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Sample records for a-kinase anchor protein

  1. A kinase-anchoring proteins and adenylyl cyclase in cardiovascular physiology and pathology.

    PubMed

    Efendiev, Riad; Dessauer, Carmen W

    2011-10-01

    3'-5'-Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), generated by adenylyl cyclase (AC), serves as a second messenger in signaling pathways regulating many aspects of cardiac physiology, including contraction rate and action potential duration, and in the pathophysiology of hypertrophy and heart failure. A kinase-anchoring proteins localize the effect of cAMP in space and time by organizing receptors, AC, protein kinase A, and other components of the cAMP cascade into multiprotein complexes. In this review, we discuss how the interaction of A kinase-anchoring proteins with distinct AC isoforms affects cardiovascular physiology.

  2. A-kinase Anchoring Protein 79/150 Recruits Protein Kinase C to Phosphorylate Roundabout Receptors.

    PubMed

    Samelson, Bret K; Gore, Bryan B; Whiting, Jennifer L; Nygren, Patrick J; Purkey, Alicia M; Colledge, Marcie; Langeberg, Lorene K; Dell'Acqua, Mark L; Zweifel, Larry S; Scott, John D

    2015-05-29

    Anchoring proteins direct protein kinases and phosphoprotein phosphatases toward selected substrates to control the efficacy, context, and duration of neuronal phosphorylation events. The A-kinase anchoring protein AKAP79/150 interacts with protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase C (PKC), and protein phosphatase 2B (calcineurin) to modulate second messenger signaling events. In a mass spectrometry-based screen for additional AKAP79/150 binding partners, we have identified the Roundabout axonal guidance receptor Robo2 and its ligands Slit2 and Slit3. Biochemical and cellular approaches confirm that a linear sequence located in the cytoplasmic tail of Robo2 (residues 991-1070) interfaces directly with sites on the anchoring protein. Parallel studies show that AKAP79/150 interacts with the Robo3 receptor in a similar manner. Immunofluorescent staining detects overlapping expression patterns for murine AKAP150, Robo2, and Robo3 in a variety of brain regions, including hippocampal region CA1 and the islands of Calleja. In vitro kinase assays, peptide spot array mapping, and proximity ligation assay staining approaches establish that human AKAP79-anchored PKC selectively phosphorylates the Robo3.1 receptor subtype on serine 1330. These findings imply that anchored PKC locally modulates the phosphorylation status of Robo3.1 in brain regions governing learning and memory and reward.

  3. A-kinase anchoring proteins: molecular regulators of the cardiac stress response.

    PubMed

    Diviani, Dario; Maric, Darko; Pérez López, Irene; Cavin, Sabrina; Del Vescovo, Cosmo D

    2013-04-01

    In response to stress or injury the heart undergoes a pathological remodeling process, associated with hypertrophy, cardiomyocyte death and fibrosis, that ultimately causes cardiac dysfunction and heart failure. It has become increasingly clear that signaling events associated with these pathological cardiac remodeling events are regulated by scaffolding and anchoring proteins, which allow coordination of pathological signals in space and time. A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) constitute a family of functionally related proteins that organize multiprotein signaling complexes that tether the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) as well as other signaling enzymes to ensure integration and processing of multiple signaling pathways. This review will discuss the role of AKAPs in the cardiac response to stress. Particular emphasis will be given to the adaptative process associated with cardiac hypoxia as well as the remodeling events linked to cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Cardiac Pathways of Differentiation, Metabolism and Contraction. PMID:22889610

  4. Targeting protein–protein interactions in complexes organized by A kinase anchoring proteins

    PubMed Central

    Calejo, Ana I.; Taskén, Kjetil

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic AMP is a ubiquitous intracellular second messenger involved in the regulation of a wide variety of cellular processes, a majority of which act through the cAMP – protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway and involve PKA phosphorylation of specific substrates. PKA phosphorylation events are typically spatially restricted and temporally well controlled. A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) directly bind PKA and recruit it to specific subcellular loci targeting the kinase activity toward particular substrates, and thereby provide discrete spatiotemporal control of downstream phosphorylation events. AKAPs also scaffold other signaling molecules into multi-protein complexes that function as crossroads between different signaling pathways. Targeting AKAP coordinated protein complexes with high-affinity peptidomimetics or small molecules to tease apart distinct protein–protein interactions (PPIs) therefore offers important means to disrupt binding of specific components of the complex to better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in the function of individual signalosomes and their pathophysiological role. Furthermore, development of novel classes of small molecules involved in displacement of AKAP-bound signal molecules is now emerging. Here, we will focus on mechanisms for targeting PPI, disruptors that modulate downstream cAMP signaling and their role, especially in the heart. PMID:26441649

  5. Neurochondrin is an atypical RIIα-specific A-kinase anchoring protein.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Jennifer S; Skroblin, Philipp; Bertinetti, Daniela; Hanold, Laura E; von der Heide, Eva K; Wagener, Eva-Maria; Zenn, Hans-Michael; Klussmann, Enno; Kennedy, Eileen J; Herberg, Friedrich W

    2015-10-01

    Protein kinase activity is regulated not only by direct strategies affecting activity but also by spatial and temporal regulatory mechanisms. Kinase signaling pathways are coordinated by scaffolding proteins that orchestrate the assembly of multi-protein complexes. One family of such scaffolding proteins are the A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). AKAPs share the commonality of binding cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). In addition, they bind further signaling proteins and kinase substrates and tether such multi-protein complexes to subcellular locations. The A-kinase binding (AKB) domain of AKAPs typically contains a conserved helical motif that interacts directly with the dimerization/docking (D/D) domain of the regulatory subunits of PKA. Based on a pull-down proteomics approach, we identified neurochondrin (neurite-outgrowth promoting protein) as a previously unidentified AKAP. Here, we show that neurochondrin interacts directly with PKA through a novel mechanism that involves two distinct binding regions. In addition, we demonstrate that neurochondrin has strong isoform selectivity towards the RIIα subunit of PKA with nanomolar affinity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Inhibitors of Protein Kinases.

  6. A-kinase anchoring proteins: cAMP compartmentalization in neurodegenerative and obstructive pulmonary diseases

    PubMed Central

    Poppinga, W J; Muñoz-Llancao, P; González-Billault, C; Schmidt, M

    2014-01-01

    The universal second messenger cAMP is generated upon stimulation of Gs protein-coupled receptors, such as the β2-adreneoceptor, and leads to the activation of PKA, the major cAMP effector protein. PKA oscillates between an on and off state and thereby regulates a plethora of distinct biological responses. The broad activation pattern of PKA and its contribution to several distinct cellular functions lead to the introduction of the concept of compartmentalization of cAMP. A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) are of central importance due to their unique ability to directly and/or indirectly interact with proteins that either determine the cellular content of cAMP, such as β2-adrenoceptors, ACs and PDEs, or are regulated by cAMP such as the exchange protein directly activated by cAMP. We report on lessons learned from neurons indicating that maintenance of cAMP compartmentalization by AKAP5 is linked to neurotransmission, learning and memory. Disturbance of cAMP compartments seem to be linked to neurodegenerative disease including Alzheimer's disease. We translate this knowledge to compartmentalized cAMP signalling in the lung. Next to AKAP5, we focus here on AKAP12 and Ezrin (AKAP78). These topics will be highlighted in the context of the development of novel pharmacological interventions to tackle AKAP-dependent compartmentalization. PMID:25132049

  7. Compartmentalization role of A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) in mediating protein kinase A (PKA) signaling and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Rababa'h, Abeer; Singh, Sonal; Suryavanshi, Santosh V; Altarabsheh, Salah Eldien; Deo, Salil V; McConnell, Bradley K

    2014-12-24

    The Beta-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) stimulation enhances contractility through protein kinase-A (PKA) substrate phosphorylation. This PKA signaling is conferred in part by PKA binding to A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). AKAPs coordinate multi-protein signaling networks that are targeted to specific intracellular locations, resulting in the localization of enzyme activity and transmitting intracellular actions of neurotransmitters and hormones to its target substrates. In particular, mAKAP (muscle-selective AKAP) has been shown to be present on the nuclear envelope of cardiomyocytes with various proteins including: PKA-regulatory subunit (RIIα), phosphodiesterase-4D3, protein phosphatase-2A, and ryanodine receptor (RyR2). Therefore, through the coordination of spatial-temporal signaling of proteins and enzymes, mAKAP controls cyclic-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels very tightly and functions as a regulator of PKA-mediated substrate phosphorylation leading to changes in calcium availability and myofilament calcium sensitivity. The goal of this review is to elucidate the critical compartmentalization role of mAKAP in mediating PKA signaling and regulating cardiomyocyte hypertrophy by acting as a scaffolding protein. Based on our literature search and studying the structure-function relationship between AKAP scaffolding protein and its binding partners, we propose possible explanations for the mechanism by which mAKAP promotes cardiac hypertrophy.

  8. The A-kinase anchoring protein 15 regulates feedback inhibition of the epithelial Na+ channel.

    PubMed

    Bengrine, Abderrahmane; Li, Jinqing; Awayda, Mouhamed S

    2007-04-01

    Protein kinase A anchoring proteins or AKAPs regulate the activity of many ion channels. Protein kinase A (PKA) is a well-recognized target of AKAPs, with other kinases now emerging as additional targets. We examined the roles of epithelial-expressed AKAPs in regulating the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC). Experiments used heterologous expression with AKAP15, AKAP-KL, and AKAP79 in Xenopus oocytes. Experiments were carried out under high and low Na+ conditions, as Na+ loading is known to affect the baseline activity of ENaC in a PKC-dependent mechanism. ENaC activity was unaffected by AKAP79 and AKAP-KL expression. However, oocytes coexpressing AKAP15 exhibited an 80% and 91% reduction in the amiloride-sensitive, whole-cell conductance in high and low Na+ conditions, respectively. The reduced channel activity was unaffected by PKA activation or inhibition, indicating a PKA-independent mechanism. Expression with a membrane-targeting domain, mutant form of AKAP15 (AKAP15m) prevented the decrease of ENaC activity, but only under low Na+ conditions. In high sodium conditions, coexpression with AKAP15m led to an increase of ENaC activity to levels similar to those observed under low Na+. These results indicate that membrane-associated AKAP15 reduces ENaC activity whereas the cytoplasmically associated one may participate in the channel's feedback inhibition by intracellular Na+, a process known to involve PKC. This hypothesis was further confirmed in coexpression experiments, which demonstrated functional and physical interaction between AKAP15 and PKCalpha. We propose that AKAP15 regulates ENaC via a novel PKA-independent pathway. PMID:17244820

  9. Adenylyl Cyclase Anchoring by a Kinase Anchor Protein AKAP5 (AKAP79/150) Is Important for Postsynaptic β-Adrenergic Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingxu; Patriarchi, Tommaso; Stein, Ivar S.; Qian, Hai; Matt, Lucas; Nguyen, Minh; Xiang, Yang K.; Hell, Johannes W.

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that the A kinase anchor protein AKAP5 (AKAP79/150) interacts not only with PKA but also with various adenylyl cyclase (AC) isoforms. However, the physiological relevance of AC-AKAP5 binding is largely unexplored. We now show that postsynaptic targeting of AC by AKAP5 is important for phosphorylation of the AMPA-type glutamate receptor subunit GluA1 on Ser-845 by PKA and for synaptic plasticity. Phosphorylation of GluA1 on Ser-845 is strongly reduced (by 70%) under basal conditions in AKAP5 KO mice but not at all in D36 mice, in which the PKA binding site of AKAP5 (i.e. the C-terminal 36 residues) has been deleted without affecting AC association with GluA1. The increase in Ser-845 phosphorylation upon β-adrenergic stimulation is much more severely impaired in AKAP5 KO than in D36 mice. In parallel, long term potentiation induced by a 5-Hz/180-s tetanus, which mimics the endogenous θ-rhythm and depends on β-adrenergic stimulation, is only modestly affected in acute forebrain slices from D36 mice but completely abrogated in AKAP5 KO mice. Accordingly, anchoring of not only PKA but also AC by AKAP5 is important for regulation of postsynaptic functions and specifically AMPA receptor activity. PMID:23649627

  10. Adenylyl cyclase anchoring by a kinase anchor protein AKAP5 (AKAP79/150) is important for postsynaptic β-adrenergic signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingxu; Patriarchi, Tommaso; Stein, Ivar S; Qian, Hai; Matt, Lucas; Nguyen, Minh; Xiang, Yang K; Hell, Johannes W

    2013-06-14

    Recent evidence indicates that the A kinase anchor protein AKAP5 (AKAP79/150) interacts not only with PKA but also with various adenylyl cyclase (AC) isoforms. However, the physiological relevance of AC-AKAP5 binding is largely unexplored. We now show that postsynaptic targeting of AC by AKAP5 is important for phosphorylation of the AMPA-type glutamate receptor subunit GluA1 on Ser-845 by PKA and for synaptic plasticity. Phosphorylation of GluA1 on Ser-845 is strongly reduced (by 70%) under basal conditions in AKAP5 KO mice but not at all in D36 mice, in which the PKA binding site of AKAP5 (i.e. the C-terminal 36 residues) has been deleted without affecting AC association with GluA1. The increase in Ser-845 phosphorylation upon β-adrenergic stimulation is much more severely impaired in AKAP5 KO than in D36 mice. In parallel, long term potentiation induced by a 5-Hz/180-s tetanus, which mimics the endogenous θ-rhythm and depends on β-adrenergic stimulation, is only modestly affected in acute forebrain slices from D36 mice but completely abrogated in AKAP5 KO mice. Accordingly, anchoring of not only PKA but also AC by AKAP5 is important for regulation of postsynaptic functions and specifically AMPA receptor activity.

  11. Protein Kinase A Opposes the Phosphorylation-dependent Recruitment of Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β to A-kinase Anchoring Protein 220.

    PubMed

    Whiting, Jennifer L; Nygren, Patrick J; Tunquist, Brian J; Langeberg, Lorene K; Seternes, Ole-Morten; Scott, John D

    2015-08-01

    The proximity of an enzyme to its substrate can influence rate and magnitude of catalysis. A-kinase anchoring protein 220 (AKAP220) is a multivalent anchoring protein that can sequester a variety of signal transduction enzymes. These include protein kinase A (PKA) and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β). Using a combination of molecular and cellular approaches we show that GSK3β phosphorylation of Thr-1132 on AKAP220 initiates recruitment of this kinase into the enzyme scaffold. We also find that AKAP220 anchors GSK3β and its substrate β-catenin in membrane ruffles. Interestingly, GSK3β can be released from the multienzyme complex in response to PKA phosphorylation on serine 9, which suppresses GSK3β activity. The signaling scaffold may enhance this regulatory mechanism, as AKAP220 has the capacity to anchor two PKA holoenzymes. Site 1 on AKAP220 (residues 610-623) preferentially interacts with RII, whereas site 2 (residues 1633-1646) exhibits a dual specificity for RI and RII. In vitro affinity measurements revealed that site 2 on AKAP220 binds RII with ∼10-fold higher affinity than site 1. Occupancy of both R subunit binding sites on AKAP220 could provide a mechanism to amplify local cAMP responses and enable cross-talk between PKA and GSK3β.

  12. Phosphoproteome analysis of capacitated human sperm. Evidence of tyrosine phosphorylation of a kinase-anchoring protein 3 and valosin-containing protein/p97 during capacitation.

    PubMed

    Ficarro, Scott; Chertihin, Olga; Westbrook, V Anne; White, Forest; Jayes, Friederike; Kalab, Petr; Marto, Jarrod A; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Herr, John C; Hunt, Donald F; Visconti, Pablo E

    2003-03-28

    Before fertilization can occur, mammalian sperm must undergo capacitation, a process that requires a cyclic AMP-dependent increase in tyrosine phosphorylation. To identify proteins phosphorylated during capacitation, two-dimensional gel analysis coupled to anti-phosphotyrosine immunoblots and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was performed. Among the protein targets, valosin-containing protein (VCP), a homolog of the SNARE-interacting protein NSF, and two members of the A kinase-anchoring protein (AKAP) family were found to be tyrosine phosphorylated during capacitation. In addition, immobilized metal affinity chromatography was used to investigate phosphorylation sites in whole protein digests from capacitated human sperm. To increase this chromatographic selectivity for phosphopeptides, acidic residues in peptide digests were converted to their respective methyl esters before affinity chromatography. More than 60 phosphorylated sequences were then mapped by MS/MS, including precise sites of tyrosine and serine phosphorylation of the sperm tail proteins AKAP-3 and AKAP-4. Moreover, differential isotopic labeling was developed to quantify phosphorylation changes occurring during capacitation. The phosphopeptide enrichment and quantification methodology coupled to MS/MS, described here for the first time, can be employed to map and compare phosphorylation sites involved in multiple cellular processes. Although we were unable to determine the exact site of phosphorylation of VCP, we did confirm, using a cross-immunoprecipitation approach, that this protein is tyrosine phosphorylated during capacitation. Immunolocalization of VCP showed fluorescent staining in the neck of noncapacitated sperm. However, after capacitation, staining in the neck decreased, and most of the sperm showed fluorescent staining in the anterior head.

  13. Muscle A-Kinase Anchoring Protein-α is an Injury-Specific Signaling Scaffold Required for Neurotrophic- and Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate-Mediated Survival.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Cameron, Evan G; Li, Jinliang; Stiles, Travis L; Kritzer, Michael D; Lodhavia, Rahul; Hertz, Jonathan; Nguyen, Tu; Kapiloff, Michael S; Goldberg, Jeffrey L

    2015-12-01

    Neurotrophic factor and cAMP-dependent signaling promote the survival and neurite outgrowth of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) after injury. However, the mechanisms conferring neuroprotection and neuroregeneration downstream to these signals are unclear. We now reveal that the scaffold protein muscle A-kinase anchoring protein-α (mAKAPα) is required for the survival and axon growth of cultured primary RGCs. Although genetic deletion of mAKAPα early in prenatal RGC development did not affect RGC survival into adulthood, nor promoted the death of RGCs in the uninjured adult retina, loss of mAKAPα in the adult increased RGC death after optic nerve crush. Importantly, mAKAPα was required for the neuroprotective effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and cyclic adenosine-monophosphate (cAMP) after injury. These results identify mAKAPα as a scaffold for signaling in the stressed neuron that is required for RGC neuroprotection after optic nerve injury. PMID:26844267

  14. The Scaffold Protein Muscle A-Kinase Anchoring Protein β Orchestrates Cardiac Myocyte Hypertrophic Signaling Required for the Development of Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kritzer, Michael D.; Li, Jinliang; Passariello, Catherine L.; Gayanilo, Marjorie; Thakur, Hrishikesh; Dayan, Joseph; Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly; Kapiloff, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiac myocyte hypertrophy is regulated by an extensive intracellular signal transduction network. In vitro evidence suggests that the scaffold protein muscle A-kinase anchoring protein β (mAKAPβ) serves as a nodal organizer of hypertrophic signaling. However, the relevance of mAKAPβ signalosomes to pathological remodeling and heart failure in vivo remains unknown. Methods and Results Using conditional, cardiac myocyte–specific gene deletion, we now demonstrate that mAKAPβ expression in mice is important for the cardiac hypertrophy induced by pressure overload and catecholamine toxicity. mAKAPβ targeting prevented the development of heart failure associated with long-term transverse aortic constriction, conferring a survival benefit. In contrast to 29% of control mice (n=24), only 6% of mAKAPβ knockout mice (n=31) died in the 16 weeks of pressure overload (P=0.02). Accordingly, mAKAPβ knockout inhibited myocardial apoptosis and the development of interstitial fibrosis, left atrial hypertrophy, and pulmonary edema. This improvement in cardiac status correlated with the attenuated activation of signaling pathways coordinated by the mAKAPβ scaffold, including the decreased phosphorylation of protein kinase D1 and histone deacetylase 4 that we reveal to participate in a new mAKAP signaling module. Furthermore, mAKAPβ knockout inhibited pathological gene expression directed by myocyte-enhancer factor-2 and nuclear factor of activated T-cell transcription factors that associate with the scaffold. Conclusions mAKAPβ orchestrates signaling that regulates pathological cardiac remodeling in mice. Targeting of the underlying physical architecture of signaling networks, including mAKAPβ signalosome formation, may constitute an effective therapeutic strategy for the prevention and treatment of pathological remodeling and heart failure. PMID:24812305

  15. Cytoplasmic anchoring of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) by A-kinase anchor proteins (AKAPs) is required for meiotic arrest of porcine full-grown and growing oocytes.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Takanori; Fujii, Wataru; Sugiura, Koji; Naito, Kunihiko

    2014-03-01

    Mammalian growing oocytes (GOs) lack the ability to resume meiosis, although the molecular mechanism of this limitation is not fully understood. We previously hypothesized that the meiotic incompetence of porcine GOs was attributed to complex spatial-temporal regulation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) by A-kinase anchor proteins (AKAPs), but found that AKAP1 is not involved in the meiotic incompetence of porcine GOs. In the present study, we cloned porcine cDNAs of AKAP5 and AKAP7alpha, and found that inhibiting the expression of these AKAPs induced PKA translocation into the nucleus and promoted meiotic resumption of porcine GOs without affecting the total PKA activity of GOs, whereas overexpressing these AKAPs had no effect. Because AKAPs regulate PKA localization through binding with regulatory subunits of PKA (PKA-Rs), PKA-R binding with AKAPs was inhibited by AKAP-binding inhibition peptides or PKA-R expression inhibition by antisense RNAs. We found that the expression inhibition and binding inhibition of PRKAR1A, an isoform of mammalian PKA-R, promoted meiotic resumption of porcine GOs, whereas these inhibitions of PRKAR2A, another PKA-R isoform, had no effect. In contrast, the expression inhibition and binding inhibition of PRKAR2A had higher effects than those of PRKAR1A on meiotic resumption of porcine full-grown oocytes. These results suggest that cytoplasmic anchoring of PKA by AKAPs is required for meiotic arrest of oocytes and that the PKA-R isoform working for the maintenance of meiotic arrest changed from PRKAR1A to PRKAR2A during the acquisition of meiotic competence. PMID:24501172

  16. Cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding an A-kinase anchoring protein located in the centrosome, AKAP450.

    PubMed Central

    Witczak, O; Skålhegg, B S; Keryer, G; Bornens, M; Taskén, K; Jahnsen, T; Orstavik, S

    1999-01-01

    A combination of protein kinase A type II (RII) overlay screening, database searches and PCR was used to identify a centrosomal A-kinase anchoring protein. A cDNA with an 11.7 kb open reading frame was characterized and found to correspond to 50 exons of genomic sequence on human chromosome 7q21-22. This cDNA clone encoded a 3908 amino acid protein of 453 kDa, that was designated AKAP450 (DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank accession No. AJ131693). Sequence comparison demonstrated that the open reading frame contained a previously characterized cDNA encoding Yotiao, as well as the human homologue of AKAP120. Numerous coiled-coil structures were predicted from AKAP450, and weak homology to pericentrin, giantin and other structural proteins was observed. A putative RII-binding site was identified involving amino acid 2556 of AKAP450 by mutation analysis combined with RII overlay and an amphipatic helix was predicted in this region. Immunoprecipitation of RII from RIPA-buffer extracts of HeLa cells demonstrated co-precipitation of AKAP450. By immunofluorecent labeling with specific antibodies it was demonstrated that AKAP450 localized to centrosomes. Furthermore, AKAP450 was shown to co-purify in centrosomal preparations. The observation of two mRNAs and several splice products suggests additional functions for the AKAP450 gene. PMID:10202149

  17. A Kinase Anchoring Protein 9 Is a Novel Myosin VI Binding Partner That Links Myosin VI with the PKA Pathway in Myogenic Cells.

    PubMed

    Karolczak, Justyna; Sobczak, Magdalena; Skowronek, Krzysztof; Rędowicz, Maria Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    Myosin VI (MVI) is a unique motor protein moving towards the minus end of actin filaments unlike other known myosins. Its important role has recently been postulated for striated muscle and myogenic cells. Since MVI functions through interactions of C-terminal globular tail (GT) domain with tissue specific partners, we performed a search for MVI partners in myoblasts and myotubes using affinity chromatography with GST-tagged MVI-GT domain as a bait. A kinase anchoring protein 9 (AKAP9), a regulator of PKA activity, was identified by means of mass spectrometry as a possible MVI interacting partner both in undifferentiated and differentiating myoblasts and in myotubes. Coimmunoprecipitation and proximity ligation assay confirmed that both proteins could interact. MVI and AKAP9 colocalized at Rab5 containing early endosomes. Similarly to MVI, the amount of AKAP9 decreased during myoblast differentiation. However, in MVI-depleted cells, both cAMP and PKA levels were increased and a change in the MVI motor-dependent AKAP9 distribution was observed. Moreover, we found that PKA phosphorylated MVI-GT domain, thus implying functional relevance of MVI-AKAP9 interaction. We postulate that this novel interaction linking MVI with the PKA pathway could be important for targeting AKAP9-PKA complex within cells and/or providing PKA to phosphorylate MVI tail domain.

  18. Association of functional genetic variants of A-kinase anchoring protein 10 with QT interval length in full-term Polish newborns

    PubMed Central

    Kaczmarczyk, Mariusz; Clark, Jeremy Simon; Gorący, Iwona; Horodnicka-Józwa, Anita; Ciechanowicz, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Introduction A-Kinase Anchoring Proteins (AKAPs) coordinate the specificity of protein kinase A signaling by localizing the kinase to subcellular sites. The 1936G (V646) AKAP10 allele has been associated in adults with low cholinergic/vagus nerve sensitivity, shortened PR intervals in ECG recording and in newborns with increased blood pressure and higher cholesterol cord blood concentration. The aim of the study was to answer the question of whether 1936A > G AKAP10 polymorphism is associated with the newborn electrocardiographic variables. Material and methods Electrocardiograms were recorded from 114 consecutive healthy Polish newborns (55 females, 59 males), born after 37 gestational weeks to healthy women with uncomplicated pregnancies. All recordings were made between 3rd and 7th day of life to avoid QT variability. The heart rate per minute and duration of PR, QRS, RR and QT intervals were usually measured. The ECGs were evaluated independently by three observers. At birth, cord blood of neonates was obtained for isolation of genomic DNA. Results The distribution of anthropometric and electrocardiographic variables in our cohort approached normality (skewness < 2 for all variables). No significant differences in anthropometric variables and electrocardiographic traits with respect to AKAP10 genotype were found. Multiple regression analysis with adjustment for gender, gestational age and birth mass revealed that QTc interval in GG AKAP10 homozygotes was significantly longer, but in range, when compared with A alleles carriers (AA + AG, recessive mode of inheritance). No rhythm disturbances were observed. Conclusions Results demonstrate possible association between AKAP10 1936A > G variant and QTc interval in Polish newborns. PMID:25861302

  19. How anchoring proteins shape pain.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Michael J M; McNaughton, Peter A

    2014-09-01

    Cellular responsiveness to external stimuli can be altered by extracellular mediators which activate membrane receptors, in turn signalling to the intracellular space via calcium, cyclic nucleotides, membrane lipids or enzyme activity. These signalling events trigger a cascade leading to an effector which can be a channel, an enzyme or a transcription factor. The effectiveness of these intracellular events is enhanced when they are maintained in close proximity by anchoring proteins, which assemble complexes of signalling molecules such as kinases together with their targets, and in this way enhance both the speed and the precision of intracellular signalling. The A kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) family are adaptor proteins originally named for their ability to associate Protein Kinase A and its targets, but several other enzymes bound by AKAPs have now been found and a wide variety of target structures has been described. This review provides an overview of anchoring proteins involved in pain signalling. The key anchoring proteins and their ion channel targets in primary sensory neurons responding to painful stimuli (nociceptors) are discussed.

  20. Disruption of the A-Kinase Anchoring Domain in Flagellar Radial Spoke Protein 3 Results in Unregulated Axonemal cAMP-dependent Protein Kinase Activity and Abnormal Flagellar Motility

    PubMed Central

    Gaillard, Anne R.; Fox, Laura A.; Rhea, Jeanne M.; Craige, Branch

    2006-01-01

    Biochemical studies of Chlamydomonas flagellar axonemes revealed that radial spoke protein (RSP) 3 is an A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP). To determine the physiological role of PKA anchoring in the axoneme, an RSP3 mutant, pf14, was transformed with an RSP3 gene containing a mutation in the PKA-binding domain. Analysis of several independent transformants revealed that the transformed cells exhibit an unusual phenotype: a fraction of the cells swim normally; the remainder of the cells twitch feebly or are paralyzed. The abnormal/paralyzed motility is not due to an obvious deficiency of radial spoke assembly, and the phenotype cosegregates with the mutant RSP3. We postulated that paralysis was due to failure in targeting and regulation of axonemal cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). To test this, reactivation experiments of demembranated cells were performed in the absence or presence of PKA inhibitors. Importantly, motility in reactivated cell models mimicked the live cell phenotype with nearly equal fractions of motile and paralyzed cells. PKA inhibitors resulted in a twofold increase in the number of motile cells, rescuing paralysis. These results confirm that flagellar RSP3 is an AKAP and reveal that a mutation in the PKA binding domain results in unregulated axonemal PKA activity and inhibition of normal motility. PMID:16571668

  1. The A-Kinase Anchoring Protein (AKAP) Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β Interaction Protein (GSKIP) Regulates β-Catenin through Its Interactions with Both Protein Kinase A (PKA) and GSK3β.

    PubMed

    Dema, Alessandro; Schröter, Micha Friedemann; Perets, Ekaterina; Skroblin, Philipp; Moutty, Marie Christine; Deàk, Veronika Anita; Birchmeier, Walter; Klussmann, Enno

    2016-09-01

    The A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) GSK3β interaction protein (GSKIP) is a cytosolic scaffolding protein binding protein kinase A (PKA) and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β). Here we show that both the AKAP function of GSKIP, i.e. its direct interaction with PKA, and its direct interaction with GSK3β are required for the regulation of β-catenin and thus Wnt signaling. A cytoplasmic destruction complex targets β-catenin for degradation and thus prevents Wnt signaling. Wnt signals cause β-catenin accumulation and translocation into the nucleus, where it induces Wnt target gene expression. GSKIP facilitates control of the β-catenin stabilizing phosphorylation at Ser-675 by PKA. Its interaction with GSK3β facilitates control of the destabilizing phosphorylation of β-catenin at Ser-33/Ser-37/Thr-41. The influence of GSKIP on β-catenin is explained by its scavenger function; it recruits the kinases away from the destruction complex without forming a complex with β-catenin. The regulation of β-catenin by GSKIP is specific for this AKAP as AKAP220, which also binds PKA and GSK3β, did not affect Wnt signaling. We find that the binding domain of AKAP220 for GSK3β is a conserved GSK3β interaction domain (GID), which is also present in GSKIP. Our findings highlight an essential compartmentalization of both PKA and GSK3β by GSKIP, and ascribe a function to a cytosolic AKAP-PKA interaction as a regulatory factor in the control of canonical Wnt signaling. Wnt signaling controls different biological processes, including embryonic development, cell cycle progression, glycogen metabolism, and immune regulation; deregulation is associated with diseases such as cancer, type 2 diabetes, inflammatory, and Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

  2. Cross-species sequence analysis reveals multiple charged residue-rich domains that regulate nuclear/cytoplasmic partitioning and membrane localization of a kinase anchoring protein 12 (SSeCKS/Gravin).

    PubMed

    Streb, Jeffrey W; Miano, Joseph M

    2005-07-29

    A kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) assemble and compartmentalize multiprotein signaling complexes at discrete subcellular locales and thus confer specificity to transduction cascades using ubiquitous signaling enzymes, such as protein kinase A. Intrinsic targeting domains in each AKAP determine the subcellular localization of these complexes and, along with protein-protein interaction domains, form the core of AKAP function. As a foundational step toward elucidating the relationship between location and function, we have used cross-species sequence analysis and deletion mapping to facilitate the identification of the targeting determinants of AKAP12 (also known as SSeCKS or Gravin). Three charged residue-rich regions were identified that regulate two aspects of AKAP12 localization, nuclear/cytoplasmic partitioning and perinuclear/cell periphery targeting. Using deletion mapping and green fluorescent protein chimeras, we uncovered a heretofore unrecognized nuclear localization potential. Five nuclear localization signals, including a novel class of this type of signal termed X2-NLS, are found in the central region of AKAP12 and are important for nuclear targeting. However, this nuclear localization is suppressed by the negatively charged C terminus that mediates nuclear exclusion. In this condition, the distribution of AKAP12 is regulated by an N-terminal targeting domain that simultaneously directs perinuclear and peripheral AKAP12 localization. Three basic residue-rich regions in the N-terminal targeting region have similarity to the MARCKS proteins and were found to control AKAP12 localization to ganglioside-rich regions at the cell periphery. Our data suggest that AKAP12 localization is regulated by a hierarchy of targeting domains and that the localization of AKAP12-assembled signaling complexes may be dynamically regulated. PMID:15923193

  3. cAMP-stimulated Protein Phosphatase 2A Activity Associated with Muscle A Kinase-anchoring Protein (mAKAP) Signaling Complexes Inhibits the Phosphorylation and Activity of the cAMP-specific Phosphodiesterase PDE4D3*

    PubMed Central

    Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly L.; Bauman, Andrea; Mayer, Nicole; Henson, Edward; Heredia, Lorena; Ahn, Jung; McAvoy, Thomas; Nairn, Angus C.; Kapiloff, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    The concentration of the second messenger cAMP is tightly controlled in cells by the activity of phosphodiesterases. We have previously described how the protein kinase A-anchoring protein mAKAP serves as a scaffold for the cAMP-dependent protein kinase PKA and the cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase PDE4D3 in cardiac myocytes. PKA and PDE4D3 constitute a negative feedback loop whereby PKA-catalyzed phosphorylation and activation of PDE4D3 attenuate local cAMP levels. We now show that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) associated with mAKAP complexes is responsible for reversing the activation of PDE4D3 by catalyzing the dephosphorylation of PDE4D3 serine residue 54. Mapping studies reveal that a C-terminal mAKAP domain (residues 2085–2319) binds PP2A. Binding to mAKAP is required for PP2A function, such that deletion of the C-terminal domain enhances both base-line and forskolin-stimulated PDE4D3 activity. Interestingly, PP2A holoenzyme associated with mAKAP complexes in the heart contains the PP2A targeting subunit B56δ. Like PDE4D3, B56δ is a PKA substrate, and PKA phosphorylation of mAKAP-bound B56δ enhances phosphatase activity 2-fold in the complex. Accordingly, expression of a B56δ mutant that cannot be phosphorylated by PKA results in increased PDE4D3 phosphorylation. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that PP2A associated with mAKAP complexes promotes PDE4D3 dephosphorylation, serving both to inhibit PDE4D3 in unstimulated cells and also to mediate a cAMP-induced positive feedback loop following adenylyl cyclase activation and B56δ phosphorylation. In general, PKA·PP2A·mAKAP complexes exemplify how protein kinases and phosphatases may participate in molecular signaling complexes to dynamically regulate localized intracellular signaling. PMID:20106966

  4. cAMP-stimulated protein phosphatase 2A activity associated with muscle A kinase-anchoring protein (mAKAP) signaling complexes inhibits the phosphorylation and activity of the cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase PDE4D3.

    PubMed

    Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly L; Bauman, Andrea; Mayer, Nicole; Henson, Edward; Heredia, Lorena; Ahn, Jung; McAvoy, Thomas; Nairn, Angus C; Kapiloff, Michael S

    2010-04-01

    The concentration of the second messenger cAMP is tightly controlled in cells by the activity of phosphodiesterases. We have previously described how the protein kinase A-anchoring protein mAKAP serves as a scaffold for the cAMP-dependent protein kinase PKA and the cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase PDE4D3 in cardiac myocytes. PKA and PDE4D3 constitute a negative feedback loop whereby PKA-catalyzed phosphorylation and activation of PDE4D3 attenuate local cAMP levels. We now show that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) associated with mAKAP complexes is responsible for reversing the activation of PDE4D3 by catalyzing the dephosphorylation of PDE4D3 serine residue 54. Mapping studies reveal that a C-terminal mAKAP domain (residues 2085-2319) binds PP2A. Binding to mAKAP is required for PP2A function, such that deletion of the C-terminal domain enhances both base-line and forskolin-stimulated PDE4D3 activity. Interestingly, PP2A holoenzyme associated with mAKAP complexes in the heart contains the PP2A targeting subunit B56delta. Like PDE4D3, B56delta is a PKA substrate, and PKA phosphorylation of mAKAP-bound B56delta enhances phosphatase activity 2-fold in the complex. Accordingly, expression of a B56delta mutant that cannot be phosphorylated by PKA results in increased PDE4D3 phosphorylation. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that PP2A associated with mAKAP complexes promotes PDE4D3 dephosphorylation, serving both to inhibit PDE4D3 in unstimulated cells and also to mediate a cAMP-induced positive feedback loop following adenylyl cyclase activation and B56delta phosphorylation. In general, PKA.PP2A.mAKAP complexes exemplify how protein kinases and phosphatases may participate in molecular signaling complexes to dynamically regulate localized intracellular signaling. PMID:20106966

  5. Biomedical applications of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins

    PubMed Central

    Heider, Susanne; Dangerfield, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) use a unique posttranslational modification to link proteins to lipid bilayer membranes. The anchoring structure consists of both a lipid and carbohydrate portion and is highly conserved in eukaryotic organisms regarding its basic characteristics, yet highly variable in its molecular details. The strong membrane targeting property has made the anchors an interesting tool for biotechnological modification of lipid membrane-covered entities from cells through extracellular vesicles to enveloped virus particles. In this review, we will take a closer look at the mechanisms and fields of application for GPI-APs in lipid bilayer membrane engineering and discuss their advantages and disadvantages for biomedicine. PMID:27542385

  6. Protein prenyltransferases: anchor size, pseudogenes and parasites.

    PubMed

    Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Washietl, Stefan; Eisenhaber, Frank

    2003-07-01

    Lipid modification of eukaryotic proteins by protein prenyltransferases is required for critical signaling pathways, cell cycle progression, cytoskeleton remodeling, induction of apoptosis and vesicular trafficking. This review analyzes the influence of distinct states of sequential posttranslational processing that can be obtained after single or double prenylation, reversible palmitoylation, proteolytic cleavage of the C-terminus and possible reversible carboxymethylation. This series of modifications, as well as the exact length of the prenyl anchor, are determinants in protein-membrane and specific protein-protein interactions of protein prenyltransferase substrates. Furthermore, the occurrence and distribution of pseudogenes of protein prenyltransferase subunits are discussed. Besides being developed as anti-cancer agents, prenyltransferase inhibitors are effective against an increasing number of parasitic diseases. Extensive screens for protein prenyltransferases in genomic data of fungal and protozoan pathogens unveil a series of new pharmacologic targets for prenyltransferase inhibition, including the parasites Brugia malayi, Onchocerca volvulus, Aspergillus nidulans, Pneumocystis carinii, Entamoeba histolytica, Strongyloides stercoralis, Trichinella spiralis and Cryptosporidium parvum.

  7. GPI-anchor and GPI-anchored protein expression in PMM2-CDG patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mutations in PMM2 impair phosphomannomutase-2 activity and cause the most frequent congenital disorder of glycosylation, PMM2-CDG. Mannose-1-phosphate, that is deficient in this disorder, is also implicated in the biosynthesis of glycosylphosphatidyl inositol (GPI) anchors. Objective To evaluate whether GPI-anchor and GPI-anchored proteins are defective in PMM2-CDG patients. Methods The expression of GPI-anchor and seven GPI-anchored proteins was evaluated by flow cytometry in different cell types from twelve PMM2-CDG patients. Additionally, neutrophil CD16 and plasma hepatic proteins were studied by Western blot. Transferrin glycoforms were evaluated by HPLC. Results Patients and controls had similar surface expression of GPI-anchor and most GPI-anchored proteins. Nevertheless, patients displayed a significantly diminished binding of two anti-CD16 antibodies (3G8 and KD1) to neutrophils and also of anti-CD14 (61D3) to monocytes. Interestingly, CD16 immunostaining and asialotransferrin levels significantly correlated with patients’ age. Analysis by flow cytometry of CD14 with MΦP9, and CD16 expression in neutrophils by Western blot using H-80 ruled out deficiencies of these antigens. Conclusions PMM2 mutations do not impair GPI-anchor or GPI-anchored protein expression. However, the glycosylation anomalies caused by PMM2 mutations might affect the immunoreactivity of monoclonal antibodies and lead to incorrect conclusions about the expression of different proteins, including GPI-anchored proteins. Neutrophils and monocytes are sensitive to PMM2 mutations, leading to abnormal glycosylation in immune receptors, which might potentially affect their affinity to their ligands, and contribute to infection. This study also confirms less severe hypoglycosylation defects in older PMM2-CDG patients. PMID:24139637

  8. Synthetic Studies of Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) Anchors and GPI-Anchored Peptides, Glycopeptides, and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhongwu

    2013-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchorage of proteins and glycoproteins onto the cell surface is ubiquitous in eukaryotes, and GPI-anchored proteins and glycoproteins play an important role in many biological processes. To study GPI anchorage and explore the functions of GPIs and GPI-anchored proteins and glycoproteins, it is essential to have access to these molecules in homogeneous and structurally defined forms. This review is focused on the progress that our laboratory has made towards the chemical and chemoenzymatic synthesis of structurally defined GPI anchors and GPI-anchored peptides, glycopeptides, and proteins. Briefly, highly convergent strategies were developed for GPI synthesis and were employed to successfully synthesize a number of GPIs, including those carrying unsaturated lipids and other useful functionalities such as the azido and alkynyl groups. The latter enabled further site-specific modification of GPIs by click chemistry. GPI-linked peptides, glycopeptides, and proteins were prepared by regioselective chemical coupling of properly protected GPIs and peptides/glycopeptides or through site-specific ligation of synthetic GPIs and peptides/glycopeptides/proteins under the influence of sortase A. The investigation of interactions between GPI anchors and pore-forming bacterial toxins by means of synthetic GPI anchors and GPI analogs is also discussed. PMID:24955081

  9. D-AKAP1a is a signal-anchored protein in the mitochondrial outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Jun, Yong-Woo; Park, Heeju; Lee, You-Kyung; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Lee, Jin-A; Jang, Deok-Jin

    2016-04-01

    Dual A-kinase anchoring protein 1a (D-AKAP1a, AKAP1) regulates cAMP signaling in mitochondria. However, it is not clear how D-AKAP1a is associated with mitochondria. In this study, we show that D-AKAP1a is a transmembrane protein in the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). We revealed that the N-terminus of D-AKAP1a is exposed to the intermembrane space of mitochondria and that its C-terminus is located on the cytoplasmic side of the MOM. Moderate hydrophobicity and the positively charged flanking residues of the transmembrane domain of D-AKAP1a were important for targeting. Taken together, D-AKAP1a can be classified as a signal-anchored protein in the MOM. Our topological study provides valuable information about the molecular and cellular mechanisms of mitochondrial targeting of AKAP1.

  10. D-AKAP1a is a signal-anchored protein in the mitochondrial outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Jun, Yong-Woo; Park, Heeju; Lee, You-Kyung; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Lee, Jin-A; Jang, Deok-Jin

    2016-04-01

    Dual A-kinase anchoring protein 1a (D-AKAP1a, AKAP1) regulates cAMP signaling in mitochondria. However, it is not clear how D-AKAP1a is associated with mitochondria. In this study, we show that D-AKAP1a is a transmembrane protein in the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). We revealed that the N-terminus of D-AKAP1a is exposed to the intermembrane space of mitochondria and that its C-terminus is located on the cytoplasmic side of the MOM. Moderate hydrophobicity and the positively charged flanking residues of the transmembrane domain of D-AKAP1a were important for targeting. Taken together, D-AKAP1a can be classified as a signal-anchored protein in the MOM. Our topological study provides valuable information about the molecular and cellular mechanisms of mitochondrial targeting of AKAP1. PMID:26950402

  11. The yeast p24 complex regulates GPI-anchored protein transport and quality control by monitoring anchor remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Castillon, Guillaume A.; Aguilera-Romero, Auxiliadora; Manzano-Lopez, Javier; Epstein, Sharon; Kajiwara, Kentaro; Funato, Kouichi; Watanabe, Reika; Riezman, Howard; Muñiz, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins are secretory proteins that are attached to the cell surface of eukaryotic cells by a glycolipid moiety. Once GPI anchoring has occurred in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the structure of the lipid part on the GPI anchor undergoes a remodeling process prior to ER exit. In this study, we provide evidence suggesting that the yeast p24 complex, through binding specifically to GPI-anchored proteins in an anchor-dependent manner, plays a dual role in their selective trafficking. First, the p24 complex promotes efficient ER exit of remodeled GPI-anchored proteins after concentration by connecting them with the COPII coat and thus facilitates their incorporation into vesicles. Second, it retrieves escaped, unremodeled GPI-anchored proteins from the Golgi to the ER in COPI vesicles. Therefore the p24 complex, by sensing the status of the GPI anchor, regulates GPI-anchored protein intracellular transport and coordinates this with correct anchor remodeling. PMID:21680708

  12. Amino acid conditions near the GPI anchor attachment site of prion protein for the conversion and the GPI anchoring.

    PubMed

    Hizume, Masaki; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki

    2010-01-22

    Prion protein (PrP) is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein, and the C-terminal GPI anchor signal sequence (GPI-SS) of PrP is cleaved before GPI anchoring. However, mutations near the GPI anchor attachment site (the omega site) in the GPI-SS have been recognized in human genetic prion diseases. Moreover, the omega site of PrP has not been identified except hamster, though it is known that amino acid restrictions are very severe at the omega and omega+2 sites in other GPI-anchored proteins. To investigate the effect of mutations near the omega site of PrP on the conversion and the GPI anchoring, and to discover the omega site of murine PrP, we systematically created mutant murine PrP with all possible single amino acid substitutions at every amino acid residue from codon 228 to 240. We transfected them into scrapie-infected mouse neuroblastoma cells and examined the conversion efficiencies and the GPI anchoring of each mutant PrP. Mutations near the omega site altered the conversion efficiencies and the GPI anchoring efficiencies. Especially, amino acid restrictions for the conversion and the GPI anchoring were severe at codons 230 and 232 in murine PrP, though they were less severe than in other GPI-anchored proteins. Only the mutant PrPs presented on a cell surface via a GPI anchor were conversion competent. The present study shows that mutations in the GPI-SS can affect the GPI anchoring and the conversion efficiency of PrP. We clarified for the first time the omega site of murine PrP and the amino acid conditions near the omega site for the conversion as well as GPI anchoring.

  13. Protein Kinase A Activity and Anchoring Are Required for Ovarian Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Andrew J.; Campbell, Shirley L.; Howe, Alan K.

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the deadliest of the gynecological malignancies, due in part to its clinically occult metastasis. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms governing EOC dissemination and invasion may provide new targets for antimetastatic therapies or new methods for detection of metastatic disease. The cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is often dysregulated in EOC. Furthermore, PKA activity and subcellular localization by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) are important regulators of cytoskeletal dynamics and cell migration. Thus, we sought to study the role of PKA and AKAP function in both EOC cell migration and invasion. Using the plasma membrane-directed PKA biosensor, pmAKAR3, and an improved migration/invasion assay, we show that PKA is activated at the leading edge of migrating SKOV-3 EOC cells, and that inhibition of PKA activity blocks SKOV-3 cell migration. Furthermore, we show that while the PKA activity within the leading edge of these cells is mediated by anchoring of type-II regulatory PKA subunits (RII), inhibition of anchoring of either RI or RII PKA subunits blocks cell migration. Importantly, we also show – for the first time – that PKA activity is up-regulated at the leading edge of SKOV-3 cells during invasion of a three-dimensional extracellular matrix and, as seen for migration, inhibition of either PKA activity or AKAP-mediated PKA anchoring blocks matrix invasion. These data are the first to demonstrate that the invasion of extracellular matrix by cancer cells elicits activation of PKA within the invasive leading edge and that both PKA activity and anchoring are required for matrix invasion. These observations suggest a role for PKA and AKAP activity in EOC metastasis. PMID:22028904

  14. Functional and Structural Mimicry of Cellular Protein Kinase A Anchoring Proteins by a Viral Oncoprotein

    PubMed Central

    King, Cason R.; Cohen, Michael J.; Fonseca, Gregory J.; Dirk, Brennan S.; Dikeakos, Jimmy D.; Mymryk, Joe S.

    2016-01-01

    The oncoproteins of the small DNA tumor viruses interact with a plethora of cellular regulators to commandeer control of the infected cell. During infection, adenovirus E1A deregulates cAMP signalling and repurposes it for activation of viral gene expression. We show that E1A structurally and functionally mimics a cellular A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP). E1A interacts with and relocalizes protein kinase A (PKA) to the nucleus, likely to virus replication centres, via an interaction with the regulatory subunits of PKA. Binding to PKA requires the N-terminus of E1A, which bears striking similarity to the amphipathic α-helical domain present in cellular AKAPs. E1A also targets the same docking-dimerization domain of PKA normally bound by cellular AKAPs. In addition, the AKAP like motif within E1A could restore PKA interaction to a cellular AKAP in which its normal interaction motif was deleted. During infection, E1A successfully competes with endogenous cellular AKAPs for PKA interaction. E1A’s role as a viral AKAP contributes to viral transcription, protein expression and progeny production. These data establish HAdV E1A as the first known viral AKAP. This represents a unique example of viral subversion of a crucial cellular regulatory pathway via structural mimicry of the PKA interaction domain of cellular AKAPs. PMID:27137912

  15. Labeling Cell Surface GPIs and GPI-Anchored Proteins through Metabolic Engineering with Artificial Inositol Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lili; Gao, Jian; Guo, Zhongwu

    2015-08-10

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchoring of proteins to the cell surface is important for various biological processes, but GPI-anchored proteins are difficult to study. An effective strategy was developed for the metabolic engineering of cell-surface GPIs and GPI-anchored proteins by using inositol derivatives carrying an azido group. The azide-labeled GPIs and GPI-anchored proteins were then tagged with biotin on live cells through a click reaction, which allows further elaboration with streptavidin-conjugated dyes or other molecules. The strategy can be used to label GPI-anchored proteins with various tags for biological studies.

  16. ANCHOR: a web server and database for analysis of protein-protein interaction binding pockets for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Meireles, Lidio M C; Dömling, Alexander S; Camacho, Carlos J

    2010-07-01

    ANCHOR is a web-based tool whose aim is to facilitate the analysis of protein-protein interfaces with regard to its suitability for small molecule drug design. To this end, ANCHOR exploits the so-called anchor residues, i.e. amino acid side-chains deeply buried at protein-protein interfaces, to indicate possible druggable pockets to be targeted by small molecules. For a given protein-protein complex submitted by the user, ANCHOR calculates the change in solvent accessible surface area (DeltaSASA) upon binding for each side-chain, along with an estimate of its contribution to the binding free energy. A Jmol-based tool allows the user to interactively visualize selected anchor residues in their pockets as well as the stereochemical properties of the surrounding region such as hydrogen bonding. ANCHOR includes a Protein Data Bank (PDB) wide database of pre-computed anchor residues from more than 30,000 PDB entries with at least two protein chains. The user can query according to amino acids, buried area (SASA), energy or keywords related to indication areas, e.g. oncogene or diabetes. This database provides a resource to rapidly assess protein-protein interactions for the suitability of small molecules or fragments with bioisostere anchor analogues as possible compounds for pharmaceutical intervention. ANCHOR web server and database are freely available at http://structure.pitt.edu/anchor.

  17. Anchored clathrate waters bind antifreeze proteins to ice

    PubMed Central

    Garnham, Christopher P.; Campbell, Robert L.; Davies, Peter L.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism by which antifreeze proteins (AFPs) irreversibly bind to ice has not yet been resolved. The ice-binding site of an AFP is relatively hydrophobic, but also contains many potential hydrogen bond donors/acceptors. The extent to which hydrogen bonding and the hydrophobic effect contribute to ice binding has been debated for over 30 years. Here we have elucidated the ice-binding mechanism through solving the first crystal structure of an Antarctic bacterial AFP. This 34-kDa domain, the largest AFP structure determined to date, folds as a Ca2+-bound parallel beta-helix with an extensive array of ice-like surface waters that are anchored via hydrogen bonds directly to the polypeptide backbone and adjacent side chains. These bound waters make an excellent three-dimensional match to both the primary prism and basal planes of ice and in effect provide an extensive X-ray crystallographic picture of the AFP∶ice interaction. This unobstructed view, free from crystal-packing artefacts, shows the contributions of both the hydrophobic effect and hydrogen bonding during AFP adsorption to ice. We term this mode of binding the “anchored clathrate” mechanism of AFP action. PMID:21482800

  18. Anchored Clathrate Waters Bind Antifreeze Proteins to Ice

    SciTech Connect

    C Garnham; R Campbell; P Davies

    2011-12-31

    The mechanism by which antifreeze proteins (AFPs) irreversibly bind to ice has not yet been resolved. The ice-binding site of an AFP is relatively hydrophobic, but also contains many potential hydrogen bond donors/acceptors. The extent to which hydrogen bonding and the hydrophobic effect contribute to ice binding has been debated for over 30 years. Here we have elucidated the ice-binding mechanism through solving the first crystal structure of an Antarctic bacterial AFP. This 34-kDa domain, the largest AFP structure determined to date, folds as a Ca{sup 2+}-bound parallel beta-helix with an extensive array of ice-like surface waters that are anchored via hydrogen bonds directly to the polypeptide backbone and adjacent side chains. These bound waters make an excellent three-dimensional match to both the primary prism and basal planes of ice and in effect provide an extensive X-ray crystallographic picture of the AFP{vert_ellipsis}ice interaction. This unobstructed view, free from crystal-packing artefacts, shows the contributions of both the hydrophobic effect and hydrogen bonding during AFP adsorption to ice. We term this mode of binding the 'anchored clathrate' mechanism of AFP action.

  19. Purification of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins by modified triton X-114 partitioning and preparative gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Ko, Y G; Thompson, G A

    1995-01-01

    Triton X-114 phase partitioning has frequently been used to obtain preparations enriched in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins and other hydrophobic proteins from crude cellular homogenates. We have developed a new modification of this phase-partitioning technique which allows two distinct GPI-anchored proteins of Tetrahymena mimbres to be separated from other hydrophobic as well as hydrophilic proteins and recovered in approximately 90% yield. The unique feature of the new method is a 24-h incubation of the first Triton X-114 extract at -20 degrees C. This improves the partitioning of GPI-anchored proteins into the detergent phase while promoting the aggregation of other hydrophobic proteins. Individual GPI-anchored proteins in the detergent phase are then purified to near homogeneity by one-step preparative sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. By substituting Triton X-114/water mixtures for the conventional SDS buffer used to collect proteins eluting from the preparative gel, the purified GPI-anchored protein can be rapidly concentrated from relatively large volumes of eluate by phase partitioning at 32 degrees C. The method is also effective in separating mammalian GPI-anchored alkaline phosphatase from other proteins. It is likely to be of general utility in characterizing the GPI anchor structures associated with nonabundant and abundant GPI-anchored proteins coexisting within the same cell type.

  20. The association between glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins and heterotrimeric G protein alpha subunits in lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, K R; Rudd, C E; Finberg, R W

    1996-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins are nonmembrane spanning cell surface proteins that have been demonstrated to be signal transduction molecules. Because these proteins do not extend into the cytoplasm, the mechanism by which cross-linking of these molecules leads to intracellular signal transduction events is obscure. Previous analysis has indicated that these proteins are associated with src family member tyrosine kinases; however, the role this interaction plays in the generation of intracellular signals is not clear. Here we show that GPI-anchored proteins are associated with alpha subunits of heterotrimeric GTP binding proteins (G proteins) in both human and murine lymphocytes. When the GPI-anchored proteins CD59, CD48, and Thy-1 were immunoprecipitated from various cell lines or freshly isolated lymphocytes, all were found to be associated with a 41-kDa phosphoprotein that we have identified, by using specific antisera, as a mixture of tyrosine phosphorylated G protein alpha subunits: a small amount of Gialpha1, and substantial amounts of Gialpha2 and Gialpha3. GTP binding assays performed with immunoprecipitations of CD59 indicated that there was GTP-binding activity associated with this molecule. Thus, we have shown by both immunochemical and functional criteria that GPI-anchored proteins are physically associated with G proteins. These experiments suggest a potential role of G proteins in the transduction of signals generated by GPI-anchored molecules expressed on lymphocytes of both mouse and human. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8650218

  1. Bat3 promotes the membrane integration of tail-anchored proteins.

    PubMed

    Leznicki, Pawel; Clancy, Anne; Schwappach, Blanche; High, Stephen

    2010-07-01

    The membrane integration of tail-anchored proteins at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is post-translational, with different tail-anchored proteins exploiting distinct cytosolic factors. For example, mammalian TRC40 has a well-defined role during delivery of tail-anchored proteins to the ER. Although its Saccharomyces cerevisiae equivalent, Get3, is known to function in concert with at least four other components, Get1, Get2, Get4 and Get5 (Mdy2), the role of additional mammalian proteins during tail-anchored protein biogenesis is unclear. To this end, we analysed the cytosolic binding partners of Sec61beta, a well-defined substrate of TRC40, and identified Bat3 as a previously unknown interacting partner. Depletion of Bat3 inhibits the membrane integration of Sec61beta, but not of a second, TRC40-independent, tail-anchored protein, cytochrome b5. Thus, Bat3 influences the in vitro membrane integration of tail-anchored proteins using the TRC40 pathway. When expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking a functional GET pathway for tail-anchored protein biogenesis, Bat3 associates with the resulting cytosolic pool of non-targeted chains and diverts it to the nucleus. This Bat3-mediated mislocalisation is not dependent upon Sgt2, a recently identified component of the yeast GET pathway, and we propose that Bat3 either modulates the TRC40 pathway in higher eukaryotes or provides an alternative fate for newly synthesised tail-anchored proteins.

  2. Glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane proteins can be distinguished from transmembrane polypeptide-anchored proteins by differential solubilization and temperature-induced phase separation in Triton X-114.

    PubMed

    Hooper, N M; Bashir, A

    1991-12-15

    Treatment of kidney microvillar membranes with the non-ionic detergent Triton X-114 at 0 degrees C, followed by low-speed centrifugation, generated a detergent-insoluble pellet and a detergent-soluble supernatant. The supernatant was further fractionated by phase separation at 30 degrees C into a detergent-rich phase and a detergent-depleted or aqueous phase. Those ectoenzymes with a covalently attached glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (G-PI) membrane anchor were recovered predominantly (greater than 73%) in the detergent-insoluble pellet. In contrast, those ectoenzymes anchored by a single membrane-spanning polypeptide were recovered predominantly (greater than 62%) in the detergent-rich phase. Removal of the hydrophobic membrane-anchoring domain from either class of ectoenzyme resulted in the proteins being recovered predominantly (greater than 70%) in the aqueous phase. This technique was also applied to other membrane types, including pig and human erythrocyte ghosts, where, in both cases, the G-PI-anchored acetylcholinesterase partitioned predominantly (greater than 69%) into the detergent-insoluble pellet. When the microvillar membranes were subjected only to differential solubilization with Triton X-114 at 0 degrees C, the G-PI-anchored ectoenzymes were recovered predominantly (greater than 63%) in the detergent-insoluble pellet, whereas the transmembrane-polypeptide-anchored ectoenzymes were recovered predominantly (greater than 95%) in the detergent-solubilized supernatant. Thus differential solubilization and temperature-induced phase separation in Triton X-114 distinguished between G-PI-anchored membrane proteins, transmembrane-polypeptide-anchored proteins and soluble, hydrophilic proteins. This technique may be more useful and reliable than susceptibility to release by phospholipases as a means of identifying a G-PI anchor on an unpurified membrane protein.

  3. Glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane proteins can be distinguished from transmembrane polypeptide-anchored proteins by differential solubilization and temperature-induced phase separation in Triton X-114.

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, N M; Bashir, A

    1991-01-01

    Treatment of kidney microvillar membranes with the non-ionic detergent Triton X-114 at 0 degrees C, followed by low-speed centrifugation, generated a detergent-insoluble pellet and a detergent-soluble supernatant. The supernatant was further fractionated by phase separation at 30 degrees C into a detergent-rich phase and a detergent-depleted or aqueous phase. Those ectoenzymes with a covalently attached glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (G-PI) membrane anchor were recovered predominantly (greater than 73%) in the detergent-insoluble pellet. In contrast, those ectoenzymes anchored by a single membrane-spanning polypeptide were recovered predominantly (greater than 62%) in the detergent-rich phase. Removal of the hydrophobic membrane-anchoring domain from either class of ectoenzyme resulted in the proteins being recovered predominantly (greater than 70%) in the aqueous phase. This technique was also applied to other membrane types, including pig and human erythrocyte ghosts, where, in both cases, the G-PI-anchored acetylcholinesterase partitioned predominantly (greater than 69%) into the detergent-insoluble pellet. When the microvillar membranes were subjected only to differential solubilization with Triton X-114 at 0 degrees C, the G-PI-anchored ectoenzymes were recovered predominantly (greater than 63%) in the detergent-insoluble pellet, whereas the transmembrane-polypeptide-anchored ectoenzymes were recovered predominantly (greater than 95%) in the detergent-solubilized supernatant. Thus differential solubilization and temperature-induced phase separation in Triton X-114 distinguished between G-PI-anchored membrane proteins, transmembrane-polypeptide-anchored proteins and soluble, hydrophilic proteins. This technique may be more useful and reliable than susceptibility to release by phospholipases as a means of identifying a G-PI anchor on an unpurified membrane protein. PMID:1837216

  4. Insulin-induced decrease in protein phosphorylation in rat adipocytes not explained by decreased A-kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Egan, J.J.; Greenberg, A.S.; Chang, M.K.; Londos, C.

    1987-05-01

    In isolated rat adipocytes, insulin inhibits lipolysis to a greater extent than would be predicted by the decrease in (-/+)cAMP activity ratio of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (A-kinase), from which it was speculated that insulin promotes the dephosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase. They have examined the phosphorylation state of cellular proteins under conditions of varying A-kinase activities in the presence and absence of insulin. Protein phosphorylation was determined by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis of extracts from /sup 32/P-loaded cells; glycerol and A-kinase activity ratios were measured in the cytosolic extracts from control, non-radioactive cells. Increased protein phosphorylation in general occurred over the same range of A-kinase activity ratios, 0.1-0.3, associated with increased glycerol release. The insulin-induced decrease in lipolysis was associated with a decrease in the /sup 32/P content of several proteins, an effect not explained by the modest reduction in A-kinase activity by insulin. This effect of insulin on protein phosphorylation was lost as the A-kinase activity ratios exceeded 0.5. The results suggest that insulin promotes the dephosphorylation of those adipocyte proteins which are subject to phosphorylation by A-kinase.

  5. The glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein repertoire of babesia bovis and its significance for erythrocyte invasion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glycosylphosphatidyl-anchored proteins are particularly abundant on the surface of pathogenic protozoans and might play an important role for parasite survival. In the present work the relevance of GPI-anchored proteins for erythrocyte invasion of Babesia bovis, one of the tick-transmitted causative...

  6. Solid-state NMR spectra of lipid-anchored proteins under magic angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kaoru; Harada, Erisa; Sugase, Kenji; Shimamoto, Keiko

    2014-03-01

    Solid-state NMR is a promising tool for elucidating membrane-related biological phenomena. We achieved the measurement of high-resolution solid-state NMR spectra for a lipid-anchored protein embedded in lipid bilayers under magic angle spinning (MAS). To date, solid-state NMR measurements of lipid-anchored proteins have not been accomplished due to the difficulty in supplying sufficient amount of stable isotope labeled samples in the overexpression of lipid-anchored proteins requiring complex posttranslational modification. We designed a pseudo lipid-anchored protein in which the protein component was expressed in E. coli and attached to a chemically synthesized lipid-anchor mimic. Using two types of membranes, liposomes and bicelles, we demonstrated different types of insertion procedures for lipid-anchored protein into membranes. In the liposome sample, we were able to observe the cross-polarization and the (13)C-(13)C chemical shift correlation spectra under MAS, indicating that the liposome sample can be used to analyze molecular interactions using dipolar-based NMR experiments. In contrast, the bicelle sample showed sufficient quality of spectra through scalar-based experiments. The relaxation times and protein-membrane interaction were capable of being analyzed in the bicelle sample. These results demonstrated the applicability of two types of sample system to elucidate the roles of lipid-anchors in regulating diverse biological phenomena.

  7. Isolation, purification, characterization and antigenic evaluation of GPI-anchored membrane proteins from Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Agustina; García-Lugo, Pablo; Crisante, Gladys; Añez-Rojas, Néstor; Añez, Néstor

    2008-02-01

    GPI-anchored proteins from the plasma membrane of Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis promastigotes were isolated, characterized and their migration pattern compared with those from other Leishmania species. In all cases the SDS-PAGE migration patterns were obtained under reducing and non-reducing conditions, using DL-dithiothreitol (DTT) as a reducer agent. Our results reveal that under reducing conditions the SDS-PAGE migration pattern is modified as a consequence of the disruption of disulphur-bonds and protein transformation. This is demonstrated when in non-reducing conditions the L. (V.) braziliensis-GPI-anchored proteins pattern showed a group of bands over the 100kDa, and two more bands of 52kDa and 50kDa in four different isolates, whereas under reducing conditions the major GPI-anchored protein fractions were detected as bands of 63kDa, 50kDa and an increase of peptides between 34kDa and 22kDa. Similar modifications were detected in the SDS-PAGE migration patterns of GPI-anchored protein fractions from L. (Leishmania) donovani, L. (L.) mexicana and L. (L.) amazonensis run under the same reducing conditions. Antigenic evaluation carried out by Western blot revealed the presence of two very specific L. (V.) braziliensis-GPI-anchored protein bands of 50kDa and 28kDa. These bands were specifically recognized by anti-L. (V.) braziliensis-GPI-anchored protein serum from experimentally immunized animals. These two peptides were not detected when GPI-anchored protein fractions from L. (L.) donovani, L. (L.) mexicana and L. (L.) amazonensis, were challenged with the same anti-serum. The present results lead us to suggest the use of these two peptides as biochemical markers to identify and differentiate leishmaniasis caused by L. (V.) braziliensis. The lack of immunogenicity observed here with the peptide gp63, a very common protein detected in Leishmania species, is considered.

  8. An accessory protein required for anchoring and assembly of amyloid fibres in B. subtilis biofilms.

    PubMed

    Romero, Diego; Vlamakis, Hera; Losick, Richard; Kolter, Roberto

    2011-06-01

    Cells within Bacillus subtilis biofilms are held in place by an extracellular matrix that contains cell-anchored amyloid fibres, composed of the amyloidogenic protein TasA. As biofilms age they disassemble because the cells release the amyloid fibres. This release appears to be the consequence of incorporation of D-tyrosine, D-leucine, D-tryptophan and D-methionine into the cell wall. Here, we characterize the in vivo roles of an accessory protein TapA (TasA anchoring/assembly protein; previously YqxM) that serves both to anchor the fibres to the cell wall and to assemble TasA into fibres. TapA is found in discrete foci in the cell envelope and these foci disappear when cells are treated with a mixture of D-amino acids. Purified cell wall sacculi retain a functional form of this anchoring protein such that purified fibres can be anchored to the sacculi in vitro. In addition, we show that TapA is essential for the proper assembly of the fibres. Its absence results in a dramatic reduction in TasA levels and what little TasA is left produces only thin fibres that are not anchored to the cell. PMID:21477127

  9. Prediction of Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Anchored Proteins in Arabidopsis. A Genomic Analysis1

    PubMed Central

    Borner, Georg H.H.; Sherrier, D. Janine; Stevens, Timothy J.; Arkin, Isaiah T.; Dupree, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchoring of proteins provides a potential mechanism for targeting to the plant plasma membrane and cell wall. However, relatively few such proteins have been identified. Here, we develop a procedure for database analysis to identify GPI-anchored proteins (GAP) based on their possession of common features. In a comprehensive search of the annotated Arabidopsis genome, we identified 167 novel putative GAP in addition to the 43 previously described candidates. Many of these 210 proteins show similarity to characterized cell surface proteins. The predicted GAP include homologs of β-1,3-glucanases (16), metallo- and aspartyl proteases (13), glycerophosphodiesterases (6), phytocyanins (25), multi-copper oxidases (2), extensins (6), plasma membrane receptors (19), and lipid-transfer-proteins (18). Classical arabinogalactan (AG) proteins (13), AG peptides (9), fasciclin-like proteins (20), COBRA and 10 homologs, and novel potential signaling peptides that we name GAPEPs (8) were also identified. A further 34 proteins of unknown function were predicted to be GPI anchored. A surprising finding was that over 40% of the proteins identified here have probable AG glycosylation modules, suggesting that AG glycosylation of cell surface proteins is widespread. This analysis shows that GPI anchoring is likely to be a major modification in plants that is used to target a specific subset of proteins to the cell surface for extracellular matrix remodeling and signaling. PMID:12068095

  10. The structural basis of tail-anchored membrane protein recognition by Get3

    SciTech Connect

    Mateja, Agnieszka; Szlachcic, Anna; Downing, Maureen E.; Dobosz, Malgorzata; Mariappan, Malaiyalam; Hegde, Ramanujan S.; Keenan, Robert J.

    2009-10-05

    Targeting of newly synthesized membrane proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum is an essential cellular process. Most membrane proteins are recognized and targeted co-translationally by the signal recognition particle. However, nearly 5% of membrane proteins are 'tail-anchored' by a single carboxy-terminal transmembrane domain that cannot access the co-translational pathway. Instead, tail-anchored proteins are targeted post-translationally by a conserved ATPase termed Get3. The mechanistic basis for tail-anchored protein recognition or targeting by Get3 is not known. Here we present crystal structures of yeast Get3 in 'open' (nucleotide-free) and 'closed' (ADP {center_dot} AlF{sub 4}{sup -}-bound) dimer states. In the closed state, the dimer interface of Get3 contains an enormous hydrophobic groove implicated by mutational analyses in tail-anchored protein binding. In the open state, Get3 undergoes a striking rearrangement that disrupts the groove and shields its hydrophobic surfaces. These data provide a molecular mechanism for nucleotide-regulated binding and release of tail-anchored proteins during their membrane targeting by Get3.

  11. The I-antigens of Ichthyophthirius multifiliis are GPI-anchored proteins.

    PubMed

    Clark, T G; Gao, Y; Gaertig, J; Wang, X; Cheng, G

    2001-01-01

    The parasitic ciliate Ichthyophthirius multifiliis has abundant surface membrane proteins (i-antigens) that when clustered, trigger rapid, premature exit from the host. Similar antigens are present in free-living ciliates and are GPI-anchored in both Paramecium and Tetrahymena. Although transmembrane signalling through GPI-anchored proteins has been well-documented in metazoan cells, comparable phenomena have yet to be described in protists. Since premature exit of Ichthyophthirius is likely to involve a transmembrane signalling event, we sought to determine whether i-antigens are GPI-anchored in these cells as well. Based on their solubility properties in Triton X-114, the i-antigens of Ichthyophthirius are amphiphilic in nature and partition with the detergent phase. Nevertheless, following treatment of detergent lysates with phospholipase C, the same proteins become hydrophilic. Concomitantly, they are recognized by antibodies against a cross-reacting determinant exposed on virtually all GPI-anchored proteins following cleavage with phospholipase C. Finally, when expressed in recombinant form in Tetrahymena thermophila, full-length i-antigens are restricted to the membrane, while those lacking hydrophobic C-termini are secreted from the cell. Taken together, these observations argue strongly that the i-antigens of Ichthyophthirius multifiliis are, in fact, GPI-anchored proteins.

  12. Distinct Pathways Mediate the Sorting of Tail-anchored Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the biogenesis of tail-anchored (TA) proteins localized to the mitochondrial outer membrane in plant cells. To address this issue, we screened all of the (>500) known and predicted TA proteins in Arabidopsis for those annotated, based on Gene Ontology, to possess mitochondrial...

  13. Distinct Pathways Mediate the Sorting of Tail-anchored Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the biogenesis of tail-anchored (TA) proteins localized to the mitochondrial outer membrane in plant cells. To address this issue, we screened all of the (>600) known and predicted TA proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana for those annotated, based on Gene Ontology, to possess mitoc...

  14. Estradiol dependent anchoring of the goat uterine estrogen receptor activation factor (E-RAF) at the endoplasmic reticulum by a 55 kDa anchor protein (ap55).

    PubMed

    Govind, Anitha P; Sreeja, S; Thampan, Raghava Varman

    2003-05-01

    The primary intracellular site of localization of the estrogen receptor activation factor (E-RAF) is shown here to be the endoplasmic reticulum where the protein remains anchored through an estrogen dependent mechanism. The retention of E-RAF by the endoplasmic reticulum is facilitated by two proteins: (1) a 55 kDa anchor protein (ap55) which is an integral membrane protein of the endoplasmic reticulum. ap55 is a high affinity estrogen binding protein. A conformational change induced by estrogen binding is thought to favor the anchoring process. (2) The anchoring of E-RAF by ap55 is mediated by yet another protein. This is the 66 kDa transport protein (tp66) which recognizes ap55 on the one hand and E-RAF on the other. The presence of estradiol that saturates the hormone binding sites on ap55 appears to favor the anchoring of tp66-E-RAF complex to ap55. This interaction appears to be weakened by levels of estradiol below 7 nM concentration leading to the dissociation of the tp66-E-RAF complex from ap55. The tp66-E-RAF complex moves towards the nucleus. PMID:12682911

  15. MCD4 Encodes a Conserved Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane Protein Essential for Glycosylphosphatidylinositol Anchor Synthesis in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Gaynor, Erin C.; Mondésert, Guillaume; Grimme, Stephen J.; Reed, Steve I.; Orlean, Peter; Emr, Scott D.

