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Sample records for a-induced oxidative stress

  1. Ochratoxin A induces rat renal carcinogenicity with limited induction of oxidative stress responses

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Xiaozhe; Yu, Tao; Zhu, Liye

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) has displayed nephrotoxicity and renal carcinogenicity in mammals, however, no clear mechanisms have been identified detailing the relationship between oxidative stress and these toxicities. This study was performed to clarify the relationship between oxidative stress and the renal carcinogenicity induced by OTA. Rats were treated with 70 or 210 μg/kg b.w. OTA for 4 or 13 weeks. In the rats administrated with OTA for 13 weeks, the kidney was damaged seriously. Cytoplasmic vacuolization was observed in the outer stripe of the outer medulla. Karyomegaly was prominent in the tubular epithelium. Kidney injury molecule-1 (Kim-1) was detected inmore » the outer stripe of the outer medulla in both low- and high-dose groups. OTA increased the mRNA levels of clusterin in rat kidneys. Interestingly, OTA did not significantly alter the oxidative stress level in rat liver and kidney. Yet, some indications related to proliferation and carcinogenicity were observed. A dose-related increase in proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was observed at 4 weeks in both liver and kidney, but at 13 weeks, only in the kidney. OTA down-regulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and up-regulated vimentin and lipocalin 2 in rat kidney at 13 weeks. The p53 gene was decreased in both liver and kidney at 13 weeks. These results suggest that OTA caused apparent kidney damage within 13 weeks but exerted limited effect on oxidative stress parameters. It implies that cell proliferation is the proposed mode of action for OTA-induced renal carcinogenicity. - Highlights: • We studied OTA toxicities in both the rat liver and kidney for 13 weeks. • OTA exerts limited effects on oxidative stress in the rat liver and kidney. • OTA induced renal carcinogenicity resulting from cell proliferation.« less

  2. Withaferin A Induces Oxidative Stress-Mediated Apoptosis and DNA Damage in Oral Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsueh-Wei; Li, Ruei-Nian; Wang, Hui-Ru; Liu, Jing-Ru; Tang, Jen-Yang; Huang, Hurng-Wern; Chan, Yu-Hsuan; Yen, Ching-Yu

    2017-01-01

    Withaferin A (WFA) is one of the most active steroidal lactones with reactive oxygen species (ROS) modulating effects against several types of cancer. ROS regulation involves selective killing. However, the anticancer and selective killing effects of WFA against oral cancer cells remain unclear. We evaluated whether the killing ability of WFA is selective, and we explored its mechanism against oral cancer cells. An MTS tetrazolium cell proliferation assay confirmed that WFA selectively killed two oral cancer cells (Ca9-22 and CAL 27) rather than normal oral cells (HGF-1). WFA also induced apoptosis of Ca9-22 cells, which was measured by flow cytometry for subG1 percentage, annexin V expression, and pan-caspase activity, as well as western blotting for caspases 1, 8, and 9 activations. Flow cytometry analysis shows that WFA-treated Ca9-22 oral cancer cells induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, ROS production, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, and phosphorylated histone H2A.X (γH2AX)-based DNA damage. Moreover, pretreating Ca9-22 cells with N -acetylcysteine (NAC) rescued WFA-induced selective killing, apoptosis, G2/M arrest, oxidative stress, and DNA damage. We conclude that WFA induced oxidative stress-mediated selective killing of oral cancer cells.

  3. Withaferin A Induces Oxidative Stress-Mediated Apoptosis and DNA Damage in Oral Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hsueh-Wei; Li, Ruei-Nian; Wang, Hui-Ru; Liu, Jing-Ru; Tang, Jen-Yang; Huang, Hurng-Wern; Chan, Yu-Hsuan; Yen, Ching-Yu

    2017-01-01

    Withaferin A (WFA) is one of the most active steroidal lactones with reactive oxygen species (ROS) modulating effects against several types of cancer. ROS regulation involves selective killing. However, the anticancer and selective killing effects of WFA against oral cancer cells remain unclear. We evaluated whether the killing ability of WFA is selective, and we explored its mechanism against oral cancer cells. An MTS tetrazolium cell proliferation assay confirmed that WFA selectively killed two oral cancer cells (Ca9-22 and CAL 27) rather than normal oral cells (HGF-1). WFA also induced apoptosis of Ca9-22 cells, which was measured by flow cytometry for subG1 percentage, annexin V expression, and pan-caspase activity, as well as western blotting for caspases 1, 8, and 9 activations. Flow cytometry analysis shows that WFA-treated Ca9-22 oral cancer cells induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, ROS production, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, and phosphorylated histone H2A.X (γH2AX)-based DNA damage. Moreover, pretreating Ca9-22 cells with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) rescued WFA-induced selective killing, apoptosis, G2/M arrest, oxidative stress, and DNA damage. We conclude that WFA induced oxidative stress-mediated selective killing of oral cancer cells. PMID:28936177

  4. Green Tea Potentially Ameliorates Bisphenol A-Induced Oxidative Stress: An In Vitro and In Silico Study

    PubMed Central

    Suthar, Hiral; Verma, R. J.; Patel, Saumya; Jasrai, Y. T.

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation was an attempt to elucidate oxidative stress induced by bisphenol A on erythrocytes and its amelioration by green tea extract. For this, venous blood samples from healthy human adults were collected in EDTA vials and used for preparation of erythrocytes suspension. When erythrocyte suspensions were treated with different concentrations of BPA/H2O2, a dose-dependent increase in hemolysis occurred. Similarly, when erythrocytes suspensions were treated with either different concentrations of H2O2 (0.05–0.25 mM) along with BPA (50 μg/mL) or 0.05 mM H2O2 along with different concentrations of BPA (50–250 μg/mL), dose-dependent significant increase in hemolysis occurred. The effect of BPA and H2O2 was found to be additive. For the confirmation, binding capacity of bisphenol A with erythrocyte proteins (hemoglobin, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase) was inspected using molecular docking tool, which showed presence of various hydrogen bonds of BPA with the proteins. The present data clearly indicates that BPA causes oxidative stress in a similar way as H2O2 . Concurrent addition of different concentrations (10–50 μg/mL) of green tea extract to reaction mixture containing high dose of bisphenol A (250 μg/mL) caused concentration-dependent amelioration in bisphenol A-induced hemolysis. The effect was significant (P < 0.05). It is concluded that BPA-induced oxidative stress could be significantly mitigated by green tea extract. PMID:25180096

  5. Malvidin and cyanidin derivatives from açai fruit (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) counteract UV-A-induced oxidative stress in immortalized fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Petruk, Ganna; Illiano, Anna; Del Giudice, Rita; Raiola, Assunta; Amoresano, Angela; Rigano, Maria Manuela; Piccoli, Renata; Monti, Daria Maria

    2017-07-01

    UV-A radiations are known to induce cellular oxidative stress, leading to premature skin aging. Consumption of açai fruit (Euterpe oleracea Martius) is known to have many health benefits due to its high level of antioxidants. Herein, we analyzed the ability of phenolic compounds extracted from this fruit to attenuate UV-A-induced oxidative stress in immortalized fibroblast. A methanol/water açai extract was fractionated by HPLC and each fraction tested for anti-oxidant stress activity. Immortalized fibroblasts were pre-incubated with açai fractions and then exposed to UV-A radiations. Açai extract was found to be able to strongly protect cells from oxidative stress. In particular, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, GSH depletion, lipid peroxidation and no increase in the phosphorylation levels of proteins involved in the oxidative stress pathway was observed in cells pre-incubated with the extract and then irradiated by UV-A. Mass spectrometry analyses of HPLC fractionated extract led us to the identification of malvidin and cyanidin derivatives as the most active molecules able to counteract the negative effects induced by UV-A irradiation. Our results indicate, for the first time, that açai fruit is a valuable natural source for malvidin and cyanidin to be used as anti-stress molecules and represent good candidates for dietary intervention in the prevention of age related skin damage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Bisphenol A induces oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in lymphoblasts from children with autism and unaffected siblings.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Kulbir; Chauhan, Ved; Gu, Feng; Chauhan, Abha

    2014-11-01

    Autism is a behaviorally defined neurodevelopmental disorder. Although there is no single identifiable cause for autism, roles for genetic and environmental factors have been implicated in autism. Extensive evidence suggests increased oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in autism. In this study, we examined whether bisphenol A (BPA) is an environmental risk factor for autism by studying its effects on oxidative stress and mitochondrial function in the lymphoblasts. When lymphoblastoid cells from autistic subjects and age-matched unaffected sibling controls were exposed to BPA, there was an increase in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential in both groups. A further subdivision of the control group into two subgroups-unaffected nontwin siblings and twin siblings-showed significantly higher ROS levels without any exposure to BPA in the unaffected twin siblings compared to the unaffected nontwin siblings. ROS levels were also significantly higher in the autism vs the unaffected nontwin siblings group. The effect of BPA on three important mtDNA genes-NADH dehydrogenase 1, NADH dehydrogenase 4, and cytochrome b-was analyzed to observe any changes in the mitochondria after BPA exposure. BPA induced a significant increase in the mtDNA copy number in the lymphoblasts from the unaffected siblings group and in the unaffected twin siblings group vs the unaffected nontwin siblings. In all three genes, the mtDNA increase was seen in 70% of the subjects. These results suggest that BPA exposure results in increased oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in the autistic subjects as well as the age-matched sibling control subjects, particularly unaffected twin siblings. Therefore, BPA may act as an environmental risk factor for autism in genetically susceptible children by inducing oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Melatonin ameliorates oxidative stress, modulates death receptor pathway proteins, and protects the rat cerebrum against bisphenol-A-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    El-Missiry, Mohamed A; Othman, Azza I; Al-Abdan, Monera A; El-Sayed, Aml A

    2014-12-15

    Epidemiological reports have indicated a correlation between the increasing of bisphenol-A (BPA) levels in the environment and the incidence of neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, the protective effect of melatonin on oxidative stress and the death receptor apoptotic proteins in the cerebrum of the bisphenol-A-treated rats were examined. Adult male rats were orally administered melatonin (10mg/kg bw) concurrently with BPA (50mg/kg bw) 3 days a week for 6 weeks. BPA exposure resulted in significant elevations of oxidative stress, as evidenced by the increased malondialdehyde level and the decreased glutathione level and superoxide dismutase activity in the cerebrum. BPA caused an upregulation of p53 and CD95-Fas and activation of capsases-3 and 8, resulting in cerebral cell apoptosis. Melatonin significantly attenuated the BPA-evoked brain oxidative stress, modulated apoptotic-regulating proteins and protected against apoptosis. These data suggest that melatonin modulated important steps in the death receptor apoptotic pathway which likely related to its redox control properties. Melatonin is a promising pharmacological agent for preventing the potential neurotoxicity of BPA following occupational or environmental exposures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis cascade implications in bisphenol A-induced liver fibrosis in male rats.

    PubMed

    Elswefy, Sahar El-Sayed; Abdallah, Fatma Rizk; Atteia, Hebatallah Husseini; Wahba, Alaa Samir; Hasan, Rehab Abdallah

    2016-10-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a key monomer in the production of plastics. It has been shown to be hepatotoxic. Inflammation and oxidative stress are closely linked with liver fibrosis, the major contributing factor to hepatic failure. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of chronic exposure to BPA on the development of hepatic fibrosis in male rats and to determine the cross-talk between the hepatic cytokine network, oxidative stress and apoptosis. For this purpose, 30 male Wistar albino rats were divided into three equal groups as follows: the first group was given no treatment (normal control group); the second group was given corn oil once daily by oral gavage for 8 weeks (vehicle control group); and the third group received BPA (50 mg/kg body weight/day, p.o.) for 8 weeks. BPA administration induced liver fibrosis as reflected in an increase in serum hepatic enzymes activities, hepatic hydroxyproline content and histopathological changes particularly increased collagen fibre deposition around the portal tract. In addition, there was inflammation (as reflected in increase in interleukin-1beta 'IL-1β', decrease in interleukin-10 'IL-10' serum levels and increase in IL-1β/IL-10 ratio), oxidative stress (as reflected in increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) level, reduction in reduced glutathione (GSH) content and inhibition of catalase (CAT) activity) and apoptosis [as reflected in an increase in caspase-3 level and a decrease in numbers of B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2)-immunopositive hepatocytes]. Interestingly, BPA had an upregulating effect on an extracellular matrix turnover gene [as reflected in matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9)] and a downregulating effect on its inhibitor gene [as reflected in tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2)] expression. Thus, the mechanism by which BPA induced liver fibrosis seems to be related to stimulation of the inflammatory response, along with oxidative stress, the apoptotic pathway and activation

  9. Oxidative shielding or oxidative stress?

    PubMed

    Naviaux, Robert K

    2012-09-01

    In this review I report evidence that the mainstream field of oxidative damage biology has been running fast in the wrong direction for more than 50 years. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and chronic oxidative changes in membrane lipids and proteins found in many chronic diseases are not the result of accidental damage. Instead, these changes are the result of a highly evolved, stereotyped, and protein-catalyzed "oxidative shielding" response that all eukaryotes adopt when placed in a chemically or microbially hostile environment. The machinery of oxidative shielding evolved from pathways of innate immunity designed to protect the cell from attack and limit the spread of infection. Both oxidative and reductive stress trigger oxidative shielding. In the cases in which it has been studied explicitly, functional and metabolic defects occur in the cell before the increase in ROS and oxidative changes. ROS are the response to disease, not the cause. Therefore, it is not the oxidative changes that should be targeted for therapy, but rather the metabolic conditions that create them. This fresh perspective is relevant to diseases that range from autism, type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, cancer, heart disease, schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, and Alzheimer disease. Research efforts need to be redirected. Oxidative shielding is protective and is a misguided target for therapy. Identification of the causal chemistry and environmental factors that trigger innate immunity and metabolic memory that initiate and sustain oxidative shielding is paramount for human health.

  10. UV-A induced oxidative stress is more prominent in naturally pigmented aged human RPE cells compared to non-pigmented human RPE cells independent of zinc treatment.

    PubMed

    Biesemeier, Antje; Kokkinou, Despina; Julien, Sylvie; Heiduschka, Peter; Berneburg, Mark; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl Ulrich; Schraermeyer, Ulrich

    2008-02-27

    To investigate the effects of zinc supplementation on human amelanotic (ARPE-19) and native pigmented retinal pigment epithelial cells (hRPE) under normal light conditions and after ultraviolet A light exposure. hRPE cells, containing both melanin and lipofuscin granules, were prepared from human donor eyes of 60-70 year old patients. Cells of the amelanotic ARPE-19 cell line and pigmented hRPE cells were treated with zinc chloride and subjected to oxidative stress by UV-A irradiation. Intracellular H(2)O(2) formation was measured using a fluorescence oxidation assay. Additionally, apoptosis and viability assays were performed. Control cells were treated identically except for irradiation and zinc supplementation. Under normal light conditions, zinc treated hRPE cells produced less H(2)O(2) than unsupplemented hRPE cells. Viability and apoptosis events did not change. After UV-A irradiation, ARPE and hRPE cells were greatly impaired in all tests performed compared to the non-irradiated controls. No differences were found after zinc supplementation. hRPE cells showed a higher apoptosis and mortality rate than non-pigmented cells when stressed by UV-A light. ARPE cells never showed any zinc related effects. In contrast, without irradiation, zinc supplementation reduced H(2)O(2) production in pigmented hRPE cells slightly. We did not find any zinc effect in irradiated hRPE cells. After UV light exposure, pigmented cells showed a higher apoptosis and mortality than cells lacking any pigmentation. We conclude that cells with pigmentation consisting of melanin and lipofuscin granules have more prooxidative than antioxidative capacity when stressed by UV light exposure compared to cells lacking any pigmentation.

  11. Oxidative Stress in BPH.

    PubMed

    Savas, M; Verit, A; Ciftci, H; Yeni, E; Aktan, E; Topal, U; Erel, O

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the relationship between potency of oxidative stress and BPH and this may assist to contribute to the realistic explanation of the ethiopathogenesis of BPH. Seventy four newly diagnosed men with BPH (mean age: 54+/-11.2), who had not undergone any previous treatment for BPH, and 62 healthy volunteers (mean age: 55+/-14) were enrolled in the present study. To determine the antioxidative status of plasma, total antioxidant capacity (TAC) was calculated, and to determine the oxidative status of plasma (TOS) total peroxide levels were measured. The ratio of TAC to total peroxide was accepted as an indicator of oxidative stress (OSI). Data are presented as mean SD +/- unless specified. Student t-test and correlation analyses were used to evaluate the statistical significance differences in the median values recorded for all parameters between BPH and control group. Plasma TAC TOS were found in patients and controls (1.70 +/- 0.32, 1.68 +/- 0.19 micromol Trolox Equiv./L), (12.48 +/- 1.98, 12.40 +/- 1.14 micromol / L) respectively. OSI was calculated as 7.57 +/- 1.91, 7.48 +/- 1.33, respectively. Plasma TAC, TOS and OSI levels were not found to be significantly difference between patients and control subjects (p>0.05, p>0.05, p>0.05). The present study has shown that there were not relationship between potency of oxidative stress and BPH. Further well designed studies should be planned to find out whether the oxidative stress-related parameters play role in BPH as an interesting pathology in regard of the etiopathogenesis.

  12. CVD and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Cervantes Gracia, Karla; Llanas-Cornejo, Daniel; Husi, Holger

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, it is known that oxidative stress plays at least two roles within the cell, the generation of cellular damage and the involvement in several signaling pathways in its balanced normal state. So far, a substantial amount of time and effort has been expended in the search for a clear link between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and the effects of oxidative stress. Here, we present an overview of the different sources and types of reactive oxygen species in CVD, highlight the relationship between CVD and oxidative stress and discuss the most prominent molecules that play an important role in CVD pathophysiology. Details are given regarding common pharmacological treatments used for cardiovascular distress and how some of them are acting upon ROS-related pathways and molecules. Novel therapies, recently proposed ROS biomarkers, as well as future challenges in the field are addressed. It is apparent that the search for a better understanding of how ROS are contributing to the pathophysiology of CVD is far from over, and new approaches and more suitable biomarkers are needed for the latter to be accomplished. PMID:28230726

  13. Oxidative Stress in Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, Bosch-Morell; Salvador, Mérida; Amparo, Navea

    2015-01-01

    Myopia affected approximately 1.6 billion people worldwide in 2000, and it is expected to increase to 2.5 billion by 2020. Although optical problems can be corrected by optics or surgical procedures, normal myopia and high myopia are still an unsolved medical problem. They frequently predispose people who have them to suffer from other eye pathologies: retinal detachment, glaucoma, macular hemorrhage, cataracts, and so on being one of the main causes of visual deterioration and blindness. Genetic and environmental factors have been associated with myopia. Nevertheless, lack of knowledge in the underlying physiopathological molecular mechanisms has not permitted an adequate diagnosis, prevention, or treatment to be found. Nowadays several pieces of evidence indicate that oxidative stress may help explain the altered regulatory pathways in myopia and the appearance of associated eye diseases. On the one hand, oxidative damage associated with hypoxia myopic can alter the neuromodulation that nitric oxide and dopamine have in eye growth. On the other hand, radical superoxide or peroxynitrite production damage retina, vitreous, lens, and so on contributing to the appearance of retinopathies, retinal detachment, cataracts and so on. The objective of this review is to suggest that oxidative stress is one of the key pieces that can help solve this complex eye problem. PMID:25922643

  14. Oxidative Stress, Nitric Oxide, and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pitocco, Dario; Zaccardi, Francesco; Di Stasio, Enrico; Romitelli, Federica; Santini, Stefano A.; Zuppi, Cecilia; Ghirlanda, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    In the recent decades, oxidative stress has become focus of interest in most biomedical disciplines and many types of clinical research. Increasing evidence from research on several diseases show that oxidative stress is associated with the pathogenesis of diabetes, obesity, cancer, ageing, inflammation, neurodegenerative disorders, hypertension, apoptosis, cardiovascular diseases, and heart failure. Based on this research, the emerging concept is that oxidative stress is the “final common pathway”, through which risk factors of several diseases exert their deleterious effects. Oxidative stress causes a complex dysregulation of cell metabolism and cell-cell homeostasis. In this review, we discuss the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and beta-cell dysfunction. These are the two most relevant mechanisms in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes, and in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications, the leading cause of death in diabetic patients. PMID:20703435

  15. Oxidative stress during extracorporeal circulation.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Charles Ian; Fraser, John Francis; Coombes, Jeff S; Fung, Yoke Lin

    2014-12-01

    There is an increased oxidative stress response in patients having cardiac surgery, haemodialysis or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation that is related to poorer outcomes and increased mortality. Exposure of the patients' blood to the artificial surfaces of these extracorporeal devices, coupled with inflammatory responses, hyperoxia and the pathophysiological aspects of the underlying illness itself, all contribute to this oxidative stress response. Oxidative stress occurs when there is a disruption of redox signalling and loss of control of redox balance. Ongoing oxidative stress occurring during extracorporeal circulation (ECC) results in damage to lipids, proteins and DNA and contributes to morbidity and mortality. This review discusses reactive species generation and the potential clinical consequences of oxidative stress during ECC as well as provides an overview of some current antioxidant compounds that are available to potentially mitigate the oxidative stress response. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  16. [Increasing oxidative stress in aging].

    PubMed

    Shimosawa, Tatsuo

    2005-06-01

    The balance between reactive oxigen species (ROS) production and degradation is important in defining oxidative stress. In aging process, ROS production increases and degradation is impaired and thus oxidative stress is accumulated. Oxidative stress damages organs both directly and indirectly. Protein, lipid, as well as DNA are directly react with ROS, more over, ROS interact with intracellular signaling system. It is reported that several transcription factors such as NF-kappaB, AP-1 and ASK-1 and also it interferes MAPK activity. Besides these signaling, we recently showed that insulin resistance is induced by accumulated oxidative stress in aged mice. Adrenomedullin deficient mice accumulate higher oxidative stress and insulin resistance developed in aging. Oxidative stress in aging relates not only direct organ damage but also induce risk factors for vascular damage such as metabolic syndrome.

  17. Does oxidative stress shorten telomeres?

    PubMed

    Boonekamp, Jelle J; Bauch, Christina; Mulder, Ellis; Verhulst, Simon

    2017-05-01

    Oxidative stress shortens telomeres in cell culture, but whether oxidative stress explains variation in telomere shortening in vivo at physiological oxidative stress levels is not well known. We therefore tested for correlations between six oxidative stress markers and telomere attrition in nestling birds (jackdaws Corvus monedula ) that show a high rate of telomere attrition in early life. Telomere attrition was measured between ages 5 and 30 days, and was highly variable (average telomere loss: 323 bp, CV = 45%). Oxidative stress markers were measured in blood at age 20 days and included markers of oxidative damage (TBARS, dROMs and GSSG) and markers of antioxidant protection (GSH, redox state, uric acid). Variation in telomere attrition was not significantly related to these oxidative stress markers (| r | ≤ 0.08, n = 87). This finding raises the question whether oxidative stress accelerates telomere attrition in vivo The accumulation of telomere attrition over time depends both on the number of cell divisions and on the number of base pairs lost per DNA replication and, based on our findings, we suggest that in a growing animal cell proliferation, dynamics may be more important for explaining variation in telomere attrition than oxidative stress. © 2017 The Author(s).

  18. Oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Durany, Nuria

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a progressive dementia affecting a large proportion of the aging population. The histopathological changes in AD include neuronal cell death, formation of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. There is also evidence that brain tissue in patients with AD is exposed to oxidative stress (e.g., protein oxidation, lipid oxidation, DNA oxidation and glycoxidation) during the course of the disease. Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) are present in amyloid plaques in AD, and its extracellular accumulation may be caused by an accelerated oxidation of glycated proteins. AGEs participate in neuronal death causing direct (chemical) and indirect (cellular) free radical production and consequently increase oxidative stress. The development of drugs for the treatment of AD that breaks the vicious cycles of oxidative stress and neurodegeneration offer new opportunities. These approaches include AGE-inhibitors, antioxidants and anti-inflammatory substances, which prevent free radical production. PMID:19372765

  19. Oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Gella, Alejandro; Durany, Nuria

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a progressive dementia affecting a large proportion of the aging population. The histopathological changes in AD include neuronal cell death, formation of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. There is also evidence that brain tissue in patients with AD is exposed to oxidative stress (e.g., protein oxidation, lipid oxidation, DNA oxidation and glycoxidation) during the course of the disease. Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) are present in amyloid plaques in AD, and its extracellular accumulation may be caused by an accelerated oxidation of glycated proteins. AGEs participate in neuronal death causing direct (chemical) and indirect (cellular) free radical production and consequently increase oxidative stress. The development of drugs for the treatment of AD that breaks the vicious cycles of oxidative stress and neurodegeneration offer new opportunities. These approaches include AGE-inhibitors, antioxidants and anti-inflammatory substances, which prevent free radical production.

  20. Oxidative stress, redox stress or redox success?

    PubMed

    Gutteridge, John M C; Halliwell, Barry

    2018-05-09

    The first life forms evolved in a highly reducing environment. This reduced state is still carried by cells today, which makes the concept of "reductive stress" somewhat redundant. When oxygen became abundant on the Earth, due to the evolution of photosynthesis, life forms had to adapt or become extinct. Living organisms did adapt, proliferated and an explosion of new life forms resulted, using reactive oxygen species (ROS) to drive their evolution. Adaptation to oxygen and its reduction intermediates necessitated the simultaneous evolution of select antioxidant defences, carefully regulated to allow ROS to perform their major roles. Clearly this "oxidative stress" did not cause a major problem to the evolution of complex life forms. Why not? Iron and oxygen share a close relationship in aerobic evolution. Iron is used in proteins to transport oxygen, promote electron transfers, and catalyse chemical reactions. In all of these functions, iron is carefully sequestered within proteins and restricted from reacting with ROS, this sequestration being one of our major antioxidant defences. Iron was abundant to life forms before the appearance of oxygen. However, oxygen caused its oxidative precipitation from solution and thereby decreased its bioavailability and thus the risk of iron-dependent oxidative damage. Micro-organisms had to adapt and develop strategies involving siderophores to acquire iron from the environment and eventually their host. This battle for iron between bacteria and animal hosts continues today, and is a much greater daily threat to our survival than "oxidative stress" and "redox stress". Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. [Oxidative stress and infectious pathology].

    PubMed

    Romero Alvira, D; Guerrero Navarro, L; Gotor Lázaro, M A; Roche Collado, E

    1995-03-01

    Pathogenic organism can be considered as pro-oxidant agents because they produce cell death and tissue damage. In addition organism can be eliminated by specific cell defense mechanism which utilize in part, reactive oxygen radicals formed by oxidative stress responses. The cause of the necessarily defense process results in cell damage thereby leading to development of inflammation, a characteristic oxidative stress situation. This fact shows the duality of oxidative stress in infections and inflammation: oxygen free radicals protect against microorganism attack and can produce tissue damage during this protection to trigger inflammation. Iron, a transition metal which participates generating oxygen free radicals, displays also this duality in infection. We suggest also that different infectious pathologies, such as sickle cell anemia/malaria and AIDS, may display in part this duality. In addition, it should be noted that oxidative damage observed in infectious diseases is mostly due the inflammatory response than to the oxidative potential of the pathogenic agent, this last point is exemplified in cases of respiratory distress and in glomerulonephritis. This review analyzes these controversial facts of infectious pathology in relation with oxidative stress.

  2. Cardiopulmonary Bypass and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zakkar, Mustafa; Guida, Gustavo; Suleiman, M-Saadeh; Angelini, Gianni D.

    2015-01-01

    The development of the cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) revolutionized cardiac surgery and contributed immensely to improved patients outcomes. CPB is associated with the activation of different coagulation, proinflammatory, survival cascades and altered redox state. Haemolysis, ischaemia, and perfusion injury and neutrophils activation during CPB play a pivotal role in oxidative stress and the associated activation of proinflammatory and proapoptotic signalling pathways which can affect the function and recovery of multiple organs such as the myocardium, lungs, and kidneys and influence clinical outcomes. The administration of agents with antioxidant properties during surgery either intravenously or in the cardioplegia solution may reduce ROS burst and oxidative stress during CPB. Alternatively, the use of modified circuits such as minibypass can modify both proinflammatory responses and oxidative stress. PMID:25722792

  3. [Vitamins and oxidative stress].

    PubMed

    Kodentsova, V M; Vrzhesinskaia, O A; Mazo, V K

    2013-01-01

    The central and local stress limiting systems, including the antioxidant defense system involved in defending the organism at the cellular and systemic levels from excess activation response to stress influence, leading to damaging effects. The development of stress, regardless of its nature [cold, increased physical activity, aging, the development of many pathologies (cardiovascular, neurodegenerative diseases, diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, ischemia, the effects of burns), immobilization, hypobaric hypoxia, hyperoxia, radiation effects etc.] leads to a deterioration of the vitamin status (vitamins E, A, C). Damaging effect on the antioxidant defense system is more pronounced compared to the stress response in animals with an isolated deficiency of vitamins C, A, E, B1 or B6 and the combined vitamins deficiency in the diet. Addition missing vitamin or vitamins restores the performance of antioxidant system. Thus, the role of vitamins in adaptation to stressors is evident. However, vitamins C, E and beta-carotene in high doses, significantly higher than the physiological needs of the organism, may be not only antioxidants, but may have also prooxidant properties. Perhaps this explains the lack of positive effects of antioxidant vitamins used in extreme doses for a long time described in some publications. There is no doubt that to justify the current optimal doses of antioxidant vitamins and other dietary antioxidants specially-designed studies, including biochemical testing of initial vitamin and antioxidant status of the organism, as well as monitoring their change over time are required.

  4. Oxidative Stress and Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; O, Wuliji; Li, Wei; Jiang, Zhi-Gang; Ghanbari, Hossein A.

    2013-01-01

    Living cells continually generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) through the respiratory chain during energetic metabolism. ROS at low or moderate concentration can play important physiological roles. However, an excessive amount of ROS under oxidative stress would be extremely deleterious. The central nervous system (CNS) is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress due to its high oxygen consumption, weakly antioxidative systems and the terminal-differentiation characteristic of neurons. Thus, oxidative stress elicits various neurodegenerative diseases. In addition, chemotherapy could result in severe side effects on the CNS and peripheral nervous system (PNS) of cancer patients, and a growing body of evidence demonstrates the involvement of ROS in drug-induced neurotoxicities as well. Therefore, development of antioxidants as neuroprotective drugs is a potentially beneficial strategy for clinical therapy. In this review, we summarize the source, balance maintenance and physiologic functions of ROS, oxidative stress and its toxic mechanisms underlying a number of neurodegenerative diseases, and the possible involvement of ROS in chemotherapy-induced toxicity to the CNS and PNS. We ultimately assess the value for antioxidants as neuroprotective drugs and provide our comments on the unmet needs. PMID:24351827

  5. Space flight and oxidative stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.

    2002-01-01

    Space flight is associated with an increase in oxidative stress after return to 1g. The effect is more pronounced after long-duration space flight. The effects lasts for several weeks after landing. In humans there is increased lipid peroxidation in erythrocyte membranes, reduction in some blood antioxidants, and increased urinary excretion of 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2alpha) and 8-oxo-7,8 dihydro-2 deoxyguanosine. Isoprostane 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2alpha) and 8-oxo-7,8 dihydro-2 deoxyguanosine are markers for oxidative damage to lipids and DNA, respectively. The changes have been attributed to a combination of the energy deficiency that occurs during flight and substrate competition for amino acids occurring between repleting muscle and other tissues during the recovery phase. The observations in humans have been complemented by rodent studies. Most rodent studies showed increased production of lipid peroxidation products postflight and decreased antioxidant enzyme activity postflight. The rodent observations were attributed to the stress associated with reentry into Earth's gravity. Decreasing the imbalance between the production of endogenous oxidant defenses and oxidant production by increasing the supply of dietary antioxidants may lessen the severity of the postflight increase in oxidative stress.

  6. Imaging of Oxidative Stress in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    transformative imaging agent. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Positron Emission Tomography, Oxidative Stress, Hydrogen Peroxide, 18F, 124I, Prostate...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0029 TITLE: Imaging of Oxidative Stress in...27September2012-26September2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Imaging of Oxidative Stress in Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  7. [Oxidative stress and vascular function].

    PubMed

    Urbański, Karol; Nowak, Michal; Guzik, Tomasz J

    2013-01-01

    The maintenance of blood vessel homeostasis is closely associated with Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species (ROS and RNS) production in the blood vessel wall. The main molecules taking part in this process are nitric oxide (NO), superoxide anion (O2*-), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and their derivatives. The production of these factors occurs in health and disease, however the increased ROS release is often referred to as oxidative stress. While initially oxidative stress was considered systemically, recent data indicate that it occurs locally in subcellular spaces and may be a result of dysfunction of individual enzyme systems. Oxidative stress induces inflammation, proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells, may regulate apoptosis and the function of the cells of vascular wall, finally leading to dysfunction of endothelium, media and adventitia, leading to cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, hypertension or heart failure. It is believed that a family of NADPH oxidases is the main source of ROS in the vessel wall, but also in other organs and tissues. It consists of seven known and quite precisely characterized homologues (NOX1, NOX2, NOX3, NOX4, NOX5, DUOX1 and DUOX2) which often have very distinct activity and cellular localization and function. Besides harmful actions, we are beginning to understand the protective effects of ROS and RNS. They have many functions regulating redox-sensitive gene expression and influencing a proper function of cells and vessels. NOX4 has been particularly well characterized in this respect. Thus, the maintenance of the right homeostasis depends not only on ROS removing capabilities, but especially on preserving the adequate level of ROS production.

  8. Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sánchez, Alba; Madrigal-Santillán, Eduardo; Bautista, Mirandeli; Esquivel-Soto, Jaime; Morales-González, Ángel; Esquivel-Chirino, Cesar; Durante-Montiel, Irene; Sánchez-Rivera, Graciela; Valadez-Vega, Carmen; Morales-González, José A.

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease of multifactorial origin and can be defined as an increase in the accumulation of body fat. Adipose tissue is not only a triglyceride storage organ, but studies have shown the role of white adipose tissue as a producer of certain bioactive substances called adipokines. Among adipokines, we find some inflammatory functions, such as Interleukin-6 (IL-6); other adipokines entail the functions of regulating food intake, therefore exerting a direct effect on weight control. This is the case of leptin, which acts on the limbic system by stimulating dopamine uptake, creating a feeling of fullness. However, these adipokines induce the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), generating a process known as oxidative stress (OS). Because adipose tissue is the organ that secretes adipokines and these in turn generate ROS, adipose tissue is considered an independent factor for the generation of systemic OS. There are several mechanisms by which obesity produces OS. The first of these is the mitochondrial and peroxisomal oxidation of fatty acids, which can produce ROS in oxidation reactions, while another mechanism is over-consumption of oxygen, which generates free radicals in the mitochondrial respiratory chain that is found coupled with oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria. Lipid-rich diets are also capable of generating ROS because they can alter oxygen metabolism. Upon the increase of adipose tissue, the activity of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), was found to be significantly diminished. Finally, high ROS production and the decrease in antioxidant capacity leads to various abnormalities, among which we find endothelial dysfunction, which is characterized by a reduction in the bioavailability of vasodilators, particularly nitric oxide (NO), and an increase in endothelium-derived contractile factors, favoring atherosclerotic disease. PMID:21686173

  9. Role of oxidative stress in epileptic seizures

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Eun-Joo; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Chung, Yoon Hee; Kim, Won-Ki; Ko, Kwang-Ho; Bach, Jae-Hyung; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Yoneda, Yukio; Kim, Hyoung-Chun

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress resulting from excessive free-radical release is likely implicated in the initiation and progression of epilepsy. Therefore, antioxidant therapies aimed at reducing oxidative stress have received considerable attention in epilepsy treatment. However, much evidence suggests that oxidative stress does not always have the same pattern in all seizures models. Thus, this review provides an overview aimed at achieving a better understanding of this issue. We summarize work regarding seizure models (i.e., genetically epilepsy-prone rats, kainic acid, pilocarpine, pentylenetetrazol, and trimethyltin), oxidative stress as an etiologic factor in epileptic seizures (i.e., impairment of antioxidant systems, mitochondrial dysfunction, involvement of redox-active metals, arachidonic acid pathway activation, and aging), and antioxidant strategies for seizure treatment. Combined, this review highlights pharmacological mechanisms associated with oxidative stress in epileptic seizures and the potential for neuroprotection in epilepsy that targets oxidative stress and is supported by effective antioxidant treatment. PMID:21672578

  10. Nitric oxide, stress, and depression.

    PubMed

    McLeod, T M; López-Figueroa, A L; López-Figueroa, M O

    2001-01-01

    Stress and depression have a significant impact on modern society. Even though their symptomatology is well characterized, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying these disturbing disorders. While the role of neurotransmitters such as serotonin, norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), and arginine vasopressin (AVP) has been extensively studied, new evidence suggests a role for the unique neurotransmitter nitric oxide (NO). This highly diffusible and reactive molecule is synthesized by at least three enzyme subtypes of NO synthase (NOS). The commonly known neuronal NOS subtype is localized in areas of the brain related to stress and depression. The limbic-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (LHPA) axis is the core of this system. These interrelated pathways have in common the production, and negative feedback, of glucocorticoids. Within these areas, NO is suggested to play a role in modulating the release of other neurotransmitters, acting as a cellular communicator in plasticity and development, and/or acting as a vasodilator in regulation of blood flow. This article summarizes some of the recent advances in the understanding of the role of NO in stress and depression.

  11. Metals, toxicity and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Valko, M; Morris, H; Cronin, M T D

    2005-01-01

    . Antioxidants (both enzymatic and non-enzymatic) provide protection against deleterious metal-mediated free radical attacks. Vitamin E and melatonin can prevent the majority of metal-mediated (iron, copper, cadmium) damage both in vitro systems and in metal-loaded animals. Toxicity studies involving chromium have shown that the protective effect of vitamin E against lipid peroxidation may be associated rather with the level of non-enzymatic antioxidants than the activity of enzymatic antioxidants. However, a very recent epidemiological study has shown that a daily intake of vitamin E of more than 400 IU increases the risk of death and should be avoided. While previous studies have proposed a deleterious pro-oxidant effect of vitamin C (ascorbate) in the presence of iron (or copper), recent results have shown that even in the presence of redox-active iron (or copper) and hydrogen peroxide, ascorbate acts as an antioxidant that prevents lipid peroxidation and does not promote protein oxidation in humans in vitro. Experimental results have also shown a link between vanadium and oxidative stress in the etiology of diabetes. The impact of zinc (Zn) on the immune system, the ability of zinc to act as an antioxidant in order to reduce oxidative stress and the neuroprotective and neurodegenerative role of zinc (and copper) in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease is also discussed. This review summarizes recent findings in the metal-induced formation of free radicals and the role of oxidative stress in the carcinogenicity and toxicity of metals.

  12. Role of oxidative stress and nitric oxide in atherothrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Lubos, Edith; Handy, Diane E.; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    During the last decade basic and clinical research has highlighted the central role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cardiovascular disease. Enhanced production or attenuated degradation of ROS leads to oxidative stress, a process that affects endothelial and vascular function, and contributes to vascular disease. Nitric oxide (NO), a product of the normal endothelium, is a principal determinant of normal endothelial and vascular function. In states of inflammation, NO production by the vasculature increases considerably and, in conjunction with other ROS, contributes to oxidative stress. This review examines the role of oxidative stress and NO in mechanisms of endothelial and vascular dysfunction with an emphasis on atherothrombosis. PMID:18508590

  13. Nutrients and Oxidative Stress: Friend or Foe?

    PubMed

    Tan, Bee Ling; Norhaizan, Mohd Esa; Liew, Winnie-Pui-Pui

    2018-01-01

    There are different types of nutritionally mediated oxidative stress sources that trigger inflammation. Much information indicates that high intakes of macronutrients can promote oxidative stress and subsequently contribute to inflammation via nuclear factor-kappa B- (NF- κ B-) mediated cell signaling pathways. Dietary carbohydrates, animal-based proteins, and fats are important to highlight here because they may contribute to the long-term consequences of nutritionally mediated inflammation. Oxidative stress is a central player of metabolic ailments associated with high-carbohydrate and animal-based protein diets and excessive fat consumption. Obesity has become an epidemic and represents the major risk factor for several chronic diseases, including diabetes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms of nutritionally mediated oxidative stress are complex and poorly understood. Therefore, this review aimed to explore how dietary choices exacerbate or dampen the oxidative stress and inflammation. We also discussed the implications of oxidative stress in the adipocyte and glucose metabolism and obesity-associated noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). Taken together, a better understanding of the role of oxidative stress in obesity and the development of obesity-related NCDs would provide a useful approach. This is because oxidative stress can be mediated by both extrinsic and intrinsic factors, hence providing a plausible means for the prevention of metabolic disorders.

  14. Nutrients and Oxidative Stress: Friend or Foe?

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Bee Ling; Liew, Winnie-Pui-Pui

    2018-01-01

    There are different types of nutritionally mediated oxidative stress sources that trigger inflammation. Much information indicates that high intakes of macronutrients can promote oxidative stress and subsequently contribute to inflammation via nuclear factor-kappa B- (NF-κB-) mediated cell signaling pathways. Dietary carbohydrates, animal-based proteins, and fats are important to highlight here because they may contribute to the long-term consequences of nutritionally mediated inflammation. Oxidative stress is a central player of metabolic ailments associated with high-carbohydrate and animal-based protein diets and excessive fat consumption. Obesity has become an epidemic and represents the major risk factor for several chronic diseases, including diabetes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms of nutritionally mediated oxidative stress are complex and poorly understood. Therefore, this review aimed to explore how dietary choices exacerbate or dampen the oxidative stress and inflammation. We also discussed the implications of oxidative stress in the adipocyte and glucose metabolism and obesity-associated noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). Taken together, a better understanding of the role of oxidative stress in obesity and the development of obesity-related NCDs would provide a useful approach. This is because oxidative stress can be mediated by both extrinsic and intrinsic factors, hence providing a plausible means for the prevention of metabolic disorders. PMID:29643982

  15. Oxidative stress adaptation with acute, chronic, and repeated stress.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Andrew M; Vojtovich, Lesya; Tower, John; A Davies, Kelvin J

    2013-02-01

    Oxidative stress adaptation, or hormesis, is an important mechanism by which cells and organisms respond to, and cope with, environmental and physiological shifts in the level of oxidative stress. Most studies of oxidative stress adaption have been limited to adaptation induced by acute stress. In contrast, many if not most environmental and physiological stresses are either repeated or chronic. In this study we find that both cultured mammalian cells and the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster are capable of adapting to chronic or repeated stress by upregulating protective systems, such as their proteasomal proteolytic capacity to remove oxidized proteins. Repeated stress adaptation resulted in significant extension of adaptive responses. Repeated stresses must occur at sufficiently long intervals, however (12-h or more for MEF cells and 7 days or more for flies), for adaptation to be successful, and the levels of both repeated and chronic stress must be lower than is optimal for adaptation to acute stress. Regrettably, regimens of adaptation to both repeated and chronic stress that were successful for short-term survival in Drosophila nevertheless also caused significant reductions in life span for the flies. Thus, although both repeated and chronic stress can be tolerated, they may result in a shorter life. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. PARTICULATE MATTER, OXIDATIVE STRESS AND ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Particulate matter (PM), a component of air pollution has been epidemiologically associated with sudden deaths, cardiovascular and respiratory illnesses. The effects are more pronounced in patients with pre-existing conditions such as asthma, diabetes or obstructive pulmonary disorders. Clinical and experimental studies have historically focused on the cardiopulmonary effects of PM. However, since PM particles carry numerous biocontaminants that are capable of triggering free radical production and cytokine release, the possibility that PM may affect organs systems sensitive to oxidative stress must be considered. Four independent studies that summarize the neurochemical and neuropathological changes found in the brains of PM exposed animals are described here. These were recently presented at two 2007 symposia sponsored by the Society of Toxicology (Charlotte, NC) and the International Neurotoxicology Association (Monterey, CA). Particulates are covered with biocontaminants (e.g., endotoxins, mold, pollen) which convey free radical activity that can damage the lipids, nucleic acids, and proteins of target cells on contact and stimulate inflammatory cytokine release. Although, the historical focus of PM toxicity has been cardiopulmonary targets, it is now appreciated that inhaled nano-size (<100 nm) particles quickly exit the lungs and enter the circulation where they distribute to various organ systems (l.e., liver, kidneys, testes, lymph nodes) (Takenaka et aI

  17. Oxidative Stress Related Diseases in Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Aykac, Kubra

    2016-01-01

    We review oxidative stress-related newborn disease and the mechanism of oxidative damage. In addition, we outline diagnostic and therapeutic strategies and future directions. Many reports have defined oxidative stress as an imbalance between an enhanced reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and the lack of protective ability of antioxidants. From that point of view, free radical-induced damage caused by oxidative stress seems to be a probable contributing factor to the pathogenesis of many newborn diseases, such as respiratory distress syndrome, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, periventricular leukomalacia, necrotizing enterocolitis, patent ductus arteriosus, and retinopathy of prematurity. We share the hope that the new understanding of the concept of oxidative stress and its relation to newborn diseases that has been made possible by new diagnostic techniques will throw light on the treatment of those diseases. PMID:27403229

  18. Nutrigenetics and modulation of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Da Costa, Laura A; Badawi, Alaa; El-Sohemy, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress develops as a result of an imbalance between the production and accumulation of reactive species and the body's ability to manage them using exogenous and endogenous antioxidants. Exogenous antioxidants obtained from the diet, including vitamin C, vitamin E, and carotenoids, have important roles in preventing and reducing oxidative stress. Individual genetic variation affecting proteins involved in the uptake, utilization and metabolism of these antioxidants may alter their serum levels, exposure to target cells and subsequent contribution to the extent of oxidative stress. Endogenous antioxidants include the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, paraoxanase, and glutathione S-transferase. These enzymes metabolize reactive species and their by-products, reducing oxidative stress. Variation in the genes coding these enzymes may impact their enzymatic antioxidant activity and, thus, the levels of reactive species, oxidative stress, and risk of disease development. Oxidative stress may contribute to the development of chronic disease, including osteoporosis, type 2 diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Indeed, polymorphisms in most of the genes that code for antioxidant enzymes have been associated with several types of cancer, although inconsistent findings between studies have been reported. These inconsistencies may, in part, be explained by interactions with the environment, such as modification by diet. In this review, we highlight some of the recent studies in the field of nutrigenetics, which have examined interactions between diet, genetic variation in antioxidant enzymes, and oxidative stress. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Oxidative stress, thiols, and redox profiles.

    PubMed

    Harris, Craig; Hansen, Jason M

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been recognized as a contributing factor in the toxicity of a large number of developmental toxicants. Traditional definitions of oxidative stress state that a shift in the balance between reduced and oxidized biomolecules within cells, in favor of the latter, result in changes that are deleterious to vital cell functions and can culminate in malformations and death. The glutathione (GSH)/glutathione disulfide (GSSG) redox couple has been the traditional marker of choice for characterization of oxidative stress because of its high concentrations and direct roles as antioxidant and cellular protectant. Steady state depletion of GSH through conjugation, oxidation, or export has often been reported as the sole criteria for invoking oxidative stress and a myriad of associated deleterious consequences. Numerous other, mostly qualitative, observations have also been reported to suggest oxidative stress has occurred but it is not always clear how well they reflect the state of a cell or its functions. Our emerging understanding of redox signaling and the roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS), thiols, oxidant molecules, and cellular antioxidants, all acting as second messengers, has prompted a redefinition of oxidative stress based on changes in the real posttranslational protein thiol modifications that are central to redox regulation and control. Thiol-based redox couples such as GSH/GSSG, cysteine/cystine (cys/cySS), thioredoxin-reduced/thioredoxin-oxidized (TRX(red)/TRX(ox)) form independent signaling nodes that selectively regulate developmental events and are closely linked to changes in intracellular redox potentials. Accurate assessment of the consequences of increased free radicals in developing conceptuses should best be made using a battery of measurements including the quantitative assessment of intracellular redox potential, ROS, redox status of biomolecules, and induced changes in specific redox signaling nodes. Methods are presented for

  20. Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant System in Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Andrukhov, Oleh; Rausch-Fan, Xiaohui

    2017-01-01

    Periodontitis is a common inflammatory disease, which is initiated by bacterial infection and subsequently progressed by aberrant host response. It can result in the destruction of teeth supporting tissues and have an influence on systemic health. When periodontitis occurs, reactive oxygen species, which are overproduced mostly by hyperactive neutrophils, could not be balanced by antioxidant defense system and cause tissues damage. This is characterized by increased metabolites of lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and protein damage. Local and systemic activities of antioxidants can also be influenced by periodontitis. Total antioxidant capacity, total oxidant status and oxidative stress index have been used to evaluate the oxidative stress associated with periodontitis. Studies have confirmed that inflammatory response in periodontitis is associated with an increased local and systemic oxidative stress and compromised antioxidant capacity. Our review focuses on increased oxidative stress in periodontal disease, specifically, on the relationship between the local and systemic biomarkers of oxidative stress and periodontitis and their association with the pathogenesis of periodontitis. Also, the relationship between periodontitis and systemic inflammation, and the effects of periodontal therapy on oxidative stress parameters will be discussed. PMID:29180965

  1. Oxidative stress and the ageing endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Giovanni; Salvioli, Stefano; Franceschi, Claudio

    2013-04-01

    Ageing is a process characterized by a progressive decline in cellular function, organismal fitness and increased risk of age-related diseases and death. Several hundred theories have attempted to explain this phenomenon. One of the most popular is the 'oxidative stress theory', originally termed the 'free radical theory'. The endocrine system seems to have a role in the modulation of oxidative stress; however, much less is known about the role that oxidative stress might have in the ageing of the endocrine system and the induction of age-related endocrine diseases. This Review outlines the interactions between hormones and oxidative metabolism and the potential effects of oxidative stress on ageing of endocrine organs. Many different mechanisms that link oxidative stress and ageing are discussed, all of which converge on the induction or regulation of inflammation. All these mechanisms, including cell senescence, mitochondrial dysfunction and microRNA dysregulation, as well as inflammation itself, could be targets of future studies aimed at clarifying the effects of oxidative stress on ageing of endocrine glands.

  2. Local oxidative stress in interdigital tinea pedis.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Perihan; Arican, Ozer; Kurutas, Ergul B; Karakas, Tugba; Gungor, Meltem

    2013-02-01

    Several skin diseases are believed to be associated with oxidative stress. Tinea pedis is an infection of the feet caused by fungi. The infectious diseases caused by dermatophytes are mainly related to the enzymes produced by these fungi. The cutaneous oxidative stress status of tinea pedis has not been demonstrated in the published work up to now. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of oxidative stress in affected skin areas in a group of patients with interdigital tinea pedis. Thirty-one consecutive patients with a diagnosis of unilateral interdigital tinea pedis were enrolled. The samples were obtained by scraping the skin surface. Oxidative stress biomarkers such as superoxide dismutase, catalase and malondialdehyde levels were measured spectrophotometrically. The activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase and the levels of malondialdehyde were significantly higher on the lesional area than the non-lesional area (P < 0.001). According to sex and fungal subtypes, there was no significant difference in the levels of oxidative stress biomarkers in patients with tinea pedis (P > 0.05). Our results suggested that antioxidant defense of lesional skin surface was higher compared to non-lesional skin. This is possibly due to a compensatory response to various fungal infections and thereby protects the cells against oxidative damage. © 2012 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  3. Oxidative Stress in Aging Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Rinnerthaler, Mark; Bischof, Johannes; Streubel, Maria Karolin; Trost, Andrea; Richter, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress in skin plays a major role in the aging process. This is true for intrinsic aging and even more for extrinsic aging. Although the results are quite different in dermis and epidermis, extrinsic aging is driven to a large extent by oxidative stress caused by UV irradiation. In this review the overall effects of oxidative stress are discussed as well as the sources of ROS including the mitochondrial ETC, peroxisomal and ER localized proteins, the Fenton reaction, and such enzymes as cyclooxygenases, lipoxygenases, xanthine oxidases, and NADPH oxidases. Furthermore, the defense mechanisms against oxidative stress ranging from enzymes like superoxide dismutases, catalases, peroxiredoxins, and GSH peroxidases to organic compounds such as L-ascorbate, α-tocopherol, beta-carotene, uric acid, CoQ10, and glutathione are described in more detail. In addition the oxidative stress induced modifications caused to proteins, lipids and DNA are discussed. Finally age-related changes of the skin are also a topic of this review. They include a disruption of the epidermal calcium gradient in old skin with an accompanying change in the composition of the cornified envelope. This modified cornified envelope also leads to an altered anti-oxidative capacity and a reduced barrier function of the epidermis. PMID:25906193

  4. Oxidative Stress in Placenta: Health and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fan; Tian, Fu-Ju; Lin, Yi

    2015-01-01

    During pregnancy, development of the placenta is interrelated with the oxygen concentration. Embryo development takes place in a low oxygen environment until the beginning of the second trimester when large amounts of oxygen are conveyed to meet the growth requirements. High metabolism and oxidative stress are common in the placenta. Reactive oxidative species sometimes harm placental development, but they are also reported to regulate gene transcription and downstream activities such as trophoblast proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis. Autophagy and apoptosis are two crucial, interconnected processes in the placenta that are often influenced by oxidative stress. The proper interactions between them play an important role in placental homeostasis. However, an imbalance between the protective and destructive mechanisms of autophagy and apoptosis seems to be linked with pregnancy-related disorders such as miscarriage, preeclampsia, and intrauterine growth restriction. Thus, potential therapies to hold oxidative stress in leash, promote placentation, and avoid unwanted apoptosis are discussed. PMID:26693479

  5. Mammalian Metallothionein-2A and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Xue-Bin; Wei, Hong-Wei; Wang, Jun; Kong, Yue-Qiong; Wu, Yu-You; Guo, Jun-Li; Li, Tian-Fa; Li, Ji-Ke

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian metallothionein-2A (MT2A) has received considerable attention in recent years due to its crucial pathophysiological role in anti-oxidant, anti-apoptosis, detoxification and anti-inflammation. For many years, most studies evaluating the effects of MT2A have focused on reactive oxygen species (ROS), as second messengers that lead to oxidative stress injury of cells and tissues. Recent studies have highlighted that oxidative stress could activate mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and MT2A, as a mediator of MAPKs, to regulate the pathogenesis of various diseases. However, the molecule mechanism of MT2A remains elusive. A deeper understanding of the functional, biochemical and molecular characteristics of MT2A would be identified, in order to bring new opportunities for oxidative stress therapy. PMID:27608012

  6. Oxidative Stress Resistance in Deinococcus radiodurans†

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Dea; Radman, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Deinococcus radiodurans is a robust bacterium best known for its capacity to repair massive DNA damage efficiently and accurately. It is extremely resistant to many DNA-damaging agents, including ionizing radiation and UV radiation (100 to 295 nm), desiccation, and mitomycin C, which induce oxidative damage not only to DNA but also to all cellular macromolecules via the production of reactive oxygen species. The extreme resilience of D. radiodurans to oxidative stress is imparted synergistically by an efficient protection of proteins against oxidative stress and an efficient DNA repair mechanism, enhanced by functional redundancies in both systems. D. radiodurans assets for the prevention of and recovery from oxidative stress are extensively reviewed here. Radiation- and desiccation-resistant bacteria such as D. radiodurans have substantially lower protein oxidation levels than do sensitive bacteria but have similar yields of DNA double-strand breaks. These findings challenge the concept of DNA as the primary target of radiation toxicity while advancing protein damage, and the protection of proteins against oxidative damage, as a new paradigm of radiation toxicity and survival. The protection of DNA repair and other proteins against oxidative damage is imparted by enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidant defense systems dominated by divalent manganese complexes. Given that oxidative stress caused by the accumulation of reactive oxygen species is associated with aging and cancer, a comprehensive outlook on D. radiodurans strategies of combating oxidative stress may open new avenues for antiaging and anticancer treatments. The study of the antioxidation protection in D. radiodurans is therefore of considerable potential interest for medicine and public health. PMID:21372322

  7. A Molecular Web: Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Inflammation, and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhari, Namrata; Talwar, Priti; Parimisetty, Avinash; Lefebvre d’Hellencourt, Christian; Ravanan, Palaniyandi

    2014-01-01

    Execution of fundamental cellular functions demands regulated protein folding homeostasis. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an active organelle existing to implement this function by folding and modifying secretory and membrane proteins. Loss of protein folding homeostasis is central to various diseases and budding evidences suggest ER stress as being a major contributor in the development or pathology of a diseased state besides other cellular stresses. The trigger for diseases may be diverse but, inflammation and/or ER stress may be basic mechanisms increasing the severity or complicating the condition of the disease. Chronic ER stress and activation of the unfolded-protein response (UPR) through endogenous or exogenous insults may result in impaired calcium and redox homeostasis, oxidative stress via protein overload thereby also influencing vital mitochondrial functions. Calcium released from the ER augments the production of mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS). Toxic accumulation of ROS within ER and mitochondria disturbs fundamental organelle functions. Sustained ER stress is known to potentially elicit inflammatory responses via UPR pathways. Additionally, ROS generated through inflammation or mitochondrial dysfunction could accelerate ER malfunction. Dysfunctional UPR pathways have been associated with a wide range of diseases including several neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, metabolic disorders, cancer, inflammatory disease, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and others. In this review, we have discussed the UPR signaling pathways, and networking between ER stress-induced inflammatory pathways, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial signaling events, which further induce or exacerbate ER stress. PMID:25120434

  8. A molecular web: endoplasmic reticulum stress, inflammation, and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Namrata; Talwar, Priti; Parimisetty, Avinash; Lefebvre d'Hellencourt, Christian; Ravanan, Palaniyandi

    2014-01-01

    Execution of fundamental cellular functions demands regulated protein folding homeostasis. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an active organelle existing to implement this function by folding and modifying secretory and membrane proteins. Loss of protein folding homeostasis is central to various diseases and budding evidences suggest ER stress as being a major contributor in the development or pathology of a diseased state besides other cellular stresses. The trigger for diseases may be diverse but, inflammation and/or ER stress may be basic mechanisms increasing the severity or complicating the condition of the disease. Chronic ER stress and activation of the unfolded-protein response (UPR) through endogenous or exogenous insults may result in impaired calcium and redox homeostasis, oxidative stress via protein overload thereby also influencing vital mitochondrial functions. Calcium released from the ER augments the production of mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS). Toxic accumulation of ROS within ER and mitochondria disturbs fundamental organelle functions. Sustained ER stress is known to potentially elicit inflammatory responses via UPR pathways. Additionally, ROS generated through inflammation or mitochondrial dysfunction could accelerate ER malfunction. Dysfunctional UPR pathways have been associated with a wide range of diseases including several neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, metabolic disorders, cancer, inflammatory disease, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and others. In this review, we have discussed the UPR signaling pathways, and networking between ER stress-induced inflammatory pathways, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial signaling events, which further induce or exacerbate ER stress.

  9. Diabetic Neuropathy and Oxidative Stress: Therapeutic Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Asieh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is a widespread disabling disorder comprising peripheral nerves' damage. DN develops on a background of hyperglycemia and an entangled metabolic imbalance, mainly oxidative stress. The majority of related pathways like polyol, advanced glycation end products, poly-ADP-ribose polymerase, hexosamine, and protein kinase c all originated from initial oxidative stress. To date, no absolute cure for DN has been defined; although some drugs are conventionally used, much more can be found if all pathophysiological links with oxidative stress would be taken into account. In this paper, although current therapies for DN have been reviewed, we have mainly focused on the links between DN and oxidative stress and therapies on the horizon, such as inhibitors of protein kinase C, aldose reductase, and advanced glycation. With reference to oxidative stress and the related pathways, the following new drugs are under study such as taurine, acetyl-L-carnitine, alpha lipoic acid, protein kinase C inhibitor (ruboxistaurin), aldose reductase inhibitors (fidarestat, epalrestat, ranirestat), advanced glycation end product inhibitors (benfotiamine, aspirin, aminoguanidine), the hexosamine pathway inhibitor (benfotiamine), inhibitor of poly ADP-ribose polymerase (nicotinamide), and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (trandolapril). The development of modern drugs to treat DN is a real challenge and needs intensive long-term comparative trials. PMID:23738033

  10. The impact of oxidative stress on hair.

    PubMed

    Trüeb, R M

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative stress reflects an imbalance between the systemic manifestation of reactive oxygen species and a biological system's ability to detoxify the reactive intermediates or to repair the resulting damage. Reactive oxygen species or free radicals are highly reactive molecules that can directly damage lipids, proteins, and DNA. They are generated by a multitude of endogenous and environmental challenges, while the body possesses endogenous defense mechanisms. With age, production of free radicals increases, while the endogenous defense mechanisms decrease. This imbalance leads to progressive damage of cellular structures, presumably resulting in the aging phenotype. While the role of oxidative stress has been widely discussed in skin aging, little focus has been placed on its impact on hair condition. Moreover, most literature on age-related hair changes focuses on alopecia, but it is equally important that the hair fibers that emerge from the scalp exhibit significant age-related changes that have equal impact on the overall cosmetic properties of hair. Sources of oxidative stress with impact on the pre-emerging fiber include: oxidative metabolism, smoking, UVR, and inflammation from microbial, pollutant, or irritant origins. Sources of oxidative stress with impact on the post-emerging fiber include: UVR (enhanced by copper), chemical insults, and oxidized scalp lipids. The role of the dermatologist is recognition and treatment of pre- and post-emerging factors for lifetime scalp and hair health. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  11. Association between prenatal psychological stress and oxidative stress during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Eick, Stephanie M; Barrett, Emily S; van 't Erve, Thomas J; Nguyen, Ruby H N; Bush, Nicole R; Milne, Ginger; Swan, Shanna H; Ferguson, Kelly K

    2018-03-30

    Prenatal psychological stress during pregnancy has been associated with adverse reproductive outcomes. A growing animal literature supports an association between psychological stress and oxidative stress. We assessed this relationship in pregnant women, hypothesising that psychological stress is associated with higher concentrations of oxidative stress biomarkers during pregnancy. Psychosocial status and stressful life events (SLE) were self-reported. 8-iso-prostaglandin F 2α (8-iso-PGF 2α ) was measured as a biomarker of oxidative stress in urine samples at median 32 weeks' gestation. We examined SLEs individually (ever vs never) and in summary (any vs none) and psychosocial status as measured by individual subscales and in summary (poor vs good). Linear models estimated associations between these parameters and urinary 8-iso-PGF 2α concentrations after adjusting for covariates. The geometric mean of 8-iso-PGF 2α was significantly higher among pregnant women who were non-White, smokers, had less than a college education, higher pre-pregnancy BMI and were unmarried. Having ever had a death in the family (n = 39) during pregnancy was associated with a 22.9% increase in 8-iso-PGF 2α in unadjusted models (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.50, 48.8). Poor psychosocial status was associated with a 13.1% (95% CI 2.43, 25.0) greater mean 8-iso-PGF 2α in unadjusted analyses. Associations were attenuated, but remained suggestive, after covariate adjustment. These data suggest that 8-iso-PGF 2α is elevated in pregnant women with who are at a sociodemographic disadvantage and who have higher psychological stress in pregnancy. Previous studies have observed that 8-iso-PGF 2α levels are associated with adverse birth outcomes, oxidative stress could be a mediator in these relationships. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Endoplasmic reticulum stress mediates withaferin A-induced apoptosis in human renal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Min Jung; Park, Eun Jung; Min, Kyoung Jin; Park, Jong-Wook; Kwon, Taeg Kyu

    2011-04-01

    The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) results in cellular stress that initiates a specialized response designated as the unfolded protein response. ER stress has been implicated in a variety of common diseases, such as diabetes, ischemia and neurodegenerative disorders. Withaferin A, a major chemical constituent of Withania somnifera, has been reported to inhibit tumor cell growth. We show that withaferin A induced a dose-dependent apoptotic cell death in several types of human cancer cells, as measured by FACS analysis and PARP cleavage. Treatment of Caki cells with withaferin A induced a number of signature ER stress markers, including phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor-2α (eIF-2 α), ER stress-specific XBP1 splicing, and up-regulation of glucose-regulated protein (GRP)-78. In addition, withaferin A caused up-regulation of CAAT/enhancer-binding protein-homologous protein (CHOP), suggesting the induction of ER stress. Pretreatment with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) significantly inhibited withaferin A-mediated ER stress proteins and cell death, suggesting that reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediate withaferin A-induced ER stress. Furthermore, CHOP siRNA or inhibition of caspase-4 activity attenuated withaferin A-induced apoptosis. Taken together, the present study provides strong evidence supporting an important role of the ER stress response in mediating withaferin A-induced apoptosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Thyroid hormone-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Venditti, P; Di Meo, S

    2006-02-01

    Hypermetabolic state in hyperthyroidism is associated with tissue oxidative injury. Available data indicate that hyperthyroid tissues exhibit an increased ROS and RNS production. The increased mitochondrial ROS generation is a side effect of the enhanced level of electron carriers, by which hyperthyroid tissues increase their metabolic capacity. Investigations of antioxidant defence system have returned controversial results. Moreover, other thyroid hormone-linked biochemical changes increase tissue susceptibility to oxidative challenge, which exacerbates the injury and dysfunction they suffer under stressful conditions. Mitochondria, as a primary target for oxidative stress, might account for hyperthyroidism linked tissue dysfunction. This is consistent with the inverse relationship found between functional recovery of ischemic hyperthyroid hearts and mitochondrial oxidative damage and respiration impairment. However, thyroid hormone-activated mitochondrial mechanisms provide protection against excessive tissue dysfunction, including increased expression of uncoupling proteins, proteolytic enzymes and transcriptional coactivator PGC-1, and stimulate opening of permeability transition pores.

  14. Oxidative Stress in Schizophrenia: An Integrated Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bitanihirwe, Byron K.Y.; Woo, Tsung-Ung W.

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been suggested to contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. In particular, oxidative damage to lipids, proteins, and DNA as observed in schizophrenia is known to impair cell viability and function, which may subsequently account for the deteriorating course of the illness. Currently available evidence points towards an alteration in the activities of enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidant systems in schizophrenia. In fact, experimental models have demonstrated that oxidative stress induces behavioural and molecular anomalies strikingly similar to those observed in schizophrenia. These findings suggest that oxidative stress is intimately linked to a variety of pathophysiological processes, such as inflammation, oligodendrocyte abnormalities, mitochondrial dysfunction, hypoactive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and the impairment of fast-spiking gamma-aminobutyric acid interneurons.[bkyb1] Such self-sustaining mechanisms may progressively worsen producing the functional and structural consequences associated with schizophrenia. Recent clinical studies have shown antioxidant treatment to be effective in ameliorating schizophrenic symptoms. Hence, identifying viable therapeutic strategies to tackle oxidative stress and the resulting physiological disturbances provide an exciting opportunity for the treatment and ultimately prevention of schizophrenia. PMID:20974172

  15. Oxidative stress parameters in localized scleroderma patients.

    PubMed

    Kilinc, F; Sener, S; Akbaş, A; Metin, A; Kirbaş, S; Neselioglu, S; Erel, O

    2016-11-01

    Localized scleroderma (LS) (morphea) is a chronic, inflammatory skin disease with unknown cause that progresses with sclerosis in the skin and/or subcutaneous tissues. Its pathogenesis is not completely understood. Oxidative stress is suggested to have a role in the pathogenesis of localized scleroderma. We have aimed to determine the relationship of morphea lesions with oxidative stress. The total oxidant capacity (TOC), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), paroxonase (PON) and arylesterase (ARES) activity parameters of PON 1 enzyme levels in the serum were investigated in 13 LS patients (generalized and plaque type) and 13 healthy controls. TOC values of the patient group were found higher than the TOC values of the control group (p < 0.01). ARES values of the patient group was found to be higher than the control group (p < 0.0001). OSI was significantly higher in the patient group when compared to the control (p < 0.005). Oxidative stress seems to be effective in the pathogenesis. ARES levels have increased in morphea patients regarding to the oxidative stress and its reduction. Further controlled studies are required in wider series.

  16. Oxidative stress status in patients with melasma.

    PubMed

    Seçkin, Havva Yıldız; Kalkan, Göknur; Baş, Yalçın; Akbaş, Ali; Önder, Yalçın; Özyurt, Hüseyin; Sahin, Mehmet

    2014-09-01

    Melasma is an acquired skin disease characterized clinically by development of gray-brown macules or patches. The lesions have geographic borders and most often seen on face and less frequently on the neck and forearms. Pathogenesis has not been completely understood yet. Although the disease constitutes a very disturbing cosmetic problem, it has not obtained an efficient treatment. There were not any studies in the literature that evaluates the role of oxidative stress in melasma. The evaluation of the role of oxidative stress in melasma. Fifty melasma patients and 50 healthy volunteers were included in the study. The diagnosis was made clinically and the patients were evaluated by Melasma Area Severity Index. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) enzyme activities and malondialdehyde, nitric oxide, protein carbonyl levels were measured both in the melasma group and the control group. SOD and GSH-Px enzyme activities were significantly higher in the patient group in comparison with the control group (p < 0.001). Protein carbonyl levels were significantly lower in the patient group (p < 0.001). The results show that the balance between oxidant and anti-oxidants was disrupted and the oxidative stress increased in melasma. These results improve the understanding of etiology-pathogenesis of the disease and its treatment.

