Science.gov

Sample records for a-induced hepatitis model

  1. Serum Amyloid A Induces Inflammation, Proliferation and Cell Death in Activated Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Siegmund, Sören V.; Schlosser, Monika; Schildberg, Frank A.; Seki, Ekihiro; De Minicis, Samuele; Uchinami, Hiroshi; Kuntzen, Christian; Knolle, Percy A.; Strassburg, Christian P.; Schwabe, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) is an evolutionary highly conserved acute phase protein that is predominantly secreted by hepatocytes. However, its role in liver injury and fibrogenesis has not been elucidated so far. In this study, we determined the effects of SAA on hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), the main fibrogenic cell type of the liver. Serum amyloid A potently activated IκB kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), Erk and Akt and enhanced NF-κB-dependent luciferase activity in primary human and rat HSCs. Serum amyloid A induced the transcription of MCP-1, RANTES and MMP9 in an NF-κB- and JNK-dependent manner. Blockade of NF-κB revealed cytotoxic effects of SAA in primary HSCs with signs of apoptosis such as caspase 3 and PARP cleavage and Annexin V staining. Serum amyloid A induced HSC proliferation, which depended on JNK, Erk and Akt activity. In primary hepatocytes, SAA also activated MAP kinases, but did not induce relevant cell death after NF-κB inhibition. In two models of hepatic fibrogenesis, CCl4 treatment and bile duct ligation, hepatic mRNA levels of SAA1 and SAA3 were strongly increased. In conclusion, SAA may modulate fibrogenic responses in the liver in a positive and negative fashion by inducing inflammation, proliferation and cell death in HSCs. PMID:26937641

  2. Serum Amyloid A Induces Inflammation, Proliferation and Cell Death in Activated Hepatic Stellate Cells.

    PubMed

    Siegmund, Sören V; Schlosser, Monika; Schildberg, Frank A; Seki, Ekihiro; De Minicis, Samuele; Uchinami, Hiroshi; Kuntzen, Christian; Knolle, Percy A; Strassburg, Christian P; Schwabe, Robert F

    2016-01-01

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) is an evolutionary highly conserved acute phase protein that is predominantly secreted by hepatocytes. However, its role in liver injury and fibrogenesis has not been elucidated so far. In this study, we determined the effects of SAA on hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), the main fibrogenic cell type of the liver. Serum amyloid A potently activated IκB kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), Erk and Akt and enhanced NF-κB-dependent luciferase activity in primary human and rat HSCs. Serum amyloid A induced the transcription of MCP-1, RANTES and MMP9 in an NF-κB- and JNK-dependent manner. Blockade of NF-κB revealed cytotoxic effects of SAA in primary HSCs with signs of apoptosis such as caspase 3 and PARP cleavage and Annexin V staining. Serum amyloid A induced HSC proliferation, which depended on JNK, Erk and Akt activity. In primary hepatocytes, SAA also activated MAP kinases, but did not induce relevant cell death after NF-κB inhibition. In two models of hepatic fibrogenesis, CCl4 treatment and bile duct ligation, hepatic mRNA levels of SAA1 and SAA3 were strongly increased. In conclusion, SAA may modulate fibrogenic responses in the liver in a positive and negative fashion by inducing inflammation, proliferation and cell death in HSCs. PMID:26937641

  3. Augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR) restrains concanavalin A-induced hepatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Mu, Mao; Zhang, Zhenwei; Cheng, Yi; Liu, Guangze; Chen, Xiusheng; Wu, Xin; Zhuang, Caifang; Liu, Bingying; Kong, Xiangping; You, Song

    2016-06-01

    Augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR), produced and released by hepatocytes, has cytoprotective and immunoregulatory effects on liver injury, and has been used in many experimental applications. However, little attention has been paid to the effects of ALR on concanavalin A (Con A)-induced hepatitis. The purpose of this paper is to explore the protective effect of ALR on Con A-induced hepatitis and elucidate potential mechanisms. We found that the ALR pretreatment evidently reduced the amount of ALT and AST in serum. In addition, pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and iNOS were suppressed. ALR pretreatment also decreased CD4(+), CD8(+) T cell infiltration in liver. Besides, we observed that ALR pretreatment was capable of suppressing the activation of several signaling pathways in Con A-induced hepatitis. These findings suggest that ALR can obviously weaken Con A-induced hepatitis and ALR has some certain immune regulation function. PMID:27085679

  4. Protective Effects of N-Acetylcysteine in Concanavalin A-Induced Hepatitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chengfen; Xia, Yujing; Dai, Weiqi; Wang, Fan; Chen, Kan; Li, Jingjing; Li, Sainan; Zhu, Rong; Yang, Jing; Yin, Qin; Zhang, Huawei; Wang, Junshan; Lu, Jie; Zhou, Yingqun; Guo, Chuanyong

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to study the protective effects and mechanisms of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) in concanavalin A-induced hepatitis in mice. In this study, pretreatment with NAC ameliorated the histopathological changes and suppressed inflammatory cytokines in ConA-induced hepatitis. The expression of IL-2, IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ was significantly reduced in the NAC-treated groups. NAC activated PI3K/Akt pathway and inhibited the activation of NF-κB. Additionally, NAC reduced autophagosome formation, as assessed by detecting the expression of LC3 and Beclin 1. Our results demonstrate that NAC can alleviate ConA-induced hepatitis by regulating the PI3K/Akt pathway and reducing the late stages of autophagy. Our results described a new pharmaceutical to provide more effective therapies for immune hepatitis. PMID:25821351

  5. Atg7 Knockdown Augments Concanavalin A-Induced Acute Hepatitis through an ROS-Mediated p38/MAPK Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuefeng; Xie, Qing; Wu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Concanavalin A (ConA), a T-cell mitogen that induces acute autoimmune hepatitis, is widely used to model pathophysiological processes of human acute autoimmune liver disease. Although autophagy has been extensively studied in the past decade, little is known about its molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of ConA-induced acute hepatitis. In this study, we used a Cre-conditional atg7 KO mouse to investigate the effects of Atg7-associated autophagy on ConA-induced murine hepatitis. Our results demonstrated that atg7 deficiency in mice enhanced macrophage activation and increased pro-inflammatory cytokines upon ConA stimulation. Atg7 silencing resulted in accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria, disruption of reactive oxygen species (ROS) degradation, and increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines in Raw264.7 cells. p38/MAPK and NF-κB levels were increased upon ConA induction due to Atg7 deficiency. Blocking ROS production inhibited ConA-induced p38/IκB phosphorylation and subsequent intracellular inflammatory responses. Hence, this study demonstrated that atg7 knockout in mice or Atg7 knockdown in cell culture augmented ConA-induced acute hepatitis and related cellular malfunction, indicating protective effects of Atg7 on regulating mitochondrial ROS via a p38/MAPK-mediated pathway. Collectively, our findings reveal that autophagy may attenuate macrophage-mediated inflammatory response to ConA and may be the potential therapeutic targets for acute liver injury. PMID:26939081

  6. Atg7 Knockdown Augments Concanavalin A-Induced Acute Hepatitis through an ROS-Mediated p38/MAPK Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yan; Li, Yi; Li, Xuefeng; Xie, Qing; Wu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Concanavalin A (ConA), a T-cell mitogen that induces acute autoimmune hepatitis, is widely used to model pathophysiological processes of human acute autoimmune liver disease. Although autophagy has been extensively studied in the past decade, little is known about its molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of ConA-induced acute hepatitis. In this study, we used a Cre-conditional atg7 KO mouse to investigate the effects of Atg7-associated autophagy on ConA-induced murine hepatitis. Our results demonstrated that atg7 deficiency in mice enhanced macrophage activation and increased pro-inflammatory cytokines upon ConA stimulation. Atg7 silencing resulted in accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria, disruption of reactive oxygen species (ROS) degradation, and increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines in Raw264.7 cells. p38/MAPK and NF-κB levels were increased upon ConA induction due to Atg7 deficiency. Blocking ROS production inhibited ConA-induced p38/IκB phosphorylation and subsequent intracellular inflammatory responses. Hence, this study demonstrated that atg7 knockout in mice or Atg7 knockdown in cell culture augmented ConA-induced acute hepatitis and related cellular malfunction, indicating protective effects of Atg7 on regulating mitochondrial ROS via a p38/MAPK-mediated pathway. Collectively, our findings reveal that autophagy may attenuate macrophage-mediated inflammatory response to ConA and may be the potential therapeutic targets for acute liver injury. PMID:26939081

  7. Protective Effects of Dracocephalum heterophyllum in ConA-Induced Acute Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qilan; Lu, Xiaohua; Shi, Qiangqiang; Zou, Junhui

    2016-01-01

    Dracocephalum heterophyllum (DH) is a Chinese herbal medicine used in treating hepatitis. However, the protective effects and pharmacological mechanisms of DH in hepatitis are unknown. In this study, we found that pretreatment with DH extract significantly ameliorated liver injury and suppressed the production of inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in Concanavalin A- (ConA-) induced hepatitis (CIH). DH recruited more CD11b+ Gr1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) to the liver and suppressed infiltration of macrophages (Kupffer cells) in the liver. The present work explores DH as an effective hepatoprotective medicine to inhibit inflammation and liver injury caused by hepatitis. PMID:27524863

  8. Inhibition of concanavalin A-induced mice hepatitis by coumarin derivatives.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, T; Yoshida, S; Kobayashi, T; Okabe, S

    2001-01-01

    The effects of coumarin derivatives, osthole, imperatorin, Pd-Ia, Pd-II and Pd-III, on mice concanavalin A (Con A) (0.2 mg/mouse, i.v.)-induced hepatitis were studied. At the dose of 200 mg/kg (i.p.), these coumarins inhibited more than 90% of the Con A-induced elevation of plasma alanine aminotransferase activity, but glycyrrhizin (200 mg/kg, i.p.) caused only 45% inhibition. At the dose of 100 mg/kg (i.p.), osthole produced the strongest inhibition among these coumarins. The inhibitory activity of osthole is lost when its 7-methoxy group is replaced by a 7-hydroxy group to form osthenol. The present results showed that coumarin derivatives inhibited Con A-induced hepatitis, with osthole being the most inhibitory. PMID:11243581

  9. The Protective Effect of Resveratrol on Concanavalin-A-Induced Acute Hepatic Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yingqun; Chen, Kan; He, Lei; Xia, Yujing; Dai, Weiqi; Wang, Fan; Li, Jingjing; Li, Sainan; Liu, Tong; Wang, Jianrong; Lu, Wenxia; Yin, Qin; Zhou, Yuqing; Lu, Jie; Teng, Hongfei; Guo, Chuanyong

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacologic Relevance. Resveratrol, an antioxidant derived from grapes, has been reported to modulate the inflammatory process. In this study, we investigated the effects of resveratrol and its mechanism of protection on concanavalin-A- (ConA-) induced liver injury in mice. Materials and Methods. Acute autoimmune hepatitis was induced by ConA (20 mg/kg) in Balb/C mice; mice were treated with resveratrol (10, 20, and 30 mg/kg) daily by oral gavage for fourteen days prior to a single intravenous injection of ConA. Eight hours after injection, histologic grading, proinflammatory cytokine levels, and hedgehog pathway activity were determined. Results. After ConA injection, the cytokines IL-2, IL-6, and TNF-α were increased, and Sonic hedgehog (Shh), Glioblastoma- (Gli-) 1, and Patched (Ptc) levels significantly increased. Pretreatment with resveratrol ameliorated the pathologic effects of ConA-induced autoimmune hepatitis and significantly inhibited IL-2, IL-6, TNF-α, Shh, Gli-1, and Ptc. The effects of resveratrol on the hedgehog pathway were studied by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Resveratrol decreased Shh expression, possibly by inhibiting Shh expression in order to reduce Gli-1 and Ptc expression. Conclusion. Resveratrol protects against ConA-induced autoimmune hepatitis by decreasing cytokines expression in mice. The decreases seen in Gli-1 and Ptc may correlate with the amelioration of hedgehog pathway activity. PMID:26089871

  10. Glutathione peroxidase 1 deficiency attenuates concanavalin A-induced hepatic injury by modulation of T-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, D H; Son, D J; Park, M H; Yoon, D Y; Han, S B; Hong, J T

    2016-01-01

    Concanavalin A (Con A)-induced hepatitis model is well-established experimental T cell-mediated liver disease. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) is associated with T-cell activation and proliferation, but continued ROS exposure induces T-cell hyporesponsiveness. Because glutathione peroxidase 1 (Gpx1) is an antioxidant enzyme and is involved in T-cell development, we investigated the role of Gpx1 during Con A-induced liver injury in Gpx1 knockout (KO) mice. Male wild-type (WT) mice and Gpx1 KO mice were intravenously injected with Con A (10 mg/kg), and then killed after 8 h after Con A injection. Serum levels of aspartate transaminase and alanine transaminase were measured to assess hepatic injury. To identify that Gpx1 affects T cell-mediated inflammation, we pretreated Gpx1 inhibitor to Human Jurkat T cells then treated Con A. Con A-induced massive liver damage in WT mice but its damage was attenuated in Gpx1 KO mice. Con A-induced Th1 cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin (IL)-2 were also decreased in the liver and spleen of Gpx1 KO mice compared with WT mice. In Jurkat T cells, Con A-induced mRNA levels of IL-2, IFN-γ and TNF-α were downregulated by pretreatment of Gpx inhibitor, mercaptosuccinic acid. We also observed that Gpx1 KO mice showed increasing oxidative stress in the liver and spleen compared with WT mice. These results suggest that Gpx1 deficiency attenuates Con A-induced liver injury by induction of T-cell hyporesponsiveness through chronic ROS exposure. PMID:27124582

  11. Modeling Hepatitis C treatment policy.

    SciTech Connect

    Kuypers, Marshall A.; Lambert, Gregory Joseph; Moore, Thomas W.; Glass, Robert John,; Finley, Patrick D.; Ross, David; Chartier, Maggie

    2013-09-01

    Chronic infection with Hepatitis C virus (HCV) results in cirrhosis, liver cancer and death. As the nation's largest provider of care for HCV, US Veterans Health Administration (VHA) invests extensive resources in the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. This report documents modeling and analysis of HCV treatment dynamics performed for the VHA aimed at improving service delivery efficiency. System dynamics modeling of disease treatment demonstrated the benefits of early detection and the role of comorbidities in disease progress and patient mortality. Preliminary modeling showed that adherence to rigorous treatment protocols is a primary determinant of treatment success. In depth meta-analysis revealed correlations of adherence and various psycho-social factors. This initial meta-analysis indicates areas where substantial improvement in patient outcomes can potentially result from VA programs which incorporate these factors into their design.

  12. The concanavalin A model of acute hepatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Heymann, F; Hamesch, K; Weiskirchen, R; Tacke, F

    2015-04-01

    The intravenous injection of the plant lectin concanavalin A (ConA) is a widely used model for acute immune-mediated hepatitis in mice. In contrast to several other models for acute hepatic damage, ConA-induced injury is primarily driven by the activation and recruitment of T cells to the liver. Hence, the ConA model has unique features with respect to its pathogenesis and important similarities to immune-mediated hepatitis in humans, such as autoimmune hepatitis, acute viral hepatitis or distinct entities of drug toxicity leading to immune activation. However, the ConA model has considerable variability, depending on the preparation of the compound, genetic background of the mice, sex, age and microbial environment of the animal facility barrier. This standard operating procedure (SOP) comprises a detailed protocol for the ConA application, including preparation of ConA working solution, handling of the animals, choice of the appropriate conditions and endpoints, as well as efficient dose-finding. PMID:25835734

  13. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) attenuates concanavalin A-induced hepatic injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongmei; Zhang, Xiaoli; Jiang, Li; Guo, Yun; Zheng, Changqing

    2014-05-01

    (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is the most abundant polyphenolic compound present in green tea and has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of EGCG against concanavalin A (ConA)-induced liver injury and the underlying mechanisms. EGCG (5 mg/kg) was administered orally by gavage to mice twice daily for 10 days before an intravenous injection of ConA. We found that EGCG effectively rescued lethality, improved hepatic pathological damage, and decreased serum levels of alanine aminotransaminase (ALT) in ConA-challenged mice. Furthermore, EGCG also significantly prevented the release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-4, and IL-6 in serum, reduced malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, and restored glutathione (GSH) content and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in liver tissues from ConA-challenged mice. Finally, nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation and expression levels of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, TLR4 and TLR9 protein in liver tissues were significantly inhibited by EGCG pretreatment. Taken together, our data suggest that EGCG possesses hepatoprotective properties against ConA-induced liver injury through its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant actions. PMID:24373695

  14. Experimental models of hepatic encephalopathy: ISHEN guidelines.

    PubMed

    Butterworth, Roger F; Norenberg, Michael D; Felipo, Vicente; Ferenci, Peter; Albrecht, Jan; Blei, Andres T

    2009-07-01

    Objectives of the International Society for Hepatic Encephalopathy and Nitrogen Metabolism Commission were to identify well-characterized animal models of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) and to highlight areas of animal modelling of the disorder that are in need of development. Features essential to HE modelling were identified. The best-characterized animal models of HE in acute liver failure, the so-called Type A HE, were found to be the hepatic devascularized rat and the rat with thioacetamide-induced toxic liver injury. In case of chronic liver failure, surgical models in the rat involving end-to-side portacaval anastomosis or bile duct ligation were considered to best model minimal/mild (Type B) HE. Unfortunately, at this time, there are no satisfactory animal models of Type C HE resulting from end-stage alcoholic liver disease or viral hepatitis, the most common aetiologies encountered in patients. The commission highlighted the urgent need for such models and of improved models of HE in chronic liver failure in general as well as a need for models of post-transplant neuropsychiatric disorders. Studies of HE pathophysiology at the cellular and molecular level continue to benefit from in vitro and or ex vivo models involving brain slices or exposure of cultured cells (principally cultured astrocytes) to toxins such as ammonia, manganese and pro-inflammatory cytokines. More attention could be paid in the future to in vitro models involving the neurovascular unit, microglia and neuronal co-cultures in relation to HE pathogenesis. PMID:19638106

  15. Parthenolide ameliorates Concanavalin A-induced acute hepatitis in mice and modulates the macrophages to an anti-inflammatory state.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Wang, Huafeng; Fu, Shuyu; Cheng, Xixi; Yang, Fengrui; Zhang, Qi; Li, Yan; Xue, Zhenyi; Zhang, Lijuan; Huang, Wenjing; Yang, Luhong; Na, Dongchen; Da, Yurong; Kong, Ying; Zhang, Rongxin

    2016-09-01

    Parthenolide, the principal sesquiterpene lactone present in medicinal plants such as feverfew, has anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities. In the present study, we investigated the protective role of parthenolide against acute hepatitis in mice. Mice acute hepatitis were induced by Concanavalin A and treated by parthenolide in vivo. Results shown that parthenolide remarkably reduced the congestion and necroinflammation of the mice livers with Concanavalin A-induced acute hepatitis. Meanwhile, parthenolide treatment recover the liver function which indicated by decreased the serum alanine transaminase and alkaline phosphatase activities and promoted the expression of Ki67 in the livers of these mice. In addition, parthenolide administration suppressed the Concanavalin A-induced immune reaction, as indicated by the number of F4/80, CD49b and CD4 cells present in the liver. Furthermore, parthenolide also significantly reduced the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-17A, IL-1β and IL-6 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 cells in vitro. Moreover, parthenolide exposure decreased the phosphorylation of STAT3 and p38, and promoted the phosphorylation of p53 in RAW264.7 cells in vitro. In conclusion, parthenolide represents a drug candidate to protect the liver against Concanavalin A-induced acute hepatitis. The possible molecular mechanism involves the anti-inflammatory effects of parthenolide may by suppressing the STAT3/p38 signals and enhanced the p53 signals. PMID:27270078

  16. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate attenuates apoptosis and autophagy in concanavalin A-induced hepatitis by inhibiting BNIP3

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sainan; Xia, Yujing; Chen, Kan; Li, Jingjing; Liu, Tong; Wang, Fan; Lu, Jie; Zhou, Yingqun; Guo, Chuanyong

    2016-01-01

    Background Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is the most effective compound in green tea, and possesses a wide range of beneficial effects, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiobesity, and anticancer effects. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of EGCG in concanavalin A (ConA)-induced hepatitis in mice and explored the possible mechanisms involved in these effects. Methods Balb/C mice were injected with ConA (25 mg/kg) to induce acute autoimmune hepatitis, and EGCG (10 or 30 mg/kg) was administered orally twice daily for 10 days before ConA injection. Serum liver enzymes, proinflammatory cytokines, and other marker proteins were determined 2, 8, and 24 hours after the ConA administration. Results BNIP3 mediated cell apoptosis and autophagy in ConA-induced hepatitis. EGCG decreased the immunoreaction and pathological damage by reducing inflammatory factors, such as TNF-α, IL-6, IFN-γ, and IL-1β. EGCG also exhibited an antiapoptotic and antiautophagic effect by inhibiting BNIP3 via the IL-6/JAKs/STAT3 pathway. Conclusion EGCG attenuated liver injury in ConA-induced hepatitis by downregulating IL-6/JAKs/STAT3/BNIP3-mediated apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:26929598

  17. Forced expression of Hnf4a induces hepatic gene activation through directed differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yahoo, Neda; Pournasr, Behshad; Rostamzadeh, Jalal; Fathi, Fardin

    2016-08-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are capable of unlimited self-renewal and have a diverse differentiation potential. These unique features make ES cells as an attractive source for developmental biology studies. Having the mature hepatocyte in the lab with functional activities is valuable in drug discovery studies. Overexpression of hepatocyte lineage-specific transcription factors (TFs) becomes a promising approach in pluripotent cell differentiation toward liver cells. Many studies generate transgenic ES cell lines to examine the effects of specific TFs overexpression in cell differentiation. In the present report, we have addressed whether a suspension or adherent model of differentiation is an appropriate way to study the role of Hnf4a overexpression. We generated ES cells that carried a doxycycline (Dox)-inducible Hnf4a using lentiviral vectors. The transduced cells were subjected to induced Hnf4a overexpression through both spontaneous and directed differentiation methods. Gene expression analysis showed substantially increased expression of hepatic gene markers, particularly Ttr and endogenous Hnf4a, in transduced cells differentiated by the directed approach. These results demonstrated that forced expression of TFs during directed differentiation would be an appropriate way to study relevant gene activation and the effects of overexpression in the context of hepatic differentiation. PMID:27233607

  18. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Hepatitis KidsHealth > For Kids > Hepatitis Print A A A ... an important digestive liquid called bile . What Is Hepatitis? Hepatitis is an inflammation (say: in-fluh-MAY- ...

  19. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... has been associated with drinking contaminated water. Hepatitis Viruses Type Transmission Prognosis A Fecal-oral (stool to ... risk for severe disease. Others A variety of viruses can affect the liver Signs and Symptoms Hepatitis ...

  20. Physiologically based synthetic models of hepatic disposition.

    PubMed

    Hunt, C Anthony; Ropella, Glen E P; Yan, Li; Hung, Daniel Y; Roberts, Michael S

    2006-12-01

    Current physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models are inductive. We present an additional, different approach that is based on the synthetic rather than the inductive approach to modeling and simulation. It relies on object-oriented programming. A model of the referent system in its experimental context is synthesized by assembling objects that represent components such as molecules, cells, aspects of tissue architecture, catheters, etc. The single pass perfused rat liver has been well described in evaluating hepatic drug pharmacokinetics (PK) and is the system on which we focus. In silico experiments begin with administration of objects representing actual compounds. Data are collected in a manner analogous to that in the referent PK experiments. The synthetic modeling method allows for recognition and representation of discrete event and discrete time processes, as well as heterogeneity in organization, function, and spatial effects. An application is developed for sucrose and antipyrine, administered separately and together. PBPK modeling has made extensive progress in characterizing abstracted PK properties but this has also been its limitation. Now, other important questions and possible extensions emerge. How are these PK properties and the observed behaviors generated? The inherent heuristic limitations of traditional models have hindered getting meaningful, detailed answers to such questions. Synthetic models of the type described here are specifically intended to help answer such questions. Analogous to wet-lab experimental models, they retain their applicability even when broken apart into sub-components. Having and applying this new class of models along with traditional PK modeling methods is expected to increase the productivity of pharmaceutical research at all levels that make use of modeling and simulation. PMID:17051440

  1. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... be serious. Some can lead to scarring, called cirrhosis, or to liver cancer. Sometimes hepatitis goes away by itself. If it does not, it can be treated with drugs. Sometimes hepatitis lasts a lifetime. Vaccines can help prevent some viral forms.

  2. Protective Effects of Astaxanthin on ConA-Induced Autoimmune Hepatitis by the JNK/p-JNK Pathway-Mediated Inhibition of Autophagy and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tong; Wang, Junshan; Dai, Weiqi; Wang, Fan; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Chen, Kan; Li, Sainan; Abudumijiti, Huerxidan; Zhou, Zheng; Wang, Jianrong; Lu, Wenxia; Zhu, Rong; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Huawei; Yin, Qin; Wang, Chengfen; Zhou, Yuqing; Lu, Jie; Zhou, Yingqun; Guo, Chuanyong

    2015-01-01

    Objective Astaxanthin, a potent antioxidant, exhibits a wide range of biological activities, including antioxidant, atherosclerosis and antitumor activities. However, its effect on concanavalin A (ConA)-induced autoimmune hepatitis remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of astaxanthin on ConA-induced hepatitis in mice, and to elucidate the mechanisms of regulation. Materials and Methods Autoimmune hepatitis was induced in in Balb/C mice using ConA (25 mg/kg), and astaxanthin was orally administered daily at two doses (20 mg/kg and 40 mg/kg) for 14 days before ConA injection. Levels of serum liver enzymes and the histopathology of inflammatory cytokines and other maker proteins were determined at three time points (2, 8 and 24 h). Primary hepatocytes were pretreated with astaxanthin (80 μM) in vitro 24 h before stimulation with TNF-α (10 ng/ml). The apoptosis rate and related protein expression were determined 24 h after the administration of TNF-α. Results Astaxanthin attenuated serum liver enzymes and pathological damage by reducing the release of inflammatory factors. It performed anti-apoptotic effects via the descending phosphorylation of Bcl-2 through the down-regulation of the JNK/p-JNK pathway. Conclusion This research firstly expounded that astaxanthin reduced immune liver injury in ConA-induced autoimmune hepatitis. The mode of action appears to be downregulation of JNK/p-JNK-mediated apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:25761053

  3. GIT2 deficiency attenuates concanavalin A-induced hepatitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yu-E; He, Dong-Fang; Yin, Rong-Hua; Chen, Hui; Wang, Jian; Wang, Shao-Xia; Zhan, Yi-Qun; Ge, Chang-Hui; Li, Chang-Yan; Yu, Miao; Yang, Xiao-Ming

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase interactor 2 (GIT2) is a signaling scaffold protein involved in regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics and the internalization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The short-splice form of GIT2 is expressed in peripheral T cells and thymocytes. However, the functions of GIT2 in T cells have not yet been determined. We show that treatment with Con A in a model of polyclonal T-lymphocyte activation resulted in marked inhibitions in the intrahepatic infiltration of inflammatory cells, cytokine response and acute liver failure in Git2−/− mice. CD4+ T cells from Git2−/− mice showed significant impairment in proliferation, cytokine production and signal transduction upon TCR-stimulated activation. Our results suggested that GIT2 plays an important role in T-cell function in vivo and in vitro. PMID:26380813

  4. Experimental models for hepatitis C virus (HCV): new opportunities for combating hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Trujillo-Murillo, Karina del Carmen; Garza-Rodríguez, María del Lourdes; Martínez-Rodríguez, Herminia Guadalupe; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo Alberto; Bosques-Padilla, Francisco; Ramos-Jiménez, Javier; Rivas-Estilla, Ana María

    2004-01-01

    Infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a global public health issue. More than 200 million people in the world are infected with HCV. Hepatitis C is considered one of the main causes of chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and liver transplantation. The identification of the viral genome quickly allowed delineation of genomic organization, and the structure and biochemical characterization of the proteins of HCV. However, it has been difficult to study its life cycle, as well as the development of antiviral agents due to the lack of a system of permissible culture. Numerous attempts have been reported to establish an in vitro system for the study of HCV. Recently, a system of efficient culture was established that allows replication of subgenomic molecules of HCV in a cell line of human hepatoma. In this revision, after a brief description of the molecular biology, means of transmission and clinical characteristics of hepatitis C, some of the experimental models are described that have been developed to date, focusing mainly on the subgenomic replicon system and their use in the development of new antiviral treatments. PMID:15257247

  5. Methane-rich saline protects against concanavalin A-induced autoimmune hepatitis in mice through anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative pathways.

    PubMed

    He, Rong; Wang, Liping; Zhu, Jiali; Fei, Miaomiao; Bao, Suhong; Meng, Yan; Wang, Yuanyuan; Li, Jinbao; Deng, Xiaoming

    2016-01-29

    Methane is a common gas which has been reported to play a protective role in organ injury and presents an anti-inflammatory property. However, its effects on Concanavalin A (Con A)-induced autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) remain unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of methane on Con A-induced autoimmune hepatitis in mice and its underlying mechanism. Autoimmune hepatitis was induced by Con A (15 mg/kg) in healthy C57BL/6 mice and methane-rich saline (MS) (20 ml/kg) was intraperitoneally injected 30 min after the challenge with Con A. We found that methane treatment significantly reduced the elevated serum aminotransferase levels and ameliorated liver pathological damage. Furthermore, methane treatment obviously suppressed the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and increased anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10). Moreover, we found that the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) were highly increased while the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were decreased in liver with the injection of Con A, which was reversed by methane. Also, the data demonstrated that the phosphorylated IκB, NF-κB and P38 MAPK in liver were significantly down-regulated by methane. These results suggested that methane protected liver against Con A-induced injury through anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative pathways. PMID:26721437

  6. Halothane hepatitis in an animal model: time course of hepatic damage.

    PubMed Central

    Knights, K. M.; Gourlay, G. K.; Hall, P. D.; Adams, J. F.; Cousins, M. J.

    1987-01-01

    The present study extends previous reports of hepatic damage 24 h after halothane anaesthesia in the phenobarbitone pretreated hypoxic rat model by fully characterizing the lesion during the time course of its onset and recovery. Phenobarbitone treated animals exposed to halothane (1% for 2 h in 14% inspired oxygen) were killed 1, 2, 4, 6, 12 and 24 h and 2, 3, 5, 10, 15 and 30 days after commencement of the anaesthetic period. Blood was collected 1 day before the administration of halothane and at the time of killing for determination of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), a biochemical index of hepatic damage. Liver tissue was obtained immediately at post-mortem for histological examination. Serum ALT was increased at the end of the anaesthetic period, i.e. 2 h, with peak levels occurring at 12-24 h and remaining elevated for 3 days after exposure. Minor changes in liver histology were evident at 2 h in 50% of the animals and by 6 h all animals had mild hepatic injury. The extent of the necrosis was maximal at 24 h and this was sustained until 3 days. By 5 days after exposure minimal evidence of liver damage was observed and animals killed at 30 days had morphologically normal livers. Elevation of serum ALT or changes in liver histology were not observed in other treatment groups. The early onset of damage at 2-6 h is in keeping with direct hepatotoxicity associated with the biotransformation of halothane. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:3689669

  7. Modeling the hepatic arterial buffer response in the liver.

    PubMed

    Ho, Harvey; Sorrell, Keagan; Bartlett, Adam; Hunter, Peter

    2013-08-01

    In this paper we present an electrical analog model for the hepatic arterial buffer response (HABR), an intrinsic regulation mechanism in the liver whereby the arterial flow counteracts the changes in portal venous flow. The model itself is a substantial simplification of a previously published model, with nonlinear arterial and portal resistors introduced to account for the dynamic HABR effects. We calibrate the baseline model using published hemodynamic data, and then perform a virtual portal occlusion simulation where the portal vein is half or fully occluded. The simulation results, which suggest that the increased arterial flow cannot fully compensate lost portal perfusion, are consistent with clinical reports and animal model findings. Since HABR functions in both the whole liver and liver graft after transplantation, we also simulate blood flow in a virtual right-lobe graft by adjusting the electronic component parameters in the electric circuit, and our model is able to reproduce the portal venous hyperperfusion and hepatic arterial hypoperfusion conditions due to the HABR effects. PMID:23157977

  8. Bioinformatics analysis of hepatitis C virus genotype 2a-induced human hepatocellular carcinoma in Huh7 cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ping; Wu, Meiying; Chen, Hui; Xu, Junchi; Wu, Minjuan; Li, Ming; Qian, Feng; Xu, Junhua

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a liver cancer that could be induced by hepatitis C virus genotype 2a Japanese fulminant hepatitis-1 (JFH-1) strain. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms of HCC. The microarray data GSE20948 includes 14 JFH-1- and 14 mock (equal volume of medium [control])-infected Huh7 samples. The data were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus. After data processing, soft cluster analyses were performed to identify co-regulated genes with similar temporal expression patterns. Functional and pathway enrichment analyses, as well as functional annotation analysis, were performed. Subsequently, combined networks of protein–protein interaction network, microRNA regulatory network, and transcriptional regulatory network were constructed. Hub nodes, modules, and five clusters of co-regulated genes were also identified. In total, 173 up and 207 down co-regulated genes were separately identified in JFH-1-infected Huh7 cells compared with those of control cells. Functional enrichment analysis indicated that up co-regulated genes were related to skeletal system morphogenesis and neuron differentiation and down co-regulated genes were related to steroid/cholesterol/sterol metabolisms. Hub genes (such as IRF1, GBP1, ICAM1, Foxa1, DHCR7, HMGCS2, and MSMO1) were identified. Transcription factors IRF1 and Foxa1 were the targets of miR-130a, miR-17-5p, and miR-20a. PPARGC1A was targeted by miR-29 family, and MSMO1 was the target of miR-23 family. Hub nodes (such as IRF1, GBP1, ICAM1, Foxa1, DHCR7, HMGCS2, and MSMO1) and microRNAs might be used as candidate biomarkers of JFH-1-infected HCC. PMID:26811688

  9. Bioinformatics analysis of hepatitis C virus genotype 2a-induced human hepatocellular carcinoma in Huh7 cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ping; Wu, Meiying; Chen, Hui; Xu, Junchi; Wu, Minjuan; Li, Ming; Qian, Feng; Xu, Junhua

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a liver cancer that could be induced by hepatitis C virus genotype 2a Japanese fulminant hepatitis-1 (JFH-1) strain. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms of HCC. The microarray data GSE20948 includes 14 JFH-1- and 14 mock (equal volume of medium [control])-infected Huh7 samples. The data were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus. After data processing, soft cluster analyses were performed to identify co-regulated genes with similar temporal expression patterns. Functional and pathway enrichment analyses, as well as functional annotation analysis, were performed. Subsequently, combined networks of protein-protein interaction network, microRNA regulatory network, and transcriptional regulatory network were constructed. Hub nodes, modules, and five clusters of co-regulated genes were also identified. In total, 173 up and 207 down co-regulated genes were separately identified in JFH-1-infected Huh7 cells compared with those of control cells. Functional enrichment analysis indicated that up co-regulated genes were related to skeletal system morphogenesis and neuron differentiation and down co-regulated genes were related to steroid/cholesterol/sterol metabolisms. Hub genes (such as IRF1, GBP1, ICAM1, Foxa1, DHCR7, HMGCS2, and MSMO1) were identified. Transcription factors IRF1 and Foxa1 were the targets of miR-130a, miR-17-5p, and miR-20a. PPARGC1A was targeted by miR-29 family, and MSMO1 was the target of miR-23 family. Hub nodes (such as IRF1, GBP1, ICAM1, Foxa1, DHCR7, HMGCS2, and MSMO1) and microRNAs might be used as candidate biomarkers of JFH-1-infected HCC. PMID:26811688

  10. A Thermodynamic Model for Genome Packaging in Hepatitis B Virus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jehoon; Wu, Jianzhong

    2015-10-20

    Understanding the fundamentals of genome packaging in viral capsids is important for finding effective antiviral strategies and for utilizing benign viral particles for gene therapy. While the structure of encapsidated genomic materials has been routinely characterized with experimental techniques such as cryo-electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction, much less is known about the molecular driving forces underlying genome assembly in an intracellular environment and its in vivo interactions with the capsid proteins. Here we study the thermodynamic basis of the pregenomic RNA encapsidation in human Hepatitis B virus in vivo using a coarse-grained molecular model that captures the essential components of nonspecific intermolecular interactions. The thermodynamic model is used to examine how the electrostatic interaction between the packaged RNA and the highly charged C-terminal domains (CTD) of capsid proteins regulate the nucleocapsid formation. The theoretical model predicts optimal RNA content in Hepatitis B virus nucleocapsids with different CTD lengths in good agreement with mutagenesis measurements, confirming the predominant role of electrostatic interactions and molecular excluded-volume effects in genome packaging. We find that the amount of encapsidated RNA is not linearly correlated with the net charge of CTD tails as suggested by earlier theoretical studies. Our thermodynamic analysis of the nucleocapsid structure and stability indicates that ∼10% of the CTD residues are free from complexation with RNA, resulting in partially exposed CTD tails. The thermodynamic model also predicts the free energy of complex formation between macromolecules, which corroborates experimental results for the impact of CTD truncation on the nucleocapsid stability. PMID:26488660

  11. Transmission Model of Hepatitis B Virus with the Migration Effect

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad Altaf; Islam, Saeed; Arif, Muhammad; ul Haq, Zahoor

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis B is a globally infectious disease. Mathematical modeling of HBV transmission is an interesting research area. In this paper, we present characteristics of HBV virus transmission in the form of a mathematical model. We analyzed the effect of immigrants in the model to study the effect of immigrants for the host population. We added the following flow parameters: “the transmission between migrated and exposed class” and “the transmission between migrated and acute class.” With these new features, we obtained a compartment model of six differential equations. First, we find the basic threshold quantity Ro and then find the local asymptotic stability of disease-free equilibrium and endemic equilibrium. Furthermore, we find the global stability of the disease-free and endemic equilibria. Previous similar publications have not added the kind of information about the numerical results of the model. In our case, from numerical simulation, a detailed discussion of the parameters and their numerical results is presented. We claim that with these assumptions and by adding the migrated class, the model informs policy for governments, to be aware of the immigrants and subject them to tests about the disease status. Immigrants for short visits and students should be subjected to tests to reduce the number of immigrants with disease. PMID:23984318

  12. Mapping Metabolic Brain Activity in Three Models of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, Marta; Fidalgo, Camino; Aller, María Ángeles; Arias, Jaime; Arias, Jorge L.

    2013-01-01

    Cirrhosis is a common disease in Western countries. Liver failure, hyperammonemia, and portal hypertension are the main factors that contribute to human cirrhosis that frequently leads to a neuropsychiatric disorder known as hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In this study, we examined the differential contribution of these leading factors to the oxidative metabolism of diverse brain limbic system regions frequently involved in memory process by histochemical labelling of cytochrome oxidase (COx). We have analyzed cortical structures such as the infralimbic and prelimbic cotices, subcortical structures such as hippocampus and ventral striatum, at thalamic level like the anterodorsal, anteroventral, and mediodorsal thalamus, and, finally, the hypothalamus, where the mammillary nuclei (medial and lateral) were measured. The severest alteration is found in the model that mimics intoxication by ammonia, followed by the thioacetamide-treated group and the portal hypertension group. No changes were found at the mammillary bodies for any of the experimental groups. PMID:23573412

  13. Empirical fitness models for hepatitis C virus immunogen design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Gregory R.; Ferguson, Andrew L.

    2015-12-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) afflicts 170 million people worldwide, 2%-3% of the global population, and kills 350 000 each year. Prophylactic vaccination offers the most realistic and cost effective hope of controlling this epidemic in the developing world where expensive drug therapies are not available. Despite 20 years of research, the high mutability of the virus and lack of knowledge of what constitutes effective immune responses have impeded development of an effective vaccine. Coupling data mining of sequence databases with spin glass models from statistical physics, we have developed a computational approach to translate clinical sequence databases into empirical fitness landscapes quantifying the replicative capacity of the virus as a function of its amino acid sequence. These landscapes explicitly connect viral genotype to phenotypic fitness, and reveal vulnerable immunological targets within the viral proteome that can be exploited to rationally design vaccine immunogens. We have recovered the empirical fitness landscape for the HCV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (protein NS5B) responsible for viral genome replication, and validated the predictions of our model by demonstrating excellent accord with experimental measurements and clinical observations. We have used our landscapes to perform exhaustive in silico screening of 16.8 million T-cell immunogen candidates to identify 86 optimal formulations. By reducing the search space of immunogen candidates by over five orders of magnitude, our approach can offer valuable savings in time, expense, and labor for experimental vaccine development and accelerate the search for a HCV vaccine. Abbreviations: HCV—hepatitis C virus, HLA—human leukocyte antigen, CTL—cytotoxic T lymphocyte, NS5B—nonstructural protein 5B, MSA—multiple sequence alignment, PEG-IFN—pegylated interferon.

  14. A perspective on modelling hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Guedj, J; Rong, L; Dahari, H; Perelson, A S

    2010-12-01

    By mathematically describing early hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA decay after initiation of interferon (IFN)-based antiviral therapy, crucial parameters of the in vivo viral kinetics have been estimated, such as the rate of production and clearance of free virus, and the rate of loss of infected cells. Furthermore, by suggesting mechanisms of action for IFN and ribavirin mathematical modelling has provided a means for evaluating and optimizing treatment strategies. Here, we review recent modelling developments for understanding complex viral kinetics patterns, such as triphasic HCV RNA declines and viral rebounds observed in patients treated with pegylated interferon and ribavirin. Moreover, we discuss new modelling approaches developed to interpret the viral kinetics observed in clinical trials with direct-acting antiviral agents, which induce a rapid decline of wild-type virus but also engender a higher risk for emergence of drug-resistant variants. Lastly, as in vitro systems have allowed a better characterization of the virus lifecycle, we discuss new modelling approaches that combine the intracellular and the extracellular viral dynamics. PMID:20723038

  15. A model for the extended studies of hepatic hemodynamics and metabolism in swine.

    PubMed

    Drougas, J G; Barnard, S E; Wright, J K; Sika, M; Lopez, R R; Stokes, K A; Williams, P E; Pinson, C W

    1996-12-01

    To our knowledge postoperative hepatic hemodynamics and hepatic metabolism have not been fully studied on a long-term basis. Our goal was to develop a large animal model that would permit the measurement of hepatic blood flow (BF), perihepatic pressures (P), and hepatic metabolism in a long-term setting. Catheters were inserted into the jugular vein, carotid artery, pulmonary artery, hepatic vein, and portal vein (PV) of 27 commercially bred pigs; ultrasonic transit time flowmeter probes were placed around the hepatic artery and PV. Daily postoperative measurements of jugular vein P, carotid artery P, pulmonary artery P, hepatic vein P, and PVP, as well as hepatic artery BF and PVBF, were recorded for 20 days. Hepatic carbohydrate metabolism was assessed by arteriovenous difference techniques. Jugular vein P, pulmonary artery P, hepatic vein P, PVP, and heart rate reached steady-state values during the first week, with a mean +/- SEM of 1.0 +/- 0.3 mm Hg for jugular vein P, 21.4 +/- 2.1 mm Hg for pulmonary artery P, 4.3 +/- 0.4 mm Hg for HVP, 7.8 +/- 0.5 mm Hg for PVP, and 116 +/- 4 beats per minute for heart rate. Mean carotid artery P increased from 65 +/- 3 mm Hg during surgery to 94 +/- 2 mm Hg on postoperative day 1 (P < 0.001) and to a mean 101 +/- 2 mm Hg thereafter. Total hepatic BF reached a steady-state value of 1,132 +/- 187 ml/min by postoperative day 7 (P = 0.19). Over week 1 hepatic artery BF measured as a percentage of total hepatic BF decreased from 35.0 +/- 3.0% to 15.5 +/- 2.7%, and PVBF increased from 65.0 +/- 3.0% to 84.5 +/- 2.7% (P < 0.005); both variables were steady thereafter. In the hemodynamic steady state the net hepatic balances of glucose, lactate, glycerol, and alanine in 5 pigs were 9.9 +/- 4.0, -4.2 +/- 0.4, -2.3 +/- 1.1, and -0.68 +/- 0.22 micromol/kg per min respectively. The net gut (portal-drained viscera) balances of glucose, lactate, alanine, and glycerol were -2.0 +/- 2.5, 1.1 +/- 0.5, 0.73 +/- 0.18, and -0.69 +/- 0

  16. Experimental models of hepatitis B and C - new insights and progress.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Emmanuel; Liang, T Jake

    2016-06-01

    Viral hepatitis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, affecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide. Hepatitis-causing viruses initiate disease by establishing both acute and chronic infections, and several of these viruses are specifically associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. Consequently, intense research efforts have been focusing on increasing our understanding of hepatitis virus biology and on improving antiviral therapy and vaccination strategies. Although valuable information on viral hepatitis emerged from careful epidemiological studies on sporadic outbreaks in humans, experimental models using cell culture, rodent and non-human primates were essential in advancing the field. Through the use of these experimental models, improvement in both the treatment and prevention of viral hepatitis has progressed rapidly; however, agents of viral hepatitis are still among the most common pathogens infecting humans. In this Review, we describe the important part that these experimental models have played in the study of viral hepatitis and led to monumental advances in our understanding and treatment of these pathogens. Ongoing developments in experimental models are also described. PMID:27075261

  17. Alcohol induced hepatic degeneration in a hepatitis C virus core protein transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Noh, Dong-Hyung; Lee, Eun-Joo; Kim, Ah-Young; Lee, Eun-Mi; Min, Chang-Woo; Kang, Kyung-Ku; Lee, Myeong-Mi; Kim, Sang-Hyeob; Sung, Soo-Eun; Hwang, Meeyul; Yu, Dae-Yeul; Jeong, Kyu-Shik

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has become a major public health issue. It is prevalent in most countries. HCV infection frequently begins without clinical symptoms, before progressing to persistent viremia, chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the majority of patients (70% to 80%). Alcohol is an independent cofactor that accelerates the development of HCC in chronic hepatitis C patients. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate ethanol-induced hepatic changes in HCV core-Tg mice and mutant core Tg mice. Wild type (NTG), core wild-Tg mice (TG-K), mutant core 116-Tg mice (TG-116) and mutant core 99-Tg mice (TG-99) were used in this investigation. All groups were given drinking water with 10% ethanol and 5% sucrose for 13 weeks. To observe liver morphological changes, we performed histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations. Histopathologically, NTG, TG-K and TG-116 mice showed moderate centrilobular necrosis, while severe centrilobular necrosis and hepatocyte dissociation were observed in TG-99 mice with increasing lymphocyte infiltration and piecemeal necrosis. In all groups, a small amount of collagen fiber was found, principally in portal areas. None of the mice were found to have myofibroblasts based on immunohistochemical staining specific for α-SMA. CYP2E1-positive cells were clearly detected in the centrilobular area in all groups. In the TG-99 mice, we also observed cells positive for CK8/18, TGF-β1 and phosphorylated (p)-Smad2/3 and p21 around the necrotic hepatocytes in the centrilobular area (p < 0.01). Based on our data, alcohol intake induced piecemeal necrosis and hepatocyte dissociation in the TG-99 mice. These phenomena involved activation of the TGF-β1/p-Smad2/3/p21 signaling pathway in hepatocytes. Data from this study will be useful for elucidating the association between alcohol intake and HCV infection. PMID:24608925

  18. Antenna design for microwave hepatic ablation using an axisymmetric electromagnetic model

    PubMed Central

    Bertram, John M; Yang, Deshan; Converse, Mark C; Webster, John G; Mahvi, David M

    2006-01-01

    Background An axisymmetric finite element method (FEM) model was employed to demonstrate important techniques used in the design of antennas for hepatic microwave ablation (MWA). To effectively treat deep-seated hepatic tumors, these antennas should produce a highly localized specific absorption rate (SAR) pattern and be efficient radiators at approved generator frequencies. Methods and results As an example, a double slot choked antenna for hepatic MWA was designed and implemented using FEMLAB™ 3.0. Discussion This paper emphasizes the importance of factors that can affect simulation accuracy, which include boundary conditions, the dielectric properties of liver tissue, and mesh resolution. PMID:16504153

  19. Recent contributions of in vitro models to our understanding of hepatitis C virus life cycle.

    PubMed

    Régeard, Morgane; Lepère, Charlotte; Trotard, Maud; Gripon, Philippe; Le Seyec, Jacques

    2007-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus is a human pathogen responsible for liver diseases including acute and chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Its high prevalence, the absence of a prophylactic vaccine and the poor efficiency of current therapies are huge medical problems. Since the discovery of the hepatitis C virus, our knowledge of its biology has been largely punctuated by the development of original models of research. At the end of the 1980s, the chimpanzee model led to cloning of the viral genome and the definition of infectious molecular clones. In 1999, a breakthrough was achieved with the development of a robust in vitro replication model named 'replicon'. This system allowed intensive research into replication mechanisms and drug discovery. Later, in 2003, pseudotyped retroviruses harbouring surface proteins of hepatitis C virus were produced to specifically investigate the viral entry process. It was only in 2005 that infectious viruses were produced in vitro, enabling intensive investigations into the entire life cycle of the hepatitis C virus. This review describes the different in vitro models developed to study hepatitis C virus, their contribution to current knowledge of the virus biology and their future research applications. PMID:17824957

  20. A zebrafish model for subgenomic hepatitis C virus replication.

    PubMed

    Ding, Cun-Bao; Zhao, Ye; Zhang, Jing-Pu; Peng, Zong-Gen; Song, Dan-Qing; Jiang, Jian-Dong

    2015-03-01

    Persistent infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major risk factor in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. The elucidation of the pathogenesis of HCV-associated liver disease is hampered by the absence of an appropriate small animal model. Zebrafish exhibits high genetic homology to mammals, and is easily manipulated experimentally. In this study, we describe the use of a zebrafish model for the analysis of HCV replication mechanisms. As the 5' untranslated region (UTR), the core protein, the non-structural protein 5B (NS5B) and the 3'UTR are essential for HCV replication, we constructed a HCV sub-replicon gene construct including the 4 gene sequences and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter gene; these genes were transcribed through the mouse hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (mHNF4) promoter. By microinjection of the subgenomic replicon vector into zebrafish larvae, the virus was easily detected by observing EGFP fluorescence in the liver. The positive core and NS5B signals showed positive expression of the HCV gene construct in zebrafish by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analysis. Importantly, the negative strand sequence of the HCV subgenomic RNA was detected by RT-PCR and hybridization in situ, demonstrating that the HCV sub-replicon has positive replication activity. Furthermore, the hybridization signal mainly appeared in the liver region of larvae, as detected by the sense probe of the core protein or NS5B, which confirmed that the sub-replicon amplification occurred in the zebrafish liver. The amplification of the sub-replicon caused alterations in the expression of certain genes, which is similar to HCV infection in human liver cells. To verify the use of this zebrafish model in drug evaluation, two drugs against HCV used in clinical practice, ribavirin and oxymatrine, were tested and these drugs showed significant inhibition of replication of the HCV sub-replicon in the larvae. In

  1. Characterization of a lipopolysaccharide mediated neutrophilic hepatitis model in Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Rose, Robert; Banerjee, Atrayee; Ramaiah, Shashi K

    2007-01-01

    Several studies have investigated the role of neutrophils during endotoxin-mediated liver injury, yet the precise mechanism for endotoxin-mediated hepatic neutrophil transmigration is unknown. The primary objective of this study was to establish a reliable lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated necro-hepatitis model to investigate the mechanisms of hepatic neutrophil infiltration following LPS administration. Male Sprague Dawley rats were administered a single (5 or 10 mg kg(-1), i.v.) or repeated injection of LPS (10 mg kg(-1), i.v., 24 h apart) with appropriate controls (i.v. saline) and were killed at various time points following LPS injection. Significant hematologic changes included neutrophilia, elevation of the neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio and toxic changes in neutrophils. Biochemical changes were observed in several liver (aspartate aminotransferase AST, gamma glutamyl transferase GGT) and kidney (blood urea nitrogen BUN) associated parameters generally at the earliest time points. Histopathology revealed a time-dependent neutrophil and mononuclear infiltration around the periportal areas in the single dose study and multifocal midzonal coagulative necrosis in the repeated dose study. The neutrophil adhesion molecule, CD 11b was up-regulated in single and repeat dose studies. Based on these studies, a reliable LPS-mediated hepatitis model with necrosis was developed by intravenous administration of LPS in a repeat dose fashion. Midzonal hepatic necrosis, peripheral neutrophilia, hepatic neutrophil infiltration and up-regulation of CD11b were the most significant and consistent markers of LPS mediated effects in this model. PMID:17370240

  2. Dysplastic Hepatocytes Develop Nuclear Inclusions in a Mouse Model of Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Priyanka; Lamoke, Folami; Chaffin, Joanna M.; Bartoli, Manuela; Lee, Jeffrey R.; Duncan, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Viral hepatitis resulting in chronic liver disease is an important clinical challenge and insight into the cellular processes that drive pathogenesis will be critical in order to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic options. Nuclear inclusions in viral and non-viral hepatitis are well documented and have diagnostic significance in some disease contexts. However, the origins and functional consequences of these nuclear inclusions remain elusive. To date the clinical observation of nuclear inclusions in viral and non-viral hepatitis has not been explored at depth in murine models of liver disease. Herein, we report that in a transgenic model of hepatitis B surface antigen mediated hepatitis, murine hepatocytes exhibit nuclear inclusions. Cells bearing nuclear inclusions were more likely to express markers of cell proliferation. We also established a correlation between these inclusions and oxidative stress. N-acetyl cysteine treatment effectively reduced oxidative stress levels, relieved endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and the number of nuclear inclusions we observed in the transgenic mice. Our results suggest that the presence of nuclear inclusions in hepatocytes correlates with oxidative stress and cellular proliferation in a model of antigen mediated hepatitis. PMID:24932583

  3. In-vivo xenograft murine human uveal melanoma model develops hepatic micrometastases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hua; Fang, Guofu; Huang, Xinping; Yu, Jie; Hsieh, Chia-Ling; Grossniklaus, Hans E.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to develop a mouse ocular melanoma model with human uveal melanoma cells that forms hepatic micrometastases. Human uveal melanoma Mel290 cells were transfected with a lentiviral-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression vector. Proliferation assays were performed by comparing Mel290-EGFP and Mel290 cells. After stable expression of EGFP and proliferation was ascertained, 1 × 106 Mel290-EGFP cells were introduced into NU/NU mice by posterior compartment (PC) inoculation or tail vein injection. Control groups were inoculated or injected with Mel290 cells. Ocular and hepatic frozen sections were examined by fluorescence microscopy, and the number of hepatic micrometastases was determined. EGFP expression was observed at 24 h after transfection. At 72 h after transfection, more than 70% of Mel290 cells expressed EGFP. At 45 days (six passages), 90% of Mel290 cells stably expressed EGFP. Histologic examination showed that Mel290-EGFP cells formed hepatic micrometastases after either PC inoculation or tail vein injection. A significant difference in the number of hepatic micrometastases between PC inoculation and tail vein injection (P<0.01) was observed. Mel290-EGFP cells stably expressed green fluorescent protein in vitro at 45 days (six passages). These cells formed hepatic micrometastases in NU/NU mice after PC inoculation or tail vein injection, with significantly more micrometastases developing in the PC inoculation model than after tail vein injection. PMID:18337645

  4. Asymptomatic Hepadnaviral Persistence and Its Consequences in the Woodchuck Model of Occult Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mulrooney-Cousins, Patricia M.; Michalak, Tomasz I.

    2015-01-01

    Woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) is molecularly and pathogenically closely related to hepatitis B virus (HBV). Both viruses display tropism towards hepatocytes and cells of the immune system and cause similar liver pathology, where acute hepatitis can progress to chronic hepatitis and to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Two forms of occult hepadnaviral persistence were identified in the woodchuck-WHV model: secondary occult infection (SOI) and primary occult infection (POI). SOI occurs after resolution of a serologically apparent infection with hepatitis or after subclinical serologically evident virus exposure. POI is caused by small amounts of virus and progresses without serological infection markers, but the virus genome and its replication are detectable in the immune system and with time in the liver. SOI can be accompanied by minimal hepatitis, while the hallmark of POI is normal liver morphology. Nonetheless, HCC develops in about 20% of animals with SOI or POI within 3 to 5 years. The virus persists throughout the lifespan in both SOI and POI at serum levels rarely greater than 100 copies/mL, causes hepatitis and HCC when concentrated and administered to virus-naïve woodchucks. SOI is accompanied by virus-specific T and B cell immune responses, while only virus-specific T cells are detected in POI. SOI coincides with protection against reinfection, while POI does not and hepatitis develops after challenge with liver pathogenic doses >1000 virions. Both SOI and POI are associated with virus DNA integration into the liver and the immune system genomes. Overall, SOI and POI are two distinct forms of silent hepadnaviral persistence that share common characteristics. Here, we review findings from the woodchuck model and discuss the relevant observations made in human occult HBV infection (OBI). PMID:26623268

  5. Chemical disinfection of duck hepatitis B virus: a model for inactivation of infectivity of hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Tsiquaye, K N; Barnard, J

    1993-08-01

    The susceptibility of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) to the virucidal effects of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC) was compared to hepatitis B virus (HBV) with the aim of using the duck as a model for studying HBV disinfection. Using viral DNA polymerase (DNAP) as a target, inhibition of DNAP activity by chlorine disinfectants was found to be concentration-dependent but independent of contact time. Two minute exposure of minimal effective concentrations of sodium hypochlorite (domestic bleach: 3600 ppm and industrial bleach: 3180 ppm) and sodium dichloroisocyanurate (3000 ppm available chlorine) to DHBV- and HBV-rich plasma totally inhibited DNA polymerase activity. DHBV particles in DHBV-carrier duck plasma (10(4.5) ID50/mL) were treated with these concentrations and inoculated intravenously into 18 one-day old ducklings (six animals/disinfectant). Analysis of plasma (0, 7 and 14 days post-infection) and post-mortem liver (14 days post-infection) by DNA hybridization techniques showed that DHBV DNA was undetectable in samples from all animals inoculated with disinfected virus particles. However, post-inoculation plasma and liver of 18 of 18 control ducklings inoculated with untreated virions were positive for DHBV DNA. These results show for the first time that total inhibition in vitro of hepadnavirus DNA polymerase activity by chemical disinfectants is predictive of inactivation of infectivity in vivo. PMID:8226434

  6. Conditions for eradicating hepatitis C in people who inject drugs: A fibrosis aware model of hepatitis C virus transmission.

    PubMed

    Rozada, Ignacio; Coombs, Daniel; Lima, Viviane D

    2016-04-21

    It is estimated that 80% of new hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections occur among people who inject drugs (PWID). Eradicating HCV from this population is key for the complete eradication of the disease, and the advent of simple to use, high efficacy treatments could conceivably make this scenario possible. This paper presents a mathematical model where transmission of HCV is studied in a simulated population of PWID where fibrosis progression is explicitly tracked. The stability thresholds that determine whether HCV will remain endemic or become eradicated were established numerically, and analytically on a reduced version of the model. Conditions on testing and treatment rates for eradication to occur were determined, within the context of the new high efficacy therapies. The results show that HCV eradication in the PWID population of the Vancouver, BC test scenario is achievable, but testing and especially treatment rates will need to increase significantly from current rates. Parameter estimates were drawn from published data. PMID:26845310

  7. An Evaluation of the Venous Equilibrium Model for Hepatic Clearance using Isolated Perfused Rainbow Trout Livers

    EPA Science Inventory

    The venous equilibrium model is widely used to describe hepatic clearance (CLH) of chemicals metabolized by the liver. If chemical delivery to the tissue does not limit CLH, this model predicts that CLH will approximately equal the product of intrinsic metabolic clearance and a t...

  8. Low Cardiac Output Leads Hepatic Fibrosis in Right Heart Failure Model Rats

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Yoshitaka; Urashima, Takashi; Shimura, Daisuke; Ito, Reiji; Kawachi, Sadataka; Kajimura, Ichige; Akaike, Toru; Kusakari, Yoichiro; Fujiwara, Masako; Ogawa, Kiyoshi; Goda, Nobuhito; Ida, Hiroyuki; Minamisawa, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatic fibrosis progresses with right heart failure, and becomes cardiac cirrhosis in a severe case. Although its causal factor still remains unclear. Here we evaluated the progression of hepatic fibrosis using a pulmonary artery banding (PAB)-induced right heart failure model and investigated whether cardiac output (CO) is responsible for the progression of hepatic fibrosis. Methods and Results Five-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats divided into the PAB and sham-operated control groups. After 4 weeks from operation, we measured CO by echocardiography, and hepatic fibrosis ratio by pathological examination using a color analyzer. In the PAB group, CO was significantly lower by 48% than that in the control group (78.2±27.6 and 150.1±31.2 ml/min, P<0.01). Hepatic fibrosis ratio and serum hyaluronic acid, an index of hepatic fibrosis, were significantly increased in the PAB group than those in the control group (7.8±1.7 and 1.0±0.2%, P<0.01, 76.2±27.5 and 32.7±7.5 ng/ml, P<0.01). Notably, the degree of hepatic fibrosis significantly correlated a decrease in CO. Immunohistological analysis revealed that hepatic stellate cells were markedly activated in hypoxic areas, and HIF-1α positive hepatic cells were increased in the PAB group. Furthermore, by real-time PCR analyses, transcripts of profibrotic and fibrotic factors (TGF-β1, CTGF, procollargen I, procollargen III, MMP 2, MMP 9, TIMP 1, TIMP 2) were significantly increased in the PAB group. In addition, western blot analyses revealed that the protein level of HIF-1α was significantly increased in the PAB group than that in the control group (2.31±0.84 and 1.0±0.18 arbitrary units, P<0.05). Conclusions Our study demonstrated that low CO and tissue hypoxia were responsible for hepatic fibrosis in right failure heart model rats. PMID:26863419

  9. Disease Modeling and Gene Therapy of Copper Storage Disease in Canine Hepatic Organoids

    PubMed Central

    Nantasanti, Sathidpak; Spee, Bart; Kruitwagen, Hedwig S.; Chen, Chen; Geijsen, Niels; Oosterhoff, Loes A.; van Wolferen, Monique E.; Pelaez, Nicolas; Fieten, Hille; Wubbolts, Richard W.; Grinwis, Guy C.; Chan, Jefferson; Huch, Meritxell; Vries, Robert R.G.; Clevers, Hans; de Bruin, Alain; Rothuizen, Jan; Penning, Louis C.; Schotanus, Baukje A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The recent development of 3D-liver stem cell cultures (hepatic organoids) opens up new avenues for gene and/or stem cell therapy to treat liver disease. To test safety and efficacy, a relevant large animal model is essential but not yet established. Because of its shared pathologies and disease pathways, the dog is considered the best model for human liver disease. Here we report the establishment of a long-term canine hepatic organoid culture allowing undifferentiated expansion of progenitor cells that can be differentiated toward functional hepatocytes. We show that cultures can be initiated from fresh and frozen liver tissues using Tru-Cut or fine-needle biopsies. The use of Wnt agonists proved important for canine organoid proliferation and inhibition of differentiation. Finally, we demonstrate that successful gene supplementation in hepatic organoids of COMMD1-deficient dogs restores function and can be an effective means to cure copper storage disease. PMID:26455412

  10. Computational classification models for predicting the interaction of compounds with hepatic organic ion importers.

    PubMed

    You, Hwan; Lee, Kyungro; Lee, Sangwon; Hwang, Sung Bo; Kim, Kwang-Yon; Cho, Kwang-Hwi; No, Kyoung Tai

    2015-10-01

    Hepatic transporters, a major determinant of pharmacokinetics, have been used to profile drug properties like efficacy. Among hepatic transporters, importers alter the concentration of the drug by facilitating the transport of a drug into a cell. Despite vast pharmacokinetic studies, the interacting mechanisms of the importers with its substrates or inhibitors are not well understood. Hence, we developed compound binary classification models of whether a compound is binder or nonbinder to a hepatic transporter with experimental data of 284 compounds for four representative hepatic importers, OATP1B1, OATP1B3, OAT2, and OCT1. Support Vector Machine (SVM) along with Genetic Algorithm (GA) was used to construct the classification models of binder versus nonbinder for each target importer. To construct the models, we prepared two data sets, a training data set from Fujitsu database (284 compounds) and an external validation data set from ChEMBL database (1738 compounds). Since an experimental classification criterion between binder and nonbinder has some ambiguity, there is an intrinsic limitation to expect high predictability of the binary classification models developed with the experimental data. The predictability of the classification models calculated with external validation sets were obtained as 77.72%, 84.31%, 84.21%, and 76.38 for OATP1B1, OATP1B3, OAT2, and OCT1, respectively. PMID:26293543

  11. Prognosis and Prognostic Scoring Models for Alcoholic Liver Disease and Acute Alcoholic Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Gholam, Pierre M

    2016-08-01

    Multiple prognostic scoring systems have been developed to predict mortality from acute alcoholic hepatitis. Some systems, such as the modified discriminant function, are specific to alcoholic hepatitis. Others, such as the model for end-stage liver disease, apply to a broad range of liver diseases. Prognostic factors are better at predicting patients who are likely to survive rather than die of this condition at 30 and 90 days. This important shortcoming may be improved by combining scores for better prediction accuracy. PMID:27373611

  12. Dimethylnitrosamine-induced hepatotoxicosis in dogs as a model of progressive canine hepatic disease.

    PubMed

    Boothe, D M; Jenkins, W L; Green, R A; Corrier, D E; Cullen, J M; Boothe, H W; Weise, D

    1992-03-01

    A model of toxin-induced progressive hepatitis is described in Beagles. The toxin, dimethylnitrosamine, was administered orally to 18 Beagles; 6 dogs comprised a control group. Clinical signs and laboratory test results were monitored as disease progressed and were used to determine the end point of disease. Following euthanasia, histologic lesions were scored and used to derive a total severity score for each dog. Severity scores were then used to allot the 18 dogs to 3 groups of hepatic disease, defined as mild, moderate, or severe. Changes in clinical laboratory test results, including tests of hepatic function, and clinical signs indicative of liver disease were described chronologically for all dogs. Group means of clinical laboratory test results and quantifiable clinical signs (eg, weight loss and ascitic fluid accumulation) were compared. This model offers several advantages, compared with other experimental models of canine hepatic disease. These include hepatospecificity, similarity to natural disease (eg, the development of multiple extrahepatic portosystemic shunts), and the ability to titrate the disease to a desired end point. The major disadvantages of this model were the toxic nature of the drug to human beings and the variation in individual animal response to the toxin, which precludes preassignment of animals into groups. PMID:1595969

  13. Viral hepatitis: A new HCV cell culture model for the next clinical challenges.

    PubMed

    Colpitts, Che C; Baumert, Thomas F

    2015-11-01

    Despite advances in hepatitis C treatment, substantial clinical hurdles remain to achieve universal cure and global control of infection. Saeed et al. identified SEC14L2 as a host factor permitting replication of clinical HCV isolates in cell culture, providing a novel system to model infection of patient-derived viruses. PMID:26441247

  14. Copper-induced hepatitis: the COMMD1 deficient dog as a translational animal model for human chronic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Favier, R P; Spee, B; Penning, L C; Rothuizen, J

    2011-03-01

    Chronic inflammatory liver disease regardless of aetiology leads to failing regeneration and fibrosis, ending in cirrhosis. Both in man and in animals this worldwide health problem has no definitive cure. Chronic liver injury causes hepatic stellate cells to proliferate and differentiate into matrix-producing cells. New therapeutic options will be developed upon detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms driving liver fibrosis. This may lead to new anti-fibrotic therapies which need to be tested in suitable models before application in the veterinary and human clinic. On the other side, to restore the failing regenerative capacity of the diseased liver cells, adult progenitor cells are of interest, as an alternative to whole organ transplantation. In order to find the most suitable large animal model it is important to recognise that the typical histopathological reaction pattern of the liver can differ between mammalian species. It is therefore imperative that specialists in veterinary internal medicine and pathology, being familiar with the diseases and pathologies of the liver in different animal species, are teaming-up in finding the best models for veterinary and human liver diseases. Several large animal models have been mentioned, like pigs, sheep, and dogs. Based on the observations that man and dog share the same hepatopathies and have identical clinical, pathological and pathogenetic reaction patterns during the development of liver disease, the dog seems to be a properly suited species to test new therapeutic strategies for pets and their best friends. PMID:22029820

  15. Dietary copper triggers onset of fulminant hepatitis in the Long-Evans cinnamon rat model

    PubMed Central

    Siaj, Ramsi; Sauer, Vanessa; Stöppeler, Sandra; Spiegel, Hans-Ullrich; Köhler, Gabriele; Zibert, Andree; Schmidt, Hartmut HJ

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the impact of dietary copper given at different time points on the onset of fulminant hepatitis. METHODS: The Long-Evans cinnamon (LEC) rat model of Wilson’s disease (WD) was used to study the impact of high dietary copper (hCu) on the induction of fulminant hepatitis at early or late time points of life. High Cu diet was started in rat pups or in adults (month 5) for three months. Animals that received reduced dietary copper (rCu) throughout their lifetime served as a control. Hepatitis-associated serum markers (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate transaminase, bilirubin) were analyzed in animal groups receiving hCu or rCu. Liver copper content and liver histology were revealed at sacrifice. A set of 5 marker genes previously found to be affected in injured liver and which are related to angiogenesis (Vegfa), fat metabolism (Srebf1), extracellular matrix (Timp1), oxidative stress (Hmox1), and the cell cycle (Cdkn1a) were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: Regardless of the time point when hCu was started, LEC rats (35/36) developed fulminant hepatitis and died. Animals receiving rCu (36/36) remained healthy, did not develop hepatitis, and survived long term without symptoms of overt disease, although liver copper accumulated in adult animals (477 ± 75 μg/g). With regard to start of hCu, onset of fulminant hepatitis was significantly (P < 0.001) earlier in adults (35 ± 9 d) that showed pre-accumulation of liver copper as compared to the pup group (77 ± 15 d). Hepatitis-associated serum markers, liver copper and liver histology, as well as gene expression, were affected in LEC rats receiving hCu. However, except for early and rapid onset of hepatitis, biochemical and molecular markers were similar at the early and late time points of disease. CONCLUSION: Rapid onset of fulminant hepatitis in asymptomatic LEC rats with elevated liver copper suggests that there is a critical threshold of liver copper which is important

  16. In Vivo MRI Assessment of Hepatic and Splenic Disease in a Murine Model of Schistosmiasis

    PubMed Central

    Laprie, Caroline; Dessein, Helia; Bernard, Monique; Dessein, Alain; Viola, Angèle

    2015-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis (or bilharzia), a major parasitic disease, affects more than 260 million people worldwide. In chronic cases of intestinal schistosomiasis caused by trematodes of the Schistosoma genus, hepatic fibrosis develops as a host immune response to the helminth eggs, followed by potentially lethal portal hypertension. In this study, we characterized hepatic and splenic features of a murine model of intestinal schistosomiasis using in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and evaluated the transverse relaxation time T2 as a non-invasive imaging biomarker for monitoring hepatic fibrogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings CBA/J mice were imaged at 11.75T two, six and ten weeks after percutaneous infection with Schistosoma mansoni. In vivo imaging studies were completed with histology at the last two time points. Anatomical MRI allowed detection of typical manifestations of the intestinal disease such as significant hepato- and splenomegaly, and dilation of the portal vein as early as six weeks, with further aggravation at 10 weeks after infection. Liver multifocal lesions observed by MRI in infected animals at 10 weeks post infection corresponded to granulomatous inflammation and intergranulomatous fibrosis with METAVIR scores up to A2F2. While most healthy hepatic tissue showed T2 values below 14 ms, these lesions were characterized by a T2 greater than 16 ms. The area fraction of increased T2 correlated (rS = 0.83) with the area fraction of Sirius Red stained collagen in histological sections. A continuous liver T2* decrease was also measured while brown pigments in macrophages were detected at histology. These findings suggest accumulation of hematin in infected livers. Conclusions/Significance Our multiparametric MRI approach confirms that this murine model replicates hepatic and splenic manifestations of human intestinal schistosomiasis. Quantitative T2 mapping proved sensitive to assess liver fibrogenesis non-invasively and may therefore

  17. Quantitative Proteomics Identifies Host Factors Modulated during Acute Hepatitis E Virus Infection in the Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Rogée, Sophie; Le Gall, Morgane; Chafey, Philippe; Bouquet, Jérôme; Cordonnier, Nathalie; Frederici, Christian

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis E virus (HEV) causes acute enterically transmitted hepatitis. In industrialized countries, it is a zoonotic disease, with swine being the major reservoir of human HEV contamination. The occurrence and severity of the disease are variable, with clinical symptoms ranging from asymptomatic to self-limiting acute hepatitis, chronic infection, or fulminant hepatitis. In the absence of a robust cell culture system or small-animal models, the HEV life cycle and pathological process remain unclear. To characterize HEV pathogenesis and virulence mechanisms, a quantitative proteomic analysis was carried out to identify cellular factors and pathways modulated during acute infection of swine. Three groups of pigs were inoculated with three different strains of swine HEV to evaluate the possible role of viral determinants in pathogenesis. Liver samples were analyzed by a differential proteomic approach, two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis, and 61 modulated proteins were identified by mass spectroscopy. The results obtained show that the three HEV strains replicate similarly in swine and that they modulate several cellular pathways, suggesting that HEV impairs several cellular processes, which can account for the various types of disease expression. Several proteins, such as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K, apolipoprotein E, and prohibitin, known to be involved in other viral life cycles, were upregulated in HEV-infected livers. Some differences were observed between the three strains, suggesting that HEV's genetic variability may induce variations in pathogenesis. This comparative analysis of the liver proteome modulated during infection with three different strains of HEV genotype 3 provides an important basis for further investigations on the factors involved in HEV replication and the mechanism of HEV pathogenesis. IMPORTANCE Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is responsible for acute hepatitis, with clinical symptoms ranging from asymptomatic

  18. The Current State of Knowledge of Hepatic Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury Based on Its Study in Experimental Models

    PubMed Central

    Mendes-Braz, M.; Elias-Miró, M.; Jiménez-Castro, M. B.; Casillas-Ramírez, A.; Ramalho, F. S.; Peralta, C.