    1999-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins are cell surface-localized proteins that serve many important cellular functions. The pathway mediating synthesis and attachment of the GPI anchor to these proteins in eukaryotic cells is complex, highly conserved, and plays a critical role in the proper targeting, transport, and function of all GPI-anchored protein family members. In this article, we demonstrate that MCD4, an essential gene that was initially identified in a genetic screen to isolate Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants defective for bud emergence, encodes a previously unidentified component of the GPI anchor synthesis pathway. Mcd4p is a multimembrane-spanning protein that localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and contains a large NH2-terminal ER lumenal domain. We have also cloned the human MCD4 gene and found that Mcd4p is both highly conserved throughout eukaryotes and has two yeast homologues. Mcd4p’s lumenal domain contains three conserved motifs found in mammalian phosphodiesterases and nucleotide pyrophosphases; notably, the temperature-conditional MCD4 allele used for our studies (mcd4–174) harbors a single amino acid change in motif 2. The mcd4–174 mutant (1) is defective in ER-to-Golgi transport of GPI-anchored proteins (i.e., Gas1p) while other proteins (i.e., CPY) are unaffected; (2) secretes and releases (potentially up-regulated cell wall) proteins into the medium, suggesting a defect in cell wall integrity; and (3) exhibits marked morphological defects, most notably the accumulation of distorted, ER- and vesicle-like membranes. mcd4–174 cells synthesize all classes of inositolphosphoceramides, indicating that the GPI protein transport block is not due to deficient ceramide synthesis. However, mcd4–174 cells have a severe defect in incorporation of [3H]inositol into proteins and accumulate several previously uncharacterized [3H]inositol-labeled lipids whose properties are consistent with their being GPI precursors

  16. The role of cytosolic proteins in the insertion of tail-anchored proteins into phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Sara F; Longhi, Renato; Borgese, Nica

    2009-07-15

    Tail-anchored (TA) proteins are membrane proteins that contain an N-terminal domain exposed to the cytosol and a single transmembrane segment near the C-terminus followed by few or no polar residues. TA proteins with a mildly hydrophobic transmembrane domain, such as cytochrome b5 (b5), are able to insert post-translationally into pure lipid vesicles without assistance from membrane proteins. Here, we investigated whether any cytosolic proteins are needed to maintain b5 in a competent state for transmembrane integration. Using b5 constructs translated in vitro or produced in bacteria, we demonstrate that cytosolic proteins are neither necessary nor facilitatory for the unassisted translocation of b5. Furthermore, we demonstrate that no cytosolic protein is involved in the translocation of a C-terminal domain of 85 residues appended to the transmembrane domain of b5. Nevertheless, b5 does bind cytosolic proteins, and in their presence but not in their absence, its insertion into liposomes is inhibited by the thiol oxidant diamide and the alkylating agent N-ethylmaleimide. The effect of diamide is also observed in living cells. Thus, the specific in vivo targeting of b5 might be achieved by interaction with redox-sensitive targeting factors that hinder its nonspecific insertion into any permissive bilayer.

  17. Vacuolar SNARE Protein Transmembrane Domains Serve as Nonspecific Membrane Anchors with Unequal Roles in Lipid Mixing*

    PubMed Central

    Pieren, Michel; Desfougères, Yann; Michaillat, Lydie; Schmidt, Andrea; Mayer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Membrane fusion is induced by SNARE complexes that are anchored in both fusion partners. SNAREs zipper up from the N to C terminus bringing the two membranes into close apposition. Their transmembrane domains (TMDs) might be mere anchoring devices, deforming bilayers by mechanical force. Structural studies suggested that TMDs might also perturb lipid structure by undergoing conformational transitions or by zipping up into the bilayer. Here, we tested this latter hypothesis, which predicts that the activity of SNAREs should depend on the primary sequence of their TMDs. We replaced the TMDs of all vacuolar SNAREs (Nyv1, Vam3, and Vti1) by a lipid anchor, by a TMD from a protein unrelated to the membrane fusion machinery, or by artificial leucine-valine sequences. Individual exchange of the native SNARE TMDs against an unrelated transmembrane anchor or an artificial leucine-valine sequence yielded normal fusion activities. Fusion activity was also preserved upon pairwise exchange of the TMDs against unrelated peptides, which eliminates the possibility for specific TMD-TMD interactions. Thus, a specific primary sequence or zippering beyond the SNARE domains is not a prerequisite for fusion. Lipid-anchored Vti1 was fully active, and lipid-anchored Nyv1 permitted the reaction to proceed up to hemifusion, and lipid-anchored Vam3 interfered already before hemifusion. The unequal contribution of proteinaceous TMDs on Vam3 and Nyv1 suggests that Q- and R-SNAREs might make different contributions to the hemifusion intermediate and the opening of the fusion pore. Furthermore, our data support the view that SNARE TMDs serve as nonspecific membrane anchors in vacuole fusion. PMID:25817997

  18. Molecular Mechanisms for cAMP-Mediated Immunoregulation in T cells – Role of Anchored Protein Kinase A Signaling Units

    PubMed Central

    Wehbi, Vanessa L.; Taskén, Kjetil

    2016-01-01

    The cyclic AMP/protein kinase A (cAMP/PKA) pathway is one of the most common and versatile signal pathways in eukaryotic cells. A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) target PKA to specific substrates and distinct subcellular compartments providing spatial and temporal specificity for mediation of biological effects channeled through the cAMP/PKA pathway. In the immune system, cAMP is a potent negative regulator of T cell receptor-mediated activation of effector T cells (Teff) acting through a proximal PKA/Csk/Lck pathway anchored via a scaffold consisting of the AKAP Ezrin holding PKA, the linker protein EBP50, and the anchoring protein phosphoprotein associated with glycosphingolipid-enriched microdomains holding Csk. As PKA activates Csk and Csk inhibits Lck, this pathway in response to cAMP shuts down proximal T cell activation. This immunomodulating pathway in Teff mediates clinically important responses to regulatory T cell (Treg) suppression and inflammatory mediators, such as prostaglandins (PGs), adrenergic stimuli, adenosine, and a number of other ligands. A major inducer of T cell cAMP levels is PG E2 (PGE2) acting through EP2 and EP4 prostanoid receptors. PGE2 plays a crucial role in the normal physiological control of immune homeostasis as well as in inflammation and cancer immune evasion. Peripherally induced Tregs express cyclooxygenase-2, secrete PGE2, and elicit the immunosuppressive cAMP pathway in Teff as one tumor immune evasion mechanism. Moreover, a cAMP increase can also be induced by indirect mechanisms, such as intercellular transfer between T cells. Indeed, Treg, known to have elevated levels of intracellular cAMP, may mediate their suppressive function by transferring cAMP to Teff through gap junctions, which we speculate could also be regulated by PKA/AKAP complexes. In this review, we present an updated overview on the influence of cAMP-mediated immunoregulatory mechanisms acting through localized cAMP signaling and the therapeutical

  19. Molecular Mechanisms for cAMP-Mediated Immunoregulation in T cells - Role of Anchored Protein Kinase A Signaling Units.

    PubMed

    Wehbi, Vanessa L; Taskén, Kjetil

    2016-01-01

    The cyclic AMP/protein kinase A (cAMP/PKA) pathway is one of the most common and versatile signal pathways in eukaryotic cells. A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) target PKA to specific substrates and distinct subcellular compartments providing spatial and temporal specificity for mediation of biological effects channeled through the cAMP/PKA pathway. In the immune system, cAMP is a potent negative regulator of T cell receptor-mediated activation of effector T cells (Teff) acting through a proximal PKA/Csk/Lck pathway anchored via a scaffold consisting of the AKAP Ezrin holding PKA, the linker protein EBP50, and the anchoring protein phosphoprotein associated with glycosphingolipid-enriched microdomains holding Csk. As PKA activates Csk and Csk inhibits Lck, this pathway in response to cAMP shuts down proximal T cell activation. This immunomodulating pathway in Teff mediates clinically important responses to regulatory T cell (Treg) suppression and inflammatory mediators, such as prostaglandins (PGs), adrenergic stimuli, adenosine, and a number of other ligands. A major inducer of T cell cAMP levels is PG E2 (PGE2) acting through EP2 and EP4 prostanoid receptors. PGE2 plays a crucial role in the normal physiological control of immune homeostasis as well as in inflammation and cancer immune evasion. Peripherally induced Tregs express cyclooxygenase-2, secrete PGE2, and elicit the immunosuppressive cAMP pathway in Teff as one tumor immune evasion mechanism. Moreover, a cAMP increase can also be induced by indirect mechanisms, such as intercellular transfer between T cells. Indeed, Treg, known to have elevated levels of intracellular cAMP, may mediate their suppressive function by transferring cAMP to Teff through gap junctions, which we speculate could also be regulated by PKA/AKAP complexes. In this review, we present an updated overview on the influence of cAMP-mediated immunoregulatory mechanisms acting through localized cAMP signaling and the therapeutical

  20. Developmental Growth Control Exerted via the Protein A Kinase Tpk2 in Ashbya gossypii

    PubMed Central

    Wasserstrom, Lisa; Lengeler, Klaus; Walther, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Sporulation in Ashbya gossypii is induced by nutrient-limited conditions and leads to the formation of haploid spores. Using RNA-seq, we have determined a gene set induced upon sporulation, which bears considerable overlap with that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae but also contains A. gossypii-specific genes. Addition of cyclic AMP (cAMP) to nutrient-limited media blocks sporulation and represses the induction of sporulation specific genes. Deletion of the protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunits encoded by TPK1 and TPK2 showed reduced growth in tpk1 but enhanced growth in the tpk2 strain; however, both mutants sporulated well. Sporulation can be blocked by cAMP in tpk1 but not in tpk2 strains. Similarly, TPK2 acts at a second developmental switch promoting the break in spore dormancy. In S. cerevisiae, PKA phosphorylates and inhibits Msn2/4. The transcript profiles of the tpk1 and msn2/4 mutants were very similar to that of the wild type under sporulation conditions. However, deletion of the single A. gossypii MSN2/4 homolog generated a specific sporulation defect. We identified a set of genes involved in spore wall assembly that was downregulated in the msn2/4 mutant, particularly DIT2, suggesting that poor spore viability may be due to lysis of spores. Our results reveal specific functional differences between the two catalytic PKA subunits in A. gossypii and identified Tpk2 as the key A kinase that transduces developmental decisions of growth. Our data also suggest that Msn2/4 is involved only at a late step of sporulation in A. gossypii and is not a major regulator of IME1. PMID:25862153

  1. Delivery of a secreted soluble protein to the vacuole via a membrane anchor

    SciTech Connect

    Barrieu, F.; Chrispeels, M.J.

    1999-08-01

    To further understand how membrane proteins are sorted in the secretory system, the authors devised a strategy that involves the expression of a membrane-anchored yeast invertase in transgenic plants. The construct consisted of a signal peptide followed by the coding region of yeast invertase and the transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail of calnexin. The substitution of a lysine near the C terminus of calnexin with a glutamic acid residue ensured progression through the secretory system rather than retention in or return to the endoplasmic reticulum. In the transformed plants, invertase activity and a 70-kD cross-reacting protein were found in the vacuoles. This yeast invertase had plant-specific complex glycans, indicating that transport to the vacuole was mediated by the Golgi apparatus. The microsomal fraction contained a membrane-anchored 90-kD cross-reacting polypeptide, but was devoid of invertase activity. Their results indicate that this membrane-anchored protein proceeds in the secretory system beyond the point where soluble proteins are sorted for secretion, and is detached from its membrane anchor either just before or just after delivery to the vacuole.

  2. VIP21/caveolin, glycosphingolipid clusters and the sorting of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins in epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zurzolo, C; van't Hof, W; van Meer, G; Rodriguez-Boulan, E

    1994-01-01

    We studied the role of the association between glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins and glycosphingolipid (GSL) clusters in apical targeting using gD1-DAF, a GPI-anchored protein that is differentially sorted by three epithelial cell lines. Differently from MDCK cells, where both gD1-DAF and glucosylceramide (GlcCer) are sorted to the apical membrane, in MDCK Concanavalin A-resistant cells (MDCK-ConAr) gD1-DAF was mis-sorted to both surfaces, but GlcCer was still targeted to the apical surface. In both MDCK and MDCK-ConAr cells, gD1-DAF became associated with TX-100-insoluble GSL clusters during transport to the cell surface. In dramatic contrast with MDCK cells, the Fischer rat thyroid (FRT) cell line targeted both gD1-DAF and GlcCer basolaterally. The targeting differences for GSLs in FRT and MDCK cells cannot be accounted for by a differential ability to form clusters because, in spite of major differences in the GSL composition, both cell lines assembled GSLs into TX-100-insoluble complexes with identical isopycnic densities. Surprisingly, in FRT cells, gD1-DAF did not form clusters with GSLs and, therefore, remained completely soluble. This clustering defect in FRT cells correlated with the lack of expression of VIP21/caveolin, a protein localized to both the plasma membrane caveolae and the trans Golgi network. This suggests that VIP21/caveolin may have an important role in recruiting GPI-anchored proteins into GSL complexes necessary for their apical sorting. However, since MDCK-ConAr cells expressed caveolin and clustered GPI-anchored proteins normally, yet mis-sorted them, our results also indicate that clustering and caveolin are not sufficient for apical targeting, and that additional factors are required for the accurate apical sorting of GPI-anchored proteins. Images PMID:8306971

  3. Selective and programmed cleavage of GPI-anchored proteins from the surface membrane by phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Müller, Alexandra; Klöppel, Christine; Smith-Valentine, Megan; Van Houten, Judith; Simon, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Many surface proteins of eukaryotic cells are tethered to the membrane by a GPI-anchor which is enzymatically cleavable. Here, we investigate cleavage and release of different GPI-proteins by phospholipase C from the outer membrane of the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia. Our data indicate that different GPI-proteins are not equally cleaved as proteins of the surface antigen family are preferentially released in vitro compared to several smaller GPI-proteins. Likewise, the analysis of culture medium indicates exclusive in vivo release of surface antigens by two phospholipase C isoforms (PLC2 and PLC6). This suggests that phospholipase C shows affinity for select groups of GPI-anchored proteins. Our data also reveal an up-regulation of PLC isoforms in GPI-anchored protein cleavage during antigenic switching. As a consequence, silencing of these PLCs leads to a drastic decrease of antigen concentration in the medium. These results suggest a higher order of GPI-regulation by phospholipase C as cleavage occurs programmed and specific for single GPI-proteins instead of an unspecific shedding of the entire surface membrane GPI-content.

  4. Multifunctional roles for the protein translocation machinery in RNA anchoring to the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Jagannathan, Sujatha; Hsu, Jack C-C; Reid, David W; Chen, Qiang; Thompson, Will J; Moseley, Arthur M; Nicchitta, Christopher V

    2014-09-12

    Signal sequence-encoding mRNAs undergo translation-dependent localization to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and at the ER are anchored via translation on Sec61-bound ribosomes. Recent investigations into the composition and membrane association characteristics of ER-associated mRNAs have, however, revealed both ribosome-dependent (indirect) and ribosome-independent (direct) modes of mRNA association with the ER. These findings raise important questions regarding our understanding of how mRNAs are selected, localized, and anchored to the ER. Using semi-intact tissue culture cells, we performed a polysome solubilization screen and identified conditions that distinguish polysomes engaged in the translation of distinct cohorts of mRNAs. To gain insight into the molecular basis of direct mRNA anchoring to the ER, we performed RNA-protein UV photocross-linking studies in rough microsomes and demonstrate that numerous ER integral membrane proteins display RNA binding activity. Quantitative proteomic analyses of HeLa cytosolic and ER-bound polysome fractions identified translocon components as selective polysome-interacting proteins. Notably, the Sec61 complex was highly enriched in polysomes engaged in the translation of endomembrane organelle proteins, whereas translocon accessory proteins, such as ribophorin I, were present in all subpopulations of ER-associated polysomes. Analyses of the protein composition of oligo(dT)-selected UV photocross-linked ER protein-RNA adducts identified Sec61α,β and ribophorin I as ER-poly(A) mRNA-binding proteins, suggesting unexpected roles for the protein translocation and modification machinery in mRNA anchoring to the ER. In summary, we propose that multiple mechanisms of mRNA and ribosome association with ER operate to enable an mRNA transcriptome-wide function for the ER in protein synthesis.

  5. Cell-surface Attachment of Bacterial Multienzyme Complexes Involves Highly Dynamic Protein-Protein Anchors*

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Kate; Najmudin, Shabir; Alves, Victor D.; Bayer, Edward A.; Smith, Steven P.; Bule, Pedro; Waller, Helen; Ferreira, Luís M. A.; Gilbert, Harry J.; Fontes, Carlos M. G. A.

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play a pivotal role in the assembly of the cellulosome, one of nature's most intricate nanomachines dedicated to the depolymerization of complex carbohydrates. The integration of cellulosomal components usually occurs through the binding of type I dockerin modules located at the C terminus of the enzymes to cohesin modules located in the primary scaffoldin subunit. Cellulosomes are typically recruited to the cell surface via type II cohesin-dockerin interactions established between primary and cell-surface anchoring scaffoldin subunits. In contrast with type II interactions, type I dockerins usually display a dual binding mode that may allow increased conformational flexibility during cellulosome assembly. Acetivibrio cellulolyticus produces a highly complex cellulosome comprising an unusual adaptor scaffoldin, ScaB, which mediates the interaction between the primary scaffoldin, ScaA, through type II cohesin-dockerin interactions and the anchoring scaffoldin, ScaC, via type I cohesin-dockerin interactions. Here, we report the crystal structure of the type I ScaB dockerin in complex with a type I ScaC cohesin in two distinct orientations. The data show that the ScaB dockerin displays structural symmetry, reflected by the presence of two essentially identical binding surfaces. The complex interface is more extensive than those observed in other type I complexes, which results in an ultra-high affinity interaction (Ka ∼1012 m). A subset of ScaB dockerin residues was also identified as modulating the specificity of type I cohesin-dockerin interactions in A. cellulolyticus. This report reveals that recruitment of cellulosomes onto the cell surface may involve dockerins presenting a dual binding mode to incorporate additional flexibility into the quaternary structure of highly populated multienzyme complexes. PMID:25855788

  6. Protein-anchoring strategy for delivering acetylcholinesterase to the neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Ito, Mikako; Suzuki, Yumi; Okada, Takashi; Fukudome, Takayasu; Yoshimura, Toshiro; Masuda, Akio; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Krejci, Eric; Ohno, Kinji

    2012-07-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is anchored to the synaptic basal lamina via a triple helical collagen Q (ColQ). Congenital defects of ColQ cause endplate AChE deficiency and myasthenic syndrome. A single intravenous administration of adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV8)-COLQ to Colq(-/-) mice recovered motor functions, synaptic transmission, as well as the morphology of the NMJ. ColQ-tailed AChE was specifically anchored to NMJ and its amount was restored to 89% of the wild type. We next characterized the molecular basis of this efficient recovery. We first confirmed that ColQ-tailed AChE can be specifically targeted to NMJ by an in vitro overlay assay in Colq(-/-) mice muscle sections. We then injected AAV1-COLQ-IRES-EGFP into the left tibialis anterior and detected AChE in noninjected limbs. Furthermore, the in vivo injection of recombinant ColQ-tailed AChE protein complex into the gluteus maximus muscle of Colq(-/-) mice led to accumulation of AChE in noninjected forelimbs. We demonstrated for the first time in vivo that the ColQ protein contains a tissue-targeting signal that is sufficient for anchoring itself to the NMJ. We propose that the protein-anchoring strategy is potentially applicable to a broad spectrum of diseases affecting extracellular matrix molecules.

  7. Angiotensin-converting enzyme is a GPI-anchored protein releasing factor crucial for fertilization.

    PubMed

    Kondoh, Gen; Tojo, Hiromasa; Nakatani, Yuka; Komazawa, Nobuyasu; Murata, Chie; Yamagata, Kazuo; Maeda, Yusuke; Kinoshita, Taroh; Okabe, Masaru; Taguchi, Ryo; Takeda, Junji

    2005-02-01

    The angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is a key regulator of blood pressure. It is known to cleave small peptides, such as angiotensin I and bradykinin and changes their biological activities, leading to upregulation of blood pressure. Here we describe a new activity for ACE: a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein releasing activity (GPIase activity). Unlike its peptidase activity, GPIase activity is weakly inhibited by the tightly binding ACE inhibitor and not inactivated by substitutions of core amino acid residues for the peptidase activity, suggesting that the active site elements for GPIase differ from those for peptidase activity. ACE shed various GPI-anchored proteins from the cell surface, and the process was accelerated by the lipid raft disruptor filipin. The released products carried portions of the GPI anchor, indicating cleavage within the GPI moiety. Further analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry predicted the cleavage site at the mannose-mannose linkage. GPI-anchored proteins such as TESP5 and PH-20 were released from the sperm membrane of wild-type mice but not in Ace knockout sperm in vivo. Moreover, peptidase-inactivated E414D mutant ACE and also PI-PLC rescued the egg-binding deficiency of Ace knockout sperms, implying that ACE plays a crucial role in fertilization through this activity. PMID:15665832

  8. Lactobacillus acidophilus CP23 with weak immunomodulatory activity lacks anchoring structure for surface layer protein.

    PubMed

    Yanagihara, Sae; Kato, Shinji; Ashida, Nobuhisa; Yamamoto, Naoyuki

    2015-05-01

    To determine the reason for the low levels of Surface layer protein A (SlpA) on CP23 cells, which might play a crucial role in the immunomodulatory effect of Lactobacillus acidophilus, the DNA sequence of the slpA gene of CP23 and L-92 strains, including the upstream region, were analyzed. Unexpectedly, there was no significant difference in the predicted amino acid sequence of the C-terminus needed for cell anchoring, and only an additional Ala-Val-Ala sequence inserted in the N-terminal region of the mature CP23 protein. Therefore, anchoring of SlpA on the cell wall of CP23 and L-92 was evaluated by a reconstitution assay, which showed that SlpA released by LiCl treatment from both CP23 and L-92 was successfully anchored on LiCl-treated L-92 cells, but not on LiCl-treated CP23 cells. Moreover, quantitative analysis of SlpA protein in the culture medium of CP23 and L-92 by ELISA revealed higher levels of SlpA secretion in CP23 cells than in L-92 cells. Collectively, these results suggest that the lower levels of SlpA on the surface of CP23 cells might be caused by less cell wall capacity for SlpA anchoring, leading to an accumulation of SlpA in the culture medium of CP23 cells. The present study supports the importance of cell surface structure of L. acidophilus L-92 for SlpA anchoring on the cell surface needed for immunomodulatory effect.

  9. Diffusion of GPI-anchored proteins is influenced by the activity of dynamic cortical actin.

    PubMed

    Saha, Suvrajit; Lee, Il-Hyung; Polley, Anirban; Groves, Jay T; Rao, Madan; Mayor, Satyajit

    2015-11-01

    Molecular diffusion at the surface of living cells is believed to be predominantly driven by thermal kicks. However, there is growing evidence that certain cell surface molecules are driven by the fluctuating dynamics of cortical cytoskeleton. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we measure the diffusion coefficient of a variety of cell surface molecules over a temperature range of 24-37 °C. Exogenously incorporated fluorescent lipids with short acyl chains exhibit the expected increase of diffusion coefficient over this temperature range. In contrast, we find that GPI-anchored proteins exhibit temperature-independent diffusion over this range and revert to temperature-dependent diffusion on cell membrane blebs, in cells depleted of cholesterol, and upon acute perturbation of actin dynamics and myosin activity. A model transmembrane protein with a cytosolic actin-binding domain also exhibits the temperature-independent behavior, directly implicating the role of cortical actin. We show that diffusion of GPI-anchored proteins also becomes temperature dependent when the filamentous dynamic actin nucleator formin is inhibited. However, changes in cortical actin mesh size or perturbation of branched actin nucleator Arp2/3 do not affect this behavior. Thus cell surface diffusion of GPI-anchored proteins and transmembrane proteins that associate with actin is driven by active fluctuations of dynamic cortical actin filaments in addition to thermal fluctuations, consistent with expectations from an "active actin-membrane composite" cell surface.

  10. Diffusion of GPI-anchored proteins is influenced by the activity of dynamic cortical actin

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Suvrajit; Lee, Il-Hyung; Polley, Anirban; Groves, Jay T.; Rao, Madan; Mayor, Satyajit

    2015-01-01

    Molecular diffusion at the surface of living cells is believed to be predominantly driven by thermal kicks. However, there is growing evidence that certain cell surface molecules are driven by the fluctuating dynamics of cortical cytoskeleton. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we measure the diffusion coefficient of a variety of cell surface molecules over a temperature range of 24–37°C. Exogenously incorporated fluorescent lipids with short acyl chains exhibit the expected increase of diffusion coefficient over this temperature range. In contrast, we find that GPI-anchored proteins exhibit temperature-independent diffusion over this range and revert to temperature-dependent diffusion on cell membrane blebs, in cells depleted of cholesterol, and upon acute perturbation of actin dynamics and myosin activity. A model transmembrane protein with a cytosolic actin-binding domain also exhibits the temperature-independent behavior, directly implicating the role of cortical actin. We show that diffusion of GPI-anchored proteins also becomes temperature dependent when the filamentous dynamic actin nucleator formin is inhibited. However, changes in cortical actin mesh size or perturbation of branched actin nucleator Arp2/3 do not affect this behavior. Thus cell surface diffusion of GPI-anchored proteins and transmembrane proteins that associate with actin is driven by active fluctuations of dynamic cortical actin filaments in addition to thermal fluctuations, consistent with expectations from an “active actin-membrane composite” cell surface. PMID:26378258

  11. Cytodifferentiation in Tetrahymena vorax is linked to glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored protein assembly.

    PubMed

    Yang, X; Ryals, P E

    1994-03-15

    The role of glycosyl-PtdIns (GPI)-anchored proteins in the cytodifferentiation of Tetrahymena vorax was examined. Labelling of cells with [3H]myristate or [3H]palmitate followed by electrophoresis showed an array of proteins carrying covalently bound lipids. Electrophoresis of protein from cells labelled with the GPI-anchor components [3H]Ins and [14C]ethanolamine revealed three polypeptides on fluorograms which have apparent molecular masses of approx. 28, 50 and 82 kDa. Labelled lipid associated with these polypeptides was susceptible to release by in vitro exposure to Bacillus thuringiensis PtdIns-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC). Using labelled fatty acids, cells induced to differentiate showed altered GPI-anchored protein-labelling patterns in comparison with undifferentiated control cells, with a heavily labelled 32 kDa band appearing upon differentiation. Pre-incubation of cells in 10 mM D-mannosamine, an inhibitor of GPI incorporation into protein, resulted in a reduction of the incorporation of label into the three GPI-anchored proteins, nearly complete inhibition of differentiation and a reduction in the rate of digestive vacuole formation. A 50% inhibition of differentiation was obtained using 500 microM mannosamine. The inhibitory impact of D-mannosamine on differentiation could be competitively and completely reversed by the inclusion of D-mannose, but not D-glucose. Neither glucosamine nor tunicamycin inhibited differentiation. Incubation of cells in PI-PLC (5 units/ml) plus the differentiation inducer resulted in an acceleration of differentiation and generally higher percentages of differentiated cells versus controls.

  12. Dysregulating IRES-dependent translation contributes to over-expression of the Aurora A kinase onco-protein

    PubMed Central

    Dobson, Tara; Chen, Juan; Krushel, Les A.

    2014-01-01

    Over-expression of the oncoprotein, Aurora A kinase occurs in multiple types of carcinomas, often early during cell transformation. To identify mechanism(s) contributing to enhanced Aurora A protein expression, we examined normal human lung fibroblast and breast epithelial cells and compared them to non-tumorigenic breast (MCF10A and MCF12A) and tumorigenic breast and cervical epithelial cell lines (MCF-7 and HeLa S3, respectively). A subset of these immortalized lines (MCF10, MCF12A, and HeLa S3) exhibited increased levels of Aurora A protein, independent of tumorigenicity. The increase in Aurora A protein expression in these immortalized cells was not due to increased transcription/RNA stability, protein half-life or cap-dependent translation. Assays utilizing monocistronic and dicistronic RNA constructs revealed that the Aurora A 5′ leader contains an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES), which is regulated through the cell cycle, peaking in G2/M phase. Moreover, IRES activity was increased in the immortalized cell lines in which Aurora A protein expression was also enhanced. Additional assays indicated that the increased internal initiation is specific to the Aurora A IRES and may be an early event during cancer progression. Taken together, these results identify a novel mechanism contributing to Aurora A kinase over-expression and possibly to immortalization leading to carcinogenesis. PMID:23661421

  13. Polarized apical distribution of glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins in a renal epithelial cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Lisanti, M P; Sargiacomo, M; Graeve, L; Saltiel, A R; Rodriguez-Boulan, E

    1988-01-01

    Polarized epithelial cell monolayers contain two distinct plasma membrane domains as delineated by the presence of tight junctions--i.e., an apical surface that faces the external environment and a basolateral surface that functions both in cell-cell contact and cell-substrate attachment. Central to the understanding of epithelial cell polarity is the question of how such cell-surface specializations are generated. A different class of membrane glycoproteins has recently emerged that may yield new insight into the mechanism underlying the biogenesis of this polarity. Members of this class contain a large extracellular protein domain linked to the membrane via glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol. Using a polarized renal epithelial cell line (Madin-Darby canine kidney), we identified endogenous glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins through release by a phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C. Six glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins of 110, 85, 70, 55, 38, and 35 kDa were identified and appeared to be restricted to the apical surface. Our data are consistent with the notion that the glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol membrane anchor may contain the necessary information for "targeting" to the apical surface. Images PMID:2974157

  14. Surface display of heterologous proteins in Bacillus thuringiensis using a peptidoglycan hydrolase anchor

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Xiaohu; Jiang, Mengtian; Yu, Ziniu; Cai, Hao; Li, Lin

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous studies have revealed that the lysin motif (LysM) domains of bacterial cell wall-degrading enzymes are able to bind to peptidoglycan moieties of the cell wall. This suggests an approach for a cell surface display system in Gram-positive bacteria using a LysM-containing protein as the anchoring motif. In this study, we developed a new surface display system in B. thuringiensis using a LysM-containing peptidoglycan hydrolase, endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (Mbg), as the anchor protein. Results Homology searching in the B. thuringiensis YBT-1520 genome revealed a putative peptidoglycan hydrolase gene. The encoded protein, Mbg, exhibited substantial cell-wall binding capacity. The deduced amino acid sequence of Mbg was structurally distinguished as an N-terminal domain with two tandemly aligned LysMs and a C-terminal catalytic domain. A GFP-fusion protein was expressed and used to verify the surface localization by Western blot, flow cytometry, protease accessibility, SDS sensitivity, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy assays. Low-level constitutive expression of Mbg was elevated by introducing a sporulation-independent promoter of cry3Aa. Truncated Mbg domains with separate N-terminus (Mbgn), C-terminus (Mbgc), LysM1, or LysM2 were further compared for their cell-wall displaying efficiencies. The Mbgn moiety contributed to cell-wall anchoring, while LysM1 was the active domain. Two tandemly repeated Mbgns exhibited the highest display activity, while the activity of three repeated Mbgns was decreased. A heterologous bacterial multicopper oxidase (WlacD) was successfully displayed onto the surface of B. thuringiensis target cells using the optimum (Mbgn)2 anchor, without radically altering its catalytic activity. Conclusion Mbg can be a functional anchor protein to target different heterologous proteins onto the surface of B. thuringiensis cells. Since the LysM domain appears to be universal in Gram-positive bacteria, the strategy

  15. Sorting of GPI-anchored proteins into ER exit sites by p24 proteins is dependent on remodeled GPI

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Morihisa; Watanabe, Reika; Jaensch, Nina; Romanova-Michaelides, Maria; Satoh, Tadashi; Kato, Masaki; Riezman, Howard; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Maeda, Yusuke

    2011-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchoring of proteins is a posttranslational modification occurring in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). After GPI attachment, proteins are transported by coat protein complex II (COPII)-coated vesicles from the ER. Because GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) are localized in the lumen, they cannot interact with cytosolic COPII components directly. Receptors that link GPI-APs to COPII are thought to be involved in efficient packaging of GPI-APs into vesicles; however, mechanisms of GPI-AP sorting are not well understood. Here we describe two remodeling reactions for GPI anchors, mediated by PGAP1 and PGAP5, which were required for sorting of GPI-APs to ER exit sites. The p24 family of proteins recognized the remodeled GPI-APs and sorted them into COPII vesicles. Association of p24 proteins with GPI-APs was pH dependent, which suggests that they bind in the ER and dissociate in post-ER acidic compartments. Our results indicate that p24 complexes act as cargo receptors for correctly remodeled GPI-APs to be sorted into COPII vesicles. PMID:21727194

  16. Listeria monocytogenes phosphatidylinositol (PI)-specific phospholipase C has low activity on glycosyl-PI-anchored proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, A J; Perussia, B; Goldfine, H

    1993-01-01

    The ability of the phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) from Listeria monocytogenes to hydrolyze glycosyl phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored membrane proteins was compared with the ability of the PI-PLC from Bacillus thuringiensis to hydrolyze such proteins. The L. monocytogenes enzyme produced no detectable release of acetylcholinesterase from bovine, sheep, and human erythrocytes. The cleavage of the GPI anchors of alkaline phosphatase from rat and rabbit kidney slices was less than 10% of the cleavage seen with the PI-PLC from B. thuringiensis. Activity for release of Fc gamma receptor IIIB (CD16) on human granulocytes was also low. Variations in pH and salt concentration had little effect on the release of GPI-anchored proteins. Our data show that L. monocytogenes PI-PLC has low activity on GPI-anchored proteins. PMID:8253689

  17. GPI-anchored proteins do not reside in ordered domains in the live cell plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Sevcsik, Eva; Brameshuber, Mario; Fölser, Martin; Weghuber, Julian; Honigmann, Alf; Schütz, Gerhard J.

    2015-01-01

    The organization of proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane has been subject of a long-lasting debate. Membrane rafts of higher lipid chain order were proposed to mediate protein interactions, but have thus far not been directly observed. Here, we use protein micropatterning combined with single-molecule tracking to put current models to the test: we rearranged lipid-anchored raft proteins (glycosylphosphatidylinositol(GPI)-anchored mGFP) directly in the live cell plasma membrane and measured the effect on the local membrane environment. Intriguingly, this treatment does neither nucleate the formation of an ordered membrane phase, nor result in any enrichment of nanoscopic ordered domains within the micropatterned regions. In contrast, we find that immobilized mGFP-GPIs behave as inert obstacles to the diffusion of other membrane constituents without influencing their membrane environment over distances beyond their physical size. Our results indicate that phase partitioning is not a fundamental element of protein organization in the plasma membrane. PMID:25897971

  18. GPI-anchored proteins do not reside in ordered domains in the live cell plasma membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevcsik, Eva; Brameshuber, Mario; Fölser, Martin; Weghuber, Julian; Honigmann, Alf; Schütz, Gerhard J.

    2015-04-01

    The organization of proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane has been the subject of a long-lasting debate. Membrane rafts of higher lipid chain order were proposed to mediate protein interactions, but have thus far not been directly observed. Here we use protein micropatterning combined with single-molecule tracking to put current models to the test: we rearranged lipid-anchored raft proteins (glycosylphosphatidylinositol(GPI)-anchored-mGFP) directly in the live cell plasma membrane and measured the effect on the local membrane environment. Intriguingly, this treatment does neither nucleate the formation of an ordered membrane phase nor result in any enrichment of nanoscopic-ordered domains within the micropatterned regions. In contrast, we find that immobilized mGFP-GPIs behave as inert obstacles to the diffusion of other membrane constituents without influencing their membrane environment over distances beyond their physical size. Our results indicate that phase partitioning is not a fundamental element of protein organization in the plasma membrane.

  19. Sialic Acid within the Glycosylphosphatidylinositol Anchor Targets the Cellular Prion Protein to Synapses.

    PubMed

    Bate, Clive; Nolan, William; McHale-Owen, Harriet; Williams, Alun

    2016-08-12

    Although the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) is concentrated at synapses, the factors that target PrP(C) to synapses are not understood. Here we demonstrate that exogenous PrP(C) was rapidly targeted to synapses in recipient neurons derived from Prnp knock-out((0/0)) mice. The targeting of PrP(C) to synapses was dependent upon both neuronal cholesterol concentrations and the lipid and glycan composition of its glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor. Thus, the removal of either an acyl chain or sialic acid from the GPI anchor reduced the targeting of PrP(C) to synapses. Isolated GPIs (derived from PrP(C)) were also targeted to synapses, as was IgG conjugated to these GPIs. The removal of sialic acid from GPIs prevented the targeting of either the isolated GPIs or the IgG-GPI conjugate to synapses. Competition studies showed that pretreatment with sialylated GPIs prevented the targeting of PrP(C) to synapses. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the sialylated GPI anchor attached to PrP(C) acts as a synapse homing signal. PMID:27325697

  20. Loss of Dfg5 glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane protein confers enhanced heat tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nasution, Olviyani; Lee, Jaok; Srinivasa, Kavitha; Choi, In-Geol; Lee, Young Mi; Kim, Eunjung; Choi, Wonja; Kim, Wankee

    2015-08-01

    The protein product of Saccharomyces cerevisiae DFG5 gene is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored plasma membrane protein and a putative glycosidase/glycosyltransferase that links other GPI-anchored proteins to β-glucans in the cell wall. Upon exposure to heat (41°C), DFG5 deletion mutant dfg5Δ displayed significantly enhanced heat tolerance as well as lowered level of reactive oxygen species and decreased membrane permeability compared with those in the control (BY4741). Comparative transcriptome profiles of BY4741 and dfg5Δ revealed that 38 and 23 genes were up- and down-regulated in dfg5Δ respectively. Of the 23 down-regulated genes, 11 of 13 viable deletion mutants were identified to be tolerant to heat, suggesting that the down-regulation of those genes might have contributed to the enhanced heat tolerance in dfg5Δ. Deletion of DFG5 caused slight activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases Hog1 in the high-osmolarity glycerol pathway and Slt2 in the cell wall integrity pathway. Therefore, a model is proposed on the signal transduction pathways associated with deletion of DFG5 upon heat stress.

  1. Signal transduction across cellular membranes can be mediated by coupling of the clustering of anchored proteins in both leaflets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Tongtao; Zhang, Xianren

    2012-01-01

    One key question in signal transduction is how the signal is relayed from the outer leaflet of a cellular membrane to the inner leaflet. Using a simulation model, a mechanism for the mediation of signal transduction is proposed here in which the coupling between membrane proteins in different leaflets can be achieved by the clustering of anchored proteins, without recruiting transmembrane proteins. Depending on the hydrophobic length of the anchored proteins, three coupling patterns, including face-to-face clustering, interdigitated clustering, and weak-coupled clustering, are observed in this work. This observation provides a possible explanation of how a particular downstream signaling pathway is selected.

  2. Transcript Expression Analysis of Putative Trypanosoma brucei GPI-Anchored Surface Proteins during Development in the Tsetse and Mammalian Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Amy F.; Cerqueira, Gustavo C.; Regmi, Sandesh; Wu, Yineng; El Sayed, Najib M.; Aksoy, Serap

    2012-01-01

    Human African Trypanosomiasis is a devastating disease caused by the parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Trypanosomes live extracellularly in both the tsetse fly and the mammal. Trypanosome surface proteins can directly interact with the host environment, allowing parasites to effectively establish and maintain infections. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchoring is a common posttranslational modification associated with eukaryotic surface proteins. In T. brucei, three GPI-anchored major surface proteins have been identified: variant surface glycoproteins (VSGs), procyclic acidic repetitive protein (PARP or procyclins), and brucei alanine rich proteins (BARP). The objective of this study was to select genes encoding predicted GPI-anchored proteins with unknown function(s) from the T. brucei genome and characterize the expression profile of a subset during cyclical development in the tsetse and mammalian hosts. An initial in silico screen of putative T. brucei proteins by Big PI algorithm identified 163 predicted GPI-anchored proteins, 106 of which had no known functions. Application of a second GPI-anchor prediction algorithm (FragAnchor), signal peptide and trans-membrane domain prediction software resulted in the identification of 25 putative hypothetical proteins. Eighty-one gene products with hypothetical functions were analyzed for stage-regulated expression using semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The expression of most of these genes were found to be upregulated in trypanosomes infecting tsetse salivary gland and proventriculus tissues, and 38% were specifically expressed only by parasites infecting salivary gland tissues. Transcripts for all of the genes specifically expressed in salivary glands were also detected in mammalian infective metacyclic trypomastigotes, suggesting a possible role for these putative proteins in invasion and/or establishment processes in the mammalian host. These results represent the first large-scale report of the differential expression of

  3. Huntingtin-associated protein 1 (HAP1) is a cGMP-dependent kinase anchoring protein (GKAP) specific for the cGMP-dependent protein kinase Iβ isoform.

    PubMed

    Corradini, Eleonora; Burgers, Pepijn P; Plank, Michael; Heck, Albert J R; Scholten, Arjen

    2015-03-20

    Protein-protein interactions are important in providing compartmentalization and specificity in cellular signal transduction. Many studies have hallmarked the well designed compartmentalization of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) through its anchoring proteins. Much less data are available on the compartmentalization of its closest homolog, cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), via its own PKG anchoring proteins (GKAPs). For the enrichment, screening, and discovery of (novel) PKA anchoring proteins, a plethora of methodologies is available, including our previously described chemical proteomics approach based on immobilized cAMP or cGMP. Although this method was demonstrated to be effective, each immobilized cyclic nucleotide did not discriminate in the enrichment for either PKA or PKG and their secondary interactors. Hence, with PKG signaling components being less abundant in most tissues, it turned out to be challenging to enrich and identify GKAPs. Here we extend this cAMP-based chemical proteomics approach using competitive concentrations of free cyclic nucleotides to isolate each kinase and its secondary interactors. Using this approach, we identified Huntingtin-associated protein 1 (HAP1) as a putative novel GKAP. Through sequence alignment with known GKAPs and secondary structure prediction analysis, we defined a small sequence domain mediating the interaction with PKG Iβ but not PKG Iα. In vitro binding studies and site-directed mutagenesis further confirmed the specificity and affinity of HAP1 binding to the PKG Iβ N terminus. These data fully support that HAP1 is a GKAP, anchoring specifically to the cGMP-dependent protein kinase isoform Iβ, and provide further evidence that also PKG spatiotemporal signaling is largely controlled by anchoring proteins.

  4. A membrane-anchored protein kinase involved in Brassica self-incompatibility signaling.

    PubMed

    Murase, Kohji; Shiba, Hiroshi; Iwano, Megumi; Che, Fang-Sik; Watanabe, Masao; Isogai, Akira; Takayama, Seiji

    2004-03-01

    Self-incompatibility (SI) response in Brassica is initiated by haplotype-specific interactions between the pollen-borne ligand S locus protein 11/SCR and its stigmatic S receptor kinase, SRK. This binding induces autophosphorylation of SRK, which is then thought to trigger a signaling cascade that leads to self-pollen rejection. A recessive mutation of the modifier (m) gene eliminates the SI response in stigma. Positional cloning of M has revealed that it encodes a membrane-anchored cytoplasmic serine/threonine protein kinase, designated M locus protein kinase (MLPK). Transient expression of MLPK restores the ability of mm papilla cells to reject self-pollen, suggesting that MLPK is a positive mediator of Brassica SI signaling.

  5. Hypomorphic Mutations in PGAP2, Encoding a GPI-Anchor-Remodeling Protein, Cause Autosomal-Recessive Intellectual Disability

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Lars; Tawamie, Hasan; Murakami, Yoshiko; Mang, Yuan; ur Rehman, Shoaib; Buchert, Rebecca; Schaffer, Stefanie; Muhammad, Safia; Bak, Mads; Nöthen, Markus M.; Bennett, Eric P.; Maeda, Yusuke; Aigner, Michael; Reis, André; Kinoshita, Taroh; Tommerup, Niels; Baig, Shahid Mahmood; Abou Jamra, Rami

    2013-01-01

    PGAP2 encodes a protein involved in remodeling the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor in the Golgi apparatus. After synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), GPI anchors are transferred to the proteins and are remodeled while transported through the Golgi to the cell membrane. Germline mutations in six genes (PIGA, PIGL, PIGM, PIGV, PIGN, and PIGO) in the ER-located part of the GPI-anchor-biosynthesis pathway have been reported, and all are associated with phenotypes extending from malformation and lethality to severe intellectual disability, epilepsy, minor dysmorphisms, and elevated alkaline phosphatase (ALP). We performed autozygosity mapping and ultra-deep sequencing followed by stringent filtering and identified two homozygous PGAP2 alterations, p.Tyr99Cys and p.Arg177Pro, in seven offspring with nonspecific autosomal-recessive intellectual disability from two consanguineous families. Rescue experiments with the altered proteins in PGAP2-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cell lines showed less expression of cell-surface GPI-anchored proteins DAF and CD59 than of the wild-type protein, substantiating the pathogenicity of the identified alterations. Furthermore, we observed a full rescue when we used strong promoters before the mutant cDNAs, suggesting a hypomorphic effect of the mutations. We report on alterations in the Golgi-located part of the GPI-anchor-biosynthesis pathway and extend the phenotypic spectrum of the GPI-anchor deficiencies to isolated intellectual disability with elevated ALP. GPI-anchor deficiencies can be interpreted within the concept of a disease family, and we propose that the severity of the phenotype is dependent on the location of the altered protein in the biosynthesis chain. PMID:23561846

  6. A HaloTag Anchored Ruler for Week-Long Studies of Protein Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Popa, Ionel; Rivas-Pardo, Jaime Andrés; Eckels, Edward C; Echelman, Daniel J; Badilla, Carmen L; Valle-Orero, Jessica; Fernández, Julio M

    2016-08-24

    Under physiological conditions, protein oxidation and misfolding occur with very low probability and on long times scales. Single-molecule techniques provide the ability to distinguish between properly folded and damaged proteins that are otherwise masked in ensemble measurements. However, at physiological conditions these rare events occur with a time constant of several hours, inaccessible to current single-molecule approaches. Here we present a magnetic-tweezers-based technique that allows, for the first time, the study of folding of single proteins during week-long experiments. This technique combines HaloTag anchoring, sub-micrometer positioning of magnets, and an active correction of the focal drift. Using this technique and protein L as a molecular template, we generate a magnet law by correlating the distance between the magnet and the measuring paramagnetic bead with unfolding/folding steps. We demonstrate that, using this magnet law, we can accurately measure the dynamics of proteins over a wide range of forces, with minimal dispersion from bead to bead. We also show that the force calibration remains invariant over week-long experiments applied to the same single proteins. The approach demonstrated in this Article opens new, exciting ways to examine proteins on the "human" time scale and establishes magnetic tweezers as a valuable technique to study low-probability events that occur during protein folding under force. PMID:27409974

  7. ER Stress-Induced Clearance of Misfolded GPI-Anchored Proteins via the Secretory Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Satpute-Krishnan, Prasanna; Ajinkya, Monica; Bhat, Savithri; Itakura, Eisuke; Hegde, Ramanujan S.; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Summary Proteins destined for the cell surface are first assessed in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) for proper folding before release into the secretory pathway. This ensures that defective proteins are normally prevented from entering the extracellular environment, where they could be disruptive. Here, we report that, when ER folding capacity is saturated during stress, misfolded glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins dissociate from resident ER chaperones, engage export receptors, and quantitatively leave the ER via vesicular transport to the Golgi. Clearance from the ER commences within minutes of acute ER stress, before the transcriptional component of the unfolded protein response is activated. These aberrant proteins then access the cell surface transiently before destruction in lysosomes. Inhibiting this stress-induced pathway by depleting the ER-export receptors leads to aggregation of the ER-retained misfolded protein. Thus, this rapid response alleviates the elevated burden of misfolded proteins in the ER at the onset of ER stress, promoting protein homeostasis in the ER. PMID:25083867

  8. The role of Listeria monocytogenes cell wall surface anchor protein LapB in virulence, adherence, and intracellular replication

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lmof2365_2117 is a Listeria monocytogenes putative cell wall surface anchor protein with a conserved domain found in collagen binding proteins. We constructed a deletion mutation in lmof2365_2117 in serotype 4b strain F2365, evaluated its virulence, and determined its ability to adhere and invade co...

  9. New insights into the targeting of a sub-set of tail-anchored proteins to the outer mitochondrial membrane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tail-anchored (TA) proteins are a unique class of functionally diverse membrane proteins that are defined by their single C-terminal membrane-spanning domain and their ability to insert post-translationally into specific organelles with an Nout-Cin orientation. The molecular mechanisms by which TA p...

  10. Disruption of pioneer growth cone guidance in vivo by removal of glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored cell surface proteins.

    PubMed

    Chang, W S; Serikawa, K; Allen, K; Bentley, D

    1992-02-01

    Cell surface proteins anchored to membranes via covalently attached glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) have been implicated in neuronal adhesion, promotion of neurite outgrowth and directed cell migration. Treatment of grasshopper embryos with bacterial phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC), an enzyme that cleaves the GPI anchor, often induced disruptions in the highly stereotyped migrations of peripheral pioneer growth cones and afferent neuron cell bodies. In distal limb regions of embryos treated with PI-PLC at early stages of pioneer axon outgrowth, growth cones lost their proximal orientation toward the central nervous system (CNS) and turned distally. Pioneer growth cones in treated limbs also failed to make a characteristic ventral turn along the trochanter-coxa (Tr-Cx) segment boundary, and instead continued to grow proximally across the boundary. Treatment at an earlier stage of development caused pre-axonogenesis Cx1 neurons to abandon their normal circumferential migration and reorient toward the CNS. None of these abnormal phenotypes were observed in limbs of untreated embryos or embryos exposed to other phospholipases that do not release GPI-anchored proteins. Incubation of embryos with PI-PLC effectively removed immunoreactivity for fasciclin I, a GPI-anchored protein expressed on a subset of neuronal surfaces. These results suggest that cell surface GPI-anchored proteins are involved in pioneer growth cone guidance and in pre-axonogenesis migration of neurons in the grasshopper limb bud in vivo.

  11. Decay-accelerating factor (CD55), a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored complement regulatory protein, is a receptor for several echoviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Bergelson, J M; Chan, M; Solomon, K R; St John, N F; Lin, H; Finberg, R W

    1994-01-01

    Echoviruses are human pathogens belonging to the picornavirus family. Decay-accelerating factor (DAF) is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored surface protein that protects cells from lysis by autologous complement. Anti-DAF monoclonal antibodies prevented echovirus 7 attachment to susceptible cells and protected cells from infection. HeLa cells specifically lost the capacity to bind echovirus 7 when treated with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C, an enzyme that releases GPI-anchored proteins from the cell surface, indicating that the virus receptor, like DAF, is a GPI-anchored protein. Although Chinese hamster ovary cells do not bind echovirus 7, transfectants expressing human DAF bound virus efficiently, and binding was prevented by pretreatment with an anti-DAF monoclonal antibody. Anti-DAF antibodies prevented infection by at least six echovirus serotypes. These results indicate that DAF is the receptor mediating attachment and infection by several echoviruses. Images PMID:7517044

  12. Cold acclimation is accompanied by complex responses of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Daisuke; Kawamura, Yukio; Uemura, Matsuo

    2016-09-01

    Cold acclimation results in changes of the plasma membrane (PM) composition. The PM is considered to contain specific lipid/protein-enriched microdomains which can be extracted as detergent-resistant plasma membrane (DRM). Previous studies in animal cells have demonstrated that glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) can be targeted to microdomains and/or the apoplast. However, the functional significance of GPI-APs during cold acclimation in plants is not yet fully understood. In this study, we aimed to investigate the responsiveness of GPI-APs to cold acclimation treatment in Arabidopsis We isolated the PM, DRM, and apoplast fractions separately and, in addition, GPI-AP-enriched fractions were prepared from the PM preparation. Label-free quantitative shotgun proteomics identified a number of GPI-APs (163 proteins). Among them, some GPI-APs such as fasciclin-like arabinogalactan proteins and glycerophosphoryldiester phosphodiesterase-like proteins predominantly increased in PM- and GPI-AP-enriched fractions while the changes of GPI-APs in the DRM and apoplast fractions during cold acclimation were considerably different from those of other fractions. These proteins are thought to be associated with cell wall structure and properties. Therefore, this study demonstrated that each GPI-AP responded to cold acclimation in a different manner, suggesting that these changes during cold acclimation are involved in rearrangement of the extracellular matrix including the cell wall towards acquisition of freezing tolerance. PMID:27471282

  13. Cold acclimation is accompanied by complex responses of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Daisuke; Kawamura, Yukio; Uemura, Matsuo

    2016-01-01

    Cold acclimation results in changes of the plasma membrane (PM) composition. The PM is considered to contain specific lipid/protein-enriched microdomains which can be extracted as detergent-resistant plasma membrane (DRM). Previous studies in animal cells have demonstrated that glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) can be targeted to microdomains and/or the apoplast. However, the functional significance of GPI-APs during cold acclimation in plants is not yet fully understood. In this study, we aimed to investigate the responsiveness of GPI-APs to cold acclimation treatment in Arabidopsis. We isolated the PM, DRM, and apoplast fractions separately and, in addition, GPI-AP-enriched fractions were prepared from the PM preparation. Label-free quantitative shotgun proteomics identified a number of GPI-APs (163 proteins). Among them, some GPI-APs such as fasciclin-like arabinogalactan proteins and glycerophosphoryldiester phosphodiesterase-like proteins predominantly increased in PM- and GPI-AP-enriched fractions while the changes of GPI-APs in the DRM and apoplast fractions during cold acclimation were considerably different from those of other fractions. These proteins are thought to be associated with cell wall structure and properties. Therefore, this study demonstrated that each GPI-AP responded to cold acclimation in a different manner, suggesting that these changes during cold acclimation are involved in rearrangement of the extracellular matrix including the cell wall towards acquisition of freezing tolerance. PMID:27471282

  14. A novel family of Apicomplexan glideosome-associated proteins with an inner membrane-anchoring role.

    PubMed

    Bullen, Hayley E; Tonkin, Christopher J; O'Donnell, Rebecca A; Tham, Wai-Hong; Papenfuss, Anthony T; Gould, Sven; Cowman, Alan F; Crabb, Brendan S; Gilson, Paul R

    2009-09-11

    The phylum Apicomplexa are a group of obligate intracellular parasites responsible for a wide range of important diseases. Central to the lifecycle of these unicellular parasites is their ability to migrate through animal tissue and invade target host cells. Apicomplexan movement is generated by a unique system of gliding motility in which substrate adhesins and invasion-related proteins are pulled across the plasma membrane by an underlying actin-myosin motor. The myosins of this motor are inserted into a dual membrane layer called the inner membrane complex (IMC) that is sandwiched between the plasma membrane and an underlying cytoskeletal basket. Central to our understanding of gliding motility is the characterization of proteins residing within the IMC, but to date only a few proteins are known. We report here a novel family of six-pass transmembrane proteins, termed the GAPM family, which are highly conserved and specific to Apicomplexa. In Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii the GAPMs localize to the IMC where they form highly SDS-resistant oligomeric complexes. The GAPMs co-purify with the cytoskeletal alveolin proteins and also to some degree with the actin-myosin motor itself. Hence, these proteins are strong candidates for an IMC-anchoring role, either directly or indirectly tethering the motor to the cytoskeleton.

  15. Characterisation of a cell wall-anchored protein of Staphylococcus saprophyticus associated with linoleic acid resistance

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus saprophyticus is the second most frequent causative agent of community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTI), accounting for up to 20% of cases. A common feature of staphylococci is colonisation of the human skin. This involves survival against innate immune defenses including antibacterial unsaturated free fatty acids such as linoleic acid which act by disrupting bacterial cell membranes. Indeed, S. saprophyticus UTI is usually preceded by perineal skin colonisation. Results In this study we identified a previously undescribed 73.5 kDa cell wall-anchored protein of S. saprophyticus, encoded on plasmid pSSAP2 of strain MS1146, which we termed S. saprophyticus surface protein F (SssF). The sssF gene is highly prevalent in S. saprophyticus clinical isolates and we demonstrate that the SssF protein is expressed at the cell surface. However, unlike all other characterised cell wall-anchored proteins of S. saprophyticus, we were unable to demonstrate a role for SssF in adhesion. SssF shares moderate sequence identity to a surface protein of Staphylococcus aureus (SasF) recently shown to be an important mediator of linoleic acid resistance. Using a heterologous complementation approach in a S. aureus sasF null genetic background, we demonstrate that SssF is associated with resistance to linoleic acid. We also show that S. saprophyticus strains lacking sssF are more sensitive to linoleic acid than those that possess it. Every staphylococcal genome sequenced to date encodes SssF and SasF homologues. Proteins in this family share similar predicted secondary structures consisting almost exclusively of α-helices in a probable coiled-coil formation. Conclusions Our data indicate that SssF is a newly described and highly prevalent surface-localised protein of S. saprophyticus that contributes to resistance against the antibacterial effects of linoleic acid. SssF is a member of a protein family widely disseminated

  16. Structural insights into tail-anchored protein binding and membrane insertion by Get3.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Gunes; Stjepanovic, Goran; Vilardi, Fabio; Amlacher, Stefan; Wild, Klemens; Bange, Gert; Favaloro, Vincenzo; Rippe, Karsten; Hurt, Ed; Dobberstein, Bernhard; Sinning, Irmgard

    2009-12-15

    Tail-anchored (TA) membrane proteins are involved in a variety of important cellular functions, including membrane fusion, protein translocation, and apoptosis. The ATPase Get3 (Asna1, TRC40) was identified recently as the endoplasmic reticulum targeting factor of TA proteins. Get3 consists of an ATPase and alpha-helical subdomain enriched in methionine and glycine residues. We present structural and biochemical analyses of Get3 alone as well as in complex with a TA protein, ribosome-associated membrane protein 4 (Ramp4). The ATPase domains form an extensive dimer interface that encloses 2 nucleotides in a head-to-head orientation and a zinc ion. Amide proton exchange mass spectrometry shows that the alpha-helical subdomain of Get3 displays considerable flexibility in solution and maps the TA protein-binding site to the alpha-helical subdomain. The non-hydrolyzable ATP analogue AMPPNP-Mg(2+)- and ADP-Mg(2+)-bound crystal structures representing the pre- and posthydrolysis states are both in a closed form. In the absence of a TA protein cargo, ATP hydrolysis does not seem to be possible. Comparison with the ADP.AlF(4)(-)-bound structure representing the transition state (Mateja A, et al. (2009) Nature 461:361-366) indicates how the presence of a TA protein is communicated to the ATP-binding site. In vitro membrane insertion studies show that recombinant Get3 inserts Ramp4 in a nucleotide- and receptor-dependent manner. Although ATP hydrolysis is not required for Ramp4 insertion per se, it seems to be required for efficient insertion. We postulate that ATP hydrolysis is needed to release Get3 from its receptor. Taken together, our results provide mechanistic insights into posttranslational targeting of TA membrane proteins by Get3. PMID:19948960

  17. Distinct Pathways Mediate the Sorting of Tail-Anchored Proteins to the Plastid Outer Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Dhanoa, Preetinder K.; Richardson, Lynn G. L.; Smith, Matthew D.; Gidda, Satinder K.; Henderson, Matthew P. A.; Andrews, David W.; Mullen, Robert T.

    2010-01-01

    Background Tail-anchored (TA) proteins are a distinct class of membrane proteins that are sorted post-translationally to various organelles and function in a number of important cellular processes, including redox reactions, vesicular trafficking and protein translocation. While the molecular targeting signals and pathways responsible for sorting TA proteins to their correct intracellular destinations in yeasts and mammals have begun to be characterized, relatively little is known about TA protein biogenesis in plant cells, especially for those sorted to the plastid outer envelope. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we investigated the biogenesis of three plastid TA proteins, including the 33-kDa and 34-kDa GTPases of the translocon at the outer envelope of chloroplasts (Toc33 and Toc34) and a novel 9-kDa protein of unknown function that we define here as an outer envelope TA protein (OEP9). Using a combination of in vivo and in vitro assays we show that OEP9 utilizes a different sorting pathway than that used by Toc33 and Toc34. For instance, while all three TA proteins interact with the cytosolic OEP chaperone/receptor, AKR2A, the plastid targeting information within OEP9 is distinct from that within Toc33 and Toc34. Toc33 and Toc34 also appear to differ from OEP9 in that their insertion is dependent on themselves and the unique lipid composition of the plastid outer envelope. By contrast, the insertion of OEP9 into the plastid outer envelope occurs in a proteinaceous-dependent, but Toc33/34-independent manner and membrane lipids appear to serve primarily to facilitate normal thermodynamic integration of this TA protein. Conclusions/Significance Collectively, the results provide evidence in support of at least two sorting pathways for plastid TA outer envelope proteins and shed light on not only the complex diversity of pathways involved in the targeting and insertion of proteins into plastids, but also the molecular mechanisms that underlie the delivery of TA

  18. MALAT1 promotes colorectal cancer cell proliferation/migration/invasion via PRKA kinase anchor protein 9.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min-Hui; Hu, Zhi-Yan; Xu, Chuan; Xie, Lin-Ying; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Shi-You; Li, Zu-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown that the 3' end of metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) is involved in colorectal cancer (CRC) cell proliferation and migration/invasion in vitro. The role and mechanism of MALAT1 in CRC metastasis in vivo, however, remain largely unknown. In the present study, we found that MALAT1 was up-regulated in human primary CRC tissues with lymph node metastasis. Overexpression of MALAT1 via RNA activation promoted CRC cell proliferation, invasion and migration in vitro, and stimulated tumor growth and metastasis in mice in vivo. Conversely, knockdown of MALAT1 inhibited CRC tumor growth and metastasis. MALAT1 regulated at least 243 genes in CRC cells in a genome-wide expression profiling. Among these genes, PRKA kinase anchor protein 9 (AKAP-9) was significantly up-regulated at both mRNA and protein levels. AKAP-9 was highly expressed in CRC cells with metastatic potential and human primary CRC tissues with lymph node metastasis, but not in normal cells or tissues. Importantly, knockdown of AKAP-9 blocked MALAT1-mediated CRC cell proliferation, migration and invasion. These data indicate that MALAT1 may promote CRC tumor development via its target protein AKAP-9.

  19. The lactococcal abortive infection protein AbiP is membrane-anchored and binds nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Susana; McGovern, Stephen; Plochocka, Danuta; Santos, Mário A; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Polard, Patrice; Chopin, Marie-Christine

    2008-03-30

    AbiP, a lactococcal abortive phage infection system, has previously been shown to arrest phage bIL66M1 DNA replication around 10 min after infection and to inhibit the switch off of phage early transcripts. We report here the functional characterization and implication in the abortive infection phenotype of two domains identified in the AbiP sequence. We show that AbiP is a protein anchored to the membrane by an N-terminal membrane-spanning domain. Our results further suggest that membrane localization may be required for the anti-phage activity of AbiP. The remainder of the protein, which contains a putative nucleic acid binding domain, is shown to be located on the cytosolic side. Purified AbiP is shown to bind nucleic acids with an approximately 10-fold preference for RNA relative to ssDNA. AbiP interaction with both ssDNA and RNA molecules occurs in a sequence-independent manner. We have analyzed the effect of substitutions of aromatic and basic residues on the surface of the putative binding fold. In vitro and in vivo studies of these AbiP derivatives indicate that the previously reported effects on phage development might be dependent on the nucleic acid binding activity displayed by the membrane-bound protein.

  20. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Anchored Proteins in Fusarium graminearum: Inventory, Variability, and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Rittenour, William R.; Harris, Steven D.

    2013-01-01

    The contribution of cell surface proteins to plant pathogenicity of fungi is not well understood. As such, the objective of this study was to investigate the functions and importance of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) in the wheat pathogen F. graminearum. GPI-APs are surface proteins that are attached to either the membrane or cell wall. In order to simultaneously disrupt several GPI-APs, a phosphoethanolamine transferase-encoding gene gpi7 was deleted and the resultant mutant characterized in terms of growth, development, and virulence. The Δgpi7 mutants exhibited slower radial growth rates and aberrantly shaped macroconidia. Furthermore, virulence tests and microscopic analyses indicated that Gpi7 is required for ramification of the fungus throughout the rachis of wheat heads. In parallel, bioinformatics tools were utilized to predict and inventory GPI-APs within the proteome of F. graminearum. Two of the genes identified in this screen (FGSG_01588 and FGSG_08844) displayed isolate-specific length variability as observed for other fungal cell wall adhesion genes. Nevertheless, deletion of these genes failed to reveal obvious defects in growth, development, or virulence. This research demonstrates the global importance of GPI-APs to in planta proliferation in F. graminearum, and also highlights the potential of individual GPI-APs as diagnostic markers. PMID:24312325

  1. Anchoring of an immunogenic Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein on the surface of Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Reymond, C D; Beghdadi-Rais, C; Roggero, M; Duarte, E A; Desponds, C; Bernard, M; Groux, D; Matile, H; Bron, C; Corradin, G

    1995-05-26

    The circumsporozoite protein (CSP), a major antigen of Plasmodium falciparum, was expressed in the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Fusion of the parasite protein to a leader peptide derived from Dictyostelium contact site A was essential for expression. The natural parasite surface antigen, however, was not detected at the slime mold cell surface as expected but retained intracellularly. Removal of the last 23 amino acids resulted in secretion of CSP, suggesting that the C-terminal segment of the CSP, rather than an ectoplasmic domain, was responsible for retention. Cell surface expression was obtained when the CSP C-terminal segment was replaced by the D. discoideum contact site A glycosyl phosphatidylinositol anchor signal sequence. Mice were immunized with Dictyostelium cells harboring CSP at their surface. The raised antibodies recognized two different regions of the CSP. Anti-sporozoite titers of these sera were equivalent to anti-peptide titers detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Thus, cell surface targeting of antigens can be obtained in Dictyostelium, generating sporozoite-like cells having potentials for vaccination, diagnostic tests, or basic studies involving parasite cell surface proteins. PMID:7759554

  2. Mechanisms of insertion of tail-anchored proteins into the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Sara F; Fasana, Elisa

    2011-12-01

    Tail-anchored proteins (TAPs) are a subclass of type II integral membrane proteins that carry out important and diverse functions within cells. Structurally, TAPs present an N-terminal domain exposed to the cytosol and a single transmembrane domain (TMD) close to the C-terminus, the latter is responsible for the targeting and insertion into the proper intracellular membrane (endoplasmic reticulum (ER), mitochondria, peroxisomes). Due to this particular topology, TAPs insert obligatorily into membranes by post-translational pathways and are excluded from the classical SRP dependent co-translational ER insertion. ER-targeted TAPs can follow two distinct ways of insertion according to the hydrophobicity of their TMD. In the "assisted" pathway, TAPs with more hydrophobic TMDs insert in the ER membrane with the requirement of energy and the involvement of proteinaceous component(s). By contrast neither energy, nor membrane or cytosolic proteins are necessary and do not even improve the "unassisted" insertion of TAPs with moderately hydrophobic TMDs. In this review, we discuss the most relevant recent data regarding the molecular mechanism that underlies these processes.

  3. A biochemical analysis of the constraints of tail-anchored protein biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Leznicki, Pawel; Warwicker, Jim; High, Stephen

    2011-06-15

    TA (tail-anchored) proteins utilize distinct biosynthetic pathways, including TRC40 (transmembrane domain recognition complex of 40 kDa)-mediated, chaperone-dependent and/or unassisted routes to the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) membrane. We have addressed the flexibility of cytosolic components participating in these pathways, and explored the thermodynamic constraints of their membrane insertion, by exploiting recombinant forms of Sec61β and Cytb5 (cytochrome b5) bearing covalent modifications within their TA region. In both cases, efficient membrane insertion relied on cytosolic factors capable of accommodating a surprising range of covalent modifications to the TA region. For Sec61β, we found that both SGTA (small glutamine-rich tetratricopeptide repeat-containing protein α) and TRC40 can bind this substrate with a singly PEGylated TA region. However, by introducing two PEG [poly(ethylene glycol)] moieties, TRC40 binding can be prevented, resulting in a block of subsequent membrane integration. Although TRC40 can bind Sec61β polypeptides singly PEGylated at different locations, membrane insertion is more sensitive to the precise location of PEG attachment. Modelling and experimentation indicate that this post-TRC40 effect results from an increased energetic cost of inserting different PEGylated TA regions into the lipid bilayer. We therefore propose that the membrane integration of TA proteins delivered via TRC40 is strongly dependent upon underlying thermodynamics, and speculate that their insertion is via a phospholipid-mediated process.

  4. A mitochondria-anchored isoform of the actin-nucleating spire protein regulates mitochondrial division.

    PubMed

    Manor, Uri; Bartholomew, Sadie; Golani, Gonen; Christenson, Eric; Kozlov, Michael; Higgs, Henry; Spudich, James; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2015-08-25

    Mitochondrial division, essential for survival in mammals, is enhanced by an inter-organellar process involving ER tubules encircling and constricting mitochondria. The force for constriction is thought to involve actin polymerization by the ER-anchored isoform of the formin protein inverted formin 2 (INF2). Unknown is the mechanism triggering INF2-mediated actin polymerization at ER-mitochondria intersections. We show that a novel isoform of the formin-binding, actin-nucleating protein Spire, Spire1C, localizes to mitochondria and directly links mitochondria to the actin cytoskeleton and the ER. Spire1C binds INF2 and promotes actin assembly on mitochondrial surfaces. Disrupting either Spire1C actin- or formin-binding activities reduces mitochondrial constriction and division. We propose Spire1C cooperates with INF2 to regulate actin assembly at ER-mitochondrial contacts. Simulations support this model's feasibility and demonstrate polymerizing actin filaments can induce mitochondrial constriction. Thus, Spire1C is optimally positioned to serve as a molecular hub that links mitochondria to actin and the ER for regulation of mitochondrial division.

  5. A mitochondria-anchored isoform of the actin-nucleating spire protein regulates mitochondrial division

    PubMed Central

    Manor, Uri; Bartholomew, Sadie; Golani, Gonen; Christenson, Eric; Kozlov, Michael; Higgs, Henry; Spudich, James; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial division, essential for survival in mammals, is enhanced by an inter-organellar process involving ER tubules encircling and constricting mitochondria. The force for constriction is thought to involve actin polymerization by the ER-anchored isoform of the formin protein inverted formin 2 (INF2). Unknown is the mechanism triggering INF2-mediated actin polymerization at ER-mitochondria intersections. We show that a novel isoform of the formin-binding, actin-nucleating protein Spire, Spire1C, localizes to mitochondria and directly links mitochondria to the actin cytoskeleton and the ER. Spire1C binds INF2 and promotes actin assembly on mitochondrial surfaces. Disrupting either Spire1C actin- or formin-binding activities reduces mitochondrial constriction and division. We propose Spire1C cooperates with INF2 to regulate actin assembly at ER-mitochondrial contacts. Simulations support this model's feasibility and demonstrate polymerizing actin filaments can induce mitochondrial constriction. Thus, Spire1C is optimally positioned to serve as a molecular hub that links mitochondria to actin and the ER for regulation of mitochondrial division. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08828.001 PMID:26305500

  6. Characterization of the GPI-anchored lipid transfer proteins in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Edstam, Monika M; Laurila, Maiju; Höglund, Andrey; Raman, Amitha; Dahlström, Käthe M; Salminen, Tiina A; Edqvist, Johan; Blomqvist, Kristina

    2014-02-01

    The non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) are characterized by a compact structure with a central hydrophobic cavity very suitable for binding hydrophobic ligands, such as lipids. The nsLTPs are encoded by large gene families in all land plant lineages, but seem to be absent from green algae. The nsLTPs are classified to different types based on molecular weight, sequence similarity, intron position or spacing between the cysteine residues. The Type G nsLTPs (LTPGs) have a GPI-anchor in the C-terminal region which may attach the protein to the exterior side of the plasma membrane. Here, we present the first characterization of nsLTPs from an early diverged plant, the moss Physcomitrella patens. Moss LTPGs were heterologously produced and purified from Pichia pastoris. The purified moss LTPGs were found to be extremely heat stable and showed a binding preference for unsaturated fatty acids. Structural modeling implied that high alanine content could be important for the heat stability. Lipid profiling revealed that cutin monomers, such as C16 and C18 mono- and di-hydroxylated fatty acids, could be identified in P. patens. Expression of a moss LTPG-YFP fusion revealed localization to the plasma membrane. The expressions of many of the moss LTPGs were found to be upregulated during drought and cold treatments.

  7. Bypassing the need for subcellular localization of a polysaccharide export-anchor complex by overexpressing its protein subunits

    PubMed Central

    Javens, June; Wan, Zhe; Hardy, Gail G.; Brun, Yves V.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Subcellular protein localization is thought to promote protein-protein interaction by increasing the effective concentration and enabling spatial coordination and proper segregation of proteins. We found that protein overexpression allowed the assembly of a productive polysaccharide biosynthesis-export-anchoring complex in the absence of polar localization in Caulobacter crescentus. Polar localization of the holdfast export protein, HfsD, depends on the presence of the other export proteins, HfsA, and HfsB, and on the polar scaffold protein PodJ. The holdfast deficiency of hfsB and podJ mutants is suppressed by the overexpression of export proteins. Restored holdfasts are randomly positioned and co-localize with a holdfast anchor protein in these strains, indicating that functional complexes can form at non-polar sites. Therefore, overexpression of export proteins surpasses a concentration threshold necessary for holdfast synthesis. Restoration of holdfast synthesis at non-polar sites reduces surface adhesion, consistent with the need to spatially coordinate the holdfast synthesis machinery with the flagellum and pili. These strains lack the cell-specific segregation of the holdfast, resulting in the presence of holdfasts in motile daughter cells. Our results highlight the fact that multiple facets of subcellular localization can be coupled to improve the phenotypic outcome of a protein assembly. PMID:23714375

  8. In vivo effect of immobilisation of bone morphogenic protein 2 on titanium implants through nano-anchored oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Schliephake, H; Rublack, J; Aeckerle, N; Förster, A; Schwenzer, B; Reichert, J; Scharnweber, D

    2015-07-27

    The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that immobilisation of bone morphogenic proteins on the surface of titanium implants through nano-anchored oligonucleotides can enhance peri-implant bone formation. Non-coding 60-mer DNA oligonucleotides (ODN) were anchored to the surface of custom made sandblasted acid etched (SAE) titanium screw implants through anodic polarisation, gamma-sterilised with a standard dose of 25 kGy, and were hybridised with complementary 30-mer strands of DNA oligonucleotides conjugated to rhBMP2. Blank SAE implants, SAE implants with nano-anchored ODN and SAE implants with nano-anchored ODN and non-conjugated rhBMP2 served as controls. The implants were inserted into the tibiae of 36 Sprague Dawley rats. Perforations at the head and the tip of the implants allowed for bone ingrowth. Bone ingrowth into perforations and bone implant contact (BIC) as well as bone density (BD) at a distance of 200 µm from the implant surface were assessed after 1 , 4 and 13 weeks. Implants with nano-anchored ODN strands hybridised with conjugated rhBMP2 exhibited enhanced bone ingrowth into the perforations and increased BIC after 1 week as well as increased BIC after 4 weeks compared to controls. No difference was seen after 13 weeks. Bone density around the outer implant surface did not differ significantly at any of the intervals. It is concluded that rhBMP2 immobilised on the surface of titanium implants through nano-anchored oligonucleotide strands can enhance bone implant contact. The conditions of sterilisation tested allowed for handling under clinically relevant conditions.

