Science.gov

Sample records for a-kinase anchor protein

  1. A-kinase Anchoring Protein 79/150 Recruits Protein Kinase C to Phosphorylate Roundabout Receptors.

    PubMed

    Samelson, Bret K; Gore, Bryan B; Whiting, Jennifer L; Nygren, Patrick J; Purkey, Alicia M; Colledge, Marcie; Langeberg, Lorene K; Dell'Acqua, Mark L; Zweifel, Larry S; Scott, John D

    2015-05-29

    Anchoring proteins direct protein kinases and phosphoprotein phosphatases toward selected substrates to control the efficacy, context, and duration of neuronal phosphorylation events. The A-kinase anchoring protein AKAP79/150 interacts with protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase C (PKC), and protein phosphatase 2B (calcineurin) to modulate second messenger signaling events. In a mass spectrometry-based screen for additional AKAP79/150 binding partners, we have identified the Roundabout axonal guidance receptor Robo2 and its ligands Slit2 and Slit3. Biochemical and cellular approaches confirm that a linear sequence located in the cytoplasmic tail of Robo2 (residues 991-1070) interfaces directly with sites on the anchoring protein. Parallel studies show that AKAP79/150 interacts with the Robo3 receptor in a similar manner. Immunofluorescent staining detects overlapping expression patterns for murine AKAP150, Robo2, and Robo3 in a variety of brain regions, including hippocampal region CA1 and the islands of Calleja. In vitro kinase assays, peptide spot array mapping, and proximity ligation assay staining approaches establish that human AKAP79-anchored PKC selectively phosphorylates the Robo3.1 receptor subtype on serine 1330. These findings imply that anchored PKC locally modulates the phosphorylation status of Robo3.1 in brain regions governing learning and memory and reward.

  2. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β Interaction Protein Functions as an A-kinase Anchoring Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Hundsrucker, Christian; Skroblin, Philipp; Christian, Frank; Zenn, Hans-Michael; Popara, Viola; Joshi, Mangesh; Eichhorst, Jenny; Wiesner, Burkhard; Herberg, Friedrich W.; Reif, Bernd; Rosenthal, Walter; Klussmann, Enno

    2010-01-01

    A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) include a family of scaffolding proteins that target protein kinase A (PKA) and other signaling proteins to cellular compartments and thereby confine the activities of the associated proteins to distinct regions within cells. AKAPs bind PKA directly. The interaction is mediated by the dimerization and docking domain of regulatory subunits of PKA and the PKA-binding domain of AKAPs. Analysis of the interactions between the dimerization and docking domain and various PKA-binding domains yielded a generalized motif allowing the identification of AKAPs. Our bioinformatics and peptide array screening approaches based on this signature motif identified GSKIP (glycogen synthase kinase 3β interaction protein) as an AKAP. GSKIP directly interacts with PKA and GSK3β (glycogen synthase kinase 3β). It is widely expressed and facilitates phosphorylation and thus inactivation of GSK3β by PKA. GSKIP contains the evolutionarily conserved domain of unknown function 727. We show here that this domain of GSKIP and its vertebrate orthologues binds both PKA and GSK3β and thereby provides a mechanism for the integration of PKA and GSK3β signaling pathways. PMID:20007971

  3. Mitochondria: a kinase anchoring protein 1, a signaling platform for mitochondrial form and function.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Ronald A; Strack, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    Mitochondria are best known for their role as cellular power plants, but they also serve as signaling hubs, regulating cellular proliferation, differentiation, and survival. A kinase anchoring protein 1 (AKAP1) is a scaffold protein that recruits protein kinase A (PKA) and other signaling proteins, as well as RNA, to the outer mitochondrial membrane. AKAP1 thereby integrates several second messenger cascades to modulate mitochondrial function and associated physiological and pathophysiological outcomes. Here, we review what is currently known about AKAP1's macromolecular interactions in health and disease states, including obesity. We also discuss dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), the enzyme that catalyzes mitochondrial fission, as one of the key substrates of the PKA/AKAP1 signaling complex in neurons. Recent evidence suggests that AKAP1 has critical roles in neuronal development and survival, which are mediated by inhibitory phosphorylation of Drp1 and maintenance of mitochondrial integrity.

  4. Neurochondrin is an atypical RIIα-specific A-kinase anchoring protein

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Jennifer S.; Skroblin, Philipp; Bertinetti, Daniela; Hanold, Laura E.; von der Heide, Eva K.; Wagener, Eva-Maria; Zenn, Hans-Michael; Klussmann, Enno; Kennedy, Eileen J.; Herberg, Friedrich W.

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase activity is regulated not only by direct strategies affecting activity but also by spatial and temporal regulatory mechanisms. Kinase signaling pathways are coordinated by scaffolding proteins that orchestrate the assembly of multi-protein complexes. One family of such scaffolding proteins are the A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). AKAPs share the commonality of binding cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). In addition, they bind further signaling proteins and kinase substrates and tether such multi-protein complexes to subcellular locations. The A-kinase binding (AKB) domain of AKAPs typically contains a conserved helical motif that interacts directly with the dimerization/docking (D/D) domain of the regulatory subunits of PKA. Based on a pull-down proteomics approach, we identified neurochondrin (neurite-outgrowth promoting protein) as a previously unidentified AKAP. Here, we show that neurochondrin interacts directly with PKA through a novel mechanism that involves two distinct binding regions. In addition, we demonstrate that neurochondrin has strong isoform selectivity towards the RIIα subunit of PKA with nanomolar affinity. PMID:25916936

  5. A-kinase anchoring proteins: cAMP compartmentalization in neurodegenerative and obstructive pulmonary diseases

    PubMed Central

    Poppinga, W J; Muñoz-Llancao, P; González-Billault, C; Schmidt, M

    2014-01-01

    The universal second messenger cAMP is generated upon stimulation of Gs protein-coupled receptors, such as the β2-adreneoceptor, and leads to the activation of PKA, the major cAMP effector protein. PKA oscillates between an on and off state and thereby regulates a plethora of distinct biological responses. The broad activation pattern of PKA and its contribution to several distinct cellular functions lead to the introduction of the concept of compartmentalization of cAMP. A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) are of central importance due to their unique ability to directly and/or indirectly interact with proteins that either determine the cellular content of cAMP, such as β2-adrenoceptors, ACs and PDEs, or are regulated by cAMP such as the exchange protein directly activated by cAMP. We report on lessons learned from neurons indicating that maintenance of cAMP compartmentalization by AKAP5 is linked to neurotransmission, learning and memory. Disturbance of cAMP compartments seem to be linked to neurodegenerative disease including Alzheimer's disease. We translate this knowledge to compartmentalized cAMP signalling in the lung. Next to AKAP5, we focus here on AKAP12 and Ezrin (AKAP78). These topics will be highlighted in the context of the development of novel pharmacological interventions to tackle AKAP-dependent compartmentalization. PMID:25132049

  6. Emerging roles of A-kinase anchoring proteins in cardiovascular pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Diviani, Dario; Reggi, Erica; Arambasic, Miroslav; Caso, Stefania; Maric, Darko

    2016-07-01

    Heart and blood vessels ensure adequate perfusion of peripheral organs with blood and nutrients. Alteration of the homeostatic functions of the cardiovascular system can cause hypertension, atherosclerosis, and coronary artery disease leading to heart injury and failure. A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) constitute a family of scaffolding proteins that are crucially involved in modulating the function of the cardiovascular system both under physiological and pathological conditions. AKAPs assemble multifunctional signaling complexes that ensure correct targeting of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) as well as other signaling enzymes to precise subcellular compartments. This allows local regulation of specific effector proteins that control the function of vascular and cardiac cells. This review will focus on recent advances illustrating the role of AKAPs in cardiovascular pathophysiology. The accent will be mainly placed on the molecular events linked to the control of vascular integrity and blood pressure as well as on the cardiac remodeling process associated with heart failure. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  7. A-kinase anchoring protein-Lbc promotes pro-fibrotic signaling in cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Cavin, Sabrina; Maric, Darko; Diviani, Dario

    2014-02-01

    In response to stress or injury the heart undergoes an adverse remodeling process associated with cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and fibrosis. Transformation of cardiac fibroblasts to myofibroblasts is a crucial event initiating the fibrotic process. Cardiac myofibroblasts invade the myocardium and secrete excess amounts of extracellular matrix proteins, which cause myocardial stiffening, cardiac dysfunctions and progression to heart failure. While several studies indicate that the small GTPase RhoA can promote profibrotic responses, the exchange factors that modulate its activity in cardiac fibroblasts are yet to be identified. In the present study, we show that AKAP-Lbc, an A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) with an intrinsic Rho-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity, is critical for activating RhoA and transducing profibrotic signals downstream of type I angiotensin II receptors (AT1Rs) in cardiac fibroblasts. In particular, our results indicate that suppression of AKAP-Lbc expression by infecting adult rat ventricular fibroblasts with lentiviruses encoding AKAP-Lbc specific short hairpin (sh) RNAs strongly reduces the ability of angiotensin II to promote RhoA activation, differentiation of cardiac fibroblasts to myofibroblasts, collagen deposition as well as myofibroblast migration. Interestingly, AT1Rs promote AKAP-Lbc activation via a pathway that requires the α subunit of the heterotrimeric G protein G12. These findings identify AKAP-Lbc as a key Rho-guanine nucleotide exchange factor modulating profibrotic responses in cardiac fibroblasts.

  8. Spatial distribution of protein kinase A activity during cell migration is mediated by A-kinase anchoring protein AKAP Lbc.

    PubMed

    Paulucci-Holthauzen, Adriana A; Vergara, Leoncio A; Bellot, Larry J; Canton, David; Scott, John D; O'Connor, Kathleen L

    2009-02-27

    Protein kinase A (PKA) has been suggested to be spatially regulated in migrating cells due to its ability to control signaling events that are critical for polarized actin cytoskeletal dynamics. Here, using the fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based A-kinase activity reporter (AKAR1), we find that PKA activity gradients form with the strongest activity at the leading edge and are restricted to the basal surface in migrating cells. The existence of these gradients was confirmed using immunocytochemistry using phospho-PKA substrate antibodies. This observation holds true for carcinoma cells migrating randomly on laminin-1 or stimulated to migrate on collagen I with lysophosphatidic acid. Phosphodiesterase inhibition allows the formation of PKA activity gradients; however, these gradients are no longer polarized. PKA activity gradients are not detected when a non-phosphorylatable mutant of AKAR1 is used, if PKA activity is inhibited with H-89 or protein kinase inhibitor, or when PKA anchoring is perturbed. We further find that a specific A-kinase anchoring protein, AKAP-Lbc, is a major contributor to the formation of these gradients. In summary, our data show that PKA activity gradients are generated at the leading edge of migrating cells and provide additional insight into the mechanisms of PKA regulation of cell motility.

  9. Spatial Distribution of Protein Kinase A Activity during Cell Migration Is Mediated by A-kinase Anchoring Protein AKAP Lbc*

    PubMed Central

    Paulucci-Holthauzen, Adriana A.; Vergara, Leoncio A.; Bellot, Larry J.; Canton, David; Scott, John D.; O'Connor, Kathleen L.

    2009-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) has been suggested to be spatially regulated in migrating cells due to its ability to control signaling events that are critical for polarized actin cytoskeletal dynamics. Here, using the fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based A-kinase activity reporter (AKAR1), we find that PKA activity gradients form with the strongest activity at the leading edge and are restricted to the basal surface in migrating cells. The existence of these gradients was confirmed using immunocytochemistry using phospho-PKA substrate antibodies. This observation holds true for carcinoma cells migrating randomly on laminin-1 or stimulated to migrate on collagen I with lysophosphatidic acid. Phosphodiesterase inhibition allows the formation of PKA activity gradients; however, these gradients are no longer polarized. PKA activity gradients are not detected when a non-phosphorylatable mutant of AKAR1 is used, if PKA activity is inhibited with H-89 or protein kinase inhibitor, or when PKA anchoring is perturbed. We further find that a specific A-kinase anchoring protein, AKAP-Lbc, is a major contributor to the formation of these gradients. In summary, our data show that PKA activity gradients are generated at the leading edge of migrating cells and provide additional insight into the mechanisms of PKA regulation of cell motility. PMID:19106088

  10. AKAP (A-kinase anchoring protein) domains: beads of structure-function on the necklace of G-protein signalling.

    PubMed

    Malbon, C C; Tao, J; Shumay, E; Wang, H-Y

    2004-11-01

    AKAPs (A-kinase anchoring proteins) are members of a diverse family of scaffold proteins that minimally possess a characteristic binding domain for the RI/RII regulatory subunit of protein kinase A and play critical roles in establishing spatial constraints for multivalent signalling assemblies. Especially for G-protein-coupled receptors, the AKAPs provide an organizing centre about which various protein kinases and phosphatases can be assembled to create solid-state signalling devices that can signal, be modulated and trafficked within the cell. The structure of AKAP250 (also known as gravin or AKAP12), based on analyses of milligram quantities of recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli, suggests that the AKAP is probably an unordered scaffold, acting as a necklace on which 'jewels' of structure-function (e.g. the RII-binding domain) that provide docking sites on which signalling components can be assembled. Recent results suggest that AKAP250 provides not only a 'tool box' for assembling signalling elements, but may indeed provide a basis for spatial constraint observed for many signalling paradigms. The spatial dimension of the integration of cell signalling will probably reflect many functions performed by members of the AKAP family.

  11. Distribution of regulatory subunits of protein kinase A and A kinase anchor proteins (AKAP 95, 150) in rat pinealocytes.

    PubMed

    Koch, M; Korf, H-W

    2002-12-01

    The rat pineal organ is an established model to study signal transduction cascades that are activated by norepinephrine (NE) and cause increases in cAMP levels and stimulation of protein kinase A (PKA). PKA type II catalyzes the phosphorylation of the transcription factor cAMP-response-element-binding protein (CREB) which is essential for the transcriptional induction of the arylalkylamine- N-acetyltransferase (AANAT), the rate limiting enzyme of melatonin biosynthesis. Moreover, PKA may control protein levels and enzyme activity via two PKA-dependent phosphorylation sites in the AANAT molecule. Despite the functional importance of PKA very little is known about the distribution of its isoenzymes and of A-kinase anchor proteins (AKAPs) that target the PKA to specific membrane areas and organelles by binding to the regulatory (R) subunits of PKA. We have addressed this problem by demonstrating the R subunits alpha and beta of PKA type I and II and two AKAPs (150 and 95) in NE-stimulated and untreated rat pinealocytes by immunoblot and immunocytochemistry. The immunoreactions (IR) of all four R subunits were confined to granules evenly distributed in the pinealocyte cytoplasm. Immunoreactions of RIIalpha and RIIbeta were stronger than those of RIalpha and RIbeta. AKAP 150-IR was concentrated at the cell periphery; AKAP 95-IR was restricted to the nucleus. Amount and subcellular distribution of the immunoreactions of all proteins investigated did not change upon NE stimulation. A substantial colocalization was observed between RII-subunits and AKAP 150-IR, suggesting that, in rat pinealocytes, AKAP 150 primarily anchors the R subunits of PKA II.

  12. The A-kinase-anchoring protein AKAP-Lbc facilitates cardioprotective PKA phosphorylation of Hsp20 on Ser(16).

    PubMed

    Edwards, Helen V; Scott, John D; Baillie, George S

    2012-09-15

    Hsp20 (heat-shock protein of 20 kDa; HspB6) is a cardioprotective agent which combats a number of pathophysiological processes in the heart, including hypertrophy, apoptosis and ischaemia/reperfusion injury. The cardioprotective actions of Hsp20 require its phosphorylation by PKA (cAMP-dependent protein kinase) on Ser(16). Although the extracellular stimuli that promote cAMP-responsive phosphorylation of Hsp20 are well known, less is understood about the molecular processes that regulate this modification. AKAPs (A-kinase-anchoring proteins) physically compartmentalize PKA to specific locations within a cell to both direct PKA phosphorylation toward selected substrates and to orchestrate downstream signalling events. In the present study we used PKA anchoring disruptor peptides to verify that an AKAP underpins the cardioprotective phosphorylation of Hsp20. Biochemical and immunofluorescence techniques identify the cytosolic protein AKAP-Lbc (AKAP13) as the anchoring protein responsible for directing PKA phosphorylation of Hsp20 on Ser(16). Gene silencing and rescue experiments establish that AKAP-Lbc-mediated PKA phosphorylation of Hsp20 is crucial to the anti-apoptotic effects of the Hsp. Thus AKAP-Lbc may serve an ancillary cardioprotective role by favouring the association of PKA with Hsp20.

  13. Cypher/ZASP Is a Novel A-kinase Anchoring Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Changsong; Guo, Xiaogang; Lange, Stephan; Liu, Jie; Ouyang, Kunfu; Yin, Xiang; Jiang, Liujun; Cai, Yibo; Mu, Yongxin; Sheikh, Farah; Ye, Sheng; Chen, Ju; Ke, Yuehai; Cheng, Hongqiang

    2013-01-01

    PKA signaling is important for the post-translational modification of proteins, especially those in cardiomyocytes involved in cardiac excitation-contraction coupling. PKA activity is spatially and temporally regulated through compartmentalization by protein kinase A anchoring proteins. Cypher/ZASP, a member of PDZ-LIM domain protein family, is a cytoskeletal protein that forms multiprotein complexes at sarcomeric Z-lines. It has been demonstrated that Cypher/ZASP plays a pivotal structural role in the structural integrity of sarcomeres, and several of its mutations are associated with myopathies including dilated cardiomyopathy. Here we show that Cypher/ZASP, interacting specifically with the type II regulatory subunit RIIα of PKA, acted as a typical protein kinase A anchoring protein in cardiomyocytes. In addition, we show that Cypher/ZASP itself was phosphorylated at Ser265 and Ser296 by PKA. Furthermore, the PDZ domain of Cypher/ZASP interacted with the L-type calcium channel through its C-terminal PDZ binding motif. Expression of Cypher/ZASP facilitated PKA-mediated phosphorylation of the L-type calcium channel in vitro. Additionally, the phosphorylation of the L-type calcium channel at Ser1928 induced by isoproterenol was impaired in neonatal Cypher/ZASP-null cardiomyocytes. Moreover, Cypher/ZASP interacted with the Ser/Thr phosphatase calcineurin, which is a phosphatase for the L-type calcium channel. Taken together, our data strongly suggest that Cypher/ZASP not only plays a structural role for the sarcomeric integrity, but is also an important sarcomeric signaling scaffold in regulating the phosphorylation of channels or contractile proteins. PMID:23996002

  14. A flagellar A-kinase anchoring protein with two amphipathic helices forms a structural scaffold in the radial spoke complex

    PubMed Central

    Sivadas, Priyanka; Dienes, Jennifer M.; St. Maurice, Martin; Meek, William D.

    2012-01-01

    A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) contain an amphipathic helix (AH) that binds the dimerization and docking (D/D) domain, RIIa, in cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA). Many AKAPs were discovered solely based on the AH–RIIa interaction in vitro. An RIIa or a similar Dpy-30 domain is also present in numerous diverged molecules that are implicated in critical processes as diverse as flagellar beating, membrane trafficking, histone methylation, and stem cell differentiation, yet these molecules remain poorly characterized. Here we demonstrate that an AKAP, RSP3, forms a dimeric structural scaffold in the flagellar radial spoke complex, anchoring through two distinct AHs, the RIIa and Dpy-30 domains, in four non-PKA spoke proteins involved in the assembly and modulation of the complex. Interestingly, one AH can bind both RIIa and Dpy-30 domains in vitro. Thus, AHs and D/D domains constitute a versatile yet potentially promiscuous system for localizing various effector mechanisms. These results greatly expand the current concept about anchoring mechanisms and AKAPs. PMID:23148234

  15. A-kinase anchoring protein 150 in the mouse brain is concentrated in areas involved in learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Ostroveanu, Anghelus; Van der Zee, Eddy A; Dolga, Amalia M; Luiten, Paul G M; Eisel, Ulrich L M; Nijholt, Ingrid M

    2007-05-11

    A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) form large macromolecular signaling complexes that specifically target cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) to unique subcellular compartments and thus, provide high specificity to PKA signaling. For example, the AKAP79/150 family tethers PKA, PKC and PP2B to neuronal membranes and postsynaptic densities and plays an important role in synaptic function. Several studies suggested that AKAP79/150 anchored PKA contributes to mechanisms associated with synaptic plasticity and memory processes, but the precise role of AKAPs in these processes is still unknown. In this study we established the mouse brain distribution of AKAP150 using two well-characterized AKAP150 antibodies. Using Western blotting and immunohistochemistry we showed that AKAP150 is widely distributed throughout the mouse brain. The highest AKAP150 expression levels were observed in striatum, cerebral cortex and several other forebrain regions (e.g. olfactory tubercle), relatively high expression was found in hippocampus and olfactory bulb and low/no expression in cerebellum, hypothalamus, thalamus and brain stem. Although there were some minor differences in mouse AKAP150 brain distribution compared to the distribution in rat brain, our data suggested that rodents have a characteristic AKAP150 brain distribution pattern. In general we observed that AKAP150 is strongly expressed in mouse brain regions involved in learning and memory. These data support its suggested role in synaptic plasticity and memory processes.

  16. Regulation of Postsynaptic Structure and Function by an A-Kinase Anchoring Protein-Membrane Associated Guanylate Kinase Scaffolding Complex

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Holly R.; Gibson, Emily S.; Benke, Timothy A.; Dell'Acqua, Mark L.

    2009-01-01

    A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) 79/150 is a scaffold protein found in dendritic spines that recruits the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and protein phosphatase 2B-calcineurin (CaN) to membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK)-linked AMPA receptors (AMPAR) to control receptor phosphorylation and synaptic plasticity. However, AKAP79/150 may also coordinate regulation of AMPAR activity with spine structure directly through MAGUK binding and membrane-cytoskeletal interactions of its N-terminal targeting domain. In cultured hippocampal neurons, we observed that rat AKAP150 expression was low early in development but then increased coincident with spine formation and maturation. Overexpression of human AKAP79 in immature or mature neurons increased the number of dendritic filopodia and spines and enlarged spine area. However, RNAi knockdown of AKAP150 decreased dendritic spine area only in mature neurons. Importantly, AKAP79 overexpression in immature neurons increased AMPAR postsynaptic localization and activity. Neither the AKAP79 PKA nor CaN anchoring domain was required for increasing dendritic protrusion numbers, spine area or AMPAR synaptic localization; however, an internal region identified as the MAGUK binding domain was found to be essential as shown by expression of a MAGUK binding mutant that formed mainly filopodia and decreased AMPAR synaptic localization and activity. Expression of the AKAP79 N-terminal targeting domain alone also increased filopodia numbers but not spine area. Overall, these results demonstrate a novel structural role for AKAP79/150 where the N-terminal targeting domain induces dendritic filopodia and binding to MAGUKs promotes spine enlargement and AMPAR recruitment. PMID:19535604

  17. The A-kinase Anchoring Protein GSKIP Regulates GSK3β Activity and Controls Palatal Shelf Fusion in Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Deák, Veronika Anita; Skroblin, Philipp; Dittmayer, Carsten; Knobeloch, Klaus-Peter; Bachmann, Sebastian; Klussmann, Enno

    2016-01-01

    A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) represent a family of structurally diverse proteins, all of which bind PKA. A member of this family is glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) interaction protein (GSKIP). GSKIP interacts with PKA and also directly interacts with GSK3β. The physiological function of the GSKIP protein in vivo is unknown. We developed and characterized a conditional knock-out mouse model and found that GSKIP deficiency caused lethality at birth. Embryos obtained through Caesarean section at embryonic day 18.5 were cyanotic, suffered from respiratory distress, and failed to initiate breathing properly. Additionally, all GSKIP-deficient embryos showed an incomplete closure of the palatal shelves accompanied by a delay in ossification along the fusion area of secondary palatal bones. On the molecular level, GSKIP deficiency resulted in decreased phosphorylation of GSK3β at Ser-9 starting early in development (embryonic day 10.5), leading to enhanced GSK3β activity. At embryonic day 18.5, GSK3β activity decreased to levels close to that of wild type. Our findings reveal a novel, crucial role for GSKIP in the coordination of GSK3β signaling in palatal shelf fusion. PMID:26582204

  18. The A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP)-Lbc-signaling complex mediates alpha1 adrenergic receptor-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Appert-Collin, Aline; Cotecchia, Susanna; Nenniger-Tosato, Monique; Pedrazzini, Thierry; Diviani, Dario

    2007-06-12

    In response to various pathological stresses, the heart undergoes a pathological remodeling process that is associated with cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Because cardiac hypertrophy can progress to heart failure, a major cause of lethality worldwide, the intracellular signaling pathways that control cardiomyocyte growth have been the subject of intensive investigation. It has been known for more than a decade that the small molecular weight GTPase RhoA is involved in the signaling pathways leading to cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Although some of the hypertrophic pathways activated by RhoA have now been identified, the identity of the exchange factors that modulate its activity in cardiomyocytes is currently unknown. In this study, we show that AKAP-Lbc, an A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) with an intrinsic Rho-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity, is critical for activating RhoA and transducing hypertrophic signals downstream of alpha1-adrenergic receptors (ARs). In particular, our results indicate that suppression of AKAP-Lbc expression by infecting rat neonatal ventricular cardiomyocytes with lentiviruses encoding AKAP-Lbc-specific short hairpin RNAs strongly reduces both alpha1-AR-mediated RhoA activation and hypertrophic responses. Interestingly, alpha1-ARs promote AKAP-Lbc activation via a pathway that requires the alpha subunit of the heterotrimeric G protein G12. These findings identify AKAP-Lbc as the first Rho-guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) involved in the signaling pathways leading to cardiomyocytes hypertrophy.

  19. A-Kinase Anchoring Protein 79/150 Coordinates Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Sensitization of Peripheral Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Szteyn, Kalina; Rowan, Matthew P.; Gomez, Ruben; Du, Junhui; Carlton, Susan M.; Jeske, Nathaniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate serves as the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in the nervous system. Previous studies have identified a role for glutamate and group I metabotropic receptors as targets for study in peripheral inflammatory pain. However, the coordination of signaling events that transpire from receptor activation to afferent neuronal sensitization has not been explored. Herein, we identify that scaffolding protein A-Kinase Anchoring Protein 79/150 (AKAP150) coordinates increased peripheral thermal sensitivity following group I metabotropic receptor (mGluR5) activation. In both acute and persistent models of thermal somatosensory behavior, we report that mGluR5 sensitization requires AKAP150 expression. Furthermore, electrophysiological approaches designed to record afferent neuronal activity reveal that mGluR5 sensitization also requires functional AKAP150 expression. In dissociated primary afferent neurons, mGluR5 activation increases TRPV1 responses in an AKAP dependent manner through a mechanism that induces AKAP association with TRPV1. Experimental results presented herein identify a mechanism of receptor-driven scaffolding association with ion channel targets. Importantly, this mechanism could prove significant in the search for therapeutic targets that repress episodes of acute pain from becoming chronic in nature. PMID:26172554

  20. A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP)-Lbc anchors a PKN-based signaling complex involved in α1-adrenergic receptor-induced p38 activation.

    PubMed

    Cariolato, Luca; Cavin, Sabrina; Diviani, Dario

    2011-03-11

    The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathways are highly organized signaling systems that transduce extracellular signals into a variety of intracellular responses. In this context, it is currently poorly understood how kinases constituting these signaling cascades are assembled and activated in response to receptor stimulation to generate specific cellular responses. Here, we show that AKAP-Lbc, an A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) with an intrinsic Rho-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity, is critically involved in the activation of the p38α MAPK downstream of α(1b)-adrenergic receptors (α(1b)-ARs). Our results indicate that AKAP-Lbc can assemble a novel transduction complex containing the RhoA effector PKNα, MLTK, MKK3, and p38α, which integrates signals from α(1b)-ARs to promote RhoA-dependent activation of p38α. In particular, silencing of AKAP-Lbc expression or disrupting the formation of the AKAP-Lbc·p38α signaling complex specifically reduces α(1)-AR-mediated p38α activation without affecting receptor-mediated activation of other MAPK pathways. These findings provide a novel mechanistic hypothesis explaining how assembly of macromolecular complexes can specify MAPK signaling downstream of α(1)-ARs.

  1. Engineering A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP)-selective regulatory subunits of protein kinase A (PKA) through structure-based phage selection.

    PubMed

    Gold, Matthew G; Fowler, Douglas M; Means, Christopher K; Pawson, Catherine T; Stephany, Jason J; Langeberg, Lorene K; Fields, Stanley; Scott, John D

    2013-06-14

    PKA is retained within distinct subcellular environments by the association of its regulatory type II (RII) subunits with A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). Conventional reagents that universally disrupt PKA anchoring are patterned after a conserved AKAP motif. We introduce a phage selection procedure that exploits high-resolution structural information to engineer RII mutants that are selective for a particular AKAP. Selective RII (RSelect) sequences were obtained for eight AKAPs following competitive selection screening. Biochemical and cell-based experiments validated the efficacy of RSelect proteins for AKAP2 and AKAP18. These engineered proteins represent a new class of reagents that can be used to dissect the contributions of different AKAP-targeted pools of PKA. Molecular modeling and high-throughput sequencing analyses revealed the molecular basis of AKAP-selective interactions and shed new light on native RII-AKAP interactions. We propose that this structure-directed evolution strategy might be generally applicable for the investigation of other protein interaction surfaces.

  2. Analysis of A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) interaction with protein kinase A (PKA) regulatory subunits: PKA isoform specificity in AKAP binding.

    PubMed

    Herberg, F W; Maleszka, A; Eide, T; Vossebein, L; Tasken, K

    2000-04-28

    Compartmentalization of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is in part mediated by specialized protein motifs in the dimerization domain of the regulatory (R)-subunits of PKA that participate in protein-protein interactions with an amphipathic helix region in A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). In order to develop a molecular understanding of the subcellular distribution and specific functions of PKA isozymes mediated by association with AKAPs, it is of importance to determine the apparent binding constants of the R-subunit-AKAP interactions. Here, we present a novel approach using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to examine directly the association and dissociation of AKAPs with all four R-subunit isoforms immobilized on a modified cAMP surface with a high level of accuracy. We show that both AKAP79 and S-AKAP84/D-AKAP1 bind RIIalpha very well (apparent K(D) values of 0.5 and 2 nM, respectively). Both proteins also bind RIIbeta quite well, but with three- to fourfold lower affinities than those observed versus RIIalpha. However, only S-AKAP84/D-AKAP1 interacts with RIalpha at a nanomolar affinity (apparent K(D) of 185 nM). In comparison, AKAP95 binds RIIalpha (apparent K(D) of 5.9 nM) with a tenfold higher affinity than RIIbeta and has no detectable binding to RIalpha. Surface competition assays with increasing concentrations of a competitor peptide covering amino acid residues 493 to 515 of the thyroid anchoring protein Ht31, demonstrated that Ht31, but not a proline-substituted peptide, Ht31-P, competed binding of RIIalpha and RIIbeta to all the AKAPs examined (EC(50)-values from 6 to 360 nM). Furthermore, RIalpha interaction with S-AKAP84/D-AKAP1 was competed (EC(50) 355 nM) with the same peptide. Here we report for the first time an approach to determine apparent rate- and equilibria binding constants for the interaction of all PKA isoforms with any AKAP as well as a novel approach for characterizing peptide competitors that disrupt PKA-AKAP anchoring.

  3. Regulation of A-Kinase-Anchoring Protein 12 by Heat Shock Protein A12B to Prevent Ventricular Dysfunction Following Acute Myocardial Infarction in Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Selvaraju, Vaithinathan; Suresh, Sumanth C; Thirunavukkarasu, Mahesh; Mannu, Jayakanthan; Foye, Jocelyn L C; Mathur, Premendu P; Palesty, J Alexander; Sanchez, Juan A; McFadden, David W; Maulik, Nilanjana

    2017-03-09

    We examined the effects of overexpressing HSPA12B on angiogenesis and myocardial function by intramyocardial administration of adenovirus encoding HSPA12B (Ad. HSPA12B) in a streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat subjected to myocardial infarction. Rats were divided randomly into six groups: control sham (CS) + Ad.LacZ, control myocardial infarction (CMI) + Ad.LacZ, control MI + Ad.HSPA12B, diabetic sham (DS) + Ad.LacZ, diabetic MI + Ad.LacZ and diabetic MI + Ad.HSPA12B. Following MI or sham surgery, the respective groups received either Ad.LacZ or Ad.HSPA12B via intramyocardial injections. We observed increased capillary and arteriolar density along with reduced fibrosis and preserved heart functions in DMI-AdHSPA12B compared to DMI-AdLacZ group. Western blot analysis demonstrated enhanced HSPA12B, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), thioredoxin-1 (Trx-1) expression along with decreased expression of thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP) and A kinase anchoring protein 12 (AKAP12) in the DMI-AdHSPA12B compared to DMI-AdLacZ group. Our findings reveal that HSPA12B overexpression interacts with AKAP12 and downregulate TXNIP in diabetic rats following acute MI.

  4. The Scaffold Protein Muscle A-Kinase Anchoring Protein β Orchestrates Cardiac Myocyte Hypertrophic Signaling Required for the Development of Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kritzer, Michael D.; Li, Jinliang; Passariello, Catherine L.; Gayanilo, Marjorie; Thakur, Hrishikesh; Dayan, Joseph; Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly; Kapiloff, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiac myocyte hypertrophy is regulated by an extensive intracellular signal transduction network. In vitro evidence suggests that the scaffold protein muscle A-kinase anchoring protein β (mAKAPβ) serves as a nodal organizer of hypertrophic signaling. However, the relevance of mAKAPβ signalosomes to pathological remodeling and heart failure in vivo remains unknown. Methods and Results Using conditional, cardiac myocyte–specific gene deletion, we now demonstrate that mAKAPβ expression in mice is important for the cardiac hypertrophy induced by pressure overload and catecholamine toxicity. mAKAPβ targeting prevented the development of heart failure associated with long-term transverse aortic constriction, conferring a survival benefit. In contrast to 29% of control mice (n=24), only 6% of mAKAPβ knockout mice (n=31) died in the 16 weeks of pressure overload (P=0.02). Accordingly, mAKAPβ knockout inhibited myocardial apoptosis and the development of interstitial fibrosis, left atrial hypertrophy, and pulmonary edema. This improvement in cardiac status correlated with the attenuated activation of signaling pathways coordinated by the mAKAPβ scaffold, including the decreased phosphorylation of protein kinase D1 and histone deacetylase 4 that we reveal to participate in a new mAKAP signaling module. Furthermore, mAKAPβ knockout inhibited pathological gene expression directed by myocyte-enhancer factor-2 and nuclear factor of activated T-cell transcription factors that associate with the scaffold. Conclusions mAKAPβ orchestrates signaling that regulates pathological cardiac remodeling in mice. Targeting of the underlying physical architecture of signaling networks, including mAKAPβ signalosome formation, may constitute an effective therapeutic strategy for the prevention and treatment of pathological remodeling and heart failure. PMID:24812305

  5. rugose (rg), a Drosophila A kinase anchor protein, is required for retinal pattern formation and interacts genetically with multiple signaling pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Shamloula, Hoda K; Mbogho, Mkajuma P; Pimentel, Angel C; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zosia M A; Hyatt, Vanneta; Okano, Hideyuki; Venkatesh, Tadmiri R

    2002-01-01

    In the developing Drosophila eye, cell fate determination and pattern formation are directed by cell-cell interactions mediated by signal transduction cascades. Mutations at the rugose locus (rg) result in a rough eye phenotype due to a disorganized retina and aberrant cone cell differentiation, which leads to reduction or complete loss of cone cells. The cone cell phenotype is sensitive to the level of rugose gene function. Molecular analyses show that rugose encodes a Drosophila A kinase anchor protein (DAKAP 550). Genetic interaction studies show that rugose interacts with the components of the EGFR- and Notch-mediated signaling pathways. Our results suggest that rg is required for correct retinal pattern formation and may function in cell fate determination through its interactions with the EGFR and Notch signaling pathways. PMID:12072466

  6. A small novel A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) that localizes specifically protein kinase A-regulatory subunit I (PKA-RI) to the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Burgers, Pepijn P; Ma, Yuliang; Margarucci, Luigi; Mackey, Mason; van der Heyden, Marcel A G; Ellisman, Mark; Scholten, Arjen; Taylor, Susan S; Heck, Albert J R

    2012-12-21

    Protein kinase A-anchoring proteins (AKAPs) provide spatio-temporal specificity for the omnipotent cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) via high affinity interactions with PKA regulatory subunits (PKA-RI, RII). Many PKA-RII-AKAP complexes are heavily tethered to cellular substructures, whereas PKA-RI-AKAP complexes have remained largely undiscovered. Here, using a cAMP affinity-based chemical proteomics strategy in human heart and platelets, we uncovered a novel, ubiquitously expressed AKAP, termed small membrane (sm)AKAP due to its specific localization at the plasma membrane via potential myristoylation/palmitoylation anchors. In vitro binding studies revealed specificity of smAKAP for PKA-RI (K(d) = 7 nM) over PKA-RII (K(d) = 53 nM) subunits, co-expression of smAKAP with the four PKA R subunits revealed an even more exclusive specificity of smAKAP for PKA-RIα/β in the cellular context. Applying the singlet oxygen-generating electron microscopy probe miniSOG indicated that smAKAP is tethered to the plasma membrane and is particularly dense at cell-cell junctions and within filopodia. Our preliminary functional characterization of smAKAP provides evidence that, like PKA-RII, PKA-RI can be tightly tethered by a novel repertoire of AKAPs, providing a new perspective on spatio-temporal control of cAMP signaling.

  7. A kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) interaction and dimerization of the RIalpha and RIbeta regulatory subunits of protein kinase a in vivo by the yeast two hybrid system.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Cathrine R; Ruppelt, Anja; Taskén, Kjetil

    2003-03-28

    Protein kinase A (PKA) regulatory (R) subunits dimerize through an N-terminal motif. Such dimerization is necessary for binding to PKA anchoring proteins (AKAPs) and targeting of PKA to its site of action. In the present study, we used the yeast two-hybrid system as an in vivo bio-reporter assay and analyzed the formation of homo- and heterodimeric complexes of RIalpha and RIbeta as well as AKAP binding of RI dimers. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) of yeast extracts confirmed the two-hybrid data. Both RIalpha- and RIbeta homodimers as well as an RIalpha:RIbeta heterodimer were observed. Single, double and one triple mutation were introduced into the RIalpha and RIbeta subunits and dimerization properties of the mutants were analyzed. Consistent with previous reports, RIalpha(C37H) dimerized, although the disulfide bridges were disrupted, whereas the additional mutation of F47 or F52 abolished the dimerization. Corresponding mutations (C38H, F48A, F53A) in RIbeta were not sufficient to abolish the RIbeta dimerization, indicating that additional or other amino acids are important. RIalpha:RIbeta heterodimers of the mutants were formed at intermediate stringency. Analysis of ternary complexes by the yeast two-hybrid system revealed that RIalpha and RIbeta homodimers as well as an RIalpha:RIbeta heterodimer and several of the mutants were able to bind to the R-binding domain of AKAP149/D-AKAP1. Furthermore, an RIbeta:AKAP149 complex was identified following introduction of RIbeta into HEK293 cells. Importantly, RIbeta revealed AKAP binding properties similar to those of RIalpha, indicating that RIbeta holoenzymes may be anchored.

  8. How anchoring proteins shape pain.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Michael J M; McNaughton, Peter A

    2014-09-01

    Cellular responsiveness to external stimuli can be altered by extracellular mediators which activate membrane receptors, in turn signalling to the intracellular space via calcium, cyclic nucleotides, membrane lipids or enzyme activity. These signalling events trigger a cascade leading to an effector which can be a channel, an enzyme or a transcription factor. The effectiveness of these intracellular events is enhanced when they are maintained in close proximity by anchoring proteins, which assemble complexes of signalling molecules such as kinases together with their targets, and in this way enhance both the speed and the precision of intracellular signalling. The A kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) family are adaptor proteins originally named for their ability to associate Protein Kinase A and its targets, but several other enzymes bound by AKAPs have now been found and a wide variety of target structures has been described. This review provides an overview of anchoring proteins involved in pain signalling. The key anchoring proteins and their ion channel targets in primary sensory neurons responding to painful stimuli (nociceptors) are discussed.

  9. The A-Kinase Anchoring Protein (AKAP) Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β Interaction Protein (GSKIP) Regulates β-Catenin through Its Interactions with Both Protein Kinase A (PKA) and GSK3β.

    PubMed

    Dema, Alessandro; Schröter, Micha Friedemann; Perets, Ekaterina; Skroblin, Philipp; Moutty, Marie Christine; Deàk, Veronika Anita; Birchmeier, Walter; Klussmann, Enno

    2016-09-09

    The A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) GSK3β interaction protein (GSKIP) is a cytosolic scaffolding protein binding protein kinase A (PKA) and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β). Here we show that both the AKAP function of GSKIP, i.e. its direct interaction with PKA, and its direct interaction with GSK3β are required for the regulation of β-catenin and thus Wnt signaling. A cytoplasmic destruction complex targets β-catenin for degradation and thus prevents Wnt signaling. Wnt signals cause β-catenin accumulation and translocation into the nucleus, where it induces Wnt target gene expression. GSKIP facilitates control of the β-catenin stabilizing phosphorylation at Ser-675 by PKA. Its interaction with GSK3β facilitates control of the destabilizing phosphorylation of β-catenin at Ser-33/Ser-37/Thr-41. The influence of GSKIP on β-catenin is explained by its scavenger function; it recruits the kinases away from the destruction complex without forming a complex with β-catenin. The regulation of β-catenin by GSKIP is specific for this AKAP as AKAP220, which also binds PKA and GSK3β, did not affect Wnt signaling. We find that the binding domain of AKAP220 for GSK3β is a conserved GSK3β interaction domain (GID), which is also present in GSKIP. Our findings highlight an essential compartmentalization of both PKA and GSK3β by GSKIP, and ascribe a function to a cytosolic AKAP-PKA interaction as a regulatory factor in the control of canonical Wnt signaling. Wnt signaling controls different biological processes, including embryonic development, cell cycle progression, glycogen metabolism, and immune regulation; deregulation is associated with diseases such as cancer, type 2 diabetes, inflammatory, and Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

  10. Specific expression of an A-kinase anchoring protein subtype, AKAP-150, and specific regulatory mechanism for Na(+),K(+)-ATPase via protein kinase A in the parotid gland among the three major salivary glands of the rat.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Kinji; Nakanishi, Nobuo; Amano, Osamu; Yamamoto, Miyuki; Iseki, Shoichi

    2003-07-15

    We have examined the expression of A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) in the three major salivary glands, i.e. the parotid gland (PG), submandibular gland (SMG), and sublingual gland (SLG), of the rat to elucidate the functional relevance between saliva secretion and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase regulation by protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent phosphorylation, since an AKAP subtype, AKAP-150, is known to be involved in the regulation of the ATPase in PG. Although AKAP-150 and its mRNA were clearly detected in the PG, they were hardly detectable in either the SMG or SLG. The membrane-bound form of the RII regulatory subunit of PKA, an index for the total amount of AKAP subtypes and therefore of the anchored PKA holoenzyme, was also undetectable in membranes from the SMG and SLG but was found in the PG; though a substantial and comparable amount of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase was present in all of these membrane preparations. Incubation with [gamma-32P]ATP revealed that Na(+),K(+)-ATPase in the PG membranes was quickly phosphorylated upon the addition of cAMP, whereas the ATPases in the membranes from SMG and SLG were not; though they were readily and equally phosphorylated by the exogenously added PKA catalytic subunit. AKAP-150 in the basolateral membranes of PG acinar cells was co-immunoprecipitated with RII by an anti-RII antiserum; and AKAP-150 and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase were immunohistochemically co-localized predominantly on the basolateral membranes, suggesting a possibility that the ATPase might directly interact with the AKAP to form an ATPase/AKAP/PKA complex or associate with the AKAP, such association being mediated via some scaffolding molecule. Expression of AKAP-150 and quick down-regulation of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase by AKAP-anchored PKA in response to cAMP elevation are characteristics specific to PG among the three major salivary glands, suggesting the presence of PG-specific regulatory mechanisms for saliva production/secretion.

  11. Biomedical applications of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins

    PubMed Central

    Heider, Susanne; Dangerfield, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) use a unique posttranslational modification to link proteins to lipid bilayer membranes. The anchoring structure consists of both a lipid and carbohydrate portion and is highly conserved in eukaryotic organisms regarding its basic characteristics, yet highly variable in its molecular details. The strong membrane targeting property has made the anchors an interesting tool for biotechnological modification of lipid membrane-covered entities from cells through extracellular vesicles to enveloped virus particles. In this review, we will take a closer look at the mechanisms and fields of application for GPI-APs in lipid bilayer membrane engineering and discuss their advantages and disadvantages for biomedicine. PMID:27542385

  12. AAT-1, a novel testis-specific AMY-1-binding protein, forms a quaternary complex with AMY-1, A-kinase anchor protein 84, and a regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase and is phosphorylated by its kinase.

    PubMed

    Yukitake, Hiroshi; Furusawa, Makoto; Taira, Takahiro; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2002-11-22

    AMY-1 has been identified by us as a c-Myc-binding protein and was found to stimulate c-Myc transcription activity. AMY-1 was also found to be associated with protein kinase A anchor protein 84/149 (S-AKAP84/AKAP149) in the mitochondria in somatic cells and sperm, suggesting that it plays a role in spermatogenesis. To determine the molecular function of AMY-1, a two-hybrid screening of cDNAs encoding AMY-1-binding proteins was carried out with AMY-1 as a bait using a human testis cDNA library, and a clone encoding a novel protein, AAT-1, was obtained. Three isoforms of AAT-1, AAT-1alpha, -beta, and -gamma, were found to be derived from an alternative splicing of the transcripts of the aat-1 gene, which was mapped at human chromosome 3q13-3q21. AAT-1 was found to be specifically expressed in the testis during the course of spermatogenesis and also to be present in the spermatid and mature sperm, as was AMY-1. AAT-1alpha was found to bind to and be colocalized in mitochondria with AMY-1 in human HeLa and mouse GC-1 cells. Furthermore, AAT-1alpha was found to bind to the N-terminal half of S-AKAP84/AKAP149 in a quaternary complex with AMY-1 and a regulatory subunit (RII) of cAMP-dependent kinase (PKA), in which AAT-1alpha was associated with RII via S-AKAP84/AKAP149, in rat testis and HeLa cells. It was then found that AAT-1alpha weakly stimulated a phosphorylation activity of PKA and also that AAT-1 itself was phosphorylated by PKA in vivo and in vitro. These results suggest that both AAT-1 and AMY-1 play roles in spermatogenesis.

  13. GPI-anchor and GPI-anchored protein expression in PMM2-CDG patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mutations in PMM2 impair phosphomannomutase-2 activity and cause the most frequent congenital disorder of glycosylation, PMM2-CDG. Mannose-1-phosphate, that is deficient in this disorder, is also implicated in the biosynthesis of glycosylphosphatidyl inositol (GPI) anchors. Objective To evaluate whether GPI-anchor and GPI-anchored proteins are defective in PMM2-CDG patients. Methods The expression of GPI-anchor and seven GPI-anchored proteins was evaluated by flow cytometry in different cell types from twelve PMM2-CDG patients. Additionally, neutrophil CD16 and plasma hepatic proteins were studied by Western blot. Transferrin glycoforms were evaluated by HPLC. Results Patients and controls had similar surface expression of GPI-anchor and most GPI-anchored proteins. Nevertheless, patients displayed a significantly diminished binding of two anti-CD16 antibodies (3G8 and KD1) to neutrophils and also of anti-CD14 (61D3) to monocytes. Interestingly, CD16 immunostaining and asialotransferrin levels significantly correlated with patients’ age. Analysis by flow cytometry of CD14 with MΦP9, and CD16 expression in neutrophils by Western blot using H-80 ruled out deficiencies of these antigens. Conclusions PMM2 mutations do not impair GPI-anchor or GPI-anchored protein expression. However, the glycosylation anomalies caused by PMM2 mutations might affect the immunoreactivity of monoclonal antibodies and lead to incorrect conclusions about the expression of different proteins, including GPI-anchored proteins. Neutrophils and monocytes are sensitive to PMM2 mutations, leading to abnormal glycosylation in immune receptors, which might potentially affect their affinity to their ligands, and contribute to infection. This study also confirms less severe hypoglycosylation defects in older PMM2-CDG patients. PMID:24139637

  14. AMY-1 interacts with S-AKAP84 and AKAP95 in the cytoplasm and the nucleus, respectively, and inhibits cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity by preventing binding of its catalytic subunit to A-kinase-anchoring protein (AKAP) complex.

    PubMed

    Furusawa, Makoto; Taira, Takahiro; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2002-12-27

    We have reported that a novel c-Myc-binding protein, AMY-1, binds to cAMP-dependent protein kinase-anchoring protein 149 (AKAP149) and its splicing variant, AKAP84 and is localized in the mitochondria in a complex with RII, a regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) (Furusawa, M., Ohnishi, T., Taira, T., Iguchi-Ariga, S. M. M., and Ariga, H. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 36647-36651). In this study, we further found that AMY-1 competitively bound to either AKAP95 or AKAP84 in the nucleus and the cytoplasm, respectively, in a concentration-dependent manner of either AKAP. Like AKAP84, AMY-1 was found to bind to the RII-binding region of AKAP95 in vivo and in vitro and to make a ternary complex with RII. It was also found that the formation of the complex of AMY-1 with AKAP84/95 and RII prevented a catalytic subunit from binding to this AKAP complex, leading to suppression of PKA activity. These findings suggest that AMY-1 is an important modulator of PKA.

  15. The identification of novel cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase anchoring proteins using bioinformatic filters and peptide arrays

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, William A.; Hou, Tingjun; Taylor, Susan S.; Wang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) localize cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) to specific regions in the cell and place PKA in proximity to its phosphorylation targets. A computational model was created to identify AKAPs that bind to the docking/dimerization domain of the RII alpha isoform of the regulatory subunit of PKA. The model was used to search the entire human proteome, and the top candidates were tested for an interaction using peptide array experiments. Verified interactions include sphingosine kinase interacting protein and retinoic acid-induced protein 16. These interactions highlight new signaling pathways mediated by PKA. PMID:21115539

  16. Structural remodeling, trafficking and functions of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Yusuke; Kinoshita, Taroh

    2011-10-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) is a glycolipid that is covalently attached to proteins as a post-translational modification. Such modification leads to the anchoring of the protein to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane. Proteins that are decorated with GPIs have unique properties in terms of their physical nature. In particular, these proteins tend to accumulate in lipid rafts, which are critical for the functions and trafficking of GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs). Recent studies mainly using mutant cells revealed that various structural remodeling reactions occur to GPIs present in GPI-APs as they are transported from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell surface. This review examines the recent progress describing the mechanisms of structural remodeling of mammalian GPI-anchors, such as inositol deacylation, glycan remodeling and fatty acid remodeling, with particular focus on their trafficking and functions, as well as the pathogenesis involving GPI-APs and their deficiency.

  17. Subcellular distribution of tail-anchored proteins in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Shaw, Rowena; Mukherjee, Joy; Bowsher, Caroline G; Harrison, Anne-Marie; Abell, Ben M

    2009-12-01

    Tail-anchored (TA) proteins function in key cellular processes in eukaryotic cells, such as vesicle trafficking, protein translocation and regulation of transcription. They anchor to internal cell membranes by a C-terminal transmembrane domain, which also serves as a targeting sequence. Targeting occurs post-translationally, via pathways that are specific to the precursor, which makes TA proteins a model system for investigating post-translational protein targeting. Bioinformatics approaches have previously been used to identify potential TA proteins in yeast and humans, yet little is known about TA proteins in plants. The identification of plant TA proteins is important for extending the post-translational model system to plastids, in addition to general proteome characterization, and the identification of functional homologues characterized in other organisms. We identified 454 loci that potentially encode TA proteins in Arabidopsis, and combined published data with new localization experiments to assign localizations to 130 proteins, including 29 associated with plastids. By analysing the tail anchor sequences of characterized proteins, we have developed a tool for predicting localization and estimate that 138 TA proteins are localized to plastids.

  18. Bigger, better, faster: principles and models of AKAP anchoring protein signaling.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, Eric C; Saucerman, Jeffrey J

    2011-11-01

    A kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) bind multiple signaling proteins and have subcellular targeting domains that allow them to greatly impact cellular signaling. AKAPs localize, specify, amplify, and accelerate signal transduction within the cell by bringing signaling proteins together in space and time. AKAPs also organize higher-order network motifs such as feed forward and feedback loops that may create complex network responses, including adaptation, oscillation, and ultrasensitivity. Computational models have begun to provide an insight into how AKAPs regulate signaling dynamics and cardiovascular pathophysiology. Models of mitogen-activated protein kinase and epidermal growth factor receptor scaffolds have revealed additional design principles and new methods for representing signaling scaffolds mathematically. Coupling computational modeling with quantitative experimental approaches will be increasingly necessary for dissecting the diverse information processing functions performed by AKAP signaling complexes.

  19. Protein Kinase A Activity and Anchoring Are Required for Ovarian Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Andrew J.; Campbell, Shirley L.; Howe, Alan K.

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the deadliest of the gynecological malignancies, due in part to its clinically occult metastasis. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms governing EOC dissemination and invasion may provide new targets for antimetastatic therapies or new methods for detection of metastatic disease. The cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is often dysregulated in EOC. Furthermore, PKA activity and subcellular localization by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) are important regulators of cytoskeletal dynamics and cell migration. Thus, we sought to study the role of PKA and AKAP function in both EOC cell migration and invasion. Using the plasma membrane-directed PKA biosensor, pmAKAR3, and an improved migration/invasion assay, we show that PKA is activated at the leading edge of migrating SKOV-3 EOC cells, and that inhibition of PKA activity blocks SKOV-3 cell migration. Furthermore, we show that while the PKA activity within the leading edge of these cells is mediated by anchoring of type-II regulatory PKA subunits (RII), inhibition of anchoring of either RI or RII PKA subunits blocks cell migration. Importantly, we also show – for the first time – that PKA activity is up-regulated at the leading edge of SKOV-3 cells during invasion of a three-dimensional extracellular matrix and, as seen for migration, inhibition of either PKA activity or AKAP-mediated PKA anchoring blocks matrix invasion. These data are the first to demonstrate that the invasion of extracellular matrix by cancer cells elicits activation of PKA within the invasive leading edge and that both PKA activity and anchoring are required for matrix invasion. These observations suggest a role for PKA and AKAP activity in EOC metastasis. PMID:22028904

  20. Functional and Structural Mimicry of Cellular Protein Kinase A Anchoring Proteins by a Viral Oncoprotein

    PubMed Central

    King, Cason R.; Cohen, Michael J.; Fonseca, Gregory J.; Dirk, Brennan S.; Dikeakos, Jimmy D.; Mymryk, Joe S.

    2016-01-01

    The oncoproteins of the small DNA tumor viruses interact with a plethora of cellular regulators to commandeer control of the infected cell. During infection, adenovirus E1A deregulates cAMP signalling and repurposes it for activation of viral gene expression. We show that E1A structurally and functionally mimics a cellular A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP). E1A interacts with and relocalizes protein kinase A (PKA) to the nucleus, likely to virus replication centres, via an interaction with the regulatory subunits of PKA. Binding to PKA requires the N-terminus of E1A, which bears striking similarity to the amphipathic α-helical domain present in cellular AKAPs. E1A also targets the same docking-dimerization domain of PKA normally bound by cellular AKAPs. In addition, the AKAP like motif within E1A could restore PKA interaction to a cellular AKAP in which its normal interaction motif was deleted. During infection, E1A successfully competes with endogenous cellular AKAPs for PKA interaction. E1A’s role as a viral AKAP contributes to viral transcription, protein expression and progeny production. These data establish HAdV E1A as the first known viral AKAP. This represents a unique example of viral subversion of a crucial cellular regulatory pathway via structural mimicry of the PKA interaction domain of cellular AKAPs. PMID:27137912

  1. Labeling Cell Surface GPIs and GPI-Anchored Proteins through Metabolic Engineering with Artificial Inositol Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lili; Gao, Jian; Guo, Zhongwu

    2015-08-10

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchoring of proteins to the cell surface is important for various biological processes, but GPI-anchored proteins are difficult to study. An effective strategy was developed for the metabolic engineering of cell-surface GPIs and GPI-anchored proteins by using inositol derivatives carrying an azido group. The azide-labeled GPIs and GPI-anchored proteins were then tagged with biotin on live cells through a click reaction, which allows further elaboration with streptavidin-conjugated dyes or other molecules. The strategy can be used to label GPI-anchored proteins with various tags for biological studies.

  2. AKAP-Lbc anchors protein kinase A and nucleates Galpha 12-selective Rho-mediated stress fiber formation.

    PubMed

    Diviani, D; Soderling, J; Scott, J D

    2001-11-23

    Guanine nucleotide exchange factors of the Dbl family relay signals from membrane receptors to Rho family GTPases. We now demonstrate that a longer transcript of the Lbc gene encodes a chimeric molecule, which we have called AKAP-Lbc, that functions as an A-kinase-anchoring protein (AKAP) and a Rho-selective guanine nucleotide exchange factor. Expression of AKAP-Lbc in fibroblasts favors the formation of stress fibers in a Rho-dependent manner. Application of lysophosphatidic acid or selective expression of Galpha(12) enhances cellular AKAP-Lbc activation. Furthermore, biochemical studies indicate that AKAP-Lbc functions as an adaptor protein to selectively couple Galpha(12) to Rho. Thus, AKAP-Lbc anchors PKA and nucleates the assembly of a Rho-mediated signaling pathway.

  3. AKAP proteins anchor cAMP-dependent protein kinase to KvLQT1/IsK channel complex.

    PubMed

    Potet, F; Scott, J D; Mohammad-Panah, R; Escande, D; Baró, I

    2001-05-01

    In cardiac myocytes, the slow component of the delayed rectifier K(+) current (I(Ks)) is regulated by cAMP. Elevated cAMP increases I(Ks) amplitude, slows its deactivation kinetics, and shifts its activation curve. At the molecular level, I(Ks) channels are composed of KvLQT1/IsK complexes. In a variety of mammalian heterologous expression systems maintained at physiological temperature, we explored cAMP regulation of recombinant KvLQT1/IsK complexes. In these systems, KvLQT1/IsK complexes were totally insensitive to cAMP regulation. cAMP regulation was not restored by coexpression with the dominant negative isoform of KvLQT1 or with the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator. In contrast, coexpression of the neuronal A kinase anchoring protein (AKAP)79, a fragment of a cardiac AKAP (mAKAP), or cardiac AKAP15/18 restored cAMP regulation of KvLQT1/IsK complexes inasmuch as cAMP stimulation increased the I(Ks) amplitude, increased its deactivation time constant, and negatively shifted its activation curve. However, in cells expressing an AKAP, the effects of cAMP stimulation on the I(Ks) amplitude remained modest compared with those previously reported in cardiac myocytes. The effects of cAMP stimulation were fully prevented by including the Ht31 peptide (a global disruptor of protein kinase A anchoring) in the intracellular medium. We concluded that cAMP regulation of I(Ks) requires protein kinase A anchoring by AKAPs, which therefore participate with the channel protein complex underlying I(Ks).

  4. Anchored Clathrate Waters Bind Antifreeze Proteins to Ice

    SciTech Connect

    C Garnham; R Campbell; P Davies

    2011-12-31

    The mechanism by which antifreeze proteins (AFPs) irreversibly bind to ice has not yet been resolved. The ice-binding site of an AFP is relatively hydrophobic, but also contains many potential hydrogen bond donors/acceptors. The extent to which hydrogen bonding and the hydrophobic effect contribute to ice binding has been debated for over 30 years. Here we have elucidated the ice-binding mechanism through solving the first crystal structure of an Antarctic bacterial AFP. This 34-kDa domain, the largest AFP structure determined to date, folds as a Ca{sup 2+}-bound parallel beta-helix with an extensive array of ice-like surface waters that are anchored via hydrogen bonds directly to the polypeptide backbone and adjacent side chains. These bound waters make an excellent three-dimensional match to both the primary prism and basal planes of ice and in effect provide an extensive X-ray crystallographic picture of the AFP{vert_ellipsis}ice interaction. This unobstructed view, free from crystal-packing artefacts, shows the contributions of both the hydrophobic effect and hydrogen bonding during AFP adsorption to ice. We term this mode of binding the 'anchored clathrate' mechanism of AFP action.

  5. Anchored clathrate waters bind antifreeze proteins to ice.

    PubMed

    Garnham, Christopher P; Campbell, Robert L; Davies, Peter L

    2011-05-03

    The mechanism by which antifreeze proteins (AFPs) irreversibly bind to ice has not yet been resolved. The ice-binding site of an AFP is relatively hydrophobic, but also contains many potential hydrogen bond donors/acceptors. The extent to which hydrogen bonding and the hydrophobic effect contribute to ice binding has been debated for over 30 years. Here we have elucidated the ice-binding mechanism through solving the first crystal structure of an Antarctic bacterial AFP. This 34-kDa domain, the largest AFP structure determined to date, folds as a Ca(2+)-bound parallel beta-helix with an extensive array of ice-like surface waters that are anchored via hydrogen bonds directly to the polypeptide backbone and adjacent side chains. These bound waters make an excellent three-dimensional match to both the primary prism and basal planes of ice and in effect provide an extensive X-ray crystallographic picture of the AFPice interaction. This unobstructed view, free from crystal-packing artefacts, shows the contributions of both the hydrophobic effect and hydrogen bonding during AFP adsorption to ice. We term this mode of binding the "anchored clathrate" mechanism of AFP action.

  6. The association between glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins and heterotrimeric G protein alpha subunits in lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, K R; Rudd, C E; Finberg, R W

    1996-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins are nonmembrane spanning cell surface proteins that have been demonstrated to be signal transduction molecules. Because these proteins do not extend into the cytoplasm, the mechanism by which cross-linking of these molecules leads to intracellular signal transduction events is obscure. Previous analysis has indicated that these proteins are associated with src family member tyrosine kinases; however, the role this interaction plays in the generation of intracellular signals is not clear. Here we show that GPI-anchored proteins are associated with alpha subunits of heterotrimeric GTP binding proteins (G proteins) in both human and murine lymphocytes. When the GPI-anchored proteins CD59, CD48, and Thy-1 were immunoprecipitated from various cell lines or freshly isolated lymphocytes, all were found to be associated with a 41-kDa phosphoprotein that we have identified, by using specific antisera, as a mixture of tyrosine phosphorylated G protein alpha subunits: a small amount of Gialpha1, and substantial amounts of Gialpha2 and Gialpha3. GTP binding assays performed with immunoprecipitations of CD59 indicated that there was GTP-binding activity associated with this molecule. Thus, we have shown by both immunochemical and functional criteria that GPI-anchored proteins are physically associated with G proteins. These experiments suggest a potential role of G proteins in the transduction of signals generated by GPI-anchored molecules expressed on lymphocytes of both mouse and human. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8650218

  7. Defining A-Kinase Anchoring Protein (AKAP) Specificity for the Protein Kinase A Subunit RI (PKA-RI).

    PubMed

    Autenrieth, Karolin; Bendzunas, N George; Bertinetti, Daniela; Herberg, Friedrich W; Kennedy, Eileen J

    2016-04-15

    A-Kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) act as spatial and temporal regulators of protein kinase A (PKA) by localizing PKA along with multiple proteins into discrete signaling complexes. AKAPs interact with the PKA holoenzyme through an α-helix that docks into a groove formed on the dimerization/docking domain of PKA-R in an isoform-dependent fashion. In an effort to understand isoform selectivity at the molecular level, a library of protein-protein interaction (PPI) disruptors was designed to systematically probe the significance of an aromatic residue on the AKAP docking sequence for RI selectivity. The stapled peptide library was designed based on a high affinity, RI-selective disruptor of AKAP binding, RI-STAD-2. Phe, Trp and Leu were all found to maintain RI selectivity, whereas multiple intermediate-sized hydrophobic substitutions at this position either resulted in loss of isoform selectivity (Ile) or a reversal of selectivity (Val). As a limited number of RI-selective sequences are currently known, this study aids in our understanding of isoform selectivity and establishing parameters for discovering additional RI-selective AKAPs.

  8. The glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein repertoire of babesia bovis and its significance for erythrocyte invasion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glycosylphosphatidyl-anchored proteins are particularly abundant on the surface of pathogenic protozoans and might play an important role for parasite survival. In the present work the relevance of GPI-anchored proteins for erythrocyte invasion of Babesia bovis, one of the tick-transmitted causative...

  9. Comprehensive evaluation of Streptococcus sanguinis cell wall-anchored proteins in early infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Turner, Lauren Senty; Kanamoto, Taisei; Unoki, Takeshi; Munro, Cindy L; Wu, Hui; Kitten, Todd

    2009-11-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis is a member of the viridans group of streptococci and a leading cause of the life-threatening endovascular disease infective endocarditis. Initial contact with the cardiac infection site is likely mediated by S. sanguinis surface proteins. In an attempt to identify the proteins required for this crucial step in pathogenesis, we searched for surface-exposed, cell wall-anchored proteins encoded by S. sanguinis and then used a targeted signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) approach to evaluate their contributions to virulence. Thirty-three predicted cell wall-anchored proteins were identified-a number much larger than those found in related species. The requirement of each cell wall-anchored protein for infective endocarditis was assessed in the rabbit model. It was found that no single cell wall-anchored protein was essential for the development of early infective endocarditis. STM screening was also employed for the evaluation of three predicted sortase transpeptidase enzymes, which mediate the cell surface presentation of cell wall-anchored proteins. The sortase A mutant exhibited a modest (approximately 2-fold) reduction in competitiveness, while the other two sortase mutants were indistinguishable from the parental strain. The combined results suggest that while cell wall-anchored proteins may play a role in S. sanguinis infective endocarditis, strategies designed to interfere with individual cell wall-anchored proteins or sortases would not be effective for disease prevention.

  10. Structure of the Cell Wall Anchor of Surface Proteins in Staphylococcus aureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneewind, Olaf; Fowler, Audree; Faull, Kym F.

    1995-04-01

    Many surface proteins are anchored to the cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria and are involved in the pathogenesis of these organisms. A hybrid molecule was designed that, when expressed in Staphylococcus aureus, was anchored to the cell wall and could be released by controlled enzymatic digestion. By a combination of molecular biology and mass spectrometry techniques, the structure of the cell wall anchor of surface proteins in S. aureus was revealed. After cleavage of surface proteins between threonine and glycine of the conserved LPXTG motif, the carboxyl of threonine is amide-linked to the free amino group of the pentaglycine crossbridge in the staphylococcal cell wall.

  11. GPI anchor transamidase of Trypanosoma brucei: in vitro assay of the recombinant protein and VSG anchor exchange.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xuedong; Szallies, Alexander; Rawer, Marc; Echner, Hartmut; Duszenko, Michael

    2002-06-15

    GPI8 from Trypanosoma brucei was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. TbGPI8 encodes a 37 kDa protein (35 kDa after removal of the putative signal sequence) with a pI of 5.5. It contains one potential N-glycosylation site near the N-terminus but no C-terminal hydrophobic region. Enzyme activity assays using trypanosomal lysates or recombinant TbGpi8 exhibited cleavage of the synthetic peptide acetyl-S-V-L-N-aminomethyl-coumarine, indicating that TbGpi8 is indeed directly involved in the proteolytic processing of the GPI anchoring signal. Intracellular localization of TbGpi8 within tubular structures, such as the endoplasmic reticulum, was observed by using specific anti-TbGpi8 antibodies. The transamidase mechanism of GPI anchoring was studied in bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei using media containing hydrazine or biotinylated hydrazine. In the presence of the latter nucleophile, part of the newly formed VSG was linked to this instead of the GPI anchor and was not transferred to the cell surface. VSG-hydrazine-biotin was detected by streptavidin in western blots and intracellularly in Golgi-like compartments.

  12. An apparent association between glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins and a sphingolipid in Tetrahymena mimbres.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, X; Thompson, G A

    1997-01-01

    Sphingolipids are thought to stabilize glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein-rich membrane domains of yeast and polarized higher animal cells during the processing and targeting of these proteins to the plasma membrane. A widely used criterion for identifying the stable sphingolipid- and GPI-anchored protein-enriched membrane domains is the resistance of these lipid-modified proteins to solubilization by the detergent Triton X-100 (TX-100) at low temperature. Surprisingly, there have been no reports of sphingolipid/GPI-anchored protein association in protozoans, despite the fact that these cells contain considerably higher levels of GPI-anchored proteins than does any other organism. We report here the presence in Tetrahymena mimbres of a significant pool of GPI-anchored proteins which resisted extraction by 1% TX-100 at 4 degrees C but not at 37 degrees C. Of the total cellular complement of GPI-anchored proteins, which together accounted for more than 2% of whole-cell protein and were especially enriched in surface membranes, 10% of the major 63kDa component (gpi63) and 23% of a somewhat less abundant component (gpi23) were insoluble in TX-100 at 4 degrees C. A substantial proportion of the cell's only abundant sphingolipid, ceramideaminoethylphosphonate (CAEP), was also insoluble in 1% TX-100 at 4 degrees C. Radiolabelling studies involving [3H]leucine incorporation into proteins and [3H]palmitic acid incorporation into lipids revealed that the TX-100-resistant gpi63, gpi23 and CAEP molecules were all metabolically distinct from their TX-100-soluble counterparts in other compartments of the cell. The presence of detergent-resistant sphingolipid/GPI-anchored protein domains in non-polarized ciliate and trypanosomatid cells was probably obscured in previous studies by the profusion of accompanying detergent-soluble molecules. PMID:9173882

  13. Anchoring of surface proteins to the cell wall of Staphylococcus aureus. III. Lipid II is an in vivo peptidoglycan substrate for sortase-catalyzed surface protein anchoring.

    PubMed

    Perry, Adrienne M; Ton-That, Hung; Mazmanian, Sarkis K; Schneewind, Olaf

    2002-05-03

    Surface proteins of Staphylococcus aureus are anchored to the cell wall peptidoglycan by a mechanism requiring a C-terminal sorting signal with an LPXTG motif. Surface proteins are first synthesized in the bacterial cytoplasm and then transported across the cytoplasmic membrane. Cleavage of the N-terminal signal peptide of the cytoplasmic surface protein P1 precursor generates the extracellular P2 species, which is the substrate for the cell wall anchoring reaction. Sortase, a membrane-anchored transpeptidase, cleaves P2 between the threonine (T) and the glycine (G) of the LPXTG motif and catalyzes the formation of an amide bond between the carboxyl group of threonine and the amino group of cell wall cross-bridges. We have used metabolic labeling of staphylococcal cultures with [(32)P]phosphoric acid to reveal a P3 intermediate. The (32)P-label of immunoprecipitated surface protein is removed by treatment with lysostaphin, a glycyl-glycine endopeptidase that separates the cell wall anchor structure. Furthermore, the appearance of P3 is prevented in the absence of sortase or by the inhibition of cell wall synthesis. (32)P-Labeled cell wall anchor species bind to nisin, an antibiotic that is known to form a complex with lipid II. Thus, it appears that the P3 intermediate represents surface protein linked to the lipid II peptidoglycan precursor. The data support a model whereby lipid II-linked polypeptides are incorporated into the growing peptidoglycan via the transpeptidation and transglycosylation reactions of cell wall synthesis, generating mature cell wall-linked surface protein.

  14. An Accessory Protein Required for Anchoring and Assembly of Amyloid Fibers in B. subtilis Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Diego; Vlamakis, Hera; Losick, Richard; Kolter, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Cells within Bacillus subtilis biofilms are held in place by an extracellular matrix that contains cell-anchored amyloid fibers, composed of the amyloidogenic protein TasA. As biofilms age they disassemble because the cells release the amyloid fibers. This release appears to be the consequence of incorporation of D-tyrosine, D-leucine, D-tryptophan and D-methionine into the cell wall. Here, we characterize the in vivo roles of an accessory protein TapA (TasA anchoring/assembly protein; previously YqxM) that serves both to anchor the fibers to the cell wall and to assemble TasA into fibers. TapA is found in discrete foci in the cell envelope and these foci disappear when cells are treated with a mixture of D-amino acids. Purified cell wall sacculi retain a functional form of this anchoring protein such that purified fibers can be anchored to the sacculi in vitro. In addition, we show that TapA is essential for the proper assembly of the fibers. Its absence results in a dramatic reduction in TasA levels and what little TasA is left produces only thin fibers that are not anchored to the cell. PMID:21477127

  15. Molecular and Genomic Analysis of Genes Encoding Surface-Anchored Proteins from Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Karjalainen, Tuomo; Waligora-Dupriet, Anne-Judith; Cerquetti, Marina; Spigaglia, Patrizia; Maggioni, Andrea; Mauri, Pierluigi; Mastrantonio, Paola

    2001-01-01

    The gene slpA, encoding the S-layer precursor protein in the virulent Clostridium difficile strains C253 and 79–685, was identified. The precursor protein carries a C-terminal highly conserved anchoring domain, similar to the one found in the Cwp66 adhesin (previously characterized in strain 79–685), an SLH domain, and a variable N-terminal domain mediating cell adherence. The genes encoding the S-layer precursor proteins and the Cwp66 adhesin are present in a genetic locus carrying 17 open reading frames, 11 of which encode a similar two-domain architecture, likely to include surface-anchored proteins. PMID:11292772

  16. Labeling cell surface GPIs and GPI-anchored proteins through cell metabolic engineering with artificial inositol derivatives**

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhongwu

    2015-01-01

    Protein GPI anchorage to the cell surface is important for various biological processes, but GPI-anchored proteins are difficult to study. This paper developed an effective strategy for metabolic engineering of cell surface GPIs and GPI-anchored proteins by using inositol derivatives carrying an azido group. The azide-labeled GPIs and GPI-anchored proteins on live cells were then tagged with biotin via click reaction and with a fluorescent molecule. The strategy can be used to label GPI-anchored proteins with various tags for biological studies. PMID:26102235

  17. The tale of tail-anchored proteins: coming from the cytosol and looking for a membrane.

    PubMed

    Borgese, Nica; Colombo, Sara; Pedrazzini, Emanuela

    2003-06-23

    A group of integral membrane proteins, known as C-tail anchored, is defined by the presence of a cytosolic NH2-terminal domain that is anchored to the phospholipid bilayer by a single segment of hydrophobic amino acids close to the COOH terminus. The mode of insertion into membranes of these proteins, many of which play key roles in fundamental intracellular processes, is obligatorily posttranslational, is highly specific, and may be subject to regulatory processes that modulate the protein's function. Although recent work has elucidated structural features in the tail region that determine selection of the correct target membrane, the molecular machinery involved in interpreting this information, and in modulating tail-anchored protein localization, has not been identified yet.

  18. Distinct Pathways Mediate the Sorting of Tail-anchored Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the biogenesis of tail-anchored (TA) proteins localized to the mitochondrial outer membrane in plant cells. To address this issue, we screened all of the (>500) known and predicted TA proteins in Arabidopsis for those annotated, based on Gene Ontology, to possess mitochondrial...

  19. Distinct Pathways Mediate the Sorting of Tail-anchored Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the biogenesis of tail-anchored (TA) proteins localized to the mitochondrial outer membrane in plant cells. To address this issue, we screened all of the (>600) known and predicted TA proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana for those annotated, based on Gene Ontology, to possess mitoc...

  20. Aurora-A kinase phosphorylation of Aurora-A kinase interacting protein (AIP) and stabilization of the enzyme-substrate complex.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Hiroshi; Sasai, Kaori; Czerniak, Bogdan A; Carter, Jennifer L; Sen, Subrata

    2007-12-01

    Aurora-A is an oncogenic kinase that plays essential roles in mitosis as well as cell survival. Aurora-A interacting protein (AIP) was identified as a negative regulator of Aurora-A with its ectopic over expression inducing destabilization of Aurora-A protein. Here we present evidence that in human cells, contrary to the earlier report, AIP functions in stabilizing rather than destabilizing Aurora-A. Furthermore, AIP is phosphorylated on Serine 70 by Aurora-A but not Aurora-B and expression of phosphorylation mimic mutant of AIP results in prolonged protein stability compared to unphosphorylatable mutant. We observed that when co-expressed with AIP, protein levels of both Aurora-A and Aurora-B are markedly elevated regardless of their kinase activities and phosphorylation state of AIP. Interaction of Aurora kinases with AIP is necessary for this elevated stability. This phenomenon is commonly detected in several human cancer cell lines used in this study. Depletion of AIP by RNA interference decreased Aurora-A but not Aurora-B in two of the three cell lines analyzed, indicating that under physiological condition, AIP functions in stabilization of Aurora-A but not Aurora-B, though this regulation may be dependent on additional factors as well. Further, AIP siRNA induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M, which is consistent with anticipated loss of function of Aurora-A in these cells. Thus, our study provides the first evidence of a role for AIP in G2/M cell cycle progression by cooperatively regulating protein stabilization of its up-stream regulator, Aurora-A kinase through protein-protein interaction as well as protein phosphorylation.

  1. Tritium labelling of a cholesterol amphiphile designed for cell membrane anchoring of proteins.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Balázs; Orbán, Erika; Kele, Zoltán; Tömböly, Csaba

    2015-01-01

    Cell membrane association of proteins can be achieved by the addition of lipid moieties to the polypeptide chain, and such lipid-modified proteins have important biological functions. A class of cell surface proteins contains a complex glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) glycolipid at the C-terminus, and they are accumulated in cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains, that is, lipid rafts. Semisynthetic lipoproteins prepared from recombinant proteins and designed lipids are valuable probes and model systems of the membrane-associated proteins. Because GPI-anchored proteins can be reinserted into the cell membrane with the retention of the biological function, they are appropriate candidates for preparing models via reduction of the structural complexity. A synthetic headgroup was added to the 3β-hydroxyl group of cholesterol, an essential lipid component of rafts, and the resulting cholesterol derivative was used as a simplified GPI mimetic. In order to quantitate the membrane integrated GPI mimetic after the exogenous addition to live cells, a tritium labelled cholesterol anchor was prepared. The radioactive label was introduced into the headgroup, and the radiolabelled GPI mimetic anchor was obtained with a specific activity of 1.37 TBq/mmol. The headgroup labelled cholesterol derivative was applied to demonstrate the sensitive detection of the cell membrane association of the anchor under in vivo conditions.

  2. Setting sail for glucose homeostasis with the AKAP150-PP2B-anchor.

    PubMed

    Teo, Adrian Kee Keong; Kulkarni, Rohit N

    2012-10-17

    Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, controlled by multiple protein phosphorylation events, is critical for the regulation of glucose homeostasis. Protein kinase A (PKA) is known to play a role in β cell physiology, but the role of its anchoring protein is not fully understood. Hinke et al (2012) illustrate the significance of A-kinase anchoring protein 150 in tethering protein phosphatase 2B to mediate nutrient-stimulated insulin secretion and thus modulate glucose homeostasis.

  3. Biosynthesis of GPI-anchored proteins: special emphasis on GPI lipid remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Taroh; Fujita, Morihisa

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositols (GPIs) act as membrane anchors of many eukaryotic cell surface proteins. GPIs in various organisms have a common backbone consisting of ethanolamine phosphate (EtNP), three mannoses (Mans), one non-N-acetylated glucosamine, and inositol phospholipid, whose structure is EtNP-6Manα-2Manα-6Manα-4GlNα-6myoinositol-P-lipid. The lipid part is either phosphatidylinositol of diacyl or 1-alkyl-2-acyl form, or inositol phosphoceramide. GPIs are attached to proteins via an amide bond between the C-terminal carboxyl group and an amino group of EtNP. Fatty chains of inositol phospholipids are inserted into the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane. More than 150 different human proteins are GPI anchored, whose functions include enzymes, adhesion molecules, receptors, protease inhibitors, transcytotic transporters, and complement regulators. GPI modification imparts proteins with unique characteristics, such as association with membrane microdomains or rafts, transient homodimerization, release from the membrane by cleavage in the GPI moiety, and apical sorting in polarized cells. GPI anchoring is essential for mammalian embryogenesis, development, neurogenesis, fertilization, and immune system. Mutations in genes involved in remodeling of the GPI lipid moiety cause human diseases characterized by neurological abnormalities. Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has >60 GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs). GPI is essential for growth of yeast. In this review, we discuss biosynthesis of GPI-APs in mammalian cells and yeast with emphasis on the lipid moiety. PMID:26563290

  4. Molecular Mechanisms for cAMP-Mediated Immunoregulation in T cells – Role of Anchored Protein Kinase A Signaling Units

    PubMed Central

    Wehbi, Vanessa L.; Taskén, Kjetil

    2016-01-01

    The cyclic AMP/protein kinase A (cAMP/PKA) pathway is one of the most common and versatile signal pathways in eukaryotic cells. A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) target PKA to specific substrates and distinct subcellular compartments providing spatial and temporal specificity for mediation of biological effects channeled through the cAMP/PKA pathway. In the immune system, cAMP is a potent negative regulator of T cell receptor-mediated activation of effector T cells (Teff) acting through a proximal PKA/Csk/Lck pathway anchored via a scaffold consisting of the AKAP Ezrin holding PKA, the linker protein EBP50, and the anchoring protein phosphoprotein associated with glycosphingolipid-enriched microdomains holding Csk. As PKA activates Csk and Csk inhibits Lck, this pathway in response to cAMP shuts down proximal T cell activation. This immunomodulating pathway in Teff mediates clinically important responses to regulatory T cell (Treg) suppression and inflammatory mediators, such as prostaglandins (PGs), adrenergic stimuli, adenosine, and a number of other ligands. A major inducer of T cell cAMP levels is PG E2 (PGE2) acting through EP2 and EP4 prostanoid receptors. PGE2 plays a crucial role in the normal physiological control of immune homeostasis as well as in inflammation and cancer immune evasion. Peripherally induced Tregs express cyclooxygenase-2, secrete PGE2, and elicit the immunosuppressive cAMP pathway in Teff as one tumor immune evasion mechanism. Moreover, a cAMP increase can also be induced by indirect mechanisms, such as intercellular transfer between T cells. Indeed, Treg, known to have elevated levels of intracellular cAMP, may mediate their suppressive function by transferring cAMP to Teff through gap junctions, which we speculate could also be regulated by PKA/AKAP complexes. In this review, we present an updated overview on the influence of cAMP-mediated immunoregulatory mechanisms acting through localized cAMP signaling and the therapeutical

  5. A kinase interacting protein (AKIP1) is a key regulator of cardiac stress

    PubMed Central

    Sastri, Mira; Haushalter, Kristofer J.; Panneerselvam, Mathivadhani; Chang, Philip; Fridolfsson, Heidi; Finley, J. Cameron; Ng, Daniel; Schilling, Jan M.; Miyanohara, Atsushi; Day, Michele E.; Hakozaki, Hiro; Petrosyan, Susanna; Koller, Antonius; King, Charles C.; Darshi, Manjula; Blumenthal, Donald K.; Ali, Sameh Saad; Roth, David M.; Patel, Hemal H.; Taylor, Susan S.

    2013-01-01

    cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) regulates a myriad of functions in the heart, including cardiac contractility, myocardial metabolism, and gene expression. However, a molecular integrator of the PKA response in the heart is unknown. Here, we show that the PKA adaptor A-kinase interacting protein 1 (AKIP1) is up-regulated in cardiac myocytes in response to oxidant stress. Mice with cardiac gene transfer of AKIP1 have enhanced protection to ischemic stress. We hypothesized that this adaptation to stress was mitochondrial-dependent. AKIP1 interacted with the mitochondrial localized apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) under both normal and oxidant stress. When cardiac myocytes or whole hearts are exposed to oxidant and ischemic stress, levels of both AKIP1 and AIF were enhanced. AKIP1 is preferentially localized to interfibrillary mitochondria and up-regulated in this cardiac mitochondrial subpopulation on ischemic injury. Mitochondria isolated from AKIP1 gene-transferred hearts showed increased mitochondrial localization of AKIP1, decreased reactive oxygen species generation, enhanced calcium tolerance, decreased mitochondrial cytochrome C release, and enhance phosphorylation of mitochondrial PKA substrates on ischemic stress. These observations highlight AKIP1 as a critical molecular regulator and a therapeutic control point for stress adaptation in the heart. PMID:23319652

  6. Delivery of a secreted soluble protein to the vacuole via a membrane anchor

    SciTech Connect

    Barrieu, F.; Chrispeels, M.J.

    1999-08-01

    To further understand how membrane proteins are sorted in the secretory system, the authors devised a strategy that involves the expression of a membrane-anchored yeast invertase in transgenic plants. The construct consisted of a signal peptide followed by the coding region of yeast invertase and the transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail of calnexin. The substitution of a lysine near the C terminus of calnexin with a glutamic acid residue ensured progression through the secretory system rather than retention in or return to the endoplasmic reticulum. In the transformed plants, invertase activity and a 70-kD cross-reacting protein were found in the vacuoles. This yeast invertase had plant-specific complex glycans, indicating that transport to the vacuole was mediated by the Golgi apparatus. The microsomal fraction contained a membrane-anchored 90-kD cross-reacting polypeptide, but was devoid of invertase activity. Their results indicate that this membrane-anchored protein proceeds in the secretory system beyond the point where soluble proteins are sorted for secretion, and is detached from its membrane anchor either just before or just after delivery to the vacuole.

  7. VIP21/caveolin, glycosphingolipid clusters and the sorting of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins in epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zurzolo, C; van't Hof, W; van Meer, G; Rodriguez-Boulan, E

    1994-01-01

    We studied the role of the association between glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins and glycosphingolipid (GSL) clusters in apical targeting using gD1-DAF, a GPI-anchored protein that is differentially sorted by three epithelial cell lines. Differently from MDCK cells, where both gD1-DAF and glucosylceramide (GlcCer) are sorted to the apical membrane, in MDCK Concanavalin A-resistant cells (MDCK-ConAr) gD1-DAF was mis-sorted to both surfaces, but GlcCer was still targeted to the apical surface. In both MDCK and MDCK-ConAr cells, gD1-DAF became associated with TX-100-insoluble GSL clusters during transport to the cell surface. In dramatic contrast with MDCK cells, the Fischer rat thyroid (FRT) cell line targeted both gD1-DAF and GlcCer basolaterally. The targeting differences for GSLs in FRT and MDCK cells cannot be accounted for by a differential ability to form clusters because, in spite of major differences in the GSL composition, both cell lines assembled GSLs into TX-100-insoluble complexes with identical isopycnic densities. Surprisingly, in FRT cells, gD1-DAF did not form clusters with GSLs and, therefore, remained completely soluble. This clustering defect in FRT cells correlated with the lack of expression of VIP21/caveolin, a protein localized to both the plasma membrane caveolae and the trans Golgi network. This suggests that VIP21/caveolin may have an important role in recruiting GPI-anchored proteins into GSL complexes necessary for their apical sorting. However, since MDCK-ConAr cells expressed caveolin and clustered GPI-anchored proteins normally, yet mis-sorted them, our results also indicate that clustering and caveolin are not sufficient for apical targeting, and that additional factors are required for the accurate apical sorting of GPI-anchored proteins. Images PMID:8306971

  8. Crucial role for prion protein membrane anchoring in the neuroinvasion and neural spread of prion infection.

    PubMed

    Klingeborn, Mikael; Race, Brent; Meade-White, Kimberly D; Rosenke, Rebecca; Striebel, James F; Chesebro, Bruce

    2011-02-01

    In nature prion diseases are usually transmitted by extracerebral prion infection, but clinical disease results only after invasion of the central nervous system (CNS). Prion protein (PrP), a host-encoded glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored membrane glycoprotein, is necessary for prion infection and disease. Here, we investigated the role of the anchoring of PrP on prion neuroinvasion by studying various inoculation routes in mice expressing either anchored or anchorless PrP. In control mice with anchored PrP, intracerebral or sciatic nerve inoculation resulted in rapid CNS neuroinvasion and clinical disease (154 to 156 days), and after tongue, ocular, intravenous, or intraperitoneal inoculation, CNS neuroinvasion was only slightly slower (193 to 231 days). In contrast, in anchorless PrP mice, these routes resulted in slow and infrequent CNS neuroinvasion. Only intracerebral inoculation caused brain PrPres, a protease-resistant isoform of PrP, and disease in both types of mice. Thus, anchored PrP was an essential component for the rapid neural spread and CNS neuroinvasion of prion infection.

  9. Cell-surface Attachment of Bacterial Multienzyme Complexes Involves Highly Dynamic Protein-Protein Anchors*

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Kate; Najmudin, Shabir; Alves, Victor D.; Bayer, Edward A.; Smith, Steven P.; Bule, Pedro; Waller, Helen; Ferreira, Luís M. A.; Gilbert, Harry J.; Fontes, Carlos M. G. A.

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play a pivotal role in the assembly of the cellulosome, one of nature's most intricate nanomachines dedicated to the depolymerization of complex carbohydrates. The integration of cellulosomal components usually occurs through the binding of type I dockerin modules located at the C terminus of the enzymes to cohesin modules located in the primary scaffoldin subunit. Cellulosomes are typically recruited to the cell surface via type II cohesin-dockerin interactions established between primary and cell-surface anchoring scaffoldin subunits. In contrast with type II interactions, type I dockerins usually display a dual binding mode that may allow increased conformational flexibility during cellulosome assembly. Acetivibrio cellulolyticus produces a highly complex cellulosome comprising an unusual adaptor scaffoldin, ScaB, which mediates the interaction between the primary scaffoldin, ScaA, through type II cohesin-dockerin interactions and the anchoring scaffoldin, ScaC, via type I cohesin-dockerin interactions. Here, we report the crystal structure of the type I ScaB dockerin in complex with a type I ScaC cohesin in two distinct orientations. The data show that the ScaB dockerin displays structural symmetry, reflected by the presence of two essentially identical binding surfaces. The complex interface is more extensive than those observed in other type I complexes, which results in an ultra-high affinity interaction (Ka ∼1012 m). A subset of ScaB dockerin residues was also identified as modulating the specificity of type I cohesin-dockerin interactions in A. cellulolyticus. This report reveals that recruitment of cellulosomes onto the cell surface may involve dockerins presenting a dual binding mode to incorporate additional flexibility into the quaternary structure of highly populated multienzyme complexes. PMID:25855788

  10. Anchors aweigh: protein localization and transport mediated by transmembrane domains.

    PubMed

    Cosson, Pierre; Perrin, Jackie; Bonifacino, Juan S

    2013-10-01

    The transmembrane domains (TMDs) of integral membrane proteins have emerged as major determinants of intracellular localization and transport in the secretory and endocytic pathways. Unlike sorting signals in cytosolic domains, TMD sorting determinants are not conserved amino acid sequences but physical properties such as the length and hydrophilicity of the transmembrane span. The underlying sorting machinery is still poorly characterized, but several mechanisms have been proposed, including TMD recognition by transmembrane sorting receptors and partitioning into membrane lipid domains. Here we review the nature of TMD sorting determinants and how they may dictate transmembrane protein localization and transport.

  11. Anchors Aweigh: Protein Traffic Mediated by Transmembrane Domains

    PubMed Central

    Cosson, Pierre; Perrin, Jackie; Bonifacino, Juan S.

    2013-01-01

    The transmembrane domains (TMDs) of integral membrane proteins have emerged as major determinants of intracellular localization and transport in the secretory and endocytic pathways. Unlike sorting signals in the cytosolic domains, TMD sorting determinants are not conserved amino-acid sequences but physical properties such as length and hydrophilicity of the transmembrane span. The underlying sorting machinery is still poorly characterized but several mechanisms have been proposed, including TMD recognition by transmembrane sorting receptors and partitioning into membrane lipid domains. Here we review the nature of TMD sorting determinants and how they may dictate transmembrane protein localization and transport. PMID:23806646

  12. Use of anchor protein modules in fluorescence polarisation aptamer assay for ochratoxin A determination.

    PubMed

    Samokhvalov, Alexey V; Safenkova, Irina V; Eremin, Sergei A; Zherdev, Anatoly V; Dzantiev, Boris B

    2017-04-15

    A new strategy for sensitive fluorescence polarisation (FP) analysis is proposed which uses aptamer as the receptor and anchor protein modules as the enhancers by including the aptamers in complexes with protein modules. This approach is based on increasing the size differences of bound and unbound fluorophores. The strategy was applied in an ochratoxin A (ОТА) assay with the competitive binding of fluorophore-labelled and free OTA with aptamer-based receptors. We showed that the binding of labelled OTA with aptamer included in complexes with anchors led to higher a FP than binding with free aptamer. This allowed the aptamer concentration to be reduced, thus lowering the limit of detection by a factor of 40, down to 3.6 nM. The assay time was 15 min. To evaluate the applicability of the FP assay with aptamer-anchor complex to real samples, we conducted OTA measurements in spiked white wine. The OTA limit of detection in wine was 2.8 nM (1.1 μg/kg), and the recoveries ranged from 83% to 113%. The study shows that the proposed anchor strategy is efficient for increasing the sensitivity of FP-based aptamer assays.

  13. Lactobacillus acidophilus CP23 with weak immunomodulatory activity lacks anchoring structure for surface layer protein.

    PubMed

    Yanagihara, Sae; Kato, Shinji; Ashida, Nobuhisa; Yamamoto, Naoyuki

    2015-05-01

    To determine the reason for the low levels of Surface layer protein A (SlpA) on CP23 cells, which might play a crucial role in the immunomodulatory effect of Lactobacillus acidophilus, the DNA sequence of the slpA gene of CP23 and L-92 strains, including the upstream region, were analyzed. Unexpectedly, there was no significant difference in the predicted amino acid sequence of the C-terminus needed for cell anchoring, and only an additional Ala-Val-Ala sequence inserted in the N-terminal region of the mature CP23 protein. Therefore, anchoring of SlpA on the cell wall of CP23 and L-92 was evaluated by a reconstitution assay, which showed that SlpA released by LiCl treatment from both CP23 and L-92 was successfully anchored on LiCl-treated L-92 cells, but not on LiCl-treated CP23 cells. Moreover, quantitative analysis of SlpA protein in the culture medium of CP23 and L-92 by ELISA revealed higher levels of SlpA secretion in CP23 cells than in L-92 cells. Collectively, these results suggest that the lower levels of SlpA on the surface of CP23 cells might be caused by less cell wall capacity for SlpA anchoring, leading to an accumulation of SlpA in the culture medium of CP23 cells. The present study supports the importance of cell surface structure of L. acidophilus L-92 for SlpA anchoring on the cell surface needed for immunomodulatory effect.

  14. Ca2+/calcineurin-dependent inactivation of neuronal L-type Ca2+ channels requires priming by AKAP-anchored protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Dittmer, Philip J; Dell'Acqua, Mark L; Sather, William A

    2014-06-12

    Within neurons, Ca2+-dependent inactivation (CDI) of voltage-gated L-type Ca2+ channels shapes cytoplasmic Ca2+ signals. CDI is initiated by Ca2+ binding to channel-associated calmodulin and subsequent Ca2+/calmodulin activation of the Ca2+-dependent phosphatase, calcineurin (CaN), which is targeted to L channels by the A-kinase-anchoring protein AKAP79/150. Here, we report that CDI of neuronal L channels was abolished by inhibition of PKA activity or PKA anchoring to AKAP79/150 and that CDI was also suppressed by stimulation of PKA activity. Although CDI was reduced by positive or negative manipulation of PKA, interference with PKA anchoring or activity lowered Ca2+ current density whereas stimulation of PKA activity elevated it. In contrast, inhibition of CaN reduced CDI but had no effect on current density. These results suggest a model wherein PKA-dependent phosphorylation enhances neuronal L current, thereby priming channels to undergo CDI, and Ca2+/calmodulin-activated CaN actuates CDI by reversing PKA-mediated enhancement of channel activity.

  15. Diffusion of GPI-anchored proteins is influenced by the activity of dynamic cortical actin.

    PubMed

    Saha, Suvrajit; Lee, Il-Hyung; Polley, Anirban; Groves, Jay T; Rao, Madan; Mayor, Satyajit

    2015-11-05

    Molecular diffusion at the surface of living cells is believed to be predominantly driven by thermal kicks. However, there is growing evidence that certain cell surface molecules are driven by the fluctuating dynamics of cortical cytoskeleton. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we measure the diffusion coefficient of a variety of cell surface molecules over a temperature range of 24-37 °C. Exogenously incorporated fluorescent lipids with short acyl chains exhibit the expected increase of diffusion coefficient over this temperature range. In contrast, we find that GPI-anchored proteins exhibit temperature-independent diffusion over this range and revert to temperature-dependent diffusion on cell membrane blebs, in cells depleted of cholesterol, and upon acute perturbation of actin dynamics and myosin activity. A model transmembrane protein with a cytosolic actin-binding domain also exhibits the temperature-independent behavior, directly implicating the role of cortical actin. We show that diffusion of GPI-anchored proteins also becomes temperature dependent when the filamentous dynamic actin nucleator formin is inhibited. However, changes in cortical actin mesh size or perturbation of branched actin nucleator Arp2/3 do not affect this behavior. Thus cell surface diffusion of GPI-anchored proteins and transmembrane proteins that associate with actin is driven by active fluctuations of dynamic cortical actin filaments in addition to thermal fluctuations, consistent with expectations from an "active actin-membrane composite" cell surface.

  16. Diffusion of GPI-anchored proteins is influenced by the activity of dynamic cortical actin

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Suvrajit; Lee, Il-Hyung; Polley, Anirban; Groves, Jay T.; Rao, Madan; Mayor, Satyajit

    2015-01-01

    Molecular diffusion at the surface of living cells is believed to be predominantly driven by thermal kicks. However, there is growing evidence that certain cell surface molecules are driven by the fluctuating dynamics of cortical cytoskeleton. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we measure the diffusion coefficient of a variety of cell surface molecules over a temperature range of 24–37°C. Exogenously incorporated fluorescent lipids with short acyl chains exhibit the expected increase of diffusion coefficient over this temperature range. In contrast, we find that GPI-anchored proteins exhibit temperature-independent diffusion over this range and revert to temperature-dependent diffusion on cell membrane blebs, in cells depleted of cholesterol, and upon acute perturbation of actin dynamics and myosin activity. A model transmembrane protein with a cytosolic actin-binding domain also exhibits the temperature-independent behavior, directly implicating the role of cortical actin. We show that diffusion of GPI-anchored proteins also becomes temperature dependent when the filamentous dynamic actin nucleator formin is inhibited. However, changes in cortical actin mesh size or perturbation of branched actin nucleator Arp2/3 do not affect this behavior. Thus cell surface diffusion of GPI-anchored proteins and transmembrane proteins that associate with actin is driven by active fluctuations of dynamic cortical actin filaments in addition to thermal fluctuations, consistent with expectations from an “active actin-membrane composite” cell surface. PMID:26378258

  17. Cytodifferentiation in Tetrahymena vorax is linked to glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored protein assembly.

    PubMed

    Yang, X; Ryals, P E

    1994-03-15

    The role of glycosyl-PtdIns (GPI)-anchored proteins in the cytodifferentiation of Tetrahymena vorax was examined. Labelling of cells with [3H]myristate or [3H]palmitate followed by electrophoresis showed an array of proteins carrying covalently bound lipids. Electrophoresis of protein from cells labelled with the GPI-anchor components [3H]Ins and [14C]ethanolamine revealed three polypeptides on fluorograms which have apparent molecular masses of approx. 28, 50 and 82 kDa. Labelled lipid associated with these polypeptides was susceptible to release by in vitro exposure to Bacillus thuringiensis PtdIns-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC). Using labelled fatty acids, cells induced to differentiate showed altered GPI-anchored protein-labelling patterns in comparison with undifferentiated control cells, with a heavily labelled 32 kDa band appearing upon differentiation. Pre-incubation of cells in 10 mM D-mannosamine, an inhibitor of GPI incorporation into protein, resulted in a reduction of the incorporation of label into the three GPI-anchored proteins, nearly complete inhibition of differentiation and a reduction in the rate of digestive vacuole formation. A 50% inhibition of differentiation was obtained using 500 microM mannosamine. The inhibitory impact of D-mannosamine on differentiation could be competitively and completely reversed by the inclusion of D-mannose, but not D-glucose. Neither glucosamine nor tunicamycin inhibited differentiation. Incubation of cells in PI-PLC (5 units/ml) plus the differentiation inducer resulted in an acceleration of differentiation and generally higher percentages of differentiated cells versus controls.

  18. High-affinity AKAP7δ–protein kinase A interaction yields novel protein kinase A-anchoring disruptor peptides

    PubMed Central

    Hundsrucker, Christian; Krause, Gerd; Beyermann, Michael; Prinz, Anke; Zimmermann, Bastian; Diekmann, Oliver; Lorenz, Dorothea; Stefan, Eduard; Nedvetsky, Pavel; Dathe, Margitta; Christian, Frank; Mcsorley, Theresa; Krause, Eberhard; Mcconnachie, George; Herberg, Friedrich W.; Scott, John D.; Rosenthal, Walter; Klussmann, Enno

    2006-01-01

    PKA (protein kinase A) is tethered to subcellular compartments by direct interaction of its regulatory subunits (RI or RII) with AKAPs (A kinase-anchoring proteins). AKAPs preferentially bind RII subunits via their RII-binding domains. RII-binding domains form structurally conserved amphipathic helices with unrelated sequences. Their binding affinities for RII subunits differ greatly within the AKAP family. Amongst the AKAPs that bind RIIα subunits with high affinity is AKAP7δ [AKAP18δ; Kd (equilibrium dissociation constant) value of 31 nM]. An N-terminally truncated AKAP7δ mutant binds RIIα subunits with higher affinity than the full-length protein presumably due to loss of an inhibitory region [Henn, Edemir, Stefan, Wiesner, Lorenz, Theilig, Schmidtt, Vossebein, Tamma, Beyermann et al. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 26654–26665]. In the present study, we demonstrate that peptides (25 amino acid residues) derived from the RII-binding domain of AKAP7δ bind RIIα subunits with higher affinity (Kd=0.4±0.3 nM) than either full-length or N-terminally truncated AKAP7δ, or peptides derived from other RII binding domains. The AKAP7δ-derived peptides and stearate-coupled membrane-permeable mutants effectively disrupt AKAP–RII subunit interactions in vitro and in cell-based assays. Thus they are valuable novel tools for studying anchored PKA signalling. Molecular modelling indicated that the high affinity binding of the amphipathic helix, which forms the RII-binding domain of AKAP7δ, with RII subunits involves both the hydrophobic and the hydrophilic faces of the helix. Alanine scanning (25 amino acid peptides, SPOT technology, combined with RII overlay assays) of the RII binding domain revealed that hydrophobic amino acid residues form the backbone of the interaction and that hydrogen bond- and salt-bridge-forming amino acid residues increase the affinity of the interaction. PMID:16483255

  19. Determination of the non-ionic detergent insolubility and phosphoprotein associations of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins expressed on T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, K R; Mallory, M A; Finberg, R W

    1998-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins are poorly solublized in non-ionic detergents such as Triton X-100 and Nonidet P40, but are easily solublized by detergents with high critical micelle concentrations such as octylglucoside. This solubility profile has been suggested to be due to the localization of GPI-anchored proteins to lipid microdomains rich in cholesterol and sphingolipids. Additionally, GPI-anchored proteins expressed on haemopoietic cells have been shown to associate with src-family tyrosine kinases and heterotrimeric G proteins. Despite these observations, the non-ionic detergent insolubility of GPI-anchored proteins on haemopoietic cells has not been quantified nor has a relationship between the non-ionic detergent insolubility of these proteins and their association with signal-transduction molecules been identified. Here we show that GPI-anchored proteins found on T-cell tumours and activated T cells, although significantly more insoluble then transmembrane proteins, are not uniform in their detergent insolubility. Whereas CD59 was between 4% and 13% soluble, CD48 was between 13% and 25% soluble, CD55 was between 20% and 30% soluble, and CD109 was between 34% and 75% soluble. The ability of these GPI-anchored proteins to associate with phosphoproteins was correlated with their detergent insolubility: the more detergent-insoluble that a GPI-anchored protein was, the greater the level of phosphoprotein associations. These experiments reveal a relationship between non-ionic detergent insolubility and association with signal-transduction molecules and suggest a cause-and-effect relationship between these two properties. In total, these experiments support the hypothesis that the association of GPI-anchored proteins with signalling molecules is due to their sorting to lipid microdomains. PMID:9716490

  20. Determination of the non-ionic detergent insolubility and phosphoprotein associations of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins expressed on T cells.

    PubMed

    Solomon, K R; Mallory, M A; Finberg, R W

    1998-09-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins are poorly solublized in non-ionic detergents such as Triton X-100 and Nonidet P40, but are easily solublized by detergents with high critical micelle concentrations such as octylglucoside. This solubility profile has been suggested to be due to the localization of GPI-anchored proteins to lipid microdomains rich in cholesterol and sphingolipids. Additionally, GPI-anchored proteins expressed on haemopoietic cells have been shown to associate with src-family tyrosine kinases and heterotrimeric G proteins. Despite these observations, the non-ionic detergent insolubility of GPI-anchored proteins on haemopoietic cells has not been quantified nor has a relationship between the non-ionic detergent insolubility of these proteins and their association with signal-transduction molecules been identified. Here we show that GPI-anchored proteins found on T-cell tumours and activated T cells, although significantly more insoluble then transmembrane proteins, are not uniform in their detergent insolubility. Whereas CD59 was between 4% and 13% soluble, CD48 was between 13% and 25% soluble, CD55 was between 20% and 30% soluble, and CD109 was between 34% and 75% soluble. The ability of these GPI-anchored proteins to associate with phosphoproteins was correlated with their detergent insolubility: the more detergent-insoluble that a GPI-anchored protein was, the greater the level of phosphoprotein associations. These experiments reveal a relationship between non-ionic detergent insolubility and association with signal-transduction molecules and suggest a cause-and-effect relationship between these two properties. In total, these experiments support the hypothesis that the association of GPI-anchored proteins with signalling molecules is due to their sorting to lipid microdomains.

  1. Surface display of heterologous proteins in Bacillus thuringiensis using a peptidoglycan hydrolase anchor

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Xiaohu; Jiang, Mengtian; Yu, Ziniu; Cai, Hao; Li, Lin

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous studies have revealed that the lysin motif (LysM) domains of bacterial cell wall-degrading enzymes are able to bind to peptidoglycan moieties of the cell wall. This suggests an approach for a cell surface display system in Gram-positive bacteria using a LysM-containing protein as the anchoring motif. In this study, we developed a new surface display system in B. thuringiensis using a LysM-containing peptidoglycan hydrolase, endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (Mbg), as the anchor protein. Results Homology searching in the B. thuringiensis YBT-1520 genome revealed a putative peptidoglycan hydrolase gene. The encoded protein, Mbg, exhibited substantial cell-wall binding capacity. The deduced amino acid sequence of Mbg was structurally distinguished as an N-terminal domain with two tandemly aligned LysMs and a C-terminal catalytic domain. A GFP-fusion protein was expressed and used to verify the surface localization by Western blot, flow cytometry, protease accessibility, SDS sensitivity, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy assays. Low-level constitutive expression of Mbg was elevated by introducing a sporulation-independent promoter of cry3Aa. Truncated Mbg domains with separate N-terminus (Mbgn), C-terminus (Mbgc), LysM1, or LysM2 were further compared for their cell-wall displaying efficiencies. The Mbgn moiety contributed to cell-wall anchoring, while LysM1 was the active domain. Two tandemly repeated Mbgns exhibited the highest display activity, while the activity of three repeated Mbgns was decreased. A heterologous bacterial multicopper oxidase (WlacD) was successfully displayed onto the surface of B. thuringiensis target cells using the optimum (Mbgn)2 anchor, without radically altering its catalytic activity. Conclusion Mbg can be a functional anchor protein to target different heterologous proteins onto the surface of B. thuringiensis cells. Since the LysM domain appears to be universal in Gram-positive bacteria, the strategy

  2. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins are preferentially targeted to the basolateral surface in Fischer rat thyroid epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) acts as an apical targeting signal in MDCK cells and other kidney and intestinal cell lines. In striking contrast with these model polarized cell lines, we show here that Fischer rat thyroid (FRT) epithelial cells do not display a preferential apical distribution of GPI-anchored proteins. Six out of nine detectable endogenous GPI-anchored proteins were localized on the basolateral surface, whereas two others were apical and one was not polarized. Transfection of several model GPI proteins, previously shown to be apically targeted in MDCK cells, also led to unexpected results. While the ectodomain of decay accelerating factor (DAF) was apically secreted, 50% of the native, GPI-anchored form, of this protein was basolateral. Addition of a GPI anchor to the ectodomain of Herpes simplex gD-1, secreted without polarity, led to basolateral localization of the fusion protein, gD1-DAF. Targeting experiments demonstrated that gD1-DAF was delivered vectorially from the Golgi apparatus to the basolateral surface. These results indicate that FRT cells have fundamental differences with MDCK cells with regard to the mechanisms for sorting GPI-anchored proteins: GPI is not an apical signal but, rather, it behaves as a basolateral signal. The "mutant" behavior of FRT cells may provide clues to the nature of the mechanisms that sort GPI-anchored proteins in epithelial cells. PMID:7684737

  3. An anchor-dependent molecular docking process for docking small flexible molecules into rigid protein receptors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Thy-Hou; Lin, Guan-Liang

    2008-08-01

    A molecular docking method designated as ADDock, anchor-dependent molecular docking process for docking small flexible molecules into rigid protein receptors, is presented in this article. ADDock makes the bond connection lists for atoms based on anchors chosen for building molecular structures for docking small flexible molecules or ligands into rigid active sites of protein receptors. ADDock employs an extended version of piecewise linear potential for scoring the docked structures. Since no translational motion for small molecules is implemented during the docking process, ADDock searches the best docking result by systematically changing the anchors chosen, which are usually the single-edge connected nodes or terminal hydrogen atoms of ligands. ADDock takes intact ligand structures generated during the docking process for computing the docked scores; therefore, no energy minimization is required in the evaluation phase of docking. The docking accuracy by ADDock for 92 receptor-ligand complexes docked is 91.3%. All these complexes have been docked by other groups using other docking methods. The receptor-ligand steric interaction energies computed by ADDock for some sets of active and inactive compounds selected and docked into the same receptor active sites are apparently separated. These results show that based on the steric interaction energies computed between the docked structures and receptor active sites, ADDock is able to separate active from inactive compounds for both being docked into the same receptor.

  4. GPI-anchored proteins do not reside in ordered domains in the live cell plasma membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevcsik, Eva; Brameshuber, Mario; Fölser, Martin; Weghuber, Julian; Honigmann, Alf; Schütz, Gerhard J.

    2015-04-01

    The organization of proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane has been the subject of a long-lasting debate. Membrane rafts of higher lipid chain order were proposed to mediate protein interactions, but have thus far not been directly observed. Here we use protein micropatterning combined with single-molecule tracking to put current models to the test: we rearranged lipid-anchored raft proteins (glycosylphosphatidylinositol(GPI)-anchored-mGFP) directly in the live cell plasma membrane and measured the effect on the local membrane environment. Intriguingly, this treatment does neither nucleate the formation of an ordered membrane phase nor result in any enrichment of nanoscopic-ordered domains within the micropatterned regions. In contrast, we find that immobilized mGFP-GPIs behave as inert obstacles to the diffusion of other membrane constituents without influencing their membrane environment over distances beyond their physical size. Our results indicate that phase partitioning is not a fundamental element of protein organization in the plasma membrane.

  5. Multiple selection filters ensure accurate tail-anchored membrane protein targeting

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Meera; Okreglak, Voytek; Chio, Un Seng; Cho, Hyunju; Walter, Peter; Shan, Shu-ou

    2016-01-01

    Accurate protein localization is crucial to generate and maintain organization in all cells. Achieving accuracy is challenging, as the molecular signals that dictate a protein’s cellular destination are often promiscuous. A salient example is the targeting of an essential class of tail-anchored (TA) proteins, whose sole defining feature is a transmembrane domain near their C-terminus. Here we show that the Guided Entry of Tail-anchored protein (GET) pathway selects TA proteins destined to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) utilizing distinct molecular steps, including differential binding by the co-chaperone Sgt2 and kinetic proofreading after ATP hydrolysis by the targeting factor Get3. Further, the different steps select for distinct physicochemical features of the TA substrate. The use of multiple selection filters may be general to protein biogenesis pathways that must distinguish correct and incorrect substrates based on minor differences. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21301.001 PMID:27925580

  6. Solution structure of a membrane-anchored ubiquitin-fold (MUB) protein from Homo sapiens.

    PubMed

    de la Cruz, Norberto B; Peterson, Francis C; Lytle, Betsy L; Volkman, Brian F

    2007-07-01

    The protein Bc059385, whose solution structure is reported here, is the human representative of a recently identified family of membrane-anchored ubiquitin-fold (MUB) proteins. Analysis of their similarity to ubiquitin indicates that homologous amino acid residues in MUBs form a hydrophobic surface very similar to the recognition patch surrounding Ile-44 in ubiquitin. This suggests that MUBs may interact with proteins containing an alpha-helical motif similar to those of some ubiquitin binding domains. A disordered loop common to MUBs may also provide a second protein interaction site. From the available data, it is probable that this protein is prenylated and associated with the membrane. With <20% identity to ubiquitin, the MUB family further expands the sequence space that maps to the beta-grasp fold, and adds membrane localization to its list of functional roles.

  7. Loss of Dfg5 glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane protein confers enhanced heat tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nasution, Olviyani; Lee, Jaok; Srinivasa, Kavitha; Choi, In-Geol; Lee, Young Mi; Kim, Eunjung; Choi, Wonja; Kim, Wankee

    2015-08-01

    The protein product of Saccharomyces cerevisiae DFG5 gene is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored plasma membrane protein and a putative glycosidase/glycosyltransferase that links other GPI-anchored proteins to β-glucans in the cell wall. Upon exposure to heat (41°C), DFG5 deletion mutant dfg5Δ displayed significantly enhanced heat tolerance as well as lowered level of reactive oxygen species and decreased membrane permeability compared with those in the control (BY4741). Comparative transcriptome profiles of BY4741 and dfg5Δ revealed that 38 and 23 genes were up- and down-regulated in dfg5Δ respectively. Of the 23 down-regulated genes, 11 of 13 viable deletion mutants were identified to be tolerant to heat, suggesting that the down-regulation of those genes might have contributed to the enhanced heat tolerance in dfg5Δ. Deletion of DFG5 caused slight activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases Hog1 in the high-osmolarity glycerol pathway and Slt2 in the cell wall integrity pathway. Therefore, a model is proposed on the signal transduction pathways associated with deletion of DFG5 upon heat stress.

  8. Transcript Expression Analysis of Putative Trypanosoma brucei GPI-Anchored Surface Proteins during Development in the Tsetse and Mammalian Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Amy F.; Cerqueira, Gustavo C.; Regmi, Sandesh; Wu, Yineng; El Sayed, Najib M.; Aksoy, Serap

    2012-01-01

    Human African Trypanosomiasis is a devastating disease caused by the parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Trypanosomes live extracellularly in both the tsetse fly and the mammal. Trypanosome surface proteins can directly interact with the host environment, allowing parasites to effectively establish and maintain infections. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchoring is a common posttranslational modification associated with eukaryotic surface proteins. In T. brucei, three GPI-anchored major surface proteins have been identified: variant surface glycoproteins (VSGs), procyclic acidic repetitive protein (PARP or procyclins), and brucei alanine rich proteins (BARP). The objective of this study was to select genes encoding predicted GPI-anchored proteins with unknown function(s) from the T. brucei genome and characterize the expression profile of a subset during cyclical development in the tsetse and mammalian hosts. An initial in silico screen of putative T. brucei proteins by Big PI algorithm identified 163 predicted GPI-anchored proteins, 106 of which had no known functions. Application of a second GPI-anchor prediction algorithm (FragAnchor), signal peptide and trans-membrane domain prediction software resulted in the identification of 25 putative hypothetical proteins. Eighty-one gene products with hypothetical functions were analyzed for stage-regulated expression using semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The expression of most of these genes were found to be upregulated in trypanosomes infecting tsetse salivary gland and proventriculus tissues, and 38% were specifically expressed only by parasites infecting salivary gland tissues. Transcripts for all of the genes specifically expressed in salivary glands were also detected in mammalian infective metacyclic trypomastigotes, suggesting a possible role for these putative proteins in invasion and/or establishment processes in the mammalian host. These results represent the first large-scale report of the differential expression of

  9. Tetraspan cargo adaptors usher GPI-anchored proteins into multivesicular bodies

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Chris; Stamnes, Mark A; Katzmann, David J; Piper, Robert C

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitinated membrane proteins are sorted into intralumenal endosomal vesicles on their way for degradation in lysosomes. Here we summarize the discovery of the Cos proteins, which work to organize and segregate ubiquitinated cargo prior to its incorporation into intralumenal vesicles of the multivesicular body (MVB). Importantly, cargoes such as GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) that cannot undergo ubiquitination, rely entirely on Cos proteins for sorting into intralumenal vesicles using the same pathway that depends on ESCRTs and ubiquitin ligases that typical polytopic membrane proteins do. Here we show Cos proteins provide functions as not only adaptor proteins for ubiquitin ligases, but also as cargo carriers that can physically usher a variety of other proteins into the MVB pathway. We then discuss the significance of this new sorting model and the broader implications for this cargo adaptor mechanism, whereby yeast Cos proteins, and their likely animal analogs, provide a ubiquitin sorting signal in trans to enable sorting of a membrane protein network into intralumenal vesicles. PMID:26505929

  10. Hypomorphic Mutations in PGAP2, Encoding a GPI-Anchor-Remodeling Protein, Cause Autosomal-Recessive Intellectual Disability

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Lars; Tawamie, Hasan; Murakami, Yoshiko; Mang, Yuan; ur Rehman, Shoaib; Buchert, Rebecca; Schaffer, Stefanie; Muhammad, Safia; Bak, Mads; Nöthen, Markus M.; Bennett, Eric P.; Maeda, Yusuke; Aigner, Michael; Reis, André; Kinoshita, Taroh; Tommerup, Niels; Baig, Shahid Mahmood; Abou Jamra, Rami

    2013-01-01

    PGAP2 encodes a protein involved in remodeling the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor in the Golgi apparatus. After synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), GPI anchors are transferred to the proteins and are remodeled while transported through the Golgi to the cell membrane. Germline mutations in six genes (PIGA, PIGL, PIGM, PIGV, PIGN, and PIGO) in the ER-located part of the GPI-anchor-biosynthesis pathway have been reported, and all are associated with phenotypes extending from malformation and lethality to severe intellectual disability, epilepsy, minor dysmorphisms, and elevated alkaline phosphatase (ALP). We performed autozygosity mapping and ultra-deep sequencing followed by stringent filtering and identified two homozygous PGAP2 alterations, p.Tyr99Cys and p.Arg177Pro, in seven offspring with nonspecific autosomal-recessive intellectual disability from two consanguineous families. Rescue experiments with the altered proteins in PGAP2-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cell lines showed less expression of cell-surface GPI-anchored proteins DAF and CD59 than of the wild-type protein, substantiating the pathogenicity of the identified alterations. Furthermore, we observed a full rescue when we used strong promoters before the mutant cDNAs, suggesting a hypomorphic effect of the mutations. We report on alterations in the Golgi-located part of the GPI-anchor-biosynthesis pathway and extend the phenotypic spectrum of the GPI-anchor deficiencies to isolated intellectual disability with elevated ALP. GPI-anchor deficiencies can be interpreted within the concept of a disease family, and we propose that the severity of the phenotype is dependent on the location of the altered protein in the biosynthesis chain. PMID:23561846

  11. Anchoring of LPXTG-Like Proteins to the Gram-Positive Cell Wall Envelope.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Sara D; Reardon, Melissa E; Ton-That, Hung

    2016-04-21

    In Gram-positive bacteria, protein precursors with a signal peptide and a cell wall sorting signal (CWSS)-which begins with an LPXTG motif, followed by a hydrophobic domain and a tail of positively charged residues-are targeted to the cell envelope by a transpeptidase enzyme call sortase. Evolution and selective pressure gave rise to six classes of sortase, i.e., SrtA-F. Only class C sortases are capable of polymerizing substrates harboring the pilin motif and CWSS into protein polymers known as pili or fimbriae, whereas the others perform cell wall anchoring functions. Regardless of the products generated from these sortases, the basic principle of sortase-catalyzed transpeptidation is the same. It begins with the cleavage of the LPXTG motif, followed by the cross-linking of this cleaved product at the threonine residue to a nucleophile, i.e., an active amino group of the peptidoglycan stem peptide or the lysine residue of the pilin motif. This chapter will summarize the efforts to identify and characterize sortases and their associated pathways with emphasis on the cell wall anchoring function.

  12. In search of tail-anchored protein machinery in plants: reevaluating the role of arsenite transporters

    PubMed Central

    Maestre-Reyna, Manuel; Wu, Shu-Mei; Chang, Yu-Ching; Chen, Chi-Chih; Maestre-Reyna, Alvaro; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Chang, Hsin-Yang

    2017-01-01

    Although the mechanisms underlying selective targeting of tail-anchored (TA) membrane proteins are well established in mammalian and yeast cells, little is known about their role in mediating intracellular membrane trafficking in plant cells. However, a recent study suggested that, in green algae, arsenite transporters located in the cytosol (ArsA1 and ArsA2) control the insertion of TA proteins into the membrane-bound organelles. In the present work, we overproduced and purified these hydrophilic proteins to near homogeneity. The analysis of their catalytic properties clearly demonstrates that C. reinhardtii ArsA proteins exhibit oxyanion-independent ATPase activity, as neither arsenite nor antimonite showed strong effects. Co-expression of ArsA proteins with TA-transmembrane regions showed not only that the former interact with the latter, but that ArsA1 does not share the same ligand specificity as ArsA2. Together with a structural model and molecular dynamics simulations, we propose that C. reinhadtii ArsA proteins are not arsenite transporters, but a TA-protein targeting factor. Further, we propose that ArsA targeting specificity is achieved at the ligand level, with ArsA1 mainly carrying TA-proteins to the chloroplast, while ArsA2 to the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:28382961

  13. A cytoplasmically anchored nuclear protein interferes specifically with the import of nuclear proteins but not U1 snRNA

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    A cytoplasmically anchored mutant SV40 T antigen, FS T antigen, was shown previously to interfere specifically with the nuclear import of a heterologous nuclear protein, adenovirus 5 fiber protein, in cultured monkey cells (Schneider, J., C. Schindewolf, K. van Zee, and E. Fanning. 1988. Cell. 54:117-125; van Zee, K., F. Appel, and E. Fanning. 1991. Mol. Cell. Biol. 11:5137-5146). In this report, we demonstrate that FS T antigen also interferes with the nuclear import of adenovirus E1A and a peptide-albumin conjugate bearing multiple copies of the T antigen nuclear localization signal, but not with the import of U1 snRNA. A kinetic analysis indicates that nuclear import of the albumin- peptide conjugate is inhibited only when high intracellular concentrations of FS T antigen are reached. After microinjection into the cytoplasm of cultured cells, purified FS T antigen protein does not accumulate at the nuclear periphery, but rather is distributed in a punctate pattern throughout the cytoplasm. These data support a model in which cytoplasmic anchoring of FS T antigen enables the mutant protein to sequester and titrate out a cellular factor which is required for nuclear protein but not U1 snRNA import. PMID:8468344

  14. Membrane Anchors of the Structural Flavivirus Proteins and Their Role in Virus Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Blazevic, Janja; Rouha, Harald; Bradt, Victoria; Heinz, Franz X.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The structural proteins of flaviviruses carry a unique set of transmembrane domains (TMDs) at their C termini that are derived from the mode of viral polyprotein processing. They function as internal signal and stop-transfer sequences during protein translation, but possible additional roles in protein interactions required during assembly and maturation of viral particles are ill defined. To shed light on the role of TMDs in these processes, we engineered a set of tick-borne encephalitis virus mutants in which these structural elements were replaced in different combinations by the homologous sequences of a distantly related flavivirus (Japanese encephalitis virus). The effects of these modifications were analyzed with respect to protein synthesis, viral particle secretion, specific infectivity, and acidic-pH-induced maturation processes. We provide evidence that interactions involving the double-membrane anchor of the envelope protein E (a unique feature compared to other viral fusion proteins) contribute substantially to particle assembly, stability, and maturation. Disturbances of the inter- and intra-TMD interactions of E resulted in the secretion of a larger proportion of capsidless subviral particles at the expense of whole virions, suggesting a possible role in the still incompletely understood mechanism of capsid integration during virus budding. In contrast, the TMD initially anchoring the C protein to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane does not appear to take part in envelope protein interactions. We also show that E TMDs are involved in the envelope protein rearrangements that are triggered by acidic pH in the trans-Golgi network and represent a hallmark of virus maturation. IMPORTANCE The assembly of flaviviruses occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum and leads to the formation of immature, noninfectious particles composed of an RNA-containing capsid surrounded by a lipid membrane, with the two integrated envelope proteins, prM and E, arranged in

  15. The role of Listeria monocytogenes cell wall surface anchor protein LapB in virulence, adherence, and intracellular replication

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lmof2365_2117 is a Listeria monocytogenes putative cell wall surface anchor protein with a conserved domain found in collagen binding proteins. We constructed a deletion mutation in lmof2365_2117 in serotype 4b strain F2365, evaluated its virulence, and determined its ability to adhere and invade co...

  16. New insights into the targeting of a sub-set of tail-anchored proteins to the outer mitochondrial membrane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tail-anchored (TA) proteins are a unique class of functionally diverse membrane proteins that are defined by their single C-terminal membrane-spanning domain and their ability to insert post-translationally into specific organelles with an Nout-Cin orientation. The molecular mechanisms by which TA p...

  17. Mammalian carboxylesterase (CES) releases GPI-anchored proteins from the cell surface upon lipid raft fluidization.

    PubMed

    Orihashi, Kaoru; Tojo, Hiromasa; Okawa, Katsuya; Tashima, Yuko; Morita, Takashi; Kondoh, Gen

    2012-03-01

    Mammalian carboxylesterase (CES) is well known as a biotransformation enzyme for prodrugs and xenobiotics. Here, we purified CES as a GPI-anchored protein (GPI-AP)-releasing factor (GPIase) that releases such protein from the cell surface. All five isoforms of CES showed this activity to various degrees. When the serine residue of the catalytic triad for esterase was replaced by alanine, esterase activity was completely disrupted, while full GPIase activity remained, suggesting that these two activities are exhibited via different mechanisms. CES6, a new class of mammalian CES, exhibited the highest GPIase activity and released specific GPI-APs from the cell surface after lipid raft fluidization. The released product contained a GPI component, indicating that GPI-AP was released by cleavage in GPI. These results revealed for the first time that CES recognizes and catalyzes macromolecule GPI-AP as well as small molecules.

  18. Decay-accelerating factor (CD55), a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored complement regulatory protein, is a receptor for several echoviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Bergelson, J M; Chan, M; Solomon, K R; St John, N F; Lin, H; Finberg, R W

    1994-01-01

    Echoviruses are human pathogens belonging to the picornavirus family. Decay-accelerating factor (DAF) is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored surface protein that protects cells from lysis by autologous complement. Anti-DAF monoclonal antibodies prevented echovirus 7 attachment to susceptible cells and protected cells from infection. HeLa cells specifically lost the capacity to bind echovirus 7 when treated with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C, an enzyme that releases GPI-anchored proteins from the cell surface, indicating that the virus receptor, like DAF, is a GPI-anchored protein. Although Chinese hamster ovary cells do not bind echovirus 7, transfectants expressing human DAF bound virus efficiently, and binding was prevented by pretreatment with an anti-DAF monoclonal antibody. Anti-DAF antibodies prevented infection by at least six echovirus serotypes. These results indicate that DAF is the receptor mediating attachment and infection by several echoviruses. Images PMID:7517044

  19. Cold acclimation is accompanied by complex responses of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Daisuke; Kawamura, Yukio; Uemura, Matsuo

    2016-01-01

    Cold acclimation results in changes of the plasma membrane (PM) composition. The PM is considered to contain specific lipid/protein-enriched microdomains which can be extracted as detergent-resistant plasma membrane (DRM). Previous studies in animal cells have demonstrated that glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) can be targeted to microdomains and/or the apoplast. However, the functional significance of GPI-APs during cold acclimation in plants is not yet fully understood. In this study, we aimed to investigate the responsiveness of GPI-APs to cold acclimation treatment in Arabidopsis. We isolated the PM, DRM, and apoplast fractions separately and, in addition, GPI-AP-enriched fractions were prepared from the PM preparation. Label-free quantitative shotgun proteomics identified a number of GPI-APs (163 proteins). Among them, some GPI-APs such as fasciclin-like arabinogalactan proteins and glycerophosphoryldiester phosphodiesterase-like proteins predominantly increased in PM- and GPI-AP-enriched fractions while the changes of GPI-APs in the DRM and apoplast fractions during cold acclimation were considerably different from those of other fractions. These proteins are thought to be associated with cell wall structure and properties. Therefore, this study demonstrated that each GPI-AP responded to cold acclimation in a different manner, suggesting that these changes during cold acclimation are involved in rearrangement of the extracellular matrix including the cell wall towards acquisition of freezing tolerance. PMID:27471282

  20. New Method for Measuring the Anchoring Energy of Strongly-Bound Membrane-Associated Proteins [Method for measuring the anchoring energy of strongly-bound membrane-associated proteins].

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, Michael S.; La Bauve, Elisa; Vernon, Briana C.; Ye, Dongmei; Rogers, David M.; Siegrist, Cathryn M.; Carson, Bryan; Rempe, Susan L.; Zheng, Aihua; Kielian, Margaret; Schreve, Andrew P.

    2016-02-01

    Here, we describe a new method to measure the activation energy required to remove a strongly-bound membrane-associated protein from a lipid membrane (anchoring energy). It is based on measuring the rate of release of a liposome-bound protein during centrifugation on a sucrose gradient as a function of time and temperature. The method was used to determine anchoring energy for the soluble dengue virus envelope protein (sE) strongly bound to 80:20 POPC:POPG liposomes at pH 5.5. We also measured the binding energy of sE at the same pH for the initial, predominantly reversible, phase of binding to a 70:30 PC:PG lipid bilayer. The anchoring energy (37 +/- 1.7 kcal/mol, 20% PG) was found to be much larger than the binding energy (7.8 +/- 0.3 kcal/mol for 30% PG, or est. 7.0 kcal/mol for 20% PG). This is consistent with data showing that free sE is a monomer at pH 5.5, but assembles into trimers after associating with membranes. But, trimerization alone is insufficient to account for the observed difference in energies, and we conclude that some energy dissipation occurs during the release process. This new method to determine anchoring energy should be useful to understand the complex interactions of integral monotopic proteins and strongly-bound peripheral membrane proteins with lipid membranes.

  1. A unifying mechanism accounts for sensing of membrane curvature by BAR domains, amphipathic helices and membrane-anchored proteins.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Vikram Kjøller; Hatzakis, Nikos S; Stamou, Dimitrios

    2010-06-01

    The discovery of proteins that recognize membrane curvature created a paradigm shift by suggesting that membrane shape may act as a cue for protein localization that is independent of lipid or protein composition. Here we review recent data on membrane curvature sensing by three structurally unrelated motifs: BAR domains, amphipathic helices and membrane-anchored proteins. We discuss the conclusion that the curvature of the BAR dimer is not responsible for sensing and that the sensing properties of all three motifs can be rationalized by the physicochemical properties of the curved membrane itself. We thus anticipate that membrane curvature will promote the redistribution of proteins that are anchored in membranes through any type of hydrophobic moiety, a thesis that broadens tremendously the implications of membrane curvature for protein sorting, trafficking and signaling in cell biology.

  2. Mice lacking WRB reveal differential biogenesis requirements of tail-anchored proteins in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Monroy, Jhon; Musiol, Lena; Unthan-Fechner, Kirsten; Farkas, Ákos; Clancy, Anne; Coy-Vergara, Javier; Weill, Uri; Gockel, Sarah; Lin, Shuh-Yow; Corey, David P.; Kohl, Tobias; Ströbel, Philipp; Schuldiner, Maya; Schwappach, Blanche; Vilardi, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Tail-anchored (TA) proteins are post-translationally inserted into membranes. The TRC40 pathway targets TA proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum via a receptor comprised of WRB and CAML. TRC40 pathway clients have been identified using in vitro assays, however, the relevance of the TRC40 pathway in vivo remains unknown. We followed the fate of TA proteins in two tissue-specific WRB knockout mouse models and found that their dependence on the TRC40 pathway in vitro did not predict their reaction to receptor depletion in vivo. The SNARE syntaxin 5 (Stx5) was extremely sensitive to disruption of the TRC40 pathway. Screening yeast TA proteins with mammalian homologues, we show that the particular sensitivity of Stx5 is conserved, possibly due to aggregation propensity of its cytoplasmic domain. We establish that Stx5 is an autophagy target that is inefficiently membrane-targeted by alternative pathways. Our results highlight an intimate relationship between the TRC40 pathway and cellular proteostasis. PMID:28000760

  3. Development of a new yeast surface display system based on Spi1 as an anchor protein.

    PubMed

    Andreu, Cecilia; Del Olmo, Marcel Lí

    2017-01-01

    Yeast surface display is a powerful tool widely used for many biotechnological and biomedical applications. It consists in exposing peptides and proteins of interest on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and other yeasts. These molecules are fused to the amino or carboxy terminus of an appropriate cell wall protein, usually bound by glycosylphosphatidylinositol. Several systems for this purpose have been reported to date. In this work, we describe a new yeast surface display strategy based on cell wall protein Spi1 as an anchor, which is expressed in centromeric and episomal plasmids under the control of its own promoter or that corresponding to the PGK1 glycolytic gene. Exposure efficiency was demonstrated by western blot, flow cytometry analyses, and fluorescence microscopy by taking advantage of including the V5 epitope. We also demonstrated the ability of this new strategy for the exposure of several peptides and proteins of different sizes. The regulation of the SPI1 promoter by the stationary phase and other stress conditions reveals interesting potential applications of systems based on it for industrial and biotechnological processes.

  4. Clumping factor A, von Willebrand factor-binding protein and von Willebrand factor anchor Staphylococcus aureus to the vessel wall.

    PubMed

    Claes, J; Liesenborghs, L; Peetermans, M; Veloso, T R; Missiakas, D; Schneewind, O; Mancini, S; Entenza, J M; Hoylaerts, M F; Heying, R; Verhamme, P; Vanassche, T

    2017-02-09

    Essentials Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) binds to endothelium via von Willebrand factor (VWF). Secreted VWF-binding protein (vWbp) mediates S. aureus adhesion to VWF under shear stress. vWbp interacts with VWF and the Sortase A-dependent surface protein Clumping factor A (ClfA). VWF-vWbp-ClfA anchor S. aureus to vascular endothelium under shear stress.

  5. A mitochondria-anchored isoform of the actin-nucleating spire protein regulates mitochondrial division

    PubMed Central

    Manor, Uri; Bartholomew, Sadie; Golani, Gonen; Christenson, Eric; Kozlov, Michael; Higgs, Henry; Spudich, James; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial division, essential for survival in mammals, is enhanced by an inter-organellar process involving ER tubules encircling and constricting mitochondria. The force for constriction is thought to involve actin polymerization by the ER-anchored isoform of the formin protein inverted formin 2 (INF2). Unknown is the mechanism triggering INF2-mediated actin polymerization at ER-mitochondria intersections. We show that a novel isoform of the formin-binding, actin-nucleating protein Spire, Spire1C, localizes to mitochondria and directly links mitochondria to the actin cytoskeleton and the ER. Spire1C binds INF2 and promotes actin assembly on mitochondrial surfaces. Disrupting either Spire1C actin- or formin-binding activities reduces mitochondrial constriction and division. We propose Spire1C cooperates with INF2 to regulate actin assembly at ER-mitochondrial contacts. Simulations support this model's feasibility and demonstrate polymerizing actin filaments can induce mitochondrial constriction. Thus, Spire1C is optimally positioned to serve as a molecular hub that links mitochondria to actin and the ER for regulation of mitochondrial division. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08828.001 PMID:26305500

  6. A mitochondria-anchored isoform of the actin-nucleating spire protein regulates mitochondrial division.

    PubMed

    Manor, Uri; Bartholomew, Sadie; Golani, Gonen; Christenson, Eric; Kozlov, Michael; Higgs, Henry; Spudich, James; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2015-08-25

    Mitochondrial division, essential for survival in mammals, is enhanced by an inter-organellar process involving ER tubules encircling and constricting mitochondria. The force for constriction is thought to involve actin polymerization by the ER-anchored isoform of the formin protein inverted formin 2 (INF2). Unknown is the mechanism triggering INF2-mediated actin polymerization at ER-mitochondria intersections. We show that a novel isoform of the formin-binding, actin-nucleating protein Spire, Spire1C, localizes to mitochondria and directly links mitochondria to the actin cytoskeleton and the ER. Spire1C binds INF2 and promotes actin assembly on mitochondrial surfaces. Disrupting either Spire1C actin- or formin-binding activities reduces mitochondrial constriction and division. We propose Spire1C cooperates with INF2 to regulate actin assembly at ER-mitochondrial contacts. Simulations support this model's feasibility and demonstrate polymerizing actin filaments can induce mitochondrial constriction. Thus, Spire1C is optimally positioned to serve as a molecular hub that links mitochondria to actin and the ER for regulation of mitochondrial division.

  7. Characterization of the GPI-anchored lipid transfer proteins in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Edstam, Monika M; Laurila, Maiju; Höglund, Andrey; Raman, Amitha; Dahlström, Käthe M; Salminen, Tiina A; Edqvist, Johan; Blomqvist, Kristina

    2014-02-01

    The non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) are characterized by a compact structure with a central hydrophobic cavity very suitable for binding hydrophobic ligands, such as lipids. The nsLTPs are encoded by large gene families in all land plant lineages, but seem to be absent from green algae. The nsLTPs are classified to different types based on molecular weight, sequence similarity, intron position or spacing between the cysteine residues. The Type G nsLTPs (LTPGs) have a GPI-anchor in the C-terminal region which may attach the protein to the exterior side of the plasma membrane. Here, we present the first characterization of nsLTPs from an early diverged plant, the moss Physcomitrella patens. Moss LTPGs were heterologously produced and purified from Pichia pastoris. The purified moss LTPGs were found to be extremely heat stable and showed a binding preference for unsaturated fatty acids. Structural modeling implied that high alanine content could be important for the heat stability. Lipid profiling revealed that cutin monomers, such as C16 and C18 mono- and di-hydroxylated fatty acids, could be identified in P. patens. Expression of a moss LTPG-YFP fusion revealed localization to the plasma membrane. The expressions of many of the moss LTPGs were found to be upregulated during drought and cold treatments.

  8. Site-specific and reversible anchoring of active proteins onto cellulose using a cellulosome-like complex.

    PubMed

    Eklund, Malin; Sandström, Kristofer; Teeri, Tuula T; Nygren, Per-Ake

    2004-04-29

    Protein engineering strategies facilitating controlled and spontaneous assembly of macromolecular complexes are of great interest for the design of artificial multi-enzyme systems of pre-defined composition. Here we have combined affinity proteins from different sources to achieve specific and reversible anchoring of affinity domain-tagged reporter proteins to a cellulose-anchored fusion protein. The design principle mimics the architecture of macromolecular cellulosome complexes produced by some cellulolytic microbes. A fusion protein between a cellulose-binding module (CBM1Cel6A) of the Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase Cel6A and a five-domain staphylococcal protein A (SPA) was constructed to serve as platform for docking of easily detectable reporter proteins onto cellulose surfaces. In turn, the reporter proteins were produced as fusions to two copies of a SPA-binding affinity protein (an affibody denoted Z(SPA-1)), selected from a phage display library constructed by combinatorial protein engineering. In a series of experiments, involving repeated washing and low pH elution, affinity-tagged Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (EGFP) and Fusarium solani pisi lipase cutinase reporter proteins were both found to be specifically directed from solution to the same region of a cellulose filter paper where SPA-CBM1Cel6A fusion protein had been previously applied. This showed that the SPA-CBM1Cel6A fusion protein had been stably anchored to the cellulose surface without loss of binding capacity and that the interaction between SPA and the Z(SPA-1) affibody domains was selective. The generality of this biospecificity-driven system for assembly applications is discussed.

  9. The GET System Inserts the Tail-Anchored Protein, SYP72, into Endoplasmic Reticulum Membranes1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zalisko, Benjamin E.; Keenan, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome encodes homologs of the Guided Entry of Tail (GET)-anchored protein system for the posttranslational insertion of tail-anchored (TA) proteins into endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes. In yeast, TA proteins are loaded onto the cytosolic targeting factor Get3 and are then delivered to the membrane-associated Get1/2 complex for insertion into ER membranes. The role of the GET system in Arabidopsis was investigated by monitoring the membrane insertion of a tail-anchored protein, SYP72, a syntaxin. SYP72 bound to yeast Get3 in vitro, forming a Get3-SYP72 fusion complex that could be inserted into yeast GET1/2-containing proteoliposomes. The Arabidopsis GET system functioned in vivo to insert TA proteins into ER membranes as demonstrated by the fact that the YFP-tagged SYP72 localized to the ER in wild-type plants but accumulated as cytoplasmic inclusions in get1, get3, or get4 mutants. The GET mutants get1 and get3 were less tolerant of ER stress agents and showed symptoms of ER stress even under unstressed conditions. Hence, the GET system is responsible for the insertion of TA proteins into the ER in Arabidopsis, and mutants with GET dysfunctions are more susceptible to ER stress. PMID:27923985

  10. Significance of Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored Protein Enrichment in Lipid Rafts for the Control of Autoimmunity*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yetao; Murakami, Yoshiko; Yasui, Teruhito; Wakana, Shigeharu; Kikutani, Hitoshi; Kinoshita, Taroh; Maeda, Yusuke

    2013-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositols (GPI) are complex glycolipids that are covalently linked to the C terminus of proteins as a post-translational modification and tether proteins to the plasma membrane. One of the most striking features of GPI-anchored proteins (APs) is their enrichment in lipid rafts. The biosynthesis of GPI and its attachment to proteins occur in the endoplasmic reticulum. In the Golgi, GPI-APs are subjected to fatty acid remodeling, which replaces an unsaturated fatty acid at the sn-2 position of the phosphatidylinositol moiety with a saturated fatty acid. We previously reported that fatty acid remodeling is critical for the enrichment of GPI-APs in lipid rafts. To investigate the biological significance of GPI-AP enrichment in lipid rafts, we generated a PGAP3 knock-out mouse (PGAP3−/−) in which fatty acid remodeling of GPI-APs does not occur. We report here that a significant number of aged PGAP3−/− mice developed autoimmune-like symptoms, such as increased anti-DNA antibodies, spontaneous germinal center formation, and enlarged renal glomeruli with deposition of immune complexes and matrix expansion. A possible cause for this was the impaired engulfment of apoptotic cells by resident peritoneal macrophages in PGAP3−/− mice. Mice with conditional targeting of PGAP3 in either B or T cells did not develop such autoimmune-like symptoms. In addition, PGAP3−/− mice exhibited the tendency of Th2 polarization. These data demonstrate that PGAP3-dependent fatty acid remodeling of GPI-APs has a significant role in the control of autoimmunity, possibly by the regulation of apoptotic cell clearance and Th1/Th2 balance. PMID:23864655

  11. Bypassing the need for subcellular localization of a polysaccharide export-anchor complex by overexpressing its protein subunits

    PubMed Central

    Javens, June; Wan, Zhe; Hardy, Gail G.; Brun, Yves V.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Subcellular protein localization is thought to promote protein-protein interaction by increasing the effective concentration and enabling spatial coordination and proper segregation of proteins. We found that protein overexpression allowed the assembly of a productive polysaccharide biosynthesis-export-anchoring complex in the absence of polar localization in Caulobacter crescentus. Polar localization of the holdfast export protein, HfsD, depends on the presence of the other export proteins, HfsA, and HfsB, and on the polar scaffold protein PodJ. The holdfast deficiency of hfsB and podJ mutants is suppressed by the overexpression of export proteins. Restored holdfasts are randomly positioned and co-localize with a holdfast anchor protein in these strains, indicating that functional complexes can form at non-polar sites. Therefore, overexpression of export proteins surpasses a concentration threshold necessary for holdfast synthesis. Restoration of holdfast synthesis at non-polar sites reduces surface adhesion, consistent with the need to spatially coordinate the holdfast synthesis machinery with the flagellum and pili. These strains lack the cell-specific segregation of the holdfast, resulting in the presence of holdfasts in motile daughter cells. Our results highlight the fact that multiple facets of subcellular localization can be coupled to improve the phenotypic outcome of a protein assembly. PMID:23714375

  12. Functional convergence of signalling by GPI-anchored and anchorless forms of a salamander protein implicated in limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Blassberg, Robert A; Garza-Garcia, Acely; Janmohamed, Azara; Gates, Phillip B; Brockes, Jeremy P

    2011-01-01

    The GPI-anchor is an established determinant of molecular localisation and various functional roles have been attributed to it. The newt GPI-anchored three-finger protein (TFP) Prod1 is an important regulator of cell behaviour during limb regeneration, but it is unclear how it signals to the interior of the cell. Prod1 was expressed by transfection in cultured newt limb cells and activated transcription and expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) by a pathway involving ligand-independent activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling and phosphorylation of extracellular regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2). This was dependent on the presence of the GPI-anchor and critical residues in the α-helical region of the protein. Interestingly, Prod1 in the axolotl, a salamander species that also regenerates its limbs, was shown to activate ERK1/2 signalling and MMP9 transcription despite being anchorless, and both newt and axolotl Prod1 co-immunoprecipitated with the newt EGFR after transfection. The substitution of the axolotl helical region activated a secreted, anchorless version of the newt molecule. The activity of the newt molecule cannot therefore depend on a unique property conferred by the anchor. Prod1 is a salamander-specific TFP and its interaction with the phylogenetically conserved EGFR has implications for our view of regeneration as an evolutionary variable.

  13. New Method for Measuring the Anchoring Energy of Strongly-Bound Membrane-Associated Proteins [Method for measuring the anchoring energy of strongly-bound membrane-associated proteins].

    DOE PAGES

    Kent, Michael S.; La Bauve, Elisa; Vernon, Briana C.; ...

    2016-02-01

    Here, we describe a new method to measure the activation energy required to remove a strongly-bound membrane-associated protein from a lipid membrane (anchoring energy). It is based on measuring the rate of release of a liposome-bound protein during centrifugation on a sucrose gradient as a function of time and temperature. The method was used to determine anchoring energy for the soluble dengue virus envelope protein (sE) strongly bound to 80:20 POPC:POPG liposomes at pH 5.5. We also measured the binding energy of sE at the same pH for the initial, predominantly reversible, phase of binding to a 70:30 PC:PG lipidmore » bilayer. The anchoring energy (37 +/- 1.7 kcal/mol, 20% PG) was found to be much larger than the binding energy (7.8 +/- 0.3 kcal/mol for 30% PG, or est. 7.0 kcal/mol for 20% PG). This is consistent with data showing that free sE is a monomer at pH 5.5, but assembles into trimers after associating with membranes. But, trimerization alone is insufficient to account for the observed difference in energies, and we conclude that some energy dissipation occurs during the release process. This new method to determine anchoring energy should be useful to understand the complex interactions of integral monotopic proteins and strongly-bound peripheral membrane proteins with lipid membranes.« less

  14. Msp1/ATAD1 maintains mitochondrial function by facilitating the degradation of mislocalized tail-anchored proteins

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Chan; Umanah, George K E; Dephoure, Noah; Andrabi, Shaida A; Gygi, Steven P; Dawson, Ted M; Dawson, Valina L; Rutter, Jared

    2014-01-01

    The majority of ER-targeted tail-anchored (TA) proteins are inserted into membranes by the Guided Entry of Tail-anchored protein (GET) system. Disruption of this system causes a subset of TA proteins to mislocalize to mitochondria. We show that the AAA+ ATPase Msp1 limits the accumulation of mislocalized TA proteins on mitochondria. Deletion of MSP1 causes the Pex15 and Gos1 TA proteins to accumulate on mitochondria when the GET system is impaired. Likely as a result of failing to extract mislocalized TA proteins, yeast with combined mutation of the MSP1 gene and the GET system exhibit strong synergistic growth defects and severe mitochondrial damage, including loss of mitochondrial DNA and protein and aberrant mitochondrial morphology. Like yeast Msp1, human ATAD1 limits the mitochondrial mislocalization of PEX26 and GOS28, orthologs of Pex15 and Gos1, respectively. GOS28 protein level is also increased in ATAD1−/− mouse tissues. Therefore, we propose that yeast Msp1 and mammalian ATAD1 are conserved members of the mitochondrial protein quality control system that might promote the extraction and degradation of mislocalized TA proteins to maintain mitochondrial integrity. PMID:24843043

  15. Mechanism of Assembly of a Substrate Transfer Complex during Tail-anchored Protein Targeting*

    PubMed Central

    Gristick, Harry B.; Rome, Michael E.; Chartron, Justin W.; Rao, Meera; Hess, Sonja; Shan, Shu-ou; Clemons, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Tail-anchored (TA) proteins, defined as having a single transmembrane helix at their C terminus, are post-translationally targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane by the guided entry of TA proteins (GET) pathway. In yeast, the handover of TA substrates is mediated by the heterotetrameric Get4/Get5 complex (Get4/5), which tethers the co-chaperone Sgt2 to the targeting factor, the Get3 ATPase. Binding of Get4/5 to Get3 is critical for efficient TA targeting; however, questions remain about the formation of the Get3·Get4/5 complex. Here we report crystal structures of a Get3·Get4/5 complex from Saccharomyces cerevisiae at 2.8 and 6.0 Å that reveal a novel interface between Get3 and Get4 dominated by electrostatic interactions. Kinetic and mutational analyses strongly suggest that these structures represent an on-pathway intermediate that rapidly assembles and then rearranges to the final Get3·Get4/5 complex. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the Get3·Get4/5 complex is dominated by a single Get4/5 heterotetramer bound to one monomer of a Get3 dimer, uncovering an intriguing asymmetry in the Get4/5 heterotetramer upon Get3 binding. Ultrafast diffusion-limited electrostatically driven Get3·Get4/5 association enables Get4/5 to rapidly sample and capture Get3 at different stages of the GET pathway. PMID:26451041

  16. SNAP-Tag-Reactive Lipid Anchors Enable Targeted and Spatiotemporally Controlled Localization of Proteins to Phospholipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Rudd, Andrew K; Valls Cuevas, Joan M; Devaraj, Neal K

    2015-04-22

    The natural mechanisms that direct proteins to membranes are typically complex, requiring multiple steps and accessory components. It would be advantageous to develop simplified methods to direct proteins of interest to phospholipid membranes in a single step. Here we report a modular method for membrane localization of proteins by using chemically modified phospholipid anchors capable of covalent attachment to O(6)-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (SNAP-tag) fusion proteins. To our knowledge, this is the first use of SNAP-tag reactions to modify benzylguanine-functionalized lipid membranes. We demonstrate that photocaged lipid precursors enable light-triggered spatial and temporal control over protein localization. The anchoring system is compatible with cell-free expression, allowing for genetic targeting of proteins to lipid membranes of giant unilamellar vesicles. This technique can be used to control membrane curvature effects, similar to what has been previously observed with certain membrane-bound proteins. This work addresses a current need in synthetic biology for simplified and robust methods to control membrane localization of expressed proteins and shows promise as a general tool for protein targeting to lipid vesicles and cellular membranes.

  17. Restrictive glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor synthesis in cwh6/gpi3 yeast cells causes aberrant biogenesis of cell wall proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Vossen, J H; Müller, W H; Lipke, P N; Klis, F M

    1997-01-01

    We previously reported that the defects in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cwh6 Calcofluor white-hypersensitive cell wall mutant are caused by a mutation in SPT14/GPI3, a gene involved in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor biosynthesis. Here we describe the effect of cwh6/spt14/gpi3 on the biogenesis of cell wall proteins. It was found that the release of precursors of cell wall proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) was retarded. This was accompanied by proliferation of ER structures. The majority of the cell wall protein precursors that eventually left the ER were not covalently incorporated into the cell wall but were secreted into the growth medium. Despite the inefficient incorporation of cell wall proteins, there was no net effect on the protein level in the cell wall. It is postulated that the availability of GPI-dependent cell wall proteins determines the rate of cell wall construction and limits growth rate. PMID:9079905

  18. Structural and genetic analyses reveal the protein SepF as a new membrane anchor for the Z ring

    PubMed Central

    Duman, Ramona; Ishikawa, Shu; Celik, Ilkay; Strahl, Henrik; Ogasawara, Naotake; Troc, Paulina; Löwe, Jan; Hamoen, Leendert W.

    2013-01-01

    A key step in bacterial cell division is the polymerization of the tubulin homolog FtsZ at midcell. FtsZ polymers are anchored to the cell membrane by FtsA and are required for the assembly of all other cell division proteins. In Gram-positive and cyanobacteria, FtsZ filaments are aligned by the protein SepF, which in vitro polymerizes into large rings that bundle FtsZ filaments. Here we describe the crystal structure of the only globular domain of SepF, located within the C-terminal region. Two-hybrid data revealed that this domain comprises the FtsZ binding site, and EM analyses showed that it is sufficient for ring formation, which is explained by the filaments in the crystals of SepF. Site-directed mutagenesis, gel filtration, and analytical ultracentrifugation indicated that dimers form the basic units of SepF filaments. High-resolution structured illumination microscopy suggested that SepF is membrane associated, and it turned out that purified SepF not only binds to lipid membranes, but also recruits FtsZ. Further genetic and biochemical analyses showed that an amphipathic helix at the N terminus functions as the membrane-binding domain, making SepF a unique membrane anchor for the FtsZ ring. This clarifies why Bacillus subtilis grows without FtsA or the putative membrane anchor EzrA and why bacteria lacking FtsA contain SepF homologs. Both FtsA and SepF use an amphipathic helix for membrane binding. These helices prefer positively curved membranes due to relaxed lipid density; therefore this type of membrane anchor may assist in keeping the Z ring positioned at the strongly curved leading edge of the developing septum. PMID:24218584

  19. The Cellulosome System of Acetivibrio cellulolyticus Includes a Novel Type of Adaptor Protein and a Cell Surface Anchoring Protein

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qi; Gao, Wenchen; Ding, Shi-You; Kenig, Rina; Shoham, Yuval; Bayer, Edward A.; Lamed, Raphael

    2003-01-01

    A scaffoldin gene cluster was identified in the mesophilic cellulolytic anaerobe Acetivibrio cellulolyticus. The previously described scaffoldin gene, cipV, encodes an N-terminal family 9 glycoside hydrolase, a family 3b cellulose-binding domain, seven cohesin domains, and a C-terminal dockerin. The gene immediately downstream of cipV was sequenced and designated scaB. The protein encoded by this gene has 942 amino acid residues and a calculated molecular weight of 100,358 and includes an N-terminal signal peptide, four type II cohesions, and a C-terminal dockerin. ScaB cohesins 1 and 2 are very closely linked. Similar, but not identical, 39-residue Thr-rich linker segments separate cohesin 2 from cohesin 3 and cohesin 3 from cohesin 4, and an 84-residue Thr-rich linker connects the fourth cohesin to a C-terminal dockerin. The scaC gene downstream of scaB codes for a 1,237-residue polypeptide that includes a signal peptide, three cohesins, and a C-terminal S-layer homology (SLH) module. A long, ca. 550-residue linker separates the third cohesin and the SLH module of ScaC and is characterized by an 18-residue Pro-Thr-Ala-Ser-rich segment that is repeated 27 times. The calculated molecular weight of the mature ScaC polypeptide (excluding the signal peptide) is 124,162. The presence of the cohesins and the conserved SLH module implies that ScaC acts as an anchoring protein. The ScaC cohesins are on a separate branch of the phylogenetic tree that is close to, but distinct from, the type I cohesins. Affinity blotting with representative recombinant probes revealed the following specific intermodular interactions: (i) an expressed CipV cohesin binds selectively to an enzyme-borne dockerin, (ii) a representative ScaB cohesin binds to the CipV band of the cell-free supernatant fraction, and (iii) a ScaC cohesin binds to the ScaB dockerin. The experimental evidence thus indicates that CipV acts as a primary (enzyme-recognizing) scaffoldin, and the protein was also

  20. BH3-only proteins are tail-anchored in the outer mitochondrial membrane and can initiate the activation of Bax.

    PubMed

    Wilfling, F; Weber, A; Potthoff, S; Vögtle, F-N; Meisinger, C; Paschen, S A; Häcker, G

    2012-08-01

    During mitochondrial apoptosis, pro-apoptotic BH3-only proteins cause the translocation of cytosolic Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) to the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) where it is activated to release cytochrome c from the mitochondrial intermembrane space, but the mechanism is under dispute. We show that most BH3-only proteins are mitochondrial proteins that are imported into the OMM via a C-terminal tail-anchor domain in isolated yeast mitochondria, independently of binding to anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins. This C-terminal domain acted as a classical mitochondrial targeting signal and was sufficient to direct green fluorescent protein to mitochondria in human cells. When expressed in mouse fibroblasts, these BH3-only proteins localised to mitochondria and were inserted in the OMM. The BH3-only proteins Bcl-2-interacting mediator of cell death (Bim), tBid and p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis sensitised isolated mitochondria from Bax/Bcl-2 homologous antagonist/killer-deficient fibroblasts to cytochrome c-release by recombinant, extramitochondrial Bax. For Bim, this activity is shown to require the C-terminal-targeting signal and to be independent of binding capacity to and presence of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins. Bim further enhanced Bax-dependent killing in yeast. A model is proposed where OMM-tail-anchored BH3-only proteins permit passive 'recruitment' and catalysis-like activation of extra-mitochondrial Bax. The recognition of C-terminal membrane-insertion of BH3-only proteins will permit the development of a more detailed concept of the initiation of mitochondrial apoptosis.

  1. Anchoring tick salivary anti-complement proteins IRAC I and IRAC II to membrane increases their immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Gillet, Laurent; Schroeder, Hélène; Mast, Jan; Thirion, Muriel; Renauld, Jean-Christophe; Dewals, Benjamin; Vanderplasschen, Alain

    2009-01-01

    Tick salivary proteins are promising targets for the development of anti-tick vaccines. Recently, we described two paralogous anti-complement proteins, called Ixodes ricinus anti-complement (IRAC) proteins I and II, that are co-expressed in tick I. ricinus salivary glands. However, our previous attempts to immunize rabbits against IRAC via infection with recombinant Bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4) vectors invariably failed although both recombinants expressed high levels of functional IRAC proteins in vitro. As IRAC are soluble monovalent antigens, one of the possible explanations is that monovalent ligation of the B-cell receptor induces receptor activation but fails to promote antigen presentation, a phenomenon that is thought to induce a state of B-cell tolerance. In the present study, we tried to increase IRAC immunogenicity by expressing them as oligovalent antigens. To this end, IRAC were fused to membrane anchors and BoHV-4 vectors expressing these recombinant forms were produced. The immunization potentials of recombinant viruses expressing either secreted or transmembrane IRAC proteins were then compared. While the former did not induce a detectable immune response against IRAC, the latter led to high titres of anti-IRAC antibodies that only marginally affected tick blood feeding. All together, the data presented in this study demonstrate that the immunogenicity of a soluble antigen can be greatly improved by anchoring it in membrane.

  2. N-glycosylation enables high lateral mobility of GPI-anchored proteins at a molecular crowding threshold

    PubMed Central

    Hartel, Andreas J. W.; Glogger, Marius; Jones, Nicola G.; Abuillan, Wasim; Batram, Christopher; Hermann, Anne; Fenz, Susanne F.; Tanaka, Motomu; Engstler, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The protein density in biological membranes can be extraordinarily high, but the impact of molecular crowding on the diffusion of membrane proteins has not been studied systematically in a natural system. The diversity of the membrane proteome of most cells may preclude systematic studies. African trypanosomes, however, feature a uniform surface coat that is dominated by a single type of variant surface glycoprotein (VSG). Here we study the density-dependence of the diffusion of different glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored VSG-types on living cells and in artificial membranes. Our results suggest that a specific molecular crowding threshold (MCT) limits diffusion and hence affects protein function. Obstacles in the form of heterologous proteins compromise the diffusion coefficient and the MCT. The trypanosome VSG-coat operates very close to its MCT. Importantly, our experiments show that N-linked glycans act as molecular insulators that reduce retarding intermolecular interactions allowing membrane proteins to function correctly even when densely packed. PMID:27641538

  3. A Multifaceted Study of Scedosporium boydii Cell Wall Changes during Germination and Identification of GPI-Anchored Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ghamrawi, Sarah; Gastebois, Amandine; Zykwinska, Agata; Vandeputte, Patrick; Marot, Agnès; Mabilleau, Guillaume; Cuenot, Stéphane; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Scedosporium boydii is a pathogenic filamentous fungus that causes a wide range of human infections, notably respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. The development of new therapeutic strategies targeting S. boydii necessitates a better understanding of the physiology of this fungus and the identification of new molecular targets. In this work, we studied the conidium-to-germ tube transition using a variety of techniques including scanning and transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, two-phase partitioning, microelectrophoresis and cationized ferritin labeling, chemical force spectroscopy, lectin labeling, and nanoLC-MS/MS for cell wall GPI-anchored protein analysis. We demonstrated that the cell wall undergoes structural changes with germination accompanied with a lower hydrophobicity, electrostatic charge and binding capacity to cationized ferritin. Changes during germination also included a higher accessibility of some cell wall polysaccharides to lectins and less CH3/CH3 interactions (hydrophobic adhesion forces mainly due to glycoproteins). We also extracted and identified 20 GPI-anchored proteins from the cell wall of S. boydii, among which one was detected only in the conidial wall extract and 12 only in the mycelial wall extract. The identified sequences belonged to protein families involved in virulence in other fungi like Gelp/Gasp, Crhp, Bglp/Bgtp families and a superoxide dismutase. These results highlighted the cell wall remodeling during germination in S. boydii with the identification of a substantial number of cell wall GPI-anchored conidial or hyphal specific proteins, which provides a basis to investigate the role of these molecules in the host-pathogen interaction and fungal virulence. PMID:26038837

  4. ADAM12 is expressed in the tumour vasculature and mediates ectodomain shedding of several membrane-anchored endothelial proteins.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Camilla; Klitgaard, Marie; Noer, Julie B; Kotzsch, Alexander; Nehammer, Camilla; Kronqvist, Pauliina; Berthelsen, Jens; Blobel, Carl; Kveiborg, Marie; Albrechtsen, Reidar; Wewer, Ulla M

    2013-05-15

    ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase) 12 is a metalloprotease implicated in cancer progression. ADAM12 can activate membrane-anchored proteins, such as sonic hedgehog, Delta-like 1 and certain epidermal growth factor receptor ligands, through a process called ectodomain shedding. We screened several membrane-anchored proteins to further dissect the substrate profile of ADAM12-mediated ectodomain shedding, and found shedding of five previously unreported substrates [Kitl1, VE-cadherin (vascular endothelial cadherin), Flk-1 (fetal liver kinase 1), Tie-2, and VCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule 1)], of which the latter four are specifically expressed by endothelial cells. We also observed that ADAM12 expression was increased in the tumour vasculature of infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the human breast as compared with little to no expression in normal breast tissue vasculature, suggesting a role for ADAM12 in tumour vessels. These results prompted us to further evaluate ADAM12-mediated shedding of two endothelial cell proteins, VE-cadherin and Tie-2. Endogenous ADAM12 expression was very low in cultured endothelial cells, but was significantly increased by cytokine stimulation. In parallel, the shed form of VE-cadherin was elevated in such cytokine-stimulated endothelial cells, and ADAM12 siRNA (small interfering RNA) knockdown reduced cytokine-induced shedding of VE-cadherin. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrate a role for ADAM12 in ectodomain shedding of several membrane-anchored endothelial proteins. We speculate that this process may have importance in tumour neovascularization or/and tumour cell extravasation.

  5. Dynamin-related Protein 1 Oligomerization in Solution Impairs Functional Interactions with Membrane-anchored Mitochondrial Fission Factor.

    PubMed

    Clinton, Ryan W; Francy, Christopher A; Ramachandran, Rajesh; Qi, Xin; Mears, Jason A

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial fission is a crucial cellular process mediated by the mechanoenzymatic GTPase, dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1). During mitochondrial division, Drp1 is recruited from the cytosol to the outer mitochondrial membrane by one, or several, integral membrane proteins. One such Drp1 partner protein, mitochondrial fission factor (Mff), is essential for mitochondrial division, but its mechanism of action remains unexplored. Previous studies have been limited by a weak interaction between Drp1 and Mff in vitro. Through refined in vitro reconstitution approaches and multiple independent assays, we show that removal of the regulatory variable domain (VD) in Drp1 enhances formation of a functional Drp1-Mff copolymer. This protein assembly exhibits greatly stimulated cooperative GTPase activity in solution. Moreover, when Mff was anchored to a lipid template, to mimic a more physiologic environment, significant stimulation of GTPase activity was observed with both WT and ΔVD Drp1. Contrary to recent findings, we show that premature Drp1 self-assembly in solution impairs functional interactions with membrane-anchored Mff. Instead, dimeric Drp1 species are selectively recruited by Mff to initiate assembly of a functional fission complex. Correspondingly, we also found that the coiled-coil motif in Mff is not essential for Drp1 interactions, but rather serves to augment cooperative self-assembly of Drp1 proximal to the membrane. Taken together, our findings provide a mechanism wherein the multimeric states of both Mff and Drp1 regulate their collaborative interaction.

  6. Dynamin-related Protein 1 Oligomerization in Solution Impairs Functional Interactions with Membrane-anchored Mitochondrial Fission Factor*

    PubMed Central

    Clinton, Ryan W.; Francy, Christopher A.; Ramachandran, Rajesh; Qi, Xin; Mears, Jason A.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial fission is a crucial cellular process mediated by the mechanoenzymatic GTPase, dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1). During mitochondrial division, Drp1 is recruited from the cytosol to the outer mitochondrial membrane by one, or several, integral membrane proteins. One such Drp1 partner protein, mitochondrial fission factor (Mff), is essential for mitochondrial division, but its mechanism of action remains unexplored. Previous studies have been limited by a weak interaction between Drp1 and Mff in vitro. Through refined in vitro reconstitution approaches and multiple independent assays, we show that removal of the regulatory variable domain (VD) in Drp1 enhances formation of a functional Drp1-Mff copolymer. This protein assembly exhibits greatly stimulated cooperative GTPase activity in solution. Moreover, when Mff was anchored to a lipid template, to mimic a more physiologic environment, significant stimulation of GTPase activity was observed with both WT and ΔVD Drp1. Contrary to recent findings, we show that premature Drp1 self-assembly in solution impairs functional interactions with membrane-anchored Mff. Instead, dimeric Drp1 species are selectively recruited by Mff to initiate assembly of a functional fission complex. Correspondingly, we also found that the coiled-coil motif in Mff is not essential for Drp1 interactions, but rather serves to augment cooperative self-assembly of Drp1 proximal to the membrane. Taken together, our findings provide a mechanism wherein the multimeric states of both Mff and Drp1 regulate their collaborative interaction. PMID:26578514

  7. Phosphorylation of anchoring protein by calmodulin protein kinase associated to the sarcoplasmic reticulum of rabbit fast-twitch muscle.

    PubMed

    Damiani, E; Sacchetto, R; Margreth, A

    2000-12-09

    Regulatory phosphorylation of phospholamban and of SR Ca(2+)-ATPase SERCA2a isoform by endogenous CaM-K II in slow-twitch skeletal and cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) is well documented, but much less is known of the exact functional role of CaM K II in fast-twitch muscle SR. Recently, it was shown that RNA splicing of brain-specific alpha CaM K II, gives rise to a truncated protein (alpha KAP), consisting mainly of the association domain, serving to anchor CaM K II to SR membrane in rat skeletal muscle [Bayer, K.-U., et al. (1998) EMBO J. 19, 5598-5605]. In the present study, we searched for the presence of alpha KAP in sucrose-density purified SR membrane fractions from representative fast-twitch and slow-twitch limb muscles, both of the rabbit and the rat, using immunoblot techniques and antibody directed against the association domain of alpha CaM K II. Putative alpha KAP was immunodetected as a 23-kDa electrophoretic component on SDS-PAGE of the isolated SR from fast-twitch but not from slow-twitch muscle, and was further identified as a specific substrate of endogenous CaM K II, in the rabbit. Immunodetected, (32)P-labeled, non-calmodulin binding protein, behaved as a single 23-kDa protein species under several electrophoretic conditions. The 23-kDa protein, with defined properties, was isolated as a complex with 60-kDa delta CaM K II isoform, by sucrose-density sedimentation analysis. Moreover, we show here that putative alphaKAP, in spite of its inability to bind CaM in ligand blot overlay, co-eluted with delta CaM K II from CaM-affinity columns. That raises the question of whether CaM K II-mediated phosphorylation of alpha KAP and triadin together might be involved in a molecular signaling pathway important for SR Ca(2+)-release in fast-twitch muscle SR.

  8. Role of yessotoxin in calcium and cAMP-crosstalks in primary and K-562 human lymphocytes: the effect is mediated by anchor kinase A mitochondrial proteins.

    PubMed

    Tobío, Araceli; Fernández-Araujo, Andrea; Alfonso, Amparo; Botana, Luis M

    2012-12-01

    line. Cytosolic expression of A-kinase anchor proteins (AKAPs), the proteins which integrates phosphodiesterases (PDEs) and PKA to the mitochondria, was determined in both cell models. On the one hand, in human fresh lymphocytes, YTX increases AKAP149 cytosolic expression. This fact is accompanied with a decrease in cAMP levels, and therefore PDEs activation, which finally leads to cell survival. On the other hand, in tumoural lymphocytes, YTX has an opposite effect since decreases AKAP149 cytosolic expression and increase cAMP levels which leads to cell death. This is the first time that YTX and mitochondrial AKAPs proteins relationship is characterised.

  9. The Crystal Structures of Yeast Get3 Suggest a Mechanism for Tail-Anchored Protein Membrane Insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Junbin; Li, Jingzhi; Qian, Xinguo; Denic, Vlad; Sha, Bingdong

    2010-08-16

    Tail-anchored (TA) proteins represent a unique class of membrane proteins that contain a single C-terminal transmembrane helix. The post-translational insertion of the yeast TA proteins into the ER membrane requires the Golgi ER trafficking (GET) complex which contains Get1, Get2 and Get3. Get3 is an ATPase that recognizes and binds the C-terminal transmembrane domain (TMD) of the TA proteins. We have determined the crystal structures of Get3 from two yeast species, S. cerevisiae and D. hansenii, respectively. These high resolution crystal structures show that Get3 contains a nucleotide-binding domain and a 'finger' domain for binding the TA protein TMD. A large hydrophobic groove on the finger domain of S. cerevisiae Get3 structure might represent the binding site for TMD of TA proteins. A hydrophobic helix from a symmetry-related Get3 molecule sits in the TMD-binding groove and mimics the TA binding scenario. Interestingly, the crystal structures of the Get3 dimers from S. cerevisiae and D. hansenii exhibit distinct conformations. The S. cerevisiae Get3 dimer structure does not contain nucleotides and maintains an 'open' conformation, while the D. hansenii Get3 dimer structure binds ADP and stays in a 'closed' conformation. We propose that the conformational changes to switch the Get3 between the open and closed conformations may facilitate the membrane insertions for TA proteins.

  10. An efficient bacterial surface display system based on a novel outer membrane anchoring element from the Escherichia coli protein YiaT.

    PubMed

    Han, Mee-Jung; Lee, Seung Hwan

    2015-01-01

    In a bacterial surface display system, the display of a successful recombinant protein is highly dependent on the choice of anchoring motif. In this study, we developed an efficient Escherichia coli display system using novel anchoring motifs derived from the protein YiaT. To determine the best surface-anchoring motif, full-length YiaT and two of its C-terminal truncated forms, cut at the R181 and R232 sites, were evaluated. Two industrial enzymes, a lipase from Pseudomonas fluorescens SIK W1 and an α-amylase from Bacillus subtilis, were used as the target proteins for display. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, Western blot, immunofluorescence microscopy and whole-cell enzyme activity measurements confirmed the expression of the fusion proteins on the E. coli surface. Using YiaTR181 or YiaTR232 as the anchoring motif, the fusion proteins showed very high enzyme activities and did not exert any adverse effects on either cell growth or the outer membrane integrity. Additionally, these fusion proteins were suitable for displaying proteins of large molecular size in an active form. Compared with the previous anchoring motifs FadL and OprF, YiaTR181 and YiaTR232 had approximately 10-fold and 20-fold higher enzyme activities, respectively. These results suggest that YiaT can be used as an E. coli anchoring motif to efficiently display various enzymes; hence, this system could be employed in a variety of biotechnological and industrial applications.

  11. Nonpolar substitution at C-terminus of the prion protein, a mimic of GPI anchor, partially impairs amyloid fibrils formation

    PubMed Central

    Breydo, Leonid; Sun, Ying; Makarava, Natallia; Lee, Cheng-I; Novitskaia, Vera; Bocharova, Olga; Kao, Joseph P.Y.; Baskakov, Ilia V.

    2008-01-01

    In contrast to most amyloidogenic proteins or peptides that do not contain any significant post-translational modifications, the prion protein (PrP) is modified with either one or two polysaccharides and a GPI anchor which attaches PrP to the plasma membrane. Like other amyloidogenic proteins, however, PrP adopts a fibrillar shape when converted to a disease-specific conformation. Therefore, PrP polymerization offers a unique opportunity to examine the effects of biologically relevant non-peptidic modifications on conversion to the amyloid conformation. To test the extent to which a long hydrophobic chain at the C-terminus affects the intrinsic amyloidogenic propensity of PrP, we modified recombinant PrP with a N-myristoylamido-maleimidyl group, which can serve as a membrane anchor. We show that while this modification increases the affinity of PrP for the cell membrane, it does not alter the structure of the protein. Myristoylation of PrP affected amyloid formation in two ways: (i) it substantially decreased the extent of fibrillation, presumably due to off-pathway aggregation, and (ii) it prohibited assembly of filaments into higher-order fibrils by preventing their lateral association. The negative effect on lateral association was abolished if the myristoylated moiety at the C-terminus was replaced by a polar group of similar size or by a hydrophobic group of smaller size. When preformed PrP fibrils were provided as seeds, myristoylated PrP supported fibril elongation and formation of higher-order fibrils composed of several filaments. Our studies illustrate that, despite a bulky hydrophobic moiety at C-terminus, myristoylated PrP can still incorporate into fibrillar structure, and that the C-terminal hydrophobic substitution does not affect the size of the proteinase K resistant core, but controls the mode of lateral assembly of filaments into higher-order fibrils. PMID:17223707

  12. SurA Is Involved in the Targeting to the Outer Membrane of a Tat Signal Sequence-Anchored Protein

    PubMed Central

    Rondelet, Arnaud

    2012-01-01

    The twin arginine translocation (Tat) pathway exports folded proteins from the cytoplasm to the periplasm of bacteria. The targeting of the exported proteins to the Tat pathway relies on a specific amino-terminal signal sequence, which is cleaved after exportation. In the phytopathogen Dickeya dadantii, the pectin lyase homologue PnlH is exported by the Tat pathway without cleavage of its signal sequence, which anchors PnlH into the outer membrane. In proteobacteria, the vast majority of outer membrane proteins consists of β-barrel proteins and lipoproteins. Thus, PnlH represents a new kind of outer membrane protein. In Escherichia coli, periplasmic chaperones SurA, Skp, and DegP work together with the β-barrel assembly machinery (Bam) to target and insert β-barrel proteins into the outer membrane. In this work, we showed that SurA is required for an efficient targeting of PnlH to the outer membrane. Moreover, we were able to detect an in vitro interaction between SurA and the PnlH signal sequence. Since the PnlH signal sequence contains a highly hydrophobic region, we propose that SurA protects it from the hydrophobic periplasm during targeting of PnlH to the outer membrane. We also studied the nature of the information carried by the PnlH signal sequence responsible for its targeting to the outer membrane after exportation by the Tat system. PMID:22961852

  13. Traffic, polarity, and detergent solubility of a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein after LDL-deprivation of MDCK cells

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins, GPI-proteins, are selectively delivered to the apical surfaces of many types of morphologically polarized epithelial cells. It has been proposed that the unit for targeting GPI-proteins to the apical surface is a membrane lipid domain. This sorting domain or molecular cluster has been equated to detergent (Triton X-100)-insoluble membrane fractions that are enriched in enriched in GPI-proteins, glycosphingolipids, and cholesterol. To determine the role of cholesterol in the formation of sorting domains and to examine its importance in the intracellular traffic and membrane polarity of GPI-proteins, we studied the behavior of a model GPI-protein, gD1-DAF, in MDCK cells cultured for 3 or 14 d without their principal source of cholesterol, serum LDL. LDL deprivation affects the intracellular traffic of gD1-DAF. Surface expression of gD1-DAF is reduced in LDL-deprived cells; this reduction is most marked after 3 d of LDL deprivation. We also find a great reduction in the fraction of gD1-DAF that is detergent-insoluble in these cells and a change in its membrane milieu defined by susceptibility to cleavage with PI-specific phospholipase C. Despite these changes, the surface polarity of gD1-DAF is no different in LDL- deprived cells than in control cells. PMID:8682863

  14. Unique domain anchoring of Src to synaptic NMDA receptors via the mitochondrial protein NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2

    PubMed Central

    Gingrich, Jeffrey R.; Pelkey, Kenneth A.; Fam, Sami R.; Huang, Yueqiao; Petralia, Ronald S.; Wenthold, Robert J.; Salter, Michael W.

    2004-01-01

    Src is the prototypic protein tyrosine kinase and is critical for controlling diverse cellular functions. Regions in Src define structural and functional domains conserved in many cell signaling proteins. Src also contains a region of low sequence conservation termed the unique domain, the function of which has until now remained enigmatic. Here, we show that the unique domain of Src is a protein–protein interaction region and we identify NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 (ND2) as a Src unique domain-interacting protein. ND2 is a subunit of complex I in mitochondria, but we find that ND2 interacts with Src outside this organelle at excitatory synapses in the brain. ND2 acts as an adapter protein anchoring Src to the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor complex, and is crucial for Src regulation of synaptic NMDA receptor activity. By showing an extramitochondrial action for a protein encoded in the mitochondrial genome, we identify a previously unsuspected means by which mitochondria regulate cellular function, suggesting a new paradigm that may be of general relevance for control of Src signaling. PMID:15069201

  15. Effect of molecular surface packing on the enzymatic activity modulation of an anchored protein on phospholipid Langmuir monolayers.

    PubMed

    Caseli, Luciano; Oliveira, Rafael G; Masui, Douglas C; Furriel, Rosa P M; Leone, Francisco A; Maggio, Bruno; Zaniquelli, M Elisabete D

    2005-04-26

    The catalytic activity of a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored alkaline phosphatase has been studied in Langmuir phospholipid monolayers at different surface pressures. The enzyme substrate, p-nitrophenyl phosphate, was injected into the subphase of mixed enzyme/lipid Langmuir monolayers. Its hydrolysis product was followed by monitoring the absorbance at 410 nm in situ in the monolayer subphase of the Langmuir trough. Several surface pressures, corresponding to different molecular surface densities, were attained by lateral compression of the monolayers. The morphology of the monolayers, observed by fluorescence microscopy, showed three different types of domains owing to the heterogeneous partition of the enzyme within the mixed enzyme/lipid film. The catalytic activity was modulated by the enzyme surface density, and it increased until a pressure of 18 mN/m was reached, but it decreased significantly when the equilibrium in-plane elasticity (surface compressional modulus) increased more noticeably, resulting in alterations in the interface morphology. A model for the modulation of the enzyme orientation and catalytic activity by lipid/enzyme surface morphology and enzyme surface packing at the air/liquid interface is proposed. The results might have an important impact on the comprehension of the enzymatic activity regulation of GPI-anchored proteins in biomembranes.

  16. Dynamic anchoring transitions at aqueous-liquid crystal interfaces induced by specific and non-specific binding of vesicles to proteins.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lie Na; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports on the dynamics of continuous anchoring transitions at interfaces formed between nematic liquid crystals (LCs, 4'-pentyl-4-cyanobiphenyl (5CB)) and immiscible aqueous phases that are induced by either non-specific or specific interactions between phospholipid vesicles and proteins adsorbed at the LC interfaces. By analyzing the dynamic response of LCs to non-specific adsorption of lipids onto bovine serum albumin (BSA)-decorated LC interfaces, we provide evidence that the LC anchoring transitions are slower than diffusion-controlled accumulation of lipid at the interface, consistent with the hypothesis that the LC transition involves lateral reorganization of proteins and lipids at the interface. Significantly, optical measurements of the tilt angle of the LC as a function of the amount of lipid captured at the interface were found to be quantitatively consistent with theoretical predictions of LC anchoring directed by nanoscopic domains of molecules that cause planar (protein) and homeotropic (lipid) anchoring of the LC. Finally, specific binding interactions between the antibody-decorated LC interfaces and vesicles (through antibody-antigen recognition) greatly accelerated the continuous LC anchoring transitions, with dynamics that were measured to scale with the logarithm of the ligand composition of the vesicles (over four orders of magnitude). The latter dynamics were found to be strongly influenced by addition of synthetic surfactants, consistent with our proposal that the rate-limiting step underlying the response of the LC was the transfer of lipids from captured vesicles into the protein-decorated LC interface. Overall, the results presented in this paper provide quantitative insight into the origin of continuous anchoring transitions triggered by vesicles at protein-decorated LC interfaces and, more broadly, guidance for the design of stimuli-responsive LC systems.

  17. Cell Surface Display and Characterization of Rhizopus oryzae Lipase in Pichia pastoris Using Sed1p as an Anchor Protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenqian; Shi, Hao; Ding, Huaihai; Wang, Liangliang; Zhang, Yu; Li, Xun; Wang, Fei

    2015-07-01

    It has been investigated to conduct the surface displaying of lipase from Rhizopus oryzae onto the cells of Pichia pastoris yeast using Sed1p as an anchor protein. A yeast cell surface display plasmid pPICZαA-rol-histag-sed1p was constructed by fusing rol and sed1p gene fragments into the plasmid pPICZαA, followed by introducing recombinant plasmid into P. pastoris cells. Surface display levels were monitored by Western Blot and immunofluorescence microscopy. The activity of displaying lipase obtained from recombinant mutS reached at 60 U/g-dry cell. In addition, the displaying lipase was stable in broad ranges of temperatures and pH, with the optimum temperature at 40 °C and pH 7.5. These results indicate that the P. pastoris displaying lipase may have potential in whole-cell biocatalyst.

  18. Surface display of bacterial tyrosinase on spores of Bacillus subtilis using CotE as an anchor protein.

    PubMed

    Hosseini-Abari, Afrouzossadat; Kim, Byung-Gee; Lee, Sang-Hyuk; Emtiazi, Giti; Kim, Wooil; Kim, June-Hyung

    2016-12-01

    Tyrosinases, copper-containing monooxygenases, are widely used enzymes for industrial, medical, and environmental applications. We report the first functional surface display of Bacillus megaterium tyrosinase on Bacillus subtilis spores using CotE as an anchor protein. Flow Cytometry was used to verify surface expression of tyrosinase on the purified spores. Moreover, tyrosinase activity of the displayed enzyme on B. subtilis spores was monitored in the presence of L-tyrosine (substrate) and CuSO4 (inducer). The stability of the spore-displayed tyrosinase was then evaluated after 15 days maintenance of the spores at room temperature, and no significant decrease in the enzyme activity was observed. In addition, the tyrosinase-expressing spores could be repeatedly used with 62% retained enzymatic activity after six times washing with Tris-HCl buffer. This genetically immobilized tyrosinase on the spores would make a new advance in industrial, medical, and environmental applications.

  19. Structure and dynamics of the conserved protein GPI anchor core inserted into detergent micelles.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Franck; Lopez-Prados, Javier; Groves, Patrick; Perez, Serge; Martín-Lomas, Manuel; Nieto, Pedro M

    2006-10-01

    A suitable approach which combines nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been used to study the structure and the dynamics of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor Manalphal-2Manalpha1-6Manalphal -4GlcNalpha1-6myo-inositol-1-OPO(3)-sn-1,2-dimyristoylglycerol (1) incorporated into dodecylphosphatidylcholine (DPC) micelles. The results have been compared to those previously obtained for the products obtainable from (1) after phospholipase cleavage, in aqueous solution. Relaxation and diffusion NMR experiments were used to establish the formation of stable aggregates and the insertion of (1) into the micelles. MD calculations were performed including explicit water, sodium and chloride ions and using the Particle Mesh Ewald approach for the evaluation of the electrostatic energy term. The MD predicted three dimensional structure and dynamics were substantiated by nuclear overhauser effect (NOE) measurements and relaxation data. The pseudopentasaccharide structure, which was not affected by incorporation of (1) into the micelle, showed a complex dynamic behaviour with a faster relative motion at the terminal mannopyranose unit and decreased mobility close to the micelle. This motion may be better described as an oscillation relative to the membrane rather than a folding event.

  20. Intermolecular Interaction between Anchoring Subunits Specify Subcellular Targeting and Function of RGS Proteins in Retina ON-Bipolar Neurons.

    PubMed

    Sarria, Ignacio; Orlandi, Cesare; McCall, Maureen A; Gregg, Ronald G; Martemyanov, Kirill A

    2016-03-09

    In vertebrate retina, light responses generated by the rod photoreceptors are transmitted to the second-order neurons, the ON-bipolar cells (ON-BC), and this communication is indispensible for vision in dim light. In ON-BCs, synaptic transmission is initiated by the metabotropic glutamate receptor, mGluR6, that signals via the G-protein Go to control opening of the effector ion channel, TRPM1. A key role in this process belongs to the GTPase Activating Protein (GAP) complex that catalyzes Go inactivation upon light-induced suppression of glutamate release in rod photoreceptors, thereby driving ON-BC depolarization to changes in synaptic input. The GAP complex has a striking molecular complexity. It contains two Regulator of G-protein Signaling (RGS) proteins RGS7 and RGS11 that directly act on Go and two adaptor subunits: RGS Anchor Protein (R9AP) and the orphan receptor, GPR179. Here we examined the organizational principles of the GAP complex in ON-BCs. Biochemical experiments revealed that RGS7 binds to a conserved site in GPR179 and that RGS11 in vivo forms a complex only with R9AP. R9AP and GPR179 are further integrated via direct protein-protein interactions involving their cytoplasmic domains. Elimination of GPR179 prevents postsynaptic accumulation of R9AP. Furthermore, concurrent knock-out of both R9AP and RGS7 does not reconfigure the GAP complex and completely abolishes synaptic transmission, resulting in a novel mouse model of night blindness. Based on these results, we propose a model of hierarchical assembly and function of the GAP complex that supports ON-BCs visual signaling.

  1. Anchoring of protein kinase A by ERM (ezrin-radixin-moesin) proteins is required for proper netrin signaling through DCC (deleted in colorectal cancer).

    PubMed

    Deming, Paula B; Campbell, Shirley L; Stone, Jamie B; Rivard, Robert L; Mercier, Alison L; Howe, Alan K

    2015-02-27

    Netrin-1, acting through its principal receptor DCC (deleted in colorectal cancer), serves as an axon guidance cue during neural development and also contributes to vascular morphogenesis, epithelial migration, and the pathogenesis of some tumors. Several lines of evidence suggest that netrin-DCC signaling can regulate and be regulated by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, PKA, although the molecular details of this relationship are poorly understood. Specificity in PKA signaling is often achieved through differential subcellular localization of the enzyme by interaction with protein kinase A anchoring proteins (AKAPs). Here, we show that AKAP function is required for DCC-mediated activation of PKA and phosphorylation of cytoskeletal regulatory proteins of the Mena/VASP (vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein) family. Moreover, we show that DCC and PKA physically interact and that this association is mediated by the ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) family of plasma membrane-actin cytoskeleton cross-linking proteins. Silencing of ERM protein expression inhibits DCC-PKA interaction, DCC-mediated PKA activation, and phosphorylation of Mena/VASP proteins as well as growth cone morphology and neurite outgrowth. Finally, although expression of wild-type radixin partially rescued growth cone morphology and tropism toward netrin in ERM-knockdown cells, expression of an AKAP-deficient mutant of radixin did not fully rescue growth cone morphology and switched netrin tropism from attraction to repulsion. These data support a model in which ERM-mediated anchoring of PKA activity to DCC is required for proper netrin/DCC-mediated signaling.

  2. Anchoring of Protein Kinase A by ERM (Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin) Proteins Is Required for Proper Netrin Signaling through DCC (Deleted in Colorectal Cancer)*

    PubMed Central

    Deming, Paula B.; Campbell, Shirley L.; Stone, Jamie B.; Rivard, Robert L.; Mercier, Alison L.; Howe, Alan K.

    2015-01-01

    Netrin-1, acting through its principal receptor DCC (deleted in colorectal cancer), serves as an axon guidance cue during neural development and also contributes to vascular morphogenesis, epithelial migration, and the pathogenesis of some tumors. Several lines of evidence suggest that netrin-DCC signaling can regulate and be regulated by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, PKA, although the molecular details of this relationship are poorly understood. Specificity in PKA signaling is often achieved through differential subcellular localization of the enzyme by interaction with protein kinase A anchoring proteins (AKAPs). Here, we show that AKAP function is required for DCC-mediated activation of PKA and phosphorylation of cytoskeletal regulatory proteins of the Mena/VASP (vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein) family. Moreover, we show that DCC and PKA physically interact and that this association is mediated by the ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) family of plasma membrane-actin cytoskeleton cross-linking proteins. Silencing of ERM protein expression inhibits DCC-PKA interaction, DCC-mediated PKA activation, and phosphorylation of Mena/VASP proteins as well as growth cone morphology and neurite outgrowth. Finally, although expression of wild-type radixin partially rescued growth cone morphology and tropism toward netrin in ERM-knockdown cells, expression of an AKAP-deficient mutant of radixin did not fully rescue growth cone morphology and switched netrin tropism from attraction to repulsion. These data support a model in which ERM-mediated anchoring of PKA activity to DCC is required for proper netrin/DCC-mediated signaling. PMID:25575591

  3. Creation of a Cellooligosaccharide-Assimilating Escherichia coli Strain by Displaying Active Beta-Glucosidase on the Cell Surface via a Novel Anchor Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Tsutomu; Kawabata, Hitomi; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrated direct assimilation of cellooligosaccharide using Escherichia coli displaying beta-glucosidase (BGL). BGL from Thermobifida fusca YX (Tfu0937) was displayed on the E. coli cell surface using a novel anchor protein named Blc. This strain was grown successfully on 0.2% cellobiose, and the optical density at 600 nm (OD600) was 1.05 after 20 h. PMID:21742905

  4. CHEMICAL SYNTHESIS OF GLYCOSYLPHOSPHATIDYLINOSITOL ANCHORS

    PubMed Central

    Swarts, Benjamin M.; Guo, Zhongwu

    2013-01-01

    Many eukaryotic cell-surface proteins and glycoproteins are anchored to the plasma membrane by glycosylphosphatidylinositols (GPIs), a family of glycolipids that are post-translationally attached to proteins at their C-termini. GPIs and GPI-anchored proteins play important roles in many biological and pathological events, such as cell recognition and adhesion, signal transduction, host defense, and acting as receptors for viruses and toxins. Chemical synthesis of structurally defined GPI anchors and GPI derivatives is a necessary step toward understanding the properties and functions of these molecules in biological systems and exploring their potential therapeutic applications. In the first part of this comprehensive article on the chemical synthesis of GPIs, classic syntheses of naturally occurring GPI anchors from protozoan parasites, yeast, and mammals are covered. The second part of the article focuses on recent diversity-oriented strategies for the synthesis of GPI anchors containing unsaturated lipids, “click chemistry” tags, and highly branched and modified structures. PMID:22794184

  5. Monomer–dimer dynamics and distribution of GPI-anchored uPAR are determined by cell surface protein assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Caiolfa, Valeria R.; Zamai, Moreno; Malengo, Gabriele; Andolfo, Annapaola; Madsen, Chris D.; Sutin, Jason; Digman, Michelle A.; Gratton, Enrico; Blasi, Francesco; Sidenius, Nicolai

    2007-01-01

    To search for functional links between glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) protein monomer–oligomer exchange and membrane dynamics and confinement, we studied urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) receptor (uPAR), a GPI receptor involved in the regulation of cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation. Using a functionally active fluorescent protein–uPAR in live cells, we analyzed the effect that extracellular matrix proteins and uPAR ligands have on uPAR dynamics and dimerization at the cell membrane. Vitronectin directs the recruitment of dimers and slows down the diffusion of the receptors at the basal membrane. The commitment to uPA–plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1–mediated endocytosis and recycling modifies uPAR diffusion and induces an exchange between uPAR monomers and dimers. This exchange is fully reversible. The data demonstrate that cell surface protein assemblies are important in regulating the dynamics and localization of uPAR at the cell membrane and the exchange of monomers and dimers. These results also provide a strong rationale for dynamic studies of GPI-anchored molecules in live cells at steady state and in the absence of cross-linker/clustering agents. PMID:18056417

  6. A Cholesterol Recognition Amino Acid Consensus Domain in GP64 Fusion Protein Facilitates Anchoring of Baculovirus to Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Luz-Madrigal, Agustin; Asanov, Alexander; Camacho-Zarco, Aldo R.; Sampieri, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    Baculoviridae is a large family of double-stranded DNA viruses that selectively infect insects. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) is the best-studied baculovirus from the family. Many studies over the last several years have shown that AcMNPV can enter a wide variety of mammalian cells and deliver genetic material for foreign gene expression. While most animal viruses studied so far have developed sophisticated mechanisms to selectively infect specific cells and tissues in an organism, AcMNPV can penetrate and deliver foreign genes into most cells studied to this date. The details about the mechanisms of internalization have been partially described. In the present study, we have identified a cholesterol recognition amino acid consensus (CRAC) domain present in the AcMNPV envelope fusion protein GP64. We demonstrated the association of a CRAC domain with cholesterol, which is important to facilitate the anchoring of the virus at the mammalian cell membrane. Furthermore, this initial anchoring favors AcMNPV endocytosis via a dynamin- and clathrin-dependent mechanism. Under these conditions, efficient baculovirus-driven gene expression is obtained. In contrast, when cholesterol is reduced from the plasma membrane, AcMNPV enters the cell via a dynamin- and clathrin-independent mechanism. The result of using this alternative internalization pathway is a reduced level of baculovirus-driven gene expression. This study is the first to document the importance of a novel CRAC domain in GP64 and its role in modulating gene delivery in AcMNPV. PMID:23986592

  7. A cholesterol recognition amino acid consensus domain in GP64 fusion protein facilitates anchoring of baculovirus to mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Luz-Madrigal, Agustin; Asanov, Alexander; Camacho-Zarco, Aldo R; Sampieri, Alicia; Vaca, Luis

    2013-11-01

    Baculoviridae is a large family of double-stranded DNA viruses that selectively infect insects. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) is the best-studied baculovirus from the family. Many studies over the last several years have shown that AcMNPV can enter a wide variety of mammalian cells and deliver genetic material for foreign gene expression. While most animal viruses studied so far have developed sophisticated mechanisms to selectively infect specific cells and tissues in an organism, AcMNPV can penetrate and deliver foreign genes into most cells studied to this date. The details about the mechanisms of internalization have been partially described. In the present study, we have identified a cholesterol recognition amino acid consensus (CRAC) domain present in the AcMNPV envelope fusion protein GP64. We demonstrated the association of a CRAC domain with cholesterol, which is important to facilitate the anchoring of the virus at the mammalian cell membrane. Furthermore, this initial anchoring favors AcMNPV endocytosis via a dynamin- and clathrin-dependent mechanism. Under these conditions, efficient baculovirus-driven gene expression is obtained. In contrast, when cholesterol is reduced from the plasma membrane, AcMNPV enters the cell via a dynamin- and clathrin-independent mechanism. The result of using this alternative internalization pathway is a reduced level of baculovirus-driven gene expression. This study is the first to document the importance of a novel CRAC domain in GP64 and its role in modulating gene delivery in AcMNPV.

  8. Hormonal activation of a kinase cascade localized at the mitochondria is required for StAR protein activity.

    PubMed

    Poderoso, Cecilia; Maloberti, Paula; Duarte, Alejandra; Neuman, Isabel; Paz, Cristina; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Podesta, Ernesto J

    2009-03-05

    It is known that ERK1/2 and MEK1/2 participate in the regulation of Star gene transcription. However, their role in StAR protein post-transcriptional regulation is not described yet. In this study we analyzed the relationship between the MAPK cascade and StAR protein phosphorylation and function. We have demonstrated that (a) steroidogenesis in MA-10 Leydig cells depends on the specific of ERK1/2 activation at the mitochondria; (b) ERK1/2 phosphorylation is driven by mitochondrial PKA and constitutive MEK1/2 in this organelle; (c) active ERK1/2 interacts with StAR protein, leads to StAR protein phosphorylation at Ser(232) only in the presence of cholesterol; (d) directed mutagenesis of Ser(232) (S232A) inhibited in vitro StAR protein phosphorylation by ERK1; (e) transient transfection of MA-10 cells with StAR S232A cDNA markedly reduced the yield of progesterone production. We show that StAR protein is a substrate of ERK1/2, and that mitochondrial ERK1/2 is part of a multimeric complex that regulates cholesterol transport.

  9. Sec-Secretion and Sortase-Mediated Anchoring of Proteins in Gram-Postive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Schneewind, Olaf; Missiakas, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Signal peptide-driven secretion of precursor proteins directs polypeptides across the plasma membrane of bacteria. Two pathways, Sec- and SRP-dependent, converge at the SecYEG translocon to thread unfolded precursor proteins across the membrane, whereas folded preproteins are routed via the Tat secretion pathway. Gram-positive bacteria lack an outer membrane and are surrounded by a rigid layer of peptidoglycan. Interactions with their environment are mediated by proteins that are retained in the cell wall, often through covalent attachment to the peptidoglycan. In this review, we describe the mechanisms for both Sec-dependent secretion and sortase-dependent assembly of proteins in the envelope of Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:24269844

  10. Insight into Early-Stage Unfolding of GPI-Anchored Human Prion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Emilia L.; Qi, Yifei; Park, Soohyung; Mallajosyula, Sairam S.; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Klauda, Jeffery B.; Im, Wonpil

    2015-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders, which are characterized by the accumulation of misfolded prion protein (PrPSc) converted from a normal host cellular prion protein (PrPC). Experimental studies suggest that PrPC is enriched with α-helical structure, whereas PrPSc contains a high proportion of β-sheet. In this study, we report the impact of N-glycosylation and the membrane on the secondary structure stability utilizing extensive microsecond molecular dynamics simulations. Our results reveal that the HB (residues 173 to 194) C-terminal fragment undergoes conformational changes and helix unfolding in the absence of membrane environments because of the competition between protein backbone intramolecular and protein-water intermolecular hydrogen bonds as well as its intrinsic instability originated from the amino acid sequence. This initiation of the unfolding process of PrPC leads to a subsequent increase in the length of the HB-HC loop (residues 195 to 199) that may trigger larger rigid body motions or further unfolding around this region. Continuous interactions between prion protein and the membrane not only constrain the protein conformation but also decrease the solvent accessibility of the backbone atoms, thereby stabilizing the secondary structure, which is enhanced by N-glycosylation via additional interactions between the N-glycans and the membrane surface. PMID:26588568

  11. Distribution of the receptor-anchoring protein gephyrin in the rat dentate gyrus and changes following entorhinal cortex lesion.

    PubMed

    Simbürger, E; Plaschke, M; Kirsch, J; Nitsch, R

    2000-04-01

    We analyzed the distribution of the receptor-anchoring protein gephyrin in the normal and deafferented rat dentate gyrus to investigate whether the expression of this postsynaptic protein is altered in response to the formation of new synaptic contacts. Confocal microscopy and digital image analysis revealed that in normal dentate gyrus immunolabeling was most prominent in the outer molecular layer and decreased successively in the direction of the granule cell layer. Simultaneous immunolabeling for gephyrin and cell-specific markers showed that granule cells and parvalbumin-positive interneurons express gephyrin. Large, intensely stained, gephyrin-positive clusters were distributed along distinct dendrites, and most of them were positive for parvalbumin. Calbindin-immunostained dendrites were associated with smaller, gephyrin-positive clusters. Lesion of the medial entorhinal cortex leads to deafferentiation of the middle molecular layer which resulted in an increased gephyrin immunoreactivity. These changes were due to a significantly increased concentration of the very small gephyrin-positive clusters. Parvalbumin-positive dendrites did not display any increase in co-localizing gephyrin-positive structures. The altered immunolabeling pattern persisted until 12 weeks after lesion, a time when the process of synaptic reorganization is complete. Our findings suggest that synaptogenesis following deafferentiation results in a cell-specific redistribution of gephyrin immunoreactivity at specific inhibitory synapses.

  12. Ricin uses arginine 235 as an anchor residue to bind to P-proteins of the ribosomal stalk

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yijun; Li, Xiao-Ping; Chen, Brian Y.; Tumer, Nilgun E.

    2017-01-01

    Ricin toxin A chain (RTA) binds to stalk P-proteins to reach the α–sarcin/ricin loop (SRL) where it cleaves a conserved adenine. Arginine residues at the RTA/RTB interface are involved in this interaction. To investigate the individual contribution of each arginine, we generated single, double and triple arginine mutations in RTA. The R235A mutation reduced toxicity and depurination activity more than any other single arginine mutation in yeast. Further reduction in toxicity, depurination activity and ribosome binding was observed when R235A was combined with a mutation in a nearby arginine. RTA interacts with the ribosome via a two-step process, which involves slow and fast interactions. Single arginine mutations eliminated the fast interactions with the ribosome, indicating that they increase the binding rate of RTA. Arginine residues form a positively charged patch to bind to negatively charged residues at the C-termini of P-proteins. When electrostatic interactions conferred by the arginines are lost, hydrophobic interactions are also abolished, suggesting that the hydrophobic interactions alone are insufficient to allow binding. We propose that Arg235 serves as an anchor residue and cooperates with nearby arginines and the hydrophobic interactions to provide the binding specificity and strength in ribosome targeting of RTA. PMID:28230053

  13. High affinity anchoring of the decoration protein pb10 onto the bacteriophage T5 capsid

    PubMed Central

    Vernhes, Emeline; Renouard, Madalena; Gilquin, Bernard; Cuniasse, Philippe; Durand, Dominique; England, Patrick; Hoos, Sylviane; Huet, Alexis; Conway, James F.; Glukhov, Anatoly; Ksenzenko, Vladimir; Jacquet, Eric; Nhiri, Naïma; Zinn-Justin, Sophie; Boulanger, Pascale

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriophage capsids constitute icosahedral shells of exceptional stability that protect the viral genome. Many capsids display on their surface decoration proteins whose structure and function remain largely unknown. The decoration protein pb10 of phage T5 binds at the centre of the 120 hexamers formed by the major capsid protein. Here we determined the 3D structure of pb10 and investigated its capsid-binding properties using NMR, SAXS, cryoEM and SPR. Pb10 consists of an α-helical capsid-binding domain and an Ig-like domain exposed to the solvent. It binds to the T5 capsid with a remarkably high affinity and its binding kinetics is characterized by a very slow dissociation rate. We propose that the conformational exchange events observed in the capsid-binding domain enable rearrangements upon binding that contribute to the quasi-irreversibility of the pb10-capsid interaction. Moreover we show that pb10 binding is a highly cooperative process, which favours immediate rebinding of newly dissociated pb10 to the 120 hexamers of the capsid protein. In extreme conditions, pb10 protects the phage from releasing its genome. We conclude that pb10 may function to reinforce the capsid thus favouring phage survival in harsh environments. PMID:28165000

  14. Anchor Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regardt, Olle; Rönnbäck, Lars; Bergholtz, Maria; Johannesson, Paul; Wohed, Petia

    Maintaining and evolving data warehouses is a complex, error prone, and time consuming activity. The main reason for this state of affairs is that the environment of a data warehouse is in constant change, while the warehouse itself needs to provide a stable and consistent interface to information spanning extended periods of time. In this paper, we propose a modeling technique for data warehousing, called anchor modeling, that offers non-destructive extensibility mechanisms, thereby enabling robust and flexible management of changes in source systems. A key benefit of anchor modeling is that changes in a data warehouse environment only require extensions, not modifications, to the data warehouse. This ensures that existing data warehouse applications will remain unaffected by the evolution of the data warehouse, i.e. existing views and functions will not have to be modified as a result of changes in the warehouse model.

  15. Bst1 is required for Candida albicans infecting host via facilitating cell wall anchorage of Glycosylphosphatidyl inositol anchored proteins

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Zou, Zui; Huang, Xin; Shen, Hui; He, Li Juan; Chen, Si Min; Li, Li Ping; Yan, Lan; Zhang, Shi Qun; Zhang, Jun Dong; Xu, Zheng; Xu, Guo Tong; An, Mao Mao; Jiang, Yuan Ying

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidyl inositol anchored proteins (GPI-APs) on fungal cell wall are essential for invasive infections. While the function of inositol deacylation of GPI-APs in mammalian cells has been previously characterized the impact of inositol deacylation in fungi and implications to host infection remains largely unexplored. Herein we describe our identification of BST1, an inositol deacylase of GPI-Aps in Candida albicans, was critical for GPI-APs cell wall attachment and host infection. BST1-deficient C. albicans (bst1Δ/Δ) was associated with severely impaired cell wall anchorage of GPI-APs and subsequen unmasked β-(1,3)-glucan. Consistent with the aberrant cell wall structures, bst1Δ/Δ strain did not display an invasive ability and could be recognized more efficiently by host immune systems. Moreover, BST1 null mutants or those expressing Bst1 variants did not display inositol deacylation activity and exhibited severely attenuated virulence and reduced organic colonization in a murine systemic candidiasis model. Thus, Bst1 can facilitate cell wall anchorage of GPI-APs in C. albicans by inositol deacylation, and is critical for host invasion and immune escape. PMID:27708385

  16. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins as chaperones and co-receptors for FERONIA receptor kinase signaling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Yeh, Fang-Ling; Cheung, Alice Y; Duan, Qiaohong; Kita, Daniel; Liu, Ming-Che; Maman, Jacob; Luu, Emily J; Wu, Brendan W; Gates, Laura; Jalal, Methun; Kwong, Amy; Carpenter, Hunter; Wu, Hen-Ming

    2015-06-08

    The Arabidopsis receptor kinase FERONIA (FER) is a multifunctional regulator for plant growth and reproduction. Here we report that the female gametophyte-expressed glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein (GPI-AP) LORELEI and the seedling-expressed LRE-like GPI-AP1 (LLG1) bind to the extracellular juxtamembrane region of FER and show that this interaction is pivotal for FER function. LLG1 interacts with FER in the endoplasmic reticulum and on the cell surface, and loss of LLG1 function induces cytoplasmic retention of FER, consistent with transport of FER from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane in a complex with LLG1. We further demonstrate that LLG1 is a component of the FER-regulated RHO GTPase signaling complex and that fer and llg1 mutants display indistinguishable growth, developmental and signaling phenotypes, analogous to how lre and fer share similar reproductive defects. Together our results support LLG1/LRE acting as a chaperone and co-receptor for FER and elucidate a mechanism by which GPI-APs enable the signaling capacity of a cell surface receptor.

  17. Analysis of novel iron-regulated, surface-anchored hemin-binding proteins in Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

    PubMed

    Allen, Courtni E; Burgos, Jonathan M; Schmitt, Michael P

    2013-06-01

    Corynebacterium diphtheriae utilizes hemin and hemoglobin (Hb) as iron sources during growth in iron-depleted environments, and recent studies have shown that the surface-exposed HtaA protein binds both hemin and Hb and also contributes to the utilization of hemin iron. Conserved (CR) domains within HtaA and in the associated hemin-binding protein, HtaB, are required for the ability to bind hemin and Hb. In this study, we identified and characterized two novel genetic loci in C. diphtheriae that encode factors that bind hemin and Hb. Both genetic systems contain two-gene operons that are transcriptionally regulated by DtxR and iron. The gene products of these operons are ChtA-ChtB and ChtC-CirA (previously DIP0522-DIP0523). The chtA and chtB genes are carried on a putative composite transposon associated with C. diphtheriae isolates that dominated the diphtheria outbreak in the former Soviet Union in the 1990s. ChtA and ChtC each contain a single N-terminal CR domain and exhibit significant sequence similarity to each other but only limited similarity with HtaA. The chtB and htaB gene products exhibited a high level of sequence similarity throughout their sequences, and both proteins contain a single CR domain. Whole-cell binding studies as well as protease analysis indicated that all four of the proteins encoded by these two operons are surface exposed, which is consistent with the presence of a transmembrane segment in their C-terminal regions. ChtA, ChtB, and ChtC are able to bind hemin and Hb, with ChtA showing the highest affinity. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that specific tyrosine residues within the ChtA CR domain were critical for hemin and Hb binding. Hemin iron utilization assays using various C. diphtheriae mutants indicate that deletion of the chtA-chtB region and the chtC gene has no affect on the ability of C. diphtheriae to use hemin or Hb as iron sources; however, a chtB htaB double mutant exhibits a significant decrease in hemin iron use

  18. FlaF is a β-sandwich protein that anchors the archaellum in the archaeal cell envelope by binding the S-layer protein

    DOE PAGES

    Banerjee, Ankan; Tsai, Chi -Lin; Chaudhury, Paushali; ...

    2015-05-01

    Archaea employ the archaellum, a type IV pilus-like nanomachine, for swimming motility. In the crenarchaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, the archaellum consists of seven proteins: FlaB/X/G/F/H/I/J. FlaF is conserved and essential for archaellum assembly but no FlaF structures exist. Here, we truncated the FlaF N terminus and solved 1.5-Å and 1.65-Å resolution crystal structures of this monotopic membrane protein. Structures revealed an N-terminal α-helix and an eight-strand β-sandwich, immunoglobulin-like fold with striking similarity to S-layer proteins. Crystal structures, X-ray scattering, and mutational analyses suggest dimer assembly is needed for in vivo function. The sole cell envelope component of S. acidocaldarius is amore » paracrystalline S-layer, and FlaF specifically bound to S-layer protein, suggesting that its interaction domain is located in the pseudoperiplasm with its N-terminal helix in the membrane. From these data, FlaF may act as the previously unknown archaellum stator protein that anchors the rotating archaellum to the archaeal cell envelope.« less

  19. FlaF is a β-sandwich protein that anchors the archaellum in the archaeal cell envelope by binding the S-layer protein

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Ankan; Tsai, Chi -Lin; Chaudhury, Paushali; Tripp, Patrick; Arvai, Andrew  S.; Ishida, Justin  P.; Tainer, John  A.; Albers, Sonja -Verena

    2015-05-01

    Archaea employ the archaellum, a type IV pilus-like nanomachine, for swimming motility. In the crenarchaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, the archaellum consists of seven proteins: FlaB/X/G/F/H/I/J. FlaF is conserved and essential for archaellum assembly but no FlaF structures exist. Here, we truncated the FlaF N terminus and solved 1.5-Å and 1.65-Å resolution crystal structures of this monotopic membrane protein. Structures revealed an N-terminal α-helix and an eight-strand β-sandwich, immunoglobulin-like fold with striking similarity to S-layer proteins. Crystal structures, X-ray scattering, and mutational analyses suggest dimer assembly is needed for in vivo function. The sole cell envelope component of S. acidocaldarius is a paracrystalline S-layer, and FlaF specifically bound to S-layer protein, suggesting that its interaction domain is located in the pseudoperiplasm with its N-terminal helix in the membrane. From these data, FlaF may act as the previously unknown archaellum stator protein that anchors the rotating archaellum to the archaeal cell envelope.

  20. FlaF Is a β-Sandwich Protein that Anchors the Archaellum in the Archaeal Cell Envelope by Binding the S-Layer Protein.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Ankan; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Chaudhury, Paushali; Tripp, Patrick; Arvai, Andrew S; Ishida, Justin P; Tainer, John A; Albers, Sonja-Verena

    2015-05-05

    Archaea employ the archaellum, a type IV pilus-like nanomachine, for swimming motility. In the crenarchaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, the archaellum consists of seven proteins: FlaB/X/G/F/H/I/J. FlaF is conserved and essential for archaellum assembly but no FlaF structures exist. Here, we truncated the FlaF N terminus and solved 1.5-Å and 1.65-Å resolution crystal structures of this monotopic membrane protein. Structures revealed an N-terminal α-helix and an eight-strand β-sandwich, immunoglobulin-like fold with striking similarity to S-layer proteins. Crystal structures, X-ray scattering, and mutational analyses suggest dimer assembly is needed for in vivo function. The sole cell envelope component of S. acidocaldarius is a paracrystalline S-layer, and FlaF specifically bound to S-layer protein, suggesting that its interaction domain is located in the pseudoperiplasm with its N-terminal helix in the membrane. From these data, FlaF may act as the previously unknown archaellum stator protein that anchors the rotating archaellum to the archaeal cell envelope.

  1. FlaF Is a β-Sandwich Protein that Anchors the Archaellum in the Archaeal Cell Envelope by Binding the S-Layer Protein

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Ankan; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Chaudhury, Paushali; Tripp, Patrick; Arvai, Andrew S.; Ishida, Justin P.; Tainer, John A.; Albers, Sonja-Verena

    2015-01-01

    Summary Archaea employ the archaellum, a type IV pilus-like nanomachine, for swimming motility. In the crenarchaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, the archaellum consists of seven proteins: FlaB/X/G/F/H/I/J. FlaF is conserved and essential for archaellum assembly but no FlaF structures exist. Here, we truncated the FlaF N terminus and solved 1.5-Å and 1.65-Å resolution crystal structures of this monotopic membrane protein. Structures revealed an N-terminal α-helix and an eight-strand β-sandwich, immunoglobulin-like fold with striking similarity to S-layer proteins. Crystal structures, X-ray scattering, and mutational analyses suggest dimer assembly is needed for in vivo function. The sole cell envelope component of S. acidocaldarius is a paracrystalline S-layer, and FlaF specifically bound to S-layer protein, suggesting that its interaction domain is located in the pseudoperiplasm with its N-terminal helix in the membrane. From these data, FlaF may act as the previously unknown archaellum stator protein that anchors the rotating archaellum to the archaeal cell envelope. PMID:25865246

  2. Correctly sorted molecules of a GPI-anchored protein are clustered and immobile when they arrive at the apical surface of MDCK cells

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins are sorted to the apical surface of many epithelial cell types. To better understand the mechanism for apical segregation of these proteins, we analyzed the lateral mobility and molecular associations of a model GPI-anchored protein, herpes simplex virus gD1 fused to human decay accelerating factor (gD1-DAF) (Lisanti, M. P., I. W. Caras, M. A. Davitz, and E. Rodriguez-Boulan. 1989. J. Cell Biol. 109:2145-2156) shortly after arrival and after long-term residence at the surface of confluent, polarized MDCK cells. FRAP measurements of lateral diffusion showed that the mobile fraction of newly arrived gD1-DAF molecules was much less than the mobile fraction of long-term resident molecules (40 vs. 80-90%). Fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements showed that the newly arrived molecules were clustered, while resident molecules were not. Newly delivered gD1-DAF molecules were clustered but not immobilized in mutant, Concanavalin A-resistant MDCK cells that failed to sort gD1-DAF. Our results indicate that GPI-anchored proteins in MDCK cells are clustered before delivery to the surface. However, clustering alone does not target molecules for apical delivery. The immobilization observed when gD1-DAF is correctly sorted suggests that the clusters must associate some component of the cell's cytoplasm. PMID:8380601

  3. Biochemical analysis of potential sites for protein 4.1-mediated anchoring of the spectrin-actin skeleton to the erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Workman, R F; Low, P S

    1998-03-13

    Erythrocyte protein 4.1 has been hypothesized to link the spectrin-actin junctional complex directly to the cytoplasmic domain of glycophorin C, but this bridging function has never been directly demonstrated. Because an alternative protein-mediated bridge between the junctional complex and the cytoplasmic domain of band 3 is also plausible, we have undertaken to characterize the membrane sites to which protein 4.1 can anchor the spectrin and actin skeleton. We demonstrate that proteolytic removal of the cytoplasmic domain of band 3 has minimal effect on the ability of protein 4.1 to promote 125I-labeled spectrin and actin binding to KI-stripped erythrocyte membrane vesicles. We also show that quantitative blockade of all band 3 sites with either monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies to band 3 is equally ineffective in preventing protein 4.1-mediated association of spectrin and actin with the membrane. In contrast, obstruction of protein 4.1 binding to its docking site on the cytoplasmic pole of glycophorin C is demonstrated to reduce the same protein 4.1 bridging function by approximately 85%. We conclude from these data that (i) glycophorin C contributes the primary anchoring site of the protein 4.1-mediated bridge to the spectrin-actin skeleton; (ii) band 3 is incapable of serving the same function; and (iii) additional minor protein 4.1 bridging sites may exist on the human erythrocyte membrane.

  4. Proteomic analysis of human norepinephrine transporter complexes reveals associations with protein phosphatase 2A anchoring subunit and 14-3-3 proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Uhna; Jennings, Jennifer L.; Link, Andrew J.; Blakely, Randy D.; E-mail: andy.blakely@vanderbilt.edu

    2005-08-05

    The norepinephrine transporter (NET) terminates noradrenergic signals by clearing released NE at synapses. NET regulation by receptors and intracellular signaling pathways is supported by a growing list of associated proteins including syntaxin1A, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) catalytic subunit (PP2A-C), PICK1, and Hic-5. In the present study, we sought evidence for additional partnerships by mass spectrometry-based analysis of proteins co-immunoprecipitated with human NET (hNET) stably expressed in a mouse noradrenergic neuroblastoma cell line. Our initial proteomic analyses reveal multiple peptides derived from hNET, peptides arising from the mouse PP2A anchoring subunit (PP2A-Ar) and peptides derived from 14-3-3 proteins. We verified physical association of NET with PP2A-Ar via co-immunoprecipitation studies using mouse vas deferens extracts and with 14-3-3 via a fusion pull-down approach, implicating specifically the hNET NH{sub 2}-terminus for interactions. The transporter complexes described likely support mechanisms regulating transporter activity, localization, and trafficking.

  5. DRAGON, a GPI-anchored membrane protein, inhibits BMP signaling in C2C12 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Kanomata, Kazuhiro; Kokabu, Shoichiro; Nojima, Junya; Fukuda, Toru; Katagiri, Takenobu

    2009-06-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) induce osteoblastic differentiation of myoblasts via binding to cell surface receptors. Repulsive guidance molecules (RGMs) have been identified as BMP co-receptors. We report here that DRAGON/RGMb, a member of the RGM family, suppressed BMP signaling in C2C12 myoblasts via a novel mechanism. All RGMs were expressed in C2C12 cells that were differentiated into myocytes and osteoblastic cells, but RGMc was not detected in immature cells. In C2C12 cells, only DRAGON suppressed ALP and Id1 promoter activities induced by BMP-4 or by constitutively activated BMP type I receptors. This inhibition by DRAGON was dependent on the secretory form of the von Willbrand factor type D domain. DRAGON even suppressed BMP signaling induced by constitutively activated Smad1. Over-expression of neogenin did not alter the inhibitory capacity of DRAGON. Taken together, these findings indicate that DRAGON may be an inhibitor of BMP signaling in C2C12 myoblasts. We also suggest that a novel molecule(s) expressed on the cell membrane may mediate the signal transduction of DRAGON in order to suppress BMP signaling in C2C12 myoblasts.

  6. AKAP-anchored PKA maintains neuronal L-type calcium channel activity and NFAT transcriptional signaling.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Jonathan G; Sanderson, Jennifer L; Gorski, Jessica A; Scott, John D; Catterall, William A; Sather, William A; Dell'Acqua, Mark L

    2014-06-12

    L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (LTCC) couple neuronal excitation to gene transcription. LTCC activity is elevated by the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and depressed by the Ca2+-dependent phosphatase calcineurin (CaN), and both enzymes are localized to the channel by A-kinase anchoring protein 79/150 (AKAP79/150). AKAP79/150 anchoring of CaN also promotes LTCC activation of transcription through dephosphorylation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT). We report here that the basal activity of AKAP79/150-anchored PKA maintains neuronal LTCC coupling to CaN-NFAT signaling by preserving LTCC phosphorylation in opposition to anchored CaN. Genetic disruption of AKAP-PKA anchoring promoted redistribution of the kinase out of postsynaptic dendritic spines, profound decreases in LTCC phosphorylation and Ca2+ influx, and impaired NFAT movement to the nucleus and activation of transcription. Thus, LTCC-NFAT transcriptional signaling in neurons requires precise organization and balancing of PKA and CaN activities in the channel nanoenvironment, which is only made possible by AKAP79/150 scaffolding.

  7. Channel-anchored Protein Kinase CK2 and Protein Phosphatase 1 Reciprocally Regulate KCNQ2-containing M-channels via Phosphorylation of Calmodulin*

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seungwoo; Xu, Mingxuan; Cooper, Edward C.; Hoshi, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    M-type potassium channels, encoded by the KCNQ family genes (KCNQ2–5), require calmodulin as an essential co-factor. Calmodulin bound to the KCNQ2 subunit regulates channel trafficking and stabilizes channel activity. We demonstrate that phosphorylation of calmodulin by protein kinase CK2 (casein kinase 2) rapidly and reversibly modulated KCNQ2 current. CK2-mediated phosphorylation of calmodulin strengthened its binding to KCNQ2 channel, caused resistance to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate depletion, and increased KCNQ2 current amplitude. Accordingly, application of CK2-selective inhibitors suppressed KCNQ2 current. This suppression was prevented by co-expression of CK2 phosphomimetic calmodulin mutants or pretreatment with a protein phosphatase inhibitor, calyculin A. We also demonstrated that functional CK2 and protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) were selectively tethered to the KCNQ2 subunit. We identified a functional KVXF consensus site for PP1 binding in the N-terminal tail of KCNQ2 subunit: mutation of this site augmented current density. CK2 inhibitor treatment suppressed M-current in rat superior cervical ganglion neurons, an effect negated by overexpression of phosphomimetic calmodulin or pretreatment with calyculin A Furthermore, CK2 inhibition diminished the medium after hyperpolarization by suppressing the M-current. These findings suggest that CK2-mediated phosphorylation of calmodulin regulates the M-current, which is tonically regulated by CK2 and PP1 anchored to the KCNQ2 channel complex. PMID:24627475

  8. Nanobiotechnologic approach to a promising vaccine prototype for immunisation against leishmaniasis: a fast and effective method to incorporate GPI-anchored proteins of Leishmania amazonensis into liposomes.

    PubMed

    Colhone, Marcelle Carolina; Silva-Jardim, Izaltina; Stabeli, Rodrigo Guerino; Ciancaglini, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Liposomes are known to be a potent adjuvant for a wide range of antigens, as well as appropriate antigen carriers for antibody generation response in vivo. In addition, liposomes are effective vehicles for peptides and proteins, thus enhancing their immunogenicity. Considering these properties of liposomes and the antigenicity of the Leishmania membrane proteins, we evaluated if liposomes carrying glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins of Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes could induce protective immunity in BALB/c mice. To assay protective immunity, BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally injected with liposomes, GPI-protein extract (EPSGPI) as well as with the proteoliposomes carrying GPI-proteins. Mice inoculated with EPSGPI and total protein present in constitutive proteoliposomes displayed a post-infection protection of about 70% and 90%, respectively. The liposomes are able to work as adjuvant in the EPSGPI protection. These systems seem to be a promising vaccine prototype for immunisation against leishmaniasis.

  9. Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy and Photon Counting Histogram on membrane proteins: Functional dynamics of the GPI-anchored Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Malengo, Gabriele; Andolfo, Annapaola; Sidenius, Nicolai; Gratton, Enrico; Zamai, Moreno; Caiolfa, Valeria R

    2009-01-01

    The oligomerization of GPI-anchored proteins is thought to regulate their association with membrane microdomains, sub-cellular sorting and activity. However, these mechanisms need to be comprehensively explored in living, unperturbed cells, without artificial clustering agents, and using fluorescent protein-tagged chimeras that are fully biologically active. We expressed in HEK293 cells a biologically active chimera of the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), the uPAR-mEGFP-GPI. We also produced HEK293/D2D3-mEGFP-GPI cells expressing the truncated form of the receptor, lacking biological activity. We studied the dynamics and oligomerization of the two proteins, combining FCS and PCH analyses, and using subclones with homogenously low expression levels. Overall, the mobile fractions of the two proteins, constituted by monomers and dimers, had comparable diffusion coefficients. However, only for the active receptor the diffusion coefficient decreased in monomer-enriched fractions, suggesting that uPAR monomers might be preferentially engaged in multi-protein transmembrane signaling complexes. Our approach helps in limiting the alteration of the data due to out-of-focus, and minimizing the overestimation of the molecular brightness. Joint to a careful design of the cellular model, it gives reliable estimates of diffusion coefficients and oligomerization of GPI-anchored proteins, in steady state conditions, at low expression levels, and in live, unperturbed cells. PMID:18601539

  10. Mechanism of anchoring of OmpA protein to the cell wall peptidoglycan of the gram-negative bacterial outer membrane

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeong Soon; Lee, Woo Cheol; Yeo, Kwon Joo; Ryu, Kyoung-Seok; Kumarasiri, Malika; Hesek, Dusan; Lee, Mijoon; Mobashery, Shahriar; Song, Jung Hyun; Kim, Seung Il; Lee, Je Chul; Cheong, Chaejoon; Jeon, Young Ho; Kim, Hye-Yeon

    2012-01-01

    The outer membrane protein A (OmpA) plays important roles in anchoring of the outer membrane to the bacterial cell wall. The C-terminal periplasmic domain of OmpA (OmpA-like domain) associates with the peptidoglycan (PGN) layer noncovalently. However, there is a paucity of information on the structural aspects of the mechanism of PGN recognition by OmpA-like domains. To elucidate this molecular recognition process, we solved the high-resolution crystal structure of an OmpA-like domain from Acinetobacter baumannii bound to diaminopimelate (DAP), a unique bacterial amino acid from the PGN. The structure clearly illustrates that two absolutely conserved Asp271 and Arg286 residues are the key to the binding to DAP of PGN. Identification of DAP as the central anchoring site of PGN to OmpA is further supported by isothermal titration calorimetry and a pulldown assay with PGN. An NMR-based computational model for complexation between the PGN and OmpA emerged, and this model is validated by determining the crystal structure in complex with a synthetic PGN fragment. These structural data provide a detailed glimpse of how the anchoring of OmpA to the cell wall of gram-negative bacteria takes place in a DAP-dependent manner.—Park, J. S., Lee, W. C., Yeo, K. J., Ryu, K.-S., Kumarasiri, M., Hesek, D., Lee, M., Mobashery, S., Song, J. H., Lim, S. I., Lee, J. C., Cheong, C., Jeon, Y. H., Kim, H.-Y. Mechanism of anchoring of OmpA protein to the cell wall peptidoglycan of the gram-negative bacterial outer membrane. PMID:21965596

  11. Anchoring of both PKA and 14-3-3 inhibits the Rho-GEF activity of the AKAP-Lbc signaling complex.

    PubMed

    Diviani, Dario; Abuin, Liliane; Cotecchia, Susanna; Pansier, Laetitia

    2004-07-21

    A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) target the cAMP-regulated protein kinase (PKA) to its physiological substrates. We recently identified a novel anchoring protein, called AKAP-Lbc, which functions as a PKA-targeting protein as well as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for RhoA. We demonstrated that AKAP-Lbc Rho-GEF activity is stimulated by the alpha subunit of the heterotrimeric G protein G12. Here, we identified 14-3-3 as a novel regulatory protein interacting with AKAP-Lbc. Elevation of the cellular concentration of cAMP activates the PKA holoenzyme anchored to AKAP-Lbc, which phosphorylates the anchoring protein on the serine 1565. This phosphorylation event induces the recruitment of 14-3-3, which inhibits the Rho-GEF activity of AKAP-Lbc. AKAP-Lbc mutants that fail to interact with PKA or with 14-3-3 show a higher basal Rho-GEF activity as compared to the wild-type protein. This suggests that, under basal conditions, 14-3-3 maintains AKAP-Lbc in an inactive state. Therefore, while it is known that AKAP-Lbc activity can be stimulated by Galpha12, in this study we demonstrated that it is inhibited by the anchoring of both PKA and 14-3-3.

  12. The CWB2 Cell Wall-Anchoring Module Is Revealed by the Crystal Structures of the Clostridium difficile Cell Wall Proteins Cwp8 and Cwp6.

    PubMed

    Usenik, Aleksandra; Renko, Miha; Mihelič, Marko; Lindič, Nataša; Borišek, Jure; Perdih, Andrej; Pretnar, Gregor; Müller, Uwe; Turk, Dušan

    2017-03-07

    Bacterial cell wall proteins play crucial roles in cell survival, growth, and environmental interactions. In Gram-positive bacteria, cell wall proteins include several types that are non-covalently attached via cell wall binding domains. Of the two conserved surface-layer (S-layer)-anchoring modules composed of three tandem SLH or CWB2 domains, the latter have so far eluded structural insight. The crystal structures of Cwp8 and Cwp6 reveal multi-domain proteins, each containing an embedded CWB2 module. It consists of a triangular trimer of Rossmann-fold CWB2 domains, a feature common to 29 cell wall proteins in Clostridium difficile 630. The structural basis of the intact module fold necessary for its binding to the cell wall is revealed. A comparison with previously reported atomic force microscopy data of S-layers suggests that C. difficile S-layers are complex oligomeric structures, likely composed of several different proteins.

  13. Subcellular Partitioning of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B to the Endoplasmic Reticulum and Mitochondria Depends Sensitively on the Composition of Its Tail Anchor

    PubMed Central

    Fueller, Julia; Egorov, Mikhail V.; Walther, Kirstin A.; Sabet, Ola; Mallah, Jana; Grabenbauer, Markus; Kinkhabwala, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The canonical protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B is an important regulator of diverse cellular signaling networks. PTP1B has long been thought to exert its influence solely from its perch on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER); however, an additional subpopulation of PTP1B has recently been detected in mitochondria extracted from rat brain tissue. Here, we show that PTP1B’s mitochondrial localization is general (observed across diverse mammalian cell lines) and sensitively dependent on the transmembrane domain length, C-terminal charge and hydropathy of its short (≤35 amino acid) tail anchor. Our electron microscopy of specific DAB precipitation revealed that PTP1B localizes via its tail anchor to the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM), with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy establishing that this OMM pool contributes to the previously reported cytoplasmic interaction of PTP1B with endocytosed epidermal growth factor receptor. We additionally examined the mechanism of PTP1B’s insertion into the ER membrane through heterologous expression of PTP1B’s tail anchor in wild-type yeast and yeast mutants of major conserved ER insertion pathways: In none of these yeast strains was ER targeting significantly impeded, providing in vivo support for the hypothesis of spontaneous membrane insertion (as previously demonstrated in vitro). Further functional elucidation of the newly recognized mitochondrial pool of PTP1B will likely be important for understanding its complex roles in cellular responses to external stimuli, cell proliferation and diseased states. PMID:26431424

  14. Ultrasonic/Sonic Anchor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart

    2009-01-01

    The ultrasonic/sonic anchor (U/S anchor) is an anchoring device that drills a hole for itself in rock, concrete, or other similar material. The U/S anchor is a recent addition to a series of related devices, the first of which were reported in "Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill/Corers With Integrated Sensors"

  15. Comparative genome-based identification of a cell wall-anchored protein from Lactobacillus plantarum increases adhesion of Lactococcus lactis to human epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Zuo, Fanglei; Yu, Rui; Zeng, Zhu; Ma, Huiqin; Chen, Shangwu

    2015-09-15

    Adhesion to host cells is considered important for Lactobacillus plantarum as well as other lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to persist in human gut and thus exert probiotic effects. Here, we sequenced the genome of Lt. plantarum strain NL42 originating from a traditional Chinese dairy product, performed comparative genomic analysis and characterized a novel adhesion factor. The genome of NL42 was highly divergent from its closest neighbors, especially in six large genomic regions. NL42 harbors a total of 42 genes encoding adhesion-associated proteins; among them, cwaA encodes a protein containing multiple domains, including five cell wall surface anchor repeat domains and an LPxTG-like cell wall anchor motif. Expression of cwaA in Lactococcus lactis significantly increased its autoaggregation and hydrophobicity, and conferred the new ability to adhere to human colonic epithelial HT-29 cells by targeting cellular surface proteins, and not carbohydrate moieties, for CwaA adhesion. In addition, the recombinant Lc. lactis inhibited adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli to HT-29 cells, mainly by exclusion. We conclude that CwaA is a novel adhesion factor in Lt. plantarum and a potential candidate for improving the adhesion ability of probiotics or other bacteria of interest.

  16. Mutation of wrb, a Component of the Guided Entry of Tail-Anchored Protein Pathway, Disrupts Photoreceptor Synapse Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Daniele, Lauren L.; Emran, Farida; Lobo, Glenn P.; Gaivin, Robert J.; Perkins, Brian D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Tail-anchored (TA) proteins contain a single hydrophobic domain at the C-terminus and are posttranslationally inserted into the ER membrane via the GET (guided entry of tail-anchored proteins) pathway. The role of the GET pathway in photoreceptors is unexplored. The goal of this study was to characterize the zebrafish pinball wizard mutant, which disrupts Wrb, a core component of the GET pathway. Methods Electroretinography, optokinetic response measurements (OKR), immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy analyses were employed to assess ribbon synapse function, protein expression, and ultrastructure in 5-day-old zebrafish larvae. Expression of wrb was investigated with real-time qRT-PCR and in situ hybridization. Results Mutation of wrb abolished the OKR and greatly diminished the ERG b-wave, but not the a-wave. Ribeye and SV2 were partially mislocalized in both photoreceptors and hair cells of wrb mutants. Fewer contacts were seen between photoreceptors and bipolar cells in wrb−/− mutants. Expression of wrb was observed throughout the nervous system and Wrb localized to the ER and synaptic region of photoreceptors. Morpholino knockdown of the cytosolic ATPase trc40, which targets TA proteins to the ER, also diminished the OKR. Overexpression of wrb fully restored contrast sensitivity in mutants, while overexpression of mutant wrbR73A, which cannot bind Trc40, did not. Conclusions Proteins Wrb and Trc40 are required for synaptic transmission between photoreceptors and bipolar cells, indicating that TA protein insertion by the TRC pathway is a critical step in ribbon synapse assembly and function. PMID:27273592

  17. GPI-80, a beta2 integrin associated glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein, concentrates on pseudopodia without association with beta2 integrin during neutrophil migration.

    PubMed

    Yoshitake, Hiroshi; Takeda, Yuji; Nitto, Takeaki; Sendo, Fujiro; Araki, Yoshihiko

    2003-01-01

    Previously, we identified a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein, designated GPI-80, present on human neutrophils and monocytes. GPI-80 is physically associated with beta2 integrin on the surface of human neutrophils and may be a regulator of neutrophil adherence and migration. However, it is not yet known how GPI-80 regulates cell adhesion and migration. To investigate the physiological role(s) of GPI-80, we examined the topological relationship of GPI-80 and the beta2 integrin subunit (CD18) on resting and migrating human neutrophils by confocal laser microscopy. On resting neutrophils, GPI-80 was evenly distributed on the cell surface and was associated with CD18. On the other hand, during the early phase of migration (5 - 30 minutes), GPI-80 was detected on cell bodies and also on pseudopodia, but CD18 was detected only on cell bodies, where it was associated with GPI-80. In the late phase of migration (60 minutes), GPI-80 was detected only on pseudopodia and its association with CD18 was hardly observed. Furthermore, some of the GPI-80 on pseudopodia of migrating neutrophils during the late phase was associated with urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), a regulator of beta2 integrin-dependent adherence and migration. The distribution of GPI-80 on cell surfaces is similar to that of uPAR. These observations suggest that GPI-80 belongs to the beta2 integrin-associated GPI-anchored protein family, which has regulatory activity in cell adherence.

  18. Enhanced response of T lymphocytes from Pgap3 knockout mouse: Insight into roles of fatty acid remodeling of GPI anchored proteins.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Hidekazu; Wang, Yetao; Hasuwa, Hidetoshi; Maeda, Yusuke; Kinoshita, Taroh; Murakami, Yoshiko

    2012-01-27

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) is a complex glycolipid that serves as a membrane anchor for many cell-surface proteins, such as Thy-1 and CD48. GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs) play important roles in many biological processes, such as signal transduction and cell-cell interaction, through their association with lipid rafts. Fatty acid remodeling of GPI-APs in the Golgi apparatus is required for their efficient association with lipid rafts, i.e., the unsaturated fatty acid at the sn-2 position of the PI moiety is exchanged for the saturated fatty acid by PGAP2 and PGAP3. To investigate the immunological role of the fatty acid remodeling of GPI-APs, we generated a Pgap3 knockout mouse. In this mouse, GPI-APs are expressed on the cell surface without fatty acid remodeling, and fail to associate with lipid rafts. Male Pgap3 knockout mice were born alive at a ratio lower than expected from Mendel's law, whereas the number of female mice followed Mendel's law. All mice exhibited growth retardation and abnormal reflexes such as limb grasping. We focused T cell function in these mice and found that T cell development in the absence of Pgap3 was normal. However, the response of T cells was enhanced in Pgap3 knockout mice in both in vitro and in vivo studies, including alloreactive response, antigen-specific immune response, and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Cross-linking of Thy-1 in wild-type cells inhibited the signal transduced by the T cell receptor (TCR), whereas cross-linking of Thy-1 in Pgap3 knockout cells enhanced the TCR signal. These results suggest that GPI-APs localized in lipid rafts may modulate signaling through the TCR.

  19. Efficient cell surface display of Lip2 lipase using C-domains of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored cell wall proteins of Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Yuzbasheva, Evgeniya Y; Yuzbashev, Tigran V; Laptev, Ivan A; Konstantinova, Tatiana K; Sineoky, Sergey P

    2011-08-01

    The cell surface display of enzymes is of great interest because of its simplified purification stage and the possibility for recycling in industrial processes. In this study, we have focused on the cell wall immobilization of Yarrowia lipolytica Lip2 protein--an enzyme that has a wide technological application. By genome analysis of Y. lipolytica in addition to already characterized Ylcwp1, we identified five putative open reading frames encoding glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins. Lip2 translation fusion with the carboxyl termini of these proteins revealed that all proteins were capable of immobilizing lipase in active form on the cell surface. The highest level of cell-bound lipase activity was achieved using C-domains encoded by YlCWP1, YlCWP3 (YALI0D27214g) and YlCWP6 (YALI0F18282g) comprising 16,173 ± 1,800, 18,785 ± 1,130 and 17,700 ± 2,101 U/g dry cells, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, these results significantly exceed the highest cell-bound lipase activity previously reported for engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris strains. Furthermore, the lyophilized biomass retained the activity and was robust to collecting/resuspending procedures. Nevertheless, in most cases, a substantial amount of lipase activity was also found in the growth medium. Further work will be necessary to better understand the nature of this phenomenon.

  20. TssK Is a Trimeric Cytoplasmic Protein Interacting with Components of Both Phage-like and Membrane Anchoring Complexes of the Type VI Secretion System*

    PubMed Central

    Zoued, Abdelrahim; Durand, Eric; Bebeacua, Cecilia; Brunet, Yannick R.; Douzi, Badreddine; Cambillau, Christian; Cascales, Eric; Journet, Laure

    2013-01-01

    The Type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a macromolecular machine that mediates bacteria-host or bacteria-bacteria interactions. The T6SS core apparatus assembles from 13 proteins that form two sub-assemblies: a phage-like complex and a trans-envelope complex. The Hcp, VgrG, TssE, and TssB/C subunits are structurally and functionally related to components of the tail of contractile bacteriophages. This phage-like structure is thought to be anchored to the membrane by a trans-envelope complex composed of the TssJ, TssL, and TssM proteins. However, how the two sub-complexes are connected remains unknown. Here we identify TssK, a protein that establishes contacts with the two T6SS sub-complexes through direct interactions with TssL, Hcp, and TssC. TssK is a cytoplasmic protein assembling trimers that display a three-armed shape, as revealed by TEM and SAXS analyses. Fluorescence microscopy experiments further demonstrate the requirement of TssK for sheath assembly. Our results suggest a central role for TssK by linking both complexes during T6SS assembly. PMID:23921384

  1. A 39-kD plasma membrane protein (IP39) is an anchor for the unusual membrane skeleton of Euglena gracilis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosiere, T.K.; Marrs, J.A.; Bouck, G.B. )

    1990-04-01

    The major integral plasma membrane protein (IP39) of Euglena gracilis was radiolabeled, peptide mapped, and dissected with proteases to identify cytoplasmic domains that bind and anchor proteins of the cell surface. When plasma membranes were radioiodinated and extracted with octyl glucoside, 98% of the extracted label was found in IP39 or the 68- and 110-kD oligomers of IP39. The octyl glucoside extracts were incubated with unlabeled cell surface proteins immobilized on nitrocellulose (overlays). Radiolabel from the membrane extract bound one (80 kD) of the two (80 and 86 kD) major membrane skeletal protein bands. Resolubilization of the bound label yielded a radiolabeled polypeptide identical in Mr to IP39. Intact plasma membranes were also digested with papain before or after radioiodination, thereby producing a cytoplasmically truncated IP39. The octyl glucoside extract of truncated IP39 no longer bound to the 80-kD membrane skeletal protein in the nitrocellulose overlays. EM of intact or trypsin digested plasma membranes incubated with membrane skeletal proteins under stringent conditions similar to those used in the nitrocellulose overlays revealed a partially reformed membrane skeletal layer. Little evidence of a membrane skeletal layer was found, however, when plasma membranes were predigested with papain before reassociation. A candidate 80-kD binding domain of IP39 has been tentatively identified as a peptide fragment that was present after trypsin digestion of plasma membranes, but was absent after papain digestion in two-dimensional peptide maps of IP39. Together, these data suggest that the unique peripheral membrane skeleton of Euglena binds to the plasma membrane through noncovalent interactions between the major 80-kD membrane skeletal protein and a small, papain sensitive cytoplasmic domain of IP39.

  2. Transamidase subunit GAA1/GPAA1 is a M28 family metallo-peptide-synthetase that catalyzes the peptide bond formation between the substrate protein's omega-site and the GPI lipid anchor's phosphoethanolamine.

    PubMed

    Eisenhaber, Birgit; Eisenhaber, Stephan; Kwang, Toh Yew; Grüber, Gerhard; Eisenhaber, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The transamidase subunit GAA1/GPAA1 is predicted to be the enzyme that catalyzes the attachment of the glycosylphosphatidyl (GPI) lipid anchor to the carbonyl intermediate of the substrate protein at the ω-site. Its ~300-amino acid residue lumenal domain is a M28 family metallo-peptide-synthetase with an α/β hydrolase fold, including a central 8-strand β-sheet and a single metal (most likely zinc) ion coordinated by 3 conserved polar residues. Phosphoethanolamine is used as an adaptor to make the non-peptide GPI lipid anchor look chemically similar to the N terminus of a peptide.

  3. Selectivity of the cleavage/attachment site of phosphatidylinositol-glycan-anchored membrane proteins determined by site-specific mutagenesis at Asp-484 of placental alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Micanovic, R; Gerber, L D; Berger, J; Kodukula, K; Udenfriend, S

    1990-01-01

    Many proteins are now known to be anchored to the plasma membrane by a phosphatidylinositol-glycan (PI-G) moiety that is attached to their COOH termini. Placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP) has been used as a model for investigating mechanisms involved in the COOH-terminal processing of PI-G-tailed proteins. The COOH-terminal domain of pre-pro-PLAP provides a signal for processing during which a largely hydrophobic 29-residue COOH-terminal peptide is removed, and the PI-G moiety is added to the newly exposed Asp-484 terminus. This cleavage/attachment site was subjected to an almost saturation mutagenesis, and the enzymatic activities, COOH-terminal processing, and cellular localizations of the various mutant PLAP forms were determined. Substitution of Asp-484 by glycine, alanine, cysteine, asparagine, or serine (category I) resulted in PI-G-tailed and enzymatically active proteins. However, not all category I mutant proteins were PI-G tailed to the same extent. Pre-pro-PLAP with other substituents at position 484 (threonine, proline, methionine, valine, leucine, tyrosine, tryptophan, lysine, glutamic acid, and glutamine; category II) were expressed, as well as the category I amino acids, but there was little or no processing to the PI-G-tailed form, and this latter group exhibited very low enzyme activity. The bulk of the PLAP protein produced by category II mutants and some produced by category I mutants were sequestered within the cell, apparently in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Most likely, certain amino acids at residue 484 are preferred because they yield better substrates for the putative "transamidating" enzyme. In transfected COS cells, at least, posttranslational PI-G-tail processing does not go to completion even for preferred substrates. Apparently PI-G tailing is a requisite for transport from the ER and for PLAP enzyme activity. Proteins that are not transamidated are apparently retained in the ER in an inactive conformation. Images PMID:2153284

  4. The nuclear pore complex protein ALADIN is anchored via NDC1 but not via POM121 and GP210 in the nuclear envelope

    SciTech Connect

    Kind, Barbara; Koehler, Katrin; Lorenz, Mike; Huebner, Angela

    2009-12-11

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) consists of {approx}30 different proteins and provides the only sites for macromolecular transport between cytoplasm and nucleus. ALADIN was discovered as a new member of the NPC. Mutations in ALADIN are known to cause triple A syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by adrenal insufficiency, alacrima, and achalasia. The function and exact location of the nucleoporin ALADIN within the NPC multiprotein complex is still unclear. Using a siRNA-based approach we downregulated the three known membrane integrated nucleoporins NDC1, GP210, and POM121 in stably expressing GFP-ALADIN HeLa cells. We identified NDC1 but not GP210 and POM121 as the main anchor of ALADIN within the NPC. Solely the depletion of NDC1 caused mislocalization of ALADIN. Vice versa, the depletion of ALADIN led also to disappearance of NDC1 at the NPC. However, the downregulation of two further membrane-integral nucleoporins GP210 and POM121 had no effect on ALADIN localization. Furthermore, we could show a direct association of NDC1 and ALADIN in NPCs by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements. Based on our findings we conclude that ALADIN is anchored in the nuclear envelope via NDC1 and that this interaction gets lost, if ALADIN is mutated. The loss of integration of ALADIN in the NPC is a main pathogenetic aspect for the development of the triple A syndrome and suggests that the interaction between ALADIN and NDC1 may be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease.

  5. A Plasma Membrane-Anchored Fluorescent Protein Fusion Illuminates Sieve Element Plasma Membranes in Arabidopsis and Tobacco1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Matthew V.; Wolniak, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    Rapid acquisition of quantitative anatomical data from the sieve tubes of angiosperm phloem has been confounded by their small size, their distance from organ surfaces, and the time-consuming nature of traditional methods, such as transmission electron microscopy. To improve access to these cells, for which good anatomical data are critical, a monomeric yellow fluorescent protein (mCitrine) was N-terminally fused to a small (approximately 6 kD) membrane protein (AtRCI2A) and stably expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana (Columbia-0 ecotype) and Nicotiana tabacum (‘Samsun’) under the control of a companion cell-specific promoter (AtSUC2p). The construct, called by its abbreviation SUmCR, yielded stable sieve element (SE) plasma membrane fluorescence labeling, even after plastic (methacrylate) embedding. In conjunction with wide-field fluorescence measurements of sieve pore number and position using aniline blue-stained callose, mCitrine-labeled material was used to calculate rough estimates of sieve tube-specific conductivity for both species. The SUmCR construct also revealed a hitherto unknown expression domain of the AtSUC2 Suc-H+ symporter in the epidermis of the cell division zone of developing root tips. The success of this construct in targeting plasma membrane-anchored fluorescent proteins to SEs could be attributable to the small size of AtRCI2A or to the presence of other signals innate to AtRCI2A that permit the protein to be trafficked to SEs. The construct provides a hitherto unique entrée into companion cell-to-SE protein targeting, as well as a new tool for studying whole-plant phloem anatomy and architecture. PMID:18223149

  6. Design and optimization of a phosphopeptide anchor for specific immobilization of a capture protein on zirconium phosphonate modified supports.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Queffélec, Clémence; Charlier, Cathy; Defontaine, Alain; Fateh, Amina; Tellier, Charles; Talham, Daniel R; Bujoli, Bruno

    2014-11-25

    The attachment of affinity proteins onto zirconium phosphonate coated glass slides was investigated by fusing a short phosphorylated peptide sequence at one extremity to enable selective bonding to the active surface via the formation of zirconium phosphate coordinate covalent bonds. In a model study, the binding of short peptides containing zero to four phosphorylated serine units and a biotin end-group was assessed by surface plasmon resonance-enhanced ellipsometry (SPREE) as well as in a microarray format using fluorescence detection of AlexaFluor 647-labeled streptavidin. Significant binding to the zirconated surface was only observed in the case of the phosphopeptides, with the best performance, as judged by streptavidin capture, observed for peptides with three or four phosphorylation sites and when spotted at pH 3. When fusing similar phosphopeptide tags to the affinity protein, the presence of four phosphate groups in the tag allows efficient immobilization of the proteins and efficient capture of their target.

  7. BAR domains, amphipathic helices and membrane-anchored proteins use the same mechanism to sense membrane curvature.

    PubMed

    Madsen, K L; Bhatia, V K; Gether, U; Stamou, D

    2010-05-03

    The internal membranes of eukaryotic cells are all twists and bends characterized by high curvature. During recent years it has become clear that specific proteins sustain these curvatures while others simply recognize membrane shape and use it as "molecular information" to organize cellular processes in space and time. Here we discuss this new important recognition process termed membrane curvature sensing (MCS). First, we review a new fluorescence-based experimental method that allows characterization of MCS using measurements on single vesicles and compare it to sensing assays that use bulk/ensemble liposome samples of different mean diameter. Next, we describe two different MCS protein motifs (amphipathic helices and BAR domains) and suggest that in both cases curvature sensitive membrane binding results from asymmetric insertion of hydrophobic amino acids in the lipid membrane. This mechanism can be extended to include the insertion of alkyl chain in the lipid membrane and consequently palmitoylated and myristoylated proteins are predicted to display similar curvature sensitive binding. Surprisingly, in all the aforementioned cases, MCS is predominantly mediated by a higher density of binding sites on curved membranes instead of higher affinity as assumed so far. Finally, we integrate these new insights into the debate about which motifs are involved in sensing versus induction of membrane curvature and what role MCS proteins may play in biology.

  8. Anchors for Education Reforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alok, Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Education reforms, considering their significance, deserve better methods than mere "trial and error." This article conceptualizes a network of six anchors for education reforms: education policy, education system, curriculum, pedagogy, assessment, and teacher education. It establishes the futility to reform anchors in isolation and…

  9. Quantitative determination of the lateral density and intermolecular correlation between proteins anchored on the membrane surfaces using grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering and grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abuillan, Wasim; Vorobiev, Alexei; Hartel, Andreas; Jones, Nicola G.; Engstler, Markus; Tanaka, Motomu

    2012-11-01

    As a physical model of the surface of cells coated with densely packed, non-crystalline proteins coupled to lipid anchors, we functionalized the surface of phospholipid membranes by coupling of neutravidin to biotinylated lipid anchors. After the characterization of fine structures perpendicular to the plane of membrane using specular X-ray reflectivity, the same membrane was characterized by grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). Within the framework of distorted wave Born approximation and two-dimensional Percus-Yevick function, we can analyze the form and structure factors of the non-crystalline, membrane-anchored proteins for the first time. As a new experimental technique to quantify the surface density of proteins on the membrane surface, we utilized grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence (GIXF). Here, the mean intermolecular distance between proteins from the sulfur peak intensities can be calculated by applying Abelé's matrix formalism. The characteristic correlation distance between non-crystalline neutravidin obtained by the GISAXS analysis agrees well with the intermolecular distance calculated by GIXF, suggesting a large potential of the combination of GISAXS and GIXF in probing the lateral density and correlation of non-crystalline proteins displayed on the membrane surface.

  10. Quantitative determination of the lateral density and intermolecular correlation between proteins anchored on the membrane surfaces using grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering and grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Abuillan, Wasim; Vorobiev, Alexei; Hartel, Andreas; Jones, Nicola G; Engstler, Markus; Tanaka, Motomu

    2012-11-28

    As a physical model of the surface of cells coated with densely packed, non-crystalline proteins coupled to lipid anchors, we functionalized the surface of phospholipid membranes by coupling of neutravidin to biotinylated lipid anchors. After the characterization of fine structures perpendicular to the plane of membrane using specular X-ray reflectivity, the same membrane was characterized by grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). Within the framework of distorted wave Born approximation and two-dimensional Percus-Yevick function, we can analyze the form and structure factors of the non-crystalline, membrane-anchored proteins for the first time. As a new experimental technique to quantify the surface density of proteins on the membrane surface, we utilized grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence (GIXF). Here, the mean intermolecular distance between proteins from the sulfur peak intensities can be calculated by applying Abelé's matrix formalism. The characteristic correlation distance between non-crystalline neutravidin obtained by the GISAXS analysis agrees well with the intermolecular distance calculated by GIXF, suggesting a large potential of the combination of GISAXS and GIXF in probing the lateral density and correlation of non-crystalline proteins displayed on the membrane surface.

  11. Arabidopsis LTPG Is a Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Anchored Lipid Transfer Protein Required for Export of Lipids to the Plant Surface[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    DeBono, Allan; Yeats, Trevor H.; Rose, Jocelyn K.C.; Bird, David; Jetter, Reinhard; Kunst, Ljerka; Samuels, Lacey

    2009-01-01

    Plant epidermal cells dedicate more than half of their lipid metabolism to the synthesis of cuticular lipids, which seal and protect the plant shoot. The cuticle is made up of a cutin polymer and waxes, diverse hydrophobic compounds including very-long-chain fatty acids and their derivatives. How such hydrophobic compounds are exported to the cuticle, especially through the hydrophilic plant cell wall, is not known. By performing a reverse genetic screen, we have identified LTPG, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored lipid transfer protein that is highly expressed in the epidermis during cuticle biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana inflorescence stems. Mutant plant lines with decreased LTPG expression had reduced wax load on the stem surface, showing that LTPG is involved either directly or indirectly in cuticular lipid deposition. In vitro 2-p-toluidinonaphthalene-6-sulfonate assays showed that recombinant LTPG has the capacity to bind to this lipid probe. LTPG was primarily localized to the plasma membrane on all faces of stem epidermal cells in the growing regions of inflorescence stems where wax is actively secreted. These data suggest that LTPG may function as a component of the cuticular lipid export machinery. PMID:19366900

  12. Protein Kinase C Isozyme in Mammary Carcinogenesis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-10-01

    11 A B Clone 72 Clone 34 AKAP 86 Clone 35H CInn 72 lonn 4 P 95 lone 351 9. 5J 4.4- 688 431 Clone 45 Clone 35F Clone 64 Annexln 1 Clone 45 Clone 35F...purified antibodies directed against a variety of PKC substrates and an A-kinase anchoring protein, AKAP 95. (B) PolyA+ mRNAs isolated from confluent cell

  13. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Issatchenkia orientalis GPI-Anchored Protein, IoGas1, Required for Resistance to Low pH and Salt Stress

    PubMed Central

    Matsushika, Akinori; Negi, Kanako; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Goshima, Tetsuya; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2016-01-01

    The use of yeasts tolerant to acid (low pH) and salt stress is of industrial importance for several bioproduction processes. To identify new candidate genes having potential roles in low-pH tolerance, we screened an expression genomic DNA library of a multiple-stress-tolerant yeast, Issatchenkia orientalis (Pichia kudriavzevii), for clones that allowed Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells to grow under highly acidic conditions (pH 2.0). A genomic DNA clone containing two putative open reading frames was obtained, of which the putative protein-coding gene comprising 1629 bp was retransformed into the host. This transformant grew significantly at pH 2.0, and at pH 2.5 in the presence of 7.5% Na2SO4. The predicted amino acid sequence of this new gene, named I. orientalis GAS1 (IoGAS1), was 60% identical to the S. cerevisiae Gas1 protein, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein essential for maintaining cell wall integrity, and 58–59% identical to Candida albicans Phr1 and Phr2, pH-responsive proteins implicated in cell wall assembly and virulence. Northern hybridization analyses indicated that, as for the C. albicans homologs, IoGAS1 expression was pH-dependent, with expression increasing with decreasing pH (from 4.0 to 2.0) of the medium. These results suggest that IoGAS1 represents a novel pH-regulated system required for the adaptation of I. orientalis to environments of diverse pH. Heterologous expression of IoGAS1 complemented the growth and morphological defects of a S. cerevisiae gas1Δ mutant, demonstrating that IoGAS1 and the corresponding S. cerevisiae gene play similar roles in cell wall biosynthesis. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments revealed that two conserved glutamate residues (E161 and E262) in the IoGas1 protein play a crucial role in yeast morphogenesis and tolerance to low pH and salt stress. Furthermore, overexpression of IoGAS1 in S. cerevisiae remarkably improved the ethanol fermentation ability at pH 2.5, and at pH 2.0 in the presence of

  14. Membrane-anchoring and charge effects in the interaction of myelin basic protein with lipid bilayers studied by site-directed spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Bates, Ian R; Boggs, Joan M; Feix, Jimmy B; Harauz, George

    2003-08-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) maintains the compaction of the myelin sheath in the central nervous system by anchoring the cytoplasmic face of the two apposing bilayers and may also play a role in signal transduction. Site-directed spin labeling was done at eight matching sites in each of two recombinant murine MBPs, qC1 (charge +19) and qC8 charge (+13), which, respectively, emulate the native form of the protein (C1) and a post-translationally modified form (C8) that is increased in multiple sclerosis. When interacting with large unilamellar vesicles, most spin-labeled sites in qC8 were more mobile than those in qC1. Depth measurement via continuous wave power saturation indicated that the N-terminal and C-terminal sites in qC1 were located below the plane of the phospholipid headgroups. In qC8, the C-terminal domain dissociated from the membrane, suggesting a means by which the exposure of natural C8 to cytosolic enzymes and ligands might increase in vivo in multiple sclerosis. The importance of two Phe-Phe pairs in MBP to its interactions with lipids was investigated by separately mutating each pair to Ala-Ala. The mobility at F42A/F43A and especially F86A/F87A increased significantly. Depth measurements and helical wheel analysis indicated that the Phe-86/Phe-87 region could form a surface-seeking amphipathic alpha-helix.

  15. AKAP-Lbc nucleates a protein kinase D activation scaffold.

    PubMed

    Carnegie, Graeme K; Smith, F Donelson; McConnachie, George; Langeberg, Lorene K; Scott, John D

    2004-09-24

    The transmission of cellular signals often proceeds through multiprotein complexes where enzymes are positioned in proximity to their upstream activators and downstream substrates. In this report we demonstrate that the A-kinase anchoring protein AKAP-Lbc assembles an activation complex for the lipid-dependent enzyme protein kinase D (PKD). Using a combination of biochemical, enzymatic, and immunofluorescence techniques, we show that the anchoring protein contributes to PKD activation in two ways: it recruits an upstream kinase PKCeta and coordinates PKA phosphorylation events that release activated protein kinase D. Thus, AKAP-Lbc synchronizes PKA and PKC activities in a manner that leads to the activation of a third kinase. This configuration illustrates the utility of kinase anchoring as a mechanism to constrain the action of broad-spectrum enzymes.

  16. Anchor Trial Launch

    Cancer.gov

    NCI has launched a multicenter phase III clinical trial called the ANCHOR Study -- Anal Cancer HSIL (High-grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesion) Outcomes Research Study -- to determine if treatment of HSIL in HIV-infected individuals can prevent anal canc

  17. The SrkA Kinase Is Part of the SakA Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Interactome and Regulates Stress Responses and Development in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Jaimes-Arroyo, Rafael; Lara-Rojas, Fernando; Bayram, Özgür; Valerius, Oliver; Braus, Gerhard H.

    2015-01-01

    Fungi and many other eukaryotes use specialized mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) of the Hog1/p38 family to transduce environmental stress signals. In Aspergillus nidulans, the MAPK SakA and the transcription factor AtfA are components of a central multiple stress-signaling pathway that also regulates development. Here we characterize SrkA, a putative MAPK-activated protein kinase, as a novel component of this pathway. ΔsrkA and ΔsakA mutants share a derepressed sexual development phenotype. However, ΔsrkA mutants are not sensitive to oxidative stress, and in fact, srkA inactivation partially suppresses the sensitivity of ΔsakA mutant conidia to H2O2, tert-butyl-hydroperoxide (t-BOOH), and menadione. In the absence of stress, SrkA shows physical interaction with nonphosphorylated SakA in the cytosol. We show that H2O2 induces a drastic change in mitochondrial morphology consistent with a fission process and the relocalization of SrkA to nuclei and mitochondria, depending on the presence of SakA. SakA-SrkA nuclear interaction is also observed during normal asexual development in dormant spores. Using SakA and SrkA S-tag pulldown and purification studies coupled to mass spectrometry, we found that SakA interacts with SrkA, the stress MAPK MpkC, the PPT1-type phosphatase AN6892, and other proteins involved in cell cycle regulation, DNA damage response, mRNA stability and protein synthesis, mitochondrial function, and other stress-related responses. We propose that oxidative stress induces DNA damage and mitochondrial fission and that SakA and SrkA mediate cell cycle arrest and regulate mitochondrial function during stress. Our results provide new insights into the mechanisms by which SakA and SrkA regulate the remodelling of cell physiology during oxidative stress and development. PMID:25820520

  18. A-Kinase Anchoring Protein 4 (AKAP4) is an ERK1/2 substrate and a switch molecule between cAMP/PKA and PKC/ERK1/2 in human spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Rahamim Ben-Navi, Liat; Almog, Tal; Yao, Zhong; Seger, Rony; Naor, Zvi

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian spermatozoa undergo capacitation and acrosome reaction in order to fertilize the egg. The PKC-ERK1/2 pathway plays an important role in human spermatozoa motility, capacitation and the acrosome reaction. Here we demonstrate that ERK1/2 phosphorylates proAKAP4 on Thr265 in human spermatozoa in vitro and in vivo. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) had no effect on ERK1/2 activity in human spermatozoa, but stimulated the MAPK in mouse pituitary LβT2 gonadotrope cells. cAMP via PKA attenuates PKC-dependent ERK1/2 activation only in the presence of proAKAP4. St-HT31, which disrupts PKA-regulatory subunit II (PKA-RII) binding to AKAP abrogates the inhibitory effect of cAMP in human spermatozoa and in HEK293T cells expressing proAKAP4. In transfected HEK293T cells, PMA relocated proAKAP4, but not proAKAP4-T265A to the Golgi in an ERK1/2-dependnet manner. Similarly, AKAP4 is localized to the spermatozoa principal piece and is relocated to the mid-piece and the postacrosomal region by PMA. Furthermore, using capacitated sperm we found that cAMP reduced PMA-induced ERK1/2 activation and acrosome reaction. Thus, the physiological role of the negative crosstalk between the cAMP/PKA/AKAP4 and the PKC/ERK1/2 pathways is to regulate capacitation and acrosome reaction. PMID:27901058

  19. SPRi-MALDI MS: characterization and identification of a kinase from cell lysate by specific interaction with different designed ankyrin repeat proteins.

    PubMed

    Anders, Ulrike; Schaefer, Jonas V; Hibti, Fatima-Ezzahra; Frydman, Chiraz; Suckau, Detlev; Plückthun, Andreas; Zenobi, Renato

    2017-03-01

    We report on the direct coupling of surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) for the investigation of specific, non-covalent interactions, using the example of designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins) and ribosomal protein S6 kinase 2 (RPS6KA2) directly from lysate of SH-SY5Y cells, derived from human bone marrow. Due to an array format, tracing of binding kinetics of numerous DARPins simultaneously and in real time becomes possible. By optimizing both the proteolytic digest directly on the SPRi chip (amount of trypsin, incubation time, and temperature) as well as the MALDI matrix application (concentration of matrix and number of spray cycles), we are able to identify the specific interaction with RPS6KA2 directly from the cell lysate at a surface coverage of only 0.8 fmol/mm(2). Graphical Abstract Workflow of the direct coupling of SPRi with MALDI mass spectrometry.

  20. Freely turning over palmitate in erythrocyte membrane proteins is not responsible for the anchoring of lipid rafts to the spectrin skeleton: a study with bio-orthogonal chemical probes.

    PubMed

    Ciana, Annarita; Achilli, Cesare; Hannoush, Rami N; Risso, Angela; Balduini, Cesare; Minetti, Giampaolo

    2013-03-01

    Erythrocyte lipid rafts are anchored to the underlying spectrin membrane skeleton [A. Ciana, C. Achilli, C. Balduini, G. Minetti, On the association of lipid rafts to the spectrin skeleton in human erythrocytes, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1808 (2011) 183-190]. The nature of this linkage and the molecules involved are poorly understood. The interaction is sensitive to the increase in pH and ionic strength induced by carbonate. Given the role of palmitoylation in modulating the partitioning of certain proteins between various sub-cellular compartments and the plasma membrane, we asked whether palmitoylation of p55, a peripheral protein located at the junctional complex between spectrin-actin-protein 4.1 that anchors the membrane skeleton to the lipid bilayer via the transmembrane protein glycophorin C, could contribute to the anchoring of lipid rafts to the membrane skeleton. We adopted a new, non-radioactive method for studying protein palmitoylation, based on bio-orthogonal chemical analogues of fatty acids, containing an omega-alkynyl group, to metabolically label cell proteins, which are then revealed by a "click chemistry" reaction of the alkynyl moiety with an azide-containing reporter tag. We show that the membrane localization and palmitoylation levels of p55 did not change after carbonate treatment. 2-bromopalmitate and cerulenin, two known palmitoylation inhibitors, completely inhibited p55 palmitoylation, and protein palmitoyl thioesterase-1 (PPT1) reduced it, without affecting the association between lipid rafts and membrane-skeleton, indicating, on the one hand, that p55 palmitoylation is enzymatic, and, on the other, that it is not involved in the modulation of the linkage of lipid rafts to the membrane-skeleton.

  1. Pathogen and Circadian Controlled 1 (PCC1) Protein Is Anchored to the Plasma Membrane and Interacts with Subunit 5 of COP9 Signalosome in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Ricardo; León, José

    2014-01-01

    The Pathogen and Circadian Controlled 1 (PCC1) gene, previously identified and further characterized as involved in defense to pathogens and stress-induced flowering, codes for an 81-amino acid protein with a cysteine-rich C-terminal domain. This domain is essential for homodimerization and anchoring to the plasma membrane. Transgenic plants with the ß-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene under the control of 1.1 kb promoter sequence of PCC1 gene display a dual pattern of expression. At early post-germination, PCC1 is expressed only in the root vasculature and in the stomata guard cells of cotyledons. During the transition from vegetative to reproductive development, PCC1 is strongly expressed in the vascular tissue of petioles and basal part of the leaf, and it further spreads to the whole limb in fully expanded leaves. This developmental pattern of expression together with the late flowering phenotype of long-day grown RNA interference (iPCC1) plants with reduced PCC1 expression pointed to a regulatory role of PCC1 in the photoperiod-dependent flowering pathway. iPCC1 plants are defective in light perception and signaling but are not impaired in the function of the core CO-FT module of the photoperiod-dependent pathway. The regulatory effect exerted by PCC1 on the transition to flowering as well as on other reported phenotypes might be explained by a mechanism involving the interaction with the subunit 5 of the COP9 signalosome (CSN). PMID:24475254

  2. Disruption of Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Anchored Lipid Transfer Protein Gene Altered Cuticular Lipid Composition, Increased Plastoglobules, and Enhanced Susceptibility to Infection by the Fungal Pathogen Alternaria brassicicola1[W

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Saet Buyl; Go, Young Sam; Bae, Hyun-Jong; Park, Jong Ho; Cho, Sung Ho; Cho, Hong Joo; Lee, Dong Sook; Park, Ohkmae K.; Hwang, Inhwan; Suh, Mi Chung

    2009-01-01

    All aerial parts of vascular plants are covered with cuticular waxes, which are synthesized by extensive export of intracellular lipids from epidermal cells to the surface. Although it has been suggested that plant lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) are involved in cuticular lipid transport, the in planta evidence is still not clear. In this study, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored LTP (LTPG1) showing higher expression in epidermal peels of stems than in stems was identified from an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome-wide microarray analysis. The expression of LTPG1 was observed in various tissues, including the epidermis, stem cortex, vascular bundles, mesophyll cells, root tips, pollen, and early-developing seeds. LTPG1 was found to be localized in the plasma membrane. Disruption of the LTPG1 gene caused alterations of cuticular lipid composition, but no significant changes on total wax and cutin monomer loads were seen. The largest reduction (10 mass %) in the ltpg1 mutant was observed in the C29 alkane, which is the major component of cuticular waxes in the stems and siliques. The reduced content was overcome by increases of the C29 secondary alcohols and C29 ketone wax loads. The ultrastructure analysis of ltpg1 showed a more diffuse cuticular layer structure, protrusions of the cytoplasm into the vacuole in the epidermis, and an increase of plastoglobules in the stem cortex and leaf mesophyll cells. Furthermore, the ltpg1 mutant was more susceptible to infection by the fungus Alternaria brassicicola than the wild type. Taken together, these results indicated that LTPG1 contributed either directly or indirectly to cuticular lipid accumulation. PMID:19321705

  3. Solid-phase translation and RNA–protein fusion: a novel approach for folding quality control and direct immobilization of proteins using anchored mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Biyani, Manish; Husimi, Yuzuru; Nemoto, Naoto

    2006-01-01

    A novel cell-free translation system is described in which template-mRNA molecules were captured onto solid surfaces to simultaneously synthesize and immobilize proteins in a more native-state form. This technology comprises a novel solid-phase approach to cell-free translation and RNA–protein fusion techniques. A newly constructed biotinylated linker-DNA which enables puromycin-assisted RNA–protein fusion is ligated to the 3′ ends of the mRNA molecules to attach the mRNA-template on a streptavidin-coated surface and further to enable the subsequent reactions of translation and RNA–protein fusion on surface. The protein products are therefore directly immobilized onto solid surfaces and furthermore were discovered to adopt a more native state with proper protein folding and superior biological activity compared with conventional liquid-phase approaches. We further validate this approach via the production of immobilized green fluorescent protein (GFP) on microbeads and by the production and assay of aldehyde reductase (ALR) enzyme with 4-fold or more activity. The approach developed in this study may enable to embrace the concept of the transformation of ‘RNA chip-to-protein chip’ using a solid-phase cell-free translation system and thus to the development of high-throughput microarray platform in the field of functional genomics and in vitro evolution. PMID:17062621

  4. Solid-phase translation and RNA-protein fusion: a novel approach for folding quality control and direct immobilization of proteins using anchored mRNA.

    PubMed

    Biyani, Manish; Husimi, Yuzuru; Nemoto, Naoto

    2006-01-01

    A novel cell-free translation system is described in which template-mRNA molecules were captured onto solid surfaces to simultaneously synthesize and immobilize proteins in a more native-state form. This technology comprises a novel solid-phase approach to cell-free translation and RNA-protein fusion techniques. A newly constructed biotinylated linker-DNA which enables puromycin-assisted RNA-protein fusion is ligated to the 3' ends of the mRNA molecules to attach the mRNA-template on a streptavidin-coated surface and further to enable the subsequent reactions of translation and RNA-protein fusion on surface. The protein products are therefore directly immobilized onto solid surfaces and furthermore were discovered to adopt a more native state with proper protein folding and superior biological activity compared with conventional liquid-phase approaches. We further validate this approach via the production of immobilized green fluorescent protein (GFP) on microbeads and by the production and assay of aldehyde reductase (ALR) enzyme with 4-fold or more activity. The approach developed in this study may enable to embrace the concept of the transformation of 'RNA chip-to-protein chip' using a solid-phase cell-free translation system and thus to the development of high-throughput microarray platform in the field of functional genomics and in vitro evolution.

  5. Regulation of Yersinia Protein Kinase A (YpkA) Kinase Activity by Multisite Autophosphorylation and Identification of an N-terminal Substrate-binding Domain in YpkA*

    PubMed Central

    Pha, Khavong; Wright, Matthew E.; Barr, Tasha M.; Eigenheer, Richard A.; Navarro, Lorena

    2014-01-01

    The serine/threonine protein kinase YpkA is an essential virulence factor produced by pathogenic Yersinia species. YpkA is delivered into host mammalian cells via a type III secretion system and localizes to the inner side of the plasma membrane. We have previously shown that YpkA binds to and phosphorylates the α subunit of the heterotrimeric G protein complex, Gαq, resulting in inhibition of Gαq signaling. To identify residues in YpkA involved in substrate binding activity we generated GFP-YpkA N-terminal deletion mutants and performed coimmunoprecipitation experiments. We located a substrate-binding domain on amino acids 40–49 of YpkA, which lies within the previously identified membrane localization domain on YpkA. Deletion of amino acids 40–49 on YpkA interfered with substrate binding, substrate phosphorylation and substrate inhibition. Autophosphorylation regulates the kinase activity of YpkA. To dissect the mechanism by which YpkA transmits signals, we performed nano liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry to map in vivo phosphorylation sites. Multiple serine phosphorylation sites were identified in the secretion/translocation region, kinase domain, and C-terminal region of YpkA. Using site-directed mutagenesis we generated multiple YpkA constructs harboring specific serine to alanine point mutations. Our results demonstrate that multiple autophosphorylation sites within the N terminus regulate YpkA kinase activation, whereas mutation of serine to alanine within the C terminus of YpkA had no effect on kinase activity. YpkA autophosphorylation on multiple sites may be a strategy used by pathogenic Yersinia to prevent inactivation of this important virulence protein by host proteins. PMID:25086045

  6. HIV-1-Tat Protein Inhibits SC35-mediated Tau Exon 10 Inclusion through Up-regulation of DYRK1A Kinase.

    PubMed

    Kadri, Ferdous; Pacifici, Marco; Wilk, Anna; Parker-Struckhoff, Amanda; Del Valle, Luis; Hauser, Kurt F; Knapp, Pamela E; Parsons, Christopher; Jeansonne, Duane; Lassak, Adam; Peruzzi, Francesca

    2015-12-25

    The HIV-1 transactivator protein Tat is implicated in the neuronal damage that contributes to neurocognitive impairment affecting people living with HIV/AIDS. Aberrant splicing of TAU exon 10 results in tauopathies characterized by alterations in the proportion of TAU isoforms containing three (3R) or four (4R) microtubule-binding repeats. The splicing factor SC35/SRSF2 binds to nuclear RNA and facilitates the incorporation of exon 10 in the TAU molecule. Here, we utilized clinical samples, an animal model, and neuronal cell cultures and found that Tat promotes TAU 3R up-regulation through increased levels of phosphorylated SC35, which is retained in nuclear speckles. This mechanism involved Tat-mediated increased expression of DYRK1A and was prevented by DYRK1A silencing. In addition, we found that Tat associates with TAU RNA, further demonstrating that Tat interferes with host RNA metabolism in the absence of viral infection. Altogether, our data unravel a novel mechanism of Tat-mediated neuronal toxicity through dysregulation of the SC35-dependent alternative splicing of TAU exon 10. Furthermore, the increased immunostaining of DYRK1A in HIV+ brains without pathology points at dysregulation of DYRK1A as an early event in the neuronal complications of HIV infection.

  7. HIV-1-Tat Protein Inhibits SC35-mediated Tau Exon 10 Inclusion through Up-regulation of DYRK1A Kinase*

    PubMed Central

    Kadri, Ferdous; Pacifici, Marco; Wilk, Anna; Parker-Struckhoff, Amanda; Del Valle, Luis; Hauser, Kurt F.; Knapp, Pamela E.; Parsons, Christopher; Jeansonne, Duane; Lassak, Adam; Peruzzi, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    The HIV-1 transactivator protein Tat is implicated in the neuronal damage that contributes to neurocognitive impairment affecting people living with HIV/AIDS. Aberrant splicing of TAU exon 10 results in tauopathies characterized by alterations in the proportion of TAU isoforms containing three (3R) or four (4R) microtubule-binding repeats. The splicing factor SC35/SRSF2 binds to nuclear RNA and facilitates the incorporation of exon 10 in the TAU molecule. Here, we utilized clinical samples, an animal model, and neuronal cell cultures and found that Tat promotes TAU 3R up-regulation through increased levels of phosphorylated SC35, which is retained in nuclear speckles. This mechanism involved Tat-mediated increased expression of DYRK1A and was prevented by DYRK1A silencing. In addition, we found that Tat associates with TAU RNA, further demonstrating that Tat interferes with host RNA metabolism in the absence of viral infection. Altogether, our data unravel a novel mechanism of Tat-mediated neuronal toxicity through dysregulation of the SC35-dependent alternative splicing of TAU exon 10. Furthermore, the increased immunostaining of DYRK1A in HIV+ brains without pathology points at dysregulation of DYRK1A as an early event in the neuronal complications of HIV infection. PMID:26534959

  8. A Kinase Inhibitor Screen Reveals Protein Kinase C-dependent Endocytic Recycling of ErbB2 in Breast Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Tameka A.; Luan, Haitao; Tom, Eric; Bielecki, Timothy Alan; Mohapatra, Bhopal; Ahmad, Gulzar; George, Manju; Kelly, David L.; Natarajan, Amarnath; Raja, Srikumar M.; Band, Vimla; Band, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    ErbB2 overexpression drives oncogenesis in 20–30% cases of breast cancer. Oncogenic potential of ErbB2 is linked to inefficient endocytic traffic into lysosomes and preferential recycling. However, regulation of ErbB2 recycling is incompletely understood. We used a high-content immunofluorescence imaging-based kinase inhibitor screen on SKBR-3 breast cancer cells to identify kinases whose inhibition alters the clearance of cell surface ErbB2 induced by Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG. Less ErbB2 clearance was observed with broad-spectrum PKC inhibitor Ro 31-8220. A similar effect was observed with Go 6976, a selective inhibitor of classical Ca2+-dependent PKCs (α, β1, βII, and γ). PKC activation by PMA promoted surface ErbB2 clearance but without degradation, and ErbB2 was observed to move into a juxtanuclear compartment where it colocalized with PKC-α and PKC-δ together with the endocytic recycling regulator Arf6. PKC-α knockdown impaired the juxtanuclear localization of ErbB2. ErbB2 transit to the recycling compartment was also impaired upon PKC-δ knockdown. PMA-induced Erk phosphorylation was reduced by ErbB2 inhibitor lapatinib, as well as by knockdown of PKC-δ but not that of PKC-α. Our results suggest that activation of PKC-α and -δ mediates a novel positive feedback loop by promoting ErbB2 entry into the endocytic recycling compartment, consistent with reported positive roles for these PKCs in ErbB2-mediated tumorigenesis. As the endocytic recycling compartment/pericentrion has emerged as a PKC-dependent signaling hub for G-protein-coupled receptors, our findings raise the possibility that oncogenesis by ErbB2 involves previously unexplored PKC-dependent endosomal signaling. PMID:25225290

  9. High MS-compatibility of silver nitrate-stained protein spots from 2-DE gels using ZipPlates and AnchorChips for successful protein identification.

    PubMed

    Nebrich, Grit; Herrmann, Marion; Sagi, Dijana; Klose, Joachim; Giavalisco, Patrick

    2007-05-01

    The availability of easy-to-handle, sensitive, and cost-effective protein staining protocols for 2-DE, in conjunction with a high compatibility for subsequent MS analysis, is still a prerequisite for successful proteome research. In this article we describe a quick and easy-to-use methodological protocol based on sensitive, homogeneous, and MS-compatible silver nitrate protein staining, in combination with an in-gel digestion, employing the Millipore 96-well ZipPlate system for peptide preparation. The improved quality and MS compatibility of the generated protein digests, as compared to the otherwise weakly MS-compatible silver nitrate staining, were evaluated on real tissue samples by analyzing 192 Coomassie-stained protein spots against their counterparts from a silver-stained 2-DE gel. Furthermore, the applicability of the experimental setup was evaluated and demonstrated by the analysis of a large-scale MALDI-TOF MS experiment, in which we analyzed an additional ~1000 protein spots from 2-DE gels from mouse liver and mouse brain tissue.

  10. The calmodulin-like proteins AtCML4 and AtCML5 are single-pass membrane proteins targeted to the endomembrane system by an N-terminal signal anchor sequence

    PubMed Central

    Ruge, Henning; Flosdorff, Sandra; Ebersberger, Ingo; Chigri, Fatima; Vothknecht, Ute C.

    2016-01-01

    Calmodulins (CaMs) are important mediators of Ca2+ signals that are found ubiquitously in all eukaryotic organisms. Plants contain a unique family of calmodulin-like proteins (CMLs) that exhibit greater sequence variance compared to canonical CaMs. The Arabidopsis thaliana proteins AtCML4 and AtCML5 are members of CML subfamily VII and possess a CaM domain comprising the characteristic double pair of EF-hands, but they are distinguished from other members of this subfamily and from canonical CaMs by an N-terminal extension of their amino acid sequence. Transient expression of yellow fluorescent protein-tagged AtCML4 and AtCML5 under a 35S-promoter in Nicotiana benthamiana leaf cells revealed a spherical fluorescence pattern. This pattern was confirmed by transient expression in Arabidopsis protoplasts under the native promoter. Co-localization analyses with various endomembrane marker proteins suggest that AtCML4 and AtCML5 are localized to vesicular structures in the interphase between Golgi and the endosomal system. Further studies revealed AtCML5 to be a single-pass membrane protein that is targeted into the endomembrane system by an N-terminal signal anchor sequence. Self-assembly green fluorescent protein and protease protection assays support a topology with the CaM domain exposed to the cytosolic surface and not the lumen of the vesicles, indicating that AtCML5 could sense Ca2+ signals in the cytosol. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that AtCML4 and AtCML5 are closely related paralogues originating from a duplication event within the Brassicaceae family. CML4/5-like proteins seem to be universally present in eudicots but are absent in some monocots. Together these results show that CML4/5-like proteins represent a flowering plant-specific subfamily of CMLs with a potential function in vesicle transport within the plant endomembrane system. PMID:27029353

  11. Protective Effects of Membrane-Anchored and Secreted DNA Vaccines Encoding Fatty Acid-Binding Protein and Glutathione S-Transferase against Schistosoma japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Yaqin; Hu, Yang; Fan, Guorun; Chen, Zhihao; Liu, Lin; Man, Dandan; Liu, Shuojie; Tang, Chengwu; Zhang, Yin; Dai, Wuxing

    2014-01-01

    In order to explore the high performance bivalent DNA-based vaccine against schistosomes, SjFABP and Sj26GST were selected and used to construct a vaccine. Two strategies were used to construct the bivalent DNA vaccine. In the first strategy, a plasmid encoding antigen in the secreted form was used, while in the other, a plasmid encoding a truncated form of SjFABP and Sj26GST targeted to the cell surface was used. Various parameters, including antibody and cytokine response, proliferation, histopathological examination, and characterization of T cell subsets were used to evaluate the type of immune response and the level of protection against challenge infection. Injection with secreted pIRES-sjFABP-sj26GST significantly increased the levels of antibody, splenocyte proliferation, and production of IFN-γ, compared with membrane-anchored groups. Analysis of splenic T cell subsets showed that the secreted vaccine significantly increased the percentage of CD3+CD4+ and CD3+CD8+ T cells. Liver immunopathology (size of liver granulomas) was significantly reduced in the secreted group compared with the membrane-anchored groups. Moreover, challenge experiments showed that the worm and egg burdens were significantly reduced in animals immunized with recombinant vaccines. Most importantly, secreted Sj26GST-SjFABP markedly enhanced protection, by reducing worm and egg burdens by 31.8% and 24.78%, respectively, while the membrane-anchored group decreased worm and egg burdens by 24.80% and 18.80%, respectively. Taken together, these findings suggest that the secretory vaccine is more promising than the membrane-anchored vaccine, and provides support for the development and application of this vaccine. PMID:24466157

  12. Gpr161 anchoring of PKA consolidates GPCR and cAMP signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Verena A.; Mayrhofer, Johanna E.; Ilouz, Ronit; Tschaikner, Philipp; Raffeiner, Philipp; Röck, Ruth; Courcelles, Mathieu; Apelt, Federico; Lu, Tsan-Wen; Baillie, George S.; Thibault, Pierre; Aanstad, Pia; Stelzl, Ulrich; Taylor, Susan S.; Stefan, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    Scaffolding proteins organize the information flow from activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to intracellular effector cascades both spatially and temporally. By this means, signaling scaffolds, such as A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs), compartmentalize kinase activity and ensure substrate selectivity. Using a phosphoproteomics approach we identified a physical and functional connection between protein kinase A (PKA) and Gpr161 (an orphan GPCR) signaling. We show that Gpr161 functions as a selective high-affinity AKAP for type I PKA regulatory subunits (RI). Using cell-based reporters to map protein–protein interactions, we discovered that RI binds directly and selectively to a hydrophobic protein–protein interaction interface in the cytoplasmic carboxyl-terminal tail of Gpr161. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that a binary complex between Gpr161 and RI promotes the compartmentalization of Gpr161 to the plasma membrane. Moreover, we show that Gpr161, functioning as an AKAP, recruits PKA RI to primary cilia in zebrafish embryos. We also show that Gpr161 is a target of PKA phosphorylation, and that mutation of the PKA phosphorylation site affects ciliary receptor localization. Thus, we propose that Gpr161 is itself an AKAP and that the cAMP-sensing Gpr161:PKA complex acts as cilium-compartmentalized signalosome, a concept that now needs to be considered in the analyzing, interpreting, and pharmaceutical targeting of PKA-associated functions. PMID:27357676

  13. Bellow seal and anchor

    DOEpatents

    Mansure, Arthur J.

    2001-01-01

    An annular seal is made of a collapsible bellows. The bellows can function as an anchor or a seal and is easily set into position using relative component movement. The bellows folds can be slanted and their outer sealing edges can have different profiles to meet expected conditions. The bellows is expanded for insertion to reduce its outer dimension and sets by compaction as a result of relative movement. The bellows can be straight or tapered and is settable with a minimal axial force.

  14. AKAP-scaffolding proteins and regulation of cardiac physiology.

    PubMed

    Mauban, J R H; O'Donnell, M; Warrier, S; Manni, S; Bond, M

    2009-04-01

    A kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) compose a growing list of diverse but functionally related proteins defined by their ability to bind to the regulatory subunit of protein kinase A. AKAPs perform an integral role in the spatiotemporal modulation of a multitude of cellular signaling pathways. This review highlights the extensive role of AKAPs in cardiac excitation/contraction coupling and cardiac physiology. The literature shows that particular AKAPs are involved in cardiac Ca(2+) influx, release, reuptake, and myocyte repolarization. Studies have also suggested roles for AKAPs in cardiac remodeling. Transgenic studies show functional effects of AKAPs, not only in the cardiovascular system but in other organ systems as well.

  15. KRE genes are required for beta-1,6-glucan synthesis, maintenance of capsule architecture and cell wall protein anchoring in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Nicole M; Donlin, Maureen J; Gerik, Kimberly J; Specht, Charles A; Djordjevic, Julianne T; Wilson, Christabel F; Sorrell, Tania C; Lodge, Jennifer K

    2010-04-01

    The polysaccharide beta-1,6-glucan is a major component of the cell wall of Cryptococcus neoformans, but its function has not been investigated in this fungal pathogen. We have identified and characterized seven genes, belonging to the KRE family, which are putatively involved in beta-1,6-glucan synthesis. The H99 deletion mutants kre5Delta and kre6Deltaskn1Delta contained less cell wall beta-1,6-glucan, grew slowly with an aberrant morphology, were highly sensitive to environmental and chemical stress and were avirulent in a mouse inhalation model of infection. These two mutants displayed alterations in cell wall chitosan and the exopolysaccharide capsule, a primary cryptococcal virulence determinant. The cell wall content of the GPI-anchored phospholipase B1 (Plb1) enzyme, which is required for cryptococcal cell wall integrity and virulence, was reduced in kre5Delta and kre6Deltaskn1Delta. Our results indicate that KRE5, KRE6 and SKN1 are involved in beta-1,6-glucan synthesis, maintenance of cell wall integrity and retention of mannoproteins and known cryptococcal virulence factors in the cell wall of C. neoformans. This study sets the stage for future investigations into the function of this abundant cell wall polymer.

  16. Granular Simulation of NEO Anchoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazhar, Hammad

    2011-01-01

    NASA is interested in designing a spacecraft capable of visiting a Near Earth Object (NEO), performing experiments, and then returning safely. Certain periods of this mission will require the spacecraft to remain stationary relative to the NEO. Such situations require an anchoring mechanism that is compact, easy to deploy and upon mission completion, easily removed. The design philosophy used in the project relies on the simulation capability of a multibody dynamics physics engine. On Earth it is difficult to create low gravity conditions and testing in low gravity environments, whether artificial or in space is costly and therefore not feasible. Through simulation, gravity can be controlled with great accuracy, making it ideally suited to analyze the problem at hand. Using Chrono::Engine [1], a simulation package capable of utilizing massively parallel GPU hardware, several validation experiments will be performed. Once there is sufficient confidence, modeling of the NEO regolith interaction will begin after which the anchor tests will be performed and analyzed. The outcome of this task is a study with an analysis of several different anchor designs, along with a recommendation on which anchor is better suited to the task of anchoring. With the anchors tested against a range of parameters relating to soil, environment and anchor penetration angles/velocities on a NEO.

  17. Regulation of the phosphatase PP2B by protein–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Nygren, Patrick J.; Scott, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Protein dephosphorylation is important for regulating cellular signaling in a variety of contexts. Protein phosphatase-2B (PP2B), or calcineurin, is a widely expressed serine/threonine phosphatase that acts on a large cross section of potential protein substrates when activated by increased levels of intracellular calcium in concert with calmodulin. PxIxIT and LxVP targeting motifs are important for maintaining specificity in response to elevated calcium. In the present study, we describe the mechanism of PP2B activation, discuss its targeting by conserved binding motifs and review recent advances in the understanding of an A-kinase anchoring protein 79/PP2B/protein kinase A complex’s role in synaptic long-term depression. Finally, we discuss potential for targeting PP2B anchoring motifs for therapeutic benefit. PMID:27911714

  18. Monitoring lipid anchor organization in cell membranes by PIE-FCCS.

    PubMed

    Triffo, Sara B; Huang, Hector H; Smith, Adam W; Chou, Eldon T; Groves, Jay T

    2012-07-04

    This study examines the dynamic co-localization of lipid-anchored fluorescent proteins in living cells using pulsed-interleaved excitation fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (PIE-FCCS) and fluorescence lifetime analysis. Specifically, we look at the pairwise co-localization of anchors from lymphocyte cell kinase (LCK: myristoyl, palmitoyl, palmitoyl), RhoA (geranylgeranyl), and K-Ras (farnesyl) proteins in different cell types. In Jurkat cells, a density-dependent increase in cross-correlation among RhoA anchors is observed, while LCK anchors exhibit a more moderate increase and broader distribution. No correlation was detected among K-Ras anchors or between any of the different anchor types studied. Fluorescence lifetime data reveal no significant Förster resonance energy transfer in any of the data. In COS 7 cells, minimal correlation was detected among LCK or RhoA anchors. Taken together, these observations suggest that some lipid anchors take part in anchor-specific co-clustering with other existing clusters of native proteins and lipids in the membrane. Importantly, these observations do not support a simple interpretation of lipid anchor-mediated organization driven by partitioning based on binary lipid phase separation.

  19. Binding constants of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands depend strongly on the nanoscale roughness of membranes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinglei; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Weikl, Thomas R

    2013-09-17

    Cell adhesion and the adhesion of vesicles to the membranes of cells or organelles are pivotal for immune responses, tissue formation, and cell signaling. The adhesion processes depend sensitively on the binding constant of the membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins that mediate adhesion, but this constant is difficult to measure in experiments. We have investigated the binding of membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins with molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the binding constant of the anchored proteins strongly decreases with the membrane roughness caused by thermally excited membrane shape fluctuations on nanoscales. We present a theory that explains the roughness dependence of the binding constant for the anchored proteins from membrane confinement and that relates this constant to the binding constant of soluble proteins without membrane anchors. Because the binding constant of soluble proteins is readily accessible in experiments, our results provide a useful route to compute the binding constant of membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins.

  20. Role of the C-terminal basic amino acids and the lipid anchor of the Gγ2 protein in membrane interactions and cell localization.

    PubMed

    Noguera-Salvà, Maria A; Guardiola-Serrano, Francisca; Martin, M Laura; Marcilla-Etxenike, Amaia; Bergo, Martin O; Busquets, Xavier; Escribá, Pablo V

    2017-02-21

    Heterotrimeric G proteins are peripheral membrane proteins that frequently localize to the plasma membrane where their presence in molar excess over G protein coupled receptors permits signal amplification. Their distribution is regulated by protein-lipid interactions, which has a clear influence on their activity. Gβγ dimer drives the interaction between G protein heterotrimers with cell membranes. We focused our study on the role of the C-terminal region of the Gγ2 protein in G protein interactions with cell membranes. The Gγ2 subunit is modified at cysteine (Cys) 68 by the addition of an isoprenyl lipid, which is followed by the proteolytic removal of the last three residues that leaves an isoprenylated and carboxyl methylated Cys-68 as the terminal amino acid. The role of Cys isoprenylation of the CAAX box has been defined for other proteins, yet the importance of proteolysis and carboxyl methylation of isoprenylated proteins is less clear. Here, we showed that not only geranylgeranylation but also proteolysis and carboxyl methylation are essential for the correct localization of Gγ2 in the plasma membrane. Moreover, we showed the importance of electrostatic interactions between the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane and the positively charged C-terminal domain of the Gγ2 subunit (amino acids Arg-62, Lys-64 and Lys-65) as a second signal to reach the plasma membrane. Indeed, single or multiple point mutations at Gγ2 C-terminal amino acids have a significant effect on Gγ2 protein-plasma membrane interactions and its localization to charged Ld (liquid disordered) membrane microdomains. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Lipid Therapy: Drugs Targeting Biomembranes edited by Pablo Escríba-Ruíz.

  1. The Membrane Bound LRR Lipoprotein Slr, and the Cell Wall-Anchored M1 Protein from Streptococcus pyogenes Both Interact with Type I Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Bober, Marta; Mörgelin, Matthias; Olin, Anders I.; von Pawel-Rammingen, Ulrich; Collin, Mattias

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is an important human pathogen and surface structures allow it to adhere to, colonize and invade the human host. Proteins containing leucine rich repeats (LRR) have been indentified in mammals, viruses, archaea and several bacterial species. The LRRs are often involved in protein-protein interaction, are typically 20–30 amino acids long and the defining feature of the LRR motif is an 11-residue sequence LxxLxLxxNxL (x being any amino acid). The streptococcal leucine rich (Slr) protein is a hypothetical lipoprotein that has been shown to be involved in virulence, but at present no ligands for Slr have been identified. We could establish that Slr is a membrane attached horseshoe shaped lipoprotein by homology modeling, signal peptidase II inhibition, electron microscopy (of bacteria and purified protein) and immunoblotting. Based on our previous knowledge of LRR proteins we hypothesized that Slr could mediate binding to collagen. We could show by surface plasmon resonance that recombinant Slr and purified M1 protein bind with high affinity to collagen I. Isogenic slr mutant strain (MB1) and emm1 mutant strain (MC25) had reduced binding to collagen type I as shown by slot blot and surface plasmon resonance. Electron microscopy using gold labeled Slr showed multiple binding sites to collagen I, both to the monomeric and the fibrillar structure, and most binding occurred in the overlap region of the collagen I fibril. In conclusion, we show that Slr is an abundant membrane bound lipoprotein that is co-expressed on the surface with M1, and that both these proteins are involved in recruiting collagen type I to the bacterial surface. This underlines the importance of S. pyogenes interaction with extracellular matrix molecules, especially since both Slr and M1 have been shown to be virulence factors. PMID:21655249

  2. Analyzing paleomagnetic data: To anchor or not to anchor?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heslop, David; Roberts, Andrew P.

    2016-11-01

    Paleomagnetic directions provide the basis for use of paleomagnetism in chronological and tectonic reconstructions and for constraining past geomagnetic field behavior over a variety of timescales. Crucial to paleomagnetic analysis is the separation and quantification of a characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM), which relates to a process of interest, from other remanence components. Principal component analysis (PCA) of stepwise demagnetization data is employed routinely in these situations to estimate magnetic remanence directions and their uncertainties. A given ChRM is often assumed to trend toward the origin of a vector demagnetization diagram and prevailing data analysis frameworks allow remanence directions to be estimated based on PCA fits that are forced to pass through the origin of such diagrams, a process referred to as "anchoring." While this approach is adopted commonly, little attention has been paid to the effects of anchoring and the influence it has on both estimated remanence directions and their associated uncertainties. In almost all cases, anchoring produces an artificially low uncertainty estimation compared to an unanchored fit. Bayesian model selection demonstrates that the effects of anchoring cannot typically be justified from a statistical standpoint. We present an alternative to anchoring that constrains the best fit remanence direction to pass through the origin of a vector demagnetization diagram without unreasonably distorting the representation of the demagnetization data.

  3. Recruitment of CD55 and CD66e brush border-associated glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins by members of the Afa/Dr diffusely adhering family of Escherichia coli that infect the human polarized intestinal Caco-2/TC7 cells.

    PubMed

    Guignot, J; Peiffer, I; Bernet-Camard, M F; Lublin, D M; Carnoy, C; Moseley, S L; Servin, A L

    2000-06-01

    The Afa/Dr family of diffusely adhering Escherichia coli (Afa/Dr DAEC) includes bacteria expressing afimbrial adhesins (AFA), Dr hemagglutinin, and fimbrial F1845 adhesin. We show that infection of human intestinal Caco-2/TC7 cells by the Afa/Dr DAEC strains C1845 and IH11128 is followed by clustering of CD55 around adhering bacteria. Mapping of CD55 epitopes involved in CD55 clustering by Afa/Dr DAEC was conducted using CD55 deletion mutants expressed by stable transfection in CHO cells. Deletion in the short consensus repeat 1 (SCR1) domain abolished Afa/Dr DAEC-induced CD55 clustering. In contrast, deletion in the SCR4 domain does not modify Afa/Dr DAEC-induced CD55 clustering. We show that the brush border-associated glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein CD66e (carcinoembryonic antigen) is recruited by the Afa/Dr DAEC strains C1845 and IH11128. This conclusion is based on the observations that (i) infection of Caco-2/TC7 cells by Afa/Dr DAEC strains is followed by clustering of CD66e around adhering bacteria and (ii) Afa/Dr DAEC strains bound efficiently to stably transfected HeLa cells expressing CD66e, accompanied by CD66e clustering around adhering bacteria. Inhibition assay using monoclonal antibodies directed against CD55 SCR domains, and polyclonal anti-CD55 and anti-CD66e antibodies demonstrate that CD55 and CD66e function as a receptors for the C1845 and IH11128 bacteria. Moreover, using structural draE gene mutants, we found that a mutant in which cysteine replaced aspartic acid at position 54 displayed conserved binding capacity but failed to induce CD55 and CD66e clustering. Taken together, these data give new insights into the mechanisms by which Afa/Dr DAEC induces adhesin-dependent cross talk in the human polarized intestinal epithelial cells by mobilizing brush border-associated GPI-anchored proteins known to function as transducing molecules.

  4. Assessment of Aurora a Kinase Expression in Breast Cancer: A Tool for Early Diagnosis?

    PubMed Central

    Ferchichi, Imen; Sassi Hannachi, Samia; Baccar, Amal; Marrakchi Triki, Raja; Cremet, Jean Yves; Ben Romdhane, Khaled; Prigent, Claude; Ben Ammar El Gaaied, Amel

    2013-01-01

    Aurora A kinase is overexpressed in many cancers but the status of this protein in the breast cancer often varies. We investigate the expression and localization of Aurora A protein in relation with tumor emergence and progression in breast cancer. Aurora A kinase status was evaluated in 107 patients using immunohistochemistry. The experimental findings showed that high expression of the Aurora A protein was correlated with elevated nuclear grade, low expression of progesterone receptor and positive nodal status. The experimental results showed also that the localization of this kinase shifts from cytoplasm in non malignant adjacent tissue to both cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments in tumoral tissue, suggesting an oncogenic role of the nuclear accumulation. We have, furthermore, detected the overexpression of this protein in non malignant adjacent tissue. The expression of the Aurora A kinase in non malignant tissue may represent an earlier diagnosis tool for breast cancer. PMID:23324574

  5. Setting up a kinase discovery and development project.

    PubMed

    Bollag, Gideon

    2012-01-01

    Discovery of novel kinase inhibitors has matured rapidly over the last decade. Paramount to the successful development of kinase inhibitors is appropriate selectivity for validated targets. Many different approaches have been applied over the years, with varied results. There are currently thirteen different small molecule protein kinase inhibitors on the marketplace. Interestingly, a majority of these compounds lack precise selectivity for specific targets. This will change in the coming years, as technology for achieving improved selectivity becomes more widely applied. This chapter will focus on some of the critical considerations in setting up a kinase discovery and development project, citing examples particularly targeting the Raf kinases.

  6. Binding kinetics of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands: Molecular dynamics simulations and theory.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinglei; Xu, Guang-Kui; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Weikl, Thomas R

    2015-12-28

    The adhesion of biological membranes is mediated by the binding of membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins. Central questions are how the binding kinetics of these proteins is affected by the membranes and by the membrane anchoring of the proteins. In this article, we (i) present detailed data for the binding of membrane-anchored proteins from coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations and (ii) provide a theory that describes how the binding kinetics depends on the average separation and thermal roughness of the adhering membranes and on the anchoring, lengths, and length variations of the proteins. An important element of our theory is the tilt of bound receptor-ligand complexes and transition-state complexes relative to the membrane normals. This tilt results from an interplay of the anchoring energy and rotational entropy of the complexes and facilitates the formation of receptor-ligand bonds at membrane separations smaller than the preferred separation for binding. In our simulations, we have considered both lipid-anchored and transmembrane receptor and ligand proteins. We find that the binding equilibrium constant and binding on-rate constant of lipid-anchored proteins are considerably smaller than the binding constant and on-rate constant of rigid transmembrane proteins with identical binding domains.

  7. Microgravity Drill and Anchor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parness, Aaron; Frost, Matthew A.; King, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    This work is a method to drill into a rock surface regardless of the gravitational field or orientation. The required weight-on-bit (WOB) is supplied by a self-contained anchoring mechanism. The system includes a rotary percussive coring drill, forming a complete sampling instrument usable by robot or human. This method of in situ sample acquisition using micro - spine anchoring technology enables several NASA mission concepts not currently possible with existing technology, including sampling from consolidated rock on asteroids, providing a bolt network for astronauts visiting a near-Earth asteroid, and sampling from the ceilings or vertical walls of lava tubes and cliff faces on Mars. One of the most fundamental parameters of drilling is the WOB; essentially, the load applied to the bit that allows it to cut, creating a reaction force normal to the surface. In every drilling application, there is a minimum WOB that must be maintained for the system to function properly. In microgravity (asteroids and comets), even a small WOB could not be supported conventionally by the weight of the robot or astronaut. An anchoring mechanism would be needed to resist the reactions, or the robot or astronaut would push themselves off the surface and into space. The ability of the system to anchor itself to a surface creates potential applications that reach beyond use in low gravity. The use of these anchoring mechanisms as end effectors on climbing robots has the potential of vastly expanding the scope of what is considered accessible terrain. Further, because the drill is supported by its own anchor rather than by a robotic arm, the workspace is not constrained by the reach of such an arm. Yet, if the drill is on a robotic arm, it has the benefit of not reflecting the forces of drilling back to the arm s joints. Combining the drill with the anchoring feet will create a highly mobile, highly stable, and highly reliable system. The drilling system s anchor uses hundreds of

  8. The RACK1 signal anchor protein from Trypanosoma brucei associates with eukaryotic elongation factor 1A: a role for translational control in cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Regmi, Sandesh; Rothberg, Karen G; Hubbard, James G; Ruben, Larry

    2008-01-01

    RACK1 is a WD-repeat protein that forms signal complexes at appropriate locations in the cell. RACK1 homologues are core components of ribosomes from yeast, plants and mammals. In contrast, a cryo-EM analysis of trypanosome ribosomes failed to detect RACK1, thus eliminating an important translational regulatory mechanism. Here we report that TbRACK1 from Trypanosoma brucei associates with eukaryotic translation elongation factor-1a (eEF1A) as determined by tandem MS of TAP-TbRACK1 affinity eluates, co-sedimentation in a sucrose gradient, and co-precipitation assays. Consistent with these observations, sucrose gradient purified 80S monosomes and translating polysomes each contained TbRACK1. When RNAi was used to deplete cells of TbRACK1, a shift in the polysome profile was observed, while the phosphorylation of a ribosomal protein increased. Under these conditions, cell growth became hypersensitive to the translational inhibitor anisomycin. The kinetoplasts and nuclei were misaligned in the postmitotic cells, resulting in partial cleavage furrow ingression during cytokinesis. Overall, these findings identify eEF1A as a novel TbRACK1 binding partner and establish TbRACK1 as a component of the trypanosome translational apparatus. The synergy between anisomycin and TbRACK1 RNAi suggests that continued translation is required for complete ingression of the cleavage furrow. PMID:18786142

  9. The levels of epithelial anchor proteins β-catenin and zona occludens-1 are altered by E7 of human papillomaviruses 5 and 8.

    PubMed

    Heuser, Sandra; Hufbauer, Martin; Marx, Benjamin; Tok, Ali; Majewski, Slawomir; Pfister, Herbert; Akgül, Baki

    2016-02-01

    Infection with viruses of the genus Betapapillomavirus, β-human papillomaviruses (β-HPV), is implicated in the development of non-melanoma skin cancer. This was first evidenced for HPV5 and HPV8 in patients with the skin disease epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV). The relocalization of the junctional bridging proteins β-catenin and zona occludens-1 (ZO-1) from the adherens and tight junctions are common processes of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) associated with tumour invasion. Here, we report that β-catenin and ZO-1 are strongly upregulated by the E7 oncoproteins of HPV5 and HPV8 in keratinocytes grown in organotypic skin cultures. Although the membrane-tethered form of β-catenin was elevated, no signs of β-catenin activity within the canonical Wnt signalling pathway could be detected. The upregulation of β-catenin and ZO-1 could also be confirmed in the skin of HPV8 transgenic mice as well as in cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas of EV patients. These data provide the first evidence that β-catenin and ZO-1 are direct targets of E7 of the oncogenic β-HPV types 5 and 8. The ability to deregulate these epithelial junction proteins may contribute to the oncogenic potential of these viruses in human skin.

  10. Anchoring a Leviathan: How the Nuclear Membrane Tethers the Genome

    PubMed Central

    Czapiewski, Rafal; Robson, Michael I.; Schirmer, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that the nuclear envelope has many distinct direct connections to chromatin that contribute to genome organization. The functional consequences of genome organization on gene regulation are less clear. Even less understood is how interactions of lamins and nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins (NETs) with chromatin can produce anchoring tethers that can withstand the physical forces of and on the genome. Chromosomes are the largest molecules in the cell, making megadalton protein structures like the nuclear pore complexes and ribosomes seem small by comparison. Thus to withstand strong forces from chromosome dynamics an anchoring tether is likely to be much more complex than a single protein-protein or protein-DNA interaction. Here we will briefly review known NE-genome interactions that likely contribute to spatial genome organization, postulate in the context of experimental data how these anchoring tethers contribute to gene regulation, and posit several hypotheses for the physical nature of these tethers that need to be investigated experimentally. Significantly, disruption of these anchoring tethers and the subsequent consequences for gene regulation could explain how mutations in nuclear envelope proteins cause diseases ranging from muscular dystrophy to lipodystrophy to premature aging progeroid syndromes. The two favored hypotheses for nuclear envelope protein involvement in disease are (1) weakening nuclear and cellular mechanical stability, and (2) disrupting genome organization and gene regulation. Considerable experimental support has been obtained for both. The integration of both mechanical and gene expression defects in the disruption of anchoring tethers could provide a unifying hypothesis consistent with both. PMID:27200088

  11. Cross-correlation analysis of inner-leaflet-anchored green fluorescent protein co-redistributed with IgE receptors and outer leaflet lipid raft components.

    PubMed Central

    Pyenta, P S; Holowka, D; Baird, B

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the structural basis for membrane interactions that occur between Lyn tyrosine kinase and IgE-Fc(epsilon)RI or other components of lipid rafts, we prepared a green fluorescent protein analog of Lyn (PM-EGFP) and used cross-correlation analysis to quantify co-redistributions of aggregates that occur after IgE-Fc(epsilon)RI is cross-linked on the cell surface. PM-EGFP, which contains minimally the palmitoylation and myristoylation sites on Lyn, was compared with another inner leaflet probe, EGFP-GG, which contains a prenylation site and a polybasic sequence similar to K-ras. Confocal fluorescence microscopy was used to examine co-redistributions of these inner leaflet components with IgE-Fc(epsilon)RI and outer leaflet raft components, ganglioside GD1b and glycosylphosphotidylinositol-linked Thy-1, under conditions where the latter were cross-linked externally to form large patches at the cell surface. The cross-correlation analysis was developed and characterized with simulations representing cell surface distributions, and parameters from the cross-correlation curves, rho(o) (peak height) and A (peak area), were shown to be reliable measures of the extent of co-redistributed aggregates and their size. Cross-correlation analysis was then applied to quantify co-redistributions of the fluorescently labeled inner and outer leaflet components on RBL-2H3 cells. As visually observed and parameterized in this manner, PM-EGFP was found to co-redistribute with lipid rafts significantly more than EGFP-GG or an endogenous prenylated protein, Cdc42. These quantitative results are consistent with previous analyses of Lyn co-redistributions and support the hypothesis that the functionally important interaction of Lyn with cross-linked IgE- Fc(epsilon)RI is due to their mutual co-association with lipid rafts. PMID:11325715

  12. Insect Cell-Derived Cofactors Become Fully Functional after Proteinase K and Heat Treatment for High-Fidelity Amplification of Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Anchored Recombinant Scrapie and BSE Prion Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Morikazu; Kato, Nobuko; Okada, Hiroyuki; Yoshioka, Miyako; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Shimizu, Yoshihisa; Mohri, Shirou; Yokoyama, Takashi; Murayama, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    The central event in prion infection is the conformational conversion of host-encoded cellular prion protein (PrPC) into the pathogenic isoform (PrPSc). Diverse mammalian species possess the cofactors required for in vitro replication of PrPSc by protein-misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA), but lower organisms, such as bacteria, yeasts, and insects, reportedly lack the essential cofactors. Various cellular components, such as RNA, lipids, and other identified cofactor molecules, are commonly distributed in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, but the reasons for the absence of cofactor activity in lower organisms remain to be elucidated. Previously, we reported that brain-derived factors were necessary for the in vitro replication of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored baculovirus-derived recombinant PrP (Bac-PrP). Here, we demonstrate that following protease digestion and heat treatment, insect cell lysates had the functional cofactor activity required for Bac-PrP replication by PMCA. Mammalian PrPSc seeds and Bac-PrPSc generated by PMCA using Bac-PrP and insect cell-derived cofactors showed similar pathogenicity and produced very similar lesions in the brains of inoculated mice. These results suggested that the essential cofactors required for the high-fidelity replication of mammalian PrPSc were present in the insect cells but that the cofactor activity was masked or inhibited in the native state. We suggest that not only RNA, but also DNA, are the key components of PMCA, although other cellular factors were necessary for the expression of the cofactor activity of nucleic acids. PMCA using only insect cell-derived substances (iPMCA) was highly useful for the ultrasensitive detection of PrPSc of some prion strains. PMID:24367521

  13. ATHLETE : Double Auger Anchoring Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The All-Terrain Hex-Legged Extra-Terrestrial Explorer (ATHLETE) is a six-limbed robot designed to support surface explorations on Near Earth Objects, the Moon and Mars. ATHLETE can carry large payloads on its top deck and can carry a fully equipped pressurized habitat in low gravity. The robot has wheels on each of its six articulated limbs, allowing it to actively conform to terrain while driving and to walk when driving is impractical. With the use of a tool adapter, ATHLETE limbs can be equipped with end effectors to support various mission objectives. For work on Near Earth Objects and other microgravity environments, an anchoring mechanism is needed to keep the ATHLETE from floating off the surface. My goal for this spring session at JPL was to design and build a counter rotating, double auger, anchoring mechanism. The mechanism mates to the tool adapter and is driven off the wheel motor. The double auger anchoring mechanism will be tested in a regolith simulant that will determine the uplift capacity of the anchoring mechanism.

  14. Holding Capacity of Plate Anchors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    embedded anchor, and a functional sequence is shown in Figure 1-3. On contact- ing the seafloor, the touchdown probe triggers the safe/arm device which...OOC-DG DiGeorge . Washington, DC; Code 0325, Program Mgr, Washington, DC; Code OOC (LT R. MacDougal). Washington DC; Code OOC-D, Washington, DC; Code PMS

  15. Expression of GPI-80, a beta2-integrin-associated glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein, requires neutrophil differentiation with dimethyl sulfoxide in HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Yuji; Fu, Junfen; Suzuki, Kichiya; Sendo, Dai; Nitto, Takeaki; Sendo, Fujiro; Araki, Yoshihiko

    2003-06-10

    GPI-80 is a member of the amidohydrolase family that has been proposed as a potential regulator of beta2-integrin-dependent leukocyte adhesion. GPI-80 is expressed mainly in human neutrophils. Our previous studies suggested that GPI-80 expression might be associated with myeloid differentiation. To verify this, we examined whether GPI-80 is expressed on the human promyelocytic leukemia cell line HL-60 following treatment with differentiation inducers. GPI-80 expression was induced in cells treated with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) to stimulate differentiation down the neutrophil pathway. On the other hand, all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), another neutrophil-inducing reagent, induced no clear GPI-80 expression. Potent monocyte-inducing reagents such as 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate also had no significant effect on the protein expression. GPI-80-positive cells were found in the well-differentiated CD11b-positive and transferrin-receptor-negative cell population. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, which augments neutrophil differentiation of HL-60 cells, up-regulated GPI-80 expression in the presence of DMSO. Granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor, which is known to suppress the neutrophil maturation of cells, inhibited expression. Adhesion of DMSO-induced cells was regulated by anti-GPI-80 monoclonal antibody, similar to the regulation observed in neutrophils. These results suggest that use of DMSO to induce neutrophil differentiation provides suitable conditions for GPI-80 expression, and that this culture system may be a helpful model for further study of the regulation of GPI-80 expression during myeloid differentiation.

  16. Structural models of the membrane anchors of envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 from pestiviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jimin Li, Yue; Modis, Yorgo

    2014-04-15

    The membrane anchors of viral envelope proteins play essential roles in cell entry. Recent crystal structures of the ectodomain of envelope protein E2 from a pestivirus suggest that E2 belongs to a novel structural class of membrane fusion machinery. Based on geometric constraints from the E2 structures, we generated atomic models of the E1 and E2 membrane anchors using computational approaches. The E1 anchor contains two amphipathic perimembrane helices and one transmembrane helix; the E2 anchor contains a short helical hairpin stabilized in the membrane by an arginine residue, similar to flaviviruses. A pair of histidine residues in the E2 ectodomain may participate in pH sensing. The proposed atomic models point to Cys987 in E2 as the site of disulfide bond linkage with E1 to form E1–E2 heterodimers. The membrane anchor models provide structural constraints for the disulfide bonding pattern and overall backbone conformation of the E1 ectodomain. - Highlights: • Structures of pestivirus E2 proteins impose constraints on E1, E2 membrane anchors. • Atomic models of the E1 and E2 membrane anchors were generated in silico. • A “snorkeling” arginine completes the short helical hairpin in the E2 membrane anchor. • Roles in pH sensing and E1–E2 disulfide bond formation are proposed for E1 residues. • Implications for E1 ectodomain structure and disulfide bonding pattern are discussed.

  17. OTEC Anchors: Selection and Plan for Development.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-12-01

    Anchor systems capable of maintaining the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion ( OTEC ) power plants on station were identified and compared. Deadweight...for OTEC , however, is probably not necessary because it is expected that such hard seafloor anchor sites are best avoided by OTEC plants. A plan for...structural analysis and design technique for the anchor, and finally a demonstration of a near prototype size OTEC free-fall deadweight anchor in early 1980. (Author)

  18. Mutational analysis of the variant surface glycoprotein GPI-anchor signal sequence in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Böhme, Ulrike; Cross, George A M

    2002-02-15

    The variant surface glycoproteins (VSG) of Trypanosoma brucei are anchored to the cell surface via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor. All GPI-anchored proteins are synthesized with a C-terminal signal sequence, which is replaced by a GPI-anchor in a rapid post-translational transamidation reaction. VSG GPI signal sequences are extraordinarily conserved. They contain either 23 or 17 amino acids, a difference that distinguishes the two major VSG classes, and consist of a spacer sequence followed by a more hydrophobic region. The omega amino acid, to which GPI is transferred, is either Ser, Asp or Asn, the omega+2 amino acid is always Ser, and the omega+7 amino acid is almost always Lys. In order to determine whether this high conservation is necessary for GPI anchoring, we introduced several mutations into the signal peptide. Surprisingly, changing the most conserved amino acids, at positions omega+1, omega+2 and omega+7, had no detectable effect on the efficiency of GPI-anchoring or on protein abundance. Several more extensive changes also had no discernable impact on GPI-anchoring. Deleting the entire 23 amino-acid signal sequence or the 15 amino-acid hydrophobic region generated proteins that were not anchored. Instead of being secreted, these truncated proteins accumulated in the endoplasmic reticulum prior to lysosomal degradation. Replacing the GPI signal sequence with a proven cell-surface membrane-spanning domain reduced expression by about 99% and resulted not in cell surface expression but in accumulation close to the flagellar pocket and in non-lysosomal compartments. These results indicate that the high conservation of the VSG GPI signal sequence is not necessary for efficient expression and GPI attachment. Instead, the GPI anchor is essential for surface expression of VSG. However, because the VSG is a major virulence factor, it is possible that small changes in the efficiency of GPI anchoring, undetectable in our experiments, might have

  19. Rigid rod anchored to infinite membrane.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kunkun; Qiu, Feng; Zhang, Hongdong; Yang, Yuliang

    2005-08-15

    We investigate the shape deformation of an infinite membrane anchored by a rigid rod. The density profile of the rod is calculated by the self-consistent-field theory and the shape of the membrane is predicted by the Helfrich membrane elasticity theory [W. Helfrich, Z. Naturforsch. 28c, 693 (1973)]. It is found that the membrane bends away from the rigid rod when the interaction between the rod and the membrane is repulsive or weakly attractive (adsorption). However, the pulled height of the membrane at first increases and then decreases with the increase of the adsorption strength. Compared to a Gaussian chain with the same length, the rigid rod covers much larger area of the membrane, whereas exerts less local entropic pressure on the membrane. An evident gap is found between the membrane and the rigid rod because the membrane's curvature has to be continuous. These behaviors are compared with that of the flexible-polymer-anchored membranes studied by previous Monte Carlo simulations and theoretical analysis. It is straightforward to extend this method to more complicated and real biological systems, such as infinite membrane/multiple chains, protein inclusion, or systems with phase separation.

  20. The ROSETTA Lander anchoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, Markus; Stöcker, Jakob; Rohe, Christian; Kömle, Norbert I.; Kargl, Günter; Hillenmaier, Olaf; Lell, Peter

    2003-09-01

    A major goal of the ESA cornerstone mission ROSETTA is to land a package of scientific instruments known as the ROSETTA Lander on the nucleus of a comet. Due to the low gravity a highly reliable fixation of the ROSETTA Lander to the target comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (3rd) is essential. For that purpose a redundant Anchoring System, consisting of two pyrotechnically actuated Anchoring Harpoons and a redundant Control Electronics has been developed, built and qualified at the Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (MPE), Garching. The pyrotechnical gas generator has been developed jointly by Pyroglobe GmbH and MPE, the procurement of the control electronics has been sub-contracted to Magson GmbH, Berlin. A study to obtain a suitable lubrication method for the commutator of a brushed DC motor has been conducted at the European Space Tribology Laboratory (ESTL; S. D. Lewis et al., 2003).

  1. Anchoring in Numeric Judgments of Visual Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Langeborg, Linda; Eriksson, Mårten

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates effects of anchoring in age estimation and estimation of quantities, two tasks which to different extents are based on visual stimuli. The results are compared to anchoring in answers to classic general knowledge questions that rely on semantic knowledge. Cognitive load was manipulated to explore possible differences between domains. Effects of source credibility, manipulated by differing instructions regarding the selection of anchor values (no information regarding anchor selection, information that the anchors are randomly generated or information that the anchors are answers from an expert) on anchoring were also investigated. Effects of anchoring were large for all types of judgments but were not affected by cognitive load or by source credibility in either one of the researched domains. A main effect of cognitive load on quantity estimations and main effects of source credibility in the two visually based domains indicate that the manipulations were efficient. Implications for theoretical explanations of anchoring are discussed. In particular, because anchoring did not interact with cognitive load, the results imply that the process behind anchoring in visual tasks is predominantly automatic and unconscious. PMID:26941684

  2. Independent control of polar and azimuthal anchoring.

    PubMed

    Anquetil-Deck, C; Cleaver, D J; Bramble, J P; Atherton, T J

    2013-07-01

    Monte Carlo simulation, experiment, and continuum theory are used to examine the anchoring exhibited by a nematic liquid crystal at a patterned substrate comprising a periodic array of rectangles that, respectively, promote vertical and planar alignment. It is shown that the easy axis and effective anchoring energy promoted by such surfaces can be readily controlled by adjusting the design of the pattern. The calculations reveal rich behavior: for strong anchoring, as exhibited by the simulated system, for rectangle ratios ≥2 the nematic aligns in the direction of the long edge of the rectangles, the azimuthal anchoring coefficient changing with pattern shape. In weak anchoring scenarios, however, including our experimental systems, preferential anchoring is degenerate between the two rectangle diagonals. Bistability between diagonally aligned and edge-aligned arrangement is predicted for intermediate combinations of anchoring coefficient and system length scale.

  3. Protein kinase A RII-like (R2D2) proteins exhibit differential localization and AKAP interaction.

    PubMed

    Newell, Amy E Hanlon; Fiedler, Sarah E; Ruan, Jenny M; Pan, Jieyan; Wang, P Jeremy; Deininger, Jutta; Corless, Christopher L; Carr, Daniel W

    2008-07-01

    A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) bind to protein kinase A (PKA) via an amphipathic helix domain that interacts with a dimerization/docking domain on the regulatory (R) subunit of PKA. Four other mammalian proteins (ROPN1, ASP, SP17, and CABYR) also contain a highly conserved RII dimerization/docking (R2D2) domain, suggesting all four proteins may interact with all AKAPs in a manner similar to RII. All four of these proteins were originally detected in the flagellum of mammalian sperm. In this report, we demonstrate that all four R2D2 proteins are expressed in a wide variety of tissues and three of the proteins SP17, CABYR, and ASP are located in motile cilia of human bronchus and fallopian tubes. In addition, we detect SP17 in primary cilia. We also provide evidence that ROPN1 and ASP bind to a variety of AKAPs and this interaction can be disrupted with anchoring inhibitor peptides. The interaction of SP17 and CABYR with AKAPs appears to be much more limited. None of the R2D2 proteins appears to bind cAMP, a fundamental characteristic of the regulatory subunits of PKA. These observations suggest that R2D2 proteins utilize docking interactions with AKAPs to accomplish their function of regulating cilia and flagella. Based on location, affinity for AKAPs and lack of affinity for cAMP, it appears that each R2D2 protein has a unique role in this process.

  4. A lunar/Martian anchor emplacement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clinton, Dustin; Holt, Andrew; Jantz, Erik; Kaufman, Teresa; Martin, James; Weber, Reed

    1993-01-01

    On the Moon or Mars, it is necessary to have an anchor, or a stable, fixed point able to support the forces necessary to rescue a stuck vehicle, act as a stake for a tent in a Martian gale, act as a fulcrum in the erection of general construction poles, or support tent-like regolith shields. The anchor emplacement system must be highly autonomous. It must supply the energy and stability for anchor deployment. The goal of the anchor emplacement system project is to design and build a prototype anchor and to design a conceptual anchor emplacement system. Various anchors were tested in a 1.3 cubic meter test bed containing decomposed granite. A simulated lunar soil was created by adjusting the moisture and compaction characteristics of the soil. We conducted tests on emplacement torque, amount of force the anchor could withstand before failure, anchor pull out force at various angles, and soil disturbances caused by placing the anchor. A single helix auger anchor performed best in this test bed based on energy to emplace, and the ultimate holding capacity. The anchor was optimized for ultimate holding capacity, minimum emplacement torque, and minimum soil disturbance in sandy soils yielding the following dimensions: helix diameter (4.45 cm), pitch (1.27 cm), blade thickness (0.15 cm), total length (35.56 cm), shaft diameter (0.78 cm), and a weight of 212.62 g. The experimental results showed that smaller diameter, single-helix augers held more force than larger diameter augers for a given depth. The emplacement system consists of a flywheel and a motor for power, sealed in a protective box supported by four legs. The flywheel system was chosen over a gear system based on its increased reliability in the lunar environment.

  5. Accessorizing and anchoring the LINC complex for multifunctionality

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wakam; Worman, Howard J.

    2015-01-01

    The linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex, composed of outer and inner nuclear membrane Klarsicht, ANC-1, and Syne homology (KASH) and Sad1 and UNC-84 (SUN) proteins, respectively, connects the nucleus to cytoskeletal filaments and performs diverse functions including nuclear positioning, mechanotransduction, and meiotic chromosome movements. Recent studies have shed light on the source of this diversity by identifying factors associated with the complex that endow specific functions as well as those that differentially anchor the complex within the nucleus. Additional diversity may be provided by accessory factors that reorganize the complex into higher-ordered arrays. As core components of the LINC complex are associated with several diseases, understanding the role of accessory and anchoring proteins could provide insights into pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:25559183

  6. The glycosyl phosphatidylinositol anchor is critical for Ly-6A/E- mediated T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Ly-6E, a glycosyl phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored murine alloantigen that can activate T cells upon antibody cross-linking, has been converted into an integral membrane protein by gene fusion. This fusion product, designated Ly-6EDb, was characterized in transiently transfected COS cells and demonstrated to be an integral cell surface membrane protein. Furthermore, the fusion antigen can be expressed on the surface of the BW5147 class "E" mutant cell line, which only expresses integral membrane proteins but not GPI-anchored proteins. The capability of this fusion antigen to activate T cells was examined by gene transfer studies in D10G4.1, a type 2 T cell helper clones. When transfected into D10 cells, the GPI-anchored Ly-6E antigen, as well as the endogenous GPI-anchored Ly-6A antigen, can initiate T cell activation upon antibody cross-linking. In contrast, the transmembrane anchored Ly-6EDb antigen was unable to mediate T cell activation. Our results demonstrate that the GPI-anchor is critical to Ly-6A/E-mediated T cell activation. PMID:1825084

  7. Anchored Instruction and Anchored Assessment: An Ecological Approach to Measuring Situated Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Michael F.; Kulikowich, Jonna M.

    Anchored instruction and anchored assessment are described and illustrated through a mathematics problem from the Jasper problem solving series developed at Vanderbilt University in Nashville (Tennessee). Anchored instruction is instruction situated in a context complex enough to provide meaning and reasons for why information is useful. Problems…

  8. Direct AKAP-mediated protein-protein interactions as potential drug targets.

    PubMed

    Hundsrucker, C; Klussmann, E

    2008-01-01

    A-kinase-anchoring proteins (AKAPs) are a diverse family of about 50 scaffolding proteins. They are defined by the presence of a structurally conserved protein kinase A (PKA)-binding domain. AKAPs tether PKA and other signalling proteins such as further protein kinases, protein phosphatases and phosphodiesterases by direct protein-protein interactions to cellular compartments. Thus, AKAPs form the basis of signalling modules that integrate cellular signalling processes and limit these to defined sites. Disruption of AKAP functions by gene targeting, knockdown approaches and, in particular, pharmacological disruption of defined AKAP-dependent protein-protein interactions has revealed key roles of AKAPs in numerous processes, including the regulation of cardiac myocyte contractility and vasopressin-mediated water reabsorption in the kidney. Dysregulation of such processes causes diseases, including cardiovascular and renal disorders. In this review, we discuss AKAP functions elucidated by gene targeting and knockdown approaches, but mainly focus on studies utilizing peptides for disruption of direct AKAP-mediated protein-protein interactions. The latter studies point to direct AKAP-mediated protein-protein interactions as targets for novel drugs.

  9. DSSC anchoring groups: a surface dependent decision.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, C; Bowler, D R

    2014-05-14

    Electrodes in dye sensitised solar cells are typically nanocrystalline anatase TiO2 with a majority (1 0 1) surface exposed. Generally the sensitising dye employs a carboxylic anchoring moiety through which it adheres to the TiO₂ surface. Recent interest in exploiting the properties of differing TiO₂ electrode morphologies, such as rutile nanorods exposing the (1 1 0) surface and anatase electrodes with high percentages of the (0 0 1) surface exposed, begs the question of whether this anchoring strategy is best, irrespective of the majority surface exposed. Here we address this question by presenting density functional theory calculations contrasting the binding properties of two promising anchoring groups, phosphonic acid and boronic acid, to that of carboxylic acid. Anchor-electrode interactions are studied for the prototypical anatase (1 0 1) surface, along with the anatase (0 0 1) and rutile (1 1 0) surfaces. Finally the effect of using these alternative anchoring groups to bind a typical coumarin dye (NKX-2311) to these TiO₂ substrates is examined. Significant differences in the binding properties are found depending on both the anchor and surface, illustrating that the choice of anchor is necessarily dependent upon the surface exposed in the electrode. In particular the boronic acid is found to show the potential to be an excellent anchor choice for electrodes exposing the anatase (0 0 1) surface.

  10. Anchors of Religious Commitment in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Layton, Emily; Dollahite, David C.; Hardy, Sam A.

    2011-01-01

    This study explores adolescent religious commitment using qualitative data from a religiously diverse (Jewish, Christian, Muslim) sample of 80 adolescents. A new construct, "anchors of religious commitment," grounded in interview data, is proposed to describe what adolescents commit to as a part of their religious identity. Seven anchors of…

  11. 21 CFR 872.3130 - Preformed anchor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Preformed anchor. 872.3130 Section 872.3130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3130 Preformed anchor. (a) Identification. A...

  12. 21 CFR 872.3130 - Preformed anchor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Preformed anchor. 872.3130 Section 872.3130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3130 Preformed anchor. (a) Identification. A...

  13. 21 CFR 872.3130 - Preformed anchor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Preformed anchor. 872.3130 Section 872.3130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3130 Preformed anchor. (a) Identification. A...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3130 - Preformed anchor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Preformed anchor. 872.3130 Section 872.3130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3130 Preformed anchor. (a) Identification. A...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3130 - Preformed anchor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Preformed anchor. 872.3130 Section 872.3130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3130 Preformed anchor. (a) Identification. A...

  16. Method of fabrication of anchored nanostructure materials

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2013-11-26

    Methods for fabricating anchored nanostructure materials are described. The methods include heating a nano-catalyst under a protective atmosphere to a temperature ranging from about 450.degree. C. to about 1500.degree. C. and contacting the heated nano-catalysts with an organic vapor to affix carbon nanostructures to the nano-catalysts and form the anchored nanostructure material.

  17. Crossed ring anchored disk resonator for self-alignment of the anchor

    PubMed Central

    Baghelani, Masoud; Ghavifekr, Habib Badri; Ebrahimi, Afshin

    2013-01-01

    Misalignment is a problematic challenge in RF MEMS resonators. It causes asymmetry in the ultra symmetric radial contour mode disk resonators and degrades their performance by increasing the insertion loss and decreasing their quality factors (Q). Self-alignment method seems to be a good solution for misalignment problem, but it cannot be directly applied on high performance ring shape anchored resonators. This paper discusses misalignment effects for the ring shape anchored resonators and proposes a method for reconfiguring its anchor to be compatible with self-alignment process. Simulation results validate that the crossed ring anchor structure has the same resonance characteristics with the complete ring shape anchored resonator. PMID:25685477

  18. Guyline anchor design keys rig stability

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, R.J.; Laguros, J.G.

    1983-09-01

    Inadequate design and field installation of ground anchors at lease well sites have frequently led to the collapse of well service rigs operating in high surface wind conditions (>50 mph). Such catastrophes incur significant equipment damage and injury to operating personnel. Although collapse of a well service rig can be attributed to inadequate strength in the guyline connection to the mast or anchor or to deformed or inadequate wire rope strength in the guyline itself, most failures result from improperly placed anchors not meeting API specifications to withstand 14,000 lb of force in tension. This article defines the length, diameter, and depth necessary (based on soil conditions) for a buried guyline anchor to meet API specifications. Deficiencies in guyline connection and strength can be alleviated by following the manufacturer's guidance on size of wire rope, its inspection, and size connection criteria in mounting guyline connectors to the mast and anchor.

  19. The effect of accuracy motivation on anchoring and adjustment: do people adjust from provided anchors?

    PubMed

    Simmons, Joseph P; LeBoeuf, Robyn A; Nelson, Leif D

    2010-12-01

    Increasing accuracy motivation (e.g., by providing monetary incentives for accuracy) often fails to increase adjustment away from provided anchors, a result that has led researchers to conclude that people do not effortfully adjust away from such anchors. We challenge this conclusion. First, we show that people are typically uncertain about which way to adjust from provided anchors and that this uncertainty often causes people to believe that they have initially adjusted too far away from such anchors (Studies 1a and 1b). Then, we show that although accuracy motivation fails to increase the gap between anchors and final estimates when people are uncertain about the direction of adjustment, accuracy motivation does increase anchor-estimate gaps when people are certain about the direction of adjustment, and that this is true regardless of whether the anchors are provided or self-generated (Studies 2, 3a, 3b, and 5). These results suggest that people do effortfully adjust away from provided anchors but that uncertainty about the direction of adjustment makes that adjustment harder to detect than previously assumed. This conclusion has important theoretical implications, suggesting that currently emphasized distinctions between anchor types (self-generated vs. provided) are not fundamental and that ostensibly competing theories of anchoring (selective accessibility and anchoring-and-adjustment) are complementary.

  20. Spatial regulation of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase during chemotactic cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Alan K.; Baldor, Linda C.; Hogan, Brian P.

    2005-01-01

    Historically, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) has a paradoxical role in cell motility, having been shown to both facilitate and inhibit actin cytoskeletal dynamics and cell migration. In an effort to understand this dichotomy, we show here that PKA is regulated in subcellular space during cell migration. Immunofluorescence microscopy and biochemical enrichment of pseudopodia showed that type II regulatory subunits of PKA and PKA activity are enriched in protrusive cellular structures formed during chemotaxis. This enrichment correlates with increased phosphorylation of key cytoskeletal substrates for PKA, including the vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) and the protein tyrosine phosphatase containing a PEST motif. Importantly, inhibition of PKA activity or its ability to interact with A kinase anchoring proteins inhibited the activity of the Rac GTPase within pseudopodia. This effect correlated with both decreased guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity and increased GTPase activating protein activity. Finally, inhibition of PKA anchoring, like inhibition of total PKA activity, inhibited pseudopod formation and chemotactic cell migration. These data demonstrate that spatial regulation of PKA via anchoring is an important facet of normal chemotactic cell movement. PMID:16176981

  1. Spatial regulation of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase during chemotactic cell migration.

    PubMed

    Howe, Alan K; Baldor, Linda C; Hogan, Brian P

    2005-10-04

    Historically, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) has a paradoxical role in cell motility, having been shown to both facilitate and inhibit actin cytoskeletal dynamics and cell migration. In an effort to understand this dichotomy, we show here that PKA is regulated in subcellular space during cell migration. Immunofluorescence microscopy and biochemical enrichment of pseudopodia showed that type II regulatory subunits of PKA and PKA activity are enriched in protrusive cellular structures formed during chemotaxis. This enrichment correlates with increased phosphorylation of key cytoskeletal substrates for PKA, including the vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) and the protein tyrosine phosphatase containing a PEST motif. Importantly, inhibition of PKA activity or its ability to interact with A kinase anchoring proteins inhibited the activity of the Rac GTPase within pseudopodia. This effect correlated with both decreased guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity and increased GTPase activating protein activity. Finally, inhibition of PKA anchoring, like inhibition of total PKA activity, inhibited pseudopod formation and chemotactic cell migration. These data demonstrate that spatial regulation of PKA via anchoring is an important facet of normal chemotactic cell movement.

  2. Anchored nanostructure materials and method of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2012-11-27

    Anchored nanostructure materials and methods for their fabrication are described. The anchored nanostructure materials may utilize nano-catalysts that include powder-based or solid-based support materials. The support material may comprise metal, such as NiAl, ceramic, a cermet, or silicon or other metalloid. Typically, nanoparticles are disposed adjacent a surface of the support material. Nanostructures may be formed as anchored to nanoparticles that are adjacent the surface of the support material by heating the nano-catalysts and then exposing the nano-catalysts to an organic vapor. The nanostructures are typically single wall or multi-wall carbon nanotubes.

  3. Anchoring Revisited: The Role of the Comparative Question

    PubMed Central

    Grau, Ina; Bohner, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    When people estimate a numeric value after judging whether it is larger or smaller than a high or low anchor value (comparative question), estimates are biased in the direction of the anchor. One explanation for this anchoring effect is that people selectively access knowledge consistent with the anchor value as part of a positive test strategy. Two studies (total N = 184) supported the alternative explanation that people access knowledge consistent with their own answer to the comparative question. Specifically, anchoring effects emerged when the answer to the comparative question was unexpected (lower than the low anchor or higher than the high anchor). For expected answers (lower than the high anchor or higher than the low anchor), however, anchoring effects were attenuated or reversed. The anchor value itself was almost never reported as an absolute estimate. PMID:24454953

  4. Aurora A kinase is required for activation of the Fanconi anemia/BRCA pathway upon DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Chun, Min Jeong; Hwang, Soo Kyung; Kim, Hyoun Geun; Goh, Sung-Ho; Kim, Sunshin; Lee, Chang-Hun

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have linked the DNA damage response to mitotic progression machinery. Mitotic kinases, such as Aurora A kinase and Polo-like kinase, are involved in the phosphorylation of cell cycle regulators in response to DNA damage. Here, we investigated the potential involvement of Aurora A kinase in the activation of the Fanconi anemia (FA)/BRCA pathway, which participates in cellular response to DNA interstrand cross-link lesions (ICL). Initially, we detected interactions between Aurora A kinase and FANCA protein, one of the components of the FA nuclear core complex. Silencing of Aurora A kinase led to inhibition of monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and formation of nuclear foci, the final consequences of FA/BRCA pathway activation upon ICL induction. An in vitro kinase assay revealed that Aurora A kinase phosphorylates S165 of FANCA. Moreover, this phosphorylation event was induced by the treatment with mitomycin C (MMC), an ICL-inducing agent. In cells overexpressing S165A mutant FANCA, monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and nuclear foci formation was impaired and cellular sensitivity to MMC was enhanced. These results suggest that S165 phosphorylation by Aurora A kinase is required for proper activation of the FA/BRCA pathway in response to DNA damage.

  5. Identification of Ski as a target for Aurora A kinase.

    PubMed

    Mosquera, Jocelyn; Armisen, Ricardo; Zhao, Hongling; Rojas, Diego A; Maldonado, Edio; Tapia, Julio C; Colombo, Alicia; Hayman, Michael J; Marcelain, Katherine

    2011-06-10

    Ski is a negative regulator of the transforming growth factor-β and other signalling pathways. The absence of SKI in mouse fibroblasts leads to chromosome segregation defects and genomic instability, suggesting a role for Ski during mitosis. At this stage, Ski is phosphorylated but to date little is known about the kinases involved in this process. Here, we show that Aurora A kinase is able to phosphorylate Ski in vitro. In vivo, Aurora A and Ski co-localized at the centrosomes and co-immunoprecipitated. Conversely, a C-terminal truncation mutant of Ski (SkiΔ491-728) lacking a coiled-coil domain, displayed decreased centrosomal localization. This mutant no longer co-immunoprecipitated with Aurora-A in vivo, but was still phosphorylated in vitro, indicating that the Ski-Aurora A interaction takes place at the centrosomes. These data identify Ski as a novel target of Aurora A and contribute to an understanding of the role of these proteins in the mitotic process.

  6. Identification of Ski as a target for Aurora A kinase

    PubMed Central

    Mosquera, Jocelyn; Armisen, Ricardo; Zhao, Hong Ling; Rojas, Diego A.; Maldonado, Edio; Tapia, Julio C; Colombo, Alicia; Hayman, Michael J; Marcelain, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    Ski is a negative regulator of the transforming growth factor-β and other signalling pathways. The absence of SKI in mouse fibroblasts leads to chromosome segregation defects and genomic instability, suggesting a role for Ski during mitosis. At this stage, Ski is phosphorylated but to date little is known about the kinases involved in this process. Here, we show that Aurora A kinase is able to phosphorylate Ski in vitro. In vivo, Aurora A and Ski co-localized at the centrosomes and co-immunoprecipitated. Conversely, a C-terminal truncation mutant of Ski (SkiΔ491–728) lacking a coiled-coil domain, displayed decreased centrosomal localization. This mutant no longer co-immunoprecipitated with Aurora-A in vivo, but was still phosphorylated in vitro, indicating that the Ski-Aurora A interaction takes place at the centrosomes. These data identify Ski as a novel target of Aurora A and contribute to an understanding of the role of these proteins in the mitotic process. PMID:21600873

  7. Anchor-Less Secure Session Mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zugenmaier, Alf; Laganier, Julien; Prasad, Anand; Slavov, Kristian

    Communication session mobility relates transferring one endpoint of a communication session including its state from one device to another. Current proposals to deal with this securely require an anchor. We propose an anchor-less solution that takes some ideas from the host identity protocol. We then show how the idea of transferring endpoints simultaneously can be tackled without introducing timeouts as the session initiation protocol currently does.

  8. On the Theory of Ground Anchors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-01-01

    AD/A-O06 582 ON THE THEORY OF GROUND ANCHORS COLD REGIONS RESEARCH AND ENGINEERING LABORATORY JANUARY 1975 DISTRIBUTED BY: National Tocnical -Intonal...ANCHORS Austin Kovacs, Scott Bicuin Bruce McKelvy and Herman Colligan January 1975 PREPARED FOR U.S. ARMY MATERIL’ COMMAND DA PROJECT IT062112A 130...applications as the tie-backs for retaining walls and bulkheads and in foundations subjected to wind, explosions, earthquakes and thermally induced lateral

  9. Anchoring effects on early autobiographical memories.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Daniel L; Bishara, Anthony J; Mugayar-Baldocchi, Marino A

    2017-02-28

    Studies of childhood memory typically show that our earliest memories come from between three and four years of age. This finding is not universal, however. The age estimate varies across cultures and is affected by social influences. Research from the judgments and decision-making literature suggests that these estimates might also involve a judgment under uncertainty. Therefore, they might be susceptible to less social influences such as heuristics and biases. To investigate this possibility, we conducted two experiments that used anchoring paradigms to influence participants' estimates of their age during early autobiographical memories. In Experiment 1, participants answered either a high-anchor or a low-anchor question, and were warned that the anchor was uninformative; they went on to estimate their age during their earliest autobiographical memory. In Experiment 2, we replicated Experiment 1 and extended the design to examine additional early autobiographical memories. In both experiments, participants in the low-anchor condition gave earlier age estimates than those in the high-anchor condition. These results provide new insights into the methods used to investigate autobiographical memory. Moreover, they show that reports of early autobiographical memories can be influenced by a relatively light touch - a change to a single digit in a single question.

  10. 46 CFR 28.235 - Anchors and radar reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Anchors and radar reflectors. 28.235 Section 28.235....235 Anchors and radar reflectors. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with an anchor(s) and chain(s), cable... rigged with gear that provides a radar signature from a distance of 6 miles, each nonmetallic hull...

  11. 46 CFR 28.235 - Anchors and radar reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Anchors and radar reflectors. 28.235 Section 28.235....235 Anchors and radar reflectors. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with an anchor(s) and chain(s), cable... rigged with gear that provides a radar signature from a distance of 6 miles, each nonmetallic hull...

  12. 46 CFR 28.235 - Anchors and radar reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Anchors and radar reflectors. 28.235 Section 28.235....235 Anchors and radar reflectors. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with an anchor(s) and chain(s), cable... rigged with gear that provides a radar signature from a distance of 6 miles, each nonmetallic hull...

  13. 46 CFR 28.235 - Anchors and radar reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Anchors and radar reflectors. 28.235 Section 28.235....235 Anchors and radar reflectors. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with an anchor(s) and chain(s), cable... rigged with gear that provides a radar signature from a distance of 6 miles, each nonmetallic hull...

  14. 46 CFR 28.235 - Anchors and radar reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Anchors and radar reflectors. 28.235 Section 28.235....235 Anchors and radar reflectors. (a) Each vessel must be fitted with an anchor(s) and chain(s), cable... rigged with gear that provides a radar signature from a distance of 6 miles, each nonmetallic hull...

  15. The Use of Comics-Based Cases in Anchored Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kneller, Matthew F.

    2009-01-01

    The primary purpose of this research was to understand how comics fulfill the role of anchor in an anchored instruction learning environment. Anchored instruction addresses the inert knowledge problem through the use of realistic multimedia stories, or "anchors," that embed a problem and the necessary data to solve it within the narrative. In the…

  16. Further Study of the Choice of Anchor Tests in Equating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trierweiler, Tammy J.; Lewis, Charles; Smith, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we describe what factors influence the observed score correlation between an (external) anchor test and a total test. We show that the anchor to full-test observed score correlation is based on two components: the true score correlation between the anchor and total test, and the reliability of the anchor test. Findings using an…

  17. Dynamic structure of membrane-anchored Arf•GTP

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yizhou; Kahn, Richard A.; Prestegard, James H.

    2010-01-01

    Arfs (ADP ribosylation factors) are N-myristoylated GTP/GDP switch proteins playing key regulatory roles in vesicle transport in eukaryotic cells. ARFs execute their roles by anchoring to membrane surfaces where they interact with other proteins to initiate budding and maturation of transport vesicles. However, existing structures of Arf•GTP are limited to non-myristoylated and truncated forms with impaired membrane binding. We report a high resolution NMR structure for full-length myristoylated yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) Arf1 in complex with a membrane mimic. The two domain structure, in which the myristoylated N-terminal helix is separated from the C-terminal domain by a flexible linker, suggests a level of adaptability in binding modes for the myriad of proteins with which Arf interacts, and allows predictions of specific lipid binding sites on some of these proteins. PMID:20601958

  18. The Glycophosphatidylinositol Anchor of the MCMV Evasin, m157, Facilitates Optimal Cell Surface Expression and Ly49 Receptor Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Carlin, Lindsey E.; Guseva, Natalya V.; Shey, Michael R.; Ballas, Zuhair K.; Heusel, Jonathan W.

    2013-01-01

    The murine cytomegalovirus-encoded protein m157 is a cognate ligand for both inhibitory and activating receptors expressed by natural killer cells. Additionally, m157 is expressed on the surface of infected cells by a glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor. Although endogenous GPI-anchored proteins are known to be ligands for the NK cell receptor, NKG2D, the contribution of the GPI anchor for viral m157 ligand function is unknown. To determine whether the GPI anchor for m157 is dispensable for m157 function, we generated m157 variants expressed as transmembrane fusion proteins and tested cells expressing transmembrane m157 for the capacity to activate cognate Ly49 receptors. We found that the GPI anchor is required for high-level cell surface expression of m157, and that the transmembrane m157 ligand retains the capacity to activate reporter cells and NK cells expressing Ly49H, as well as Ly49I129 reporter cells, but with reduced potency. Importantly, target cells expressing the transmembrane form of m157 were killed less efficiently and failed to mediate Ly49H receptor downregulation on fresh NK cells compared to targets expressing GPI-anchored m157. Taken together, these results show that the GPI anchor for m157 facilitates robust cell surface expression, and that NK cells are sensitive to the altered cell surface expression of this potent viral evasin. PMID:23840655

  19. Anchors as Semantic Primes in Value Construction: An EEG Study of the Anchoring Effect

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Qiang; Qiu, Wenwei

    2015-01-01

    Previous research regarding anchoring effects has demonstrated that human judgments are often assimilated to irrelevant information. Studies have demonstrated that anchors influence the economic valuation of various products and experiences; however, the cognitive explanations of this effect remain controversial, and its neural mechanisms have rarely been explored. In the current study, we conducted an electroencephalography (EEG) experiment to investigate the anchoring effect on willingness to accept (WTA) for an aversive hedonic experience and the role of anchors in this judgment heuristic. The behavioral results demonstrated that random numbers affect participants’ WTA for listening to pieces of noise. The participants asked for higher pay after comparing their WTA with higher numbers. The EEG results indicated that anchors also influenced the neural underpinnings of the valuation process. Specifically, when a higher anchor number was drawn, larger P2 and late positive potential amplitudes were elicited, reflecting the anticipation of more intensive pain from the subsequent noise. Moreover, higher anchors induced a stronger theta band power increase compared with lower anchors when subjects listened to the noises, indicating that the participants felt more unpleasant during the actual experience of the noise. The levels of unpleasantness during both anticipation and experience were consistent with the semantic information implied by the anchors. Therefore, these data suggest that a semantic priming process underlies the anchoring effect in WTA. This study provides proof for the robustness of the anchoring effect and neural evidence of the semantic priming model. Our findings indicate that activated contextual information, even seemingly irrelevant, can be embedded in the construction of economic value in the brain. PMID:26439926

  20. Anticonical anchoring and surface transitions in a nematic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Faget, L; Lamarque-Forget, S; Martinot-Lagarde, Ph; Auroy, P; Dozov, I

    2006-11-01

    Recent works reported planar and conical azimuthally degenerated nematic anchorings. Here we predict an additional "anticonical" degenerated anchoring. Its energy presents two minima, parallel and perpendicular to the substrate plane, separated by a conical energy barrier. We realize this bistable anchoring on a grafted polymer brush and we observe temperature-driven transitions between the conical, planar, and anticonical degenerated anchorings. Under electric field we break the anticonical anchoring and switch between its bistable states.

  1. Anticonical anchoring and surface transitions in a nematic liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faget, L.; Lamarque-Forget, S.; Martinot-Lagarde, Ph.; Auroy, P.; Dozov, I.

    2006-11-01

    Recent works reported planar and conical azimuthally degenerated nematic anchorings. Here we predict an additional “anticonical” degenerated anchoring. Its energy presents two minima, parallel and perpendicular to the substrate plane, separated by a conical energy barrier. We realize this bistable anchoring on a grafted polymer brush and we observe temperature-driven transitions between the conical, planar, and anticonical degenerated anchorings. Under electric field we break the anticonical anchoring and switch between its bistable states.

  2. Lipid-anchored Synaptobrevin Provides Little or No Support for Exocytosis or Liposome Fusion*

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Che-Wei; Chiang, Chung-Wei; Gaffaney, Jon D.; Chapman, Edwin R.; Jackson, Meyer B.

    2016-01-01

    SNARE proteins catalyze many forms of biological membrane fusion, including Ca2+-triggered exocytosis. Although fusion mediated by SNAREs generally involves proteins anchored to each fusing membrane by a transmembrane domain (TMD), the role of TMDs remains unclear, and previous studies diverge on whether SNAREs can drive fusion without a TMD. This issue is important because it relates to the question of the structure and composition of the initial fusion pore, as well as the question of whether SNAREs mediate fusion solely by creating close proximity between two membranes versus a more active role in transmitting force to the membrane to deform and reorganize lipid bilayer structure. To test the role of membrane attachment, we generated four variants of the synaptic v-SNARE synaptobrevin-2 (syb2) anchored to the membrane by lipid instead of protein. These constructs were tested for functional efficacy in three different systems as follows: Ca2+-triggered dense core vesicle exocytosis, spontaneous synaptic vesicle exocytosis, and Ca2+-synaptotagmin-enhanced SNARE-mediated liposome fusion. Lipid-anchoring motifs harboring one or two lipid acylation sites completely failed to support fusion in any of these assays. Only the lipid-anchoring motif from cysteine string protein-α, which harbors many lipid acylation sites, provided support for fusion but at levels well below that achieved with wild type syb2. Thus, lipid-anchored syb2 provides little or no support for exocytosis, and anchoring syb2 to a membrane by a TMD greatly improves its function. The low activity seen with syb2-cysteine string protein-α may reflect a slower alternative mode of SNARE-mediated membrane fusion. PMID:26663078

  3. Monitoring ground anchor using non-destructive ground anchor integrity test (NDT-GRANIT)

    SciTech Connect

    Robbany, Z. Handayani, G.

    2015-09-30

    Monitoring at ground anchor commonly uses a pull out test method, therefor we developing a non-destructive ground anchor integrity testing (NDT-GRANIT). NDT-GRANIT using the principle of seismic waves that have been modified into form of sweep signal, the signal will be demodulated, filtered, and Fourier transformation (inverse discrete Fourier transform) so the data can be interpreted reflected wave from the ground anchor. The method was applied to determine whether the ground anchor still gripped in the subsurface by looking the attenuation of the wave generated sources. From the result we can see that ground anchor does not grip. To validate the results of the comparison method of measurement used pile integrity test.

  4. Polymer's anchoring behavior in liquid crystal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yue

    The current dissertation mainly discusses about the polymers anchoring behavior in liquid crystal cells in two aspects: surface interaction and bulk interaction. The goal of the research is to understand the fundamental physics of anchoring strength and apply the knowledge to liquid crystal display devices. Researchers proposed two main contributors to the surface anchoring strength: the micro grooves generated by external force and the polymer chain's alignment. Both of them has experimental proofs. In the current study, explorations were made to understand the mechanisms of surface anchoring strength and easy axis of surface liquid crystal provided by rubbed polymer alignment layer. The work includes not only the variation of the alignment layer itself such as thickness(Chapter 3) and polymer side chain (Chapter 5), but also the variation of external conditions such as temperature (Chapter 4) and rubbing condition (Chapter 6). To determine the polar and azimuthal anchoring strengths, Rapini-Papoular's expression was applied. However, it was discovered that higher order terms may be required in order to fit the experimental result or theoretically predict unique anchoring behaviors (Chapter 2, Chapter 6). SEM and AFM technologies were introduced to gather the actual structures of polymer alignment layer and extrapolate the alignment of liquid crystal in a micro scale. The result shows that the anchoring strength can be adjusted by the layer thickness, side chain structure, while the easy axis direction can be adjusted by a second rubbing direction. In addition, different anchoring conditions combined with liquid crystal's elastic energy can generate quite different forms of liquid crystals (Chapter 7). In the study of bulk alignment, the main contrition from the current dissertation is applying the understanding of anchoring behavior to optimizing actual switchable devices. Conventional PDLC performance can be tuned with the knowledge of the polymer and the liquid

  5. Construction of a Highly Active Xylanase Displaying Oleaginous Yeast: Comparison of Anchoring Systems

    PubMed Central

    Duquesne, Sophie; Bozonnet, Sophie; Bordes, Florence; Dumon, Claire; Nicaud, Jean-Marc; Marty, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Three Yarrowia lipolytica cell wall proteins (YlPir, YlCWP1 and YlCBM) were evaluated for their ability to display the xylanase TxXYN from Thermobacillus xylanilyticus on the cell surface of Y. lipolytica. The fusion proteins were produced in Y. lipolytica JMY1212, a strain engineered for mono-copy chromosomal insertion, and enabling accurate comparison of anchoring systems. The construction using YlPir enabled cell bound xylanase activity to be maximised (71.6 U/g). Although 48% of the activity was released in the supernatant, probably due to proteolysis at the fusion zone, this system is three times more efficient for the anchoring of TxXYN than the YlCWP1 system formerly developed for Y. lipolytica. As far as we know it represents the best displayed xylanase activity ever published. It could be an attractive alternative anchoring system to display enzymes in Y. lipolytica. PMID:24743311

  6. Fibre-Reinforced Adhesive for Structure Anchoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnat, J.; Bajer, M.

    2015-11-01

    The topic of this paper is the glue-concrete interface of bonded anchors loaded by tension force. The paper is closely focused on bond strength experiments using high strength concrete up to class C50/60 or higher together with pure epoxy resin and fibre-reinforced resin. The goal of this research is to find the limits of the effective use of such glue types in high performance concrete, and also to verify the most commonly used design methods for bonded anchors. The presented research includes experimental analysis of the glue-concrete interface and the influence of its parameters on anchor behaviour. The presented analysis shows some problems of the 'separated failure modes' approach and also presents experimentally verified bond strength values obtained for the currently most widespread glue types. Results of fibre reinforced epoxy resin are also presented in this paper.

  7. A mutant cytochrome b5 with a lengthened membrane anchor escapes from the endoplasmic reticulum and reaches the plasma membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Pedrazzini, E; Villa, A; Borgese, N

    1996-01-01

    Many resident membrane proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) do not have known retrieval sequences. Among these are the so-called tail-anchored proteins, which are bound to membranes by a hydrophobic tail close to the C terminus and have most of their sequence as a cytosolically exposed N-terminal domain. Because ER tail-anchored proteins generally have short (< or = 17 residues) hydrophobic domains, we tested whether this feature is important for localization, using cytochrome b5 as a model. The hydrophobic domain of cytochrome b5 was lengthened by insertion of five amino acids (ILAAV), and the localization of the mutant was analyzed by immunofluorescence in transiently transfected mammalian cells. While the wild-type cytochrome was localized to the ER, the mutant was relocated to the surface. This relocation was not due to the specific sequence introduced, as demonstrated by the ER localization of a second mutant, in which the original length of the membrane anchor was restored, while maintaining the inserted ILAAV sequence. Experiments with brefeldin A and with cycloheximide demonstrated that the extended anchor mutant reached the plasma membrane by transport along the secretory pathway. We conclude that the short membrane anchor of cytochrome b5 is important for its ER residency, and we discuss the relevance of this finding for other ER tail-anchored proteins. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8633042

  8. Multiple magnetic microrobot control using electrostatic anchoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawashe, Chytra; Floyd, Steven; Sitti, Metin

    2009-04-01

    Addressing power and control to individual untethered microrobots is a challenge for small-scale robotics. We present a 250×130×100 μm3 magnetic robot wirelessly driven by pulsed external magnetic fields. An induced stick-slip motion results in translation speeds over 8 mm/s. Control of multiple robots is achieved by an array of addressable electrostatic anchoring pads on the surface, which selectively fixes microrobots, preventing translation. We demonstrate control of two microrobots in both uncoupled individual motion and coupled symmetric motion. An estimated anchoring force of 23.0 μN is necessary to effectively fix each microrobot.

  9. Bond strength of glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) grouted anchors

    SciTech Connect

    Bellavance, E.; Xu, H.; Benmokrane, B.

    1995-11-01

    This paper describes the results of laboratory and field pull-out tests on cement grouted glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) anchors. As an alternative for grouted steel anchors, GFRP bars have many advantages over steel tendons, and can avoid corrosion and some difficulties in transportation, handling, and installation. Three types of 36 GFRP anchors and 20 steel anchors installed in three types of host media: steel pipe, concrete block, and rock mass were tested in the laboratory as well as in the field. The bond strength, load carrying capacity, load-displacement behavior, and critical bond length of cement grouted GFRP anchors were examined in comparison with conventional steel anchors.

  10. Monogenean anchor morphometry: systematic value, phylogenetic signal, and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Soo, Oi Yoon Michelle; Tan, Wooi Boon; Lim, Lee Hong Susan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Anchors are one of the important attachment appendages for monogenean parasites. Common descent and evolutionary processes have left their mark on anchor morphometry, in the form of patterns of shape and size variation useful for systematic and evolutionary studies. When combined with morphological and molecular data, analysis of anchor morphometry can potentially answer a wide range of biological questions. Materials and Methods. We used data from anchor morphometry, body size and morphology of 13 Ligophorus (Monogenea: Ancyrocephalidae) species infecting two marine mugilid (Teleostei: Mugilidae) fish hosts: Moolgarda buchanani (Bleeker) and Liza subviridis (Valenciennes) from Malaysia. Anchor shape and size data (n = 530) were generated using methods of geometric morphometrics. We used 28S rRNA, 18S rRNA, and ITS1 sequence data to infer a maximum likelihood phylogeny. We discriminated species using principal component and cluster analysis of shape data. Adams’s Kmult was used to detect phylogenetic signal in anchor shape. Phylogeny-correlated size and shape changes were investigated using continuous character mapping and directional statistics, respectively. We assessed morphological constraints in anchor morphometry using phylogenetic regression of anchor shape against body size and anchor size. Anchor morphological integration was studied using partial least squares method. The association between copulatory organ morphology and anchor shape and size in phylomorphospace was used to test the Rohde-Hobbs hypothesis. We created monogeneaGM, a new R package that integrates analyses of monogenean anchor geometric morphometric data with morphological and phylogenetic data. Results. We discriminated 12 of the 13 Ligophorus species using anchor shape data. Significant phylogenetic signal was detected in anchor shape. