metabolism-related genes. During suckling period, the protein level of G6Pase in the liver of suckling piglets progressively declined with day of age compared with that of newborn piglets (at 1 day of age), whereas the PEPCK level stabilized until day 21 of age, indicating that hepatic GNG capacity gradually weakened in suckling piglets. The synthesis of hepatic glycogen, which was consistent with the fluctuation of glycolytic key genes PFKL and PKLR that gradually decreased after birth and was more or less steady during latter suckling period, although both the mRNA levels of GCK and key glucose transporter GLUT2 presented uptrend in suckling piglets. However, early weaning significantly suppressed the hepatic GNG in the weaned piglets, especially at d 3-5 of weaning period, then gradually recovered at d 7 of weaning period. Meanwhile, PFKL, PKLR and GLUT2 showed the similar trend during weaning period. On the contrast, the hepatic glycogen reached the maximum value when the G6Pase and PEPCK protein expression were at the lowest level, although the GCK level maintained increasing through 7 days of weaning period. Altogether, our study provides evidence that hepatic GNG and glycolysis in newborn piglets were more active than other days during suckling period, and early weaning could significantly suppressed glucose metabolism in liver, but this inhibition would progressively recover at day 7 after weaning.

  2. Feature Hepatitis: Hepatitis Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature Hepatitis Hepatitis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention Past Issues / Spring 2009 ... No appetite Fever Headaches Diagnosis To check for hepatitis viruses, your doctor will test your blood. You ...

  3. A model-based meta-analysis of sofosbuvir-based treatments in chronic hepatitis C patients.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pitarch, Alejandro; Guglieri-López, Beatriz; Ferriols-Lisart, Rafael; Merino-Sanjuán, Matilde

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of sofosbuvir-based treatments in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection using a model-based meta-analysis (MBMA). A bibliographic search was performed to identify clinical trials involving sofosbuvir as a unique direct-acting antiviral (DAA) agent or together with daclatasvir, ledipasvir or simeprevir for the treatment of diagnosed HCV infection. The time course of the virological response (VR) was modelled to estimate the effect of treatment and the influence of population characteristics on the longitudinal efficacy profile. The model was validated and simulations of 10 different treatment schedules were performed. Data from 19 clinical trials were included in the analysis. According to the developed model, therapy with sofosbuvir+ledipasvir is the most effective therapy in all scenarios, but it does not differ greatly in terms of sustained VR with respect to other combinations of DAA treatments. In conclusion, this MBMA generates knowledge regarding hypothetical head-to-head trials that have not been conducted previously. Therapies with sofosbuvir+ledipasvir are probably the most effective sofosbuvir-based treatments.

  4. Medullary Thymic Epithelial Cells and Central Tolerance in Autoimmune Hepatitis Development: Novel Perspective from a New Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Alexandropoulos, Konstantina; Bonito, Anthony J.; Weinstein, Erica G.; Herbin, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is an immune-mediated disorder that affects the liver parenchyma. Diagnosis usually occurs at the later stages of the disease, complicating efforts towards understanding the causes of disease development. While animal models are useful for studying the etiology of autoimmune disorders, most of the existing animal models of AIH do not recapitulate the chronic course of the human condition. In addition, approaches to mimic AIH-associated liver inflammation have instead led to liver tolerance, consistent with the high tolerogenic capacity of the liver. Recently, we described a new mouse model that exhibited spontaneous and chronic liver inflammation that recapitulated the known histopathological and immunological parameters of AIH. The approach involved liver-extrinsic genetic engineering that interfered with the induction of T-cell tolerance in the thymus, the very process thought to inhibit AIH induction by liver-specific expression of exogenous antigens. The mutation led to depletion of specialized thymic epithelial cells that present self-antigens and eliminate autoreactive T-cells before they exit the thymus. Based on our findings, which are summarized below, we believe that this mouse model represents a relevant experimental tool towards elucidating the cellular and molecular aspects of AIH development and developing novel therapeutic strategies for treating this disease. PMID:25603179

  5. The transmission dynamics of hepatitis B in the UK: a mathematical model for evaluating costs and effectiveness of immunization programmes.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, J. R.; Nokes, D. J.; Medley, G. F.; Anderson, R. M.

    1996-01-01

    Complex hepatitis B (HBV) epidemiology makes it difficult to evaluate and compare effectiveness of different immunization policies. A method for doing so is presented using a mathematical model of HBV transmission dynamics which can represent universal infant and adolescent vaccination strategies and those targeted at genito-urinary (GU) clinic attenders and infants born to infectious mothers. Model structure, epidemiological underpinning, and parameterization, are described. Data from the UK National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles is used to define patterns of sexual activity and GU clinic attendance; data deficiencies are discussed, in particular that of UK seroprevalence of HBV markers stratified by age, sex, and risk factors. General model predictions of endemic HBV marker prevalence in homosexual and heterosexual populations seem consistent with published UK data. The simulations exhibit non-linearities in the impact of different vaccination strategies. Estimated number of carriers prevented per vaccine dose for each strategy provides a measure of costs and benefits, varying temporally over the course of a programme, and with level of vaccine coverage. Screening before vaccination markedly increases payback per dose in homosexuals but not in heterosexuals; mass infant vaccination gives the poorest effectiveness ratio and vaccination of infants after antenatal screening the best; in general, increasing vaccine coverage yields lower pay-back per dose. The model provides a useful framework for evaluating costs and benefits of immunization programmes, but for precise quantitative comparison more UK epidemiological data is urgently needed. PMID:8626006

  6. [Compartmental model of the adsorption of a dye by proteins. The possible role of adsorption in the hepatic excretion of bromosulphophthalein].

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Phong-Chau; Brocas, J

    1976-07-01

    A compartmental model was suggested for the study of the hepatic excretion of bromosulphophthalein (BSP). By using a hypothesis concerning the adsorption of the BSP compound by proteins, one derives from the equations of the model several known experimental results, viz. form of concentration curves that vary in accordance with the strength of the injection, existence of a limiting Tm value, etc. An explicit formula is given for calculating Tm.

  7. The herbal compound Songyou Yin (SYY) inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma growth and improves survival in models of chronic fibrosis via paracrine inhibition of activated hepatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Tong-Chun; Zhang, Quan-Bao; Zhang, Ke-Zhi; Zhang, Qiang-Bo; You, Yang; Tian, Hui; Qin, Lun-Xiu; Tang, Zhao-You

    2015-01-01

    Chronic fibrosis is a major risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The pathological progression of hepatic fibrosis has been linked to cellular processes that promote tumor growth and metastasis. Several recent studies have highlighted the cross-talk between tumor cells and activated hepatic stellate cells (aHSCs) in HCC. The herbal compound Songyou Yin (SYY) is known to attenuate hepatoma cell invasion and metastasis via down-regulation of cytokine secretion by aHSCs. However the underlying mechanism of SYY treatment in reversal of hepatic fibrosis and metastasis of liver cancers is not known. In the current study, a nude mouse model with liver fibrosis bearing orthotopic xenograft was established and we found that SYY could reduce associated fibrosis, inhibit tumor growth and improve survival. In the subcutaneous tumor model with fibrosis, we found that SYY could inhibit liver cancer. In vitro, hepatoma cells incubated with conditioned media (CM) from SYY treated aHSCs showed reduced proliferation, decrease in colony formation and invasive potential. SYY treated group showed altered gene expression, with 1205 genes up-regulated and 1323 genes down-regulated. Gene cluster analysis indicated that phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) was one of the key genes altered in the expression profiles. PI3K related markers were all significantly down-regulated. ELISA also indicated decreased secretion of cytokines which were regulated by PI3K/AKT signaling after SYY treatment in the hepatic stellate cell line, LX2. These data clearly demonstrate that SYY therapy inhibits HCC invasive and metastatic potential and improves survival in nude mice models with chronic fibrosis background via inhibition of cytokine secretion by activated hepatic stellate cells. PMID:26517671

  8. Prevention of Hepatic Fibrosis in a Murine Model of Metabolic Syndrome with Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    DeLeve, Laurie D.; Wang, Xiangdong; Kanel, Gary C.; Atkinson, Roscoe D.; McCuskey, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    The endocannabinoid pathway plays an important role in the regulation of appetite and body weight, hepatic lipid metabolism, and fibrosis. Blockade of the endocannabinoid receptor CB1 with SR141716 promotes weight loss, reduces hepatocyte fatty acid synthesis, and is antifibrotic. D-4F, an apolipoprotein A-1 mimetic with antioxidant properties, is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of atherosclerosis. C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet for 7 months, followed by a 2.5-month treatment with either SR141716 or D-4F. SR141716 markedly improved body weight, liver weight, serum transaminases, insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, hypercholesterolemia, hyperleptinemia, and oxidative stress, accompanied by the significant prevention of fibrosis progression. D-4F improved hypercholesterolemia and hyperleptinemia without improvement in body weight, steatohepatitis, insulin resistance, or oxidative stress, and yet, there was significant prevention of fibrosis. D-4F prevented culture-induced activation of stellate cells in vitro. In summary, C57BL/6J mice given a high-fat diet developed features of metabolic syndrome with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and fibrosis. Both SR141716 and D-4F prevented progression of fibrosis after onset of steatohepatitis, ie, a situation comparable to a common clinical scenario, with D-4F seeming to have a more general antifibrotic effect. Either compound therefore has the potential to be of clinical benefit. PMID:18772330

  9. Liver Cancer and Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... Our Accomplishments Annual Reports Our Videos What Is Hepatitis B? What Is Hepatitis B? The ABCs of Viral Hepatitis Liver Cancer and Hepatitis B Hepatitis Delta Coinfection Hepatitis C Coinfection HIV/AIDS ...

  10. Hepatitis C: Sex and Sexuality

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Hepatitis » Sex and Sexuality: Entire Lesson Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... hepatitis C virus through sex. Can you pass hepatitis C to a sex partner? Yes, but it ...

  11. Modelling the prevalence of hepatitis C virus amongst blood donors in Libya: An investigation of providing a preventive strategy

    PubMed Central

    Daw, Mohamed A; Shabash, Amira; El-Bouzedi, Abdallah; Dau, Aghnya A; Habas, Moktar; Libyan Study Group of Hepatitis and HIV

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine hepatitis C virus (HCV) seroprevalence among the Libyan population using blood donors and applying the autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model to predict future trends and formulate plans to minimize the burden of HCV infection. METHODS: HCV positive cases were collected from 1008214 healthy blood donors over a 6-year period from 2008 to 2013. Data were used to construct the ARIMA model to forecast HCV seroprevalence among blood donors. The validity of the model was assessed using the mean absolute percentage error between the observed and fitted seroprevalence. The fitted ARIMA model was used to forecast the incidence of HCV beyond the observed period for the year 2014 and further to 2055. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of HCV among blood donors was 1.8%, varying over the study period from 1.7% to 2.5%, though no significant variation was found within each calendar year. The ARIMA model showed a non-significant auto-correlation of the residuals, and the prevalence was steady within the last 3 years as expressed by the goodness-of-fit test. The forecast incidence showed an increase in HCV seropositivity in 2014, ranging from 500 to 700 per 10000 population, with an overall prevalence of 2.3%-2.7%. This may be extended to 2055 with minimal periodical variation within each 6-year period. CONCLUSION: The applied model was found to be valuable in evaluating the seroprevalence of HCV among blood donors, and highlighted the growing burden of such infection on the Libyan health care system. The model may help in formulating national policies to prevent increases in HCV infection and plan future strategies that target the consequences of the infection. PMID:26870670

  12. Understanding early serum hepatitis D virus and HBsAg kinetics during pegylated interferon-alfa therapy via mathematical modeling

    PubMed Central

    Guedj, Jeremie; Rotman, Yaron; Cotler, Scott J.; Koh, Christopher; Schmid, Peter; Albrecht, Jeff; Haynes-Williams, Vanessa; Liang, Jake T.; Hoofnagle, Jay H.; Heller, Theo; Dahari, Harel

    2014-01-01

    There is little information on the early kinetics of hepatitis delta virus (HDV) and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) during interferon-α therapy. Here a mathematical model was developed and fitted to frequent HDV and HBsAg kinetic data from 10 patients during the first 28 weeks of pegylated-interferon-α2a (peg-IFN) therapy. Three patients achieved a complete virological response (CVR), defined as undetectable HDV 6 months after treatment stopped with loss of HBsAg and anti-HBsAg seroconversion. After initiation of therapy a median delay of 9 days (interquartile range IQR:[5;15]) was observed with no significant changes in HDV level. Thereafter, HDV declined in a biphasic manner, where a rapid first-phase lasting for 25 days (IQR:[23;58]) was followed by a slower or plateau second-phase. The model predicts that the main effect of peg-IFN is to reduce HDV production/release with a median effectiveness of 96% (IQR:[93;99.8]). Median serum HDV half-life (t1/2) was estimated to 2.9 days (IQR:[1.5;5.3]) with pretreatment production and clearance of about 1010 (IQR:[109.8-1010.8]) virions/day. None of the patients with flat 2nd phase in HDV achieved CVR. HBsAg kinetics of decline paralleled the second-phase of HDV decline consistent with HBsAg-productive-infected cells being the main source of production of HDV, with a median t1/2 of 135 days (IQR:[20-460]. The interferon lambda-3 polymorphism (rs12979860) was not associated with kinetic parameters. Conclusions Modeling results provide insights into HDV-host dynamics, the relationship between serum HBsAg levels and HBsAg-infected cells, IFN's mode of action and its effectiveness. The observation that a flat second phase in HDV and HBsAg kinetics was associated with failure to achieve CVR provides the basis to develop early stopping rules during peg-IFN treatment in HDV-infected patients. PMID:25098971

  13. The Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor Teneligliptin Attenuates Hepatic Lipogenesis via AMPK Activation in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Model Mice.

    PubMed

    Ideta, Takayasu; Shirakami, Yohei; Miyazaki, Tsuneyuki; Kochi, Takahiro; Sakai, Hiroyasu; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Shimizu, Masahito

    2015-12-08

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is strongly associated with metabolic syndrome, is increasingly a major cause of hepatic disorder. Dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitors, anti-diabetic agents, are expected to be effective for the treatment of NAFLD. In the present study, we established a novel NAFLD model mouse using monosodium glutamate (MSG) and a high-fat diet (HFD) and investigated the effects of a DPP-4 inhibitor, teneligliptin, on the progression of NAFLD. Male MSG/HFD-treated mice were divided into two groups, one of which received teneligliptin in drinking water. Administration of MSG and HFD caused mice to develop severe fatty changes in the liver, but teneligliptin treatment improved hepatic steatosis and inflammation, as evaluated by the NAFLD activity score. Serum alanine aminotransferase and intrahepatic triglyceride levels were significantly decreased in teneligliptin-treated mice (p < 0.05). Hepatic mRNA levels of the genes involved in de novo lipogenesis were significantly downregulated by teneligliptin (p < 0.05). Moreover, teneligliptin increased hepatic expression levels of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) protein. These findings suggest that teneligliptin attenuates lipogenesis in the liver by activating AMPK and downregulating the expression of genes involved in lipogenesis. DPP-4 inhibitors may be effective for the treatment of NAFLD and may be able to prevent its progression to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

  14. Partial Portal Vein Arterialization Attenuates Acute Bile Duct Injury Induced by Hepatic Dearterialization in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jishu; Wu, Junli; Gao, Wentao; Li, Qiang; Jiang, Kuirong

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic infarcts or abscesses occur after hepatic artery interruption. We explored the mechanisms of hepatic deprivation-induced acute liver injury and determine whether partial portal vein arterialization attenuated this injury in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent either complete hepatic arterial deprivation or partial portal vein arterialization, or both. Hepatic ischemia was evaluated using biochemical analysis, light microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Hepatic ATP levels, the expression of hypoxia- and inflammation-associated genes and proteins, and the expression of bile transporter genes were assessed. Complete dearterialization of the liver induced acute liver injury, as evidenced by the histological changes, significantly increased serum biochemical markers, decreased ATP content, increased expression of hypoxia- and inflammation-associated genes and proteins, and decreased expression of bile transporter genes. These detrimental changes were extenuated but not fully reversed by partial portal vein arterialization, which also attenuated ductular reaction and fibrosis in completely dearterialized rat livers. Collectively, complete hepatic deprivation causes severe liver injury, including bile infarcts and biloma formation. Partial portal vein arterialization seems to protect against acute ischemia-hypoxia-induced liver injury. PMID:27872855

  15. Hepatic alteration of tryptophan metabolism in an acute porphyria model Its relation with gluconeogenic blockage.

    PubMed

    Lelli, Sandra M; Mazzetti, Marta B; San Martín de Viale, Leonor C

    2008-02-01

    This study focuses on the alterations suffered by the serotoninergic and kinurenergic routes of tryptophan (TRP) metabolism in liver, and their relation with gluconeogenic phosphoenolpyruvate-carboxykinase (PEPCK) blockage in experimental acute porphyria. This porphyria was induced in rats by a combined treatment of 2-allyl-2-isopropylacetamide (100, 250, 500 mg/kg bw) and 3,5-dietoxicarbonil 1,4-dihydrocollidine (constant 50 mg/kg bw dose). Results showed a marked dose-dependent increase of all TRP pyrrolase (TRPp) forms, active (holo, total) and inactive (apo), and a decrease in the degree of enzyme saturation by heme. Increases for holo, total, and apo-TRPp were 90, 150, and 230%, respectively, at the highest dose assayed (H). The treatment also impaired the serotoninergic route of TRP metabolism in liver, causing a decrease in serotonin level (H, 38%), and a concomitant enhancement in TRP content (H, 23%). The porphyrinogenic treatment promoted a blockage in PEPCK activity (H, 30%). This occurred in correlation to the development of porphyria, to TRPp alterations and to the production of hepatic microsomal thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. Porphyria was estimated through increases in 5-aminolevulinic acid-synthase (ALA-S) activity, ALA and porphobilinogen contents, and a decrease in ferrochelatase activity. Thus, the TRP kynurenine route was augmented whereas the serotoninergic route was reduced. PEPCK blockage could be partly attributed to quinolinate generated from TRP by the increase of TRPp activity, which would be due to the effect of porphyrinogenic drugs on TRP. The contribution of ROS to PEPCK blockage is analyzed. Likewise, the implication of these results in the control of porphyrias by glucose is discussed.

  16. Cost-effectiveness model for hepatitis C screening and treatment: Implications for Egypt and other countries with high prevalence.

    PubMed

    Kim, David D; Hutton, David W; Raouf, Ahmed A; Salama, Mohsen; Hablas, Ahmed; Seifeldin, Ibrahim A; Soliman, Amr S

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of cirrhosis and liver cancer, and many developing countries report intermediate-to-high prevalence. However, the economic impact of screening and treatment for HCV in high prevalence countries has not been well studied. Thus, we examined the cost-effectiveness of screening and treatment for HCV infection for asymptomatic, average-risk adults using a Markov decision analytic model. In our model, we collected age-specific prevalence, disease progression rates for Egyptians and local cost estimates in Egypt, which has the highest prevalence of HCV infection (~15%) in the world. We estimated the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio and conducted sensitivity analyses to determine how cost-effective HCV screening and treatment might be in other developing countries with high and intermediate prevalence. In Egypt, implementing a screening programme using triple-therapy treatment (sofosbuvir with pegylated interferon and ribavirin) was dominant compared with no screening because it would have lower total costs and improve health outcomes. HCV screening and treatment would also be cost-effective in global settings with intermediate costs of drug treatment (~$8000) and a higher sustained viral response rate (70-80%).

  17. Phenethyl amides as novel noncovalent inhibitors of hepatitis C virus NS3/4A protease: discovery, initial SAR, and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Colarusso, Stefania; Koch, Uwe; Gerlach, Benjamin; Steinkühler, Christian; De Francesco, Raffaele; Altamura, Sergio; Matassa, Victor G; Narjes, Frank

    2003-01-30

    The discovery of novel, reversible and competitive tripeptide inhibitors of the Hepatitis C virus NS3/4A serine protease is described. These inhibitors are characterized by the presence of a C-terminal phenethyl amide group, which extends into the prime side of the enzyme. Initial SAR together with molecular modeling and data from site-directed mutagenesis suggest an interaction of the phenethyl amide group with Lys-136.

  18. Performance of several simple, noninvasive models for assessing significant liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xianghua; Xu, Cheng; He, Dengming; Li, Maoshi; Zhang, Huiyan; Wu, Quanxin; Xiang, Dedong; Wang, Yuming

    2015-01-01

    Aim To compare the performance of several simple, noninvasive models comprising various serum markers in diagnosing significant liver fibrosis in the same sample of patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) with the same judgment standard. Methods A total of 308 patients with CHB who had undergone liver biopsy, laboratory tests, and liver stiffness measurement (LSM) at the Southwest Hospital, Chongqing, China between March 2010 and April 2014 were retrospectively studied. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and area under ROC curves (AUROCs) were used to analyze the results of the models, which incorporated age-platelet (PLT) index (API model), aspartate transaminase (AST) to alanine aminotransferase (ALT) ratio (AAR model), AST to PLT ratio index (APRI model), γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) to PLT ratio index (GPRI model), GGT-PLT-albumin index (S index model), age-AST-PLT-ALT index (FIB-4 model), and age-AST-PLT-ALT-international normalized ratio index (Fibro-Q model). Results The AUROCs of the S index, GPRI, FIB-4, APRI, API, Fibro-Q, AAR, and LSM for predicting significant liver fibrosis were 0.726 (P < 0.001), 0.726 (P < 0.001), 0.621 (P = 0.001), 0.619 (P = 0.001), 0.580 (P = 0.033), 0.569 (P = 0.066), 0.495 (P = 0.886), and 0.757 (P < 0.001), respectively. The S index and GPRI had the highest correlation with histopathological scores (r = 0.373, P < 0.001; r = 0.372, P < 0.001, respectively) and LSM values (r = 0.516, P < 0.001; r = 0.513, P < 0.001, respectively). When LSM was combined with S index and GPRI, the AUROCs were 0.753 (P < 0.001) and 0.746 (P < 0.001), respectively. Conclusion S index and GPRI had the best diagnostic performance for significant liver fibrosis and were robust predictors of significant liver fibrosis in patients with CHB for whom transient elastography was unavailable. PMID:26088852

  19. Hepatic and Extrahepatic Insulin Clearance Are Differentially Regulated: Results From a Novel Model-Based Analysis of Intravenous Glucose Tolerance Data.

    PubMed

    Polidori, David C; Bergman, Richard N; Chung, Stephanie T; Sumner, Anne E

    2016-06-01

    Insulin clearance is a highly variable and important factor that affects circulating insulin concentrations. We developed a novel model-based method to estimate both hepatic and extrahepatic insulin clearance using plasma insulin and C-peptide profiles obtained from the insulin-modified frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test. Data from 100 African immigrants without diabetes (mean age 38 years, body weight 81.7 kg, fasting plasma glucose concentration 83 mg/dL, and fasting insulin concentration 37 pmol/L) were used. Endogenous insulin secretion (calculated by C-peptide deconvolution) and insulin infusion rates were used as inputs to a new two-compartment model of insulin kinetics and hepatic and extrahepatic clearance parameters were estimated. Good agreement between modeled and measured plasma insulin profiles was observed (mean normalized root mean square error 6.8%), and considerable intersubject variability in parameters of insulin clearance among individuals was identified (the mean [interquartile range] for hepatic extraction was 25.8% [32.7%], and for extrahepatic insulin clearance was 20.7 mL/kg/min [11.7 mL/kg/min]). Parameters of insulin clearance were correlated with measures of insulin sensitivity and acute insulin response to glucose. The method described appears promising for future research aimed at characterizing variability in insulin clearance and the mechanisms involved in the regulation of insulin clearance.

  20. Nitrosative Stress-Induced Disruption of Baroreflex Neural Circuits in a Rat Model of Hepatic Encephalopathy: A DTI Study

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ching-Yi; Su, Chia-Hao; Chan, Julie Y. H.; Chan, Samuel H. H.

    2017-01-01

    The onset of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) in liver failure is associated with high mortality; the underlying mechanism is undecided. Here we report that in an acute liver failure model employing intraperitoneal administration of thioacetamide in Sprague-Dawley rats, diffusion weighted imaging revealed a progressive reduction in apparent diffusion coefficient in the brain stem. Diffusion tensor imaging further showed that the connectivity between nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS), the terminal site of baroreceptor afferents in brain stem and rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), the origin of sympathetic innervation of blood vessels, was progressively disrupted until its disappearance, coincidental with the irreversible cessation of baroreflex-mediated sympathetic vasomotor tone signifying clinically the occurrence of brain death. In addition, superoxide, nitric oxide, peroxynitrite and ammonia levels in the NTS or RVLM were elevated, alongside swelling of astroctytes. A scavenger of peroxynitrite, but not an antioxidant, delivered intracisternally reversed all these events. We conclude that nitrosative stress because of augmented peroxynitrite related to accumulation of ammonia and swelling of astrocytes in the NTS or RVLM, leading to cytotoxic edema in the brain stem and severance of the NTS-RVLM connectivity, underpins the defunct baroreflex-mediated sympathetic vasomotor tone that accounts for the high mortality associated with HE. PMID:28079146

  1. Pharmacological manipulation of cyclic GMP levels in brain restores learning ability in animal models of hepatic encephalopathy: therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, Regina; Monfort, Pilar; Cauli, Omar; Erceg, Slaven; Felipo, Vicente

    2006-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a complex neuropsychiatric syndrome present in patients with liver disease that includes impaired intellectual function. To develop therapeutic treatments to restore cognitive function, it is important to understand the molecular mechanisms that impair cognitive function in HE. This review summarizes data showing that: (a) cognitive function and learning are impaired in patients with liver disease and in animal models of chronic liver failure or hyperammonemia; (b) the glutamate–NO–cGMP pathway modulates some forms of learning; and (c) the function of this pathway is impaired in brain in vivo in rats with chronic hyperammonemia or liver failure and from patients who died from HE. Learning ability of hyperammonemic rats was restored by increasing cGMP by: (1) continuous intracerebral administration of zaprinast, an inhibitor of the cGMP-degrading phosphodiesterase; (2) chronic oral administration of sildenafil, an inhibitor of the phosphodiesterase that crosses the blood–brain barrier; and (3) continuous intracerebral administration of cGMP. The data summarized indicate that impairment of learning ability in rats with chronic liver failure or hyperammonemia is due to impairment of the glutamate–NO–cGMP pathway. Moreover, increasing extracellular cGMP by pharmacological means may be a new therapeutic approach to improve cognitive function in patients with HE. PMID:19412446

  2. Psammomys obesus, a unique model of metabolic syndrome, inflammation and autophagy in the pathologic development of hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Sihali-Beloui, Ouahiba; El-Aoufi, Salima; Maouche, Boubekeur; Marco, Sergio

    The aim of our transmission electron microscope study was to show, for the first time, the alteration of liver cells involved in the evolution of steatosis to steatohepatitis on a murine model of the diet-induced metabolic syndrome, Psammomys obesus. This pathologic evolution was induced by using the standard laboratory diet during 10 months, and analyzed with metabolic studies and the immunohistochemistry technique. Four months later, hepatocytes charged with lipid vacuoles were involved in autophagy. Furthermore, in the sinusoids, we observed Kupffer cells, neutrophils and macrophages. All those cells were associated with necrotic hepatocytes inducing hepatocellular necrosis. We also noticed a synthesis of extracellular matrix in excess, caused by proliferation and activation of hepatic stellate cells in necrotic areas. We observed as well a fragmentation of the endoplasmic reticulum, which formed isolated membranes (phagophores) surrounding mitochondria. The complex membrane-mitochondria formed like an autophagosome. Thus, a defect in autophagy favored the development and progression of steatohepatitis. In conclusion, our results suggest that P. obesus is very well adapted for experimental research, and could help improve the early therapeutic management of patients and the prevention of autophagic risks in the liver.

  3. Chitosan and Sodium Alginate Combinations Are Alternative, Efficient, and Safe Natural Adjuvant Systems for Hepatitis B Vaccine in Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    AbdelAllah, Nourhan H.; Boseila, Abeer A.; Amin, Magdy A.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B viral (HBV) infections represent major public health problem and are an occupational hazard for healthcare workers. Current alum-adjuvanted HBV vaccine is the most effective measure to prevent HBV infection. However, the vaccine has some limitations including poor response in some vaccinee and being a frost-sensitive suspension. The goal of our study was to use an alternative natural adjuvant system strongly immunogenic allowing for a reduction in dose and cost. We tested HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) adjuvanted with chitosan (Ch) and sodium alginate (S), both natural adjuvants, either alone or combined with alum in mouse model. Mice groups were immunized subcutaneously with HBsAg adjuvanted with Ch or S, or triple adjuvant formula with alum (Al), Ch, and S, or double formulations with AlCh or AlS. These were compared to control groups immunized with current vaccine formula or unadjuvanted HBsAg. We evaluated the rate of seroconversion, serum HBsAg antibody, IL-4, and IFN-γ levels. The results showed that the solution formula with Ch or S exhibited comparable immunogenic responses to Al-adjuvanted suspension. The AlChS gave significantly higher immunogenic response compared to controls. Collectively, our results indicated that Ch and S are effective HBV adjuvants offering natural alternatives, potentially reducing dose. PMID:27493674

  4. Origanum Majoranum Extract Modulates Gene Expression, Hepatic and Renal Changes in a Rat Model of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Mohamed Mohamed; Abdo Nassan, Mohamed; Ismail, Tamer Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to test the effect of Origanum Majoranum Extract (OME) of leaves on alterations induced in a model of type 2 diabetic rats. Adult male Wistar rats were fed high fat diet for 3 weeks and injected a single dose of streptozotocin (35 mg/kg) intraperitoneally to induce type 2 diabetic rats. Diabetic rats were given aqueous extract of OME in a dose of 20 mg/kg orally for 3 weeks. Changes in lipid profiles, glucose, insulin, expression of some genes related to glucose metabolism and histopathological changes in liver and kidney were examined. Administration of OME improved and normalized dyslipidemia recorded in type 2 diabetic rats together with reduction in glucose and insulin levels. OME induced up-regulation in gene expression of glucose [adiponectin and glucose transporter-2 (GLUT-2)] and lipid metabolism [lipoprotein lipase (LPL)]. Moreover, OME normalized histopathological changes occurred in liver and kidney of diabetic rats. OME decreased lipids accumulation in liver and kidney and increased regeneration of hepatic parenchyma and restored normal renal architecture with disappearance of fat droplets. In conclusion, OME improved dyslipidemia associated with type 2 diabetes through regulation of genes related to glucose and lipid metabolism. PMID:28228803

  5. Application of Static Models to Predict Midazolam Clinical Interactions in the Presence of Single or Multiple Hepatitis C Virus Drugs.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yaofeng; Ma, Li; Chang, Shu-Ying; Humphreys, W Griffith; Li, Wenying

    2016-08-01

    Asunaprevir (ASV), daclatasvir (DCV), and beclabuvir (BCV) are three drugs developed for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection. Here, we evaluated the CYP3A4 induction potential of each drug, as well as BCV-M1 (the major metabolite of BCV), in human hepatocytes by measuring CYP3A4 mRNA alteration. The induction responses were quantified as induction fold (mRNA fold change) and induction increase (mRNA fold increase), and then fitted with four nonlinear regression algorithms. Reversible inhibition and time-dependent inhibition (TDI) on CYP3A4 activity were determined to predict net drug-drug interactions (DDIs). All four compounds were CYP3A4 inducers and inhibitors, with ASV demonstrating TDI. The curve-fitting results demonstrated that fold increase is a better assessment to determine kinetic parameters for compounds inducing weak responses. By summing the contribution of each inducer, the basic static model was able to correctly predict the potential for a clinically meaningful induction signal for single or multiple perpetrators, but with over prediction of the magnitude. With the same approach, the mechanistic static model improved the prediction accuracy of DCV and BCV when including both induction and inhibition effects, but incorrectly predicted the net DDI effects for ASV alone or triple combinations. The predictions of ASV or the triple combination could be improved by only including the induction and reversible inhibition but not the ASV CYP3A4 TDI component. Those results demonstrated that static models can be applied as a tool to help project the DDI risk of multiple perpetrators using in vitro data.

  6. Identification of hepatic phospholipidosis inducers in sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes, a physiologically relevant model, reveals altered basolateral uptake and biliary excretion of anionic probe substrates.

    PubMed

    Ferslew, Brian C; Brouwer, Kim L R

    2014-05-01

    Drug-induced phospholipidosis (PLD) is characterized by phospholipid accumulation within the lysosomes of affected tissues, resulting in lysosomal enlargement and laminar body inclusions. Numerous adverse effects and toxicities have been linked to PLD-inducing drugs, but it remains unknown whether drug-induced PLD represents a distinct toxicity or cellular adaptation. In silico and immortalized cellular models have been used to evaluate the PLD potential of new drugs, but these systems have some limitations. The aims of this study were to determine whether primary sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH) can serve as a sensitive and selective model to evaluate hepatic drug-induced PLD, and to evaluate the impact of PLD on the uptake and biliary excretion of probe substrates, taurocholate (TC) and rosuvastatin (RSV). Rat SCH were cultured for 48 h with prototypic hepatic PLD-inducing drugs, amiodarone (AMD), chloroquine (CHQ), desipramine (DES), and azithromycin (AZI), as well as the renal PLD inducer gentamicin (GTM). LysoTracker Red localization and transmission electron microscopy indicated enlarged lysosomal compartments and laminar body inclusions in SCH treated with AMD, CHQ, DES, and AZI, but not GTM, relative to control. PLD resulted in a 51-92% decrease in the in vitro biliary clearance of both TC and RSV; the biliary excretion index significantly decreased for TC from 88 to 35-73%. These data suggested that PLD significantly reduced both organic anion transporting polypeptide-mediated uptake, and bile salt export pump-mediated biliary transport processes. The current study demonstrates that the rat SCH system is a promising model to study hepatic PLD in vitro. Altered hepatic transport of anionic substrates secondary to drug-induced PLD is a novel finding.

  7. Chronic hepatitis B infection and HBV DNA-containing capsids: Modeling and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manna, Kalyan; Chakrabarty, Siddhartha P.