    2012-01-01

    The present review focuses on the numerous experimental models used to study the complexity of hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Although experimental models of hepatic I/R injury represent a compromise between the clinical reality and experimental simplification, the clinical transfer of experimental results is problematic because of anatomical and physiological differences and the inevitable simplification of experimental work. In this review, the strengths and limitations of the various models of hepatic I/R are discussed. Several strategies to protect the liver from I/R injury have been developed in animal models and, some of these, might find their way into clinical practice. We also attempt to highlight the fact that the mechanisms responsible for hepatic I/R injury depend on the experimental model used, and therefore the therapeutic strategies also differ according to the model used. Thus, the choice of model must therefore be adapted to the clinical question being answered. PMID:22649277

  19. Ability of IDO to attenuate liver injury in alpha-galactosylceramide-induced hepatitis model.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hiroyasu; Hoshi, Masato; Ohtaki, Hirofumi; Taguchi, Ayako; Ando, Kazuki; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Osawa, Yosuke; Hara, Akira; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Saito, Kuniaki; Seishima, Mitsuru

    2010-10-15

    IDO converts tryptophan to l-kynurenine, and it is noted as a relevant molecule in promoting tolerance and suppressing adaptive immunity. In this study, we examined the effect of IDO in α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer)-induced hepatitis. The increase in IDO expression in the liver of wild-type (WT) mice administered α-GalCer was confirmed by real-time PCR, Western blotting, and IDO immunohistochemical analysis. The serum alanine aminotransferase levels in IDO-knockout (KO) mice after α-GalCer injection significantly increased compared with those in WT mice. 1-Methyl-D-tryptophan also exacerbated liver injury in this murine hepatitis model. In α-GalCer-induced hepatitis models, TNF-α is critical in the development of liver injury. The mRNA expression and protein level of TNF-α in the liver from IDO-KO mice were more enhanced compared with those in WT mice. The phenotypes of intrahepatic lymphocytes from WT mice and IDO-KO mice treated with α-GalCer were analyzed by flow cytometry, and the numbers of CD49b(+) and CD11b(+) cells were found to have increased in IDO-KO mice. Moreover, as a result of the increase in the number of NK cells and macrophages in the liver of IDO-KO mice injected with α-GalCer, TNF-α secretion in these mice was greater than that in WT mice. Deficiency of IDO exacerbated liver injury in α-GalCer-induced hepatitis. IDO induced by proinflammatory cytokines may decrease the number of TNF-α-producing immune cells in the liver. Thus, IDO may suppress overactive immune response in the α-GalCer-induced hepatitis model. PMID:20844202

  20. Modeling toxicodynamic effects of trichloroethylene on liver in mouse model of autoimmune hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Kathleen M.; Reisfeld, Brad; Zurlinden, Todd; Kreps, Meagan N.; Erickson, Stephen W.; Blossom, Sarah J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic exposure to industrial solvent and water pollutant trichloroethylene (TCE) in female MRL+/+ mice generates disease similar to human autoimmune hepatitis. The current study was initiated to investigate why TCE-induced autoimmunity targeted the liver. Compared to other tissues the liver has an unusually robust capacity for repair and regeneration. This investigation examined both time-dependent and dose-dependent effects of TCE on hepatoprotective and pro-inflammatory events in liver and macrophages from female MRL+/+ mice. After a 12-week exposure to TCE in drinking water a dose-dependent decrease in macrophage production of IL-6 at both the transcriptional and protein level was observed. A longitudinal study similarly showed that TCE inhibited macrophage IL-6 production. In terms of the liver, TCE had little effect on expression of pro-inflammatory genes (Tnfa, Saa2 or Cscl1) until the end of the 40-week exposure. Instead, TCE suppressed hepatic expression of genes involved in IL-6 signaling (Il6r, gp130, and Egr1). Linear regression analysis confirmed liver histopathology in the TCE-treated mice correlated with decreased expression of Il6r. A toxicodynamic model was developed to estimate the effects of TCE on IL-6 signaling and liver pathology under different levels of exposure and rates of repair. This study underlined the importance of longitudinal studies in mechanistic evaluations of immuntoxicants. It showed that later-occurring liver pathology caused by TCE was associated with early suppression of hepatoprotection rather than an increase in conventional pro-inflammatory events. This information was used to create a novel toxicodynamic model of IL-6-mediated TCE-induced liver inflammation. PMID:25026505

  1. Altered hepatic clearance and killing of Candida albicans in the isolated perfused mouse liver model.

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, R T; Horst, M N; Garner, R E; Hudson, J; Jenkins, P R; Richardson, A L

    1990-01-01

    The adherence of Candida albicans was studied in situ by using the perfused mouse liver model. After exhaustive washing, 10(6) C. albicans were infused into mouse livers. At the time of recovery, 62 +/- 5% (mean +/- standard error of the mean) of the infused C. albicans were recovered from the liver and 14 +/- 3% were recovered from the effluent for a total recovery of 76 +/- 4%. This indicates that 86 +/- 3% of the original inoculum was trapped by the liver and that 24 +/- 4% was killed within the liver. Chemical pretreatment of C. albicans with 8 M urea, 12 mM dithiothreitol, 2% beta-mercaptoethanol, 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate, 10% Triton X-100, or 3 M potassium chloride or enzyme pretreatment with alpha-mannosidase, alpha-chymotrypsin, subtilisin, beta-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase, pronase, trypsin, papain, or lipase did not alter adherence of C. albicans to hepatic tissue. By contrast, pepsin pretreatment significantly decreased hepatic trapping. Simultaneous perfusion with either 100 mg of C. albicans glycoprotein per liter or 100 mg of C. albicans mannan per liter also decreased trapping. Furthermore, both substances eluted previously trapped C. albicans from hepatic tissue. Chemical pretreatment with 8 M urea, 12 mM dithiothreitol, or 3 M KCI or enzymatic pretreatment with alpha-mannosidase, subtilisin, alpha-chymotrypsin, or papain increased killing of C. albicans three- to fivefold within hepatic tissue. The data suggest that mannose-containing structures on the surface of C. albicans, for example. mannans or glucomannoproteins, mediate adherence of C. albicans within the liver. Indirectly, chemical and enzymatic pretreatment renders C. albicans more susceptible to hepatic killing. PMID:2117571

  2. Anchoring Hepatic Gene Expression with Development of Fibrosis and Neoplasia in a Toxicant-Induced Fish Model of Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Van Wettere, Arnaud J.; Law, J. Mac; Hinton, David E.; Kullman, Seth W.

    2014-01-01

    Fish have been used as laboratory models to study hepatic development and carcinogenesis but not for pathogenesis of hepatic fibrosis. In this study, a dimethylnitrosamine-induced fish model of hepatic injury was developed in Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) and gene expression was anchored with the development of hepatic fibrosis and neoplasia. Exposed livers exhibited mild hepatocellular degenerative changes 2 weeks post-exposure. Within six weeks hepatic fibrosis/cirrhosis was evident with development of neoplasia by 10 weeks. Stellate cell activation and development of fibrosis was associated with upregulation of tgfb1,tgfb receptor 2, smad3a, smad3b, ctnnb1, myc, mmp2, mmp14a, mmp14b, timp2a, timp2b, timp3, col1a1a, and col1a1b, and a less pronounced increase in mmp13 and col4a1expression. Tgfb receptor I expression was unchanged. Immunohistochemistry suggested that biliary epithelial cells and stellate cells were the main producers of TGF-β1. This study identified a group of candidate genes likely to be involved in the development of hepatic fibrosis, and demonstrated that the TGF-β pathway likely plays a major role in the pathogenesis. These results support the medaka as a viable fish model of hepatic fibrosis. PMID:23197195

  3. Evaluation of the assumptions of an ontogeny model of rat hepatic cytochrome P450 activity.

    PubMed

    Alcorn, Jane; Elbarbry, Fawzy A; Allouh, Mohammed Z; McNamara, Patrick J

    2007-12-01

    We previously reported an ontogeny model of hepatic cytochrome P450 (P450) activity that predicts in vivo P450 elimination from in vitro intrinsic clearance. The purpose of this study was to conduct investigations into key assumptions of the P450 ontogeny model using the developing rat model system. We used two developmentally dissimilar enzymes, CYP2E1 and CYP1A2, and male rats (n = 4) at age groups representing critical developmental stages. Total body and liver weights and hepatic microsomal protein contents were measured. Following high-performance liquid chromatography analysis, apparent K(M) and V(max) estimates were calculated using nonlinear regression analysis for CYP2E1- and CYP1A2-mediated chlorzoxazone 6-hydroxylation and methoxyresorufin O-dealkylation, and V(max) estimates for p-nitrophenol and phenacetin hydroxylations, respectively. Hepatic scaling factors and V(max) values provided estimates for infant scaling factors (ISF). The data show microsomal protein contents increased with postnatal age and reached adult values after postnatal day (PD) 7. Apparent K(M) values were similar at all developmental stages except at < or =PD7. Developmental increases in probe substrate V(max) values did not correlate with the biphasic increase in immunoquantifiable P450. The activity of two different probe substrates for each P450 covaried as a function of age. A plot of observed ISF values as a function of age reflected the developmental pattern of rat hepatic P450. In summation, these observations diverge from several of the model's assumptions. Further investigations are required to explain these inconsistencies and to investigate whether the developing rat may provide a predictive paradigm for pediatric risk assessment for P450-mediated elimination processes. PMID:17881659

  4. Modeling toxicodynamic effects of trichloroethylene on liver in mouse model of autoimmune hepatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Kathleen M.; Reisfeld, Brad; Zurlinden, Todd J.; Kreps, Meagan N.; Erickson, Stephen W.; Blossom, Sarah J.

    2014-09-15

    Chronic exposure to industrial solvent and water pollutant trichloroethylene (TCE) in female MRL +/+ mice generates disease similar to human autoimmune hepatitis. The current study was initiated to investigate why TCE-induced autoimmunity targeted the liver. Compared to other tissues the liver has an unusually robust capacity for repair and regeneration. This investigation examined both time-dependent and dose-dependent effects of TCE on hepatoprotective and pro-inflammatory events in liver and macrophages from female MRL +/+ mice. After a 12-week exposure to TCE in drinking water a dose-dependent decrease in macrophage production of IL-6 at both the transcriptional and protein level was observed. A longitudinal study similarly showed that TCE inhibited macrophage IL-6 production. In terms of the liver, TCE had little effect on expression of pro-inflammatory genes (Tnfa, Saa2 or Cscl1) until the end of the 40-week exposure. Instead, TCE suppressed hepatic expression of genes involved in IL-6 signaling (Il6r, gp130, and Egr1). Linear regression analysis confirmed liver histopathology in the TCE-treated mice correlated with decreased expression of Il6r. A toxicodynamic model was developed to estimate the effects of TCE on IL-6 signaling and liver pathology under different levels of exposure and rates of repair. This study underlined the importance of longitudinal studies in mechanistic evaluations of immuntoxicants. It showed that later-occurring liver pathology caused by TCE was associated with early suppression of hepatoprotection rather than an increase in conventional pro-inflammatory events. This information was used to create a novel toxicodynamic model of IL-6-mediated TCE-induced liver inflammation. - Highlights: • We developed a toxicodynamic model to study effects of trichloroethylene on liver. • We examined protective as well as pro-inflammatory events in the liver. • Trichloroethylene inhibits IL-6 production by macrophages. • Trichloroethylene

  5. Ethanol-induced impairment of hepatic glycoprotein secretion in the isolated rat liver perfusion model

    SciTech Connect

    Volentine, G.D.; Ogden, K.A.; Tuma, D.J.; Sorrell, M.F.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have previously shown that acute administration of ethanol inhibits hepatic glycoprotein secretion in vivo. This ethanol-induced effect appears to be mediated by its reactive metabolite, acetaldehyde. Since hormonal influences and vascular changes can not be controlled in vivo during ethanol administration, they investigated the effect of ethanol in the isolated perfused liver model. Rat liver from fed animals was perfused with oxygenated KRB at 3 ml/min/g liver for 4 hrs. Since ethanol inhibits proteins synthesis in vitro, protein acceptor pool size was equalized in both ethanol and control perfused livers with 1 mM cycloheximide. /sup 3/H-glucosamine was used to label hepatic secretory glycoproteins in the perfusate. Colchicine, a known inhibitor of protein secretion, impaired the secretion of labeled glycoproteins with a concomitant retention of these export proteins in the liver; therefore, confirming the authors secretory model. Ethanol (50 mM) inhibited the appearance of glucosamine-labeled glycoproteins by 60% into the perfusate as compared to control livers. Pretreatment of animals with cyanamide (an aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibitor) further potentiated this effect of ethanol in the isolated perfused liver. These data suggest that ethanol inhibits hepatic glycoprotein secretion in the isolated liver perfusion model, and this ethanol-induced impairment appears to be mediated by acetaldehyde.

  6. Exploring multiple quantitative trait loci models of hepatic fibrosis in a mouse intercross.

    PubMed

    Hall, Rabea A; Hillebrandt, Sonja; Lammert, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Most common diseases are attributed to multiple genetic variants, and the feasibility of identifying inherited risk factors is often restricted to the identification of alleles with high or intermediate effect sizes. In our previous studies, we identified single loci associated with hepatic fibrosis (Hfib1-Hfib4). Recent advances in analysis tools allowed us to model loci interactions for liver fibrosis. We analysed 322 F2 progeny from an intercross of the fibrosis-susceptible strain BALB/cJ and the resistant strain FVB/NJ. The mice were challenged with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) for 6 weeks to induce chronic hepatic injury and fibrosis. Fibrosis progression was quantified by determining histological fibrosis stages and hepatic collagen contents. Phenotypic data were correlated to genome-wide markers to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL). Thirteen susceptibility loci were identified by single and composite interval mapping, and were included in the subsequent multiple QTL model (MQM) testing. Models provided evidence for susceptibility loci with strongest association to collagen contents (chromosomes 1, 2, 8 and 13) or fibrosis stages (chromosomes 1, 2, 12 and 14). These loci contained the known fibrosis risk genes Hc, Fasl and Foxa2 and were incorporated in a fibrosis network. Interestingly the hepatic fibrosis locus on chromosome 1 (Hfib5) connects both phenotype networks, strengthening its role as a potential modifier locus. Including multiple QTL mapping to association studies adds valuable information on gene-gene interactions in experimental crosses and human cohorts. This study presents an initial step towards a refined understanding of profibrogenic gene networks. PMID:26547557

  7. Quantifying the Contribution of the Liver to Glucose Homeostasis: A Detailed Kinetic Model of Human Hepatic Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    König, Matthias; Bulik, Sascha; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2012-01-01

    Despite the crucial role of the liver in glucose homeostasis, a detailed mathematical model of human hepatic glucose metabolism is lacking so far. Here we present a detailed kinetic model of glycolysis, gluconeogenesis and glycogen metabolism in human hepatocytes integrated with the hormonal control of these pathways by insulin, glucagon and epinephrine. Model simulations are in good agreement with experimental data on (i) the quantitative contributions of glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and glycogen metabolism to hepatic glucose production and hepatic glucose utilization under varying physiological states. (ii) the time courses of postprandial glycogen storage as well as glycogen depletion in overnight fasting and short term fasting (iii) the switch from net hepatic glucose production under hypoglycemia to net hepatic glucose utilization under hyperglycemia essential for glucose homeostasis (iv) hormone perturbations of hepatic glucose metabolism. Response analysis reveals an extra high capacity of the liver to counteract changes of plasma glucose level below 5 mM (hypoglycemia) and above 7.5 mM (hyperglycemia). Our model may serve as an important module of a whole-body model of human glucose metabolism and as a valuable tool for understanding the role of the liver in glucose homeostasis under normal conditions and in diseases like diabetes or glycogen storage diseases. PMID:22761565

  8. Effects of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenases in carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatitis model of rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Cai, Haidong; Hou, Min; Fu, Da; Ma, Yushui; Luo, Qiong; Yuan, Xueyu; Lv, Mingli; Zhang, Xiaoping; Cong, Xianling; Lv, Zhongwei

    2012-06-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) converts tryptophan to l-kynurenine, and it is noted as a relevant molecule in promoting tolerance and suppressing adaptive immunity. In this study, to investigate the effects of IDO in carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4) )-induced hepatitis model, the levels of IDO enzymic activities in the mock group, the control group and the 1-methyl-D-tryptophan (1-MT)-treated group were confirmed by determination of l-kynurenine concentrations. Serum alanine aminotransferase levels in 1-MT-treated rats after CCl(4) injection significantly increased compared with those in mock and control groups. In CCl(4)-induced hepatitis models, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is critical in the development of liver injury. The mRNA expression and secretion levels of TNF-α in the liver from 1-MT-treated rats were more enhanced compared with those in the mock and the control groups. Moreover, the levels of cytokine and chemokine from mock, control group and 1-MT-treated rats after treated with CCl(4) were analyzed by ELISA, and the level of interleukin-6 was found to increase in 1-MT-treated rats. It was concluded that the deficiency of IDO exacerbated liver injury in CCl(4)-induced hepatitis and its effect may be connected with TNF-α and interleukin-6. PMID:22249930

  9. Blockade of Tim-3 Pathway Ameliorates Interferon-γ Production from Hepatic CD8+ T Cells in a Mouse Model of Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Ying; Hou, Nan; Zhang, Xiaoning; Zhao, Di; Liu, Ying; Wang, Jinjin; Luan, Fang; Shi, Wei; Zhu, Faliang; Sun, Wensheng; Zhang, Lining; Gao, Chengjiang; Gao, Lifen; Liang, Xiaohong; Ma, Chunhong

    2009-01-01

    T cell immunoglobulin- and mucin-domain-containing molecule-3 (Tim-3) has been reported to participate in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. However, whether Tim-3 is involved in hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains unknown. Here, we studied the expression and function of Tim-3 in a hydrodynamics-based mouse model of HBV infection. A significant increase of Tim-3 expression on hepatic T lymphocytes, especially on CD8+ T cells, was demonstrated in HBV model mice from day 7 to day 18. After Tim-3 knockdown by specific shRNAs, significantly increased IFN-γ production from hepatic CD8+ T cells in HBV model mice was observed. Very interestingly, we found Tim-3 expression on CD8+ T cells was higher in HBV model mice with higher serum anti-HBs production. Moreover, Tim-3 knockdown influenced anti-HBs production in vivo. Collectively, our data suggested that Tim-3 might act as a potent regulator of antiviral T-cell responses in HBV infection. PMID:19254478

  10. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatic cell lines as a new model for host interaction with hepatitis B virus

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Shun; Kakinuma, Sei; Asahina, Yasuhiro; Kamiya, Akihide; Miyoshi, Masato; Tsunoda, Tomoyuki; Nitta, Sayuri; Asano, Yu; Nagata, Hiroko; Otani, Satoshi; Kawai-Kitahata, Fukiko; Murakawa, Miyako; Itsui, Yasuhiro; Nakagawa, Mina; Azuma, Seishin; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Nishitsuji, Hironori; Ujino, Saneyuki; Shimotohno, Kunitada; Iwamoto, Masashi; Watashi, Koichi; Wakita, Takaji; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is not eradicated by current antiviral therapies due to persistence of HBV covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) in host cells, and thus development of novel culture models for productive HBV infection is urgently needed, which will allow the study of HBV cccDNA eradication. To meet this need, we developed culture models of HBV infection using human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocyte lineages, including immature proliferating hepatic progenitor-like cell lines (iPS-HPCs) and differentiated hepatocyte-like cells (iPS-Heps). These cells were susceptible to HBV infection, produced HBV particles, and maintained innate immune responses. The infection efficiency of HBV in iPS-HPCs predominantly depended on the expression levels of sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP), and was low relative to iPS-Heps: however, long-term culture of iPS-Heps was difficult. To provide a model for HBV persistence, iPS-HPCs overexpressing NTCP were established. The long-term persistence of HBV cccDNA was detected in iPS-HPCs overexpressing NTCP, and depended on the inhibition of the Janus-kinase signaling pathway. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that iPS-derived hepatic cell lines can be utilized for novel HBV culture models with genetic variation to investigate the interactions between HBV and host cells and the development of anti-HBV strategies. PMID:27386799

  11. History, ethics, advantages and limitations of experimental models for hepatic ablation

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Seok Ling; Gravante, Gianpiero; Metcalfe, Matthew S; Dennison, Ashley R

    2013-01-01

    Numerous techniques developed in medicine require careful evaluation to determine their indications, limitations and potential side effects prior to their clinical use. At present this generally involves the use of animal models which is undesirable from an ethical standpoint, requires complex and time-consuming authorization, and is very expensive. This process is exemplified in the development of hepatic ablation techniques, starting experiments on explanted livers and progressing to safety and efficacy studies in living animals prior to clinical studies. The two main approaches used are ex vivo isolated non-perfused liver models and in vivo animal models. Ex vivo non perfused models are less expensive, easier to obtain but not suitable to study the heat sink effect or experiments requiring several hours. In vivo animal models closely resemble clinical subjects but often are expensive and have small sample sizes due to ethical guidelines. Isolated perfused ex vivo liver models have been used to study drug toxicity, liver failure, organ transplantation and hepatic ablation and combine advantages of both previous models. PMID:23345935

  12. An overview of animal models for investigating the pathogenesis and therapeutic strategies in acute hepatic failure

    PubMed Central

    Tuñón, María Jesús; Alvarez, Marcelino; Culebras, Jesús M; González-Gallego, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Acute hepatic failure (AHF) is a severe liver injury accompanied by hepatic encephalopathy which causes multiorgan failure with an extremely high mortality rate, even if intensive care is provided. Management of severe AHF continues to be one of the most challenging problems in clinical medicine. Liver transplantation has been shown to be the most effective therapy, but the procedure is limited by shortage of donor organs. Although a number of clinical trials testing different liver assist devices are under way, these systems alone have no significant effect on patient survival and are only regarded as a useful approach to bridge patients with AHF to liver transplantation. As a result, reproducible experimental animal models resembling the clinical conditions are still needed. The three main approaches used to create an animal model for AHF are: surgical procedures, toxic liver injury and infective procedures. Most common models are based on surgical techniques (total/partial hepatectomy, complete/transient devascularization) or the use of hepatotoxic drugs (acetaminophen, galactosamine, thioacetamide, and others), and very few satisfactory viral models are available. We have recently developed a viral model of AHF by means of the inoculation of rabbits with the virus of rabbit hemorrhagic disease. This model displays biochemical and histological characteristics, and clinical features that resemble those in human AHF. In the present article an overview is given of the most widely used animal models of AHF, and their main advantages and disadvantages are reviewed. PMID:19575487

  13. Modeling hepatitis C virus kinetics under therapy using pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic information

    SciTech Connect

    Perelson, Alan S; Shudo, Emi; Ribeiro, Ruy M

    2008-01-01

    Mathematical models have proven helpful in analyzing the virological response to antiviral therapy in hepatitis C virus (HCY) infected subjects. Objective: To summarize the uses and limitations of different models for analyzing HCY kinetic data under pegylated interferon therapy. Methods: We formulate mathematical models and fit them by nonlinear least square regression to patient data in order estimate model parameters. We compare the goodness of fit and parameter values estimated by different models statistically. Results/Conclusion: The best model for parameter estimation depends on the availability and the quality of data as well as the therapy used. We also discuss the mathematical models that will be needed to analyze HCV kinetic data from clinical trials with new antiviral drugs.

  14. Global analysis of a mathematical model for Hepatitis C virus transmissions.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ruiqing; Cui, Yunting

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a mathematical model is proposed and analyzed for Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection transmissions. In this model, both of chronic primary infection and possibility of reinfection are considered. Two thresholds of basic reproduction number R0 and control reproduction number Rc are derived. We get the sufficient conditions for the existence of infection-free equilibrium and endemic equilibrium. The sufficient conditions for the local and global stability of the equilibria are also obtained. Some numerical simulations are performed to prove the theoretical results. At last, some discussions are presented. PMID:26940946

  15. Erythropoietin ameliorates the motor and cognitive function impairments in a rat model of hepatic cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Aghaei, Iraj; Nazeri, Masoud; Shabani, Mohammad; Mossavinasab, Marziehsadat; Mirhosseini, Fatemeh Khaleghi; Nayebpour, Mohsen; Dalili, Afshin

    2015-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a serious consequence of hepatic cirrhosis (HC). Previous studies have demonstrated cognitive impairments in both clinical and animal experiments of HC. Some potential therapeutic agents have been used to alleviate the cognitive symptoms in the animal models of HC. In the current study, the possible effect of erythropoietin (ERY) as a potent neuroprotective agent on motor and cognitive impairments induced by HC has been studied. Male Wistar rats (180-200 g) underwent bile duct ligation (BDL) or sham surgery. Administration of ERY (5,000 IU/kg, i.p., daily for three days) was initiated 2 weeks after surgery and lasted for the next 28 days. Open field, rotarod, Morris water maze and passive avoidance learning was used to evaluate the motor and cognitive function of the animals. ANOVA and repeated measures ANOVA were used to analyze the data. p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. BDL rats had an increased level of hepatic enzymes and bilirubin. Impairment of balance function by BDL was reversed by ERY. Spatial and passive avoidance learning impairments observed in BDL rats were also reversed by chronic administration of ERY. ERY can be offered as a potential neuroprotective agent in the treatment of patients with HC that manifest mental dysfunctions. Though further studies are needed to clarify the exact mechanisms, the neuroprotective properties of ERY against BDL impairments were demonstrated in the current study. PMID:25115607

  16. Modelling hepatitis C therapy—predicting effects of treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Perelson, Alan S.; Guedj, Jeremie

    2015-06-30

    Mathematically modelling changes in HCV RNA levels measured in patients who receive antiviral therapy has yielded many insights into the pathogenesis and effects of treatment on the virus. By determining how rapidly HCV is cleared when viral replication is interrupted by a therapy, one can deduce how rapidly the virus is produced in patients before treatment. This knowledge, coupled with estimates of the HCV mutation rate, enables one to estimate the frequency with which drug resistant variants arise. Modelling HCV also permits the deduction of the effectiveness of an antiviral agent at blocking HCV replication from the magnitude of the initial viral decline. One can also estimate the lifespan of an HCV-infected cell from the slope of the subsequent viral decline and determine the duration of therapy needed to cure infection. The original understanding of HCV RNA decline under interferon-based therapies obtained by modelling needed to be revised in order to interpret the HCV RNA decline kinetics seen when using direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs). In addition, there also exist unresolved issues involving understanding therapies with combinations of DAAs, such as the presence of detectable HCV RNA at the end of therapy in patients who nonetheless have a sustained virologic response.

  17. Modelling hepatitis C therapy—predicting effects of treatment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Perelson, Alan S.; Guedj, Jeremie

    2015-06-30

    Mathematically modelling changes in HCV RNA levels measured in patients who receive antiviral therapy has yielded many insights into the pathogenesis and effects of treatment on the virus. By determining how rapidly HCV is cleared when viral replication is interrupted by a therapy, one can deduce how rapidly the virus is produced in patients before treatment. This knowledge, coupled with estimates of the HCV mutation rate, enables one to estimate the frequency with which drug resistant variants arise. Modelling HCV also permits the deduction of the effectiveness of an antiviral agent at blocking HCV replication from the magnitude of themore » initial viral decline. One can also estimate the lifespan of an HCV-infected cell from the slope of the subsequent viral decline and determine the duration of therapy needed to cure infection. The original understanding of HCV RNA decline under interferon-based therapies obtained by modelling needed to be revised in order to interpret the HCV RNA decline kinetics seen when using direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs). In addition, there also exist unresolved issues involving understanding therapies with combinations of DAAs, such as the presence of detectable HCV RNA at the end of therapy in patients who nonetheless have a sustained virologic response.« less

  18. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Public Home » For Veterans and the Public Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... the Public Veterans and Public Home How is Hepatitis C Treated? Find the facts about the newest ...

  19. COMMD1-Deficient Dogs Accumulate Copper in Hepatocytes and Provide a Good Model for Chronic Hepatitis and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Favier, Robert P.; Spee, Bart; Schotanus, Baukje A.; van den Ingh, Ted S. G. A. M.; Fieten, Hille; Brinkhof, Bas; Viebahn, Cornelia S.; Penning, Louis C.; Rothuizen, Jan

    2012-01-01

    New therapeutic concepts developed in rodent models should ideally be evaluated in large animal models prior to human clinical application. COMMD1-deficiency in dogs leads to hepatic copper accumulation and chronic hepatitis representing a Wilson’s disease like phenotype. Detailed understanding of the pathogenesis and time course of this animal model is required to test its feasibility as a large animal model for chronic hepatitis. In addition to mouse models, true longitudinal studies are possible due to the size of these dogs permitting detailed analysis of the sequence of events from initial insult to final cirrhosis. Therefore, liver biopsies were taken each half year from five new born COMMD1-deficient dogs over a period of 42 months. Biopsies were used for H&E, reticulin, and rubeanic acid (copper) staining. Immunohistochemistry was performed on hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation marker (alpha-smooth muscle actin, α-SMA), proliferation (Ki67), apoptosis (caspase-3), and bile duct and liver progenitor cell (LPC) markers keratin (K) 19 and 7. Quantitative RT-PCR and Western Blots were performed on gene products involved in the regenerative and fibrotic pathways. Maximum copper accumulation was reached at 12 months of age, which coincided with the first signs of hepatitis. HSCs were activated (α-SMA) from 18 months onwards, with increasing reticulin deposition and hepatocytic proliferation in later stages. Hepatitis and caspase-3 activity (first noticed at 18 months) increased over time. Both HGF and TGF-β1 gene expression peaked at 24 months, and thereafter decreased gradually. Both STAT3 and c-MET showed an increased time-dependent activation. Smad2/3 phosphorylation, indicative for fibrogenesis, was present at all time-points. COMMD1-deficient dogs develop chronic liver disease and cirrhosis comparable to human chronic hepatitis, although at much higher pace. Therefore they represent a genetically-defined large animal model to test clinical

  20. Modelling hepatitis C therapy—predicting effects of treatment

    PubMed Central

    Perelson, Alan S.; Guedj, Jeremie

    2015-01-01

    Mathematically modelling HCV RNA changes measured in patients who receive antiviral therapy has yielded many insights into the pathogenesis and effects of treatment on the virus. By determining how rapidly HCV is cleared when viral replication is interrupted by a therapy, one can deduce how rapidly the virus is produced in patients before treatment. This knowledge, coupled with estimates of the HCV mutation rate, enables one to estimate the frequency with which drug resistant variants arise. Modelling HCV also permits the deduction of antiviral agent effectiveness at blocking HCV replication from the magnitude of the initial viral decline. One can also estimate the lifespan of an HCV infected cell from the slope of the subsequent viral decline and, determine the duration of therapy needed to cure infection. Our understanding of HCV RNA decline under IFN-based therapies needs to be revised in order to understand the HCV RNA decline kinetics seen when using direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs). In this Review, we also discuss the unresolved issues involving understanding therapies with combinations of DAAs, such as whether a sustained virological response necessarily involves elimination of all infected cells PMID:26122475

  1. Transposon mouse models to elucidate the genetic mechanisms of hepatitis B viral induced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Amy P; Tschida, Barbara R; Lo, Lilian H; Moriarity, Branden S; Rowlands, Dewi K; Largaespada, David A; Keng, Vincent W

    2015-11-14

    The major type of human liver cancer is hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and there are currently many risk factors that contribute to this deadly disease. The majority of HCC occurrences are associated with chronic hepatitis viral infection, and hepatitis B viral (HBV) infection is currently a major health problem in Eastern Asia. Elucidating the genetic mechanisms associated with HBV-induced HCC has been difficult due to the heterogeneity and genetic complexity associated with this disease. A repertoire of animal models has been broadly used to study the pathophysiology and to develop potential treatment regimens for HBV-associated HCC. The use of these animal models has provided valuable genetic information and has been an important contributor to uncovering the factors involved in liver malignant transformation, invasion and metastasis. Recently, transposon-based mouse models are becoming more widely used in liver cancer research to interrogate the genome by forward genetics and also used to validate genes rapidly in a reverse genetic manner. Importantly, these transposon-based rapid reverse genetic mouse models could become crucial in testing potential therapeutic agents before proceeding to clinical trials in human. Therefore, this review will cover the use of transposon-based mouse models to address the problems of liver cancer, especially HBV-associated HCC occurrences in Asia. PMID:26576100

  2. Cohort effects in dynamic models and their impact on vaccination programmes: an example from Hepatitis A

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasa Rao, Arni SR; Chen, Maggie H; Pham, Ba' Z; Tricco, Andrea C; Gilca, Vladimir; Duval, Bernard; Krahn, Murray D; Bauch, Chris T

    2006-01-01

    Background Infection rates for many infectious diseases have declined over the past century. This has created a cohort effect, whereby older individuals experienced a higher infection rate in their past than younger individuals do now. As a result, age-stratified seroprevalence profiles often differ from what would be expected from constant infection rates. Methods Here, we account for the cohort effect by fitting an age-structured compartmental model with declining transmission rates to Hepatitis A seroprevalence data for Canadian-born individuals. We compare the predicted impact of universal vaccination with and without including the cohort effect in the dynamic model. Results We find that Hepatitis A transmissibility has declined by a factor of 2.8 since the early twentieth century. When the cohort effect is not included in the model, incidence and mortality both with and without vaccination are significantly over-predicted. Incidence (respectively mortality) over a 20 year period of universal vaccination is 34% (respectively 90%) higher than if the cohort effect is included. The percentage reduction in incidence and mortality due to vaccination are also over-predicted when the cohort effect is not included. Similar effects are likely for many other infectious diseases where infection rates have declined significantly over past decades and where immunity is lifelong. Conclusion Failure to account for cohort effects has implications for interpreting seroprevalence data and predicting the impact of vaccination programmes with dynamic models. Cohort effects should be included in dynamic modelling studies whenever applicable. PMID:17147828

  3. Transposon mouse models to elucidate the genetic mechanisms of hepatitis B viral induced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Amy P; Tschida, Barbara R; Lo, Lilian H; Moriarity, Branden S; Rowlands, Dewi K; Largaespada, David A; Keng, Vincent W

    2015-01-01

    The major type of human liver cancer is hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and there are currently many risk factors that contribute to this deadly disease. The majority of HCC occurrences are associated with chronic hepatitis viral infection, and hepatitis B viral (HBV) infection is currently a major health problem in Eastern Asia. Elucidating the genetic mechanisms associated with HBV-induced HCC has been difficult due to the heterogeneity and genetic complexity associated with this disease. A repertoire of animal models has been broadly used to study the pathophysiology and to develop potential treatment regimens for HBV-associated HCC. The use of these animal models has provided valuable genetic information and has been an important contributor to uncovering the factors involved in liver malignant transformation, invasion and metastasis. Recently, transposon-based mouse models are becoming more widely used in liver cancer research to interrogate the genome by forward genetics and also used to validate genes rapidly in a reverse genetic manner. Importantly, these transposon-based rapid reverse genetic mouse models could become crucial in testing potential therapeutic agents before proceeding to clinical trials in human. Therefore, this review will cover the use of transposon-based mouse models to address the problems of liver cancer, especially HBV-associated HCC occurrences in Asia. PMID:26576100

  4. Chimeric mouse model for the infection of hepatitis B and C viruses.

    PubMed

    Tesfaye, Abeba; Stift, Judith; Maric, Dragan; Cui, Qingwen; Dienes, Hans-Peter; Feinstone, Stephen M

    2013-01-01

    While the chimpanzee remains the only animal that closely models human hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, transgenic and immunodeficient mice in which human liver can be engrafted serve as a partial solution to the need for a small animal model for HCV infection. The established system that was based on mice carrying a transgene for urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) gene under the control of the human albumin promoter has proved to be useful for studies of virus infectivity and for testing antiviral drug agents. However, the current Alb-uPA transgenic model with a humanized liver has practical limitations due to the inability to maintain non-engrafted mice as dizygotes for the transgene, poor engraftment of hemizygotes, high neonatal and experimental death rates of dizygous mice and a very short time window for hepatocyte engraftment. To improve the model, we crossed transgenic mice carrying the uPA gene driven by the major urinary protein promoter onto a SCID/Beige background (MUP-uPA SCID/Bg). These transgenic mice are healthy relative to Alb-uPA mice and provide a long window from about age 4 to 12 months for engraftment with human hepatocytes and infection with hepatitis C or hepatitis B (HBV) viruses. We have demonstrated engraftment of human hepatocytes by immunohistochemistry staining for human albumin (30-80% engraftment) and observed a correlation between the number of human hepatocytes inoculated and the level of the concentration of human albumin in the serum. We have shown that these mice support the replication of both HBV and all six major HCV genotypes. Using HBV and HCV inocula that had been previously tittered in chimpanzees, we showed that the mice had approximately the same sensitivity for infection as chimpanzees. These mice should be useful for isolating non-cell culture adapted viruses as well as testing of antiviral drugs, antibody neutralization studies and examination of phenotypic changes in viral mutants. PMID:24155939

  5. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... with hepatitis? How does a pregnant woman pass hepatitis B virus to her baby? If I have hepatitis B, what does my baby need so that she ... Can I breastfeed my baby if I have hepatitis B? More information on viral hepatitis What is hepatitis? ...

  6. Interferon-β Mediates Signaling Pathways Uniquely Regulated in Hepatic Stellate Cells and Attenuates the Progression of Hepatic Fibrosis in a Dietary Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Kazumi; Akiyama, Hideo; Funamoto, Saeko; Izawa, Akiko; Sai, Takafumi; Kunita, Kana; Kainoh, Mie; Suzuki, Tomohiko; Kawada, Norifumi

    2015-01-01

    The results of clinical and experimental studies suggest that type I interferons (IFNs) may have direct antifibrotic activity in addition to their antiviral properties. However, the mechanisms are still unclear; in particular, little is known about the antifibrotic activity of IFN-β and how its activity is distinct from that of IFN-α. Using DNA microarrays, we demonstrated that gene expression in TWNT-4 cells, an activated human hepatic stellate cell line, was remarkably altered by IFN-β more than by IFN-α. Integrated pathway enrichment analyses revealed that a variety of IFN-β–mediated signaling pathways are uniquely regulated in TWNT-4 cells, including those related to cell cycle and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling. To investigate the antifibrotic activity of IFN-β and the involvement of TLR4 signaling in vivo, we used mice fed a choline-deficient l-amino acid-defined diet as a model of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis-related hepatic fibrosis. In this model, the administration of IFN-β significantly attenuated augmentation of the area of liver fibrosis, with accompanying transcriptional downregulation of the TLR4 adaptor molecule MyD88. Our results provide important clues for understanding the mechanisms of the preferential antifibrotic activity of IFN-β and suggest that IFN-β itself, as well as being a modulator of its unique signaling pathway, may be a potential treatment for patients with hepatic fibrosis in a pathogenesis-independent manner. PMID:25715168

  7. Modeling of Corticosteroid Effects on Hepatic Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptors and Plasma Lipid Dynamics in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hazra, Anasuya; Pyszczynski, Nancy A.; DuBois, Debra C.; Almon, Richard R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study examines methylprednisolone (MPL) effects on the dynamics of hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) mRNA and plasma lipids associated with increased risks for atherosclerosis. Materials and methods Normal male Wistar rats were given 50 mg/kg MPL intramuscularly (IM) and sacrificed at various times. Measurements included plasma MPL and CST, hepatic glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA, cytosolic GR density and hepatic LDLR mRNA, and plasma total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLC), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC), and triglycerides (TG). Results MPL showed bi-exponential disposition with two first-order absorption components. Hepatic GR and LDLR mRNA exhibited circadian patterns which were disrupted by MPL. Down-regulation in GR mRNA (40–50%) was followed by a delayed rebound phase. LDLR mRNA exhibited transient down-regulation (60–70%). Cytosolic GR density was significantly suppressed but returned to baseline by 72 h. Plasma TC and LDLC showed increases (55 and 142%) at 12 h. A mechanistic receptor/gene pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model was developed to describe CS effects on hepatic LDLR mRNA and plasma cholesterols. Conclusions Our PK/PD model was able to satisfactorily capture the MPL effects on hepatic LDLR, its relationship to various plasma cholesterols, and builds the foundation to explore this area in the future. PMID:17674160

  8. Lactoferrin dampens high-fructose corn syrup-induced hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi-Chieh; Hsieh, Chang-Chi

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome are related obesity, type 2 diabetes/insulin resistance and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Here we investigated how the anti-inflammatory properties of lactoferrin can protect against the onset of hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome by using a murine model administered with high-fructose corn syrup. Our results show that a high-fructose diet stimulates intestinal bacterial overgrowth and increases intestinal permeability, leading to the introduction of endotoxin into blood circulation and liver. Immunohistochemical staining of Toll-like receptor-4 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin indicated that lactoferrin can modulate lipopolysaccharide-mediated inflammatory cascade. The important regulatory roles are played by adipokines including interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and adiponectin, ultimately reducing hepatitis and decreasing serum alanine aminotransferase release. These beneficial effects of lactoferrin related to the downregulation of the lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory cascade in the liver. Furthermore, lactoferrin reduced serum and hepatic triglycerides to prevent lipid accumulation in the liver, and reduced lipid peroxidation, resulting in 4-hydroxynonenal accumulation. Lactoferrin reduced oral glucose tolerance test and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance. Lactoferrin administration thus significantly lowered liver weight, resulting from a decrease in the triglyceride and cholesterol synthesis that activates hepatic steatosis. Taken together, these results suggest that lactoferrin protected against high-fructose corn syrup induced hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:24816278

  9. Inflammatory responses in a new mouse model of prolonged hepatic cold ischemia followed by arterialized orthotopic liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiu-Da; Gao, Feng; Ke, Bibo; Zhai, Yuan; Lassman, Charles R; Tsuchihashi, Sei-Ichiro; Farmer, Douglas G; Busuttil, Ronald W; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W

    2005-10-01

    The current models of liver ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) in mice are largely limited to a warm ischemic component. To investigate the mechanism of hepatic "cold" IRI, we developed and validated a new mouse model of prolonged cold preservation followed by syngeneic orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Two hundred and forty-three OLTs with or without rearterialization and preservation in University of Wisconsin solution at 4 degrees C were performed in Balb/c mice. The 14-day survivals in the nonarterialized OLT groups were 92% (11/12), 82% (9/11), and 8% (1/12) after 1-hour, 6-hour and 24-hour preservation, respectively. In contrast, hepatic artery reconstruction after 1-hour, 6-hour, and 24-hour preservation improved the outcome as evidenced by 2-week survival of 100% (12/12), 100% (10/10), and 33% (4/12), respectively, and diminished hepatocellular damage (serum alanine aminotransferase /histology). Moreover, 24-hour (but not 1-h) cold preservation of rearterialized OLTs increased hepatic CD4+ T-cell infiltration and proinflammatory cytokine (tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin 2, interferon-gamma) production, as well as enhanced local apoptosis, and Toll-like receptor 4/caspase 3 expression. These cardinal features of hepatic IRI validate the model. In conclusion, we have developed and validated a new mouse model of IRI in which hepatic artery reconstruction was mandatory for long-term animal survival after prolonged (24-h) OLT preservation. With the availability of genetically manipulated mouse strains, this model should provide important insights into the mechanism of antigen-independent hepatic IRI and help design much needed refined therapeutic means to combat hepatic IRI in the clinics. PMID:16184555

  10. Hepatic Isoprenoid Metabolism in a Rat Model of Smith-Lemli-Opitz Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Keller, R. Kennedy; Mitchell, David A.; Goulah, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    Elevated (4 to 7-fold) levels of urinary dolichol and coenzyme Q and substantially longer chain lengths for urinary dolichols have been reported in Smith-Lemli-Opitz Syndrome (SLOS) patients, compared to normal subjects. We investigated the possibility of similar alterations in hepatic, nonsterol isoprenoids in a well-established rat model of SLOS. In this model, the ratio of 7-dehydrocholesterol (7DHC) to cholesterol (Chol) in serum approached 15:1; however, total sterol mass in serum decreased by >80 %. Livers from treated rats had 7DHC/Chol ratios of ~32:1, but the steady-state levels of total sterols were >40 % those of livers from age-matched (3-month-old) control animals. No significant differences in the levels of LDL receptor or HMG-CoA reductase were observed. The levels of dolichol and coenzyme Q were elevated only modestly (by 64 and 31 %, respectively; p < 0.05, N = 6) in the livers of the SLOS rat model compared to controls; moreover, the chain lengths of these isoprenoids were not different in the two groups. We conclude that hepatic isoprenoid synthesis is marginally elevated in this animal model of SLOS, but without preferential shunting to the nonsterol branches (dolichol and coenzyme Q) of the pathway and without alteration of normal dolichol chain lengths. PMID:23361583

  11. Rodent models of hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury: time and percentage-related pathophysiological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Karatzas, Theodore; Neri, Anna-Aikaterini; Baibaki, Maria-Eleni; Dontas, Ismene A

    2014-10-01

    Ischemia and reperfusion (IR) injury remains one of the major problems in liver surgery and transplantation, which determines the viability of the hepatic tissue after resection and of the grafted organ. This review aims to elucidate the mechanisms involved in IR injury of the liver in rodent experimental studies and the preventative methods and pharmacologic agents that have been applied. Many time- and percentage-related liver IR injury rodent models have been used to examine the pathophysiological mechanisms and the parameters implicated with different morbidity, mortality, and pathology findings. The most preferred experimental rodent model of liver IR is the induction of 70% IR for 45 min, which is associated with almost 100% survival. In this model, plasma levels of several parameters such as alanine transaminase, aspartate aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyltransferase, endothelin-1, malonodialdehyde, tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 1b, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and caspases are increased. The increase of caspases is associated with the initiation of hepatic cellular apoptosis. The main injuries observed 24 h after reperfusion are nuclear pyknosis, cytoplasmic hypereosinophilia, severe necrosis, and loss of intercellular borders. Both ischemic pre- and post-conditioning preventative methods and pharmacologic agents are successfully applied to alleviate the IR injuries. The selection of the time- and percentage-related liver IR injury rodent model and the potential preventative method should be related to the clinical question being answered. PMID:25033703

  12. Transposon mutagenesis identifies genes driving hepatocellular carcinoma in a chronic hepatitis B mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Bard-Chapeau, Emilie A.; Nguyen, Anh-Tuan; Rust, Alistair G.; Sayadi, Ahmed; Lee, Philip; Chua, Belinda Q; New, Lee-Sun; de Jong, Johann; Ward, Jerrold M.; Chin, Christopher KY.; Chew, Valerie; Toh, Han Chong; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Benoukraf, Touati; Soong, Richie; Bard, Frederic A.; Dupuy, Adam J.; Johnson, Randy L.; Radda, George K.; Chan, Eric CY.; Wessels, Lodewyk FA.; Adams, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The most common risk factor for developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV). To better understand the evolutionary forces driving HCC we performed a near saturating transposon mutagenesis screen in a mouse HBV model of HCC. This screen identified 21 candidate early stage drivers, and a bewildering number (2860) of candidate later stage drivers, that were enriched for genes mutated, deregulated, or that function in signaling pathways important for human HCC, with a striking 1199 genes linked to cellular metabolic processes. Our study provides a comprehensive overview of the genetic landscape of HCC. PMID:24316982

  13. Percutaneous Ultrasound Guided Implantation of VX2 for Creation of a Rabbit Hepatic Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    White, Sarah B.; Chen, Jeane; Gordon, Andrew C.; Harris, Kathleen R.; Nicolai, Jodi R.; West, Derek L.; Larson, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    Creation of a VX2 tumor model has traditionally required a laparotomy and surgical implantation of tumor fragments. Open surgical procedures are invasive and require long procedure times and recovery that can result in post-operative morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study is to report the results of a percutaneous ultrasound guided method for creation of a VX2 model in rabbit livers. A total of 27 New Zealand white rabbits underwent a percutaneous ultrasound guided approach, where a VX2 tumor fragment was implanted in the liver. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess for tumor growth and necropsy was performed to determine rates of tract seeding and metastatic disease. Ultrasound guided tumor implantation was successful in all 27 rabbits. One rabbit died 2 days following the implantation procedure. Two rabbits had no tumors seen on follow-up imaging. Therefore, tumor development was seen in 24/26 (92%) rabbits. During the follow-up period, tract seeding was seen in 8% of rabbits and 38% had extra-hepatic metastatic disease. Therefore, percutaneous ultrasound guided tumor implantation safely provides reliable tumor growth for establishing hepatic VX2 tumors in a rabbit model with decreased rates of tract seeding, compared to previously reported methods. PMID:25853660

  14. Determinants of [13N]ammonia kinetics in hepatic PET experiments: a minimal recirculatory model.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Michael; Roelsgaard, Klaus; Bender, Dirk; Keiding, Susanne

    2002-12-01

    The aim of this study was the development of a modelling approach for the analysis of the systemic kinetics of the tracer nitrogen-13 ammonia administered for dynamic liver scanning. The radioactive half-life of this tracer is 9.8 min, which limits the time span in which data are available in a positron emission tomography experimental setting. A circulatory pharmacokinetic model was applied to the metabolism of ammonia in anaesthetised pigs, which incorporated data from serial measurements of [(13)N]ammonia and [(13)N]metabolite activity in arterial and portal venous blood together with blood flow rates through the portal vein and through the hepatic artery obtained over 20 min after intravenous injection of [(13)N]ammonia. Model analysis showed that up to 20 min after injection the time course of [(13)N]ammonia concentration in arterial blood is primarily determined by distribution kinetics (steady-state volume of distribution 1,856+/-531 ml kg(-1)). Simultaneous fitting of arterial ammonia and metabolite blood concentrations allowed for estimation of the hepatic [(13)N]ammonia clearance (10.25+/-1.84 ml min(-1) kg(-1)), which accounted for the formation of the circulating metabolites. PMID:12458400

  15. Modeling hepatitis C virus transmission among people who inject drugs: Assumptions, limitations and future challenges

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Nick; Hellard, Margaret; McBryde, Emma Sue

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of highly effective hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatments has led to discussion of elimination and intensified interest in models of HCV transmission. In developed settings, HCV disproportionally affects people who inject drugs (PWID), and models are typically used to provide an evidence base for the effectiveness of interventions such as needle and syringe programs, opioid substitution therapy and more recently treating PWID with new generation therapies to achieve specified reductions in prevalence and / or incidence. This manuscript reviews deterministic compartmental S-I, deterministic compartmental S-I-S and network-based transmission models of HCV among PWID. We detail typical assumptions made when modeling injecting risk behavior, virus transmission, treatment and re-infection and how they correspond with available evidence and empirical data. PMID:26305706

  16. Modeling hepatitis C virus transmission among people who inject drugs: Assumptions, limitations and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Scott, Nick; Hellard, Margaret; McBryde, Emma Sue

    2016-02-17

    The discovery of highly effective hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatments has led to discussion of elimination and intensified interest in models of HCV transmission. In developed settings, HCV disproportionally affects people who inject drugs (PWID), and models are typically used to provide an evidence base for the effectiveness of interventions such as needle and syringe programs, opioid substitution therapy and more recently treating PWID with new generation therapies to achieve specified reductions in prevalence and / or incidence. This manuscript reviews deterministic compartmental S-I, deterministic compartmental S-I-S and network-based transmission models of HCV among PWID. We detail typical assumptions made when modeling injecting risk behavior, virus transmission, treatment and re-infection and how they correspond with available evidence and empirical data. PMID:26305706

  17. Modeling hepatic insulin sensitivity during a meal: validation against the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp.

    PubMed

    Dalla Man, Chiara; Piccinini, Francesca; Basu, Rita; Basu, Ananda; Rizza, Robert A; Cobelli, Claudio

    2013-04-15

    Recently, we proposed a model describing the suppression of endogenous glucose production (EGP) during a meal. It assumes that EGP suppression depends on glucose concentration and its rate of change and on delayed insulin action. Hepatic insulin sensitivity (S(I)(Lmeal)) can be derived from EGP model parameters. This model was shown to adequately describe EGP profiles measured with multiple tracer techniques; however, S(I)(Lmeal) has never been compared directly with its euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp counterpart (S(I)(Lclamp)). To do so, 62 subjects with different degrees of glucose tolerance underwent a triple-tracer mixed meal. Fifty-seven subjects also underwent a labeled ([3-(3)H]glucose) euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp. From the triple-tracer meal data, virtually model-independent estimates of EGP were obtained using the tracer-to-tracee clamp technique, and the EGP model was identified in each subject. Model fit was satisfactory, and S(I)(Lmeal) was estimated with good precision. Correlation between S(I)(Lclamp) and S(I)(Lmeal) was good (r = 0.72, P < 0.001); however, S(I)(Lmeal) was lower than S(I)(Lclamp) (4.60 ± 0.64 vs. 8.73 ± 1.07 10(-4) dl·kg(-1)·min(-1) per μU/ml, P < 0.01). This difference may be due to different ranges of insulin explored during the two tests (ΔI(clamp) = 15.60 ± 1.61 vs. ΔI(meal)= 83.37 ± 10.71 μU/ml) as well as steady- vs. non-steady-state glucose and insulin profiles. In conclusion, the new EGP model provides an estimate of hepatic insulin sensitivity during a meal that is in good agreement with that derived in the same individuals with a hyperinsulinemic clamp. When used in conjunction with the minimal model, the approach potentially enables estimation of hepatic insulin sensitivity from a single-tracer labeled meal or oral glucose tolerance test. PMID:23443923

  18. New models of hepatitis E virus replication in human and porcine hepatocyte cell lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) causes acute, enterically-transmitted hepatitis. It is associated with large epidemics in tropical and subtropical regions where it is endemic or with sporadic cases in non-endemic regions. Unlike other hepatitis viruses, HEV has several animal reservoirs. Phylogenetic studie...

  19. Noninvasive models for assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Da-Wu; Dong, Jing; Liu, Yu-Rui; Jiang, Jia-Ji; Zhu, Yue-Yong

    2016-08-01

    There are approximately 240 million patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection worldwide. Up to 40% of HBV-infected patients can progress to liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma or chronic end-stage liver disease during their lifetime. This, in turn, is responsible for around 650000 deaths annually worldwide. Repeated hepatitis flares may increase the progression of liver fibrosis, making the accurate diagnosis of the stage of liver fibrosis critical in order to make antiviral therapeutic decisions for HBV-infected patients. Liver biopsy remains the "gold standard" for diagnosing liver fibrosis. However, this technique has recently been challenged by the development of several novel noninvasive tests to evaluate liver fibrosis, including serum markers, combined models and imaging techniques. In addition, the cost and accessibility of imaging techniques have been suggested as additional limitations for invasive assessment of liver fibrosis in developing countries. Therefore, a noninvasive assessment model has been suggested to evaluate liver fibrosis, specifically in HBV-infected patients, owing to its high applicability, inter-laboratory reproducibility, wide availability for repeated assays and reasonable cost. The current review aims to present the status of knowledge in this new and exciting field, and to highlight the key points in HBV-infected patients for clinicians. PMID:27547009

  20. Noninvasive models for assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Da-Wu; Dong, Jing; Liu, Yu-Rui; Jiang, Jia-Ji; Zhu, Yue-Yong

    2016-01-01

    There are approximately 240 million patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection worldwide. Up to 40% of HBV-infected patients can progress to liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma or chronic end-stage liver disease during their lifetime. This, in turn, is responsible for around 650000 deaths annually worldwide. Repeated hepatitis flares may increase the progression of liver fibrosis, making the accurate diagnosis of the stage of liver fibrosis critical in order to make antiviral therapeutic decisions for HBV-infected patients. Liver biopsy remains the “gold standard” for diagnosing liver fibrosis. However, this technique has recently been challenged by the development of several novel noninvasive tests to evaluate liver fibrosis, including serum markers, combined models and imaging techniques. In addition, the cost and accessibility of imaging techniques have been suggested as additional limitations for invasive assessment of liver fibrosis in developing countries. Therefore, a noninvasive assessment model has been suggested to evaluate liver fibrosis, specifically in HBV-infected patients, owing to its high applicability, inter-laboratory reproducibility, wide availability for repeated assays and reasonable cost. The current review aims to present the status of knowledge in this new and exciting field, and to highlight the key points in HBV-infected patients for clinicians. PMID:27547009

  1. Dynamic analysis of a hepatitis B model with three-age-classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Suxia; Zhou, Yicang

    2014-07-01

    Based on the fact that the likelihood of becoming chronically infected is dependent on age at primary infection Kane (1995) [2], Edmunds et al. (1993) [3], Medley et al. (2001) [4], and Ganem and Prince (2004) [6], we formulate a hepatitis B transmission model with three age classes. The reproduction number, R0 is defined and the dynamical behavior of the model is analyzed. It is proved that the disease-free equilibrium is globally stable if R0<1, and there exists at least one endemic equilibrium and that the disease is uniformly persistent if R0>1. The unique endemic equilibrium and its global stability is obtained in a special case. Simulations are also conducted to compare the dynamical behavior of the model with and without age classes.

  2. Modeling viral and drug kinetics: hepatitis C virus treatment with pegylated interferon alfa-2b.

    PubMed

    Powers, Kimberly A; Dixit, Narendra M; Ribeiro, Ruy M; Golia, Preeti; Talal, Andrew H; Perelson, Alan S

    2003-01-01

    Administration of peginterferon alfa-2b plus ribavirin results in an early hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA decay followed by an increase as the drug concentration declines between doses. Upon administration of the next dose 1 week later, the same pattern is observed. We have incorporated pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis into a model of viral dynamics to describe the effect that changes in drug concentration and effectiveness can have on viral levels. To illustrate the relationship between pharmacokinetics and viral dynamics, we fit the model to data from four HCV/human immunodeficiency virus co-infected patients, and obtained good agreement with the measured serum HCV RNA levels. We were able to account for the observed increases in HCV RNA, and estimate virion and drug half-lives that are in agreement with previous reports. Models incorporating pharmacokinetics are needed to correctly interpret viral load changes and estimate drug effectiveness in treatment protocols using peginterferon alfa-2b. PMID:12934163

  3. Hepatic drug metabolizing profile of Flinders Sensitive Line rat model of depression.

    PubMed

    Kotsovolou, Olga; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Lang, Matti A; Marselos, Marios; Overstreet, David H; Papadopoulou-Daifoti, Zoi; Johanson, Inger; Fotopoulos, Andrew; Konstandi, Maria

    2010-08-16

    The Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rat model of depression exhibits some behavioral, neurochemical, and pharmacological features that have been reported in depressed patients and has been very effective in screening antidepressants. Major factor that determines the effectiveness and toxicity of a drug is the drug metabolizing capacity of the liver. Therefore, in order to discriminate possible differentiation in the hepatic drug metabolism between FSL rats and Sprague-Dawley (SD) controls, their hepatic metabolic profile was investigated in this study. The data showed decreased glutathione (GSH) content and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and lower expression of certain major CYP enzymes, including the CYP2B1, CYP2C11 and CYP2D1 in FSL rats compared to SD controls. In contrast, p-nitrophenol hydroxylase (PNP), 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase (EROD) and 16alpha-testosterone hydroxylase activities were higher in FSL rats. Interestingly, the wide spread environmental pollutant benzo(alpha)pyrene (B(alpha)P) induced CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2B1/2 and ALDH3c at a lesser extend in FSL than in SD rats, whereas the antidepressant mirtazapine (MIRT) up-regulated CYP1A1/2, CYP2C11, CYP2D1, CYP2E1 and CYP3A1/2, mainly, in FSL rats. The drug also further increased ALDH3c whereas suppressed GSH content in B(alpha)P-exposed FSL rats. In conclusion, several key enzymes of the hepatic biotransformation machinery are differentially expressed in FSL than in SD rats, a condition that may influence the outcome of drug therapy. The MIRT-induced up-regulation of several drug-metabolizing enzymes indicates the critical role of antidepressant treatment that should be always taken into account in the designing of treatment and interpretation of insufficient pharmacotherapy or drug toxicity. PMID:20595028

  4. Modelling the Impact of Cell-To-Cell Transmission in Hepatitis B Virus

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cell-free virus is a well-recognized and efficient mechanism for the spread of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in the liver. Cell-to-cell transmission (CCT) can be a more efficient means of virus propagation. Despite experimental evidence implying CCT occurs in HBV, its relative impact is uncertain. We develop a 3-D agent-based model where each hepatocyte changes its viral state according to a dynamical process driven by cell-free virus infection, CCT and intracellular replication. We determine the relative importance of CCT in the development and resolution of acute HBV infection in the presence of cytolytic (CTL) and non-CTL mechanisms. T cell clearance number is defined as the minimum number of infected cells needed to be killed by each T cell at peak infection that results in infection clearance within 12 weeks with hepatocyte turnover (HT, number of equivalent livers) ≤3. We find that CCT has very little impact on the establishment of infection as the mean cccDNA copies/cell remains between 15 to 20 at the peak of the infection regardless of CCT strength. In contrast, CCT inhibit immune-mediated clearance of acute HBV infection as higher CCT strength requires higher T cell clearance number and increases the probability of T cell exhaustion. An effective non-CTL inhibition can counter these negative effects of higher strengths of CCT by supporting rapid, efficient viral clearance and with little liver destruction. This is evident as the T cell clearance number drops by approximately 50% when non-CTL inhibition is increased from 10% to 80%. Higher CCT strength also increases the probability of the incidence of fulminant hepatitis with this phenomenon being unlikely to arise for no CCT. In conclusion, we report the possibility of CCT impacting HBV clearance and its contribution to fulminant hepatitis. PMID:27560827

  5. UNFEASIBLE EXPERIMENTAL MODEL OF NORMOTHERMIC HEPATIC ISCHEMIA AND REPERFUSION IN RATS USING THE PRINGLE MANEUVER

    PubMed Central

    GOMES, Helbert Minuncio Pereira; SERIGIOLLE, Leonardo Carvalho; RODRIGUES, Daren Athiê Boy; LOPES, Carolina Marques; STUDART, Sarah do Valle; LEME, Pedro Luiz Squilacci

    2014-01-01

    Background The negative result of a research does not always indicate failure, and when the data do not permit a proper conclusion, or are contrary to the initial project, should not simply be discarded and archived. Aim To report failure after performing experimental model of liver ischemia and reperfusion normothermic, continuous or intermittent, in small animals aiming at the study of biochemical and histological parameters after postoperative recovery. Methods Fifteen Wistar rats were divided into three groups of five animals each; all underwent surgery, the abdomen was sutured after the proposed procedures for each group and the animals were observed for 6 h or until they died, and then were reoperated. In Group 1, control (sham-operated): dissection of the hepatic hilum was performed; in Group 2: clamping of the hepatic hilum for 30 m; in Group 3: clamping of the hepatic hilum for 15 m, reperfusion for 5 m and another 15 m of clamping. Data from Groups 2 and 3 were compared with Student's t test. Results All animals of Group 1 survived for 6 h. Two animals in Group 2 died before the 6 h needed to validate the experiment; two did not recover from anesthesia and one survived until the end. In Group 3, four animals died before the 6 h established and one of them survived the required time. Only one animal in Group 2 and one in Group 3 survived and were able to accomplish the study. There was no statistical significance when the results of Groups 2 and 3 were compared (p>0.05). Conclusion The death of six animals before the necessary period of observation turned the initial proposal of the experiment unfeasible. PMID:25184771

  6. Hepatic perfusion in a tumor model using DCE-CT: an accuracy and precision study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Errol E.; Chen, Xiaogang; Hadway, Jennifer; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2008-08-01

    In the current study we investigate the accuracy and precision of hepatic perfusion measurements based on the Johnson and Wilson model with the adiabatic approximation. VX2 carcinoma cells were implanted into the livers of New Zealand white rabbits. Simultaneous dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) and radiolabeled microsphere studies were performed under steady-state normo-, hyper- and hypo-capnia. The hepatic arterial blood flows (HABF) obtained using both techniques were compared with ANOVA. The precision was assessed by the coefficient of variation (CV). Under normo-capnia the microsphere HABF were 51.9 ± 4.2, 40.7 ± 4.9 and 99.7 ± 6.0 ml min-1 (100 g)-1 while DCE-CT HABF were 50.0 ± 5.7, 37.1 ± 4.5 and 99.8 ± 6.8 ml min-1 (100 g)-1 in normal tissue, tumor core and rim, respectively. There were no significant differences between HABF measurements obtained with both techniques (P > 0.05). Furthermore, a strong correlation was observed between HABF values from both techniques: slope of 0.92 ± 0.05, intercept of 4.62 ± 2.69 ml min-1 (100 g)-1 and R2 = 0.81 ± 0.05 (P < 0.05). The Bland-Altman plot comparing DCE-CT and microsphere HABF measurements gives a mean difference of -0.13 ml min-1 (100 g)-1, which is not significantly different from zero. DCE-CT HABF is precise, with CV of 5.7, 24.9 and 1.4% in the normal tissue, tumor core and rim, respectively. Non-invasive measurement of HABF with DCE-CT is accurate and precise. DCE-CT can be an important extension of CT to assess hepatic function besides morphology in liver diseases.

  7. Modelling the Impact of Cell-To-Cell Transmission in Hepatitis B Virus.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Ashish; Murray, John M

    2016-01-01

    Cell-free virus is a well-recognized and efficient mechanism for the spread of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in the liver. Cell-to-cell transmission (CCT) can be a more efficient means of virus propagation. Despite experimental evidence implying CCT occurs in HBV, its relative impact is uncertain. We develop a 3-D agent-based model where each hepatocyte changes its viral state according to a dynamical process driven by cell-free virus infection, CCT and intracellular replication. We determine the relative importance of CCT in the development and resolution of acute HBV infection in the presence of cytolytic (CTL) and non-CTL mechanisms. T cell clearance number is defined as the minimum number of infected cells needed to be killed by each T cell at peak infection that results in infection clearance within 12 weeks with hepatocyte turnover (HT, number of equivalent livers) ≤3. We find that CCT has very little impact on the establishment of infection as the mean cccDNA copies/cell remains between 15 to 20 at the peak of the infection regardless of CCT strength. In contrast, CCT inhibit immune-mediated clearance of acute HBV infection as higher CCT strength requires higher T cell clearance number and increases the probability of T cell exhaustion. An effective non-CTL inhibition can counter these negative effects of higher strengths of CCT by supporting rapid, efficient viral clearance and with little liver destruction. This is evident as the T cell clearance number drops by approximately 50% when non-CTL inhibition is increased from 10% to 80%. Higher CCT strength also increases the probability of the incidence of fulminant hepatitis with this phenomenon being unlikely to arise for no CCT. In conclusion, we report the possibility of CCT impacting HBV clearance and its contribution to fulminant hepatitis. PMID:27560827

  8. Magnesium lithospermate B reduces inflammatory response in a mouse model of hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Song, Shaohua; Liu, Wenyu; Liu, Fang; Wang, Zhengxin; Ding, Guoshan; Guo, Wenyuan; Fu, Zhiren

    2014-06-01

    It has been well proved that acute inflammatory response and hepatocellular apoptosis contributed to the pathogenesis of liver ischemia reperfusion (IR) injury. A vast amount of research has demonstrated that magnesium lithospermate B (MLB) has potent anti-apoptosis and potential anti-inflammatory pharmacological properties. However, it has not previously been examined whether MLB can attenuate hepatic IR injury. Firstly, the optimal dose of MLB to protect against hepatic IR injury was determined using hepatic IR model in mice. Then, the effect of MLB on IR-induced inflammatory response was detected in detail. We found that MLB exhibited protective effect from the beginning of 50 mg/kg and culminated at the doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg. The alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels in MLB group were markedly decreased. Severe hepatocellular swelling/necrosis, sinusoidal/vascular congestion and inflammatory cell infiltration were seen and a large number of apoptotic cells were found in the liver samples from Saline group, while minimal damage and very few apoptotic cells were noted in the samples from MLB group. Kuppfer cells infiltration, myeloperoxidase activity and mRNA level of CD11b in MLB group was significantly decreased. Serum TNF-a and IL-6, and mRNA expression of CXCL-10 and ICAM-1 was markedly decreased in the samples from MLB group. Inflammatory signaling pathway activation was largely prevented in MLB group. MLB can significantly attenuate IR-induced hepatocellular damage and hepatocellular apoptosis by preventing inflammatory signaling pathways activation, inflammatory mediators expression and macrophage and neutrophil infiltration. PMID:24385154

  9. Minocycline protects against hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Li, Yining; Li, Tao; Qi, Haizhi; Yuan, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is a common clinical problem. The present study was conducted to investigate the protective effect and mechanism of minocycline (Mino), a tetracycline with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, on I/R injury of liver in rats. In total, 54 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 3 groups with 18 rats in each: Sham-operated (control group), I/R model (I/R group) and Mino preconditioning groups (Mino group). The rats of the Mino group were administered Mino (45 mg/kg) by gastric irrigation at 36 h before surgery and were subsequently administered with 22.5 mg/kg every 12 h for the 36 h before surgery. The rats were sacrificed at 2, 6 and 24 h after reperfusion, and the serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were measured. Hematoxylin/eosin staining of liver tissues was performed to detect the rat liver histological changes and the grade of liver I/R injury (Suzuki's criteria); the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were determined by spectrophotometry; hepatic tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) mRNA were measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction; the Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1) and β-catenin gene products of the liver were detected by western blot analysis. Mino treatment significantly ameliorated the I/R injury of the liver, as shown by decreased Suzuki scores and liver function (ALT, AST and LDH). After 2, 6 and 24 h reperfusion, compared to the I/R group the MDA and MPO levels of the Mino group decreased in the liver tissues and the levels of hepatic TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA were decreased too. The protein expression of hepatic DKK-1 decreased, whereas β-catenin increased, which indicates that the Wnt/β-catenin pathway has been activated. In conclusion, Mino protects the liver from I/R injury mainly through reducing oxidative stress and inhibiting the release of pro

  10. Minocycline protects against hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    LI, YINING; LI, TAO; QI, HAIZHI; YUAN, FANG

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is a common clinical problem. The present study was conducted to investigate the protective effect and mechanism of minocycline (Mino), a tetracycline with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, on I/R injury of liver in rats. In total, 54 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 3 groups with 18 rats in each: Sham-operated (control group), I/R model (I/R group) and Mino preconditioning groups (Mino group). The rats of the Mino group were administered Mino (45 mg/kg) by gastric irrigation at 36 h before surgery and were subsequently administered with 22.5 mg/kg every 12 h for the 36 h before surgery. The rats were sacrificed at 2, 6 and 24 h after reperfusion, and the serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were measured. Hematoxylin/eosin staining of liver tissues was performed to detect the rat liver histological changes and the grade of liver I/R injury (Suzuki's criteria); the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were determined by spectrophotometry; hepatic tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) mRNA were measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction; the Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1) and β-catenin gene products of the liver were detected by western blot analysis. Mino treatment significantly ameliorated the I/R injury of the liver, as shown by decreased Suzuki scores and liver function (ALT, AST and LDH). After 2, 6 and 24 h reperfusion, compared to the I/R group the MDA and MPO levels of the Mino group decreased in the liver tissues and the levels of hepatic TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA were decreased too. The protein expression of hepatic DKK-1 decreased, whereas β-catenin increased, which indicates that the Wnt/β-catenin pathway has been activated. In conclusion, Mino protects the liver from I/R injury mainly through reducing oxidative stress and inhibiting the release of pro

  11. Deterministically patterned biomimetic human iPSC-derived hepatic model via rapid 3D bioprinting.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xuanyi; Qu, Xin; Zhu, Wei; Li, Yi-Shuan; Yuan, Suli; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Justin; Wang, Pengrui; Lai, Cheuk Sun Edwin; Zanella, Fabian; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Sheikh, Farah; Chien, Shu; Chen, Shaochen

    2016-02-23

    The functional maturation and preservation of hepatic cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are essential to personalized in vitro drug screening and disease study. Major liver functions are tightly linked to the 3D assembly of hepatocytes, with the supporting cell types from both endodermal and mesodermal origins in a hexagonal lobule unit. Although there are many reports on functional 2D cell differentiation, few studies have demonstrated the in vitro maturation of hiPSC-derived hepatic progenitor cells (hiPSC-HPCs) in a 3D environment that depicts the physiologically relevant cell combination and microarchitecture. The application of rapid, digital 3D bioprinting to tissue engineering has allowed 3D patterning of multiple cell types in a predefined biomimetic manner. Here we present a 3D hydrogel-based triculture model that embeds hiPSC-HPCs with human umbilical vein endothelial cells and adipose-derived stem cells in a microscale hexagonal architecture. In comparison with 2D monolayer culture and a 3D HPC-only model, our 3D triculture model shows both phenotypic and functional enhancements in the hiPSC-HPCs over weeks of in vitro culture. Specifically, we find improved morphological organization, higher liver-specific gene expression levels, increased metabolic product secretion, and enhanced cytochrome P450 induction. The application of bioprinting technology in tissue engineering enables the development of a 3D biomimetic liver model that recapitulates the native liver module architecture and could be used for various applications such as early drug screening and disease modeling. PMID:26858399

  12. Deterministically patterned biomimetic human iPSC-derived hepatic model via rapid 3D bioprinting

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xuanyi; Qu, Xin; Zhu, Wei; Li, Yi-Shuan; Yuan, Suli; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Justin; Wang, Pengrui; Lai, Cheuk Sun Edwin; Zanella, Fabian; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Sheikh, Farah; Chien, Shu; Chen, Shaochen

    2016-01-01

    The functional maturation and preservation of hepatic cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are essential to personalized in vitro drug screening and disease study. Major liver functions are tightly linked to the 3D assembly of hepatocytes, with the supporting cell types from both endodermal and mesodermal origins in a hexagonal lobule unit. Although there are many reports on functional 2D cell differentiation, few studies have demonstrated the in vitro maturation of hiPSC-derived hepatic progenitor cells (hiPSC-HPCs) in a 3D environment that depicts the physiologically relevant cell combination and microarchitecture. The application of rapid, digital 3D bioprinting to tissue engineering has allowed 3D patterning of multiple cell types in a predefined biomimetic manner. Here we present a 3D hydrogel-based triculture model that embeds hiPSC-HPCs with human umbilical vein endothelial cells and adipose-derived stem cells in a microscale hexagonal architecture. In comparison with 2D monolayer culture and a 3D HPC-only model, our 3D triculture model shows both phenotypic and functional enhancements in the hiPSC-HPCs over weeks of in vitro culture. Specifically, we find improved morphological organization, higher liver-specific gene expression levels, increased metabolic product secretion, and enhanced cytochrome P450 induction. The application of bioprinting technology in tissue engineering enables the development of a 3D biomimetic liver model that recapitulates the native liver module architecture and could be used for various applications such as early drug screening and disease modeling. PMID:26858399

  13. Berberine Inhibition of Fibrogenesis in a Rat Model of Liver Fibrosis and in Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning; Xu, Qihe; Tan, Hor Yue; Hong, Ming; Li, Sha; Yuen, Man-Fung; Feng, Yibin

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To examine the effect of berberine (BBR) on liver fibrosis and its possible mechanisms through direct effects on hepatic stellate cells (HSC). Methods. The antifibrotic effect of BBR was determined in a rat model of bile duct ligation- (BDL-) induced liver fibrosis. Multiple cellular and molecular approaches were introduced to examine the effects of BBR on HSC. Results. BBR potently inhibited hepatic fibrosis induced by BDL in rats. It exhibited cytotoxicity to activated HSC at doses nontoxic to hepatocytes. High doses of BBR induced apoptosis of activated HSC, which was mediated by loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and Bcl-2/Bax imbalance. Low doses of BBR suppressed activation of HSC as evidenced by the inhibition of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression and cell motility. BBR did not affect Smad2/3 phosphorylation but significantly activated 5′ AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signalling, which was responsible for the transcriptional inhibition by BBR of profibrogenic factors α-SMA and collagen in HSC. Conclusion. BBR is a promising agent for treating liver fibrosis through multiple mechanisms, at least partially by directly targeting HSC and by inhibiting the AMPK pathway. Its value as an antifibrotic drug in patients with liver disease deserves further investigation. PMID:27239214

  14. Decreasing mitochondrial fission alleviates hepatic steatosis in a murine model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Galloway, Chad A.; Lee, Hakjoo; Brookes, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria produce the majority of cellular ATP through oxidative phosphorylation, and their capacity to do so is influenced by many factors. Mitochondrial morphology is recently suggested as an important contributor in controlling mitochondrial bioenergetics. Mitochondria divide and fuse continuously, which is affected by environmental factors, including metabolic alterations. Underscoring its bioenergetic influence, altered mitochondrial morphology is reported in tissues of patients and in animal models of metabolic dysfunction. In this study, we found that mitochondrial fission plays a vital role in the progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The development of hepatic steatosis, oxidative/nitrative stress, and hepatic tissue damage, induced by a high-fat diet, were alleviated in genetically manipulated mice suppressing mitochondrial fission. The alleviation of steatosis was recapitulated in primary hepatocytes with the inhibition of mitochondrial fission. Mechanistically, our study indicates that fission inhibition enhances proton leak under conditions of free fatty acid incubation, implicating bioenergetic change through manipulating mitochondrial fission. Taken together, our results suggest a mechanistic role for mitochondrial fission in the etiology of NAFLD. The efficacy of decreasing mitochondrial fission in the suppression of NAFLD suggests that mitochondrial fission represents a novel target for therapeutic treatment of NAFLD. PMID:25080922

  15. Modelling Hepatitis B Virus Antiviral Therapy and Drug Resistant Mutant Strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, Julie; Dix, Trevor; Allison, Lloyd; Bartholomeusz, Angeline; Yuen, Lilly

    Despite the existence of vaccines, the Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is still a serious global health concern. HBV targets liver cells. It has an unusual replication process involving an RNA pre-genome that the reverse transcriptase domain of the viral polymerase protein translates into viral DNA. The reverse transcription process is error prone and together with the high replication rates of the virus, allows the virus to exist as a heterogeneous population of mutants, known as a quasispecies, that can adapt and become resistant to antiviral therapy. This study presents an individual-based model of HBV inside an artificial liver, and associated blood serum, undergoing antiviral therapy. This model aims to provide insights into the evolution of the HBV quasispecies and the individual contribution of HBV mutations in the outcome of therapy.

  16. Glutathione protects against hepatic injury in a murine model of primary Sjögren’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shuhua; Hu, Liwei; Ping, Lifeng; Sun, Fengyan; Wang, Xiaolei

    2016-01-01

    Primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS) is a systemic autoimmune disease which may cause complications such as hepatic dysfunction and injury. As an important antioxidant, reduced glutathione (GSH) has been reported protecting against hepatic injury induced by some diseases, but the role of GSH in pSS is poorly understood. This study aims at investigating the role of GSH in hepatic injury during pSS. A murine model of pSS, non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, was used for GSH administration via tail intravenous injection. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was performed to detect serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT), as well as the levels of GSH, tumor necrosis factor, interleukin (IL) 10, integrin alpha M, IL1B, malondialdehyde, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 4, and superoxide dismutases in hepatocyte homogenates. Hematoxylin-eosin staining was performed to observe hepatic histology. The results showed that serum AST and ALT levels were up-regulated in the NOD mice (p = 0.0021 and 0.0048), but were significantly recovered after the GSH administration (p = 0.0081 and 0.0263). The NOD mice exhibited disturbed hepatic tissue structure, which was attenuated by GSH. The GSH administration could also promote the production of GSH in the hepatocytes (p = 0.0264), and control the levels of inflammatory factors and oxidative stress-related factors. These results indicate that GSH has significant effects on protecting against the hepatic injury during pSS, which may be associated with its regulation of the inflammatory factors and oxidative stress-related factors. This study suggests that GSH is a promising therapeutic strategy for controlling hepatic injury during pSS and offers valuable information for further research.

  17. IL-12-based vaccination therapy reverses liver-induced systemic tolerance in a mouse model of hepatitis B virus carrier.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhutian; Kong, Xiaohui; Li, Fenglei; Wei, Haiming; Sun, Rui; Tian, Zhigang

    2013-10-15

    Liver-induced systemic immune tolerance that occurs during chronic hepadnavirus infection is the biggest obstacle for effective viral clearance. Immunotherapeutic reversal of this tolerance is a promising strategy in the clinic but remains to be explored. In this study, using a hepatitis B virus (HBV)-carrier mouse model, we report that IL-12-based vaccination therapy can efficiently reverse systemic tolerance toward HBV. HBV-carrier mice lost responsiveness to hepatitis B surface Ag (HBsAg) vaccination, and IL-12 alone could not reverse this liver-induced immune tolerance. However, after IL-12-based vaccination therapy, the majority of treated mice became HBsAg(-) in serum; hepatitis B core Ag was also undetectable in hepatocytes. HBV clearance was dependent on HBsAg vaccine-induced anti-HBV immunity. Further results showed that IL-12-based vaccination therapy strongly enhanced hepatic HBV-specific CD8(+) T cell responses, including proliferation and IFN-γ secretion. Systemic HBV-specific CD4(+) T cell responses were also restored in HBV-carrier mice, leading to the arousal of HBsAg-specific follicular Th-germinal center B cell responses and anti-hepatitis B surface Ag Ab production. Recovery of HBsAg-specific responses also correlated with both reduced CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cell frequency and an enhanced capacity of effector T cells to overcome inhibition by regulatory T cells. In conclusion, IL-12-based vaccination therapy may reverse liver-induced immune tolerance toward HBV by restoring systemic HBV-specific CD4(+) T cell responses, eliciting robust hepatic HBV-specific CD8(+) T cell responses, and facilitating the generation of HBsAg-specific humoral immunity; thus, this therapy may become a viable approach to treating patients with chronic hepatitis B. PMID:24048897

  18. Costs of a Public Health Model to Increase Receipt of Hepatitis-Related Services for Persons with Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Eric P.; Rosenberg, Stanley D.; Dixon, Lisa B.; Goldberg, Richard W.; Wolford, George; Himelhoch, Seth; Tapscott, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective was to contextualize the costs associated with implementation of a specialized HIV/hepatitis preventive services model designed to reach persons with serious mental illness and co-occurring disorders, an underserved population. Methods Between 2006 and 2008, a random sample of 236 non-elderly, predominantly African American, male participants with serious mental illness and a co-occurring substance use disorder were recruited at four community mental health outpatient programs in a large metropolitan area. All participants had been diagnosed with a psychotic or major depressive disorder. Participants were randomized within site to receive either the experimental intervention Screen, Test, Immunize, Reduce risk, and Refer (STIRR) or enhanced treatment as usual, which consisted of education and referral to medical testing. We estimated STIRR’s standardized costs, the costs of STIRR per person who received hepatitis testing, HIV testing, and/or hepatitis A/B vaccination during the 6-months post-randomization. Results The average cost of delivering the STIRR intervention was $423 (SD±$90) per participant (in 2008 dollars) and the average cost of delivering the eTAU intervention was $24 (SD±$22) per participant (test of difference t=52.9, P<.001). The standardized costs per person who received hepatitis C testing, hepatitis B testing, HIV testing, and hepatitis A/B vaccination were $706 (SD±$165), $776 (SD±$181), $3,630 (SD±$846), and $561 (SD±131). Conclusions The STIRR model’s standardized costs suggest that hepatitis and HIV prevention services delivered in outpatient mental health settings to persons with serious mental illness can be at least as cost-effective as similar interventions designed for other at-risk populations. PMID:23475451

  19. A precursor-inducible zebrafish model of acute protoporphyria with hepatic protein aggregation and multiorganelle stress.

    PubMed

    Elenbaas, Jared S; Maitra, Dhiman; Liu, Yang; Lentz, Stephen I; Nelson, Bradley; Hoenerhoff, Mark J; Shavit, Jordan A; Omary, M Bishr

    2016-05-01

    Protoporphyria is a metabolic disease that causes excess production of protoporphyrin IX (PP-IX), the final biosynthetic precursor to heme. Hepatic PP-IX accumulation may lead to end-stage liver disease. We tested the hypothesis that systemic administration of porphyrin precursors to zebrafish larvae results in protoporphyrin accumulation and a reproducible nongenetic porphyria model. Retro-orbital infusion of PP-IX or the iron chelator deferoxamine mesylate (DFO), with the first committed heme precursor α-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), generates high levels of PP-IX in zebrafish larvae. Exogenously infused or endogenously produced PP-IX accumulates preferentially in the liver of zebrafish larvae and peaks 1 to 3 d after infusion. Similar to patients with protoporphyria, PP-IX is excreted through the biliary system. Porphyrin accumulation in zebrafish liver causes multiorganelle protein aggregation as determined by mass spectrometry and immunoblotting. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and induction of autophagy were noted in zebrafish larvae and corroborated in 2 mouse models of protoporphyria. Furthermore, electron microscopy of zebrafish livers from larvae administered ALA + DFO showed hepatocyte autophagosomes, nuclear membrane ruffling, and porphyrin-containing vacuoles with endoplasmic reticulum distortion. In conclusion, systemic administration of the heme precursors PP-IX or ALA + DFO into zebrafish larvae provides a new model of acute protoporphyria with consequent hepatocyte protein aggregation and proteotoxic multiorganelle alterations and stress.-Elenbaas, J. S., Maitra, D., Liu, Y., Lentz, S. I., Nelson, B., Hoenerhoff, M. J., Shavit, J. A., Omary, M. B. A precursor-inducible zebrafish model of acute protoporphyria with hepatic protein aggregation and multiorganelle stress. PMID:26839379

  20. AIC649 Induces a Bi-Phasic Treatment Response in the Woodchuck Model of Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, Daniela; Weber, Olaf; Ruebsamen-Schaeff, Helga; Tennant, Bud C.; Menne, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    AIC649 has been shown to directly address the antigen presenting cell arm of the host immune defense leading to a regulated cytokine release and activation of T cell responses. In the present study we analyzed the antiviral efficacy of AIC649 as well as its potential to induce functional cure in animal models for chronic hepatitis B. Hepatitis B virus transgenic mice and chronically woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) infected woodchucks were treated with AIC649, respectively. In the mouse system AIC649 decreased the hepatitis B virus titer as effective as the “gold standard”, Tenofovir. Interestingly, AIC649-treated chronically WHV infected woodchucks displayed a bi-phasic pattern of response: The marker for functional cure—hepatitis surface antigen—first increased but subsequently decreased even after cessation of treatment to significantly reduced levels. We hypothesize that the observed bi-phasic response pattern to AIC649 treatment reflects a physiologically “concerted”, reconstituted immune response against WHV and therefore may indicate a potential for inducing functional cure in HBV-infected patients. PMID:26656974

  1. AIC649 Induces a Bi-Phasic Treatment Response in the Woodchuck Model of Chronic Hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Daniela; Weber, Olaf; Ruebsamen-Schaeff, Helga; Tennant, Bud C; Menne, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    AIC649 has been shown to directly address the antigen presenting cell arm of the host immune defense leading to a regulated cytokine release and activation of T cell responses. In the present study we analyzed the antiviral efficacy of AIC649 as well as its potential to induce functional cure in animal models for chronic hepatitis B. Hepatitis B virus transgenic mice and chronically woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) infected woodchucks were treated with AIC649, respectively. In the mouse system AIC649 decreased the hepatitis B virus titer as effective as the "gold standard", Tenofovir. Interestingly, AIC649-treated chronically WHV infected woodchucks displayed a bi-phasic pattern of response: The marker for functional cure--hepatitis surface antigen--first increased but subsequently decreased even after cessation of treatment to significantly reduced levels. We hypothesize that the observed bi-phasic response pattern to AIC649 treatment reflects a physiologically "concerted", reconstituted immune response against WHV and therefore may indicate a potential for inducing functional cure in HBV-infected patients. PMID:26656974

  2. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) potentiates autoimmune hepatitis in the CYP2D6 mouse model.

    PubMed

    Müller, Peter; Messmer, Marie; Bayer, Monika; Pfeilschifter, Josef M; Hintermann, Edith; Christen, Urs

    2016-05-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and its more severe development non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are increasing worldwide. In particular NASH, which is characterized by an active hepatic inflammation, has often severe consequences including progressive fibrosis, cirrhosis, and eventually hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here we investigated how metabolic liver injury is influencing the pathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). We used the CYP2D6 mouse model in which wild type C57BL/6 mice are infected with an Adenovirus expressing the major liver autoantigen cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6). Such mice display several features of human AIH, including interface hepatitis, formation of LKM-1 antibodies and CYP2D6-specific T cells, as well as hepatic fibrosis. NAFLD was induced with a high-fat diet (HFD). We found that pre-existing NAFLD potentiates the severity of AIH. Mice fed for 12 weeks with a HFD displayed increased cellular infiltration of the liver, enhanced hepatic fibrosis and elevated numbers of liver autoantigen-specific T cells. Our data suggest that a pre-existing metabolic liver injury constitutes an additional risk for the severity of an autoimmune condition of the liver, such as AIH. PMID:26924542

  3. CD40 dependent exacerbation of immune mediated hepatitis by hepatic CD11b+ Gr-1+ myeloid derived suppressor cells in tumor bearing mice

    PubMed Central

    Kapanadze, Tamar; Medina-Echeverz, José; Gamrekelashvili, Jaba; Weiss, Jonathan M.; Wiltrout, Robert H.; Kapoor, Veena; Hawk, Nga; Terabe, Masaki; Berzofsky, Jay A.; Manns, Michael P.; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M.; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F.

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppressive CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) accumulate in the livers of tumor-bearing mice. We studied hepatic MDSC in two murine models of immune mediated hepatitis. Unexpectedly, treatment of tumor bearing mice with Concanavalin A or α-Galactosylceramide resulted in increased ALT and AST serum levels in comparison to tumor free mice. Adoptive transfer of hepatic MDSC into naïve mice exacerbated Concanavalin A induced liver damage. Hepatic CD11b+Gr-1+ cells revealed a polarized pro-inflammatory gene signature after Concanavalin A treatment. An interferon gamma- dependent up-regulation of CD40 on hepatic CD11b+Gr-1+ cells along with an up-regulation of CD80, CD86, and CD1d after Concanavalin A treatment was observed. Concanavalin A treatment resulted in a loss of suppressor function by tumor-induced CD11b+Gr-1+ MDSC as well as enhanced reactive oxygen species-mediated hepatotoxicity. CD40 knockdown in hepatic MDSC led to increased arginase activity upon Concanavalin A treatment and lower ALT/AST serum levels. Finally, blockade of arginase activity in Cd40−/− tumor-induced myeloid cells resulted in exacerbation of hepatitis and increased reactive oxygen species production in vivo. Our findings indicate that in a setting of acute hepatitis, tumor-induced hepatic MDSC act as pro-inflammatory immune effector cells capable of killing hepatocytes in a CD40-dependent manner. PMID:25616156

  4. From whole body to cellular models of hepatic triglyceride metabolism: man has got to know his limitations

    PubMed Central

    Green, Charlotte J.; Pramfalk, Camilla; Morten, Karl J.

    2014-01-01

    The liver is a main metabolic organ in the human body and carries out a vital role in lipid metabolism. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common liver diseases, encompassing a spectrum of conditions from simple fatty liver (hepatic steatosis) through to cirrhosis. Although obesity is a known risk factor for hepatic steatosis, it remains unclear what factor(s) is/are responsible for the primary event leading to retention of intrahepatocellular fat. Studying hepatic processes and the etiology and progression of disease in vivo in humans is challenging, not least as NAFLD may take years to develop. We present here a review of experimental models and approaches that have been used to assess liver triglyceride metabolism and discuss their usefulness in helping to understand the aetiology and development of NAFLD. PMID:25352434

  5. Early detection of hepatocellular carcinoma co-occurring with hepatitis C virus infection: A mathematical model

    PubMed Central

    Zekri, Abdel-Rahman Nabawy; Youssef, Amira Salah El-Din; Bakr, Yasser Mabrouk; Gabr, Reham Mohamed; Ahmed, Ola Sayed; Elberry, Mostafa Hamed; Mayla, Ahmed Mahmoud; Abouelhoda, Mohamed; Bahnassy, Abeer A

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To develop a mathematical model for the early detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with a panel of serum proteins in combination with α-fetoprotein (AFP). METHODS: Serum levels of interleukin (IL)-8, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor II (sTNF-RII), proteasome, and β-catenin were measured in 479 subjects categorized into four groups: (1) HCC concurrent with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection (n = 192); (2) HCV related liver cirrhosis (LC) (n = 96); (3) Chronic hepatitis C (CHC) (n = 96); and (4) Healthy controls (n = 95). The R package and different modules for binary and multi-class classifiers based on generalized linear models were used to model the data. Predictive power was used to evaluate the performance of the model. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis over pairs of groups was used to identify the best cutoffs differentiating the different groups. RESULTS: We revealed mathematical models, based on a binary classifier, made up of a unique panel of serum proteins that improved the individual performance of AFP in discriminating HCC patients from patients with chronic liver disease either with or without cirrhosis. We discriminated the HCC group from the cirrhotic liver group using a mathematical model (-11.3 + 7.38 × Prot + 0.00108 × sICAM + 0.2574 × β-catenin + 0.01597 × AFP) with a cutoff of 0.6552, which achieved 98.8% specificity and 89.1% sensitivity. For the discrimination of the HCC group from the CHC group, we used a mathematical model [-10.40 + 1.416 × proteasome + 0.002024 × IL + 0.004096 × sICAM-1 + (4.251 × 10-4) × sTNF + 0.02567 × β-catenin + 0.02442 × AFP] with a cutoff 0.744 and achieved 96.8% specificity and 89.7% sensitivity. Additionally, we derived an algorithm, based on a binary classifier, for resolving the multi-class classification problem by using three successive mathematical model predictions of liver disease status. CONCLUSION: Our

  6. Metabolic transformations of dietary polyphenols: comparison between in vitro colonic and hepatic models and in vivo urinary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Vetrani, Claudia; Rivellese, Angela A; Annuzzi, Giovanni; Adiels, Martin; Borén, Jan; Mattila, Ismo; Orešič, Matej; Aura, Anna-Marja

    2016-07-01

    Studies on metabolism of polyphenols have revealed extensive transformations in the carbon backbone by colonic microbiota; however, the influence of microbial and hepatic transformations on human urinary metabolites has not been explored. Therefore, the aims of this study were (1) to compare the in vitro microbial phenolic metabolite profile of foods and beverages with that excreted in urine of subjects consuming the same foodstuff and (2) to explore the role of liver on postcolonic metabolism of polyphenols by using in vitro hepatic models. A 24-h urinary phenolic metabolite profile was evaluated in 72 subjects participating in an 8-week clinical trial during which they were randomly assigned to diets differing for polyphenol content. Polyphenol-rich foods and beverages used in the clinical trial were subjected to human fecal microbiota in the in vitro colon model. Metabolites from green tea, one of the main components of the polyphenol-rich diet, were incubated with primary hepatocytes to highlight hepatic conversion of polyphenols. The analyses were performed using targeted gas chromatography with mass spectrometer (GCxGC-TOFMS:colon model; GC-MS: urine and hepatocytes). A significant correlation was found between urinary and colonic metabolites with C1-C3 side chain (P=.040). However, considerably higher amounts of hippuric acid, 3-hydroxybenzoic acid and ferulic acid were detected in urine than in the colon model. The hepatic conversion showed additional amounts of these metabolites complementing the gap between in vitro colon model and the in vivo urinary excretion. Therefore, combining in vitro colon and hepatic models may better elucidate the metabolism of polyphenols from dietary exposure to urinary metabolites. PMID:27155917

  7. Multi-scale model for hepatitis C viral load kinetics under treatment with direct acting antivirals.

    PubMed

    Clausznitzer, Diana; Harnisch, Julia; Kaderali, Lars

    2016-06-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections are a global health problem, and extensive research over the last decades has been targeted at understanding its molecular biology and developing effective antiviral treatments. Recently, a number of potent direct acting antiviral drugs have been developed targeting specific processes in the viral life cycle. Here, we developed a mathematical multi-scale model of the within-host dynamics of HCV infection by integrating a standard model for viral infection with a detailed model of the viral replication cycle inside infected cells. We use this model to study patient time courses of viral load under treatment with daclatasvir, an inhibitor of the viral non-structural protein NS5A. Model analysis predicts that treatment efficacy can be increased by combining daclatasvir with dedicated viral polymerase inhibitors, corresponding to promising current strategies in drug development. Hence, our model presents a predictive tool for in silico simulations, which can be used to study and optimize direct acting antiviral drug treatment. PMID:26409026

  8. Models and methods for in vitro testing of hepatic gap junctional communication.

    PubMed

    Maes, Michaël; Crespo Yanguas, Sara; Willebrords, Joost; Vinken, Mathieu

    2015-12-25

    Inherent to their pivotal roles in controlling all aspects of the liver cell life cycle, hepatocellular gap junctions are frequently disrupted upon impairment of the homeostatic balance, as occurs during liver toxicity. Hepatic gap junctions, which are mainly built up by connexin32, are specifically targeted by tumor promoters and epigenetic carcinogens. This renders inhibition of gap junction functionality a suitable indicator for the in vitro detection of nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogenicity. The establishment of a reliable liver gap junction inhibition assay for routine in vitro testing purposes requires a cellular system in which gap junctions are expressed at an in vivo-like level as well as an appropriate technique to probe gap junction activity. Both these models and methods are discussed in the current paper, thereby focusing on connexin32-based gap junctions. PMID:26420514

  9. Models and methods for in vitro testing of hepatic gap junctional communication

    PubMed Central

    Willebrords, Joost; Vinken, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Inherent to their pivotal roles in controlling all aspects of the liver cell life cycle, hepatocellular gap junctions are frequently disrupted upon impairment of the homeostatic balance, as occurs during liver toxicity. Hepatic gap junctions, which are mainly built up by connexin32, are specifically targeted by tumor promoters and epigenetic carcinogens. This renders inhibition of gap junction functionality a suitable indicator for the in vitro detection of nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogenicity. The establishment of a reliable liver gap junction inhibition assay for routine in vitro testing purposes requires a cellular system in which gap junctions are expressed at an in vivo-like level as well as an appropriate technique to probe gap junction activity. Both these models and methods are discussed in the current paper, thereby focusing on connexin32-based gap junctions. PMID:26420514

  10. Selective cytoprotective effect of histamine on doxorubicin-induced hepatic and cardiac toxicity in animal models

    PubMed Central

    Lamas, DJMartinel; Nicoud, MB; Sterle, HA; Carabajal, E; Tesan, F; Perazzo, JC; Cremaschi, GA; Rivera, ES; Medina, VA

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to evaluate the potential protective effect of histamine on Doxorubicin (Dox)-induced hepatic and cardiac toxicity in different rodent species and in a triple-negative breast tumor-bearing mice model. Male Sprague Dawley rats and Balb/c mice were divided into four groups: control (received saline), histamine (5 mg/kg for rats and 1 mg/kg for mice, daily subcutaneous injection starting 24 h before treatment with Dox), Dox (2 mg/kg, intraperitoneally injected three times a week for 2 weeks) and Dox+histamine (received both treatments). Tissue toxicity was evaluated by histopathological studies and oxidative stress and biochemical parameters. The combined effect of histamine and Dox was also investigated in vitro and in vivo in human MDA-MB-231 triple-negative breast cancer model. Heart and liver of Dox-treated animals displayed severe histological damage, loss of tissue weight, increased TBARS levels and DNA damage along with an augment in serum creatine kinase-myocardial band. Pretreatment with histamine prevented Dox-induced tissue events producing a significant preservation of the integrity of both rat and mouse myocardium and liver, through the reduction of Dox-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis. Histamine treatment preserved anti-tumor activity of Dox, exhibiting differential cytotoxicity and increasing the Dox-induced inhibition of breast tumor growth. Findings provide preclinical evidence indicating that histamine could be a promising candidate as a selective cytoprotective agent for the treatment of Dox-induced cardiac and hepatic toxicity, and encourage the translation to clinical practice. PMID:27551485

  11. Experimental in vitro and in vivo models for the study of human hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Allweiss, Lena; Dandri, Maura

    2016-04-01

    Chronic infection with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) affects an estimate of 240 million people worldwide despite the availability of a preventive vaccine. Medication to repress viral replication is available but a cure is rarely achieved. The narrow species and tissue tropism of the virus and the lack of reliable in vitro models and laboratory animals susceptible to HBV infection, have limited research progress in the past. As a result, several aspects of the HBV life cycle as well as the network of virus host interactions occurring during the infection are not yet understood. Only recently, the identification of the functional cellular receptor enabling HBV entry has opened new possibilities to establish innovative infection systems. Regarding the in vivo models of HBV infection, the classical reference was the chimpanzee. However, because of the strongly restricted use of great apes for HBV research, major efforts have focused on the development of mouse models of HBV replication and infection such as the generation of humanized mice. This review summarizes the animal and cell culture based models currently available for the study of HBV biology. We will discuss the benefits and caveats of each model and present a selection of the most important findings that have been retrieved from the respective systems. PMID:27084033

  12. High Intrinsic Aerobic Capacity Protects against Ethanol-Induced Hepatic Injury and Metabolic Dysfunction: Study Using High Capacity Runner Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Szary, Nicholas; Rector, R Scott; Uptergrove, Grace M; Ridenhour, Suzanne E; Shukla, Shivendra D; Thyfault, John P; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2015-01-01

    Rats artificially selected over several generations for high intrinsic endurance/aerobic capacity resulting in high capacity runners (HCR) has been developed to study the links between high aerobic fitness and protection from metabolic diseases (Wisloff et al., Science, 2005). We have previously shown that the HCR strain have elevated hepatic mitochondrial content and oxidative capacity. In this study, we tested if the elevated hepatic mitochondrial content in the HCR rat would provide "metabolic protection" from chronic ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis and injury. The Leiber-Decarli liquid diet with ethanol (7% v/v; HCR-E) and without (HCR-C) was given to HCR rats (n = 8 per group) from 14 to 20 weeks of age that were weight matched and pair-fed to assure isocaloric intake. Hepatic triglyceride (TG) content and macro- and microvesicular steatosis were significantly greater in HCR-E compared with HCR-C (p < 0.05). In addition, hepatic superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione levels were significantly (p < 0.05) reduced in the HCR-E rats. This hepatic phenotype also was associated with reduced total hepatic fatty acid oxidation (p = 0.03) and β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity (p = 0.01), and reductions in microsomal triglyceride transfer protein and apoB-100 protein content (p = 0.01) in HCR-E animals. However, despite these documented hepatic alterations, ethanol ingestion failed to induce significant hepatic liver injury, including no changes in hepatic inflammation, or serum alanine amino transferase (ALTs), free fatty acids (FFAs), triglycerides (TGs), insulin, or glucose. High intrinsic aerobic fitness did not reduce ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis, but protected against ethanol-induced hepatic injury and systemic metabolic dysfunction in a high aerobic capacity rat model. PMID:26610588

  13. High Intrinsic Aerobic Capacity Protects against Ethanol-Induced Hepatic Injury and Metabolic Dysfunction: Study Using High Capacity Runner Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Szary, Nicholas; Rector, R. Scott; Uptergrove, Grace M.; Ridenhour, Suzanne E.; Shukla, Shivendra D.; Thyfault, John P.; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Ibdah, Jamal A.

    2015-01-01

    Rats artificially selected over several generations for high intrinsic endurance/aerobic capacity resulting in high capacity runners (HCR) has been developed to study the links between high aerobic fitness and protection from metabolic diseases (Wisloff et al., Science, 2005). We have previously shown that the HCR strain have elevated hepatic mitochondrial content and oxidative capacity. In this study, we tested if the elevated hepatic mitochondrial content in the HCR rat would provide “metabolic protection” from chronic ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis and injury. The Leiber-Decarli liquid diet with ethanol (7% v/v; HCR-E) and without (HCR-C) was given to HCR rats (n = 8 per group) from 14 to 20 weeks of age that were weight matched and pair-fed to assure isocaloric intake. Hepatic triglyceride (TG) content and macro- and microvesicular steatosis were significantly greater in HCR-E compared with HCR-C (p < 0.05). In addition, hepatic superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione levels were significantly (p < 0.05) reduced in the HCR-E rats. This hepatic phenotype also was associated with reduced total hepatic fatty acid oxidation (p = 0.03) and β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity (p = 0.01), and reductions in microsomal triglyceride transfer protein and apoB-100 protein content (p = 0.01) in HCR-E animals. However, despite these documented hepatic alterations, ethanol ingestion failed to induce significant hepatic liver injury, including no changes in hepatic inflammation, or serum alanine amino transferase (ALTs), free fatty acids (FFAs), triglycerides (TGs), insulin, or glucose. High intrinsic aerobic fitness did not reduce ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis, but protected against ethanol-induced hepatic injury and systemic metabolic dysfunction in a high aerobic capacity rat model. PMID:26610588

  14. Hepatitis virus panel

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis A antibody test; Hepatitis B antibody test; Hepatitis C antibody test; Hepatitis D antibody test ... or past infection, or immunity to hepatitis A Hepatitis B tests: Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), you have ...

  15. Hepatitis C and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Problems : Hepatitis C Subscribe Translate Text Size Print Hepatitis C What is Hepatitis? Hepatitis means inflammation of the liver. This condition ... our related pages, Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B . Hepatitis C and HIV About 25% of people living ...

  16. Hepatitis B and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Problems : Hepatitis B Subscribe Translate Text Size Print Hepatitis B What is Hepatitis? Hepatitis means inflammation of the liver. This condition ... our related pages, Hepatitis A and Hepatitis C . Hepatitis B and HIV About 10% of people living ...

  17. Hepatitis Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused by viruses. They include hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C. To diagnose hepatitis, your health care provider will ask you about your medical history and symptoms, do a physical exam, and order blood tests. There are blood tests for each type of ...

  18. A molecular thermodynamic model for the stability of hepatitis B capsids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jehoon; Wu, Jianzhong

    2014-06-21

    Self-assembly of capsid proteins and genome encapsidation are two critical steps in the life cycle of most plant and animal viruses. A theoretical description of such processes from a physiochemical perspective may help better understand viral replication and morphogenesis thus provide fresh insights into the experimental studies of antiviral strategies. In this work, we propose a molecular thermodynamic model for predicting the stability of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids either with or without loading nucleic materials. With the key components represented by coarse-grained thermodynamic models, the theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with experimental data for the formation free energies of empty T4 capsids over a broad range of temperature and ion concentrations. The theoretical model predicts T3/T4 dimorphism also in good agreement with the capsid formation at in vivo and in vitro conditions. In addition, we have studied the stability of the viral particles in response to physiological cellular conditions with the explicit consideration of the hydrophobic association of capsid subunits, electrostatic interactions, molecular excluded volume effects, entropy of mixing, and conformational changes of the biomolecular species. The course-grained model captures the essential features of the HBV nucleocapsid stability revealed by recent experiments. PMID:24952568

  19. A molecular thermodynamic model for the stability of hepatitis B capsids

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jehoon; Wu, Jianzhong

    2014-06-21

    Self-assembly of capsid proteins and genome encapsidation are two critical steps in the life cycle of most plant and animal viruses. A theoretical description of such processes from a physiochemical perspective may help better understand viral replication and morphogenesis thus provide fresh insights into the experimental studies of antiviral strategies. In this work, we propose a molecular thermodynamic model for predicting the stability of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids either with or without loading nucleic materials. With the key components represented by coarse-grained thermodynamic models, the theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with experimental data for the formation free energies of empty T4 capsids over a broad range of temperature and ion concentrations. The theoretical model predicts T3/T4 dimorphism also in good agreement with the capsid formation at in vivo and in vitro conditions. In addition, we have studied the stability of the viral particles in response to physiological cellular conditions with the explicit consideration of the hydrophobic association of capsid subunits, electrostatic interactions, molecular excluded volume effects, entropy of mixing, and conformational changes of the biomolecular species. The course-grained model captures the essential features of the HBV nucleocapsid stability revealed by recent experiments.

  20. A molecular thermodynamic model for the stability of hepatitis B capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jehoon; Wu, Jianzhong

    2014-06-01

    Self-assembly of capsid proteins and genome encapsidation are two critical steps in the life cycle of most plant and animal viruses. A theoretical description of such processes from a physiochemical perspective may help better understand viral replication and morphogenesis thus provide fresh insights into the experimental studies of antiviral strategies. In this work, we propose a molecular thermodynamic model for predicting the stability of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids either with or without loading nucleic materials. With the key components represented by coarse-grained thermodynamic models, the theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with experimental data for the formation free energies of empty T4 capsids over a broad range of temperature and ion concentrations. The theoretical model predicts T3/T4 dimorphism also in good agreement with the capsid formation at in vivo and in vitro conditions. In addition, we have studied the stability of the viral particles in response to physiological cellular conditions with the explicit consideration of the hydrophobic association of capsid subunits, electrostatic interactions, molecular excluded volume effects, entropy of mixing, and conformational changes of the biomolecular species. The course-grained model captures the essential features of the HBV nucleocapsid stability revealed by recent experiments.

  1. Animal models for the study of hepatitis C virus infection and related liver disease.

    PubMed

    Bukh, Jens

    2012-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) causes liver-related death in more than 300,000 people annually. Treatments for patients with chronic HCV are suboptimal, despite the introduction of directly acting antiviral agents. There is no vaccine that prevents HCV infection. Relevant animal models are important for HCV research and development of drugs and vaccines. Chimpanzees are the best model for studies of HCV infection and related innate and adaptive host immune responses. They can be used in immunogenicity and efficacy studies of HCV vaccines. The only small animal models of robust HCV infection are T- and B- cell deficient mice with human chimeric livers. Although these mice cannot be used in studies of adaptive immunity, they have provided new insights into HCV neutralization, interactions between virus and receptors, innate host responses, and therapeutic approaches. Recent progress in developing genetically humanized mice is exciting, but these models only permit studies of specific steps in the HCV life cycle and have limited or no viral replication. PMID:22537434

  2. Transmission of hepatitis B, hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency viruses through unsafe injections in the developing world: model-based regional estimates.

    PubMed

    Kane, A; Lloyd, J; Zaffran, M; Simonsen, L; Kane, M

    1999-01-01

    Thousands of millions of injections are delivered every year in developing countries, many of them unsafe, and the transmission of certain bloodborne pathogens via this route is thought to be a major public health problem. In this article we report global and regional estimates of the number of hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections that may occur from unsafe injections in the developing world. The estimates were determined using quantitative data on unsafe injection practices, transmission efficiency and disease burden of HBV, HCV and HIV and the prevalence of injection use obtained from a review of the literature. A simple mass-action model was used consisting of a generalized linear equation with variables accounting for the prevalence of a pathogen in a population, susceptibility of a population, transmission efficiency of the pathogen, proportion of injections that are unsafe, and the number of injections received. The model was applied to world census data to generate conservative estimates of incidence of transmission of bloodborne pathogens that may be attributable to unsafe injections. The model suggests that approximately 8-16 million HBV, 2.3-4.7 million HCV and 80,000-160,000 HIV infections may result every year from unsafe injections. The estimated range for HBV infections is in accordance with several epidemiological studies that attributed at least 20% of all new HBV infections to unsafe injections in developing countries. Our results suggest that unsafe injections may lead to a high number of infections with bloodborne pathogens. A major initiative is therefore needed to improve injection safety and decrease injection overuse in many countries. PMID:10593027

  3. A Hepatitis C Virus Infection Model with Time-Varying Drug Effectiveness: Solution and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Jessica M.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2014-01-01

    Simple models of therapy for viral diseases such as hepatitis C virus (HCV) or human immunodeficiency virus assume that, once therapy is started, the drug has a constant effectiveness. More realistic models have assumed either that the drug effectiveness depends on the drug concentration or that the effectiveness varies over time. Here a previously introduced varying-effectiveness (VE) model is studied mathematically in the context of HCV infection. We show that while the model is linear, it has no closed-form solution due to the time-varying nature of the effectiveness. We then show that the model can be transformed into a Bessel equation and derive an analytic solution in terms of modified Bessel functions, which are defined as infinite series, with time-varying arguments. Fitting the solution to data from HCV infected patients under therapy has yielded values for the parameters in the model. We show that for biologically realistic parameters, the predicted viral decay on therapy is generally biphasic and resembles that predicted by constant-effectiveness (CE) models. We introduce a general method for determining the time at which the transition between decay phases occurs based on calculating the point of maximum curvature of the viral decay curve. For the parameter regimes of interest, we also find approximate solutions for the VE model and establish the asymptotic behavior of the system. We show that the rate of second phase decay is determined by the death rate of infected cells multiplied by the maximum effectiveness of therapy, whereas the rate of first phase decline depends on multiple parameters including the rate of increase of drug effectiveness with time. PMID:25101902

  4. Computational design of hepatitis C vaccines using maximum entropy models and population dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Gregory; Ferguson, Andrew

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) afflicts 170 million people and kills 350,000 annually. Vaccination offers the most realistic and cost effective hope of controlling this epidemic. Despite 20 years of research, no vaccine is available. A major obstacle is the virus' extreme genetic variability and rapid mutational escape from immune pressure. Improvements in the vaccine design process are urgently needed. Coupling data mining with spin glass models and maximum entropy inference, we have developed a computational approach to translate sequence databases into empirical fitness landscapes. These landscapes explicitly connect viral genotype to phenotypic fitness and reveal vulnerable targets that can be exploited to rationally design immunogens. Viewing these landscapes as the mutational ''playing field'' over which the virus is constrained to evolve, we have integrated them with agent-based models of the viral mutational and host immune response dynamics, establishing a data-driven immune simulator of HCV infection. We have employed this simulator to perform in silico screening of HCV immunogens. By systematically identifying a small number of promising vaccine candidates, these models can accelerate the search for a vaccine by massively reducing the experimental search space.

  5. Hepatocellular carcinoma mouse models: Hepatitis B virus-associated hepatocarcinogenesis and haploinsufficient tumor suppressor genes

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Yuan-Chi; Shen, Zhao-Qing; Kao, Cheng-Heng; Tsai, Ting-Fen

    2016-01-01

    The multifactorial and multistage pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has fascinated a wide spectrum of scientists for decades. While a number of major risk factors have been identified, their mechanistic roles in hepatocarcinogenesis still need to be elucidated. Many tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) have been identified as being involved in HCC. These TSGs can be classified into two groups depending on the situation with respect to allelic mutation/loss in the tumors: the recessive TSGs with two required mutated alleles and the haploinsufficient TSGs with one required mutated allele. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is one of the most important risk factors associated with HCC. Although mice cannot be infected with HBV due to the narrow host range of HBV and the lack of a proper receptor, one advantage of mouse models for HBV/HCC research is the numerous and powerful genetic tools that help investigate the phenotypic effects of viral proteins and allow the dissection of the dose-dependent action of TSGs. Here, we mainly focus on the application of mouse models in relation to HBV-associated HCC and on TSGs that act either in a recessive or in a haploinsufficient manner. Discoveries obtained using mouse models will have a great impact on HCC translational medicine. PMID:26755878

  6. Mathematically modelling the spread of hepatitis C in injecting drug users.

    PubMed

    Corson, S; Greenhalgh, D; Hutchinson, S

    2012-09-01

    Mathematical modelling can provide valuable insights into the biological and epidemiological properties of infectious diseases as well as the potential impact of intervention strategies employed by health organizations worldwide. In this paper, we develop a deterministic, compartmental mathematical model to approximate the spread of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) in an injecting drug user (IDU) population. Using analytical techniques, we find that the model behaviour is determined by the basic reproductive number R(0), where R(0) = 1 is a critical threshold separating two different outcomes. If R(0) ≤ 1 and HCV is initially present in the population, we find that the system will reach a disease-free equilibrium where HCV has been eliminated in all IDUs and needles. If R(0) > 1, then there is a unique positive endemic equilibrium which we show is locally stable. We then use simulations to verify our analytical results and examine the effect of different parameter values and intervention measures on HCV prevalence estimates. PMID:21900152

  7. Modeling Complex Decay Profiles of Hepatitis B Virus during Antiviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dahari, Harel; Shudo, Emi; Ribeiro, Ruy M.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2013-01-01

    Typically, hepatitis B virus (HBV) decays in patients under therapy in a biphasic manner. However, more complex decay profiles of HBV DNA (e.g. flat partial response, triphasic, stepwise) have also been observed in some treated patients with no clear understanding of their origin. We recently introduced the notion of a critical drug efficacy, εc, such that if overall drug efficacy, εtot, is higher than the critical drug efficacy, i.e., εtot > εc, then viral levels will continually decline on therapy, while if εtot < εc then viral loads will initially decline but ultimately stabilize at a new set point, as seen in flat partial responders. Using the idea of critical efficacy and including hepatocyte proliferation in a viral kinetic model we can account for these complex HBV DNA decays. The model predicts that complex profiles such as those exhibiting a plateau or shoulder phase as well as a class of stepwise declines occur only in patients in whom the majority of hepatocytes are infected before therapy. In conclusion, we show via kinetic modeling how a variety of HBV DNA decay profiles can arise in treated patients. PMID:19065674

  8. Protective Effects of White Button Mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) against Hepatic Steatosis in Ovariectomized Mice as a Model of Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Kanaya, Noriko; Kubo, Makoto; Liu, Zheng; Chu, Peiguo; Wang, Charles; Chen, Yate-Ching Yuan, Shiuan

    2011-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) includes various hepatic pathologies ranging from hepatic steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), fibrosis and cirrhosis. Estrogen provides a protective effect on the development of NAFLD in women. Therefore, postmenopausal women have a higher risk of developing NAFLD. Hepatic steatosis is an early stage of fatty liver disease. Steatosis can develop to the aggressive stages (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, fibrosis and cirrhosis). Currently, there is no specific drug to prevent/treat these liver diseases. In this study, we found that white button mushroom (WBM), Agaricus Bisporus, has protective effects against liver steatosis in ovariectomized (OVX) mice (a model of postmenopausal women). OVX mice were fed a high fat diet supplemented with WBM powder. We found that dietary WBM intake significantly lowered liver weight and hepatic injury markers in OVX mice. Pathological examination of liver tissue showed less fat accumulation in the livers of mice on WBM diet; moreover, these animals had improved glucose clearance ability. Microarray analysis revealed that genes related to the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway, particularly the genes for fatty acid synthetase (Fas) and fatty acid elongase 6 (Elovl6), were down-regulated in the liver of mushroom-fed mice. In vitro mechanistic studies using the HepG2 cell line showed that down-regulation of the expression of FAS and ELOVL6 by WBM extract was through inhibition of Liver X receptor (LXR) signaling and its downstream transcriptional factor SREBP1c. These results suggest that WBM is protective against hepatic steatosis and NAFLD in OVX mice as a model for postmenopausal women. PMID:22046322

  9. Transporter-Enzyme Interplay: Deconvoluting Effects of Hepatic Transporters and Enzymes on Drug Disposition Using Static and Dynamic Mechanistic Models.

    PubMed

    Varma, Manthena V; El-Kattan, Ayman F

    2016-07-01

    A large body of evidence suggests hepatic uptake transporters, organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs), are of high clinical relevance in determining the pharmacokinetics of substrate drugs, based on which recent regulatory guidances to industry recommend appropriate assessment of investigational drugs for the potential drug interactions. We recently proposed an extended clearance classification system (ECCS) framework in which the systemic clearance of class 1B and 3B drugs is likely determined by hepatic uptake. The ECCS framework therefore predicts the possibility of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) involving OATPs and the effects of genetic variants of SLCO1B1 early in the discovery and facilitates decision making in the candidate selection and progression. Although OATP-mediated uptake is often the rate-determining process in the hepatic clearance of substrate drugs, metabolic and/or biliary components also contribute to the overall hepatic disposition and, more importantly, to liver exposure. Clinical evidence suggests that alteration in biliary efflux transport or metabolic enzymes associated with genetic polymorphism leads to change in the pharmacodynamic response of statins, for which the pharmacological target resides in the liver. Perpetrator drugs may show inhibitory and/or induction effects on transporters and enzymes simultaneously. It is therefore important to adopt models that frame these multiple processes in a mechanistic sense for quantitative DDI predictions and to deconvolute the effects of individual processes on the plasma and hepatic exposure. In vitro data-informed mechanistic static and physiologically based pharmacokinetic models are proven useful in rationalizing and predicting transporter-mediated DDIs and the complex DDIs involving transporter-enzyme interplay. PMID:27385183

  10. Activation of farnesoid X receptor attenuates hepatic injury in a murine model of alcoholic liver disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Weibin; Zhu, Bo; Peng, Xiaomin; Zhou, Meiling; Jia, Dongwei; Gu, Jianxin

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •FXR activity was impaired by chronic ethanol ingestion in a murine model of ALD. •Activation of FXR attenuated alcohol-induced liver injury and steatosis. •Activation of FXR attenuated cholestasis and oxidative stress in mouse liver. -- Abstract: Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a common cause of advanced liver disease, and considered as a major risk factor of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Hepatic cholestasis is a pathophysiological feature observed in all stages of ALD. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, and plays an essential role in the regulation of bile acid, lipid and glucose homeostasis. However, the role of FXR in the pathogenesis and progression of ALD remains largely unknown. Mice were fed Lieber-DeCarli ethanol diet or an isocaloric control diet. We used a specific agonist of FXR WAY-362450 to study the effect of pharmacological activation of FXR in alcoholic liver disease. In this study, we demonstrated that FXR activity was impaired by chronic ethanol ingestion in a murine model of ALD. Activation of FXR by specific agonist WAY-362450 protected mice from the development of ALD. We also found that WAY-362450 treatment rescued FXR activity, suppressed ethanol-induced Cyp2e1 up-regulation and attenuated oxidative stress in liver. Our results highlight a key role of FXR in the modulation of ALD development, and propose specific FXR agonists for the treatment of ALD patients.

  11. Coordinating Role of RXRα in Downregulating Hepatic Detoxification during Inflammation Revealed by Fuzzy-Logic Modeling.

    PubMed

    Keller, Roland; Klein, Marcus; Thomas, Maria; Dräger, Andreas; Metzger, Ute; Templin, Markus F; Joos, Thomas O; Thasler, Wolfgang E; Zell, Andreas; Zanger, Ulrich M

    2016-01-01

    During various inflammatory processes circulating cytokines including IL-6, IL-1β, and TNFα elicit a broad and clinically relevant impairment of hepatic detoxification that is based on the simultaneous downregulation of many drug metabolizing enzymes and transporter genes. To address the question whether a common mechanism is involved we treated human primary hepatocytes with IL-6, the major mediator of the acute phase response in liver, and characterized acute phase and detoxification responses in quantitative gene expression and (phospho-)proteomics data sets. Selective inhibitors were used to disentangle the roles of JAK/STAT, MAPK, and PI3K signaling pathways. A prior knowledge-based fuzzy logic model comprising signal transduction and gene regulation was established and trained with perturbation-derived gene expression data from five hepatocyte donors. Our model suggests a greater role of MAPK/PI3K compared to JAK/STAT with the orphan nuclear receptor RXRα playing a central role in mediating transcriptional downregulation. Validation experiments revealed a striking similarity of RXRα gene silencing versus IL-6 induced negative gene regulation (rs = 0.79; P<0.0001). These results concur with RXRα functioning as obligatory heterodimerization partner for several nuclear receptors that regulate drug and lipid metabolism. PMID:26727233

  12. Ethanol affects hepatitis C pathogenesis: humanized SCID Alb-uPA mouse model.

    PubMed

    Osna, Natalia A; Kharbanda, Kusum K; Sun, Yimin; Simpson, Ronda L; Poluektova, Larisa E; Ganesan, Murali; Wisecarver, James L; Mercer, David F

    2014-07-18

    Alcohol consumption exacerbates the course of hepatitis C viral (HCV) infection, worsens outcomes and contributes to the development of chronic infection that exhibits low anti-viral treatment efficiency. The lack of suitable in vivo models makes HCV-ethanol studies very difficult. Here, we examine whether chimeric SCID Alb-uPA mice transplanted with human hepatocytes and infected with HCV develop worsening pathology when fed ethanol. After 5 weeks of feeding, such mice fed chow+water (control) or chow+20% ethanol in water (EtOH) diets mice developed oxidative stress, decreased proteasome activity and increased steatosis. Importantly, HCV(+) mice in the control group cleared HCV RNA after 5 weeks, while the infection persisted in EtOH-fed mice at the same or even higher levels compared with pre-feeding HCV RNA. We conclude that in chimeric SCID Alb-uPA mice, EtOH exposure causes the complex biochemical and histological changes typical for alcoholic liver injury. In addition, ethanol feeding delays the clearance of HCV RNA thereby generating persistent infection and promoting liver injury. Overall, this model is appropriate for conducting HCV-ethanol studies. PMID:24953695

  13. Coordinating Role of RXRα in Downregulating Hepatic Detoxification during Inflammation Revealed by Fuzzy-Logic Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Maria; Dräger, Andreas; Metzger, Ute; Templin, Markus F.; Joos, Thomas O.; Thasler, Wolfgang E.; Zell, Andreas; Zanger, Ulrich M.

    2016-01-01

    During various inflammatory processes circulating cytokines including IL-6, IL-1β, and TNFα elicit a broad and clinically relevant impairment of hepatic detoxification that is based on the simultaneous downregulation of many drug metabolizing enzymes and transporter genes. To address the question whether a common mechanism is involved we treated human primary hepatocytes with IL-6, the major mediator of the acute phase response in liver, and characterized acute phase and detoxification responses in quantitative gene expression and (phospho-)proteomics data sets. Selective inhibitors were used to disentangle the roles of JAK/STAT, MAPK, and PI3K signaling pathways. A prior knowledge-based fuzzy logic model comprising signal transduction and gene regulation was established and trained with perturbation-derived gene expression data from five hepatocyte donors. Our model suggests a greater role of MAPK/PI3K compared to JAK/STAT with the orphan nuclear receptor RXRα playing a central role in mediating transcriptional downregulation. Validation experiments revealed a striking similarity of RXRα gene silencing versus IL-6 induced negative gene regulation (rs = 0.79; P<0.0001). These results concur with RXRα functioning as obligatory heterodimerization partner for several nuclear receptors that regulate drug and lipid metabolism. PMID:26727233

  14. Mouse Systems to Model Hepatitis C Virus Treatment and Associated Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Mesalam, Ahmed Atef; Vercauteren, Koen; Meuleman, Philip

    2016-01-01

    While addition of the first-approved protease inhibitors (PIs), telaprevir and boceprevir, to pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) and ribavirin (RBV) combination therapy significantly increased sustained virologic response (SVR) rates, PI-based triple therapy for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection was prone to the emergence of resistant viral variants. Meanwhile, multiple direct acting antiviral agents (DAAs) targeting either the HCV NS3/4A protease, NS5A or NS5B polymerase have been approved and these have varying potencies and distinct propensities to provoke resistance. The pre-clinical in vivo assessment of drug efficacy and resistant variant emergence underwent a great evolution over the last decade. This field had long been hampered by the lack of suitable small animal models that robustly support the entire HCV life cycle. In particular, chimeric mice with humanized livers (humanized mice) and chimpanzees have been instrumental for studying HCV inhibitors and the evolution of drug resistance. In this review, we present the different in vivo HCV infection models and discuss their applicability to assess HCV therapy response and emergence of resistant variants. PMID:27338446

  15. Hepatoprotective effect of nitric oxide in experimental model of acute hepatic failure

    PubMed Central

    Saracyn, Marek; Brytan, Marek; Zdanowski, Robert; Ząbkowski, Tomasz; Dyrla, Przemysław; Patera, Janusz; Wojtuń, Stanisław; Kozłowski, Wojciech; Wańkowicz, Zofia

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of nitric oxide (NO) on the development and degree of liver failure in an animal model of acute hepatic failure (AHF). METHODS: An experimental rat model of galactosamine-induced AHF was used. An inhibitor of NO synthase, nitroarginine methyl ester, or an NO donor, arginine, were administered at various doses prior to or after the induction of AHF. RESULTS: All tested groups developed AHF. Following inhibition of the endogenous NO pathway, most liver parameters improved, regardless of the inhibitor dose before the induction of liver damage, and depending on the inhibitor dose after liver damage. Prophylactic administration of the inhibitor was more effective in improving liver function parameters than administration of the inhibitor after liver damage. An attempt to activate the endogenous NO pathway prior to the induction of liver damage did not change the observed liver function parameters. Stimulation of the endogenous NO pathway after liver damage, regardless of the NO donor dose used, improved most liver function parameters. CONCLUSION: The endogenous NO pathway plays an important role in the development of experimental galactosamine-induced AHF. PMID:25516652

  16. Mitochondrial dysfunction as a mediator of hippocampal apoptosis in a model of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, J; Lores-Arnaiz, S; Tallis, S; Roselló, D M; Lago, N; Lemberg, A; Boveris, A; Perazzo, J C

    2011-08-01

    In this study, we describe the presence of apoptosis, associated with a mitochondrial dysfunction in the hippocampus of animals in an experimental model defined as minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE). This experimental model was studied after 10 days of induced portal vein calibrated stricture, leading to portal hypertension and to a moderate hyperammonemia, without the presence of other evident central nervous system changes. The molecular mechanisms here proposed indicate the presence of apoptotic intrinsic pathways that point to hippocampal mitochondria as an important mediator of apoptosis in this experimental model. In this model of MHE, the presence of DNA fragmentation is documented by 2.3-times increased number of TUNEL-positive cells. These findings together with a higher ratio of the Bcl-2 family members Bax/Bcl-xL in the outer mitochondrial membrane of the MHE animals together with 11% of cytochrome c release indicate the presence of apoptosis in this experimental model. A detailed analysis of the hippocampal mitochondrial physiology was performed after mitochondrial isolation. The determination of the respiratory rate in the presence of malate plus glutamate and ADP showed a 45% decrease in respiratory control in MHE animals as compared with the sham group. A marked decrease of cytochrome oxidase (complex IV of the electron transport chain) was also observed, showing 46% less activity in hippocampal mitochondria from MHE animals. In addition, mitochondria from these animals showed less ability to maintain membrane potential (ΔΨ (m)) which was 13% lower than the sham group. Light scattering experiments showed that mitochondria from MHE animals were more sensitive to swell in the presence of increased calcium concentrations as compared with the sham group. In addition, in vitro studies performed in mitochondria from sham animals showed that mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) could be a mitochondrial mediator of the apoptotic signaling in the

  17. A proposed predictive model for advanced fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B and its validation

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Kunihiro; Ishii, Akio; Takata, Ryo; Enomoto, Hirayuki; Yoh, Kazunori; Kishino, Kyohei; Shimono, Yoshihiro; Iwata, Yoshinori; Nakano, Chikage; Nishimura, Takashi; Aizawa, Nobuhiro; Sakai, Yoshiyuki; Ikeda, Naoto; Takashima, Tomoyuki; Iijima, Hiroko; Nishiguchi, Shuhei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We created a predictive model using serum-based biomarkers for advanced fibrosis (F3 or more) in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and to confirm the accuracy in an independent cohort. A total of 249 CHB patients were analyzed. To achieve our study aim, a training group (n = 125) and a validation group (n = 124) were formed. In the training group, parameters related to the presence of advanced fibrosis in univariate and multivariate analyses were examined, and a formula for advanced fibrosis was created. Next, we verified the applicability of the predictive model in the validation group. Multivariate analysis identified that gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT, P = 0.0343) and platelet count (P = 0.0034) were significant predictors of the presence of advanced fibrosis, while Wisteria floribunda agglutinin-positive Mac-2-binding protein (WFA+-M2BP, P = 0.0741) and hyaluronic acid (P = 0.0916) tended to be significant factors. Using these 4 parameters, we created the following formula: GMPH score = −0.755 − (0.015 × GGT) − (0.268 × WFA+-M2BP) + (0.167 × platelet count) + (0.003 × hyaluronic acid). In 8 analyzed variables (WFA+-M2BP, aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index, FIB-4 index, prothrombin time, platelet count, hyaluronic acid, Forns index, and GMPH score), GMPH score had the highest area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve for advanced fibrosis with a value of 0.8064 in the training group and in the validation group, GMPH score also had the highest AUROC (0.7782). In all subgroup analyses of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) status (HB surface antigen quantification, HBV-DNA quantification, and HBe antigen seropositivity), GMPH score in F3 or F4 was significantly lower than that in F0 to F2. In the above mentioned 8 variables, differences between the liver fibrosis stages (F0 to F1 vs F2, F2 vs F3, F3 vs F4, F0 to F1 vs F3, F0 to F1 vs F4, and F2 vs

  18. A proposed predictive model for advanced fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B and its validation.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Kunihiro; Ishii, Akio; Takata, Ryo; Enomoto, Hirayuki; Yoh, Kazunori; Kishino, Kyohei; Shimono, Yoshihiro; Iwata, Yoshinori; Nakano, Chikage; Nishimura, Takashi; Aizawa, Nobuhiro; Sakai, Yoshiyuki; Ikeda, Naoto; Takashima, Tomoyuki; Iijima, Hiroko; Nishiguchi, Shuhei

    2016-08-01

    We created a predictive model using serum-based biomarkers for advanced fibrosis (F3 or more) in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and to confirm the accuracy in an independent cohort.A total of 249 CHB patients were analyzed. To achieve our study aim, a training group (n = 125) and a validation group (n = 124) were formed. In the training group, parameters related to the presence of advanced fibrosis in univariate and multivariate analyses were examined, and a formula for advanced fibrosis was created. Next, we verified the applicability of the predictive model in the validation group.Multivariate analysis identified that gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT, P = 0.0343) and platelet count (P = 0.0034) were significant predictors of the presence of advanced fibrosis, while Wisteria floribunda agglutinin-positive Mac-2-binding protein (WFA-M2BP, P = 0.0741) and hyaluronic acid (P = 0.0916) tended to be significant factors. Using these 4 parameters, we created the following formula: GMPH score = -0.755 - (0.015 × GGT) - (0.268 × WFA-M2BP) + (0.167 × platelet count) + (0.003 × hyaluronic acid). In 8 analyzed variables (WFA-M2BP, aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index, FIB-4 index, prothrombin time, platelet count, hyaluronic acid, Forns index, and GMPH score), GMPH score had the highest area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve for advanced fibrosis with a value of 0.8064 in the training group and in the validation group, GMPH score also had the highest AUROC (0.7782). In all subgroup analyses of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) status (HB surface antigen quantification, HBV-DNA quantification, and HBe antigen seropositivity), GMPH score in F3 or F4 was significantly lower than that in F0 to F2. In the above mentioned 8 variables, differences between the liver fibrosis stages (F0 to F1 vs F2, F2 vs F3, F3 vs F4, F0 to F1 vs F3, F0 to F1 vs F4, and F2 vs F4) for the entire

  19. Differential Fmo3 Gene Expression in Various Liver Injury Models Involving Hepatic Oxidative Stress in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rudraiah, Swetha; Moscovitz, Jamie E.; Donepudi, Ajay C.; Campion, Sarah N.; Slitt, Angela L.; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Manautou, José E.

    2015-01-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenase-3 (FMO3) catalyzes metabolic reactions similar to cytochrome P450 monooxygenase however, most metabolites of FMO3 are considered non-toxic. Recent findings in our laboratory demonstrated Fmo3gene induction following toxic acetaminophen (APAP) treatment in mice.The goal of this study was to evaluate Fmo3gene expression in diverseother mouse models of hepatic oxidative stress and injury. Fmo3 gene regulation by Nrf2 was also investigated using Nrf2 knockout (Nrf2 KO) mice. In our studies, male C57BL/6J mice were treated with toxic dosesof hepatotoxicants or underwent bile duct ligation (BDL, 10d). Hepatotoxicants included APAP (400 mg/kg, 24 to 72h), alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT; 50 mg/kg, 2 to 48h), carbontetrachloride (CCl4;10 or 30 μL/kg, 24 and 48h) and allyl alcohol (AlOH; 30 or 60 mg/kg, 6 and 24h). Because oxidative stress activates nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), additional studies investigated Fmo3 gene regulation by Nrf2 using Nrf2 knockout (Nrf2 KO) mice. At appropriate time-points, blood and liver samples were collected for assessment of plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity, plasma and hepatic bile acid levels, as well as liver Fmo3 mRNA and protein expression. Fmo3 mRNA expression increased significantly by 43-fold at 12h after ANIT treatment,and this increase translates to a 4-fold change in protein levels. BDL also increased Fmo3 mRNA expression by 1899-fold, but with no change in protein levels. Treatment of mice with CCl4decreased liver Fmo3gene expression, whileno change in expression was detected with AlOH treatment. Nrf2 KO mice are more susceptible to APAP (400 mg/kg, 72h) treatment compared to their wild-type (WT) counterparts, which is evidenced by greater plasma ALT activity. Fmo3 mRNA and protein expression increased in Nrf2 KO mice after APAP treatment. Collectively, not all hepatotoxicantsthat produce oxidative stress alter Fmo3gene expression. Along with APAP, toxic ANIT

  20. Induction of Hepatic and Endothelial Differentiation by Perfusion in a Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Model of Human Fetal Liver

    PubMed Central

    Pekor, Christopher; Gerlach, Jörg C.; Nettleship, Ian

    2015-01-01

    The development of functional engineered tissue constructs depends on high cell densities and appropriate vascularization. In this study we implemented a four-compartment three-dimensional perfusion bioreactor culture model for studying the effects of medium perfusion on endothelial, hepatic, and hematopoietic cell populations of primary human fetal liver in an in vivo-like environment. Human fetal liver cells were cultured in bioreactors configured to provide either perfusion or diffusion conditions. Metabolic activities of the cultures were monitored daily by measuring glucose consumption and lactate production. Cell viability during culture was analyzed by lactate dehydrogenase activity. Hepatic functionality was determined by the release of albumin and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) in culture medium samples. After 4 days of culture, cells were analyzed for the expression of a variety of endothelial, hepatic, and hematopoietic genes, as well as the surface marker expression of CD31 and CD34 in flow cytometry. We found that medium perfusion increased the gene expression of endothelial markers such as CD31, von Willebrand factor (vWF), CD140b, CD309, and CD144 while decreasing the gene expression of the erythrocyte-surface marker CD235a. Hepatic differentiation was promoted under perfusion conditions as demonstrated by lower AFP and higher albumin secretion compared with cultures not exposed to medium perfusion. Additionally, cultures exposed to medium perfusion gave higher rates of glucose consumption and lactate production, indicating increased metabolic activity. In conclusion, high-density bioreactors configured to provide constant medium perfusion significantly induced hepatic and endothelial cell differentiation and provided improved conditions for the culture of human fetal liver cells compared with cultures without perfusion. PMID:25559936

  1. Induction of Hepatic and Endothelial Differentiation by Perfusion in a Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Model of Human Fetal Liver.

    PubMed

    Pekor, Christopher; Gerlach, Jörg C; Nettleship, Ian; Schmelzer, Eva

    2015-07-01

    The development of functional engineered tissue constructs depends on high cell densities and appropriate vascularization. In this study we implemented a four-compartment three-dimensional perfusion bioreactor culture model for studying the effects of medium perfusion on endothelial, hepatic, and hematopoietic cell populations of primary human fetal liver in an in vivo-like environment. Human fetal liver cells were cultured in bioreactors configured to provide either perfusion or diffusion conditions. Metabolic activities of the cultures were monitored daily by measuring glucose consumption and lactate production. Cell viability during culture was analyzed by lactate dehydrogenase activity. Hepatic functionality was determined by the release of albumin and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) in culture medium samples. After 4 days of culture, cells were analyzed for the expression of a variety of endothelial, hepatic, and hematopoietic genes, as well as the surface marker expression of CD31 and CD34 in flow cytometry. We found that medium perfusion increased the gene expression of endothelial markers such as CD31, von Willebrand factor (vWF), CD140b, CD309, and CD144 while decreasing the gene expression of the erythrocyte-surface marker CD235a. Hepatic differentiation was promoted under perfusion conditions as demonstrated by lower AFP and higher albumin secretion compared with cultures not exposed to medium perfusion. Additionally, cultures exposed to medium perfusion gave higher rates of glucose consumption and lactate production, indicating increased metabolic activity. In conclusion, high-density bioreactors configured to provide constant medium perfusion significantly induced hepatic and endothelial cell differentiation and provided improved conditions for the culture of human fetal liver cells compared with cultures without perfusion. PMID:25559936

  2. Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... infected with the hepatitis B virus, can I breastfeed? • If I am infected with the hepatitis B ... infected with the hepatitis C virus, can I breastfeed? • Glossary What are hepatitis B and hepatitis C ...

  3. Histopathological characteristics of glutamine synthetase-positive hepatic tumor lesions in a mouse model of spontaneous metabolic syndrome (TSOD mouse)

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Tetsuyuki; Nishida, Takeshi; Baba, Hayato; Hatta, Hideki; Imura, Johji; Sutoh, Mitsuko; Toyohara, Syunji; Hokao, Ryoji; Watanabe, Syunsuke; Ogawa, Hirohisa; Uehara, Hisanori; Tsuneyama, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that Tsumura-Suzuki obese diabetic (TSOD) mice, a polygenic model of spontaneous type 2 diabetes, is a valuable model of hepatic carcinogenesis via non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). One of the characteristics of tumors in these mice is the diffuse expression of glutamine synthetase (GS), which is a diagnostic marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this study, we performed detailed histopathological examinations and found that GS expression was diffusely positive in >70% of the hepatic tumors from 15-month-old male TSOD mice. Translocation of β-catenin into nuclei with enhanced membranous expression also occurred in GS-positive tumors. Small lesions (<1 mm) in GS-positive cases exhibited dysplastic nodules, with severe nuclear atypia, whereas large lesions (>3 mm) bore the characteristics of human HCC, exhibiting nuclear and structural atypia with invasive growth. By contrast, the majority of GS-negative tumors were hepatocellular adenomas with advanced fatty change and low nuclear grade. In GS-negative tumors, loss of liver fatty acid-binding protein expression was observed. These results suggest that the histological characteristics of GS-positive hepatic tumors in TSOD mice resemble human HCC; thus, this model may be a useful tool in translational research targeting the NAFLD/NASH-HCC sequence. PMID:27446562

  4. Biodistribution and acute toxicity of naked gold nanoparticles in a rabbit hepatic tumor model

    PubMed Central

    GLAZER, EVAN S; ZHU, CIHUI; HAMIR, AMIR N.; BORNE, AGATHA; THOMPSON, C. SHEA; CURLEY, STEVEN A.

    2012-01-01

    There is a paucity of data regarding the safety of administering solid gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in large animal tumor models. We assessed the acute toxicity and biodistribution of 5 nm and 25 nm solid AuNPs in New Zealand White rabbits (n = 6 in each) with implanted liver Vx2 tumors 24 hours after intravenous injection. Gold concentration was determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP) and imaged with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). There was no clinico-pathologic evidence of renal, hepatic, pulmonary, or other organ dysfunction. After 25 nm AuNP administration, the concentration of white blood cells increased after treatment (p = 0.001). Most other blood studies were unchanged. AuNPs were distributed to the spleen, liver, and Vx2 tumors, but not to other tissues. The urinary excretion of AuNPs was bimodal as measured by ICP. 25 nm AuNPs were more evenly distributed throughout tissues and may be better tools for medical therapy. PMID:20854190

  5. Hepatic mitochondrial alterations and increased oxidative stress in nutritional diabetes-prone Psammomys obesus model.

    PubMed

    Bouderba, Saida; Sanz, M Nieves; Sánchez-Martín, Carlos; El-Mir, M Yehia; Villanueva, Gloria R; Detaille, Dominique; Koceïr, E Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is considered to be a pivotal component of insulin resistance and associated metabolic diseases. Psammomys obesus is a relevant model of nutritional diabetes since these adult animals exhibit a state of insulin resistance when fed a standard laboratory chow, hypercaloric for them as compared to their natural food. In this context, alterations in bioenergetics were studied. Using liver mitochondria isolated from these rats fed such a diet for 18 weeks, oxygen consumption rates, activities of respiratory complexes, and content in cytochromes were examined. Levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and gluthatione (GSH) were measured in tissue homogenates. Diabetic Psammomys showed a serious liver deterioration (hepatic mass accretion, lipids accumulation), accompanied by an enhanced oxidative stress (MDA increased, GSH depleted). On the other hand, both ADP-dependent and uncoupled respirations greatly diminished below control values, and the respiratory flux to cytochrome oxydase was mildly lowered. Furthermore, an inhibition of complexes I and III together with an activation of complex II were found. With emergence of oxidative stress, possibly related to a defect in oxidative phosphorylation, some molecular adjustments could contribute to alleviate, at least in part, the deleterious outcomes of insulin resistance in this gerbil species. PMID:22675340

  6. Optical fluorescence spectroscopy to detect hepatic necrosis after normothermic ischemia: animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Renan A.; Vollet-Filho, Jose D.; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Fernandez, Jorge L.; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Castro-e-Silva, Orlando; Sankarankutty, Ajith K.

    2015-06-01

    Liver transplantation is a well-established treatment for liver failure. However, the success of the transplantation procedure depends on liver graft conditions. The tissue function evaluation during the several transplantation stages is relevant, in particular during the organ harvesting, when a decision is made concerning the viability of the graft. Optical fluorescence spectroscopy is a good option because it is a noninvasive and fast technique. A partial normothermic hepatic ischemia was performed in rat livers, with a vascular occlusion of both median and left lateral lobes, allowing circulation only for the right lateral lobe and the caudate lobe. Fluorescence spectra under excitation at 532 nm (doubled frequency Nd:YAG laser) were collected using a portable spectrometer (USB2000, Ocean Optics, USA). The fluorescence emission was collected before vascular occlusion, after ischemia, and 24 hours after reperfusion. A morphometric histology analysis was performed as the gold standard evaluation - liver samples were analyzed, and the percentage of necrotic tissue was obtained. The results showed that changes in the fluorescence emission after ischemia can be correlated with the amount of necrosis evaluated by a morphometric analysis, the Pearson correlation coefficient of the generated model was 0.90 and the root mean square error was around 20%. In this context, the laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy technique after normothermic ischemia showed to be a fast and efficient method to differentiate ischemic injury from viable tissues.

  7. Anti-hepatitis C virus potency of a new autophagy inhibitor using human liver slices model

    PubMed Central

    Lagaye, Sylvie; Brun, Sonia; Gaston, Jesintha; Shen, Hong; Stranska, Ruzena; Camus, Claire; Dubray, Clarisse; Rousseau, Géraldine; Massault, Pierre-Philippe; Courcambeck, Jerôme; Bassisi, Firas; Halfon, Philippe; Pol, Stanislas

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the antiviral potency of a new anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) antiviral agent targeting the cellular autophagy machinery. METHODS: Non-infected liver slices, obtained from human liver resection and cut in 350 μm-thick slices (2.7 × 106 cells per slice) were infected with cell culture-grown HCV Con1b/C3 supernatant (multiplicity of infection = 0.1) cultivated for up to ten days. HCV infected slices were treated at day 4 post-infection with GNS-396 for 6 d at different concentrations. HCV replication was evaluated by strand-specific real-time quantitative reverse transcription - polymerase chain reaction. The infectivity titers of supernatants were evaluated by foci formation upon inoculation into naive Huh-7.5.1 cells. The cytotoxic effect of the drugs was evaluated by lactate dehydrogenase leakage assays. RESULTS: The antiviral efficacy of a new antiviral drug, GNS-396, an autophagy inhibitor, on HCV infection of adult human liver slices was evidenced in a dose-dependent manner. At day 6 post-treatment, GNS-396 EC50 was 158 nmol/L without cytotoxic effect (compared to hydroxychloroquine EC50 = 1.17 μmol/L). CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrated that our ex vivo model is efficient for evaluation the potency of autophagy inhibitors, in particular a new quinoline derivative GNS-396 as antiviral could inhibit HCV infection in a dose-dependent manner without cytotoxic effect. PMID:27478540

  8. Characterization of the Treg Response in the Hepatitis B Virus Hydrodynamic Injection Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Dietze, Kirsten K.; Schimmer, Simone; Kretzmer, Freya; Wang, Junzhong; Lin, Yong; Huang, Xuan; Wu, Weimin; Wang, Baoju; Lu, Mengji

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an important role in counter-regulating effector T cell responses in many infectious diseases. However, they can also contribute to the development of T cell dysfunction and pathogen persistence in chronic infections. Tregs have been reported to suppress virus-specific T cell responses in hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection of human patients as well as in HBV animal models. However, the phenotype and expansion of Tregs has so far only been investigated in other infections, but not in HBV. We therefore performed hydrodynamic injections of HBV plasmids into mice and analyzed the Treg response in the spleen and liver. Absolute Treg numbers significantly increased in the liver but not the spleen after HBV injection. The cells were natural Tregs that surprisingly did not show any activation or proliferation in response to the infection. However, they were able to suppress effector T cell responses, as selective depletion of Tregs significantly increased HBV-specific CD8+ T cell responses and accelerated viral antigen clearance. The data implies that natural Tregs infiltrate the liver in HBV infection without further activation or expansion but are still able to interfere with T cell mediated viral clearance. PMID:26986976

  9. Role of dopaminergic and serotonergic neurotransmitters in behavioral alterations observed in rodent model of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Dhanda, Saurabh; Sandhir, Rajat

    2015-06-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the role of biogenic amines in behavioral alterations observed in rat model of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) following bile duct ligation (BDL). Male Wistar rats subjected to BDL developed biliary fibrosis after four weeks which was supported by altered liver function tests, increased ammonia levels and histological staining (Sirius red). Animals were assessed for their behavioral performance in terms of cognitive, anxiety and motor functions. The levels of dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT), epinephrine and norepinephrine (NE) were estimated in different regions of brain viz. cortex, hippocampus, striatum and cerebellum using HPLC along with activity of monoamine oxidase (MAO). Cognitive assessment of BDL rats revealed a progressive decline in learning, memory formation, retrieval, exploration of novel environment and spontaneous locomotor activity along with decrease in 5-HT and NE levels. This was accompanied by an increase in MAO activity. Motor functions of BDL rats were also altered which were evident from decrease in the time spent on the rotating rod and higher foot faults assessed using narrow beam walk task. A global decrease was observed in the DA content along with an increase in MAO activity. Histopathological studies using hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) and cresyl violet exhibited marked neuronal degeneration, wherein neurons appeared more pyknotic, condensed and damaged. The results reveal that dopaminergic and serotonergic pathways are disturbed in chronic liver failure post-BDL which may be responsible for behavioral impairments observed in HE. PMID:25639545

  10. Activation of farnesoid X receptor attenuates hepatic injury in a murine model of alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weibin; Zhu, Bo; Peng, Xiaomin; Zhou, Meiling; Jia, Dongwei; Gu, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a common cause of advanced liver disease, and considered as a major risk factor of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Hepatic cholestasis is a pathophysiological feature observed in all stages of ALD. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, and plays an essential role in the regulation of bile acid, lipid and glucose homeostasis. However, the role of FXR in the pathogenesis and progression of ALD remains largely unknown. Mice were fed Lieber-DeCarli ethanol diet or an isocaloric control diet. We used a specific agonist of FXR WAY-362450 to study the effect of pharmacological activation of FXR in alcoholic liver disease. In this study, we demonstrated that FXR activity was impaired by chronic ethanol ingestion in a murine model of ALD. Activation of FXR by specific agonist WAY-362450 protected mice from the development of ALD. We also found that WAY-362450 treatment rescued FXR activity, suppressed ethanol-induced Cyp2e1 up-regulation and attenuated oxidative stress in liver. Our results highlight a key role of FXR in the modulation of ALD development, and propose specific FXR agonists for the treatment of ALD patients. PMID:24269813

  11. Effect of bovine lactoferrin in a therapeutic hamster model of hepatic amoebiasis.

    PubMed

    Ordaz-Pichardo, Cynthia; León-Sicairos, Nidia; Hernández-Ramírez, Verónica Ivonne; Talamás-Rohana, Patricia; de la Garza, Mireya

    2012-06-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the causative agent of amoebiasis, a disease that produces dysentery as a result of the perforation of the large intestine. This parasite often invades other organs, primarily the liver, leading to an amoebic liver abscess (ALA), which can cause death. Metronidazole is the drug of choice for the treatment of ALA; however, it produces toxic side effects in patients. Lactoferrin (Lf) is a glycoprotein of the innate immune response that sequesters iron in the mucosae. Lf possesses immune-regulatory properties, such as antiinflammatory and antioxidant activities. Moreover, the microbicidal activity of apoLf, which lacks bound iron, has been shown. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of bovine Lf (bLf) against ALA in a model of hepatic amoebiasis in hamsters. Interestingly, hamsters treated intragastrically with Lf (2.5 mg/100 g mass) over a period of 8 days showed no clinical signs of disease and ALA was effectively decreased, with only 0.63% detectable lesion, compared with 63% in untreated animals. Furthermore, liver function and blood cells approached normal levels among those receiving bLf treatment. These results suggest that bLf may aid in the therapy of amoebiasis, likely without producing undesirable effects in patients. PMID:22332957

  12. Characterization of the Treg Response in the Hepatitis B Virus Hydrodynamic Injection Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Dietze, Kirsten K; Schimmer, Simone; Kretzmer, Freya; Wang, Junzhong; Lin, Yong; Huang, Xuan; Wu, Weimin; Wang, Baoju; Lu, Mengji; Dittmer, Ulf; Yang, Dongliang; Liu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an important role in counter-regulating effector T cell responses in many infectious diseases. However, they can also contribute to the development of T cell dysfunction and pathogen persistence in chronic infections. Tregs have been reported to suppress virus-specific T cell responses in hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection of human patients as well as in HBV animal models. However, the phenotype and expansion of Tregs has so far only been investigated in other infections, but not in HBV. We therefore performed hydrodynamic injections of HBV plasmids into mice and analyzed the Treg response in the spleen and liver. Absolute Treg numbers significantly increased in the liver but not the spleen after HBV injection. The cells were natural Tregs that surprisingly did not show any activation or proliferation in response to the infection. However, they were able to suppress effector T cell responses, as selective depletion of Tregs significantly increased HBV-specific CD8+ T cell responses and accelerated viral antigen clearance. The data implies that natural Tregs infiltrate the liver in HBV infection without further activation or expansion but are still able to interfere with T cell mediated viral clearance. PMID:26986976

  13. Hepatitis virus panel

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis A antibody test; Hepatitis B antibody test; Hepatitis C antibody test; Hepatitis D antibody test ... There are different tests for hepatitis A and B. A positive test is ... may mean: You currently have a hepatitis infection. This may ...

  14. Hepatitis C and Incarceration

    MedlinePlus

    HEPATITIS C & INCARCERATION What is hepatitis? “Hepatitis” means inflammation or swelling of the liver. The liver is an important ... viral hepatitis: Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C. They are all different from each other and ...

  15. Hepatitis C: Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Public Home » Hepatitis C » Hepatitis C Treatment Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Hepatitis C Treatment for Veterans and the Public Treatment ...

  16. Hepatic ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatic ischemia is a condition in which the liver does not get enough blood or oxygen, causing injury to ... pressure from any condition can lead to hepatic ischemia. Such conditions may include: Abnormal heart rhythms Dehydration ...

  17. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Hepatic Encephalopathy, sometimes referred to as portosystemic encephalopathy or PSE, is a condition that ... medical care is an important factor in staying as healthy as possible. The American Liver Foundation is ...

  18. Hepatitis D

    MedlinePlus

    ... if the hepatitis B virus is also present. Transmission Hepatitis D can be found in the blood, ... other body fluids of people who are infected. Transmission happens when infected body fluid enters another person’s ...

  19. Autoimmune hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Lupoid hepatitis; Chronic acute liver disease ... This form of hepatitis is an autoimmune disease . The body's immune system cannot tell the difference between healthy body tissue and harmful, outside ...

  20. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2014 Select a Language: Fact Sheet 507 Hepatitis C WHAT IS HEPATITIS C? HOW IS IT DIAGNOSED? ... treatment may be less likely to work. Hep C treatment is less effective for coinfected people. Cure ...

  1. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis A, is caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). The disease spreads through contact with ... washed in untreated water Putting into your mouth a finger or object that came into contact with ...

  2. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000279.htm Hepatitis B To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hepatitis B is irritation and swelling (inflammation) of the ...

  3. Depletion of the AMPAR reserve pool impairs synaptic plasticity in a model of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Schroeter, Annett; Wen, Shuping; Mölders, Andrea; Erlenhardt, Nadine; Stein, Valentin; Klöcker, Nikolaj

    2015-09-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is the most common neuropsychiatric complication of acute or chronic liver failure. Clinical symptoms include cognitive and intellectual dysfunction as well as impaired motor activity and coordination. There is general consensus that increased levels of ammonia play a central role in the pathogenesis of HE. However, it is still elusive how cognitive performance including the ability to learn and memorize information is affected by ammonia at molecular levels. In the present study, we have employed a neuroglial co-culture model, which preserves neuroglial interplay but allows for cell-type specific molecular and functional analyses, to investigate glutamatergic neurotransmission under conditions of high ammonia. Chronic exposure to ammonia significantly reduced neuronal mRNA and protein expression of AMPA-subtype glutamate receptors (AMPARs), which mediate most fast excitatory neurotransmission in the brain. Surprisingly, neurons were able to fully maintain basal glutamatergic neurotransmission as recorded by AMPAR-mediated miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) even when >50% of total AMPARs were lost. However, long-lasting, activity-dependent changes in the efficacy of synaptic communication, which model the capability of the brain to learn and store information, were severely constrained. Whereas synaptic efficacy could still be depressed, an increase in synaptic strength was abolished. We conclude that neurons retain basal glutamatergic transmission at the expense of the extrasynaptic population of AMPARs, which is revealed when the extrasynaptic reserve pool is recruited in vain for synaptic potentiation. Our findings thus offer a molecular model, which might not only explain impaired synaptic plasticity in HE but also in other neurological diseases accompanied by a decrease in extrasynaptic AMPAR expression. PMID:26363416

  4. An IL28B Genotype-Based Clinical Prediction Model for Treatment of Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Thomas R.; Everhart, James E.; Morgan, Timothy R.; Lok, Anna S.; Chung, Raymond T.; Shao, Yongwu; Shiffman, Mitchell L.; Dotrang, Myhanh; Sninsky, John J.; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Genetic variation in IL28B and other factors are associated with sustained virological response (SVR) after pegylated-interferon/ribavirin treatment for chronic hepatitis C (CHC). Using data from the HALT-C Trial, we developed a model to predict a patient's probability of SVR based on IL28B genotype and clinical variables. Methods HALT-C enrolled patients with advanced CHC who had failed previous interferon-based treatment. Subjects were re-treated with pegylated-interferon/ribavirin during trial lead-in. We used step-wise logistic regression to calculate adjusted odds ratios (aOR) and create the predictive model. Leave-one-out cross-validation was used to predict a priori probabilities of SVR and determine area under the receiver operator characteristics curve (AUC). Results Among 646 HCV genotype 1-infected European American patients, 14.2% achieved SVR. IL28B rs12979860-CC genotype was the strongest predictor of SVR (aOR, 7.56; p<.0001); the model also included HCV RNA (log10 IU/ml), AST∶ALT ratio, Ishak fibrosis score and prior ribavirin treatment. For this model AUC was 78.5%, compared to 73.0% for a model restricted to the four clinical predictors and 60.0% for a model restricted to IL28B genotype (p<0.001). Subjects with a predicted probability of SVR <10% had an observed SVR rate of 3.8%; subjects with a predicted probability >10% (43.3% of subjects) had an SVR rate of 27.9% and accounted for 84.8% of subjects actually achieving SVR. To verify that consideration of both IL28B genotype and clinical variables is required for treatment decisions, we calculated AUC values from published data for the IDEAL Study. Conclusion A clinical prediction model based on IL28B genotype and clinical variables can yield useful individualized predictions of the probability of treatment success that could increase SVR rates and decrease the frequency of futile treatment among patients with CHC. PMID:21760886

  5. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... is an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis A, is caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). The disease spreads through contact with ... suggest medicines to help relieve your symptoms. The hepatitis A vaccine can prevent HAV. Good hygiene can also ...

  6. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis C, is caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV). It usually spreads through contact with ... childbirth. Most people who are infected with hepatitis C don't have any symptoms for years. If ...

  7. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... Organizations ​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Español Hepatitis A Page Content On this page: What is ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is hepatitis A? Hepatitis * A is a virus , or infection, ...

  8. Autoimmune Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Organizations ​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Autoimmune Hepatitis Page Content On this page: What is autoimmune ... Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is autoimmune hepatitis? Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic—or long lasting— ...

  9. Dysregulation of hepatic zinc transporters in a mouse model of alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qian; Li, Qiong; Zhong, Wei; Zhang, Jiayang; Sun, Xiuhua; Tan, Xiaobing; Yin, Xinmin; Sun, Xinguo; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Zinc deficiency is a consistent phenomenon observed in patients with alcoholic liver disease, but the mechanisms have not been well defined. The objective of this study was to determine if alcohol alters hepatic zinc transporters in association with reduction of hepatic zinc levels and if oxidative stress mediates the alterations of zinc transporters. C57BL/6 mice were pair-fed with the Lieber-DeCarli control or ethanol diets for 2, 4, or 8 wk. Chronic alcohol exposure reduced hepatic zinc levels, but increased plasma and urine zinc levels, at all time points. Hepatic zinc finger proteins, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF-4α), were downregulated in ethanol-fed mice. Four hepatic zinc transporter proteins showed significant alterations in ethanol-fed mice compared with the controls. ZIP5 and ZIP14 proteins were downregulated, while ZIP7 and ZnT7 proteins were upregulated, by ethanol exposure at all time points. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that chronic ethanol exposure upregulated cytochrome P-450 2E1 and caused 4-hydroxynonenal accumulation in the liver. For the in vitro study, murine FL-83B hepatocytes were treated with 5 μM 4-hydroxynonenal or 100 μM hydrogen peroxide for 72 h. The results from in vitro studies demonstrated that 4-hydroxynonenal treatment altered ZIP5 and ZIP7 protein abundance, and hydrogen peroxide treatment changed ZIP7, ZIP14, and ZnT7 protein abundance. These results suggest that chronic ethanol exposure alters hepatic zinc transporters via oxidative stress, which might account for ethanol-induced hepatic zinc deficiency. PMID:24924749

  10. A Novel Small-molecule Tumor Necrosis Factor α Inhibitor Attenuates Inflammation in a Hepatitis Mouse Model*

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li; Gong, Haiyan; Zhu, Haiyan; Ji, Qing; Su, Pei; Liu, Peng; Cao, Shannan; Yao, Jianfeng; Jiang, Linlin; Han, Mingzhe; Ma, Xiaotong; Xiong, Dongsheng; Luo, Hongbo R.; Wang, Fei; Zhou, Jiaxi; Xu, Yuanfu

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) is a hallmark of many inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and septic shock and hepatitis, making it a potential therapeutic target for clinical interventions. To explore chemical inhibitors against TNFα activity, we applied computer-aided drug design combined with in vitro and cell-based assays and identified a lead chemical compound, (E)-4-(2-(4-chloro-3-nitrophenyl) (named as C87 thereafter), which directly binds to TNFα, potently inhibits TNFα-induced cytotoxicity (IC50 = 8.73 μm) and effectively blocks TNFα-triggered signaling activities. Furthermore, by using a murine acute hepatitis model, we showed that C87 attenuates TNFα-induced inflammation, thereby markedly reducing injuries to the liver and improving animal survival. Thus, our results lead to a novel and highly specific small-molecule TNFα inhibitor, which can be potentially used to treat TNFα-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:24634219

  11. Cutthroat trout virus as a surrogate in vitro infection model for testing inhibitors of hepatitis E virus replication

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Debing, Yannick; Winton, James; Neyts, Johan; Dallmeier, Kai

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is one of the most important causes of acute hepatitis worldwide. Although most infections are self-limiting, mortality is particularly high in pregnant women. Chronic infections can occur in transplant and other immune-compromised patients. Successful treatment of chronic hepatitis E has been reported with ribavirin and pegylated interferon-alpha, however severe side effects were observed. We employed the cutthroat trout virus (CTV), a non-pathogenic fish virus with remarkable similarities to HEV, as a potential surrogate for HEV and established an antiviral assay against this virus using the Chinook salmon embryo (CHSE-214) cell line. Ribavirin and the respective trout interferon were found to efficiently inhibit CTV replication. Other known broad-spectrum inhibitors of RNA virus replication such as the nucleoside analog 2′-C-methylcytidine resulted only in a moderate antiviral activity. In its natural fish host, CTV levels largely fluctuate during the reproductive cycle with the virus detected mainly during spawning. We wondered whether this aspect of CTV infection may serve as a surrogate model for the peculiar pathogenesis of HEV in pregnant women. To that end the effect of three sex steroids on in vitro CTV replication was evaluated. Whereas progesterone resulted in marked inhibition of virus replication, testosterone and 17β-estradiol stimulated viral growth. Our data thus indicate that CTV may serve as a surrogate model for HEV, both for antiviral experiments and studies on the replication biology of the Hepeviridae.

  12. Clinical impact of treatment timing for chronic hepatitis C infection: a decision model

    PubMed Central

    Pho, M T; Jensen, D M; Meltzer, D O; Kim, A Y; Linas, B P

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection have led to the availability of both highly efficacious interferon-containing and interferon-sparing regimens. However, the use of such therapies faces restrictions due to high costs. For patients who are medically eligible to receive interferon, the choice between the two will likely be impacted by preferences surrounding interferon, severity of disease, coverage policies and out-of-pocket costs. We developed a decision model to quantify the trade-offs between immediate, interferon-containing therapy and delayed, interferon-free therapy for patients with chronic, genotype 1 HCV infection. We projected the quality-adjusted life expectancy stratified by the presence or absence of cirrhosis for four strategies: (i) no treatment; (ii) immediate, one-time treatment with an interferon-containing regimen; (iii) immediate treatment as above with the opportunity for retreatment in patients who fail to achieve sustained virologic response with interferon-free therapy in 1 year; and (iv) delayed therapy with interferon-free therapy in 1 year. When compared to one-time immediate treatment with the interferon-containing regimen, delayed treatment with the interferon-free regimen in 1 year resulted in longer life expectancy, with a 0.2 quality-adjusted life year (QALY) increase in noncirrhotic patients, and a 1.1 QALY increase in patients with cirrhosis. This superiority in health benefits was lost when wait time for interferon-free therapy was greater than 3–3.2 years. In this modelling analysis, interferon-free therapy resulted in superior health benefits compared to immediate therapy with interferon until wait time exceeded 3–3.2 years. Such data can inform decision-making regarding treatment initiation for HCV as healthcare financing evolves. PMID:26135026

  13. Simple models based on gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and platelets for predicting survival in hepatitis B-associated hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Qing; Bi, Jian-Bin; Wang, Zhi-Xin; Xu, Xin-Sen; Qu, Kai; Miao, Run-Chen; Chen, Wei; Zhou, Yan-Yan; Liu, Chang

    2016-01-01

    Background Several hepatic cirrhosis-derived noninvasive models have been developed to predict the incidence and outcomes of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We aimed to investigate the prognostic significance of the two novel established cirrhosis-associated models based on gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) and platelets in hepatitis B-associated HCC. Methods We retrospectively evaluated 182 HCC patients with positive hepatitis B surface antigen who received radical therapy at a single institution between 2002 and 2012. Laboratory data prior to operation were collected to calculate the GGT to platelets ratio (GPR) and the S-index. Predictive factors associated with overall survival and recurrence-free survival were assessed using log-rank test and multivariate Cox analysis. Additional analyses were performed after patients were stratified based on cirrhosis status, tumor size, therapy methods, and so forth, to investigate the prognostic significance in different subgroups. Results During a median follow-up time of 45.0 months, a total of 88 (48.4%) patients died and 79 (43.4%) patients recurred. The cut-off points for GPR and S-index in predicting death were determined to be 0.76 and 0.56, respectively. Compared with patients with a lower GPR, those with GPR ≥0.76 had a higher probability of cirrhosis and a larger tumor (both P<0.05). GPR and S-index were both found to be significantly associated with survival by univariate log-rank test. Multivariate analysis identified tumor size ≥5 and high level of GPR, but not high Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer stage or S-index, as independent factors for predicting poor overall survival and recurrence-free survival. Conclusion The GPR is an effective preoperative predictor for outcomes in hepatitis B-associated HCC. PMID:27110127

  14. Hepatic Arterial Embolization with Doxorubicin-Loaded Superabsorbent Polymer Microspheres in a Rabbit Liver Tumor Model

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Sanjay Wright, Kenneth C.; Ensor, Joe; Van Pelt, Carolyn S.; Dixon, Katherine A.; Kundra, Vikas

    2011-10-15

    Objectives: The pharmacokinetic profile after hepatic arterial embolization with superabsorbent microspheres (QuadraSpheres) loaded with doxorubicin was studied. Methods: Rabbits with hepatic VX2 tumors were treated with intra-arterial administration of QuadraSpheres loaded with doxorubicin, or transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) using doxorubicin, Lipiodol and Embospheres, or hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) of doxorubicin. Tumor specimens were evaluated by fluorescence microscopy, and plasma and tumor concentrations of doxorubicin were measured. Results: The peak plasma concentration of doxorubicin was lower in the QuadraSphere group (309.9 ng/ml) than in the HAI (673.4 ng/ml) or TACE (360.5 ng/ml) groups, suggesting higher tumor retention in the QuadraSphere group. Intratumoral doxorubicin levels declined to negligible levels at 1 and 3 days after treatment, respectively, in the HAI and TACE groups. In the QuadraSphere groups, intratumoral doxorubicin level declined after day 1, but was still detectable at 14 days after treatment and was higher than that in the other groups at 1, 3, and 7 days. Intratumoral doxorubicin fluorescence was detected at all time points in the QuadraSphere group, but only at 1 day after treatment in the TACE group. Conclusions: Hepatic arterial administration of doxorubicin-loaded QuadraSpheres enables the sustained release of doxorubicin to hepatic tumors.

  15. Attenuation of Experimental Autoimmune Hepatitis by Exogenous and Endogenous Cannabinoids: Involvement of Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Venkatesh L.; Hegde, Shweta; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Hofseth, Lorne J.; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash S.

    2009-01-01

    Immune-mediated liver diseases including autoimmune and viral hepatitis are a major health problem worldwide. Natural cannabinoids such as Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) effectively modulate immune cell function, and they have shown therapeutic potential in treating inflammatory diseases. We investigated the effects of THC in a murine model of concanavalin A (ConA)-induced hepatitis. Intraperitoneal administration of THC after ConA challenge inhibited hepatitis as shown by significant decrease in liver enzymes and reduced liver tissue injury. Furthermore, THC treatment resulted in significant suppression of crucial inflammatory cytokines in ConA-induced hepatitis. It is noteworthy that THC treatment in ConA-injected mice led to significant increase in absolute number of Forkhead helix transcription factor p3+ T regulatory cells in liver. We were surprised to find that select cannabinoid receptor (CB1 or CB2) agonists were not able to block hepatitis either independently or in combination. However, CB1/CB2 mixed agonists were able to efficiently attenuate hepatitis similar to THC. The modulatory effect of THC in ConA-induced hepatitis was reversed by both CB1 and CB2 antagonists. We also observed that endogenous cannabinoid anandamide was able to reduce hepatitis by suppressing cytokine levels. In addition, deficiency or inhibition of endocannabinoid hydrolyzing enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), which leads to increased levels of endogenous cannabinoids, resulted in decreased liver injury upon ConA challenge. Our data demonstrate that targeting cannabinoid receptors using exogenous or endogenous cannabinoids and use of FAAH inhibitors may constitute novel therapeutic modalities to treat immune-mediated liver inflammation. PMID:18388242

  16. Increased brain uptake of gamma-aminobutyric acid in a rabbit model of hepatic encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Bassett, M.L.; Mullen, K.D.; Scholz, B.; Fenstermacher, J.D.; Jones, E.A. )

    1990-03-01

    Transfer of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid across the normal blood-brain barrier is minimal. One prerequisite for gamma-aminobutyric acid in plasma contributing to the neural inhibition of hepatic encephalopathy would be that increased transfer of gamma-aminobutyric acid across the blood-brain barrier occurs in liver failure. The aim of the present study was to determine if brain gamma-aminobutyric acid uptake is increased in rabbits with stage II-III (precoma) hepatic encephalopathy due to galactosamine-induced fulminant hepatic failure. A modification of the Oldendorf intracarotid artery-injection technique was applied. (3H) gamma-aminobutyric acid, (14C) butanol, and 113mIn-labeled serum protein (transferrin) were injected simultaneously 4 s before decapitation. The ipsilateral brain uptake index of gamma-aminobutyric acid was determined from measurements of the 3 isotopes in 5 brain regions. Uncorrected or simple brain uptake indices of (3H) gamma-aminobutyric acid and (113mIn) transferrin were calculated using (14C) butanol as the highly extracted reference compound. The (113mIn) transferrin data were also used to correct the brain uptake index of (3H) gamma-aminobutyric acid for intravascular retention of (3H) gamma-aminobutyric acid. The methodology adopted minimized problems attributable to rapid (3H) gamma-aminobutyric acid metabolism, and slow brain washout and recirculation of the radiolabeled tracers. Both the uncorrected and corrected brain uptake indices of gamma-aminobutyric acid as well as the simple brain uptake index of transferrin were significantly increased in both stage II and III hepatic encephalopathy in all brain regions studied. Moreover, these brain uptake indices were significantly greater in stage III hepatic encephalopathy than in stage II hepatic encephalopathy.

  17. Osthole attenuates hepatic injury in a rodent model of trauma-hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huang-Ping; Liu, Fu-Chao; Tsai, Yung-Fong; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidences show that osthole possesses anti-inflammatory properties and protective effects following shock-like states, but the mechanism of these effects remains unknown. The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) pathway exerts anti-inflammatory effects in injury. The aim of this study was to investigate whether p38 MAPK plays any role in the osthole-mediated attenuation of hepatic injury after trauma-hemorrhage. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent trauma-hemorrhage (mean blood pressure maintained at approximately 35-40 mmHg for 90 minutes), followed by fluid resuscitation. During resuscitation, a single dose of osthole (3 mg/kg, intravenously) with and without a p38 MAPK inhibitor SB-203580 (2 mg/kg, intravenously), SB-203580 or vehicle was administered. Plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) with aspartate aminotransferase (AST) concentrations and various hepatic parameters were measured (n = 8 rats/group) at 24 hours after resuscitation. The results showed that trauma-hemorrhage increased hepatic myeloperoxidase activity, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and interleukin-6 levels, and plasma ALT and AST concentrations. These parameters were significantly improved in the osthole-treated rats subjected to trauma-hemorrhage. Osthole treatment also increased hepatic phospho-p38 MAPK expression compared with vehicle-treated trauma-hemorrhaged rats. Co-administration of SB-203580 with osthole abolished the osthole-induced beneficial effects on the above parameters and hepatic injury. These results suggest that the protective effect of osthole administration on alleviation of hepatic injury after trauma-hemorrhage, which is, at least in part, through p38 MAPK-dependent pathway. PMID:23755293

  18. Effects of melatonin on liver function and lipid peroxidation in a rat model of hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    DENG, WEN-SHENG; XU, QING; LIU, YE; JIANG, CHUN-HUI; ZHOU, HONG; GU, LEI

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of melatonin (MT) on liver function and lipid peroxidation following hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). A total of 66 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned into three groups: Normal control (N) group, ischemia-reperfusion (IR) group and the MT-treated group. A hepatic IRI model was developed by blocking the first porta hepatis, and subsequently restoring hepatic blood inflow after 35 min. Following reperfusion, changes in the levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) were detected by a chemical method at various time points. In the MT group, the MDA levels were significantly reduced (P<0.05) at all time points, as compared with the IR group. Furthermore, SOD activity was significantly increased (P<0.05) in the MT group, as compared with the IR group at all time points; and the levels of GSH in the MT group were significantly higher (P<0.05) than those of the IR group at 2, 4, and 8 h post-reperfusion. The levels of ALT, AST and LDH were significantly reduced in the MT group at each time point, as compared with that of the IR group (P<0.05). In conclusion, MT exhibits potent antioxidant properties that may create favorable conditions for the recovery of liver function following IRI. PMID:27168834

  19. Ability of the ankaferd blood stopper® to prevent parenchymal bleeding in an experimental hepatic trauma model

    PubMed Central

    Aysan, Erhan; Bektas, Hasan; Ersoz, Feyzullah; Sari, Serkan; Kaygusuz, Arslan; Huq, Gulben Erdem

    2010-01-01

    Hepatic parenchymal bleeding (HPB) is a major problem following both trauma and elective hepatic procedures. The present study investigated the effect of the Ankaferd Blood Stopper® (ABS) on HPB. Method(s): A total of 20 rats were used. After creating a laceration model in the left lateral hepatic lobe, the area was compressed for 3 minutes with the ABS in the rats in group 1 (n=10) and with 0.9% NaCl-soaked gauze in the rats in group 2 (n=10). Results: The mean change in haematocrit levels between baseline and the 24 hour values in group 1 was lower than group 2 (p=0.045). The mean perioperative bleeding in group 1 was lower than group 2 (p=0.003). The histopa-thologic evaluation revealed that there were no differences between the groups with respect to areas of necrosis (p=0.107) or inflammation (p=0.135). Conclusion: Although the ABS does not stop HPB completely, it ensures a statistically significant reduction in HPB. PMID:20827316

  20. Changes of hepatic lactoferrin gene expression in two mouse models of the acute phase reaction.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Ghayyor; Sial, Gull Zareen Khan; Ramadori, Pierluigi; Dudas, Jozsef; Batusic, Danko S; Ramadori, Giuliano

    2011-12-01

    Lactoferrin (Ltf), an iron binding glycoprotein, is a pleiotropic molecule whose serum concentration increases under acute phase conditions. The physiological roles of this protein have been well elucidated, but the source and serum regulation of Ltf gene expression have not been investigated in detail as part of the acute phase reaction (APR). In the current work, the changes in hepatic Ltf-gene-expression during turpentine oil- (TO-) or LPS-induced APR were investigated. Ltf was upregulated at both the mRNA and protein levels in the liver of TO- and LPS-treated wild type (WT) mice. The pattern of induction however was different in both animal models indicating distinctive signalling patterns resulting in an acute phase reaction. Cytokines are the core regulators of APR. Among the major cytokines, IL-6 is an important signalling molecule, which also regulates iron homeostasis in response to an inflammatory situation. In this study, the administration of IL-6 induced Ltf gene expression in the liver of WT mice, in murine hepatocytes and in hepa 1-6 cells. Ltf-gene-expression was upregulated also in the liver of TO- and LPS-treated IL-6 knockout (KO) mice. The increase in serum Ltf after LPS injection was greater than after TO-injection both in WT and IL-6-KO mice. To evaluate the contribution of other acute phase cytokines in the regulation of Ltf-gene-expression in the liver, both in vitro and in vivo studies with IL-1β, TNF-α, or IFN-γ were performed. The results demonstrate that TNF-α and IFN-γ also upregulated Ltf-gene-expression, while IL-1β has no role in the regulation of Ltf-gene-expression. PMID:21963450

  1. Comfrey (Symphytum Officinale. l.) and Experimental Hepatic Carcinogenesis: A Short-term Carcinogenesis Model Study

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Maria Fernanda Pereira Lavieri; de Oliveira Massoco, Cristina; Xavier, José Guilherme

    2010-01-01

    Comfrey or Symphytum officinale (L.) (Boraginaceae) is a very popular plant used for therapeutic purposes. Since the 1980s, its effects have been studied in long-term carcinogenesis studies, in which Comfrey extract is administered at high doses during several months and the neoplastic hepatic lesions are evaluated. However, the literature on this topic is very poor considering the studies performed under short-term carcinogenesis protocols, such as the ‘resistant hepatocyte model’ (RHM). In these studies, it is possible to observe easily the phenomena related to the early phases of tumor development, since pre-neoplastic lesions (PNLs) rise in about 1–2 months of chemical induction. Herein, the effects of chronic oral treatment of rats with 10% Comfrey ethanolic extract were evaluated in a RHM. Wistar rats were sequentially treated with N-nitrosodiethylamine (ip) and 2-acetilaminofluorene (po), and submitted to hepatectomy to induce carcinogenesis promotion. Macroscopic/microscopic quantitative analysis of PNL was performed. Non-parametric statistical tests (Mann–Whitney and χ2) were used, and the level of significance was set at P ≤ 0.05. Comfrey treatment reduced the number of pre-neoplastic macroscopic lesions up to 1 mm (P ≤ 0.05), the percentage of oval cells (P = 0.0001) and mitotic figures (P = 0.007), as well as the number of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) positive cells (P = 0.0001) and acidophilic pre-neoplastic nodules (P = 0.05). On the other hand, the percentage of cells presenting megalocytosis (P = 0.0001) and vacuolar degeneration (P = 0.0001) was increased. Scores of fibrosis, glycogen stores and the number of nucleolus organizing regions were not altered. The study indicated that oral treatment of rats with 10% Comfrey alcoholic extract reduced cell proliferation in this model. PMID:18955295

  2. Lipid-lowering agents inhibit hepatic steatosis in a non-alcoholic steatohepatitis-derived hepatocellular carcinoma mouse model.

    PubMed

    Orime, Kazuki; Shirakawa, Jun; Togashi, Yu; Tajima, Kazuki; Inoue, Hideaki; Nagashima, Yoji; Terauchi, Yasuo

    2016-02-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with various metabolic disorders, and the therapeutic strategies for treating NAFLD and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) have not been fully established. In the present study, we examined whether lipid-lowering agents inhibited the progression of NAFLD and tumorigenesis in a non-alcoholic steatohepatitis-derived hepatocellular carcinoma model mouse (STAM mice) generated by streptozotocin injection and a high-fat diet. Seven-week-old STAM mice were divided into groups fed a high-fat diet (Ctl) or a high-fat diet supplemented with ezetimibe (Ez), fenofibrate (Ff), rosuvastatin (Rs), ezetimibe plus fenofibrate (EF), or ezetimibe plus rosuvastatin (ER) for 4 weeks. At the end of the experiments, an oral glucose tolerance test, an insulin tolerance test, biochemical analyses using serum and liver, and a histological analysis of liver were performed in 11-week-old STAM mice. The lipid-lowering agents did not affect the body weight or the casual blood glucose levels in any of the groups. The serum triglyceride level was significantly decreased by Ff, Rs, and EF. Glucose tolerance was improved by Ez and Ff, but none of these agents improved insulin sensitivity. A histochemical analysis revealed that the lipid-lowering agents, with the exception of Rs, significantly inhibited the progression of hepatic steatosis. Nonetheless, no significant changes in the incidence of hepatic tumors were observed in any of the groups. Lipid-lowering agents inhibited the progression of hepatic steatosis without suppressing tumorigenesis in STAM mice. Our data has implications for the mechanism underlying steatosis-independent hepatic tumorigenesis in mice. PMID:26724391

  3. Hepatitis Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ogholikhan, Sina; Schwarz, Kathleen B.

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is a serious health problem all over the world. However, the reduction of the morbidity and mortality due to vaccinations against hepatitis A and hepatitis B has been a major component in the overall reduction in vaccine preventable diseases. We will discuss the epidemiology, vaccine development, and post-vaccination effects of the hepatitis A and B virus. In addition, we discuss attempts to provide hepatitis D vaccine for the 350 million individuals infected with hepatitis B globally. Given the lack of a hepatitis C vaccine, the many challenges facing the production of a hepatitis C vaccine will be shown, along with current and former vaccination trials. As there is no current FDA-approved hepatitis E vaccine, we will present vaccination data that is available in the rest of the world. Finally, we will discuss the existing challenges and questions facing future endeavors for each of the hepatitis viruses, with efforts continuing to focus on dramatically reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with these serious infections of the liver. PMID:26978406

  4. Hepatitis Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ogholikhan, Sina; Schwarz, Kathleen B

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is a serious health problem all over the world. However, the reduction of the morbidity and mortality due to vaccinations against hepatitis A and hepatitis B has been a major component in the overall reduction in vaccine preventable diseases. We will discuss the epidemiology, vaccine development, and post-vaccination effects of the hepatitis A and B virus. In addition, we discuss attempts to provide hepatitis D vaccine for the 350 million individuals infected with hepatitis B globally. Given the lack of a hepatitis C vaccine, the many challenges facing the production of a hepatitis C vaccine will be shown, along with current and former vaccination trials. As there is no current FDA-approved hepatitis E vaccine, we will present vaccination data that is available in the rest of the world. Finally, we will discuss the existing challenges and questions facing future endeavors for each of the hepatitis viruses, with efforts continuing to focus on dramatically reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with these serious infections of the liver. PMID:26978406

  5. Analysis of Hepatitis C Virus Decline during Treatment with the Protease Inhibitor Danoprevir Using a Multiscale Model

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rong, Libin; Guedj, Jeremie; Dahari, Harel; Coffield, Daniel J.; Levi, Micha; Smith, Patrick; Perelson, Alan S.

    2013-03-14

    The current paradigm for studying hepatitis C virus (HCV) dynamics in patients utilizes a standard viral dynamic model that keeps track of uninfected (target) cells, infected cells, and virus. The model does not account for the dynamics of intracellular viral replication, which is the major target of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs). In this paper, we describe and study a recently developed multiscale age-structured model that explicitly considers the potential effects of DAAs on intracellular viral RNA production, degradation, and secretion as virus into the circulation. We show that when therapy significantly blocks both intracellular viral RNA production and virus secretion,more » the serum viral load decline has three phases, with slopes reflecting the rate of serum viral clearance, the rate of loss of intracellular viral RNA, and the rate of loss of intracellular replication templates and infected cells, respectively. We also derive analytical approximations of the multiscale model and use one of them to analyze data from patients treated for 14 days with the HCV protease inhibitor danoprevir. Analysis suggests that danoprevir significantly blocks intracellular viral production (with mean effectiveness 99.2%), enhances intracellular viral RNA degradation about 5-fold, and moderately inhibits viral secretion (with mean effectiveness 56%). Finally, the multiscale model can be used to study viral dynamics in patients treated with other DAAs and explore their mechanisms of action in treatment of hepatitis C.« less

  6. Analysis of Hepatitis C Virus Decline during Treatment with the Protease Inhibitor Danoprevir Using a Multiscale Model

    SciTech Connect

    Rong, Libin; Guedj, Jeremie; Dahari, Harel; Coffield, Daniel J.; Levi, Micha; Smith, Patrick; Perelson, Alan S.

    2013-03-14

    The current paradigm for studying hepatitis C virus (HCV) dynamics in patients utilizes a standard viral dynamic model that keeps track of uninfected (target) cells, infected cells, and virus. The model does not account for the dynamics of intracellular viral replication, which is the major target of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs). In this paper, we describe and study a recently developed multiscale age-structured model that explicitly considers the potential effects of DAAs on intracellular viral RNA production, degradation, and secretion as virus into the circulation. We show that when therapy significantly blocks both intracellular viral RNA production and virus secretion, the serum viral load decline has three phases, with slopes reflecting the rate of serum viral clearance, the rate of loss of intracellular viral RNA, and the rate of loss of intracellular replication templates and infected cells, respectively. We also derive analytical approximations of the multiscale model and use one of them to analyze data from patients treated for 14 days with the HCV protease inhibitor danoprevir. Analysis suggests that danoprevir significantly blocks intracellular viral production (with mean effectiveness 99.2%), enhances intracellular viral RNA degradation about 5-fold, and moderately inhibits viral secretion (with mean effectiveness 56%). Finally, the multiscale model can be used to study viral dynamics in patients treated with other DAAs and explore their mechanisms of action in treatment of hepatitis C.

  7. Role of antigen presenting cell invariant chain in the development of hepatic steatosis in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Alaknanda; Iyer, Srikanth; Kesarwani, Ashwani; Baligar, Prakash; Arya, Satya Pal; Arindkar, Shailendra; Kumar, M J Mahesh; Upadhyay, Pramod; Majumdar, Subeer S; Nagarajan, Perumal

    2016-08-15

    The role of Invariant chain (CD74 or Ii) in antigen presentation via Antigen Presenting Cells (APC), macrophage recruitment as well as survival, T cell activation and B cell differentiation has been well recognized. However, the aspect of CD74 which is involved in the development of hepatic steatosis and the pathways through which it acts remain to be studied. In this study, we investigated the role of CD74 in the inflammatory pathway and its contribution to development of hepatic steatosis. For this, wild type C57BL/6J and CD74 deficient mice (Ii(-/-) mice) were fed with high fat high fructose (HFHF) diet for 12 weeks. Chronic consumption of this feed did not develop hepatic steatosis, glucose intolerance or change in the level of immune cells in Ii(-/-) mice. Moreover, there was relatively delayed expression of genes involved in development of non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in HFHF fed Ii(-/-) mice as compared to that of C57BL/6J phenotype. Taken together, the data suggest that HFHF diet fed Ii(-/-) mice fail to develop hepatic steatosis, suggesting that Ii mediated pathways play a vital role in the initiation and propagation of liver inflammation. PMID:27371158

  8. OVERVIEW OF AN INTERLABORATORY COLLABORATION ON EVALUATING THE EFFECTS OF MODEL HEPATOTOXICANTS ON HEPATIC GENE EXPRESSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluating the Effects of Methapyrilene and Clofibrate on Hepatic Gene Expression: A Collaboration Between Laboratories and a Comparison of Platform and Analytical Approaches

    Roger G. Ulrich1, John C. Rockett2, G. Gordon Gibson3 and Syril Pettit4

    1 Rosetta Inpharmat...

  9. Genistein Attenuates Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis and Increases Hepatic PPARγ in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Susutlertpanya, Warinda; Werawatganon, Duangporn; Siriviriyakul, Prasong; Klaikeaw, Naruemon

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) has become a global chronic liver disease, but no effective medicine has been proven to cure it. This study investigated the protective effects of genistein, a phytoestrogen, on NASH and examined whether it has any effect on hepatic PPARγ. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: control group fed ad libitum with standard rat diet, NASH group fed ad libitum with high-fat diet to induce NASH and NASH + Gen8 group and NASH + Gen16 group fed with high-fat diet plus intragastric administration of 8 or 16 mg/kg genistein once daily. After 6 weeks, liver samples were collected to determine MDA, TNF-α, PPARγ, and histopathology. The findings were that levels of hepatic MDA and TNF-α increased in NASH group, but 16 mg/kg genistein reduced these levels significantly. Downregulation of hepatic PPARγ was observed in NASH group, but genistein significantly upregulated the expression of PPARγ in both NASH + Gen groups. The histological appearance of liver in NASH group presented pathological features of steatohepatitis which were diminished in both NASH + Gen groups. The results suggest that genistein attenuates the liver histopathology of NASH with upregulation of hepatic PPARγ, reduction of oxidative stress, and inhibition of inflammatory cytokine. PMID:26246839

  10. Experimental transmission of equine hepacivirus in horses as a model for hepatitis C virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Equine hepacivirus (EHCV; non-primate hepacivirus) is a hepatotropic member of the Flaviviridae family that infects horses. Although EHCV is the closest known relative to hepatitis C virus (HCV), its complete replication kinetics in vivo have not been described, and direct evidence that it causes he...

  11. FXR-dependent reduction of hepatic steatosis in a bile salt deficient mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kunne, Cindy; Acco, Alexandra; Duijst, Suzanne; de Waart, Dirk R; Paulusma, Coen C; Gaemers, Ingrid; Oude Elferink, Ronald P J

    2014-05-01

    It has been established that bile salts play a role in the regulation of hepatic lipid metabolism. Accordingly, overt signs of steatosis have been observed in mice with reduced bile salt synthesis. The aim of this study was to identify the mechanism of hepatic steatosis in mice with bile salt deficiency due to a liver specific disruption of cytochrome P450 reductase. In this study mice lacking hepatic cytochrome P450 reductase (Hrn) or wild type (WT) mice were fed a diet supplemented with or without either 0.1% cholic acid (CA) or 0.025% obeticholic acid, a specific FXR-agonist. Feeding a CA-supplemented diet resulted in a significant decrease of plasma ALT in Hrn mice. Histologically, hepatic steatosis ameliorated after CA feeding and this was confirmed by reduced hepatic triglyceride content (115.5±7.3mg/g liver and 47.9±4.6mg/g liver in control- and CA-fed Hrn mice, respectively). The target genes of FXR-signaling were restored to normal levels in Hrn mice when fed cholic acid. VLDL secretion in both control and CA-fed Hrn mice was reduced by 25% compared to that in WT mice. In order to gain insight in the mechanism behind these bile salt effects, the FXR agonist also was administered for 3weeks. This resulted in a similar decrease in liver triglycerides, indicating that the effect seen in bile salt fed Hrn animals is FXR dependent. In conclusion, steatosis in Hrn mice is ameliorated when mice are fed bile salts. This effect is FXR dependent. Triglyceride accumulation in Hrn liver may partly involve impaired VLDL secretion. PMID:24548803

  12. Dynamics of hepatic gene expression and serum cytokine profiles in single and double-hit burn and sepsis animal models

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Rohit; Orman, Mehmet A.; Berthiaume, Francois; Androulakis, Ioannis P.

    2015-01-01

    We simulate the pathophysiology of severe burn trauma and burn-induced sepsis, using rat models of experimental burn injury and cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) either individually (singe-hit model) or in combination (double-hit model). The experimental burn injury simulates a systemic but sterile pro-inflammatory response, while the CLP simulates the effect of polymicrobial sepsis. Given the liver׳s central role in mediating the host immune response and onset of hypermetabolism after burn injury, elucidating the alterations in hepatic gene expression in response to injury can lead to a better understanding of the regulation of the inflammatory response, whereas circulating cytokine protein expression, reflects key systemic inflammatory mediators. In this article, we present both the hepatic gene expression and circulating cytokine/chemokine protein expression data for the above-mentioned experimental model to gain insights into the temporal dynamics of the inflammatory and hypermetabolic response following burn and septic injury. This data article supports results discussed in research articles (Yang et al., 2012 [1,4]; Mattick et al. 2012, 2013 [2,3]; Nguyen et al., 2014 [5]; Orman et al., 2011, 2012 [6–8]). PMID:26217749

  13. Quantification of Hepatitis C Virus Cell-to-Cell Spread Using a Stochastic Modeling Approach

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Danyelle N.; Perelson, Alan S.; Dahari, Harel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT It has been proposed that viral cell-to-cell transmission plays a role in establishing and maintaining chronic infections. Thus, understanding the mechanisms and kinetics of cell-to-cell spread is fundamental to elucidating the dynamics of infection and may provide insight into factors that determine chronicity. Because hepatitis C virus (HCV) spreads from cell to cell and has a chronicity rate of up to 80% in exposed individuals, we examined the dynamics of HCV cell-to-cell spread in vitro and quantified the effect of inhibiting individual host factors. Using a multidisciplinary approach, we performed HCV spread assays and assessed the appropriateness of different stochastic models for describing HCV focus expansion. To evaluate the effect of blocking specific host cell factors on HCV cell-to-cell transmission, assays were performed in the presence of blocking antibodies and/or small-molecule inhibitors targeting different cellular HCV entry factors. In all experiments, HCV-positive cells were identified by immunohistochemical staining and the number of HCV-positive cells per focus was assessed to determine focus size. We found that HCV focus expansion can best be explained by mathematical models assuming focus size-dependent growth. Consistent with previous reports suggesting that some factors impact HCV cell-to-cell spread to different extents, modeling results estimate a hierarchy of efficacies for blocking HCV cell-to-cell spread when targeting different host factors (e.g., CLDN1 > NPC1L1 > TfR1). This approach can be adapted to describe focus expansion dynamics under a variety of experimental conditions as a means to quantify cell-to-cell transmission and assess the impact of cellular factors, viral factors, and antivirals. IMPORTANCE The ability of viruses to efficiently spread by direct cell-to-cell transmission is thought to play an important role in the establishment and maintenance of viral persistence. As such, elucidating the dynamics of cell

  14. Application of a Combined Model with Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) and Generalized Regression Neural Network (GRNN) in Forecasting Hepatitis Incidence in Heng County, China

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Hao; Gao, Lian; Liang, Bingyu; Huang, Jiegang; Zang, Ning; Liao, Yanyan; Yu, Jun; Lai, Jingzhen; Qin, Fengxiang; Su, Jinming; Ye, Li; Chen, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatitis is a serious public health problem with increasing cases and property damage in Heng County. It is necessary to develop a model to predict the hepatitis epidemic that could be useful for preventing this disease. Methods The autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model and the generalized regression neural network (GRNN) model were used to fit the incidence data from the Heng County CDC (Center for Disease Control and Prevention) from January 2005 to December 2012. Then, the ARIMA-GRNN hybrid model was developed. The incidence data from January 2013 to December 2013 were used to validate the models. Several parameters, including mean absolute error (MAE), root mean square error (RMSE), mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) and mean square error (MSE), were used to compare the performance among the three models. Results The morbidity of hepatitis from Jan 2005 to Dec 2012 has seasonal variation and slightly rising trend. The ARIMA(0,1,2)(1,1,1)12 model was the most appropriate one with the residual test showing a white noise sequence. The smoothing factor of the basic GRNN model and the combined model was 1.8 and 0.07, respectively. The four parameters of the hybrid model were lower than those of the two single models in the validation. The parameters values of the GRNN model were the lowest in the fitting of the three models. Conclusions The hybrid ARIMA-GRNN model showed better hepatitis incidence forecasting in Heng County than the single ARIMA model and the basic GRNN model. It is a potential decision-supportive tool for controlling hepatitis in Heng County. PMID:27258555

  15. Hepatitis B Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a combination product containing Hepatitis A Vaccine, Hepatitis B Vaccine) ... What is hepatitis B?Hepatitis B is a serious infection that affects the liver. It is caused by the hepatitis B virus. ...

  16. Hepatitis A Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Twinrix® (as a combination product containing Hepatitis A Vaccine, Hepatitis B Vaccine) ... What is hepatitis A?Hepatitis A is a serious liver disease caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). HAV is found in ...

  17. Hepatitis C: Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Public Home » Hepatitis C » Treatment Decisions Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... can I find out about participating in a hepatitis C clinical trial? Many trials are being conducted ...

  18. Autoimmune hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... diseases. These include: Graves disease Inflammatory bowel disease Rheumatoid arthritis Scleroderma Sjogren syndrome Systemic lupus erythematosus Thyroiditis Type 1 diabetes Ulcerative colitis Autoimmune hepatitis may occur in family ...

  19. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Hepatitis B HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Influenza (Flu) Measles Meningococcal Disease Mumps Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Pneumococcal Disease Rubella (German Measles) Shingles (Herpes Zoster) Tetanus (Lockjaw) Professional Resources Adult ...

  20. Hepatic arterial administration of sorafenib and iodized oil effectively attenuates tumor growth and intrahepatic metastasis in rabbit VX2 hepatocellular carcinoma model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Liu, Feng-Yong; Fu, Jin-Xin; Duan, Feng; Fan, Qing-Sheng; Wang, Mao-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the therapeutic effect of the hepatic arterial administration of sorafenib in rabbit VX-2 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) model. Methods: Rabbit VX-2 HCC models were established via implanting VX-2 tumors into the livers, and randomly divided into four groups, respectively treated with (1) The hepatic arterial administration of iodized oil alone (TACE-i), (2) The hepatic arterial administration of iodized oil and pharmorubicin (TACE-ip), (3) The hepatic arterial administration of iodized and cis-DDP (TACE-ic), (4) The hepatic arterial administration of iodized and sorafenib (TACE-is). The growth rate and intrahepatic metastasis of implanted VX-2 tumor in each rabbit were measured. Microvessel density (MVD) in the adjacent tissues of implanted VX-2 tumor were estimated by detecting the expression of CD34 and VEGF level in tumor adjacent tissues were also examined by Immunohistochemistry. Results: Compared with other groups, TACE-is treatment group presented a better effect on inhibiting tumor growth rate and intrahepatic metastasis in rabbit VX-2 HCC model. The angiogenesis (assessed by MVD) in the adjacent tissues were suppressed more dramatically in TACE-is treated group. Moreover, TACE-is treatment did not significantly increase the levels of alanine transaminase and creatinine compared to the group with TACE-i treatment. Conclusion: The hepatic arterial administration of sorafenib and iodized oil (TACE-is) effectively attenuates tumor growth and intrahepatic metastasis in rabbit VX-2 HCC model without obvious hepatic and renal toxicity. One of the related mechanisms may be due to the inhibition of angiogenesis in the adjacent tissues. Our data indicated that TACE-is may be a secure and effective treatment for HCC. PMID:25550815

  1. A physiologically-based flow network model for hepatic drug elimination I: regular lattice lobule model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We develop a physiologically-based lattice model for the transport and metabolism of drugs in the functional unit of the liver, called the lobule. In contrast to earlier studies, we have emphasized the dominant role of convection in well-vascularized tissue with a given structure. Estimates of convective, diffusive and reaction contributions are given. We have compared drug concentration levels observed exiting the lobule with their predicted detailed distribution inside the lobule, assuming that most often the former is accessible information while the latter is not. PMID:24007328

  2. Deficient copper concentrations in dried-defatted hepatic tissue from ob/ob mice: A potential model for study of defective copper regulation in metabolic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Church, Stephanie J.; Begley, Paul; Kureishy, Nina; McHarg, Selina; Bishop, Paul N.; Bechtold, David A.; Unwin, Richard D.; Cooper, Garth J.S.

    2015-01-01

    Ob/ob mice provide an animal model for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease/non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NAFLD/NASH) in patients with obesity and type-2 diabetes. Low liver copper has been linked to hepatic lipid build-up (steatosis) in animals with systemic copper deficiency caused by low-copper diets. However, hepatic copper status in patients with NAFLD or NASH is uncertain, and a validated animal model useful for the study of hepatic copper regulation in common forms of metabolic liver disease is lacking. Here, we report parallel measurements of essential metal levels in whole-liver tissue and defatted-dried liver tissue from ob/ob and non-obese control mice. Measurements in whole-liver tissue from ob/ob mice at an age when they have developed NAFLD/NASH, provide compelling evidence for factitious lowering of copper and all other essential metals by steatosis, and so cannot be used to study hepatic metal regulation in this model. By marked contrast, metal measurements in defatted-dried liver samples reveal that most essential metals were actually normal and indicate specific lowering of copper in ob/ob mice, consistent with hepatic copper deficiency. Thus ob/ob mice can provide a model useful for the study of copper regulation in NAFLD and NASH, provided levels are measured in defatted-dried liver tissue. PMID:25797622

  3. A lipidomics study reveals hepatic lipid signatures associating with deficiency of the LDL receptor in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Chao; Hu, Chunxiu; Xie, Bingxian; Du, Yinan; Chen, Liang; Yang, Wei; Yang, Liu; Chen, Qiaoli; Shen, Bin; Hu, Bian; Zheng, Zhihong; Zhu, Haibo; Huang, Xingxu; Xu, Guowang; Chen, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) plays a critical role in the liver for the clearance of plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Its deficiency causes hypercholesterolemia in many models. To facilitate the usage of rats as animal models for the discovery of cholesterol-lowering drugs, we took a genetic approach to delete the LDLR in rats aiming to increase plasma LDL cholesterol (LDL-C). An LDLR knockout rat was generated via zinc-finger nuclease technology, which harbors a 19-basepair deletion in the seventh exon of the ldlr gene. As expected, deletion of the LDLR elevated total cholesterol and total triglyceride in the plasma, and caused a tenfold increase of plasma LDL-C and a fourfold increase of plasma very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL-C). A lipidomics analysis revealed that deletion of the LDLR affected hepatic lipid metabolism, particularly lysophosphatidylcholines, free fatty acids and sphingolipids in the liver. Cholesterol ester (CE) 20:4 also displayed a significant increase in the LDLR knockout rats. Taken together, the LDLR knockout rat offers a new model of hypercholesterolemia, and the lipidomics analysis reveals hepatic lipid signatures associating with deficiency of the LDL receptor. PMID:27378433

  4. A lipidomics study reveals hepatic lipid signatures associating with deficiency of the LDL receptor in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong Yu; Quan, Chao; Hu, Chunxiu; Xie, Bingxian; Du, Yinan; Chen, Liang; Yang, Wei; Yang, Liu; Chen, Qiaoli; Shen, Bin; Hu, Bian; Zheng, Zhihong; Zhu, Haibo; Huang, Xingxu; Xu, Guowang; Chen, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) plays a critical role in the liver for the clearance of plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Its deficiency causes hypercholesterolemia in many models. To facilitate the usage of rats as animal models for the discovery of cholesterol-lowering drugs, we took a genetic approach to delete the LDLR in rats aiming to increase plasma LDL cholesterol (LDL-C). An LDLR knockout rat was generated via zinc-finger nuclease technology, which harbors a 19-basepair deletion in the seventh exon of the ldlr gene. As expected, deletion of the LDLR elevated total cholesterol and total triglyceride in the plasma, and caused a tenfold increase of plasma LDL-C and a fourfold increase of plasma very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL-C). A lipidomics analysis revealed that deletion of the LDLR affected hepatic lipid metabolism, particularly lysophosphatidylcholines, free fatty acids and sphingolipids in the liver. Cholesterol ester (CE) 20:4 also displayed a significant increase in the LDLR knockout rats. Taken together, the LDLR knockout rat offers a new model of hypercholesterolemia, and the lipidomics analysis reveals hepatic lipid signatures associating with deficiency of the LDL receptor. PMID:27378433

  5. Intrahepatic Transcriptional Signature Associated with Response to Interferon-α Treatment in the Woodchuck Model of Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Simon P.; Chin, Daniel J.; Gruenbaum, Lore; Bitter, Hans; Rasmussen, Erik; Ravindran, Palanikumar; Swinney, David C.; Birzele, Fabian; Schmucki, Roland; Lorenz, Stefan H.; Kopetzki, Erhard; Carter, Jade; Triyatni, Miriam; Thampi, Linta M.; Yang, Junming; AlDeghaither, Dalal; Murredu, Marta G.; Cote, Paul; Menne, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant interferon-alpha (IFN-α) is an approved therapy for chronic hepatitis B (CHB), but the molecular basis of treatment response remains to be determined. The woodchuck model of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection displays many characteristics of human disease and has been extensively used to evaluate antiviral therapeutics. In this study, woodchucks with chronic woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) infection were treated with recombinant woodchuck IFN-α (wIFN-α) or placebo (n = 12/group) for 15 weeks. Treatment with wIFN-α strongly reduced viral markers in the serum and liver in a subset of animals, with viral rebound typically being observed following cessation of treatment. To define the intrahepatic cellular and molecular characteristics of the antiviral response to wIFN-α, we characterized the transcriptional profiles of liver biopsies taken from animals (n = 8–12/group) at various times during the study. Unexpectedly, this revealed that the antiviral response to treatment did not correlate with intrahepatic induction of the majority of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) by wIFN-α. Instead, treatment response was associated with the induction of an NK/T cell signature in the liver, as well as an intrahepatic IFN-γ transcriptional response and elevation of liver injury biomarkers. Collectively, these data suggest that NK/T cell cytolytic and non-cytolytic mechanisms mediate the antiviral response to wIFN-α treatment. In summary, by studying recombinant IFN-α in a fully immunocompetent animal model of CHB, we determined that the immunomodulatory effects, but not the direct antiviral activity, of this pleiotropic cytokine are most closely correlated with treatment response. This has important implications for the rational design of new therapeutics for the treatment of CHB. PMID:26352406

  6. Intrahepatic Transcriptional Signature Associated with Response to Interferon-α Treatment in the Woodchuck Model of Chronic Hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Simon P; Chin, Daniel J; Gruenbaum, Lore; Bitter, Hans; Rasmussen, Erik; Ravindran, Palanikumar; Swinney, David C; Birzele, Fabian; Schmucki, Roland; Lorenz, Stefan H; Kopetzki, Erhard; Carter, Jade; Triyatni, Miriam; Thampi, Linta M; Yang, Junming; AlDeghaither, Dalal; Murreddu, Marta G; Murredu, Marta G; Cote, Paul; Menne, Stephan

    2015-09-01

    Recombinant interferon-alpha (IFN-α) is an approved therapy for chronic hepatitis B (CHB), but the molecular basis of treatment response remains to be determined. The woodchuck model of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection displays many characteristics of human disease and has been extensively used to evaluate antiviral therapeutics. In this study, woodchucks with chronic woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) infection were treated with recombinant woodchuck IFN-α (wIFN-α) or placebo (n = 12/group) for 15 weeks. Treatment with wIFN-α strongly reduced viral markers in the serum and liver in a subset of animals, with viral rebound typically being observed following cessation of treatment. To define the intrahepatic cellular and molecular characteristics of the antiviral response to wIFN-α, we characterized the transcriptional profiles of liver biopsies taken from animals (n = 8-12/group) at various times during the study. Unexpectedly, this revealed that the antiviral response to treatment did not correlate with intrahepatic induction of the majority of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) by wIFN-α. Instead, treatment response was associated with the induction of an NK/T cell signature in the liver, as well as an intrahepatic IFN-γ transcriptional response and elevation of liver injury biomarkers. Collectively, these data suggest that NK/T cell cytolytic and non-cytolytic mechanisms mediate the antiviral response to wIFN-α treatment. In summary, by studying recombinant IFN-α in a fully immunocompetent animal model of CHB, we determined that the immunomodulatory effects, but not the direct antiviral activity, of this pleiotropic cytokine are most closely correlated with treatment response. This has important implications for the rational design of new therapeutics for the treatment of CHB. PMID:26352406

  7. INACTIVATION OF HEPATITIS A VIRUS AND MODEL VIRUSES IN WATER BY FREE CHLORINE AND MONOCHLORAMINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The kinetics and extent of inactivation of hepatitis A virus (HAV) as well as three other viruses, coxsackievirus B5 (CB5) and coliphages MS2 and X174, by 0.5 mg/l free chlorine, pH 6-10, and 10 mg/1 monochloramine, pH8, in 0.01 M phosphate buffer were determined. These results i...

  8. Brain concentrations of benzodiazepines are elevated in an animal model of hepatic encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Basile, A.S.; Pannell, L.; Jaouni, T.; Gammal, S.H.; Fales, H.M.; Jones, E.A.; Skolnick, P. )

    1990-07-01

    Brain extracts from rats with hepatic encephalopathy due to thioacetamide-induced fulminant hepatic failure contained 4- to 6-fold higher concentrations of substances that inhibit radioligand binding to benzodiazepine receptors than corresponding control rat extracts. Both isocratic and gradient-elution HPLC indicated that this inhibitory activity was localized in 3-8 peaks with retention times corresponding to deschlorodiazepam, deschlorolorazepam, lorazepam, oxazepam, diazepam, and N-desmethyldiazepam. The presence of diazepam and N-desmethyldiazepam was confirmed by mass spectroscopy. Both mass spectroscopic and radiometric techniques indicated that the concentrations of N-desmethyldiazepam and diazepam in brain extracts from encephalopathic rats were 2-9 and 5-7 times higher, respectively, than in control brain extracts. While benzodiazepines have been identified previously in mammalian and plant tissues, this report demonstrates that concentrations of these substances are increased in a pathophysiological condition. These findings provide a rational basis for the use of benzodiazepine receptor antagonists in the management of hepatic encephalopathy in humans.

  9. Akt2 is required for hepatic lipid accumulation in models of insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Leavens, Karla F.; Easton, Rachael M.; Shulman, Gerald I.; Previs, Stephen F.; Birnbaum, Morris J.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Insulin drives the global anabolic response to nutrient ingestion, regulating both carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Previous studies have demonstrated that Akt2/protein kinase B is critical to insulin’s control of glucose metabolism, but its role in lipid metabolism has remained controversial. Here we show that Akt2 is required for hepatic lipid accumulation in obese, insulin-resistant states induced by either leptin-deficiency or high fat diet feeding. Lepob/ob mice lacking hepatic Akt2 failed to amass triglycerides in their livers, associated with and most likely due to a decrease in lipogenic gene expression and de novo lipogenesis. However, Akt2 is also required for steatotic pathways unrelated to fatty acid synthesis, as mice fed high fat diet had reduced liver triglycerides in the absence of hepatic Akt2 but did not exhibit changes in lipogenesis. These data demonstrate that Akt2 is a requisite component of the insulin-dependent regulation of lipid metabolism during insulin resistance. PMID:19883618

  10. Antiviral activity and toxicity of fialuridine in the woodchuck model of hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Tennant, B C; Baldwin, B H; Graham, L A; Ascenzi, M A; Hornbuckle, W E; Rowland, P H; Tochkov, I A; Yeager, A E; Erb, H N; Colacino, J M; Lopez, C; Engelhardt, J A; Bowsher, R R; Richardson, F C; Lewis, W; Cote, P J; Korba, B E; Gerin, J L

    1998-07-01

    Woodchucks were used to study the antiviral activity and toxicity of fialuridine (FIAU; 1,-2'deoxy-2'fluoro-1-beta-D-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodo-uracil). In an initial experiment, groups of six chronic woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) carrier woodchucks received daily doses of FIAU by intraperitoneal injection for 4 weeks. At 0.3 mg/kg/d, the antiviral effect was equivocal, but at 1.5 mg/kg/d, FIAU had significant antiviral activity. No evidence of drug toxicity was observed during the 4-week period of treatment or during posttreatment follow-up. In a second experiment, groups of nine WHV carriers or uninfected woodchucks were given 1.5 mg/kg/d of FIAU orally for 12 weeks, and the results compared with placebo-treated controls. After 4 weeks, the serum WHV-DNA concentration in the FIAU-treated carrier group was two to three logs lower than that in the placebo-treated group. After 12 weeks of FIAU treatment, serum WHV DNA was not detectable by conventional dot-blot analysis, hepatic WHV-DNA replicative intermediates (RI) had decreased 100-fold, and hepatic expression of WHV core antigen was remarkably decreased. No evidence of toxicity was observed after 4 weeks, but, after 6 to 7 weeks, food intake decreased and, after 8 weeks, the mean body weights of woodchucks treated with FIAU were significantly lower than controls. Anorexia, weight loss, muscle wasting, and lethargy became progressively severe, and all FIAU-treated woodchucks died or were euthanized 78 to 111 days after treatment began. Hepatic insufficiency (hyperbilirubinemia, decreased serum fibrinogen, elevated prothrombin time), lactic acidosis, and hepatic steatosis were characteristic findings in the final stages of FIAU toxicity in woodchucks. The syndrome of delayed toxicity in woodchucks was similar to that observed previously in humans treated with FIAU, suggesting that the woodchuck should be valuable in future investigations of the molecular mechanisms of FIAU toxicity in vivo and for preclinical

  11. The effect of cocoa supplementation on hepatic steatosis, reactive oxygen species and LFABP in a rat model of NASH

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Non alcoholic steatohepatitis is hypothesised to develop via a mechanism involving fat accumulation and oxidative stress. The current study aimed to investigate if an increase in oxidative stress was associated with changes in the expression of liver fatty acid binding protein in a rat model of non alcoholic steatohepatitis and whether cocoa supplementation attenuated those changes. Methods Female Sprague Dawley rats were fed a high fat control diet, a high fat methionine choline deficient diet, or one of four 12.5% cocoa supplementation regimes in combination with the high fat methionine choline deficient diet. Results Liver fatty acid binding protein mRNA and protein levels were reduced in the liver of animals with fatty liver disease when compared to controls. Increased hepatic fat content was accompanied by higher levels of oxidative stress in animals with fatty liver disease when compared to controls. An inverse association was found between the levels of hepatic liver fatty acid binding protein and the level of hepatic oxidative stress in fatty liver disease. Elevated NADPH oxidase protein levels were detected in the liver of animals with increased severity in inflammation and fibrosis. Cocoa supplementation was associated with partial attenuation of these pathological changes, although the severity of liver disease induced by the methionine choline deficient diet prevented complete reversal of any disease associated changes. Red blood cell glutathione was increased by cocoa supplementation, whereas liver glutathione was reduced by cocoa compared to methionine choline deficient diet fed animals. Conclusion These findings suggest a potential role for liver fatty acid binding protein and NADPH oxidase in the development of non alcoholic steatohepatitis. Furthermore, cocoa supplementation may have be of therapeutic benefit in less sever forms of NASH. PMID:22081873

  12. Nine scoring models for short-term mortality in alcoholic hepatitis: cross-validation in a biopsy-proven cohort

    PubMed Central

    Papastergiou, V; Tsochatzis, E A; Pieri, G; Thalassinos, E; Dhar, A; Bruno, S; Karatapanis, S; Luong, T V; O'Beirne, J; Patch, D; Thorburn, D; Burroughs, A K

    2014-01-01

    Background Several prognostic models have emerged in alcoholic hepatitis (AH), but lack of external validation precludes their universal use. Aim To validate the Maddrey Discriminant Function (DF); Glasgow Alcoholic Hepatitis Score (GAHS); Mayo End-stage Liver Disease (MELD); Age, Bilirubin, INR, Creatinine (ABIC); MELD-Na, UK End-stage Liver Disease (UKELD), and three scores of corticosteroid response at 1 week: an Early Change in Bilirubin Levels (ECBL), a 25% fall in bilirubin, and the Lille score. Methods Seventy-one consecutive patients with biopsy-proven AH, admitted between November 2007-September 2011, were evaluated. The clinical and biochemical parameters were analysed to assess prognostic models with respect to 30- and 90-day mortality. Results There were no significant differences in the areas under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUROCs) relative to 30-day/90-day mortality: MELD 0.79/0.84, DF 0.71/0.74, GAHS 0.75/0.78, ABIC 0.71/0.78, MELD-Na 0.68/0.76, UKELD 0.56/0.68. One-week rescoring yielded a trend towards improved predictive accuracies (30-day/90-day AUROCs: 0.69–0.84/0.77–0.86). In patients with admission DF ≥32 (n = 31), response to corticosteroids according to ECBL, 25% fall in bilirubin and the Lille model yielded AUROCs of 0.73/0.73, 0.78/0.72 and 0.81/0.82 for a 30-day/90-day outcome respectively. All models showed excellent negative predictive values (NPVs; range: 86–100%), while the positive ones were low (range: 17–50%). Conclusions MELD, DF, GAHS, ABIC and scores of corticosteroid response proved to be valid in an independent cohort of biopsy-proven alcoholic hepatitis. MELD modifications incorporating sodium did not confer any prognostic advantage over classical MELD. Based on excellent NPVs, the models are best to identify patients at low risk of death. PMID:24612165

  13. Estimating Functional Liver Reserve Following Hepatic Irradiation: Adaptive Normal Tissue Response Models

    PubMed Central

    Stenmark, Matthew H.; Cao, Yue; Wang, Hesheng; Jackson, Andrew; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Feng, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To estimate the limit of functional liver reserve for safe application of hepatic irradiation using changes in indocyanine green, an established assay of liver function. Materials and Methods From 2005–2011, 60 patients undergoing hepatic irradiation were enrolled in a prospective study assessing the plasma retention fraction of indocyanine green at 15-min (ICG-R15) prior to, during (at 60% of planned dose), and after radiotherapy (RT). The limit of functional liver reserve was estimated from the damage fraction of functional liver (DFL) post-RT [1−(ICG-R15pre-RT/ICG-R15post-RT)] where no toxicity was observed using a beta distribution function. Results Of 48 evaluable patients, 3 (6%) developed RILD, all within 2.5 months of completing RT. The mean ICG-R15 for non-RILD patients pre-RT, during-RT and 1-month post-RT was 20.3%(SE 2.6), 22.0%(3.0), and 27.5%(2.8), and for RILD patients was 6.3%(4.3), 10.8%(2.7), and 47.6%(8.8). RILD was observed at post-RT damage fractions of ≥78%. Both DFL assessed by during-RT ICG and MLD predicted for DFL post-RT (p<0.0001). Limiting the post-RT DFL to 50%, predicted a 99% probability of a true complication rate <15%. Conclusion The DFL as assessed by changes in ICG during treatment serves as an early indicator of a patient’s tolerance to hepatic irradiation. PMID:24813090

  14. A Proteomic Investigation of Hepatic Resistance to Ascaris in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Deslyper, Gwendoline; Colgan, Thomas J.; Cooper, Andrew J. R.; Holland, Celia V.; Carolan, James C.

    2016-01-01

    The helminth Ascaris causes ascariasis in both humans and pigs. Humans, especially children, experience significant morbidity including respiratory complications, growth deficits and intestinal obstruction. Given that 800 million people worldwide are infected by Ascaris, this represents a significant global public health concern. The severity of the symptoms and associated morbidity are related to the parasite burden and not all hosts are infected equally. While the pathology of the disease has been extensively examined, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance and susceptibility to this nematode infection is poor. In order to investigate host differences associated with heavy and light parasite burden, an experimental murine model was developed utilising Ascaris-susceptible and -resistant mice strains, C57BL/6J and CBA/Ca, respectively, which experience differential burdens of migratory Ascaris larvae in the host lungs. Previous studies identified the liver as the site where this difference in susceptibility occurs. Using a label free quantitative proteomic approach, we analysed the hepatic proteomes of day four post infection C57BL/6J and CBA/Ca mice with and without Ascaris infection to identify proteins changes potentially linked to both resistance and susceptibility amongst the two strains, respectively. Over 3000 proteins were identified in total and clear intrinsic differences were elucidated between the two strains. These included a higher abundance of mitochondrial proteins, particularly those associated with the oxidative phosphorylation pathway and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the relatively resistant CBA/Ca mice. We hypothesise that the increased ROS levels associated with higher levels of mitochondrial activity results in a highly oxidative cellular environment that has a dramatic effect on the nematode’s ability to successfully sustain a parasitic association with its resistant host. Under infection, both

  15. A Proteomic Investigation of Hepatic Resistance to Ascaris in a Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Deslyper, Gwendoline; Colgan, Thomas J; Cooper, Andrew J R; Holland, Celia V; Carolan, James C

    2016-08-01

    The helminth Ascaris causes ascariasis in both humans and pigs. Humans, especially children, experience significant morbidity including respiratory complications, growth deficits and intestinal obstruction. Given that 800 million people worldwide are infected by Ascaris, this represents a significant global public health concern. The severity of the symptoms and associated morbidity are related to the parasite burden and not all hosts are infected equally. While the pathology of the disease has been extensively examined, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance and susceptibility to this nematode infection is poor. In order to investigate host differences associated with heavy and light parasite burden, an experimental murine model was developed utilising Ascaris-susceptible and -resistant mice strains, C57BL/6J and CBA/Ca, respectively, which experience differential burdens of migratory Ascaris larvae in the host lungs. Previous studies identified the liver as the site where this difference in susceptibility occurs. Using a label free quantitative proteomic approach, we analysed the hepatic proteomes of day four post infection C57BL/6J and CBA/Ca mice with and without Ascaris infection to identify proteins changes potentially linked to both resistance and susceptibility amongst the two strains, respectively. Over 3000 proteins were identified in total and clear intrinsic differences were elucidated between the two strains. These included a higher abundance of mitochondrial proteins, particularly those associated with the oxidative phosphorylation pathway and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the relatively resistant CBA/Ca mice. We hypothesise that the increased ROS levels associated with higher levels of mitochondrial activity results in a highly oxidative cellular environment that has a dramatic effect on the nematode's ability to successfully sustain a parasitic association with its resistant host. Under infection, both

  16. Transplacental Transfer of Hepatitis B Neutralizing Antibody during Pregnancy in an Animal Model: Implications for Newborn and Maternal Health

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li; Norton, Malgorzata G.; Mahmood, Iftekhar; Zhao, Zhong; Zhong, Lilin; Zhang, Pei; Struble, Evi B.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the success of postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) of the newborn in preventing mother-to-child transmission of hepatitis B virus), in non-US clinical trials, administering hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG) to mothers at the end of pregnancy (in addition to passive-active PEP of the newborn) only partially improved outcomes. That is, a significant percentage of newborns became infected during their first year of life. We used a relevant animal model for human IgG transplacental transfer to study dose, time and subclass dependence of HBV neutralizing antibody (nAb) maternal, and fetal levels at the end of pregnancy. Pregnant guinea pigs received 50 or 100 IU/kg HBIGIV 2–5 days before delivery. Human total IgG, IgG subclasses, and nAb in mothers and their litters were measured. In vitro analyses of guinea pig Fc neonatal receptor binding to HBIGIV, as well as to all human IgG subclasses, were also performed. Our study showed that nAb transferred transplacentally from the pregnant guinea pigs to their litters; no transfer occurred during parturition. The amount of the transferred nAb was dose and time dependent. Thus, selection of an efficacious dose in the clinic is important: microdosing may be underdosing, particularly in cases of high viraemia. PMID:24800066

  17. Hepatocellular protein profiles after hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury with or without octreotide preconditioning in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Sun, H; Guan, R; Liu, W; Xia, Y; Zhao, J; Liu, J

    2014-12-01

    Hepatic ischemic/reperfusion injury (HIRI) is a major complication of liver resection and transplantation. Octreotide, a somatostatin analogue, has been used to treat hepatic fibrosis and portal hypertension; however, its function against HIRI remains unclear. To elucidate the effect of octreotide in HIRI, we investigated the hepatocellular protein profiles in response to octreotide preconditioning in a rabbit model by using proteomic analysis. Twenty-four rabbits were divided into 3 groups: the sham operative group (control), the ischemia/reperfusion group (IR), and the ischemia/reperfusion + octreotide group (IR+Oct). They were subjected to 30 minutes of normothermic ischemia followed by 120 minutes of reperfusion by using Pringle's maneuver method. Proteomic studies were then performed to compare the protein profiles of their left liver lobe. A total of 16 differential proteins were successfully identified. These findings suggest that octreotide might exert an effect against HIRI through up-regulating the expression of the anti-injury substances, such as heat-shock proteins 70 and 27 (confirmed by using Western blot analysis); significantly raising the phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein that alleviates IR-related apoptosis; and down-regulating mitochondrial metabolic enzymes such as NADH2 dehydrogenase and triosephosphate isomerase. PMID:25498038

  18. Protective Effect of Baccharis trimera Extract on Acute Hepatic Injury in a Model of Inflammation Induced by Acetaminophen

    PubMed Central

    Pádua, Bruno da Cruz; Rossoni Júnior, Joamyr Victor; de Brito Magalhães, Cíntia Lopes; Chaves, Míriam Martins; Silva, Marcelo Eustáquio; Pedrosa, Maria Lucia; de Souza, Gustavo Henrique Bianco; Brandão, Geraldo Célio; Rodrigues, Ivanildes Vasconcelos; Lima, Wanderson Geraldo; Costa, Daniela Caldeira

    2014-01-01

    Background. Acetaminophen (APAP) is a commonly used analgesic and antipyretic. When administered in high doses, APAP is a clinical problem in the US and Europe, often resulting in severe liver injury and potentially acute liver failure. Studies have demonstrated that antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents effectively protect against the acute hepatotoxicity induced by APAP overdose. Methods. The present study attempted to investigate the protective effect of B. trimera against APAP-induced hepatic damage in rats. The liver-function markers ALT and AST, biomarkers of oxidative stress, antioxidant parameters, and histopathological changes were examined. Results. The pretreatment with B. trimera attenuated serum activities of ALT and AST that were enhanced by administration of APAP. Furthermore, pretreatment with the extract decreases the activity of the enzyme SOD and increases the activity of catalase and the concentration of total glutathione. Histopathological analysis confirmed the alleviation of liver damage and reduced lesions caused by APAP. Conclusions. The hepatoprotective action of B. trimera extract may rely on its effect on reducing the oxidative stress caused by APAP-induced hepatic damage in a rat model. General Significance. These results make the extract of B. trimera a potential candidate drug capable of protecting the liver against damage caused by APAP overdose. PMID:25435714

  19. Resveratrol Ameliorates the Components of Hepatic Inflammation and Apoptosis in a Rat Model of Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pektaş, Mehmet Bilgehan; Sadi, Gökhan; Koca, Halit Bugra; Yuksel, Yasemin; Vurmaz, Ayhan; Koca, Tulay; Tosun, Murat

    2016-02-01

    Preclinical Research Trans-resveratrol has a wide range of biological effects that reflect its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticarcinogenic and cardioprotective properties. This study was conducted to elucidate the potential role of resveratrol on hepatic inflammation and the apoptotic pathway components Bcl-2, Bax and p53 in a streptozotocin (STZ)-induced rat model of diabetes mellitus. Inflammatory and apoptotic biomarkers indicated a reduction in hepatic erythropoietin (1.26-fold) and increased asymmetric dimethylarginine (3.9-fold), visfatin (1.6-fold), inflammatory interleukins and TNF-α contents (approximately twofold each) in the diabetic animals. Induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase gene (2.04-fold) and protein expression (1.24-fold) was also observed. Immunohistochemical studies showed enhancement of the apoptotic biomarkers Bax and p53 in diabetic animals. STZ-induced diabetic male Wistar rats were treated with resveratrol (20 mg/kg/day i.p.). Resveratrol succeeded to recover most of these inflammatory and apoptotic elements. Therefore, inflammatory and apoptotic pathways were proved to be affected by STZ-induced diabetes in several aspects and resveratrol might contribute hepatoprotective effects as evidenced from this study. PMID:26748675

  20. Modeling Suggests a Mechanism of Synergy Between Hepatitis C Virus Entry Inhibitors and Drugs of Other Classes

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, P; Dixit, NM

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) entry inhibitors (EIs) act synergistically with drugs targeting other stages of the HCV lifecycle. The origin of this synergy remains unknown. Here, we argue that the synergy may arise from the complementary activities of the drugs across cell subpopulations expressing different levels of HCV entry receptors. We employ mathematical modeling of viral kinetics in vitro, where cells with a distribution of entry receptor expression levels are exposed to HCV with or without drugs. The drugs act independently in each cell, as expected in the absence of underlying interactions. Yet, at the cell population level our model predicts that the drugs exhibit synergy. EIs effectively block infection of cells with low receptor levels. With high receptor levels, where EIs are compromised, other drugs are potent. This novel mechanism of synergy, arising at the cell population level may facilitate interpretation of drug activity and treatment optimization. PMID:26380153

  1. Modeling Suggests a Mechanism of Synergy Between Hepatitis C Virus Entry Inhibitors and Drugs of Other Classes.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, P; Dixit, N M

    2015-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) entry inhibitors (EIs) act synergistically with drugs targeting other stages of the HCV lifecycle. The origin of this synergy remains unknown. Here, we argue that the synergy may arise from the complementary activities of the drugs across cell subpopulations expressing different levels of HCV entry receptors. We employ mathematical modeling of viral kinetics in vitro, where cells with a distribution of entry receptor expression levels are exposed to HCV with or without drugs. The drugs act independently in each cell, as expected in the absence of underlying interactions. Yet, at the cell population level our model predicts that the drugs exhibit synergy. EIs effectively block infection of cells with low receptor levels. With high receptor levels, where EIs are compromised, other drugs are potent. This novel mechanism of synergy, arising at the cell population level may facilitate interpretation of drug activity and treatment optimization. PMID:26380153

  2. Airway oxidative stress causes vascular and hepatic inflammation via upregulation of IL-17A in a murine model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Al-Harbi, Naif O; Nadeem, Ahmed; Al-Harbi, Mohammed M; Ansari, Mushtaq A; AlSharari, Shakir D; Bahashwan, Saleh A; Attia, Sabry M; Al-Hosaini, Khaled A; Al Hoshani, Ali R; Ahmad, Sheikh F

    2016-05-01

    Oxidants are generated in asthmatic airways due to infiltration of inflammatory leukocytes and resident cells in the lung. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide and superoxide radical may leak into systemic circulation when generated in uncontrolled manner and may impact vasculature. Our previous studies have shown an association between airway inflammation and systemic inflammation; however so far none has investigated the impact of airway oxidative inflammation on hepatic oxidative stress and Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokine markers in liver/vasculature in a murine model of asthma. Therefore, this study investigated the contribution of oxidative stress encountered in asthmatic airways in modulation of systemic/hepatic Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines balance and hepatic oxidative stress. Mice were sensitized intraperitoneally with cockroach extract (CE) in the presence of aluminum hydroxide followed by several intranasal (i.n.) challenges with CE. Mice were then assessed for systemic/hepatic inflammation through assessment of Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines and oxidative stress (iNOS, protein nitrotyrosine, lipid peroxides and myeloperoxidase activity). Challenge with CE led to increased Th2/Th17 cytokines in blood/liver and hepatic oxidative stress. However, only Th17 related pro-inflammatory markers were upregulated by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) inhalation in vasculature and liver, whereas antioxidant treatment, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) downregulated them. Hepatic oxidative stress was also upregulated by H2O2 inhalation, whereas NAC attenuated it. Therefore, our study shows that airway oxidative inflammation may contribute to systemic inflammation through upregulation of Th17 immune responses in blood/liver and hepatic oxidative stress. This might predispose these patients to increased risk for the development of cardiovascular disorders. PMID:26953647

  3. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bleibel, Wissam; Al-Osaimi, Abdullah M. S.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic liver disease and cirrhosis affect hundreds of millions of patients all over the world. The majority of patients with cirrhosis will eventually develop complications related to portal hypertension. One of these recurrent and difficult to treat complications is hepatic encephalopathy. Studies have indicated that overt hepatic encephalopathy affects 30 to 45% of patients with cirrhosis and a higher percentage may be affected by minimal degree of encephalopathy. All of these factors add to the impact of hepatic encephalopathy on the healthcare system and presents a major challenge to the gastroenterologist, hospitalist and primary care physician. PMID:23006457

  4. Validation of Ten Noninvasive Diagnostic Models for Prediction of Liver Fibrosis in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jieyao; Hou, Jinlin; Ding, Huiguo; Chen, Guofeng; Xie, Qing; Wang, Yuming; Zeng, Minde; Ou, Xiaojuan; Ma, Hong; Jia, Jidong

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Noninvasive models have been developed for fibrosis assessment in patients with chronic hepatitis B. However, the sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy in evaluating liver fibrosis of these methods have not been validated and compared in the same group of patients. The aim of this study was to verify the diagnostic performance and reproducibility of ten reported noninvasive models in a large cohort of Asian CHB patients. Methods The diagnostic performance of ten noninvasive models (HALF index, FibroScan, S index, Zeng model, Youyi model, Hui model, APAG, APRI, FIB-4 and FibroTest) was assessed against the liver histology by ROC curve analysis in CHB patients. The reproducibility of the ten models were evaluated by recalculating the diagnostic values at the given cut-off values defined by the original studies. Results Six models (HALF index, FibroScan, Zeng model, Youyi model, S index and FibroTest) had AUROCs higher than 0.70 in predicting any fibrosis stage and 2 of them had best diagnostic performance with AUROCs to predict F≥2, F≥3 and F4 being 0.83, 0.89 and 0.89 for HALF index, 0.82, 0.87 and 0.87 for FibroScan, respectively. Four models (HALF index, FibroScan, Zeng model and Youyi model) showed good diagnostic values at given cut-offs. Conclusions HALF index, FibroScan, Zeng model, Youyi model, S index and FibroTest show a good diagnostic performance and all of them, except S index and FibroTest, have good reproducibility for evaluating liver fibrosis in CHB patients. Registration Number ChiCTR-DCS-07000039. PMID:26709706

  5. Gadolinium chloride, a Kupffer cell inhibitor, attenuates hepatic injury in a rat model of chronic cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Zandieh, Ali; Payabvash, Seyedmehedi; Pasalar, Parvin; Morteza, Afsaneh; Zandieh, Basira; Tavangar, Seyed Mohammad; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2011-11-01

    The aim of the current study was to elucidate the effect of Kupffer cells inhibition on hepatic injury induced by chronic cholestasis. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent bile duct ligation (BDL) or sham operation and were treated with either saline solution or gadolinium chloride (GdCl(3), a specific Kupffer cell inhibitor, 20 mg/kg i.p. daily). Serum and liver samples were collected after 28 days. Direct and total bilirubin concentrations and serum enzyme activities of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) increased following BDL (p < 0.01). On the contrary to bilirubin concentrations and AST activity, GdCl(3) partially prevented the elevation in ALP, ALT and GGT enzyme activities (p < 0.05). GdCl(3) alleviated lipid peroxidation (reflected by malondialdehyde [MDA] concentration) and increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes (i.e. catalase and glutathione peroxidase) in liver samples after BDL (p < 0.05). Fibrosis, ductular proliferation and portal inflammation were also scored in liver samples. Among morphological changes appeared following BDL (i.e. marked fibrosis, portal inflammation and ductular proliferation); only ductular proliferation was not alleviated by GdCl(3). Therefore, Kupffer cells inhibition has beneficial effects against the development of hepatic injury induced by chronic cholestasis. PMID:21339256

  6. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Change Plan Wallet card for patients to record their alcohol use over a 4-week period as a way to monitor and reduce their drinking behavior. Glossary Definitions of terms commonly used with viral hepatitis and ...

