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Sample records for a-induced hepatitis model

  1. Serum Amyloid A Induces Inflammation, Proliferation and Cell Death in Activated Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Siegmund, Sören V.; Schlosser, Monika; Schildberg, Frank A.; Seki, Ekihiro; De Minicis, Samuele; Uchinami, Hiroshi; Kuntzen, Christian; Knolle, Percy A.; Strassburg, Christian P.; Schwabe, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) is an evolutionary highly conserved acute phase protein that is predominantly secreted by hepatocytes. However, its role in liver injury and fibrogenesis has not been elucidated so far. In this study, we determined the effects of SAA on hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), the main fibrogenic cell type of the liver. Serum amyloid A potently activated IκB kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), Erk and Akt and enhanced NF-κB-dependent luciferase activity in primary human and rat HSCs. Serum amyloid A induced the transcription of MCP-1, RANTES and MMP9 in an NF-κB- and JNK-dependent manner. Blockade of NF-κB revealed cytotoxic effects of SAA in primary HSCs with signs of apoptosis such as caspase 3 and PARP cleavage and Annexin V staining. Serum amyloid A induced HSC proliferation, which depended on JNK, Erk and Akt activity. In primary hepatocytes, SAA also activated MAP kinases, but did not induce relevant cell death after NF-κB inhibition. In two models of hepatic fibrogenesis, CCl4 treatment and bile duct ligation, hepatic mRNA levels of SAA1 and SAA3 were strongly increased. In conclusion, SAA may modulate fibrogenic responses in the liver in a positive and negative fashion by inducing inflammation, proliferation and cell death in HSCs. PMID:26937641

  2. Protective Effects of N-Acetylcysteine in Concanavalin A-Induced Hepatitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chengfen; Xia, Yujing; Dai, Weiqi; Wang, Fan; Chen, Kan; Li, Jingjing; Li, Sainan; Zhu, Rong; Yang, Jing; Yin, Qin; Zhang, Huawei; Wang, Junshan; Lu, Jie; Zhou, Yingqun; Guo, Chuanyong

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to study the protective effects and mechanisms of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) in concanavalin A-induced hepatitis in mice. In this study, pretreatment with NAC ameliorated the histopathological changes and suppressed inflammatory cytokines in ConA-induced hepatitis. The expression of IL-2, IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ was significantly reduced in the NAC-treated groups. NAC activated PI3K/Akt pathway and inhibited the activation of NF-κB. Additionally, NAC reduced autophagosome formation, as assessed by detecting the expression of LC3 and Beclin 1. Our results demonstrate that NAC can alleviate ConA-induced hepatitis by regulating the PI3K/Akt pathway and reducing the late stages of autophagy. Our results described a new pharmaceutical to provide more effective therapies for immune hepatitis. PMID:25821351

  3. Effects of intravenous immunoglobulins on T-cell mediated, concanavalin A-induced hepatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Shirin, H; Bruck, R; Aeed, H; Hershkoviz, R; Lider, O; Kenet, G; Avni, Y; Halpern, Z

    1997-12-01

    Concanavalin A (ConA) activates T lymphocytes and causes T-cell mediated hepatic injury in mice. The intravenous administration of human immunoglobulins has beneficial effects in T-cell mediated diseases such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and adjuvant arthritis. In the present study, we examined the effects of intravenous immunoglobulins in a mouse model of T-cell mediated, acute liver injury induced by concanavalin A. Balb/c mice were inoculated with 12 mg/kg concanavalin A with or without intravenous immunoglobulins at doses of 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 g/kg body wt. The serum levels of liver enzymes, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interferon-gamma and interleukin-6 were assayed 2, 6 and 24 h after concanavalin A administration. Intravenous immunoglobulins did not prevent concanavalin A-induced hepatitis, as manifested by elevation of serum aminotransferases and histopathological evaluation. The serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in mice pretreated with immunoglobulins, measured 2 h after ConA treatment were reduced, while interferon-gamma levels measured 6 h after ConA inoculation were 5-fold higher than control levels. There was no effect of intravenous immunoglobulins on the release of interleukin 6. In conclusion, these results indicate that intravenous immunoglobulin is not effective in preventing T-cell mediated concanavalin A-induced hepatitis. The increased secretion of interferon-gamma and the incomplete suppression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha release may explain the lack of efficacy of intravenous immunoglobulin in this experimental model. PMID:9455732

  4. Atg7 Knockdown Augments Concanavalin A-Induced Acute Hepatitis through an ROS-Mediated p38/MAPK Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yan; Li, Yi; Li, Xuefeng; Xie, Qing; Wu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Concanavalin A (ConA), a T-cell mitogen that induces acute autoimmune hepatitis, is widely used to model pathophysiological processes of human acute autoimmune liver disease. Although autophagy has been extensively studied in the past decade, little is known about its molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of ConA-induced acute hepatitis. In this study, we used a Cre-conditional atg7 KO mouse to investigate the effects of Atg7-associated autophagy on ConA-induced murine hepatitis. Our results demonstrated that atg7 deficiency in mice enhanced macrophage activation and increased pro-inflammatory cytokines upon ConA stimulation. Atg7 silencing resulted in accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria, disruption of reactive oxygen species (ROS) degradation, and increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines in Raw264.7 cells. p38/MAPK and NF-κB levels were increased upon ConA induction due to Atg7 deficiency. Blocking ROS production inhibited ConA-induced p38/IκB phosphorylation and subsequent intracellular inflammatory responses. Hence, this study demonstrated that atg7 knockout in mice or Atg7 knockdown in cell culture augmented ConA-induced acute hepatitis and related cellular malfunction, indicating protective effects of Atg7 on regulating mitochondrial ROS via a p38/MAPK-mediated pathway. Collectively, our findings reveal that autophagy may attenuate macrophage-mediated inflammatory response to ConA and may be the potential therapeutic targets for acute liver injury. PMID:26939081

  5. Critical role of interleukin-17/interleukin-17 receptor axis in mediating Con A-induced hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shu; Wang, Luman; Liu, Nan; Wang, Ying; Chu, Yiwei

    2012-04-01

    Concanavalin A (Con A)-induced hepatitis is thought to be a T-cell-mediated disease with active destruction of liver cells. Interleukin (IL)-17 is a cytokine produced principally by CD4(+) T cells. However, whether IL-17/IL-17 receptor (IL-17/IL-17R)-mediated responses are involved in T-cell-mediated Con A-induced liver injury remains unclear. In this study, we found that IL-17 expression was highly elevated in liver tissues during Con A-induced hepatitis. The increased levels of IL-17 were paralleled with the severity of liver injury reflected by Alanine aminotransaminase and histological assay as well as the secretion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-6. Blockage of IL-17 significantly ameliorated Con A-induced hepatitis, while overexpression of IL-17 systemically resulted in massive hepatocyte necrosis in mice. Furthermore, overexpression of an IL-17R immunoglobulin G1 fusion protein significantly attenuated liver inflammation after acute Con A treatment. High expression of IL-17R on Kupffer cells was also observed along with the production of cytokines including TNF-α and IL-6. Inhibition of Kupffer cells by gadolinium chloride completely prevented Con A-induced liver injury and cytokine release. Finally, IL-17-expressing CD4(+) T and natural killer T cells were greatly increased in Con A-injected mice compared with that in controls. Overall, our results indicate that IL-17R signaling is critically involved in the pathogenesis in Con A-induced hepatitis, and blockade of IL-17/IL-17R signaling pathway may represent a novel therapeutic intervention in human autoimmune-related hepatitis.

  6. Endothelial cells are damaged by autophagic induction before hepatocytes in Con A-induced acute hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming-Chen; Chang, Chih-Peng; Lei, Huan-Yao

    2010-08-01

    We have reported both T-cell-dependent and -independent hepatitis in immunocompetent and immunodeficiency mice, respectively, after intravenous injection of Con A in mice. The mode of hepatocyte cell death is different: autophagy for T-cell-independent hepatitis in contrast to apoptosis for T-cell-dependent one. In this study, we further demonstrate that liver blood vessels are the first target in both modes. The infused Con A bond to the hepatic vascular endothelial cells and cause its damage with autophagy. Before the elevation of the serum alanine aminotransferase at 6 h post-injection, the plasma leakage and hemorrhage occur at 1-3 h without inflammation. Con A induces autophagy of endothelial cells and hemorrhage that is enhanced by IFN-gamma. Using the endothelial cell line HMEC-1, a dose- and time-dependent cell death with autophagic LC3-II (microtubule-associated protein light chain 3) conversion was induced by Con A and was enhanced by IFN-gamma. In conclusion, Con A induced autophagy on hepatic endothelial cells; the damage of liver blood vessel occurs before the induction of T-cell-dependent hepatitis via apoptosis or T-cell-independent hepatitis via autophagy.

  7. Proteomic analysis of differentially expressed proteins in mice with concanavalin A-induced hepatitis*

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xu-fei; Chen, Feng; Wu, Shan-shan; Shi, Yu; Liu, Dong-cheng; Chen, Zhi

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To find new protein biomarkers for the detection and evaluation of liver injury and to analyze the relationship between such proteins and disease progression in concanavalin A (Con A)-induced hepatitis. Methods: Twenty-five mice were randomly divided into five groups: an untreated group, a control group injected with phosphate buffered saline (PBS), and groups with Con A-induced hepatitis evaluated at 1, 3 and 6 h. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry (MS) were used to identify differences in protein expression among groups. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was performed to verify the results. Results: In mice with Con A-induced hepatitis, expression levels of four proteins were increased: RIKEN, fructose bisphosphatase 1 (fbp1), ketohexokinase (khk), and Chain A of class pi glutathione S-transferase. Changes in fbp1 and khk were confirmed by qRT-PCR. Conclusion: Levels of two proteins, fbp1 and khk, are clearly up-regulated in mice with Con A-induced hepatitis. PMID:20205309

  8. Protective Effects of Dracocephalum heterophyllum in ConA-Induced Acute Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qilan; Lu, Xiaohua; Shi, Qiangqiang; Zou, Junhui

    2016-01-01

    Dracocephalum heterophyllum (DH) is a Chinese herbal medicine used in treating hepatitis. However, the protective effects and pharmacological mechanisms of DH in hepatitis are unknown. In this study, we found that pretreatment with DH extract significantly ameliorated liver injury and suppressed the production of inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in Concanavalin A- (ConA-) induced hepatitis (CIH). DH recruited more CD11b+ Gr1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) to the liver and suppressed infiltration of macrophages (Kupffer cells) in the liver. The present work explores DH as an effective hepatoprotective medicine to inhibit inflammation and liver injury caused by hepatitis. PMID:27524863

  9. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 facilitates con a-induced IFN-γ-- mediated immune hepatic injury.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Chieh; Huang, Wei-Ching; Chen, Chia-Ling; Hsieh, Chia-Yuan; Lin, Yee-Shin; Chen, Shun-Hua; Yang, Kao-Chi; Lin, Chiou-Feng

    2011-10-01

    Immune hepatic injury induced by Con A results primarily from IFN-γ-mediated inflammation, followed by hepatic cell death. Glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3, which acts proapoptotically and is proinflammatory, is also important for facilitating IFN-γ signaling. We hypothesized a pathogenic role for GSK-3 in Con A hepatic injury. Con A stimulation caused GSK-3 activation in the livers of C57BL/6 mice. Inhibiting GSK-3 reduced Con A hepatic injury, including hepatic necrosis and apoptosis, inflammation, infiltration of T cells and granulocytes, and deregulated expression of adhesion molecule CD54. Con A induced hepatic injury in an IFN-γ receptor 1-dependent manner. Con A/IFN-γ induced activation and expression of STAT1 in a GSK-3-dependent manner. GSK-3 facilitated IFN-γ-induced inducible NO synthase, but had limited effects on CD95 upregulation and CD95-mediated hepatocyte apoptosis in vitro. Notably, inhibiting GSK-3 decreased Con A-induced IFN-γ production in both wild-type and IFN-γ receptor 1-deficient C57BL/6 mice. In Con A-activated NKT cells, GSK-3 was also activated and was required for nuclear translocation of T-box transcription factor Tbx21, a transcription factor of IFN-γ, but it was not required for CD95 ligand expression or activation-induced cell death. These results demonstrate the dual and indispensable role of GSK-3 in Con A hepatic injury by facilitating IFN-γ-induced hepatopathy.

  10. Blockade of IL-33 ameliorates Con A-induced hepatic injury by reducing NKT cell activation and IFN-γ production in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Duan, Lihua; Xiong, Ali; Zhang, Hongwei; Zheng, Fang; Tan, Zheng; Gong, Feili; Fang, Min

    2012-12-01

    IL-33, a recently described member of the IL-1 family, has been identified as a cytokine endowed with pro-Th2 type functions. To date, there are only limited data on its role in physiological and pathological hepatic immune responses. In this study, we examined the role of IL-33 in immune-mediated liver injury by exploring the model of concanavalin A (Con A)-induced hepatitis. We observed that the level of IL-33 expression in the liver was dramatically increased at 12 h after Con A injection. Meanwhile, ST2L, the receptor of IL-33, was significantly up-regulated in lymphocytes including T and natural killer T (NKT) cells, especially in NKT cells. Moreover, administration of recombinant IL-33 exacerbated Con A-induced hepatitis, while pretreatment of IL-33-blocking antibody or psST2-Fc plasmids showed a protective effect probably by inhibiting the activation of late stage of T cells and NKT cells and also decreasing the production of the cytokine IFN-γ. Furthermore, depletion of NKT cells abolished the protective effect of IL-33-blocking antibody, and IL-33 failed to exacerbate Con A-induced hepatitis in IFN-γ(-/-) mice. These data suggested the critical roles of NKT cells and IFN-γ in the involvement of IL-33 in Con A-induced hepatitis. Blockade of IL-33 may represent a novel therapeutic strategy through IL-33/ST2L signal to prevent immune-mediated liver injury.

  11. Retinoic acid alleviates Con A-induced hepatitis and differentially regulates effector production in NKT cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoo-A; Song, You Chan; Kim, Ga-Young; Choi, Gyeyoung; Lee, Yoon-Sook; Lee, Jung-Mi; Kang, Chang-Yuil

    2012-07-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a diverse regulator of immune responses. Although RA promotes natural killer T (NKT) cell activation in vitro by increasing CD1d expression on antigen-presenting cells (APCs), the direct effects of RA on NKT-cell responses in vivo are not known. In the present study, we demonstrated the effect of RA on the severity of Con A-induced hepatitis and molecular changes of NKT cells. First, we demonstrated that Con A-induced liver damage was ameliorated by RA. In correlation with cytokine levels in serum, RA regulated the production of IFN-γ and IL-4 but not TNF-α by NKT cells without influencing the NKT-cell activation status. However, RA did not alleviate α-GalCer-induced liver injury, even though it reduced IFN-γ and IL-4 but not TNF-α levels in serum. This regulation was also detected when liver mononuclear cells (MNCs) or NKT hybridoma cells were treated with RA in vitro. The regulatory effect of RA on NKT cells was mediated by RAR-α, and RA reduced the phosphorylation of MAPK. These results suggest that RA differentially modulates the production of effector cytokines by NKT cells in hepatitis, and the suppressive effect of RA on hepatitis varies with the pathogenic mechanism of liver injury.

  12. Modeling Hepatitis C treatment policy.

    SciTech Connect

    Kuypers, Marshall A.; Lambert, Gregory Joseph; Moore, Thomas W.; Glass, Robert John,; Finley, Patrick D.; Ross, David; Chartier, Maggie

    2013-09-01

    Chronic infection with Hepatitis C virus (HCV) results in cirrhosis, liver cancer and death. As the nations largest provider of care for HCV, US Veterans Health Administration (VHA) invests extensive resources in the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. This report documents modeling and analysis of HCV treatment dynamics performed for the VHA aimed at improving service delivery efficiency. System dynamics modeling of disease treatment demonstrated the benefits of early detection and the role of comorbidities in disease progress and patient mortality. Preliminary modeling showed that adherence to rigorous treatment protocols is a primary determinant of treatment success. In depth meta-analysis revealed correlations of adherence and various psycho-social factors. This initial meta-analysis indicates areas where substantial improvement in patient outcomes can potentially result from VA programs which incorporate these factors into their design.

  13. Vγ4 γδ T cell-derived IL-17A negatively regulates NKT cell function in Con A-induced fulminant hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Na; Hao, Jianlei; Ni, Yuanyuan; Luo, Wei; Liang, Ruifang; Cao, Guangchao; Zhao, Yapu; Wang, Puyue; Zhao, Liqing; Tian, Zhigang; Flavell, Richard; Hong, Zhangyong; Han, Jihong; Yao, Zhi; Wu, Zhenzhou; Yin, Zhinan

    2011-11-15

    Con A-induced fulminant hepatitis is a well-known animal model for acute liver failure. However, the role of γδ T cells in this model is undefined. In this report, using TCR δ(-/-) mice, we demonstrated a protective role of γδ T cells in Con A-induced hepatitis model. TCR δ(-/-) mice showed significantly decreased levels of IL-17A and IL-17F in the Con A-treated liver tissue, and reconstitution of TCR δ(-/-) mice with wild-type (Wt), but not IL-17A(-/-), γδ T cells significantly reduced hepatitis, strongly suggesting a critical role of IL-17A in mediating the protective effect of γδ T cells. Interestingly, only Vγ4, but not Vγ1, γδ T cells exerted such a protective effect. Furthermore, depletion of NKT cells in TCR δ(-/-) mice completely abolished hepatitis, and NKT cells from Con A-challenged liver tissues of TCR δ(-/-) mice expressed significantly higher amounts of proinflammatory cytokine IFN-γ than those from Wt mice, indicating that γδ T cells protected hepatitis through targeting NKT cells. Finally, abnormal capacity of IFN-γ production by NKT cells of TCR δ(-/-) mice could only be downregulated by transferring Wt, but not IL-17(-/-), Vγ4 γδ T cells, confirming an essential role of Vγ4-derived IL-17A in regulating the function of NKT cells. In summary, our report thus demonstrated a novel function of Vγ4 γδ T cells in mediating a protective effect against Con A-induced fulminant hepatitis through negatively regulating function of NKT cells in an IL-17A-dependent manner, and transferring Vγ4 γδ T cells may provide a novel therapeutic approach for this devastating liver disease.

  14. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) attenuates concanavalin A-induced hepatic injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongmei; Zhang, Xiaoli; Jiang, Li; Guo, Yun; Zheng, Changqing

    2014-05-01

    (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is the most abundant polyphenolic compound present in green tea and has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of EGCG against concanavalin A (ConA)-induced liver injury and the underlying mechanisms. EGCG (5 mg/kg) was administered orally by gavage to mice twice daily for 10 days before an intravenous injection of ConA. We found that EGCG effectively rescued lethality, improved hepatic pathological damage, and decreased serum levels of alanine aminotransaminase (ALT) in ConA-challenged mice. Furthermore, EGCG also significantly prevented the release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-4, and IL-6 in serum, reduced malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, and restored glutathione (GSH) content and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in liver tissues from ConA-challenged mice. Finally, nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation and expression levels of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, TLR4 and TLR9 protein in liver tissues were significantly inhibited by EGCG pretreatment. Taken together, our data suggest that EGCG possesses hepatoprotective properties against ConA-induced liver injury through its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant actions. PMID:24373695

  15. Activated Kupffer cells play an important role in intra-hepatic Th1-associated necro-inflammation in Concanavalin A-induced hepatic injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Morita, Atsuhiro; Itoh, Yoshito; Toyama, Tetsuya; Fujii, Hideki; Nishioji, Kenichi; Kirishima, Toshihiko; Makiyama, Akiko; Yamauchi, Norihito; Okanoue, Takeshi

    2003-10-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: To examine whether or not activated Kupffer cells play an important role in intra-hepatic Th1-associated necro-inflammation in Concanavalin A (Con A)-induced hepatic injury in mice. METHODS: Con A was administered to Balb/c mice pretreated with or without gadolinium chloride (GdCl(3)). Kupffer cell activation was evaluated by their ability to produce superoxide anions in situ under liver perfusion with nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT). Hepatic concentration of cytokines was measured by ELISA and the mRNA expression of CXC chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3) was evaluated by RT-PCR. Immunohistochemical detection of CD4 positive lymphocytes in the liver was also performed. RESULTS: GdCl(3)-pretreatment significantly (P<0.01) reduced the serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in Con A-treated mice. Formazan deposition in Kupffer cells, the hepatic concentration of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma, the mRNA expression of CXCR3 and the CD4 positive lymphocytes in the liver were decreased in GdCl(3)-pretreated mice as compared with those without GdCl(3)-pretreatment (P<0.05, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Activated Kupffer cells, which produce superoxide anions, are involved in Con A-induced hepatic necro-inflammation in mice possibly through the activation of Th1-associated immune response mediated by CD4 and/or CXCR3 positive cells recruited into the liver.

  16. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate attenuates apoptosis and autophagy in concanavalin A-induced hepatitis by inhibiting BNIP3

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sainan; Xia, Yujing; Chen, Kan; Li, Jingjing; Liu, Tong; Wang, Fan; Lu, Jie; Zhou, Yingqun; Guo, Chuanyong

    2016-01-01

    Background Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is the most effective compound in green tea, and possesses a wide range of beneficial effects, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiobesity, and anticancer effects. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of EGCG in concanavalin A (ConA)-induced hepatitis in mice and explored the possible mechanisms involved in these effects. Methods Balb/C mice were injected with ConA (25 mg/kg) to induce acute autoimmune hepatitis, and EGCG (10 or 30 mg/kg) was administered orally twice daily for 10 days before ConA injection. Serum liver enzymes, proinflammatory cytokines, and other marker proteins were determined 2, 8, and 24 hours after the ConA administration. Results BNIP3 mediated cell apoptosis and autophagy in ConA-induced hepatitis. EGCG decreased the immunoreaction and pathological damage by reducing inflammatory factors, such as TNF-α, IL-6, IFN-γ, and IL-1β. EGCG also exhibited an antiapoptotic and antiautophagic effect by inhibiting BNIP3 via the IL-6/JAKs/STAT3 pathway. Conclusion EGCG attenuated liver injury in ConA-induced hepatitis by downregulating IL-6/JAKs/STAT3/BNIP3-mediated apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:26929598

  17. Forced expression of Hnf4a induces hepatic gene activation through directed differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yahoo, Neda; Pournasr, Behshad; Rostamzadeh, Jalal; Fathi, Fardin

    2016-08-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are capable of unlimited self-renewal and have a diverse differentiation potential. These unique features make ES cells as an attractive source for developmental biology studies. Having the mature hepatocyte in the lab with functional activities is valuable in drug discovery studies. Overexpression of hepatocyte lineage-specific transcription factors (TFs) becomes a promising approach in pluripotent cell differentiation toward liver cells. Many studies generate transgenic ES cell lines to examine the effects of specific TFs overexpression in cell differentiation. In the present report, we have addressed whether a suspension or adherent model of differentiation is an appropriate way to study the role of Hnf4a overexpression. We generated ES cells that carried a doxycycline (Dox)-inducible Hnf4a using lentiviral vectors. The transduced cells were subjected to induced Hnf4a overexpression through both spontaneous and directed differentiation methods. Gene expression analysis showed substantially increased expression of hepatic gene markers, particularly Ttr and endogenous Hnf4a, in transduced cells differentiated by the directed approach. These results demonstrated that forced expression of TFs during directed differentiation would be an appropriate way to study relevant gene activation and the effects of overexpression in the context of hepatic differentiation. PMID:27233607

  18. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Hepatitis KidsHealth > For Kids > Hepatitis Print A A A ... an important digestive liquid called bile . What Is Hepatitis? Hepatitis is an inflammation (say: in-fluh-MAY- ...

  19. NCPP treatment alleviates ConA-induced hepatitis via reducing CD4+T activation and NO production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chenghu; Gao, Shangxian; Qu, Zhonghua; Wang, Qun; Zhu, Faliang; Guo, Chun; Hou, Li; Wu, Ping; Shi, Yanping; Zhang, Lining

    2012-12-01

    Corynebacterium parvum (CP), a kind of immunomodulator, has been well documented in many diseases. Non-cell C. parvum product (NCPP) is a newly-found nano-preparation. To investigate the effect of NCPP on Con A-induced murine severe hepatitis, we pretreated mice with NCPP intraperitoneally. After 12 h, ConA (25 μg/g body wt) was injected intravenously to provoke severe hepatitis and the degree of liver injury was evaluated by serum transaminase analysis and heptatic tissue pathology. Results have shown that levels of serum transaminase and degree of liver injury in ConA/NCPP groups had significantly declined than those in ConA/PBS groups. Notably, results of flow cytometry have demonstrated that activation of CD4+T cells in ConA/NCPP groups has been down-regulated, compared with ConA/PBS groups. Further, levels of serum and KC-related nitric oxide (NO) was displayed significantly lower in ConA/NCPP groups than those in ConA/PBS groups. The results indicate that NCPP may alleviate ConA-induced hepatitis by reducing CD4+T activation and NO production. PMID:22537148

  20. A rat model for hepatitis E virus

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Niraj; Verbeken, Erik; Ramaekers, Kaat; Dallmeier, Kai

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is one of the prime causes of acute viral hepatitis, and chronic hepatitis E is increasingly recognized as an important problem in the transplant setting. Nevertheless, the fundamental understanding of the biology of HEV replication is limited and there are few therapeutic options. The development of such therapies is partially hindered by the lack of a robust and convenient animal model. We propose the infection of athymic nude rats with the rat HEV strain LA-B350 as such a model. A cDNA clone, pLA-B350, was constructed and the infectivity of its capped RNA transcripts was confirmed in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, a subgenomic replicon, pLA-B350/luc, was constructed and validated for in vitro antiviral studies. Interestingly, rat HEV proved to be less sensitive to the antiviral activity of α-interferon, ribavirin and mycophenolic acid than genotype 3 HEV (a strain that infects humans). As a proof-of-concept, part of the C-terminal polymerase sequence of pLA-B350/luc was swapped with its genotype 3 HEV counterpart: the resulting chimeric replicon replicated with comparable efficiency as the wild-type construct, confirming that LA-B350 strain is amenable to humanization (replacement of certain sequences or motifs by their counterparts from human HEV strains). Finally, ribavirin effectively inhibited LA-B350 replication in athymic nude rats, confirming the suitability of the rat model for antiviral studies. PMID:27483350

  1. Mathematical modelling of hepatic lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Adrian C; Wattis, Jonathan A D; Salter, Andrew M

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop a mathematical model capable of simulating the metabolic response to a variety of mixed meals in fed and fasted conditions with particular emphasis placed on the hepatic triglyceride element of the model. Model validation is carried out using experimental data for the ingestion of three mixed composition meals over a 24-h period. Comparison with experimental data suggests the model predicts key plasma lipids accurately given a prescribed insulin profile. One counter-intuitive observation to arise from simulations is that liver triglyceride initially decreases when a high fat meal is ingested, a phenomenon potentially explained by the carbohydrate portion of the meal raising plasma insulin.

  2. Theoretical Modeling for Hepatic Microwave Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Punit

    2010-01-01

    Thermal tissue ablation is an interventional procedure increasingly being used for treatment of diverse medical conditions. Microwave ablation is emerging as an attractive modality for thermal therapy of large soft tissue targets in short periods of time, making it particularly suitable for ablation of hepatic and other tumors. Theoretical models of the ablation process are a powerful tool for predicting the temperature profile in tissue and resultant tissue damage created by ablation devices. These models play an important role in the design and optimization of devices for microwave tissue ablation. Furthermore, they are a useful tool for exploring and planning treatment delivery strategies. This review describes the status of theoretical models developed for microwave tissue ablation. It also reviews current challenges, research trends and progress towards development of accurate models for high temperature microwave tissue ablation. PMID:20309393

  3. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... has been associated with drinking contaminated water. Hepatitis Viruses Type Transmission Prognosis A Fecal-oral (stool to ... risk for severe disease. Others A variety of viruses can affect the liver Signs and Symptoms Hepatitis ...

  4. Establishment of a hepatic cirrhosis and portal hypertension model by hepatic arterial perfusion with 80% alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; He, Fu-Liang; Liu, Fu-Quan; Yue, Zhen-Dong; Zhao, Hong-Wei

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the feasibility and safety of establishing a porcine hepatic cirrhosis and portal hypertension model by hepatic arterial perfusion with 80% alcohol. METHODS: Twenty-one healthy Guizhou miniature pigs were randomly divided into three experimental groups and three control groups. The pigs in the three experimental groups were subjected to hepatic arterial perfusion with 7, 12 and 17 mL of 80% alcohol, respectively, while those in the three control groups underwent hepatic arterial perfusion with 7, 12 and 17 mL of saline, respectively. Hepatic arteriography and direct portal phlebography were performed on all animals before and after perfusion, and the portal venous pressure and diameter were measured before perfusion, immediately after perfusion, and at 2, 4 and 6 wk after perfusion. The following procedures were performed at different time points: routine blood sampling, blood biochemistry, blood coagulation and blood ammonia tests before surgery, and at 2, 4 and 6 wk after surgery; hepatic biopsy before surgery, within 6 h after surgery, and at 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 wk after surgery; abdominal enhanced computed tomography examination before surgery and at 6 wk after surgery; autopsy and multi-point sampling of various liver lobes for histological examination at 6 wk after surgery. RESULTS: In experimental group 1, different degrees of hepatic fibrosis were observed, and one pig developed hepatic cirrhosis. In experimental group 2, there were cases of hepatic cirrhosis, different degrees of increased portal venous pressure, and intrahepatic portal venous bypass, but neither extrahepatic portal-systemic bypass circulation nor death occurred. In experimental group 3, two animals died and three animals developed hepatic cirrhosis, and different degrees of increased portal venous pressure and intrahepatic portal venous bypass were also observed, but there was no extrahepatic portal-systemic bypass circulation. CONCLUSION: It is feasible to establish an

  5. A Dog Model for Acetaminophen-Induced Fulminant Hepatic Failure

    PubMed Central

    FRANCAVILLA, A.; MAKOWKA, L.; POLIMENO, L.; BARONE, M.; DEMETRIS, J.; PRELICH, J.; Van THIEL, D. H.; STARZL, T. E.

    2010-01-01

    The development of a large animal model of fulminant hepatic failure produced with acetaminophen that should be useful in the development and evaluation of potential medical therapies for the important clinical problem of fulminant hepatic failure is described. Acetaminophen in dimethyl sulfoxide (600 mg/ml) given as three subcutaneous injections, with the first dose (750 mg/kg body wt) being given at noon, the second dose (200 mg/kg body wt) being given 9 h later, and the third dose (200 mg/kg body wt) being given 24 h after the initial dose consistently produces fulminant hepatic failure in dogs. The dimethyl sulfoxide vehicle, injected intramuscularly, does not influence either animal survival or hepatic function in control-treated dogs. No deaths occur within the first 36 h. By 72 h after initial drug administration, the mortality is 90%. Histopathological and biochemical investigations demonstrate a high degree of hepatocellular necrosis in nonsurviving animals without appreciable damage to the kidneys, lungs, or heart. The drug schedule and preparation outlined avoids the administration of large volumes of vehicle and results in prolonged high levels of acetaminophen in the blood sufficient to induce severe hepatic injury. Ranitidine (120 mg/kg body wt i.m.) given 30 min before each acetaminophen dose significantly reduces the mortality and hepatic necrosis produced using this model. This model satisfies all criteria established by Miller et al. for the production of a suitable large animal model of fulminant acute hepatic failure. PMID:2910762

  6. The therapeutic effect of TNFR1-selective antagonistic mutant TNF-alpha in murine hepatitis models.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Hiroko; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ohkawa, Akiko; Abe, Yasuhiro; Nomura, Tetsuya; Mukai, Yohei; Nakagawa, Shinsaku; Taniai, Madoka; Ohta, Tsunetaka; Mayumi, Tadanori; Kamada, Haruhiko; Tsunoda, Shin-ichi; Tsutsumi, Yasuo

    2008-11-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is critically involved in a wide variety of inflammatory pathologies, such as hepatitis, via the TNF receptor-1 (TNFR1). To develop TNFR1-targeted anti-inflammatory drugs, we have already succeeded in creating a TNFR1-selective antagonistic mutant TNF-alpha (R1antTNF) and shown that R1antTNF efficiently inhibits TNF-alpha/TNFR1-mediated biological activity in vitro. In this study, we examined the therapeutic effect of R1antTNF in acute hepatitis using two independent experimental models, induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)) or concanavalin A (ConA). In a CCl(4)-induced model, treatment with R1antTNF significantly inhibited elevation in the serum level of ALT (alanine aminotransferase), a marker for liver damage. In a ConA-induced T-cell-mediated hepatitis model, R1antTNF also inhibited the production of serum immune activated markers such as IL-2 and IL-6. These R1antTNF-mediated therapeutic effects were as good as or better than those obtained using conventional anti-TNF-alpha antibody therapy. Our results suggest that R1antTNF may be a clinically useful TNF-alpha antagonist in hepatitis.

  7. Galectin-9 Ameliorates Con A-Induced Hepatitis by Inducing CD4+CD25low/int Effector T-Cell Apoptosis and Increasing Regulatory T Cell Number

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mengying; Zhong, Min; Suo, Qifeng

    2012-01-01

    Background T cell-mediated liver damage is a key event in the pathogenesis of many chronic human liver diseases, such as liver transplant rejection, primary biliary cirrhosis, and sclerosing cholangitis. We and other groups have previously reported that galectin-9, one of the β-galactoside binding animal lectins, might be potentially useful in the treatment of T cell-mediated diseases. To evaluate the direct effect of galectin-9 on hepatitis induced by concanavalin A (Con A) administration in mice and to clarify the mechanisms involved, we administered galectin-9 into mice, and evaluated its therapeutic effect on Con A-induced hepatitis. Methodology/Principal Findings Galectin-9 was administrated i.v. to Balb/c mice 30 min before Con A injection. Compared with no treatment, galectin-9 pretreatment significantly reduced serum ALT and AST levels and improved liver histopathology, suggesting an ameliorated hepatitis. This therapeutic effect was not only attributable to a blunted Th1 immune response, but also to an increased number in regulatory T cells, as reflected in a significantly increased apoptosis of CD4+CD25low/int effector T cells and in reduced proinflammatory cytokine levels. Conclusion/Significance Our findings constitute the first preclinical data indicating that interfering with TIM-3/galectin-9 signaling in vivo could ameliorate Con A-induced hepatitis. This strategy may represent a new therapeutic approach in treating human diseases involving T cell activation. PMID:23118999

  8. An integrated approach to model hepatic drug clearance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lichuan; Pang, K Sandy

    2006-11-01

    It has been well accepted that hepatic drug extraction depends on the blood flow, vascular binding, transmembrane barriers, transporters, enzymes and cosubstrate and their zonal heterogeneity. Models of hepatic drug clearances have been appraised with respect to their utility in predicting drug removal by the liver. Among these models, the "well-stirred" model is the simplest since it assumes venous equilibration, with drug emerging from the outflow being in equilibrium with drug within the liver, and the concentration is the same throughout. The "parallel tube" and dispersion models, and distributed model of Goresky and co-workers have been used to account for the observed sinusoidal concentration gradient from the inlet and outlet. Departure from these models exists to include heterogeneity in flow, enzymes, and transporters. This article utilized the physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) liver model and its extension that include heterogeneity in enzymes and transporters to illustrate how in vitro uptake and metabolic data from zonal hepatocytes on transport and enzymes may be used to predict the kinetics of removal in the intact liver; binding data were also necessary. In doing so, an integrative platform was provided to examine determinants of hepatic drug clearance. We used enalapril and digoxin as examples, and described a simple liver PBPK model that included transmembrane transport and metabolism occurring behind the membrane, and a zonal model in which the PBPK model was expanded three sets of sub-compartments that are arranged sequentially to represent zones 1, 2, and 3 along the flow path. The latter model readily accommodated the heterogeneous distribution of hepatic enzymes and transporters. Transport and metabolic data, piecewise information that served as initial estimates, allowed for the unknown efflux and other intrinsic clearances to be estimated. The simple or zonal PBPK model provides predictive views on the hepatic removal of drugs and

  9. MicroRNA let-7a ameliorates con A-induced hepatitis by inhibiting IL-6-dependent Th17 cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingying; Wang, Xiangmin; Zhong, Min; Zhang, Mengying; Suo, Qifeng; Lv, Kun

    2013-04-01

    In this study we explored the effects of microRNA let-7a on Con A-induced hepatitis and its possible mechanisms involved. We demonstrated that IL-6 and IL-17 expression were significantly upregulated in the liver following Con A treatment and IL-6 level was correlated with the IL-17 expression. To explore whether let-7a may have therapeutic effect on Con A-induced hepatitis, mice was infected with a lentiviral vector containing the let-7a sequence 7 days before Con A treatment. Significantly reduced Th17 cells and remarkably increased regulatory T cells frequency in the liver tissue were found as compared to control mice. It was accompanied by a significant decreased level of inflammatory cytokines as TNF-α, IL-6 and IFN-γ in the serum, and an decreased level of Th17 lineage-specific genes such as Il17a, Il17f, Il21 and Il23r. let-7a was further found to inhibit Th17 differentiation by downregulating IL-6 secretion. It may represent as a novel therapeutic strategy in treating immune-mediated inflammatory hepatitis.

  10. Methane-rich saline protects against concanavalin A-induced autoimmune hepatitis in mice through anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative pathways.

    PubMed

    He, Rong; Wang, Liping; Zhu, Jiali; Fei, Miaomiao; Bao, Suhong; Meng, Yan; Wang, Yuanyuan; Li, Jinbao; Deng, Xiaoming

    2016-01-29

    Methane is a common gas which has been reported to play a protective role in organ injury and presents an anti-inflammatory property. However, its effects on Concanavalin A (Con A)-induced autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) remain unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of methane on Con A-induced autoimmune hepatitis in mice and its underlying mechanism. Autoimmune hepatitis was induced by Con A (15 mg/kg) in healthy C57BL/6 mice and methane-rich saline (MS) (20 ml/kg) was intraperitoneally injected 30 min after the challenge with Con A. We found that methane treatment significantly reduced the elevated serum aminotransferase levels and ameliorated liver pathological damage. Furthermore, methane treatment obviously suppressed the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and increased anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10). Moreover, we found that the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) were highly increased while the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were decreased in liver with the injection of Con A, which was reversed by methane. Also, the data demonstrated that the phosphorylated IκB, NF-κB and P38 MAPK in liver were significantly down-regulated by methane. These results suggested that methane protected liver against Con A-induced injury through anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative pathways.

  11. Hepatitis B viral clearance studies using duck virus model.

    PubMed

    Long, Z; Sun, C S; White, E M; Horowitz, B; Sito, A F

    1993-01-01

    We have shown data to suggest that the in vivo duck hepatitis B virus system represents an excellent animal model system for the study of hepatitis B virus. Because of the similarity of DHBV to human HBV (including comparable results in virus inactivation studies), the high level of sensitivity of the DHBV assay, and the rapidity, ease, and relative low cost of obtaining results, we propose that the in vivo DHBV titration system be used as a model for human HBV in process validation studies. Data generated in such validation studies have, in fact, been submitted by a number of blood products manufacturers to the U.S. F.D.A. in support of IND applications.

  12. Experimental models of hepatic fibrosis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Wasser, S; Tan, C E

    1999-01-01

    The rat is a frequently used experimental model in studies involving human disease. We review several methods of inducing hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis in rats. These include induction by hepatotoxins and hepatocarcinogens such as carbon tetrachloride, dimethylnitrosamine, thioacetamide and furan; the hepatoxin-cum-nutrient, alcohol; a high fat-low choline-low protein diet; immunologic agents such as heterologous serum or bacterial cell wall products; and obstructive jaundice and biliary cirrhosis by common bile duct ligation. PMID:10374036

  13. Naturally occurring animal models of human hepatitis E virus infection.

    PubMed

    Yugo, Danielle M; Cossaboom, Caitlin M; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA virus in the family Hepeviridae. Hepatitis E caused by HEV is a clinically important global disease. There are currently four well-characterized genotypes of HEV in mammalian species, although numerous novel strains of HEV likely belonging to either new genotypes or species have recently been identified from several other animal species. HEV genotypes 1 and 2 are limited to infection in humans, whereas genotypes 3 and 4 infect an expanding host range of animal species and are zoonotic to humans. Historical animal models include various species of nonhuman primates, which have been indispensable for the discovery of human HEV and for understanding its pathogenesis and course of infection. With the genetic identification and characterization of animal strains of HEV, a number of naturally occurring animal models such as swine, chicken, and rabbit have recently been developed for various aspects of HEV research, including vaccine trials, pathogenicity, cross-species infection, mechanism of virus replication, and molecular biology studies. Unfortunately, the current available animal models for HEV are still inadequate for certain aspects of HEV research. For instance, an animal model is still lacking to study the underlying mechanism of severe and fulminant hepatitis E during pregnancy. Also, an animal model that can mimic chronic HEV infection is critically needed to study the mechanism leading to chronicity in immunocompromised individuals. Genetic identification of additional novel animal strains of HEV may lead to the development of better naturally occurring animal models for HEV. This article reviews the current understanding of animal models of HEV infection in both natural and experimental infection settings and identifies key research needs and limitations.

  14. Bioinformatics analysis of hepatitis C virus genotype 2a-induced human hepatocellular carcinoma in Huh7 cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ping; Wu, Meiying; Chen, Hui; Xu, Junchi; Wu, Minjuan; Li, Ming; Qian, Feng; Xu, Junhua

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a liver cancer that could be induced by hepatitis C virus genotype 2a Japanese fulminant hepatitis-1 (JFH-1) strain. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms of HCC. The microarray data GSE20948 includes 14 JFH-1- and 14 mock (equal volume of medium [control])-infected Huh7 samples. The data were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus. After data processing, soft cluster analyses were performed to identify co-regulated genes with similar temporal expression patterns. Functional and pathway enrichment analyses, as well as functional annotation analysis, were performed. Subsequently, combined networks of protein–protein interaction network, microRNA regulatory network, and transcriptional regulatory network were constructed. Hub nodes, modules, and five clusters of co-regulated genes were also identified. In total, 173 up and 207 down co-regulated genes were separately identified in JFH-1-infected Huh7 cells compared with those of control cells. Functional enrichment analysis indicated that up co-regulated genes were related to skeletal system morphogenesis and neuron differentiation and down co-regulated genes were related to steroid/cholesterol/sterol metabolisms. Hub genes (such as IRF1, GBP1, ICAM1, Foxa1, DHCR7, HMGCS2, and MSMO1) were identified. Transcription factors IRF1 and Foxa1 were the targets of miR-130a, miR-17-5p, and miR-20a. PPARGC1A was targeted by miR-29 family, and MSMO1 was the target of miR-23 family. Hub nodes (such as IRF1, GBP1, ICAM1, Foxa1, DHCR7, HMGCS2, and MSMO1) and microRNAs might be used as candidate biomarkers of JFH-1-infected HCC. PMID:26811688

  15. Bioinformatics analysis of hepatitis C virus genotype 2a-induced human hepatocellular carcinoma in Huh7 cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ping; Wu, Meiying; Chen, Hui; Xu, Junchi; Wu, Minjuan; Li, Ming; Qian, Feng; Xu, Junhua

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a liver cancer that could be induced by hepatitis C virus genotype 2a Japanese fulminant hepatitis-1 (JFH-1) strain. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms of HCC. The microarray data GSE20948 includes 14 JFH-1- and 14 mock (equal volume of medium [control])-infected Huh7 samples. The data were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus. After data processing, soft cluster analyses were performed to identify co-regulated genes with similar temporal expression patterns. Functional and pathway enrichment analyses, as well as functional annotation analysis, were performed. Subsequently, combined networks of protein-protein interaction network, microRNA regulatory network, and transcriptional regulatory network were constructed. Hub nodes, modules, and five clusters of co-regulated genes were also identified. In total, 173 up and 207 down co-regulated genes were separately identified in JFH-1-infected Huh7 cells compared with those of control cells. Functional enrichment analysis indicated that up co-regulated genes were related to skeletal system morphogenesis and neuron differentiation and down co-regulated genes were related to steroid/cholesterol/sterol metabolisms. Hub genes (such as IRF1, GBP1, ICAM1, Foxa1, DHCR7, HMGCS2, and MSMO1) were identified. Transcription factors IRF1 and Foxa1 were the targets of miR-130a, miR-17-5p, and miR-20a. PPARGC1A was targeted by miR-29 family, and MSMO1 was the target of miR-23 family. Hub nodes (such as IRF1, GBP1, ICAM1, Foxa1, DHCR7, HMGCS2, and MSMO1) and microRNAs might be used as candidate biomarkers of JFH-1-infected HCC. PMID:26811688

  16. New Hepatitis C Virus Drug Discovery Strategies and Model Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Snawar; Barretto, Naina; Uprichard, Susan L

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Hepatitis C virus is a major cause of liver disease worldwide and the leading indication for liver transplantation in the United States. Current treatment options are expensive, not effective in all patients and are associated with serious side effects. While pre-clinical anti-HCV drug screening is still hampered by the lack of readily infectable small animal models, the development of cell culture HCV experimental model systems has driven a promising new wave of HCV antiviral drug discovery. Areas covered This review contains a concise overview of current HCV treatment options and limitations with a subsequent in-depth focus on the available experimental models and novel strategies that have and continue to enable important advances in HCV drug development. Expert opinion With a large cohort of chronically HCV infected patients progressively developing liver disease that puts them at risk for hepatocellular carcinoma and hepatic decompensation, there is an urgent need to develop effective therapeutics that are well-tolerated and effective in all patients and against all HCV genotypes. Significant advances in HCV experimental model development have expedited drug discovery; however, additional progress is needed. Importantly, the current trends and momentum in the field suggests that we will continue to overcome critical experimental challenges to reach this end goal. PMID:22861052

  17. Hepatitis C Virus Experimental Model Systems and Antiviral drug Research*

    PubMed Central

    Uprichard, Susan L.

    2010-01-01

    An estimated 130 million people worldwide are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) making it a leading cause of liver disease worldwide. Because the currently available therapy of pegylated interferon-alpha and ribavirin is only effective in a subset of patients, the development of new HCV antivirals is a healthcare imperative. This review discusses the experimental models available for HCV antiviral drug research, recent advances in HCV antiviral drug development, as well as active research being pursued to facilitate development of new HCV-specific therapeutics. PMID:20960298

  18. CLINICAL AND GENETIC PREDICTORS AND PROGNOSTIC MODEL OF RAPIDLY PROGRESSIVE HEPATIC FIBROSIS IN CHRONIC HEPATITIS C.

    PubMed

    Dubinskaya, G; Sizova, L; Koval, T; Kovalyova, Е; Kaydashev, I

    2016-07-01

    The search for risk factors for rapid progression of hepatic fibrosis (HF) in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is a topical scientific and practical task. The purpose of the study is to identify clinical and genetic predictors and create the prognostic model of rapidly progressive HF in CHC. A retrospective cohort study of 125 patients with CHC has been carried out. The logistic regression and ROC-analysis have been applied for statistical data processing. The resulting analysis of 46 potential predictors of rapidly progressive HF in CHC identified the following significant ctiteria: male gender - ОR=3.44 [95% СΙ 1.60-7.39], р=0.001; increased levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) - ОR=4.93 [95% СΙ 1.54-15.76], р=0.007, particularly, moderate cytolytic activity - ОR=2.36 [95% СΙ 1.08-5.16], р=0.031; aspartate aminotransferase (АSТ) - ОR=3.65 [95% СΙ 1.41-9.43] р=0.007; γ-glutamiltranspeptidase (GGTP) - ОR=3.63 [95% СΙ 1.73-7.61], р=0.001; total bilirubin - ОR=3.53 [95% СΙ 1.47-8.47], р=0.005; alkaline phosphatase - ОR=9.18 [95% 1.11-75.80], р=0.039; alcohol intake>40 g/day (ОR=3.53 [95% СΙ 1.36-9.17], р=0.009), Gln11Gln genotype of the TLR7 gene (ОR=4.56 [95% СΙ 1.57-13.22], р=0.005), presence of chronic cholecystitis and/or pancreatitis (ОR=5.30 [95% СΙ 1.84-15.25], р=0.002). The prognostic model, comprising 6 predictors (level of GGTP>upper limit of normal (ULN), male gender, Gln11Gln genotype of the TLR7 gene chronic cholecystitis and/or pancreatitis, levels of total bilirubin and АSТ>ULN) have been created, demonstrating the statistical significance (p=0.000) and high operational characteristics (sensitivity - 85.5%, specificity - 68.3%, total number of the appropriate assignments - 76.8%, positive and negative predictive value - 72,6% and 82.7%,, respectively, the AUC ROC-curve - 0.840). Use of the created model will help to predict the rapid progression of HF in CHC and form the risk-group, requiring individual

  19. CLINICAL AND GENETIC PREDICTORS AND PROGNOSTIC MODEL OF RAPIDLY PROGRESSIVE HEPATIC FIBROSIS IN CHRONIC HEPATITIS C.

    PubMed

    Dubinskaya, G; Sizova, L; Koval, T; Kovalyova, Е; Kaydashev, I

    2016-07-01

    The search for risk factors for rapid progression of hepatic fibrosis (HF) in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is a topical scientific and practical task. The purpose of the study is to identify clinical and genetic predictors and create the prognostic model of rapidly progressive HF in CHC. A retrospective cohort study of 125 patients with CHC has been carried out. The logistic regression and ROC-analysis have been applied for statistical data processing. The resulting analysis of 46 potential predictors of rapidly progressive HF in CHC identified the following significant ctiteria: male gender - ОR=3.44 [95% СΙ 1.60-7.39], р=0.001; increased levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) - ОR=4.93 [95% СΙ 1.54-15.76], р=0.007, particularly, moderate cytolytic activity - ОR=2.36 [95% СΙ 1.08-5.16], р=0.031; aspartate aminotransferase (АSТ) - ОR=3.65 [95% СΙ 1.41-9.43] р=0.007; γ-glutamiltranspeptidase (GGTP) - ОR=3.63 [95% СΙ 1.73-7.61], р=0.001; total bilirubin - ОR=3.53 [95% СΙ 1.47-8.47], р=0.005; alkaline phosphatase - ОR=9.18 [95% 1.11-75.80], р=0.039; alcohol intake>40 g/day (ОR=3.53 [95% СΙ 1.36-9.17], р=0.009), Gln11Gln genotype of the TLR7 gene (ОR=4.56 [95% СΙ 1.57-13.22], р=0.005), presence of chronic cholecystitis and/or pancreatitis (ОR=5.30 [95% СΙ 1.84-15.25], р=0.002). The prognostic model, comprising 6 predictors (level of GGTP>upper limit of normal (ULN), male gender, Gln11Gln genotype of the TLR7 gene chronic cholecystitis and/or pancreatitis, levels of total bilirubin and АSТ>ULN) have been created, demonstrating the statistical significance (p=0.000) and high operational characteristics (sensitivity - 85.5%, specificity - 68.3%, total number of the appropriate assignments - 76.8%, positive and negative predictive value - 72,6% and 82.7%,, respectively, the AUC ROC-curve - 0.840). Use of the created model will help to predict the rapid progression of HF in CHC and form the risk-group, requiring individual

  20. Amelioration of concanavalin A-induced autoimmune hepatitis by magnesium isoglycyrrhizinate through inhibition of CD4+CD25−CD69+ subset proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qi; Wang, Jianwei; Liu, Ran; Wang, Zhiqiang; Li, Yufeng; Zhang, Yifan; Hao, Xiaohua; Huang, Yubo; Xie, Wen; Wei, Hongshan

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium isoglycyrrhizinate (MGL) is a new stereoisomer of glycyrrhizic acid, which is clinically used as a hepatoprotective medicine with more potent effects and less side effects than glycyrrhizic acid. This study was designed to evaluate the protective effects and possible mechanism of MGL against concanavalin A (Con A)-induced autoimmune hepatitis. Hepatitis was induced by Con A in C57/6J mice with or without MGL administration; injury score and serum ALT were evaluated. The CD4+ T-cells were isolated from splenocytes and challenged with Con A after coculturing with MGL. The injury score was significantly improved in MGL-treated mice after Con A challenging for 12 and 24 hours compared with those merely challenged with Con A. Similar trends were observed in the serum levels of ALT and AST. The most interesting result was that MGL administration significantly decreased the frequency of CD4+CD25−CD69+ T-cells rather than CD4+CD25+CD69+ T-cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, after Con A challenging 12 and 24 hours. Moreover, the serum ALT levels were markedly correlated with the frequency of CD4+CD25−CD69+ cells, but only weakly correlated with CD4+CD25+CD69+ cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. More importantly, MGL (5 mg/mL) almost completely eliminated the proliferation of the CD25−CD69+ subset in primary CD4+ T-cells after Con A challenge. Compared with merely Con A-challenged mice, those with MGL administration significantly demonstrated decreased NALP3, NLRP6, and caspase-3 expression, in which the NALP3 and caspase-3 downregulated in a dose-dependent manner. Our results indicate that MGL may have potential as a therapeutic agent in autoimmune hepatitis by ameliorating liver injury. Its molecular mechanism may be involved in inhibiting CD4+CD25−CD69+ subset proliferation and downregulating inflammasome expression in liver tissue. PMID:26869766

  1. An experimental mouse model for hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kiminori; Kohara, Michinori

    2011-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection affects approximately 170 million people and is a major global health problem because infected individuals can develop liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Despite significant improvements in antiviral drugs, only around 50% of treated patients with genotype 1 and 4 demonstrate HCV clearance. Unfortunately, an anti-HCV vaccine is still not available. To progress treatment of HCV, it is necessary to understand the mechanism(s) by which HCV infects hepatocytes, and how the host immune response prevents the spread of the virus. Because HCV infects only humans and chimpanzees, it is difficult to evaluate immune response mechanisms, and the effects of chemicals and new technologies on these response mechanisms. These difficulties underline the importance of establishing a small HCV-infected animal model. This review focuses on the progress made in recent years towards the development of an experimental mouse model for HCV.

  2. A Thermodynamic Model for Genome Packaging in Hepatitis B Virus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jehoon; Wu, Jianzhong

    2015-10-20

    Understanding the fundamentals of genome packaging in viral capsids is important for finding effective antiviral strategies and for utilizing benign viral particles for gene therapy. While the structure of encapsidated genomic materials has been routinely characterized with experimental techniques such as cryo-electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction, much less is known about the molecular driving forces underlying genome assembly in an intracellular environment and its in vivo interactions with the capsid proteins. Here we study the thermodynamic basis of the pregenomic RNA encapsidation in human Hepatitis B virus in vivo using a coarse-grained molecular model that captures the essential components of nonspecific intermolecular interactions. The thermodynamic model is used to examine how the electrostatic interaction between the packaged RNA and the highly charged C-terminal domains (CTD) of capsid proteins regulate the nucleocapsid formation. The theoretical model predicts optimal RNA content in Hepatitis B virus nucleocapsids with different CTD lengths in good agreement with mutagenesis measurements, confirming the predominant role of electrostatic interactions and molecular excluded-volume effects in genome packaging. We find that the amount of encapsidated RNA is not linearly correlated with the net charge of CTD tails as suggested by earlier theoretical studies. Our thermodynamic analysis of the nucleocapsid structure and stability indicates that ∼10% of the CTD residues are free from complexation with RNA, resulting in partially exposed CTD tails. The thermodynamic model also predicts the free energy of complex formation between macromolecules, which corroborates experimental results for the impact of CTD truncation on the nucleocapsid stability.

  3. Discrete virus infection model of hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengfei; Min, Lequan; Pian, Jianwei

    2015-01-01

    In 1996 Nowak and his colleagues proposed a differential equation virus infection model, which has been widely applied in the study for the dynamics of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Biological dynamics may be described more practically by discrete events rather than continuous ones. Using discrete systems to describe biological dynamics should be reasonable. Based on one revised Nowak et al's virus infection model, this study introduces a discrete virus infection model (DVIM). Two equilibriums of this model, E1 and E2, represents infection free and infection persistent, respectively. Similar to the case of the basic virus infection model, this study deduces a basic virus reproductive number R0 independing on the number of total cells of an infected target organ. A proposed theorem proves that if the basic virus reproductive number R0<1 then the virus free equilibrium E1 is locally stable. The DVIM is more reasonable than an abstract discrete susceptible-infected-recovered model (SIRS) whose basic virus reproductive number R0 is relevant to the number of total cells of the infected target organ. As an application, this study models the clinic HBV DNA data of a patient who was accepted via anti-HBV infection therapy with drug lamivudine. The results show that the numerical simulation is good in agreement with the clinic data.

  4. Transmission Model of Hepatitis B Virus with the Migration Effect

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad Altaf; Islam, Saeed; Arif, Muhammad; ul Haq, Zahoor

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis B is a globally infectious disease. Mathematical modeling of HBV transmission is an interesting research area. In this paper, we present characteristics of HBV virus transmission in the form of a mathematical model. We analyzed the effect of immigrants in the model to study the effect of immigrants for the host population. We added the following flow parameters: “the transmission between migrated and exposed class” and “the transmission between migrated and acute class.” With these new features, we obtained a compartment model of six differential equations. First, we find the basic threshold quantity Ro and then find the local asymptotic stability of disease-free equilibrium and endemic equilibrium. Furthermore, we find the global stability of the disease-free and endemic equilibria. Previous similar publications have not added the kind of information about the numerical results of the model. In our case, from numerical simulation, a detailed discussion of the parameters and their numerical results is presented. We claim that with these assumptions and by adding the migrated class, the model informs policy for governments, to be aware of the immigrants and subject them to tests about the disease status. Immigrants for short visits and students should be subjected to tests to reduce the number of immigrants with disease. PMID:23984318

  5. A probability cellular automaton model for hepatitis B viral infections.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xuan; Shao, Shi-Huang; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2006-04-01

    The existing models of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection dynamics are based on the assumption that the populations of viruses and cells are uniformly mixed. However, the real virus infection system is actually not homogeneous and some spatial factors might play a nontrivial role in governing the development of HBV infection and its outcome. For instance, the localized populations of dead cells might adversely affect the spread of infection. To consider this kind of inhomogeneous feature, a simple 2D (dimensional) probability Cellular Automaton model was introduced to study the dynamic process of HBV infection. The model took into account the existence of different types of HBV infectious and non-infectious particles. The simulation results thus obtained showed that the Cellular Automaton model could successfully account for some important features of the disease, such as its wide variety in manifestation and its age dependency. Meanwhile, the effects of the model's parameters on the dynamical process of the infection were also investigated. It is anticipated that the Cellular Automaton model may be extended to serve as a useful vehicle for studying, among many other complicated dynamic biological systems, various persistent infections with replicating parasites.

  6. Empirical fitness models for hepatitis C virus immunogen design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Gregory R.; Ferguson, Andrew L.

    2015-12-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) afflicts 170 million people worldwide, 2%–3% of the global population, and kills 350 000 each year. Prophylactic vaccination offers the most realistic and cost effective hope of controlling this epidemic in the developing world where expensive drug therapies are not available. Despite 20 years of research, the high mutability of the virus and lack of knowledge of what constitutes effective immune responses have impeded development of an effective vaccine. Coupling data mining of sequence databases with spin glass models from statistical physics, we have developed a computational approach to translate clinical sequence databases into empirical fitness landscapes quantifying the replicative capacity of the virus as a function of its amino acid sequence. These landscapes explicitly connect viral genotype to phenotypic fitness, and reveal vulnerable immunological targets within the viral proteome that can be exploited to rationally design vaccine immunogens. We have recovered the empirical fitness landscape for the HCV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (protein NS5B) responsible for viral genome replication, and validated the predictions of our model by demonstrating excellent accord with experimental measurements and clinical observations. We have used our landscapes to perform exhaustive in silico screening of 16.8 million T-cell immunogen candidates to identify 86 optimal formulations. By reducing the search space of immunogen candidates by over five orders of magnitude, our approach can offer valuable savings in time, expense, and labor for experimental vaccine development and accelerate the search for a HCV vaccine. Abbreviations: HCV—hepatitis C virus, HLA—human leukocyte antigen, CTL—cytotoxic T lymphocyte, NS5B—nonstructural protein 5B, MSA—multiple sequence alignment, PEG-IFN—pegylated interferon.

  7. Empirical fitness models for hepatitis C virus immunogen design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Gregory R.; Ferguson, Andrew L.

    2015-12-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) afflicts 170 million people worldwide, 2%-3% of the global population, and kills 350 000 each year. Prophylactic vaccination offers the most realistic and cost effective hope of controlling this epidemic in the developing world where expensive drug therapies are not available. Despite 20 years of research, the high mutability of the virus and lack of knowledge of what constitutes effective immune responses have impeded development of an effective vaccine. Coupling data mining of sequence databases with spin glass models from statistical physics, we have developed a computational approach to translate clinical sequence databases into empirical fitness landscapes quantifying the replicative capacity of the virus as a function of its amino acid sequence. These landscapes explicitly connect viral genotype to phenotypic fitness, and reveal vulnerable immunological targets within the viral proteome that can be exploited to rationally design vaccine immunogens. We have recovered the empirical fitness landscape for the HCV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (protein NS5B) responsible for viral genome replication, and validated the predictions of our model by demonstrating excellent accord with experimental measurements and clinical observations. We have used our landscapes to perform exhaustive in silico screening of 16.8 million T-cell immunogen candidates to identify 86 optimal formulations. By reducing the search space of immunogen candidates by over five orders of magnitude, our approach can offer valuable savings in time, expense, and labor for experimental vaccine development and accelerate the search for a HCV vaccine. Abbreviations: HCV—hepatitis C virus, HLA—human leukocyte antigen, CTL—cytotoxic T lymphocyte, NS5B—nonstructural protein 5B, MSA—multiple sequence alignment, PEG-IFN—pegylated interferon.

  8. Manifestation of psychiatric behaviors in a mouse model of griseofulvin-induced hepatic porphyria.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Yoko; Iwadate, Reiko; Watanabe, Yukino; Kawai, Hiroshi; Kudo, Naomi; Kawashima, Yoichi; Mitsumoto, Atsushi

    2008-12-01

    Most patients with hepatic porphyria exhibit neuropsychiatric symptoms, including abdominal pain, peripheral neuropathy, confusion, insomnia and mental disturbances such as anxiety and depression. Although heme deficiency and accumulation of heme precursors are thought to be responsible for neuropsychiatric manifestations in patients with acute porphyria, the pathogenetic mechanisms remain poorly understood. In the present study, we observed psychiatric behaviors in mice with hepatic porphyria induced by the ingestion of a griseofulvin (GF)-containing diet over a period of 12 weeks. GF ingestion by the mice caused an accumulation of porphyrins in the feces and a decrease in heme in the liver; these effects were observed throughout the entire duration of the experiment, with maximum levels observed after circa 1 week of ingestion of this diet. In addition, the mice developed enlargement of the liver, hepatocyte injury, and cholestasis. Mice with hepatic porphyria manifested an anxiety-like behavior by the long-term treatment (over 5 weeks) in a GF-dose and duration dependent manner. The hepatic porphyria mice also manifested depression-like behaviors by the short-term treatment (3 weeks) of GF2.0, which was reversed by administration of anti-depressant, imipramine. In conclusion, this study for the first time demonstrated psychiatric manifestations in GF-induced hepatic porphyria mice. The present results suggest that model animals could be useful for elucidating the mechanisms underlying psychiatric manifestations in syndromes such as hepatic porphyria and hepatic encephalopathy that are associated with the impairment of hepatic function.

  9. Alcohol induced hepatic degeneration in a hepatitis C virus core protein transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Noh, Dong-Hyung; Lee, Eun-Joo; Kim, Ah-Young; Lee, Eun-Mi; Min, Chang-Woo; Kang, Kyung-Ku; Lee, Myeong-Mi; Kim, Sang-Hyeob; Sung, Soo-Eun; Hwang, Meeyul; Yu, Dae-Yeul; Jeong, Kyu-Shik

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has become a major public health issue. It is prevalent in most countries. HCV infection frequently begins without clinical symptoms, before progressing to persistent viremia, chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the majority of patients (70% to 80%). Alcohol is an independent cofactor that accelerates the development of HCC in chronic hepatitis C patients. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate ethanol-induced hepatic changes in HCV core-Tg mice and mutant core Tg mice. Wild type (NTG), core wild-Tg mice (TG-K), mutant core 116-Tg mice (TG-116) and mutant core 99-Tg mice (TG-99) were used in this investigation. All groups were given drinking water with 10% ethanol and 5% sucrose for 13 weeks. To observe liver morphological changes, we performed histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations. Histopathologically, NTG, TG-K and TG-116 mice showed moderate centrilobular necrosis, while severe centrilobular necrosis and hepatocyte dissociation were observed in TG-99 mice with increasing lymphocyte infiltration and piecemeal necrosis. In all groups, a small amount of collagen fiber was found, principally in portal areas. None of the mice were found to have myofibroblasts based on immunohistochemical staining specific for α-SMA. CYP2E1-positive cells were clearly detected in the centrilobular area in all groups. In the TG-99 mice, we also observed cells positive for CK8/18, TGF-β1 and phosphorylated (p)-Smad2/3 and p21 around the necrotic hepatocytes in the centrilobular area (p < 0.01). Based on our data, alcohol intake induced piecemeal necrosis and hepatocyte dissociation in the TG-99 mice. These phenomena involved activation of the TGF-β1/p-Smad2/3/p21 signaling pathway in hepatocytes. Data from this study will be useful for elucidating the association between alcohol intake and HCV infection.

  10. The Impact of Acute Matriptase Inhibition in Hepatic Inflammatory Models.

    PubMed

    Pomothy, Judit; Szombath, Gergely; Rokonál, Patrik; Mátis, Gábor; Neogrády, Zsuzsanna; Steinmetzer, Torsten; Pászti-Gere, Erzsébet

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Dysfunction of matriptase-2 can be involved in iron regulatory disorder via downregulation of hepcidin expression. In the present study, we investigated the effects of 3-amidinophenylalanine-derived matriptase inhibitors on porcine hepatic inflammatory cell models. Methods. Hepatocyte-Kupffer cell cocultures (ratio of 2 : 1 and 6 : 1) were treated with four structurally related matriptase inhibitors at 50 μM. Cell cytotoxicity and relative expressions of IL-6 and IL-8 and the levels of hepcidin were determined by MTS and porcine-specific ELISA. The extracellular H2O2 contents were analyzed by Amplex Red method. Results. Matriptase inhibitors at 50 µM for 24 h did not increase cell death rate. The elevated ROS production observed after short-term application of inhibitor MI-441 could be correlated with lowered hepcidin expression. MI-460 could significantly enhance hepcidin levels in the supernatants of cocultures (by 62.21 ± 26.8% in hepatocyte-Kupffer cell, 2 : 1, and by 42.6 ± 14.3% in hepatocyte-Kupffer cell, 6 : 1, cocultures, resp.). No significant changes were found in IL-6 and IL-8 levels in cocultures exposed to matriptase inhibitors. Conclusions. Based on in vitro findings, administration of MI-460 via modulation of hepcidin expression without cytotoxic and oxidative stress inducing properties might be a reliable alternative to treat iron overload in human and veterinary clinical practice. PMID:27642598

  11. Hepatic SILAC proteomic data from PANDER transgenic model.

    PubMed

    Athanason, Mark G; Stevens, Stanley M; Burkhardt, Brant R

    2016-12-01

    This article contains raw and processed data related to research published in "Quantitative Proteomic Profiling Reveals Hepatic Lipogenesis and Liver X Receptor Activation in the PANDER Transgenic Model" (M.G. Athanason, W.A. Ratliff, D. Chaput, C.B. MarElia, M.N. Kuehl, S.M., Jr. Stevens, B.R. Burkhardt (2016)) [1], and was generated by "spike-in" SILAC-based proteomic analysis of livers obtained from the PANcreatic-Derived factor (PANDER) transgenic mouse (PANTG) under various metabolic conditions [1]. The mass spectrometry output of the PANTG and wild-type B6SJLF mice liver tissue and resulting proteome search from MaxQuant 1.2.2.5 employing the Andromeda search algorithm against the UniprotKB reference database for Mus musculus has been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (http://www.proteomexchange.org) via the PRIDE partner repository with dataset identifiers PRIDE: PXD004171 and doi:10.6019/PXD004171. Protein ratio values representing PANTG/wild-type obtained by MaxQuant analysis were input into the Perseus processing suite to determine statistical significance using the Significance A outlier test (p<0.05). Differentially expressed proteins using this approach were input into Ingenuity Pathway Analysis to determined altered pathways and upstream regulators that were altered in PANTG mice.

  12. The Impact of Acute Matriptase Inhibition in Hepatic Inflammatory Models

    PubMed Central

    Szombath, Gergely; Rokonál, Patrik; Mátis, Gábor; Neogrády, Zsuzsanna

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Dysfunction of matriptase-2 can be involved in iron regulatory disorder via downregulation of hepcidin expression. In the present study, we investigated the effects of 3-amidinophenylalanine-derived matriptase inhibitors on porcine hepatic inflammatory cell models. Methods. Hepatocyte-Kupffer cell cocultures (ratio of 2 : 1 and 6 : 1) were treated with four structurally related matriptase inhibitors at 50 μM. Cell cytotoxicity and relative expressions of IL-6 and IL-8 and the levels of hepcidin were determined by MTS and porcine-specific ELISA. The extracellular H2O2 contents were analyzed by Amplex Red method. Results. Matriptase inhibitors at 50 µM for 24 h did not increase cell death rate. The elevated ROS production observed after short-term application of inhibitor MI-441 could be correlated with lowered hepcidin expression. MI-460 could significantly enhance hepcidin levels in the supernatants of cocultures (by 62.21 ± 26.8% in hepatocyte-Kupffer cell, 2 : 1, and by 42.6 ± 14.3% in hepatocyte-Kupffer cell, 6 : 1, cocultures, resp.). No significant changes were found in IL-6 and IL-8 levels in cocultures exposed to matriptase inhibitors. Conclusions. Based on in vitro findings, administration of MI-460 via modulation of hepcidin expression without cytotoxic and oxidative stress inducing properties might be a reliable alternative to treat iron overload in human and veterinary clinical practice.

  13. Hepatic SILAC proteomic data from PANDER transgenic model.

    PubMed

    Athanason, Mark G; Stevens, Stanley M; Burkhardt, Brant R

    2016-12-01

    This article contains raw and processed data related to research published in "Quantitative Proteomic Profiling Reveals Hepatic Lipogenesis and Liver X Receptor Activation in the PANDER Transgenic Model" (M.G. Athanason, W.A. Ratliff, D. Chaput, C.B. MarElia, M.N. Kuehl, S.M., Jr. Stevens, B.R. Burkhardt (2016)) [1], and was generated by "spike-in" SILAC-based proteomic analysis of livers obtained from the PANcreatic-Derived factor (PANDER) transgenic mouse (PANTG) under various metabolic conditions [1]. The mass spectrometry output of the PANTG and wild-type B6SJLF mice liver tissue and resulting proteome search from MaxQuant 1.2.2.5 employing the Andromeda search algorithm against the UniprotKB reference database for Mus musculus has been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (http://www.proteomexchange.org) via the PRIDE partner repository with dataset identifiers PRIDE: PXD004171 and doi:10.6019/PXD004171. Protein ratio values representing PANTG/wild-type obtained by MaxQuant analysis were input into the Perseus processing suite to determine statistical significance using the Significance A outlier test (p<0.05). Differentially expressed proteins using this approach were input into Ingenuity Pathway Analysis to determined altered pathways and upstream regulators that were altered in PANTG mice. PMID:27642623

  14. The Impact of Acute Matriptase Inhibition in Hepatic Inflammatory Models

    PubMed Central

    Szombath, Gergely; Rokonál, Patrik; Mátis, Gábor; Neogrády, Zsuzsanna

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Dysfunction of matriptase-2 can be involved in iron regulatory disorder via downregulation of hepcidin expression. In the present study, we investigated the effects of 3-amidinophenylalanine-derived matriptase inhibitors on porcine hepatic inflammatory cell models. Methods. Hepatocyte-Kupffer cell cocultures (ratio of 2 : 1 and 6 : 1) were treated with four structurally related matriptase inhibitors at 50 μM. Cell cytotoxicity and relative expressions of IL-6 and IL-8 and the levels of hepcidin were determined by MTS and porcine-specific ELISA. The extracellular H2O2 contents were analyzed by Amplex Red method. Results. Matriptase inhibitors at 50 µM for 24 h did not increase cell death rate. The elevated ROS production observed after short-term application of inhibitor MI-441 could be correlated with lowered hepcidin expression. MI-460 could significantly enhance hepcidin levels in the supernatants of cocultures (by 62.21 ± 26.8% in hepatocyte-Kupffer cell, 2 : 1, and by 42.6 ± 14.3% in hepatocyte-Kupffer cell, 6 : 1, cocultures, resp.). No significant changes were found in IL-6 and IL-8 levels in cocultures exposed to matriptase inhibitors. Conclusions. Based on in vitro findings, administration of MI-460 via modulation of hepcidin expression without cytotoxic and oxidative stress inducing properties might be a reliable alternative to treat iron overload in human and veterinary clinical practice. PMID:27642598

  15. Spontaneous hepatic copper accumulation in Long-Evans Cinnamon rats with hereditary hepatitis. A model of Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Togashi, Y; Sato, S; Emoto, T; Kang, J H; Takeichi, N; Kobayashi, H; Kojima, Y; Une, Y; Uchino, J

    1991-05-01

    Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rats, an inbred strain of a mutant rat isolated from Long-Evans rats, develop hereditary hepatitis. To elucidate the role of copper metabolism in the development of the hepatitis in LEC rats, we examined the copper concentration in the tissues and serum levels of copper and ceruloplasmin. Copper concentration in the liver of LEC rats was over 40 times that of normal Long-Evans Agouti (LEA) rats, while the serum ceruloplasmin and copper concentrations in LEC rats decreased significantly. The hepatocytes of LEC rats show steatosis in cytoplasm and pleomorphism of mitochondria, resembling the histologic features of the liver in Wilson's disease. These findings suggest that the hereditary hepatitis in LEC rats is closely associated with copper toxicity, and may be dealing with a rat form of Wilson's disease. Thus the LEC rats will provide a unique and useful animal model for clarifying the mechanism and for developing treatment strategies for Wilson's disease and other abnormal copper metabolism in humans.

  16. Dysplastic Hepatocytes Develop Nuclear Inclusions in a Mouse Model of Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Priyanka; Lamoke, Folami; Chaffin, Joanna M.; Bartoli, Manuela; Lee, Jeffrey R.; Duncan, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Viral hepatitis resulting in chronic liver disease is an important clinical challenge and insight into the cellular processes that drive pathogenesis will be critical in order to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic options. Nuclear inclusions in viral and non-viral hepatitis are well documented and have diagnostic significance in some disease contexts. However, the origins and functional consequences of these nuclear inclusions remain elusive. To date the clinical observation of nuclear inclusions in viral and non-viral hepatitis has not been explored at depth in murine models of liver disease. Herein, we report that in a transgenic model of hepatitis B surface antigen mediated hepatitis, murine hepatocytes exhibit nuclear inclusions. Cells bearing nuclear inclusions were more likely to express markers of cell proliferation. We also established a correlation between these inclusions and oxidative stress. N-acetyl cysteine treatment effectively reduced oxidative stress levels, relieved endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and the number of nuclear inclusions we observed in the transgenic mice. Our results suggest that the presence of nuclear inclusions in hepatocytes correlates with oxidative stress and cellular proliferation in a model of antigen mediated hepatitis. PMID:24932583

  17. The Woodchuck, a Nonprimate Model for Immunopathogenesis and Therapeutic Immunomodulation in Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Roggendorf, Michael; Kosinska, Anna D; Liu, Jia; Lu, Mengji

    2015-12-01

    The woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) and its host, the eastern woodchuck, is a very valuable model system for hepatitis B virus infection. Many aspects of WHV replication and pathogenesis resemble acute and chronic hepatitis B infection in patients. Since the establishment of immunological tools, woodchucks were used to develop new therapeutic vaccines and immunomodulatory approaches to treat chronic hepadnaviral infections. Combination therapy of nucleos(t)ide analogs, with prime-boost vaccination and triple therapy, including immunomodulatory strategies by blocking the interaction of the programmed death-1 (PD-1) receptor with its ligand inducing a potent T-cell response in chronic WHV carrier woodchucks, suppression of viral replication, and complete elimination of the virus in 30% of the animals. Both strategies may be used for future therapies in patients with chronic hepatitis B. PMID:26511761

  18. Macrophage Stimulating Protein Enhances Hepatic Inflammation in a NASH Model

    PubMed Central

    van Gorp, Patrick J.; Jeurissen, Mike L. J.; Houben, Tom; Walenbergh, Sofie M. A.; Debets, Jacques; Oligschlaeger, Yvonne; Gijbels, Marion J. J.; Neumann, Dietbert; Shiri-Sverdlov, Ronit

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a common liver disease characterized by hepatic lipid accumulation (steatosis) and inflammation. Currently, therapeutic options are poor and the long-term burden to society is constantly increasing. Previously, macrophage stimulating protein (MSP)—a serum protein mainly secreted by liver—was shown to inhibit oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL)/lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-induced inflammation in mouse macrophages. Additionally, MSP could reduce palmitic acid (PA)-induced lipid accumulation and lipogenesis in the HepG2 cell line. Altogether, these data suggest MSP as a suppressor for metabolic inflammation. However, so far the potential of MSP to be used as a treatment for NASH was not investigated. We hypothesized that MSP reduces lipid accumulation and hepatic inflammation. To investigate the effects of MSP in the early stage of NASH, low-density lipoprotein receptor (Ldlr-/-) mice were fed either a regular chow or a high fat, high cholesterol (HFC) diet for 7 days. Recombinant MSP or saline (control) was administrated to the mice by utilizing subcutaneously-implanted osmotic mini-pumps for the last 4 days. As expected, mice fed an HFC diet showed increased plasma and hepatic lipid accumulation, as well as enhanced hepatic inflammation, compared with chow-fed controls. Upon MSP administration, the rise in cholesterol and triglyceride levels after an HFC diet remained unaltered. Surprisingly, while hepatic macrophage and neutrophil infiltration was similar between the groups, MSP-treated mice showed increased gene expression of pro-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic mediators in the liver, compared with saline-treated controls. Contrary to our expectations, MSP did not ameliorate NASH. Observed changes in inflammatory gene expression suggest that further research is needed to clarify the long-term effects of MSP. PMID:27685150

  19. Asymptomatic Hepadnaviral Persistence and Its Consequences in the Woodchuck Model of Occult Hepatitis B Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Mulrooney-Cousins, Patricia M; Michalak, Tomasz I

    2015-09-28

    Woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) is molecularly and pathogenically closely related to hepatitis B virus (HBV). Both viruses display tropism towards hepatocytes and cells of the immune system and cause similar liver pathology, where acute hepatitis can progress to chronic hepatitis and to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Two forms of occult hepadnaviral persistence were identified in the woodchuck-WHV model: secondary occult infection (SOI) and primary occult infection (POI). SOI occurs after resolution of a serologically apparent infection with hepatitis or after subclinical serologically evident virus exposure. POI is caused by small amounts of virus and progresses without serological infection markers, but the virus genome and its replication are detectable in the immune system and with time in the liver. SOI can be accompanied by minimal hepatitis, while the hallmark of POI is normal liver morphology. Nonetheless, HCC develops in about 20% of animals with SOI or POI within 3 to 5 years. The virus persists throughout the lifespan in both SOI and POI at serum levels rarely greater than 100 copies/mL, causes hepatitis and HCC when concentrated and administered to virus-naïve woodchucks. SOI is accompanied by virus-specific T and B cell immune responses, while only virus-specific T cells are detected in POI. SOI coincides with protection against reinfection, while POI does not and hepatitis develops after challenge with liver pathogenic doses >1000 virions. Both SOI and POI are associated with virus DNA integration into the liver and the immune system genomes. Overall, SOI and POI are two distinct forms of silent hepadnaviral persistence that share common characteristics. Here, we review findings from the woodchuck model and discuss the relevant observations made in human occult HBV infection (OBI).

  20. Show Me ECHO-Hepatitis C: A telemedicine mentoring program for patients with hepatitis C in underserved and rural areas in Missouri as a model in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Tahan, Veysel; Almashhrawi, Ashraf; Mutrux, Rachel; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2015-11-01

    Project (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes) (ECHO) is a telemedicine case-based training model for primary care providers to treat complex diseases by mentoring academicians of universities. It was first developed by the University of New Mexico for rural and underserved areas in New Mexico. The project Show Me ECHO- Hepatitis C (HCV) is an adaptation of Project ECHO to improve healthcare and hepatitis C therapy in the entire state of Missouri, including rural and underserved areas. Show Me ECHO- HCV uses telemedicine as videoconferencing technology for the case-based learning. The medical specialists of the University of Missouri-Columbia provide training and mentoring to primary care providers working in rural and urban underserved areas to deliver the best evidence-based care for patients with hepatitis C. This type of a model is promising in the management of patients with hepatitis C in developing countries with the availability of basic internet connections and potential voluntary participants.

  1. Randomized, controlled comparison of advanced hemostatic pads in hepatic surgical models.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kevin M; McKee, Jeff; Schiviz, Alexandra; Bauer, Alexander; Wolfsegger, Martin; Goppelt, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Blood loss during hepatic surgery leads to poor patient outcomes. This study investigates the hemostatic efficacy of a novel sealing hemostatic pad (polyethylene glycol-coated collagen, PCC) and a fibrin sealant pad (fibrin-thrombin coated collagen, FTC) in a leporine hepatic segmentectomy and a porcine hepatic abrasion model. A segmentectomy was used to compare hemostatic success and hematoma incidence in 20 rabbits (10/group). Hepatic abrasions were used to compare hemostatic success up to 10 min after application in six pigs (42 lesions/group). In the segmentectomy model, PCC achieved 100% hemostatic success within 2 min (95% CI: 72.3% to 100%) and FTC achieved 80% hemostatic success within 3 min (49.0% to 94.3%). PCC had lower hematoma incidence at 15 min (0.0 versus 11.1%) and 24 h (20.0 versus 66.7%). In the abrasion model, PCC provided superior hemostatic success at 3 (odds ratio: 24.8, 95% CI: 8.86 to 69.2, P < 0.001), 5 (66.3, 28.5 to 153.9, P < 0.001), 7 (177.5, 64.4 to 489.1, P < 0.001), and 10 min (777.6, 148.2 to 4078, P < 0.001) leading to statistically significant less blood loss. The novel sealing hemostat provides faster and more sustained hemostasis than a fibrin sealant pad in a leporine hepatic segmentectomy and a porcine hepatic abrasion model of hepatic surgery. PMID:24729905

  2. Rhesus monkey model of liver disease reflecting clinical disease progression and hepatic gene expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Tan, Tao; Wang, Junfeng; Niu, Yuyu; Yan, Yaping; Guo, Xiangyu; Kang, Yu; Duan, Yanchao; Chang, Shaohui; Liao, Jianpeng; Si, Chenyang; Ji, Weizhi; Si, Wei

    2015-10-07

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a significant public health issue with heavy medical and economic burdens. The aetiology of ALD is not yet completely understood. The development of drugs and therapies for ALD is hampered by a lack of suitable animal models that replicate both the histological and metabolic features of human ALD. Here, we characterize a rhesus monkey model of alcohol-induced liver steatosis and hepatic fibrosis that is compatible with the clinical progression of the biochemistry and pathology in humans with ALD. Microarray analysis of hepatic gene expression was conducted to identify potential molecular signatures of ALD progression. The up-regulation of expression of hepatic genes related to liver steatosis (CPT1A, FASN, LEPR, RXRA, IGFBP1, PPARGC1A and SLC2A4) was detected in our rhesus model, as was the down-regulation of such genes (CYP7A1, HMGCR, GCK and PNPLA3) and the up-regulation of expression of hepatic genes related to liver cancer (E2F1, OPCML, FZD7, IGFBP1 and LEF1). Our results demonstrate that this ALD model reflects the clinical disease progression and hepatic gene expression observed in humans. These findings will be useful for increasing the understanding of ALD pathogenesis and will benefit the development of new therapeutic procedures and pharmacological reagents for treating ALD.

  3. Rhesus monkey model of liver disease reflecting clinical disease progression and hepatic gene expression analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Tan, Tao; Wang, Junfeng; Niu, Yuyu; Yan, Yaping; Guo, Xiangyu; Kang, Yu; Duan, Yanchao; Chang, Shaohui; Liao, Jianpeng; Si, Chenyang; Ji, Weizhi; Si, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a significant public health issue with heavy medical and economic burdens. The aetiology of ALD is not yet completely understood. The development of drugs and therapies for ALD is hampered by a lack of suitable animal models that replicate both the histological and metabolic features of human ALD. Here, we characterize a rhesus monkey model of alcohol-induced liver steatosis and hepatic fibrosis that is compatible with the clinical progression of the biochemistry and pathology in humans with ALD. Microarray analysis of hepatic gene expression was conducted to identify potential molecular signatures of ALD progression. The up-regulation of expression of hepatic genes related to liver steatosis (CPT1A, FASN, LEPR, RXRA, IGFBP1, PPARGC1A and SLC2A4) was detected in our rhesus model, as was the down-regulation of such genes (CYP7A1, HMGCR, GCK and PNPLA3) and the up-regulation of expression of hepatic genes related to liver cancer (E2F1, OPCML, FZD7, IGFBP1 and LEF1). Our results demonstrate that this ALD model reflects the clinical disease progression and hepatic gene expression observed in humans. These findings will be useful for increasing the understanding of ALD pathogenesis and will benefit the development of new therapeutic procedures and pharmacological reagents for treating ALD. PMID:26442469

  4. [Sutureless hepatic transection using a new radiofrequency assisted device. Theoretical model, experimental study and clinic trial].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Serrano, María Ángeles; Grande, Luis; Burdío, Fernando; Berjano, Enrique; Poves, Ignasi; Quesada, Rita

    2011-03-01

    The ideal instrument for performing hepatic transection should combine safe and rapid haemostasis in a single tool. We present a new multidisciplinary investigation designed to develop a hepatic transection device assisted by radiofrequency (RF); the investigation included: a computerised theoretical model, and experimental study and a clinical trial of this device. The theoretic modelling was performed by computer, based on the Finite Elements Method (FEM), with the objective of studying the distribution of electrical energy and temperature in the tissue, and to assess the effect of the characteristics of the instrument. The experimental study, based on an in vivo porcine model, suggested that the new instrument would allow the transection velocity of the hepatic parenchyma to be increased with lower bleeding per transection area compared with other techniques extensively used in liver surgery. These data should enable the first phase of clinical trial to be conducted, with preliminary results that suggest that the new device is safe and effective.

  5. Chemical disinfection of duck hepatitis B virus: a model for inactivation of infectivity of hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Tsiquaye, K N; Barnard, J

    1993-08-01

    The susceptibility of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) to the virucidal effects of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC) was compared to hepatitis B virus (HBV) with the aim of using the duck as a model for studying HBV disinfection. Using viral DNA polymerase (DNAP) as a target, inhibition of DNAP activity by chlorine disinfectants was found to be concentration-dependent but independent of contact time. Two minute exposure of minimal effective concentrations of sodium hypochlorite (domestic bleach: 3600 ppm and industrial bleach: 3180 ppm) and sodium dichloroisocyanurate (3000 ppm available chlorine) to DHBV- and HBV-rich plasma totally inhibited DNA polymerase activity. DHBV particles in DHBV-carrier duck plasma (10(4.5) ID50/mL) were treated with these concentrations and inoculated intravenously into 18 one-day old ducklings (six animals/disinfectant). Analysis of plasma (0, 7 and 14 days post-infection) and post-mortem liver (14 days post-infection) by DNA hybridization techniques showed that DHBV DNA was undetectable in samples from all animals inoculated with disinfected virus particles. However, post-inoculation plasma and liver of 18 of 18 control ducklings inoculated with untreated virions were positive for DHBV DNA. These results show for the first time that total inhibition in vitro of hepadnavirus DNA polymerase activity by chemical disinfectants is predictive of inactivation of infectivity in vivo. PMID:8226434

  6. Defining Hepatic Dysfunction Parameters in Two Models of Fatty Liver Disease in Zebrafish Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Howarth, Deanna L.; Yin, Chunyue; Yeh, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Fatty liver disease in humans can progress from steatosis to hepatocellular injury, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and liver failure. We developed a series of straightforward assays to determine whether zebrafish larvae with either tunicamycin- or ethanol-induced steatosis develop hepatic dysfunction. We found altered expression of genes involved in acute phase response and hepatic function, and impaired hepatocyte secretion and disruption of canaliculi in both models, but glycogen deficiency in hepatocytes and dilation of hepatic vasculature occurred only in ethanol-treated larvae. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) become activated during liver injury and HSC numbers increased in both models. Whether the excess lipids in hepatocytes are a direct cause of hepatocyte dysfunction in fatty liver disease has not been defined. We prevented ethanol-induced steatosis by blocking activation of the sterol response element binding proteins (Srebps) using gonzombtps1 mutants and scap morphants and found that hepatocyte dysfunction persisted even in the absence of lipid accumulation. This suggests that lipotoxicity is not the primary cause of hepatic injury in these models of fatty liver disease. This study provides a panel of parameters to assess liver disease that can be easily applied to zebrafish mutants, transgenics, and for drug screening in which liver function is an important consideration. PMID:23697887

  7. Defining hepatic dysfunction parameters in two models of fatty liver disease in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Howarth, Deanna L; Yin, Chunyue; Yeh, Karen; Sadler, Kirsten C

    2013-06-01

    Fatty liver disease in humans can progress from steatosis to hepatocellular injury, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and liver failure. We developed a series of straightforward assays to determine whether zebrafish larvae with either tunicamycin- or ethanol-induced steatosis develop hepatic dysfunction. We found altered expression of genes involved in acute phase response and hepatic function, and impaired hepatocyte secretion and disruption of canaliculi in both models, but glycogen deficiency in hepatocytes and dilation of hepatic vasculature occurred only in ethanol-treated larvae. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) become activated during liver injury and HSC numbers increased in both models. Whether the excess lipids in hepatocytes are a direct cause of hepatocyte dysfunction in fatty liver disease has not been defined. We prevented ethanol-induced steatosis by blocking activation of the sterol response element binding proteins (Srebps) using gonzo(mbtps1) mutants and scap morphants and found that hepatocyte dysfunction persisted even in the absence of lipid accumulation. This suggests that lipotoxicity is not the primary cause of hepatic injury in these models of fatty liver disease. This study provides a panel of parameters to assess liver disease that can be easily applied to zebrafish mutants, transgenics, and for drug screening in which liver function is an important consideration. PMID:23697887

  8. An Evaluation of the Venous Equilibrium Model for Hepatic Clearance using Isolated Perfused Rainbow Trout Livers

    EPA Science Inventory

    The venous equilibrium model is widely used to describe hepatic clearance (CLH) of chemicals metabolized by the liver. If chemical delivery to the tissue does not limit CLH, this model predicts that CLH will approximately equal the product of intrinsic metabolic clearance and a t...

  9. Low Cardiac Output Leads Hepatic Fibrosis in Right Heart Failure Model Rats

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Yoshitaka; Urashima, Takashi; Shimura, Daisuke; Ito, Reiji; Kawachi, Sadataka; Kajimura, Ichige; Akaike, Toru; Kusakari, Yoichiro; Fujiwara, Masako; Ogawa, Kiyoshi; Goda, Nobuhito; Ida, Hiroyuki; Minamisawa, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatic fibrosis progresses with right heart failure, and becomes cardiac cirrhosis in a severe case. Although its causal factor still remains unclear. Here we evaluated the progression of hepatic fibrosis using a pulmonary artery banding (PAB)-induced right heart failure model and investigated whether cardiac output (CO) is responsible for the progression of hepatic fibrosis. Methods and Results Five-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats divided into the PAB and sham-operated control groups. After 4 weeks from operation, we measured CO by echocardiography, and hepatic fibrosis ratio by pathological examination using a color analyzer. In the PAB group, CO was significantly lower by 48% than that in the control group (78.2±27.6 and 150.1±31.2 ml/min, P<0.01). Hepatic fibrosis ratio and serum hyaluronic acid, an index of hepatic fibrosis, were significantly increased in the PAB group than those in the control group (7.8±1.7 and 1.0±0.2%, P<0.01, 76.2±27.5 and 32.7±7.5 ng/ml, P<0.01). Notably, the degree of hepatic fibrosis significantly correlated a decrease in CO. Immunohistological analysis revealed that hepatic stellate cells were markedly activated in hypoxic areas, and HIF-1α positive hepatic cells were increased in the PAB group. Furthermore, by real-time PCR analyses, transcripts of profibrotic and fibrotic factors (TGF-β1, CTGF, procollargen I, procollargen III, MMP 2, MMP 9, TIMP 1, TIMP 2) were significantly increased in the PAB group. In addition, western blot analyses revealed that the protein level of HIF-1α was significantly increased in the PAB group than that in the control group (2.31±0.84 and 1.0±0.18 arbitrary units, P<0.05). Conclusions Our study demonstrated that low CO and tissue hypoxia were responsible for hepatic fibrosis in right failure heart model rats. PMID:26863419

  10. Disease Modeling and Gene Therapy of Copper Storage Disease in Canine Hepatic Organoids

    PubMed Central

    Nantasanti, Sathidpak; Spee, Bart; Kruitwagen, Hedwig S.; Chen, Chen; Geijsen, Niels; Oosterhoff, Loes A.; van Wolferen, Monique E.; Pelaez, Nicolas; Fieten, Hille; Wubbolts, Richard W.; Grinwis, Guy C.; Chan, Jefferson; Huch, Meritxell; Vries, Robert R.G.; Clevers, Hans; de Bruin, Alain; Rothuizen, Jan; Penning, Louis C.; Schotanus, Baukje A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The recent development of 3D-liver stem cell cultures (hepatic organoids) opens up new avenues for gene and/or stem cell therapy to treat liver disease. To test safety and efficacy, a relevant large animal model is essential but not yet established. Because of its shared pathologies and disease pathways, the dog is considered the best model for human liver disease. Here we report the establishment of a long-term canine hepatic organoid culture allowing undifferentiated expansion of progenitor cells that can be differentiated toward functional hepatocytes. We show that cultures can be initiated from fresh and frozen liver tissues using Tru-Cut or fine-needle biopsies. The use of Wnt agonists proved important for canine organoid proliferation and inhibition of differentiation. Finally, we demonstrate that successful gene supplementation in hepatic organoids of COMMD1-deficient dogs restores function and can be an effective means to cure copper storage disease. PMID:26455412

  11. Bio-mathematical models of viral dynamics to tailor antiviral therapy in chronic viral hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Brunetto, Maurizia Rossana; Colombatto, Piero; Bonino, Ferruccio

    2009-01-01

    The simulation of the dynamics of viral infections by mathematical equations has been applied successfully to the study of viral infections during antiviral therapy. Standard models applied to viral hepatitis describe the viral load decline in the first 2-4 wk of antiviral therapy, but do not adequately simulate the dynamics of viral infection for the following period. The hypothesis of a constant clearance rate of the infected cells provides an unrealistic estimation of the time necessary to reach the control or the clearance of hepatitis B virus (HBV)/hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. To overcome the problem, we have developed a new multiphasic model in which the immune system activity is modulated by a negative feedback caused by the infected cells reduction, and alanine aminotransferase kinetics serve as a surrogate marker of infected-cell clearance. By this approach, we can compute the dynamics of infected cells during the whole treatment course, and find a good correlation between the number of infected cells at the end of therapy and the long-term virological response in patients with chronic hepatitis C. The new model successfully describes the HBV infection dynamics far beyond the third month of antiviral therapy under the assumption that the sum of infected and non-infected cells remains roughly constant during therapy, and both target and infected cells concur in the hepatocyte turnover. In clinical practice, these new models will allow the development of simulators of treatment response that will be used as an “automatic pilot” for tailoring antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis B as well as chronic hepatitis C patients. PMID:19195054

  12. Copper-induced hepatitis: the COMMD1 deficient dog as a translational animal model for human chronic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Favier, R P; Spee, B; Penning, L C; Rothuizen, J

    2011-03-01

    Chronic inflammatory liver disease regardless of aetiology leads to failing regeneration and fibrosis, ending in cirrhosis. Both in man and in animals this worldwide health problem has no definitive cure. Chronic liver injury causes hepatic stellate cells to proliferate and differentiate into matrix-producing cells. New therapeutic options will be developed upon detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms driving liver fibrosis. This may lead to new anti-fibrotic therapies which need to be tested in suitable models before application in the veterinary and human clinic. On the other side, to restore the failing regenerative capacity of the diseased liver cells, adult progenitor cells are of interest, as an alternative to whole organ transplantation. In order to find the most suitable large animal model it is important to recognise that the typical histopathological reaction pattern of the liver can differ between mammalian species. It is therefore imperative that specialists in veterinary internal medicine and pathology, being familiar with the diseases and pathologies of the liver in different animal species, are teaming-up in finding the best models for veterinary and human liver diseases. Several large animal models have been mentioned, like pigs, sheep, and dogs. Based on the observations that man and dog share the same hepatopathies and have identical clinical, pathological and pathogenetic reaction patterns during the development of liver disease, the dog seems to be a properly suited species to test new therapeutic strategies for pets and their best friends. PMID:22029820

  13. Dietary copper triggers onset of fulminant hepatitis in the Long-Evans cinnamon rat model

    PubMed Central

    Siaj, Ramsi; Sauer, Vanessa; Stöppeler, Sandra; Spiegel, Hans-Ullrich; Köhler, Gabriele; Zibert, Andree; Schmidt, Hartmut HJ

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the impact of dietary copper given at different time points on the onset of fulminant hepatitis. METHODS: The Long-Evans cinnamon (LEC) rat model of Wilson’s disease (WD) was used to study the impact of high dietary copper (hCu) on the induction of fulminant hepatitis at early or late time points of life. High Cu diet was started in rat pups or in adults (month 5) for three months. Animals that received reduced dietary copper (rCu) throughout their lifetime served as a control. Hepatitis-associated serum markers (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate transaminase, bilirubin) were analyzed in animal groups receiving hCu or rCu. Liver copper content and liver histology were revealed at sacrifice. A set of 5 marker genes previously found to be affected in injured liver and which are related to angiogenesis (Vegfa), fat metabolism (Srebf1), extracellular matrix (Timp1), oxidative stress (Hmox1), and the cell cycle (Cdkn1a) were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: Regardless of the time point when hCu was started, LEC rats (35/36) developed fulminant hepatitis and died. Animals receiving rCu (36/36) remained healthy, did not develop hepatitis, and survived long term without symptoms of overt disease, although liver copper accumulated in adult animals (477 ± 75 μg/g). With regard to start of hCu, onset of fulminant hepatitis was significantly (P < 0.001) earlier in adults (35 ± 9 d) that showed pre-accumulation of liver copper as compared to the pup group (77 ± 15 d). Hepatitis-associated serum markers, liver copper and liver histology, as well as gene expression, were affected in LEC rats receiving hCu. However, except for early and rapid onset of hepatitis, biochemical and molecular markers were similar at the early and late time points of disease. CONCLUSION: Rapid onset of fulminant hepatitis in asymptomatic LEC rats with elevated liver copper suggests that there is a critical threshold of liver copper which is important

  14. In Vivo MRI Assessment of Hepatic and Splenic Disease in a Murine Model of Schistosmiasis

    PubMed Central

    Laprie, Caroline; Dessein, Helia; Bernard, Monique; Dessein, Alain; Viola, Angèle

    2015-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis (or bilharzia), a major parasitic disease, affects more than 260 million people worldwide. In chronic cases of intestinal schistosomiasis caused by trematodes of the Schistosoma genus, hepatic fibrosis develops as a host immune response to the helminth eggs, followed by potentially lethal portal hypertension. In this study, we characterized hepatic and splenic features of a murine model of intestinal schistosomiasis using in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and evaluated the transverse relaxation time T2 as a non-invasive imaging biomarker for monitoring hepatic fibrogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings CBA/J mice were imaged at 11.75T two, six and ten weeks after percutaneous infection with Schistosoma mansoni. In vivo imaging studies were completed with histology at the last two time points. Anatomical MRI allowed detection of typical manifestations of the intestinal disease such as significant hepato- and splenomegaly, and dilation of the portal vein as early as six weeks, with further aggravation at 10 weeks after infection. Liver multifocal lesions observed by MRI in infected animals at 10 weeks post infection corresponded to granulomatous inflammation and intergranulomatous fibrosis with METAVIR scores up to A2F2. While most healthy hepatic tissue showed T2 values below 14 ms, these lesions were characterized by a T2 greater than 16 ms. The area fraction of increased T2 correlated (rS = 0.83) with the area fraction of Sirius Red stained collagen in histological sections. A continuous liver T2* decrease was also measured while brown pigments in macrophages were detected at histology. These findings suggest accumulation of hematin in infected livers. Conclusions/Significance Our multiparametric MRI approach confirms that this murine model replicates hepatic and splenic manifestations of human intestinal schistosomiasis. Quantitative T2 mapping proved sensitive to assess liver fibrogenesis non-invasively and may therefore

  15. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Manganese II. Hepatic Processing after Ingestion and Inhalation

    SciTech Connect

    Teeguarden, Justin G.; Dorman, David C.; Nong, Andy; Covington, Tammie R.; Clewell, III, H. J.; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2007-01-01

    ABSTRACT Current concerns regarding inhalation exposure to Mn, a component from oxidation of the gasoline antiknock agent MMT, have stimulated interest in developing kinetic tools for describing the inhalation and combined inhalation/oral route kinetics of Mn. Here we integrate kinetic approaches for (i) bulk tissue Mn kinetics and (ii) hepato-intestinal control of oral-route Mn uptake into a integrated model structure connecting systemic and oral Mn. Linkages were developed between the hepato-intestinal and systemic tissues in order to evaluate differences in hepatic processing of orally absorbed Mn and systemic Mn. The integrated, unified model described the uptake, net absorption and elimination of ingested manganese and the elimination kinetics of iv administered (systemic) manganese by treating Mn arriving at the liver from systemic versus portal blood differently. Hepatic extraction of orally absorbed Mn in rats predicted through simulation of the oral uptake data was 19 %, 54 % and 78 % at dietary exposures of 1.5 ppm, 11.2 ppm and 100 ppm, respectively. In contrast, hepatic extraction of systemic Mn predicted through simulation of elimination kinetics iv tracer Mn was much less, 0.004%, 0.005%, or 0.009% at dietary levels of 2, 10 and 100 ppm, respectively. These differences in hepatic processing of blood Mn derived from different dose-routes need to be accounted for in more complete PK models for Mn that are intended to support human health risk assessments.

  16. Application of hepatic tolerance tests to the functional reserve assessment in rat models of fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Furuhama, K; Yabe, K

    1998-05-01

    The present study was designed to define whether maximal removal rate of indocyanine green (ICG Rmax), plasma cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response to exogenous glucagon (peak to basal ratio of cAMP level: P/B cAMP) and plasma half-life of galactose (t1/2 galactose) can measure the hepatic functional reserve of fatty liver prepared in rats fed choline-deficient (9 weeks), 2% cholesterol (2 weeks) or 0.25% DL-ethionine (2 weeks) diet. Although changes in cholesterol and phospholipid values in serum during feeding periods differed among the models, histopathologic examinations in the liver of almost all animals revealed intermediate to severe fatty liver with or without fibrosis at each termination. ICG Rmax and P/B cAMP were significantly decreased in rats fed choline-deficient or DL-ethionine diet, implying reductions in hepatic functional mass and disturbances in hepatic cAMP production. Meanwhile, t1/2 galactose showed no change in any of the models, suggesting that glucose metabolisms in the models used may be preserved. These findings demonstrate that ICG Rmax and P/B cAMP can apply to measurement of hepatic surviving reserve of fatty liver with fibrosis.

  17. Quantitative Proteomics Identifies Host Factors Modulated during Acute Hepatitis E Virus Infection in the Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    Rogée, Sophie; Le Gall, Morgane; Chafey, Philippe; Bouquet, Jérôme; Cordonnier, Nathalie; Frederici, Christian

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis E virus (HEV) causes acute enterically transmitted hepatitis. In industrialized countries, it is a zoonotic disease, with swine being the major reservoir of human HEV contamination. The occurrence and severity of the disease are variable, with clinical symptoms ranging from asymptomatic to self-limiting acute hepatitis, chronic infection, or fulminant hepatitis. In the absence of a robust cell culture system or small-animal models, the HEV life cycle and pathological process remain unclear. To characterize HEV pathogenesis and virulence mechanisms, a quantitative proteomic analysis was carried out to identify cellular factors and pathways modulated during acute infection of swine. Three groups of pigs were inoculated with three different strains of swine HEV to evaluate the possible role of viral determinants in pathogenesis. Liver samples were analyzed by a differential proteomic approach, two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis, and 61 modulated proteins were identified by mass spectroscopy. The results obtained show that the three HEV strains replicate similarly in swine and that they modulate several cellular pathways, suggesting that HEV impairs several cellular processes, which can account for the various types of disease expression. Several proteins, such as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K, apolipoprotein E, and prohibitin, known to be involved in other viral life cycles, were upregulated in HEV-infected livers. Some differences were observed between the three strains, suggesting that HEV's genetic variability may induce variations in pathogenesis. This comparative analysis of the liver proteome modulated during infection with three different strains of HEV genotype 3 provides an important basis for further investigations on the factors involved in HEV replication and the mechanism of HEV pathogenesis. IMPORTANCE Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is responsible for acute hepatitis, with clinical symptoms ranging from asymptomatic

  18. Ability of IDO to attenuate liver injury in alpha-galactosylceramide-induced hepatitis model.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hiroyasu; Hoshi, Masato; Ohtaki, Hirofumi; Taguchi, Ayako; Ando, Kazuki; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Osawa, Yosuke; Hara, Akira; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Saito, Kuniaki; Seishima, Mitsuru

    2010-10-15

    IDO converts tryptophan to l-kynurenine, and it is noted as a relevant molecule in promoting tolerance and suppressing adaptive immunity. In this study, we examined the effect of IDO in α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer)-induced hepatitis. The increase in IDO expression in the liver of wild-type (WT) mice administered α-GalCer was confirmed by real-time PCR, Western blotting, and IDO immunohistochemical analysis. The serum alanine aminotransferase levels in IDO-knockout (KO) mice after α-GalCer injection significantly increased compared with those in WT mice. 1-Methyl-D-tryptophan also exacerbated liver injury in this murine hepatitis model. In α-GalCer-induced hepatitis models, TNF-α is critical in the development of liver injury. The mRNA expression and protein level of TNF-α in the liver from IDO-KO mice were more enhanced compared with those in WT mice. The phenotypes of intrahepatic lymphocytes from WT mice and IDO-KO mice treated with α-GalCer were analyzed by flow cytometry, and the numbers of CD49b(+) and CD11b(+) cells were found to have increased in IDO-KO mice. Moreover, as a result of the increase in the number of NK cells and macrophages in the liver of IDO-KO mice injected with α-GalCer, TNF-α secretion in these mice was greater than that in WT mice. Deficiency of IDO exacerbated liver injury in α-GalCer-induced hepatitis. IDO induced by proinflammatory cytokines may decrease the number of TNF-α-producing immune cells in the liver. Thus, IDO may suppress overactive immune response in the α-GalCer-induced hepatitis model.

  19. Computer Modeling of Yttrium-90-Microsphere Transport in the Hepatic Arterial Tree to Improve Clinical Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, Andrew S.; Kleinstreuer, Clement; Basciano, Christopher A.; Dezarn, William A.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: Radioembolization (RE) via yttrium-90 ({sup 90}Y) microspheres is an effective and safe treatment for unresectable liver malignancies. However, no data are available regarding the impact of local blood flow dynamics on {sup 90}Y-microsphere transport and distribution in the human hepatic arterial system. Methods and Materials: A three-dimensional (3-D) computer model was developed to analyze and simulate blood-microsphere flow dynamics in the hepatic arterial system with tumor. Supplemental geometric and flow data sets from patients undergoing RE were also available to validate the accuracy of the computer simulation model. Specifically, vessel diameters, curvatures, and branching patterns, as well as blood flow velocities/pressures and microsphere characteristics (i.e., diameter and specific gravity), were measured. Three-dimensional computer-aided design software was used to create the vessel geometries. Initial trials, with 10,000 noninteracting microspheres released into the hepatic artery, used resin spheres 32-{mu}m in diameter with a density twice that of blood. Results: Simulations of blood flow subject to different branch-outlet pressures as well as blood-microsphere transport were successfully carried out, allowing testing of two types of microsphere release distributions in the inlet plane of the main hepatic artery. If the inlet distribution of microspheres was uniform (evenly spaced particles), a greater percentage would exit into the vessel branch feeding the tumor. Conversely, a parabolic inlet distribution of microspheres (more particles around the vessel center) showed a high percentage of microspheres exiting the branch vessel leading to the normal liver. Conclusions: Computer simulations of both blood flow patterns and microsphere dynamics have the potential to provide valuable insight on how to optimize {sup 90}Y-microsphere implantation into hepatic tumors while sparing normal tissue.

  20. Hemodynamic changes in the hepatic circulation after the modulation of the splenic circulation in an in vivo human experimental model.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Nobuhisa; Sugawara, Yasuhiko; Satou, Shouichi; Mitsui, Tetsuya; Ninomiya, Riki; Komagome, Masahiko; Ozawa, Fumiaki; Beck, Yoshifumi

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in liver surgery have highlighted the effects of the splenic circulation on the hepatic circulation with respect to the hepatic arterial buffer response (HABR). The aim of the present study was to investigate the actual hemodynamic effects of splenic artery embolization/ligation and splenectomy on the hepatic circulation in patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy through in vivo experimental models. In vivo models of splenic artery embolization/ligation (only splenic artery clamping) and splenectomy (simultaneous clamping of both the splenic artery and the splenic vein) were created in 40 patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy for various reasons. The portal venous flow velocity, the portal venous flow volume, the hepatic arterial flow velocity, and the hepatic arterial resistance index were measured with color Doppler ultrasonography. Clamping of the splenic artery induced an immediate and significant increase (16%) in the hepatic artery velocity (P < 0.001), and the portal venous flow also decreased significantly (10%, P = 0.03). Fifteen minutes after the clamping of the splenic artery, the hepatic artery velocity remained significantly increased at the level of the initial clamping, and the portal venous flow significantly decreased (16%, P < 0.001). Clamping of the splenic vein, which was performed after the clamping of the splenic artery, resulted in an immediate and significant decrease (30%) in the portal venous flow (P < 0.001), but the hepatic arterial flow was not affected. Fifteen minutes after the clamping of the splenic vein, there was no change in the portal flow, which remained significantly lower (28%) than the flow in controls, whereas the hepatic arterial flow further significantly increased (31%, P < 0.001). In conclusion, our findings indicate that both splenic artery embolization/ligation and splenectomy are effective for increasing hepatic arterial flow and decreasing portal flow, with splenectomy providing a

  1. Pharmacological correction of neonatal lethal hepatic dysfunction in a murine model of hereditary tyrosinaemia type I.

    PubMed

    Grompe, M; Lindstedt, S; al-Dhalimy, M; Kennaway, N G; Papaconstantinou, J; Torres-Ramos, C A; Ou, C N; Finegold, M

    1995-08-01

    Hereditary tyrosinaemia type I, a severe autosomal recessive metabolic disease, affects the liver and kidneys and is caused by deficiency of fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH). Mice homozygous for a FAH gene disruption have a neonatal lethal phenotype caused by liver dysfunction and do not represent an adequate model of the human disease. Here we demonstrate that treatment of affected animals with 2-(2-nitro-4-trifluoro-methylbenzyol)-1,3-cyclohexanedione abolished neonatal lethality, corrected liver function and partially normalized the altered expression pattern of hepatic mRNAs. The prolonged lifespan of affected animals resulted in a phenotype analogous to human tyrosinaemia type I including hepatocellular carcinoma. The adult FAH-/- mouse will serve as useful model for studies of the pathophysiology and treatment of hereditary tyrosinaemia type I as well as hepatic cancer. PMID:7545495

  2. Hepatic capillariasis in rats: a new model for testing antifibrotic drugs.

    PubMed

    de Souza, M M; Silva, L M; Barbosa, A A; de Oliveira, I R; Paraná, R; Andrade, Z A

    2000-11-01

    Rats infected with the helminth Capillaria hepatica regularly develop septal hepatic fibrosis that may progress to cirrhosis in a relatively short time. Because of such characteristics, this experimental model was selected for testing drugs exhibiting antifibrosis potential, such as pentoxifylline, gadolinium chloride and vitamin A. Hepatic fibrosis was qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated in liver samples obtained by partial hepatectomy and at autopsy. The material was submitted to histological, biochemical and morphometric methods. A statistically significant reduction of fibrosis was obtained with pentoxifylline when administered intraperitoneally rather than intravenously. Gadolinium chloride showed moderate activity when administered prophylactically (before fibrosis had started), but showed a poor effect when fibrosis was well advanced. No modification of fibrosis was seen after vitamin A administration. Hydroxyproline content was correlated with morphometric measurements. The model appears to be adequate, since few animals die of the infection, fibrosis develops regularly in all animals, and the effects of different antifibrotic drugs and administration protocols can be easily detected.

  3. Altered hepatic clearance and killing of Candida albicans in the isolated perfused mouse liver model.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, R T; Horst, M N; Garner, R E; Hudson, J; Jenkins, P R; Richardson, A L

    1990-09-01

    The adherence of Candida albicans was studied in situ by using the perfused mouse liver model. After exhaustive washing, 10(6) C. albicans were infused into mouse livers. At the time of recovery, 62 +/- 5% (mean +/- standard error of the mean) of the infused C. albicans were recovered from the liver and 14 +/- 3% were recovered from the effluent for a total recovery of 76 +/- 4%. This indicates that 86 +/- 3% of the original inoculum was trapped by the liver and that 24 +/- 4% was killed within the liver. Chemical pretreatment of C. albicans with 8 M urea, 12 mM dithiothreitol, 2% beta-mercaptoethanol, 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate, 10% Triton X-100, or 3 M potassium chloride or enzyme pretreatment with alpha-mannosidase, alpha-chymotrypsin, subtilisin, beta-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase, pronase, trypsin, papain, or lipase did not alter adherence of C. albicans to hepatic tissue. By contrast, pepsin pretreatment significantly decreased hepatic trapping. Simultaneous perfusion with either 100 mg of C. albicans glycoprotein per liter or 100 mg of C. albicans mannan per liter also decreased trapping. Furthermore, both substances eluted previously trapped C. albicans from hepatic tissue. Chemical pretreatment with 8 M urea, 12 mM dithiothreitol, or 3 M KCI or enzymatic pretreatment with alpha-mannosidase, subtilisin, alpha-chymotrypsin, or papain increased killing of C. albicans three- to fivefold within hepatic tissue. The data suggest that mannose-containing structures on the surface of C. albicans, for example. mannans or glucomannoproteins, mediate adherence of C. albicans within the liver. Indirectly, chemical and enzymatic pretreatment renders C. albicans more susceptible to hepatic killing.

  4. Anchoring Hepatic Gene Expression with Development of Fibrosis and Neoplasia in a Toxicant-Induced Fish Model of Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Van Wettere, Arnaud J.; Law, J. Mac; Hinton, David E.; Kullman, Seth W.

    2014-01-01

    Fish have been used as laboratory models to study hepatic development and carcinogenesis but not for pathogenesis of hepatic fibrosis. In this study, a dimethylnitrosamine-induced fish model of hepatic injury was developed in Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) and gene expression was anchored with the development of hepatic fibrosis and neoplasia. Exposed livers exhibited mild hepatocellular degenerative changes 2 weeks post-exposure. Within six weeks hepatic fibrosis/cirrhosis was evident with development of neoplasia by 10 weeks. Stellate cell activation and development of fibrosis was associated with upregulation of tgfb1,tgfb receptor 2, smad3a, smad3b, ctnnb1, myc, mmp2, mmp14a, mmp14b, timp2a, timp2b, timp3, col1a1a, and col1a1b, and a less pronounced increase in mmp13 and col4a1expression. Tgfb receptor I expression was unchanged. Immunohistochemistry suggested that biliary epithelial cells and stellate cells were the main producers of TGF-β1. This study identified a group of candidate genes likely to be involved in the development of hepatic fibrosis, and demonstrated that the TGF-β pathway likely plays a major role in the pathogenesis. These results support the medaka as a viable fish model of hepatic fibrosis. PMID:23197195

  5. Modeling toxicodynamic effects of trichloroethylene on liver in mouse model of autoimmune hepatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Kathleen M.; Reisfeld, Brad; Zurlinden, Todd J.; Kreps, Meagan N.; Erickson, Stephen W.; Blossom, Sarah J.

    2014-09-15

    Chronic exposure to industrial solvent and water pollutant trichloroethylene (TCE) in female MRL +/+ mice generates disease similar to human autoimmune hepatitis. The current study was initiated to investigate why TCE-induced autoimmunity targeted the liver. Compared to other tissues the liver has an unusually robust capacity for repair and regeneration. This investigation examined both time-dependent and dose-dependent effects of TCE on hepatoprotective and pro-inflammatory events in liver and macrophages from female MRL +/+ mice. After a 12-week exposure to TCE in drinking water a dose-dependent decrease in macrophage production of IL-6 at both the transcriptional and protein level was observed. A longitudinal study similarly showed that TCE inhibited macrophage IL-6 production. In terms of the liver, TCE had little effect on expression of pro-inflammatory genes (Tnfa, Saa2 or Cscl1) until the end of the 40-week exposure. Instead, TCE suppressed hepatic expression of genes involved in IL-6 signaling (Il6r, gp130, and Egr1). Linear regression analysis confirmed liver histopathology in the TCE-treated mice correlated with decreased expression of Il6r. A toxicodynamic model was developed to estimate the effects of TCE on IL-6 signaling and liver pathology under different levels of exposure and rates of repair. This study underlined the importance of longitudinal studies in mechanistic evaluations of immuntoxicants. It showed that later-occurring liver pathology caused by TCE was associated with early suppression of hepatoprotection rather than an increase in conventional pro-inflammatory events. This information was used to create a novel toxicodynamic model of IL-6-mediated TCE-induced liver inflammation. - Highlights: • We developed a toxicodynamic model to study effects of trichloroethylene on liver. • We examined protective as well as pro-inflammatory events in the liver. • Trichloroethylene inhibits IL-6 production by macrophages. • Trichloroethylene

  6. Evaluation of the assumptions of an ontogeny model of rat hepatic cytochrome P450 activity.

    PubMed

    Alcorn, Jane; Elbarbry, Fawzy A; Allouh, Mohammed Z; McNamara, Patrick J

    2007-12-01

    We previously reported an ontogeny model of hepatic cytochrome P450 (P450) activity that predicts in vivo P450 elimination from in vitro intrinsic clearance. The purpose of this study was to conduct investigations into key assumptions of the P450 ontogeny model using the developing rat model system. We used two developmentally dissimilar enzymes, CYP2E1 and CYP1A2, and male rats (n = 4) at age groups representing critical developmental stages. Total body and liver weights and hepatic microsomal protein contents were measured. Following high-performance liquid chromatography analysis, apparent K(M) and V(max) estimates were calculated using nonlinear regression analysis for CYP2E1- and CYP1A2-mediated chlorzoxazone 6-hydroxylation and methoxyresorufin O-dealkylation, and V(max) estimates for p-nitrophenol and phenacetin hydroxylations, respectively. Hepatic scaling factors and V(max) values provided estimates for infant scaling factors (ISF). The data show microsomal protein contents increased with postnatal age and reached adult values after postnatal day (PD) 7. Apparent K(M) values were similar at all developmental stages except at < or =PD7. Developmental increases in probe substrate V(max) values did not correlate with the biphasic increase in immunoquantifiable P450. The activity of two different probe substrates for each P450 covaried as a function of age. A plot of observed ISF values as a function of age reflected the developmental pattern of rat hepatic P450. In summation, these observations diverge from several of the model's assumptions. Further investigations are required to explain these inconsistencies and to investigate whether the developing rat may provide a predictive paradigm for pediatric risk assessment for P450-mediated elimination processes.

  7. Animal Models of Chronic Hepatitis Delta Virus Infection Host–Virus Immunologic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Aldabe, Rafael; Suárez-Amarán, Lester; Usai, Carla; González-Aseguinolaza, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is a defective RNA virus that has an absolute requirement for a virus belonging to the hepadnaviridae family like hepatitis B virus (HBV) for its replication and formation of new virions. HDV infection is usually associated with a worsening of HBV-induced liver pathogenesis, which leads to more frequent cirrhosis, increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and fulminant hepatitis. Importantly, no selective therapies are available for HDV infection. The mainstay of treatment for HDV infection is pegylated interferon alpha; however, response rates to this therapy are poor. A better knowledge of HDV–host cell interaction will help with the identification of novel therapeutic targets, which are urgently needed. Animal models like hepadnavirus-infected chimpanzees or the eastern woodchuck have been of great value for the characterization of HDV chronic infection. Recently, more practical animal models in which to perform a deeper study of host virus interactions and to evaluate new therapeutic strategies have been developed. Therefore, the main focus of this review is to discuss the current knowledge about HDV host interactions obtained from cell culture and animal models. PMID:25686091

  8. Ethanol-induced impairment of hepatic glycoprotein secretion in the isolated rat liver perfusion model

    SciTech Connect

    Volentine, G.D.; Ogden, K.A.; Tuma, D.J.; Sorrell, M.F.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have previously shown that acute administration of ethanol inhibits hepatic glycoprotein secretion in vivo. This ethanol-induced effect appears to be mediated by its reactive metabolite, acetaldehyde. Since hormonal influences and vascular changes can not be controlled in vivo during ethanol administration, they investigated the effect of ethanol in the isolated perfused liver model. Rat liver from fed animals was perfused with oxygenated KRB at 3 ml/min/g liver for 4 hrs. Since ethanol inhibits proteins synthesis in vitro, protein acceptor pool size was equalized in both ethanol and control perfused livers with 1 mM cycloheximide. /sup 3/H-glucosamine was used to label hepatic secretory glycoproteins in the perfusate. Colchicine, a known inhibitor of protein secretion, impaired the secretion of labeled glycoproteins with a concomitant retention of these export proteins in the liver; therefore, confirming the authors secretory model. Ethanol (50 mM) inhibited the appearance of glucosamine-labeled glycoproteins by 60% into the perfusate as compared to control livers. Pretreatment of animals with cyanamide (an aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibitor) further potentiated this effect of ethanol in the isolated perfused liver. These data suggest that ethanol inhibits hepatic glycoprotein secretion in the isolated liver perfusion model, and this ethanol-induced impairment appears to be mediated by acetaldehyde.

  9. Prediction models of hepatocellular carcinoma development in chronic hepatitis B patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye Won; Ahn, Sang Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Applying the same strategies for antiviral therapy and HCC surveillance to all chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients would be a burden worldwide. To properly manage CHB patients, it is necessary to identify and classify the risk for HCC development in such patients. Several HCC risk scores based on risk factors such as cirrhosis, age, male gender, and high viral load have been used, and have negative predictive values of ≥ 95%. Most of these have been derived from, and internally validated in, treatment-naïve Asian CHB patients. Herein, we summarized various HCC prediction models, including IPM (Individual Prediction Model), CU-HCC (Chinese University-HCC), GAG-HCC (Guide with Age, Gender, HBV DNA, Core Promoter Mutations and Cirrhosis-HCC), NGM-HCC (Nomogram-HCC), REACH-B (Risk Estimation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Chronic Hepatitis B), and Page-B score. To develop a noninvasive test of liver fibrosis, we also introduced a new scoring system that uses liver stiffness values from transient elastography, including an LSM (Liver Stiffness Measurement)-based model, LSM-HCC, and mREACH-B (modified REACH-B). PMID:27729738

  10. TRO40303, a mitochondrial-targeted cytoprotective compound, provides protection in hepatitis models

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, Sophie; Michaud, Magali; Latyszenok, Virginie; Robert, Fabrice; Hocine, Mélanie; Arnoux, Thomas; Gabriac, Mélanie; Codoul, Hélène; Bourhane, Ahmed; de Bellefois, Isabel Clémançon; Afxantidis, Jean; Pruss, Rebecca M

    2015-01-01

    TRO40303 is cytoprotective compound that was shown to reduce infarct size in preclinical models of myocardial infarction. It targets mitochondria, delays mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening and reduces oxidative stress in cardiomyocytes submitted to ischemia/reperfusion in vitro. Because the involvement of the mitochondria and the mPTP has been demonstrated in chronic as well as acute hepatitis, we investigated the potential of TRO40303 to prevent hepatocyte injury. A first set of in vitro studies showed that TRO40303 (from 0.3 to 3 μmol/L) protected HepG2 cells and primary mouse embryonic hepatocytes (PMEH) from palmitate intoxication, a model mimicking steatohepatitis. In PMEH, TRO40303 provided similar protection against cell death due to Jo2 anti-Fas antibody intoxication. Further studies were then preformed in a mouse model of Fas-induced fulminant hepatitis induced by injecting Jo2 anti-Fas antibody. When mice received a sublethal dose of Jo2 at 125 μg/kg, TRO40303 pretreatment prevented liver enzyme elevation in plasma in parallel with a decrease in cytochrome C release from mitochondria and caspase 3 and 7 activation in hepatic tissue. When higher, lethal doses of Jo2 were administered, TRO40303 (10 and 30 mg/kg) significantly reduced mortality by 65–90% when administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) 1 h before Jo2 injection, a time when TRO40303 plasma concentrations reached their peak. TRO40303 (30 mg/kg, i.p.) was also able to reduce mortality by 30–50% when administered 1 h postlethal Jo2 intoxication. These results suggest that TRO40303 could be a promising new therapy for the treatment or prevention of hepatitis. PMID:26236486

  11. An improved model of galactosamine-induced fulminant hepatic failure in the pig.

    PubMed

    Kalpana, K; Ong, H S; Soo, K C; Tan, S Y; Prema Raj, J

    1999-04-01

    Fulminant hepatic failure is a serious condition with very high mortality. Development of new therapies designed to bridge the patient through the acute period of their disease has been hampered by the lack of a large animal model that closely reproduces the changes in humans. We have established an improved model of fulminant hepatic failure in the pig by administration of an aminosugar d-galactosamine hydrochloride. Galactosamine in a dose of 1.0 g/kg was dissolved in 5% dextrose in water (D5W) and given intravenously to seven young pigs weighing 8 to 15 kg. Seven control pigs received an equal volume of D5W alone. Two days prior to injection, a baseline ultrasound-guided liver biopsy was done in each pig under general anesthesia using isofluorane. Clinical data were recorded and blood for laboratory determinations was drawn at 0 h (baseline), 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h after infusion of galactosamine or D5W alone, under general anesthesia. Neurological data were recorded at the same intervals before inducing anesthesia. Galactosamine-treated animals showed 100% mortality. All of them died by 86 h after injection of galactosamine, with death resulting from fulminant hepatic failure characterized by marked increases in total bilirubin, liver enzymes, ammonia, and lactate; associated coagulopathy; hypoglycemia; and coma. Liver histology showed massive hepatocellular necrosis in all seven galactosamine-treated animals. This large and highly reproducible animal model appears promising for future evaluation of bioartificial liver support systems designed to treat fulminant hepatic failure in humans.

  12. Modeling the Health and Economic Burden of Hepatitis C Virus in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Müllhaupt, Beat; Bruggmann, Philip; Bihl, Florian; Blach, Sarah; Lavanchy, Daniel; Razavi, Homie; Semela, David; Negro, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic hepatitis C virus infection is a major cause of liver disease in Switzerland and carries a significant cost burden. Currently, only conservative strategies are in place to mitigate the burden of hepatitis C in Switzerland. This study expands on previously described modeling efforts to explore the impact of: no treatment, and treatment to reduce HCC and mortality. Furthermore, the costs associated with untreated HCV were modeled. Methods Hepatitis C disease progression and mortality were modeled. Baseline historical assumptions were collected from the literature and expert interviews and strategies were developed to show the impact of different levels of intervention (improved drug cure rates, treatment and diagnosis) until 2030. Results Under the historical standard of care, the number of advanced stage cases was projected to increase until 2030, at which point the annual economic burden of untreated viremic infections was projected to reach €96.8 (95% Uncertainty Interval: €36 – €232) million. Scenarios to reduce HCV liver-related mortality by 90% by 2030 required treatment of 4,190 ≥F2 or 3,200 ≥F3 patients annually by 2018 using antivirals with a 95% efficacy rate. Delaying the implementation of these scenarios by 2 or 5 years reduced the impact on mortality to 75% and 57%, respectively. Conclusions With today’s treatment efficacy and uptake rates, hepatitis C disease burden is expected to increase through 2030. A substantial reduction in disease burden can be achieved by means of both higher efficacy drugs and increased treatment uptake. However, these efforts cannot be undertaken without a simultaneous effort to diagnose more infections. PMID:26107467

  13. Hepatitis C virus evasion of adaptive immune responses: a model for viral persistence.

    PubMed

    Burke, Kelly P; Cox, Andrea L

    2010-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects over 170 million people worldwide and is a leading cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Approximately 20% [corrected] of those acutely infected clear the infection, whereas the remaining 80% [corrected] progress to chronic infection. Hepatitis C thus provides a model in which successful and unsuccessful responses can be compared to better understand the human response to viral infection. Our laboratory studies the strategies by which HCV evades the adaptive immune response. This review describes the impact of viral mutation on T cell recognition, the role of cell surface inhibitory receptors in recognition of HCV, and the development of antibodies that neutralize HCV infection. Understanding what constitutes an effective immune response in the control of HCV may enable the development of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines for HCV and other chronic viral infections.

  14. Anti-fibrotic effects of the Masson pine pollen aqueous extract on hepatic fibrosis rat model

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Tao; Jin, Xue-Yuan; Zhao, Lin; Ma, Long; Li, Rui-Sheng; Zhao, Ping; Guo, Chang-Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To observe the antifibrotic effects of Masson Pine Pollen aqueous extract. Methods: Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into control (CG), hepatic fibrosis model (MG), MPPAE low dose (LG), MPPAE high dose (HG), and MPP original powder (MPPOP; OG) groups. Each group was treated with specific protocols and sacrificed 8 weeks later. Multiple indicators such as serum transaminase, HE staining of the liver tissue, and relevant indexes to fibrosis were determined. Results: Severe hyperplasia of fibrous connective tissues was observed in livers of the MG group rats, while aspartate transaminase and alanine transaminase levels and collagen content obviously increased, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities and MMPs expression decreased, malondialdehyde (MDA) and 8-hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine concentrations increased, while mRNA expressions of hepatic stellate cell (HSC)-related cytokines such as transforming growth factor-β1 and platelet-derived growth factor, transcription factors such as nuclear factor-κB p65, and signaling protein α-smooth muscle actin were all increased significantly. Conclusions: MPPAE effectively inhibited the fibrotic process in this CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis rat model. It may be associated with synergic functions of antioxidant activity, inhibitory activity on HSC proliferation, collagen synthesis, and MMPs expression induction. PMID:26191155

  15. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatic cell lines as a new model for host interaction with hepatitis B virus

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Shun; Kakinuma, Sei; Asahina, Yasuhiro; Kamiya, Akihide; Miyoshi, Masato; Tsunoda, Tomoyuki; Nitta, Sayuri; Asano, Yu; Nagata, Hiroko; Otani, Satoshi; Kawai-Kitahata, Fukiko; Murakawa, Miyako; Itsui, Yasuhiro; Nakagawa, Mina; Azuma, Seishin; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Nishitsuji, Hironori; Ujino, Saneyuki; Shimotohno, Kunitada; Iwamoto, Masashi; Watashi, Koichi; Wakita, Takaji; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is not eradicated by current antiviral therapies due to persistence of HBV covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) in host cells, and thus development of novel culture models for productive HBV infection is urgently needed, which will allow the study of HBV cccDNA eradication. To meet this need, we developed culture models of HBV infection using human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocyte lineages, including immature proliferating hepatic progenitor-like cell lines (iPS-HPCs) and differentiated hepatocyte-like cells (iPS-Heps). These cells were susceptible to HBV infection, produced HBV particles, and maintained innate immune responses. The infection efficiency of HBV in iPS-HPCs predominantly depended on the expression levels of sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP), and was low relative to iPS-Heps: however, long-term culture of iPS-Heps was difficult. To provide a model for HBV persistence, iPS-HPCs overexpressing NTCP were established. The long-term persistence of HBV cccDNA was detected in iPS-HPCs overexpressing NTCP, and depended on the inhibition of the Janus-kinase signaling pathway. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that iPS-derived hepatic cell lines can be utilized for novel HBV culture models with genetic variation to investigate the interactions between HBV and host cells and the development of anti-HBV strategies. PMID:27386799

  16. History, ethics, advantages and limitations of experimental models for hepatic ablation

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Seok Ling; Gravante, Gianpiero; Metcalfe, Matthew S; Dennison, Ashley R

    2013-01-01

    Numerous techniques developed in medicine require careful evaluation to determine their indications, limitations and potential side effects prior to their clinical use. At present this generally involves the use of animal models which is undesirable from an ethical standpoint, requires complex and time-consuming authorization, and is very expensive. This process is exemplified in the development of hepatic ablation techniques, starting experiments on explanted livers and progressing to safety and efficacy studies in living animals prior to clinical studies. The two main approaches used are ex vivo isolated non-perfused liver models and in vivo animal models. Ex vivo non perfused models are less expensive, easier to obtain but not suitable to study the heat sink effect or experiments requiring several hours. In vivo animal models closely resemble clinical subjects but often are expensive and have small sample sizes due to ethical guidelines. Isolated perfused ex vivo liver models have been used to study drug toxicity, liver failure, organ transplantation and hepatic ablation and combine advantages of both previous models. PMID:23345935

  17. A preoperative mathematic model for computed tomographic guided microwave ablation treatment of hepatic dome tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bin; Xue, Jing-Bing; Mo, Zhi-Qiang; Zhong, Zhi-Hui; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Fu-Jun; Fan, Wei-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study sought to prospectively evaluate the feasibility and safety of a preoperative mathematic model for computed tomographic(CT) guided microwave(MW) ablation treatment of hepatic dome tumors. Methods This mathematic model was a regular cylinder quantifying appropriate puncture routes from the bottom up. A total of 103 patients with hepatic dome tumors were enrolled and randomly divided into 2 groups based on whether this model was used or not: Group A (using the model; n = 43) versus Group B (not using the model; n = 60). All tumors were treated by CT-guided MW ablation and follow-up contrast CT were reviewed. Results The average number of times for successful puncture, average ablation time, and incidence of right shoulder pain were less in Group A than Group B (1.4 vs. 2.5, P = 0.001; 8.8 vs. 11.1 minutes, P = 0.003; and 4.7% vs. 20%, P = 0.039). The technical success rate was higher in Group A than Group B (97.7% vs. 85.0%, P = 0.032). There were no significant differences between the two groups in primary and secondary technique efficacy rates (97.7% vs. 88.3%, P = 0.081; 90.0% vs. 72.7%, P = 0.314). No major complications occurred in both groups. Conclusion The mathematic model of regular cylinder is feasible and safe for CT-guided MW ablation in treating hepatic dome tumors. PMID:27028994

  18. Ensemble Modeling of Hepatic Fatty Acid Metabolism with a Synthetic Glyoxylate Shunt

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Jason T.; Rizk, Matthew L.; Tan, Yikun; Dipple, Katrina M.; Liao, James C.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The liver plays a central role in maintaining whole body metabolic and energy homeostasis by consuming and producing glucose and fatty acids. Glucose and fatty acids compete for hepatic substrate oxidation with regulation ensuring glucose is oxidized preferentially. Increasing fatty acid oxidation is expected to decrease lipid storage in the liver and avoid lipid-induced insulin-resistance. To increase hepatic lipid oxidation in the presence of glucose, we previously engineered a synthetic glyoxylate shunt into human hepatocyte cultures and a mouse model and showed that this synthetic pathway increases free fatty acid β-oxidation and confers resistance to diet-induced obesity in the mouse model. Here we used ensemble modeling to decipher the effects of perturbations to the hepatic metabolic network on fatty acid oxidation and glucose uptake. Despite sampling of kinetic parameters using the most fundamental elementary reaction models, the models based on current metabolic regulation did not readily describe the phenotype generated by glyoxylate shunt expression. Although not conclusive, this initial negative result prompted us to probe unknown regulations, and malate was identified as inhibitor of hexokinase 2 expression either through direct or indirect actions. This regulation allows the explanation of observed phenotypes (increased fatty acid degradation and decreased glucose consumption). Moreover, the result is a function of pyruvate-carboxylase, mitochondrial pyruvate transporter, citrate transporter protein, and citrate synthase activities. Some subsets of these flux ratios predict increases in fatty acid and decreases in glucose uptake after glyoxylate expression, whereas others predict no change. Altogether, this work defines the possible biochemical space where the synthetic shunt will produce the desired phenotype and demonstrates the efficacy of ensemble modeling for synthetic pathway design. PMID:20409457

  19. Tissue culture and animal models for hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Pietschmann, Thomas; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2003-02-01

    In recent years, significant advances have been achieved both in the development of animal- and tissue-culture models for HCV. Among all the new systems, the small animal model based on transgenic mice with chimeric mouse-human livers and the replicon system will presumably have the most profound impact on future HCV research. Yet, in spite of this progress, much more work will be required to optimizse both systems. In case of the mouse model, breeding homozygous Alb-uPa animals is difficult because of the toxicity of the transgene, and the transplantation of primary human hepatocytes into mice a few days after birth is technically challenging. These are immunodeficient, and, therefore, it will be desirable to furnish them with components of the human immune system in order to expand the applicability of this in vivo model to questions related to pathogenesis. Advances in cryopreservation techniques are urgently needed, moreover, as this would improve the availability of primary hepatocytes and in turn also the accessibility of this small animal model. As regards the replicon system, a number of open questions remain that will hopefully be answered by future research. Why, for instance, has replication in cell culture so far been achieved only with genotype 1b isolates, whereas an isolate with proven infectivity derived from genotype 1a failed to replicate in Huh-7 cells? And why can replicons so far be propagated only in this particular cell line? Is this attributable to the lack of certain inhibitory factors, or the presence of specific activators? What are the mechanisms underlying cell-culture adaptation. and what determines whether a certain Huh-7 cell replicates HCV RNA more efficiently? Finally, the replicon system may also lead the way to the development of systems for efficient virus production in cell culture, and ultimately also a permissive cell line. These developments would at last allow us to model the complete viral life cycle, something researchers

  20. Modeling hepatitis C virus kinetics under therapy using pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic information

    SciTech Connect

    Perelson, Alan S; Shudo, Emi; Ribeiro, Ruy M

    2008-01-01

    Mathematical models have proven helpful in analyzing the virological response to antiviral therapy in hepatitis C virus (HCY) infected subjects. Objective: To summarize the uses and limitations of different models for analyzing HCY kinetic data under pegylated interferon therapy. Methods: We formulate mathematical models and fit them by nonlinear least square regression to patient data in order estimate model parameters. We compare the goodness of fit and parameter values estimated by different models statistically. Results/Conclusion: The best model for parameter estimation depends on the availability and the quality of data as well as the therapy used. We also discuss the mathematical models that will be needed to analyze HCV kinetic data from clinical trials with new antiviral drugs.

  1. Modelling hepatitis C therapy—predicting effects of treatment

    DOE PAGES

    Perelson, Alan S.; Guedj, Jeremie

    2015-06-30

    Mathematically modelling changes in HCV RNA levels measured in patients who receive antiviral therapy has yielded many insights into the pathogenesis and effects of treatment on the virus. By determining how rapidly HCV is cleared when viral replication is interrupted by a therapy, one can deduce how rapidly the virus is produced in patients before treatment. This knowledge, coupled with estimates of the HCV mutation rate, enables one to estimate the frequency with which drug resistant variants arise. Modelling HCV also permits the deduction of the effectiveness of an antiviral agent at blocking HCV replication from the magnitude of themore » initial viral decline. One can also estimate the lifespan of an HCV-infected cell from the slope of the subsequent viral decline and determine the duration of therapy needed to cure infection. The original understanding of HCV RNA decline under interferon-based therapies obtained by modelling needed to be revised in order to interpret the HCV RNA decline kinetics seen when using direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs). In addition, there also exist unresolved issues involving understanding therapies with combinations of DAAs, such as the presence of detectable HCV RNA at the end of therapy in patients who nonetheless have a sustained virologic response.« less

  2. Modelling hepatitis C therapy—predicting effects of treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Perelson, Alan S.; Guedj, Jeremie

    2015-06-30

    Mathematically modelling changes in HCV RNA levels measured in patients who receive antiviral therapy has yielded many insights into the pathogenesis and effects of treatment on the virus. By determining how rapidly HCV is cleared when viral replication is interrupted by a therapy, one can deduce how rapidly the virus is produced in patients before treatment. This knowledge, coupled with estimates of the HCV mutation rate, enables one to estimate the frequency with which drug resistant variants arise. Modelling HCV also permits the deduction of the effectiveness of an antiviral agent at blocking HCV replication from the magnitude of the initial viral decline. One can also estimate the lifespan of an HCV-infected cell from the slope of the subsequent viral decline and determine the duration of therapy needed to cure infection. The original understanding of HCV RNA decline under interferon-based therapies obtained by modelling needed to be revised in order to interpret the HCV RNA decline kinetics seen when using direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs). In addition, there also exist unresolved issues involving understanding therapies with combinations of DAAs, such as the presence of detectable HCV RNA at the end of therapy in patients who nonetheless have a sustained virologic response.

  3. Modelling hepatitis C therapy—predicting effects of treatment

    PubMed Central

    Perelson, Alan S.; Guedj, Jeremie

    2015-01-01

    Mathematically modelling HCV RNA changes measured in patients who receive antiviral therapy has yielded many insights into the pathogenesis and effects of treatment on the virus. By determining how rapidly HCV is cleared when viral replication is interrupted by a therapy, one can deduce how rapidly the virus is produced in patients before treatment. This knowledge, coupled with estimates of the HCV mutation rate, enables one to estimate the frequency with which drug resistant variants arise. Modelling HCV also permits the deduction of antiviral agent effectiveness at blocking HCV replication from the magnitude of the initial viral decline. One can also estimate the lifespan of an HCV infected cell from the slope of the subsequent viral decline and, determine the duration of therapy needed to cure infection. Our understanding of HCV RNA decline under IFN-based therapies needs to be revised in order to understand the HCV RNA decline kinetics seen when using direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs). In this Review, we also discuss the unresolved issues involving understanding therapies with combinations of DAAs, such as whether a sustained virological response necessarily involves elimination of all infected cells PMID:26122475

  4. (18)F-FBHGal for asialoglycoprotein receptor imaging in a hepatic fibrosis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kao, Hao-Wen; Chen, Chuan-Lin; Chang, Wen-Yi; Chen, Jenn-Tzong; Lin, Wuu-Jyh; Liu, Ren-Shyan; Wang, Hsin-Ell

    2013-02-15

    Quantification of the expression of asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR), which is located on the hepatocyte membrane with high-affinity for galactose residues, can help assess ASGPR-related liver diseases. A hepatic fibrosis mouse model with lower asialoglycoprotein receptor expression was established by dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) administration. This study developed and demonstrated that 4-(18)F-fluoro-N-(6-((3,4,5-trihydroxy-6-(hydroxymethyl)tetrahydro-2H-pyran-2-yl)oxy)hexyl)benzamide ((18)F-FBHGal), a new (18)F-labeled monovalent galactose derivative, is an asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR)-specific PET probe in a normal and a hepatic fibrosis mouse models. Immunoassay exhibited a linear correlation between the accumulation of GalH-FITC, a fluorescent surrogate of FBHGal, and the amount of ASGPR. A significant reduction in HepG2 cellular uptake (P <0.0001) was observed using confocal microscopy when co-incubated with 0.5μM of asialofetuin, a well known ASGPR blocking agent. Animal studies showed the accumulation of (18)F-FBHGal in fibrosis liver (14.84±1.10 %ID/g) was appreciably decreased compared with that in normal liver (20.50±1.51 %ID/g, P <0.01) at 30min post-injection. The receptor indexes (liver/liver-plus-heart ratio at 30min post-injection) of hepatic fibrosis mice derived from both microPET imaging and biodistribution study were significantly lower (P <0.01) than those of normal mice. The pharmacokinetic parameters (T(1/2)α, T(1/2)β, AUC and Cl) derived from microPET images revealed prolonged systemic circulation of (18)F-FBHGal in hepatic fibrosis mice compared to that in normal mice. The findings in biological characterizations suggest that (18)F-FBHGal is a feasible agent for PET imaging of hepatic fibrosis in mice and may provide new insights into ASGPR-related liver dysfunction.

  5. (18)F-FBHGal for asialoglycoprotein receptor imaging in a hepatic fibrosis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kao, Hao-Wen; Chen, Chuan-Lin; Chang, Wen-Yi; Chen, Jenn-Tzong; Lin, Wuu-Jyh; Liu, Ren-Shyan; Wang, Hsin-Ell

    2013-02-15

    Quantification of the expression of asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR), which is located on the hepatocyte membrane with high-affinity for galactose residues, can help assess ASGPR-related liver diseases. A hepatic fibrosis mouse model with lower asialoglycoprotein receptor expression was established by dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) administration. This study developed and demonstrated that 4-(18)F-fluoro-N-(6-((3,4,5-trihydroxy-6-(hydroxymethyl)tetrahydro-2H-pyran-2-yl)oxy)hexyl)benzamide ((18)F-FBHGal), a new (18)F-labeled monovalent galactose derivative, is an asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR)-specific PET probe in a normal and a hepatic fibrosis mouse models. Immunoassay exhibited a linear correlation between the accumulation of GalH-FITC, a fluorescent surrogate of FBHGal, and the amount of ASGPR. A significant reduction in HepG2 cellular uptake (P <0.0001) was observed using confocal microscopy when co-incubated with 0.5μM of asialofetuin, a well known ASGPR blocking agent. Animal studies showed the accumulation of (18)F-FBHGal in fibrosis liver (14.84±1.10 %ID/g) was appreciably decreased compared with that in normal liver (20.50±1.51 %ID/g, P <0.01) at 30min post-injection. The receptor indexes (liver/liver-plus-heart ratio at 30min post-injection) of hepatic fibrosis mice derived from both microPET imaging and biodistribution study were significantly lower (P <0.01) than those of normal mice. The pharmacokinetic parameters (T(1/2)α, T(1/2)β, AUC and Cl) derived from microPET images revealed prolonged systemic circulation of (18)F-FBHGal in hepatic fibrosis mice compared to that in normal mice. The findings in biological characterizations suggest that (18)F-FBHGal is a feasible agent for PET imaging of hepatic fibrosis in mice and may provide new insights into ASGPR-related liver dysfunction. PMID:23321012

  6. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Public Home » For Veterans and the Public Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... the Public Veterans and Public Home How is Hepatitis C Treated? Find the facts about the newest ...

  7. Transposon mouse models to elucidate the genetic mechanisms of hepatitis B viral induced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Amy P; Tschida, Barbara R; Lo, Lilian H; Moriarity, Branden S; Rowlands, Dewi K; Largaespada, David A; Keng, Vincent W

    2015-01-01

    The major type of human liver cancer is hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and there are currently many risk factors that contribute to this deadly disease. The majority of HCC occurrences are associated with chronic hepatitis viral infection, and hepatitis B viral (HBV) infection is currently a major health problem in Eastern Asia. Elucidating the genetic mechanisms associated with HBV-induced HCC has been difficult due to the heterogeneity and genetic complexity associated with this disease. A repertoire of animal models has been broadly used to study the pathophysiology and to develop potential treatment regimens for HBV-associated HCC. The use of these animal models has provided valuable genetic information and has been an important contributor to uncovering the factors involved in liver malignant transformation, invasion and metastasis. Recently, transposon-based mouse models are becoming more widely used in liver cancer research to interrogate the genome by forward genetics and also used to validate genes rapidly in a reverse genetic manner. Importantly, these transposon-based rapid reverse genetic mouse models could become crucial in testing potential therapeutic agents before proceeding to clinical trials in human. Therefore, this review will cover the use of transposon-based mouse models to address the problems of liver cancer, especially HBV-associated HCC occurrences in Asia. PMID:26576100

  8. Cohort effects in dynamic models and their impact on vaccination programmes: an example from Hepatitis A

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasa Rao, Arni SR; Chen, Maggie H; Pham, Ba' Z; Tricco, Andrea C; Gilca, Vladimir; Duval, Bernard; Krahn, Murray D; Bauch, Chris T

    2006-01-01

    Background Infection rates for many infectious diseases have declined over the past century. This has created a cohort effect, whereby older individuals experienced a higher infection rate in their past than younger individuals do now. As a result, age-stratified seroprevalence profiles often differ from what would be expected from constant infection rates. Methods Here, we account for the cohort effect by fitting an age-structured compartmental model with declining transmission rates to Hepatitis A seroprevalence data for Canadian-born individuals. We compare the predicted impact of universal vaccination with and without including the cohort effect in the dynamic model. Results We find that Hepatitis A transmissibility has declined by a factor of 2.8 since the early twentieth century. When the cohort effect is not included in the model, incidence and mortality both with and without vaccination are significantly over-predicted. Incidence (respectively mortality) over a 20 year period of universal vaccination is 34% (respectively 90%) higher than if the cohort effect is included. The percentage reduction in incidence and mortality due to vaccination are also over-predicted when the cohort effect is not included. Similar effects are likely for many other infectious diseases where infection rates have declined significantly over past decades and where immunity is lifelong. Conclusion Failure to account for cohort effects has implications for interpreting seroprevalence data and predicting the impact of vaccination programmes with dynamic models. Cohort effects should be included in dynamic modelling studies whenever applicable. PMID:17147828

  9. Dietary folic acid activates AMPK and improves insulin resistance and hepatic inflammation in dietary rodent models of the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Buettner, R; Bettermann, I; Hechtl, C; Gäbele, E; Hellerbrand, C; Schölmerich, J; Bollheimer, L C

    2010-10-01

    The AMP activated kinase plays an important role in metabolic control, and pharmacologic enhancement of AMPK activity is used to improve insulin resistance. We hypothesized that high dose of folic acid supplementation might improve insulin sensitivity and hepatic inflammation and examined this by a dietary intervention in (a) the high fat fed rat model of the metabolic syndrome, which shows sole hepatic steatosis as well as (b) in rats fed with a high cholesterol, high cholate diet inducing nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Male Wistar rats were fed with folic acid supplemented (40 mg/kg) high fat diet [based on lard, fat content 25% (wt/wt)] or NASH inducing diet (containing 15% fat, 1.25% cholesterol, 0.5% sodium cholate). Metabolic profiling was performed by measuring the animals' visceral fat pads, fasting plasma glucose, insulin, and adipokines as well as in vivo insulin tolerance tests. Hepatic steatosis and inflammation were analyzed semiquantitatively by histological analysis. Folic acid supplementation reduced visceral obesity and improved plasma adiponectin levels. In vivo insulin sensitivity was improved, and in HF-FA rats folic acid increased activation of hepatic AMPK. Further, folic acid supplementation improved hepatic inflammation in animals fed with NASH-inducing diet. Dietary folic acid improved parameters of insulin resistance and hepatic inflammation in rodent models. This might be due to an increased AMK activation.

  10. Lactoferrin dampens high-fructose corn syrup-induced hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi-Chieh; Hsieh, Chang-Chi

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome are related obesity, type 2 diabetes/insulin resistance and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Here we investigated how the anti-inflammatory properties of lactoferrin can protect against the onset of hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome by using a murine model administered with high-fructose corn syrup. Our results show that a high-fructose diet stimulates intestinal bacterial overgrowth and increases intestinal permeability, leading to the introduction of endotoxin into blood circulation and liver. Immunohistochemical staining of Toll-like receptor-4 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin indicated that lactoferrin can modulate lipopolysaccharide-mediated inflammatory cascade. The important regulatory roles are played by adipokines including interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and adiponectin, ultimately reducing hepatitis and decreasing serum alanine aminotransferase release. These beneficial effects of lactoferrin related to the downregulation of the lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory cascade in the liver. Furthermore, lactoferrin reduced serum and hepatic triglycerides to prevent lipid accumulation in the liver, and reduced lipid peroxidation, resulting in 4-hydroxynonenal accumulation. Lactoferrin reduced oral glucose tolerance test and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance. Lactoferrin administration thus significantly lowered liver weight, resulting from a decrease in the triglyceride and cholesterol synthesis that activates hepatic steatosis. Taken together, these results suggest that lactoferrin protected against high-fructose corn syrup induced hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:24816278

  11. Lactoferrin dampens high-fructose corn syrup-induced hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi-Chieh; Hsieh, Chang-Chi

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome are related obesity, type 2 diabetes/insulin resistance and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Here we investigated how the anti-inflammatory properties of lactoferrin can protect against the onset of hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome by using a murine model administered with high-fructose corn syrup. Our results show that a high-fructose diet stimulates intestinal bacterial overgrowth and increases intestinal permeability, leading to the introduction of endotoxin into blood circulation and liver. Immunohistochemical staining of Toll-like receptor-4 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin indicated that lactoferrin can modulate lipopolysaccharide-mediated inflammatory cascade. The important regulatory roles are played by adipokines including interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and adiponectin, ultimately reducing hepatitis and decreasing serum alanine aminotransferase release. These beneficial effects of lactoferrin related to the downregulation of the lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory cascade in the liver. Furthermore, lactoferrin reduced serum and hepatic triglycerides to prevent lipid accumulation in the liver, and reduced lipid peroxidation, resulting in 4-hydroxynonenal accumulation. Lactoferrin reduced oral glucose tolerance test and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance. Lactoferrin administration thus significantly lowered liver weight, resulting from a decrease in the triglyceride and cholesterol synthesis that activates hepatic steatosis. Taken together, these results suggest that lactoferrin protected against high-fructose corn syrup induced hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome.

  12. Effect of Green Tea Extract Encapsulated Into Chitosan Nanoparticles on Hepatic Fibrosis Collagen Fibers Assessed by Atomic Force Microscopy in Rat Hepatic Fibrosis Model.

    PubMed

    Safer, Abdel-Majeed A; Hanafy, Nomany A; Bharali, Dhruba J; Cui, Huadong; Mousa, Shaker A

    2015-09-01

    The present study examined the effect of Green Tea Extract (GTE) encapsulated into Chitosan Nanoparticles (CS-NPs) on hepatic fibrosis in rat model as determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The bioactive compounds in GTE encapsulated into CS-NPs were determined using LC-MS/MS method. Additionally, the uptake of GTE-CS NPs in HepG2 cells showed enhanced uptake. In experimental fibrosis model, AFM was used as a high resolution microscopic tool to investigate collagen fibers as an indicator of hepatic fibrosis induced by treatment with CCl4. Paraffin sections of fibrotic liver tissues caused by CC4 treatment of rats and the effect of GTE-CS NPs treatment with or without CCl4 on hepatic fibrosis were examined. Liver tissues from the different groups of animals were de-waxed and processed as for normal H/E staining and Masson's trichrome staining to locate the proper area of ECM collagen in the CCl4 group versus collagen in liver tissues treated with the GTE-CS NPs with or without CCl4. Selected areas of paraffin sections were trimmed off and fixed flat on top of mica and inserted in the AFM stage. H/E staining, Masson's trichrome stained slides, and AFM images revealed that collagen fibers of 250 to 300 nm widths were abundant in the fibrotic liver samples while those of GTE-CS NPs were clear as in the control group. Data confirmed the hypothesis that GTE-CS NPs are effective in removing all the extracellular collagen caused by CCl4 in the hepatic fibrosis rat liver.

  13. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... with hepatitis? How does a pregnant woman pass hepatitis B virus to her baby? If I have hepatitis B, what does my baby need so that she ... Can I breastfeed my baby if I have hepatitis B? More information on viral hepatitis What is hepatitis? ...

  14. Transposon mutagenesis identifies genes driving hepatocellular carcinoma in a chronic hepatitis B mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Bard-Chapeau, Emilie A.; Nguyen, Anh-Tuan; Rust, Alistair G.; Sayadi, Ahmed; Lee, Philip; Chua, Belinda Q; New, Lee-Sun; de Jong, Johann; Ward, Jerrold M.; Chin, Christopher KY.; Chew, Valerie; Toh, Han Chong; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Benoukraf, Touati; Soong, Richie; Bard, Frederic A.; Dupuy, Adam J.; Johnson, Randy L.; Radda, George K.; Chan, Eric CY.; Wessels, Lodewyk FA.; Adams, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The most common risk factor for developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV). To better understand the evolutionary forces driving HCC we performed a near saturating transposon mutagenesis screen in a mouse HBV model of HCC. This screen identified 21 candidate early stage drivers, and a bewildering number (2860) of candidate later stage drivers, that were enriched for genes mutated, deregulated, or that function in signaling pathways important for human HCC, with a striking 1199 genes linked to cellular metabolic processes. Our study provides a comprehensive overview of the genetic landscape of HCC. PMID:24316982

  15. A review of the long-term protection after hepatitis A and B vaccination.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, Pierre; Van Herck, Koen

    2007-03-01

    on early projections of observed antibody levels. However, recent follow-up studies with up to 12 year observation, as well as studies employing mathematical models predict that following primary vaccination, antibodies will persist for at least 25 years. In addition, experimental studies confirm that vaccination against hepatitis A induces immunological memory. Therefore hepatitis A booster vaccination is presently considered as unnecessary in fully vaccinated individuals. The above findings are of importance in the context of administering combined hepatitis A and B vaccine for which similar long-term data have been observed. All available data on monovalent and combined hepatitis A and hepatitis B vaccines indicates that there is no support for a hepatitis A or hepatitis B booster when a complete primary vaccination course is offered to immunocompetent individuals.

  16. Modeling hepatitis C virus transmission among people who inject drugs: Assumptions, limitations and future challenges

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Nick; Hellard, Margaret; McBryde, Emma Sue

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of highly effective hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatments has led to discussion of elimination and intensified interest in models of HCV transmission. In developed settings, HCV disproportionally affects people who inject drugs (PWID), and models are typically used to provide an evidence base for the effectiveness of interventions such as needle and syringe programs, opioid substitution therapy and more recently treating PWID with new generation therapies to achieve specified reductions in prevalence and / or incidence. This manuscript reviews deterministic compartmental S-I, deterministic compartmental S-I-S and network-based transmission models of HCV among PWID. We detail typical assumptions made when modeling injecting risk behavior, virus transmission, treatment and re-infection and how they correspond with available evidence and empirical data. PMID:26305706

  17. Changes of the hepatic proteome in murine models for toxically induced fibrogenesis and sclerosing cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Henkel, Corinna; Roderfeld, Martin; Weiskirchen, Ralf; Berres, Marie-Luise; Hillebrandt, Sonja; Lammert, Frank; Meyer, Helmut E; Stühler, Kai; Graf, Jürgen; Roeb, Elke

    2006-12-01

    We investigated the changes in the hepatic proteome in murine models for toxic-induced fibrogenesis and sclerosing cholangitis. A comprehensive comparison of protein changes observed is made and the mechanistical basis of the expression changes is discussed. Hepatic fibrosis was induced by repetitive intraperitoneal CCl4 treatment of BALB/c mice or developed spontaneously in BALB/c-ATP-binding cassette, subfamily B, member 4 (Abcb4) knock out mice. Fibrosis was verified by a morphometric score and assessment of hydroxyproline content of liver tissue, respectively. The innovative difference in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE) technique was used to analyse protein expression levels of the mouse proteome. Results were confirmed by Western blotting and real-time RT-PCR. In CCl4-induced fibrosis 20 out of 40 and in BALB/c-Abcb4(-/-) mice 8 out of 28 differentially expressed proteins were identified utilizing DIGE. Only two proteins, selenium-binding protein (Sbp2) and carbonic anhydrase 3, have been unidirectionally expressed (i.e. down-regulated) in both models. Relevant differences in the pathogenesis of toxically induced liver fibrosis and sclerosing cholangitis exist. The only novel protein with regard to liver fibrosis depicting a unidirectional expression pattern in both animal models was Sbp2. An explicit protein function could not be clarified yet.

  18. New models of hepatitis E virus replication in human and porcine hepatocyte cell lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) causes acute, enterically-transmitted hepatitis. It is associated with large epidemics in tropical and subtropical regions where it is endemic or with sporadic cases in non-endemic regions. Unlike other hepatitis viruses, HEV has several animal reservoirs. Phylogenetic studie...

  19. Cell Culture Models for the Investigation of Hepatitis B and D Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Verrier, Eloi R.; Colpitts, Che C.; Schuster, Catherine; Zeisel, Mirjam B.; Baumert, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis D virus (HDV) infections are major causes of liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide. Despite the presence of an efficient preventive vaccine, more than 250 million patients are chronically infected with HBV. Current antivirals effectively control but only rarely cure chronic infection. While the molecular biology of the two viruses has been characterized in great detail, the absence of robust cell culture models for HBV and/or HDV infection has limited the investigation of virus-host interactions. Native hepatoma cell lines do not allow viral infection, and the culture of primary hepatocytes, the natural host cell for the viruses, implies a series of constraints restricting the possibilities of analyzing virus-host interactions. Recently, the discovery of the sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP) as a key HBV/HDV cell entry factor has opened the door to a new era of investigation, as NTCP-overexpressing hepatoma cells acquire susceptibility to HBV and HDV infections. In this review, we summarize the major cell culture models for HBV and HDV infection, discuss their advantages and limitations and highlight perspectives for future developments. PMID:27657111

  20. Noninvasive models for assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Da-Wu; Dong, Jing; Liu, Yu-Rui; Jiang, Jia-Ji; Zhu, Yue-Yong

    2016-08-01

    There are approximately 240 million patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection worldwide. Up to 40% of HBV-infected patients can progress to liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma or chronic end-stage liver disease during their lifetime. This, in turn, is responsible for around 650000 deaths annually worldwide. Repeated hepatitis flares may increase the progression of liver fibrosis, making the accurate diagnosis of the stage of liver fibrosis critical in order to make antiviral therapeutic decisions for HBV-infected patients. Liver biopsy remains the "gold standard" for diagnosing liver fibrosis. However, this technique has recently been challenged by the development of several novel noninvasive tests to evaluate liver fibrosis, including serum markers, combined models and imaging techniques. In addition, the cost and accessibility of imaging techniques have been suggested as additional limitations for invasive assessment of liver fibrosis in developing countries. Therefore, a noninvasive assessment model has been suggested to evaluate liver fibrosis, specifically in HBV-infected patients, owing to its high applicability, inter-laboratory reproducibility, wide availability for repeated assays and reasonable cost. The current review aims to present the status of knowledge in this new and exciting field, and to highlight the key points in HBV-infected patients for clinicians. PMID:27547009

  1. Noninvasive models for assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Da-Wu; Dong, Jing; Liu, Yu-Rui; Jiang, Jia-Ji; Zhu, Yue-Yong

    2016-01-01

    There are approximately 240 million patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection worldwide. Up to 40% of HBV-infected patients can progress to liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma or chronic end-stage liver disease during their lifetime. This, in turn, is responsible for around 650000 deaths annually worldwide. Repeated hepatitis flares may increase the progression of liver fibrosis, making the accurate diagnosis of the stage of liver fibrosis critical in order to make antiviral therapeutic decisions for HBV-infected patients. Liver biopsy remains the “gold standard” for diagnosing liver fibrosis. However, this technique has recently been challenged by the development of several novel noninvasive tests to evaluate liver fibrosis, including serum markers, combined models and imaging techniques. In addition, the cost and accessibility of imaging techniques have been suggested as additional limitations for invasive assessment of liver fibrosis in developing countries. Therefore, a noninvasive assessment model has been suggested to evaluate liver fibrosis, specifically in HBV-infected patients, owing to its high applicability, inter-laboratory reproducibility, wide availability for repeated assays and reasonable cost. The current review aims to present the status of knowledge in this new and exciting field, and to highlight the key points in HBV-infected patients for clinicians. PMID:27547009

  2. Characterization of the murine model of schistosomal hepatic periportal fibrosis ('pipestem' fibrosis).

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Z. A.; Cheever, A. W.

    1993-01-01

    During mild (one to two pairs of worms) and prolonged (23 weeks or more) mouse infections with Schistosoma mansoni, but not with S. japonicum, periovular granulomas and fibrosis were seen to be preferentially located along periportal tissues. This caused fibrotic expansion of the portal spaces on a background of normal-looking hepatic parenchyma, a picture mimicking 'clay pipestem fibrosis' seen in human patients with advanced schistosomiasis. The model was reproduced in outbred and in several strains of inbred mice, and their main characteristics were studied and compared to the human counterpart. A balanced consideration of the similarities and differences between the murine model and human pipestem fibrosis is needed for the adequate utilization of this simple, reproducible and inexpensive experimental model. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8499320

  3. Dynamic analysis of a hepatitis B model with three-age-classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Suxia; Zhou, Yicang

    2014-07-01

    Based on the fact that the likelihood of becoming chronically infected is dependent on age at primary infection Kane (1995) [2], Edmunds et al. (1993) [3], Medley et al. (2001) [4], and Ganem and Prince (2004) [6], we formulate a hepatitis B transmission model with three age classes. The reproduction number, R0 is defined and the dynamical behavior of the model is analyzed. It is proved that the disease-free equilibrium is globally stable if R0<1, and there exists at least one endemic equilibrium and that the disease is uniformly persistent if R0>1. The unique endemic equilibrium and its global stability is obtained in a special case. Simulations are also conducted to compare the dynamical behavior of the model with and without age classes.

  4. Modeling viral and drug kinetics: hepatitis C virus treatment with pegylated interferon alfa-2b.

    PubMed

    Powers, Kimberly A; Dixit, Narendra M; Ribeiro, Ruy M; Golia, Preeti; Talal, Andrew H; Perelson, Alan S

    2003-01-01

    Administration of peginterferon alfa-2b plus ribavirin results in an early hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA decay followed by an increase as the drug concentration declines between doses. Upon administration of the next dose 1 week later, the same pattern is observed. We have incorporated pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis into a model of viral dynamics to describe the effect that changes in drug concentration and effectiveness can have on viral levels. To illustrate the relationship between pharmacokinetics and viral dynamics, we fit the model to data from four HCV/human immunodeficiency virus co-infected patients, and obtained good agreement with the measured serum HCV RNA levels. We were able to account for the observed increases in HCV RNA, and estimate virion and drug half-lives that are in agreement with previous reports. Models incorporating pharmacokinetics are needed to correctly interpret viral load changes and estimate drug effectiveness in treatment protocols using peginterferon alfa-2b. PMID:12934163

  5. Hepatic perfusion in a tumor model using DCE-CT: an accuracy and precision study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Errol E.; Chen, Xiaogang; Hadway, Jennifer; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2008-08-01

    In the current study we investigate the accuracy and precision of hepatic perfusion measurements based on the Johnson and Wilson model with the adiabatic approximation. VX2 carcinoma cells were implanted into the livers of New Zealand white rabbits. Simultaneous dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) and radiolabeled microsphere studies were performed under steady-state normo-, hyper- and hypo-capnia. The hepatic arterial blood flows (HABF) obtained using both techniques were compared with ANOVA. The precision was assessed by the coefficient of variation (CV). Under normo-capnia the microsphere HABF were 51.9 ± 4.2, 40.7 ± 4.9 and 99.7 ± 6.0 ml min-1 (100 g)-1 while DCE-CT HABF were 50.0 ± 5.7, 37.1 ± 4.5 and 99.8 ± 6.8 ml min-1 (100 g)-1 in normal tissue, tumor core and rim, respectively. There were no significant differences between HABF measurements obtained with both techniques (P > 0.05). Furthermore, a strong correlation was observed between HABF values from both techniques: slope of 0.92 ± 0.05, intercept of 4.62 ± 2.69 ml min-1 (100 g)-1 and R2 = 0.81 ± 0.05 (P < 0.05). The Bland-Altman plot comparing DCE-CT and microsphere HABF measurements gives a mean difference of -0.13 ml min-1 (100 g)-1, which is not significantly different from zero. DCE-CT HABF is precise, with CV of 5.7, 24.9 and 1.4% in the normal tissue, tumor core and rim, respectively. Non-invasive measurement of HABF with DCE-CT is accurate and precise. DCE-CT can be an important extension of CT to assess hepatic function besides morphology in liver diseases.

  6. UNFEASIBLE EXPERIMENTAL MODEL OF NORMOTHERMIC HEPATIC ISCHEMIA AND REPERFUSION IN RATS USING THE PRINGLE MANEUVER

    PubMed Central

    GOMES, Helbert Minuncio Pereira; SERIGIOLLE, Leonardo Carvalho; RODRIGUES, Daren Athiê Boy; LOPES, Carolina Marques; STUDART, Sarah do Valle; LEME, Pedro Luiz Squilacci

    2014-01-01

    Background The negative result of a research does not always indicate failure, and when the data do not permit a proper conclusion, or are contrary to the initial project, should not simply be discarded and archived. Aim To report failure after performing experimental model of liver ischemia and reperfusion normothermic, continuous or intermittent, in small animals aiming at the study of biochemical and histological parameters after postoperative recovery. Methods Fifteen Wistar rats were divided into three groups of five animals each; all underwent surgery, the abdomen was sutured after the proposed procedures for each group and the animals were observed for 6 h or until they died, and then were reoperated. In Group 1, control (sham-operated): dissection of the hepatic hilum was performed; in Group 2: clamping of the hepatic hilum for 30 m; in Group 3: clamping of the hepatic hilum for 15 m, reperfusion for 5 m and another 15 m of clamping. Data from Groups 2 and 3 were compared with Student's t test. Results All animals of Group 1 survived for 6 h. Two animals in Group 2 died before the 6 h needed to validate the experiment; two did not recover from anesthesia and one survived until the end. In Group 3, four animals died before the 6 h established and one of them survived the required time. Only one animal in Group 2 and one in Group 3 survived and were able to accomplish the study. There was no statistical significance when the results of Groups 2 and 3 were compared (p>0.05). Conclusion The death of six animals before the necessary period of observation turned the initial proposal of the experiment unfeasible. PMID:25184771

  7. Modelling the Impact of Cell-To-Cell Transmission in Hepatitis B Virus

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cell-free virus is a well-recognized and efficient mechanism for the spread of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in the liver. Cell-to-cell transmission (CCT) can be a more efficient means of virus propagation. Despite experimental evidence implying CCT occurs in HBV, its relative impact is uncertain. We develop a 3-D agent-based model where each hepatocyte changes its viral state according to a dynamical process driven by cell-free virus infection, CCT and intracellular replication. We determine the relative importance of CCT in the development and resolution of acute HBV infection in the presence of cytolytic (CTL) and non-CTL mechanisms. T cell clearance number is defined as the minimum number of infected cells needed to be killed by each T cell at peak infection that results in infection clearance within 12 weeks with hepatocyte turnover (HT, number of equivalent livers) ≤3. We find that CCT has very little impact on the establishment of infection as the mean cccDNA copies/cell remains between 15 to 20 at the peak of the infection regardless of CCT strength. In contrast, CCT inhibit immune-mediated clearance of acute HBV infection as higher CCT strength requires higher T cell clearance number and increases the probability of T cell exhaustion. An effective non-CTL inhibition can counter these negative effects of higher strengths of CCT by supporting rapid, efficient viral clearance and with little liver destruction. This is evident as the T cell clearance number drops by approximately 50% when non-CTL inhibition is increased from 10% to 80%. Higher CCT strength also increases the probability of the incidence of fulminant hepatitis with this phenomenon being unlikely to arise for no CCT. In conclusion, we report the possibility of CCT impacting HBV clearance and its contribution to fulminant hepatitis. PMID:27560827

  8. Modelling the Impact of Cell-To-Cell Transmission in Hepatitis B Virus.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Ashish; Murray, John M

    2016-01-01

    Cell-free virus is a well-recognized and efficient mechanism for the spread of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in the liver. Cell-to-cell transmission (CCT) can be a more efficient means of virus propagation. Despite experimental evidence implying CCT occurs in HBV, its relative impact is uncertain. We develop a 3-D agent-based model where each hepatocyte changes its viral state according to a dynamical process driven by cell-free virus infection, CCT and intracellular replication. We determine the relative importance of CCT in the development and resolution of acute HBV infection in the presence of cytolytic (CTL) and non-CTL mechanisms. T cell clearance number is defined as the minimum number of infected cells needed to be killed by each T cell at peak infection that results in infection clearance within 12 weeks with hepatocyte turnover (HT, number of equivalent livers) ≤3. We find that CCT has very little impact on the establishment of infection as the mean cccDNA copies/cell remains between 15 to 20 at the peak of the infection regardless of CCT strength. In contrast, CCT inhibit immune-mediated clearance of acute HBV infection as higher CCT strength requires higher T cell clearance number and increases the probability of T cell exhaustion. An effective non-CTL inhibition can counter these negative effects of higher strengths of CCT by supporting rapid, efficient viral clearance and with little liver destruction. This is evident as the T cell clearance number drops by approximately 50% when non-CTL inhibition is increased from 10% to 80%. Higher CCT strength also increases the probability of the incidence of fulminant hepatitis with this phenomenon being unlikely to arise for no CCT. In conclusion, we report the possibility of CCT impacting HBV clearance and its contribution to fulminant hepatitis. PMID:27560827

  9. Inactivated ORF virus shows antifibrotic activity and inhibits human hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication in preclinical models.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Daniela; Urban, Andreas; Knorr, Andreas; Hirth-Dietrich, Claudia; Siegling, Angela; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Mercer, Andrew A; Limmer, Andreas; Schumak, Beatrix; Knolle, Percy; Ruebsamen-Schaeff, Helga; Weber, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Inactivated orf virus (iORFV), strain D1701, is a potent immune modulator in various animal species. We recently demonstrated that iORFV induces strong antiviral activity in animal models of acute and chronic viral infections. In addition, we found D1701-mediated antifibrotic effects in different rat models of liver fibrosis. In the present study, we compare iORFV derived from two different strains of ORFV, D1701 and NZ2, respectively, with respect to their antifibrotic potential as well as their potential to induce an antiviral response controlling infections with the hepatotropic pathogens hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). Both strains of ORFV showed anti-viral activity against HCV in vitro and against HBV in a transgenic mouse model without signs of necro-inflammation in vivo. Our experiments suggest that the absence of liver damage is potentially mediated by iORFV-induced downregulation of antigen cross-presentation in liver sinus endothelial cells. Furthermore, both strains showed significant anti-fibrotic activity in rat models of liver fibrosis. iORFV strain NZ2 appeared more potent compared to strain D1701 with respect to both its antiviral and antifibrotic activity on the basis of dosages estimated by titration of active virus. These results show a potential therapeutic approach against two important human liver pathogens HBV and HCV that independently addresses concomitant liver fibrosis. Further studies are required to characterize the details of the mechanisms involved in this novel therapeutic principle.

  10. Deterministically patterned biomimetic human iPSC-derived hepatic model via rapid 3D bioprinting.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xuanyi; Qu, Xin; Zhu, Wei; Li, Yi-Shuan; Yuan, Suli; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Justin; Wang, Pengrui; Lai, Cheuk Sun Edwin; Zanella, Fabian; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Sheikh, Farah; Chien, Shu; Chen, Shaochen

    2016-02-23

    The functional maturation and preservation of hepatic cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are essential to personalized in vitro drug screening and disease study. Major liver functions are tightly linked to the 3D assembly of hepatocytes, with the supporting cell types from both endodermal and mesodermal origins in a hexagonal lobule unit. Although there are many reports on functional 2D cell differentiation, few studies have demonstrated the in vitro maturation of hiPSC-derived hepatic progenitor cells (hiPSC-HPCs) in a 3D environment that depicts the physiologically relevant cell combination and microarchitecture. The application of rapid, digital 3D bioprinting to tissue engineering has allowed 3D patterning of multiple cell types in a predefined biomimetic manner. Here we present a 3D hydrogel-based triculture model that embeds hiPSC-HPCs with human umbilical vein endothelial cells and adipose-derived stem cells in a microscale hexagonal architecture. In comparison with 2D monolayer culture and a 3D HPC-only model, our 3D triculture model shows both phenotypic and functional enhancements in the hiPSC-HPCs over weeks of in vitro culture. Specifically, we find improved morphological organization, higher liver-specific gene expression levels, increased metabolic product secretion, and enhanced cytochrome P450 induction. The application of bioprinting technology in tissue engineering enables the development of a 3D biomimetic liver model that recapitulates the native liver module architecture and could be used for various applications such as early drug screening and disease modeling.

  11. Deterministically patterned biomimetic human iPSC-derived hepatic model via rapid 3D bioprinting

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xuanyi; Qu, Xin; Zhu, Wei; Li, Yi-Shuan; Yuan, Suli; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Justin; Wang, Pengrui; Lai, Cheuk Sun Edwin; Zanella, Fabian; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Sheikh, Farah; Chien, Shu; Chen, Shaochen

    2016-01-01

    The functional maturation and preservation of hepatic cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are essential to personalized in vitro drug screening and disease study. Major liver functions are tightly linked to the 3D assembly of hepatocytes, with the supporting cell types from both endodermal and mesodermal origins in a hexagonal lobule unit. Although there are many reports on functional 2D cell differentiation, few studies have demonstrated the in vitro maturation of hiPSC-derived hepatic progenitor cells (hiPSC-HPCs) in a 3D environment that depicts the physiologically relevant cell combination and microarchitecture. The application of rapid, digital 3D bioprinting to tissue engineering has allowed 3D patterning of multiple cell types in a predefined biomimetic manner. Here we present a 3D hydrogel-based triculture model that embeds hiPSC-HPCs with human umbilical vein endothelial cells and adipose-derived stem cells in a microscale hexagonal architecture. In comparison with 2D monolayer culture and a 3D HPC-only model, our 3D triculture model shows both phenotypic and functional enhancements in the hiPSC-HPCs over weeks of in vitro culture. Specifically, we find improved morphological organization, higher liver-specific gene expression levels, increased metabolic product secretion, and enhanced cytochrome P450 induction. The application of bioprinting technology in tissue engineering enables the development of a 3D biomimetic liver model that recapitulates the native liver module architecture and could be used for various applications such as early drug screening and disease modeling. PMID:26858399

  12. Deterministically patterned biomimetic human iPSC-derived hepatic model via rapid 3D bioprinting.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xuanyi; Qu, Xin; Zhu, Wei; Li, Yi-Shuan; Yuan, Suli; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Justin; Wang, Pengrui; Lai, Cheuk Sun Edwin; Zanella, Fabian; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Sheikh, Farah; Chien, Shu; Chen, Shaochen

    2016-02-23

    The functional maturation and preservation of hepatic cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are essential to personalized in vitro drug screening and disease study. Major liver functions are tightly linked to the 3D assembly of hepatocytes, with the supporting cell types from both endodermal and mesodermal origins in a hexagonal lobule unit. Although there are many reports on functional 2D cell differentiation, few studies have demonstrated the in vitro maturation of hiPSC-derived hepatic progenitor cells (hiPSC-HPCs) in a 3D environment that depicts the physiologically relevant cell combination and microarchitecture. The application of rapid, digital 3D bioprinting to tissue engineering has allowed 3D patterning of multiple cell types in a predefined biomimetic manner. Here we present a 3D hydrogel-based triculture model that embeds hiPSC-HPCs with human umbilical vein endothelial cells and adipose-derived stem cells in a microscale hexagonal architecture. In comparison with 2D monolayer culture and a 3D HPC-only model, our 3D triculture model shows both phenotypic and functional enhancements in the hiPSC-HPCs over weeks of in vitro culture. Specifically, we find improved morphological organization, higher liver-specific gene expression levels, increased metabolic product secretion, and enhanced cytochrome P450 induction. The application of bioprinting technology in tissue engineering enables the development of a 3D biomimetic liver model that recapitulates the native liver module architecture and could be used for various applications such as early drug screening and disease modeling. PMID:26858399

  13. Deterministically patterned biomimetic human iPSC-derived hepatic model via rapid 3D bioprinting

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xuanyi; Qu, Xin; Zhu, Wei; Li, Yi-Shuan; Yuan, Suli; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Justin; Wang, Pengrui; Lai, Cheuk Sun Edwin; Zanella, Fabian; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Sheikh, Farah; Chien, Shu; Chen, Shaochen

    2016-01-01

    The functional maturation and preservation of hepatic cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are essential to personalized in vitro drug screening and disease study. Major liver functions are tightly linked to the 3D assembly of hepatocytes, with the supporting cell types from both endodermal and mesodermal origins in a hexagonal lobule unit. Although there are many reports on functional 2D cell differentiation, few studies have demonstrated the in vitro maturation of hiPSC-derived hepatic progenitor cells (hiPSC-HPCs) in a 3D environment that depicts the physiologically relevant cell combination and microarchitecture. The application of rapid, digital 3D bioprinting to tissue engineering has allowed 3D patterning of multiple cell types in a predefined biomimetic manner. Here we present a 3D hydrogel-based triculture model that embeds hiPSC-HPCs with human umbilical vein endothelial cells and adipose-derived stem cells in a microscale hexagonal architecture. In comparison with 2D monolayer culture and a 3D HPC-only model, our 3D triculture model shows both phenotypic and functional enhancements in the hiPSC-HPCs over weeks of in vitro culture. Specifically, we find improved morphological organization, higher liver-specific gene expression levels, increased metabolic product secretion, and enhanced cytochrome P450 induction. The application of bioprinting technology in tissue engineering enables the development of a 3D biomimetic liver model that recapitulates the native liver module architecture and could be used for various applications such as early drug screening and disease modeling. PMID:26858399

  14. Modelling Hepatitis B Virus Antiviral Therapy and Drug Resistant Mutant Strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, Julie; Dix, Trevor; Allison, Lloyd; Bartholomeusz, Angeline; Yuen, Lilly

    Despite the existence of vaccines, the Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is still a serious global health concern. HBV targets liver cells. It has an unusual replication process involving an RNA pre-genome that the reverse transcriptase domain of the viral polymerase protein translates into viral DNA. The reverse transcription process is error prone and together with the high replication rates of the virus, allows the virus to exist as a heterogeneous population of mutants, known as a quasispecies, that can adapt and become resistant to antiviral therapy. This study presents an individual-based model of HBV inside an artificial liver, and associated blood serum, undergoing antiviral therapy. This model aims to provide insights into the evolution of the HBV quasispecies and the individual contribution of HBV mutations in the outcome of therapy.

  15. Zinc supplementation decreases hepatic copper accumulation in LEC rat: a model of Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Blanca P Esparza; Niño Fong, Rodolfo; Gibson, Candace J; Fuentealba, I Carmen; Cherian, M George

    2005-01-01

    The effect of dietary zinc (Zn) supplementation on copper (Cu)-induced liver damage was investigated in Long-Evans Cinnamon rats (LEC), a model for Wilson's disease (WD). Four-week-old LEC (N=64) and control Long-Evans (LE) (N=32) female rats were divided into two groups; one group was fed with a Zn-supplemented diet (group I) and the other was given a normal rodent diet (group II). LEC rats were killed at 6, 8, 10, 12, 18, and 20 wk of age; the LE control rats were killed at 6, 12, 18, and 20 wk of age. Cu concentration in the liver was reduced in LEC rats fed the Zn-supplemented diet compared with LEC rats on the normal diet between 6 and 18 wk of age. Metallothionein (MT) concentration in the livers of LEC rats in group I increased between 12 and 20 wk of age, whereas hepatic MT concentration in LEC rats from group II decreased after 12 wk. Hepatocyte apoptosis, as determined by TUNEL, was reduced in Zn-supplemented LEC rats at all ages. Cholangiocellular carcinoma was observed only in LEC rats in group II at wk 20. These results suggest that Zn supplementation can reduce hepatic Cu concentration and delay the onset of clinical and pathological changes of Cu toxicity in LEC rats. Although the actual mechanism of protection is unknown, it could be explained by sequestration of dietary Cu by intestinal MT, induced by high dietary Zn content.

  16. Berberine Inhibition of Fibrogenesis in a Rat Model of Liver Fibrosis and in Hepatic Stellate Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Xu, Qihe; Tan, Hor Yue; Hong, Ming; Li, Sha; Yuen, Man-Fung; Feng, Yibin

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To examine the effect of berberine (BBR) on liver fibrosis and its possible mechanisms through direct effects on hepatic stellate cells (HSC). Methods. The antifibrotic effect of BBR was determined in a rat model of bile duct ligation- (BDL-) induced liver fibrosis. Multiple cellular and molecular approaches were introduced to examine the effects of BBR on HSC. Results. BBR potently inhibited hepatic fibrosis induced by BDL in rats. It exhibited cytotoxicity to activated HSC at doses nontoxic to hepatocytes. High doses of BBR induced apoptosis of activated HSC, which was mediated by loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and Bcl-2/Bax imbalance. Low doses of BBR suppressed activation of HSC as evidenced by the inhibition of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression and cell motility. BBR did not affect Smad2/3 phosphorylation but significantly activated 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signalling, which was responsible for the transcriptional inhibition by BBR of profibrogenic factors α-SMA and collagen in HSC. Conclusion. BBR is a promising agent for treating liver fibrosis through multiple mechanisms, at least partially by directly targeting HSC and by inhibiting the AMPK pathway. Its value as an antifibrotic drug in patients with liver disease deserves further investigation. PMID:27239214

  17. Costs of a Public Health Model to Increase Receipt of Hepatitis-Related Services for Persons with Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Eric P.; Rosenberg, Stanley D.; Dixon, Lisa B.; Goldberg, Richard W.; Wolford, George; Himelhoch, Seth; Tapscott, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective was to contextualize the costs associated with implementation of a specialized HIV/hepatitis preventive services model designed to reach persons with serious mental illness and co-occurring disorders, an underserved population. Methods Between 2006 and 2008, a random sample of 236 non-elderly, predominantly African American, male participants with serious mental illness and a co-occurring substance use disorder were recruited at four community mental health outpatient programs in a large metropolitan area. All participants had been diagnosed with a psychotic or major depressive disorder. Participants were randomized within site to receive either the experimental intervention Screen, Test, Immunize, Reduce risk, and Refer (STIRR) or enhanced treatment as usual, which consisted of education and referral to medical testing. We estimated STIRR’s standardized costs, the costs of STIRR per person who received hepatitis testing, HIV testing, and/or hepatitis A/B vaccination during the 6-months post-randomization. Results The average cost of delivering the STIRR intervention was $423 (SD±$90) per participant (in 2008 dollars) and the average cost of delivering the eTAU intervention was $24 (SD±$22) per participant (test of difference t=52.9, P<.001). The standardized costs per person who received hepatitis C testing, hepatitis B testing, HIV testing, and hepatitis A/B vaccination were $706 (SD±$165), $776 (SD±$181), $3,630 (SD±$846), and $561 (SD±131). Conclusions The STIRR model’s standardized costs suggest that hepatitis and HIV prevention services delivered in outpatient mental health settings to persons with serious mental illness can be at least as cost-effective as similar interventions designed for other at-risk populations. PMID:23475451

  18. Glutathione protects against hepatic injury in a murine model of primary Sjögren’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shuhua; Hu, Liwei; Ping, Lifeng; Sun, Fengyan; Wang, Xiaolei

    2016-01-01

    Primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS) is a systemic autoimmune disease which may cause complications such as hepatic dysfunction and injury. As an important antioxidant, reduced glutathione (GSH) has been reported protecting against hepatic injury induced by some diseases, but the role of GSH in pSS is poorly understood. This study aims at investigating the role of GSH in hepatic injury during pSS. A murine model of pSS, non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, was used for GSH administration via tail intravenous injection. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was performed to detect serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT), as well as the levels of GSH, tumor necrosis factor, interleukin (IL) 10, integrin alpha M, IL1B, malondialdehyde, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 4, and superoxide dismutases in hepatocyte homogenates. Hematoxylin-eosin staining was performed to observe hepatic histology. The results showed that serum AST and ALT levels were up-regulated in the NOD mice (p = 0.0021 and 0.0048), but were significantly recovered after the GSH administration (p = 0.0081 and 0.0263). The NOD mice exhibited disturbed hepatic tissue structure, which was attenuated by GSH. The GSH administration could also promote the production of GSH in the hepatocytes (p = 0.0264), and control the levels of inflammatory factors and oxidative stress-related factors. These results indicate that GSH has significant effects on protecting against the hepatic injury during pSS, which may be associated with its regulation of the inflammatory factors and oxidative stress-related factors. This study suggests that GSH is a promising therapeutic strategy for controlling hepatic injury during pSS and offers valuable information for further research.

  19. PD-1 Blockage Reverses Immune Dysfunction and Hepatitis B Viral Persistence in a Mouse Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Tzeng, Horng-Tay; Tsai, Hwei-Fang; Liao, Hsiu-Jung; Lin, Yi-Jiun; Chen, Lieping; Chen, Pei-Jer; Hsu, Ping-Ning

    2012-01-01

    Persistent hepatitis B viral (HBV) infection results in chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Recent studies in animal models of viral infection indicate that the interaction between the inhibitory receptor, programmed death (PD)-1, on lymphocytes and its ligand (PD-L1) play a critical role in T-cell exhaustion by inducing T-cell inactivation. High PD-1 expression levels by peripheral T-lymphocytes and the possibility of improving T-cell function by blocking PD-1-mediated signaling confirm the importance of this inhibitory pathway in inducing T-cell exhaustion. We studied T-cell exhaustion and the effects of PD-1 and PD-L1 blockade on intrahepatic infiltrating T-cells in our recently developed mouse model of HBV persistence. In this mouse animal model, we demonstrated that there were increased intrahepatic PD-1-expressing CD8+ and CD4+ T cells in mice with HBV persistence, but PD-1 upregulation was resolved in mice which had cleared HBV. The Intrahepatic CD8+ T-cells expressed higher levels of PD-1 and lower levels of CD127 in mice with HBV persistence. Blockade of PD-1/PD-L1 interactions increased HBcAg-specific interferon (IFN)-γ production in intrahepatic T lymphocytes. Furthermore, blocking the interaction of PD-1 with PD-L1 by an anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) reversed the exhausted phenotype in intrahepatic T lymphocytes and viral persistence to clearance of HBV in vivo. Our results indicated that PD-1 blockage reverses immune dysfunction and viral persistence of HBV infection in a mouse animal model, suggesting that the anti-PD-1 mAb might be a good therapeutic candidate for chronic HBV infection. PMID:22761734

  20. AIC649 Induces a Bi-Phasic Treatment Response in the Woodchuck Model of Chronic Hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Daniela; Weber, Olaf; Ruebsamen-Schaeff, Helga; Tennant, Bud C; Menne, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    AIC649 has been shown to directly address the antigen presenting cell arm of the host immune defense leading to a regulated cytokine release and activation of T cell responses. In the present study we analyzed the antiviral efficacy of AIC649 as well as its potential to induce functional cure in animal models for chronic hepatitis B. Hepatitis B virus transgenic mice and chronically woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) infected woodchucks were treated with AIC649, respectively. In the mouse system AIC649 decreased the hepatitis B virus titer as effective as the "gold standard", Tenofovir. Interestingly, AIC649-treated chronically WHV infected woodchucks displayed a bi-phasic pattern of response: The marker for functional cure--hepatitis surface antigen--first increased but subsequently decreased even after cessation of treatment to significantly reduced levels. We hypothesize that the observed bi-phasic response pattern to AIC649 treatment reflects a physiologically "concerted", reconstituted immune response against WHV and therefore may indicate a potential for inducing functional cure in HBV-infected patients. PMID:26656974

  1. From whole body to cellular models of hepatic triglyceride metabolism: man has got to know his limitations.

    PubMed

    Green, Charlotte J; Pramfalk, Camilla; Morten, Karl J; Hodson, Leanne

    2015-01-01

    The liver is a main metabolic organ in the human body and carries out a vital role in lipid metabolism. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common liver diseases, encompassing a spectrum of conditions from simple fatty liver (hepatic steatosis) through to cirrhosis. Although obesity is a known risk factor for hepatic steatosis, it remains unclear what factor(s) is/are responsible for the primary event leading to retention of intrahepatocellular fat. Studying hepatic processes and the etiology and progression of disease in vivo in humans is challenging, not least as NAFLD may take years to develop. We present here a review of experimental models and approaches that have been used to assess liver triglyceride metabolism and discuss their usefulness in helping to understand the aetiology and development of NAFLD.

  2. From whole body to cellular models of hepatic triglyceride metabolism: man has got to know his limitations

    PubMed Central

    Green, Charlotte J.; Pramfalk, Camilla; Morten, Karl J.

    2014-01-01

    The liver is a main metabolic organ in the human body and carries out a vital role in lipid metabolism. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common liver diseases, encompassing a spectrum of conditions from simple fatty liver (hepatic steatosis) through to cirrhosis. Although obesity is a known risk factor for hepatic steatosis, it remains unclear what factor(s) is/are responsible for the primary event leading to retention of intrahepatocellular fat. Studying hepatic processes and the etiology and progression of disease in vivo in humans is challenging, not least as NAFLD may take years to develop. We present here a review of experimental models and approaches that have been used to assess liver triglyceride metabolism and discuss their usefulness in helping to understand the aetiology and development of NAFLD. PMID:25352434

  3. Early detection of hepatocellular carcinoma co-occurring with hepatitis C virus infection: A mathematical model

    PubMed Central

    Zekri, Abdel-Rahman Nabawy; Youssef, Amira Salah El-Din; Bakr, Yasser Mabrouk; Gabr, Reham Mohamed; Ahmed, Ola Sayed; Elberry, Mostafa Hamed; Mayla, Ahmed Mahmoud; Abouelhoda, Mohamed; Bahnassy, Abeer A

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To develop a mathematical model for the early detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with a panel of serum proteins in combination with α-fetoprotein (AFP). METHODS: Serum levels of interleukin (IL)-8, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor II (sTNF-RII), proteasome, and β-catenin were measured in 479 subjects categorized into four groups: (1) HCC concurrent with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection (n = 192); (2) HCV related liver cirrhosis (LC) (n = 96); (3) Chronic hepatitis C (CHC) (n = 96); and (4) Healthy controls (n = 95). The R package and different modules for binary and multi-class classifiers based on generalized linear models were used to model the data. Predictive power was used to evaluate the performance of the model. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis over pairs of groups was used to identify the best cutoffs differentiating the different groups. RESULTS: We revealed mathematical models, based on a binary classifier, made up of a unique panel of serum proteins that improved the individual performance of AFP in discriminating HCC patients from patients with chronic liver disease either with or without cirrhosis. We discriminated the HCC group from the cirrhotic liver group using a mathematical model (-11.3 + 7.38 × Prot + 0.00108 × sICAM + 0.2574 × β-catenin + 0.01597 × AFP) with a cutoff of 0.6552, which achieved 98.8% specificity and 89.1% sensitivity. For the discrimination of the HCC group from the CHC group, we used a mathematical model [-10.40 + 1.416 × proteasome + 0.002024 × IL + 0.004096 × sICAM-1 + (4.251 × 10-4) × sTNF + 0.02567 × β-catenin + 0.02442 × AFP] with a cutoff 0.744 and achieved 96.8% specificity and 89.7% sensitivity. Additionally, we derived an algorithm, based on a binary classifier, for resolving the multi-class classification problem by using three successive mathematical model predictions of liver disease status. CONCLUSION: Our

  4. Metabolic transformations of dietary polyphenols: comparison between in vitro colonic and hepatic models and in vivo urinary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Vetrani, Claudia; Rivellese, Angela A; Annuzzi, Giovanni; Adiels, Martin; Borén, Jan; Mattila, Ismo; Orešič, Matej; Aura, Anna-Marja

    2016-07-01

    Studies on metabolism of polyphenols have revealed extensive transformations in the carbon backbone by colonic microbiota; however, the influence of microbial and hepatic transformations on human urinary metabolites has not been explored. Therefore, the aims of this study were (1) to compare the in vitro microbial phenolic metabolite profile of foods and beverages with that excreted in urine of subjects consuming the same foodstuff and (2) to explore the role of liver on postcolonic metabolism of polyphenols by using in vitro hepatic models. A 24-h urinary phenolic metabolite profile was evaluated in 72 subjects participating in an 8-week clinical trial during which they were randomly assigned to diets differing for polyphenol content. Polyphenol-rich foods and beverages used in the clinical trial were subjected to human fecal microbiota in the in vitro colon model. Metabolites from green tea, one of the main components of the polyphenol-rich diet, were incubated with primary hepatocytes to highlight hepatic conversion of polyphenols. The analyses were performed using targeted gas chromatography with mass spectrometer (GCxGC-TOFMS:colon model; GC-MS: urine and hepatocytes). A significant correlation was found between urinary and colonic metabolites with C1-C3 side chain (P=.040). However, considerably higher amounts of hippuric acid, 3-hydroxybenzoic acid and ferulic acid were detected in urine than in the colon model. The hepatic conversion showed additional amounts of these metabolites complementing the gap between in vitro colon model and the in vivo urinary excretion. Therefore, combining in vitro colon and hepatic models may better elucidate the metabolism of polyphenols from dietary exposure to urinary metabolites. PMID:27155917

  5. Models and methods for in vitro testing of hepatic gap junctional communication

    PubMed Central

    Willebrords, Joost; Vinken, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Inherent to their pivotal roles in controlling all aspects of the liver cell life cycle, hepatocellular gap junctions are frequently disrupted upon impairment of the homeostatic balance, as occurs during liver toxicity. Hepatic gap junctions, which are mainly built up by connexin32, are specifically targeted by tumor promoters and epigenetic carcinogens. This renders inhibition of gap junction functionality a suitable indicator for the in vitro detection of nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogenicity. The establishment of a reliable liver gap junction inhibition assay for routine in vitro testing purposes requires a cellular system in which gap junctions are expressed at an in vivo-like level as well as an appropriate technique to probe gap junction activity. Both these models and methods are discussed in the current paper, thereby focusing on connexin32-based gap junctions. PMID:26420514

  6. Selective cytoprotective effect of histamine on doxorubicin-induced hepatic and cardiac toxicity in animal models

    PubMed Central

    Lamas, DJMartinel; Nicoud, MB; Sterle, HA; Carabajal, E; Tesan, F; Perazzo, JC; Cremaschi, GA; Rivera, ES; Medina, VA

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to evaluate the potential protective effect of histamine on Doxorubicin (Dox)-induced hepatic and cardiac toxicity in different rodent species and in a triple-negative breast tumor-bearing mice model. Male Sprague Dawley rats and Balb/c mice were divided into four groups: control (received saline), histamine (5 mg/kg for rats and 1 mg/kg for mice, daily subcutaneous injection starting 24 h before treatment with Dox), Dox (2 mg/kg, intraperitoneally injected three times a week for 2 weeks) and Dox+histamine (received both treatments). Tissue toxicity was evaluated by histopathological studies and oxidative stress and biochemical parameters. The combined effect of histamine and Dox was also investigated in vitro and in vivo in human MDA-MB-231 triple-negative breast cancer model. Heart and liver of Dox-treated animals displayed severe histological damage, loss of tissue weight, increased TBARS levels and DNA damage along with an augment in serum creatine kinase-myocardial band. Pretreatment with histamine prevented Dox-induced tissue events producing a significant preservation of the integrity of both rat and mouse myocardium and liver, through the reduction of Dox-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis. Histamine treatment preserved anti-tumor activity of Dox, exhibiting differential cytotoxicity and increasing the Dox-induced inhibition of breast tumor growth. Findings provide preclinical evidence indicating that histamine could be a promising candidate as a selective cytoprotective agent for the treatment of Dox-induced cardiac and hepatic toxicity, and encourage the translation to clinical practice. PMID:27551485

  7. Methods of Liver Stem Cell Therapy in Rodents as Models of Human Liver Regeneration in Hepatic Failure.

    PubMed

    Hashemi Goradel, Nasser; Darabi, Masoud; Shamsasenjan, Karim; Ejtehadifar, Mostafa; Zahedi, Sarah

    2015-09-01

    Cell therapy is a promising intervention for treating liver diseases and liver failure. Different animal models of human liver cell therapy have been developed in recent years. Rats and mice are the most commonly used liver failure models. In fact, rodent models of hepatic failure have shown significant improvement in liver function after cell infusion. With the advent of stem-cell technologies, it is now possible to re-programme adult somatic cells such as skin or hair-follicle cells from individual patients to stem-like cells and differentiate them into liver cells. Such regenerative stem cells are highly promising in the personalization of cell therapy. The present review article will summarize current approaches to liver stem cell therapy with rodent models. In addition, we discuss common cell tracking techniques and how tracking data help to direct liver cell therapy research in animal models of hepatic failure.

  8. Experimental in vitro and in vivo models for the study of human hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Allweiss, Lena; Dandri, Maura

    2016-04-01

    Chronic infection with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) affects an estimate of 240 million people worldwide despite the availability of a preventive vaccine. Medication to repress viral replication is available but a cure is rarely achieved. The narrow species and tissue tropism of the virus and the lack of reliable in vitro models and laboratory animals susceptible to HBV infection, have limited research progress in the past. As a result, several aspects of the HBV life cycle as well as the network of virus host interactions occurring during the infection are not yet understood. Only recently, the identification of the functional cellular receptor enabling HBV entry has opened new possibilities to establish innovative infection systems. Regarding the in vivo models of HBV infection, the classical reference was the chimpanzee. However, because of the strongly restricted use of great apes for HBV research, major efforts have focused on the development of mouse models of HBV replication and infection such as the generation of humanized mice. This review summarizes the animal and cell culture based models currently available for the study of HBV biology. We will discuss the benefits and caveats of each model and present a selection of the most important findings that have been retrieved from the respective systems. PMID:27084033

  9. High Intrinsic Aerobic Capacity Protects against Ethanol-Induced Hepatic Injury and Metabolic Dysfunction: Study Using High Capacity Runner Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Szary, Nicholas; Rector, R Scott; Uptergrove, Grace M; Ridenhour, Suzanne E; Shukla, Shivendra D; Thyfault, John P; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2015-01-01

    Rats artificially selected over several generations for high intrinsic endurance/aerobic capacity resulting in high capacity runners (HCR) has been developed to study the links between high aerobic fitness and protection from metabolic diseases (Wisloff et al., Science, 2005). We have previously shown that the HCR strain have elevated hepatic mitochondrial content and oxidative capacity. In this study, we tested if the elevated hepatic mitochondrial content in the HCR rat would provide "metabolic protection" from chronic ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis and injury. The Leiber-Decarli liquid diet with ethanol (7% v/v; HCR-E) and without (HCR-C) was given to HCR rats (n = 8 per group) from 14 to 20 weeks of age that were weight matched and pair-fed to assure isocaloric intake. Hepatic triglyceride (TG) content and macro- and microvesicular steatosis were significantly greater in HCR-E compared with HCR-C (p < 0.05). In addition, hepatic superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione levels were significantly (p < 0.05) reduced in the HCR-E rats. This hepatic phenotype also was associated with reduced total hepatic fatty acid oxidation (p = 0.03) and β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity (p = 0.01), and reductions in microsomal triglyceride transfer protein and apoB-100 protein content (p = 0.01) in HCR-E animals. However, despite these documented hepatic alterations, ethanol ingestion failed to induce significant hepatic liver injury, including no changes in hepatic inflammation, or serum alanine amino transferase (ALTs), free fatty acids (FFAs), triglycerides (TGs), insulin, or glucose. High intrinsic aerobic fitness did not reduce ethanol-induced hepatic steatosis, but protected against ethanol-induced hepatic injury and systemic metabolic dysfunction in a high aerobic capacity rat model. PMID:26610588

  10. Hepatic 3D spheroid models for the detection and study of compounds with cholestatic liability

    PubMed Central

    Hendriks, Delilah F. G.; Fredriksson Puigvert, Lisa; Messner, Simon; Mortiz, Wolfgang; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Drug-induced cholestasis (DIC) is poorly understood and its preclinical prediction is mainly limited to assessing the compound’s potential to inhibit the bile salt export pump (BSEP). Here, we evaluated two 3D spheroid models, one from primary human hepatocytes (PHH) and one from HepaRG cells, for the detection of compounds with cholestatic liability. By repeatedly co-exposing both models to a set of compounds with different mechanisms of hepatotoxicity and a non-toxic concentrated bile acid (BA) mixture for 8 days we observed a selective synergistic toxicity of compounds known to cause cholestatic or mixed cholestatic/hepatocellular toxicity and the BA mixture compared to exposure to the compounds alone, a phenomenon that was more pronounced after extending the exposure time to 14 days. In contrast, no such synergism was observed after both 8 and 14 days of exposure to the BA mixture for compounds that cause non-cholestatic hepatotoxicity. Mechanisms behind the toxicity of the cholestatic compound chlorpromazine were accurately detected in both spheroid models, including intracellular BA accumulation, inhibition of ABCB11 expression and disruption of the F-actin cytoskeleton. Furthermore, the observed synergistic toxicity of chlorpromazine and BA was associated with increased oxidative stress and modulation of death receptor signalling. Combined, our results demonstrate that the hepatic spheroid models presented here can be used to detect and study compounds with cholestatic liability. PMID:27759057

  11. A molecular thermodynamic model for the stability of hepatitis B capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jehoon; Wu, Jianzhong

    2014-06-01

    Self-assembly of capsid proteins and genome encapsidation are two critical steps in the life cycle of most plant and animal viruses. A theoretical description of such processes from a physiochemical perspective may help better understand viral replication and morphogenesis thus provide fresh insights into the experimental studies of antiviral strategies. In this work, we propose a molecular thermodynamic model for predicting the stability of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids either with or without loading nucleic materials. With the key components represented by coarse-grained thermodynamic models, the theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with experimental data for the formation free energies of empty T4 capsids over a broad range of temperature and ion concentrations. The theoretical model predicts T3/T4 dimorphism also in good agreement with the capsid formation at in vivo and in vitro conditions. In addition, we have studied the stability of the viral particles in response to physiological cellular conditions with the explicit consideration of the hydrophobic association of capsid subunits, electrostatic interactions, molecular excluded volume effects, entropy of mixing, and conformational changes of the biomolecular species. The course-grained model captures the essential features of the HBV nucleocapsid stability revealed by recent experiments.

  12. A molecular thermodynamic model for the stability of hepatitis B capsids

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jehoon; Wu, Jianzhong

    2014-06-21

    Self-assembly of capsid proteins and genome encapsidation are two critical steps in the life cycle of most plant and animal viruses. A theoretical description of such processes from a physiochemical perspective may help better understand viral replication and morphogenesis thus provide fresh insights into the experimental studies of antiviral strategies. In this work, we propose a molecular thermodynamic model for predicting the stability of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids either with or without loading nucleic materials. With the key components represented by coarse-grained thermodynamic models, the theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with experimental data for the formation free energies of empty T4 capsids over a broad range of temperature and ion concentrations. The theoretical model predicts T3/T4 dimorphism also in good agreement with the capsid formation at in vivo and in vitro conditions. In addition, we have studied the stability of the viral particles in response to physiological cellular conditions with the explicit consideration of the hydrophobic association of capsid subunits, electrostatic interactions, molecular excluded volume effects, entropy of mixing, and conformational changes of the biomolecular species. The course-grained model captures the essential features of the HBV nucleocapsid stability revealed by recent experiments.

  13. Diagnostic non-invasive model of large risky esophageal varices in cirrhotic hepatitis C virus patients

    PubMed Central

    Elalfy, Hatem; Elsherbiny, Walid; Abdel Rahman, Ashraf; Elhammady, Dina; Shaltout, Shaker Wagih; Elsamanoudy, Ayman Z; El Deek, Bassem

    2016-01-01

    AIM To build a diagnostic non-invasive model for screening of large varices in cirrhotic hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients. METHODS This study was conducted on 124 post-HCV cirrhotic patients presenting to the clinics of the Endemic Medicine Department at Mansoura University Hospital for evaluation before HCV antiviral therapy: 78 were Child A and 46 were Child B (score ≤ 8). Inclusion criteria for patients enrolled in this study was presence of cirrhotic HCV (diagnosed by either biopsy or fulfillment of clinical basis). Exclusion criteria consisted of patients with other etiologies of liver cirrhosis, e.g., hepatitis B virus and patients with high MELD score on transplant list. All patients were subjected to full medical record, full basic investigations, endoscopy, and computed tomography (CT), and then divided into groups with no varices, small varices, or large risky varices. In addition, values of Fibrosis-4 score (FIB-4), aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI), and platelet count/splenic diameter ratio (PC/SD) were also calculated. RESULTS Detection of large varies is a multi-factorial process, affected by many variables. Choosing binary logistic regression, dependent factors were either large or small varices while independent factors included CT variables such coronary vein diameter, portal vein (PV) diameter, lieno-renal shunt and other laboratory non-invasive variables namely FIB-4, APRI, and platelet count/splenic diameter. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was plotted to determine the accuracy of non-invasive parameters for predicting the presence of large esophageal varices and the area under the ROC curve for each one of these parameters was obtained. A model was established and the best model for prediction of large risky esophageal varices used both PC/SD and PV diameter (75% accuracy), while the logistic model equation was shown to be (PV diameter × -0.256) plus (PC/SD × -0.006) plus (8.155). Values nearing 2 or more denote

  14. Diagnostic non-invasive model of large risky esophageal varices in cirrhotic hepatitis C virus patients

    PubMed Central

    Elalfy, Hatem; Elsherbiny, Walid; Abdel Rahman, Ashraf; Elhammady, Dina; Shaltout, Shaker Wagih; Elsamanoudy, Ayman Z; El Deek, Bassem

    2016-01-01

    AIM To build a diagnostic non-invasive model for screening of large varices in cirrhotic hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients. METHODS This study was conducted on 124 post-HCV cirrhotic patients presenting to the clinics of the Endemic Medicine Department at Mansoura University Hospital for evaluation before HCV antiviral therapy: 78 were Child A and 46 were Child B (score ≤ 8). Inclusion criteria for patients enrolled in this study was presence of cirrhotic HCV (diagnosed by either biopsy or fulfillment of clinical basis). Exclusion criteria consisted of patients with other etiologies of liver cirrhosis, e.g., hepatitis B virus and patients with high MELD score on transplant list. All patients were subjected to full medical record, full basic investigations, endoscopy, and computed tomography (CT), and then divided into groups with no varices, small varices, or large risky varices. In addition, values of Fibrosis-4 score (FIB-4), aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI), and platelet count/splenic diameter ratio (PC/SD) were also calculated. RESULTS Detection of large varies is a multi-factorial process, affected by many variables. Choosing binary logistic regression, dependent factors were either large or small varices while independent factors included CT variables such coronary vein diameter, portal vein (PV) diameter, lieno-renal shunt and other laboratory non-invasive variables namely FIB-4, APRI, and platelet count/splenic diameter. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was plotted to determine the accuracy of non-invasive parameters for predicting the presence of large esophageal varices and the area under the ROC curve for each one of these parameters was obtained. A model was established and the best model for prediction of large risky esophageal varices used both PC/SD and PV diameter (75% accuracy), while the logistic model equation was shown to be (PV diameter × -0.256) plus (PC/SD × -0.006) plus (8.155). Values nearing 2 or more denote

  15. Hepatitis virus panel

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis A antibody test; Hepatitis B antibody test; Hepatitis C antibody test; Hepatitis D antibody test ... or past infection, or immunity to hepatitis A Hepatitis B tests: Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), you have ...

  16. Hepatitis C and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Problems : Hepatitis C Subscribe Translate Text Size Print Hepatitis C What is Hepatitis? Hepatitis means inflammation of the liver. This condition ... our related pages, Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B . Hepatitis C and HIV About 25% of people living ...

  17. Hepatitis B and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Problems : Hepatitis B Subscribe Translate Text Size Print Hepatitis B What is Hepatitis? Hepatitis means inflammation of the liver. This condition ... our related pages, Hepatitis A and Hepatitis C . Hepatitis B and HIV About 10% of people living ...

  18. A Hepatitis C Virus Infection Model with Time-Varying Drug Effectiveness: Solution and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Jessica M.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2014-01-01

    Simple models of therapy for viral diseases such as hepatitis C virus (HCV) or human immunodeficiency virus assume that, once therapy is started, the drug has a constant effectiveness. More realistic models have assumed either that the drug effectiveness depends on the drug concentration or that the effectiveness varies over time. Here a previously introduced varying-effectiveness (VE) model is studied mathematically in the context of HCV infection. We show that while the model is linear, it has no closed-form solution due to the time-varying nature of the effectiveness. We then show that the model can be transformed into a Bessel equation and derive an analytic solution in terms of modified Bessel functions, which are defined as infinite series, with time-varying arguments. Fitting the solution to data from HCV infected patients under therapy has yielded values for the parameters in the model. We show that for biologically realistic parameters, the predicted viral decay on therapy is generally biphasic and resembles that predicted by constant-effectiveness (CE) models. We introduce a general method for determining the time at which the transition between decay phases occurs based on calculating the point of maximum curvature of the viral decay curve. For the parameter regimes of interest, we also find approximate solutions for the VE model and establish the asymptotic behavior of the system. We show that the rate of second phase decay is determined by the death rate of infected cells multiplied by the maximum effectiveness of therapy, whereas the rate of first phase decline depends on multiple parameters including the rate of increase of drug effectiveness with time. PMID:25101902

  19. Transmission of hepatitis B, hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency viruses through unsafe injections in the developing world: model-based regional estimates.

    PubMed Central

    Kane, A.; Lloyd, J.; Zaffran, M.; Simonsen, L.; Kane, M.

    1999-01-01

    Thousands of millions of injections are delivered every year in developing countries, many of them unsafe, and the transmission of certain bloodborne pathogens via this route is thought to be a major public health problem. In this article we report global and regional estimates of the number of hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections that may occur from unsafe injections in the developing world. The estimates were determined using quantitative data on unsafe injection practices, transmission efficiency and disease burden of HBV, HCV and HIV and the prevalence of injection use obtained from a review of the literature. A simple mass-action model was used consisting of a generalized linear equation with variables accounting for the prevalence of a pathogen in a population, susceptibility of a population, transmission efficiency of the pathogen, proportion of injections that are unsafe, and the number of injections received. The model was applied to world census data to generate conservative estimates of incidence of transmission of bloodborne pathogens that may be attributable to unsafe injections. The model suggests that approximately 8-16 million HBV, 2.3-4.7 million HCV and 80,000-160,000 HIV infections may result every year from unsafe injections. The estimated range for HBV infections is in accordance with several epidemiological studies that attributed at least 20% of all new HBV infections to unsafe injections in developing countries. Our results suggest that unsafe injections may lead to a high number of infections with bloodborne pathogens. A major initiative is therefore needed to improve injection safety and decrease injection overuse in many countries. PMID:10593027

  20. Retrospective analysis of hepatitis C infected patients treated through an integrated care model

    PubMed Central

    Levin, James M; Dabirshahsahebi, Shabnam; Bauer, Mindy; Huckins, Eric

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine if our health system’s integrated model reflects sustained virologic response (SVR) outcomes similar to those in clinical trial data, maximizes adherence, and averts drug interactions. METHODS Subjects with chronic hepatitis C had their medical records reviewed from November 1st, 2014 through March 1st, 2016. Patients eligible for treatment were entered into an integrated care model therapy algorithm. The primary outcome was SVR12 based on intention to treat (ITT) analysis. Inclusion criteria consisted of both treatment naïve and experienced patients over the age of 18 who were at least twelve weeks post-therapy completion with any genotype (GT) or METAVIR score. Secondary outcomes included adherence, adverse events, and number of drug interaction interventions. RESULTS At the time of analysis, 133 patients had reached twelve weeks post therapy with ITT. In the ITT analysis 70 patients were GT 1a, 26 GT 1b, 23 could not be differentiated between GT 1a or 1b, 8 GT 2, 4 GT 3, and 2 patients with multiple genotypes. The ITT treatment regimens consisted of 97 sofosbuvir (SOF)/ledipasvir (LDV), 8 SOF/LDV and ribavirin (RBV), 7 SOF and Simeprevir (SMV), 6 3D and RBV, 1 3D, 11 SOF and RBV, and 1 SOF, peg interferon alpha, and RBV. The overall SVR12 rate was 93% in the ITT analysis with a total of 6 patients relapsing. In patients with cirrhosis, 89% obtained SVR12. All 33 patients who were previous treatment failures achieved SVR12. Drug-drug interactions were identified in 56.4% of our patient population, 69 of which required interventions made by the pharmacist. The most common side effects were fatigue (41.4%), headache (28.6%), nausea (18.1%), and diarrhea (8.3%). No serious adverse effects were reported. CONCLUSION Dean Health System’s integrated care model successfully managed patients being treated for hepatitis C virus (HCV). The integrated care model demonstrates high SVR rates amongst patients with different levels of fibrosis, genotypes

  1. A novel in vivo model for evaluating agents that protect against ultraviolet A-induced photoaging.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, T; Uitto, J; Bernstein, E F

    1998-04-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates that ultraviolet A radiation (UVA) contributes to photoaging, which results in the accumulation of massive amounts of abnormal elastic material in the dermis of photoaged skin. To study UVA-induced photoaging in an in vivo system, we utilized a line of transgenic mice containing the human elastin promoter linked to a chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter gene. Our prior work demonstrates promoter activation in response to ultraviolet B radiation (UVB), UVA, and psoralen plus ultraviolet A radiation in the skin of these mice. The addition of psoralen (8-MOP) prior to administration of UVA results in substantial increases in promoter activation, as compared with UVA alone. To demonstrate the utility of these mice as a model of UVA-induced photodamage, we administered four lotions to the skin of our transgenic mice that included: a sunscreen containing octyl methoxycinnamate and benzophenone-3 with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 15, the UVA filter butyl methoxydibenzoylmethane, the SPF 15 sunscreen and the UVA filter together, and the lotion vehicle alone. Following sunscreen administration, mice received a single psoralen plus ultraviolet A radiation treatment. All sunscreens decreased chloramphenicol acetyl transferase activity with the SPF 15 sunscreen, the UVA filter, and the combination SPF 15 sunscreen and UVA filter, resulting in increasing degrees of protection against psoralen plus ultraviolet A radiation. These results demonstrate that this model functions as a rapid and sensitive model of UVA photodamage for the identification and comparison of compounds that protect against UVA-induced photoaging.

  2. Computational design of hepatitis C vaccines using maximum entropy models and population dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Gregory; Ferguson, Andrew

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) afflicts 170 million people and kills 350,000 annually. Vaccination offers the most realistic and cost effective hope of controlling this epidemic. Despite 20 years of research, no vaccine is available. A major obstacle is the virus' extreme genetic variability and rapid mutational escape from immune pressure. Improvements in the vaccine design process are urgently needed. Coupling data mining with spin glass models and maximum entropy inference, we have developed a computational approach to translate sequence databases into empirical fitness landscapes. These landscapes explicitly connect viral genotype to phenotypic fitness and reveal vulnerable targets that can be exploited to rationally design immunogens. Viewing these landscapes as the mutational ''playing field'' over which the virus is constrained to evolve, we have integrated them with agent-based models of the viral mutational and host immune response dynamics, establishing a data-driven immune simulator of HCV infection. We have employed this simulator to perform in silico screening of HCV immunogens. By systematically identifying a small number of promising vaccine candidates, these models can accelerate the search for a vaccine by massively reducing the experimental search space.

  3. Hepatocellular carcinoma mouse models: Hepatitis B virus-associated hepatocarcinogenesis and haploinsufficient tumor suppressor genes

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Yuan-Chi; Shen, Zhao-Qing; Kao, Cheng-Heng; Tsai, Ting-Fen

    2016-01-01

    The multifactorial and multistage pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has fascinated a wide spectrum of scientists for decades. While a number of major risk factors have been identified, their mechanistic roles in hepatocarcinogenesis still need to be elucidated. Many tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) have been identified as being involved in HCC. These TSGs can be classified into two groups depending on the situation with respect to allelic mutation/loss in the tumors: the recessive TSGs with two required mutated alleles and the haploinsufficient TSGs with one required mutated allele. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is one of the most important risk factors associated with HCC. Although mice cannot be infected with HBV due to the narrow host range of HBV and the lack of a proper receptor, one advantage of mouse models for HBV/HCC research is the numerous and powerful genetic tools that help investigate the phenotypic effects of viral proteins and allow the dissection of the dose-dependent action of TSGs. Here, we mainly focus on the application of mouse models in relation to HBV-associated HCC and on TSGs that act either in a recessive or in a haploinsufficient manner. Discoveries obtained using mouse models will have a great impact on HCC translational medicine. PMID:26755878

  4. A Computational Model of Hepatic Energy Metabolism: Understanding Zonated Damage and Steatosis in NAFLD

    PubMed Central

    Ashworth, William B.; Bogle, I. David L.

    2016-01-01

    In non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), lipid build-up and the resulting damage is known to occur more severely in pericentral cells. Due to the complexity of studying individual regions of the sinusoid, the causes of this zone specificity and its implications on treatment are largely ignored. In this study, a computational model of liver glucose and lipid metabolism is presented which treats the sinusoid as the repeating unit of the liver rather than the single hepatocyte. This allows for inclusion of zonated enzyme expression by splitting the sinusoid into periportal to pericentral compartments. By simulating insulin resistance (IR) and high intake diets leading to the development of steatosis in the model, we identify key differences between periportal and pericentral cells accounting for higher susceptibility to pericentral steatosis. Secondly, variation between individuals is seen in both susceptibility to steatosis and in its development across the sinusoid. Around 25% of obese individuals do not show excess liver fat, whilst 16% of lean individuals develop NAFLD. Furthermore, whilst pericentral cells tend to show higher lipid levels, variation is seen in the predominant location of steatosis from pericentral to pan-sinusoidal or azonal. Sensitivity analysis was used to identify the processes which have the largest effect on both total hepatic triglyceride levels and on the sinusoidal location of steatosis. As is seen in vivo, steatosis occurs when simulating IR in the model, predominantly due to increased uptake, along with an increase in de novo lipogenesis. Additionally, concentrations of glucose intermediates including glycerol-3-phosphate increased when simulating IR due to inhibited glycogen synthesis. Several differences between zones contributed to a higher susceptibility to steatosis in pericentral cells in the model simulations. Firstly, the periportal zonation of both glycogen synthase and the oxidative phosphorylation enzymes meant that the

  5. A Computational Model of Hepatic Energy Metabolism: Understanding Zonated Damage and Steatosis in NAFLD.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, William B; Davies, Nathan A; Bogle, I David L

    2016-09-01

    In non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), lipid build-up and the resulting damage is known to occur more severely in pericentral cells. Due to the complexity of studying individual regions of the sinusoid, the causes of this zone specificity and its implications on treatment are largely ignored. In this study, a computational model of liver glucose and lipid metabolism is presented which treats the sinusoid as the repeating unit of the liver rather than the single hepatocyte. This allows for inclusion of zonated enzyme expression by splitting the sinusoid into periportal to pericentral compartments. By simulating insulin resistance (IR) and high intake diets leading to the development of steatosis in the model, we identify key differences between periportal and pericentral cells accounting for higher susceptibility to pericentral steatosis. Secondly, variation between individuals is seen in both susceptibility to steatosis and in its development across the sinusoid. Around 25% of obese individuals do not show excess liver fat, whilst 16% of lean individuals develop NAFLD. Furthermore, whilst pericentral cells tend to show higher lipid levels, variation is seen in the predominant location of steatosis from pericentral to pan-sinusoidal or azonal. Sensitivity analysis was used to identify the processes which have the largest effect on both total hepatic triglyceride levels and on the sinusoidal location of steatosis. As is seen in vivo, steatosis occurs when simulating IR in the model, predominantly due to increased uptake, along with an increase in de novo lipogenesis. Additionally, concentrations of glucose intermediates including glycerol-3-phosphate increased when simulating IR due to inhibited glycogen synthesis. Several differences between zones contributed to a higher susceptibility to steatosis in pericentral cells in the model simulations. Firstly, the periportal zonation of both glycogen synthase and the oxidative phosphorylation enzymes meant that the

  6. A Computational Model of Hepatic Energy Metabolism: Understanding Zonated Damage and Steatosis in NAFLD.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, William B; Davies, Nathan A; Bogle, I David L

    2016-09-01

    In non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), lipid build-up and the resulting damage is known to occur more severely in pericentral cells. Due to the complexity of studying individual regions of the sinusoid, the causes of this zone specificity and its implications on treatment are largely ignored. In this study, a computational model of liver glucose and lipid metabolism is presented which treats the sinusoid as the repeating unit of the liver rather than the single hepatocyte. This allows for inclusion of zonated enzyme expression by splitting the sinusoid into periportal to pericentral compartments. By simulating insulin resistance (IR) and high intake diets leading to the development of steatosis in the model, we identify key differences between periportal and pericentral cells accounting for higher susceptibility to pericentral steatosis. Secondly, variation between individuals is seen in both susceptibility to steatosis and in its development across the sinusoid. Around 25% of obese individuals do not show excess liver fat, whilst 16% of lean individuals develop NAFLD. Furthermore, whilst pericentral cells tend to show higher lipid levels, variation is seen in the predominant location of steatosis from pericentral to pan-sinusoidal or azonal. Sensitivity analysis was used to identify the processes which have the largest effect on both total hepatic triglyceride levels and on the sinusoidal location of steatosis. As is seen in vivo, steatosis occurs when simulating IR in the model, predominantly due to increased uptake, along with an increase in de novo lipogenesis. Additionally, concentrations of glucose intermediates including glycerol-3-phosphate increased when simulating IR due to inhibited glycogen synthesis. Several differences between zones contributed to a higher susceptibility to steatosis in pericentral cells in the model simulations. Firstly, the periportal zonation of both glycogen synthase and the oxidative phosphorylation enzymes meant that the

  7. Transporter-Enzyme Interplay: Deconvoluting Effects of Hepatic Transporters and Enzymes on Drug Disposition Using Static and Dynamic Mechanistic Models.

    PubMed

    Varma, Manthena V; El-Kattan, Ayman F

    2016-07-01

    A large body of evidence suggests hepatic uptake transporters, organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs), are of high clinical relevance in determining the pharmacokinetics of substrate drugs, based on which recent regulatory guidances to industry recommend appropriate assessment of investigational drugs for the potential drug interactions. We recently proposed an extended clearance classification system (ECCS) framework in which the systemic clearance of class 1B and 3B drugs is likely determined by hepatic uptake. The ECCS framework therefore predicts the possibility of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) involving OATPs and the effects of genetic variants of SLCO1B1 early in the discovery and facilitates decision making in the candidate selection and progression. Although OATP-mediated uptake is often the rate-determining process in the hepatic clearance of substrate drugs, metabolic and/or biliary components also contribute to the overall hepatic disposition and, more importantly, to liver exposure. Clinical evidence suggests that alteration in biliary efflux transport or metabolic enzymes associated with genetic polymorphism leads to change in the pharmacodynamic response of statins, for which the pharmacological target resides in the liver. Perpetrator drugs may show inhibitory and/or induction effects on transporters and enzymes simultaneously. It is therefore important to adopt models that frame these multiple processes in a mechanistic sense for quantitative DDI predictions and to deconvolute the effects of individual processes on the plasma and hepatic exposure. In vitro data-informed mechanistic static and physiologically based pharmacokinetic models are proven useful in rationalizing and predicting transporter-mediated DDIs and the complex DDIs involving transporter-enzyme interplay.

  8. Transporter-Enzyme Interplay: Deconvoluting Effects of Hepatic Transporters and Enzymes on Drug Disposition Using Static and Dynamic Mechanistic Models.

    PubMed

    Varma, Manthena V; El-Kattan, Ayman F

    2016-07-01

    A large body of evidence suggests hepatic uptake transporters, organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs), are of high clinical relevance in determining the pharmacokinetics of substrate drugs, based on which recent regulatory guidances to industry recommend appropriate assessment of investigational drugs for the potential drug interactions. We recently proposed an extended clearance classification system (ECCS) framework in which the systemic clearance of class 1B and 3B drugs is likely determined by hepatic uptake. The ECCS framework therefore predicts the possibility of drug-drug interactions (DDIs) involving OATPs and the effects of genetic variants of SLCO1B1 early in the discovery and facilitates decision making in the candidate selection and progression. Although OATP-mediated uptake is often the rate-determining process in the hepatic clearance of substrate drugs, metabolic and/or biliary components also contribute to the overall hepatic disposition and, more importantly, to liver exposure. Clinical evidence suggests that alteration in biliary efflux transport or metabolic enzymes associated with genetic polymorphism leads to change in the pharmacodynamic response of statins, for which the pharmacological target resides in the liver. Perpetrator drugs may show inhibitory and/or induction effects on transporters and enzymes simultaneously. It is therefore important to adopt models that frame these multiple processes in a mechanistic sense for quantitative DDI predictions and to deconvolute the effects of individual processes on the plasma and hepatic exposure. In vitro data-informed mechanistic static and physiologically based pharmacokinetic models are proven useful in rationalizing and predicting transporter-mediated DDIs and the complex DDIs involving transporter-enzyme interplay. PMID:27385183

  9. The study on mechanism of the modified Chinese herbal compound, jianpijiedu, on a mouse model of hepatic carcinoma cachexia

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Baoguo; Luo, Haoxuan; Deng, Liuxiang; Zhang, Shijun; Chen, Zexiong

    2016-01-01

    Various studies have investigated hepatic carcinoma cachexia, however, there is little published information regarding the effect of Chinese Medicine carcinoma cachexia. The present study was performed to investigate the effect of modified Chinese herbal compound jianpijiedu (MJPJD) on a mouse model of ascites-induced hepatic carcinoma cachexia. C57BL/6 mice were randomized to five groups: Control (Group A); xenograft tumor (Group B); low concentration of MJPJD (Group C); high concentration of MJPJD (Group D) and medroxyprogesterone (MPA) combined with indometacin (IND; Group E). The mouse model of ascites-induced hepatic carcinoma cachexia was established by abdominal injection of H22 hepatic carcinoma cells. Subsequently, the body weight, food intake and gastrocnemius weight were recorded, and the levels of interleukin (IL)-lα, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in ascites were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The protein expression levels of muscle RING-finger protein-1 (MU-RF1) and atrogin 1 were detected by western blotting and immunohistochemistry, and the mRNA levels in gastrocnemius were detected by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Compared with the xenograft tumor group, the administration of MJPJD inhibited the increase in body weight and the volume of ascites, the consumption of gastrocnemius was reduced, the net weight of ascites was maintained, the food intake was enhanced and the levels of the cytokines IL-lα, IL-6, TNF-α in ascites and the levels of MU-RF1 and atrogin 1 proteins were reduced. These results indicated that MJPJD delays the pathological process of ascites-induced hepatic carcinoma cachexia, and the mechanism of action may be correlated with a reduction in the levels of IL-lα, IL-6, TNF-α and inhibiting the activation of the ubiquitin proteosome pathway. PMID:27511050

  10. Hepatitis C virus infection and related liver disease: the quest for the best animal model

    PubMed Central

    Mailly, Laurent; Robinet, Eric; Meuleman, Philip; Baumert, Thomas F.; Zeisel, Mirjam B.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) making the virus the most common cause of liver failure and transplantation. HCV is estimated to chronically affect 130 million individuals and to lead to more than 350,000 deaths per year worldwide. A vaccine is currently not available. The recently developed direct acting antivirals (DAAs) have markedly increased the efficacy of the standard of care but are not efficient enough to completely cure all chronically infected patients and their toxicity limits their use in patients with advanced liver disease, co-morbidity or transplant recipients. Because of the host restriction, which is limited to humans and non-human primates, in vivo study of HCV infection has been hampered since its discovery more than 20 years ago. The chimpanzee remains the most physiological model to study the innate and adaptive immune responses, but its use is ethically difficult and is now very restricted and regulated. The development of a small animal model that allows robust HCV infection has been achieved using chimeric liver immunodeficient mice, which are therefore not suitable for studying the adaptive immune responses. Nevertheless, these models allowed to go deeply in the comprehension of virus-host interactions and to assess different therapeutic approaches. The immunocompetent mouse models that were recently established by genetic humanization have shown an interesting improvement concerning the study of the immune responses but are still limited by the absence of the complete robust life cycle of the virus. In this review, we will focus on the relevant available animal models of HCV infection and their usefulness for deciphering the HCV life cycle and virus-induced liver disease, as well as for the development and evaluation of new therapeutics. We will also discuss the perspectives on future immunocompetent mouse models and the hurdles to their development. PMID:23898329

  11. In vivo isolated liver perfusion technique in a rat hepatic metastasis model: 5-fluorouracil concentrations in tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    de Brauw, L M; van de Velde, C J; Tjaden, U R; de Bruijn, E A; Bell, A V; Hermans, J; Zwaveling, A

    1988-02-01

    An in vivo method of isolated rat liver perfusion was developed with true vascular isolation and recirculating perfusate. This new surgical technique to temporarily isolate the liver vascularly, and the perfusion procedure are described in depth. Twelve inbred WAG/RIJ rats were subjected to 25 min of normothermic liver perfusion without chemotherapy, and all rats survived the procedure. Hepatic functional and histological integrity were not significantly altered during perfusion. To determine the role of isolated liver perfusion (ILP) as a means of improved targeting of antitumor agents, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) concentrations were monitored in hepatic tumor and liver tissues and in systemic plasma using high-performance liquid chromatography. Fifty-one rats with hepatic tumors of colonic origin were randomly assigned to one of three dosage groups (20, 40, or 80 mg/kg) receiving 5-FU by ILP, hepatic artery infusion (HAI), or jugular vein infusion (JVI). ILP resulted in significantly increased 5-FU concentrations in liver tissue. However, no significant differences were found in tumor tissue concentrations of 5-FU between the three treatment modalities. 5-FU concentrations in tumor tissue increased as a function of the dose with ILP, HAI, and JVI. ILP was associated with the lowest systemic drug concentrations. The low systemic 5-FU concentrations with ILP suggest a higher maximum tolerable dose. This mode of treatment deserves to be studied further in our model before conclusions can be drawn regarding its therapeutic potential. PMID:3339874

  12. FXR agonist obeticholic acid reduces hepatic inflammation and fibrosis in a rat model of toxic cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Verbeke, Len; Mannaerts, Inge; Schierwagen, Robert; Govaere, Olivier; Klein, Sabine; Vander Elst, Ingrid; Windmolders, Petra; Farre, Ricard; Wenes, Mathias; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Nevens, Frederik; van Grunsven, Leo A.; Trebicka, Jonel; Laleman, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic inflammation drives hepatic stellate cells (HSC), resulting in liver fibrosis. The Farnesoid-X receptor (FXR) antagonizes inflammation through NF-κB inhibition. We investigated preventive and therapeutic effects of FXR agonist obeticholic acid (OCA) on hepatic inflammation and fibrosis in toxic cirrhotic rats. Cirrhosis was induced by thioacetamide (TAA) intoxication. OCA was given during or after intoxication with vehicle-treated rats as controls. At sacrifice, fibrosis, hemodynamic and biochemical parameters were assessed. HSC activation, cell turn-over, hepatic NF-κB activation, pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic cytokines were determined. The effect of OCA was further evaluated in isolated HSC, Kupffer cells, hepatocytes and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC). OCA decreased hepatic inflammation and fibrogenesis during TAA-administration and reversed fibrosis in established cirrhosis. Portal pressure decreased through reduced intrahepatic vascular resistance. This was paralleled by decreased expression of pro-fibrotic cytokines (transforming growth-factor β, connective tissue growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor β-receptor) as well as markers of hepatic cell turn-over, by blunting effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g. monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1). In vitro, OCA inhibited both LSEC and Kupffer cell activation; while HSC remained unaffected. This related to NF-κB inhibition via up-regulated IκBα. In conclusion, OCA inhibits hepatic inflammation in toxic cirrhotic rats resulting in decreased HSC activation and fibrosis. PMID:27634375

  13. FXR agonist obeticholic acid reduces hepatic inflammation and fibrosis in a rat model of toxic cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Verbeke, Len; Mannaerts, Inge; Schierwagen, Robert; Govaere, Olivier; Klein, Sabine; Vander Elst, Ingrid; Windmolders, Petra; Farre, Ricard; Wenes, Mathias; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Nevens, Frederik; van Grunsven, Leo A; Trebicka, Jonel; Laleman, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic inflammation drives hepatic stellate cells (HSC), resulting in liver fibrosis. The Farnesoid-X receptor (FXR) antagonizes inflammation through NF-κB inhibition. We investigated preventive and therapeutic effects of FXR agonist obeticholic acid (OCA) on hepatic inflammation and fibrosis in toxic cirrhotic rats. Cirrhosis was induced by thioacetamide (TAA) intoxication. OCA was given during or after intoxication with vehicle-treated rats as controls. At sacrifice, fibrosis, hemodynamic and biochemical parameters were assessed. HSC activation, cell turn-over, hepatic NF-κB activation, pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic cytokines were determined. The effect of OCA was further evaluated in isolated HSC, Kupffer cells, hepatocytes and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC). OCA decreased hepatic inflammation and fibrogenesis during TAA-administration and reversed fibrosis in established cirrhosis. Portal pressure decreased through reduced intrahepatic vascular resistance. This was paralleled by decreased expression of pro-fibrotic cytokines (transforming growth-factor β, connective tissue growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor β-receptor) as well as markers of hepatic cell turn-over, by blunting effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g. monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1). In vitro, OCA inhibited both LSEC and Kupffer cell activation; while HSC remained unaffected. This related to NF-κB inhibition via up-regulated IκBα. In conclusion, OCA inhibits hepatic inflammation in toxic cirrhotic rats resulting in decreased HSC activation and fibrosis. PMID:27634375

  14. Liver fibrosis impairs hepatic pharmacokinetics of liver transplant drugs in the rat model.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yu-Hong; Liu, Xin; Khlentzos, Alexander M; Asadian, Peyman; Li, Peng; Thorling, Camilla A; Robertson, Thomas A; Fletcher, Linda M; Crawford, Darrell H G; Roberts, Michael S

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to investigate hepatic pharmacokinetics of the four most common drugs (metoprolol, omeprazole, spironolactone, and furosemide) given to patients undergoing liver transplantation before surgery. The investigation was carried out in CCl(4)-induced fibrotic perfused rat livers and the results were compared to those in normal rat liver. Drug outflow fraction-time profiles were obtained after bolus injection into a single-pass-perfused normal or fibrotic rat liver. The pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated using previously developed barrier-limited and space-distributed models. The results showed a marked increase in the liver fibrosis index for CCl(4)-treated rats compared to controls (p<0.05). The extraction ratios (E) for all drugs were significantly lower (p<0.05) in fibrotic than in normal livers and the decrease in E was consistent with the decrease in intrinsic clearance and permeability-surface area product. In addition, other than for furosemide, the mean transit times for all drugs were significantly longer (p<0.01) in the fibrotic livers than in normal livers. Pharmacokinetic model and stepwise regression analyses suggest that these differences arise from a reduction in both the transport of drugs across the basolateral membrane and their metabolic clearance and were in a manner similar to those previously found for another group of drugs.

  15. Mouse Systems to Model Hepatitis C Virus Treatment and Associated Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Mesalam, Ahmed Atef; Vercauteren, Koen; Meuleman, Philip

    2016-01-01

    While addition of the first-approved protease inhibitors (PIs), telaprevir and boceprevir, to pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) and ribavirin (RBV) combination therapy significantly increased sustained virologic response (SVR) rates, PI-based triple therapy for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection was prone to the emergence of resistant viral variants. Meanwhile, multiple direct acting antiviral agents (DAAs) targeting either the HCV NS3/4A protease, NS5A or NS5B polymerase have been approved and these have varying potencies and distinct propensities to provoke resistance. The pre-clinical in vivo assessment of drug efficacy and resistant variant emergence underwent a great evolution over the last decade. This field had long been hampered by the lack of suitable small animal models that robustly support the entire HCV life cycle. In particular, chimeric mice with humanized livers (humanized mice) and chimpanzees have been instrumental for studying HCV inhibitors and the evolution of drug resistance. In this review, we present the different in vivo HCV infection models and discuss their applicability to assess HCV therapy response and emergence of resistant variants. PMID:27338446

  16. Coordinating Role of RXRα in Downregulating Hepatic Detoxification during Inflammation Revealed by Fuzzy-Logic Modeling.

    PubMed

    Keller, Roland; Klein, Marcus; Thomas, Maria; Dräger, Andreas; Metzger, Ute; Templin, Markus F; Joos, Thomas O; Thasler, Wolfgang E; Zell, Andreas; Zanger, Ulrich M

    2016-01-01

    During various inflammatory processes circulating cytokines including IL-6, IL-1β, and TNFα elicit a broad and clinically relevant impairment of hepatic detoxification that is based on the simultaneous downregulation of many drug metabolizing enzymes and transporter genes. To address the question whether a common mechanism is involved we treated human primary hepatocytes with IL-6, the major mediator of the acute phase response in liver, and characterized acute phase and detoxification responses in quantitative gene expression and (phospho-)proteomics data sets. Selective inhibitors were used to disentangle the roles of JAK/STAT, MAPK, and PI3K signaling pathways. A prior knowledge-based fuzzy logic model comprising signal transduction and gene regulation was established and trained with perturbation-derived gene expression data from five hepatocyte donors. Our model suggests a greater role of MAPK/PI3K compared to JAK/STAT with the orphan nuclear receptor RXRα playing a central role in mediating transcriptional downregulation. Validation experiments revealed a striking similarity of RXRα gene silencing versus IL-6 induced negative gene regulation (rs = 0.79; P<0.0001). These results concur with RXRα functioning as obligatory heterodimerization partner for several nuclear receptors that regulate drug and lipid metabolism. PMID:26727233

  17. Coordinating Role of RXRα in Downregulating Hepatic Detoxification during Inflammation Revealed by Fuzzy-Logic Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Maria; Dräger, Andreas; Metzger, Ute; Templin, Markus F.; Joos, Thomas O.; Thasler, Wolfgang E.; Zell, Andreas; Zanger, Ulrich M.

    2016-01-01

    During various inflammatory processes circulating cytokines including IL-6, IL-1β, and TNFα elicit a broad and clinically relevant impairment of hepatic detoxification that is based on the simultaneous downregulation of many drug metabolizing enzymes and transporter genes. To address the question whether a common mechanism is involved we treated human primary hepatocytes with IL-6, the major mediator of the acute phase response in liver, and characterized acute phase and detoxification responses in quantitative gene expression and (phospho-)proteomics data sets. Selective inhibitors were used to disentangle the roles of JAK/STAT, MAPK, and PI3K signaling pathways. A prior knowledge-based fuzzy logic model comprising signal transduction and gene regulation was established and trained with perturbation-derived gene expression data from five hepatocyte donors. Our model suggests a greater role of MAPK/PI3K compared to JAK/STAT with the orphan nuclear receptor RXRα playing a central role in mediating transcriptional downregulation. Validation experiments revealed a striking similarity of RXRα gene silencing versus IL-6 induced negative gene regulation (rs = 0.79; P<0.0001). These results concur with RXRα functioning as obligatory heterodimerization partner for several nuclear receptors that regulate drug and lipid metabolism. PMID:26727233

  18. Activation of farnesoid X receptor attenuates hepatic injury in a murine model of alcoholic liver disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Weibin; Zhu, Bo; Peng, Xiaomin; Zhou, Meiling; Jia, Dongwei; Gu, Jianxin

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •FXR activity was impaired by chronic ethanol ingestion in a murine model of ALD. •Activation of FXR attenuated alcohol-induced liver injury and steatosis. •Activation of FXR attenuated cholestasis and oxidative stress in mouse liver. -- Abstract: Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a common cause of advanced liver disease, and considered as a major risk factor of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Hepatic cholestasis is a pathophysiological feature observed in all stages of ALD. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, and plays an essential role in the regulation of bile acid, lipid and glucose homeostasis. However, the role of FXR in the pathogenesis and progression of ALD remains largely unknown. Mice were fed Lieber-DeCarli ethanol diet or an isocaloric control diet. We used a specific agonist of FXR WAY-362450 to study the effect of pharmacological activation of FXR in alcoholic liver disease. In this study, we demonstrated that FXR activity was impaired by chronic ethanol ingestion in a murine model of ALD. Activation of FXR by specific agonist WAY-362450 protected mice from the development of ALD. We also found that WAY-362450 treatment rescued FXR activity, suppressed ethanol-induced Cyp2e1 up-regulation and attenuated oxidative stress in liver. Our results highlight a key role of FXR in the modulation of ALD development, and propose specific FXR agonists for the treatment of ALD patients.

  19. Ethanol affects hepatitis C pathogenesis: humanized SCID Alb-uPA mouse model.

    PubMed

    Osna, Natalia A; Kharbanda, Kusum K; Sun, Yimin; Simpson, Ronda L; Poluektova, Larisa E; Ganesan, Murali; Wisecarver, James L; Mercer, David F

    2014-07-18

    Alcohol consumption exacerbates the course of hepatitis C viral (HCV) infection, worsens outcomes and contributes to the development of chronic infection that exhibits low anti-viral treatment efficiency. The lack of suitable in vivo models makes HCV-ethanol studies very difficult. Here, we examine whether chimeric SCID Alb-uPA mice transplanted with human hepatocytes and infected with HCV develop worsening pathology when fed ethanol. After 5 weeks of feeding, such mice fed chow+water (control) or chow+20% ethanol in water (EtOH) diets mice developed oxidative stress, decreased proteasome activity and increased steatosis. Importantly, HCV(+) mice in the control group cleared HCV RNA after 5 weeks, while the infection persisted in EtOH-fed mice at the same or even higher levels compared with pre-feeding HCV RNA. We conclude that in chimeric SCID Alb-uPA mice, EtOH exposure causes the complex biochemical and histological changes typical for alcoholic liver injury. In addition, ethanol feeding delays the clearance of HCV RNA thereby generating persistent infection and promoting liver injury. Overall, this model is appropriate for conducting HCV-ethanol studies.

  20. Coordinating Role of RXRα in Downregulating Hepatic Detoxification during Inflammation Revealed by Fuzzy-Logic Modeling.

    PubMed

    Keller, Roland; Klein, Marcus; Thomas, Maria; Dräger, Andreas; Metzger, Ute; Templin, Markus F; Joos, Thomas O; Thasler, Wolfgang E; Zell, Andreas; Zanger, Ulrich M

    2016-01-01

    During various inflammatory processes circulating cytokines including IL-6, IL-1β, and TNFα elicit a broad and clinically relevant impairment of hepatic detoxification that is based on the simultaneous downregulation of many drug metabolizing enzymes and transporter genes. To address the question whether a common mechanism is involved we treated human primary hepatocytes with IL-6, the major mediator of the acute phase response in liver, and characterized acute phase and detoxification responses in quantitative gene expression and (phospho-)proteomics data sets. Selective inhibitors were used to disentangle the roles of JAK/STAT, MAPK, and PI3K signaling pathways. A prior knowledge-based fuzzy logic model comprising signal transduction and gene regulation was established and trained with perturbation-derived gene expression data from five hepatocyte donors. Our model suggests a greater role of MAPK/PI3K compared to JAK/STAT with the orphan nuclear receptor RXRα playing a central role in mediating transcriptional downregulation. Validation experiments revealed a striking similarity of RXRα gene silencing versus IL-6 induced negative gene regulation (rs = 0.79; P<0.0001). These results concur with RXRα functioning as obligatory heterodimerization partner for several nuclear receptors that regulate drug and lipid metabolism.

  1. Differential Fmo3 Gene Expression in Various Liver Injury Models Involving Hepatic Oxidative Stress in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rudraiah, Swetha; Moscovitz, Jamie E.; Donepudi, Ajay C.; Campion, Sarah N.; Slitt, Angela L.; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Manautou, José E.

    2015-01-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenase-3 (FMO3) catalyzes metabolic reactions similar to cytochrome P450 monooxygenase however, most metabolites of FMO3 are considered non-toxic. Recent findings in our laboratory demonstrated Fmo3gene induction following toxic acetaminophen (APAP) treatment in mice.The goal of this study was to evaluate Fmo3gene expression in diverseother mouse models of hepatic oxidative stress and injury. Fmo3 gene regulation by Nrf2 was also investigated using Nrf2 knockout (Nrf2 KO) mice. In our studies, male C57BL/6J mice were treated with toxic dosesof hepatotoxicants or underwent bile duct ligation (BDL, 10d). Hepatotoxicants included APAP (400 mg/kg, 24 to 72h), alpha-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT; 50 mg/kg, 2 to 48h), carbontetrachloride (CCl4;10 or 30 μL/kg, 24 and 48h) and allyl alcohol (AlOH; 30 or 60 mg/kg, 6 and 24h). Because oxidative stress activates nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), additional studies investigated Fmo3 gene regulation by Nrf2 using Nrf2 knockout (Nrf2 KO) mice. At appropriate time-points, blood and liver samples were collected for assessment of plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity, plasma and hepatic bile acid levels, as well as liver Fmo3 mRNA and protein expression. Fmo3 mRNA expression increased significantly by 43-fold at 12h after ANIT treatment,and this increase translates to a 4-fold change in protein levels. BDL also increased Fmo3 mRNA expression by 1899-fold, but with no change in protein levels. Treatment of mice with CCl4decreased liver Fmo3gene expression, whileno change in expression was detected with AlOH treatment. Nrf2 KO mice are more susceptible to APAP (400 mg/kg, 72h) treatment compared to their wild-type (WT) counterparts, which is evidenced by greater plasma ALT activity. Fmo3 mRNA and protein expression increased in Nrf2 KO mice after APAP treatment. Collectively, not all hepatotoxicantsthat produce oxidative stress alter Fmo3gene expression. Along with APAP, toxic ANIT

  2. A proposed predictive model for advanced fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B and its validation.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Kunihiro; Ishii, Akio; Takata, Ryo; Enomoto, Hirayuki; Yoh, Kazunori; Kishino, Kyohei; Shimono, Yoshihiro; Iwata, Yoshinori; Nakano, Chikage; Nishimura, Takashi; Aizawa, Nobuhiro; Sakai, Yoshiyuki; Ikeda, Naoto; Takashima, Tomoyuki; Iijima, Hiroko; Nishiguchi, Shuhei

    2016-08-01

    We created a predictive model using serum-based biomarkers for advanced fibrosis (F3 or more) in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and to confirm the accuracy in an independent cohort.A total of 249 CHB patients were analyzed. To achieve our study aim, a training group (n = 125) and a validation group (n = 124) were formed. In the training group, parameters related to the presence of advanced fibrosis in univariate and multivariate analyses were examined, and a formula for advanced fibrosis was created. Next, we verified the applicability of the predictive model in the validation group.Multivariate analysis identified that gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT, P = 0.0343) and platelet count (P = 0.0034) were significant predictors of the presence of advanced fibrosis, while Wisteria floribunda agglutinin-positive Mac-2-binding protein (WFA-M2BP, P = 0.0741) and hyaluronic acid (P = 0.0916) tended to be significant factors. Using these 4 parameters, we created the following formula: GMPH score = -0.755 - (0.015 × GGT) - (0.268 × WFA-M2BP) + (0.167 × platelet count) + (0.003 × hyaluronic acid). In 8 analyzed variables (WFA-M2BP, aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index, FIB-4 index, prothrombin time, platelet count, hyaluronic acid, Forns index, and GMPH score), GMPH score had the highest area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve for advanced fibrosis with a value of 0.8064 in the training group and in the validation group, GMPH score also had the highest AUROC (0.7782). In all subgroup analyses of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) status (HB surface antigen quantification, HBV-DNA quantification, and HBe antigen seropositivity), GMPH score in F3 or F4 was significantly lower than that in F0 to F2. In the above mentioned 8 variables, differences between the liver fibrosis stages (F0 to F1 vs F2, F2 vs F3, F3 vs F4, F0 to F1 vs F3, F0 to F1 vs F4, and F2 vs F4) for the entire

  3. A proposed predictive model for advanced fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B and its validation

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Kunihiro; Ishii, Akio; Takata, Ryo; Enomoto, Hirayuki; Yoh, Kazunori; Kishino, Kyohei; Shimono, Yoshihiro; Iwata, Yoshinori; Nakano, Chikage; Nishimura, Takashi; Aizawa, Nobuhiro; Sakai, Yoshiyuki; Ikeda, Naoto; Takashima, Tomoyuki; Iijima, Hiroko; Nishiguchi, Shuhei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We created a predictive model using serum-based biomarkers for advanced fibrosis (F3 or more) in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and to confirm the accuracy in an independent cohort. A total of 249 CHB patients were analyzed. To achieve our study aim, a training group (n = 125) and a validation group (n = 124) were formed. In the training group, parameters related to the presence of advanced fibrosis in univariate and multivariate analyses were examined, and a formula for advanced fibrosis was created. Next, we verified the applicability of the predictive model in the validation group. Multivariate analysis identified that gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT, P = 0.0343) and platelet count (P = 0.0034) were significant predictors of the presence of advanced fibrosis, while Wisteria floribunda agglutinin-positive Mac-2-binding protein (WFA+-M2BP, P = 0.0741) and hyaluronic acid (P = 0.0916) tended to be significant factors. Using these 4 parameters, we created the following formula: GMPH score = −0.755 − (0.015 × GGT) − (0.268 × WFA+-M2BP) + (0.167 × platelet count) + (0.003 × hyaluronic acid). In 8 analyzed variables (WFA+-M2BP, aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index, FIB-4 index, prothrombin time, platelet count, hyaluronic acid, Forns index, and GMPH score), GMPH score had the highest area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve for advanced fibrosis with a value of 0.8064 in the training group and in the validation group, GMPH score also had the highest AUROC (0.7782). In all subgroup analyses of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) status (HB surface antigen quantification, HBV-DNA quantification, and HBe antigen seropositivity), GMPH score in F3 or F4 was significantly lower than that in F0 to F2. In the above mentioned 8 variables, differences between the liver fibrosis stages (F0 to F1 vs F2, F2 vs F3, F3 vs F4, F0 to F1 vs F3, F0 to F1 vs F4, and F2 vs

  4. Induction of Hepatic and Endothelial Differentiation by Perfusion in a Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Model of Human Fetal Liver

    PubMed Central

    Pekor, Christopher; Gerlach, Jörg C.; Nettleship, Ian

    2015-01-01

    The development of functional engineered tissue constructs depends on high cell densities and appropriate vascularization. In this study we implemented a four-compartment three-dimensional perfusion bioreactor culture model for studying the effects of medium perfusion on endothelial, hepatic, and hematopoietic cell populations of primary human fetal liver in an in vivo-like environment. Human fetal liver cells were cultured in bioreactors configured to provide either perfusion or diffusion conditions. Metabolic activities of the cultures were monitored daily by measuring glucose consumption and lactate production. Cell viability during culture was analyzed by lactate dehydrogenase activity. Hepatic functionality was determined by the release of albumin and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) in culture medium samples. After 4 days of culture, cells were analyzed for the expression of a variety of endothelial, hepatic, and hematopoietic genes, as well as the surface marker expression of CD31 and CD34 in flow cytometry. We found that medium perfusion increased the gene expression of endothelial markers such as CD31, von Willebrand factor (vWF), CD140b, CD309, and CD144 while decreasing the gene expression of the erythrocyte-surface marker CD235a. Hepatic differentiation was promoted under perfusion conditions as demonstrated by lower AFP and higher albumin secretion compared with cultures not exposed to medium perfusion. Additionally, cultures exposed to medium perfusion gave higher rates of glucose consumption and lactate production, indicating increased metabolic activity. In conclusion, high-density bioreactors configured to provide constant medium perfusion significantly induced hepatic and endothelial cell differentiation and provided improved conditions for the culture of human fetal liver cells compared with cultures without perfusion. PMID:25559936

  5. Histopathological characteristics of glutamine synthetase-positive hepatic tumor lesions in a mouse model of spontaneous metabolic syndrome (TSOD mouse)

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Tetsuyuki; Nishida, Takeshi; Baba, Hayato; Hatta, Hideki; Imura, Johji; Sutoh, Mitsuko; Toyohara, Syunji; Hokao, Ryoji; Watanabe, Syunsuke; Ogawa, Hirohisa; Uehara, Hisanori; Tsuneyama, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that Tsumura-Suzuki obese diabetic (TSOD) mice, a polygenic model of spontaneous type 2 diabetes, is a valuable model of hepatic carcinogenesis via non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). One of the characteristics of tumors in these mice is the diffuse expression of glutamine synthetase (GS), which is a diagnostic marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this study, we performed detailed histopathological examinations and found that GS expression was diffusely positive in >70% of the hepatic tumors from 15-month-old male TSOD mice. Translocation of β-catenin into nuclei with enhanced membranous expression also occurred in GS-positive tumors. Small lesions (<1 mm) in GS-positive cases exhibited dysplastic nodules, with severe nuclear atypia, whereas large lesions (>3 mm) bore the characteristics of human HCC, exhibiting nuclear and structural atypia with invasive growth. By contrast, the majority of GS-negative tumors were hepatocellular adenomas with advanced fatty change and low nuclear grade. In GS-negative tumors, loss of liver fatty acid-binding protein expression was observed. These results suggest that the histological characteristics of GS-positive hepatic tumors in TSOD mice resemble human HCC; thus, this model may be a useful tool in translational research targeting the NAFLD/NASH-HCC sequence. PMID:27446562

  6. Comparison of dual- and triple-freeze protocols for hepatic cryoablation in a Tibet pig model.

    PubMed

    Li, Jialiang; Chen, Jibing; Zhou, Liang; Zeng, Jianying; Yao, Fei; Wu, Binghui; Fang, Gang; Deng, Chunjuan; Chen, Zhixian; Leng, Yin; Xu, Keqiang; Niu, Lizhi; Zuo, Jiansheng; Xu, Kecheng

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare a dual-freeze protocol with a triple-freeze protocol for hepatic cryoablation in a porcine model. Eighteen cryoablations were performed over an exposed operation field in nine normal porcine livers, using dual- (10-5-10-5) and triple-freeze (5-5-5-5-10-5) protocols. Changes in the temperature of the cryoprobes and the diameter of the iceballs were recorded during the ablation, and pathological changes in the cryozones (zones of tissue destruction) were assessed seven days after the procedure. Use of two and three freeze-thaw cycles produced iceballs of different diameters. Seven days after cryosurgery, the triple-freeze protocol was associated with a larger zone of complete necrosis than the dual-freeze protocol, although the two protocols produced cryozones and cryolesions of similar length, and in both cases the cryozones contained five areas of destruction. With the same freezing time (20 min), the triple-freeze protocol may be a more powerful liver ablation method than the dual-freeze protocol.

  7. Optical fluorescence spectroscopy to detect hepatic necrosis after normothermic ischemia: animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Renan A.; Vollet-Filho, Jose D.; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Fernandez, Jorge L.; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Castro-e-Silva, Orlando; Sankarankutty, Ajith K.

    2015-06-01

    Liver transplantation is a well-established treatment for liver failure. However, the success of the transplantation procedure depends on liver graft conditions. The tissue function evaluation during the several transplantation stages is relevant, in particular during the organ harvesting, when a decision is made concerning the viability of the graft. Optical fluorescence spectroscopy is a good option because it is a noninvasive and fast technique. A partial normothermic hepatic ischemia was performed in rat livers, with a vascular occlusion of both median and left lateral lobes, allowing circulation only for the right lateral lobe and the caudate lobe. Fluorescence spectra under excitation at 532 nm (doubled frequency Nd:YAG laser) were collected using a portable spectrometer (USB2000, Ocean Optics, USA). The fluorescence emission was collected before vascular occlusion, after ischemia, and 24 hours after reperfusion. A morphometric histology analysis was performed as the gold standard evaluation - liver samples were analyzed, and the percentage of necrotic tissue was obtained. The results showed that changes in the fluorescence emission after ischemia can be correlated with the amount of necrosis evaluated by a morphometric analysis, the Pearson correlation coefficient of the generated model was 0.90 and the root mean square error was around 20%. In this context, the laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy technique after normothermic ischemia showed to be a fast and efficient method to differentiate ischemic injury from viable tissues.

  8. Effect of bovine lactoferrin in a therapeutic hamster model of hepatic amoebiasis.

    PubMed

    Ordaz-Pichardo, Cynthia; León-Sicairos, Nidia; Hernández-Ramírez, Verónica Ivonne; Talamás-Rohana, Patricia; de la Garza, Mireya

    2012-06-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the causative agent of amoebiasis, a disease that produces dysentery as a result of the perforation of the large intestine. This parasite often invades other organs, primarily the liver, leading to an amoebic liver abscess (ALA), which can cause death. Metronidazole is the drug of choice for the treatment of ALA; however, it produces toxic side effects in patients. Lactoferrin (Lf) is a glycoprotein of the innate immune response that sequesters iron in the mucosae. Lf possesses immune-regulatory properties, such as antiinflammatory and antioxidant activities. Moreover, the microbicidal activity of apoLf, which lacks bound iron, has been shown. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of bovine Lf (bLf) against ALA in a model of hepatic amoebiasis in hamsters. Interestingly, hamsters treated intragastrically with Lf (2.5 mg/100 g mass) over a period of 8 days showed no clinical signs of disease and ALA was effectively decreased, with only 0.63% detectable lesion, compared with 63% in untreated animals. Furthermore, liver function and blood cells approached normal levels among those receiving bLf treatment. These results suggest that bLf may aid in the therapy of amoebiasis, likely without producing undesirable effects in patients. PMID:22332957

  9. Effect of bovine lactoferrin in a therapeutic hamster model of hepatic amoebiasis.

    PubMed

    Ordaz-Pichardo, Cynthia; León-Sicairos, Nidia; Hernández-Ramírez, Verónica Ivonne; Talamás-Rohana, Patricia; de la Garza, Mireya

    2012-06-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the causative agent of amoebiasis, a disease that produces dysentery as a result of the perforation of the large intestine. This parasite often invades other organs, primarily the liver, leading to an amoebic liver abscess (ALA), which can cause death. Metronidazole is the drug of choice for the treatment of ALA; however, it produces toxic side effects in patients. Lactoferrin (Lf) is a glycoprotein of the innate immune response that sequesters iron in the mucosae. Lf possesses immune-regulatory properties, such as antiinflammatory and antioxidant activities. Moreover, the microbicidal activity of apoLf, which lacks bound iron, has been shown. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of bovine Lf (bLf) against ALA in a model of hepatic amoebiasis in hamsters. Interestingly, hamsters treated intragastrically with Lf (2.5 mg/100 g mass) over a period of 8 days showed no clinical signs of disease and ALA was effectively decreased, with only 0.63% detectable lesion, compared with 63% in untreated animals. Furthermore, liver function and blood cells approached normal levels among those receiving bLf treatment. These results suggest that bLf may aid in the therapy of amoebiasis, likely without producing undesirable effects in patients.

  10. Role of dopaminergic and serotonergic neurotransmitters in behavioral alterations observed in rodent model of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Dhanda, Saurabh; Sandhir, Rajat

    2015-06-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the role of biogenic amines in behavioral alterations observed in rat model of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) following bile duct ligation (BDL). Male Wistar rats subjected to BDL developed biliary fibrosis after four weeks which was supported by altered liver function tests, increased ammonia levels and histological staining (Sirius red). Animals were assessed for their behavioral performance in terms of cognitive, anxiety and motor functions. The levels of dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT), epinephrine and norepinephrine (NE) were estimated in different regions of brain viz. cortex, hippocampus, striatum and cerebellum using HPLC along with activity of monoamine oxidase (MAO). Cognitive assessment of BDL rats revealed a progressive decline in learning, memory formation, retrieval, exploration of novel environment and spontaneous locomotor activity along with decrease in 5-HT and NE levels. This was accompanied by an increase in MAO activity. Motor functions of BDL rats were also altered which were evident from decrease in the time spent on the rotating rod and higher foot faults assessed using narrow beam walk task. A global decrease was observed in the DA content along with an increase in MAO activity. Histopathological studies using hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) and cresyl violet exhibited marked neuronal degeneration, wherein neurons appeared more pyknotic, condensed and damaged. The results reveal that dopaminergic and serotonergic pathways are disturbed in chronic liver failure post-BDL which may be responsible for behavioral impairments observed in HE. PMID:25639545

  11. Anti-hepatitis C virus potency of a new autophagy inhibitor using human liver slices model

    PubMed Central

    Lagaye, Sylvie; Brun, Sonia; Gaston, Jesintha; Shen, Hong; Stranska, Ruzena; Camus, Claire; Dubray, Clarisse; Rousseau, Géraldine; Massault, Pierre-Philippe; Courcambeck, Jerôme; Bassisi, Firas; Halfon, Philippe; Pol, Stanislas

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the antiviral potency of a new anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) antiviral agent targeting the cellular autophagy machinery. METHODS: Non-infected liver slices, obtained from human liver resection and cut in 350 μm-thick slices (2.7 × 106 cells per slice) were infected with cell culture-grown HCV Con1b/C3 supernatant (multiplicity of infection = 0.1) cultivated for up to ten days. HCV infected slices were treated at day 4 post-infection with GNS-396 for 6 d at different concentrations. HCV replication was evaluated by strand-specific real-time quantitative reverse transcription - polymerase chain reaction. The infectivity titers of supernatants were evaluated by foci formation upon inoculation into naive Huh-7.5.1 cells. The cytotoxic effect of the drugs was evaluated by lactate dehydrogenase leakage assays. RESULTS: The antiviral efficacy of a new antiviral drug, GNS-396, an autophagy inhibitor, on HCV infection of adult human liver slices was evidenced in a dose-dependent manner. At day 6 post-treatment, GNS-396 EC50 was 158 nmol/L without cytotoxic effect (compared to hydroxychloroquine EC50 = 1.17 μmol/L). CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrated that our ex vivo model is efficient for evaluation the potency of autophagy inhibitors, in particular a new quinoline derivative GNS-396 as antiviral could inhibit HCV infection in a dose-dependent manner without cytotoxic effect. PMID:27478540

  12. Modeling chronic hepatitis B or C virus infection during antiviral therapy using an analogy to enzyme kinetics: long-term viral dynamics without rebound and oscillation.

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Toshiaki

    2013-12-01

    The basic model for chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection during therapy enables us to analyze short-term viral kinetics. However, the model is not useful for analyzing long-term viral kinetics. Here, I suggest a new model that was obtained by introducing Michaelis-Menten kinetics into the basic model. The new model can exhibit long-term viral kinetics without rebound and oscillation, unlike the basic model. The value of the parameter K in the new model is analogous to the Michaelis constant Km and is predicted to be approximately less than 10(10)/ml.

  13. Model-based projections of the population-level impact of hepatitis A vaccination in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Van Effelterre, Thierry; De Antonio-Suarez, Rodrigo; Cassidy, Adrian; Romano-Mazzotti, Luis; Marano, Cinzia

    2012-01-01

    There are indications of a shift in the pattern of hepatitis A (HAV) in Mexico from high to intermediate endemicity, progressively increasing the mean age of infection and the proportion of cases which are symptomatic. This study estimated the potential impact of universal infant HAV vaccination in Mexico with two doses of Havrix™ at 12 and 18 mo of age on all HAV infections and symptomatic HAV infections. We developed a dynamic transmission model that accounts for changes in demography and HAV epidemiology. It was calibrated using Mexican age-specific seroprevalence and symptomatic HAV incidence data. With 70% first-dose coverage and 85% second-dose coverage, the calibrated model projected that HAV vaccination would reduce the incidence of all HAV infections (symptomatic and asymptomatic) after the first 25 y of vaccination by 71–76% (minimum and maximum for different transmission scenarios). The projected reduction in cumulative incidence of symptomatic HAV infections over the first 25 y of vaccination was 45–51%. With 90% first-dose coverage and 85% second-dose coverage, the projected reduction in incidence of all HAV infections was 85–93%, and the projected reduction in the cumulative incidence of symptomatic HAV infections was 61–67%, over a 25-y time frame. Sensitivity analyses indicated that second-dose coverage is important under the conservative base-case assumptions made about the duration of vaccine protection. The model indicated that universal infant HAV vaccination could substantially reduce the burden of HAV disease in Mexico. PMID:22854667

  14. Hepatitis C: Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Public Home » Hepatitis C » Hepatitis C Treatment Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Hepatitis C Treatment for Veterans and the Public Treatment ...

  15. Hepatitis C and Incarceration

    MedlinePlus

    HEPATITIS C & INCARCERATION What is hepatitis? “Hepatitis” means inflammation or swelling of the liver. The liver is an important ... viral hepatitis: Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C. They are all different from each other and ...

  16. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis A, is caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). The disease spreads through contact with ... washed in untreated water Putting into your mouth a finger or object that came into contact with ...

  17. Autoimmune hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Lupoid hepatitis; Chronic acute liver disease ... This form of hepatitis is an autoimmune disease . The body's immune system cannot tell the difference between healthy body tissue and harmful, outside ...

  18. Hepatitis D

    MedlinePlus

    ... if the hepatitis B virus is also present. Transmission Hepatitis D can be found in the blood, ... other body fluids of people who are infected. Transmission happens when infected body fluid enters another person’s ...

  19. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2014 Select a Language: Fact Sheet 507 Hepatitis C WHAT IS HEPATITIS C? HOW IS IT DIAGNOSED? ... treatment may be less likely to work. Hep C treatment is less effective for coinfected people. Cure ...

  20. A Novel Small-molecule Tumor Necrosis Factor α Inhibitor Attenuates Inflammation in a Hepatitis Mouse Model*

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li; Gong, Haiyan; Zhu, Haiyan; Ji, Qing; Su, Pei; Liu, Peng; Cao, Shannan; Yao, Jianfeng; Jiang, Linlin; Han, Mingzhe; Ma, Xiaotong; Xiong, Dongsheng; Luo, Hongbo R.; Wang, Fei; Zhou, Jiaxi; Xu, Yuanfu

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) is a hallmark of many inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and septic shock and hepatitis, making it a potential therapeutic target for clinical interventions. To explore chemical inhibitors against TNFα activity, we applied computer-aided drug design combined with in vitro and cell-based assays and identified a lead chemical compound, (E)-4-(2-(4-chloro-3-nitrophenyl) (named as C87 thereafter), which directly binds to TNFα, potently inhibits TNFα-induced cytotoxicity (IC50 = 8.73 μm) and effectively blocks TNFα-triggered signaling activities. Furthermore, by using a murine acute hepatitis model, we showed that C87 attenuates TNFα-induced inflammation, thereby markedly reducing injuries to the liver and improving animal survival. Thus, our results lead to a novel and highly specific small-molecule TNFα inhibitor, which can be potentially used to treat TNFα-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:24634219

  1. Reversibility of Hepatic Histological Damage after Surgical Temporary Obstruction of the Common Bile Duct in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Olguín, H. Juárez; Hernández, J. L. Figueroa; Guzman, D. Calderón; Medina, R. Alemón

    2011-01-01

    The reversibility of hepatic histological damage after restoring bile flow in a murine model was assessed. 25 male Balb C mice (25-35 g, age 6 weeks) were divided into 5 groups and their common bile duct (CBD) fastened to obstruct the release of gall bladder and liver contents. Group I, CBD untied at day 10, group II at day 15, and groups III and IV at days 20 and 30, respectively. Hematoxilin-eosin stained liver slices were analysed 0, 5, 10 and 20 days after restoring bile flow. Group I showed slight histological lesions (second stage), as cholangiolar bile pigment concretion, pericholangiolar and portal collagen accumulation; group II, mild lesions (third stage), as cholangiolar hamartomatous proliferation and bile duct portal fibrosis; group III showed severe lesions (fourth stage), as loss of functional parenchyma, and also the second and first stage lesions. Group IV died before 30 days. First stage corresponds to absent lesions (control group). Group I recovered totally, group II recovered only from slight lesions and group III had irreversible damage. Severity of lesions increased gradually and accumulatively, irreversible hepatic damage was achieved at 20 days and is deadly at 30 days. Our model of temporary CBD obstruction was suitable to assess reversibility of hepatic histological damage. PMID:23675215

  2. Cutthroat trout virus as a surrogate in vitro infection model for testing inhibitors of hepatitis E virus replication

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Debing, Yannick; Winton, James; Neyts, Johan; Dallmeier, Kai

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is one of the most important causes of acute hepatitis worldwide. Although most infections are self-limiting, mortality is particularly high in pregnant women. Chronic infections can occur in transplant and other immune-compromised patients. Successful treatment of chronic hepatitis E has been reported with ribavirin and pegylated interferon-alpha, however severe side effects were observed. We employed the cutthroat trout virus (CTV), a non-pathogenic fish virus with remarkable similarities to HEV, as a potential surrogate for HEV and established an antiviral assay against this virus using the Chinook salmon embryo (CHSE-214) cell line. Ribavirin and the respective trout interferon were found to efficiently inhibit CTV replication. Other known broad-spectrum inhibitors of RNA virus replication such as the nucleoside analog 2′-C-methylcytidine resulted only in a moderate antiviral activity. In its natural fish host, CTV levels largely fluctuate during the reproductive cycle with the virus detected mainly during spawning. We wondered whether this aspect of CTV infection may serve as a surrogate model for the peculiar pathogenesis of HEV in pregnant women. To that end the effect of three sex steroids on in vitro CTV replication was evaluated. Whereas progesterone resulted in marked inhibition of virus replication, testosterone and 17β-estradiol stimulated viral growth. Our data thus indicate that CTV may serve as a surrogate model for HEV, both for antiviral experiments and studies on the replication biology of the Hepeviridae.

  3. Comfrey (Symphytum Officinale. l.) and Experimental Hepatic Carcinogenesis: A Short-term Carcinogenesis Model Study.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Maria Fernanda Pereira Lavieri; de Oliveira Massoco, Cristina; Xavier, José Guilherme; Bonamin, Leoni Villano

    2010-06-01

    Comfrey or Symphytum officinale (L.) (Boraginaceae) is a very popular plant used for therapeutic purposes. Since the 1980s, its effects have been studied in long-term carcinogenesis studies, in which Comfrey extract is administered at high doses during several months and the neoplastic hepatic lesions are evaluated. However, the literature on this topic is very poor considering the studies performed under short-term carcinogenesis protocols, such as the 'resistant hepatocyte model' (RHM). In these studies, it is possible to observe easily the phenomena related to the early phases of tumor development, since pre-neoplastic lesions (PNLs) rise in about 1-2 months of chemical induction. Herein, the effects of chronic oral treatment of rats with 10% Comfrey ethanolic extract were evaluated in a RHM. Wistar rats were sequentially treated with N-nitrosodiethylamine (ip) and 2-acetilaminofluorene (po), and submitted to hepatectomy to induce carcinogenesis promotion. Macroscopic/microscopic quantitative analysis of PNL was performed. Non-parametric statistical tests (Mann-Whitney and χ(2)) were used, and the level of significance was set at P ≤ 0.05. Comfrey treatment reduced the number of pre-neoplastic macroscopic lesions up to 1 mm (P ≤ 0.05), the percentage of oval cells (P = 0.0001) and mitotic figures (P = 0.007), as well as the number of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) positive cells (P = 0.0001) and acidophilic pre-neoplastic nodules (P = 0.05). On the other hand, the percentage of cells presenting megalocytosis (P = 0.0001) and vacuolar degeneration (P = 0.0001) was increased. Scores of fibrosis, glycogen stores and the number of nucleolus organizing regions were not altered. The study indicated that oral treatment of rats with 10% Comfrey alcoholic extract reduced cell proliferation in this model. PMID:18955295

  4. Immunization with hepatitis B vaccine accelerates SLE-like disease in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Arango, María-Teresa; Kivity, Shaye; Katzav, Aviva; Gilburd, Boris; Blank, Miri; Tomer, Nir; Volkov, Alex; Barshack, Iris; Chapman, Joab; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2014-11-01

    Hepatitis-B vaccine (HBVv) can prevent HBV-infection and associated liver diseases. However, concerns regarding its safety, particularly among patients with autoimmune diseases (i.e. SLE) were raised. Moreover, the aluminum adjuvant in HBVv was related to immune mediated adverse events. Therefore, we examined the effects of immunization with HBVv or alum on SLE-like disease in a murine model. NZBWF1 mice were immunized with HBVv (Engerix), or aluminum hydroxide (alum) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) at 8 and 12 weeks of age. Mice were followed for weight, autoantibodies titers, blood counts, proteinuria, kidney histology, neurocognitive functions (novel object recognition, staircase, Y-maze and the forced swimming tests) and brain histology. Immunization with HBVv induced acceleration of kidney disease manifested by high anti-dsDNA antibodies (p < 0.01), early onset of proteinuria (p < 0.05), histological damage and deposition of HBs antigen in the kidney. Mice immunized with HBVv and/or alum had decreased cells counts mainly of the red cell lineage (p < 0.001), memory deficits (p < 0.01), and increased activated microglia in different areas of the brain compare with mice immunized with PBS. Anxiety-like behavior was more pronounced among mice immunized with alum. In conclusion, herein we report that immunization with the HBVv aggravated kidney disease in an animal model of SLE. Immunization with either HBVv or alum affected blood counts, neurocognitive functions and brain gliosis. Our data support the concept that different component of vaccines may be linked with immune and autoimmune mediated adverse events.

  5. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... Organizations ​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Español Hepatitis A Page Content On this page: What is ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is hepatitis A? Hepatitis * A is a virus , or infection, ...

  6. Autoimmune Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Organizations ​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Autoimmune Hepatitis Page Content On this page: What is autoimmune ... Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is autoimmune hepatitis? Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic—or long lasting— ...

  7. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis C, is caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV). It usually spreads through contact with ... childbirth. Most people who are infected with hepatitis C don't have any symptoms for years. If ...

  8. Hepatic Arterial Embolization with Doxorubicin-Loaded Superabsorbent Polymer Microspheres in a Rabbit Liver Tumor Model

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Sanjay Wright, Kenneth C.; Ensor, Joe; Van Pelt, Carolyn S.; Dixon, Katherine A.; Kundra, Vikas

    2011-10-15

    Objectives: The pharmacokinetic profile after hepatic arterial embolization with superabsorbent microspheres (QuadraSpheres) loaded with doxorubicin was studied. Methods: Rabbits with hepatic VX2 tumors were treated with intra-arterial administration of QuadraSpheres loaded with doxorubicin, or transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) using doxorubicin, Lipiodol and Embospheres, or hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) of doxorubicin. Tumor specimens were evaluated by fluorescence microscopy, and plasma and tumor concentrations of doxorubicin were measured. Results: The peak plasma concentration of doxorubicin was lower in the QuadraSphere group (309.9 ng/ml) than in the HAI (673.4 ng/ml) or TACE (360.5 ng/ml) groups, suggesting higher tumor retention in the QuadraSphere group. Intratumoral doxorubicin levels declined to negligible levels at 1 and 3 days after treatment, respectively, in the HAI and TACE groups. In the QuadraSphere groups, intratumoral doxorubicin level declined after day 1, but was still detectable at 14 days after treatment and was higher than that in the other groups at 1, 3, and 7 days. Intratumoral doxorubicin fluorescence was detected at all time points in the QuadraSphere group, but only at 1 day after treatment in the TACE group. Conclusions: Hepatic arterial administration of doxorubicin-loaded QuadraSpheres enables the sustained release of doxorubicin to hepatic tumors.

  9. Pre-acute hepadnaviral infection is associated with activation-induced apoptotic death of lymphocytes in the woodchuck (Marmota monax) model of hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Gujar, Shashi A; Jenkins, Adam K M; Macparland, Sonya A; Michalak, Tomasz I

    2010-09-01

    Woodchucks (Marmota monax) infected with woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) represent a highly valuable immunopathogenic model of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Both WHV and HBV are noncytopathic hepadnaviruses which induce a strong but delayed virus-specific cellular immune response believed to be a cause of hepatitis. The reason behind this postponement is not well understood and its dissection in the woodchuck model has been hampered by the lack of appropriate research tools. In this study, we applied an assay for the simultaneous detection of cell apoptosis and proliferation to determine the fate of T lymphocytes after WHV infection leading to acute hepatitis. The results revealed that pre-acute WHV infection is associated with the significantly heightened susceptibility of T lymphocytes to activation-induced apoptotic death. This suggests that T lymphocyte function is compromised very early in the course of hepadnaviral infection and this may directly contribute to the postponement of virus-specific T cell response.

  10. Heat shock protein 60 inhibits Th1-mediated hepatitis model via innate regulation of Th1/Th2 transcription factors and cytokines.

    PubMed

    Zanin-Zhorov, Alexandra; Bruck, Rafael; Tal, Guy; Oren, Shirly; Aeed, Hussein; Hershkoviz, Rami; Cohen, Irun R; Lider, Ofer

    2005-03-15

    Extracellular heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) has been considered a proinflammatory danger signal. Yet, HSP60 can also down-regulate experimental immune arthritis and diabetes models by specific inhibition of Th1-like responses. We now report that HSP60 in vitro differentially modulates the expression of Th1/Th2 transcription factors in human T cells: HSP60 down-regulates T-bet, NF-kappaB, and NFATp and up-regulates GATA-3, leading to decreased secretion of TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma and enhanced secretion of IL-10. These effects depended on TLR2 signaling and could not be attributed to LPS or to other contaminants. In BALB/c mice, HSP60 in vivo inhibited the clinical, histological, and serological manifestations of Con A-induced hepatitis associated with up-regulated T cell expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 and GATA-3 and down-regulated T-bet expression. These results provide a molecular explanation for the effects of HSP60 treatment on T cell inflammation via innate regulation of the inflammatory response. PMID:15749853

  11. Increased brain uptake of gamma-aminobutyric acid in a rabbit model of hepatic encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Bassett, M.L.; Mullen, K.D.; Scholz, B.; Fenstermacher, J.D.; Jones, E.A. )

    1990-03-01

    Transfer of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid across the normal blood-brain barrier is minimal. One prerequisite for gamma-aminobutyric acid in plasma contributing to the neural inhibition of hepatic encephalopathy would be that increased transfer of gamma-aminobutyric acid across the blood-brain barrier occurs in liver failure. The aim of the present study was to determine if brain gamma-aminobutyric acid uptake is increased in rabbits with stage II-III (precoma) hepatic encephalopathy due to galactosamine-induced fulminant hepatic failure. A modification of the Oldendorf intracarotid artery-injection technique was applied. (3H) gamma-aminobutyric acid, (14C) butanol, and 113mIn-labeled serum protein (transferrin) were injected simultaneously 4 s before decapitation. The ipsilateral brain uptake index of gamma-aminobutyric acid was determined from measurements of the 3 isotopes in 5 brain regions. Uncorrected or simple brain uptake indices of (3H) gamma-aminobutyric acid and (113mIn) transferrin were calculated using (14C) butanol as the highly extracted reference compound. The (113mIn) transferrin data were also used to correct the brain uptake index of (3H) gamma-aminobutyric acid for intravascular retention of (3H) gamma-aminobutyric acid. The methodology adopted minimized problems attributable to rapid (3H) gamma-aminobutyric acid metabolism, and slow brain washout and recirculation of the radiolabeled tracers. Both the uncorrected and corrected brain uptake indices of gamma-aminobutyric acid as well as the simple brain uptake index of transferrin were significantly increased in both stage II and III hepatic encephalopathy in all brain regions studied. Moreover, these brain uptake indices were significantly greater in stage III hepatic encephalopathy than in stage II hepatic encephalopathy.

  12. Gradually softening hydrogels for modeling hepatic stellate cell behavior during fibrosis regression.

    PubMed

    Caliari, Steven R; Perepelyuk, Maryna; Soulas, Elizabeth M; Lee, Gi Yun; Wells, Rebecca G; Burdick, Jason A

    2016-06-13

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) presents an evolving set of mechanical cues to resident cells. We developed methacrylated hyaluronic acid (MeHA) hydrogels containing both stable and hydrolytically degradable crosslinks to provide cells with a gradually softening (but not fully degradable) milieu, mimicking physiological events such as fibrosis regression. To demonstrate the utility of this cell culture system, we studied the phenotype of rat hepatic stellate cells, the major liver precursors of fibrogenic myofibroblasts, within this softening environment. Stellate cells that were mechanically primed on tissue culture plastic attained a myofibroblast phenotype, which persisted when seeded onto stiff (∼20 kPa) hydrogels. However, mechanically primed stellate cells on stiff-to-soft (∼20 to ∼3 kPa) hydrogels showed reversion of the myofibroblast phenotype over 14 days, with reductions in cell area, expression of the myofibroblast marker alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and Yes-associated protein/Transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (YAP/TAZ) nuclear localization when compared to stellate cells on stiff hydrogels. Cells on stiff-to-soft hydrogels did not fully revert, however. They displayed reduced expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and underwent abnormally rapid re-activation to myofibroblasts in response to re-stiffening of the hydrogels through introduction of additional crosslinks. These features are typical of stellate cells with an intermediate phenotype, reported to occur in vivo with fibrosis regression and re-injury. Together, these data suggest that mechanics play an important role in fibrosis regression and that integrating dynamic mechanical cues into model systems helps capture cell behaviors observed in vivo.

  13. Comfrey (Symphytum Officinale. l.) and Experimental Hepatic Carcinogenesis: A Short-term Carcinogenesis Model Study

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Maria Fernanda Pereira Lavieri; de Oliveira Massoco, Cristina; Xavier, José Guilherme

    2010-01-01

    Comfrey or Symphytum officinale (L.) (Boraginaceae) is a very popular plant used for therapeutic purposes. Since the 1980s, its effects have been studied in long-term carcinogenesis studies, in which Comfrey extract is administered at high doses during several months and the neoplastic hepatic lesions are evaluated. However, the literature on this topic is very poor considering the studies performed under short-term carcinogenesis protocols, such as the ‘resistant hepatocyte model’ (RHM). In these studies, it is possible to observe easily the phenomena related to the early phases of tumor development, since pre-neoplastic lesions (PNLs) rise in about 1–2 months of chemical induction. Herein, the effects of chronic oral treatment of rats with 10% Comfrey ethanolic extract were evaluated in a RHM. Wistar rats were sequentially treated with N-nitrosodiethylamine (ip) and 2-acetilaminofluorene (po), and submitted to hepatectomy to induce carcinogenesis promotion. Macroscopic/microscopic quantitative analysis of PNL was performed. Non-parametric statistical tests (Mann–Whitney and χ2) were used, and the level of significance was set at P ≤ 0.05. Comfrey treatment reduced the number of pre-neoplastic macroscopic lesions up to 1 mm (P ≤ 0.05), the percentage of oval cells (P = 0.0001) and mitotic figures (P = 0.007), as well as the number of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) positive cells (P = 0.0001) and acidophilic pre-neoplastic nodules (P = 0.05). On the other hand, the percentage of cells presenting megalocytosis (P = 0.0001) and vacuolar degeneration (P = 0.0001) was increased. Scores of fibrosis, glycogen stores and the number of nucleolus organizing regions were not altered. The study indicated that oral treatment of rats with 10% Comfrey alcoholic extract reduced cell proliferation in this model. PMID:18955295

  14. Effects of melatonin on liver function and lipid peroxidation in a rat model of hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    DENG, WEN-SHENG; XU, QING; LIU, YE; JIANG, CHUN-HUI; ZHOU, HONG; GU, LEI

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of melatonin (MT) on liver function and lipid peroxidation following hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). A total of 66 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned into three groups: Normal control (N) group, ischemia-reperfusion (IR) group and the MT-treated group. A hepatic IRI model was developed by blocking the first porta hepatis, and subsequently restoring hepatic blood inflow after 35 min. Following reperfusion, changes in the levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) were detected by a chemical method at various time points. In the MT group, the MDA levels were significantly reduced (P<0.05) at all time points, as compared with the IR group. Furthermore, SOD activity was significantly increased (P<0.05) in the MT group, as compared with the IR group at all time points; and the levels of GSH in the MT group were significantly higher (P<0.05) than those of the IR group at 2, 4, and 8 h post-reperfusion. The levels of ALT, AST and LDH were significantly reduced in the MT group at each time point, as compared with that of the IR group (P<0.05). In conclusion, MT exhibits potent antioxidant properties that may create favorable conditions for the recovery of liver function following IRI. PMID:27168834

  15. Ability of the ankaferd blood stopper® to prevent parenchymal bleeding in an experimental hepatic trauma model

    PubMed Central

    Aysan, Erhan; Bektas, Hasan; Ersoz, Feyzullah; Sari, Serkan; Kaygusuz, Arslan; Huq, Gulben Erdem

    2010-01-01

    Hepatic parenchymal bleeding (HPB) is a major problem following both trauma and elective hepatic procedures. The present study investigated the effect of the Ankaferd Blood Stopper® (ABS) on HPB. Method(s): A total of 20 rats were used. After creating a laceration model in the left lateral hepatic lobe, the area was compressed for 3 minutes with the ABS in the rats in group 1 (n=10) and with 0.9% NaCl-soaked gauze in the rats in group 2 (n=10). Results: The mean change in haematocrit levels between baseline and the 24 hour values in group 1 was lower than group 2 (p=0.045). The mean perioperative bleeding in group 1 was lower than group 2 (p=0.003). The histopa-thologic evaluation revealed that there were no differences between the groups with respect to areas of necrosis (p=0.107) or inflammation (p=0.135). Conclusion: Although the ABS does not stop HPB completely, it ensures a statistically significant reduction in HPB. PMID:20827316

  16. Expression kinetics of hepatic progenitor markers in cellular models of human liver development recapitulating hepatocyte and biliary cell fate commitment.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Pooja; Tian, Lipeng; Deshmukh, Abhijeet; Jang, Yoon-Young

    2016-09-01

    Due to the limitations of research using human embryos and the lack of a biological model of human liver development, the roles of the various markers associated with liver stem or progenitor cell potential in humans are largely speculative, and based on studies utilizing animal models and certain patient tissues. Human pluripotent stem cell-based in vitro multistage hepatic differentiation systems may serve as good surrogate models for mimicking normal human liver development, pathogenesis and injury/regeneration studies. Here, we describe the implications of various liver stem or progenitor cell markers and their bipotency (i.e. hepatocytic- and biliary-epithelial cell differentiation), based on the pluripotent stem cell-derived model of human liver development. Future studies using the human cellular model(s) of liver and biliary development will provide more human relevant biological and/or pathological roles of distinct markers expressed in heterogeneous liver stem/progenitor cell populations.

  17. Analysis of Hepatitis C Virus Decline during Treatment with the Protease Inhibitor Danoprevir Using a Multiscale Model

    DOE PAGES

    Rong, Libin; Guedj, Jeremie; Dahari, Harel; Coffield, Daniel J.; Levi, Micha; Smith, Patrick; Perelson, Alan S.

    2013-03-14

    The current paradigm for studying hepatitis C virus (HCV) dynamics in patients utilizes a standard viral dynamic model that keeps track of uninfected (target) cells, infected cells, and virus. The model does not account for the dynamics of intracellular viral replication, which is the major target of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs). In this paper, we describe and study a recently developed multiscale age-structured model that explicitly considers the potential effects of DAAs on intracellular viral RNA production, degradation, and secretion as virus into the circulation. We show that when therapy significantly blocks both intracellular viral RNA production and virus secretion,more » the serum viral load decline has three phases, with slopes reflecting the rate of serum viral clearance, the rate of loss of intracellular viral RNA, and the rate of loss of intracellular replication templates and infected cells, respectively. We also derive analytical approximations of the multiscale model and use one of them to analyze data from patients treated for 14 days with the HCV protease inhibitor danoprevir. Analysis suggests that danoprevir significantly blocks intracellular viral production (with mean effectiveness 99.2%), enhances intracellular viral RNA degradation about 5-fold, and moderately inhibits viral secretion (with mean effectiveness 56%). Finally, the multiscale model can be used to study viral dynamics in patients treated with other DAAs and explore their mechanisms of action in treatment of hepatitis C.« less

  18. Analysis of Hepatitis C Virus Decline during Treatment with the Protease Inhibitor Danoprevir Using a Multiscale Model

    SciTech Connect

    Rong, Libin; Guedj, Jeremie; Dahari, Harel; Coffield, Daniel J.; Levi, Micha; Smith, Patrick; Perelson, Alan S.

    2013-03-14

    The current paradigm for studying hepatitis C virus (HCV) dynamics in patients utilizes a standard viral dynamic model that keeps track of uninfected (target) cells, infected cells, and virus. The model does not account for the dynamics of intracellular viral replication, which is the major target of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs). In this paper, we describe and study a recently developed multiscale age-structured model that explicitly considers the potential effects of DAAs on intracellular viral RNA production, degradation, and secretion as virus into the circulation. We show that when therapy significantly blocks both intracellular viral RNA production and virus secretion, the serum viral load decline has three phases, with slopes reflecting the rate of serum viral clearance, the rate of loss of intracellular viral RNA, and the rate of loss of intracellular replication templates and infected cells, respectively. We also derive analytical approximations of the multiscale model and use one of them to analyze data from patients treated for 14 days with the HCV protease inhibitor danoprevir. Analysis suggests that danoprevir significantly blocks intracellular viral production (with mean effectiveness 99.2%), enhances intracellular viral RNA degradation about 5-fold, and moderately inhibits viral secretion (with mean effectiveness 56%). Finally, the multiscale model can be used to study viral dynamics in patients treated with other DAAs and explore their mechanisms of action in treatment of hepatitis C.

  19. OVERVIEW OF AN INTERLABORATORY COLLABORATION ON EVALUATING THE EFFECTS OF MODEL HEPATOTOXICANTS ON HEPATIC GENE EXPRESSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluating the Effects of Methapyrilene and Clofibrate on Hepatic Gene Expression: A Collaboration Between Laboratories and a Comparison of Platform and Analytical Approaches

    Roger G. Ulrich1, John C. Rockett2, G. Gordon Gibson3 and Syril Pettit4

    1 Rosetta Inpharmat...

  20. Experimental transmission of equine hepacivirus in horses as a model for hepatitis C virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Equine hepacivirus (EHCV; non-primate hepacivirus) is a hepatotropic member of the Flaviviridae family that infects horses. Although EHCV is the closest known relative to hepatitis C virus (HCV), its complete replication kinetics in vivo have not been described, and direct evidence that it causes he...

  1. Genistein Attenuates Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis and Increases Hepatic PPARγ in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Susutlertpanya, Warinda; Werawatganon, Duangporn; Siriviriyakul, Prasong; Klaikeaw, Naruemon

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) has become a global chronic liver disease, but no effective medicine has been proven to cure it. This study investigated the protective effects of genistein, a phytoestrogen, on NASH and examined whether it has any effect on hepatic PPARγ. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: control group fed ad libitum with standard rat diet, NASH group fed ad libitum with high-fat diet to induce NASH and NASH + Gen8 group and NASH + Gen16 group fed with high-fat diet plus intragastric administration of 8 or 16 mg/kg genistein once daily. After 6 weeks, liver samples were collected to determine MDA, TNF-α, PPARγ, and histopathology. The findings were that levels of hepatic MDA and TNF-α increased in NASH group, but 16 mg/kg genistein reduced these levels significantly. Downregulation of hepatic PPARγ was observed in NASH group, but genistein significantly upregulated the expression of PPARγ in both NASH + Gen groups. The histological appearance of liver in NASH group presented pathological features of steatohepatitis which were diminished in both NASH + Gen groups. The results suggest that genistein attenuates the liver histopathology of NASH with upregulation of hepatic PPARγ, reduction of oxidative stress, and inhibition of inflammatory cytokine. PMID:26246839

  2. [Effects of calcitriol and alfacalcidol on an osteoporosis model in rats with hepatic failure].

    PubMed

    Yamanishi, A; Ishibashi, Y; Kuriyama, K; Tachiiri, T; Kusajima, H; Kojima, E; Momo, K

    1999-01-01

    To predict the potential utility of calcitriol in human osteoporosis with hepatic dysfunction, we examined the effects of calcitriol and alfacalcidol in ovariectomized (OVX) aged-rats with CCl4-induced hepatic failure. In OVX+CCl4 rats, GOT, GTP, alkaline phosphatase and total bilirubin increased and hepatic enzyme activity (cytochrome b5 and P450) decreased. Repeated oral doses of calcitriol (0.1 and 0.2 microgram/kg) for 51 days inhibited a decrease in serum calcium concentration. This effect was more potent than that of alfacalcidol at the same dose. Both drugs tended to inhibit a decrease in femoral calcium contents. Calcitriol (0.2 microgram/kg) prevented a decrease in femoral bone density (dry and ash weight per volume), unlike alfacalcidol. Soft X-ray imaging analysis revealed that both drugs tended to inhibit the decrease in femoral bone density. There were no differences in the femoral bone strength between OVX+CCl4 and sham-operated rats. The serum calcitriol concentrations increased after the last doses of calcitriol, while they did not increase after the last dose of alfacalcidol. All these effects of calcitriol were related to the serum calcitriol levels. These results suggest that calcitriol, unlike alfacalcidol, may have a clinical therapeutic effect in osteoporosis with hepatic dysfunction.

  3. Hepatitis Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ogholikhan, Sina; Schwarz, Kathleen B.

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is a serious health problem all over the world. However, the reduction of the morbidity and mortality due to vaccinations against hepatitis A and hepatitis B has been a major component in the overall reduction in vaccine preventable diseases. We will discuss the epidemiology, vaccine development, and post-vaccination effects of the hepatitis A and B virus. In addition, we discuss attempts to provide hepatitis D vaccine for the 350 million individuals infected with hepatitis B globally. Given the lack of a hepatitis C vaccine, the many challenges facing the production of a hepatitis C vaccine will be shown, along with current and former vaccination trials. As there is no current FDA-approved hepatitis E vaccine, we will present vaccination data that is available in the rest of the world. Finally, we will discuss the existing challenges and questions facing future endeavors for each of the hepatitis viruses, with efforts continuing to focus on dramatically reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with these serious infections of the liver. PMID:26978406

  4. [Autoimmune hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Ostojić, Rajko

    2003-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is an unresolving, hepatocellular inflammation of unknown cause that is characterized by the presence of periportal hepatitis on histologic examination, tissue autoantibodies in serum, and hypergammaglobulinemia. By international consensus, the designation autoimmune hepatitis has replaced alternative terms for the condition. Three types of autoimmune hepatitis have been proposed based on immunoserologic findings. Type 1 autoimmune hepatitis is characterized by the presence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) or smooth muscle antibodies (SMA) (or both) in serum. Seventy percent of patients with type 1 of autoimmune hepatitis are women. This type is the most common form and accounts for at least 80% of cases. Type 2 is characterized by the presence of antibodies to liver-kidney microsome type 1 (anti-LKM1) in serum. Patients with this type of autoimmune hepatitis are predominantly children. Type 3 autoimmune hepatitis is characterized by the presence of antibodies to soluble liver antigen (anti-SLA) in serum. There are no individual features that are pathognomonic of autoimmune hepatitis, and its diagnosis requires the confident exclusion of other conditions. The large majority of patients show satisfactory response to corticosteroid (usually prednisone or prednisolone) therapy. For the past 30 years it has been customary to add azathioprine as a "steroid sparing" agent to allow lower doses of steroids to be used and remission, once achieved, can be sustained in many patients with azathioprine alone after steroid withdrawal. Patients with autoimmune hepatitis who have decompensated during or after corticosteroid therapy are candidates for liver transplantation.

  5. Viral hepatitis*

    PubMed Central

    Deinhardt, F.; Gust, I. D.

    1982-01-01

    Three forms of viral hepatitis can be recognized: hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and hepatitis non-A, non-B. Hepatitis A is caused by a picornavirus, is transmitted by the faceal—oral route, does not become chronic, and no chronic virus carriers exist. The virus can be grown in cell cultures, and killed as well as live attenuated virus vaccines are under development. Hepatitis B is caused by an enveloped virus containing a circular, double-stranded form of DNA. The disease is transmitted parenterally through inoculation of blood or blood products containing virus or through close personal contact with a virus-positive person. Hepatitis B becomes chronic in a certain number of cases and can lead to cirrhosis and primary liver cell carcinoma. The blood and certain body secretions of individuals with a persistent or chronic infection may remain infectious for many years. The hepatitis B virus cannot be grown in cell cultures but the entire genome has been sequenced and cloned in bacterial and eukaryotic cells. An inactivated virus vaccine has been prepared from hepatitis B surface antigen present in the plasma of hepatitis B virus carriers and further vaccines are under development. The agents of hepatitis non-A, non-B have not been identified. It is possible to distinguish between a predominantly parenterally transmitted and an orally transmitted form of hepatitis non-A, non-B. The latter is reported to be caused by a picornavirus that does not, however, have any antigenic relationship with hepatitis A virus. PMID:6817933

  6. Mathematical analysis of multiscale models for hepatitis C virus dynamics under therapy with direct-acting antiviral agents.

    PubMed

    Rong, Libin; Perelson, Alan S

    2013-09-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection remains a world-wide public health problem. Therapy with interferon and ribavirin leads to viral elimination in less than 50% of treated patients. New treatment options aiming at a higher cure rate are focused on direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs), which directly interfere with different steps in the HCV life cycle. In this paper, we describe and analyze a recently developed multiscale model that predicts HCV dynamics under therapy with DAAs. The model includes both intracellular viral RNA replication and extracellular viral infection. We calculate the steady states of the model and perform a detailed stability analysis. With certain assumptions we obtain analytical approximations of the viral load decline after treatment initiation. One approximation agrees well with the prediction of the model, and can conveniently be used to fit patient data and estimate parameter values. We also discuss other possible ways to incorporate intracellular viral dynamics into the multiscale model.

  7. The natural history model of hepatitis C virus infection and the economic evaluation of alpha interferon treatment.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Kenshi; Nagasue, Ichiro; Fukuda, Takashi; Gunji, Atsuaki

    2002-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) therapy is used for the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) disease, but is so expensive that it creates controversy as to whether or not it is effective use of limited health care resources. In order to make this judgement possible, it must be necessary to build a comprehensive disease model of HCV infection from social perspective. A Markov chain model of the natural history of HCV infection in male patients was developed. Parameters on the clinical phase of the disease were adopted from published reports, but those of the non-clinical phase were estimated from the data on blood donation and mortality rates from the disease. Then, adding in the modeling of treatment outcome from IFN therapy and cost-benefit analysis, IFN therapy was economically evaluated. Using this model, it was shown that (1) IFN therapy for chronic hepatitis C (CHC) would be economically beneficial at least in the Japanese situation, (2) the complete response rate to therapy would be the most sensitive factor affecting outcome, and (3) the younger the person cured by IFN therapy, the greater the benefit seen. These results demonstrate that IFN therapy would be beneficial in the case of the CHC patients (male). PMID:11848181

  8. An intravital microscopic study of the hepatic microcirculation in cirrhotic mice models: relationship between fibrosis and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Vanheule, Eline; Geerts, Anja M; Van Huysse, Jacques; Schelfhout, Daphné; Praet, Marleen; Van Vlierberghe, Hans; De Vos, Martine; Colle, Isabelle

    2008-12-01

    This intravital fluorescence microscopy (IVFM) study validates cirrhotic mice models and describes the different intrahepatic alterations and the role of angiogenesis in the liver during genesis of cirrhosis. Cirrhosis was induced by subcutaneous injection of carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)) and by common bile duct ligation (CBDL) in mice. Diameters of sinusoids, portal venules (PV), central venules (CV) and shunts were measured at different time points by IVFM. Thereafter, liver samples were taken for sirius red, CD31, Ki67, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) evaluation by immunohistochemistry (IHC). In parallel with fibrogenesis, hepatic microcirculation was markedly disturbed in CCl(4) and CBDL mice with a significant decrease in sinusoidal diameter compared to control mice. In CCl(4) mice, CV were enlarged, with marked sinusoidal-free spaces around CV. In contrast, PV were enlarged in CBDL mice and bile lakes were observed. In both mice models, intrahepatic shunts developed gradually after induction. During genesis of cirrhosis using CD31 IHC we observed a progressive increase in the number of blood vessels within the fibrotic septa area and a progressively increase in staining by Ki67, VEGF and alpha-SMA of endothelial cells, hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells respectively. In vivo study of the hepatic microcirculation demonstrated a totally disturbed intrahepatic architecture, with narrowing of sinusoids in both cirrhotic mice models. The diameters of CV and PV increased and large shunts, bypassing the sinusoids, were seen after both CCl(4) and CBDL induction. Thus present study shows that there is angiogenesis in the liver during cirrhogenesis, and this is probably due partially to an increased production of VEGF.

  9. A physiologically-based flow network model for hepatic drug elimination I: regular lattice lobule model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We develop a physiologically-based lattice model for the transport and metabolism of drugs in the functional unit of the liver, called the lobule. In contrast to earlier studies, we have emphasized the dominant role of convection in well-vascularized tissue with a given structure. Estimates of convective, diffusive and reaction contributions are given. We have compared drug concentration levels observed exiting the lobule with their predicted detailed distribution inside the lobule, assuming that most often the former is accessible information while the latter is not. PMID:24007328

  10. Application of a Combined Model with Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) and Generalized Regression Neural Network (GRNN) in Forecasting Hepatitis Incidence in Heng County, China

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Hao; Gao, Lian; Liang, Bingyu; Huang, Jiegang; Zang, Ning; Liao, Yanyan; Yu, Jun; Lai, Jingzhen; Qin, Fengxiang; Su, Jinming; Ye, Li; Chen, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatitis is a serious public health problem with increasing cases and property damage in Heng County. It is necessary to develop a model to predict the hepatitis epidemic that could be useful for preventing this disease. Methods The autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model and the generalized regression neural network (GRNN) model were used to fit the incidence data from the Heng County CDC (Center for Disease Control and Prevention) from January 2005 to December 2012. Then, the ARIMA-GRNN hybrid model was developed. The incidence data from January 2013 to December 2013 were used to validate the models. Several parameters, including mean absolute error (MAE), root mean square error (RMSE), mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) and mean square error (MSE), were used to compare the performance among the three models. Results The morbidity of hepatitis from Jan 2005 to Dec 2012 has seasonal variation and slightly rising trend. The ARIMA(0,1,2)(1,1,1)12 model was the most appropriate one with the residual test showing a white noise sequence. The smoothing factor of the basic GRNN model and the combined model was 1.8 and 0.07, respectively. The four parameters of the hybrid model were lower than those of the two single models in the validation. The parameters values of the GRNN model were the lowest in the fitting of the three models. Conclusions The hybrid ARIMA-GRNN model showed better hepatitis incidence forecasting in Heng County than the single ARIMA model and the basic GRNN model. It is a potential decision-supportive tool for controlling hepatitis in Heng County. PMID:27258555

  11. Autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Roberts, E A

    1995-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis can present as either acute or chronic disease in children. Clinical and laboratory features, including association with extrahepatic autoimmune syndromes and prompt response to immunosuppressive treatment, circulating autoantibodies and hypergammaglobulinemia, suggest an immune etiology. However, the disease mechanism remains uncertain. Different types of autoimmune hepatitis are defined on the basis of which autoantibodies are present: anti-smooth muscle (type 1), anti-liver/kidney microsomal (type 2), or anti-soluble liver antigen (type 3). Diseases which may be clinically similar to autoimmune hepatitis must be excluded before the diagnosis of autoimmune hepatitis is established: Wilson's disease, primary sclerosing cholangitis, chronic hepatitis B or C, and drug-induced liver disease are among the most important entities. Corticosteroids alone or with azathioprine constitute the usual treatment for autoimmune hepatitis. Although some children achieve a complete remission, or even recovery, and can stop immunosuppressive treatment, others required low-dose prednisone treatment indefinitely.

  12. A lipidomics study reveals hepatic lipid signatures associating with deficiency of the LDL receptor in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Chao; Hu, Chunxiu; Xie, Bingxian; Du, Yinan; Chen, Liang; Yang, Wei; Yang, Liu; Chen, Qiaoli; Shen, Bin; Hu, Bian; Zheng, Zhihong; Zhu, Haibo; Huang, Xingxu; Xu, Guowang; Chen, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) plays a critical role in the liver for the clearance of plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Its deficiency causes hypercholesterolemia in many models. To facilitate the usage of rats as animal models for the discovery of cholesterol-lowering drugs, we took a genetic approach to delete the LDLR in rats aiming to increase plasma LDL cholesterol (LDL-C). An LDLR knockout rat was generated via zinc-finger nuclease technology, which harbors a 19-basepair deletion in the seventh exon of the ldlr gene. As expected, deletion of the LDLR elevated total cholesterol and total triglyceride in the plasma, and caused a tenfold increase of plasma LDL-C and a fourfold increase of plasma very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL-C). A lipidomics analysis revealed that deletion of the LDLR affected hepatic lipid metabolism, particularly lysophosphatidylcholines, free fatty acids and sphingolipids in the liver. Cholesterol ester (CE) 20:4 also displayed a significant increase in the LDLR knockout rats. Taken together, the LDLR knockout rat offers a new model of hypercholesterolemia, and the lipidomics analysis reveals hepatic lipid signatures associating with deficiency of the LDL receptor. PMID:27378433

  13. The importance of liver microcirculation in promoting autoimmune hepatitis via maintaining an inflammatory cytokine milieu--a mathematical model study.

    PubMed

    Lettmann, Karsten Alexander; Hardtke-Wolenski, Matthias

    2014-05-01

    In autoimmune diseases, inflammatory cytokine concentrations are important for initiating and maintaining the status of autoimmunity. Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is an inflammatory liver disease characterized by a loss of immune tolerance against specific antigens located in hepatocytes. During the progression of the disease, antigen-presenting cells and different classes of T-helper cells secrete specific cytokines important for maintaining the disease. As these cytokines are secreted into the local liver environment, the blood flow in liver sinusoids might influence the local cytokine concentration. Considering the liver tissue as a porous medium, based on Darcy׳s law, the microcirculation within a liver lobule was modelled. Using realistic physiological pressure differences and tissue permeabilities, the blood velocity inside the sinusoids could be calculated and validated with blood velocity data obtained via Orthogonal Polarization Spectral Imaging (OPSI). Furthermore, oxygen consumption is modelled to obtain Rappaport׳s acinus model. Finally, steady state spatial distributions of secreted cytokines within the liver lobule could be estimated for specified realistic production rates of T-helper cells. It could be demonstrated that the characteristics of the liver microcirculation have an important impact on establishing inflammatory cytokine levels within the portal fields and the vascular septa promoting the occurrence of interface hepatitis.

  14. Deficient copper concentrations in dried-defatted hepatic tissue from ob/ob mice: A potential model for study of defective copper regulation in metabolic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Church, Stephanie J.; Begley, Paul; Kureishy, Nina; McHarg, Selina; Bishop, Paul N.; Bechtold, David A.; Unwin, Richard D.; Cooper, Garth J.S.

    2015-01-01

    Ob/ob mice provide an animal model for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease/non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NAFLD/NASH) in patients with obesity and type-2 diabetes. Low liver copper has been linked to hepatic lipid build-up (steatosis) in animals with systemic copper deficiency caused by low-copper diets. However, hepatic copper status in patients with NAFLD or NASH is uncertain, and a validated animal model useful for the study of hepatic copper regulation in common forms of metabolic liver disease is lacking. Here, we report parallel measurements of essential metal levels in whole-liver tissue and defatted-dried liver tissue from ob/ob and non-obese control mice. Measurements in whole-liver tissue from ob/ob mice at an age when they have developed NAFLD/NASH, provide compelling evidence for factitious lowering of copper and all other essential metals by steatosis, and so cannot be used to study hepatic metal regulation in this model. By marked contrast, metal measurements in defatted-dried liver samples reveal that most essential metals were actually normal and indicate specific lowering of copper in ob/ob mice, consistent with hepatic copper deficiency. Thus ob/ob mice can provide a model useful for the study of copper regulation in NAFLD and NASH, provided levels are measured in defatted-dried liver tissue. PMID:25797622

  15. Co-occurring Hepatitis C, substance use, and psychiatric illness: treatment issues and developing integrated models of care.