    2015-05-01

    We analyze the dynamics of chronic HBV infection taking into account both uninfected and infected hepatocytes along with the intracellular HBV DNA-containing capsids and the virions. While previous HBV models have included either the uninfected hepatocytes or the intracellular HBV DNA-containing capsids, our model accounts for both these two populations. We prove the conditions for local and global stability of both the uninfected and infected steady states in terms of the basic reproduction number. Further, we incorporate a time lag in the model to encompass the intracellular delay in the production of the infected hepatocytes and find that this delay does not affect the overall dynamics of the system. The results for the model and the delay model are finally numerically illustrated.

  8. Therapeutic role of niacin in the prevention and regression of hepatic steatosis in rat model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Ganji, Shobha H; Kukes, Gary D; Lambrecht, Nils; Kashyap, Moti L; Kamanna, Vaijinath S

    2014-02-15

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a leading cause of liver damage, comprises a spectrum of liver abnormalities including the early fat deposition in the liver (hepatic steatosis) and advanced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Niacin decreases plasma triglycerides, but its effect on hepatic steatosis is elusive. To examine the effect of niacin on steatosis, rats were fed either a rodent normal chow, chow containing high fat (HF), or HF containing 0.5% or 1.0% niacin in the diet for 4 wk. For regression studies, rats were first fed the HF diet for 6 wk to induce hepatic steatosis and were then treated with niacin (0.5% in the diet) while on the HF diet for 6 wk. The findings indicated that inclusion of niacin at 0.5% and 1.0% doses in the HF diet significantly decreased liver fat content, liver weight, hepatic oxidative products, and prevented hepatic steatosis. Niacin treatment to rats with preexisting hepatic steatosis induced by the HF diet significantly regressed steatosis. Niacin had no effect on the mRNA expression of fatty acid synthesis or oxidation genes (including sterol-regulatory element-binding protein 1, acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1, fatty acid synthase, and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1) but significantly inhibited mRNA levels, protein expression, and activity of diacylglycerol acyltrasferase 2, a key enzyme in triglyceride synthesis. These novel findings suggest that niacin effectively prevents and causes the regression of experimental hepatic steatosis. Approved niacin formulation(s) for other indications or niacin analogs may offer a very cost-effective opportunity for the clinical development of niacin for treating NAFLD and fatty liver disease.

  9. Berberine increases the expression of NHE3 and AQP4 in sennosideA-induced diarrhoea model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongguo; Wang, Xin; Sha, Sumei; Liang, Shuli; Zhao, Lina; Liu, Lin; Chai, Na; Wang, Honghong; Wu, Kaichun

    2012-09-01

    Berberine, a compound isolated from Chinese Goldthread Rhizome, has been widely used as a non-prescription drug to treat diarrhoea in China. Previous studies have demonstrated multiple pharmacological activities for berberine, including its significant role in antimicrobial activity. However, its effect on ion exchange and water transfer remains unclear. The present study aims to explore the effect of berberine on the expression of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger3 (NHE3) and aquaporin4 (AQP4) in both diarrhoea mouse model induced by sennosideA and human intestinal epithelium cell line (HIEC). Semi-quantitative RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and western blotting were adopted to detect the mRNA and protein expression levels of NHE3 and AQP4. Furthermore, the absorption of berberine and the PKC activity were detected by HPLC and PepTag® Assay to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. It was shown that the expression levels of NHE3 and AQP4 were significantly increased in the diarrhoea mice treated with berberine compared with the untreated diarrhoea mice. Similarly, the expression levels of NHE3 and AQP4 were strikingly enhanced in HIEC co-treated with sennosideA and berberine compared with samples treated with sennosideA only. We also found the maximal absorption of berberine to be approximately 0.01%. In addition, no significant change of PKC activity was observed in the different HIEC treated groups. These results showed that berberine was able to increase the expression of NHE3 and AQP4, suggesting that berberine might exhibit its anti-diarrhoeal effect partially by enhancing the absorption of Na(+) and water.

  10. Pooled model-based approach to compare the pharmacokinetics of entecavir between Japanese and non-Japanese chronic hepatitis B patients.

    PubMed

    Yoshitsugu, Hiroyuki; Sakurai, Takao; Ishikawa, Hiroki; Roy, Amit; Bifano, Marc; Pfister, Marc; Seriu, Taku; Hiraoka, Masaki

    2011-05-01

    This study evaluated the population pharmacokinetics (PK) of entecavir in Japanese patients with chronic hepatitis B infection enrolled in 2 Japanese phase IIb clinical trials and compared them to non-Japanese patients enrolled in global phase II trials. The objectives were to identify significant and clinically meaningful covariate effects on entecavir population pharmacokinetic parameters and assess whether differences exist between Japanese and non-Japanese patients. A total of 843 observations were obtained from 142 patients who received once daily administration of entecavir at 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 mg doses in the 2 Japanese studies. Consistent with findings in non-Japanese patients, creatinine clearance estimated with ideal body weight (ICrCL) was found to be statistically significant for clearance in a 2-compartment model. Also, the entecavir dose was identified as a covariate on intercompartmental clearance. Age, gender, and hepatic function were not identified as covariate for clearance. The estimated population average of oral clearance in a typical patient with a reference ICrCL value of 100 mL/min was 26.4 L/h (interindividual variability: 19.4%). This model-based analysis indicates that the PK of entecavir are similar in Japanese and non-Japanese chronic hepatitis B patients.

  11. Multiple Probe Hepatic Radio-Frequency Ablation: Ex-Vivo Experiments in the Porcine Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    temperatures) were scaled to 80% of the data used for the first model. The model of dynamic system B approximated a situation where higher blood...sample B (initial temperature 27 °C). t ee KeKu n m mm nn ∆⋅ +⋅+⋅= = − 1 1 ip 2 (2) 0 20 40 60 80 100 0 200 400 Time (s) A ve ra g e T ip T em

  12. Analysis of changes in hepatic gene expression in a murine model of tolerance to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity (autoprotection).

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Meeghan A; Koza-Taylor, Petra; Campion, Sarah N; Aleksunes, Lauren M; Gu, Xinsheng; Enayetallah, Ahmed E; Lawton, Michael P; Manautou, José E

    2014-01-01

    Pretreatment of mice with a low hepatotoxic dose of acetaminophen (APAP) results in resistance to a subsequent, higher dose of APAP. This mouse model, termed APAP autoprotection was used here to identify differentially expressed genes and cellular pathways that could contribute to this development of resistance to hepatotoxicity. Male C57BL/6J mice were pretreated with APAP (400mg/kg) and then challenged 48h later with 600mg APAP/kg. Livers were obtained 4 or 24h later and total hepatic RNA was isolated and hybridized to Affymetrix Mouse Genome MU430_2 GeneChip. Statistically significant genes were determined and gene expression changes were also interrogated using the Causal Reasoning Engine (CRE). Extensive literature review narrowed our focus to methionine adenosyl transferase-1 alpha (MAT1A), nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (Fmo3) and galectin-3 (Lgals3). Down-regulation of MAT1A could lead to decreases in S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), which is known to protect against APAP toxicity. Nrf2 activation is expected to play a role in protective adaptation. Up-regulation of Lgals3, one of the genes supporting the Nrf2 hypothesis, can lead to suppression of apoptosis and reduced mitochondrial dysfunction. Fmo3 induction suggests the involvement of an enzyme not known to metabolize APAP in the development of tolerance to APAP toxicity. Subsequent quantitative RT-PCR and immunochemical analysis confirmed the differential expression of some of these genes in the APAP autoprotection model. In conclusion, our genomics strategy identified cellular pathways that might further explain the molecular basis for APAP autoprotection.

  13. Hepatitis B virus (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis B is also known as serum hepatitis and is spread through blood and sexual contact. It is ... population. This photograph is an electronmicroscopic image of hepatitis B virus particles. (Image courtesy of the Centers for ...

  14. Hepatitis Risk Assessment

    MedlinePlus

    ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Hepatitis Risk Assessment Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Viral Hepatitis. ... you at risk? Take this 5 minute Hepatitis Risk Assessment developed by the CDC and get a personalized ...

  15. Preventing hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis A is inflammation (irritation and swelling) of the liver caused by the hepatitis A virus. You can take several steps to ... reduce your risk of spreading or catching the hepatitis A virus: Always wash your hands thoroughly after ...

  16. Hepatitis B Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Hepatitis B Testing Share this page: Was this page ... known as: HBV Tests; Hep B; anti-HBs; Hepatitis B Surface Antibody; HBsAg; Hepatitis B Surface Antigen; ...

  17. HIV and Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections and Coinfections HIV and Hepatitis C (Last updated 8/31/2016; last reviewed ... the medicines for any side effects. What is hepatitis C? Hepatitis C is a liver disease caused ...

  18. HIV and Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections and Coinfections HIV and Hepatitis B (Last updated 8/31/2016; last reviewed ... should be treated for both diseases. What is hepatitis B? Hepatitis B is a liver disease caused ...

  19. Drug-induced hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Toxic hepatitis ... to get liver damage. Some drugs can cause hepatitis with small doses, even if the liver breakdown ... liver. Many different drugs can cause drug-induced hepatitis. Painkillers and fever reducers that contain acetaminophen are ...

  20. Adult Living with Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... Viral Hepatitis Liver Cancer and Hepatitis B Hepatitis Delta Coinfection Hepatitis C Coinfection HIV/AIDS Coinfection Prevention & ... Institute Education & Training Hep B United Coalition Hepatitis Delta Connect 2017 International HBV Meeting National Patient Advocacy ...

  1. Pharmacokinetics of 5-fluorouracil and increased hepatic dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase activity levels in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colorectal cancer model rats.

    PubMed

    Kobuchi, Shinji; Ito, Yukako; Okada, Kae; Imoto, Kazuki; Takada, Kanji

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the hepatic dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) activity in colorectal cancer (CRC), which is critically important to create a patient-specific dosing regimen, we performed 5-FU pharmacokinetic studies in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced CRC model rats (CRC rats). After rats received 5-FU intravenous (IV) bolus injections, the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) and elimination half-life (t 1/2) in CRC rats (10.02 ± 0.37 μg h mL(-1), 0.30 ± 0.02 h, respectively) were significantly lower than that in control rats (13.46 ± 1.20 μg h mL(-1), 0.52 ± 0.05 h, respectively), whereas total plasma clearance (CLtot) in CRC rats (2.01 ± 0.07 L h(-1) kg(-1)) was significantly increased compared with that in control rats (1.54 ± 0.14 L h(-1) kg(-1)). Conversely, the avoidance ratio of the hepatic first-pass effect was approximately 20 % lower than that in control rats. Of interest is that hepatic DPD activity levels and the dihydrouracil-uracil ratio (UH2/Ura ratio) in plasma, which may act as a potential biomarker to evaluate hepatic DPD activity levels, were significantly increased in CRC rats. These results suggest that the decrease of hepatic availability in CRC rats is brought about by the increase in intrinsic clearance induced by the increase in DPD activity, resulting in a decrease in AUC and t 1/2 and an increase in CLtot after 5-FU IV bolus injection. Along with a proper dosing regimen for patients with CRC, a hepatic DPD activity monitoring system, such as the determination of UH2/Ura ratio in plasma, is desirable.

  2. Evaluation of rhesus monkey and guinea pig hepatic cytosol fractions as models for human aldehyde oxidase.

    PubMed

    Choughule, Kanika V; Barr, John T; Jones, Jeffrey P

    2013-10-01

    Aldehyde oxidase (AOX) is a cytosolic enzyme expressed across a wide range of species, including guinea pig and rhesus monkey. These species are believed to be the best preclinical models for studying human AOX-mediated metabolism. We compared AOX activity in rhesus monkeys, guinea pigs, and humans using phthalazine and N-[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl]acridone-4-carboxamide (DACA) as substrates and raloxifene as an inhibitor. Michaelis-Menten kinetics was observed for phthalazine oxidation in rhesus monkey, guinea pig, and human liver cytosol, whereas substrate inhibition was seen with DACA oxidase activity in all three livers. Raloxifene inhibited phthalazine and DACA oxidase activity uncompetitively in guinea pig, whereas mixed-mode inhibition was seen in rhesus monkey. Our analysis of the primary sequence alignment of rhesus monkey, guinea pig, and human aldehyde oxidase isoform 1 (AOX1) along with homology modeling has led to the identification of several amino acid residue differences within the active site and substrate entrance channel of AOX1. We speculate that some of these residues might be responsible for the differences observed in activity. Overall, our data indicate that rhesus monkeys and guinea pigs would overestimate intrinsic clearance in humans and would be unsuitable to use as animal models. Our study also showed that AOX metabolism in species is substrate-dependent and no single animal model can be reliably used to predict every drug response in humans.

  3. Evaluation of Rhesus Monkey and Guinea Pig Hepatic Cytosol Fractions as Models for Human Aldehyde Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Choughule, Kanika V.; Barr, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Aldehyde oxidase (AOX) is a cytosolic enzyme expressed across a wide range of species, including guinea pig and rhesus monkey. These species are believed to be the best preclinical models for studying human AOX-mediated metabolism. We compared AOX activity in rhesus monkeys, guinea pigs, and humans using phthalazine and N-[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl]acridone-4-carboxamide (DACA) as substrates and raloxifene as an inhibitor. Michaelis-Menten kinetics was observed for phthalazine oxidation in rhesus monkey, guinea pig, and human liver cytosol, whereas substrate inhibition was seen with DACA oxidase activity in all three livers. Raloxifene inhibited phthalazine and DACA oxidase activity uncompetitively in guinea pig, whereas mixed-mode inhibition was seen in rhesus monkey. Our analysis of the primary sequence alignment of rhesus monkey, guinea pig, and human aldehyde oxidase isoform 1 (AOX1) along with homology modeling has led to the identification of several amino acid residue differences within the active site and substrate entrance channel of AOX1. We speculate that some of these residues might be responsible for the differences observed in activity. Overall, our data indicate that rhesus monkeys and guinea pigs would overestimate intrinsic clearance in humans and would be unsuitable to use as animal models. Our study also showed that AOX metabolism in species is substrate-dependent and no single animal model can be reliably used to predict every drug response in humans. PMID:23918666

  4. A Parallel Sliding Region Algorithm to Make Agent-Based Modeling Possible for a Large-Scale Simulation: Modeling Hepatitis C Epidemics in Canada.

    PubMed

    Wong, William W L; Feng, Zeny Z; Thein, Hla-Hla

    2016-11-01

    Agent-based models (ABMs) are computer simulation models that define interactions among agents and simulate emergent behaviors that arise from the ensemble of local decisions. ABMs have been increasingly used to examine trends in infectious disease epidemiology. However, the main limitation of ABMs is the high computational cost for a large-scale simulation. To improve the computational efficiency for large-scale ABM simulations, we built a parallelizable sliding region algorithm (SRA) for ABM and compared it to a nonparallelizable ABM. We developed a complex agent network and performed two simulations to model hepatitis C epidemics based on the real demographic data from Saskatchewan, Canada. The first simulation used the SRA that processed on each postal code subregion subsequently. The second simulation processed the entire population simultaneously. It was concluded that the parallelizable SRA showed computational time saving with comparable results in a province-wide simulation. Using the same method, SRA can be generalized for performing a country-wide simulation. Thus, this parallel algorithm enables the possibility of using ABM for large-scale simulation with limited computational resources.

  5. Hepatitis B Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... a combination product containing Haemophilus influenzae type b, Hepatitis B Vaccine) ... combination product containing Diphtheria, Tetanus Toxoids, Acellular Pertussis, Hepatitis B, Polio Vaccine)

  6. Structural identifiability analyses of candidate models for in vitro Pitavastatin hepatic uptake.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, Thomas R B; Chappell, Michael J; Yates, James W T; Evans, Neil D

    2014-05-01

    In this paper a review of the application of four different techniques (a version of the similarity transformation approach for autonomous uncontrolled systems, a non-differential input/output observable normal form approach, the characteristic set differential algebra and a recent algebraic input/output relationship approach) to determine the structural identifiability of certain in vitro nonlinear pharmacokinetic models is provided. The Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide (OATP) substrate, Pitavastatin, is used as a probe on freshly isolated animal and human hepatocytes. Candidate pharmacokinetic non-linear compartmental models have been derived to characterise the uptake process of Pitavastatin. As a prerequisite to parameter estimation, structural identifiability analyses are performed to establish that all unknown parameters can be identified from the experimental observations available.

  7. A Predictive Model for Toxicity Effects Assessment of Biotransformed Hepatic Drugs Using Iterative Sampling Method

    PubMed Central

    Tharwat, Alaa; Moemen, Yasmine S.; Hassanien, Aboul Ella

    2016-01-01

    Measuring toxicity is one of the main steps in drug development. Hence, there is a high demand for computational models to predict the toxicity effects of the potential drugs. In this study, we used a dataset, which consists of four toxicity effects:mutagenic, tumorigenic, irritant and reproductive effects. The proposed model consists of three phases. In the first phase, rough set-based methods are used to select the most discriminative features for reducing the classification time and improving the classification performance. Due to the imbalanced class distribution, in the second phase, different sampling methods such as Random Under-Sampling, Random Over-Sampling and Synthetic Minority Oversampling Technique are used to solve the problem of imbalanced datasets. ITerative Sampling (ITS) method is proposed to avoid the limitations of those methods. ITS method has two steps. The first step (sampling step) iteratively modifies the prior distribution of the minority and majority classes. In the second step, a data cleaning method is used to remove the overlapping that is produced from the first step. In the third phase, Bagging classifier is used to classify an unknown drug into toxic or non-toxic. The experimental results proved that the proposed model performed well in classifying the unknown samples according to all toxic effects in the imbalanced datasets. PMID:27934950

  8. Identification of the common regulators for hepatocellular carcinoma induced by hepatitis B virus X antigen in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jeng-Wei; Hsia, Yu; Yang, Wan-Yu; Lin, Yu-I; Li, Chao-Chin; Tsai, Ting-Fen; Chang, Ko-Wei; Shieh, Grace S; Tsai, Shih-Feng; Wang, Horng-Dar; Yuh, Chiou-Hwa

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus X antigen plays an important role in the development of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The key regulators controlling the temporal downstream gene expression for HCC progression remains unknown. In this study, we took advantage of systems biology approach and analyzed the microarray data of the HBx transgenic mouse as a screening process to identify the differentially expressed genes and applied the software Pathway Studio to identify potential pathways and regulators involved in HCC. Using subnetwork enrichment analysis, we identified five common regulator genes: EDN1, BMP7, BMP4, SPIB and SRC. Upregulation of the common regulators was validated in the other independent HBx transgenic mouse lines. Furthermore, we verified the correlation of their RNA expression levels by using the human HCC samples, and their protein levels by using the human liver disease tissue arrays. EDN1, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 4 and BMP7 were upregulated in cirrhosis, BMP4, BMP7 and SRC were further upregulated in hepatocellular or cholangiocellular carcinoma samples. The trend of increasing expression of the common regulators correlates well with the progression of human liver cancer. Overexpression of the common regulators increases the cell viability, promotes migration and invasiveness and enhances the colony formation ability in Hep3B cells. Our approach allows us to identify the critical genes in hepatocarcinogenesis in an HBx-induced mouse model. The validation of the gene expressions in the liver cancer of human patients and their cellular function assays suggests that the identified common regulators may serve as useful molecular targets for the early-stage diagnosis or therapy for HCC.

  9. Antioxidant properties of tea blunt ROS-dependent lipogenesis: beneficial effect on hepatic steatosis in a high fat-high sucrose diet NAFLD obese rat model.

    PubMed

    Braud, Laura; Battault, Sylvain; Meyer, Grégory; Nascimento, Alessandro; Gaillard, Sandrine; de Sousa, Georges; Rahmani, Roger; Riva, Catherine; Armand, Martine; Maixent, Jean-Michel; Reboul, Cyril

    2017-02-01

    Oxidative stress could trigger lipid accumulation in liver and thus hepatic steatosis. Tea is able to prevent liver disorders, but a direct link between antioxidant capacities and prevention of steatosis has not been reported yet. We aimed to investigate such relationship in a rat model of high fat-high sucrose diet (HFS)-induced obesity and to explore more deeply the mechanisms in isolated hepatocytes. Wistar rats were divided into a control group (standard diet), an HFS group (high fat-sucrose diet) and an HFS+tea group (HFS diet with ad-libitum access to tea drink). Body weight, fat mass, glycemic parameters in blood, lipid and oxidative stress parameters in blood and liver were measured in each group after 14 weeks. Isolated hepatocytes were treated with the reactive oxygen species (ROS) inducer t-BHP in the presence or not of antioxidants (tempol or tea), and superoxide anion production and lipid accumulation were measured using specific fluorescent probes. We reported that the HFS diet highly increased hepatic lipids content, while tea consumption attenuated steatosis and improved the oxidative status (decrease in hepatic oxidative stress, increase in plasma total antioxidant capacity). The role of antioxidant properties of tea in such phenomenon was confirmed in primary cultured rat hepatocytes. Indeed, the increase of mitochondrial ROS production with t-BHP resulted in lipid accumulation in hepatocytes (positive linear regression), and antioxidants (tempol or tea) normalized both. We reported that the antioxidant properties of tea protect rats from an obesogenic HFS diet-induced hepatic steatosis by counteracting the ROS-dependent lipogenesis.

  10. Association of the Nonalcoholic Hepatic Steatosis and Its Degrees With the Values of Liver Enzymes and Homeostasis Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance Index

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Mario Augusto Ferreira; Cruz, Josilda Ferreira; Macena, Larissa Baracho; de Santana, Demetrius Silva; Oliveira, Cristiane Costa da Cunha; Lima, Sonia Oliveira; Franca, Alex Vianey Callado

    2015-01-01

    Background Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is among the most common chronic diseases of the modern world with a wide variety of factors including genetic, environmental and metabolic. The aim of this study was to verify the association between the degrees of hepatic steatosis at the abdominal ultrasound and the values of aminotransferases (aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine transferase (ALT)), gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index. Methods A prospective, descriptive survey study, using a quantitative analytical examination, was conducted from July 2013 to July 2014. In the statistical analysis, values were expressed as median, first and third quartiles. We used the nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test to compare the medians between the degrees of steatosis, adopted a statistical significance of 5% (P ≤ 0.05) and used the statistical program SPSS 22.0. Results We diagnosed 233/800 (29.1%) patients with hepatic steatosis on routine ultrasound, and 65.7% were female. Regarding degrees, 119 had grade 1 (51.0%), 94 grade 2 (40.4%) and 20 grade 3 (8.6%). The median age of the patients with grade 1, 2 or 3 did not vary significantly (P > 0.05). The median body mass index (BMI), although clinically important because of its elevation, did not differ significantly (P > 0.05). ALT levels increased as the degree of hepatic steatosis has advanced as well as the levels of AST, GGT and HOMA-IR. AST values showed a greater association with the severity of fatty liver (P = 0.0001) than the ALT (P = 0.001). Conclusions ALT, AST, GGT and HOMA-IR are associated to the degrees of hepatic steatosis on ultrasound and can help in the selection of patients for the liver histological evaluation. PMID:27785306

  11. Branched-chain amino acids prevent hepatic fibrosis and development of hepatocellular carcinoma in a non-alcoholic steatohepatitis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Takegoshi, Kai; Honda, Masao; Okada, Hikari; Takabatake, Riuta; Matsuzawa-Nagata, Naoto; Campbell, Jean S; Nishikawa, Masashi; Shimakami, Tetsuro; Shirasaki, Takayoshi; Sakai, Yoshio; Yamashita, Taro; Takamura, Toshinari; Tanaka, Takuji; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2017-02-13

    Oral supplementation with branched-chain amino acids (BCAA; leucine, isoleucine, and valine) in patients with liver cirrhosis potentially suppresses the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and improves event-free survival. However, the detailed mechanisms of BCAA action have not been fully elucidated. BCAA were administered to atherogenic and high-fat (Ath+HF) diet-induced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) model mice. Liver histology, tumor incidence, and gene expression profiles were evaluated. Ath+HF diet mice developed hepatic tumors at a high frequency at 68 weeks. BCAA supplementation significantly improved hepatic steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, and tumors in Ath+HF mice at 68 weeks. GeneChip analysis demonstrated the significant resolution of pro-fibrotic gene expression by BCAA supplementation. The anti-fibrotic effect of BCAA was confirmed further using platelet-derived growth factor C transgenic mice, which develop hepatic fibrosis and tumors. In vitro, BCAA restored the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-stimulated expression of pro-fibrotic genes in hepatic stellate cells (HSC). In hepatocytes, BCAA restored TGF-β1-induced apoptosis, lipogenesis, and Wnt/β-Catenin signaling, and inhibited the transformation of WB-F344 rat liver epithelial stem-like cells. BCAA repressed the promoter activity of TGFβ1R1 by inhibiting the expression of the transcription factor NFY and histone acetyltransferase p300. Interestingly, the inhibitory effect of BCAA on TGF-β1 signaling was mTORC1 activity-dependent, suggesting the presence of negative feedback regulation from mTORC1 to TGF-β1 signaling. Thus, BCAA induce an anti-fibrotic effect in HSC, prevent apoptosis in hepatocytes, and decrease the incidence of HCC; therefore, BCAA supplementation would be beneficial for patients with advanced liver fibrosis with a high risk of HCC.

  12. Nrf2 pathway activation contributes to anti-fibrosis effects of ginsenoside Rg1 in a rat model of alcohol- and CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian-ping; Gao, Yan; Chu, Shi-feng; Zhang, Zhao; Xia, Cong-yuan; Mou, Zheng; Song, Xiu-yun; He, Wen-bin; Guo, Xiao-feng; Chen, Nai-hong

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the anti-fibrosis effects of ginsenoside Rg1 on alcohol- and CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis in rats and to explore the mechanisms of the effects. Methods: Rats were given 6% alcohol in water and injected with CCl4 (2 mL/kg, sc) twice a week for 8 weeks. Rg1 (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg per day, po) was administered in the last 2 weeks. Hepatic fibrosis was determined by measuring serum biochemical parameters, HE staining, Masson's trichromic staining, and hydroxyproline and α-SMA immunohistochemical staining of liver tissues. The activities of antioxidant enzymes, lipid peroxidation, and Nrf2 signaling pathway-related proteins (Nrf2, Ho-1 and Nqo1) in liver tissues were analyzed. Cultured hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) of rats were prepared for in vitro studies. Results: In the alcohol- and CCl4-treated rats, Rg1 administration dose-dependently suppressed the marked increases of serum ALT, AST, LDH and ALP levels, inhibited liver inflammation and HSC activation and reduced liver fibrosis scores. Rg1 significantly increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes (SOD, GSH-Px and CAT) and reduced MDA levels in liver tissues. Furthermore, Rg1 significantly increased the expression and nuclear translocation of Nrf2 that regulated the expression of many antioxidant enzymes. Treatment of the cultured HSCs with Rg1 (1 μmol/L) induced Nrf2 translocation, and suppressed CCl4-induced cell proliferation, reversed CCl4- induced changes in MDA, GPX, PCIII and HA contents in the supernatant fluid and α-SMA expression in the cells. Knockdown of Nrf2 gene diminished these actions of Rg1 in CCl4-treated HSCs in vitro. Conclusion: Rg1 exerts protective effects in a rat model of alcohol- and CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis via promoting the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and expression of antioxidant enzymes. PMID:24976156

  13. Effectiveness of Losartan-Loaded Hyaluronic Acid (HA) Micelles for the Reduction of Advanced Hepatic Fibrosis in C3H/HeN Mice Model.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Reju George; Moon, Myeong Ju; Kim, Jo Heon; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Jeong, Yong Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Advanced hepatic fibrosis therapy using drug-delivering nanoparticles is a relatively unexplored area. Angiotensin type 1 (AT1) receptor blockers such as losartan can be delivered to hepatic stellate cells (HSC), blocking their activation and thereby reducing fibrosis progression in the liver. In our study, we analyzed the possibility of utilizing drug-loaded vehicles such as hyaluronic acid (HA) micelles carrying losartan to attenuate HSC activation. Losartan, which exhibits inherent lipophilicity, was loaded into the hydrophobic core of HA micelles with a 19.5% drug loading efficiency. An advanced liver fibrosis model was developed using C3H/HeN mice subjected to 20 weeks of prolonged TAA/ethanol weight-adapted treatment. The cytocompatibility and cell uptake profile of losartan-HA micelles were studied in murine fibroblast cells (NIH3T3), human hepatic stellate cells (hHSC) and FL83B cells (hepatocyte cell line). The ability of these nanoparticles to attenuate HSC activation was studied in activated HSC cells based on alpha smooth muscle actin (α-sma) expression. Mice treated with oral losartan or losartan-HA micelles were analyzed for serum enzyme levels (ALT/AST, CK and LDH) and collagen deposition (hydroxyproline levels) in the liver. The accumulation of HA micelles was observed in fibrotic livers, which suggests increased delivery of losartan compared to normal livers and specific uptake by HSC. Active reduction of α-sma was observed in hHSC and the liver sections of losartan-HA micelle-treated mice. The serum enzyme levels and collagen deposition of losartan-HA micelle-treated mice was reduced significantly compared to the oral losartan group. Losartan-HA micelles demonstrated significant attenuation of hepatic fibrosis via an HSC-targeting mechanism in our in vitro and in vivo studies. These nanoparticles can be considered as an alternative therapy for liver fibrosis.

  14. Hepatic immunohistochemical localization of the tight junction protein ZO-1 in rat models of cholestasis.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, J. M.; Glade, J. L.; Stevenson, B. R.; Boyer, J. L.; Mooseker, M. S.

    1989-01-01

    Structural alterations in hepatocyte tight junctions accompanying cholestasis were investigated using immunolocalization of ZO-1, the first known protein component of the tight junction. Disruption in the paracellular barrier function of the tight junction has been proposed to allow reflux of bile into the blood. Cholestasis was induced in 210 to 235 g male Sprague-Dawley rats either by five consecutive daily subcutaneous injections of 17-alpha-ethinyl estradiol (0.5 mg/kg/d in propylene glycol) or ligation of the common bile duct for 72 hours. The structural organization of the tight junction was assessed in each model by indirect immunofluorescent and immunoperoxidase staining for ZO-1 on frozen sections of liver and compared with controls. In control, sham-operated, and estradiol-injected animals, ZO-1 localizes in a uniform continuous manner along the margins of the canaliculi. In contrast, bile duct ligation results in the appearance of numerous discontinuities in ZO-1 staining accompanied by dilation or collapse of the lumenal space. Tissue content of the ZO-1 protein, as determined by quantitative immunoblotting, was unaffected in either cholestatic model compared with controls. These findings indicate that the molecular organization of the tight junction can be assessed from immunostaining patterns of ZO-1 in frozen sections of cholestatic livers. Under these experimental conditions, the organization of the tight junction at the level of the ZO-1 protein is altered by bile duct obstruction but not by ethinyl estradiol. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2719075

  15. Hepatic and serum lipid signatures specific to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in murine models

    PubMed Central

    Chiappini, Franck; Desterke, Christophe; Bertrand-Michel, Justine; Guettier, Catherine; Le Naour, François

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) is a precursor of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a condition that may progress to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Markers for diagnosis of NASH are still lacking. We have investigated lipid markers using mouse models that developed NAFL when fed with high fat diet (HFD) or NASH when fed using methionine choline deficient diet (MCDD). We have performed a comprehensive lipidomic analysis on liver tissues as well as on sera from mice fed HFD (n = 5), MCDD (n = 5) or normal diet as controls (n = 10). Machine learning approach based on prediction analysis of microarrays followed by random forests allowed identifying 21 lipids out of 149 in the liver and 14 lipids out of 155 in the serum discriminating mice fed MCDD from HFD or controls. In conclusion, the global approach implemented allowed characterizing lipid signatures specific to NASH in both liver and serum from animal models. This opens new avenue for investigating early and non-invasive lipid markers for diagnosis of NASH in human. PMID:27510159

  16. Hepatic Overexpression of GRP94 in a Rabbit Model of Parenteral Nutrition-Associated Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xueping; Zhang, Xiaomin; Yu, Lingling; Xu, Yumin; Feng, Xing; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To use a rabbit model of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD) to study changes of the endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) marker glucose regulatory protein 94 (GRP94) and determine its role in the pathogenesis of PNALD. Methods. A rabbit PNALD model total parenteral nutrition (TPN) group was established. A corresponding control group received breast-feeding for one week. Serum biochemical parameters were measured and liver histological examinations were performed. The level of GRP94 mRNA and protein were measured. Results. The results showed that the serum TBIL, DBIL, and γ-GT levels in the TPN group were significantly higher than those in the control group, while levels of serum ALB in TPN group were significantly lower than those in the control group. The immunohistochemistry results showed that the protein expression level of GRP94 in the liver of TPN group was significantly increased compared with the control group. The RT-PCR results showed that the level of GRP94 mRNA in the liver of the TPN group was significantly higher compared with the control group. Conclusions. The mRNA and protein levels of GRP94 in the TPN group were both significantly increased, indicating that ERS may be directly related to the occurrence and development of PNALD. PMID:25918521

  17. A silk peptide fraction restores cognitive function in AF64A-induced Alzheimer disease model rats by increasing expression of choline acetyltransferase gene.

    PubMed

    Cha, Yeseul; Lee, Sang Hoon; Jang, Su Kil; Guo, Haiyu; Ban, Young-Hwan; Park, Dongsun; Jang, Gwi Yeong; Yeon, Sungho; Lee, Jeong-Yong; Choi, Ehn-Kyoung; Joo, Seong Soo; Jeong, Heon-Sang; Kim, Yun-Bae

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of a silk peptide fraction obtained by incubating silk proteins with Protease N and Neutrase (SP-NN) on cognitive dysfunction of Alzheimer disease model rats. In order to elucidate underlying mechanisms, the effect of SP-NN on the expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) mRNA was assessed in F3.ChAT neural stem cells and Neuro2a neuroblastoma cells; active amino acid sequence was identified using HPLC-MS. The expression of ChAT mRNA in F3.ChAT cells increased by 3.79-fold of the control level by treatment with SP-NN fraction. The active peptide in SP-NN was identified as tyrosine-glycine with 238.1 of molecular weight. Male rats were orally administered with SP-NN (50 or 300mg/kg) and challenged with a cholinotoxin AF64A. As a result of brain injury and decreased brain acetylcholine level, AF64A induced astrocytic activation, resulting in impairment of learning and memory function. Treatment with SP-NN exerted recovering activities on acetylcholine depletion and brain injury, as well as cognitive deficit induced by AF64A. The results indicate that, in addition to a neuroprotective activity, the SP-NN preparation restores cognitive function of Alzheimer disease model rats by increasing the release of acetylcholine.