  7. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement. Ann Intern Med . 2014;161(1):58-66. PMID 24863637 ... Development Conference Statement: Management of hepatitis B. Ann Intern Med . 2009;150:104-10. PMID: 19124811 www. ...

  8. Hepatic Overexpression of Steroid Sulfatase Ameliorates Mouse Models of Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes through Sex-specific Mechanisms*

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Mengxi; He, Jinhan; Kucera, Heidi; Gaikwad, Nilesh W.; Zhang, Bin; Xu, Meishu; O'Doherty, Robert M.; Selcer, Kyle W.; Xie, Wen

    2014-01-01

    The steroid sulfatase (STS)-mediated desulfation is a critical metabolic mechanism that regulates the chemical and functional homeostasis of endogenous and exogenous molecules. In this report, we first showed that the liver expression of Sts was induced in both the high fat diet (HFD) and ob/ob models of obesity and type 2 diabetes and during the fed to fasting transition. In defining the functional relevance of STS induction in metabolic disease, we showed that overexpression of STS in the liver of transgenic mice alleviated HFD and ob/ob models of obesity and type 2 diabetes, including reduced body weight, improved insulin sensitivity, and decreased hepatic steatosis and inflammation. Interestingly, STS exerted its metabolic benefit through sex-specific mechanisms. In female mice, STS may have increased hepatic estrogen activity by converting biologically inactive estrogen sulfates to active estrogens and consequently improved the metabolic functions, whereas ovariectomy abolished this protective effect. In contrast, the metabolic benefit of STS in males may have been accounted for by the male-specific decrease of inflammation in white adipose tissue and skeletal muscle as well as a pattern of skeletal muscle gene expression that favors energy expenditure. The metabolic benefit in male STS transgenic mice was retained after castration. Treatment with the STS substrate estrone sulfate also improved metabolic functions in both the HFD and ob/ob models. Our results have uncovered a novel function of STS in energy metabolism and type 2 diabetes. Liver-specific STS induction or estrogen/estrogen sulfate delivery may represent a novel approach to manage metabolic syndrome. PMID:24497646

  9. The Efficacy of Social Role Models to Increase Motivation to Obtain Vaccination against Hepatitis B among Men Who Have Sex with Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vet, R.; de Wit, J. B. F.; Das, E.

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of role models in persuasive messages about risk and social norms to increase motivation to obtain hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination in men who have sex with men (MSM). MSM at risk for HBV in The Netherlands (N = 168) were recruited online via a range of websites and were randomly assigned to one of four…

  10. Mathematical Modeling of Hepatitis C Prevalence Reduction with Antiviral Treatment Scale-Up in Persons Who Inject Drugs in Metropolitan Chicago

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Echevarria, Desarae; Gutfraind, Alexander; Boodram, Basmattee; Major, Marian; Del Valle, Sara; Cotler, Scott J.; Dahari, Harel

    2015-08-21

    New direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) provide an opportunity to combat hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in persons who inject drugs (PWID). Here we use a mathematical model to predict the impact of a DAA-treatment scale-up on HCV prevalence among PWID and the estimated cost in metropolitan Chicago.

  11. Hepatitis B Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... worldwide 2 Billion People have been infected with Hepatitis B Worldwide The Hepatitis B Foundation is working ... of people living with hepatitis B. Learn About Hepatitis B in 10 Other Languages . Resource Video See ...

  12. Hepatitis C - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... virus (HCV). Other common hepatitis virus infections include hepatitis A and hepatitis B . ... Elisofon SA, Jonas MMF. Viral hepatitis in children. In: Boyer TD, Manns MP, Sanyal AJ, eds. Zakim & Boyer's Hepatology: A Textbook of Liver Disease. 6th ed. ...

  13. Hepatitis A FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Viral Hepatitis Contact Us Quick Links to Hepatitis ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home ... Outbreaks State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource Center Hepatitis A FAQs for the Public Recommend on Facebook ...

  14. Delta agent (Hepatitis D)

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis D virus ... Hepatitis D virus (HDV) is found only in people who carry the hepatitis B virus. HDV may make liver ... B virus but who never had symptoms. Hepatitis D infects about 15 million people worldwide. It occurs ...

  15. Hepatitis C FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Viral Hepatitis Contact Us Quick Links to Hepatitis ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home ... Outbreaks State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource Center Hepatitis C FAQs for the Public Recommend on Facebook ...

  16. Hepatitis B FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Viral Hepatitis Contact Us Quick Links to Hepatitis ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home ... Outbreaks State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource Center Hepatitis B FAQs for the Public Recommend on Facebook ...

  17. Hepatitis A Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Hepatitis A Testing Share this page: Was this page ... HAV-Ab total; Anti-HAV Formal name: Viral Hepatitis A Antibody Related tests: Hepatitis B Testing ; Hepatitis ...

  18. Mouse hepatitis virus infection of the CNS: a model for defense, disease, and repair

    PubMed Central

    Schaumburg, Chris S.; Held, Katherine S.; Lane, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Viral infection of the central nervous system (CNS) results in varied outcomes ranging from encephalitis, paralytic poliomyelitis or other serious consequences. One of the principal factors that directs the outcome of infection is the localized innate immune response, which is proceeded by the adaptive immune response against the invading viral pathogen. The role of the immune system is to contain and control the spread of virus within the CNS, and paradoxically, this response may also be pathological. Studies with a neurotropic murine coronavirus, mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) have provided important insights into how the immune system combats neuroinvasive viruses, and have identified molecular and cellular mechanisms contributing to chronic disease in persistently infected mice. PMID:18508518

  19. An Ex Vivo Model for Studying Hepatic Schistosomiasis and the Effect of Released Protein from Dying Eggs

    PubMed Central

    Gobert, Geoffrey N.; Nawaratna, Sujeevi K.; Harvie, Marina; Ramm, Grant A.; McManus, Donald P.

    2015-01-01

    Background We report the use of an ex vivo precision cut liver slice (PCLS) mouse model for studying hepatic schistosomiasis. In this system, liver tissue is unfixed, unfrozen, and alive for maintenance in culture and subsequent molecular analysis. Methods and Findings Using thick naive mouse liver tissue and sterile culture conditions, the addition of soluble egg antigen (SEA) derived from Schistosoma japonicum eggs, followed 4, 24 and 48hrs time points. Tissue was collected for transcriptional analysis and supernatants collected to quantitate liver enzymes, cytokines and chemokines. No significant hepatotoxicity was demonstrated by supernatant liver enzymes due to the presence of SEA. A proinflammatory response was observed both at the transcriptional level and at the protein level by cytokine and chemokine bead assay. Key genes observed elevated transcription in response to the addition of SEA included: IL1-α and IL1-β, IL6, all associated with inflammation. The recruitment of antigen presenting cells was reflected in increases in transcription of CD40, CCL4 and CSF1. Indications of tissue remodeling were seen in elevated gene expression of various Matrix MetalloProteinases (MMP3, 9, 10, 13) and delayed increases in TIMP1. Collagen deposition was significantly reduced in the presence of SEA as shown in COL1A1 expression by qPCR after 24hrs culture. Cytokine and chemokine analysis of the culture supernatants confirmed the elevation of proteins including IL6, CCL3, CCL4 and CXCL5. Conclusions This ex vivo model system for the synchronised delivery of parasite antigen to liver tissue provides an insight into the early phase of hepatic schistosomiasis, corresponding with the release of soluble proteins from dying schistosome eggs. PMID:25965781

  20. Exploratory investigation on nitro- and phospho-proteome cerebellum changes in hyperammonemia and hepatic encephalopathy rat models.

    PubMed

    Brunelli, Laura; Campagna, Roberta; Airoldi, Luisa; Cauli, Omar; Llansola, Marta; Boix, Jordi; Felipo, Vicente; Pastorelli, Roberta

    2012-03-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neurological disease associated with hepatic dysfunction. Current knowledge suggests that hyperammonemia, related to liver failure, is a main factor contributing to the cerebral alterations in HE and that hyperammonemia might impair signal transduction associated with post-translational modification of proteins such as tyrosine-nitration and phosphorylation. However, the molecular bases of the HE remain unclear and very little is known about the occurrence of post-translational modification on in vivo proteins. In this exploratory study we look for evidence of post-translation modifications of proteins in the cerebellum of experimental HE rat models using a proteomic approach. For the first time we showed that hyperammonemia without liver failure (HA rats) and experimental HE with liver failure due to portacaval shunt (PCS rats) lead to a reduced protein nitration in rat cerebellum, where the undernitrated proteins were involved in energy metabolism and cytoskeleton remodelling. Moreover we showed that tyrosine nitration loss of these proteins was not necessarily associated to a change in their phosphorylation state as result of the disease. Interestingly the rat cerebellum phosphoproteome was mainly perturbed in PCS rats, whereas HA rats did not shown appreciable changes in their phosphoprotein profile. Since the protein nitration level decreased similarly in the cerebellum of both HA and PCS rats, this implies that the two disease models share common effects but also present some differential signalling effects in the cerebellum of the same animals. This study highlights the interest for studying the concerted action of multiple signalling pathways in HE development. PMID:22083566

  1. Feature Hepatitis: Hepatitis Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Feature Hepatitis Hepatitis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table of ... Stomach ache Nausea Diarrhea No appetite Fever Headaches Diagnosis To check for hepatitis viruses, your doctor will ...

  2. Validation of the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease Score Criteria in Urgent Liver Transplantation for Acute Flare Up of Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wei-Chen; Lee, Ching-Song; Wang, Yu-Chao; Cheng, Chih-Hsien; Wu, Tsung-Han; Lee, Chen-Fang; Soong, Ruey-Shyang; Chang, Ming-Ling; Wu, Ting-Jung; Chou, Hong-Shiue; Chan, Kun-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Acute flare up of hepatitis B in noncirrhotic liver with rapid liver function deterioration is a critical condition. This flare up of hepatitis B may be subsided under medical treatments, otherwise urgent liver transplantation is needed. However, the necessity of urgent liver transplantation is hard to decide. In this institute, the indications of urgent liver transplantation for acute flare up of hepatitis B in noncirrhotic liver were settled according to the model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) scores: once upon MELD scores ≥35 (criterion 1) or MELD score < 35 at beginning and increased in the subsequent 1 to 2 weeks (criterion 2). This study was to examine whether MELD score criteria for liver transplantation were valid in such an urgent condition. Eighty-three patients having acute flare up of hepatitis B virus with total bilirubin ≥17.5 mg/dL were included in this study. Among 83 patients, 20 patients met criterion 1. Five patients were transplanted and 15 patients died of liver failure with a median survival of 17 days. Fifty-one patients met criterion 2. Nineteen were transplanted, 30 patients died of liver failure with a median survival of 23.5 days, and 2 patients recovered from this critical condition. The other 12 patients did not meet criteria 1 and 2, and urgent liver transplantation was spared although 5 patients needed liver transplantation in subsequent 2 to 3 months. Therefore, the sensitivity of MELD score criteria for urgent liver transplantation was 100% and specificity was 85.7%. In conclusion, determination of urgent liver transplantation for hepatitis B with acute liver failure is crucial. MELD score criteria are valid to make a decision of urgent liver transplantation for hepatitis B patients with acute flare up and liver failure. PMID:27258492

  3. Validation of the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease Score Criteria in Urgent Liver Transplantation for Acute Flare Up of Hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wei-Chen; Lee, Ching-Song; Wang, Yu-Chao; Cheng, Chih-Hsien; Wu, Tsung-Han; Lee, Chen-Fang; Soong, Ruey-Shyang; Chang, Ming-Ling; Wu, Ting-Jung; Chou, Hong-Shiue; Chan, Kun-Ming

    2016-05-01

    Acute flare up of hepatitis B in noncirrhotic liver with rapid liver function deterioration is a critical condition. This flare up of hepatitis B may be subsided under medical treatments, otherwise urgent liver transplantation is needed. However, the necessity of urgent liver transplantation is hard to decide. In this institute, the indications of urgent liver transplantation for acute flare up of hepatitis B in noncirrhotic liver were settled according to the model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) scores: once upon MELD scores ≥35 (criterion 1) or MELD score < 35 at beginning and increased in the subsequent 1 to 2 weeks (criterion 2). This study was to examine whether MELD score criteria for liver transplantation were valid in such an urgent condition. Eighty-three patients having acute flare up of hepatitis B virus with total bilirubin ≥17.5 mg/dL were included in this study. Among 83 patients, 20 patients met criterion 1. Five patients were transplanted and 15 patients died of liver failure with a median survival of 17 days. Fifty-one patients met criterion 2. Nineteen were transplanted, 30 patients died of liver failure with a median survival of 23.5 days, and 2 patients recovered from this critical condition. The other 12 patients did not meet criteria 1 and 2, and urgent liver transplantation was spared although 5 patients needed liver transplantation in subsequent 2 to 3 months. Therefore, the sensitivity of MELD score criteria for urgent liver transplantation was 100% and specificity was 85.7%. In conclusion, determination of urgent liver transplantation for hepatitis B with acute liver failure is crucial. MELD score criteria are valid to make a decision of urgent liver transplantation for hepatitis B patients with acute flare up and liver failure. PMID:27258492

  4. Developmental changes in hepatic glucose metabolism in a newborn piglet model: A comparative analysis for suckling period and early weaning period.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chunyan; Wang, Qinhua; Wang, Jing; Tan, Bie; Fan, Zhiyong; Deng, Ze-yuan; Wu, Xin; Yin, Yulong

    2016-02-19

    The liver glucose metabolism, supplying sufficient energy for glucose-dependent tissues, is important in suckling or weaned animals, although there are few studies with piglet model. To better understand the development of glucose metabolism in the piglets during suckling period and early weaning period, we determined the hepatic glycogen content, and investigated the relative protein expression of key enzymes of glucogenesis (GNG) and mRNA levels of some glucose metabolism-related genes. During suckling period, the protein level of G6Pase in the liver of suckling piglets progressively declined with day of age compared with that of newborn piglets (at 1 day of age), whereas the PEPCK level stabilized until day 21 of age, indicating that hepatic GNG capacity gradually weakened in suckling piglets. The synthesis of hepatic glycogen, which was consistent with the fluctuation of glycolytic key genes PFKL and PKLR that gradually decreased after birth and was more or less steady during latter suckling period, although both the mRNA levels of GCK and key glucose transporter GLUT2 presented uptrend in suckling piglets. However, early weaning significantly suppressed the hepatic GNG in the weaned piglets, especially at d 3-5 of weaning period, then gradually recovered at d 7 of weaning period. Meanwhile, PFKL, PKLR and GLUT2 showed the similar trend during weaning period. On the contrast, the hepatic glycogen reached the maximum value when the G6Pase and PEPCK protein expression were at the lowest level, although the GCK level maintained increasing through 7 days of weaning period. Altogether, our study provides evidence that hepatic GNG and glycolysis in newborn piglets were more active than other days during suckling period, and early weaning could significantly suppressed glucose metabolism in liver, but this inhibition would progressively recover at day 7 after weaning. PMID:26802463

  5. Hepatitis C: Sex and Sexuality

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Hepatitis » Sex and Sexuality: Entire Lesson Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... hepatitis C virus through sex. Can you pass hepatitis C to a sex partner? Yes, but it ...

  6. Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Bharti; Kumar Dharma, Vijay; Chawla, Sumit; Jindal, Harashish; Bhatt, Bhumika

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Following acute infection, 20% of people eliminate the virus over weeks or months and are often asymptomatic. The remaining 80% of people will develop chronic disease, of which approximately 20% will eventually develop liver cirrhosis and 1–5% will develop liver cancer. About 150 million people are chronically infected with HCV, and more than 350 000 people die every year from hepatitis C related liver diseases. The economic cost of hepatitis C is significant both to the individual and to the society. In the United States the average lifetime cost of the disease was estimated at $33 407 USD with the cost of a liver transplant approximately $200 000 USD. PEG-IFN and ribavirin treatment is also expensive and, at an average cost of approximately GB £7000 in the UK for a treatment course, is unaffordable in developing countries. Hepatitis C, not only brings down the quality of the life of individuals but also affect progress of the nation by adding financial burden. If we prevent the disease from occurring or find a perfect cure of the disease, in form of a prophylactic or therapeutic vaccine, it will be a boon to not only to the individual but to the nation as a whole. PMID:24165512

  7. Deregulation of energy metabolism promotes antifibrotic effects in human hepatic stellate cells and prevents liver fibrosis in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Swathi; Potter, James J; Geschwind, Jean-Francois; Sur, Surojit; Hamilton, James P; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Mezey, Esteban; Ganapathy-Kanniappan, Shanmugasundaram

    2016-01-15

    Liver fibrosis and cirrhosis result from uncontrolled secretion and accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins by hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) that are activated by liver injury and inflammation. Despite the progress in understanding the biology liver fibrogenesis and the identification of potential targets for treating fibrosis, development of an effective therapy remains elusive. Since an uninterrupted supply of intracellular energy is critical for the activated-HSCs to maintain constant synthesis and secretion of ECM, we hypothesized that interfering with energy metabolism could affect ECM secretion. Here we report that a sublethal dose of the energy blocker, 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) facilitates phenotypic alteration of activated LX-2 (a human hepatic stellate cell line), into a less-active form. This treatment-dependent reversal of activated-LX2 cells was evidenced by a reduction in α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and collagen secretion, and an increase in activity of matrix metalloproteases. Mechanistically, 3-BrPA-dependent antifibrotic effects involved down-regulation of the mitochondrial metabolic enzyme, ATP5E, and up-regulation of glycolysis, as evident by elevated levels of lactate dehydrogenase, lactate production and its transporter, MCT4. Finally, the antifibrotic effects of 3-BrPA were validated in vivo in a mouse model of carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis. Results from histopathology & histochemical staining for collagen and α-SMA substantiated that 3-BrPA promotes antifibrotic effects in vivo. Taken together, our data indicate that sublethal, metronomic treatment with 3-BrPA blocks the progression of liver fibrosis suggesting its potential as a novel therapeutic for treating liver fibrosis. PMID:26525850

  8. A model-based meta-analysis of sofosbuvir-based treatments in chronic hepatitis C patients.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pitarch, Alejandro; Guglieri-López, Beatriz; Ferriols-Lisart, Rafael; Merino-Sanjuán, Matilde

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of sofosbuvir-based treatments in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection using a model-based meta-analysis (MBMA). A bibliographic search was performed to identify clinical trials involving sofosbuvir as a unique direct-acting antiviral (DAA) agent or together with daclatasvir, ledipasvir or simeprevir for the treatment of diagnosed HCV infection. The time course of the virological response (VR) was modelled to estimate the effect of treatment and the influence of population characteristics on the longitudinal efficacy profile. The model was validated and simulations of 10 different treatment schedules were performed. Data from 19 clinical trials were included in the analysis. According to the developed model, therapy with sofosbuvir+ledipasvir is the most effective therapy in all scenarios, but it does not differ greatly in terms of sustained VR with respect to other combinations of DAA treatments. In conclusion, this MBMA generates knowledge regarding hypothetical head-to-head trials that have not been conducted previously. Therapies with sofosbuvir+ledipasvir are probably the most effective sofosbuvir-based treatments. PMID:26915476

  9. Medullary Thymic Epithelial Cells and Central Tolerance in Autoimmune Hepatitis Development: Novel Perspective from a New Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Alexandropoulos, Konstantina; Bonito, Anthony J.; Weinstein, Erica G.; Herbin, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is an immune-mediated disorder that affects the liver parenchyma. Diagnosis usually occurs at the later stages of the disease, complicating efforts towards understanding the causes of disease development. While animal models are useful for studying the etiology of autoimmune disorders, most of the existing animal models of AIH do not recapitulate the chronic course of the human condition. In addition, approaches to mimic AIH-associated liver inflammation have instead led to liver tolerance, consistent with the high tolerogenic capacity of the liver. Recently, we described a new mouse model that exhibited spontaneous and chronic liver inflammation that recapitulated the known histopathological and immunological parameters of AIH. The approach involved liver-extrinsic genetic engineering that interfered with the induction of T-cell tolerance in the thymus, the very process thought to inhibit AIH induction by liver-specific expression of exogenous antigens. The mutation led to depletion of specialized thymic epithelial cells that present self-antigens and eliminate autoreactive T-cells before they exit the thymus. Based on our findings, which are summarized below, we believe that this mouse model represents a relevant experimental tool towards elucidating the cellular and molecular aspects of AIH development and developing novel therapeutic strategies for treating this disease. PMID:25603179

  10. Metabolomic analysis reveals hepatic metabolite perturbations in citrin/mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase double-knockout mice, a model of human citrin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Saheki, Takeyori; Inoue, Kanako; Ono, Hiromi; Tushima, Anmi; Katsura, Natsumi; Yokogawa, Mana; Yoshidumi, Yukari; Kuhara, Tomiko; Ohse, Morimasa; Eto, Kazuhiro; Kadowaki, Takashi; Sinasac, David S; Kobayashi, Keiko

    2011-12-01

    The citrin/mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (mGPD) double-knockout mouse displays phenotypic attributes of both neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis and adult-onset type II citrullinemia, making it a suitable model of human citrin deficiency. In the present study, we investigated metabolic disturbances in the livers of wild-type, citrin (Ctrn) knockout, mGPD knockout, and Ctrn/mGPD double-knockout mice following oral sucrose versus saline administration using metabolomic approaches. By using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and capillary electrophoresis/mass spectrometry, we found three general groupings of metabolite changes in the livers of the double-knockout mice following sucrose administration that were subsequently confirmed using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry or enzymatic methods: a marked increase of hepatic glycerol 3-phosphate, a generalized decrease of hepatic tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, and alterations of hepatic amino acid levels related to the urea cycle or lysine catabolism including marked increases in citrulline and lysine. Furthermore, concurrent oral administration of sodium pyruvate with sucrose ameliorated the hyperammonemia induced by sucrose, as had been shown previously, as well as almost completely normalizing the hepatic metabolite perturbations found. Overall, we have identified additional metabolic disturbances in double-KO mice following oral sucrose administration, and provided further evidence for the therapeutic use of sodium pyruvate in our mouse model of citrin deficiency. PMID:21908222

  11. Silymarin attenuated hepatic steatosis through regulation of lipid metabolism and oxidative stress in a mouse model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

    PubMed

    Ni, Xunjun; Wang, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    Silymarin, which derived from the milk thistle plant (silybum marianum), has been used for centuries as a natural remedy for diseases of the liver and biliary tract. Considering the therapeutic potential to liver disease, we tested efficacy of silymarin on hepatic steatosis with a high fat diet (HFD)-induced mouse model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and investigated possible effects on lipid metabolic pathways. In our study, silymarin could attenuate the hepatic steatosis, which was proved by both Oil Red O staining and hepatic triglyceride (TG) level determination. Furthermore, compared with INT-747, a potent and selective FXR agonist, silymarin could preserve plasmatic high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) to a higher level and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) to a lower level, which benefited more to the circulation system. Through real-time PCR analysis, we clarified a vital protective role of silymarin in mRNA regulation of genes involved in lipid metabolism and oxidative stress. It was also shown that silymarin had no effects on body weight, food intake, and liver transaminase. Taken together, silymarin could attenuate hepatic steatosis in a mouse model of NAFLD through regulation of lipid metabolism and oxidative stress, and benefit to the circulation system. All these findings shed new light on NAFLD treatment. PMID:27158393

  12. Differential rescue of the renal and hepatic disease in an autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease mouse mutant. A new model to study the liver lesion.

    PubMed Central

    Yoder, B. K.; Richards, W. G.; Sommardahl, C.; Sweeney, W. E.; Michaud, E. J.; Wilkinson, J. E.; Avner, E. D.; Woychik, R. P.

    1997-01-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) is characterized by biliary and renal lesions that produce significant morbidity and mortality. The biliary ductual ectasia and hepatic portal fibrosis associated with ARPKD have not been well studied even though such lesions markedly affect the clinical course of patients after renal replacement therapy such as dialysis or transplantation. Here we describe the generation of a new mouse model to study the hepatic lesions associated with polycystic kidney disease. This model was generated by differentially rescuing the renal pathology in the orpk mutant mouse that displays a hepatorenal pathology that is similar to that seen in human patients with ARPKD. This was accomplished by expressing, as a transgene in the mutant animals, the cloned wild-type version of the gene associated with the mutant locus in this line of mice. Although renal function in the rescue animals is normal, the liver still exhibits biliary and ductular hyperplasia along with varying degrees of hepatic portal fibrosis that is indistinguishable from that in the mutant animals. Most important, the rescue animals survive significantly longer than mutants and will permit a more detailed analysis of the clinical and cellular pathophysiology of the hepatic defect associated with this disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:9176412

  13. Silymarin attenuated hepatic steatosis through regulation of lipid metabolism and oxidative stress in a mouse model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Xunjun; Wang, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    Silymarin, which derived from the milk thistle plant (silybum marianum), has been used for centuries as a natural remedy for diseases of the liver and biliary tract. Considering the therapeutic potential to liver disease, we tested efficacy of silymarin on hepatic steatosis with a high fat diet (HFD)-induced mouse model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and investigated possible effects on lipid metabolic pathways. In our study, silymarin could attenuate the hepatic steatosis, which was proved by both Oil Red O staining and hepatic triglyceride (TG) level determination. Furthermore, compared with INT-747, a potent and selective FXR agonist, silymarin could preserve plasmatic high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) to a higher level and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) to a lower level, which benefited more to the circulation system. Through real-time PCR analysis, we clarified a vital protective role of silymarin in mRNA regulation of genes involved in lipid metabolism and oxidative stress. It was also shown that silymarin had no effects on body weight, food intake, and liver transaminase. Taken together, silymarin could attenuate hepatic steatosis in a mouse model of NAFLD through regulation of lipid metabolism and oxidative stress, and benefit to the circulation system. All these findings shed new light on NAFLD treatment. PMID:27158393

  14. Use of three-compartment physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling to predict hepatic blood levels of fluvoxamine relevant for drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Iga, Katsumi

    2015-04-01

    Using a three-compartment physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model and a tube model for hepatic extraction kinetics, equations for calculating blood drug levels (Cb s) and hepatic blood drug levels (Chb s, proportional to actual hepatic drug levels), were derived mathematically. Assuming the actual values for total body clearance (CLtot ), oral bioavailability (F), and steady-state distribution volume (Vdss ), Cb s, and Chb s after intravenous and oral administration of fluvoxamine (strong perpetrator in drug-drug interactions, DDIs), propranolol, imipramine, and tacrine were simulated. Values for Cb s corresponded to the actual values for all tested drugs, and mean Chb and maximal Chb -to-maximal Cb ratio predicted for oral fluvoxamine administration (50 mg twice-a-day administration) were nearly 100 nM and 2.3, respectively, which would be useful for the predictions of the DDIs caused by fluvoxamine. Fluvoxamine and tacrine are known to exhibit relatively large F values despite having CLtot similar to or larger than hepatic blood flow, which may be because of the high liver uptake (almost 0.6) upon intravenous administration. The present method is thus considered to be more predictive of the Chb for perpetrators of DDIs than other methods. PMID:25558834

  15. A predictive model for carcinogenesis in patients with chronic hepatitis B undergoing entecavir therapy and its validation.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Hiroki; Nishijima, Norihiro; Enomoto, Hirayuki; Sakamoto, Azusa; Nasu, Akihiro; Komekado, Hideyuki; Nishimura, Takashi; Kita, Ryuichi; Kimura, Toru; Iijima, Hiroko; Nishiguchi, Shuhei; Osaki, Yukio

    2016-09-01

    We created a model to predict the development of liver carcinogenesis in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) undergoing entecavir (ETV) therapy and to validate the accuracy using an independent dataset.A total of 328 CHB subjects were analyzed. Subjects were randomly assigned into 2 groups: the training group (n = 164) and the validation group (n = 164). Using data from the training group, we built a predictive model for liver carcinogenesis by performing univariate and multivariate analyses using variables associated with liver carcinogenesis. We subsequently assessed the applicability of the constructed model in the validation group.The median (range) follow-up periods in the training and the validation groups were 5.03 years (1.03-9.98) and 4.84 years (1.10-9.97), respectively. The proportion of hepatitis B virus-DNA at 24 weeks <1.9 log IU/mL in the training group was 70.7% (116/164), while that in the validation group was 71.3% (117/164). For the entire cohort (n = 328), the median alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) value at 24 weeks (3.45 ng/mL; range, 0.9-102.7 ng/mL) significantly decreased compared to the baseline values (5.55 ng/mL; range, 0.9-1039.5 ng/mL), while the median alanine aminotransferase (ALT) value at 24 weeks (24 IU/mL; range, 6-251 IU/mL) also significantly decreased compared to baseline values (57 IU/mL; range, 7-1450 IU/mL). During the observation period, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) developed in 15 (9.1%) patients in the training group and in 17 (10.4%) patients in the validation group. The 3- and 5-year cumulative HCC incidence rates in the entire cohort were 4.48% and 9.52%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis of the training group, age ≥54 years (P = 0.0273), ALT level at 24 weeks (P = 0.0456), and AFP at 24 weeks (P = 0.0485) were found to be significant predictors linked to HCC. Using these independent predictors, the risk for HCC development was well stratified in the validation group (overall significance

  16. The herbal compound Songyou Yin (SYY) inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma growth and improves survival in models of chronic fibrosis via paracrine inhibition of activated hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Bu, Yang; Jia, Qing-An; Ren, Zheng-Gang; Xue, Tong-Chun; Zhang, Quan-Bao; Zhang, Ke-Zhi; Zhang, Qiang-Bo; You, Yang; Tian, Hui; Qin, Lun-Xiu; Tang, Zhao-You

    2015-11-24

    Chronic fibrosis is a major risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The pathological progression of hepatic fibrosis has been linked to cellular processes that promote tumor growth and metastasis. Several recent studies have highlighted the cross-talk between tumor cells and activated hepatic stellate cells (aHSCs) in HCC. The herbal compound Songyou Yin (SYY) is known to attenuate hepatoma cell invasion and metastasis via down-regulation of cytokine secretion by aHSCs. However the underlying mechanism of SYY treatment in reversal of hepatic fibrosis and metastasis of liver cancers is not known. In the current study, a nude mouse model with liver fibrosis bearing orthotopic xenograft was established and we found that SYY could reduce associated fibrosis, inhibit tumor growth and improve survival. In the subcutaneous tumor model with fibrosis, we found that SYY could inhibit liver cancer. In vitro, hepatoma cells incubated with conditioned media (CM) from SYY treated aHSCs showed reduced proliferation, decrease in colony formation and invasive potential. SYY treated group showed altered gene expression, with 1205 genes up-regulated and 1323 genes down-regulated. Gene cluster analysis indicated that phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) was one of the key genes altered in the expression profiles. PI3K related markers were all significantly down-regulated. ELISA also indicated decreased secretion of cytokines which were regulated by PI3K/AKT signaling after SYY treatment in the hepatic stellate cell line, LX2. These data clearly demonstrate that SYY therapy inhibits HCC invasive and metastatic potential and improves survival in nude mice models with chronic fibrosis background via inhibition of cytokine secretion by activated hepatic stellate cells. PMID:26517671

  17. The herbal compound Songyou Yin (SYY) inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma growth and improves survival in models of chronic fibrosis via paracrine inhibition of activated hepatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Tong-Chun; Zhang, Quan-Bao; Zhang, Ke-Zhi; Zhang, Qiang-Bo; You, Yang; Tian, Hui; Qin, Lun-Xiu; Tang, Zhao-You

    2015-01-01

    Chronic fibrosis is a major risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The pathological progression of hepatic fibrosis has been linked to cellular processes that promote tumor growth and metastasis. Several recent studies have highlighted the cross-talk between tumor cells and activated hepatic stellate cells (aHSCs) in HCC. The herbal compound Songyou Yin (SYY) is known to attenuate hepatoma cell invasion and metastasis via down-regulation of cytokine secretion by aHSCs. However the underlying mechanism of SYY treatment in reversal of hepatic fibrosis and metastasis of liver cancers is not known. In the current study, a nude mouse model with liver fibrosis bearing orthotopic xenograft was established and we found that SYY could reduce associated fibrosis, inhibit tumor growth and improve survival. In the subcutaneous tumor model with fibrosis, we found that SYY could inhibit liver cancer. In vitro, hepatoma cells incubated with conditioned media (CM) from SYY treated aHSCs showed reduced proliferation, decrease in colony formation and invasive potential. SYY treated group showed altered gene expression, with 1205 genes up-regulated and 1323 genes down-regulated. Gene cluster analysis indicated that phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) was one of the key genes altered in the expression profiles. PI3K related markers were all significantly down-regulated. ELISA also indicated decreased secretion of cytokines which were regulated by PI3K/AKT signaling after SYY treatment in the hepatic stellate cell line, LX2. These data clearly demonstrate that SYY therapy inhibits HCC invasive and metastatic potential and improves survival in nude mice models with chronic fibrosis background via inhibition of cytokine secretion by activated hepatic stellate cells. PMID:26517671

  18. Hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Córdoba, Juan; Mínguez, Beatriz

    2008-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a severe complication of cirrhosis that is related to the effects of ammonia. Analysis of interorgan ammonia trafficking has identified an important role of skeletal muscle in ammonia removal and has highlighted the importance of the nutritional status. Ammonia causes neurotransmitter abnormalities and induces injury to astrocytes that is partially mediated by oxidative stress. These disturbances lead to astrocyte swelling and brain edema, which appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of neurological manifestations. Inflammatory mediators worsen brain disturbances. New methods for assessing hepatic encephalopathy include clinical scales, neuropsychological tests, imaging of portal-systemic circulation, and magnetic resonance of the brain. Reappraisal of current therapy indicates the need for performing placebo-controlled trials and the lack of evidence for administering diets with restricted protein content. Liver transplant should be considered in selected patients with hepatic encephalopathy. Future prospects include new drugs that decrease plasma ammonia, measures to reduce brain edema, and liver-support devices. PMID:18293278

  19. [Hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Córdoba, Juan; Mur, Rafael Esteban

    2014-07-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (EH) is a severe complication of hepatic cirrhosis that is characterized by multiple neuropsychiatric manifestations. EH is usually triggered by a precipitating factor and occurs in patients with severely impaired hepatic function. Minimal EH is characterized by minor cognitive impairments that are difficult to specify but represent a risk for the patients. The primary pathophysiological mechanism of EH is considered to be an increase in blood ammonia with an impairment in the patency of the blood-brainbarrier and its metabolism to glutamine in astrocytes. The diagnosis is clinical and neuroimaging techniques can be complementary. The diagnosis of minimal EH requires specific neurocognitive tests. The clinical evaluation should be directed towards identifying the trigger. Nonabsorbable disaccharides and rifaximin constitute the treatment of choice, along with prophylaxis for new episodes. PMID:25087716

  20. Prevention of Hepatic Fibrosis in a Murine Model of Metabolic Syndrome with Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    DeLeve, Laurie D.; Wang, Xiangdong; Kanel, Gary C.; Atkinson, Roscoe D.; McCuskey, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    The endocannabinoid pathway plays an important role in the regulation of appetite and body weight, hepatic lipid metabolism, and fibrosis. Blockade of the endocannabinoid receptor CB1 with SR141716 promotes weight loss, reduces hepatocyte fatty acid synthesis, and is antifibrotic. D-4F, an apolipoprotein A-1 mimetic with antioxidant properties, is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of atherosclerosis. C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet for 7 months, followed by a 2.5-month treatment with either SR141716 or D-4F. SR141716 markedly improved body weight, liver weight, serum transaminases, insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, hypercholesterolemia, hyperleptinemia, and oxidative stress, accompanied by the significant prevention of fibrosis progression. D-4F improved hypercholesterolemia and hyperleptinemia without improvement in body weight, steatohepatitis, insulin resistance, or oxidative stress, and yet, there was significant prevention of fibrosis. D-4F prevented culture-induced activation of stellate cells in vitro. In summary, C57BL/6J mice given a high-fat diet developed features of metabolic syndrome with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and fibrosis. Both SR141716 and D-4F prevented progression of fibrosis after onset of steatohepatitis, ie, a situation comparable to a common clinical scenario, with D-4F seeming to have a more general antifibrotic effect. Either compound therefore has the potential to be of clinical benefit. PMID:18772330

  1. Modelling the prevalence of hepatitis C virus amongst blood donors in Libya: An investigation of providing a preventive strategy

    PubMed Central

    Daw, Mohamed A; Shabash, Amira; El-Bouzedi, Abdallah; Dau, Aghnya A; Habas, Moktar; Libyan Study Group of Hepatitis and HIV

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine hepatitis C virus (HCV) seroprevalence among the Libyan population using blood donors and applying the autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model to predict future trends and formulate plans to minimize the burden of HCV infection. METHODS: HCV positive cases were collected from 1008214 healthy blood donors over a 6-year period from 2008 to 2013. Data were used to construct the ARIMA model to forecast HCV seroprevalence among blood donors. The validity of the model was assessed using the mean absolute percentage error between the observed and fitted seroprevalence. The fitted ARIMA model was used to forecast the incidence of HCV beyond the observed period for the year 2014 and further to 2055. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of HCV among blood donors was 1.8%, varying over the study period from 1.7% to 2.5%, though no significant variation was found within each calendar year. The ARIMA model showed a non-significant auto-correlation of the residuals, and the prevalence was steady within the last 3 years as expressed by the goodness-of-fit test. The forecast incidence showed an increase in HCV seropositivity in 2014, ranging from 500 to 700 per 10000 population, with an overall prevalence of 2.3%-2.7%. This may be extended to 2055 with minimal periodical variation within each 6-year period. CONCLUSION: The applied model was found to be valuable in evaluating the seroprevalence of HCV among blood donors, and highlighted the growing burden of such infection on the Libyan health care system. The model may help in formulating national policies to prevent increases in HCV infection and plan future strategies that target the consequences of the infection. PMID:26870670

  2. Elevated Hepatic Iron Activates NF-E2–Related Factor 2–Regulated Pathway in a Dietary Iron Overload Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Isom, Harriet C.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic iron overload has been associated classically with the genetic disorder hereditary hemochromatosis. More recently, it has become apparent that mild-to-moderate degrees of elevated hepatic iron stores observed in other liver diseases also have clinical relevance. The goal was to use a mouse model of dietary hepatic iron overload and isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation proteomics to identify, at a global level, differentially expressed proteins in livers from mice fed a control or 3,5,5-trimethyl-hexanoyl-ferrocene (TMHF) supplemented diet for 4 weeks. The expression of 74 proteins was altered by ≥ ±1.5-fold, showing that the effects of iron on the liver proteome were extensive. The top canonical pathway altered by TMHF treatment was the NF-E2–related factor 2 (NRF2–)–mediated oxidative stress response. Because of the long-standing association of elevated hepatic iron with oxidative stress, the remainder of the study was focused on NRF2. TMHF treatment upregulated 25 phase I/II and antioxidant proteins previously categorized as NRF2 target gene products. Immunoblot analyses showed that TMHF treatment increased the levels of glutathione S-transferase (GST) M1, GSTM4, glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL) catalytic subunit, GCL modifier subunit, glutathione synthetase, glutathione reductase, heme oxygenase 1, epoxide hydrolase 1, and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase quinone 1. Immunofluorescence, carried out to determine the cellular localization of NRF2, showed that NRF2 was detected in the nucleus of hepatocytes from TMHF-treated mice and not from control mice. We conclude that elevated hepatic iron in a mouse model activates NRF2, a key regulator of the cellular response to oxidative stress. PMID:22649188

  3. Understanding early serum hepatitis D virus and HBsAg kinetics during pegylated interferon-alfa therapy via mathematical modeling

    PubMed Central

    Guedj, Jeremie; Rotman, Yaron; Cotler, Scott J.; Koh, Christopher; Schmid, Peter; Albrecht, Jeff; Haynes-Williams, Vanessa; Liang, Jake T.; Hoofnagle, Jay H.; Heller, Theo; Dahari, Harel

    2014-01-01

    There is little information on the early kinetics of hepatitis delta virus (HDV) and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) during interferon-α therapy. Here a mathematical model was developed and fitted to frequent HDV and HBsAg kinetic data from 10 patients during the first 28 weeks of pegylated-interferon-α2a (peg-IFN) therapy. Three patients achieved a complete virological response (CVR), defined as undetectable HDV 6 months after treatment stopped with loss of HBsAg and anti-HBsAg seroconversion. After initiation of therapy a median delay of 9 days (interquartile range IQR:[5;15]) was observed with no significant changes in HDV level. Thereafter, HDV declined in a biphasic manner, where a rapid first-phase lasting for 25 days (IQR:[23;58]) was followed by a slower or plateau second-phase. The model predicts that the main effect of peg-IFN is to reduce HDV production/release with a median effectiveness of 96% (IQR:[93;99.8]). Median serum HDV half-life (t1/2) was estimated to 2.9 days (IQR:[1.5;5.3]) with pretreatment production and clearance of about 1010 (IQR:[109.8-1010.8]) virions/day. None of the patients with flat 2nd phase in HDV achieved CVR. HBsAg kinetics of decline paralleled the second-phase of HDV decline consistent with HBsAg-productive-infected cells being the main source of production of HDV, with a median t1/2 of 135 days (IQR:[20-460]. The interferon lambda-3 polymorphism (rs12979860) was not associated with kinetic parameters. Conclusions Modeling results provide insights into HDV-host dynamics, the relationship between serum HBsAg levels and HBsAg-infected cells, IFN's mode of action and its effectiveness. The observation that a flat second phase in HDV and HBsAg kinetics was associated with failure to achieve CVR provides the basis to develop early stopping rules during peg-IFN treatment in HDV-infected patients. PMID:25098971

  4. The Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor Teneligliptin Attenuates Hepatic Lipogenesis via AMPK Activation in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Model Mice.

    PubMed

    Ideta, Takayasu; Shirakami, Yohei; Miyazaki, Tsuneyuki; Kochi, Takahiro; Sakai, Hiroyasu; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Shimizu, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is strongly associated with metabolic syndrome, is increasingly a major cause of hepatic disorder. Dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitors, anti-diabetic agents, are expected to be effective for the treatment of NAFLD. In the present study, we established a novel NAFLD model mouse using monosodium glutamate (MSG) and a high-fat diet (HFD) and investigated the effects of a DPP-4 inhibitor, teneligliptin, on the progression of NAFLD. Male MSG/HFD-treated mice were divided into two groups, one of which received teneligliptin in drinking water. Administration of MSG and HFD caused mice to develop severe fatty changes in the liver, but teneligliptin treatment improved hepatic steatosis and inflammation, as evaluated by the NAFLD activity score. Serum alanine aminotransferase and intrahepatic triglyceride levels were significantly decreased in teneligliptin-treated mice (p < 0.05). Hepatic mRNA levels of the genes involved in de novo lipogenesis were significantly downregulated by teneligliptin (p < 0.05). Moreover, teneligliptin increased hepatic expression levels of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) protein. These findings suggest that teneligliptin attenuates lipogenesis in the liver by activating AMPK and downregulating the expression of genes involved in lipogenesis. DPP-4 inhibitors may be effective for the treatment of NAFLD and may be able to prevent its progression to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. PMID:26670228

  5. The Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor Teneligliptin Attenuates Hepatic Lipogenesis via AMPK Activation in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Model Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ideta, Takayasu; Shirakami, Yohei; Miyazaki, Tsuneyuki; Kochi, Takahiro; Sakai, Hiroyasu; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Shimizu, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is strongly associated with metabolic syndrome, is increasingly a major cause of hepatic disorder. Dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitors, anti-diabetic agents, are expected to be effective for the treatment of NAFLD. In the present study, we established a novel NAFLD model mouse using monosodium glutamate (MSG) and a high-fat diet (HFD) and investigated the effects of a DPP-4 inhibitor, teneligliptin, on the progression of NAFLD. Male MSG/HFD-treated mice were divided into two groups, one of which received teneligliptin in drinking water. Administration of MSG and HFD caused mice to develop severe fatty changes in the liver, but teneligliptin treatment improved hepatic steatosis and inflammation, as evaluated by the NAFLD activity score. Serum alanine aminotransferase and intrahepatic triglyceride levels were significantly decreased in teneligliptin-treated mice (p < 0.05). Hepatic mRNA levels of the genes involved in de novo lipogenesis were significantly downregulated by teneligliptin (p < 0.05). Moreover, teneligliptin increased hepatic expression levels of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) protein. These findings suggest that teneligliptin attenuates lipogenesis in the liver by activating AMPK and downregulating the expression of genes involved in lipogenesis. DPP-4 inhibitors may be effective for the treatment of NAFLD and may be able to prevent its progression to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. PMID:26670228

  6. Activity of a potent hepatitis C virus polymerase inhibitor in the chimpanzee model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Ming; He, Yupeng; Lu, Liangjun; Lim, Hock Ben; Tripathi, Rakesh L; Middleton, Tim; Hernandez, Lisa E; Beno, David W A; Long, Michelle A; Kati, Warren M; Bosse, Todd D; Larson, Daniel P; Wagner, Rolf; Lanford, Robert E; Kohlbrenner, William E; Kempf, Dale J; Pilot-Matias, Tami J; Molla, Akhteruzzaman

    2007-12-01

    A-837093 is a potent and specific nonnucleoside inhibitor of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 5B (NS5B) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. It possesses nanomolar potencies in both enzymatic and replicon-based cell culture assays. In rats and dogs this compound demonstrated an oral plasma half-life of greater than 7 h, and its bioavailability was >60%. In monkeys it had a half-life of 1.9 h and 15% bioavailability. Its antiviral efficacy was evaluated in two chimpanzees infected with HCV in a proof-of-concept study. The design included oral dosing of 30 mg per kg of body weight twice a day for 14 days, followed by a 14-day posttreatment observation. Maximum viral load reductions of 1.4 and 2.5 log(10) copies RNA/ml for genotype 1a- and 1b-infected chimpanzees, respectively, were observed within 2 days after the initiation of treatment. After this initial drop in the viral load, a rebound of plasma HCV RNA was observed in the genotype 1b-infected chimpanzee, while the genotype 1a-infected chimpanzee experienced a partial rebound that lasted throughout the treatment period. Clonal analysis of NS5B gene sequences derived from the plasma of A-837093-treated chimpanzees revealed the presence of several mutations associated with resistance to A-837093, including Y448H, G554D, and D559G in the genotype 1a-infected chimpanzee and C316Y and G554D in the genotype 1b-infected chimpanzee. The identification of resistance-associated mutations in both chimpanzees is consistent with the findings of in vitro selection studies, in which many of the same mutations were selected. These findings validate the antiviral efficacy and resistance development of benzothiadiazine HCV polymerase inhibitors in vivo. PMID:17908950

  7. Human variation and CYP enzyme contribution in benfuracarb metabolism in human in vitro hepatic models.

    PubMed

    Abass, Khaled; Reponen, Petri; Mattila, Sampo; Rautio, Arja; Pelkonen, Olavi

    2014-01-13

    Human responses to the toxicological effects of chemicals are often complicated by a substantial interindividual variability in toxicokinetics, of which metabolism is often the most important factor. Therefore, we investigated human variation and the contributions of human-CYP isoforms to in vitro metabolism of benfuracarb. The primary metabolic pathways were the initial sulfur oxidation to benfuracarb-sulfoxide and the nitrogen-sulfur bond cleavage to carbofuran (activation). The Km, Vmax, and CL(int) values of carbofuran production in ten individual hepatic samples varied 7.3-, 3.4-, and 5.4-fold, respectively. CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 catalyzed benfuracarb sulphur oxidation. Carbofuran formation, representing from 79% to 98% of the total metabolism, was catalyzed predominantly by CYP3A4. The calculated relative contribution of CYP3A4 to carbofuran formation was 93%, while it was 4.4% for CYP2C9. The major contribution of CYP3A4 in benfuracarb metabolism was further substantiated by showing a strong correlation with CYP3A4-selective markers midazolam-1'-hydroxylation and omeprazole-sulfoxidation (r=0.885 and 0.772, respectively). Carbofuran formation was highly inhibited by the CYP3A inhibitor ketoconazole. Moreover, CYP3A4 marker activities were relatively inhibited by benfuracarb. These results confirm that human CYP3A4 is the major enzyme involved in the in vitro activation of benfuracarb and that CYP3A4-catalyzed metabolism is the primary source of interindividual differences. PMID:24016712

  8. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... Low-grade fever Nausea and vomiting Pale or clay-colored stools Yellow skin (jaundice) ... The virus does not remain in the body after the infection is gone. Most people with hepatitis A recover within 3 months. Nearly all people get better within 6 months. There ...

  9. Autoimmune Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider will closely monitor and manage any side effects that may occur, as high doses of prednisone are often prescribed to treat autoimmune hepatitis. Immune system suppressors. Medications that suppress the immune system prevent the body from making autoantibodies and block the immune reaction ...

  10. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... Advisory Board Sponsors Sponsorship Opporunities Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician ... Body Hepatitis means “inflammation of the liver.” This inflammation can be caused by a wide variety of toxins, drugs, and metabolic diseases, as well as infection. There ...

  11. Utility of a novel Oatp1b2 knockout mouse model for evaluating the role of Oatp1b2 in the hepatic uptake of model compounds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cuiping; Stock, Jeffery L; Liu, Xingrong; Shi, Jilin; Van Deusen, Jeffrey W; DiMattia, Debra A; Dullea, Robert G; de Morais, Sonia M

    2008-09-01

    We generated the organic anion transporting polypeptide (Oatp) 1b2 knockout (KO) mouse model and assessed its utility to study hepatic uptake using model compounds: cerivastatin, lovastatin acid, pravastatin, simvastatin acid, rifampicin, and rifamycin SV. A selective panel of liver cytochromes P450 (P450s) (Cyp3a11, Cyp3a13, Cyp3a16, Cyp2c29, and Cyp2c39) and transporters [Oatp1b2, Oatp1a1, Oatp1a4, Oatp1a5; organic anion transporter (Oat) 1, Oat2, Oat3; multidrug resistance gene 1 (Mdr1) a, Mdr1b; bile salt export pump, multidrug resistance associated protein (Mrp) 2, Mrp3; breast cancer resistance protein] were measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in both KO and wild-type (WT) male mice. Male KO and WT mice received each model compound s.c. at 3 mg/kg. Blood and liver samples were obtained at 0, 0.5, and 2 h postdose and analyzed using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Liver/plasma concentration ratio (K(p,liver)) was calculated. Student's t test was used to compare the mRNA and K(p,liver) between the KO and WT mice. A similar mRNA expression was observed between the KO and WT for the selected P450s and transporters except for Oatp1b2, for which the level was negligible in the KO but prominent in the WT mice with P < 0.0001. The in vivo results showed a differential effect of Oatp1b2 on hepatic uptake of the model compounds, indicating that Oatp1b2 plays a more significant role in the hepatobiliary disposition of rifampicin and lovastatin than the other compounds tested. This study suggests the Oatp1b2 mouse as a useful in vivo tool to understand drug targeting and disposition in the liver. PMID:18556442

  12. The immature rat as a potential model for chemical risks to children: Ontogeny of selected hepatic P450s.

    PubMed

    McPhail, Brooks T; White, Catherine A; Cummings, Brian S; Muralidhara, Srinivasa; Wilson, Jewell T; Bruckner, James V

    2016-08-25

    Concern about potential susceptibilities of infants and children to chemicals has led to the consideration of immature rodents as potential test surrogates. Maturation of some hepatic microsomal cytochrome P450s (CYPs), that participate in metabolic activation of organic solvents and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), may differ significantly between humans and rodents. The present investigation was undertaken to delineate the ontogeny of selected hepatic CYPs in male and female Sprague-Dawley (S-D) rats, and to contrast them with developmental profiles in humans. Microsomes were prepared from the liver of sexed and unsexed postnatal day (PND) 1-90 rats, and total CYP450 levels, as well as CYP1A1/2, CYP2E1 and CYP2B1/2 activities and protein, were quantified. CYP1A1/2 and CYP2E1 activity and expression rose rapidly after birth, peaked from PND 21-40/50, and declined substantially to adult values by PND 90. The same ontogenic profiles were manifested when the enzyme activities were expressed per entire liver or liver normalized to body weight. CYP1A1/2 and CYP2E1 activity and protein expression were well correlated. CYP2B1/2 activity peaked abruptly on PND 21 and declined irregularly to adult values. These patterns are in contrast to human CYP1A2 and CYP2E1, which are reported to progressively increase in liver during the first few months to years of life. The three CYP protein developmental profiles were largely gender independent in rats. The immature rat does not appear to be a suitable model for assessing risks posed to infants and children by chemicals metabolically activated by CYP2E1, based on the findings of greater carbon tetrachloride hepatotoxicity in preweanlings and weanlings than in adult animals. Additional studies are required to determine whether immature S-D rats may be used as an animal model for substrates of other CYPs, as total CYP450 levels in the liver progressively rose during maturation, similarly to humans. PMID:27387539

  13. Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic wedge hepatic resection with a water-jet hybrid knife in a non-survival porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hong; Jiang, Sheng-Jun; Li, Bin; Fu, Deng-Ke; Xin, Pei; Wang, Yong-Guang

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To explore the feasibility of a water-jet hybrid knife to facilitate wedge hepatic resection using a natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) approach in a non-survival porcine model. METHODS: The Erbe Jet2 water-jet system allows a needleless, tissue-selective hydro-dissection with a pre-selected pressure. Using this system, wedge hepatic resection was performed through three natural routes (trans-anal, trans-vaginal and trans-umbilical) in three female pigs weighing 35 kg under general anesthesia. Entry into the peritoneal cavity was via a 15-mm incision using a hook knife. The targeted liver segment was marked by an APC probe, followed by wedge hepatic resection performed using a water-jet hybrid knife with the aid of a 4-mm transparent distance soft cap mounted onto the tip of the endoscope for holding up the desired plane. The exposed vascular and ductal structures were clipped with Endoclips. Hemostasis was applied to the bleeding cut edges of the liver parenchyma by electrocautery. After the procedure, the incision site was left open, and the animal was euthanized followed by necropsy. RESULTS: Using the Erbe Jet2 water-jet system, trans-anal and trans-vaginal wedge hepatic resection was successfully performed in two pigs without laparoscopic assistance. Trans-umbilical attempt failed due to an unstable operating platform. The incision for peritoneal entry took 1 min, and about 2 h was spent on excision of the liver tissue. The intra-operative blood loss ranged from 100 to 250 mL. Microscopically, the hydro-dissections were relatively precise and gentle, preserving most vessels. CONCLUSION: The Erbe Jet2 water-jet system can safely accomplish non-anatomic wedge hepatic resection in NOTES, which deserves further studies to shorten the dissection time. PMID:21412502

  14. Chronic proliferative hepatitis in A/JCr mice associated with persistent Helicobacter hepaticus infection: a model of helicobacter-induced carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, J G; Li, X; Yan, L; Cahill, R J; Hurley, R; Lewis, R; Murphy, J C

    1996-01-01

    Helicobacter hepaticus causes hepatitis in selected strains of mice and in A/JCr mice is linked to liver cancer. To analyze whether H. hepaticus persists in specified ecological niches, to determine whether biomarkers of infection exist, and to analyze the influence of H. hepaticus on hepatocyte proliferation, a longitudinal study of H. hepaticus-infected A/JCr mice was undertaken. A/JCr mice were serially euthanatized from 3 through 18 months and surveyed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; bacterial culture of liver, colon, and cecum; histology; electron microscopy; hepatocyte proliferation indices determined by using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine; and measurement of the liver enzyme alanine aminotransferase. In infected animals throughout the 18-month study, H. hepaticus was consistently isolated from the lower bowel but only sporadically from the liver. By electron microscopy, H. hepaticus was noted infrequently and only in bile canaliculi. Infected mice, particularly males, showed chronic inflammation; oval cell, Kupffer cell, and Ito cell hyperplasia; hepatocytomegaly; and bile duct proliferation. The inflammatory and necrotizing lesion was progressive and involved the hepatic parenchyma, portal triads, and intralobular venules. Hepatic adenomas were noted only in male mice, whereas 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine proliferation indices were markedly increased in both sexes, but especially in males, compared to control A/J mice. Infected mice also developed sustained anti-H. hepaticus serum immunoglobulin G antibody responses and elevated alanine aminotransferase levels. H. hepaticus, which persists in the lower bowels and livers of A/JCr mice, is associated with a chronic proliferative hepatitis, and hepatomas in selected male mice indicate that this novel bacterium may cause an increased risk of hepatic cancer induction in susceptible strains of mice. This murine model should prove useful in dissecting the molecular events operable in the development of neoplasms

  15. Modeling receptor/gene-mediated effects of corticosteroids on hepatic tyrosine aminotransferase dynamics in rats: dual regulation by endogenous and exogenous corticosteroids

    PubMed Central

    Hazra, Anasuya; Pyszczynski, Nancy; DuBois, Debra C.; Almon, Richard R.

    2014-01-01

    Receptor/gene-mediated effects of corticosteroids on hepatic tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) were evaluated in normal rats. A group of normal male Wistar rats were injected with 50 mg/kg methylprednisolone (MPL) intramuscularly at the nadir of their plasma corticosterone (CST) rhythm (early light cycle) and sacrificed at various time points up to 96 h post-treatment. Blood and livers were collected to measure plasma MPL, CST, hepatic glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA, cytosolic GR density, TAT mRNA, and TAT activity. The pharmacokinetics of MPL showed bi-exponential disposition with two first-order absorption components from the injection site and bioavailability was 21%. Plasma CST was reduced after MPL dosing, but resumed its daily circadian pattern within 36 h. Cytosolic receptor density was significantly suppressed (90%) and returned to baseline by 72 h resuming its biphasic pattern. Hepatic GR mRNA follows a circadian pattern which was disrupted by MPL and did not return during the study. MPL caused significant down-regulation (50%) in GR mRNA which was followed by a delayed rebound phase (60–70 h). Hepatic TAT mRNA and activity showed up-regulation as a consequence of MPL, and returned to their circadian baseline within 72 and 24 h of treatment. A mechanistic receptor/gene-mediated pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model was able to satisfactorily describe the complex interplay of exogenous and endogenous corticosteroid effects on hepatic GR mRNA, cytosolic free GR, TAT mRNA, and TAT activity in normal rats. PMID:17593325

  16. Predictors of Hepatitis B Cure Using Gene Therapy to Deliver DNA Cleavage Enzymes: A Mathematical Modeling Approach

    PubMed Central

    Schiffer, Joshua T.; Swan, Dave A.; Stone, Daniel; Jerome, Keith R.

    2013-01-01

    Most chronic viral infections are managed with small molecule therapies that inhibit replication but are not curative because non-replicating viral forms can persist despite decades of suppressive treatment. There are therefore numerous strategies in development to eradicate all non-replicating viruses from the body. We are currently engineering DNA cleavage enzymes that specifically target hepatitis B virus covalently closed circular DNA (HBV cccDNA), the episomal form of the virus that persists despite potent antiviral therapies. DNA cleavage enzymes, including homing endonucleases or meganucleases, zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), TAL effector nucleases (TALENs), and CRISPR-associated system 9 (Cas9) proteins, can disrupt specific regions of viral DNA. Because DNA repair is error prone, the virus can be neutralized after repeated cleavage events when a target sequence becomes mutated. DNA cleavage enzymes will be delivered as genes within viral vectors that enter hepatocytes. Here we develop mathematical models that describe the delivery and intracellular activity of DNA cleavage enzymes. Model simulations predict that high vector to target cell ratio, limited removal of delivery vectors by humoral immunity, and avid binding between enzyme and its DNA target will promote the highest level of cccDNA disruption. Development of de novo resistance to cleavage enzymes may occur if DNA cleavage and error prone repair does not render the viral episome replication incompetent: our model predicts that concurrent delivery of multiple enzymes which target different vital cccDNA regions, or sequential delivery of different enzymes, are both potentially useful strategies for avoiding multi-enzyme resistance. The underlying dynamics of cccDNA persistence are unlikely to impact the probability of cure provided that antiviral therapy is given concurrently during eradication trials. We conclude by describing experiments that can be used to validate the model, which will in turn

  17. Modeling and analysis of innate immune responses induced by the host cells against hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Obaid, Ayesha; Ahmad, Jamil; Naz, Anam; Awan, Faryal Mehwish; Paracha, Rehan Zafar; Tareen, Samar Hayat Khan; Anjum, Sadia; Raza, Abida; Baumbach, Jan; Ali, Amjad

    2015-05-01

    An in-depth understanding of complex systems such as hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and host immunomodulatory response is an open challenge for biologists. In order to understand the mechanisms involved in immune evasion by HCV, we present a simplified formalization of the highly dynamic system consisting of HCV, its replication cycle and host immune responses at the cellular level using hybrid Petri net (HPN). The approach followed in this study comprises of step wise simulation, model validation and analysis of host immune response. This study was performed with an objective of making correlations among viral RNA levels, interferon (IFN) production and interferon stimulated genes (ISGs) induction. The results correlate with the biological data verifying that the model is very useful in predicting the dynamic behavior of the signaling proteins in response to a stimulus. This study implicates that HCV infection is dependent upon several key factors of the host immune response. The effect of host proteins on limiting viral infection is effectively overruled by the viral pathogen. This study also analyzes activity levels of RNase L, miR-122, IFN, ISGs and PKR induction and inhibition of TLR3/RIG1 mediated pathways in response to targeted manipulation in the presence of HCV. The results are in complete agreement at the time of writing with the published expression studies and western blot experiments. Our model also provides some biological insights regarding the role of PKR in the acute infection of HCV. It might help to explain why many patients fail to clear acute HCV infection while others, with low ISG basal levels, clear HCV spontaneously. The described methodology can easily be reproduced, which suitably supports the study of other viral infections in a formal, automated and expressive manner. The Petri net-based modeling approach applied here may provide valuable insights for study design and analyses to evaluate other disease associated integrated pathways

  18. Primary seronegative but molecularly evident hepadnaviral infection engages liver and induces hepatocarcinoma in the woodchuck model of hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Mulrooney-Cousins, Patricia M; Chauhan, Ranjit; Churchill, Norma D; Michalak, Tomasz I

    2014-08-01

    Hepadnavirus at very low doses establishes in woodchucks asymptomatic, serologically undetectable but molecularly evident persistent infection. This primary occult infection (POI) preferentially engages the immune system and initiates virus-specific T cell response in the absence of antiviral antibody induction. The current study aimed to determine whether POI with time may culminate in serologically identifiable infection and hepatitis, and what are, if any, its pathological consequences. Juvenile woodchucks were intravenously injected with inocula containing 10 or 100 virions of woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) to induce POI and followed for life or up to 5.5 years thereafter. All 10 animals established molecularly detectable infection with virus DNA in serum (<100-200 copies/mL) and in circulating lymphoid cells, but serum WHV surface antigen and antibodies to WHV core antigen remained undetectable for life. By approximately 2.5-3.5 years post-infection, circulating virus transiently increased to 103 copies/mL and virus replication became detectable in the livers, but serological markers of infection and biochemical or histological evidence of hepatitis remained undetectable. Nonetheless, typical hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) developed in 2/10 animals. WHV DNA integration into hepatic and lymphatic system genomes was identified in 9/10 animals. Virus recovered from the liver virus-negative or virus-positive phases of POI displayed the wild-type sequence and transmitted infection to healthy woodchucks causing hepatitis and HCC. In summary, for the first time, our data demonstrate that an asymptomatic hepadnaviral persistence initiated by very small amounts of otherwise pathogenic virus, advancing in the absence of traditional serological markers of infection and hepatitis, coincides with virus DNA integration into the host's hepatic and immune system genomes, retains liver pro-oncogenic potency and is capable of transmitting liver pathogenic infection. This

  19. Hepatic and Extrahepatic Insulin Clearance Are Differentially Regulated: Results From a Novel Model-Based Analysis of Intravenous Glucose Tolerance Data.

    PubMed

    Polidori, David C; Bergman, Richard N; Chung, Stephanie T; Sumner, Anne E

    2016-06-01

    Insulin clearance is a highly variable and important factor that affects circulating insulin concentrations. We developed a novel model-based method to estimate both hepatic and extrahepatic insulin clearance using plasma insulin and C-peptide profiles obtained from the insulin-modified frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test. Data from 100 African immigrants without diabetes (mean age 38 years, body weight 81.7 kg, fasting plasma glucose concentration 83 mg/dL, and fasting insulin concentration 37 pmol/L) were used. Endogenous insulin secretion (calculated by C-peptide deconvolution) and insulin infusion rates were used as inputs to a new two-compartment model of insulin kinetics and hepatic and extrahepatic clearance parameters were estimated. Good agreement between modeled and measured plasma insulin profiles was observed (mean normalized root mean square error 6.8%), and considerable intersubject variability in parameters of insulin clearance among individuals was identified (the mean [interquartile range] for hepatic extraction was 25.8% [32.7%], and for extrahepatic insulin clearance was 20.7 mL/kg/min [11.7 mL/kg/min]). Parameters of insulin clearance were correlated with measures of insulin sensitivity and acute insulin response to glucose. The method described appears promising for future research aimed at characterizing variability in insulin clearance and the mechanisms involved in the regulation of insulin clearance. PMID:26993071

  20. Chitosan and Sodium Alginate Combinations Are Alternative, Efficient, and Safe Natural Adjuvant Systems for Hepatitis B Vaccine in Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    AbdelAllah, Nourhan H.; Boseila, Abeer A.; Amin, Magdy A.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B viral (HBV) infections represent major public health problem and are an occupational hazard for healthcare workers. Current alum-adjuvanted HBV vaccine is the most effective measure to prevent HBV infection. However, the vaccine has some limitations including poor response in some vaccinee and being a frost-sensitive suspension. The goal of our study was to use an alternative natural adjuvant system strongly immunogenic allowing for a reduction in dose and cost. We tested HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) adjuvanted with chitosan (Ch) and sodium alginate (S), both natural adjuvants, either alone or combined with alum in mouse model. Mice groups were immunized subcutaneously with HBsAg adjuvanted with Ch or S, or triple adjuvant formula with alum (Al), Ch, and S, or double formulations with AlCh or AlS. These were compared to control groups immunized with current vaccine formula or unadjuvanted HBsAg. We evaluated the rate of seroconversion, serum HBsAg antibody, IL-4, and IFN-γ levels. The results showed that the solution formula with Ch or S exhibited comparable immunogenic responses to Al-adjuvanted suspension. The AlChS gave significantly higher immunogenic response compared to controls. Collectively, our results indicated that Ch and S are effective HBV adjuvants offering natural alternatives, potentially reducing dose. PMID:27493674

  1. Pharmacological manipulation of cyclic GMP levels in brain restores learning ability in animal models of hepatic encephalopathy: therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, Regina; Monfort, Pilar; Cauli, Omar; Erceg, Slaven; Felipo, Vicente

    2006-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a complex neuropsychiatric syndrome present in patients with liver disease that includes impaired intellectual function. To develop therapeutic treatments to restore cognitive function, it is important to understand the molecular mechanisms that impair cognitive function in HE. This review summarizes data showing that: (a) cognitive function and learning are impaired in patients with liver disease and in animal models of chronic liver failure or hyperammonemia; (b) the glutamate–NO–cGMP pathway modulates some forms of learning; and (c) the function of this pathway is impaired in brain in vivo in rats with chronic hyperammonemia or liver failure and from patients who died from HE. Learning ability of hyperammonemic rats was restored by increasing cGMP by: (1) continuous intracerebral administration of zaprinast, an inhibitor of the cGMP-degrading phosphodiesterase; (2) chronic oral administration of sildenafil, an inhibitor of the phosphodiesterase that crosses the blood–brain barrier; and (3) continuous intracerebral administration of cGMP. The data summarized indicate that impairment of learning ability in rats with chronic liver failure or hyperammonemia is due to impairment of the glutamate–NO–cGMP pathway. Moreover, increasing extracellular cGMP by pharmacological means may be a new therapeutic approach to improve cognitive function in patients with HE. PMID:19412446

  2. Hepatic and Splenic Stiffness Augmentation Assessed with MR Elastography in an in vivo Porcine Portal Hypertension Model

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Meng; Kolipaka, Arunark; Woodrum, David A.; Glaser, Kevin J.; Romano, Anthony J; Manduca, Armando; Talwalkar, Jayant A.; Araoz, Philip A.; McGee, Kiaran P.; Anavekar, Nandan S.; Ehman, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the influence of portal pressure on the shear stiffness of the liver and spleen in a well-controlled in vivo porcine model with MR Elastography (MRE). A significant correlation between portal pressure and tissue stiffness could be used to noninvasively assess increased portal venous pressure (portal hypertension), which is a frequent clinical condition caused by cirrhosis of the liver and is responsible for the development of many lethal complications. Materials and Methods During multiple intra-arterial infusions of Dextran-40 in three adult domestic pigs in vivo, 3-D abdominal MRE was performed with left ventricle and portal catheters measuring blood pressure simultaneously. Least-squares linear regressions were used to analyze the relationship between tissue stiffness and portal pressure. Results Liver and spleen stiffness have a dynamic component that increases significantly following an increase in portal or left ventricular pressure. Correlation coefficients with the linear regressions between stiffness and pressure exceeded 0.8 in most cases. Conclusion The observed stiffness-pressure relationship of the liver and spleen could provide a promising noninvasive method for assessing portal pressure. Using MRE to study the tissue mechanics associated with portal pressure may provide new insights into the natural history and pathophysiology of hepatic diseases and may have significant diagnostic value in the future. PMID:23418135

  3. Chitosan and Sodium Alginate Combinations Are Alternative, Efficient, and Safe Natural Adjuvant Systems for Hepatitis B Vaccine in Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    AbdelAllah, Nourhan H; Abdeltawab, Nourtan F; Boseila, Abeer A; Amin, Magdy A

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B viral (HBV) infections represent major public health problem and are an occupational hazard for healthcare workers. Current alum-adjuvanted HBV vaccine is the most effective measure to prevent HBV infection. However, the vaccine has some limitations including poor response in some vaccinee and being a frost-sensitive suspension. The goal of our study was to use an alternative natural adjuvant system strongly immunogenic allowing for a reduction in dose and cost. We tested HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) adjuvanted with chitosan (Ch) and sodium alginate (S), both natural adjuvants, either alone or combined with alum in mouse model. Mice groups were immunized subcutaneously with HBsAg adjuvanted with Ch or S, or triple adjuvant formula with alum (Al), Ch, and S, or double formulations with AlCh or AlS. These were compared to control groups immunized with current vaccine formula or unadjuvanted HBsAg. We evaluated the rate of seroconversion, serum HBsAg antibody, IL-4, and IFN-γ levels. The results showed that the solution formula with Ch or S exhibited comparable immunogenic responses to Al-adjuvanted suspension. The AlChS gave significantly higher immunogenic response compared to controls. Collectively, our results indicated that Ch and S are effective HBV adjuvants offering natural alternatives, potentially reducing dose. PMID:27493674

  4. Application of Static Models to Predict Midazolam Clinical Interactions in the Presence of Single or Multiple Hepatitis C Virus Drugs.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yaofeng; Ma, Li; Chang, Shu-Ying; Humphreys, W Griffith; Li, Wenying

    2016-08-01

    Asunaprevir (ASV), daclatasvir (DCV), and beclabuvir (BCV) are three drugs developed for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection. Here, we evaluated the CYP3A4 induction potential of each drug, as well as BCV-M1 (the major metabolite of BCV), in human hepatocytes by measuring CYP3A4 mRNA alteration. The induction responses were quantified as induction fold (mRNA fold change) and induction increase (mRNA fold increase), and then fitted with four nonlinear regression algorithms. Reversible inhibition and time-dependent inhibition (TDI) on CYP3A4 activity were determined to predict net drug-drug interactions (DDIs). All four compounds were CYP3A4 inducers and inhibitors, with ASV demonstrating TDI. The curve-fitting results demonstrated that fold increase is a better assessment to determine kinetic parameters for compounds inducing weak responses. By summing the contribution of each inducer, the basic static model was able to correctly predict the potential for a clinically meaningful induction signal for single or multiple perpetrators, but with over prediction of the magnitude. With the same approach, the mechanistic static model improved the prediction accuracy of DCV and BCV when including both induction and inhibition effects, but incorrectly predicted the net DDI effects for ASV alone or triple combinations. The predictions of ASV or the triple combination could be improved by only including the induction and reversible inhibition but not the ASV CYP3A4 TDI component. Those results demonstrated that static models can be applied as a tool to help project the DDI risk of multiple perpetrators using in vitro data. PMID:27226352

  5. Serum NX-DCP as a New Noninvasive Model to Predict Significant Liver Fibrosis in Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Masaya; Yano, Yoshihiko; Hirano, Hirotaka; Momose, Kenji; Yoshida, Masaru; Azuma, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Finding a noninvasive method to predict liver fibrosis using inexpensive and easy-to-use markers is important. Objectives: We aimed to clarify whether NX-des-γ-carboxyprothrombin (NX-DCP) could become a new noninvasive model to predict liver fibrosis in hepatitis C virus (HCV) related liver disease. Patients and Methods: We performed a prospective cohort study on a consecutive group of 101 patients who underwent liver biopsy for HCV-related liver disease at Kobe University Hospital. Laboratory measurements were performed on the same day as the biopsy. Factors associated with significant fibrosis (F3-4) were assessed by multivariate analyses. A comparison of predictive ability between multivariate factors and abovementioned noninvasive models was also performed. Results: Increase in serum NX-DCP was significantly related to increase in fibrosis stage (P = 0.006). Moreover, NX-DCP was a multivariate factor associated with the presence of significant fibrosis F 3-4 (median 21 of F0-2 group vs. median 22 of F3-4 group with P = 0.002). The AUC of NX-DCP showed no significant differences compared with those of the AST-to-platelet ratio index (APRI), modified-APRI, the Göteborg University Cirrhosis Index (GUCI), the Lok index, the Hui score, cirrhosis discriminating score (CDS) and the Pohl score (P > 0.05). Conclusions: NX-DCP correlated positively with fibrosis stage and could discriminate well between HCV-related patients with or without significant fibrosis. Moreover, NX-DCP had a similar predictive ability to the abovementioned models, and thereby could be a new noninvasive prediction tool for fibrosis. PMID:25788955

  6. Population pharmacokinetic modeling of plasma and intracellular ribavirin concentrations in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liviawati S; Rower, Joseph E; Burton, James R; Anderson, Peter L; Hammond, Kyle P; Baouchi-Mokrane, Fafa; Everson, Gregory T; Urban, Thomas J; D'Argenio, David Z; Kiser, Jennifer J

    2015-04-01

    Ribavirin, a guanosine analog, is a broad-spectrum antiviral agent. Ribavirin has been a fundamental component of the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection for decades, but there is a very limited understanding of the clinical pharmacology of this drug. Furthermore, it is associated with a major dose-limiting toxicity, hemolytic anemia. Ribavirin undergoes intracellular phosphorylation by host enzymes to ribavirin monophosphate (RMP), ribavirin diphosphate (RDP), and ribavirin triphosphate (RTP). The intracellular forms have been associated with antiviral and toxic effects in vitro, but the kinetics of these phosphorylated moieties have not been fully elucidated in vivo. We developed a model to characterize the plasma pharmacokinetics of ribavirin and the difference between intracellular phosphorylation kinetics in red cells (nonnucleated) and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (nucleated). A time-independent two-compartment model with first-order absorption described the plasma data well. The cellular phosphorylation kinetics was described by a one-compartment model for RMP, with the formation rate driven by plasma concentrations and the first-order degradation rate. RDP and RTP rapidly reached equilibrium with RMP. Concomitant telaprevir use, inosine triphosphatase genetics, creatinine clearance, weight, and sex were significant covariates. The terminal ribavirin half-life in plasma and phosphorylated anabolites in cells was approximately 224 h. We found no evidence of time-dependent kinetics. These data provide a foundation for uncovering concentration-effect associations for ribavirin and determining the optimal dose and duration of this drug for use in combination with newer direct-acting HCV agents. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01097395.). PMID:25645847

  7. A mathematical model of hepatitis c virus dynamics in patients with high baseline viral loads or advanced liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Dahari, Harel; Layden-Almer, Jennifer E.; Kallwitz, Eric; Ribeiro, Ruy M.; Cotler, Scott J.; Layden, Thomas J.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Patients with baseline hepatitis C virus-RNA levels (bHCV-RNA) >6 log IU/ml or cirrhosis have a reduced probability of a sustained-virological response (SVR). We examined the relationship between bHCV-RNA, cirrhosis and SVR using a mathematical model that includes the critical-drug efficacy (εc; the efficacy required for a drug to clear HCV), the infection-rate constant (β) and the percentage of HCV-infected hepatocytes (π). Methods The relationship between baseline factors and SVR was evaluated in 1,000 in silico HCV-infected patients, generated by randomly assignment of realistic host and viral kinetic parameters. Model predictions were compared with clinical data from 170 non-cirrhotic and 75 cirrhotic patients. Results The ranges chosen for β and the viral production rate (p) resulted in bHCV-RNA levels that were in agreement with the distribution observed in US patients. Using these β and p values, higher bHCV-RNA levels led to higher εc, resulting in lower SVR rates. Alternatively, higher β values resulted in lower bHCV-RNA levels but higher π and εc, predicting lower rates of SVR. Cirrhotic patients had lower bHCV-RNA levels than non-cirrhotic patients (p=0.013) and more had bHCV-RNA levels <6 log IU/ml (p<0.001). Even cirrhotic patients with lower bHCV-RNA levels had lower SVR rates. An increase in β could explain the results observed in cirrhotic patients. Conclusions Our model predicts that higher bHCV-RNA levels lead to higher εc, reducing the chance of achieving SVR; cirrhotic patients have lower SVR rates because of large π values, caused by increased rates of hepatocyte infection. PMID:19208338

  8. [Hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Jacques, Jérémie; Carrier, Paul; Debette-Gratien, Marilyne; Sobesky, Rodolphe; Loustaud-Ratti, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a severe complication of liver cirrhosis and is an important therapeutic challenge, with a social and economic issue. If, now, the pathophysiology is not totally understood (main role of ammonia, but a better understanding of cerebral mechanisms), the clinical presentation is well-known. Some treatments are useful (disaccharides, treatment of the trigger) but their efficiency is limited. Nevertheless, the emergence of new treatments, such as non-absorbable antibiotics (rifaximin essentially), is an interesting therapeutic tool. PMID:26597584

  9. Drug-induced hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Toxic hepatitis ... to get liver damage. Some drugs can cause hepatitis with small doses, even if the liver breakdown ... liver. Many different drugs can cause drug-induced hepatitis. Painkillers and fever reducers that contain acetaminophen are ...

  10. Hepatitis A - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... have the virus and do not practice good hygiene. Other common hepatitis virus infections include hepatitis B ... where diapers are changed to ensure that proper hygiene is followed. If your child gets hepatitis A, ...

  11. Hepatitis B virus (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis B is also known as serum hepatitis and is spread through blood and sexual contact. It is ... population. This photograph is an electronmicroscopic image of hepatitis B virus particles. (Image courtesy of the Centers for ...

  12. Preventing hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis A is inflammation (irritation and swelling) of the liver caused by the hepatitis A virus. You can take several steps to ... reduce your risk of spreading or catching the hepatitis A virus: Always wash your hands thoroughly after ...

  13. What Is Hepatitis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter Facebook Google + iTunes Play Store What is hepatitis? Online Q&A Reviewed July 2016 Q: What ... Question and answer archives Submit a question World Hepatitis Day Know hepatitis - Act now Event notice Key ...

  14. Cell death, perfusion and electrical parameters are critical in models of hepatic radiofrequency ablation

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Sheldon K.; Ooi, Ean H.; Payne, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: A sensitivity analysis has been performed on a mathematical model of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in the liver. The purpose of this is to identify the most important parameters in the model, defined as those that produce the largest changes in the prediction. This is important in understanding the role of uncertainty and when comparing the model predictions to experimental data. Materials and methods: The Morris method was chosen to perform the sensitivity analysis because it is ideal for models with many parameters or that take a significant length of time to obtain solutions. A comprehensive literature review was performed to obtain ranges over which the model parameters are expected to vary, crucial input information. Results: The most important parameters in predicting the ablation zone size in our model of RFA are those representing the blood perfusion, electrical conductivity and the cell death model. The size of the 50 °C isotherm is sensitive to the electrical properties of tissue while the heat source is active, and to the thermal parameters during cooling. Conclusions: The parameter ranges chosen for the sensitivity analysis are believed to represent all that is currently known about their values in combination. The Morris method is able to compute global parameter sensitivities taking into account the interaction of all parameters, something that has not been done before. Research is needed to better understand the uncertainties in the cell death, electrical conductivity and perfusion models, but the other parameters are only of second order, providing a significant simplification. PMID:26000972

  15. Chronic hepatitis B infection and HBV DNA-containing capsids: Modeling and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manna, Kalyan; Chakrabarty, Siddhartha P.

    2015-05-01

    We analyze the dynamics of chronic HBV infection taking into account both uninfected and infected hepatocytes along with the intracellular HBV DNA-containing capsids and the virions. While previous HBV models have included either the uninfected hepatocytes or the intracellular HBV DNA-containing capsids, our model accounts for both these two populations. We prove the conditions for local and global stability of both the uninfected and infected steady states in terms of the basic reproduction number. Further, we incorporate a time lag in the model to encompass the intracellular delay in the production of the infected hepatocytes and find that this delay does not affect the overall dynamics of the system. The results for the model and the delay model are finally numerically illustrated.

  16. Silymarin suppresses hepatic stellate cell activation in a dietary rat model of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis: analysis of isolated hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mina; Yang, Su-Geun; Kim, Joon Mi; Lee, Jin-Woo; Kim, Young Soo; Lee, Jung Il

    2012-09-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is characterized by hepatocellular injury and initial fibrosis severity has been suggested as an important prognostic factor of NASH. Silymarin was reported to improve carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis and reduce the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSC). We investigated whether silymarin could suppress the activation of HSCs in NASH induced by methionine- and choline-deficient (MCD) diet fed to insulin-resistant rats. NASH was induced by feeding MCD diet to obese diabetic Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats. Non-diabetic Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) rats were fed with standard chow and served as the control. OLETF rats were fed on either standard laboratory chow, or MCD diet or MCD diet mixed with silymarin. Histological analysis of the liver showed improved non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) activity score in silymarin-fed MCD-induced NASH. Silymarin reduced the activation of HSCs, evaluated by counting α-smooth muscle actin (SMA)-positive cells and measuring α-SMA mRNA expression in the liver lysates as well as in HSCs isolated from the experimental animals. Although silymarin decreased α(1)-procollagen mRNA expression in isolated HSCs, the anti-fibrogenic effect of silymarin was not prominent so as to show significant difference under histological analysis. Silymarin increased the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and decreased tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α mRNA expression in the liver. Our study suggested that the possible protective effect of silymarin in diet induced NASH by suppressing the activation of HSCs and disturbing the role of the inflammatory cytokine TNF-α. PMID:22710359

  17. The effects of low-intensity laser therapy on hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Takhtfooladi, Mohammad Ashrafzadeh; Takhtfooladi, Hamed Ashrafzadeh; Khansari, Mohammadreza

    2014-11-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) is a major mechanism of liver injury following hepatic surgery or transplantation. Despite numerous reports on the role and relics of low-intensity laser therapy (LILT) in many organs, the potential effects of LILT on hepatic ischemia-reperfusion have not been explored. This study was aimed to investigate the impresses of LILT applied to the skin following hepatic ischemia and reperfusion. Thirty-six healthy male Wistar rats were allocated into three groups of twelve animals each as follows: Sham, Ischemia-reperfusion (IR), and Ischemia-reperfusion with laser treatment (IR+LILT). Hepatic ischemia was induced by clamping the arterial and portal venous for 45 min. A laser diode (400 mW, 804 nm) was applied to the skin surface at the anatomical site of the liver at a dose of 3 J/cm(2), and the duration of irradiation was selected 120 s with 15-min interval after beginning the reperfusion. Animals were maintained under anesthesia and sacrificed 6 h subsequent reperfusion. Hepatic samples were evaluated for histological assessment and biochemistry analysis. Serum aminotransferase levels, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels, malondialdehyde (MDA), and glutathione (GSH) levels were significantly lower (P < 0.05) in the irradiated group compared to the I/R group during the 6 h after reperfusion. The number of histopathological changes in the hepatic tissues was significantly lower in the treated group (P < 0.05). These observations suggest that LILT applied in transcutaneous manner effectively improves hepatic injuries after ischemia-reperfusion period in rats. PMID:24906482

  18. Antiviral Activity of Bacillus sp. Isolated from the Marine Sponge Petromica citrina against Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus, a Surrogate Model of the Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, Juliana Cristina Santiago; Kohn, Luciana Konecny; Fantinatti-Garboggini, Fabiana; Padilla, Marina Aiello; Flores, Eduardo Furtado; da Silva, Bárbara Pereira; de Menezes, Cláudia Beatriz Afonso; Arns, Clarice Weis

    2013-01-01

    The Hepatitis C virus causes chronic infections in humans, which can develop to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The Bovine viral diarrhea virus is used as a surrogate model for antiviral assays for the HCV. From marine invertebrates and microorganisms isolated from them, extracts were prepared for assessment of their possible antiviral activity. Of the 128 tested, 2 were considered active and 1 was considered promising. The best result was obtained from the extracts produced from the Bacillus sp. isolated from the sponge Petromica citrina. The extracts 555 (500 µg/mL, SI>18) and 584 (150 µg/mL, SI 27) showed a percentage of protection of 98% against BVDV, and the extract 616, 90% of protection. All of them showed activity during the viral adsorption. Thus, various substances are active on these studied organisms and may lead to the development of drugs which ensure an alternative therapy for the treatment of hepatitis C. PMID:23628828

  19. Optimization of immune responses induced by therapeutic vaccination with cross-reactive antigens in a humanized hepatitis B surface antigen transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Bourgine, Maryline; Dion, Sarah; Godon, Ophélie; Guillen, Gerardo; Michel, Marie-Louise; Aguilar, Julio Cesar

    2012-08-15

    The absence of relevant animal models of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has hampered the evaluation and development of therapeutic HBV vaccines. In this study, we generated a novel transgenic mouse lineage that expresses human class I and II HLA molecules and the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). HBsAg and hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg) administered as plasmid DNAs and recombinant proteins, either alone or in combination, were evaluated as therapeutic vaccine candidates in this mouse model. Our results emphasize the importance of the route of administration in breaking HBsAg tolerance. Although immunizing the transgenic mice with DNA encoding homologous HBsAg was sufficient to induce CD8+ T-cell responses, HBsAg from a heterologous subtype was required to induce a CD4+ T-cell response. Importantly, only prime-boost immunization protocols that combined plasmid DNA injection followed by protein injection induced the production of antibodies against the HBsAg expressed by the transgenic mice. PMID:22591777

  20. Analysis of Changes in Hepatic Gene Expression in a Murine Model of Tolerance to Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity (Autoprotection)

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Meeghan A; Koza-Taylor, Petra; Campion, Sarah N; Aleksunes, Lauren M; Gu, Xinsheng; Enayetallah, Ahmed E.; Lawton, Michael P; Manautou, José E

    2013-01-01

    Pretreatment of mice with a low hepatotoxic dose of acetaminophen (APAP) results in resistance to a subsequent, higher dose of APAP. This mouse model, termed APAP autoprotection was used here to identify differentially expressed genes and cellular pathways that could contribute to this development of resistance to hepatotoxicity. Male C57BL/6J mice were pretreated with APAP (400 mg/kg) and then challenged 48 hr later with 600 mg APAP/kg. Livers were obtained 4 or 24 hr later and total hepatic RNA was isolated and hybridized to Affymetrix Mouse Genome MU430_2 GeneChip. Statistically significant genes were determined and gene expression changes were also interrogated using the Causal Reasoning Engine (CRE). Extensive literature review narrowed our focus to methionine adenosyl transferase-1 alpha (MAT1A), nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (Fmo3) and galectin-3 (Lgals3). Down-regulation of MAT1A could lead to decreases in S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), which is known to protect against APAP toxicity. Nrf2 activation is expected to play a role in protective adaptation. Up-regulation of Lgals3, one of the genes supporting the Nrf2 hypothesis, can lead to suppression of apoptosis and reduced mitochondrial dysfunction. Fmo3 induction suggests the involvement of an enzyme not known to metabolize APAP in the development of tolerance to APAP toxicity. Subsequent quantitative RT-PCR and immunochemical analysis confirmed the differential expression of some of these genes in the APAP autoprotection model. In conclusion, our genomics strategy identified cellular pathways that might further explain the molecular basis for APAP autoprotection. PMID:24126418

  1. Water Extract of Dolichos lablab Attenuates Hepatic Lipid Accumulation in a Cellular Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Model.

    PubMed

    Im, A-Rang; Kim, Yun Hee; Lee, Hye Won; Song, Kwang Hoon

    2016-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common chronic liver disease that is rising in prevalence worldwide. Therapeutic strategies for patients with NAFLD are limited by a lack of effective drugs. In this report, we show that Dolichos lablab water extract (DLL-Ex) protects against free fatty acid (FFA)-induced lipid accumulation and attenuates expression of genes involved in lipid droplet accumulation in cellular NAFLD models. The hepatoprotective effects and underlying mechanism of DLL-Ex were assessed using an in vitro cellular model in which NAFLD was simulated by inducing excessive FFA influx into hepatocytes. HepG2 cells were treated with DLL-Ex and FFAs for 24 h, after which intracellular lipid content was observed by using Nile Red and Oil Red O staining. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to measure expression levels of genes related to FFA-mediated cellular energy depletion. Western blotting was used to measure protein levels of phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase, AMP-activated protein kinase alpha (AMPKα), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1 alpha. In HepG2 cells, DLL-Ex inhibited expression of CD36, which regulates fatty acid uptake, as well as BODIPY-labeled fatty acid uptake. Additionally, DLL-Ex significantly attenuated FFA-mediated cellular energy depletion and mitochondrial membrane depolarization. Furthermore, DLL-Ex enhanced phosphorylation of AMPK, indicating that AMPK is a critical regulator of DLL-Ex-mediated inhibition of hepatic lipid accumulation, possibly through its antioxidative effect. These results demonstrate that DLL-Ex exerts potent anti-NAFLD activity, suggesting that it could be a potential adjuvant treatment for patients with NAFLD. PMID:27152979

  2. Modeling hepatitis C virus kinetics: the relationship between the infected cell loss rate and the final slope of viral decay

    PubMed Central

    Dahari, Harel; Shudo, Emi; Cotler, Scott J.; Layden, Thomas J.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) who respond to treatment with interferon-α plus ribavirin exhibit biphasic or triphasic viral load declines. While the rapid first phase is indicative of the effectiveness of therapy in blocking viral production, ε, the slope of the final phase, λ, i.e., the second phase in biphasic declines and the third phase in triphasic declines, depends on the infected-cell loss rate, δ. Further, in standard models λ is approximately εδ, when the viral-clearance rate c>>δ as has been previously estimated. Methods The relationship among ε, δ, λ and the baseline fraction of HCV-infected hepatocytes, π, was investigated in a model that includes proliferation of hepatocytes. Results We find that λ is not proportional to ε but rather obeys complex relationship that can lead to dramatic increases in estimates of δ as ε increases. In particular, when ε<99%, λ moderately underestimates δ in patients with a small π, whereas δ may be up to 10-fold larger than λ in patients with a large π. Interestingly, when ε>99%, δ~λ, regardless of π. Conclusions Our results indicate that under therapy achieving <2 log reduction in viral load (ε<99%), previously estimated δ values may represent only a minimal estimate of the infected-cell loss rate. Moreover, combining interferon-α with new antiviral agents to achieve ε>99% should allow for a more accurate estimate of δ in HCV-RNA kinetic studies. This may be important when using viral kinetics to estimate the impact of the immune response on viral elimination and the attainment of sustained virological response. PMID:19474480

  3. Role of hemostatic factors in hepatic injury and disease: animal models de-liver.

    PubMed

    Kopec, A K; Joshi, N; Luyendyk, J P

    2016-07-01

    Chronic liver damage is associated with unique changes in the hemostatic system. Patients with liver disease often show a precariously rebalanced hemostatic system, which is easily tipped towards bleeding or thrombotic complications by otherwise benign stimuli. In addition, some clinical studies have shown that hemostatic system components contribute to the progression of liver disease. There is a strong basic science foundation for clinical studies with this particular focus. Chronic and acute liver disease can be modeled in rodents and large animals with a variety of approaches, which span chronic exposure to toxic xenobiotics, diet-induced obesity, and surgical intervention. These experimental approaches have now provided strong evidence that, in addition to perturbations in hemostasis caused by liver disease, elements of the hemostatic system have powerful effects on the progression of experimental liver toxicity and disease. In this review, we cover the basis of the animal models that are most often utilized to assess the impact of the hemostatic system on liver disease, and highlight the role that coagulation proteases and their targets play in experimental liver toxicity and disease, emphasizing key similarities and differences between models. The need to characterize hemostatic changes in existing animal models and to develop novel animal models recapitulating the coagulopathy of chronic liver disease is highlighted. Finally, we emphasize the continued need to translate knowledge derived from highly applicable animal models to improve our understanding of the reciprocal interaction between liver disease and the hemostatic system in patients. PMID:27060337

  4. Murine Models of Acute Alcoholic Hepatitis and Their Relevance to Human Disease.

    PubMed

    Wilkin, Richard J W; Lalor, Patricia F; Parker, Richard; Newsome, Philip N

    2016-04-01

    Alcohol-induced liver damage is a major burden for most societies, and murine studies can provide a means to better understand its pathogenesis and test new therapies. However, there are many models reported with widely differing phenotypes, not all of which fully regenerate the spectrum of human disease. Thus, it is important to understand the implications of these variations to efficiently model human disease. This review critically appraises key articles in the field, detailing the spectrum of liver damage seen in different models, and how they relate to the phenotype of disease seen in patients. A range of different methods of alcohol administration have been studied, ranging from ad libitum consumption of alcohol and water to modified diets (eg, Lieber deCarli liquid diet). Other feeding regimens have taken more invasive routes using intragastric feeding tubes to infuse alcohol directly into the stomach. Notably, models using wild-type mice generally produce a milder phenotype of liver damage than those using genetically modified mice, with the exception of the chronic binge-feeding model. We recommend panels of tests for consideration to standardize end points for the evaluation of the severity of liver damage-key for comparison of models of injury, testing of new therapies, and subsequent translation of findings into clinical practice. PMID:26835538

  5. 5-lipoxygenase activation is involved in the mechanisms of chronic hepatic injury in a rat model of chronic aluminum overload exposure.

    PubMed

    Mai, Shaoshan; He, Qin; Wang, Hong; Hu, Xinyue; Luo, Ying; Yang, Yang; Kuang, Shengnan; Tian, Xiaoyan; Ma, Jie; Yang, Junqing

    2016-08-15

    We previously confirmed that rats overloaded with aluminum exhibited hepatic function damage and increased susceptibility to hepatic inflammation. However, the mechanism of liver toxicity by chronic aluminum overload is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated changes in the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) signaling pathway and its effect on liver injury in aluminum-overloaded rats. A rat hepatic injury model of chronic aluminum injury was established via the intragastric administration of aluminum gluconate (Al(3+) 200mg/kg per day, 5days a week for 20weeks). The 5-LO inhibitor, caffeic acid (10 and 30mg/kg), was intragastrically administered 1h after aluminum administration. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was used to visualize pathological changes in rat liver tissue. A series of biochemical indicators were measured with biochemistry assay or ELISAs. Immunochemistry and RT-PCR methods were used to detect 5-LO protein and mRNA expression in the liver, respectively. Caffeic acid administration protected livers against histopathological injury, decreased plasma ALT, AST, and ALP levels, decreased TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and LTs levels, increased the reactive oxygen species content, and down-regulated the mRNA and protein expressions of 5-LO in aluminum overloaded rats. Our results indicate that 5-lipoxygenase activation is mechanistically involved in chronic hepatic injury in a rat model of chronic aluminum overload exposure and that the 5-LO signaling pathway, which associated with inflammation and oxidative stress, is a potential therapeutic target for chronic non-infection liver diseases. PMID:27368151

  6. Alcoholic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Damgaard Sandahl, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is an acute inflammatory syndrome causing significant morbidity and mortality. The prognosis is strongly dependent on disease severity, as assessed by clinical scoring systems. Reliable epidemiological data as well as knowledge of the clinical course of AH are essential for planning and resource allocation within the health care system. Likewise, individual evaluation of risk is desirable in the clinical handling of patients with AH as it can guide treatment, improve patient information, and serve as strata in clinical trials. The present PhD thesis is based on three studies using a cohort of nearly 2000 patients diagnosed with AH in Denmark from 1999 to 2008 as a cohort, in a population-based study design. The aims of this thesis were as follows. (1) To describe the incidence and short- and long-term mortality, of AH in Denmark (Study I). (2) To validate and compare the ability of the currently available prognostic scores to predict mortality in AH (Study II). (3) To investigate the short- and long-term causes of death of patients with AH (Study III). During the study decade, the annual incidence rate in the Danish population rose from 37 to 46 per 106 for men and from 24 to 34 per 106 for women. Both short- and long-term mortality rose for men and women, and the increase in short-term mortality was attributable to increasing patient age and prevalence of cirrhosis. Our evaluation of the most commonly used prognostic scores for predicting the mortality of patients with AH showed that all scores performed similarly, with Area under the Receiver Operator Characteristics curves giving values between 0.74 and 0.78 for 28-day mortality assessed on admission. Our study on causes of death showed that in the short-term (< 84 days after diagnosis), patients with AH were likely to die from liver-related events and infections. In the long-term (≥ 84 days after diagnosis), those who developed cirrhosis mainly died from liver-related causes, and

  7. Molecular mechanism of age-specific hepatic lipid accumulation in PPARalpha (+/-):LDLR (+/-) mice, an obese mouse model.

    PubMed

    Li, Yufeng; Sugiyama, Eiko; Yokoyama, Shin; Jiang, Lingling; Tanaka, Naoki; Aoyama, Toshifumi

    2008-04-01

    This study aimed to clarify the molecular mechanisms of age-specific hepatic lipid accumulation accompanying hyperinsulinemia in a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) (+/-):low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) (+/-) mouse line. The hepatic fat content, protein amounts, and mRNA levels of genes involved in hepatic lipid metabolism were analyzed in 25-, 50-, 75- and 100-week-old mice. Severe fatty liver was confirmed only in 50- and 75-week-old mice. The hepatic expression of proteins that function in lipid transport and catabolism did not differ among the groups. In contrast, the mRNA levels and protein amounts of lipogenic enzymes, including acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase-1, fatty acid synthase, and glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase, enhanced in the mice with fatty liver. Elevated mRNA and protein levels of lipoprotein lipase and fatty acid translocase, which are involved in hepatic lipid uptake, were also detected in mice with fatty liver. Moreover, both protein and mRNA levels of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1), a transcription factor regulating lipid synthesis, had age-specific patterns similar to those of the proteins described above. Therefore, the age-specific fatty liver found in the PPARalpha (+/-):LDLR (+/-) mouse line is probably caused by age-specific expression of SREBP-1 and its downstream lipogenic genes, coordinated by the increased uptake of lipids. All of these factors might be affected by age-specific changes in serum insulin concentration. PMID:18335269

  8. Hepatic and systemic metabolic responses to aerobic and anaerobic intra-abdominal abscesses in a highly reproducible chronic rat model.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, T; Sato, T; Marzella, L; Hirai, F; Trump, B F; Siegel, J H

    1984-01-01

    A single, uniform abscess was formed in 100% of the animals inoculated with a fecal pellet made of sterile rat feces, agar, and a known number and strain of bacteria. The effects of monoclonal Escherichia coli abscess (83 rats) were compared to those of sterile abscess (34 rats) and sham operation (35 rats without abscess). Bacteroides fragilis was added to the sterile pellet to study the effect of an anaerobic monoclonal abscess (16 rats) or of a biclonal abscess containing both aerobes and anaerobes (32 rats). After inoculation, a peritonitis stage with leucopenia, hypoglycemia, body weight loss, and slight fever was followed by the abscess stage with leucocytosis and a slight hyperglycemia. Mild hepatic energy charge deficiency and hepatic lactic acidosis were observed in sterile abscess rats, and slightly enhanced energy charge was seen in monoclonal E. coli abscess rats. The addition of B. fragilis to the sterile pellet, alone or together with E. coli, produced hepatic energy charge deficiency and hepatic lactic acidosis, which were significantly enhanced compared with the monoclonal E. coli abscess rats. The greatest effect was seen in the biclonal E. coli plus B. fragilis abscess, suggesting that anaerobic or combined aerobe and anaerobe abscesses may produce a greater hepatic injury than an aerobic organism abscess alone. This may account for the apparent synergic interaction between aerobic and anaerobic organisms. PMID:6380793

  9. Optimal control for an age-structured model for the transmission of hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Djidjou Demasse, Ramses; Tewa, Jean-Jules; Bowong, Samuel; Emvudu, Yves

    2016-08-01

    One of the characteristics of HBV transmission is the age structure of the host population and the vertical transmission of the disease. That is the infection is transmitted directly from infected mother to an embryo, fetus, or baby during pregnancy or childbirth (the perinatal infection). We formulated an age-structured model for the transmission dynamics of HBV with differential infectivity: symptomatic and asymptomatic infections. The model without intervention strategies is completely analyzed. We compute the basic reproduction number which determines the outcome of the disease. We also compute equilibria and study their stability. The sensitivity analysis of the initial model parameters is performed (to determine the impact of control-related parameters on outbreak severity). Using optimal control theory, we determine the cost-effective balance of three interventions methods which minimizes HBV-related deaths as well as the costs associated with intervention. PMID:26676356

  10. Feature Hepatitis: Hepatitis Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... of chronic liver disease, cirrhosis, viral hepatitis, and liver cancer make liver disease one of the 10 leading ... disease are decreasing, those for viral hepatitis and liver cancer are on the rise, both in the U.S. ...

  11. Metabolome Analyses Uncovered a Novel Inhibitory Effect of Acyclic Retinoid on Aberrant Lipogenesis in a Mouse Diethylnitrosamine-Induced Hepatic Tumorigenesis Model.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xian-Yang; Tatsukawa, Hideki; Hitomi, Kiyotaka; Shirakami, Yohei; Ishibashi, Naoto; Shimizu, Masahito; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Kojima, Soichi

    2016-03-01

    Acyclic retinoid (ACR) is a promising drug under clinical trials for preventing recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma. The objective of this study was to gain insights into molecular basis of the antitumorigenic action of ACR from a metabolic point of view. To achieve this, comprehensive cationic and lipophilic liver metabolic profiling was performed in mouse diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-induced hepatic tumorigenesis model using both capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry. ACR significantly counteracted against acceleration of lipogenesis but not glucose metabolism in DEN-treated mice liver, suggesting an important role of lipid metabolic reprogramming in the initiation step of hepatic tumorigenesis. Knowledge-based pathway analysis suggested that inhibition of linoleic acid metabolites such as arachidonic acid, a proinflammatory precursor, played a crucial role in the prevention by ACR of DEN-induced chronic inflammation-mediated tumorigenesis of the liver. As a molecular mechanism of the ACR's effect to prevent the aberrant lipogenesis, microarray analysis identified that a key transcription regulator of both embryogenesis and tumorigenesis, COUP transcription factor 2, also known as NR2F2, was associated with the metabolic effect of ACR in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Our study provided potential therapeutic targets for the chemoprevention of hepatocellular carcinoma as well as new insights into the mechanisms underlying prevention of hepatic tumorigenesis. PMID:26744170

  12. In vivo hepatic lipid quantification using MRS at 7 Tesla in a mouse model of glycogen storage disease type 1a

    PubMed Central

    Ramamonjisoa, Nirilanto; Ratiney, Helene; Mutel, Elodie; Guillou, Herve; Mithieux, Gilles; Pilleul, Frank; Rajas, Fabienne; Beuf, Olivier; Cavassila, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    The assessment of liver lipid content and composition is needed in preclinical research to investigate steatosis and steatosis-related disorders. The purpose of this study was to quantify in vivo hepatic fatty acid content and composition using a method based on short echo time proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) at 7 Tesla. A mouse model of glycogen storage disease type 1a with inducible liver-specific deletion of the glucose-6-phosphatase gene (L-G6pc−/−) mice and control mice were fed a standard diet or a high-fat/high-sucrose (HF/HS) diet for 9 months. In control mice, hepatic lipid content was found significantly higher with the HF/HS diet than with the standard diet. As expected, hepatic lipid content was already elevated in L-G6pc−/− mice fed a standard diet compared with control mice. L-G6pc−/− mice rapidly developed steatosis which was not modified by the HF/HS diet. On the standard diet, estimated amplitudes from olefinic protons were found significantly higher in L-G6pc−/− mice compared with that in control mice. L-G6pc−/− mice showed no noticeable polyunsaturation from diallylic protons. Total unsaturated fatty acid indexes measured by gas chromatography were in agreement with MRS measurements. These results showed the great potential of high magnetic field MRS to follow the diet impact and lipid alterations in mouse liver. PMID:23596325

  13. Structural identifiability analyses of candidate models for in vitro Pitavastatin hepatic uptake.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, Thomas R B; Chappell, Michael J; Yates, James W T; Evans, Neil D

    2014-05-01

    In this paper a review of the application of four different techniques (a version of the similarity transformation approach for autonomous uncontrolled systems, a non-differential input/output observable normal form approach, the characteristic set differential algebra and a recent algebraic input/output relationship approach) to determine the structural identifiability of certain in vitro nonlinear pharmacokinetic models is provided. The Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide (OATP) substrate, Pitavastatin, is used as a probe on freshly isolated animal and human hepatocytes. Candidate pharmacokinetic non-linear compartmental models have been derived to characterise the uptake process of Pitavastatin. As a prerequisite to parameter estimation, structural identifiability analyses are performed to establish that all unknown parameters can be identified from the experimental observations available. PMID:23870173

  14. Pharmacodynamic Modeling of Acute and Chronic Effects of Methylprednisolone on Hepatic Urea Cycle Genes in Rats*

    PubMed Central

    Hazra, Anasuya; DuBois, Debra C.; Almon, Richard R.; Snyder, Grayson H.; Jusko, William J.

    2008-01-01

    Corticosteroids (CS) regulate many enzymes at both mRNA and protein levels. This study used microarrays to broadly assess regulation of various genes related to the greater urea cycle and employs pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling to quantitatively analyze and compare the temporal profiles of these genes during acute and chronic exposure to methylprednisolone (MPL). One group of adrenalectomized male Wistar rats received an intravenous bolus dose (50 mg/kg) of MPL, whereas a second group received MPL by a subcutaneous infusion (Alzet osmotic pumps) at a rate of 0.3 mg/kg/hr for seven days. The rats were sacrificed at various time points over 72 hours (acute) or 168 hours (chronic) and livers were harvested. Total RNA was extracted and Affymetrix® gene chips (RG_U34A for acute and RAE 230A for chronic) were used to identify genes regulated by CS. Besides five primary urea cycle enzymes, many other genes related to the urea cycle showed substantial changes in mRNA expression. Some genes that were simply up- or down-regulated after acute MPL showed complex biphasic patterns upon chronic infusion indicating involvement of secondary regulation. For the simplest patterns, indirect response models were used to describe the nuclear steroid-bound receptor mediated increase or decrease in gene transcription (e.g. tyrosine aminotransferase, glucocorticoid receptor). For the biphasic profiles, involvement of a secondary biosignal was assumed (e.g. ornithine decarboxylase, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein) and more complex models were derived. Microarrays were used successfully to explore CS effects on various urea cycle enzyme genes. PD models presented in this report describe testable hypotheses regarding molecular mechanisms and quantitatively characterize the direct or indirect regulation of various genes by CS. PMID:19787073

  15. Hepatic tissue culture model for study of host-parasite interactions in alveolar echinococcosis.

    PubMed Central

    Jura, H; Bader, A; Hartmann, M; Maschek, H; Frosch, M

    1996-01-01

    An in vitro model for growth and differentiation of the metacestode tissue of the tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis is described. This model simulates the organotropism of the parasite toward the liver of the intermediate host. In the presence of collagen-embedded primary hepatocytes from rats and humans, which can be kept in culture for 2 to 3 months, the parasitic vesicles grew by exogenous budding and multiplied about 12-fold within 3 weeks. In contrast, without the hepatocytes, the metacestodes rapidly degenerated. Development of protoscolices was seen only in the presence of rat hepatocytes but not in coculture of the metacestodes with hepatocytes of human origin, thus reflecting the in vivo situation during infection of rodents and in alveolar echinococcosis in humans. The experiments indicated that growth of the metacestodes and development of protoscolices depended on soluble low-molecular-weight factors released by the hepatocytes. The in vitro-grown metacestodes did not differ morphologically from the larvae found in infected intermediate hosts, and their infectivity was completely maintained. This report describes the first in vitro model of alveolar echinococcosis and will be the basis for future studies on host-parasite interactions of this important zoonosis. PMID:8751888

  16. A decision model and cost analysis of intra-operative cell salvage during hepatic resection

    PubMed Central

    Lemke, Madeline; Eeson, Gareth; Lin, Yulia; Tarshis, Jordan; Hallet, Julie; Coburn, Natalie; Law, Calvin; Karanicolas, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Intraoperative cell salvage (ICS) can reduce allogeneic transfusions but with notable direct costs. This study assessed whether routine use of ICS is cost minimizing in hepatectomy and defines a subpopulation of patients where ICS is most cost minimizing based on patient transfusion risk. Methods A decision model from a health systems perspective was developed to examine adoption and non-adoption of ICS use for hepatectomy. A prospectively maintained database of hepatectomy patients provided data to populate the model. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis was used to determine the probability of ICS being cost-minimizing at specified transfusion risks. One-way sensitivity analysis was used to identify factors most relevant to institutions considering adoption of ICS for hepatectomies. Results In the base case analysis (transfusion risk of 28.8%) the probability that routine utilization of ICS is cost-minimizing is 64%. The probability that ICS is cost-minimizing exceeds 50% if the patient transfusion risk exceeds 25%. The model was most sensitive to patient transfusion risk, variation in costs of allogeneic blood, and number of appropriate cases the device could be used for. Conclusions ICS is cost-minimizing for routine use in liver resection, particularly when used for patients with a risk of transfusion of 25% or greater. PMID:27154806

  17. Identification of the common regulators for hepatocellular carcinoma induced by hepatitis B virus X antigen in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jeng-Wei; Hsia, Yu; Yang, Wan-Yu; Lin, Yu-I; Li, Chao-Chin; Tsai, Ting-Fen; Chang, Ko-Wei; Shieh, Grace S; Tsai, Shih-Feng; Wang, Horng-Dar; Yuh, Chiou-Hwa

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus X antigen plays an important role in the development of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The key regulators controlling the temporal downstream gene expression for HCC progression remains unknown. In this study, we took advantage of systems biology approach and analyzed the microarray data of the HBx transgenic mouse as a screening process to identify the differentially expressed genes and applied the software Pathway Studio to identify potential pathways and regulators involved in HCC. Using subnetwork enrichment analysis, we identified five common regulator genes: EDN1, BMP7, BMP4, SPIB and SRC. Upregulation of the common regulators was validated in the other independent HBx transgenic mouse lines. Furthermore, we verified the correlation of their RNA expression levels by using the human HCC samples, and their protein levels by using the human liver disease tissue arrays. EDN1, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 4 and BMP7 were upregulated in cirrhosis, BMP4, BMP7 and SRC were further upregulated in hepatocellular or cholangiocellular carcinoma samples. The trend of increasing expression of the common regulators correlates well with the progression of human liver cancer. Overexpression of the common regulators increases the cell viability, promotes migration and invasiveness and enhances the colony formation ability in Hep3B cells. Our approach allows us to identify the critical genes in hepatocarcinogenesis in an HBx-induced mouse model. The validation of the gene expressions in the liver cancer of human patients and their cellular function assays suggests that the identified common regulators may serve as useful molecular targets for the early-stage diagnosis or therapy for HCC. PMID:22021908

  18. Functional and Biochemical Characterization of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Particles Produced in a Humanized Liver Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Calattini, Sara; Fusil, Floriane; Mancip, Jimmy; Dao Thi, Viet Loan; Granier, Christelle; Gadot, Nicolas; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Zeisel, Mirjam B; Baumert, Thomas F; Lavillette, Dimitri; Dreux, Marlène; Cosset, François-Loïc

    2015-09-18

    Lipoprotein components are crucial factors for hepatitis C virus (HCV) assembly and entry. As hepatoma cells producing cell culture-derived HCV (HCVcc) particles are impaired in some aspects of lipoprotein metabolism, it is of upmost interest to biochemically and functionally characterize the in vivo produced viral particles, particularly regarding how lipoprotein components modulate HCV entry by lipid transfer receptors such as scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI). Sera from HCVcc-infected liver humanized FRG mice were separated by density gradients. Viral subpopulations, termed HCVfrg particles, were characterized for their physical properties, apolipoprotein association, and infectivity. We demonstrate that, in contrast to the widely spread distribution of apolipoproteins across the different HCVcc subpopulations, the most infectious HCVfrg particles are highly enriched in apoE, suggesting that such apolipoprotein enrichment plays a role for entry of in vivo derived infectious particles likely via usage of apolipoprotein receptors. Consistent with this salient feature, we further reveal previously undefined functionalities of SR-BI in promoting entry of in vivo produced HCV. First, unlike HCVcc, SR-BI is a particularly limiting factor for entry of HCVfrg subpopulations of very low density. Second, HCVfrg entry involves SR-BI lipid transfer activity but not its capacity to bind to the viral glycoprotein E2. In conclusion, we demonstrate that composition and biophysical properties of the different subpopulations of in vivo produced HCVfrg particles modulate their levels of infectivity and receptor usage, hereby featuring divergences with in vitro produced HCVcc particles and highlighting the powerfulness of this in vivo model for the functional study of the interplay between HCV and liver components. PMID:26224633

  19. Autophagic response in the Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease, an animal model of virally-induced fulminant hepatic failure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus (RHDV) induces a severe disease that fulfils many requirements of an animal model of fulminant hepatic failure. However, a better knowledge of molecular mechanisms contributing to liver damage is required, and it is unknown whether the RHDV induces liver autophagy and how it relates to apoptosis. In this study, we attempted to explore which signalling pathways were involved in the autophagic response induced by the RHDV and to characterize their role in the context of RHDV pathogenesis. Rabbits were infected with 2 × 104 hemmaglutination units of a RHDV isolate. The autophagic response was measured as presence of autophagic vesicles, LC3 staining, conversion of LC3-I to autophagosome-associated LC3-II and changes in expression of beclin-1, UVRAG, Atg5, Atg12, Atg16L1 and p62/SQSTM1. RHDV-triggered autophagy reached a maximum at 24 hours post-infection (hpi) and declined at 30 and 36 hpi. Phosphorylation of mTOR also augmented in early periods of infection and there was an increase in the expression of the endoplasmic reticulum chaperones BiP/GRP78, CHOP and GRP94. Apoptosis, measured as caspase-3 activity and expression of PARP-1, increased significantly at 30 and 36 hpi in parallel to the maximal expression of the RHDV capsid protein VP60. These data indicate that RHDV infection initiates a rapid autophagic response, perhaps in an attempt to protect liver, which associates to ER stress development and is independent from downregulation of the major autophagy suppressor mTOR. As the infection continues and the autophagic response declines, cells begin to exhibit apoptosis. PMID:24490870

  20. Nrf2 pathway activation contributes to anti-fibrosis effects of ginsenoside Rg1 in a rat model of alcohol- and CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian-ping; Gao, Yan; Chu, Shi-feng; Zhang, Zhao; Xia, Cong-yuan; Mou, Zheng; Song, Xiu-yun; He, Wen-bin; Guo, Xiao-feng; Chen, Nai-hong

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the anti-fibrosis effects of ginsenoside Rg1 on alcohol- and CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis in rats and to explore the mechanisms of the effects. Methods: Rats were given 6% alcohol in water and injected with CCl4 (2 mL/kg, sc) twice a week for 8 weeks. Rg1 (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg per day, po) was administered in the last 2 weeks. Hepatic fibrosis was determined by measuring serum biochemical parameters, HE staining, Masson's trichromic staining, and hydroxyproline and α-SMA immunohistochemical staining of liver tissues. The activities of antioxidant enzymes, lipid peroxidation, and Nrf2 signaling pathway-related proteins (Nrf2, Ho-1 and Nqo1) in liver tissues were analyzed. Cultured hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) of rats were prepared for in vitro studies. Results: In the alcohol- and CCl4-treated rats, Rg1 administration dose-dependently suppressed the marked increases of serum ALT, AST, LDH and ALP levels, inhibited liver inflammation and HSC activation and reduced liver fibrosis scores. Rg1 significantly increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes (SOD, GSH-Px and CAT) and reduced MDA levels in liver tissues. Furthermore, Rg1 significantly increased the expression and nuclear translocation of Nrf2 that regulated the expression of many antioxidant enzymes. Treatment of the cultured HSCs with Rg1 (1 μmol/L) induced Nrf2 translocation, and suppressed CCl4-induced cell proliferation, reversed CCl4- induced changes in MDA, GPX, PCIII and HA contents in the supernatant fluid and α-SMA expression in the cells. Knockdown of Nrf2 gene diminished these actions of Rg1 in CCl4-treated HSCs in vitro. Conclusion: Rg1 exerts protective effects in a rat model of alcohol- and CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis via promoting the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and expression of antioxidant enzymes. PMID:24976156

  1. Effectiveness of Losartan-Loaded Hyaluronic Acid (HA) Micelles for the Reduction of Advanced Hepatic Fibrosis in C3H/HeN Mice Model

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Reju George; Moon, Myeong Ju; Kim, Jo Heon; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Jeong, Yong Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Advanced hepatic fibrosis therapy using drug-delivering nanoparticles is a relatively unexplored area. Angiotensin type 1 (AT1) receptor blockers such as losartan can be delivered to hepatic stellate cells (HSC), blocking their activation and thereby reducing fibrosis progression in the liver. In our study, we analyzed the possibility of utilizing drug-loaded vehicles such as hyaluronic acid (HA) micelles carrying losartan to attenuate HSC activation. Losartan, which exhibits inherent lipophilicity, was loaded into the hydrophobic core of HA micelles with a 19.5% drug loading efficiency. An advanced liver fibrosis model was developed using C3H/HeN mice subjected to 20 weeks of prolonged TAA/ethanol weight-adapted treatment. The cytocompatibility and cell uptake profile of losartan-HA micelles were studied in murine fibroblast cells (NIH3T3), human hepatic stellate cells (hHSC) and FL83B cells (hepatocyte cell line). The ability of these nanoparticles to attenuate HSC activation was studied in activated HSC cells based on alpha smooth muscle actin (α-sma) expression. Mice treated with oral losartan or losartan-HA micelles were analyzed for serum enzyme levels (ALT/AST, CK and LDH) and collagen deposition (hydroxyproline levels) in the liver. The accumulation of HA micelles was observed in fibrotic livers, which suggests increased delivery of losartan compared to normal livers and specific uptake by HSC. Active reduction of α-sma was observed in hHSC and the liver sections of losartan-HA micelle-treated mice. The serum enzyme levels and collagen deposition of losartan-HA micelle-treated mice was reduced significantly compared to the oral losartan group. Losartan-HA micelles demonstrated significant attenuation of hepatic fibrosis via an HSC-targeting mechanism in our in vitro and in vivo studies. These nanoparticles can be considered as an alternative therapy for liver fibrosis. PMID:26714035

  2. Sustained Efficacy and Seroconversion with the Toll-Like Receptor 7 Agonist GS-9620 in the Woodchuck Model of Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Menne, Stephan; Tumas, Daniel B.; Liu, Katherine H.; Thampi, Linta; AlDeghaither, Dalal; Baldwin, Betty H.; Bellezza, Christine A.; Cote, Paul J.; Zheng, Jim; Halcomb, Randall; Fosdick, Abigail; Fletcher, Simon P.; Daffis, Stephane; Li, Li; Yue, Peng; Wolfgang, Grushenka H. I.; Tennant, Bud C.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims New therapies for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) are urgently needed since current treatments rarely lead to cure. We evaluated whether the oral small molecule toll-like receptor (TLR7) agonist GS-9620 could induce durable anti-viral efficacy in woodchucks chronically infected with woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV), a hepadnavirus closely related to human hepatitis B virus (HBV). Methods After evaluating the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and tolerability of oral GS-9620 in uninfected woodchucks, adult woodchucks chronically infected with WHV (n=7 per group) were dosed with GS-9620 or placebo for 4 or 8 weeks with different treatment schedules. Results GS-9620 treatment induced rapid, marked and sustained reduction in serum viral DNA (mean maximal 6.2 log10 reduction), and hepatic WHV DNA replicative intermediates, WHV cccDNA and WHV RNA, as well as loss of detectable serum WHV surface antigen (WHsAg). GS-9620 treatment also induced a sustained antibody response against WHsAg in a subset of animals. Strikingly, treatment reduced the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from 71% in the placebo group to 8% in GS-9620-treated woodchucks with sustained viral load reduction. GS-9620 treatment was associated with reversible increases in serum liver enzymes and thrombocytopenia, and induced intrahepatic CD8+ T cell, NK cell, B cell and interferon (IFN) response transcriptional signatures. Conclusions The data demonstrate that short duration, finite treatment with the oral TLR7 agonist GS-9620 can induce a sustained antiviral response in the woodchuck model of CHB, and support investigation of this compound as a therapeutic approach to attain a functional cure in CHB patients. PMID:25559326

  3. Outer Membrane Protein A (OmpA) of Shigella flexneri 2a, Induces Protective Immune Response in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Pore, Debasis; Mahata, Nibedita; Pal, Amit; Chakrabarti, Manoj K.

    2011-01-01

    Background In our earlier studies 34 kDa outer membrane protein (OMP) of Shigella flexneri 2a has been identified as an efficient immunostimulant. Key Results In the present study MALDI-TOF MS analysis of the purified 34 kDa OMP of Shigella flexneri 2a shows considerable sequence homology (Identity 65%) with the OmpA of S. flexneri 2a. By using the specific primers, the gene of interest has been amplified from S. flexneri 2a (N.Y-962/92) genomic DNA, cloned in pET100/D-TOPO® vector and expressed using induction with isopropyl thiogalactoside (IPTG) for the first time. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the recombinant OmpA has been evaluated in an intranasally immunized murine pulmonary model. The recombinant protein induces significantly enhanced protein specific IgG and IgA Abs in both mucosal and systemic compartments and IgA secreting cells in the systemic compartment (spleen). The mice immunized with OmpA have been protected completely from systemic challenge with a lethal dose of virulent S. flexneri 2a. Immunization with the protein causes mild polymorphonuclear neutrophil infiltration in the lung, without inducing the release of large amounts of proinflammatory cytokines. Conclusion These results suggest that the OmpA of S. flexneri 2a can be an efficacious mucosal immunogen inducing protective immune responses. Our findings also demonstrate that antibodies and Th1 immune response may be associated with the marked protective efficacy of immunized mice after intranasal shigellae infection. PMID:21818362

  4. Hepatic and serum lipid signatures specific to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in murine models

    PubMed Central

    Chiappini, Franck; Desterke, Christophe; Bertrand-Michel, Justine; Guettier, Catherine; Le Naour, François

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) is a precursor of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a condition that may progress to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Markers for diagnosis of NASH are still lacking. We have investigated lipid markers using mouse models that developed NAFL when fed with high fat diet (HFD) or NASH when fed using methionine choline deficient diet (MCDD). We have performed a comprehensive lipidomic analysis on liver tissues as well as on sera from mice fed HFD (n = 5), MCDD (n = 5) or normal diet as controls (n = 10). Machine learning approach based on prediction analysis of microarrays followed by random forests allowed identifying 21 lipids out of 149 in the liver and 14 lipids out of 155 in the serum discriminating mice fed MCDD from HFD or controls. In conclusion, the global approach implemented allowed characterizing lipid signatures specific to NASH in both liver and serum from animal models. This opens new avenue for investigating early and non-invasive lipid markers for diagnosis of NASH in human. PMID:27510159

  5. Hepatic and serum lipid signatures specific to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in murine models.

    PubMed

    Chiappini, Franck; Desterke, Christophe; Bertrand-Michel, Justine; Guettier, Catherine; Le Naour, François

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) is a precursor of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a condition that may progress to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Markers for diagnosis of NASH are still lacking. We have investigated lipid markers using mouse models that developed NAFL when fed with high fat diet (HFD) or NASH when fed using methionine choline deficient diet (MCDD). We have performed a comprehensive lipidomic analysis on liver tissues as well as on sera from mice fed HFD (n = 5), MCDD (n = 5) or normal diet as controls (n = 10). Machine learning approach based on prediction analysis of microarrays followed by random forests allowed identifying 21 lipids out of 149 in the liver and 14 lipids out of 155 in the serum discriminating mice fed MCDD from HFD or controls. In conclusion, the global approach implemented allowed characterizing lipid signatures specific to NASH in both liver and serum from animal models. This opens new avenue for investigating early and non-invasive lipid markers for diagnosis of NASH in human. PMID:27510159

  6. Protect Yourself from Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... develop yellowish eyes and skin. All the hepatitis viruses can cause acute, or short-term, hepatitis. Some can also cause chronic hepatitis, in which the infection lasts a long time, sometimes for your whole life. Chronic hepatitis can eventually lead to scarring of ...

  7. Hepatic osteodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Gatta, Angelo; Verardo, Alberto; Di Pascoli, Marco; Giannini, Sandro; Bolognesi, Massimo

    2014-09-01

    Metabolic disturbances of bone are frequent in patients with chronic liver disease. The prevalence of osteoporosis among patients with advanced chronic liver disease is reported between 12% and 55%; it is higher in primary biliary cirrhosis. All patients with advanced liver disease should be screened for osteoporosis with a densitometry, especially if the etiology is cholestatic and in the presence of other risk factors. Clinical relevance of hepatic osteodystrophy increases after liver transplantation. After liver transplant, a rapid loss of bone mineral density can be detected in the first 6 months, followed by stabilization and slight improvement of the values. At the time of transplantation, bone density values are very important prognostic factors. Therapy of hepatic osteodystrophy is based primarily on the control of risk factors: cessation of tobacco and alcohol assumption, reduction of caffeine ingestion, exercise, supplementation of calcium and vitamin D, limitation of drugs such as loop diuretics, corticosteroids, cholestyramine. Bisphosphonates have been proposed for the therapy of osteoporosis in patients with liver disease, particularly after liver transplantation. The possible side effects of oral administration of bisphosphonates, such as the occurrence of esophageal ulcerations, are of particular concern in patients with liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension, due to the risk of gastrointestinal hemorrhage from ruptured esophageal varices, although this risk is probably overestimated. PMID:25568651

  8. [Hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Festi, Davide; Marasco, Giovanni; Ravaioli, Federico; Colecchia, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a common complication of liver cirrhosis and it can manifest with a broad spectrum of neuropsychiatric abnormalities of varying severity, acuity and time course with important clinical implications. According to recent guidelines, HE has been classified into different types, depending on the severity of hepatic dysfunction, the presence of porto-systemic shunts and the number of previous episodes or persistent manifestations. From a clinical point of view, HE can be recognized as unimpaired, covert (that deals with minimal and grade 1 according to the grading of mental state), and overt (that is categorized from grade 2 to grade 4). Different and only partially known pathogenic mechanisms have been identified, comprising ammonia, inflammatory cytokines, benzodiazepine-like compounds and manganese deposition. Different therapeutic strategies are available for treating HE, in particular the overt HE, since covert HE needs to be managed case by case. Recognition and treatment of precipitating factors represent fundamental part of the management. The more effective treatments, which can be performed separately or combined, are represented by non-absorbable disaccharides (lactulose and lactitol) and the topic antibiotic rifaximin; other possible therapies, mainly used in patients non responders to previous treatments, are represented by branched chain amino acids and metabolic ammonia scavengers. PMID:27571468

  9. Hepatic progenitor cells, stem cells, and AFP expression in models of liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Kuhlmann, Wolf D; Peschke, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Adult hepatocytes and liver-cell progenitors play a role in restoring liver tissue after injury. For the study of progenitor cells in liver repair, experimental models included (a) surgical removal of liver tissue by partial hepatectomy; (b) acute injury by carbontetrachloride; (c) acute injury by d-galactosamine (GalN) and N-nitrosomorpholine (NNM); and (d) chemical hepatocarcinogenesis by feeding NNM in low and high doses. Serological and immunohistological detection of alpha-fetoprotein gene expression served to follow pathways of cellular differentiation. Stem cells were not required in models of surgical removal of parenchyma and in carbon tetrachloride intoxication of adult hepatocytes. In contrast, regeneration of liver occurred through biliary epithelial cells in injuries induced by GalN and NNM. These biliary epithelial cells, collectively called oval cells, are most probably derived from the canals of Hering. Proliferating bile duct cells reached a level of differentiation with reactivation of foetal genes and significant alpha-1-fetoprotein (AFP) synthesis signalling a certain degree of retrodifferentiation with potential stemness. Due to the same embryonic origin of bile ducts and hepatocytes, biliary epithelium and its proliferating progeny (oval cells) have a defined role in liver regeneration as a transit and amplification compartment. In their early proliferation stage, oval cells were heavily engaged in DNA synthesis ([3H]thymidine labelling). Pulse-chase experiments during experimental hepatocarcinogenesis exhibited their development into hepatocytes with high risk for transformation and leading to foci of altered hepatocytes. Hepatocellular carcinomas may arise either from proliferating/differentiating oval cells or from adult hepatocytes; both cell types have stem-like properties. AFP-positive and AFP-negative carcinomas occurred in the same liver. They may represent random clonal origin. The heterogeneity of phenotypic marker (AFP) correlated

  10. Patient-Specific Biomechanical Modeling for Guidance During Minimally-Invasive Hepatic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Plantefève, Rosalie; Peterlik, Igor; Haouchine, Nazim; Cotin, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    During the minimally-invasive liver surgery, only the partial surface view of the liver is usually provided to the surgeon via the laparoscopic camera. Therefore, it is necessary to estimate the actual position of the internal structures such as tumors and vessels from the pre-operative images. Nevertheless, such task can be highly challenging since during the intervention, the abdominal organs undergo important deformations due to the pneumoperitoneum, respiratory and cardiac motion and the interaction with the surgical tools. Therefore, a reliable automatic system for intra-operative guidance requires fast and reliable registration of the pre- and intra-operative data. In this paper we present a complete pipeline for the registration of pre-operative patient-specific image data to the sparse and incomplete intra-operative data. While the intra-operative data is represented by a point cloud extracted from the stereo-endoscopic images, the pre-operative data is used to reconstruct a biomechanical model which is necessary for accurate estimation of the position of the internal structures, considering the actual deformations. This model takes into account the patient-specific liver anatomy composed of parenchyma, vascularization and capsule, and is enriched with anatomical boundary conditions transferred from an atlas. The registration process employs the iterative closest point technique together with a penalty-based method. We perform a quantitative assessment based on the evaluation of the target registration error on synthetic data as well as a qualitative assessment on real patient data. We demonstrate that the proposed registration method provides good results in terms of both accuracy and robustness w.r.t. the quality of the intra-operative data. PMID:26297341

  11. Multi‑transgenic minipig models exhibiting potential for hepatic insulin resistance and pancreatic apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kong, Siyuan; Ruan, Jinxue; Xin, Leilei; Fan, Junhua; Xia, Jihan; Liu, Zhiguo; Mu, Yulian; Yang, Shulin; Li, Kui

    2016-01-01

    There are currently no multi‑transgenic minipig models of diabetes for the regulation of multiple genes involved in its pathogenesis. The foot and mouth disease virus 2A (F2A)‑mediated polycistronic system possesses several advantages, and the present study developed a novel multi‑transgenic minipig model associated with diabetes using this system. The tissue‑specific polycistronic system used in the present study consisted of two expression cassettes, separated by an insulator: (i) 11‑β‑hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (11β‑HSD1), driven by the porcine liver‑specific apolipoprotein E promoter; (ii) human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), linked to the furin digested site and F‑2A, driven by the porcine pancreas‑specific insulin promoter. In the present study, porcine fetal fibroblasts were transfected with this vector. Following somatic cell nuclear transfer using 10 cell clones and the transplantation of 1,459 embryos in total, three Landrace x Yorkshire surrogates became pregnant and delivered three Wuzhishan piglets. Genomic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) demonstrated that the piglets were multi‑transgenic. Reverse transcription‑quantitative PCR confirmed that 11β‑HSD1 transcription was upregulated in the targeted liver. Similarly, hIAPP and CHOP were expressed at high levels, compared with the control (P<0.05 and P<0.01) in the pancreas, consistent with the western blotting and immunohistochemistry results. The primary results also showed that overexpression of 11β‑HSD1 in the liver increased the liver fat lipid parameters; and the levels of hIAPP and CHOP in the pancreatic islet cells, leading to delayed β‑cell development and apoptosis. This novel tissue‑specific polycistronic system offers a promising starting point for efficiently mimicking multigenic metabolic disease. PMID:26648014

  12. Multi-transgenic minipig models exhibiting potential for hepatic insulin resistance and pancreatic apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    KONG, SIYUAN; RUAN, JINXUE; XIN, LEILEI; FAN, JUNHUA; XIA, JIHAN; LIU, ZHIGUO; MU, YULIAN; YANG, SHULIN; LI, KUI

    2016-01-01

    There are currently no multi-transgenic minipig models of diabetes for the regulation of multiple genes involved in its pathogenesis. The foot and mouth disease virus 2A (F2A)-mediated polycistronic system possesses several advantages, and the present study developed a novel multi-transgenic minipig model associated with diabetes using this system. The tissue-specific polycistronic system used in the present study consisted of two expression cassettes, separated by an insulator: (i) 11-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (11β-HSD1), driven by the porcine liver-specific apolipoprotein E promoter; (ii) human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), linked to the furin digested site and F-2A, driven by the porcine pancreas-specific insulin promoter. In the present study, porcine fetal fibroblasts were transfected with this vector. Following somatic cell nuclear transfer using 10 cell clones and the transplantation of 1,459 embryos in total, three Landrace x Yorkshire surrogates became pregnant and delivered three Wuzhishan piglets. Genomic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) demonstrated that the piglets were multi-transgenic. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR confirmed that 11β-HSD1 transcription was upregulated in the targeted liver. Similarly, hIAPP and CHOP were expressed at high levels, compared with the control (P<0.05 and P<0.01) in the pancreas, consistent with the western blotting and immunohistochemistry results. The primary results also showed that overexpression of 11β-HSD1 in the liver increased the liver fat lipid parameters; and the levels of hIAPP and CHOP in the pancreatic islet cells, leading to delayed β-cell development and apoptosis. This novel tissue-specific polycistronic system offers a promising starting point for efficiently mimicking multigenic metabolic disease. PMID:26648014

  13. Effect of Corilagin on the miR-21/smad7/ERK signaling pathway in a schistosomiasis-induced hepatic fibrosis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Wang, Yao; Xue, Jun; Ma, Qian; Zhang, Juan; Chen, Yun-Fei; Shang, Zhen-Zhong; Li, Quan-Qiang; Zhang, Shu-Ling; Zhao, Lei

    2016-08-01

    This study sought to investigate the anti-fibrotic effect of Corilagin via interference with the miR-21/smad7/ERK signaling pathway in a schistosomiasis-induced hepatic fibrosis mouse model. Mice were infected with Schistosoma japonicum cercaria to establish the mouse model of schistosomiasis-induced hepatic fibrosis. At four weeks after infection, the groups were given different medications. The living conditions were observed. Real-time PCR was employed to detect the mRNA levels of miR-21, smad7 and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), and western blotting was used to examine the protein levels of smad7, CTGF, smad1, p-smad1, smad2, p-smad2, ERK1/2, p-ERK1/2 and TGF-β receptor I. Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the expression of CTGF. Compared with the model group, increasing concentrations of Corilagin improved the quality of life, inhibited the mRNA expression of miR-21, promoted smad7 protein expression, and inhibited CTGF protein expression (p<0.05 or 0.01). Moreover, Corilagin significantly reduced the protein levels of p-smad1, p-smad2, p-ERK1/2, and TGF-β receptor I (p<0.05 or 0.01). CTGF staining in the cytoplasm was markedly decreased by Corilagin (p<0.05 or 0.01). In conclusion, Corilagin inhibited schistosomiasis-induced hepatic fibrosis via the miR21/smad7/ERK pathway in this animal model. PMID:26946098

  14. Hepatitis Virus Infections in Poultry.

    PubMed

    Yugo, Danielle M; Hauck, Ruediger; Shivaprasad, H L; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2016-09-01

    Viral hepatitis in poultry is a complex disease syndrome caused by several viruses belonging to different families including avian hepatitis E virus (HEV), duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV), duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV-1, -2, -3), duck hepatitis virus Types 2 and 3, fowl adenoviruses (FAdV), and turkey hepatitis virus (THV). While these hepatitis viruses share the same target organ, the liver, they each possess unique clinical and biological features. In this article, we aim to review the common and unique features of major poultry hepatitis viruses in an effort to identify the knowledge gaps and aid the prevention and control of poultry viral hepatitis. Avian HEV is an Orthohepevirus B in the family Hepeviridae that naturally infects chickens and consists of three distinct genotypes worldwide. Avian HEV is associated with hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome or big liver and spleen disease in chickens, although the majority of the infected birds are subclinical. Avihepadnaviruses in the family of Hepadnaviridae have been isolated from ducks, snow geese, white storks, grey herons, cranes, and parrots. DHBV evolved with the host as a noncytopathic form without clinical signs and rarely progressed to chronicity. The outcome for DHBV infection varies by the host's ability to elicit an immune response and is dose and age dependent in ducks, thus mimicking the pathogenesis of human hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections and providing an excellent animal model for human HBV. DHAV is a picornavirus that causes a highly contagious virus infection in ducks with up to 100% flock mortality in ducklings under 6 wk of age, while older birds remain unaffected. The high morbidity and mortality has an economic impact on intensive duck production farming. Duck hepatitis virus Types 2 and 3 are astroviruses in the family of Astroviridae with similarity phylogenetically to turkey astroviruses, implicating the potential for cross-species infections between strains. Duck astrovirus (DAstV) causes

  15. Woodchuck hepatitis virus core gene deletions and proliferative responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated by an immunodominant epitope: a viral immune escape in the woodchuck model of chronic hepatitis B?

    PubMed

    Taffon, Stefania; Kondili, Loreta A; Giuseppetti, Roberto; Ciccaglione, Anna Rita; Pulimanti, Barbara; Attili, Adolfo F; Rapicetta, Maria; D'Ugo, Emilio

    2015-04-01

    Marmota monax and its natural infection by woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) could be used as a predictive model for evaluating mechanisms of viral persistence during chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of viral variants in the core gene of chronically WHV-infected woodchucks that showed two different patterns of peripheral blood mononuclear cells' (PBMCs') responses after stimulation with a specific WHV core peptide. Sequences' analysis of the WHV core region from eight WHV chronically infected woodchucks have been performed after in vitro stimulation with an immunodominant epitope of the WHV core protein (amino acids [aa] 96-110). Following this stimulation, positive PBMC responses at each point of follow-up were observed for four animals (group A), and weak immune responses at one or a few points of follow-up were observed for the remaining four animals (group B). The WHV core gene sequences contained amino acid deletions (aa 84-126, aa 84-113) in three of four group A animals and in none of group B animals. In the group A animals, the same deletions were observed in liver specimens and in two of four tumor specimens. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was diagnosed in all group A animals and in one group B animal. In conclusion, internal deletions in the core region correlated with a sustained PBMC response to the immunogenic peptide (96-110) of the core protein. A possible role of this relationship in hepatocarcinogenesis could be hypothesized; however, this needs to be investigated in patients with chronic HBV infection. The evaluation of virus-specific T-cell responses and T-cell epitopes that are possibly related to the mechanisms of viral evasion should be further investigated in order to design combined antiviral and immune approaches to control chronic HBV infection. PMID:25666197

  16. Metabolite Kinetics: The Segregated Flow Model for Intestinal and Whole Body Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling to Describe Intestinal and Hepatic Glucuronidation of Morphine in Rats In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qi Joy; Fan, Jianghong; Chen, Shu; Liu, Lutan; Sun, Huadong; Pang, K Sandy

    2016-07-01

    We used the intestinal segregated flow model (SFM) versus the traditional model (TM), nested within physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models, to describe the biliary and urinary excretion of morphine 3β-glucuronide (MG) after intravenous and intraduodenal dosing of morphine in rats in vivo. The SFM model describes a partial (5%-30%) intestinal blood flow perfusing the transporter- and enzyme-rich enterocyte region, whereas the TM describes 100% flow perfusing the intestine as a whole. For the SFM, drugs entering from the circulation are expected to be metabolized to lesser extents by the intestine due to the segregated flow, reflecting the phenomenon of shunting and route-dependent intestinal metabolism. The poor permeability of MG crossing the liver or intestinal basolateral membranes mandates that most of MG that is excreted into bile is hepatically formed, whereas MG that is excreted into urine originates from both intestine and liver metabolism, since MG is effluxed back to blood. The ratio of MG amounts in urine/bile [Formula: see text] for intraduodenal/intravenous dosing is expected to exceed unity for the SFM but approximates unity for the TM. Compartmental analysis of morphine and MG data, without consideration of the permeability of MG and where MG is formed, suggests the ratio to be 1 and failed to describe the kinetics of MG. The observed intraduodenal/intravenous ratio of [Formula: see text] (2.55 at 4 hours) was better predicted by the SFM-PBPK (2.59 at 4 hours) and not the TM-PBPK (1.0), supporting the view that the SFM is superior for the description of intestinal-liver metabolism of morphine to MG. The SFM-PBPK model predicts an appreciable contribution of the intestine to first pass M metabolism. PMID:27098743

  17. Characterization of hepatic lipid profiles in a mouse model with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and subsequent fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kosuke; Uebanso, Takashi; Maekawa, Keiko; Ishikawa, Masaki; Taguchi, Ryo; Nammo, Takao; Nishimaki-Mogami, Tomoko; Udagawa, Haruhide; Fujii, Masato; Shibazaki, Yuichiro; Yoneyama, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Kazuki; Saito, Yoshiro

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a major health problem since it often leads to hepatocellular carcinoma. However, the underlying mechanisms of NASH development and subsequent fibrosis have yet to be clarified. We compared comprehensive lipidomic profiles between mice with high fat diet (HFD)-induced steatosis and STAM mice with NASH and subsequent fibrosis. The STAM mouse is a model that demonstrates NASH progression resembling the disease in humans: STAM mice manifest NASH at 8 weeks, which progresses to fibrosis at 12 weeks, and finally develop hepatocellular carcinoma. Overall, 250 lipid molecules were detected in the liver using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. We found that STAM mice with NASH presented a significantly higher abundance of sphingolipids and lower levels of triacylglycerols than the HFD-fed control mice. The abundance of certain fatty acids in phospholipid side chains was also significantly different between STAM and control mice, although global levels of phosphatidylcholines and phosphatidylethanolamines were comparable. Finally, increase in levels of acylcarnitines and some diacylglycerols was observed in STAM mice toward the fibrosis stage, but not in age-matched control mice. Our study provides insights into the lipid status of the steatotic, NASH, and fibrotic liver that would help elucidate the molecular pathophysiology of NASH progression. PMID:26289793

  18. Characterization of hepatic lipid profiles in a mouse model with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and subsequent fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Kosuke; Uebanso, Takashi; Maekawa, Keiko; Ishikawa, Masaki; Taguchi, Ryo; Nammo, Takao; Nishimaki-Mogami, Tomoko; Udagawa, Haruhide; Fujii, Masato; Shibazaki, Yuichiro; Yoneyama, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Kazuki; Saito, Yoshiro

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a major health problem since it often leads to hepatocellular carcinoma. However, the underlying mechanisms of NASH development and subsequent fibrosis have yet to be clarified. We compared comprehensive lipidomic profiles between mice with high fat diet (HFD)-induced steatosis and STAM mice with NASH and subsequent fibrosis. The STAM mouse is a model that demonstrates NASH progression resembling the disease in humans: STAM mice manifest NASH at 8 weeks, which progresses to fibrosis at 12 weeks, and finally develop hepatocellular carcinoma. Overall, 250 lipid molecules were detected in the liver using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. We found that STAM mice with NASH presented a significantly higher abundance of sphingolipids and lower levels of triacylglycerols than the HFD-fed control mice. The abundance of certain fatty acids in phospholipid side chains was also significantly different between STAM and control mice, although global levels of phosphatidylcholines and phosphatidylethanolamines were comparable. Finally, increase in levels of acylcarnitines and some diacylglycerols was observed in STAM mice toward the fibrosis stage, but not in age-matched control mice. Our study provides insights into the lipid status of the steatotic, NASH, and fibrotic liver that would help elucidate the molecular pathophysiology of NASH progression. PMID:26289793

  19. Modeling interchild differences in pharmacokinetics on the basis of subject-specific data on physiology and hepatic CYP2E1 levels: A case study with toluene

    SciTech Connect

    Nong, A.; McCarver, D.G.; Hines, R.N.; Krishnan, K. . E-mail: Kannan.Krishnan@umontreal.ca

    2006-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the magnitude of interindividual variability in the internal dose of toluene in children of various age groups, on the basis of subject-specific hepatic CYP2E1 content and physiology. The methodology involved the use of a previously validated physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, in which the intrinsic clearance for hepatic metabolism (CL{sub int}) was expressed in terms of the CYP2E1 content. The adult toluene PBPK model, with enzyme content-normalized CL{sub int}, facilitated the calculation of child-specific CL{sub int} based on knowledge of hepatic CYP2E1 protein levels. The child-specific physiological parameters, except liver volume, were computed with knowledge of age and body weight, whereas physicochemical parameters for toluene were kept age-invariant based on available data. The actual individual-specific liver volume (autopsy data) was also included in the model. The resulting model was used to simulate the blood concentration profiles in children exposed by inhalation, to 1 ppm toluene for 24 h. For this exposure scenario, the area under the venous blood concentration vs. time curve (AUC) ranged from 0.30 to 1.01 {mu}g/ml x h in neonates with low CYP2E1 concentration (<3.69 pmol/mg protein). The simulations indicated that neonates with higher levels of CYP2E1 (4.33 to 55.93 pmol/mg protein) as well as older children would have lower AUC (0.16 to 0.43 {mu}g/ml x h). The latter values were closer to those simulated for adults. Similar results were also obtained for 7 h exposure to 17 ppm toluene, a scenario previously evaluated in human volunteers. The interindividual variability factor for each subgroup of children and adults, calculated as the ratio of the 95th and 50th percentile values of AUC, was within a factor of 2. The 95th percentile value of the low metabolizing neonate group, however, was greater than the mean adult AUC by a factor of 3.9. This study demonstrates the feasibility

  20. Analysis of changes in hepatic gene expression in a murine model of tolerance to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity (autoprotection)

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, Meeghan A.; Koza-Taylor, Petra; Campion, Sarah N.; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Gu, Xinsheng; Enayetallah, Ahmed E.; Lawton, Michael P.; Manautou, José E.