  9. Msp1/ATAD1 maintains mitochondrial function by facilitating the degradation of mislocalized tail-anchored proteins

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Chan; Umanah, George K E; Dephoure, Noah; Andrabi, Shaida A; Gygi, Steven P; Dawson, Ted M; Dawson, Valina L; Rutter, Jared

    2014-01-01

    The majority of ER-targeted tail-anchored (TA) proteins are inserted into membranes by the Guided Entry of Tail-anchored protein (GET) system. Disruption of this system causes a subset of TA proteins to mislocalize to mitochondria. We show that the AAA+ ATPase Msp1 limits the accumulation of mislocalized TA proteins on mitochondria. Deletion of MSP1 causes the Pex15 and Gos1 TA proteins to accumulate on mitochondria when the GET system is impaired. Likely as a result of failing to extract mislocalized TA proteins, yeast with combined mutation of the MSP1 gene and the GET system exhibit strong synergistic growth defects and severe mitochondrial damage, including loss of mitochondrial DNA and protein and aberrant mitochondrial morphology. Like yeast Msp1, human ATAD1 limits the mitochondrial mislocalization of PEX26 and GOS28, orthologs of Pex15 and Gos1, respectively. GOS28 protein level is also increased in ATAD1−/− mouse tissues. Therefore, we propose that yeast Msp1 and mammalian ATAD1 are conserved members of the mitochondrial protein quality control system that might promote the extraction and degradation of mislocalized TA proteins to maintain mitochondrial integrity. PMID:24843043

  10. Protein kinase A-anchoring protein AKAP95 interacts with MCM2, a regulator of DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Eide, Turid; Taskén, Kristin A; Carlson, Cathrine; Williams, Gareth; Jahnsen, Tore; Taskén, Kjetil; Collas, Philippe

    2003-07-18

    Protein kinase A (PKA)-anchoring protein AKAP95 is localized to the nucleus in interphase, where it primarily associates with the nuclear matrix. A yeast two-hybrid screen for AKAP95 interaction partners identified the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) 2 protein, a component of the pre-replication complex. AKAP95-MCM2 interaction was mapped to residues 1-195 of AKAP95 and corroborated by glutathione S-transferase precipitation and immunoprecipitation from chromatin. Disruption of AKAP95-MCM2 interaction with an AKAP95-(1-195) peptide within HeLa cell nuclei abolishes initiation of DNA replication in G1 phase and the elongation phase of replication in vitro without affecting global nuclear organization or import. Disruption of the C-terminal zinc finger of AKAP95 reduces efficiency of replication initiation. Disruption of the PKA-binding domain does not impair replication in G1- or S-phase nuclei, whereas a PKA inhibitor affects the initiation but not the elongation phase of replication. Depleting AKAP95 from nuclei partially depletes MCM2 and abolishes replication. Recombinant AKAP95 restores intranuclear MCM2 and replication in a dose-dependent manner. Our results suggest a role of AKAP95 in DNA replication by providing a scaffold for MCM2. PMID:12740381

  11. Interaction between fidgetin and protein kinase A-anchoring protein AKAP95 is critical for palatogenesis in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Mahaffey, Connie L; Bérubé, Nathalie; Frankel, Wayne N

    2006-08-01

    The gene defective in fidget mice encodes fidgetin, a member of the AAA (ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities) family of ATPases. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we identified cAMP-dependent protein kinase A anchoring protein 95 kDa (AKAP95) as a potential fidgetin-binding protein. Epitope-tagged fidgetin co-localized with endogenous AKAP95 in the nuclear matrix, and the physical interaction between fidgetin and AKAP95 was further confirmed by reciprocal immunoprecipitation. To evaluate the biological significance of the fidgetin-AKAP95 binding, we created AKAP95 mutant mice through a gene trap strategy. Akap95 mutant mice are surprisingly viable with no overt phenotype. However, a significant number of mice carrying both Akap95 and fidget mutations die soon after birth due to cleft palate, consistent with the overlapping expression of AKAP95 and fidgetin in the branchial arches during mouse embryogenesis. These results expand the spectrum of the pleiotropic phenotypes of fidget mice and provide new leads on the in vivo function of AKAP95.

  12. Elongator Protein 3 (Elp3) Lysine Acetyltransferase Is a Tail-anchored Mitochondrial Protein in Toxoplasma gondii *

    PubMed Central

    Stilger, Krista L.; Sullivan, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Lysine acetylation has recently emerged as an important, widespread post-translational modification occurring on proteins that reside in multiple cellular compartments, including the mitochondria. However, no lysine acetyltransferase (KAT) has been definitively localized to this organelle to date. Here we describe the identification of an unusual homologue of Elp3 in early-branching protozoa in the phylum Apicomplexa. Elp3 is the catalytic subunit of the well-conserved transcription Elongator complex; however, Apicomplexa lack all other Elongator subunits, suggesting that the Elp3 in these organisms plays a role independent of transcription. Surprisingly, Elp3 in the parasites of this phylum, including Toxoplasma gondii (TgElp3), possesses a unique C-terminal transmembrane domain (TMD) that localizes the protein to the mitochondrion. As TgElp3 is devoid of known mitochondrial targeting signals, we used selective permeabilization studies to reveal that this KAT is oriented with its catalytic components facing the cytosol and its C-terminal TMD inserted into the outer mitochondrial membrane, consistent with a tail-anchored membrane protein. Elp3 trafficking to mitochondria is not exclusive to Toxoplasma as we also present evidence that a form of Elp3 localizes to these organelles in mammalian cells, supporting the idea that Elp3 performs novel functions across eukaryotes that are independent of transcriptional elongation. Importantly, we also present genetic studies that suggest TgElp3 is essential in Toxoplasma and must be positioned at the mitochondrial surface for parasite viability. PMID:23878194

  13. Conversion of secretory proteins into membrane proteins by fusing with a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor signal of alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Oda, K; Cheng, J; Saku, T; Takami, N; Sohda, M; Misumi, Y; Ikehara, Y; Millán, J L

    1994-01-01

    Placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP) is initially synthesized as a precursor (proPLAP) with a C-terminal extension. We constructed a recombinant cDNA which encodes a chimeric protein (alpha GL-PLAP) comprising rat alpha 2u-globulin (alpha GL) and the C-terminal extension of PLAP. Two molecular species (25 kDa and 22 kDa) were expressed in the COS-1 cell transfected with the cDNA for alpha GL-PLAP. Only the 22 kDa form was labelled with both [3H]stearic acid and [3H]ethanolamine. Upon digestion with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C the 22 kDa form was released into the medium, indicating that this form is anchored on the cell surface via glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI). A specific IgG raised against a C-terminal nonapeptide of proPLAP precipitated the 25 kDa form but not the 22 kDa form, suggesting that the 25 kDa form is a precursor retaining the C-terminal propeptide. When a mutant alpha GL-PLAP, in which the aspartic acid residue is replaced with tryptophan at a putative cleavage/attachment site, was expressed in COS-1 cells, the 25 kDa precursor was the only form found inside the cell and retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, as judged by immunofluorescence microscopy. In vitro translation programmed with mRNAs coding for the wild-type and mutant forms of alpha GL-PLAP demonstrated that the C-terminal propeptide was cleaved from the wild-type chimeric protein, but not from the mutant one. This gave rise to the 22 kDa form attached with a GPI anchor, suggesting that GPI is covalently linked to the aspartic acid residue (Asp159) of alpha GL-PLAP. Taken together, these results indicate that the C-terminal propeptide of PLAP functions as a signal to render alpha GL a GPI-linked membrane protein in vitro and in vivo in cultured cells, and that the chimeric protein constructed in this study may be useful for elucidating the mechanism underlying the cleavage of the propeptide and attachment of GPI, which occur in the endoplasmic reticulum. Images

  14. Growth factor-induced activation of a kinase activity which causes regulatory phosphorylation of p42/microtubule-associated protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    L'Allemain, G; Her, J H; Wu, J; Sturgill, T W; Weber, M J

    1992-01-01

    p42/microtubule-associated protein kinase (p42mapk) is activated by tyrosine and threonine phosphorylation, and its regulatory phosphorylation is likely to be important in signalling pathways involved in growth control, secretion, and differentiation. Here we show that treatment of quiescent 3T3 cells with diverse agonists results in the appearance of an activity capable of causing the in vitro phosphorylation of p42mapk on the regulatory tyrosine and to a lesser extent on the regulatory threonine, resulting in enzymatic activation of the p42mapk. This p42mapk-activating activity is capable of phosphorylating a kinase-defective p42mapk mutant, thus confirming its activity as a kinase. Images PMID:1314951

  15. Tail-anchored Protein Insertion in Mammals: FUNCTION AND RECIPROCAL INTERACTIONS OF THE TWO SUBUNITS OF THE TRC40 RECEPTOR.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Sara Francesca; Cardani, Silvia; Maroli, Annalisa; Vitiello, Adriana; Soffientini, Paolo; Crespi, Arianna; Bram, Richard F; Benfante, Roberta; Borgese, Nica

    2016-07-15

    The GET (guided entry of tail-anchored proteins)/TRC (transmembrane recognition complex) pathway for tail-anchored protein targeting to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has been characterized in detail in yeast and is thought to function similarly in mammals, where the orthologue of the central ATPase, Get3, is known as TRC40 or Asna1. Get3/TRC40 function requires an ER receptor, which in yeast consists of the Get1/Get2 heterotetramer and in mammals of the WRB protein (tryptophan-rich basic protein), homologous to yeast Get1, in combination with CAML (calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand), which is not homologous to Get2. To better characterize the mammalian receptor, we investigated the role of endogenous WRB and CAML in tail-anchored protein insertion as well as their association, concentration, and stoichiometry in rat liver microsomes and cultured cells. Functional proteoliposomes, reconstituted from a microsomal detergent extract, lost their activity when made with an extract depleted of TRC40-associated proteins or of CAML itself, whereas in vitro synthesized CAML and WRB together were sufficient to confer insertion competence to liposomes. CAML was found to be in ∼5-fold excess over WRB, and alteration of this ratio did not inhibit insertion. Depletion of each subunit affected the levels of the other one; in the case of CAML silencing, this effect was attributable to destabilization of the WRB transcript and not of WRB protein itself. These results reveal unanticipated complexity in the mutual regulation of the TRC40 receptor subunits and raise the question as to the role of the excess CAML in the mammalian ER.

  16. Tail-anchored Protein Insertion in Mammals: FUNCTION AND RECIPROCAL INTERACTIONS OF THE TWO SUBUNITS OF THE TRC40 RECEPTOR.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Sara Francesca; Cardani, Silvia; Maroli, Annalisa; Vitiello, Adriana; Soffientini, Paolo; Crespi, Arianna; Bram, Richard F; Benfante, Roberta; Borgese, Nica

    2016-07-15

    The GET (guided entry of tail-anchored proteins)/TRC (transmembrane recognition complex) pathway for tail-anchored protein targeting to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has been characterized in detail in yeast and is thought to function similarly in mammals, where the orthologue of the central ATPase, Get3, is known as TRC40 or Asna1. Get3/TRC40 function requires an ER receptor, which in yeast consists of the Get1/Get2 heterotetramer and in mammals of the WRB protein (tryptophan-rich basic protein), homologous to yeast Get1, in combination with CAML (calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand), which is not homologous to Get2. To better characterize the mammalian receptor, we investigated the role of endogenous WRB and CAML in tail-anchored protein insertion as well as their association, concentration, and stoichiometry in rat liver microsomes and cultured cells. Functional proteoliposomes, reconstituted from a microsomal detergent extract, lost their activity when made with an extract depleted of TRC40-associated proteins or of CAML itself, whereas in vitro synthesized CAML and WRB together were sufficient to confer insertion competence to liposomes. CAML was found to be in ∼5-fold excess over WRB, and alteration of this ratio did not inhibit insertion. Depletion of each subunit affected the levels of the other one; in the case of CAML silencing, this effect was attributable to destabilization of the WRB transcript and not of WRB protein itself. These results reveal unanticipated complexity in the mutual regulation of the TRC40 receptor subunits and raise the question as to the role of the excess CAML in the mammalian ER. PMID:27226539

  17. The sulphonylurea drug, glimepiride, stimulates release of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored plasma-membrane proteins from 3T3 adipocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Müller, G; Dearey, E A; Pünter, J

    1993-01-01

    Sulphonylurea drugs stimulate glucose transport and metabolism in muscle and fat cells in vitro. The molecular basis for the insulin-mimetic extrapancreatic effects of these oral antidiabetic therapeutic agents is unknown at present. Here we demonstrate that incubation of 3T3 adipocytes with the novel sulphonylurea, glimepiride, causes a time- and concentration-dependent release of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored ecto-proteins, 5'-nucleotidase, lipoprotein lipase and a 62 kDa cyclic AMP (cAMP)-binding protein from the plasma membrane into the culture medium. The change in the localization is accompanied by conversion of the membrane-anchored amphiphilic proteins into their soluble hydrophilic versions, as judged by pulse-chase experiments and Triton X-114 partitioning, and by appearance of anti-cross-reacting determinant (CRD) immunoreactivity of the released proteins as shown by Western blotting. Metabolic labelling of cells with myo-[14C]inositol demonstrates that inositol is retained in the major portion of released lipoprotein lipase and cAMP-binding ectoprotein. The identification of inositol phosphate after deamination of these proteins with nitrous acid suggests cleavage of their GPI membrane anchor by a GPI-specific phospholipase C. However, after longer incubation with glimepiride the amount of soluble versions of the GPI-proteins lacking inositol and anti-CRD immunoreactivity increases, which may be caused by additional drug-stimulated hydrolytic events within their GPI structure or C-termini. Since insulin also stimulates membrane release of these GPI-modified proteins, and in combination with glimepiride in a synergistic manner, sulphonylurea drugs may exert their peripheral actions in adipose tissue by using (part of) the insulin postreceptor signalling cascade at the step of activation of a GPI-specific phospholipase C. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7678737

  18. Factors affecting the ability of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase D to degrade the membrane anchors of cell surface proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Low, M G; Huang, K S

    1991-01-01

    Mammalian serum and plasma contain high levels of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase D (GPI-PLD). Previous studies with crude serum or partially purified GPI-PLD have shown that this enzyme is capable of degrading the GPI anchor of several purified detergent-solubilized cell surface proteins yet is unable to act on GPI-anchored proteins located in intact cells. Treatment of intact ROS17/2.8, WISH or HeLa cells (or membrane fractions prepared from them) with GPI-PLD purified from bovine serum by immunoaffinity chromatography gave no detectable release of alkaline phosphatase into the medium. However, when membranes were treated with GPI-PLD in the presence of 0.1% Nonidet P-40 substantial GPI anchor degradation (as measured by Triton X-114 phase separation) was observed. The mechanism of this stimulatory effect of detergent was further investigated using [3H]myristate-labelled variant surface glycoprotein and human placental alkaline phosphatase reconstituted into phospholipid vesicles. As with the cell membranes the reconstituted substrates exhibited marked resistance to the action of purified GPI-PLD which could be overcome by the inclusion of Nonidet P-40. Similar results were obtained when crude bovine serum was used as the source of GPI-PLD. These data indicate that the resistance of cell membranes to the action of GPI-PLD is not entirely due to the action of serum or membrane-associated inhibitory factors. A more likely explanation is that, in common with many other eukaryotic phospholipases, the action of GPI-PLD is restricted by the physical state of the phospholipid bilayer in which the substrates are embedded. These data may account for the ability of endothelial and blood cells to retain GPI-anchored proteins on their surfaces in spite of the high levels of GPI-PLD present in plasma. PMID:1835378

  19. Genomic structure and chromosomal localization of GML (GPI-anchored molecule-like protein), a gene induced by p53

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Yasutoshi |; Furuhata, Tomohisa; Nakamura, Yusuke

    1997-05-01

    Among its known functions, tumor suppressor gene p53 serves as a transcriptional regulator and mediates various signals through activation of downstream genes. We recently identified a novel gene, GML (glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored molecule-like protein), whose expression is specifically induced by wildtype p53. To characterize the GML gene further, we determined 35.8 kb of DNA sequence that included a consensus binding sequence for p53 and the entire GML gene. The GML gene consists of four exons, and the p53-binding sequence is present in the 5{prime}-flanking region. In genomic organization this gene resembles genes encoding murine Ly-6 glycoproteins, a human homologue of the Ly-6 family called RIG-E, and CD59; products of these genes, known as GPI-anchored proteins, are variously involved in signal transduction, cell-cell adhesion, and cell-matrix attachment. FISH analysis revealed that the GML gene is located on human chromosome 8q24.3. Genes encoding at least two other GPI-anchored molecules, E48 and RIG-E, are also located in this region. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Structural and genetic analyses reveal the protein SepF as a new membrane anchor for the Z ring

    PubMed Central

    Duman, Ramona; Ishikawa, Shu; Celik, Ilkay; Strahl, Henrik; Ogasawara, Naotake; Troc, Paulina; Löwe, Jan; Hamoen, Leendert W.

    2013-01-01

    A key step in bacterial cell division is the polymerization of the tubulin homolog FtsZ at midcell. FtsZ polymers are anchored to the cell membrane by FtsA and are required for the assembly of all other cell division proteins. In Gram-positive and cyanobacteria, FtsZ filaments are aligned by the protein SepF, which in vitro polymerizes into large rings that bundle FtsZ filaments. Here we describe the crystal structure of the only globular domain of SepF, located within the C-terminal region. Two-hybrid data revealed that this domain comprises the FtsZ binding site, and EM analyses showed that it is sufficient for ring formation, which is explained by the filaments in the crystals of SepF. Site-directed mutagenesis, gel filtration, and analytical ultracentrifugation indicated that dimers form the basic units of SepF filaments. High-resolution structured illumination microscopy suggested that SepF is membrane associated, and it turned out that purified SepF not only binds to lipid membranes, but also recruits FtsZ. Further genetic and biochemical analyses showed that an amphipathic helix at the N terminus functions as the membrane-binding domain, making SepF a unique membrane anchor for the FtsZ ring. This clarifies why Bacillus subtilis grows without FtsA or the putative membrane anchor EzrA and why bacteria lacking FtsA contain SepF homologs. Both FtsA and SepF use an amphipathic helix for membrane binding. These helices prefer positively curved membranes due to relaxed lipid density; therefore this type of membrane anchor may assist in keeping the Z ring positioned at the strongly curved leading edge of the developing septum. PMID:24218584

  1. The Cellulosome System of Acetivibrio cellulolyticus Includes a Novel Type of Adaptor Protein and a Cell Surface Anchoring Protein

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qi; Gao, Wenchen; Ding, Shi-You; Kenig, Rina; Shoham, Yuval; Bayer, Edward A.; Lamed, Raphael

    2003-01-01

    A scaffoldin gene cluster was identified in the mesophilic cellulolytic anaerobe Acetivibrio cellulolyticus. The previously described scaffoldin gene, cipV, encodes an N-terminal family 9 glycoside hydrolase, a family 3b cellulose-binding domain, seven cohesin domains, and a C-terminal dockerin. The gene immediately downstream of cipV was sequenced and designated scaB. The protein encoded by this gene has 942 amino acid residues and a calculated molecular weight of 100,358 and includes an N-terminal signal peptide, four type II cohesions, and a C-terminal dockerin. ScaB cohesins 1 and 2 are very closely linked. Similar, but not identical, 39-residue Thr-rich linker segments separate cohesin 2 from cohesin 3 and cohesin 3 from cohesin 4, and an 84-residue Thr-rich linker connects the fourth cohesin to a C-terminal dockerin. The scaC gene downstream of scaB codes for a 1,237-residue polypeptide that includes a signal peptide, three cohesins, and a C-terminal S-layer homology (SLH) module. A long, ca. 550-residue linker separates the third cohesin and the SLH module of ScaC and is characterized by an 18-residue Pro-Thr-Ala-Ser-rich segment that is repeated 27 times. The calculated molecular weight of the mature ScaC polypeptide (excluding the signal peptide) is 124,162. The presence of the cohesins and the conserved SLH module implies that ScaC acts as an anchoring protein. The ScaC cohesins are on a separate branch of the phylogenetic tree that is close to, but distinct from, the type I cohesins. Affinity blotting with representative recombinant probes revealed the following specific intermodular interactions: (i) an expressed CipV cohesin binds selectively to an enzyme-borne dockerin, (ii) a representative ScaB cohesin binds to the CipV band of the cell-free supernatant fraction, and (iii) a ScaC cohesin binds to the ScaB dockerin. The experimental evidence thus indicates that CipV acts as a primary (enzyme-recognizing) scaffoldin, and the protein was also

  2. Design and characterization of a modular membrane protein anchor to functionalize the moss Physcomitrella patens with extracellular catalytic and/or binding activities.

    PubMed

    Morath, Volker; Truong, Dong-Jiunn Jeffery; Albrecht, Florian; Polte, Ingmar; Ciccone, Rosario Adriano; Funke, Louise Friederike; Reichart, Leonie; Wolf, Christopher Guy; Brunner, Andreas-David; Fischer, Katrin; Schneider, Philipp Constantin; Brüggenthies, Johanna Barbara; Fröhlich, Fabian; Wiedemann, Gertrud; Reski, Ralf; Skerra, Arne

    2014-12-19

    Heterologous enzymes and binding proteins were secreted by the moss Physcomitrella patens or anchored extracellularly on its cell membrane in order to functionalize the apoplast as a biochemical reaction compartment. This modular membrane anchoring system utilizes the signal peptide and the transmembrane segment of the somatic embryogenesis receptor-like kinase (SERK), which were identified in a comprehensive bioinformatic analysis of the P. patens genome. By fusing the soluble enzyme NanoLuc luciferase to the signal peptide, its secretion capability was confirmed in vivo. The membrane localization of hybrid proteins comprising the SERK signal peptide, NanoLuc or other functional modules, the SERK transmembrane anchor, and a C-terminal GFP reporter was demonstrated using fluorescence microscopy as well as site-specific proteolytic release of the extracellular enzyme domain. Our membrane anchoring system enables the expression of various functional proteins in the apoplast of P. patens, empowering this photoautotrophic organism for biotechnological applications.

  3. N-glycosylation enables high lateral mobility of GPI-anchored proteins at a molecular crowding threshold.

    PubMed

    Hartel, Andreas J W; Glogger, Marius; Jones, Nicola G; Abuillan, Wasim; Batram, Christopher; Hermann, Anne; Fenz, Susanne F; Tanaka, Motomu; Engstler, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The protein density in biological membranes can be extraordinarily high, but the impact of molecular crowding on the diffusion of membrane proteins has not been studied systematically in a natural system. The diversity of the membrane proteome of most cells may preclude systematic studies. African trypanosomes, however, feature a uniform surface coat that is dominated by a single type of variant surface glycoprotein (VSG). Here we study the density-dependence of the diffusion of different glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored VSG-types on living cells and in artificial membranes. Our results suggest that a specific molecular crowding threshold (MCT) limits diffusion and hence affects protein function. Obstacles in the form of heterologous proteins compromise the diffusion coefficient and the MCT. The trypanosome VSG-coat operates very close to its MCT. Importantly, our experiments show that N-linked glycans act as molecular insulators that reduce retarding intermolecular interactions allowing membrane proteins to function correctly even when densely packed. PMID:27641538

  4. N-glycosylation enables high lateral mobility of GPI-anchored proteins at a molecular crowding threshold

    PubMed Central

    Hartel, Andreas J. W.; Glogger, Marius; Jones, Nicola G.; Abuillan, Wasim; Batram, Christopher; Hermann, Anne; Fenz, Susanne F.; Tanaka, Motomu; Engstler, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The protein density in biological membranes can be extraordinarily high, but the impact of molecular crowding on the diffusion of membrane proteins has not been studied systematically in a natural system. The diversity of the membrane proteome of most cells may preclude systematic studies. African trypanosomes, however, feature a uniform surface coat that is dominated by a single type of variant surface glycoprotein (VSG). Here we study the density-dependence of the diffusion of different glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored VSG-types on living cells and in artificial membranes. Our results suggest that a specific molecular crowding threshold (MCT) limits diffusion and hence affects protein function. Obstacles in the form of heterologous proteins compromise the diffusion coefficient and the MCT. The trypanosome VSG-coat operates very close to its MCT. Importantly, our experiments show that N-linked glycans act as molecular insulators that reduce retarding intermolecular interactions allowing membrane proteins to function correctly even when densely packed. PMID:27641538

  5. A C-terminal Membrane Anchor Affects the Interactions of Prion Proteins with Lipid Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Nam K.; Shabbir, Waheed; Bove-Fenderson, Erin; Araman, Can; Lemmens-Gruber, Rosa; Harris, David A.; Becker, Christian F. W.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane attachment via a C-terminal glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor is critical for conversion of PrPC into pathogenic PrPSc. Therefore the effects of the anchor on PrP structure and function need to be deciphered. Three PrP variants, including full-length PrP (residues 23–231, FL_PrP), N-terminally truncated PrP (residues 90–231, T_PrP), and PrP missing its central hydrophobic region (Δ105–125, ΔCR_PrP), were equipped with a C-terminal membrane anchor via a semisynthesis strategy. Analyses of the interactions of lipidated PrPs with phospholipid membranes demonstrated that C-terminal membrane attachment induces a different binding mode of PrP to membranes, distinct from that of non-lipidated PrPs, and influences the biochemical and conformational properties of PrPs. Additionally, fluorescence-based assays indicated pore formation by lipidated ΔCR_PrP, a variant that is known to be highly neurotoxic in transgenic mice. This finding was supported by using patch clamp electrophysiological measurements of cultured cells. These results provide new evidence for the role of the membrane anchor in PrP-lipid interactions, highlighting the importance of the N-terminal and the central hydrophobic domain in these interactions. PMID:25217642

  6. A C-terminal membrane anchor affects the interactions of prion proteins with lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Chu, Nam K; Shabbir, Waheed; Bove-Fenderson, Erin; Araman, Can; Lemmens-Gruber, Rosa; Harris, David A; Becker, Christian F W

    2014-10-24

    Membrane attachment via a C-terminal glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor is critical for conversion of PrP(C) into pathogenic PrP(Sc). Therefore the effects of the anchor on PrP structure and function need to be deciphered. Three PrP variants, including full-length PrP (residues 23-231, FL_PrP), N-terminally truncated PrP (residues 90-231, T_PrP), and PrP missing its central hydrophobic region (Δ105-125, ΔCR_PrP), were equipped with a C-terminal membrane anchor via a semisynthesis strategy. Analyses of the interactions of lipidated PrPs with phospholipid membranes demonstrated that C-terminal membrane attachment induces a different binding mode of PrP to membranes, distinct from that of non-lipidated PrPs, and influences the biochemical and conformational properties of PrPs. Additionally, fluorescence-based assays indicated pore formation by lipidated ΔCR_PrP, a variant that is known to be highly neurotoxic in transgenic mice. This finding was supported by using patch clamp electrophysiological measurements of cultured cells. These results provide new evidence for the role of the membrane anchor in PrP-lipid interactions, highlighting the importance of the N-terminal and the central hydrophobic domain in these interactions.

  7. A Multifaceted Study of Scedosporium boydii Cell Wall Changes during Germination and Identification of GPI-Anchored Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ghamrawi, Sarah; Gastebois, Amandine; Zykwinska, Agata; Vandeputte, Patrick; Marot, Agnès; Mabilleau, Guillaume; Cuenot, Stéphane; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Scedosporium boydii is a pathogenic filamentous fungus that causes a wide range of human infections, notably respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. The development of new therapeutic strategies targeting S. boydii necessitates a better understanding of the physiology of this fungus and the identification of new molecular targets. In this work, we studied the conidium-to-germ tube transition using a variety of techniques including scanning and transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, two-phase partitioning, microelectrophoresis and cationized ferritin labeling, chemical force spectroscopy, lectin labeling, and nanoLC-MS/MS for cell wall GPI-anchored protein analysis. We demonstrated that the cell wall undergoes structural changes with germination accompanied with a lower hydrophobicity, electrostatic charge and binding capacity to cationized ferritin. Changes during germination also included a higher accessibility of some cell wall polysaccharides to lectins and less CH3/CH3 interactions (hydrophobic adhesion forces mainly due to glycoproteins). We also extracted and identified 20 GPI-anchored proteins from the cell wall of S. boydii, among which one was detected only in the conidial wall extract and 12 only in the mycelial wall extract. The identified sequences belonged to protein families involved in virulence in other fungi like Gelp/Gasp, Crhp, Bglp/Bgtp families and a superoxide dismutase. These results highlighted the cell wall remodeling during germination in S. boydii with the identification of a substantial number of cell wall GPI-anchored conidial or hyphal specific proteins, which provides a basis to investigate the role of these molecules in the host-pathogen interaction and fungal virulence. PMID:26038837

  8. A Multifaceted Study of Scedosporium boydii Cell Wall Changes during Germination and Identification of GPI-Anchored Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ghamrawi, Sarah; Gastebois, Amandine; Zykwinska, Agata; Vandeputte, Patrick; Marot, Agnès; Mabilleau, Guillaume; Cuenot, Stéphane; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Scedosporium boydii is a pathogenic filamentous fungus that causes a wide range of human infections, notably respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. The development of new therapeutic strategies targeting S. boydii necessitates a better understanding of the physiology of this fungus and the identification of new molecular targets. In this work, we studied the conidium-to-germ tube transition using a variety of techniques including scanning and transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, two-phase partitioning, microelectrophoresis and cationized ferritin labeling, chemical force spectroscopy, lectin labeling, and nanoLC-MS/MS for cell wall GPI-anchored protein analysis. We demonstrated that the cell wall undergoes structural changes with germination accompanied with a lower hydrophobicity, electrostatic charge and binding capacity to cationized ferritin. Changes during germination also included a higher accessibility of some cell wall polysaccharides to lectins and less CH3/CH3 interactions (hydrophobic adhesion forces mainly due to glycoproteins). We also extracted and identified 20 GPI-anchored proteins from the cell wall of S. boydii, among which one was detected only in the conidial wall extract and 12 only in the mycelial wall extract. The identified sequences belonged to protein families involved in virulence in other fungi like Gelp/Gasp, Crhp, Bglp/Bgtp families and a superoxide dismutase. These results highlighted the cell wall remodeling during germination in S. boydii with the identification of a substantial number of cell wall GPI-anchored conidial or hyphal specific proteins, which provides a basis to investigate the role of these molecules in the host-pathogen interaction and fungal virulence. PMID:26038837

  9. Molecular insights into DNA binding and anchoring by the Bacillus subtilis sporulation kinetochore-like RacA protein

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Maria A.; Lee, Jeehyun; Zeng, Wenjie

    2016-01-01

    During Bacillus subtilis sporulation, segregating sister chromosomes are anchored to cell poles and the chromosome is remodeled into an elongated structure called the axial filament. Data indicate that a developmentally regulated protein called RacA is involved in these functions. To gain insight into how RacA performs these diverse processes we performed a battery of structural and biochemical analyses. These studies show that RacA contains an N-terminal winged-helix-turn-helix module connected by a disordered region to a predicted coiled-coil domain. Structures capture RacA binding the DNA using distinct protein–protein interfaces and employing adjustable DNA docking modes. This unique DNA binding mechanism indicates how RacA can both specifically recognize its GC-rich centromere and also non-specifically bind the DNA. Adjacent RacA molecules within the protein–DNA structure interact leading to DNA compaction, suggesting a mechanism for axial filament formation. We also show that the RacA C-domain coiled coil directly contacts the coiled coil region of the polar protein DivIVA, which anchors RacA and hence the chromosome to the pole. Thus, our combined data reveal unique DNA binding properties by RacA and provide insight into the DNA remodeling and polar anchorage functions of the protein. PMID:27085804

  10. C lostridium difficile surface proteins are anchored to the cell wall using CWB2 motifs that recognise the anionic polymer PSII

    PubMed Central

    Willing, Stephanie E.; Candela, Thomas; Shaw, Helen Alexandra; Seager, Zoe; Mesnage, Stéphane; Fagan, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Gram‐positive surface proteins can be covalently or non‐covalently anchored to the cell wall and can impart important properties on the bacterium in respect of cell envelope organisation and interaction with the environment. We describe here a mechanism of protein anchoring involving tandem CWB2 motifs found in a large number of cell wall proteins in the Firmicutes. In the Clostridium difficile cell wall protein family, we show the three tandem repeats of the CWB2 motif are essential for correct anchoring to the cell wall. CWB2 repeats are non‐identical and cannot substitute for each other, as shown by the secretion into the culture supernatant of proteins containing variations in the patterns of repeats. A conserved Ile Leu Leu sequence within the CWB2 repeats is essential for correct anchoring, although a preceding proline residue is dispensable. We propose a likely genetic locus encoding synthesis of the anionic polymer PSII and, using RNA knock‐down of key genes, reveal subtle effects on cell wall composition. We show that the anionic polymer PSII binds two cell wall proteins, SlpA and Cwp2, and these interactions require the CWB2 repeats, defining a new mechanism of protein anchoring in Gram‐positive bacteria. PMID:25649385

  11. Identification of complete precursors for the glycosylphosphatidylinositol protein anchors of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Heise, N; Raper, J; Buxbaum, L U; Peranovich, T M; de Almeida, M L

    1996-07-12

    The survival of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease, depends vitally on proteins and glycoconjugates that mediate the parasite/host interaction. Since most of these molecules are attached to the membrane by glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI), alternative means of chemotherapeutic intervention might emerge from GPI biosynthesis studies. The structure of the major 1G7 antigen GPI has been fully characterized by us (Güther, M. L. S., Cardoso de Almeida, M. L., Yoshida, N., and Ferguson, M. A. J.(1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 6820-6828; Heise, N., Cardoso de Almeida, M. L., and Ferguson, M. A. J.(1995) Mol. Biochem. Parasitol. 70, 71-84), and based on its properties we now report the complete precursor glycolipids predicted to be transferred to the nascent protein. Migrating closely to Trypanosoma brucei glycolipid A on TLC, such species, named glycolipids A-like 1 and A-like 2, were labeled with tritiated palmitic acid, myo-inositol, glucosamine, and mannose, but surprisingly only the less polar glycolipid A-like 1 incorporated ethanolamine. The predicted products following nitrous acid deamination and digestion with phospholipases A2, C, and D confirmed their GPI nature. Evidence that they may represent the anchor transferred to the 1G7 antigen came from the following analyses: (i) alpha-mannosidase treatments indicated that only one mannose was amenable to removal; (ii) their lipid moiety was identified as sn-1-alkyl-2-acylglycerol due to their sensitivity to phospholipase A2 (PLA2), mild base and by direct high performance TLC analysis of the corresponding benzoylated diradylglycerol components; and (iii) both glycolipids incorporated 3H-fatty acid only in the sn-2- and not in the sn-1-alkyl position as previously found in the GPI of the mature 1G7 antigen. Based on the differential [3H]ethanolamine incorporation pattern and the recent report that an aminoethylphosphonic acid (AEP) replaces ethanolamine phosphate (EtNH2-PO4) in the GPI in

  12. Creating Order from Chaos: Cellular Regulation by Kinase Anchoring

    PubMed Central

    Scott, John D.; Dessauer, Carmen W.; Tasken, Kjetil

    2012-01-01

    Second messenger responses rely on where and when the enzymes that propagate these signals become active. Spatial and temporal organization of certain signaling enzymes is controlled in part by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). This family of regulatory proteins was originally classified on the basis of their ability to compartmentalize the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (also known as protein kinase A, or PKA). However, it is now recognized that AKAPs position G protein–coupled receptors, adenylyl cyclases, G proteins, and their effector proteins in relation to protein kinases and signal termination enzymes such as phosphodiesterases and protein phosphatases. This arrangement offers a simple and efficient means to limit the scope, duration, and directional flow of information to sites deep within the cell. This review focuses on the pros and cons of reagents that define the biological role of kinase anchoring inside cells and discusses recent advances in our understanding of anchored second messenger signaling in the cardiovascular and immune systems. PMID:23043438

  13. The Crystal Structures of Yeast Get3 Suggest a Mechanism for Tail-Anchored Protein Membrane Insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Junbin; Li, Jingzhi; Qian, Xinguo; Denic, Vlad; Sha, Bingdong

    2010-08-16

    Tail-anchored (TA) proteins represent a unique class of membrane proteins that contain a single C-terminal transmembrane helix. The post-translational insertion of the yeast TA proteins into the ER membrane requires the Golgi ER trafficking (GET) complex which contains Get1, Get2 and Get3. Get3 is an ATPase that recognizes and binds the C-terminal transmembrane domain (TMD) of the TA proteins. We have determined the crystal structures of Get3 from two yeast species, S. cerevisiae and D. hansenii, respectively. These high resolution crystal structures show that Get3 contains a nucleotide-binding domain and a 'finger' domain for binding the TA protein TMD. A large hydrophobic groove on the finger domain of S. cerevisiae Get3 structure might represent the binding site for TMD of TA proteins. A hydrophobic helix from a symmetry-related Get3 molecule sits in the TMD-binding groove and mimics the TA binding scenario. Interestingly, the crystal structures of the Get3 dimers from S. cerevisiae and D. hansenii exhibit distinct conformations. The S. cerevisiae Get3 dimer structure does not contain nucleotides and maintains an 'open' conformation, while the D. hansenii Get3 dimer structure binds ADP and stays in a 'closed' conformation. We propose that the conformational changes to switch the Get3 between the open and closed conformations may facilitate the membrane insertions for TA proteins.

  14. New insights into the targeting of a subset of tail-anchored proteins to the outer mitochondrial membrane

    PubMed Central

    Marty, Naomi J.; Teresinski, Howard J.; Hwang, Yeen Ting; Clendening, Eric A.; Gidda, Satinder K.; Sliwinska, Elwira; Zhang, Daiyuan; Miernyk, Ján A.; Brito, Glauber C.; Andrews, David W.; Dyer, John M.; Mullen, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Tail-anchored (TA) proteins are a unique class of functionally diverse membrane proteins defined by their single C-terminal membrane-spanning domain and their ability to insert post-translationally into specific organelles with an Ncytoplasm-Corganelle interior orientation. The molecular mechanisms by which TA proteins are sorted to the proper organelles are not well-understood. Herein we present results indicating that a dibasic targeting motif (i.e., -R-R/K/H-X{X≠E}) identified previously in the C terminus of the mitochondrial isoform of the TA protein cytochrome b5, also exists in many other A. thaliana outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM)-TA proteins. This motif is conspicuously absent, however, in all but one of the TA protein subunits of the translocon at the outer membrane of mitochondria (TOM), suggesting that these two groups of proteins utilize distinct biogenetic pathways. Consistent with this premise, we show that the TA sequences of the dibasic-containing proteins are both necessary and sufficient for targeting to mitochondria, and are interchangeable, while the TA regions of TOM proteins lacking a dibasic motif are necessary, but not sufficient for localization, and cannot be functionally exchanged. We also present results from a comprehensive mutational analysis of the dibasic motif and surrounding sequences that not only greatly expands the functional definition and context-dependent properties of this targeting signal, but also led to the identification of other novel putative OMM-TA proteins. Collectively, these results provide important insight to the complexity of the targeting pathways involved in the biogenesis of OMM-TA proteins and help define a consensus targeting motif that is utilized by at least a subset of these proteins. PMID:25237314

  15. An efficient bacterial surface display system based on a novel outer membrane anchoring element from the Escherichia coli protein YiaT.

    PubMed

    Han, Mee-Jung; Lee, Seung Hwan

    2015-01-01

    In a bacterial surface display system, the display of a successful recombinant protein is highly dependent on the choice of anchoring motif. In this study, we developed an efficient Escherichia coli display system using novel anchoring motifs derived from the protein YiaT. To determine the best surface-anchoring motif, full-length YiaT and two of its C-terminal truncated forms, cut at the R181 and R232 sites, were evaluated. Two industrial enzymes, a lipase from Pseudomonas fluorescens SIK W1 and an α-amylase from Bacillus subtilis, were used as the target proteins for display. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, Western blot, immunofluorescence microscopy and whole-cell enzyme activity measurements confirmed the expression of the fusion proteins on the E. coli surface. Using YiaTR181 or YiaTR232 as the anchoring motif, the fusion proteins showed very high enzyme activities and did not exert any adverse effects on either cell growth or the outer membrane integrity. Additionally, these fusion proteins were suitable for displaying proteins of large molecular size in an active form. Compared with the previous anchoring motifs FadL and OprF, YiaTR181 and YiaTR232 had approximately 10-fold and 20-fold higher enzyme activities, respectively. These results suggest that YiaT can be used as an E. coli anchoring motif to efficiently display various enzymes; hence, this system could be employed in a variety of biotechnological and industrial applications.

  16. Dynamic Partitioning of a GPI-Anchored Protein in Glycosphingolipid-Rich Microdomains Imaged by Single-Quantum Dot Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Pinaud, Fabien; Michalet, Xavier; Iyer, Gopal; Margeat, Emmanuel; Moore, Hsiao-Ping; Weiss, Shimon

    2009-01-01

    Recent experimental developments have led to a revision of the classical fluid mosaic model proposed by Singer and Nicholson 35 years ago. In particular, it is now well established that lipids and proteins diffuse heterogeneously in cell plasma membranes. Their complex motion patterns reflect the dynamic structure and composition of the membrane itself, as well as the presence of the underlying cytoskeleton scaffold and that of the extracellular matrix. How the structural organization of plasma membranes influences the diffusion of individual proteins remains a challenging, yet central question for cell signaling and its regulation. Here we have developed a raft-associated glycosylphosphatidyl Inositol-anchored avidin test probe (Av-GPI), whose diffusion patterns indirectly reports on the structure and dynamics of putative raft microdomains in the membrane of HeLa cells. Labeling with quantum dots (qdots) allowed high-resolution and long-term tracking of individual Av-GPI and the classification of their various diffusive behaviors. Using dual-color total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, we studied the correlation between the diffusion of individual Av-GPI and the location of glycosphingolipid GM1-rich microdomains and caveolae. We show that Av-GPI exhibit a fast and a slow diffusion regime in different membrane regions, and that slowing down of their diffusion is correlated with entry in GM1-rich microdomains located in close proximity to, but distinct, from caveolae. We further show that Av-GPI dynamically partition in and out of these microdomains in a cholesterol-dependent manner. Our results provide direct evidence that cholesterol/sphingolipid-rich microdomains can compartmentalize the diffusion of GPI-anchored proteins in living cells and that the dynamic partitioning raft model appropriately describes the diffusive behavior of some raft-associated proteins across the plasma membrane. PMID:19416475

  17. Studies on the Roles of Clathrin-Mediated Membrane Trafficking and Zinc Transporter Cis4 in the Transport of GPI-Anchored Proteins in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yan; Sugiura, Reiko; Kuno, Takayoshi

    2012-01-01

    We previously identified Cis4, a zinc transporter belonging to the cation diffusion facilitator protein family, and we demonstrated that Cis4 is implicated in Golgi membrane trafficking in fission yeast. Here, we identified three glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins, namely Ecm33, Aah3, and Gaz2, as multicopy suppressors of the MgCl2-sensitive phenotype of cis4-1 mutant. The phenotypes of ecm33, aah3 and gaz2 deletion cells were distinct from each other, and Cis4 overexpression suppressed Δecm33 phenotypes but did not suppress Δaah3 defects. Notably, green fluorescent protein-tagged Ecm33, which was observed at the cell surface in wild-type cells, mostly localized as intracellular dots that are presumed to be the Golgi and endosomes in membrane-trafficking mutants, including Δapm1, ypt3-i5, and chc1-1 mutants. Interestingly, all these membrane-trafficking mutants showed hypersensitivity to BE49385A, an inhibitor of Its8 that is involved in GPI-anchored protein synthesis. Taken together, these results suggest that GPI-anchored proteins are transported through a clathrin-mediated post-Golgi membrane trafficking pathway and that zinc transporter Cis4 may play roles in membrane trafficking of GPI-anchored proteins in fission yeast. PMID:22848669

  18. Dynamic anchoring transitions at aqueous-liquid crystal interfaces induced by specific and non-specific binding of vesicles to proteins.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lie Na; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports on the dynamics of continuous anchoring transitions at interfaces formed between nematic liquid crystals (LCs, 4'-pentyl-4-cyanobiphenyl (5CB)) and immiscible aqueous phases that are induced by either non-specific or specific interactions between phospholipid vesicles and proteins adsorbed at the LC interfaces. By analyzing the dynamic response of LCs to non-specific adsorption of lipids onto bovine serum albumin (BSA)-decorated LC interfaces, we provide evidence that the LC anchoring transitions are slower than diffusion-controlled accumulation of lipid at the interface, consistent with the hypothesis that the LC transition involves lateral reorganization of proteins and lipids at the interface. Significantly, optical measurements of the tilt angle of the LC as a function of the amount of lipid captured at the interface were found to be quantitatively consistent with theoretical predictions of LC anchoring directed by nanoscopic domains of molecules that cause planar (protein) and homeotropic (lipid) anchoring of the LC. Finally, specific binding interactions between the antibody-decorated LC interfaces and vesicles (through antibody-antigen recognition) greatly accelerated the continuous LC anchoring transitions, with dynamics that were measured to scale with the logarithm of the ligand composition of the vesicles (over four orders of magnitude). The latter dynamics were found to be strongly influenced by addition of synthetic surfactants, consistent with our proposal that the rate-limiting step underlying the response of the LC was the transfer of lipids from captured vesicles into the protein-decorated LC interface. Overall, the results presented in this paper provide quantitative insight into the origin of continuous anchoring transitions triggered by vesicles at protein-decorated LC interfaces and, more broadly, guidance for the design of stimuli-responsive LC systems.

  19. The molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis complex interacts with actin filaments via molybdenum insertase Cnx1 as anchor protein in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kaufholdt, David; Baillie, Christin-Kirsty; Bikker, Rolf; Burkart, Valentin; Dudek, Christian-Alexander; von Pein, Linn; Rothkegel, Martin; Mendel, Ralf R; Hänsch, Robert

    2016-03-01

    The pterin based molybdenum cofactor (Moco) plays an essential role in almost all organisms. Its biosynthesis is catalysed by six enzymes in a conserved four step reaction pathway. The last three steps are located in the cytoplasm, where a multimeric protein complex is formed to protect the intermediates from degradation. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation was used to test for cytoskeleton association of the Moco biosynthesis enzymes with actin filaments and microtubules using known cytoskeleton associated proteins, thus permitting non-invasive in vivo studies. Coding sequences of binding proteins were cloned via the GATEWAY system. No Moco biosynthesis enzyme showed any interaction with microtubules. However, alone the two domain protein Cnx1 exhibited interaction with actin filaments mediated by both domains with the Cnx1G domain displaying a stronger interaction. Cnx6 showed actin association only if unlabelled Cnx1 was co-expressed in comparable amounts. So Cnx1 is likely to be the anchor protein for the whole biosynthesis complex on actin filaments. A stabilization of the whole Moco biosynthesis complex on the cytoskeleton might be crucial. In addition a micro-compartmentation might either allow a localisation near the mitochondrial ATM3 exporter providing the first Moco intermediate or near one of the three molybdate transporters enabling efficient molybdate incorporation.

  20. Hormonal activation of a kinase cascade localized at the mitochondria is required for StAR protein activity.

    PubMed

    Poderoso, Cecilia; Maloberti, Paula; Duarte, Alejandra; Neuman, Isabel; Paz, Cristina; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Podesta, Ernesto J

    2009-03-01

    It is known that ERK1/2 and MEK1/2 participate in the regulation of Star gene transcription. However, their role in StAR protein post-transcriptional regulation is not described yet. In this study we analyzed the relationship between the MAPK cascade and StAR protein phosphorylation and function. We have demonstrated that (a) steroidogenesis in MA-10 Leydig cells depends on the specific of ERK1/2 activation at the mitochondria; (b) ERK1/2 phosphorylation is driven by mitochondrial PKA and constitutive MEK1/2 in this organelle; (c) active ERK1/2 interacts with StAR protein, leads to StAR protein phosphorylation at Ser(232) only in the presence of cholesterol; (d) directed mutagenesis of Ser(232) (S232A) inhibited in vitro StAR protein phosphorylation by ERK1; (e) transient transfection of MA-10 cells with StAR S232A cDNA markedly reduced the yield of progesterone production. We show that StAR protein is a substrate of ERK1/2, and that mitochondrial ERK1/2 is part of a multimeric complex that regulates cholesterol transport.

  1. Cell Surface Display and Characterization of Rhizopus oryzae Lipase in Pichia pastoris Using Sed1p as an Anchor Protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenqian; Shi, Hao; Ding, Huaihai; Wang, Liangliang; Zhang, Yu; Li, Xun; Wang, Fei

    2015-07-01

    It has been investigated to conduct the surface displaying of lipase from Rhizopus oryzae onto the cells of Pichia pastoris yeast using Sed1p as an anchor protein. A yeast cell surface display plasmid pPICZαA-rol-histag-sed1p was constructed by fusing rol and sed1p gene fragments into the plasmid pPICZαA, followed by introducing recombinant plasmid into P. pastoris cells. Surface display levels were monitored by Western Blot and immunofluorescence microscopy. The activity of displaying lipase obtained from recombinant mutS reached at 60 U/g-dry cell. In addition, the displaying lipase was stable in broad ranges of temperatures and pH, with the optimum temperature at 40 °C and pH 7.5. These results indicate that the P. pastoris displaying lipase may have potential in whole-cell biocatalyst. PMID:26013444

  2. Anchoring Secreted Proteins in Endoplasmic Reticulum by Plant Oleosin: The Example of Vitamin B12 Cellular Sequestration by Transcobalamin

    PubMed Central

    Alberto, Jean-Marc; Arango-Rodriguez, Martha Ligia; Dumas, Dominique; Martinez-Fong, Daniel; Freund, Jean-Noel; Gueant, Jean-Louis

    2009-01-01

    Background Oleosin is a plant protein localized to lipid droplets and endoplasmic reticulum of plant cells. Our idea was to use it to target functional secretory proteins of interest to the cytosolic side of the endoplasmic reticulum of mammalian cells, through expressing oleosin-containing chimeras. We have designed this approach to create cellular models deficient in vitamin B12 (cobalamin) because of the known problematics associated to the obtainment of effective vitamin B12 deficient cell models. This was achieved by the overexpression of transcobalamin inside cells through anchoring to oleosin. Methodology chimera gene constructs including transcobalamin-oleosin (TC-O), green fluorescent protein-transcobalamin-oleosin (GFP-TC-O) and oleosin-transcobalamin (O-TC) were inserted into pAcSG2 and pCDNA3 vectors for expression in sf9 insect cells, Caco2 (colon carcinoma), NIE-115 (mouse neuroblastoma), HEK (human embryonic kidney), COS-7 (Green Monkey SV40-transfected kidney fibroblasts) and CHO (Chinese hamster ovary cells). The subcellular localization, the changes in vitamin B12 binding activity and the metabolic consequences were investigated in both Caco2 and NIE-115 cells. Principal findings vitamin B12 binding was dramatically higher in TC-O than that in O-TC and wild type (WT). The expression of GFP-TC-O was observed in all cell lines and found to be co-localized with an ER-targeted red fluorescent protein and calreticulin of the endoplasmic reticulum in Caco2 and COS-7 cells. The overexpression of TC-O led to B12 deficiency, evidenced by impaired conversion of cyano-cobalamin to ado-cobalamin and methyl-cobalamin, decreased methionine synthase activity and reduced S-adenosyl methionine to S-adenosyl homocysteine ratio, as well as increases in homocysteine and methylmalonic acid concentration. Conclusions/Significance the heterologous expression of TC-O in mammalian cells can be used as an effective strategy for investigating the cellular consequences of

  3. Anchoring of Protein Kinase A by ERM (Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin) Proteins Is Required for Proper Netrin Signaling through DCC (Deleted in Colorectal Cancer)*

    PubMed Central

    Deming, Paula B.; Campbell, Shirley L.; Stone, Jamie B.; Rivard, Robert L.; Mercier, Alison L.; Howe, Alan K.

    2015-01-01

    Netrin-1, acting through its principal receptor DCC (deleted in colorectal cancer), serves as an axon guidance cue during neural development and also contributes to vascular morphogenesis, epithelial migration, and the pathogenesis of some tumors. Several lines of evidence suggest that netrin-DCC signaling can regulate and be regulated by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, PKA, although the molecular details of this relationship are poorly understood. Specificity in PKA signaling is often achieved through differential subcellular localization of the enzyme by interaction with protein kinase A anchoring proteins (AKAPs). Here, we show that AKAP function is required for DCC-mediated activation of PKA and phosphorylation of cytoskeletal regulatory proteins of the Mena/VASP (vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein) family. Moreover, we show that DCC and PKA physically interact and that this association is mediated by the ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) family of plasma membrane-actin cytoskeleton cross-linking proteins. Silencing of ERM protein expression inhibits DCC-PKA interaction, DCC-mediated PKA activation, and phosphorylation of Mena/VASP proteins as well as growth cone morphology and neurite outgrowth. Finally, although expression of wild-type radixin partially rescued growth cone morphology and tropism toward netrin in ERM-knockdown cells, expression of an AKAP-deficient mutant of radixin did not fully rescue growth cone morphology and switched netrin tropism from attraction to repulsion. These data support a model in which ERM-mediated anchoring of PKA activity to DCC is required for proper netrin/DCC-mediated signaling. PMID:25575591

  4. Anchoring of protein kinase A by ERM (ezrin-radixin-moesin) proteins is required for proper netrin signaling through DCC (deleted in colorectal cancer).

    PubMed

    Deming, Paula B; Campbell, Shirley L; Stone, Jamie B; Rivard, Robert L; Mercier, Alison L; Howe, Alan K

    2015-02-27

    Netrin-1, acting through its principal receptor DCC (deleted in colorectal cancer), serves as an axon guidance cue during neural development and also contributes to vascular morphogenesis, epithelial migration, and the pathogenesis of some tumors. Several lines of evidence suggest that netrin-DCC signaling can regulate and be regulated by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, PKA, although the molecular details of this relationship are poorly understood. Specificity in PKA signaling is often achieved through differential subcellular localization of the enzyme by interaction with protein kinase A anchoring proteins (AKAPs). Here, we show that AKAP function is required for DCC-mediated activation of PKA and phosphorylation of cytoskeletal regulatory proteins of the Mena/VASP (vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein) family. Moreover, we show that DCC and PKA physically interact and that this association is mediated by the ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) family of plasma membrane-actin cytoskeleton cross-linking proteins. Silencing of ERM protein expression inhibits DCC-PKA interaction, DCC-mediated PKA activation, and phosphorylation of Mena/VASP proteins as well as growth cone morphology and neurite outgrowth. Finally, although expression of wild-type radixin partially rescued growth cone morphology and tropism toward netrin in ERM-knockdown cells, expression of an AKAP-deficient mutant of radixin did not fully rescue growth cone morphology and switched netrin tropism from attraction to repulsion. These data support a model in which ERM-mediated anchoring of PKA activity to DCC is required for proper netrin/DCC-mediated signaling.

  5. Intermolecular Interaction between Anchoring Subunits Specify Subcellular Targeting and Function of RGS Proteins in Retina ON-Bipolar Neurons.

    PubMed

    Sarria, Ignacio; Orlandi, Cesare; McCall, Maureen A; Gregg, Ronald G; Martemyanov, Kirill A

    2016-03-01

    In vertebrate retina, light responses generated by the rod photoreceptors are transmitted to the second-order neurons, the ON-bipolar cells (ON-BC), and this communication is indispensible for vision in dim light. In ON-BCs, synaptic transmission is initiated by the metabotropic glutamate receptor, mGluR6, that signals via the G-protein Go to control opening of the effector ion channel, TRPM1. A key role in this process belongs to the GTPase Activating Protein (GAP) complex that catalyzes Go inactivation upon light-induced suppression of glutamate release in rod photoreceptors, thereby driving ON-BC depolarization to changes in synaptic input. The GAP complex has a striking molecular complexity. It contains two Regulator of G-protein Signaling (RGS) proteins RGS7 and RGS11 that directly act on Go and two adaptor subunits: RGS Anchor Protein (R9AP) and the orphan receptor, GPR179. Here we examined the organizational principles of the GAP complex in ON-BCs. Biochemical experiments revealed that RGS7 binds to a conserved site in GPR179 and that RGS11 in vivo forms a complex only with R9AP. R9AP and GPR179 are further integrated via direct protein-protein interactions involving their cytoplasmic domains. Elimination of GPR179 prevents postsynaptic accumulation of R9AP. Furthermore, concurrent knock-out of both R9AP and RGS7 does not reconfigure the GAP complex and completely abolishes synaptic transmission, resulting in a novel mouse model of night blindness. Based on these results, we propose a model of hierarchical assembly and function of the GAP complex that supports ON-BCs visual signaling.

  6. Intermolecular Interaction between Anchoring Subunits Specify Subcellular Targeting and Function of RGS Proteins in Retina ON-Bipolar Neurons.

    PubMed

    Sarria, Ignacio; Orlandi, Cesare; McCall, Maureen A; Gregg, Ronald G; Martemyanov, Kirill A

    2016-03-01

    In vertebrate retina, light responses generated by the rod photoreceptors are transmitted to the second-order neurons, the ON-bipolar cells (ON-BC), and this communication is indispensible for vision in dim light. In ON-BCs, synaptic transmission is initiated by the metabotropic glutamate receptor, mGluR6, that signals via the G-protein Go to control opening of the effector ion channel, TRPM1. A key role in this process belongs to the GTPase Activating Protein (GAP) complex that catalyzes Go inactivation upon light-induced suppression of glutamate release in rod photoreceptors, thereby driving ON-BC depolarization to changes in synaptic input. The GAP complex has a striking molecular complexity. It contains two Regulator of G-protein Signaling (RGS) proteins RGS7 and RGS11 that directly act on Go and two adaptor subunits: RGS Anchor Protein (R9AP) and the orphan receptor, GPR179. Here we examined the organizational principles of the GAP complex in ON-BCs. Biochemical experiments revealed that RGS7 binds to a conserved site in GPR179 and that RGS11 in vivo forms a complex only with R9AP. R9AP and GPR179 are further integrated via direct protein-protein interactions involving their cytoplasmic domains. Elimination of GPR179 prevents postsynaptic accumulation of R9AP. Furthermore, concurrent knock-out of both R9AP and RGS7 does not reconfigure the GAP complex and completely abolishes synaptic transmission, resulting in a novel mouse model of night blindness. Based on these results, we propose a model of hierarchical assembly and function of the GAP complex that supports ON-BCs visual signaling. PMID:26961947

  7. Structure and dynamics of the conserved protein GPI anchor core inserted into detergent micelles.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Franck; Lopez-Prados, Javier; Groves, Patrick; Perez, Serge; Martín-Lomas, Manuel; Nieto, Pedro M

    2006-10-01

    A suitable approach which combines nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been used to study the structure and the dynamics of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor Manalphal-2Manalpha1-6Manalphal -4GlcNalpha1-6myo-inositol-1-OPO(3)-sn-1,2-dimyristoylglycerol (1) incorporated into dodecylphosphatidylcholine (DPC) micelles. The results have been compared to those previously obtained for the products obtainable from (1) after phospholipase cleavage, in aqueous solution. Relaxation and diffusion NMR experiments were used to establish the formation of stable aggregates and the insertion of (1) into the micelles. MD calculations were performed including explicit water, sodium and chloride ions and using the Particle Mesh Ewald approach for the evaluation of the electrostatic energy term. The MD predicted three dimensional structure and dynamics were substantiated by nuclear overhauser effect (NOE) measurements and relaxation data. The pseudopentasaccharide structure, which was not affected by incorporation of (1) into the micelle, showed a complex dynamic behaviour with a faster relative motion at the terminal mannopyranose unit and decreased mobility close to the micelle. This motion may be better described as an oscillation relative to the membrane rather than a folding event. PMID:16774909

  8. Structure and dynamics of the conserved protein GPI anchor core inserted into detergent micelles.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Franck; Lopez-Prados, Javier; Groves, Patrick; Perez, Serge; Martín-Lomas, Manuel; Nieto, Pedro M

    2006-10-01

    A suitable approach which combines nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been used to study the structure and the dynamics of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor Manalphal-2Manalpha1-6Manalphal -4GlcNalpha1-6myo-inositol-1-OPO(3)-sn-1,2-dimyristoylglycerol (1) incorporated into dodecylphosphatidylcholine (DPC) micelles. The results have been compared to those previously obtained for the products obtainable from (1) after phospholipase cleavage, in aqueous solution. Relaxation and diffusion NMR experiments were used to establish the formation of stable aggregates and the insertion of (1) into the micelles. MD calculations were performed including explicit water, sodium and chloride ions and using the Particle Mesh Ewald approach for the evaluation of the electrostatic energy term. The MD predicted three dimensional structure and dynamics were substantiated by nuclear overhauser effect (NOE) measurements and relaxation data. The pseudopentasaccharide structure, which was not affected by incorporation of (1) into the micelle, showed a complex dynamic behaviour with a faster relative motion at the terminal mannopyranose unit and decreased mobility close to the micelle. This motion may be better described as an oscillation relative to the membrane rather than a folding event.

  9. Creation of a Cellooligosaccharide-Assimilating Escherichia coli Strain by Displaying Active Beta-Glucosidase on the Cell Surface via a Novel Anchor Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Tsutomu; Kawabata, Hitomi; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrated direct assimilation of cellooligosaccharide using Escherichia coli displaying beta-glucosidase (BGL). BGL from Thermobifida fusca YX (Tfu0937) was displayed on the E. coli cell surface using a novel anchor protein named Blc. This strain was grown successfully on 0.2% cellobiose, and the optical density at 600 nm (OD600) was 1.05 after 20 h. PMID:21742905

  10. C-terminal sequences of hsp70 and hsp90 as non-specific anchors for tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) proteins.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Andrew J; Russell, Lance C; Chinkers, Michael

    2009-10-12

    Steroid-hormone-receptor maturation is a multi-step process that involves several TPR (tetratricopeptide repeat) proteins that bind to the maturation complex via the C-termini of hsp70 (heat-shock protein 70) and hsp90 (heat-shock protein 90). We produced a random T7 peptide library to investigate the roles played by the C-termini of the two heat-shock proteins in the TPR-hsp interactions. Surprisingly, phages with the MEEVD sequence, found at the C-terminus of hsp90, were not recovered from our biopanning experiments. However, two groups of phages were isolated that bound relatively tightly to HsPP5 (Homo sapiens protein phosphatase 5) TPR. Multiple copies of phages with a C-terminal sequence of LFG were isolated. These phages bound specifically to the TPR domain of HsPP5, although mutation studies produced no evidence that they bound to the domain's hsp90-binding groove. However, the most abundant family obtained in the initial screen had an aspartate residue at the C-terminus. Two members of this family with a C-terminal sequence of VD appeared to bind with approximately the same affinity as the hsp90 C-12 control. A second generation pseudo-random phage library produced a large number of phages with an LD C-terminus. These sequences acted as hsp70 analogues and had relatively low affinities for hsp90-specific TPR domains. Unfortunately, we failed to identify residues near hsp90's C-terminus that impart binding specificity to individual hsp90-TPR interactions. The results suggest that the C-terminal sequences of hsp70 and hsp90 act primarily as non-specific anchors for TPR proteins.

  11. A cholesterol recognition amino acid consensus domain in GP64 fusion protein facilitates anchoring of baculovirus to mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Luz-Madrigal, Agustin; Asanov, Alexander; Camacho-Zarco, Aldo R; Sampieri, Alicia; Vaca, Luis

    2013-11-01

    Baculoviridae is a large family of double-stranded DNA viruses that selectively infect insects. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) is the best-studied baculovirus from the family. Many studies over the last several years have shown that AcMNPV can enter a wide variety of mammalian cells and deliver genetic material for foreign gene expression. While most animal viruses studied so far have developed sophisticated mechanisms to selectively infect specific cells and tissues in an organism, AcMNPV can penetrate and deliver foreign genes into most cells studied to this date. The details about the mechanisms of internalization have been partially described. In the present study, we have identified a cholesterol recognition amino acid consensus (CRAC) domain present in the AcMNPV envelope fusion protein GP64. We demonstrated the association of a CRAC domain with cholesterol, which is important to facilitate the anchoring of the virus at the mammalian cell membrane. Furthermore, this initial anchoring favors AcMNPV endocytosis via a dynamin- and clathrin-dependent mechanism. Under these conditions, efficient baculovirus-driven gene expression is obtained. In contrast, when cholesterol is reduced from the plasma membrane, AcMNPV enters the cell via a dynamin- and clathrin-independent mechanism. The result of using this alternative internalization pathway is a reduced level of baculovirus-driven gene expression. This study is the first to document the importance of a novel CRAC domain in GP64 and its role in modulating gene delivery in AcMNPV.

  12. A Cholesterol Recognition Amino Acid Consensus Domain in GP64 Fusion Protein Facilitates Anchoring of Baculovirus to Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Luz-Madrigal, Agustin; Asanov, Alexander; Camacho-Zarco, Aldo R.; Sampieri, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    Baculoviridae is a large family of double-stranded DNA viruses that selectively infect insects. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) is the best-studied baculovirus from the family. Many studies over the last several years have shown that AcMNPV can enter a wide variety of mammalian cells and deliver genetic material for foreign gene expression. While most animal viruses studied so far have developed sophisticated mechanisms to selectively infect specific cells and tissues in an organism, AcMNPV can penetrate and deliver foreign genes into most cells studied to this date. The details about the mechanisms of internalization have been partially described. In the present study, we have identified a cholesterol recognition amino acid consensus (CRAC) domain present in the AcMNPV envelope fusion protein GP64. We demonstrated the association of a CRAC domain with cholesterol, which is important to facilitate the anchoring of the virus at the mammalian cell membrane. Furthermore, this initial anchoring favors AcMNPV endocytosis via a dynamin- and clathrin-dependent mechanism. Under these conditions, efficient baculovirus-driven gene expression is obtained. In contrast, when cholesterol is reduced from the plasma membrane, AcMNPV enters the cell via a dynamin- and clathrin-independent mechanism. The result of using this alternative internalization pathway is a reduced level of baculovirus-driven gene expression. This study is the first to document the importance of a novel CRAC domain in GP64 and its role in modulating gene delivery in AcMNPV. PMID:23986592

  13. Reverse micelle encapsulation of membrane anchored proteins for solution NMR studies

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, Kathleen G.; Peterson, Ronald; Saad, Jamil S.; Summers, Michael F.; Xu, Xianzhong; Ames, James B.; Wand, A. Joshua

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Perhaps 5 to 10% of proteins bind to the membranes via a covalently attached lipid. Post-translational attachment of fatty acids such as myristate occurs on a variety of viral and cellular proteins. High-resolution information about the nature of lipidated proteins is remarkably sparse, often because of solubility problems caused by the exposed fatty acids. Reverse micelle encapsulation is used here to study two myristoylated proteins in their lipid-extruded states: myristoylated recoverin, which is a switch in the Ca+2 signaling pathway in vision and the myristoylated HIV-1 matrix protein, which is postulated to be targeted to the plasma membrane through its binding to phosphatidylinositol(4,5)bisphosphate. Both proteins have been successfully encapsulated in the lipid extruded state and high-resolution NMR spectra obtained. Both proteins bind their activating ligands in the reverse micelle. This approach seems broadly applicable to membrane proteins with exposed fatty acid chains that have eluded structural characterization by conventional approaches. PMID:20152148

  14. CHEMICAL SYNTHESIS OF GLYCOSYLPHOSPHATIDYLINOSITOL ANCHORS

    PubMed Central

    Swarts, Benjamin M.; Guo, Zhongwu

    2013-01-01

    Many eukaryotic cell-surface proteins and glycoproteins are anchored to the plasma membrane by glycosylphosphatidylinositols (GPIs), a family of glycolipids that are post-translationally attached to proteins at their C-termini. GPIs and GPI-anchored proteins play important roles in many biological and pathological events, such as cell recognition and adhesion, signal transduction, host defense, and acting as receptors for viruses and toxins. Chemical synthesis of structurally defined GPI anchors and GPI derivatives is a necessary step toward understanding the properties and functions of these molecules in biological systems and exploring their potential therapeutic applications. In the first part of this comprehensive article on the chemical synthesis of GPIs, classic syntheses of naturally occurring GPI anchors from protozoan parasites, yeast, and mammals are covered. The second part of the article focuses on recent diversity-oriented strategies for the synthesis of GPI anchors containing unsaturated lipids, “click chemistry” tags, and highly branched and modified structures. PMID:22794184

  15. Sec-Secretion and Sortase-Mediated Anchoring of Proteins in Gram-Postive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Schneewind, Olaf; Missiakas, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Signal peptide-driven secretion of precursor proteins directs polypeptides across the plasma membrane of bacteria. Two pathways, Sec- and SRP-dependent, converge at the SecYEG translocon to thread unfolded precursor proteins across the membrane, whereas folded preproteins are routed via the Tat secretion pathway. Gram-positive bacteria lack an outer membrane and are surrounded by a rigid layer of peptidoglycan. Interactions with their environment are mediated by proteins that are retained in the cell wall, often through covalent attachment to the peptidoglycan. In this review, we describe the mechanisms for both Sec-dependent secretion and sortase-dependent assembly of proteins in the envelope of Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:24269844

  16. Insight into Early-Stage Unfolding of GPI-Anchored Human Prion Protein.

    PubMed

    Wu, Emilia L; Qi, Yifei; Park, Soohyung; Mallajosyula, Sairam S; MacKerell, Alexander D; Klauda, Jeffery B; Im, Wonpil

    2015-11-17

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders, which are characterized by the accumulation of misfolded prion protein (PrPSc) converted from a normal host cellular prion protein (PrPC). Experimental studies suggest that PrPC is enriched with α-helical structure, whereas PrPSc contains a high proportion of β-sheet. In this study, we report the impact of N-glycosylation and the membrane on the secondary structure stability utilizing extensive microsecond molecular dynamics simulations. Our results reveal that the HB (residues 173 to 194) C-terminal fragment undergoes conformational changes and helix unfolding in the absence of membrane environments because of the competition between protein backbone intramolecular and protein-water intermolecular hydrogen bonds as well as its intrinsic instability originated from the amino acid sequence. This initiation of the unfolding process of PrPC leads to a subsequent increase in the length of the HB-HC loop (residues 195 to 199) that may trigger larger rigid body motions or further unfolding around this region. Continuous interactions between prion protein and the membrane not only constrain the protein conformation but also decrease the solvent accessibility of the backbone atoms, thereby stabilizing the secondary structure, which is enhanced by N-glycosylation via additional interactions between the N-glycans and the membrane surface. PMID:26588568

  17. Esc1, a Nuclear Periphery Protein Required for Sir4-Based Plasmid Anchoring and Partitioning

    PubMed Central

    Andrulis, Erik D.; Zappulla, David C.; Ansari, Athar; Perrod, Severine; Laiosa, Catherine V.; Gartenberg, Marc R.; Sternglanz, Rolf

    2002-01-01

    A targeted silencing screen was performed to identify yeast proteins that, when tethered to a telomere, suppress a telomeric silencing defect caused by truncation of Rap1. A previously uncharacterized protein, Esc1 (establishes silent chromatin), was recovered, in addition to well-characterized proteins Rap1, Sir1, and Rad7. Telomeric silencing was slightly decreased in Δesc1 mutants, but silencing of the HM loci was unaffected. On the other hand, targeted silencing by various tethered proteins was greatly weakened in Δesc1 mutants. Two-hybrid analysis revealed that Esc1 and Sir4 interact via a 34-amino-acid portion of Esc1 (residues 1440 to 1473) and a carboxyl-terminal domain of Sir4 known as PAD4 (residues 950 to 1262). When tethered to DNA, this Sir4 domain confers efficient partitioning to otherwise unstable plasmids and blocks the ability of bound DNA segments to rotate freely in vivo. Here, both phenomena were shown to require ESC1. Sir protein-mediated partitioning of a telomere-based plasmid also required ESC1. Fluorescence microscopy of cells expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-Esc1 showed that the protein localized to the nuclear periphery, a region of the nucleus known to be functionally important for silencing. GFP-Esc1 localization, however, was not entirely coincident with telomeres, the nucleolus, or nuclear pore complexes. Our data suggest that Esc1 is a component of a redundant pathway that functions to localize silencing complexes to the nuclear periphery. PMID:12417731

  18. The mouse neuronal cell surface protein F3: a phosphatidylinositol- anchored member of the immunoglobulin superfamily related to chicken contactin

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Several members of the Ig superfamily are expressed on neural cells where they participate in surface interactions between cell bodies and processes. Their Ig domains are more closely related to each other than to Ig variable and constant domains and have been grouped into the C2 set. Here, we report the cloning and characterization of another member of this group, the mouse neuronal cell surface antigen F3. The F3 cDNA sequence contains an open reading frame that could encode a 1,020-amino acid protein consisting of a signal sequence, six Ig-like domains of the C2 type, a long premembrane region containing two segments that exhibit sequence similarity to fibronectin type III repeats and a moderately hydrophobic COOH-terminal sequence. The protein does not contain a typical transmembrane segment but appears to be attached to the membrane by a phosphatidylinositol anchor. Antibodies against the F3 protein recognize a prominent 135-kD protein in mouse brain. In fetal brain cultures, they stain the neuronal cell surface and, in cultures maintained in chemically defined medium, most prominently neurites and neurite bundles. The mouse f3 gene maps to band F of chromosome 15. The gene transcripts detected in the brain by F3 cDNA probes are developmentally regulated, the highest amounts being expressed between 1 and 2 wk after birth. The F3 nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence show striking similarity to the recently published sequence of the chicken neuronal cell surface protein contactin. However, there are important differences between the two molecules. In contrast to F3, contactin has a transmembrane and a cytoplasmic domain. Whereas contactin is insoluble in nonionic detergent and is tightly associated with the cytoskeleton, about equal amounts of F3 distribute between buffer-soluble, nonionic detergent-soluble, and detergent- insoluble fractions. Among other neural cell surface proteins, F3 most resembles the neuronal cell adhesion protein L1, with 25% amino

  19. Intermolecular Interaction between Anchoring Subunits Specify Subcellular Targeting and Function of RGS Proteins in Retina ON-Bipolar Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sarria, Ignacio; Orlandi, Cesare; McCall, Maureen A.; Gregg, Ronald G.