  18. Correction of metabolic abnormalities in a rodent model of obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus by inhibitors of hepatic protein kinase C-ι.

    PubMed

    Sajan, Mini P; Nimal, Sonali; Mastorides, Stephen; Acevedo-Duncan, Mildred; Kahn, C Ronald; Fields, Alan P; Braun, Ursula; Leitges, Michael; Farese, Robert V

    2012-04-01

    Excessive activity of hepatic atypical protein kinase (aPKC) is proposed to play a critical role in mediating lipid and carbohydrate abnormalities in obesity, the metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. In previous studies of rodent models of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, adenoviral-mediated expression of kinase-inactive aPKC rapidly reversed or markedly improved most if not all metabolic abnormalities. Here, we examined effects of 2 newly developed small-molecule PKC-ι/λ inhibitors. We used the mouse model of heterozygous muscle-specific knockout of PKC-λ, in which partial deficiency of muscle PKC-λ impairs glucose transport in muscle and thereby causes glucose intolerance and hyperinsulinemia, which, via hepatic aPKC activation, leads to abdominal obesity, hepatosteatosis, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypercholesterolemia. One inhibitor, 1H-imidazole-4-carboxamide, 5-amino-1-[2,3-dihydroxy-4-[(phosphonooxy)methyl]cyclopentyl-[1R-(1a,2b,3b,4a)], binds to the substrate-binding site of PKC-λ/ι, but not other PKCs. The other inhibitor, aurothiomalate, binds to cysteine residues in the PB1-binding domains of aPKC-λ/ι/ζ and inhibits scaffolding. Treatment with either inhibitor for 7 days inhibited aPKC, but not Akt, in liver and concomitantly improved insulin signaling to Akt and aPKC in muscle and adipocytes. Moreover, both inhibitors diminished excessive expression of hepatic, aPKC-dependent lipogenic, proinflammatory, and gluconeogenic factors; and this was accompanied by reversal or marked improvements in hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, abdominal obesity, hepatosteatosis, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypercholesterolemia. Our findings highlight the pathogenetic importance of insulin signaling to hepatic PKC-ι in obesity, the metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus and suggest that 1H-imidazole-4-carboxamide, 5-amino-1-[2,3-dihydroxy-4-[(phosphonooxy)methyl]cyclopentyl-[1R-(1a,2b,3b,4a)] and aurothiomalate or similar agents that

  19. Metabolite Kinetics: The Segregated Flow Model for Intestinal and Whole Body Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling to Describe Intestinal and Hepatic Glucuronidation of Morphine in Rats In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qi Joy; Fan, Jianghong; Chen, Shu; Liu, Lutan; Sun, Huadong; Pang, K Sandy

    2016-07-01

    We used the intestinal segregated flow model (SFM) versus the traditional model (TM), nested within physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models, to describe the biliary and urinary excretion of morphine 3β-glucuronide (MG) after intravenous and intraduodenal dosing of morphine in rats in vivo. The SFM model describes a partial (5%-30%) intestinal blood flow perfusing the transporter- and enzyme-rich enterocyte region, whereas the TM describes 100% flow perfusing the intestine as a whole. For the SFM, drugs entering from the circulation are expected to be metabolized to lesser extents by the intestine due to the segregated flow, reflecting the phenomenon of shunting and route-dependent intestinal metabolism. The poor permeability of MG crossing the liver or intestinal basolateral membranes mandates that most of MG that is excreted into bile is hepatically formed, whereas MG that is excreted into urine originates from both intestine and liver metabolism, since MG is effluxed back to blood. The ratio of MG amounts in urine/bile [Formula: see text] for intraduodenal/intravenous dosing is expected to exceed unity for the SFM but approximates unity for the TM. Compartmental analysis of morphine and MG data, without consideration of the permeability of MG and where MG is formed, suggests the ratio to be 1 and failed to describe the kinetics of MG. The observed intraduodenal/intravenous ratio of [Formula: see text] (2.55 at 4 hours) was better predicted by the SFM-PBPK (2.59 at 4 hours) and not the TM-PBPK (1.0), supporting the view that the SFM is superior for the description of intestinal-liver metabolism of morphine to MG. The SFM-PBPK model predicts an appreciable contribution of the intestine to first pass M metabolism.

  20. A mouse model for studying the clearance of hepatitis B virus in vivo using a luciferase reporter.

    PubMed

    Liang, Sheng-qiang; Du, Juan; Yan, Hu; Zhou, Qian-qian; Zhou, Yong; Yuan, Zhen-nan; Yan, Shao-duo; Fu, Qiu-xia; Wang, Xiao-hui; Jia, Shuai-zheng; Peng, Jian-chun; Zhang, Yang-gen; Zhan, Lin-sheng

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus(HBV) infection remains a global problem, despite the effectiveness of the Hepatitis B vaccine in preventing infection. The resolution of Hepatitis B virus infection has been believed to be attributable to virus-specific immunity. In vivo direct evaluation of anti-HBV immunity in the liver is currently not possible. We have developed a new assay system that detects HBV clearance in the liver after the hydrodynamic transfer of a reporter gene and over-length, linear HBV DNA into hepatocytes, followed by bioluminescence imaging of the reporter gene (Fluc). We employed bioluminescence detection of luciferase expression in HBV-infected hepatocytes to measure the Hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg)-specific immune responses directed against these infected hepatocytes. Only HBcAg-immunized, but not mock-treated, animals decreased the amounts of luciferase expression, HBsAg and viral DNA from the liver at day 28 after hydrodynamic infection with over-length HBV DNA, indicating that control of luciferase expression correlates with viral clearance from infected hepatocytes.

  1. Characterization of hepatic lipid profiles in a mouse model with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and subsequent fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kosuke; Uebanso, Takashi; Maekawa, Keiko; Ishikawa, Masaki; Taguchi, Ryo; Nammo, Takao; Nishimaki-Mogami, Tomoko; Udagawa, Haruhide; Fujii, Masato; Shibazaki, Yuichiro; Yoneyama, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Kazuki; Saito, Yoshiro

    2015-08-20

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a major health problem since it often leads to hepatocellular carcinoma. However, the underlying mechanisms of NASH development and subsequent fibrosis have yet to be clarified. We compared comprehensive lipidomic profiles between mice with high fat diet (HFD)-induced steatosis and STAM mice with NASH and subsequent fibrosis. The STAM mouse is a model that demonstrates NASH progression resembling the disease in humans: STAM mice manifest NASH at 8 weeks, which progresses to fibrosis at 12 weeks, and finally develop hepatocellular carcinoma. Overall, 250 lipid molecules were detected in the liver using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. We found that STAM mice with NASH presented a significantly higher abundance of sphingolipids and lower levels of triacylglycerols than the HFD-fed control mice. The abundance of certain fatty acids in phospholipid side chains was also significantly different between STAM and control mice, although global levels of phosphatidylcholines and phosphatidylethanolamines were comparable. Finally, increase in levels of acylcarnitines and some diacylglycerols was observed in STAM mice toward the fibrosis stage, but not in age-matched control mice. Our study provides insights into the lipid status of the steatotic, NASH, and fibrotic liver that would help elucidate the molecular pathophysiology of NASH progression.

  2. Genetic and Environmental Models of Circadian Disruption Link SRC-2 Function to Hepatic Pathology.

    PubMed

    Fleet, Tiffany; Stashi, Erin; Zhu, Bokai; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Marcelo, Kathrina L; Kettner, Nicole M; Gorman, Blythe K; Coarfa, Cristian; Fu, Loning; O'Malley, Bert W; York, Brian

    2016-10-01

    Circadian rhythmicity is a fundamental process that synchronizes behavioral cues with metabolic homeostasis. Disruption of daily cycles due to jet lag or shift work results in severe physiological consequences including advanced aging, metabolic syndrome, and even cancer. Our understanding of the molecular clock, which is regulated by intricate positive feedforward and negative feedback loops, has expanded to include an important metabolic transcriptional coregulator, Steroid Receptor Coactivator-2 (SRC-2), that regulates both the central clock of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and peripheral clocks including the liver. We hypothesized that an environmental uncoupling of the light-dark phases, termed chronic circadian disruption (CCD), would lead to pathology similar to the genetic circadian disruption observed with loss of SRC-2 We found that CCD and ablation of SRC-2 in mice led to a common comorbidity of metabolic syndrome also found in humans with circadian disruption, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The combination of SRC-2(-/-) and CCD results in a more robust phenotype that correlates with human non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) gene signatures. Either CCD or SRC-2 ablation produces an advanced aging phenotype leading to increased mortality consistent with other circadian mutant mouse models. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that SRC-2 provides an essential link between the behavioral activities influenced by light cues and the metabolic homeostasis maintained by the liver.

  3. Patterns of histological changes following hepatic electrolytic ablation in an ex-vivo perfused model.

    PubMed

    Gravante, Gianpiero; Ong, Seok Ling; West, Kevin; McGregor, Angus; Maddern, Guy J; Metcalfe, Matthew S; Lloyd, David M; Dennison, Ashley R

    2012-10-01

    Electrolytic ablation (EA) destroys the liver by releasing toxic radicles and producing modifications in the local pH without increasing the tissue temperature. We assessed the histological changes produced by EA using an ex-vivo perfused model. Five porcine livers were harvested, preserved in ice and reperfused for six hours in an extracorporeal circuit using autologous normothermic blood. One hour after reperfusion EA was performed and liver biopsies collected at the end of the experiments. The main necrotic zone consisted of coagulative necrosis, sinusoidal dilatation and haemorrhage with an unusual morphological pattern. The coagulative necrosis and haemorrhage affected mainly the peripheral area of the lobule with relative sparing of the area surrounding the centrilobular vein. Contrasting with this sinusoidal dilatation appeared to be more prominent in the centrilobular area. EA produces patterns of tissue destruction that have not been observed with the more commonly used thermal techniques. Further studies should obtain more information about the influence of adjacent biliary and vascular structures so that appropriate clinical trials can be designed.

  4. Analysis of changes in hepatic gene expression in a murine model of tolerance to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity (autoprotection)

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, Meeghan A.; Koza-Taylor, Petra; Campion, Sarah N.; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Gu, Xinsheng; Enayetallah, Ahmed E.; Lawton, Michael P.; Manautou, José E.

    2014-01-01

    Pretreatment of mice with a low hepatotoxic dose of acetaminophen (APAP) results in resistance to a subsequent, higher dose of APAP. This mouse model, termed APAP autoprotection was used here to identify differentially expressed genes and cellular pathways that could contribute to this development of resistance to hepatotoxicity. Male C57BL/6J mice were pretreated with APAP (400 mg/kg) and then challenged 48 h later with 600 mg APAP/kg. Livers were obtained 4 or 24 h later and total hepatic RNA was isolated and hybridized to Affymetrix Mouse Genome MU430{sub 2} GeneChip. Statistically significant genes were determined and gene expression changes were also interrogated using the Causal Reasoning Engine (CRE). Extensive literature review narrowed our focus to methionine adenosyl transferase-1 alpha (MAT1A), nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (Fmo3) and galectin-3 (Lgals3). Down-regulation of MAT1A could lead to decreases in S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), which is known to protect against APAP toxicity. Nrf2 activation is expected to play a role in protective adaptation. Up-regulation of Lgals3, one of the genes supporting the Nrf2 hypothesis, can lead to suppression of apoptosis and reduced mitochondrial dysfunction. Fmo3 induction suggests the involvement of an enzyme not known to metabolize APAP in the development of tolerance to APAP toxicity. Subsequent quantitative RT-PCR and immunochemical analysis confirmed the differential expression of some of these genes in the APAP autoprotection model. In conclusion, our genomics strategy identified cellular pathways that might further explain the molecular basis for APAP autoprotection. - Highlights: • Differential expression of genes in mice resistant to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. • Increased gene expression of Flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 and Galectin-3. • Decrease in MAT1A expression and compensatory hepatocellular regeneration. • Two distinct gene

  5. Modeling interchild differences in pharmacokinetics on the basis of subject-specific data on physiology and hepatic CYP2E1 levels: A case study with toluene

    SciTech Connect

    Nong, A.; McCarver, D.G.; Hines, R.N.; Krishnan, K. . E-mail: Kannan.Krishnan@umontreal.ca

    2006-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the magnitude of interindividual variability in the internal dose of toluene in children of various age groups, on the basis of subject-specific hepatic CYP2E1 content and physiology. The methodology involved the use of a previously validated physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, in which the intrinsic clearance for hepatic metabolism (CL{sub int}) was expressed in terms of the CYP2E1 content. The adult toluene PBPK model, with enzyme content-normalized CL{sub int}, facilitated the calculation of child-specific CL{sub int} based on knowledge of hepatic CYP2E1 protein levels. The child-specific physiological parameters, except liver volume, were computed with knowledge of age and body weight, whereas physicochemical parameters for toluene were kept age-invariant based on available data. The actual individual-specific liver volume (autopsy data) was also included in the model. The resulting model was used to simulate the blood concentration profiles in children exposed by inhalation, to 1 ppm toluene for 24 h. For this exposure scenario, the area under the venous blood concentration vs. time curve (AUC) ranged from 0.30 to 1.01 {mu}g/ml x h in neonates with low CYP2E1 concentration (<3.69 pmol/mg protein). The simulations indicated that neonates with higher levels of CYP2E1 (4.33 to 55.93 pmol/mg protein) as well as older children would have lower AUC (0.16 to 0.43 {mu}g/ml x h). The latter values were closer to those simulated for adults. Similar results were also obtained for 7 h exposure to 17 ppm toluene, a scenario previously evaluated in human volunteers. The interindividual variability factor for each subgroup of children and adults, calculated as the ratio of the 95th and 50th percentile values of AUC, was within a factor of 2. The 95th percentile value of the low metabolizing neonate group, however, was greater than the mean adult AUC by a factor of 3.9. This study demonstrates the feasibility

  6. Palmiwon attenuates hepatic lipid accumulation and hyperlipidemia in a menopausal rat model

    PubMed Central

    Go, Hiroe; Ryuk, Jin Ah; Lee, Hye Won; Ko, Byoung Seob

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective We examined the phytoestrogenic effects of palmiwon on breast carcinoma, lipid accumulation in methyl-β-cyclodextrin–induced HepG2 cells, and lipid-related diseases in a rat model of menopausal hyperlipidemia. Methods E-Screen assay was used to screen for phytoestrogens, especially those with antiestrogenic activity, in MCF-7 cells. Oil Red O staining and intracellular cholesterol analyses were used to quantify cellular cholesterol levels. 3-Hydroxy-3-methyl glutaryl coenzyme A reductase assay was used to measure enzyme activity. The levels of phosphorylated adenosine monophosphate–activated protein kinases and products of genes involved in cholesterol synthesis were measured by Western blot analysis. Thirty rats were either ovariectomized or sham-operated and randomly assigned to four groups (n = 5)—Sham, OVX, OVX-SV, or OVX-PMW (50, 150, or 450 mg/kg) group—for 8 weeks. A number of targets associated with lipid-related diseases were examined to confirm the estrogenic effects of palmiwon. Results Palmiwon showed antiestrogenic activity in MCF-7 cells. Palmiwon decreased lipid accumulation, total cholesterol levels, and low-density lipoprotein/very-low-density lipoprotein levels in HepG2 cells. Moreover, palmiwon reversed the effects of methyl-β-cyclodextrin on cholesterol synthesis regulators and inhibited the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl glutaryl coenzyme A reductase. Phosphorylation of adenosine monophosphate–activated protein kinase was stimulated by palmiwon. In ovariectomized rats, palmiwon reduced retroperitoneal and perirenal fat accumulation, serum lipids, atherogenic index, cardiac risk factor score, intima-media thickness, and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis scores. Conclusions These results indicate that palmiwon inhibits lipid accumulation without estrogenic activity in the breast. Therefore, palmiwon may have potential as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of hyperlipidemia in postmenopausal women. PMID:25563794

  7. Hepatitis B (HBV)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Hepatitis B (HBV) KidsHealth > For Teens > Hepatitis B (HBV) A A A What's in this article? ... poisons). There are several different types of hepatitis . Hepatitis B is a type that can move from one ...

  8. Hepatitis Virus Infections in Poultry.

    PubMed

    Yugo, Danielle M; Hauck, Ruediger; Shivaprasad, H L; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2016-09-01

    Viral hepatitis in poultry is a complex disease syndrome caused by several viruses belonging to different families including avian hepatitis E virus (HEV), duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV), duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV-1, -2, -3), duck hepatitis virus Types 2 and 3, fowl adenoviruses (FAdV), and turkey hepatitis virus (THV). While these hepatitis viruses share the same target organ, the liver, they each possess unique clinical and biological features. In this article, we aim to review the common and unique features of major poultry hepatitis viruses in an effort to identify the knowledge gaps and aid the prevention and control of poultry viral hepatitis. Avian HEV is an Orthohepevirus B in the family Hepeviridae that naturally infects chickens and consists of three distinct genotypes worldwide. Avian HEV is associated with hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome or big liver and spleen disease in chickens, although the majority of the infected birds are subclinical. Avihepadnaviruses in the family of Hepadnaviridae have been isolated from ducks, snow geese, white storks, grey herons, cranes, and parrots. DHBV evolved with the host as a noncytopathic form without clinical signs and rarely progressed to chronicity. The outcome for DHBV infection varies by the host's ability to elicit an immune response and is dose and age dependent in ducks, thus mimicking the pathogenesis of human hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections and providing an excellent animal model for human HBV. DHAV is a picornavirus that causes a highly contagious virus infection in ducks with up to 100% flock mortality in ducklings under 6 wk of age, while older birds remain unaffected. The high morbidity and mortality has an economic impact on intensive duck production farming. Duck hepatitis virus Types 2 and 3 are astroviruses in the family of Astroviridae with similarity phylogenetically to turkey astroviruses, implicating the potential for cross-species infections between strains. Duck astrovirus (DAstV) causes

  9. Coenzyme Q10 prevents hepatic fibrosis, inflammation, and oxidative stress in a male rat model of poor maternal nutrition and accelerated postnatal growth1

    PubMed Central

    Tarry-Adkins, Jane L; Fernandez-Twinn, Denise S; Hargreaves, Iain P; Neergheen, Viruna; Aiken, Catherine E; Martin-Gronert, Malgorzata S; McConnell, Josie M; Ozanne, Susan E

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is well established that low birth weight and accelerated postnatal growth increase the risk of liver dysfunction in later life. However, molecular mechanisms underlying such developmental programming are not well characterized, and potential intervention strategies are poorly defined. Objectives: We tested the hypotheses that poor maternal nutrition and accelerated postnatal growth would lead to increased hepatic fibrosis (a pathological marker of liver dysfunction) and that postnatal supplementation with the antioxidant coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) would prevent this programmed phenotype. Design: A rat model of maternal protein restriction was used to generate low-birth-weight offspring that underwent accelerated postnatal growth (termed “recuperated”). These were compared with control rats. Offspring were weaned onto standard feed pellets with or without dietary CoQ10 (1 mg/kg body weight per day) supplementation. At 12 mo, hepatic fibrosis, indexes of inflammation, oxidative stress, and insulin signaling were measured by histology, Western blot, ELISA, and reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction. Results: Hepatic collagen deposition (diameter of deposit) was greater in recuperated offspring (mean ± SEM: 12 ± 2 μm) than in controls (5 ± 0.5 μm) (P < 0.001). This was associated with greater inflammation (interleukin 6: 38% ± 24% increase; P < 0.05; tumor necrosis factor α: 64% ± 24% increase; P < 0.05), lipid peroxidation (4-hydroxynonenal, measured by ELISA: 0.30 ± 0.02 compared with 0.19 ± 0.05 μg/mL per μg protein; P < 0.05), and hyperinsulinemia (P < 0.05). CoQ10 supplementation increased (P < 0.01) hepatic CoQ10 concentrations and ameliorated liver fibrosis (P < 0.001), inflammation (P < 0.001), some measures of oxidative stress (P < 0.001), and hyperinsulinemia (P < 0.01). Conclusions: Suboptimal in utero nutrition combined with accelerated postnatal catch-up growth caused more hepatic fibrosis in adulthood, which was

  10. Poly(I:C) Treatment Leads to Interferon-Dependent Clearance of Hepatitis B Virus in a Hydrodynamic Injection Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun; Huang, Shunmei; Zhao, Xiaoli; Chen, Mingfa; Lin, Yong; Xia, Youchen; Sun, Chan; Yang, Xuecheng; Wang, Junzhong; Guo, Yan; Song, Jingjiao; Zhang, Ejuan; Wang, Baoju; Zheng, Xin; Schlaak, Joerg F.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have previously shown that poly(I:C) activates murine hepatic cells to produce interferon (IFN) and suppresses hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication in vitro. Therefore, we addressed whether poly(I:C) is able to induce the clearance of HBV in vivo. The chronic HBV replication mouse model was established by the hydrodynamic injection (HI) of pAAV-HBV1.2 into the tail veins of wild-type and IFN-α/βR-, IFN-γ-, and CXCR3-deficient C57BL/6 mice. Fourteen days post-HI of pAAV-HBV1.2, mice were administered poly(I:C) by intraperitoneal injection, intramuscular injection, or HI. Only treatment of poly(I:C) by HI led to HBV clearance in wild-type C57BL/6 mice. Serum HBsAg disappeared within 40 days postinfection (dpi) in mice that received poly(I:C) by HI, and this was accompanied by the appearance of anti-HBs antibodies. HBV-specific T-cell and antibody responses were significantly enhanced by HI of poly(I:C). HBV replication intermediates and HBcAg-positive hepatocytes were eliminated in the liver. HI of poly(I:C) induced the production of IFNs in mice and enhanced the levels of cytokines, IFN-stimulated genes, and T-cell markers in the liver. Importantly, poly(I:C)-induced HBV clearance was impaired in IFN-α/βR-, IFN-γ-, and CXCR3-deficient mice, indicating that the induction of type I IFN and the stimulation and recruitment of T cells into the liver are essential for HBV clearance in this model. Taken together, the application of poly(I:C) by HI into the liver enhances innate and adaptive immune responses and leads to HBV clearance in an HBV mouse model, implicating the potential of intrahepatic Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) activation for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B patients. IMPORTANCE It has become well accepted that immunomodulation is a potentially useful approach to treat chronic viral infection. Recently, combinations of antiviral treatment and therapeutic vaccinations were evaluated for therapies of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV

  11. Predictive Models for Regional Hepatic Function Based upon 99mTc-IDA SPECT and Local Radiation Dose for Physiological Adaptive RT

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hesheng; Feng, Mary; Frey, Kirk A.; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Cao, Yue

    2013-01-01

    Purpose High dose radiation therapy (RT) for intrahepatic cancer is limited by the development of liver injury. This study investigated whether regional hepatic function assessed prior to and during the course of RT using 99mTc-labeled immindodiacetic acid (IDA) SPECT could predict regional liver function reserve after RT. Methods and Materials Fourteen patients treated with RT for intrahepatic cancers underwent dynamic 99mTc-IDA SPECT scans prior to RT, during, and one month after completion of RT. Indocyanine green (ICG) tests (a measure of overall liver function) were performed within 1 day of each scan. 3D volumetric hepatic extraction fraction (HEF) images of the liver were estimated by deconvolution analysis. After co-registration of the CT/SPECT and the treatment planning CT, HEF dose-response functions during and post-RT were generated. The volumetric mean of the HEFs in the whole liver was correlated with ICG clearance time. Three models, Dose, Priori and Adaptive models, were developed using multivariate linear regression to assess whether the regional HEFs measured before and during RT helped predict regional hepatic function post-RT. Results The mean of the volumetric liver HEFs was significantly correlated with ICG clearance half-life time (r = −0.80, p<0.0001), for all time points. Linear correlations between local doses and regional HEFs one month post-RT were significant in 12 patients. In the priori model, regional HEF post-RT was predicted by the planned dose and regional HEF assessed prior to RT (R=0.71, p<0.0001). In the adaptive model, regional HEF post-RT was predicted by regional HEF re-assessed during RT and the remaining planned local dose (R=0.83, p<0.0001). Conclusions 99mTc-IDA SPECT obtained during RT could be used to assess regional hepatic function and helped predict post-RT regional liver function reserve. This could support individualized adaptive radiation treatment strategies to maximize tumor control and minimize the risk of

  12. Predictive Models for Regional Hepatic Function Based on 99mTc-IDA SPECT and Local Radiation Dose for Physiologic Adaptive Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hesheng; Feng, Mary; Frey, Kirk A.; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Cao, Yue

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: High-dose radiation therapy (RT) for intrahepatic cancer is limited by the development of liver injury. This study investigated whether regional hepatic function assessed before and during the course of RT using 99mTc-labeled iminodiacetic acid (IDA) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) could predict regional liver function reserve after RT. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients treated with RT for intrahepatic cancers underwent dynamic 99mTc-IDA SPECT scans before RT, during, and 1 month after completion of RT. Indocyanine green (ICG) tests, a measure of overall liver function, were performed within 1 day of each scan. Three-dimensional volumetric hepatic extraction fraction (HEF) images of the liver were estimated by deconvolution analysis. After coregistration of the CT/SPECT and the treatment planning CT, HEF dose–response functions during and after RT were generated. The volumetric mean of the HEFs in the whole liver was correlated with ICG clearance time. Three models, dose, priori, and adaptive models, were developed using multivariate linear regression to assess whether the regional HEFs measured before and during RT helped predict regional hepatic function after RT. Results: The mean of the volumetric liver HEFs was significantly correlated with ICG clearance half-life time (r=−0.80, P<.0001), for all time points. Linear correlations between local doses and regional HEFs 1 month after RT were significant in 12 patients. In the priori model, regional HEF after RT was predicted by the planned dose and regional HEF assessed before RT (R=0.71, P<.0001). In the adaptive model, regional HEF after RT was predicted by regional HEF reassessed during RT and the remaining planned local dose (R=0.83, P<.0001). Conclusions: 99mTc-IDA SPECT obtained during RT could be used to assess regional hepatic function and helped predict post-RT regional liver function reserve. This could support individualized adaptive radiation treatment strategies

  13. The Cost Effectiveness of Hepatitis Immunization for US College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, R. Jake; Saab, Sammy; Meyerhoff, Allen S.

    2003-01-01

    Hepatitis B immunization is recommended for all American children, and hepatitis A immunization is recommended for children who live in areas with elevated disease rates. Because hepatitis A and B occur most commonly in young adults, the authors examined the cost effectiveness of college-based vaccination. They developed epidemiologic models to…

  14. Portosystemic hepatic encephalopathy model shows reversal learning impairment and dysfunction of neural activity in the prefrontal cortex and regions involved in motivated behavior.

    PubMed

    Méndez, M; Méndez-López, M; López, L; Aller, M A; Arias, J; Arias, J L

    2011-05-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neurological complication that affects attention and memory. Experimental animal models have been used to study HE, the most frequent being the portacaval shunt (PCS). In order to investigate learning impairment and brain functional alterations in this model, we assessed reversal learning and neural metabolic activity in a PCS rat model. PCS and sham-operated rats were tested for reversal learning in the Morris water maze. Brains were then processed for cytochrome oxidase (CO) histochemistry. The PCS group had reversal learning impairment and a reduction in CO activity in the prefrontal cortex, ventral tegmental area and accumbens shell nucleus. These results suggest that this model of portosystemic HE shows learning impairments that could be linked to dysfunction in neural activity in the prefrontal cortex and regions involved in motivated behavior.

  15. Testosterone supplementation improves glucose homeostasis despite increasing hepatic insulin resistance in male mouse model of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Pal, M; Gupta, S

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies have revealed that testosterone supplementation had a positive effect on glucose homeostasis in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), but did not address how testosterone supplementation affected insulin responsiveness in the liver, a key glucose homeostatic organ. In this study, we aimed to study the effect of testosterone supplementation on hepatic insulin responsiveness and glucose homeostasis through liver in male high-fat diet-induced T2DM mice. Testosterone treatment to T2DM animals showed reduced hepatic glucose output. Testosterone inhibited the insulin signaling in liver, thus increased insulin resistance. However, testosterone treatment inactivated GSK3α independent of PI3K/AKT pathway and inhibited FOXO1 By interaction of androgen receptor to FOXO1 and downregulated PEPCK, causing repression of gluconeogenic pathway, which is otherwise upregulated in T2DM, resulted in better glucose homeostasis. PMID:27941939

  16. Hepatitis C virus infection and thyroid autoimmune disorders: A model of interactions between the host and the environment

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, Francesca; Martocchia, Antonio; Stefanelli, Manuela; Prunas, Pietro; Giordano, Stefania; Toussan, Lavinia; Devito, Antonio; Falaschi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is an important public health problem and it is associated with hepatic and extrahepatic manifestations. Autoimmune thyroid diseases are common in HCV infected patients and the standard interferon-based treatment is associated with an increase of the immune-mediated thyroid damage. Recent evidence in the literature analyzed critical points of the mechanisms of thyroid damage, focusing on the balance between the two sides of the interaction: The environment (virus infection with potential cross-reaction) and the host (susceptibility genes with consistent immune response). The spectrum of antiviral treatment for chronic HCV infection is rapidly expanding for the development of dual o triple therapy. The availability of interferon-free combined treatment with direct antiviral agents for HCV is very promising, in order to ameliorate the patient compliance and to reduce the development of thyroid autoimmunity. PMID:26807204

  17. Antiviral Efficacy and Host Innate Immunity Associated with SB 9200 Treatment in the Woodchuck Model of Chronic Hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Korolowicz, Kyle E; Iyer, Radhakrishnan P; Czerwinski, Stefanie; Suresh, Manasa; Yang, Junming; Padmanabhan, Seetharamaiyer; Sheri, Anjaneyulu; Pandey, Rajendra K; Skell, Jeffrey; Marquis, Judith K; Kallakury, Bhaskar V; Tucker, Robin D; Menne, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    SB 9200, an oral prodrug of the dinucleotide SB 9000, is being developed for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and represents a novel class of antivirals. SB 9200 is thought to activate the viral sensor proteins, retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RIG-I) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2) resulting in interferon (IFN) mediated antiviral immune responses in virus-infected cells. Additionally, the binding of SB 9200 to these sensor proteins could also sterically block the ability of the viral polymerase to access pre-genomic RNA for nucleic acid synthesis. The immune stimulating and direct antiviral properties of SB 9200 were evaluated in woodchucks chronically infected with woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) by daily, oral dosing at 15 and 30 mg/kg for 12 weeks. Prolonged treatment resulted in 2.2 and 3.7 log10 reductions in serum WHV DNA and in 0.5 and 1.6 log10 declines in serum WHV surface antigen from pretreatment level with the lower or higher dose of SB 9200, respectively. SB 9200 treatment also resulted in lower hepatic levels of WHV nucleic acids and antigen and reduced liver inflammation. Following treatment cessation, recrudescence of viral replication was observed but with dose-dependent delays in viral relapse. The antiviral effects were associated with dose-dependent and long-lasting induction of IFN-α, IFN-β and IFN-stimulated genes in blood and liver, which correlated with the prolonged activation of the RIG-I/NOD2 pathway and hepatic presence of elevated RIG-I protein levels. These results suggest that in addition to a direct antiviral activity, SB 9200 induces antiviral immunity during chronic hepadnaviral infection via activation of the viral sensor pathway.

  18. Antiviral Efficacy and Host Innate Immunity Associated with SB 9200 Treatment in the Woodchuck Model of Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Korolowicz, Kyle E.; Iyer, Radhakrishnan P.; Czerwinski, Stefanie; Suresh, Manasa; Yang, Junming; Padmanabhan, Seetharamaiyer; Sheri, Anjaneyulu; Pandey, Rajendra K.; Skell, Jeffrey; Marquis, Judith K.; Kallakury, Bhaskar V.; Tucker, Robin D.; Menne, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    SB 9200, an oral prodrug of the dinucleotide SB 9000, is being developed for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and represents a novel class of antivirals. SB 9200 is thought to activate the viral sensor proteins, retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RIG-I) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2) resulting in interferon (IFN) mediated antiviral immune responses in virus-infected cells. Additionally, the binding of SB 9200 to these sensor proteins could also sterically block the ability of the viral polymerase to access pre-genomic RNA for nucleic acid synthesis. The immune stimulating and direct antiviral properties of SB 9200 were evaluated in woodchucks chronically infected with woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) by daily, oral dosing at 15 and 30 mg/kg for 12 weeks. Prolonged treatment resulted in 2.2 and 3.7 log10 reductions in serum WHV DNA and in 0.5 and 1.6 log10 declines in serum WHV surface antigen from pretreatment level with the lower or higher dose of SB 9200, respectively. SB 9200 treatment also resulted in lower hepatic levels of WHV nucleic acids and antigen and reduced liver inflammation. Following treatment cessation, recrudescence of viral replication was observed but with dose-dependent delays in viral relapse. The antiviral effects were associated with dose-dependent and long-lasting induction of IFN-α, IFN-β and IFN-stimulated genes in blood and liver, which correlated with the prolonged activation of the RIG-I/NOD2 pathway and hepatic presence of elevated RIG-I protein levels. These results suggest that in addition to a direct antiviral activity, SB 9200 induces antiviral immunity during chronic hepadnaviral infection via activation of the viral sensor pathway. PMID:27552102

  19. Helicobacter pylori infection does not promote hepatocellular cancer in a transgenic mouse model of hepatitis C virus pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    García, Alexis; Feng, Yan; Parry, Nicola MA; McCabe, Amanda; Mobley, Melissa W; Lertpiriyapong, Kvin; Whary, Mark T; Fox, James G

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infect millions of people and can induce cancer. We investigated if H. pylori infection promoted HCV-associated liver cancer. Helicobacter-free C3B6F1 wild-type (WT) and C3B6F1-Tg(Alb1-HCVN)35Sml (HT) male and female mice were orally inoculated with H. pylori SS1 or sterile media. Mice were euthanized at ~12 mo postinoculation and samples were collected for analyses. There were no significant differences in hepatocellular tumor promotion between WT and HT mice; however, HT female mice developed significantly larger livers with more hepatic steatosis than WT female mice. H. pylori did not colonize the liver nor promote hepatocellular tumors in WT or HT mice. In the stomach, H. pylori induced more corpus lesions in WT and HT female mice than in WT and HT male mice, respectively. The increased corpus pathology in WT and HT female mice was associated with decreased gastric H. pylori colonization, increased gastric and hepatic interferon gamma expression, and increased serum Th1 immune responses against H. pylori. HT male mice appeared to be protected from H. pylori-induced corpus lesions. Furthermore, during gastric H. pylori infection, HT male mice were protected from gastric antral lesions and hepatic steatosis relative to WT male mice and these effects were associated with increased serum TNF-α. Our findings indicate that H. pylori is a gastric pathogen that does not promote hepatocellular cancer and suggest that the HCV transgene is associated with amelioration of specific liver and gastric lesions observed during concurrent H. pylori infection in mice. PMID:23929035

  20. Selective inhibitor of Wnt/β-catenin/CBP signaling ameliorates hepatitis C virus-induced liver fibrosis in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Yuko; Osawa, Yosuke; Ohtsuki, Takahiro; Hayashi, Yukiko; Yamaji, Kenzaburo; Yamane, Daisuke; Hara, Mitsuko; Munekata, Keisuke; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Hishima, Tsunekazu; Kojima, Soichi; Kimura, Kiminori; Kohara, Michinori

    2017-03-23

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is one of the major causes of serious liver diseases, including liver cirrhosis. There are no anti-fibrotic drugs with efficacy against liver cirrhosis. Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of tissue fibrosis. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a β-catenin/CBP (cyclic AMP response element binding protein) inhibitor on liver fibrosis. The anti-fibrotic activity of PRI-724, a selective inhibitor of β-catenin/CBP, was assessed in HCV GT1b transgenic mice at 18 months after HCV genome expression. PRI-724 was injected intraperitoneally or subcutaneously in these mice for 6 weeks. PRI-724 reduced liver fibrosis, which was indicated by silver stain, Sirius Red staining, and hepatic hydroxyproline levels, in HCV mice while attenuating αSMA induction. PRI-724 led to increased levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-8 mRNA in the liver, along with elevated levels of intrahepatic neutrophils and macrophages/monocytes. The induced intrahepatic neutrophils and macrophages/monocytes were identified as the source of MMP-8. In conclusion, PRI-724 ameliorated HCV-induced liver fibrosis in mice. We hypothesize that inhibition of hepatic stellate cells activation and induction of fibrolytic cells expressing MMP-8 contribute to the anti-fibrotic effects of PRI-724. PRI-724 is a drug candidate which possesses anti-fibrotic effect.