    2014-01-01

    Pretreatment of mice with a low hepatotoxic dose of acetaminophen (APAP) results in resistance to a subsequent, higher dose of APAP. This mouse model, termed APAP autoprotection was used here to identify differentially expressed genes and cellular pathways that could contribute to this development of resistance to hepatotoxicity. Male C57BL/6J mice were pretreated with APAP (400 mg/kg) and then challenged 48 h later with 600 mg APAP/kg. Livers were obtained 4 or 24 h later and total hepatic RNA was isolated and hybridized to Affymetrix Mouse Genome MU430{sub 2} GeneChip. Statistically significant genes were determined and gene expression changes were also interrogated using the Causal Reasoning Engine (CRE). Extensive literature review narrowed our focus to methionine adenosyl transferase-1 alpha (MAT1A), nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (Fmo3) and galectin-3 (Lgals3). Down-regulation of MAT1A could lead to decreases in S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), which is known to protect against APAP toxicity. Nrf2 activation is expected to play a role in protective adaptation. Up-regulation of Lgals3, one of the genes supporting the Nrf2 hypothesis, can lead to suppression of apoptosis and reduced mitochondrial dysfunction. Fmo3 induction suggests the involvement of an enzyme not known to metabolize APAP in the development of tolerance to APAP toxicity. Subsequent quantitative RT-PCR and immunochemical analysis confirmed the differential expression of some of these genes in the APAP autoprotection model. In conclusion, our genomics strategy identified cellular pathways that might further explain the molecular basis for APAP autoprotection. - Highlights: • Differential expression of genes in mice resistant to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. • Increased gene expression of Flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 and Galectin-3. • Decrease in MAT1A expression and compensatory hepatocellular regeneration. • Two distinct gene

  1. Error analysis of the quantification of hepatic perfusion using a dual-input single-compartment model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Shohei; Yamazaki, Youichi; Murase, Kenya

    2008-11-01

    We performed an error analysis of the quantification of liver perfusion from dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) data using a dual-input single-compartment model for various disease severities, based on computer simulations. In the simulations, the time-density curves (TDCs) in the liver were generated from an actually measured arterial input function using a theoretical equation describing the kinetic behavior of the contrast agent (CA) in the liver. The rate constants for the transfer of CA from the hepatic artery to the liver (K1a), from the portal vein to the liver (K1p), and from the liver to the plasma (k2) were estimated from simulated TDCs with various plasma volumes (V0s). To investigate the effect of the shapes of input functions, the original arterial and portal-venous input functions were stretched in the time direction by factors of 2, 3 and 4 (stretching factors). The above parameters were estimated with the linear least-squares (LLSQ) and nonlinear least-squares (NLSQ) methods, and the root mean square errors (RMSEs) between the true and estimated values were calculated. Sensitivity and identifiability analyses were also performed. The RMSE of V0 was the smallest, followed by those of K1a, k2 and K1p in an increasing order. The RMSEs of K1a, K1p and k2 increased with increasing V0, while that of V0 tended to decrease. The stretching factor also affected parameter estimation in both methods. The LLSQ method estimated the above parameters faster and with smaller variations than the NLSQ method. Sensitivity analysis showed that the magnitude of the sensitivity function of V0 was the greatest, followed by those of K1a, K1p and k2 in a decreasing order, while the variance of V0 obtained from the covariance matrices was the smallest, followed by those of K1a, K1p and k2 in an increasing order. The magnitude of the sensitivity function and the variance increased and decreased, respectively, with increasing disease severity and decreased

  2. Unraveling hepatitis C virus structure.

    PubMed

    Fauvelle, Catherine; Felmlee, Daniel J; Baumert, Thomas F

    2014-04-01

    The high variability and the limited knowledge of the structure of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope glycoproteins (GP) are challenging hurdles for vaccine design. Recently, Kong et al. published a new model of HCV E2 GP structure in Science, revealing a globular structure, starkly contrasting from the extended model of class II fusion proteins from other Flaviviridae viruses. PMID:24626133

  3. Overview of an interlaboratory collaboration on evaluating the effects of model hepatotoxicants on hepatic gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Roger G; Rockett, John C; Gibson, G Gordon; Pettit, Syril D

    2004-01-01

    DNA microarrays and related tools offer promise for identification of pathways involved in toxic responses to xenobiotics. To be useful for risk assessment, experimental data must be challenged for reliability and interlaboratory reproducibility. Toward this goal, the Hepatotoxicity Working Group of the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) Technical Committee on Application of Genomics to Mechanism-Based Risk Assessment evaluated and compared biological and gene expression responses in rats exposed to two model hepatotoxins--clofibrate and methapyrilene. This collaborative effort provided an unprecedented opportunity for the working group to evaluate and compare multiple biological, genomic, and toxicological parameters across different laboratories and microarray platforms. Many of the results from this collaboration are presented in accompanying articles in this mini-monograph, whereas others have been published previously. (Italic)In vivo(/Italic) studies for both compounds were conducted in two laboratories using a standard experimental protocol, and RNA samples were distributed to 16 laboratories for analysis on six microarray platforms. Histopathology, clinical chemistry, and organ weight changes were consistent with reported effects. Gene expression results demonstrated reasonable agreement between laboratories and across platforms. Discrepancies in expression profiles of some individual genes were largely due to platform differences and approaches to data analysis rather than to biological or interlaboratory variability. Despite these discrepancies there was overall agreement in the biological pathways affected by these compounds, demonstrating that transcriptional profiling is reproducible between laboratories and can reliably identify affected pathways necessary to provide mechanistic insight. This effort represents an important first step toward the use of transcriptional profiling in risk

  4. Palmiwon attenuates hepatic lipid accumulation and hyperlipidemia in a menopausal rat model

    PubMed Central

    Go, Hiroe; Ryuk, Jin Ah; Lee, Hye Won; Ko, Byoung Seob

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective We examined the phytoestrogenic effects of palmiwon on breast carcinoma, lipid accumulation in methyl-β-cyclodextrin–induced HepG2 cells, and lipid-related diseases in a rat model of menopausal hyperlipidemia. Methods E-Screen assay was used to screen for phytoestrogens, especially those with antiestrogenic activity, in MCF-7 cells. Oil Red O staining and intracellular cholesterol analyses were used to quantify cellular cholesterol levels. 3-Hydroxy-3-methyl glutaryl coenzyme A reductase assay was used to measure enzyme activity. The levels of phosphorylated adenosine monophosphate–activated protein kinases and products of genes involved in cholesterol synthesis were measured by Western blot analysis. Thirty rats were either ovariectomized or sham-operated and randomly assigned to four groups (n = 5)—Sham, OVX, OVX-SV, or OVX-PMW (50, 150, or 450 mg/kg) group—for 8 weeks. A number of targets associated with lipid-related diseases were examined to confirm the estrogenic effects of palmiwon. Results Palmiwon showed antiestrogenic activity in MCF-7 cells. Palmiwon decreased lipid accumulation, total cholesterol levels, and low-density lipoprotein/very-low-density lipoprotein levels in HepG2 cells. Moreover, palmiwon reversed the effects of methyl-β-cyclodextrin on cholesterol synthesis regulators and inhibited the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl glutaryl coenzyme A reductase. Phosphorylation of adenosine monophosphate–activated protein kinase was stimulated by palmiwon. In ovariectomized rats, palmiwon reduced retroperitoneal and perirenal fat accumulation, serum lipids, atherogenic index, cardiac risk factor score, intima-media thickness, and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis scores. Conclusions These results indicate that palmiwon inhibits lipid accumulation without estrogenic activity in the breast. Therefore, palmiwon may have potential as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of hyperlipidemia in postmenopausal women. PMID:25563794

  5. Overview of an interlaboratory collaboration on evaluating the effects of model hepatotoxicants on hepatic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Roger G; Rockett, John C; Gibson, G Gordon; Pettit, Syril D

    2004-03-01

    DNA microarrays and related tools offer promise for identification of pathways involved in toxic responses to xenobiotics. To be useful for risk assessment, experimental data must be challenged for reliability and interlaboratory reproducibility. Toward this goal, the Hepatotoxicity Working Group of the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) Technical Committee on Application of Genomics to Mechanism-Based Risk Assessment evaluated and compared biological and gene expression responses in rats exposed to two model hepatotoxins--clofibrate and methapyrilene. This collaborative effort provided an unprecedented opportunity for the working group to evaluate and compare multiple biological, genomic, and toxicological parameters across different laboratories and microarray platforms. Many of the results from this collaboration are presented in accompanying articles in this mini-monograph, whereas others have been published previously. (Italic)In vivo(/Italic) studies for both compounds were conducted in two laboratories using a standard experimental protocol, and RNA samples were distributed to 16 laboratories for analysis on six microarray platforms. Histopathology, clinical chemistry, and organ weight changes were consistent with reported effects. Gene expression results demonstrated reasonable agreement between laboratories and across platforms. Discrepancies in expression profiles of some individual genes were largely due to platform differences and approaches to data analysis rather than to biological or interlaboratory variability. Despite these discrepancies there was overall agreement in the biological pathways affected by these compounds, demonstrating that transcriptional profiling is reproducible between laboratories and can reliably identify affected pathways necessary to provide mechanistic insight. This effort represents an important first step toward the use of transcriptional profiling in risk

  6. The Cost Effectiveness of Hepatitis Immunization for US College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, R. Jake; Saab, Sammy; Meyerhoff, Allen S.

    2003-01-01

    Hepatitis B immunization is recommended for all American children, and hepatitis A immunization is recommended for children who live in areas with elevated disease rates. Because hepatitis A and B occur most commonly in young adults, the authors examined the cost effectiveness of college-based vaccination. They developed epidemiologic models to…

  7. A novel transgenic mouse model of CBS-deficient homocystinuria does not incur hepatic steatosis or fibrosis and exhibits a hypercoagulative phenotype that is ameliorated by betaine treatment

    PubMed Central

    Maclean, Kenneth N.; Sikora, Jakub; Kožich, Viktor; Jiang, Hua; Greiner, Lori S.; Kraus, Eva; Krijt, Jakub; Overdier, Katherine H.; Collard, Renata; Brodsky, Gary L.; Meltesen, Lynne; Crnic, Linda S.; Allen, Robert H.; Stabler, Sally P.; Elleder, Milan; Rozen, Rima; Patterson, David; Kraus, Jan P.

    2010-01-01

    Cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) catalyzes the condensation of homocysteine (Hcy) and serine to cystathionine, which is then hydrolyzed to cysteine by cystathionine gamma-lyase. Inactivation of CBS results in CBS-deficient homocystinuria more commonly referred to as classical homocystinuria, which, if untreated, results in mental retardation, thromboembolic complications, and a range of connective tissue disorders. The molecular mechanisms that underlie the pathology of this disease are poorly understood. We report here the generation of a new mouse model of classical homocystinuria in which the mouse cbs gene is inactivated and that exhibits low-level expression of the human CBS transgene under the control of the human CBS promoter. This mouse model, designated “human only” (HO), exhibits severe elevations in both plasma and tissue levels of Hcy, methionine, S-adenosylmethionine, and S-adenosylhomocysteine and a concomitant decrease in plasma and hepatic levels of cysteine. HO mice exhibit mild hepatopathy but, in contrast to previous models of classical homocystinuria, do not incur hepatic steatosis, fibrosis, or neonatal death with approximately 90% of HO mice living for at least 6 months. Tail bleeding determinations indicate that HO mice are in a hypercoagulative state that is significantly ameliorated by betaine treatment in a manner that recapitulates the disease as it occurs in humans. Our findings indicate that this mouse model will be a valuable tool in the study of pathogenesis in classical homocystinuria and the rational design of novel treatments. PMID:20638879

  8. Coenzyme Q10 prevents hepatic fibrosis, inflammation, and oxidative stress in a male rat model of poor maternal nutrition and accelerated postnatal growth1

    PubMed Central

    Tarry-Adkins, Jane L; Fernandez-Twinn, Denise S; Hargreaves, Iain P; Neergheen, Viruna; Aiken, Catherine E; Martin-Gronert, Malgorzata S; McConnell, Josie M; Ozanne, Susan E

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is well established that low birth weight and accelerated postnatal growth increase the risk of liver dysfunction in later life. However, molecular mechanisms underlying such developmental programming are not well characterized, and potential intervention strategies are poorly defined. Objectives: We tested the hypotheses that poor maternal nutrition and accelerated postnatal growth would lead to increased hepatic fibrosis (a pathological marker of liver dysfunction) and that postnatal supplementation with the antioxidant coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) would prevent this programmed phenotype. Design: A rat model of maternal protein restriction was used to generate low-birth-weight offspring that underwent accelerated postnatal growth (termed “recuperated”). These were compared with control rats. Offspring were weaned onto standard feed pellets with or without dietary CoQ10 (1 mg/kg body weight per day) supplementation. At 12 mo, hepatic fibrosis, indexes of inflammation, oxidative stress, and insulin signaling were measured by histology, Western blot, ELISA, and reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction. Results: Hepatic collagen deposition (diameter of deposit) was greater in recuperated offspring (mean ± SEM: 12 ± 2 μm) than in controls (5 ± 0.5 μm) (P < 0.001). This was associated with greater inflammation (interleukin 6: 38% ± 24% increase; P < 0.05; tumor necrosis factor α: 64% ± 24% increase; P < 0.05), lipid peroxidation (4-hydroxynonenal, measured by ELISA: 0.30 ± 0.02 compared with 0.19 ± 0.05 μg/mL per μg protein; P < 0.05), and hyperinsulinemia (P < 0.05). CoQ10 supplementation increased (P < 0.01) hepatic CoQ10 concentrations and ameliorated liver fibrosis (P < 0.001), inflammation (P < 0.001), some measures of oxidative stress (P < 0.001), and hyperinsulinemia (P < 0.01). Conclusions: Suboptimal in utero nutrition combined with accelerated postnatal catch-up growth caused more hepatic fibrosis in adulthood, which was

  9. Epigenetic Alterations of IL-6/STAT3 Signaling by Placental Stem Cells Promote Hepatic Regeneration in a Rat Model with CCl4-induced Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jieun; Moon, Ji Wook; Choi, Jong-Ho; Lee, Yong Woo; Park, Sun-Hwa; Kim, Gi Jin

    2015-01-01

    Background Human chorionic plate-derived mesenchymal stem cells (CP-MSCs) isolated from the placenta have been reported to demonstrate therapeutic effects in animal models of liver injury; however, the underlying epigenetic mechanism of this effect has not been elucidated. Thus, we investigated whether CP-MSCs influence epigenetic processes during regeneration of the injured liver. Methods CP-MSCs were engrafted into a carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-injured rat model through direct transplantation into the liver (DTX), intrasplenic transplantation (STX), and intravenous transplantation via the tail vein (TTX). Non-transplanted (NTX) rats were maintained as sham controls. Liver tissues were analyzed after transplantation using immunohistochemistry, western blot analysis, and quantitative methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. Proliferation and human interleukin-6 (hIL-6) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were performed using CCl4-treated hepatic cells that were co-cultured with CP-MSCs. Results The Ki67 labeling index, cell cyclins, albumin, IL-6, and gp130 levels were elevated in the CP-MSC transplantation groups. The concentration of hIL-6 in supernatants and the proliferation of CCl4-treated rat hepatic cells were enhanced by co-culturing with CP-MSCs (p<0.05), while the methylation of IL-6/IL-6R and STAT3 by CP-MSC transplantation decreased. Conclusion These results suggest that administration of CP-MSCs promotes IL-6/STAT3 signaling by decreasing the methylation of the IL-6/SATA3 promoters and thus inducing the proliferation of hepatic cells in a CCl4-injured liver rat model. These data advance our understanding of the therapeutic mechanisms in injured livers, and can facilitate the development of cell-based therapies using placenta-derived stem cells. PMID:26019757

  10. Biological characteristics of the rtA181T/sW172* mutant strain of Hepatitis B virus in animal model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The effects of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) rtA181T/sW172* mutation on viral replication and pathogenicity was concerned recently. This study aimed to investigate the biological characteristics of rtA181T/sW172* mutant strain of HBV in animal model. Methods The rtA181T/sW172* mutant plasmid was constructed using the pHBV4.1 (wild type HBV) as a template. The wild and mutant HBV replication mouse models were established utilizing a hydrodynamic technique. The titers of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), hepatitis B e antigen, and HBV DNA in serum, and the levels of HBsAg, hepatitis B core antigen(HBcAg), HBV DNA replication intermediates (HBV DNA RI) and HBV RNA in liver were measured after 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 12 and 15 days of plasmid injection. Results In wild-type HBV replication mouse model, serum HBsAg was high on day 1, 3, and 5, but became lower since day 7; while in mutant HBV mouse model, serum HBsAg was always at very low level. In liver tissues, HBV DNA RI of wild type HBV was detected on day 1 after transfection. The level subsequently peaked on day 3, gradually declined after day 5, and was almost undetectable on day 10. However, the HBV DNA RI levels of the mutant strain were always higher and lasted longer until day 15. Consistently, the expression levels of HBsAg and HBcAg in liver of the mutant group were significantly increased. Conclusions In the case of the HBV rtA181T/sW172* mutation, the secretion of serum HBsAg was impaired, whereas HBV DNA replication and HBsAg/HBcAg expression were increased in liver. These results suggest that the mutation can impair HBsAg secretion, and may cause the accumulation of viral core particles in liver. PMID:23171829

  11. Predictive Models for Regional Hepatic Function Based upon 99mTc-IDA SPECT and Local Radiation Dose for Physiological Adaptive RT

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hesheng; Feng, Mary; Frey, Kirk A.; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Cao, Yue

    2013-01-01

    Purpose High dose radiation therapy (RT) for intrahepatic cancer is limited by the development of liver injury. This study investigated whether regional hepatic function assessed prior to and during the course of RT using 99mTc-labeled immindodiacetic acid (IDA) SPECT could predict regional liver function reserve after RT. Methods and Materials Fourteen patients treated with RT for intrahepatic cancers underwent dynamic 99mTc-IDA SPECT scans prior to RT, during, and one month after completion of RT. Indocyanine green (ICG) tests (a measure of overall liver function) were performed within 1 day of each scan. 3D volumetric hepatic extraction fraction (HEF) images of the liver were estimated by deconvolution analysis. After co-registration of the CT/SPECT and the treatment planning CT, HEF dose-response functions during and post-RT were generated. The volumetric mean of the HEFs in the whole liver was correlated with ICG clearance time. Three models, Dose, Priori and Adaptive models, were developed using multivariate linear regression to assess whether the regional HEFs measured before and during RT helped predict regional hepatic function post-RT. Results The mean of the volumetric liver HEFs was significantly correlated with ICG clearance half-life time (r = −0.80, p<0.0001), for all time points. Linear correlations between local doses and regional HEFs one month post-RT were significant in 12 patients. In the priori model, regional HEF post-RT was predicted by the planned dose and regional HEF assessed prior to RT (R=0.71, p<0.0001). In the adaptive model, regional HEF post-RT was predicted by regional HEF re-assessed during RT and the remaining planned local dose (R=0.83, p<0.0001). Conclusions 99mTc-IDA SPECT obtained during RT could be used to assess regional hepatic function and helped predict post-RT regional liver function reserve. This could support individualized adaptive radiation treatment strategies to maximize tumor control and minimize the risk of

  12. Viral hepatitis: Indian scenario.

    PubMed

    Satsangi, Sandeep; Chawla, Yogesh K

    2016-07-01

    Viral hepatitis is a cause for major health care burden in India and is now equated as a threat comparable to the "big three" communicable diseases - HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis. Hepatitis A virus and Hepatitis E virus are predominantly enterically transmitted pathogens and are responsible to cause both sporadic infections and epidemics of acute viral hepatitis. Hepatitis B virus and Hepatitis C virus are predominantly spread via parenteral route and are notorious to cause chronic hepatitis which can lead to grave complications including cirrhosis of liver and hepatocellular carcinoma. Around 400 million people all over the world suffer from chronic hepatitis and the Asia-Pacific region constitutes the epicentre of this epidemic. The present article would aim to cover the basic virologic aspects of these viruses and highlight the present scenario of viral hepatitis in India. PMID:27546957

  13. Hepatitis C virus infection and thyroid autoimmune disorders: A model of interactions between the host and the environment

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, Francesca; Martocchia, Antonio; Stefanelli, Manuela; Prunas, Pietro; Giordano, Stefania; Toussan, Lavinia; Devito, Antonio; Falaschi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is an important public health problem and it is associated with hepatic and extrahepatic manifestations. Autoimmune thyroid diseases are common in HCV infected patients and the standard interferon-based treatment is associated with an increase of the immune-mediated thyroid damage. Recent evidence in the literature analyzed critical points of the mechanisms of thyroid damage, focusing on the balance between the two sides of the interaction: The environment (virus infection with potential cross-reaction) and the host (susceptibility genes with consistent immune response). The spectrum of antiviral treatment for chronic HCV infection is rapidly expanding for the development of dual o triple therapy. The availability of interferon-free combined treatment with direct antiviral agents for HCV is very promising, in order to ameliorate the patient compliance and to reduce the development of thyroid autoimmunity. PMID:26807204

  14. Antiviral Efficacy and Host Innate Immunity Associated with SB 9200 Treatment in the Woodchuck Model of Chronic Hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Korolowicz, Kyle E; Iyer, Radhakrishnan P; Czerwinski, Stefanie; Suresh, Manasa; Yang, Junming; Padmanabhan, Seetharamaiyer; Sheri, Anjaneyulu; Pandey, Rajendra K; Skell, Jeffrey; Marquis, Judith K; Kallakury, Bhaskar V; Tucker, Robin D; Menne, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    SB 9200, an oral prodrug of the dinucleotide SB 9000, is being developed for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and represents a novel class of antivirals. SB 9200 is thought to activate the viral sensor proteins, retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RIG-I) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2) resulting in interferon (IFN) mediated antiviral immune responses in virus-infected cells. Additionally, the binding of SB 9200 to these sensor proteins could also sterically block the ability of the viral polymerase to access pre-genomic RNA for nucleic acid synthesis. The immune stimulating and direct antiviral properties of SB 9200 were evaluated in woodchucks chronically infected with woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) by daily, oral dosing at 15 and 30 mg/kg for 12 weeks. Prolonged treatment resulted in 2.2 and 3.7 log10 reductions in serum WHV DNA and in 0.5 and 1.6 log10 declines in serum WHV surface antigen from pretreatment level with the lower or higher dose of SB 9200, respectively. SB 9200 treatment also resulted in lower hepatic levels of WHV nucleic acids and antigen and reduced liver inflammation. Following treatment cessation, recrudescence of viral replication was observed but with dose-dependent delays in viral relapse. The antiviral effects were associated with dose-dependent and long-lasting induction of IFN-α, IFN-β and IFN-stimulated genes in blood and liver, which correlated with the prolonged activation of the RIG-I/NOD2 pathway and hepatic presence of elevated RIG-I protein levels. These results suggest that in addition to a direct antiviral activity, SB 9200 induces antiviral immunity during chronic hepadnaviral infection via activation of the viral sensor pathway. PMID:27552102

  15. Antiviral Efficacy and Host Innate Immunity Associated with SB 9200 Treatment in the Woodchuck Model of Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Korolowicz, Kyle E.; Iyer, Radhakrishnan P.; Czerwinski, Stefanie; Suresh, Manasa; Yang, Junming; Padmanabhan, Seetharamaiyer; Sheri, Anjaneyulu; Pandey, Rajendra K.; Skell, Jeffrey; Marquis, Judith K.; Kallakury, Bhaskar V.; Tucker, Robin D.; Menne, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    SB 9200, an oral prodrug of the dinucleotide SB 9000, is being developed for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and represents a novel class of antivirals. SB 9200 is thought to activate the viral sensor proteins, retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RIG-I) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2) resulting in interferon (IFN) mediated antiviral immune responses in virus-infected cells. Additionally, the binding of SB 9200 to these sensor proteins could also sterically block the ability of the viral polymerase to access pre-genomic RNA for nucleic acid synthesis. The immune stimulating and direct antiviral properties of SB 9200 were evaluated in woodchucks chronically infected with woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) by daily, oral dosing at 15 and 30 mg/kg for 12 weeks. Prolonged treatment resulted in 2.2 and 3.7 log10 reductions in serum WHV DNA and in 0.5 and 1.6 log10 declines in serum WHV surface antigen from pretreatment level with the lower or higher dose of SB 9200, respectively. SB 9200 treatment also resulted in lower hepatic levels of WHV nucleic acids and antigen and reduced liver inflammation. Following treatment cessation, recrudescence of viral replication was observed but with dose-dependent delays in viral relapse. The antiviral effects were associated with dose-dependent and long-lasting induction of IFN-α, IFN-β and IFN-stimulated genes in blood and liver, which correlated with the prolonged activation of the RIG-I/NOD2 pathway and hepatic presence of elevated RIG-I protein levels. These results suggest that in addition to a direct antiviral activity, SB 9200 induces antiviral immunity during chronic hepadnaviral infection via activation of the viral sensor pathway. PMID:27552102

  16. Diabetes and Hepatitis B Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetes and Hepatitis B Vaccination Information for Diabetes Educators What is hepatitis B? Hepatitis B is a contagious liver disease that results from infection with the hepatitis B virus. When first infected, a person can develop ...

  17. Hepatitis B Blood Tests: FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2 Billion People have been infected with Hepatitis B Worldwide The Hepatitis B Foundation is working on ... people living with hepatitis B. Learn About Hepatitis B in 10 Other Languages . Resource Video See More ...

  18. Hepatitis Information for the Public

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Viral Hepatitis Contact Us Quick Links to Hepatitis ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home ... Outbreaks State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource Center Hepatitis Information for the Public Recommend on Facebook Tweet ...

  19. Impact of eradicating hepatitis C virus on the work productivity of chronic hepatitis C (CH-C) patients: an economic model from five European countries.

    PubMed

    Younossi, Z; Brown, A; Buti, M; Fagiuoli, S; Mauss, S; Rosenberg, W; Serfaty, L; Srivastava, A; Smith, N; Stepanova, M; Beckerman, R

    2016-03-01

    CH-C negatively affects work productivity (WP), creating a large economic burden. The aim of this study was to model the impact of sustained virologic response (SVR) on WP in CHC genotype 1 (GT1) patients in five European countries (EU5). Work Productivity and Activity Index-Specific Health Problem questionnaire was administered to patients across the ION clinical trials (n = 629 European patients). The analysis modelled a population of GT1 CHC patients over one year, who had been either not treated or treated with LDV/SOF. Sensitivity analyses assessed the possibility that CHC patients' labour costs were lower than the general population's and presented results by fibrosis stage. Before initiation of treatment, EU patients with CHC GT1 exhibited absenteeism and presenteeism impairments of 3.54% and 9.12%, respectively. About 91.8% of EU patients in the ION trials achieved SVR and improved absenteeism and presenteeism impairments by 16.3% and 19.5%, respectively. Monetizing these data, treatment with LDV/SOF resulted in an annual productivity gain of €435 million and a weighted average per-employed patient (PEP) gain of €900 in the EU5. PEP gains from treatment are projected to be higher in cirrhotic than in noncirrhotic patients. If CHC patients are assumed to earn 20% less than the general population, gains of €348 million (€720 PEP) annually are projected. CHC results in a significant economic burden to European society. Due to improvements in WP, SVR with treatment could provide substantial economic gains, partly offsetting the direct costs related to its widespread use. PMID:26482680

  20. Methionine excess in diet induces acute lethal hepatitis in mice lacking cystathionine γ-lyase, an animal model of cystathioninuria.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hidenori; Akahoshi, Noriyuki; Kamata, Shotaro; Hagiya, Yoshifumi; Hishiki, Takako; Nagahata, Yoshiko; Matsuura, Tomomi; Takano, Naoharu; Mori, Masatomo; Ishizaki, Yasuki; Izumi, Takashi; Kumagai, Yoshito; Kasahara, Tadashi; Suematsu, Makoto; Ishii, Isao

    2012-05-01

    Physiological roles of the transsulfuration pathway have been recognized by its contribution to the synthesis of cytoprotective cysteine metabolites, such as glutathione, taurine/hypotaurine, and hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), whereas its roles in protecting against methionine toxicity remained to be clarified. This study aimed at revealing these roles by analyzing high-methionine diet-fed transsulfuration-defective cystathionine γ-lyase-deficient (Cth(-/-)) mice. Wild-type and Cth(-/-) mice were fed a standard diet (1 × Met: 0.44%) or a high-methionine diet (3 × Met or 6 × Met), and hepatic conditions were monitored by serum biochemistry and histology. Metabolome analysis was performed for methionine derivatives using capillary electrophoresis- or liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and sulfur-detecting gas chromatography. The 6 × Met-fed Cth(-/-) (not 1 × Met-fed Cth(-/-) or 6 × Met-fed wild type) mice displayed acute hepatitis, which was characterized by markedly elevated levels of serum alanine/aspartate aminotransferases and serum/hepatic lipid peroxidation, inflammatory cell infiltration, and hepatocyte ballooning; thereafter, they died of gastrointestinal bleeding due to coagulation factor deficiency. After 1 week on 6 × Met, blood levels of ammonia/homocysteine and hepatic levels of methanethiol/3-methylthiopropionate (a methionine transamination product/methanethiol precursor) became significantly higher in Cth(-/-) mice than in wild-type mice. Although hepatic levels of methionine sulfoxide became higher in 6 × Met-fed wild-type mice and Cth(-/-) mice, those of glutathione, taurine/hypotaurine, and H(2)S became lower and serum levels of homocysteine became much higher in 6 × Met-fed Cth(-/-) mice than in wild-type mice. Thus, transsulfuration plays a critical role in the detoxification of excessive methionine by circumventing aberrant accumulation of its toxic transamination metabolites, including ammonia, methanethiol, and 3-methylthiopropionate

  1. Pharmacological Intervention in Hepatic Stellate Cell Activation and Hepatic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Schon, Hans-Theo; Bartneck, Matthias; Borkham-Kamphorst, Erawan; Nattermann, Jacob; Lammers, Twan; Tacke, Frank; Weiskirchen, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The activation and transdifferentiation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) into contractile, matrix-producing myofibroblasts (MFBs) are central events in hepatic fibrogenesis. These processes are driven by autocrine- and paracrine-acting soluble factors (i.e., cytokines and chemokines). Proof-of-concept studies of the last decades have shown that both the deactivation and removal of hepatic MFBs as well as antagonizing profibrogenic factors are in principle suitable to attenuate ongoing hepatic fibrosis. Although several drugs show potent antifibrotic activities in experimental models of hepatic fibrosis, there is presently no effective pharmaceutical intervention specifically approved for the treatment of liver fibrosis. Pharmaceutical interventions are generally hampered by insufficient supply of drugs to the diseased liver tissue and/or by adverse effects as a result of affecting non-target cells. Therefore, targeted delivery systems that bind specifically to receptors solely expressed on activated HSCs or transdifferentiated MFBs and delivery systems that can improve drug distribution to the liver in general are urgently needed. In this review, we summarize current strategies for targeted delivery of drugs to the liver and in particular to pro-fibrogenic liver cells. The applicability and efficacy of sequestering molecules, selective protein carriers, lipid-based drug vehicles, viral vectors, transcriptional targeting approaches, therapeutic liver- and HSC-specific nanoparticles, and miRNA-based strategies are discussed. Some of these delivery systems that had already been successfully tested in experimental animal models of ongoing hepatic fibrogenesis are expected to translate into clinically useful therapeutics specifically targeting HSCs. PMID:26941644

  2. [Viral hepatitis in travellers].

    PubMed

    Abreu, Cândida

    2007-01-01

    Considering the geographical asymmetric distribution of viral hepatitis A, B and E, having a much higher prevalence in the less developed world, travellers from developed countries are exposed to a considerable and often underestimated risk of hepatitis infection. In fact a significant percentage of viral hepatitis occurring in developed countries is travel related. This results from globalization and increased mobility from tourism, international work, humanitarian and religious missions or other travel related activities. Several studies published in Europe and North America shown that more than 50% of reported cases of hepatitis A are travel related. On the other hand frequent outbreaks of hepatitis A and E in specific geographic areas raise the risk of infection in these restricted zones and that should be clearly identified. Selected aspects related with the distribution of hepatitis A, B and E are reviewed, particularly the situation in Portugal according to the published studies, as well as relevant clinical manifestations and differential diagnosis of viral hepatitis. Basic prevention rules considering enteric transmitted hepatitis (hepatitis A and hepatitis E) and parenteral transmitted (hepatitis B) are reviewed as well as hepatitis A and B immunoprophylaxis. Common clinical situations and daily practice "pre travel" advice issues are discussed according to WHO/CDC recommendations and the Portuguese National Vaccination Program. Implications from near future availability of a hepatitis E vaccine, a currently in phase 2 trial, are highlighted. Potential indications for travellers to endemic countries like India, Nepal and some regions of China, where up to 30% of sporadic cases of acute viral hepatitis are caused by hepatitis E virus, are considered. Continued epidemiological surveillance for viral hepatitis is essential to recognize and control possible outbreaks, but also to identify new viral hepatitis agents that may emerge as important global health

  3. Genomic Methylation Inhibits Expression of Hepatitis B Virus Envelope Protein in Transgenic Mice: A Non-Infectious Mouse Model to Study Silencing of HBV Surface Antigen Genes

    PubMed Central

    Graumann, Franziska; Churin, Yuri; Tschuschner, Annette; Reifenberg, Kurt; Glebe, Dieter; Roderfeld, Martin; Roeb, Elke

    2015-01-01

    Objective The Hepatitis B virus genome persists in the nucleus of virus infected hepatocytes where it serves as template for viral mRNA synthesis. Epigenetic modifications, including methylation of the CpG islands contribute to the regulation of viral gene expression. The present study investigates the effects of spontaneous age dependent loss of hepatitis B surface protein- (HBs) expression due to HBV-genome specific methylation as well as its proximate positive effects in HBs transgenic mice. Methods Liver and serum of HBs transgenic mice aged 5–33 weeks were analyzed by Western blot, immunohistochemistry, serum analysis, PCR, and qRT-PCR. Results From the third month of age hepatic loss of HBs was observed in 20% of transgenic mice. The size of HBs-free area and the relative number of animals with these effects increased with age and struck about 55% of animals aged 33 weeks. Loss of HBs-expression was strongly correlated with amelioration of serum parameters ALT and AST. In addition lower HBs-expression went on with decreased ER-stress. The loss of surface protein expression started on transcriptional level and appeared to be regulated epigenetically by DNA methylation. The amount of the HBs-expression correlated negatively with methylation of HBV DNA in the mouse genome. Conclusions Our data suggest that methylation of specific CpG sites controls gene expression even in HBs-transgenic mice with truncated HBV genome. More important, the loss of HBs expression and intracellular aggregation ameliorated cell stress and liver integrity. Thus, targeted modulation of HBs expression may offer new therapeutic approaches. Furthermore, HBs-transgenic mice depict a non-infectious mouse model to study one possible mechanism of HBs gene silencing by hypermethylation. PMID:26717563

  4. Hepatic abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopalan, S.; Langer, V.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic abscesses are potentially lethal diseases if early diagnosis and treatment are not instituted. They are prevalent all over the globe and pyogenic abscesses are predominant over amoebic. With better control of intra abdominal and systemic infections by a spectrum of antibiotics, aetiology of pyogenic abscesses are secondary to interventions and diseases in the biliary tree to a large extent today. The common organisms isolated are the Gram negative group. Amoebic abscesses continue to plague some regions of the world where hygiene and sanitation are questionable. Over the years, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis have evolved remarkably. Imaging modalities like ultrasonography and CT scan have become the cornerstone of diagnosis. The absence of ionizing radiation makes MRI an attractive alternative in patients who require multiple follow up scans. Serological testing in amoebic abscesses has become more reliable. Though antibiotics have remained the principal modality of management, percutaneous drainage of abscesses have vastly improved the chances of cure and bring down the morbidity drastically in pyogenic abscesses. Amoebic abscesses respond well to medical treatment with nitroimidazoles, and minimally invasive surgical drainage is an option in cases where open surgery is indicated. PMID:24532886

  5. Hepatitis B Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... IgM; anti-HBe; Hepatitis B e Antibody; HBV DNA Formal name: Hepatitis B Virus Testing Related tests: ... produced by the virus, and others detect viral DNA . The main uses for HBV tests include: To ...

  6. Hepatitis Foundation International

    MedlinePlus

    ... partner – it's your best friend. Welcome. The Hepatitis Foundation International (HFI) is a 501 (c) 3 non- ... and cures is your participation in the Hepatitis Foundation International Registry. Whether you are affected, a caregiver, ...

  7. Hepatitis A - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... hepatitis A. Children can get hepatitis A at day care center from other children or from child care ... treatment with immunoglobulin therapy. If your child attends day care: Make sure the children and staff at the ...

  8. Hepatitis C (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis C is a virus-caused liver inflammation which may cause jaundice, fever and cirrhosis. Persons who are most at risk for contracting and spreading hepatitis C are those who share needles for injecting drugs ...

  9. Nicotinamide Riboside Ameliorates Hepatic Metaflammation by Modulating NLRP3 Inflammasome in a Rodent Model of Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee Jae; Hong, Young-Shick; Jun, Woojin; Yang, Soo Jin

    2015-11-01

    Low-grade chronic inflammation (metaflammation) is a major contributing factor for the onset and development of metabolic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease. Nicotinamide riboside (NR), which is present in milk and beer, is a functional vitamin B3 having advantageous effects on metabolic regulation. However, the anti-inflammatory capacity of NR is unknown. This study evaluated whether NR modulates hepatic nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome. Male, 8-week-old KK/HlJ mice were allocated to the control or NR group. NR (100 mg/kg/day) or vehicle (phosphate-buffered saline) was administrated by an osmotic pump for 7 days. Glucose control, lipid profiles, NLRP3 inflammasome, and inflammation markers were analyzed, and structural and histological analyses were conducted. NR treatment did not affect body weight gain, food intake, and liver function. Glucose control based on the oral glucose tolerance test and levels of serum insulin and adiponectin was improved by NR treatment. Among tested lipid profiles, NR lowered the total cholesterol concentration in the liver. Histological and structural analysis by hematoxylin and eosin staining and transmission electron microscopy, respectively, showed that NR rescued the disrupted cellular integrity of the mitochondria and nucleus in the livers of obese and diabetic KK mice. In addition, NR treatment significantly improved hepatic proinflammatory markers, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-1. These ameliorations were accompanied by significant shifts of NLRP3 inflammasome components (NLRP3, ASC, and caspase1). These results demonstrate that NR attenuates hepatic metaflammation by modulating the NLRP3 inflammasome. PMID:25974041

  10. 24-nor-ursodeoxycholic acid ameliorates inflammatory response and liver fibrosis in a murine model of hepatic schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Sombetzki, Martina; Fuchs, Claudia D.; Fickert, Peter; Österreicher, Christoph H.; Mueller, Michaela; Claudel, Thierry; Loebermann, Micha; Engelmann, Robby; Langner, Cord; Sahin, Emine; Schwinge, Dorothee; Guenther, Nina D.; Schramm, Christoph; Mueller-Hilke, Brigitte; Reisinger, Emil C.; Trauner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Intrahepatic granuloma formation and fibrosis characterize the pathological features of Schistosoma mansoni infection. Based on previously observed substantial anti-fibrotic effects of 24-nor-ursodeoxycholic acid (norUDCA) in Abcb4/Mdr2−/− mice with cholestatic liver injury and biliary fibrosis, we hypothesized that norUDCA improves inflammation-driven liver fibrosis in S. mansoni infection. Methods Adult NMRI mice were infected with 50 S. mansoni cercariae and after 12 weeks received either norUDCA- or ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA)-enriched diet (0.5% wt/wt) for 4 weeks. Bile acid effects on liver histology, serum biochemistry, key regulatory cytokines, hepatic hydroxyproline content as well as granuloma formation were compared to naive mice and infected controls. In addition, effects of norUDCA on primary T-cell activation/proliferation and maturation of the antigen-presenting-cells (dendritic cells, macrophages) were determined in vitro. Results UDCA as well as norUDCA attenuated the inflammatory response in livers of S. mansoni infected mice, but exclusively norUDCA changed cellular composition and reduced size of hepatic granulomas as well as TH2-mediated hepatic fibrosis in vivo. Moreover, norUDCA affected surface expression level of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II of macrophages and dendritic cells as well as activation/proliferation of T-lymphocytes in vitro, whereas UDCA had no effect. Conclusions This study demonstrates pronounced anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects of norUDCA compared to UDCA in S. mansoni induced liver injury, and indicates that norUDCA directly represses antigen presentation of antigen presenting cells and subsequent T-cell activation in vitro. Therefore, norUDCA represents a promising drug for the treatment of this important cause of liver fibrosis. PMID:25463533

  11. Monoclonal Antibodies against Extracellular Domains of Claudin-1 Block Hepatitis C Virus Infection in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Nagase, Shotaro; Shirasago, Yoshitaka; Iida, Manami; Yamashita, Mayo; Endo, Kohki; Yagi, Kiyohito; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Wakita, Takaji; Hanada, Kentaro; Kuniyasu, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis C virus (HCV) entry into host cells is a complex process requiring multiple host factors, including claudin-1 (CLDN1). Safe and effective therapeutic entry inhibitors need to be developed. We isolated a human hepatic Huh7.5.1-derived cell mutant that is nonpermissive to HCV, and comparative microarray analysis showed that the mutant was CLDN1 defective. Four hybridomas were obtained, which produced monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that interacted with the parental Huh7.5.1 cell but not with the CLDN1-defective mutant. All MAbs produced by these hybridomas specifically bound to human CLDN1 with a very high affinity and prevented HCV infection of Huh7.5.1 cells in a dose-dependent manner, without apparent cytotoxicity. Two selected MAbs also inhibited HCV infection of human liver-chimeric mice without significant adverse effects. CLDN1 may be a potential target to prevent HCV infection in vivo. Anti-CLDN1 MAbs may hence be promising candidates as novel anti-HCV agents. IMPORTANCE Safe and effective therapeutic entry inhibitors against hepatitis C virus (HCV) are very useful for combination therapies with other anti-HCV drugs, such as direct-acting antivirals. In this study, we first showed an effective strategy for developing functional monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against extracellular domains of a multimembrane-spanning target protein, claudin-1 (CLDN1), by using parental cells expressing the intact target membrane protein and target-defective cells. The established MAbs against CLDN1, which had a very high affinity for intact CLDN1, efficiently inhibited in vitro and in vivo HCV infections. These anti-CLDN1 MAbs are promising leads for novel entry inhibitors against HCV. PMID:25673725

  12. Hepatitis E Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lhomme, Sébastien; Marion, Olivier; Abravanel, Florence; Chapuy-Regaud, Sabine; Kamar, Nassim; Izopet, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Although most hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections are asymptomatic, some can be severe, causing fulminant hepatitis and extra-hepatic manifestations, including neurological and kidney injuries. Chronic HEV infections may also occur in immunocompromised patients. This review describes how our understanding of the pathogenesis of HEV infection has progressed in recent years. PMID:27527210

  13. Treating hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Karmen

    2014-10-01

    (1) New treatments for hepatitis C are curing more people than before. (2) Baby boomers make up an estimated 75 percent of all cases of hepatitis C. (3) Medicare and some insurance plans cover screening for hepatitis C as a preventive service without a copayment. PMID:25514812

  14. Hepatitis E Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lhomme, Sébastien; Marion, Olivier; Abravanel, Florence; Chapuy-Regaud, Sabine; Kamar, Nassim; Izopet, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Although most hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections are asymptomatic, some can be severe, causing fulminant hepatitis and extra-hepatic manifestations, including neurological and kidney injuries. Chronic HEV infections may also occur in immunocompromised patients. This review describes how our understanding of the pathogenesis of HEV infection has progressed in recent years. PMID:27527210

  15. Hepatitis B (HBV)

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Hepatitis B (HBV) KidsHealth > For Teens > Hepatitis B (HBV) Print A A A Text Size ... Prevented? How Is It Treated? What Is It? Hepatitis (pronounced: hep-uh-TIE-tiss) is a disease ...

  16. Characterization and genotyping of the DRB1 gene of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in the Marmota monax, animal model of hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Cugnon, Leire; Esparza-Baquer, Aitor; Larruskain, Amaia; García-Etxebarria, Koldo; Menne, Stephan; González-Aseguinolaza, Gloria; Jugo, Begoña M

    2015-02-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-containing genes are among the most polymorphic in vertebrates. MHC genes code for proteins that are critical in the immune system response. In this study, the polymorphism of the second exon of the MHC class II DRB gene was characterized in the Eastern woodchuck (Marmota monax). Woodchucks chronically infected with the woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) represent the best available animal model for the study of chronic hepatitis B infection in humans. In the genotyped animals we found fifteen alleles, which were expressed in two independent loci and that were named DRB1A and DRB1B in this work. The 15 alleles investigated showed an elevated divergence. A significant excess of non-synonymous substitutions was detected, which could indicate that a historical positive selection is acting in the woodchuck DRB1 genes. This hypothesis was confirmed in our study by the high variability in or near the antigen binding sites (ABS) and by the results obtained in sequence variability analyses. This analysis identified the presence of a microsatellite sequence that is located at the start of the second intron, which could further allow the development of a fast and cheap semiautomatic sequencing method. PMID:25458311

  17. Dietary tomato powder inhibits alcohol-induced hepatic injury by suppressing cytochrome p450 2E1 induction in rodent models.

    PubMed

    Stice, Camilla P; Liu, Chun; Aizawa, Koichi; Greenberg, Andrew S; Ausman, Lynne M; Wang, Xiang-Dong

    2015-04-15

    Chronic and excessive alcohol consumption leads to the development of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and greatly increases the risk of liver cancer. Induction of the cytochrome p450 2E1 (CYP2E1) enzyme by chronic and excessive alcohol intake is known to play a role in the pathogenesis of ALD. High intake of tomatoes, rich in the carotenoid lycopene, is associated with a decreased risk of chronic disease. We investigated the effects of whole tomato (tomato powder, TP), partial tomato (tomato extract, TE), and purified lycopene (LYC) against ALD development in rats. Of the three supplements, only TP reduced the severity of alcohol-induced steatosis, hepatic inflammatory foci, and CYP2E1 protein levels. TE had no effect on these outcomes and LYC greatly increased inflammatory foci in alcohol-fed rats. To further support the protective effect of TP against ALD, TP was supplemented in a carcinogen (diethylnitrosamine, DEN)-initiated alcohol-promoted mouse model. In addition to reduced steatosis and inflammatory foci, TP abolished the presence of preneoplastic foci of altered hepatocytes in DEN-injected mice fed alcohol. These reductions were associated with decreased hepatic CYP2E1 protein levels, restored levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α and downstream gene expression, decreased inflammatory gene expression, and reduced endoplasmic reticulum stress markers. These data provide strong evidence for TP as an effective whole food prevention strategy against ALD. PMID:25592162

  18. Quantitative farm-to-fork risk assessment model for norovirus and hepatitis A virus in European leafy green vegetable and berry fruit supply chains.

    PubMed

    Bouwknegt, Martijn; Verhaelen, Katharina; Rzeżutka, Artur; Kozyra, Iwona; Maunula, Leena; von Bonsdorff, Carl-Henrik; Vantarakis, Apostolos; Kokkinos, Petros; Petrovic, Tamas; Lazic, Sava; Pavlik, Ivo; Vasickova, Petra; Willems, Kris A; Havelaar, Arie H; Rutjes, Saskia A; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria

    2015-04-01

    Fresh produce that is contaminated with viruses may lead to infection and viral gastroenteritis or hepatitis when consumed raw. It is thus important to reduce virus numbers on these foods. Prevention of virus contamination in fresh produce production and processing may be more effective than treatment, as sufficient virus removal or inactivation by post-harvest treatment requires high doses that may adversely affect food quality. To date knowledge of the contribution of various potential contamination routes is lacking. A risk assessment model was developed for human norovirus, hepatitis A virus and human adenovirus in raspberry and salad vegetable supply chains to quantify contributions of potential contamination sources to the contamination of produce at retail. These models were used to estimate public health risks. Model parameterization was based on monitoring data from European supply chains and literature data. No human pathogenic viruses were found in the soft fruit supply chains; human adenovirus (hAdV) was detected, which was additionally monitored as an indicator of fecal pollution to assess the contribution of potential contamination points. Estimated risks per serving of lettuce based on the models were 3×10(-4) (6×10(-6)-5×10(-3)) for NoV infection and 3×10(-8) (7×10(-10)-3×10(-6)) for hepatitis A jaundice. The contribution to virus contamination of hand-contact was larger as compared with the contribution of irrigation, the conveyor belt or the water used for produce rinsing. In conclusion, viral contamination in the lettuce and soft fruit supply chains occurred and estimated health risks were generally low. Nevertheless, the 97.5% upper limit for the estimated NoV contamination of lettuce suggested that infection risks up to 50% per serving might occur. Our study suggests that attention to full compliance for hand hygiene will improve fresh produce safety related to virus risks most as compared to the other examined sources, given the

  19. The Australian study of HIV and injecting Drug Use. Part II: predicting exposure to hepatitis C and hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Carruthers, S J; Loxley, W M; Phillips, M; Bevan, J S

    1997-09-01

    Researchers agree that while hepatitis B maybe in control, hepatitis C is present in epidemic proportions among injecting drug users and that current HIV prevention strategies have not been sufficient to halt the spread of this hepatitis virus, although there is some evidence to suggest that incidence rates are stabilizing. Since there is no effective cure and it is unlikely that a vaccine will become available in the foreseeable future all efforts to control the spread of hepatitis C must rely on education and prevention strategies. The Australian Study of HIV and Injecting Drug Use is a cross-sectional national study designed to investigate exposure to and risks for infection with bloodborne viruses. Of those volunteering a usable blood sample for hepatitis C antibody and hepatitis B core antibody testing 55% and 19%, respectively, returned reactive test results. Logistic regression statistical models were used to identify risk factors for hepatitis C and hepatitis B. Risk factors for hepatitis C were identified as duration of use, use of opiates on last injecting occasion, education level, treatment status and having a history of sexually transmissible diseases. Risk factors associated with hepatitis B were duration of use, and use of opiates on last injecting occasion. The lack of identifiable risk factors for hepatitis B suggest that past rather than current injecting and sexual behaviour patterns are required to predict accurately risk of exposure to hepatitis B. In addition to this, one-third of respondents reported being vaccinated against hepatitis B. Respondents perceived themselves to be at greater risk from hepatitis C than from hepatitis B or HIV. A discussion of strategies needed to prevent the spread of the hepatitis viruses will be presented along with recommendations for further research. PMID:16203430

  20. Tetrandrine stimulates the apoptosis of hepatic stellate cells and ameliorates development of fibrosis in a thioacetamide rat model

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Ming-Fu; Lian, Li-Hua; Piao, Dong-Ming; Nan, Ji-Xing

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the therapeutic effect of tetrandrine on liver fibrosis induced by thioacetamide in rats in vivo and in vitro. METHODS: In vitro study: we investigated the effect of tetrandrine on the apoptosis of rat hepatic stellate cells transformed by simian virus 40 (T-HSC/Cl-6), which retains the features of activated cells. In vivo study: hepatic fibrosis was induced in rats by thioacetamide. Tetrandrine was given orally to rats at doses of 5, 10 or 20 mg/kg for 4 wk compared with intraperitoneal injection of interferon-г. RESULTS: In vitro study: 5, 10 or 25 μg/mL of tetrandrine-induced activation of caspase-3 in t-HSC/Cl-6 cells occurred dose-dependently. In vivo study: tetrandrine treatment as well as interferon-г significantly ameliorated the development of fibrosis as determined by lowered serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), total bilirubin (T-Bil) and the levels of liver hydroxyproline (Hyp), hyaluronic acid (HA), laminin (LN) and also improved histological findings. The effects of tetrandrine at the concentration of 20 mg/kg were better than the other concentration groups. CONCLUSION: Tetrandrine promotes the apoptosis of activated HSCs in vitro. Tetrandrine administration can prevent liver fibrosis and liver damage induced by thioacetamide in rats in vivo, indicating that it might exert a direct effect on rat HSCs. PMID:17451202

  1. Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    McCluskey, James; Bourgeois, Marie; Harbison, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity is a persistent allergic contact dermatitides documented in floral workers exposed to Alstroemeria and its cultivars.[1] The causative allergen is tulipalin A, a toxic glycoside named for the tulip bulbs from which it was first isolated.[2] The condition is characterized by fissured acropulpitis, often accompanied by hyperpigmentation, onychorrhexis, and paronychia. More of the volar surface may be affected in sensitized florists. Dermatitis and paronychia are extremely common conditions and diagnostic errors may occur. A thorough patient history, in conjunction with confirmatory patch testing with a bulb sliver and tuliposide A exposure, can prevent misdiagnosis. We report a case of Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity misdiagnosed as an unresolved tinea manuum infection in a patient evaluated for occupational exposure. PMID:25024947

  2. Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    McCluskey, James; Bourgeois, Marie; Harbison, Raymond

    2014-04-01

    Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity is a persistent allergic contact dermatitides documented in floral workers exposed to Alstroemeria and its cultivars.[1] The causative allergen is tulipalin A, a toxic glycoside named for the tulip bulbs from which it was first isolated.[2] The condition is characterized by fissured acropulpitis, often accompanied by hyperpigmentation, onychorrhexis, and paronychia. More of the volar surface may be affected in sensitized florists. Dermatitis and paronychia are extremely common conditions and diagnostic errors may occur. A thorough patient history, in conjunction with confirmatory patch testing with a bulb sliver and tuliposide A exposure, can prevent misdiagnosis. We report a case of Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity misdiagnosed as an unresolved tinea manuum infection in a patient evaluated for occupational exposure. PMID:25024947

  3. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ciećko-Michalska, Irena; Szczepanek, Małgorzata; Słowik, Agnieszka; Mach, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy can be a serious complication of acute liver failure and chronic liver diseases, predominantly liver cirrhosis. Hyperammonemia plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The brain-blood barrier disturbances, changes in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, GABA-ergic or benzodiazepine pathway abnormalities, manganese neurotoxicity, brain energetic disturbances, and brain blood flow abnormalities are considered to be involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The influence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) on the induction of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is recently emphasized. The aim of this paper is to present the current views on the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:23316223

  4. [Estimation of risk areas for hepatitis A].

    PubMed

    Braga, Ricardo Cerqueira Campos; Valencia, Luís Iván Ortiz; Medronho, Roberto de Andrade; Escosteguy, Claudia Caminha

    2008-08-01

    This study estimated hepatitis A risk areas in a region of Duque de Caxias, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. A cross-sectional study consisting of a hepatitis A serological survey and a household survey were conducted in 19 census tracts. Of these, 11 tracts were selected and 1,298 children from one to ten years of age were included in the study. Geostatistical techniques allowed modeling the spatial continuity of hepatitis A, non-use of filtered drinking water, time since installation of running water, and number of water taps per household and their spatial estimation through ordinary and indicator kriging. Adjusted models for the outcome and socioeconomic variables were isotropic; risk maps were constructed; cross-validation of the four models was satisfactory. Spatial estimation using the kriging method detected areas with increased risk of hepatitis A, independently of the urban administrative area in which the census tracts were located. PMID:18709215

  5. A model to predict 3-month mortality risk of acute-on-chronic hepatitis B liver failure using artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Zheng, M-H; Shi, K-Q; Lin, X-F; Xiao, D-D; Chen, L-L; Liu, W-Y; Fan, Y-C; Chen, Y-P

    2013-04-01

    Model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) scoring was initiated using traditional statistical technique by assuming a linear relationship between clinical features, but most phenomena in a clinical situation are not linearly related. The aim of this study was to predict 3-month mortality risk of acute-on-chronic hepatitis B liver failure (ACHBLF) on an individual patient level using an artificial neural network (ANN) system. The ANN model was built using data from 402 consecutive patients with ACHBLF. It was trained to predict 3-month mortality by the data of 280 patients and validated by the remaining 122 patients. The area under the curve of receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) was calculated for ANN and MELD-based scoring systems. The following variables age (P < 0.001), prothrombin activity (P < 0.001), serum sodium (P < 0.001), total bilirubin (P = 0.015), hepatitis B e antigen positivity rate (P < 0.001) and haemoglobin (P < 0.001) were significantly related to the prognosis of ACHBLF and were selected to build the ANN. The ANN performed significantly better than MELD-based scoring systems both in the training cohort (AUROC = 0.869 vs 0.667, 0.591, 0.643, 0.571 and 0.577; P < 0.001, respectively) and in the validation cohort (AUROC = 0.765 vs 0.599, 0.563, 0.601, 0.521 and 0.540; P ≤ 0.006, respectively). Thus, the ANN model was shown to be more accurate in predicting 3-month mortality of ACHBLF than MELD-based scoring systems. PMID:23490369

  6. Hepatitis: protecting BMETs & CEs.

    PubMed

    Baker, S A

    1994-01-01

    Hepatitis is the primary occupational hazard for healthcare workers. Not until the 1970s were hepatitis viruses isolated and identified as types A and B. In the late 1970s, hepatitis D was discovered as a major cause of fulminant hepatitis. Soon, it was evident that another type was also at work. Because testing was only available for types A and B, the new category was referred to as non-A, non-B. In the 1980s, scientists identified two more viruses from this non-A, non-B group, namely hepatitis E and hepatitis C. These five types of hepatitis have different modes of transmission. The fecal-to-oral route is the mode of transmission for hepatitis types A and E. But, types B and D are bloodborne pathogens. With the advent of a safe vaccine for hepatitis B, this category is declining. To date, hepatitis C appears to have multiple routes of transmission, with half the cases being posttransfusion. In the United States, 85,000 people per year develop chronic hepatitis C, which ultimately leads to severe liver damage. This paper addresses each of the five viruses that have been grouped by routes of transmission, prevention techniques for BMETs and CEs, and statistics of reported cases to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDCP) over the last 20 years. PMID:10139739

  7. METABOLISM Wnt Signaling Regulates Hepatic Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongjun; Fergusson, Maria M.; Wu, J. Julie; Rovira, Ilsa I.; Liu, Jie; Gavrilova, Oksana; Lu, Teng; Bao, Jianjun; Han, Donghe; Sack, Michael N.; Finkel, Toren

    2011-01-01

    The contribution of the Wnt pathway has been extensively characterized in embryogenesis, differentiation, and stem cell biology but not in mammalian metabolism. Here, using in vivo gain- and loss-of-function models, we demonstrate an important role for Wnt signaling in hepatic metabolism. In particular, β-Catenin, the downstream mediator of canonical Wnt signaling, altered serum glucose concentrations and regulated hepatic glucose production. β-catenin also modulated hepatic insulin signaling. Furthermore, β-catenin interacted with the transcription factor FoxO1 in livers from mice under starved conditions. The interaction of FoxO1 with β-catenin regulated the transcriptional activation of the genes encoding glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), the two rate-limiting enzymes in hepatic gluconeogenesis. Moreover, starvation induced the hepatic expression of mRNAs encoding different Wnt isoforms. In addition, nutrient deprivation appeared to favor the association of β-catenin with FoxO family members, rather than with members of the T cell factor of transcriptional activators. Notably, in a model of diet-induced obesity, hepatic deletion of β-catenin improved overall metabolic homeostasis. These observations implicate Wnt signaling in the modulation of hepatic metabolism and raise the possibility that Wnt signaling may play a similar role in the metabolic regulation of other tissues. PMID:21285411

  8. INFLUENCE OF TYPE II DIABETES, OBESITY, AND EXPOSURE TO 2, 3, 7, 8-TETRACHLORODIBENZO-P-DIOXIN (TCDD) EXPOSURE ON THE EXPRESSION OF HEPATIC CYP1A2 IN A MURIN MODEL OF TYPE II DIABETES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Influence of type II diabetes, obesity and exposure 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) exposure on the expression of hepatic CYPIA2 in a murine model of type II diabetes. SJ Godin', VM Richardson2, JJ Diliberto2, LS Birnbaum', MJ DeVito2; 'Curriculum In Toxicology, UNC-CH...

  9. Pathological characterization and morphometric analysis of hepatic lesions in SHRSP5/Dmcr, an experimental non-alcoholic steatohepatitis model, induced by high-fat and high-cholesterol diet.

    PubMed

    Horai, Yasushi; Utsumi, Hiroyuki; Ono, Yuko; Kishimoto, Toshimitsu; Ono, Yuuichi; Fukunari, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    SHRSP5/Dmcr is a newly established substrain of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHRSP). Recently, high-fat and high-cholesterol (HFC) diet-fed SHRSP5/Dmcr has been reported as a novel rat model of developing hepatic lesions similar to human non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The aim of this study was to investigate the detailed pathological conditions induced by HFC diet in SHRSP5/Dmcr rats using molecular biological methods and morphometric analysis. SHRSP5/Dmcr rats at 6 weeks of age were fed on either HFC diet or stroke-prone (SP) diet for 2, 4, 6, 8 and 16 weeks and histopathological changes in the liver, blood chemistry and mRNA expression levels in the liver were investigated. As evidenced by the histopathological examination of the liver of the SHRSP5/Dmcr rats, hepatic steatosis and lobular inflammation were present, with gradual increasing severity from 2 weeks after the introduction of the HFC diet. Partial hepatic fibrosis was detected at 6 weeks and spread over the entire region of the liver with more severe bridging formation by 16 weeks. The degrees of NASH-like hepatic lesions such as steatosis (the size distribution of lipid droplets), inflammation and fibrosis were quantified by morphometric analysis. Eosinophilic inclusion bodies encountered in the hepatocytes had immunoreactivity with Cox-4 and double-membrane walls, identified as mega-mitochondria. Serum ALT and bilirubins, and the mRNA expression levels related to fibrosis were closely correlated with hepatic histopathological changes. The clear feeding time-dependent progression of NASH-like hepatic lesion in HFC diet-fed SHRSP5/Dmcr rats reinforced the conclusion that this strain might be a useful model of NASH and of inflammatory fibrotic liver disease. PMID:27037502

  10. Caspase 3 inactivation protects against hepatic cell death and ameliorates fibrogenesis in a diet induced NASH model

    PubMed Central

    Thapaliya, Samjhana; Wree, Alexander; Povero, Davide; Inzaugarat, Maria Eugenia; Berk, Michael; Dixon, Laura; Papouchado, Bettina G.; Feldstein, Ariel E

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Hepatocyte cell death is a key feature of nonalcoholic steohepatitis (NASH). As the contribution of specific caspases remains unclear, our aim was to ascertain the effect of caspase 3 suppression on liver injury and fibrogenesis. Methods C57BL/6 wild-type (WT), and caspase 3 knock out (Casp3−/−) mice were placed on a methionine- and choline-deficient (MCD) diet for 6 weeks to induce steatohepatitis and liver fibrosis. Thereafter, liver injury, liver fibrosis and hepatocellular apoptosis were quantified in liver sections. Additionally, expression of proteins associated with liver inflammation and fibrogenesis were analyzed. Results WT mice fed MCD diet showed marked activation of caspase 3 in hepatocytes, in conjunction with steatohepatitis and increased hepatic triglyceride levels, hepatocyte ballooning, inflammation and fibrosis. Casp3−/− fed the MCD diet showed similar serum ALT levels and NAFLD activity scores (NAS) compared to WT MCD-fed mice. However Casp3−/− mice on the MCD diet showed a marked reduction in expression of transcripts for pro-fibrogenic genes i which translated into reduced hepatic collagen deposition. These changes were associated with decreased levels of apoptosis, and a significant reduction in the expression of cytokines involved in inflammatory signaling. Casp3−/− mice on the MCD showed a reduction in expression of chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) leading to ameliorated infiltration of inflammatory lymphocyte antigen 6 complex, locus C1 (Ly6c) positive monocytes. Conclusion These findings support a prominent role for hepatocyte caspase 3 activation in NASH related apoptosis, fibrogenesis and fibrosis which in part is mediated via CCR2 dependent infiltration of Ly6c positive monocytes. PMID:24795036

  11. Ribavirin Potentiates Interferon Action by Augmenting Interferon-Stimulated Gene Induction in Hepatitis C Virus Cell Culture Models

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Emmanuel; Feld, Jordan J.; Li, Qisheng; Hu, Zongyi; Fried, Michael W.; Liang, T. Jake

    2012-01-01

    The combination of pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) and ribavirin is the standard treatment for chronic hepatitis C. Our recent clinical study suggests that ribavirin augments the induction of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) in patients treated for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. In order to further characterize the mechanisms of action of ribavirin, we examined the effect of ribavirin treatment on ISG induction in cell culture. In addition, the effect of ribavirin on infectious HCV cell culture systems was studied. Similar to interferon (IFN)-α, ribavirin potently inhibits JFH-1 infection of Huh7.5.1 cells in a dose-dependent manner, which spans the physiological concentration of ribavirin in vivo. Microarray analysis and subsequent quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays demonstrated that ribavirin treatment resulted in the induction of a distinct set of ISGs. These ISGs, including IFN regulatory factors 7 and 9, are known to play an important role in anti-HCV responses. When ribavirin is used in conjunction with IFN-α, induction of specific ISGs is synergistic when compared with either drug applied separately. Direct up-regulation of these antiviral genes by ribavirin is mediated by a novel mechanism different from those associated with IFN signaling and intracellular double-stranded RNA sensing pathways such as RIG-I and MDA5. RNA interference studies excluded the activation of the Toll-like receptor and nuclear factor κB pathways in the action of ribavirin. Conclusion Our study suggests that ribavirin, acting by way of a novel innate mechanism, potentiates the anti-HCV effect of IFN. Understanding the mechanism of action of ribavirin would be valuable in identifying novel antivirals PMID:21254160

  12. In vitro-in vivo extrapolation of quantitative hepatic biotransformation data for fish - I. A review of methods, and strategies for incorporating intrinsic clearance estimates into chemical kinetic models

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, John W.; Schultz, Irv R.; Fitzsimmons, Patrick N..

    2006-06-10

    Mammalian researchers have developed a stepwise approach to predict in vivo hepatic clearance from measurements of in vitro hepatic metabolism. The resulting clearance estimates have been used to screen drug candidates, identify potential drug-drug interactions, investigate idiosyncratic drug responses, and support toxicology risk assessments. In this report we review these methods, discuss their potential application to studies with fish, and describe how extrapolated values could be incorporated into well-known compartmental kinetic models. Empirical equations that relate extrapolation factors to chemical log Kow are given to facilitate the incorporation of metabolism data into bioconcentration and bioaccumulation models. Because they explicitly incorporate the concept of clearance, compartmental clearance volume models are particularly well suited for incorporating hepatic clearance estimates. The manner in which these clearance values are incorporated into a given model depends, however, on the measurement frame of reference. Procedures for the incorporation of in vitro metabolism data into physiologically based toxicokinetic (PBTK) models are also described. Unlike most compartmental models, PBTK models are developed to describe the effects of metabolism in the tissue where it occurs. In addition, PBTK models are well suited to modeling metabolism in more than one tissue.

  13. Hepatic encephalopathy: a review.

    PubMed

    Lizardi-Cervera, Javier; Almeda, Paloma; Guevara, Luis; Uribe, Misael

    2003-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a complication that presents in as many as 28% of patients with cirrhosis, and reported up to ten years after the diagnosis of cirrhosis. Commonly, it is observed in patients with severe hepatic failure and is characterized by neuropsychiatric manifestations that can range in severity from a mild alteration in mental state to a coma; additionally, some neuromuscular symptoms can be observed. This complication of either acute or chronic hepatic disease is the result of a diminished hepatic reservoir and inability to detoxify some toxins that originate in the bowel. Today, the role of astrocytes, specifically the Alzheimer type II cells, is known to be very important in the pathogenesis of the hepatic encephalopathy, and will be reviewed later. In conclusion, the objectives of this review are: To understand the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy, To recognize the precipitating factors, as well as preventive measures for the development of the hepatic encephalopathy, To describe the new classification of hepatic encephalopathy and its clinical implications, To recognize the clinical manifestations and stages of the disease, To understand the main diagnostic tests used to detect the hepatic encephalopathy, To describe the main therapeutic treatments of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:15115963

  14. Feature Hepatitis: Hepatitis Can Strike Anyone

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. From Hollywood's "Walk of Stars" to Main Street, USA, people from all walks ... that includes many well-known names: Legendary television star Larry Hagman was diagnosed with advanced hepatitis C ...

  15. The anti-TNF-α antibody infliximab inhibits the expression of fat-transporter-protein FAT/CD36 in a selective hepatic-radiation mouse model.

    PubMed

    Martius, Gesa; Cameron, Silke; Rave-Fränk, Margret; Hess, Clemens F; Wolff, Hendrik A; Malik, Ihtzaz A

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we reported a radiation-induced inflammation triggering fat-accumulation through fatty-acid-translocase/cluster of differentiation protein 36 (FAT/CD36) in rat liver. Furthermore, inhibition of radiation-induced FAT/CD36-expression by anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (anti-TNF-α) (infliximab) was shown in vitro. The current study investigates fat-accumulation in a mouse-model of single-dose liver-irradiation (25-Gray) and the effect of anti-TNF-α-therapy on FAT/CD36 gene-expression. Mice livers were selectively irradiated in vivo in presence or absence of infliximab. Serum- and hepatic-triglycerides, mRNA, and protein were analyzed by colorimetric assays, RT-PCR, Immunofluorescence and Western-Blot, respectively. Sudan-staining was used demonstrating fat-accumulation in tissue. In mice livers, early (1-3 h) induction of TNF-α-expression, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, was observed. It was followed by elevated hepatic-triglyceride level (6-12 h), compared to sham-irradiated controls. In contrast, serum-triglyceride level was decreased at these time points. Similar to triglyceride level in mice livers, Sudan staining of liver cryosections showed a quick (6-12 h) increase of fat-droplets after irradiation. Furthermore, expression of fat-transporter-protein FAT/CD36 was increased at protein level caused by radiation or TNF-α. TNF-α-blockage by anti-TNF-α showed an early inhibition of radiation-induced FAT/CD36 expression in mice livers. Immunohistochemistry showed basolateral and cytoplasmic expression of FAT/CD36 in hepatocytes. Moreover, co-localization of FAT/CD36 was detected with α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA+) cells and F4/80+ macrophages. In summary, hepatic-radiation triggers fat-accumulation in mice livers, involving acute-phase-processes. Accordingly, anti-TNF-α-therapy prevented early radiation-induced expression of FAT/CD36 in vivo. PMID:25739082

  16. Does Artificial Ascites Induce the Heat-Sink Phenomenon during Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation of the Hepatic Subcapsular Area?: an in vivo Experimental Study Using a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-sun; Choi, Dongil; Lim, Hyo K.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of the heat-sink phenomenon induced by artificial ascites on the size of the ablation zone during percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation of the hepatic subcapsular area in an in vivo rabbit model. Materials and Methods A total of 21 percutaneous rabbit liver RF ablations were performed with and without artificial ascites (5% dextrose aqueous solution). The rabbits were divided into three groups: a) control group (C, n = 7); b) room temperature ascites group (R, n = 7); and c) warmed ascites group (W, n = 7). The tip of a 1 cm, internally cooled electrode was placed on the subcapsular region of the hepatic dome via ultrasound guidance, and ablation was continued for 6 min. Changes in temperature of the ascites were monitored during the ablation. The size of the ablation zones of the excised livers and immediate complications rates were compared statistically between the groups (Mann-Whitney U test, Kruskal-Wallis test, linear-by-linear association, p = 0.05). Results One rabbit from the "W" group expired during the procedure. In all groups, the ascites temperatures approached their respective body temperatures as the ablations continued; however, a significant difference in ascites temperature was found between groups "W" and "R" throughout the procedures (39.2±0.4℃ in group W and 33.4±4.3℃ in group R at 6 min, p = 0.003). No significant difference was found between the size of the ablation zones (782.4±237.3 mL in group C, 1,172.0±468.9 mL in group R, and 1,030.6±665.1 mL in group W, p = 0.170) for the excised liver specimens. Diaphragmatic injury was identified in three of seven cases (42.9%) upon visual inspection of group "C" rabbits (p = 0.030). Conclusion Artificial ascites are not likely to cause a significant heat-sink phenomenon in the percutaneous RF ablation of the hepatic subcapsular region. PMID:19182502

  17. The Anti-TNF-α Antibody Infliximab Inhibits the Expression of Fat-Transporter-Protein FAT/CD36 in a Selective Hepatic-Radiation Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Martius, Gesa; Cameron, Silke; Rave-Fränk, Margret; Hess, Clemens F.; Wolff, Hendrik A.; Malik, Ihtzaz A.

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we reported a radiation-induced inflammation triggering fat-accumulation through fatty-acid-translocase/cluster of differentiation protein 36 (FAT/CD36) in rat liver. Furthermore, inhibition of radiation-induced FAT/CD36-expression by anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (anti-TNF-α) (infliximab) was shown in vitro. The current study investigates fat-accumulation in a mouse-model of single-dose liver-irradiation (25-Gray) and the effect of anti-TNF-α-therapy on FAT/CD36 gene-expression. Mice livers were selectively irradiated in vivo in presence or absence of infliximab. Serum- and hepatic-triglycerides, mRNA, and protein were analyzed by colorimetric assays, RT-PCR, Immunofluorescence and Western-Blot, respectively. Sudan-staining was used demonstrating fat-accumulation in tissue. In mice livers, early (1–3 h) induction of TNF-α-expression, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, was observed. It was followed by elevated hepatic-triglyceride level (6–12 h), compared to sham-irradiated controls. In contrast, serum-triglyceride level was decreased at these time points. Similar to triglyceride level in mice livers, Sudan staining of liver cryosections showed a quick (6–12 h) increase of fat-droplets after irradiation. Furthermore, expression of fat-transporter-protein FAT/CD36 was increased at protein level caused by radiation or TNF-α. TNF-α-blockage by anti-TNF-α showed an early inhibition of radiation-induced FAT/CD36 expression in mice livers. Immunohistochemistry showed basolateral and cytoplasmic expression of FAT/CD36 in hepatocytes. Moreover, co-localization of FAT/CD36 was detected with α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA+) cells and F4/80+ macrophages. In summary, hepatic-radiation triggers fat-accumulation in mice livers, involving acute-phase-processes. Accordingly, anti-TNF-α-therapy prevented early radiation-induced expression of FAT/CD36 in vivo. PMID:25739082

  18. LPSF/GQ-02 inhibits the development of hepatic steatosis and inflammation in a mouse model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

    PubMed

    Soares e Silva, Amanda Karolina; de Oliveira Cipriano Torres, Dilênia; dos Santos Gomes, Fabiana Oliveira; dos Santos Silva, Bruna; Lima Ribeiro, Edlene; Costa Oliveira, Amanda; dos Santos, Laise Aline Martins; de Lima, Maria do Carmo Alves; Pitta, Ivan da Rocha; Peixoto, Christina Alves

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) defines a wide spectrum of liver diseases that extends from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Although the pathogenesis of NAFLD remains undefined, it is recognized that insulin resistance is present in almost all patients who develop this disease. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) act as an insulin sensitizer and have been used in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes and other insulin-resistant conditions, including NAFLD. Hence, therapy of NAFLD with insulin-sensitizing drugs should ideally improve the key hepatic histological changes, while also reducing cardiometabolic and cancer risks. Controversially, TZDs are associated with the development of cardiovascular events and liver problems. Therefore, there is a need for the development of new therapeutic strategies to improve liver function in patients with chronic liver diseases. The aim of the present study was to assess the therapeutic effects of LPSF/GQ-02 on the liver of LDLR-/- mice after a high-fat diet. Eighty male mice were divided into 4 groups and two different experiments: 1-received a standard diet; 2-fed with a high-fat diet (HFD); 3-HFD+pioglitazone; 4-HFD+LPSF/GQ-02. The experiments were conducted for 10 or 12 weeks and in the last two or four weeks respectively, the drugs were administered daily by gavage. The results obtained with an NAFLD murine model indicated that LPSF/GQ-02 was effective in improving the hepatic architecture, decreasing fat accumulation, reducing the amount of collagen, decreasing inflammation by reducing IL-6, iNOS, COX-2 and F4 / 80, and increasing the protein expression of IκBα, cytoplasmic NFκB-65, eNOS and IRS-1 in mice LDLR -/-. These results suggest a direct action by LPSF/GQ-02 on the factors that affect inflammation, insulin resistance and fat accumulation in the liver of these animals. Further studies are being conducted in our laboratory to investigate the possible mechanism of action of LPSF/GQ-02 on

  19. Combination of DNA prime--adenovirus boost immunization with entecavir elicits sustained control of chronic hepatitis B in the woodchuck model.

    PubMed

    Kosinska, Anna D; Zhang, Ejuan; Johrden, Lena; Liu, Jia; Seiz, Pia L; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Ma, Zhiyong; Kemper, Thekla; Fiedler, Melanie; Glebe, Dieter; Wildner, Oliver; Dittmer, Ulf; Lu, Mengji; Roggendorf, Michael

    2013-01-01

    A potent therapeutic T-cell vaccine may be an alternative treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Previously, we developed a DNA prime-adenovirus (AdV) boost vaccination protocol that could elicit strong and specific CD8+ T-cell responses to woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) core antigen (WHcAg) in mice. In the present study, we first examined whether this new prime-boost immunization could induce WHcAg-specific T-cell responses and effectively control WHV replication in the WHV-transgenic mouse model. Secondly, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of this new vaccination strategy in chronically WHV-infected woodchucks in combination with a potent antiviral treatment. Immunization of WHV-transgenic mice by DNA prime-AdV boost regimen elicited potent and functional WHcAg-specific CD8+ T-cell response that consequently resulted in the reduction of the WHV load below the detection limit in more than 70% of animals. The combination therapy of entecavir (ETV) treatment and DNA prime-AdV boost immunization in chronic WHV carriers resulted in WHsAg- and WHcAg-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses, which were not detectable in ETV-only treated controls. Woodchucks receiving the combination therapy showed a prolonged suppression of WHV replication and lower WHsAg levels compared to controls. Moreover, two of four immunized carriers remained WHV negative after the end of ETV treatment and developed anti-WHs antibodies. These results demonstrate that the combined antiviral and vaccination approach efficiently elicited sustained immunological control of chronic hepadnaviral infection in woodchucks and may be a new promising therapeutic strategy in patients. PMID:23785279

  20. Modulation of AP-endonuclease1 levels associated with hepatic cirrhosis in rat model treated with human umbilical cord blood mononuclear stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Bassiouny, Ahmad R; Zaky, Amira Z; Abdulmalek, Shaymaa A; Kandeel, Kamal M; Ismail, Alaa; Moftah, Marie

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress in liver cells may contribute to the etiology of hepatic diseases, as in liver cirrhosis. AP-Endonuclease1 (APE1/Ref-1) is essential for cell protection toward oxidative stress by acting as a transcriptional regulator of pro-survival genes and as a redox sensitive protein. The aim of this study was to critically analyze the various parameters governing the success of human umbilical cord blood mononuclear stem cell-based (MNCs) therapy without the use of an immunosuppressant and to investigate for the first time the expression of APE1 during thioacetamide (TAA)-induced cirrhosis and MNCs therapy in a rat model. Umbilical cord blood samples from full-term deliveries were collected. Lethal fulminant hepatic cirrhosis in rats was induced by intraperitoneal injection of thio-acetamide. MNCs were then intrahepatically transplanted. We measured APE1 expression at mRNA and protein levels, mRNA expression of TGF-β, α-SMA, STAP, CTGF, MMP-9 and TIMP-1 in a follow up study. Histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses were performed 10 weeks after intrahepatic injection of the cells. Transdifferentiated cells could be efficiently stained with antihuman hepatocytes. Interestingly, human hepatocyte-specific markers, human albumin, cytokeratin-18 and cytokeratin-19 mRNAs were detected in rat liver after 10 days of MNCs infusion. MNC transplanted by intrahepatic route, could engraft recipient liver, differentiated into functional hepatocytes, and rescued liver failure. Moreover up regulation of APE1 expression confirmed by marked immunohistochemical staining may be involved in MNCs-induced hepatocytes regeneration suggesting that maintaining high level of APE1 has protective effect as pro-survival signal. PMID:22076170

  1. Activated farnesoid X receptor attenuates apoptosis and liver injury in autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Lian, Fan; Wang, Yu; Xiao, Youjun; Wu, Xiwen; Xu, Hanshi; Liang, Liuqin; Yang, Xiuyan

    2015-10-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a chronic inflammatory liver disease associated with interface hepatitis, the presence of autoantibodies, regulatory T‑cell dysfunction and raised plasma liver enzyme levels. The present study assessed the hepatoprotective and antiapoptotic role of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) in AIH. a mouse model of AIH was induced by treatment with concanavalin A (ConA). The FXR agonist, chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), was administered to mice exhibiting ConA‑induced liver injury and a normal control. Blood samples were obtained to detect the levels of aminotransferases and inflammatory cytokines. Liver specimens were collected, and hematoxylin‑eosin staining was used for histopathological examination and detection. Apoptosis was evaluated using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase‑mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) method. The expression levels of apoptosis‑associated genes and proteins were determined by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, respectively. The results demonstrated that FXR was downregulated at the mRNA and protein level in the liver specimens of mice induced with ConA‑induced hepatitis. Increased levels of aminotransferases and inflammatory cytokines, including interferon‑γ, tumor necrosis factor‑α, interleukin (IL)‑4 and IL‑2, were detected in ConA‑treated mice. The mice pretreated with the FXR agonist, CDCA, were more resistant to ConA hepatitis, as indicated by reduced levels of alanine transaminase/aspartate aminotransferase and aminotransferases. The activation of FXR ameliorated hepatocyte apoptosis, as demonstrated by TUNEL analysis and downregulation of the Fas/Fas ligand, tumor necrosis factor‑related apoptosis‑inducing ligand and caspase‑3. Taken together, FXR activation ameliorated liver injury and suppressed inflammatory cytokines in ConA‑induced hepatitis. FXR, therefore, exerts a protective role against ConA-induced apoptosis. PMID

  2. Preventing hepatitis B or C

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000401.htm Preventing hepatitis B or C To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hepatitis B and hepatitis C infections cause irritation and ...

  3. Hepatitis B in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Tran, Tram T

    2016-06-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is estimated to affect >350 million people worldwide and represents a significant cause of morbidity and mortality related to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HBV remains an important source of incident cases of HBV. Current barriers to eradication of incident HBV infections via MTCT include underutilization of immunoprophylaxis with hepatitis B vaccination and hepatitis B immune globulin in certain endemic regions as well as failure of immunoprophylaxis. PMID:27190321

  4. Hepatitis B vaccine education programs: what really works?

    PubMed

    Handelman, E Y

    1992-06-01

    1. Health care workers need to know that hepatitis B vaccine provides a safe, effective protection for them against a significant occupational hazard. 2. Several theoretical models can be used to design hepatitis B education programs, including motivational theories, the Health Belief Model, and andragogy. Specific recommendations can be made about the plan, format, content, and evaluation of adult education programs about hepatitis B. Federal agencies, including the Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Labor, have established criteria for hepatitis B education programs. PMID:1388368

  5. TMBIM6 (transmembrane BAX inhibitor motif containing 6) enhances autophagy and reduces renal dysfunction in a cyclosporine A-induced nephrotoxicity model.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Raj Kumar; Lee, Geum-Hwa; Lee, Hwa-Young; Li, Bo; Jung, Han-Eul; Rashid, Harun-Or; Choi, Min Kyung; Yadav, Binod Kumar; Kim, Woo-Ho; Kim, Kyung-Woon; Park, Byung-Hyun; Kim, Won; Lee, Yong-Chul; Kim, Hyung-Ryong; Chae, Han-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) is widely used as an immunosuppressor in transplantation. Previous studies reported that CsA induces autophagy and that chronic treatment with CsA results in accumulation of autophagosomes and reduced autophagic clearance. Autophagy is a prosurvival process that promotes recovery from acute kidney injury by degrading misfolded proteins produced in the kidney. In the present study, we used TMBIM6-expressing HK-2, human kidney tubular cells (TMBIM6 cells) and Tmbim6 knockout (tmbim6(-/-)) mice. When exposed to CsA, the TMBIM6 cells maintained autophagy activity by preventing autophagosome accumulation. With regard to signaling, PRKKA/AMPK phosphorylation and mechanistic target of rapamycin (serine/threonine kinase) complex 1 (MTORC1) expression and its downstream target TFEB (transcription factor EB), a lysosome biogenesis factor, were regulated in the TMBIM6 cells. Lysosomal activity was highly increased or stably maintained in the presence of TMBIM6. In addition, treatment of tmbim6(-/-) mice with CsA resulted in increased autophagosome formation and decreased lysosome formation and activity. We also found that tmbim6(-/-) mice were susceptible to CsA-induced kidney injury. Taken together, these results indicate that TMBIM6 protects against CsA-induced nephrotoxicity both in vitro and in vivo by inducing autophagy and activating lysosomes. PMID:26305401

  6. Hepatitis C: Information on Testing and Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    HEPATITIS C Information on Testing & Diagnosis What is Hepatitis C? Hepatitis C is a serious liver disease that results from infection with the Hepatitis C virus. Hepatitis C has been called a silent ...

  7. [Treatment for hepatic osteodystrophy].

    PubMed

    Kaji, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    Chronic liver diseases, including liver cirrhosis, are caused by various pathogenesis, such as viral hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, autoimmune hepatitis and steatohepatitis. There have not been enough clinical evidence about the treatment of hepatic osteodystrophy at the present time. Several reports suggested that bisphosphonates, such as alendronate, are effective for an increase in bone mineral density in patients with chronic liver disease. Vitamin D treatment might be useful for the frequent prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in the pathogenesis of hepatic oseodystrophy. The use of estrogens will be limited for the risk of liver dysfunction and hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:26503875

  8. Hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Jones, John G

    2016-06-01

    The liver has a central role in the regulation of systemic glucose and lipid fluxes during feeding and fasting and also relies on these substrates for its own energy needs. These parallel requirements are met by coordinated control of carbohydrate and lipid fluxes into and out of the Krebs cycle, which is highly tuned to nutrient availability and heavily regulated by insulin and glucagon. During progression of type 2 diabetes, hepatic carbohydrate and lipid biosynthesis fluxes become elevated, thus contributing to hyperglycaemia and hypertriacylglycerolaemia. Over this interval there are also significant fluctuations in hepatic energy state. To date, it is not known to what extent abnormal glucose and lipid fluxes are causally linked to altered energy states. Recent evidence that the glucose-lowering effects of metformin appear to be mediated by attenuation of hepatic energy generation places an additional spotlight on the interdependence of hepatic biosynthetic and oxidative fluxes. The transition from fasting to feeding results in a significant re-direction of hepatic glucose and lipid fluxes and may also incur a temporary hepatic energy deficit. At present, it is not known to what extent these variables are additionally modified by type 2 diabetes and/or non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Thus, there is a compelling need to measure fluxes through oxidative, gluconeogenic and lipogenic pathways and determine their relationship with hepatic energy state in both fasting and fed conditions. New magnetic resonance-based technologies allow these variables to be non-invasively studied in animal models and humans. This review summarises a presentation given at the symposium entitled 'The liver in focus' at the 2015 annual meeting of the EASD. It is accompanied by two other reviews on topics from this symposium (by Kenneth Cusi, DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3952-1 , and by Hannele Yki-Järvinen, DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3944-1 ) and a commentary by the Session Chair, Michael

  9. Chemoprotective influence of Zanthoxylum sps. on hepatic carcinogen metabolizing and antioxidant enzymes and skin papillomagenesis in murine model.

    PubMed

    Rajamani, Paulraj; Banerjeet, Sanjeev; Rao, A Ramesha

    2011-11-01

    In the present study, the putative potential of pericarp of dried fruit of Zanthoxylum (Rutaceae Family), a common spice additive in India's west coast cuisines, in protecting against carcinogenesis has been reported. Extract from dried fruit of Zanthoxylum was orally administered to mice at two dose levels: 100 and 200 mg/kg body wt. for 14 days. Results reveal bifunctional nature of Zanthoxylum species as deduced from its potential to induce phase-I and phase-II enzyme activities associated with carcinogen activation and detoxification in the liver of mice. Hepatic glutathione S-transferase and DT-diaphorase were found significantly elevated by the treatment. Zanthoxylum was also effective in augmenting the antioxidant enzyme activities of glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase albeit significantly by high dose of the extract (P < 0.05; P < 0.01). Reduced glutathione was also significantly elevated in the liver of treated animals (P < 0.05). The present study also investigated peri-initiation application of acetone extract of Zanthoxylum on initiated mouse skin. Results showed a significant reduction in tumor incidence from 68% to 36% (P < 0.05); as well as, a reduction in tumor burden per effective mouse from 3.87 to 0.72 (P < 0.01). Cumulatively, the findings strongly suggest cancer chemopreventive potential of Zanthoxylum sps. PMID:22126017

  10. Hepatitis B virus X protein modifies invasion, proliferation and the inflammatory response in an HTR-8/SVneo cell model.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hong; Li, Qiu-Ling; Chen, Jing; Na, Quan; Liu, Cai-Xia

    2015-10-01

    Mother-to-infant transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV) can occur as an intrauterine, intrapartum or postpartum infection. In the present study, we induced a multifunctional viral regulator of HBV gene products, HBx, and its different fragments to overexpress in a tropho-blast cell line, HTR-8/SVneo. We then identified the biological effects of HBx on HTR-8/SVneo cells. Our results indicated that HBx inhibited apoptosis and induced invasion as detected using Annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) double staining and Transwell assay, respectively. Furthermore, we carried out western blot analysis to analyze the possible related signaling pathway. We confirmed that HBx and its different fragments can activate the Smad signaling pathway, accompanied by downregulation of E-cadherin, and upregulation of vimentin and N-cadherin. TGF‑β1 was used as a control to activate the Smad signaling pathway in HTR-8/SVneo cells. HBx activated the Smad signaling pathway in the HTR-8/SVneo cells. After the signaling pathway was activated, reduced apoptosis, higher invasive ability and enhanced inflammatory response were observed in the HTR-8/SVneo cells. PMID:26251950

  11. Aberrations in hemostasis and coagulation in untreated discordant hepatic xenotransplantation: studies in the dog-to-pig model.

    PubMed

    Tector, A Joseph; Fridell, Jonathan A; Elias, Nahel; Watanabe, Taichi; Salazar, Julie; Greinke, Doris; Metrakos, Peter; Tchervenkov, Jean I

    2002-02-01

    Discordant liver xenotransplantation is a poorly explored entity. Data from the few large animal studies of hepatic xenotransplantation suggest that severe hemorrhage is encountered. The purpose of the studies described here is to characterize the nature of the hemorrhage that accompanies liver xenotransplantation. Canine livers were transplanted into porcine recipients, and lethal hemorrhage was encountered. Analysis of recipient blood showed that factors V, IX, and X were present in adequate levels until after the hemorrhage appeared, suggesting that coagulation factor loss was the result and not the cause of hemorrhage. Platelet counts decreased dramatically in recipients within minutes of graft reperfusion. There also was no evidence of clotting activity in the blood of recipients of liver xenografts within minutes of graft reperfusion. This loss of clotting activity was specific to liver xenografts, was not seen in renal xenografts with or without venovenous bypass, and also was absent in pig-to-pig liver allografts. In brief, the hemorrhage that accompanies liver xenotransplantation occurs because of a decrease in the number and function of circulating platelets in the recipient. PMID:11862592

  12. In vitro-in vivo extrapolation of hepatic clearance: biological tools, scaling factors, model assumptions and correct concentrations.

    PubMed

    Pelkonen, O; Turpeinen, M

    2007-01-01

    Although the measurement of metabolite formation or substrate depletion in in vitro systems, from recombinant enzymes to tissue slices, is a relatively routine task, there are a number of more or less unresolved issues in the extrapolation of the enzymatic intrinsic clearance into hepatic metabolic clearance. Nominal concentrations of the drug added to the incubation system are not necessarily the concentration the transporter or the metabolizing enzyme sees. In addition, peculiarities of incubation set-ups should be assessed. Unbound drug fractions (concentrations) in the in vitro system itself should be measured or estimated for the appropriate assessment of enzymatic intrinsic clearance. In addition, blood and/or plasma concentrations to be encountered in the in vivo situation should be measured or estimated for the extrapolation. Extrapolation always means making a number of assumptions and the most important of these, such as scaling factors from recombinant enzymes, microsomes or hepatocytes to the mass unit of the liver, liver weight, blood flow, and distribution volume amongst others, and so on, should be explicitly stated and included in the extrapolation process. Despite all the above-mentioned reservations the in vitro-in vivo extrapolation of metabolic clearance seems to be a useful and mostly fairly precise tool for predicting the important pharmacokinetic processes of a drug. PMID:17968737

  13. Single-Genome Sequencing of Hepatitis C Virus in Donor-Recipient Pairs Distinguishes Modes and Models of Virus Transmission and Early Diversification

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Stoddard, Mark B.; Wang, Shuyi; Giorgi, Elena E.; Blair, Lily M.; Learn, Gerald H.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Alter, Harvey J.; Busch, Michael P.; Fierer, Daniel S.; Ribeiro, Ruy M.; Perelson, Alan S.; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite the recent development of highly effective anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) drugs, the global burden of this pathogen remains immense. Control or eradication of HCV will likely require the broad application of antiviral drugs and development of an effective vaccine. A precise molecular identification of transmitted/founder (T/F) HCV genomes that lead to productive clinical infection could play a critical role in vaccine research, as it has for HIV-1. However, the replication schema of these two RNA viruses differ substantially, as do viral responses to innate and adaptive host defenses. These differences raise questions as to the certainty of T/F HCV genome inferences, particularly in cases where multiple closely related sequence lineages have been observed. To clarify these issues and distinguish between competing models of early HCV diversification, we examined seven cases of acute HCV infection in humans and chimpanzees, including three examples of virus transmission between linked donors and recipients. Using single-genome sequencing (SGS) of plasma vRNA, we found that inferred T/F sequences in recipients were identical to viral sequences in their respective donors. Early in infection, HCV genomes generally evolved according to a simple model of random evolution where the coalescent corresponded to the T/F sequence. Closely related sequence lineages could be explained by high multiplicity infection from a donor whose viral sequences had undergone a pretransmission bottleneck due to treatment, immune selection, or recent infection. These findings validate SGS, together with mathematical modeling and phylogenetic analysis, as a novel strategy to infer T/F HCV genome sequences. IMPORTANCE Despite the recent development of highly effective, interferon-sparing anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) drugs, the global burden of this pathogen remains immense. Control or eradication of HCV will likely require the broad application of antiviral drugs and the

  14. Complement activation in discordant hepatic xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Tector, A J; Chen, X; Soderland, C; Tchervenkov, J I

    1998-11-01

    Little is known about hyperacute rejection in hepatic xenotransplantation. Information from clinical xenoperfusions suggests that the liver may be rejected by a mechanism less vigorous than either kidney or heart xenografts. We used the in vitro model of porcine hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells (PHEC) incubated with either complement replete or deficient human serum to determine the relative roles of the classical and alternate pathways of complement in the immediate response to hepatic xenotransplantation. Our results suggest that either the classical or alternate pathways are capable of independently activating the complement cascade upon exposure to the porcine hepatic sinusoidal endothelium. Our results also imply that either pathway alone is capable of initiating similar degrees of injury as the entire cascade. PMID:9915253

  15. Analysis of the C-Terminal Membrane Anchor Domains of Hepatitis C Virus Glycoproteins E1 and E2: toward a Topological Model

    PubMed Central

    Charloteaux, Benoit; Lins, Laurence; Moereels, Henri; Brasseur, Robert

    2002-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) glycoproteins E1 and E2 should be anchored in the viral membrane by their C-terminal domains. During synthesis, they are translocated to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen where they remain. The 31 C-terminal residues of the E1 protein and the 29 C-terminal residues of the E2 protein are implicated in the ER retention. Moreover, the E1 and E2 C termini are implicated in E1-E2 heterodimerization. We studied the E1 and E2 C-terminal sequences of 25 HCV strains in silico using molecular modeling techniques. We conclude that both C-terminal domains should adopt a similar and peculiar configuration: one amphipathic α-helix followed by a pair of transmembrane β-strands. Several three-dimensional (3-D) models were generated. After energy minimization, their ability to interact with membranes was studied using the molecular hydrophobicity potentials calculation and the IMPALA procedure. The latter simulates interactions with a membrane by a Monte Carlo minimization of energy. These methods suggest that the β-hairpins could anchor the glycoproteins in the ER membrane at least transiently. Anchoring could be stabilized by the adsorption of the nearby amphipathic α-helices at the membrane surface. The 3-D models correlate with experimental results which indicate that the E1-E2 transmembrane domains are involved in the heterodimerization and have ER retention properties. PMID:11799189

  16. Simple but highly effective three-dimensional chemical-feature-based pharmacophore model for diketo acid derivatives as hepatitis C virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Di Santo, Roberto; Fermeglia, Maurizio; Ferrone, Marco; Paneni, Maria Silvia; Costi, Roberta; Artico, Marino; Roux, Alessandra; Gabriele, Mirko; Tardif, Keith D; Siddiqui, Aleem; Pricl, Sabrina

    2005-10-01

    A molecular modeling strategy using aryl diketo acid (ADK) derivatives recently reported in the literature as hepatitis C virus (HCV) polymerase inhibitors was designed. A 3D chemical-feature-based pharmacophore model was developed using Catalyst software, which produced 10 pharmacophore hypotheses. The top-ranked one (Hypo 1), characterized by a high correlation coefficient (r = 0.965), consisted of two hydrogen bond acceptors, one negative ionizable moiety, and two hydrophobic aromatics. This model was used to predict the anti-RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (anti-RdRp) activity of 6-(1-arylmethylpyrrol-2-yl)-1,4-dioxo-5-hexenoic acids and other ADK derivatives previously synthesized in our laboratories as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors. Furthermore, the experimental IC50 values of 9 compounds, tested in vitro against recombinant HCV polymerase, were compared with the corresponding values predicted using Hypo1. A good agreement between experimental and simulated data was obtained. The results demonstrate that the hypothesis derived in this study can be considered to be a useful tool in designing new leads based on ADK scaffolds as HCV RdRp inhibitors. PMID:16190757

  17. Ezetimibe markedly attenuates hepatic cholesterol accumulation and improves liver function in the lysosomal acid lipase-deficient mouse, a model for cholesteryl ester storage disease.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Jen-Chieh; Lopez, Adam M; Posey, Kenneth S; Turley, Stephen D

    2014-01-17

    Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) plays a critical role in the intracellular handling of lipids by hydrolyzing cholesteryl esters (CE) and triacylglycerols (TAG) contained in newly internalized lipoproteins. In humans, mutations in the LAL gene result in cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD), or in Wolman disease (WD) when the mutations cause complete loss of LAL activity. A rat model for WD and a mouse model for CESD have been described. In these studies we used LAL-deficient mice to investigate how modulating the amount of intestinally-derived cholesterol reaching the liver might impact its mass, cholesterol content, and function in this model. The main experiment tested if ezetimibe, a potent cholesterol absorption inhibitor, had any effect on CE accumulation in mice lacking LAL. In male Lal(-/-) mice given ezetimibe in their diet (20 mg/day/kg bw) for 4 weeks starting at 21 days of age, both liver mass and hepatic cholesterol concentration (mg/g) were reduced to the extent that whole-liver cholesterol content (mg/organ) in the treated mice (74.3±3.4) was only 56% of that in those not given ezetimibe (133.5±6.7). There was also a marked improvement in plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity. Thus, minimizing cholesterol absorption has a favorable impact on the liver in CESD. PMID:24370824

  18. Adapting the Andersen model to a francophone West African immigrant population: hepatitis B screening and linkage to care in New York City.

    PubMed

    Blanas, Demetri A; Nichols, Kim; Bekele, Mulusew; Shankar, Hari; Bekele, Saba; Jandorf, Lina; Izzeldin, Saria; Ndiaye, Daouda; Traore, Adama; Bassam, Motahar; Perumalswami, Ponni V

    2015-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is highly endemic in West Africa and immigration from this region to the United States has greatly increased over the past quarter century. Using the Andersen Model as a conceptual framework, this study qualitatively examines francophone West African immigrants' perceptions of factors affecting access to HBV screening and linkage-to-care in New York City. Four focus groups were conducted with 39 purposefully selected participants. The focus groups were conducted in French, audio-recorded, translated into English, transcribed, analyzed, and coded for major themes. Participants identified increasing knowledge of HBV and opportunities to access care in a culturally-sensitive manner that decreases fatalism and avoids generating stigma as priorities. They also emphasized the importance of engaging religious establishments and social networks and employing the Internet to disseminate HBV-relevant information. Cost and health insurance are identified as future challenges that will need to be addressed in a health care environment in which undocumented immigrants are ineligible for health insurance. The qualitative analysis in this study highlights the recursive and interdependent nature of the Andersen Model, and a modification of the model is proposed that is intended to inform examinations of other minority communities' access to health care. PMID:25000917

  19. Meta-analysis of hepatic cytochrome P450 ontogeny to underwrite the prediction of pediatric pharmacokinetics using physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Upreti, Vijay V; Wahlstrom, Jan L

    2016-03-01

    The accurate prediction of pharmacokinetics (PK) is fundamental to underwriting safety and efficacy in pediatric clinical trials; age-dependent PK may be observed with pediatrics because of the growth and maturation processes that occur during development. Understanding the ontogeny of drug-metabolizing enzymes is a critical enabler for pediatric PK prediction, as enzyme expression or activity may change with age. Although ontogeny functions for the cytochrome P450s (CYPs) have been developed, disconnects between ontogeny functions for the same CYP may exist, depending on whether the functions were derived from in vitro or in vivo data. This report describes the development of ontogeny functions for all the major hepatic CYPs based on in vitro or in vivo data; these ontogeny functions were subsequently incorporated into a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model and evaluated. Pediatric PK predictions based on in vivo-derived ontogeny functions performed markedly better than those developed from in vitro data for intravenous (100% versus 51% within 2-fold, respectively) and oral (98% versus 67%, respectively) dosing. The verified models were then applied to complex pediatric scenarios involving active metabolites, CYP polymorphisms and physiological changes because of critical illness; the models reasonably explained the observed age-dependent changes in pediatric PK. PMID:26139104

  20. Mathematical Model of Viral Kinetics In Vitro Estimates the Number of E2-CD81 Complexes Necessary for Hepatitis C Virus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Pranesh; Dixit, Narendra M.

    2011-01-01

    Interaction between the hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope protein E2 and the host receptor CD81 is essential for HCV entry into target cells. The number of E2-CD81 complexes necessary for HCV entry has remained difficult to estimate experimentally. Using the recently developed cell culture systems that allow persistent HCV infection in vitro, the dependence of HCV entry and kinetics on CD81 expression has been measured. We reasoned that analysis of the latter experiments using a mathematical model of viral kinetics may yield estimates of the number of E2-CD81 complexes necessary for HCV entry. Here, we constructed a mathematical model of HCV viral kinetics in vitro, in which we accounted explicitly for the dependence of HCV entry on CD81 expression. Model predictions of viral kinetics are in quantitative agreement with experimental observations. Specifically, our model predicts triphasic viral kinetics in vitro, where the first phase is characterized by cell proliferation, the second by the infection of susceptible cells and the third by the growth of cells refractory to infection. By fitting model predictions to the above data, we were able to estimate the threshold number of E2-CD81 complexes necessary for HCV entry into human hepatoma-derived cells. We found that depending on the E2-CD81 binding affinity, between 1 and 13 E2-CD81 complexes are necessary for HCV entry. With this estimate, our model captured data from independent experiments that employed different HCV clones and cells with distinct CD81 expression levels, indicating that the estimate is robust. Our study thus quantifies the molecular requirements of HCV entry and suggests guidelines for intervention strategies that target the E2-CD81 interaction. Further, our model presents a framework for quantitative analyses of cell culture studies now extensively employed to investigate HCV infection. PMID:22174670

  1. Erythropoietic and hepatic porphyrias.

    PubMed

    Gross, U; Hoffmann, G F; Doss, M O

    2000-11-01

    Porphyrias are divided into erythropoietic and hepatic manifestations. Erythropoietic porphyrias are characterized by cutaneous symptoms and appear in early childhood. Erythropoietic protoporphyria is complicated by cholestatic liver cirrhosis and progressive hepatic failure in 10%, of patients. Acute hepatic porphyrias (delta-aminolaevulinic acid dehydratase deficiency porphyria, acute intermittent porphyria, hereditary coproporphyria and variegate porphyria) are characterized by variable extrahepatic gastrointestinal, neurological-psychiatric and cardiovascular manifestations requiring early diagnosis to avoid life-threatening complications. Acute hepatic porphyrias are pharmacogenetic and molecular regulatory diseases (without porphyrin accumulation) mainly induced by drugs, sex hormones, fasting or alcohol. The disease process depends on the derepression of hepatic delta-aminolaevulinic acid synthase following haem depletion. In contrast to the acute porphyrias, nonacute, chronic hepatic porphyrias such as porphyria cutanea tarda are porphyrin accumulation disorders leading to cutaneous symptoms associated with liver disease, especially caused by alcohol or viral hepatitis. Alcohol, oestrogens, haemodialysis, hepatitis C and AIDS are triggering factors. Porphyria cutanea tarda is the most common porphyria, followed by acute intermittent porphyria and erythropoietic protoporphyria. The molecular genetics of the porphyrias is very heterogenous. Nearly every family has its own mutation. The mutations identified account for the corresponding enzymatic deficiencies, which may remain clinically silent throughout life. Thus, the recognition of the overt disorder with extrahepatic manifestations depends on the demonstration of biochemical abnormalities due to these primary defects and compensatory hepatic overexpression of hepatic delta-aminolaevulinic acid synthase in the acute porphyrias. Consequently, haem precursors are synthesized in excess. The increased

  2. Modelling the impact of improving screening and treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection on future hepatocellular carcinoma rates and liver-related mortality

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The societal, clinical and economic burden imposed by the complications of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection - including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) - is expected to increase over the coming decades. However, new therapies may improve sustained virological response (SVR) rates and shorten treatment duration. This study aimed to estimate the future burden of HCV-related disease in England if current management strategies remain the same and the impact of increasing diagnosis and treatment of HCV as new therapies become available. Methods A previously published model was adapted for England using published literature and government reports, and validated through an iterative process of three meetings of HCV experts. The impact of increasing diagnosis and treatment of HCV as new therapies become available was modelled and compared to the base-case scenario of continuing current management strategies. To assess the ‘best case’ clinical benefit of new therapies, the number of patients treated was increased by a total of 115% by 2018. Results In the base-case scenario, total viraemic (HCV RNA-positive) cases of HCV in England will decrease from 144,000 in 2013 to 76,300 in 2030. However, due to the slow progression of chronic HCV, the number of individuals with cirrhosis, decompensated cirrhosis and HCC will continue to increase over this period. The model suggests that the ‘best case’ substantially reduces HCV-related hepatic disease and HCV-related liver mortality by 2020 compared to the base-case scenario. The number of HCV-related HCC cases would decrease 50% by 2020 and the number progressing from infection to decompensated cirrhosis would decline by 65%. Therefore, compared to projections of current practices, increasing treatment numbers by 115% by 2018 would reduce HCV-related mortality by 50% by 2020. Conclusions This analysis suggests that with current treatment practices the number of patients developing HCV

  3. An evaluation of hepatic extraction and clearance of doxorubicin.

    PubMed Central

    August, D. A.; Verma, N.; Vaertan, M. A.; Shah, R.; Brenner, D. E.

    1995-01-01

    A swine model was developed to study quantitatively the pharmacokinetics of hepatic extraction and clearance of doxorubicin (DOX). Systemic and hepatic artery infusions of DOX (0.5-9 mg kg-1) were administered to 34 pigs. Pharmacokinetic analysis was simplified by use of a double-balloon catheter in the inferior vena cava to collect hepatic venous effluent. During hepatic artery infusion only, DOX in hepatic venous blood was extracted using activated carbon filters to prevent drug recirculation. Hepatic extraction and clearance of DOX were independent of dose and route of administration. Extraction ratios varied from 0.75 to 0.91 during hepatic artery infusion and from 0.50 to 0.72 during systemic infusion. Clearance results were analogous. After cessation of drug infusions, hepatic extraction and clearance of DOX was negative, suggesting that the liver serves as a drug reservoir during DOX infusion and subsequently is a net source of unmetabolised drug. Liver extraction and clearance of DOX in pigs are substantial. During either systemic or hepatic artery infusion of DOX, the liver serves as a drug reservoir. Subsequent mobilisation of this hepatic pool of DOX may cause prolonged systemic exposure to drug. PMID:7599068

  4. Hepatitis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... people at risk for contracting hepatitis. But frequent hand washing and good hygiene practices can reduce this risk. All kids in ... to prevent viral hepatitis you should: Follow good hygiene and avoid crowded, ... their hands thoroughly after using the toilet and before eating. ...

  5. Hepatitis and activity

    PubMed Central

    Krikler, Dennis M.

    1971-01-01

    The effects of physical activity during an attack of infectious hepatitis are discussed. There is no evidence that activity during convalescence produces any ill-effects. On the other hand, strenuous physical activity in the acute stage may be dangerous, possibly because hepatic blood-flow is reduced. PMID:5560143

  6. Hepatitis C virus-cross-reactive TCR gene-modified T cells: a model for immunotherapy against diseases with genomic instability.

    PubMed

    Spear, Timothy T; Riley, Timothy P; Lyons, Gretchen E; Callender, Glenda G; Roszkowski, Jeffrey J; Wang, Yuan; Simms, Patricia E; Scurti, Gina M; Foley, Kendra C; Murray, David C; Hellman, Lance M; McMahan, Rachel H; Iwashima, Makio; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Rosen, Hugo R; Baker, Brian M; Nishimura, Michael I

    2016-09-01

    A major obstacle hindering the development of effective immunity against viral infections, their associated disease, and certain cancers is their inherent genomic instability. Accumulation of mutations can alter processing and presentation of antigens recognized by antibodies and T cells that can lead to immune escape variants. Use of an agent that can intrinsically combat rapidly mutating viral or cancer-associated antigens would be quite advantageous in developing effective immunity against such disease. We propose that T cells harboring cross-reactive TCRs could serve as a therapeutic agent in these instances. With the use of hepatitis C virus, known for its genomic instability as a model for mutated antigen recognition, we demonstrate cross-reactivity against immunogenic and mutagenic nonstructural protein 3:1406-1415 and nonstructural protein 3:1073-1081 epitopes in PBL-derived, TCR-gene-modified T cells. These single TCR-engineered T cells can CD8-independently recognize naturally occurring and epidemiologically relevant mutant variants. TCR-peptide MHC modeling data allow us to rationalize how TCR structural properties accommodate recognition of certain mutated epitopes and how these substitutions impact the requirement of CD8 affinity enhancement for recognition. A better understanding of such TCRs' promiscuous behavior may allow for exploitation of these properties to develop novel, adoptive T cell-based therapies for viral infections and cancers exhibiting similar genomic instability. PMID:26921345

  7. [Update chronic viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Ziegenhagen, D J

    2016-03-01

    More than 500,000 people in Germany have chronic viral hepatitis. The interferon-based treatments formerly used in hepatitis B have been widely replaced by life-long oral medication with nucleoside or nucleotide analogues. Treatment for chronic hepatitis C has been improved substantially by the development of new and very expensive drug combinations. Up to 90% of patients can now be cured with certainty, and one to two years after successful treatment there is no relevant risk of recurrence. These individuals expect to receive insurance cover under appropriate conditions. Vaccination programmes are very efficient at decreasing the incidence of hepatitis B, but no vaccine against hepatitis C is likely to become available in the next decade. PMID:27111951

  8. Update on Alcoholic Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Torok, Natalie J.

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease is one of the most prevalent liver diseases worldwide, and a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Alcoholic hepatitis is a severe form of liver injury in patients with alcohol abuse, can present as an acute on chronic liver failure associated with a rapid decline in liver synthetic function, and consequent increase in mortality. Despite therapy, about 30%–50% of patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis eventually die. The pathogenic pathways that lead to the development of alcoholic hepatitis are complex and involve oxidative stress, gut dysbiosis, and dysregulation of the innate and adaptive immune system with injury to the parenchymal cells and activation of hepatic stellate cells. As accepted treatment approaches are currently limited, a better understanding of the pathophysiology would be required to generate new approaches that improve outcomes. This review focuses on recent advances in the diagnosis, pathogenesis of alcoholic hepatitis and novel treatment strategies. PMID:26540078

  9. Hepatitis E in Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Marion, Olivier; Abravanel, Florence; Lhomme, Sebastien; Izopet, Jacques; Kamar, Nassim

    2016-03-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) has a worldwide distribution and is known to cause acute and fulminant hepatitis. However, over the last few years, it has been shown to also cause chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis in immunosuppressed patients, especially solid-organ-transplant patients. In immunocompetent and immunosuppressed patients, HEV is also associated with extra-hepatic manifestations, such as neurological symptoms and kidney injury. Unfortunately, a diagnostic assay for HEV infection is still not available in all countries. Reduction of immunosuppression is the first-line therapeutic option for organ-transplant patients with chronic hepatitis. In addition, ribavirin is highly efficient at treating chronic HEV infection. In this comprehensive review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding HEV diagnosis, its natural history, clinical manifestations, and treatments in patients with a solid-organ transplant. PMID:26838163

  10. In Vivo Diagnostic Imaging Using Micro-CT: Sequential and Comparative Evaluation of Rodent Models for Hepatic/Brain Ischemia and Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Hayasaka, Naoto; Nagai, Nobuo; Kawao, Naoyuki; Niwa, Atsuko; Yoshioka, Yoshichika; Mori, Yuki; Shigeta, Hiroshi; Kashiwagi, Nobuo; Miyazawa, Masaaki; Satou, Takao; Higashino, Hideaki; Matsuo, Osamu; Murakami, Takamichi

    2012-01-01

    Background There is an increasing need for animal disease models for pathophysiological research and efficient drug screening. However, one of the technical barriers to the effective use of the models is the difficulty of non-invasive and sequential monitoring of the same animals. Micro-CT is a powerful tool for serial diagnostic imaging of animal models. However, soft tissue contrast resolution, particularly in the brain, is insufficient for detailed analysis, unlike the current applications of CT in the clinical arena. We address the soft tissue contrast resolution issue in this report. Methodology We performed contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) on mouse models of experimental cerebral infarction and hepatic ischemia. Pathological changes in each lesion were quantified for two weeks by measuring the lesion volume or the ratio of high attenuation area (%HAA), indicative of increased vascular permeability. We also compared brain images of stroke rats and ischemic mice acquired with micro-CT to those acquired with 11.7-T micro-MRI. Histopathological analysis was performed to confirm the diagnosis by CECT. Principal Findings In the models of cerebral infarction, vascular permeability was increased from three days through one week after surgical initiation, which was also confirmed by Evans blue dye leakage. Measurement of volume and %HAA of the liver lesions demonstrated differences in the recovery process between mice with distinct genetic backgrounds. Comparison of CT and MR images acquired from the same stroke rats or ischemic mice indicated that accuracy of volumetric measurement, as well as spatial and contrast resolutions of CT images, was comparable to that obtained with MRI. The imaging results were also consistent with the histological data. Conclusions This study demonstrates that the CECT scanning method is useful in rodents for both quantitative and qualitative evaluations of pathologic lesions in tissues/organs including the brain, and is also suitable for

  11. Generating an in vitro-in vivo correlation for metabolism and liver enrichment of a hepatitis C virus drug, faldaprevir, using a rat hepatocyte model (HepatoPac).

    PubMed

    Ramsden, Diane; Tweedie, Donald J; St George, Roger; Chen, Lin-Zhi; Li, Yongmei

    2014-03-01

    Hepatocytes provide an integrated model to study drug metabolism and disposition. As a result of a loss of polarity or a significant decrease in the expression of enzymes and transporters, suspended and sandwich-cultured hepatocytes have limitations in determining hepatocellular drug concentrations. Underprediction of the extent of glucuronidation is also a concern for these hepatocyte models. Faldaprevir is a hepatitis C virus protease inhibitor in late-stage development that has demonstrated significant liver enrichment in in vivo rat models based on quantitative whole-body autoradiography (QWBA) and liver-to-plasma area under-the-curve ratio. In bile duct cannulated rats, the primary biliary metabolite was a glucuronide. Owing to ethical concerns, it is difficult to assess liver enrichment in humans, and a lack of in vitro and in vivo correlation of glucuronidation has been reported. The current study was conducted to verify whether a hepatocyte model, rat HepatoPac, could overcome some of these limitations and provide validity for follow-up studies with human HepatoPac. With rat HepatoPac, liver enrichment values averaged 34-fold and were consistent with rat QWBA (26.8-fold) and in vivo data (42-fold). In contrast, liver enrichment in suspended hepatocytes was only 2.8-fold. Furthermore, the extent of faldaprevir glucuronidation in HepatoPac studies was in agreement with in vivo results, with glucuronidation as the major pathway (96%). Suspended rat hepatocytes did not generate the glucuronide or two key hydroxylated metabolites that were observed in vivo. Overall, our studies suggest that HepatoPac is a promising in vitro model to predict in vivo liver enrichment and metabolism, especially for glucuronidation, and has demonstrated superiority over suspended hepatocytes. PMID:24366905

  12. Resistance to leptin action is the major determinant of hepatic triglyceride accumulation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Sigal; Muzumdar, Radhika H; Atzmon, Gil; Ma, Xiaohui; Yang, Xiaoman; Einstein, Francine H; Barzilai, Nir

    2007-01-01

    Impairment of both insulin and leptin action has been implicated in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. By assessing hepatic triglyceride (TG) stores in response to modulation of leptin action (by leptin infusion), we attempted to determine whether leptin has the major role in hepatic TG accumulation. TG were markedly decreased (by 63%, P<0.05) in young animals treated with leptin. However, this was also associated with improvement in hepatic insulin action (2-fold decrease in HGP during clamp, P<0.05). These effects on hepatic TG stores and insulin action were abolished in old rats who demonstrate leptin resistance. Since these experiments could not discern the role of leptin from the role of hepatic insulin action on hepatic TG stores, we further examined the effect of improvement of hepatic insulin action by visceral fat removal (VF-). Enhancement of hepatic insulin action in old VF-rats was associated with reduced hepatic TG stores (by 64% P<0.01). Because this manipulation may have induced an improvement in leptin action as well, we studied VF removal in a genetically leptin-resistant model (Zucker Diabetic Fatty rats, ZDF). Only in this mode was exclusive improvement of hepatic insulin action by VF removal not associated with reduced hepatic TG stores, suggesting that improved hepatic insulin action is not necessary for modulation of hepatic TG stores. By dissociating action of leptin from that of insulin, we suggest that the failure of leptin action is the major physiological mechanism for hepatic steatosis. PMID:17099068

  13. Efficacy of HGF carried by ultrasound microbubble-cationic nano-liposomes complex for treating hepatic fibrosis in a bile duct ligation rat model, and its relationship with the diffusion-weighted MRI parameters.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shou-hong; Wen, Kun-ming; Wu, Wei; Li, Wen-yan; Zhao, Jian-nong

    2013-12-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is a major consequence of liver aggression. Finding novel ways for counteracting this damaging process, and for evaluating fibrosis with a non-invasive imaging approach, represent important therapeutic and diagnostic challenges. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is an anti-fibrosis cell growth factor that induces apoptosis in activated hepatic stellate cells, reduces excessive collagen deposition, and stimulates hepatocyte regeneration. Thus, using HGF in gene therapy against liver fibrosis is an attractive approach. The aims of the present study were: (i) to explore the efficacy of treating liver fibrosis using HGF expression vector carried by a novel ultrasound microbubble delivery system; (ii) to explore the diagnostic interest of diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI-MRI) in evaluating liver fibrosis. We established a rat model of hepatic fibrosis. The rats were administered HGF linked to novel ultrasound micro-bubbles. Progression of hepatic fibrosis was evaluated by histopathology, hydroxyproline content, and DWI-MRI to determine the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). Our targeted gene therapy produced a significant anti-fibrosis effect, as shown by liver histology and significant reduction of hydroxyproline content. Moreover, using DWI-MRI, the b value (diffusion gradient factor) was equal to 300s/mm(2), and the ADC values significantly decreased as the severity of hepatic fibrosis increased. Using this methodology, F0-F2 could be distinguished from F3 and F4 (P<0.01). This is the first in vivo report of using an ultrasound microbubble-cationic nano-liposome complex for gene delivery. The data indicate that, this approach is efficient to counteract the fibrosis process. DWI-MRI appears a promising imaging technique for evaluating liver fibrosis. PMID:24012221

  14. Inhibition of hepatic organic anion-transporting polypeptide by RNA interference in sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes: an in vitro model to assess transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Liao, Mingxiang; Raczynski, Arek R; Chen, Michael; Chuang, Bei-Ching; Zhu, Qing; Shipman, Rob; Morrison, Jodi; Lee, David; Lee, Frank W; Balani, Suresh K; Xia, Cindy Q

    2010-09-01

    Organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs), members of the SLCO/SLC21 family, mediate the transport of various endo- and xenobiotics. In human liver, OATP1B1, 1B3, and 2B1 are located at the basolateral membrane of hepatocytes and are involved in hepatic drug uptake and biliary elimination. Clinically significant drug-drug interactions (DDIs) mediated by hepatic OATPs have drawn great attention from clinical practitioners and researchers. However, there are considerable challenges to prospectively understanding the extent of OATP-mediated DDIs because of the lack of specific OATP inhibitors or substrates and the limitations of in vitro tools. In the present study, a novel RNA interference knockdown sandwich-cultured human hepatocyte model was developed and validated. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction, microarray and immunoblotting analyses, along with uptake assays, illustrated that the expression and transport activity of hepatic OATPs were reduced by small interfering (siRNA) efficiently and specifically in this model. Although OATP siRNA decreased only 20 to 30% of the total uptake of cerivastatin into human hepatocytes, it caused a 50% reduction in cerivastatin metabolism, which was observed by monitoring the formation of the two major metabolites of cerivastatin. The results suggest that coadministration of a drug that is a hepatic OATP inhibitor could significantly alter the pharmacokinetic profile of cerivastatin in clinical studies. Further studies with this novel model demonstrated that OATP and cytochrome P450 have a synergistic effect on cerivastatin-gemfibrozil interactions. The siRNA knockdown sandwich-cultured human hepatocytes may provide a new powerful model for evaluating DDIs. PMID:20516252

  15. Hepatitis C virus. A review.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, E.

    1991-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus has been shown to be responsible for most cases of posttransfusion hepatitis, as well as for sporadic non-A, non-B viral hepatitis. Hepatitis C virus has also been implicated in the development of primary hepatocellular carcinoma, autoimmune hepatitis, and fulminant viral hepatitis. Although the role of the parenteral transmission of hepatitis C virus is well established, its route of transmission in cases of sporadic infection remains unclear. Sexual transmission is suspected but not confirmed. Recent work regarding treatment has shown interferon alfa to be effective, but the discontinuation of therapy is associated with a 50% relapse rate. PMID:1656611

  16. Why are some amyloidoses systemic? Does hepatic “chaperoning at a distance” prevent cardiac deposition in a transgenic model of human senile systemic (transthyretin) amyloidosis?

    PubMed Central

    Buxbaum, Joel N.; Tagoe, Clement; Gallo, Gloria; Walker, John R.; Kurian, Sunil; Salomon, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    ., Kurian, S., Salomon, D. R. Why are some amyloidoses systemic? Does hepatic “chaperoning at a distance” prevent cardiac deposition in a transgenic model of human senile systemic (transthyretin) amyloidosis? PMID:22362898

  17. The Effects of Diet Composition on Body Fat and Hepatic Steatosis in an Animal (Peromyscus californicus) Model of the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Krugner-Higby, Lisa; Caldwell, Stephen; Coyle, Kathryn; Bush, Eugene; Atkinson, Richard; Joers, Valerie

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this research was to determine body composition, total fat content, fat distribution, and serum leptin concentration in hyperlipidemic (high responder, HR) and normolipidemic (low responder, LR) California mice (Peromyscus californicus). In our initial experiments, we sought to determine whether differences in regional fat storage were associated with hyperlipidemia in this species. To further characterize the hepatic steatosis in the mice, we performed 2 additional experiments by using a diet containing 45% of energy as fat. The body fat content of mice fed a low fat-diet (12.3% energy as fat) was higher than that of mice fed a moderate-fat diet (25.8% energy as fat). Total body fat did not differ between HR and LR mice. There was no significant difference between intraabdominal, gonadal, or inguinal fat pad weights. Liver weights of HR mice fed the moderate-fat diet were higher than those of LR mice fed the same diet, and the moderate-fat diet was associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL). Mice fed the 45% diet had higher histologic score for steatosis but very little inflammatory response. Chemical analysis indicated increased lipid in the livers of mice fed the high-fat diet compared with those fed the low-fat diet. HR and LR mice had similar serum leptin concentrations. California mice develop NAFL without excess fat accumulation elsewhere. NAFL was influenced by genetic and dietary factors. These mice may be a naturally occuring model of partial lipodystrophy. PMID:21819679

  18. ASS and SULT2A1 are Novel and Sensitive Biomarkers of Acute Hepatic Injury-A Comparative Study in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Prima, Victor; Cao, Mengde; Svetlov, Stanislav I

    2013-01-01

    Liver and kidney damage associated with polytrauma, endotoxic shock/sepsis, and organ transplantation, are among the leading causes of the multiple organ failure. Development of novel sensitive biomarkers that detect early stages of liver and kidney injury is vital for the effective diagnostics and treatment of these life-threatening conditions. Previously, we identified several hepatic proteins, including Argininosuccinate Synthase (ASS) and sulfotransferases which were degraded in the liver and rapidly released into circulation during Ischemia/Reperfusion (I/R) injury. Here we compared sensitivity and specificity of the newly developed sandwich ELISA assays for ASS and the sulfotransferase isoform SULT2A1 with the standard clinical liver and kidney tests Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT) and Aspartate Transaminase (AST) in various pre-clinical models of acute injury. Our data suggest that ASS and SULT2A1 have superior characteristics for liver and kidney health assessment in endotoxemia, Ischemia/Reperfusion (I/R), chemical and drug-induced liver injury and may be of high potential value for clinical applications. PMID:23724364

  19. Inhibition of hepatitis C virus in mouse models by lipidoid nanoparticle-mediated systemic delivery of siRNA against PRK2.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jae-Su; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Han, Song-Hee; Kim, Eun-Jung; Cho, Hee; Lee, Wooseong; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Kim, Tae-Eun; Park, Hyun-Ji; Rhee, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Seong-Jun; Cho, Seung-Woo; Han, Seung Hyun; Oh, Jong-Won

    2016-08-01

    Host-targeting antivirals have an advantage over direct-acting antivirals in that they have a high genetic barrier to resistance. Here, we describe in vivo anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) efficacy of a potent siRNA targeting the protein kinase C-related kinase 2 (PRK2), which phosphorylates HCV NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and promotes HCV replication. PRK2-silencing reduced the phosphorylated NS5B level and resulted in inhibition of NS5B RdRp activity to decrease HCV genome abundance. Systemic administration of lipidoid nanoparticle-formulated PRK2 siRNA (once every three days for a total of three injections at a dose of 3mgkg(-1)) resulted in a 3.72 and 1.96 log10 reduction in serum HCV RNA titer, in mouse subcutaneous and orthotopic xenograft models for HCV replication, respectively. Our results verify the essential role of PRK2 in HCV replication and offer a host-targeting anti-HCV siRNA therapy that might be beneficial for non-responders to current treatment regimens. PMID:27013134

  20. The Phospholipid:Diacylglycerol Acyltransferase Lro1 Is Responsible for Hepatitis C Virus Core-Induced Lipid Droplet Formation in a Yeast Model System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao-Wen; Cheng, Yun-Hsin; Irokawa, Hayato; Hwang, Gi-Wook; Naganuma, Akira; Kuge, Shusuke

    2016-01-01

    Chronic infection with the hepatitis C virus frequently induces steatosis, which is a significant risk factor for liver pathogenesis. Steatosis is characterized by the accumulation of lipid droplets in hepatocytes. The structural protein core of the virus induces lipid droplet formation and localizes on the surface of the lipid droplets. However, the precise molecular mechanisms for the core-induced formation of lipid droplets remain elusive. Recently, we showed that the expression of the core protein in yeast as a model system could induce lipid droplet formation. In this study, we probed the cellular factors responsible for the formation of core-induced lipid-droplets in yeast cells. We demonstrated that one of the enzymes responsible for triglyceride synthesis, a phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (Lro1), is required for the core-induced lipid droplet formation. While core proteins inhibit Lro1 degradation and alter Lro1 localization, the characteristic localization of Lro1 adjacent to the lipid droplets appeared to be responsible for the core-induced lipid droplet formation. RNA virus genomes have evolved using high mutation rates to maintain their ability to replicate. Our observations suggest a functional relationship between the core protein with hepatocytes and yeast cells. The possible interactions between core proteins and the endoplasmic reticulum membrane affect the mobilization of specific proteins. PMID:27459103

  1. A competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay specific for murine hepcidin-1: correlation with hepatic mRNA expression in established and novel models of dysregulated iron homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Gutschow, Patrick; Schmidt, Paul J.; Han, Huiling; Ostland, Vaughn; Bartnikas, Thomas B.; Pettiglio, Michael A.; Herrera, Carolina; Butler, James S.; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ganz, Tomas; Fleming, Mark D.; Westerman, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Mice have been essential for distinguishing the role of hepcidin in iron homeostasis. Currently, investigators monitor levels of murine hepatic hepcidin-1 mRNA as a surrogate marker for the bioactive hepcidin protein itself. Here, we describe and validate a competitive, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay that quantifies hepcidin-1 in mouse serum and urine. The assay exhibits a biologically relevant lower limit of detection, high precision, and excellent linearity and recovery. We also demonstrate correlation between serum and urine hepcidin-1 values and validate the competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay by analyzing plasma hepcidin response of mice to physiological challenges, including iron deficiency, iron overload, acute blood loss, and inflammation. Furthermore, we analyze multiple murine genetic models of iron dysregulation, including β-thalassemia intermedia (Hbbth3/+), hereditary hemochromatosis (Hfe−/−, Hjv−/−, and Tfr2Y245X/Y245X), hypotransferrinemia (Trfhpx/hpx), heterozygous transferrin receptor 1 deficiency (Tfrc+/−) and iron refractory iron deficiency anemia (Tmprss6−/− and Tmprss6hem8/hem8). Novel compound iron metabolism mutants were also phenotypically characterized here for the first time. We demonstrate that serum hepcidin concentrations correlate with liver hepcidin mRNA expression, transferrin saturation and non-heme liver iron. In some circumstances, serum hepcidin-1 more accurately predicts iron parameters than hepcidin mRNA, and distinguishes smaller, statistically significant differences between experimental groups. PMID:25425686

  2. Complexation of a 1-Indanone Thiosemicarbazone with Hydroxypropyl-β-Cyclodextrin Enhances Its Activity Against a Hepatitis C Virus Surrogate Model.

    PubMed

    Glisoni, Romina J; Castro, Eliana F; Cavallaro, Lucía V; Moglioni, Albertina G; Sosnik, Alejandro

    2015-06-01

    The current standard of care of the infection by hepatitis C virus (HCV) is effective in a limited number of patients and the high cost hinders therapy affordability and compliance. In this context, the research of new direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) for a more effective and long-lasting therapy is an urgent need and an area of active investigation. In an effort to develop novel DAAs, a series of 1-indanone thiosemicarbazones (TSCs) was synthesized and fully characterized. However, the high self-aggregation tendency and extremely poor aqueous solubility of these antiviral candidates often preclude their reliable biological evaluation in vitro. To maintain constant TSC concentrations over the biological assays, different TSC/cyclodextrin complexes were produced. In the present work, we report for the first time the cytotoxicity and antiviral activity of 5,6-dimethoxy TSC inclusion complexes with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin on bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) as HCV surrogate model. Results showed a potent suppression of the virus replication, with greater activity for the inclusion complexes than the free compound. PMID:26369033

  3. Modeling the impact of hepatitis C viral clearance on end-stage liver disease in an HIV co-infected cohort with Targeted Maximum Likelihood Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Schnitzer, Mireille E; Moodie, Erica EM; van der Laan, Mark J; Platt, Robert W; Klein, Marina B

    2013-01-01

    Summary Despite modern effective HIV treatment, hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infection is associated with a high risk of progression to end-stage liver disease (ESLD) which has emerged as the primary cause of death in this population. Clinical interest lies in determining the impact of clearance of HCV on risk for ESLD. In this case study, we examine whether HCV clearance affects risk of ESLD using data from the multicenter Canadian Co-infection Cohort Study. Complications in this survival analysis arise from the time-dependent nature of the data, the presence of baseline confounders, loss to follow-up, and confounders that change over time, all of which can obscure the causal effect of interest. Additional challenges included non-censoring variable missingness and event sparsity. In order to efficiently estimate the ESLD-free survival probabilities under a specific history of HCV clearance, we demonstrate the doubly-robust and semiparametric efficient method of Targeted Maximum Likelihood Estimation (TMLE). Marginal structural models (MSM) can be used to model the effect of viral clearance (expressed as a hazard ratio) on ESLD-free survival and we demonstrate a way to estimate the parameters of a logistic model for the hazard function with TMLE. We show the theoretical derivation of the efficient influence curves for the parameters of two different MSMs and how they can be used to produce variance approximations for parameter estimates. Finally, the data analysis evaluating the impact of HCV on ESLD was undertaken using multiple imputations to account for the non-monotone missing data. PMID:24571372

  4. Agent-Based Model Forecasts Aging of the Population of People Who Inject Drugs in Metropolitan Chicago and Changing Prevalence of Hepatitis C Infections.

    PubMed

    Gutfraind, Alexander; Boodram, Basmattee; Prachand, Nikhil; Hailegiorgis, Atesmachew; Dahari, Harel; Major, Marian E

    2015-01-01

    People who inject drugs (PWID) are at high risk for blood-borne pathogens transmitted during the sharing of contaminated injection equipment, particularly hepatitis C virus (HCV). HCV prevalence is influenced by a complex interplay of drug-use behaviors, social networks, and geography, as well as the availability of interventions, such as needle exchange programs. To adequately address this complexity in HCV epidemic forecasting, we have developed a computational model, the Agent-based Pathogen Kinetics model (APK). APK simulates the PWID population in metropolitan Chicago, including the social interactions that result in HCV infection. We used multiple empirical data sources on Chicago PWID to build a spatial distribution of an in silico PWID population and modeled networks among the PWID by considering the geography of the city and its suburbs. APK was validated against 2012 empirical data (the latest available) and shown to agree with network and epidemiological surveys to within 1%. For the period 2010-2020, APK forecasts a decline in HCV prevalence of 0.8% per year from 44(± 2)% to 36(± 5)%, although some sub-populations would continue to have relatively high prevalence, including Non-Hispanic Blacks, 48(± 5)%. The rate of decline will be lowest in Non-Hispanic Whites and we find, in a reversal of historical trends, that incidence among non-Hispanic Whites would exceed incidence among Non-Hispanic Blacks (0.66 per 100 per years vs 0.17 per 100 person years). APK also forecasts an increase in PWID mean age from 35(± 1) to 40(± 2) with a corresponding increase from 59(± 2)% to 80(± 6)% in the proportion of the population >30 years old. Our studies highlight the importance of analyzing subpopulations in disease predictions, the utility of computer simulation for analyzing demographic and health trends among PWID and serve as a tool for guiding intervention and prevention strategies in Chicago, and other major cities. PMID:26421722

  5. Agent-Based Model Forecasts Aging of the Population of People Who Inject Drugs in Metropolitan Chicago and Changing Prevalence of Hepatitis C Infections

    PubMed Central

    Prachand, Nikhil; Hailegiorgis, Atesmachew; Dahari, Harel; Major, Marian E.

    2015-01-01

    People who inject drugs (PWID) are at high risk for blood-borne pathogens transmitted during the sharing of contaminated injection equipment, particularly hepatitis C virus (HCV). HCV prevalence is influenced by a complex interplay of drug-use behaviors, social networks, and geography, as well as the availability of interventions, such as needle exchange programs. To adequately address this complexity in HCV epidemic forecasting, we have developed a computational model, the Agent-based Pathogen Kinetics model (APK). APK simulates the PWID population in metropolitan Chicago, including the social interactions that result in HCV infection. We used multiple empirical data sources on Chicago PWID to build a spatial distribution of an in silico PWID population and modeled networks among the PWID by considering the geography of the city and its suburbs. APK was validated against 2012 empirical data (the latest available) and shown to agree with network and epidemiological surveys to within 1%. For the period 2010–2020, APK forecasts a decline in HCV prevalence of 0.8% per year from 44(±2)% to 36(±5)%, although some sub-populations would continue to have relatively high prevalence, including Non-Hispanic Blacks, 48(±5)%. The rate of decline will be lowest in Non-Hispanic Whites and we find, in a reversal of historical trends, that incidence among non-Hispanic Whites would exceed incidence among Non-Hispanic Blacks (0.66 per 100 per years vs 0.17 per 100 person years). APK also forecasts an increase in PWID mean age from 35(±1) to 40(±2) with a corresponding increase from 59(±2)% to 80(±6)% in the proportion of the population >30 years old. Our studies highlight the importance of analyzing subpopulations in disease predictions, the utility of computer simulation for analyzing demographic and health trends among PWID and serve as a tool for guiding intervention and prevention strategies in Chicago, and other major cities. PMID:26421722

  6. Noninvasive Monitoring of Hepatic Damage from Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Alavez-Ramírez, J.; Fuentes-Allen, J. L.; López-Estrada, J.

    2011-01-01

    The mathematical model for the dynamics of the hepatitis C proposed in Avendaño et al. (2002), with four populations (healthy and unhealthy hepatocytes, the viral load of the hepatitis C virus, and T killer cells), is revised. Showing that the reduced model obtained by considering only the first three of these populations, known as basic model, has two possible equilibrium states: the uninfected one where viruses are not present in the individual, and the endemic one where viruses and infected cells are present. A threshold parameter (the basic reproductive virus number) is introduced, and in terms of it, the global stability of both two possible equilibrium states is established. Other central result consists in showing, by model numerical simulations, the feasibility of monitoring liver damage caused by HCV, avoiding unnecessary biopsies and the undesirable related inconveniences/imponderables to the patient; another result gives a mathematical modelling basis to recently developed techniques for the disease assessment based essentially on viral load measurements. PMID:21331263

  7. Feature Hepatitis: The Dangers of Hepatitis: What you should know from A to E

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hepatitis: What you should know from A to E Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table of Contents For ... condition is called chronic hepatitis. Hepatitis A and E do not cause chronic hepatitis. Hepatitis viruses B, ...

  8. Viral hepatitis and hepatitis B antigen: recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Krugman, Saul

    1974-01-01

    Recent advances in hepatitis research have shed new light on the etiology, pathogenesis, epidemiology and prevention of type B hepatitis infection. The so-called ‘Dane’ particle is probably the complete hepatitis B virion; its outer coat is the hepatitis B (Australia) antigen (HB Ag) and its inner core is an immunologically distinct particle. Subtypes of HB Ag (a, d, y, w and r) are useful indices for epidemiological surveys. Concepts of epidemiology have changed: type B hepatitis is transmissible by contact as well as by inoculation. The presence of HB Ag in blood is indicative of the presence of hepatitis B virus. Tests to detect antigen and use of voluntary blood donors have played a major role in the decreased incidence of post transfusion hepatitis. A special hepatitis B gammaglobulin preparation and a heat-inactivated hepatitis B vaccine have proved to be effective in preliminary studies. PMID:4219230

  9. Simulation of Metabolic Drug-Drug Interactions Perpetrated by Fluvoxamine Using Hybridized Two-Compartment Hepatic Drug-Pool-Based Tube Modeling and Estimation of In Vivo Inhibition Constants.

    PubMed

    Iga, Katsumi

    2015-10-01

    Co-administration of fluvoxamine (FLV) (perpetrator) and ramelteon (victim, high-clearance CYP1A2 substrate) reportedly showed a 130-fold increase in the area under blood-ramelteon-levels curve (AUCR), which is unpredictable by any method assuming the traditional well-stirred hepatic extraction (Eh ) model. Thus, in order to predict this drug interaction (DDI), a mathematical method that allows simulation of dynamic changes in blood victim levels in response to metabolic inhibition by a perpetrator, without the use of any specialized tools, was derived using hybridized two-compartment hepatic drug-pool-based tube modeling. Using this method, the ramelteon-victimized DDI could be simulated in comparison with other victim DDIs, assuming a consistent FLV dosing regimen. Despite large differences in AUCRs, CYP1A2 or CYP2C19 substrate-victimized DDIs resulted in equivalent inhibition constants (Ki , around 3 nM) and net enzymatic inhibitory activities calculated by eliminating hepatic availability increases for victims. Thus, the unusually large ramelteon DDI could be attributed to the Eh of ramelteon itself. This DDI risk could also be accurately predicted from Ki s estimated in the other CYP1A2 or CYP2C19-substrate interactions. Meanwhile, dynamic changes in blood perpetrator levels were demonstrated to have a small effect on DDI, thus suggesting the usefulness of a tube-based static method for DDI prediction. PMID:26099559

  10. Drug-induced hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... induced hepatitis. Painkillers and fever reducers that contain acetaminophen are a common cause of liver inflammation. These ... problem. However, if you took high doses of acetaminophen , treatment should be started as soon as possible ...

  11. Hepatitis C and sex.

    PubMed

    Page, Emma E; Nelson, Mark

    2016-04-01

    An outbreak of acute hepatitis C among HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) in the last decade has been shown to be sexually transmitted. Initially recreational drug use, in particular drug injection, was not prevalent among those becoming infected with hepatitis C. However more recently chemsex (the use of drugs to enhance sexual experience) and its associated drugs, which are not uncommonly injected, have become more frequently reported among those diagnosed with hepatitis C. It is hoped that the widespread -introduction of direct-acting antivirals and upscaling of numbers treated may have a positive impact on this epidemic. However their introduction may negatively impact on the perceived risk of acquiring hepatitis C and in conjunction with the introduction of HIV transmission prevention strategies may result in increased transmissions and spread to the HIV-negative MSM population. PMID:27037392

  12. Hepatitis C - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... chap 358. Jhaveri R. Hepatitis C virus. In: Cherry JD, Harrison GJ, Kaplan SL, Steinbach WJ, Hotez PJ, eds. Feigin and Cherry's Textbook of Pediatric Infectious Diseases. 7th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  13. Hepatitis Risk Assessment

    MedlinePlus

    ... About the Division of Viral Hepatitis Contact Us File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel ...

  14. [Patient education of hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Boyer, Dominique; Faillebin, Françoise; de la Brière, Aice

    2013-11-01

    The therapeutic education of patients with hepatitis C helps to improve their health and quality of life. The aim is to encourage compliance with the treatment and the fight against side effects, through to the patient's recovery. PMID:24409616

  15. Hepatitis B - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... kissing, coughing, or sneezing. Breast-feeding by a mother with hepatitis B is safe if the child is treated properly at the time of birth. Teenagers who are not vaccinated can get HBV during unprotected sex or drug use.

  16. Hepatitis B - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... tests detect liver damage and the risk for liver cancer from chronic hepatitis B: Albumin level Liver function tests Prothrombin time Liver biopsy Abdominal ultrasound Liver cancer tumor markers such as alpha fetoprotein The provider ...

  17. HIV and Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... prevalent among blacks as among whites. Viral Hepatitis Transmission People can be infected with the three most ... risk for HAV. • • New data suggest that sexual transmission of HCV among MSM with HIV occurs more ...

  18. Hepatitis A FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... 185°F (85°C), kill the virus, although freezing temperatures do not. Symptoms Does Hepatitis A cause ... food, such as drinking beverages (with or without ice) of unknown purity, eating uncooked shellfish, and eating ...

  19. Chemoembolization of hepatic malignancy.

    PubMed

    Gonsalves, Carin F; Brown, Daniel B

    2009-01-01

    Treatment of primary and secondary hepatic malignancies with transarterial chemoembolization represents an essential component of interventional oncology. This article discusses patient selection, procedure technique, results, and complications associated with transarterial chemoembolization. PMID:18668189

  20. Imaging of hepatic infections.

    PubMed

    Doyle, D J; Hanbidge, A E; O'Malley, M E

    2006-09-01

    Imaging plays a significant role in the detection, characterization and treatment of hepatic infections. Infectious diseases of the liver include pyogenic and amoebic abscesses and parasitic, fungal, viral and granulomatous infections. With increases in worldwide travel, immunosuppression and changing population demographics, identification of cases of hepatic infection is becoming more common in daily practice. Knowledge of the imaging features seen with hepatic infections can assist in early diagnosis and timely initiation of appropriate therapy. This review presents the imaging appearances of hepatic infections, emphasizing specific features that may contribute to the diagnosis. Examples of the imaging findings seen with pyogenic and amoebic abscesses, infection with Echinococcus granulosus (Hydatid), schistosomiasis, candidiasis and tuberculosis (TB) are presented. PMID:16905380

  1. Human hereditary hepatic porphyrias.

    PubMed

    Nordmann, Yves; Puy, Hervé

    2002-11-01

    The human hereditary hepatic porphyrias are diseases due to marked deficiencies of enzymes in the heme biosynthetic pathway. Porphyrias can be classified as either hepatic or erythroid, depending on the major production site of porphyrins or their precursors. The pathogenesis of inherited hepatic porphyrias has now been defined at the molecular level. Some gene carriers are vulnerable to a range of exogenous and endogenous factors, which may trigger neuropsychiatric and/or cutaneous symptoms. Early diagnosis is of prime importance since it makes way for counselling. In this article we present an overview of recent advances on hepatic porphyrias: 5-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase deficiency porphyria, acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT), hereditary coproporphyria (HC), and variegate porphyria (VP). PMID:12367763

  2. Prevalence of Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C Coinfections in an Adult HIV Centre Population in Gaborone, Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Premal; Davis, Stephanie; Tolle, Michael; Mabikwa, Vincent; Anabwani, Gabriel

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of hepatitis B and hepatitis C coinfections in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) -infected adults at an HIV center in Gaborone, Botswana. A retrospective review was performed of charts of currently active HIV-infected adult patients in the Family Model Clinic (FMC) of the Botswana-Baylor Children's Clinical Center of Excellence (BCOE) in Gaborone, Botswana, for the results of serum hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and antihepatitis C IgG tests performed between January 1, 2005 and December 15, 2009. Of 308 active FMC patients, 266 underwent HBsAg serology testing within the period of study. The HBsAg coinfection prevalence was 5.3% (14/266); 2 of 252 patients had at least one positive antihepatitis C IgG serology, a 0.8% prevalence. Hepatitis B coinfection is relatively common in HIV-infected adults at our center in Botswana, whereas hepatitis C coinfection is rare. In this setting, where the diagnosis of hepatitis B coinfection with HIV has implications for choice of first-line antiretroviral therapy and prevention of perinatal hepatitis B transmission, broader sampling to establish the true population prevalence of hepatitis B coinfection and the desirability of adding screening to HIV management should be considered. These findings provide little justification for adding hepatitis C coinfection screening to the management of HIV infection in Botswana. PMID:21813864

  3. Prevalence of hepatitis B and hepatitis C coinfections in an adult HIV centre population in Gaborone, Botswana.

    PubMed

    Patel, Premal; Davis, Stephanie; Tolle, Michael; Mabikwa, Vincent; Anabwani, Gabriel

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of hepatitis B and hepatitis C coinfections in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) -infected adults at an HIV center in Gaborone, Botswana. A retrospective review was performed of charts of currently active HIV-infected adult patients in the Family Model Clinic (FMC) of the Botswana-Baylor Children's Clinical Center of Excellence (BCOE) in Gaborone, Botswana, for the results of serum hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and antihepatitis C IgG tests performed between January 1, 2005 and December 15, 2009. Of 308 active FMC patients, 266 underwent HBsAg serology testing within the period of study. The HBsAg coinfection prevalence was 5.3% (14/266); 2 of 252 patients had at least one positive antihepatitis C IgG serology, a 0.8% prevalence. Hepatitis B coinfection is relatively common in HIV-infected adults at our center in Botswana, whereas hepatitis C coinfection is rare. In this setting, where the diagnosis of hepatitis B coinfection with HIV has implications for choice of first-line antiretroviral therapy and prevention of perinatal hepatitis B transmission, broader sampling to establish the true population prevalence of hepatitis B coinfection and the desirability of adding screening to HIV management should be considered. These findings provide little justification for adding hepatitis C coinfection screening to the management of HIV infection in Botswana. PMID:21813864

  4. Angiogenesis and experimental hepatic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Queli Teixeira; Andrade, Zilton A

    2010-08-01

    Angiogenesis is a basic change occurring during repair by granulation tissue. This process seems to precede fibrosis formation in most types of chronic liver disease. To examine its presence and significance in different types of