  17. Stress generation and evolution in oxide heteroepitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fluri, Aline; Pergolesi, Daniele; Wokaun, Alexander; Lippert, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    Many physical properties of oxides can be changed by inducing lattice distortions in the crystal through heteroepitaxial growth of thin films. The average lattice strain can often be tuned by changing the film thickness or using suitable buffer layers between film and substrate. The exploitation of the full potential of strain engineering for sample or device fabrication rests on the understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of stress generation and evolution. For this study an optical measurement of the substrate curvature is used to monitor in situ how the stress builds up and relaxes during the growth of oxide thin films by pulsed laser deposition. The relaxation behavior is correlated with the growth mode, which is monitored simultaneously with reflection high-energy electron diffraction. The stress relaxation data is fitted and compared with theoretical models for stress evolution which were established for semiconductor epitaxy. The initial stage of the growth appears to be governed by surface stress and surface energy effects, while the subsequent stress relaxation is found to be fundamentally different between films grown on single-crystal substrates and on buffer layers. The first case can be rationalized with established theoretical models, but these models fail in the attempt to describe the growth on buffer layers. This is most probably due to the larger average density of crystalline defects in the buffer layers, which leads to a two-step stress relaxation mechanism, driven first by the nucleation and later by the migration of dislocation lines.

  18. Genetics of Oxidative Stress in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Rupérez, Azahara I.; Gil, Angel; Aguilera, Concepción M.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a multifactorial disease characterized by the excessive accumulation of fat in adipose tissue and peripheral organs. Its derived metabolic complications are mediated by the associated oxidative stress, inflammation and hypoxia. Oxidative stress is due to the excessive production of reactive oxygen species or diminished antioxidant defenses. Genetic variants, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms in antioxidant defense system genes, could alter the efficacy of these enzymes and, ultimately, the risk of obesity; thus, studies investigating the role of genetic variations in genes related to oxidative stress could be useful for better understanding the etiology of obesity and its metabolic complications. The lack of existing literature reviews in this field encouraged us to gather the findings from studies focusing on the impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms in antioxidant enzymes, oxidative stress-producing systems and transcription factor genes concerning their association with obesity risk and its phenotypes. In the future, the characterization of these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in obese patients could contribute to the development of controlled antioxidant therapies potentially beneficial for the treatment of obesity-derived metabolic complications. PMID:24562334

  19. Genetics of oxidative stress in obesity.

    PubMed

    Rupérez, Azahara I; Gil, Angel; Aguilera, Concepción M

    2014-02-20

    Obesity is a multifactorial disease characterized by the excessive accumulation of fat in adipose tissue and peripheral organs. Its derived metabolic complications are mediated by the associated oxidative stress, inflammation and hypoxia. Oxidative stress is due to the excessive production of reactive oxygen species or diminished antioxidant defenses. Genetic variants, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms in antioxidant defense system genes, could alter the efficacy of these enzymes and, ultimately, the risk of obesity; thus, studies investigating the role of genetic variations in genes related to oxidative stress could be useful for better understanding the etiology of obesity and its metabolic complications. The lack of existing literature reviews in this field encouraged us to gather the findings from studies focusing on the impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms in antioxidant enzymes, oxidative stress-producing systems and transcription factor genes concerning their association with obesity risk and its phenotypes. In the future, the characterization of these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in obese patients could contribute to the development of controlled antioxidant therapies potentially beneficial for the treatment of obesity-derived metabolic complications.

  20. Mechanism of Oxidative Stress in Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Sonia; Abramov, Andrey Y.

    2012-01-01

    Biological tissues require oxygen to meet their energetic demands. However, the consumption of oxygen also results in the generation of free radicals that may have damaging effects on cells. The brain is particularly vulnerable to the effects of reactive oxygen species due to its high demand for oxygen, and its abundance of highly peroxidisable substrates. Oxidative stress is caused by an imbalance in the redox state of the cell, either by overproduction of reactive oxygen species, or by dysfunction of the antioxidant systems. Oxidative stress has been detected in a range of neurodegenerative disease, and emerging evidence from in vitro and in vivo disease models suggests that oxidative stress may play a role in disease pathogenesis. However, the promise of antioxidants as novel therapies for neurodegenerative diseases has not been borne out in clinical studies. In this review, we critically assess the hypothesis that oxidative stress is a crucial player in common neurodegenerative disease and discuss the source of free radicals in such diseases. Furthermore, we examine the issues surrounding the failure to translate this hypothesis into an effective clinical treatment. PMID:22685618

  1. Essential hypertension and oxidative stress: New insights

    PubMed Central

    González, Jaime; Valls, Nicolás; Brito, Roberto; Rodrigo, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    Essential hypertension is a highly prevalent pathological condition that is considered as one of the most relevant cardiovascular risk factors and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality around the world. Despite the fact that mechanisms underlying hypertension are not yet fully elucidated, a large amount of evidence shows that oxidative stress plays a central role in its pathophysiology. Oxidative stress can be defined as an imbalance between oxidant agents, such as superoxide anion, and antioxidant molecules, and leads to a decrease in nitric oxide bioavailability, which is the main factor responsible for maintaining the vascular tone. Several vasoconstrictor peptides, such as angiotensin II, endothelin-1 and urotensin II, act through their receptors to stimulate the production of reactive oxygen species, by activating enzymes like NADPH oxidase and xanthine oxidase. The knowledge of the mechanism described above has allowed generating new therapeutic strategies against hypertension based on the use of antioxidants agents, including vitamin C and E, N-Acetylcysteine, polyphenols and selenium, among others. These substances have different therapeutic targets, but all represent antioxidant reinforcement. Several clinical trials using antioxidants have been made. The aim of the present review is to provide new insights about the key role of oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of essential hypertension and new clinical attempts to demonstrate the usefulness of antioxidant therapy in the treatment of hypertension. PMID:24976907

  2. Interdependence of tetrapyrrole metabolism, the generation of oxidative stress and the mitigative oxidative stress response

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Andrea W.U.; Montgomery, Beronda L.

    2015-01-01

    Tetrapyrroles are involved in light harvesting and light perception, electron-transfer reactions, and as co-factors for key enzymes and sensory proteins. Under conditions in which cells exhibit stress-induced imbalances of photosynthetic reactions, or light absorption exceeds the ability of the cell to use photoexcitation energy in synthesis reactions, redox imbalance can occur in photosynthetic cells. Such conditions can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) associated with alterations in tetrapyrrole homeostasis. ROS accumulation can result in cellular damage and detrimental effects on organismal fitness, or ROS molecules can serve as signals to induce a protective or damage-mitigating oxidative stress signaling response in cells. Induced oxidative stress responses include tetrapyrrole-dependent and -independent mechanisms for mitigating ROS generation and/or accumulation. Thus, tetrapyrroles can be contributors to oxidative stress, but are also essential in the oxidative stress response to protect cells by contributing to detoxification of ROS. In this review, we highlight the interconnection and interdependence of tetrapyrrole metabolism with the occurrence of oxidative stress and protective oxidative stress signaling responses in photosynthetic organisms. PMID:25618582

  3. IGF-1, oxidative stress, and atheroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Higashi, Yusuke; Sukhanov, Sergiy; Anwar, Asif; Shai, Shaw-Yung; Delafontaine, Patrice

    2009-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease in which early endothelial dysfunction and subintimal modified lipoprotein deposition progress to complex, advanced lesions that are predisposed to erosion, rupture and thrombosis. Oxidative stress plays a critical role not only in initial lesion formation but also in lesion progression and destabilization. While growth factors are thought to promote vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration, thereby increasing neointima, recent animal studies indicate that IGF-1 exerts pleiotropic anti-oxidant effects along with anti-inflammatory effects that together reduce atherosclerotic burden. This review discusses the effects of IGF-1 in vascular injury and atherosclerosis models, emphasizing the relationship between oxidative stress and potential atheroprotective actions of IGF-1. PMID:20071192

  4. IGF-1, oxidative stress and atheroprotection.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Yusuke; Sukhanov, Sergiy; Anwar, Asif; Shai, Shaw-Yung; Delafontaine, Patrice

    2010-04-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease in which early endothelial dysfunction and subintimal modified lipoprotein deposition progress to complex, advanced lesions that are predisposed to erosion, rupture and thrombosis. Oxidative stress plays a crucial role not only in initial lesion formation but also in lesion progression and destabilization. Although most growth factors are thought to promote vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration, thereby increasing neointima, recent animal studies indicate that insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 exerts both pleiotropic anti-oxidant effects and anti-inflammatory effects, which together reduce atherosclerotic burden. This review discusses the effects of IGF-1 in models of vascular injury and atherosclerosis, emphasizing the relationship between oxidative stress and potential atheroprotective actions of IGF-1. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Thiol specific oxidative stress response in Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Dosanjh, Nirpjit S; Rawat, Mamta; Chung, Ji-Hae; Av-Gay, Yossef

    2005-08-01

    The cellular response of mycobacteria to thiol specific oxidative stress was studied in Mycobacterium bovis BCG cultures. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed that upon diamide treatment at least 60 proteins were upregulated. Fourteen of these proteins were identified by MALDI-MS; four proteins, AhpC, Tpx, GroEL2, and GroEL1 are functionally related to oxidative stress response; eight proteins, LeuC, LeuD, Rv0224c, Rv3029c, AsnB, Rv2971, PheA and HisH are classified as part of the bacterial intermediary metabolism and respiration pathways; protein EchA14 belong to lipid metabolism, and NrdE, belongs to the mycobacterial information pathway category. Reverse transcription followed by quantitative real time PCR in response to diamide stress demonstrated that protein expression is directly proportional to the corresponding gene transcription.

  6. Oxidative stress and vascular inflammation in aging.

    PubMed

    El Assar, Mariam; Angulo, Javier; Rodríguez-Mañas, Leocadio

    2013-12-01

    Vascular aging, a determinant factor for cardiovascular disease and health status in the elderly, is now viewed as a modifiable risk factor. Impaired endothelial vasodilation is a early hallmark of arterial aging that precedes the clinical manifestations of vascular dysfunction, the first step to cardiovascular disease and influencing vascular outcomes in the elderly. Accordingly, the preservation of endothelial function is thought to be an essential determinant of healthy aging. With special attention on the effects of aging on the endothelial function, this review is focused on the two main mechanisms of aging-related endothelial dysfunction: oxidative stress and inflammation. Aging vasculature generates an excess of the reactive oxygen species (ROS), superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, that compromise the vasodilatory activity of nitric oxide (NO) and facilitate the formation of the deleterious radical, peroxynitrite. Main sources of ROS are mitochondrial respiratory chain and NADPH oxidases, although NOS uncoupling could also account for ROS generation. In addition, reduced antioxidant response mediated by erythroid-2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) and downregulation of mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) contributes to the establishment of chronic oxidative stress in aged vessels. This is accompanied by a chronic low-grade inflammatory phenotype that participates in defective endothelial vasodilation. The redox-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), is upregulated in vascular cells from old subjects and drives a proinflammatory shift that feedbacks oxidative stress. This chronic NF-κB activation is contributed by increased angiotensin-II signaling and downregulated sirtuins and precludes adequate cellular response to acute ROS generation. Interventions targeted to recover endogenous antioxidant capacity and cellular stress response rather than exogenous antioxidants could reverse oxidative stress-inflammation vicious cycle in

  7. Piracetam improves mitochondrial dysfunction following oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Keil, Uta; Scherping, Isabel; Hauptmann, Susanne; Schuessel, Katin; Eckert, Anne; Müller, Walter E

    2005-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction including decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential and reduced ATP production represents a common final pathway of many conditions associated with oxidative stress, for example, hypoxia, hypoglycemia, and aging. Since the cognition-improving effects of the standard nootropic piracetam are usually more pronounced under such pathological conditions and young healthy animals usually benefit little by piracetam, the effect of piracetam on mitochondrial dysfunction following oxidative stress was investigated using PC12 cells and dissociated brain cells of animals treated with piracetam. Piracetam treatment at concentrations between 100 and 1000 μM improved mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production of PC12 cells following oxidative stress induced by sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and serum deprivation. Under conditions of mild serum deprivation, piracetam (500 μM) induced a nearly complete recovery of mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels. Piracetam also reduced caspase 9 activity after SNP treatment. Piracetam treatment (100–500 mg kg−1 daily) of mice was also associated with improved mitochondrial function in dissociated brain cells. Significant improvement was mainly seen in aged animals and only less in young animals. Moreover, the same treatment reduced antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase) in aged mouse brain only, which are elevated as an adaptive response to the increased oxidative stress with aging. In conclusion, therapeutically relevant in vitro and in vivo concentrations of piracetam are able to improve mitochondrial dysfunction associated with oxidative stress and/or aging. Mitochondrial stabilization and protection might be an important mechanism to explain many of piracetam's beneficial effects in elderly patients. PMID:16284628

  8. Protein Quality Control Under Oxidative Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Jan-Ulrik; Gray, Michael J.; Jakob, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of reactive oxygen and chlorine species (RO/CS) is generally regarded to be a toxic and highly undesirable event, which serves as contributing factor in aging and many age-related diseases. However, it is also put to excellent use during host defense, when high levels of RO/CS are produced to kill invading microorganisms and regulate bacterial colonization. Biochemical and cell biological studies of how bacteria and other microorganisms deal with RO/CS have now provided important new insights into the physiological consequences of oxidative stress, the major targets that need protection, and the cellular strategies employed by organisms to mitigate the damage. This review examines the redox-regulated mechanisms by which cells maintain a functional proteome during oxidative stress. We will discuss the well-characterized redox-regulated chaperone Hsp33, and review recent discoveries demonstrating that oxidative stress-specific activation of chaperone function is a much more widespread phenomenon than previously anticipated. New members of this group include the cytosolic ATPase Get3 in yeast, the E. coli protein RidA, and the mammalian protein α2-macroglobin. We will conclude our review with recent evidence showing that inorganic polyphosphate (polyP), whose accumulation significantly increases bacterial oxidative stress resistance, works by a protein-like chaperone mechanism. Understanding the relationship between oxidative and proteotoxic stresses will improve our understanding of both host-microbe interactions and of how mammalian cells combat the damaging side effects of uncontrolled RO/CS production, a hallmark of inflammation. PMID:25698115

  9. Good Stress, Bad Stress and Oxidative Stress: Insights from Anticipatory Cortisol Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Aschbacher, Kirstin; O'Donovan, Aoife; Wolkowitz, Owen M.; Dhabhar, Firdaus S.; Su, Yali; Epel, Elissa

    2014-01-01

    Chronic psychological stress appears to accelerate biological aging, and oxidative damage is an important potential mediator of this process. However, the mechanisms by which psychological stress promotes oxidative damage are poorly understood. This study investigates the theory that cortisol increases in response to an acutely stressful event have the potential to either enhance or undermine psychobiological resilience to oxidative damage, depending on the body's prior exposure to chronic psychological stress. In order to achieve a range of chronic stress exposure, forty-eight post-menopausal women were recruited in a case-control design that matched women caring for spouses with dementia (a chronic stress model) with similarly aged control women whose spouses were healthy. Participants completed a questionnaire assessing perceived stress over the previous month and provided fasting blood. Three markers of oxidative damage were assessed: 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α (IsoP), lipid peroxidation, 8-hydroxyguanosine (8-OxoG) and 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), reflecting oxidative damage to RNA/DNA respectively. Within approximately one week, participants completed a standardized acute laboratory stress task while salivary cortisol responses were measured. The increase from 0 to 30 min was defined as “peak” cortisol reactivity, while the increase from 0 to 15 min was defined as “anticipatory” cortisol reactivity, representing a cortisol response that began while preparing for the stress task. Women under chronic stress had higher 8-oxoG, oxidative damage to RNA (p<.01). A moderated mediation model was tested, in which it was hypothesized that heightened anticipatory cortisol reactivity would mediate the relationship between perceived stress and elevated oxidative stress damage, but only among women under chronic stress. Consistent with this model, bootstrapped path analysis found significant indirect paths from perceived stress to 8-OxoG and IsoP (but not

  10. Good stress, bad stress and oxidative stress: insights from anticipatory cortisol reactivity.

    PubMed

    Aschbacher, Kirstin; O'Donovan, Aoife; Wolkowitz, Owen M; Dhabhar, Firdaus S; Su, Yali; Epel, Elissa

    2013-09-01

    Chronic psychological stress appears to accelerate biological aging, and oxidative damage is an important potential mediator of this process. However, the mechanisms by which psychological stress promotes oxidative damage are poorly understood. This study investigates the theory that cortisol increases in response to an acutely stressful event have the potential to either enhance or undermine psychobiological resilience to oxidative damage, depending on the body's prior exposure to chronic psychological stress. In order to achieve a range of chronic stress exposure, forty-eight post-menopausal women were recruited in a case-control design that matched women caring for spouses with dementia (a chronic stress model) with similarly aged control women whose spouses were healthy. Participants completed a questionnaire assessing perceived stress over the previous month and provided fasting blood. Three markers of oxidative damage were assessed: 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2α) (IsoP), lipid peroxidation, 8-hydroxyguanosine (8-oxoG) and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), reflecting oxidative damage to RNA/DNA respectively. Within approximately one week, participants completed a standardized acute laboratory stress task while salivary cortisol responses were measured. The increase from 0 to 30 min was defined as "peak" cortisol reactivity, while the increase from 0 to 15 min was defined as "anticipatory" cortisol reactivity, representing a cortisol response that began while preparing for the stress task. Women under chronic stress had higher 8-oxoG, oxidative damage to RNA (p<.01). A moderated mediation model was tested, in which it was hypothesized that heightened anticipatory cortisol reactivity would mediate the relationship between perceived stress and elevated oxidative stress damage, but only among women under chronic stress. Consistent with this model, bootstrapped path analysis found significant indirect paths from perceived stress to 8-oxoG and IsoP (but not 8-OHd

  11. Electromagnetic Fields, Oxidative Stress, and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Consales, Claudia; Merla, Caterina; Marino, Carmela; Benassi, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Electromagnetic fields (EMFs) originating both from both natural and manmade sources permeate our environment. As people are continuously exposed to EMFs in everyday life, it is a matter of great debate whether they can be harmful to human health. On the basis of two decades of epidemiological studies, an increased risk for childhood leukemia associated with Extremely Low Frequency fields has been consistently assessed, inducing the International Agency for Research on Cancer to insert them in the 2B section of carcinogens in 2001. EMFs interaction with biological systems may cause oxidative stress under certain circumstances. Since free radicals are essential for brain physiological processes and pathological degeneration, research focusing on the possible influence of the EMFs-driven oxidative stress is still in progress, especially in the light of recent studies suggesting that EMFs may contribute to the etiology of neurodegenerative disorders. This review synthesizes the emerging evidences about this topic, highlighting the wide data uncertainty that still characterizes the EMFs effect on oxidative stress modulation, as both pro-oxidant and neuroprotective effects have been documented. Care should be taken to avoid methodological limitations and to determine the patho-physiological relevance of any alteration found in EMFs-exposed biological system. PMID:22991514

  12. Oxidative Stress and Periodontal Disease in Obesity.

    PubMed

    Dursun, Erhan; Akalin, Ferda Alev; Genc, Tolga; Cinar, Nese; Erel, Ozcan; Yildiz, Bulent Okan

    2016-03-01

    Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory disease of the jaws and is more prevalent in obesity. Local and systemic oxidative stress may be an early link between periodontal disease and obesity. The primary aim of this study was to detect whether increased periodontal disease susceptibility in obese individuals is associated with local and systemic oxidative stress. Accordingly; we analyzed periodontal status and systemic (serum) and local (gingival crevicular fluid [GCF]) oxidative status markers in young obese women in comparison with age-matched lean women.Twenty obese and 20 lean women participated. Periodontal condition was determined by clinical periodontal indices including probing depth, clinical attachment level, gingival index, gingival bleeding index, and plaque index. Anthropometric, hormonal, and metabolic measurements were also performed. Blood and GCF sampling was performed at the same time after an overnight fasting. Serum and GCF total antioxidant capacity (TAOC), and total oxidant status (TOS) levels were determined, and oxidative stress index (OSI) was calculated.Clinical periodontal analyses showed higher gingival index and gingival bleeding index in the obese group (P = 0.001 for both) with no significant difference in probing depth, clinical attachment level, and plaque index between the obese and the lean women. Oxidant status analyses revealed lower GCF and serum TAOC, and higher GCF and serum OSI values in the obese women (P < 0.05 for all). GCF TOS was higher in the obese women (P < 0.05), whereas there was a nonsignificant trend for higher serum TOS in obese women (P = 0.074). GCF TAOC values showed a negative correlation with body mass index, whereas GCF OSI was positively correlated with fasting insulin and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels (P < 0.05 for all). Clinical periodontal indices showed significant correlations with body mass index, insulin, and lipid levels, and also oxidant status markers

  13. Oxidative Stress and Periodontal Disease in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Dursun, Erhan; Akalın, Ferda Alev; Genc, Tolga; Cinar, Nese; Erel, Ozcan; Yildiz, Bulent Okan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory disease of the jaws and is more prevalent in obesity. Local and systemic oxidative stress may be an early link between periodontal disease and obesity. The primary aim of this study was to detect whether increased periodontal disease susceptibility in obese individuals is associated with local and systemic oxidative stress. Accordingly; we analyzed periodontal status and systemic (serum) and local (gingival crevicular fluid [GCF]) oxidative status markers in young obese women in comparison with age-matched lean women. Twenty obese and 20 lean women participated. Periodontal condition was determined by clinical periodontal indices including probing depth, clinical attachment level, gingival index, gingival bleeding index, and plaque index. Anthropometric, hormonal, and metabolic measurements were also performed. Blood and GCF sampling was performed at the same time after an overnight fasting. Serum and GCF total antioxidant capacity (TAOC), and total oxidant status (TOS) levels were determined, and oxidative stress index (OSI) was calculated. Clinical periodontal analyses showed higher gingival index and gingival bleeding index in the obese group (P = 0.001 for both) with no significant difference in probing depth, clinical attachment level, and plaque index between the obese and the lean women. Oxidant status analyses revealed lower GCF and serum TAOC, and higher GCF and serum OSI values in the obese women (P < 0.05 for all). GCF TOS was higher in the obese women (P < 0.05), whereas there was a nonsignificant trend for higher serum TOS in obese women (P = 0.074). GCF TAOC values showed a negative correlation with body mass index, whereas GCF OSI was positively correlated with fasting insulin and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels (P < 0.05 for all). Clinical periodontal indices showed significant correlations with body mass index, insulin, and lipid levels, and also oxidant status

  14. Nitric oxide in the stress axis.

    PubMed

    López-Figueroa, M O; Day, H E; Akil, H; Watson, S J

    1998-10-01

    In recent years nitric oxide (NO) has emerged as a unique biological messenger. NO is a highly diffusible gas, synthesized from L-arginine by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Three unique subtypes of NOS have been described, each with a specific distribution profile in the brain and periphery. NOS subtype I is present, among other areas, in the hippocampus, hypothalamus, pituitary and adrenal gland. Together these structures form the limbic-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (LHPA) or stress axis, activation of which is one of the defining features of a stress response. Evidence suggests that NO may modulate the release of the stress hormones ACTH and corticosterone, and NOS activity and transcription is increased in the LHPA axis following various stressful stimuli. Furthermore, following activation of the stress axis, glucocorticoids are thought to down-regulate the transcription and activity of NOS via a feedback mechanism. Taken together, current data indicate a role for NO in the regulation of the LHPA axis, although at present this role is not well defined. It has been suggested that NO may act as a cellular communicator in plasticity and development, to facilitate the activation or the release of other neurotransmitters, to mediate immune responses, and/or as a vasodilator in the regulation of blood flow. In the following review we summarize some of the latest insights into the function of NO, with special attention to its relationship with the LHPA axis.

  15. Antibacterial activity of graphite, graphite oxide, graphene oxide, and reduced graphene oxide: membrane and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shaobin; Zeng, Tingying Helen; Hofmann, Mario; Burcombe, Ehdi; Wei, Jun; Jiang, Rongrong; Kong, Jing; Chen, Yuan

    2011-09-27

    Health and environmental impacts of graphene-based materials need to be thoroughly evaluated before their potential applications. Graphene has strong cytotoxicity toward bacteria. To better understand its antimicrobial mechanism, we compared the antibacterial activity of four types of graphene-based materials (graphite (Gt), graphite oxide (GtO), graphene oxide (GO), and reduced graphene oxide (rGO)) toward a bacterial model-Escherichia coli. Under similar concentration and incubation conditions, GO dispersion shows the highest antibacterial activity, sequentially followed by rGO, Gt, and GtO. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and dynamic light scattering analyses show that GO aggregates have the smallest average size among the four types of materials. SEM images display that the direct contacts with graphene nanosheets disrupt cell membrane. No superoxide anion (O(2)(•-)) induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is detected. However, the four types of materials can oxidize glutathione, which serves as redox state mediator in bacteria. Conductive rGO and Gt have higher oxidation capacities than insulating GO and GtO. Results suggest that antimicrobial actions are contributed by both membrane and oxidation stress. We propose that a three-step antimicrobial mechanism, previously used for carbon nanotubes, is applicable to graphene-based materials. It includes initial cell deposition on graphene-based materials, membrane stress caused by direct contact with sharp nanosheets, and the ensuing superoxide anion-independent oxidation. We envision that physicochemical properties of graphene-based materials, such as density of functional groups, size, and conductivity, can be precisely tailored to either reducing their health and environmental risks or increasing their application potentials. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  16. Wet-cupping removes oxidants and decreases oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Tagil, Suleyman Murat; Celik, Huseyin Tugrul; Ciftci, Sefa; Kazanci, Fatmanur Hacievliyagil; Arslan, Muzeyyen; Erdamar, Nazan; Kesik, Yunus; Erdamar, Husamettin; Dane, Senol

    2014-12-01

    Wet-cupping therapy is one of the oldest known medical techniques. Although it is widely used in various conditions such as acute\\chronic inflammation, infectious diseases, and immune system disorders, its mechanism of action is not fully known. In this study, we investigated the oxidative status as the first step to elucidate possible mechanisms of action of wet cupping. Wet cupping therapy is implemented to 31 healthy volunteers. Venous blood samples and Wet cupping blood samples were taken concurrently. Serum nitricoxide, malondialdehyde levels and activity of superoxide dismutase and myeloperoxidase were measured spectrophotometrically. Wet cupping blood had higher activity of myeloperoxidase, lower activity of superoxide dismutase, higher levels of malondialdehyde and nitricoxide compared to the venous blood. Wet cupping removes oxidants and decreases oxidative stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Oxidative stress in pathogenesis of COPD].

    PubMed

    Betsuyaku, Tomoko

    2007-04-01

    Cigarette smoke and aging are major risk factors of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease(COPD). It remains unsolved how long -term smoking with age affects the molecular responses in the lung. Respiratory tract is the major interface to the environment and is rich in glutathione, which protects lung from oxidative stress. We performed bronchoalveolar lavage for nonsmokers and smokers of various ages, who were further categorized according to the presence of emphysema on high-resolution computed tomography. We thus evaluated glutathione antioxidant system in BAL fluid. Characterization of older smokers with long-term smoking histories, contrasted with young recent smokers, may in part explain the predisposition of the lungs to destructive lung diseases. On the other hands, oxidative stress results from an imbalance in aerobic metabolism and poses a serious threat to cellular apoptosis, leading to emphysematous lung destruction. The therapeutic interference with targeted up-regulation of protective mechanisms might be critical for the success of future COPD therapies.

  18. The role of oxidative stress in menopause

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Sejal B.; Agarwal, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    This review will discuss the concept of reproductive aging, which includes the definition of menopause, its symptoms, and predisposing conditions. It will elaborate upon the contributory factors implicated in the pathogenesis of menopause, focusing most prominently on oxidative stress. Specifically, this paper will explain how oxidative stress, in the form of free radicals and antioxidant deficiencies, has been directly linked to the decline of estrogen during reproductive aging. Additionally, this paper will elaborate upon the treatment options aimed at mitigating the menopausal symptoms and hormonal deficiencies that can lead to various disease processes. Treatment options such as hormonal therapy, antioxidant supplementation, and lifestyle modification have been explored for their effectiveness in treating and preventing the symptoms and sequelae of menopause. The majority of information in this review was obtained through PubMed and the National Library of Medicine. While most references in this paper are original research articles, a limited number of references are comprehensive reviews on the topic. PMID:24672185

  19. Oxidative stress and apoptosis in preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Can, Murat; Guven, Berrak; Bektas, Sibel; Arikan, Ilker

    2014-12-01

    We aimed to determine the oxidative stress and antioxidant status in preeclamptic placenta. Also, we investigated the apoptotic index of villous trophoblast and proliferation index of cytotrophoblasts. The study included 32 pregnant with preeclampsia and 31 normotensive healthy pregnant women. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and total antioxidant status (TAS) levels were measured in the placenta. For detection of apoptosis and proliferation in trophoblast, apoptosis protease activating factor 1 (APAF-1) and Ki-67 were used. Placental MDA levels in preeclamptic women were significantly higher than normal pregnancies (p=0.002). There was no significant difference between the groups in the TAS levels of placenta (p=0.773). Also, the apoptotic index in villous trophoblasts increased (p<0.001), but proliferation index did not change in preeclampsia (p=0.850). Increased oxidative stress and apoptosis in pathological placenta are not balanced by antioxidant systems and proliferation mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Atherosclerosis, oxidative stress and physical activity. Review].

    PubMed

    Calderón, Juan Camilo; Fernández, Ana Zita; María de Jesús, Alina Isabel

    2008-09-01

    Atherosclerosis and related diseases have emerged as the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the western world and, therefore, as a problem of public health. Free radicals and reactive oxygen species have been suggested to be part of the pathophysiology of these diseases. It is well known that physical activity plays an important role as a public health measure by reducing the risk of developing atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular events in the general population. It is also known that physical activity increases in some tissues, the reactive oxygen species production. In this review the atherosclerosis-oxidative stress-physical activity relationship is focused on the apparent paradox by which physical activity reduces atherosclerosis and cardiovascular risk in parallel with the activation of an apparently damaging mechanism which is an increased oxidative stress. A hypothesis including the experimental and clinical evidence is presented to explain the aforementioned paradox.

  1. Role of mitochondrial oxidative stress in hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ungvari, Zoltan

    2013-01-01

    Based on mosaic theory, hypertension is a multifactorial disorder that develops because of genetic, environmental, anatomical, adaptive neural, endocrine, humoral, and hemodynamic factors. It has been recently proposed that oxidative stress may contribute to all of these factors and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in the development of hypertension. Previous studies focusing on the role of vascular NADPH oxidases provided strong support of this concept. Although mitochondria represent one of the most significant sources of cellular ROS generation, the regulation of mitochondrial ROS generation in the cardiovascular system and its pathophysiological role in hypertension are much less understood. In this review, the role of mitochondrial oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of hypertension and cross talk between angiotensin II signaling, pathways involved in mechanotransduction, NADPH oxidases, and mitochondria-derived ROS are considered. The possible benefits of therapeutic strategies that have the potential to attenuate mitochondrial oxidative stress for the prevention/treatment of hypertension are also discussed. PMID:24043248

  2. Chrononutrition against Oxidative Stress in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, M.; Terrón, M. P.; Rodríguez, A. B.

    2013-01-01

    Free radicals and oxidative stress have been recognized as important factors in the biology of aging and in many age-associated degenerative diseases. Antioxidant systems deteriorate during aging. It is, thus, considered that one way to reduce the rate of aging and the risk of chronic disease is to avoid the formation of free radicals and reduce oxidative stress by strengthening antioxidant defences. Phytochemicals present in fruits, vegetables, grains, and other foodstuffs have been linked to reducing the risk of major oxidative stress-induced diseases. Some dietary components of foods possess biological activities which influence circadian rhythms in humans. Chrononutrition studies have shown that not only the content of food, but also the time of ingestion contributes to the natural functioning of the circadian system. Dietary interventions with antioxidant-enriched foods taking into account the principles of chrononutrition are of particular interest for the elderly since they may help amplify the already powerful benefits of phytochemicals as natural instruments with which to prevent or delay the onset of common age-related diseases. PMID:23861994

  3. [Oxidative stress in station service workers].

    PubMed

    Basso, A; Elia, G; Petrozzi, M T; Zefferino, R

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify an oxidative stress in service station workers. Previous studies verified an increased incidence of leukemia and myeloma, however other authors haven't verified it. There are reports of nasal, pharyngeal, laryngeal, and lung cancer in service station workers. Our study wants to evaluate the oxidative balance in the fuel workers. We studied 44 subjects with gasoline exposure and 29 control subjects. We determined the blood concentrations of Glutathione reduced and oxidized, Protein sulfhydrylic (PSH) Vitamine E, Vitamine C, Malondialdehyde, Protein oxidized (OX-PROT) and beta carotene. The t test was performed to analyze the differences between the means, the Chi square was used to evaluate the statistical significance of associations between variable categorical (redox index). The Anova test excluded the confusing effect of age, smoke and alcohol habit. The mean age of the workers was 36.6 years, instead the control group was 38. In the workers Glutathione reduced, Vit. E and Beta carotene were lower than in the control subjects, this difference was statistically significant (p < 0.01). The Malondialdehyde concentration was higher in the workers higher than in the control group, but this difference wasn't statistically significant. Our data demonstrated Glutathione, Vit. E, and Beta carotene are useful to verify a reduction of the antioxidant activity. The only marker of the presence of oxidative injury that correlated to work exposure was the malondialdehyde. The redox index was surest marker. The limit of our study is the number of control group, it was little and lower than workers. Conclusively we believe it's useful to continue our studies and, if our results are going to be confirmed, we retain that stress oxidative determination would be verified in occupational medicine using these markers, especially to study exposure of the fuel workers who were investigated less and, in our opinion, would receive more attention.

  4. Role of oxidative stress in female reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Ashok; Gupta, Sajal; Sharma, Rakesh K

    2005-01-01

    In a healthy body, ROS (reactive oxygen species) and antioxidants remain in balance. When the balance is disrupted towards an overabundance of ROS, oxidative stress (OS) occurs. OS influences the entire reproductive lifespan of a woman and even thereafter (i.e. menopause). OS results from an imbalance between prooxidants (free radical species) and the body's scavenging ability (antioxidants). ROS are a double-edged sword – they serve as key signal molecules in physiological processes but also have a role in pathological processes involving the female reproductive tract. ROS affect multiple physiological processes from oocyte maturation to fertilization, embryo development and pregnancy. It has been suggested that OS modulates the age-related decline in fertility. It plays a role during pregnancy and normal parturition and in initiation of preterm labor. Most ovarian cancers appear in the surface epithelium, and repetitive ovulation has been thought to be a causative factor. Ovulation-induced oxidative base damage and damage to DNA of the ovarian epithelium can be prevented by antioxidants. There is growing literature on the effects of OS in female reproduction with involvement in the pathophsiology of preeclampsia, hydatidiform mole, free radical-induced birth defects and other situations such as abortions. Numerous studies have shown that OS plays a role in the pathoysiology of infertility and assisted fertility. There is some evidence of its role in endometriosis, tubal and peritoneal factor infertility and unexplained infertility. This article reviews the role OS plays in normal cycling ovaries, follicular development and cyclical endometrial changes. It also discusses OS-related female infertility and how it influences the outcomes of assisted reproductive techniques. The review comprehensively explores the literature for evidence of the role of oxidative stress in conditions such as abortions, preeclampsia, hydatidiform mole, fetal embryopathies, preterm

  5. [Oxidative stress in platelets at an oncopathology].

    PubMed

    Gorozhanskaya, E G; Sviridova, S P; Baykova, V N; Zubrikhina, G N; Dobrovolskaya, M M; Sitov, A V

    2015-01-01

    To determine the biochemical disorders in the blood coagulation mechanism associated with oxidative stress parameters of the antioxidant status were examined in platelets of 57 colorectal cancer patients, (including 21 patients before and after surgery), and 40 healthy individuals. We determined the total content of nitric oxide (NOx), levels of superoxide dismutase (Cu/ZnSOD), glutathione and malondialdehyde (MDA). Before treatment, we observed the changes in the antioxidant defense system of platelets, which did not depend on the prevalence of malignancy: elevated levels of SOD by 16% (p<0.05), reduced glutathione and MDA in 5.2 and 1.7 times, respectively. NOx levels did not differ from the norm. Significant shifts were found in the postoperative period: they consisted of the increase in the generation of NOx both on the third, and on the 10-th day after surgery. These changes reflect apparently platelet response to the inflammatory process associated with the surgical trauma and confirm the role of NOx as a mediator of inflammation. The content of SOD after surgery was significantly reduced, but return to a baseline on the 10-th day. Despite the significant increase in the number of platelets, no correlations of the studied parameters and their aggregation ability were found.The findings suggest that metabolic disorders in vascular-platelet hemostasis are associated with oxidative stress, which provides a basis for further study of the relationship of cancer to thrombosis.

  6. Oxidative Stress and Autophagy in Cardiovascular Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Cyndi R.; Pedrozo, Zully; Lavandero, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Autophagy is an evolutionarily ancient process of intracellular protein and organelle recycling required to maintain cellular homeostasis in the face of a wide variety of stresses. Dysregulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) leads to oxidative damage. Both autophagy and ROS/RNS serve pathological or adaptive roles within cardiomyocytes, depending on the context. Recent Advances: ROS/RNS and autophagy communicate with each other via both transcriptional and post-translational events. This cross talk, in turn, regulates the structural integrity of cardiomyocytes, promotes proteostasis, and reduces inflammation, events critical to disease pathogenesis. Critical Issues: Dysregulation of either autophagy or redox state has been implicated in many cardiovascular diseases. Cardiomyocytes are rich in mitochondria, which make them particularly sensitive to oxidative damage. Maintenance of mitochondrial homeostasis and elimination of defective mitochondria are each critical to the maintenance of redox homeostasis. Future Directions: The complex interplay between autophagy and oxidative stress underlies a wide range of physiological and pathological events and its elucidation holds promise of potential clinical applicability. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 507–518. PMID:23641894

  7. Oxidative stress inhibition and oxidant activity by fibrous clays.

    PubMed

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Nieto-Camacho, Antonio; Gómez-Vidales, Virginia

    2015-09-01

    Fibrous clays (sepiolite, palygorskite) are produced at 1.2m tonnes per year and have a wide range of industrial applications needing to replace long-fibre length asbestos. However, information on the beneficial effects of fibrous clays on health remains scarce. This paper reports on the effect of sepiolite (Vallecas, Spain) and palygorskite (Torrejón El Rubio, Spain) on cell damage via oxidative stress (determined as the progress of lipid peroxidation, LP). The extent of LP was assessed using the Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances assay. The oxidant activity by fibrous clays was quantified using Electron-Paramagnetic Resonance. Sepiolite and palygorskite inhibited LP, whereby corresponding IC50 values were 6557±1024 and 4250±289μgmL(-1). As evidenced by dose-response experiments LP inhibition by palygorskite was surface-controlled. Fibrous clay surfaces did not stabilize HO species, except for suspensions containing 5000μgmL(-1). A strong oxidant (or weak anti-oxidant) activity favours the inhibition of LP by fibrous clays. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Nuclear transport, oxidative stress, and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vivek P; Chu, Charleen T

    2011-01-01

    Trafficking of transcription factors between the cytoplasm and the nucleus is an essential aspect of signal transduction, which is particularly challenging in neurons due to their highly polarized structure. Disruption in the subcellular localization of many proteins, including transcription factors, is observed in affected neurons of human neurodegenerative diseases. In these diseases, there is also growing evidence supporting alterations in nuclear transport as potential mechanisms underlying the observed mislocalization of proteins. Oxidative stress, which plays a key pathogenic role in these diseases, has also been associated with significant alterations in nuclear transport. After providing an overview of the major nuclear import and export pathways and discussing the impact of oxidative injury on nuclear trafficking of proteins, this review synthesizes emerging evidence for altered nuclear transport as a possible mechanism in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Potential strategies to overcome such deficits are also discussed. PMID:21487518

  9. Oxidative stress-mediated HMGB1 biology

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yan; Tang, Daolin; Kang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a widely-expressed and highly-abundant protein that acts as an extracellular signal upon active secretion by immune cells or passive release by dead, dying, and injured cells. Both intracellular and extracellular HMGB1 play pivotal roles in regulation of the cellular response to stress. Targeting the translocation, release, and activity of HMGB1 can limit inflammation and reduce tissue damage during infection and sterile inflammation. Although the mechanisms contributing to HMGB1 biology are still under investigation, it appears that oxidative stress is a central regulator of HMGB1's translocation, release, and activity in inflammation and cell death (e.g., necrosis, apoptosis, autophagic cell death, pyroptosis, and NETosis). Thus, targeting HMGB1 with antioxidant compounds may be an attractive therapeutic strategy for inflammation-associated diseases such as sepsis, ischemia and reperfusion injury, arthritis, diabetes, and cancer. PMID:25904867

  10. Free radicals, reactive oxygen species, oxidative stress and its classification.

    PubMed

    Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2014-12-05

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) initially considered as only damaging agents in living organisms further were found to play positive roles also. This paper describes ROS homeostasis, principles of their investigation and technical approaches to investigate ROS-related processes. Especial attention is paid to complications related to experimental documentation of these processes, their diversity, spatiotemporal distribution, relationships with physiological state of the organisms. Imbalance between ROS generation and elimination in favor of the first with certain consequences for cell physiology has been called "oxidative stress". Although almost 30years passed since the first definition of oxidative stress was introduced by Helmut Sies, to date we have no accepted classification of oxidative stress. In order to fill up this gape here classification of oxidative stress based on its intensity is proposed. Due to that oxidative stress may be classified as basal oxidative stress (BOS), low intensity oxidative stress (LOS), intermediate intensity oxidative stress (IOS), and high intensity oxidative stress (HOS). Another classification of potential interest may differentiate three categories such as mild oxidative stress (MOS), temperate oxidative stress (TOS), and finally severe (strong) oxidative stress (SOS). Perspective directions of investigations in the field include development of sophisticated classification of oxidative stresses, accurate identification of cellular ROS targets and their arranged responses to ROS influence, real in situ functions and operation of so-called "antioxidants", intracellular spatiotemporal distribution and effects of ROS, deciphering of molecular mechanisms responsible for cellular response to ROS attacks, and ROS involvement in realization of normal cellular functions in cellular homeostasis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA: A CATECHOLAMINE AND OXIDATIVE STRESS DISORDER

    PubMed Central

    Pacak, Karel

    2012-01-01

    The WHO classification of endocrine tumors defines pheochromocytoma as a tumor arising from chromaffin cells in the adrenal medulla — an intra-adrenal paraganglioma. Closely related tumors of extra-adrenal sympathetic and parasympathetic paraganglia are classified as extra-adrenal paragangliomas. Almost all pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas produce catecholamines. The concentrations of catecholamines in pheochromocytoma tissues are enormous, potentially creating a volcano that can erupt at any time. Significant eruptions result in catecholamine storms called “attacks” or “spells”. Acute catecholamine crisis can strike unexpectedly, leaving traumatic memories of acute medical disaster that champions any intensive care unit. A very well-defined genotype-biochemical phenotype relationship exists, guiding proper and cost-effective genetic testing of patients with these tumors. Currently, the production of norepinephrine and epinephrine is optimally assessed by the measurement of their O-methylated metabolites, normetanephrine or metanephrine, respectively. Dopamine is a minor component, but some paragangliomas produce only this catecholamine or this together with norepinephrine. Methoxytyramine, the O-methylated metabolite of dopamine, is the best biochemical marker of these tumors. In those patients with equivocal biochemical results, a modified clonidine suppression test coupled with the measurement of plasma normetanephrine has recently been introduced. In addition to differences in catecholamine enzyme expression, the presence of either constitutive or regulated secretory pathways contributes further to the very unique mutation-dependent catecholamine production and release, resulting in various clinical presentations. Oxidative stress results from a significant imbalance between levels of prooxidants, generated during oxidative phosphorylation, and antioxidants. The gradual accumulation of prooxidants due to metabolic oxidative stress results in proto

  12. [Oxidative stress in patients on mechanical ventilation].

    PubMed

    Marjanović, Vesna; Dordević, Vidosava; Marjanović, Goran

    2009-01-01

    The appearance and intensity of oxidative stress were analyzed in the course of mechanical ventilation and parameters that could point toward potential lung damage. In three time intervals on day 1, 3 and 7 of mechanical ventilation, parameters such as: triglycerides, cholesterol, lactate, serum lactic dehydrogenase, acid-base balance and lipid peroxidation products--thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, were followed in 30 patients with head injuries. A decrease in the level of partial oxygen pressure (PaO2) (p < 0.01) and PaO2/FiO2 index (p < 0.05) in arterial blood was recorded on day 3 of mechanical ventilation. This was accompanied with an increase in alveolar-arterial difference (AaDO2) (p < 0.05), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (p < 0.001) and lactic dehydrogenase (p < 0.001) comparing to day 1 of mechanical ventilation. The patients with initial PaO2 > 120 mmHg, had significant increase of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and AaDO2 (p < 0.05) and fall of PaO2 (p < 0.001) on day 3 of mechanical ventilation. Oxidative stress and lipid peroxide production are increased during third day of mechanical ventilation leading to disruption of oxygen diffusion through alveolar-capillary membrane and reduction of parameters of oxygenation.

  13. OXIDATIVE STRESS: BIOMARKERS AND NOVEL THERAPEUTIC PATHWAYS

    PubMed Central

    Maiese, Kenneth; Chong, Zhao Zhong; Hou, Jinling; Shang, Yan Chen

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress significantly impacts multiple cellular pathways that can lead to the initiation and progression of varied disorders throughout the body. It therefore becomes imperative to elucidate the components and function of novel therapeutic strategies against oxidative stress to further clinical diagnosis and care. In particular, both the growth factor and cytokine erythropoietin (EPO) and members of the mammalian forkhead transcription factors of the O class (FoxOs) may offer the greatest promise for new treatment regimens since these agents and the cellular pathways they oversee cover a range of critical functions that directly influence progenitor cell development, cell survival and degeneration, metabolism, immune function, and cancer cell invasion. Furthermore, both EPO and FoxOs function not only as therapeutic targets, but also as biomarkers of disease onset and progression, since their cellular pathways are closely linked and overlap with several unique signal transduction pathways. However, biological outcome with EPO and FoxOs may sometimes be both unexpected and undesirable that can raise caution for these agents and warrant further investigations. Here we present the exciting as well as complicated role EPO and FoxOs possess to uncover the benefits as well as the risks of these agents for cell biology and clinical care in processes that range from stem cell development to uncontrolled cellular proliferation. PMID:20064603

  14. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Links Oxidative Stress to Impaired Pancreatic Beta-Cell Function Caused by Human Oxidized LDL.

    PubMed

    Plaisance, Valérie; Brajkovic, Saška; Tenenbaum, Mathie; Favre, Dimitri; Ezanno, Hélène; Bonnefond, Amélie; Bonner, Caroline; Gmyr, Valéry; Kerr-Conte, Julie; Gauthier, Benoit R; Widmann, Christian; Waeber, Gérard; Pattou, François; Froguel, Philippe; Abderrahmani, Amar

    2016-01-01

    Elevated plasma concentration of the pro-atherogenic oxidized low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) triggers adverse effects in pancreatic beta-cells and is associated with type 2 diabetes. Here, we investigated whether the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a key player coupling oxidative stress to beta-cell dysfunction and death elicited by human oxidized LDL. We found that human oxidized LDL activates ER stress as evidenced by the activation of the inositol requiring 1α, and the elevated expression of both DDIT3 (also called CHOP) and DNAJC3 (also called P58IPK) ER stress markers in isolated human islets and the mouse insulin secreting MIN6 cells. Silencing of Chop and inhibition of ER stress markers by the chemical chaperone phenyl butyric acid (PBA) prevented cell death caused by oxidized LDL. Finally, we found that oxidative stress accounts for activation of ER stress markers induced by oxidized LDL. Induction of Chop/CHOP and p58IPK/P58IPK by oxidized LDL was mimicked by hydrogen peroxide and was blocked by co-treatment with the N-acetylcystein antioxidant. As a conclusion, the harmful effects of oxidized LDL in beta-cells requires ER stress activation in a manner that involves oxidative stress. This mechanism may account for impaired beta-cell function in diabetes and can be reversed by antioxidant treatment.

  15. "Cumulative Stress": The Effects of Maternal and Neonatal Oxidative Stress and Oxidative Stress-Inducible Genes on Programming of Atopy.

    PubMed

    Manti, Sara; Marseglia, Lucia; D'Angelo, Gabriella; Cuppari, Caterina; Cusumano, Erika; Arrigo, Teresa; Gitto, Eloisa; Salpietro, Carmelo

    2016-01-01

    Although extensive epidemiological and laboratory studies have been performed to identify the environmental and immunological causes of atopy, genetic predisposition seems to be the biggest risk factor for allergic diseases. The onset of atopic diseases may be the result of heritable changes of gene expression, without any alteration in DNA sequences occurring in response to early environmental stimuli. Findings suggest that the establishment of a peculiar epigenetic pattern may also be generated by oxidative stress (OS) and perpetuated by the activation of OS-related genes. Analyzing the role of maternal and neonatal oxidative stress and oxidative stress-inducible genes, the purpose of this review was to summarize what is known about the relationship between maternal and neonatal OS-related genes and the development of atopic diseases.

  16. Oxidative stress in organophosphate poisoning: role of standard antidotal therapy.

    PubMed

    Vanova, Nela; Pejchal, Jaroslav; Herman, David; Dlabkova, Alzbeta; Jun, Daniel

    2018-08-01

    Despite the main mechanism of organophosphate (OP) toxicity through inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) being well known over the years, some chronic adverse health effects indicate the involvement of additional pathways. Oxidative stress is among the most intensively studied. Overstimulation of cholinergic and glutamatergic nervous system is followed by intensified generation of reactive species and oxidative damage in many tissues. In this review, the role of oxidative stress in pathophysiology of OP poisoning and the influence of commonly used medical interventions on its levels are discussed. Current standardized therapy of OP intoxications comprises live-saving administration of the anticholinergic drug atropine accompanied by oxime AChE reactivator and diazepam. The capability of these antidotes to ameliorate OP-induced oxidative stress varies between both therapeutic groups and individual medications within the drug class. Regarding oxidative stress, atropine does not seem to have a significant effect on oxidative stress parameters in OP poisoning. In a case of AChE reactivators, pro-oxidative and antioxidative properties could be found. It is assumed that the ability of oximes to trigger oxidative stress is rather associated with their chemical structure than reactivation efficacy. The data indicating the potency of diazepam in preventing OP-induced oxidative stress are not available. Based on current knowledge on the mechanism of OP-mediated oxidative stress, alternative approaches (including antioxidants or multifunctional drugs) in therapy of OP poisoning are under consideration. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Evaluation of Oxidative Stress in Bipolar Disorder in terms of Total Oxidant Status, Total Antioxidant Status, and Oxidative Stress Index

    PubMed Central

    CİNGİ YİRÜN, Merve; ÜNAL, Kübranur; ALTUNSOY ŞEN, Neslihan; YİRÜN, Onur; AYDEMİR, Çiğdem; GÖKA, Erol

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bipolar disorder is one of the most debilitating psychiatric disorders characterized by disruptive episodes of mania/hypomania and depression. Considering the complex role of biological and environmental factors in the etiology of affective disorders, recent studies have focused on oxidative stress, which may damage nerve cell components and take part in pathophysiology. The aim of the present study was to contribute to the data about oxidative stress in bipolar disorder by detecting the total antioxidant status (TAS), total oxidant status (TOS), and oxidative stress index (OSI) levels of manic episode (ME) and euthymic (EU) patients and by comparing these results with those of healthy controls (HCs). Methods The study population consisted of 28 EU outpatients meeting the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) criteria for bipolar disorder I and 23 inpatients who were currently hospitalized in a psychiatry ward with the diagnosis of the bipolar disorder ME according to the DSM-5 criteria. Forty-three healthy subjects were included in the study as the control group (HC). Serum TAS, TOS, and OSI levels of all the participants were determined. Results Statistical analysis of serum TAS, TOS, and OSI levels did not show any significant differences between the ME patients, EU patients, and HCs. Comparison between the bipolar disorder patients (ME+EU) and HC also did not reveal any statistically significant difference between these two groups in terms of serum TAS, TOS, and OSI levels. Conclusion To date, studies on oxidative stress in bipolar disorder have led to controversial results. In the present study, no statistically significant difference was detected between the oxidative parameters of bipolar disorder patients and HCs. In order to comprehensively evaluate oxidative stress in bipolar disorder, further studies are needed. PMID:28373794

  18. Evaluation of Oxidative Stress in Bipolar Disorder in terms of Total Oxidant Status, Total Antioxidant Status, and Oxidative Stress Index.

    PubMed

    Cingi Yirün, Merve; Ünal, Kübranur; Altunsoy Şen, Neslihan; Yirün, Onur; Aydemir, Çiğdem; Göka, Erol

    2016-09-01

    Bipolar disorder is one of the most debilitating psychiatric disorders characterized by disruptive episodes of mania/hypomania and depression. Considering the complex role of biological and environmental factors in the etiology of affective disorders, recent studies have focused on oxidative stress, which may damage nerve cell components and take part in pathophysiology. The aim of the present study was to contribute to the data about oxidative stress in bipolar disorder by detecting the total antioxidant status (TAS), total oxidant status (TOS), and oxidative stress index (OSI) levels of manic episode (ME) and euthymic (EU) patients and by comparing these results with those of healthy controls (HCs). The study population consisted of 28 EU outpatients meeting the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) criteria for bipolar disorder I and 23 inpatients who were currently hospitalized in a psychiatry ward with the diagnosis of the bipolar disorder ME according to the DSM-5 criteria. Forty-three healthy subjects were included in the study as the control group (HC). Serum TAS, TOS, and OSI levels of all the participants were determined. Statistical analysis of serum TAS, TOS, and OSI levels did not show any significant differences between the ME patients, EU patients, and HCs. Comparison between the bipolar disorder patients (ME+EU) and HC also did not reveal any statistically significant difference between these two groups in terms of serum TAS, TOS, and OSI levels. To date, studies on oxidative stress in bipolar disorder have led to controversial results. In the present study, no statistically significant difference was detected between the oxidative parameters of bipolar disorder patients and HCs. In order to comprehensively evaluate oxidative stress in bipolar disorder, further studies are needed.

  19. Measurement of exercise-induced oxidative stress in lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Turner, James E; Bosch, Jos A; Aldred, Sarah

    2011-10-01

    Vigorous exercise is associated with oxidative stress, a state that involves modifications to bodily molecules due to release of pro-oxidant species. Assessment of such modifications provides non-specific measures of oxidative stress in human tissues and blood, including circulating lymphocytes. Lymphocytes are a very heterogeneous group of white blood cells, consisting of subtypes that have different functions in immunity. Importantly, exercise drastically changes the lymphocyte composition in blood by increasing the numbers of some subsets, while leaving other cells unaffected. This fact may imply that observed changes in oxidative stress markers are confounded by changes in lymphocyte composition. For example, lymphocyte subsets may differ in exposure to oxidative stress because of subset differences in cell division and the acquisition of cytotoxic effector functions. The aim of the present review is to raise awareness of interpretational issues related to the assessment of oxidative stress in lymphocytes with exercise and to address the relevance of lymphocyte subset phenotyping in these contexts.

  20. The Role of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidants in Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sha; Tan, Hor-Yue; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Zhang-Jin; Lao, Lixing; Wong, Chi-Woon; Feng, Yibin

    2015-01-01

    A complex antioxidant system has been developed in mammals to relieve oxidative stress. However, excessive reactive species derived from oxygen and nitrogen may still lead to oxidative damage to tissue and organs. Oxidative stress has been considered as a conjoint pathological mechanism, and it contributes to initiation and progression of liver injury. A lot of risk factors, including alcohol, drugs, environmental pollutants and irradiation, may induce oxidative stress in liver, which in turn results in severe liver diseases, such as alcoholic liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Application of antioxidants signifies a rational curative strategy to prevent and cure liver diseases involving oxidative stress. Although conclusions drawn from clinical studies remain uncertain, animal studies have revealed the promising in vivo therapeutic effect of antioxidants on liver diseases. Natural antioxidants contained in edible or medicinal plants often possess strong antioxidant and free radical scavenging abilities as well as anti-inflammatory action, which are also supposed to be the basis of other bioactivities and health benefits. In this review, PubMed was extensively searched for literature research. The keywords for searching oxidative stress were free radicals, reactive oxygen, nitrogen species, anti-oxidative therapy, Chinese medicines, natural products, antioxidants and liver diseases. The literature, including ours, with studies on oxidative stress and anti-oxidative therapy in liver diseases were the focus. Various factors that cause oxidative stress in liver and effects of antioxidants in the prevention and treatment of liver diseases were summarized, questioned, and discussed. PMID:26540040

  1. Mitochondrial oxidative stress and cardiac ageing.

    PubMed

    Martín-Fernández, Beatriz; Gredilla, Ricardo

    According with different international organizations, cardiovascular diseases are becoming the first cause of death in western countries. Although exposure to different risk factors, particularly those related to lifestyle, contribute to the etiopathogenesis of cardiac disorders, the increase in average lifespan and aging are considered major determinants of cardiac diseases events. Mitochondria and oxidative stress have been pointed out as relevant factors both in heart aging and in the development of cardiac diseases such as heart failure, cardiac hypertrophy and diabetic cardiomyopathy. During aging, cellular processes related with mitochondrial function, such as bioenergetics, apoptosis and inflammation are altered leading to cardiac dysfunction. Increasing our knowledge about the mitochondrial mechanisms related with the aging process, will provide new strategies in order to improve this process, particularly the cardiovascular ones. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Oxidative stress, free radicals and protein peroxides.

    PubMed

    Gebicki, Janusz M

    2016-04-01

    Primary free radicals generated under oxidative stress in cells and tissues produce a cascade of reactive secondary radicals, which attack biomolecules with efficiency determined by the reaction rate constants and target concentration. Proteins are prominent targets because they constitute the bulk of the organic content of cells and tissues and react readily with many of the secondary radicals. The reactions commonly lead to the formation of carbon-centered radicals, which generally convert in vivo to peroxyl radicals and finally to semistable hydroperoxides. All of these intermediates can initiate biological damage. This article outlines the advantages of the application of ionizing radiations to studies of radicals, with particular reference to the generation of desired radicals, studies of the kinetics of their reactions and correlating the results with events in biological systems. In one such application, formation of protein hydroperoxides in irradiated cells was inhibited by the intracellular ascorbate and glutathione. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Air Pollution, Oxidative Stress, and Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Moulton, Paula Valencia; Yang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia affecting millions of people worldwide and will continue to affect millions more with population aging on the rise. AD causality is multifactorial. Known causal factors include genetic predisposition, age, and sex. Environmental toxins such as air pollution (AP) have also been implicated in AD causation. Exposure to AP can lead to chronic oxidative stress (OS), which is involved in the pathogenesis of AD. Whereas AP plays a role in AD pathology, the epidemiological evidence for this association is limited. Given the significant prevalence of AP exposure combined with increased population aging, epidemiological evidence for this link is important to consider. In this paper, we examine the existing evidence supporting the relationship between AP, OS, and AD and provide recommendations for future research on the population level, which will provide evidence in support of public health interventions. PMID:22523504

  4. Oxidative stress in normal and diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Torres, M D; Canal, J R; Pérez, C

    1999-01-01

    Parameters related to oxidative stress were studied in a group of 10 Wistar diabetic rats and 10 control rats. The levels of total erythrocyte catalase activity in the diabetic animals were significantly (p<0.001) greater than the control levels. The diabetic animals presented an amount of vitamin E far greater (p<0.0001) than the controls, as was also the case for the vitaminE/polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) and vitaminE/linoleic acid (C18:2) ratios. Greater vitaminE/triglyceride (TG) ratio, however, appeared in the control group. The corresponding vitamin A ratios (vitaminA/TG, vitaminA/PUFA, vitaminA/C 18:2) were higher in the control group. Our work corroborates the findings that fatty acid metabolism presents alterations in the diabetes syndrome and that the antioxidant status is affected.

  5. Sport and oxidative stress in oncological patients.

    PubMed

    Knop, K; Schwan, R; Bongartz, M; Bloch, W; Brixius, K; Baumann, F

    2011-12-01

    Oxidative stress is thought to be an important factor in the onset, progression and recurrence of cancer. In order to investigate how it is influenced by physical activity, we measured oxidative stress and antioxidative capacity (aoC) in 12 women with breast cancer and 6 men with prostate cancer, before and after long hiking trips. Before the hike, the men had a ROS-concentration of 1.8±0.6 mM H2O2 and an aoC of 0.7±0.6 mM Trolox-equivalent (Tro), while the women had a ROS-concentration of 3.1±0.7 mM H2O2 and an aoC of 1.2±0.2 mM Tro. After the hike, women showed no significant change in ROS and a significant increase in aoC (1.3±0.2 mM Tro), while the ROS concentration in men increased significantly (2.1±0.3 mM H2O2) and their aoC decreased (0.25±0.1 mM Tro). After a regenerative phase, the ROS concentration of the men decreased to 1.7±0.4 mM H2O2 and their aoC recovered significantly (1.2±0.4 mM Tro), while the women presented no significant change in the concentration of H2O2 but showed an ulterior increase in antioxidant capacity (2.05±0.43 mM Tro). From this data we conclude that physical training programs as for example long distance hiking trips can improve the aoC in the blood of oncological patients. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Effects of Febuxostat on Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Toshiki; Maruyama, Mie; Yamauchi, Kazuhiro; Yoshitaka, Sumie; Yasuda, Tadashi; Abe, Youichi

    2015-07-01

    We previously examined factors that affect the measured derivatives of reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs), an indicator of reactive oxygen species production, and biological antioxidant potential (BAP), an indicator of antioxidant capacity, in typical health checkup examinees and reported the usefulness of measuring both indicators simultaneously. In addition, a positive correlation reportedly exists between d-ROMs and the visceral fat area measured by using computed tomography. A recent study of the relationship between uric acid levels and various obesity-related factors found that visceral fat was the factor most strongly related to uric acid levels. Uric acid is itself a potent endogenous antioxidant, but because reactive oxygen species are produced during uric acid generation, it is suggested that uric acid may have opposing effects. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of febuxostat, a novel xanthine oxidase inhibitor, on oxidative stress. Study subjects were 43 hyperuricemia outpatients receiving care in the internal medicine department of our institution. The subjects were divided into a new administration group (29 patients) and a switched administration group (14 patients); the latter were allopurinol-treated patients with hyperuricemia who were switched to febuxostat. In addition to measuring the patients' uric acid and creatinine levels and estimated glomerular filtration rate before and after treatment, their d-ROMs and BAP as well as the BAP/d-ROMs ratio were also measured. Both groups exhibited significant decreases in uric acid levels, as well as significant decreases in d-ROMs and BAP. No significant changes were observed in the BAP/dROMs ratio or renal function, including creatinine levels and estimated glomerular filtration rate. Febuxostat could significantly reduce d-ROMs. However, BAP levels were also significantly reduced concurrently. No changes were observed in the BAP/d-ROMs ratios. This regulatory mechanism is believed

  7. Oxidative stress, protein modification and Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Tramutola, A; Lanzillotta, C; Perluigi, M; Butterfield, D Allan

    2017-07-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects the elderly population with complex etiology. Many hypotheses have been proposed to explain different causes of AD, but the exact mechanisms remain unclear. In this review, we focus attention on the oxidative-stress hypothesis of neurodegeneration and we discuss redox proteomics approaches to analyze post-mortem human brain from AD brain. Collectively, these studies have provided valuable insights into the molecular mechanisms involved both in the pathogenesis and progression of AD, demonstrating the impairment of numerous cellular processes such as energy production, cellular structure, signal transduction, synaptic function, mitochondrial function, cell cycle progression, and degradative systems. Each of these cellular functions normally contributes to maintain healthy neuronal homeostasis, so the deregulation of one or more of these functions could contribute to the pathology and clinical presentation of AD. In particular, we discuss the evidence demonstrating the oxidation/dysfunction of a number of enzymes specifically involved in energy metabolism that support the view that reduced glucose metabolism and loss of ATP are crucial events triggering neurodegeneration and progression of AD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Implantation of Neural Probes in the Brain Elicits Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ereifej, Evon S.; Rial, Griffin M.; Hermann, John K.; Smith, Cara S.; Meade, Seth M.; Rayyan, Jacob M.; Chen, Keying; Feng, He; Capadona, Jeffrey R.

    2018-01-01

    Clinical implantation of intracortical microelectrodes has been hindered, at least in part, by the perpetual inflammatory response occurring after device implantation. The neuroinflammatory response observed after device implantation has been correlated to oxidative stress that occurs due to neurological injury and disease. However, there has yet to be a definitive link of oxidative stress to intracortical microelectrode implantation. Thus, the objective of this study is to give direct evidence of oxidative stress following intracortical microelectrode implantation. This study also aims to identify potential molecular targets to attenuate oxidative stress observed postimplantation. Here, we implanted adult rats with silicon non-functional microelectrode probes for 4 weeks and compared the oxidative stress response to no surgery controls through postmortem gene expression analysis and qualitative histological observation of oxidative stress markers. Gene expression analysis results at 4 weeks postimplantation indicated that EH domain-containing 2, prion protein gene (Prnp), and Stearoyl-Coenzyme A desaturase 1 (Scd1) were all significantly higher for animals implanted with intracortical microelectrode probes compared to no surgery control animals. To the contrary, NADPH oxidase activator 1 (Noxa1) relative gene expression was significantly lower for implanted animals compared to no surgery control animals. Histological observation of oxidative stress showed an increased expression of oxidized proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids concentrated around the implant site. Collectively, our results reveal there is a presence of oxidative stress following intracortical microelectrode implantation compared to no surgery controls. Further investigation targeting these specific oxidative stress linked genes could be beneficial to understanding potential mechanisms and downstream therapeutics that can be utilized to reduce oxidative stress-mediated damage following

  9. Biomarkers for oxidative stress: clinical application in pediatric medicine.

    PubMed

    Tsukahara, Hirokazu

    2007-01-01

    Loads of reactive oxygen species (ROS), including superoxide anion and nitric oxide, that overburden antioxidant systems induce oxidative stress in the body. Major cellular targets of ROS are membrane lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, and carbohydrates. Circumstantial evidence suggests that ROS play a crucial role in the initiation and progression of various diseases in children and adolescents. The involvement of ROS and oxidative stress in pediatric diseases is an important concern, but oxidative stress status in young subjects and appropriate methods for its measurement remain to be defined. Recently, specific biomarkers for oxidative damage and antioxidant defense have been introduced into the field of pediatric medicine. This review is intended to provide an overview of clinical applications of oxidative stress biomarkers in the field of pediatric medicine. First, this review presents the biochemistry and pathophysiology of ROS and antioxidant defense systems. Second, it presents a list of clinically applicable biomarkers, along with pediatric diseases in which enhanced oxidative stress might be involved. The discussion emphasizes that several reliable biomarkers are easily measurable using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Third, this review presents age-related reference normal ranges of oxidative stress biomarkers, including urinary acrolein-lysine, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, nitrite/nitrate, and pentosidine, and the changes of the parameters in several clinical conditions, including atopic dermatitis and diabetes mellitus. New and interesting data on oxidative stress and antioxidant defenses in neonatal biology are also presented. Fourth, this review discusses the ever-accumulating body of data linking oxidative stress to disturbances of the nitric oxide system and vascular endothelial activation/dysfunction. Finally, this review describes the reported clinical trials that have evaluated the efficacy of antioxidants for oxidative-stress related diseases

  10. Classification of oxidative stress based on its intensity

    PubMed Central

    Lushchak, Volodymyr I.

    2014-01-01

    In living organisms production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is counterbalanced by their elimination and/or prevention of formation which in concert can typically maintain a steady-state (stationary) ROS level. However, this balance may be disturbed and lead to elevated ROS levels called oxidative stress. To our best knowledge, there is no broadly acceptable system of classification of oxidative stress based on its intensity due to which proposed here system may be helpful for interpretation of experimental data. Oxidative stress field is the hot topic in biology and, to date, many details related to ROS-induced damage to cellular components, ROS-based signaling, cellular responses and adaptation have been disclosed. However, it is common situation when researchers experience substantial difficulties in the correct interpretation of oxidative stress development especially when there is a need to characterize its intensity. Careful selection of specific biomarkers (ROS-modified targets) and some system may be helpful here. A classification of oxidative stress based on its intensity is proposed here. According to this classification there are four zones of function in the relationship between “Dose/concentration of inducer” and the measured “Endpoint”: I – basal oxidative stress (BOS); II – low intensity oxidative stress (LOS); III – intermediate intensity oxidative stress (IOS); IV – high intensity oxidative stress (HOS). The proposed classification will be helpful to describe experimental data where oxidative stress is induced and systematize it based on its intensity, but further studies will be in need to clear discriminate between stress of different intensity. PMID:26417312

  11. Protein Sulfenylation: A Novel Readout of Environmental Oxidant Stress

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidative stress is a commonly cited mechanism of toxicity of environmental agents. Ubiquitous environmental chemicals such as the diesel exhaust component 1,2-naphthoquinone (1,2-NQ)induce oxidative stress by redox cycling, which generates hydrogen peroxide (H202). Cysteinylthio...

  12. Altered Gravity Induces Oxidative Stress in Drosophila Melanogaster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharya, Sharmila; Hosamani, Ravikumar

    2015-01-01

    Altered gravity environments can induce increased oxidative stress in biological systems. Microarray data from our previous spaceflight experiment (FIT experiment on STS-121) indicated significant changes in the expression of oxidative stress genes in adult fruit flies after spaceflight. Currently, our lab is focused on elucidating the role of hypergravity-induced oxidative stress and its impact on the nervous system in Drosophila melanogaster. Biochemical, molecular, and genetic approaches were combined to study this effect on the ground. Adult flies (2-3 days old) exposed to acute hypergravity (3g, for 1 hour and 2 hours) showed significantly elevated levels of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in fly brains compared to control samples. This data was supported by significant changes in mRNA expression of specific oxidative stress and antioxidant defense related genes. As anticipated, a stress-resistant mutant line, Indy302, was less vulnerable to hypergravity-induced oxidative stress compared to wild-type flies. Survival curves were generated to study the combined effect of hypergravity and pro-oxidant treatment. Interestingly, many of the oxidative stress changes that were measured in flies showed sex specific differences. Collectively, our data demonstrate that altered gravity significantly induces oxidative stress in Drosophila, and that one of the organs where this effect is evident is the brain.

  13. Antioxidant status and biomarkers of oxidative stress in canine lymphoma

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background – Oxidative stress might play a role in carcinogenesis, as well as impacting morbidity and mortality of veterinary cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate antioxidant concentrations and biomarkers of oxidative stress in dogs with newly-diagnosed lymphoma prior to treatm...

  14. Oxidative stress treatment for clinical trials in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Ienco, Elena Caldarazzo; LoGerfo, Annalisa; Carlesi, Cecilia; Orsucci, Daniele; Ricci, Giulia; Mancuso, Michelangelo; Siciliano, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a metabolic condition arising from imbalance between the production of potentially reactive oxygen species and the scavenging activities. Mitochondria are the main providers but also the main scavengers of cell oxidative stress. The role of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases is well documented. Therefore, therapeutic approaches targeting mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage hold great promise in neurodegenerative diseases. Despite this evidence, human experience with antioxidant neuroprotectants has generally been negative with regards to the clinical progress of disease, with unclear results in biochemical assays. Here we review the antioxidant approaches performed so far in neurodegenerative diseases and the future challenges in modern medicine.

  15. Oxidative Stress in Diabetes: Implications for Vascular and Other Complications

    PubMed Central

    Pitocco, Dario; Tesauro, Manfredi; Alessandro, Rizzi; Ghirlanda, Giovanni; Cardillo, Carmine

    2013-01-01

    In recent decades, oxidative stress has become a focus of interest in most biomedical disciplines and many types of clinical research. Increasing evidence shows that oxidative stress is associated with the pathogenesis of diabetes, obesity, cancer, ageing, inflammation, neurodegenerative disorders, hypertension, apoptosis, cardiovascular diseases, and heart failure. Based on these studies, an emerging concept is that oxidative stress is the “final common pathway” through which the risk factors for several diseases exert their deleterious effects. Oxidative stress causes a complex dysregulation of cell metabolism and cell–cell homeostasis; in particular, oxidative stress plays a key role in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction. These are the two most relevant mechanisms in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes and its vascular complications, the leading cause of death in diabetic patients. PMID:24177571

  16. Oxidative stress-induced autophagy: Role in pulmonary toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Malaviya, Rama; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L., E-mail: laskin@eohsi.rutgers.edu

    2014-03-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process important in regulating the turnover of essential proteins and in elimination of damaged organelles and protein aggregates. Autophagy is observed in the lung in response to oxidative stress generated as a consequence of exposure to environmental toxicants. Whether autophagy plays role in promoting cell survival or cytotoxicity is unclear. In this article recent findings on oxidative stress-induced autophagy in the lung are reviewed; potential mechanisms initiating autophagy are also discussed. A better understanding of autophagy and its role in pulmonary toxicity may lead to the development of new strategies to treat lung injurymore » associated with oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Exposure to pulmonary toxicants is associated with oxidative stress. • Oxidative stress is known to induce autophagy. • Autophagy is upregulated in the lung following exposure to pulmonary toxicants. • Autophagy may be protective or pathogenic.« less

  17. Biomarkers of oxidative stress in pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Poston, Lucilla; Chappell, Lucy; Seed, Paul; Shennan, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is associated with oxidative stress, confirmed by measurement of biomarkers and relevant antioxidant enzymes in the placenta and maternal circulation. Studies in vitro have described the pathways by which placental ischaemia can lead to oxidative stress as well as endoplasmic reticulum stress, which is coupled to synthesis of reactive oxygen species. However, clinical trials of antioxidants vitamins C and E, with an associated increase of plasma vitamins C and E concentrations have shown no benefit in prevention of the disorder, which may infer lack of a mechanistic role. Before oxidative stress is dismissed as an irrelevant accompaniment to pre-eclampsia further studies of proven biomarkers of oxidative stress are required to determine whether vitamins C and E supplementation leads to evidence of reversal of oxidative processes and tissue damage. If not, alternative antioxidant strategies may be worthy of consideration. Copyright © 2010 Society of Egyptian Anesthesiologists. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Oxidative stress signaling to chromatin in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Kreuz, Sarah; Fischle, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress has a significant impact on the development and progression of common human pathologies, including cancer, diabetes, hypertension and neurodegenerative diseases. Increasing evidence suggests that oxidative stress globally influences chromatin structure, DNA methylation, enzymatic and non-enzymatic post-translational modifications of histones and DNA-binding proteins. The effects of oxidative stress on these chromatin alterations mediate a number of cellular changes, including modulation of gene expression, cell death, cell survival and mutagenesis, which are disease-driving mechanisms in human pathologies. Targeting oxidative stress-dependent pathways is thus a promising strategy for the prevention and treatment of these diseases. We summarize recent research developments connecting oxidative stress and chromatin regulation. PMID:27319358

  19. Clinical Perspective of Oxidative Stress in Sporadic ALS

    PubMed Central

    D’Amico, Emanuele; Factor-Litvak, Pam; Santella, Regina M.; Mitsumoto, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (sALS) is one of the most devastating neurological diseases; most patients die within 3 to 4 years after symptom onset. Oxidative stress is a disturbance in the pro-oxidative/anti-oxidative balance favoring the pro-oxidative state. Autopsy and laboratory studies in ALS indicate that oxidative stress plays a major role in motor neuron degeneration and astrocyte dysfunction. Oxidative stress biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid, plasma, and urine, are elevated, suggesting that abnormal oxidative stress is generated outside of the central nervous system. Our review indicates that agricultural chemicals, heavy metals, military service, professional sports, excessive physical exertion, chronic head trauma, and certain foods might be modestly associated with ALS risk, with a stronger association between risk and smoking. At the cellular level, these factors are all involved in generating oxidative stress. Experimental studies indicate that a combination of insults that induce modest oxidative stress can exert additive deleterious effects on motor neurons, suggesting multiple exposures in real-world environments are important. As the disease progresses, nutritional deficiency, cachexia, psychological stress, and impending respiratory failure may further increase oxidative stress. Moreover, accumulating evidence suggests that ALS is possibly a systemic disease. Laboratory, pathologic, and epidemiologic evidence clearly support the hypothesis that oxidative stress is central in the pathogenic process, particularly in genetically susceptive individuals. If we are to improve ALS treatment, well-designed biochemical and genetic epidemiological studies, combined with a multidisciplinary research approach, are needed and will provide knowledge crucial to our understanding of ALS etiology, pathophysiology, and prognosis. PMID:23797033

  20. Hypertension and physical exercise: The role of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Korsager Larsen, Monica; Matchkov, Vladimir V

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is associated with the pathogenesis of hypertension. Decreased bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO) is one of the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis. It has been suggested that physical exercise could be a potential non-pharmacological strategy in treatment of hypertension because of its beneficial effects on oxidative stress and endothelial function. The aim of this review is to investigate the effect of oxidative stress in relation to hypertension and physical exercise, including the role of NO in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Endothelial dysfunction and decreased NO levels have been found to have the adverse effects in the correlation between oxidative stress and hypertension. Most of the previous studies found that aerobic exercise significantly decreased blood pressure and oxidative stress in hypertensive subjects, but the intense aerobic exercise can also injure endothelial cells. Isometric exercise decreases normally only systolic blood pressure. An alternative exercise, Tai chi significantly decreases blood pressure and oxidative stress in normotensive elderly, but the effect in hypertensive subjects has not yet been studied. Physical exercise and especially aerobic training can be suggested as an effective intervention in the prevention and treatment of hypertension and cardiovascular disease via reduction in oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 The Lithuanian University of Health Sciences. Production and hosting by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  1. Oxidative stress in patients with endodontic pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Vengerfeldt, Veiko; Mändar, Reet; Saag, Mare; Piir, Anneli; Kullisaar, Tiiu

    2017-01-01

    Background Apical periodontitis (AP) is an inflammatory disease affecting periradicular tissues. It is a widespread condition but its etiopathogenetic mechanisms have not been completely elucidated and the current treatment options are not always successful. Purpose To compare oxidative stress (OxS) levels in the saliva and the endodontium (root canal [RC] contents) in patients with different endodontic pathologies and in endodontically healthy subjects. Patients and methods The study group of this comparison study included 22 subjects with primary chronic apical periodontitis (pCAP), 26 with posttreatment or secondary chronic apical periodontitis (sCAP), eight with acute periapical abscess, 13 with irreversible pulpitis, and 17 healthy controls. Resting saliva samples were collected before clinical treatment. Pulp samples (remnants of the pulp, tooth tissue, and/or previous root filling material) were collected under strict aseptic conditions using the Hedström file. The samples were frozen to −80°C until analysis. OxS markers (myeloperoxidase [MPO], oxidative stress index [OSI], 8-isoprostanes [8-EPI]) were detected in the saliva and the endodontium. Results The highest MPO and 8-EPI levels were seen in pCAP and pulpitis, while the highest levels of OSI were seen in pCAP and abscess patients, as well as the saliva of sCAP patients. Controls showed the lowest OxS levels in both RC contents and saliva. Significant positive correlations between OxS markers, periapical index, and pain were revealed. Patients with pain had significantly higher OxS levels in both the endodontium (MPO median 27.9 vs 72.6 ng/mg protein, p=0.004; OSI 6.0 vs 10.4, p<0.001; 8-EPI 50.0 vs 75.0 pg/mL, p<0.001) and saliva (MPO 34.2 vs 117.5 ng/mg protein, p<0.001; 8-EPI 50.0 vs 112.8 pg/mL, p<0.001) compared to pain-free subjects. Conclusion OxS is an important pathomechanism in endodontic pathologies that is evident at both the local (RC contents) and systemic (saliva) level. OxS is

  2. Oxidative stress in patients with endodontic pathologies.

    PubMed

    Vengerfeldt, Veiko; Mändar, Reet; Saag, Mare; Piir, Anneli; Kullisaar, Tiiu

    2017-01-01

    Apical periodontitis (AP) is an inflammatory disease affecting periradicular tissues. It is a widespread condition but its etiopathogenetic mechanisms have not been completely elucidated and the current treatment options are not always successful. To compare oxidative stress (OxS) levels in the saliva and the endodontium (root canal [RC] contents) in patients with different endodontic pathologies and in endodontically healthy subjects. The study group of this comparison study included 22 subjects with primary chronic apical periodontitis (pCAP), 26 with posttreatment or secondary chronic apical periodontitis (sCAP), eight with acute periapical abscess, 13 with irreversible pulpitis, and 17 healthy controls. Resting saliva samples were collected before clinical treatment. Pulp samples (remnants of the pulp, tooth tissue, and/or previous root filling material) were collected under strict aseptic conditions using the Hedström file. The samples were frozen to -80°C until analysis. OxS markers (myeloperoxidase [MPO], oxidative stress index [OSI], 8-isoprostanes [8-EPI]) were detected in the saliva and the endodontium. The highest MPO and 8-EPI levels were seen in pCAP and pulpitis, while the highest levels of OSI were seen in pCAP and abscess patients, as well as the saliva of sCAP patients. Controls showed the lowest OxS levels in both RC contents and saliva. Significant positive correlations between OxS markers, periapical index, and pain were revealed. Patients with pain had significantly higher OxS levels in both the endodontium (MPO median 27.9 vs 72.6 ng/mg protein, p =0.004; OSI 6.0 vs 10.4, p <0.001; 8-EPI 50.0 vs 75.0 pg/mL, p <0.001) and saliva (MPO 34.2 vs 117.5 ng/mg protein, p <0.001; 8-EPI 50.0 vs 112.8 pg/mL, p <0.001) compared to pain-free subjects. OxS is an important pathomechanism in endodontic pathologies that is evident at both the local (RC contents) and systemic (saliva) level. OxS is significantly associated with dental pain and bone

  3. Mitochondrial oxidative stress in aging and healthspan

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The free radical theory of aging proposes that reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced accumulation of damage to cellular macromolecules is a primary driving force of aging and a major determinant of lifespan. Although this theory is one of the most popular explanations for the cause of aging, several experimental rodent models of antioxidant manipulation have failed to affect lifespan. Moreover, antioxidant supplementation clinical trials have been largely disappointing. The mitochondrial theory of aging specifies more particularly that mitochondria are both the primary sources of ROS and the primary targets of ROS damage. In addition to effects on lifespan and aging, mitochondrial ROS have been shown to play a central role in healthspan of many vital organ systems. In this article we review the evidence supporting the role of mitochondrial oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage and dysfunction in aging and healthspan, including cardiac aging, age-dependent cardiovascular diseases, skeletal muscle aging, neurodegenerative diseases, insulin resistance and diabetes as well as age-related cancers. The crosstalk of mitochondrial ROS, redox, and other cellular signaling is briefly presented. Potential therapeutic strategies to improve mitochondrial function in aging and healthspan are reviewed, with a focus on mitochondrial protective drugs, such as the mitochondrial antioxidants MitoQ, SkQ1, and the mitochondrial protective peptide SS-31. PMID:24860647

  4. Evaluation of oxidative stress in hunting dogs during exercise.

    PubMed

    Pasquini, A; Luchetti, E; Cardini, G

    2010-08-01

    Exercise has been shown to increase the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to a point that can exceed antioxidant defenses, to cause oxidative stress. The aim of our trials was to evaluate oxidative stress and recovery times in trained dogs during two different hunting exercises, with reactive oxygen metabolites-derivatives (d-ROMs) and biological antioxidant potential (BAP) tests. A group of nine privately owned Italian hounds were included. A 20-min aerobic exercise and a 4-h aerobic exercise, after 30 days of rest, were performed by the dogs. Our results show an oxidative stress after exercise due to both the high concentration of oxidants (d-ROMs) and the low level of antioxidant power (BAP). Besides, the recovery time is faster after the 4-h aerobic exercise than the 20-min aerobic exercise. Oxidative stress monitoring during dogs exercise could become an interesting aid to establish ideal adaptation to training. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Relationship between hyposalivation and oxidative stress in aging mice.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Yoshitaka; Matsuno, Tomonori; Omata, Kazuhiko; Satoh, Tazuko

    2017-07-01

    The increase in oxidative stress that accompanies aging has been implicated in the abnormal advance of aging and in the onset of various systemic diseases. However, the details of what effects the increase in oxidative stress that accompanies aging has on saliva secretion are not known. In this study, naturally aging mice were used to examine the stimulated whole saliva flow rate, saliva and serum oxidative stress, antioxidant level, submandibular gland H-E staining, and immunofluorescence staining to investigate the effect of aging on the volume of saliva secretion and the relationship with oxidative stress, as well as the effect of aging on the structure of salivary gland tissue. The stimulated whole saliva flow rate decreased significantly with age. Also, oxidative stress increased significantly with age. Antioxidant levels, however, decreased significantly with age. Structural changes of the submandibular gland accompanying aging included atrophy of parenchyma cells and fatty degeneration and fibrosis of stroma, and the submandibular gland weight ratio decreased. These results suggest that oxidative stress increases with age, not just systemically but also locally in the submandibular gland, and that oxidative stress causes changes in the structure of the salivary gland and is involved in hyposalivation.

  6. Potential role of punicalagin against oxidative stress induced testicular damage.

    PubMed

    Rao, Faiza; Tian, Hui; Li, Wenqing; Hung, Helong; Sun, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Punicalagin is isolated from pomegranate and widely used for the treatment of different diseases in Chinese traditional medicine. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Punicalagin (purity ≥98%) on oxidative stress induced testicular damage and its effect on fertility. We detected the antioxidant potential of punicalagin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced oxidative stress damage in testes, also tried to uncover the boosting fertility effect of Punicalagin (PU) against oxidative stress-induced infertility. Results demonstrated that 9 mg kg-1 for 7 days treatment significantly decreases LPS induced oxidative damage in testes and nitric oxide production. The administration of oxidative stress resulted in a significant reduction in testes antioxidants GSH, T-SOD, and CAT raised LPO, but treatment with punicalagin for 7 days increased antioxidant defense GSH, T-SOD, and CAT by the end of the experiment and reduced LPO level as well. PU also significantly activates Nrf2, which is involved in regulation of antioxidant defense systems. Hence, the present research categorically elucidates the protective effect of punicalagin against LPS induced oxidative stress induced perturbation in the process of spermatogenesis and significantly increased sperm health and number. Moreover, fertility success significantly decreased in LPS-injected mice compared to controls. Mice injected with LPS had fertility indices of 12.5%, while others treated with a combination of PU + LPS exhibited 75% indices. By promoting fertility and eliminating oxidative stress and inflammation, PU may be a useful nutrient for the treatment of infertility.

  7. Potential role of punicalagin against oxidative stress induced testicular damage

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Faiza; Tian, Hui; Li, Wenqing; Hung, Helong; Sun, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Punicalagin is isolated from pomegranate and widely used for the treatment of different diseases in Chinese traditional medicine. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Punicalagin (purity ≥98%) on oxidative stress induced testicular damage and its effect on fertility. We detected the antioxidant potential of punicalagin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced oxidative stress damage in testes, also tried to uncover the boosting fertility effect of Punicalagin (PU) against oxidative stress-induced infertility. Results demonstrated that 9 mg kg−1 for 7 days treatment significantly decreases LPS induced oxidative damage in testes and nitric oxide production. The administration of oxidative stress resulted in a significant reduction in testes antioxidants GSH, T-SOD, and CAT raised LPO, but treatment with punicalagin for 7 days increased antioxidant defense GSH, T-SOD, and CAT by the end of the experiment and reduced LPO level as well. PU also significantly activates Nrf2, which is involved in regulation of antioxidant defense systems. Hence, the present research categorically elucidates the protective effect of punicalagin against LPS induced oxidative stress induced perturbation in the process of spermatogenesis and significantly increased sperm health and number. Moreover, fertility success significantly decreased in LPS-injected mice compared to controls. Mice injected with LPS had fertility indices of 12.5%, while others treated with a combination of PU + LPS exhibited 75% indices. By promoting fertility and eliminating oxidative stress and inflammation, PU may be a useful nutrient for the treatment of infertility. PMID:26763544

  8. Dietary Modulation of Oxidative Stress in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Arjun; Carroll, Nick J

    2017-07-21

    Cells generate unpaired electrons, typically via oxygen- or nitrogen-based by-products during normal cellular respiration and under stressed situations. These pro-oxidant molecules are highly unstable and may oxidize surrounding cellular macromolecules. Under normal conditions, the reactive oxygen or nitrogen species can be beneficial to cell survival and function by destroying and degrading pathogens or antigens. However, excessive generation and accumulation of the reactive pro-oxidant species over time can damage proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids. Over time, this oxidative stress can contribute to a range of aging-related degenerative diseases such as cancer, diabetes, macular degeneration, and Alzheimer's, and Parkinson's diseases. It is well accepted that natural compounds, including vitamins A, C, and E, β-carotene, and minerals found in fruits and vegetables are powerful anti-oxidants that offer health benefits against several different oxidative stress induced degenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). There is increasing interest in developing anti-oxidative therapeutics to prevent AD. There are contradictory and inconsistent reports on the possible benefits of anti-oxidative supplements; however, fruits and vegetables enriched with multiple anti-oxidants (e.g., flavonoids and polyphenols) and minerals may be highly effective in attenuating the harmful effects of oxidative stress. As the physiological activation of either protective or destructive pro-oxidant behavior remains relatively unclear, it is not straightforward to relate the efficacy of dietary anti-oxidants in disease prevention. Here, we review oxidative stress mediated toxicity associated with AD and highlight the modulatory roles of natural dietary anti-oxidants in preventing AD.

  9. Selected oxidative stress markers in a South American crocodilian species.

    PubMed

    Furtado-Filho, Orlando V; Polcheira, Cássia; Machado, Daniel P; Mourão, Guilherme; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo

    2007-01-01

    Crocodilians and other diving vertebrates experience hypoperfusion and hypoxia of several internal organs during long dives. At the end of a dive, reperfusion of aerated blood may cause a physiologically relevant oxidative stress. In this study, we analyzed selected markers of oxidative stress in eight organs of normoxic Paraguayan caiman (Caiman yacare) captured in the Brazilian Pantanal wetlands during the winter of 2001 (six mature-adult males and eight young-adult males; AD-1 and YA-1 groups, respectively), and during the summer of 2002 (six young-adult males (YA-2 group), ten hatchlings and five embryos). Lipid peroxidation products determined by three different assays were generally highest in brain, liver and kidney (in comparison with all other organs), and lowest in white muscles from the tail and hind legs. Liver and kidney showed the highest levels of carbonyl protein, while brain showed low levels. Intermediate levels of oxidative stress markers were mostly found in the heart ventricles and lung. Differences in oxidative stress markers between AD-1 and YA-1 were organ-specific, showing no age-related correlation. However, most oxidative stress markers in YA-2 organs were either higher than (by 1.4- to 3.7-fold) or not significantly different from respective values in hatchlings organs. This pattern (hatchlings versus young-adults) was confirmed using correlation analysis of individual caiman size versus levels of oxidative damage markers in four organs. The higher level of oxidative stress markers in young-adults possibly relates to the fast growth rate (and thus, increased oxidative metabolic rate) of C. yacare in the first years of life. Differences in oxidative stress markers between YA-1 and YA-2 were also observed and were ascribed to seasonal changes in free radical metabolism. These results in normoxic C. yacare represent the first step towards understanding the age-related physiological oxidative stress of a diving reptile from a seasonally

  10. 13 reasons why the brain is susceptible to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Cobley, James Nathan; Fiorello, Maria Luisa; Bailey, Damian Miles

    2018-05-01

    The human brain consumes 20% of the total basal oxygen (O 2 ) budget to support ATP intensive neuronal activity. Without sufficient O 2 to support ATP demands, neuronal activity fails, such that, even transient ischemia is neurodegenerative. While the essentiality of O 2 to brain function is clear, how oxidative stress causes neurodegeneration is ambiguous. Ambiguity exists because many of the reasons why the brain is susceptible to oxidative stress remain obscure. Many are erroneously understood as the deleterious result of adventitious O 2 derived free radical and non-radical species generation. To understand how many reasons underpin oxidative stress, one must first re-cast free radical and non-radical species in a positive light because their deliberate generation enables the brain to achieve critical functions (e.g. synaptic plasticity) through redox signalling (i.e. positive functionality). Using free radicals and non-radical derivatives to signal sensitises the brain to oxidative stress when redox signalling goes awry (i.e. negative functionality). To advance mechanistic understanding, we rationalise 13 reasons why the brain is susceptible to oxidative stress. Key reasons include inter alia unsaturated lipid enrichment, mitochondria, calcium, glutamate, modest antioxidant defence, redox active transition metals and neurotransmitter auto-oxidation. We review RNA oxidation as an underappreciated cause of oxidative stress. The complex interplay between each reason dictates neuronal susceptibility to oxidative stress in a dynamic context and neural identity dependent manner. Our discourse sets the stage for investigators to interrogate the biochemical basis of oxidative stress in the brain in health and disease. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Oxidative stress and psychological functioning among medical students

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Rani; Batra, Jyoti

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oxidative stress has gained attention recently in behavioral medicine and has been reported to be associated with various psychological disturbances and their prognoses. Objectives: Study aims to evaluate the oxidative stress (malonylaldehyde (MDA) levels) and its relation with psychological factors (dimensions of personality, levels of anxiety, stress, and depression) among medical/paramedical students of 1st and 3rd year). Materials and Methods: A total of 150 students; 75 from 1st year (2010–2011) and75 from 3rd year (2009–2010); of medical and paramedical background were assessed on level of MDA (oxidative stress) and personality variables, that is, level of anxiety, stress, and depression. These psychological variables were correlated with the level of their oxidative stress. Results: Findings revealed that both groups are influenced by oxidative stress and their psychological variables are also compatible in order to confirm their vulnerabilities to stress. Conclusions: Stress in 3rd year students was significantly higher and it was noted that it adversely affects the psychological parameters. Hence, special attention on mental health aspect in these students may be given. PMID:25788802

  12. The glutathione mimic ebselen inhibits oxidative stress but not endoplasmic reticulum stress in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ahwach, Salma Makhoul; Thomas, Melanie; Onstead-Haas, Luisa; Mooradian, Arshag D; Haas, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    Reactive oxygen species are associated with cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and atherosclerosis, yet the use of antioxidants in clinical trials has been ineffective at improving outcomes. In endothelial cells, high-dextrose-induced oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress promote endothelial dysfunction leading to the recruitment and activation of peripheral blood lymphocytes and the breakdown of barrier function. Ebselen, a glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1) mimic, has been shown to improve β-cell function in diabetes and prevent atherosclerosis. To determine if ebselen inhibits both oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in endothelial cells, we examined its effects in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) with and without high-dextrose. Oxidative stress and ER stress were measured by 2-methyl-6-(4-methoxyphenyl)-3,7-dihydroimidazo[1,2-A]pyrazin-3-one hydrochloride chemiluminescence and ER stress alkaline phosphatase assays, respectively. GPX1 over-expression and knockdown were performed by transfecting cells with a GPX1 expression construct or a GPX1-specific siRNA, respectively. Ebselen inhibited dextrose-induced oxidative stress but not ER stress in both HUVEC and HCAEC. Ebselen also had no effect on tunicamycin-induced ER stress in HCAEC. Furthermore, augmentation of GPX1 activity directly by sodium selenite supplementation or transfection of a GPX1 expression plasmid decreased dextrose-induced oxidative stress but not ER stress, while GPX1 knockout enhanced oxidative stress but had no effect on ER stress. These results suggest that ebselen targets only oxidative stress but not ER stress. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Oxidative stress-induced autophagy: Role in pulmonary toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Malaviya, Rama; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process important in regulating the turnover of essential proteins and in elimination of damaged organelles and protein aggregates. Autophagy is observed in the lung in response to oxidative stress generated as a consequence of exposure to environmental toxicants. Whether autophagy plays role in promoting cell survival or cytotoxicity is unclear. In this article recent findings on oxidative stress-induced autophagy in the lung are reviewed; potential mechanisms initiating autophagy are also discussed. A better understanding of autophagy and its role in pulmonary toxicity may lead to the development of new strategies to treat lung injury associated with oxidative stress. PMID:24398106

  14. Mitochondrial metabolism mediates oxidative stress and inflammation in fatty liver

    PubMed Central

    Satapati, Santhosh; Kucejova, Blanka; Duarte, Joao A.G.; Fletcher, Justin A.; Reynolds, Lacy; Sunny, Nishanth E.; He, Tianteng; Nair, L. Arya; Livingston, Kenneth; Fu, Xiaorong; Merritt, Matthew E.; Sherry, A. Dean; Malloy, Craig R.; Shelton, John M.; Lambert, Jennifer; Parks, Elizabeth J.; Corbin, Ian; Magnuson, Mark A.; Browning, Jeffrey D.; Burgess, Shawn C.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are critical for respiration in all tissues; however, in liver, these organelles also accommodate high-capacity anaplerotic/cataplerotic pathways that are essential to gluconeogenesis and other biosynthetic activities. During nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), mitochondria also produce ROS that damage hepatocytes, trigger inflammation, and contribute to insulin resistance. Here, we provide several lines of evidence indicating that induction of biosynthesis through hepatic anaplerotic/cataplerotic pathways is energetically backed by elevated oxidative metabolism and hence contributes to oxidative stress and inflammation during NAFLD. First, in murine livers, elevation of fatty acid delivery not only induced oxidative metabolism, but also amplified anaplerosis/cataplerosis and caused a proportional rise in oxidative stress and inflammation. Second, loss of anaplerosis/cataplerosis via genetic knockdown of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (Pck1) prevented fatty acid–induced rise in oxidative flux, oxidative stress, and inflammation. Flux appeared to be regulated by redox state, energy charge, and metabolite concentration, which may also amplify antioxidant pathways. Third, preventing elevated oxidative metabolism with metformin also normalized hepatic anaplerosis/cataplerosis and reduced markers of inflammation. Finally, independent histological grades in human NAFLD biopsies were proportional to oxidative flux. Thus, hepatic oxidative stress and inflammation are associated with elevated oxidative metabolism during an obesogenic diet, and this link may be provoked by increased work through anabolic pathways. PMID:26571396

  15. Oxidative stress induces senescence in human mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brandl, Anita; Meyer, Matthias; Bechmann, Volker

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) contribute to tissue repair in vivo and form an attractive cell source for tissue engineering. Their regenerative potential is impaired by cellular senescence. The effects of oxidative stress on MSCs are still unknown. Our studies were to investigate into the proliferation potential, cytological features and the telomere linked stress response system of MSCs, subject to acute or prolonged oxidant challenge with hydrogen peroxide. Telomere length was measured using the telomere restriction fragment assay, gene expression was determined by rtPCR. Sub-lethal doses of oxidative stress reduced proliferation rates and induced senescent-morphological features and senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase positivity. Prolongedmore » low dose treatment with hydrogen peroxide had no effects on cell proliferation or morphology. Sub-lethal and prolonged low doses of oxidative stress considerably accelerated telomere attrition. Following acute oxidant insult p21 was up-regulated prior to returning to initial levels. TRF1 was significantly reduced, TRF2 showed a slight up-regulation. SIRT1 and XRCC5 were up-regulated after oxidant insult and expression levels increased in aging cells. Compared to fibroblasts and chondrocytes, MSCs showed an increased tolerance to oxidative stress regarding proliferation, telomere biology and gene expression with an impaired stress tolerance in aged cells.« less

  16. Oxidative stress and skin diseases: possible role of physical activity.

    PubMed

    Kruk, Joanna; Duchnik, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    The skin is the largest body organ that regulates excretion of metabolic waste products, temperature, and plays an important role in body protection against environmental physical and chemical, as well as biological factors. These include agents that may act as oxidants or catalysts of reactions producing reactive oxygen species (ROS), reactive nitrogen species (RNS), and other oxidants in skin cells. An increased amount of the oxidants, exceeding the antioxidant defense system capacity is called oxidative stress, leading to chronic inflammation, which, in turn, can cause collagen fragmentation and disorganization of collagen fibers and skin cell functions, and thus contribute to skin diseases including cancer. Moreover, research suggests that oxidative stress participates in all stages of carcinogenesis. We report here a summary of the present state of knowledge on the role of oxidative stress in pathogenesis of dermatologic diseases, defensive systems against ROS/RNS, and discuss how physical activity may modulate skin diseases through effects on oxidative stress. The data show duality of physical activity actions: regular moderate activity protects against ROS/RNS damage, and endurance exercise with a lack of training mediates oxidative stress. These findings indicate that the redox balance should be considered in the development of new antioxidant strategies linked to the prevention and therapy of skin diseases.

  17. Severe Life Stress and Oxidative Stress in the Brain: From Animal Models to Human Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Jaquet, Vincent; Trabace, Luigia; Krause, Karl-Heinz

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Severe life stress (SLS), as opposed to trivial everyday stress, is defined as a serious psychosocial event with the potential of causing an impacting psychological traumatism. Recent Advances: Numerous studies have attempted to understand how the central nervous system (CNS) responds to SLS. This response includes a variety of morphological and neurochemical modifications; among them, oxidative stress is almost invariably observed. Oxidative stress is defined as disequilibrium between oxidant generation and the antioxidant response. Critical Issues: In this review, we discuss how SLS leads to oxidative stress in the CNS, and how the latter impacts pathophysiological outcomes. We also critically discuss experimental methods that measure oxidative stress in the CNS. The review covers animal models and human observations. Animal models of SLS include sleep deprivation, maternal separation, and social isolation in rodents, and the establishment of hierarchy in non-human primates. In humans, SLS, which is caused by traumatic events such as child abuse, war, and divorce, is also accompanied by oxidative stress in the CNS. Future Directions: The outcome of SLS in humans ranges from resilience, over post-traumatic stress disorder, to development of chronic mental disorders. Defining the sources of oxidative stress in SLS might in the long run provide new therapeutic avenues. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1475–1490. PMID:22746161

  18. The relationship between oxidative stress and exercise.

    PubMed

    Finkler, Maya; Lichtenberg, Dov; Pinchuk, Ilya

    2014-02-01

    Physical exercise has many benefits, but it might also have a negative impact on the body, depending on the training level, length of workout, gender, age and fitness. The negative effects of physical exercise are commonly attributed to an imbalance between the levels of antioxidants (both low molecular weight antioxidants and antioxidant enzymes) and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species due to excessive production of free radicals during physical exercise. In this critical review, we look for answers for three specific questions regarding the interrelationship between physical exercise and oxidative stress (OS), namely, (i) the dependence of the steady-state level of OS on fitness, (ii) the effect of intensive exercise on the OS and (iii) the dependence of the effect of the intense exercise on the individual fitness. All these questions have been raised, investigated and answered, but the answers given on the basis of different studies are different. In the present review, we try to explain the reason(s) for the inconsistencies between the conclusions of different investigations, commonly based on the concentrations of specific biomarkers in body fluids. We think that most of the inconsistencies can be attributed to the difference between the criteria of the ill-defined term denoted OS, the methods used to test them and in some cases, between the qualities of the applied assays. On the basis of our interpretation of the differences between different criteria of OS, we consider possible answers to three well-defined questions. Possible partial answers are given, all of which lend strong support to the conclusion that the network responsible for homeostasis of the redox status is very effective. However, much more data are required to address the association between exercise and OS and its dependence on various relevant factors.

  19. Oxidation stress evolution and relaxation of oxide film/metal substrate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xuelin; Feng, Xue; Hwang, Keh-Chih

    2012-07-01

    Stresses in the oxide film/metal substrate system are crucial to the reliability of the system at high temperature. Two models for predicting the stress evolution during isothermal oxidation are proposed. The deformation of the system is depicted by the curvature for single surface oxidation. The creep strain of the oxide and metal, and the lateral growth strain of the oxide are considered. The proposed models are compared with the experimental results in literature, which demonstrates that the elastic model only considering for elastic strain gives an overestimated stress in magnitude, but the creep model is consistent with the experimental data and captures the stress relaxation phenomenon during oxidation. The effects of the parameter for the lateral growth strain rate are also analyzed.

  20. Strawberry polyphenols decrease oxidative stress in chronic diseases

    PubMed

    Oviedo-Solís, Cecilia Isabel; Cornejo-Manzo, Sinthia; Murillo-Ortiz, Blanca Olivia; Guzmán-Barrón, Michelle Montserrat; Ramírez-Emiliano, Joel

    2018-01-01

    Consumption of hypercaloric diets leads to increase of free fatty acids (FFA), pro-inflammatory cytokines and production of oxygen and nitrogen reactive species. These alterations induce oxidative and nitrosative stress causing dysfunction of tissues and consequently the development of chronic diseases. Therefore, it is important to decrease oxidative stress and thus preventing the development of these diseases. Strawberry has a lot of Vitamin C and polyphenols, compounds with excellent antioxidant properties, which may be an option for reducing oxidative stress and therefore to prevent the development of some diseases. Studies conducted in vitro in animal models and clinical studies support that this fruit can be a good alternative to reduce oxidative stress and thus reducing and/or preventing the development of diseases in humans. Copyright: © 2018 SecretarÍa de Salud.

  1. Oxidative stress negatively affects human sperm mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Ferramosca, Alessandra; Pinto Provenzano, Sara; Montagna, Daniela Domenica; Coppola, Lamberto; Zara, Vincenzo

    2013-07-01

    To correlate the level of oxidative stress in serum and seminal fluid and the level of sperm deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fragmentation with sperm mitochondrial respiratory efficiency. Sperm mitochondrial respiratory activity was evaluated with a polarographic assay of oxygen consumption carried out in hypotonically treated sperm cells. A possible relationship between sperm mitochondrial respiratory efficiency, the level of oxidative stress, and the level of sperm DNA fragmentation was investigated. Sperm motility was positively correlated with mitochondrial respiration but negatively correlated with oxidative stress and DNA fragmentation. Interestingly, sperm mitochondrial respiratory activity was negatively affected by oxidative stress and DNA fragmentation. Our data indicate that sperm mitochondrial respiration is decreased in patients with high levels of reactive oxygen species by an uncoupling between electron transport and adenosine triphosphate synthesis. This reduction in mitochondrial functionality might be 1 of the reasons responsible for the decrease in spermatozoa motility. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Reduced resistance to oxidative stress during reproduction as a cost of early-life stress.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Cédric; Spencer, Karen A

    2015-05-01

    Stress exposure during early-life development can have long-term consequences for a variety of biological functions including oxidative stress. The link between early-life stress and oxidative balance is beginning to be explored and previous studies have focused on this link in adult non-breeding or immature individuals. However, as oxidative stress is considered as the main physiological mechanism underlying the trade-off between self-maintenance and investment in reproduction, it is necessary to look at the consequences of early-life stress on oxidative status during reproduction. Here, we investigated the effects of exposure to pre- and/or post-natal stress on oxidative balance during reproduction under benign or stressful environmental conditions in an avian model species, the Japanese quail. We determined total antioxidant status (TAS), total oxidant status (TOS) and resistance to a free-radical attack in individual exposed to pre-natal stress, post-natal stress or both and in control individuals exposed to none of the stressors. TAS levels decreased over time in all females that reproduced under stressful conditions. TOS decreased between the beginning and the end of reproductive period in pre-natal control females. In all females, resistance to a free-radical attack decreased over the reproductive event but this decrease was more pronounced in females from a pre-natal stress development. Our results suggest that pre-natal stress may be associated with a higher cost of reproduction in terms of oxidative stress. These results also confirm that early-life stress can be associated with both benefits and costs depending of the life-history stage or environmental context. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Oxidative stress in juvenile chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welker, T.L.; Congleton, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    Juvenile chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), were held in 8-11??C freshwater, starved for 3 days and subjected to a low-water stressor to determine the relationship between the general stress response and oxidative stress. Lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels (lipid hydroperoxides) were measured in kidney, liver and brain samples taken at the beginning of the experiment (0-h unstressed controls) and at 6, 24 and 48 h after application of a continuous low-water stressor. Tissue samples were also taken at 48 h from fish that had not been exposed to the stressor (48-h unstressed controls). Exposure to the low-water stressor affected LPO in kidney and brain tissues. In kidney, LPO decreased 6 h after imposition of the stressor; similar but less pronounced decreases also occurred in the liver and brain. At 48 h, LPO increased (in comparison with 6-h stressed tissues) in the kidney and brain. In comparison with 48-h unstressed controls, LPO levels were higher in the kidney and brain of stressed fish. Although preliminary, results suggest that stress can cause oxidative tissue damage in juvenile chinook salmon. Measures of oxidative stress have shown similar responses to stress in mammals; however, further research is needed to determine the extent of the stress-oxidative stress relationship and the underlying physiological mechanisms in fish.

  4. The Role of Oxidative Stress in Apoptosis of Breast Cancer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-09-27

    supported by studies demonstrating that inappropriate expression of an oncogene, bcl - 2 , prevents cell death and thereby promotes Page _1L ANNUAL REPORT...see Appendix: Baker et al., "Decreased Antioxidant Defense and Increased Oxidant Stress During Dexamethasone-Induced Apoptosis: bcl - 2 Selectively...Alzheimer’s disease. The bcl - 2 oncogene blocks apoptosis in diverse systems and protects cells against oxidative stress- induced damage (Hockenbery et

  5. Introduction to Oxidative Stress in Biomedical and Biological Research

    PubMed Central

    Breitenbach, Michael; Eckl, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is now a well-researched area with thousands of new articles appearing every year. We want to give the reader here an overview of the topics in biomedical and basic oxidative stress research which are covered by the authors of this thematic issue. We also want to give the newcomer a short introduction into some of the basic concepts, definitions and analytical procedures used in this field. PMID:26117854

  6. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Oxidative Stress: A Vicious Nexus Implicated in Bowel Disease Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Wai Chin; Shastri, Madhur D.; Eri, Rajaraman

    2017-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a complex protein folding and trafficking organelle. Alteration and discrepancy in the endoplasmic reticulum environment can affect the protein folding process and hence, can result in the production of misfolded proteins. The accumulation of misfolded proteins causes cellular damage and elicits endoplasmic reticulum stress. Under such stress conditions, cells exhibit reduced functional synthesis, and will undergo apoptosis if the stress is prolonged. To resolve the ER stress, cells trigger an intrinsic mechanism called an unfolded protein response (UPR). UPR is an adaptive signaling process that triggers multiple pathways through the endoplasmic reticulum transmembrane transducers, to reduce and remove misfolded proteins and improve the protein folding mechanism, in order to improve and maintain endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis. An increasing number of studies support the view that oxidative stress has a strong connection with ER stress. During the protein folding process, reactive oxygen species are produced as by-products, leading to impaired reduction-oxidation (redox) balance conferring oxidative stress. As the protein folding process is dependent on redox homeostasis, the oxidative stress can disrupt the protein folding mechanism and enhance the production of misfolded proteins, causing further ER stress. It is proposed that endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress together play significant roles in the pathophysiology of bowel diseases. PMID:28379196

  7. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Oxidative Stress: A Vicious Nexus Implicated in Bowel Disease Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Chong, Wai Chin; Shastri, Madhur D; Eri, Rajaraman

    2017-04-05

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a complex protein folding and trafficking organelle. Alteration and discrepancy in the endoplasmic reticulum environment can affect the protein folding process and hence, can result in the production of misfolded proteins. The accumulation of misfolded proteins causes cellular damage and elicits endoplasmic reticulum stress. Under such stress conditions, cells exhibit reduced functional synthesis, and will undergo apoptosis if the stress is prolonged. To resolve the ER stress, cells trigger an intrinsic mechanism called an unfolded protein response (UPR). UPR is an adaptive signaling process that triggers multiple pathways through the endoplasmic reticulum transmembrane transducers, to reduce and remove misfolded proteins and improve the protein folding mechanism, in order to improve and maintain endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis. An increasing number of studies support the view that oxidative stress has a strong connection with ER stress. During the protein folding process, reactive oxygen species are produced as by-products, leading to impaired reduction-oxidation (redox) balance conferring oxidative stress. As the protein folding process is dependent on redox homeostasis, the oxidative stress can disrupt the protein folding mechanism and enhance the production of misfolded proteins, causing further ER stress. It is proposed that endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress together play significant roles in the pathophysiology of bowel diseases.

  8. Pro-Oxidant Biological Effects of Inorganic Component of Petroleum: Vanadium and Oxidative Stress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-08-01

    independent existence. Pro-Oxidant Chemicals and Free Radicals Involved in Oxidative Stress Pro-Oxidant Chemicals Chemical and Metabolic Generation... metabolic reactions may generate primary free radicals (Fig. 1). Then, in an avalanche-type process, secondary free radicals and reactive oxygen species...vanadium absorption, distribution, metabolism , and disposition, and no pharmacokinetic model is available describing comparative kinetics and toxicity

  9. Oxidative stress in uremia: nature, mechanisms, and potential consequences.

    PubMed

    Vaziri, Nosratola D

    2004-09-01

    Oxidative stress has emerged as a constant feature of chronic renal failure (CRF). The presence of oxidative stress in CRF is evidenced by an overabundance of lipid, carbohydrate, and protein oxidation products in the plasma and tissues of uremic patients and animals. We recently have shown that oxidative stress in CRF animals is associated with and, in part, owing to up-regulation of superoxide-producing enzyme, nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD(P)H) oxidase, and down-regulation of superoxide dismutase (SOD). The functional significance of these findings was confirmed by favorable response to administration of the cell-permeable SOD-mimetic agent, tempol, in CRF rats. Oxidative stress in CRF plays an important role in the pathogenesis of the associated hypertension (oxidation of NO and arachidonic acid and vascular remodeling), cardiovascular disease (oxidation of lipoproteins, atherogenesis), neurologic disorders (nitration of brain proteins, oxidation of myelin), anemia (reduction of erythrocyte lifespan), inflammation (nuclear factor kappa B activation), fibrosis, apoptosis, and accelerated aging. The CRF-induced oxidative stress is aggravated by diabetes, uncontrolled hypertension, and autoimmune diseases, which independently increase production of reactive oxygen intermediates, and frequently are associated with CRF. In addition, dialysis treatment (blood interaction with dialyzer membrane and dialysate impurities), acute and chronic infections (blood access infection, hepatitis, and so forth), and excessive parenteral iron administration intensify CRF-associated oxidative stress and its adverse consequences in patients with end-stage renal disease. The problem is compounded by limited intake of fresh fruits and vegetables (K(+) restriction), which contain numerous natural phytochemicals and antioxidant vitamins.

  10. Mycotoxin-Containing Diet Causes Oxidative Stress in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yan-Jun; Zhao, Yong-Yan; Xiong, Bo; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Xu, Yin-Xue; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Mycotoxins which mainly consist of Aflatoxin (AF), Zearalenone (ZEN) and Deoxynivalenol (DON) are commonly found in many food commodities. Although each component has been shown to cause liver toxicity and oxidative stress in several species, there is no evidence regarding the effect of naturally contained multiple mycotoxins on tissue toxicity and oxidative stress in vivo. In the present study, mycotoxins-contaminated maize (AF 597 µg/kg, ZEN 729 µg/kg, DON 3.1 mg/kg maize) was incorporated into the diet at three different doses (0, 5 and 20%) to feed the mice, and blood and tissue samples were collected to examine the oxidative stress related indexes. The results showed that the indexes of liver, kidney and spleen were all increased and the liver and kidney morphologies changed in the mycotoxin-treated mice. Also, the treatment resulted in the elevated glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) level in the serum and liver, indicating the presence of the oxidative stress. Moreover, the decrease of catalase (CAT) activity in the serum, liver and kidney as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in the liver and kidney tissue further confirmed the occurrence of oxidative stress. In conclusion, our data indicate that the naturally contained mycotoxins are toxic in vivo and able to induce the oxidant stress in the mouse. PMID:23555961

  11. Prohibitin as an oxidative stress biomarker in the eye

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunju; Arnouk, Hilal; Sripathi, Srinivas; Chen, Ping; Zhang, Ruonan; Hunt, Richard C.; Hrushesky, William J. M.; Chung, Hyewon; Lee, Sung Haeng; Jahng, Wan Jin

    2016-01-01

    Identification of biomarker proteins in the retina and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) under oxidative stress may imply new insights into signaling mechanisms of retinal degeneration at the molecular level. Proteomic data from an in vivo mice model in constant light and an in vitro oxidative stress model are compared to controls under normal conditions. Our proteomic study shows that prohibitin is involved in oxidative stress signaling in the retina and RPE. The identity of prohibitin in the retina and the RPE was studied using 2D electrophoresis, immunohistochemistry, western blot, and mass spectrometry analysis. Comparison of expression levels with apoptotic markers as well as translocation between mitochondria and the nucleus imply that the regulation of prohibitin is an early signaling event in the RPE and retina under oxidative stress. Immunohistochemical analysis of murine aged and diabetic eyes further suggests that the regulation of prohibitin in the RPE/retina is related to aging- and diabetes-induced oxidative stress. Our proteomic approach implies that prohibitin in the RPE and the retina could be a new biomarker protein of oxidative stress in aging and diabetes. PMID:20832420

  12. Prohibitin as an oxidative stress biomarker in the eye.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunju; Arnouk, Hilal; Sripathi, Srinivas; Chen, Ping; Zhang, Ruonan; Bartoli, Manuela; Hunt, Richard C; Hrushesky, William J M; Chung, Hyewon; Lee, Sung Haeng; Jahng, Wan Jin

    2010-12-01

    Identification of biomarker proteins in the retina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) under oxidative stress may imply new insights into signaling mechanisms of retinal degeneration at the molecular level. Proteomic data from an in vivo mice model in constant light and an in vitro oxidative stress model are compared to controls under normal conditions. Our proteomic study shows that prohibitin is involved in oxidative stress signaling in the retina and RPE. The identity of prohibitin in the retina and RPE was studied using 2D electrophoresis, immunohistochemistry, western blot, and mass spectrometry analysis. Comparison of expression levels with apoptotic markers as well as translocation between mitochondria and the nucleus imply that the regulation of prohibitin is an early signaling event in the RPE and retina under oxidative stress. Immunohistochemical analysis of murine aged and diabetic eyes further suggests that the regulation of prohibitin in the RPE/retina is related to aging- and diabetes-induced oxidative stress. Our proteomic approach implies that prohibitin in the RPE and the retina could be a new biomarker protein of oxidative stress in aging and diabetes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Nitrative and Oxidative Stress in Toxicology and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Ruth A.; Laskin, Debra L.; Smith, Charles V.; Robertson, Fredika M.; Allen, Erin M. G.; Doorn, Jonathan A.; Slikker, William

    2009-01-01

    Persistent inflammation and the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species play pivotal roles in tissue injury during disease pathogenesis and as a reaction to toxicant exposures. The associated oxidative and nitrative stress promote diverse pathologic reactions including neurodegenerative disorders, atherosclerosis, chronic inflammation, cancer, and premature labor and stillbirth. These effects occur via sustained inflammation, cellular proliferation and cytotoxicity and via induction of a proangiogenic environment. For example, exposure to the ubiquitous air pollutant ozone leads to generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in lung macrophages that play a key role in subsequent tissue damage. Similarly, studies indicate that genes involved in regulating oxidative stress are altered by anesthetic treatment resulting in brain injury, most notable during development. In addition to a role in tissue injury in the brain, inflammation, and oxidative stress are implicated in Parkinson's disease, a neurodegenerative disease characterized by the loss of dopamine neurons. Recent data suggest a mechanistic link between oxidative stress and elevated levels of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde, a neurotoxin endogenous to dopamine neurons. These findings have significant implications for development of therapeutics and identification of novel biomarkers for Parkinson's disease pathogenesis. Oxidative and nitrative stress is also thought to play a role in creating the proinflammatory microenvironment associated with the aggressive phenotype of inflammatory breast cancer. An understanding of fundamental concepts of oxidative and nitrative stress can underpin a rational plan of treatment for diseases and toxicities associated with excessive production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. PMID:19656995

  14. [Oxidative stress. Should it be measured in the diabetic patient?].

    PubMed

    Villa-Caballero, L; Nava-Ocampo, A A; Frati-Munari, A C; Ponce-Monter, H

    2000-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been defined as a loss of counterbalance between free radical or reactive oxygen species production and the antioxidant systems, with negative effects on carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins. It is also involved in the progression of different chronic diseases and apoptosis. Diabetes mellitus is associated to a high oxidative stress level through different biochemical pathways, i.e. protein glycosylation, glucose auto-oxidation, and the polyol pathway, mainly induced by hyperglycemia. Oxidative stress could also be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic lesions and other chronic diabetic complications. Measurement of oxidative stress could be useful to investigate its role in the initiation and development processes of chronic diabetic complications and also to evaluate preventive actions, including antioxidative therapy. Different attempts have been made to obtain a practical, accurate, specific, and sensitive method to evaluate oxidative stress in clinical practice. However, this ideal method is not currently available to date and the usefulness of the current methods needs to be confirmed in daily practice. We suggest quantifying oxidated and reduced glutation (GSSG/GSH) and the thiobarbituric reactive substances (TBARS) with currently alternatives. Currently available alternative methods while we await better options.

  15. Infrared Dielectric Properties of Low-Stress Silicon Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, Giuseppe; Wollack, Edward J.; Brown, Ari D.; Miller, Kevin H.

    2016-01-01

    Silicon oxide thin films play an important role in the realization of optical coatings and high-performance electrical circuits. Estimates of the dielectric function in the far- and mid-infrared regime are derived from the observed transmittance spectrum for a commonly employed low-stress silicon oxide formulation. The experimental, modeling, and numerical methods used to extract the dielectric function are presented.

  16. ELECTROSTATIC CHARGE STIMULATES OXIDATIVE STRESS IN CNS MICROGLIA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanometer size particles carry free radical activity on their surface and can create oxidative stress (OS)-mediated inflammatory changes upon impact. The oxidative burst signals the activation of phage-lineage cells such as peripheral macrophages, Kupffer cells and CNS microgl...

  17. CONCENTRATED AMBIENT AIR POLLUTION CREATES OXIDATIVE STRESS IN CNS MICROGLIA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanometer size particles carry free radical activity on their surface and can produce oxidative stress (OS)-mediated damage upon impact to target cells. The initiating event of phage cell activation (i.e., the oxidative burst) is unknown, although many proximal events have been i...

  18. A review: oxidative stress in fish induced by pesticides.

    PubMed

    Slaninova, Andrea; Smutna, Miriam; Modra, Helena; Svobodova, Zdenka

    2009-01-01

    The knowledge in oxidative stress in fish has a great importance for environmental and aquatic toxicology. Because oxidative stress is evoked by many chemicals including some pesticides, pro-oxidant factors' action in fish organism can be used to assess specific area pollution or world sea pollution. Hepatotoxic effect of DDT may be related with lipid peroxidation. Releasing of reactive oxygen species (ROS) after HCB exposure can be realized via two ways: via the uncoupling of the electron transport chain from monooxygenase activity and via metabolism of HCB major metabolite pentachlorophenol. Chlorothalonil disrupts mitochondrial metabolism due to the impairment of NADPH oxidase function. Activation of spleen macrophages and a decrease of catalase (CAT) activity have been observed after endosulfan exposure. Excessive release of superoxide radicals after etoxazole exposure can cause a decrease of CAT activity and increase phagocytic activity of splenocytes. Anticholinergic activity of organophosphates leads to the accumulation of ROS and resulting lipid peroxidation. Carbaryl induces changes in the content of glutathione and antioxidant enzymes activities. The antioxidant enzymes changes have been observed after actuation of pesticides deltamethrin and cypermethrin. Bipyridyl herbicides are able to form redox cycles and thereby cause oxidative stress. Low concentrations of simazine do not cause oxidative stress in carps during sub-chronic tests while sublethal concentrations of atrazin can induce oxidative stress in bluegill sunfish. Butachlor causes increased activity of superoxide dismutase -catalase system in the kidney. Rotenon can inhibit the electron transport in mitochondria and thereby increase ROS production. Dichloroaniline, the metabolite of diuron, has oxidative effects. Oxidative damage from fenpyroximate actuation is related to the disruption of mitochondrial redox respiratory chain. Low concentration of glyphosate can cause mild oxidative stress.

  19. Oxidative stress in β-thalassaemia and sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Voskou, S.; Aslan, M.; Fanis, P.; Phylactides, M.; Kleanthous, M.

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease and β-thalassaemia are inherited haemoglobinopathies resulting in structural and quantitative changes in the β-globin chain. These changes lead to instability of the generated haemoglobin or to globin chain imbalance, which in turn impact the oxidative environment both intracellularly and extracellularly. The ensuing oxidative stress and the inability of the body to adequately overcome it are, to a large extent, responsible for the pathophysiology of these diseases. This article provides an overview of the main players and control mechanisms involved in the establishment of oxidative stress in these haemoglobinopathies. PMID:26285072

  20. Salivary markers of oxidative stress in oral diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tóthová, L'ubomíra; Kamodyová, Natália; Červenka, Tomáš; Celec, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Saliva is an interesting alternative diagnostic body fluid with several specific advantages over blood. These include non-invasive and easy collection and related possibility to do repeated sampling. One of the obstacles that hinders the wider use of saliva for diagnosis and monitoring of systemic diseases is its composition, which is affected by local oral status. However, this issue makes saliva very interesting for clinical biochemistry of oral diseases. Periodontitis, caries, oral precancerosis, and other local oral pathologies are associated with oxidative stress. Several markers of lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and DNA damage induced by reactive oxygen species can be measured in saliva. Clinical studies have shown an association with oral pathologies at least for some of the established salivary markers of oxidative stress. This association is currently limited to the population level and none of the widely used markers can be applied for individual diagnostics. Oxidative stress seems to be of local oral origin, but it is currently unclear whether it is caused by an overproduction of reactive oxygen species due to inflammation or by the lack of antioxidants. Interventional studies, both, in experimental animals as well as humans indicate that antioxidant treatment could prevent or slow-down the progress of periodontitis. This makes the potential clinical use of salivary markers of oxidative stress even more attractive. This review summarizes basic information on the most commonly used salivary markers of oxidative damage, antioxidant status, and carbonyl stress and the studies analyzing these markers in patients with caries or periodontitis. PMID:26539412

  1. Antioxidants Mediate Both Iron Homeostasis and Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Imam, Mustapha Umar; Zhang, Shenshen; Ma, Jifei; Wang, Hao; Wang, Fudi

    2017-06-28

    Oxidative stress is a common denominator in the pathogenesis of many chronic diseases. Therefore, antioxidants are often used to protect cells and tissues and reverse oxidative damage. It is well known that iron metabolism underlies the dynamic interplay between oxidative stress and antioxidants in many pathophysiological processes. Both iron deficiency and iron overload can affect redox state, and these conditions can be restored to physiological conditions using iron supplementation and iron chelation, respectively. Similarly, the addition of antioxidants to these treatment regimens has been suggested as a viable therapeutic approach for attenuating tissue damage induced by oxidative stress. Notably, many bioactive plant-derived compounds have been shown to regulate both iron metabolism and redox state, possibly through interactive mechanisms. This review summarizes our current understanding of these mechanisms and discusses compelling preclinical evidence that bioactive plant-derived compounds can be both safe and effective for managing both iron deficiency and iron overload conditions.

  2. Markers of Oxidative Stress and Neuroprogression in Depression Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Vaváková, Magdaléna; Trebatická, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Major depression is multifactorial disorder with high prevalence and alarming prognostic in the nearest 15 years. Several mechanisms of depression are known. Neurotransmitters imbalance and imbalance between neuroprogressive and neuroprotective factors are observed in major depression. Depression is accompanied by inflammatory responses of the organism and consequent elevation of proinflammatory cytokines and increased lipid peroxidation are described in literature. Neuropsychiatric disorders including major depression are also associated with telomerase shortening, oxidative changes in nucleotides, and polymorphisms in several genes connected to metabolism of reactive oxygen species. Mitochondrion dysfunction is directly associated with increasing levels of oxidative stress. Oxidative stress plays significant role in pathophysiology of major depression via actions of free radicals, nonradical molecules, and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Products of oxidative stress represent important parameters for measuring and predicting of depression status as well as for determining effectiveness of administrated antidepressants. Positive effect of micronutrients, vitamins, and antioxidants in depression treatment is also reviewed. PMID:26078821

  3. Oxidative stress, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Tangvarasittichai, Surapon

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is increased in metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and this appears to underlie the development of cardiovascular disease, T2DM and diabetic complications. Increased oxidative stress appears to be a deleterious factor leading to insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, β-cell dysfunction, impaired glucose tolerance and ultimately leading to T2DM. Chronic oxidative stress, hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia are particularly dangerous for β-cells from lowest levels of antioxidant, have high oxidative energy requirements, decrease the gene expression of key β-cell genes and induce cell death. If β-cell functioning is impaired, it results in an under production of insulin, impairs glucose stimulated insulin secretion, fasting hyperglycemia and eventually the development of T2DM. PMID:25897356

  4. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction-linked neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Torequl

    2017-01-01

    Reactive species play an important role in physiological functions. Overproduction of reactive species, notably reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species along with the failure of balance by the body's antioxidant enzyme systems results in destruction of cellular structures, lipids, proteins, and genetic materials such as DNA and RNA. Moreover, the effects of reactive species on mitochondria and their metabolic processes eventually cause a rise in ROS/RNS levels, leading to oxidation of mitochondrial proteins, lipids, and DNA. Oxidative stress has been considered to be linked to the etiology of many diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases (NDDs) such as Alzheimer diseases, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Friedreich's ataxia, Huntington's disease, Multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson's diseases. In addition, oxidative stress causing protein misfold may turn to other NDDs include Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy, Kuru, Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker syndrome, and Fatal Familial Insomnia. An overview of the oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction-linked NDDs has been summarized in this review.

  5. Antioxidants Mediate Both Iron Homeostasis and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shenshen; Ma, Jifei; Wang, Hao; Wang, Fudi

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a common denominator in the pathogenesis of many chronic diseases. Therefore, antioxidants are often used to protect cells and tissues and reverse oxidative damage. It is well known that iron metabolism underlies the dynamic interplay between oxidative stress and antioxidants in many pathophysiological processes. Both iron deficiency and iron overload can affect redox state, and these conditions can be restored to physiological conditions using iron supplementation and iron chelation, respectively. Similarly, the addition of antioxidants to these treatment regimens has been suggested as a viable therapeutic approach for attenuating tissue damage induced by oxidative stress. Notably, many bioactive plant-derived compounds have been shown to regulate both iron metabolism and redox state, possibly through interactive mechanisms. This review summarizes our current understanding of these mechanisms and discusses compelling preclinical evidence that bioactive plant-derived compounds can be both safe and effective for managing both iron deficiency and iron overload conditions. PMID:28657578

  6. Copper toxicity, oxidative stress, and antioxidant nutrients.

    PubMed

    Gaetke, Lisa M; Chow, Ching Kuang

    2003-07-15

    Copper (Cu) is an integral part of many important enzymes involved in a number of vital biological processes. Although normally bound to proteins, Cu may be released and become free to catalyze the formation of highly reactive hydroxyl radicals. Data obtained from in vitro and cell culture studies are largely supportive of Cu's capacity to initiate oxidative damage and interfere with important cellular events. Oxidative damage has been linked to chronic Cu-overload and/or exposure to excess Cu caused by accidents, occupational hazards, and environmental contamination. Additionally, Cu-induced oxidative damage has been implicated in disorders associated with abnormal Cu metabolism and neurodegenerative changes. Interestingly, a deficiency in dietary Cu also increases cellular susceptibility to oxidative damage. A number of nutrients have been shown to interact with Cu and alter its cellular effects. Vitamin E is generally protective against Cu-induced oxidative damage. While most in vitro or cell culture studies show that ascorbic acid aggravates Cu-induced oxidative damage, results obtained from available animal studies suggest that the compound is protective. High intakes of ascorbic acid and zinc may provide protection against Cu toxicity by preventing excess Cu uptake. Zinc also removes Cu from its binding site, where it may cause free radical formation. Beta-carotene, alpha-lipoic acid and polyphenols have also been shown to attenuate Cu-induced oxidative damage. Further studies are needed to better understand the cellular effects of this essential, but potentially toxic, trace mineral and its functional interaction with other nutrients.

  7. Stressed Oxidation of C/SiC Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Brewer, David N.; Eckel, Andrew J.; Cawley, James D.

    1997-01-01

    Constant load, stressed oxidation testing was performed on T-300 C/SiC composites with a SiC seal coat. Test conditions included temperatures ranging from 350 C to 1500 C at stresses of 69 MPa and 172 MPa (10 and 25 ksi). The coupon subjected to stressed oxidation at 550 C/69 MPa for 25 hours had a room temperature residual strength one-half that of the as-received coupons. The coupon tested at the higher stress and all coupons tested at higher temperatures failed in less than 25 hr. Microstructural analysis of the fracture surfaces, using SEM (scanning electron microscopy), revealed the formation of reduced cross-sectional fibers with pointed tips. Analysis of composite cross-sections show pathways for oxygen ingress. The discussion will focus on fiber/matrix interphase oxidation and debonding as well as the formation and implications of the fiber tip morphology.

  8. The Role of Oxidative Stress in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Vera; Junn, Eunsung; Mouradian, M. Maral

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Disruptions in the physiologic maintenance of the redox potential in neurons interfere with several biological processes, ultimately leading to cell death. Evidence has been developed for oxidative and nitrative damage to key cellular components in the PD substantia nigra. A number of sources and mechanisms for the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are recognized including the metabolism of dopamine itself, mitochondrial dysfunction, iron, neuroinflammatory cells, calcium, and aging. PD causing gene products including DJ-1, PINK1, parkin, alpha-synuclein and LRRK2 also impact in complex ways mitochondrial function leading to exacerbation of ROS generation and susceptibility to oxidative stress. Additionally, cellular homeostatic processes including the ubiquitin-proteasome system and mitophagy are impacted by oxidative stress. It is apparent that the interplay between these various mechanisms contributes to neurodegeneration in PD as a feed forward scenario where primary insults lead to oxidative stress, which damages key cellular pathogenetic proteins that in turn cause more ROS production. Animal models of PD have yielded some insights into the molecular pathways of neuronal degeneration and highlighted previously unknown mechanisms by which oxidative stress contributes to PD. However, therapeutic attempts to target the general state of oxidative stress in clinical trials have failed to demonstrate an impact on disease progression. Recent knowledge gained about the specific mechanisms related to PD gene products that modulate ROS production and the response of neurons to stress may provide targeted new approaches towards neuroprotection. PMID:24252804

  9. Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress Responses in the Pediatric Population

    PubMed Central

    Avloniti, Alexandra; Chatzinikolaou, Athanasios; Deli, Chariklia K.; Vlachopoulos, Dimitris; Gracia-Marco, Luis; Leontsini, Diamanda; Draganidis, Dimitrios; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z.; Mastorakos, George; Fatouros, Ioannis G.

    2017-01-01

    Adults demonstrate an upregulation of their pro- and anti-oxidant mechanisms in response to acute exercise while systematic exercise training enhances their antioxidant capacity, thereby leading to a reduced generation of free radicals both at rest and in response to exercise stress. However, less information exists regarding oxidative stress responses and the underlying mechanisms in the pediatric population. Evidence suggests that exercise-induced redox perturbations may be valuable in order to monitor exercise-induced inflammatory responses and as such training overload in children and adolescents as well as monitor optimal growth and development. The purpose of this review was to provide an update on oxidative stress responses to acute and chronic exercise in youth. It has been documented that acute exercise induces age-specific transient alterations in both oxidant and antioxidant markers in children and adolescents. However, these responses seem to be affected by factors such as training phase, training load, fitness level, mode of exercise etc. In relation to chronic adaptation, the role of training on oxidative stress adaptation has not been adequately investigated. The two studies performed so far indicate that children and adolescents exhibit positive adaptations of their antioxidant system, as adults do. More studies are needed in order to shed light on oxidative stress and antioxidant responses, following acute exercise and training adaptations in youth. Available evidence suggests that small amounts of oxidative stress may be necessary for growth whereas the transition to adolescence from childhood may promote maturation of pro- and anti-oxidant mechanisms. Available evidence also suggests that obesity may negatively affect basal and exercise-related antioxidant responses in the peripubertal period during pre- and early-puberty. PMID:28106721

  10. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in Kindler syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zapatero-Solana, Elisabeth; García-Giménez, Jose Luis; Guerrero-Aspizua, Sara; García, Marta; Toll, Agustí; Baselga, Eulalia; Durán-Moreno, Maria; Markovic, Jelena; García-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Conti, Claudio J; Has, Cristina; Larcher, Fernando; Pallardó, Federico V; Del Rio, Marcela

    2014-12-21

    Kindler Syndrome (KS) is an autosomal recessive skin disorder characterized by skin blistering, photosensitivity, premature aging, and propensity to skin cancer. In spite of the knowledge underlying cause of this disease involving mutations of FERMT1 (fermitin family member 1), and efforts to characterize genotype-phenotype correlations, the clinical variability of this genodermatosis is still poorly understood. In addition, several pathognomonic features of KS, not related to skin fragility such as aging, inflammation and cancer predisposition have been strongly associated with oxidative stress. Alterations of the cellular redox status have not been previously studied in KS. Here we explored the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of this rare cutaneous disease. Patient-derived keratinocytes and their respective controls were cultured and classified according to their different mutations by PCR and western blot, the oxidative stress biomarkers were analyzed by spectrophotometry and qPCR and additionally redox biosensors experiments were also performed. The mitochondrial structure and functionality were analyzed by confocal microscopy and electron microscopy. Patient-derived keratinocytes showed altered levels of several oxidative stress biomarkers including MDA (malondialdehyde), GSSG/GSH ratio (oxidized and reduced glutathione) and GCL (gamma-glutamyl cysteine ligase) subunits. Electron microscopy analysis of both, KS skin biopsies and keratinocytes showed marked morphological mitochondrial abnormalities. Consistently, confocal microscopy studies of mitochondrial fluorescent probes confirmed the mitochondrial derangement. Imbalance of oxidative stress biomarkers together with abnormalities in the mitochondrial network and function are consistent with a pro-oxidant state. This is the first study to describe mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress involvement in KS.

  11. Are metallothioneins equally good biomarkers of metal and oxidative stress?

    PubMed

    Figueira, Etelvina; Branco, Diana; Antunes, Sara C; Gonçalves, Fernando; Freitas, Rosa

    2012-10-01

    Several researchers investigated the induction of metallothioneins (MTs) in the presence of metals, namely Cadmium (Cd). Fewer studies observed the induction of MTs due to oxidizing agents, and literature comparing the sensitivity of MTs to different stressors is even more scarce or even nonexistent. The role of MTs in metal and oxidative stress and thus their use as a stress biomarker, remains to be clearly elucidated. To better understand the role of MTs as a biomarker in Cerastoderma edule, a bivalve widely used as bioindicator, a laboratory assay was conducted aiming to assess the sensitivity of MTs to metal and oxidative stressors. For this purpose, Cd was used to induce metal stress, whereas hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), being an oxidizing compound, was used to impose oxidative stress. Results showed that induction of MTs occurred at very different levels in metal and oxidative stress. In the presence of the oxidizing agent (H2O2), MTs only increased significantly when the degree of oxidative stress was very high, and mortality rates were higher than 50 percent. On the contrary, C. edule survived to all Cd concentrations used and significant MTs increases, compared to the control, were observed in all Cd exposures. The present work also revealed that the number of ions and the metal bound to MTs varied with the exposure conditions. In the absence of disturbance, MTs bound most (60-70 percent) of the essential metals (Zn and Cu) in solution. In stressful situations, such as the exposure to Cd and H2O2, MTs did not bind to Cu and bound less to Zn. When organisms were exposed to Cd, the total number of ions bound per MT molecule did not change, compared to control. However the sort of ions bound per MT molecule differed; part of the Zn and all Cu ions where displaced by Cd ions. For organisms exposed to H2O2, each MT molecule bound less than half of the ions compared to control and Cd conditions, which indicates a partial oxidation of thiol groups in the cysteine

  12. Chronic stress increases vulnerability to diet-related abdominal fat, oxidative stress, and metabolic risk.

    PubMed

    Aschbacher, Kirstin; Kornfeld, Sarah; Picard, Martin; Puterman, Eli; Havel, Peter J; Stanhope, Kimber; Lustig, Robert H; Epel, Elissa

    2014-08-01

    In preclinical studies, the combination of chronic stress and a high sugar/fat diet is a more potent driver of visceral adiposity than diet alone, a process mediated by peripheral neuropeptide Y (NPY). In a human model of chronic stress, we investigated whether the synergistic combination of highly palatable foods (HPF; high sugar/fat) and stress was associated with elevated metabolic risk. Using a case-control design, we compared 33 post-menopausal caregivers (the chronic stress group) to 28 age-matched low-stress control women on reported HPF consumption (modified Block Food Frequency Questionnaire), waistline circumference, truncal fat ultrasound, and insulin sensitivity using a 3-h oral glucose tolerance test. A fasting blood draw was assayed for plasma NPY and oxidative stress markers (8-hydroxyguanosine and F2-Isoprostanes). Among chronically stressed women only, greater HPF consumption was associated with greater abdominal adiposity, oxidative stress, and insulin resistance at baseline (all p's≤.01). Furthermore, plasma NPY was significantly elevated in chronically stressed women (p<.01), and the association of HPF with abdominal adiposity was stronger among women with high versus low NPY. There were no significant predictions of change over 1-year, likely due to high stability (little change) in the primary outcomes over this period. Chronic stress is associated with enhanced vulnerability to diet-related metabolic risk (abdominal adiposity, insulin resistance, and oxidative stress). Stress-induced peripheral NPY may play a mechanistic role. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Genetic resistance to malaria, oxidative stress and hemoglobin oxidation.

    PubMed

    Destro Bisol, G

    1999-09-01

    I describe a model which posits the molecular basis of some malaria-resistance genes in the interaction between oxidized hemoglobin and membrane components. The model is supported by a considerable body of evidence which indicates that erythrocytes of genetically protected individuals (carriers of sickle cell trait, alpha- and beta-thalassemia, and G6PD deficiency) are susceptible to the increase of oxidation of hemoglobin following H2O2 release in the host cell by Plasmodium falciparum. I suggest that the irreversible interaction between oxidized hemoglobin and the red cell membrane could trigger mechanisms that: (i) reduce invasion of erythrocytes by the falciparum parasite; (ii) impair parasite survival and development within the cell; (iii) accelerate infected erythrocyte clearance by phagocytosis.

  14. Oxidative Stress and Nucleic Acid Oxidation in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Chih-Chien; Hsu, Yu-Chuan; Lin, Yuh-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have high cardiovascular mortality and morbidity and a high risk for developing malignancy. Excessive oxidative stress is thought to play a major role in elevating these risks by increasing oxidative nucleic acid damage. Oxidative stress results from an imbalance between reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (RONS) production and antioxidant defense mechanisms and can cause vascular and tissue injuries as well as nucleic acid damage in CKD patients. The increased production of RONS, impaired nonenzymatic or enzymatic antioxidant defense mechanisms, and other risk factors including gene polymorphisms, uremic toxins (indoxyl sulfate), deficiency of arylesterase/paraoxonase, hyperhomocysteinemia, dialysis-associated membrane bioincompatibility, and endotoxin in patients with CKD can inhibit normal cell function by damaging cell lipids, arachidonic acid derivatives, carbohydrates, proteins, amino acids, and nucleic acids. Several clinical biomarkers and techniques have been used to detect the antioxidant status and oxidative stress/oxidative nucleic acid damage associated with long-term complications such as inflammation, atherosclerosis, amyloidosis, and malignancy in CKD patients. Antioxidant therapies have been studied to reduce the oxidative stress and nucleic acid oxidation in patients with CKD, including alpha-tocopherol, N-acetylcysteine, ascorbic acid, glutathione, folic acid, bardoxolone methyl, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, and providing better dialysis strategies. This paper provides an overview of radical production, antioxidant defence, pathogenesis and biomarkers of oxidative stress in patients with CKD, and possible antioxidant therapies. PMID:24058721

  15. Oxidative stress and protein aggregation during biological aging.

    PubMed

    Squier, T C

    2001-09-01

    Biological aging is a fundamental process that represents the major risk factor with respect to the development of cancer, neurodegenerative, and cardiovascular diseases in vertebrates. It is, therefore, evident that the molecular mechanisms of aging are fundamental to understand many disease processes. In this regard, the oxidation and nitration of intracellular proteins and the formation of protein aggregates have been suggested to underlie the loss of cellular function and the reduced ability of senescent animals to withstand physiological stresses. Since oxidatively modified proteins are thermodynamically unstable and assume partially unfolded tertiary structures that readily form aggregates, it is likely that oxidized proteins are intermediates in the formation of amyloid fibrils. It is, therefore, of interest to identify oxidatively sensitive protein targets that may play a protective role through their ability to down-regulate energy metabolism and the consequent generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this respect, the maintenance of cellular calcium gradients represents a major energetic expense, which links alterations in intracellular calcium levels to ATP utilization and the associated generation of ROS through respiratory control mechanisms. The selective oxidation or nitration of the calcium regulatory proteins calmodulin and Ca-ATPase that occurs in vivo during aging and under conditions of oxidative stress may represent an adaptive response to oxidative stress that functions to down-regulate energy metabolism and the associated generation of ROS. Since these calcium regulatory proteins are also preferentially oxidized or nitrated under in vitro conditions, these results suggest an enhanced sensitivity of these critical calcium regulatory proteins, which modulate signal transduction processes and intracellular energy metabolism, to conditions of oxidative stress. Thus, the selective oxidation of critical signal transduction proteins probably

  16. Role of Magnesium in Oxidative Stress in Individuals with Obesity.

    PubMed

    Morais, Jennifer Beatriz Silva; Severo, Juliana Soares; Santos, Loanne Rocha Dos; de Sousa Melo, Stéfany Rodrigues; de Oliveira Santos, Raisa; de Oliveira, Ana Raquel Soares; Cruz, Kyria Jayanne Clímaco; do Nascimento Marreiro, Dilina

    2017-03-01

    Adipose tissue is considered an endocrine organ that promotes excessive production of reactive oxygen species when in excess, thus contributing to lipid peroxidation. Magnesium deficiency contributes to the development of oxidative stress in obese individuals, as this mineral plays a role as an antioxidant, participates as a cofactor of several enzymes, maintains cell membrane stability and mitigates the effects of oxidative stress. The objective of this review is to bring together updated information on the participation of magnesium in the oxidative stress present in obesity. We conducted a search of articles published in the PubMed, SciELO and LILACS databases, using the keywords 'magnesium', 'oxidative stress', 'malondialdehyde', 'superoxide dismutase', 'glutathione peroxidase', 'reactive oxygen species', 'inflammation' and 'obesity'. The studies show that obese subjects have low serum concentrations of magnesium, as well as high concentrations of oxidative stress marker in these individuals. Furthermore, it is evident that the adequate intake of magnesium contributes to its appropriate homeostasis in the body. Thus, this review of current research can help define the need for intervention with supplementation of this mineral for the prevention and treatment of disorders associated with this chronic disease.

  17. Lithospermum erythrorhizon extract protects keratinocytes and fibroblasts against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hee Geun; Lee, Bong Han; Kim, Wooki; Lee, Jong Suk; Kim, Gun Hee; Chun, Ock K; Koo, Sung I; Kim, Dae-Ok

    2014-11-01

    Oxidative stress damages dermal and epidermal cells and degrades extracellular matrix proteins, such as collagen, ultimately leading to skin aging. The present study evaluated the potential protective effect of the aqueous methanolic extract obtained from Lithospermum erythrorhizon (LE) against oxidative stress, induced by H2O2 and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, on human keratinocyte (HaCaT) and human dermal fibroblast-neonatal (HDF-n) cells. Exposure of cells to H2O2 or UVB irradiation markedly increased oxidative stress and reduced cell viability. However, pretreatment of cells with the LE extract not only increased cell viability (up to 84.5%), but also significantly decreased oxidative stress. Further, the LE extract downregulated the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1, an endopeptidase that degrades extracellular matrix collagen. In contrast, treatment with the LE extract did not affect the expression of procollagen type 1 in HDF-n cells exposed to UVA irradiation. Thirteen phenolic compounds, including derivatives of shikonin and caffeic acid, were identified by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. These results suggest that LE-derived extracts may protect oxidative-stress-induced skin aging by inhibiting degradation of skin collagen, and that this protection may derive at least in part from the antioxidant phenolics present in these extracts. Further studies are warranted to determine the potential utility of LE-derived extracts in both therapeutic and cosmetic applications.

  18. Role of Oxidative Stress in Epigenetic Modification in Endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Ito, Fuminori; Yamada, Yuki; Shigemitsu, Aiko; Akinishi, Mika; Kaniwa, Hiroko; Miyake, Ryuta; Yamanaka, Shoichiro; Kobayashi, Hiroshi

    2017-11-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation and histone modification are associated with an increased risk of reproductive disorders such as endometriosis. However, a cause-effect relationship between epigenetic mechanisms and endometriosis development has not been fully determined. This review provides current information based on oxidative stress in epigenetic modification in endometriosis. This article reviews the English-language literature on epigenetics, DNA methylation, histone modification, and oxidative stress associated with endometriosis in an effort to identify epigenetic modification that causes a predisposition to endometriosis. Oxidative stress, secondary to the influx of hemoglobin, heme, and iron during retrograde menstruation, is involved in the expression of CpG demethylases, ten-eleven translocation, and jumonji (JMJ). Ten-eleven translocation and JMJ recognize a wide range of endogenous DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). The increased expression levels of DNMTs may be involved in the subsequent downregulation of the decidualization-related genes. This review supports the hypothesis that there are at least 2 distinct phases of epigenetic modification in endometriosis: the initial wave of iron-induced oxidative stress would be followed by the second big wave of epigenetic modulation of endometriosis susceptibility genes. We summarize the recent advances in our understanding of the underlying epigenetic mechanisms focusing on oxidative stress in endometriosis.

  19. Oxidative stress markers imbalance in late-life depression.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Breno S; Mendes-Silva, Ana Paula; Silva, Lucelia Barroso; Bertola, Laiss; Vieira, Monica Costa; Ferreira, Jessica Diniz; Nicolau, Mariana; Bristot, Giovana; da Rosa, Eduarda Dias; Teixeira, Antonio L; Kapczinski, Flavio

    2018-03-20

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathophysiology of mood disorders in young adults. However, there is few data to support its role in the elderly. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate whether subjects with late-life depression (LLD) presented with changes in oxidative stress response in comparison with the non-depressed control group. We then explored how oxidative stress markers associated with specific features of LLD, in particular cognitive performance and age of onset of major depressive disorder in these individuals. We included a convenience sample of 124 individuals, 77 with LLD and 47 non-depressed subjects (Controls). We measure the plasma levels of 6 oxidative stress markers: thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), protein carbonil content (PCC), free 8-isoprostane, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, glutathione reductase (GR) activity, and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity. We found that participants with LLD had significantly higher free 8-isoprostane levels (p = 0.003) and lower glutathione peroxidase activity (p = 0.006) compared to controls. Free 8-isoprostane levels were also significantly correlated with worse scores in the initiation/perseverance (r = -0.24, p = 0.01), conceptualization (r = -0.22, p = 0.02) sub-scores, and the total scores (r = -0.21, p = 0.04) on the DRS. Our study provides robust evidence of the imbalance between oxidative stress damage, in particular lipid peroxidation, and anti-oxidative defenses as a mechanism related to LLD, and cognitive impairment in this population. Interventions aiming to reduce oxidative stress damage can have a potential neuroprotective effect for LLD subjects. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Oxidative stress and maternal obesity: feto-placental unit interaction.

    PubMed

    Malti, N; Merzouk, H; Merzouk, S A; Loukidi, B; Karaouzene, N; Malti, A; Narce, M

    2014-06-01

    To determine oxidative stress markers in maternal obesity during pregnancy and to evaluate feto-placental unit interaction, especially predictors of fetal metabolic alterations. 40 obese pregnant women (prepregnancy BMI > 30 kg/m²) were compared to 50 control pregnant women. Maternal, cord blood and placenta samples were collected at delivery. Biochemical parameters (total cholesterol and triglycerides) and oxidative stress markers (malondialdehyde, carbonyl proteins, superoxide anion expressed as reduced Nitroblue Tetrazolium, nitric oxide expressed as nitrite, reduced glutathione, catalase, superoxide dismutase) were assayed by biochemical methods. Maternal, fetal and placental triglyceride levels were increased in obese group compared to control. Maternal malondialdehyde, carbonyl proteins, nitric oxide and superoxide anion levels were high while reduced glutathione concentrations and superoxide dismutase activity were low in obesity. In the placenta and in newborns of these obese mothers, variations of redox balance were also observed indicating high oxidative stress. Maternal and placental interaction constituted a strong predictor of fetal redox variations in obese pregnancies. Maternal obesity compromised placental metabolism and antioxidant status which strongly impacted fetal redox balance. Oxidative stress may be one of the key downstream mediators that initiate programming of the offspring. Maternal obesity is associated with metabolic alterations and dysregulation of redox balance in the mother-placenta - fetus unit. These perturbations could lead to maternal and fetal complications and should be carefully considered. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Osteogenesis potential of different titania nanotubes in oxidative stress microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yonglin; Shen, Xinkun; Luo, Zhong; Hu, Yan; Li, Menghuan; Ma, Pingping; Ran, Qichun; Dai, Liangliang; He, Ye; Cai, Kaiyong

    2018-06-01

    Oxidative stress is commonly existed in bone degenerative disease (osteoarthritis, osteoporosis etc.) and some antioxidants had great potential to enhance osteogenesis. In this study, we aim to investigate the anti-oxidative properties of various TiO 2 nanotubes (TNTs) so to screen the desirable size for improved osteogenesis and reveal the underlying molecular mechanism in vitro. Comparing cellular behaviors under normal and oxidative stress conditions, an interesting conclusion was obtained. In normal microenvironment, small TNTs were beneficial for adhesion and proliferation of osteoblasts, but large TNTs greatly increased osteogenic differentiation. However, after H 2 O 2 (300 μM) treatment (mimicking oxidative stress), only large TNTs samples demonstrated superior cellular behaviors of increased osteoblasts' adhesion, survival and differentiation when comparing with those of native titanium (control). Molecular results revealed that oxidative stress resistance of large nanotubes was closely related to the high expression of integrin α5β1 (ITG α5β1), which further up-regulated the production of anti-apoptotic proteins (p-FAK, p-Akt, p-FoxO3a and Bcl2) and down-regulated the expression of pro-apoptotic protein (Bax). Moreover, we found that Wnt signals (Wnt3a, Wnt5a, Lrp5, Lrp6 and β-catenin) played an important role in promoting osteogenic differentiation of osteoblasts under oxidative condition. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. IRON OXIDE NANOPARTICLE-INDUCED OXIDATIVE STRESS AND INFLAMMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. Nanoparticle Physicochemical Characterizations
    2. We first focused on creating NP systems that could be used to test our hypotheses and assessing their stability in aqueous media. The iron oxide NP systems were not stable in cell culture medium o...

    3. Grape seed proanthocyanidins prevent plasma postprandial oxidative stress in humans.

      PubMed

      Natella, Fausta; Belelli, Federica; Gentili, Vincenzo; Ursini, Fulvio; Scaccini, Cristina

      2002-12-18

      Postprandial hyperlipemia is a well-defined risk factor for atherosclerosis. A reasonable contributing mechanism could involve the postprandial increase of plasma lipid hydroperoxides (LPO) affecting the oxidant/antioxidant balance and increasing the susceptibility of LDL to oxidation. Wine has been shown to prevent both these events. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of supplementing a meal with grape seed proanthocyanidins (the main phenolic antioxidant of red wine) on plasma postprandial oxidative stress. In two different sessions, 8 healthy volunteers consumed the same test meal rich in oxidized and oxidizable lipids without (control) or with 300 mg of a proanthocyanidin-rich grape seeds extract (GSE). Lipid hydroperoxide concentration, antioxidant status, and LDL resistance to oxidative modification were measured in postprandial plasma. The content of LPO in chylomicrons was 1.5-fold higher after the control meal than after the GSE-supplemented meal. Plasma LPO increased only after consumption of the control meal. The plasma antioxidant capacity increased in the postprandial phase only following the GSE supplemented meal. LDL isolated 3 h after the control meal tended to be more susceptible to oxidative modification (but the difference did not reach statistical significance). An opposite trend was observed following the GSE supplemented meal. In conclusion, the supplementation of a meal with GSE minimizes the postprandial oxidative stress by decreasing the oxidants and increasing the antioxidant levels in plasma, and, as a consequence, enhancing the resistance to oxidative modification of LDL.

    4. Protein Sulfenylation: A Novel Readout of Environmental Oxidant Stress

      PubMed Central

      Wages, Phillip A.; Lavrich, Katelyn S.; Zhang, Zhenfa; Cheng, Wan-Yun; Corteselli, Elizabeth; Gold, Avram; Bromberg, Philip; Simmons, Steven O.; Samet, James M.

      2016-01-01

      Oxidative stress is a commonly cited mechanism of toxicity of environmental agents. Ubiquitous environmental chemicals such as the diesel exhaust component 1,2-naphthoquinone (1,2-NQ) induce oxidative stress by redox cycling, which generates hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Cysteinyl thiolate residues on regulatory proteins are subjected to oxidative modification by H2O2 in physiological contexts and are also toxicological targets of oxidant stress induced by environmental contaminants. We investigated whether exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of 1,2-NQ can induce H2O2-dependent oxidation of cysteinyl thiols in regulatory proteins as a readout of oxidant stress in human airway epithelial cells. BEAS-2B cells were exposed to 0–1000 μM 1,2-NQ for 0–30 min, and levels of H2O2 were measured by ratiometric spectrofluorometry of HyPer. H2O2-dependent protein sulfenylation was measured using immunohistochemistry, immunoblotting, and isotopic mass spectrometry. Catalase overexpression was used to investigate the relationship between H2O2 generation and protein sulfenylation in cells exposed to 1,2-NQ. Multiple experimental approaches showed that exposure to 1,2-NQ at concentrations as low as 3 μM induces H2O2-dependent protein sulfenylation in BEAS-2B cells. Moreover, the time of onset and duration of 1,2-NQ-induced sulfenylation of the regulatory proteins GAPDH and PTP1B showed significant differences. Oxidative modification of regulatory cysteinyl thiols in human lung cells exposed to relevant concentrations of an ambient air contaminant represents a novel marker of oxidative environmental stress. PMID:26605980

    5. Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and DNA Damage Responses Elicited by Silver, Titanium Dioxide, and Cerium Oxide Nanomaterials

      EPA Science Inventory

      Previous literature on the biological effects of engineered nanomaterials has focused largely on oxidative stress and inflammation endpoints without further investigating potential pathways. Here we examine time-sensitive biological response pathways affected by engineered nanoma...

    6. The Mismetallation of Enzymes during Oxidative Stress*

      PubMed Central

      Imlay, James A.

      2014-01-01

      Mononuclear iron enzymes can tightly bind non-activating metals. How do cells avoid mismetallation? The model bacterium Escherichia coli may control its metal pools so that thermodynamics favor the correct metallation of each enzyme. This system is disrupted, however, by superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. These species oxidize ferrous iron and thereby displace it from many iron-dependent mononuclear enzymes. Ultimately, zinc binds in its place, confers little activity, and imposes metabolic bottlenecks. Data suggest that E. coli compensates by using thiols to extract the zinc and by importing manganese to replace the catalytic iron atom. Manganese resists oxidants and provides substantial activity. PMID:25160623

    7. Impact of early life stress on the pathogenesis of mental disorders: relation to brain oxidative stress.

      PubMed

      Schiavone, Stefania; Colaianna, Marilena; Curtis, Logos

      2015-01-01

      Stress is an inevitable part of human life and it is experienced even before birth. Stress to some extent could be considered normal and even necessary for the survival and the regular psychological development during childhood or adolescence. However, exposure to prolonged stress could become harmful and strongly impact mental health increasing the risk of developing psychiatric disorders. Recent studies have attempted to clarify how the human central nervous system (CNS) reacts to early life stress, focusing mainly on neurobiological modifications. Oxidative stress, defined as a disequilibrium between the oxidant generation and the antioxidant response, has been recently described as a candidate for most of the observed modifications. In this review, we will discuss how prolonged stressful events during childhood or adolescence (such as early maternal separation, parental divorce, physical violence, sexual or psychological abuses, or exposure to war events) can lead to increased oxidative stress in the CNS and enhance the risk to develop psychiatric diseases such as anxiety, depression, drug abuse or psychosis. Defining the sources of oxidative stress following exposure to early life stress might open new beneficial insights in therapeutic approaches to these mental disorders.

    8. Honey bee (Apis mellifera) drones survive oxidative stress due to increased tolerance instead of avoidance or repair of oxidative damage

      USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

      Oxidative stress can lead to premature aging symptoms and cause acute mortality at higher doses in a range of organisms. Oxidative stress resistance and longevity are mechanistically and phenotypically linked: considerable variation in oxidative stress resistance exists among and within species and ...

    9. 8-isoprostane as Oxidative Stress Marker in Coal Mine Workers.

      PubMed

      Zimet, Zlatko; Bilban, Marjan; Marc Malovrh, Mateja; Korošec, Peter; Poljšak, Borut; Osredkar, Joško; Šilar, Mira

      2016-08-01

      This study was to investigate whether working in conditions of elevated concentrations of mine gases (CO2, CO, CH4, DMS) and dust may result in oxidative stress. Coal miners (n=94) from the Velenje Coal mine who were arranged into control group and three groups according to a number of consecutive working days. 8-isoprostane as a biological marker of oxidative stress was measured in exhaled breath condensate (EBC). Miners who worked for three consecutive days had higher 8-isoprostane values in EBC compared to the control group. Gas/dust concentrations and exposure time of a single/two day shift seem too low to trigger immediate oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

    10. Colorectal Carcinogenesis: Role of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidants.

      PubMed

      Carini, Francesco; Mazzola, Margherita; Rappa, Francesca; Jurjus, Abdo; Geagea, Alice Gerges; Al Kattar, Sahar; Bou-Assi, Tarek; Jurjus, Rosalyn; Damiani, Provvidenza; Leone, Angelo; Tomasello, Giovanni

      2017-09-01

      One of the contributory causes of colon cancer is the negative effect of reactive oxygen species on DNA repair mechanisms. Currently, there is a growing support for the concept that oxidative stress may be an important etiological factor for carcinogenesis. The purpose of this review is to elucidate the role of oxidative stress in promoting colorectal carcinogenesis and to highlight the potential protective role of antioxidants. Several studies have documented the importance of antioxidants in countering oxidative stress and preventing colorectal carcinogenesis. However, there are conflicting data in the literature concerning its proper use in humans, since these studies did not yield definitive results and were performed mostly in vitro on cell populations, or in vivo in experimental animal models. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

    11. Chronic unpredictable stress deteriorates the chemopreventive efficacy of pomegranate through oxidative stress pathway.

      PubMed

      Hasan, Shirin; Suhail, Nida; Bilal, Nayeem; Ashraf, Ghulam Md; Zaidi, Syed Kashif; AlNohair, Sultan; Banu, Naheed

      2016-05-01

      Chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) can influence the risk and progression of cancer through increased oxidative stress. Pomegranate is known to protect carcinogenesis through its anti-oxidative properties. This study is carried out to examine whether CUS affects the chemopreventive potential of pomegranate through oxidative stress pathway. Role of CUS on early stages of 7, 12 dimethyl benz(a) anthracene (DMBA) induced carcinogenesis, and its pre-exposure effect on chemopreventive efficacy of pomegranate juice (PJ) was examined in terms of in vivo antioxidant and biochemical parameters in Swiss albino rats. Rats were divided in various groups and were subjected to CUS paradigm, DMBA administration (65 mg/kg body weight, single dose), and PJ treatment. Exposure to stress (alone) and DMBA (alone) led to increased oxidative stress by significantly decreasing the antioxidant enzymes activities and altering the glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT), and glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT) levels. A significant increase in DNA damage demonstrated by comet assay was seen in the liver cells. Stress exposure to DMBA-treated rats further increased the oxidative stress and disturbed the biochemical parameters as compared to DMBA (alone)-treated rats. Chemoprevention with PJ in DMBA (alone)-treated rats restored the altered parameters. However, in the pre-stress DMBA-treated rats, the overall antioxidant potential of PJ was significantly diminished. Our results indicate that chronic stress not only increases the severity of carcinogenesis but also diminishes the anti-oxidative efficacy of PJ. In a broader perspective, special emphasis should be given to stress management and healthy diet during cancer chemoprevention.

    12. Oxygen and oxidative stress in the perinatal period.

      PubMed

      Torres-Cuevas, Isabel; Parra-Llorca, Anna; Sánchez-Illana, Angel; Nuñez-Ramiro, Antonio; Kuligowski, Julia; Cháfer-Pericás, Consuelo; Cernada, María; Escobar, Justo; Vento, Máximo

      2017-08-01

      Fetal life evolves in a hypoxic environment. Changes in the oxygen content in utero caused by conditions such as pre-eclampsia or type I diabetes or by oxygen supplementation to the mother lead to increased free radical production and correlate with perinatal outcomes. In the fetal-to-neonatal transition asphyxia is characterized by intermittent periods of hypoxia ischemia that may evolve to hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy associated with neurocognitive, motor, and neurosensorial impairment. Free radicals generated upon reoxygenation may notably increase brain damage. Hence, clinical trials have shown that the use of 100% oxygen given with positive pressure in the airways of the newborn infant during resuscitation causes more oxidative stress than using air, and increases mortality. Preterm infants are endowed with an immature lung and antioxidant system. Clinical stabilization of preterm infants after birth frequently requires positive pressure ventilation with a gas admixture that contains oxygen to achieve a normal heart rate and arterial oxygen saturation. In randomized controlled trials the use high oxygen concentrations (90% to 100%) has caused more oxidative stress and clinical complications that the use of lower oxygen concentrations (30-60%). A correlation between the amount of oxygen received during resuscitation and the level of biomarkers of oxidative stress and clinical outcomes was established. Thus, based on clinical outcomes and analytical results of oxidative stress biomarkers relevant changes were introduced in the resuscitation policies. However, it should be underscored that analysis of oxidative stress biomarkers in biofluids has only been used in experimental and clinical research but not in clinical routine. The complexity of the technical procedures, lack of automation, and cost of these determinations have hindered the routine use of biomarkers in the clinical setting. Overcoming these technical and economical difficulties constitutes a

    13. Withaferin A induces apoptosis through the generation of thiol oxidation in human head and neck cancer cells.

      PubMed

      Park, Jong Won; Min, Kyoung-Jin; Kim, Dong Eun; Kwon, Taeg Kyu

      2015-01-01

      Withaferin A is a steroidal lactone purified from the Indian medicinal plant, Withania somnifera. Withaferin A has been shown to inhibit the proliferation, metastasis, invasion and angiogenesis of cancer cells. In the present study, we investigated whether withaferin A induces apoptosis in the human head and neck cancer cells, AMC-HN4. Withaferin A markedly increased the sub-G1 cell population and the cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), which are markers of apoptosis. Pan-caspase inhibitor, z-VAD-fmk (z-VAD), markedly inhibited the withaferin A-induced apoptosis. However, the withaferin A-induced increase in the expression of COX-2 was not affected by treatment with z-VAD. Furthermore, withaferin A upregulated cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression. The COX-2 inhibitor, NS-398, reduced the withaferin A-induced production of prostaglandin E2. However, treatment with NS-398 did not affect the sub-G1 population and the cleavage of PARP. In addition, the withaferin A-induced apoptosis was independent of reactive oxygen species production. Thiol donors [N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and dithiothreitol (DTT)] reversed withaferin A-induced apoptosis. Therefore, our data suggest that withaferin A induces apoptosis through the mechanism of thiol oxidation in head and neck carcinoma cells.

    14. Oxidative stress in MeHg-induced neurotoxicity

      SciTech Connect

      Farina, Marcelo, E-mail: farina@ccb.ufsc.br; Aschner, Michael; Department of Pharmacology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN

      2011-11-15

      Methylmercury (MeHg) is an environmental toxicant that leads to long-lasting neurological and developmental deficits in animals and humans. Although the molecular mechanisms mediating MeHg-induced neurotoxicity are not completely understood, several lines of evidence indicate that oxidative stress represents a critical event related to the neurotoxic effects elicited by this toxicant. The objective of this review is to summarize and discuss data from experimental and epidemiological studies that have been important in clarifying the molecular events which mediate MeHg-induced oxidative damage and, consequently, toxicity. Although unanswered questions remain, the electrophilic properties of MeHg and its ability to oxidize thiols have beenmore » reported to play decisive roles to the oxidative consequences observed after MeHg exposure. However, a close examination of the relationship between low levels of MeHg necessary to induce oxidative stress and the high amounts of sulfhydryl-containing antioxidants in mammalian cells (e.g., glutathione) have led to the hypothesis that nucleophilic groups with extremely high affinities for MeHg (e.g., selenols) might represent primary targets in MeHg-induced oxidative stress. Indeed, the inhibition of antioxidant selenoproteins during MeHg poisoning in experimental animals has corroborated this hypothesis. The levels of different reactive species (superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide) have been reported to be increased in MeHg-exposed systems, and the mechanisms concerning these increments seem to involve a complex sequence of cascading molecular events, such as mitochondrial dysfunction, excitotoxicity, intracellular calcium dyshomeostasis and decreased antioxidant capacity. This review also discusses potential therapeutic strategies to counteract MeHg-induced toxicity and oxidative stress, emphasizing the use of organic selenocompounds, which generally present higher affinity for MeHg when compared to the

    15. [Role of green tea in oxidative stress prevention].

      PubMed

      Metro, D; Muraca, U; Manasseri, L

      2006-01-01

      Oxidative stress is a condition caused by an increase of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) or by a shortage of the mechanisms of cellular protection and antioxidant defence. ROS have a potential oxidative effect towards various cellular macromolecules: proteins, nucleic acids, proteoglycans, lipids, with consequent damages in several cellular districts and promotion of the ageing process of the organism. However, some substances are able to prevent and/or reduce the damages caused by ROS; therefore, they are defined antioxidant. The present research studied, in a group of subjects, the antioxidant effects of the green tea, that was administered with fruit and vegetables in a strictly controlled diet. 50 subjects were selected and requested to daily consume 2-3 fruit portions (especially pineapple), 3-5 portions of vegetables (especially tomato) and 2-3 glasses of green tea for about 2 months to integrate the controlled basic diet. Some indicators of the oxidative stress were measured in the plasma before and after the integration period. The integration of a basic diet with supplements of fruit, vegetables and green tea turned out to be able in increasing both plasmatic total antioxidant capacity and endogenous antioxidant levels and to reduce the lipid peroxidation of the membranes, suggesting a reduction of the oxidative stress. These data suggest that an adequate supplement of antioxidants can prevent oxidative stress and correlated pathologies.

    16. In vitro model suggests oxidative stress involved in keratoconus disease

      PubMed Central

      Karamichos, D.; Hutcheon, A. E. K.; Rich, C. B.; Trinkaus-Randall, V.; Asara, J. M.; Zieske, J. D.

      2014-01-01

      Keratoconus (KC) affects 1:2000 people and is a disorder where cornea thins and assumes a conical shape. Advanced KC requires surgery to maintain vision. The role of oxidative stress in KC remains unclear. We aimed to identify oxidative stress levels between human corneal keratocytes (HCKs), fibroblasts (HCFs) and keratoconus cells (HKCs). Cells were cultured in 2D and 3D systems. Vitamin C (VitC) and TGF-β3 (T3) were used for 4 weeks to stimulate self-assembled extracellular matrix (ECM). No T3 used as controls. Samples were analyzed using qRT-PCR and metabolomics. qRT-PCR data showed low levels of collagen I and V, as well as keratocan for HKCs, indicating differentiation to a myofibroblast phenotype. Collagen type III, a marker for fibrosis, was up regulated in HKCs. We robustly detected more than 150 metabolites of the targeted 250 by LC-MS/MS per condition and among those metabolites several were related to oxidative stress. Lactate levels, lactate/malate and lactate/pyruvate ratios were elevated in HKCs, while arginine and glutathione/oxidized glutathione ratio were reduced. Similar patterns found in both 2D and 3D. Our data shows that fibroblasts exhibit enhanced oxidative stress compared to keratocytes. Furthermore the HKC cells exhibit the greatest level suggesting they may have a myofibroblast phenotype. PMID:24714342

    17. Association between oxidative stress and nutritional status in the elderly.

      PubMed

      Moreira, Priscila Lucelia; Villas Boas, Paulo Jose Fortes; Ferreira, Ana Lucia Anjos

      2014-01-01

      Ageing is a dynamic and progressive process that is characterized by the occurrence of morphological, biochemical, functional and psychological changes in the organism. The aim of the present article is to provide updated concepts on oxidative stress, covering its importance in aging, as well as nutritional status and supplementation with antioxidants (substances that prevent or attenuate oxidation of oxidizable substrates, such as lipids, proteins, carbohydrates and deoxyribonucleic acid) in the geriatric population. Evidence suggests that there is an inverse relationship between oxidative stress and nutritional status in elderly individuals. Although an increase in oxidative stress in chronic diseases associated with aging has been proven, such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease, up to now there has been no consistent clinical evidence proving the efficiency of supplementation with antioxidants against oxidative stress. In this context, supplementation is not recommended. On the other hand, the elderly should be encouraged to eat antioxidant foods, such as fruits and vegetables. Maintaining a normal weight (body mass index between 23 and 28 Kg/m(2)) should also be stimulated.

    18. Stressed Oxidation Life Prediction for C/SiC Composites

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Levine, Stanley R.

      2004-01-01

      The residual strength and life of C/SiC is dominated by carbon interface and fiber oxidation if seal coat and matrix cracks are open to allow oxygen ingress. Crack opening is determined by the combination of thermal, mechanical and thermal expansion mismatch induced stresses. When cracks are open, life can be predicted by simple oxidation based models with reaction controlled kinetics at low temperature, and by gas phase diffusion controlled kinetics at high temperatures. Key life governing variables in these models include temperature, stress, initial strength, oxygen partial pressure, and total pressure. These models are described in this paper.

    19. Food-derived bioactive peptides on inflammation and oxidative stress.

      PubMed

      Chakrabarti, Subhadeep; Jahandideh, Forough; Wu, Jianping

      2014-01-01

      Chronic diseases such as atherosclerosis and cancer are now the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Inflammatory processes and oxidative stress underlie the pathogenesis of these pathological conditions. Bioactive peptides derived from food proteins have been evaluated for various beneficial effects, including anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. In this review, we summarize the roles of various food-derived bioactive peptides in inflammation and oxidative stress and discuss the potential benefits and limitations of using these compounds against the burden of chronic diseases.

    20. Stress generation in thermally grown oxide films. [oxide scale spalling from superalloy substrates

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Kumnick, A. J.; Ebert, L. J.

      1981-01-01

      A three dimensional finite element analysis was conducted, using the ANSYS computer program, of the stress state in a thin oxide film thermally formed on a rectangular piece of NiCrAl alloy. The analytical results indicate a very high compressive stress in the lateral directions of the film (approximately 6200 MPa), and tensile stresses in the metal substrate that ranged from essentially zero to about 55 MPa. It was found further that the intensity of the analytically determined average stresses could be approximated reasonably well by the modification of an equation developed previously by Oxx for stresses induced into bodies by thermal gradients.

  1. Overexpression of calreticulin sensitizes SERCA2a to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Yoshito; Kageyama, Kan; Kondo, Takahito

    2005-04-22

    Calreticulin (CRT), a Ca(2+)-binding molecular chaperone in the endoplasmic reticulum, plays a vital role in cardiac physiology and pathology. Oxidative stress is a main cause of myocardiac disorder in the ischemic heart, but the function of CRT under oxidative stress is not fully understood. In this study, the effect of overexpression of CRT on sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) 2a under oxidative stress was examined using myocardiac H9c2 cells transfected with the CRT gene. The in vitro activity of SERCA2a and uptake of (45)Ca(2+) into isolated microsomes were suppressed by H(2)O(2) in CRT-overexpressing cells compared with controls. Moreover, SERCA2a protein was degraded via a proteasome-dependent pathway following the formation of a complex with CRT under the stress with H(2)O(2). Thus, we conclude that overexpression of CRT enhances the inactivation and degradation of SERCA2a in the cells under oxidative stress, suggesting some pathophysiological functions of CRT in Ca(2+) homeostasis of myocardiac disease.

  2. Oxidative stress markers during a course of hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Lampka, Magdalena; Junik, Roman; Nowicka, Anna; Kopczyńska, Ewa; Tyrakowski, Tomasz; Odrowaz-Sypniewska, Grazyna

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have shown the presence of oxidative stress in hyperthyroid patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of hyperthyroidism on lipid peroxidation, plasma lipoprotein oxidation and antioxidant status. We have estimated the clinical utility of the biochemical parameters analysed as markers of oxidative stress in hyperthyroidism. Twenty five patients with overt hyperthyroidism because of Graves' disease or toxic multinodular goitre and 20 healthy subjects were included in the study. Lipid peroxidation was evaluated by measurement of peroxides and malondialdehyde with 4-hydroxynonenal (MDA + 4-HNE) concentrations. Autoantibodies against oxidised LDL (anti-oxLDL) were assayed as a marker of lipoprotein oxidation. Changes in the antioxidant defence system were estimated by measurement of total antioxidant status in serum (TAS) and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase activity (SOD). A significant increase in serum concentration of peroxides and MDA + 4-HNE was observed in patients with hyperthyroidism. However, no difference was found in anti-oxLDL concentration and antioxidant status parameters (TAS, SOD) between the control group and the patient group. Our results indicate an intensification of the oxidative processes caused by an excess of thyroid hormones, which is not accompanied by a response from the antioxidant system. Elevated concentrations of lipid peroxidation products in serum, both peroxides and malondialdehyde with 4-hydroxynonenal, may be useful as markers of oxidative stress during the course of hyperthyroidism.

  3. Dehydrins Impart Protection against Oxidative Stress in Transgenic Tobacco Plants

    PubMed Central

    Halder, Tanmoy; Upadhyaya, Gouranga; Basak, Chandra; Das, Arup; Chakraborty, Chandrima; Ray, Sudipta

    2018-01-01

    Environmental stresses generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) which might be detrimental to the plants when produced in an uncontrolled way. However, the plants ameliorate such stresses by synthesizing antioxidants and enzymes responsible for the dismutation of ROS. Additionally, the dehydrins were also able to protect the inactivation of the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase against hydroxyl radicals (OH⋅) generated during Fenton’s reaction. SbDhn1 and SbDhn2 overexpressing transgenic tobacco plants were able to protect against oxidative damage. Transgenic tobacco lines showed better photosynthetic efficiency along with high chlorophyll content, soluble sugar and proline. However, the malonyl dialdehyde (MDA) content was significantly lower in transgenic lines. Experimental evidence demonstrates the protective effect of dehydrins on electron transport chain in isolated chloroplast upon methyl viologen (MV) treatment. The transgenic tobacco plants showed significantly lower superoxide radical generation () upon MV treatment. The accumulation of the H2O2 was also lower in the transgenic plants. Furthermore, in the transgenic plants the expression of ROS scavenging enzymes was higher compared to non-transformed (NT) or vector transformed (VT) plants. Taken together these data, during oxidative stress dehydrins function by scavenging the () directly and also by rendering protection to the enzymes responsible for the dismutation of () thereby significantly reducing the amount of hydrogen peroxides formed. Increase in proline content along with other antioxidants might also play a significant role in stress amelioration. Dehydrins thus function co-operatively with other protective mechanisms under oxidative stress conditions rendering protection in stress environment. PMID:29491874

  4. Effect of interface reaction and diffusion on stress-oxidation coupling at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Mengkun; Dong, Xuelin; Fang, Xufei; Feng, Xue

    2018-04-01

    High-temperature structural materials undergo oxidation during the service, and stress would generate in the oxide film. Understanding the coupling effect between stress and oxidation contributes to the understanding of material degradation and failure during the oxidation process. Here, we propose a model to investigative the coupling effect of stress and oxidation at high temperature by considering the three-stage oxidation process, where both the interface reaction and the diffusion process are present. The governing equations including the oxidation kinetics and stress equilibrium for isothermal oxidation under stress-oxidation coupling effect have been derived. The theory is validated by comparing with the experimental results of SiO2 grown on Si substrate. Results show that the coupling of stress and oxidation influences the growth of the oxide film by affecting all three stages of the oxidation process.

  5. The paradoxical relationship between stallion fertility and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Gibb, Zamira; Lambourne, Sarah R; Aitken, Robert J

    2014-09-01

    The relationship between stallion fertility and oxidative stress remains poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to identify criteria for thoroughbred fertility assessment by performing a logistical regression analysis using "dismount" sperm parameters as predictors and weekly per-cycle conception rate as the dependent variable. Paradoxically, positive relationships between fertility and oxidative stress were revealed, such that samples that produced pregnancies exhibited higher rates of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine release (1490.2% vs. 705.5 pg/ml/24 h) and lower vitality (60.5% vs. 69.6%) and acrosome integrity (40.2% vs. 50.1%) than those that did not. We hypothesized that the most fertile spermatozoa exhibited the highest levels of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), with oxidative stress simply being a by-product of intense mitochondrial activity. Accordingly, an experiment to investigate the relationship between oxidative stress and motility was conducted and revealed positive correlations between mitochondrial ROS and total motility (R² = 0.90), rapid motility (R² = 0.89), average path velocity (VAP; R² = 0.59), and curvilinear velocity (VCL; R² = 0.66). Similarly, lipid peroxidation was positively correlated with total motility (R² = 0.46), rapid motility (R² = 0.51), average path velocity (R² = 0.62), and VCL (R² = 0.56), supporting the aforementioned hypothesis. The relative importance of OXPHOS in supporting the motility of equine spermatozoa was contrasted with human spermatozoa, which primarily utilize glycolysis. In this study, mitochondrial inhibition significantly reduced the velocity (P < 0.01) and ATP (P < 0.05) content of equine, but not human, spermatozoa, emphasizing the former's relative dependence on OXPHOS. The equine is the first mammal in which such a positive relationship between oxidative stress and functionality has been observed, with implications for the management of stallion fertility in vitro and in vivo. © 2014 by

  6. Association of military training with oxidative stress and overreaching.

    PubMed

    Tanskanen, Minna M; Uusitalo, Arja L; Kinnunen, Hannu; Häkkinen, Keijo; Kyröläinen, Heikki; Atalay, Mustafa

    2011-08-01

    We hypothesized that increased oxidative stress and disrupted redox balance may be predisposing factors and markers for overreaching (OR). The study's purpose was to examine whether oxidative stress markers and antioxidant status and physical fitness are related to OR during an 8-wk military basic training (BT) period. Oxidative stress and antioxidant status were evaluated in the beginning and after 4 and 7 wk of training in 35 males (age = 19.7 ± 0.3 yr) at rest and immediately after a 45-min submaximal exercise. Physical activity (PA) was monitored by an accelerometer throughout BT. Indicators of OR were also examined. From baseline to week 4, increased daytime moderate to vigorous PA led to concomitant decreases in the ratio of oxidized to total glutathione (GSSG/TGSH) and GSSG. After 4 wk of BT, GSSG/TGSH and GSSG returned to the baseline values at rest, whereas PA remained unchanged. At every time point, acute exercise decreased TGSH and increased GSSG and GSSG/TGSH, whereas a decrease was observed in antioxidant capacity after 4 wk of training. In the beginning of BT, OR subjects (11 of the 35 males) had higher GSSG, GSSG/TGSH, and malondialdehyde (a marker of lipid peroxidation) at rest (P < 0.01-0.05) and lower response of GSSG and GSSG/TGSH ratio (P < 0.01) to exercise than non-OR subjects. Moreover, OR subjects had higher PA during BT than non-OR (P < 0.05). The sustained training load during the last 4 wk of BT led to oxidative stress observable both at rest and after submaximal exercise. Increased oxidative stress may be a marker of insufficient recovery leading possibly to OR.

  7. Oxidative Stress, Redox Signaling, and Autophagy: Cell Death Versus Survival

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Yepes, Juliana; Burns, Michaela; Anandhan, Annadurai; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; del Razo, Luz Maria; Quintanilla-Vega, Betzabet; Pappa, Aglaia; Panayiotidis, Mihalis I.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The molecular machinery regulating autophagy has started becoming elucidated, and a number of studies have undertaken the task to determine the role of autophagy in cell fate determination within the context of human disease progression. Oxidative stress and redox signaling are also largely involved in the etiology of human diseases, where both survival and cell death signaling cascades have been reported to be modulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Recent Advances: To date, there is a good understanding of the signaling events regulating autophagy, as well as the signaling processes by which alterations in redox homeostasis are transduced to the activation/regulation of signaling cascades. However, very little is known about the molecular events linking them to the regulation of autophagy. This lack of information has hampered the understanding of the role of oxidative stress and autophagy in human disease progression. Critical Issues: In this review, we will focus on (i) the molecular mechanism by which ROS/RNS generation, redox signaling, and/or oxidative stress/damage alter autophagic flux rates; (ii) the role of autophagy as a cell death process or survival mechanism in response to oxidative stress; and (iii) alternative mechanisms by which autophagy-related signaling regulate mitochondrial function and antioxidant response. Future Directions: Our research efforts should now focus on understanding the molecular basis of events by which autophagy is fine tuned by oxidation/reduction events. This knowledge will enable us to understand the mechanisms by which oxidative stress and autophagy regulate human diseases such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 66–85. PMID:24483238

  8. Reproductive Benefit of Oxidative Damage: An Oxidative Stress “Malevolence”?

    PubMed Central

    Poljsak, B.; Milisav, I.; Lampe, T.; Ostan, I.

    2011-01-01

    High levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) compared to antioxidant defenses are considered to play a major role in diverse chronic age-related diseases and aging. Here we present an attempt to synthesize information about proximate oxidative processes in aging (relevant to free radical or oxidative damage hypotheses of aging) with an evolutionary scenario (credited here to Dawkins hypotheses) involving tradeoffs between the costs and benefits of oxidative stress to reproducing organisms. Oxidative stress may be considered a biological imperfection; therefore, the Dawkins' theory of imperfect adaptation of beings to environment was applied to the role of oxidative stress in processes like famine and infectious diseases and their consequences at the molecular level such as mutations and cell signaling. Arguments are presented that oxidative damage is not necessarily an evolutionary mistake but may be beneficial for reproduction; this may prevail over its harmfulness to health and longevity in evolution. Thus, Dawkins' principle of biological “malevolence” may be an additional biological paradigm for explaining the consequences of oxidative stress. PMID:21969876

  9. Role of oxidative stress in melasma: a prospective study on serum and blood markers of oxidative stress in melasma patients.

    PubMed

    Choubey, Vikrant; Sarkar, Rashmi; Garg, Vijay; Kaushik, Smita; Ghunawat, Sneha; Sonthalia, Sidharth

    2017-09-01

    Melasma is a common pigmentary disorder presenting in the dermatological clinic. Many factors have been implicated in the pathogenesis, however, the cause still remains elusive. Recently the effect of oxidative damage has been proposed in the etiopathogenesis of melasma. This study was undertaken to evaluate the role of oxidative stress in patients with melasma. Fifty patients with melasma, age 18 years of age and older, and an equal number of age and sex-matched controls were included in the study. Baseline severity assessment using the modified Melasma Area and Severity Index (modified MASI score) was done in all patients. Serum malondialdehyde, blood superoxide dismutase, and blood glutathione peroxidase levels were measured in cases and controls group and results were compared. The serum levels of malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase, and blood glutathione were significantly higher among the cases compared to controls. The difference in the serum concentrations was significant between the two groups (P < 0.01). A positive correlation was found between these enzyme levels and severity of melasma (modified MASI score); however, this correlation was statistically significant with serum malondialdehyde only. The level of oxidative stress among the male and female melasma patients was not statistically different. Oxidative stress was found to be increased in cases of melasma compared to the control group in this study. This substantiates the role of oxidative stress in etiopathogenesis of melasma; however, further studies are required to reach a definitive conclusion. © 2017 The International Society of Dermatology.

  10. Influence of Endodontic Treatment on Systemic Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Inchingolo, Francesco; Marrelli, Massimo; Annibali, Susanna; Cristalli, Maria Paola; Dipalma, Gianna; Inchingolo, Alessio Danilo; Palladino, Antonio; Inchingolo, Angelo Michele; Gargari, Marco; Tatullo, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: An increased production of oxidizing species related to reactive oral diseases, such as chronic apical periodontitis, could have systemic implications such as an increase in cardiovascular morbidity. Based on this consideration, we conducted a prospective study to assess whether subjects affected by chronic periodontitis presented with higher values of oxidative stress than reference values before endodontic treatment, and whether endodontic treatment can reduce the oxidative imbalance and bring it back to normal in these subjects. Materials and methods: The authors recruited 2 groups of patients from private studies and dental clinics: these patients were recruited randomly. The oxidative balance in both patients with chronic apical periodontitis (CAP) and healthy control patients was determined by measuring the oxidant status, using an identification of the reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs) test, while the antioxidant status in these patients was determined using a biological antioxidant potential (BAP) test. Both these tests were carried on plasma samples taken from enrolled patients. Values were measured both before the endodontic treatment of the patients with chronic apical periodontitis, and 30 and 90 days after treatment, and compared to those obtained from healthy control patients. Results: It was found that, on recruitment, the patients with chronic apical periodontitis exhibited significantly higher levels of oxidative stress than control patients, as determined by the d-ROMs and BAP tests. Furthermore, the d-ROMs test values were shown to decrease and the BAP test values to increase over time in patients with chronic apical periodontitis following endodontic therapy. As the levels of oxidative stress in these patients tended to reduce and return to normal by 90 days following treatment. Conclusions: This study has demonstrated a positive association between chronic apical periodontitis and oxidative stress. Subjects affected by chronic

  11. Acute restraint stress induces endothelial dysfunction: role of vasoconstrictor prostanoids and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Carda, Ana P P; Marchi, Katia C; Rizzi, Elen; Mecawi, André S; Antunes-Rodrigues, José; Padovan, Claudia M; Tirapelli, Carlos R

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that acute stress would induce endothelial dysfunction. Male Wistar rats were restrained for 2 h within wire mesh. Functional and biochemical analyses were conducted 24 h after the 2-h period of restraint. Stressed rats showed decreased exploration on the open arms of an elevated-plus maze (EPM) and increased plasma corticosterone concentration. Acute restraint stress did not alter systolic blood pressure, whereas it increased the in vitro contractile response to phenylephrine and serotonin in endothelium-intact rat aortas. NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME; nitric oxide synthase, NOS, inhibitor) did not alter the contraction induced by phenylephrine in aortic rings from stressed rats. Tiron, indomethacin and SQ29548 reversed the increase in the contractile response to phenylephrine induced by restraint stress. Increased systemic and vascular oxidative stress was evident in stressed rats. Restraint stress decreased plasma and vascular nitrate/nitrite (NOx) concentration and increased aortic expression of inducible (i) NOS, but not endothelial (e) NOS. Reduced expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1, but not COX-2, was observed in aortas from stressed rats. Restraint stress increased thromboxane (TX)B(2) (stable TXA(2) metabolite) concentration but did not affect prostaglandin (PG)F2α concentration in the aorta. Restraint reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, whereas concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were not affected. The major new finding of our study is that restraint stress increases vascular contraction by an endothelium-dependent mechanism that involves increased oxidative stress and the generation of COX-derived vasoconstrictor prostanoids. Such stress-induced endothelial dysfunction could predispose to the development of cardiovascular diseases.

  12. Oxidative stress in recurrent pregnancy loss women.

    PubMed

    Baban, Rayah S

    2010-07-01

    To investigate biochemical changes in lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide, and vitamin E in recurrent pregnancy loss women, and compare these with healthy pregnant, and non-pregnant women. A case control study was conducted from September 2008 to December 2009 at Al-Khadimiya Teaching Hospital, Baghdad, Iraq. Ninety-six subjects were included in the study, 32 were patients with recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL), and 32 pregnant women in their third trimester, and another 32 non-pregnant women were used as controls. Blood samples were collected from each patient at the time of pregnancy loss. Serum from patients and controls was then used to estimate malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO), and vitamin E levels. There was a significant elevation in patient serum MDA compared with third trimester pregnant women (p=0.002) and non-pregnant women (p=0.0001). Both serum vitamin E and NO levels in RPL patients also showed a highly significant decrease compared with third trimester pregnant, and non-pregnant women. A highly significant difference was found in the MDA/vitamin E ratio between RPL and control groups, while no significance was found between RPL and control groups' NO/vitamin E ratio. The decrease in NO production and vitamin E is a result of RPL and not a causative factor, as the RPL was without pathological cause, medication, or fibroid presence, and no significant difference was found between the NO/vitamin E ratio in RPL and controls group.

  13. Oxidative stress and pathology in muscular dystrophies: focus on protein thiol oxidation and dysferlinopathies.

    PubMed

    Terrill, Jessica R; Radley-Crabb, Hannah G; Iwasaki, Tomohito; Lemckert, Frances A; Arthur, Peter G; Grounds, Miranda D

    2013-09-01

    The muscular dystrophies comprise more than 30 clinical disorders that are characterized by progressive skeletal muscle wasting and degeneration. Although the genetic basis for many of these disorders has been identified, the exact mechanism for pathogenesis generally remains unknown. It is considered that disturbed levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to the pathology of many muscular dystrophies. Reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress may cause cellular damage by directly and irreversibly damaging macromolecules such as proteins, membrane lipids and DNA; another major cellular consequence of reactive oxygen species is the reversible modification of protein thiol side chains that may affect many aspects of molecular function. Irreversible oxidative damage of protein and lipids has been widely studied in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and we have recently identified increased protein thiol oxidation in dystrophic muscles of the mdx mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. This review evaluates the role of elevated oxidative stress in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and other forms of muscular dystrophies, and presents new data that show significantly increased protein thiol oxidation and high levels of lipofuscin (a measure of cumulative oxidative damage) in dysferlin-deficient muscles of A/J mice at various ages. The significance of this elevated oxidative stress and high levels of reversible thiol oxidation, but minimal myofibre necrosis, is discussed in the context of the disease mechanism for dysferlinopathies, and compared with the situation for dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. © 2013 The Authors Journal compilation © 2013 FEBS.

  14. Oxidative Stress in Dilated Cardiomyopathy Caused by MYBPC3 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Thomas L.; Sivaguru, Mayandi; Velayutham, Murugesan; Cardounel, Arturo J.; Michels, Michelle; Barefield, David; Govindan, Suresh; dos Remedios, Cristobal; van der Velden, Jolanda; Sadayappan, Sakthivel

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies can result from mutations in genes encoding sarcomere proteins including MYBPC3, which encodes cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C). However, whether oxidative stress is augmented due to contractile dysfunction and cardiomyocyte damage in MYBPC3-mutated cardiomyopathies has not been elucidated. To determine whether oxidative stress markers were elevated in MYBPC3-mutated cardiomyopathies, a previously characterized 3-month-old mouse model of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) expressing a homozygous MYBPC3 mutation (cMyBP-C(t/t)) was used, compared to wild-type (WT) mice. Echocardiography confirmed decreased percentage of fractional shortening in DCM versus WT hearts. Histopathological analysis indicated a significant increase in myocardial disarray and fibrosis while the second harmonic generation imaging revealed disorganized sarcomeric structure and myocyte damage in DCM hearts when compared to WT hearts. Intriguingly, DCM mouse heart homogenates had decreased glutathione (GSH/GSSG) ratio and increased protein carbonyl and lipid malondialdehyde content compared to WT heart homogenates, consistent with elevated oxidative stress. Importantly, a similar result was observed in human cardiomyopathy heart homogenate samples. These results were further supported by reduced signals for mitochondrial semiquinone radicals and Fe-S clusters in DCM mouse hearts measured using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. In conclusion, we demonstrate elevated oxidative stress in MYPBC3-mutated DCM mice, which may exacerbate the development of heart failure. PMID:26508994

  15. Effect of seminal oxidative stress on fertility after vasectomy reversal.

    PubMed

    Kolettis, P N; Sharma, R K; Pasqualotto, F F; Nelson, D; Thomas, A J; Agarwal, A

    1999-02-01

    To evaluate seminal oxidative stress in men after vasectomy reversal and to determine whether seminal oxidative stress could predict fertility after vasectomy reversal. Measurement of seminal reactive oxygen species (ROS) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in normal donors, men who were fertile after vasectomy reversal, and men who were infertile after vasectomy reversal. A male infertility clinic of a tertiary care center. Thirty men who underwent vasectomy reversal and 17 normal donors. None. Semen characteristics, seminal ROS, and TAC were measured with chemiluminescence assays in samples from donors and reversal patients. Mean adjusted seminal ROS (log [ROS+1]) was higher in infertile reversal patients (2.38+/-0.25) than in normal donors (1.30+/-0.14). Seminal ROS was also higher in all (fertile and infertile reversal combined) reversal patients than in donors. Total antioxidant capacity did not differ between groups. The ROS-TAC score, a composite index of seminal oxidative stress, was a significant predictor of fertility. A ROS-TAC score of 45 or greater had a positive predictive value of 73% in predicting fertility. Seminal oxidative stress is associated with vasectomy reversal. The ROS-TAC score is a possible predictor of infertility after vasectomy reversal.

  16. The role of oxidative stress in nervous system aging.

    PubMed

    Sims-Robinson, Catrina; Hur, Junguk; Hayes, John M; Dauch, Jacqueline R; Keller, Peter J; Brooks, Susan V; Feldman, Eva L

    2013-01-01

    While oxidative stress is implicated in aging, the impact of oxidative stress on aging in the peripheral nervous system is not well understood. To determine a potential mechanism for age-related deficits in the peripheral nervous system, we examined both functional and morphological changes and utilized microarray technology to compare normal aging in wild-type mice to effects in copper/zinc superoxide dismutase-deficient (Sod1(-/-)) mice, a mouse model of increased oxidative stress. Sod1(-/-) mice exhibit a peripheral neuropathy phenotype with normal sensory nerve function and deficits in motor nerve function. Our data indicate that a decrease in the synthesis of cholesterol, which is vital to myelin formation, correlates with the structural deficits in axons, myelin, and the cell body of motor neurons in the Sod1(+/+) mice at 30 months and the Sod1(-/-) mice at 20 months compared with mice at 2 months. Collectively, we have demonstrated that the functional and morphological changes within the peripheral nervous system in our model of increased oxidative stress are manifested earlier and resemble the deficits observed during normal aging.

  17. The Role of Oxidative Stress in Nervous System Aging

    PubMed Central

    Sims-Robinson, Catrina; Hur, Junguk; Hayes, John M.; Dauch, Jacqueline R.; Keller, Peter J.; Brooks, Susan V.; Feldman, Eva L.

    2013-01-01

    While oxidative stress is implicated in aging, the impact of oxidative stress on aging in the peripheral nervous system is not well understood. To determine a potential mechanism for age-related deficits in the peripheral nervous system, we examined both functional and morphological changes and utilized microarray technology to compare normal aging in wild-type mice to effects in copper/zinc superoxide dismutase-deficient (Sod1−/−) mice, a mouse model of increased oxidative stress. Sod1−/− mice exhibit a peripheral neuropathy phenotype with normal sensory nerve function and deficits in motor nerve function. Our data indicate that a decrease in the synthesis of cholesterol, which is vital to myelin formation, correlates with the structural deficits in axons, myelin, and the cell body of motor neurons in the Sod1+/+ mice at 30 months and the Sod1−/− mice at 20 months compared with mice at 2 months. Collectively, we have demonstrated that the functional and morphological changes within the peripheral nervous system in our model of increased oxidative stress are manifested earlier and resemble the deficits observed during normal aging. PMID:23844146

  18. Erythrocyte deformability and oxidative stress in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Akman, Tulay; Akarsu, Mesut; Akpinar, Hale; Resmi, Halil; Taylan, Ebru; Sezer, Ebru

    2012-02-01

    Oxidative stress and reduced microvascular flow are important factors in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The increased oxidative stress reduces the erythrocyte deformability. However, in IBD, there are no studies in the literature which evaluate erythrocyte deformability. In our study, we investigated the effect of oxidative stress and erythrocyte deformability in IBD. Forty-three patients with active IBD, 48 patients with inactive IBD and 45 healthy controls were included. The erytrocyte deformability, malonyldialdehyde levels, glutation peroxidase and sulfhydryl levels were measured in peripheral venous blood samples. Erytrocyte malonyldialdehyde levels in both active and inactive IBD were significantly increased compared with control groups. Plasma glutation peroxidase levels did not show statistically significant difference between all groups. The decreased plasma sulfhydryl levels in active IBD were statistically significant compared with both the inactive IBD and the control group, but plasma sulfhydryl levels in inactive IBD group did not show statistically significant differences when compared with the control group. Elongation index values in both active and inactive IBD increased significantly compared with the control group. Statistically significant correlations were not found between the elongation index and glutation peroxidase, malonyldialdehyde, sulfhydryl levels in all groups. Our study is the first to evaluate the erythrocyte deformability in IBD. In our study, increased erytrocyte malonyldialdehyde levels and decreased plasma sulfhydryl levels manifested the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of the disease. It is thought that the increased erythrocyte malonyldialdehyde values cause the reduction in erythrocyte deformability.

  19. OXIDATIVE STRESS PARTICIPATES IN PARTICULATE MATTER (PM) INDUCED LUNG INJURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidative stress participates in particulate matter (PM) induced acute lung injury.
    Elizabeth S. Roberts1, Judy L. Richards2, Kevin L. Dreher2. 1College of Veterinary Medicine, NC State University, Raleigh, NC, 2US Environmental Protection Agency, NHEERL, RTP, NC.
    Epidemiol...

  20. Oxidative Stress Induces Disruption of the Axon Initial Segment

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Kareem C.; Sword, Brooke A.; Dupree, Jeffrey L.

    2017-01-01

    The axon initial segment (AIS), the domain responsible for action potential initiation and maintenance of neuronal polarity, is targeted for disruption in a variety of central nervous system pathological insults. Previous work in our laboratory implicates oxidative stress as a potential mediator of structural AIS alterations in two separate mouse models of central nervous system inflammation, as these effects were attenuated following reactive oxygen species scavenging and NADPH oxidase-2 ablation. While these studies suggest a role for oxidative stress in modulation of the AIS, the direct effects of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) on the stability of this domain remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that oxidative stress, as induced through treatment with 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1), a spontaneous ROS/RNS generator, drives a reversible loss of AIS protein clustering in primary cortical neurons in vitro. Pharmacological inhibition of both voltage-dependent and intracellular calcium (Ca2+) channels suggests that this mechanism of AIS disruption involves Ca2+ entry specifically through L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels and its release from IP3-gated intracellular stores. Furthermore, ROS/RNS-induced AIS disruption is dependent upon activation of calpain, a Ca2+-activated protease previously shown to drive AIS modulation. Overall, we demonstrate for the first time that oxidative stress, as induced through exogenously applied ROS/RNS, is capable of driving structural alterations in the AIS complex. PMID:29228786

  1. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial adaptive shift during pituitary tumoral growth.

    PubMed

    Sabatino, Maria Eugenia; Grondona, Ezequiel; Sosa, Liliana D V; Mongi Bragato, Bethania; Carreño, Lucia; Juarez, Virginia; da Silva, Rodrigo A; Remor, Aline; de Bortoli, Lucila; de Paula Martins, Roberta; Pérez, Pablo A; Petiti, Juan Pablo; Gutiérrez, Silvina; Torres, Alicia I; Latini, Alexandra; De Paul, Ana L

    2018-05-20

    The cellular transformation of normal functional cells to neoplastic ones implies alterations in the cellular metabolism and mitochondrial function in order to provide the bioenergetics and growth requirements for tumour growth progression. Currently, the mitochondrial physiology and dynamic shift during pituitary tumour development are not well understood. Pituitary tumours present endocrine neoplastic benign growth which, in previous reports, we had shown that in addition to increased proliferation, these tumours were also characterized by cellular senescence signs with no indication of apoptosis. Here, we show clear evidence of oxidative stress in pituitary cells, accompanied by bigger and round mitochondria during tumour development, associated with augmented biogenesis and an increased fusion process. An activation of the Nrf2 stress response pathway together with the attenuation of the oxidative damage signs occurring during tumour development were also observed which will probably provide survival advantages to the pituitary cells. These neoplasms also presented a progressive increase in lactate production, suggesting a metabolic shift towards glycolysis metabolism. These findings might imply an oxidative stress state that could impact on the pathogenesis of pituitary tumours. These data may also reflect that pituitary cells can modulate their metabolism to adapt to different energy requirements and signalling events in a pathophysiological situation to obtain protection from damage and enhance their survival chances. Thus, we suggest that mitochondria function, oxidative stress or damage might play a critical role in pituitary tumour progression. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Enteric bacteria boost defences against oxidative stress in Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Varet, Hugo; Shaulov, Yana; Sismeiro, Odile; Trebicz-Geffen, Meirav; Legendre, Rachel; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Ankri, Serge; Guillen, Nancy

    2018-06-13

    Oxidative stress is one of the strongest toxic factors in nature: it can harm or even kill cells. Cellular means of subverting the toxicity of oxidative stress are important for the success of infectious diseases. Many types of bacterium inhabit the intestine, where they can encounter pathogens. During oxidative stress, we analyzed the interplay between an intestinal parasite (the pathogenic amoeba Entamoeba histolytica - the agent of amoebiasis) and enteric bacteria (microbiome residents, pathogens and probiotics). We found that live enteric bacteria protected E. histolytica against oxidative stress. By high-throughput RNA sequencing, two amoebic regulatory modes were observed with enteric bacteria but not with probiotics. The first controls essential elements of homeostasis, and the second the levels of factors required for amoeba survival. Characteristic genes of both modes have been acquired by the amoebic genome through lateral transfer from the bacterial kingdom (e.g. glycolytic enzymes and leucine-rich proteins). Members of the leucine-rich are homologous to proteins from anti-bacterial innate immune such as Toll-like receptors. The factors identified here suggest that despite its old age in evolutionary terms, the protozoan E. histolytica displays key characteristics of higher eukaryotes' innate immune systems indicating that components of innate immunity existed in the common ancestor of plants and animals.

  3. Antioxidant agents against trichothecenes: new hints for oxidative stress treatment

    PubMed Central

    Nepovimova, Eugenie; Wang, Yun; Yang, Hualin; Li, Li; Zhang, Xiujuan; Kuca, Kamil

    2017-01-01

    Trichothecenes are a group of mycotoxins mainly produced by fungi of genus Fusarium. Due to high toxicity and widespread dissemination, T-2 toxin and deoxynivalenol (DON) are considered to be the most important compounds of this class. Trichothecenes generate free radicals, including reactive oxygen species (ROS), which induce lipid peroxidation, decrease levels of antioxidant enzymes, and ultimately lead to apoptosis. Consequently, oxidative stress is an active area of research on the toxic mechanisms of trichothecenes, and identification of antioxidant agents that could be used against trichothecenes is crucial for human health. Numerous natural compounds have been analyzed and have shown to function very effectively as antioxidants against trichothecenes. In this review, we summarize the molecular mechanisms underlying oxidative stress induced by these compounds, and discuss current knowledge regarding such antioxidant agents as vitamins, quercetin, selenium, glucomannan, nucleotides, antimicrobial peptides, bacteria, polyunsaturated fatty acids, oligosaccharides, and plant extracts. These products inhibit trichothecene-induced oxidative stress by (1) inhibiting ROS generation and induced DNA damage and lipid peroxidation; (2) increasing antioxidant enzyme activity; (3) blocking the MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways; (4) inhibiting caspase activity and apoptosis; (5) protecting mitochondria; and (6) regulating anti-inflammatory actions. Finally, we summarize some decontamination methods, including bacterial and yeast biotransformation and degradation, as well as mycotoxin-binding agents. This review provides a comprehensive overview of antioxidant agents against trichothecenes and casts new light on the attenuation of oxidative stress. PMID:29299181

  4. Oxidative stress-mediated antibacterial activity of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Han, Jae Woong; Dayem, Ahmed Abdal; Eppakayala, Vasuki; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2012-01-01

    Background Graphene holds great promise for potential use in next-generation electronic and photonic devices due to its unique high carrier mobility, good optical transparency, large surface area, and biocompatibility. The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial effects of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this work, we used a novel reducing agent, betamercaptoethanol (BME), for synthesis of graphene to avoid the use of toxic materials. To uncover the impacts of GO and rGO on human health, the antibacterial activity of two types of graphene-based material toward a bacterial model P. aeruginosa was studied and compared. Methods The synthesized GO and rGO was characterized by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, particle-size analyzer, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Further, to explain the antimicrobial activity of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide, we employed various assays, such as cell growth, cell viability, reactive oxygen species generation, and DNA fragmentation. Results Ultraviolet-visible spectra of the samples confirmed the transition of GO into graphene. Dynamic light-scattering analyses showed the average size among the two types of graphene materials. X-ray diffraction data validated the structure of graphene sheets, and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy was employed to investigate the morphologies of prepared graphene. Raman spectroscopy data indicated the removal of oxygen-containing functional groups from the surface of GO and the formation of graphene. The exposure of cells to GO and rGO induced the production of superoxide radical anion and loss of cell viability. Results suggest that the antibacterial activities are contributed to by loss of cell viability, induced oxidative stress, and DNA fragmentation. Conclusion The antibacterial activities of GO and rGO against P. aeruginosa were compared. The loss of P

  5. Oxidative stress-mediated antibacterial activity of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Han, Jae Woong; Dayem, Ahmed Abdal; Eppakayala, Vasuki; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2012-01-01

    Graphene holds great promise for potential use in next-generation electronic and photonic devices due to its unique high carrier mobility, good optical transparency, large surface area, and biocompatibility. The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial effects of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this work, we used a novel reducing agent, betamercaptoethanol (BME), for synthesis of graphene to avoid the use of toxic materials. To uncover the impacts of GO and rGO on human health, the antibacterial activity of two types of graphene-based material toward a bacterial model P. aeruginosa was studied and compared. The synthesized GO and rGO was characterized by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, particle-size analyzer, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Further, to explain the antimicrobial activity of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide, we employed various assays, such as cell growth, cell viability, reactive oxygen species generation, and DNA fragmentation. Ultraviolet-visible spectra of the samples confirmed the transition of GO into graphene. Dynamic light-scattering analyses showed the average size among the two types of graphene materials. X-ray diffraction data validated the structure of graphene sheets, and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy was employed to investigate the morphologies of prepared graphene. Raman spectroscopy data indicated the removal of oxygen-containing functional groups from the surface of GO and the formation of graphene. The exposure of cells to GO and rGO induced the production of superoxide radical anion and loss of cell viability. Results suggest that the antibacterial activities are contributed to by loss of cell viability, induced oxidative stress, and DNA fragmentation. The antibacterial activities of GO and rGO against P. aeruginosa were compared. The loss of P. aeruginosa viability increased in a dose- and

  6. Cytoprotective Effects of Pumpkin (Cucurbita Moschata) Fruit Extract against Oxidative Stress and Carbonyl Stress.

    PubMed

    Shayesteh, Reyhaneh; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Adiban, Hasan; Kardan, Azin; Keyhanfar, Fariborz; Eskandari, Mohammad Reza

    2017-10-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus is a chronic endocrine disorder that is associated with significant mortality and morbidity due to microvascular and macrovascular complications. Diabetes complications accompanied with oxidative stress and carbonyl stress in different organs of human body because of the increased generation of free radicals and impaired antioxidant defense systems. In the meantime, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive carbonyl species (RCS) have key mediatory roles in the development and progression of diabetes complications. Therapeutic strategies have recently focused on preventing such diabetes-related abnormalities using different natural and chemical compounds. Pumpkin ( Cucurbita moschata ) is one of the most important vegetables in the world with a broad-range of pharmacological activities such as antihyperglycemic effect. Methods In the present study, the cytoprotective effects of aqueous extract of C. moschata fruit on hepatocyte cytotoxicity induced by cumene hydroperoxide (oxidative stress model) or glyoxal (carbonylation model) were investigated using freshly isolated rat hepatocytes. Results The extract of C. moschata (50 μg/ml) excellently prevented oxidative and carbonyl stress markers, including hepatocyte lysis, ROS production, lipid peroxidation, glutathione depletion, mitochondrial membrane potential collapse, lysosomal damage, and cellular proteolysis. In addition, protein carbonylation was prevented by C. moschata in glyoxal-induced carbonyl stress. Conclusion It can be concluded that C. moschata has cytoprotective effects in oxidative stress and carbonyl stress models and this valuable vegetable can be considered as a suitable herbal product for the prevention of toxic subsequent of oxidative stress and carbonyl stress seen in chronic hyperglycemia. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Modulating Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Elders: The MOXIE Study

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Amy Cameron; Dudenbostel, Tanja; Locher, Julie L.; Crowe-White, Kristi

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death among women in the United States. Endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness increase with advancing age and are early predictors of future CVD outcomes. We designed the Modulating Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Elders (MOXIE) study to examine the effects of 100% watermelon juice as a “food-first” intervention to reduce CVD risk among African American (AA) and European American (EA) women aged 55–69 years. Vascular dysfunction is more pronounced in AA compared to EA women due in part to lower nitric oxide bioavailability caused by higher oxidative stress. However, bioactive compounds in watermelon may improve vascular function by increasing nitric oxide bioavailability and antioxidant capacity. This trial will use a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover design to investigate the potential of 100% watermelon juice to positively impact various robust measures of vascular function as well as serum biomarkers of oxidative stress and antioxidant capacity. This nutrition intervention and its unique methodology to examine both clinical and mechanistic outcomes are described in this article. PMID:27897608

  8. Oxidative Stress Induced Inflammation Initiates Functional Decline of Tear Production

    PubMed Central

    Uchino, Yuichi; Kawakita, Tetsuya; Miyazawa, Masaki; Ishii, Takamasa; Onouchi, Hiromi; Yasuda, Kayo; Ogawa, Yoko; Shimmura, Shigeto; Ishii, Naoaki; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative damage and inflammation are proposed to be involved in an age-related functional decline of exocrine glands. However, the molecular mechanism of how oxidative stress affects the secretory function of exocrine glands is unclear. We developed a novel mev-1 conditional transgenic mouse model (Tet-mev-1) using a modified tetracycline system (Tet-On/Off system). This mouse model demonstrated decreased tear production with morphological changes including leukocytic infiltration and fibrosis. We found that the mev-1 gene encodes Cyt-1, which is the cytochrome b560 large subunit of succinate-ubiquinone oxidoreductase in complex II of mitochondria (homologous to succinate dehydrogenase C subunit (SDHC) in humans). The mev-1 gene induced excessive oxidative stress associated with ocular surface epithelial damage and a decrease in protein and aqueous secretory function. This new model provides evidence that mitochondrial oxidative damage in the lacrimal gland induces lacrimal dysfunction resulting in dry eye disease. Tear volume in Tet-mev-1 mice was lower than in wild type mice and histopathological analyses showed the hallmarks of lacrimal gland inflammation by intense mononuclear leukocytic infiltration and fibrosis in the lacrimal gland of Tet-mev-1 mice. These findings strongly suggest that oxidative stress can be a causative factor for the development of dry eye disease. PMID:23071526

  9. Marine Carotenoids against Oxidative Stress: Effects on Human Health.

    PubMed

    Gammone, Maria Alessandra; Riccioni, Graziano; D'Orazio, Nicolantonio

    2015-09-30

    Carotenoids are lipid-soluble pigments that are produced in some plants, algae, fungi, and bacterial species, which accounts for their orange and yellow hues. Carotenoids are powerful antioxidants thanks to their ability to quench singlet oxygen, to be oxidized, to be isomerized, and to scavenge free radicals, which plays a crucial role in the etiology of several diseases. Unusual marine environments are associated with a great chemical diversity, resulting in novel bioactive molecules. Thus, marine organisms may represent an important source of novel biologically active substances for the development of therapeutics. In this respect, various novel marine carotenoids have recently been isolated from marine organisms and displayed several utilizations as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. Marine carotenoids (astaxanthin, fucoxanthin, β-carotene, lutein but also the rare siphonaxanthin, sioxanthin, and myxol) have recently shown antioxidant properties in reducing oxidative stress markers. This review aims to describe the role of marine carotenoids against oxidative stress and their potential applications in preventing and treating inflammatory diseases.

  10. [Modulation of oxidative stresses in human aging skin].

    PubMed

    Blatt, T; Mundt, C; Mummert, C; Maksiuk, T; Wolber, R; Keyhani, R; Schreiner, V; Hoppe, U; Schachtschabel, D O; Stäb, F

    1999-04-01

    Oxidative stress (UV irradiation, free radicals) plays a significant role in aging. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) and exogenously applied antioxidants can significantly reduce the formation of oxidative stress with increasing age. In our in vitro and in vivo experiments concerning the parameters of ultraweak photon emission (UPE), intracellular thiol status, mitochondrial membrane potential and cell vitality, we demonstrated a diminished resistance in keratinocytes of old donors against UV irradiation. This reduced epidermal resistance against oxidative stressors, i.e. UV irradiation, can be improved by topical application of CoQ10 and antioxidants like alpha-glucosylrutin (15). Furthermore, our in vivo investigations show that wrinkles around the region of the eyes ("crow feet") could be reduced by long-term application of CoQ10.

  11. Antioxidant Therapeutic Strategies for Cardiovascular Conditions Associated with Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Víctor M.; Carrasco, Rodrigo A.; Figueroa, Elías; Letelier, Pablo; Castillo, Rodrigo L.

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) refers to the imbalance between the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the ability to scavenge these ROS by endogenous antioxidant systems, where ROS overwhelms the antioxidant capacity. Excessive presence of ROS results in irreversible damage to cell membranes, DNA, and other cellular structures by oxidizing lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. Oxidative stress plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases related to hypoxia, cardiotoxicity and ischemia–reperfusion. Here, we describe the participation of OS in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular conditions such as myocardial infarction, anthracycline cardiotoxicity and congenital heart disease. This review focuses on the different clinical events where redox factors and OS are related to cardiovascular pathophysiology, giving to support for novel pharmacological therapies such as omega 3 fatty acids, non-selective betablockers and microRNAs. PMID:28862654

  12. Antioxidant Therapeutic Strategies for Cardiovascular Conditions Associated with Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Farías, Jorge G; Molina, Víctor M; Carrasco, Rodrigo A; Zepeda, Andrea B; Figueroa, Elías; Letelier, Pablo; Castillo, Rodrigo L

    2017-09-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) refers to the imbalance between the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the ability to scavenge these ROS by endogenous antioxidant systems, where ROS overwhelms the antioxidant capacity. Excessive presence of ROS results in irreversible damage to cell membranes, DNA, and other cellular structures by oxidizing lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. Oxidative stress plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases related to hypoxia, cardiotoxicity and ischemia-reperfusion. Here, we describe the participation of OS in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular conditions such as myocardial infarction, anthracycline cardiotoxicity and congenital heart disease. This review focuses on the different clinical events where redox factors and OS are related to cardiovascular pathophysiology, giving to support for novel pharmacological therapies such as omega 3 fatty acids, non-selective betablockers and microRNAs.

  13. Role of Oxidative Stress in Transformation Induced by Metal Mixture

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Silva-Aguilar; Emilio, Rojas; Mahara, Valverde

    2011-01-01

    Metals are ubiquitous pollutants present as mixtures. In particular, mixture of arsenic-cadmium-lead is among the leading toxic agents detected in the environment. These metals have carcinogenic and cell-transforming potential. In this study, we used a two step cell transformation model, to determine the role of oxidative stress in transformation induced by a mixture of arsenic-cadmium-lead. Oxidative damage and antioxidant response were determined. Metal mixture treatment induces the increase of damage markers and the antioxidant response. Loss of cell viability and increased transforming potential were observed during the promotion phase. This finding correlated significantly with generation of reactive oxygen species. Cotreatment with N-acetyl-cysteine induces effect on the transforming capacity; while a diminution was found in initiation, in promotion phase a total block of the transforming capacity was observed. Our results suggest that oxidative stress generated by metal mixture plays an important role only in promotion phase promoting transforming capacity. PMID:22191014

  14. Diabetes and Kidney Disease: Role of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Jay C.; Banal, Claudine; Chow, Bryna S.M.; Cooper, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Intrarenal oxidative stress plays a critical role in the initiation and progression of diabetic kidney disease (DKD). Enhanced oxidative stress results from overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the context of concomitant, insufficient antioxidant pathways. Renal ROS production in diabetes is predominantly mediated by various NADPH oxidases (NOXs), but a defective antioxidant system as well as mitochondrial dysfunction may also contribute. Recent Advances: Effective agents targeting the source of ROS generation hold the promise to rescue the kidney from oxidative damage and prevent subsequent progression of DKD. Critical Issues and Future Directions: In the present review, we summarize and critically analyze molecular and cellular mechanisms that have been demonstrated to be involved in NOX-induced renal injury in diabetes, with particular focus on the role of increased glomerular injury, the development of albuminuria, and tubulointerstitial fibrosis, as well as mitochondrial dysfunction. Furthermore, novel agents targeting NOX isoforms are discussed. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 657–684. PMID:26906673

  15. Oxidative/nitrosative stress and antidepressants: targets for novel antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Yup; Lee, Soo-Jung; Han, Changsu; Patkar, Ashwin A; Masand, Prakash S; Pae, Chi-Un

    2013-10-01

    The brain is an organ predisposed to oxidative/nitrosative stress. This is especially true in the case of aging as well as several neurodegenerative diseases. Under such circumstances, a decline in the normal antioxidant defense mechanisms leads to an increase in the vulnerability of the brain to the deleterious effects of oxidative damage. Highly reactive oxygen/nitrogen species damage lipids, proteins, and mitochondrial and neuronal genes. Unless antioxidant defenses react appropriately to damage inflicted by radicals, neurons may experience microalteration, microdysfunction, and degeneration. We reviewed how oxidative and nitrosative stresses contribute to the pathogenesis of depressive disorders and reviewed the clinical implications of various antioxidants as future targets for antidepressant treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Nitric oxide ameliorates the damaging effects of oxidative stress induced by iron deficiency in cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Manish Singh; Srivastava, Meenakshi; Srivastava, Alka; Singh, Anumeha; Mishra, Arun Kumar

    2016-11-01

    In cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120, iron deficiency leads to oxidative stress with unavoidable consequences. Nitric oxide reduces pigment damage and supported the growth of Anabaena 7120 in iron-deficient conditions. Elevation in nitric oxide accumulation and reduced superoxide radical production justified the role of nitric oxide in alleviating oxidative stress in iron deficiency. Increased activities of antioxidative enzymes and higher levels of ROS scavengers (ascorbate, glutathione and thiol) in iron deficiency were also observed in the presence of nitric oxide. Nitric oxide also supported the membrane integrity of Anabaena cells and reduces protein and DNA damage caused by oxidative stress induced by iron deficiency. Results suggested that nitric oxide alleviates the damaging effects of oxidative stress induced by iron deficiency in cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120.

  17. The effects of anesthetic agents on oxidative stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakan, Selvinaz; Düzgüner, Vesile

    2016-04-01

    Oxidative stress can be defined as the instability between antioxidant defense of the body and the production of free radical that causes peroxydation on the lipid layer. Free radicals are reactive oxygen species that are produced in the course of normal metabolisms of aerobe organisms and they may cause disorders in cell structure and organelles by interacting macromolecules, like lipid, protein, nucleic acids. Therefore, they may cause cardiovascular, immune system, liver, kidney illnesses and many other illnesses like cancer, aging, cataract, diabetes. It is known that many drugs used for the purpose of anesthetizing may cause lipid peroxidation in organism. For these reasons, determining the Oxidative stress index of anaesthetic stress chosen in the ones that are exposed to long term anaesthetic agents and anaesthesia appliccations, is so substantial.

  18. Exercise-induced oxidative stress and hypoxic exercise recovery.

    PubMed

    Ballmann, Christopher; McGinnis, Graham; Peters, Bridget; Slivka, Dustin; Cuddy, John; Hailes, Walter; Dumke, Charles; Ruby, Brent; Quindry, John

    2014-04-01

    Hypoxia due to altitude diminishes performance and alters exercise oxidative stress responses. While oxidative stress and exercise are well studied, the independent impact of hypoxia on exercise recovery remains unknown. Accordingly, we investigated hypoxic recovery effects on post-exercise oxidative stress. Physically active males (n = 12) performed normoxic cycle ergometer exercise consisting of ten high:low intensity intervals, 20 min at moderate intensity, and 6 h recovery at 975 m (normoxic) or simulated 5,000 m (hypoxic chamber) in a randomized counter-balanced cross-over design. Oxygen saturation was monitored via finger pulse oximetry. Blood plasma obtained pre- (Pre), post- (Post), 2 h post- (2Hr), 4 h post- (4Hr), and 6 h (6Hr) post-exercise was assayed for Ferric Reducing Ability of Plasma (FRAP), Trolox Equivalent Antioxidant Capacity (TEAC), Lipid Hydroperoxides (LOOH), and Protein Carbonyls (PC). Biopsies from the vastus lateralis obtained Pre and 6Hr were analyzed by real-time PCR quantify expression of Heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1), Superoxide Dismutase 2 (SOD2), and Nuclear factor (euthyroid-derived2)-like factor (NFE2L2). PCs were not altered between trials, but a time effect (13 % Post-2Hr increase, p = 0.044) indicated exercise-induced blood oxidative stress. Plasma LOOH revealed only a time effect (p = 0.041), including a 120 % Post-4Hr increase. TEAC values were elevated in normoxic recovery versus hypoxic recovery. FRAP values were higher 6Hr (p = 0.045) in normoxic versus hypoxic recovery. Exercise elevated gene expression of NFE2L2 (20 % increase, p = 0.001) and SOD2 (42 % increase, p = 0.003), but hypoxic recovery abolished this response. Data indicate that recovery in a hypoxic environment, independent of exercise, may alter exercise adaptations to oxidative stress and metabolism.

  19. Increased endothelial microparticles and oxidative stress at extreme altitude.

    PubMed

    Pichler Hefti, Jacqueline; Leichtle, Alexander; Stutz, Monika; Hefti, Urs; Geiser, Thomas; Huber, Andreas R; Merz, Tobias M

    2016-04-01

    Hypoxia and oxidative stress affect endothelial function. Endothelial microparticles (MP) are established measures of endothelial dysfunction and influence vascular reactivity. To evaluate the effects of hypoxia and antioxidant supplementation on endothelial MP profiles, a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, during a high altitude expedition was performed. 29 participants were randomly assigned to a treatment group (n = 14), receiving vitamin E, C, A, and N-acetylcysteine daily, and a control group (n = 15), receiving placebo. Blood samples were obtained at 490 m (baseline), 3530, 4590, and 6210 m. A sensitive tandem mass spectrometry method was used to measure 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α and hydroxyoctadecadienoic acids as markers of oxidative stress. Assessment of MP profiles including endothelial activation markers (CD62+MP and CD144+MP) and cell apoptosis markers (phosphatidylserine+MP and CD31+MP) was performed using a standardized flow cytometry-based protocol. 15 subjects reached all altitudes and were included in the final analysis. Oxidative stress increased significantly at altitude. No statistically significant changes were observed comparing baseline to altitude measurements of phosphatidylserine expressing MP (p = 0.1718) and CD31+MP (p = 0.1305). Compared to baseline measurements, a significant increase in CD62+MP (p = 0.0079) and of CD144+MP was detected (p = 0.0315) at high altitudes. No significant difference in any MP level or oxidative stress markers were found between the treatment and the control group. Hypobaric hypoxia is associated with increased oxidative stress and induces a significant increase in CD62+ and CD144+MP, whereas phosphatidylserine+MP and CD31+MP remain unchanged. This indicates that endothelial activation rather than an apoptosis is the primary factor of hypoxia induced endothelial dysfunction.

  20. RAGE polymorphisms and oxidative stress levels in Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Giannakou, Maria; Saltiki, Katerina; Mantzou, Emily; Loukari, Eleni; Philippou, Georgios; Terzidis, Konstantinos; Lili, Kiriaki; Stavrianos, Charalampos; Kyprianou, Miltiades; Alevizaki, Maria

    2017-05-01

    Polymorphisms of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) gene have been studied in various autoimmune disorders, but not in Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Also, increased oxidative stress has been described in patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible role of two common RAGE polymorphisms (-429T>C, -374T>A) in Hashimoto's thyroiditis; in parallel, we studied oxidative stress levels. A total of 300 consecutive euthyroid women were examined and classified into three groups: Hashimoto's thyroiditis with treatment (n = 96), Hashimoto's thyroiditis without treatment (n = 109) and controls (n = 95). For a rough evaluation of oxidative stress, total lipid peroxide levels in serum were measured. The -429T>C AluI and -374T>A MfeI polymorphisms of RAGE were studied in genomic DNA. Significant association of the RAGE system with Hashimoto's thyroiditis was found only with regard to the prevalence of the -429T>C, but not with -374T>A polymorphism. The levels of oxidative stress were significantly elevated in Hashimoto's thyroiditis patients under treatment. Further analysis demonstrated that an oxidative stress cut-off value of 590 μmol/L is associated with an increased risk of progression of Hashimoto's thyroiditis from euthyroidism to hypothyroidism; this risk is further increased in carriers of the RAGE -429T>C polymorphism. Our findings indicate that both examined risk factors may be implicated in the occurrence of Hashimoto's thyroiditis, but this covers only a fraction of the pathophysiology of the disease. © 2017 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  1. Oxidative stress in normal hematopoietic stem cells and leukemia.

    PubMed

    Samimi, Azin; Kalantari, Heybatullah; Lorestani, Marzieh Zeinvand; Shirzad, Reza; Saki, Najmaldin

    2018-04-01

    Leukemia is developed following the abnormal proliferation of immature hematopoietic cells in the blood when hematopoietic stem cells lose the ability to turn into mature cells at different stages of maturation and differentiation. Leukemia initiating cells are specifically dependent upon the suppression of oxidative stress in the hypoglycemic bone marrow (BM) environment to be able to start their activities. Relevant literature was identified by a PubMed search (2000-2017) of English-language literature using the terms 'oxidative stress,' 'reactive oxygen species,' 'hematopoietic stem cell,' and 'leukemia.' The generation and degradation of free radicals is a main component of the metabolism in aerobic organisms. A certain level of ROS is required for proper cellular function, but values outside this range will result in oxidative stress (OS). Long-term overactivity of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has harmful effects on the function of cells and their vital macromolecules, including the transformation of proteins into autoantigens and increased degradation of protein/DNA, which eventually leads to the change in pathways involved in the development of cancer and several other disorders. According to the metabolic disorders of cancer, the relationship between OS changes, the viability of cancer cells, and their response to chemotherapeutic agents affecting this pathway are undeniable. Recently, studies have been conducted to determine the effect of herbal agents and cancer chemotherapy drugs on oxidative stress pathways. By emphasizing the role of oxidative stress on stem cells in the incidence of leukemia, this paper attempts to state and summarize this subject. © 2018 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Myocardial Oxidative Stress in Infants Undergoing Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Sznycer-Taub, Nathaniel; Mackie, Stewart; Peng, Yun-Wen; Donohue, Janet; Yu, Sunkyung; Aiyagari, Ranjit; Charpie, John

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac surgery for congenital heart disease often necessitates a period of myocardial ischemia during cardiopulmonary bypass and cardioplegic arrest, followed by reperfusion after aortic cross-clamp removal. In experimental models, myocardial ischemia-reperfusion is associated with significant oxidative stress and ventricular dysfunction. A prospective observational study was conducted in infants (<1 year) who underwent elective surgical repair of a ventricular septal defect (VSD) or tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). Blood samples were drawn following anesthetic induction (baseline) and directly from the coronary sinus at 1, 3, 5, and 10 min following aortic cross-clamp removal. Samples were analyzed for oxidant stress using assays for thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, protein carbonyl, 8-isoprostane, and total antioxidant capacity. For each subject, raw assay data were normalized to individual baseline samples and expressed as fold-change from baseline. Results were compared using a one-sample t test with Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. Sixteen patients (ten with TOF and six with VSD) were enrolled in the study, and there were no major postoperative complications observed. For the entire cohort, there was an immediate, rapid increase in myocardial oxidative stress that was sustained for 10 min following aortic cross-clamp removal in all biomarker assays (all P < 0.01), except total antioxidant capacity. Infant cardiac surgery is associated with a rapid, robust, and time-dependent increase in myocardial oxidant stress as measured from the coronary sinus in vivo. Future studies with larger enrollment are necessary to assess any association between myocardial oxidative stress and early postoperative outcomes.

  3. An Antioxidant Phytotherapy to Rescue Neuronal Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhihong; Zhu, Danni; Yan, Yongqing; Yu, Boyang; Wang, Qiujuan; Shen, Pingniang; Ruan, Kefeng

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of ischemic neuronal injury. A Chinese herbal formula composed of Poria cocos (Chinese name: Fu Ling), Atractylodes macrocephala (Chinese name: Bai Zhu) and Angelica sinensis (Chinese names: Danggui, Dong quai, Donggui; Korean name: Danggwi) (FBD), has been proved to be beneficial in the treatment of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R).This study was carried out to evaluate the protective effect of FBD against neuronal oxidative stress in vivo and in vitro. Rat I/R were established by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 1 h, followed by 24 h reperfusion. MCAO led to significant depletion in superoxide dismutase and glutathione and rise in lipid peroxidation (LPO) and nitric oxide in brain. The neurological deficit and brain infarction were also significantly elevated by MCAO as compared with sham-operated group. All the brain oxidative stress and damage were significantly attenuated by 7 days pretreatment with the aqueous extract of FBD (250 mg kg−1, p.o.). Moreover, cerebrospinal fluid sampled from FBD-pretreated rats protected PC12 cells against oxidative insult induced by 0.2 mM hydrogen peroxide, in a concentration and time-dependent manner (IC50 10.6%, ET50 1.2 h). However, aqueous extract of FBD just slightly scavenged superoxide anion radical generated in xanthine–xanthine oxidase system (IC50 2.4 mg ml−1) and hydroxyl radical generated in Fenton reaction system (IC50 3.6 mg ml−1). In conclusion, FBD was a distinct antioxidant phytotherapy to rescue neuronal oxidative stress, through blocking LPO, restoring endogenous antioxidant system, but not scavenging free radicals. PMID:18955358

  4. Nanoparticle-induced oxidation of corona proteins initiates an oxidative stress response in cells†

    PubMed Central

    Jayaram, Dhanya T.; Runa, Sabiha; Kemp, Melissa L.

    2017-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs), used as pigments and photocatalysts, are ubiquitous in our daily lives. Previous work has observed cellular oxidative stress in response to the UV-excitation of photocatalytic TiO2 NPs. In comparison, most human exposure to TiO2 NPs takes place in the dark, in the lung following inhalation or in the gut following consumption of TiO2 NP food pigment. Our spectroscopic characterization shows that both photocatalytic and food grade TiO2 NPs, in the dark, generate low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), specifically hydroxyl radicals and superoxides. These ROS oxidize serum proteins that form a corona of proteins on the NP surface. This protein layer is the interface between the NP and the cell. An oxidized protein corona triggers an oxidative stress response, detected with PCR and western blotting. Surface modification of TiO2 NPs to increase or decrease surface defects correlates with ROS generation and oxidative stress, suggesting that NP surface defects, likely oxygen vacancies, are the underlying cause of TiO2 NP-induced oxidative stress. PMID:28537609

  5. Sulforaphane Inhibits Mitochondrial Permeability Transition and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Tiffany; Shafer, Jonathan; Fiskum, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Exposure of mitochondria to oxidative stress and elevated Ca2+ promotes opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP), resulting in membrane depolarization, uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation, and potentially cell death. This study tested the hypothesis that treatment of rats with sulforaphane (SFP), an activator of the Nrf2 pathway of antioxidant gene expression, increases the resistance of liver mitochondria to redox-regulated PTP opening and elevates mitochondrial levels of antioxidants. Rats were injected with SFP or drug vehicle and liver mitochondria were isolated 40 hr later. Respiring mitochondria actively accumulated added Ca2+, which was then released through PTP opening induced by agents that either cause an oxidized shift in the mitochondrial redox state or that directly oxidize protein thiol groups. SFP treatment of rats inhibited the rate of pro-oxidant-induced mitochondrial Ca2+ release and increased expression of the glutathione peroxidase/reductase system, thioredoxin, and malic enzyme. These results are the first to demonstrate that SFP treatment of animals increases liver mitochondrial antioxidant defenses and inhibits redox-sensitive PTP opening. This novel form of preconditioning could protect against a variety of pathologies that include oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in their etiologies. PMID:21986339

  6. Rapamycin alleviates oxidative stress-induced damage in rat erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhishek Kumar; Singh, Sandeep; Garg, Geetika; Rizvi, Syed Ibrahim

    2016-10-01

    An imbalanced cellular redox system promotes the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that may lead to oxidative stress-mediated cell death. Erythrocytes are the best-studied model of antioxidant defense mechanism. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of the immunosuppressant drug rapamycin, an inducer of autophagy, on redox balance of erythrocytes and blood plasma of oxidatively challenged rats. Male Wistar rats were oxidatively challenged with HgCl 2 (5 mg/kg body mass (b.m.)). A significant (p < 0.05) induction in ROS production, plasma membrane redox system (PMRS), intracellular Ca 2+ influx, lipid peroxidation (LPO), osmotic fragility, plasma protein carbonyl (PCO) content, and plasma advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and simultaneously significant reduction in glutathione (GSH) level and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) were observed in rats exposed to HgCl 2 . Furthermore, rapamycin (0.5 mg/kg b.m.) provided significant protection against HgCl 2 -induced alterations in rat erythrocytes and plasma by reducing ROS production, PMRS activity, intracellular Ca 2+ influx, LPO, osmotic fragility, PCO content, and AOPP and also restored the level of antioxidant GSH and FRAP. Our observations provide evidence that rapamycin improves redox status and attenuates oxidative stress in oxidatively challenged rats. Our data also demonstrate that rapamycin is a comparatively safe immunosuppressant drug.

  7. Infectious Agents in Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Diseases through Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Di Pietro, Marisa; Filardo, Simone; Falasca, Francesca; Turriziani, Ombretta; Sessa, Rosa

    2017-01-01

    Accumulating evidence demonstrates that vascular oxidative stress is a critical feature of atherosclerotic process, potentially triggered by several infectious agents that are considered as risk co-factors for the atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). C. pneumoniae has been shown to upregulate multiple enzymatic systems capable of producing reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as NADPH oxidase (NOX) and cyclooxygenase in vascular endothelial cells, NOX and cytochrome c oxidase in macrophages as well as nitric oxide synthase and lipoxygenase in platelets contributing to both early and late stages of atherosclerosis. P. gingivalis seems to be markedly involved in the atherosclerotic process as compared to A. actinomycetemcomitans contributing to LDL oxidation and foam cell formation. Particularly interesting is the evidence describing the NLRP3 inflammasome activation as a new molecular mechanism underlying P. gingivalis-induced oxidative stress and inflammation. Amongst viral agents, immunodeficiency virus-1 and hepatitis C virus seem to have a major role in promoting ROS production, contributing, hence, to the early stages of atherosclerosis including endothelial dysfunction and LDL oxidation. In conclusion, oxidative mechanisms activated by several infectious agents during the atherosclerotic process underlying CVDs are very complex and not well-known, remaining, thus, an attractive target for future research. PMID:29156574

  8. Infectious Agents in Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Diseases through Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Di Pietro, Marisa; Filardo, Simone; Falasca, Francesca; Turriziani, Ombretta; Sessa, Rosa

    2017-11-18

    Accumulating evidence demonstrates that vascular oxidative stress is a critical feature of atherosclerotic process, potentially triggered by several infectious agents that are considered as risk co-factors for the atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). C. pneumoniae has been shown to upregulate multiple enzymatic systems capable of producing reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as NADPH oxidase (NOX) and cyclooxygenase in vascular endothelial cells, NOX and cytochrome c oxidase in macrophages as well as nitric oxide synthase and lipoxygenase in platelets contributing to both early and late stages of atherosclerosis. P. gingivalis seems to be markedly involved in the atherosclerotic process as compared to A. actinomycetemcomitans contributing to LDL oxidation and foam cell formation. Particularly interesting is the evidence describing the NLRP3 inflammasome activation as a new molecular mechanism underlying P. gingivalis -induced oxidative stress and inflammation. Amongst viral agents, immunodeficiency virus-1 and hepatitis C virus seem to have a major role in promoting ROS production, contributing, hence, to the early stages of atherosclerosis including endothelial dysfunction and LDL oxidation. In conclusion, oxidative mechanisms activated by several infectious agents during the atherosclerotic process underlying CVDs are very complex and not well-known, remaining, thus, an attractive target for future research.

  9. The Effect of Agoraphobia on Oxidative Stress in Panic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Karlidag, Rifat; Cumurcu, Birgul Elbozan; Turkoz, Yusuf; Kartalci, Sukru; Ozcan, A. Cemal; Erdemli, M. Erman

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to investigate whether agoraphobia (A) in panic disorder (PD) has any effects on oxidative and anti-oxidative parameters. We measured total antioxidant capacity (TAC), paraoxonase (PON), arylesterase (ARE) antioxidant and malondialdehyde (MDA) oxidant levels using blood samples from a total of 31 PD patients with A, 22 PD patients without A and 53 control group subjects. There was a significant difference between the TAC, PON, ARE and MDA levels of the three groups consisting of PD with A, PD without A and the control group. The two-way comparison to clarify the group creating the difference showed that the TAC, PON, and ARE antioxidants were significantly lower in the PD with A group compared to the control group while the MDA oxidant was significantly higher. There was no significant difference between the PD without A and control groups for TAC, PON, ARE and MDA levels. We clearly demonstrated that the oxidative stress and damage to the anti-oxidative mechanism are significantly higher in the PD group with A. These findings suggest that oxidative/anti-oxidative mechanisms may play a more important role on the pathogenesis of PB with A. PMID:24474979

  10. Visualization of Oxidative Stress Induced by Experimental Periodontitis in Keap1-Dependent Oxidative Stress Detector-Luciferase Mice.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Kota; Ekuni, Daisuke; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Irie, Koichiro; Kunitomo, Muneyoshi; Uchida, Yoko; Fukuhara, Daiki; Morita, Manabu

    2016-11-16

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether a Keap1-dependent oxidative stress detector-luciferase (OKD-LUC) mouse model would be useful for the visualization of oxidative stress induced by experimental periodontitis. A ligature was placed around the mandibular first molars for seven days to induce periodontitis. Luciferase activity was measured with an intraperitoneal injection of d-luciferin on days 0, 1, and 7. The luciferase activity in the periodontitis group was significantly greater than that in the control group at seven days. The expressions of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and malondialdehyde in periodontal tissue were significantly higher in the periodontitis group than in the control group. Immunofluorescent analysis confirmed that the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) occurred more frequently in the periodontitis group than in the control group. This study found that under oxidative stress induced by experimental periodontitis, the Nrf2/antioxidant defense pathway was activated and could be visualized from the luciferase activity in the OKD-LUC model. Thus, the OKD-LUC mouse model may be useful for exploring the mechanism underlying the relationship between the Nrf2/antioxidant defense pathway and periodontitis by enabling the visualization of oxidative stress over time.

  11. Psychological stress during exercise: immunoendocrine and oxidative responses.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Jung; Webb, Heather E; Evans, Ronald K; McCleod, Kelly A; Tangsilsat, Supatchara E; Kamimori, Gary H; Acevedo, Edmund O

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the changes in catecholamines (epinephrine [EPI] and norepinephrine [NE]), interleukin-2 (IL-2) and a biomarker of oxidative stress (8-isoprostane) in healthy individuals who were exposed to a dual challenge (physical and psychological stress). Furthermore, this study also examined the possible relationships between catecholamines (NE and EPI) and 8-isoprostane and between IL-2 and 8-isoprostane following a combined physical and psychological challenge. Seven healthy male subjects completed two experimental conditions. The exercise-alone condition (EAC) consisted of cycling at 60% VO(2max) for 37 min, while the dual-stress condition (DSC) included 20 min of a mental challenge while cycling. DSC showed greater EPI and 8-isoprostane levels (significant condition by time interaction). NE and IL-2 revealed significant change across time in both conditions. In addition, following dual stress, EPI area-under-the-curve (AUC) demonstrated a positive correlation with NE AUC and IL-2 AUC. NE AUC was positively correlated with IL-2 AUC and peak 8-isoprostane, and peak IL-2 was positively correlated with peak 8-isoprostane in response to a dual stress. The potential explanation for elevated oxidative stress during dual stress may be through the effects of the release of catecholamines and IL-2. These findings may further provide the potential explanation that dual stress alters physiological homeostasis in many occupations including firefighting, military operations and law enforcement. A greater understanding of these responses to stress can assist in finding strategies (e.g. exercise training) to overcome the inherent psychobiological challenges associated with physically and mentally demanding professions.

  12. Oxidative stress and antioxidant defenses in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Leal, Claudio A M; Schetinger, Maria R C; Leal, Daniela B R; Morsch, Vera M; da Silva, Aleksandro Schafer; Rezer, João F P; de Bairros, André Valle; Jaques, Jeandre Augusto Dos Santos

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) is defined as an imbalance in the production of reactive oxygen species and the capacity of antioxidant defenses. The objective of this work was to investigate OS and antioxidant capacity in pregnant women. Parameters of the oxidative status and antioxidant capacity in serum and whole blood were evaluated in thirty-nine women with normal pregnancy. The assessment of antioxidants indicated an increase in superoxide dismutase and catalase activities (P<0.05 and P<0.01) and a decrease in ascorbic acid levels and the total content of sulfhydryl (P<0.05 and P<0.001). Additionally, when the pro-oxidant system was investigated we found an increase (P<0.01) in malondialdehyde and no significant change (P>0.05) in protein carbonylation. This study demonstrates that there is a change in the pro-oxidant and antioxidant defenses associated with body and circulation changes that are inherent to the pregnancy process.

  13. Mitochondrial oxidative stress in aortic stiffening with age: the role of smooth muscle cell function.

    EPA Science Inventory

    OBJECTIVE: Age-related aortic stiffness is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Although oxidative stress is implicated in aortic stiffness, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unelucidated. Here, we examined the source of oxidative stress in aging and i...

  14. Protein Carbonyl Formation in Response to Propiconazole-Induced Oxidative Stress.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Propiconazole, a widely used fungicide, is hepatotoxic and hepatotumorigenic in mice. Previous genomic analysis of liver tissues from propiconazole-treated mice identified genes and pathways involved in oxidative stress, suggesting that oxidative stress may play a role in propico...

  15. Live-cell Imaging Approaches for the Investigation of Xenobiotic-Induced Oxidant Stress

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Oxidant stress is arguably a universal feature in toxicology. Research studies on the role of oxidant stress induced by xenobiotic exposures have typically relied on the identification of damaged biomolecules using a variety of conventional biochemical and molecular t...

  16. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage in coronary artery bypass graft surgery: effects of antioxidant treatments.

    PubMed

    Milei, J; Ferreira, R; Grana, D R; Boveris, A

    2001-01-01

    We examined antioxidant actions in 73 patients undergoing coronary artery surgery by assessing mitochondrial damage and oxidative stress in ventricular biopsies obtained at preischemia and postreperfusion. Those patients who received antioxidant therapy benefited by less oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage.

  17. Oxidative stress and metabolic syndrome in a Japanese female population.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Kazuhiko; Yamada, Toshiyuki

    2012-06-01

    One of the methods to evaluate oxidative stress in clinical medical settings is the reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs) test. While metabolic syndrome (MetS) is considered an oxidative condition, the oxidative status in MetS has not been fully examined using this test. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible association between oxidative stress as evaluated by the d-ROMs test and the MetS component number, in a Japanese female population. The serum oxidant capacity (measured by the d-ROMs test) was cross-sectionally determined in cardiovascular disease-free and non-smoking women who were not taking medications (n = 180; mean age, 60 ± 10 (standard deviation) years). Their MetS state was determined by the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel recommendations with minor modifications for a Japanese population. Patients with MetS (n = 60, 362 ± 53 CARR U) showed a significantly higher oxidant capacity by d-ROMs than those without MetS (n = 120, 324 ± 55 CARR U, P < 0.01). Moreover, the significant increase in the oxidant capacity by d-ROMs was closely associated with an increase in the MetS component number (trend P < 0.01). These results showed a significantly positive association between the oxidant capacity (by d-ROMs) and the MetS component number in this population. Further studies are required to establish the clinical applications of this test to MetS practice and clarify the biological mechanisms of the observed relationships. © 2012 The Authors. Australasian Journal on Ageing © 2012 ACOTA.

  18. [Periodonta disease in smokers, and the parameters of oxidative stress].

    PubMed

    Golusińska-Kardach, Ewelina; Napierała, Marta; Sokalski, Jerzy; Kardachi, Hubert; Florek, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease, periodontitis, and caries disease, are the two most common disease occurring in the mouth. They affect a large proportion of the world's population. The causes of periodontitis are varied, but the largest group are those caused by infections. The characteristic long asymptomatic period of development of periodontitis, make that patients are not aware of their condition. In-addition, it was observed that tobacco abuse affects the growth of disease and advancing disease state for periodontal diseases. Free radicals and other reactive particles are capable of destroying many cellular structures. They are produced mostly during the breathing process and the immune response or come from the environment. The evolution of living organisms ensure the proper tools to fight against reactive oxygen species after enzymatic and non-enzymatic by antioxidants. Sometimes this protection is not sufficient and the balance between antioxidants and oxidants is compromised. This condition is called oxidative stress. A number of studies looking for a link between oxidative stress, and diseases affecting human and determined that it is an important risk factor in many diseases. Evaluating the parameters of oxidative stress in the saliva allows for effective monitoring of disease progression, evaluation of the therapy and taking preventive measures in a timely manner.

  19. Increased Serum Oxidative Stress Markers in Women with Uterine Leiomyoma

    PubMed Central

    Santulli, Pietro; Borghese, Bruno; Lemaréchal, Herve; Leconte, Mahaut; Millischer, Anne-Elodie; Batteux, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Background Uterine leiomyomas (fibroids) are the most common gynaecological benign tumors in premenopausal women. Evidences support the role of oxidative stress in the development of uterine leiomyoma. We have analysed oxidative stress markers (thiols, advanced oxidized protein products (AOPP), protein carbonyls and nitrates/nitrites) in preoperative sera from women with histologically proven uterine leiomyoma. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a laboratory study in a tertiary-care university hospital. Fifty-nine women with histologically proven uterine leiomyoma and ninety-two leiomyoma-free control women have been enrolled in this study. Complete surgical exploration of the abdominopelvic cavity was performed in each patient. Preoperative serum samples were obtained from all study participants to assay serum thiols, AOPP, protein carbonyls and nitrates/nitrites. Concentrations of serum protein carbonyl groups and AOPP were higher in leiomyoma patients than in the control group (p=0.005 and p<0.001, respectively). By contrast, serum thiol levels were lower in leiomyoma patients (p<0.001). We found positive correlations between serum AOPP concentrations and total fibroids weight (r=0.339; p=0.028), serum AOPP and serum protein carbonyls with duration of infertility (r=0.762; p=0.006 and r=0.683; p=0.021, respectively). Conclusions/Significance This study, for the first time, reveals a significant increase of protein oxidative stress status and reduced antioxidant capacity in sera from women with uterine leiomyoma. PMID:23951284

  20. Toxicological and pharmacological concerns on oxidative stress and related diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Saeidnia, Soodabeh; College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon; Abdollahi, Mohammad, E-mail: Mohammad@TUMS.Ac.Ir

    2013-12-15

    Although reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical are generated as the natural byproduct of normal oxygen metabolism, they can create oxidative damage via interaction with bio-molecules. The role of oxidative stress as a remarkable upstream part is frequently reported in the signaling cascade of inflammation as well as chemo attractant production. Even though hydrogen peroxide can control cell signaling and stimulate cell proliferation at low levels, in higher concentrations it can initiate apoptosis and in very high levels may create necrosis. So far, the role of ROS in cellular damage and death is wellmore » documented with implicating in a broad range of degenerative alterations e.g. carcinogenesis, aging and other oxidative stress related diseases (OSRDs). Reversely, it is cleared that antioxidants are potentially able to suppress (at least in part) the immune system and to enhance the normal cellular protective responses to tissue damage. In this review, we aimed to provide insights on diverse OSRDs, which are correlated with the concept of oxidative stress as well as its cellular effects that can be inhibited by antioxidants. Resveratrol, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, statins, nebivolol and carvedilol, pentaerythritol tetranitrate, mitochondria-targeted antioxidants, and plant-derived drugs (alone or combined) are the potential medicines that can be used to control OSRD.« less

  1. Oxidative stress and hypertension: Possibility of hypertension therapy with antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Baradaran, Azar; Nasri, Hamid; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for myocardial infarction, heart failure, stroke, peripheral arterial disease, and aortic aneurysm, and is a cause of chronic kidney disease. Hypertension is often associated with metabolic abnormalities such as diabetes and dyslipidemia, and the rate of these diseases is increasing nowadays. Recently it has been hypothesized that oxidative stress is a key player in the pathogenesis of hypertension. A reduction in superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activity has been observed in newly diagnosed and untreated hypertensive subjects, which are inversely correlated with blood pressure. Hydrogen peroxide production is also higher in hypertensive subjects. Furthermore, hypertensive patients have higher lipid hydroperoxide production. Oxidative stress is also markedly increased in hypertensive patients with renovascular disease. If oxidative stress is indeed a cause of hypertension, then, antioxidants should have beneficial effects on hypertension control and reduction of oxidative damage should result in a reduction in blood pressure. Although dietary antioxidants may have beneficial effects on hypertension and cardiovascular risk factors, however, antioxidant supplementation has not been shown consistently to be effective and improvement is not usually seen in blood pressure after treatment with single or combination antioxidant therapy in subjects thought to be at high risk of cardiovascular disease. This matter is the main focus of this paper. A list of medicinal plants that have been reported to be effective in hypertension is also presented. PMID:25097610

  2. In vitro potential cytogenetic and oxidative stress effects of roxithromycin.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Mehmet; Timocin, Taygun; Ila, Hasan B

    2017-10-01

    Macrolide antibiotic roxithromycin was evaluated in terms of its genotoxic, cytotoxic and oxidative stress effects. For this purpose; 25, 50, 100 and 200 μg/mL concentrations of roxithromycin were dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide and treated to human peripheral blood lymphocytes for two different treatment periods (24 and 48 h). In chromosome aberration (CA) and micronucleus (MN) tests, roxithromycin did not show genotoxic effect. But it induced sister chromatid exchange (SCE) at the highest concentration (200 μg/mL) for the 24-h treatment period and at all concentrations (except 25 μg/mL) for the 48-h treatment period. Looking at cytotoxic effect of roxithromycin, statistically insignificant decreases on mitotic index and proliferation index were observed. Roxithromycin decreased nuclear division index (NDI) at highest two concentrations (100 and 200 μg/mL) for the 24-h treatment period and at all concentrations (expect 25 μg/mL) for the 48-h treatment period. Total oxidant values, total antioxidant values and oxidative stress index did not change with roxithromycin treatment. Eventually, roxithromycin did not have genotoxic and oxidative stress effects in human-cultured lymphocytes.

  3. Gypenosides protect retinal pigment epithelium cells from oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Alhasani, Reem Hasaballah; Biswas, Lincoln; Tohari, Ali Mohammad; Zhou, Xinzhi; Reilly, James; He, Jian-Feng; Shu, Xinhua

    2018-02-01

    Oxidative stress plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of retinal degeneration. Gypenosides are the major functional components isolated from Gynostemma pentaphyllum. They have been shown to protect against oxidative stress and inflammation and have also demonstrated a protective effect on experimental optic neuritis. In order to determine the protective properties of gypenosides against oxidative stress in human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells, ARPE-19 cells were treated with H 2 O 2 or H 2 O 2 plus gypenosides for 24 h. ARPE-19 cells co-treated with gypenosides had significantly increased cell viability and decreased cell death rate when compared to cells treated with H 2 O 2 alone. The level of GSH, the activities of SOD and catalase, and the expression of NRF2 and antioxidant genes were notably decreased, while there were marked increases in ROS, MDA and pro-inflammatory cytokines in ARPE-19 cells exposed to H 2 O 2 ; co-treatment with gypenosides significantly counteract these changes. Our study suggests that gypenosides protect RPE cells from oxidative damage and offer therapeutic potential for the treatment of retinal degeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. An update on oxidative stress-mediated organ pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Kahkashan; Sinha, Krishnendu; Sil, Parames C

    2013-12-01

    Exposure to environmental pollutants and drugs can result in pathophysiological situations in the body. Research in this area is essential as the knowledge on cellular survival and death would help in designing effective therapeutic strategies that are needed for the maintenance of the normal physiological functions of the body. In this regard, naturally occurring bio-molecules can be considered as potential therapeutic targets as they are normally available in commonly consumed foodstuffs and are thought to have minimum side effects. This review article describes the detailed mechanisms of oxidative stress-mediated organ pathophysiology and the ultimate fate of the cells either to survive or to undergo necrotic or apoptotic death. The mechanisms underlying the beneficial role of a number of naturally occurring bioactive molecules in oxidative stress-mediated organ pathophysiology have also been included in the review. The review provides useful information about the recent progress in understanding the mechanism(s) of various types of organ pathophysiology, the complex cross-talk between these pathways, as well as their modulation in stressed conditions. Additionally, it suggests possible therapeutic applications of a number of naturally occurring bioactive molecules in conditions involving oxidative stress. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Implication of Oxidative Stress in Fetal Programming of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Pilar; Ramiro-Cortijo, David; Reyes-Hernández, Cynthia G.; López de Pablo, Angel L.; González, M. Carmen; Arribas, Silvia M.

    2018-01-01

    Lifestyle and genetic background are well known risk factors of cardiovascular disease (CVD). A third contributing factor is suboptimal fetal development, due to nutrient or oxygen deprivation, placental insufficiency, or exposure to toxic substances. The fetus adapts to adverse intrauterine conditions to ensure survival; the immediate consequence is low birth weight (LBW) and the long-term effect is an increased susceptibility to develop CVD in adult life. This process is known as Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) or fetal programming of CVD. The influence of fetal life for the future cardiovascular health of the individual has been evidenced by numerous epidemiologic studies in populations suffering from starvation during intrauterine life. Furthermore, experimental animal models have provided support and enabled exploring the underlying mechanisms. Oxidative stress seems to play a central role in fetal programming of CVD, both in the response of the feto-placental unit to the suboptimal intrauterine environment and in the alterations of physiologic systems of cardiovascular control, ultimately leading to disease. This review aims to summarize current knowledge on the alterations in oxidative balance in response to fetal stress factors covering two aspects. Firstly, the evidence from human studies of the implication of oxidative stress in LBW induced by suboptimal conditions during intrauterine life, emphasizing the role of the placenta. In the second part we summarize data on specific redox alterations in key cardiovascular control organs induced by exposure to known stress factors in experimental animals and discuss the emerging role of the mitochondria. PMID:29875698

  6. Oxidative Stress Responses in the Human Fungal Pathogen, Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Dantas, Alessandra; Day, Alison; Ikeh, Mélanie; Kos, Iaroslava; Achan, Beatrice; Quinn, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major fungal pathogen of humans, causing approximately 400,000 life-threatening systemic infections world-wide each year in severely immunocompromised patients. An important fungicidal mechanism employed by innate immune cells involves the generation of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. Consequently, there is much interest in the strategies employed by C. albicans to evade the oxidative killing by macrophages and neutrophils. Our understanding of how C. albicans senses and responds to ROS has significantly increased in recent years. Key findings include the observations that hydrogen peroxide triggers the filamentation of this polymorphic fungus and that a superoxide dismutase enzyme with a novel mode of action is expressed at the cell surface of C. albicans. Furthermore, recent studies have indicated that combinations of the chemical stresses generated by phagocytes can actively prevent C. albicans oxidative stress responses through a mechanism termed the stress pathway interference. In this review, we present an up-date of our current understanding of the role and regulation of oxidative stress responses in this important human fungal pathogen. PMID:25723552

  7. Nitric oxide leads to cytoskeletal reorganization in the retinal pigment epithelium under oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sripathi, Srinivas R; He, Weilue; Um, Ji-Yeon; Moser, Trevor; Dehnbostel, Stevie; Kindt, Kimberly; Goldman, Jeremy; Frost, Megan C; Jahng, Wan Jin

    2012-01-01

    Light is a risk factor for various eye diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). We aim to understand how cytoskeletal proteins in the retinal pigment epithetlium (RPE) respond to oxidative stress, including light and how these responses affect apoptotic signaling. Previously, proteomic analysis revealed that the expression levels of vimentin and serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) are significantly increased when mice are exposed under continuous light for 7 days compared to a condition of 12 hrs light/dark cycling exposure using retina degeneration 1 (rd1) model. When melatonin is administered to animals while they are exposed to continuous light, the levels of vimentin and PP2A return to a normal level. Vimentin is a substrate of PP2A that directly binds to vimentin and dephosphorylates it. The current study shows that upregulation of PP2Ac (catalytic subunit) phosphorylation negatively correlates with vimentin phosphorylation under stress condition. Stabilization of vimentin appears to be achieved by decreased PP2Ac phosphorylation by nitric oxide induction. We tested our hypothesis that site-specific modifications of PP2Ac may drive cytoskeletal reorganization by vimentin dephosphorylation through nitric oxide signaling. We speculate that nitric oxide determines protein nitration under stress conditions. Our results demonstrate that PP2A and vimentin are modulated by nitric oxide as a key element involved in cytoskeletal signaling. The current study suggests that external stress enhances nitric oxide to regulate PP2Ac and vimentin phosphorylation, thereby stabilizing or destabilizing vimentin. Phosphorylation may result in depolymerization of vimentin, leading to nonfilamentous particle formation. We propose that a stabilized vimentin might act as an anti-apoptotic molecule when cells are under oxidative stress.

  8. Nitric oxide leads to cytoskeletal reorganization in the retinal pigment epithelium under oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Um, Ji-Yeon; Moser, Trevor; Dehnbostel, Stevie; Kindt, Kimberly; Goldman, Jeremy; Frost, Megan C.; Jahng, Wan Jin

    2016-01-01

    Light is a risk factor for various eye diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). We aim to understand how cytoskeletal proteins in the retinal pigment epithetlium (RPE) respond to oxidative stress, including light and how these responses affect apoptotic signaling. Previously, proteomic analysis revealed that the expression levels of vimentin and serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) are significantly increased when mice are exposed under continuous light for 7 days compared to a condition of 12 hrs light/dark cycling exposure using retina degeneration 1 (rd1) model. When melatonin is administered to animals while they are exposed to continuous light, the levels of vimentin and PP2A return to a normal level. Vimentin is a substrate of PP2A that directly binds to vimentin and dephosphorylates it. The current study shows that upregulation of PP2Ac (catalytic subunit) phosphorylation negatively correlates with vimentin phosphorylation under stress condition. Stabilization of vimentin appears to be achieved by decreased PP2Ac phosphorylation by nitric oxide induction. We tested our hypothesis that site-specific modifications of PP2Ac may drive cytoskeletal reorganization by vimentin dephosphorylation through nitric oxide signaling. We speculate that nitric oxide determines protein nitration under stress conditions. Our results demonstrate that PP2A and vimentin are modulated by nitric oxide as a key element involved in cytoskeletal signaling. The current study suggests that external stress enhances nitric oxide to regulate PP2Ac and vimentin phosphorylation, thereby stabilizing or destabilizing vimentin. Phosphorylation may result in depolymerization of vimentin, leading to nonfilamentous particle formation. We propose that a stabilized vimentin might act as an anti-apoptotic molecule when cells are under oxidative stress. PMID:27974994

  9. Protective effects of glutamine on human melanocyte oxidative stress model.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liya; Guo, Zhen; Kong, Yulong; Liang, Jianhua; Wang, Yi; Wang, Keyu

    2018-01-01

    Vitiligo is a disorder caused by the loss of the melanocyte activity on melanin pigment generation. Studies show that oxidative-stress induced apoptosis in melanocytes is closely related to the pathogenesis of vitiligo. Glutamine is a well known antioxidant with anti-apoptotic effects, and is used in a variety of diseases. However, it is unclear whether glutamine has an antioxidant or anti-apoptotic effect on melanocytes. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of glutamine on a human melanocyte oxidative stress model. The oxidative stress model was established on human melanocytes using hydrogen peroxide. The morphology and viability of melanocytes, levels of oxidants [reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde], levels of antioxidants [superoxide dismutase and glutathione-S-transferase], and apoptosis-related indicators (caspase-3, bax and bcl-2) were examined after glutamine exposure at various concentrations. Expressions of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2, heme oxygenase-1, and heat shock protein 70 were detected using western blot technique after glutamine exposure at various concentrations. Our results demonstrate that pre-treatment and post-treatment with glutamine promoted melanocyte viability, increased levels of superoxide dismutase, glutathione-S-transferase and bcl-2, decreased levels of reactive oxygen species, malondialdehyde, bax and caspase-3, and enhanced nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2, heme oxygenase-1, and heat shock protein 70 expression in a dose dependent manner. The effect of pre-treatment was more significant than post-treatment, at the same concentration. The mechanisms of glutamine activated nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 antioxidant responsive element signaling pathway need further investigation. Glutamine enhances the antioxidant and anti-apoptotic capabilities of melanocytes and protects them against oxidative stress.

  10. Association between adherence to the Mediterranean diet and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jun; Jones, Dean P; Goldberg, Jack; Ziegler, Thomas R; Bostick, Roberd M; Wilson, Peter W; Manatunga, Amita K; Shallenberger, Lucy; Jones, Linda; Vaccarino, Viola

    2008-11-01

    The cardioprotective property of the Mediterranean diet has been attributed to its antioxidant capacity, but direct investigation of this mechanism has been limited. We examined the association between the Mediterranean diet and an established plasma marker of oxidative stress, the ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG), in a well-controlled study of twins. We administered the Willett food-frequency questionnaire to 138 monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs and to 21 unpaired twins and derived a score measuring adherence to the Mediterranean diet. Fasting plasma GSH and GSSG concentrations were measured to calculate the GSH/GSSG ratio. The higher the ratio, the lower the oxidative stress. Mixed-effect regression analysis was used to partition the association into between- and within-twin pair differences. When within-pair effects are examined, twins are matched for sociodemographic and familial factors. A one-unit increment in the diet score was associated with a 7% higher GSH/GSSG ratio (P = 0.03) after adjustment for energy intake, other nutritional factors, cardiovascular disease risk factors, and medication use. The association persisted within twin pairs: a one-unit within-pair absolute difference in the diet score was associated with a 10% (95% CI: 2.7, 18.0) higher GSH/GSSG ratio in the twin with the higher score than in the co-twin with the lower score (P = 0.007). Results were similar in monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs. The association between the Mediterranean diet and plasma oxidative stress is robust and is not confounded by genetic or shared environmental factors. Decreased oxidative stress is a plausible mechanism linking the Mediterranean diet to reduced cardiovascular disease risk.

  11. Circadian Rhythm Connections to Oxidative Stress: Implications for Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Wilking, Melissa; Ndiaye, Mary; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Oxygen and circadian rhythmicity are essential in a myriad of physiological processes to maintain homeostasis, from blood pressure and sleep/wake cycles, down to cellular signaling pathways that play critical roles in health and disease. If the human body or cells experience significant stress, their ability to regulate internal systems, including redox levels and circadian rhythms, may become impaired. At cellular as well as organismal levels, impairment in redox regulation and circadian rhythms may lead to a number of adverse effects, including the manifestation of a variety of diseases such as heart diseases, neurodegenerative conditions, and cancer. Recent Advances: Researchers have come to an understanding as to the basics of the circadian rhythm mechanism, as well as the importance of the numerous species of oxidative stress components. The effects of oxidative stress and dysregulated circadian rhythms have been a subject of intense investigations since they were first discovered, and recent investigations into the molecular mechanisms linking the two have started to elucidate the bases of their connection. Critical Issues: While much is known about the mechanics and importance of oxidative stress systems and circadian rhythms, the front where they interact has had very little research focused on it. This review discusses the idea that these two systems are together intricately involved in the healthy body, as well as in disease. Future Directions: We believe that for a more efficacious management of diseases that have both circadian rhythm and oxidative stress components in their pathogenesis, targeting both systems in tandem would be far more successful. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 192–208 PMID:23198849

  12. Oxidative stress markers at birth: Analyses of a neonatal population.

    PubMed

    Giuffrè, Mario; Rizzo, Manfredi; Scaturro, Giusy; Pitruzzella, Alessandro; Marino Gammazza, Antonella; Cappello, Francesco; Corsello, Giovanni; Li Volti, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    In order to further understand neonatal stress and, thus, control it efficaciously, there is a need for more information on the manifestations of stress at the molecular level in the newborn, with particular regard to oxidants, and anti-oxidant and anti-stress mechanisms, including mitochondrial heat shock protein-chaperones such as Hsp60. We investigated patterns of anti-oxidants, biomarkers of oxidative stress, and Hsp60 levels in sera from newborns and found significant associations between glutathione (GSH) levels and gestational age, delivery modality, and lipid hydroperoxydes (LOOH) level. LOOH levels and spontaneous (vaginal) delivery were independently associated with increased GSH levels when these were above the median. Hsp60 and LOOH levels were positively correlated whereas Hsp60 and GSH levels were inversely correlated in spontaneously delivered newborns; in contrast, Hsp60 and GSH levels were positively correlated in newborns delivered by cesarea. Our results point to new directions in the search for definite patterns of GSH, LOOH, and Hsp60 in the newborn's serum that might have functional and diagnostic significance and that could help in the monitoring of newborn health during and after delivery. In addition, the data provide a starting basis for investigating the precise roles and interplay of GSH and Hsp60 in the maintenance of an optimal redox balance at birth to cope with the stress inherent to delivery, and also for investigating the predictive value of any given pattern of GSH, LOOH, and Hsp60 at birth with regard to health status and risk of disease in adult life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Physiological changes induced in four bacterial strains following oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Baatout, S; De Boever, P; Mergeay, M

    2006-01-01

    In order to study the behaviour and resistance of bacteria under extreme conditions, physiological changes associated with oxidative stress were monitored using flow cytometry. The study was conducted to assess the maintenance of membrane integrity and potential as well as the esterase activity, the intracellular pH and the production of superoxide anions in four bacterial strains (Ralstonia metallidurans, Escherichia coli, Shewanella oneidensis and Deinococcus radiodurans). The strains were chosen for their potential usefulness in bioremediation. Suspensions of R. metallidurans, E. coli, S. oneidensis and D. radiodurans were submitted to 1 h oxidative stress (H2O2 at various concentrations from 0 to 880 mM). Cell membrane permeability (propidium iodide) and potential (rhodamine-123, 3,3'-dihexyloxacarbocyanine iodide), intracellular esterase activity (fluorescein diacetate), intracellular reactive oxygen species concentration (hydroethidine) and intracellular pH (carboxyflurorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (5(6)) were monitored to evaluate the physiological state and the overall fitness of individual bacterial cells under oxidative stress. The four bacterial strains exhibited varying sensitivities towards H2O2. However, for all bacterial strains, some physiological damage could already be observed from 13.25 mM H2O2 onwards, in particular with regard to their membrane permeability. Depending on the bacterial strains, moderate to high physiological damage could be observed between 13.25 mM and 220 mM H2O2. Membrane potential, esterase activity, intracellular pH and production of superoxide anion production were considerably modified at high H2O2 concentrations in all four strains. In conclusion, we show that a range of significant physiological alterations occurs when bacteria are challenged with H2O2 and fluorescent staining methods coupled with flow cytometry are useful for monitoring the changes induced not only by oxidative stress but also by other

  14. Oxidative costs of reproduction: Oxidative stress in mice fed standard and low antioxidant diets.

    PubMed

    Vaanholt, L M; Milne, A; Zheng, Y; Hambly, C; Mitchell, S E; Valencak, T G; Allison, D B; Speakman, J R

    2016-02-01

    Lactation is one of the most energetically expensive behaviours, and trade-offs may exist between the energy devoted to it and somatic maintenance, including protection against oxidative damage. However, conflicting data exist for the effects of reproduction on oxidative stress. In the wild, a positive relationship is often observed, but in laboratory studies oxidative damage is often lower in lactating than in non-breeding animals. We hypothesised that this discrepancy may exist because during lactation food intake increases many-fold resulting in a large increase in the intake of dietary antioxidants which are typically high in laboratory rodent chow where they are added as a preservative. We supplied lactating and non-breeding control mice with either a standard or low antioxidant diet and studied how this affected the activity of endogenous antioxidants (catalase, superoxide dismutase; SOD, and glutathione peroxidise; GPx) and oxidative damage to proteins (protein carbonyls, PC) in liver and brain tissue. The low antioxidant diet did not significantly affect activities of antioxidant enzymes in brain or liver, and generally did not result in increased protein damage, except in livers of control mice on low antioxidant diet. Catalase activity, but not GPx or SOD, was decreased in both control and lactating mice on the low antioxidant diet. Lactating mice had significantly reduced oxidative damage to both liver and brain compared to control mice, independent of the diet they were given. In conclusion, antioxidant content of the diet did not affect oxidative stress in control or reproductive mice, and cannot explain the previously observed reduction in oxidative stress in lactating mammals studied in the laboratory. The reduced oxidative stress in the livers of lactating mice even under low antioxidant diet treatment was consistent with the 'shielding' hypothesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Assessment of Eccentric Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress Using Oxidation-Reduction Potential Markers

    PubMed Central

    Stagos, Dimitrios; Goutzourelas, Nikolaos; Ntontou, Amalia-Maria; Kafantaris, Ioannis; Deli, Chariklia K.; Poulios, Athanasios; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z.; Bar-Or, David; Kouretas, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the use of static (sORP) and capacity ORP (cORP) oxidation-reduction potential markers as measured by the RedoxSYS Diagnostic System in plasma, for assessing eccentric exercise-induced oxidative stress. Nineteen volunteers performed eccentric exercise with the knee extensors. Blood was collected before, immediately after exercise, and 24, 48, and 72 h after exercise. Moreover, common redox biomarkers were measured, which were protein carbonyls, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, total antioxidant capacity in plasma, and catalase activity and glutathione levels in erythrocytes. When the participants were examined as one group, there were not significant differences in any marker after exercise. However, in 11 participants there was a high increase in cORP after exercise, while in 8 participants there was a high decrease. Thus, the participants were divided in low cORP group exhibiting significant decrease in cORP after exercise and in high cORP group exhibiting significant increase. Moreover, only in the low cORP group there was a significant increase in lipid peroxidation after exercise suggesting induction of oxidative stress. The results suggested that high decreases in cORP values after exercise may indicate induction of oxidative stress by eccentric exercise, while high increases in cORP values after exercise may indicate no existence of oxidative stress. PMID:25874019

  16. How Does the Macula Protect Itself from Oxidative Stress?

    PubMed Central

    Handa, James T.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been hypothesized to contribute to the development of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common cause of blindness in the United States. At present, there is no treatment for early disease. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a physiological role in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), a key cell type in this disease, but with excessive ROS, oxidative damage or excessive innate immune system activation can result. The RPE has developed a robust antioxidant system driven by the transcription factor Nrf2. Impaired Nrf2 signaling can lead to oxidative damage or activate the innate immune response, both of which can lead to RPE apoptosis, a defining change in AMD. Several mouse models simulating environmental stressors or targeting specific antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase or Nrf2, have simulated some of the features of AMD. While ROS are short-lived, oxidatively damaged molecules termed oxidation specific epitopes (OSEs), can be long-lived and a source of chronic stress that activates the innate immune system through pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). The macula accumulates a number of OSEs including carboxyethylpyrrole, malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal, and advanced glycation endproducts, as well as their respective neutralizing PRRs. Excessive accumulation of OSEs results in pathologic immune activation. For example, mice immunized with the carboxyethylpyrrole develop cardinal features of AMD. Regulating ROS in the RPE by modulating antioxidant systems or neutralizing OSEs through an appropriate innate immune response are potential modalities to treat or prevent early AMD. PMID:22503691

  17. How does the macula protect itself from oxidative stress?

    PubMed

    Handa, James T

    2012-08-01

    Oxidative stress has been hypothesized to contribute to the development of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common cause of blindness in the United States. At present, there is no treatment for early disease. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a physiological role in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), a key cell type in this disease, but with excessive ROS, oxidative damage or excessive innate immune system activation can result. The RPE has developed a robust antioxidant system driven by the transcription factor Nrf2. Impaired Nrf2 signaling can lead to oxidative damage or activate the innate immune response, both of which can lead to RPE apoptosis, a defining change in AMD. Several mouse models simulating environmental stressors or targeting specific antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase or Nrf2, have simulated some of the features of AMD. While ROS are short-lived, oxidatively damaged molecules termed oxidation specific epitopes (OSEs), can be long-lived and a source of chronic stress that activates the innate immune system through pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). The macula accumulates a number of OSEs including carboxyethylpyrrole, malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal, and advanced glycation endproducts, as well as their respective neutralizing PRRs. Excessive accumulation of OSEs results in pathologic immune activation. For example, mice immunized with the carboxyethylpyrrole develop cardinal features of AMD. Regulating ROS in the RPE by modulating antioxidant systems or neutralizing OSEs through an appropriate innate immune response are potential modalities to treat or prevent early AMD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The role of oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Ramón; González, Jaime; Paoletto, Fabio

    2011-04-01

    Hypertension is considered to be the most important risk factor in the development of cardiovascular disease. An increasing body of evidence suggests that oxidative stress, which results in an excessive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), has a key role in the pathogenesis of hypertension. The modulation of the vasomotor system involves ROS as mediators of vasoconstriction induced by angiotensin II, endothelin-1 and urotensin-II, among others. The bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO), which is a major vasodilator, is highly dependent on the redox status. Under physiological conditions, low concentrations of intracellular ROS have an important role in the normal redox signaling maintaining vascular function and integrity. However, under pathophysiological conditions, increased levels of ROS contribute to vascular dysfunction and remodeling through oxidative damage. In human hypertension, an increase in the production of superoxide anions and hydrogen peroxide, a decrease in NO synthesis and a reduction in antioxidant bioavailability have been observed. In turn, antioxidants are reducing agents that can neutralize these oxidative and otherwise damaging biomolecules. The use of antioxidant vitamins, such as vitamins C and E, has gained considerable interest as protecting agents against vascular endothelial damage. Available data support the role of these vitamins as effective antioxidants that can counteract ROS effects. This review discusses the mechanisms involved in ROS generation, the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of vascular damage in hypertension, and the possible therapeutic strategies that could prevent or treat this disorder.

  19. Flow of essential elements in subcellular fractions during oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Lago, Larissa; Nunes, Emilene A; Vigato, Aryane A; Souza, Vanessa C O; Barbosa, Fernando; Sato, João R; Batista, Bruno L; Cerchiaro, Giselle

    2017-02-01

    Essential trace elements are commonly found in altered concentrations in the brains of patients with neurodegenerative diseases. Many studies in trace metal determination and quantification are conducted in tissue, cell culture or whole brain. In the present investigation, we determined by ICP-MS Fe, Cu, Zn, Ca, Se, Co, Cr, Mg, and Mn in organelles (mitochondria, nuclei) and whole motor neuron cell cultured in vitro. We performed experiments using two ways to access oxidative stress: cell treatments with H 2 O 2 or Aβ-42 peptide in its oligomeric form. Both treatments caused accumulation of markers of oxidative stress, such as oxidized proteins and lipids, and alteration in DNA. Regarding trace elements, cells treated with H 2 O 2 showed higher levels of Zn and lower levels of Ca in nuclei when compared to control cells with no oxidative treatments. On the other hand, cells treated with Aβ-42 peptide in its oligomeric form showed higher levels of Mg, Ca, Fe and Zn in nuclei when compared to control cells. These differences showed that metal flux in cell organelles during an intrinsic external oxidative condition (H 2 O 2 treatment) are different from an intrinsic external neurodegenerative treatment.

  20. Oxidative stress and mechanisms of ochronosis in alkaptonuria.

    PubMed

    Braconi, Daniela; Millucci, Lia; Bernardini, Giulia; Santucci, Annalisa

    2015-11-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare metabolic disease due to a deficient activity of the enzyme homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase (HGD), involved in Phe and Tyr catabolism. Due to such a deficiency, AKU patients undergo accumulation of the metabolite homogentisic acid (HGA), which is prone to oxidation/polymerization reactions causing the production of a melanin-like pigment. Once the pigment is deposited onto connective tissues (mainly in joints, spine, and cardiac valves), a classical bluish-brown discoloration is imparted, leading to a phenomenon known as "ochronosis", the hallmark of AKU. A clarification of the molecular mechanisms for the production and deposition of the ochronotic pigment in AKU started only recently with a range of in vitro and ex vivo human models used for the study of HGA-induced effects. Thanks to redox-proteomic analyses, it was found that HGA could induce significant oxidation of a number of serum and chondrocyte proteins. Further investigations allowed highlighting how HGA-induced proteome alteration, lipid peroxidation, thiol depletion, and amyloid production could contribute to oxidative stress generation and protein oxidation in AKU. This review briefly summarizes the most recent findings on HGA-induced oxidative stress in AKU, helping in the clarification of the molecular mechanisms of ochronosis and potentially providing the basis for its pharmacological treatment. Future work should be undertaken in order to validate in vivo the results so far obtained in in vitro AKU models. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Increased oxidative stress in infants exposed to passive smoking.

    PubMed

    Aycicek, Ali; Erel, Ozcan; Kocyigit, Abdurrahim

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of passive cigarette smoking on the oxidative and anti-oxidative status of plasma in infants. Eighty-four infants aged 6-28 weeks were divided into two groups: the study group included infants who had been exposed to passive smoking via at least five cigarettes per day for at least the past 6 weeks at home, while the control group included infants who had never been exposed to passive smoking. The antioxidative status of plasma was assessed by the measurement of individual antioxidant components: vitamin C, albumin, bilirubin, uric acid, thiol contents and total antioxidant capacity (TAC 1 and TAC 2). Oxidative status was assessed by the determination of total peroxide levels and the oxidative stress index (OSI 1 and OSI 2). Plasma vitamin C, thiol concentration and TAC 1 and TAC 2 levels were significantly lower, whereas plasma total peroxide levels and OSI 1 and OSI 2 were significantly higher, in passive smoking infants than in the controls (P<0.01). We conclude that passive smoking has a negative impact on numerous parts of the antioxidant defence system in infants, and exposes them to potent oxidative stress.

  2. Oxidative stress, d-ROMs test, and ceruloplasmin.

    PubMed

    Colombini, Francesco; Carratelli, Mauro; Alberti, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Human serum samples were evaluated for oxidative stress with the d-ROMs test. The ceruloplasmin (CP) and copper contents of the samples was independently measured and compared to those calculated on the basis of the d-ROMs test results for pure CP solutions. The d-ROMs readings did not show any significant correlation with either the CP or copper contents of the samples. Critical interference of CP on the d-ROMs test was therefore excluded and the usefulness of the test in the evaluation of global oxidative status of a biological sample could be reassessed.

  3. Oxidative airway inflammation leads to systemic and vascular oxidative stress in a murine model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Al-Harbi, Naif O; Nadeem, A; Al-Harbi, Mohamed M; Imam, F; Al-Shabanah, Othman A; Ahmad, Sheikh F; Sayed-Ahmed, Mohamed M; Bahashwan, Saleh A

    2015-05-01

    Oxidant-antioxidant imbalance plays an important role in repeated cycles of airway inflammation observed in asthma. It is when reactive oxygen species (ROS) overwhelm antioxidant defenses that a severe inflammatory state becomes apparent and may impact vasculature. Several studies have shown an association between airway inflammation and cardiovascular complications; however so far none has investigated the link between airway oxidative stress and systemic/vascular oxidative stress in a murine model of asthma. Therefore, this study investigated the contribution of oxidative stress encountered in asthmatic airways in modulation of vascular/systemic oxidant-antioxidant balance. Rats were sensitized intraperitoneally with ovalbumin (OVA) in the presence of aluminum hydroxide followed by several intranasal (i.n.) challenges with OVA. Rats were then assessed for airway and vascular inflammation, oxidative stress (ROS, lipid peroxides) and antioxidants measured as total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and thiol content. Challenge with OVA led to increased airway inflammation and oxidative stress with a concomitant increase in vascular inflammation and oxidative stress. Oxidative stress in the vasculature was significantly inhibited by antioxidant treatment, N-acetyl cysteine; whereas hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) inhalation worsened it. Therefore, our study shows that oxidative airway inflammation is associated with vascular/systemic oxidative stress which might predispose these patients to increased cardiovascular risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Carbon monoxide exposure enhances arrhythmia after cardiac stress: involvement of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    André, Lucas; Gouzi, Fares; Thireau, Jérôme; Meyer, Gregory; Boissiere, Julien; Delage, Martine; Abdellaoui, Aldja; Feillet-Coudray, Christine; Fouret, Gilles; Cristol, Jean-Paul; Lacampagne, Alain; Obert, Philippe; Reboul, Cyril; Fauconnier, Jérémy; Hayot, Maurice; Richard, Sylvain; Cazorla, Olivier

    2011-11-01

    Arrhythmias following cardiac stress are a key predictor of death in healthy population. Carbon monoxide (CO) is a ubiquitous pollutant promoting oxidative stress and associated with hospitalization for cardiovascular disease and cardiac mortality. We investigated the effect of chronic CO exposure on the occurrence of arrhythmic events after a cardiac stress test and the possible involvement of related oxidative stress. Wistar rats exposed chronically (4 weeks) to sustained urban CO pollution presented more arrhythmic events than controls during recovery after cardiac challenge with isoprenaline in vivo. Sudden death occurred in 22% of CO-exposed rats versus 0% for controls. Malondialdehyde (MDA), an end-product of lipid peroxidation, was increased in left ventricular tissue of CO-exposed rats. Cardiomyocytes isolated from CO-exposed rats showed higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) production (measured with MitoSox Red dye), higher diastolic Ca(2+) resulting from SR calcium leak and an higher occurrence of irregular Ca(2+) transients (measured with Indo-1) in comparison to control cells after a high pacing sequence. Acute treatment with a ROS scavenger (N-acetylcysteine, 20 mmol/L, 1 h) prevented this sequence of alterations and decreased the number of arrhythmic cells following high pacing. Chronic CO exposure promotes oxidative stress that alters Ca(2+) homeostasis (through RYR2 and SERCA defects) and thereby mediates the triggering of ventricular arrhythmia after cardiac stress that can lead to sudden death.

  5. Increased oxidative stress in preschool children exposed to passive smoking.

    PubMed

    Yıldırım, Faruk; Sermetow, Kabil; Aycicek, Ali; Kocyigit, Abdurrahim; Erel, Ozcan

    2011-01-01

    To study the effect of passive cigarette smoking on plasma oxidative and antioxidative status in passive smoking preschool children and to compare them with controls. Thirty-four passive smoking (five to 50 cigarettes per day) preschool children (study group) and 32 controls who had never been exposed to cigarette smoke were randomly chosen from children aged from 4 to 6 years. Urinary cotinine and plasma indicators of oxidative and antioxidative status, i.e., total oxidant status (TOS), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), and oxidative stress index (OSI), were determined. Mean environmental cigarette consumption was 22±13 cigarettes per day in passive smoking children. Mean urinary cotinine levels were 77.6±41.4 ng/mL and 11.9±2.3 ng/mL in the study and control groups, respectively (p < 0.001). Mean plasma TAC levels were 0.95±0.13 mmol Trolox equivalent/L and 1.01±0.09 mmol Trolox equivalent/L, respectively (p = 0.039). Mean plasma TOS levels were 28.6±7.9 µmol H2O2 equivalent/L and 18.5±6.3 µmol H2O2 equivalent/L, respectively (p < 0.001). Mean OSI levels were 3.08±0.98 arbitrary units and 1.84±0.64 arbitrary units, respectively (p < 0.001). A small amount of cigarette smoke (five to 10 cigarettes per day) causes considerable oxidative stress. There were significant correlations between number of cigarettes consumed and oxidant status and OSI levels. Passive smoke is a potent oxidant in preschool children. Its deleterious effects are not limited just to heavy passive smoking, but also occur with exposure to small amounts of smoke.

  6. Oxidative stress in myelin sheath: The other face of the extramitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation ability.

    PubMed

    Ravera, S; Bartolucci, M; Cuccarolo, P; Litamè, E; Illarcio, M; Calzia, D; Degan, P; Morelli, A; Panfoli, I

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) is not only the main source of ATP for the cell, but also a major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which lead to oxidative stress. At present, mitochondria are considered the organelles responsible for the OXPHOS, but in the last years we have demonstrated that it can also occur outside the mitochondrion. Myelin sheath is able to conduct an aerobic metabolism, producing ATP that we have hypothesized is transferred to the axon, to support its energetic demand. In this work, spectrophotometric, cytofluorimetric, and luminometric analyses were employed to investigate the oxidative stress production in isolated myelin, as far as its respiratory activity is concerned. We have evaluated the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), markers of lipid peroxidation, as well as of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), marker of ROS production. To assess the presence of endogenous antioxidant systems, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activities were assayed. The effect of certain uncoupling or antioxidant molecules on oxidative stress in myelin was also investigated. We report that isolated myelin produces high levels of MDA, 4-HNE, and H2O2, likely through the pathway composed by Complex I-III-IV, but it also contains active superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, as antioxidant defense. Uncoupling compounds or Complex I inhibitors increase oxidative stress, while antioxidant compounds limit ROS generation. Data may shed new light on the role of myelin sheath in physiology and pathology. In particular, it can be presumed that the axonal degeneration associated with myelin loss in demyelinating diseases is related to oxidative stress caused by impaired OXPHOS.

  7. Antidepressant Flavonoids and Their Relationship with Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Hritcu, Lucian; Ionita, Radu; Postu, Paula Alexandra; Gupta, Girish Kumar; Turkez, Hasan; Lima, Tamires Cardoso; Carvalho, Caroline Uchôa Souza

    2017-01-01

    Depression is a serious disorder that affects hundreds of millions of people around the world and causes poor quality of life, problem behaviors, and limitations in activities of daily living. Therefore, the search for new therapeutic options is of high interest and growth. Research on the relationship between depression and oxidative stress has shown important biochemical aspects in the development of this disease. Flavonoids are a class of natural products that exhibit several pharmacological properties, including antidepressant-like activity, and affects various physiological and biochemical functions in the body. Studies show the clinical potential of antioxidant flavonoids in treating depressive disorders and strongly suggest that these natural products are interesting prototype compounds in the study of new antidepressant drugs. So, this review will summarize the chemical and pharmacological perspectives related to the discovery of flavonoids with antidepressant activity. The mechanisms of action of these compounds are also discussed, including their actions on oxidative stress relating to depression. PMID:29410733

  8. Parkin and PINK1 functions in oxidative stress and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Barodia, Sandeep K; Creed, Rose B; Goldberg, Matthew S

    2017-07-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the genes encoding Parkin and PINK1 are causally linked to autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease (PD). Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, and PINK1, a mitochondrial-targeted kinase, function together in a common pathway to remove dysfunctional mitochondria by autophagy. Presumably, deficiency for Parkin or PINK1 impairs mitochondrial autophagy and thereby increases oxidative stress due to the accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria that release reactive oxygen species. Parkin and PINK1 likely have additional functions that may be relevant to the mechanisms by which mutations in these genes cause neurodegeneration, such as regulating inflammation, apoptosis, or dendritic morphogenesis. Here we briefly review what is known about functions of Parkin and PINK1 related to oxidative stress and neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The Role of Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Cardiovascular Aging

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Junzhen; Xia, Shijin; Kalionis, Bill; Sun, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Age is an independent risk factor of cardiovascular disease, even in the absence of other traditional factors. Emerging evidence in experimental animal and human models has emphasized a central role for two main mechanisms of age-related cardiovascular disease: oxidative stress and inflammation. Excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) and superoxide generated by oxidative stress and low-grade inflammation accompanying aging recapitulate age-related cardiovascular dysfunction, that is, left ventricular hypertrophy, fibrosis, and diastolic dysfunction in the heart as well as endothelial dysfunction, reduced vascular elasticity, and increased vascular stiffness. We describe the signaling involved in these two main mechanisms that include the factors NF-κB, JunD, p66Shc, and Nrf2. Potential therapeutic strategies to improve the cardiovascular function with aging are discussed, with a focus on calorie restriction, SIRT1, and resveratrol. PMID:25143940

  10. Oxidative stress and antioxidants in athletes undertaking regular exercise training.

    PubMed

    Watson, Trent A; MacDonald-Wicks, Lesley K; Garg, Manohar L

    2005-04-01

    Exercise has been shown to increase the production of reactive oxygen species to a point that can exceed antioxidant defenses to cause oxidative stress. Dietary intake of antioxidants, physical activity levels, various antioxidants and oxidative stress markers were examined in 20 exercise-trained "athletes" and 20 age- and sex-matched sedentary "controls." Plasma F2-isoprostanes, antioxidant enzyme activities, and uric acid levels were similar in athletes and sedentary controls. Plasma alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene were higher in athletes compared with sedentary controls. Total antioxidant capacity tended to be lower in athletes, with a significant difference between male athletes and male controls. Dietary intakes of antioxidants were also similar between groups and well above recommended dietary intakes for Australians. These findings suggest that athletes who consume a diet rich in antioxidants have elevated plasma alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene that were likely to be brought about by adaptive processes resulting from regular exercise.

  11. Allelochemical Stress Can Trigger Oxidative Damage in Receptor Plants

    PubMed Central

    Lara-Núñez, Aurora; Anaya, Ana Luisa

    2007-01-01

    Plants can interact with other plants through the release of chemical compounds or allelochemicals. These compounds released by donor plants influence germination, growth, development, and establishment of receptor plants; having an important role on the pattern of vegetation, i.e as invasive strategy, and on crop productivity. This phytotoxic or negative effect of the released allelochemicals (allelochemical stress) is caused by modifying or altering diverse metabolic processes, having many molecular targets in the receptor plants. Recently, using an aggressive and allelopathic plant Sicyos deppei as the donor plant, and Lycopersicon esculentum as the receptor plant, we showed that the allelochemicals released by S. deppei caused oxidative damage through an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation or modification of antioxidant enzymes. Based on this study, we proposed that oxidative stress is one of the mechanisms, among others, by which an allelopathic plant causes phytotoxicity to other plants. PMID:19704677

  12. Oxidative Stress, Unfolded Protein Response, and Apoptosis in Developmental Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kupsco, Allison; Schlenk, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Physiological development requires precise spatiotemporal regulation of cellular and molecular processes. Disruption of these key events can generate developmental toxicity in the form of teratogenesis or mortality. The mechanism behind many developmental toxicants remains unknown. While recent work has focused on the unfolded protein response (UPR), oxidative stress, and apoptosis in the pathogenesis of disease, few studies have addressed their relationship in developmental toxicity. Redox regulation, UPR, and apoptosis are essential for physiological development and can be disturbed by a variety of endogenous and exogenous toxicants to generate lethality and diverse malformations. This review examines the current knowledge of the role of oxidative stress, UPR, and apoptosis in physiological development as well as in developmental toxicity, focusing on studies and advances in vertebrates model systems. PMID:26008783

  13. [Oxidative stress and antioxitant therapy of chronic periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Shen, Y X; Guo, S J; Wu, Y F

    2016-07-01

    Chronic periodontitis is a progressive, infectious inflammation disease, caused by the dysbiosis of oral resident flora, leading to the destruction of periodontium. The onset of pathogenic microorganisms is the etiological factor of periodontitis, while the immuno-inflammatory response affects the progression of the disease. Under chronic periodontitis, oxidative stress occurs when excessive reactive oxygen species are produced and exceed the compensative capacity of the organism. Oxidative stress leads to the destruction of periodontium, in a direct way(damaging the biomolecule) or an indirect way(enhancing the produce of inflammatory cytokine and destructive enzymes). Therefore, as the antagonist of the reactive oxygen species, antioxidants may be helpful to treat the chronic periodontitis. This paper reviewed relevant literatures about the destructive role of excessive reactive oxygen species and protective role of antioxidants in chronic periodontitis.

  14. Oxidative Stress and Programmed Cell Death in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Farrugia, Gianluca; Balzan, Rena

    2012-01-01

    Yeasts, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, have long served as useful models for the study of oxidative stress, an event associated with cell death and severe human pathologies. This review will discuss oxidative stress in yeast, in terms of sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS), their molecular targets, and the metabolic responses elicited by cellular ROS accumulation. Responses of yeast to accumulated ROS include upregulation of antioxidants mediated by complex transcriptional changes, activation of pro-survival pathways such as mitophagy, and programmed cell death (PCD) which, apart from apoptosis, includes pathways such as autophagy and necrosis, a form of cell death long considered accidental and uncoordinated. The role of ROS in yeast aging will also be discussed. PMID:22737670

  15. Nivalenol induces oxidative stress and increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidant effect in intestinal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Del Regno, Marisanta; Adesso, Simona; Popolo, Ada

    Mycotoxins are secondary fungal metabolites often found as contaminants in almost all agricultural commodities worldwide, and the consumption of food or feed contaminated by mycotoxins represents a major risk for human and animal health. Reactive oxygen species are normal products of cellular metabolism. However, disproportionate generation of reactive oxygen species poses a serious problem to bodily homeostasis and causes oxidative tissue damage. In this study we analyzed the effect of two trichothecenes mycotoxins: nivalenol and deoxynivalenol, alone and in combination, on oxidative stress in the non-tumorigenic intestinal epithelial cell line IEC-6. Our results indicate the pro-oxidant nivalenol effect in IEC-6,more » the stronger pro-oxidant effect of nivalenol when compared to deoxynivalenol and, interestingly, that nivalenol increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidative effects. Mechanistic studies indicate that the observed effects were mediated by NADPH oxidase, calcium homeostasis alteration, NF-kB and Nrf2 pathways activation and by iNOS and nitrotyrosine formation. The toxicological interaction by nivalenol and deoxynivalenol reported in this study in IEC-6, points out the importance of the toxic effect of these mycotoxins, mostly in combination, further highlighting the risk assessment process of these toxins that are of growing concern. - Highlights: • Nivalenol induces oxidative stress in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). • Nivalenol increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidant effects in IECs. • Nivalenol and deoxynivalenol trigger antioxidant response IECs. • These results indicate the importance of mycotoxins co-contamination.« less

  16. Sea buckthorn seed oil protects against the oxidative stress produced by thermally oxidized lipids.

    PubMed

    Zeb, Alam; Ullah, Sana

    2015-11-01

    Thermally oxidized vegetable ghee was fed to the rabbits for 14 days with specific doses of sea buckthorn seed oil (SO). The ghee and SO were characterized for quality parameters and fatty acid composition using GC-MS. Rabbits serum lipid profile, hematology and histology were investigated. Major fatty acids were palmitic acid (44%) and oleic acid (46%) in ghee, while SO contains oleic acid (56.4%) and linoleic acid (18.7%). Results showed that oxidized vegetable ghee increases the serum total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterols, triglycerides and decrease the serum glucose. Oxidized ghee produced toxic effects in the liver and hematological parameters. Sea buckthorn oil supplementation significantly lowered the serum LDL-cholesterols, triglycerides and increased serum glucose and body weight of the animals. Sea buckthorn oil was found to reduce the toxic effects and degenerative changes in the liver and thus provides protection against the thermally oxidized lipids induced oxidative stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Anti-oxidative effects of curcumin on immobilization-induced oxidative stress in rat brain, liver and kidney.

    PubMed

    Samarghandian, Saeed; Azimi-Nezhad, Mohsen; Farkhondeh, Tahereh; Samini, Fariborz

    2017-03-01

    Restraint stress has been indicated to induce oxidative damage in tissues. Several investigations have reported that curcumin (CUR) may have a protective effect against oxidative stress. The present study was designed to investigate the protective effects of CUR on restraint stress induced oxidative stress damage in the brain, liver and kidneys. For chronic restraint stress, rats were kept in the restrainers for 1h every day, for 21 consecutive days. The animals received systemic administrations of CUR daily for 21days. In order to evaluate the changes of the oxidative stress parameters following restraint stress, the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), as well as antioxidant enzyme activities superoxide dismutase (SOD) glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR) and catalase (CAT) were measured in the brain, liver and kidney of rats after the end of restraint stress. The restraint stress significantly increased MDA level, but decreased the level of GSH and activists of SOD, GPx, GR, and CAT the brain, liver and kidney of rats in comparison to the normal rats (P<0.001). Intraperitoneal administration of CUR significantly attenuated oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation, prevented apoptosis, and increased antioxidant defense mechanism activity in the tissues versus the control group (P<0.05). This study shows that CUR can prevent restraint stress-induced oxidative damage in the brain, liver and kidney of rats and propose that CUR may be useful agents against oxidative stress in the tissues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Oxidative stress and plasma lipoproteins in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Maia, Fernanda Maria Machado; Santos, Emanuelly Barbosa; Reis, Germana Elias

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the relation between oxidative stress and lipid profile in patients with different types of cancer. Methods This was an observational cross-sectional. A total of 58 subjects were evaluated, 33 males, divided into two groups of 29 patients each: Group 1, patients with cancer of the digestive tract and accessory organs; Group 2 patients with other types of cancers, all admitted to a public hospital. The plasma levels (lipoproteins and total cholesterol, HDL, and triglycerides, for example) were analyzed by enzymatic kits, and oxidative stress based on thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, by assessing the formation of malondialdehyde. Results In general the levels of malondialdehyde of patients were high (5.00μM) as compared to 3.31μM for healthy individuals. The median values of lipids exhibited normal triacylglycerol (138.78±89.88mg/dL), desirable total cholesterol values (163.04±172.38mg/dL), borderline high LDL (151.30±178.25mg/dL) and low HDL (31.70±22.74mg/dL). Median HDL levels in Group 1 were lower (31.32mg/dL) than the cancer patients in Group 2 (43.67mg/dL) (p=0.038). Group 1 also showed higher levels of oxidative stress (p=0.027). Conclusion The lipid profile of patients with cancer was not favorable, which seems to have contributed to higher lipid peroxidation rate, generating a significant oxidative stress. PMID:25628201

  19. Oxidative stress status in congenital hypogonadism: an appraisal.

    PubMed

    Haymana, C; Aydoğdu, A; Soykut, B; Erdem, O; Ibrahimov, T; Dinc, M; Meric, C; Basaran, Y; Sonmez, A; Azal, O

    2017-07-01

    Patients with hypogonadism are at increased risk of cardiac and metabolic diseases. However, the pathogenesis of increased cardiometabolic risk in patients with hypogonadism is not clear. Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiometabolic diseases. This study aimed to investigate possible differences in oxidative stress conditions between patients with hypogonadism and healthy controls. In this study, 38 male patients with congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) (mean age: 21.7 ± 1.6 years) and 44 healthy male controls (mean age: 22.3 ± 1.4 years) with almost equal body mass index were enrolled. The demographic parameters, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), total and free testosterone, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and oxidative stress parameters, such as superoxide dismutase, catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and malondialdehyde (MDA), were compared between both groups. Compared to the healthy controls, triglycerides (p = .02), insulin levels, HOMA-IR values, CAT activities and MDA levels (p < .001 for all) were significantly higher and HDL cholesterol (p = .04), total and free testosterone, FSH, LH levels and GPx activity were significantly lower (p < .001 for all) in patients with CHH. There were significant correlations between total testosterone levels and CAT activity (r = -.33 p = .01), GPx activity (r = .36 p = .007) and MDA (r = -.47 p < .001) levels. The results of this study showed that young and treatment-naïve patients with congenital hypogonadism had an increased status of oxidative stress.

  20. Oxidative stress and kidney injury in trans-radial catheterization.

    PubMed

    Tsarouhas, Konstantinos; Tsitsimpikou, Christina; Papantoni, Xrisoula; Lazaridou, Dimitra; Koutouzis, Michael; Mazzaris, Savvas; Rezaee, Ramin; Mamoulakis, Charalambos; Georgoulias, Panagiotis; Nepka, Charitini; Rentoukas, Elias; Kyriakides, Zenon; Tsatsakis, Aristidis; Spandidos, Demetrios A; Kouretas, Demetrios

    2018-05-01

    Oxidative stress is linked to coronary artery disease and is a major mechanism in contrast-induced nephropathy. Trans-radial approach in coronary angiography (CA) with minimized peri-procedural bleeding is expected to reduce acute kidney injury incidence. In the present study, oxidative stress patterns observed in radial CA and their associations with early manifestations of kidney injury are described. A total of 20 stable coronary disease patients submitted to CA and 17 sex-matched patients undergoing computed tomography for myoskeletal reasons were enrolled. Reduced glutathione, catalase, thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) levels and total anti-oxidant status were measured at various time points postangiography. In ischemic patients baseline TBARS levels were 2-fold lower compared to controls, while carbonyls levels were 35% higher. Glutathione was almost 4-fold lower than the control group. Glutathione and lipid peroxidation in ischemic patients gradually increased after contrast medium administration and reached 180% (P<0.001) and 20% (P=0.021) after 4-6 h, respectively. Four patients presented early evidence of contrast-induced nephropathy postangiography, while no control patient developed acute kidney injury. In the multiple logistic regression analysis, only the creatinine levels at baseline influenced the frequency of early contrast-induced nephropathy development (β =0.36, 95% CI: 0.285-0.438, P=0.01). Glutathione low levels were dominant in the baseline values of ischemic patients who developed contrast-induced nephropathy. Glutathione levels rapidly increased while protein oxidation decreased at the expense of lipid peroxidation. In conclusion, early oxidative stress changes occur in trans-radial CA patients with a mild profile, sufficient to mobilize patient antioxidant defenses.

  1. Oxidative stress triggers cytokinesis failure in hepatocytes upon isolation.

    PubMed

    Tormos, A M; Taléns-Visconti, R; Bonora-Centelles, A; Pérez, S; Sastre, J

    2015-01-01

    Primary hepatocytes are highly differentiated cells and proliferatively quiescent. However, the stress produced during liver digestion seems to activate cell cycle entry by proliferative/dedifferentiation programs that still remain unclear. The aim of this work was to assess whether the oxidative stress associated with hepatocyte isolation affects cell cycle and particularly cytokinesis, the final step of mitosis. Hepatocytes were isolated from C57BL/6 mice by collagenase perfusion in the absence and presence of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). Polyploidy, cell cycle, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were studied by flow cytometry (DNA, phospho-histone 3, and CellROX(®) Deep Red) and Western blotting (cyclins B1 and D1, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen). mRNA expression of cyclins A1, B1, B2, D1, and F by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR was also assessed. Glutathione levels were measured by mass spectrometry. Here we show that hepatocyte isolation enhanced cell cycle entry, increased hepatocyte binucleation, and caused marked glutathione oxidation. Addition of 5 mM NAC to the hepatocyte isolation media prevented glutathione depletion, partially blocked ROS production and cell cycle entry of hepatocytes, and avoided the blockade of mitosis progression, abrogating defective cytokinesis and diminishing the formation of binucleated hepatocytes during isolation. Therefore, addition of NAC to the isolation media decreased the generation of polyploid hepatocytes confirming that oxidative stress occurs during hepatocyte isolation and it is responsible, at least in part, for cytokinesis failure and hepatocyte binucleation.

  2. Dimethyl sulfoxide induces oxidative stress in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sadowska-Bartosz, Izabela; Pączka, Aleksandra; Mołoń, Mateusz; Bartosz, Grzegorz

    2013-12-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is used as a cryoprotectant for the preservation of cells, including yeast, and as a solvent for chemical compounds. We report that DMSO induces oxidative stress in the yeast. Saccharomyces cerevisiae wt strain EG-103 and its mutants Δsod1, Δsod2, and Δsod1 Δsod2 were used. Yeast were subjected to the action of 1-14% DMSO for 1 h at 28 °C. DMSO induced a concentration-dependent inhibition of yeast growth, the effect being more pronounced for mutants devoid of SOD (especially Δsod1 Δsod2). Cell viability was compromised. DMSO-concentration-dependent activity loss of succinate dehydrogenase, a FeS enzyme sensitive to oxidative stress, was observed. DMSO enhanced formation of reactive oxygen species, estimated with dihydroethidine in a concentration-dependent manner, the effect being again more pronounced in mutants devoid of superoxide dismutases. The content of cellular glutathione was increased with increasing DMSO concentrations, which may represent a compensatory response. Membrane fluidity, estimated by fluorescence polarization of DPH, was decreased by DMSO. These results demonstrate that DMSO, although generally considered to be antioxidant, induces oxidative stress in yeast cells. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Blue light-induced oxidative stress in live skin.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yuya; Ohta, Shigeo; Wolf, Alexander M

    2017-07-01

    Skin damage from exposure to sunlight induces aging-like changes in appearance and is attributed to the ultraviolet (UV) component of light. Photosensitized production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by UVA light is widely accepted to contribute to skin damage and carcinogenesis, but visible light is thought not to do so. Using mice expressing redox-sensitive GFP to detect ROS, blue light could produce oxidative stress in live skin. Blue light induced oxidative stress preferentially in mitochondria, but green, red, far red or infrared light did not. Blue light-induced oxidative stress was also detected in cultured human keratinocytes, but the per photon efficacy was only 25% of UVA in human keratinocyte mitochondria, compared to 68% of UVA in mouse skin. Skin autofluorescence was reduced by blue light, suggesting flavins are the photosensitizer. Exposing human skin to the blue light contained in sunlight depressed flavin autofluorescence, demonstrating that the visible component of sunlight has a physiologically significant effect on human skin. The ROS produced by blue light is probably superoxide, but not singlet oxygen. These results suggest that blue light contributes to skin aging similar to UVA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. New findings of oxidative stress biomarkers in nutritional research.

    PubMed

    Kochlik, Bastian; Grune, Tilman; Weber, Daniela

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this article is to present a brief overview of recently published articles assessing oxidative stress markers in nutritional studies. Intervention and observational studies were carried out in both, healthy subjects and patients and describe the association of foodstuffs as well as isolated nutrients with biomarkers of oxidative stress. The results from human intervention studies on healthy participants and patients are controversial. Long-term interventions (>8 weeks) seem to be more effective than short-term or single-dose interventions. Results are difficult to compare because not only the methods used, also the assessed biomarkers and outcomes were very diverse. In addition, studies vary in the compounds and doses used, duration, participants and so on. Different biomarkers (damaged molecules together with antioxidants from different compartments) should be assessed to evaluate the true 'redox-status' of an individual and the impact of a nutritional intervention. Both observational and interventional studies performed in healthy participants and patients show possible beneficial effects of nutrients and foodstuffs by improving oxidative stress markers and antioxidant enzyme activities. Biomarkers should be standardized to allow better comparison of results of antioxidant intervention studies.

  5. Reduction of oxidative stress by compression stockings in standing workers.

    PubMed

    Flore, Roberto; Gerardino, Laura; Santoliquido, Angelo; Catananti, Cesare; Pola, Paolo; Tondi, Paolo

    2007-08-01

    Healthy workers who stand for prolonged periods show enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in their systemic circulation. Oxidative stress is thought to be a risk factor for chronic venous insufficiency and other systemic diseases. To evaluate the effectiveness of compression stockings in the prevention of oxidative stress at work. ROS and venous pressure of the lower limbs were measured in 55 theatre nurses who stood in the operating theatre for >6 h, 23 industrial ironers who stood for up to 5 h during their shift and 65 outpatient department nurses and 35 laundry workers who acted as controls. Subjects and controls were examined on two consecutive days before and after work and with and without compression stockings. Without compression stockings, lower limb venous pressure increased significantly after work in all subjects and controls (P < 0.001), while only operating theatre nurses showed significantly higher mean levels of ROS (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference in venous pressures and ROS levels after work in subjects or controls when wearing compression stockings. Our data suggest a preventive role of compression stockings against oxidative stress in healthy workers with a standing occupation.

  6. p53 as a retrovirus-induced oxidative stress modulator.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Jin; Wong, Paul K Y

    2015-01-01

    Infection of astrocytes by the neuropathogenic mutant of Moloney murine leukemia virus, ts1, exhibits increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and signs of oxidative stress compared with uninfected astrocytes. Previously, we have demonstrated that ts1 infection caused two separate events of ROS upregulation. The first upregulation occurs during early viral establishment in host cells and the second during the virus-mediated apoptotic process. In this study, we show that virus-mediated ROS upregulation activates the protein kinase, ataxia telangiectasia mutated, which in turn phosphorylates serine 15 on p53. This activation of p53 however, is unlikely associated with ts1-induced cell death. Rather p53 appears to be involved in suppressing intracellular ROS levels in astrocytes under oxidative stress. The activated p53 appears to delay retroviral gene expression by suppressing NADPH oxidase, a superoxide-producing enzyme. These results suggest that p53 plays a role as a retrovirus-mediated oxidative stress modulator. © 2015 The Authors.

  7. Evaluation of oxidative stress in mice subjected to aerobic exercise.

    PubMed

    Lima, Mônica Cruvinel de; Marks, Guido; Silva, Iandara Schettert; Silva, Baldomero Antonio Kato da; Cônsolo, Lourdes Zélia Zanoni; Nogueira, Gabriel Bogalho

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate the influence of aerobic exercise on oxidative stress in mice. The study included twenty female mice Mus musculus-Swiss divided into two groups: sedentary control (GA) and exercise (GB), each containing ten animals. All animals underwent an adaptation period of seven days isolated in individual boxes. After this period, the animals in the exercise group (GB) were trained in angled running wheel with circumference of 25 cm assembled on an articulated axle during five minutes for three consecutive days. On the fourth day, they underwent an exercise program of one session lasting 45 minutes. The evaluation of oxidative stress was performed by determining the levels of malondialhyde derived of lipid peroxidation by the TBA method. The samples were read in a spectrophotometer at 535 nm. No significant difference was observed in the intergroup comparison of MDA levels in the tissues evaluated. A significant difference was observed in the intragroup comparison of MDA levels in the control group (p = 0.0201).The Tukeys' post hoc test indicated significantly lower values of MDA in the smooth muscle in relation to plasma. In the analysis of variance in the exercise group, a significant difference between tissues (p = 0.0009), with significantly lower values in the smooth muscle in relation to plasma (p<0.001) and higher in striated muscle in relation to smooth muscle (p<0.05) was observed. There was no change in the analysis of oxidative stress in mice which were undergone a single session of aerobic exercise.

  8. Autophagy and Oxidative Stress in Gliomas with IDH1 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Misty R.; Liu, Yinxing; Neltner, Janna; Pu, Hong; Morris, Andrew; Sunkara, Manjula; Pittman, Thomas; Kyprianou, Natasha; Horbinski, Craig

    2013-01-01

    IDH1 mutations in gliomas associate with longer survival. Prooxidant and antiproliferative effects of IDH1 mutations and its D-2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG) product have been described in vitro, but inconsistently observed. It is also unclear whether overexpression of mutant IDH1 in wild-type cells accurately phenocopies the effects of endogenous IDH1-mutations on tumor apoptosis and autophagy. Herein we investigated the effects of 2-HG and mutant IDH1 overexpression on proliferation, apoptosis, oxidative stress, and autophagy in IDH1 wild-type glioma cells, and compared those results with patient-derived tumors. 2-HG reduced viability and proliferation of U87MG and LN18 cells, triggered apoptosis in LN18 cells, and autophagy in U87MG cells. In vitro studies and flank xenografts of U87MG cells overexpressing R132H IDH1 exhibited increased oxidative stress, including increases of both manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and p62. Patient-derived IDH1-mutant tumors showed no significant differences in apoptosis or autophagy, but showed p62 accumulation and actually trended toward reduced MnSOD expression. These data indicate that mutant IDH1 and 2-HG can induce oxidative stress, autophagy, and apoptosis, but these effects vary greatly according to cell type. PMID:24150401

  9. High Glucose Inhibits Neural Stem Cell Differentiation Through Oxidative Stress and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Shen, Wei-Bin; Yang, Penghua; Dong, Daoyin; Sun, Winny; Yang, Peixin

    2018-06-01

    Maternal diabetes induces neural tube defects by suppressing neurogenesis in the developing neuroepithelium. Our recent study further revealed that high glucose inhibited embryonic stem cell differentiation into neural lineage cells. However, the mechanism whereby high glucose suppresses neural differentiation is unclear. To investigate whether high glucose-induced oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress lead to the inhibition of neural differentiation, the effect of high glucose on neural stem cell (the C17.2 cell line) differentiation was examined. Neural stem cells were cultured in normal glucose (5 mM) or high glucose (25 mM) differentiation medium for 3, 5, and 7 days. High glucose suppressed neural stem cell differentiation by significantly decreasing the expression of the neuron marker Tuj1 and the glial cell marker GFAP and the numbers of Tuj1 + and GFAP + cells. The antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase mimetic Tempol reversed high glucose-decreased Tuj1 and GFAP expression and restored the numbers of neurons and glial cells differentiated from neural stem cells. Hydrogen peroxide treatment imitated the inhibitory effect of high glucose on neural stem cell differentiation. Both high glucose and hydrogen peroxide triggered ER stress, whereas Tempol blocked high glucose-induced ER stress. The ER stress inhibitor, 4-phenylbutyrate, abolished the inhibition of high glucose or hydrogen peroxide on neural stem cell differentiation. Thus, oxidative stress and its resultant ER stress mediate the inhibitory effect of high glucose on neural stem cell differentiation.

  10. Modeling Oxidation Induced Stresses in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, B. L.; Freborg, A. M.; Petrus, G. J.; Brindley, William J.

    1998-01-01

    The use of thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) in gas turbines has increased dramatically in recent years, due mainly to the need for component protection from ever increasing service temperatures. Oxidation of the bond coat has been identified as an important contributing factor to spallation of the ceramic top coat during service. Additional variables found to influence TBC thermal cycle life include bond coat coefficient of thermal expansion, creep behavior of both the ceramic and bond coat layers, and modulus of elasticity. The purpose of this work was to characterize the effects of oxidation on the stress states within the TBC system, as well as to examine the interaction of oxidation with other factors affecting TBC life.

  11. Oxidative Stress and Maxi Calcium-Activated Potassium (BK) Channels

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Anton; Sitdikova, Guzel F.; Weiger, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    All cells contain ion channels in their outer (plasma) and inner (organelle) membranes. Ion channels, similar to other proteins, are targets of oxidative impact, which modulates ion fluxes across membranes. Subsequently, these ion currents affect electrical excitability, such as action potential discharge (in neurons, muscle, and receptor cells), alteration of the membrane resting potential, synaptic transmission, hormone secretion, muscle contraction or coordination of the cell cycle. In this chapter we summarize effects of oxidative stress and redox mechanisms on some ion channels, in particular on maxi calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels which play an outstanding role in a plethora of physiological and pathophysiological functions in almost all cells and tissues. We first elaborate on some general features of ion channel structure and function and then summarize effects of oxidative alterations of ion channels and their functional consequences. PMID:26287261

  12. Oxidative Stress and the Homeodynamics of Iron Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Bresgen, Nikolaus; Eckl, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Iron and oxygen share a delicate partnership since both are indispensable for survival, but if the partnership becomes inadequate, this may rapidly terminate life. Virtually all cell components are directly or indirectly affected by cellular iron metabolism, which represents a complex, redox-based machinery that is controlled by, and essential to, metabolic requirements. Under conditions of increased oxidative stress—i.e., enhanced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS)—however, this machinery may turn into a potential threat, the continued requirement for iron promoting adverse reactions such as the iron/H2O2-based formation of hydroxyl radicals, which exacerbate the initial pro-oxidant condition. This review will discuss the multifaceted homeodynamics of cellular iron management under normal conditions as well as in the context of oxidative stress. PMID:25970586

  13. Nanoparticle Inhalation Increases Microvascular Oxidative Stress and Compromises Nitric Oxide Bioavailability

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have shown that pulmonary nanoparticle exposure impairs endothelium dependent dilation in systemic arterioles. However, the mechanism(s) through which this effect occurs are unclear. The purpose of this study was to identify alterations in the production of oxidative stress an...

  14. The effect of reagents mimicking oxidative stress on fibrinogen function.

    PubMed

    Štikarová, Jana; Kotlín, Roman; Riedel, Tomáš; Suttnar, Jiří; Pimková, Kristýna; Chrastinová, Leona; Dyr, Jan E

    2013-01-01

    Fibrinogen is one of the plasma proteins most susceptible to oxidative modification. It has been suggested that modification of fibrinogen may cause thrombotic/bleeding complications associated with many pathophysiological states of organism. We exposed fibrinogen molecules to three different modification reagents-malondialdehyde, sodium hypochlorite, and peroxynitrite-that are presented to various degrees in different stages of oxidative stress. We studied the changes in fibrin network formation and platelet interactions with modified fibrinogens under flow conditions. The fastest modification of fibrinogen was caused by hypochlorite. Fibers from fibrinogen modified with either reagent were thinner in comparison with control fibers. We found that platelet dynamic adhesion was significantly lower on fibrinogen modified with malondialdehyde and significantly higher on fibrinogen modified either with hypochlorite or peroxynitrite reflecting different prothrombotic/antithrombotic properties of oxidatively modified fibrinogens. It seems that, in the complex reactions ongoing in living organisms at conditions of oxidation stress, hypochlorite modifies proteins (e.g., fibrinogen) faster and more preferentially than malondialdehyde. It suggests that the prothrombotic effects of prior fibrinogen modifications may outweigh the antithrombotic effect of malondialdehyde-modified fibrinogen in real living systems.

  15. The Effect of Reagents Mimicking Oxidative Stress on Fibrinogen Function

    PubMed Central

    Štikarová, Jana; Kotlín, Roman; Riedel, Tomáš; Suttnar, Jiří; Pimková, Kristýna; Chrastinová, Leona; Dyr, Jan E.

    2013-01-01

    Fibrinogen is one of the plasma proteins most susceptible to oxidative modification. It has been suggested that modification of fibrinogen may cause thrombotic/bleeding complications associated with many pathophysiological states of organism. We exposed fibrinogen molecules to three different modification reagents—malondialdehyde, sodium hypochlorite, and peroxynitrite—that are presented to various degrees in different stages of oxidative stress. We studied the changes in fibrin network formation and platelet interactions with modified fibrinogens under flow conditions. The fastest modification of fibrinogen was caused by hypochlorite. Fibers from fibrinogen modified with either reagent were thinner in comparison with control fibers. We found that platelet dynamic adhesion was significantly lower on fibrinogen modified with malondialdehyde and significantly higher on fibrinogen modified either with hypochlorite or peroxynitrite reflecting different prothrombotic/antithrombotic properties of oxidatively modified fibrinogens. It seems that, in the complex reactions ongoing in living organisms at conditions of oxidation stress, hypochlorite modifies proteins (e.g., fibrinogen) faster and more preferentially than malondialdehyde. It suggests that the prothrombotic effects of prior fibrinogen modifications may outweigh the antithrombotic effect of malondialdehyde-modified fibrinogen in real living systems. PMID:24235886

  16. In situ stress observation in oxide films and how tensile stress influences oxygen ion conduction

    PubMed Central

    Fluri, Aline; Pergolesi, Daniele; Roddatis, Vladimir; Wokaun, Alexander; Lippert, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Many properties of materials can be changed by varying the interatomic distances in the crystal lattice by applying stress. Ideal model systems for investigations are heteroepitaxial thin films where lattice distortions can be induced by the crystallographic mismatch with the substrate. Here we describe an in situ simultaneous diagnostic of growth mode and stress during pulsed laser deposition of oxide thin films. The stress state and evolution up to the relaxation onset are monitored during the growth of oxygen ion conducting Ce0.85Sm0.15O2-δ thin films via optical wafer curvature measurements. Increasing tensile stress lowers the activation energy for charge transport and a thorough characterization of stress and morphology allows quantifying this effect using samples with the conductive properties of single crystals. The combined in situ application of optical deflectometry and electron diffraction provides an invaluable tool for strain engineering in Materials Science to fabricate novel devices with intriguing functionalities. PMID:26912416

  17. A potential biomarker for fatigue: Oxidative stress and anti-oxidative activity.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Sanae; Nojima, Junzo; Motoki, Yukari; Yamaguti, Kouzi; Nakatomi, Yasuhito; Okawa, Naoko; Fujiwara, Kazumi; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Kuratsune, Hirohiko

    2016-07-01

    We sought to determine whether oxidative stress and anti-oxidative activity could act as biomarkers that discriminate patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) from healthy volunteers at acute and sub-acute fatigue and resting conditions. We calculated the oxidative stress index (OSI) from reactive oxygen metabolites-derived compounds (d-ROMs) and the biological antioxidant potential (BAP). We determined changes in d-ROMs, BAP, and OSI in acute and sub-acute fatigue in two healthy groups, and compared their values at rest between patients with CFS (diagnosed by Fukuda 1994 criteria) and another group of healthy controls. Following acute fatigue in healthy controls, d-ROMs and OSI increased, and BAP decreased. Although d-ROMs and OSI were significantly higher after sub-acute fatigue, BAP did not decrease. Resting condition yielded higher d-ROMs, higher OSI, and lower BAP in patients with CFS than in healthy volunteers, but lower d-ROMs and OSI when compared with sub-acute controls. BAP values did not significantly differ between patients with CFS and controls in the sub-acute condition. However, values were significantly higher than in the resting condition for controls. Thus, measured of oxidative stress (d-ROMS) and anti-oxidative activity (BAP) might be useful for discriminating acute, sub-acute, and resting fatigue in healthy people from patients with CFS, or for evaluating fatigue levels in healthy people. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Nitric Oxide Regulates Protein Methylation during Stress Responses in Plants.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiliang; Yang, Huanjie; Mu, Jinye; Lu, Tiancong; Peng, Juli; Deng, Xian; Kong, Zhaosheng; Bao, Shilai; Cao, Xiaofeng; Zuo, Jianru

    2017-08-17

    Methylation and nitric oxide (NO)-based S-nitrosylation are highly conserved protein posttranslational modifications that regulate diverse biological processes. In higher eukaryotes, PRMT5 catalyzes Arg symmetric dimethylation, including key components of the spliceosome. The Arabidopsis prmt5 mutant shows severe developmental defects and impaired stress responses. However, little is known about the mechanisms regulating the PRMT5 activity. Here, we report that NO positively regulates the PRMT5 activity through S-nitrosylation at Cys-125 during stress responses. In prmt5-1 plants, a PRMT5 C125S transgene, carrying a non-nitrosylatable mutation at Cys-125, fully rescues the developmental defects, but not the stress hypersensitive phenotype and the responsiveness to NO during stress responses. Moreover, the salt-induced Arg symmetric dimethylation is abolished in PRMT5 C125S /prmt5-1 plants, correlated to aberrant splicing of pre-mRNA derived from a stress-related gene. These findings define a mechanism by which plants transduce stress-triggered NO signal to protein methylation machinery through S-nitrosylation of PRMT5 in response to environmental alterations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Oxidative stress, activity behaviour and body mass in captive parrots

    PubMed Central

    Larcombe, S D; Tregaskes, C A; Coffey, J; Stevenson, A E; Alexander, L G

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Many parrot species are kept in captivity for conservation, but often show poor reproduction, health and survival. These traits are known to be influenced by oxidative stress, the imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ability of antioxidant defences to ameliorate ROS damage. In humans, oxidative stress is linked with obesity, lack of exercise and poor nutrition, all of which are common in captive animals. Here, we tested whether small parrots (budgerigars, Melopsittacus undulatus) maintained in typical pet cages and on ad libitum food varied in oxidative profile, behaviour and body mass. Importantly, as with many birds held in captivity, they did not have enough space to engage in extensive free flight. Four types of oxidative damage, single-stranded DNA breaks (low-pH comet assay), alkali-labile sites in DNA (high-pH comet assay), sensitivity of DNA to ROS (H2O2-treated comet assay) and malondialdehyde (a byproduct of lipid peroxidation), were uncorrelated with each other and with plasma concentrations of dietary antioxidants. Without strenuous exercise over 28 days in a relatively small cage, more naturally ‘active’ individuals had more single-stranded DNA breaks than sedentary birds. High body mass at the start or end of the experiment, coupled with substantial mass gain, were all associated with raised sensitivity of DNA to ROS. Thus, high body mass in these captive birds was associated with oxidative damage. These birds were not lacking dietary antioxidants, because final body mass was positively related to plasma levels of retinol, zeaxanthin and α-tocopherol. Individuals varied widely in activity levels, feeding behaviour, mass gain and oxidative profile despite standardized living conditions. DNA damage is often associated with poor immunocompetence, low fertility and faster ageing. Thus, we have candidate mechanisms for the limited lifespan and fecundity common to many birds kept for conservation purposes

  20. Oxidative stress, activity behaviour and body mass in captive parrots.

    PubMed

    Larcombe, S D; Tregaskes, C A; Coffey, J; Stevenson, A E; Alexander, L G; Arnold, K E

    2015-01-01

    Many parrot species are kept in captivity for conservation, but often show poor reproduction, health and survival. These traits are known to be influenced by oxidative stress, the imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ability of antioxidant defences to ameliorate ROS damage. In humans, oxidative stress is linked with obesity, lack of exercise and poor nutrition, all of which are common in captive animals. Here, we tested whether small parrots (budgerigars, Melopsittacus undulatus) maintained in typical pet cages and on ad libitum food varied in oxidative profile, behaviour and body mass. Importantly, as with many birds held in captivity, they did not have enough space to engage in extensive free flight. Four types of oxidative damage, single-stranded DNA breaks (low-pH comet assay), alkali-labile sites in DNA (high-pH comet assay), sensitivity of DNA to ROS (H2O2-treated comet assay) and malondialdehyde (a byproduct of lipid peroxidation), were uncorrelated with each other and with plasma concentrations of dietary antioxidants. Without strenuous exercise over 28 days in a relatively small cage, more naturally 'active' individuals had more single-stranded DNA breaks than sedentary birds. High body mass at the start or end of the experiment, coupled with substantial mass gain, were all associated with raised sensitivity of DNA to ROS. Thus, high body mass in these captive birds was associated with oxidative damage. These birds were not lacking dietary antioxidants, because final body mass was positively related to plasma levels of retinol, zeaxanthin and α-tocopherol. Individuals varied widely in activity levels, feeding behaviour, mass gain and oxidative profile despite standardized living conditions. DNA damage is often associated with poor immunocompetence, low fertility and faster ageing. Thus, we have candidate mechanisms for the limited lifespan and fecundity common to many birds kept for conservation purposes.

  1. Artemin protects cells and proteins against oxidative and salt stress.

    PubMed

    Takalloo, Zeinab; Sajedi, Reza H; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Moazzenzade, Taghi

    2017-02-01

    Artemin is an abundant thermostable protein in Artemia encysted embryos under environmental stresses. It is confirmed that high regulatory expression of artemin is relevant to stress resistance in this crustacean. Here, the protective role of artemin from Artemia urmiana has been investigated on survival of bacterial cells under salt and oxidative shocks. Also, for continuous monitoring of the effect of artemin in prevention of proteins aggregation/inactivation, co-expression of artemin and luciferase (as an intracellular reporter) in bacterial cells was performed. According to the results, residual activity of luciferase in artemin expressing E. coli cells exposing to different concentrations of H 2 O 2 and NaCl was significantly higher than non-expressing cells. The luciferase activity was rapidly lost in control cells under salt treatments while in co-transformed cells, the activity was considerably retained at higher salt concentrations. Also, analysis from cell viability assays showed that artemin-expressing cells exhibited more resistance to both stress conditions. In the present study, we document for the first time that artemin can protect proteins and bacterial cells against oxidative and salt stress conditions. These results can declare the resistance property of this crustacean against harsh environmental conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Antioxidant functionalized polymer capsules to prevent oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Larrañaga, Aitor; Isa, Isma Liza Mohd; Patil, Vaibhav; Thamboo, Sagana; Lomora, Mihai; Fernández-Yague, Marc A; Sarasua, Jose-Ramon; Palivan, Cornelia G; Pandit, Abhay

    2018-02-01

    Polymeric capsules exhibit significant potential for therapeutic applications as microreactors, where the bio-chemical reactions of interest are efficiently performed in a spatial and time defined manner due to the encapsulation of an active biomolecule (e.g., enzyme) and control over the transfer of reagents and products through the capsular membrane. In this work, catalase loaded polymer capsules functionalized with an external layer of tannic acid (TA) are fabricated via a layer-by-layer approach using calcium carbonate as a sacrificial template. The capsules functionalised with TA exhibit a higher scavenging capacity for hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals, suggesting that the external layer of TA shows intrinsic antioxidant properties, and represents a valid strategy to increase the overall antioxidant potential of the developed capsules. Additionally, the hydrogen peroxide scavenging capacity of the capsules is enhanced in the presence of the encapsulated catalase. The capsules prevent oxidative stress in an in vitro inflammation model of degenerative disc disease. Moreover, the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), and disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motif-5 (ADAMTS-5), which represents the major proteolytic enzymes in intervertebral disc, are attenuated in the presence of the polymer capsules. This platform technology exhibits potential to reduce oxidative stress, a key modulator in the pathology of a broad range of inflammatory diseases. Oxidative stress damages important cell structures leading to cellular apoptosis and senescence, for numerous disease pathologies including cancer, neurodegeneration or osteoarthritis. Thus, the development of biomaterials-based systems to control oxidative stress has gained an increasing interest. Herein, polymer capsules loaded with catalase and functionalized with an external layer of tannic acid are fabricated, which can efficiently scavenge important reactive oxygen species (i

  3. Oxidative stress in hemodialysis patients receiving intravenous iron therapy and the role of N-acetylcysteine in preventing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Swarnalatha, G; Ram, R; Neela, Prasad; Naidu, M U R; Dakshina Murty, K V

    2010-09-01

    To determine the contribution of injectable iron administered to hemodialysis (HD) patients in causing oxidative stress and the beneficial effect of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) in reducing it, we studied in a prospective, double blinded, randomized controlled, cross over trial 14 adult HD patients who were randomized into two groups; one group received NAC in a dose of 600 mgs twice daily for 10 days prior to intravenous iron therapy and the other group received placebo. Both the groups were subjected to intravenous iron therapy, 100 mg of iron sucrose in 100 mL of normal saline given over a period of one hour. Blood samples for the markers of oxidative stress were taken before and after iron therapy. After the allowance of a week of wash out period for the effect of N-acetylcysteine we crossed over the patients to the opposite regimen. We measured the lipid peroxidation marker, malondiaaldehyde (MDA), to evaluate the oxidative stress and total anti-oxidant capacity (TAC) for the antioxidant level in addition to the highly sensitive C-reactive protein (HsCRP). Non-invasive assessment of endothelial dysfunction was measured by digital plethysmography before and after intravenous iron therapy. There was an increase of MDA (21.97 + 3.65% vs 7.06 + 3.65%) and highly sensitive C-reactive protein (HsCRP) (11.19 + 24.63% vs 13.19 + 7.7%) after iron administration both in the placebo and the NAC groups. NAC reduced the baseline acute systemic generation of oxidative stress when compared to placebo, which was statistically significant with MDA (12.76 + 4.4% vs 9.37 + 4.40%: P = 0.032) but not with HsCRP though there was a declining trend (2.85 + 22.75 % vs 8.93 + 5.19%: P = 0.112). Pre-treatment with NAC reduced the endothelial dysfunction when compared to placebo, but it was not statistically significant, except for reflection index (RI). We conclude that in our HD patients NAC reduced the oxidative stress before and after the administration of intravenous iron therapy in

  4. Creatine supplementation and oxidative stress in rat liver

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to determine the effects of creatine supplementation on liver biomarkers of oxidative stress in exercise-trained rats. Methods Forty 90-day-old adult male Wistar rats were assigned to four groups for the eight-week experiment. Control group (C) rats received a balanced control diet; creatine control group (CCr) rats received a balanced diet supplemented with 2% creatine; trained group (T) rats received a balanced diet and intense exercise training equivalent to the maximal lactate steady state phase; and supplemented-trained (TCr) rats were given a balanced diet supplemented with 2% creatine and subjected to intense exercise training equivalent to the maximal lactate steady state phase. At the end of the experimental period, concentrations of creatine, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were measured as well as the enzyme activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-GPx) and catalase (CAT). Liver tissue levels of reduced glutathione (GSH), oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and the GSH/GSSG ratio were also determined. Results Hepatic creatine levels were highest in the CCr and TCr groups with increased concentration of H2O2 observed in the T and TCr animal groups. SOD activity was decreased in the TCr group. GSH-GPx activity was increased in the T and TCr groups while CAT was elevated in the CCr and TCr groups. GSH, GGS and the GSH/GSSG ratio did not differ between all animal subsets. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that creatine supplementation acts in an additive manner to physical training to raise antioxidant enzymes in rat liver. However, because markers of liver oxidative stress were unchanged, this finding may also indicate that training-induced oxidative stress cannot be ameliorated by creatine supplementation. PMID:24325803

  5. Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Potential of One Hundred Medicinal Plants.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Waseem; Noreen, Hamsa; Rehman, Shakila; Gul, Shehnaz; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad; Kamdem, Jean Paul; Zaman, Bakht; da Rocha, Joao B T

    2017-01-01

    Reactive species are produced in biological system because of redox reactions. The imbalance in pro-oxidant and antioxidant homeostasis leads to the production of toxic reactive oxygen and nitrogen species like hydrogen peroxide, organic peroxides, hydroxyl radicals, superoxide anion and nitric oxide. Inactivation of metabolic enzymes, oxidation of biomolecules and cellular damage are some of the prominent characteristics of reactive species. Similarly, oxidative stress has been associated with more than one hundred (100) pathologies such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, pancreatic and liver diseases, joint disorders, cardiac fibrosis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, neurological diseases (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Huntington's disorder, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease), ageing and cancer etc. The toxicity of reactive species is balanced by the integrated antioxidant systems, which include enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants. Antioxidant therapies or defenses protect the biological sites by removing or quenching the free radicals (prooxidants). Medicinal plants can not only protect the oxidative damage, but also play a vital role in health maintenance and prevention of chronic degenerative diseases. This review will provide a valuable discussion of one hundred (100) well known medicinal plants, which may add to the optimization of antioxidants rank. Besides, some of the antioxidant evaluation techniques or mechanisms via which medicinal plants act as antioxidants are also described. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Endogenous ROS levels in C. elegans under exogenous stress support revision of oxidative stress theory of life-history tradeoffs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The oxidative stress theory of life-history tradeoffs states that oxidative stress caused by damaging free radicals directly underpins tradeoffs between reproduction and longevity by altering the allocation of energetic resources between these tasks. We test this theory by characterizing the effects of exogenous oxidative insult and its interaction with thermal stress and diet quality on a suite of life-history traits and correlations in Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes. We also quantify demographic aging rates and endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in live animals. Results Our findings indicate a tradeoff between investment in reproduction and antioxidant defense (somatic maintenance) consistent with theoretical predictions, but correlations between standard life-history traits yield little evidence that oxidative stress generates strict tradeoffs. Increasing oxidative insult, however, shows a strong tendency to uncouple positive phenotypic correlations and, in particular, to reduce the correlation between reproduction and lifespan. We also found that mild oxidative insult results in lower levels of endogenous ROS accompanied by hormetic changes in lifespan, demographic aging, and reproduction that disappear in combined-stress treatments--consistent with the oxidative stress theory of aging. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that oxidative stress is a direct contributor to life-history trait variation and that traditional tradeoffs are not necessary to invoke oxidative stress as a mediator of relationships between life-history traits, supporting previous calls for revisions to theory. PMID:25056725

  7. Endogenous ROS levels in C. elegans under exogenous stress support revision of oxidative stress theory of life-history tradeoffs.

    PubMed

    Smith, Samson W; Latta, Leigh C; Denver, Dee R; Estes, Suzanne

    2014-07-24

    The oxidative stress theory of life-history tradeoffs states that oxidative stress caused by damaging free radicals directly underpins tradeoffs between reproduction and longevity by altering the allocation of energetic resources between these tasks. We test this theory by characterizing the effects of exogenous oxidative insult and its interaction with thermal stress and diet quality on a suite of life-history traits and correlations in Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes. We also quantify demographic aging rates and endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in live animals. Our findings indicate a tradeoff between investment in reproduction and antioxidant defense (somatic maintenance) consistent with theoretical predictions, but correlations between standard life-history traits yield little evidence that oxidative stress generates strict tradeoffs. Increasing oxidative insult, however, shows a strong tendency to uncouple positive phenotypic correlations and, in particular, to reduce the correlation between reproduction and lifespan. We also found that mild oxidative insult results in lower levels of endogenous ROS accompanied by hormetic changes in lifespan, demographic aging, and reproduction that disappear in combined-stress treatments--consistent with the oxidative stress theory of aging. Our findings demonstrate that oxidative stress is a direct contributor to life-history trait variation and that traditional tradeoffs are not necessary to invoke oxidative stress as a mediator of relationships between life-history traits, supporting previous calls for revisions to theory.

  8. Thiol oxidation by nitrosative stress: Cellular localization in human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Cabrillana, María E; Uribe, Pamela; Villegas, Juana V; Álvarez, Juan; Sánchez, Raúl; Fornés, Miguel W

    2016-10-01

    Peroxynitrite is a highly reactive nitrogen species and when it is generated at high levels it causes nitrosative stress, an important cause of impaired sperm function. High levels of peroxynitrite have been shown to correlate with decreased semen quality in infertile men. Thiol groups in sperm are mainly found in enzymes, antioxidant molecules, and structural proteins in the axoneme. Peroxynitrite primarily reacts with thiol groups of cysteine-containing proteins. Although it is well known that peroxynitrite oxidizes sulfhydryl groups in sperm, the subcellular localization of this oxidation remains unknown. The main objective of this study was to establish the subcellular localization of peroxynitrite-induced nitrosative stress in thiol groups and its relation to sperm motility in human spermatozoa. For this purpose, spermatozoa from healthy donors were exposed in vitro to 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1), a compound which generates peroxynitrite. In order to detect peroxynitrite and reduced thiol groups, the fluorescent probes, dihydrorhodamine 123 and monobromobimane (mBBr), were used respectively. Sperm viability was analyzed by propidium iodide staining. Peroxynitrite generation and thiol redox state were monitored by confocal microscopy whereas sperm viability was evaluated by flow cytometry. Sperm motility was analyzed by CASA using the ISAS(®) system. The results showed that exposure of human spermatozoa to peroxynitrite results in increased thiol oxidation which is mainly localized in the sperm head and principal piece regions. Thiol oxidation was associated with motility loss. The high susceptibility of thiol groups to peroxynitrite-induced oxidation could explain, at least in part, the negative effect of reactive nitrogen species on sperm motility. DHR: dihydrorhodamine 123; mBBr: monobromobimane ONOO(-): peroxynitrite RNS: reactive nitrogen species RFI: relative fluorescence intensity SIN-1: 3-morpholinosydnonimine CASA: Computer-Aided Sperm Analysis

  9. Nitric oxide donors rescue diabetic nephropathy through oxidative-stress-and nitrosative-stress-mediated Wnt signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yung-Chien; Lee, Pei-Hsien; Lei, Chen-Chou; Ho, Cheng; Shih, Ya-Hsueh; Lin, Chun-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Aims/Introduction The role of the renal nitric oxide (NO) system in the pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy constitutes a very challenging and fertile field for future investigation. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether NO donors can attenuate diabetic renal fibrosis and apoptosis through modulating oxidative-and nitrosative-stress, and Wnt signaling using in vivo diabetic models. Materials and Methods Diabetic rat was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. Rats in each group were intraperitoneally given 2,2′-(hydroxynitrosohydrazino)bis-ethanamine (1 U/kg/day) and vehicle for 28 and 56 consecutive days. Expression of the oxidative-and nitrosative-stress, and Wnt signaling components were examined in kidneys from diabetic animals by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, western blot analysis and immunohistochemical staining. Results NO donor treatment significantly reduced the ratio of kidney weight to bodyweight and proteinuria. This treatment also significantly restored the suppressive effect of diabetes on urinary NO2 + NO3 levels. Immunohistochemistry showed that NO donor treatment significantly reduced transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, fibronectin, cleaved caspase-3 and triphosphate-biotin nick end-labeling expression in the glomeruli of diabetic rats. We found that diabetes promoted 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine, and peroxynitrite expression coincided with reduced endothelial NO synthase expression in glomeruli. Interestingly, NO donor treatment completely removed oxidative stress and nitrosative stress, and restored endothelial NO synthase expression in diabetic renal glomeruli. Immunohistomorphometry results showed that NO donor treatment significantly restored suppressed Wnt5a expression and β-catenin immunoreactivities in glomeruli. Based on laser-captured microdissection for quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, diabetes significantly increased

  10. Systemic and airway oxidative stress in competitive swimmers.

    PubMed

    Škrgat, Sabina; Marčun, Robert; Kern, Izidor; Šilar, Mira; Šelb, Julij; Fležar, Matjaž; Korošec, Peter

    2018-04-01

    The environment in swimming pools, which contain chlorine, might interact with the airway epithelium, resulting in oxidative stress and/or inflammation during high intensity training periods. We evaluated pulmonary functional (metacholine challenge test, FEV1 and VC), cellular (eosinophils and neutrophils), inflammatory (FeNo, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α), oxidative (8-isoprostanes) and angiogenesis factors (VEGF) in induced sputum and peripheral blood of 41 healthy non-asthmatic elite swimmers (median 16 years) during the period of high intensity training before a national championship. The second paired sampling was performed seven months later after training had been stopped for one month. There was a ten-fold increase (median 82-924 pg/ml; P < 0.001) in 8-isoprostanes in induced sputum and five-fold increase (median 82-924 pg/ml; P < 0.001) in sera during training in comparison to the period of rest. However, there was no difference in FEV1 (113 vs 116%), VC (119 vs 118%), FeNo (median 34 vs 38 ppb), eosinophils (2.7 vs 2.9% in sputum; 180 vs 165 cells/μl in blood), neutrophils, different cytokines or VEGF in induced sputum or sera. The only exception was TNF-α, which was moderately increased in sera (median 23 vs 40 pg/ml; P = 0.02) during the peak training period. Almost half (18 of 41) of swimmers showed bronchial hyperresponsiveness during the peak training period (PC20 cutoff was 4 mg/ml). There was no correlation between hyperresponsiveness and the markers of oxidative stress or inflammation. High intensity training in healthy, non-asthmatic competitive swimmers results in marked oxidative stress at the airway and systemic levels, but does not lead to airway inflammation. However, we could not confirm that oxidative stress is associated with bronchial hyperresponsiveness (AHR), which is often observed during the peak exercise training period. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Nitric oxide mitigates arsenic-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in Vicia faba L.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Pratiksha; Singh, A K

    2015-09-01

    The protective effects of nitric oxide (NO) against arsenic (As)-induced structural disturbances in Vicia faba have been investigated. As treatment (0.25, 0.50, and 1 mM) resulted in a declined growth of V. faba seedlings. Arsenic treatment stimulates the activity of SOD and CAT while the activities of APX and GST content were decreased. The oxidative stress markers such as superoxide radical, hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde (lipid peroxidation) contents were enhanced by As. Overall results revealed that significant accumulation of As suppressed growth, photosynthesis, antioxidant enzymes (SOD, CAT, APX, and GST activity), mitotic index, and induction of different chromosomal abnormalities, hence led to oxidative stress. The concentration of SNP (0.02 mM) was very effective in counteracting the adverse effect of As toxicity. These abnormalities use partially or fully reversed by a simultaneous application of As and NO donor and sodium nitroprusside and has an ameliorating effect against As-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in V. faba roots.

  12. Chronic unpredictable mild stress generates oxidative stress and systemic inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    López-López, Ana Laura; Jaime, Herlinda Bonilla; Escobar Villanueva, María Del Carmen; Padilla, Malinalli Brianza; Palacios, Gonzalo Vázquez; Aguilar, Francisco Javier Alarcón

    2016-07-01

    Stress is considered to be a causal agent of chronic degenerative diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, arthritis and Alzheimer's. Chronic glucocorticoid and catecholamine release into the circulation during the stress response has been suggested to activate damage mechanisms, which in the long term produce metabolic alterations associated with oxidative stress and inflammation. However, the consequences of stress in animal models for periods longer than 40days have not been explored. The goal of this work was to determine whether chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) produced alterations in the redox state and the inflammatory profile of rats after 20, 40, and 60days. CUMS consisted of random exposure of the animals to different stressors. The following activities were measured in the liver and pancreas: reduced glutathione (GSH), lipid peroxidation (LPO), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), and protein oxidation. Similarly, serum cytokine levels (IL-6, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-10) were determined. CUMS activated the stress response from day 20 until day 60. In the liver and pancreas, GHS levels were decreased from day 40, whereas protein lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation were increased. This is the first work to report that the pancreas redox state is subject to chronic stress conditions. The TAC was constant in the liver and reduced in the pancreas. An increase in the TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 inflammatory markers and a decrease in the IL-10 level due to CUMS was shown, thereby resulting in the generation of a systemic inflammation state after 60days of treatment. Together, the CUMS consequences on day 60 suggest that both processes can contribute to the development of chronic degenerative diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus. CUMS is an animal model that in addition to avoiding habituation activates damage mechanisms such as oxidative stress and low-grade chronic

  13. Oxidative stress in the elderly with diabetes mellitus or hypertension

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Castañeda, Aleida; Martínez-González, Katia Leticia; Sánchez-Arenas, Rosalinda; Sánchez-García, Sergio; Grijalva, Israel; Basurto-Acevedo, Lourdes; Cuadros-Moreno, Juan; Ramírez-García, Eliseo; García-de la Torre, Paola

    2018-01-01

    Mexico City has the highest aging rate in the country, as well as a high prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension (HT). It is known that each one of these conditions increase oxidative stress (OS) independently. With this study we described changes in OS of 18 patients without DM or HT (controls), 12 with DM, 23 with HT, and 18 with DM and HT, all of them members of the COSFAMM (Cohorte de Obesidad, Sarcopenia y Fragilidad en Adultos Mayores de México). OS was measured by the quantification of reactive oxygen species (ROS), by the oxidation of diclorofluorosceine, and by determination of lipid peroxidation by product malondialdehyde (MDA). HT patients showed increased ROS levels, as did men with HT compared with the respective DM and HT groups. Also, women of control group showed higher levels of ROS compared with men. Generally, HT turned out to be the most influential factor for the increase of oxidative stress in the elderly while DM has no effect whatsoever.

  14. Buprenorphine Alters Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress Molecular Markers in Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hitchon, Carol

    2017-01-01

    Buprenorphine is recommended for use as an analgesic in animal models including in murine models of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). However, the effect of buprenorphine on the expression of disease-associated biomarkers is not well defined. We examined the effect of buprenorphine administration on disease progression and the expression of inflammatory and oxidative stress markers, in a murine model of CIA. Buprenorphine administration altered the expression of cytokines, IFN-γ, IL-6, and MMP-3, and oxidative markers, for example, iNOS, superoxide dismutase (SOD1), and catalase (CAT), in the CIA mice. As buprenorphine is an analgesic, we further monitored the association of expression of these biomarkers with pain scores in a human cohort of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Serum MMP-3 levels and blood mRNA expression of antioxidants sod1 and cat correlated with pain scores in the RA cohort. We have demonstrated that administration of buprenorphine alters the expression of inflammatory and oxidative stress-related molecular markers in a murine model of CIA. This caveat needs to be considered in animal experiments using buprenorphine as an analgesic, as it can be a confounding factor in murine studies used for prediction of response to therapy. Furthermore, the antioxidant enzymes that showed an association with pain scores in the human cohort may be explored as biomarkers for pain in future studies. PMID:28572711

  15. Marine Carotenoids against Oxidative Stress: Effects on Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Gammone, Maria Alessandra; Riccioni, Graziano; D’Orazio, Nicolantonio

    2015-01-01

    Carotenoids are lipid-soluble pigments that are produced in some plants, algae, fungi, and bacterial species, which accounts for their orange and yellow hues. Carotenoids are powerful antioxidants thanks to their ability to quench singlet oxygen, to be oxidized, to be isomerized, and to scavenge free radicals, which plays a crucial role in the etiology of several diseases. Unusual marine environments are associated with a great chemical diversity, resulting in novel bioactive molecules. Thus, marine organisms may represent an important source of novel biologically active substances for the development of therapeutics. In this respect, various novel marine carotenoids have recently been isolated from marine organisms and displayed several utilizations as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. Marine carotenoids (astaxanthin, fucoxanthin, β-carotene, lutein but also the rare siphonaxanthin, sioxanthin, and myxol) have recently shown antioxidant properties in reducing oxidative stress markers. This review aims to describe the role of marine carotenoids against oxidative stress and their potential applications in preventing and treating inflammatory diseases. PMID:26437420

  16. Effects of Kombucha on oxidative stress induced nephrotoxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Trichloroethylene (TCE) may induce oxidative stress which generates free radicals and alters antioxidants or oxygen-free radical scavenging enzymes. Methods Twenty male albino rats were divided into four groups: (1) the control group treated with vehicle, (2) Kombucha (KT)-treated group, (3) TCE-treated group and (4) KT/TCE-treated group. Kidney lipid peroxidation, glutathione content, nitric oxide (NO) and total blood free radical concentrations were evaluated. Serum urea, creatinine level, gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities were also measured. Results TCE administration increased the malondiahyde (MDA) and NO contents in kidney, urea and creatinine concentrations in serum, total free radical level in blood and GGT and LDH activities in serum, whereas it decreased the glutathione (GSH) level in kidney homogenate. KT administration significantly improved lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress induced by TCE. Conclusion The present study indicates that Kombucha may repair damage caused by environmental pollutants such as TCE and may be beneficial to patient suffering from renal impairment. PMID:19943946

  17. Effects of Kombucha on oxidative stress induced nephrotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Gharib, Ola Ali

    2009-11-27

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) may induce oxidative stress which generates free radicals and alters antioxidants or oxygen-free radical scavenging enzymes. Twenty male albino rats were divided into four groups: (1) the control group treated with vehicle, (2) Kombucha (KT)-treated group, (3) TCE-treated group and (4) KT/TCE-treated group. Kidney lipid peroxidation, glutathione content, nitric oxide (NO) and total blood free radical concentrations were evaluated. Serum urea, creatinine level, gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities were also measured. TCE administration increased the malondiahyde (MDA) and NO contents in kidney, urea and creatinine concentrations in serum, total free radical level in blood and GGT and LDH activities in serum, whereas it decreased the glutathione (GSH) level in kidney homogenate. KT administration significantly improved lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress induced by TCE. The present study indicates that Kombucha may repair damage caused by environmental pollutants such as TCE and may be beneficial to patient suffering from renal impairment.

  18. [Oxidative Stress Level of Vanadium-exposed Workers].

    PubMed

    Wei, Teng-da; Li, Shun-pin; Liu, Yun-xing; Tan, Chun-ping; Li, Juan; Zhang, Zu-hui; Lan, Ya-jia; Zhang, Qin

    2015-11-01

    To determine the oxidative stress level in peripheral blood of vanadium-exposed workers, as an indication of population health effect of vanadium on human neurobehavioral system. 86 vanadium-exposed workers and 65 non-exposed workers were recruited by cluster sampling. A questionnaire was administered to collect demographic and occupational exposure information. Serum activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and malonaldehyde (MDA) contents were detected by kit assay. The differences in oxidative stress level between vanadium-exposed and non-exposed workers were compared. Vanadium-exposed workers had higher levels of MDA contents than the controls. The total superoxide dismutase(T-SOD) activity in vanadium-exposed workers was significantly lower than that in the controls, which was associated with lowered levels of manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) activity. No changes in serum levels of cupro-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD) was found in vanadium-exposed workers. No difference in iNOS activity was found between vanadium-exposed workers and controls. Vanadium exposure increases free radical production in serum and reduces antioxidant capacity. But the relationship between vanadium exposure and iNOS damage remains uncertain.

  19. Systemic oxidative stress associated with the neurological diseases of aging.

    PubMed

    Serra, Jorge A; Domínguez, Raúl O; Marschoff, Enrique R; Guareschi, Eduardo M; Famulari, Arturo L; Boveris, Alberto

    2009-12-01

    Markers of oxidative stress were measured in blood samples of 338 subjects (965 observations): Alzheimer's, vascular dementia, diabetes (type II) superimposed to dementias, Parkinson's disease and controls. Patients showed increased thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (+21%; P < 0.05), copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (+64%; P < 0.001) and decreased antioxidant capacity (-28%; P < 0.001); pairs of variables resulted linearly related across groups (P < 0.001). Catalase and glutathione peroxidase, involved in discrimination between diseases, resulted non-significant. When diabetes is superimposed with dementias, changes resulted less marked but significant. Also, superoxide dismutase resulted not linearly correlated with any other variable or age-related (pure Alzheimer's peaks at 70 years, P < 0.001). Systemic oxidative stress was significantly associated (P < 0.001) with all diseases indicating a disbalance in peripheral/adaptive responses to oxidative disorders through different free radical metabolic pathways. While other changes - methionine cycle, insulin correlation - are also associated with dementias, the responses presented here show a simple linear relation between prooxidants and antioxidant defenses.

  20. Oxidative stress of crystalline lens in rat menopausal model.

    PubMed

    Acer, Semra; Pekel, Gökhan; Küçükatay, Vural; Karabulut, Aysun; Yağcı, Ramazan; Çetin, Ebru Nevin; Akyer, Şahika Pınar; Şahin, Barbaros

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate lenticular oxidative stress in rat menopausal models. Forty Wistar female albino rats were included in this study. A total of thirty rats underwent oophorectomy to generate a menopausal model. Ten rats that did not undergo oophorectomy formed the control group (Group 1). From the rats that underwent oophorectomy, 10 formed the menopause control group (Group 2), 10 were administered a daily injection of methylprednisolone until the end of the study (Group 3), and the remaining 10 rats were administered intraperitoneal streptozocin to induce diabetes mellitus (Group 4). Total oxidant status (TOS), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), and oxidative stress index (OSI) measurements of the crystalline lenses were analyzed. The mean OSI was the lowest in group 1 and highest in group 4. Nevertheless, the difference between the groups was not statistically significant in terms of OSI (p >0.05). The mean TOS values were similar between the groups (p >0.05), whereas the mean TAC of group 1 was significantly higher than that of the other groups (p <0.001). Our results indicate that menopause may not promote cataract formation.

  1. Neuroprotective effects of sildenafil against oxidative stress and memory dysfunction in mice exposed to noise stress.

    PubMed

    Sikandaner, Hu Erxidan; Park, So Young; Kim, Min Jung; Park, Shi Nae; Yang, Dong Won

    2017-02-15

    Noise exposure has been well characterized as an environmental stressor, and is known to have auditory and non-auditory effects. Phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors affect memory and hippocampus plasticity through various signaling cascades which are regulated by cGMP. In this study, we investigated the effects of sildenafil on memory deficiency, neuroprotection and oxidative stress in mice caused by chronic noise exposure. Mice were exposed to noise for 4h every day up to 14days at 110dB SPL of noise level. Sildenafil (15mg/kg) was orally administered 30min before noise exposure for 14days. Behavioral assessments were performed using novel object recognition (NOR) test and radial arm maze (RAM) test. Higher levels of memory dysfunction and oxidative stress were observed in noise alone-induced mice compared to control group. Interestingly, sildenafil administration increased memory performance, decreased oxidative stress, and increased neuroprotection in the hippocampus region of noise alone-induced mice likely through affecting memory related pathways such as cGMP/PKG/CREB and p25/CDK5, and induction of free radical scavengers such as SOD1, SOD2, SOD3, Prdx5, and catalase in the brain of stressed mice. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Oxidative stress and apoptotic events during thermal stress in the symbiotic sea anemone, Anemonia viridis.

    PubMed

    Richier, Sophie; Sabourault, Cécile; Courtiade, Juliette; Zucchini, Nathalie; Allemand, Denis; Furla, Paola

    2006-09-01

    Symbiosis between cnidarian and photosynthetic protists is widely distributed over temperate and tropical seas. These symbioses can periodically breakdown, a phenomenon known as cnidarian bleaching. This event can be irreversible for some associations subjected to acute and/or prolonged environmental disturbances, and leads to the death of the animal host. During bleaching, oxidative stress has been described previously as acting at molecular level and apoptosis is suggested to be one of the mechanisms involved. We focused our study on the role of apoptosis in bleaching via oxidative stress in the association between the sea anemone Anemonia viridis and the dinoflagellates Symbiodinium species. Characterization of caspase-like enzymes were conducted at the biochemical and molecular level to confirm the presence of a caspase-dependent apoptotic phenomenon in the cnidarian host. We provide evidence of oxidative stress followed by induction of caspase-like activity in animal host cells after an elevated temperature stress, suggesting the concomitant action of these components in bleaching.

  3. Aluminium oxide nanoparticles induced morphological changes, cytotoxicity and oxidative stress in Chinook salmon (CHSE-214) cells.

    PubMed

    Srikanth, Koigoora; Mahajan, Amit; Pereira, Eduarda; Duarte, Armando Costa; Venkateswara Rao, Janapala

    2015-10-01

    Aluminium oxide nanoparticles (Al2 O3 NPs) are increasingly used in diverse applications that has raised concern about their safety. Recent studies suggested that Al2 O3 NPs induced oxidative stress may be the cause of toxicity in algae, Ceriodaphnia dubia, Caenorhabditis elegans and Danio rerio. However, there is paucity on the toxicity of Al2 O3 NPs on fish cell lines. The current study was aimed to investigate Al2 O3 NPs induced cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and morphological abnormality of Chinnok salmon cells (CHSE-214). A dose-dependent decline in cell viability was observed in CHSE-214 cells exposed to Al2 O3 NPs. Oxidative stress induced by Al2 O3 NPs in CHSE-214 cells has resulted in the significant reduction of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione in a dose-dependent manner. However, a significant increase in glutathione sulfo-transferase and lipid peroxidation was observed in CHSE-214 cells exposed to Al2 O3 NPs in a dose-dependent manner. Significant morphological changes in CHSE-214 cells were observed when exposed to Al2 O3 NPs at 6, 12 and 24 h. The cells started to detach and appear spherical at 6 h followed by loss of cellular contents resulting in the shrinking of the cells. At 24 h, the cells started to disintegrate and resulted in cell death. Our data demonstrate that Al2 O3 NPs induce cytotoxicity and oxidative stress in a dose-dependent manner in CHSE-214 cells. Thus, our current work may serve as a base-line study for future evaluation of toxicity studies using CHSE-214 cells. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Oxidative stress and nitrosative stress are involved in different stages of proteolytic pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Lanzetti, Manuella; da Costa, Cristiane Aguiar; Nesi, Renata Tiscoski; Barroso, Marina Valente; Martins, Vanessa; Victoni, Tatiana; Lagente, Vincent; Pires, Karla Maria Pereira; e Silva, Patrícia Machado Rodrigues; Resende, Angela Castro; Porto, Luis Cristóvão; Benjamim, Cláudia Farias; Valença, Samuel Santos

    2012-12-01

    Our aim was to investigate the role of oxidative stress in elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to pancreatic porcine elastase (PPE) instillation (0.05 or 0.5 U per mouse, i.t.) to induce pulmonary emphysema. Lungs were collected on days 7, 14, and 21 after PPE instillation. The control group was sham injected. Also, mice treated with 1% aminoguanidine (AMG) and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) knockout mice received 0.5 U PPE (i.t.), and lungs were analyzed 21 days after. We performed bronchoalveolar lavage, biochemical analyses of oxidative stress, and lung stereology and morphometry assays. Emphysema was observed histologically at 21 days after 0.5 U PPE treatment; tissues from these mice exhibited increased alveolar linear intercept and air-space volume density in comparison with the control group. TNF-α was elevated at 7 and 14 days after 0.5 U PPE treatment, concomitant with a reduction in the IL-10 levels at the same time points. Myeloperoxidase was elevated in all groups treated with 0.5 U PPE. Oxidative stress was observed during early stages of emphysema, with increased nitrite levels and malondialdehyde and superoxide dismutase activity at 7 days after 0.5 U PPE treatment. Glutathione peroxidase activity was increased in all groups treated with 0.5 U PPE. The emphysema was attenuated when iNOS was inhibited using 1% AMG and in iNOS knockout mice. Furthermore, proteolytic stimulation by PPE enhanced the expression of nitrotyrosine and iNOS, whereas the PPE+AMG group showed low expression of iNOS and nitrotyrosine. PPE stimulus also induced endothelial (e) NOS expression, whereas AMG reduced eNOS. Our results suggest that the oxidative and nitrosative stress pathways are triggered by nitric oxide production via iNOS expression in pulmonary emphysema. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Measurement of Mitochondrial Mass by Flow Cytometry during Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Edward; Perl, Andras

    2017-07-01

    Properly assessing mitochondrial health is crucial to understand their role in disease. MitoTracker green (MTG) and nonylacridine orange (NAO) are fluorescent probes which have been commonly used to assess mitochondrial mass. This is based on the assumption that both MTG and NAO accumulate in mitochondria regardless of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨ m ). Here, we utilized flow cytometry to evaluate the performance of these probes for assessment of mitochondrial mass relative to forward (FSC) and side scatter (SSC) in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). In isolated mitochondria, two subpopulations were identified by FSC and SSC measurements which were matched to subpopulations stained by MTG and NAO. The performance of these dyes was examined under oxidative and nitrosative stress induced by rotenone and NOC-18 while N -acetylcysteine (NAC) was employed as an antioxidant. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ΔΨ m were monitored in parallel. With respect to representation of mitochondrial mass, neither MTG nor NAO was affected by ΔΨ m . However, MTG showed significant correlation with cytosolic and mitochondrial ROS production and nitrosative stress. Our data suggest that NAO may be more suitable than MTG for assessment of mitochondrial mass by flow cytometry during oxidative stress.

  6. Mitochondrial-nuclear communication by prohibitin shuttling under oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sripathi, Srinivas R; He, Weilue; Atkinson, Cameron L; Smith, Joseph J; Liu, Zhicong; Elledge, Beth M; Jahng, Wan Jin

    2011-10-04

    Mitochondrial-nuclear communication is critical for maintaining mitochondrial activity under stress conditions. Adaptation of the mitochondrial-nuclear network to changes in the intracellular oxidation and reduction milieu is critical for the survival of retinal and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, in relation to their high oxygen demand and rapid metabolism. However, the generation and transmission of the mitochondrial signal to the nucleus remain elusive. Previously, our in vivo study revealed that prohibitin is upregulated in the retina, but downregulated in RPE cells in the aging and diabetic model. In this study, the functional role of prohibitin in the retina and RPE cells was examined using biochemical methods, including a lipid binding assay, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, immunocytochemistry, Western blotting, and a knockdown approach. Protein depletion by siRNA characterized prohibitin as an anti-apoptotic molecule in mitochondria, while the lipid binding assay demonstrated subcellular communication between mitochondria and the nucleus under oxidative stress. The changes in the expression and localization of mitochondrial prohibitin triggered by reactive oxygen species are crucial for mitochondrial integrity. We propose that prohibitin shuttles between mitochondria and the nucleus as an anti-apoptotic molecule and a transcriptional regulator in a stress environment in the retina and RPE cells.

  7. Mitochondrial-Nuclear Communication by Prohibitin Shuttling Under Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Sripathi, Srinivas; He, Weilue; Atkinson, Cameron; Smith, Joey; Liu, Zhicong; Elledge, Beth; Jahng, Wan Jin

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial-nuclear communication is critical to maintain mitochondrial activity under stress conditions. Adaptation of the mitochondria-nucleus network to changes in the intracellular oxidation and reduction milieu is critical for the survival of retinal and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, in relation to their high oxygen demand and rapid metabolism. However, the generation and transmittal of mitochondrial signal to the nucleus remains elusive. Previously, our in vivo study revealed that prohibitin is up-regulated in the retina but is down-regulated in RPE in the aging and diabetic model. In this study, the functional role of prohibitin in the retina and the RPE was studied using biochemical methods, including lipid binding assay, 2D gel electrophoresis, immunocytochemistry, Western blot, and knockdown approach. Protein depletion by siRNA characterized prohibitin as an anti-apoptotic molecule in mitochondria, while lipid binding assay demonstrated subcellular communications between mitochondria and the nucleus under oxidative stress. The changes of the expressions and localization of mitochondrial prohibitin triggered by reactive oxygen species are crucial for mitochondrial integrity. We propose that prohibitin shuttles between mitochondria and the nucleus as an anti-apoptotic molecule and a transcriptional regulator under stress environment in the retina and RPE. PMID:21879722

  8. A meta-analysis of biomarkers related to oxidative stress and nitric oxide pathway in migraine.

    PubMed

    Neri, Monica; Frustaci, Alessandra; Milic, Mirta; Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Fini, Massimo; Bonassi, Stefano; Barbanti, Piero

    2015-09-01

    Oxidative and nitrosative stress are considered key events in the still unclear pathophysiology of migraine. Studies comparing the level of biomarkers related to nitric oxide (NO) pathway/oxidative stress in the blood/urine of migraineurs vs. unaffected controls were extracted from the PubMed database. Summary estimates of mean ratios (MR) were carried out whenever a minimum of three papers were available. Nineteen studies were included in the meta-analyses, accounting for more than 1000 patients and controls, and compared with existing literature. Most studies measuring superoxide dismutase (SOD) showed lower activity in cases, although the meta-analysis in erythrocytes gave null results. On the contrary, plasma levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), an aspecific biomarker of oxidative damage, showed a meta-MR of 2.20 (95% CI: 1.65-2.93). As for NOs, no significant results were found in plasma, serum and urine. However, higher levels were shown during attacks, in patients with aura, and an effect of diet was found. The analysis of glutathione precursor homocysteine and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an NO synthase inhibitor, gave inconclusive results. The role of the oxidative pathway in migraine is still uncertain. Interesting evidence emerged for TBARS and SOD, and concerning the possible role of diet in the control of NOx levels. © International Headache Society 2015.

  9. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Oxidative Stress in Cell Fate Decision and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Stewart Siyan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a specialized organelle for the folding and trafficking of proteins, which is highly sensitive to changes in intracellular homeostasis and extracellular stimuli. Alterations in the protein-folding environment cause accumulation of misfolded proteins in the ER that profoundly affect a variety of cellular signaling processes, including reduction–oxidation (redox) homeostasis, energy production, inflammation, differentiation, and apoptosis. The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a collection of adaptive signaling pathways that evolved to resolve protein misfolding and restore an efficient protein-folding environment. Recent Advances: Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been linked to ER stress and the UPR. ROS play a critical role in many cellular processes and can be produced in the cytosol and several organelles, including the ER and mitochondria. Studies suggest that altered redox homeostasis in the ER is sufficient to cause ER stress, which could, in turn, induce the production of ROS in the ER and mitochondria. Critical Issues: Although ER stress and oxidative stress coexist in many pathologic states, whether and how these stresses interact is unknown. It is also unclear how changes in the protein-folding environment in the ER cause oxidative stress. In addition, how ROS production and protein misfolding commit the cell to an apoptotic death and contribute to various degenerative diseases is unknown. Future Directions: A greater fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that preserve protein folding homeostasis and redox status will provide new information toward the development of novel therapeutics for many human diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 396–413. PMID:24702237

  10. Role of oxidative stress enzymes in open-angle glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, O; Ateş, N A; Ercan, B; Muşlu, N; Unlü, A; Tamer, L; Atik, U; Kanik, A

    2005-05-01

    To investigate the role of oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation in the pathogenesis of primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). The activities of myeloperoxidase (MPO), catalase (CAT), and the levels of plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured in 40 (15 men and 25 women) patients with POAG and 60 (30 men and 30 women) healthy controls. There was no significant difference in the activities of CAT and MPO between the POAG patients and the controls. However, the plasma MDA level was significantly higher in patients than the controls. The results of this preliminary study suggest that the possible alterations of plasma MDA levels may be associated with the pathogenesis of POAG, but further research is needed to understand the role of oxidative damage in this important disorder of aging.

  11. Oxidative stress upregulates the NMDA receptor on cerebrovascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Betzen, Christian; White, Robin; Zehendner, Christoph M; Pietrowski, Eweline; Bender, Bianca; Luhmann, Heiko J; Kuhlmann, Christoph R W

    2009-10-15

    N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R)-mediated oxidative stress has been implicated in blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption in a variety of neuropathological diseases. Although some interactions between both phenomena have been elucidated, possible influences of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on the NMDA-R itself have so far been neglected. The objective of this study was to examine how the cerebroendothelial NMDA-R is affected by exposure to oxidative stress and to assess possible influences on BBB integrity. RT-PCR confirmed several NMDA-R subunits (NR1, NR2B-D) expressed in the bEnd3 cell line (murine cerebrovascular endothelial cells). NR1 protein expression after exposure to ROS was observed via in-cell Western. The functionality of the expressed NMDA-R was determined by measuring DiBAC fluorescence in ROS-preexposed cells upon stimulation with the specific agonist NMDA. Finally, the effects on barrier integrity were evaluated using the ECIS system to detect changes in monolayer impedance upon NMDA-R stimulation after exposure to ROS. The expression of NR1 significantly (p<0.001) increased 72 h after 30 min exposure to superoxide (+33.8+/-7.5%), peroxynitrite (+84.9+/-10.7%), or hydrogen peroxide (+92.8+/-7.6%), resulting in increased cellular response to NMDA-R stimulation and diminished monolayer impedance. We conclude that oxidative stress upregulates NMDA-R on cerebrovascular endothelium and thus heightens susceptibility to glutamate-induced BBB disruption.

  12. Effect of influenza vaccination on oxidative stress products in breath.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Michael; Cataneo, Renee N; Chaturvedi, Anirudh; Danaher, Patrick J; Devadiga, Anantrai; Legendre, David A; Nail, Kim L; Schmitt, Peter; Wai, James

    2010-06-01

    Viral infections cause increased oxidative stress, so a breath test for oxidative stress biomarkers (alkanes and alkane derivatives) might provide a new tool for early diagnosis. We studied 33 normal healthy human subjects receiving scheduled treatment with live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV). Each subject was his or her own control, since they were studied on day 0 prior to vaccination, and then on days 2, 7 and 14 following vaccination. Breath volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were collected with a breath collection apparatus, then analyzed by automated thermal desorption with gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy. A Monte Carlo simulation technique identified non-random VOC biomarkers of infection based on their C-statistic values (area under curve of receiver operating characteristic). Treatment with LAIV was followed by non-random changes in the abundance of breath VOCs. 2, 8-Dimethyl-undecane and other alkane derivatives were observed on all days. Conservative multivariate models identified vaccinated subjects on day 2 (C-statistic = 0.82, sensitivity = 63.6% and specificity = 88.5%); day 7 (C-statistic = 0.94, sensitivity = 88.5% and specificity = 92.3%); and day 14 (C-statistic = 0.95, sensitivity = 92.3% and specificity = 92.3%). The altered breath VOCs were not detected in live attenuated influenza vaccine, excluding artifactual contamination. LAIV vaccination in healthy humans elicited a prompt and sustained increase in breath biomarkers of oxidative stress. A breath test for these VOCs could potentially identify humans who are acutely infected with influenza, but who have not yet developed clinical symptoms or signs of disease.

  13. Erythrocyte oxidative stress markers in children with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Priscila Bacarin; Pianovski, Mara Albonei Dudeque; Henneberg, Railson; Nascimento, Aguinaldo José; Leonart, Maria Suely Soares

    2016-01-01

    To determine eight parameters of oxidative stress markers in erythrocytes from children with sickle cell disease and compare with the same parameters in erythrocytes from healthy children, since oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease and because this disease is a serious public health problem in many countries. Blood samples were obtained from 45 children with sickle cell disease (21 males and 24 females with a mean age of 9 years; range: 3-13 years) and 280 blood samples were obtained from children without hemoglobinopathies (137 males and 143 females with a mean age of 10 years; range: 8-11 years), as a control group. All blood samples were analyzed for methemoglobin, reduced glutathione, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, percentage of hemolysis, reactive oxygen species, and activity of the enzymes glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, superoxide dismutase, and catalase. Data were analyzed using Student's t-test and were expressed as the mean±standard deviation. A p-value of <0.05 was considered significant. Significant differences were observed between children with sickle cell disease and the control group for the parameters methemoglobin, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, hemolysis, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity, and reactive oxygen species, with higher levels in the patients than in the controls. Oxidative stress parameters in children's erythrocytes were determined using simple laboratory methods with small volumes of blood; these biomarkers can be useful to evaluate disease progression and outcomes in patients. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Oxidative stress and food supplementation with antioxidants in therapy dogs.

    PubMed

    Sechi, Sara; Fiore, Filippo; Chiavolelli, Francesca; Dimauro, Corrado; Nudda, Anna; Cocco, Raffaella

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of a long-term antioxidant-supplemented diet to regulate the oxidative stress and general health status of dogs involved in animal-assisted intervention (AAI) programs. Oxidative stress is a consequence of the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Exercise-induced oxidative stress can increase muscle fatigue and fiber damage and eventually leads to impairment of the immune system. A randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover clinical evaluation was conducted with 11 healthy therapy dogs: 6 females and 5 males of different breeds and with a mean age of 2.7 ± 0.8 y (mean ± SEM). The dogs were divided into 2 groups, 1 fed a high quality commercial diet without antioxidants (CD) and the other a high quality commercial diet supplemented with antioxidants (SD) for 18 wk. After the first 18 wk, metabolic parameters, reactive oxygen metabolite-derivatives (d-ROMs), and biological antioxidant potential (BAP) levels were monitored and showed a significant reduction of d-ROMs, triglycerides, and creatinine values in the SD group ( P < 0.05) and a significant increase in amylase values in the CD group ( P < 0.01). At the end of this period, groups were crossed over and fed for another 18 wk. A significant decrease in amylase and glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT) values was observed in the CD and SD group, respectively ( P < 0.05). In conclusion, a controlled, balanced antioxidant diet may be a valid approach to restoring good cell metabolism and neutralizing excess free radicals in therapy dogs.

  15. Oxidative stress and food supplementation with antioxidants in therapy dogs

    PubMed Central

    Sechi, Sara; Fiore, Filippo; Chiavolelli, Francesca; Dimauro, Corrado; Nudda, Anna; Cocco, Raffaella

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of a long-term antioxidant-supplemented diet to regulate the oxidative stress and general health status of dogs involved in animal-assisted intervention (AAI) programs. Oxidative stress is a consequence of the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Exercise-induced oxidative stress can increase muscle fatigue and fiber damage and eventually leads to impairment of the immune system. A randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover clinical evaluation was conducted with 11 healthy therapy dogs: 6 females and 5 males of different breeds and with a mean age of 2.7 ± 0.8 y (mean ± SEM). The dogs were divided into 2 groups, 1 fed a high quality commercial diet without antioxidants (CD) and the other a high quality commercial diet supplemented with antioxidants (SD) for 18 wk. After the first 18 wk, metabolic parameters, reactive oxygen metabolite-derivatives (d-ROMs), and biological antioxidant potential (BAP) levels were monitored and showed a significant reduction of d-ROMs, triglycerides, and creatinine values in the SD group (P < 0.05) and a significant increase in amylase values in the CD group (P < 0.01). At the end of this period, groups were crossed over and fed for another 18 wk. A significant decrease in amylase and glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT) values was observed in the CD and SD group, respectively (P < 0.05). In conclusion, a controlled, balanced antioxidant diet may be a valid approach to restoring good cell metabolism and neutralizing excess free radicals in therapy dogs. PMID:28725111

  16. Oxidative Stress and the Use of Antioxidants in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Shirley, Rachel; Ord, Emily N. J.; Work, Lorraine M.

    2014-01-01

    Transient or permanent interruption of cerebral blood flow by occlusion of a cerebral artery gives rise to an ischaemic stroke leading to irreversible damage or dysfunction to the cells within the affected tissue along with permanent or reversible neurological deficit. Extensive research has identified excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation and cell death as key contributory pathways underlying lesion progression. The cornerstone of treatment for acute ischaemic stroke remains reperfusion therapy with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA). The downstream sequelae of events resulting from spontaneous or pharmacological reperfusion lead to an imbalance in the production of harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS) over endogenous anti-oxidant protection strategies. As such, anti-oxidant therapy has long been investigated as a means to reduce the extent of injury resulting from ischaemic stroke with varying degrees of success. Here we discuss the production and source of these ROS and the various strategies employed to modulate levels. These strategies broadly attempt to inhibit ROS production or increase scavenging or degradation of ROS. While early clinical studies have failed to translate success from bench to bedside, the combination of anti-oxidants with existing thrombolytics or novel neuroprotectants may represent an avenue worthy of clinical investigation. Clearly, there is a pressing need to identify new therapeutic alternatives for the vast majority of patients who are not eligible to receive rt-PA for this debilitating and devastating disease. PMID:26785066

  17. Oxidized low density lipoprotein increases RANKL level in human vascular cells. Involvement of oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Mazière, Cécile, E-mail: maziere.cecile@chu-amiens.fr; Salle, Valéry; INSERM U1088

    Highlights: •Oxidized LDL enhances RANKL level in human smooth muscle cells. •The effect of OxLDL is mediated by the transcription factor NFAT. •UVA, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and buthionine sulfoximine also increase RANKL level. •All these effects are observed in human fibroblasts and endothelial cells. -- Abstract: Receptor Activator of NFκB Ligand (RANKL) and its decoy receptor osteoprotegerin (OPG) have been shown to play a role not only in bone remodeling but also in inflammation, arterial calcification and atherosclerotic plaque rupture. In human smooth muscle cells, Cu{sup 2+}-oxidized LDL (CuLDL) 10–50 μg/ml increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and RANKL level inmore » a dose-dependent manner, whereas OPG level was not affected. The lipid extract of CuLDL reproduced the effects of the whole particle. Vivit, an inhibitor of the transcription factor NFAT, reduced the CuLDL-induced increase in RANKL, whereas PKA and NFκB inhibitors were ineffective. LDL oxidized by myeloperoxidase (MPO-LDL), or other pro-oxidant conditions such as ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation, incubation with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis{sub ,} also induced an oxidative stress and enhanced RANKL level. The increase in RANKL in pro-oxidant conditions was also observed in fibroblasts and endothelial cells. Since RANKL is involved in myocardial inflammation, vascular calcification and plaque rupture, this study highlights a new mechanism whereby OxLDL might, by generation of an oxidative stress, exert a deleterious effect on different cell types of the arterial wall.« less

  18. Oxidative stress and anti-oxidant enzyme activities in the trophocytes and fat cells of queen honeybees (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yu-Shan; Hsu, Chin-Yuan

    2013-08-01

    Trophocytes and fat cells of queen honeybees have been used for delayed cellular senescence studies, but their oxidative stress and anti-oxidant enzyme activities with advancing age are unknown. In this study, we assayed reactive oxygen species (ROS) and anti-oxidant enzymes in the trophocytes and fat cells of young and old queens. Young queens had lower ROS levels, lower superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities, and higher thioredoxin reductase (TR) activity compared to old queens. These results show that oxidative stress and anti-oxidant enzyme activities in trophocytes and fat cells increase with advancing age in queens and suggest that an increase in oxidative stress and a consequent increase in stress defense mechanisms are associated with the longevity of queen honeybees.

  19. Moderate treadmill exercise prevents oxidative stress-induced anxiety-like behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Salim, Samina; Sarraj, Nada; Taneja, Manish; Saha, Kaustuv; Tejada-Simon, Maria Victoria; Chugh, Gaurav

    2010-04-02

    Recent work has suggested correlation of oxidative stress with anxiety-like behavior. There also is evidence for anxiolytic effects of physical exercise. However, a direct role of oxidative stress in anxiety is not clear and a protective role of physical exercise in oxidative stress-mediated anxiety has never been addressed. In this study, we have utilized rats to test direct involvement of oxidative stress with anxiety-like behavior and have identified oxidative stress mechanisms likely involved in anxiolytic effects of physical exercise. Intraperitoneal injections at non-toxic dose of l-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO), an agent that increases oxidative stress markers, increased anxiety-like behavior of rats compared to vehicle-treated control rats. Prior 2 weeks treatment with the antioxidant, tempol attenuated BSO-induced anxiety-like behavior of rats suggesting a role of oxidative stress in this phenomenon. Moreover, moderate treadmill exercise prevented BSO-induced anxiety-like behavior of rats and also prevented BSO-mediated increase in oxidative stress markers in serum, urine and brain tissue homogenates from hippocampus, amygdala and locus coeruleus. Thus increasing oxidative stress increases anxiety-like behavior of rats. Moreover, antioxidant or treadmill exercise training both reduce oxidative stress in the rat brain regions implicated in anxiety response and prevent anxiety-like behavior of rats. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Proanthocyanidins against Oxidative Stress: From Molecular Mechanisms to Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Xia; Lai, Rui

    2018-01-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PCs) are naturally occurring polyphenolic compounds abundant in many vegetables, plant skins (rind/bark), seeds, flowers, fruits, and nuts. Numerous in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated myriad effects potentially beneficial to human health, such as antioxidation, anti-inflammation, immunomodulation, DNA repair, and antitumor activity. Accumulation of prooxidants such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) exceeding cellular antioxidant capacity results in oxidative stress (OS), which can damage macromolecules (DNA, lipids, and proteins), organelles (membranes and mitochondria), and whole tissues. OS is implicated in the pathogenesis and exacerbation of many cardiovascular, neurodegenerative, dermatological, and metabolic diseases, both through direct molecular damage and secondary activation of stress-associated signaling pathways. PCs are promising natural agents to safely prevent acute damage and control chronic diseases at relatively low cost. In this review, we summarize the molecules and signaling pathways involved in OS and the corresponding therapeutic mechanisms of PCs. PMID:29750172

  1. Oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation in prolonged users of methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Solhi, Hassan; Malekirad, Aliakbar; Kazemifar, Amir Mohammad; Sharifi, Farzaneh

    2014-07-01

    Methamphetamine abuse results in numerous adverse health effects. Formation of free radicals may be a contributing factor. Methamphetamine has produced free radicals in animal studies. Present study was conducted to evaluate status of oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation among chronic methamphetamine users. Ninety six individuals were selected randomly from methamphetamine abusers who had referred to rehabilitation and treatment center for drug abuse and their closed relatives, after providing informed consent. Blood samples were taken from each of the studied individuals. Ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) assay and serum level of MDA (malondialdehyde) were used to assess the total anti-oxidant power and status of lipid peroxidation of the body, respectively. The results were analyzed by SPSS software version 16.0. Differences among groups were determined by T-test. Total anti-oxidant powers of plasma were 0.31±0.04 micromoles/liter and 0.46±0.05 micromoles/liter in methamphetamine abusers and control groups respectively. The difference was statistically significant (p-value=0.04). Levels of MDA were 4.38±5.05 micromoles/liter and 1.72±2.04 micromoles/liter in methamphetamine abusers and control group. The difference was statistically significant (p-value=0.01). results of present study suggest that prolonged use of methamphetamine exerts oxidative stress on the body and enhances lipid peroxidation. The event may contribute to emergence of adverse effects of acute and prolonged use of methamphetamine; such as loss of attention, psychomotor dysfunction, and cognitive deficits. It is recommended that antioxidants were included in drug regimens prescribed for methamphetamine abusers who referred to physicians to seek medical care for any reason.

  2. Trivalent chromium induces oxidative stress in goldfish brain.

    PubMed

    Lushchak, Oleh V; Kubrak, Olha I; Torous, Ihor M; Nazarchuk, Tetyana Yu; Storey, Kenneth B; Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2009-03-01

    Although information on the effects of Cr(6+) in biological systems is abundant, Cr(3+) has received less attention. Toxic effects of chromium compounds are partially associated with activation of redox processes. Recently we found that Cr(6+) induced oxidative stress in goldfish tissues and the glutathione system was shown to play a protective role. The present study aimed to investigate free radical processes in brain of goldfish exposed to CrCl(3). Trivalent chromium at a concentration of 50 mg L(-1) was lethal and therefore we chose to examine sublethal dosages of 1.0-10.0 mg L(-1) in aquarium water. The levels of lipid peroxides and protein carbonyls (measures of oxidative damage to lipids and proteins) in brain increased after 96 h exposure of goldfish to Cr(3+). However, exposure to 1.0-10.0 mg L(-1) Cr(3+) decreased total glutathione concentration in brain by approximately 50-60%. Oxidized glutathione levels also fell by approximately 40-60% except at the 10.0 mg L(-1) dosage where they decreased by 85%. Therefore, 10.0 mg L(-1) Cr(3+) significantly reduced the ratio [GSSG]/[totalGSH] to 35% of the control value. Chromium treatment did not affect the activity of superoxide dismutase, but reduced the activities of catalase by 55-62% and glutathione-S-transferase by 14-21%. The activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase were unchanged under any experimental conditions used. Therefore, it can be concluded that although Cr(3+) exposure induced oxidative stress in goldfish brain, it failed to enhance the efficiency of the antioxidant system in the organ.

  3. [Atherosclerosis, chronic inflammation and oxidative stress in CKD].

    PubMed

    Leoni, Marco; Gorini, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    Chronic low-grade inflammation is emerging as the pathophysiological mechanism underlying of the several chronic degenerative diseases. Atherosclerosis, inflammation and oxidative stress are some of the issues that arise from the general context of chronic inflammation. In this manuscript we analyzed the role of the immune system, metabolism and inflammation's molecular mediators in order to show an overview about only apparently different problems. Finally, we proposed some possible solutions to improve the survival and quality of life of patient with chronic kidney disease. Copyright by Società Italiana di Nefrologia SIN, Rome, Italy.

  4. Impact of diabetes on gingival wound healing via oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Kido, Daisuke; Mizutani, Koji; Takeda, Kohei; Mikami, Risako; Matsuura, Takanori; Iwasaki, Kengo; Izumi, Yuichi

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the mechanisms linking high glucose to gingival wound healing. Bilateral wounds were created in the palatal gingiva adjacent to maxillary molars of control rats and rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. After evaluating postsurgical wound closure by digital imaging, the maxillae including wounds were resected for histological examinations. mRNA expressions of angiogenesis, inflammation, and oxidative stress markers in the surgical sites were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Primary fibroblast culture from the gingiva of both rats was performed in high glucose and normal medium. In vitro wound healing and cell proliferation assays were performed. Oxidative stress marker mRNA expressions and reactive oxygen species production were measured. Insulin resistance was evaluated via PI3K/Akt and MAPK/Erk signaling following insulin stimulation using Western blotting. To clarify oxidative stress involvement in high glucose culture and cells of diabetic rats, cells underwent N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment; subsequent Akt activity was measured. Wound healing in diabetic rats was significantly delayed compared with that in control rats. Nox1, Nox2, Nox4, p-47, and tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA levels were significantly higher at baseline in diabetic rats than in control rats. In vitro study showed that cell proliferation and migration significantly decreased in diabetic and high glucose culture groups compared with control groups. Nox1, Nox2, Nox4, and p47 expressions and reactive oxygen species production were significantly higher in diabetic and high glucose culture groups than in control groups. Akt phosphorylation decreased in the high glucose groups compared with the control groups. Erk1/2 phosphorylation increased in the high glucose groups, with or without insulin treatment, compared with the control groups. Impaired Akt phosphorylation partially normalized after antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment

  5. Effects of creatine supplementation on oxidative stress profile of athletes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Creatine (Cr) supplementation has been widely used among athletes and physically active individuals. Secondary to its performance-enhancing ability, an increase in oxidative stress may occur, thus prompting concern about its use. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of Cr monohydrate supplementation and resistance training on muscle strength and oxidative stress profile in healthy athletes. Methods A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled method was used to assess twenty-six male elite Brazilian handball players divided into 3 groups: Cr monohydrate supplemented group (GC, N = 9), placebo group (GP, N = 9), no treatment group (COT, N = 8) for 32 days. All subjects underwent a resistance training program. Blood samples were drawn on 0 and 32 days post Cr supplementation to analyze the oxidative stress markers, thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS), total antioxidant status (TAS), and uric acid. Creatine phosphokinase, urea, and creatinine were also analyzed, as well. Fitness tests (1 repetition maximum - 1RM and muscle endurance) were performed on the bench press. Body weight and height, body fat percentage (by measuring skin folds) and upper muscular area were also evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA. Results Only GC group showed increase in 1RM (54 ± 9 vs. 63 ± 10 kg; p = 0.0356) and uric acid (4.6 ± 1.0 vs. 7.4 ± 1.6 mg/dl; p = 0.025), with a decrease in TAS (1.11 ± 0.34 vs. 0.60 ± 0.19 mmol/l; p = 0.001). No differences (pre- vs. post-training) in TBARS, creatine phosphokinase, urea, creatinine, body weight and height, body fat percentage, or upper muscular area were observed in any group. When compared to COT, GC group showed greater decrease in TAS (−0.51 ± 0.36 vs. -0.02 ± 0.50 mmol/l; p = 0.0268), higher increase in 1RM (8.30 ± 2.26 vs. 5.29 ± 2.36 kg; p = 0.0209) and uric acid (2.77 ± 1.70 vs. 1.00 ± 1.03 mg/dl; p = 0.0276). Conclusion We conclude that Cr monohydrate

  6. Oxidative Stress and Immune System in Vitiligo and Thyroid Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Colucci, Roberta; Dragoni, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired dermatological disease frequently associated with autoimmune thyroid disorders. Several theories have been proposed so far to unravel the complex vitiligo pathogenesis. Currently, the autocytotoxic and the autoimmune theories are the most accredited hypothesis, since they are sustained by several important clinical and experimental evidences. A growing body of evidences shows that autoimmunity and oxidative stress strictly interact to finally determine melanocyte loss. In this scenario, associated thyroid autoimmunity might play an active and important role in triggering and maintaining the depigmentation process of vitiligo. PMID:25838868

  7. Impact of diabetes on gingival wound healing via oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kido, Daisuke; Mizutani, Koji; Takeda, Kohei; Mikami, Risako; Matsuura, Takanori; Iwasaki, Kengo; Izumi, Yuichi

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the mechanisms linking high glucose to gingival wound healing. Bilateral wounds were created in the palatal gingiva adjacent to maxillary molars of control rats and rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. After evaluating postsurgical wound closure by digital imaging, the maxillae including wounds were resected for histological examinations. mRNA expressions of angiogenesis, inflammation, and oxidative stress markers in the surgical sites were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Primary fibroblast culture from the gingiva of both rats was performed in high glucose and normal medium. In vitro wound healing and cell proliferation assays were performed. Oxidative stress marker mRNA expressions and reactive oxygen species production were measured. Insulin resistance was evaluated via PI3K/Akt and MAPK/Erk signaling following insulin stimulation using Western blotting. To clarify oxidative stress involvement in high glucose culture and cells of diabetic rats, cells underwent N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment; subsequent Akt activity was measured. Wound healing in diabetic rats was significantly delayed compared with that in control rats. Nox1, Nox2, Nox4, p-47, and tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA levels were significantly higher at baseline in diabetic rats than in control rats. In vitro study showed that cell proliferation and migration significantly decreased in diabetic and high glucose culture groups compared with control groups. Nox1, Nox2, Nox4, and p47 expressions and reactive oxygen species production were significantly higher in diabetic and high glucose culture groups than in control groups. Akt phosphorylation decreased in the high glucose groups compared with the control groups. Erk1/2 phosphorylation increased in the high glucose groups, with or without insulin treatment, compared with the control groups. Impaired Akt phosphorylation partially normalized after antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment

  8. Fundamental studies of stress distributions and stress relaxation in oxide scales on high temperature alloys. [Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Shores, D.A.; Stout, J.H.; Gerberich, W.W.

    1993-06-01

    This report summarizes a three-year study of stresses arising in the oxide scale and underlying metal during high temperature oxidation and of scale cracking. In-situ XRD was developed to measure strains during oxidation over 1000{degrees}C on pure metals. Acoustic emission was used to observe scale fracture during isothermal oxidation and cooling, and statistical analysis was used to infer mechanical aspects of cracking. A microscratch technique was used to measure the fracture toughness of scale/metal interface. A theoretical model was evaluated for the development and relaxation of stresses in scale and metal substrate during oxidation.

  9. Adaptive stress response to menadione-induced oxidative stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae KNU5377.

    PubMed

    Kim, Il-Sup; Sohn, Ho-Yong; Jin, Ingnyol

    2011-10-01

    The molecular mechanisms involved in the ability of yeast cells to adapt and respond to oxidative stress are of great interest to the pharmaceutical, medical, food, and fermentation industries. In this study, we investigated the time-dependent, cellular redox homeostasis ability to adapt to menadione-induced oxidative stress, using biochemical and proteomic approaches in Saccharomyces cerevisiae KNU5377. Time-dependent cell viability was inversely proportional to endogenous amounts of ROS measured by a fluorescence assay with 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFHDA), and was hypersensitive when cells were exposed to the compound for 60 min. Morphological changes, protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation were also observed. To overcome the unfavorable conditions due to the presence of menadione, yeast cells activated a variety of cell rescue proteins including antioxidant enzymes, molecular chaperones, energy-generating metabolic enzymes, and antioxidant molecules such as trehalose. Thus, these results show that menadione causes ROS generation and high accumulation of cellular ROS levels, which affects cell viability and cell morphology and there is a correlation between resistance to menadione and the high induction of cell rescue proteins after cells enter into this physiological state, which provides a clue about the complex and dynamic stress response in yeast cells.

  10. Oxidative stress, oxidative balance score, and hypertension among a racially diverse population.

    PubMed

    Annor, Francis B; Goodman, Michael; Okosun, Ike S; Wilmot, Douglas W; Il'yasova, Dora; Ndirangu, Murugi; Lakkur, Sindhu

    2015-08-01

    Hypertension is a risk factor for several vascular diseases. Evidence suggests that oxidative stress (OS) plays a significant role in its pathophysiology. Human studies have shown inconsistent results, varying based on the OS biomarker and study population. In a racially diverse population, examine the association between: (1) blood pressure or hypertension and four markers of OS and (2) blood pressure or hypertension and oxidative balance score (OBS). Using data (n = 317) from the cross-sectional study on race, stress, and hypertension, an OBS was constructed from various measures of pro-oxidant and antioxidant exposures. OS was assessed by four biomarkers: fluorescence oxidative products, F2-isoprostanes, mitochondrial DNA copy number, and gamma tocopherol. Multivariate linear and logistic regression analyses were used to estimate the associations of interest. None of the adjusted associations between hypertension and OS markers was statistically significant. OBS was inversely associated with hypertension after adjusting for study covariates. Persons with higher OBS have lower odds of having hypertension; however, the evidence on the relationship between OS markers and blood pressure remains unconvincing. Copyright © 2015 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Limitations in Using Chemical Oxidative Potential to Understand Oxidative Stress from Particulate Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, A. W. H.; Wang, S.; Wang, X.; Kohl, L.; Chow, C. W.

    2017-12-01

    Particulate matter (PM) in the atmosphere is known to cause adverse cardiorespiratory health effects. It has been suggested that the ability of PM to generate oxidative stress leads to a proinflammatory response. In this work, we study the biological relevance of using a chemical oxidative potential (OP) assay to evaluate proinflammatory response in airway epithelial cells. Here we study the OPs of laboratory secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and metal mixtures, ambient PM from India, ash from the 2016 Alberta wildfires, and diesel exhaust particles. We use SOA derived from naphthalene and from monoterpenes as model systems for SOA. We measure OP using the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay, and cytosolic reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in BEAS-2B cell culture was measured using CellROX assay. We found that both SOA and copper show high OPs individually, but the OP of the combined SOA/copper mixture, which is more atmospherically relevant, was lower than either of the individual OPs. The reduced activity is attributed to chelation between metals and organic compounds using proton nuclear magnetic resonance. There is reasonable association between DTT activity and cellular ROS production within each particle type, but weak association across different particle types, suggesting that particle composition plays an important role in distinguishing between antioxidant consumption and ROS production. Our results highlight that while oxidative potential is a useful metric of PM's ability to generate oxidative stress, the chemical composition and cellular environment should be considered in understanding health impacts of PM.

  12. [Influence of dietary intake on plasma biomarkers of oxidative stress in humans].

    PubMed

    Barbosa, K B F; Bressan, J; Zulet, M A; Martínez Hernández, J A

    2008-01-01

    Oxidative stress is related to an imbalance between the production of reactive species and the antioxidant defenses. In essence, oxidative stress has been defined as a disturbance in the pro-oxidant/antioxidant balance, leading to potential damage. It has been suggested that oxidative stress is involved in the etiology of several chronic diseases including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer and neurodegenerative processes. The antioxidant defenses include nonenzymatic (especially dietary antioxidants) and antioxidant enzymes. Vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals (polyphenols and carotenoids) are among the major dietary antioxidants. The assessment of oxidative stress status though specific biomarkers has acquired great importance. The major biomarkers include the products of the attack of free radicals and reactive species to various substrates: lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. Measurement of antioxidant capacity may also involve the assessment of specific oxidative stress biomarkers. Most of the studies that have examined the association between diet and oxidative stress consider the effects of antioxidant supplements (vitamins and minerals), drinks and foods with bioactive compounds or dietary patterns on oxidative stress biomarkers. Some of these studies have demonstrated beneficial results on oxidative stress markers. However, the role of diet on oxidative stress biomarkers remains unclear and represents a potentially fruitful area for further research in the health area.

  13. Honey Bee (Apis mellifera) Drones Survive Oxidative Stress due to Increased Tolerance instead of Avoidance or Repair of Oxidative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Huang, Ming Hua; Simone-Finstrom, Michael; Strand, Micheline K.; Tarpy, David R.; Rueppell, Olav

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress can lead to premature aging symptoms and cause acute mortality at higher doses in a range of organisms. Oxidative stress resistance and longevity are mechanistically and phenotypically linked; considerable variation in oxidative stress resistance exists among and within species and typically covaries with life expectancy. However, it is unclear whether stress-resistant, long-lived individuals avoid, repair, or tolerate molecular damage to survive longer than others. The honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) is an emerging model system that is well-suited to address this question. Furthermore, this species is the most economically important pollinator, whose health may be compromised by pesticide exposure, including oxidative stressors. Here, we develop a protocol for inducing oxidative stress in honey bee males (drones) via Paraquat injection. After injection, individuals from different colony sources were kept in common social conditions to monitor their survival compared to saline-injected controls. Oxidative stress was measured in susceptible and resistant individuals. Paraquat drastically reduced survival but individuals varied in their resistance to treatment within and among colony sources. Longer-lived individuals exhibited higher levels of lipid peroxidation than individuals dying early. In contrast, the level of protein carbonylation was not significantly different between the two groups. This first study of oxidative stress in male honey bees suggests that survival of an acute oxidative stressor is due to tolerance, not prevention or repair, of oxidative damage to lipids. It also demonstrates colony differences in oxidative stress resistance that might be useful for breeding stress-resistant honey bees. PMID:27422326

  14. Honey bee (Apis mellifera) drones survive oxidative stress due to increased tolerance instead of avoidance or repair of oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Huang, Ming Hua; Simone-Finstrom, Michael; Strand, Micheline K; Tarpy, David R; Rueppell, Olav

    2016-10-01

    Oxidative stress can lead to premature aging symptoms and cause acute mortality at higher doses in a range of organisms. Oxidative stress resistance and longevity are mechanistically and phenotypically linked; considerable variation in oxidative stress resistance exists among and within species and typically covaries with life expectancy. However, it is unclear whether stress-resistant, long-lived individuals avoid, repair, or tolerate molecular damage to survive longer than others. The honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) is an emerging model system that is well-suited to address this question. Furthermore, this species is the most economically important pollinator, whose health may be compromised by pesticide exposure, including oxidative stressors. Here, we develop a protocol for inducing oxidative stress in honey bee males (drones) via Paraquat injection. After injection, individuals from different colony sources were kept in common social conditions to monitor their survival compared to saline-injected controls. Oxidative stress was measured in susceptible and resistant individuals. Paraquat drastically reduced survival but individuals varied in their resistance to treatment within and among colony sources. Longer-lived individuals exhibited higher levels of lipid peroxidation than individuals dying early. In contrast, the level of protein carbonylation was not significantly different between the two groups. This first study of oxidative stress in male honey bees suggests that survival of an acute oxidative stressor is due to tolerance, not prevention or repair, of oxidative damage to lipids. It also demonstrates colony differences in oxidative stress resistance that might be useful for breeding stress-resistant honey bees. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Bad, the Good, and the Ugly about Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Del-Rio, Marlene; Velez-Pardo, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and cancer (e.g., leukemia) are the most devastating disorders affecting millions of people worldwide. Except for some kind of cancers, no effective and/or definitive therapeutic treatment aimed to reduce or to retard the clinic and pathologic symptoms induced by AD and PD is presently available. Therefore, it is urgently needed to understand the molecular basis of these disorders. Since oxidative stress (OS) is an important etiologic factor of the pathologic process of AD, PD, and cancer, understanding how intracellular signaling pathways respond to OS will have a significant implication in the therapy of these diseases. Here, we propose a model of minimal completeness of cell death signaling induced by OS as a mechanistic explanation of neuronal and cancer cell demise. This mechanism might provide the basis for therapeutic design strategies. Finally, we will attempt to associate PD, cancer, and OS. This paper critically analyzes the evidence that support the “oxidative stress model” in neurodegeneration and cancer. PMID:22619696

  16. Cirrhosis induces apoptosis in renal tissue through intracellular oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Keli Cristina Simões da; Viau, Cassiana Macagnan; Colares, Josiane Raskopf; Saffi, Jenifer; Marroni, Norma Possa; Porawski, Marilene

    2015-01-01

    Renal failure is a frequent and serious complication in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. We aimed to evaluate the renal oxidative stress, cell damage and impaired cell function in animal model of cirrhosis. Secondary biliary cirrhosis was induced in rats by ligation of the common bile duct. We measured TBARS, ROS and mitochondrial membrane potential in kidney as markers of oxidative stress, and activities of the antioxidant enzymes. Relative cell viability was determined by trypan blue dye-exclusion assay. Annexin V-PE was used with a vital dye, 7-AAD, to distinguish apoptotic from necrotic cells and comet assay was used for determined DNA integrity in single cells. In bile duct ligation animals there was significant increase in the kidney lipoperoxidation and an increase of the level of intracellular ROS. There was too an increase in the activity of all antioxidant enzymes evaluated in the kidney. The percentage viability was above 90% in the control group and in bile duct ligation was 64.66% and the dominant cell death type was apoptosis. DNA damage was observed in the bile duct ligation. There was a decreased in the mitochondrial membrane potential from 71.40% ± 6.35% to 34.48% ± 11.40% in bile duct ligation. These results indicate that intracellular increase of ROS cause damage in the DNA and apoptosis getting worse the renal function in cirrhosis.

  17. The role of oxidative stress and antioxidants in male fertility

    PubMed Central

    Walczak–Jedrzejowska, Renata; Wolski, Jan Karol

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress results from the imbalance between production of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the protective effect of the antioxidant system responsible for their neutralization and removal. An excess of ROS causes a pathological reaction resulting in damage to cells and tissues. Spermatozoa are particularly vulnerable to the harmful effects of ROS. Oxidative stress affects their activity, damages DNA structure, and accelerates apoptosis, all of which consequently decrease their numbers, hinders motility and development of normal morphology, and impairs function. This leads to disturbances in fertility or embryo development disorder. The main cellular source of ROS in the semen are immature sperm cells and white blood cells. The increase in the number of leukocytes may be due to infection and inflammation, but can also be secondary to harmful environmental factors, long sexual abstinence, or varicocele. The protective antioxidant system in the semen is composed of enzymes, as well as nonenzymatic substances, which closely interact with each other to ensure optimal protection against ROS. Non–enzymatic antioxidants include vitamins A, E, C, and B complex, glutathione, pantothenic acid, coenzyme Q10 and carnitine, and micronutrients such as zinc, selenium, and copper. It seems that a deficiency of any of them can cause a decrease in total antioxidant status. In vitro and in vivo that studies demonstrate many antioxidants possess a beneficial effect on fertility and, therefore, their use is recommended as supportive therapy for the treatment of infertility in men. PMID:24578993

  18. The role of oxidative stress and antioxidants in male fertility.

    PubMed

    Walczak-Jedrzejowska, Renata; Wolski, Jan Karol; Slowikowska-Hilczer, Jolanta

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress results from the imbalance between production of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the protective effect of the antioxidant system responsible for their neutralization and removal. An excess of ROS causes a pathological reaction resulting in damage to cells and tissues. Spermatozoa are particularly vulnerable to the harmful effects of ROS. Oxidative stress affects their activity, damages DNA structure, and accelerates apoptosis, all of which consequently decrease their numbers, hinders motility and development of normal morphology, and impairs function. This leads to disturbances in fertility or embryo development disorder. The main cellular source of ROS in the semen are immature sperm cells and white blood cells. The increase in the number of leukocytes may be due to infection and inflammation, but can also be secondary to harmful environmental factors, long sexual abstinence, or varicocele. The protective antioxidant system in the semen is composed of enzymes, as well as nonenzymatic substances, which closely interact with each other to ensure optimal protection against ROS. Non-enzymatic antioxidants include vitamins A, E, C, and B complex, glutathione, pantothenic acid, coenzyme Q10 and carnitine, and micronutrients such as zinc, selenium, and copper. It seems that a deficiency of any of them can cause a decrease in total antioxidant status. In vitro and in vivo that studies demonstrate many antioxidants possess a beneficial effect on fertility and, therefore, their use is recommended as supportive therapy for the treatment of infertility in men.

  19. Exposure of rat hippocampal astrocytes to Ziram increases oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Matei, Ann-Marie; Trombetta, Louis D

    2016-04-01

    Pesticides have been shown in several studies to be the leading candidates of environmental toxins and may contribute to the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases. Ziram (zinc-bis(dimethyldithiocarbamate)) is an agricultural dithiocarbamate fungicide that is used to treat a variety of plant diseases. In spite of their generally acknowledged low toxicity, dithiocarbamates are known to cause a wide range of neurobehavioral effects as well as neuropathological changes in the brain. Astrocytes play a key role in normal brain physiology and in the pathology of the nervous system. This investigation studied the effects of 1.0 µM Ziram on rat hippocampal astrocytes. The thiobarbituric acid reactive substance assay performed showed a significant increase in malondialdehyde, a product of lipid peroxidation, in the Ziram-treated cells. Biochemical analysis also revealed a significant increase in the induction of 70 kDa heat shock and heme oxygenase 1 stress proteins. In addition, an increase of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and a significant increase in oxidized glutathione (GSSG) were observed in the Ziram-treated cells. The ratio GSH to GSSG calculated from the treated cells was also decreased. Light and transmission electron microscopy supported the biochemical findings in Ziram-treated astrocytes. This data suggest that the cytotoxic effects observed with Ziram treatments may be related to the increase of oxidative stress. © The Author(s) 2013.

  20. Oxidative stress in aging: advances in proteomic approaches.

    PubMed

    Ortuño-Sahagún, Daniel; Pallàs, Mercè; Rojas-Mayorquín, Argelia E

    2014-01-01

    Aging is a gradual, complex process in which cells, tissues, organs, and the whole organism itself deteriorate in a progressive and irreversible manner that, in the majority of cases, implies pathological conditions that affect the individual's Quality of Life (QOL). Although extensive research efforts in recent years have been made, the anticipation of aging and prophylactic or treatment strategies continue to experience major limitations. In this review, the focus is essentially on the compilation of the advances generated by cellular expression profile analysis through proteomics studies (two-dimensional [2D] electrophoresis and mass spectrometry [MS]), which are currently used as an integral approach to study the aging process. Additionally, the relevance of the oxidative stress factors is discussed. Emphasis is placed on postmitotic tissues, such as neuronal, muscular, and red blood cells, which appear to be those most frequently studied with respect to aging. Additionally, models for the study of aging are discussed in a number of organisms, such as Caenorhabditis elegans, senescence-accelerated probe-8 mice (SAMP8), naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber), and the beagle canine. Proteomic studies in specific tissues and organisms have revealed the extensive involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress in aging.

  1. Protective effect of sulforaphane against oxidative stress: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Beltrán, Carlos Enrique; Calderón-Oliver, Mariel; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Chirino, Yolanda Irasema

    2012-07-01

    Sulforaphane [1-isothiocyanate-(4R)-(methylsulfinyl)butane] is a natural dietary isothiocyanate produced by the enzymatic action of the myrosinase on glucopharanin, a 4-methylsulfinylbutyl glucosinolate contained in cruciferous vegetables of the genus Brassica such as broccoli, brussel sprouts, and cabbage. Studies on this compound is increasing because its anticarcinogenic and cytoprotective properties in several in vivo experimental paradigms associated with oxidative stress such as focal cerebral ischemia, brain inflammation, intracerebral hemorrhage, ischemia and reperfusion induced acute renal failure, cisplatin induced-nephrotoxicity, streptozotocin-induced diabetes, carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatotoxicity and cardiac ischemia and reperfusion. This protective effect also has been observed in in vitro studies in different cell lines such as human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y, renal epithelial proximal tubule LLC-PK1 cells and aortic smooth muscle A10 cells. Sulforaphane is considered an indirect antioxidant; this compound is able to induce many cytoprotective proteins, including antioxidant enzymes, through the Nrf2-antioxidant response element pathway. Heme oxygenase-1, NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase, glutathione-S-transferase, gamma-glutamyl cysteine ligase, and glutathione reductase are among the cytoprotective proteins induced by sulforaphane. In conclusion, sulforaphane is a promising antioxidant agent that is effective to attenuate oxidative stress and tissue/cell damage in different in vivo and in vitro experimental paradigms. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Oxidative stress in dairy cows seropositives for Neospora caninum.

    PubMed

    Glombowsky, Patrícia; Bottari, Nathieli B; Klauck, Vanderlei; Fávero, Juscivete F; Soldá, Natan M; Baldissera, Matheus D; Perin, Gessica; Morsch, Vera M; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Stefani, Lenita M; Da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2017-10-01

    Bovine neosporosis is caused by the protozoan Neospora caninum and is one of the major causes of abortion in cows. Cattle are intermediate hosts of this parasite and may have asymptomatic or symptomatic infections. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate oxidative stress marker reactive oxygen species (ROS), thiobarbituric reactive acid substances (TBARS) levels, glutathione S-transferase (GST), adenosine deaminase (ADA), and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) activities in dairy cows seropositives for N. caninum (asymptomatic or symptomatic). Dairy cows (n=90) were tested by immunofluorescent antibody assay (IFA) for N. caninum and divided accordingly into three groups: the group A (seronegatives, n=30), the group B (seropositives and asymptomatic, n=30), and the group C (seropositives and symptomatic, n=30). It was observed increased levels of TBARS and reduced (P<0.05) BChE activity in seropositives either asymptomatic or symptomatic animals. ROS levels and ADA activity increased, and GST activity decreased (P<0.05) only in seropositives symptomatic dairy cows (the group C) compared to seronegatives dairy cows (the group A). Based on these results, it was observed that seropositive animals showed cell damage associated with oxidative stress and inflammation, mainly in those with symptomatic infections. Increased seric ROS levels and BChE activity may have influenced N. caninum pathogenesis in symptomatic animals due to increased cell damage and exacerbated inflammatory response, leading to the development of clinical signs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Oxidative stress equilibrium during obstetric event in normal pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Salas-Pacheco, Jose Manuel; Lourenco-Jaramillo, Diana Lelidett; Mendez-Hernandez, Edna Madai; Sandoval-Carrillo, Ada Agustina; Hernandez Rayon, Yessica Ivonne; Llave-Leon, Osmel La; Aguilar-Duran, Marisela; Lopez-Terrones, Marcos Alonso; Barraza-Salas, Marcelo; Vazquez-Alaniz, Fernando

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration as an oxidative stress marker and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in pregnancy before and after perinatal event. This study was performed on 200 healthy full-term pregnant women admitted to pregnancy resolution in Maternal-Child Hospital of Durango, Mexico. Oxidative stress and TAC were assessed through detection of lipid peroxidation by quantitation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) and TAC through ferric reducing ability of the plasma (FRAP). Our results showed increased levels of MDA after vaginal delivery (VD). TAC was also increased after obstetric event, but it did not differ between VD and caesarean section. We demonstrated that MDA concentrations are increased two hours after obstetric event, and this increase correlates with VD. The TAC was increased as a compensatory mechanism during obstetric event. Another important finding is that women receiving analgesia administration in VD, as well as dexamethasone administration in caesarean section, experienced a protector effect that decreased MDA levels.

  4. Hyperhydricity in micropropagated carnation shoots: the role of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Saher, Shady; Piqueras, Abel; Hellin, Eladio; Olmos, Enrique

    2004-01-01

    The physiology of hyperhydricity in relation to oxidative stress, mineral nutrients, antioxidant enzymes and ethylene has been studied in three micropropagated carnation cultivars under experimentally induced hyperhydricity. A marked increase in Fe content in comparison with normal tissues was observed in the hyperhydric tissues from the three cultivars. The levels of ethylene, solute leakage and malondialdehyde content were also significantly higher in the hyperhydric tissues. In relation to the time course of H(2)O(2) production measured by fluorescence quenching, a similar trend could be observed for the three cultivars, with a clear increase in the generation of hydrogen peroxide in hyperhydric tissues. The activities of all the antioxidative enzymes studied, except lipoxygenase, were higher in the hyperhydric shoots. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) showed a significant decrease in activity in the hyperhydric tissues in comparison with the controls for the three cultivars. Soluble guaiacol peroxidase had a strong increase in activity in hyperhydric shoots of the three cultivars. These results provide, for the first time, direct evidence of H(2)O(2) generation in hyperhydric tissues, characterize the response of the antioxidant system to an oxidative stress during hyperhydricity in carnation leaves and point to the accumulation of toxic forms of oxygen as the inducer of some of the abnormalities observed.

  5. Roles of Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Vascular Dysfunction in Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Dinh, Quynh N.; Drummond, Grant R.; Sobey, Christopher G.

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is a complex condition and is the most common cardiovascular risk factor, contributing to widespread morbidity and mortality. Approximately 90% of hypertension cases are classified as essential hypertension, where the precise cause is unknown. Hypertension is associated with inflammation; however, whether inflammation is a cause or effect of hypertension is not well understood. The purpose of this review is to describe evidence from human and animal studies that inflammation leads to the development of hypertension, as well as the evidence for involvement of oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction—both thought to be key steps in the development of hypertension. Other potential proinflammatory conditions that contribute to hypertension—such as activation of the sympathetic nervous system, aging, and elevated aldosterone—are also discussed. Finally, we consider the potential benefit of anti-inflammatory drugs and statins for antihypertensive therapy. The evidence reviewed suggests that inflammation can lead to the development of hypertension and that oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction are involved in the inflammatory cascade. Aging and aldosterone may also both be involved in inflammation and hypertension. Hence, in the absence of serious side effects, anti-inflammatory drugs could potentially be used to treat hypertension in the future. PMID:25136585

  6. New Insights for Oxidative Stress and Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the generation of oxidative stress are considered critical factors for the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus (DM), a disorder that is growing in prevalence and results in significant economic loss. New therapeutic directions that address the detrimental effects of oxidative stress may be especially warranted to develop effective care for the millions of individuals that currently suffer from DM. The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (S. cerevisiae) (SIRT1), and Wnt1 inducible signaling pathway protein 1 (WISP1) are especially justified to be considered treatment targets for DM since these pathways can address the complex relationship between stem cells, trophic factors, impaired glucose tolerance, programmed cell death pathways of apoptosis and autophagy, tissue remodeling, cellular energy homeostasis, and vascular biology that greatly impact the biology and disease progression of DM. The translation and development of these pathways into viable therapies will require detailed understanding of their proliferative nature to maximize clinical efficacy and limit adverse effects that have the potential to lead to unintended consequences. PMID:26064426

  7. Oxidative stress promotes pathologic polyploidization in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Gentric, Géraldine; Maillet, Vanessa; Paradis, Valérie; Couton, Dominique; L’Hermitte, Antoine; Panasyuk, Ganna; Fromenty, Bernard; Celton-Morizur, Séverine; Desdouets, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    Polyploidization is one of the most dramatic changes that can occur in the genome. In the liver, physiological polyploidization events occur during both liver development and throughout adult life. Here, we determined that a pathological polyploidization takes place in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a widespread hepatic metabolic disorder that is believed to be a risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In murine models of NAFLD, the parenchyma of fatty livers displayed alterations of the polyploidization process, including the presence of a large proportion of highly polyploid mononuclear cells, which are rarely observed in normal hepatic parenchyma. Biopsies from patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) revealed the presence of alterations in hepatocyte ploidy compared with tissue from control individuals. Hepatocytes from NAFLD mice revealed that progression through the S/G2 phases of the cell cycle was inefficient. This alteration was associated with activation of a G2/M DNA damage checkpoint, which prevented activation of the cyclin B1/CDK1 complex. Furthermore, we determined that oxidative stress promotes the appearance of highly polyploid cells, and antioxidant-treated NAFLD hepatocytes resumed normal cell division and returned to a physiological state of polyploidy. Collectively, these findings indicate that oxidative stress promotes pathological polyploidization and suggest that this is an early event in NAFLD that may contribute to HCC development. PMID:25621497

  8. Oxidative stress promotes pathologic polyploidization in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Gentric, Géraldine; Maillet, Vanessa; Paradis, Valérie; Couton, Dominique; L'Hermitte, Antoine; Panasyuk, Ganna; Fromenty, Bernard; Celton-Morizur, Séverine; Desdouets, Chantal

    2015-03-02

    Polyploidization is one of the most dramatic changes that can occur in the genome. In the liver, physiological polyploidization events occur during both liver development and throughout adult life. Here, we determined that a pathological polyploidization takes place in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a widespread hepatic metabolic disorder that is believed to be a risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In murine models of NAFLD, the parenchyma of fatty livers displayed alterations of the polyploidization process, including the presence of a large proportion of highly polyploid mononuclear cells, which are rarely observed in normal hepatic parenchyma. Biopsies from patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) revealed the presence of alterations in hepatocyte ploidy compared with tissue from control individuals. Hepatocytes from NAFLD mice revealed that progression through the S/G2 phases of the cell cycle was inefficient. This alteration was associated with activation of a G2/M DNA damage checkpoint, which prevented activation of the cyclin B1/CDK1 complex. Furthermore, we determined that oxidative stress promotes the appearance of highly polyploid cells, and antioxidant-treated NAFLD hepatocytes resumed normal cell division and returned to a physiological state of polyploidy. Collectively, these findings indicate that oxidative stress promotes pathological polyploidization and suggest that this is an early event in NAFLD that may contribute to HCC development.

  9. Uranium induces oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Periyakaruppan, Adaikkappan; Kumar, Felix; Sarkar, Shubhashish; Sharma, Chidananda S.

    2009-01-01

    Uranium compounds are widely used in the nuclear fuel cycle, antitank weapons, tank armor, and also as a pigment to color ceramics and glass. Effective management of waste uranium compounds is necessary to prevent exposure to avoid adverse health effects on the population. Health risks associated with uranium exposure includes kidney disease and respiratory disorders. In addition, several published results have shown uranium or depleted uranium causes DNA damage, mutagenicity, cancer and neurological defects. In the current study, uranium toxicity was evaluated in rat lung epithelial cells. The study shows uranium induces significant oxidative stress in rat lung epithelial cells followed by concomitant decrease in the antioxidant potential of the cells. Treatment with uranium to rat lung epithelial cells also decreased cell proliferation after 72 h in culture. The decrease in cell proliferation was attributed to loss of total glutathione and superoxide dismutase in the presence of uranium. Thus the results indicate the ineffectiveness of antioxidant system’s response to the oxidative stress induced by uranium in the cells. PMID:17124605

  10. Metal-induced oxidative stress in terrestrial macrolichens.

    PubMed

    Kováčik, Jozef; Dresler, Sławomir; Peterková, Viera; Babula, Petr

    2018-07-01

    Short-term (24 h) responses of Cladonia arbuscula subsp. mitis and Cladonia furcata to copper (CuII) or chromium (CrIII) excess (10 or 100 μM) were compared. C. arbuscula accumulated more Cu and Cr at higher metal doses but both species revealed depletion of K and/or Ca amount. Not only Cu but also Cr typically elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation (fluorescence microscopy detection of total ROS and hydrogen peroxide) and depleted nitric oxide (NO) signal, with Cu showing more negative impact on lipid peroxidation (BODIPY 581/591 C11 staining reagent). Metals and staining reagents also affected anatomical responses and photobiont/mycobiont visibility. Principally different impact of Cu and Cr was observed at antioxidative metabolites level, indicating various ways of metal-induced ROS removal and/or metal chelation: Cu strongly depleted glutathione (GSH) and stimulated phytochelatin 2 (PC2) content while ascorbic acid accumulation was depleted by Cu and stimulated by Cr. Subsequent experiment with GSH biosynthetic inhibitor (buthionine sulfoximine, BSO) revealed that 48 h of exposure is needed to deplete GSH and BSO-induced depletion of GSH and PC2 amounts under Cu or Cr excess elevated ROS but depleted NO. These data suggest close relations between thiols, NO and appearance of oxidative stress (ROS generation) under metallic stress also in lichens. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Oxidative stress contributes to methamphetamine-induced left ventricular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lord, Kevin C; Shenouda, Sylvia K; McIlwain, Elizabeth; Charalampidis, Dimitrios; Lucchesi, Pamela A; Varner, Kurt J

    2010-07-01

    Our aim was to test the hypothesis that the repeated, binge administration of methamphetamine would produce oxidative stress in the myocardium leading to structural remodeling and impaired left ventricular function. Echocardiography and Millar pressure-volume catheters were used to monitor left ventricular structure and function in rats subjected to four methamphetamine binges (3 mg/kg, iv for 4 days, separated by a 10-day drug-free period). Hearts from treated and control rats were used for histological or proteomic analysis. When compared with saline treatment, four methamphetamine binges produced eccentric left ventricular hypertrophy. The drug also significantly impaired systolic function (decreased fractional shortening, ejection fraction, and adjusted maximal power) and produced significant diastolic dysfunction (increased -dP/dt and tau). Dihydroethedium staining showed that methamphetamine significantly increased (285%) the levels of reactive oxygen species in the left ventricle. Treatment with methamphetamine also resulted in the tyrosine nitration of myofilament (desmin, myosin light chain) and mitochondrial (ATP synthase, NADH dehydrogenase, cytochrome c oxidase, prohibitin) proteins. Treatment with the superoxide dismutase mimetic, tempol in the drinking water prevented methamphetamine-induced left ventricular dilation and systolic dysfunction; however, tempol (2.5 mM) did not prevent the diastolic dysfunction. Tempol significantly reduced, but did not eliminate dihydroethedium staining in the left ventricle, nor did it prevent the tyrosine nitration of mitochondrial and contractile proteins. This study shows that oxidative stress plays a significant role in mediating methamphetamine-induced eccentric left ventricular dilation and systolic dysfunction.

  12. Oxidative Stress in Hypertension: Role of the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Magali

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Renal oxidative stress can be a cause, a consequence, or more often a potentiating factor for hypertension. Increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the kidney have been reported in multiple models of hypertension and related to renal vasoconstriction and alterations of renal function. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase is the central source of ROS in the hypertensive kidney, but a defective antioxidant system also can contribute. Recent Advances: Superoxide has been identified as the principal ROS implicated for vascular and tubular dysfunction, but hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) has been implicated in diminishing preglomerular vascular reactivity, and promoting medullary blood flow and pressure natriuresis in hypertensive animals. Critical Issues and Future Directions: Increased renal ROS have been implicated in renal vasoconstriction, renin release, activation of renal afferent nerves, augmented contraction, and myogenic responses of afferent arterioles, enhanced tubuloglomerular feedback, dysfunction of glomerular cells, and proteinuria. Inhibition of ROS with antioxidants, superoxide dismutase mimetics, or blockers of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system or genetic deletion of one of the components of the signaling cascade often attenuates or delays the onset of hypertension and preserves the renal structure and function. Novel approaches are required to dampen the renal oxidative stress pathways to reduced O2−• rather than H2O2 selectivity and/or to enhance the endogenous antioxidant pathways to susceptible subjects to prevent the development and renal-damaging effects of hypertension. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 74–101. PMID:23472618

  13. Endothelial mitochondrial oxidative stress determines podocyte depletion in segmental glomerulosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Daehn, Ilse; Casalena, Gabriella; Zhang, Taoran; Shi, Shaolin; Fenninger, Franz; Barasch, Nicholas; Yu, Liping; D’Agati, Vivette; Schlondorff, Detlef; Kriz, Wilhelm; Haraldsson, Borje; Bottinger, Erwin P.

    2014-01-01

    Focal segmental glomerular sclerosis (FSGS) is a primary kidney disease that is commonly associated with proteinuria and progressive loss of glomerular function, leading to development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). FSGS is characterized by podocyte injury and depletion and collapse of glomerular capillary segments. Progression of FSGS is associated with TGF-β activation in podocytes; however, it is not clear how TGF-β signaling promotes disease. Here, we determined that podocyte-specific activation of TGF-β signaling in transgenic mice and BALB/c mice with Adriamycin-induced glomerulosclerosis is associated with endothelin-1 (EDN1) release by podocytes, which mediates mitochondrial oxidative stress and dysfunction in adjacent endothelial cells via paracrine EDN1 receptor type A (EDNRA) activation. Endothelial dysfunction promoted podocyte apoptosis, and inhibition of EDNRA or scavenging of mitochondrial-targeted ROS prevented podocyte loss, albuminuria, glomerulosclerosis, and renal failure. We confirmed reciprocal crosstalk between podocytes and endothelial cells in a coculture system. Biopsies from patients with FSGS exhibited increased mitochondrial DNA damage, consistent with EDNRA-mediated glomerular endothelial mitochondrial oxidative stress. Our studies indicate that segmental glomerulosclerosis develops as a result of podocyte-endothelial crosstalk mediated by EDN1/EDNRA-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction and suggest that targeting the reciprocal interaction between podocytes and endothelia may provide opportunities for therapeutic intervention in FSGS. PMID:24590287

  14. The bad, the good, and the ugly about oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Del-Rio, Marlene; Velez-Pardo, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and cancer (e.g., leukemia) are the most devastating disorders affecting millions of people worldwide. Except for some kind of cancers, no effective and/or definitive therapeutic treatment aimed to reduce or to retard the clinic and pathologic symptoms induced by AD and PD is presently available. Therefore, it is urgently needed to understand the molecular basis of these disorders. Since oxidative stress (OS) is an important etiologic factor of the pathologic process of AD, PD, and cancer, understanding how intracellular signaling pathways respond to OS will have a significant implication in the therapy of these diseases. Here, we propose a model of minimal completeness of cell death signaling induced by OS as a mechanistic explanation of neuronal and cancer cell demise. This mechanism might provide the basis for therapeutic design strategies. Finally, we will attempt to associate PD, cancer, and OS. This paper critically analyzes the evidence that support the "oxidative stress model" in neurodegeneration and cancer.

  15. Oxidative stress, microRNAs and cytosolic calcium homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Magenta, Alessandra; Dellambra, Elena; Ciarapica, Roberta; Capogrossi, Maurizio C

    2016-09-01

    Reactive oxygen species increase cytosolic [Ca(2+)], (Cai), and also modulate the expression of some microRNAs (miRNAs), however the link among oxidative stress, miRNAs and Cai is poorly characterized. In this review we have focused on three groups of miRNAs: (a) miRNAs that are modulated both by ROS and Cai: miR-181a and miR-205; (b) miRNAs that are modulated by ROS and have an effect on Cai: miR-1, miR-21, miR-24, miR-25, miR-185 and miR-214; (c) miRNAs that modulate both ROS and Cai: miR-133; miR-145, miR-495, and we have analyzed their effects on cell signaling and cell function. Finally, in the last section we have examined the role of these miRNAs in the skin, under conditions associated with enhanced oxidative stress, i.e. skin aging, the response to ultraviolet light and two important skin diseases, psoriasis and atopic dermatitis. It is apparent that although some experimental evidence is already available on (a) the role of Cai in miRNAs expression and (b) on the ability of some miRNAs to modulate Cai-dependent intracellular signaling, these research lines are still largely unexplored and represent important areas of future studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. 2,4,6-Trichlorophenol cytotoxicity involves oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoning; Zhang, Xiaona; Niu, Zhidan; Qi, Yongmei; Huang, Dejun; Zhang, Yingmei

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the cytotoxicity and potential mechanisms of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP) in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Our results show that 2,4,6-TCP causes morphological changes and reduces cell viability. The overproduction of reactive oxygen species, the upregulation of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1) messenger RNA (mRNA) expressions, and the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 protein demonstrate that 2,4,6-TCP induces oxidative stress, and the Nrf2/HMOX1 pathway might be involved in 2,4,6-TCP-induced antioxidative response. Simultaneously, our data also demonstrate that 2,4,6-TCP upregulates the expressions of binding immunoglobulin protein, inositol-requiring enzyme/endonuclease 1α, and C/EBP homologous protein; stimulates α subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 phosphorylation; and induces the splicing of Xbp1 mRNA, suggesting that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is triggered. Moreover, 2,4,6-TCP alters the mitochondrial membrane potential and increases the apoptosis rate, the caspase 3 activity, and the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, demonstrating that the mitochondrial pathway is involved in the 2,4,6-TCP-induced apoptosis. Thus, these results show that 2,4,6-TCP induces oxidative stress, ER stress, and apoptosis, which together contribute to its cytotoxicity in vitro. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Tolerance of pentose utilising yeast to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Jennifer; Phister, Trevor G; Smart, Katherine A; Greetham, Darren

    2014-03-17

    Bioethanol fermentations follow traditional beverage fermentations where the yeast is exposed to adverse conditions such as oxidative stress. Lignocellulosic bioethanol fermentations involve the conversion of pentose and hexose sugars into ethanol. Environmental stress conditions such as osmotic stress and ethanol stress may affect the fermentation performance; however, oxidative stress as a consequence of metabolic output can also occur. However, the effect of oxidative stress on yeast with pentose utilising capabilities has yet to be investigated. Assaying for the effect of hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress on Candida, Pichia and Scheffersomyces spp. has demonstrated that these yeast tolerate hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in a manner consistent with that demonstrated by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Pichia guillermondii appears to be more tolerant to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress when compared to Candida shehatae, Candida succiphila or Scheffersomyces stipitis. Sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress increased in the presence of minimal media; however, addition of amino acids and nucleobases was observed to increase tolerance. In particular adenine increased tolerance and methionine reduced tolerance to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress.

  18. Tolerance of pentose utilising yeast to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bioethanol fermentations follow traditional beverage fermentations where the yeast is exposed to adverse conditions such as oxidative stress. Lignocellulosic bioethanol fermentations involve the conversion of pentose and hexose sugars into ethanol. Environmental stress conditions such as osmotic stress and ethanol stress may affect the fermentation performance; however, oxidative stress as a consequence of metabolic output can also occur. However, the effect of oxidative stress on yeast with pentose utilising capabilities has yet to be investigated. Results Assaying for the effect of hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress on Candida, Pichia and Scheffersomyces spp. has demonstrated that these yeast tolerate hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in a manner consistent with that demonstrated by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Pichia guillermondii appears to be more tolerant to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress when compared to Candida shehatae, Candida succiphila or Scheffersomyces stipitis. Conclusions Sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress increased in the presence of minimal media; however, addition of amino acids and nucleobases was observed to increase tolerance. In particular adenine increased tolerance and methionine reduced tolerance to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress. PMID:24636079

  19. Oxidative stress and insulin resistance in policemen working shifts.

    PubMed

    Demir, Irfan; Toker, Aysun; Zengin, Selcuk; Laloglu, Esra; Aksoy, Hulya

    2016-04-01

    Shift work is a work schedule involving irregular or unusual hours, compared to those of a normal daytime work schedule. In developed countries, night shift work is very common. In several cities of our country, 12/24 shift system is implemented in police organization. While night shift work composes half of the 20 shift in a month, in ergonomic shift system, an alternative shift schedule, shift work can be performed in three shifts in a day. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of 12/24 shift work system on insulin resistance and oxidative stress and systemic inflammation. Two hundred and four 12/24 shift workers (age 44.3 ± 5.6 years) and 193 ergonomic shift workers (age 42.6 ± 5.5 years) were included to study. Serum oxidized LDL (ox-LDL), neutrophil gelatinase lipocalin-2 (NGAL) as oxidative stress markers, glucose, insulin, ferritin, high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate values were measured. Homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated to evaluate insulin resistance. Serum ox-LDL, HOMA-IR, hsCRP and NGAL levels in 12/24 shift system were found to be significantly higher compared with ergonomic shift workers (p < 0.0001, p = 0.02, p = 0.03, p = 0.02, respectively). When evaluated all subjects, weak but significant correlation was found between HOMA-IR with ox-LDL (r = 0.12, p = 0.01), hsCRP (r = 0.17, p = 0.001) and ferritin (r = 0.15, r = 0.003). Also in 12/24 shift work group, there were significant correlations between HOMA-IR with hsCRP (r = 0.17, p = 0.01) and ferritin (r = 0.25, p = 0.0001). It may be concluded that 12/24 shift system might give rise to insulin resistance and oxidative stress. Additionally, workers in this system may under risk of systemic inflammatory response. Working hours must be arranged in accordance with the physiological rhythm.

  20. Oxidative stress and fatigue in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Segal, B M; Thomas, W; Zhu, X; Diebes, A; McElvain, G; Baechler, E; Gross, M

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the relationship of oxidative stress to fatigue in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Patients with a confirmed diagnosis of SLE by ACR criteria and healthy controls completed validated questionnaires to assess depression and fatigue. Fatigue was measured with the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) and the Profile of Fatigue (Prof-F). Visual analogue scales (VAS) were also used to assess fatigue and pain. Depression was measured with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Plasma F(2)-isoprostane was measured with gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy to assess oxidative stress. Evaluation included medical record review, physical exam and calculation of body mass index (BMI), disease activity (SLEDAI) and damage (SLICC) in the SLE patients. Seventy-one SLE patients with low disease activity (mean SLEDAI = 1.62 standard error (SE) 0.37, range 0-8) were compared to 51 controls. Fatigue-limiting physical activity (defined as FSS ≥ 4) was present in 56% of patients and 12% of controls. F(2)-isoprostane was higher in SLE patients with fatigue compared to not-fatigued SLE subjects (p = .0076) who were otherwise similar in ethnicity, disease activity and cardiovascular risk factors. Plasma F(2)-isoprostane was strongly correlated with FSS and Profile of Somatic Fatigue (Prof-S) (p < .0001), VAS fatigue (p = .005), CES-D (p = .008) and with BMI (p = .0001.) In a multivariate model, F(2)-isoprostane was a significant predictor of FSS after adjustment for age, BMI, pain and depression (p = .0002). Fatigue in SLE patients with low disease activity is associated with increased F(2)-isoprostane. F2-isoprostane could provide a useful biomarker to explore mitochondrial function and the regulation of oxidative pathways in patients with SLE in whom fatigue is a debilitating symptom.

  1. Fatigue and Oxidative Stress in Children Undergoing Leukemia Treatment.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Cheryl; Sanborn, Chelse; Taylor, Olga; Gundy, Patricia; Pasvogel, Alice; Moore, Ida M Ki; Hockenberry, Marilyn J

    2016-10-01

    Fatigue is a frequent and distressing symptom in children undergoing leukemia treatment; however, little is known about factors influencing this symptom. Antioxidants such as glutathione can decrease symptom severity in adult oncology patients, but no study has evaluated antioxidants' effects on symptoms in pediatric oncology patients. This study describes fatigue patterns and associations of fatigue with antioxidants represented by reduced glutathione (GSH) and the reduced/oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) ratio among children receiving leukemia treatment. A repeated measures design assessed fatigue and antioxidants among 38 children from two large U.S. cancer centers. Fatigue was assessed among school-age children and by parent proxy among young children. Antioxidants (GSH and GSH/GSSG ratio) were assessed from cerebrospinal fluid at four phases during leukemia treatment. Young children had a steady decline of fatigue from the end of induction treatment through the continuation phase of treatment, but no significant changes were noted among the school-age children. Mean antioxidant scores varied slightly over time; however, the GSH/GSSG ratios in these children were significantly lower than the normal ratio. Mean GSH/GSSG ratios significantly correlated to fatigue scores of the school-age children during early phases of treatment. Children with low mean GSH/GSSG ratios demonstrated oxidative stress. The low ratios noted early in therapy were significantly correlated with higher fatigue scores during induction and postinduction treatment phases. This finding suggests that increased oxidative stress during the more intensive phases of therapy may explain the experience of fatigue children report. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. Reactive oxygen species, oxidative stress, glaucoma and hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    McMonnies, Charles

    This review examines the role of oxidative stress in damage to cells of the trabecular meshwork and associated impaired aqueous drainage as well as damage to retinal ganglion cells and associated visual field losses. Consideration is given to the interaction between vascular and mechanical explanations for pathological changes in glaucoma. For example, elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) forces may contribute to ischaemia but there is increasing evidence that altered blood flow in a wider sense is also involved. Both vascular and mechanical theories are involved through fluctuations in intraocular pressure and dysregulation of blood flow. Retinal function is very sensitive to changes in haemoglobin oxygen concentration and the associated variations in the production of reactive oxygen species. Reperfusion injury and production of reactive oxygen species occurs when IOP is elevated or blood pressure is low and beyond the capacity for blood flow autoregulation to maintain appropriate oxygen concentration. Activities such as those associated with postural changes, muscular effort, eye wiping and rubbing which cause IOP fluctuation, may have significant vascular, mechanical, reperfusion and oxidative stress consequences. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy exposes the eye to increased oxygen concentration and the risk of oxidative damage in susceptible individuals. However, oxygen concentration in aqueous humour, and the risk of damage to trabecular meshwork cells may be greater if hyperbaric oxygen is delivered by a hood which exposes the anterior ocular surface to higher than normal oxygen levels. Oronasal mask delivery of hyperbaric oxygen therapy appears to be indicated in these cases. Copyright © 2017 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. The role of allopurinol on oxidative stress in experimental hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Makay, O; Yenisey, C; Icoz, G; Genc Simsek, N; Ozgen, G; Akyildiz, M; Yetkin, E

    2009-09-01

    During hyperthyroidism, production of free oxygen radicals derives, where xanthine oxidase may also play an important role. Allopurinol, a xanthine oxidase inhibitor, has a significant effect on thyrotoxicosis-related oxidative stress. However, the relationship between thyroid hormones, oxidative stress parameters and allopurinol remains to be explored. Forty-two Wistar albino rats were divided into three groups. Rats in group A served as negative controls, while group B had untreated thyrotoxicosis and group C received allopurinol. Hyperthyroidism was induced by daily 0.2 mg/kg L-thyroxine intraperitoneally in groups B and C; 40 mg/kg allopurinol were given daily intraperitoneally. Efficacy of the treatment was assessed after 72 h and 21 days, by measuring serum xanthine oxidase (XO), malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and nitric oxide derivates (NO*x). In both time periods, serum XO, MDA, GSH and NO*x levels were significantly increased after thyroid hormone induction (p<0.05). Levels of XO, MDA and NO*x decreased with allopurinol treatment (p<0.05). There was a remarkable decrease in triiodothyronine levels in group C after 72 h (p<0.05), and in both triiodothyronine and thyroxine levels in group C after 21 days (p<0.05). There was no difference between groups B and C in means of serum GSH, GR and GPx levels (p>0.05). This study suggests an association between allopurinol and the biosynthesis of thyroid hormones. Allopurinol prevents the hyperthyroid state, which is mediated predominantly by triiodothyronine and not by XO. This issue has to be questioned in further studies where allopurinol is administered in control subjects.

  4. Astaxanthin blocks preeclampsia progression by suppressing oxidative stress and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Rong-Rong; Niu, Ting-Ting; Chen, Hai-Min

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the antioxidative effect of astaxanthin on Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME)-induced preeclamptic rats. Cell survival, the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the changes in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were examined in astaxanthin and H2O2-treated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The preeclamptic Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat model was established by injection of L‑NAME and treatment with astaxanthin. The activities of malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in serum were analyzed. Pathological changes were examined by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. The expression of nuclear factor (NF)‑κB, Rho‑associated protein kinase II (ROCK II), heme oxygenase‑1 (HO‑1) and caspase 3 in preeclamptic placentas were examined by immunohistochemistry. Astaxanthin significantly reduced H2O2‑induced HUVEC cell death, decreased ROS and increased MMP. Astaxanthin significantly reduced blood pressure and the content of MDA, but significantly increased the activity of SOD in preeclamptic rats. The urinary protein and the level of NO and NOS were also decreased. H&E staining revealed that the thickness of the basilar membrane was increased, while the content of trophoblast cells and spiral arteries were reduced following astaxanthin treatment. Immunohistochemistry results showed that the expression of NF‑κB, ROCK II and caspase 3 in preeclamptic placentas was significantly decreased after astaxanthin treatment, while HO‑1 expression was increased. In conclusion, astaxanthin inhibited H2O2‑induced oxidative stress in HUVECs. Astaxanthin treatment significantly improved L‑NAME‑induced preeclamptic symptoms and reduced the oxidative stress and inflammatory damages in preeclamptic placentas. Astaxanthin treatment may effectively prevent and treat preeclampsia.

  5. Resolution of mitochondrial oxidant stress improves aged-cardiovascular performance

    PubMed Central

    Owada, Takashi; Yamauchi, Hiroyuki; Miura, Shunsuke; Machii, Hirofumi; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2017-01-01

    Background Senescence is a major factor that increases oxidative stress in mitochondria, which contributes toward the pathogenesis of heart disease. However, the effect of antioxidant therapy on cardiac mitochondria in aged-cardiac performance remains elusive. Objectives We postulated that the mitochondrial targeting of superoxide scavenging would have benefits in the aged heart. Methods and results Generation of superoxide in the mitochondria and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase activity increased in the heart of old mice compared with that in young mice. In old mice treated with a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoTEMPO (180 µg/kg/day, 28 days) co-infusion using a subcutaneously implanted minipump, levels of superoxide in the mitochondria and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase activity as well as hydrogen peroxide decreased markedly in cardiomyocytes. Treatment with MitoTEMPO in old mice improved the systolic and diastolic function assessed by echocardiography. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation in isolated coronary arteries and endothelial nitric-oxide synthase phosphorylation were impaired in old mice compared with that in young mice and were improved by MitoTEMPO treatment. Mitochondria from the old mice myocardium showed lower rates of complex I-dependent and II-dependent respiration compared with that from young mice. Supplementation of MitoTEMPO in old mice improved the respiration rates and efficiency of ATP generation in mitochondria to a level similar to that of young mice. Conclusion Resolution of oxidative stress in mitochondria by MitoTEMPO in old mice restored cardiac function and the capacity of coronary vasodilation to the same magnitude observed in young mice. An antioxidant strategy targeting mitochondria could have a therapeutic benefit in heart disease with senescence. PMID:27740971

  6. Dietary supplementation with a natural carotenoid mixture decreases oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kiokias, S; Gordon, M H

    2003-09-01

    To determine whether dietary supplementation with a natural carotenoid mixture counteracts the enhancement of oxidative stress induced by consumption of fish oil. A randomised double-blind crossover dietary intervention. Hugh Sinclair Unit of Human Nutrition, School of Food Biosciences, The University of Reading, Whiteknights PO Box 226, Reading RG6 6AP, UK. A total of 32 free-living healthy nonsmoking volunteers were recruited by posters and e-mails in The University of Reading. One volunteer withdrew during the study. The volunteers consumed a daily supplement comprising capsules containing fish oil (4 x 1 g) or fish oil (4 x 1 g) containing a natural carotenoid mixture (4 x 7.6 mg) for 3 weeks in a randomised crossover design separated by a 12 week washout phase. The carotenoid mixture provided a daily intake of beta-carotene (6.0 mg), alpha-carotene (1.4 mg), lycopene (4.5 mg), bixin (11.7 mg), lutein (4.4 mg) and paprika carotenoids (2.2 mg). Blood and urine samples were collected on days 0 and 21 of each dietary period. The carotenoid mixture reduced the fall in ex vivo oxidative stability of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) induced by the fish oil (P=0.045) and it reduced the extent of DNA damage assessed by the concentration of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine in urine (P=0.005). There was no effect on the oxidative stability of plasma ex vivo assessed by the oxygen radical absorbance capacity test. beta-Carotene, alpha-carotene, lycopene and lutein were increased in the plasma of subjects consuming the carotenoid mixture. Plasma triglyceride levels were reduced significantly more than the reduction for the fish oil control (P=0.035), but total cholesterol, HDL and LDL levels were not significantly changed by the consumption of the carotenoid mixture. Consumption of the natural carotenoid mixture lowered the increase in oxidative stress induced by the fish oil as assessed by ex vivo oxidative stability of LDL and DNA degradation product in urine. The carotenoid

  7. Plasmodium falciparum uses vitamin E to avoid oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sussmann, Rodrigo A C; Fotoran, Wesley L; Kimura, Emilia A; Katzin, Alejandro M

    2017-10-10

    Plasmodium falciparum is sensitive to oxidative stress in vitro and in vivo, and many drugs such as artemisinin, chloroquine and cercosporin interfere in the parasite's redox system. To minimize the damage caused by reactive radicals, antioxidant enzymes and their substrates found in parasites and in erythrocytes must be functionally active. It was shown that P. falciparum synthesizes vitamin E and that usnic acid acts as an inhibitor of its biosynthesis. Vitamin E is a potent antioxidant that protects polyunsaturated fatty acids from lipid peroxidation, and this activity can be measured by detecting its oxidized product and by evaluating reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Here, we demonstrated that ROS levels increased in P. falciparum when vitamin E biosynthesis was inhibited by usnic acid treatment and decreased to basal levels if exogenous vitamin E was added. Furthermore, we used metabolic labelling to demonstrate that vitamin E biosynthesized by the parasite acts as an antioxidant since we could detect its radiolabeled oxidized product. The treatment with chloroquine or cercosporin of the parasites increased the ratio between α-tocopherolquinone and α-tocopherol. Our findings demonstrate that vitamin E produced endogenously by P. falciparum is active as an antioxidant, probably protecting the parasite from the radicals generated by drugs.

  8. [The role of oxidative stress in pathogenesis of GBS].

    PubMed

    Dogonadze, S I; Ninua, N G; Gordeziani, M G; Kavlashvili, M S; Sanikidze, T V

    2006-11-01

    Axon degeneration accompanying its demielinization is a main course of neurological insufficiency typical for GBS. The mechanisms of axon degeneration, considered as the secondary result of serve inflammation are not established. We aimed to determine the role of oxidative metabolism in viral polyneuropathy pathogenesis. The activity of pro- and antioxidant systems of the body was studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) method. In blood and cerebrospinal fluid the intensive EPR signals of nitric oxide (NO), complexes of NO with nonhemic iron (HbNO), lypo- and superoxide radicals content noticeably increases, the signals of free Mn2+ and Fe2+ revealed, the activity of blood antioxidant enzymes, ceruloplasmin and katalasa increases (by 60%), superoxidedismitase's and glutation reductases activity decreases (by 20% and 70% correspondingly). It was considered, that inflammatory damage of nervous system induced by different infectious stimulus is initiated by activated immune cell proinflamatory agents (reactive oxygen and nitrogen species). Subsequently the oxidative stress, as result of accumulation of generators of reactive oxygen species, disordered intracellular metabolism products, contributes to axon demielinization and degeneration.

  9. Mangiferin induces cell death against rhabdomyosarcoma through sustained oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Padma, Vishwanadha Vijaya; Kalaiselvi, Palanisamy; Yuvaraj, Rangasamy; Rabeeth, M

    2015-06-01

    Embryonic rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) is the most prevalent type of cancer among children. The present study aimed to investigate cell death induced by mangiferin in RD cells. The Inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) value of mangiferin was determined by an MTT (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide) assay. Cell death induced by mangiferin against RD cells was determined through lactate dehydrogenase and nitric oxide release, intracellular calcium levels, reactive oxygen species generation, antioxidant status, mitochondrial calcium level, and mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining was performed to determine early/late apoptotic event. Mangiferin induced cell death in RD cells with an IC 50 value of 70 μM. The cytotoxic effect was reflected in a dose-dependent increase in lactate dehydrogenase leakage and nitric oxide release during mangiferin treatment. Mangiferin caused dose dependent increase in reactive oxygen species generation, intracellular calcium levels with subsequent decrease in antioxidant status (catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione-S-transferase, and glutathione) and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in RD cells. Further data from fluorescence microscopy suggest that mangiferin caused cell shrinkage and nuclear condensation along with the occurrence of a late event of apoptosis. Results of the present study shows that mangiferin can act as a promising chemopreventive agent against RD by inducing sustained oxidative stress.

  10. Oak kombucha protects against oxidative stress and inflammatory processes.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Cabral, B D; Larrosa-Pérez, M; Gallegos-Infante, J A; Moreno-Jiménez, M R; González-Laredo, R F; Rutiaga-Quiñones, J G; Gamboa-Gómez, C I; Rocha-Guzmán, N E

    2017-06-25

    Black tea infusion is the common substrate for preparing kombucha; however other sources such as oak leaves infusions can be used for the same purpose. Almost any white oak species have been used for medicinal applications by some ethnic groups in Mexico and could be also suitable for preparing kombucha analogues from oak (KAO). The objective of this research was to investigate the antioxidant activity and anti-inflammatory effects of KAO by examining its modulation ability on macrophage-derived TNF-alpha and IL-6. Herbal infusions from oak and black tea were fermented by kombucha consortium during seven days at 28 °C. Chemical composition was determined by LC-ESI-MS/MS. The antioxidant activity of samples against oxidative damage caused by H 2 O 2 in monocytes activated (macrophages) was explored. Additionally, it was determined the anti-inflammatory activity using lipopolysaccharide (LPS) - stimulated macrophages; in particular, the nitric oxide (NO), TNF-alpha, and IL-6 production was assessed. Levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-alpha were significantly reduced by the sample treatment. Likewise, NO production was lower in treatment with kombucha and KAO compared with LPS-stimulated macrophages. Fermented beverages of oak effectively down-regulated the production of NO, while pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha and IL-6) in macrophages were stimulated with LPS. Additionally, phytochemical compounds present in KAO decrease oxidative stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin (acetovanillone) induces oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Riganti, Chiara; Costamagna, Costanzo; Bosia, Amalia

    Apocynin (acetovanillone) is often used as a specific inhibitor of NADPH oxidase. In N11 glial cells, apocynin induced, in a dose-dependent way, a significant increase of both malonyldialdehyde level (index of lipid peroxidation) and lactate dehydrogenase release (index of a cytotoxic effect). Apocynin evoked also, in a significant way, an increase of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration and a decrease of the intracellular glutathione/glutathione disulfide ratio, accompanied by augmented efflux of glutathione and glutathione disulfide. Apocynin induced the activation of both pentose phosphate pathway and tricarboxylic acid cycle, which was blocked when the cells were incubated with glutathione together with apocynin.more » The cell incubation with glutathione prevented also the apocynin-induced increase of malonyldialdehyde generation and lactate dehydrogenase leakage. Apocynin exerted an oxidant effect also in a cell-free system: indeed, in aqueous solution, it evoked a faster oxidation of the thiols glutathione and dithiothreitol, and elicited the generation of reactive oxygen species, mainly superoxide anions. Our results suggest that apocynin per se can induce an oxidative stress and exert a cytotoxic effect in N11 cells and other cell types, and that some effects of apocynin in in vitro and in vivo experimental models should be interpreted with caution.« less

  12. The role of heat shock protein 70 in oxidant stress and inflammatory injury in quail spleen induced by cold stress.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jiayi; Liu, Chunpeng; Zhao, Dan; Fu, Jing

    2018-05-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in oxidative stress and inflammatory damage in the spleen of quails which were induced by cold stress. One hundred ninety-two 15-day-old male quails were randomly divided into 12 groups and kept at 12 ± 1 °C to examine acute and chronic cold stress. We first detected the changes in activities of antioxidant enzymes in the spleen tissue under acute and chronic cold stress. The activities of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) fluctuated in acute cold stress groups, while they were significantly decreased (p < 0.05) after chronic cold stress. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and nitric oxide (NO) content were decreased significantly (p < 0.05) in both of the acute and chronic cold stress groups. Malondialdehyde (MDA) content was significantly increased (p < 0.05) under cold stress except the 0.5 h group of acute cold stress. Besides, histopathological analysis showed that quail's spleen tissue was inflammatory injured seriously in both the acute and chronic cold stress groups. Additionally, the inflammatory factors (cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), prostaglandin E synthase (PTGES), iNOS, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), and tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-α)) and Hsp70 mRNA levels were increased in both of the acute and chronic cold stress groups compared with the control groups. These results suggest that oxidative stress and inflammatory injury could be induced by cold stress in spleen tissues of quails. Furthermore, the increased expression of Hsp70 may play a role in protecting the spleen against oxidative stress and inflammatory damage caused by cold stress.

  13. Progranulin causes adipose insulin resistance via increased autophagy resulting from activated oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qinyue; Xu, Lin; Li, Huixia; Sun, Hongzhi; Liu, Jiali; Wu, Shufang; Zhou, Bo

    2017-01-31

    Progranulin (PGRN) has recently emerged as an important regulator for insulin resistance. However, the direct effect of progranulin in adipose insulin resistance associated with the autophagy mechanism is not fully understood. In the present study, progranulin was administered to 3T3-L1 adipocytes and C57BL/6 J mice with/without specific inhibitors of oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress, and metabolic parameters, oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress and autophagy markers were assessed. Progranulin treatment increased iNOS expression, NO synthesis and ROS generation, and elevated protein expressions of CHOP, GRP78 and the phosphorylation of PERK, and caused a significant increase in Atg7 and LC3-II protein expression and a decreased p62 expression, and decreased insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1 and glucose uptake, demonstrating that progranulin activated oxidative stress and ER stress, elevated autophagy and induced insulin insensitivity in adipocytes and adipose tissue of mice. Interestingly, inhibition of iNOS and ER stress both reversed progranulin-induced stress response and increased autophagy, protecting against insulin resistance in adipocytes. Furthermore, the administration of the ER stress inhibitor 4-phenyl butyric acid reversed the negative effect of progranulin in vivo. Our findings showed the clinical potential of the novel adipokine progranulin in the regulation of insulin resistance, suggesting that progranulin might mediate adipose insulin resistance, at least in part, by inducing autophagy via activated oxidative stress and ER stress.

  14. Quercetin prevents chronic unpredictable stress induced behavioral dysfunction in mice by alleviating hippocampal oxidative and inflammatory stress.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Vineet; Parashar, Arun; Udayabanu, Malairaman

    2017-03-15

    It is now evident that chronic stress is associated with anxiety, depression and cognitive dysfunction and very few studies have focused on identifying possible methods to prevent these stress-induced disorders. Previously, we identified abundance of quercetin in Urtica dioica extract, which efficiently attenuated stress related complications. Therefore, current study was designed to investigate the effect of quercetin on chronic unpredicted stress (CUS) induced behavioral dysfunction, oxidative stress and neuroinflammation in the mouse hippocampus. Animals were subjected to unpredicted stress for 21days, during which 30mg/kg quercetin was orally administered to them. Effect of CUS and quercetin treatment on animal behavior was assessed between day 22-26. Afterward, the hippocampus was processed to evaluate neuronal damage, oxidative and inflammatory stress. Results revealed that stressed animals were highly anxious (Elevated Plus Maze and Open Field), showed depressive-like behavior (sucrose preference task), performed poorly in short-term and long-term associative memory task (passive avoidance step-through task) and displayed reduced locomotion (open field). Quercetin alleviated behavioral dysfunction in chronically stressed animals. Compared to CUS, quercetin treatment significantly reduced anxiety, attenuated depression, improved cognitive dysfunction and normalized locomotor activity. Further, CUS elevated the levels of oxidative stress markers (TBARS, nitric oxide), lowered antioxidants (total thiol, catalase), enhanced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α, IL-1β and COX-2) in the hippocampus and damaged hippocampal neurons. Quercetin treatment significantly lowered oxidative and inflammatory stress and prevented neural damage. In conclusion, quercetin can efficiently prevent stress induced neurological complications by rescuing brain from oxidative and inflammatory stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Shear stress increases nitric oxide production in thick ascending limbs

    PubMed Central

    Cabral, Pablo D.; Hong, Nancy J.

    2010-01-01

    We showed that luminal flow stimulates nitric oxide (NO) production in thick ascending limbs. Ion delivery, stretch, pressure, and shear stress all increase when flow is enhanced. We hypothesized that shear stress stimulates NO in thick ascending limbs, whereas stretch, pressure, and ion delivery do not. We measured NO in isolated, perfused rat thick ascending limbs using the NO-sensitive dye DAF FM-DA. NO production rose from 21 ± 7 to 58 ± 12 AU/min (P < 0.02; n = 7) when we increased luminal flow from 0 to 20 nl/min, but dropped to 16 ± 8 AU/min (P < 0.02; n = 7) 10 min after flow was stopped. Flow did not increase NO in tubules from mice lacking NO synthase 3 (NOS 3). Flow stimulated NO production by the same extent in tubules perfused with ion-free solution and physiological saline (20 ± 7 vs. 24 ± 6 AU/min; n = 7). Increasing stretch while reducing shear stress and pressure lowered NO generation from 42 ± 9 to 17 ± 6 AU/min (P < 0.03; n = 6). In the absence of shear stress, increasing pressure and stretch had no effect on NO production (2 ± 8 vs. 8 ± 8 AU/min; n = 6). Similar results were obtained in the presence of tempol (100 μmol/l), a O2− scavenger. Primary cultures of thick ascending limb cells subjected to shear stresses of 0.02 and 0.55 dyne/cm2 produced NO at rates of 55 ± 10 and 315 ± 93 AU/s, respectively (P < 0.002; n = 7). Pretreatment with the NOS inhibitor l-NAME (5 mmol/l) blocked the shear stress-induced increase in NO production. We concluded that shear stress rather than pressure, stretch, or ion delivery mediates flow-induced stimulation of NO by NOS 3 in thick ascending limbs. PMID:20719980

  16. The effect of upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy process on serum oxidative stress levels.

    PubMed

    Turan, Mehmet Nuri; Aslan, Mehmet; Bolukbas, Filiz Fusun; Bolukbas, Cengiz; Selek, Sahbettin; Sabuncu, Tevfik

    2016-12-01

    Some authors have investigated the effects of oxidative stress in some process such as undergoing laparoscopic. However, the effect of upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy process on oxidative stress is unclear. We evaluated the short-term effect of upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy process on oxidative stress. Thirty patients who underwent endoscopy process and 20 healthy controls were enrolled in the prospective study. Serum total antioxidant capacity and total oxidant status measurements were measured before and after endoscopy process. The ratio percentage of total oxidant status to total antioxidant capacity was regarded as oxidative stress index. Before endoscopy process, serum total antioxidant capacity levels were higher, while serum total oxidant status levels and oxidative stress index values were lower in patients than controls, but this difference was not statistically significant (all, p > 0.05). After endoscopy process, serum total antioxidant capacity and total oxidant status levels were significantly higher in patients than before endoscopy process (both, p < 0.05). However, oxidative stress index values were slight higher in patients but this difference was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). We observed that serum TAC and TOS levels were increased in patients who underwent endoscopy process after endoscopy process. However, short-time upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy process did not cause an important change in the oxidative stress index. Further studies enrolling a larger number of patients are required to clarify the results obtained here.

  17. Oxidized LDL triggers changes in oxidative stress and inflammatory biomarkers in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lara-Guzmán, Oscar J; Gil-Izquierdo, Ángel; Medina, Sonia; Osorio, Edison; Álvarez-Quintero, Rafael; Zuluaga, Natalia; Oger, Camille; Galano, Jean-Marie; Durand, Thierry; Muñoz-Durango, Katalina

    2018-05-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is a well-recognized proatherogenic particle that functions in atherosclerosis. In this study, we established conditions to generate human oxLDL, characterized according to the grade of lipid and protein oxidation, particle size and oxylipin content. The induction effect of the cellular proatherogenic response was assessed in foam cells by using an oxLDL-macrophage interaction model. Uptake of oxLDL, reactive oxygen species production and expression of oxLDL receptors (CD36, SR-A and LOX-1) were significantly increased in THP-1 macrophages. Analyses of 35 oxylipins revealed that isoprostanes (IsoP) and prostaglandins (PGs) derived from the oxidation of arachidonic, dihomo gamma-linolenic and eicosapentaenoic acids were strongly and significantly induced in macrophages stimulated with oxLDL. Importantly, the main metabolites responsible for the THP1-macrophage response to oxLDL exposure were the oxidative stress markers 5-epi-5-F 2t -IsoP, 15-E 1t -IsoP, 8-F 3t -IsoP and 15-keto-15-F 2t -IsoP as well as inflammatory markers PGDM, 17-trans-PGF 3α , and 11β-PGF 2α , all of which are reported here, for the first time, to function in the interaction of oxLDL with THP-1 macrophages. By contrast, a salvage pathway mediated by anti-inflammatory PGs (PGE 1 and 17-trans-PGF 3α ) was also identified, suggesting a response to oxLDL-induced injury. In conclusion, when THP-1 macrophages were treated with oxLDL, a specific induction of biomarkers related to oxidative stress and inflammation was triggered. This work contributes to our understanding of initial atherogenic events mediated by oxLDL-macrophage interactions and helps to generate new approaches for their modulation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Investigation on oxidative stress of nitric oxide synthase interacting protein from Clonorchis sinensis.

    PubMed

    Bian, Meng; Xu, Qingxia; Xu, Yanquan; Li, Shan; Wang, Xiaoyun; Sheng, Jiahe; Wu, Zhongdao; Huang, Yan; Yu, Xinbing

    2016-01-01

    Numerous evidences indicate that excretory-secretory products (ESPs) from liver flukes trigger the generation of free radicals that are associated with the initial pathophysiological responses in host cells. In this study, we first constructed a Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis, Cs)-infected BALB/c mouse model and examined relative results respectively at 3, 5, 7, and 9 weeks postinfection (p.i.). Quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR indicated that the transcriptional level of both endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) gradually decreased with lastingness of infection, while the transcriptional level of inducible NOS (iNOS) significantly increased. The level of malondialdehyde (MDA) in sera of infected mouse significantly increased versus the healthy control group. These results showed that the liver of C. sinensis-infected mouse was in a state with elevated levels of oxidation stress. Previously, C. sinensis NOS interacting protein coding gene (named CsNOSIP) has been isolated and recombinant CsNOSIP (rCsNOSIP) has been expressed in Escherichia coli, which has been confirmed to be a component present in CsESPs and confirmed to play important roles in immune regulation of the host. In the present paper, we investigated the effects of rCsNOSIP on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activated RAW264.7, a murine macrophage cell line. We found that endotoxin-free rCsNOSIP significantly promoted the levels of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) after pretreated with rCsNOSIP, while the level of SOD decreased. Furthermore, rCsNOSIP could also increase the level of lipid peroxidation MDA. Taken together, these results suggested that CsNOSIP was a key molecule which was involved in the production of nitric oxide (NO) and its reactive intermediates, and played an important role in oxidative stress during C. sinensis infection.

  19. Redox-Sensitive Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles Protect Human Keratinocytes from Oxidative Stress Induced by Glutathione Depletion.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ragini; Karakoti, Ajay S; Self, William; Seal, Sudipta; Singh, Sanjay

    2016-11-22

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeNPs) have gathered much attention in the biomedical field due to its unique antioxidant property. It can protect cells and tissues from oxidative stress induced damage due to its autoregenerative redox cycle. Our study explores the antioxidant and antigenotoxic behavior of PEGylated CeNPs toward oxidative insult produced by buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) in human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells). BSO inhibits the γ-glutamylcysteinesynthetase (γ-GCS) enzyme and thus acts as a glutathione (GSH) depleting agent to modulate the cellular redox potential. GSH is a natural ROS scavenger present in the mammalian cells, and its depletion causes generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, we challenged HaCaT cells (keratinocytes) with BSO to alter the redox potential within the cell and monitored toxicity, ROS generation, and nuclear fragmentation. We also followed changes in expressions of related proteins and genes. We found that PEGylated CeNPs can protect HaCaT cells from BSO-induced oxidative damage. BSO-exposed cells, preincubated with PEGylated CeNPs, showed better cell survival and significant decrease in the intracellular levels of ROS. We also observed decrease in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and nuclear fragmentation in CeNP-treated cells that were challenged with BSO as compared to treatment with BSO alone. Exposure of HaCaT cells with BSO leads to altered expression of antioxidant genes and proteins, i.e., thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and peroxiredoxin 6 (Prx6) whereas, in our study, pretreatment of PEGylated CeNPs reduces the need for induction of genes that produce enzymes involved in the defense against oxidative stress. Since, growing evidence argued the involvement of ROS in mediating death of mammalian cells in several ailments, our finding reinforces the use of PEGylated CeNPs as a potent pharmacological agent under the lower cellular GSH/GSSG ratios for the treatment of diseases mediated by free radicals.

  20. The effects of oxidative stress on female reproduction: a review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress (OS), a state characterized by an imbalance between pro-oxidant molecules including reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, and antioxidant defenses, has been identified to play a key role in the pathogenesis of subfertility in both males and females. The adverse effects of OS on sperm quality and functions have been well documented. In females, on the other hand, the impact of OS on oocytes and reproductive functions remains unclear. This imbalance between pro-oxidants and antioxidants can lead to a number of reproductive diseases such as endometriosis, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and unexplained infertility. Pregnancy complications such as spontaneous abortion, recurrent pregnancy loss, and preeclampsia, can also develop in response to OS. Studies have shown that extremes of body weight and lifestyle factors such as cigarette smoking, alcohol use, and recreational drug use can promote excess free radical production, which could affect fertility. Exposures to environmental pollutants are of increasing concern, as they too have been found to trigger oxidative states, possibly contributing to female infertility. This article will review the currently available literature on the roles of reactive species and OS in both normal and abnormal reproductive physiological processes. Antioxidant supplementation may be effective in controlling the production of ROS and continues to be explored as a potential strategy to overcome reproductive disorders associated with infertility. However, investigations conducted to date have been through animal or in vitro studies, which have produced largely conflicting results. The impact of OS on assisted reproductive techniques (ART) will be addressed, in addition to the possible benefits of antioxidant supplementation of ART culture media to increase the likelihood for ART success. Future randomized controlled clinical trials on humans are necessary to elucidate the precise mechanisms through which OS affects female

  1. Starved Escherichia coli preserve reducing power under nitric oxide stress

    SciTech Connect

    Gowers, Glen-Oliver F.; Robinson, Jonathan L.; Brynildsen, Mark P., E-mail: mbrynild@princeton.edu

    Nitric oxide (NO) detoxification enzymes, such as NO dioxygenase (NOD) and NO reductase (NOR), are important to the virulence of numerous bacteria. Pathogens use these defense systems to ward off immune-generated NO, and they do so in environments that contain additional stressors, such as reactive oxygen species, nutrient deprivation, and acid stress. NOD and NOR both use reducing equivalents to metabolically deactivate NO, which suggests that nutrient deprivation could negatively impact their functionality. To explore the relationship between NO detoxification and nutrient deprivation, we examined the ability of Escherichia coli to detoxify NO under different levels of carbon source availabilitymore » in aerobic cultures. We observed failure of NO detoxification under both carbon source limitation and starvation, and those failures could have arisen from inabilities to synthesize Hmp (NOD of E. coli) and/or supply it with sufficient NADH (preferred electron donor). We found that when limited quantities of carbon source were provided, NO detoxification failed due to insufficient NADH, whereas starvation prevented Hmp synthesis, which enabled cells to maintain their NADH levels. This maintenance of NADH levels under starvation was confirmed to be dependent on the absence of Hmp. Intriguingly, these data show that under NO stress, carbon-starved E. coli are better positioned with regard to reducing power to cope with other stresses than cells that had consumed an exhaustible amount of carbon. -- Highlights: •Carbon source availability is critical to aerobic E. coli NO detoxification. •Carbon source starvation, under NO stress, preserves intracellular NADH levels. •Preservation of NADH depends on starvation-dependent inhibition of Hmp induction.« less

  2. Dietary resveratrol confers apoptotic resistance to oxidative stress in myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Haramizu, Satoshi; Asano, Shinichi; Butler, David C; Stanton, David A; Hajira, Ameena; Mohamed, Junaith S; Alway, Stephen E

    2017-12-01

    High levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to muscle cell death in aging and disuse. We have previously found that resveratrol can reduce oxidative stress in response to aging and hindlimb unloading in rodents in vivo, but it was not known if resveratrol would protect muscle stem cells during repair or regeneration when oxidative stress is high. To test the protective role of resveratrol on muscle stem cells directly, we treated the C2C12 mouse myoblast cell line with moderate (100 μM) or very high (1 mM) levels of H 2 O 2 in the presence or absence of resveratrol. The p21 promoter activity declined in myoblasts in response to high ROS, and this was accompanied a greater nuclear to cytoplasmic translocation of p21 in a dose-dependent matter in myoblasts as compared to myotubes. Apoptosis, as indicated by TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling, was greater in C2C12 myoblasts as compared to myotubes (P<.05) after treatment with H 2 O 2 . Caspase-9, -8 and -3 activities were elevated significantly (P<.05) in myoblasts treated with H 2 O 2 . Myoblasts were more susceptible to ROS-induced oxidative stress than myotubes. We treated C2C12 myoblasts with 50 μM of resveratrol for periods up to 48 h to determine if myoblasts could be rescued from high-ROS-induced apoptosis by resveratrol. Resveratrol reduced the apoptotic index and significantly reduced the ROS-induced caspase-9, -8 and -3 activity in myoblasts. Furthermore, Bcl-2 and the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio were partially rescued in myoblasts by resveratrol treatment. Similarly, muscle stem cells isolated from mouse skeletal muscles showed reduced Sirt1 protein abundance with H 2 O 2 treatment, but this could be reversed by resveratrol. Reduced apoptotic susceptibility in myoblasts as compared to myotubes to ROS is regulated, at least in part, by enhanced p21 promoter activity and nuclear p21 location in myotubes. Resveratrol confers further protection against ROS by improving Sirt1 levels and increasing antioxidant

  3. Hydrogen peroxide as a central redox signaling molecule in physiological oxidative stress: Oxidative eustress.

    PubMed

    Sies, Helmut

    2017-04-01

    Hydrogen peroxide emerged as major redox metabolite operative in redox sensing, signaling and redox regulation. Generation, transport and capture of H 2 O 2 in biological settings as well as their biological consequences can now be addressed. The present overview focuses on recent progress on metabolic sources and sinks of H 2 O 2 and on the role of H 2 O 2 in redox signaling under physiological conditions (1-10nM), denoted as oxidative eustress. Higher concentrations lead to adaptive stress responses via master switches such as Nrf2/Keap1 or NF-κB. Supraphysiological concentrations of H 2 O 2 (>100nM) lead to damage of biomolecules, denoted as oxidative distress. Three questions are addressed: How can H 2 O 2 be assayed in the biological setting? What are the metabolic sources and sinks of H 2 O 2 ? What is the role of H 2 O 2 in redox signaling and oxidative stress? Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Endoplasmic reticulum calcium release potentiates the ER stress and cell death caused by an oxidative stress in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Dejeans, Nicolas; Tajeddine, Nicolas; Beck, Raphaël; Verrax, Julien; Taper, Henryk; Gailly, Philippe; Calderon, Pedro Buc

    2010-05-01

    Increase in cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca2+](c)), release of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium ([Ca2+](er)) and ER stress have been proposed to be involved in oxidative toxicity. Nevertheless, their relative involvements in the processes leading to cell death are not well defined. In this study, we investigated whether oxidative stress generated during ascorbate-driven menadione redox cycling (Asc/Men) could trigger these three events, and, if so, whether they contributed to Asc/Men cytoxicity in MCF-7 cells. Using microspectrofluorimetry, we demonstrated that Asc/Men-generated oxidative stress was associated with a slow and moderate increase in [Ca2+](c), largely preceding permeation of propidium iodide, and thus cell death. Asc/Men treatment was shown to partially deplete ER calcium stores after 90 min (decrease by 45% compared to control). This event was associated with ER stress activation, as shown by analysis of eIF2 phosphorylation and expression of the molecular chaperone GRP94. Thapsigargin (TG) was then used to study the effect of complete [Ca2+](er) emptying during the oxidative stress generated by Asc/Men. Surprisingly, the combination of TG and Asc/Men increased ER stress to a level considerably higher than that observed for either treatment alone, suggesting that [Ca2+](er) release alone is not sufficient to explain ER stress activation during oxidative stress. Finally, TG-mediated [Ca2+](er) release largely potentiated ER stress, DNA fragmentation and cell death caused by Asc/Men, supporting a role of ER stress in the process of Asc/Men cytotoxicity. Taken together, our results highlight the involvement of ER stress and [Ca2+](er) decrease in the process of oxidative stress-induced cell death in MCF-7 cells. 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Oxidative stress, innate immunity, and age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Peter X.; Stiles, Travis; Douglas, Christopher; Ho, Daisy; Fan, Wei; Du, Hongjun; Xiao, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of vision loss affecting tens of millions of elderly worldwide. Early AMD is characterized by the appearance of soft drusen, as well as pigmentary changes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). These soft, confluent drusen can progress into two forms of advanced AMD: geographic atrophy (GA, or dry AMD) or choroidal neovascularization (CNV, or wet AMD). Both forms of AMD result in a similar clinical progression in terms of loss of central vision. The exact mechanism for developing early AMD, as well as triggers responsible for progressing to advanced stage of disease, is still largely unknown. However, significant evidence exists demonstrating a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors as causes of AMD progression. Multiple genes and/or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been found associated with AMD, including various genes involved in the complement pathway, lipid metabolism and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. Of the known genetic contributors to disease risk, the CFH Y402H and HTRA1/ARMS polymorphisms contribute to more than 50% of the genetic risk for AMD. Environmentally, oxidative stress plays a critical role in many aging diseases including cardiovascular disease, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and AMD. Due to the exposure to sunlight and high oxygen concentration, the oxidative stress burden is higher in the eye than other tissues, which can be further complicated by additional oxidative stressors such as smoking. Increasingly, evidence is accumulating suggesting that functional abnormalities of the innate immune system incurred via high risk genotypes may be contributing to the pathogenesis of AMD by altering the inflammatory homeostasis in the eye, specifically in the handling of oxidation products. As the eye in non-pathological instances maintains a low level of inflammation despite the presence of a relative abundance of potentially inflammatory molecules, we have

  6. Serum Levels of Stress Hormones and Oxidative Stress Biomarkers Differ according to Sasang Constitutional Type

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeong Geug; Kim, Yoon Jung; Ahn, Yo Chan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study investigated whether Sasang constitutional type is associated with differences in the serum levels of stress hormones and oxidative stress. Methods. A total of 236 participants (77 males and 159 females) were enrolled. The serum levels of cortisol, adrenaline, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and malondialdehyde (MDA) were analyzed. Results. The distribution of Sasang constitutional types was as follows: Taeumin, 35.6%; Soumin, 33.0%; and Soyangin, 31.4%. The serum cortisol levels of Taeumin were significantly lower than Soumin (p < 0.1 in both sexes) and Soyangin (p < 0.05 in males and p < 0.1 in females). The adrenaline levels were also significantly lower in Taeumin than in Soumin (p < 0.05 in males and p < 0.1 in females) and Soyangin (p < 0.1 in males). Serum ROS levels were significantly higher in Soyangin than in Taeumin and Soumin (p < 0.05 in males), whereas MDA levels were significantly lower in Taeumin compared with Soumin and Soyangin (p < 0.05 in males and p < 0.1 in females). Conclusion. Taeumin type may tolerate psychological or oxidative stress better than other types, which suggests a biological mechanism to explain the different pathophysiological features of Sasang constitutional types. PMID:26539232

  7. The Impact of Oxidative Stress on the Bone System in Response to the Space Special Environment

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ye; Ma, Xiaoli; Yang, Chaofei; Su, Peihong; Yin, Chong

    2017-01-01

    The space special environment mainly includes microgravity, radiation, vacuum and extreme temperature, which seriously threatens an astronaut’s health. Bone loss is one of the most significant alterations in mammalians after long-duration habitation in space. In this review, we summarize the crucial roles of major factors—namely radiation and microgravity—in space in oxidative stress generation in living organisms, and the inhibito