  1. Benznidazole, the trypanocidal drug used for Chagas disease, induces hepatic NRF2 activation and attenuates the inflammatory response in a murine model of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Lambertucci, Flavia; Motiño, Omar; Villar, Silvina; Rigalli, Juan Pablo; de Luján Alvarez, María; Catania, Viviana A; Martín-Sanz, Paloma; Carnovale, Cristina Ester; Quiroga, Ariel Darío; Francés, Daniel Eleazar; Ronco, María Teresa

    2017-01-15

    Molecular mechanisms on sepsis progression are linked to the imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and cellular antioxidant capacity. Previous studies demonstrated that benznidazole (BZL), known for its antiparasitic action on Trypanosoma cruzi, has immunomodulatory effects, increasing survival in C57BL/6 mice in a model of polymicrobial sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). The mechanism by which BZL inhibits inflammatory response in sepsis is poorly understood. Also, our group recently reported that BZL is able to activate the nuclear factor erytroide-derived 2-Like 2 (NRF2) in vitro. The aim of the present work was to delineate the beneficial role of BZL during sepsis, analyzing its effects on the cellular redox status and the possible link to the innate immunity receptor TLR4. Specifically, we analyzed the effect of BZL on Nrf2 regulation and TLR4 expression in liver of mice 24hours post-CLP. BZL was able to induce NRF2 nuclear protein localization in CLP mice. Also, we found that protein kinase C (PKC) is involved in the NRF2 nuclear accumulation and induction of its target genes. In addition, BZL prompted a reduction in hepatic CLP-induced TLR4 protein membrane localization, evidencing its immunomodulatory effects. Together, our results demonstrate that BZL induces hepatic NRF2 activation with the concomitant increase in the antioxidant defenses, and the attenuation of inflammatory response, in part, by inhibiting TLR4 expression in a murine model of sepsis.

  2. Hepatitis Information for the Public

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Viral Hepatitis Contact Us Quick Links to Hepatitis … A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home ... Local Partners & Grantees Policy and Programs Resource Center Hepatitis Information for the Public Recommend on Facebook Tweet ...

  3. Hepatitis B and concomitant hepatic steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chong Teik

    2017-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis is becoming more common in Asia with prevalence becoming as common as Western countries. Concomitant Hepatitis B and hepatic steatosis is increasingly encountered in clinical practice. The interaction between the two concomitant conditions at both molecular level and clinical outcome remains to be explored. The present review is aimed at summarizing the existing literature on the complex interaction of the two-concomitant disease. PMID:28251117

  4. Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    McCluskey, James; Bourgeois, Marie; Harbison, Raymond

    2014-04-01

    Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity is a persistent allergic contact dermatitides documented in floral workers exposed to Alstroemeria and its cultivars.[1] The causative allergen is tulipalin A, a toxic glycoside named for the tulip bulbs from which it was first isolated.[2] The condition is characterized by fissured acropulpitis, often accompanied by hyperpigmentation, onychorrhexis, and paronychia. More of the volar surface may be affected in sensitized florists. Dermatitis and paronychia are extremely common conditions and diagnostic errors may occur. A thorough patient history, in conjunction with confirmatory patch testing with a bulb sliver and tuliposide A exposure, can prevent misdiagnosis. We report a case of Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity misdiagnosed as an unresolved tinea manuum infection in a patient evaluated for occupational exposure.

  5. Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    McCluskey, James; Bourgeois, Marie; Harbison, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity is a persistent allergic contact dermatitides documented in floral workers exposed to Alstroemeria and its cultivars.[1] The causative allergen is tulipalin A, a toxic glycoside named for the tulip bulbs from which it was first isolated.[2] The condition is characterized by fissured acropulpitis, often accompanied by hyperpigmentation, onychorrhexis, and paronychia. More of the volar surface may be affected in sensitized florists. Dermatitis and paronychia are extremely common conditions and diagnostic errors may occur. A thorough patient history, in conjunction with confirmatory patch testing with a bulb sliver and tuliposide A exposure, can prevent misdiagnosis. We report a case of Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity misdiagnosed as an unresolved tinea manuum infection in a patient evaluated for occupational exposure. PMID:25024947

  6. Pharmacological Intervention in Hepatic Stellate Cell Activation and Hepatic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Schon, Hans-Theo; Bartneck, Matthias; Borkham-Kamphorst, Erawan; Nattermann, Jacob; Lammers, Twan; Tacke, Frank; Weiskirchen, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The activation and transdifferentiation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) into contractile, matrix-producing myofibroblasts (MFBs) are central events in hepatic fibrogenesis. These processes are driven by autocrine- and paracrine-acting soluble factors (i.e., cytokines and chemokines). Proof-of-concept studies of the last decades have shown that both the deactivation and removal of hepatic MFBs as well as antagonizing profibrogenic factors are in principle suitable to attenuate ongoing hepatic fibrosis. Although several drugs show potent antifibrotic activities in experimental models of hepatic fibrosis, there is presently no effective pharmaceutical intervention specifically approved for the treatment of liver fibrosis. Pharmaceutical interventions are generally hampered by insufficient supply of drugs to the diseased liver tissue and/or by adverse effects as a result of affecting non-target cells. Therefore, targeted delivery systems that bind specifically to receptors solely expressed on activated HSCs or transdifferentiated MFBs and delivery systems that can improve drug distribution to the liver in general are urgently needed. In this review, we summarize current strategies for targeted delivery of drugs to the liver and in particular to pro-fibrogenic liver cells. The applicability and efficacy of sequestering molecules, selective protein carriers, lipid-based drug vehicles, viral vectors, transcriptional targeting approaches, therapeutic liver- and HSC-specific nanoparticles, and miRNA-based strategies are discussed. Some of these delivery systems that had already been successfully tested in experimental animal models of ongoing hepatic fibrogenesis are expected to translate into clinically useful therapeutics specifically targeting HSCs. PMID:26941644

  7. Nicotinamide Riboside Ameliorates Hepatic Metaflammation by Modulating NLRP3 Inflammasome in a Rodent Model of Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee Jae; Hong, Young-Shick; Jun, Woojin; Yang, Soo Jin

    2015-11-01

    Low-grade chronic inflammation (metaflammation) is a major contributing factor for the onset and development of metabolic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease. Nicotinamide riboside (NR), which is present in milk and beer, is a functional vitamin B3 having advantageous effects on metabolic regulation. However, the anti-inflammatory capacity of NR is unknown. This study evaluated whether NR modulates hepatic nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome. Male, 8-week-old KK/HlJ mice were allocated to the control or NR group. NR (100 mg/kg/day) or vehicle (phosphate-buffered saline) was administrated by an osmotic pump for 7 days. Glucose control, lipid profiles, NLRP3 inflammasome, and inflammation markers were analyzed, and structural and histological analyses were conducted. NR treatment did not affect body weight gain, food intake, and liver function. Glucose control based on the oral glucose tolerance test and levels of serum insulin and adiponectin was improved by NR treatment. Among tested lipid profiles, NR lowered the total cholesterol concentration in the liver. Histological and structural analysis by hematoxylin and eosin staining and transmission electron microscopy, respectively, showed that NR rescued the disrupted cellular integrity of the mitochondria and nucleus in the livers of obese and diabetic KK mice. In addition, NR treatment significantly improved hepatic proinflammatory markers, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-1. These ameliorations were accompanied by significant shifts of NLRP3 inflammasome components (NLRP3, ASC, and caspase1). These results demonstrate that NR attenuates hepatic metaflammation by modulating the NLRP3 inflammasome.

  8. Characterization and genotyping of the DRB1 gene of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in the Marmota monax, animal model of hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Cugnon, Leire; Esparza-Baquer, Aitor; Larruskain, Amaia; García-Etxebarria, Koldo; Menne, Stephan; González-Aseguinolaza, Gloria; Jugo, Begoña M

    2015-02-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-containing genes are among the most polymorphic in vertebrates. MHC genes code for proteins that are critical in the immune system response. In this study, the polymorphism of the second exon of the MHC class II DRB gene was characterized in the Eastern woodchuck (Marmota monax). Woodchucks chronically infected with the woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) represent the best available animal model for the study of chronic hepatitis B infection in humans. In the genotyped animals we found fifteen alleles, which were expressed in two independent loci and that were named DRB1A and DRB1B in this work. The 15 alleles investigated showed an elevated divergence. A significant excess of non-synonymous substitutions was detected, which could indicate that a historical positive selection is acting in the woodchuck DRB1 genes. This hypothesis was confirmed in our study by the high variability in or near the antigen binding sites (ABS) and by the results obtained in sequence variability analyses. This analysis identified the presence of a microsatellite sequence that is located at the start of the second intron, which could further allow the development of a fast and cheap semiautomatic sequencing method.

  9. Quantitative farm-to-fork risk assessment model for norovirus and hepatitis A virus in European leafy green vegetable and berry fruit supply chains.

    PubMed

    Bouwknegt, Martijn; Verhaelen, Katharina; Rzeżutka, Artur; Kozyra, Iwona; Maunula, Leena; von Bonsdorff, Carl-Henrik; Vantarakis, Apostolos; Kokkinos, Petros; Petrovic, Tamas; Lazic, Sava; Pavlik, Ivo; Vasickova, Petra; Willems, Kris A; Havelaar, Arie H; Rutjes, Saskia A; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria

    2015-04-02

    Fresh produce that is contaminated with viruses may lead to infection and viral gastroenteritis or hepatitis when consumed raw. It is thus important to reduce virus numbers on these foods. Prevention of virus contamination in fresh produce production and processing may be more effective than treatment, as sufficient virus removal or inactivation by post-harvest treatment requires high doses that may adversely affect food quality. To date knowledge of the contribution of various potential contamination routes is lacking. A risk assessment model was developed for human norovirus, hepatitis A virus and human adenovirus in raspberry and salad vegetable supply chains to quantify contributions of potential contamination sources to the contamination of produce at retail. These models were used to estimate public health risks. Model parameterization was based on monitoring data from European supply chains and literature data. No human pathogenic viruses were found in the soft fruit supply chains; human adenovirus (hAdV) was detected, which was additionally monitored as an indicator of fecal pollution to assess the contribution of potential contamination points. Estimated risks per serving of lettuce based on the models were 3×10(-4) (6×10(-6)-5×10(-3)) for NoV infection and 3×10(-8) (7×10(-10)-3×10(-6)) for hepatitis A jaundice. The contribution to virus contamination of hand-contact was larger as compared with the contribution of irrigation, the conveyor belt or the water used for produce rinsing. In conclusion, viral contamination in the lettuce and soft fruit supply chains occurred and estimated health risks were generally low. Nevertheless, the 97.5% upper limit for the estimated NoV contamination of lettuce suggested that infection risks up to 50% per serving might occur. Our study suggests that attention to full compliance for hand hygiene will improve fresh produce safety related to virus risks most as compared to the other examined sources, given the

  10. Hepatitis B Foundation Newsletter: B Informed

    MedlinePlus

    ... Our Accomplishments Annual Reports Our Videos What Is Hepatitis B? What Is Hepatitis B? The ABCs of Viral Hepatitis Liver Cancer and Hepatitis B Hepatitis Delta Coinfection Hepatitis C Coinfection HIV/AIDS ...

  11. Hemostasis and Hepatic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Eeson, Gareth; Karanicolas, Paul J

    2016-04-01

    Operative blood loss is a major source of morbidity and even mortality for patients undergoing hepatic resection. This review discusses strategies to minimize blood loss and the utilization of allogeneic blood transfusion pertaining to oncologic hepatic surgery.

  12. Delta agent (Hepatitis D)

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000216.htm Delta agent (Hepatitis D) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Delta agent is a type of virus called hepatitis ...

  13. Know More Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Boomers Hepatitis Risk Assessment Campaign Materials Fact Sheets Posters Infographics Videos Buttons & Badges Email Signatures Radio Ads and Scripts Know More Hepatitis Logos Presentation Templates Guidelines for using materials and logos About ...

  14. Hepatitis A - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... hepatitis A. Children can get hepatitis A at day care center from other children or from child care ... treatment with immunoglobulin therapy. If your child attends day care: Make sure the children and staff at the ...

  15. Hepatic (Liver) Function Panel

    MedlinePlus

    ... related side effects. The hepatic function panel evaluates: Alanine aminotransferase (ALT). This enzyme, found in the liver, ... MORE ON THIS TOPIC Mononucleosis Hepatitis Blood Test: Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT, or SGPT) Blood Test: Aspartate Aminotransferase ( ...

  16. Hepatitis Foundation International

    MedlinePlus

    ... million people globally. admin / 03/17/2015 Viral Hepatitis An estimated 4.4 million Americans from all ... Events section below. EVENTS FULL CALENDAR Loading… VIRAL HEPATITIS DISPARITIES HARD TO REACH, HARD TO TREAT™ AFRICAN ...

  17. Hepatitis virus panel

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003558.htm Hepatitis virus panel To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The hepatitis virus panel is a series of blood tests used ...

  18. Hepatitis B -- children

    MedlinePlus

    ... at birth: Newborn babies should receive their first hepatitis B vaccine and one dose of immunoglobulins (IG) within 12 hours. The baby should complete all hepatitis B vaccines as recommended during the first six months. Some ...

  19. Hepatitis B (HBV)

    MedlinePlus

    ... special immune injection and the first dose of hepatitis B vaccine at birth. How Is It Prevented? Because people ... B virus. Doctors recommend that teens get a hepatitis B immunization (vaccine). It's a series of three shots over a ...

  20. Hepatitis C (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis C is a virus-caused liver inflammation which may cause jaundice, fever and cirrhosis. Persons who are most at risk for contracting and spreading hepatitis C are those who share needles for injecting drugs ...

  1. Progress in vaccination against hepatitis B in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Ropero, Alba Maria; Danovaro-Holliday, M Carolina; Andrus, Jon K

    2005-12-01

    Hepatitis B is a serious public health problem leading to chronic infection, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The World Health Organization (WHO) and the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) recommend routine universal infant vaccination against hepatitis B as the main strategy for the control hepatitis B and its severe consequences. PAHO additionally recommends routinely vaccinating healthcare workers. As of 2005, all countries in the Americas, except Haiti and Dominica, have hepatitis B vaccine in their childhood immunization schedule; 13 countries/territories include a hepatitis B dose given at birth. Hepatitis B vaccine has been incorporated into national schedules using different modalities; notably, 28 countries use it as a combination vaccine diphtheria tetanus pertussis + Haemophilus influenzae type b + hepatitis B (DTP+Hib+Hep B) for infants. Coverage levels for the third dose of hepatitis B are usually over 80%; however, hepatitis B vaccine coverage overall is lower than for the third dose of DTP. Insufficient information is available at this time to assess the use of hepatitis B vaccine in healthcare workers in the Americas. The most important factor associated with the success in the implementation of hepatitis B vaccination has been the strong commitment of country governments. This experience can be used as a model when implementing new technologies in health as they become available. However, much still needs to be done to improve hepatitis B coverage.

  2. Transplanted fibroblast cell sheets promote migration of hepatic progenitor cells in the incised host liver in allogeneic rat model.

    PubMed

    Muraoka, Izumi; Takatsuki, Mitsuhisa; Sakai, Yusuke; Tomonaga, Tetsuo; Soyama, Akihiko; Hidaka, Masaaki; Hishikawa, Yoshitaka; Koji, Takehiko; Utoh, Rie; Ohashi, Kazuo; Okano, Teruo; Kanematsu, Takashi; Eguchi, Susumu

    2015-11-01

    Cell sheet engineering has been noted as a new and valuable approach in the tissue-engineering field. The objective of this study was to explore a procedure to induce hepatic progenitor cells and biliary duct structures in the liver. Sprague-Dawley rat dermal fibroblast (DF) sheets were transplanted into the incised surface of the liver of F344 nude rats. In the control group, an incision was made without transplantation of the DF sheets. Bile duct (BD)-like structures and immature hepatocyte-like cells were observed in the DF sheet transplant sites. These BD-like structures were cytokeratin-8-positive, while the hepatocyte-like cells were both OV-6-positive and α-fetoprotein-positive as well. The proliferation and differentiation of liver progenitor cells were not influenced by hepatectomy. We also transplanted DF sheets transfected with a plasmid encoding the enhanced yellow fluorescent protein target to mitochondria (pEYFP-Mito) by electroporation, and found that the new structures were pEYFP-Mito-negative. We observed new BD-like structures and immature hepatocytes after transplantation of DF sheets onto incised liver surfaces, and clarified that the origin of these BD-like structures and hepatocyte-like cells was the recipient liver. The present study described an aspect of the hepatic differentiation process induced at the site of liver injury.

  3. Hepatitis E Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lhomme, Sébastien; Marion, Olivier; Abravanel, Florence; Chapuy-Regaud, Sabine; Kamar, Nassim; Izopet, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Although most hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections are asymptomatic, some can be severe, causing fulminant hepatitis and extra-hepatic manifestations, including neurological and kidney injuries. Chronic HEV infections may also occur in immunocompromised patients. This review describes how our understanding of the pathogenesis of HEV infection has progressed in recent years. PMID:27527210

  4. What Is Hepatitis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... عربي 中文 English Français Русский Español What is hepatitis? Online Q&A Reviewed July 2016 Q: What ... Question and answer archives Submit a question World Hepatitis Day Know hepatitis - Act now Event notice Key ...

  5. Hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Burra, Patrizia

    2009-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a leading cause of end-stage liver disease worldwide and the most common indication for liver transplantation in the United States and Europe. HCV nearly always recurs in liver-transplanted patients, and 10 to 25% of them develop cirrhosis within 5 to 10 years. One of the strategies suggested to limit virological HCV recurrence is pretransplant antiviral treatment, but studies are warranted on the pharmacokinetics of antiviral drugs in cirrhotic patients, the benefits of fixed or escalating antiviral drug dosage schedules, the duration of the treatment, and the indications for using growth factors. Several risk factors are associated with a more aggressive recurrent HCV and early allograft failure, such as an older donor age. The relationship between immunosuppression and fibrosis progression in HCV recurrence remains uncertain. Concerning the antiviral treatment, treating established recurrent disease with a combination of interferon and ribavirin has been the mainstay of management to date, but when it is best to start and how to manage the side effects are still controversial issues. Antiviral treatment should be started once the disease has been confirmed by a biopsy when the fibrosis develops, providing that ongoing acute or chronic rejection, biliary obstruction, vascular damage, autoimmune diseases and sepsis, and any other standard contraindications for antiviral therapy, have been excluded. HCV recurrence after liver transplantation may well lead to graft failure and become an indication for retransplantation, but this is done in a relatively small number of cases, accounting for only 3 to 5% of retransplanted patients, since retransplantation is associated with much worse results than primary liver transplant procedures. We must be prepared for the fact that increasing numbers of HCV-positive recipients with allografts failing due to recurrent HCV will be asking to be retransplanted-and we do not know yet how to respond to this

  6. [Epidemiology of viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Kaić, Bernard; Vilibić-Cavlek, Tatjana; Filipović, Sanja Kurecić; Nemeth-Blazić, Tatjana; Pem-Novosel, Iva; Vucina, Vesna Visekruna; Simunović, Aleksandar; Zajec, Martina; Radić, Ivan; Pavlić, Jasmina; Glamocanin, Marica; Gjenero-Margan, Ira

    2013-10-01

    Understanding the country-specific epidemiology of disease, which may vary greatly among countries, is crucial for identifying the most appropriate preventive and control measures. An overview of the local epidemiology of viral hepatitis in Croatia is given in this paper. The overall prevalence of hepatitis B in Croatia is low (less than 2% HBsAg carriers in the general population). Hepatitis B incidence and prevalence began to decline significantly following the introduction of universal hepatitis B vaccination in 1999. Information on HBsAg seroprevalence is derived from routine testing of certain subpopulations (pregnant women, blood donors) and seroprevalence studies mostly targeted at high-risk populations. Universal childhood vaccination against hepatitis B remains the main preventive measure. We recommend testing for immunity one to two months after the third dose of hepatitis B vaccine for health-care workers. The incidence and prevalence of hepatitis C have also been declining in the general population. The main preventive measures are ensuring safety of blood products, prevention of drug abuse, and harm reduction programs for intravenous drug users. Hepatitis A incidence has declined dramatically since fifty years ago, when thousands of cases were reported annually. In the last five years, an average of twenty cases have been reported per year. The reduction of hepatitis A is a consequence of improved personal and community hygiene and sanitation. Hepatitis D has not been reported in Croatia. The risk of hepatitis D will get to be even smaller as the proportion of population vaccinated against hepatitis B builds up. Hepatitis E is reported only sporadically in Croatia, mostly in persons occupationally in contact with pigs and in travelers to endemic countries. In conclusion, Croatia is a low prevalence country for hepatitides A, B and C. Hepatitis D has not been reported to occur in Croatia and there are only sporadic cases of hepatitis E. Since hepatitis

  7. Hepatitis B Virus Infection and Immunopathogenesis in a Humanized Mouse Model: Induction of Human-Specific Liver Fibrosis and M2-Like Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bility, Moses T.; Cheng, Liang; Zhang, Zheng; Luan, Yan; Li, Feng; Chi, Liqun; Zhang, Liguo; Tu, Zhengkun; Gao, Yanhang; Fu, Yangxin; Niu, Junqi; Wang, Fusheng; Su, Lishan

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms of chronic HBV infection and immunopathogenesis are poorly understood due to a lack of a robust small animal model. Here we report the development of a humanized mouse model with both human immune system and human liver cells by reconstituting the immunodeficient A2/NSG (NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ mice with human HLA-A2 transgene) with human hematopoietic stem cells and liver progenitor cells (A2/NSG-hu HSC/Hep mice). The A2/NSG-hu HSC/Hep mouse supported HBV infection and approximately 75% of HBV infected mice established persistent infection for at least 4 months. We detected human immune responses, albeit impaired in the liver, chronic liver inflammation and liver fibrosis in infected animals. An HBV neutralizing antibody efficiently inhibited HBV infection and associated liver diseases in humanized mice. In addition, we found that the HBV mediated liver disease was associated with high level of infiltrated human macrophages with M2-like activation phenotype. Importantly, similar M2-like macrophage accumulation was confirmed in chronic hepatitis B patients with liver diseases. Furthermore, gene expression analysis showed that induction of M2-like macrophage in the liver is associated with accelerated liver fibrosis and necrosis in patients with acute HBV-induced liver failure. Lastly, we demonstrate that HBV promotes M2-like activation in both M1 and M2 macrophages in cell culture studies. Our study demonstrates that the A2/NSG-hu HSC/Hep mouse model is valuable in studying HBV infection, human immune responses and associated liver diseases. Furthermore, results from this study suggest a critical role for macrophage polarization in hepatitis B virus-induced immune impairment and liver pathology. PMID:24651854

  8. Hepatitis B virus infection and immunopathogenesis in a humanized mouse model: induction of human-specific liver fibrosis and M2-like macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bility, Moses T; Cheng, Liang; Zhang, Zheng; Luan, Yan; Li, Feng; Chi, Liqun; Zhang, Liguo; Tu, Zhengkun; Gao, Yanhang; Fu, Yangxin; Niu, Junqi; Wang, Fusheng; Su, Lishan

    2014-03-01

    The mechanisms of chronic HBV infection and immunopathogenesis are poorly understood due to a lack of a robust small animal model. Here we report the development of a humanized mouse model with both human immune system and human liver cells by reconstituting the immunodeficient A2/NSG (NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2rg(tm1Wjl)/SzJ mice with human HLA-A2 transgene) with human hematopoietic stem cells and liver progenitor cells (A2/NSG-hu HSC/Hep mice). The A2/NSG-hu HSC/Hep mouse supported HBV infection and approximately 75% of HBV infected mice established persistent infection for at least 4 months. We detected human immune responses, albeit impaired in the liver, chronic liver inflammation and liver fibrosis in infected animals. An HBV neutralizing antibody efficiently inhibited HBV infection and associated liver diseases in humanized mice. In addition, we found that the HBV mediated liver disease was associated with high level of infiltrated human macrophages with M2-like activation phenotype. Importantly, similar M2-like macrophage accumulation was confirmed in chronic hepatitis B patients with liver diseases. Furthermore, gene expression analysis showed that induction of M2-like macrophage in the liver is associated with accelerated liver fibrosis and necrosis in patients with acute HBV-induced liver failure. Lastly, we demonstrate that HBV promotes M2-like activation in both M1 and M2 macrophages in cell culture studies. Our study demonstrates that the A2/NSG-hu HSC/Hep mouse model is valuable in studying HBV infection, human immune responses and associated liver diseases. Furthermore, results from this study suggest a critical role for macrophage polarization in hepatitis B virus-induced immune impairment and liver pathology.

  9. INFLUENCE OF TYPE II DIABETES, OBESITY, AND EXPOSURE TO 2, 3, 7, 8-TETRACHLORODIBENZO-P-DIOXIN (TCDD) EXPOSURE ON THE EXPRESSION OF HEPATIC CYP1A2 IN A MURIN MODEL OF TYPE II DIABETES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Influence of type II diabetes, obesity and exposure 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) exposure on the expression of hepatic CYPIA2 in a murine model of type II diabetes. SJ Godin', VM Richardson2, JJ Diliberto2, LS Birnbaum', MJ DeVito2; 'Curriculum In Toxicology, UNC-CH...

  10. [Estimation of risk areas for hepatitis A].

    PubMed

    Braga, Ricardo Cerqueira Campos; Valencia, Luís Iván Ortiz; Medronho, Roberto de Andrade; Escosteguy, Claudia Caminha

    2008-08-01

    This study estimated hepatitis A risk areas in a region of Duque de Caxias, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. A cross-sectional study consisting of a hepatitis A serological survey and a household survey were conducted in 19 census tracts. Of these, 11 tracts were selected and 1,298 children from one to ten years of age were included in the study. Geostatistical techniques allowed modeling the spatial continuity of hepatitis A, non-use of filtered drinking water, time since installation of running water, and number of water taps per household and their spatial estimation through ordinary and indicator kriging. Adjusted models for the outcome and socioeconomic variables were isotropic; risk maps were constructed; cross-validation of the four models was satisfactory. Spatial estimation using the kriging method detected areas with increased risk of hepatitis A, independently of the urban administrative area in which the census tracts were located.

  11. 2-(2-Thienyl)-5,6-dihydroxy-4-carboxypyrimidines as inhibitors of the hepatitis C virus NS5B polymerase: discovery, SAR, modeling, and mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Koch, Uwe; Attenni, Barbara; Malancona, Savina; Colarusso, Stefania; Conte, Immacolata; Di Filippo, Marcello; Harper, Steven; Pacini, Barbara; Giomini, Claudia; Thomas, Steven; Incitti, Ilario; Tomei, Licia; De Francesco, Raffaele; Altamura, Sergio; Matassa, Victor G; Narjes, Frank

    2006-03-09

    Infections caused by hepatitis C virus (HCV) are a significant world health problem for which novel therapies are in urgent demand. The polymerase of HCV is responsible for the replication of viral RNA. We recently disclosed dihydroxypyrimidine carboxylates 2 as novel, reversible inhibitors of the HCV NS5B polymerase. This series was further developed into 5,6-dihydroxy-2-(2-thienyl)pyrimidine-4-carboxylic acids such as 34 (EC50 9.3 microM), which now show activity in the cell-based HCV replication assay. The structure-activity relationship of these inhibitors is discussed in the context of their physicochemical properties and of the polymerase crystal structure. We also report the results of mutagenesis experiments which support the proposed binding model, which involves pyrophosphate-like chelation of the active site Mg ions.

  12. Living-donor liver transplant using the right hepatic lobe without the right hepatic vein: solving the drainage problem.

    PubMed

    Akbulut, Sami; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Eris, Cengiz; Kutlu, Ramazan; Yilmaz, Sezai

    2013-06-01

    Although rare, major congenital defects of the hepatic veins are detectable at autopsy, advanced, noninvasive imaging techniques such as Doppler ultrasonography and multislice computed tomography can accurately define these anomalies. One of these anomalies is congenital absence of the main right hepatic vein. We present a 21-year-old woman living-liver donor candidate with congenital absence of the right hepatic vein who underwent an extended right donor hepatectomy. She was tested for transplant compatibility with her 45-year-old brother, who had chronic liver failure secondary to hepatitis B. Multislice computed tomography revealed an absence of the right hepatic vein, and the right hepatic lobe was drained by 4 inferior hepatic veins with diameters ranging from 4 to 8.4 mm. An extended right-donor hepatectomy was performed. A common-large opening drainage reconstruction model that included all of the inferior hepatic veins and middle hepatic vein was created using the saphenous vein and an aortic homograft. There were no postoperative complications related to hepatic venous drainage thanks to the common-large opening model. We demonstrate that a right donor hepatectomy is feasible in congenital absence of the right hepatic vein solving the drainage problem using common-large opening reconstruction technique.

  13. Hydrogen-Rich Saline Attenuates Cardiac and Hepatic Injury in Doxorubicin Rat Model by Inhibiting Inflammation and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) remains the most effective anticancer agent which is widely used in several adult and pediatric cancers, but its application is limited for its cardiotoxicity and hepatotoxicity. Hydrogen, as a selective antioxidant, is a promising potential therapeutic option for many diseases. In this study, we found that intraperitoneal injection of hydrogen-rich saline (H2 saline) ameliorated the mortality, cardiac dysfunction, and histopathological changes caused by DOX in rats. Meanwhile, serum brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), albumin (ALB), tissue reactive oxygen species (ROS), and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were also attenuated after H2 saline treatment. What is more, we further demonstrated that H2 saline treatment could inhibit cardiac and hepatic inflammation and apoptosis relative proteins expressions by western blotting test. In conclusion, our results revealed a protective effect of H2 saline on DOX-induced cardiotoxicity and hepatotoxicity in rats by inhibiting inflammation and apoptosis. PMID:28104928

  14. Nicotinamide improves glucose metabolism and affects the hepatic NAD-sirtuin pathway in a rodent model of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Soo Jin; Choi, Jung Mook; Kim, Lisa; Park, Se Eun; Rhee, Eun Jung; Lee, Won Young; Oh, Ki Won; Park, Sung Woo; Park, Cheol-Young

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinic acid (NA) and nicotinamide (NAM) are major forms of niacin and exert their physiological functions as precursors of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD). Sirtuins, which are NAD-dependent deacetylases, regulate glucose and lipid metabolism and are implicated in the pathophysiology of aging, diabetes, and hepatic steatosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of two NAD donors, NA and NAM, on glucose metabolism and the hepatic NAD-sirtuin pathway. The effects were investigated in OLETF rats, a rodent model of obesity and type 2 diabetes. OLETF rats were divided into five groups: (1) high fat (HF) diet, (2) HF diet and 10 mg NA/kg body weight (BW)/day (NA 10), (3) HF diet and 100 mg NA/kg BW/day (NA 100), (4) HF diet and 10 mg NAM/kg BW/day (NAM 10), and (5) HF diet and 100 mg NAM/kg BW/day (NAM 100). NA and NAM were delivered via drinking water for four weeks. NAM 100 treatment affected glucose control significantly, as shown by lower levels of accumulative area under the curve during oral glucose tolerance test, serum fasting glucose, serum fasting insulin, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, and higher levels of serum adiponectin. With regard to NAD-sirtuin pathway, intracellular nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, NAD, the NAD/NADH ratio, Sirt1, 2, 3, and 6 mRNA expressions, and Sirt1 activity all increased in livers of NAM 100-treated rats. These alterations were accompanied by the increased levels of proliferator-activated receptor gamma, coactivator 1 alpha and mitochondrial DNA. The effect of NA treatment was less evident than that of NAM 100. These results demonstrate that NAM is more effective than NA on the regulation of glucose metabolism and the NAD-sirtuin pathway, which may relate to the altered mitochondrial biogenesis.

  15. Coinfection with the intestinal nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus markedly reduces hepatic egg-induced immunopathology and proinflammatory cytokines in mouse models of severe schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Bazzone, Lindsey E; Smith, Patrick M; Rutitzky, Laura I; Shainheit, Mara G; Urban, Joseph F; Setiawan, Tommy; Blum, Arthur M; Weinstock, Joel V; Stadecker, Miguel J

    2008-11-01

    Infection with the trematode helminth Schistosoma mansoni results in a parasite egg-induced, CD4 T-cell-mediated, hepatointestinal granulomatous and fibrosing inflammation that varies greatly in severity, with a higher frequency of milder forms typically occurring in regions where the disease is endemic. One possible explanation for this is that in these regions the degree of inflammation is lessened by widespread concurrent infection with gastrointestinal nematodes. We tested this hypothesis by establishing a murine coinfection model in which mice were infected with the intestinal nematode parasite Heligmosomoides polygyrus prior to infection with S. mansoni. In CBA mice that naturally display a severe form of schistosomiasis, preinfection with H. polygyrus resulted in a marked reduction in schistosome egg-induced hepatic immunopathology, which was associated with significant decreases in the levels of interleukin-17 (IL-17), gamma interferon, tumor necrosis factor alpha, IL-23, IL-6, and IL-1beta and with increases in the levels of IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, and transforming growth factor beta in mesenteric lymph node cells, purified CD4 T cells, and isolated liver granuloma cells. There also were increases in liver Ym1 and forkhead box P3 transcription factor expression. In another model of high-pathology schistosomiasis induced in C57BL/6 mice by immunization with schistosome egg antigens in complete Freund's adjuvant, coinfection with the nematodes also resulted in a marked inhibition of hepatic immunopathology accompanied by similar shifts in cytokine production. These findings demonstrate that intestinal nematodes prevent Th1- and Th17-cell-mediated inflammation by promoting a strong Th2-polarized environment associated with increases in the levels of alternatively activated macrophages and T regulatory cells, which result in significant amelioration of schistosome-induced immunopathology.

  16. Dietary fish protein alters blood lipid concentrations and hepatic genes involved in cholesterol homeostasis in the rat model.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Anjali; Bettzieche, Anja; Hirche, Frank; Brandsch, Corinna; Stangl, Gabriele I; Eder, Klaus

    2006-10-01

    It is known that various dietary plant proteins are capable of influencing the lipid metabolism of human subjects and animals when compared with casein. Less, however, is known about the effects of fish protein on the cholesterol and triacylglycerol metabolism. Therefore, two experiments were conducted in which rats were fed diets containing 200 g of either fish protein, prepared from Alaska pollack fillets, or casein, which served as control, per kilogram, over 20 and 22 d, respectively. As parameters of lipid metabolism, the concentrations of cholesterol and triacylglycerols in the plasma and liver, the faecal excretion of bile acids and the hepatic expression of genes encoding proteins involved in lipid homeostasis were determined. In both experiments, rats fed fish protein had higher concentrations of cholesteryl esters in the liver, a lower concentration of cholesterol in the HDL fraction (rho > 1.063 kg/l) and lower plasma triacylglycerol concentrations than rats fed casein (P < 0.05). The gene expression analysis performed in experiment 2 showed that rats fed fish protein had higher relative mRNA concentrations of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-2, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, LDL receptor, apo AI, scavenger receptor B1 and lecithin-cholesterol-acyltransferase in their liver than did rats fed casein (P < 0.05). The faecal excretion of bile acids and the mRNA concentrations of cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase, SREBP-1c and corresponding target genes were not altered. These findings show that fish protein had multiple effects on plasma and liver lipids that were at least in part caused by an altered expression of the hepatic genes involved in lipid homeostasis.

  17. In vitro-in vivo extrapolation of quantitative hepatic biotransformation data for fish - I. A review of methods, and strategies for incorporating intrinsic clearance estimates into chemical kinetic models

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, John W.; Schultz, Irv R.; Fitzsimmons, Patrick N..

    2006-06-10

    Mammalian researchers have developed a stepwise approach to predict in vivo hepatic clearance from measurements of in vitro hepatic metabolism. The resulting clearance estimates have been used to screen drug candidates, identify potential drug-drug interactions, investigate idiosyncratic drug responses, and support toxicology risk assessments. In this report we review these methods, discuss their potential application to studies with fish, and describe how extrapolated values could be incorporated into well-known compartmental kinetic models. Empirical equations that relate extrapolation factors to chemical log Kow are given to facilitate the incorporation of metabolism data into bioconcentration and bioaccumulation models. Because they explicitly incorporate the concept of clearance, compartmental clearance volume models are particularly well suited for incorporating hepatic clearance estimates. The manner in which these clearance values are incorporated into a given model depends, however, on the measurement frame of reference. Procedures for the incorporation of in vitro metabolism data into physiologically based toxicokinetic (PBTK) models are also described. Unlike most compartmental models, PBTK models are developed to describe the effects of metabolism in the tissue where it occurs. In addition, PBTK models are well suited to modeling metabolism in more than one tissue.

  18. Salecan protected against concanavalin A-induced acute liver injury by modulating T cell immune responses and NMR-based metabolic profiles.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qi; Xu, Xi; Yang, Xiao; Weng, Dan; Wang, Junsong; Zhang, Jianfa

    2017-02-15

    Salecan, a water-soluble extracellular β-glucan produced by Agrobacterium sp. ZX09, has been reported to exhibit a wide range of biological effects. The aims of the present study were to investigate the protective effect of salecan against Concanavalin A (ConA)-induced hepatitis, a well-established animal model of immune-mediated liver injury, and to search for possible mechanisms. C57BL/6 mice were pretreated with salecan followed by ConA injection. Salecan treatment significantly reduced ConA-induced acute liver injury, and suppressed the expression and secretion of inflammatory cytokines including interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1β in ConA-induced liver injury model. The high expression levels of chemokines and adhesion molecules such as MIP-1α, MIP-1β, ICAM-1, MCP-1 and RANTES in the liver induced by ConA were also down-regulated after salecan treatment. Salecan inhibited the infiltration and activation of inflammatory cells, especially T cells, in the liver induced by ConA. Moreover, salecan reversed the metabolic profiles of ConA-treated mice towards the control group by partly recovering the metabolic perturbations induced by ConA. Our results suggest the preventive and therapeutic potential of salecan in immune-mediated hepatitis.

  19. LPSF/GQ-02 Inhibits the Development of Hepatic Steatosis and Inflammation in a Mouse Model of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD)

    PubMed Central

    Soares e Silva, Amanda Karolina; de Oliveira Cipriano Torres, Dilênia; dos Santos Gomes, Fabiana Oliveira; dos Santos Silva, Bruna; Lima Ribeiro, Edlene; Costa Oliveira, Amanda; dos Santos, Laise Aline Martins; de Lima, Maria do Carmo Alves; Pitta, Ivan da Rocha; Peixoto, Christina Alves

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) defines a wide spectrum of liver diseases that extends from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Although the pathogenesis of NAFLD remains undefined, it is recognized that insulin resistance is present in almost all patients who develop this disease. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) act as an insulin sensitizer and have been used in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes and other insulin-resistant conditions, including NAFLD. Hence, therapy of NAFLD with insulin-sensitizing drugs should ideally improve the key hepatic histological changes, while also reducing cardiometabolic and cancer risks. Controversially, TZDs are associated with the development of cardiovascular events and liver problems. Therefore, there is a need for the development of new therapeutic strategies to improve liver function in patients with chronic liver diseases. The aim of the present study was to assess the therapeutic effects of LPSF/GQ-02 on the liver of LDLR-/- mice after a high-fat diet. Eighty male mice were divided into 4 groups and two different experiments: 1-received a standard diet; 2-fed with a high-fat diet (HFD); 3–HFD+pioglitazone; 4–HFD+LPSF/GQ-02. The experiments were conducted for 10 or 12 weeks and in the last two or four weeks respectively, the drugs were administered daily by gavage. The results obtained with an NAFLD murine model indicated that LPSF/GQ-02 was effective in improving the hepatic architecture, decreasing fat accumulation, reducing the amount of collagen, decreasing inflammation by reducing IL-6, iNOS, COX-2 and F4 / 80, and increasing the protein expression of IκBα, cytoplasmic NFκB-65, eNOS and IRS-1 in mice LDLR -/-. These results suggest a direct action by LPSF/GQ-02 on the factors that affect inflammation, insulin resistance and fat accumulation in the liver of these animals. Further studies are being conducted in our laboratory to investigate the possible mechanism of action of LPSF

  20. The anti-TNF-α antibody infliximab inhibits the expression of fat-transporter-protein FAT/CD36 in a selective hepatic-radiation mouse model.

    PubMed

    Martius, Gesa; Cameron, Silke; Rave-Fränk, Margret; Hess, Clemens F; Wolff, Hendrik A; Malik, Ihtzaz A

    2015-03-02

    Previously, we reported a radiation-induced inflammation triggering fat-accumulation through fatty-acid-translocase/cluster of differentiation protein 36 (FAT/CD36) in rat liver. Furthermore, inhibition of radiation-induced FAT/CD36-expression by anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (anti-TNF-α) (infliximab) was shown in vitro. The current study investigates fat-accumulation in a mouse-model of single-dose liver-irradiation (25-Gray) and the effect of anti-TNF-α-therapy on FAT/CD36 gene-expression. Mice livers were selectively irradiated in vivo in presence or absence of infliximab. Serum- and hepatic-triglycerides, mRNA, and protein were analyzed by colorimetric assays, RT-PCR, Immunofluorescence and Western-Blot, respectively. Sudan-staining was used demonstrating fat-accumulation in tissue. In mice livers, early (1-3 h) induction of TNF-α-expression, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, was observed. It was followed by elevated hepatic-triglyceride level (6-12 h), compared to sham-irradiated controls. In contrast, serum-triglyceride level was decreased at these time points. Similar to triglyceride level in mice livers, Sudan staining of liver cryosections showed a quick (6-12 h) increase of fat-droplets after irradiation. Furthermore, expression of fat-transporter-protein FAT/CD36 was increased at protein level caused by radiation or TNF-α. TNF-α-blockage by anti-TNF-α showed an early inhibition of radiation-induced FAT/CD36 expression in mice livers. Immunohistochemistry showed basolateral and cytoplasmic expression of FAT/CD36 in hepatocytes. Moreover, co-localization of FAT/CD36 was detected with α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA+) cells and F4/80+ macrophages. In summary, hepatic-radiation triggers fat-accumulation in mice livers, involving acute-phase-processes. Accordingly, anti-TNF-α-therapy prevented early radiation-induced expression of FAT/CD36 in vivo.

  1. LPSF/GQ-02 inhibits the development of hepatic steatosis and inflammation in a mouse model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

    PubMed

    Soares e Silva, Amanda Karolina; de Oliveira Cipriano Torres, Dilênia; dos Santos Gomes, Fabiana Oliveira; dos Santos Silva, Bruna; Lima Ribeiro, Edlene; Costa Oliveira, Amanda; dos Santos, Laise Aline Martins; de Lima, Maria do Carmo Alves; Pitta, Ivan da Rocha; Peixoto, Christina Alves

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) defines a wide spectrum of liver diseases that extends from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Although the pathogenesis of NAFLD remains undefined, it is recognized that insulin resistance is present in almost all patients who develop this disease. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) act as an insulin sensitizer and have been used in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes and other insulin-resistant conditions, including NAFLD. Hence, therapy of NAFLD with insulin-sensitizing drugs should ideally improve the key hepatic histological changes, while also reducing cardiometabolic and cancer risks. Controversially, TZDs are associated with the development of cardiovascular events and liver problems. Therefore, there is a need for the development of new therapeutic strategies to improve liver function in patients with chronic liver diseases. The aim of the present study was to assess the therapeutic effects of LPSF/GQ-02 on the liver of LDLR-/- mice after a high-fat diet. Eighty male mice were divided into 4 groups and two different experiments: 1-received a standard diet; 2-fed with a high-fat diet (HFD); 3-HFD+pioglitazone; 4-HFD+LPSF/GQ-02. The experiments were conducted for 10 or 12 weeks and in the last two or four weeks respectively, the drugs were administered daily by gavage. The results obtained with an NAFLD murine model indicated that LPSF/GQ-02 was effective in improving the hepatic architecture, decreasing fat accumulation, reducing the amount of collagen, decreasing inflammation by reducing IL-6, iNOS, COX-2 and F4 / 80, and increasing the protein expression of IκBα, cytoplasmic NFκB-65, eNOS and IRS-1 in mice LDLR -/-. These results suggest a direct action by LPSF/GQ-02 on the factors that affect inflammation, insulin resistance and fat accumulation in the liver of these animals. Further studies are being conducted in our laboratory to investigate the possible mechanism of action of LPSF/GQ-02 on

  2. Inhibition of sphingolipid synthesis improves dyslipidemia in the diet-induced hamster model of insulin resistance: evidence for the role of sphingosine and sphinganine in hepatic VLDL-apoB100 overproduction.

    PubMed

    Dekker, Mark J; Baker, Chris; Naples, Mark; Samsoondar, Josh; Zhang, Rianna; Qiu, Wei; Sacco, Jennifer; Adeli, Khosrow

    2013-05-01

    Sphingolipids have emerged as important bioactive lipid species involved in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. However, little is known of the regulatory role of sphingolipids in dyslipidemia of insulin-resistant states. We employed hamster models of dyslipidemia and insulin resistance to investigate the role of sphingolipids in hepatic VLDL overproduction, induction of insulin resistance, and inflammation. Hamsters were fed either a control chow diet, a high fructose diet, or a diet high in fat, fructose and cholesterol (FFC diet). They were then treated for 2 weeks with vehicle or 0.3 mg/kg myriocin, a potent inhibitor of de novo sphingolipid synthesis. Both fructose and FFC feeding induced significant increases in hepatic sphinganine, which was normalized to chow-fed levels with myriocin (P < 0.05); myriocin also lowered hepatic ceramide content (P < 0.05). Plasma TG and cholesterol as well as VLDL-TG and -apoB100 were similarly reduced with myriocin treatment in all hamsters, regardless of diet. Myriocin treatment also led to improved insulin sensitivity and reduced hepatic SREBP-1c mRNA, though it did not appear to ameliorate the activation of hepatic inflammatory pathways. Importantly, direct treatment of primary hamster hepatocytes ex vivo with C2 ceramide or sphingosine led to an increased secretion of newly synthesized apoB100. Taken together, these data suggest that a) hepatic VLDL-apoB100 overproduction may be stimulated by ceramides and sphingosine and b) inhibition of sphingolipid synthesis can reduce circulating VLDL in hamsters and improve circulating lipids--an effect that is possibly due to improved insulin signaling and reduced lipogenesis but is independent of changes in inflammation.

  3. Clinical Model for Predicting Hepatocellular Carcinomas in Patients with Post-Sustained Virologic Responses of Chronic Hepatitis C: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Qing-Lei; Li, Bing; Zhang, Xue-Xiu; Chen, Yan; Fu, Yan-Ling; Lv, Jun; Liu, Yan-Min; Yu, Zu-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims No clinical model exists to predict the occurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma in sustained virologic response-achieving (HCC after SVR) patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). Methods We performed a case-control study using a clinical database to research the risk factors for HCC after SVR. A predictive model based on risk factors was established, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was calculated. Results In the multivariate model, an initial diagnosis of compensated cirrhosis and post-SVR albumin reductions of 1 g/L were associated with 21.7-fold (95% CI, 4.2 to 112.3; p<0.001) and 1.3-fold (95% CI, 1.1 to 1.7; p=0.004) increases in the risk of HCC after SVR, respectively. A predictive model based on an initial diagnosis of compensated cirrhosis (yes, +1; no, 0) and post-SVR albumin ≤36.0 g/L (yes, +1; not, 0) predicted the occurrence of HCC after SVR with a cutoff value of >0, an AUC of 0.880, a sensitivity of 0.833, a specificity of 0.896, and a negative predictive value of 0.956. Conclusions An initial diagnosis of compensated cirrhosis combined with a post-SVR albumin value of ≤36.0 g/L predicts the occurrence of HCC after SVR in patients with CHC. PMID:27257023

  4. The Toll-like receptor 5 agonist entolimod suppresses hepatic metastases in a murine model of ocular melanoma via an NK cell-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hua; Brackett, Craig M.; Morales-Tirado, Vanessa Marie; Li, Zezhong; Zhang, Qing; Wilson, Matthew W.; Benjamin, Camille; Harris, Wayne; Waller, Edmund K.; Gudkov, Andrei V.; Burdelya, Lyudmila G.; Grossniklaus, Hans E.

    2016-01-01

    Uveal melanoma (UM) is the most common primary cancer of the eye in adults and progresses to metastatic disease predominantly of the liver in ∼50% of patients. In these cases, life expectancy averages just 9 months due to the lack of effective treatment options. The Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) agonist entolimod (former name CBLB502) rapidly activates TLR5-NF-κB signaling in hepatocytes and suppresses growth of both TLR5-expressing and non-expressing tumors in the liver through mobilization and activation of innate and adaptive immune mechanisms. The goal of this study was to explore the potential of entolimod as an immunotherapeutic agent against hepatic metastasis of UM using the TLR5-positive B16LS9 mouse model of ocular melanoma. Mice were given seven subcutaneous injections of vehicle or entolimod given 72 h apart started one day before, on the same day or three days after intraocular injection of B16LS9 cells. All tested regimens of entolimod treatment resulted in significantly reduced B16LS9 metastasis to the liver. Entolimod induced mobilization of natural killer (NK) cells to the liver and stimulated their maturation, differentiation and activation. Antibody-mediated depletion of NK cells from mice abrogated entolimod's antimetastatic activity in the liver and eliminated the entolimod-elicited in vitro cytotoxic activity of hepatic lymphocytes against B16LS9 cells. These results provide pre-clinical evidence of entolimod's efficacy against hepatometastasis of UM and support its further development as an anticancer immunotherapeutic drug. PMID:26655090

  5. DNA vaccine expressing the non-structural proteins of hepatitis C virus diminishes the expression of HCV proteins in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Wada, Takeshi; Kohara, Michinori; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro

    2013-12-05

    Most of the people infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) develop chronic hepatitis, which in some cases progresses to cirrhosis and ultimately to hepatocellular carcinoma. Although various immunotherapies against the progressive disease status of HCV infection have been studied, a preventive or therapeutic vaccine against this pathogen is still not available. In this study, we constructed a DNA vaccine expressing an HCV structural protein (CN2), non-structural protein (N25) or the empty plasmid DNA as a control and evaluated their efficacy as a candidate HCV vaccine in C57BL/6 and novel genetically modified HCV infection model (HCV-Tg) mice. Strong cellular immune responses to several HCV structural and non-structural proteins, characterized by cytotoxicity and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) production, were observed in CN2 or N25 DNA vaccine-immunized C57BL/6 mice but not in empty plasmid DNA-administered mice. The therapeutic effects of these DNA vaccines were also examined in HCV-Tg mice that conditionally express HCV proteins in their liver. Though a reduction in cellular immune responses was observed in HCV-Tg mice, there was a significant decrease in the expression of HCV protein in mice administered the N25 DNA vaccine but not in mice administered the empty plasmid DNA. Moreover, both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells were required for the decrease of HCV protein in the liver. We found that the N25 DNA vaccine improved pathological changes in the liver compared to the empty plasmid DNA. Thus, these DNA vaccines, especially that expressing the non-structural protein gene, may be an alternative approach for treatment of individuals chronically infected with HCV.

  6. Hepatic hematoma and hepatic rupture in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Poo, Jorge Luis; Góngora, Julieta

    2006-01-01

    Hepatic perforation is an unusual complication of woman pregnancy associated with a poor outcome. A comprehensive review of epidemiology, clinical spectrum, diagnostic methods and therapeutic options is presented in this short paper.

  7. Single-Genome Sequencing of Hepatitis C Virus in Donor-Recipient Pairs Distinguishes Modes and Models of Virus Transmission and Early Diversification

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Stoddard, Mark B.; Wang, Shuyi; Giorgi, Elena E.; Blair, Lily M.; Learn, Gerald H.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Alter, Harvey J.; Busch, Michael P.; Fierer, Daniel S.; Ribeiro, Ruy M.; Perelson, Alan S.; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite the recent development of highly effective anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) drugs, the global burden of this pathogen remains immense. Control or eradication of HCV will likely require the broad application of antiviral drugs and development of an effective vaccine. A precise molecular identification of transmitted/founder (T/F) HCV genomes that lead to productive clinical infection could play a critical role in vaccine research, as it has for HIV-1. However, the replication schema of these two RNA viruses differ substantially, as do viral responses to innate and adaptive host defenses. These differences raise questions as to the certainty of T/F HCV genome inferences, particularly in cases where multiple closely related sequence lineages have been observed. To clarify these issues and distinguish between competing models of early HCV diversification, we examined seven cases of acute HCV infection in humans and chimpanzees, including three examples of virus transmission between linked donors and recipients. Using single-genome sequencing (SGS) of plasma vRNA, we found that inferred T/F sequences in recipients were identical to viral sequences in their respective donors. Early in infection, HCV genomes generally evolved according to a simple model of random evolution where the coalescent corresponded to the T/F sequence. Closely related sequence lineages could be explained by high multiplicity infection from a donor whose viral sequences had undergone a pretransmission bottleneck due to treatment, immune selection, or recent infection. These findings validate SGS, together with mathematical modeling and phylogenetic analysis, as a novel strategy to infer T/F HCV genome sequences. IMPORTANCE Despite the recent development of highly effective, interferon-sparing anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) drugs, the global burden of this pathogen remains immense. Control or eradication of HCV will likely require the broad application of antiviral drugs and the

  8. Comparison of the hemostatic effects of oxidized cellulose and calcium alginate in an experimental animal model of hepatic parenchymal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Dorterler, Mustafa Erman; Ayangil, Harun Resit; Turan, Cüneyt; Deniz, Kemal

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite all recent developments, bleeding is still one of the main causes of increasing morbidity and mortality following both trauma and elective hepatic surgery. The main goal of treatment is stop the bleeding immediately. In this study, the hemostatic and histopathological effects of Ankaferd blood stopper (ABS), oxidized cellulose (OC), and calcium alginate (CA) were compared in an experimental liver injury. Materials and Methods: Forty Wistar albino rats were randomly divided into four groups of ten animals each, receiving 0.9% NaCl, CA, OC, or ABS following liver resection. After 5 days, the samples from the resection site were acquired for histopathological evaluation. The efficacy of the agents was assessed using the hematocrit level and histopathological examination. Statistical analyses were applied. Results: The amount of bleeding was lowest in ABS–treated rats, followed by those treated with OC, CA, and NaCl, respectively. The difference among the groups was statistically significant (P < 0.001). ABS–treated rats also had significantly less necrosis than those receiving OC; other differences in this regard were not significant. Inflammatory status was significantly different between OC- and CA–treated rats (P < 0.05) but not among the other groups (P > 0.05). No significant difference was determined between the groups regarding granulation (P > 0.05). Conclusion: ABS reduced the volume of bleeding in liver surgery and partial liver resection. The hemostatic effect of CA was limited. PMID:28149820

  9. Hepatitis B virus X protein modifies invasion, proliferation and the inflammatory response in an HTR-8/SVneo cell model.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hong; Li, Qiu-Ling; Chen, Jing; Na, Quan; Liu, Cai-Xia

    2015-10-01

    Mother-to-infant transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV) can occur as an intrauterine, intrapartum or postpartum infection. In the present study, we induced a multifunctional viral regulator of HBV gene products, HBx, and its different fragments to overexpress in a tropho-blast cell line, HTR-8/SVneo. We then identified the biological effects of HBx on HTR-8/SVneo cells. Our results indicated that HBx inhibited apoptosis and induced invasion as detected using Annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) double staining and Transwell assay, respectively. Furthermore, we carried out western blot analysis to analyze the possible related signaling pathway. We confirmed that HBx and its different fragments can activate the Smad signaling pathway, accompanied by downregulation of E-cadherin, and upregulation of vimentin and N-cadherin. TGF‑β1 was used as a control to activate the Smad signaling pathway in HTR-8/SVneo cells. HBx activated the Smad signaling pathway in the HTR-8/SVneo cells. After the signaling pathway was activated, reduced apoptosis, higher invasive ability and enhanced inflammatory response were observed in the HTR-8/SVneo cells.

  10. Quantification of the Healing Effect in Hepatic Fibrosis Induced by Chitosan Nano-Encapsulated Green Tea in Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Safer, Abdel-Majeed; Sen, Anindito; Hanafy, Nemany A; Mousa, Shaker A

    2015-12-01

    Green tea extract exhibits several beneficial activities for the human body. In the present work, we explored the healing effect of a novel bio-nano particle named 'Chitosan nano-encapsulated green tea extract' at the ultrastructural level by performing experiments on rat hepatocytes. A fixed volume of Chitosan nano-encapsulated green tea extract solution was administered orally to a group of adult rats for 25 days, after being treated with carbon-tetrachloride and ethanol doses for 3 weeks. Images of ultra-thin sections of liver samples from these rats were recorded in a transmission electron microscope. Using computational analysis, we probed the images quantitatively and found that Chitosan nano-encapsulated green tea extract heals nearly 25% of the sub-cellular area infected with hepatic fibrosis, suggesting its high medicinal value. Scanning electron microscopy was performed to study the topographical changes of cell surface as well as the extracellular matrix network between the hepatocytes, which further confirmed the healing effect.

  11. Hepatoprotective effects of eburicoic acid and dehydroeburicoic acid from Antrodia camphorata in a mouse model of acute hepatic injury.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guan-Jhong; Deng, Jeng-Shyan; Huang, Shyh-Shyun; Lee, Chao-Ying; Hou, Wen-Chi; Wang, Sheng-Yang; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung

    2013-12-01

    The hepatoprotective effects of eburicoic acid (TR1) and dehydroeburicoic acid (TR2) from Antrodia camphorata (AC) against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver damage were investigated in mice. TR1 and TR2 was administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) for 7 days prior to the administration of CCl4. Pretreatment with TR1 and TR2 prevented the elevation of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and liver lipid peroxides in CCl4-treated mice. The activities of antioxidant enzymes [catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx)], nitric oxide (NO) production, and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were decreased after the treatment with TR1 and TR2 in CCl4-treated mice. Western blotting revealed that TR1 and TR2 significantly decreased inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expressions and increased the expression of cytochrome P4502E1 (CYP2E1) in CCl4-treated mice. Therefore, we speculate that TR1 and TR2 protect the liver from CCl4-induced hepatic damage via antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms.

  12. Duck hepatitis A virus serotype 1 minigenome: a model for studying the viral 3'UTR effect on viral translation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ruiying; Li, Chuanfeng; Jin, Hongyan; Meng, Chunchun; Chen, Zongyan; Zhu, Jie; Miao, Qiuhong; Ding, Chan; Liu, Guangqing

    2015-12-01

    To date, the genetic replication and translation mechanisms as well as the pathogenesis of duck hepatitis A virus type 1 (DHAV-1) have not been adequately characterized due to the lack of a reliable and efficient cell culture system. Although the full-length infections clone system is the best platform to manipulate the virus, it is relatively difficult to assemble this system due to the lack of a suitable cell line. It has been proven that the minigenome system an efficient reverse genetics system for the study of RNA viruses. In some cases, it can be used to displace the infectious clone of RNA viruses. Here, we generated a minigenome for DHAV-1 with two luciferase reporter genes, firefly luciferase (Fluc) and Renilla luciferase (Rluc). The Rluc gene was used as a reference gene for the normalization of the Fluc gene expression in transfected cells, which provided a platform for studying the regulatory mechanisms of DHAV-1. Furthermore, to investigate the role of DHAV-3'UTR in the regulation of viral protein translation, deletions in the 3'UTR were introduced into the DHAV-1 minigenome. Luciferase activity, an indicator of virus translation, was then determined. These results showed that a minigenome system for DHAV-1 was successfully constructed for the first time and that the complete or partial deletion of the DHAV-3'UTR did not affect the expression level of the reporter gene, indicating that DHAV-1 translation may not be modulated by the viral genomic 3'UTR sequence.

  13. Autophagy in hepatic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Song, Yang; Zhao, Yingying; Wang, Fei; Tao, Lichan; Xiao, Junjie; Yang, Changqing

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Hepatic fibrosis is usually associated with chronic liver diseases caused by infection, drugs, metabolic disorders, or autoimmune imbalances. Effective clinical therapies are still lacking. Autophagy is a cellular process that degrades damaged organelles or protein aggregation, which participates in many pathological processes including liver diseases. Autophagy participates in hepatic fibrosis by activating hepatic stellate cells and may participate as well through influencing other fibrogenic cells. Besides that, autophagy can induce some liver diseases to develop while it may play a protective role in hepatocellular abnormal aggregates related liver diseases and reduces fibrosis. With a better understanding of the potential effects of autophagy on hepatic fibrosis, targeting autophagy might be a novel therapeutic strategy for hepatic fibrosis in the near future.

  14. Mathematical model of viral kinetics in vitro estimates the number of E2-CD81 complexes necessary for hepatitis C virus entry.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Pranesh; Dixit, Narendra M

    2011-12-01

    Interaction between the hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope protein E2 and the host receptor CD81 is essential for HCV entry into target cells. The number of E2-CD81 complexes necessary for HCV entry has remained difficult to estimate experimentally. Using the recently developed cell culture systems that allow persistent HCV infection in vitro, the dependence of HCV entry and kinetics on CD81 expression has been measured. We reasoned that analysis of the latter experiments using a mathematical model of viral kinetics may yield estimates of the number of E2-CD81 complexes necessary for HCV entry. Here, we constructed a mathematical model of HCV viral kinetics in vitro, in which we accounted explicitly for the dependence of HCV entry on CD81 expression. Model predictions of viral kinetics are in quantitative agreement with experimental observations. Specifically, our model predicts triphasic viral kinetics in vitro, where the first phase is characterized by cell proliferation, the second by the infection of susceptible cells and the third by the growth of cells refractory to infection. By fitting model predictions to the above data, we were able to estimate the threshold number of E2-CD81 complexes necessary for HCV entry into human hepatoma-derived cells. We found that depending on the E2-CD81 binding affinity, between 1 and 13 E2-CD81 complexes are necessary for HCV entry. With this estimate, our model captured data from independent experiments that employed different HCV clones and cells with distinct CD81 expression levels, indicating that the estimate is robust. Our study thus quantifies the molecular requirements of HCV entry and suggests guidelines for intervention strategies that target the E2-CD81 interaction. Further, our model presents a framework for quantitative analyses of cell culture studies now extensively employed to investigate HCV infection.

  15. Ezetimibe markedly attenuates hepatic cholesterol accumulation and improves liver function in the lysosomal acid lipase-deficient mouse, a model for cholesteryl ester storage disease.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Jen-Chieh; Lopez, Adam M; Posey, Kenneth S; Turley, Stephen D

    2014-01-17

    Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) plays a critical role in the intracellular handling of lipids by hydrolyzing cholesteryl esters (CE) and triacylglycerols (TAG) contained in newly internalized lipoproteins. In humans, mutations in the LAL gene result in cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD), or in Wolman disease (WD) when the mutations cause complete loss of LAL activity. A rat model for WD and a mouse model for CESD have been described. In these studies we used LAL-deficient mice to investigate how modulating the amount of intestinally-derived cholesterol reaching the liver might impact its mass, cholesterol content, and function in this model. The main experiment tested if ezetimibe, a potent cholesterol absorption inhibitor, had any effect on CE accumulation in mice lacking LAL. In male Lal(-/-) mice given ezetimibe in their diet (20 mg/day/kg bw) for 4 weeks starting at 21 days of age, both liver mass and hepatic cholesterol concentration (mg/g) were reduced to the extent that whole-liver cholesterol content (mg/organ) in the treated mice (74.3±3.4) was only 56% of that in those not given ezetimibe (133.5±6.7). There was also a marked improvement in plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity. Thus, minimizing cholesterol absorption has a favorable impact on the liver in CESD.

  16. Human induced-pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells as an in vitro model of human hepatitis B virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Fuminori; Mitani, Seiji; Yamamoto, Tatsuro; Takayama, Kazuo; Tachibana, Masashi; Watashi, Koichi; Wakita, Takaji; Iijima, Sayuki; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    In order to understand the life cycle of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and to develop efficient anti-HBV drugs, a useful in vitro cell culture system which allows HBV infection and recapitulates virus-host interactions is essential; however, pre-existing in vitro HBV infection models are often problematic. Here, we examined the potential of human induced-pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells (iPS-HLCs) as an in vitro HBV infection model. Expression levels of several genes involved in HBV infection, including the sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) gene, were gradually elevated as the differentiation status of human iPS cells proceeded to iPS-HLCs. The mRNA levels of these genes were comparable between primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) and iPS-HLCs. Following inoculation with HBV, we found significant production of HBV proteins and viral RNAs in iPS-HLCs. The three major forms of the HBV genome were detected in iPS-HLCs by Southern blotting analysis. Anti-HBV agents entecavir and Myrcludex-B, which are a nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitor and a synthetic pre-S1 peptide, respectively, significantly inhibited HBV infection in iPS-HLCs. These data demonstrate that iPS-HLCs can be used as a promising in vitro HBV infection model. PMID:28374759

  17. Hepatitis B immunization for indigenous adults, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Yin, J Kevin; Beard, Frank; Wesselingh, Steve; Cowie, Benjamin; Ward, James; Macartney, Kristine

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To quantify the disparity in incidence of hepatitis B between indigenous and non-indigenous people in Australia, and to estimate the potential impact of a hepatitis B immunization programme targeting non-immune indigenous adults. Methods Using national data on persons with newly acquired hepatitis B disease notified between 2005 and 2012, we estimated incident infection rates and rate ratios comparing indigenous and non-indigenous people, with adjustments for underreporting. The potential impact of a hepatitis B immunization programme targeting non-immune indigenous adults was projected using a Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation model. Findings Of the 54 522 persons with hepatitis B disease notified between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2012, 1953  infections were newly acquired. Acute hepatitis B infection notification rates were significantly higher for indigenous than non-indigenous Australians. The rates per 100 000 population for all ages were 3.6 (156/4 368 511) and 1.1 (1797/168 449 302) for indigenous and non-indigenous people respectively. The rate ratio of age-standardized notifications was 4.0 (95% confidence interval: 3.7–4.3). If 50% of non-immune indigenous adults (20% of all indigenous adults) were vaccinated over a 10-year programme a projected 527–549 new cases of acute hepatitis B would be prevented. Conclusion There continues to be significant health inequity between indigenous and non-indigenous Australians in relation to vaccine-preventable hepatitis B disease. An immunization programme targeting indigenous Australian adults could have considerable impact in terms of cases of acute hepatitis B prevented, with a relatively low number needed to vaccinate to prevent each case. PMID:27821885

  18. Update on autoimmune hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Teufel, Andreas; Galle, Peter R; Kanzler, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a necroinflammatory liver disease of unknown etiology that occurs in children and adults of all ages. Characteristics are its autoimmune features, hyperglobulinemia (IgG), and the presence of circulating autoantibodies, as well as a response to immunosuppressant drugs. Current treatment consists of prednisone and azathioprine and in most patients this disease has become very treatable. Over the past 2 years, a couple of new insights into the genetic aspects, clinical course and treatment of AIH have been reported, which will be the focus of this review. In particular, we concentrate on genome-wide microsatellite analysis, a novel mouse model of AIH, the evaluation of a large AIH cohort for overlap syndromes, suggested novel criteria for the diagnosis of AIH, and the latest studies on treatment of AIH with budenoside and mycophenolate mofetil. PMID:19266594

  19. Preventing hepatitis B or C

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000401.htm Preventing hepatitis B or C To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hepatitis B and hepatitis C infections cause irritation and ...