    2016-01-01

    In vertebrate retina, light responses generated by the rod photoreceptors are transmitted to the second-order neurons, the ON-bipolar cells (ON-BC), and this communication is indispensible for vision in dim light. In ON-BCs, synaptic transmission is initiated by the metabotropic glutamate receptor, mGluR6, that signals via the G-protein Go to control opening of the effector ion channel, TRPM1. A key role in this process belongs to the GTPase Activating Protein (GAP) complex that catalyzes Go inactivation upon light-induced suppression of glutamate release in rod photoreceptors, thereby driving ON-BC depolarization to changes in synaptic input. The GAP complex has a striking molecular complexity. It contains two Regulator of G-protein Signaling (RGS) proteins RGS7 and RGS11 that directly act on Go and two adaptor subunits: RGS Anchor Protein (R9AP) and the orphan receptor, GPR179. Here we examined the organizational principles of the GAP complex in ON-BCs. Biochemical experiments revealed that RGS7 binds to a conserved site in GPR179 and that RGS11 in vivo forms a complex only with R9AP. R9AP and GPR179 are further integrated via direct protein–protein interactions involving their cytoplasmic domains. Elimination of GPR179 prevents postsynaptic accumulation of R9AP. Furthermore, concurrent knock-out of both R9AP and RGS7 does not reconfigure the GAP complex and completely abolishes synaptic transmission, resulting in a novel mouse model of night blindness. Based on these results, we propose a model of hierarchical assembly and function of the GAP complex that supports ON-BCs visual signaling. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The ability of photoreceptors to transmit signals to the downstream ON-bipolar neurons in the retina is indispensible for vision. In this study, we delineate the molecular organization of the central regulatory complex, the GTPase Activating Protein (GAP) complex, that drives postsynaptic responses in ON-bipolar cells. Here, we identify an unexpected

  20. Functional regions of the presynaptic cytomatrix protein bassoon: significance for synaptic targeting and cytomatrix anchoring.

    PubMed

    Dresbach, Thomas; Hempelmann, Anne; Spilker, Christina; tom Dieck, Susanne; Altrock, Wilko D; Zuschratter, Werner; Garner, Craig C; Gundelfinger, Eckart D

    2003-06-01

    Exocytosis of neurotransmitter from synaptic vesicles is restricted to specialized sites of the presynaptic plasma membrane called active zones. A complex cytomatrix of proteins exclusively assembled at active zones, the CAZ, is thought to form a molecular scaffold that organizes neurotransmitter release sites. Here, we have analyzed synaptic targeting and cytomatrix association of Bassoon, a major scaffolding protein of the CAZ. By combining immunocytochemistry and transfection of cultured hippocampal neurons, we show that the central portion of Bassoon is crucially involved in synaptic targeting and CAZ association. An N-terminal region harbors a distinct capacity for N-myristoylation-dependent targeting to synaptic vesicle clusters, but is not incorporated into the CAZ. Our data provide the first experimental evidence for the existence of distinct functional regions in Bassoon and suggest that a centrally located CAZ targeting function may be complemented by an N-terminal capacity for targeting to membrane-bounded synaptic organelles.

  1. FlaF is a β-sandwich protein that anchors the archaellum in the archaeal cell envelope by binding the S-layer protein

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Ankan; Tsai, Chi -Lin; Chaudhury, Paushali; Tripp, Patrick; Arvai, Andrew  S.; Ishida, Justin  P.; Tainer, John  A.; Albers, Sonja -Verena

    2015-05-01

    Archaea employ the archaellum, a type IV pilus-like nanomachine, for swimming motility. In the crenarchaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, the archaellum consists of seven proteins: FlaB/X/G/F/H/I/J. FlaF is conserved and essential for archaellum assembly but no FlaF structures exist. Here, we truncated the FlaF N terminus and solved 1.5-Å and 1.65-Å resolution crystal structures of this monotopic membrane protein. Structures revealed an N-terminal α-helix and an eight-strand β-sandwich, immunoglobulin-like fold with striking similarity to S-layer proteins. Crystal structures, X-ray scattering, and mutational analyses suggest dimer assembly is needed for in vivo function. The sole cell envelope component of S. acidocaldarius is a paracrystalline S-layer, and FlaF specifically bound to S-layer protein, suggesting that its interaction domain is located in the pseudoperiplasm with its N-terminal helix in the membrane. From these data, FlaF may act as the previously unknown archaellum stator protein that anchors the rotating archaellum to the archaeal cell envelope.

  2. FlaF is a β-sandwich protein that anchors the archaellum in the archaeal cell envelope by binding the S-layer protein

    DOE PAGES

    Banerjee, Ankan; Tsai, Chi -Lin; Chaudhury, Paushali; Tripp, Patrick; Arvai, Andrew  S.; Ishida, Justin  P.; Tainer, John  A.; Albers, Sonja -Verena

    2015-05-01

    Archaea employ the archaellum, a type IV pilus-like nanomachine, for swimming motility. In the crenarchaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, the archaellum consists of seven proteins: FlaB/X/G/F/H/I/J. FlaF is conserved and essential for archaellum assembly but no FlaF structures exist. Here, we truncated the FlaF N terminus and solved 1.5-Å and 1.65-Å resolution crystal structures of this monotopic membrane protein. Structures revealed an N-terminal α-helix and an eight-strand β-sandwich, immunoglobulin-like fold with striking similarity to S-layer proteins. Crystal structures, X-ray scattering, and mutational analyses suggest dimer assembly is needed for in vivo function. The sole cell envelope component of S. acidocaldarius is amore » paracrystalline S-layer, and FlaF specifically bound to S-layer protein, suggesting that its interaction domain is located in the pseudoperiplasm with its N-terminal helix in the membrane. From these data, FlaF may act as the previously unknown archaellum stator protein that anchors the rotating archaellum to the archaeal cell envelope.« less

  3. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins as chaperones and co-receptors for FERONIA receptor kinase signaling in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chao; Yeh, Fang-Ling; Cheung, Alice Y; Duan, Qiaohong; Kita, Daniel; Liu, Ming-Che; Maman, Jacob; Luu, Emily J; Wu, Brendan W; Gates, Laura; Jalal, Methun; Kwong, Amy; Carpenter, Hunter; Wu, Hen-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis receptor kinase FERONIA (FER) is a multifunctional regulator for plant growth and reproduction. Here we report that the female gametophyte-expressed glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein (GPI-AP) LORELEI and the seedling-expressed LRE-like GPI-AP1 (LLG1) bind to the extracellular juxtamembrane region of FER and show that this interaction is pivotal for FER function. LLG1 interacts with FER in the endoplasmic reticulum and on the cell surface, and loss of LLG1 function induces cytoplasmic retention of FER, consistent with transport of FER from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane in a complex with LLG1. We further demonstrate that LLG1 is a component of the FER-regulated RHO GTPase signaling complex and that fer and llg1 mutants display indistinguishable growth, developmental and signaling phenotypes, analogous to how lre and fer share similar reproductive defects. Together our results support LLG1/LRE acting as a chaperone and co-receptor for FER and elucidate a mechanism by which GPI-APs enable the signaling capacity of a cell surface receptor. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06587.001 PMID:26052747

  4. Testicular Angiotensin-converting enzyme with different glycan modification: characterization on glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein releasing and dipeptidase activities.

    PubMed

    Kondoh, Gen; Watanabe, Hitomi; Tashima, Yuko; Maeda, Yusuke; Kinoshita, Taroh

    2009-01-01

    We have previously found that the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) carries GPI-anchored protein releasing activity (GPIase) as well as dipeptidase activity. Testicular ACE (tACE), the male germinal specific isozyme, plays a crucial role in male fertilization. The amino-terminal region of this isozyme is different from that of somatic isozyme (sACE) and contains potential O-linked glycosylation sites. By multiple mutagenesis after an in silico prediction, amino acid residues acquiring O-glycans were assigned. Both GPIase and dipeptidase activities were compared between O-glycan null mutant and wild-type molecules, but no differences were found. Furthermore, the wild-type tACE was produced in two different cells (COS7 and CHO) and its activities compared. The GPIase activity, but not dipeptidase, was apparently higher for CHO-derived molecule than COS7. Sensitivity to neuraminidase and O-glycosidase digestions and the profile of glycosylation were quite different between these two molecules. Moreover, serial digestions with neuraminidase and O-glycosidase have no influence on GPIase activity of both molecules, suggesting that the sialylation and the presence of O-glycan has no influence on tACE enzyme activities, while the set of glycans modulate GPIase activity.

  5. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins as chaperones and co-receptors for FERONIA receptor kinase signaling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Yeh, Fang-Ling; Cheung, Alice Y; Duan, Qiaohong; Kita, Daniel; Liu, Ming-Che; Maman, Jacob; Luu, Emily J; Wu, Brendan W; Gates, Laura; Jalal, Methun; Kwong, Amy; Carpenter, Hunter; Wu, Hen-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis receptor kinase FERONIA (FER) is a multifunctional regulator for plant growth and reproduction. Here we report that the female gametophyte-expressed glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein (GPI-AP) LORELEI and the seedling-expressed LRE-like GPI-AP1 (LLG1) bind to the extracellular juxtamembrane region of FER and show that this interaction is pivotal for FER function. LLG1 interacts with FER in the endoplasmic reticulum and on the cell surface, and loss of LLG1 function induces cytoplasmic retention of FER, consistent with transport of FER from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane in a complex with LLG1. We further demonstrate that LLG1 is a component of the FER-regulated RHO GTPase signaling complex and that fer and llg1 mutants display indistinguishable growth, developmental and signaling phenotypes, analogous to how lre and fer share similar reproductive defects. Together our results support LLG1/LRE acting as a chaperone and co-receptor for FER and elucidate a mechanism by which GPI-APs enable the signaling capacity of a cell surface receptor. PMID:26052747

  6. Bst1 is required for Candida albicans infecting host via facilitating cell wall anchorage of Glycosylphosphatidyl inositol anchored proteins

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Zou, Zui; Huang, Xin; Shen, Hui; He, Li Juan; Chen, Si Min; Li, Li Ping; Yan, Lan; Zhang, Shi Qun; Zhang, Jun Dong; Xu, Zheng; Xu, Guo Tong; An, Mao Mao; Jiang, Yuan Ying

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidyl inositol anchored proteins (GPI-APs) on fungal cell wall are essential for invasive infections. While the function of inositol deacylation of GPI-APs in mammalian cells has been previously characterized the impact of inositol deacylation in fungi and implications to host infection remains largely unexplored. Herein we describe our identification of BST1, an inositol deacylase of GPI-Aps in Candida albicans, was critical for GPI-APs cell wall attachment and host infection. BST1-deficient C. albicans (bst1Δ/Δ) was associated with severely impaired cell wall anchorage of GPI-APs and subsequen unmasked β-(1,3)-glucan. Consistent with the aberrant cell wall structures, bst1Δ/Δ strain did not display an invasive ability and could be recognized more efficiently by host immune systems. Moreover, BST1 null mutants or those expressing Bst1 variants did not display inositol deacylation activity and exhibited severely attenuated virulence and reduced organic colonization in a murine systemic candidiasis model. Thus, Bst1 can facilitate cell wall anchorage of GPI-APs in C. albicans by inositol deacylation, and is critical for host invasion and immune escape. PMID:27708385

  7. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high density lipoprotein–binding protein 1 plays a critical role in the lipolytic processing of chylomicrons

    PubMed Central

    Beigneux, Anne P.; Davies, Brandon S. J.; Gin, Peter; Weinstein, Michael M.; Farber, Emily; Qiao, Xin; Peale, Franklin; Bunting, Stuart; Walzem, Rosemary L.; Wong, Jinny S.; Blaner, William S.; Ding, Zhi-Ming; Melford, Kristan; Wongsiriroj, Nuttaporn; Shu, Xiao; de Sauvage, Fred; Ryan, Robert O.; Fong, Loren G.; Bensadoun, André; Young, Stephen G.

    2007-01-01

    Summary The triglycerides in chylomicrons are hydrolyzed by lipoprotein lipase (LpL) along the luminal surface of the capillaries. However, the endothelial cell molecule that facilitates chylomicron processing by LpL has not yet been defined. Here, we show that glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high density lipoprotein–binding protein 1 (GPIHBP1) plays a critical role in the lipolytic processing of chylomicrons. Gpihbp1-deficient mice exhibit a striking accumulation of chylomicrons in the plasma, even on a low-fat diet, resulting in milky plasma and plasma triglyceride levels as high as 5,000 mg/dl. Normally, Gpihbp1 is expressed highly in heart and adipose tissue, the same tissues that express high levels of LpL. In these tissues, GPIHBP1 is located on the luminal face of the capillary endothelium. Expression of GPIHBP1 in cultured cells confers the ability to bind both LpL and chylomicrons. These studies strongly suggest that GPIHBP1 is an important platform for the LpL-mediated processing of chylomicrons in capillaries. PMID:17403372

  8. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins as chaperones and co-receptors for FERONIA receptor kinase signaling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Yeh, Fang-Ling; Cheung, Alice Y; Duan, Qiaohong; Kita, Daniel; Liu, Ming-Che; Maman, Jacob; Luu, Emily J; Wu, Brendan W; Gates, Laura; Jalal, Methun; Kwong, Amy; Carpenter, Hunter; Wu, Hen-Ming

    2015-06-08

    The Arabidopsis receptor kinase FERONIA (FER) is a multifunctional regulator for plant growth and reproduction. Here we report that the female gametophyte-expressed glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein (GPI-AP) LORELEI and the seedling-expressed LRE-like GPI-AP1 (LLG1) bind to the extracellular juxtamembrane region of FER and show that this interaction is pivotal for FER function. LLG1 interacts with FER in the endoplasmic reticulum and on the cell surface, and loss of LLG1 function induces cytoplasmic retention of FER, consistent with transport of FER from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane in a complex with LLG1. We further demonstrate that LLG1 is a component of the FER-regulated RHO GTPase signaling complex and that fer and llg1 mutants display indistinguishable growth, developmental and signaling phenotypes, analogous to how lre and fer share similar reproductive defects. Together our results support LLG1/LRE acting as a chaperone and co-receptor for FER and elucidate a mechanism by which GPI-APs enable the signaling capacity of a cell surface receptor.

  9. Arabidopsis LTPG is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored lipid transfer protein required for export of lipids to the plant surface.

    PubMed

    Debono, Allan; Yeats, Trevor H; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Bird, David; Jetter, Reinhard; Kunst, Ljerka; Samuels, Lacey

    2009-04-01

    Plant epidermal cells dedicate more than half of their lipid metabolism to the synthesis of cuticular lipids, which seal and protect the plant shoot. The cuticle is made up of a cutin polymer and waxes, diverse hydrophobic compounds including very-long-chain fatty acids and their derivatives. How such hydrophobic compounds are exported to the cuticle, especially through the hydrophilic plant cell wall, is not known. By performing a reverse genetic screen, we have identified LTPG, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored lipid transfer protein that is highly expressed in the epidermis during cuticle biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana inflorescence stems. Mutant plant lines with decreased LTPG expression had reduced wax load on the stem surface, showing that LTPG is involved either directly or indirectly in cuticular lipid deposition. In vitro 2-p-toluidinonaphthalene-6-sulfonate assays showed that recombinant LTPG has the capacity to bind to this lipid probe. LTPG was primarily localized to the plasma membrane on all faces of stem epidermal cells in the growing regions of inflorescence stems where wax is actively secreted. These data suggest that LTPG may function as a component of the cuticular lipid export machinery.

  10. Complementary DNA for the folate binding protein correctly predicts anchoring to the membrane by glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol.

    PubMed Central

    Lacey, S W; Sanders, J M; Rothberg, K G; Anderson, R G; Kamen, B A

    1989-01-01

    Membrane bound and soluble forms of a high-affinity folate binding protein have been found in kidney, placenta, serum, milk, and in several cell lines. The two forms have similar binding characteristics for folates, are immunologically cross-reactive and based upon limited amino acid sequence data, are nearly identical. Based upon pulse-chase experiments, a precursor-product relationship has been suggested. The membrane form has been shown to mediate the transport of folate in cells grown in physiological concentrations of folate. A function for the soluble form has not yet been identified. We constructed a cDNA library from a human carcinoma cell line, Caco-2, which expresses the membrane form abundantly. The library was screened and a near full-length cDNA for the folate binder was isolated. Transfection of COS cells with the cDNA inserted in an expression vector resulted in marked overexpression of a membrane-associated folate binder as assessed by direct binding of radiolabeled folate and by indirect immunofluorescence. The deduced amino acid sequence is not consistent with a typical membrane spanning domain but rather with a signal for anchoring via a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol linkage. Release of the binder with a phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C strongly supports this hypothesis. Images PMID:2527252

  11. Display of active enzymes on the cell surface of Escherichia coli using PgsA anchor protein and their application to bioconversion.

    PubMed

    Narita, Junya; Okano, Kenji; Tateno, Toshihiro; Tanino, Takanori; Sewaki, Tomomitsu; Sung, Moon-Hee; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2006-05-01

    We have developed a novel Escherichia coli cell surface display system by employing PgsA as an anchoring motif. In our display system, C-terminal fusion to PgsA anchor protein from Bacillus subtilis was used. The enzymes selected for display were alpha-amylase (AmyA) from Streptococcus bovis 148 and lipase B (CALB) from Candida antarctica. The molecular mass values of AmyA and CALB are approximately 77 and 34 kDa, respectively. The enzymes were displayed on the surface as a fusion protein with a FLAG peptide tag at the C terminus. Both the PgsA-AmyA-FLAG and PgsA-CALB-FLAG fusion proteins were shown to be displayed by immunofluorescence labeling using anti-FLAG antibody. The displayed enzymes were active forms, and AmyA and CALB activities reached 990 U/g (dry cell weight) and 4.6 U/g (dry cell weight), respectively. AmyA-displaying E. coli cells grew utilizing cornstarch as the sole carbon source, while CALB-displaying E. coli cells catalyzed enantioselective transesterification, indicating that they are effective whole-cell biocatalysts. Since a target enzyme with a size of 77 kDa and an industrially useful lipase have been successfully displayed on the cell surface of E. coli for the first time, PgsA protein is probably a useful anchoring motif to display various enzymes.

  12. Correctly sorted molecules of a GPI-anchored protein are clustered and immobile when they arrive at the apical surface of MDCK cells.

    PubMed

    Hannan, L A; Lisanti, M P; Rodriguez-Boulan, E; Edidin, M

    1993-01-01

    Glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins are sorted to the apical surface of many epithelial cell types. To better understand the mechanism for apical segregation of these proteins, we analyzed the lateral mobility and molecular associations of a model GPI-anchored protein, herpes simplex virus gD1 fused to human decay accelerating factor (gD1-DAF) (Lisanti, M. P., I. W. Caras, M. A. Davitz, and E. Rodriguez-Boulan. 1989. J. Cell Biol. 109:2145-2156) shortly after arrival and after long-term residence at the surface of confluent, polarized MDCK cells. FRAP measurements of lateral diffusion showed that the mobile fraction of newly arrived gD1-DAF molecules was much less than the mobile fraction of long-term resident molecules (40 vs. 80-90%). Fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements showed that the newly arrived molecules were clustered, while resident molecules were not. Newly delivered gD1-DAF molecules were clustered but not immobilized in mutant, Concanavalin A-resistant MDCK cells that failed to sort gD1-DAF. Our results indicate that GPI-anchored proteins in MDCK cells are clustered before delivery to the surface. However, clustering alone does not target molecules for apical delivery. The immobilization observed when gD1-DAF is correctly sorted suggests that the clusters must associate some component of the cell's cytoplasm.

  13. Plasmodium falciparum Plasmodium helical interspersed subtelomeric proteins contribute to cytoadherence and anchor P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 to the host cell cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Oberli, Alexander; Zurbrügg, Laura; Rusch, Sebastian; Brand, Françoise; Butler, Madeleine E; Day, Jemma L; Cutts, Erin E; Lavstsen, Thomas; Vakonakis, Ioannis; Beck, Hans-Peter

    2016-10-01

    Adherence of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes to host endothelium is conferred through the parasite-derived virulence factor P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1), the major contributor to malaria severity. PfEMP1 located at knob structures on the erythrocyte surface is anchored to the cytoskeleton, and the Plasmodium helical interspersed subtelomeric (PHIST) gene family plays a role in many host cell modifications including binding the intracellular domain of PfEMP1. Here, we show that conditional reduction of the PHIST protein PFE1605w strongly reduces adhesion of infected erythrocytes to the endothelial receptor CD36. Adhesion to other endothelial receptors was less affected or even unaltered by PFE1605w depletion, suggesting that PHIST proteins might be optimized for subsets of PfEMP1 variants. PFE1605w does not play a role in PfEMP1 transport, but it directly interacts with both the intracellular segment of PfEMP1 and with cytoskeletal components. This is the first report of a PHIST protein interacting with key molecules of the cytoadherence complex and the host cytoskeleton, and this functional role seems to play an essential role in the pathology of P. falciparum.

  14. Proteomic analysis of human norepinephrine transporter complexes reveals associations with protein phosphatase 2A anchoring subunit and 14-3-3 proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Uhna; Jennings, Jennifer L.; Link, Andrew J.; Blakely, Randy D.; E-mail: andy.blakely@vanderbilt.edu

    2005-08-05

    The norepinephrine transporter (NET) terminates noradrenergic signals by clearing released NE at synapses. NET regulation by receptors and intracellular signaling pathways is supported by a growing list of associated proteins including syntaxin1A, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) catalytic subunit (PP2A-C), PICK1, and Hic-5. In the present study, we sought evidence for additional partnerships by mass spectrometry-based analysis of proteins co-immunoprecipitated with human NET (hNET) stably expressed in a mouse noradrenergic neuroblastoma cell line. Our initial proteomic analyses reveal multiple peptides derived from hNET, peptides arising from the mouse PP2A anchoring subunit (PP2A-Ar) and peptides derived from 14-3-3 proteins. We verified physical association of NET with PP2A-Ar via co-immunoprecipitation studies using mouse vas deferens extracts and with 14-3-3 via a fusion pull-down approach, implicating specifically the hNET NH{sub 2}-terminus for interactions. The transporter complexes described likely support mechanisms regulating transporter activity, localization, and trafficking.

  15. Epitope analysis of immunoglobulins against gp20, a GPI-anchored protein of the human sperm surface homologous to leukocyte antigen CD52.

    PubMed

    Flori, F; Giovampaola, C Della; Focarelli, R; Secciani, F; La Sala, G B; Nicoli, A; Hale, G; Rosati, F

    2005-09-01

    Gp20 is a sialylglycoprotein of the human sperm surface related to maturation and capacitation and is homologous to CD52, a glycosyl- phosphatidyl-inositol (GPI)-anchored protein highly expressed in lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils, and epididymal cells, described by the monoclonal antibody family CAMPATH. The CAMPATH antigen is characterized by a very short peptide (12 amino acids) and an N-linked oligosaccharide chain bound to the asparagine located in the third position and a GPI anchor bound to the C-terminal serine. The CAMPATH epitope includes three amino acids at the C-terminus and part of the GPI anchor. It has been suggested that anti-gp20 interacts with the same peptide recognized by CAMPATH antibodies but with a different epitope, since it describes the corresponding antigen in a different way. For example, it localizes the corresponding antigen in the equatorial region of the sperm head when sperm are capacitated, whereas CAMPATH antibodies bind all over the sperm surface. Our results indicate that the anti-gp20 epitope does not include the peptide backbone, the GPI anchor, or the N-glycans but consists of O-linked oligosaccharide chains bound to a unique CD52 glycoform present both in sperm and leukocytes. This is suggested by results obtained using many different approaches, such as immunoblot analysis of gp20 after removal of N- and O-glycans and after jacalin (Artocarpus integrifolia agglutinin)-affinity chromatography.

  16. Characterization of meFucoidan as a selective inhibitor for secretory phospholipase A2-IIA and the phosphorylation of meFucoidan-binding proteins by A-kinase in vitro.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Hiroko; Suzuki, Kanzo; Miyai, Sayaka; Ohtsuki, Kenzo

    2008-04-01

    The direct interaction of Mekabu fucoidan (meFucoidan) with four functional basic proteins (sPLA2-IIA, bFGF, histone H2B and HBV core protein) and three synthetic FGF-BP peptides (sp5, GE13 and RS6) was characterized in vitro. It was found that (i) meFucoidan inhibited dose-dependently the activity of sPLA2-IIA, but not pPLA2, through its direct binding to the enzyme; (ii) sPLA2-IIA activity was sensitive to meFucoidan rather than heparin, but significantly stimulated by sulfatide; (iii) the A-kinase-mediated phosphorylation of these basic proteins, except sPLA2-IIA, and synthetic peptides, containing potent phosphorylation sites for A-kinase, was inhibited dose-dependently by meFucoidan; and (iv) two consensus meFucoidan-binding motifs (B-B-B-B-X and B-X-B-B-X; B, basic amino acid) in these basic proteins and synthetic peptides could be overlapping to the potent phosphorylation site (B-B-X-S/T) for the kinase in vitro. These results presented here suggest that meFucoidan functions as a selective inhibitor for sPLA2-IIA and the A-kinase-mediated phosphorylation of cellular meFucoidan-binding functional basic proteins in vitro. PMID:18379068

  17. DRAGON, a GPI-anchored membrane protein, inhibits BMP signaling in C2C12 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Kanomata, Kazuhiro; Kokabu, Shoichiro; Nojima, Junya; Fukuda, Toru; Katagiri, Takenobu

    2009-06-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) induce osteoblastic differentiation of myoblasts via binding to cell surface receptors. Repulsive guidance molecules (RGMs) have been identified as BMP co-receptors. We report here that DRAGON/RGMb, a member of the RGM family, suppressed BMP signaling in C2C12 myoblasts via a novel mechanism. All RGMs were expressed in C2C12 cells that were differentiated into myocytes and osteoblastic cells, but RGMc was not detected in immature cells. In C2C12 cells, only DRAGON suppressed ALP and Id1 promoter activities induced by BMP-4 or by constitutively activated BMP type I receptors. This inhibition by DRAGON was dependent on the secretory form of the von Willbrand factor type D domain. DRAGON even suppressed BMP signaling induced by constitutively activated Smad1. Over-expression of neogenin did not alter the inhibitory capacity of DRAGON. Taken together, these findings indicate that DRAGON may be an inhibitor of BMP signaling in C2C12 myoblasts. We also suggest that a novel molecule(s) expressed on the cell membrane may mediate the signal transduction of DRAGON in order to suppress BMP signaling in C2C12 myoblasts.

  18. Regulation of presynaptic anchoring of the scaffold protein Bassoon by phosphorylation-dependent interaction with 14-3-3 adaptor proteins.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Markus S; Stellmacher, Anne; Romorini, Stefano; Marini, Claudia; Montenegro-Venegas, Carolina; Altrock, Wilko D; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Fejtova, Anna

    2013-01-01

    The proper organization of the presynaptic cytomatrix at the active zone is essential for reliable neurotransmitter release from neurons. Despite of the virtual stability of this tightly interconnected proteinaceous network it becomes increasingly clear that regulated dynamic changes of its composition play an important role in the processes of synaptic plasticity. Bassoon, a core component of the presynaptic cytomatrix, is a key player in structural organization and functional regulation of presynaptic release sites. It is one of the most highly phosphorylated synaptic proteins. Nevertheless, to date our knowledge about functions mediated by any one of the identified phosphorylation sites of Bassoon is sparse. In this study, we have identified an interaction of Bassoon with the small adaptor protein 14-3-3, which depends on phosphorylation of the 14-3-3 binding motif of Bassoon. In vitro phosphorylation assays indicate that phosphorylation of the critical Ser-2845 residue of Bassoon can be mediated by a member of the 90-kDa ribosomal S6 protein kinase family. Elimination of Ser-2845 from the 14-3-3 binding motif results in a significant decrease of Bassoon's molecular exchange rates at synapses of living rat neurons. We propose that the phosphorylation-induced 14-3-3 binding to Bassoon modulates its anchoring to the presynaptic cytomatrix. This regulation mechanism might participate in molecular and structural presynaptic remodeling during synaptic plasticity.

  19. Comprehensive behavioral analysis of voltage-gated calcium channel beta-anchoring and -regulatory protein knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Nakao, Akito; Miki, Takafumi; Shoji, Hirotaka; Nishi, Miyuki; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs) induces numerous intracellular events such as neuronal excitability, neurotransmitter release, synaptic plasticity, and gene regulation. It has been shown that genes related to Ca2+ signaling, such as the CACNA1C, CACNB2, and CACNA1I genes that encode VGCC subunits, are associated with schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders. Recently, VGCC beta-anchoring and -regulatory protein (BARP) was identified as a novel regulator of VGCC activity via the interaction of VGCC β subunits. To examine the role of the BARP in higher brain functions, we generated BARP knockout (KO) mice and conducted a comprehensive battery of behavioral tests. BARP KO mice exhibited greatly reduced locomotor activity, as evidenced by decreased vertical activity, stereotypic counts in the open field test, and activity level in the home cage, and longer latency to complete a session in spontaneous T-maze alteration test, which reached “study-wide significance.” Acoustic startle response was also reduced in the mutants. Interestingly, they showed multiple behavioral phenotypes that are seemingly opposite to those seen in the mouse models of schizophrenia and its related disorders, including increased working memory, flexibility, prepulse inhibition, and social interaction, and decreased locomotor activity, though many of these phenotypes are statistically weak and require further replications. These results demonstrate that BARP is involved in the regulation of locomotor activity and, possibly, emotionality. The possibility was also suggested that BARP KO mice may serve as a unique tool for investigating the pathogenesis/pathophysiology of schizophrenia and related disorders. Further evaluation of the molecular and physiological phenotypes of the mutant mice would provide new insights into the role of BARP in higher brain functions. PMID:26136667

  20. Nanobiotechnologic approach to a promising vaccine prototype for immunisation against leishmaniasis: a fast and effective method to incorporate GPI-anchored proteins of Leishmania amazonensis into liposomes.

    PubMed

    Colhone, Marcelle Carolina; Silva-Jardim, Izaltina; Stabeli, Rodrigo Guerino; Ciancaglini, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Liposomes are known to be a potent adjuvant for a wide range of antigens, as well as appropriate antigen carriers for antibody generation response in vivo. In addition, liposomes are effective vehicles for peptides and proteins, thus enhancing their immunogenicity. Considering these properties of liposomes and the antigenicity of the Leishmania membrane proteins, we evaluated if liposomes carrying glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins of Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes could induce protective immunity in BALB/c mice. To assay protective immunity, BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally injected with liposomes, GPI-protein extract (EPSGPI) as well as with the proteoliposomes carrying GPI-proteins. Mice inoculated with EPSGPI and total protein present in constitutive proteoliposomes displayed a post-infection protection of about 70% and 90%, respectively. The liposomes are able to work as adjuvant in the EPSGPI protection. These systems seem to be a promising vaccine prototype for immunisation against leishmaniasis.

  1. Beyond anchoring: the expanding role of the hendra virus fusion protein transmembrane domain in protein folding, stability, and function.

    PubMed

    Smith, Everett Clinton; Culler, Megan R; Hellman, Lance M; Fried, Michael G; Creamer, Trevor P; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2012-03-01

    While work with viral fusion proteins has demonstrated that the transmembrane domain (TMD) can affect protein folding, stability, and membrane fusion promotion, the mechanism(s) remains poorly understood. TMDs could play a role in fusion promotion through direct TMD-TMD interactions, and we have recently shown that isolated TMDs from three paramyxovirus fusion (F) proteins interact as trimers using sedimentation equilibrium (SE) analysis (E. C. Smith, et al., submitted for publication). Immediately N-terminal to the TMD is heptad repeat B (HRB), which plays critical roles in fusion. Interestingly, addition of HRB decreased the stability of the trimeric TMD-TMD interactions. This result, combined with previous findings that HRB forms a trimeric coiled coil in the prefusion form of the whole protein though HRB peptides fail to stably associate in isolation, suggests that the trimeric TMD-TMD interactions work in concert with elements in the F ectodomain head to stabilize a weak HRB interaction. Thus, changes in TMD-TMD interactions could be important in regulating F triggering and refolding. Alanine insertions between the TMD and HRB demonstrated that spacing between these two regions is important for protein stability while not affecting TMD-TMD interactions. Additional mutagenesis of the C-terminal end of the TMD suggests that β-branched residues within the TMD play a role in membrane fusion, potentially through modulation of TMD-TMD interactions. Our results support a model whereby the C-terminal end of the Hendra virus F TMD is an important regulator of TMD-TMD interactions and show that these interactions help hold HRB in place prior to the triggering of membrane fusion.

  2. Cdc1 removes the ethanolamine phosphate of the first mannose of GPI anchors and thereby facilitates the integration of GPI proteins into the yeast cell wall

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, Hector M.; Vionnet, Christine; Roubaty, Carole; Conzelmann, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Temperature-sensitive cdc1ts mutants are reported to stop the cell cycle upon a shift to 30°C in early G2, that is, as small budded cells having completed DNA replication but unable to duplicate the spindle pole body. A recent report showed that PGAP5, a human homologue of CDC1, acts as a phosphodiesterase removing an ethanolamine phosphate (EtN-P) from mannose 2 of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor, thus permitting efficient endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-to-Golgi transport of GPI proteins. We find that the essential CDC1 gene can be deleted in mcd4∆ cells, which do not attach EtN-P to mannose 1 of the GPI anchor, suggesting that Cdc1 removes the EtN-P added by Mcd4. Cdc1-314ts mutants do not accumulate GPI proteins in the ER but have a partial secretion block later in the secretory pathway. Growth tests and the genetic interaction profile of cdc1-314ts pinpoint a distinct cell wall defect. Osmotic support restores GPI protein secretion and actin polarization but not growth. Cell walls of cdc1-314ts mutants contain large amounts of GPI proteins that are easily released by β-glucanases and not attached to cell wall β1,6-glucans and that retain their original GPI anchor lipid. This suggests that the presumed transglycosidases Dfg5 and Dcw1 of cdc1-314ts transfer GPI proteins to cell wall β1,6-glucans inefficiently. PMID:25165136

  3. The Nup155-mediated organisation of inner nuclear membrane proteins is independent of Nup155 anchoring to the metazoan nuclear pore complex.

    PubMed

    Busayavalasa, Kiran; Chen, Xin; Farrants, Ann-Kristin Östlund; Wagner, Nicole; Sabri, Nafiseh

    2012-09-15

    The nuclear envelope (NE), an important barrier between the nucleus and the cytoplasm, is composed of three structures: the outer nuclear membrane, which is continuous with the ER, the inner nuclear membrane (INM), which interfaces with chromatin, and nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), which are essential for the exchange of macromolecules between the two compartments. The NPC protein Nup155 has an evolutionarily conserved role in the metazoan NE formation; but the in vivo analysis of Nup155 has been severely hampered by the essential function of this protein in cell viability. Here, we take advantage of the hypomorphicity of RNAi systems and use a combination of protein binding and rescue assays to map the interaction sites of two neighbouring NPC proteins Nup93 and Nup53 on Nup155, and to define the requirements of these interactions in INM protein organization. We show that different parts of Drosophila Nup155 have distinct functions: the Nup155 β-propeller anchors the protein to the NPC, whereas the α-solenoid part of Nup155 is essential for the correct localisation of INM proteins lamin-B receptor (LBR) and otefin. Using chromatin extracts from semi-synchronized cells, we also provide evidence that the Nup155 α-solenoid has a chromatin-binding activity that is stronger at the end of mitosis. Our results argue that the role of Nup155 in INM protein localisation is not mediated through the NPC anchoring activity of the protein and suggest that regions other than Nup155 β-propeller are necessary for the targeting of proteins to the INM. PMID:22718353

  4. Subcellular Partitioning of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B to the Endoplasmic Reticulum and Mitochondria Depends Sensitively on the Composition of Its Tail Anchor

    PubMed Central

    Fueller, Julia; Egorov, Mikhail V.; Walther, Kirstin A.; Sabet, Ola; Mallah, Jana; Grabenbauer, Markus; Kinkhabwala, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The canonical protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B is an important regulator of diverse cellular signaling networks. PTP1B has long been thought to exert its influence solely from its perch on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER); however, an additional subpopulation of PTP1B has recently been detected in mitochondria extracted from rat brain tissue. Here, we show that PTP1B’s mitochondrial localization is general (observed across diverse mammalian cell lines) and sensitively dependent on the transmembrane domain length, C-terminal charge and hydropathy of its short (≤35 amino acid) tail anchor. Our electron microscopy of specific DAB precipitation revealed that PTP1B localizes via its tail anchor to the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM), with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy establishing that this OMM pool contributes to the previously reported cytoplasmic interaction of PTP1B with endocytosed epidermal growth factor receptor. We additionally examined the mechanism of PTP1B’s insertion into the ER membrane through heterologous expression of PTP1B’s tail anchor in wild-type yeast and yeast mutants of major conserved ER insertion pathways: In none of these yeast strains was ER targeting significantly impeded, providing in vivo support for the hypothesis of spontaneous membrane insertion (as previously demonstrated in vitro). Further functional elucidation of the newly recognized mitochondrial pool of PTP1B will likely be important for understanding its complex roles in cellular responses to external stimuli, cell proliferation and diseased states. PMID:26431424

  5. Anchored PKA as a gatekeeper for gap junctions

    PubMed Central

    Pidoux, Guillaume; Taskén, Kjetil

    2015-01-01

    Anchored protein kinase A (PKA) bound to A Kinase Anchoring Protein (AKAP) mediates effects of localized increases in cAMP in defined subcellular microdomains and retains the specificity in cAMP-PKA signaling to distinct extracellular stimuli. Gap junctions are pores between adjacent cells constituted by connexin proteins that provide means of communication and transfer of small molecules. While the PKA signaling is known to promote human trophoblast cell fusion, the gap junction communication through connexin 43 (Cx43) is a prerequisite for this process. We recently demonstrated that trophoblast fusion is regulated by ezrin, a known AKAP, which binds to Cx43 and delivers PKA in the vicinity gap junctions. We found that disruption of the ezrin-Cx43 interaction abolished PKA-dependent phosphorylation of Cx43 as well as gap junction communication and subsequently cell fusion. We propose that the PKA-ezrin-Cx43 macromolecular complex regulating gap junction communication constitutes a general mechanism to control opening of Cx43 gap junctions by phosphorylation in response to cAMP signaling in various cell types. PMID:26478781

  6. Comparative genome-based identification of a cell wall-anchored protein from Lactobacillus plantarum increases adhesion of Lactococcus lactis to human epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Zuo, Fanglei; Yu, Rui; Zeng, Zhu; Ma, Huiqin; Chen, Shangwu

    2015-01-01

    Adhesion to host cells is considered important for Lactobacillus plantarum as well as other lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to persist in human gut and thus exert probiotic effects. Here, we sequenced the genome of Lt. plantarum strain NL42 originating from a traditional Chinese dairy product, performed comparative genomic analysis and characterized a novel adhesion factor. The genome of NL42 was highly divergent from its closest neighbors, especially in six large genomic regions. NL42 harbors a total of 42 genes encoding adhesion-associated proteins; among them, cwaA encodes a protein containing multiple domains, including five cell wall surface anchor repeat domains and an LPxTG-like cell wall anchor motif. Expression of cwaA in Lactococcus lactis significantly increased its autoaggregation and hydrophobicity, and conferred the new ability to adhere to human colonic epithelial HT-29 cells by targeting cellular surface proteins, and not carbohydrate moieties, for CwaA adhesion. In addition, the recombinant Lc. lactis inhibited adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli to HT-29 cells, mainly by exclusion. We conclude that CwaA is a novel adhesion factor in Lt. plantarum and a potential candidate for improving the adhesion ability of probiotics or other bacteria of interest. PMID:26370773

  7. Comparative genome-based identification of a cell wall-anchored protein from Lactobacillus plantarum increases adhesion of Lactococcus lactis to human epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Zuo, Fanglei; Yu, Rui; Zeng, Zhu; Ma, Huiqin; Chen, Shangwu

    2015-01-01

    Adhesion to host cells is considered important for Lactobacillus plantarum as well as other lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to persist in human gut and thus exert probiotic effects. Here, we sequenced the genome of Lt. plantarum strain NL42 originating from a traditional Chinese dairy product, performed comparative genomic analysis and characterized a novel adhesion factor. The genome of NL42 was highly divergent from its closest neighbors, especially in six large genomic regions. NL42 harbors a total of 42 genes encoding adhesion-associated proteins; among them, cwaA encodes a protein containing multiple domains, including five cell wall surface anchor repeat domains and an LPxTG-like cell wall anchor motif. Expression of cwaA in Lactococcus lactis significantly increased its autoaggregation and hydrophobicity, and conferred the new ability to adhere to human colonic epithelial HT-29 cells by targeting cellular surface proteins, and not carbohydrate moieties, for CwaA adhesion. In addition, the recombinant Lc. lactis inhibited adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli to HT-29 cells, mainly by exclusion. We conclude that CwaA is a novel adhesion factor in Lt. plantarum and a potential candidate for improving the adhesion ability of probiotics or other bacteria of interest.

  8. Priority targeting of glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins to the bile-canalicular (apical) plasma membrane of hepatocytes. Involvement of 'late' endosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Ali, N; Evans, W H

    1990-01-01

    1. Liver plasma membranes originating from the sinusoidal, lateral and canalicular surface domains of hepatocytes were covalently labelled with sulpho-N-hydroxysuccinamide-biotin. After solubilization in Triton X-114, treatment with a phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC), two-phase partitioning and 125I-streptavidin labelling of the proteins resolved by PAGE, six major polypeptides (molecular masses 110, 85, 70, 55, 38 and 35 kDa) were shown to be anchored in bile canalicular membrane vesicles by a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (G-PI) 'tail'. 2. Permeabilized 'early' and 'late' endocytic vesicles isolated from liver were also examined. Two polypeptides (110 and 35 kDa) were shown to be anchored by a G-PI tail in 'late' endocytic vesicles. 3. Analysis of marker enzymes in bile-canalicular vesicles treated with PI-PLC showed that 5'-nucleotidase and alkaline phosphatase, but not leucine aminopeptidase and ecto-Ca2(+)-ATPase activities were released from the membrane. A low release and recovery of alkaline phosphodiesterase activity was noted. The cleavage from the membrane of 5'-nucleotidase as a 70 kDa polypeptide was confirmed by Western blotting using an antibody to this enzyme. 4. Antibodies raised to proteins released from bile-canalicular vesicles by PI-PLC treatment, and purified by partitioning in aqueous and Triton X-114 phases, localized to the bile canaliculi in thin liver sections. Antibodies to proteins not hydrolysed by this treatment stained by immunofluorescence the sinusoidal and canalicular surface regions of hepatocytes. 5. Antibodies generated to proteins cleaved by PI-PLC treatment of canalicular vesicles were shown to identify, by Western blotting, a major 110 kDa polypeptide in these vesicles. Two polypeptides (55 and 38 kDa) were detected in MDCK and HepG-2 cultured cells. 6. Since two of the six G-PI-anchored proteins targeted to the bile-canalicular plasma membrane were also detected in 'late' endocytic vesicles, the

  9. [Display cellulolytic enzymes on Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell surface by using Flo1p as an anchor protein for cellulosic ethanol production].

    PubMed

    Mo, Chunling; Yang, Yueyue; Chen, Ning; Yang, Xiushan; Tian, Shen

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we constructed a yeast consortium surface-display expression system by using Flo1 as an anchor protein. Endoglucanase II (EGII) and cellobiohydrolase II (CBHII) from Trichoderma reesei, and β3-glucosidase 1 (BGLI) from Aspergillus aculeatus were immobilized on Saccharomyces cerevisiae Y5. We constructed the cellulose-displaying expression yeast consortium (Y5/fEGII:Y5/fCBHII:Y5/fBGLI = 1:1:1) and investigated the enzymatic ability and ethanol fermentation. The displayed cellulolytic enzymes was stabile during the 96-h fermentation. The yeast consortium produced 0.77 g/L ethanol from 10 g/L phosphoric acid swollen cellulose (PASC) within 96 h. The yield (in grams of ethanol produced per gram of carbohydrate consumed) was 0.35 g/g, which correspond to 68.6% of the theoretical yield.

  10. [Display cellulolytic enzymes on Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell surface by using Flo1p as an anchor protein for cellulosic ethanol production].

    PubMed

    Mo, Chunling; Yang, Yueyue; Chen, Ning; Yang, Xiushan; Tian, Shen

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we constructed a yeast consortium surface-display expression system by using Flo1 as an anchor protein. Endoglucanase II (EGII) and cellobiohydrolase II (CBHII) from Trichoderma reesei, and β3-glucosidase 1 (BGLI) from Aspergillus aculeatus were immobilized on Saccharomyces cerevisiae Y5. We constructed the cellulose-displaying expression yeast consortium (Y5/fEGII:Y5/fCBHII:Y5/fBGLI = 1:1:1) and investigated the enzymatic ability and ethanol fermentation. The displayed cellulolytic enzymes was stabile during the 96-h fermentation. The yeast consortium produced 0.77 g/L ethanol from 10 g/L phosphoric acid swollen cellulose (PASC) within 96 h. The yield (in grams of ethanol produced per gram of carbohydrate consumed) was 0.35 g/g, which correspond to 68.6% of the theoretical yield. PMID:25720155

  11. p18/LAMTOR1: a late endosome/lysosome-specific anchor protein for the mTORC1/MAPK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Nada, Shigeyuki; Mori, Shunsuke; Takahashi, Yusuke; Okada, Masato

    2014-01-01

    p18/LAMTOR1 is a membrane protein specifically localized to the surface of late endosomes/lysosomes that serves as an anchor for the "Ragulator" complex, which contains p14/LAMTOR2, MP1/LAMTOR3, HBXIP, and C7orf59. The Ragulator interacts with RagAB/CD GTPases and V-ATPase and plays crucial roles for activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) on the lysosomal surface. Activated mTORC1 orchestrates various cellular functions, for example, macromolecule biosynthesis, energy metabolism, autophagy, cell growth, responses to growth factors, and the trafficking and maturation of lysosomes. The Ragulator can also regulate a branch of the MAPK pathway by recruiting MEK1 to MP1/LAMTOR3. These findings suggest that p18/LAMTOR1 creates a core platform for intracellular signaling pathways that function via late endosomes/lysosomes.

  12. A phospholipid is the membrane-anchoring domain of a protein growth factor of molecular mass 34 kDa in placental trophoblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Roy-Choudhury, S; Mishra, V S; Low, M G; Das, M

    1988-01-01

    Recently we isolated a protein growth factor of 34 kDa from trophoblastic membranes of human placenta. A fraction (approximately equal to 50%) of the membrane-associated 34-kDa protein is peripherally associated--i.e., it can be released by high salt treatment. The remainder shows the characteristics of an integral membrane protein--i.e., its release requires detergent treatment. Here we report studies on the structural basis for membrane anchorage of the protein. Phospholipase C was found to release an immunoreactive 34-kDa polypeptide from intact isolated cytotrophoblasts. Studies with isolated trophoblastic membranes showed that phospholipase C specifically released the salt-resistant fraction of the 34-kDa polypeptide. The polypeptide released by phospholipase C showed the same electrophoretic mobility in NaDodSO4/PAGE as the polypeptide prior to phospholipase C treatment. The identity of the released protein with the 34-kDa growth factor has been established by both immunologic and receptor-binding assays. Other studies show that there is biosynthetic incorporation of [3H]myristate into the 34-kDa protein. The myristate label is labile to phospholipase C treatment. These results suggest that some of the 34-kDa protein is anchored to the plasma membrane via a posttranslationally added phospholipid. This mode of anchorage has been observed for some other membrane proteins and raises interesting questions regarding the role of this novel linkage in the mitogenic function of the 34-kDa polypeptide. Images PMID:3162324

  13. Enhanced response of T lymphocytes from Pgap3 knockout mouse: Insight into roles of fatty acid remodeling of GPI anchored proteins.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Hidekazu; Wang, Yetao; Hasuwa, Hidetoshi; Maeda, Yusuke; Kinoshita, Taroh; Murakami, Yoshiko

    2012-01-27

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) is a complex glycolipid that serves as a membrane anchor for many cell-surface proteins, such as Thy-1 and CD48. GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) play important roles in many biological processes, such as signal transduction and cell-cell interaction, through their association with lipid rafts. Fatty acid remodeling of GPI-APs in the Golgi apparatus is required for their efficient association with lipid rafts, i.e., the unsaturated fatty acid at the sn-2 position of the PI moiety is exchanged for the saturated fatty acid by PGAP2 and PGAP3. To investigate the immunological role of the fatty acid remodeling of GPI-APs, we generated a Pgap3 knockout mouse. In this mouse, GPI-APs are expressed on the cell surface without fatty acid remodeling, and fail to associate with lipid rafts. Male Pgap3 knockout mice were born alive at a ratio lower than expected from Mendel's law, whereas the number of female mice followed Mendel's law. All mice exhibited growth retardation and abnormal reflexes such as limb grasping. We focused T cell function in these mice and found that T cell development in the absence of Pgap3 was normal. However, the response of T cells was enhanced in Pgap3 knockout mice in both in vitro and in vivo studies, including alloreactive response, antigen-specific immune response, and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Cross-linking of Thy-1 in wild-type cells inhibited the signal transduced by the T cell receptor (TCR), whereas cross-linking of Thy-1 in Pgap3 knockout cells enhanced the TCR signal. These results suggest that GPI-APs localized in lipid rafts may modulate signaling through the TCR.

  14. Apical sorting of lysoGPI-anchored proteins occurs independent of association with detergent-resistant membranes but dependent on their N-glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Castillon, Guillaume Alain; Michon, Laetitia; Watanabe, Reika

    2013-01-01

    Most glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) are located at the apical surface of epithelial cells. The apical delivery of GPI-APs is believed to result from their association with lipid rafts. We find that overexpression of C-terminally tagged PGAP3 caused predominant production of lysoGPI-APs, an intermediate precursor in the GPI lipid remodeling process in Madin–Darby canine kidney cells. In these cells, produced lysoGPI-APs are not incorporated into detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) but still are delivered apically, suggesting that GPI-AP association with DRMs is not necessary for apical targeting. In contrast, apical transport of both fully remodeled and lyso forms of GPI-APs is dependent on N-glycosylation, confirming a general role of N-glycans in apical protein transport. We also find that depletion of cholesterol causes apical-to-basolateral retargeting not only of fully remodeled GPI-APs, but also of lysoGPI-APs, as well as endogenous soluble and transmembrane proteins that would normally be targeted to the apical membrane. These findings confirm the essential role for cholesterol in the apical protein targeting and further demonstrate that the mechanism of cholesterol-dependent apical sorting is not related to DRM association of GPI-APs. PMID:23615438

  15. GhLTPG1, a cotton GPI-anchored lipid transfer protein, regulates the transport of phosphatidylinositol monophosphates and cotton fiber elongation

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Ting; Yao, Hongyan; Wang, Jin; Wang, Jun; Xue, Hongwei; Zuo, Kaijing

    2016-01-01

    The cotton fibers are seed trichomes that elongate from the ovule epidermis. Polar lipids are required for the quick enlargement of cell membrane and fiber cell growth, however, how lipids are transported from the ovules into the developing fibers remains less known. Here, we reported the functional characterization of GhLTPG1, a GPI-anchored lipid transport protein, during cotton fiber elongation. GhLTPG1 was abundantly expressed in elongating cotton fibers and outer integument of the ovules, and GhLTPG1 protein was located on cell membrane. Biochemical analysis showed that GhLTPG1 specifically bound to phosphatidylinositol mono-phosphates (PtdIns3P, PtdIns4P and PtdIns5P) in vitro and transported PtdInsPs from the synthesis places to the plasma membranes in vivo. Expression of GhLTPG1 in Arabidopsis caused an increased number of trichomes, and fibers in GhLTPG1-knockdown cotton plants exhibited significantly reduced length, decreased polar lipid content, and repression of fiber elongation-related genes expression. These results suggested that GhLTPG1 protein regulates the cotton fiber elongation through mediating the transport of phosphatidylinositol monophosphates. PMID:27311358

  16. In silicio identification of glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored plasma-membrane and cell wall proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Caro, L H; Tettelin, H; Vossen, J H; Ram, A F; van den Ende, H; Klis, F M

    1997-12-01

    Use of the Von Heijne algorithm allowed the identification of 686 open reading frames (ORFs) in the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that encode proteins with a potential N-terminal signal sequence for entering the secretory pathway. On further analysis, 51 of these proteins contain a potential glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-attachment signal. Seven additional ORFs were found to belong to this group. Upon examination of the possible GPI-attachment sites, it was found that in yeast the most probable amino acids for GPI-attachment as asparagine and glycine. In yeast, GPI-proteins are found at the cell surface, either attached to the plasma-membrane or as an intrinsic part of the cell wall. It was noted that plasma-membrane GPI-proteins possess a dibasic residue motif just before their predicted GPI-attachment site. Based on this, and on homologies between proteins, families of plasma-membrane and cell wall proteins were assigned, revealing 20 potential plasma-membrane and 38 potential cell wall proteins. For members of three plasma-membrane protein families, a function has been described. On the other hand, most of the cell wall proteins seem to be structural components of the wall, responsive to different growth conditions. The GPI-attachment site of yeast slightly differs from mammalian cells. This might be of use in the development of anti-fungal drugs.

  17. Roles of the protruding loop of factor B essential for the localization of lipoproteins (LolB) in the anchoring of bacterial triacylated proteins to the outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yumi; Tsurumizu, Ryoji; Tsukahara, Jun; Takeda, Kazuki; Narita, Shin-ichiro; Mori, Makiko; Miki, Kunio; Tokuda, Hajime

    2014-04-11

    The Lol system comprising five Lol proteins, LolA through LolE, sorts Escherichia coli lipoproteins to outer membranes. The LolCDE complex, an ATP binding cassette transporter in inner membranes, releases outer membrane-specific lipoproteins in an ATP-dependent manner, causing formation of the LolA-lipoprotein complex in the periplasm. LolA transports lipoproteins through the periplasm to LolB on outer membranes. LolB is itself a lipoprotein anchored to outer membranes, although the membrane anchor is functionally dispensable. LolB then localizes lipoproteins to outer membranes through largely unknown mechanisms. The crystal structure of LolB is similar to that of LolA, and it possesses a hydrophobic cavity that accommodates acyl chains of lipoproteins. To elucidate the molecular function of LolB, a periplasmic version of LolB, mLolB, was mutagenized at various conserved residues. Despite the lack of acyl chains, most defective mutants were insoluble. However, a derivative with glutamate in place of leucine 68 was soluble and unable to localize lipoproteins to outer membranes. This leucine is present in a loop protruding from mLolB into an aqueous environment, and no analogous loop is present in LolA. Thus, leucine 68 was replaced with other residues. Replacement by acidic, but not hydrophobic, residues generated for the first time mLolB derivatives that can accept but cannot localize lipoproteins to outer membranes. Moreover, deletion of the leucine with neighboring residues impaired the lipoprotein receptor activity. Based on these observations, the roles of the protruding loop of LolB in the last step of lipoprotein sorting are discussed. PMID:24569999

  18. The nuclear pore complex protein ALADIN is anchored via NDC1 but not via POM121 and GP210 in the nuclear envelope

    SciTech Connect

    Kind, Barbara; Koehler, Katrin; Lorenz, Mike; Huebner, Angela

    2009-12-11

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) consists of {approx}30 different proteins and provides the only sites for macromolecular transport between cytoplasm and nucleus. ALADIN was discovered as a new member of the NPC. Mutations in ALADIN are known to cause triple A syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by adrenal insufficiency, alacrima, and achalasia. The function and exact location of the nucleoporin ALADIN within the NPC multiprotein complex is still unclear. Using a siRNA-based approach we downregulated the three known membrane integrated nucleoporins NDC1, GP210, and POM121 in stably expressing GFP-ALADIN HeLa cells. We identified NDC1 but not GP210 and POM121 as the main anchor of ALADIN within the NPC. Solely the depletion of NDC1 caused mislocalization of ALADIN. Vice versa, the depletion of ALADIN led also to disappearance of NDC1 at the NPC. However, the downregulation of two further membrane-integral nucleoporins GP210 and POM121 had no effect on ALADIN localization. Furthermore, we could show a direct association of NDC1 and ALADIN in NPCs by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements. Based on our findings we conclude that ALADIN is anchored in the nuclear envelope via NDC1 and that this interaction gets lost, if ALADIN is mutated. The loss of integration of ALADIN in the NPC is a main pathogenetic aspect for the development of the triple A syndrome and suggests that the interaction between ALADIN and NDC1 may be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease.

  19. Identification of membrane dipeptidase as a major glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored protein of the pancreatic zymogen granule membrane, and evidence for its release by phospholipase A.

    PubMed

    Hooper, N M; Cook, S; Lainé, J; Lebel, D

    1997-05-15

    Membrane dipeptidase (EC 3.4.13.19) enzyme activity that is inhibited by cilastatin has been detected in pancreatic zymogen granule membranes of human, porcine and rat origin. Immunoelectrophoretic blot analysis of human and porcine pancreatic zymogen granule membranes with polyclonal antisera raised against the corresponding kidney membrane dipeptidase revealed that the enzyme is a disulphide-linked homodimer of subunit mass 61 kDa in the human and 45 kDa in the pig. Although membrane dipeptidase was, along with glycoprotein-2, one of the only two major components of carbonate high pH-washed membranes, no enzyme activity or immunoreactivity was detected in the zymogen granule contents. Digestion with bacterial phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC), and subsequent recognition by antibodies specific for the cross-reacting determinant, revealed that membrane dipeptidase in human and porcine pancreatic zymogen granule membranes is glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored. Membrane dipeptidase was released from the pancreatic zymogen granule membranes by an endogenous hydrolase, and the released form migrated as a disulphide-linked dimer on SDS/PAGE under non-reducing conditions. Under reducing conditions it migrated with the same apparent molecular mass as the membrane-bound form, and was still a substrate for bacterial PI-PLC. Treatment of kidney microvillar membranes with phospholipase A2 resulted in the release of membrane dipeptidase in a form that demonstrated electrophoretic and cilastatin-Sepharose binding properties identical to those of the endogenously released form of the enzyme from zymogen granule membranes. These results indicate that the glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol anchor on the pancreatic membrane dipeptidase is cleaved by an endogenous hydrolase, probably a phospholipase A, and that this cleavage may promote the release of the protein from the membrane.

  20. The Mr 140,000 Intermediate Chain of Chlamydomonas Flagellar Inner Arm Dynein Is a WD-Repeat Protein Implicated in Dynein Arm Anchoring

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Pinfen; Sale, Winfield S.

    1998-01-01

    Previous structural and biochemical studies have revealed that the inner arm dynein I1 is targeted and anchored to a unique site located proximal to the first radial spoke in each 96-nm axoneme repeat on flagellar doublet microtubules. To determine whether intermediate chains mediate the positioning and docking of dynein complexes, we cloned and characterized the 140-kDa intermediate chain (IC140) of the I1 complex. Sequence and secondary structural analysis, with particular emphasis on β-sheet organization, predicted that IC140 contains seven WD repeats. Reexamination of other members of the dynein intermediate chain family of WD proteins indicated that these polypeptides also bear seven WD/β-sheet repeats arranged in the same pattern along each intermediate chain protein. A polyclonal antibody was raised against a 53-kDa fusion protein derived from the C-terminal third of IC140. The antibody is highly specific for IC140 and does not bind to other dynein intermediate chains or proteins in Chlamydomonas flagella. Immunofluorescent microscopy of Chlamydomonas cells confirmed that IC140 is distributed along the length of both flagellar axonemes. In vitro reconstitution experiments demonstrated that the 53-kDa C-terminal fusion protein binds specifically to axonemes lacking the I1 complex. Chemical cross-linking indicated that IC140 is closely associated with a second intermediate chain in the I1 complex. These data suggest that IC140 contains domains responsible for the assembly and docking of the I1 complex to the doublet microtubule cargo. PMID:9843573

  1. Identification of high density lipoprotein-binding proteins, including a glycosyl phosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane dipeptidase, in rat lung and type II pneumocytes.

    PubMed

    Witt, W; Kolleck, I; Rüstow, B

    2000-06-01

    Numerous communications have indicated that specific binding proteins for high density lipoprotein (HDL) exist in addition to the well characterized candidate HDL receptor SR-BI, but structural information was presented only in a few cases, and most of the work was aimed at the liver and steroidogenic glands. In this study, we purified two HDL-binding proteins by standard procedures from rat lung tissue. One of these membrane glycoproteins was identified by N-terminal sequencing and with specific antibodies as HB2, a previously described HDL-binding protein, whereas the other one was identified as a glycosyl phosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane dipeptidase (MDP). The apparent dissociation constant of the HDL binding was determined by solid phase assay to be 2.1 microg/ml (HB2) and 25 microg/ml (MDP). MDP also exerts affinity to low density lipoprotein (LDL) on ligand blots, and competition between HDL and LDL was observed, but analysis by solid phase assay showed that very high concentrations of LDL are required. The physiologic relevance of this effect is therefore questionable. The level in type II pneumocyte membranes of both binding proteins, MDP and HB2, increased when the plasma lipoprotein concentration was reduced by treatment of rats with 4-aminopyrazolo[3,4-d]-pyrimidine, consistent with a function to facilitate lipid uptake in vivo. The binding proteins were also dramatically upregulated by feeding rats a vitamin E-depleted diet. Vitamin E uptake requires interaction between HDL and type II cells, suggesting a role of HB2 and MDP also in this process.

  2. Interaction of modified tail-anchored proteins with liposomes: effect of extensions of hydrophilic segment at the COOH-terminus of holo-cytochromes b₅.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Yoichi; Miura, Masahiro; Takeuchi, Fusako; Park, Sam-Yong; Tsubaki, Motonari

    2012-03-01

    A group of membrane proteins having a single COOH-terminal hydrophobic domain capable of post-translational insertion into lipid bilayer is known as tail-anchored (TA) proteins. To clarify the insertion mechanism of the TA-domain of human cytochrome b(5) (Hcytb5) into ER membranes, we produced and purified various membrane-bound forms of Hcytb5 with their heme b-bound, in which various truncated forms of NH(2)-terminal bovine opsin sequence were appended at the COOH-terminus of the native form. We analyzed the integration of the TA-domains of these forms onto protein-free liposomes. The integration occurred efficiently even in the presence of a small amount of sodium cholate and, once incorporated, such proteoliposomes were very stable. The mode of the integration was further analyzed by treatment of the proteoliposomes with trypsin either on the extravesicular side or on the luminal side. LC-MS analyses of the trypsin digests obtained from the proteoliposomes indicated that most of the C-terminal hydrophilic segment of the native Hcytb5 were exposed towards the lumen of the vesicles and, further, a significant part of the population of the extended C-terminal hydrophilic segments of the modified Hcytb5 were exposed in the lumen as well, suggesting efficient translocation ability of the TA-domain without any assistance from other protein factors. Present results opened a route for the use of the C-terminal TA-domain as a convenient tool for the transport of proteins as well as short peptides into artificial liposomes.

  3. Design and optimization of a phosphopeptide anchor for specific immobilization of a capture protein on zirconium phosphonate modified supports.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Queffélec, Clémence; Charlier, Cathy; Defontaine, Alain; Fateh, Amina; Tellier, Charles; Talham, Daniel R; Bujoli, Bruno

    2014-11-25

    The attachment of affinity proteins onto zirconium phosphonate coated glass slides was investigated by fusing a short phosphorylated peptide sequence at one extremity to enable selective bonding to the active surface via the formation of zirconium phosphate coordinate covalent bonds. In a model study, the binding of short peptides containing zero to four phosphorylated serine units and a biotin end-group was assessed by surface plasmon resonance-enhanced ellipsometry (SPREE) as well as in a microarray format using fluorescence detection of AlexaFluor 647-labeled streptavidin. Significant binding to the zirconated surface was only observed in the case of the phosphopeptides, with the best performance, as judged by streptavidin capture, observed for peptides with three or four phosphorylation sites and when spotted at pH 3. When fusing similar phosphopeptide tags to the affinity protein, the presence of four phosphate groups in the tag allows efficient immobilization of the proteins and efficient capture of their target.

  4. Quantitative determination of the lateral density and intermolecular correlation between proteins anchored on the membrane surfaces using grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering and grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abuillan, Wasim; Vorobiev, Alexei; Hartel, Andreas; Jones, Nicola G.; Engstler, Markus; Tanaka, Motomu

    2012-11-01

    As a physical model of the surface of cells coated with densely packed, non-crystalline proteins coupled to lipid anchors, we functionalized the surface of phospholipid membranes by coupling of neutravidin to biotinylated lipid anchors. After the characterization of fine structures perpendicular to the plane of membrane using specular X-ray reflectivity, the same membrane was characterized by grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). Within the framework of distorted wave Born approximation and two-dimensional Percus-Yevick function, we can analyze the form and structure factors of the non-crystalline, membrane-anchored proteins for the first time. As a new experimental technique to quantify the surface density of proteins on the membrane surface, we utilized grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence (GIXF). Here, the mean intermolecular distance between proteins from the sulfur peak intensities can be calculated by applying Abelé's matrix formalism. The characteristic correlation distance between non-crystalline neutravidin obtained by the GISAXS analysis agrees well with the intermolecular distance calculated by GIXF, suggesting a large potential of the combination of GISAXS and GIXF in probing the lateral density and correlation of non-crystalline proteins displayed on the membrane surface.

  5. The SrkA Kinase Is Part of the SakA Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Interactome and Regulates Stress Responses and Development in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Jaimes-Arroyo, Rafael; Lara-Rojas, Fernando; Bayram, Özgür; Valerius, Oliver; Braus, Gerhard H.

    2015-01-01

    Fungi and many other eukaryotes use specialized mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) of the Hog1/p38 family to transduce environmental stress signals. In Aspergillus nidulans, the MAPK SakA and the transcription factor AtfA are components of a central multiple stress-signaling pathway that also regulates development. Here we characterize SrkA, a putative MAPK-activated protein kinase, as a novel component of this pathway. ΔsrkA and ΔsakA mutants share a derepressed sexual development phenotype. However, ΔsrkA mutants are not sensitive to oxidative stress, and in fact, srkA inactivation partially suppresses the sensitivity of ΔsakA mutant conidia to H2O2, tert-butyl-hydroperoxide (t-BOOH), and menadione. In the absence of stress, SrkA shows physical interaction with nonphosphorylated SakA in the cytosol. We show that H2O2 induces a drastic change in mitochondrial morphology consistent with a fission process and the relocalization of SrkA to nuclei and mitochondria, depending on the presence of SakA. SakA-SrkA nuclear interaction is also observed during normal asexual development in dormant spores. Using SakA and SrkA S-tag pulldown and purification studies coupled to mass spectrometry, we found that SakA interacts with SrkA, the stress MAPK MpkC, the PPT1-type phosphatase AN6892, and other proteins involved in cell cycle regulation, DNA damage response, mRNA stability and protein synthesis, mitochondrial function, and other stress-related responses. We propose that oxidative stress induces DNA damage and mitochondrial fission and that SakA and SrkA mediate cell cycle arrest and regulate mitochondrial function during stress. Our results provide new insights into the mechanisms by which SakA and SrkA regulate the remodelling of cell physiology during oxidative stress and development. PMID:25820520

  6. High-dose exposure to systemic phosmet insecticide modifies the phosphatidylinositol anchor on the prion protein: the origins of new variant transmissible spongiform encephalopathies?

    PubMed

    Purdey, M

    1998-02-01

    Compulsory exposure of the UK bovine to exclusively high biannual doses of a 'systemic' pour-on formulation of an organo-phthalimido-phosphorus warblecide, phosmet, during the 1980s (combined with exposure to the lipid-bound residues of 'bioconcentrated' phosmet recycled back via the intensive feeding of meat and bone meal), initiated the 'new strain' modification of the CNS prion protein (PrP) causing the UK's bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) epidemic. A lipophilic solution of phosmet was poured along the bovine's spinal column, whence it penetrated and concentrated in phospholipids of the CNS membranes, covalently modifying endogenous phosphorylation sites on phosphatidylinositols (PIs) etc., forming a 'toxic membrane bank' of abnormally modified lipids that 'infect' any membrane proteins (such as PrP) that are programmed to conjugate onto them for anchorage to the membrane. Thus, phosmet invokes a primary covalent modification on PrP's PI anchor which, in turn, invokes an overall diverse disturbance upon CNS phosphoinositide second messenger feed back cycle, calcium homeostasis and essential free radicals; thus initiating a self-perpetuating cascade of abnormally phosphorylated PI-PrP that invokes a secondary electrostatic and allosteric disturbance on the main body of PrP impairing tertiary folding. Chaperone stress proteins conjugate onto misfolded PrP blocking its sites of proteolytic cleavage. Fresh epidemiological evidence is presented and experimental evidence referenced that adds support to a multifactorial hypothesis which proposes that BSE is a hitherto unrecognized and previously unmanifested class of subtle chronic phosmet-induced delayed neuro-excitotoxicity in the susceptible bovine.

  7. Construction of membrane-anchoring fusion protein of Thermococcus kodakaraensis glycerol kinase and its application to repetitive batchwise reactions.

    PubMed

    Restiawaty, Elvi; Honda, Kohsuke; Okano, Kenji; Hirota, Ryuichi; Omasa, Takeshi; Kuroda, Akio; Ohtake, Hisao

    2012-04-01

    We previously demonstrated the stoichiometric conversion of glycerol to glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) using Escherichia coli recombinants producing the ATP-dependent glycerol kinase of the hyperthermophile Thermococcus kodakaraensis (TkGK) and the polyphosphate kinase of Thermus thermophilus HB27 (TtPPK). TtPPK was associated with the membrane fraction of E. coli recombinants, whereas TkGK was released from the cells during the reaction at 70°C. In this study, TkGK was fused with either TtPPK or an E. coli membrane-intrinsic protein, YedZ, to minimize the heat-induced leakage of TkGK. When the E. coli recombinants having these fusion proteins were incubated at 70°C for 2h, more than 80% of TkGK activity was retained in the heated E. coli cells. However, the yields of G3P production by E. coli having the fusion proteins of TtPPK and TkGK were only less than 35%. Polyphosphate is a strong chelator for metal ions and has an inhibitory effect on TkGK which requires magnesium. Insufficient space between TtPPK and TkGK might enhance the inhibitory effect of polyphosphate on TkGK activity of the fusion protein. The mixture of E. coli cells having TtPPK and those having TkGK fused with YedZ converted 80% of glycerol into G3P. These recombinant cells could be easily recovered from the reaction mixture by centrifugation and repeatedly used without a significant loss of enzyme activities.

  8. A role for the CaM Kinase II related anchoring protein (αkap) in maintaining the stability of nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mouslim, Chakib; Aittaleb, Mohamed; Hume, Richard I.; Akaaboune, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    αkap, a muscle specific anchoring protein encoded within the Camk2a gene is thought to play a role in targeting multiple calcium/calmodulin kinase II isoforms to specific subcellular locations. Here we demonstrate a novel function of αkap in stabilizing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChR). Knockdown of αkap expression with shRNA significantly enhanced the degradation of AChR α-subunits (AChRα), leading to fewer and smaller AChR clusters on the surface of differentiated C2C12 myotubes. Mutagenesis and biochemical studies in HEK293T cells revealed that αkap promoted AChRα stability by a ubiquitin-dependent mechanism. In the absence of αkap, AChRα was heavily ubiquitinated and the number of AChRα was increased by proteasome inhibitors. However, in the presence of αkap, AChRα was less ubiquitinated and proteasome inhibitors had almost no effect on AChRα accumulation. The major sites of AChRα ubiquitination reside within the large intracellular loop and mutations of critical lysine residues in this loop to arginine increased AChRα stability in the absence of αkap. These results provide an unexpected mechanism by which αkap controls receptor trafficking onto the surface of muscle cells, and thus the maintenance of postsynaptic receptor density and synaptic function. PMID:22496563

  9. Identification of Proteins Associating with Glycosylphosphatidylinositol- Anchored T-Cadherin on the Surface of Vascular Endothelial Cells: Role for Grp78/BiP in T-Cadherin-Dependent Cell Survival▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Philippova, Maria; Ivanov, Danila; Joshi, Manjunath B.; Kyriakakis, Emmanouil; Rupp, Katharina; Afonyushkin, Taras; Bochkov, Valery; Erne, Paul; Resink, Therese J.