    PubMed

    Sylvestre, Diana L; Loftis, Jennifer M; Hauser, Peter; Genser, Sander; Cesari, Helen; Borek, Nicolette; Kresina, Thomas F; Seeff, Leonard; Francis, Henry

    2004-12-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is transmitted by injection drug use and associated with psychiatric conditions. Patients with drug use or significant psychiatric illness have typically been excluded from HCV treatment trials noting the 1997 National Institutes of Health Consensus Statement on HCV that indicated active drug use and major depressive illness were contraindications to treatment of HCV infection. However, the 2002 NIH Consensus Statement recognized that these patients could be effectively treated for HCV infection and recommended that treatment be considered on a case-by-case basis. Treating HCV infection in these patients is challenging, with drug use relapse possibly leading to psychosocial instability, poor adherence, and HCV reinfection. Interferon therapy may exacerbate preexisting psychiatric symptoms. Co-occurring human immunodeficiency virus or hepatitis B virus provide additional challenges, and access to ancillary medical and psychiatric services may be limited. Patients with co-occurring HCV infection, substance use, and psychiatric illness can complete interferon treatment with careful monitoring and aggressive intervention. Clinicians must integrate early interventions for psychiatric conditions and drug use into their treatment algorithm. Few programs or treatment models are designed to manage co-occurring substance use, psychiatric illness, and HCV infection and therapy. The National Institute on Drug Abuse convened a panel of experts to address the current status and the long-range needs through a 2-day workshop, Co-occurring Hepatitis C, Substance Abuse, and Psychiatric Illness: Addressing the Issues and Developing Integrated Models of Care. This conference report summarizes current data, medical management issues, and strategies discussed.

  16. Intrahepatic Transcriptional Signature Associated with Response to Interferon-α Treatment in the Woodchuck Model of Chronic Hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Simon P; Chin, Daniel J; Gruenbaum, Lore; Bitter, Hans; Rasmussen, Erik; Ravindran, Palanikumar; Swinney, David C; Birzele, Fabian; Schmucki, Roland; Lorenz, Stefan H; Kopetzki, Erhard; Carter, Jade; Triyatni, Miriam; Thampi, Linta M; Yang, Junming; AlDeghaither, Dalal; Murreddu, Marta G; Murredu, Marta G; Cote, Paul; Menne, Stephan

    2015-09-01

    Recombinant interferon-alpha (IFN-α) is an approved therapy for chronic hepatitis B (CHB), but the molecular basis of treatment response remains to be determined. The woodchuck model of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection displays many characteristics of human disease and has been extensively used to evaluate antiviral therapeutics. In this study, woodchucks with chronic woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) infection were treated with recombinant woodchuck IFN-α (wIFN-α) or placebo (n = 12/group) for 15 weeks. Treatment with wIFN-α strongly reduced viral markers in the serum and liver in a subset of animals, with viral rebound typically being observed following cessation of treatment. To define the intrahepatic cellular and molecular characteristics of the antiviral response to wIFN-α, we characterized the transcriptional profiles of liver biopsies taken from animals (n = 8-12/group) at various times during the study. Unexpectedly, this revealed that the antiviral response to treatment did not correlate with intrahepatic induction of the majority of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) by wIFN-α. Instead, treatment response was associated with the induction of an NK/T cell signature in the liver, as well as an intrahepatic IFN-γ transcriptional response and elevation of liver injury biomarkers. Collectively, these data suggest that NK/T cell cytolytic and non-cytolytic mechanisms mediate the antiviral response to wIFN-α treatment. In summary, by studying recombinant IFN-α in a fully immunocompetent animal model of CHB, we determined that the immunomodulatory effects, but not the direct antiviral activity, of this pleiotropic cytokine are most closely correlated with treatment response. This has important implications for the rational design of new therapeutics for the treatment of CHB. PMID:26352406

  17. Hepatitis B Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a combination product containing Hepatitis A Vaccine, Hepatitis B Vaccine) ... What is hepatitis B?Hepatitis B is a serious infection that affects the liver. It is caused by the hepatitis B virus. ...

  18. Hepatitis C: Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Public Home » Hepatitis C » Treatment Decisions Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... can I find out about participating in a hepatitis C clinical trial? Many trials are being conducted ...

  19. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Hepatitis B HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Influenza (Flu) Measles Meningococcal Disease Mumps Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Pneumococcal Disease Rubella (German Measles) Shingles (Herpes Zoster) Tetanus (Lockjaw) Professional Resources Adult ...

  20. Hepatic parasympathetic role in insulin resistance on an animal model of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, R T; Afonso, R A; Macedo, M Paula

    2007-02-01

    The hepatic insulin sensitizing substance (HISS) pathway, which includes the hepatic parasympathetic nerves and hepatic nitric oxide (HNO), has been shown to be crucial to the action of insulin on glucose metabolism. Insulin resistance in essential hypertension has been related to parasympathetic dysfunction; thus, we tested the hypothesis that the HISS pathway is impaired in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) when compared with their normotensive controls, Wistar (WIS) and Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. A modified euglycemic clamp quantified insulin sensitivity. Differentiation of the HISS-dependent and HISS-independent components of insulin action was achieved by administration of a muscarinic receptor antagonist (atropine, 3 mg/kg) or of a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (N(g)-methyl-arginine, 0.73 mg/kg). Both SHR and WKY had lower postprandial total insulin action when compared with WIS (209.1 +/- 13.6 for WKY and 217.8 +/- 19.8 for SHR vs 296.1 +/- 16.9 mg glucose/kg body weight for WIS, P < .05). Furthermore, we observed that this is due to a decrease of the HISS-dependent component of insulin action (154.8 +/- 16.4 for WIS vs 87.1 +/- 14.5 for WKY and 55.9 +/- 15.6 mg glucose/kg body weight for SHR; P < .05 and P < .001, respectively; data concerning the atropine protocol). Blockade of HISS action by inhibition of hepatic nitric oxide synthase with N(g)-methyl-arginine showed similar results to those obtained with atropine, suggesting that they indeed act through the same pathway. In conclusion, our results support our hypothesis that impairment of the HISS pathway is responsible for the development of insulin resistance between WIS and SHR.

  1. Brain concentrations of benzodiazepines are elevated in an animal model of hepatic encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Basile, A.S.; Pannell, L.; Jaouni, T.; Gammal, S.H.; Fales, H.M.; Jones, E.A.; Skolnick, P. )

    1990-07-01

    Brain extracts from rats with hepatic encephalopathy due to thioacetamide-induced fulminant hepatic failure contained 4- to 6-fold higher concentrations of substances that inhibit radioligand binding to benzodiazepine receptors than corresponding control rat extracts. Both isocratic and gradient-elution HPLC indicated that this inhibitory activity was localized in 3-8 peaks with retention times corresponding to deschlorodiazepam, deschlorolorazepam, lorazepam, oxazepam, diazepam, and N-desmethyldiazepam. The presence of diazepam and N-desmethyldiazepam was confirmed by mass spectroscopy. Both mass spectroscopic and radiometric techniques indicated that the concentrations of N-desmethyldiazepam and diazepam in brain extracts from encephalopathic rats were 2-9 and 5-7 times higher, respectively, than in control brain extracts. While benzodiazepines have been identified previously in mammalian and plant tissues, this report demonstrates that concentrations of these substances are increased in a pathophysiological condition. These findings provide a rational basis for the use of benzodiazepine receptor antagonists in the management of hepatic encephalopathy in humans.

  2. Predictions of the emergence of vaccine-resistant hepatitis B in The Gambia using a mathematical model.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, J. N.; Nokes, D. J.; Carman, W. F.

    2000-01-01

    Vaccine escape variants of hepatitis B virus (HBV) have been identified world-wide. A mathematical model of HBV transmission is used to investigate the potential pattern of emergence of such variants. Attention is focused on The Gambia as a country with high quality epidemiological data, universal infant immunization and in which escape mutants after childhood infections have been observed. We predict that a variant cannot become dominant for at least 20 years from the start of vaccination, even when using a vaccine which affords no cross protection. The dominant factor responsible for this long time scale is the low rate of infectious contacts between infected and susceptible individuals (we estimate the basic reproduction number of hepatitis B in The Gambia to be 1.7). A variant strain that achieves high prevalence will also take many years to control, and it is questionable whether emergence will be identifiable by sero-surveillance until of high prevalence. The sensitivity of the model predictions to epidemiological and demographic factors is explored. PMID:10813156

  3. Zeaxanthin Dipalmitate Therapeutically Improves Hepatic Functions in an Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Model through Modulating MAPK Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Feiyue; Han, Tao; Jiao, Rui; Liong, Emily C.; Fung, Man-Lung; So, Kwok-Fai; Tipoe, George L.

    2014-01-01

    In the current study, the therapeutic effects of zeaxanthin dipalmitate (ZD) on a rat alcoholic fatty liver disease (AFLD) model were evaluated. After-treatment with ZD from the 5th week to the 10th week in a 10-week ethanol intragastric administration in rats significantly alleviated the typical AFLD symptoms, including reduction in rat body weight, accumulation of hepatic fat droplets, occurrence of oxidative stress, inflammation, chemoattractive responses and hepatic apoptosis in the liver. The reduction of liver function abnormalities by ZD was partly through lower expression level of cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), diminished activity of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) through the restoration of its inhibitor kappa B alpha (IκBα), and the modulation of MAPK pathways including p38 MAPK, JNK and ERK. ZD treatment alone did not pose obvious adverse effect on the healthy rat. In the cellular AFLD model, we also confirmed the inhibition of p38 MAPK and ERK abolished the beneficial effects of ZD. These results provide a scientific rationale for the use of zeaxanthin and its derivatives as new complementary agents for the prevention and treatment of alcoholic liver diseases. PMID:24740309

  4. Single stage and multistage classification models for the prediction of liver fibrosis degree in patients with chronic hepatitis C infection.

    PubMed

    Hashem, Ahmed M; Rasmy, M Emad M; Wahba, Khaled M; Shaker, Olfat G

    2012-03-01

    Predicting significant fibrosis or cirrhosis in patients with hepatitis C virus has persistently preoccupied the research agenda of many specialized research centers. Many studies have been conducted to evaluate the use of readily available laboratory tests to predict significant fibrosis or cirrhosis with the purpose to substantially reduce the number of biopsies performed. Although many of them reported significant predictive values of several serum markers for the diagnosis of cirrhosis, none of these diagnostic techniques was successful in accurately predicting early stages of liver fibrosis. Therefore, in this study a single stage classification model and a multistage stepwise classification model based on Neural Network, Decision Tree, Logistic Regression, and Nearest Neighborhood clustering, have been developed to predict individual's liver fibrosis degree. Results showed that the area under the receiver operator curve (AUROC) values of the multistage model ranged from 0.874 to 0.974 which is a higher range than what is reported in current researches with similar conditions.

  5. The effect of black raspberry extracts on MnSOD activity in protection against concanavalin A induced liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuanyi; Li, Yan; States, Vanessa A.; Li, Suping; Zhang, Xiang; Martin, Robert C.G.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress are the key events in carcinogenetic transformation. Black raspberries (BRB) have been demonstrated to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer bioactivities. In this study, a concanavalin A induced hepatitis mouse model is used to examine the effect of BRB extract on hepatic injury. Three BRB extracts, including ethanol/H2O extracts (both anthocyanin-contained fraction and non-anthocyanin-contained fraction) and hexane extract were used. The alterations in hepatic histology, apoptosis and oxidative stress were observed in the animals pretreated with BRB extracts and then challenged by concanavalin A. Results indicate that ethanol/H2O extracts can inhibit Con A induced liver injury. The hepatic protection by the ethanol/H2O BRB extracts is associated with decreases of lipid peroxidation and NDA oxidative damage. Importantly, the BRB extracts increase manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) activity but not the CuZnSOD. The preservation of MnSOD by BRB extracts is associated with the protective action in the liver challenged by Con A. Ethanol/H2O BRB extracts function as antioxidants, thus demonstrating the critical role of oxidative stress in the Con A induced liver injury, and providing evidence that the protective effects of ethanol/H2O BRB extracts result, at least in part, from their antioxidant action. PMID:24911141

  6. Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptides alter hepatic killing of Candida albicans in the isolated perfused mouse liver model.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, R T; Garner, R E; Hudson, J A

    1992-01-01

    The isolated perfused mouse liver model was used to study the effect of Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-containing peptides on hepatic trapping and killing of Candida albicans. After extensive washing, 10(6) C. albicans CFU were infused into mouse livers. At the time of recovery, 63% +/- 2% (mean +/- standard error of the mean) of the infused C. albicans CFU were recovered from the liver and 14% +/- 1% were recovered from the effluent for a total recovery of 77% +/- 2%. This indicates that 86% +/- 9% of the original inoculum was trapped by the liver and that 23% +/- 2% was killed within the liver. Prior to their infusion into livers, 10(7) CFU of C. albicans were incubated at 37 degrees C for 30 min in the presence of various RGD peptides (0.1 mg/ml). Repeatedly, more than 90% of the infused RGD-treated C. albicans was trapped by the perfused liver. In comparison with the 23% killing rate observed in control livers, perfused livers killed approximately 40 to 50% of the infused C. albicans treated either with fibronectin, PepTite 2000, RGD, or RGDS. Hepatic killing of C. albicans treated with PepTite 2000 or fibronectin was dose dependent. Treatment of C. albicans with GRGDTP, GRGDSP, GRADSP, or GRGESP did not alter the ability of the perfused liver to kill C. albicans, suggesting that a degree of specificity for RGD peptides is associated with an increased ability of liver to kill RGD-treated C. albicans. Together, the data suggest that RGD peptides bind to a receptor on the surface of C. albicans, thereby increasing hepatic, and presumably Kupffer cell, killing of C. albicans. Natural or synthetic RGD peptides may serve as opsonins promoting C. albicans killing by Kupffer cells.

  7. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Gene Deficiency Ameliorates Hepatic Injury in a Mouse Model of Chronic Binge Alcohol-Induced Alcoholic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huilin; Beier, Juliane I.; Arteel, Gavin E.; Ramsden, Christopher E.; Feldstein, Ariel E.; McClain, Craig J.; Kirpich, Irina A.

    2016-01-01

    Experimental alcohol-induced liver injury is exacerbated by a high polyunsaturated fat diet rich in linoleic acid. We postulated that bioactive oxidized linoleic acid metabolites (OXLAMs) play a critical role in the development/progression of alcohol-mediated hepatic inflammation and injury. OXLAMs are endogenous ligands for transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1). Herein, we evaluated the role of signaling through TRPV1 in an experimental animal model of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Chronic binge alcohol administration increased plasma OXLAM levels, specifically 9- and 13-hydroxy-octadecadienoic acids. This effect was associated with up-regulation of hepatic TRPV1. Exposure of hepatocytes to these OXLAMs in vitro resulted in activation of TRPV1 signal transduction with increased intracellular Ca2+ levels. Genetic depletion of TRPV1 did not blunt hepatic steatosis caused by ethanol, but prevented hepatic injury. TRPV1 deficiency protected from hepatocyte death and prevented the increase in proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression, including tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6, macrophage inflammatory protein-2, and monocyte chemotactic protein 1. TRPV1 depletion markedly blunted ethanol-mediated induction of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, an important alcohol-induced hepatic inflammation mediator, via fibrin accumulation. This study indicates, for the first time, that TRPV1 receptor pathway may be involved in hepatic inflammatory response in an experimental animal model of ALD. TRPV1-OXLAM interactions appear to play a significant role in hepatic inflammation/injury, further supporting an important role for dietary lipids in ALD. PMID:25447051

  8. [Autoimmune hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Marcais, O; Larrey, D

    1994-01-01

    Acute and chronic autoimmune hepatitis are uncommon inflammatory liver diseases, mainly occurring in young women, in association with hypergammaglobulinemia and serum autoantibodies. Different types have been described: type 1 characterized by anti-smooth muscle and anti-nuclear antibodies; type 2 characterized by anti-LKM1 antibodies; type 3 characterized by anti-SLA antibodies. Other types, still not clearly defined, may exist. Autoimmune hepatitis are associated with HLA A1 B8 DR3 and HLA DR4. Without any treatment, the disease leads to cirrhosis and, uncommonly, to fulminant hepatitis. Large doses of corticosteroids usually allow to control the disease. Relapse of hepatitis is frequent after corticosteroid withdrawal. Concomitant administration of immunosuppressive agents such as azathioprine allows to reduce corticosteroid dosage and contributes to maintain the remission of the disease. Liver transplantation may be indicated in cases of severe cirrhosis or fulminant hepatitis.

  9. A Proteomic Investigation of Hepatic Resistance to Ascaris in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Deslyper, Gwendoline; Colgan, Thomas J.; Cooper, Andrew J. R.; Holland, Celia V.; Carolan, James C.

    2016-01-01

    The helminth Ascaris causes ascariasis in both humans and pigs. Humans, especially children, experience significant morbidity including respiratory complications, growth deficits and intestinal obstruction. Given that 800 million people worldwide are infected by Ascaris, this represents a significant global public health concern. The severity of the symptoms and associated morbidity are related to the parasite burden and not all hosts are infected equally. While the pathology of the disease has been extensively examined, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance and susceptibility to this nematode infection is poor. In order to investigate host differences associated with heavy and light parasite burden, an experimental murine model was developed utilising Ascaris-susceptible and -resistant mice strains, C57BL/6J and CBA/Ca, respectively, which experience differential burdens of migratory Ascaris larvae in the host lungs. Previous studies identified the liver as the site where this difference in susceptibility occurs. Using a label free quantitative proteomic approach, we analysed the hepatic proteomes of day four post infection C57BL/6J and CBA/Ca mice with and without Ascaris infection to identify proteins changes potentially linked to both resistance and susceptibility amongst the two strains, respectively. Over 3000 proteins were identified in total and clear intrinsic differences were elucidated between the two strains. These included a higher abundance of mitochondrial proteins, particularly those associated with the oxidative phosphorylation pathway and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the relatively resistant CBA/Ca mice. We hypothesise that the increased ROS levels associated with higher levels of mitochondrial activity results in a highly oxidative cellular environment that has a dramatic effect on the nematode’s ability to successfully sustain a parasitic association with its resistant host. Under infection, both

  10. A Proteomic Investigation of Hepatic Resistance to Ascaris in a Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Deslyper, Gwendoline; Colgan, Thomas J; Cooper, Andrew J R; Holland, Celia V; Carolan, James C

    2016-08-01

    The helminth Ascaris causes ascariasis in both humans and pigs. Humans, especially children, experience significant morbidity including respiratory complications, growth deficits and intestinal obstruction. Given that 800 million people worldwide are infected by Ascaris, this represents a significant global public health concern. The severity of the symptoms and associated morbidity are related to the parasite burden and not all hosts are infected equally. While the pathology of the disease has been extensively examined, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance and susceptibility to this nematode infection is poor. In order to investigate host differences associated with heavy and light parasite burden, an experimental murine model was developed utilising Ascaris-susceptible and -resistant mice strains, C57BL/6J and CBA/Ca, respectively, which experience differential burdens of migratory Ascaris larvae in the host lungs. Previous studies identified the liver as the site where this difference in susceptibility occurs. Using a label free quantitative proteomic approach, we analysed the hepatic proteomes of day four post infection C57BL/6J and CBA/Ca mice with and without Ascaris infection to identify proteins changes potentially linked to both resistance and susceptibility amongst the two strains, respectively. Over 3000 proteins were identified in total and clear intrinsic differences were elucidated between the two strains. These included a higher abundance of mitochondrial proteins, particularly those associated with the oxidative phosphorylation pathway and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the relatively resistant CBA/Ca mice. We hypothesise that the increased ROS levels associated with higher levels of mitochondrial activity results in a highly oxidative cellular environment that has a dramatic effect on the nematode's ability to successfully sustain a parasitic association with its resistant host. Under infection, both

  11. Chronic intermittent hypoxia causes hepatitis in a mouse model of diet-induced fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Savransky, Vladimir; Bevans, Shannon; Nanayakkara, Ashika; Li, Jianguo; Smith, Philip L; Torbenson, Michael S; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y

    2007-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) causes chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) during sleep. OSA is associated with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in obese individuals and may contribute to progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease from steatosis to NASH. The purpose of this study was to examine whether CIH induces inflammatory changes in the liver in mice with diet-induced hepatic steatosis. C57BL/6J mice (n = 8) on a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet were exposed to CIH for 6 mo and were compared with mice on the same diet exposed to intermittent air (control; n = 8). CIH caused liver injury with an increase in serum ALT (461 +/- 58 U/l vs. 103 +/- 16 U/l in the control group; P < 0.01) and AST (637 +/- 37 U/l vs. 175 +/- 13 U/l in the control group; P < 0.001), whereas alkaline phosphatase and total bilirubin levels were unchanged. Histology revealed hepatic steatosis in both groups, with mild accentuation of fat staining in the zone 3 hepatocytes in mice exposed to CIH. Animals exposed to CIH exhibited lobular inflammation and fibrosis in the liver, which were not evident in control mice. CIH caused significant increases in lipid peroxidation in serum and liver tissue; significant increases in hepatic levels of myeloperoxidase and proinflammatory cytokines IL-1beta, IL-6, and CXC chemokine MIP-2; a trend toward an increase in TNF-alpha; and an increase in alpha1(I)-collagen mRNA. We conclude that CIH induces lipid peroxidation and inflammation in the livers of mice on a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet.

  12. Estimating Functional Liver Reserve Following Hepatic Irradiation: Adaptive Normal Tissue Response Models

    PubMed Central

    Stenmark, Matthew H.; Cao, Yue; Wang, Hesheng; Jackson, Andrew; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Feng, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To estimate the limit of functional liver reserve for safe application of hepatic irradiation using changes in indocyanine green, an established assay of liver function. Materials and Methods From 2005–2011, 60 patients undergoing hepatic irradiation were enrolled in a prospective study assessing the plasma retention fraction of indocyanine green at 15-min (ICG-R15) prior to, during (at 60% of planned dose), and after radiotherapy (RT). The limit of functional liver reserve was estimated from the damage fraction of functional liver (DFL) post-RT [1−(ICG-R15pre-RT/ICG-R15post-RT)] where no toxicity was observed using a beta distribution function. Results Of 48 evaluable patients, 3 (6%) developed RILD, all within 2.5 months of completing RT. The mean ICG-R15 for non-RILD patients pre-RT, during-RT and 1-month post-RT was 20.3%(SE 2.6), 22.0%(3.0), and 27.5%(2.8), and for RILD patients was 6.3%(4.3), 10.8%(2.7), and 47.6%(8.8). RILD was observed at post-RT damage fractions of ≥78%. Both DFL assessed by during-RT ICG and MLD predicted for DFL post-RT (p<0.0001). Limiting the post-RT DFL to 50%, predicted a 99% probability of a true complication rate <15%. Conclusion The DFL as assessed by changes in ICG during treatment serves as an early indicator of a patient’s tolerance to hepatic irradiation. PMID:24813090

  13. Hepatic Overexpression of Hemopexin Inhibits Inflammation and Vascular Stasis in Murine Models of Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vercellotti, Gregory M; Zhang, Ping; Nguyen, Julia; Abdulla, Fuad; Chen, Chunsheng; Nguyen, Phong; Nowotny, Carlos; Steer, Clifford J; Smith, Ann; Belcher, John D

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) patients have low serum hemopexin (Hpx) levels due to chronic hemolysis. We hypothesized that in SCD mice, hepatic overexpression of hemopexin would scavenge the proximal mediator of vascular activation, heme, and inhibit inflammation and microvascular stasis. To examine the protective role of Hpx in SCD, we transplanted bone marrow from NY1DD SCD mice into Hpx-/- or Hpx+/+ C57BL/6 mice. Dorsal skin fold chambers were implanted 13 wks post-transplant, and microvascular stasis (% nonflowing venules) was evaluated in response to heme infusion. Hpx-/- sickle mice had significantly greater microvascular stasis in response to heme infusion than Hpx+/+ sickle mice (p < 0.05), demonstrating the protective effect of Hpx in SCD. We utilized Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-mediated gene transfer to overexpress wild-type rat Hpx (wt-Hpx) in NY1DD and Townes-SS SCD mice. Control SCD mice were treated with lactated Ringer’s solution (LRS) or a luciferase (Luc) plasmid. Plasma and hepatic Hpx were significantly increased compared with LRS and Luc controls. Microvascular stasis in response to heme infusion in NY1DD and Townes-SS mice overexpressing wt-Hpx had significantly less stasis than controls (p < 0.05). Wt-Hpx overexpression markedly increased hepatic nuclear Nrf2 expression, HO-1 activity and protein, and the heme-Hpx binding protein and scavenger receptor CD91/LRP1, and decreased NF-κB activation. Two missense (ms)-Hpx SB constructs that bound neither heme nor the Hpx receptor CD91/LRP1 did not prevent heme-induced stasis. In conclusion, increasing Hpx levels in transgenic sickle mice via gene transfer activates the Nrf2/HO-1 antioxidant axis and ameliorates inflammation and vasoocclusion. PMID:27451971

  14. Resveratrol Ameliorates the Components of Hepatic Inflammation and Apoptosis in a Rat Model of Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pektaş, Mehmet Bilgehan; Sadi, Gökhan; Koca, Halit Bugra; Yuksel, Yasemin; Vurmaz, Ayhan; Koca, Tulay; Tosun, Murat

    2016-02-01

    Preclinical Research Trans-resveratrol has a wide range of biological effects that reflect its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticarcinogenic and cardioprotective properties. This study was conducted to elucidate the potential role of resveratrol on hepatic inflammation and the apoptotic pathway components Bcl-2, Bax and p53 in a streptozotocin (STZ)-induced rat model of diabetes mellitus. Inflammatory and apoptotic biomarkers indicated a reduction in hepatic erythropoietin (1.26-fold) and increased asymmetric dimethylarginine (3.9-fold), visfatin (1.6-fold), inflammatory interleukins and TNF-α contents (approximately twofold each) in the diabetic animals. Induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase gene (2.04-fold) and protein expression (1.24-fold) was also observed. Immunohistochemical studies showed enhancement of the apoptotic biomarkers Bax and p53 in diabetic animals. STZ-induced diabetic male Wistar rats were treated with resveratrol (20 mg/kg/day i.p.). Resveratrol succeeded to recover most of these inflammatory and apoptotic elements. Therefore, inflammatory and apoptotic pathways were proved to be affected by STZ-induced diabetes in several aspects and resveratrol might contribute hepatoprotective effects as evidenced from this study.

  15. Protective Effect of Baccharis trimera Extract on Acute Hepatic Injury in a Model of Inflammation Induced by Acetaminophen

    PubMed Central

    Pádua, Bruno da Cruz; Rossoni Júnior, Joamyr Victor; de Brito Magalhães, Cíntia Lopes; Chaves, Míriam Martins; Silva, Marcelo Eustáquio; Pedrosa, Maria Lucia; de Souza, Gustavo Henrique Bianco; Brandão, Geraldo Célio; Rodrigues, Ivanildes Vasconcelos; Lima, Wanderson Geraldo; Costa, Daniela Caldeira

    2014-01-01

    Background. Acetaminophen (APAP) is a commonly used analgesic and antipyretic. When administered in high doses, APAP is a clinical problem in the US and Europe, often resulting in severe liver injury and potentially acute liver failure. Studies have demonstrated that antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents effectively protect against the acute hepatotoxicity induced by APAP overdose. Methods. The present study attempted to investigate the protective effect of B. trimera against APAP-induced hepatic damage in rats. The liver-function markers ALT and AST, biomarkers of oxidative stress, antioxidant parameters, and histopathological changes were examined. Results. The pretreatment with B. trimera attenuated serum activities of ALT and AST that were enhanced by administration of APAP. Furthermore, pretreatment with the extract decreases the activity of the enzyme SOD and increases the activity of catalase and the concentration of total glutathione. Histopathological analysis confirmed the alleviation of liver damage and reduced lesions caused by APAP. Conclusions. The hepatoprotective action of B. trimera extract may rely on its effect on reducing the oxidative stress caused by APAP-induced hepatic damage in a rat model. General Significance. These results make the extract of B. trimera a potential candidate drug capable of protecting the liver against damage caused by APAP overdose. PMID:25435714

  16. Airway oxidative stress causes vascular and hepatic inflammation via upregulation of IL-17A in a murine model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Al-Harbi, Naif O; Nadeem, Ahmed; Al-Harbi, Mohammed M; Ansari, Mushtaq A; AlSharari, Shakir D; Bahashwan, Saleh A; Attia, Sabry M; Al-Hosaini, Khaled A; Al Hoshani, Ali R; Ahmad, Sheikh F

    2016-05-01

    Oxidants are generated in asthmatic airways due to infiltration of inflammatory leukocytes and resident cells in the lung. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide and superoxide radical may leak into systemic circulation when generated in uncontrolled manner and may impact vasculature. Our previous studies have shown an association between airway inflammation and systemic inflammation; however so far none has investigated the impact of airway oxidative inflammation on hepatic oxidative stress and Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokine markers in liver/vasculature in a murine model of asthma. Therefore, this study investigated the contribution of oxidative stress encountered in asthmatic airways in modulation of systemic/hepatic Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines balance and hepatic oxidative stress. Mice were sensitized intraperitoneally with cockroach extract (CE) in the presence of aluminum hydroxide followed by several intranasal (i.n.) challenges with CE. Mice were then assessed for systemic/hepatic inflammation through assessment of Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines and oxidative stress (iNOS, protein nitrotyrosine, lipid peroxides and myeloperoxidase activity). Challenge with CE led to increased Th2/Th17 cytokines in blood/liver and hepatic oxidative stress. However, only Th17 related pro-inflammatory markers were upregulated by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) inhalation in vasculature and liver, whereas antioxidant treatment, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) downregulated them. Hepatic oxidative stress was also upregulated by H2O2 inhalation, whereas NAC attenuated it. Therefore, our study shows that airway oxidative inflammation may contribute to systemic inflammation through upregulation of Th17 immune responses in blood/liver and hepatic oxidative stress. This might predispose these patients to increased risk for the development of cardiovascular disorders.

  17. A model of interaction: aflatoxins and hepatitis viruses in liver cancer aetiology and prevention.

    PubMed

    Wild, Christopher P; Montesano, Ruggero

    2009-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide and has an extremely poor prognosis. The majority of cases occur in south-east Asia and sub-Saharan Africa where the major risk factors are chronic infection with hepatitis B and C viruses (HBV and HCV) as well as dietary exposure to aflatoxins. Aflatoxin B1, the most commonly occurring and potent of the aflatoxins is associated with a specific AGG to AGT transversion mutation at codon 249 of the p53 gene in human HCC, providing mechanistic support to a causal link between exposure and disease. Prospective epidemiological studies have shown a more than multiplicative interaction between HBV and aflatoxins in terms of HCC risk. However, the biology underlying this statistical interaction is not fully understood. There are a number of potential mechanisms including, among others: the fixation of AFB1-induced mutations in the presence of liver regeneration and hyperplasia induced by chronic HBV infection; the predisposition of HBV-infected hepatocytes to aflatoxin-induced DNA damage; an increase in susceptibility to chronic HBV infection in aflatoxin-exposed individuals; and oxidative stress exacerbated by co-exposure to aflatoxins and chronic hepatitis infection. Priorities for prevention are global HBV vaccination, primary and secondary prevention strategies against aflatoxin and the avoidance of transmission of HCV through good hygiene practices.

  18. Kinetic modeling of human hepatic glucose metabolism in type 2 diabetes mellitus predicts higher risk of hypoglycemic events in rigorous insulin therapy.

    PubMed

    König, Matthias; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2012-10-26

    A major problem in the insulin therapy of patients with diabetes type 2 (T2DM) is the increased occurrence of hypoglycemic events which, if left untreated, may cause confusion or fainting and in severe cases seizures, coma, and even death. To elucidate the potential contribution of the liver to hypoglycemia in T2DM we applied a detailed kinetic model of human hepatic glucose metabolism to simulate changes in glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and glycogen metabolism induced by deviations of the hormones insulin, glucagon, and epinephrine from their normal plasma profiles. Our simulations reveal in line with experimental and clinical data from a multitude of studies in T2DM, (i) significant changes in the relative contribution of glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and glycogen metabolism to hepatic glucose production and hepatic glucose utilization; (ii) decreased postprandial glycogen storage as well as increased glycogen depletion in overnight fasting and short term fasting; and (iii) a shift of the set point defining the switch between hepatic glucose production and hepatic glucose utilization to elevated plasma glucose levels, respectively, in T2DM relative to normal, healthy subjects. Intriguingly, our model simulations predict a restricted gluconeogenic response of the liver under impaired hormonal signals observed in T2DM, resulting in an increased risk of hypoglycemia. The inability of hepatic glucose metabolism to effectively counterbalance a decline of the blood glucose level becomes even more pronounced in case of tightly controlled insulin treatment. Given this Janus face mode of action of insulin, our model simulations underline the great potential that normalization of the plasma glucagon profile may have for the treatment of T2DM.

  19. Establishing a new animal model for hepadnaviral infection: susceptibility of Chinese Marmota-species to woodchuck hepatitis virus infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bao-Ju; Tian, Yong-Jun; Meng, Zhong-Ji; Jiang, Min; Wei, Bo-Qing; Tao, Yuan-Qing; Fan, Wei; Li, An-Yi; Bao, Jun-Jie; Li, Xin-Yu; Zhang, Zheng-Mao; Wang, Zhong-Dong; Wang, Hu; Roggendorf, Michael; Lu, Meng-Ji; Yang, Dong-Liang

    2011-03-01

    Hepatitis B virus infection (HBV) is a major medical problem in China. The lack of a suitable infection model in China is recognized as an obstacle for research on HBV in China. Chinese Marmota-species is phylogenetically closely related to Marmota monax, thus, it might be suitable to serve as an animal model for HBV infection. Therefore, we attempted to prove the claim about the existence of woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV)-like viruses in Chinese Marmota-species and to determine the susceptibility of these species to experimental WHV infection. In the present study, 653 sera from three Chinese Marmota-species, Marmota himalayana, Marmota baibacina and Marmota bobak, were screened for WHV-like viruses by serological and molecular assays. The susceptibility to WHV of three species was investigated by experimental infection and monitored by testing of anti-WHc and WHsAg by ELISA, detection of WHV DNA by PCR, and detection of WHV replication intermediates and antigens in liver samples. No evidence for the existence of a genetically closely related virus to WHV in three Chinese Marmota-species was found by serological assays and PCR. M. himalayana was susceptible to WHV infection as inoculated animals became positive for anti-WHc, WHsAg and WHV DNA. Further, WHV replication intermediates and proteins were detected in liver samples. In contrast, M. baibacina remained negative for tested virological parameters. M. bobak species showed a limited susceptibility to WHV. Our data do not support early reports about WHV-like viruses in China. M. himalayana is suitable for the establishment of a model for hepadnaviral infection.

  20. Hepatic Overexpression of Steroid Sulfatase Ameliorates Mouse Models of Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes through Sex-specific Mechanisms*

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Mengxi; He, Jinhan; Kucera, Heidi; Gaikwad, Nilesh W.; Zhang, Bin; Xu, Meishu; O'Doherty, Robert M.; Selcer, Kyle W.; Xie, Wen

    2014-01-01

    The steroid sulfatase (STS)-mediated desulfation is a critical metabolic mechanism that regulates the chemical and functional homeostasis of endogenous and exogenous molecules. In this report, we first showed that the liver expression of Sts was induced in both the high fat diet (HFD) and ob/ob models of obesity and type 2 diabetes and during the fed to fasting transition. In defining the functional relevance of STS induction in metabolic disease, we showed that overexpression of STS in the liver of transgenic mice alleviated HFD and ob/ob models of obesity and type 2 diabetes, including reduced body weight, improved insulin sensitivity, and decreased hepatic steatosis and inflammation. Interestingly, STS exerted its metabolic benefit through sex-specific mechanisms. In female mice, STS may have increased hepatic estrogen activity by converting biologically inactive estrogen sulfates to active estrogens and consequently improved the metabolic functions, whereas ovariectomy abolished this protective effect. In contrast, the metabolic benefit of STS in males may have been accounted for by the male-specific decrease of inflammation in white adipose tissue and skeletal muscle as well as a pattern of skeletal muscle gene expression that favors energy expenditure. The metabolic benefit in male STS transgenic mice was retained after castration. Treatment with the STS substrate estrone sulfate also improved metabolic functions in both the HFD and ob/ob models. Our results have uncovered a novel function of STS in energy metabolism and type 2 diabetes. Liver-specific STS induction or estrogen/estrogen sulfate delivery may represent a novel approach to manage metabolic syndrome. PMID:24497646

  1. The Efficacy of Social Role Models to Increase Motivation to Obtain Vaccination against Hepatitis B among Men Who Have Sex with Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vet, R.; de Wit, J. B. F.; Das, E.

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of role models in persuasive messages about risk and social norms to increase motivation to obtain hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination in men who have sex with men (MSM). MSM at risk for HBV in The Netherlands (N = 168) were recruited online via a range of websites and were randomly assigned to one of four…

  2. Mathematical Modeling of Hepatitis C Prevalence Reduction with Antiviral Treatment Scale-Up in Persons Who Inject Drugs in Metropolitan Chicago

    SciTech Connect

    Echevarria, Desarae; Gutfraind, Alexander; Boodram, Basmattee; Major, Marian; Del Valle, Sara; Cotler, Scott J.; Dahari, Harel

    2015-08-21

    New direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) provide an opportunity to combat hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in persons who inject drugs (PWID). Here we use a mathematical model to predict the impact of a DAA-treatment scale-up on HCV prevalence among PWID and the estimated cost in metropolitan Chicago.

  3. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement. Ann Intern Med . 2014;161(1):58-66. PMID 24863637 ... Development Conference Statement: Management of hepatitis B. Ann Intern Med . 2009;150:104-10. PMID: 19124811 www. ...

  4. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Change Plan Wallet card for patients to record their alcohol use over a 4-week period as a way to monitor and reduce their drinking behavior. Glossary Definitions of terms commonly used with viral hepatitis and ...

  5. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... All babies should get the vaccine, but older children and adults can get it too. If you travel to countries where Hepatitis B is common, you should get the vaccine. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  6. Hepatic Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Tadros, Micheal; Forouhar, Faripour; Wu, George Y

    2013-12-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem disease characterized by the presence of non-caseating granulomas in affected organs. Pulmonary involvement is the most common site of disease activity. However, hepatic involvement is also common in sarcoidosis, occurring in up to 70% of patients. Most patients with liver involvement are asymptomatic. Therefore, the majority of cases are discovered incidentally, frequently by the finding of elevated liver enzymes. Pain in the right upper quadrant of the abdomen, fatigue, pruritus, and jaundice may be associated with liver involvement. Portal hypertension and cirrhosis are complications linked to long-standing hepatic sarcoidosis. Liver biopsy is usually required to confirm the diagnosis. It is important to differentiate hepatic sarcoidosis from other autoimmune and granulomatous liver diseases. Not all cases of hepatic sarcoidosis require treatment. For symptomatic patients, the first line treatment includes corticosteroids or ursodeoxycholic acid. Various immunosuppressant agents can be used as second line agents. Rarely, severe cases require liver transplantation.

  7. Autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Heneghan, Michael A; Yeoman, Andrew D; Verma, Sumita; Smith, Alastair D; Longhi, Maria Serena

    2013-10-26

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a disease of the hepatic parenchyma that can present in acute or chronic forms. In common with many autoimmune diseases, autoimmune hepatitis is associated with non-organ-specific antibodies in the context of hepatic autoimmunity. This dichotomy has made definition of a unifying hypothesis in the pathophysiology of the disease difficult, although data from the past 8 years have drawn attention to the role of regulatory T cells. Several triggers have been identified, and the disease arises in genetically susceptible individuals. Clinical and biochemical remission is achievable in up to 85% of cases. For the remaining patients, alternative immunosuppression strategies are an option. Liver transplantation provides an excellent outcome for patients with acute liver failure or complications of end-stage liver disease, including hepatocellular carcinoma. Variant or overlapping syndromes are worthy of consideration when unexpected disease features arise.

  8. Baseline prognostic factors and statistic model to predict early virological response in lamivudine-treated patients with chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rui; Pan, Fan; Lin, Chun; Lin, Xiuquan; Gao, Haibing; Huang, Shuiwen; Huang, Zuxiong; Lin, Yong; Pan, Chen; Zhou, Yuanping

    2015-01-01

    Lamivudine is a potent nucleoside analogue used in treating chronic hepatitis B (CHB). However, resistance to the drug remains a problem. We analyzed all lamivudine recipients in this trial to determine the baseline characteristics and a model to predict early virological response reflecting the long-term effect of lamivudine. In this prospective trial, 230 patients who had not treated with nucleotide analogue with chronic HBV infection were assigned to receive 100 mg of lamivudine once daily for 24 weeks at least. All patients were followed up every 2 week. Cox proportional hazard regression model analyses were employed to evaluate baseline variables and to develop a statistical model. Female (P = 0.042), baseline higher serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) (P = 0.002), and lower level of HBV-DNA (P = 0.016) were identified to be associated with higher possibility of early virological response. A model was established based on these variables to calculate the risk scores (R) for CHB patients. R > -0.45 suggested early virological response to lamivudine. The model was validated among an independent set of 40 patients. The gender as well as baseline AST and HBV-DNA levels can predict early virological response. The model provides a better tool for response prediction based on the three prognostic factors.

  9. Efficient Delivery of DOX to Nuclei of Hepatic Carcinoma Cells in the Subcutaneous Tumor Model Using pH-Sensitive Pullulan-DOX Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Li, Huanan; Cui, Yani; Sui, Junhui; Bian, Shaoquan; Sun, Yong; Liang, Jie; Fan, Yujiang; Zhang, Xingdong

    2015-07-29

    A series of pullulan-doxorubicin conjugates (Pu-DOXs) were investigated for effectively delivering DOX to nuclei of hepatic carcinoma cells in subcutaneous tumor model. These Pu-DOXs were prepared by conjugating DOX onto pullulan molecule via pH-responsive hydrazone bond using spacers with different alkane chain length. The highest drug loading content of Pu-DOXs went up to nearly 50%, and the diameter of Pu-DOX nanoparticles ranged from 50 to 170 nm, as measured by DLS and TEM. These Pu-DOX nanoparticles could rapidly release DOX in the acidic environment at pH = 5.0 while being kept relatively stable in neural conditions. The in vitro cell coculture experiments revealed that these Pu-DOX nanoparticles were selectively internalized by hepatic carcinoma cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis via asialoglycoprotein receptor on the hepatic carcinoma cell surface. DOX was rapidly released from Pu-DOX nanoparticles in acidic endosome/lysosome, diffused into cell nuclei due to its strong affinity to nucleic acid, inhibited the cell proliferation, and accelerated the cell apoptosis. In the nude mice subcutaneous hepatic carcinoma model, Pu-DOX nanoparticles efficiently accumulated in the tumor site through the enhanced permeation and retention effect. Then DOX was specifically internalized by hepatic carcinoma cells and rapidly diffused into the nuclei of cells. Compared with the control group in in vivo experiments, these Pu-DOX nanoparticles effectively inhibited solid tumor growth, prolonging the lifetime of the experimental animal. These pH sensitive nanoparticles might provide an important clinical implication for targeted hepatic carcinoma therapy with high efficiency and low systematic toxicity.

  10. Mouse hepatitis virus infection of the CNS: a model for defense, disease, and repair

    PubMed Central

    Schaumburg, Chris S.; Held, Katherine S.; Lane, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Viral infection of the central nervous system (CNS) results in varied outcomes ranging from encephalitis, paralytic poliomyelitis or other serious consequences. One of the principal factors that directs the outcome of infection is the localized innate immune response, which is proceeded by the adaptive immune response against the invading viral pathogen. The role of the immune system is to contain and control the spread of virus within the CNS, and paradoxically, this response may also be pathological. Studies with a neurotropic murine coronavirus, mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) have provided important insights into how the immune system combats neuroinvasive viruses, and have identified molecular and cellular mechanisms contributing to chronic disease in persistently infected mice. PMID:18508518

  11. Cutthroat Trout Virus—Towards a Virus Model to Support Hepatitis E Research

    PubMed Central

    von Nordheim, Marcus; Boinay, Michel; Leisi, Remo; Kempf, Christoph; Ros, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Cutthroat trout virus (CTV) is a non-pathogenic fish virus belonging to the Hepeviridae family, and it is distantly related to hepatitis E virus (HEV). Here, we report the development of an efficient cell culture system where CTV can consistently replicate to titers never observed before with a hepevirus. By using the rainbow trout gill (RTGill-W1) cell line, CTV reaches 1010 geq/mL intracellularly and 109 geq/mL extracellularly within 5–6 days in culture. We additionally established a qPCR system to investigate CTV infectivity, and developed a specific antibody directed against the viral capsid protein encoded by ORF2. With these methods, we were able to follow the progressive accumulation of viral RNA and the capsid protein, and their intracellular distribution during virus replication. Virus progeny purified through iodixanol density gradients indicated—that similar to HEV—CTV produced in cell culture is also lipid-associated. The lack of an efficient cell culture system has greatly impeded studies with HEV, a major human pathogen that causes hepatitis worldwide. Although several cell culture systems have recently been established, the replication efficiency of HEV is not robust enough to allow studies on different aspects of the virus replication cycle. Therefore, a surrogate virus that can replicate easily and efficiently in cultured cells would be helpful to boost research studies with hepeviruses. Due to its similarities, but also its key differences to HEV, CTV represents a promising tool to elucidate aspects of the replication cycle of Hepeviridae in general, and HEV in particular. PMID:27775612

  12. Fucoidan reduces inflammatory response in a rat model of hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Jing; Ye, Qi-Fa

    2015-11-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury after a liver transplant is a major cause of severe complications that lead to graft dysfunction. Fucoidan, a complex of sulfated polysaccharides derived from marine brown algae, demonstrated antiapoptotic as well as potential anti-inflammatory properties in previous studies. Fucoidan has also shown protective effects on I/R-injured kidney and heart. However, whether fucoidan can attenuate hepatic I/R injury has not been examined. To clarify the role of fucoidan in hepatic I/R injury, Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to sham operation or ischemia followed by reperfusion with treatment of saline or fucoidan (50, 100, or 200 mg·(kg body mass)(-1)·d(-1)). The fucoidan-treated group showed decreased levels of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase compared with the control group. Myeloperoxidase and malondialdehyde activities and mRNA levels of CD11b in the fucoidan-treated group were significantly decreased. Hepatocellular swelling/necrosis, sinusoidal/vascular congestion, and inflammatory cell infiltration were also attenuated in the fucoidan group. The expression of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, CXCL-10, VCAM-1, and ICAM-1 were markedly decreased in the samples from the fucoidan-treated group. Fucoidan largely prevented activation of the inflammatory signaling pathway, compared with the control group. In summary, fucoidan can protect the liver from I/R injury through suppressing activation of the inflammatory signaling pathway, as well as the expression of inflammatory mediators, and inflammatory cell infiltration.

  13. Linagliptin alleviates hepatic steatosis and inflammation in a mouse model of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Klein, Thomas; Fujii, Masato; Sandel, Jan; Shibazaki, Yuichiro; Wakamatsu, Kyoko; Mark, Michael; Yoneyama, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a primary cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitors are established therapies for type 2 diabetes and although DPP-4 inhibitors can reduce hepatic steatosis, their impact on local inflammation and fibrosis in NASH remains unknown. Using two different experimental treatment regimens (4- and 2-week treatments) in streptozotocin-treated neonatal mice on a high-fat diet, we show that the DPP-4 inhibitor linagliptin (10 and 30 mg/kg) significantly attenuated the NAS score from 4.9 ± 0.6 to 3.7 ± 0.4 and 3.6 ± 0.3, respectively, in the 4-week study. In the 2-week study, linagliptin 10 mg/kg significantly reduced NAS score from 4.1 ± 0.4 to 2.4 ± 0.4. Telmisartan was used as a positive control in both studies and lowered NAS score to 1.9 ± 0.7 and 1.4 ± 0.3, respectively. Due to streptozotocin treatment, elevated glucose levels were unchanged by either drug treatment. Further, linagliptin 10 mg/kg significantly reduced mRNA levels of SOCS-3 (from 1.68 ± 0.2 to 0.83 ± 0.08), IFN-γ (from 4.0 ± 0.5 to 2.3 ± 0.3), and TNF-α (from 5.7 ± 0.5 to 2.13 ± 0.3). The latter observation was confirmed by immunohistochemistry of TNF-α in liver specimens. In addition, using microautoradiography, we showed that the distribution of radiolabeled linagliptin was heterogeneous with the highest density associated with interlobular bile ducts and portal tracts (acini). In conclusion, these studies confirm that linagliptin has high exposure in hepatic tissue and has both anti-inflammatory and anti-steatotic activity in NASH.

  14. Hepatitis C FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Viral Hepatitis Contact Us Quick Links to Hepatitis ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home ... Outbreaks State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource Center Hepatitis C FAQs for the Public Recommend on Facebook ...

  15. Hepatitis B FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Viral Hepatitis Contact Us Quick Links to Hepatitis ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home ... Outbreaks State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource Center Hepatitis B FAQs for the Public Recommend on Facebook ...

  16. Hepatitis A Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Hepatitis A Testing Share this page: Was this page ... HAV-Ab total; Anti-HAV Formal name: Viral Hepatitis A Antibody Related tests: Hepatitis B Testing ; Hepatitis ...

  17. Delta agent (Hepatitis D)

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis D virus ... Hepatitis D virus (HDV) is found only in people who carry the hepatitis B virus. HDV may make liver ... B virus but who never had symptoms. Hepatitis D infects about 15 million people worldwide. It occurs ...

  18. Feature Hepatitis: Hepatitis Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature Hepatitis Hepatitis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention Past Issues / Spring 2009 ... No appetite Fever Headaches Diagnosis To check for hepatitis viruses, your doctor will test your blood. You ...

  19. Developmental changes in hepatic glucose metabolism in a newborn piglet model: A comparative analysis for suckling period and early weaning period.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chunyan; Wang, Qinhua; Wang, Jing; Tan, Bie; Fan, Zhiyong; Deng, Ze-yuan; Wu, Xin; Yin, Yulong

    2016-02-19

    The liver glucose metabolism, supplying sufficient energy for glucose-dependent tissues, is important in suckling or weaned animals, although there are few studies with piglet model. To better understand the development of glucose metabolism in the piglets during suckling period and early weaning period, we determined the hepatic glycogen content, and investigated the relative protein expression of key enzymes of glucogenesis (GNG) and mRNA levels of some glucose metabolism-related genes. During suckling period, the protein level of G6Pase in the liver of suckling piglets progressively declined with day of age compared with that of newborn piglets (at 1 day of age), whereas the PEPCK level stabilized until day 21 of age, indicating that hepatic GNG capacity gradually weakened in suckling piglets. The synthesis of hepatic glycogen, which was consistent with the fluctuation of glycolytic key genes PFKL and PKLR that gradually decreased after birth and was more or less steady during latter suckling period, although both the mRNA levels of GCK and key glucose transporter GLUT2 presented uptrend in suckling piglets. However, early weaning significantly suppressed the hepatic GNG in the weaned piglets, especially at d 3-5 of weaning period, then gradually recovered at d 7 of weaning period. Meanwhile, PFKL, PKLR and GLUT2 showed the similar trend during weaning period. On the contrast, the hepatic glycogen reached the maximum value when the G6Pase and PEPCK protein expression were at the lowest level, although the GCK level maintained increasing through 7 days of weaning period. Altogether, our study provides evidence that hepatic GNG and glycolysis in newborn piglets were more active than other days during suckling period, and early weaning could significantly suppressed glucose metabolism in liver, but this inhibition would progressively recover at day 7 after weaning.

  20. The transmission dynamics of hepatitis B in the UK: a mathematical model for evaluating costs and effectiveness of immunization programmes.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, J. R.; Nokes, D. J.; Medley, G. F.; Anderson, R. M.

    1996-01-01

    Complex hepatitis B (HBV) epidemiology makes it difficult to evaluate and compare effectiveness of different immunization policies. A method for doing so is presented using a mathematical model of HBV transmission dynamics which can represent universal infant and adolescent vaccination strategies and those targeted at genito-urinary (GU) clinic attenders and infants born to infectious mothers. Model structure, epidemiological underpinning, and parameterization, are described. Data from the UK National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles is used to define patterns of sexual activity and GU clinic attendance; data deficiencies are discussed, in particular that of UK seroprevalence of HBV markers stratified by age, sex, and risk factors. General model predictions of endemic HBV marker prevalence in homosexual and heterosexual populations seem consistent with published UK data. The simulations exhibit non-linearities in the impact of different vaccination strategies. Estimated number of carriers prevented per vaccine dose for each strategy provides a measure of costs and benefits, varying temporally over the course of a programme, and with level of vaccine coverage. Screening before vaccination markedly increases payback per dose in homosexuals but not in heterosexuals; mass infant vaccination gives the poorest effectiveness ratio and vaccination of infants after antenatal screening the best; in general, increasing vaccine coverage yields lower pay-back per dose. The model provides a useful framework for evaluating costs and benefits of immunization programmes, but for precise quantitative comparison more UK epidemiological data is urgently needed. PMID:8626006

  1. A model-based meta-analysis of sofosbuvir-based treatments in chronic hepatitis C patients.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pitarch, Alejandro; Guglieri-López, Beatriz; Ferriols-Lisart, Rafael; Merino-Sanjuán, Matilde

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of sofosbuvir-based treatments in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection using a model-based meta-analysis (MBMA). A bibliographic search was performed to identify clinical trials involving sofosbuvir as a unique direct-acting antiviral (DAA) agent or together with daclatasvir, ledipasvir or simeprevir for the treatment of diagnosed HCV infection. The time course of the virological response (VR) was modelled to estimate the effect of treatment and the influence of population characteristics on the longitudinal efficacy profile. The model was validated and simulations of 10 different treatment schedules were performed. Data from 19 clinical trials were included in the analysis. According to the developed model, therapy with sofosbuvir+ledipasvir is the most effective therapy in all scenarios, but it does not differ greatly in terms of sustained VR with respect to other combinations of DAA treatments. In conclusion, this MBMA generates knowledge regarding hypothetical head-to-head trials that have not been conducted previously. Therapies with sofosbuvir+ledipasvir are probably the most effective sofosbuvir-based treatments.

  2. Deregulation of energy metabolism promotes antifibrotic effects in human hepatic stellate cells and prevents liver fibrosis in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Swathi; Potter, James J; Geschwind, Jean-Francois; Sur, Surojit; Hamilton, James P; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Mezey, Esteban; Ganapathy-Kanniappan, Shanmugasundaram

    2016-01-15

    Liver fibrosis and cirrhosis result from uncontrolled secretion and accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins by hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) that are activated by liver injury and inflammation. Despite the progress in understanding the biology liver fibrogenesis and the identification of potential targets for treating fibrosis, development of an effective therapy remains elusive. Since an uninterrupted supply of intracellular energy is critical for the activated-HSCs to maintain constant synthesis and secretion of ECM, we hypothesized that interfering with energy metabolism could affect ECM secretion. Here we report that a sublethal dose of the energy blocker, 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) facilitates phenotypic alteration of activated LX-2 (a human hepatic stellate cell line), into a less-active form. This treatment-dependent reversal of activated-LX2 cells was evidenced by a reduction in α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and collagen secretion, and an increase in activity of matrix metalloproteases. Mechanistically, 3-BrPA-dependent antifibrotic effects involved down-regulation of the mitochondrial metabolic enzyme, ATP5E, and up-regulation of glycolysis, as evident by elevated levels of lactate dehydrogenase, lactate production and its transporter, MCT4. Finally, the antifibrotic effects of 3-BrPA were validated in vivo in a mouse model of carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis. Results from histopathology & histochemical staining for collagen and α-SMA substantiated that 3-BrPA promotes antifibrotic effects in vivo. Taken together, our data indicate that sublethal, metronomic treatment with 3-BrPA blocks the progression of liver fibrosis suggesting its potential as a novel therapeutic for treating liver fibrosis.

  3. A High Protein Diet during Pregnancy Affects Hepatic Gene Expression of Energy Sensing Pathways along Ontogenesis in a Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Oster, Michael; Murani, Eduard; Metges, Cornelia C.; Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Wimmers, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    In rodent models and in humans the impact of gestational diets on the offspring's phenotype was shown experimentally and epidemiologically. The underlying programming of fetal development was shown to be associated with an increased risk of degenerative diseases in adulthood, including the metabolic syndrome. There are clues that diet-dependent modifications of the metabolism during fetal life can persist until adulthood. This leads to the hypothesis that the offspring's transcriptomes show short-term and long-term changes depending on the maternal diet. To this end pregnant German landrace gilts were fed either a high protein diet (HP, 30% CP) or an adequate protein diet (AP, 12% CP) throughout pregnancy. Hepatic transcriptome profiles of the offspring were analyzed at prenatal (94 dpc) and postnatal stages (1, 28, 188 dpn). Depending on the gestational dietary exposure, mRNA expression levels of genes related to energy metabolism, N-metabolism, growth factor signaling pathways, lipid metabolism, nucleic acid metabolism and stress/immune response were affected either in a short-term or in a long-term manner. Gene expression profiles at fetal stage 94 dpc were almost unchanged between the diets. The gestational HP diet affected the hepatic expression profiles at prenatal and postnatal stages. The effects encompassed a modulation of the genome in terms of an altered responsiveness of energy and nutrient sensing pathways. Differential expression of genes related to energy production and nutrient utilization contribute to the maintenance of development and growth performance within physiological norms, however the modulation of these pathways may be accompanied by a predisposition for metabolic disturbances up to adult stages. PMID:21789176

  4. A predictive model for carcinogenesis in patients with chronic hepatitis B undergoing entecavir therapy and its validation.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Hiroki; Nishijima, Norihiro; Enomoto, Hirayuki; Sakamoto, Azusa; Nasu, Akihiro; Komekado, Hideyuki; Nishimura, Takashi; Kita, Ryuichi; Kimura, Toru; Iijima, Hiroko; Nishiguchi, Shuhei; Osaki, Yukio

    2016-09-01

    We created a model to predict the development of liver carcinogenesis in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) undergoing entecavir (ETV) therapy and to validate the accuracy using an independent dataset.A total of 328 CHB subjects were analyzed. Subjects were randomly assigned into 2 groups: the training group (n = 164) and the validation group (n = 164). Using data from the training group, we built a predictive model for liver carcinogenesis by performing univariate and multivariate analyses using variables associated with liver carcinogenesis. We subsequently assessed the applicability of the constructed model in the validation group.The median (range) follow-up periods in the training and the validation groups were 5.03 years (1.03-9.98) and 4.84 years (1.10-9.97), respectively. The proportion of hepatitis B virus-DNA at 24 weeks <1.9 log IU/mL in the training group was 70.7% (116/164), while that in the validation group was 71.3% (117/164). For the entire cohort (n = 328), the median alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) value at 24 weeks (3.45 ng/mL; range, 0.9-102.7 ng/mL) significantly decreased compared to the baseline values (5.55 ng/mL; range, 0.9-1039.5 ng/mL), while the median alanine aminotransferase (ALT) value at 24 weeks (24 IU/mL; range, 6-251 IU/mL) also significantly decreased compared to baseline values (57 IU/mL; range, 7-1450 IU/mL). During the observation period, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) developed in 15 (9.1%) patients in the training group and in 17 (10.4%) patients in the validation group. The 3- and 5-year cumulative HCC incidence rates in the entire cohort were 4.48% and 9.52%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis of the training group, age ≥54 years (P = 0.0273), ALT level at 24 weeks (P = 0.0456), and AFP at 24 weeks (P = 0.0485) were found to be significant predictors linked to HCC. Using these independent predictors, the risk for HCC development was well stratified in the validation group (overall significance

  5. Silymarin attenuated hepatic steatosis through regulation of lipid metabolism and oxidative stress in a mouse model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Xunjun; Wang, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    Silymarin, which derived from the milk thistle plant (silybum marianum), has been used for centuries as a natural remedy for diseases of the liver and biliary tract. Considering the therapeutic potential to liver disease, we tested efficacy of silymarin on hepatic steatosis with a high fat diet (HFD)-induced mouse model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and investigated possible effects on lipid metabolic pathways. In our study, silymarin could attenuate the hepatic steatosis, which was proved by both Oil Red O staining and hepatic triglyceride (TG) level determination. Furthermore, compared with INT-747, a potent and selective FXR agonist, silymarin could preserve plasmatic high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) to a higher level and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) to a lower level, which benefited more to the circulation system. Through real-time PCR analysis, we clarified a vital protective role of silymarin in mRNA regulation of genes involved in lipid metabolism and oxidative stress. It was also shown that silymarin had no effects on body weight, food intake, and liver transaminase. Taken together, silymarin could attenuate hepatic steatosis in a mouse model of NAFLD through regulation of lipid metabolism and oxidative stress, and benefit to the circulation system. All these findings shed new light on NAFLD treatment. PMID:27158393

  6. Silymarin attenuated hepatic steatosis through regulation of lipid metabolism and oxidative stress in a mouse model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

    PubMed

    Ni, Xunjun; Wang, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    Silymarin, which derived from the milk thistle plant (silybum marianum), has been used for centuries as a natural remedy for diseases of the liver and biliary tract. Considering the therapeutic potential to liver disease, we tested efficacy of silymarin on hepatic steatosis with a high fat diet (HFD)-induced mouse model of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and investigated possible effects on lipid metabolic pathways. In our study, silymarin could attenuate the hepatic steatosis, which was proved by both Oil Red O staining and hepatic triglyceride (TG) level determination. Furthermore, compared with INT-747, a potent and selective FXR agonist, silymarin could preserve plasmatic high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) to a higher level and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) to a lower level, which benefited more to the circulation system. Through real-time PCR analysis, we clarified a vital protective role of silymarin in mRNA regulation of genes involved in lipid metabolism and oxidative stress. It was also shown that silymarin had no effects on body weight, food intake, and liver transaminase. Taken together, silymarin could attenuate hepatic steatosis in a mouse model of NAFLD through regulation of lipid metabolism and oxidative stress, and benefit to the circulation system. All these findings shed new light on NAFLD treatment.

  7. Use of three-compartment physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling to predict hepatic blood levels of fluvoxamine relevant for drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Iga, Katsumi

    2015-04-01

    Using a three-compartment physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model and a tube model for hepatic extraction kinetics, equations for calculating blood drug levels (Cb s) and hepatic blood drug levels (Chb s, proportional to actual hepatic drug levels), were derived mathematically. Assuming the actual values for total body clearance (CLtot ), oral bioavailability (F), and steady-state distribution volume (Vdss ), Cb s, and Chb s after intravenous and oral administration of fluvoxamine (strong perpetrator in drug-drug interactions, DDIs), propranolol, imipramine, and tacrine were simulated. Values for Cb s corresponded to the actual values for all tested drugs, and mean Chb and maximal Chb -to-maximal Cb ratio predicted for oral fluvoxamine administration (50 mg twice-a-day administration) were nearly 100 nM and 2.3, respectively, which would be useful for the predictions of the DDIs caused by fluvoxamine. Fluvoxamine and tacrine are known to exhibit relatively large F values despite having CLtot similar to or larger than hepatic blood flow, which may be because of the high liver uptake (almost 0.6) upon intravenous administration. The present method is thus considered to be more predictive of the Chb for perpetrators of DDIs than other methods. PMID:25558834

  8. Hepatitis C: Sex and Sexuality

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Hepatitis » Sex and Sexuality: Entire Lesson Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... hepatitis C virus through sex. Can you pass hepatitis C to a sex partner? Yes, but it ...

  9. Impact of Hepatitis B and C Infection on Health Services Utilization in Homeless Adults: A Test of the Gelberg-Andersen Behavioral Model for Vulnerable Populations

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Judith A.; Andersen, Ronald M.; Robertson, Marjorie; Gelberg, Lillian

    2011-01-01

    Objective Homeless people have disproportionately high rates of viral hepatitis. The Gelberg-Andersen Behavioral Model for Vulnerable Populations (predisposing, enabling, and need variables) was expanded to predict prevalence and awareness of hepatitis B (HBV) or hepatitis C (HCV) infection as well as health services utilization (HSU) among homeless adults using structural equation modeling. Design A population-based sample of 534 homeless adults in Los Angeles’ “Skid Row” was interviewed and tested for HBV and HCV. Main outcome measures HBV/HCV seropositivity, awareness of seropositivity, and HSU in the previous 12 months. Results Seropositivity (43%), usually unknown (72% of seropositives), was predicted by injection drug use, alcohol use, older age, and risky sexual behavior. No regular source of care, risky sexual behavior, less case management, and greater age predicted not knowing one’s positive status. Health insurance, younger age, alcohol use, perceived bad health and more medical conditions predicted emergency room (ER) use; ER use was less likely among seropositives. Hospitalizations were predicted by more medical conditions and greater percentage of life homeless and were less frequent among African-Americans and males. Ambulatory visits were predicted by a regular source of care, case management, more education and perceived bad health; they were less likely among seropositives. Conclusion The Gelberg-Andersen Behavioral Model provided a useful guide for predicting HBV/HCV positivity as well as HSU in homeless adults. Most hepatitis-positives did not know their status and used health services less often than other homeless adults. More aggressive detection of hepatitis B and C among homeless adults is needed. PMID:21574705

  10. The herbal compound Songyou Yin (SYY) inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma growth and improves survival in models of chronic fibrosis via paracrine inhibition of activated hepatic stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Tong-Chun; Zhang, Quan-Bao; Zhang, Ke-Zhi; Zhang, Qiang-Bo; You, Yang; Tian, Hui; Qin, Lun-Xiu; Tang, Zhao-You

    2015-01-01

    Chronic fibrosis is a major risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The pathological progression of hepatic fibrosis has been linked to cellular processes that promote tumor growth and metastasis. Several recent studies have highlighted the cross-talk between tumor cells and activated hepatic stellate cells (aHSCs) in HCC. The herbal compound Songyou Yin (SYY) is known to attenuate hepatoma cell invasion and metastasis via down-regulation of cytokine secretion by aHSCs. However the underlying mechanism of SYY treatment in reversal of hepatic fibrosis and metastasis of liver cancers is not known. In the current study, a nude mouse model with liver fibrosis bearing orthotopic xenograft was established and we found that SYY could reduce associated fibrosis, inhibit tumor growth and improve survival. In the subcutaneous tumor model with fibrosis, we found that SYY could inhibit liver cancer. In vitro, hepatoma cells incubated with conditioned media (CM) from SYY treated aHSCs showed reduced proliferation, decrease in colony formation and invasive potential. SYY treated group showed altered gene expression, with 1205 genes up-regulated and 1323 genes down-regulated. Gene cluster analysis indicated that phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) was one of the key genes altered in the expression profiles. PI3K related markers were all significantly down-regulated. ELISA also indicated decreased secretion of cytokines which were regulated by PI3K/AKT signaling after SYY treatment in the hepatic stellate cell line, LX2. These data clearly demonstrate that SYY therapy inhibits HCC invasive and metastatic potential and improves survival in nude mice models with chronic fibrosis background via inhibition of cytokine secretion by activated hepatic stellate cells. PMID:26517671

  11. Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Bharti; Kumar Dharma, Vijay; Chawla, Sumit; Jindal, Harashish; Bhatt, Bhumika

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Following acute infection, 20% of people eliminate the virus over weeks or months and are often asymptomatic. The remaining 80% of people will develop chronic disease, of which approximately 20% will eventually develop liver cirrhosis and 1–5% will develop liver cancer. About 150 million people are chronically infected with HCV, and more than 350 000 people die every year from hepatitis C related liver diseases. The economic cost of hepatitis C is significant both to the individual and to the society. In the United States the average lifetime cost of the disease was estimated at $33 407 USD with the cost of a liver transplant approximately $200 000 USD. PEG-IFN and ribavirin treatment is also expensive and, at an average cost of approximately GB £7000 in the UK for a treatment course, is unaffordable in developing countries. Hepatitis C, not only brings down the quality of the life of individuals but also affect progress of the nation by adding financial burden. If we prevent the disease from occurring or find a perfect cure of the disease, in form of a prophylactic or therapeutic vaccine, it will be a boon to not only to the individual but to the nation as a whole. PMID:24165512

  12. [Cost-effective medical therapy of hepatitis C employing novel compensation models - pay for cure].

    PubMed

    Foerster, F; Wörns, M A; Galle, P R; Schattenberg, J M

    2015-12-01

    Direct acting antivirals (DAAs) have increased cure rates for chronic hepatitis C infection up to nearly 100 %. At the same time treatment costs have risen significantly. Treating all HCV infected patients in Germany with DAAs would generate medication costs ranging between 19 and 37 billion EUR depending on the drug regimen used. Expenses in patients who fail to respond to treatment would amount to approximately 0.9 to 2.15 billion EUR. In difficult to treat patient populations that are characterized by prior failure to treatment or advanced liver disease, lost drug expenses are particularly high due to lower cure rates and longer treatment duration. Outcome-based reimbursement schemes are used to improve the quality of care and to reduce costs in the health care system. In Germany, disease management programs have been implemented for defined chronic diseases. However, drug reimbursement is still based on packages sold (pay for pill). In this context, it would be appealing to link reimbursement and treatment success (pay for cure) in order to reward successful treatment, limit lost drug spending and develop a shared risk environment that would involve all concerned parties. Under the assumption that 20,000 patients with HCV are treated each year in Germany and that cure rates are 95.4 %, the saved treatment costs would amount up to 45 and 107 million EUR per year. By this approach, economic incentives to withhold therapy from difficult to treat patients could be avoided. PMID:26666278

  13. Hepatitis E Virus (HEV) Genotype 3 Infection of Human Liver Chimeric Mice as a Model for Chronic HEV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pas, Suzan D.; van der Net, Guido; de Man, Robert A.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Haagmans, Bart L.; Boonstra, Andre

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genotype 3 (gt3) hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections are emerging in Western countries. Immunosuppressed patients are at risk of chronic HEV infection and progressive liver damage, but no adequate model system currently mimics this disease course. Here we explore the possibilities of in vivo HEV studies in a human liver chimeric mouse model (uPA+/+Nod-SCID-IL2Rγ−/−) next to the A549 cell culture system, using HEV RNA-positive EDTA-plasma, feces, or liver biopsy specimens from 8 immunocompromised patients with chronic gt3 HEV. HEV from feces- or liver-derived inocula showed clear virus propagation within 2 weeks after inoculation onto A549 cells, compared to slow or no HEV propagation of HEV RNA-positive, EDTA-plasma samples. These in vitro HEV infectivity differences were mirrored in human-liver chimeric mice after intravenous (i.v.) inoculation of selected samples. HEV RNA levels of up to 8 log IU HEV RNA/gram were consistently present in 100% of chimeric mouse livers from week 2 to week 14 after inoculation with human feces- or liver-derived HEV. Feces and bile of infected mice contained moderate to large amounts of HEV RNA, while HEV viremia was low and inconsistently detected. Mouse-passaged HEV could subsequently be propagated for up to 100 days in vitro. In contrast, cell culture-derived or seronegative EDTA-plasma-derived HEV was not infectious in inoculated animals. In conclusion, the infectivity of feces-derived human HEV is higher than that of EDTA-plasma-derived HEV both in vitro and in vivo. Persistent HEV gt3 infections in chimeric mice show preferential viral shedding toward mouse bile and feces, paralleling the course of infection in humans. IMPORTANCE Hepatitis E virus (HEV) genotype 3 infections are emerging in Western countries and are of great concern for immunosuppressed patients at risk for developing chronic HEV infection. Lack of adequate model systems for chronic HEV infection hampers studies on HEV infectivity and transmission

  14. Modelling the prevalence of hepatitis C virus amongst blood donors in Libya: An investigation of providing a preventive strategy

    PubMed Central

    Daw, Mohamed A; Shabash, Amira; El-Bouzedi, Abdallah; Dau, Aghnya A; Habas, Moktar; Libyan Study Group of Hepatitis and HIV

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine hepatitis C virus (HCV) seroprevalence among the Libyan population using blood donors and applying the autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model to predict future trends and formulate plans to minimize the burden of HCV infection. METHODS: HCV positive cases were collected from 1008214 healthy blood donors over a 6-year period from 2008 to 2013. Data were used to construct the ARIMA model to forecast HCV seroprevalence among blood donors. The validity of the model was assessed using the mean absolute percentage error between the observed and fitted seroprevalence. The fitted ARIMA model was used to forecast the incidence of HCV beyond the observed period for the year 2014 and further to 2055. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of HCV among blood donors was 1.8%, varying over the study period from 1.7% to 2.5%, though no significant variation was found within each calendar year. The ARIMA model showed a non-significant auto-correlation of the residuals, and the prevalence was steady within the last 3 years as expressed by the goodness-of-fit test. The forecast incidence showed an increase in HCV seropositivity in 2014, ranging from 500 to 700 per 10000 population, with an overall prevalence of 2.3%-2.7%. This may be extended to 2055 with minimal periodical variation within each 6-year period. CONCLUSION: The applied model was found to be valuable in evaluating the seroprevalence of HCV among blood donors, and highlighted the growing burden of such infection on the Libyan health care system. The model may help in formulating national policies to prevent increases in HCV infection and plan future strategies that target the consequences of the infection. PMID:26870670

  15. Hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Córdoba, Juan; Mínguez, Beatriz

    2008-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a severe complication of cirrhosis that is related to the effects of ammonia. Analysis of interorgan ammonia trafficking has identified an important role of skeletal muscle in ammonia removal and has highlighted the importance of the nutritional status. Ammonia causes neurotransmitter abnormalities and induces injury to astrocytes that is partially mediated by oxidative stress. These disturbances lead to astrocyte swelling and brain edema, which appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of neurological manifestations. Inflammatory mediators worsen brain disturbances. New methods for assessing hepatic encephalopathy include clinical scales, neuropsychological tests, imaging of portal-systemic circulation, and magnetic resonance of the brain. Reappraisal of current therapy indicates the need for performing placebo-controlled trials and the lack of evidence for administering diets with restricted protein content. Liver transplant should be considered in selected patients with hepatic encephalopathy. Future prospects include new drugs that decrease plasma ammonia, measures to reduce brain edema, and liver-support devices. PMID:18293278

  16. Endogenous hydrogen sulfide is associated with angiotensin II type 1 receptor in a rat model of carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    FAN, HUI-NING; CHEN, NI-WEI; SHEN, WEI-LIN; ZHAO, XIANG-YUN; ZHANG, JING

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on the expression levels of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1) in a rat model of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced hepatic fibrosis. A total of 56 Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups: Normal control group, model group, sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) group, and DL-propargylglycine (PAG) group. Hepatic fibrosis was induced by CCl4. The rats in the PAG group were intraperitoneally injected with PAG, an inhibitor of cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE). The rats in the NaHS group were intraperitoneally injected with NaHS. An equal volume of saline solution was intraperitoneally injected into both the control and model groups. All rats were sacrificed at week three or four following treatment. The serum levels of hyaluronidase (HA), laminin protein (LN), procollagen III (PcIII), and collagen IV (cIV) were detected using ELISA. The serum levels of alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), and albumin (ALB) were detected using an automatic biochemical analyzer. The liver mRNA expression levels of CSE were detected by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The liver expression levels of AGTR1 and the plasma expression levels of H2S were detected using western blot analyses. The results indicated that the severity of hepatic fibrosis, the serum expression levels of HA, LN, PcIII, cIV, ALT, and AST, the liver expression levels of CSE and AGTR1, and the plasma expression levels of H2S were significantly higher in the PAG group, as compared with the model group (P<0.05). Conversely, the expression levels of ALB were significantly lower in the PAG group, as compared with the model group. In addition, the severity of hepatic fibrosis, the serum expression levels of HA, LN, PcIII, cIV, ALT, and AST, the liver expression levels of CSE and AGTR1, and the plasma expression levels of H2S were significantly lower in the NaHS group, as compared with

  17. Hepatic sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Karagiannidis, Alexandros; Karavalaki, Maria; Koulaouzidis, Anastasios

    2006-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem disease of unknown aetiology. Histological evidence of non-caseating granulomas represents the main finding. It affects mostly young people, targeting primary the lung and hilar lymph nodes although liver involvement is often encountered. Hepatic sarcoidosis covers a broad spectrum from asymptomatic hepatic granulomas formation and slightly deranged liver function tests to clinically evident disease with cholestasis or, in advanced cases, cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Other granulomatous diseases (mainly systemic infections like tuberculosis) should be excluded prior to treatment, as longstanding corticosteroid administration is the main stem of therapy. In advanced cases, liver transplantation represents the ultimate therapeutic option.

  18. Targeting of hepatic angiotensinogen using chemically modified siRNAs results in significant and sustained blood pressure lowering in a rat model of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Olearczyk, Jeffrey; Gao, Sheng; Eybye, Marianne; Yendluri, Satyasri; Andrews, Lori; Bartz, Steven; Cully, Doris; Tadin-Strapps, Marija

    2014-05-01

    Angiotensinogen (AGT) is the precursor of active vasoconstrictive octapeptide angiotensin II (Ang II) in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Blocking the AGT-converting enzymes in the pathway and the Ang II receptor through pharmacological agents has been proven to be effective in lowering blood pressure (BP) in hypertensive patients. In this study, we developed chemically modified small interfering RNAs (siRNA) to target hepatic AGT mRNA in rats. Lipid nanoparticle encapsulated siRNAs were efficiently delivered to rat liver and resulted in significant reduction in hepatic Agt mRNA levels and plasma AGT concentration without impairing liver function. Single intravenous injection of Agt siRNA led to significant and sustained BP lowering in spontaneous hypertensive rats and in Sprague-Dawley rats, and the effect was maintained by weekly siRNA dosing. Data presented here provide proof-of-feasibility for the use of siRNA technology for inhibition of peripheral AGT levels via hepatic mRNA silencing with beneficial effects on BP in preclinical rat models. Similar approach could be used for validation of novel hypertension hepatic and extrahepatic targets. PMID:24335718

  19. The Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor Teneligliptin Attenuates Hepatic Lipogenesis via AMPK Activation in Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Model Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ideta, Takayasu; Shirakami, Yohei; Miyazaki, Tsuneyuki; Kochi, Takahiro; Sakai, Hiroyasu; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Shimizu, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is strongly associated with metabolic syndrome, is increasingly a major cause of hepatic disorder. Dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitors, anti-diabetic agents, are expected to be effective for the treatment of NAFLD. In the present study, we established a novel NAFLD model mouse using monosodium glutamate (MSG) and a high-fat diet (HFD) and investigated the effects of a DPP-4 inhibitor, teneligliptin, on the progression of NAFLD. Male MSG/HFD-treated mice were divided into two groups, one of which received teneligliptin in drinking water. Administration of MSG and HFD caused mice to develop severe fatty changes in the liver, but teneligliptin treatment improved hepatic steatosis and inflammation, as evaluated by the NAFLD activity score. Serum alanine aminotransferase and intrahepatic triglyceride levels were significantly decreased in teneligliptin-treated mice (p < 0.05). Hepatic mRNA levels of the genes involved in de novo lipogenesis were significantly downregulated by teneligliptin (p < 0.05). Moreover, teneligliptin increased hepatic expression levels of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) protein. These findings suggest that teneligliptin attenuates lipogenesis in the liver by activating AMPK and downregulating the expression of genes involved in lipogenesis. DPP-4 inhibitors may be effective for the treatment of NAFLD and may be able to prevent its progression to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. PMID:26670228

  20. Characterization of Timed Changes in Hepatic Copper Concentrations, Methionine Metabolism, Gene Expression, and Global DNA Methylation in the Jackson Toxic Milk Mouse Model of Wilson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Le, Anh; Shibata, Noreene M.; French, Samuel W.; Kim, Kyoungmi; Kharbanda, Kusum K.; Islam, Mohammad S.; LaSalle, Janine M.; Halsted, Charles H.; Keen, Carl L.; Medici, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Background Wilson disease (WD) is characterized by hepatic copper accumulation with progressive liver damage to cirrhosis. This study aimed to characterize the toxic milk mouse from The Jackson Laboratory (Bar Harbor, ME, USA) (tx-j) mouse model of WD according to changes over time in hepatic copper concentrations, methionine metabolism, global DNA methylation, and gene expression from gestational day 17 (fetal) to adulthood (28 weeks). Methods Included liver histology and relevant biochemical analyses including hepatic copper quantification, S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) liver levels, qPCR for transcript levels of genes relevant to methionine metabolism and liver damage, and DNA dot blot for global DNA methylation. Results Hepatic copper was lower in tx-j fetuses but higher in weanling (three weeks) and adult tx-j mice compared to controls. S-adenosylhomocysteinase transcript levels were significantly lower at all time points, except at three weeks, correlating negatively with copper levels and with consequent changes in the SAM:SAH methylation ratio and global DNA methylation. Conclusion Compared to controls, methionine metabolism including S-adenosylhomocysteinase gene expression is persistently different in the tx-j mice with consequent alterations in global DNA methylation in more advanced stages of liver disease. The inhibitory effect of copper accumulation on S-adenosylhomocysteinase expression is associated with progressively abnormal methionine metabolism and decreased methylation capacity and DNA global methylation. PMID:24810691

  1. Hepatic alteration of tryptophan metabolism in an acute porphyria model Its relation with gluconeogenic blockage.

    PubMed

    Lelli, Sandra M; Mazzetti, Marta B; San Martín de Viale, Leonor C

    2008-02-01

    This study focuses on the alterations suffered by the serotoninergic and kinurenergic routes of tryptophan (TRP) metabolism in liver, and their relation with gluconeogenic phosphoenolpyruvate-carboxykinase (PEPCK) blockage in experimental acute porphyria. This porphyria was induced in rats by a combined treatment of 2-allyl-2-isopropylacetamide (100, 250, 500 mg/kg bw) and 3,5-dietoxicarbonil 1,4-dihydrocollidine (constant 50 mg/kg bw dose). Results showed a marked dose-dependent increase of all TRP pyrrolase (TRPp) forms, active (holo, total) and inactive (apo), and a decrease in the degree of enzyme saturation by heme. Increases for holo, total, and apo-TRPp were 90, 150, and 230%, respectively, at the highest dose assayed (H). The treatment also impaired the serotoninergic route of TRP metabolism in liver, causing a decrease in serotonin level (H, 38%), and a concomitant enhancement in TRP content (H, 23%). The porphyrinogenic treatment promoted a blockage in PEPCK activity (H, 30%). This occurred in correlation to the development of porphyria, to TRPp alterations and to the production of hepatic microsomal thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. Porphyria was estimated through increases in 5-aminolevulinic acid-synthase (ALA-S) activity, ALA and porphobilinogen contents, and a decrease in ferrochelatase activity. Thus, the TRP kynurenine route was augmented whereas the serotoninergic route was reduced. PEPCK blockage could be partly attributed to quinolinate generated from TRP by the increase of TRPp activity, which would be due to the effect of porphyrinogenic drugs on TRP. The contribution of ROS to PEPCK blockage is analyzed. Likewise, the implication of these results in the control of porphyrias by glucose is discussed.

  2. Cost-effectiveness model for hepatitis C screening and treatment: Implications for Egypt and other countries with high prevalence.

    PubMed

    Kim, David D; Hutton, David W; Raouf, Ahmed A; Salama, Mohsen; Hablas, Ahmed; Seifeldin, Ibrahim A; Soliman, Amr S

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of cirrhosis and liver cancer, and many developing countries report intermediate-to-high prevalence. However, the economic impact of screening and treatment for HCV in high prevalence countries has not been well studied. Thus, we examined the cost-effectiveness of screening and treatment for HCV infection for asymptomatic, average-risk adults using a Markov decision analytic model. In our model, we collected age-specific prevalence, disease progression rates for Egyptians and local cost estimates in Egypt, which has the highest prevalence of HCV infection (~15%) in the world. We estimated the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio and conducted sensitivity analyses to determine how cost-effective HCV screening and treatment might be in other developing countries with high and intermediate prevalence. In Egypt, implementing a screening programme using triple-therapy treatment (sofosbuvir with pegylated interferon and ribavirin) was dominant compared with no screening because it would have lower total costs and improve health outcomes. HCV screening and treatment would also be cost-effective in global settings with intermediate costs of drug treatment (~$8000) and a higher sustained viral response rate (70-80%). PMID:25469976

  3. Cost-effectiveness model for hepatitis C screening and treatment: Implications for Egypt and other countries with high prevalence.

    PubMed

    Kim, David D; Hutton, David W; Raouf, Ahmed A; Salama, Mohsen; Hablas, Ahmed; Seifeldin, Ibrahim A; Soliman, Amr S

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of cirrhosis and liver cancer, and many developing countries report intermediate-to-high prevalence. However, the economic impact of screening and treatment for HCV in high prevalence countries has not been well studied. Thus, we examined the cost-effectiveness of screening and treatment for HCV infection for asymptomatic, average-risk adults using a Markov decision analytic model. In our model, we collected age-specific prevalence, disease progression rates for Egyptians and local cost estimates in Egypt, which has the highest prevalence of HCV infection (~15%) in the world. We estimated the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio and conducted sensitivity analyses to determine how cost-effective HCV screening and treatment might be in other developing countries with high and intermediate prevalence. In Egypt, implementing a screening programme using triple-therapy treatment (sofosbuvir with pegylated interferon and ribavirin) was dominant compared with no screening because it would have lower total costs and improve health outcomes. HCV screening and treatment would also be cost-effective in global settings with intermediate costs of drug treatment (~$8000) and a higher sustained viral response rate (70-80%).

  4. Cost-effectiveness model for hepatitis C screening and treatment: Implications for Egypt and other countries with high prevalence

    PubMed Central

    Kim, David D.; Hutton, David W.; Raouf, Ahmed A.; Salama, Mohsen; Hablas, Ahmed; Seifeldin, Ibrahim A.; Soliman, Amr S.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of cirrhosis and liver cancer, and many developing countries report intermediate-to-high prevalence. However, the economic impact of screening and treatment for HCV in high prevalence countries has not been well studied. Thus, we examined the cost-effectiveness of screening and treatment for HCV infection for asymptomatic, average-risk adults using a Markov decision analytic model. In our model, we collected age-specific prevalence, disease progression rates for Egyptians, and local cost estimates in Egypt, which has the highest prevalence of HCV infection (~15%) in the world. We estimated the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) and conducted sensitivity analyses to determine how cost-effective HCV screening and treatment might be in other developing countries with high and intermediate prevalence. In Egypt, implementing a screening program using triple-therapy treatment (sofosbuvir with pegylated interferon and ribavirin) was dominant compared to no screening because it would have lower total costs and improve health outcomes. HCV screening and treatment would also be cost-effective in global settings with intermediate costs of drug treatment (~$8,000) and a higher sustained viral response rate (70–80%). PMID:25469976

  5. Studies on hepatic lipidosis and coinciding health and fertility problems of high-producing dairy cows using the "Utrecht fatty liver model of dairy cows". A review.

    PubMed

    Geelen, M J H; Wensing, T

    2006-09-01

    Fatty liver or hepatic lipidosis is a major metabolic disorder of high-producing dairy cows that occurs rather frequently in early lactation and is associated with decreased health, production and fertility. A background section of the review explores reasons why high-producing dairy cows are prone to develop fatty liver post partum. Hepatic lipidosis and coinciding health and fertility problems seriously endanger profitability and longevity of the dairy cow. Results from a great number of earlier epidemiological and clinical studies made it clear that a different approach was needed for elucidation of pathogenesis and etiology of this complex of health problems. There was a need for an adequate animal model in which hepatic lipidosis and production, health and fertility problems could be provoked under controlled conditions. It was hypothesized that overconditioning ante partum and feed restriction post partum might induce lipolysis in adipose tissue and triacylglycerol accumulation in the liver following calving. This consideration formed the basis for the experiments, which resulted in the "Utrecht fatty liver model of dairy cows". In this model, post partum triacylglycerol-lipidosis as well as the whole complex of health and fertility problems are induced under well-controlled conditions. The experimental protocol based on this hypothesis produced in all cases (10 feeding trials with over 150 dairy cattle) the intended result, i.e. all experimental cows developed post partum higher hepatic triacylglycerol concentrations than did control cows. The model was evaluated in biochemical, clinical pathology, immunological, clinical and fertility terms. It turned out that in this model, post partum triacylglycerol-lipidosis as well as the whole complex of health and fertility problems were induced under well-controlled conditions.

  6. Hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Liddle, C

    1996-04-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome was isolated during the late 1980s using molecular cloning techniques. It is recognized as the cause of most cases of percutaneously transmitted non-A, non-B hepatitis. Prevalence of antibodies to HCV(anti-HCV) in the general Australian population is 0.3%. However, among regular intravenous drug users the prevalence exceeds 90%. The predominant risk factors for HCV are intravenous drug use, tattoos, exposure to blood products, occupational risk and ethnicity. In contrast to hepatitis B, sexual spread and vertical transmission of HCV from mother to neonate are relatively uncommon. The risk of acquiring HCV from a single HCV-contaminated needlestick accident is about 5%. Most cases of acute HCV infection are asymptomatic, but 50 to 80% progress to chronic disease. The percentage of those with chronic HCV progressing to cirrhosis is not accurately known, but is probably 20%. Treatment strategies for HCV, utilizing recombinant interferons, are proving useful in patients with mild to moderate liver disease, but fare less well in patients with cirrhosis. Currently, there is no vaccine for hepatitis C, so pre-exposure prophylaxis is not possible. Equally, no post-exposure intervention, for example with gamma globulin, has been shown to be beneficial, though there may be a role for early interferon therapy.

  7. Imino sugars inhibit the formation and secretion of bovine viral diarrhea virus, a pestivirus model of hepatitis C virus: Implications for the development of broad spectrum anti-hepatitis virus agents

    PubMed Central

    Zitzmann, Nicole; Mehta, Anand S.; Carrouée, Sandra; Butters, Terry D.; Platt, Frances M.; McCauley, John; Blumberg, Baruch S.; Dwek, Raymond A.; Block, Timothy M.

    1999-01-01

    One function of N-linked glycans is to assist in the folding of glycoproteins by mediating interactions of the lectin-like chaperone proteins calnexin and calreticulin with nascent glycoproteins. These interactions can be prevented by inhibitors of the α-glucosidases, such as N-butyl-deoxynojirimycin (NB-DNJ) and N-nonyl-DNJ (NN-DNJ), and this causes some proteins to be misfolded and retained within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We have shown previously that the NN-DNJ-induced misfolding of one of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) envelope glycoproteins prevents the formation and secretion of virus in vitro and that this inhibitor alters glycosylation and reduces the viral levels in an animal model of chronic HBV infection. This led us to investigate the effect of glucosidase inhibitors on another ER-budding virus, bovine viral diarrhea virus, a tissue culture surrogate of human hepatitis C virus (HCV). Here we show that in MDBK cells α-glucosidase inhibitors prevented the formation and secretion of infectious bovine viral diarrhea virus. Data also are presented showing that NN-DNJ, compared with NB-DNJ, exhibits a prolonged retention in liver in vivo. Because viral secretion is selectively hypersensitive to glucosidase inhibition relative to the secretion of cellular proteins, the possibility that glucosidase inhibitors could be used as broad-based antiviral hepatitis agents is discussed. A single drug against HBV, HCV, and, possibly, HDV, which together chronically infect more than 400 million people worldwide, would be of great therapeutic value. PMID:10518544

  8. Modeling receptor/gene-mediated effects of corticosteroids on hepatic tyrosine aminotransferase dynamics in rats: dual regulation by endogenous and exogenous corticosteroids

    PubMed Central

    Hazra, Anasuya; Pyszczynski, Nancy; DuBois, Debra C.; Almon, Richard R.

    2014-01-01

    Receptor/gene-mediated effects of corticosteroids on hepatic tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) were evaluated in normal rats. A group of normal male Wistar rats were injected with 50 mg/kg methylprednisolone (MPL) intramuscularly at the nadir of their plasma corticosterone (CST) rhythm (early light cycle) and sacrificed at various time points up to 96 h post-treatment. Blood and livers were collected to measure plasma MPL, CST, hepatic glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA, cytosolic GR density, TAT mRNA, and TAT activity. The pharmacokinetics of MPL showed bi-exponential disposition with two first-order absorption components from the injection site and bioavailability was 21%. Plasma CST was reduced after MPL dosing, but resumed its daily circadian pattern within 36 h. Cytosolic receptor density was significantly suppressed (90%) and returned to baseline by 72 h resuming its biphasic pattern. Hepatic GR mRNA follows a circadian pattern which was disrupted by MPL and did not return during the study. MPL caused significant down-regulation (50%) in GR mRNA which was followed by a delayed rebound phase (60–70 h). Hepatic TAT mRNA and activity showed up-regulation as a consequence of MPL, and returned to their circadian baseline within 72 and 24 h of treatment. A mechanistic receptor/gene-mediated pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model was able to satisfactorily describe the complex interplay of exogenous and endogenous corticosteroid effects on hepatic GR mRNA, cytosolic free GR, TAT mRNA, and TAT activity in normal rats. PMID:17593325

  9. Chronic proliferative hepatitis in A/JCr mice associated with persistent Helicobacter hepaticus infection: a model of helicobacter-induced carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fox, J G; Li, X; Yan, L; Cahill, R J; Hurley, R; Lewis, R; Murphy, J C

    1996-05-01

    Helicobacter hepaticus causes hepatitis in selected strains of mice and in A/JCr mice is linked to liver cancer. To analyze whether H. hepaticus persists in specified ecological niches, to determine whether biomarkers of infection exist, and to analyze the influence of H. hepaticus on hepatocyte proliferation, a longitudinal study of H. hepaticus-infected A/JCr mice was undertaken. A/JCr mice were serially euthanatized from 3 through 18 months and surveyed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; bacterial culture of liver, colon, and cecum; histology; electron microscopy; hepatocyte proliferation indices determined by using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine; and measurement of the liver enzyme alanine aminotransferase. In infected animals throughout the 18-month study, H. hepaticus was consistently isolated from the lower bowel but only sporadically from the liver. By electron microscopy, H. hepaticus was noted infrequently and only in bile canaliculi. Infected mice, particularly males, showed chronic inflammation; oval cell, Kupffer cell, and Ito cell hyperplasia; hepatocytomegaly; and bile duct proliferation. The inflammatory and necrotizing lesion was progressive and involved the hepatic parenchyma, portal triads, and intralobular venules. Hepatic adenomas were noted only in male mice, whereas 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine proliferation indices were markedly increased in both sexes, but especially in males, compared to control A/J mice. Infected mice also developed sustained anti-H. hepaticus serum immunoglobulin G antibody responses and elevated alanine aminotransferase levels. H. hepaticus, which persists in the lower bowels and livers of A/JCr mice, is associated with a chronic proliferative hepatitis, and hepatomas in selected male mice indicate that this novel bacterium may cause an increased risk of hepatic cancer induction in susceptible strains of mice. This murine model should prove useful in dissecting the molecular events operable in the development of neoplasms

  10. Primary seronegative but molecularly evident hepadnaviral infection engages liver and induces hepatocarcinoma in the woodchuck model of hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Mulrooney-Cousins, Patricia M; Chauhan, Ranjit; Churchill, Norma D; Michalak, Tomasz I

    2014-08-01

    Hepadnavirus at very low doses establishes in woodchucks asymptomatic, serologically undetectable but molecularly evident persistent infection. This primary occult infection (POI) preferentially engages the immune system and initiates virus-specific T cell response in the absence of antiviral antibody induction. The current study aimed to determine whether POI with time may culminate in serologically identifiable infection and hepatitis, and what are, if any, its pathological consequences. Juvenile woodchucks were intravenously injected with inocula containing 10 or 100 virions of woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) to induce POI and followed for life or up to 5.5 years thereafter. All 10 animals established molecularly detectable infection with virus DNA in serum (<100-200 copies/mL) and in circulating lymphoid cells, but serum WHV surface antigen and antibodies to WHV core antigen remained undetectable for life. By approximately 2.5-3.5 years post-infection, circulating virus transiently increased to 103 copies/mL and virus replication became detectable in the livers, but serological markers of infection and biochemical or histological evidence of hepatitis remained undetectable. Nonetheless, typical hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) developed in 2/10 animals. WHV DNA integration into hepatic and lymphatic system genomes was identified in 9/10 animals. Virus recovered from the liver virus-negative or virus-positive phases of POI displayed the wild-type sequence and transmitted infection to healthy woodchucks causing hepatitis and HCC. In summary, for the first time, our data demonstrate that an asymptomatic hepadnaviral persistence initiated by very small amounts of otherwise pathogenic virus, advancing in the absence of traditional serological markers of infection and hepatitis, coincides with virus DNA integration into the host's hepatic and immune system genomes, retains liver pro-oncogenic potency and is capable of transmitting liver pathogenic infection. This

  11. Dietary Aflatoxin-Induced Stunting in a Novel Rat Model: Evidence for Toxin-Induced Liver Injury and Hepatic Growth Hormone Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Knipstein, Brittany; Huang, Jiansheng; Barr, Emily; Sossenheimer, Philip; Dietzen, Dennis; Egner, Patricia A.; Groopman, John D.; Rudnick, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite a strong statistical correlation between dietary aflatoxin B1 (AFB1)-exposure and childhood stunting, the causal mechanism remains speculative. This issue is important because of emerging interest in reduction of human aflatoxin exposure to diminish the prevalence and complications of stunting. Pediatric liver diseases cause growth impairment, and AFB1 is hepatotoxic. Thus, liver injury might mediate AFB1-associated growth impairment. We have developed a rat model of dietary AFB1-induced stunting to investigate these questions. Methods Newly-weaned rats were given AFB1-supplemented- or control-diets from age 3-9 weeks, and then euthanized for serum- and tissue-collection. Food intake and weight were serially assessed, with tibial-length determined at the experimental endpoint. Serum AFB1-adducts, hepatic gene and protein expression, and liver injury markers were quantified using established methodologies. Results AFB1-albumin adducts correlated with dietary toxin contamination, but such contamination did not affect food consumption. AFB1-exposed animals exhibited dose-dependent wasting and stunting, liver pathology, and suppression of hepatic targets of growth hormone (GH) signaling, but did not display increased mortality. Conclusion These data establish toxin-dependent liver injury and hepatic GH-resistance as candidate mechanisms by which AFB1-exposure causes growth impairment in this mammalian model. Interrogation of modifiers of stunting using this model could guide interventions in at-risk and affected children. PMID:25938735

  12. Chitosan and Sodium Alginate Combinations Are Alternative, Efficient, and Safe Natural Adjuvant Systems for Hepatitis B Vaccine in Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    AbdelAllah, Nourhan H.; Boseila, Abeer A.; Amin, Magdy A.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B viral (HBV) infections represent major public health problem and are an occupational hazard for healthcare workers. Current alum-adjuvanted HBV vaccine is the most effective measure to prevent HBV infection. However, the vaccine has some limitations including poor response in some vaccinee and being a frost-sensitive suspension. The goal of our study was to use an alternative natural adjuvant system strongly immunogenic allowing for a reduction in dose and cost. We tested HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) adjuvanted with chitosan (Ch) and sodium alginate (S), both natural adjuvants, either alone or combined with alum in mouse model. Mice groups were immunized subcutaneously with HBsAg adjuvanted with Ch or S, or triple adjuvant formula with alum (Al), Ch, and S, or double formulations with AlCh or AlS. These were compared to control groups immunized with current vaccine formula or unadjuvanted HBsAg. We evaluated the rate of seroconversion, serum HBsAg antibody, IL-4, and IFN-γ levels. The results showed that the solution formula with Ch or S exhibited comparable immunogenic responses to Al-adjuvanted suspension. The AlChS gave significantly higher immunogenic response compared to controls. Collectively, our results indicated that Ch and S are effective HBV adjuvants offering natural alternatives, potentially reducing dose. PMID:27493674

  13. Chitosan and Sodium Alginate Combinations Are Alternative, Efficient, and Safe Natural Adjuvant Systems for Hepatitis B Vaccine in Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    AbdelAllah, Nourhan H; Abdeltawab, Nourtan F; Boseila, Abeer A; Amin, Magdy A

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B viral (HBV) infections represent major public health problem and are an occupational hazard for healthcare workers. Current alum-adjuvanted HBV vaccine is the most effective measure to prevent HBV infection. However, the vaccine has some limitations including poor response in some vaccinee and being a frost-sensitive suspension. The goal of our study was to use an alternative natural adjuvant system strongly immunogenic allowing for a reduction in dose and cost. We tested HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) adjuvanted with chitosan (Ch) and sodium alginate (S), both natural adjuvants, either alone or combined with alum in mouse model. Mice groups were immunized subcutaneously with HBsAg adjuvanted with Ch or S, or triple adjuvant formula with alum (Al), Ch, and S, or double formulations with AlCh or AlS. These were compared to control groups immunized with current vaccine formula or unadjuvanted HBsAg. We evaluated the rate of seroconversion, serum HBsAg antibody, IL-4, and IFN-γ levels. The results showed that the solution formula with Ch or S exhibited comparable immunogenic responses to Al-adjuvanted suspension. The AlChS gave significantly higher immunogenic response compared to controls. Collectively, our results indicated that Ch and S are effective HBV adjuvants offering natural alternatives, potentially reducing dose. PMID:27493674

  14. Cell death, perfusion and electrical parameters are critical in models of hepatic radiofrequency ablation

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Sheldon K.; Ooi, Ean H.; Payne, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: A sensitivity analysis has been performed on a mathematical model of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in the liver. The purpose of this is to identify the most important parameters in the model, defined as those that produce the largest changes in the prediction. This is important in understanding the role of uncertainty and when comparing the model predictions to experimental data. Materials and methods: The Morris method was chosen to perform the sensitivity analysis because it is ideal for models with many parameters or that take a significant length of time to obtain solutions. A comprehensive literature review was performed to obtain ranges over which the model parameters are expected to vary, crucial input information. Results: The most important parameters in predicting the ablation zone size in our model of RFA are those representing the blood perfusion, electrical conductivity and the cell death model. The size of the 50 °C isotherm is sensitive to the electrical properties of tissue while the heat source is active, and to the thermal parameters during cooling. Conclusions: The parameter ranges chosen for the sensitivity analysis are believed to represent all that is currently known about their values in combination. The Morris method is able to compute global parameter sensitivities taking into account the interaction of all parameters, something that has not been done before. Research is needed to better understand the uncertainties in the cell death, electrical conductivity and perfusion models, but the other parameters are only of second order, providing a significant simplification. PMID:26000972

  15. Chronic hepatitis B infection and HBV DNA-containing capsids: Modeling and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manna, Kalyan; Chakrabarty, Siddhartha P.

    2015-05-01

    We analyze the dynamics of chronic HBV infection taking into account both uninfected and infected hepatocytes along with the intracellular HBV DNA-containing capsids and the virions. While previous HBV models have included either the uninfected hepatocytes or the intracellular HBV DNA-containing capsids, our model accounts for both these two populations. We prove the conditions for local and global stability of both the uninfected and infected steady states in terms of the basic reproduction number. Further, we incorporate a time lag in the model to encompass the intracellular delay in the production of the infected hepatocytes and find that this delay does not affect the overall dynamics of the system. The results for the model and the delay model are finally numerically illustrated.

  16. A predictive model for carcinogenesis in patients with chronic hepatitis B undergoing entecavir therapy and its validation

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, Hiroki; Nishijima, Norihiro; Enomoto, Hirayuki; Sakamoto, Azusa; Nasu, Akihiro; Komekado, Hideyuki; Nishimura, Takashi; Kita, Ryuichi; Kimura, Toru; Iijima, Hiroko; Nishiguchi, Shuhei; Osaki, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We created a model to predict the development of liver carcinogenesis in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) undergoing entecavir (ETV) therapy and to validate the accuracy using an independent dataset. A total of 328 CHB subjects were analyzed. Subjects were randomly assigned into 2 groups: the training group (n = 164) and the validation group (n = 164). Using data from the training group, we built a predictive model for liver carcinogenesis by performing univariate and multivariate analyses using variables associated with liver carcinogenesis. We subsequently assessed the applicability of the constructed model in the validation group. The median (range) follow-up periods in the training and the validation groups were 5.03 years (1.03–9.98) and 4.84 years (1.10–9.97), respectively. The proportion of hepatitis B virus-DNA at 24 weeks <1.9 log IU/mL in the training group was 70.7% (116/164), while that in the validation group was 71.3% (117/164). For the entire cohort (n = 328), the median alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) value at 24 weeks (3.45 ng/mL; range, 0.9–102.7 ng/mL) significantly decreased compared to the baseline values (5.55 ng/mL; range, 0.9–1039.5 ng/mL), while the median alanine aminotransferase (ALT) value at 24 weeks (24 IU/mL; range, 6–251 IU/mL) also significantly decreased compared to baseline values (57 IU/mL; range, 7–1450 IU/mL). During the observation period, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) developed in 15 (9.1%) patients in the training group and in 17 (10.4%) patients in the validation group. The 3- and 5-year cumulative HCC incidence rates in the entire cohort were 4.48% and 9.52%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis of the training group, age ≥54 years (P = 0.0273), ALT level at 24 weeks (P = 0.0456), and AFP at 24 weeks (P = 0.0485) were found to be significant predictors linked to HCC. Using these independent predictors, the risk for HCC development was well stratified in the validation group

  17. Hepatic insulin sensitivity in healthy and prediabetic subjects: from a dual- to a single-tracer oral minimal model

    PubMed Central

    Visentin, Roberto; Dalla Man, Chiara; Basu, Rita; Basu, Ananda; Rizza, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a model was proposed to assess hepatic insulin sensitivity during a meal, i.e., the ability of insulin to suppress glucose production (EGP), SIP. The model was developed on EGP data obtained from a triple-tracer meal and the tracer-to-tracee clamp technique and validated against the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp. The aim of this study was to assess whether SIP can be obtained from plasma concentrations measured after a single-tracer meal by incorporating the above EGP model into the oral glucose minimal model by describing both glucose production and disposal (OMMPD). Triple-tracer meal data of two databases (20 healthy and 60 healthy and prediabetic subjects) were used. Virtually model-independent EGP estimates were calculated. OMMPD was identified on exogenous and endogenous glucose concentrations, providing indices of SIP, disposal insulin sensitivity (SID), and EGP. The model fitted the data well, and SIP and SID were estimated with precision in both databases (SIP = 5.48 ± 0.54 10−4 dl·kg−1·min−1 per μU/ml and SID = 9.93 ± 2.18 10−4 dl·kg−1·min−1 per μU/ml in healthy; SIP = 5.41 ± 3.55 10−4 dl·kg−1·min−1 per μU/ml and SID = 5.34 ± 6.17 10−4 dl·kg−1·min−1 per μU/ml, in healthy and prediabetic subjects). Estimated SIP and that derived from the triple-tracer EGP model were very similar on average. Moreover, the time course of EGP normalized to basal EGP (EGPb), and EGP/EGPb agreed with the results obtained using the triple-tracer method. In this study, we have demonstrated that SIP, SID, and EGP/EGPb time course can be estimated reliably from a single-tracer meal protocol in both healthy and prediabetic subjects. PMID:25991649

  18. Therapeutic role of niacin in the prevention and regression of hepatic steatosis in rat model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Ganji, Shobha H; Kukes, Gary D; Lambrecht, Nils; Kashyap, Moti L; Kamanna, Vaijinath S

    2014-02-15

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a leading cause of liver damage, comprises a spectrum of liver abnormalities including the early fat deposition in the liver (hepatic steatosis) and advanced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Niacin decreases plasma triglycerides, but its effect on hepatic steatosis is elusive. To examine the effect of niacin on steatosis, rats were fed either a rodent normal chow, chow containing high fat (HF), or HF containing 0.5% or 1.0% niacin in the diet for 4 wk. For regression studies, rats were first fed the HF diet for 6 wk to induce hepatic steatosis and were then treated with niacin (0.5% in the diet) while on the HF diet for 6 wk. The findings indicated that inclusion of niacin at 0.5% and 1.0% doses in the HF diet significantly decreased liver fat content, liver weight, hepatic oxidative products, and prevented hepatic steatosis. Niacin treatment to rats with preexisting hepatic steatosis induced by the HF diet significantly regressed steatosis. Niacin had no effect on the mRNA expression of fatty acid synthesis or oxidation genes (including sterol-regulatory element-binding protein 1, acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1, fatty acid synthase, and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1) but significantly inhibited mRNA levels, protein expression, and activity of diacylglycerol acyltrasferase 2, a key enzyme in triglyceride synthesis. These novel findings suggest that niacin effectively prevents and causes the regression of experimental hepatic steatosis. Approved niacin formulation(s) for other indications or niacin analogs may offer a very cost-effective opportunity for the clinical development of niacin for treating NAFLD and fatty liver disease.

  19. Hepatitis B virus (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis B is also known as serum hepatitis and is spread through blood and sexual contact. It is ... population. This photograph is an electronmicroscopic image of hepatitis B virus particles. (Image courtesy of the Centers for ...

  20. What Is Hepatitis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter Facebook Google + iTunes Play Store What is hepatitis? Online Q&A Reviewed July 2016 Q: What ... Question and answer archives Submit a question World Hepatitis Day Know hepatitis - Act now Event notice Key ...

  1. Drug-induced hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Toxic hepatitis ... to get liver damage. Some drugs can cause hepatitis with small doses, even if the liver breakdown ... liver. Many different drugs can cause drug-induced hepatitis. Painkillers and fever reducers that contain acetaminophen are ...

  2. Murine Models of Acute Alcoholic Hepatitis and Their Relevance to Human Disease.

    PubMed

    Wilkin, Richard J W; Lalor, Patricia F; Parker, Richard; Newsome, Philip N

    2016-04-01

    Alcohol-induced liver damage is a major burden for most societies, and murine studies can provide a means to better understand its pathogenesis and test new therapies. However, there are many models reported with widely differing phenotypes, not all of which fully regenerate the spectrum of human disease. Thus, it is important to understand the implications of these variations to efficiently model human disease. This review critically appraises key articles in the field, detailing the spectrum of liver damage seen in different models, and how they relate to the phenotype of disease seen in patients. A range of different methods of alcohol administration have been studied, ranging from ad libitum consumption of alcohol and water to modified diets (eg, Lieber deCarli liquid diet). Other feeding regimens have taken more invasive routes using intragastric feeding tubes to infuse alcohol directly into the stomach. Notably, models using wild-type mice generally produce a milder phenotype of liver damage than those using genetically modified mice, with the exception of the chronic binge-feeding model. We recommend panels of tests for consideration to standardize end points for the evaluation of the severity of liver damage-key for comparison of models of injury, testing of new therapies, and subsequent translation of findings into clinical practice. PMID:26835538

  3. Effect of atrial natriuretic peptide on ischemia-reperfusion injury in a porcine total hepatic vascular exclusion model

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Katsumi; Oshima, Kiyohiro; Muraoka, Masato; Akao, Takahiko; Totsuka, Osamu; Shimizu, Hisashi; Sato, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Kazumi; Konno, Kenjiro; Matsumoto, Koshi; Takeyoshi, Izumi

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of ANP on warm I/R injury in a porcine THVE model. METHODS: Miniature pigs (mini-pigs) weighing 16-24 kg were observed for 120 min after reperfusion following 120 min of THVE. The animals were divided into two groups. ANP (0.1 μg/kg per min) was administered to the ANP group (n = 7), and vehicle was administered to the control group (n = 7). Either vehicle or ANP was intravenously administered from 30 min before the THVE to the end of the experiment. Arterial blood was collected to measure AST, LDH, and TNF-α. Hepatic tissue blood flow (HTBF) was also measured. Liver specimens were harvested for p38 MAPK analysis and histological study. Those results were compared between the two groups. RESULTS: The AST and LDH levels were lower in the ANP group than in the control group; the AST levels were significantly different between the two groups (60 min: 568.7 ± 113.3 vs 321.6 ± 60.1, P = 0.038 < 0.05, 120 min: 673.6 ± 148.2 vs 281.1 ± 44.8, P = 0.004 < 0.01). No significant difference was observed in the TNF-α levels between the two groups. HTBF was higher in the ANP group, but the difference was not significant. A significantly higher level of phosphorylated p38 MAPK was observed in the ANP group compared to the control group (0 min: 2.92 ± 1.1 vs 6.38 ± 1.1, P = 0.011 < 0.05). Histological tissue damage was milder in the ANP group than in the control group. CONCLUSION: Our results show that ANP has a protective role in I/R injury with p38 MAPK activation in a porcine THVE model. PMID:17659696

  4. Water Extract of Dolichos lablab Attenuates Hepatic Lipid Accumulation in a Cellular Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Model.

    PubMed

    Im, A-Rang; Kim, Yun Hee; Lee, Hye Won; Song, Kwang Hoon

    2016-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common chronic liver disease that is rising in prevalence worldwide. Therapeutic strategies for patients with NAFLD are limited by a lack of effective drugs. In this report, we show that Dolichos lablab water extract (DLL-Ex) protects against free fatty acid (FFA)-induced lipid accumulation and attenuates expression of genes involved in lipid droplet accumulation in cellular NAFLD models. The hepatoprotective effects and underlying mechanism of DLL-Ex were assessed using an in vitro cellular model in which NAFLD was simulated by inducing excessive FFA influx into hepatocytes. HepG2 cells were treated with DLL-Ex and FFAs for 24 h, after which intracellular lipid content was observed by using Nile Red and Oil Red O staining. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to measure expression levels of genes related to FFA-mediated cellular energy depletion. Western blotting was used to measure protein levels of phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase, AMP-activated protein kinase alpha (AMPKα), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1 alpha. In HepG2 cells, DLL-Ex inhibited expression of CD36, which regulates fatty acid uptake, as well as BODIPY-labeled fatty acid uptake. Additionally, DLL-Ex significantly attenuated FFA-mediated cellular energy depletion and mitochondrial membrane depolarization. Furthermore, DLL-Ex enhanced phosphorylation of AMPK, indicating that AMPK is a critical regulator of DLL-Ex-mediated inhibition of hepatic lipid accumulation, possibly through its antioxidative effect. These results demonstrate that DLL-Ex exerts potent anti-NAFLD activity, suggesting that it could be a potential adjuvant treatment for patients with NAFLD. PMID:27152979

  5. Analysis of Changes in Hepatic Gene Expression in a Murine Model of Tolerance to Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity (Autoprotection)

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Meeghan A; Koza-Taylor, Petra; Campion, Sarah N; Aleksunes, Lauren M; Gu, Xinsheng; Enayetallah, Ahmed E.; Lawton, Michael P; Manautou, José E

    2013-01-01

    Pretreatment of mice with a low hepatotoxic dose of acetaminophen (APAP) results in resistance to a subsequent, higher dose of APAP. This mouse model, termed APAP autoprotection was used here to identify differentially expressed genes and cellular pathways that could contribute to this development of resistance to hepatotoxicity. Male C57BL/6J mice were pretreated with APAP (400 mg/kg) and then challenged 48 hr later with 600 mg APAP/kg. Livers were obtained 4 or 24 hr later and total hepatic RNA was isolated and hybridized to Affymetrix Mouse Genome MU430_2 GeneChip. Statistically significant genes were determined and gene expression changes were also interrogated using the Causal Reasoning Engine (CRE). Extensive literature review narrowed our focus to methionine adenosyl transferase-1 alpha (MAT1A), nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (Fmo3) and galectin-3 (Lgals3). Down-regulation of MAT1A could lead to decreases in S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), which is known to protect against APAP toxicity. Nrf2 activation is expected to play a role in protective adaptation. Up-regulation of Lgals3, one of the genes supporting the Nrf2 hypothesis, can lead to suppression of apoptosis and reduced mitochondrial dysfunction. Fmo3 induction suggests the involvement of an enzyme not known to metabolize APAP in the development of tolerance to APAP toxicity. Subsequent quantitative RT-PCR and immunochemical analysis confirmed the differential expression of some of these genes in the APAP autoprotection model. In conclusion, our genomics strategy identified cellular pathways that might further explain the molecular basis for APAP autoprotection. PMID:24126418

  6. Analysis of changes in hepatic gene expression in a murine model of tolerance to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity (autoprotection).

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Meeghan A; Koza-Taylor, Petra; Campion, Sarah N; Aleksunes, Lauren M; Gu, Xinsheng; Enayetallah, Ahmed E; Lawton, Michael P; Manautou, José E

    2014-01-01

    Pretreatment of mice with a low hepatotoxic dose of acetaminophen (APAP) results in resistance to a subsequent, higher dose of APAP. This mouse model, termed APAP autoprotection was used here to identify differentially expressed genes and cellular pathways that could contribute to this development of resistance to hepatotoxicity. Male C57BL/6J mice were pretreated with APAP (400mg/kg) and then challenged 48h later with 600mg APAP/kg. Livers were obtained 4 or 24h later and total hepatic RNA was isolated and hybridized to Affymetrix Mouse Genome MU430_2 GeneChip. Statistically significant genes were determined and gene expression changes were also interrogated using the Causal Reasoning Engine (CRE). Extensive literature review narrowed our focus to methionine adenosyl transferase-1 alpha (MAT1A), nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (Fmo3) and galectin-3 (Lgals3). Down-regulation of MAT1A could lead to decreases in S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), which is known to protect against APAP toxicity. Nrf2 activation is expected to play a role in protective adaptation. Up-regulation of Lgals3, one of the genes supporting the Nrf2 hypothesis, can lead to suppression of apoptosis and reduced mitochondrial dysfunction. Fmo3 induction suggests the involvement of an enzyme not known to metabolize APAP in the development of tolerance to APAP toxicity. Subsequent quantitative RT-PCR and immunochemical analysis confirmed the differential expression of some of these genes in the APAP autoprotection model. In conclusion, our genomics strategy identified cellular pathways that might further explain the molecular basis for APAP autoprotection. PMID:24126418

  7. In vitro activation of woodchuck lymphocytes measured by radiopurine incorporation and interleukin-2 production: implications for modeling immunity and therapy in hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cote, P J; Gerin, J L

    1995-09-01

    Cellular immune responses to hepatitis B virus (HBV) play an important role in the resolution of acute infection. They also influence the course of chronic infection and disease but are inadequate to completely clear the infection. Woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) infection of the woodchuck can provide a model to study these processes. Lymphocyte responses of woodchucks were assessed by in vitro proliferation and/or interleukin (IL)-2 assays using mitogen (Concanavalin A [ConA]), cytokine (IL-2), superantigen (Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B [SEB]), major histocompatibility complex (MHC) allo-antigen (mixed lymphocyte reaction [MLR]), and viral antigens (woodchuck hepatitis virus core antigen [WHcAg] and woodchuck hepatitis virus surface antigen [WHsAg]). ConA-stimulated woodchuck lymphocytes underwent cell division based on cell counting experiments and produced IL-2 as detected using an IL-2-dependent murine cell line but failed to incorporate sufficient tritiated thymidine; however, they did incorporate sufficient tritiated adenosine and deoxyadenosine to permit development of a meaningful proliferation assay. The IL-2 assay was sensitive and specific for detection of woodchuck IL-2 induced by mitogen, superantigen, and MLR, as shown by quantitative titration analysis and anti-body neutralization of ConA-supernatant activity. Cyclosporin A and FK506 specifically inhibited ConA- and SEB-induced IL-2 production by woodchuck lymphocytes. Positive two-way MLRs were detected by IL-2 production and proliferation assay between woodchucks from different geographic regions, thus indicating divergence among MHC molecules; however, occasional negative MLR reactions among indigenous pairs of woodchucks indicated that some woodchucks were mutually immunocompatible to some degree. The radioadenosine proliferation assay was sensitive for detecting peripheral blood lymphocyte responses to WHcAg and WHsAg in adult woodchucks with recently resolved acute infections. The above

  8. Evaluation of Rhesus Monkey and Guinea Pig Hepatic Cytosol Fractions as Models for Human Aldehyde Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Choughule, Kanika V.; Barr, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Aldehyde oxidase (AOX) is a cytosolic enzyme expressed across a wide range of species, including guinea pig and rhesus monkey. These species are believed to be the best preclinical models for studying human AOX-mediated metabolism. We compared AOX activity in rhesus monkeys, guinea pigs, and humans using phthalazine and N-[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl]acridone-4-carboxamide (DACA) as substrates and raloxifene as an inhibitor. Michaelis-Menten kinetics was observed for phthalazine oxidation in rhesus monkey, guinea pig, and human liver cytosol, whereas substrate inhibition was seen with DACA oxidase activity in all three livers. Raloxifene inhibited phthalazine and DACA oxidase activity uncompetitively in guinea pig, whereas mixed-mode inhibition was seen in rhesus monkey. Our analysis of the primary sequence alignment of rhesus monkey, guinea pig, and human aldehyde oxidase isoform 1 (AOX1) along with homology modeling has led to the identification of several amino acid residue differences within the active site and substrate entrance channel of AOX1. We speculate that some of these residues might be responsible for the differences observed in activity. Overall, our data indicate that rhesus monkeys and guinea pigs would overestimate intrinsic clearance in humans and would be unsuitable to use as animal models. Our study also showed that AOX metabolism in species is substrate-dependent and no single animal model can be reliably used to predict every drug response in humans. PMID:23918666

  9. Alcoholic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Damgaard Sandahl, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is an acute inflammatory syndrome causing significant morbidity and mortality. The prognosis is strongly dependent on disease severity, as assessed by clinical scoring systems. Reliable epidemiological data as well as knowledge of the clinical course of AH are essential for planning and resource allocation within the health care system. Likewise, individual evaluation of risk is desirable in the clinical handling of patients with AH as it can guide treatment, improve patient information, and serve as strata in clinical trials. The present PhD thesis is based on three studies using a cohort of nearly 2000 patients diagnosed with AH in Denmark from 1999 to 2008 as a cohort, in a population-based study design. The aims of this thesis were as follows. (1) To describe the incidence and short- and long-term mortality, of AH in Denmark (Study I). (2) To validate and compare the ability of the currently available prognostic scores to predict mortality in AH (Study II). (3) To investigate the short- and long-term causes of death of patients with AH (Study III). During the study decade, the annual incidence rate in the Danish population rose from 37 to 46 per 106 for men and from 24 to 34 per 106 for women. Both short- and long-term mortality rose for men and women, and the increase in short-term mortality was attributable to increasing patient age and prevalence of cirrhosis. Our evaluation of the most commonly used prognostic scores for predicting the mortality of patients with AH showed that all scores performed similarly, with Area under the Receiver Operator Characteristics curves giving values between 0.74 and 0.78 for 28-day mortality assessed on admission. Our study on causes of death showed that in the short-term (< 84 days after diagnosis), patients with AH were likely to die from liver-related events and infections. In the long-term (≥ 84 days after diagnosis), those who developed cirrhosis mainly died from liver-related causes, and

  10. Structural identifiability analyses of candidate models for in vitro Pitavastatin hepatic uptake.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, Thomas R B; Chappell, Michael J; Yates, James W T; Evans, Neil D

    2014-05-01

    In this paper a review of the application of four different techniques (a version of the similarity transformation approach for autonomous uncontrolled systems, a non-differential input/output observable normal form approach, the characteristic set differential algebra and a recent algebraic input/output relationship approach) to determine the structural identifiability of certain in vitro nonlinear pharmacokinetic models is provided. The Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide (OATP) substrate, Pitavastatin, is used as a probe on freshly isolated animal and human hepatocytes. Candidate pharmacokinetic non-linear compartmental models have been derived to characterise the uptake process of Pitavastatin. As a prerequisite to parameter estimation, structural identifiability analyses are performed to establish that all unknown parameters can be identified from the experimental observations available. PMID:23870173

  11. Structural identifiability analyses of candidate models for in vitro Pitavastatin hepatic uptake.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, Thomas R B; Chappell, Michael J; Yates, James W T; Evans, Neil D

    2014-05-01

    In this paper a review of the application of four different techniques (a version of the similarity transformation approach for autonomous uncontrolled systems, a non-differential input/output observable normal form approach, the characteristic set differential algebra and a recent algebraic input/output relationship approach) to determine the structural identifiability of certain in vitro nonlinear pharmacokinetic models is provided. The Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide (OATP) substrate, Pitavastatin, is used as a probe on freshly isolated animal and human hepatocytes. Candidate pharmacokinetic non-linear compartmental models have been derived to characterise the uptake process of Pitavastatin. As a prerequisite to parameter estimation, structural identifiability analyses are performed to establish that all unknown parameters can be identified from the experimental observations available.

  12. A decision model and cost analysis of intra-operative cell salvage during hepatic resection

    PubMed Central

    Lemke, Madeline; Eeson, Gareth; Lin, Yulia; Tarshis, Jordan; Hallet, Julie; Coburn, Natalie; Law, Calvin; Karanicolas, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Intraoperative cell salvage (ICS) can reduce allogeneic transfusions but with notable direct costs. This study assessed whether routine use of ICS is cost minimizing in hepatectomy and defines a subpopulation of patients where ICS is most cost minimizing based on patient transfusion risk. Methods A decision model from a health systems perspective was developed to examine adoption and non-adoption of ICS use for hepatectomy. A prospectively maintained database of hepatectomy patients provided data to populate the model. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis was used to determine the probability of ICS being cost-minimizing at specified transfusion risks. One-way sensitivity analysis was used to identify factors most relevant to institutions considering adoption of ICS for hepatectomies. Results In the base case analysis (transfusion risk of 28.8%) the probability that routine utilization of ICS is cost-minimizing is 64%. The probability that ICS is cost-minimizing exceeds 50% if the patient transfusion risk exceeds 25%. The model was most sensitive to patient transfusion risk, variation in costs of allogeneic blood, and number of appropriate cases the device could be used for. Conclusions ICS is cost-minimizing for routine use in liver resection, particularly when used for patients with a risk of transfusion of 25% or greater. PMID:27154806

  13. Antiamoebic and Toxicity Studies of a Carbamic Acid Derivative and Its Therapeutic Effect in a Hamster Model of Hepatic Amoebiasis

    PubMed Central

    Ordaz-Pichardo, Cynthia; Shibayama, Mineko; Villa-Treviño, Saúl; Arriaga-Alba, Myriam; Angeles, Enrique; de la Garza, Mireya

    2005-01-01

    Amoebiasis is an important public health problem in developing countries. Entamoeba histolytica, the causative agent of amoebiasis, may develop resistance to nitroimidazoles, a group of drugs considered to be the most effective against this parasitic disease. Therefore, research on new drugs for the treatment of this common infection still constitutes an important therapeutic demand. In the present study we determined the effects of a carbamate derivative, ethyl 4-chlorophenylcarbamate (C4), on trophozoites of E. histolytica strain HM-1:IMSS. C4 was subject to various toxicity tests, including the determination of mutagenicity for bacterial DNA and changes in the enzymatic activities of eukaryotic cells. Genotoxicity studies were performed by the mutagenicity Ames test (plate incorporation and preincubation methods) with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, with or without metabolic activation produced by the S9 fraction of rat liver. C4 toxicity studies were performed by measuring enzymatic activity in eukaryotic cells by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide-formazan test with Fischer 344 rat hepatocytes. C4 did not induce either frame-shift mutations in S. enterica serovar Typhimurium TA97 or TA98 or base pair substitutions in strains TA100 and TA102. The compound was not toxic for cultured rat hepatic cells. Trophozoites treated with 100 μg of C4 per ml were inhibited 97.88% at 48 h of culture; moreover, damage to the amoebae was also confirmed by electron microscopy. The antiamoebic activity of C4 was evaluated by using an in vivo model of amoebic liver abscess in hamsters. Doses of 75 and 100 mg/100 g of body weight reduced the extent of the amoebic liver abscess by 84 and 94%, respectively. These results justify further studies to clearly validate whether C4 is a new suitable antiamoebic drug. PMID:15728919

  14. A mathematical model to predict the risk of hepatitis B infection through needle/syringe sharing in mass vaccination

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Japanese Government settled a class litigation case with hepatitis B virus (HBV) carriers who claim to have been infected through needle/syringe sharing in childhood mass vaccination with a blanket compensation agreement. However, it is difficult to estimate how many of the present HBV carriers were infected horizontally from mass vaccination and how many were infected vertically from mothers. Methods A mathematical model to predict the risk of infection through needle/syringe sharing in mass vaccination was proposed and a formula was developed. The formula was presented in a logarithmic graph enabling users to estimate how many people will be infected if a needle/syringe is shared by how many people for how many times under certain probability of infection. The formula was then applied to the historical data of mass tuberculin skin tests (TSTs) and BCG inoculation, from which a best estimate of how much needle/syringe sharing was practiced in different birth cohorts was determined. Results For the oldest cohort born between 1951 and 1955, the prevalence of HBV carriers—0.65% at birth through vertical transmission—more than doubled in 1995 (1.46%) through horizontal transmission. If the probability of infection through needle/syringe sharing is assumed to be 10%, it is theoretically likely that an average of five or more people shared a needle/syringe four times to achieve the prevalence of HBV carriers in 1995. However, for the youngest cohort born between 1981 and 1985, the effects of needle/syringe sharing were negligible because the later prevalence of HBV carriers was lower than the prevalence at birth. Conclusions More than half of the HBV carriers born in the early 1950s might have contracted the disease by mass vaccinations. Japan’s experience needs to be shared with other countries as a caution in conducting mass vaccination programs under scarce needle/syringe supply (291 words). PMID:24252667

  15. Role of p38 Mapk in development of acute hepatic injury in Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rats, an animal model of human Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kadowaki, Shingo; Meguro, Saori; Imaizumi, Yoshitaka; Sakai, Hiroshi; Endoh, Daiji; Hayashi, Masanobu

    2013-12-30

    The Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rat, an animal model of human Wilson's disease, spontaneously develops fulminant hepatitis associated with severe jaundice at about 4 months of age. In this study, we examined the changes in gene expression during progression of acute hepatic injury. When levels of gene expression in the liver of LEC rats at 13 weeks of age were compared to those in rats at 4 weeks of age using oligonucleotide arrays, 1,620 genes out of 7,700 genes analyzed showed more than 2-fold differences. Expression levels of 11 of 29 genes related to stress-activating protein kinase (SAPK) changed by more than 2-fold in the liver of LEC rats, but none of the SAPK-related genes showed changes in expression levels in the liver of control rats. Activity of p38 mapk in the liver of LEC rats at 13 weeks of age was about 8.1-fold higher than that in rats at 4 weeks of age. When LEC rats were administered SB203580, a p38 mapk-specific inhibitor, by s.c. injection twice a week from 10 to 13 weeks of age, activities of p38 mapk in the liver, activities of AST and ALT and concentrations of bilirubin in sera of rats administered SB203580 significantly decreased compared to those in rats not administered. These results showed that the increase in activities of p38 mapk was related to the occurrence of acute hepatic injury in LEC rats.

  16. Effectiveness of Losartan-Loaded Hyaluronic Acid (HA) Micelles for the Reduction of Advanced Hepatic Fibrosis in C3H/HeN Mice Model

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Reju George; Moon, Myeong Ju; Kim, Jo Heon; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Jeong, Yong Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Advanced hepatic fibrosis therapy using drug-delivering nanoparticles is a relatively unexplored area. Angiotensin type 1 (AT1) receptor blockers such as losartan can be delivered to hepatic stellate cells (HSC), blocking their activation and thereby reducing fibrosis progression in the liver. In our study, we analyzed the possibility of utilizing drug-loaded vehicles such as hyaluronic acid (HA) micelles carrying losartan to attenuate HSC activation. Losartan, which exhibits inherent lipophilicity, was loaded into the hydrophobic core of HA micelles with a 19.5% drug loading efficiency. An advanced liver fibrosis model was developed using C3H/HeN mice subjected to 20 weeks of prolonged TAA/ethanol weight-adapted treatment. The cytocompatibility and cell uptake profile of losartan-HA micelles were studied in murine fibroblast cells (NIH3T3), human hepatic stellate cells (hHSC) and FL83B cells (hepatocyte cell line). The ability of these nanoparticles to attenuate HSC activation was studied in activated HSC cells based on alpha smooth muscle actin (α-sma) expression. Mice treated with oral losartan or losartan-HA micelles were analyzed for serum enzyme levels (ALT/AST, CK and LDH) and collagen deposition (hydroxyproline levels) in the liver. The accumulation of HA micelles was observed in fibrotic livers, which suggests increased delivery of losartan compared to normal livers and specific uptake by HSC. Active reduction of α-sma was observed in hHSC and the liver sections of losartan-HA micelle-treated mice. The serum enzyme levels and collagen deposition of losartan-HA micelle-treated mice was reduced significantly compared to the oral losartan group. Losartan-HA micelles demonstrated significant attenuation of hepatic fibrosis via an HSC-targeting mechanism in our in vitro and in vivo studies. These nanoparticles can be considered as an alternative therapy for liver fibrosis. PMID:26714035

  17. Orally Ingested 13C2-Retinol is Incorporated into Hepatic Retinyl Esters in a Nonhuman Primate (Macaca mulatta) Model of Hypervitaminosis A

    PubMed Central

    Escaron, Anne L; Tanumihardjo, Sherry A

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism responsible for the metabolism of vitamin A during hypervitaminosis is largely unknown. This study investigated hepatic 13C-retinol uptake in hypervitaminotic A rhesus monkeys. We hypothesized that individual retinyl esters would be enriched in 13C after a physiologic dose of 13C2-retinyl acetate, thus suggesting de novo in vivo hepatic retinol esterification. Male rhesus macaques (n = 16; 11.8 ± 2.9 y) each received 3.5 µmol 14, 15-13C2-retinyl acetate. Blood was drawn at baseline and 5 h and 2, 4, 7, 14, 21, and 28 d after administration. Liver biopsies were collected 7 d before and 2 d after dose administration (n = 4) and at 7, 14, and 28 d after dose administration (n = 4 per time point). 13C enrichments of retinol and retinyl esters HPLC-purified from liver samples were measured by using gas chromatography–combustion–isotope ratio mass spectrometry. 13C enrichment of total vitamin A and individual retinyl esters were significantly greater 2 d after dose administration compared with baseline levels. In contrast, the concentration of isolated retinyl esters did not always increase 2 d after treatment. Given that the liver biopsy site differed between monkeys, these data suggest that the accumulation of hepatic retinyl esters is a dynamic process that is better represented by combining analytical techniques. This sensitive methodology can be used to characterize vitamin A trafficking after physiologic doses of 13C-retinol. In this nonhuman primate model of hypervitaminosis A, hepatic retinyl esters continued to accumulate with high liver stores. PMID:20158952

  18. Nrf2 pathway activation contributes to anti-fibrosis effects of ginsenoside Rg1 in a rat model of alcohol- and CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian-ping; Gao, Yan; Chu, Shi-feng; Zhang, Zhao; Xia, Cong-yuan; Mou, Zheng; Song, Xiu-yun; He, Wen-bin; Guo, Xiao-feng; Chen, Nai-hong

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the anti-fibrosis effects of ginsenoside Rg1 on alcohol- and CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis in rats and to explore the mechanisms of the effects. Methods: Rats were given 6% alcohol in water and injected with CCl4 (2 mL/kg, sc) twice a week for 8 weeks. Rg1 (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg per day, po) was administered in the last 2 weeks. Hepatic fibrosis was determined by measuring serum biochemical parameters, HE staining, Masson's trichromic staining, and hydroxyproline and α-SMA immunohistochemical staining of liver tissues. The activities of antioxidant enzymes, lipid peroxidation, and Nrf2 signaling pathway-related proteins (Nrf2, Ho-1 and Nqo1) in liver tissues were analyzed. Cultured hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) of rats were prepared for in vitro studies. Results: In the alcohol- and CCl4-treated rats, Rg1 administration dose-dependently suppressed the marked increases of serum ALT, AST, LDH and ALP levels, inhibited liver inflammation and HSC activation and reduced liver fibrosis scores. Rg1 significantly increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes (SOD, GSH-Px and CAT) and reduced MDA levels in liver tissues. Furthermore, Rg1 significantly increased the expression and nuclear translocation of Nrf2 that regulated the expression of many antioxidant enzymes. Treatment of the cultured HSCs with Rg1 (1 μmol/L) induced Nrf2 translocation, and suppressed CCl4-induced cell proliferation, reversed CCl4- induced changes in MDA, GPX, PCIII and HA contents in the supernatant fluid and α-SMA expression in the cells. Knockdown of Nrf2 gene diminished these actions of Rg1 in CCl4-treated HSCs in vitro. Conclusion: Rg1 exerts protective effects in a rat model of alcohol- and CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis via promoting the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and expression of antioxidant enzymes. PMID:24976156

  19. Effectiveness of Losartan-Loaded Hyaluronic Acid (HA) Micelles for the Reduction of Advanced Hepatic Fibrosis in C3H/HeN Mice Model.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Reju George; Moon, Myeong Ju; Kim, Jo Heon; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Jeong, Yong Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Advanced hepatic fibrosis therapy using drug-delivering nanoparticles is a relatively unexplored area. Angiotensin type 1 (AT1) receptor blockers such as losartan can be delivered to hepatic stellate cells (HSC), blocking their activation and thereby reducing fibrosis progression in the liver. In our study, we analyzed the possibility of utilizing drug-loaded vehicles such as hyaluronic acid (HA) micelles carrying losartan to attenuate HSC activation. Losartan, which exhibits inherent lipophilicity, was loaded into the hydrophobic core of HA micelles with a 19.5% drug loading efficiency. An advanced liver fibrosis model was developed using C3H/HeN mice subjected to 20 weeks of prolonged TAA/ethanol weight-adapted treatment. The cytocompatibility and cell uptake profile of losartan-HA micelles were studied in murine fibroblast cells (NIH3T3), human hepatic stellate cells (hHSC) and FL83B cells (hepatocyte cell line). The ability of these nanoparticles to attenuate HSC activation was studied in activated HSC cells based on alpha smooth muscle actin (α-sma) expression. Mice treated with oral losartan or losartan-HA micelles were analyzed for serum enzyme levels (ALT/AST, CK and LDH) and collagen deposition (hydroxyproline levels) in the liver. The accumulation of HA micelles was observed in fibrotic livers, which suggests increased delivery of losartan compared to normal livers and specific uptake by HSC. Active reduction of α-sma was observed in hHSC and the liver sections of losartan-HA micelle-treated mice. The serum enzyme levels and collagen deposition of losartan-HA micelle-treated mice was reduced significantly compared to the oral losartan group. Losartan-HA micelles demonstrated significant attenuation of hepatic fibrosis via an HSC-targeting mechanism in our in vitro and in vivo studies. These nanoparticles can be considered as an alternative therapy for liver fibrosis.

  20. Association of the Nonalcoholic Hepatic Steatosis and Its Degrees With the Values of Liver Enzymes and Homeostasis Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance Index

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Mario Augusto Ferreira; Cruz, Josilda Ferreira; Macena, Larissa Baracho; de Santana, Demetrius Silva; Oliveira, Cristiane Costa da Cunha; Lima, Sonia Oliveira; Franca, Alex Vianey Callado

    2015-01-01

    Background Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is among the most common chronic diseases of the modern world with a wide variety of factors including genetic, environmental and metabolic. The aim of this study was to verify the association between the degrees of hepatic steatosis at the abdominal ultrasound and the values of aminotransferases (aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine transferase (ALT)), gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index. Methods A prospective, descriptive survey study, using a quantitative analytical examination, was conducted from July 2013 to July 2014. In the statistical analysis, values were expressed as median, first and third quartiles. We used the nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test to compare the medians between the degrees of steatosis, adopted a statistical significance of 5% (P ≤ 0.05) and used the statistical program SPSS 22.0. Results We diagnosed 233/800 (29.1%) patients with hepatic steatosis on routine ultrasound, and 65.7% were female. Regarding degrees, 119 had grade 1 (51.0%), 94 grade 2 (40.4%) and 20 grade 3 (8.6%). The median age of the patients with grade 1, 2 or 3 did not vary significantly (P > 0.05). The median body mass index (BMI), although clinically important because of its elevation, did not differ significantly (P > 0.05). ALT levels increased as the degree of hepatic steatosis has advanced as well as the levels of AST, GGT and HOMA-IR. AST values showed a greater association with the severity of fatty liver (P = 0.0001) than the ALT (P = 0.001). Conclusions ALT, AST, GGT and HOMA-IR are associated to the degrees of hepatic steatosis on ultrasound and can help in the selection of patients for the liver histological evaluation. PMID:27785306

  1. Hepatic immunohistochemical localization of the tight junction protein ZO-1 in rat models of cholestasis.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, J. M.; Glade, J. L.; Stevenson, B. R.; Boyer, J. L.; Mooseker, M. S.

    1989-01-01

    Structural alterations in hepatocyte tight junctions accompanying cholestasis were investigated using immunolocalization of ZO-1, the first known protein component of the tight junction. Disruption in the paracellular barrier function of the tight junction has been proposed to allow reflux of bile into the blood. Cholestasis was induced in 210 to 235 g male Sprague-Dawley rats either by five consecutive daily subcutaneous injections of 17-alpha-ethinyl estradiol (0.5 mg/kg/d in propylene glycol) or ligation of the common bile duct for 72 hours. The structural organization of the tight junction was assessed in each model by indirect immunofluorescent and immunoperoxidase staining for ZO-1 on frozen sections of liver and compared with controls. In control, sham-operated, and estradiol-injected animals, ZO-1 localizes in a uniform continuous manner along the margins of the canaliculi. In contrast, bile duct ligation results in the appearance of numerous discontinuities in ZO-1 staining accompanied by dilation or collapse of the lumenal space. Tissue content of the ZO-1 protein, as determined by quantitative immunoblotting, was unaffected in either cholestatic model compared with controls. These findings indicate that the molecular organization of the tight junction can be assessed from immunostaining patterns of ZO-1 in frozen sections of cholestatic livers. Under these experimental conditions, the organization of the tight junction at the level of the ZO-1 protein is altered by bile duct obstruction but not by ethinyl estradiol. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2719075

  2. Hepatic and serum lipid signatures specific to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in murine models.

    PubMed

    Chiappini, Franck; Desterke, Christophe; Bertrand-Michel, Justine; Guettier, Catherine; Le Naour, François

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) is a precursor of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a condition that may progress to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Markers for diagnosis of NASH are still lacking. We have investigated lipid markers using mouse models that developed NAFL when fed with high fat diet (HFD) or NASH when fed using methionine choline deficient diet (MCDD). We have performed a comprehensive lipidomic analysis on liver tissues as well as on sera from mice fed HFD (n = 5), MCDD (n = 5) or normal diet as controls (n = 10). Machine learning approach based on prediction analysis of microarrays followed by random forests allowed identifying 21 lipids out of 149 in the liver and 14 lipids out of 155 in the serum discriminating mice fed MCDD from HFD or controls. In conclusion, the global approach implemented allowed characterizing lipid signatures specific to NASH in both liver and serum from animal models. This opens new avenue for investigating early and non-invasive lipid markers for diagnosis of NASH in human. PMID:27510159

  3. Hepatic and serum lipid signatures specific to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in murine models

    PubMed Central

    Chiappini, Franck; Desterke, Christophe; Bertrand-Michel, Justine; Guettier, Catherine; Le Naour, François

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) is a precursor of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a condition that may progress to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Markers for diagnosis of NASH are still lacking. We have investigated lipid markers using mouse models that developed NAFL when fed with high fat diet (HFD) or NASH when fed using methionine choline deficient diet (MCDD). We have performed a comprehensive lipidomic analysis on liver tissues as well as on sera from mice fed HFD (n = 5), MCDD (n = 5) or normal diet as controls (n = 10). Machine learning approach based on prediction analysis of microarrays followed by random forests allowed identifying 21 lipids out of 149 in the liver and 14 lipids out of 155 in the serum discriminating mice fed MCDD from HFD or controls. In conclusion, the global approach implemented allowed characterizing lipid signatures specific to NASH in both liver and serum from animal models. This opens new avenue for investigating early and non-invasive lipid markers for diagnosis of NASH in human. PMID:27510159

  4. Correction of metabolic abnormalities in a rodent model of obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus by inhibitors of hepatic protein kinase C-ι.

    PubMed

    Sajan, Mini P; Nimal, Sonali; Mastorides, Stephen; Acevedo-Duncan, Mildred; Kahn, C Ronald; Fields, Alan P; Braun, Ursula; Leitges, Michael; Farese, Robert V

    2012-04-01

    Excessive activity of hepatic atypical protein kinase (aPKC) is proposed to play a critical role in mediating lipid and carbohydrate abnormalities in obesity, the metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. In previous studies of rodent models of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, adenoviral-mediated expression of kinase-inactive aPKC rapidly reversed or markedly improved most if not all metabolic abnormalities. Here, we examined effects of 2 newly developed small-molecule PKC-ι/λ inhibitors. We used the mouse model of heterozygous muscle-specific knockout of PKC-λ, in which partial deficiency of muscle PKC-λ impairs glucose transport in muscle and thereby causes glucose intolerance and hyperinsulinemia, which, via hepatic aPKC activation, leads to abdominal obesity, hepatosteatosis, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypercholesterolemia. One inhibitor, 1H-imidazole-4-carboxamide, 5-amino-1-[2,3-dihydroxy-4-[(phosphonooxy)methyl]cyclopentyl-[1R-(1a,2b,3b,4a)], binds to the substrate-binding site of PKC-λ/ι, but not other PKCs. The other inhibitor, aurothiomalate, binds to cysteine residues in the PB1-binding domains of aPKC-λ/ι/ζ and inhibits scaffolding. Treatment with either inhibitor for 7 days inhibited aPKC, but not Akt, in liver and concomitantly improved insulin signaling to Akt and aPKC in muscle and adipocytes. Moreover, both inhibitors diminished excessive expression of hepatic, aPKC-dependent lipogenic, proinflammatory, and gluconeogenic factors; and this was accompanied by reversal or marked improvements in hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, abdominal obesity, hepatosteatosis, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypercholesterolemia. Our findings highlight the pathogenetic importance of insulin signaling to hepatic PKC-ι in obesity, the metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus and suggest that 1H-imidazole-4-carboxamide, 5-amino-1-[2,3-dihydroxy-4-[(phosphonooxy)methyl]cyclopentyl-[1R-(1a,2b,3b,4a)] and aurothiomalate or similar agents that

  5. Patient-Specific Biomechanical Modeling for Guidance During Minimally-Invasive Hepatic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Plantefève, Rosalie; Peterlik, Igor; Haouchine, Nazim; Cotin, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    During the minimally-invasive liver surgery, only the partial surface view of the liver is usually provided to the surgeon via the laparoscopic camera. Therefore, it is necessary to estimate the actual position of the internal structures such as tumors and vessels from the pre-operative images. Nevertheless, such task can be highly challenging since during the intervention, the abdominal organs undergo important deformations due to the pneumoperitoneum, respiratory and cardiac motion and the interaction with the surgical tools. Therefore, a reliable automatic system for intra-operative guidance requires fast and reliable registration of the pre- and intra-operative data. In this paper we present a complete pipeline for the registration of pre-operative patient-specific image data to the sparse and incomplete intra-operative data. While the intra-operative data is represented by a point cloud extracted from the stereo-endoscopic images, the pre-operative data is used to reconstruct a biomechanical model which is necessary for accurate estimation of the position of the internal structures, considering the actual deformations. This model takes into account the patient-specific liver anatomy composed of parenchyma, vascularization and capsule, and is enriched with anatomical boundary conditions transferred from an atlas. The registration process employs the iterative closest point technique together with a penalty-based method. We perform a quantitative assessment based on the evaluation of the target registration error on synthetic data as well as a qualitative assessment on real patient data. We demonstrate that the proposed registration method provides good results in terms of both accuracy and robustness w.r.t. the quality of the intra-operative data.

  6. Hepatic progenitor cells, stem cells, and AFP expression in models of liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Kuhlmann, Wolf D; Peschke, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Adult hepatocytes and liver-cell progenitors play a role in restoring liver tissue after injury. For the study of progenitor cells in liver repair, experimental models included (a) surgical removal of liver tissue by partial hepatectomy; (b) acute injury by carbontetrachloride; (c) acute injury by d-galactosamine (GalN) and N-nitrosomorpholine (NNM); and (d) chemical hepatocarcinogenesis by feeding NNM in low and high doses. Serological and immunohistological detection of alpha-fetoprotein gene expression served to follow pathways of cellular differentiation. Stem cells were not required in models of surgical removal of parenchyma and in carbon tetrachloride intoxication of adult hepatocytes. In contrast, regeneration of liver occurred through biliary epithelial cells in injuries induced by GalN and NNM. These biliary epithelial cells, collectively called oval cells, are most probably derived from the canals of Hering. Proliferating bile duct cells reached a level of differentiation with reactivation of foetal genes and significant alpha-1-fetoprotein (AFP) synthesis signalling a certain degree of retrodifferentiation with potential stemness. Due to the same embryonic origin of bile ducts and hepatocytes, biliary epithelium and its proliferating progeny (oval cells) have a defined role in liver regeneration as a transit and amplification compartment. In their early proliferation stage, oval cells were heavily engaged in DNA synthesis ([3H]thymidine labelling). Pulse-chase experiments during experimental hepatocarcinogenesis exhibited their development into hepatocytes with high risk for transformation and leading to foci of altered hepatocytes. Hepatocellular carcinomas may arise either from proliferating/differentiating oval cells or from adult hepatocytes; both cell types have stem-like properties. AFP-positive and AFP-negative carcinomas occurred in the same liver. They may represent random clonal origin. The heterogeneity of phenotypic marker (AFP) correlated

  7. Multi-transgenic minipig models exhibiting potential for hepatic insulin resistance and pancreatic apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    KONG, SIYUAN; RUAN, JINXUE; XIN, LEILEI; FAN, JUNHUA; XIA, JIHAN; LIU, ZHIGUO; MU, YULIAN; YANG, SHULIN; LI, KUI

    2016-01-01

    There are currently no multi-transgenic minipig models of diabetes for the regulation of multiple genes involved in its pathogenesis. The foot and mouth disease virus 2A (F2A)-mediated polycistronic system possesses several advantages, and the present study developed a novel multi-transgenic minipig model associated with diabetes using this system. The tissue-specific polycistronic system used in the present study consisted of two expression cassettes, separated by an insulator: (i) 11-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (11β-HSD1), driven by the porcine liver-specific apolipoprotein E promoter; (ii) human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), linked to the furin digested site and F-2A, driven by the porcine pancreas-specific insulin promoter. In the present study, porcine fetal fibroblasts were transfected with this vector. Following somatic cell nuclear transfer using 10 cell clones and the transplantation of 1,459 embryos in total, three Landrace x Yorkshire surrogates became pregnant and delivered three Wuzhishan piglets. Genomic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) demonstrated that the piglets were multi-transgenic. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR confirmed that 11β-HSD1 transcription was upregulated in the targeted liver. Similarly, hIAPP and CHOP were expressed at high levels, compared with the control (P<0.05 and P<0.01) in the pancreas, consistent with the western blotting and immunohistochemistry results. The primary results also showed that overexpression of 11β-HSD1 in the liver increased the liver fat lipid parameters; and the levels of hIAPP and CHOP in the pancreatic islet cells, leading to delayed β-cell development and apoptosis. This novel tissue-specific polycistronic system offers a promising starting point for efficiently mimicking multigenic metabolic disease. PMID:26648014

  8. Selection of reference genes for qRT-PCR in high fat diet-induced hepatic steatosis mice model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lingyan; Ma, Xinran; Cui, Bin; Li, Xiaoying; Ning, Guang; Wang, Shu

    2011-07-01

    With the epidemic proportions of obesity worldwide and the concurrent prevalence of hepatic steatosis, there is an urgent need for better understanding the intrinsic mechanism of hepatic steatosis, especially the changes of gene expression underlying the development of hepatic steatosis and its associated abnormal liver function. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) is a sensitive and highly reproducible technique of gene expression analysis. However, for accurate and reliable gene expression results, it is vital to have an internal control gene expressed at constant levels under all the experimental conditions being analyzed for. In this study, the authors validated candidate reference genes suitable for qRT-PCR profiling experiments using livers from control mice and high fat diet-induced obese mice. Cross-validation of expression stability of ten selected reference genes using three popular algorithms, GeNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper found HPRT1 and GAPDH as most stable reference genes. Thus, HPRT1 and GAPDH are recommended as stable reference genes most suitable for gene expression studies in the development of hepatic steatosis.

  9. Woodchuck hepatitis virus core gene deletions and proliferative responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated by an immunodominant epitope: a viral immune escape in the woodchuck model of chronic hepatitis B?

    PubMed

    Taffon, Stefania; Kondili, Loreta A; Giuseppetti, Roberto; Ciccaglione, Anna Rita; Pulimanti, Barbara; Attili, Adolfo F; Rapicetta, Maria; D'Ugo, Emilio

    2015-04-01

    Marmota monax and its natural infection by woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) could be used as a predictive model for evaluating mechanisms of viral persistence during chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of viral variants in the core gene of chronically WHV-infected woodchucks that showed two different patterns of peripheral blood mononuclear cells' (PBMCs') responses after stimulation with a specific WHV core peptide. Sequences' analysis of the WHV core region from eight WHV chronically infected woodchucks have been performed after in vitro stimulation with an immunodominant epitope of the WHV core protein (amino acids [aa] 96-110). Following this stimulation, positive PBMC responses at each point of follow-up were observed for four animals (group A), and weak immune responses at one or a few points of follow-up were observed for the remaining four animals (group B). The WHV core gene sequences contained amino acid deletions (aa 84-126, aa 84-113) in three of four group A animals and in none of group B animals. In the group A animals, the same deletions were observed in liver specimens and in two of four tumor specimens. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was diagnosed in all group A animals and in one group B animal. In conclusion, internal deletions in the core region correlated with a sustained PBMC response to the immunogenic peptide (96-110) of the core protein. A possible role of this relationship in hepatocarcinogenesis could be hypothesized; however, this needs to be investigated in patients with chronic HBV infection. The evaluation of virus-specific T-cell responses and T-cell epitopes that are possibly related to the mechanisms of viral evasion should be further investigated in order to design combined antiviral and immune approaches to control chronic HBV infection. PMID:25666197

  10. Characterization of hepatic lipid profiles in a mouse model with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and subsequent fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Kosuke; Uebanso, Takashi; Maekawa, Keiko; Ishikawa, Masaki; Taguchi, Ryo; Nammo, Takao; Nishimaki-Mogami, Tomoko; Udagawa, Haruhide; Fujii, Masato; Shibazaki, Yuichiro; Yoneyama, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Kazuki; Saito, Yoshiro

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a major health problem since it often leads to hepatocellular carcinoma. However, the underlying mechanisms of NASH development and subsequent fibrosis have yet to be clarified. We compared comprehensive lipidomic profiles between mice with high fat diet (HFD)-induced steatosis and STAM mice with NASH and subsequent fibrosis. The STAM mouse is a model that demonstrates NASH progression resembling the disease in humans: STAM mice manifest NASH at 8 weeks, which progresses to fibrosis at 12 weeks, and finally develop hepatocellular carcinoma. Overall, 250 lipid molecules were detected in the liver using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. We found that STAM mice with NASH presented a significantly higher abundance of sphingolipids and lower levels of triacylglycerols than the HFD-fed control mice. The abundance of certain fatty acids in phospholipid side chains was also significantly different between STAM and control mice, although global levels of phosphatidylcholines and phosphatidylethanolamines were comparable. Finally, increase in levels of acylcarnitines and some diacylglycerols was observed in STAM mice toward the fibrosis stage, but not in age-matched control mice. Our study provides insights into the lipid status of the steatotic, NASH, and fibrotic liver that would help elucidate the molecular pathophysiology of NASH progression. PMID:26289793

  11. Genetic and Environmental Models of Circadian Disruption Link SRC-2 Function to Hepatic Pathology.

    PubMed

    Fleet, Tiffany; Stashi, Erin; Zhu, Bokai; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Marcelo, Kathrina L; Kettner, Nicole M; Gorman, Blythe K; Coarfa, Cristian; Fu, Loning; O'Malley, Bert W; York, Brian

    2016-10-01

    Circadian rhythmicity is a fundamental process that synchronizes behavioral cues with metabolic homeostasis. Disruption of daily cycles due to jet lag or shift work results in severe physiological consequences including advanced aging, metabolic syndrome, and even cancer. Our understanding of the molecular clock, which is regulated by intricate positive feedforward and negative feedback loops, has expanded to include an important metabolic transcriptional coregulator, Steroid Receptor Coactivator-2 (SRC-2), that regulates both the central clock of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and peripheral clocks including the liver. We hypothesized that an environmental uncoupling of the light-dark phases, termed chronic circadian disruption (CCD), would lead to pathology similar to the genetic circadian disruption observed with loss of SRC-2 We found that CCD and ablation of SRC-2 in mice led to a common comorbidity of metabolic syndrome also found in humans with circadian disruption, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The combination of SRC-2(-/-) and CCD results in a more robust phenotype that correlates with human non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) gene signatures. Either CCD or SRC-2 ablation produces an advanced aging phenotype leading to increased mortality consistent with other circadian mutant mouse models. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that SRC-2 provides an essential link between the behavioral activities influenced by light cues and the metabolic homeostasis maintained by the liver.

  12. Genetic and Environmental Models of Circadian Disruption Link SRC-2 Function to Hepatic Pathology.

    PubMed

    Fleet, Tiffany; Stashi, Erin; Zhu, Bokai; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Marcelo, Kathrina L; Kettner, Nicole M; Gorman, Blythe K; Coarfa, Cristian; Fu, Loning; O'Malley, Bert W; York, Brian

    2016-10-01

    Circadian rhythmicity is a fundamental process that synchronizes behavioral cues with metabolic homeostasis. Disruption of daily cycles due to jet lag or shift work results in severe physiological consequences including advanced aging, metabolic syndrome, and even cancer. Our understanding of the molecular clock, which is regulated by intricate positive feedforward and negative feedback loops, has expanded to include an important metabolic transcriptional coregulator, Steroid Receptor Coactivator-2 (SRC-2), that regulates both the central clock of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and peripheral clocks including the liver. We hypothesized that an environmental uncoupling of the light-dark phases, termed chronic circadian disruption (CCD), would lead to pathology similar to the genetic circadian disruption observed with loss of SRC-2 We found that CCD and ablation of SRC-2 in mice led to a common comorbidity of metabolic syndrome also found in humans with circadian disruption, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The combination of SRC-2(-/-) and CCD results in a more robust phenotype that correlates with human non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) gene signatures. Either CCD or SRC-2 ablation produces an advanced aging phenotype leading to increased mortality consistent with other circadian mutant mouse models. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that SRC-2 provides an essential link between the behavioral activities influenced by light cues and the metabolic homeostasis maintained by the liver. PMID:27432117

  13. [Hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Festi, Davide; Marasco, Giovanni; Ravaioli, Federico; Colecchia, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a common complication of liver cirrhosis and it can manifest with a broad spectrum of neuropsychiatric abnormalities of varying severity, acuity and time course with important clinical implications. According to recent guidelines, HE has been classified into different types, depending on the severity of hepatic dysfunction, the presence of porto-systemic shunts and the number of previous episodes or persistent manifestations. From a clinical point of view, HE can be recognized as unimpaired, covert (that deals with minimal and grade 1 according to the grading of mental state), and overt (that is categorized from grade 2 to grade 4). Different and only partially known pathogenic mechanisms have been identified, comprising ammonia, inflammatory cytokines, benzodiazepine-like compounds and manganese deposition. Different therapeutic strategies are available for treating HE, in particular the overt HE, since covert HE needs to be managed case by case. Recognition and treatment of precipitating factors represent fundamental part of the management. The more effective treatments, which can be performed separately or combined, are represented by non-absorbable disaccharides (lactulose and lactitol) and the topic antibiotic rifaximin; other possible therapies, mainly used in patients non responders to previous treatments, are represented by branched chain amino acids and metabolic ammonia scavengers. PMID:27571468

  14. Protect Yourself from Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... develop yellowish eyes and skin. All the hepatitis viruses can cause acute, or short-term, hepatitis. Some can also cause chronic hepatitis, in which the infection lasts a long time, sometimes for your whole life. Chronic hepatitis can eventually lead to scarring of ...

  15. Palmiwon attenuates hepatic lipid accumulation and hyperlipidemia in a menopausal rat model

    PubMed Central

    Go, Hiroe; Ryuk, Jin Ah; Lee, Hye Won; Ko, Byoung Seob

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective We examined the phytoestrogenic effects of palmiwon on breast carcinoma, lipid accumulation in methyl-β-cyclodextrin–induced HepG2 cells, and lipid-related diseases in a rat model of menopausal hyperlipidemia. Methods E-Screen assay was used to screen for phytoestrogens, especially those with antiestrogenic activity, in MCF-7 cells. Oil Red O staining and intracellular cholesterol analyses were used to quantify cellular cholesterol levels. 3-Hydroxy-3-methyl glutaryl coenzyme A reductase assay was used to measure enzyme activity. The levels of phosphorylated adenosine monophosphate–activated protein kinases and products of genes involved in cholesterol synthesis were measured by Western blot analysis. Thirty rats were either ovariectomized or sham-operated and randomly assigned to four groups (n = 5)—Sham, OVX, OVX-SV, or OVX-PMW (50, 150, or 450 mg/kg) group—for 8 weeks. A number of targets associated with lipid-related diseases were examined to confirm the estrogenic effects of palmiwon. Results Palmiwon showed antiestrogenic activity in MCF-7 cells. Palmiwon decreased lipid accumulation, total cholesterol levels, and low-density lipoprotein/very-low-density lipoprotein levels in HepG2 cells. Moreover, palmiwon reversed the effects of methyl-β-cyclodextrin on cholesterol synthesis regulators and inhibited the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl glutaryl coenzyme A reductase. Phosphorylation of adenosine monophosphate–activated protein kinase was stimulated by palmiwon. In ovariectomized rats, palmiwon reduced retroperitoneal and perirenal fat accumulation, serum lipids, atherogenic index, cardiac risk factor score, intima-media thickness, and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis scores. Conclusions These results indicate that palmiwon inhibits lipid accumulation without estrogenic activity in the breast. Therefore, palmiwon may have potential as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of hyperlipidemia in postmenopausal women. PMID:25563794

  16. Overview of an interlaboratory collaboration on evaluating the effects of model hepatotoxicants on hepatic gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Roger G; Rockett, John C; Gibson, G Gordon; Pettit, Syril D

    2004-01-01

    DNA microarrays and related tools offer promise for identification of pathways involved in toxic responses to xenobiotics. To be useful for risk assessment, experimental data must be challenged for reliability and interlaboratory reproducibility. Toward this goal, the Hepatotoxicity Working Group of the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) Technical Committee on Application of Genomics to Mechanism-Based Risk Assessment evaluated and compared biological and gene expression responses in rats exposed to two model hepatotoxins--clofibrate and methapyrilene. This collaborative effort provided an unprecedented opportunity for the working group to evaluate and compare multiple biological, genomic, and toxicological parameters across different laboratories and microarray platforms. Many of the results from this collaboration are presented in accompanying articles in this mini-monograph, whereas others have been published previously. (Italic)In vivo(/Italic) studies for both compounds were conducted in two laboratories using a standard experimental protocol, and RNA samples were distributed to 16 laboratories for analysis on six microarray platforms. Histopathology, clinical chemistry, and organ weight changes were consistent with reported effects. Gene expression results demonstrated reasonable agreement between laboratories and across platforms. Discrepancies in expression profiles of some individual genes were largely due to platform differences and approaches to data analysis rather than to biological or interlaboratory variability. Despite these discrepancies there was overall agreement in the biological pathways affected by these compounds, demonstrating that transcriptional profiling is reproducible between laboratories and can reliably identify affected pathways necessary to provide mechanistic insight. This effort represents an important first step toward the use of transcriptional profiling in risk

  17. Analysis of changes in hepatic gene expression in a murine model of tolerance to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity (autoprotection)

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, Meeghan A.; Koza-Taylor, Petra; Campion, Sarah N.; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Gu, Xinsheng; Enayetallah, Ahmed E.; Lawton, Michael P.; Manautou, José E.

    2014-01-01

    Pretreatment of mice with a low hepatotoxic dose of acetaminophen (APAP) results in resistance to a subsequent, higher dose of APAP. This mouse model, termed APAP autoprotection was used here to identify differentially expressed genes and cellular pathways that could contribute to this development of resistance to hepatotoxicity. Male C57BL/6J mice were pretreated with APAP (400 mg/kg) and then challenged 48 h later with 600 mg APAP/kg. Livers were obtained 4 or 24 h later and total hepatic RNA was isolated and hybridized to Affymetrix Mouse Genome MU430{sub 2} GeneChip. Statistically significant genes were determined and gene expression changes were also interrogated using the Causal Reasoning Engine (CRE). Extensive literature review narrowed our focus to methionine adenosyl transferase-1 alpha (MAT1A), nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (Fmo3) and galectin-3 (Lgals3). Down-regulation of MAT1A could lead to decreases in S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), which is known to protect against APAP toxicity. Nrf2 activation is expected to play a role in protective adaptation. Up-regulation of Lgals3, one of the genes supporting the Nrf2 hypothesis, can lead to suppression of apoptosis and reduced mitochondrial dysfunction. Fmo3 induction suggests the involvement of an enzyme not known to metabolize APAP in the development of tolerance to APAP toxicity. Subsequent quantitative RT-PCR and immunochemical analysis confirmed the differential expression of some of these genes in the APAP autoprotection model. In conclusion, our genomics strategy identified cellular pathways that might further explain the molecular basis for APAP autoprotection. - Highlights: • Differential expression of genes in mice resistant to acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. • Increased gene expression of Flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 and Galectin-3. • Decrease in MAT1A expression and compensatory hepatocellular regeneration. • Two distinct gene

  18. Error analysis of the quantification of hepatic perfusion using a dual-input single-compartment model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Shohei; Yamazaki, Youichi; Murase, Kenya

    2008-11-01

    We performed an error analysis of the quantification of liver perfusion from dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) data using a dual-input single-compartment model for various disease severities, based on computer simulations. In the simulations, the time-density curves (TDCs) in the liver were generated from an actually measured arterial input function using a theoretical equation describing the kinetic behavior of the contrast agent (CA) in the liver. The rate constants for the transfer of CA from the hepatic artery to the liver (K1a), from the portal vein to the liver (K1p), and from the liver to the plasma (k2) were estimated from simulated TDCs with various plasma volumes (V0s). To investigate the effect of the shapes of input functions, the original arterial and portal-venous input functions were stretched in the time direction by factors of 2, 3 and 4 (stretching factors). The above parameters were estimated with the linear least-squares (LLSQ) and nonlinear least-squares (NLSQ) methods, and the root mean square errors (RMSEs) between the true and estimated values were calculated. Sensitivity and identifiability analyses were also performed. The RMSE of V0 was the smallest, followed by those of K1a, k2 and K1p in an increasing order. The RMSEs of K1a, K1p and k2 increased with increasing V0, while that of V0 tended to decrease. The stretching factor also affected parameter estimation in both methods. The LLSQ method estimated the above parameters faster and with smaller variations than the NLSQ method. Sensitivity analysis showed that the magnitude of the sensitivity function of V0 was the greatest, followed by those of K1a, K1p and k2 in a decreasing order, while the variance of V0 obtained from the covariance matrices was the smallest, followed by those of K1a, K1p and k2 in an increasing order. The magnitude of the sensitivity function and the variance increased and decreased, respectively, with increasing disease severity and decreased

  19. Hepatitis Virus Infections in Poultry.

    PubMed

    Yugo, Danielle M; Hauck, Ruediger; Shivaprasad, H L; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2016-09-01

    Viral hepatitis in poultry is a complex disease syndrome caused by several viruses belonging to different families including avian hepatitis E virus (HEV), duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV), duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV-1, -2, -3), duck hepatitis virus Types 2 and 3, fowl adenoviruses (FAdV), and turkey hepatitis virus (THV). While these hepatitis viruses share the same target organ, the liver, they each possess unique clinical and biological features. In this article, we aim to review the common and unique features of major poultry hepatitis viruses in an effort to identify the knowledge gaps and aid the prevention and control of poultry viral hepatitis. Avian HEV is an Orthohepevirus B in the family Hepeviridae that naturally infects chickens and consists of three distinct genotypes worldwide. Avian HEV is associated with hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome or big liver and spleen disease in chickens, although the majority of the infected birds are subclinical. Avihepadnaviruses in the family of Hepadnaviridae have been isolated from ducks, snow geese, white storks, grey herons, cranes, and parrots. DHBV evolved with the host as a noncytopathic form without clinical signs and rarely progressed to chronicity. The outcome for DHBV infection varies by the host's ability to elicit an immune response and is dose and age dependent in ducks, thus mimicking the pathogenesis of human hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections and providing an excellent animal model for human HBV. DHAV is a picornavirus that causes a highly contagious virus infection in ducks with up to 100% flock mortality in ducklings under 6 wk of age, while older birds remain unaffected. The high morbidity and mortality has an economic impact on intensive duck production farming. Duck hepatitis virus Types 2 and 3 are astroviruses in the family of Astroviridae with similarity phylogenetically to turkey astroviruses, implicating the potential for cross-species infections between strains. Duck astrovirus (DAstV) causes

  20. Hepatitis Virus Infections in Poultry.

    PubMed

    Yugo, Danielle M; Hauck, Ruediger; Shivaprasad, H L; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2016-09-01

    Viral hepatitis in poultry is a complex disease syndrome caused by several viruses belonging to different families including avian hepatitis E virus (HEV), duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV), duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV-1, -2, -3), duck hepatitis virus Types 2 and 3, fowl adenoviruses (FAdV), and turkey hepatitis virus (THV). While these hepatitis viruses share the same target organ, the liver, they each possess unique clinical and biological features. In this article, we aim to review the common and unique features of major poultry hepatitis viruses in an effort to identify the knowledge gaps and aid the prevention and control of poultry viral hepatitis. Avian HEV is an Orthohepevirus B in the family Hepeviridae that naturally infects chickens and consists of three distinct genotypes worldwide. Avian HEV is associated with hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome or big liver and spleen disease in chickens, although the majority of the infected birds are subclinical. Avihepadnaviruses in the family of Hepadnaviridae have been isolated from ducks, snow geese, white storks, grey herons, cranes, and parrots. DHBV evolved with the host as a noncytopathic form without clinical signs and rarely progressed to chronicity. The outcome for DHBV infection varies by the host's ability to elicit an immune response and is dose and age dependent in ducks, thus mimicking the pathogenesis of human hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections and providing an excellent animal model for human HBV. DHAV is a picornavirus that causes a highly contagious virus infection in ducks with up to 100% flock mortality in ducklings under 6 wk of age, while older birds remain unaffected. The high morbidity and mortality has an economic impact on intensive duck production farming. Duck hepatitis virus Types 2 and 3 are astroviruses in the family of Astroviridae with similarity phylogenetically to turkey astroviruses, implicating the potential for cross-species infections between strains. Duck astrovirus (DAstV) causes

  1. Coenzyme Q10 prevents hepatic fibrosis, inflammation, and oxidative stress in a male rat model of poor maternal nutrition and accelerated postnatal growth1

    PubMed Central

    Tarry-Adkins, Jane L; Fernandez-Twinn, Denise S; Hargreaves, Iain P; Neergheen, Viruna; Aiken, Catherine E; Martin-Gronert, Malgorzata S; McConnell, Josie M; Ozanne, Susan E

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is well established that low birth weight and accelerated postnatal growth increase the risk of liver dysfunction in later life. However, molecular mechanisms underlying such developmental programming are not well characterized, and potential intervention strategies are poorly defined. Objectives: We tested the hypotheses that poor maternal nutrition and accelerated postnatal growth would lead to increased hepatic fibrosis (a pathological marker of liver dysfunction) and that postnatal supplementation with the antioxidant coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) would prevent this programmed phenotype. Design: A rat model of maternal protein restriction was used to generate low-birth-weight offspring that underwent accelerated postnatal growth (termed “recuperated”). These were compared with control rats. Offspring were weaned onto standard feed pellets with or without dietary CoQ10 (1 mg/kg body weight per day) supplementation. At 12 mo, hepatic fibrosis, indexes of inflammation, oxidative stress, and insulin signaling were measured by histology, Western blot, ELISA, and reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction. Results: Hepatic collagen deposition (diameter of deposit) was greater in recuperated offspring (mean ± SEM: 12 ± 2 μm) than in controls (5 ± 0.5 μm) (P < 0.001). This was associated with greater inflammation (interleukin 6: 38% ± 24% increase; P < 0.05; tumor necrosis factor α: 64% ± 24% increase; P < 0.05), lipid peroxidation (4-hydroxynonenal, measured by ELISA: 0.30 ± 0.02 compared with 0.19 ± 0.05 μg/mL per μg protein; P < 0.05), and hyperinsulinemia (P < 0.05). CoQ10 supplementation increased (P < 0.01) hepatic CoQ10 concentrations and ameliorated liver fibrosis (P < 0.001), inflammation (P < 0.001), some measures of oxidative stress (P < 0.001), and hyperinsulinemia (P < 0.01). Conclusions: Suboptimal in utero nutrition combined with accelerated postnatal catch-up growth caused more hepatic fibrosis in adulthood, which was

  2. Hepatic Perfusion Therapy.

    PubMed

    Rajeev, Rahul; Gamblin, T Clark; Turaga, Kiran K

    2016-04-01

    Isolated hepatic perfusion uses the unique vascular supply of hepatic malignancies to deliver cytotoxic chemotherapy. The procedure involves vascular isolation of the liver and delivery of chemotherapy via the hepatic artery and extraction from retrohepatic vena cava. Benefits of hepatic perfusion have been observed in hepatic metastases of ocular melanoma and colorectal cancer and primary hepatocellular carcinoma. Percutaneous and prophylactic perfusions are avenues of ongoing research.

  3. The Cost Effectiveness of Hepatitis Immunization for US College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, R. Jake; Saab, Sammy; Meyerhoff, Allen S.

    2003-01-01

    Hepatitis B immunization is recommended for all American children, and hepatitis A immunization is recommended for children who live in areas with elevated disease rates. Because hepatitis A and B occur most commonly in young adults, the authors examined the cost effectiveness of college-based vaccination. They developed epidemiologic models to…

  4. Predictive Models for Regional Hepatic Function Based on 99mTc-IDA SPECT and Local Radiation Dose for Physiologic Adaptive Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hesheng; Feng, Mary; Frey, Kirk A.; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Cao, Yue

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: High-dose radiation therapy (RT) for intrahepatic cancer is limited by the development of liver injury. This study investigated whether regional hepatic function assessed before and during the course of RT using 99mTc-labeled iminodiacetic acid (IDA) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) could predict regional liver function reserve after RT. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients treated with RT for intrahepatic cancers underwent dynamic 99mTc-IDA SPECT scans before RT, during, and 1 month after completion of RT. Indocyanine green (ICG) tests, a measure of overall liver function, were performed within 1 day of each scan. Three-dimensional volumetric hepatic extraction fraction (HEF) images of the liver were estimated by deconvolution analysis. After coregistration of the CT/SPECT and the treatment planning CT, HEF dose–response functions during and after RT were generated. The volumetric mean of the HEFs in the whole liver was correlated with ICG clearance time. Three models, dose, priori, and adaptive models, were developed using multivariate linear regression to assess whether the regional HEFs measured before and during RT helped predict regional hepatic function after RT. Results: The mean of the volumetric liver HEFs was significantly correlated with ICG clearance half-life time (r=−0.80, P<.0001), for all time points. Linear correlations between local doses and regional HEFs 1 month after RT were significant in 12 patients. In the priori model, regional HEF after RT was predicted by the planned dose and regional HEF assessed before RT (R=0.71, P<.0001). In the adaptive model, regional HEF after RT was predicted by regional HEF reassessed during RT and the remaining planned local dose (R=0.83, P<.0001). Conclusions: 99mTc-IDA SPECT obtained during RT could be used to assess regional hepatic function and helped predict post-RT regional liver function reserve. This could support individualized adaptive radiation treatment strategies

  5. Predictive Models for Regional Hepatic Function Based upon 99mTc-IDA SPECT and Local Radiation Dose for Physiological Adaptive RT

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hesheng; Feng, Mary; Frey, Kirk A.; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Cao, Yue

    2013-01-01

    Purpose High dose radiation therapy (RT) for intrahepatic cancer is limited by the development of liver injury. This study investigated whether regional hepatic function assessed prior to and during the course of RT using 99mTc-labeled immindodiacetic acid (IDA) SPECT could predict regional liver function reserve after RT. Methods and Materials Fourteen patients treated with RT for intrahepatic cancers underwent dynamic 99mTc-IDA SPECT scans prior to RT, during, and one month after completion of RT. Indocyanine green (ICG) tests (a measure of overall liver function) were performed within 1 day of each scan. 3D volumetric hepatic extraction fraction (HEF) images of the liver were estimated by deconvolution analysis. After co-registration of the CT/SPECT and the treatment planning CT, HEF dose-response functions during and post-RT were generated. The volumetric mean of the HEFs in the whole liver was correlated with ICG clearance time. Three models, Dose, Priori and Adaptive models, were developed using multivariate linear regression to assess whether the regional HEFs measured before and during RT helped predict regional hepatic function post-RT. Results The mean of the volumetric liver HEFs was significantly correlated with ICG clearance half-life time (r = −0.80, p<0.0001), for all time points. Linear correlations between local doses and regional HEFs one month post-RT were significant in 12 patients. In the priori model, regional HEF post-RT was predicted by the planned dose and regional HEF assessed prior to RT (R=0.71, p<0.0001). In the adaptive model, regional HEF post-RT was predicted by regional HEF re-assessed during RT and the remaining planned local dose (R=0.83, p<0.0001). Conclusions 99mTc-IDA SPECT obtained during RT could be used to assess regional hepatic function and helped predict post-RT regional liver function reserve. This could support individualized adaptive radiation treatment strategies to maximize tumor control and minimize the risk of

  6. Antiviral Efficacy and Host Innate Immunity Associated with SB 9200 Treatment in the Woodchuck Model of Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Korolowicz, Kyle E.; Iyer, Radhakrishnan P.; Czerwinski, Stefanie; Suresh, Manasa; Yang, Junming; Padmanabhan, Seetharamaiyer; Sheri, Anjaneyulu; Pandey, Rajendra K.; Skell, Jeffrey; Marquis, Judith K.; Kallakury, Bhaskar V.; Tucker, Robin D.; Menne, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    SB 9200, an oral prodrug of the dinucleotide SB 9000, is being developed for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and represents a novel class of antivirals. SB 9200 is thought to activate the viral sensor proteins, retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RIG-I) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2) resulting in interferon (IFN) mediated antiviral immune responses in virus-infected cells. Additionally, the binding of SB 9200 to these sensor proteins could also sterically block the ability of the viral polymerase to access pre-genomic RNA for nucleic acid synthesis. The immune stimulating and direct antiviral properties of SB 9200 were evaluated in woodchucks chronically infected with woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) by daily, oral dosing at 15 and 30 mg/kg for 12 weeks. Prolonged treatment resulted in 2.2 and 3.7 log10 reductions in serum WHV DNA and in 0.5 and 1.6 log10 declines in serum WHV surface antigen from pretreatment level with the lower or higher dose of SB 9200, respectively. SB 9200 treatment also resulted in lower hepatic levels of WHV nucleic acids and antigen and reduced liver inflammation. Following treatment cessation, recrudescence of viral replication was observed but with dose-dependent delays in viral relapse. The antiviral effects were associated with dose-dependent and long-lasting induction of IFN-α, IFN-β and IFN-stimulated genes in blood and liver, which correlated with the prolonged activation of the RIG-I/NOD2 pathway and hepatic presence of elevated RIG-I protein levels. These results suggest that in addition to a direct antiviral activity, SB 9200 induces antiviral immunity during chronic hepadnaviral infection via activation of the viral sensor pathway. PMID:27552102

  7. Antiviral Efficacy and Host Innate Immunity Associated with SB 9200 Treatment in the Woodchuck Model of Chronic Hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Korolowicz, Kyle E; Iyer, Radhakrishnan P; Czerwinski, Stefanie; Suresh, Manasa; Yang, Junming; Padmanabhan, Seetharamaiyer; Sheri, Anjaneyulu; Pandey, Rajendra K; Skell, Jeffrey; Marquis, Judith K; Kallakury, Bhaskar V; Tucker, Robin D; Menne, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    SB 9200, an oral prodrug of the dinucleotide SB 9000, is being developed for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and represents a novel class of antivirals. SB 9200 is thought to activate the viral sensor proteins, retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RIG-I) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2) resulting in interferon (IFN) mediated antiviral immune responses in virus-infected cells. Additionally, the binding of SB 9200 to these sensor proteins could also sterically block the ability of the viral polymerase to access pre-genomic RNA for nucleic acid synthesis. The immune stimulating and direct antiviral properties of SB 9200 were evaluated in woodchucks chronically infected with woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) by daily, oral dosing at 15 and 30 mg/kg for 12 weeks. Prolonged treatment resulted in 2.2 and 3.7 log10 reductions in serum WHV DNA and in 0.5 and 1.6 log10 declines in serum WHV surface antigen from pretreatment level with the lower or higher dose of SB 9200, respectively. SB 9200 treatment also resulted in lower hepatic levels of WHV nucleic acids and antigen and reduced liver inflammation. Following treatment cessation, recrudescence of viral replication was observed but with dose-dependent delays in viral relapse. The antiviral effects were associated with dose-dependent and long-lasting induction of IFN-α, IFN-β and IFN-stimulated genes in blood and liver, which correlated with the prolonged activation of the RIG-I/NOD2 pathway and hepatic presence of elevated RIG-I protein levels. These results suggest that in addition to a direct antiviral activity, SB 9200 induces antiviral immunity during chronic hepadnaviral infection via activation of the viral sensor pathway. PMID:27552102

  8. Aflatoxin B1 and/or hepatitis B virus induced tumor spectrum in a genetically engineered hepatitis B virus expression and Trp53 haploinsufficient mouse model system for hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cullen, John M; Brown, Danielle L; Kissling, Grace E; Foley, Julie F; Rizzo, Jennifer; Marion, Patricia L; Parron, Vandy I; French, John E

    2009-04-01

    The authors investigated the spectrum of tumors and Trp53 mutations in genetically engineered models using the FVB/N mouse that expressed the hepatitis B virus genome and/or carried a Trp53 null and wildtype allele and/or were exposed to aflatoxin B1. Liver tumor incidence was increased when all three risk factors were present. Without aflatoxin B1 exposure, neither Trp53 haploinsufficiency nor HBV expression affected liver tumor development. Liver tumor prevalence increased with aflatoxin B1 exposure (p < .001), as thirteen of fourteen mice with liver tumors were initiated with aflatoxin B1. Liver tumors were more frequent in males (12/190) than females (2/170). Seventy-three mice developed sarcomas. Trp53 haploinsufficiency was associated with increased sarcoma incidence in males and females (p < .001). In Trp53 haploinsufficient mice, the HBV transgene increased the risk of sarcoma in males and females (p < .001). Lymphoma was significantly increased in Trp53 haploinsufficient FVB/N mice. There was no loss of heterozygosity at the wildtype Trp53 locus in twenty-five sarcomas or four hepatocellular tumors examined. No mutations were identified in the mRNA (exons 2-11) of Trp53 in six liver neoplasms or twenty-four sarcomas. In this model system, HBV expression affected only hepatocellular neoplasia in association with both aflatoxin B1 initiation and p53 haploinsufficiency. PMID:19258306

  9. Viral hepatitis: Indian scenario.

    PubMed

    Satsangi, Sandeep; Chawla, Yogesh K

    2016-07-01

    Viral hepatitis is a cause for major health care burden in India and is now equated as a threat comparable to the "big three" communicable diseases - HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis. Hepatitis A virus and Hepatitis E virus are predominantly enterically transmitted pathogens and are responsible to cause both sporadic infections and epidemics of acute viral hepatitis. Hepatitis B virus and Hepatitis C virus are predominantly spread via parenteral route and are notorious to cause chronic hepatitis which can lead to grave complications including cirrhosis of liver and hepatocellular carcinoma. Around 400 million people all over the world suffer from chronic hepatitis and the Asia-Pacific region constitutes the epicentre of this epidemic. The present article would aim to cover the basic virologic aspects of these viruses and highlight the present scenario of viral hepatitis in India. PMID:27546957

  10. Hepatitis Information for the Public

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Viral Hepatitis Contact Us Quick Links to Hepatitis ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home ... Outbreaks State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource Center Hepatitis Information for the Public Recommend on Facebook Tweet ...

  11. Diabetes and Hepatitis B Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetes and Hepatitis B Vaccination Information for Diabetes Educators What is hepatitis B? Hepatitis B is a contagious liver disease that results from infection with the hepatitis B virus. When first infected, a person can develop ...

  12. Pharmacological Intervention in Hepatic Stellate Cell Activation and Hepatic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Schon, Hans-Theo; Bartneck, Matthias; Borkham-Kamphorst, Erawan; Nattermann, Jacob; Lammers, Twan; Tacke, Frank; Weiskirchen, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The activation and transdifferentiation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) into contractile, matrix-producing myofibroblasts (MFBs) are central events in hepatic fibrogenesis. These processes are driven by autocrine- and paracrine-acting soluble factors (i.e., cytokines and chemokines). Proof-of-concept studies of the last decades have shown that both the deactivation and removal of hepatic MFBs as well as antagonizing profibrogenic factors are in principle suitable to attenuate ongoing hepatic fibrosis. Although several drugs show potent antifibrotic activities in experimental models of hepatic fibrosis, there is presently no effective pharmaceutical intervention specifically approved for the treatment of liver fibrosis. Pharmaceutical interventions are generally hampered by insufficient supply of drugs to the diseased liver tissue and/or by adverse effects as a result of affecting non-target cells. Therefore, targeted delivery systems that bind specifically to receptors solely expressed on activated HSCs or transdifferentiated MFBs and delivery systems that can improve drug distribution to the liver in general are urgently needed. In this review, we summarize current strategies for targeted delivery of drugs to the liver and in particular to pro-fibrogenic liver cells. The applicability and efficacy of sequestering molecules, selective protein carriers, lipid-based drug vehicles, viral vectors, transcriptional targeting approaches, therapeutic liver- and HSC-specific nanoparticles, and miRNA-based strategies are discussed. Some of these delivery systems that had already been successfully tested in experimental animal models of ongoing hepatic fibrogenesis are expected to translate into clinically useful therapeutics specifically targeting HSCs. PMID:26941644

  13. Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    McCluskey, James; Bourgeois, Marie; Harbison, Raymond

    2014-04-01

    Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity is a persistent allergic contact dermatitides documented in floral workers exposed to Alstroemeria and its cultivars.[1] The causative allergen is tulipalin A, a toxic glycoside named for the tulip bulbs from which it was first isolated.[2] The condition is characterized by fissured acropulpitis, often accompanied by hyperpigmentation, onychorrhexis, and paronychia. More of the volar surface may be affected in sensitized florists. Dermatitis and paronychia are extremely common conditions and diagnostic errors may occur. A thorough patient history, in conjunction with confirmatory patch testing with a bulb sliver and tuliposide A exposure, can prevent misdiagnosis. We report a case of Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity misdiagnosed as an unresolved tinea manuum infection in a patient evaluated for occupational exposure. PMID:25024947

  14. Hepatic abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopalan, S.; Langer, V.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic abscesses are potentially lethal diseases if early diagnosis and treatment are not instituted. They are prevalent all over the globe and pyogenic abscesses are predominant over amoebic. With better control of intra abdominal and systemic infections by a spectrum of antibiotics, aetiology of pyogenic abscesses are secondary to interventions and diseases in the biliary tree to a large extent today. The common organisms isolated are the Gram negative group. Amoebic abscesses continue to plague some regions of the world where hygiene and sanitation are questionable. Over the years, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis have evolved remarkably. Imaging modalities like ultrasonography and CT scan have become the cornerstone of diagnosis. The absence of ionizing radiation makes MRI an attractive alternative in patients who require multiple follow up scans. Serological testing in amoebic abscesses has become more reliable. Though antibiotics have remained the principal modality of management, percutaneous drainage of abscesses have vastly improved the chances of cure and bring down the morbidity drastically in pyogenic abscesses. Amoebic abscesses respond well to medical treatment with nitroimidazoles, and minimally invasive surgical drainage is an option in cases where open surgery is indicated. PMID:24532886

  15. Nicotinamide Riboside Ameliorates Hepatic Metaflammation by Modulating NLRP3 Inflammasome in a Rodent Model of Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee Jae; Hong, Young-Shick; Jun, Woojin; Yang, Soo Jin

    2015-11-01

    Low-grade chronic inflammation (metaflammation) is a major contributing factor for the onset and development of metabolic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease. Nicotinamide riboside (NR), which is present in milk and beer, is a functional vitamin B3 having advantageous effects on metabolic regulation. However, the anti-inflammatory capacity of NR is unknown. This study evaluated whether NR modulates hepatic nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome. Male, 8-week-old KK/HlJ mice were allocated to the control or NR group. NR (100 mg/kg/day) or vehicle (phosphate-buffered saline) was administrated by an osmotic pump for 7 days. Glucose control, lipid profiles, NLRP3 inflammasome, and inflammation markers were analyzed, and structural and histological analyses were conducted. NR treatment did not affect body weight gain, food intake, and liver function. Glucose control based on the oral glucose tolerance test and levels of serum insulin and adiponectin was improved by NR treatment. Among tested lipid profiles, NR lowered the total cholesterol concentration in the liver. Histological and structural analysis by hematoxylin and eosin staining and transmission electron microscopy, respectively, showed that NR rescued the disrupted cellular integrity of the mitochondria and nucleus in the livers of obese and diabetic KK mice. In addition, NR treatment significantly improved hepatic proinflammatory markers, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-1. These ameliorations were accompanied by significant shifts of NLRP3 inflammasome components (NLRP3, ASC, and caspase1). These results demonstrate that NR attenuates hepatic metaflammation by modulating the NLRP3 inflammasome. PMID:25974041

  16. Nicotinamide Riboside Ameliorates Hepatic Metaflammation by Modulating NLRP3 Inflammasome in a Rodent Model of Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee Jae; Hong, Young-Shick; Jun, Woojin; Yang, Soo Jin

    2015-11-01

    Low-grade chronic inflammation (metaflammation) is a major contributing factor for the onset and development of metabolic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease. Nicotinamide riboside (NR), which is present in milk and beer, is a functional vitamin B3 having advantageous effects on metabolic regulation. However, the anti-inflammatory capacity of NR is unknown. This study evaluated whether NR modulates hepatic nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome. Male, 8-week-old KK/HlJ mice were allocated to the control or NR group. NR (100 mg/kg/day) or vehicle (phosphate-buffered saline) was administrated by an osmotic pump for 7 days. Glucose control, lipid profiles, NLRP3 inflammasome, and inflammation markers were analyzed, and structural and histological analyses were conducted. NR treatment did not affect body weight gain, food intake, and liver function. Glucose control based on the oral glucose tolerance test and levels of serum insulin and adiponectin was improved by NR treatment. Among tested lipid profiles, NR lowered the total cholesterol concentration in the liver. Histological and structural analysis by hematoxylin and eosin staining and transmission electron microscopy, respectively, showed that NR rescued the disrupted cellular integrity of the mitochondria and nucleus in the livers of obese and diabetic KK mice. In addition, NR treatment significantly improved hepatic proinflammatory markers, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-1. These ameliorations were accompanied by significant shifts of NLRP3 inflammasome components (NLRP3, ASC, and caspase1). These results demonstrate that NR attenuates hepatic metaflammation by modulating the NLRP3 inflammasome.

  17. 24-nor-ursodeoxycholic acid ameliorates inflammatory response and liver fibrosis in a murine model of hepatic schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Sombetzki, Martina; Fuchs, Claudia D.; Fickert, Peter; Österreicher, Christoph H.; Mueller, Michaela; Claudel, Thierry; Loebermann, Micha; Engelmann, Robby; Langner, Cord; Sahin, Emine; Schwinge, Dorothee; Guenther, Nina D.; Schramm, Christoph; Mueller-Hilke, Brigitte; Reisinger, Emil C.; Trauner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Intrahepatic granuloma formation and fibrosis characterize the pathological features of Schistosoma mansoni infection. Based on previously observed substantial anti-fibrotic effects of 24-nor-ursodeoxycholic acid (norUDCA) in Abcb4/Mdr2−/− mice with cholestatic liver injury and biliary fibrosis, we hypothesized that norUDCA improves inflammation-driven liver fibrosis in S. mansoni infection. Methods Adult NMRI mice were infected with 50 S. mansoni cercariae and after 12 weeks received either norUDCA- or ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA)-enriched diet (0.5% wt/wt) for 4 weeks. Bile acid effects on liver histology, serum biochemistry, key regulatory cytokines, hepatic hydroxyproline content as well as granuloma formation were compared to naive mice and infected controls. In addition, effects of norUDCA on primary T-cell activation/proliferation and maturation of the antigen-presenting-cells (dendritic cells, macrophages) were determined in vitro. Results UDCA as well as norUDCA attenuated the inflammatory response in livers of S. mansoni infected mice, but exclusively norUDCA changed cellular composition and reduced size of hepatic granulomas as well as TH2-mediated hepatic fibrosis in vivo. Moreover, norUDCA affected surface expression level of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II of macrophages and dendritic cells as well as activation/proliferation of T-lymphocytes in vitro, whereas UDCA had no effect. Conclusions This study demonstrates pronounced anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects of norUDCA compared to UDCA in S. mansoni induced liver injury, and indicates that norUDCA directly represses antigen presentation of antigen presenting cells and subsequent T-cell activation in vitro. Therefore, norUDCA represents a promising drug for the treatment of this important cause of liver fibrosis. PMID:25463533

  18. Hepatitis A - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... hepatitis A. Children can get hepatitis A at day care center from other children or from child care ... treatment with immunoglobulin therapy. If your child attends day care: Make sure the children and staff at the ...

  19. Hepatitis B Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... IgM; anti-HBe; Hepatitis B e Antibody; HBV DNA Formal name: Hepatitis B Virus Testing Related tests: ... produced by the virus, and others detect viral DNA . The main uses for HBV tests include: To ...

  20. Hepatitis C (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis C is a virus-caused liver inflammation which may cause jaundice, fever and cirrhosis. Persons who are most at risk for contracting and spreading hepatitis C are those who share needles for injecting drugs ...

  1. A Model to Provide Comprehensive Testing for HIV, Viral Hepatitis, and Sexually Transmitted Infections at a Short Term Drug Treatment Center

    PubMed Central

    Lally, Michelle A.; MacNevin, Ryan; Sergie, Ziad; Hitt, Robert; DiSpigno, Melissa; Cenedella, Carly; Stein, Michael D.

    2006-01-01

    Substance users are at high risk for blood borne infections as well as those that are transmitted sexually. Substance abuse treatment centers present an opportunity to offer comprehensive counseling and testing (CCT) for HIV, viral hepatitis, and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) to this high-risk population. We examined the feasibility and acceptability of one model of CCT among substance users. CCT was offered to 145 consecutive inpatients; study participants completed a risk factor questionnaire and selected from a menu of testing options. Thirty-six percent of those approached agreed to participate and accepted at least one biologic test. Sixty-two percent of participants accepted all tests that were offered. While beneficial to those who accept testing, the described model of CCT is feasible in a drug treatment center, but acceptable to only a minority of inpatients. PMID:15916492

  2. Characterization and genotyping of the DRB1 gene of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in the Marmota monax, animal model of hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Cugnon, Leire; Esparza-Baquer, Aitor; Larruskain, Amaia; García-Etxebarria, Koldo; Menne, Stephan; González-Aseguinolaza, Gloria; Jugo, Begoña M

    2015-02-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-containing genes are among the most polymorphic in vertebrates. MHC genes code for proteins that are critical in the immune system response. In this study, the polymorphism of the second exon of the MHC class II DRB gene was characterized in the Eastern woodchuck (Marmota monax). Woodchucks chronically infected with the woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) represent the best available animal model for the study of chronic hepatitis B infection in humans. In the genotyped animals we found fifteen alleles, which were expressed in two independent loci and that were named DRB1A and DRB1B in this work. The 15 alleles investigated showed an elevated divergence. A significant excess of non-synonymous substitutions was detected, which could indicate that a historical positive selection is acting in the woodchuck DRB1 genes. This hypothesis was confirmed in our study by the high variability in or near the antigen binding sites (ABS) and by the results obtained in sequence variability analyses. This analysis identified the presence of a microsatellite sequence that is located at the start of the second intron, which could further allow the development of a fast and cheap semiautomatic sequencing method.

  3. Characterization and genotyping of the DRB1 gene of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in the Marmota monax, animal model of hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Cugnon, Leire; Esparza-Baquer, Aitor; Larruskain, Amaia; García-Etxebarria, Koldo; Menne, Stephan; González-Aseguinolaza, Gloria; Jugo, Begoña M

    2015-02-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-containing genes are among the most polymorphic in vertebrates. MHC genes code for proteins that are critical in the immune system response. In this study, the polymorphism of the second exon of the MHC class II DRB gene was characterized in the Eastern woodchuck (Marmota monax). Woodchucks chronically infected with the woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) represent the best available animal model for the study of chronic hepatitis B infection in humans. In the genotyped animals we found fifteen alleles, which were expressed in two independent loci and that were named DRB1A and DRB1B in this work. The 15 alleles investigated showed an elevated divergence. A significant excess of non-synonymous substitutions was detected, which could indicate that a historical positive selection is acting in the woodchuck DRB1 genes. This hypothesis was confirmed in our study by the high variability in or near the antigen binding sites (ABS) and by the results obtained in sequence variability analyses. This analysis identified the presence of a microsatellite sequence that is located at the start of the second intron, which could further allow the development of a fast and cheap semiautomatic sequencing method. PMID:25458311

  4. Dietary tomato powder inhibits alcohol-induced hepatic injury by suppressing cytochrome p450 2E1 induction in rodent models.

    PubMed

    Stice, Camilla P; Liu, Chun; Aizawa, Koichi; Greenberg, Andrew S; Ausman, Lynne M; Wang, Xiang-Dong

    2015-04-15

    Chronic and excessive alcohol consumption leads to the development of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and greatly increases the risk of liver cancer. Induction of the cytochrome p450 2E1 (CYP2E1) enzyme by chronic and excessive alcohol intake is known to play a role in the pathogenesis of ALD. High intake of tomatoes, rich in the carotenoid lycopene, is associated with a decreased risk of chronic disease. We investigated the effects of whole tomato (tomato powder, TP), partial tomato (tomato extract, TE), and purified lycopene (LYC) against ALD development in rats. Of the three supplements, only TP reduced the severity of alcohol-induced steatosis, hepatic inflammatory foci, and CYP2E1 protein levels. TE had no effect on these outcomes and LYC greatly increased inflammatory foci in alcohol-fed rats. To further support the protective effect of TP against ALD, TP was supplemented in a carcinogen (diethylnitrosamine, DEN)-initiated alcohol-promoted mouse model. In addition to reduced steatosis and inflammatory foci, TP abolished the presence of preneoplastic foci of altered hepatocytes in DEN-injected mice fed alcohol. These reductions were associated with decreased hepatic CYP2E1 protein levels, restored levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α and downstream gene expression, decreased inflammatory gene expression, and reduced endoplasmic reticulum stress markers. These data provide strong evidence for TP as an effective whole food prevention strategy against ALD.

  5. Interindividual variability in hepatic drug glucuronidation: studies into the role of age, sex, enzyme inducers, and genetic polymorphism using the human liver bank as a model system.

    PubMed

    Court, Michael H

    2010-02-01

    The human liver bank has provided an invaluable model system for the study of interindividual variability in expression and activity of the major hepatic UGTs, including UGT1A1, 1A4, 1A6, 1A9, 2B7, and 2B15. Based on studies using UGT-isoform-selective probes, the rank order of activity variability is UGT 1A1>1A6>2B15>1A4 = 1A9>2B7, with coefficient of variation values ranging from 92 to 45%. Liver donor age, sex, enzyme inducers, and genetic polymorphism are factors that have been implicated as sources of this variability in UGT activity. The expression of UGTs prior to, and immediately following, birth is quite limited, explaining the susceptibility of neonates to certain drug toxicities. Old age appears to have minimal effect on UGT function. Sex differences in UGT activity are relatively small and are confined to several UGTs, including UGT2B15, which shows higher activity in males, compared with females. Enzyme inducers, including coadministered drugs, smoking, and alcohol, may increase hepatic UGT levels. Human liver bank phenotype-genotype studies, using UGT-isoform-selective probes have identified common genetic polymorphisms that are predictive of glucuronidation activity in vitro and that were subsequently verified as predictors of probe-drug clearance by glucuronidation in vivo.

  6. Dietary tomato powder inhibits alcohol-induced hepatic injury by suppressing cytochrome p450 2E1 induction in rodent models

    PubMed Central

    Stice, Camilla P.; Liu, Chun; Aizawa, Koichi; Greenberg, Andrew S.; Ausman, Lynne M.; Wang, Xiang-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Chronic and excessive alcohol consumption leads to the development of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and greatly increases the risk of liver cancer. Induction of the cytochrome p450 2E1 (CYP2E1) enzyme by chronic and excessive alcohol intake is known to play a role in the pathogenesis of ALD. High intake of tomatoes, rich in the carotenoid lycopene, is associated with a decreased risk of chronic disease. We investigated the effects of whole tomato (tomato powder, TP), partial tomato (tomato extract, TE), and purified lycopene (LYC) against ALD development in rats. Of the three supplements, only TP reduced the severity of alcohol-induced steatosis, hepatic inflammatory foci, and CYP2E1 protein levels. TE had no effect on these outcomes and LYC greatly increased inflammatory foci in alcohol-fed rats. To further support the protective effect of TP against ALD, TP was supplemented in a carcinogen (diethylnitrosamine, DEN)-initiated alcohol-promoted mouse model. In addition to reduced steatosis and inflammatory foci, TP abolished the presence of preneoplastic foci of altered hepatocytes in DEN-injected mice fed alcohol. These reductions were associated with decreased hepatic CYP2E1 protein levels, restored levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α and downstream gene expression, decreased inflammatory gene expression, and reduced endoplasmic reticulum stress markers. These data provide strong evidence for TP as an effective whole food prevention strategy against ALD. PMID:25592162

  7. Dietary tomato powder inhibits alcohol-induced hepatic injury by suppressing cytochrome p450 2E1 induction in rodent models.

    PubMed

    Stice, Camilla P; Liu, Chun; Aizawa, Koichi; Greenberg, Andrew S; Ausman, Lynne M; Wang, Xiang-Dong

    2015-04-15

    Chronic and excessive alcohol consumption leads to the development of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and greatly increases the risk of liver cancer. Induction of the cytochrome p450 2E1 (CYP2E1) enzyme by chronic and excessive alcohol intake is known to play a role in the pathogenesis of ALD. High intake of tomatoes, rich in the carotenoid lycopene, is associated with a decreased risk of chronic disease. We investigated the effects of whole tomato (tomato powder, TP), partial tomato (tomato extract, TE), and purified lycopene (LYC) against ALD development in rats. Of the three supplements, only TP reduced the severity of alcohol-induced steatosis, hepatic inflammatory foci, and CYP2E1 protein levels. TE had no effect on these outcomes and LYC greatly increased inflammatory foci in alcohol-fed rats. To further support the protective effect of TP against ALD, TP was supplemented in a carcinogen (diethylnitrosamine, DEN)-initiated alcohol-promoted mouse model. In addition to reduced steatosis and inflammatory foci, TP abolished the presence of preneoplastic foci of altered hepatocytes in DEN-injected mice fed alcohol. These reductions were associated with decreased hepatic CYP2E1 protein levels, restored levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α and downstream gene expression, decreased inflammatory gene expression, and reduced endoplasmic reticulum stress markers. These data provide strong evidence for TP as an effective whole food prevention strategy against ALD. PMID:25592162

  8. Quantitative farm-to-fork risk assessment model for norovirus and hepatitis A virus in European leafy green vegetable and berry fruit supply chains.

    PubMed

    Bouwknegt, Martijn; Verhaelen, Katharina; Rzeżutka, Artur; Kozyra, Iwona; Maunula, Leena; von Bonsdorff, Carl-Henrik; Vantarakis, Apostolos; Kokkinos, Petros; Petrovic, Tamas; Lazic, Sava; Pavlik, Ivo; Vasickova, Petra; Willems, Kris A; Havelaar, Arie H; Rutjes, Saskia A; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria

    2015-04-01

    Fresh produce that is contaminated with viruses may lead to infection and viral gastroenteritis or hepatitis when consumed raw. It is thus important to reduce virus numbers on these foods. Prevention of virus contamination in fresh produce production and processing may be more effective than treatment, as sufficient virus removal or inactivation by post-harvest treatment requires high doses that may adversely affect food quality. To date knowledge of the contribution of various potential contamination routes is lacking. A risk assessment model was developed for human norovirus, hepatitis A virus and human adenovirus in raspberry and salad vegetable supply chains to quantify contributions of potential contamination sources to the contamination of produce at retail. These models were used to estimate public health risks. Model parameterization was based on monitoring data from European supply chains and literature data. No human pathogenic viruses were found in the soft fruit supply chains; human adenovirus (hAdV) was detected, which was additionally monitored as an indicator of fecal pollution to assess the contribution of potential contamination points. Estimated risks per serving of lettuce based on the models were 3×10(-4) (6×10(-6)-5×10(-3)) for NoV infection and 3×10(-8) (7×10(-10)-3×10(-6)) for hepatitis A jaundice. The contribution to virus contamination of hand-contact was larger as compared with the contribution of irrigation, the conveyor belt or the water used for produce rinsing. In conclusion, viral contamination in the lettuce and soft fruit supply chains occurred and estimated health risks were generally low. Nevertheless, the 97.5% upper limit for the estimated NoV contamination of lettuce suggested that infection risks up to 50% per serving might occur. Our study suggests that attention to full compliance for hand hygiene will improve fresh produce safety related to virus risks most as compared to the other examined sources, given the

  9. Quantitative farm-to-fork risk assessment model for norovirus and hepatitis A virus in European leafy green vegetable and berry fruit supply chains.

    PubMed

    Bouwknegt, Martijn; Verhaelen, Katharina; Rzeżutka, Artur; Kozyra, Iwona; Maunula, Leena; von Bonsdorff, Carl-Henrik; Vantarakis, Apostolos; Kokkinos, Petros; Petrovic, Tamas; Lazic, Sava; Pavlik, Ivo; Vasickova, Petra; Willems, Kris A; Havelaar, Arie H; Rutjes, Saskia A; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria

    2015-04-01

    Fresh produce that is contaminated with viruses may lead to infection and viral gastroenteritis or hepatitis when consumed raw. It is thus important to reduce virus numbers on these foods. Prevention of virus contamination in fresh produce production and processing may be more effective than treatment, as sufficient virus removal or inactivation by post-harvest treatment requires high doses that may adversely affect food quality. To date knowledge of the contribution of various potential contamination routes is lacking. A risk assessment model was developed for human norovirus, hepatitis A virus and human adenovirus in raspberry and salad vegetable supply chains to quantify contributions of potential contamination sources to the contamination of produce at retail. These models were used to estimate public health risks. Model parameterization was based on monitoring data from European supply chains and literature data. No human pathogenic viruses were found in the soft fruit supply chains; human adenovirus (hAdV) was detected, which was additionally monitored as an indicator of fecal pollution to assess the contribution of potential contamination points. Estimated risks per serving of lettuce based on the models were 3×10(-4) (6×10(-6)-5×10(-3)) for NoV infection and 3×10(-8) (7×10(-10)-3×10(-6)) for hepatitis A jaundice. The contribution to virus contamination of hand-contact was larger as compared with the contribution of irrigation, the conveyor belt or the water used for produce rinsing. In conclusion, viral contamination in the lettuce and soft fruit supply chains occurred and estimated health risks were generally low. Nevertheless, the 97.5% upper limit for the estimated NoV contamination of lettuce suggested that infection risks up to 50% per serving might occur. Our study suggests that attention to full compliance for hand hygiene will improve fresh produce safety related to virus risks most as compared to the other examined sources, given the

  10. Studies on immunoregulatory mechanisms in acute and chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed Central

    Lemm, G; Salzer, K; Warnatz, H

    1983-01-01

    Patients with acute hepatitis B and HBV-induced chronic hepatitis as well as normal control persons participated in the study. Hepatitis patients of both groups have decreased OKT4+/OKT8+T cell ratios due to an percental increase of OKT8+T cells in peripheral blood compared to the data of controls. Lymphocyte cultures of chronic hepatitis patients show reduced DNA synthesis after stimulation by allogeneic non-T cells, PHA, Con A and PWM. PWM-induced immunoglobulin secretion by B cells, determined by means of a reverse haemolytic plaque assay (RHPA) and a solid phase ELISA, showed comparable results in hepatitis B patients and controls. The AMLR, which is thought to reflect an autologous immunoregulatory phenomenon, is slightly impaired in cultures of hepatitis B patients in comparison to controls. Con A-induced suppressor cell activity on T cell reactions is decreased in hepatitis, whereas suppressor cell activity on B cell activation is within the same range as in cultures of controls. It is concluded from these data, that suppressor cell activity on T cell function is impaired in hepatitis B, whereas B cell functions and suppressor cell activity on B cell function are in the normal range. The results with the functional assays and the finding of increased proportions of OKT8+T cells in hepatitis B are considered to reflect properties of different T cell subpopulations, responsible for different immunoregulatory functions. PMID:6222854

  11. Hepatic oleate regulates adipose tissue lipogenesis and fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Burhans, Maggie S; Flowers, Matthew T; Harrington, Kristin R; Bond, Laura M; Guo, Chang-An; Anderson, Rozalyn M; Ntambi, James M

    2015-02-01

    Hepatic steatosis is associated with detrimental metabolic phenotypes including enhanced risk for diabetes. Stearoyl-CoA desaturases (SCDs) catalyze the synthesis of MUFAs. In mice, genetic ablation of SCDs reduces hepatic de novo lipogenesis (DNL) and protects against diet-induced hepatic steatosis and adiposity. To understand the mechanism by which hepatic MUFA production influences adipose tissue stores, we created two liver-specific transgenic mouse models in the SCD1 knockout that express either human SCD5 or mouse SCD3, that synthesize oleate and palmitoleate, respectively. We demonstrate that hepatic de novo synthesized oleate, but not palmitoleate, stimulate hepatic lipid accumulation and adiposity, reversing the protective effect of the global SCD1 knockout under lipogenic conditions. Unexpectedly, the accumulation of hepatic lipid occurred without induction of the hepatic DNL program. Changes in hepatic lipid composition were reflected in plasma and in adipose tissue. Importantly, endogenously synthesized hepatic oleate was associated with suppressed DNL and fatty acid oxidation in white adipose tissue. Regression analysis revealed a strong correlation between adipose tissue lipid fuel utilization and hepatic and adipose tissue lipid storage. These data suggest an extrahepatic mechanism where endogenous hepatic oleate regulates lipid homeostasis in adipose tissues.

  12. Hepatitis E Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lhomme, Sébastien; Marion, Olivier; Abravanel, Florence; Chapuy-Regaud, Sabine; Kamar, Nassim; Izopet, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Although most hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections are asymptomatic, some can be severe, causing fulminant hepatitis and extra-hepatic manifestations, including neurological and kidney injuries. Chronic HEV infections may also occur in immunocompromised patients. This review describes how our understanding of the pathogenesis of HEV infection has progressed in recent years. PMID:27527210

  13. Hepatitis B (HBV)

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Hepatitis B (HBV) KidsHealth > For Teens > Hepatitis B (HBV) Print A A A Text Size ... Prevented? How Is It Treated? What Is It? Hepatitis (pronounced: hep-uh-TIE-tiss) is a disease ...

  14. Hepatitis E Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lhomme, Sébastien; Marion, Olivier; Abravanel, Florence; Chapuy-Regaud, Sabine; Kamar, Nassim; Izopet, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Although most hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections are asymptomatic, some can be severe, causing fulminant hepatitis and extra-hepatic manifestations, including neurological and kidney injuries. Chronic HEV infections may also occur in immunocompromised patients. This review describes how our understanding of the pathogenesis of HEV infection has progressed in recent years. PMID:27527210

  15. Tetrandrine stimulates the apoptosis of hepatic stellate cells and ameliorates development of fibrosis in a thioacetamide rat model

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Ming-Fu; Lian, Li-Hua; Piao, Dong-Ming; Nan, Ji-Xing

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the therapeutic effect of tetrandrine on liver fibrosis induced by thioacetamide in rats in vivo and in vitro. METHODS: In vitro study: we investigated the effect of tetrandrine on the apoptosis of rat hepatic stellate cells transformed by simian virus 40 (T-HSC/Cl-6), which retains the features of activated cells. In vivo study: hepatic fibrosis was induced in rats by thioacetamide. Tetrandrine was given orally to rats at doses of 5, 10 or 20 mg/kg for 4 wk compared with intraperitoneal injection of interferon-г. RESULTS: In vitro study: 5, 10 or 25 μg/mL of tetrandrine-induced activation of caspase-3 in t-HSC/Cl-6 cells occurred dose-dependently. In vivo study: tetrandrine treatment as well as interferon-г significantly ameliorated the development of fibrosis as determined by lowered serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), total bilirubin (T-Bil) and the levels of liver hydroxyproline (Hyp), hyaluronic acid (HA), laminin (LN) and also improved histological findings. The effects of tetrandrine at the concentration of 20 mg/kg were better than the other concentration groups. CONCLUSION: Tetrandrine promotes the apoptosis of activated HSCs in vitro. Tetrandrine administration can prevent liver fibrosis and liver damage induced by thioacetamide in rats in vivo, indicating that it might exert a direct effect on rat HSCs. PMID:17451202

  16. Transplanted fibroblast cell sheets promote migration of hepatic progenitor cells in the incised host liver in allogeneic rat model.

    PubMed

    Muraoka, Izumi; Takatsuki, Mitsuhisa; Sakai, Yusuke; Tomonaga, Tetsuo; Soyama, Akihiko; Hidaka, Masaaki; Hishikawa, Yoshitaka; Koji, Takehiko; Utoh, Rie; Ohashi, Kazuo; Okano, Teruo; Kanematsu, Takashi; Eguchi, Susumu

    2015-11-01

    Cell sheet engineering has been noted as a new and valuable approach in the tissue-engineering field. The objective of this study was to explore a procedure to induce hepatic progenitor cells and biliary duct structures in the liver. Sprague-Dawley rat dermal fibroblast (DF) sheets were transplanted into the incised surface of the liver of F344 nude rats. In the control group, an incision was made without transplantation of the DF sheets. Bile duct (BD)-like structures and immature hepatocyte-like cells were observed in the DF sheet transplant sites. These BD-like structures were cytokeratin-8-positive, while the hepatocyte-like cells were both OV-6-positive and α-fetoprotein-positive as well. The proliferation and differentiation of liver progenitor cells were not influenced by hepatectomy. We also transplanted DF sheets transfected with a plasmid encoding the enhanced yellow fluorescent protein target to mitochondria (pEYFP-Mito) by electroporation, and found that the new structures were pEYFP-Mito-negative. We observed new BD-like structures and immature hepatocytes after transplantation of DF sheets onto incised liver surfaces, and clarified that the origin of these BD-like structures and hepatocyte-like cells was the recipient liver. The present study described an aspect of the hepatic differentiation process induced at the site of liver injury.

  17. Establishing models of portal vein occlusion and evaluating value of multi-slice CT in hepatic VX2 tumor in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yue-Yong; Zou, Li-Guang; Liang, Ping; Zhang, Dong

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To establish models of portal vein occlusion of hepatic VX2 tumor in rabbits and to evaluate the value of multi-slice CT. METHODS: Forty New Zealand rabbits were divided into 4 groups according to digital table: Immediate group (group A; transplantation of tumor immediately after the portal vein occlusion), 3-wk group (group B; transplantation of tumor at 3 wk after the portal vein occlusion), negative control group (group C) and positive control group (group D), 10 rabbits in each group. Hepatic VX2 tumor was transplanted with abdominal-embedding innoculation immediately after the portal vein occlusion and at 3 wk after the portal vein occlusion. Meanwhile, they were divided into negative control group (Left external branch of portal vein was occluded by sham-operation, and left exite was embedded and inoculated pseudoly) and positive control group (Transplanted tumor did not suffer from the portal vein occlusion). All rabbits were scanned with multi-slice CT. RESULTS: All 40 animals were employed in the final analysis without death. Tumor did not grow in both immediate group and 3-wk group. In 3-wk group, left endite was atrophied and growth of tumor was inhibited. The maximal diameter of tumor was significantly smaller than that in positive control group (2.55 ± 0.46 vs 3.59 ± 0.37 cm, t = 5.57, P < 0.001). Incidences of metastasis in the liver and lung were lower in 3-wk group than those in positive control group (10% vs 40%, and 90% vs 100%, respectively). The expression intensities of the vascular endothelium growth factor (VEGF) in groups A, B, C and D were 0.10 ± 0.06, 0.66 ± 0.21, 0.28 ± 0.09 and 1.48 ± 0.32, respectively. VEGF expression level in the test group A was significantly lower than that in the negative control group C (t = 5.07; P < 0.001). In addition, VEGF expression in the test group B was significantly lower than that in the positive control group D (t = 6.38; P < 0.001). Scanning with multi-slice CT showed that displaying rate of

  18. The Australian study of HIV and injecting Drug Use. Part II: predicting exposure to hepatitis C and hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Carruthers, S J; Loxley, W M; Phillips, M; Bevan, J S

    1997-09-01

    Researchers agree that while hepatitis B maybe in control, hepatitis C is present in epidemic proportions among injecting drug users and that current HIV prevention strategies have not been sufficient to halt the spread of this hepatitis virus, although there is some evidence to suggest that incidence rates are stabilizing. Since there is no effective cure and it is unlikely that a vaccine will become available in the foreseeable future all efforts to control the spread of hepatitis C must rely on education and prevention strategies. The Australian Study of HIV and Injecting Drug Use is a cross-sectional national study designed to investigate exposure to and risks for infection with bloodborne viruses. Of those volunteering a usable blood sample for hepatitis C antibody and hepatitis B core antibody testing 55% and 19%, respectively, returned reactive test results. Logistic regression statistical models were used to identify risk factors for hepatitis C and hepatitis B. Risk factors for hepatitis C were identified as duration of use, use of opiates on last injecting occasion, education level, treatment status and having a history of sexually transmissible diseases. Risk factors associated with hepatitis B were duration of use, and use of opiates on last injecting occasion. The lack of identifiable risk factors for hepatitis B suggest that past rather than current injecting and sexual behaviour patterns are required to predict accurately risk of exposure to hepatitis B. In addition to this, one-third of respondents reported being vaccinated against hepatitis B. Respondents perceived themselves to be at greater risk from hepatitis C than from hepatitis B or HIV. A discussion of strategies needed to prevent the spread of the hepatitis viruses will be presented along with recommendations for further research. PMID:16203430

  19. A model to predict 3-month mortality risk of acute-on-chronic hepatitis B liver failure using artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Zheng, M-H; Shi, K-Q; Lin, X-F; Xiao, D-D; Chen, L-L; Liu, W-Y; Fan, Y-C; Chen, Y-P

    2013-04-01

    Model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) scoring was initiated using traditional statistical technique by assuming a linear relationship between clinical features, but most phenomena in a clinical situation are not linearly related. The aim of this study was to predict 3-month mortality risk of acute-on-chronic hepatitis B liver failure (ACHBLF) on an individual patient level using an artificial neural network (ANN) system. The ANN model was built using data from 402 consecutive patients with ACHBLF. It was trained to predict 3-month mortality by the data of 280 patients and validated by the remaining 122 patients. The area under the curve of receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) was calculated for ANN and MELD-based scoring systems. The following variables age (P < 0.001), prothrombin activity (P < 0.001), serum sodium (P < 0.001), total bilirubin (P = 0.015), hepatitis B e antigen positivity rate (P < 0.001) and haemoglobin (P < 0.001) were significantly related to the prognosis of ACHBLF and were selected to build the ANN. The ANN performed significantly better than MELD-based scoring systems both in the training cohort (AUROC = 0.869 vs 0.667, 0.591, 0.643, 0.571 and 0.577; P < 0.001, respectively) and in the validation cohort (AUROC = 0.765 vs 0.599, 0.563, 0.601, 0.521 and 0.540; P ≤ 0.006, respectively). Thus, the ANN model was shown to be more accurate in predicting 3-month mortality of ACHBLF than MELD-based scoring systems. PMID:23490369

  20. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ciećko-Michalska, Irena; Szczepanek, Małgorzata; Słowik, Agnieszka; Mach, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy can be a serious complication of acute liver failure and chronic liver diseases, predominantly liver cirrhosis. Hyperammonemia plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The brain-blood barrier disturbances, changes in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, GABA-ergic or benzodiazepine pathway abnormalities, manganese neurotoxicity, brain energetic disturbances, and brain blood flow abnormalities are considered to be involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The influence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) on the induction of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is recently emphasized. The aim of this paper is to present the current views on the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:23316223

  1. INFLUENCE OF TYPE II DIABETES, OBESITY, AND EXPOSURE TO 2, 3, 7, 8-TETRACHLORODIBENZO-P-DIOXIN (TCDD) EXPOSURE ON THE EXPRESSION OF HEPATIC CYP1A2 IN A MURIN MODEL OF TYPE II DIABETES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Influence of type II diabetes, obesity and exposure 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) exposure on the expression of hepatic CYPIA2 in a murine model of type II diabetes. SJ Godin', VM Richardson2, JJ Diliberto2, LS Birnbaum', MJ DeVito2; 'Curriculum In Toxicology, UNC-CH...

  2. Hepatitis: protecting BMETs & CEs.

    PubMed

    Baker, S A

    1994-01-01

    Hepatitis is the primary occupational hazard for healthcare workers. Not until the 1970s were hepatitis viruses isolated and identified as types A and B. In the late 1970s, hepatitis D was discovered as a major cause of fulminant hepatitis. Soon, it was evident that another type was also at work. Because testing was only available for types A and B, the new category was referred to as non-A, non-B. In the 1980s, scientists identified two more viruses from this non-A, non-B group, namely hepatitis E and hepatitis C. These five types of hepatitis have different modes of transmission. The fecal-to-oral route is the mode of transmission for hepatitis types A and E. But, types B and D are bloodborne pathogens. With the advent of a safe vaccine for hepatitis B, this category is declining. To date, hepatitis C appears to have multiple routes of transmission, with half the cases being posttransfusion. In the United States, 85,000 people per year develop chronic hepatitis C, which ultimately leads to severe liver damage. This paper addresses each of the five viruses that have been grouped by routes of transmission, prevention techniques for BMETs and CEs, and statistics of reported cases to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDCP) over the last 20 years. PMID:10139739

  3. METABOLISM Wnt Signaling Regulates Hepatic Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongjun; Fergusson, Maria M.; Wu, J. Julie; Rovira, Ilsa I.; Liu, Jie; Gavrilova, Oksana; Lu, Teng; Bao, Jianjun; Han, Donghe; Sack, Michael N.; Finkel, Toren

    2011-01-01

    The contribution of the Wnt pathway has been extensively characterized in embryogenesis, differentiation, and stem cell biology but not in mammalian metabolism. Here, using in vivo gain- and loss-of-function models, we demonstrate an important role for Wnt signaling in hepatic metabolism. In particular, β-Catenin, the downstream mediator of canonical Wnt signaling, altered serum glucose concentrations and regulated hepatic glucose production. β-catenin also modulated hepatic insulin signaling. Furthermore, β-catenin interacted with the transcription factor FoxO1 in livers from mice under starved conditions. The interaction of FoxO1 with β-catenin regulated the transcriptional activation of the genes encoding glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), the two rate-limiting enzymes in hepatic gluconeogenesis. Moreover, starvation induced the hepatic expression of mRNAs encoding different Wnt isoforms. In addition, nutrient deprivation appeared to favor the association of β-catenin with FoxO family members, rather than with members of the T cell factor of transcriptional activators. Notably, in a model of diet-induced obesity, hepatic deletion of β-catenin improved overall metabolic homeostasis. These observations implicate Wnt signaling in the modulation of hepatic metabolism and raise the possibility that Wnt signaling may play a similar role in the metabolic regulation of other tissues. PMID:21285411

  4. Pathological characterization and morphometric analysis of hepatic lesions in SHRSP5/Dmcr, an experimental non-alcoholic steatohepatitis model, induced by high-fat and high-cholesterol diet.

    PubMed

    Horai, Yasushi; Utsumi, Hiroyuki; Ono, Yuko; Kishimoto, Toshimitsu; Ono, Yuuichi; Fukunari, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    SHRSP5/Dmcr is a newly established substrain of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHRSP). Recently, high-fat and high-cholesterol (HFC) diet-fed SHRSP5/Dmcr has been reported as a novel rat model of developing hepatic lesions similar to human non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The aim of this study was to investigate the detailed pathological conditions induced by HFC diet in SHRSP5/Dmcr rats using molecular biological methods and morphometric analysis. SHRSP5/Dmcr rats at 6 weeks of age were fed on either HFC diet or stroke-prone (SP) diet for 2, 4, 6, 8 and 16 weeks and histopathological changes in the liver, blood chemistry and mRNA expression levels in the liver were investigated. As evidenced by the histopathological examination of the liver of the SHRSP5/Dmcr rats, hepatic steatosis and lobular inflammation were present, with gradual increasing severity from 2 weeks after the introduction of the HFC diet. Partial hepatic fibrosis was detected at 6 weeks and spread over the entire region of the liver with more severe bridging formation by 16 weeks. The degrees of NASH-like hepatic lesions such as steatosis (the size distribution of lipid droplets), inflammation and fibrosis were quantified by morphometric analysis. Eosinophilic inclusion bodies encountered in the hepatocytes had immunoreactivity with Cox-4 and double-membrane walls, identified as mega-mitochondria. Serum ALT and bilirubins, and the mRNA expression levels related to fibrosis were closely correlated with hepatic histopathological changes. The clear feeding time-dependent progression of NASH-like hepatic lesion in HFC diet-fed SHRSP5/Dmcr rats reinforced the conclusion that this strain might be a useful model of NASH and of inflammatory fibrotic liver disease. PMID:27037502

  5. Liver steatosis replaced with non-invasive viral and host parametars can serve as negative predictive model in patients with chronic hepatitis-C.

    PubMed

    Višnjić, Ana; Ostojić, Zvonimir; Hrstić, Irena; Corić, Marijana; Premuzić, Marina

    2014-09-01

    Almost 70% of chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients will have concomitant hepatic steatosis (HS) usually determined with invasive method. HS serve as negative predictive factor for lower sustained viral response (SVR) in CHC patients treated with standard of care (SOC) (PEG-IFN and Rib). Retrospective analysis of biochemical, virological and histological data in CHC patients treated with PEG-IFN and Ribavarin. Statistical analysis was carried out by Biometriha Healthcare Research. Level of significance was set to 95% (p < 0.05). 72 patients (43 M; 29 F; median age 41 y) with CHC (60 G1; 12 G3) with no concomitant metabolic syndrome were analyzed. HS ranged from 5 to 30% (median 15%). Overall accuracy of prediction of SVR based on the levels of HS was AUC=0.71 (95% CI=0.58-0.84; p=0.005). When HS was split regarding cut-off value of 5% significant difference was found between responders and non-responders to treatment (chi2 = 10.025; df = 1; p = 0.002). Overall sensitivity was 48% and specificity 91%. Conventional predictive variables (gender, age, fibrosis and genotype) where combined with HS (>5%) and all together achieved Nagelherke R squared of 34.0% in prediction of SVR, with accuracy rate of 75.0%. Further, invasive variables (fibrosis and HS) where replaced with vire mia and body mass index (BMI). All noninvasive variables together achieved Nagelkerke R squared of 26.5% in prediction of SVR with 74% accuracy rate of the logistic regression model. Very low HS (<5%) is negative predictor of SVR and can be replaced with noninvasive variables (gender, age, viremia and BMI) with same accuracy rate of the logistic regres- sion model. PMID:25507366

  6. TMBIM6 (transmembrane BAX inhibitor motif containing 6) enhances autophagy and reduces renal dysfunction in a cyclosporine A-induced nephrotoxicity model.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Raj Kumar; Lee, Geum-Hwa; Lee, Hwa-Young; Li, Bo; Jung, Han-Eul; Rashid, Harun-Or; Choi, Min Kyung; Yadav, Binod Kumar; Kim, Woo-Ho; Kim, Kyung-Woon; Park, Byung-Hyun; Kim, Won; Lee, Yong-Chul; Kim, Hyung-Ryong; Chae, Han-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) is widely used as an immunosuppressor in transplantation. Previous studies reported that CsA induces autophagy and that chronic treatment with CsA results in accumulation of autophagosomes and reduced autophagic clearance. Autophagy is a prosurvival process that promotes recovery from acute kidney injury by degrading misfolded proteins produced in the kidney. In the present study, we used TMBIM6-expressing HK-2, human kidney tubular cells (TMBIM6 cells) and Tmbim6 knockout (tmbim6(-/-)) mice. When exposed to CsA, the TMBIM6 cells maintained autophagy activity by preventing autophagosome accumulation. With regard to signaling, PRKKA/AMPK phosphorylation and mechanistic target of rapamycin (serine/threonine kinase) complex 1 (MTORC1) expression and its downstream target TFEB (transcription factor EB), a lysosome biogenesis factor, were regulated in the TMBIM6 cells. Lysosomal activity was highly increased or stably maintained in the presence of TMBIM6. In addition, treatment of tmbim6(-/-) mice with CsA resulted in increased autophagosome formation and decreased lysosome formation and activity. We also found that tmbim6(-/-) mice were susceptible to CsA-induced kidney injury. Taken together, these results indicate that TMBIM6 protects against CsA-induced nephrotoxicity both in vitro and in vivo by inducing autophagy and activating lysosomes. PMID:26305401

  7. Hepatic encephalopathy: a review.

    PubMed

    Lizardi-Cervera, Javier; Almeda, Paloma; Guevara, Luis; Uribe, Misael

    2003-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a complication that presents in as many as 28% of patients with cirrhosis, and reported up to ten years after the diagnosis of cirrhosis. Commonly, it is observed in patients with severe hepatic failure and is characterized by neuropsychiatric manifestations that can range in severity from a mild alteration in mental state to a coma; additionally, some neuromuscular symptoms can be observed. This complication of either acute or chronic hepatic disease is the result of a diminished hepatic reservoir and inability to detoxify some toxins that originate in the bowel. Today, the role of astrocytes, specifically the Alzheimer type II cells, is known to be very important in the pathogenesis of the hepatic encephalopathy, and will be reviewed later. In conclusion, the objectives of this review are: To understand the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy, To recognize the precipitating factors, as well as preventive measures for the development of the hepatic encephalopathy, To describe the new classification of hepatic encephalopathy and its clinical implications, To recognize the clinical manifestations and stages of the disease, To understand the main diagnostic tests used to detect the hepatic encephalopathy, To describe the main therapeutic treatments of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:15115963

  8. Feature Hepatitis: Hepatitis Can Strike Anyone

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. From Hollywood's "Walk of Stars" to Main Street, USA, people from all walks ... that includes many well-known names: Legendary television star Larry Hagman was diagnosed with advanced hepatitis C ...

  9. Clinical Model for Predicting Hepatocellular Carcinomas in Patients with Post-Sustained Virologic Responses of Chronic Hepatitis C: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Qing-Lei; Li, Bing; Zhang, Xue-Xiu; Chen, Yan; Fu, Yan-Ling; Lv, Jun; Liu, Yan-Min; Yu, Zu-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims No clinical model exists to predict the occurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma in sustained virologic response-achieving (HCC after SVR) patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). Methods We performed a case-control study using a clinical database to research the risk factors for HCC after SVR. A predictive model based on risk factors was established, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was calculated. Results In the multivariate model, an initial diagnosis of compensated cirrhosis and post-SVR albumin reductions of 1 g/L were associated with 21.7-fold (95% CI, 4.2 to 112.3; p<0.001) and 1.3-fold (95% CI, 1.1 to 1.7; p=0.004) increases in the risk of HCC after SVR, respectively. A predictive model based on an initial diagnosis of compensated cirrhosis (yes, +1; no, 0) and post-SVR albumin ≤36.0 g/L (yes, +1; not, 0) predicted the occurrence of HCC after SVR with a cutoff value of >0, an AUC of 0.880, a sensitivity of 0.833, a specificity of 0.896, and a negative predictive value of 0.956. Conclusions An initial diagnosis of compensated cirrhosis combined with a post-SVR albumin value of ≤36.0 g/L predicts the occurrence of HCC after SVR in patients with CHC. PMID:27257023

  10. Modulation of AP-endonuclease1 levels associated with hepatic cirrhosis in rat model treated with human umbilical cord blood mononuclear stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Bassiouny, Ahmad R; Zaky, Amira Z; Abdulmalek, Shaymaa A; Kandeel, Kamal M; Ismail, Alaa; Moftah, Marie

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress in liver cells may contribute to the etiology of hepatic diseases, as in liver cirrhosis. AP-Endonuclease1 (APE1/Ref-1) is essential for cell protection toward oxidative stress by acting as a transcriptional regulator of pro-survival genes and as a redox sensitive protein. The aim of this study was to critically analyze the various parameters governing the success of human umbilical cord blood mononuclear stem cell-based (MNCs) therapy without the use of an immunosuppressant and to investigate for the first time the expression of APE1 during thioacetamide (TAA)-induced cirrhosis and MNCs therapy in a rat model. Umbilical cord blood samples from full-term deliveries were collected. Lethal fulminant hepatic cirrhosis in rats was induced by intraperitoneal injection of thio-acetamide. MNCs were then intrahepatically transplanted. We measured APE1 expression at mRNA and protein levels, mRNA expression of TGF-β, α-SMA, STAP, CTGF, MMP-9 and TIMP-1 in a follow up study. Histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses were performed 10 weeks after intrahepatic injection of the cells. Transdifferentiated cells could be efficiently stained with antihuman hepatocytes. Interestingly, human hepatocyte-specific markers, human albumin, cytokeratin-18 and cytokeratin-19 mRNAs were detected in rat liver after 10 days of MNCs infusion. MNC transplanted by intrahepatic route, could engraft recipient liver, differentiated into functional hepatocytes, and rescued liver failure. Moreover up regulation of APE1 expression confirmed by marked immunohistochemical staining may be involved in MNCs-induced hepatocytes regeneration suggesting that maintaining high level of APE1 has protective effect as pro-survival signal. PMID:22076170

  11. Evaluation of the HC-04 Cell Line as an In Vitro Model for Mechanistic Assessment of Changes in Hepatic Cytochrome P450 3A during Adenovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wonganan, Piyanuch; Jonsson-Schmunk, Kristina; Callahan, Shellie M.; Choi, Jin Huk

    2014-01-01

    HC-04 cells were evaluated as an in vitro model for mechanistic study of changes in the function of hepatic CYP3A during virus infection. Similar to in vivo observations, infection with a first generation recombinant adenovirus significantly inhibited CYP3A4 catalytic activity in an isoform-specific manner. Virus (MOI 100) significantly reduced expression of the retinoid X receptor (RXR) by 30% 96 hours after infection. Cytoplasmic concentrations of the pregnane X receptor (PXR) were reduced by 50%, whereas the amount of the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) in the nuclear fraction doubled with respect to uninfected controls. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF-4α) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) were also reduced by ∼70% during infection. Virus suppressed CYP3A4 activity in the presence of the PXR agonist rifampicin and did not affect CYP3A4 activity in the presence of the CAR agonist CITCO [6-(4-chlorophenyl) imidazo[2,1-b][1,3]thiazole-5-carbaldehyde-O-(3,4-dichlorobenzyl)oxime], suggesting that virus-induced modification of PXR may be responsible for observed changes in hepatic CYP3A4. The HC-04 cell line is easy to maintain, and CYP3A4 in these cells was responsive to known inducers and suppressors. Dexamethasone (200 μM) and phenobarbital (500 μM) increased activity by 230 and 124%, whereas ketoconazole (10 μM) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (10 μg/ml) reduced activity by 90 and 92%, respectively. This suggests that HC-04 cells can be a valuable tool for mechanistic study of drug metabolism during infection and for routine toxicological screening of novel compounds prior to use in the clinic. PMID:24764148

  12. Combination of DNA Prime – Adenovirus Boost Immunization with Entecavir Elicits Sustained Control of Chronic Hepatitis B in the Woodchuck Model

    PubMed Central

    Kosinska, Anna D.; Zhang, Ejuan; Johrden, Lena; Liu, Jia; Seiz, Pia L.; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Ma, Zhiyong; Kemper, Thekla; Fiedler, Melanie; Glebe, Dieter; Wildner, Oliver; Dittmer, Ulf; Lu, Mengji; Roggendorf, Michael

    2013-01-01

    A potent therapeutic T-cell vaccine may be an alternative treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Previously, we developed a DNA prime-adenovirus (AdV) boost vaccination protocol that could elicit strong and specific CD8+ T-cell responses to woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) core antigen (WHcAg) in mice. In the present study, we first examined whether this new prime-boost immunization could induce WHcAg-specific T-cell responses and effectively control WHV replication in the WHV-transgenic mouse model. Secondly, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of this new vaccination strategy in chronically WHV-infected woodchucks in combination with a potent antiviral treatment. Immunization of WHV-transgenic mice by DNA prime-AdV boost regimen elicited potent and functional WHcAg-specific CD8+ T-cell response that consequently resulted in the reduction of the WHV load below the detection limit in more than 70% of animals. The combination therapy of entecavir (ETV) treatment and DNA prime-AdV boost immunization in chronic WHV carriers resulted in WHsAg- and WHcAg-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses, which were not detectable in ETV-only treated controls. Woodchucks receiving the combination therapy showed a prolonged suppression of WHV replication and lower WHsAg levels compared to controls. Moreover, two of four immunized carriers remained WHV negative after the end of ETV treatment and developed anti-WHs antibodies. These results demonstrate that the combined antiviral and vaccination approach efficiently elicited sustained immunological control of chronic hepadnaviral infection in woodchucks and may be a new promising therapeutic strategy in patients. PMID:23785279

  13. Combination hepatitis a-hepatitis B vaccine.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, A J; Balfour, J A

    1997-09-01

    The adult formulation of this combination hepatitis A-hepatitis B vaccine contains 720 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay units (EU) of formalin-inactivated hepatitis A virus strain HM175 and 20mug of recombinant DNA yeast-derived hepatitis B surface antigen adsorbed onto aluminium salts in 1ml for injection. The paediatric formulation contains half this dosage in 0.5ml for injection. The combination vaccine has been shown to be highly immunogenic in healthy young adults after the full dosage schedule of 3 doses at 0, 1 and 6 months. Trials in older adults and children indicate that immunogenicity is adequate in these groups also. The immunogenicity of the combination vaccine appears to be similar to that of hepatitis A vaccine and hepatitis B vaccine administered separately. Possible advantages for the combination vaccine recipient include fewer injections and lower costs. Local adverse reactions such as soreness at the injection site, redness and swelling occur often with the first dose of the series, but the incidence falls with subsequent doses. Local reactions are usually mild and transient, and reported systemic reactions (fatigue, headache) are thought not to have a causal link with the vaccine. PMID:18020513

  14. Single-Genome Sequencing of Hepatitis C Virus in Donor-Recipient Pairs Distinguishes Modes and Models of Virus Transmission and Early Diversification

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Stoddard, Mark B.; Wang, Shuyi; Giorgi, Elena E.; Blair, Lily M.; Learn, Gerald H.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Alter, Harvey J.; Busch, Michael P.; Fierer, Daniel S.; Ribeiro, Ruy M.; Perelson, Alan S.; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite the recent development of highly effective anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) drugs, the global burden of this pathogen remains immense. Control or eradication of HCV will likely require the broad application of antiviral drugs and development of an effective vaccine. A precise molecular identification of transmitted/founder (T/F) HCV genomes that lead to productive clinical infection could play a critical role in vaccine research, as it has for HIV-1. However, the replication schema of these two RNA viruses differ substantially, as do viral responses to innate and adaptive host defenses. These differences raise questions as to the certainty of T/F HCV genome inferences, particularly in cases where multiple closely related sequence lineages have been observed. To clarify these issues and distinguish between competing models of early HCV diversification, we examined seven cases of acute HCV infection in humans and chimpanzees, including three examples of virus transmission between linked donors and recipients. Using single-genome sequencing (SGS) of plasma vRNA, we found that inferred T/F sequences in recipients were identical to viral sequences in their respective donors. Early in infection, HCV genomes generally evolved according to a simple model of random evolution where the coalescent corresponded to the T/F sequence. Closely related sequence lineages could be explained by high multiplicity infection from a donor whose viral sequences had undergone a pretransmission bottleneck due to treatment, immune selection, or recent infection. These findings validate SGS, together with mathematical modeling and phylogenetic analysis, as a novel strategy to infer T/F HCV genome sequences. IMPORTANCE Despite the recent development of highly effective, interferon-sparing anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) drugs, the global burden of this pathogen remains immense. Control or eradication of HCV will likely require the broad application of antiviral drugs and the

  15. Mincle Signaling Promotes Con A Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Greco, Stephanie H; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Kalabin, Aleksandr; Whiteman, Clint; Rokosh, Rae; Ravirala, Sushma; Ochi, Atsuo; Gutierrez, Johana; Salyana, Muhammad Atif; Mani, Vishnu R; Nagaraj, Savitha V; Deutsch, Michael; Seifert, Lena; Daley, Donnele; Barilla, Rocky; Hundeyin, Mautin; Nikifrov, Yuriy; Tejada, Karla; Gelb, Bruce E; Katz, Steven C; Miller, George

    2016-10-01

    Con A hepatitis is regarded as a T cell-mediated model of acute liver injury. Mincle is a C-type lectin receptor that is critical in the immune response to mycobacteria and fungi but does not have a well-defined role in preclinical models of non-pathogen-mediated inflammation. Because Mincle can ligate the cell death ligand SAP130, we postulated that Mincle signaling drives intrahepatic inflammation and liver injury in Con A hepatitis. Acute liver injury was assessed in the murine Con A hepatitis model using C57BL/6, Mincle(-/-), and Dectin-1(-/-) mice. The role of C/EBPβ and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) signaling was assessed using selective inhibitors. We found that Mincle was highly expressed in hepatic innate inflammatory cells and endothelial cells in both mice and humans. Furthermore, sterile Mincle ligands and Mincle signaling intermediates were increased in the murine liver in Con A hepatitis. Most significantly, Mincle deletion or blockade protected against Con A hepatitis, whereas Mincle ligation exacerbated disease. Bone marrow chimeric and adoptive transfer experiments suggested that Mincle signaling in infiltrating myeloid cells dictates disease phenotype. Conversely, signaling via other C-type lectin receptors did not alter disease course. Mechanistically, we found that Mincle blockade decreased the NF-κβ-related signaling intermediates C/EBPβ and HIF-1α, both of which are necessary in macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses. Accordingly, Mincle deletion lowered production of nitrites in Con A hepatitis and inhibition of both C/EBPβ and HIF-1α reduced the severity of liver disease. Our work implicates a novel innate immune driver of Con A hepatitis and, more broadly, suggests a potential role for Mincle in diseases governed by sterile inflammation. PMID:27559045

  16. Mincle Signaling Promotes Con A Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Greco, Stephanie H; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Kalabin, Aleksandr; Whiteman, Clint; Rokosh, Rae; Ravirala, Sushma; Ochi, Atsuo; Gutierrez, Johana; Salyana, Muhammad Atif; Mani, Vishnu R; Nagaraj, Savitha V; Deutsch, Michael; Seifert, Lena; Daley, Donnele; Barilla, Rocky; Hundeyin, Mautin; Nikifrov, Yuriy; Tejada, Karla; Gelb, Bruce E; Katz, Steven C; Miller, George

    2016-10-01

    Con A hepatitis is regarded as a T cell-mediated model of acute liver injury. Mincle is a C-type lectin receptor that is critical in the immune response to mycobacteria and fungi but does not have a well-defined role in preclinical models of non-pathogen-mediated inflammation. Because Mincle can ligate the cell death ligand SAP130, we postulated that Mincle signaling drives intrahepatic inflammation and liver injury in Con A hepatitis. Acute liver injury was assessed in the murine Con A hepatitis model using C57BL/6, Mincle(-/-), and Dectin-1(-/-) mice. The role of C/EBPβ and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) signaling was assessed using selective inhibitors. We found that Mincle was highly expressed in hepatic innate inflammatory cells and endothelial cells in both mice and humans. Furthermore, sterile Mincle ligands and Mincle signaling intermediates were increased in the murine liver in Con A hepatitis. Most significantly, Mincle deletion or blockade protected against Con A hepatitis, whereas Mincle ligation exacerbated disease. Bone marrow chimeric and adoptive transfer experiments suggested that Mincle signaling in infiltrating myeloid cells dictates disease phenotype. Conversely, signaling via other C-type lectin receptors did not alter disease course. Mechanistically, we found that Mincle blockade decreased the NF-κβ-related signaling intermediates C/EBPβ and HIF-1α, both of which are necessary in macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses. Accordingly, Mincle deletion lowered production of nitrites in Con A hepatitis and inhibition of both C/EBPβ and HIF-1α reduced the severity of liver disease. Our work implicates a novel innate immune driver of Con A hepatitis and, more broadly, suggests a potential role for Mincle in diseases governed by sterile inflammation.

  17. Adapting the Andersen model to a francophone West African immigrant population: hepatitis B screening and linkage to care in New York City.

    PubMed

    Blanas, Demetri A; Nichols, Kim; Bekele, Mulusew; Shankar, Hari; Bekele, Saba; Jandorf, Lina; Izzeldin, Saria; Ndiaye, Daouda; Traore, Adama; Bassam, Motahar; Perumalswami, Ponni V

    2015-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is highly endemic in West Africa and immigration from this region to the United States has greatly increased over the past quarter century. Using the Andersen Model as a conceptual framework, this study qualitatively examines francophone West African immigrants' perceptions of factors affecting access to HBV screening and linkage-to-care in New York City. Four focus groups were conducted with 39 purposefully selected participants. The focus groups were conducted in French, audio-recorded, translated into English, transcribed, analyzed, and coded for major themes. Participants identified increasing knowledge of HBV and opportunities to access care in a culturally-sensitive manner that decreases fatalism and avoids generating stigma as priorities. They also emphasized the importance of engaging religious establishments and social networks and employing the Internet to disseminate HBV-relevant information. Cost and health insurance are identified as future challenges that will need to be addressed in a health care environment in which undocumented immigrants are ineligible for health insurance. The qualitative analysis in this study highlights the recursive and interdependent nature of the Andersen Model, and a modification of the model is proposed that is intended to inform examinations of other minority communities' access to health care.

  18. Hepatitis C: Information on Testing and Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    HEPATITIS C Information on Testing & Diagnosis What is Hepatitis C? Hepatitis C is a serious liver disease that results from infection with the Hepatitis C virus. Hepatitis C has been called a silent ...

  19. Hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Jones, John G

    2016-06-01

    The liver has a central role in the regulation of systemic glucose and lipid fluxes during feeding and fasting and also relies on these substrates for its own energy needs. These parallel requirements are met by coordinated control of carbohydrate and lipid fluxes into and out of the Krebs cycle, which is highly tuned to nutrient availability and heavily regulated by insulin and glucagon. During progression of type 2 diabetes, hepatic carbohydrate and lipid biosynthesis fluxes become elevated, thus contributing to hyperglycaemia and hypertriacylglycerolaemia. Over this interval there are also significant fluctuations in hepatic energy state. To date, it is not known to what extent abnormal glucose and lipid fluxes are causally linked to altered energy states. Recent evidence that the glucose-lowering effects of metformin appear to be mediated by attenuation of hepatic energy generation places an additional spotlight on the interdependence of hepatic biosynthetic and oxidative fluxes. The transition from fasting to feeding results in a significant re-direction of hepatic glucose and lipid fluxes and may also incur a temporary hepatic energy deficit. At present, it is not known to what extent these variables are additionally modified by type 2 diabetes and/or non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Thus, there is a compelling need to measure fluxes through oxidative, gluconeogenic and lipogenic pathways and determine their relationship with hepatic energy state in both fasting and fed conditions. New magnetic resonance-based technologies allow these variables to be non-invasively studied in animal models and humans. This review summarises a presentation given at the symposium entitled 'The liver in focus' at the 2015 annual meeting of the EASD. It is accompanied by two other reviews on topics from this symposium (by Kenneth Cusi, DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3952-1 , and by Hannele Yki-Järvinen, DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3944-1 ) and a commentary by the Session Chair, Michael

  20. Complement activation in discordant hepatic xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Tector, A J; Chen, X; Soderland, C; Tchervenkov, J I

    1998-11-01

    Little is known about hyperacute rejection in hepatic xenotransplantation. Information from clinical xenoperfusions suggests that the liver may be rejected by a mechanism less vigorous than either kidney or heart xenografts. We used the in vitro model of porcine hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells (PHEC) incubated with either complement replete or deficient human serum to determine the relative roles of the classical and alternate pathways of complement in the immediate response to hepatic xenotransplantation. Our results suggest that either the classical or alternate pathways are capable of independently activating the complement cascade upon exposure to the porcine hepatic sinusoidal endothelium. Our results also imply that either pathway alone is capable of initiating similar degrees of injury as the entire cascade. PMID:9915253

  1. Hepatic stem cells: in search of.

    PubMed

    Walkup, Maggie H; Gerber, David A

    2006-08-01

    The field of stem cell biology has exploded with the study of a wide range of cellular populations involving endodermal, mesenchymal, and ectodermal organs. One area of extensive study has included the identification of hepatic stem and progenitor cell subpopulations. Liver stem cells provide insights into the potential pathways involving liver regeneration that are independent of mature hepatocytes. Hepatic progenitor cells are either bipotent or multipotent and capable of multiple rounds of replication. They have been identified in fetal as well as adult liver. Various injury models have been used to expand this cellular compartment. The nomenclature, origin, and function of the hepatic progenitor cell populations are areas of ongoing debate. In this review, we will discuss the different definitions and functions of hepatic progenitor cells as well as the current research efforts examining their therapeutic potential.

  2. Modeling host interactions with hepatitis B virus using primary and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocellular systems.

    PubMed

    Shlomai, Amir; Schwartz, Robert E; Ramanan, Vyas; Bhatta, Ankit; de Jong, Ype P; Bhatia, Sangeeta N; Rice, Charles M

    2014-08-19

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) chronically infects 400 million people worldwide and is a leading driver of end-stage liver disease and liver cancer. Research into the biology and treatment of HBV requires an in vitro cell-culture system that supports the infection of human hepatocytes, and accurately recapitulates virus-host interactions. Here, we report that micropatterned cocultures of primary human hepatocytes with stromal cells (MPCCs) reliably support productive HBV infection, and infection can be enhanced by blocking elements of the hepatocyte innate immune response associated with the induction of IFN-stimulated genes. MPCCs maintain prolonged, productive infection and represent a facile platform for studying virus-host interactions and for developing antiviral interventions. Hepatocytes obtained from different human donors vary dramatically in their permissiveness to HBV infection, suggesting that factors--such as divergence in genetic susceptibility to infection--may influence infection in vitro. To establish a complementary, renewable system on an isogenic background in which candidate genetics can be interrogated, we show that inducible pluripotent stem cells differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells (iHeps) support HBV infection that can also be enhanced by blocking interferon-stimulated gene induction. Notably, the emergence of the capacity to support HBV transcriptional activity and initial permissiveness for infection are marked by distinct stages of iHep differentiation, suggesting that infection of iHeps can be used both to study HBV, and conversely to assess the degree of iHep differentiation. Our work demonstrates the utility of these infectious systems for studying HBV biology and the virus' interactions with host hepatocyte genetics and physiology. PMID:25092305

  3. Modeling and Simulating Dynamics of Complete- and Poor-Response Chronic Hepatitis B Chinese Patients for Adefovir and Traditional Chinese Medicine Plus Adefovir Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Min, Lequan; Chen, Xiao; Ye, Yongan; Zhang, Qun; Ru, Shuying; Li, Xiaoke

    2013-01-01

    ChiCTR-TRC-11001263 study was the first large-scale double-blind randomized placebo-controlled traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) and adefovir (ADV) antihepatitis B virus (HBV) infection trial in the world. A total of 560 hepatitis B e antigen- (HBeAg-) positive Chinese patients with chronical HBV were randomly classified, in 1 : 1 ratio, into two groups: experimental group (EXG) receiving TCMs + ADV and controlled group (CTG) receiving ADV + TCM-placebo treatment for 48 weeks. This paper introduces two models to model and simulate the evolutions of dynamics for the complete-response patients and the poor-response patients in EXG and CTG, respectively. The stimulated mean HBV DNA and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels were close to the patients' experimental data. Analysis and simulations suggest that the activated patients' immune functions by TCMs + ADV may not only clear infected hepatocytes, but also clear HBV, which made the complete-response patients' mean serum HBV DNA levels in EXG reduce rapidly 12 weeks' earlier than the ones in CTG. One can assume that both the TCMs and ADV have the function of preventing complete-response patients' infected hepatocytes from being injured by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs); the patients' activated immune cells may also block HBV replications. PMID:24282437

  4. Hepatitis C virus-cross-reactive TCR gene-modified T cells: a model for immunotherapy against diseases with genomic instability.

    PubMed

    Spear, Timothy T; Riley, Timothy P; Lyons, Gretchen E; Callender, Glenda G; Roszkowski, Jeffrey J; Wang, Yuan; Simms, Patricia E; Scurti, Gina M; Foley, Kendra C; Murray, David C; Hellman, Lance M; McMahan, Rachel H; Iwashima, Makio; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Rosen, Hugo R; Baker, Brian M; Nishimura, Michael I

    2016-09-01

    A major obstacle hindering the development of effective immunity against viral infections, their associated disease, and certain cancers is their inherent genomic instability. Accumulation of mutations can alter processing and presentation of antigens recognized by antibodies and T cells that can lead to immune escape variants. Use of an agent that can intrinsically combat rapidly mutating viral or cancer-associated antigens would be quite advantageous in developing effective immunity against such disease. We propose that T cells harboring cross-reactive TCRs could serve as a therapeutic agent in these instances. With the use of hepatitis C virus, known for its genomic instability as a model for mutated antigen recognition, we demonstrate cross-reactivity against immunogenic and mutagenic nonstructural protein 3:1406-1415 and nonstructural protein 3:1073-1081 epitopes in PBL-derived, TCR-gene-modified T cells. These single TCR-engineered T cells can CD8-independently recognize naturally occurring and epidemiologically relevant mutant variants. TCR-peptide MHC modeling data allow us to rationalize how TCR structural properties accommodate recognition of certain mutated epitopes and how these substitutions impact the requirement of CD8 affinity enhancement for recognition. A better understanding of such TCRs' promiscuous behavior may allow for exploitation of these properties to develop novel, adoptive T cell-based therapies for viral infections and cancers exhibiting similar genomic instability. PMID:26921345

  5. Hepatitis C virus-cross-reactive TCR gene-modified T cells: a model for immunotherapy against diseases with genomic instability.

    PubMed

    Spear, Timothy T; Riley, Timothy P; Lyons, Gretchen E; Callender, Glenda G; Roszkowski, Jeffrey J; Wang, Yuan; Simms, Patricia E; Scurti, Gina M; Foley, Kendra C; Murray, David C; Hellman, Lance M; McMahan, Rachel H; Iwashima, Makio; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Rosen, Hugo R; Baker, Brian M; Nishimura, Michael I

    2016-09-01

    A major obstacle hindering the development of effective immunity against viral infections, their associated disease, and certain cancers is their inherent genomic instability. Accumulation of mutations can alter processing and presentation of antigens recognized by antibodies and T cells that can lead to immune escape variants. Use of an agent that can intrinsically combat rapidly mutating viral or cancer-associated antigens would be quite advantageous in developing effective immunity against such disease. We propose that T cells harboring cross-reactive TCRs could serve as a therapeutic agent in these instances. With the use of hepatitis C virus, known for its genomic instability as a model for mutated antigen recognition, we demonstrate cross-reactivity against immunogenic and mutagenic nonstructural protein 3:1406-1415 and nonstructural protein 3:1073-1081 epitopes in PBL-derived, TCR-gene-modified T cells. These single TCR-engineered T cells can CD8-independently recognize naturally occurring and epidemiologically relevant mutant variants. TCR-peptide MHC modeling data allow us to rationalize how TCR structural properties accommodate recognition of certain mutated epitopes and how these substitutions impact the requirement of CD8 affinity enhancement for recognition. A better understanding of such TCRs' promiscuous behavior may allow for exploitation of these properties to develop novel, adoptive T cell-based therapies for viral infections and cancers exhibiting similar genomic instability.

  6. Generating an in vitro-in vivo correlation for metabolism and liver enrichment of a hepatitis C virus drug, faldaprevir, using a rat hepatocyte model (HepatoPac).

    PubMed

    Ramsden, Diane; Tweedie, Donald J; St George, Roger; Chen, Lin-Zhi; Li, Yongmei

    2014-03-01

    Hepatocytes provide an integrated model to study drug metabolism and disposition. As a result of a loss of polarity or a significant decrease in the expression of enzymes and transporters, suspended and sandwich-cultured hepatocytes have limitations in determining hepatocellular drug concentrations. Underprediction of the extent of glucuronidation is also a concern for these hepatocyte models. Faldaprevir is a hepatitis C virus protease inhibitor in late-stage development that has demonstrated significant liver enrichment in in vivo rat models based on quantitative whole-body autoradiography (QWBA) and liver-to-plasma area under-the-curve ratio. In bile duct cannulated rats, the primary biliary metabolite was a glucuronide. Owing to ethical concerns, it is difficult to assess liver enrichment in humans, and a lack of in vitro and in vivo correlation of glucuronidation has been reported. The current study was conducted to verify whether a hepatocyte model, rat HepatoPac, could overcome some of these limitations and provide validity for follow-up studies with human HepatoPac. With rat HepatoPac, liver enrichment values averaged 34-fold and were consistent with rat QWBA (26.8-fold) and in vivo data (42-fold). In contrast, liver enrichment in suspended hepatocytes was only 2.8-fold. Furthermore, the extent of faldaprevir glucuronidation in HepatoPac studies was in agreement with in vivo results, with glucuronidation as the major pathway (96%). Suspended rat hepatocytes did not generate the glucuronide or two key hydroxylated metabolites that were observed in vivo. Overall, our studies suggest that HepatoPac is a promising in vitro model to predict in vivo liver enrichment and metabolism, especially for glucuronidation, and has demonstrated superiority over suspended hepatocytes. PMID:24366905

  7. Hepatitis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... people at risk for contracting hepatitis. But frequent hand washing and good hygiene practices can reduce this risk. All kids in ... to prevent viral hepatitis you should: Follow good hygiene and avoid crowded, ... their hands thoroughly after using the toilet and before eating. ...

  8. [Update chronic viral hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Ziegenhagen, D J

    2016-03-01

    More than 500,000 people in Germany have chronic viral hepatitis. The interferon-based treatments formerly used in hepatitis B have been widely replaced by life-long oral medication with nucleoside or nucleotide analogues. Treatment for chronic hepatitis C has been improved substantially by the development of new and very expensive drug combinations. Up to 90% of patients can now be cured with certainty, and one to two years after successful treatment there is no relevant risk of recurrence. These individuals expect to receive insurance cover under appropriate conditions. Vaccination programmes are very efficient at decreasing the incidence of hepatitis B, but no vaccine against hepatitis C is likely to become available in the next decade. PMID:27111951

  9. Update on Alcoholic Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Torok, Natalie J

    2015-11-02

    Alcoholic liver disease is one of the most prevalent liver diseases worldwide, and a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Alcoholic hepatitis is a severe form of liver injury in patients with alcohol abuse, can present as an acute on chronic liver failure associated with a rapid decline in liver synthetic function, and consequent increase in mortality. Despite therapy, about 30%-50% of patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis eventually die. The pathogenic pathways that lead to the development of alcoholic hepatitis are complex and involve oxidative stress, gut dysbiosis, and dysregulation of the innate and adaptive immune system with injury to the parenchymal cells and activation of hepatic stellate cells. As accepted treatment approaches are currently limited, a better understanding of the pathophysiology would be required to generate new approaches that improve outcomes. This review focuses on recent advances in the diagnosis, pathogenesis of alcoholic hepatitis and novel treatment strategies.

  10. Update on Alcoholic Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Torok, Natalie J.

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease is one of the most prevalent liver diseases worldwide, and a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Alcoholic hepatitis is a severe form of liver injury in patients with alcohol abuse, can present as an acute on chronic liver failure associated with a rapid decline in liver synthetic function, and consequent increase in mortality. Despite therapy, about 30%–50% of patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis eventually die. The pathogenic pathways that lead to the development of alcoholic hepatitis are complex and involve oxidative stress, gut dysbiosis, and dysregulation of the innate and adaptive immune system with injury to the parenchymal cells and activation of hepatic stellate cells. As accepted treatment approaches are currently limited, a better understanding of the pathophysiology would be required to generate new approaches that improve outcomes. This review focuses on recent advances in the diagnosis, pathogenesis of alcoholic hepatitis and novel treatment strategies. PMID:26540078

  11. Efficacy of HGF carried by ultrasound microbubble-cationic nano-liposomes complex for treating hepatic fibrosis in a bile duct ligation rat model, and its relationship with the diffusion-weighted MRI parameters.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shou-hong; Wen, Kun-ming; Wu, Wei; Li, Wen-yan; Zhao, Jian-nong

    2013-12-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is a major consequence of liver aggression. Finding novel ways for counteracting this damaging process, and for evaluating fibrosis with a non-invasive imaging approach, represent important therapeutic and diagnostic challenges. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is an anti-fibrosis cell growth factor that induces apoptosis in activated hepatic stellate cells, reduces excessive collagen deposition, and stimulates hepatocyte regeneration. Thus, using HGF in gene therapy against liver fibrosis is an attractive approach. The aims of the present study were: (i) to explore the efficacy of treating liver fibrosis using HGF expression vector carried by a novel ultrasound microbubble delivery system; (ii) to explore the diagnostic interest of diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI-MRI) in evaluating liver fibrosis. We established a rat model of hepatic fibrosis. The rats were administered HGF linked to novel ultrasound micro-bubbles. Progression of hepatic fibrosis was evaluated by histopathology, hydroxyproline content, and DWI-MRI to determine the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). Our targeted gene therapy produced a significant anti-fibrosis effect, as shown by liver histology and significant reduction of hydroxyproline content. Moreover, using DWI-MRI, the b value (diffusion gradient factor) was equal to 300s/mm(2), and the ADC values significantly decreased as the severity of hepatic fibrosis increased. Using this methodology, F0-F2 could be distinguished from F3 and F4 (P<0.01). This is the first in vivo report of using an ultrasound microbubble-cationic nano-liposome complex for gene delivery. The data indicate that, this approach is efficient to counteract the fibrosis process. DWI-MRI appears a promising imaging technique for evaluating liver fibrosis.

  12. The Effects of Diet Composition on Body Fat and Hepatic Steatosis in an Animal (Peromyscus californicus) Model of the Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Krugner-Higby, Lisa; Caldwell, Stephen; Coyle, Kathryn; Bush, Eugene; Atkinson, Richard; Joers, Valerie

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this research was to determine body composition, total fat content, fat distribution, and serum leptin concentration in hyperlipidemic (high responder, HR) and normolipidemic (low responder, LR) California mice (Peromyscus californicus). In our initial experiments, we sought to determine whether differences in regional fat storage were associated with hyperlipidemia in this species. To further characterize the hepatic steatosis in the mice, we performed 2 additional experiments by using a diet containing 45% of energy as fat. The body fat content of mice fed a low fat-diet (12.3% energy as fat) was higher than that of mice fed a moderate-fat diet (25.8% energy as fat). Total body fat did not differ between HR and LR mice. There was no significant difference between intraabdominal, gonadal, or inguinal fat pad weights. Liver weights of HR mice fed the moderate-fat diet were higher than those of LR mice fed the same diet, and the moderate-fat diet was associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL). Mice fed the 45% diet had higher histologic score for steatosis but very little inflammatory response. Chemical analysis indicated increased lipid in the livers of mice fed the high-fat diet compared with those fed the low-fat diet. HR and LR mice had similar serum leptin concentrations. California mice develop NAFL without excess fat accumulation elsewhere. NAFL was influenced by genetic and dietary factors. These mice may be a naturally occuring model of partial lipodystrophy. PMID:21819679

  13. MATLAB-implemented estimation procedure for model-based assessment of hepatic insulin degradation from standard intravenous glucose tolerance test data.

    PubMed

    Di Nardo, Francesco; Mengoni, Michele; Morettini, Micaela

    2013-05-01

    Present study provides a novel MATLAB-based parameter estimation procedure for individual assessment of hepatic insulin degradation (HID) process from standard frequently-sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIGTT) data. Direct access to the source code, offered by MATLAB, enabled us to design an optimization procedure based on the alternating use of Gauss-Newton's and Levenberg-Marquardt's algorithms, which assures the full convergence of the process and the containment of computational time. Reliability was tested by direct comparison with the application, in eighteen non-diabetic subjects, of well-known kinetic analysis software package SAAM II, and by application on different data. Agreement between MATLAB and SAAM II was warranted by intraclass correlation coefficients ≥0.73; no significant differences between corresponding mean parameter estimates and prediction of HID rate; and consistent residual analysis. Moreover, MATLAB optimization procedure resulted in a significant 51% reduction of CV% for the worst-estimated parameter by SAAM II and in maintaining all model-parameter CV% <20%. In conclusion, our MATLAB-based procedure was suggested as a suitable tool for the individual assessment of HID process.

  14. Histopathological study of the hepatic and renal toxicity associated with the co-administration of imatinib and acetaminophen in a preclinical mouse model.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Inthisham; Pasupati, Thanikachalam; Judson, John Paul; Segarra, Ignacio

    2010-06-01

    Imatinib, a selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is the first line treatment against chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Several fatal cases have been associated with imatinib hepatotoxicity. Acetaminophen, an over-the-counter analgesic, anti-pyretic drug, which can cause hepatotoxicity, is commonly used in cancer pain management. We assessed renal and hepatic toxicity after imatinib and acetaminophen co-administration in a preclinical model. Four groups of male ICR mice (30-35 g) were fasted overnight and administered either saline solution orally (baseline control), imatinib 100 mg/kg orally (control), acetaminophen 700 mg/kg intraperitoneally (positive control) or co-administered imatinib 100 mg/kg orally and acetaminophen 700 mg/kg intraperitoneally (study group), and sacrificed at 15 min, 30 min, 1 h, 2 h, 4 h and 6 h post-administration (n = 4 per time point). The liver and kidneys were harvested for histopathology assessment. The liver showed reversible cell damage like feathery degeneration, microvesicular fatty change, sinusoidal congestion and pyknosis, when imatinib or acetaminophen were administered separately. The damage increased gradually with time, peaked at 2 h but resolved by 4 h. When both drugs were administered concurrently, the liver showed irreversible damage (cytolysis, karyolysis and karyorrhexis) which did not resolve by 6 h. Very minor renal changes were observed. Acetaminophen and imatinib co-administration increased hepatoxicity which become irreversible, probably due to shared P450 biotransformation pathways and transporters in the liver.

  15. The Phospholipid:Diacylglycerol Acyltransferase Lro1 Is Responsible for Hepatitis C Virus Core-Induced Lipid Droplet Formation in a Yeast Model System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao-Wen; Cheng, Yun-Hsin; Irokawa, Hayato; Hwang, Gi-Wook; Naganuma, Akira; Kuge, Shusuke

    2016-01-01

    Chronic infection with the hepatitis C virus frequently induces steatosis, which is a significant risk factor for liver pathogenesis. Steatosis is characterized by the accumulation of lipid droplets in hepatocytes. The structural protein core of the virus induces lipid droplet formation and localizes on the surface of the lipid droplets. However, the precise molecular mechanisms for the core-induced formation of lipid droplets remain elusive. Recently, we showed that the expression of the core protein in yeast as a model system could induce lipid droplet formation. In this study, we probed the cellular factors responsible for the formation of core-induced lipid-droplets in yeast cells. We demonstrated that one of the enzymes responsible for triglyceride synthesis, a phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (Lro1), is required for the core-induced lipid droplet formation. While core proteins inhibit Lro1 degradation and alter Lro1 localization, the characteristic localization of Lro1 adjacent to the lipid droplets appeared to be responsible for the core-induced lipid droplet formation. RNA virus genomes have evolved using high mutation rates to maintain their ability to replicate. Our observations suggest a functional relationship between the core protein with hepatocytes and yeast cells. The possible interactions between core proteins and the endoplasmic reticulum membrane affect the mobilization of specific proteins. PMID:27459103

  16. ASS and SULT2A1 are Novel and Sensitive Biomarkers of Acute Hepatic Injury-A Comparative Study in Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Prima, Victor; Cao, Mengde; Svetlov, Stanislav I

    2013-01-10

    Liver and kidney damage associated with polytrauma, endotoxic shock/sepsis, and organ transplantation, are among the leading causes of the multiple organ failure. Development of novel sensitive biomarkers that detect early stages of liver and kidney injury is vital for the effective diagnostics and treatment of these life-threatening conditions. Previously, we identified several hepatic proteins, including Argininosuccinate Synthase (ASS) and sulfotransferases which were degraded in the liver and rapidly released into circulation during Ischemia/Reperfusion (I/R) injury. Here we compared sensitivity and specificity of the newly developed sandwich ELISA assays for ASS and the sulfotransferase isoform SULT2A1 with the standard clinical liver and kidney tests Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT) and Aspartate Transaminase (AST) in various pre-clinical models of acute injury. Our data suggest that ASS and SULT2A1 have superior characteristics for liver and kidney health assessment in endotoxemia, Ischemia/Reperfusion (I/R), chemical and drug-induced liver injury and may be of high potential value for clinical applications.

  17. Isolation, Characterization, and Molecular Modeling of a Rheumatoid Factor from a Hepatitis C Virus Infected Patient with Sjögren's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Leu, Sy-Jye; Liu, Chia-Yu

    2013-01-01

    We have previously isolated several IgG rheumatoid factors (RFs) from patients with both rheumatoid arthritis and idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura using phage display system. To study IgG RFs in patients with other autoimmune diseases, phage display antibody libraries from a hepatitis C virus infected patient with Sjögren's syndrome were constructed. After panning, a specific clone RFL11 was isolated for characterization in advance. The binding activity and specificity of RFL11 to IgG Fc fragment were comparable to those of RFs previously isolated. The analysis with existed RF-Fc complex structures indicated the homology model of RFL11 is similar to IgM RF61 complex with high binding affinity of about 6 × 10−8 M. This effect resulted from longer complementarity-determining region (CDR) combining key somatic mutations. In the RFL11-Fc interfaces, the CDR-H3 loop forms a finger-like structure extending into the bottom of Fc pocket and resulting in strong ion and cation-pi interactions. Moreover, a process of antigen-driven maturation was proven by somatically mutated VH residues on H2 and H3 CDR loops in the interfaces. Taken together, these results suggested that high affinity IgG RFs can be generated in patients with Sjögren's syndrome and may play an important role in the pathogenesis of this autoimmune disease. PMID:24489505

  18. Transforming growth factor-beta-induced stimulation of formation of collagen fiber network and anti-fibrotic effect of taurine in an in vitro model of hepatic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kato, Junya; Ido, Akio; Hasuike, Satoru; Uto, Hirofumi; Hori, Takeshi; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Murakami, Shigeru; Terano, Akira; Tsubouchi, Hirohito

    2004-09-01

    The cell strain M, which was established from normal rat liver cells, is characterized by the active formation of a collagen fiber network. In this study, we investigated the characterization of M cells and evaluated the anti-fibrogenic effects of taurine using this culture system. M cells expressed cytokeratin (CK)8, CK18, vimentin, and alpha-smooth muscle actin, whereas expression of CK-19 or desmin was not detected. Also, M cells expressed transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1, -beta2, and TGF-beta type I and II receptors, and treatment with TGF-beta1 (1ng/ml) for 6 days markedly stimulated the formation of a collagen fiber network and expression of procollagen alpha1(I) mRNA. When M cells were treated with various concentrations of taurine (10-50mM), network formation and procollagen alpha1(I) expression were significantly suppressed in a dose dependent manner. Additionally, even in the presence of TGF-beta1, taurine treatment effectively reduced the formation of a collagen fiber network. These results suggest that M cells exhibit features of not only hepatocytes but also myofibroblasts, and TGF-beta1 plays an important role in the formation of collagen fiber networks in this culture system. Additionally, this M cell culture system is appropriate for use as an in vitro model of hepatic fibrosis in the evaluation of the anti-fibrogenic effects of various agents.

  19. Complexation of a 1-Indanone Thiosemicarbazone with Hydroxypropyl-β-Cyclodextrin Enhances Its Activity Against a Hepatitis C Virus Surrogate Model.

    PubMed

    Glisoni, Romina J; Castro, Eliana F; Cavallaro, Lucía V; Moglioni, Albertina G; Sosnik, Alejandro

    2015-06-01

    The current standard of care of the infection by hepatitis C virus (HCV) is effective in a limited number of patients and the high cost hinders therapy affordability and compliance. In this context, the research of new direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) for a more effective and long-lasting therapy is an urgent need and an area of active investigation. In an effort to develop novel DAAs, a series of 1-indanone thiosemicarbazones (TSCs) was synthesized and fully characterized. However, the high self-aggregation tendency and extremely poor aqueous solubility of these antiviral candidates often preclude their reliable biological evaluation in vitro. To maintain constant TSC concentrations over the biological assays, different TSC/cyclodextrin complexes were produced. In the present work, we report for the first time the cytotoxicity and antiviral activity of 5,6-dimethoxy TSC inclusion complexes with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin on bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) as HCV surrogate model. Results showed a potent suppression of the virus replication, with greater activity for the inclusion complexes than the free compound. PMID:26369033

  20. Development of a GB virus B marmoset model and its validation with a novel series of hepatitis C virus NS3 protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bright, Helen; Carroll, Anthony R; Watts, Paul A; Fenton, Robert J

    2004-02-01

    GB virus B (GBV-B), a flavivirus closely related to HCV, has previously been shown to infect and replicate to high titers in tamarins (Saguinus sp.). This study describes the use of GBV-B infection and replication in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) for the successful development and validation of a surrogate animal model for hepatitis C virus (HCV). Infection of marmosets with GBV-B produced a viremia that peaked at 10(8) to 10(9) genome copies/ml for a period of 40 to 60 days followed by viral clearance at 60 to 80 days postinfection. Passage of the initial tamarin-derived GBV-B in marmosets produced an infectious stock that gave a more reproducible and consistent infection in the marmoset. Titration of the virus stocks in vivo indicated that they contained 1 infectious unit for every 1,000 genome copies. Cultures of primary marmoset hepatocytes were also successfully infected with GBV-B, with high levels of virus detected in supernatants and cells for up to 14 days postinfection. Treatment of GBV-B-infected hepatocyte cultures with a novel class of HCV protease inhibitor (pyrrolidine 5,5 trans-lactams) reduced viral levels by more than 2 logs. Treatment of GBV-B-infected marmosets with one such inhibitor resulted in a 3-log drop in serum viral titer over 4 days of therapy. These studies provide the first demonstration of the in vivo efficacy of a small-molecule inhibitor for HCV in an animal model and illustrate the utility of GBV-B as a surrogate animal model system for HCV.

  1. Agent-Based Model Forecasts Aging of the Population of People Who Inject Drugs in Metropolitan Chicago and Changing Prevalence of Hepatitis C Infections

    PubMed Central

    Prachand, Nikhil; Hailegiorgis, Atesmachew; Dahari, Harel; Major, Marian E.

    2015-01-01

    People who inject drugs (PWID) are at high risk for blood-borne pathogens transmitted during the sharing of contaminated injection equipment, particularly hepatitis C virus (HCV). HCV prevalence is influenced by a complex interplay of drug-use behaviors, social networks, and geography, as well as the availability of interventions, such as needle exchange programs. To adequately address this complexity in HCV epidemic forecasting, we have developed a computational model, the Agent-based Pathogen Kinetics model (APK). APK simulates the PWID population in metropolitan Chicago, including the social interactions that result in HCV infection. We used multiple empirical data sources on Chicago PWID to build a spatial distribution of an in silico PWID population and modeled networks among the PWID by considering the geography of the city and its suburbs. APK was validated against 2012 empirical data (the latest available) and shown to agree with network and epidemiological surveys to within 1%. For the period 2010–2020, APK forecasts a decline in HCV prevalence of 0.8% per year from 44(±2)% to 36(±5)%, although some sub-populations would continue to have relatively high prevalence, including Non-Hispanic Blacks, 48(±5)%. The rate of decline will be lowest in Non-Hispanic Whites and we find, in a reversal of historical trends, that incidence among non-Hispanic Whites would exceed incidence among Non-Hispanic Blacks (0.66 per 100 per years vs 0.17 per 100 person years). APK also forecasts an increase in PWID mean age from 35(±1) to 40(±2) with a corresponding increase from 59(±2)% to 80(±6)% in the proportion of the population >30 years old. Our studies highlight the importance of analyzing subpopulations in disease predictions, the utility of computer simulation for analyzing demographic and health trends among PWID and serve as a tool for guiding intervention and prevention strategies in Chicago, and other major cities. PMID:26421722

  2. Quasi-elastic light scattering studies of native hepatic bile from the dog: comparison with aggregative behavior of model biliary lipid systems.

    PubMed

    Mazer, N A; Schurtenberg, P; Carey, M C; Preisig, R; Weigand, K; Känzig, W

    1984-04-24

    Using quasi-elastic light scattering ( QLS ), we have characterized the macromolecular components in hepatic bile obtained from the dog and compared these results with data from model bile solutions containing the bile salt (BS) sodium taurocholate (TC), egg lecithin (L), and cholesterol (Ch). Native bile samples were obtained by direct catheterization of the common bile duct in a previously cholecystectomized dog fitted with a Thomas duodenal cannula. Hepatic bile was sampled during three secretory states: (A) unstimulated "fasting" bile, (B) "stimulated" secretion during an intravenous TC infusion, and (C) "secretin-stimulated" secretion. All three samples had comparable molar ratios of L/BS (0.21 +/- 0.03) and Ch/L (0.027 +/- 0.006) but differed in the total lipid concentration (BS + L + Ch): (A) 13.1 +/- 0.8, (B) 6.7 +/- 0.8, and (C) 3.0 +/- 0.4 g/dL. From the QLS autocorrelation functions measured on samples B and C, three macromolecular components (denoted 1 alpha, 1 beta, and 2) were resolved. Component 1 alpha (hydrodynamic radius R1 alpha = 10 +/- 2 A) is comparable in size to the micellar aggregates of model systems. Component 1 beta (R1 beta = 67 +/- 7 A) appears to reflect an average of biliary proteins. Component 2 (R2 = 650 +/- 15 A) is a trace component whose size and sedimentation behavior are compatible with those of the canalicular membrane vesicles postulated to be present in bile [ Godfrey , P. P., Warner, M. J., & Coleman , R. (1981) Biochem. J. 196, 11]. Serial dilution of the B and C bile samples with Tris buffer (0.15 M NaCl, pH 8.0) showed a remarkable similarity in the behavior of the 1 alpha component as compared to the mean hydrodynamic radius Rh of similarly diluted model bile solutions. When a critical dilution factor, d gamma, is reached, Rh increases abruptly from approximately 30 to approximately 400 A. Above a second dilution factor, d alpha, it then decreases to a value of approximately 150 A. Similar results were obtained on

  3. The hepatitis C crisis.

    PubMed

    St John, Tina M; Sandt, Lorren

    2005-01-01

    An estimated 170 million persons (3% of the world's population) are infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV), and 3 to 4 million persons are newly infected each year. Of those infected, 70%-85% develop chronic viremia with the potential for devastating long-term sequelae, including chronic liver disease, cirrhosis, hepatic failure, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The passivity in the public health sector and in the medical community at large with respect to hepatitis C portends a myriad of societal, fiscal, and personal costs for the United States within the next two decades unless immediate actions are taken to intervene in the natural history of this emerging public health crisis. PMID:15822840

  4. Noninvasive Monitoring of Hepatic Damage from Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Alavez-Ramírez, J.; Fuentes-Allen, J. L.; López-Estrada, J.

    2011-01-01

    The mathematical model for the dynamics of the hepatitis C proposed in Avendaño et al. (2002), with four populations (healthy and unhealthy hepatocytes, the viral load of the hepatitis C virus, and T killer cells), is revised. Showing that the reduced model obtained by considering only the first three of these populations, known as basic model, has two possible equilibrium states: the uninfected one where viruses are not present in the individual, and the endemic one where viruses and infected cells are present. A threshold parameter (the basic reproductive virus number) is introduced, and in terms of it, the global stability of both two possible equilibrium states is established. Other central result consists in showing, by model numerical simulations, the feasibility of monitoring liver damage caused by HCV, avoiding unnecessary biopsies and the undesirable related inconveniences/imponderables to the patient; another result gives a mathematical modelling basis to recently developed techniques for the disease assessment based essentially on viral load measurements. PMID:21331263

  5. Feature Hepatitis: The Dangers of Hepatitis: What you should know from A to E

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature Hepatitis The Dangers of Hepatitis: What you should know from A to E ... drugs. In some cases, hepatitis lasts a lifetime. Hepatitis: Acute or Chronic? Acute hepatitis is the initial ...

  6. Hepatic sarcoidosis complicating treatment-naive viral hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Aravinthan, Aloysious; Gelson, William; Limbu, Anita; Brais, Rebecca; Richardson, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic sarcoidosis is usually asymptomatic but rarely leads to adverse liver-related outcome. Co-existence of viral hepatitis and hepatic sarcoidosis is a rare, but recognised phenomenon. Obtaining a balance between immune suppression and anti-viral therapy may be problematic. Immunosuppression in the presence of viral hepatitis can lead to rapid deterioration of liver disease. Similarly, anti-viral therapy may exacerbate granulomatous hepatitis. Here we present two cases of viral hepatitis co-existing with sarcoidosis that illustrate successful management strategies. In one, hepatitis B replication was suppressed with oral anti-viral therapy before commencing prednisolone. In the second, remission of hepatic sarcoidosis was achieved with prednisolone, before treating hepatitis C and obtaining a sustained virological response with pegylated interferon and ribavirin therapy. PMID:23355920

  7. Discovery of Novel Hepatitis C Virus NS5B Polymerase Inhibitors by Combining Random Forest, Multiple e-Pharmacophore Modeling and Docking

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yu; Li, Jinlong; Qing, Jie; Huang, Mingjie; Wu, Ming; Gao, Fenghua; Li, Dongmei; Hong, Zhangyong; Kong, Lingbao; Huang, Weiqiang; Lin, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    The NS5B polymerase is one of the most attractive targets for developing new drugs to block Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We describe the discovery of novel potent HCV NS5B polymerase inhibitors by employing a virtual screening (VS) approach, which is based on random forest (RB-VS), e-pharmacophore (PB-VS), and docking (DB-VS) methods. In the RB-VS stage, after feature selection, a model with 16 descriptors was used. In the PB-VS stage, six energy-based pharmacophore (e-pharmacophore) models from different crystal structures of the NS5B polymerase with ligands binding at the palm I, thumb I and thumb II regions were used. In the DB-VS stage, the Glide SP and XP docking protocols with default parameters were employed. In the virtual screening approach, the RB-VS, PB-VS and DB-VS methods were applied in increasing order of complexity to screen the InterBioScreen database. From the final hits, we selected 5 compounds for further anti-HCV activity and cellular cytotoxicity assay. All 5 compounds were found to inhibit NS5B polymerase with IC50 values of 2.01–23.84 μM and displayed anti-HCV activities with EC50 values ranging from 1.61 to 21.88 μM, and all compounds displayed no cellular cytotoxicity (CC50 > 100 μM) except compound N2, which displayed weak cytotoxicity with a CC50 value of 51.3 μM. The hit compound N2 had the best antiviral activity against HCV, with a selective index of 32.1. The 5 hit compounds with new scaffolds could potentially serve as NS5B polymerase inhibitors through further optimization and development. PMID:26845440

  8. Ultradeep Pyrosequencing and Molecular Modeling Identify Key Structural Features of Hepatitis B Virus RNase H, a Putative Target for Antiviral Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Hayer, Juliette; Rodriguez, Christophe; Germanidis, Georgios; Deléage, Gilbert; Zoulim, Fabien; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    Last-generation nucleoside/nucleotide analogues are potent against hepatitis B virus (HBV) and have a high barrier to resistance. However, delayed responses have been observed in patients previously exposed to other drugs of the same class, long-term resistance is possible, and cure of infection cannot be achieved with these therapies, emphasizing the need for alternative therapeutic approaches. The HBV RNase H represents an interesting target because its enzyme activity is essential to the HBV life cycle. The goal of our study was to characterize the structure of the HBV RNase H by computing a 3-dimensional molecular model derived from E. coli RNase H and analyzing 2,326 sequences of all HBV genotypes available in public databases and 958,000 sequences generated by means of ultradeep pyrosequencing of sequences from a homogenous population of 73 treatment-naive patients infected with HBV genotype D. Our data revealed that (i) the putative 4th catalytic residue displays unexpected variability that could be explained by the overlap of the HBx gene and has no apparent impact on HBV replicative capacity and that (ii) the C-helix-containing basic protrusion, which is required to guide the RNA/DNA heteroduplex into the catalytic site, is highly conserved and bears unique structural properties that can be used to target HBV-specific RNase H inhibitors without cross-species activity. The model shows substantial differences from other known RNases H and paves the way for functional and structural studies as a prerequisite to the development of new inhibitors of the HBV cell cycle specifically targeting RNase H activity. PMID:24173223

  9. An Agent-Based Model of a Hepatic Inflammatory Response to Salmonella: A Computational Study under a Large Set of Experimental Data.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhenzhen; Chapes, Stephen K; Ben-Arieh, David; Wu, Chih-Hang

    2016-01-01

    We present an agent-based model (ABM) to simulate a hepatic inflammatory response (HIR) in a mouse infected by Salmonella that sometimes progressed to problematic proportions, known as "sepsis". Based on over 200 published studies, this ABM describes interactions among 21 cells or cytokines and incorporates 226 experimental data sets and/or data estimates from those reports to simulate a mouse HIR in silico. Our simulated results reproduced dynamic patterns of HIR reported in the literature. As shown in vivo, our model also demonstrated that sepsis was highly related to the initial Salmonella dose and the presence of components of the adaptive immune system. We determined that high mobility group box-1, C-reactive protein, and the interleukin-10: tumor necrosis factor-α ratio, and CD4+ T cell: CD8+ T cell ratio, all recognized as biomarkers during HIR, significantly correlated with outcomes of HIR. During therapy-directed silico simulations, our results demonstrated that anti-agent intervention impacted the survival rates of septic individuals in a time-dependent manner. By specifying the infected species, source of infection, and site of infection, this ABM enabled us to reproduce the kinetics of several essential indicators during a HIR, observe distinct dynamic patterns that are manifested during HIR, and allowed us to test proposed therapy-directed treatments. Although limitation still exists, this ABM is a step forward because it links underlying biological processes to computational simulation and was validated through a series of comparisons between the simulated results and experimental studies. PMID:27556404

  10. An Agent-Based Model of a Hepatic Inflammatory Response to Salmonella: A Computational Study under a Large Set of Experimental Data

    PubMed Central

    Chapes, Stephen K.; Ben-Arieh, David; Wu, Chih-Hang

    2016-01-01

    We present an agent-based model (ABM) to simulate a hepatic inflammatory response (HIR) in a mouse infected by Salmonella that sometimes progressed to problematic proportions, known as “sepsis”. Based on over 200 published studies, this ABM describes interactions among 21 cells or cytokines and incorporates 226 experimental data sets and/or data estimates from those reports to simulate a mouse HIR in silico. Our simulated results reproduced dynamic patterns of HIR reported in the literature. As shown in vivo, our model also demonstrated that sepsis was highly related to the initial Salmonella dose and the presence of components of the adaptive immune system. We determined that high mobility group box-1, C-reactive protein, and the interleukin-10: tumor necrosis factor-α ratio, and CD4+ T cell: CD8+ T cell ratio, all recognized as biomarkers during HIR, significantly correlated with outcomes of HIR. During therapy-directed silico simulations, our results demonstrated that anti-agent intervention impacted the survival rates of septic individuals in a time-dependent manner. By specifying the infected species, source of infection, and site of infection, this ABM enabled us to reproduce the kinetics of several essential indicators during a HIR, observe distinct dynamic patterns that are manifested during HIR, and allowed us to test proposed therapy-directed treatments. Although limitation still exists, this ABM is a step forward because it links underlying biological processes to computational simulation and was validated through a series of comparisons between the simulated results and experimental studies. PMID:27556404

  11. Neospora caninum and Toxoplasma gondii: relationship between hepatic lesions, cytological and biochemical analysis of the cavitary liquid during the acute phase of the diseases in experimental models.

    PubMed

    Bottari, Nathieli B; Tonin, Alexandre A; Fighera, Rafael; Flores, Mariana M; França, Raqueli T; Camillo, Giovana; Toscan, Gustavo; Vogel, Fernanda S F; Sangoi, Manuela B; Bochi, Guilherme V; Moresco, Rafael N; Lopes, Sonia T A; Da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the pathogenesis of ascites in mice infected with Toxoplasma gondii and gerbils infected with Neospora caninum during the acute phase disease. For that, 12 gerbils [Experiment I: not infected/control (n=6) and infected (n=6)] and 12 mice [Experiment II: control (n=6) and infected (n=6)] were used. Infected gerbils and mice showed marked ascites on days 5-7 post-infection (PI), while the not-infected animals had not ascites. Peritoneal liquid was collected from the all mice with uninfected animals receiving 1.5mL of saline solution into their abdominal cavity, allowing the recovery of cavity liquid. As a result, it was possible to observe differences in physics, chemistry and cytological analysis of the fluid cavity of animals infected with N. caninum and T. gondii, when they were compared with uninfected animals, as well as between animals experimentally infected. Additionally both, N. caninum and T gondii, caused an increase in the levels of nitric oxide (NOx-nitrate/nitrite), protein oxidation (AOPP) and lipid peroxidation (TBARS), while serum total protein and albumin were reduced in infected gerbils and mice. Gerbils infected with N. caninum showed multiple large cells with multilobulated nucleus, lytic necrosis and abundant amount of eosinophilic cytoplasm into the hepatic parenchyma. By the other hand, mice infected with T. gondii developed myriad foci of lytic necrosis combined with tachyzoites and cysts containing bradyzoites in liver. Both experimental models for N. caninum and T. gondii showed inflammatory foci and tachyzoites the peritoneum, which could be a major cause of ascites. Toxoplasmosis and neosporosis were able to cause clinical signs in experimental models with similar alterations in peritoneal fluid; however the toxoplasmosis histological changes were much more evident. Therefore, the pathogenesis of ascites appears to be directly related to liver damage, which strongly suggests alteration in the

  12. Hepatitis Risk Assessment

    MedlinePlus

    ... About the Division of Viral Hepatitis Contact Us File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel ...

  13. [Patient education of hepatitis].

    PubMed

    Boyer, Dominique; Faillebin, Françoise; de la Brière, Aice

    2013-11-01

    The therapeutic education of patients with hepatitis C helps to improve their health and quality of life. The aim is to encourage compliance with the treatment and the fight against side effects, through to the patient's recovery. PMID:24409616

  14. XTC-induced hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Oranje, W A; von Pol, P; vd Wurff, A; Zeijen, R N; Stockbrügger, R W; Arends, J W

    1994-02-01

    An increasing number of severe complications associated with the use of XTC is being reported. After 11 earlier case reports we describe an acute hepatitis due to occasional use of XTC in a 25-year-old woman.

  15. HIV and Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... prevalent among blacks as among whites. Viral Hepatitis Transmission People can be infected with the three most ... risk for HAV. • • New data suggest that sexual transmission of HCV among MSM with HIV occurs more ...

  16. Hepatitis A FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... 185°F (85°C), kill the virus, although freezing temperatures do not. Symptoms Does Hepatitis A cause ... food, such as drinking beverages (with or without ice) of unknown purity, eating uncooked shellfish, and eating ...

  17. Hepatitis B - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... tests detect liver damage and the risk for liver cancer from chronic hepatitis B: Albumin level Liver function tests Prothrombin time Liver biopsy Abdominal ultrasound Liver cancer tumor markers such as alpha fetoprotein The provider ...

  18. Angiogenesis and experimental hepatic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Queli Teixeira; Andrade, Zilton A

    2010-08-01

    Angiogenesis is a basic change occurring during repair by granulation tissue. This process seems to precede fibrosis formation in most types of chronic liver disease. To examine its presence and significance in different types of hepatic insults, this paper sought to identify the presence, evolution and peculiarities of angiogenesis in the most common experimental models of hepatic fibrosis. The characterization of cells, vessels and extracellular matrix and the identification of factors associated with endothelium (factor VIII RA), vascular basement membrane, other components of the vascular walls (actin, elastin) and the presence of the vascular-endothelial growth factor were investigated. The models examined included Capillaria hepatica septal fibrosis, whole pig serum injections, carbon tetrachloride administration, main bile duct ligation and Schistosoma mansoni infection. The first four models were performed in rats, while the last used mice. All models studied exhibited prominent angiogenesis. The most evident relationship between angiogenesis and fibrosis occurred with the C. hepatica model due to circumstances to be discussed. Special attention was paid to the presence of pericytes and to their tendency to become detached from the vascular wall and be transformed into myofibroblasts, which is a sequence of events that explains the decisive role angiogenesis plays in fibrosis.

  19. Prevalence of Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C Coinfections in an Adult HIV Centre Population in Gaborone, Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Premal; Davis, Stephanie; Tolle, Michael; Mabikwa, Vincent; Anabwani, Gabriel

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of hepatitis B and hepatitis C coinfections in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) -infected adults at an HIV center in Gaborone, Botswana. A retrospective review was performed of charts of currently active HIV-infected adult patients in the Family Model Clinic (FMC) of the Botswana-Baylor Children's Clinical Center of Excellence (BCOE) in Gaborone, Botswana, for the results of serum hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and antihepatitis C IgG tests performed between January 1, 2005 and December 15, 2009. Of 308 active FMC patients, 266 underwent HBsAg serology testing within the period of study. The HBsAg coinfection prevalence was 5.3% (14/266); 2 of 252 patients had at least one positive antihepatitis C IgG serology, a 0.8% prevalence. Hepatitis B coinfection is relatively common in HIV-infected adults at our center in Botswana, whereas hepatitis C coinfection is rare. In this setting, where the diagnosis of hepatitis B coinfection with HIV has implications for choice of first-line antiretroviral therapy and prevention of perinatal hepatitis B transmission, broader sampling to establish the true population prevalence of hepatitis B coinfection and the desirability of adding screening to HIV management should be considered. These findings provide little justification for adding hepatitis C coinfection screening to the management of HIV infection in Botswana. PMID:21813864

  20. Role of interleukin-1 and its antagonism of hepatic stellate cell proliferation and liver fibrosis in the Abcb4-/- mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, Florian P; Wimmer, Ralf; Wottke, Lena; Artmann, Renate; Nagel, Jutta M; Carranza, Manuel O; Mayr, Doris; Rust, Christian; Fickert, Peter; Trauner, Michael; Gerbes, Alexander L; Hohenester, Simon; Denk, Gerald U

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To study the interleukin-1 (IL-1) pathway as a therapeutic target for liver fibrosis in vitro and in vivo using the ATP-binding cassette transporter b4-/- (Abcb4-/-) mouse model. METHODS: Female and male Abcb4-/- mice from 6 to 13 mo of age were analysed for the degree of cholestasis (liver serum tests), extent of liver fibrosis (hydroxyproline content and Sirius red staining) and tissue-specific activation of signalling pathways such as the IL-1 pathway [quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)]. For in vivo experiments, murine hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) were isolated via pronase-collagenase perfusion followed by density gradient centrifugation using female mice. Murine HSCs were stimulated with up to 1 ng/mL IL-1β with or without 2.5 μg/mL Anakinra, an IL-1 receptor antagonist, respectively. The proliferation of murine HSCs was assessed via the BrdU assay. The toxicity of Anakinra was evaluated via the fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis (FDH) assay. In vivo 8-wk-old Abcb4-/- mice with an already fully established hepatic phenotype were treated with Anakinra (1 mg/kg body-weight daily intraperitoneally) or vehicle and liver injury and liver fibrosis were evaluated via serum tests, qPCR, hydroxyproline content and Sirius red staining. RESULTS: Liver fibrosis was less pronounced in males than in female Abcb4-/- animals as defined by a lower hydroxyproline content (274 ± 64 μg/g vs 436 ± 80 μg/g liver, respectively; n = 13-15; P < 0.001; Mann-Whitney U-test) and lower mRNA expression of the profibrogenic tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP) (1 ± 0.41 vs 0.66 ± 0.33 fold, respectively; n = 13-15; P < 0.05; Mann-Whitney U-test). Reduced liver fibrosis was associated with significantly lower levels of F4/80 mRNA expression (1 ± 0.28 vs 0.71 ± 0.41 fold, respectively; n = 12-15; P < 0.05; Mann-Whitney U-test) and significantly lower IL-1β mRNA expression levels (1 ± 0.38 vs 0.44 ± 0.26 fold, respectively; n = 13-15; P < 0.001; Mann

  1. Immigration and viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Suraj; Carballo, Manuel; Feld, Jordan J; Janssen, Harry L A

    2015-08-01

    WHO estimates reveal that the global prevalence of viral hepatitis may be as high as 500 million, with an annual mortality rate of up to 1.3 million individuals. The majority of this global burden of disease is borne by nations of the developing world with high rates of vertical and iatrogenic transmission of HBV and HCV, as well as poor access to healthcare. In 2013, 3.2% of the global population (231 million individuals) migrated into a new host nation. Migrants predominantly originate from the developing countries of the south, into the developed economies of North America and Western Europe. This mass migration of individuals from areas of high-prevalence of viral hepatitis poses a unique challenge to the healthcare systems of the host nations. Due to a lack of universal standards for screening, vaccination and treatment of viral hepatitis, the burden of chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma continues to increase among migrant populations globally. Efforts to increase case identification and treatment among migrants have largely been limited to small outreach programs in urban centers, such that the majority of migrants with viral hepatitis continue to remain unaware of their infection. This review summarizes the data on prevalence of viral hepatitis and burden of chronic liver disease among migrants, current standards for screening and treatment of immigrants and refugees, and efforts to improve the identification and treatment of viral hepatitis among migrants. PMID:25962882

  2. Delta hepatitis in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Sinniah, M; Dimitrakakis, M; Tan, D S

    1986-06-01

    Sera from one hundred and fifty nine Malaysian individuals were screened for the prevalence of delta markers. These included 15 HBsAg positive homosexuals, 16 acute hepatitis B cases, 9 chronic hepatitis B patients, 13 healthy HBsAg carriers and 106 intravenous (i.v.) drug abusers, of whom 27 were positive for HBsAg only and the rest were anti-HBc IgG positive but HBsAg negative. The prevalence of delta markers in the homosexuals was found to be 6.7%, in the HBsAg positive drug abusers 17.8%, in acute hepatitis B cases 12.5%. No evidence of delta infection was detected in healthy HBsAg carriers, chronic hepatitis B cases and HBsAg negative i.v. drug abusers. With reference to i.v. drug abusers, the prevalence of delta markers was higher in Malays (23%) than in Chinese (7%) although the latter had a higher HBsAg carrier rate. Although the HBsAg carrier rate in the homosexuals was high, their delta prevalence rate was low as compared to drug abusers. In Malaysia, as in other non-endemic regions, hepatitis delta virus transmission appeared to occur mainly via the parenteral and sexual routes. This is the first time in Malaysia that a reservoir of delta infection has been demonstrated in certain groups of the population at high risk for hepatitis B. PMID:3787309

  3. Immigration and viral hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Suraj; Carballo, Manuel; Feld, Jordan J; Janssen, Harry L A

    2015-08-01

    WHO estimates reveal that the global prevalence of viral hepatitis may be as high as 500 million, with an annual mortality rate of up to 1.3 million individuals. The majority of this global burden of disease is borne by nations of the developing world with high rates of vertical and iatrogenic transmission of HBV and HCV, as well as poor access to healthcare. In 2013, 3.2% of the global population (231 million individuals) migrated into a new host nation. Migrants predominantly originate from the developing countries of the south, into the developed economies of North America and Western Europe. This mass migration of individuals from areas of high-prevalence of viral hepatitis poses a unique challenge to the healthcare systems of the host nations. Due to a lack of universal standards for screening, vaccination and treatment of viral hepatitis, the burden of chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma continues to increase among migrant populations globally. Efforts to increase case identification and treatment among migrants have largely been limited to small outreach programs in urban centers, such that the majority of migrants with viral hepatitis continue to remain unaware of their infection. This review summarizes the data on prevalence of viral hepatitis and burden of chronic liver disease among migrants, current standards for screening and treatment of immigrants and refugees, and efforts to improve the identification and treatment of viral hepatitis among migrants.

  4. Mechanisms of Hepatic Fibrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Scott L.

    2010-01-01

    Substantial improvements in the treatment of chronic liver disease have accelerated interest in uncovering the mechanisms underlying hepatic fibrosis and its resolution. Activation of resident hepatic stellate cells into proliferative, contractile, and fibrogenic cells in liver injury remains a dominant theme driving the field. However, several new areas of rapid progress in the past 5–10 years also have taken root, including: (1) identification of different fibrogenic populations apart from resident stellate cells, for example, portal fibroblasts, fibrocytes, and bone-marrow– derived cells, as well as cells derived from epithelial mesenchymal transition; (2) emergence of stellate cells as finely regulated determinants of hepatic inflammation and immunity; (3) elucidation of multiple pathways controlling gene expression during stellate cell activation including transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and epigenetic mechanisms; (4) recognition of disease-specific pathways of fibrogenesis; (5) re-emergence of hepatic macrophages as determinants of matrix degradation in fibrosis resolution and the importance of matrix cross-linking and scar maturation in determining reversibility; and (6) hints that hepatic stellate cells may contribute to hepatic stem cell behavior, cancer, and regeneration. Clinical and translational implications of these advances have become clear, and have begun to impact significantly on the management and outlook of patients with chronic liver disease. PMID:18471545

  5. Hepatitis C: liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Metts, Julius; Carmichael, Lesley; Kokor, Winfred; Scharffenberg, Robert

    2014-12-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma account for approximately 40% of the 6,000 adult liver transplantations performed each year in the United States. Survival rates are 76% to 83% at 2 years and 69% to 72% at 5 years. If eligible for surgery and in the absence of contraindications, any patient with HCV infection who develops decompensated liver disease or hepatocellular carcinoma is a candidate for liver transplantation. Most transplantation programs require that a patient with a history of alcohol or drug abuse be abstinent for at least 6 months and active in a substance abuse rehabilitation program. Prioritization for transplantation is based primarily on a patient's model for end-stage liver disease score, though other factors are considered. Complications after liver transplantation include recurrence of HCV infection, rejection of the transplanted liver, and an increased rate of infection because of immunosuppression. Various drugs are used to prevent infection and organ rejection. Liver transplant recipients also develop diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, renal dysfunction, osteopenia, and cancers at high rates, likely because of the effects of immunosuppressive drugs, particularly steroids and calcineurin inhibitors. The family physician's role in caring for liver transplant recipients often involves detection and management of these conditions. PMID:25478647

  6. Quantification of Hepatic Steatosis with T1-independent, T2*-corrected MR Imaging with Spectral Modeling of Fat: Blinded Comparison with MR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hines, Catherine D. G.; Hamilton, Gavin; Sirlin, Claude B.; McKenzie, Charles A.; Yu, Huanzhou; Brittain, Jean H.; Reeder, Scott B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively compare an investigational version of a complex-based chemical shift–based fat fraction magnetic resonance (MR) imaging method with MR spectroscopy for the quantification of hepatic steatosis. Materials and Methods: This study was approved by the institutional review board and was HIPAA compliant. Written informed consent was obtained before all studies. Fifty-five patients (31 women, 24 men; age range, 24–71 years) were prospectively imaged at 1.5 T with quantitative MR imaging and single-voxel MR spectroscopy, each within a single breath hold. The effects of T2* correction, spectral modeling of fat, and magnitude fitting for eddy current correction on fat quantification with MR imaging were investigated by reconstructing fat fraction images from the same source data with different combinations of error correction. Single-voxel T2-corrected MR spectroscopy was used to measure fat fraction and served as the reference standard. All MR spectroscopy data were postprocessed at a separate institution by an MR physicist who was blinded to MR imaging results. Fat fractions measured with MR imaging and MR spectroscopy were compared statistically to determine the correlation (r2), and the slope and intercept as measures of agreement between MR imaging and MR spectroscopy fat fraction measurements, to determine whether MR imaging can help quantify fat, and examine the importance of T2* correction, spectral modeling of fat, and eddy current correction. Two-sided t tests (significance level, P = .05) were used to determine whether estimated slopes and intercepts were significantly different from 1.0 and 0.0, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity for the classification of clinically significant steatosis were evaluated. Results: Overall, there was excellent correlation between MR imaging and MR spectroscopy for all reconstruction combinations. However, agreement was only achieved when T2* correction, spectral modeling of fat, and magnitude

  7. Tonsil-derived mesenchymal stem cells alleviate concanavalin A-induced acute liver injury.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Kyung-Ha; Kim, So-Yeon; Kim, Ye-Ryung; Woo, So-Youn; Sung, Sun Hee; Kim, Han Su; Jung, Sung-Chul; Jo, Inho; Park, Joo-Won

    2014-08-01

    Acute liver failure, the fatal deterioration of liver function, is the most common indication for emergency liver transplantation, and drug-induced liver injury and viral hepatitis are frequent in young adults. Stem cell therapy has come into the limelight as a potential therapeutic approach for various diseases, including liver failure and cirrhosis. In this study, we investigated therapeutic effects of tonsil-derived mesenchymal stem cells (T-MSCs) in concanavalin A (ConA)- and acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury. ConA-induced hepatitis resembles viral and immune-mediated hepatic injury, and acetaminophen overdose is the most frequent cause of acute liver failure in the United States and Europe. Intravenous administration of T-MSCs significantly reduced ConA-induced hepatic toxicity, but not acetaminophen-induced liver injury, affirming the immunoregulatory capacity of T-MSCs. T-MSCs were successfully recruited to damaged liver and suppressed inflammatory cytokine secretion. T-MSCs expressed high levels of galectin-1 and -3, and galectin-1 knockdown which partially diminished interleukin-2 and tumor necrosis factor α secretion from cultured T-cells. Galectin-1 knockdown in T-MSCs also reversed the protective effect of T-MSCs on ConA-induced hepatitis. These results suggest that galectin-1 plays an important role in immunoregulation of T-MSCs, which contributes to their protective effect in immune-mediated hepatitis. Further, suppression of T-cell activation by frozen and thawed T-MSCs implies great potential of T-MSC banking for clinical utilization in immune-mediated disease. PMID:24954408

  8. Function of opioidergic and dopaminergic antagonists on both spatial and object novelty detection deficits induced in rodent model of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Nasehi, Mohammad; Mafi, Fatemeh; Ebrahimi-Ghiri, Mohaddeseh; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2016-10-15

    Liver disease has been known for a long time to affect brain function. We now report the function of opioidergic and dopaminergic antagonists on both spatial and object novelty detection deficits induced by hepatic encephalopathy (HE) following bile duct ligation (BDL), a model of chronic liver disease. Assessment of spatial and object novelty detection memories was carried out in the non-associative task. It consists of placing mice in an open field containing five objects and, after three sessions of habituation, examining their reactivity to object displacement (spatial novelty) and object substitution (object novelty). Both spatial and object novelty detection memories were impaired by BDL after 4 weeks. In the BDL mice, pre-test intraperitoneal administration of naloxone (μ-opioidergic receptor antagonist) at dose of 0.9mg/kg restored while sulpiride (D2-like dopamine receptor antagonist) at dose of 40mg/kg potentiated object novelty detection memory deficit. However, SCH23390 (D1-like dopamine receptor antagonist) at dose of 0.04mg/kg or sulpiride (20mg/kg) restored spatial novelty detection memory deficit. Moreover, SCH23390 or sulpiride impaired while naloxone did not alter both memories in sham-operated mice. Furthermore, subthreshold dose co-administration of dopaminergic antagonists together or each one plus naloxone did not alter both memory impairments in BDL mice, while all of three co-administration groups impaired object novelty detection and co-administration of naloxone plus sulpiride impaired spatial detection memory in sham-operated mice. In conclusion, we suggest that opioidergic and dopaminergic systems through separate pathways may contribute in memory impairments induced by BDL in the non-associative task. PMID:27401106

  9. Antiviral effects of grape seed extract against feline calicivirus, murine norovirus, and hepatitis A virus in model food systems and under gastric conditions.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Snehal S; Su, Xiaowei; D'Souza, Doris H

    2015-12-01

    Grape seed extract (GSE) has antiviral activities against hepatitis A virus (HAV) and human norovirus surrogates (feline calicivirus (FCV-F9) and murine norovirus (MNV-1)). The objectives of this study were to determine (1) time and dose-dependence of GSE against FCV-F9, MNV-1, and HAV at room temperature (RT) and 37 °C over 24 h; and (2) GSE effects in model foods (apple juice (AJ) and 2% milk) and simulated gastric conditions at 37 °C. Viruses at ∼5 log PFU/ml were treated with 0.5-8 mg/ml GSE prepared in water, AJ, milk or gastric juices, or water over 24 h at RT or 37 °C. Infectivity of triplicate treatments was evaluated using plaque assays. GSE effects increased with time and concentration. GSE at 1 mg/ml in AJ reduced MNV-1 to undetectable levels after 1 h and by 1 log in milk after 24 h. GSE at 1 and 2 mg/ml in AJ reduced HAV to undetectable levels after 1 h, while 2 and 4 mg/ml GSE in milk caused ∼1 log reduction after 24 h. GSE at 2 mg/ml in intestinal fluid reduced FCV-F9, MNV-1 and HAV to undetectable levels after 6 h. GSE appears to be a suitable natural option for foodborne viral reduction. PMID:26338111

  10. Antiviral effects of grape seed extract against feline calicivirus, murine norovirus, and hepatitis A virus in model food systems and under gastric conditions.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Snehal S; Su, Xiaowei; D'Souza, Doris H

    2015-12-01

    Grape seed extract (GSE) has antiviral activities against hepatitis A virus (HAV) and human norovirus surrogates (feline calicivirus (FCV-F9) and murine norovirus (MNV-1)). The objectives of this study were to determine (1) time and dose-dependence of GSE against FCV-F9, MNV-1, and HAV at room temperature (RT) and 37 °C over 24 h; and (2) GSE effects i