  20. Mincle Signaling Promotes Con A Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Greco, Stephanie H; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Kalabin, Aleksandr; Whiteman, Clint; Rokosh, Rae; Ravirala, Sushma; Ochi, Atsuo; Gutierrez, Johana; Salyana, Muhammad Atif; Mani, Vishnu R; Nagaraj, Savitha V; Deutsch, Michael; Seifert, Lena; Daley, Donnele; Barilla, Rocky; Hundeyin, Mautin; Nikifrov, Yuriy; Tejada, Karla; Gelb, Bruce E; Katz, Steven C; Miller, George

    2016-10-01

    Con A hepatitis is regarded as a T cell-mediated model of acute liver injury. Mincle is a C-type lectin receptor that is critical in the immune response to mycobacteria and fungi but does not have a well-defined role in preclinical models of non-pathogen-mediated inflammation. Because Mincle can ligate the cell death ligand SAP130, we postulated that Mincle signaling drives intrahepatic inflammation and liver injury in Con A hepatitis. Acute liver injury was assessed in the murine Con A hepatitis model using C57BL/6, Mincle(-/-), and Dectin-1(-/-) mice. The role of C/EBPβ and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) signaling was assessed using selective inhibitors. We found that Mincle was highly expressed in hepatic innate inflammatory cells and endothelial cells in both mice and humans. Furthermore, sterile Mincle ligands and Mincle signaling intermediates were increased in the murine liver in Con A hepatitis. Most significantly, Mincle deletion or blockade protected against Con A hepatitis, whereas Mincle ligation exacerbated disease. Bone marrow chimeric and adoptive transfer experiments suggested that Mincle signaling in infiltrating myeloid cells dictates disease phenotype. Conversely, signaling via other C-type lectin receptors did not alter disease course. Mechanistically, we found that Mincle blockade decreased the NF-κβ-related signaling intermediates C/EBPβ and HIF-1α, both of which are necessary in macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses. Accordingly, Mincle deletion lowered production of nitrites in Con A hepatitis and inhibition of both C/EBPβ and HIF-1α reduced the severity of liver disease. Our work implicates a novel innate immune driver of Con A hepatitis and, more broadly, suggests a potential role for Mincle in diseases governed by sterile inflammation.

  1. Crucial role of IL-4/STAT6 in T cell-mediated hepatitis: up-regulating eotaxins and IL-5 and recruiting leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Jaruga, Barbara; Hong, Feng; Sun, Rui; Radaeva, Svetlana; Gao, Bin

    2003-09-15

    T cell-mediated immune responses are implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of liver disorders; however, the underlying mechanism remains obscure. Con A injection is a widely accepted mouse model to study T cell-mediated liver injury, in which STAT6 is rapidly activated. Disruption of the IL-4 and STAT6 gene by way of genetic knockout abolishes Con A-mediated liver injury without affecting IFN-gamma/STAT1, IL-6/STAT3, or TNF-alpha/NF-kappaB signaling or affecting NKT cell activation. Infiltration of neutrophils and eosinophils in Con A-induced hepatitis is markedly suppressed in IL-4 (-/-) and STAT6(-/-) mice compared with wild-type mice. IL-4 treatment induces expression of eotaxins in hepatocytes and sinusoidal endothelial cells isolated from wild-type mice but not from STAT6(-/-) mice. Con A injection induces expression of eotaxins in the liver and elevates serum levels of IL-5 and eotaxins; such induction is markedly attenuated in IL-4(-/-) and STAT6(-/-) mice. Finally, eotaxin blockade attenuates Con A-induced liver injury and leukocyte infiltration. Taken together, these findings suggest that IL-4/STAT6 plays a critical role in Con A-induced hepatitis, via enhancing expression of eotaxins in hepatocytes and sinusoidal endothelial cells, and induces IL-5 expression, thereby facilitating recruitment of eosinophils and neutrophils into the liver and resulting in hepatitis.

  2. Liver cancer arterial perfusion modelling and CFD boundary conditions methodology: a case study of the haemodynamics of a patient-specific hepatic artery in literature-based healthy and tumour-bearing liver scenarios.

    PubMed

    Aramburu, Jorge; Antón, Raúl; Rivas, Alejandro; Ramos, Juan Carlos; Sangro, Bruno; Bilbao, José Ignacio

    2016-11-01

    Some of the latest treatments for unresectable liver malignancies (primary or metastatic tumours), which include bland embolisation, chemoembolisation, and radioembolisation, among others, take advantage of the increased arterial blood supply to the tumours to locally attack them. A better understanding of the factors that influence this transport may help improve the therapeutic procedures by taking advantage of flow patterns or by designing catheters and infusion systems that result in the injected beads having increased access to the tumour vasculature. Computational analyses may help understand the haemodynamic patterns and embolic-microsphere transport through the hepatic arteries. In addition, physiological inflow and outflow boundary conditions are essential in order to reliably represent the blood flow through arteries. This study presents a liver cancer arterial perfusion model based on a literature review and derives boundary conditions for tumour-bearing liver-feeding hepatic arteries based on the arterial perfusion characteristics of normal and tumorous liver segment tissue masses and the hepatic artery branching configuration. Literature-based healthy and tumour-bearing realistic scenarios are created and haemodynamically analysed for the same patient-specific hepatic artery. As a result, this study provides boundary conditions for computational fluid dynamics simulations that will allow researchers to numerically study, for example, various intravascular devices used for liver disease intra-arterial treatments with different cancer scenarios. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Hepatic Stellate Cells Improve Engraftment of Human Primary Hepatocytes: A Preclinical Transplantation Study in an Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Dusabineza, Ange-Clarisse; Najimi, Mustapha; van Hul, Noémi; Legry, Vanessa; Khuu, Dung Ngoc; van Grunsven, Leo A; Sokal, Etienne; Leclercq, Isabelle A

    2015-01-01

    Human hepatocytes are used for liver cell therapy, but the small number of engrafting cells limits the benefit of cell transplantation. We tested whether cotransplantation of hepatocytes with hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) could improve hepatocyte engraftment in vivo. Human primary hepatocytes were transplanted into SCID mice either alone or in a mixture with HSCs (quiescent or after culture activation) or LX-2 cells (ratio 20:1). Four weeks after transplantation into mouse livers, human albumin-positive (huAlb(+)) hepatocytes were found scattered. When cotransplanted in a mixture with HSCs or LX-2 cells, huAlb(+) hepatocytes formed clusters and were more numerous occupying 2- to 5.9-fold more surface on the tissue section than in livers transplanted with hepatocytes alone. Increased huAlb mRNA expression in livers transplanted with the cell mixtures confirmed those results. The presence of HSCs increased the number of hepatocytes entrapped in the host liver at an early time point posttransplantation but not their proliferation in situ as assessed by cumulative incorporation of BrdU. Importantly, 4 weeks posttransplantation, we found no accumulation of αSMA(+)-activated HSCs or collagen deposition. To follow the fate of transplanted HSCs, HSCs derived from GFP(+) mice were injected into GFP(-) littermates: 17 h posttransplant, GFP(+) HSCs were found in the sinusoids, without proliferating or actively producing ECM; they were undetectable at later time points. Coculture with HSCs improved the number of adherent hepatocytes, with best attachment obtained when hepatocytes were seeded in contact with activated HSCs. In vivo, cotransplantation of hepatocytes with HSCs into a healthy liver recipient does not generate fibrosis, but significantly improves the engraftment of hepatocytes, probably by ameliorating cell homing.

  4. In Vivo Diagnostic Imaging Using Micro-CT: Sequential and Comparative Evaluation of Rodent Models for Hepatic/Brain Ischemia and Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Hayasaka, Naoto; Nagai, Nobuo; Kawao, Naoyuki; Niwa, Atsuko; Yoshioka, Yoshichika; Mori, Yuki; Shigeta, Hiroshi; Kashiwagi, Nobuo; Miyazawa, Masaaki; Satou, Takao; Higashino, Hideaki; Matsuo, Osamu; Murakami, Takamichi

    2012-01-01

    Background There is an increasing need for animal disease models for pathophysiological research and efficient drug screening. However, one of the technical barriers to the effective use of the models is the difficulty of non-invasive and sequential monitoring of the same animals. Micro-CT is a powerful tool for serial diagnostic imaging of animal models. However, soft tissue contrast resolution, particularly in the brain, is insufficient for detailed analysis, unlike the current applications of CT in the clinical arena. We address the soft tissue contrast resolution issue in this report. Methodology We performed contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) on mouse models of experimental cerebral infarction and hepatic ischemia. Pathological changes in each lesion were quantified for two weeks by measuring the lesion volume or the ratio of high attenuation area (%HAA), indicative of increased vascular permeability. We also compared brain images of stroke rats and ischemic mice acquired with micro-CT to those acquired with 11.7-T micro-MRI. Histopathological analysis was performed to confirm the diagnosis by CECT. Principal Findings In the models of cerebral infarction, vascular permeability was increased from three days through one week after surgical initiation, which was also confirmed by Evans blue dye leakage. Measurement of volume and %HAA of the liver lesions demonstrated differences in the recovery process between mice with distinct genetic backgrounds. Comparison of CT and MR images acquired from the same stroke rats or ischemic mice indicated that accuracy of volumetric measurement, as well as spatial and contrast resolutions of CT images, was comparable to that obtained with MRI. The imaging results were also consistent with the histological data. Conclusions This study demonstrates that the CECT scanning method is useful in rodents for both quantitative and qualitative evaluations of pathologic lesions in tissues/organs including the brain, and is also suitable for

  5. Protective effect of schisandrin B against cyclosporine A-induced nephrotoxicity in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shaohua; Wang, Yan; Chen, Meiwan; Jin, Jing; Qiu, Yuwen; Huang, Min; Huang, Zhiying

    2012-01-01

    Schisandrin B (Sch B) is an active ingredient of the fruit of Schisandra chinensis. It has many therapeutic effects arising from its tonic, sedative, antitussive and antiaging activities and is also used in the treatment of viral and chemical hepatitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of Sch B on cyclosporine A (CsA)-induced nephrotoxicity in mice and HK-2 cells (a human proximal tubular epithelial cell line). After gavage with Sch B (20 mg/kg) or olive oil (vehicle), mice received CsA (30 mg/kg) by subcutaneous injection once daily for four weeks. Renal function, histopathology, and tissue glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were evaluated after the last treatment. The effects of Sch B on CsA-induced oxidative damage in HK-2 cells were investigated by measuring cell viability, the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the cellular GSH and ATP concentrations. Cellular apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry. Treatment with Sch B in CsA-treated mice significantly suppressed the elevation of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine levels and attenuated the histopathological changes. Additionally, Sch B also decreased renal MDA levels and increased GSH levels in CsA-treated mice. Using an in vitro model, Sch B (2.5, 5 and 10 μM) significantly increased the cell viability and reduced LDH release and apoptosis induced by CsA (10 μM) in HK-2 cells. Furthermore, Sch B increased the intracellular GSH and ATP levels and attenuated CsA-induced ROS generation. In conclusion, Sch B appears to protect against CsA-induced nephrotoxicity by decreasing oxidative stress and cell death.

  6. Hepatitis C -- children

    MedlinePlus

    ... children; HCV children; Pregnancy - hepatitis C - children; Maternal transmission - hepatitis C - children References Elisofon SA, Jonas MMF. ... Hospital, Hollywood, FL. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David ... this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A. ...

  7. Efficacy of HGF carried by ultrasound microbubble-cationic nano-liposomes complex for treating hepatic fibrosis in a bile duct ligation rat model, and its relationship with the diffusion-weighted MRI parameters.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shou-hong; Wen, Kun-ming; Wu, Wei; Li, Wen-yan; Zhao, Jian-nong

    2013-12-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is a major consequence of liver aggression. Finding novel ways for counteracting this damaging process, and for evaluating fibrosis with a non-invasive imaging approach, represent important therapeutic and diagnostic challenges. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is an anti-fibrosis cell growth factor that induces apoptosis in activated hepatic stellate cells, reduces excessive collagen deposition, and stimulates hepatocyte regeneration. Thus, using HGF in gene therapy against liver fibrosis is an attractive approach. The aims of the present study were: (i) to explore the efficacy of treating liver fibrosis using HGF expression vector carried by a novel ultrasound microbubble delivery system; (ii) to explore the diagnostic interest of diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI-MRI) in evaluating liver fibrosis. We established a rat model of hepatic fibrosis. The rats were administered HGF linked to novel ultrasound micro-bubbles. Progression of hepatic fibrosis was evaluated by histopathology, hydroxyproline content, and DWI-MRI to determine the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). Our targeted gene therapy produced a significant anti-fibrosis effect, as shown by liver histology and significant reduction of hydroxyproline content. Moreover, using DWI-MRI, the b value (diffusion gradient factor) was equal to 300s/mm(2), and the ADC values significantly decreased as the severity of hepatic fibrosis increased. Using this methodology, F0-F2 could be distinguished from F3 and F4 (P<0.01). This is the first in vivo report of using an ultrasound microbubble-cationic nano-liposome complex for gene delivery. The data indicate that, this approach is efficient to counteract the fibrosis process. DWI-MRI appears a promising imaging technique for evaluating liver fibrosis.

  8. Perceptions of Risk for Hepatitis B Infection among the Hmong

    PubMed Central

    Thorburn, Sheryl; Szalacha, Laura A.

    2017-01-01

    The Hmong in the U.S. who emigrated from Southeast Asia, an area where hepatitis B is endemic, experience high rates of hepatitis B infection and liver cancer compared to non-Hispanic whites. This exploratory study examined the Hmong’s perceptions of risk of hepatitis B infection. We interviewed 83 Hmong women and men living in Oregon. In bivariate statistical analysis, greater perceived susceptibility, lower perceived barriers, and having a healthcare provider recommendation were each significantly related to having ever been screened for hepatitis B. Logistic regression models indicated that having a recommendation by a doctor or healthcare provider was the strongest predictor of having been screened for hepatitis B, followed by education and insurance. Future interventions with the Hmong population should focus on the important role of health care providers play in raising awareness about hepatitis B infection and increasing screening uptake. PMID:28154502

  9. Update on Alcoholic Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Torok, Natalie J

    2015-11-02

    Alcoholic liver disease is one of the most prevalent liver diseases worldwide, and a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Alcoholic hepatitis is a severe form of liver injury in patients with alcohol abuse, can present as an acute on chronic liver failure associated with a rapid decline in liver synthetic function, and consequent increase in mortality. Despite therapy, about 30%-50% of patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis eventually die. The pathogenic pathways that lead to the development of alcoholic hepatitis are complex and involve oxidative stress, gut dysbiosis, and dysregulation of the innate and adaptive immune system with injury to the parenchymal cells and activation of hepatic stellate cells. As accepted treatment approaches are currently limited, a better understanding of the pathophysiology would be required to generate new approaches that improve outcomes. This review focuses on recent advances in the diagnosis, pathogenesis of alcoholic hepatitis and novel treatment strategies.

  10. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN UVEITIS, DIFFERENT TYPES OF VIRAL HEPATITIS, AND LIVER CIRRHOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Tien, Peng-Tai; Tsai, Yi-Yu; Chen, Huan-Sheng; Hwang, De-Kuang; Muo, Chih-Hsin; Lin, Jane-Ming; Chen, Wen-Lu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates whether patients with viral hepatitis and cirrhosis are at risk of uveitis in the years following hepatitis. Methods: We used data from Taiwan National Health Insurance system. The cases were patients newly diagnosed with viral hepatitis from 2000 to 2011. The end point of interest was a diagnosis of uveitis. A chi-square test was used for the difference of demographic characteristics between viral hepatitis and comparison. The risk of uveitis in hepatitis was stratified using Cox proportional hazard regression. Results: We selected 17,389 patients with viral hepatitis and 34,778 matched comparison. The risk of uveitis in hepatitis cohort was 1.30-fold (95% confidence interval = 1.01–1.69). Patients with hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus coinfection had the highest risk (hazard ratio = 2.88; 95% confidence interval = 1.07–7.78), and followed by only hepatitis C virus infection (hazard ratio = 1.75; 95% confidence interval = 1.10–2.79). Patients with cirrhosis had a higher risk in the multivariable model but did not attach statistic difference. Conclusion: Patients with hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus coinfection had the highest risk of uveitis. In patients with hepatitis C virus and/or hepatitis B virus infection, the symptoms of uveitis should be alerted. Although these epidemiologic studies yielded informative results, the underlying mechanisms and the host's genetic factors remain to be investigated. PMID:27870801

  11. Viral Hepatitis: Information for Gay and Bisexual Men

    MedlinePlus

    VIRAL HEPATITIS Information for Gay and Bisexual Men What is viral hepatitis? Viral hepatitis is an infection of the liver caused by ... United States, the most common types of viral hepatitis are Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C. ...

  12. MATLAB-implemented estimation procedure for model-based assessment of hepatic insulin degradation from standard intravenous glucose tolerance test data.

    PubMed

    Di Nardo, Francesco; Mengoni, Michele; Morettini, Micaela

    2013-05-01

    Present study provides a novel MATLAB-based parameter estimation procedure for individual assessment of hepatic insulin degradation (HID) process from standard frequently-sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIGTT) data. Direct access to the source code, offered by MATLAB, enabled us to design an optimization procedure based on the alternating use of Gauss-Newton's and Levenberg-Marquardt's algorithms, which assures the full convergence of the process and the containment of computational time. Reliability was tested by direct comparison with the application, in eighteen non-diabetic subjects, of well-known kinetic analysis software package SAAM II, and by application on different data. Agreement between MATLAB and SAAM II was warranted by intraclass correlation coefficients ≥0.73; no significant differences between corresponding mean parameter estimates and prediction of HID rate; and consistent residual analysis. Moreover, MATLAB optimization procedure resulted in a significant 51% reduction of CV% for the worst-estimated parameter by SAAM II and in maintaining all model-parameter CV% <20%. In conclusion, our MATLAB-based procedure was suggested as a suitable tool for the individual assessment of HID process.

  13. A competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay specific for murine hepcidin-1: correlation with hepatic mRNA expression in established and novel models of dysregulated iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Gutschow, Patrick; Schmidt, Paul J; Han, Huiling; Ostland, Vaughn; Bartnikas, Thomas B; Pettiglio, Michael A; Herrera, Carolina; Butler, James S; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ganz, Tomas; Fleming, Mark D; Westerman, Mark

    2015-02-01

    Mice have been essential for distinguishing the role of hepcidin in iron homeostasis. Currently, investigators monitor levels of murine hepatic hepcidin-1 mRNA as a surrogate marker for the bioactive hepcidin protein itself. Here, we describe and validate a competitive, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay that quantifies hepcidin-1 in mouse serum and urine. The assay exhibits a biologically relevant lower limit of detection, high precision, and excellent linearity and recovery. We also demonstrate correlation between serum and urine hepcidin-1 values and validate the competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay by analyzing plasma hepcidin response of mice to physiological challenges, including iron deficiency, iron overload, acute blood loss, and inflammation. Furthermore, we analyze multiple murine genetic models of iron dysregulation, including β-thalassemia intermedia (Hbb(th3/+)), hereditary hemochromatosis (Hfe(-/-), Hjv(-/-), and Tfr2(Y245X/Y245X)), hypotransferrinemia (Trf(hpx/hpx)), heterozygous transferrin receptor 1 deficiency (Tfrc(+/-)) and iron refractory iron deficiency anemia (Tmprss6(-/-) and Tmprss6(hem8/hem8)). Novel compound iron metabolism mutants were also phenotypically characterized here for the first time. We demonstrate that serum hepcidin concentrations correlate with liver hepcidin mRNA expression, transferrin saturation and non-heme liver iron. In some circumstances, serum hepcidin-1 more accurately predicts iron parameters than hepcidin mRNA, and distinguishes smaller, statistically significant differences between experimental groups.

  14. The Phospholipid:Diacylglycerol Acyltransferase Lro1 Is Responsible for Hepatitis C Virus Core-Induced Lipid Droplet Formation in a Yeast Model System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao-Wen; Cheng, Yun-Hsin; Irokawa, Hayato; Hwang, Gi-Wook; Naganuma, Akira; Kuge, Shusuke

    2016-01-01

    Chronic infection with the hepatitis C virus frequently induces steatosis, which is a significant risk factor for liver pathogenesis. Steatosis is characterized by the accumulation of lipid droplets in hepatocytes. The structural protein core of the virus induces lipid droplet formation and localizes on the surface of the lipid droplets. However, the precise molecular mechanisms for the core-induced formation of lipid droplets remain elusive. Recently, we showed that the expression of the core protein in yeast as a model system could induce lipid droplet formation. In this study, we probed the cellular factors responsible for the formation of core-induced lipid-droplets in yeast cells. We demonstrated that one of the enzymes responsible for triglyceride synthesis, a phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (Lro1), is required for the core-induced lipid droplet formation. While core proteins inhibit Lro1 degradation and alter Lro1 localization, the characteristic localization of Lro1 adjacent to the lipid droplets appeared to be responsible for the core-induced lipid droplet formation. RNA virus genomes have evolved using high mutation rates to maintain their ability to replicate. Our observations suggest a functional relationship between the core protein with hepatocytes and yeast cells. The possible interactions between core proteins and the endoplasmic reticulum membrane affect the mobilization of specific proteins. PMID:27459103

  15. Isogenic mesenchymal stem cells transplantation improves a rat model of chronic aristolochic acid nephropathy via upregulation of hepatic growth factor and downregulation of transforming growth factor β1.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Jiang, Hong; Feng, Jiang-Min

    2012-09-01

    Chronic aristolochic acid (AA) nephropathy (CAAN) caused by intake of AA-containing herbs is difficult to treat. We evaluated the therapeutic effect of bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on a rat model of CAAN. Female Wistar rats were fed with decoction of Caulis Aristolochia manshuriensis by intragastric administration. MSCs were prepared from BM of male Wistar rats and injected into female CAAN rats through tail vein. Body weight, renal function, and urinary excretion of these CAAN rats were monitored before killing at the end of the 20th week. Blood, urine, and tissue samples were collected from experimental (MSC and non-MSC) and normal control groups. All animals developed renal fibrosis after 12 weeks of intake of AA-containing decoction. Fibrosis in the MSC groups was significantly reduced as examined with light and electron microscopy. Blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, and urine protein levels were significantly reduced and hemoglobin levels were improved in the MSC group as compared with the non-MSC group (p < 0.01). The expression of TGF-β1 mRNA and protein was reduced but hepatic growth factor (HGF) was increased in the MSC group compared with the non-MSC group, but still higher than the normal control level as measured by immunochemical, RT-PCR, and western blotting assays (p < 0.01). The renal fibrosis of CAAN could be protected by isogenic MSC transplantation, probably via upregulation of HGF and downregulation of TGF-β1.

  16. ASS and SULT2A1 are Novel and Sensitive Biomarkers of Acute Hepatic Injury-A Comparative Study in Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Prima, Victor; Cao, Mengde; Svetlov, Stanislav I

    2013-01-10

    Liver and kidney damage associated with polytrauma, endotoxic shock/sepsis, and organ transplantation, are among the leading causes of the multiple organ failure. Development of novel sensitive biomarkers that detect early stages of liver and kidney injury is vital for the effective diagnostics and treatment of these life-threatening conditions. Previously, we identified several hepatic proteins, including Argininosuccinate Synthase (ASS) and sulfotransferases which were degraded in the liver and rapidly released into circulation during Ischemia/Reperfusion (I/R) injury. Here we compared sensitivity and specificity of the newly developed sandwich ELISA assays for ASS and the sulfotransferase isoform SULT2A1 with the standard clinical liver and kidney tests Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT) and Aspartate Transaminase (AST) in various pre-clinical models of acute injury. Our data suggest that ASS and SULT2A1 have superior characteristics for liver and kidney health assessment in endotoxemia, Ischemia/Reperfusion (I/R), chemical and drug-induced liver injury and may be of high potential value for clinical applications.

  17. Histopathological study of the hepatic and renal toxicity associated with the co-administration of imatinib and acetaminophen in a preclinical mouse model.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Inthisham; Pasupati, Thanikachalam; Judson, John Paul; Segarra, Ignacio

    2010-06-01

    Imatinib, a selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is the first line treatment against chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Several fatal cases have been associated with imatinib hepatotoxicity. Acetaminophen, an over-the-counter analgesic, anti-pyretic drug, which can cause hepatotoxicity, is commonly used in cancer pain management. We assessed renal and hepatic toxicity after imatinib and acetaminophen co-administration in a preclinical model. Four groups of male ICR mice (30-35 g) were fasted overnight and administered either saline solution orally (baseline control), imatinib 100 mg/kg orally (control), acetaminophen 700 mg/kg intraperitoneally (positive control) or co-administered imatinib 100 mg/kg orally and acetaminophen 700 mg/kg intraperitoneally (study group), and sacrificed at 15 min, 30 min, 1 h, 2 h, 4 h and 6 h post-administration (n = 4 per time point). The liver and kidneys were harvested for histopathology assessment. The liver showed reversible cell damage like feathery degeneration, microvesicular fatty change, sinusoidal congestion and pyknosis, when imatinib or acetaminophen were administered separately. The damage increased gradually with time, peaked at 2 h but resolved by 4 h. When both drugs were administered concurrently, the liver showed irreversible damage (cytolysis, karyolysis and karyorrhexis) which did not resolve by 6 h. Very minor renal changes were observed. Acetaminophen and imatinib co-administration increased hepatoxicity which become irreversible, probably due to shared P450 biotransformation pathways and transporters in the liver.

  18. Agent-Based Model Forecasts Aging of the Population of People Who Inject Drugs in Metropolitan Chicago and Changing Prevalence of Hepatitis C Infections.

    PubMed

    Gutfraind, Alexander; Boodram, Basmattee; Prachand, Nikhil; Hailegiorgis, Atesmachew; Dahari, Harel; Major, Marian E

    2015-01-01

    People who inject drugs (PWID) are at high risk for blood-borne pathogens transmitted during the sharing of contaminated injection equipment, particularly hepatitis C virus (HCV). HCV prevalence is influenced by a complex interplay of drug-use behaviors, social networks, and geography, as well as the availability of interventions, such as needle exchange programs. To adequately address this complexity in HCV epidemic forecasting, we have developed a computational model, the Agent-based Pathogen Kinetics model (APK). APK simulates the PWID population in metropolitan Chicago, including the social interactions that result in HCV infection. We used multiple empirical data sources on Chicago PWID to build a spatial distribution of an in silico PWID population and modeled networks among the PWID by considering the geography of the city and its suburbs. APK was validated against 2012 empirical data (the latest available) and shown to agree with network and epidemiological surveys to within 1%. For the period 2010-2020, APK forecasts a decline in HCV prevalence of 0.8% per year from 44(± 2)% to 36(± 5)%, although some sub-populations would continue to have relatively high prevalence, including Non-Hispanic Blacks, 48(± 5)%. The rate of decline will be lowest in Non-Hispanic Whites and we find, in a reversal of historical trends, that incidence among non-Hispanic Whites would exceed incidence among Non-Hispanic Blacks (0.66 per 100 per years vs 0.17 per 100 person years). APK also forecasts an increase in PWID mean age from 35(± 1) to 40(± 2) with a corresponding increase from 59(± 2)% to 80(± 6)% in the proportion of the population >30 years old. Our studies highlight the importance of analyzing subpopulations in disease predictions, the utility of computer simulation for analyzing demographic and health trends among PWID and serve as a tool for guiding intervention and prevention strategies in Chicago, and other major cities.

  19. Hepatic transcriptomic profiles of European flounder (Platichthys flesus) from field sites and computational approaches to predict site from stress gene responses following exposure to model toxicants.

    PubMed

    Falciani, F; Diab, A M; Sabine, V; Williams, T D; Ortega, F; George, S G; Chipman, J K

    2008-11-11

    Genomic technologies offer opportunities to gain a more global assessment of the health status of an organism through an understanding of the functional pathways that are responding to pollutant exposure. We have developed a 13,000 clone cDNA toxicogenomics microarray for Platichthys flesus, the European flounder (EU-GENIPOL Project). We aimed to distinguish the origins of flounder taken from six sampling sites of different pollution status in Northern Europe according to their hepatic gene expression profile using bioinformatic approaches. To determine which gene expression differences may relate to pollutant impact, we have completed complementary laboratory exposures of flounder to selected toxicants and determined the associated gene expression profiles. Using multivariate variable selection coupled with a statistical modelling procedure (GALGO) we can predict geographical site but the accuracy is limited to specific sites. The search space for a combination of genes that effectively predicts class membership is very large, however, by combining the signatures derived from acute laboratory exposure to individual chemicals to limit the search space, a very accurate model for classification of all the different environmental sites was achieved. The final model utilised the expression profiles of 16 clones and validation with a qPCR array comprising these genes correctly assigned the site of origin for fish obtained from three of the sites in an independent sampling. These data would imply that the gene expression fingerprints obtained with these arrays are primarily attributable to variations in chemical pollutant responses at the different sites, indicating their potential utility in environmental impact assessment.

  20. Epitope spreading of the anti-CYP2D6 antibody response in patients with autoimmune hepatitis and in the CYP2D6 mouse model.

    PubMed

    Hintermann, Edith; Holdener, Martin; Bayer, Monika; Loges, Stephanie; Pfeilschifter, Josef M; Granier, Claude; Manns, Michael P; Christen, Urs

    2011-11-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a serious chronic inflammatory disease of the liver with yet unknown etiology and largely uncertain immunopathology. The hallmark of type 2 AIH is the generation of liver kidney microsomal-1 (LKM-1) autoantibodies, which predominantly react to cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6). The identification of disease initiating factors has been hampered in the past, since antibody epitope mapping was mostly performed using serum samples collected late during disease resulting in the identification of immunodominant epitopes not necessarily representing those involved in disease initiation. In order to identify possible environmental triggers for AIH, we analyzed for the first time the spreading of the anti-CYP2D6 antibody response over a prolonged period of time in AIH patients and in the CYP2D6 mouse model, in which mice infected with Adenovirus-human CYP2D6 (Ad-h2D6) develop antibodies with a similar specificity than AIH patients. Epitope spreading was analyzed in six AIH-2-patients and in the CYP2D6 mouse model using SPOTs membranes containing peptides covering the entire CYP2D6 protein. Despite of a considerable variation, both mice and AIH patients largely focus their humoral immune response on an immunodominant epitope early after infection (mice) or diagnosis (patients). The CYP2D6 mouse model revealed that epitope spreading is initiated at the immunodominant epitope and later expands to neighboring and remote regions. Sequence homologies to human pathogens have been detected for all identified epitopes. Our study demonstrates that epitope spreading does indeed occur during the pathogenesis of AIH and supports the concept of molecular mimicry as a possible initiating mechanism for AIH.

  1. Modeling the impact of hepatitis C viral clearance on end-stage liver disease in an HIV co-infected cohort with Targeted Maximum Likelihood Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Schnitzer, Mireille E; Moodie, Erica EM; van der Laan, Mark J; Platt, Robert W; Klein, Marina B

    2013-01-01

    Summary Despite modern effective HIV treatment, hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infection is associated with a high risk of progression to end-stage liver disease (ESLD) which has emerged as the primary cause of death in this population. Clinical interest lies in determining the impact of clearance of HCV on risk for ESLD. In this case study, we examine whether HCV clearance affects risk of ESLD using data from the multicenter Canadian Co-infection Cohort Study. Complications in this survival analysis arise from the time-dependent nature of the data, the presence of baseline confounders, loss to follow-up, and confounders that change over time, all of which can obscure the causal effect of interest. Additional challenges included non-censoring variable missingness and event sparsity. In order to efficiently estimate the ESLD-free survival probabilities under a specific history of HCV clearance, we demonstrate the doubly-robust and semiparametric efficient method of Targeted Maximum Likelihood Estimation (TMLE). Marginal structural models (MSM) can be used to model the effect of viral clearance (expressed as a hazard ratio) on ESLD-free survival and we demonstrate a way to estimate the parameters of a logistic model for the hazard function with TMLE. We show the theoretical derivation of the efficient influence curves for the parameters of two different MSMs and how they can be used to produce variance approximations for parameter estimates. Finally, the data analysis evaluating the impact of HCV on ESLD was undertaken using multiple imputations to account for the non-monotone missing data. PMID:24571372

  2. [The ABC of viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Van Bambeke, F

    2008-03-01

    Viral hepatitis has long been under-diagnosed. Hepatitis A is an acute disease, while patients infected by hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses are likely to develop chronical infections and severe complications (cancer, cirrhosis). The current treatment of hepatitis B and C consists in alpha interferon (preferably under its pegylated form), in combination with ribavirin for hepatitis C. The frequent and severe adverse effects of interferon-based therapy constitute, however, a major limiting factor (reactions at the injection site, flu-like syndrome, neurological disorders, ...). For hepatitis B, two alternatives are available so far, namely lamivudine and adefovir (used as a prodrug with highe oral bioavailability).

  3. Hepatic albumin and urea synthesis: The mathematical modelling of the dynamics of [14C]carbonate-derived guanidine-labelled arginine in the isolated perfused rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Tavill, A S; Nadkarni, D; Metcalfe, J; Black, E; Hoffenberg, R; Carson, E R

    1975-01-01

    A mathematical model was constructed to define the dynamics of incorporation of radioactivity into urea carbon and the guanidine carbon of arginine in plasma albumin after the rapid intraportal-venous administration of Na214CO3 in the isolated perfused rat liver. 2. The model was formulated in terms of compartmental analysis and additional experiments were designed to provide further information on subsystem dynamics and to discriminate between alternative model structures. 3. Evidence for the rapid-time-constant of labelling of intracellular arginine was provided by precursor-product analysis of precursor [14C]carboante and product [14C]urea in the perfusate. 4. Compartmental analysis of the dynamics of newly synthesized urea was based on the fate of exogenous [13C]urea, endogenous [14C]urea and the accumulation of [12C]urea in perfusate water, confirming the early completion of urea carbon labelling, the absence of continuing synthesis of labelled urea, and the presence of a small intrahepatic urea-delay pool. 5. Analysis of the perfusate dynamics of endogenously synthesized and exogenously administered [6-14C]arginine indicated that although the capacity for extrahepatic formation of [14C]-urea exists, little or no arginine formed within the intrahepatic urea cycle was transported out of the liver. However, the presence of a rapidly turning-over intrahepatic arginine pool was confirmed. 6. On the basis of these subsystem analyses it was possible to offer feasible estimations for the parameters of the mathematical model. However, it was not possible to stimulate the form and magnitude of the dynamics of newly synthesized labelled urea and albumin which were simultaneously observed after administration of [14C]carbonate on the basis of a preliminary model which postulated that both products were derived from a single hepatic pool of [16-14C]arginine. On the other hand these observed dynamics could be satisfied to a two-compartment arginine model, which also

  4. Hepatitis Testing: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Hepatitis A Test (American Association for Clinical Chemistry) Hepatitis B Test (American Association for Clinical Chemistry) Hepatitis C Test (American Association for Clinical Chemistry) ...

  5. Novel Immunotherapies for Autoimmune Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cassim, Shamir; Bilodeau, Marc; Vincent, Catherine; Lapierre, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease of unknown pathogenesis, characterized by a loss of immunological tolerance against liver autoantigens resulting in the progressive destruction of the hepatic parenchyma. Current treatments are based on non-specific immunosuppressive drugs. Although tremendous progress has been made using specific biological agents in other inflammatory diseases, progress has been slow to come for AIH patients. While current treatments are successful in the majority of patients, treatment discontinuation is difficult to achieve, and relapses are frequent. Lifelong immunosuppression is not without risks, especially in the pediatric population; 4% of patient with type 1 AIH will eventually develop hepatocellular carcinoma with a 2.9% probability after 10 years of treatment. Therefore, future treatments should aim to restore tolerance to hepatic autoantigens and induce long-term remission. Promising new immunotherapies have been tested in experimental models of AIH including T and B cell depletion and regulatory CD4+ T cells infusion. Clinical studies on limited numbers of patients have also shown encouraging results using B-cell-depleting (rituximab) and anti-TNF-α (infliximab) antibodies. A better understanding of key molecular targets in AIH combined with effective site-specific immunotherapies could lead to long-term remission without blanket immunosuppression and with minimal deleterious side effects. PMID:28184367

  6. Novel Immunotherapies for Autoimmune Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Cassim, Shamir; Bilodeau, Marc; Vincent, Catherine; Lapierre, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease of unknown pathogenesis, characterized by a loss of immunological tolerance against liver autoantigens resulting in the progressive destruction of the hepatic parenchyma. Current treatments are based on non-specific immunosuppressive drugs. Although tremendous progress has been made using specific biological agents in other inflammatory diseases, progress has been slow to come for AIH patients. While current treatments are successful in the majority of patients, treatment discontinuation is difficult to achieve, and relapses are frequent. Lifelong immunosuppression is not without risks, especially in the pediatric population; 4% of patient with type 1 AIH will eventually develop hepatocellular carcinoma with a 2.9% probability after 10 years of treatment. Therefore, future treatments should aim to restore tolerance to hepatic autoantigens and induce long-term remission. Promising new immunotherapies have been tested in experimental models of AIH including T and B cell depletion and regulatory CD4(+) T cells infusion. Clinical studies on limited numbers of patients have also shown encouraging results using B-cell-depleting (rituximab) and anti-TNF-α (infliximab) antibodies. A better understanding of key molecular targets in AIH combined with effective site-specific immunotherapies could lead to long-term remission without blanket immunosuppression and with minimal deleterious side effects.

  7. In Vitro-In Vivo Extrapolation of Quantitative Hepatic Biotransformation Data for Fish: II. Modeled Effects on Chemical Bioaccumulation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goals of this study were to evaluate the potential for measured in vitro rates of metabolism in fish to impact chemical bioaccumulation, and establish a basis for making comparisons among the two modeling approaches.

  8. Noninvasive Monitoring of Hepatic Damage from Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Alavez-Ramírez, J.; Fuentes-Allen, J. L.; López-Estrada, J.

    2011-01-01

    The mathematical model for the dynamics of the hepatitis C proposed in Avendaño et al. (2002), with four populations (healthy and unhealthy hepatocytes, the viral load of the hepatitis C virus, and T killer cells), is revised. Showing that the reduced model obtained by considering only the first three of these populations, known as basic model, has two possible equilibrium states: the uninfected one where viruses are not present in the individual, and the endemic one where viruses and infected cells are present. A threshold parameter (the basic reproductive virus number) is introduced, and in terms of it, the global stability of both two possible equilibrium states is established. Other central result consists in showing, by model numerical simulations, the feasibility of monitoring liver damage caused by HCV, avoiding unnecessary biopsies and the undesirable related inconveniences/imponderables to the patient; another result gives a mathematical modelling basis to recently developed techniques for the disease assessment based essentially on viral load measurements. PMID:21331263

  9. Role of endosomal trafficking dynamics on the regulation of hepatic insulin receptor activity: models for Fao cells.

    PubMed

    Hori, Sharon S; Kurland, Irwin J; DiStefano, Joseph J

    2006-05-01

    Evidence indicates that endosomal insulin receptor (IR) trafficking plays a role in regulating insulin signal transduction. To evaluate its importance, we developed a series of biokinetic models for quantifying activated surface and endosomal IR dynamics from published experimental data. Starting with a published two-compartment Fao hepatoma model, a four-pool model was formulated that depicts IR autophosphorylation after receptor binding, IR endosomal internalization/trafficking, insulin dissociation from and dephosphorylation of internalized IR, and recycling of unliganded, dephosphorylated IR to the plasma membrane. Quantification required three additional data sets, two measured, but unmodeled by the same group. A five-pool model created to include endosomal trafficking of the nonphosphorylated insulin-IR complex was fitted using the same data sets, augmented with another published data set. Creation of a six-pool model added the physiologically relevant dissociation of insulin ligand from the activated endosomal IR. More importantly, all three models, validated against additional data not used in model fitting, predict that, mechanistically, internalization of activated IR is a rate-limiting step, at least under the receptor saturating conditions of the fitting data. This rate includes the transit time to a site where insulin dissociation from and/or dephosphorylation of the IR occurs by docking with protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases), or where a sufficient conformational change occurs in the IR, perhaps due to insulin-IR dissociation, where associated PTPases may complete IR dephosphorylation. Our new models indicate that key events in endosomal IR trafficking have significance in mediating IR activity, possibly serving to regulate insulin signal transduction.

  10. An Agent-Based Model of a Hepatic Inflammatory Response to Salmonella: A Computational Study under a Large Set of Experimental Data

    PubMed Central

    Chapes, Stephen K.; Ben-Arieh, David; Wu, Chih-Hang

    2016-01-01

    We present an agent-based model (ABM) to simulate a hepatic inflammatory response (HIR) in a mouse infected by Salmonella that sometimes progressed to problematic proportions, known as “sepsis”. Based on over 200 published studies, this ABM describes interactions among 21 cells or cytokines and incorporates 226 experimental data sets and/or data estimates from those reports to simulate a mouse HIR in silico. Our simulated results reproduced dynamic patterns of HIR reported in the literature. As shown in vivo, our model also demonstrated that sepsis was highly related to the initial Salmonella dose and the presence of components of the adaptive immune system. We determined that high mobility group box-1, C-reactive protein, and the interleukin-10: tumor necrosis factor-α ratio, and CD4+ T cell: CD8+ T cell ratio, all recognized as biomarkers during HIR, significantly correlated with outcomes of HIR. During therapy-directed silico simulations, our results demonstrated that anti-agent intervention impacted the survival rates of septic individuals in a time-dependent manner. By specifying the infected species, source of infection, and site of infection, this ABM enabled us to reproduce the kinetics of several essential indicators during a HIR, observe distinct dynamic patterns that are manifested during HIR, and allowed us to test proposed therapy-directed treatments. Although limitation still exists, this ABM is a step forward because it links underlying biological processes to computational simulation and was validated through a series of comparisons between the simulated results and experimental studies. PMID:27556404

  11. Discovery of Novel Hepatitis C Virus NS5B Polymerase Inhibitors by Combining Random Forest, Multiple e-Pharmacophore Modeling and Docking

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yu; Li, Jinlong; Qing, Jie; Huang, Mingjie; Wu, Ming; Gao, Fenghua; Li, Dongmei; Hong, Zhangyong; Kong, Lingbao; Huang, Weiqiang; Lin, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    The NS5B polymerase is one of the most attractive targets for developing new drugs to block Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We describe the discovery of novel potent HCV NS5B polymerase inhibitors by employing a virtual screening (VS) approach, which is based on random forest (RB-VS), e-pharmacophore (PB-VS), and docking (DB-VS) methods. In the RB-VS stage, after feature selection, a model with 16 descriptors was used. In the PB-VS stage, six energy-based pharmacophore (e-pharmacophore) models from different crystal structures of the NS5B polymerase with ligands binding at the palm I, thumb I and thumb II regions were used. In the DB-VS stage, the Glide SP and XP docking protocols with default parameters were employed. In the virtual screening approach, the RB-VS, PB-VS and DB-VS methods were applied in increasing order of complexity to screen the InterBioScreen database. From the final hits, we selected 5 compounds for further anti-HCV activity and cellular cytotoxicity assay. All 5 compounds were found to inhibit NS5B polymerase with IC50 values of 2.01–23.84 μM and displayed anti-HCV activities with EC50 values ranging from 1.61 to 21.88 μM, and all compounds displayed no cellular cytotoxicity (CC50 > 100 μM) except compound N2, which displayed weak cytotoxicity with a CC50 value of 51.3 μM. The hit compound N2 had the best antiviral activity against HCV, with a selective index of 32.1. The 5 hit compounds with new scaffolds could potentially serve as NS5B polymerase inhibitors through further optimization and development. PMID:26845440

  12. Mechanism of Corilagin interference with IL-13/STAT6 signaling pathways in hepatic alternative activation macrophages in schistosomiasis-induced liver fibrosis in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Du, Peng; Ma, Qian; Zhu, Zhi-De; Li, Gang; Wang, Yao; Li, Quan-Qiang; Chen, Yun-Fei; Shang, Zhen-Zhong; Zhang, Juan; Zhao, Lei

    2016-12-15

    This study tried to find the mechanism of Corilagin interference with interleukin (IL)-13/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 6 signaling pathways in IL-13-activated liver alternative activation macrophages in schistosomiasis-induced liver fibrosis in Balb/c mice. As a result, IL-13 in serum and the mRNA expression of IL-13 Receptor α1, IL-4 Receptor α and downstream mediators supressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) 1, Kruppel-like factor (KLF) 4, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) δ in the liver tissue were significantly inhibited by Corilagin (P<0.05 or 0.01). The protein expression of IL-13 Receptor α1, IL-4 Receptor α, SOCS1, KLF4, PPARγ, PPARδ and Phospho-STAT6 (P-STAT6) in Corilagin group were also markedly suppressed when compared with the model group (P<0.05 or 0.01). Furthermore, the inhibitory effect was enhanced when the concentration of Corilagin increased (P<0.05). By hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining, when compared with the model group, the Corilagin group showed smaller granulomas (P<0.05 or 0.01). The area of positive cells and integrated optical density (IOD) of CD68, CD206 and KLF4 was significantly decreased by Corilagin stained by IHC (P<0.05 or 0.01). In conclusion, Corilagin had potential to relieve hepatic fibrosis caused by egg granuloma in Schistosoma japonicum infection by decreasing the expression of molecules associated with IL-13/STAT6 signaling pathway in liver alternative activation macrophages.

  13. Feature Hepatitis: The Dangers of Hepatitis: What you should know from A to E

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature Hepatitis The Dangers of Hepatitis: What you should know from A to E ... drugs. In some cases, hepatitis lasts a lifetime. Hepatitis: Acute or Chronic? Acute hepatitis is the initial ...

  14. Viral hepatitis and hepatitis B antigen: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Krugman, Saul

    1974-01-01

    Recent advances in hepatitis research have shed new light on the etiology, pathogenesis, epidemiology and prevention of type B hepatitis infection. The so-called ‘Dane’ particle is probably the complete hepatitis B virion; its outer coat is the hepatitis B (Australia) antigen (HB Ag) and its inner core is an immunologically distinct particle. Subtypes of HB Ag (a, d, y, w and r) are useful indices for epidemiological surveys. Concepts of epidemiology have changed: type B hepatitis is transmissible by contact as well as by inoculation. The presence of HB Ag in blood is indicative of the presence of hepatitis B virus. Tests to detect antigen and use of voluntary blood donors have played a major role in the decreased incidence of post transfusion hepatitis. A special hepatitis B gammaglobulin preparation and a heat-inactivated hepatitis B vaccine have proved to be effective in preliminary studies. PMID:4219230

  15. Omega-3 fatty acids decreases oxidative stress, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interleukin-1 beta in hyperthyroidism-induced hepatic dysfunction rat model.

    PubMed

    Gomaa, Asmaa M S; Abd El-Aziz, Ebtihal A

    2016-12-01

    Hyperthyroidism is associated with abnormalities of the liver. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, especially their long-chain forms: eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have beneficial health effects. The objectives of the present study were to assess hyperthyroidism-induced hepatic dysfunction in adult male rats and to evaluate the ameliorative effects of omega-3 on hyperthyroidism-induced hepatic dysfunction and the underlying mechanisms. Twenty four adult male rats were randomly divided into three equal groups; control group which received water for 6 weeks, hyperthyroid group which received L-thyroxine orally for 6 weeks and hyperthyroid omega-3 treated group which received L-thyroxine for 2 weeks and then co-treated with L-thyroxine and omega-3 oral compound containing 18% of EPA and 12% of DHA for 4 weeks. Hyperthyroid omega-3 treated group showed significantly increased final body weight and body weight gain, decreased liver weight to body weight ratio, decreased serum triiodo-l-thyronine level, increased serum thyroid stimulating hormone level, decreased serum levels of alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, increased hepatic levels of total antioxidant capacity and decreased hepatic levels of total peroxide and interleukin-1 beta when compared with the hyperthyroid group. Furthermore, histopathological studies revealed also marked improvement. We concluded that omega-3 had encouraging therapeutic effects against hyperthyroidism-induced hepatic dysfunction attributable to more than one mechanism: antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects.

  16. Comparison of trout hepatocytes and liver S9 fractions as in vitro models for predicting hepatic clearance in fish

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isolated hepatocytes and liver S9 fractions have been used to collect in vitro biotransformation data for fish as a means of improving modeled estimates of chemical bioaccumulation. To date, however, there have been few direct comparisons of these two methods. In the present st...

  17. A Noninvasive Score Model for Prediction of NASH in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis B and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jing; Liu, Fang; Han, Tao; Jing, Li; Ma, Zhe; Gao, Yingtang

    2017-01-01

    Aims. To develop a noninvasive score model to predict NASH in patients with combined CHB and NAFLD. Objective and Methods. 65 CHB patients with NAFLD were divided into NASH group (34 patients) and non-NASH group (31 patients) according to the NAS score. Biochemical indexes, liver stiffness, and Controlled Attenuation Parameter (CAP) were determined. Data in the two groups were compared and subjected to multivariate analysis, to establish a score model for the prediction of NASH. Results. In the NASH group, ALT, TG, fasting blood glucose (FBG), M30 CK-18, CAP, and HBeAg positive ratio were significantly higher than in the non-NASH group (P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis showed that CK-18 M30, CAP, FBG, and HBVDNA level were independent predictors of NASH. Therefore, a new model combining CK18 M30, CAP, FBG, and HBVDNA level was established using logistic regression. The AUROC curve predicting NASH was 0.961 (95% CI: 0.920–1.00, cutoff value is 0.218), with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 80.6%. Conclusion. A noninvasive score model might be considered for the prediction of NASH in patients with CHB combined with NAFLD. PMID:28349067

  18. Comparison of trout hepatocytes and liver S9 fractions as in vitro models for predicting hepatic clearance in fish

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isolated hepatocytes and liver S9 fractions have been used to collect in vitro biotransformation data for fish as a means of improving modeled estimates of chemical bioaccumulation. To date, however, there have been few direct comparisons of these two methods. In the present stud...

  19. Hepatitis B Vaccination Protection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Protection Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a pathogenic microorganism that can cause potentially life- threatening disease in ... bloodbornepathogens/index.html. To file a complaint by phone, report an emergency, or get OSHA advice, assistance, ...

  20. Hepatitis C and Incarceration

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Hepatitis Cvirus? Bleaching, boiling, heating with a flame, or using common cleaning fluids, alcohol, or peroxide ... Cbe treated? Yes, but not everyone needs medical treatment or can benefit from it. If possible, it ...

  1. Travelers' Health: Hepatitis E

    MedlinePlus

    ... by hepatitis E virus (HEV), a single-stranded, RNA virus belonging to the Hepeviridae family. TRANSMISSION HEV ... HEV IgM and IgG in serum. Detecting HEV RNA in serum or stools further confirms the serologic ...

  2. Alcohol and Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... code here Enter ZIP code here Daily Living: Alcohol for Veterans and the Public Alcohol and Hepatitis: Entire Lesson Overview Alcohol is one ... related to choices you make about your lifestyle . Alcohol and fibrosis Fibrosis is the medical term for ...

  3. Aggressive hepatitis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic active hepatitis is a liver disease caused by infection, drug ingestion, metabolic or autoimmune disorders. Necrosis (death) of liver cells, inflammation and fibrosis may lead to liver failure. Death within 5 years of onset occurs in ...

  4. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Zamora Nava, Luis Eduardo; Torre Delgadillo, Aldo

    2011-06-01

    The term minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) refers to the subtle changes in cognitive function, electrophysiological parameters, cerebral neurochemical/neurotransmitter homeostasis, cerebral blood flow, metabolism, and fluid homeostasis that can be observed in patients with cirrhosis who have no clinical evidence of hepatic encephalopathy; the prevalence is as high as 84% in patients with hepatic cirrhosis. Physician does generally not perceive cirrhosis complications, and neuropsychological tests and another especial measurement like evoked potentials and image studies like positron emission tomography can only make diagnosis. Diagnosis of minimal hepatic encephalopathy may have prognostic and therapeutic implications in cirrhotic patients. The present review pretends to explore the clinic, therapeutic, diagnosis and prognostic aspects of this complication.

  5. MicroRNA-19b reduces hepatic stellate cell proliferation by targeting GRB2 in hepatic fibrosis models in vivo and in vitro as part of the inhibitory effect of estradiol.

    PubMed

    Ge, Shanfei; Xie, Jianping; Liu, Fei; He, Jinni; He, Jinwen

    2015-11-01

    Estradiol (E2) is a major determinant of gender-based differences in the development of hepatic fibrosis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous 19-25 nucleotide, noncoding, single-stranded RNAs that regulate gene expression by blocking the translation or decreasing the stability of mRNAs and play an important role in liver fibrosis. The mechanisms underlying the regulation of miRNAs by E2 remain largely unknown. In this study, miR-19b levels were higher and were associated with lower GRB2 mRNA and protein levels in female rats more than in male rats. We also showed that miR-19b levels were down-regulated, were associated with the up-regulation of GRB2 mRNA and protein levels in PS (porcine serum-induced hepatic fibrosis) versus NS (normal control) groups and were up-regulated when associated with the down-regulation of GRB2 mRNA and protein levels in PS + E2 versus PS and in aHSC + E2 (estradiol treated aHSC) versus aHSC groups. MiR-19b expression inhibited cell proliferation in aHSCs, and also down-regulated GRB2 protein expression. The overexpression of miR-19b inhibited cell growth and suppressed COL1A1 protein levels by decreasing the levels of GRB2. However, the forced expression of GRB2 partly rescued the effect of miR-19b in the cells, attenuated cell proliferation, and suppressed the GRB2 protein level by up-regulating the levels of GRB2. Taken together, these findings will shed light on the role of miR-19b in regulating aHSC proliferation via the miR-19b/GRB2 axis. This newly identified miR-19b/GRB2 interaction provided novel insights into the suppressive effect of E2 on HSC proliferation and might facilitate the development of therapies targeting hepatic fibrosis.

  6. Hepatic SATB1 induces paracrine activation of hepatic stellate cells and is upregulated by HBx

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jin; Tu, Wei; Han, Jian; He, Jiayi; Liu, Jingmei; Han, Ping; Wang, Yunwu; Li, Mengke; Liu, Mei; Liao, Jiazhi; Tian, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major cause of chronic liver diseases, but its involvement in hepatic fibrogenesis remains unclear. Special AT-rich binding protein 1 (SATB1) has been implicated in reprogramming chromatin organization and transcription profiles in many cancers and non-cancer-related conditions. We found that hepatic SATB1 expression was significantly up-regulated in fibrotic tissues from chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected patients and HBV transgenic (HBV-Tg) mouse model. Knockdown of SATB1 in the liver significantly alleviated CCl4-induced fibrosis in HBV-Tg mouse model. Moreover, we suggested HBV encoded x protein (HBx) induced SATB1 expression through activation of JNK and ERK pathways. Enforced expression of SATB1 in hepatocytes promoted the activation and proliferation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) by secretion of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and platelet derived growth factor-A (PDGF-AA). Our findings demonstrated that HBx upregulated hepatic SATB1 which exerted pro-fibrotic effects by paracrine activation of stellate cells in HBV-related fibrosis. PMID:27883059

  7. Management of hepatic injury.

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, S. S.; Jirsch, D. W.

    1977-01-01

    Liver injuries may be due to either blunt or penetrating trauma to the thorax or abdomen. Specific treatment depends on the site and extent of hepatic injury. Following resuscitation with intravenous fluids and blood as needed, surgical therapy is directed to provide hemostasis, remove necrotic liver tissue and promote adequate external drainage in the postoperative period. While local measures are usually sufficient, complex hepatic wounds may require extensive resection and vascular ligature or repair. PMID:890631

  8. Immigration and viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Suraj; Carballo, Manuel; Feld, Jordan J; Janssen, Harry L A

    2015-08-01

    WHO estimates reveal that the global prevalence of viral hepatitis may be as high as 500 million, with an annual mortality rate of up to 1.3 million individuals. The majority of this global burden of disease is borne by nations of the developing world with high rates of vertical and iatrogenic transmission of HBV and HCV, as well as poor access to healthcare. In 2013, 3.2% of the global population (231 million individuals) migrated into a new host nation. Migrants predominantly originate from the developing countries of the south, into the developed economies of North America and Western Europe. This mass migration of individuals from areas of high-prevalence of viral hepatitis poses a unique challenge to the healthcare systems of the host nations. Due to a lack of universal standards for screening, vaccination and treatment of viral hepatitis, the burden of chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma continues to increase among migrant populations globally. Efforts to increase case identification and treatment among migrants have largely been limited to small outreach programs in urban centers, such that the majority of migrants with viral hepatitis continue to remain unaware of their infection. This review summarizes the data on prevalence of viral hepatitis and burden of chronic liver disease among migrants, current standards for screening and treatment of immigrants and refugees, and efforts to improve the identification and treatment of viral hepatitis among migrants.

  9. Delta hepatitis in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Sinniah, M; Dimitrakakis, M; Tan, D S

    1986-06-01

    Sera from one hundred and fifty nine Malaysian individuals were screened for the prevalence of delta markers. These included 15 HBsAg positive homosexuals, 16 acute hepatitis B cases, 9 chronic hepatitis B patients, 13 healthy HBsAg carriers and 106 intravenous (i.v.) drug abusers, of whom 27 were positive for HBsAg only and the rest were anti-HBc IgG positive but HBsAg negative. The prevalence of delta markers in the homosexuals was found to be 6.7%, in the HBsAg positive drug abusers 17.8%, in acute hepatitis B cases 12.5%. No evidence of delta infection was detected in healthy HBsAg carriers, chronic hepatitis B cases and HBsAg negative i.v. drug abusers. With reference to i.v. drug abusers, the prevalence of delta markers was higher in Malays (23%) than in Chinese (7%) although the latter had a higher HBsAg carrier rate. Although the HBsAg carrier rate in the homosexuals was high, their delta prevalence rate was low as compared to drug abusers. In Malaysia, as in other non-endemic regions, hepatitis delta virus transmission appeared to occur mainly via the parenteral and sexual routes. This is the first time in Malaysia that a reservoir of delta infection has been demonstrated in certain groups of the population at high risk for hepatitis B.

  10. Mechanisms of Hepatic Fibrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Scott L.

    2010-01-01

    Substantial improvements in the treatment of chronic liver disease have accelerated interest in uncovering the mechanisms underlying hepatic fibrosis and its resolution. Activation of resident hepatic stellate cells into proliferative, contractile, and fibrogenic cells in liver injury remains a dominant theme driving the field. However, several new areas of rapid progress in the past 5–10 years also have taken root, including: (1) identification of different fibrogenic populations apart from resident stellate cells, for example, portal fibroblasts, fibrocytes, and bone-marrow– derived cells, as well as cells derived from epithelial mesenchymal transition; (2) emergence of stellate cells as finely regulated determinants of hepatic inflammation and immunity; (3) elucidation of multiple pathways controlling gene expression during stellate cell activation including transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and epigenetic mechanisms; (4) recognition of disease-specific pathways of fibrogenesis; (5) re-emergence of hepatic macrophages as determinants of matrix degradation in fibrosis resolution and the importance of matrix cross-linking and scar maturation in determining reversibility; and (6) hints that hepatic stellate cells may contribute to hepatic stem cell behavior, cancer, and regeneration. Clinical and translational implications of these advances have become clear, and have begun to impact significantly on the management and outlook of patients with chronic liver disease. PMID:18471545

  11. miRNA-146a induces vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis in a rat model of coronary heart disease via NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Z W; Liu, Y F; Wang, S; Li, B

    2015-12-29

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of miRNA-146a in modulating the function of vascular smooth muscle cells in a rat model of coronary heart disease. Vascular smooth muscle cells were isolated and cultured from the rat coronary heart disease model and normal rats (controls). miRNA-146a levels were measured in vascular smooth muscle cells obtained from rats with coronary heart disease and control rats. The proliferation, growth, apoptosis, and activation of the NF-κB pathway in the vascular smooth muscle cells were detected using the MTT assay and flow cytometry, respectively. The role of the NF-κB pathway in modulating the apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells was investigated by measuring the reactivity of the cells to an NF-κB pathway inhibitor (TPCA-1). Vascular smooth muscle cells from the disease model exhibited higher levels of miRNA-146a than that by the normal controls (P = 0.0024). The vascular smooth muscle cells obtained from rats with coronary heart disease showed decreased proliferation and growth and increased apoptosis. miRNA-146a overexpression elevated the rate of cell apoptosis. The NF-κB pathway was activated in vascular smooth muscle cells obtained from rats with coronary heart disease. Inhibition of the NF- κB pathway significantly decreased the rate of vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis in coronary heart disease rats (P = 0.0038). In conclusion, miRNA- 146a was found to induce vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis in rats with coronary heart disease via the activation of the NF-κB signal pathway.

  12. Antiviral effects of grape seed extract against feline calicivirus, murine norovirus, and hepatitis A virus in model food systems and under gastric conditions.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Snehal S; Su, Xiaowei; D'Souza, Doris H

    2015-12-01

    Grape seed extract (GSE) has antiviral activities against hepatitis A virus (HAV) and human norovirus surrogates (feline calicivirus (FCV-F9) and murine norovirus (MNV-1)). The objectives of this study were to determine (1) time and dose-dependence of GSE against FCV-F9, MNV-1, and HAV at room temperature (RT) and 37 °C over 24 h; and (2) GSE effects in model foods (apple juice (AJ) and 2% milk) and simulated gastric conditions at 37 °C. Viruses at ∼5 log PFU/ml were treated with 0.5-8 mg/ml GSE prepared in water, AJ, milk or gastric juices, or water over 24 h at RT or 37 °C. Infectivity of triplicate treatments was evaluated using plaque assays. GSE effects increased with time and concentration. GSE at 1 mg/ml in AJ reduced MNV-1 to undetectable levels after 1 h and by 1 log in milk after 24 h. GSE at 1 and 2 mg/ml in AJ reduced HAV to undetectable levels after 1 h, while 2 and 4 mg/ml GSE in milk caused ∼1 log reduction after 24 h. GSE at 2 mg/ml in intestinal fluid reduced FCV-F9, MNV-1 and HAV to undetectable levels after 6 h. GSE appears to be a suitable natural option for foodborne viral reduction.

  13. Hepatitis C virus treatment for prevention among people who inject drugs: Modeling treatment scale-up in the age of direct-acting antivirals

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Natasha K; Vickerman, Peter; Grebely, Jason; Hellard, Margaret; Hutchinson, Sharon J; Lima, Viviane D; Foster, Graham R; Dillon, John F; Goldberg, David J; Dore, Gregory J; Hickman, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Substantial reductions in hepatitis C virus (HCV) prevalence among people who inject drugs (PWID) cannot be achieved by harm reduction interventions such as needle exchange and opiate substitution therapy (OST) alone. Current HCV treatment is arduous and uptake is low, but new highly effective and tolerable interferon-free direct-acting antiviral (DAA) treatments could facilitate increased uptake. We projected the potential impact of DAA treatments on PWID HCV prevalence in three settings. A dynamic HCV transmission model was parameterized to three chronic HCV prevalence settings: Edinburgh, UK (25%); Melbourne, Australia (50%); and Vancouver, Canada (65%). Using realistic scenarios of future DAAs (90% sustained viral response, 12 weeks duration, available 2015), we projected the treatment rates required to reduce chronic HCV prevalence by half or three-quarters within 15 years. Current HCV treatment rates may have a minimal impact on prevalence in Melbourne and Vancouver (<2% relative reductions) but could reduce prevalence by 26% in 15 years in Edinburgh. Prevalence could halve within 15 years with treatment scale-up to 15, 40, or 76 per 1,000 PWID annually in Edinburgh, Melbourne, or Vancouver, respectively (2-, 13-, and 15-fold increases, respectively). Scale-up to 22, 54, or 98 per 1,000 PWID annually could reduce prevalence by three-quarters within 15 years. Less impact occurs with delayed scale-up, higher baseline prevalence, or shorter average injecting duration. Results are insensitive to risk heterogeneity or restricting treatment to PWID on OST. At existing HCV drug costs, halving chronic prevalence would require annual treatment budgets of US $3.2 million in Edinburgh and approximately $50 million in Melbourne and Vancouver. Conclusion: Interferon-free DAAs could enable increased HCV treatment uptake among PWID, which could have a major preventative impact. However, treatment costs may limit scale-up, and should be addressed. (Hepatology 2013;58:1598

  14. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supernatant promotes intestinal barrier function, balances Treg and TH17 cells and ameliorates hepatic injury in a mouse model of chronic-binge alcohol feeding.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui-Cong; Xu, Lan-Man; Du, Shan-Jie; Huang, Si-Si; Wu, He; Dong, Jia-Jia; Huang, Jian-Rong; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Feng, Wen-Ke; Chen, Yong-Ping

    2016-01-22

    Impaired intestinal barrier function plays a critical role in alcohol-induced hepatic injury, and the subsequent excessive absorbed endotoxin and bacterial translocation activate the immune response that aggravates the liver injury. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supernatant (LGG-s) has been suggested to improve intestinal barrier function and alleviate the liver injury induced by chronic and binge alcohol consumption, but the underlying mechanisms are still not clear. In this study, chronic-binge alcohol fed model was used to determine the effects of LGG-s on the prevention of alcoholic liver disease in C57BL/6 mice and investigate underlying mechanisms. Mice were fed Lieber-DeCarli diet containing 5% alcohol for 10 days, and one dose of alcohol was gavaged on Day 11. In one group, LGG-s was supplemented along with alcohol. Control mice were fed isocaloric diet. Nine hours later the mice were sacrificed for analysis. Chronic-binge alcohol exposure induced an elevation in liver enzymes, steatosis and morphology changes, while LGG-s supplementation attenuated these changes. Treatment with LGG-s significantly improved intestinal barrier function reflected by increased mRNA expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins and villus-crypt histology in ileum, and decreased Escherichia coli (E. coli) protein level in liver. Importantly, flow cytometry analysis showed that alcohol reduced Treg cell population while increased TH17 cell population as well as IL-17 secretion, which was reversed by LGG-s administration. In conclusion, our findings indicate that LGG-s is effective in preventing chronic-binge alcohol exposure-induced liver injury and shed a light on the importance of the balance of Treg and TH17 cells in the role of LGG-s application.

  15. Activation of intrahepatic CD4+CXCR5+ T and CD19+ B cells is associated with viral clearance in a mouse model of acute hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiao-Fei; Hu, Ting-Ting; Lei, Yu; Li, Hu; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Miao; Liu, Bin; Chen, Min; Hu, Huai-Dong; Ren, Hong; Hu, Peng

    2016-08-09

    The role of immunity in the pathogenesis of acute hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is poorly understood. The purpose of this research was to define the intrahepatic immune factors responsible for viral clearance during acute HBV infection. The model of acute HBV infection was established by hydrodynamically transfecting mice with pCDNA3.1-HBV1.3 plasmids which contained a supergenomic HBV1.3-length transgene. The frequency of CD4+ CXCR5+ T cells, CD19+ B cells and their surface molecules in livers, spleens and peripheral blood were detected using flow cytometry. The lymphomononuclear cells isolated from the livers of transfected mice were further stimulated by HBc-derived peptides and then the frequency and cytokine secretion of HBV-specific CD4+CXCR5+ T cells were detected. We found that the frequency of CXCR5+ in CD4+ T cells was specifically increased; the expression of PD-1 was decreased while the expression of ICOS was increased on intrahepatic CD4+CXCR5+ T cells. Although the frequency of CD19+ B cells was not affected, the expression of PDL-1, ICOSL and IL-21R on B cells was increased in the livers of mice. The frequency of HBV-specific CD4+CXCR5+ T cells and the production of IL-21 by intrahepatic CD4+CXCR5+ T cells of mice with acute HBV infection were increased after stimulation. Furthermore, the expression of function-related molecules of intrahepatic CD4+CXCR5+ T, including Bcl-6, CXCR5, IL-6, IL-6R, IL-21 and IL-4 in the liver was increased during acute HBV infection. In conclusion, the activation of intrahepatic CD4+CXCR5+ T cells and B cells was associated with the clearance of HBV during acute infection.

  16. Carnitine, acylcarnitine and amino acid profiles analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry in a surfactant/virus mouse model of acute hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Murphy, M G; Crocker, J F S; O'Regan, P; Lee, S H S; Geldenhuys, L; Dooley, K; Al-Khalidi, M; Acott, P D

    2007-08-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was used to analyze multiple serum metabolites for the first time in a surfactant/virus mouse model of acute hepatic encephalopathy (AHE). AHE is characterized by acute liver failure that can lead to potentially lethal increases in intracranial pressure. We have reproduced AHE in young CD-1 mice exposed from postnatal day (P) 2-13 to the industrial surfactant, Toximul 3409F (Tox), and then infected intranasally on P14 with sublethal doses (LD(10-30)) of mouse-adapted human influenza B (Lee) virus (FluB). The sera analyzed by MS/MS were from mice exhibiting typical markers of Tox-mediated potentiation of viral illness, including reduced weights and blood glucose levels. Most metabolite abnormalities were not evident until five days after viral infection (P19), the time corresponding to the onset of weight loss and mortality. Values for fatty acylcarnitines and amino acids in the Tox+FluB-treated mice were either additive or supra-additive relative to the effects of either treatment alone. Amino acid profiles were consistent with those reported for human AHE. None of the treated mice exhibited signs of carnitine deficiency, and propionylcarnitine levels were normal. On P19, mice given combined Tox+FluB treatment had significant increases in levels of both medium- and long-chain acylcarnitines (C6:0-C12:0 and C14:0-C20:0, respectively), including their monounsaturated metabolites. Levels of medium-chain dicarboxylic and long-chain hydroxy-acylcarnitines were also elevated in the combined treatment group. The results of this study indicate a diffuse mitochondrial dysfunction in Tox+FluB-treated mice that results in a serum metabolite profile unique from those observed in classic inherited metabolic disorders.

  17. The Influence of Finasteride on Mean and Relative Spectral Density of EEG Bands in Rat Model of Thioacetamide-Induced Hepatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Mladenović, D; Hrnčić, D; Rašić-Marković, A; Macut, Dj; Stanojlović, O

    Liver failure is associated with a neuropsychiatric syndrome, known as hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Finasteride, inhibitor of neurosteroid synthesis, may improve the course of HE. The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of finasteride on mean and relative power density of EEG bands, determined by spectral analysis, in rat model of thioacetamide-induced HE. Male Wistar rats were divided into groups: (1) control; (2) thioacetamide-treated group, TAA (900 mg/kg); (3) finasteride-treated group, FIN (150 mg/kg); and (4) group treated with finasteride (150 mg/kg) and thioacetamide (900 mg/kg), FIN + TAA. Daily doses of FIN (50 mg/kg) and TAA (300 mg/kg) were administered during 3 subsequent days, and in FIN + TAA group FIN was administered 2 h before every dose of TAA. EEG was recorded 22-24 h after treatment and analyzed by fast Fourier transformation. While TAA did not induce significant changes in the beta band, mean and relative power in this band were significantly higher in FIN + TAA versus control group (p < 0.01). TAA caused a significant decline in mean power in alpha, theta, and delta band, and in FIN + TAA group the mean power in these bands was significantly higher compared with control. While in TAA group relative power was significantly decreased in theta (p < 0.01) and increased in delta band (p < 0.01) versus control, the opposite changes were found in FIN + TAA group: an increase in theta (p < 0.01) and a decrease in delta relative power (p < 0.01). In this study, finasteride pretreatment caused EEG changes that correspond to mild TAA-induced HE.

  18. Photodynamic effects of new silicon phthalocyanines: in vitro studies utilizing rat hepatic microsomes and human erythrocyte ghosts as model membrane sources.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, S I; Agarwal, R; Eichler, G; Rihter, B D; Kenney, M E; Mukhtar, H

    1993-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer is a modality that relies upon the irradiation of tumors with visible light following selective uptake of a photosensitizer by the tumor tissue. There is considerable emphasis to define new photosensitizers suitable for PDT of cancer. In this study we evaluated six phthalocyanines (Pc) for their photodynamic effects utilizing rat hepatic microsomes and human erythrocyte ghosts as model membrane sources. Of the newly synthesized Pc, two showed significant destruction of cytochrome P-450 and monooxygenase activities, and enhancement of lipid peroxidation, when added to microsomal suspension followed by irradiation with approximately 675 nm light. These two Pc named SiPc IV (HOSiPcOSi[CH3]2[CH2]3N[CH3]2) and SiPc V (HOSiPc-OSi[CH3]2[CH2]3N[CH3]3+I-) showed dose-dependent photodestruction of cytochrome P-450 and monooxygenase activities in liver microsomes, and photoenhancement of lipid peroxidation, lipid hydroperoxide formation and lipid fluorescence in microsomes and erythrocyte ghosts. Compared to chloroaluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate, SiPc IV and SiPc V produced far more pronounced photodynamic effects. Sodium azide, histidine, and 2,5-dimethylfuran, the quenchers of singlet oxygen, afforded highly significant protection against SiPc IV- and SiPc V-mediated photodynamic effects. However, to a lesser extent, the quenchers of superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical also showed some protective effects. These results suggest that SiPc IV and SiPc V may be promising photosensitizers for the PDT of cancer.

  19. Hepatitis B FAQs for the Public

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professional Resources Patient Education Resources Quick Links to Hepatitis … A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home ... Grantees Policy and Programs Resource Center Viral Hepatitis Hepatitis B FAQs for the Public Recommend on Facebook ...

  20. Surveillance for Viral Hepatitis - United States, 2014

    MedlinePlus

    ... Historical reported cases and estimates Quick Links to Hepatitis … A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home ... Programs Resource Center Viral Hepatitis Surveillance for Viral Hepatitis – United States, 2014 Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ...

  1. Hepatitis C FAQs for the Public

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Viral Hepatitis Contact Us Quick Links to Hepatitis … A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home ... Local Partners & Grantees Policy and Programs Resource Center Hepatitis C FAQs for the Public Recommend on Facebook ...

  2. Viral Hepatitis: A through E and Beyond

    MedlinePlus

    ... travelers How can hepatitis B be prevented? The hepatitis B vaccine offers the best pro tection. All infants and ... should receive hepatitis B immune globulin and the hepatitis B vaccine within 12 hours of birth to help prevent ...

  3. Agent-based model forecasts aging of the population of people who inject drugs in metropolitan Chicago and changing prevalence of hepatitis C infections

    DOE PAGES

    Gutfraind, Alexander; Boodram, Basmattee; Prachand, Nikhil; ...

    2015-09-30

    People who inject drugs (PWID) are at high risk for blood-borne pathogens transmitted during the sharing of contaminated injection equipment, particularly hepatitis C virus (HCV). HCV prevalence is influenced by a complex interplay of drug-use behaviors, social networks, and geography, as well as the availability of interventions, such as needle exchange programs. To adequately address this complexity in HCV epidemic forecasting, we have developed a computational model, the Agent-based Pathogen Kinetics model (APK). APK simulates the PWID population in metropolitan Chicago, including the social interactions that result in HCV infection. We used multiple empirical data sources on Chicago PWID tomore » build a spatial distribution of an in silico PWID population and modeled networks among the PWID by considering the geography of the city and its suburbs. APK was validated against 2012 empirical data (the latest available) and shown to agree with network and epidemiological surveys to within 1%. For the period 2010–2020, APK forecasts a decline in HCV prevalence of 0.8% per year from 44(±2)% to 36(±5)%, although some sub-populations would continue to have relatively high prevalence, including Non-Hispanic Blacks, 48(±5)%. The rate of decline will be lowest in Non-Hispanic Whites and we find, in a reversal of historical trends, that incidence among non-Hispanic Whites would exceed incidence among Non-Hispanic Blacks (0.66 per 100 per years vs 0.17 per 100 person years). APK also forecasts an increase in PWID mean age from 35(±1) to 40(±2) with a corresponding increase from 59(±2)% to 80(±6)% in the proportion of the population >30 years old. Our research highlight the importance of analyzing sub-populations in disease predictions, the utility of computer simulation for analyzing demographic and health trends among PWID and serve as a tool for guiding intervention and prevention strategies in Chicago, and other major cities.« less

  4. Agent-based model forecasts aging of the population of people who inject drugs in metropolitan Chicago and changing prevalence of hepatitis C infections

    SciTech Connect

    Gutfraind, Alexander; Boodram, Basmattee; Prachand, Nikhil; Hailegiorgis, Atesmachew; Dahari, Harel; Major, Marian E.; Kaderali, Lars

    2015-09-30

    People who inject drugs (PWID) are at high risk for blood-borne pathogens transmitted during the sharing of contaminated injection equipment, particularly hepatitis C virus (HCV). HCV prevalence is influenced by a complex interplay of drug-use behaviors, social networks, and geography, as well as the availability of interventions, such as needle exchange programs. To adequately address this complexity in HCV epidemic forecasting, we have developed a computational model, the Agent-based Pathogen Kinetics model (APK). APK simulates the PWID population in metropolitan Chicago, including the social interactions that result in HCV infection. We used multiple empirical data sources on Chicago PWID to build a spatial distribution of an in silico PWID population and modeled networks among the PWID by considering the geography of the city and its suburbs. APK was validated against 2012 empirical data (the latest available) and shown to agree with network and epidemiological surveys to within 1%. For the period 2010–2020, APK forecasts a decline in HCV prevalence of 0.8% per year from 44(±2)% to 36(±5)%, although some sub-populations would continue to have relatively high prevalence, including Non-Hispanic Blacks, 48(±5)%. The rate of decline will be lowest in Non-Hispanic Whites and we find, in a reversal of historical trends, that incidence among non-Hispanic Whites would exceed incidence among Non-Hispanic Blacks (0.66 per 100 per years vs 0.17 per 100 person years). APK also forecasts an increase in PWID mean age from 35(±1) to 40(±2) with a corresponding increase from 59(±2)% to 80(±6)% in the proportion of the population >30 years old. Our research highlight the importance of analyzing sub-populations in disease predictions, the utility of computer simulation for analyzing demographic and health trends among PWID and serve as a tool for guiding intervention and prevention strategies in Chicago, and other major cities.

  5. Fulminant herpes hepatitis mimicking hepatic abscesses.

    PubMed

    Wolfsen, H C; Bolen, J W; Bowen, J L; Fenster, L F

    1993-01-01

    Fulminant hepatitis due to herpes simplex virus (HSV) in adults is a rare and deadly disease. We describe a 23-year-old woman with a 20-year history of Crohn's disease (CD) who was hospitalized with an acute febrile illness and diarrhea. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen demonstrated an intramural sigmoid colon abscess and multiple abscesses in the liver. Despite high-dose parenteral corticosteroids and broad-spectrum antibiotics, the patient remained acutely ill, with high fever and markedly elevated serum transaminase levels, but no jaundice. Sigmoid resection and wedge liver biopsy were performed at laparotomy. Histologic examination documented HSV-type intranuclear inclusions and inflammation with necrosis in both the sigmoid colon and liver specimens. The patient subsequently died despite parenteral acyclovir treatment. Although rare, fulminant hepatitis due to HSV simplex virus should be considered in the differential diagnosis of all patients with severe hepatitis. Of special note, the necrotizing liver lesions may be mistaken for pyogenic abscesses on CT scan.

  6. Use of Isolated Trout Hepatocytes to Predict Measured Hepatic Clearance and Whole-animal Bioconcentration Factors for Six Polyaromatic Hydrocarbons

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hepatic metabolism is an important determinant of chemical bioaccumulation in fish. Consequently, measured in vitro hepatic metabolism may improve model predictions of bioaccumulation. In this study, fresh and cryopreserved trout hepatocytes were used to measure in vitro intrin...

  7. Hepatic cytochrome P450 deficiency in mouse models for intrahepatic cholestasis predispose to bile salt-induced cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Kunne, Cindy; de Graaff, Marijke; Duijst, Suzanne; de Waart, Dirk R; Oude Elferink, Ronald P J; Paulusma, Coen C

    2014-10-01

    Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC) types 1 and 3 are severe cholestatic liver diseases caused by deficiency of ATB8B1 and ABCB4, respectively. Mouse models for PFIC display mild phenotypes compared with human patients, and this can be explained by the difference in bile salt pool composition. Mice, unlike humans, have the ability to detoxify hydrophobic bile salts by cytochrome P450-mediated (re)hydroxylation and thus have a less toxic bile salt pool. We have crossed mouse models for PFIC1 and PFIC3 with Hrn mice that have a reduced capacity to (re)hydroxylate bile salts. Double transgenes were obtained by backcrossing Atp8b1(G308V/G308V) and Abcb4(-/-) mice with Hrn mice that have a liver-specific disruption of the cytochrome P450 reductase gene and therefore have markedly reduced P450 activity. In these mice, a more hydrophobic bile salt pool was instilled by cholic acid supplementation of the diet, and bile formation and liver pathology was studied. As opposed to single transgenes, Atp8b1(G308V/G308V)/Hrn and Abcb4(-/-)/Hrn mice rapidly developed strong cholestasis that was evidenced by increased plasma bilirubin and bile salt levels. The bile salt pool was more toxic in both models; Atp8b1(G308V/G308V)/Hrn mice had a more hydrophobic plasma pool compared with the single transgene, whereas Abcb4(-/-)/Hrn mice had a more hydrophobic biliary pool compared with the single transgene. In line with these findings, liver damage was not aggravated in Atp8b1(G308V/G308V)/Hrn but was more severe in Abcb4(-/-)/Hrn mice. These data indicate that bile salt pool composition is a critical determinant in the initiation and progression of cholestasis and liver pathology in PFIC1 and PFIC3. Most importantly, our data suggest that the hydrophobicity of the plasma bile salt pool is an important determinant of the severity of cholestasis, whereas the hydrophobicity of the biliary bile salt pool is an important determinant of the severity of liver pathology.

  8. Acute serum amyloid A induces migration, angiogenesis, and inflammation in synovial cells in vitro and in a human rheumatoid arthritis/SCID mouse chimera model.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Mary; Marrelli, Alessandra; Blades, Mark; McCormick, Jennifer; Maderna, Paola; Godson, Catherine; Mullan, Ronan; FitzGerald, Oliver; Bresnihan, Barry; Pitzalis, Costantino; Veale, Douglas J; Fearon, Ursula

    2010-06-01

    Serum amyloid A (A-SAA), an acute-phase protein with cytokine-like properties, is expressed at sites of inflammation. This study investigated the effects of A-SAA on chemokine-regulated migration and angiogenesis using rheumatoid arthritis (RA) cells and whole-tissue explants in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo. A-SAA levels were measured by real-time PCR and ELISA. IL-8 and MCP-1 expression was examined in RA synovial fibroblasts, human microvascular endothelial cells, and RA synovial explants by ELISA. Neutrophil transendothelial cell migration, cell adhesion, invasion, and migration were examined using transwell leukocyte/monocyte migration assays, invasion assays, and adhesion assays with or without anti-MCP-1/anti-IL-8. NF-kappaB was examined using a specific inhibitor and Western blotting. An RA synovial/SCID mouse chimera model was used to examine the effects of A-SAA on cell migration, proliferation, and angiogenesis in vivo. High expression of A-SAA was demonstrated in RA patients (p < 0.05). A-SAA induced chemokine expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner (p < 0.05). Blockade with anti-scavenger receptor class B member 1 and lipoxin A4 (A-SAA receptors) significantly reduced chemokine expression in RA synovial tissue explants (p < 0.05). A-SAA induced cell invasion, neutrophil-transendothelial cell migration, monocyte migration, and adhesion (all p < 0.05), effects that were blocked by anti-IL-8 or anti-MCP-1. A-SAA-induced chemokine expression was mediated through NF-kappaB in RA explants (p < 0.05). Finally, in the RA synovial/SCID mouse chimera model, we demonstrated for the first time in vivo that A-SAA directly induces monocyte migration from the murine circulation into RA synovial grafts, synovial cell proliferation, and angiogenesis (p < 0.05). A-SAA promotes cell migrational mechanisms and angiogenesis critical to RA pathogenesis.

  9. [Sodium butyrate inhibits HMGB1 expression and release and attenuates concanavalin A-induced acute liver injury in mice].

    PubMed

    Gong, Quan; Chen, Mao-Jian; Wang, Chao; Nie, Hao; Zhang, Yan-Xiang; Shu, Ke-Gang; Li, Gang

    2014-10-25

    The purpose of the present study is to explore the protective effects of sodium butyrate (SB) pretreatment on concanavalin A (Con A)-induced acute liver injury in mice. The model animals were first administered intraperitoneally with SB. Half an hour later, acute liver injury mouse model was established by caudal vein injection with Con A (15 mg/kg). Then, levels of serous alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) were measured using standard clinical method by an automated chemistry analyzer, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) were measured by ELISA, and pathological changes in hepatic tissue were observed by using HE staining and light microscopy. The expression and release of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) were assessed by using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunohistochemistry and ELISA. The results showed that the pretreatment of SB significantly protected Con A-treated mice from liver injury as evidenced by the decrease of serum ALT, AST (P < 0.01) and reduction of hepatic tissues necrosis. SB also decreased levels of serous TNF-α and IFN-γ (P < 0.01). Furthermore, the expression and release of HMGB1 were markedly inhibited by SB pretreatment (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). These results suggest that the attenuating effect of SB on Con A-induced acute liver injury may be due to its role of reducing the TNF-α and IFN-γ production, and inhibiting HMGB1 expression and release.

  10. Asparagus polysaccharide and gum with hepatic artery embolization induces tumor growth and inhibits angiogenesis in an orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma model.

    PubMed

    Weng, Ling-Ling; Xiang, Jian-Feng; Lin, Jin-Bo; Yi, Shang-Hui; Yang, Li-Tao; Li, Yi-Sheng; Zeng, Hao-Tao; Lin, Sheng-Ming; Xin, Dong-Wei; Zhao, Hai-Liang; Qiu, Shu-Qi; Chen, Tao; Zhang, Min-Guang

    2014-01-01

    Liver cancer is one of leading digestive malignancies with high morbidity and mortality. There is an urgent need for the development of novel therapies for this deadly disease. It has been proven that asparagus polysaccharide, one of the most active derivates from the traditional medicine asparagus, possesses notable antitumor properties. However, little is known about the efficacy of asparagus polysaccharide as an adjuvant for liver cancer chemotherapy. Herein, we reported that asparagus polysaccharide and its embolic agent form, asparagus gum, significantly inhibited liver tumor growth with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) therapy in an orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tumor model, while significantly inhibiting angiogenesis and promoting tumor cell apoptosis. Moreover, asparagine gelatinous possessed immunomodulatory functions and showed little toxicity to the host. These results highlight the chemotherapeutic potential of asparagus polysaccharide and warrant a future focus on development as novel chemotherapeutic agent for liver cancer TACE therapy.

  11. Hepatic encephalopathy associated with hepatic lipidosis in llamas (Lama glama).

    PubMed

    Pillitteri, C A; Craig, L E

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy has been listed as a differential for llamas displaying neurologic signs, but it has not been histopathologically described. This report details the neurologic histopathologic findings associated with 3 cases of hepatic lipidosis with concurrent neurologic signs and compares them to 3 cases of hepatic lipidosis in the absence of neurologic signs and 3 cases without hepatic lipidosis. Brain from all 3 llamas displaying neurologic signs contained Alzheimer type II cells, which were not detected in either subset of llamas without neurologic signs. Astrocytic immunohistochemical staining intensity for glial fibrillary acid protein was decreased in llamas with neurologic signs as compared to 2 of 3 llamas with hepatic lipidosis and without neurologic signs and to 2 of 3 llamas without hepatic lipidosis. Immunohistochemical staining for S100 did not vary between groups. These findings suggest that hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with hepatic lipidosis in llamas.

  12. Malnutrition induces gut atrophy and increases hepatic fat infiltration: studies in a pig model of childhood malnutrition

    PubMed Central

    Lykke, Mikkel; Hother, Anne-Louise; Hansen, Christian F; Friis, Henrik; Mølgaard, Christian; Michaelsen, Kim F; Briend, André; Larsen, Torben; Sangild, Per T; Thymann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Childhood malnutrition is a problem in developing countries, and pathological changes in digestive organs such as the intestine and liver are poorly understood. An animal model to study the progression of severe acute malnutrition could elucidate pathological changes in the intestine and liver. We sought to characterize growth and clinical changes during malnutrition related to structural and functional indices in the intestine and liver. Newly weaned piglets were given ad libitum access to a maize flour diet (MAIZE, n=9) or a nutritionally optimized reference diet (REFERENCE, n=12) for 7 weeks. Growth, hematology and clinical biochemistry where recorded weekly. After 7 weeks, the MAIZE pigs had lower body weights than the REF pigs (8.3 kg vs. 32.4 kg, P < 0.001), indicating severe stunting and moderate to severe wasting. This was paralleled by lower values for hematocrit, hemoglobin and mean cell volume in MAIZE vs. REFERENCE (P < 0.01), indicating anemia. Although the observed temporal changes in MAIZE were associated with atrophy of the small intestinal mucosa (P < 0.001), digestive enzyme activity was only marginally reduced. Serum alanine aminotransferase, bilirubin and albumin were increased in the MAIZE pigs (P < 0.001), and the liver had a vacuolated appearance and tendency toward increased triglyceride content (P=0.054). We conclude that liver and intestinal indices are compromised during malnutrition and are associated with temporal changes in growth and hematological and biochemical endpoints. The pig model is relevant for malnourished infants and can act as a valuable tool for understanding the pathophysiology of malnutrition. PMID:23977413

  13. Effect of protein kinase A-induced phosphorylation on the gating mechanism of the brain Na+ channel: model fitting to whole-cell current traces.

    PubMed Central

    d'Alcantara, P; Schiffmann, S N; Swillens, S

    1999-01-01

    The activity of the voltage-gated Na+ channel is subjected to modulation through covalent modifications. It has been previously shown that brain Na+ currents are reduced following the activation of the protein kinase A (PKA) pathway, but the effect of the phosphorylation on the gating mechanism of the channel has not been demonstrated so far. In this study, we analyze the whole-cell Na+ current recorded in the absence or presence of forskolin, which stimulates the PKA pathway. A minimal molecular model of the gating mechanism of the Na+ channel is defined to fit the experimental data: it consists of three closed states, one open state, and two inactivated states. We experimentally demonstrate that the kinetics of inactivation from the closed states are not affected by phosphorylation. The results obtained by computer fitting indicate that, among all the kinetic parameters describing the transitions between states, only one parameter is significantly modified in the presence of forskolin, and corresponds to the acceleration of the inactivation from the open state. This conclusion is supported by the analysis of current traces obtained from cells in the presence of a phosphatase inhibitor or loaded with the PKA catalytic unit, and is in agreement with previously reported single channel records. PMID:10388750

  14. Participation of pro- and anti-nociceptive interleukins in botulinum toxin A-induced analgesia in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Zychowska, Magdalena; Rojewska, Ewelina; Makuch, Wioletta; Luvisetto, Siro; Pavone, Flaminia; Marinelli, Sara; Przewlocka, Barbara; Mika, Joanna

    2016-11-15

    Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) shows antinociceptive properties, and its clinical applications in pain therapy are continuously increasing. BoNT/A specifically cleaves SNAP-25, which results in the formation of a non-functional SNARE complex, thereby potently inhibiting the release of neurotransmitters and neuropeptides, including those involved in nociception. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of BoNT/A (300pg/paw) on pain-related behavior and the levels of glial markers and interleukins in the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) after chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the sciatic nerve in rats. Glial activity was also examined after repeated intraperitoneal injection of minocycline combined with a single BoNT/A injection. Our results show that a single intraplantar BoNT/A injection did not influence motor function but strongly diminished pain-related behaviors in naïve and CCI-exposed rats. Additionally, microglial inhibition using minocycline enhanced the analgesic effects of BoNT/A. Western blotting results suggested that CCI induces the upregulation of the pronociceptive proteins IL-18, IL-6 and IL-1β in the ipsilateral lumbar spinal cord and DRG, but no changes in the levels of the antinociceptive proteins IL-18BP, IL-1RA and IL-10 were observed. Interestingly, BoNT/A injection suppressed the CCI-induced upregulation of IL-18 and IL-1β in the spinal cord and/or DRG and increased the levels of IL-10 and IL-1RA in the DRG. In summary, our results suggest that BoNT/A significantly attenuates pain-related behavior and microglial activation and restores the neuroimmune balance in a CCI model by decreasing the levels of pronociceptive factors (IL-1β and IL-18) and increasing the levels of antinociceptive factors (IL-10 and IL-1RA) in the spinal cord and DRG.

  15. Reassessing immune control of hepatitis A virus.

    PubMed

    Walker, Christopher M; Feng, Zongdi; Lemon, Stanley M

    2015-04-01

    There is renewed interest in hepatitis A virus (HAV) pathogenesis and immunity after 2-3 decades of limited progress. From a public health perspective, the average age at infection has increased in developing countries, resulting in more severe hepatitis that is poorly understood mechanistically. More fundamentally, there is interest in comparing immunity to HAV and hepatitis C virus (HCV): small, positive-strand RNA viruses with very different infection outcomes. Here, we review evidence that circulating HAV virions are cloaked in membranes, with consequences for induction of innate immunity and antibody-mediated neutralization. We also consider the contribution of CD4+ helper versus CD8+ cytotoxic T cells to antiviral immunity and liver injury, and present a model of non-cytotoxic immune control of HAV infection.

  16. Poly(vinyl alcohol)-coated chitosan microparticles act as an effective oral vaccine delivery system for hepatitis B vaccine in rat model.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Bijaya; Rath, Jyoti Prakash

    2014-12-01

    The present study focused on the development of an effective oral vaccine delivery system of poly(vinyl alcohol)-coated chitosan microparticles-based recombinant hepatitis B vaccine. Chitosan microparticles were prepared by ionotropic gelation technique; they were loaded with recombinant hepatitis B vaccine and coated with poly(vinyl alcohol). The average sizes of the microparticles were measured in the range of 100-410 nm. The optimal loading capacity and loading efficiency were recorded around 3.4 and 74%, respectively. In vitro release study shows that the prepared microparticles release the antigen in a sustained manner. Moreover, the microparticles were resistant to simulated gastric environment and release the antigen in the targeted intestinal milieu. Furthermore, oral immunisation of rats with poly(vinyl alcohol)-coated chitosan hepatitis-B microparticles vaccine shows comparable seroprotective immune response to presently practiced intramuscular vaccination. The results demonstrated that poly(vinyl alcohol)-coated chitosan microparticles have the potential for being used as an oral vaccine delivery system for hepatitis B vaccine and may be a suitable alternative for needle-based vaccination.

  17. Development of a Fatal Noncompressible Truncal Hemorrhage Model with Combined Hepatic and Portal Venous Injury in Normothermic Normovolemic Swine

    PubMed Central

    Yanala, Ujwal R.; Johanning, Jason M.; Pipinos, Iraklis I.; Larsen, Gustavo; Velander, William H.; Carlson, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Noncompressible truncal hemorrhage and brain injury currently account for most early mortality of warfighters on the battlefield. There is no effective treatment for noncompressible truncal hemorrhage, other than rapid evacuation to a surgical facility. The availability of an effective field treatment for noncompressible truncal hemorrhage could increase the number of warfighters salvaged from this frequently-lethal scenario. Our intent was to develop a porcine model of noncompressible truncal hemorrhage with a ∼50% one-hour mortality so that we could develop new treatments for this difficult problem. Normovolemic normothermic domestic swine (barrows, 3 months old, 34–36 kg) underwent one of three injury types through a midline incision: 1) central stellate injury (N = 6); 2) excision of a portal vein branch distal to the main PV trunk (N = 6); or 3) hemi-transection of the left lateral lobe of the liver at its base (N = 10). The one-hour mortality of these injuries was 0, 82, and 40%, respectively; the final mean arterial pressure was 65, 24, and 30 mm Hg, respectively; and the final hemoglobin was 8.3, 2.3, and 3.6 g/dL, respectively. Hemi-transection of the left lateral lobe of the liver appeared to target our desired mortality rate better than the other injury mechanisms. PMID:25251401

  18. Molecular magnetic resonance imaging of activated hepatic stellate cells with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide targeting integrin αvβ3 for staging liver fibrosis in rat model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Caiyuan; Liu, Huanhuan; Cui, Yanfen; Li, Xiaoming; Zhang, Zhongyang; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Dengbin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the expression level of integrin αvβ3 on activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) at different stages of liver fibrosis induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) in rat model and the feasibility to stage liver fibrosis by using molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide modified ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (USPIO) specifically targeting integrin αvβ3. Materials and methods All experiments received approval from our Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Thirty-six rats were randomly divided into three groups of 12 subjects each, and intraperitoneally injected with CCl4 for either 3, 6, or 9 weeks. Controls (n=10) received pure olive oil. The change in T2* relaxation rate (ΔR2*) pre- and postintravenous administration of RGD-USPIO or naked USPIO was measured by 3.0T clinical MRI and compared by one-way analysis of variance or the Student’s t-test. The relationship between expression level of integrin αvβ3 and liver fibrotic degree was evaluated by Spearman’s ranked correlation. Results Activated HSCs were confirmed to be the main cell types expressing integrin αvβ3 during liver fibrogenesis. The protein level of integrin αv and β3 subunit expressed on activated HSCs was upregulated and correlated well with the progression of liver fibrosis (r=0.954, P<0.001; r=0.931, P<0.001, respectively). After injection of RGD-USPIO, there is significant difference in ΔR2* among rats treated with 0, 3, 6, and 9 weeks of CCl4 (P<0.001). The accumulation of iron particles in fibrotic liver specimen is significantly greater for RGD-USPIO than naked USPIO after being injected with equal dose of iron. Conclusion Molecular MRI of integrin αvβ3 expressed on activated HSCs by using RGD-USPIO may distinguish different liver fibrotic stages in CCl4 rat model and shows promising to noninvasively monitor the progression of the liver fibrosis and therapeutic response to

  19. MicroRNA-130a and -130b enhance activation of hepatic stellate cells by suppressing PPARγ expression: A rat fibrosis model study

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Le; Wang, Jinlong; Lu, Hongwei; Zhang, Guoyu; Liu, Yang; Wang, Jiazhong; Zhang, Yafei; Shang, Hao; Ji, Hong; Chen, Xi; Duan, Yanxia; Li, Yiming

    2015-09-25

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the primary sources of extracellular matrix (ECM) in normal and fibrotic liver. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) maintains HSCs in a quiescent state, and its downregulation induces HSC activation. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) can induce PPARγ mRNA degradation, but the mechanism by which miRNAs regulate PPARγ in rat HSCs is unclear. This study aimed to investigate some miRNAs which putatively bind to the 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) of PPARγ mRNA, and increase expression of ECM genes in rat HSCs. In carbon tetrachloride injection (CCl{sub 4}) and common bile duct ligation (CBDL) liver fibrosis models, miRNAs miR-130a, miR-130b, miR-301a, miR-27b and miR-340 levels were found to be increased and PPARγ expression decreased. Overexpression of miR-130a and miR-130b enhanced cell proliferation by involving Runx3. MiR-130a and miR-130b decreased PPARγ expression by targeting the 3′-UTR of PPARγ mRNA in rat HSC-T6 cells. Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) may mediate miR-130a and miR-130b overexpression, PPARγ downregulation, and ECM genes overexpression in cell culture. These findings suggest that miR-130a and miR-130b are involved in downregulation of PPARγ in liver fibrosis. - Highlights: • MiR-130a and miR-130b are increased and PPARγ is decreased in liver fibrosis models. • MiR-130a and miR-130b decreased PPARγ by targeting the 3′-UTR of PPARγ mRNA. • MiR-130a and miR-130b enhanced HSC cell proliferation by involving Runx3. • TGF-β1 may mediate miR-130a and miR-130b overexpression.

  20. Hyperinsulinemia Enhances Hepatic Expression of the Fatty Acid Transporter Cd36 and Provokes Hepatosteatosis and Hepatic Insulin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Steneberg, Pär; Sykaras, Alexandros G; Backlund, Fredrik; Straseviciene, Jurate; Söderström, Ingegerd; Edlund, Helena

    2015-07-31

    Hepatosteatosis is associated with the development of both hepatic insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes. Hepatic expression of Cd36, a fatty acid transporter, is enhanced in obese and diabetic murine models and human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and thus it correlates with hyperinsulinemia, steatosis, and insulin resistance. Here, we have explored the effect of hyperinsulinemia on hepatic Cd36 expression, development of hepatosteatosis, insulin resistance, and dysglycemia. A 3-week sucrose-enriched diet was sufficient to provoke hyperinsulinemia, hepatosteatosis, hepatic insulin resistance, and dysglycemia in CBA/J mice. The development of hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance in CBA/J mice on a sucrose-enriched diet was paralleled by increased hepatic expression of the transcription factor Pparγ and its target gene Cd36 whereas that of genes implicated in lipogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, and VLDL secretion was unaltered. Additionally, we demonstrate that insulin, in a Pparγ-dependent manner, is sufficient to directly increase Cd36 expression in perfused livers and isolated hepatocytes. Mouse strains that display low insulin levels, i.e. C57BL6/J, and/or lack hepatic Pparγ, i.e. C3H/HeN, do not develop hepatic steatosis, insulin resistance, or dysglycemia on a sucrose-enriched diet, suggesting that elevated insulin levels, via enhanced CD36 expression, provoke fatty liver development that in turn leads to hepatic insulin resistance and dysglycemia. Thus, our data provide evidence for a direct role for hyperinsulinemia in stimulating hepatic Cd36 expression and thus the development of hepatosteatosis, hepatic insulin resistance, and dysglycemia.

  1. FastStats: Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Viral Hepatitis Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are for the U.S. Morbidity Number of new hepatitis A cases: 1,781 (2013) Number of new ...

  2. Diabetes and Hepatitis B Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... monitoring in close succession. CDC now recommends the hepatitis B vaccine for adults with diabetes. What is the recommendation ... As with other vaccines, the effectiveness of the hepatitis B vaccine decreases with age. Decisions to vaccinate should include ...