    2008-01-01

    There is scant knowledge regarding how cell surface lipid-anchored T-cadherin (T-cad) transmits signals through the plasma membrane to its intracellular targets. This study aimed to identify membrane proteins colocalizing with atypical glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored T-cad on the surface of endothelial cells and to evaluate their role as signaling adaptors for T-cad. Application of coimmunoprecipitation from endothelial cells expressing c-myc-tagged T-cad and high-performance liquid chromatography revealed putative association of T-cad with the following proteins: glucose-related protein GRP78, GABA-A receptor α1 subunit, integrin β3, and two hypothetical proteins, LOC124245 and FLJ32070. Association of Grp78 and integrin β3 with T-cad on the cell surface was confirmed by surface biotinylation and reciprocal immunoprecipitation and by confocal microscopy. Use of anti-Grp78 blocking antibodies, Grp78 small interfering RNA, and coexpression of constitutively active Akt demonstrated an essential role for surface Grp78 in T-cad-dependent survival signal transduction via Akt in endothelial cells. The findings herein are relevant in the context of both the identification of transmembrane signaling partners for GPI-anchored T-cad as well as the demonstration of a novel mechanism whereby Grp78 can influence endothelial cell survival as a cell surface signaling receptor rather than an intracellular chaperone. PMID:18411300

  10. Anchors for Education Reforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alok, Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Education reforms, considering their significance, deserve better methods than mere "trial and error." This article conceptualizes a network of six anchors for education reforms: education policy, education system, curriculum, pedagogy, assessment, and teacher education. It establishes the futility to reform anchors in isolation and anticipates…

  11. HIV-1-Tat Protein Inhibits SC35-mediated Tau Exon 10 Inclusion through Up-regulation of DYRK1A Kinase.

    PubMed

    Kadri, Ferdous; Pacifici, Marco; Wilk, Anna; Parker-Struckhoff, Amanda; Del Valle, Luis; Hauser, Kurt F; Knapp, Pamela E; Parsons, Christopher; Jeansonne, Duane; Lassak, Adam; Peruzzi, Francesca

    2015-12-25

    The HIV-1 transactivator protein Tat is implicated in the neuronal damage that contributes to neurocognitive impairment affecting people living with HIV/AIDS. Aberrant splicing of TAU exon 10 results in tauopathies characterized by alterations in the proportion of TAU isoforms containing three (3R) or four (4R) microtubule-binding repeats. The splicing factor SC35/SRSF2 binds to nuclear RNA and facilitates the incorporation of exon 10 in the TAU molecule. Here, we utilized clinical samples, an animal model, and neuronal cell cultures and found that Tat promotes TAU 3R up-regulation through increased levels of phosphorylated SC35, which is retained in nuclear speckles. This mechanism involved Tat-mediated increased expression of DYRK1A and was prevented by DYRK1A silencing. In addition, we found that Tat associates with TAU RNA, further demonstrating that Tat interferes with host RNA metabolism in the absence of viral infection. Altogether, our data unravel a novel mechanism of Tat-mediated neuronal toxicity through dysregulation of the SC35-dependent alternative splicing of TAU exon 10. Furthermore, the increased immunostaining of DYRK1A in HIV+ brains without pathology points at dysregulation of DYRK1A as an early event in the neuronal complications of HIV infection. PMID:26534959

  12. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Issatchenkia orientalis GPI-Anchored Protein, IoGas1, Required for Resistance to Low pH and Salt Stress

    PubMed Central

    Matsushika, Akinori; Negi, Kanako; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Goshima, Tetsuya; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2016-01-01

    The use of yeasts tolerant to acid (low pH) and salt stress is of industrial importance for several bioproduction processes. To identify new candidate genes having potential roles in low-pH tolerance, we screened an expression genomic DNA library of a multiple-stress-tolerant yeast, Issatchenkia orientalis (Pichia kudriavzevii), for clones that allowed Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells to grow under highly acidic conditions (pH 2.0). A genomic DNA clone containing two putative open reading frames was obtained, of which the putative protein-coding gene comprising 1629 bp was retransformed into the host. This transformant grew significantly at pH 2.0, and at pH 2.5 in the presence of 7.5% Na2SO4. The predicted amino acid sequence of this new gene, named I. orientalis GAS1 (IoGAS1), was 60% identical to the S. cerevisiae Gas1 protein, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein essential for maintaining cell wall integrity, and 58–59% identical to Candida albicans Phr1 and Phr2, pH-responsive proteins implicated in cell wall assembly and virulence. Northern hybridization analyses indicated that, as for the C. albicans homologs, IoGAS1 expression was pH-dependent, with expression increasing with decreasing pH (from 4.0 to 2.0) of the medium. These results suggest that IoGAS1 represents a novel pH-regulated system required for the adaptation of I. orientalis to environments of diverse pH. Heterologous expression of IoGAS1 complemented the growth and morphological defects of a S. cerevisiae gas1Δ mutant, demonstrating that IoGAS1 and the corresponding S. cerevisiae gene play similar roles in cell wall biosynthesis. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments revealed that two conserved glutamate residues (E161 and E262) in the IoGas1 protein play a crucial role in yeast morphogenesis and tolerance to low pH and salt stress. Furthermore, overexpression of IoGAS1 in S. cerevisiae remarkably improved the ethanol fermentation ability at pH 2.5, and at pH 2.0 in the presence of

  13. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Issatchenkia orientalis GPI-Anchored Protein, IoGas1, Required for Resistance to Low pH and Salt Stress.

    PubMed

    Matsushika, Akinori; Negi, Kanako; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Goshima, Tetsuya; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2016-01-01

    The use of yeasts tolerant to acid (low pH) and salt stress is of industrial importance for several bioproduction processes. To identify new candidate genes having potential roles in low-pH tolerance, we screened an expression genomic DNA library of a multiple-stress-tolerant yeast, Issatchenkia orientalis (Pichia kudriavzevii), for clones that allowed Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells to grow under highly acidic conditions (pH 2.0). A genomic DNA clone containing two putative open reading frames was obtained, of which the putative protein-coding gene comprising 1629 bp was retransformed into the host. This transformant grew significantly at pH 2.0, and at pH 2.5 in the presence of 7.5% Na2SO4. The predicted amino acid sequence of this new gene, named I. orientalis GAS1 (IoGAS1), was 60% identical to the S. cerevisiae Gas1 protein, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein essential for maintaining cell wall integrity, and 58-59% identical to Candida albicans Phr1 and Phr2, pH-responsive proteins implicated in cell wall assembly and virulence. Northern hybridization analyses indicated that, as for the C. albicans homologs, IoGAS1 expression was pH-dependent, with expression increasing with decreasing pH (from 4.0 to 2.0) of the medium. These results suggest that IoGAS1 represents a novel pH-regulated system required for the adaptation of I. orientalis to environments of diverse pH. Heterologous expression of IoGAS1 complemented the growth and morphological defects of a S. cerevisiae gas1Δ mutant, demonstrating that IoGAS1 and the corresponding S. cerevisiae gene play similar roles in cell wall biosynthesis. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments revealed that two conserved glutamate residues (E161 and E262) in the IoGas1 protein play a crucial role in yeast morphogenesis and tolerance to low pH and salt stress. Furthermore, overexpression of IoGAS1 in S. cerevisiae remarkably improved the ethanol fermentation ability at pH 2.5, and at pH 2.0 in the presence of

  14. Salmonella Effectors SseF and SseG Interact with Mammalian Protein ACBD3 (GCP60) To Anchor Salmonella-Containing Vacuoles at the Golgi Network

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiu-Jun; Liu, Mei

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Following infection of mammalian cells, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) replicates within membrane-bound compartments known as Salmonella-containing vacuoles (SCVs). The Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 type III secretion system (SPI-2 T3SS) translocates approximately 30 different effectors across the vacuolar membrane. SseF and SseG are two such effectors that are required for SCVs to localize close to the Golgi network in infected epithelial cells. In a yeast two-hybrid assay, SseG and an N-terminal variant of SseF interacted directly with mammalian ACBD3, a multifunctional cytosolic Golgi network-associated protein. Knockdown of ACBD3 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) reduced epithelial cell Golgi network association of wild-type bacteria, phenocopying the effect of null mutations of sseG or sseF. Binding of SseF to ACBD3 in infected cells required the presence of SseG. A single-amino-acid mutant of SseG and a double-amino-acid mutant of SseF were obtained that did not interact with ACBD3 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. When either of these was produced together with the corresponding wild-type effector by Salmonella in infected cells, they enabled SCV-Golgi network association and interacted with ACBD3. However, these properties were lost and bacteria displayed an intracellular replication defect when cells were infected with Salmonella carrying both mutant genes. Knockdown of ACBD3 resulted in a replication defect of wild-type bacteria but did not further attenuate the growth defect of a ΔsseFG mutant strain. We propose a model in which interaction between SseF and SseG enables both proteins to bind ACBD3, thereby anchoring SCVs at the Golgi network and facilitating bacterial replication. PMID:27406559

  15. A kinase inhibitor screen reveals protein kinase C-dependent endocytic recycling of ErbB2 in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Tameka A; Luan, Haitao; Tom, Eric; Bielecki, Timothy Alan; Mohapatra, Bhopal; Ahmad, Gulzar; George, Manju; Kelly, David L; Natarajan, Amarnath; Raja, Srikumar M; Band, Vimla; Band, Hamid

    2014-10-31

    ErbB2 overexpression drives oncogenesis in 20-30% cases of breast cancer. Oncogenic potential of ErbB2 is linked to inefficient endocytic traffic into lysosomes and preferential recycling. However, regulation of ErbB2 recycling is incompletely understood. We used a high-content immunofluorescence imaging-based kinase inhibitor screen on SKBR-3 breast cancer cells to identify kinases whose inhibition alters the clearance of cell surface ErbB2 induced by Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG. Less ErbB2 clearance was observed with broad-spectrum PKC inhibitor Ro 31-8220. A similar effect was observed with Go 6976, a selective inhibitor of classical Ca(2+)-dependent PKCs (α, β1, βII, and γ). PKC activation by PMA promoted surface ErbB2 clearance but without degradation, and ErbB2 was observed to move into a juxtanuclear compartment where it colocalized with PKC-α and PKC-δ together with the endocytic recycling regulator Arf6. PKC-α knockdown impaired the juxtanuclear localization of ErbB2. ErbB2 transit to the recycling compartment was also impaired upon PKC-δ knockdown. PMA-induced Erk phosphorylation was reduced by ErbB2 inhibitor lapatinib, as well as by knockdown of PKC-δ but not that of PKC-α. Our results suggest that activation of PKC-α and -δ mediates a novel positive feedback loop by promoting ErbB2 entry into the endocytic recycling compartment, consistent with reported positive roles for these PKCs in ErbB2-mediated tumorigenesis. As the endocytic recycling compartment/pericentrion has emerged as a PKC-dependent signaling hub for G-protein-coupled receptors, our findings raise the possibility that oncogenesis by ErbB2 involves previously unexplored PKC-dependent endosomal signaling.

  16. Molecular dynamics of Aurora-A kinase in living mitotic cells simultaneously visualized with histone H3 and nuclear membrane protein importinalpha.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Kenji; Urano, Takeshi; Zushi, Hitomi; Inoue, Kimiko; Tasaka, Hiroaki; Tachibana, Makoto; Dotsu, Masaya

    2002-12-01

    Aurora-A is known to be a mitotic kinase required for spindle assembly. We constructed a human stable cell-line in which Aurora-A, histone H3 and importinalpha were differentially expressed as fusions to green, cyan, and red fluorescent proteins (GFP, CFP and DsRed). In interphase cells, GFP-Aurora-A was localized in the centrosome. Its molecular behavior in living mitotic cells was extensively analyzed by an advanced timelapse image analyzing system. In G2 phase, duplicated centrosomal dots of Aurora-A separated and moved to the opposite poles, a process requiring 18 min. In prophase, the Aurora-A dots approached closer and the nuclear membrane of DsRed-importinalpha beneath them became thick and invaginated, resulting in a "dumb-bell" shaped nucleus with condensed chromatin. As the importinalpha membrane further shrank and disappeared, the condensed chromatin was excluded from the nucleus and the Aurora-A dots grew rapidly into a spindle-like structure. Congression of mitotic chromosomes continued for 20-50 min until they were properly aligned at the spindle equator and then the sister chromatids started to segregate, taking 4-6 min for them to reach the poles. An importinalpha membrane reappeared around the surface of chromatin 10 min after anaphase onset. Aurora-A gradually decreased in size in telophase and returned to the surface of the newly formed small sister nuclei. These observations showed that the morphological change of Aurora-A was cooperated with the breakdown and reformation of nuclear membrane. Immunostaining with anti-alpha or gamma-tubulin further indicated that Aurora-A was involved in the formation of mitotic spindle in metaphase as well as the subsequent chromosome movement in anaphase.

  17. Effects of hyperinsulinemia on lipoprotein lipase, angiopoietin-like protein 4, and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high-density lipoprotein binding protein 1 in subjects with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ruge, Toralph; Sukonina, Valentina; Kroupa, Olessia; Makoveichuk, Elena; Lundgren, Magdalena; Svensson, Maria K; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Eriksson, Jan W

    2012-05-01

    Our aims were to compare the systemic effects of insulin on lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in tissues from subjects with different degrees of insulin sensitivity. The effects of insulin on LPL during a 4-hour hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp were studied in skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and postheparin plasma from young healthy subjects (YS), older subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DS), and older control subjects (CS). In addition, we studied the effects of insulin on the expression of 2 recently recognized candidate genes for control of LPL activity: angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high-density lipoprotein binding protein 1. As an effect of insulin, LPL activity decreased by 20% to 25% in postheparin plasma and increased by 20% to 30% in adipose tissue in all groups. In YS, the levels of ANGPTL4 messenger RNA in adipose tissue decreased 3-fold during the clamp. In contrast, there was no significant change in DS or CS. Regression analysis showed that the ability of insulin to reduce the expression of ANGPTL4 was positively correlated with M-values and inversely correlated with factors linked to the metabolic syndrome. Expression of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high-density lipoprotein binding protein 1 tended to be higher in YS than in DS or CS, but the expression was not affected by insulin in any of the groups. Our data imply that the insulin-mediated regulation of LPL is not directly linked to the control of glucose turnover by insulin or to ANGPTL4 expression in adipose tissue or plasma. Interestingly, the response of ANGPTL4 expression in adipose tissue to insulin was severely blunted in both DS and CS. PMID:22078753

  18. Therapeutic strategies for anchored kinases and phosphatases: exploiting short linear motifs and intrinsic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Nygren, Patrick J.; Scott, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorylation events that occur in response to the second messenger cAMP are controlled spatially and temporally by protein kinase A (PKA) interacting with A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). Recent advances in understanding the structural basis for this interaction have reinforced the hypothesis that AKAPs create spatially constrained signaling microdomains. This has led to the realization that the PKA/AKAP interface is a potential drug target for modulating a plethora of cell-signaling events. Pharmacological disruption of kinase–AKAP interactions has previously been explored for disease treatment and remains an interesting area of research. However, disrupting or enhancing the association of phosphatases with AKAPs is a therapeutic concept of equal promise, particularly since they oppose the actions of many anchored kinases. Accordingly, numerous AKAPs bind phosphatases such as protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), calcineurin (PP2B), and PP2A. These multimodal signaling hubs are equally able to control the addition of phosphate groups onto target substrates, as well as the removal of these phosphate groups. In this review, we describe recent advances in structural analysis of kinase and phosphatase interactions with AKAPs, and suggest future possibilities for targeting these interactions for therapeutic benefit. PMID:26283967

  19. Freely turning over palmitate in erythrocyte membrane proteins is not responsible for the anchoring of lipid rafts to the spectrin skeleton: a study with bio-orthogonal chemical probes.

    PubMed

    Ciana, Annarita; Achilli, Cesare; Hannoush, Rami N; Risso, Angela; Balduini, Cesare; Minetti, Giampaolo

    2013-03-01

    Erythrocyte lipid rafts are anchored to the underlying spectrin membrane skeleton [A. Ciana, C. Achilli, C. Balduini, G. Minetti, On the association of lipid rafts to the spectrin skeleton in human erythrocytes, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1808 (2011) 183-190]. The nature of this linkage and the molecules involved are poorly understood. The interaction is sensitive to the increase in pH and ionic strength induced by carbonate. Given the role of palmitoylation in modulating the partitioning of certain proteins between various sub-cellular compartments and the plasma membrane, we asked whether palmitoylation of p55, a peripheral protein located at the junctional complex between spectrin-actin-protein 4.1 that anchors the membrane skeleton to the lipid bilayer via the transmembrane protein glycophorin C, could contribute to the anchoring of lipid rafts to the membrane skeleton. We adopted a new, non-radioactive method for studying protein palmitoylation, based on bio-orthogonal chemical analogues of fatty acids, containing an omega-alkynyl group, to metabolically label cell proteins, which are then revealed by a "click chemistry" reaction of the alkynyl moiety with an azide-containing reporter tag. We show that the membrane localization and palmitoylation levels of p55 did not change after carbonate treatment. 2-bromopalmitate and cerulenin, two known palmitoylation inhibitors, completely inhibited p55 palmitoylation, and protein palmitoyl thioesterase-1 (PPT1) reduced it, without affecting the association between lipid rafts and membrane-skeleton, indicating, on the one hand, that p55 palmitoylation is enzymatic, and, on the other, that it is not involved in the modulation of the linkage of lipid rafts to the membrane-skeleton.

  20. Pathogen and Circadian Controlled 1 (PCC1) Protein Is Anchored to the Plasma Membrane and Interacts with Subunit 5 of COP9 Signalosome in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Ricardo; León, José

    2014-01-01

    The Pathogen and Circadian Controlled 1 (PCC1) gene, previously identified and further characterized as involved in defense to pathogens and stress-induced flowering, codes for an 81-amino acid protein with a cysteine-rich C-terminal domain. This domain is essential for homodimerization and anchoring to the plasma membrane. Transgenic plants with the ß-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene under the control of 1.1 kb promoter sequence of PCC1 gene display a dual pattern of expression. At early post-germination, PCC1 is expressed only in the root vasculature and in the stomata guard cells of cotyledons. During the transition from vegetative to reproductive development, PCC1 is strongly expressed in the vascular tissue of petioles and basal part of the leaf, and it further spreads to the whole limb in fully expanded leaves. This developmental pattern of expression together with the late flowering phenotype of long-day grown RNA interference (iPCC1) plants with reduced PCC1 expression pointed to a regulatory role of PCC1 in the photoperiod-dependent flowering pathway. iPCC1 plants are defective in light perception and signaling but are not impaired in the function of the core CO-FT module of the photoperiod-dependent pathway. The regulatory effect exerted by PCC1 on the transition to flowering as well as on other reported phenotypes might be explained by a mechanism involving the interaction with the subunit 5 of the COP9 signalosome (CSN). PMID:24475254

  1. Bivalent Ligation of the Collagen-binding Modules of Fibronectin by SFS, a Non-anchored Bacterial Protein of Streptococcus equi*

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wenjiang; Ma, Hanqing; Fogerty, Frances J.; Mosher, Deane F.

    2015-01-01

    SFS is a non-anchored protein of Streptococcus equi subspecies equi that causes upper respiratory infection in horses. SFS has been shown to bind to fibronectin (FN) and block interaction of FN with type I collagen. We have characterized interactions of a recombinant 60-mer polypeptide, R1R2, with FN. R1R2 contains two copies of collagen-like 19-residue repeats. Experiments utilizing various FN fragments and epitope-mapped anti-FN monoclonal antibodies located the binding site to 8-9FNI modules of the gelatin-binding domain. Fluorescence polarization and competitive enzyme-linked assays demonstrated that R1R2 binds preferentially to compact dimeric FN rather than monomeric constructs containing 8-9FNI or a large dimeric FN construct that is constitutively in an extended conformation. In contrast to bacterial peptides that bind 2–5FNI in addition to 8-9FNI, R1R2 did not cause conformational extension of FN as assessed by a conformationally sensitive antibody. Equilibrium and stopped-flow binding assays and size exclusion chromatography were compatible with a two-step binding reaction in which each of the repeats of R1R2 interacts with one of the subunits of dimeric FN, resulting in a stable complex with a slow koff. In addition to not binding to type I collagen, the R1R2·FN complex incorporated less efficiently into extracellular matrix than free FN. Thus, R1R2 binds to FN utilizing features of compact soluble FN and in doing so interferes with the organization of the extracellular matrix. A similar bivalent binding strategy may underlie the collagen-FN interaction. PMID:25525266

  2. Solid-phase translation and RNA-protein fusion: a novel approach for folding quality control and direct immobilization of proteins using anchored mRNA.

    PubMed

    Biyani, Manish; Husimi, Yuzuru; Nemoto, Naoto

    2006-01-01

    A novel cell-free translation system is described in which template-mRNA molecules were captured onto solid surfaces to simultaneously synthesize and immobilize proteins in a more native-state form. This technology comprises a novel solid-phase approach to cell-free translation and RNA-protein fusion techniques. A newly constructed biotinylated linker-DNA which enables puromycin-assisted RNA-protein fusion is ligated to the 3' ends of the mRNA molecules to attach the mRNA-template on a streptavidin-coated surface and further to enable the subsequent reactions of translation and RNA-protein fusion on surface. The protein products are therefore directly immobilized onto solid surfaces and furthermore were discovered to adopt a more native state with proper protein folding and superior biological activity compared with conventional liquid-phase approaches. We further validate this approach via the production of immobilized green fluorescent protein (GFP) on microbeads and by the production and assay of aldehyde reductase (ALR) enzyme with 4-fold or more activity. The approach developed in this study may enable to embrace the concept of the transformation of 'RNA chip-to-protein chip' using a solid-phase cell-free translation system and thus to the development of high-throughput microarray platform in the field of functional genomics and in vitro evolution.

  3. Anchor Trial Launch

    Cancer.gov

    NCI has launched a multicenter phase III clinical trial called the ANCHOR Study -- Anal Cancer HSIL (High-grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesion) Outcomes Research Study -- to determine if treatment of HSIL in HIV-infected individuals can prevent anal canc

  4. Gpr161 anchoring of PKA consolidates GPCR and cAMP signaling.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Verena A; Mayrhofer, Johanna E; Ilouz, Ronit; Tschaikner, Philipp; Raffeiner, Philipp; Röck, Ruth; Courcelles, Mathieu; Apelt, Federico; Lu, Tsan-Wen; Baillie, George S; Thibault, Pierre; Aanstad, Pia; Stelzl, Ulrich; Taylor, Susan S; Stefan, Eduard

    2016-07-12

    Scaffolding proteins organize the information flow from activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to intracellular effector cascades both spatially and temporally. By this means, signaling scaffolds, such as A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs), compartmentalize kinase activity and ensure substrate selectivity. Using a phosphoproteomics approach we identified a physical and functional connection between protein kinase A (PKA) and Gpr161 (an orphan GPCR) signaling. We show that Gpr161 functions as a selective high-affinity AKAP for type I PKA regulatory subunits (RI). Using cell-based reporters to map protein-protein interactions, we discovered that RI binds directly and selectively to a hydrophobic protein-protein interaction interface in the cytoplasmic carboxyl-terminal tail of Gpr161. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that a binary complex between Gpr161 and RI promotes the compartmentalization of Gpr161 to the plasma membrane. Moreover, we show that Gpr161, functioning as an AKAP, recruits PKA RI to primary cilia in zebrafish embryos. We also show that Gpr161 is a target of PKA phosphorylation, and that mutation of the PKA phosphorylation site affects ciliary receptor localization. Thus, we propose that Gpr161 is itself an AKAP and that the cAMP-sensing Gpr161:PKA complex acts as cilium-compartmentalized signalosome, a concept that now needs to be considered in the analyzing, interpreting, and pharmaceutical targeting of PKA-associated functions.

  5. Anchoring of FRET Sensors—A Requirement for Spatiotemporal Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Elena V.; Figueroa, Ricardo A.; Gatsinzi, Tom; Hallberg, Einar; Iverfeldt, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    FRET biosensors have become a routine tool for investigating mechanisms and components of cell signaling. Strategies for improving them for particular applications are continuously sought. One important aspect to consider when designing FRET probes is the dynamic distribution and propagation of signals within living cells. We have addressed this issue by directly comparing an anchored (taFS) to a non-anchored (naFS) cleavable FRET sensor. We chose a microtubule-associated protein tau as an anchor, as microtubules are abundant throughout the cytosol of cells. We show that tau-anchored FRET sensors are concentrated at the cytoskeleton and enriched in the neurite-like processes of cells, providing high intensity of the total signal. In addition, anchoring limits the diffusion of the sensor, enabling spatiotemporally resolved monitoring of subcellular variations in enzyme activity. Thus, anchoring is an important aspect to consider when designing FRET sensors for deeper understanding of cell signaling. PMID:27196902

  6. The calmodulin-like proteins AtCML4 and AtCML5 are single-pass membrane proteins targeted to the endomembrane system by an N-terminal signal anchor sequence

    PubMed Central

    Ruge, Henning; Flosdorff, Sandra; Ebersberger, Ingo; Chigri, Fatima; Vothknecht, Ute C.

    2016-01-01

    Calmodulins (CaMs) are important mediators of Ca2+ signals that are found ubiquitously in all eukaryotic organisms. Plants contain a unique family of calmodulin-like proteins (CMLs) that exhibit greater sequence variance compared to canonical CaMs. The Arabidopsis thaliana proteins AtCML4 and AtCML5 are members of CML subfamily VII and possess a CaM domain comprising the characteristic double pair of EF-hands, but they are distinguished from other members of this subfamily and from canonical CaMs by an N-terminal extension of their amino acid sequence. Transient expression of yellow fluorescent protein-tagged AtCML4 and AtCML5 under a 35S-promoter in Nicotiana benthamiana leaf cells revealed a spherical fluorescence pattern. This pattern was confirmed by transient expression in Arabidopsis protoplasts under the native promoter. Co-localization analyses with various endomembrane marker proteins suggest that AtCML4 and AtCML5 are localized to vesicular structures in the interphase between Golgi and the endosomal system. Further studies revealed AtCML5 to be a single-pass membrane protein that is targeted into the endomembrane system by an N-terminal signal anchor sequence. Self-assembly green fluorescent protein and protease protection assays support a topology with the CaM domain exposed to the cytosolic surface and not the lumen of the vesicles, indicating that AtCML5 could sense Ca2+ signals in the cytosol. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that AtCML4 and AtCML5 are closely related paralogues originating from a duplication event within the Brassicaceae family. CML4/5-like proteins seem to be universally present in eudicots but are absent in some monocots. Together these results show that CML4/5-like proteins represent a flowering plant-specific subfamily of CMLs with a potential function in vesicle transport within the plant endomembrane system. PMID:27029353

  7. The calmodulin-like proteins AtCML4 and AtCML5 are single-pass membrane proteins targeted to the endomembrane system by an N-terminal signal anchor sequence.

    PubMed

    Ruge, Henning; Flosdorff, Sandra; Ebersberger, Ingo; Chigri, Fatima; Vothknecht, Ute C

    2016-06-01

    Calmodulins (CaMs) are important mediators of Ca(2+) signals that are found ubiquitously in all eukaryotic organisms. Plants contain a unique family of calmodulin-like proteins (CMLs) that exhibit greater sequence variance compared to canonical CaMs. The Arabidopsis thaliana proteins AtCML4 and AtCML5 are members of CML subfamily VII and possess a CaM domain comprising the characteristic double pair of EF-hands, but they are distinguished from other members of this subfamily and from canonical CaMs by an N-terminal extension of their amino acid sequence. Transient expression of yellow fluorescent protein-tagged AtCML4 and AtCML5 under a 35S-promoter in Nicotiana benthamiana leaf cells revealed a spherical fluorescence pattern. This pattern was confirmed by transient expression in Arabidopsis protoplasts under the native promoter. Co-localization analyses with various endomembrane marker proteins suggest that AtCML4 and AtCML5 are localized to vesicular structures in the interphase between Golgi and the endosomal system. Further studies revealed AtCML5 to be a single-pass membrane protein that is targeted into the endomembrane system by an N-terminal signal anchor sequence. Self-assembly green fluorescent protein and protease protection assays support a topology with the CaM domain exposed to the cytosolic surface and not the lumen of the vesicles, indicating that AtCML5 could sense Ca(2+) signals in the cytosol. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that AtCML4 and AtCML5 are closely related paralogues originating from a duplication event within the Brassicaceae family. CML4/5-like proteins seem to be universally present in eudicots but are absent in some monocots. Together these results show that CML4/5-like proteins represent a flowering plant-specific subfamily of CMLs with a potential function in vesicle transport within the plant endomembrane system. PMID:27029353

  8. Gpr161 anchoring of PKA consolidates GPCR and cAMP signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Verena A.; Mayrhofer, Johanna E.; Ilouz, Ronit; Tschaikner, Philipp; Raffeiner, Philipp; Röck, Ruth; Courcelles, Mathieu; Apelt, Federico; Lu, Tsan-Wen; Baillie, George S.; Thibault, Pierre; Aanstad, Pia; Stelzl, Ulrich; Taylor, Susan S.; Stefan, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    Scaffolding proteins organize the information flow from activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to intracellular effector cascades both spatially and temporally. By this means, signaling scaffolds, such as A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs), compartmentalize kinase activity and ensure substrate selectivity. Using a phosphoproteomics approach we identified a physical and functional connection between protein kinase A (PKA) and Gpr161 (an orphan GPCR) signaling. We show that Gpr161 functions as a selective high-affinity AKAP for type I PKA regulatory subunits (RI). Using cell-based reporters to map protein–protein interactions, we discovered that RI binds directly and selectively to a hydrophobic protein–protein interaction interface in the cytoplasmic carboxyl-terminal tail of Gpr161. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that a binary complex between Gpr161 and RI promotes the compartmentalization of Gpr161 to the plasma membrane. Moreover, we show that Gpr161, functioning as an AKAP, recruits PKA RI to primary cilia in zebrafish embryos. We also show that Gpr161 is a target of PKA phosphorylation, and that mutation of the PKA phosphorylation site affects ciliary receptor localization. Thus, we propose that Gpr161 is itself an AKAP and that the cAMP-sensing Gpr161:PKA complex acts as cilium-compartmentalized signalosome, a concept that now needs to be considered in the analyzing, interpreting, and pharmaceutical targeting of PKA-associated functions. PMID:27357676

  9. Subcellular post-transcriptional targeting: delivery of an intracellular protein to the extracellular leaflet of the plasma membrane using a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) membrane anchor in neurons and polarised epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Brown, O; Cowen, R L; Preston, C M; Castro, M G; Lowenstein, P R

    2000-11-01

    The effectiveness of viral vector-mediated gene transfer depends on the expression of therapeutic transgenes in the correct target cell types. So far, however, little attention has been given to targeted subcellular distribution of expressed transgenes. Targeting individual transgenes to particular subcellular compartments will provide various advantages in increasing the safety, efficacy, and specificity of viral vector-mediated gene delivery. Viruses normally hijack the cellular protein synthesis machinery for their own advantages. It is thus unknown whether cells infected with viral vectors will be able to target proteins to the correct subcellular organelles, or whether the subcellular targeting machinery would be selectively disrupted by viral infection. In this article we explored whether a herpes simplex virus type 1-derived vector could be used to deliver a transgene engineered to be targeted to the extracellular membrane of target cells. To do so we constructed a temperature-sensitive mutant HSV-1 vector, tsK-TT21 expressing a recombinant marker protein, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP), linked to sequence encoding a signal for the addition of a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor within the endoplasmic reticulum. Our results demonstrate that HSV1-derived viral vectors can be used to target transgenes as GPI anchored proteins to the outside leaflet of plasma membranes, without disrupting the targeting machinery of host epithelial cells or neurons. This approach could then be used to target specific proteins to the cell membrane to modify cell-cell interactions, the function of specific plasma membrane proteins, or their interactions with other membrane proteins, and also to target a prodrug converting enzyme to the plasma membrane of target cells, therefore enhancing its cell killing effects.

  10. Anchoring the Deficit of the Anchor Deficit: Dyslexia or Attention?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willburger, Edith; Landerl, Karin

    2010-01-01

    In the anchoring deficit hypothesis of dyslexia ("Trends Cogn. Sci.", 2007; 11: 458-465), it is proposed that perceptual problems arise from the lack of forming a perceptual anchor for repeatedly presented stimuli. A study designed to explicitly test the specificity of the anchoring deficit for dyslexia is presented. Four groups, representing all…

  11. Bellow seal and anchor

    DOEpatents

    Mansure, Arthur J.

    2001-01-01

    An annular seal is made of a collapsible bellows. The bellows can function as an anchor or a seal and is easily set into position using relative component movement. The bellows folds can be slanted and their outer sealing edges can have different profiles to meet expected conditions. The bellows is expanded for insertion to reduce its outer dimension and sets by compaction as a result of relative movement. The bellows can be straight or tapered and is settable with a minimal axial force.

  12. Anchoring a Leviathan: How the Nuclear Membrane Tethers the Genome.

    PubMed

    Czapiewski, Rafal; Robson, Michael I; Schirmer, Eric C

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that the nuclear envelope has many distinct direct connections to chromatin that contribute to genome organization. The functional consequences of genome organization on gene regulation are less clear. Even less understood is how interactions of lamins and nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins (NETs) with chromatin can produce anchoring tethers that can withstand the physical forces of and on the genome. Chromosomes are the largest molecules in the cell, making megadalton protein structures like the nuclear pore complexes and ribosomes seem small by comparison. Thus to withstand strong forces from chromosome dynamics an anchoring tether is likely to be much more complex than a single protein-protein or protein-DNA interaction. Here we will briefly review known NE-genome interactions that likely contribute to spatial genome organization, postulate in the context of experimental data how these anchoring tethers contribute to gene regulation, and posit several hypotheses for the physical nature of these tethers that need to be investigated experimentally. Significantly, disruption of these anchoring tethers and the subsequent consequences for gene regulation could explain how mutations in nuclear envelope proteins cause diseases ranging from muscular dystrophy to lipodystrophy to premature aging progeroid syndromes. The two favored hypotheses for nuclear envelope protein involvement in disease are (1) weakening nuclear and cellular mechanical stability, and (2) disrupting genome organization and gene regulation. Considerable experimental support has been obtained for both. The integration of both mechanical and gene expression defects in the disruption of anchoring tethers could provide a unifying hypothesis consistent with both.

  13. KRE genes are required for beta-1,6-glucan synthesis, maintenance of capsule architecture and cell wall protein anchoring in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Nicole M; Donlin, Maureen J; Gerik, Kimberly J; Specht, Charles A; Djordjevic, Julianne T; Wilson, Christabel F; Sorrell, Tania C; Lodge, Jennifer K

    2010-04-01

    The polysaccharide beta-1,6-glucan is a major component of the cell wall of Cryptococcus neoformans, but its function has not been investigated in this fungal pathogen. We have identified and characterized seven genes, belonging to the KRE family, which are putatively involved in beta-1,6-glucan synthesis. The H99 deletion mutants kre5Delta and kre6Deltaskn1Delta contained less cell wall beta-1,6-glucan, grew slowly with an aberrant morphology, were highly sensitive to environmental and chemical stress and were avirulent in a mouse inhalation model of infection. These two mutants displayed alterations in cell wall chitosan and the exopolysaccharide capsule, a primary cryptococcal virulence determinant. The cell wall content of the GPI-anchored phospholipase B1 (Plb1) enzyme, which is required for cryptococcal cell wall integrity and virulence, was reduced in kre5Delta and kre6Deltaskn1Delta. Our results indicate that KRE5, KRE6 and SKN1 are involved in beta-1,6-glucan synthesis, maintenance of cell wall integrity and retention of mannoproteins and known cryptococcal virulence factors in the cell wall of C. neoformans. This study sets the stage for future investigations into the function of this abundant cell wall polymer.

  14. Binding constants of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands depend strongly on the nanoscale roughness of membranes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinglei; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Weikl, Thomas R

    2013-09-17

    Cell adhesion and the adhesion of vesicles to the membranes of cells or organelles are pivotal for immune responses, tissue formation, and cell signaling. The adhesion processes depend sensitively on the binding constant of the membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins that mediate adhesion, but this constant is difficult to measure in experiments. We have investigated the binding of membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins with molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the binding constant of the anchored proteins strongly decreases with the membrane roughness caused by thermally excited membrane shape fluctuations on nanoscales. We present a theory that explains the roughness dependence of the binding constant for the anchored proteins from membrane confinement and that relates this constant to the binding constant of soluble proteins without membrane anchors. Because the binding constant of soluble proteins is readily accessible in experiments, our results provide a useful route to compute the binding constant of membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins.

  15. Regulation of lipid biosynthesis, sliding motility, and biofilm formation by a membrane-anchored nucleoid-associated protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Soumitra; Indi, Shantinath S; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2013-04-01

    Bacteria use a number of small basic proteins for organization and compaction of their genomes. By their interaction with DNA, these nucleoid-associated proteins (NAPs) also influence gene expression. Rv3852, a NAP of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is conserved among the pathogenic and slow-growing species of mycobacteria. Here, we show that the protein predominantly localizes in the cell membrane and that the carboxy-terminal region with the propensity to form a transmembrane helix is necessary for its membrane localization. The protein is involved in genome organization, and its ectopic expression in Mycobacterium smegmatis resulted in altered nucleoid morphology, defects in biofilm formation, sliding motility, and change in apolar lipid profile. We demonstrate its crucial role in regulating the expression of KasA, KasB, and GroEL1 proteins, which are in turn involved in controlling the surface phenotypes in mycobacteria. PMID:23396914

  16. Granular Simulation of NEO Anchoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazhar, Hammad

    2011-01-01

    NASA is interested in designing a spacecraft capable of visiting a Near Earth Object (NEO), performing experiments, and then returning safely. Certain periods of this mission will require the spacecraft to remain stationary relative to the NEO. Such situations require an anchoring mechanism that is compact, easy to deploy and upon mission completion, easily removed. The design philosophy used in the project relies on the simulation capability of a multibody dynamics physics engine. On Earth it is difficult to create low gravity conditions and testing in low gravity environments, whether artificial or in space is costly and therefore not feasible. Through simulation, gravity can be controlled with great accuracy, making it ideally suited to analyze the problem at hand. Using Chrono::Engine [1], a simulation package capable of utilizing massively parallel GPU hardware, several validation experiments will be performed. Once there is sufficient confidence, modeling of the NEO regolith interaction will begin after which the anchor tests will be performed and analyzed. The outcome of this task is a study with an analysis of several different anchor designs, along with a recommendation on which anchor is better suited to the task of anchoring. With the anchors tested against a range of parameters relating to soil, environment and anchor penetration angles/velocities on a NEO.

  17. Bone cement improves suture anchor fixation.

    PubMed

    Giori, Nicholas J; Sohn, David H; Mirza, Faisal M; Lindsey, Derek P; Lee, Arthur T

    2006-10-01

    Suture anchor fixation failure can occur if the anchor pulls out of bone. We hypothesized that suture anchor fixation can be augmented with polymethylmethacrylate cement, and that polymethylmethacrylate can be used to improve fixation in a stripped anchor hole. Six matched cadaveric proximal humeri were used. On one side, suture anchors were placed and loaded to failure using a ramped cyclic loading protocol. The stripped anchor holes then were injected with approximately 1 cc polymethylmethacrylate, and anchors were replaced and tested again. In the contralateral humerus, polymethylmethacrylate was injected into anchor holes before anchor placement and testing. In unstripped anchors, polymethylmethacrylate increased the number of cycles to failure by 34% and failure load by 71% compared with anchors not augmented with polymethylmethacrylate. Polymethylmethacrylate haugmentation of stripped anchors increased the cycles to failure by 31% and failure load by 111% compared with unstripped uncemented anchors. No difference was found in cycles to failure or failure load between cemented stripped anchors and cemented unstripped anchors. Polymethylmethacrylate can be used to augment fixation, reducing the risk of anchor pull-out failure, regardless whether the suture anchor hole is stripped or unstripped. PMID:16702922

  18. TbGT8 is a bifunctional glycosyltransferase that elaborates N-linked glycans on a protein phosphatase AcP115 and a GPI-anchor modifying glycan in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Masayuki; Karasudani, Moe; Shiraishi, Takahiro; Hashida, Kazunori; Hino, Mami; Ferguson, Michael A J; Nomoto, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    The procyclic form of Trypanosoma brucei expresses procyclin surface glycoproteins with unusual glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor side chain structures that contain branched N-acetyllactosamine and lacto-N-biose units. The glycosyltransferase TbGT8 is involved in the synthesis of the branched side chain through its UDP-GlcNAc: βGal β1-3N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase activity. Here, we explored the role of TbGT8 in the mammalian bloodstream form of the parasite with a tetracycline-inducible conditional null T. brucei mutant for TbGT8. Under non-permissive conditions, the mutant showed significantly reduced binding to tomato lectin, which recognizes poly-N-acetyllactosamine-containing glycans. Lectin pull-down assays revealed differences between the wild type and TbGT8 null-mutant T. brucei, notably the absence of a broad protein band with an approximate molecular weight of 110 kDa in the mutant lysate. Proteomic analysis revealed that the band contained several glycoproteins, including the acidic ecto-protein phosphatase AcP115, a stage-specific glycoprotein in the bloodstream form of T. brucei. Western blotting with an anti-AcP115 antibody revealed that AcP115 was approximately 10kDa smaller in the mutant. Enzymatic de-N-glycosylation demonstrated that the underlying protein cores were the same, suggesting that the 10-kDa difference was due to differences in N-linked glycans. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed the colocalization of hemagglutinin epitope-tagged TbGT8 and the Golgi-associated protein GRASP. These data suggest that TbGT8 is involved in the construction of complex poly-N-acetyllactosamine-containing type N-linked and GPI-linked glycans in the Golgi of the bloodstream and procyclic parasite forms, respectively. PMID:24508870

  19. Anchoring: A "Cure" for Epy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thalgott, Mary R.

    1986-01-01

    Anchoring, a neurolinguistic programing technique, was successful in helping a sixth grader with learning disabilities reduce his anxiety reaction to math tasks. Other uses for the approach are noted and guidelines offered. (CL)

  20. Binding kinetics of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands: Molecular dynamics simulations and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jinglei; Xu, Guang-Kui; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Weikl, Thomas R.

    2015-12-01

    The adhesion of biological membranes is mediated by the binding of membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins. Central questions are how the binding kinetics of these proteins is affected by the membranes and by the membrane anchoring of the proteins. In this article, we (i) present detailed data for the binding of membrane-anchored proteins from coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations and (ii) provide a theory that describes how the binding kinetics depends on the average separation and thermal roughness of the adhering membranes and on the anchoring, lengths, and length variations of the proteins. An important element of our theory is the tilt of bound receptor-ligand complexes and transition-state complexes relative to the membrane normals. This tilt results from an interplay of the anchoring energy and rotational entropy of the complexes and facilitates the formation of receptor-ligand bonds at membrane separations smaller than the preferred separation for binding. In our simulations, we have considered both lipid-anchored and transmembrane receptor and ligand proteins. We find that the binding equilibrium constant and binding on-rate constant of lipid-anchored proteins are considerably smaller than the binding constant and on-rate constant of rigid transmembrane proteins with identical binding domains.

  1. Binding kinetics of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands: Molecular dynamics simulations and theory.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinglei; Xu, Guang-Kui; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Weikl, Thomas R

    2015-12-28

    The adhesion of biological membranes is mediated by the binding of membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins. Central questions are how the binding kinetics of these proteins is affected by the membranes and by the membrane anchoring of the proteins. In this article, we (i) present detailed data for the binding of membrane-anchored proteins from coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations and (ii) provide a theory that describes how the binding kinetics depends on the average separation and thermal roughness of the adhering membranes and on the anchoring, lengths, and length variations of the proteins. An important element of our theory is the tilt of bound receptor-ligand complexes and transition-state complexes relative to the membrane normals. This tilt results from an interplay of the anchoring energy and rotational entropy of the complexes and facilitates the formation of receptor-ligand bonds at membrane separations smaller than the preferred separation for binding. In our simulations, we have considered both lipid-anchored and transmembrane receptor and ligand proteins. We find that the binding equilibrium constant and binding on-rate constant of lipid-anchored proteins are considerably smaller than the binding constant and on-rate constant of rigid transmembrane proteins with identical binding domains.

  2. Effect of secondary anchor amino acid substitutions on the immunogenic properties of an HLA-A*0201-restricted T cell epitope derived from the Trypanosoma cruzi KMP-11 protein.

    PubMed

    Lasso, Paola; Cárdenas, Constanza; Guzmán, Fanny; Rosas, Fernando; Thomas, María Carmen; López, Manuel Carlos; González, John Mario; Cuéllar, Adriana; Campanera, Josep Maria; Luque, F Javier; Puerta, Concepción Judith

    2016-04-01

    The TcTLE peptide (TLEEFSAKL) is a CD8(+) T cell HLA-A*0201-restricted epitope derived from the Trypanosoma cruzi KMP-11 protein that is efficiently processed, presented and recognized by CD8(+) T cells from chagasic patients. Since the immunogenic properties of wild-type epitopes may be enhanced by suitable substitutions in secondary anchor residues, we have studied the effect of introducing specific mutations at position 3, 6 and 7 of the TcTLE peptide. Mutations (E3L, S6V and A7F) were chosen on the basis of in silico predictions and in vitro assays were performed to determine the TcTLE-modified peptide binding capacity to the HLA-A*0201 molecule. In addition, the functional activity of peptide-specific CD8(+) T cells in HLA-A2(+) chagasic patients was also interrogated. In contrast to bioinformatics predictions, the TcTLE-modified peptide was found to have lower binding affinity and stability than the original peptide. Nevertheless, CD8(+) T cells from chronic chagasic patients recognized the TcTLE-modified peptide producing TNF-α and INF-γ and expressing CD107a/b, though in less extension than the response triggered by the original peptide. Overall, although the amino acids at positions 3, 6 and 7 of TcTLE are critical for the peptide affinity, they have a limited effect on the immunogenic properties of the TcTLE epitope.

  3. Effect of secondary anchor amino acid substitutions on the immunogenic properties of an HLA-A*0201-restricted T cell epitope derived from the Trypanosoma cruzi KMP-11 protein.

    PubMed

    Lasso, Paola; Cárdenas, Constanza; Guzmán, Fanny; Rosas, Fernando; Thomas, María Carmen; López, Manuel Carlos; González, John Mario; Cuéllar, Adriana; Campanera, Josep Maria; Luque, F Javier; Puerta, Concepción Judith

    2016-04-01

    The TcTLE peptide (TLEEFSAKL) is a CD8(+) T cell HLA-A*0201-restricted epitope derived from the Trypanosoma cruzi KMP-11 protein that is efficiently processed, presented and recognized by CD8(+) T cells from chagasic patients. Since the immunogenic properties of wild-type epitopes may be enhanced by suitable substitutions in secondary anchor residues, we have studied the effect of introducing specific mutations at position 3, 6 and 7 of the TcTLE peptide. Mutations (E3L, S6V and A7F) were chosen on the basis of in silico predictions and in vitro assays were performed to determine the TcTLE-modified peptide binding capacity to the HLA-A*0201 molecule. In addition, the functional activity of peptide-specific CD8(+) T cells in HLA-A2(+) chagasic patients was also interrogated. In contrast to bioinformatics predictions, the TcTLE-modified peptide was found to have lower binding affinity and stability than the original peptide. Nevertheless, CD8(+) T cells from chronic chagasic patients recognized the TcTLE-modified peptide producing TNF-α and INF-γ and expressing CD107a/b, though in less extension than the response triggered by the original peptide. Overall, although the amino acids at positions 3, 6 and 7 of TcTLE are critical for the peptide affinity, they have a limited effect on the immunogenic properties of the TcTLE epitope. PMID:26854383

  4. N-terminus of IpaB provides a potential anchor to the Shigella type III secretion system tip complex protein IpaD.

    PubMed

    Dickenson, Nicholas E; Arizmendi, Olivia; Patil, Mrinalini K; Toth, Ronald T; Middaugh, C Russell; Picking, William D; Picking, Wendy L

    2013-12-10

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is an essential virulence factor for Shigella flexneri , providing a conduit through which host-altering effectors are injected directly into a host cell to promote uptake. The type III secretion apparatus (T3SA) is composed of a basal body, external needle, and regulatory tip complex. The nascent needle is a polymer of MxiH capped by a pentamer of invasion plasmid antigen D (IpaD). Exposure to bile salts (e.g., deoxycholate) causes a conformational change in IpaD and promotes recruitment of IpaB to the needle tip. It has been proposed that IpaB senses contact with host cell membranes, recruiting IpaC and inducing full secretion of T3SS effectors. Although the steps of T3SA maturation and their external triggers have been identified, details of specific protein interactions and mechanisms have remained difficult to study because of the hydrophobic nature of the IpaB and IpaC translocator proteins. Here, we explored the ability for a series of soluble N-terminal IpaB peptides to interact with IpaD. We found that DOC is required for the interaction and that a region of IpaB between residues 11-27 is required for maximum binding, which was confirmed in vivo. Furthermore, intramolecular FRET measurements indicated that movement of the IpaD distal domain away from the protein core accompanied the binding of IpaB11-226. Together, these new findings provide important new insight into the interactions and potential mechanisms that define the maturation of the Shigella T3SA needle tip complex and provide a foundation for further studies probing T3SS activation.

  5. The levels of epithelial anchor proteins β-catenin and zona occludens-1 are altered by E7 of human papillomaviruses 5 and 8.

    PubMed

    Heuser, Sandra; Hufbauer, Martin; Marx, Benjamin; Tok, Ali; Majewski, Slawomir; Pfister, Herbert; Akgül, Baki

    2016-02-01

    Infection with viruses of the genus Betapapillomavirus, β-human papillomaviruses (β-HPV), is implicated in the development of non-melanoma skin cancer. This was first evidenced for HPV5 and HPV8 in patients with the skin disease epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV). The relocalization of the junctional bridging proteins β-catenin and zona occludens-1 (ZO-1) from the adherens and tight junctions are common processes of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) associated with tumour invasion. Here, we report that β-catenin and ZO-1 are strongly upregulated by the E7 oncoproteins of HPV5 and HPV8 in keratinocytes grown in organotypic skin cultures. Although the membrane-tethered form of β-catenin was elevated, no signs of β-catenin activity within the canonical Wnt signalling pathway could be detected. The upregulation of β-catenin and ZO-1 could also be confirmed in the skin of HPV8 transgenic mice as well as in cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas of EV patients. These data provide the first evidence that β-catenin and ZO-1 are direct targets of E7 of the oncogenic β-HPV types 5 and 8. The ability to deregulate these epithelial junction proteins may contribute to the oncogenic potential of these viruses in human skin. PMID:26645068

  6. The levels of epithelial anchor proteins β-catenin and zona occludens-1 are altered by E7 of human papillomaviruses 5 and 8.

    PubMed

    Heuser, Sandra; Hufbauer, Martin; Marx, Benjamin; Tok, Ali; Majewski, Slawomir; Pfister, Herbert; Akgül, Baki

    2016-02-01

    Infection with viruses of the genus Betapapillomavirus, β-human papillomaviruses (β-HPV), is implicated in the development of non-melanoma skin cancer. This was first evidenced for HPV5 and HPV8 in patients with the skin disease epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV). The relocalization of the junctional bridging proteins β-catenin and zona occludens-1 (ZO-1) from the adherens and tight junctions are common processes of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) associated with tumour invasion. Here, we report that β-catenin and ZO-1 are strongly upregulated by the E7 oncoproteins of HPV5 and HPV8 in keratinocytes grown in organotypic skin cultures. Although the membrane-tethered form of β-catenin was elevated, no signs of β-catenin activity within the canonical Wnt signalling pathway could be detected. The upregulation of β-catenin and ZO-1 could also be confirmed in the skin of HPV8 transgenic mice as well as in cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas of EV patients. These data provide the first evidence that β-catenin and ZO-1 are direct targets of E7 of the oncogenic β-HPV types 5 and 8. The ability to deregulate these epithelial junction proteins may contribute to the oncogenic potential of these viruses in human skin.

  7. Insect cell-derived cofactors become fully functional after proteinase K and heat treatment for high-fidelity amplification of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored recombinant scrapie and BSE prion proteins.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Morikazu; Kato, Nobuko; Okada, Hiroyuki; Yoshioka, Miyako; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Shimizu, Yoshihisa; Mohri, Shirou; Yokoyama, Takashi; Murayama, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    The central event in prion infection is the conformational conversion of host-encoded cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into the pathogenic isoform (PrP(Sc)). Diverse mammalian species possess the cofactors required for in vitro replication of PrP(Sc) by protein-misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA), but lower organisms, such as bacteria, yeasts, and insects, reportedly lack the essential cofactors. Various cellular components, such as RNA, lipids, and other identified cofactor molecules, are commonly distributed in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, but the reasons for the absence of cofactor activity in lower organisms remain to be elucidated. Previously, we reported that brain-derived factors were necessary for the in vitro replication of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored baculovirus-derived recombinant PrP (Bac-PrP). Here, we demonstrate that following protease digestion and heat treatment, insect cell lysates had the functional cofactor activity required for Bac-PrP replication by PMCA. Mammalian PrP(Sc) seeds and Bac-PrP(Sc) generated by PMCA using Bac-PrP and insect cell-derived cofactors showed similar pathogenicity and produced very similar lesions in the brains of inoculated mice. These results suggested that the essential cofactors required for the high-fidelity replication of mammalian PrP(Sc) were present in the insect cells but that the cofactor activity was masked or inhibited in the native state. We suggest that not only RNA, but also DNA, are the key components of PMCA, although other cellular factors were necessary for the expression of the cofactor activity of nucleic acids. PMCA using only insect cell-derived substances (iPMCA) was highly useful for the ultrasensitive detection of PrP(Sc) of some prion strains.

  8. Anchoring a Leviathan: How the Nuclear Membrane Tethers the Genome

    PubMed Central

    Czapiewski, Rafal; Robson, Michael I.; Schirmer, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that the nuclear envelope has many distinct direct connections to chromatin that contribute to genome organization. The functional consequences of genome organization on gene regulation are less clear. Even less understood is how interactions of lamins and nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins (NETs) with chromatin can produce anchoring tethers that can withstand the physical forces of and on the genome. Chromosomes are the largest molecules in the cell, making megadalton protein structures like the nuclear pore complexes and ribosomes seem small by comparison. Thus to withstand strong forces from chromosome dynamics an anchoring tether is likely to be much more complex than a single protein-protein or protein-DNA interaction. Here we will briefly review known NE-genome interactions that likely contribute to spatial genome organization, postulate in the context of experimental data how these anchoring tethers contribute to gene regulation, and posit several hypotheses for the physical nature of these tethers that need to be investigated experimentally. Significantly, disruption of these anchoring tethers and the subsequent consequences for gene regulation could explain how mutations in nuclear envelope proteins cause diseases ranging from muscular dystrophy to lipodystrophy to premature aging progeroid syndromes. The two favored hypotheses for nuclear envelope protein involvement in disease are (1) weakening nuclear and cellular mechanical stability, and (2) disrupting genome organization and gene regulation. Considerable experimental support has been obtained for both. The integration of both mechanical and gene expression defects in the disruption of anchoring tethers could provide a unifying hypothesis consistent with both. PMID:27200088

  9. Rearrangements in the Relative Orientation of Cytoplasmic Domains Induced by a Membrane-anchored Protein Mediate Modulations in Kv Channel Gating*

    PubMed Central

    Lvov, Anatoli; Greitzer, Dafna; Berlin, Shai; Chikvashvili, Dodo; Tsuk, Sharon; Lotan, Ilana; Michaelevski, Izhak

    2009-01-01

    Interdomain interactions between intracellular N and C termini have been described for various K+ channels, including the voltage-gated Kv2.1, and suggested to affect channel gating. However, no channel regulatory protein directly affecting N/C interactions has been demonstrated. Most Kv2.1 channel interactions with regulatory factors occur at its C terminus. The vesicular SNARE that is also present at a high concentration in the neuronal plasma membrane, VAMP2, is the only protein documented to affect Kv2.1 gating by binding to its N terminus. As its binding target has been mapped near a site implicated in Kv2.1 N/C interactions, we hypothesized that VAMP2 binding to the N terminus requires concomitant conformational changes in the C terminus, which wraps around the N terminus from the outside, to give VAMP2 access. Here, we first determined that the Kv2.1 N terminus, although crucial, is not sufficient to convey functional interaction with VAMP2, and that, concomitant to its binding to the “docking loop” at the Kv2.1 N terminus, VAMP2 binds to the proximal part of the Kv2.1 C terminus, C1a. Next, using computational biology approaches (ab initio modeling, docking, and molecular dynamics simulations) supported by molecular biology, biochemical, electrophysiological, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer analyses, we mapped the interaction sites on both VAMP2 and Kv2.1 and found that this interaction is accompanied by rearrangements in the relative orientation of Kv2.1 cytoplasmic domains. We propose that VAMP2 modulates Kv2.1 inactivation by interfering with the interaction between the docking loop and C1a, a mechanism for gating regulation that may pertain also to other Kv channels. PMID:19690160

  10. Bone Anchored Hearing Aid

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this health technology policy assessment was to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) in improving the hearing of people with conduction or mixed hearing loss. The Technology The (BAHA) is a bone conduction hearing device that includes a titanium fixture permanently implanted into the mastoid bone of the skull and an external percutaneous sound processor. The sound processor is attached to the fixture by means of a skin penetrating abutment. Because the device bypasses the middle ear and directly stimulates the cochlea, it has been recommended for individuals with conduction hearing loss or discharging middle ear infection. The titanium implant is expected to last a lifetime while the external sound processor is expected to last 5 years. The total initial device cost is approximately $5,300 and the external sound processor costs approximately $3,500. Review of BAHA by the Medical Advisory Secretariat The Medical Advisory Secretariat’s review is a descriptive synthesis of findings from 36 research articles published between January 1990 and May 2002. Summary of Findings No randomized controlled studies were found. The evidence was derived from level 4 case series with relative small sample sizes (ranging from 30-188). The majority of the studies have follow-up periods of eight years or longer. All except one study were based on monaural BAHA implant on the side with the best bone conduction threshold. Safety Level 4 evidence showed that BAHA has been be implanted safely in adults and children with success rates of 90% or higher in most studies. No mortality or life threatening morbidity has been reported. Revision rates for tissue reduction or resiting were generally under 10% for adults but have been reported to be as high as 25% in pediatric studies. Adverse skin reaction around the skin penetration site was the most common complication reported. Most of these

  11. Microgravity Drill and Anchor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parness, Aaron; Frost, Matthew A.; King, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    This work is a method to drill into a rock surface regardless of the gravitational field or orientation. The required weight-on-bit (WOB) is supplied by a self-contained anchoring mechanism. The system includes a rotary percussive coring drill, forming a complete sampling instrument usable by robot or human. This method of in situ sample acquisition using micro - spine anchoring technology enables several NASA mission concepts not currently possible with existing technology, including sampling from consolidated rock on asteroids, providing a bolt network for astronauts visiting a near-Earth asteroid, and sampling from the ceilings or vertical walls of lava tubes and cliff faces on Mars. One of the most fundamental parameters of drilling is the WOB; essentially, the load applied to the bit that allows it to cut, creating a reaction force normal to the surface. In every drilling application, there is a minimum WOB that must be maintained for the system to function properly. In microgravity (asteroids and comets), even a small WOB could not be supported conventionally by the weight of the robot or astronaut. An anchoring mechanism would be needed to resist the reactions, or the robot or astronaut would push themselves off the surface and into space. The ability of the system to anchor itself to a surface creates potential applications that reach beyond use in low gravity. The use of these anchoring mechanisms as end effectors on climbing robots has the potential of vastly expanding the scope of what is considered accessible terrain. Further, because the drill is supported by its own anchor rather than by a robotic arm, the workspace is not constrained by the reach of such an arm. Yet, if the drill is on a robotic arm, it has the benefit of not reflecting the forces of drilling back to the arm s joints. Combining the drill with the anchoring feet will create a highly mobile, highly stable, and highly reliable system. The drilling system s anchor uses hundreds of

  12. Permanent ground anchors: Nicholson design criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, P. J.; Uranowski, D. D.; Wycliffe-Jones, P. T.

    1982-09-01

    The methods used by Nicholson Construction Company in the design of permanent ground anchors specifically as related to retaining walls are discussed. Basic soil parameters, design concepts, drilling and grouting methods for ground anchors are discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on anchors founded in soil rather than rock formations. Also, soil properties necessary for the proper design of anchored retaining walls are detailed. The second chapter of the report is devoted to a general discussion of retaining wall and anchor design. In addition, a design example of an anchored retaining wall is presented in a step by step manner.

  13. Evidence for Two Distinct Binding Sites for Lipoprotein Lipase on Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored High Density Lipoprotein-binding Protein 1 (GPIHBP1)*

    PubMed Central

    Reimund, Mart; Larsson, Mikael; Kovrov, Oleg; Kasvandik, Sergo; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Lookene, Aivar

    2015-01-01

    GPIHBP1 is an endothelial membrane protein that transports lipoprotein lipase (LPL) from the subendothelial space to the luminal side of the capillary endothelium. Here, we provide evidence that two regions of GPIHBP1, the acidic N-terminal domain and the central Ly6 domain, interact with LPL as two distinct binding sites. This conclusion is based on comparative binding studies performed with a peptide corresponding to the N-terminal domain of GPIHBP1, the Ly6 domain of GPIHBP1, wild type GPIHBP1, and the Ly6 domain mutant GPIHBP1 Q114P. Although LPL and the N-terminal domain formed a tight but short lived complex, characterized by fast on- and off-rates, the complex between LPL and the Ly6 domain formed more slowly and persisted for a longer time. Unlike the interaction of LPL with the Ly6 domain, the interaction of LPL with the N-terminal domain was significantly weakened by salt. The Q114P mutant bound LPL similarly to the N-terminal domain of GPIHBP1. Heparin dissociated LPL from the N-terminal domain, and partially from wild type GPIHBP1, but was unable to elute the enzyme from the Ly6 domain. When LPL was in complex with the acidic peptide corresponding to the N-terminal domain of GPIHBP1, the enzyme retained its affinity for the Ly6 domain. Furthermore, LPL that was bound to the N-terminal domain interacted with lipoproteins, whereas LPL bound to the Ly6 domain did not. In summary, our data suggest that the two domains of GPIHBP1 interact independently with LPL and that the functionality of LPL depends on its localization on GPIHBP1. PMID:25873395

  14. Evidence for Two Distinct Binding Sites for Lipoprotein Lipase on Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored High Density Lipoprotein-binding Protein 1 (GPIHBP1).

    PubMed

    Reimund, Mart; Larsson, Mikael; Kovrov, Oleg; Kasvandik, Sergo; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Lookene, Aivar

    2015-05-29

    GPIHBP1 is an endothelial membrane protein that transports lipoprotein lipase (LPL) from the subendothelial space to the luminal side of the capillary endothelium. Here, we provide evidence that two regions of GPIHBP1, the acidic N-terminal domain and the central Ly6 domain, interact with LPL as two distinct binding sites. This conclusion is based on comparative binding studies performed with a peptide corresponding to the N-terminal domain of GPIHBP1, the Ly6 domain of GPIHBP1, wild type GPIHBP1, and the Ly6 domain mutant GPIHBP1 Q114P. Although LPL and the N-terminal domain formed a tight but short lived complex, characterized by fast on- and off-rates, the complex between LPL and the Ly6 domain formed more slowly and persisted for a longer time. Unlike the interaction of LPL with the Ly6 domain, the interaction of LPL with the N-terminal domain was significantly weakened by salt. The Q114P mutant bound LPL similarly to the N-terminal domain of GPIHBP1. Heparin dissociated LPL from the N-terminal domain, and partially from wild type GPIHBP1, but was unable to elute the enzyme from the Ly6 domain. When LPL was in complex with the acidic peptide corresponding to the N-terminal domain of GPIHBP1, the enzyme retained its affinity for the Ly6 domain. Furthermore, LPL that was bound to the N-terminal domain interacted with lipoproteins, whereas LPL bound to the Ly6 domain did not. In summary, our data suggest that the two domains of GPIHBP1 interact independently with LPL and that the functionality of LPL depends on its localization on GPIHBP1. PMID:25873395

  15. Muscle-regulated expression and determinants for neuromuscular junctional localization of the mouse RIα regulatory subunit of cAMP- dependent protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Barradeau, Sébastien; Imaizumi-Scherrer, Tereza; Weiss, Mary C.; Faust, Daniela M.

    2001-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, transcription of the gene encoding the mouse type Iα (RIα) subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase is initiated from the alternative noncoding first exons 1a and 1b. Here, we report that activity of the promoter upstream of exon 1a (Pa) depends on two adjacent E boxes (E1 and E2) in NIH 3T3-transfected fibroblasts as well as in intact muscle. Both basal activity and MyoD transactivation of the Pa promoter require binding of the upstream stimulating factors (USF) to E1. E2 binds either an unknown protein in a USF/E1 complex-dependent manner or MyoD. Both E2-bound proteins seem to function as repressors, but with different strengths, of the USF transactivation potential. Previous work has shown localization of the RIα protein at the neuromuscular junction. Using DNA injection into muscle of plasmids encoding segments of RIα or RIIα fused to green fluorescent protein, we demonstrate that anchoring at the neuromuscular junction is specific to RIα subunits and requires the amino-terminal residues 1–81. Mutagenesis of Phe-54 to Ala in the full-length RIα–green fluorescent protein template abolishes localization, indicating that dimerization of RIα is essential for anchoring. Moreover, two other hydrophobic residues, Val-22 and Ile-27, are crucial for localization of RIα at the neuromuscular junction. These amino acids are involved in the interaction of the Caenorhabditis elegans type Iα homologue RCE with AKAPCE and for in vitro binding of RIα to dual A-kinase anchoring protein 1. We also show enrichment of dual A-kinase anchoring protein 1 at the neuromuscular junction, suggesting that it could be responsible for RIα tethering at this site. PMID:11296260

  16. Structural models of the membrane anchors of envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 from pestiviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jimin Li, Yue; Modis, Yorgo

    2014-04-15

    The membrane anchors of viral envelope proteins play essential roles in cell entry. Recent crystal structures of the ectodomain of envelope protein E2 from a pestivirus suggest that E2 belongs to a novel structural class of membrane fusion machinery. Based on geometric constraints from the E2 structures, we generated atomic models of the E1 and E2 membrane anchors using computational approaches. The E1 anchor contains two amphipathic perimembrane helices and one transmembrane helix; the E2 anchor contains a short helical hairpin stabilized in the membrane by an arginine residue, similar to flaviviruses. A pair of histidine residues in the E2 ectodomain may participate in pH sensing. The proposed atomic models point to Cys987 in E2 as the site of disulfide bond linkage with E1 to form E1–E2 heterodimers. The membrane anchor models provide structural constraints for the disulfide bonding pattern and overall backbone conformation of the E1 ectodomain. - Highlights: • Structures of pestivirus E2 proteins impose constraints on E1, E2 membrane anchors. • Atomic models of the E1 and E2 membrane anchors were generated in silico. • A “snorkeling” arginine completes the short helical hairpin in the E2 membrane anchor. • Roles in pH sensing and E1–E2 disulfide bond formation are proposed for E1 residues. • Implications for E1 ectodomain structure and disulfide bonding pattern are discussed.

  17. Data for identification of GPI-anchored peptides and ω-sites in cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Masuishi, Yusuke; Kimura, Yayoi; Arakawa, Noriaki; Hirano, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    We present data obtained using a focused proteomics approach to identify the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored peptides in 19 human cancer cell lines. GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs), which localize to the outer leaflet of the membrane microdomains commonly referred to as lipid rafts play important roles in diverse biological processes. Due to the complex structure of the GPI-anchor moiety, it has been difficult to identify GPI-anchored peptide sequences on the proteomic scale by database searches using tools such as MASCOT. Here we provide data from 73 ω-sites derived from 49 GPI-APs in 19 human cancer cell lines. This article contains data related to the research article entitled “Identification of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins and ω-sites using TiO2-based affinity purification followed by hydrogen fluoride treatment” (Masuishi et al., 2016) [1]. PMID:27141528

  18. Data for identification of GPI-anchored peptides and ω-sites in cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Masuishi, Yusuke; Kimura, Yayoi; Arakawa, Noriaki; Hirano, Hisashi

    2016-06-01

    We present data obtained using a focused proteomics approach to identify the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored peptides in 19 human cancer cell lines. GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs), which localize to the outer leaflet of the membrane microdomains commonly referred to as lipid rafts play important roles in diverse biological processes. Due to the complex structure of the GPI-anchor moiety, it has been difficult to identify GPI-anchored peptide sequences on the proteomic scale by database searches using tools such as MASCOT. Here we provide data from 73 ω-sites derived from 49 GPI-APs in 19 human cancer cell lines. This article contains data related to the research article entitled "Identification of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins and ω-sites using TiO2-based affinity purification followed by hydrogen fluoride treatment" (Masuishi et al., 2016) [1]. PMID:27141528

  19. Multimerization of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high density lipoprotein-binding protein 1 (GPIHBP1) and familial chylomicronemia from a serine-to-cysteine substitution in GPIHBP1 Ly6 domain.

    PubMed

    Plengpanich, Wanee; Young, Stephen G; Khovidhunkit, Weerapan; Bensadoun, André; Karnman, Hirankorn; Ploug, Michael; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Leung, Calvin S; Adeyo, Oludotun; Larsson, Mikael; Muanpetch, Suwanna; Charoen, Supannika; Fong, Loren G; Niramitmahapanya, Sathit; Beigneux, Anne P

    2014-07-11

    GPIHBP1, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored glycoprotein of microvascular endothelial cells, binds lipoprotein lipase (LPL) within the interstitial spaces and transports it across endothelial cells to the capillary lumen. The ability of GPIHBP1 to bind LPL depends on the Ly6 domain, a three-fingered structure containing 10 cysteines and a conserved pattern of disulfide bond formation. Here, we report a patient with severe hypertriglyceridemia who was homozygous for a GPIHBP1 point mutation that converted a serine in the GPIHBP1 Ly6 domain (Ser-107) to a cysteine. Two hypertriglyceridemic siblings were homozygous for the same mutation. All three homozygotes had very low levels of LPL in the preheparin plasma. We suspected that the extra cysteine in GPIHBP1-S107C might prevent the trafficking of the protein to the cell surface, but this was not the case. However, nearly all of the GPIHBP1-S107C on the cell surface was in the form of disulfide-linked dimers and multimers, whereas wild-type GPIHBP1 was predominantly monomeric. An insect cell GPIHBP1 expression system confirmed the propensity of GPIHBP1-S107C to form disulfide-linked dimers and to form multimers. Functional studies showed that only GPIHBP1 monomers bind LPL. In keeping with that finding, there was no binding of LPL to GPIHBP1-S107C in either cell-based or cell-free binding assays. We conclude that an extra cysteine in the GPIHBP1 Ly6 motif results in multimerization of GPIHBP1, defective LPL binding, and severe hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:24847059

  20. Multimerization of Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored High Density Lipoprotein-binding Protein 1 (GPIHBP1) and Familial Chylomicronemia from a Serine-to-Cysteine Substitution in GPIHBP1 Ly6 Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Plengpanich, Wanee; Young, Stephen G.; Khovidhunkit, Weerapan; Bensadoun, André; Karnman, Hirankorn; Ploug, Michael; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Leung, Calvin S.; Adeyo, Oludotun; Larsson, Mikael; Muanpetch, Suwanna; Charoen, Supannika; Fong, Loren G.; Niramitmahapanya, Sathit; Beigneux, Anne P.

    2014-01-01

    GPIHBP1, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored glycoprotein of microvascular endothelial cells, binds lipoprotein lipase (LPL) within the interstitial spaces and transports it across endothelial cells to the capillary lumen. The ability of GPIHBP1 to bind LPL depends on the Ly6 domain, a three-fingered structure containing 10 cysteines and a conserved pattern of disulfide bond formation. Here, we report a patient with severe hypertriglyceridemia who was homozygous for a GPIHBP1 point mutation that converted a serine in the GPIHBP1 Ly6 domain (Ser-107) to a cysteine. Two hypertriglyceridemic siblings were homozygous for the same mutation. All three homozygotes had very low levels of LPL in the preheparin plasma. We suspected that the extra cysteine in GPIHBP1-S107C might prevent the trafficking of the protein to the cell surface, but this was not the case. However, nearly all of the GPIHBP1-S107C on the cell surface was in the form of disulfide-linked dimers and multimers, whereas wild-type GPIHBP1 was predominantly monomeric. An insect cell GPIHBP1 expression system confirmed the propensity of GPIHBP1-S107C to form disulfide-linked dimers and to form multimers. Functional studies showed that only GPIHBP1 monomers bind LPL. In keeping with that finding, there was no binding of LPL to GPIHBP1-S107C in either cell-based or cell-free binding assays. We conclude that an extra cysteine in the GPIHBP1 Ly6 motif results in multimerization of GPIHBP1, defective LPL binding, and severe hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:24847059

  1. The SPI1 gene, encoding a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored cell wall protein, plays a prominent role in the development of yeast resistance to lipophilic weak-acid food preservatives.

    PubMed

    Simões, T; Mira, N P; Fernandes, A R; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2006-11-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae SPI1 gene encodes a member of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored cell wall protein family. In this work we show results indicating that SPI1 expression protects the yeast cell from damage caused by weak acids used as food preservatives. This is documented by a less extended period of adaptation to growth in their presence and by a less inhibited specific growth rate for a parental strain compared with a mutant with SPI1 deleted. Maximal protection exerted by Spi1p against equivalent concentrations of the various weak acids tested was registered for the more lipophilic acids (octanoic acid, followed by benzoic acid) and was minimal for acetic acid. Weak-acid adaptation was found to involve the rapid activation of SPI1 transcription, which is dependent on the presence of the Msn2p transcription factor. Activation of SPI1 transcription upon acetic acid stress also requires Haa1p, whereas this recently described transcription factor has a negligible role in the adaptive response to benzoic acid. The expression of SPI1 was found to play a prominent role in the development of yeast resistance to 1,3-beta-glucanase in benzoic acid-stressed cells, while its involvement in acetic acid-induced resistance to the cell wall-lytic enzyme is slighter. The results are consistent with the notion that Spi1p expression upon weak-acid stress leads to cell wall remodeling, especially for the more lipophilic acids, decreasing cell wall porosity. Decreased cell wall porosity, in turn, reduces access to the plasma membrane, reducing membrane damage, intracellular acidification, and viability loss.

  2. Multimerization of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high density lipoprotein-binding protein 1 (GPIHBP1) and familial chylomicronemia from a serine-to-cysteine substitution in GPIHBP1 Ly6 domain.

    PubMed

    Plengpanich, Wanee; Young, Stephen G; Khovidhunkit, Weerapan; Bensadoun, André; Karnman, Hirankorn; Ploug, Michael; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Leung, Calvin S; Adeyo, Oludotun; Larsson, Mikael; Muanpetch, Suwanna; Charoen, Supannika; Fong, Loren G; Niramitmahapanya, Sathit; Beigneux, Anne P

    2014-07-11

    GPIHBP1, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored glycoprotein of microvascular endothelial cells, binds lipoprotein lipase (LPL) within the interstitial spaces and transports it across endothelial cells to the capillary lumen. The ability of GPIHBP1 to bind LPL depends on the Ly6 domain, a three-fingered structure containing 10 cysteines and a conserved pattern of disulfide bond formation. Here, we report a patient with severe hypertriglyceridemia who was homozygous for a GPIHBP1 point mutation that converted a serine in the GPIHBP1 Ly6 domain (Ser-107) to a cysteine. Two hypertriglyceridemic siblings were homozygous for the same mutation. All three homozygotes had very low levels of LPL in the preheparin plasma. We suspected that the extra cysteine in GPIHBP1-S107C might prevent the trafficking of the protein to the cell surface, but this was not the case. However, nearly all of the GPIHBP1-S107C on the cell surface was in the form of disulfide-linked dimers and multimers, whereas wild-type GPIHBP1 was predominantly monomeric. An insect cell GPIHBP1 expression system confirmed the propensity of GPIHBP1-S107C to form disulfide-linked dimers and to form multimers. Functional studies showed that only GPIHBP1 monomers bind LPL. In keeping with that finding, there was no binding of LPL to GPIHBP1-S107C in either cell-based or cell-free binding assays. We conclude that an extra cysteine in the GPIHBP1 Ly6 motif results in multimerization of GPIHBP1, defective LPL binding, and severe hypertriglyceridemia.

  3. Anchors Aweigh: A Demonstration of Cross-Modality Anchoring and Magnitude Priming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oppenheimer, Daniel M.; LeBoeuf, Robyn A.; Brewer, Noel T.

    2008-01-01

    Research has shown that judgments tend to assimilate to irrelevant "anchors." We extend anchoring effects to show that anchors can even operate across modalities by, apparently, priming a general sense of magnitude that is not moored to any unit or scale. An initial study showed that participants drawing long "anchor" lines made higher numerical…

  4. 33 CFR 401.15 - Stern anchors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stern anchors. 401.15 Section 401... TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Condition of Vessels § 401.15 Stern anchors. (a) Every... equipped with a stern anchor. (b) Every integrated tug and barge or articulated tug and barge unit...

  5. 30 CFR 57.19002 - Anchoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Anchoring. 57.19002 Section 57.19002 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND....19002 Anchoring. Hoists shall be anchored securely....

  6. 30 CFR 56.19002 - Anchoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Anchoring. 56.19002 Section 56.19002 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Anchoring. Hoists shall be anchored securely....

  7. Late disengagement of a knotless anchor.

    PubMed

    Antonogiannakis, Emmanuel; Yiannakopoulos, Christos K; Karliaftis, Konstantinos; Karabalis, Christos

    2002-10-01

    The knotless anchor is a new type of suture anchor that eliminates the need to perform arthroscopic knots, thus facilitating the performance of arthroscopic shoulder surgery. We report our experience in the use of this type of anchor in arthroscopic Bankart repair and discuss a complication related to using this type of fixation device.

  8. The ROSETTA Lander anchoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, Markus; Stöcker, Jakob; Rohe, Christian; Kömle, Norbert I.; Kargl, Günter; Hillenmaier, Olaf; Lell, Peter

    2003-09-01

    A major goal of the ESA cornerstone mission ROSETTA is to land a package of scientific instruments known as the ROSETTA Lander on the nucleus of a comet. Due to the low gravity a highly reliable fixation of the ROSETTA Lander to the target comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (3rd) is essential. For that purpose a redundant Anchoring System, consisting of two pyrotechnically actuated Anchoring Harpoons and a redundant Control Electronics has been developed, built and qualified at the Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (MPE), Garching. The pyrotechnical gas generator has been developed jointly by Pyroglobe GmbH and MPE, the procurement of the control electronics has been sub-contracted to Magson GmbH, Berlin. A study to obtain a suitable lubrication method for the commutator of a brushed DC motor has been conducted at the European Space Tribology Laboratory (ESTL; S. D. Lewis et al., 2003).

  9. Anchoring bias in online voting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zimo; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Zhou, Tao

    2012-12-01

    Voting online with explicit ratings could largely reflect people's preferences and objects' qualities, but ratings are always irrational, because they may be affected by many unpredictable factors like mood, weather and other people's votes. By analyzing two real systems, this paper reveals a systematic bias embedding in the individual decision-making processes, namely people tend to give a low rating after a low rating, as well as a high rating following a high rating. This so-called anchoring bias is validated via extensive comparisons with null models, and numerically speaking, the extent of bias decays with voting interval in a logarithmic form. Our findings could be applied in the design of recommender systems and considered as important complementary materials to previous knowledge about anchoring effects on financial trades, performance judgments, auctions, and so on.

  10. Anchoring in Numeric Judgments of Visual Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Langeborg, Linda; Eriksson, Mårten

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates effects of anchoring in age estimation and estimation of quantities, two tasks which to different extents are based on visual stimuli. The results are compared to anchoring in answers to classic general knowledge questions that rely on semantic knowledge. Cognitive load was manipulated to explore possible differences between domains. Effects of source credibility, manipulated by differing instructions regarding the selection of anchor values (no information regarding anchor selection, information that the anchors are randomly generated or information that the anchors are answers from an expert) on anchoring were also investigated. Effects of anchoring were large for all types of judgments but were not affected by cognitive load or by source credibility in either one of the researched domains. A main effect of cognitive load on quantity estimations and main effects of source credibility in the two visually based domains indicate that the manipulations were efficient. Implications for theoretical explanations of anchoring are discussed. In particular, because anchoring did not interact with cognitive load, the results imply that the process behind anchoring in visual tasks is predominantly automatic and unconscious. PMID:26941684

  11. Anchoring in Numeric Judgments of Visual Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Langeborg, Linda; Eriksson, Mårten

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates effects of anchoring in age estimation and estimation of quantities, two tasks which to different extents are based on visual stimuli. The results are compared to anchoring in answers to classic general knowledge questions that rely on semantic knowledge. Cognitive load was manipulated to explore possible differences between domains. Effects of source credibility, manipulated by differing instructions regarding the selection of anchor values (no information regarding anchor selection, information that the anchors are randomly generated or information that the anchors are answers from an expert) on anchoring were also investigated. Effects of anchoring were large for all types of judgments but were not affected by cognitive load or by source credibility in either one of the researched domains. A main effect of cognitive load on quantity estimations and main effects of source credibility in the two visually based domains indicate that the manipulations were efficient. Implications for theoretical explanations of anchoring are discussed. In particular, because anchoring did not interact with cognitive load, the results imply that the process behind anchoring in visual tasks is predominantly automatic and unconscious. PMID:26941684

  12. Anchoring in Numeric Judgments of Visual Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Langeborg, Linda; Eriksson, Mårten

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates effects of anchoring in age estimation and estimation of quantities, two tasks which to different extents are based on visual stimuli. The results are compared to anchoring in answers to classic general knowledge questions that rely on semantic knowledge. Cognitive load was manipulated to explore possible differences between domains. Effects of source credibility, manipulated by differing instructions regarding the selection of anchor values (no information regarding anchor selection, information that the anchors are randomly generated or information that the anchors are answers from an expert) on anchoring were also investigated. Effects of anchoring were large for all types of judgments but were not affected by cognitive load or by source credibility in either one of the researched domains. A main effect of cognitive load on quantity estimations and main effects of source credibility in the two visually based domains indicate that the manipulations were efficient. Implications for theoretical explanations of anchoring are discussed. In particular, because anchoring did not interact with cognitive load, the results imply that the process behind anchoring in visual tasks is predominantly automatic and unconscious.

  13. Independent control of polar and azimuthal anchoring.

    PubMed

    Anquetil-Deck, C; Cleaver, D J; Bramble, J P; Atherton, T J

    2013-07-01

    Monte Carlo simulation, experiment, and continuum theory are used to examine the anchoring exhibited by a nematic liquid crystal at a patterned substrate comprising a periodic array of rectangles that, respectively, promote vertical and planar alignment. It is shown that the easy axis and effective anchoring energy promoted by such surfaces can be readily controlled by adjusting the design of the pattern. The calculations reveal rich behavior: for strong anchoring, as exhibited by the simulated system, for rectangle ratios ≥2 the nematic aligns in the direction of the long edge of the rectangles, the azimuthal anchoring coefficient changing with pattern shape. In weak anchoring scenarios, however, including our experimental systems, preferential anchoring is degenerate between the two rectangle diagonals. Bistability between diagonally aligned and edge-aligned arrangement is predicted for intermediate combinations of anchoring coefficient and system length scale.

  14. Independent control of polar and azimuthal anchoring.

    PubMed

    Anquetil-Deck, C; Cleaver, D J; Bramble, J P; Atherton, T J

    2013-07-01

    Monte Carlo simulation, experiment, and continuum theory are used to examine the anchoring exhibited by a nematic liquid crystal at a patterned substrate comprising a periodic array of rectangles that, respectively, promote vertical and planar alignment. It is shown that the easy axis and effective anchoring energy promoted by such surfaces can be readily controlled by adjusting the design of the pattern. The calculations reveal rich behavior: for strong anchoring, as exhibited by the simulated system, for rectangle ratios ≥2 the nematic aligns in the direction of the long edge of the rectangles, the azimuthal anchoring coefficient changing with pattern shape. In weak anchoring scenarios, however, including our experimental systems, preferential anchoring is degenerate between the two rectangle diagonals. Bistability between diagonally aligned and edge-aligned arrangement is predicted for intermediate combinations of anchoring coefficient and system length scale. PMID:23944468

  15. Characterization of the C-terminal ER membrane anchor of PTP1B

    SciTech Connect

    Anderie, Ines Schulz, Irene; Schmid, Andreas

    2007-09-10

    The tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B is an important regulator of cell function. In living cells PTP1B activity is restricted to the vicinity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by post-translational C-terminal attachment of PTP1B to the ER membrane network. In our study we investigated the membrane anchor of PTP1B by use of EGFP fusion proteins. We demonstrate that the membrane anchor of PTP1B cannot be narrowed down to a unique amino acid sequence with a defined start and stop point but rather is moveable within several amino acids. Removal of up to seven amino acids from the C-terminus, as well as exchange of single amino acids in the putative transmembrane sequence did not influence subcellular localization of PTP1B. With the method of bimolecular fluorescence complementation we could demonstrate dimerization of PTP1B in vivo. Homodimerization was, in contrast to other tail-anchored proteins, not dependent on the membrane anchor. Our data demonstrate that the C-terminal membrane anchor of PTP1B is formed by a combination of a single stretch transmembrane domain (TMD) followed by a tail. TMD and tail length are variable and there are no sequence-specific features. Our data for PTP1B are consistent with a concept that explains the ER membrane anchor of tail-anchored proteins as a physicochemical structure.

  16. Key role of heparan sulfate chains in assembly of anchoring complex at the dermal-epidermal junction.

    PubMed

    Iriyama, Shunsuke; Tsunenaga, Makoto; Amano, Satoshi; Adachi, Eijiro

    2011-11-01

    Epidermal basement membrane forms anchoring complex composed of hemidesmosomes, anchoring filaments, lamina densa and anchoring fibrils to link epidermis to dermis. However, the anchoring complex is rarely formed in skin equivalent models, probably because of degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and heparan sulfate chains by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and heparanase, respectively. To explore the roles of ECM proteins and heparan sulfate in anchoring complex assembly, we used specific inhibitors of MMPs and heparanase, and the formation of anchoring complex was analysed in terms of polarized deposition of collagen VII, BP180 and β4 integrin at the dermal-epidermal junction (DEJ) by means of immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The deposition of collagen VII was polarized to the basal side by the addition of MMP inhibitor, and the staining intensity was increased by combined treatment with MMP inhibitor and heparanase inhibitor, which enhanced anchoring fibril formation as observed by TEM. BP180 was polarized to the basal side by heparanase inhibitor, which protects HS chains, but not by MMP inhibitor. MMP inhibitor improved the polarization of β4 integrin. Hemidesmosomes were formed in the presence of each inhibitor, as observed by TEM, and formation was greatly enhanced by the combined treatment. These findings suggest that heparan sulfate chains, in addition to ECM proteins at the DEJ, play an important role in the assembly of anchoring complex, especially hemidesmosomes and anchoring fibrils.

  17. Nestin Modulates Glucocorticoid Receptor Function by Cytoplasmic Anchoring

    PubMed Central

    Szalay, Beata; Hagel, Christian; Hohenberg, Heinrich; Deppert, Wolfgang; Bohn, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Nestin is the characteristic intermediate filament (IF) protein of rapidly proliferating progenitor cells and regenerating tissue. Nestin copolymerizes with class III IF-proteins, mostly vimentin, into heteromeric filaments. Its expression is downregulated with differentiation. Here we show that a strong nestin expression in mouse embryo tissue coincides with a strong accumulation of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), a key regulator of growth and differentiation in embryonic development. Microscopic studies on cultured cells show an association of GR with IFs composed of vimentin and nestin. Cells lacking nestin, but expressing vimentin, or cells expressing vimentin, but lacking nestin accumulate GR in the nucleus. Completing these networks with an exogenous nestin, respectively an exogenous vimentin restores cytoplasmic anchoring of GR to the IF system. Thus, heteromeric filaments provide the basis for anchoring of GR. The reaction pattern with phospho-GR specific antibodies and the presence of the chaperone HSC70 suggest that specifically the unliganded receptor is anchored to the IF system. Ligand addition releases GR from IFs and shifts the receptor into the nucleus. Suppression of nestin by specific shRNA abolishes anchoring of GR, induces its accumulation in the nucleus and provokes an irreversible G1/S cell cycle arrest. Suppression of GR prior to that of nestin prevents entry into the arrest. The data give evidence that nestin/vimentin specific anchoring modulates growth suppression by GR. We hypothesize that expression of nestin is a major determinant in suppression of anti-proliferative activity of GR in undifferentiated tissue and facilitates activation of this growth control in a precise tissue and differentiation dependent manner. PMID:19562035

  18. Insertion of a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored enzyme into liposomes.

    PubMed

    Ronzon, F; Morandat, S; Roux, B; Bortolato, M

    2004-02-01

    Incorporation of alkaline phosphatase (AP), a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein, into liposomes containing detergent, followed by detergent removal with hydrophobic resin was performed. Incorporation media were collected during different steps of detergent removal and were analyzed by flotation in sucrose gradient. The presence of protein was checked by measuring enzymatic activity, while the presence of (3)H-radio-labelled liposomes was followed by determination of the radioactivity. The incorporation yield of the protein into liposomes increased with incubation time in presence of hydrophobic resin. Protein was also incorporated at different protein/lipid ratios. At the highest protein lipid ratio, our data showed that 260 molecules of GPI-linked AP (AP-GPI) could be associated with one liposome, corresponding to 65% vesicle coverage. Finally, observations by electron cryomicroscopy indicated (i) that the protein seemed exclusively associated with the lipid bilayer via the GPI-anchor, as shown by the distance-about 2.5 nm-between the protein core and the liposome membrane; (ii) that the AP-GPI distribution was heterogeneous on the liposome surface, forming clusters of protein.

  19. Accessorizing and anchoring the LINC complex for multifunctionality

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wakam; Worman, Howard J.

    2015-01-01

    The linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex, composed of outer and inner nuclear membrane Klarsicht, ANC-1, and Syne homology (KASH) and Sad1 and UNC-84 (SUN) proteins, respectively, connects the nucleus to cytoskeletal filaments and performs diverse functions including nuclear positioning, mechanotransduction, and meiotic chromosome movements. Recent studies have shed light on the source of this diversity by identifying factors associated with the complex that endow specific functions as well as those that differentially anchor the complex within the nucleus. Additional diversity may be provided by accessory factors that reorganize the complex into higher-ordered arrays. As core components of the LINC complex are associated with several diseases, understanding the role of accessory and anchoring proteins could provide insights into pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:25559183

  20. Glycosylphosphatidylinositols: More than just an anchor?

    PubMed

    Bate, Clive; Nolan, William; Williams, Alun

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the role of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors that attach some proteins to cell membranes. Far from being biologically inert, GPIs influence the targeting, intracellular trafficking and function of the attached protein. Our recent paper demonstrated the role of sialic acid on the GPI of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)). The "prion diseases" arise following the conversion of PrP(C) to a disease-associated isoform called PrP(Sc) or "prion". Our paper showed that desialylated PrP(C) inhibited PrP(Sc) formation. Aggregated PrP(Sc) creates a signaling platform in the cell membrane incorporating and activating cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), an enzyme that regulates PrP(C) trafficking and hence PrP(Sc) formation. The presence of desialylated PrP(C) caused the dissociation of cPLA2 from PrP-containing platforms, reduced the activation of cPLA2 and inhibited PrP(Sc) production. We concluded that sialic acid contained within the GPI attached to PrP(C) modifies local membrane microenvironments that are important in PrP-mediated cell signaling and PrP(Sc) formation. PMID:27195066

  1. Glycosylphosphatidylinositols: More than just an anchor?

    PubMed Central

    Bate, Clive; Nolan, William; Williams, Alun

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT There is increasing interest in the role of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors that attach some proteins to cell membranes. Far from being biologically inert, GPIs influence the targeting, intracellular trafficking and function of the attached protein. Our recent paper demonstrated the role of sialic acid on the GPI of the cellular prion protein (PrPC). The “prion diseases” arise following the conversion of PrPC to a disease-associated isoform called PrPSc or “prion”. Our paper showed that desialylated PrPC inhibited PrPSc formation. Aggregated PrPSc creates a signaling platform in the cell membrane incorporating and activating cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), an enzyme that regulates PrPC trafficking and hence PrPSc formation. The presence of desialylated PrPC caused the dissociation of cPLA2 from PrP-containing platforms, reduced the activation of cPLA2 and inhibited PrPSc production. We concluded that sialic acid contained within the GPI attached to PrPC modifies local membrane microenvironments that are important in PrP-mediated cell signaling and PrPSc formation. PMID:27195066

  2. A lunar/Martian anchor emplacement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clinton, Dustin; Holt, Andrew; Jantz, Erik; Kaufman, Teresa; Martin, James; Weber, Reed

    1993-01-01

    On the Moon or Mars, it is necessary to have an anchor, or a stable, fixed point able to support the forces necessary to rescue a stuck vehicle, act as a stake for a tent in a Martian gale, act as a fulcrum in the erection of general construction poles, or support tent-like regolith shields. The anchor emplacement system must be highly autonomous. It must supply the energy and stability for anchor deployment. The goal of the anchor emplacement system project is to design and build a prototype anchor and to design a conceptual anchor emplacement system. Various anchors were tested in a 1.3 cubic meter test bed containing decomposed granite. A simulated lunar soil was created by adjusting the moisture and compaction characteristics of the soil. We conducted tests on emplacement torque, amount of force the anchor could withstand before failure, anchor pull out force at various angles, and soil disturbances caused by placing the anchor. A single helix auger anchor performed best in this test bed based on energy to emplace, and the ultimate holding capacity. The anchor was optimized for ultimate holding capacity, minimum emplacement torque, and minimum soil disturbance in sandy soils yielding the following dimensions: helix diameter (4.45 cm), pitch (1.27 cm), blade thickness (0.15 cm), total length (35.56 cm), shaft diameter (0.78 cm), and a weight of 212.62 g. The experimental results showed that smaller diameter, single-helix augers held more force than larger diameter augers for a given depth. The emplacement system consists of a flywheel and a motor for power, sealed in a protective box supported by four legs. The flywheel system was chosen over a gear system based on its increased reliability in the lunar environment.

  3. The glycosyl phosphatidylinositol anchor is critical for Ly-6A/E- mediated T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Ly-6E, a glycosyl phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored murine alloantigen that can activate T cells upon antibody cross-linking, has been converted into an integral membrane protein by gene fusion. This fusion product, designated Ly-6EDb, was characterized in transiently transfected COS cells and demonstrated to be an integral cell surface membrane protein. Furthermore, the fusion antigen can be expressed on the surface of the BW5147 class "E" mutant cell line, which only expresses integral membrane proteins but not GPI-anchored proteins. The capability of this fusion antigen to activate T cells was examined by gene transfer studies in D10G4.1, a type 2 T cell helper clones. When transfected into D10 cells, the GPI-anchored Ly-6E antigen, as well as the endogenous GPI-anchored Ly-6A antigen, can initiate T cell activation upon antibody cross-linking. In contrast, the transmembrane anchored Ly-6EDb antigen was unable to mediate T cell activation. Our results demonstrate that the GPI-anchor is critical to Ly-6A/E-mediated T cell activation. PMID:1825084

  4. Spatial regulation of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase during chemotactic cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Alan K.; Baldor, Linda C.; Hogan, Brian P.

    2005-01-01

    Historically, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) has a paradoxical role in cell motility, having been shown to both facilitate and inhibit actin cytoskeletal dynamics and cell migration. In an effort to understand this dichotomy, we show here that PKA is regulated in subcellular space during cell migration. Immunofluorescence microscopy and biochemical enrichment of pseudopodia showed that type II regulatory subunits of PKA and PKA activity are enriched in protrusive cellular structures formed during chemotaxis. This enrichment correlates with increased phosphorylation of key cytoskeletal substrates for PKA, including the vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) and the protein tyrosine phosphatase containing a PEST motif. Importantly, inhibition of PKA activity or its ability to interact with A kinase anchoring proteins inhibited the activity of the Rac GTPase within pseudopodia. This effect correlated with both decreased guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity and increased GTPase activating protein activity. Finally, inhibition of PKA anchoring, like inhibition of total PKA activity, inhibited pseudopod formation and chemotactic cell migration. These data demonstrate that spatial regulation of PKA via anchoring is an important facet of normal chemotactic cell movement. PMID:16176981

  5. Spatial regulation of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase during chemotactic cell migration.

    PubMed

    Howe, Alan K; Baldor, Linda C; Hogan, Brian P

    2005-10-01

    Historically, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) has a paradoxical role in cell motility, having been shown to both facilitate and inhibit actin cytoskeletal dynamics and cell migration. In an effort to understand this dichotomy, we show here that PKA is regulated in subcellular space during cell migration. Immunofluorescence microscopy and biochemical enrichment of pseudopodia showed that type II regulatory subunits of PKA and PKA activity are enriched in protrusive cellular structures formed during chemotaxis. This enrichment correlates with increased phosphorylation of key cytoskeletal substrates for PKA, including the vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) and the protein tyrosine phosphatase containing a PEST motif. Importantly, inhibition of PKA activity or its ability to interact with A kinase anchoring proteins inhibited the activity of the Rac GTPase within pseudopodia. This effect correlated with both decreased guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity and increased GTPase activating protein activity. Finally, inhibition of PKA anchoring, like inhibition of total PKA activity, inhibited pseudopod formation and chemotactic cell migration. These data demonstrate that spatial regulation of PKA via anchoring is an important facet of normal chemotactic cell movement.

  6. KID, a Kinase Inhibitor Database project.

    PubMed

    Collin, O; Meijer, L

    1999-01-01

    The Kinase Inhibitor Database is a small specialized database dedicated to the gathering of information on protein kinase inhibitors. The database is accessible through the World Wide Web system and gives access to structural and bibliographic information on protein kinase inhibitors. The data in the database will be collected and submitted by researchers working in the kinase inhibitor field. The submitted data will be checked by the curator of the database before entry.

  7. Anchored Instruction and Anchored Assessment: An Ecological Approach to Measuring Situated Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Michael F.; Kulikowich, Jonna M.

    Anchored instruction and anchored assessment are described and illustrated through a mathematics problem from the Jasper problem solving series developed at Vanderbilt University in Nashville (Tennessee). Anchored instruction is instruction situated in a context complex enough to provide meaning and reasons for why information is useful. Problems…

  8. Identification of Ski as a target for Aurora A kinase

    PubMed Central

    Mosquera, Jocelyn; Armisen, Ricardo; Zhao, Hong Ling; Rojas, Diego A.; Maldonado, Edio; Tapia, Julio C; Colombo, Alicia; Hayman, Michael J; Marcelain, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    Ski is a negative regulator of the transforming growth factor-β and other signalling pathways. The absence of SKI in mouse fibroblasts leads to chromosome segregation defects and genomic instability, suggesting a role for Ski during mitosis. At this stage, Ski is phosphorylated but to date little is known about the kinases involved in this process. Here, we show that Aurora A kinase is able to phosphorylate Ski in vitro. In vivo, Aurora A and Ski co-localized at the centrosomes and co-immunoprecipitated. Conversely, a C-terminal truncation mutant of Ski (SkiΔ491–728) lacking a coiled-coil domain, displayed decreased centrosomal localization. This mutant no longer co-immunoprecipitated with Aurora-A in vivo, but was still phosphorylated in vitro, indicating that the Ski-Aurora A interaction takes place at the centrosomes. These data identify Ski as a novel target of Aurora A and contribute to an understanding of the role of these proteins in the mitotic process. PMID:21600873

  9. 33 CFR 164.19 - Requirements for vessels at anchor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... anchor. 164.19 Section 164.19 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... vessels at anchor. The master or person in charge of each vessel that is anchored shall ensure that: (a) A proper anchor watch is maintained; (b) Procedures are followed to detect a dragging anchor; and...

  10. Observed Score Equating Using a Mini-Version Anchor and an Anchor with Less Spread of Difficulty: A Comparison Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Jinghua; Sinharay, Sandip; Holland, Paul; Feigenbaum, Miriam; Curley, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Two different types of anchors are investigated in this study: a mini-version anchor and an anchor that has a less spread of difficulty than the tests to be equated. The latter is referred to as a midi anchor. The impact of these two different types of anchors on observed score equating are evaluated and compared with respect to systematic error…

  11. 21 CFR 872.3130 - Preformed anchor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Preformed anchor. 872.3130 Section 872.3130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3130 Preformed anchor. (a) Identification. A...

  12. 21 CFR 872.3130 - Preformed anchor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Preformed anchor. 872.3130 Section 872.3130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3130 Preformed anchor. (a) Identification. A...

  13. DSSC anchoring groups: a surface dependent decision.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, C; Bowler, D R

    2014-05-14

    Electrodes in dye sensitised solar cells are typically nanocrystalline anatase TiO2 with a majority (1 0 1) surface exposed. Generally the sensitising dye employs a carboxylic anchoring moiety through which it adheres to the TiO₂ surface. Recent interest in exploiting the properties of differing TiO₂ electrode morphologies, such as rutile nanorods exposing the (1 1 0) surface and anatase electrodes with high percentages of the (0 0 1) surface exposed, begs the question of whether this anchoring strategy is best, irrespective of the majority surface exposed. Here we address this question by presenting density functional theory calculations contrasting the binding properties of two promising anchoring groups, phosphonic acid and boronic acid, to that of carboxylic acid. Anchor-electrode interactions are studied for the prototypical anatase (1 0 1) surface, along with the anatase (0 0 1) and rutile (1 1 0) surfaces. Finally the effect of using these alternative anchoring groups to bind a typical coumarin dye (NKX-2311) to these TiO₂ substrates is examined. Significant differences in the binding properties are found depending on both the anchor and surface, illustrating that the choice of anchor is necessarily dependent upon the surface exposed in the electrode. In particular the boronic acid is found to show the potential to be an excellent anchor choice for electrodes exposing the anatase (0 0 1) surface.

  14. 30 CFR 57.7032 - Anchoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Anchoring. 57.7032 Section 57.7032 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Drilling-Underground Only § 57.7032 Anchoring. Columns and the drills mounted on them shall be...

  15. Anchors of Religious Commitment in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Layton, Emily; Dollahite, David C.; Hardy, Sam A.

    2011-01-01

    This study explores adolescent religious commitment using qualitative data from a religiously diverse (Jewish, Christian, Muslim) sample of 80 adolescents. A new construct, "anchors of religious commitment," grounded in interview data, is proposed to describe what adolescents commit to as a part of their religious identity. Seven anchors of…

  16. Method of fabrication of anchored nanostructure materials

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2013-11-26

    Methods for fabricating anchored nanostructure materials are described. The methods include heating a nano-catalyst under a protective atmosphere to a temperature ranging from about 450.degree. C. to about 1500.degree. C. and contacting the heated nano-catalysts with an organic vapor to affix carbon nanostructures to the nano-catalysts and form the anchored nanostructure material.

  17. AKAP350 Interaction with cdc42 Interacting Protein 4 at the Golgi Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Larocca, M. Cecilia; Shanks, Ryan A.; Tian, Lan; Nelson, David L.; Stewart, Donn M.; Goldenring, James R.

    2004-01-01

    The A kinase anchoring protein 350 (AKAP350) is a multiply spliced type II protein kinase A anchoring protein that localizes to the centrosomes in most cells and to the Golgi apparatus in epithelial cells. In the present study, we sought to identify AKAP350 interacting proteins that could yield insights into AKAP350 function at the Golgi apparatus. Using yeast two-hybrid and pull-down assays, we found that AKAP350 interacts with a family of structurally related proteins, including FBP17, FBP17b, and cdc42 interacting protein 4 (CIP4). CIP4 interacts with the GTP-bound form of cdc42, with the Wiscott Aldrich Syndrome group of proteins, and with microtubules, and exerts regulatory effects on cytoskeleton and membrane trafficking. CIP4 is phosphorylated by protein kinase A in vitro, and elevation of intracellular cyclic AMP with forskolin stimulates in situ phosphorylation of CIP4. Our results indicate that CIP4 interacts with AKAP350 at the Golgi apparatus and that either disruption of this interaction by expressing the CIP4 binding domain in AKAP350, or reduction of AKAP350 expression by RNA interference leads to changes in Golgi structure. The results suggest that AKAP350 and CIP4 influence the maintenance of normal Golgi apparatus structure. PMID:15047863

  18. A Tenebrio molitor GPI-anchored alkaline phosphatase is involved in binding of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa to brush border membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Zúñiga-Navarrete, Fernando; Gómez, Isabel; Peña, Guadalupe; Bravo, Alejandra; Soberón, Mario

    2013-03-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins recognizes their target cells in part by the binding to glycosyl-phosphatidyl-inositol (GPI) anchored proteins such as aminopeptidase-N (APN) or alkaline phosphatases (ALP). Treatment of Tenebrio molitor brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) with phospholipase C that cleaves out GPI-anchored proteins from the membranes, showed that GPI-anchored proteins are involved in binding of Cry3Aa toxin to BBMV. A 68 kDa GPI-anchored ALP was shown to bind Cry3Aa by toxin overlay assays. The 68 kDa GPI-anchored ALP was preferentially expressed in early instar larvae in comparison to late instar larvae. Our work shows for the first time that GPI-anchored ALP is important for Cry3Aa binding to T. molitor BBMV suggesting that the mode of action of Cry toxins is conserved in different insect orders.

  19. A Tenebrio molitor GPI-anchored alkaline phosphatase is involved in binding of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa to brush border membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Zúñiga-Navarrete, Fernando; Gómez, Isabel; Peña, Guadalupe; Bravo, Alejandra; Soberón, Mario

    2013-03-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins recognizes their target cells in part by the binding to glycosyl-phosphatidyl-inositol (GPI) anchored proteins such as aminopeptidase-N (APN) or alkaline phosphatases (ALP). Treatment of Tenebrio molitor brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) with phospholipase C that cleaves out GPI-anchored proteins from the membranes, showed that GPI-anchored proteins are involved in binding of Cry3Aa toxin to BBMV. A 68 kDa GPI-anchored ALP was shown to bind Cry3Aa by toxin overlay assays. The 68 kDa GPI-anchored ALP was preferentially expressed in early instar larvae in comparison to late instar larvae. Our work shows for the first time that GPI-anchored ALP is important for Cry3Aa binding to T. molitor BBMV suggesting that the mode of action of Cry toxins is conserved in different insect orders. PMID:22743140

  20. Both the hydrophobicity and a positively charged region flanking the C-terminal region of the transmembrane domain of signal-anchored proteins play critical roles in determining their targeting specificity to the endoplasmic reticulum or endosymbiotic organelles in Arabidopsis cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junho; Lee, Hyunkyung; Kim, Jinho; Lee, Sumin; Kim, Dae Heon; Kim, Sanguk; Hwang, Inhwan

    2011-04-01

    Proteins localized to various cellular and subcellular membranes play pivotal roles in numerous cellular activities. Accordingly, in eukaryotic cells, the biogenesis of organellar proteins is an essential process requiring their correct localization among various cellular and subcellular membranes. Localization of these proteins is determined by either cotranslational or posttranslational mechanisms, depending on the final destination. However, it is not fully understood how the targeting specificity of membrane proteins is determined in plant cells. Here, we investigate the mechanism by which signal-anchored (SA) proteins are differentially targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or endosymbiotic organelles using in vivo targeting, subcellular fractionation, and bioinformatics approaches. For targeting SA proteins to endosymbiotic organelles, the C-terminal positively charged region (CPR) flanking the transmembrane domain (TMD) is necessary but not sufficient. The hydrophobicity of the TMD in CPR-containing proteins also plays a critical role in determining targeting specificity; TMDs with a hydrophobicity value >0.4 on the Wimley and White scale are targeted primarily to the ER, whereas TMDs with lower values are targeted to endosymbiotic organelles. Based on these data, we propose that the CPR and the hydrophobicity of the TMD play a critical role in determining the targeting specificity between the ER and endosymbiotic organelles.

  1. High-affinity binding of short peptides to major histocompatibility complex class II molecules by anchor combinations.

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, J; Belunis, C; Bolin, D; Papadopoulos, J; Walsky, R; Higelin, J; Danho, W; Sinigaglia, F; Nagy, Z A

    1994-01-01

    We have previously identified four anchor positions in HLA-DRB1*0101-binding peptides, and three anchors involved in peptide binding to DRB1*0401 and DRB1*1101 molecules, by screening of an M13 peptide display library (approximately 20 million independent nonapeptides) for DR-binding activity. In this study, high stringency screening of the M13 library for DRB1*0401 binding has resulted in identification of three further anchor positions. Taken together, a peptide-binding motif has been obtained, in which six of seven positions show enrichment of certain residues. We have demonstrated an additive effect of anchors in two different ways: (i) the addition of more anchors is shown to compensate for progressive truncation of designer peptides; (ii) the incorporation of an increasing number of anchors into 6- or 7-residue-long designer peptides is shown to result in a gradual increase of binding affinity to the level of 13-residue-long high-affinity epitopes. The anchor at relative position 1 seems to be obligatory, in that its substitution abrogates binding completely, whereas the elimination of other anchors results only in partial loss of binding affinity. The spacing between anchors is critical, since their effect is lost by shifting them one position toward the N or C terminus. The information born out of this study has been successfully used to identify DR-binding sequences from natural proteins. PMID:8183931

  2. Anchored nanostructure materials and method of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2012-11-27

    Anchored nanostructure materials and methods for their fabrication are described. The anchored nanostructure materials may utilize nano-catalysts that include powder-based or solid-based support materials. The support material may comprise metal, such as NiAl, ceramic, a cermet, or silicon or other metalloid. Typically, nanoparticles are disposed adjacent a surface of the support material. Nanostructures may be formed as anchored to nanoparticles that are adjacent the surface of the support material by heating the nano-catalysts and then exposing the nano-catalysts to an organic vapor. The nanostructures are typically single wall or multi-wall carbon nanotubes.

  3. Anchoring Revisited: The Role of the Comparative Question

    PubMed Central

    Grau, Ina; Bohner, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    When people estimate a numeric value after judging whether it is larger or smaller than a high or low anchor value (comparative question), estimates are biased in the direction of the anchor. One explanation for this anchoring effect is that people selectively access knowledge consistent with the anchor value as part of a positive test strategy. Two studies (total N = 184) supported the alternative explanation that people access knowledge consistent with their own answer to the comparative question. Specifically, anchoring effects emerged when the answer to the comparative question was unexpected (lower than the low anchor or higher than the high anchor). For expected answers (lower than the high anchor or higher than the low anchor), however, anchoring effects were attenuated or reversed. The anchor value itself was almost never reported as an absolute estimate. PMID:24454953

  4. Anchor Coil Technique for Arteriovenous Fistula Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Kanemaru, Kazuya; Ezura, Masayuki; Nishiyama, Yoshihisa; Yagi, Takashi; Yoshioka, Hideyuki; Fukumoto, Yuichiro; Horikoshi, Toru; Kinouch, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Summary We describe a case of arteriovenous fistula (AVF) successfully treated by coil embolization with an anchor coil inserted in the varix to facilitate dense packing at the shunting site. AVF of the left anterior choroidal artery (AChoA) draining into the ipsilateral basal vein of Rosenthal was incidentally found in a newborn female. A single detachable coil was inserted as an anchor into the varix adjacent to the shunt, and the microcatheter was pulled back to the shunting point. Three more detachable coils were delivered at the shunting point without migration under the support of the anchor coil, and the AVF was successfully obliterated with preservation of AChoA blood flow. The anchor coil technique can reduce the risk of coil migration and the number of coils required. PMID:24976089

  5. Behavior of soil anchors under dynamic loads

    SciTech Connect

    Picornell, M.; Olague, B.

    1997-07-01

    Helical anchors placed in a cohesionless soil in a laboratory setting were tested under static and dynamic loads. The dynamic tests were performed after subjecting the anchors to a seating load. The dynamic load had an intensity that changed in sinusoidal fashion and was superimposed to the static seating loads. Although, the anchors have a static pull-out capacity, when the dynamic loads are applied the anchor experiences additional deformations for each load cycle. The deformations per cycle are initially high but then decrease to a nearly constant rate. Eventually, the constant rate increases suddenly accelerating until failure. This failure can take place even at small fractions of the static pull-out capacity. The rate of deformation per load cycle is found to increase for larger seating loads and for larger dynamic pulsating loads. The results of this study shows that the designer can only adjust loads to decrease the deformation rate to suit the design life of the structure.

  6. 21 CFR 872.3130 - Preformed anchor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3130 Preformed anchor. (a) Identification. A preformed... the platinum group intended to be incorporated into a dental appliance, such as a denture, to...

  7. Bone anchored hearing aids in children.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Jayesh; McDermott, Ann-Louise

    2015-01-01

    Bone-anchored hearing devices have evolved over recent years. This article provides an overview of the device history, indications, evolution of surgical technique, evidence for benefit and focuses on the challenges that are faced in the pediatric population.

  8. Applying a Targeted Label-free Approach using LC-MS AMT Tags to Evaluate Changes in Protein Phosphorylation Following Phosphatase Inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Feng; Jaitly, Navdeep; Jayachandran, Hemalatha; Lou, Quanzhou; Monroe, Matthew E.; Du, Xiuxia; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Zhang, Rui; Anderson, David J.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Moore, Ronald J.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Ding, Shi-Jian; Lipton, Mary S.; Camp, David G.; Udseth, Harold R.; Smith, Richard D.; Rossie, Sandra S.

    2007-10-12

    To identify phosphoproteins regulated by the phosphoprotein phosphatase (PPP) family of S/T phosphatases, we performed a large-scale characterization of changes in protein phosphorylation on extracts from HeLa cells treated with or without calyculin A, a potent PPP enzyme inhibitor. A label-free comparative Phosphoproteomics approach using immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography and targeted tandem mass spectrometry was employed to discover and identify signatures based upon distinctive changes in abundance. Overall, 232 proteins were identified as either direct or indirect targets for PPP enzyme regulation. Most of the present identifications represent novel PPP enzyme targets at the level of both phosphorylation site and protein. These include phosphorylation sites within signaling proteins such as p120 Catenin, A Kinase Anchoring Protein 8, JunB, and Type II Phosphatidyl Inositol 4 Kinase. These data can be used to define underlying signaling pathways and events regulated by the PPP family of S/T phosphatases.

  9. Improving performance by anchoring movement and "nerves".

    PubMed

    Iso-Ahola, Seppo E; Dotson, Charles O; Jagodinsky, Adam E; Clark, Lily C; Smallwood, Lorraine L; Wilburn, Christopher; Weimar, Wendi H; Miller, Matthew W

    2016-10-01

    Golf's governing bodies' recent decision to ban all putting styles "anchoring one end of the club against the body" bridges an important practical problem with psychological theory. We report the first experiment testing whether anchoring provides technical and/or psychological advantage in competitive performance. Many "greats" of professional golf from Arnold Palmer and Jack Nicklaus to Tiger Woods have argued against anchoring, believing that it takes "nerves" out of competitive performance and therefore artificially levels the playing field. To shed more light on the issue, we tested participants' performance with anchored and unanchored putters under low and high pressure when controlling for the putter length. We found no statistically significant evidence for a technical advantage due to anchoring but a clear psychological advantage: participants who anchored their putters significantly outperformed unanchored counterparts under high, but not low, pressure. Results provide tentative evidence for the ban's justification from a competitive standpoint. However, before any definite conclusions can be made, more research is needed when using high-level golfers.

  10. Improving performance by anchoring movement and "nerves".

    PubMed

    Iso-Ahola, Seppo E; Dotson, Charles O; Jagodinsky, Adam E; Clark, Lily C; Smallwood, Lorraine L; Wilburn, Christopher; Weimar, Wendi H; Miller, Matthew W

    2016-10-01

    Golf's governing bodies' recent decision to ban all putting styles "anchoring one end of the club against the body" bridges an important practical problem with psychological theory. We report the first experiment testing whether anchoring provides technical and/or psychological advantage in competitive performance. Many "greats" of professional golf from Arnold Palmer and Jack Nicklaus to Tiger Woods have argued against anchoring, believing that it takes "nerves" out of competitive performance and therefore artificially levels the playing field. To shed more light on the issue, we tested participants' performance with anchored and unanchored putters under low and high pressure when controlling for the putter length. We found no statistically significant evidence for a technical advantage due to anchoring but a clear psychological advantage: participants who anchored their putters significantly outperformed unanchored counterparts under high, but not low, pressure. Results provide tentative evidence for the ban's justification from a competitive standpoint. However, before any definite conclusions can be made, more research is needed when using high-level golfers. PMID:27459587

  11. 46 CFR 28.235 - Anchors and radar reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Anchors and radar reflectors. 28.235 Section 28.235....235 Anchors and radar reflectors. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with an anchor(s) and chain(s), cable... rigged with gear that provides a radar signature from a distance of 6 miles, each nonmetallic hull...

  12. 46 CFR 28.235 - Anchors and radar reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Anchors and radar reflectors. 28.235 Section 28.235....235 Anchors and radar reflectors. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with an anchor(s) and chain(s), cable... rigged with gear that provides a radar signature from a distance of 6 miles, each nonmetallic hull...

  13. 46 CFR 28.235 - Anchors and radar reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Anchors and radar reflectors. 28.235 Section 28.235....235 Anchors and radar reflectors. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with an anchor(s) and chain(s), cable... rigged with gear that provides a radar signature from a distance of 6 miles, each nonmetallic hull...

  14. 46 CFR 28.235 - Anchors and radar reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Anchors and radar reflectors. 28.235 Section 28.235....235 Anchors and radar reflectors. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with an anchor(s) and chain(s), cable... rigged with gear that provides a radar signature from a distance of 6 miles, each nonmetallic hull...

  15. 46 CFR 28.235 - Anchors and radar reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Anchors and radar reflectors. 28.235 Section 28.235....235 Anchors and radar reflectors. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with an anchor(s) and chain(s), cable... rigged with gear that provides a radar signature from a distance of 6 miles, each nonmetallic hull...

  16. The Use of Comics-Based Cases in Anchored Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kneller, Matthew F.

    2009-01-01

    The primary purpose of this research was to understand how comics fulfill the role of anchor in an anchored instruction learning environment. Anchored instruction addresses the inert knowledge problem through the use of realistic multimedia stories, or "anchors," that embed a problem and the necessary data to solve it within the narrative. In the…

  17. Anchors as Semantic Primes in Value Construction: An EEG Study of the Anchoring Effect

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Qiang; Qiu, Wenwei

    2015-01-01

    Previous research regarding anchoring effects has demonstrated that human judgments are often assimilated to irrelevant information. Studies have demonstrated that anchors influence the economic valuation of various products and experiences; however, the cognitive explanations of this effect remain controversial, and its neural mechanisms have rarely been explored. In the current study, we conducted an electroencephalography (EEG) experiment to investigate the anchoring effect on willingness to accept (WTA) for an aversive hedonic experience and the role of anchors in this judgment heuristic. The behavioral results demonstrated that random numbers affect participants’ WTA for listening to pieces of noise. The participants asked for higher pay after comparing their WTA with higher numbers. The EEG results indicated that anchors also influenced the neural underpinnings of the valuation process. Specifically, when a higher anchor number was drawn, larger P2 and late positive potential amplitudes were elicited, reflecting the anticipation of more intensive pain from the subsequent noise. Moreover, higher anchors induced a stronger theta band power increase compared with lower anchors when subjects listened to the noises, indicating that the participants felt more unpleasant during the actual experience of the noise. The levels of unpleasantness during both anticipation and experience were consistent with the semantic information implied by the anchors. Therefore, these data suggest that a semantic priming process underlies the anchoring effect in WTA. This study provides proof for the robustness of the anchoring effect and neural evidence of the semantic priming model. Our findings indicate that activated contextual information, even seemingly irrelevant, can be embedded in the construction of economic value in the brain. PMID:26439926

  18. Anchors as Semantic Primes in Value Construction: An EEG Study of the Anchoring Effect.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qingguo; Li, Diandian; Shen, Qiang; Qiu, Wenwei

    2015-01-01

    Previous research regarding anchoring effects has demonstrated that human judgments are often assimilated to irrelevant information. Studies have demonstrated that anchors influence the economic valuation of various products and experiences; however, the cognitive explanations of this effect remain controversial, and its neural mechanisms have rarely been explored. In the current study, we conducted an electroencephalography (EEG) experiment to investigate the anchoring effect on willingness to accept (WTA) for an aversive hedonic experience and the role of anchors in this judgment heuristic. The behavioral results demonstrated that random numbers affect participants' WTA for listening to pieces of noise. The participants asked for higher pay after comparing their WTA with higher numbers. The EEG results indicated that anchors also influenced the neural underpinnings of the valuation process. Specifically, when a higher anchor number was drawn, larger P2 and late positive potential amplitudes were elicited, reflecting the anticipation of more intensive pain from the subsequent noise. Moreover, higher anchors induced a stronger theta band power increase compared with lower anchors when subjects listened to the noises, indicating that the participants felt more unpleasant during the actual experience of the noise. The levels of unpleasantness during both anticipation and experience were consistent with the semantic information implied by the anchors. Therefore, these data suggest that a semantic priming process underlies the anchoring effect in WTA. This study provides proof for the robustness of the anchoring effect and neural evidence of the semantic priming model. Our findings indicate that activated contextual information, even seemingly irrelevant, can be embedded in the construction of economic value in the brain.

  19. Anchors as Semantic Primes in Value Construction: An EEG Study of the Anchoring Effect.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qingguo; Li, Diandian; Shen, Qiang; Qiu, Wenwei

    2015-01-01

    Previous research regarding anchoring effects has demonstrated that human judgments are often assimilated to irrelevant information. Studies have demonstrated that anchors influence the economic valuation of various products and experiences; however, the cognitive explanations of this effect remain controversial, and its neural mechanisms have rarely been explored. In the current study, we conducted an electroencephalography (EEG) experiment to investigate the anchoring effect on willingness to accept (WTA) for an aversive hedonic experience and the role of anchors in this judgment heuristic. The behavioral results demonstrated that random numbers affect participants' WTA for listening to pieces of noise. The participants asked for higher pay after comparing their WTA with higher numbers. The EEG results indicated that anchors also influenced the neural underpinnings of the valuation process. Specifically, when a higher anchor number was drawn, larger P2 and late positive potential amplitudes were elicited, reflecting the anticipation of more intensive pain from the subsequent noise. Moreover, higher anchors induced a stronger theta band power increase compared with lower anchors when subjects listened to the noises, indicating that the participants felt more unpleasant during the actual experience of the noise. The levels of unpleasantness during both anticipation and experience were consistent with the semantic information implied by the anchors. Therefore, these data suggest that a semantic priming process underlies the anchoring effect in WTA. This study provides proof for the robustness of the anchoring effect and neural evidence of the semantic priming model. Our findings indicate that activated contextual information, even seemingly irrelevant, can be embedded in the construction of economic value in the brain. PMID:26439926

  20. Monitoring ground anchor using non-destructive ground anchor integrity test (NDT-GRANIT)

    SciTech Connect

    Robbany, Z. Handayani, G.

    2015-09-30

    Monitoring at ground anchor commonly uses a pull out test method, therefor we developing a non-destructive ground anchor integrity testing (NDT-GRANIT). NDT-GRANIT using the principle of seismic waves that have been modified into form of sweep signal, the signal will be demodulated, filtered, and Fourier transformation (inverse discrete Fourier transform) so the data can be interpreted reflected wave from the ground anchor. The method was applied to determine whether the ground anchor still gripped in the subsurface by looking the attenuation of the wave generated sources. From the result we can see that ground anchor does not grip. To validate the results of the comparison method of measurement used pile integrity test.

  1. Polymer's anchoring behavior in liquid crystal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yue

    The current dissertation mainly discusses about the polymers anchoring behavior in liquid crystal cells in two aspects: surface interaction and bulk interaction. The goal of the research is to understand the fundamental physics of anchoring strength and apply the knowledge to liquid crystal display devices. Researchers proposed two main contributors to the surface anchoring strength: the micro grooves generated by external force and the polymer chain's alignment. Both of them has experimental proofs. In the current study, explorations were made to understand the mechanisms of surface anchoring strength and easy axis of surface liquid crystal provided by rubbed polymer alignment layer. The work includes not only the variation of the alignment layer itself such as thickness(Chapter 3) and polymer side chain (Chapter 5), but also the variation of external conditions such as temperature (Chapter 4) and rubbing condition (Chapter 6). To determine the polar and azimuthal anchoring strengths, Rapini-Papoular's expression was applied. However, it was discovered that higher order terms may be required in order to fit the experimental result or theoretically predict unique anchoring behaviors (Chapter 2, Chapter 6). SEM and AFM technologies were introduced to gather the actual structures of polymer alignment layer and extrapolate the alignment of liquid crystal in a micro scale. The result shows that the anchoring strength can be adjusted by the layer thickness, side chain structure, while the easy axis direction can be adjusted by a second rubbing direction. In addition, different anchoring conditions combined with liquid crystal's elastic energy can generate quite different forms of liquid crystals (Chapter 7). In the study of bulk alignment, the main contrition from the current dissertation is applying the understanding of anchoring behavior to optimizing actual switchable devices. Conventional PDLC performance can be tuned with the knowledge of the polymer and the liquid

  2. Isolation of a potential anchoring motif based on proteome analysis of Escherichia coli and its use for cell surface display.

    PubMed

    Yim, Sung Sun; An, Seul Ji; Han, Mee-Jung; Choi, Jae Woong; Jeong, Ki Jun

    2013-06-01

    For bacterial cell surface display, the target protein needs to be linked to an anchoring motif, and it is essential to choose an appropriate anchoring motif for efficient and stable display of the protein on the cell surface. To isolate a potential anchoring motif that would allow a stable and enhanced display of target proteins on the surface of an Escherichia coli host, we analyzed the outer membrane proteome of E. coli. On the basis of this proteomic analysis, the outer membrane protein X (OmpX), which has a small, monomeric β-barrel structure and is highly expressed, was selected as a potential anchoring motif. The role of OmpX as an anchoring motif for cell surface display was demonstrated using three important industrial enzymes: endoxylanase, lipase, and alkaline phosphatase. Two different positions (Lys(122), Val(160)) in the extracellular loops of OmpX were examined for C-terminal fusion, and the biological activities and localization of the displayed enzymes were analyzed. All three enzymes examined were efficiently displayed on the E. coli cell surface with high activity. These results reveal that the use of OmpX as an anchoring motif is an efficient method to display functional enzymes on the surface of an E. coli host.

  3. Structural models of the membrane anchors of envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 from pestiviruses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jimin; Li, Yue; Modis, Yorgo

    2014-01-01

    The membrane anchors of viral envelope proteins play essential roles in cell entry. Recent crystal structures of the ectodomain of envelope protein E2 from a pestivirus suggest that E2 belongs to a novel structural class of membrane fusion machinery. Based on geometric constraints from the E2 structures, we generated atomic models of the E1 and E2 membrane anchors using computational approaches. The E1 anchor contains two amphipathic perimembrane helices and one transmembrane helix; the E2 anchor contains a short helical hairpin stabilized in the membrane by an arginine residue, similar to flaviviruses. A pair of histidine residues in the E2 ectodomain may participate in pH sensing. The proposed atomic models point to Cys987 in E2 as the site of disulfide bond linkage with E1 to form E1–E2 heterodimers. The membrane anchor models provide structural constraints for the disulfide bonding pattern and overall backbone conformation of the E1 ectodomain. PMID:24725935

  4. Structural models of the membrane anchors of envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 from pestiviruses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jimin; Li, Yue; Modis, Yorgo

    2014-04-01

    The membrane anchors of viral envelope proteins play essential roles in cell entry. Recent crystal structures of the ectodomain of envelope protein E2 from a pestivirus suggest that E2 belongs to a novel structural class of membrane fusion machinery. Based on geometric constraints from the E2 structures, we generated atomic models of the E1 and E2 membrane anchors using computational approaches. The E1 anchor contains two amphipathic perimembrane helices and one transmembrane helix; the E2 anchor contains a short helical hairpin stabilized in the membrane by an arginine residue, similar to flaviviruses. A pair of histidine residues in the E2 ectodomain may participate in pH sensing. The proposed atomic models point to Cys987 in E2 as the site of disulfide bond linkage with E1 to form E1-E2 heterodimers. The membrane anchor models provide structural constraints for the disulfide bonding pattern and overall backbone conformation of the E1 ectodomain.

  5. Anchoring in rhythmic in-phase and antiphase visuomotor tracking.

    PubMed

    Roerdink, Melvyn; Bank, Paulina J M; Peper, C E; Beek, Peter J

    2013-04-01

    Rhythmic limb movements are often anchored at particular points in the movement cycle. Anchoring may reveal essential task-specific information for motor control. We examined the effect of tracking mode (in-phase, antiphase) and gaze direction (left, right) on anchoring in visuomotor tracking with and without concurrent visual feedback of the hand movement. For in-phase tracking, anchoring was observed at the foveated reversal point whereas for antiphase tracking anchoring was observed at both reversals, suggesting the presence of two reference points instead of one. Anchoring at the foveated reversal reflected gaze anchoring (i.e., coalignment of hand and gaze) while anchoring at the nonfoveated reversal reflected visuomotor synchronization (i.e., the hand was steered to the nonfoveated reversal coincident with a target reversal at the point of gaze). We propose that the number and location of anchor points play a crucial role in the underlying control by providing reference values for error correction processes.

  6. Fibre-Reinforced Adhesive for Structure Anchoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnat, J.; Bajer, M.

    2015-11-01

    The topic of this paper is the glue-concrete interface of bonded anchors loaded by tension force. The paper is closely focused on bond strength experiments using high strength concrete up to class C50/60 or higher together with pure epoxy resin and fibre-reinforced resin. The goal of this research is to find the limits of the effective use of such glue types in high performance concrete, and also to verify the most commonly used design methods for bonded anchors. The presented research includes experimental analysis of the glue-concrete interface and the influence of its parameters on anchor behaviour. The presented analysis shows some problems of the 'separated failure modes' approach and also presents experimentally verified bond strength values obtained for the currently most widespread glue types. Results of fibre reinforced epoxy resin are also presented in this paper.

  7. Multiple magnetic microrobot control using electrostatic anchoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawashe, Chytra; Floyd, Steven; Sitti, Metin

    2009-04-01

    Addressing power and control to individual untethered microrobots is a challenge for small-scale robotics. We present a 250×130×100 μm3 magnetic robot wirelessly driven by pulsed external magnetic fields. An induced stick-slip motion results in translation speeds over 8 mm/s. Control of multiple robots is achieved by an array of addressable electrostatic anchoring pads on the surface, which selectively fixes microrobots, preventing translation. We demonstrate control of two microrobots in both uncoupled individual motion and coupled symmetric motion. An estimated anchoring force of 23.0 μN is necessary to effectively fix each microrobot.

  8. Bond strength of glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) grouted anchors

    SciTech Connect

    Bellavance, E.; Xu, H.; Benmokrane, B.

    1995-11-01

    This paper describes the results of laboratory and field pull-out tests on cement grouted glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) anchors. As an alternative for grouted steel anchors, GFRP bars have many advantages over steel tendons, and can avoid corrosion and some difficulties in transportation, handling, and installation. Three types of 36 GFRP anchors and 20 steel anchors installed in three types of host media: steel pipe, concrete block, and rock mass were tested in the laboratory as well as in the field. The bond strength, load carrying capacity, load-displacement behavior, and critical bond length of cement grouted GFRP anchors were examined in comparison with conventional steel anchors.

  9. Cross-talk between calcium and protein kinase A in the regulation of cell migration.

    PubMed

    Howe, Alan K

    2011-10-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) and the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) are pleiotropic cellular regulators and both exert powerful, diverse effects on cytoskeletal dynamics, cell adhesion, and cell migration. Localization, by A-kinase-anchoring proteins (AKAPs), of PKA activity to the protrusive leading edge, integrins, and other regulators of cytoskeletal dynamics has emerged as an important facet of its role in cell migration. Additional recent work has firmly established the importance of Ca(2+) influx through mechanosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) channels and through store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) in cell migration. Finally, there is considerable evidence showing that these mechanisms of Ca(2+) influx and PKA regulation intersect--and often interact--and thus may work in concert to translate complex extracellular cues into the intracellular biochemical anisotropy required for directional cell migration.

  10. DYRK1A kinase inhibitors with emphasis on cancer.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, A; Dufrasne, F; Gelbcke, M; Jabin, I; Kiss, R; Lamoral-Theys, D

    2012-11-01

    Various types of cancers (including gliomas, melanomas, and esophageal, pancreas and non-small-cell lung cancers) display intrinsic resistance to pro-apoptotic stimuli, such as conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and/or the activation of a multidrug resistance phenotype, which are major barriers to effective treatment and lead to poor patient prognosis. The DYRK1A kinase is directly implicated in the resistance of cancer cells to pro-apoptotic stimuli and drives several pathways that enhance proliferation, migration, and the reduction of cell death, leading to very aggressive biological behavior in cancer cell populations. The DYRK1A kinase is also implicated in neurological diseases and in neoangiogenic processes. Thus, the DYRK1A kinase is of great interest for both cancer and neuroscience research. During the last decade, numerous compounds that inhibit DYRK1A have been synthesized. The present review discusses the available molecules known to interfere with DYRK1A activity and the implications of DYRK1A in cancer and other diseases and serves as a rational analysis for researchers who aim to improve the anti-DYRK1A activity of currently available compounds. PMID:23016545

  11. Monogenean anchor morphometry: systematic value, phylogenetic signal, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Khang, Tsung Fei; Soo, Oi Yoon Michelle; Tan, Wooi Boon; Lim, Lee Hong Susan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Anchors are one of the important attachment appendages for monogenean parasites. Common descent and evolutionary processes have left their mark on anchor morphometry, in the form of patterns of shape and size variation useful for systematic and evolutionary studies. When combined with morphological and molecular data, analysis of anchor morphometry can potentially answer a wide range of biological questions. Materials and Methods. We used data from anchor morphometry, body size and morphology of 13 Ligophorus (Monogenea: Ancyrocephalidae) species infecting two marine mugilid (Teleostei: Mugilidae) fish hosts: Moolgarda buchanani (Bleeker) and Liza subviridis (Valenciennes) from Malaysia. Anchor shape and size data (n = 530) were generated using methods of geometric morphometrics. We used 28S rRNA, 18S rRNA, and ITS1 sequence data to infer a maximum likelihood phylogeny. We discriminated species using principal component and cluster analysis of shape data. Adams's K mult was used to detect phylogenetic signal in anchor shape. Phylogeny-correlated size and shape changes were investigated using continuous character mapping and directional statistics, respectively. We assessed morphological constraints in anchor morphometry using phylogenetic regression of anchor shape against body size and anchor size. Anchor morphological integration was studied using partial least squares method. The association between copulatory organ morphology and anchor shape and size in phylomorphospace was used to test the Rohde-Hobbs hypothesis. We created monogeneaGM, a new R package that integrates analyses of monogenean anchor geometric morphometric data with morphological and phylogenetic data. Results. We discriminated 12 of the 13 Ligophorus species using anchor shape data. Significant phylogenetic signal was detected in anchor shape. Thus, we discovered new morphological characters based on anchor shaft shape, the length between the inner root point and the outer root

  12. Monogenean anchor morphometry: systematic value, phylogenetic signal, and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Soo, Oi Yoon Michelle; Tan, Wooi Boon; Lim, Lee Hong Susan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Anchors are one of the important attachment appendages for monogenean parasites. Common descent and evolutionary processes have left their mark on anchor morphometry, in the form of patterns of shape and size variation useful for systematic and evolutionary studies. When combined with morphological and molecular data, analysis of anchor morphometry can potentially answer a wide range of biological questions. Materials and Methods. We used data from anchor morphometry, body size and morphology of 13 Ligophorus (Monogenea: Ancyrocephalidae) species infecting two marine mugilid (Teleostei: Mugilidae) fish hosts: Moolgarda buchanani (Bleeker) and Liza subviridis (Valenciennes) from Malaysia. Anchor shape and size data (n = 530) were generated using methods of geometric morphometrics. We used 28S rRNA, 18S rRNA, and ITS1 sequence data to infer a maximum likelihood phylogeny. We discriminated species using principal component and cluster analysis of shape data. Adams’s Kmult was used to detect phylogenetic signal in anchor shape. Phylogeny-correlated size and shape changes were investigated using continuous character mapping and directional statistics, respectively. We assessed morphological constraints in anchor morphometry using phylogenetic regression of anchor shape against body size and anchor size. Anchor morphological integration was studied using partial least squares method. The association between copulatory organ morphology and anchor shape and size in phylomorphospace was used to test the Rohde-Hobbs hypothesis. We created monogeneaGM, a new R package that integrates analyses of monogenean anchor geometric morphometric data with morphological and phylogenetic data. Results. We discriminated 12 of the 13 Ligophorus species using anchor shape data. Significant phylogenetic signal was detected in anchor shape. Thus, we discovered new morphological characters based on anchor shaft shape, the length between the inner root point and the outer root

  13. 24 CFR 3285.401 - Anchoring instructions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Anchorage Against Wind § 3285.401... wind by use of anchor assembly type installations or by connecting the home to an alternative... must require the home to be secured against the wind, as described in this section. The...

  14. 24 CFR 3285.401 - Anchoring instructions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Anchorage Against Wind § 3285.401... wind by use of anchor assembly type installations or by connecting the home to an alternative... must require the home to be secured against the wind, as described in this section. The...

  15. 24 CFR 3285.401 - Anchoring instructions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Anchorage Against Wind § 3285.401... wind by use of anchor assembly type installations or by connecting the home to an alternative... must require the home to be secured against the wind, as described in this section. The...

  16. The "Anchor" Method: Principle and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selgin, Paul

    This report discusses the "anchor" language learning method that is based upon derivation rather than construction, using Italian as an example of a language to be learned. This method borrows from the natural process of language learning as it asks the student to remember whole expressions that serve as vehicles for learning both words and rules,…

  17. International Lunar Network (ILN) Anchor Nodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Barbara A.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the United States' contribution to the International Lunar Network (ILN) project, the Anchor Nodes project. The ILN is an initiative of 9 national space agencies to establish a set of robotic geophysical monitoring stations on the surface of the Moon. The project is aimed at furthering the understanding of the lunar composition, and interior structure.

  18. Anchoring the Panic Disorder Severity Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keough, Meghan E.; Porter, Eliora; Kredlow, M. Alexandra; Worthington, John J.; Hoge, Elizabeth A.; Pollack, Mark H.; Shear, M. Katherine; Simon, Naomi M.

    2012-01-01

    The Panic Disorder Severity Scale (PDSS) is a clinician-administered measure of panic disorder symptom severity widely used in clinical research. This investigation sought to provide clinically meaningful anchor points for the PDSS both in terms of clinical severity as measured by the Clinical Global Impression-Severity Scale (CGI-S) and to extend…

  19. Finding Chemical Anchors in the Kitchen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haim, Liliana

    2005-01-01

    ''The Chemistry Kitchen'', a unit composed of five activities with kitchen elements for elementary students ages 9-11, introduces the children to the skills and chemical working ideas to be used later as anchors for chemical concepts. These activities include kitchen elements, determining the relative mass and so on.

  20. A Description of the Anchor Test Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Testing Service, Princeton, NJ.

    The Anchor Test Study is described as to objectives, the need for the study, tests selected for the study, States' participation, renumeration of School Test Coordinator, teacher participation, schedule of activities, reports of test results, pupil personnel data needed, and the tests administered during the restandardization phase and equating…

  1. A mitotic beacon reveals its nucleosome anchor.

    PubMed

    Hondele, Maria; Ladurner, Andreas

    2010-09-24

    Mitosis, nuclear envelope formation, and nucleocytoplasmic transport require chromosomes to identify themselves by enriching Ran-GTP around the chromatin fiber. In a recent Nature report, Makde et al. (2010) describe the structure of the Ran activator RCC1 anchored onto nucleosomes.

  2. Anchoring and adjustment during social inferences.

    PubMed

    Tamir, Diana I; Mitchell, Jason P

    2013-02-01

    Simulation theories of social cognition suggest that people use their own mental states to understand those of others-particularly similar others. However, perceivers cannot rely solely on self-knowledge to understand another person; they must also correct for differences between the self and others. Here we investigated serial adjustment as a mechanism for correction from self-knowledge anchors during social inferences. In 3 studies, participants judged the attitudes of a similar or dissimilar person and reported their own attitudes. For each item, we calculated the discrepancy between responses for the self and other. The adjustment process unfolds serially, so to the extent that individuals indeed anchor on self-knowledge and then adjust away, trials with a large amount of self-other discrepancy should be associated with longer response times, whereas small self-other discrepancy should correspond to shorter response times. Analyses consistently revealed this positive linear relationship between reaction time and self-other discrepancy, evidence of anchoring-and-adjustment, but only during judgments of similar targets. These results suggest that perceivers mentalize about similar others using the cognitive process of anchoring-and-adjustment. PMID:22506753

  3. Influence of Anchoring on Burial Depth of Submarine Pipelines.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yuan; Li, Yang; Su, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Since the beginning of the twenty-first century, there has been widespread construction of submarine oil-gas transmission pipelines due to an increase in offshore oil exploration. Vessel anchoring operations are causing more damage to submarine pipelines due to shipping transportation also increasing. Therefore, it is essential that the influence of anchoring on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines is determined. In this paper, mathematical models for ordinary anchoring and emergency anchoring have been established to derive an anchor impact energy equation for each condition. The required effective burial depth for submarine pipelines has then been calculated via an energy absorption equation for the protection layer covering the submarine pipelines. Finally, the results of the model calculation have been verified by accident case analysis, and the impact of the anchoring height, anchoring water depth and the anchor weight on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines has been further analyzed. PMID:27166952

  4. Influence of Anchoring on Burial Depth of Submarine Pipelines.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yuan; Li, Yang; Su, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Since the beginning of the twenty-first century, there has been widespread construction of submarine oil-gas transmission pipelines due to an increase in offshore oil exploration. Vessel anchoring operations are causing more damage to submarine pipelines due to shipping transportation also increasing. Therefore, it is essential that the influence of anchoring on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines is determined. In this paper, mathematical models for ordinary anchoring and emergency anchoring have been established to derive an anchor impact energy equation for each condition. The required effective burial depth for submarine pipelines has then been calculated via an energy absorption equation for the protection layer covering the submarine pipelines. Finally, the results of the model calculation have been verified by accident case analysis, and the impact of the anchoring height, anchoring water depth and the anchor weight on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines has been further analyzed.

  5. 9. CABLE ANCHORAGE DETAIL, NORTHWEST ABUTMENT (NOTE MOSSCOVERED CONCRETE ANCHOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. CABLE ANCHORAGE DETAIL, NORTHWEST ABUTMENT (NOTE MOSS-COVERED CONCRETE ANCHOR LEFT OF ANCHOR BOLTS) - Nisqually Suspension Bridge, Spanning Nisqually River on Service Road, Longmire, Pierce County, WA

  6. Influence of Anchoring on Burial Depth of Submarine Pipelines

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Yuan; Li, Yang; Su, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Since the beginning of the twenty-first century, there has been widespread construction of submarine oil-gas transmission pipelines due to an increase in offshore oil exploration. Vessel anchoring operations are causing more damage to submarine pipelines due to shipping transportation also increasing. Therefore, it is essential that the influence of anchoring on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines is determined. In this paper, mathematical models for ordinary anchoring and emergency anchoring have been established to derive an anchor impact energy equation for each condition. The required effective burial depth for submarine pipelines has then been calculated via an energy absorption equation for the protection layer covering the submarine pipelines. Finally, the results of the model calculation have been verified by accident case analysis, and the impact of the anchoring height, anchoring water depth and the anchor weight on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines has been further analyzed. PMID:27166952

  7. Inositolphosphoglycan mediators structurally related to glycosyl phosphatidylinositol anchors: synthesis, structure and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Martín-Lomas, M; Khiar, N; García, S; Koessler, J L; Nieto, P M; Rademacher, T W

    2000-10-01

    The preparation of the pseudopentasaccharide 1a, an inositol-phosphoglycan (IPG) that contains the conserved linear structure of glycosyl phosphatidylinositol anchors (GPI anchors), was carried out by using a highly convergent 2+3-block synthesis approach which involves imidate and sulfoxide glycosylation reactions. The preferred solution conformation of this structure was determined by using NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations prior to carrying out quantitative structure--activity relationship studies in connection with the insulin signalling process. The ability of 1a to stimulate lipogenesis in rat adipocytes as well as to inhibit cAMP dependent protein kinase and to activate pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase was investigated. Compound 1a did not show any significant activity, which may be taken as a strong indication that the GPI anchors are not the precursors of the IPG mediators. PMID:11072827

  8. Inositolphosphoglycan mediators structurally related to glycosyl phosphatidylinositol anchors: synthesis, structure and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Martín-Lomas, M; Khiar, N; García, S; Koessler, J L; Nieto, P M; Rademacher, T W

    2000-10-01

    The preparation of the pseudopentasaccharide 1a, an inositol-phosphoglycan (IPG) that contains the conserved linear structure of glycosyl phosphatidylinositol anchors (GPI anchors), was carried out by using a highly convergent 2+3-block synthesis approach which involves imidate and sulfoxide glycosylation reactions. The preferred solution conformation of this structure was determined by using NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations prior to carrying out quantitative structure--activity relationship studies in connection with the insulin signalling process. The ability of 1a to stimulate lipogenesis in rat adipocytes as well as to inhibit cAMP dependent protein kinase and to activate pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase was investigated. Compound 1a did not show any significant activity, which may be taken as a strong indication that the GPI anchors are not the precursors of the IPG mediators.

  9. TWISTED DWARF1, a Unique Plasma Membrane-anchored Immunophilin-like Protein, Interacts with Arabidopsis Multidrug Resistance-like Transporters AtPGP1 and AtPGP19

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, Markus; Kolukisaoglu, H. Üner; Bouchard, Rodolphe; Billion, Karla; Berger, Joachim; Saal, Beate; Frangne, Nathalie; Koncz-Kálmán, Zsuzsanna; Koncz, Csaba; Dudler, Robert; Blakeslee, Joshua J.; Murphy, Angus S.; Martinoia, Enrico; Schulz, Burkhard

    2003-01-01

    Null-mutations of the Arabidopsis FKBP-like immunophilin TWISTED DWARF1 (TWD1) gene cause a pleiotropic phenotype characterized by reduction of cell elongation and disorientated growth of all plant organs. Heterologously expressed TWD1 does not exhibit cis-trans-peptidylprolyl isomerase (PPIase) activity and does not complement yeast FKBP12 mutants, suggesting that TWD1 acts indirectly via protein-protein interaction. Yeast two-hybrid protein interaction screens with TWD1 identified cDNA sequences that encode the C-terminal domain of Arabidopsis multidrugresistance-like ABC transporter AtPGP1. This interaction was verified in vitro. Mapping of protein interaction domains shows that AtPGP1 surprisingly binds to the N-terminus of TWD1 harboring the cis-trans peptidyl-prolyl isomerase-like domain and not to the tetratrico-peptide repeat domain, which has been shown to mediate protein-protein interaction. Unlike all other FKBPs, TWD1 is shown to be an integral membrane protein that colocalizes with its interacting partner AtPGP1 on the plasma membrane. TWD1 also interacts with AtPGP19 (AtMDR1), the closest homologue of AtPGP1. The single gene mutation twd1-1 and double atpgp1-1/atpgp19-1 (atmdr1-1) mutants exhibit similar phenotypes including epinastic growth, reduced inflorescence size, and reduced polar auxin transport, suggesting that a functional TWD1-AtPGP1/AtPGP19 complex is required for proper plant development. PMID:14517332

  10. Career Paths, Images and Anchors: A Study with Brazilian Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilimnik, Zelia Miranda; de Oliveira, Luiz Claudio Vieira; Sant'anna, Anderson De Souza; Barros, Delba Teixeira Rodrigues

    2011-01-01

    This article analyses career anchors changes associated to images and professionals trajectories. Its main question: Do anchors careers change through time? We conducted twelve interviews involving professionals from the Administration Area, applying Schein's Career Anchors Inventory (1993). We did the same two years later. In both of them, the…

  11. 33 CFR 401.14 - Anchor marking buoys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Anchor marking buoys. 401.14... OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Condition of Vessels § 401.14 Anchor marking buoys. A highly visible anchor marking buoy of a type approved by the Manager and the...

  12. Students' Anchoring Predisposition: An Illustration from Spring Training Baseball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohrweis, Lawrence C.

    2014-01-01

    The anchoring tendency results when decision makers anchor on initial values and then make final assessments that are adjusted insufficiently away from the initial values. The professional literature recognizes that auditors often risk falling into the judgment trap of anchoring and adjusting (Ranzilla et al., 2011). Students may also be unaware…

  13. Optimisation of BACE1 inhibition of tripartite structures by modification of membrane anchors, spacers and pharmacophores - development of potential agents for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Linning, Philipp; Haussmann, Ute; Beyer, Isaak; Weidlich, Sebastian; Schieb, Heinke; Wiltfang, Jens; Klafki, Hans-Wolfgang; Knölker, Hans-Joachim

    2012-10-01

    Systematic variation of membrane anchor, spacer and pharmacophore building blocks leads to an optimisation of the inhibitory effect of tripartite structures towards BACE1-induced cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). PMID:22930158

  14. Allosteric inhibition of Aurora-A kinase by a synthetic vNAR domain.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Selena G; Oleksy, Arkadiusz; Cavazza, Tommaso; Richards, Mark W; Vernos, Isabelle; Matthews, David; Bayliss, Richard

    2016-07-01

    The vast majority of clinically approved protein kinase inhibitors target the ATP-binding pocket directly. Consequently, many inhibitors have broad selectivity profiles and most have significant off-target effects. Allosteric inhibitors are generally more selective, but are difficult to identify because allosteric binding sites are often unknown or poorly characterized. Aurora-A is activated through binding of TPX2 to an allosteric site on the kinase catalytic domain, and this knowledge could be exploited to generate an inhibitor. Here, we generated an allosteric inhibitor of Aurora-A kinase based on a synthetic, vNAR single domain scaffold, vNAR-D01. Biochemical studies and a crystal structure of the Aurora-A/vNAR-D01 complex show that the vNAR domain overlaps with the TPX2 binding site. In contrast with the binding of TPX2, which stabilizes an active conformation of the kinase, binding of the vNAR domain stabilizes an inactive conformation, in which the αC-helix is distorted, the canonical Lys-Glu salt bridge is broken and the regulatory (R-) spine is disrupted by an additional hydrophobic side chain from the activation loop. These studies illustrate how single domain antibodies can be used to characterize the regulatory mechanisms of kinases and provide a rational basis for structure-guided design of allosteric Aurora-A kinase inhibitors. PMID:27411893

  15. Allosteric inhibition of Aurora-A kinase by a synthetic vNAR domain

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Selena G.; Oleksy, Arkadiusz; Cavazza, Tommaso; Richards, Mark W.; Vernos, Isabelle; Matthews, David

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of clinically approved protein kinase inhibitors target the ATP-binding pocket directly. Consequently, many inhibitors have broad selectivity profiles and most have significant off-target effects. Allosteric inhibitors are generally more selective, but are difficult to identify because allosteric binding sites are often unknown or poorly characterized. Aurora-A is activated through binding of TPX2 to an allosteric site on the kinase catalytic domain, and this knowledge could be exploited to generate an inhibitor. Here, we generated an allosteric inhibitor of Aurora-A kinase based on a synthetic, vNAR single domain scaffold, vNAR-D01. Biochemical studies and a crystal structure of the Aurora-A/vNAR-D01 complex show that the vNAR domain overlaps with the TPX2 binding site. In contrast with the binding of TPX2, which stabilizes an active conformation of the kinase, binding of the vNAR domain stabilizes an inactive conformation, in which the αC-helix is distorted, the canonical Lys-Glu salt bridge is broken and the regulatory (R-) spine is disrupted by an additional hydrophobic side chain from the activation loop. These studies illustrate how single domain antibodies can be used to characterize the regulatory mechanisms of kinases and provide a rational basis for structure-guided design of allosteric Aurora-A kinase inhibitors. PMID:27411893

  16. Molecular interactions of the neuronal GPI-anchored lipocalin Lazarillo.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Diego; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Akerström, Bo; Herrera, Macarena; Bastiani, Michael J; Ganfornina, Maria D

    2008-01-01

    Lazarillo, a glycoprotein involved in axon growth and guidance in the grasshopper embryo, is the only member of the lipocalin family that is attached to the cell surface by a GPI anchor. Recently, the study of Lazarillo homologous genes in Drosophila and mouse has revealed new functions in the regulation of lifespan, stress resistance and neurodegeneration. Here we report an analysis of biochemical properties of Lazarillo to gain insight into the molecular basis of its physiological function. Recombinant forms of the grasshopper protein were expressed in two different systems to test: (1) potential binding of several hydrophobic ligands; (2) protein-protein homophilic interactions; and (3) whether interaction with the function-blocking mAb 10E6 interferes with ligand binding. We tested 10 candidate ligands (retinoic acid, heme, bilirubin, biliverdin, ecdysterone, juvenile hormone, farnesol, arachidonic acid, linoleic acid and palmitic acid), and monitored binding using electrophoretic mobility shift, absorbance spectrum, and fluorimetry assays. Our work indicates binding to heme and retinoic acid, resulting in increased electrophoretic mobility, as well as to fatty acids, resulting in multimerization. Retinoic acid and fatty acids binding were confirmed by fluorescence titration, and heme binding was confirmed with absorbance spectrum assays. We demonstrate that Lazarillo oligomerizes in solution and can form clusters in the plasma membrane when expressed and GPI-anchored to the cell surface, however it is unable to mediate cell-cell adhesion. Finally, by ligand-mAb competition experiments we show that ligand-binding alone cannot be the key factor for Lazarillo to perform its function during axonal growth in the grasshopper embryo.

  17. Liquid-phase synthesis of bridged peptides using olefin metathesis of a protected peptide with a long aliphatic chain anchor.

    PubMed

    Aihara, Keisuke; Komiya, Chiaki; Shigenaga, Akira; Inokuma, Tsubasa; Takahashi, Daisuke; Otaka, Akira

    2015-02-01

    Bridged peptides including stapled peptides are attractive tools for regulating protein-protein interactions (PPIs). An effective synthetic methodology in a heterogeneous system for the preparation of these peptides using olefin metathesis and hydrogenation of protected peptides with a long aliphatic chain anchor is reported. PMID:25629979

  18. Liquid-phase synthesis of bridged peptides using olefin metathesis of a protected peptide with a long aliphatic chain anchor.

    PubMed

    Aihara, Keisuke; Komiya, Chiaki; Shigenaga, Akira; Inokuma, Tsubasa; Takahashi, Daisuke; Otaka, Akira

    2015-02-01

    Bridged peptides including stapled peptides are attractive tools for regulating protein-protein interactions (PPIs). An effective synthetic methodology in a heterogeneous system for the preparation of these peptides using olefin metathesis and hydrogenation of protected peptides with a long aliphatic chain anchor is reported.

  19. Saccharomyces cerevisiae CWH43 Is Involved in the Remodeling of the Lipid Moiety of GPI Anchors to Ceramides

    PubMed Central

    Umemura, Mariko; Fujita, Morihisa; Yoko-o, Takehiko; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi

    2007-01-01

    The glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins are subjected to lipid remodeling during their biosynthesis. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the mature GPI-anchored proteins contain mainly ceramide or diacylglycerol with a saturated long-fatty acid, whereas conventional phosphatidylinositol (PI) used for GPI biosynthesis contains an unsaturated fatty acid. Here, we report that S. cerevisiae Cwh43p, whose N-terminal region contains a sequence homologous to mammalian PGAP2, is involved in the remodeling of the lipid moiety of GPI anchors to ceramides. In cwh43 disruptant cells, the PI moiety of the GPI-anchored protein contains a saturated long fatty acid and lyso-PI but not inositolphosphorylceramides, which are the main lipid moieties of GPI-anchored proteins from wild-type cells. Moreover, the C-terminal region of Cwh43p (Cwh43-C), which is not present in PGAP2, is essential for the ability to remodel GPI lipids to ceramides. The N-terminal region of Cwh43p (Cwh43-N) is associated with Cwh43-C, and it enhanced the lipid remodeling to ceramides by Cwh43-C. Our results also indicate that mouse FRAG1 and C130090K23, which are homologous to Cwh43-N and -C, respectively, share these activities. PMID:17761529

  20. Composite materials formed with anchored nanostructures

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2015-03-10

    A method of forming nano-structure composite materials that have a binder material and a nanostructure fiber material is described. A precursor material may be formed using a mixture of at least one metal powder and anchored nanostructure materials. The metal powder mixture may be (a) Ni powder and (b) NiAl powder. The anchored nanostructure materials may comprise (i) NiAl powder as a support material and (ii) carbon nanotubes attached to nanoparticles adjacent to a surface of the support material. The process of forming nano-structure composite materials typically involves sintering the mixture under vacuum in a die. When Ni and NiAl are used in the metal powder mixture Ni.sub.3Al may form as the binder material after sintering. The mixture is sintered until it consolidates to form the nano-structure composite material.

  1. Resisting anchoring effects: The roles of metric and mapping knowledge.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew R; Windschitl, Paul D

    2015-10-01

    The biasing influence of anchors on numerical estimates is well established, but the relationship between knowledge level and the susceptibility to anchoring effects is less clear. In two studies, we addressed the potential mitigating effects of having knowledge in a domain on vulnerability to anchoring effects in that domain. Of critical interest was a distinction between two forms of knowledge-metric and mapping knowledge. In Study 1, participants who had studied question-relevant information-that is, high-knowledge participants-were less influenced by anchors than were participants who had studied irrelevant information. The results from knowledge measures suggested that the reduction in anchoring was tied to increases in metric rather than mapping knowledge. In Study 2, participants studied information specifically designed to influence different types of knowledge. As we predicted, increases in metric knowledge-and not mapping knowledge-led to reduced anchoring effects. Implications for debiasing anchoring effects are discussed.

  2. International Lunar Network (ILN) Anchor Nodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Barbara A.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews what we know about the interior and surface of the moon and the need to establish a robotic set of geophysical monitoring stations on the surface of the Moon for the purpose of providing significant scientific value to the exploration of the Moon. The ILN Anchor Nodes will provide the backbone of the network in a way that accomplishes new science and allows other nodes to be flexible contributors to the network.

  3. Does the tail wag the dog? How the structure of a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor affects prion formation.

    PubMed

    Bate, Clive; Nolan, William; Williams, Alun

    2016-03-01

    There is increasing interest in the role of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor attached to the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)). Since GPI anchors can alter protein targeting, trafficking and cell signaling, our recent study examined how the structure of the GPI anchor affected prion formation. PrP(C) containing a GPI anchor from which the sialic acid had been removed (desialylated PrP(C)) was not converted to PrP(Sc) in prion-infected neuronal cell lines and in scrapie-infected primary cortical neurons. In uninfected neurons desialylated PrP(C) was associated with greater concentrations of gangliosides and cholesterol than PrP(C). In addition, the targeting of desialylated PrP(C) to lipid rafts showed greater resistance to cholesterol depletion than PrP(C). The presence of desialylated PrP(C) caused the dissociation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) from PrP-containing lipid rafts, reduced the activation of cPLA2 and inhibited PrP(Sc) production. We conclude that the sialic acid moiety of the GPI attached to PrP(C) modifies local membrane microenvironments that are important in PrP-mediated cell signaling and PrP(Sc) formation. PMID:26901126

  4. Test Score Equating Using a Mini-Version Anchor and a Midi Anchor: A Case Study Using SAT[R] Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Jinghua; Sinharay, Sandip; Holland, Paul W.; Curley, Edward; Feigenbaum, Miriam

    2011-01-01

    This study explores an anchor that is different from the traditional miniature anchor in test score equating. In contrast to a traditional "mini" anchor that has the same spread of item difficulties as the tests to be equated, the studied anchor, referred to as a "midi" anchor (Sinharay & Holland), has a smaller spread of item difficulties than…

  5. Lipid Binding of the Amphipathic Helix Serving as Membrane Anchor of Pestivirus Glycoprotein Erns

    PubMed Central

    Aberle, Daniel; Oetter, Kay-Marcus; Meyers, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Pestiviruses express a peculiar protein named Erns representing envelope glycoprotein and RNase, which is important for control of the innate immune response and persistent infection. The latter functions are connected with secretion of a certain amount of Erns from the infected cell. Retention/secretion of Erns is most likely controlled by its unusual membrane anchor, a long amphipathic helix attached in plane to the membrane. Here we present results of experiments conducted with a lipid vesicle sedimentation assay able to separate lipid-bound from unbound protein dissolved in the water phase. Using this technique we show that a protein composed of tag sequences and the carboxyterminal 65 residues of Erns binds specifically to membrane vesicles with a clear preference for compositions containing negatively charged lipids. Mutations disturbing the helical folding and/or amphipathic character of the anchor as well as diverse truncations and exchange of amino acids important for intracellular retention of Erns had no or only small effects on the proteins membrane binding. This result contrasts the dramatically increased secretion rates observed for Erns proteins with equivalent mutations within cells. Accordingly, the ratio of secreted versus cell retained Erns is not determined by the lipid affinity of the membrane anchor. PMID:26270479

  6. Structural basis for membrane anchoring of HIV-1 envelope spike.

    PubMed

    Dev, Jyoti; Park, Donghyun; Fu, Qingshan; Chen, Jia; Ha, Heather Jiwon; Ghantous, Fadi; Herrmann, Tobias; Chang, Weiting; Liu, Zhijun; Frey, Gary; Seaman, Michael S; Chen, Bing; Chou, James J

    2016-07-01

    HIV-1 envelope spike (Env) is a type I membrane protein that mediates viral entry. We used nuclear magnetic resonance to determine an atomic structure of the transmembrane (TM) domain of HIV-1 Env reconstituted in bicelles that mimic a lipid bilayer. The TM forms a well-ordered trimer that protects a conserved membrane-embedded arginine. An amino-terminal coiled-coil and a carboxyl-terminal hydrophilic core stabilize the trimer. Individual mutations of conserved residues did not disrupt the TM trimer and minimally affected membrane fusion and infectivity. Major changes in the hydrophilic core, however, altered the antibody sensitivity of Env. These results show how a TM domain anchors, stabilizes, and modulates a viral envelope spike and suggest that its influence on Env conformation is an important consideration for HIV-1 immunogen design. PMID:27338706

  7. N-Glycans and Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Anchor Act on Polarized Sorting of Mouse PrPC in Madin-Darby Canine Kidney Cells

    PubMed Central

    Puig, Berta; Altmeppen, Hermann C.; Thurm, Dana; Geissen, Markus; Conrad, Catharina; Braulke, Thomas; Glatzel, Markus

    2011-01-01

    The cellular prion protein (PrPC) plays a fundamental role in prion disease. PrPC is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein with two variably occupied N-glycosylation sites. In general, GPI-anchor and N-glycosylation direct proteins to apical membranes in polarized cells whereas the majority of mouse PrPC is found in basolateral membranes in polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. In this study we have mutated the first, the second, and both N-glycosylation sites of PrPC and also replaced the GPI-anchor of PrPC by the Thy-1 GPI-anchor in order to investigate the role of these signals in sorting of PrPC in MDCK cells. Cell surface biotinylation experiments and confocal microscopy showed that lack of one N-linked oligosaccharide leads to loss of polarized sorting of PrPC. Exchange of the PrPC GPI-anchor for the one of Thy-1 redirects PrPC to the apical membrane. In conclusion, both N-glycosylation and GPI-anchor act on polarized sorting of PrPC, with the GPI-anchor being dominant over N-glycans. PMID:21931781

  8. Robotic Ankle for Omnidirectional Rock Anchors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parness, Aaron; Frost, Matthew; Thatte, Nitish

    2013-01-01

    Future robotic exploration of near-Earth asteroids and the vertical and inverted rock walls of lava caves and cliff faces on Mars and other planetary bodies would require a method of gripping their rocky surfaces to allow mobility without gravitational assistance. In order to successfully navigate this terrain and drill for samples, the grippers must be able to produce anchoring forces in excess of 100 N. Additionally, the grippers must be able to support the inertial forces of a moving robot, as well gravitational forces for demonstrations on Earth. One possible solution would be to use microspine arrays to anchor to rock surfaces and provide the necessary load-bearing abilities for robotic exploration of asteroids. Microspine arrays comprise dozens of small steel hooks supported on individual suspensions. When these arrays are dragged along a rock surface, the steel hooks engage with asperities and holes on the surface. The suspensions allow for individual hooks to engage with asperities while the remaining hooks continue to drag along the surface. This ensures that the maximum possible number of hooks engage with the surface, thereby increasing the load-bearing abilities of the gripper. Using the microspine array grippers described above as the end-effectors of a robot would allow it to traverse terrain previously unreachable by traditional wheeled robots. Furthermore, microspine-gripping robots that can perch on cliffs or rocky walls could enable a new class of persistent surveillance devices for military applications. In order to interface these microspine grippers with a legged robot, an ankle is needed that can robotically actuate the gripper, as well as allow it to conform to the large-scale irregularities in the rock. The anchor serves three main purposes: deploy and release the anchor, conform to roughness or misalignment with the surface, and cancel out any moments about the anchor that could cause unintentional detachment. The ankle design contains a

  9. Binding constants of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands: A general theory corroborated by Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guang-Kui; Hu, Jinglei; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Weikl, Thomas R

    2015-12-28

    Adhesion processes of biological membranes that enclose cells and cellular organelles are essential for immune responses, tissue formation, and signaling. These processes depend sensitively on the binding constant K2D of the membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins that mediate adhesion, which is difficult to measure in the "two-dimensional" (2D) membrane environment of the proteins. An important problem therefore is to relate K2D to the binding constant K3D of soluble variants of the receptors and ligands that lack the membrane anchors and are free to diffuse in three dimensions (3D). In this article, we present a general theory for the binding constants K2D and K3D of rather stiff proteins whose main degrees of freedom are translation and rotation, along membranes and around anchor points "in 2D," or unconstrained "in 3D." The theory generalizes previous results by describing how K2D depends both on the average separation and thermal nanoscale roughness of the apposing membranes, and on the length and anchoring flexibility of the receptors and ligands. Our theoretical results for the ratio K2D/K3D of the binding constants agree with detailed results from Monte Carlo simulations without any data fitting, which indicates that the theory captures the essential features of the "dimensionality reduction" due to membrane anchoring. In our Monte Carlo simulations, we consider a novel coarse-grained model of biomembrane adhesion in which the membranes are represented as discretized elastic surfaces, and the receptors and ligands as anchored molecules that diffuse continuously along the membranes and rotate at their anchor points.

  10. Histologic and morphologic evaluation of explanted bone anchors from bone-anchored hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Mlynski, Robert; Goldberg, Eva; Ebmeyer, Joerg; Scheich, Matthias; Gattenlöhner, Stefan; Schwager, Konrad; Hagen, Rudolf; Shehata-Dieler, Wafaa

    2009-05-01

    Bone-anchored hearing aids are a standard option in rehabilitation of patients with conductive or mixed hearing loss, and also CROS fitting. However, the skin-penetrating bone anchor repeatedly gives reason for discussion about the risk of infection of surrounding tissues as a major cause of malfunction. In the present study, explanted bone anchors with surrounding bone and soft tissue were examined and compared with the morphology of lost implants. The anchors originated from five patients. Two needed explantation due to deafness with the need of cochlea implantation. A third patient underwent explantation due to meningeal irritation by the bone anchor. Another patient lost the implant due to mechanical stress shortly after implantation. The last implant was lost in a child without apparent reason. All implants were clinically free of infection and had been stable for a median implantation period of 12 months. During the explantation procedure, the fixtures were recovered together with the attached soft tissue and bone. The specimens were examined by light microscopy or scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Sectioning for light microscopy was performed with a diamond-coated saw microtome. Histopathologic examination of the surrounding skin and subcutaneous soft tissue showed slight inflammation in one case only. The bone was regularly vital, presenting no signs of inflammation. The threads of the fixtures were filled with bone, with particularly strong attachment to the flank of traction. The SEM investigation exposed the ultrastructural interaction of bone with the implant surface. Filiform- and podocyte-like processes of osteocytes attach to the implant; lost implants did not reflect these features. Implant integration involves both osseointegration as well as soft tissue integration. Titanium oxide as the active implant surface promotes this integration even in unstable implants. The morphologic analysis exposed structural areas of the implant with weak bone

  11. Histologic and morphologic evaluation of explanted bone anchors from bone-anchored hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Mlynski, Robert; Goldberg, Eva; Ebmeyer, Joerg; Scheich, Matthias; Gattenlöhner, Stefan; Schwager, Konrad; Hagen, Rudolf; Shehata-Dieler, Wafaa

    2009-05-01

    Bone-anchored hearing aids are a standard option in rehabilitation of patients with conductive or mixed hearing loss, and also CROS fitting. However, the skin-penetrating bone anchor repeatedly gives reason for discussion about the risk of infection of surrounding tissues as a major cause of malfunction. In the present study, explanted bone anchors with surrounding bone and soft tissue were examined and compared with the morphology of lost implants. The anchors originated from five patients. Two needed explantation due to deafness with the need of cochlea implantation. A third patient underwent explantation due to meningeal irritation by the bone anchor. Another patient lost the implant due to mechanical stress shortly after implantation. The last implant was lost in a child without apparent reason. All implants were clinically free of infection and had been stable for a median implantation period of 12 months. During the explantation procedure, the fixtures were recovered together with the attached soft tissue and bone. The specimens were examined by light microscopy or scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Sectioning for light microscopy was performed with a diamond-coated saw microtome. Histopathologic examination of the surrounding skin and subcutaneous soft tissue showed slight inflammation in one case only. The bone was regularly vital, presenting no signs of inflammation. The threads of the fixtures were filled with bone, with particularly strong attachment to the flank of traction. The SEM investigation exposed the ultrastructural interaction of bone with the implant surface. Filiform- and podocyte-like processes of osteocytes attach to the implant; lost implants did not reflect these features. Implant integration involves both osseointegration as well as soft tissue integration. Titanium oxide as the active implant surface promotes this integration even in unstable implants. The morphologic analysis exposed structural areas of the implant with weak bone

  12. Scaffold State Switching Amplifies, Accelerates, and Insulates Protein Kinase C Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Greenwald, Eric C.; Redden, John M.; Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly L.; Saucerman, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    Scaffold proteins localize two or more signaling enzymes in close proximity to their downstream effectors. A-kinase-anchoring proteins (AKAPs) are a canonical family of scaffold proteins known to bind protein kinase A (PKA) and other enzymes. Several AKAPs have been shown to accelerate, amplify, and specify signal transduction to dynamically regulate numerous cellular processes. However, there is little theory available to mechanistically explain how signaling on protein scaffolds differs from solution biochemistry. In our present study, we propose a novel kinetic mechanism for enzymatic reactions on protein scaffolds to explain these phenomena, wherein the enzyme-substrate-scaffold complex undergoes stochastic state switching to reach an active state. This model predicted anchored enzymatic reactions to be accelerated, amplified, and insulated from inhibition compared with those occurring in solution. We exploited a direct interaction between protein kinase C (PKC) and AKAP7α as a model to validate these predictions experimentally. Using a genetically encoded PKC activity reporter, we found that both the strength and speed of substrate phosphorylation were enhanced by AKAP7α. PKC tethered to AKAP7α was less susceptible to inhibition from the ATP-competitive inhibitor Gö6976 and the substrate-competitive inhibitor PKC 20-28, but not the activation-competitive inhibitor calphostin C. Model predictions and experimental validation demonstrated that insulation is a general property of scaffold tethering. Sensitivity analysis indicated that these findings may be applicable to many other scaffolds as well. Collectively, our findings provide theoretical and experimental evidence that scaffold proteins can amplify, accelerate, and insulate signal transduction. PMID:24302730

  13. Gravin orchestrates protein kinase A and β2-adrenergic receptor signaling critical for synaptic plasticity and memory.

    PubMed

    Havekes, Robbert; Canton, David A; Park, Alan J; Huang, Ted; Nie, Ting; Day, Jonathan P; Guercio, Leonardo A; Grimes, Quinn; Luczak, Vincent; Gelman, Irwin H; Baillie, George S; Scott, John D; Abel, Ted

    2012-12-12

    A kinase-anchoring proteins (AKAPs) organize compartmentalized pools of protein kinase A (PKA) to enable localized signaling events within neurons. However, it is unclear which of the many expressed AKAPs in neurons target PKA to signaling complexes important for long-lasting forms of synaptic plasticity and memory storage. In the forebrain, the anchoring protein gravin recruits a signaling complex containing PKA, PKC, calmodulin, and PDE4D (phosphodiesterase 4D) to the β2-adrenergic receptor. Here, we show that mice lacking the α-isoform of gravin have deficits in PKA-dependent long-lasting forms of hippocampal synaptic plasticity including β2-adrenergic receptor-mediated plasticity, and selective impairments of long-term memory storage. Furthermore, both hippocampal β2-adrenergic receptor phosphorylation by PKA, and learning-induced activation of ERK in the CA1 region of the hippocampus are attenuated in mice lacking gravin-α. We conclude that gravin compartmentalizes a significant pool of PKA that regulates learning-induced β2-adrenergic receptor signaling and ERK activation in the hippocampus in vivo, thereby organizing molecular interactions between glutamatergic and noradrenergic signaling pathways for long-lasting synaptic plasticity, and memory storage.

  14. BAHA: Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid

    PubMed Central

    Hagr, Abdulrahman

    2007-01-01

    Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid (BAHA) has proven performance and advantages for patients with aural atresia or chronic ear drainage who cannot wear air-conduction hearing aids. The BAHA has both cosmetic and acoustic advantages over most conventional hearing aids and hence is becoming increasingly popular. Moreover, BAHA improves the quality of life and has also significantly reduces ear discharge. This extensive review of the literature pertaining to BAHA discus the history, the indications, the advantages, the prediction of the outcome and the complications of this device as well as comparing it to the conventional hearing aids. PMID:21475438

  15. [An update on bone anchored hearing aids].

    PubMed

    Fries, S; Maire, R; Grosjean, P; George, M; Simon, C; Zaugg, Y

    2014-10-01

    Hearing loss represents a hidden handicapwith various repercussions on development and social life. In the majority of cases, classical hearing aids address most hearing losses. However, the enhancement required for severe deafness frequently involves sound distortions which are very uncomfortable for patients. With the advent of bone anchored hearing aids, conductive hearing losses as well as mixed hearing losses are now better rehabilitated. Recently their indications have been expanded to profound to severe sensorineural hearing loss. The emergence of new materials as well as subcutaneous implants has lead to lessen skin complications and has diminished the aesthetic discomfort of this type of hearing devices.

  16. [The bone-anchored hearing aid].

    PubMed

    Foghsgaard, Søren

    2014-08-11

    The bone-anchored hearing aid (Baha) was introduced in 1977 by Tjellström and colleagues and has now been used clinically for over 30 years. Generally, the outcomes are good, and several studies have shown improved audiological- and quality of life outcomes. The principle of the Baha is, that sound vibrations are led directly to the inner ear via the mastoid bone, bypassing the middle ear. This is achieved via an osseointegrated implant and a skin-penetrating abutment. Studies report high success rates and a majority of complications as typically minor in nature.

  17. Anchor-based classification and type-C inhibitors for tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Kai-Cheng; Sung, Tzu-Ying; Lin, Chih-Ta; Chiu, Yi-Yuan; Hsu, John T.-A.; Hung, Hui-Chen; Sun, Chung-Ming; Barve, Indrajeet; Chen, Wen-Liang; Huang, Wen-Chien; Huang, Chin-Ting; Chen, Chun-Hwa; Yang, Jinn-Moon

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosine kinases regulate various biological processes and are drug targets for cancers. At present, the design of selective and anti-resistant inhibitors of kinases is an emergent task. Here, we inferred specific site-moiety maps containing two specific anchors to uncover a new binding pocket in the C-terminal hinge region by docking 4,680 kinase inhibitors into 51 protein kinases, and this finding provides an opportunity for the development of kinase inhibitors with high selectivity and anti-drug resistance. We present an anchor-based classification for tyrosine kinases and discover two type-C inhibitors, namely rosmarinic acid (RA) and EGCG, which occupy two and one specific anchors, respectively, by screening 118,759 natural compounds. Our profiling reveals that RA and EGCG selectively inhibit 3% (EGFR and SYK) and 14% of 64 kinases, respectively. According to the guide of our anchor model, we synthesized three RA derivatives with better potency. These type-C inhibitors are able to maintain activities for drug-resistant EGFR and decrease the invasion ability of breast cancer cells. Our results show that the type-C inhibitors occupying a new pocket are promising for cancer treatments due to their kinase selectivity and anti-drug resistance. PMID:26077136

  18. Promotion of PDGF-induced endothelial cell migration by phosphorylated VASP depends on PKA anchoring via AKAP.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Deling; Ouyang, Jingping; Wang, Nian; Zhang, Yahui; Bie, Jinghua; Zhang, Yemin

    2010-02-01

    Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP), an important substrate of PKA, plays a critical role in remodeling of actin cytoskeleton and actin-based cell motility. However, how PKA accurately transfers extracellular signals to VASP and then how phosphorylation of VASP regulates endothelial cell migration have not been clearly defined. Protein kinase A anchoring proteins (AKAPs) are considered to regulate intracellular-specific signal targeting of PKA via AKAP-mediated PKA anchoring. Thus, our study investigated the relationship among AKAP anchoring of PKA, PKA activity, and VASP phosphorylation, which is to clarify the exact role of VASP and its upstream regulatory mechanism in PKA-dependent migration. Our results show that chemotactic factor PDGF activated PKA, increased phosphorylation of VASP at Ser157, and enhanced ECV304 endothelial cell migration. However, phosphorylation site-directed mutation of VASP at Ser157 attenuated the chemotactic effect of PDGF on endothelial cells, suggesting phosphorylation of VASP at Ser157 promotes PKA-mediated endothelial cell migration. Furthermore, disrupting PKA anchoring to AKAP or PKA activity significantly attenuated the PKA activity, VASP phosphorylation, and subsequent cell migration. Meanwhile, disrupting PKA anchoring to AKAP abolished PDGF-induced lamellipodia formation and special VASP accumulation at leading edge of lamellipodia. These results indicate that PKA activation and PKA-mediated substrate responses in VASP phosphorylation and localization depend on PKA anchoring via AKAP in PDGF-induced endothelial cell migration. In conclusion, AKAP anchoring of PKA is an essential upstream event in regulation of PKA-mediated VASP phosphorylation and subsequent endothelial cell migration, which contributes to explore new methods for controlling endothelial cell migration related diseases and angiogenesis.

  19. GSKIP- and GSK3-mediated anchoring strengthens cAMP/PKA/Drp1 axis signaling in the regulation of mitochondrial elongation.

    PubMed

    Loh, Joon-Khim; Lin, Ching-Chih; Yang, Ming-Chang; Chou, Chia-Hua; Chen, Wan-Shia; Hong, Ming-Chang; Cho, Chung-Lung; Hsu, Ching-Mei; Cheng, Jiin-Tsuey; Chou, An-Kuo; Chang, Chung-Hsing; Tseng, Chao-Neng; Wang, Chi-Huei; Lieu, Ann-Shung; Howng, Shen-Long; Hong, Yi-Ren

    2015-08-01

    GSK3β binding of GSKIP affects neurite outgrowth, but the physiological significance of PKA binding to GSKIP remains to be determined. We hypothesized that GSKIP and GSK3β mediate cAMP/PKA/Drp1 axis signaling and modulate mitochondrial morphology by forming a working complex comprising PKA/GSKIP/GSK3β/Drp1. We demonstrated that GSKIP wild-type overexpression increased phosphorylation of Drp1 S637 by 7-8-fold compared to PKA kinase-inactive mutants (V41/L45) and a GSK3β binding-defective mutant (L130) under H2O2 and forskolin challenge in HEK293 cells, indicating that not only V41/L45, but also L130 may be involved in Drp1-associated protection of GSKIP. Interestingly, silencing either GSKIP or GSK3β but not GSK3α resulted in a dramatic decrease in Drp1 S637 phosphorylation, revealing that both GSKIP and GSK3β are required in this novel PKA/GSKIP/GSK3β/Drp1 complex. Moreover, overexpressed kinase-dead GSK3β-K85R, which retains the capacity to bind GSKIP, but not K85M which shows total loss of GSKIP-binding, has a higher Drp1 S637 phosphorylation similar to the GSKIP wt overexpression group, indicating that GSK3β recruits Drp1 by anchoring rather than in a kinase role. With further overexpression of either V41/L45P or the L130P GSKIP mutant, the elongated mitochondrial phenotype was lost; however, ectopically expressed Drp1 S637D, a phosphomimetic mutant, but not S637A, a non-phosphorylated mutant, restored the elongated mitochondrial morphology, indicating that Drp1 is a downstream effector of direct PKA signaling and possibly has an indirect GSKIP function involved in the cAMP/PKA/Drp1 signaling axis. Collectively, our data revealed that both GSKIP and GSK3β function as anchoring proteins in the cAMP/PKA/Drp1 signaling axis modulating Drp1 phosphorylation.

  20. Anchor-induced chondral damage in the hip

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Dean K.; Bharam, Srino; White, Brian J.; Matsuda, Nicole A.; Safran, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the outcomes from anchor-induced chondral damage of the hip, both with and without frank chondral penetration. A multicenter retrospective case series was performed of patients with chondral deformation or penetration during initial hip arthroscopic surgery. Intra-operative findings, post-surgical clinical courses, hip outcome scores and descriptions of arthroscopic treatment in cases requiring revision surgery and anchor removal are reported. Five patients (three females) of mean age 32 years (range, 16–41 years) had documented anchor-induced chondral damage with mean 3.5 years (range, 1.5–6.0 years) follow-up. The 1 o'clock position (four cases) and anterior and mid-anterior portals (two cases each) were most commonly implicated. Two cases of anchor-induced acetabular chondral deformation without frank penetration had successful clinical and radiographic outcomes, while one case progressed from deformation to chondral penetration with clinical worsening. Of the cases that underwent revision hip arthroscopy, all three had confirmed exposed hard anchors which were removed. Two patients have had clinical improvement and one patient underwent early total hip arthroplasty. Anchor-induced chondral deformation without frank chondral penetration may be treated with close clinical and radiographic monitoring with a low threshold for revision surgery and anchor removal. Chondral penetration should be treated with immediate removal of offending hard anchor implants. Preventative measures include distal-based portals, small diameter and short anchors, removable hard anchors, soft suture-based anchors, curved drill and anchor insertion instrumentation and attention to safe trajectories while visualizing the acetabular articular surface. PMID:27011815

  1. Anchor-induced chondral damage in the hip.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Dean K; Bharam, Srino; White, Brian J; Matsuda, Nicole A; Safran, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the outcomes from anchor-induced chondral damage of the hip, both with and without frank chondral penetration. A multicenter retrospective case series was performed of patients with chondral deformation or penetration during initial hip arthroscopic surgery. Intra-operative findings, post-surgical clinical courses, hip outcome scores and descriptions of arthroscopic treatment in cases requiring revision surgery and anchor removal are reported. Five patients (three females) of mean age 32 years (range, 16-41 years) had documented anchor-induced chondral damage with mean 3.5 years (range, 1.5-6.0 years) follow-up. The 1 o'clock position (four cases) and anterior and mid-anterior portals (two cases each) were most commonly implicated. Two cases of anchor-induced acetabular chondral deformation without frank penetration had successful clinical and radiographic outcomes, while one case progressed from deformation to chondral penetration with clinical worsening. Of the cases that underwent revision hip arthroscopy, all three had confirmed exposed hard anchors which were removed. Two patients have had clinical improvement and one patient underwent early total hip arthroplasty. Anchor-induced chondral deformation without frank chondral penetration may be treated with close clinical and radiographic monitoring with a low threshold for revision surgery and anchor removal. Chondral penetration should be treated with immediate removal of offending hard anchor implants. Preventative measures include distal-based portals, small diameter and short anchors, removable hard anchors, soft suture-based anchors, curved drill and anchor insertion instrumentation and attention to safe trajectories while visualizing the acetabular articular surface.

  2. Nonrotating, self-centering anchor assembly for anchoring a bolt in a borehole

    SciTech Connect

    Bevan, John E.; King, Grant W.

    1997-12-01

    An expandable anchor assembly is provided for anchoring the threaded end portion of an elongated roof bolt in a borehole. The anchoring assembly includes a hollow outer sleeve in the form of a plurality of symmetrically arranged, longitudinal segmented wall portions with exterior gripping teeth and an inner expander sleeve in the form of a corresponding plurality of longitudinal wall portions symmetrically arranged about a central axis to define an inner threaded cylindrical section. The inner sleeve is captured within and moveable axially relative to the outer sleeve. As the threaded end portion of the elongated bolt is inserted into the inner threaded cylindrical section of the inner sleeve from the trailing end to the leading end thereof, the inner sleeve expands over and clamps around the threaded end portion of the elongated bolt. Thereafter, partial withdrawal of the elongated bolt from the borehole causes the inner sleeve to axially move relative to the outer sleeve from the leading end toward the trailing end of the outer sleeve in a wedging action to cause the outer sleeve to radially expand and force engagement of the gripping teeth against the sidewall of the borehole to thereby secure the expandable anchor assembly and therewith the threaded end portion of the elongated bolt within the borehole.

  3. Decoding Cytoskeleton-Anchored and Non-Anchored Receptors from Single-Cell Adhesion Force Data.

    PubMed

    Sariisik, Ediz; Popov, Cvetan; Müller, Jochen P; Docheva, Denitsa; Clausen-Schaumann, Hauke; Benoit, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Complementary to parameters established for cell-adhesion force curve analysis, we evaluated the slope before a force step together with the distance from the surface at which the step occurs and visualized the result in a two-dimensional density plot. This new tool allows detachment steps of long membrane tethers to be distinguished from shorter jumplike force steps, which are typical for cytoskeleton-anchored bonds. A prostate cancer cell line (PC3) immobilized on an atomic-force-microscopy sensor interacted with three different substrates: collagen-I (Col-I), bovine serum albumin, and a monolayer of bone marrow-derived stem cells (SCP1). To address PC3 cells' predominant Col-I binding molecules, an antibody-blocking β1-integrin was used. Untreated PC3 cells on Col-I or SCP1 cells, which express Col-I, predominantly showed jumps in their force curves, while PC3 cells on bovine-serum-albumin- and antibody-treated PC3 cells showed long membrane tethers. The probability density plots thus revealed that β1-integrin-specific interactions are predominately anchored to the cytoskeleton, while the nonspecific interactions are mainly membrane-anchored. Experiments with latrunculin-A-treated PC3 cells corroborated these observations. The plots thus reveal details of the anchoring of bonds to the cell and provide a better understanding of receptor-ligand interactions. PMID:26445433

  4. Nonrotating, self-centering anchor assembly for anchoring a bolt in a borehole

    DOEpatents

    Bevan, J.E.; King, G.W.

    1998-12-08

    An expandable anchor assembly is provided for anchoring the threaded end portion of an elongated roof bolt in a borehole. The anchoring assembly includes a hollow outer sleeve in the form of a plurality of symmetrically arranged, longitudinal segmented wall portions with exterior gripping teeth and an inner expander sleeve in the form of a corresponding plurality of longitudinal wall portions symmetrically arranged about a central axis to define an inner threaded cylindrical section. The inner sleeve is captured within and moveable axially relative to the outer sleeve. As the threaded end portion of the elongated bolt is inserted into the inner threaded cylindrical section of the inner sleeve from the trailing end to the leading end thereof, the inner sleeve expands over and clamps around the threaded end portion of the elongated bolt. Thereafter, partial withdrawal of the elongated bolt from the borehole causes the inner sleeve to axially move relative to the outer sleeve from the leading end toward the trailing end of the outer sleeve in a wedging action to cause the outer sleeve to radially expand and force engagement of the gripping teeth against the sidewall of the borehole to thereby secure the expandable anchor assembly and therewith the threaded end portion of the elongated bolt within the borehole. 8 figs.

  5. Nonrotating, self-centering anchor assembly for anchoring a bolt in a borehole

    DOEpatents

    Bevan, John E.; King, Grant W.

    1998-01-01

    An expandable anchor assembly is provided for anchoring the threaded end portion of an elongated roof bolt in a borehole. The anchoring assembly includes a hollow outer sleeve in the form of a plurality of symmetrically arranged, longitudinal segmented wall portions with exterior gripping teeth and an inner expander sleeve in the form of a corresponding plurality of longitudinal wall portions symmetrically arranged about a central axis to define an inner threaded cylindrical section. The inner sleeve is captured within and moveable axially relative to the outer sleeve. As the threaded end portion of the elongated bolt is inserted into the inner threaded cylindrical section of the inner sleeve from the trailing end to the leading end thereof, the inner sleeve expands over and clamps around the threaded end portion of the elongated bolt. Thereafter, partial withdrawal of the elongated bolt from the borehole causes the inner sleeve to axially move relative to the outer sleeve from the leading end toward the trailing end of the outer sleeve in a wedging action to cause the outer sleeve to radially expand and force engagement of the gripping teeth against the sidewall of the borehole to thereby secure the expandable anchor assembly and therewith the threaded end portion of the elongated bolt within the borehole.

  6. Differential effects of glycosphingolipids on the detergent-insolubility of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane dipeptidase.

    PubMed

    Parkin, E T; Turner, A J; Hooper, N M

    2001-08-15

    The insolubility of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins in certain detergents appears to be an intrinsic property of their association with sphingolipids and cholesterol in lipid rafts. We show that the GPI-anchored protein membrane dipeptidase is localized in detergent-insoluble lipid rafts isolated from porcine kidney microvillar membranes, and that these rafts, which lack caveolin, are enriched not only in sphingomyelin and cholesterol, but also in the glycosphingolipid lactosylceramide (LacCer). Dipeptidase purified from porcine kidney was reconstituted into artificial liposomes in order to investigate the relationship between glycosphingolipids and GPI-anchored protein detergent-insolubility. Dipeptidase was insoluble in liposomes containing extremely low concentrations of LacCer. In contrast, identical concentrations of glucosylceramide or galactosylceramide failed to promote significant detergent-insolubility. Cholesterol was shown to enhance the detergent-insoluble effect of LacCer. GC-MS analysis revealed dramatic differences between the fatty acyl compositions of LacCer and those of the other glycosphingolipids. However, despite these differences, we show that the unusually marked effect of LacCer to promote the detergent-insolubility of dipeptidase cannot be singularly attributed to the fatty acyl composition of this glycosphingolipid molecule. Instead, we suggest that the ability of LacCer to confer detergent-insolubility on this GPI-anchored protein is dependent on the structure of the lipid molecule in its entirety, and that this glycosphingolipid may have an important role to play in the stabilization of lipid rafts, particularly the caveolin-free glycosphingolipid signalling domains.

  7. Phosphatidylinositol anchor of HeLa cell alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Jemmerson, R.; Low, M.G.

    1987-09-08

    Alkaline phosphatase from cancer cells, HeLa TCRC-1, was biosynthetically labeled with either /sup 3/H-fatty acids or (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine as analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography of immunoprecipitated material. Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) released a substantial proportion of the /sup 3/H-fatty acid label from immunoaffinity-purified alkaline phosphatase but had no effect on the radioactivity of (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine-labeled material. PI-PLC also liberated catalytically active alkaline phosphatase from viable cells, and this could be selectively blocked by monoclonal antibodies to alkaline phosphatase. However, the alkaline phosphatase released from /sup 3/H-fatty acid labeled cells by PI-PLC was not radioactive. By contrast, treatment with bromelain removed both the /sup 3/H-fatty acid and the (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine label from purified alkaline phosphatase. Subtilisin was also able to remove the (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine label from the purified alkaline phosphatase. The /sup 3/H radioactivity in alkaline phosphatase purified from (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine-labeled cells comigrated with authentic (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine by anion-exchange chromatography after acid hydrolysis. The data suggest that the /sup 3/H-fatty acid and (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine are covalently attached to the carboxyl-terminal segment since bromelain and subtilisin both release alkaline phosphatase from the membrane by cleavage at that end of the polypeptide chain. The data are consistent with findings for other proteins recently shown to be anchored in the membrane through a glycosylphosphatidylinositol structure and indicate that a similar structure contributes to the membrane anchoring of alkaline phosphatase.

  8. A Novel Acetivibrio cellulolyticus Anchoring Scaffoldin That Bears Divergent Cohesins

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qi; Barak, Yoav; Kenig, Rina; Shoham, Yuval; Bayer, Edward A.; Lamed, Raphael

    2004-01-01

    Sequencing of a cellulosome-integrating gene cluster in Acetivibrio cellulolyticus was completed. The cluster contains four tandem scaffoldin genes (scaA, scaB, scaC, and scaD) bounded upstream and downstream, respectively, by a presumed cellobiose phosphorylase and a nucleotide methylase. The sequences and properties of scaA, scaB, and scaC were reported previously, and those of scaD are reported here. The scaD gene encodes an 852-residue polypeptide that includes a signal peptide, three cohesins, and a C-terminal S-layer homology (SLH) module. The calculated molecular weight of the mature ScaD is 88,960; a 67-residue linker segment separates cohesins 1 and 2, and two ∼30-residue linkers separate cohesin 2 from 3 and cohesin 3 from the SLH module. The presence of an SLH module in ScaD indicates its role as an anchoring protein. The first two ScaD cohesins can be classified as type II, similar to the four cohesins of ScaB. Surprisingly, the third ScaD cohesin belongs to the type I cohesins, like the seven ScaA cohesins. ScaD is the first scaffoldin to be described that contains divergent types of cohesins as integral parts of the polypeptide chain. The recognition properties among selected recombinant cohesins and dockerins from the different scaffoldins of the gene cluster were investigated by affinity blotting. The results indicated that the divergent types of ScaD cohesins also differ in their preference of dockerins. ScaD thus plays a dual role, both as a primary scaffoldin, capable of direct incorporation of a single dockerin-borne enzyme, and as a secondary scaffoldin that anchors the major primary scaffoldin, ScaA and its complement of enzymes to the cell surface. PMID:15317783

  9. New Retrievable Coil Anchors: Preliminary In Vivo Experiences in Swine

    SciTech Connect

    Konya, A. Wright, K.C.

    2005-04-15

    Purpose. To design and test retrievable coil anchors to improve the safety and efficacy of coil embolization. Methods. Fifty-two 0.038-inch homemade retrievable stainless steel coils were equipped with one of four different pre-shaped nitinol anchors and tested in 38 pigs. All coils with the anchor were completely retrieved and redeployed 3-18 times (median 7 times) prior to release. Types 1 and 2 anchored coils were acutely deployed in the external iliac arteries (n = 10 each), and chronically tested (1 week) in the common carotid arteries (n = 6 each). Larger type 1 (n = 4), type 3 (n = 6), and type 4 (n = 4) anchored coils were acutely deployed in the abdominal aorta. The largest type 1 anchors (n = 6) were acutely tested in the inferior vena cava. Results. All anchored coils were successfully retrieved and repositioned several times. All but two coils formed a compact plug and there was no coil migration except with two mechanically defective type 3 anchors. Conclusion. The use of retrievable anchors allowed the coils to be retrieved and repositioned, prevented coil migration, and enabled compact coil configuration.

  10. Defective lipid remodeling of GPI anchors in peroxisomal disorders, Zellweger syndrome, and rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata

    PubMed Central

    Kanzawa, Noriyuki; Shimozawa, Nobuyuki; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Murakami, Yoshiko; Waterham, Hans R.; Mukai, Satoru; Fujita, Morihisa; Maeda, Yusuke; Taguchi, Ryo; Fujiki, Yukio; Kinoshita, Taroh

    2012-01-01

    Many cell surface proteins in mammalian cells are anchored to the plasma membrane via glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI). The predominant form of mammalian GPI contains 1-alkyl-2-acyl phosphatidylinositol (PI), which is generated by lipid remodeling from diacyl PI. The conversion of diacyl PI to 1-alkyl-2-acyl PI occurs in the ER at the third intermediate in the GPI biosynthetic pathway. This lipid remodeling requires the alkyl-phospholipid biosynthetic pathway in peroxisome. Indeed, cells defective in dihydroxyacetone phosphate acyltransferase (DHAP-AT) or alkyl-DHAP synthase express only the diacyl form of GPI-anchored proteins. A defect in the alkyl-phospholipid biosynthetic pathway causes a peroxisomal disorder, rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata (RCDP), and defective biogenesis of peroxisomes causes Zellweger syndrome, both of which are lethal genetic diseases with multiple clinical phenotypes such as psychomotor defects, mental retardation, and skeletal abnormalities. Here, we report that GPI lipid remodeling is defective in cells from patients with Zellweger syndrome having mutations in the peroxisomal biogenesis factors PEX5, PEX16, and PEX19 and in cells from patients with RCDP types 1, 2, and 3 caused by mutations in PEX7, DHAP-AT, and alkyl-DHAP synthase, respectively. Absence of the 1-alkyl-2-acyl form of GPI-anchored proteins might account for some of the complex phenotypes of these two major peroxisomal disorders. PMID:22253471

  11. Differences in the glycolipid membrane anchors of bovine and human erythrocyte acetylcholinesterases.

    PubMed

    Roberts, W L; Kim, B H; Rosenberry, T L

    1987-11-01

    Acetylcholinesterases (AcChoEases; EC 3.1.1.7) from bovine (Ebo) and human (Ehu) erythrocytes were purified to apparent homogeneity by affinity chromatography. The hydrophobic portion of the glycolipid membrane anchor of each enzyme was radiolabeled with the photoactivated reagent 3-(trifluoromethyl)-3-(m-[125I]iodophenyl)diazirine. Several cleavage procedures demonstrated that this radiolabel was highly selective for the fatty acid portion of the anchor in both enzymes. The labeled enzymes were digested with phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns)-specific phospholipase C (EC 3.1.4.10), and label release was assessed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. About 85% of the radiolabel was cleaved from Ebo AcChoEase, whereas only 5% was released from Ehu AcChoEase. This finding agrees with a report that Ebo AcChoEase was quantitatively released from intact erythrocytes by PtdIns-specific phospholipase C but Ehu AcChoEase was not [Low, M. G. & Finean, J. B. (1977) FEBS Lett. 82, 143-146]. The two AcChoEases contained comparable amounts of the anchor components ethanolamine, glucosamine, and myo-inositol, but qualitative and quantitative differences were found in the fatty acids. Thin-layer chromatography of radiolabeled fragments generated from Ebo and Ehu AcChoEases by nitrous acid deamination revealed a major difference in the membrane anchors of the two enzymes. The fragment released from Ebo AcChoEase by this procedure comigrated with PtdIns, whereas the corresponding fragment from Ehu AcChoEase had a mobility much greater than that of PtdIns even though it contained myo-inositol and fatty acids. These studies show that 3-(trifluoromethyl)-3-(m-[125I]iodophenyl)diazirine is useful for analysis of lipid-containing compounds and indicate that, whereas Ebo AcChoEase contains PtdIns in its glycolipid anchor, Ehu AcChoEase has a different anchor structure, which is resistant to PtdIns-specific phospholipase C. This observation suggests the existence of a class of glycolipid-anchored

  12. Differences in the glycolipid membrane anchors of bovine and human erythrocyte acetylcholinesterases.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, W L; Kim, B H; Rosenberry, T L

    1987-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterases (AcChoEases; EC 3.1.1.7) from bovine (Ebo) and human (Ehu) erythrocytes were purified to apparent homogeneity by affinity chromatography. The hydrophobic portion of the glycolipid membrane anchor of each enzyme was radiolabeled with the photoactivated reagent 3-(trifluoromethyl)-3-(m-[125I]iodophenyl)diazirine. Several cleavage procedures demonstrated that this radiolabel was highly selective for the fatty acid portion of the anchor in both enzymes. The labeled enzymes were digested with phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns)-specific phospholipase C (EC 3.1.4.10), and label release was assessed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. About 85% of the radiolabel was cleaved from Ebo AcChoEase, whereas only 5% was released from Ehu AcChoEase. This finding agrees with a report that Ebo AcChoEase was quantitatively released from intact erythrocytes by PtdIns-specific phospholipase C but Ehu AcChoEase was not [Low, M. G. & Finean, J. B. (1977) FEBS Lett. 82, 143-146]. The two AcChoEases contained comparable amounts of the anchor components ethanolamine, glucosamine, and myo-inositol, but qualitative and quantitative differences were found in the fatty acids. Thin-layer chromatography of radiolabeled fragments generated from Ebo and Ehu AcChoEases by nitrous acid deamination revealed a major difference in the membrane anchors of the two enzymes. The fragment released from Ebo AcChoEase by this procedure comigrated with PtdIns, whereas the corresponding fragment from Ehu AcChoEase had a mobility much greater than that of PtdIns even though it contained myo-inositol and fatty acids. These studies show that 3-(trifluoromethyl)-3-(m-[125I]iodophenyl)diazirine is useful for analysis of lipid-containing compounds and indicate that, whereas Ebo AcChoEase contains PtdIns in its glycolipid anchor, Ehu AcChoEase has a different anchor structure, which is resistant to PtdIns-specific phospholipase C. This observation suggests the existence of a class of glycolipid-anchored

  13. Structure of a CGI-58 motif provides the molecular basis of lipid droplet anchoring.

    PubMed

    Boeszoermenyi, Andras; Nagy, Harald Manuel; Arthanari, Haribabu; Pillip, Christoph Jens; Lindermuth, Hanna; Luna, Rafael Eulogio; Wagner, Gerhard; Zechner, Rudolf; Zangger, Klaus; Oberer, Monika

    2015-10-30

    Triacylglycerols (TGs) stored in lipid droplets (LDs) are hydrolyzed in a highly regulated metabolic process called lipolysis to free fatty acids that serve as energy substrates for β-oxidation, precursors for membrane lipids and signaling molecules. Comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) stimulates the enzymatic activity of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), which catalyzes the hydrolysis of TGs to diacylglycerols and free fatty acids. In adipose tissue, protein-protein interactions between CGI-58 and the LD coating protein perilipin 1 restrain the ability of CGI-58 to activate ATGL under basal conditions. Phosphorylation of perilipin 1 disrupts these interactions and mobilizes CGI-58 for the activation of ATGL. We have previously demonstrated that the removal of a peptide at the N terminus (residues 10-31) of CGI-58 abrogates CGI-58 localization to LDs and CGI-58-mediated activation of ATGL. Here, we show that this tryptophan-rich N-terminal peptide serves as an independent LD anchor, with its three tryptophans serving as focal points of the left (harboring Trp(21) and Trp(25)) and right (harboring Trp(29)) anchor arms. The solution state NMR structure of a peptide comprising the LD anchor bound to dodecylphosphocholine micelles as LD mimic reveals that the left arm forms a concise hydrophobic core comprising tryptophans Trp(21) and Trp(25) and two adjacent leucines. Trp(29) serves as the core of a functionally independent anchor arm. Consequently, simultaneous tryptophan alanine permutations in both arms abolish localization and activity of CGI-58 as opposed to tryptophan substitutions that occur in only one arm.

  14. Expanding the clinical and molecular characteristics of PIGT-CDG, a disorder of glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchors.

    PubMed

    Lam, Christina; Golas, Gretchen A; Davids, Mariska; Huizing, Marjan; Kane, Megan S; Krasnewich, Donna M; Malicdan, May Christine V; Adams, David R; Markello, Thomas C; Zein, Wadih M; Gropman, Andrea L; Lodish, Maya B; Stratakis, Constantine A; Maric, Irina; Rosenzweig, Sergio D; Baker, Eva H; Ferreira, Carlos R; Danylchuk, Noelle R; Kahler, Stephen; Garnica, Adolfo D; Bradley Schaefer, G; Boerkoel, Cornelius F; Gahl, William A; Wolfe, Lynne A

    2015-01-01

    PIGT-CDG, an autosomal recessive syndromic intellectual disability disorder of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors, was recently described in two independent kindreds [Multiple Congenital Anomalies-Hypotonia-Seizures Syndrome 3 (OMIM, #615398)]. PIGT encodes phosphatidylinositol-glycan biosynthesis class T, a subunit of the heteropentameric transamidase complex that facilitates the transfer of GPI to proteins. GPI facilitates attachment (anchoring) of proteins to cell membranes. We describe, at ages 7 and 6 years, two children of non-consanguineous parents; they had hypotonia, severe global developmental delay, and intractable seizures along with endocrine, ophthalmologic, skeletal, hearing, and cardiac anomalies. Exome sequencing revealed that both siblings had compound heterozygous variants in PIGT (NM_015937.5), i.e., c.918dupC, a novel duplication leading to a frameshift, and c.1342C > T encoding a previously described missense variant. Flow cytometry studies showed decreased surface expression of GPI-anchored proteins on granulocytes, consistent with findings in previous cases. These siblings further delineate the clinical spectrum of PIGT-CDG, reemphasize the neuro-ophthalmologic presentation, clarify the endocrine features, and add hypermobility, low CSF albumin quotient, and hearing loss to the phenotypic spectrum. Our results emphasize that GPI anchor-related congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs) should be considered in subjects with early onset severe seizure disorders and dysmorphic facial features, even in the presence of a normal carbohydrate-deficient transferrin pattern and N-glycan profiling. Currently available screening for CDGs will not reliably detect this family of disorders, and our case reaffirms that the use of flow cytometry and genetic testing is essential for diagnosis in this group of disorders.

  15. Structure of a CGI-58 Motif Provides the Molecular Basis of Lipid Droplet Anchoring*

    PubMed Central

    Boeszoermenyi, Andras; Nagy, Harald Manuel; Arthanari, Haribabu; Pillip, Christoph Jens; Lindermuth, Hanna; Luna, Rafael Eulogio; Wagner, Gerhard; Zechner, Rudolf; Zangger, Klaus; Oberer, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Triacylglycerols (TGs) stored in lipid droplets (LDs) are hydrolyzed in a highly regulated metabolic process called lipolysis to free fatty acids that serve as energy substrates for β-oxidation, precursors for membrane lipids and signaling molecules. Comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) stimulates the enzymatic activity of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), which catalyzes the hydrolysis of TGs to diacylglycerols and free fatty acids. In adipose tissue, protein-protein interactions between CGI-58 and the LD coating protein perilipin 1 restrain the ability of CGI-58 to activate ATGL under basal conditions. Phosphorylation of perilipin 1 disrupts these interactions and mobilizes CGI-58 for the activation of ATGL. We have previously demonstrated that the removal of a peptide at the N terminus (residues 10–31) of CGI-58 abrogates CGI-58 localization to LDs and CGI-58-mediated activation of ATGL. Here, we show that this tryptophan-rich N-terminal peptide serves as an independent LD anchor, with its three tryptophans serving as focal points of the left (harboring Trp21 and Trp25) and right (harboring Trp29) anchor arms. The solution state NMR structure of a peptide comprising the LD anchor bound to dodecylphosphocholine micelles as LD mimic reveals that the left arm forms a concise hydrophobic core comprising tryptophans Trp21 and Trp25 and two adjacent leucines. Trp29 serves as the core of a functionally independent anchor arm. Consequently, simultaneous tryptophan alanine permutations in both arms abolish localization and activity of CGI-58 as opposed to tryptophan substitutions that occur in only one arm. PMID:26350461

  16. Structure of a CGI-58 motif provides the molecular basis of lipid droplet anchoring.

    PubMed

    Boeszoermenyi, Andras; Nagy, Harald Manuel; Arthanari, Haribabu; Pillip, Christoph Jens; Lindermuth, Hanna; Luna, Rafael Eulogio; Wagner, Gerhard; Zechner, Rudolf; Zangger, Klaus; Oberer, Monika

    2015-10-30

    Triacylglycerols (TGs) stored in lipid droplets (LDs) are hydrolyzed in a highly regulated metabolic process called lipolysis to free fatty acids that serve as energy substrates for β-oxidation, precursors for membrane lipids and signaling molecules. Comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) stimulates the enzymatic activity of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), which catalyzes the hydrolysis of TGs to diacylglycerols and free fatty acids. In adipose tissue, protein-protein interactions between CGI-58 and the LD coating protein perilipin 1 restrain the ability of CGI-58 to activate ATGL under basal conditions. Phosphorylation of perilipin 1 disrupts these interactions and mobilizes CGI-58 for the activation of ATGL. We have previously demonstrated that the removal of a peptide at the N terminus (residues 10-31) of CGI-58 abrogates CGI-58 localization to LDs and CGI-58-mediated activation of ATGL. Here, we show that this tryptophan-rich N-terminal peptide serves as an independent LD anchor, with its three tryptophans serving as focal points of the left (harboring Trp(21) and Trp(25)) and right (harboring Trp(29)) anchor arms. The solution state NMR structure of a peptide comprising the LD anchor bound to dodecylphosphocholine micelles as LD mimic reveals that the left arm forms a concise hydrophobic core comprising tryptophans Trp(21) and Trp(25) and two adjacent leucines. Trp(29) serves as the core of a functionally independent anchor arm. Consequently, simultaneous tryptophan alanine permutations in both arms abolish localization and activity of CGI-58 as opposed to tryptophan substitutions that occur in only one arm. PMID:26350461

  17. Software Note: Using BILOG for Fixed-Anchor Item Calibration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMars, Christine E.; Jurich, Daniel P.

    2012-01-01

    The nonequivalent groups anchor test (NEAT) design is often used to scale item parameters from two different test forms. A subset of items, called the anchor items or common items, are administered as part of both test forms. These items are used to adjust the item calibrations for any differences in the ability distributions of the groups taking…

  18. 49 CFR 178.337-13 - Supporting and anchoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Supporting and anchoring. 178.337-13 Section 178.337-13 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS... anchoring. (a) A cargo tank that is not permanently attached to or integral with a vehicle chassis must...

  19. Retention of internal anchor tags by juvenile striped bass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Den Avyle, M.J.; Wallin, J.E.

    2001-01-01

    We marked hatchery-reared striped bass Morone saxatilis (145-265 mm total length) with internal anchor tags and monitored retention for 28 months after stocking in the Savannah River, Georgia and South Carolina. Anchor tags (with an 18-mm, T-shaped anchor and 42-mm streamer) were surgically implanted ventrally, and coded wire tags (1 mm long and 0.25 mm in diameter) were placed into the cheek muscle to help identify subsequent recaptures. The estimated probability of retention (SD) of anchor tags was 0.94 (0.05) at 4 months, 0.64 (0.13) at 16 months, and 0.33 (0.19) at 28 months. Of 10 fish recaptured with only coded wire tags, 5 showed an externally visible wound or scar near the point of anchor tag insertion. The incidence of wounds or scars, which we interpreted as evidence of tag shedding, increased to 50% in recaptures taken at 28 months (three of six fish). Our estimates for retention of anchor tags were generally lower than those in other studies of striped bass, possibly because of differences in the style of anchor or sizes of fish used. Because of its low rate of retention, the type of anchor tag we used may not be suitable for long-term assessments of stock enhancement programs that use striped bass of the sizes we evaluated.

  20. 30 CFR 56.9311 - Anchoring stationary sizing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Anchoring stationary sizing devices. 56.9311 Section 56.9311 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Dumping Sites § 56.9311 Anchoring stationary sizing devices. Grizzlies and other stationary sizing...

  1. 30 CFR 57.9311 - Anchoring stationary sizing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Anchoring stationary sizing devices. 57.9311 Section 57.9311 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Dumping Sites § 57.9311 Anchoring stationary sizing devices. Grizzlies and other stationary sizing...

  2. Using Anchored Instruction to Evaluate Mathematical Growth and Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurz, Terri L.; Batarelo, Ivana

    2005-01-01

    Anchored instruction is designed to present problems in a meaningful context to allow for investigations into real life environments. The Jasper Project was created to allow students to investigate mathematical dilemmas using anchored instruction techniques. This study uses case study methods to examine the perceptions that preservice teachers…

  3. Understanding Rasch Measurement: Partial Credit Model and Pivot Anchoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bode, Rita K.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Rasch measurement partial credit model, what it is, how it differs from other Rasch models, and when and how to use it. Also describes the calibration of instruments with increasingly complex items. Explains pivot anchoring and illustrates its use and describes the effect of pivot anchoring on step calibrations, item hierarchy, and…

  4. Memory for Dialogue: Recalling an Anchor through Talk and Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaver, Pam

    This paper reports on a project involving student recall of the dialogue in a movie and retention of the "anchor," which in this case refers to a videotape recording of "To Kill a Mockingbird." The project looked at how students retained knowledge over a few days and what kind of activities resulted from expertise with an anchor. The goal of…

  5. Aurora A kinase modulates actin cytoskeleton through phosphorylation of Cofilin: Implication in the mitotic process.

    PubMed

    Ritchey, Lisa; Chakrabarti, Ratna

    2014-11-01

    Aurora A kinase regulates early mitotic events through phosphorylation and activation of a variety of proteins. Specifically, Aur-A is involved in centrosomal separation and formation of mitotic spindles in early prophase. The effect of Aur-A on mitotic spindles is mediated by the modulation of microtubule dynamics and association with microtubule binding proteins. In this study we show that Aur-A exerts its effects on spindle organization through the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. Aurora A phosphorylates Cofilin at multiple sites including S(3) resulting in the inactivation of its actin depolymerizing function. Aur-A interacts with Cofilin in early mitotic phases and regulates its phosphorylation status. Cofilin phosphorylation follows a dynamic pattern during the progression of prophase to metaphase. Inhibition of Aur-A activity induced a delay in the progression of prophase to metaphase. Aur-A inhibitor also disturbed the pattern of Cofilin phosphorylation, which correlated with the mitotic delay. Our results establish a novel function of Aur-A in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton reorganization, through Cofilin phosphorylation during early mitotic stages.

  6. Electrically insulated MLI and thermal anchor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, Koji; Furukawa, Masato; Hatakenaka, Ryuta; Miyakita, Takeshi; Murakami, Haruyuki; Kizu, Kaname; Tsuchiya, Katsuhiko; Koidea, Yoshihiko; Yoshida, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    The thermal shield of JT-60SA is kept at 80 K and will use the multilayer insulation (MLI) to reduce radiation heat load to the superconducting coils at 4.4 K from the cryostat at 300 K. Due to plasma pulse operation, the MLI is affected by eddy current in toroidal direction. The MLI is designed to suppress the current by electrically insulating every 20 degree in the toroidal direction by covering the MLI with polyimide films. In this paper, two kinds of designs for the MLI system are proposed, focusing on a way to overlap the layers. A boil-off calorimeter method and temperature measurement has been performed to determine the thermal performance of the MLI system. The design of the electrical insulated thermal anchor between the toroidal field (TF) coil and the thermal shield is also explained.

  7. Electrically insulated MLI and thermal anchor

    SciTech Connect

    Kamiya, Koji; Furukawa, Masato; Murakami, Haruyuki; Kizu, Kaname; Tsuchiya, Katsuhiko; Koidea, Yoshihiko; Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Hatakenaka, Ryuta; Miyakita, Takeshi

    2014-01-29

    The thermal shield of JT-60SA is kept at 80 K and will use the multilayer insulation (MLI) to reduce radiation heat load to the superconducting coils at 4.4 K from the cryostat at 300 K. Due to plasma pulse operation, the MLI is affected by eddy current in toroidal direction. The MLI is designed to suppress the current by electrically insulating every 20 degree in the toroidal direction by covering the MLI with polyimide films. In this paper, two kinds of designs for the MLI system are proposed, focusing on a way to overlap the layers. A boil-off calorimeter method and temperature measurement has been performed to determine the thermal performance of the MLI system. The design of the electrical insulated thermal anchor between the toroidal field (TF) coil and the thermal shield is also explained.

  8. Anchoring submersible ultrasonic receivers in river channels with stable substrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bettoli, Phillip William; Scholten, G.D.; Hubbs, D.

    2010-01-01

    We developed an anchoring system for submersible ultrasonic receivers (SURs) that we placed on the bottom of the riverine reaches of three main-stem reservoirs in the upper Tennessee River. Each anchor consisted of a steel tube (8.9 x 35.6 cm) welded vertically to a round plate of steel (5.1 x 40.6 cm). All seven SURs and their 57-kg anchors were successfully deployed and retrieved three times over 547 d by a dive team employing surface air-breathing equipment and a davit-equipped boat. All of the anchors and their SURs remained stationary over two consecutive winters on the hard-bottom, thalweg sites where they were deployed. The SUR and its anchor at the most downriver site experienced flows that exceeded 2,100 m(3)/s and mean water column velocities of about 0.9 m/s.

  9. Reaching the top: career anchors and professional development in nursing.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Ruth; Shmulevitz, Carmela; Raviv, Dennie

    2009-01-01

    This study, based on Shein's conceptual theory of career anchors, examined the relationship between career anchors, professional development and emerging career patterns for graduates of 12 consecutive two year second career programs in nursing (N=231) compared to graduates of concurrent four year academic programs (N=273). A 2-group comparison design was used and data collection tools included a demographic profile, a professional profile and a career anchor questionnaire. Statistically significant differences were found in regard to career anchors (p< 0.001) and career development (p< 0.001). Primary career anchors for the second career nurses were specialization and lifestyle where academic graduates chose management, autonomy and service. Academics displayed a statistically significant preference for administrative specialization (34%) compared to the second career tract (6.5%). Researchers propose that each group develops differently and contributes to the workplace and the importance of both certification and academic incentives to ensure recruitment.

  10. Effects of accuracy motivation and anchoring on metacomprehension judgment and accuracy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qin

    2012-01-01

    The current research investigates how accuracy motivation impacts anchoring and adjustment in metacomprehension judgment and how accuracy motivation and anchoring affect metacomprehension accuracy. Participants were randomly assigned to one of six conditions produced by the between-subjects factorial design involving accuracy motivation (incentive or no) and peer performance anchor (95%, 55%, or no). Two studies showed that accuracy motivation did not impact anchoring bias, but the adjustment-from-anchor process occurred. Accuracy incentive increased anchor-judgment gap for the 95% anchor but not for the 55% anchor, which induced less certainty about the direction of adjustment. The findings offer support to the integrative theory of anchoring. Additionally, the two studies revealed a "power struggle" between accuracy motivation and anchoring in influencing metacomprehension accuracy. Accuracy motivation could improve metacomprehension accuracy in spite of anchoring effect, but if anchoring effect is too strong, it could overpower the motivation effect. The implications of the findings were discussed.

  11. Astral Microtubule Pivoting Promotes Their Search for Cortical Anchor Sites during Mitosis in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Baumgärtner, Stephan; Tolić, Iva M.

    2014-01-01

    Positioning of the mitotic spindle is crucial for proper cell division. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two mechanisms contribute to spindle positioning. In the Kar9 pathway, astral microtubules emanating from the daughter-bound spindle pole body interact via the linker protein Kar9 with the myosin Myo2, which moves the microtubule along the actin cables towards the neck. In the dynein pathway, astral microtubules off-load dynein onto the cortical anchor protein Num1, which is followed by dynein pulling on the spindle. Yet, the mechanism by which microtubules target cortical anchor sites is unknown. Here we quantify the pivoting motion of astral microtubules around the spindle pole bodies, which occurs during spindle translocation towards the neck and through the neck. We show that this pivoting is largely driven by the Kar9 pathway. The microtubules emanating from the daughter-bound spindle pole body pivot faster than those at the mother-bound spindle pole body. The Kar9 pathway reduces the time needed for an astral microtubule inside the daughter cell to start pulling on the spindle. Thus, we propose a new role for microtubule pivoting: By pivoting around the spindle pole body, microtubules explore the space laterally, which helps them search for cortical anchor sites in the context of spindle positioning in budding yeast. PMID:24721997

  12. Structural features of the extracellular portion of membrane-anchoring peptides on membrane-bound immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Major, J G; Davis, F M; Liou, R S; Chang, T W

    1996-02-01

    Membrane-bound immunoglobulins, mIgs, are displayed as transmembrane proteins on the surface of B cells, where they serve as antigen receptors. The mIgs are anchored to the membrane through a carboxy-terminal extension of the immunoglobulin heavy chain. Three distinct structural regions of these membrane-anchor peptides, of mouse and human mIgs, have been delineated: (1) a central conserved stretch of 25 hydrophobic, unchanged amino acid residues, which spans the membrane lipid bilayer; (2) a C-terminal hydrophilic region of 3-28 amino acids, which is intracytoplasmic; and (3) an N-terminal extracellular hydrophilic region of 13-67 amino acids, which is isotype-specific. Here we report predicted secondary and tertiary structures of the third structural region of the membrane anchoring peptide along with corroborating experimental evidence. The predictions of secondary and tertiary structure indicate that most of these regions can assume an chi-helical conformation. Circular dichroism spectroscopy of corresponding synthetic peptide confirms this essential feature. The choice of solvent and pH have dramatic effects on peptide helicity; solvent conditions consistent with a membrane-proximal environment promote helicity. Additional studies suggest that the two adjacent extracellular peptides may be stabilized through coiled-coil interactions similar to those described for some other transmembrane proteins.

  13. The Use of Two Anchors in Nonequivalent Groups with Anchor Test (NEAT) Equating. Research Report. ETS RR-10-23

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moses, Tim; Deng, Weiling; Zhang, Yu-Li

    2010-01-01

    In the equating literature, a recurring concern is that equating functions that utilize a single anchor to account for examinee groups' nonequivalence are biased when the groups are extremely different and/or when the anchor only weakly measures what the tests measure. Several proposals have been made to address this equating bias by incorporating…

  14. A novel membrane anchor for FtsZ is linked to cell wall hydrolysis in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Meier, Elizabeth L; Razavi, Shiva; Inoue, Takanari; Goley, Erin D

    2016-07-01

    In most bacteria, the tubulin-like GTPase FtsZ forms an annulus at midcell (the Z-ring) which recruits the division machinery and regulates cell wall remodeling. Although both activities require membrane attachment of FtsZ, few membrane anchors have been characterized. FtsA is considered to be the primary membrane tether for FtsZ in bacteria, however in Caulobacter crescentus, FtsA arrives at midcell after stable Z-ring assembly and early FtsZ-directed cell wall synthesis. We hypothesized that additional proteins tether FtsZ to the membrane and demonstrate that in C. crescentus, FzlC is one such membrane anchor. FzlC associates with membranes directly in vivo and in vitro and recruits FtsZ to membranes in vitro. As for most known membrane anchors, the C-terminal peptide of FtsZ is required for its recruitment to membranes by FzlC in vitro and midcell recruitment of FzlC in cells. In vivo, overproduction of FzlC causes cytokinesis defects whereas deletion of fzlC causes synthetic defects with dipM, ftsE and amiC mutants, implicating FzlC in cell wall hydrolysis. Our characterization of FzlC as a novel membrane anchor for FtsZ expands our understanding of FtsZ regulators and establishes a role for membrane-anchored FtsZ in the regulation of cell wall hydrolysis.

  15. Glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored renal dipeptidase is released by a phospholipase C in vivo.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Wook; Choi, Kyong; Lee, Hwanghee Blaise; Park, Sung Kwang; Turner, Anthony J; Hooper, Nigel M; Park, Haeng Soon

    2002-01-01

    The release mechanism of the glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored renal dipeptidase (EC 3.4.13.19) in vivo has been investigated. Triton X-114 phase separation indicated that the dipeptidase is exclusively present as a hydrophilic form in urine from porcine, rat, rabbit and human. Western blot analysis of human and porcine purified dipeptidase and the urine concentrates with anti-(cross-reacting determinant) serum demonstrated the presence of inositol 1,2-cyclic monophosphate indicating that the renal dipeptidase had been released from the membrane by the action of a phospholipase C. This is the first direct evidence for cleavage of a human GPI-anchored protein by a responsible phospholipase C in vivo.

  16. The Role of Plasmalemmal-Cortical Anchoring on the Stability of Transmembrane Electropores

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, S. M.; Ji, Z.; Rockweiler, N. B.; Hahn, A. R.; Booske, J. H.; Hagness, S. C.

    2009-01-01

    The structure of eukaryotic cells is maintained by a network of filamentous actin anchored subjacently to the plasma membrane. This structure is referred to as the actin cortex. We present a locally constrained surface tension model for electroporation in order to address the influence of plasmalemmal-cortical anchoring on electropore dynamics. This model predicts that stable electropores are possible under certain conditions. The existence of stable electropores has been suggested in several experimental studies. The electropore radius at which stability is achieved is a function of the characteristic radii of locally constrained regions about the plasma membrane. This model opens the possibility of using actin-modifying compounds to physically manipulate cortical density, thereby manipulating electroporation dynamics. It also underscores the need to improve electroporation models further by incorporating the influence of trans-electropore ionic and aqueous flow, cortical flexibility, transmembrane protein mobility, and active cellular wound healing mechanisms. PMID:20490371

  17. Tripolin A, a Novel Small-Molecule Inhibitor of Aurora A Kinase, Reveals New Regulation of HURP's Distribution on Microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Kesisova, Iliana A.; Nakos, Konstantinos C.; Tsolou, Avgi; Angelis, Dimitrios; Lewis, Joe; Chatzaki, Aikaterini; Agianian, Bogos; Giannis, Athanassios; Koffa, Maria D.

    2013-01-01

    Mitotic regulators exhibiting gain of function in tumor cells are considered useful cancer therapeutic targets for the development of small-molecule inhibitors. The human Aurora kinases are a family of such targets. In this study, from a panel of 105 potential small-molecule inhibitors, two compounds Tripolin A and Tripolin B, inhibited Aurora A kinase activity in vitro. In human cells however, only Tripolin A acted as an Aurora A inhibitor. We combined in vitro, in vivo single cell and in silico studies to demonstrate the biological action of Tripolin A, a non-ATP competitive inhibitor. Tripolin A reduced the localization of pAurora A on spindle microtubules (MTs), affected centrosome integrity, spindle formation and length, as well as MT dynamics in interphase, consistent with Aurora A inhibition by RNAi or other specific inhibitors, such as MLN8054 or MLN8237. Interestingly, Tripolin A affected the gradient distribution towards the chromosomes, but not the MT binding of HURP (Hepatoma Up-Regulated Protein), a MT-associated protein (MAP) and substrate of the Aurora A kinase. Therefore Tripolin A reveals a new way of regulating mitotic MT stabilizers through Aurora A phosphorylation. Tripolin A is predicted to bind Aurora A similarly but not identical to MLN8054, therefore it could be used to dissect pathways orchestrated by Aurora kinases as well as a scaffold for further inhibitor development. PMID:23516487

  18. Peptide Anchor for Folate-Targeted Liposomal Delivery.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Eugénia; Mangialavori, Irene C; Loureiro, Ana; Azoia, Nuno G; Sárria, Marisa P; Nogueira, Patrícia; Freitas, Jaime; Härmark, Johan; Shimanovich, Ulyana; Rollett, Alexandra; Lacroix, Ghislaine; Bernardes, Gonçalo J L; Guebitz, Georg; Hebert, Hans; Moreira, Alexandra; Carmo, Alexandre M; Rossi, Juan Pablo F C; Gomes, Andreia C; Preto, Ana; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2015-09-14

    Specific folate receptors are abundantly overexpressed in chronically activated macrophages and in most cancer cells. Directed folate receptor targeting using liposomes is usually achieved using folate linked to a phospholipid or cholesterol anchor. This link is formed using a large spacer like polyethylene glycol. Here, we report an innovative strategy for targeted liposome delivery that uses a hydrophobic fragment of surfactant protein D linked to folate. Our proposed spacer is a small 4 amino acid residue linker. The peptide conjugate inserts deeply into the lipid bilayer without affecting liposomal integrity, with high stability and specificity. To compare the drug delivery potential of both liposomal targeting systems, we encapsulated the nuclear dye Hoechst 34580. The eventual increase in blue fluorescence would only be detectable upon liposome disruption, leading to specific binding of this dye to DNA. Our delivery system was proven to be more efficient (2-fold) in Caco-2 cells than classic systems where the folate moiety is linked to liposomes by polyethylene glycol.

  19. Material Testing for Robotic Omnidirectional Anchor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witkoe, Kevin S.

    2012-01-01

    To successfully explore near-Earth Asteroids the question of mobility emerges as the key issue for any robotic mission. When small bodies have extremely low escape velocities, traditional methods, such as wheels, would send the robot hurtling off of the asteroid's surface. To solve this problem, JPL has developed an omni-directional anchoring mechanism for use in microgravity that utilizes microspine technology. These microspines are placed in circular arrays with 16 independent carriages biasing the surface of the rock. The asperities in the surface allow the gripper to hold nearly 150N in all directions. While the gripper has been proven successful on consolidated rocks, it had yet to be tested on a variety of other surfaces that are suspected to separate the large boulders on an asteroid. Since asteroid surfaces vary widely, from friable rocks to lose ponds of regolith, the gripper was tested in a large variety of materials such as, bonded pumice, sand, gravel, and loose rocks. The forces are applied tangent, at 45 degrees, and normal to the surface of the material. The immediate results from this experiment will give insight into the gripper's effectiveness across the wide spectrum of materials found on asteroids.

  20. Ideals as Anchors for Relationship Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Frye, Margaret; Trinitapoli, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Research on young-adult sexuality in sub-Saharan Africa typically conceptualizes sex as an individual-level risk behavior. We introduce a new approach that connects the conditions surrounding the initiation of sex with subsequent relationship well-being, examines relationships as sequences of interdependent events, and indexes relationship experiences to individually held ideals. New card-sort data from southern Malawi capture young women’s relationship experiences and their ideals in a sequential framework. Using optimal matching, we measure the distance between ideal and experienced relationship sequences to (1) assess the associations between ideological congruence and perceived relationship well-being, (2) compare this ideal-based approach to other experience-based alternatives, and (3) identify individual- and couple-level correlates of congruence between ideals and experiences in the romantic realm. We show that congruence between ideals and experiences conveys relationship well-being along four dimensions: expressions of love and support, robust communication habits, perceived biological safety, and perceived relationship stability. We further show that congruence is patterned by socioeconomic status and supported by shared ideals within romantic dyads. We argue that conceiving of ideals as anchors for how sexual experiences are manifest advances current understandings of romantic relationships, and we suggest that this approach has applications for other domains of life. PMID:27110031

  1. Caenorhabditis elegans Aurora A kinase is required for the formation of spindle microtubules in female meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Sumiyoshi, Eisuke; Fukata, Yuma; Namai, Satoshi; Sugimoto, Asako

    2015-01-01

    In many animals, female meiotic spindles are assembled in the absence of centrosomes, the major microtubule (MT)-organizing centers. How MTs are formed and organized into meiotic spindles is poorly understood. Here we report that, in Caenorhabditis elegans, Aurora A kinase/AIR-1 is required for the formation of spindle microtubules during female meiosis. When AIR-1 was depleted or its kinase activity was inhibited in C. elegans oocytes, although MTs were formed around chromosomes at germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD), they were decreased during meiotic prometaphase and failed to form a bipolar spindle, and chromosomes were not separated into two masses. Whereas AIR-1 protein was detected on and around meiotic spindles, its kinase-active form was concentrated on chromosomes at prometaphase and on interchromosomal MTs during late anaphase and telophase. We also found that AIR-1 is involved in the assembly of short, dynamic MTs in the meiotic cytoplasm, and these short MTs were actively incorporated into meiotic spindles. Collectively our results suggest that, after GVBD, the kinase activity of AIR-1 is continuously required for the assembly and/or stabilization of female meiotic spindle MTs. PMID:26378257

  2. Caenorhabditis elegans Aurora A kinase is required for the formation of spindle microtubules in female meiosis.

    PubMed

    Sumiyoshi, Eisuke; Fukata, Yuma; Namai, Satoshi; Sugimoto, Asako

    2015-11-15

    In many animals, female meiotic spindles are assembled in the absence of centrosomes, the major microtubule (MT)-organizing centers. How MTs are formed and organized into meiotic spindles is poorly understood. Here we report that, in Caenorhabditis elegans, Aurora A kinase/AIR-1 is required for the formation of spindle microtubules during female meiosis. When AIR-1 was depleted or its kinase activity was inhibited in C. elegans oocytes, although MTs were formed around chromosomes at germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD), they were decreased during meiotic prometaphase and failed to form a bipolar spindle, and chromosomes were not separated into two masses. Whereas AIR-1 protein was detected on and around meiotic spindles, its kinase-active form was concentrated on chromosomes at prometaphase and on interchromosomal MTs during late anaphase and telophase. We also found that AIR-1 is involved in the assembly of short, dynamic MTs in the meiotic cytoplasm, and these short MTs were actively incorporated into meiotic spindles. Collectively our results suggest that, after GVBD, the kinase activity of AIR-1 is continuously required for the assembly and/or stabilization of female meiotic spindle MTs.

  3. Knotless anchors with sutures external to the anchor body may be at risk for suture cutting through osteopenic bone

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Y.; Woodmass, J. M.; Nelson, A. A.; Boorman, R. S.; Thornton, G. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the mechanical performance, under low-load cyclic loading, of two different knotless suture anchor designs: sutures completely internal to the anchor body (SpeedScrew) and sutures external to the anchor body and adjacent to bone (MultiFIX P). Methods Using standard suture loops pulled in-line with the rotator cuff (approximately 60°), anchors were tested in cadaveric bone and foam blocks representing normal to osteopenic bone. Mechanical testing included preloading to 10 N and cyclic loading for 500 cycles from 10 N to 60 N at 60 mm/min. The parameters evaluated were initial displacement, cyclic displacement and number of cycles and load at 3 mm displacement relative to preload. Video recording throughout testing documented the predominant source of suture displacement and the distance of ‘suture cutting through bone’. Results In cadaveric bone and foam blocks, MultiFIX P anchors had significantly greater initial displacement, and lower number of cycles and lower load at 3 mm displacement than SpeedScrew anchors. Video analysis revealed ‘suture cutting through bone’ as the predominant source of suture displacement in cadaveric bone (qualitative) and greater ‘suture cutting through bone’ comparing MultiFIX P with SpeedScrew anchors in foam blocks (quantitative). The greater suture displacement in MultiFIX P anchors was predominantly from suture cutting through bone, which was enhanced in an osteopenic bone model. Conclusions Anchors with sutures external to the anchor body are at risk for suture cutting through bone since the suture eyelet is at the distal tip of the implant and the suture directly abrades against the bone edge during cyclic loading. Suture cutting through bone may be a significant source of fixation failure, particularly in osteopenic bone. Cite this article: Y. Ono, J. M. Woodmass, A. A. Nelson, R. S. Boorman, G. M. Thornton, I. K. Y. Lo. Knotless anchors with sutures external to the anchor body may be

  4. Null Mutation in PGAP1 Impairing Gpi-Anchor Maturation in Patients with Intellectual Disability and Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Yoshiko; Tawamie, Hasan; Maeda, Yusuke; Büttner, Christian; Buchert, Rebecca; Radwan, Farah; Schaffer, Stefanie; Sticht, Heinrich; Aigner, Michael; Reis, André; Kinoshita, Taroh; Jamra, Rami Abou

    2014-01-01

    Many eukaryotic cell-surface proteins are anchored to the membrane via glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI). There are at least 26 genes involved in biosynthesis and remodeling of GPI anchors. Hypomorphic coding mutations in seven of these genes have been reported to cause decreased expression of GPI anchored proteins (GPI-APs) on the cell surface and to cause autosomal-recessive forms of intellectual disability (ARID). We performed homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing in a family with encephalopathy and non-specific ARID and identified a homozygous 3 bp deletion (p.Leu197del) in the GPI remodeling gene PGAP1. PGAP1 was not described in association with a human phenotype before. PGAP1 is a deacylase that removes an acyl-chain from the inositol of GPI anchors in the endoplasmic reticulum immediately after attachment of GPI to proteins. In silico prediction and molecular modeling strongly suggested a pathogenic effect of the identified deletion. The expression levels of GPI-APs on B lymphoblastoid cells derived from an affected person were normal. However, when those cells were incubated with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC), GPI-APs were cleaved and released from B lymphoblastoid cells from healthy individuals whereas GPI-APs on the cells from the affected person were totally resistant. Transfection with wild type PGAP1 cDNA restored the PI-PLC sensitivity. These results indicate that GPI-APs were expressed with abnormal GPI structure due to a null mutation in the remodeling gene PGAP1. Our results add PGAP1 to the growing list of GPI abnormalities and indicate that not only the cell surface expression levels of GPI-APs but also the fine structure of GPI-anchors is important for the normal neurological development. PMID:24784135

  5. Mutations in PGAP3 impair GPI-anchor maturation, causing a subtype of hyperphosphatasia with mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Howard, Malcolm F; Murakami, Yoshiko; Pagnamenta, Alistair T; Daumer-Haas, Cornelia; Fischer, Björn; Hecht, Jochen; Keays, David A; Knight, Samantha J L; Kölsch, Uwe; Krüger, Ulrike; Leiz, Steffen; Maeda, Yusuke; Mitchell, Daphne; Mundlos, Stefan; Phillips, John A; Robinson, Peter N; Kini, Usha; Taylor, Jenny C; Horn, Denise; Kinoshita, Taroh; Krawitz, Peter M

    2014-02-01

    Glycosylphophatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins play important roles in many biological processes, and mutations affecting proteins involved in the synthesis of the GPI anchor are reported to cause a wide spectrum of intellectual disabilities (IDs) with characteristic additional phenotypic features. Here, we describe a total of five individuals (from three unrelated families) in whom we identified mutations in PGAP3, encoding a protein that is involved in GPI-anchor maturation. Three siblings in a consanguineous Pakistani family presented with profound developmental delay, severe ID, no speech, psychomotor delay, and postnatal microcephaly. A combination of autozygosity mapping and exome sequencing identified a 13.8 Mb region harboring a homozygous c.275G>A (p.Gly92Asp) variant in PGAP3 region 17q11.2-q21.32. Subsequent testing showed elevated serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP), a GPI-anchored enzyme, in all three affected children. In two unrelated individuals in a cohort with developmental delay, ID, and elevated ALP, we identified compound-heterozygous variants c.439dupC (p.Leu147Profs(∗)16) and c.914A>G (p.Asp305Gly) and homozygous variant c.314C>G (p.Pro105Arg). The 1 bp duplication causes a frameshift and nonsense-mediated decay. Further evidence supporting pathogenicity of the missense mutations c.275G>A, c.314C>G, and c.914A>G was provided by the absence of the variants from ethnically matched controls, phylogenetic conservation, and functional studies on Chinese hamster ovary cell lines. Taken together with recent data on PGAP2, these results confirm the importance of the later GPI-anchor remodelling steps for normal neuronal development. Impairment of PGAP3 causes a subtype of hyperphosphatasia with ID, a congenital disorder of glycosylation that is also referred to as Mabry syndrome. PMID:24439110

  6. 21. DETAIL OF WEST (AMERICAN) CANTILEVER AND ANCHOR ARMS OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. DETAIL OF WEST (AMERICAN) CANTILEVER AND ANCHOR ARMS OF MAIN SPAN, SHOWING PIER M. VIEW TO NORTH. - Blue Water Bridge, Spanning St. Clair River at I-69, I-94, & Canadian Route 402, Port Huron, St. Clair County, MI

  7. 22. DETAIL OF EAST (CANADIAN) CANTILEVER AND ANCHOR ARMS OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. DETAIL OF EAST (CANADIAN) CANTILEVER AND ANCHOR ARMS OF MAIN SPAN, SHOWING PIER C. VIEW TO NORTH. - Blue Water Bridge, Spanning St. Clair River at I-69, I-94, & Canadian Route 402, Port Huron, St. Clair County, MI

  8. Using Anchors to Estimate Clinical State without Labeled Data

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Yoni; Choi, Youngduck; Horng, Steven; Sontag, David

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel framework for learning to estimate and predict clinical state variables without labeled data. The resulting models can used for electronic phenotyping, triggering clinical decision support, and cohort selection. The framework relies on key observations which we characterize and term “anchor variables”. By specifying anchor variables, an expert encodes a certain amount of domain knowledge about the problem while the rest of learning proceeds in an unsupervised manner. The ability to build anchors upon standardized ontologies and the framework’s ability to learn from unlabeled data promote generalizability across institutions. We additionally develop a user interface to enable experts to choose anchor variables in an informed manner. The framework is applied to electronic medical record-based phenotyping to enable real-time decision support in the emergency department. We validate the learned models using a prospectively gathered set of gold-standard responses from emergency physicians for nine clinically relevant variables. PMID:25954366

  9. 6. ANCHOR FIXTURES AT STATION "0", EAST END, LAUNCHING PAD. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. ANCHOR FIXTURES AT STATION "0", EAST END, LAUNCHING PAD. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Edwards Air Force Base, North of Avenue B, between 100th & 140th Streets East, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  10. 7. DETAIL, ANCHOR FIXTURES. Looking to north. Edwards Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL, ANCHOR FIXTURES. Looking to north. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Edwards Air Force Base, North of Avenue B, between 100th & 140th Streets East, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  11. 2. VIEW EAST TOWARD DARIEN ANCHOR BRIDGE #465 OF CIRCUIT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW EAST TOWARD DARIEN ANCHOR BRIDGE #465 OF CIRCUIT BREAKER INSTALLATION ON CROSS BEAM OF BRIDGE. - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Bridge-Type Circuit Breakers, Long Island shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Cos Cob, Fairfield County, CT

  12. 27. CIRCUIT BREAKERS AT SOUTH END OF BRIDGE, CATENARY ANCHOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. CIRCUIT BREAKERS AT SOUTH END OF BRIDGE, CATENARY ANCHOR BRIDGE 310, COS COB POWER PLANT - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  13. 3. VIEW EAST TOWARD STAMFORD ANCHOR BRIDGE #374 OF CIRCUIT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW EAST TOWARD STAMFORD ANCHOR BRIDGE #374 OF CIRCUIT BREAKER INSTALLATION ON CROSS BEAM OF BRIDGE. - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Bridge-Type Circuit Breakers, Long Island shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Cos Cob, Fairfield County, CT

  14. Visual implant elastomer and anchor tag retention in largemouth bass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartman, K.J.; Janney, E.C.

    2006-01-01

    We double-marked largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides with Floy FD-68B anchor tags and visible implant elastomer (VIE) marks before stocking to compare retention of the two marks for age-0 (178 mm total length [TL]) and age-1 (273 mm TL) largemouth bass. In a short-term (31-d) evaluation, retention rate of anchor tags was over 94% for each age-class and retention of VIE marks was 98% in both age-classes. In a longer-term comparison of fish stocked into the Ohio River, retention was substantially higher for VIE marks (92.9%) than for anchor tags (42.9%) after 403 d (ages combined). Although anchor tags had high retention in two sizes of largemouth bass during the short-term experiment, they should not be used in situations where accurate identification of marked fish is required for periods longer than 123 d. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2006.

  15. Fluctuation-induced interactions in nematics with disordered anchoring energy.

    PubMed

    Haddadan, Fahimeh Karimi Pour; Naji, Ali; Shirzadiani, Nafiseh; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2014-12-17

    We examine fluctuation-induced (pseudo-Casimir) interactions in nematic liquid-crystalline films confined between two surfaces, where one of the surfaces imposes a strong homeotropic anchoring (ensuring a uniform mean director profile), while the other one is assumed to be a chemically disordered substrate exhibiting an annealed distribution of anchoring energies. We employ a saddle-point approximation to evaluate the free energy of interaction mediated between the two surfaces and investigate how the interaction force is influenced by the presence of disordered surface anchoring energy. It is shown that the disorder results in a renormalization of the effective surface anchoring parameter in a way that it leads to quantitative and qualitative changes (including a change of sign at intermediate inter-surface separations) in the pseudo-Casimir interaction force when compared with the interaction force in the absence of disorder.

  16. 48 CFR 1812.7000 - Anchor tenancy contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... be developed or used, NASA may enter into a multi-year anchor tenancy contract only if Administrator... venture is not dependent upon a continued Government market or other nonreimbursable Government...

  17. Medial rectus muscle anchoring in complete oculomotor nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Si Hyung; Chang, Jee Ho

    2015-10-01

    The management of exotropia resulting from complete oculomotor nerve palsy is challenging. Conventional therapeutic interventions, including supramaximal resection and recession, superior oblique tendon resection and transposition, and several ocular anchoring procedures have yielded less-than-adequate results. Here we describe a novel surgical technique of anchoring the medial rectus muscle to the medial orbital wall in combination with lateral rectus disinsertion and reattachment to the lateral orbital wall. PMID:26486032

  18. The nucleoplasmin homolog NLP mediates centromere clustering and anchoring to the nucleolus.

    PubMed

    Padeken, Jan; Mendiburo, María José; Chlamydas, Sarantis; Schwarz, Hans-Jürgen; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Heun, Patrick

    2013-04-25

    Centromere clustering during interphase is a phenomenon known to occur in many different organisms and cell types, yet neither the factors involved nor their physiological relevance is well understood. Using Drosophila tissue culture cells and flies, we identified a network of proteins, including the nucleoplasmin-like protein (NLP), the insulator protein CTCF, and the nucleolus protein Modulo, to be essential for the positioning of centromeres. Artificial targeting further demonstrated that NLP and CTCF are sufficient for clustering, while Modulo serves as the anchor to the nucleolus. Centromere clustering was found to depend on centric chromatin rather than specific DNA sequences. Moreover, unclustering of centromeres results in the spatial destabilization of pericentric heterochromatin organization, leading to partial defects in the silencing of repetitive elements, defects during chromosome segregation, and genome instability.

  19. A Communal Bacterial Adhesin Anchors Biofilm and Bystander Cells to Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Absalon, Cedric; Van Dellen, Katrina; Watnick, Paula I.

    2011-01-01

    While the exopolysaccharide component of the biofilm matrix has been intensively studied, much less is known about matrix-associated proteins. To better understand the role of these proteins, we undertook a proteomic analysis of the V. cholerae biofilm matrix. Here we show that the two matrix-associated proteins, Bap1 and RbmA, perform distinct roles in the biofilm matrix. RbmA strengthens intercellular attachments. In contrast, Bap1 is concentrated on surfaces where it serves to anchor the biofilm and recruit cells not yet committed to the sessile lifestyle. This is the first example of a biofilm-derived, communally synthesized conditioning film that stabilizes the association of multilayer biofilms with a surface and facilitates recruitment of planktonic bystanders to the substratum. These studies define a novel paradigm for spatial and functional differentiation of proteins in the biofilm matrix and provide evidence for bacterial cooperation in maintenance and expansion of the multilayer biofilm. PMID:21901100

  20. Genome mapping by random anchoring: A discrete theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M. Q.; Marr, T. G.

    1993-11-01

    As a part of the international human genome project, large-scale genomic maps of human and other model organisms are being generated. More recently, mapping using various anchoring (as opposed to the traditional "fingerprinting") strategies have been proposed based largely on mathematical models. In all of the theoretical work dealing with anchoring, an anchor has been idealized as a point on a continuous, infinite-length genome. In general, it is not desirable to make these assumptions, since in practice they may be violated under a variety of actual biological situations. Here we analyze a discrete model that can be used to predict the expected progress made when mapping by random anchoring. By virtue of keeping all three length scales (genome length, clone length, and probe length) finite, our results for the random anchoring strategy are derived in full generality, which contain previous results as special cases and hence can have broad application for planning mapping experiments or assessing the accuracy of the continuum models. Finally, we pose a challenging nonrandom anchoring model corresponding to a more efficient mapping scheme.

  1. Filamentous structures in skeletal muscle: anchors for the subsarcolemmal space.

    PubMed

    Khairani, Astrid Feinisa; Tajika, Yuki; Takahashi, Maiko; Ueno, Hitoshi; Murakami, Tohru; Soenggono, Arifin; Yorifuji, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    In skeletal muscle fibers, intermediate filaments and actin filaments provide structural support to the myofibrils and the sarcolemma. For many years, it was poorly understood from ultrastructural observations that how these filamentous structures were kept anchored. The present study was conducted to determine the architecture of filamentous anchoring structures in the subsarcolemmal space and the intermyofibrils. The diaphragms (Dp) of adult wild type and mdx mice (mdx is a model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy) were subjected to tension applied perpendicular to the long axis of the muscle fibers, with or without treatment with 1% Triton X-100 or 0.03% saponin. These experiments were conducted to confirm the presence and integrity of the filamentous anchoring structures. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that these structures provide firm transverse connections between the sarcolemma and peripheral myofibrils. Most of the filamentous structures appeared to be inserted into subsarcolemmal densities, forming anchoring connections between the sarcolemma and peripheral myofibrils. In some cases, actin filaments were found to run longitudinally in the subsarcolemmal space to connect to the sarcolemma or in some cases to connect to the intermyofibrils as elongated thin filaments. These filamentous anchoring structures were less common in the mdx Dp. Our data suggest that the transverse and longitudinal filamentous structures form an anchoring system in the subsarcolemmal space and the intermyofibrils.

  2. Poor anchoring limits dyslexics' perceptual, memory, and reading skills.

    PubMed

    Oganian, Yulia; Ahissar, Merav

    2012-07-01

    The basic deficits underlying the severe and persistent reading difficulties in dyslexia are still highly debated. One of the major topics of debate is whether these deficits are language specific, or affect both verbal and non-verbal stimuli. Recently, Ahissar and colleagues proposed the "anchoring-deficit hypothesis" (Ahissar, Lubin, Putter-Katz, & Banai, 2006), which suggests that dyslexics have a general difficulty in automatic extraction of stimulus regularities from auditory inputs. This hypothesis explained a broad range of dyslexics' verbal and non-verbal difficulties. However, it was not directly tested in the context of reading and verbal memory, which poses the main stumbling blocks to dyslexics. Here we assessed the abilities of adult dyslexics to efficiently benefit from ("anchor to") regularities embedded in repeated tones, orally presented syllables, and written words. We also compared dyslexics' performance to that of individuals with attention disorder (ADHD), but no reading disability. We found an anchoring effect in all groups: all gained from stimulus repetition. However, in line with the anchoring-deficit hypothesis, controls and ADHD participants showed a significantly larger anchoring effect in all tasks. This study is the first that directly shows that the same domain-general deficit, poor anchoring, characterizes dyslexics' performance in perceptual, working memory and reading tasks.

  3. Epoxy-coated rock anchors for upper Occoquan Dam

    SciTech Connect

    Bruen, M.P.; Pansic, N.; Schwartz, M.I.

    1995-12-31

    High-capacity, epoxy-coated anchors were installed at Upper Occoquan Dam to increase the stability of the 70-foot-high concrete gravity dam and powerhouse under revised Probable Maximum Flood (PMF) conditions. The post-tensioned anchorage system consisted of 56 multi-strand rock anchors with design loads of 700 to 1855 kips, averaging 1500 kips per tendon. A double corrosion protection system was specified to provide protection throughout the entire anchor length. During anchor stressing and testing, significant creep movement under constant loads equivalent to 133% of the design load was experienced and exceeded the requisite Post-Tensioning Institute (PTI) criteria. In addition to the creep phenomena, seating losses during transfer of the load to the end anchorage are at least 2 to 3 times greater than that which has been experienced with bare-wire strand tendons. On the basis of anchor test results, modifications were made to the anchor testing protocol, acceptance criteria, and the approach used for assessment of the long-term performance of the anchorage system.

  4. Free versus anchored numerical estimation: A unified approach.

    PubMed

    Opfer, John E; Thompson, Clarissa A; Kim, Dan

    2016-04-01

    Children's number-line estimation has produced a lively debate about representational change, supported by apparently incompatible data regarding descriptive adequacy of logarithmic (Opfer, Siegler, & Young, 2011) and cyclic power models (Slusser, Santiago, & Barth, 2013). To test whether methodological differences might explain discrepant findings, we created a fully crossed 2×2 design and assigned 96 children to one of four cells. In the design, we crossed anchoring (free, anchored) and sampling (over-, even-), which were candidate factors to explain discrepant findings. In three conditions (free/over-sampling, free/even-sampling, and anchored/over-sampling), the majority of children provided estimates better fit by the logarithmic than cyclic power function. In the last condition (anchored/even-sampling), the reverse was found. Results suggest that logarithmically-compressed numerical estimates do not depend on sampling, that the fit of cyclic power functions to children's estimates is likely an effect of anchors, and that a mixed log/linear model provides a useful model for both free and anchored numerical estimation. PMID:26774104

  5. Evaluation of mitral valve replacement anchoring in a phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, A. Jonathan; Moore, John; Lang, Pencilla; Bainbridge, Dan; Campbell, Gordon; Jones, Doug L.; Guiraudon, Gerard M.; Peters, Terry M.

    2012-02-01

    Conventional mitral valve replacement requires a median sternotomy and cardio-pulmonary bypass with aortic crossclamping and is associated with significant mortality and morbidity which could be reduced by performing the procedure off-pump. Replacing the mitral valve in the closed, off-pump, beating heart requires extensive development and validation of surgical and imaging techniques. Image guidance systems and surgical access for off-pump mitral valve replacement have been previously developed, allowing the prosthetic valve to be safely introduced into the left atrium and inserted into the mitral annulus. The major remaining challenge is to design a method of securely anchoring the prosthetic valve inside the beating heart. The development of anchoring techniques has been hampered by the expense and difficulty in conducting large animal studies. In this paper, we demonstrate how prosthetic valve anchoring may be evaluated in a dynamic phantom. The phantom provides a consistent testing environment where pressure measurements and Doppler ultrasound can be used to monitor and assess the valve anchoring procedures, detecting pararvalvular leak when valve anchoring is inadequate. Minimally invasive anchoring techniques may be directly compared to the current gold standard of valves sutured under direct vision, providing a useful tool for the validation of new surgical instruments.

  6. The Dynamics of Scaling: A Memory-Based Anchor Model of Category Rating and Absolute Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrov, Alexander A.; Anderson, John R.

    2005-01-01

    A memory-based scaling model--ANCHOR--is proposed and tested. The perceived magnitude of the target stimulus is compared with a set of anchors in memory. Anchor selection is probabilistic and sensitive to similarity, base-level strength, and recency. The winning anchor provides a reference point near the target and thereby converts the global…

  7. Glycolipid precursors for the membrane anchor of Trypanosoma brucei variant surface glycoproteins. II. Lipid structures of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C sensitive and resistant glycolipids

    SciTech Connect

    Mayor, S.; Menon, A.K.; Cross, G.A. )

    1990-04-15

    A common diagnostic feature of glycosylinositol phospholipid (GPI)-anchored proteins is their release from the membrane by a phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC). However, some GPI-anchored proteins are resistant to this enzyme. The best characterized example of this subclass is the human erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase, where the structural basis of PI-PLC resistance has been shown to be the acylation of an inositol hydroxyl group(s). Both PI-PLC-sensitive and resistant GPI-anchor precursors (P2 and P3, respectively) have been found in Trypanosoma brucei, where the major surface glycoprotein is anchored by a PI-PLC-sensitive glycolipid anchor. The accompanying paper shows that P2 and P3 have identical glycans, indistinguishable from the common core glycan found on all the characterized GPI protein anchors. This paper shows that the single difference between P2 and P3, and the basis for the PI-PLC insusceptibility of P3, is a fatty acid, ester-linked to the inositol residue in P3. The inositol-linked fatty acid can be removed by treatment with mild base to restore PI-PLC sensitivity. Biosynthetic labeling experiments with (3H)palmitic acid and (3H)myristic acid show that (3H)palmitic acid specifically labels the inositol residue in P3 while (3H)myristic acid labels the diacylglycerol portion. Possible models to account for the simultaneous presence of PI-PLC-resistant and sensitive glycolipids are discussed in the context of available information on the biosynthesis of GPI-anchors.

  8. Display of GPI-anchored anti-EGFR nanobodies on extracellular vesicles promotes tumour cell targeting

    PubMed Central

    Kooijmans, Sander A. A.; Aleza, Clara Gómez; Roffler, Steve R.; van Solinge, Wouter W.; Vader, Pieter; Schiffelers, Raymond M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are attractive candidate drug delivery systems due to their ability to functionally transport biological cargo to recipient cells. However, the apparent lack of target cell specificity of exogenously administered EVs limits their therapeutic applicability. In this study, we propose a novel method to equip EVs with targeting properties, in order to improve their interaction with tumour cells. Methods EV producing cells were transfected with vectors encoding for anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) nanobodies, which served as targeting ligands for tumour cells, fused to glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor signal peptides derived from decay-accelerating factor (DAF). EVs were isolated using ultrafiltration/size-exclusion liquid chromatography and characterized using western blotting, Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis, and electron microscopy. EV–tumour cell interactions were analyzed under static conditions using flow cytometry and under flow conditions using a live-cell fluorescence microscopy-coupled perfusion system. Results EV analysis showed that GPI-linked nanobodies were successfully displayed on EV surfaces and were highly enriched in EVs compared with parent cells. Display of GPI-linked nanobodies on EVs did not alter general EV characteristics (i.e. morphology, size distribution and protein marker expression), but greatly improved EV binding to tumour cells dependent on EGFR density under static conditions. Moreover, nanobody-displaying EVs showed a significantly improved cell association to EGFR-expressing tumour cells under flow conditions. Conclusions We show that nanobodies can be anchored on the surface of EVs via GPI, which alters their cell targeting behaviour. Furthermore, this study highlights GPI-anchoring as a new tool in the EV toolbox, which may be applied for EV display of a variety of proteins, such as antibodies, reporter proteins and signaling molecules. PMID:26979463

  9. Influence of trifluoroethanol on membrane interfacial anchoring interactions of transmembrane alpha-helical peptides.

    PubMed

    Ozdirekcan, Suat; Nyholm, Thomas K M; Raja, Mobeen; Rijkers, Dirk T S; Liskamp, Rob M J; Killian, J Antoinette

    2008-02-15

    Interfacial anchoring interactions between aromatic amino acid residues and the lipid-water interface are believed to be important determinants for membrane protein structure and function. Thus, it is possible that molecules that partition into the lipid-water interface can influence membrane protein activity simply by interfering with these anchoring interactions. Here we tested this hypothesis by investigating the effects of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) on the interaction of a Trp-flanked synthetic transmembrane peptide (acetyl-GW(2)(LA)(8)LW(2)A-NH(2)) with model membranes of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine. Two striking observations were made. First, using (2)H nuclear magnetic resonance on acyl chain deuterated lipids, we found that addition of 4 or 8 vol % of TFE completely abolishes the ability of the peptide to order and stretch the lipid acyl chains in these relatively thin bilayers. Second, we observed that addition of 8 vol % TFE reduces the tilt angle of the peptide from 5.3 degrees to 2.5 degrees, as measured by (2)H NMR on Ala-d(4) labeled peptides. The "straightening" of the peptide was accompanied by an increased exposure of Trp to the aqueous phase, as shown by Trp-fluorescence quenching experiments using acrylamide. The observation of a reduced tilt angle was surprising because we also found that TFE partioning results in a significant thinning of the membrane, which would increase the extent of hydrophobic mismatch. In contrast to the Trp-flanked peptide, no effect of TFE was observed on the interaction of a Lys-flanked analog (acetyl-GK(2)(LA)(8)LK(2)A-NH(2)) with the lipid bilayer. These results emphasize the importance of interfacial anchoring interactions for membrane organization and provide new insights into how molecules such as TFE that can act as anesthetics may affect the behavior of membrane proteins that are enriched in aromatic amino acids at the lipid-water interface.

  10. Membrane anchoring stabilizes and favors secretion of New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase.

    PubMed

    González, Lisandro J; Bahr, Guillermo; Nakashige, Toshiki G; Nolan, Elizabeth M; Bonomo, Robert A; Vila, Alejandro J

    2016-07-01

    Carbapenems, 'last-resort' β-lactam antibiotics, are inactivated by zinc-dependent metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs). The host innate immune response withholds nutrient metal ions from microbial pathogens by releasing metal-chelating proteins such as calprotectin. We show that metal sequestration is detrimental for the accumulation of MBLs in the bacterial periplasm, because those enzymes are readily degraded in their nonmetallated form. However, the New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase (NDM-1) can persist under conditions of metal depletion. NDM-1 is a lipidated protein that anchors to the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Membrane anchoring contributes to the unusual stability of NDM-1 and favors secretion of this enzyme in outer-membrane vesicles (OMVs). OMVs containing NDM-1 can protect nearby populations of bacteria from otherwise lethal antibiotic levels, and OMVs from clinical pathogens expressing NDM-1 can carry this MBL and the blaNDM gene. We show that protein export into OMVs can be targeted, providing possibilities of new antibacterial therapeutic strategies.

  11. Anchoring PEG-oleate to cell membranes stimulates reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Shinji; Nomura, Koujiro; Mochizuki, Kei; Taya, Masahito

    2016-11-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) derivatives possessing oleyl and reactive groups for conjugating functional substrates, such as proteins and quantum dots, are useful materials for cell-surface engineering and cell immobilization onto substrates. The reagent is known as a biocompatible anchor for cell membranes (BAM). Here, BAM-anchoring on cell membranes is reported to stimulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in those cells. Significant increases in ROS production and release to the surrounding environment were detected in mouse fibroblast cell line 10T1/2 when soaked in a solution containing BAM conjugated with 1/10mol/mol bovine serum albumin at 1.5μM-protein. ROS production stimulation was confirmed to be independent of the protein crosslinked with BAM and of cell type. Similar stimulation was detected for BAMs conjugated with ovalbumin and casein, in human hepatoma cell line HepG2, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Considering the effects of ROS on a variety of cellular processes, these results demonstrated the necessity for focusing attention on the effects of generated and released ROS on the behaviors of cells in the studies applying BAM to cells.

  12. Perceptual Anchoring in Preschool Children: Not Adultlike, but There

    PubMed Central

    Banai, Karen; Yifat, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent studies suggest that human auditory perception follows a prolonged developmental trajectory, sometimes continuing well into adolescence. Whereas both sensory and cognitive accounts have been proposed, the development of the ability to base current perceptual decisions on prior information, an ability that strongly benefits adult perception, has not been directly explored. Here we ask whether the auditory frequency discrimination of preschool children also improves when given the opportunity to use previously presented standard stimuli as perceptual anchors, and whether the magnitude of this anchoring effect undergoes developmental changes. Methodology/Principal Findings Frequency discrimination was tested using two adaptive same/different protocols. In one protocol (with-reference), a repeated 1-kHz standard tone was presented repeatedly across trials. In the other (no-reference), no such repetitions occurred. Verbal memory and early reading skills were also evaluated to determine if the pattern of correlations between frequency discrimination, memory and literacy is similar to that previously reported in older children and adults. Preschool children were significantly more sensitive in the with-reference than in the no-reference condition, but the magnitude of this anchoring effect was smaller than that observed in adults. The pattern of correlations among discrimination thresholds, memory and literacy replicated previous reports in older children. Conclusions/Significance The processes allowing the use of context to form perceptual anchors are already functional among preschool children, albeit to a lesser extent than in adults. Nevertheless, immature anchoring cannot fully account for the poorer frequency discrimination abilities of young children. That anchoring is present among the majority of typically developing preschool children suggests that the anchoring deficits observed among individuals with dyslexia represent a true deficit rather

  13. Perinuclear Anchoring of H3K9-Methylated Chromatin Stabilizes Induced Cell Fate in C. elegans Embryos.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Sandoval, Adriana; Towbin, Benjamin D; Kalck, Veronique; Cabianca, Daphne S; Gaidatzis, Dimos; Hauer, Michael H; Geng, Liqing; Wang, Li; Yang, Teddy; Wang, Xinghao; Zhao, Kehao; Gasser, Susan M

    2015-12-01

    Interphase chromatin is organized in distinct nuclear sub-compartments, reflecting its degree of compaction and transcriptional status. In Caenorhabditis elegans embryos, H3K9 methylation is necessary to silence and to anchor repeat-rich heterochromatin at the nuclear periphery. In a screen for perinuclear anchors of heterochromatin, we identified a previously uncharacterized C. elegans chromodomain protein, CEC-4. CEC-4 binds preferentially mono-, di-, or tri-methylated H3K9 and localizes at the nuclear envelope independently of H3K9 methylation and nuclear lamin. CEC-4 is necessary for endogenous heterochromatin anchoring, but not for transcriptional repression, in contrast to other known H3K9 methyl-binders in worms, which mediate gene repression but not perinuclear anchoring. When we ectopically induce a muscle differentiation program in embryos, cec-4 mutants fail to commit fully to muscle cell fate. This suggests that perinuclear sequestration of chromatin during development helps restrict cell differentiation programs by stabilizing commitment to a specific cell fate. PAPERCLIP. PMID:26607792

  14. AKAP-Independent Localization of Type-II Protein Kinase A to Dynamic Actin Microspikes

    PubMed Central

    Rivard, Robert L.; Birger, Monique; Gaston, Kara J.; Howe, Alan K.

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) in subcellular space is required for cytoskeletal dynamics and chemotaxis. Currently, spatial regulation of PKA is thought to require the association of PKA regulatory (R) subunits with A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). Here, we show that the regulatory RIIα subunit of PKA associates with dynamic actin microspikes in an AKAP-independent manner. Both endogenous RIIα and a GFP-RIIα fusion protein co-localize with F-actin in microspikes within hippocampal neuron growth cones and the leading edge lamellae of NG108-15 cells. Live-cell imaging demonstrates that RIIα-associated microspikes are highly dynamic and that the coupling of RIIα to actin is tight, as the movement of both actin and RIIα are immediately and coincidently stopped by low-dose cytochalasin D. Importantly, co-localization of RIIα and actin in these structures is resistant to displacement by a cell-permeable disrupter of PKA-AKAP interactions. Biochemical fractionation confirms that a substantial pool of PKA RIIα is associated with the detergent-insoluble cytoskeleton and is resistant to extraction by a peptide inhibitor of AKAP interactions. Finally, mutation of the AKAP-binding domain of RIIα fails to disrupt its association with actin microspikes. These data provide the first demonstration of the physical association of a kinase with such dynamic actin structures, as well as the first demonstration of the ability of type-II PKA to localize to discrete subcellular structures independently of canonical AKAP function. This association is likely to be important for microfilament dynamics and cell migration and may prime the investigation of novel mechanisms for localizing PKA activity. PMID:19536823

  15. A novel human erythrocyte glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored glycoprotein ACA. Isolation, purification, primary structure determination, and molecular parameters of its lipid structure.

    PubMed

    Becker Kojić, Zorica A; Terness, Peter

    2002-10-25

    A method has been elaborated to isolate and purify up to homogeneity a novel membrane glycoprotein containing a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor by means of salting out with ammonium sulfate (40-80% saturation), followed by preparative SDS-PAGE, chromatography and acetone precipitation. The preparation obtained was homogeneous upon electrophoresis in the presence of 0.1% SDS after reduction with 2-mercaptoethanol. It is protein-soluble at its isoelectrical point (pH 5.5) with molecular mass of 65,000 daltons. The isolated protein is linked to the membrane via glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol susceptible to cleavage by purified phospholipase C. The hydrophobic portion of the glycolipid membrane anchor of the protein was radiolabeled with the photoactivated reagent 3-(trifluoromethyl)-3-(m-[(125)I]iodophenyl)diazirine and hydrolyzed with glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C, followed by enzymatic deacetylation of the remaining lipid. Thin-layer chromatography showed that the generated radiolabeled fragment migrates with the same mobility as that of variant surface glycoprotein (VSG), obtained in the same manner. In this study we describe a novel erythrocyte membrane GPI-linked protein with the structural feature of an anchor that, in contrast to other GPI-linked erythrocyte proteins, has a non-acetylated inositol ring and diacylglycerol rather than alkyl-acyl glycerol as a lipid tail of the anchor.

  16. Bacillus thuringiensis pore-forming toxins trigger massive shedding of GPI-anchored aminopeptidase N from gypsy moth midgut epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Valaitis, Algimantas P

    2008-06-01

    The insecticidal Cry proteins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis strains are pore-forming toxins (PFTs) that bind to the midgut brush border membrane and cause extensive damage to the midgut epithelial cells of susceptible insect larvae. Force-feeding B. thuringiensis PFTs to Lymantria dispar larvae elicited rapid and massive shedding of a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored aminopeptidase N (APN) from midgut epithelial cells into the luminal fluid, and depletion of the membrane-anchored enzyme on the midgut epithelial cells. The amount of APN released into the luminal fluid of intoxicated larvae was dose- and time-dependent, and directly related to insecticidal potency of the PFTs. The induction of toxin-induced shedding of APN was inhibited by cyclic AMP and MAPK kinase (MEK) inhibitors PD98059 and U0126, indicating that signal transduction in the MEK/ERK pathway is involved in the regulation of the shedding process. APN released from epithelial cells appears to be generated by the action of a phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) cleavage of the GPI anchor based upon detection of a cross-reacting determinant (CRD) on the protein shed into the luminal fluid. Alkaline phosphatase was also released from the gut epithelial cells, supporting the conclusion that other GPI-anchored proteins are released as a consequence of the activation PI-PLC. These observations are the basis of a novel and highly sensitive tool for evaluating the insecticidal activity of new Cry proteins obtained though discovery or protein engineering.

  17. Ectoenzymes of the kidney microvillar membrane. Differential solubilization by detergents can predict a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol membrane anchor.

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, N M; Turner, A J

    1988-01-01

    The pattern of solubilization of nine kidney microvillar ectoenzymes by a range of detergents distinguished two classes of membrane proteins: those released from the membrane by bacterial phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C and those not so released. The latter group of transmembrane proteins were solubilized efficiently (greater than 80%) by all the detergents examined. In contrast, proteins released by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C were solubilized effectively only by octyl glucoside, 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulphonate and sodium deoxycholate. Octyl glucoside solubilized the amphipathic forms of the ectoenzymes examined, suggesting that this may be a useful detergent in the purification of glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored ectoenzymes. PMID:2839148

  18. Nitric oxide inhibits the shedding of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored dipeptidase from porcine renal proximal tubules.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Wook; Yoon, Hyun Joong; Lee, Hwanghee Blaise; Hooper, Nigel M; Park, Haeng Soon

    2002-05-15

    NO is related to the pathological condition acute renal failure, in which we previously observed that the level of soluble dipeptidase in urine was decreased. In this study the role of NO in the shedding of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored form of renal dipeptidase (RDPase) was examined. The NO donors sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine rapidly inhibited the release of RDPase from porcine kidney proximal tubules. The substrate of NO synthase, l-Arg, also inhibited the release of RDPase, and this effect was reversed by the NO synthase inhibitor N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester. Western-blot analyses using antibodies raised against porcine RDPase and the inositol-1,2-cyclic monophosphate moiety formed on phospholipase C cleavage of the GPI anchor demonstrated that SNP mediated its inhibitory effect on the release of RDPase via a GPI-specific phospholipase C (GPI-PLC). Peroxynitrite scavengers (deferoxamine and superoxide dismutase) or reducing agent (dithiothreitol) did not affect SNP's inhibition of the release of RDPase. Exposure to the G-protein activator AlF(-)(4) mimicked the l-Arg effect in the presence of a low concentration of l-Arg, and the effect was completely reversed by U73122, an intracellular phosphatidylinositol-specific PLC (PI-PLC) inhibitor. These results suggest a signal-transduction pathway involving NO, which is produced by NO synthase(s) following activation of a G-protein-coupled PI-PLC, resulting in inhibition of the GPI-PLC that cleaves and releases RDPase. Therefore, this indicates a role for NO as an inhibitory regulator of the shedding of the GPI-anchored RDPase in acute renal failure.

  19. The Msd1–Wdr8–Pkl1 complex anchors microtubule minus ends to fission yeast spindle pole bodies

    PubMed Central

    Yukawa, Masashi; Ikebe, Chiho

    2015-01-01

    The minus ends of spindle microtubules are anchored to a microtubule-organizing center. The conserved Msd1/SSX2IP proteins are localized to the spindle pole body (SPB) and the centrosome in fission yeast and humans, respectively, and play a critical role in microtubule anchoring. In this paper, we show that fission yeast Msd1 forms a ternary complex with another conserved protein, Wdr8, and the minus end–directed Pkl1/kinesin-14. Individual deletion mutants displayed the identical spindle-protrusion phenotypes. Msd1 and Wdr8 were delivered by Pkl1 to mitotic SPBs, where Pkl1 was tethered through Msd1–Wdr8. The spindle-anchoring defect imposed by msd1/wdr8/pkl1 deletions was suppressed by a mutation of the plus end–directed Cut7/kinesin-5, which was shown to be mutual. Intriguingly, Pkl1 motor activity was not required for its anchoring role once targeted to the SPB. Therefore, spindle anchoring through Msd1–Wdr8–Pkl1 is crucial for balancing the Cut7/kinesin-5–mediated outward force at the SPB. Our analysis provides mechanistic insight into the spatiotemporal regulation of two opposing kinesins to ensure mitotic spindle bipolarity. PMID:25987607

  20. PAP7, a PBR/PKA-RIalpha-associated protein: a new element in the relay of the hormonal induction of steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Li, Hua; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2003-06-01

    The precise mechanism by which the hormone-induced minimal cAMP levels act at the mitochondria to activate cholesterol transport and steroid synthesis is unknown. We propose that this mechanism involves a macromolecular signaling complex where a newly identified peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR)-associated protein (PAP7) binds the regulatory subunit RIalpha of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), thus allowing for local efficient catalytic activation and phosphorylation of the substrate steroidogenesis acute regulatory protein (StAR), leading to cholesterol transfer from the low affinity StAR to the high affinity PBR cholesterol binding protein. The mouse and human PAP7 proteins were cloned, their genomic organization and chromosomal localization characterized, their tissue distribution evaluated and subcellular localization defined. PAP7 is highly expressed in steroidogenic tissues, where it follows the pattern of PKA-RIalpha expression and data from a human adrenal disease suggest that it participates in PKA-RIalpha-mediated tumorigenesis and hormone-independent hypercortisolism. PAP7 is localized in the Golgi and mitochondria and inhibition of PAP7 expression results in reduced hormone-induced cholesterol transport into mitochondria and decreased steroid formation. Taken together, these data suggest that PAP7 functions as an A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) critical in the cAMP-dependent steroid formation.

  1. Expression of GPI anchored human recombinant erythropoietin in CHO cells is devoid of glycosylation heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Devasahayam, Mercy; Devi, Sobita

    2015-04-01

    Erythropoietin is a glycohormone involved in the regulation of the blood cell levels. It is a 166 amino acid protein having 3 N-glycosylation and one O-linked glycosylation sites, and is used to treat anaemia related illness. Though human recombinant erythropoietin (rEPO) is produced in CHO cells, the loss in quality control is 80% due to incomplete glycosylation of the rEPO with low levels of fully glycosylated active rEPO. Here, we describe the expression from CHO cells of fully glycosylated human rEPO when expressed as a GPI anchored molecule (rEPO-g). The results demonstrated the production of a homogenous completely glycosylated human rEPO-g as a 42 kD band without any low molecular weight glycoform variants as shown by affinity chromatography followed by SDS-PAGE and anti-human EPO specific western blot. The western blot using specific monoclonal antibody is the available biochemical technique to prove the presence of homogeneity in the expressed recombinant protein. The GPI anchor can be removed during the purification process to yield a therapeutically relevant recombinant erythropoietin molecule cells with a higher in vivo biological activity due to its high molecular weight of 40 kD. This is possibly the first report on the production of a homogenous and completely glycosylated human rEPO from CHO cells for efficient therapy. PMID:26011979

  2. Experience-based, body-anchored qualitative research interviewing.

    PubMed

    Stelter, Reinhard

    2010-06-01

    Two theoretical constructs that lay the foundation for experience-based, body-anchored interviewing are presented: the first-person perspective and the concept of meaning. These theoretical concepts are concretized, first, by means of a methodological framework for experience-based, body-anchored interviewing, and second, by an interview guide that explores a research participant's personal experience with mindfulness meditation. An excerpt from an interview is discussed to illustrate the advantages of this interview form, namely its value as a methodological instrument for qualitative research in areas such as traditional and holistic medicine, Western alternative and complementary medicine, nursing, psychotherapy, coaching, physiotherapy, movement arts, and physical education.

  3. 17. VIEW OF ANCHOR BRIDGE NUMBER 310 LOOKING EAST ALONG ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. VIEW OF ANCHOR BRIDGE NUMBER 310 LOOKING EAST ALONG THE MAIN LINE TRACK LOCATED TO THE NORTH OF THE COS COB POWER PLANT. ANCHOR BRIDGES LOCATED AT TWO MILE INTERVALS WITHSTAND CATENARY TENSION AND PROVIDE A PLATFORM FOR MOUNTING OIL FILLED CIRCUIT BREAKERS, LIGHTNING ARRESTORS AND OTHER ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT. THE ROOF OF THE LOAD DISPATCHER'S TOWER CAN BE SEEN DIRECTLY BEHIND THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE BRIDGE. - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Cos Cob Power Plant, Sound Shore Drive, Greenwich, Fairfield County, CT

  4. A reusable suture anchor for arthroscopy psychomotor skills training.

    PubMed

    Tillett, Edward D; Rogers, Rainie; Nyland, John

    2003-03-01

    For residents to adequately develop the early arthroscopy psychomotor skills required to better learn how to manage the improvisational situations they will encounter during actual patient cases, they need to experience sufficient practice repetitions within a contextually relevant environment. Unfortunately, the cost of suture anchors can be a practice repetition-limiting factor in learning arthroscopic knot-tying techniques. We describe a technique for creating inexpensive reusable suture anchors and provide an example of their application to repair the anterior glenoid labrum during an arthroscopy psychomotor skills laboratory training session.

  5. Modeling and Simulation of Anchoring Processess for Small Body Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quadrelli, Marco B.; Mazahar, Hammad; Negrut, Dan

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes recent work done in modeling and simulation of anchoring processes in granular media, with applications to anchoring on a Near Earth Object (NEO), where the forces due to interactions with the regolith are much stronger than the local surface gravity field. This effort is part of a larger systems engineering capability developed at JPL to answer key questions, validate requirements, conduct key system and mission trades,and evaluate performance and risk related to NEO operations for any proposed human or robotic missions to a NEO.

  6. Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    1985-01-01

    Examines proteins which give rise to structure and, by virtue of selective binding to other molecules, make genes. Binding sites, amino acids, protein evolution, and molecular paleontology are discussed. Work with encoding segments of deoxyribonucleic acid (exons) and noncoding stretches (introns) provides new information for hypotheses. (DH)

  7. Protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the major structural and functional components of all cells in the body. They are macromolecules that comprise 1 or more chains of amino acids that vary in their sequence and length and are folded into specific 3-dimensional structures. The sizes and conformations of proteins, therefor...

  8. Probing the Huntingtin 1-17 Membrane Anchor on a Phospholipid Bilayer by Using All-Atom Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Côté, Sébastien; Binette, Vincent; Salnikov, Evgeniy S.; Bechinger, Burkhard; Mousseau, Normand

    2015-01-01

    Mislocalization and aggregation of the huntingtin protein are related to Huntington’s disease. Its first exon—more specifically the first 17 amino acids (Htt17)—is crucial for the physiological and pathological functions of huntingtin. It regulates huntingtin’s activity through posttranslational modifications and serves as an anchor to membrane-containing organelles of the cell. Recently, structure and orientation of the Htt17 membrane anchor were determined using a combined solution and solid-state NMR approach. This prompted us to refine this model by investigating the dynamics and thermodynamics of this membrane anchor on a POPC bilayer using all-atom, explicit solvent molecular dynamics and Hamiltonian replica exchange. Our simulations are combined with various experimental measurements to generate a high-resolution atomistic model for the huntingtin Htt17 membrane anchor on a POPC bilayer. More precisely, we observe that the single α-helix structure is more stable in the phospholipid membrane than the NMR model obtained in the presence of dodecylphosphocholine detergent micelles. The resulting Htt17 monomer has its hydrophobic plane oriented parallel to the bilayer surface. Our results further unveil the key residues interacting with the membrane in terms of hydrogen bonds, salt-bridges, and nonpolar contributions. We also observe that Htt17 equilibrates at a well-defined insertion depth and that it perturbs the physical properties—order parameter, thickness, and area per lipid—of the bilayer in a manner that could favor its dimerization. Overall, our observations reinforce and refine the NMR measurements on the Htt17 membrane anchor segment of huntingtin that is of fundamental importance to its biological functions. PMID:25762330

  9. Spatial Organization in Protein Kinase A Signaling Emerged at the Base of Animal Evolution.

    PubMed

    Peng, Mao; Aye, Thin Thin; Snel, Berend; van Breukelen, Bas; Scholten, Arjen; Heck, Albert J R

    2015-07-01

    In phosphorylation-directed signaling, spatial and temporal control is organized by complex interaction networks that diligently direct kinases toward distinct substrates to fine-tune specificity. How these protein networks originate and evolve into complex regulatory machineries are among the most fascinating research questions in biology. Here, spatiotemporal signaling is investigated by tracing the evolutionary dynamics of each functional domain of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and its diverse set of A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). Homologues of the catalytic (PKA-C) and regulatory (PKA-R) domains of the (PKA-R)2-(PKA-C)2 holoenzyme were found throughout evolution. Most variation was observed in the RIIa of PKA-R, crucial for dimerization and docking to AKAPs. The RIIa domain was not observed in all PKA-R homologues. In the fungi and distinct protist lineages, the RIIa domain emerges within PKA-R, but it displays large sequence variation. These organisms do not harbor homologues of AKAPs, suggesting that efficient docking to direct spatiotemporal PKA activity evolved in multicellular eukaryotes. To test this in silico hypothesis, we experimentally screened organisms with increasing complexity by cAMP-based chemical proteomics to reveal that the occurrence of PKA-AKAP interactions indeed coincided and expanded within vertebrates, suggesting a crucial role for AKAPs in the advent of metazoan multicellularity. PMID:26066639

  10. p23/Tmp21 associates with protein kinase Cdelta (PKCdelta) and modulates its apoptotic function.

    PubMed

    Wang, HongBin; Xiao, Liqing; Kazanietz, Marcelo G

    2011-05-01

    There is emerging evidence that C1 domains, motifs originally identified in PKC isozymes and responsible for binding of phorbol esters and diacylglycerol, interact with the Golgi/endoplasmic reticulum protein p23 (Tmp21). In this study, we investigated whether PKCδ, a kinase widely implicated in apoptosis and inhibition of cell cycle progression, associates with p23 and determined the potential functional implications of this interaction. Using a yeast two-hybrid approach, we found that the PKCδ C1b domain associates with p23 and identified two key residues (Asp(245) and Met(266)) implicated in this interaction. Interestingly, silencing p23 from LNCaP prostate cancer cells using RNAi markedly enhanced PKCδ-dependent apoptosis and activation of PKCδ downstream effectors ROCK and JNK by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Moreover, translocation of PKCδ to the plasma membrane by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate was enhanced in p23-depleted LNCaP cells. Notably, a PKCδ mutant that failed to interact with p23 triggered a strong apoptotic response when expressed in LNCaP cells. In summary, our data compellingly support the concept that C1 domains have dual roles both in lipid and protein associations and provide strong evidence that p23 acts as an anchoring protein that retains PKCδ at the perinuclear region, thus limiting the availability of this kinase for activation in response to stimuli.

  11. Current status of frameless anchored IUD for immediate intracesarean insertion.

    PubMed

    Wildemeersch, Dirk; Goldstuck, Norman D; Hasskamp, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Immediate postpartum intrauterine device (IUD) insertion deserves great attention as it can provide immediate, timely and convenient contraception plus the added benefit of preventing repeat unintended pregnancies. Although women post vaginal delivery can benefit from immediate post-placenta contraception, women undergoing Cesarean section clearly need contraception, as an inter-delivery interval shorter than 18 months places them at a high risk for uterine rupture. The main drawback of currently available framed IUD devices for immediate postpartum insertion of an IUD is their high expulsion and displacement rates when inserted immediately postpartum after both vaginal and Cesarean delivery. Current research suggests that a brief window of opportunity exists of 10 minutes for insertion of conventional IUDs after which time expulsion rates both immediately and over time are greatly enhanced. This paper summarizes the current research conducted to overcome the expulsion problems associated with conventional T-shaped devices as well as through the use of an anchored frameless device. In the 1970s and 1980s, attempts were made to solve the expulsion problem by modifying existing devices, such as adding absorbable sutures (Delta-T) or additional appendages. These attempts proved to be clinically unsuccessful as the catgut suture added to the transverse arms did not provide sufficient resistance to prevent downward displacement and expulsion. An anchoring technique to suspend a copper IUD to the fundus of the uterus was developed in Belgium in the 1980s and has been the subject of extensive ongoing clinical research since 1985. Recently the frameless copper releasing anchor IUD, GyneFix, has been tested for postplacental insertion. Initially, the anchor was modified by the inclusion of a biodegradable cone which was added below the anchoring knot. Clinical studies confirmed the adequacy of this approach suggesting that it was technically possible to anchor an IUD

  12. Release of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored enzyme ecto-5'-nucleotidase by phospholipase C: catalytic activation and modulation by the lipid bilayer.

    PubMed Central

    Lehto, M T; Sharom, F J

    1998-01-01

    Many hydrolytic enzymes are attached to the extracellular face of the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells by a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor. Little is currently known about the consequences for enzyme function of anchor cleavage by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C. We have examined this question for the GPI-anchored protein 5'-nucleotidase (5'-ribonucleotide phosphohydrolase; EC 3.1.3.5), both in the native lymphocyte plasma membrane, and following purification and reconstitution into defined lipid bilayer vesicles, using Bacillus thuringiensis phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC). Membrane-bound, detergent-solubilized and cleaved 5'-nucleotidase all obeyed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with a Km for 5'-AMP in the range 11-16 microM. The GPI anchor was removed from essentially all 5'-nucleotidase molecules, indicating that there is no phospholipase-resistant pool of enzyme. However, the phospholipase was much less efficient at cleaving the GPI anchor when 5'-nucleotidase was present in detergent solution, dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine, egg phosphatidylethanolamine and sphingomyelin, compared with the native plasma membrane, egg phosphatidylcholine and a sphingolipid/cholesterol-rich mixture. Lipid molecular properties and bilayer packing may affect the ability of PI-PLC to gain access to the GPI anchor. Catalytic activation, characterized by an increase in Vmax, was observed following PI-PLC cleavage of reconstituted 5'-nucleotidase from vesicles of several different lipids. The highest degree of activation was noted for 5'-nucleotidase in egg phosphatidylethanolamine. An increase in Vmax was also noted for a sphingolipid/cholesterol-rich mixture, the native plasma membrane and egg phosphatidylcholine, whereas vesicles of sphingomyelin and dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine showed little activation. Km generally remained unchanged following cleavage, except in the case of the sphingolipid/cholesterol-rich mixture. Insertion

  13. Characterization of the phosphatidylinositol-glycan membrane anchor of human placental alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, A.D.; Berger, J.; Gerber, L.; Familletti, P.; Udenfriend, S.

    1987-09-01

    Placental alkaline phosphatase (orthophosphoric-monoester phosphohydrolase (alkaline optimum), EC 3.1.3.1) is a member of a diverse group of membrane proteins whose attachment to the lipid bilayer is mediated by a phosphatidylinositol-glycan. To investigate structural aspects of the glycolipid anchor, cultured WISH cells were used because, they produce the enzyme in abundant quantities. When cell suspensions were incubated with purified phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C, most of the placental alkaline phosphatase was released from membranes in a hydrophilic form. On incubation of the cells with (/sup 14/C)ethanolamine, (/sup 14/C)myristic acid, or myo(/sup 3/H)inositol, each was incorporated into the phosphatase near the carboxyl terminus, showing that these components, which are found in other phosphatidylinositol membrane-linked proteins, are also present in placental alkaline phosphatase.

  14. A soluble acid invertase is directed to the vacuole by a signal anchor mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rae, Anne L; Casu, Rosanne E; Perroux, Jai M; Jackson, Mark A; Grof, Christopher P L

    2011-06-15

    Enzyme activities in the vacuole have an important impact on the net concentration of sucrose. In sugarcane (Saccharum hybrid), immunolabelling demonstrated that a soluble acid invertase (β-fructofuranosidase; EC 3.2.1.26) is present in the vacuole of storage parenchyma cells during sucrose accumulation. Examination of sequences from sugarcane, barley and rice showed that the N-terminus of the invertase sequence contains a signal anchor and a tyrosine motif, characteristic of single-pass membrane proteins destined for lysosomal compartments. The N-terminal peptide from the barley invertase was shown to be capable of directing the green fluorescent protein to the vacuole in sugarcane cells. The results suggest that soluble acid invertase is sorted to the vacuole in a membrane-bound form.

  15. End Anchoring in Short-Term Order Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Simon; Lelievre, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Temporally grouping lists has systematic effects on immediate serial recall accuracy, order errors, and recall latencies, and is generally taken to reflect the use of multiple dimensions of ordering in short-term memory. It has been argued that these representations are fully relative, in that all sequence positions are anchored to both the start…

  16. The Effect of Anchor Test Construction on Scale Drift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antal, Judit; Melican, Gerald; Proctor, Thomas; Wiley, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Presented at the Annual Meeting of National Council on Measurement in Education (NCME) in 2010. The focus of the research is to investigate the effect of applying the Sinharay & Holland (2007) midi-test idea for building anchor tests to an on-going testing program with a series of versions of the test and comparing these results to the more…

  17. 24 CFR 3285.402 - Ground anchor installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Anchorage Against Wind § 3285... anchoring. Manufactured homes must also be stabilized against wind in the longitudinal direction in all Wind Zones. Manufactured homes located in Wind Zones II and III must have longitudinal ground...

  18. 24 CFR 3285.402 - Ground anchor installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Anchorage Against Wind § 3285... anchoring. Manufactured homes must also be stabilized against wind in the longitudinal direction in all Wind Zones. Manufactured homes located in Wind Zones II and III must have longitudinal ground...

  19. 24 CFR 3285.402 - Ground anchor installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Anchorage Against Wind § 3285... anchoring. Manufactured homes must also be stabilized against wind in the longitudinal direction in all Wind Zones. Manufactured homes located in Wind Zones II and III must have longitudinal ground...

  20. Dependability of Anchoring Labels of Likert-Type Scales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Lei

    This study uses generalizability theory to examine the dependability of anchoring labels of Likert-type scales. Variance components associated with labeling were estimated in two samples using a two-facet random effect generalizability-study design. In one sample, 173 graduate students in education were administered 7 items measuring attitudes…

  1. Anchor the Boat: A Classwide Intervention to Reduce Problem Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohrmann, Sharon; Talerico, Janet

    2004-01-01

    Universal interventions are designed to systematically teach and reinforce consistent behavioral expectations. The purpose of this study was to provide an example of a group contingency classwide intervention called "Anchor the Boat" that operationally defined behavioral expectations, taught those expectations using teacher-directed instruction…

  2. The Effect of Anchor Test Construction on Scale Drift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antal, Judit; Proctor, Thomas P.; Melican, Gerald J.

    2014-01-01

    In common-item equating the anchor block is generally built to represent a miniature form of the total test in terms of content and statistical specifications. The statistical properties frequently reflect equal mean and spread of item difficulty. Sinharay and Holland (2007) suggested that the requirement for equal spread of difficulty may be too…

  3. 30 CFR 57.9311 - Anchoring stationary sizing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Anchoring stationary sizing devices. 57.9311 Section 57.9311 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES...

  4. 30 CFR 57.9311 - Anchoring stationary sizing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Anchoring stationary sizing devices. 57.9311 Section 57.9311 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES...

  5. 30 CFR 57.9311 - Anchoring stationary sizing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Anchoring stationary sizing devices. 57.9311 Section 57.9311 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES...

  6. 30 CFR 57.9311 - Anchoring stationary sizing devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Anchoring stationary sizing devices. 57.9311 Section 57.9311 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES...

  7. Equating without an Anchor for Nonequivalent Groups of Examinees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longford, Nicholas T.

    2015-01-01

    An equating procedure for a testing program with evolving distribution of examinee profiles is developed. No anchor is available because the original scoring scheme was based on expert judgment of the item difficulties. Pairs of examinees from two administrations are formed by matching on coarsened propensity scores derived from a set of…

  8. Poor Anchoring Limits Dyslexics' Perceptual, Memory, and Reading Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oganian, Yulia; Ahissar, Merav

    2012-01-01

    The basic deficits underlying the severe and persistent reading difficulties in dyslexia are still highly debated. One of the major topics of debate is whether these deficits are language specific, or affect both verbal and non-verbal stimuli. Recently, Ahissar and colleagues proposed the "anchoring-deficit hypothesis" (Ahissar, Lubin,…

  9. A Theoretical Analysis of Sea-anchor Soaring.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto

    1998-06-01

    This study presents a concise mathematical model that accounts for sea-anchor soaring, a special flight technique used by sea birds, in particular storm petrels. Conventional wing theory is used to reveal the mechanics of sea-anchor soaring. The feasibility and existence of an equilibrium are summarized by formulae giving the wind velocity criteria. The stability of the equilibrium is also revealed: among two possible equilibria, the equilibrium at the very low velocity to water is shown to be stable. Numerical examples show the following: sea-anchor soaring is almost always stable; Wilson's storm petrel can soar at 0.256 ms-1 in wind with 4.79 ms-1 under the best conditions. Larger sea-birds like albatrosses need gusty winds to soar, but such strong winds make the sea choppy and hence prevent soaring. Foot-web size regulates the size of a bird utilizing sea-anchor soaring at low velocities to water.Copyright 1998 Academic Press Limited PMID:9735255

  10. Ten Anchor Points for Teaching Principles of Marketing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomkovick, Chuck

    2004-01-01

    Effective marketing instructors commonly share a love for their students, an affinity for the subject matter, and a devotion to continuous quality improvement. The purpose of this article is to highlight 10 anchor points for teaching Principles of Marketing, which are designed to better engage students in the learning process. These anchor…

  11. Culturally-Anchored Values and University Education Experience Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitsis, Ann; Foley, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine whether business students' gender, age and culturally-anchored values affect their perceptions of their university course experience. Design/methodology/approach: Culturally diverse business students (n 1/4 548) studying at an Australian university were surveyed using previously established scales.…

  12. Implementing Anchored Instruction: Guiding Principles for Curriculum Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLarty, Kim; And Others

    A curriculum based on "anchored instruction" was developed to enhance students' literacy development and acquisition of knowledge. The curriculum was designed to create a rich, shared environment that generates interest and enables students to identify and define problems while they explore the content from many perspectives. Based on what is…

  13. Promises and Pitfalls of Anchoring Vignettes in Health Survey Research.

    PubMed

    Grol-Prokopczyk, Hanna; Verdes-Tennant, Emese; McEniry, Mary; Ispány, Márton

    2015-10-01

    Data harmonization is a topic of growing importance to demographers, who increasingly conduct domestic or international comparative research. Many self-reported survey items cannot be directly compared across demographic groups or countries because these groups differ in how they use subjective response categories. Anchoring vignettes, already appearing in numerous surveys worldwide, promise to overcome this problem. However, many anchoring vignettes have not been formally evaluated for adherence to the key measurement assumptions of vignette equivalence and response consistency. This article tests these assumptions in some of the most widely fielded anchoring vignettes in the world: the health vignettes in the World Health Organization (WHO) Study on Global AGEing and Adult Health (SAGE) and World Health Survey (WHS) (representing 10 countries; n = 52,388), as well as similar vignettes in the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) (n = 4,528). Findings are encouraging regarding adherence to response consistency, but reveal substantial violations of vignette equivalence both cross-nationally and across socioeconomic groups. That is, members of different sociocultural groups appear to interpret vignettes as depicting fundamentally different levels of health. The evaluated anchoring vignettes do not fulfill their promise of providing interpersonally comparable measures of health. Recommendations for improving future implementations of vignettes are discussed. PMID:26335547

  14. 15. DETAIL OF ANCHOR BOLT WHICH FORMERLY SECURED A TIMBER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. DETAIL OF ANCHOR BOLT WHICH FORMERLY SECURED A TIMBER SILL BEAM TO THE GRANITE SILL ALONG THE EASTERLY EDGE OF THE SPILLWAY APRON (NOTE 3" SWISS ARMY KNIFE TO RIGHT OF BOLT FOR SCALE); VIEW TO WEST. - Blackstone Canal Millbury Segment, Beginning northwest of State Route 146 & McCracken Road, running along west side of Route 146, Millbury, Worcester County, MA

  15. Isolating Suture Slippage During Cadaveric Testing of Knotless Anchors.

    PubMed

    Klinge, Stephen A; Vopat, Bryan G; Paller, David; Avery, Anthony L; Koruprolu, Sarath; Fadale, Paul D

    2015-07-01

    We evaluated a testing method designed to isolate and analyze the effectiveness of different suture-retention mechanisms in knotless suture anchors used for rotator cuff repairs. Six knotless PushLock implants (Arthrex) with a suture-retention mechanism dependent on a press-fit of suture between the anchor's outer diameter and surrounding bone were compared with 6 ReelX STT devices (Stryker) reliant on an intrinsic suture-locking mechanism. Suture slippage beyond minimal clinical failure thresholds, as well as ultimate failure load, were determined with a novel testing fixture that isolated suture slippage. Suture slippage was isolated from anchor-bone disengagement. Each PushLock exhibited suture slippage of more than 3 mm, and each ReelX exhibited slippage of less than 3 mm. The PushLock implants also exhibited significantly (P < .05) more interval and maximum slippage; 5 of these 6 implants failed via complete suture slippage before dynamic testing could be completed. All ReelX devices survived dynamic testing and ultimately failed via suture breakage. This novel axial load biomechanical testing technique isolated suture slippage in 2 uniquely designed knotless anchors. The press-fit PushLock implant was prone to slippage failure, whereas the ReelX device with its internal suture-locking mechanism exhibited minimal slippage. PMID:26161766

  16. Impact of Enhanced Anchored Instruction in Inclusive Math Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bottge, Brian A.; Toland, Michael D.; Gassaway, Linda; Butler, Mark; Choo, Sam; Griffen, Ann Katherine; Ma, Xin

    2015-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards for Mathematics will place more pressure on special education and math teachers to raise the skill levels of all students, especially those with disabilities in math (MD). The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of enhanced anchored instruction (EAI) on students with and without MD in co-taught general…

  17. 1. VIEW EAST TOWARD COS COB ANCHOR BRIDGE #310 OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW EAST TOWARD COS COB ANCHOR BRIDGE #310 OF CIRCUIT BREAKER INSTALLATION ON CROSS BEAM OF BRIDGE. ABANDONED COS COB POWER STATION IS TO THE SOUTH OF THIS BRIDGE. - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Bridge-Type Circuit Breakers, Long Island shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Cos Cob, Fairfield County, CT

  18. Anchoring Students' Metaperspective Discussions of History in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jankvist, Uffe Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The article discusses an empirical study on the use of history (as a goal) in mathematics education. A historical module was designed and implemented in a Danish upper secondary class to study how students' discussions of metaperspective issues of the historical development of mathematics may be anchored in the taught and learned subject matter of…

  19. Promises and Pitfalls of Anchoring Vignettes in Health Survey Research.

    PubMed

    Grol-Prokopczyk, Hanna; Verdes-Tennant, Emese; McEniry, Mary; Ispány, Márton

    2015-10-01

    Data harmonization is a topic of growing importance to demographers, who increasingly conduct domestic or international comparative research. Many self-reported survey items cannot be directly compared across demographic groups or countries because these groups differ in how they use subjective response categories. Anchoring vignettes, already appearing in numerous surveys worldwide, promise to overcome this problem. However, many anchoring vignettes have not been formally evaluated for adherence to the key measurement assumptions of vignette equivalence and response consistency. This article tests these assumptions in some of the most widely fielded anchoring vignettes in the world: the health vignettes in the World Health Organization (WHO) Study on Global AGEing and Adult Health (SAGE) and World Health Survey (WHS) (representing 10 countries; n = 52,388), as well as similar vignettes in the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) (n = 4,528). Findings are encouraging regarding adherence to response consistency, but reveal substantial violations of vignette equivalence both cross-nationally and across socioeconomic groups. That is, members of different sociocultural groups appear to interpret vignettes as depicting fundamentally different levels of health. The evaluated anchoring vignettes do not fulfill their promise of providing interpersonally comparable measures of health. Recommendations for improving future implementations of vignettes are discussed.

  20. When Does Scale Anchoring Work? A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinharay, Sandip; Haberman, Shelby J.; Lee, Yi-Hsuan

    2011-01-01

    Providing information to test takers and test score users about the abilities of test takers at different score levels has been a persistent problem in educational and psychological measurement. Scale anchoring, a technique which describes what students at different points on a score scale know and can do, is a tool to provide such information.…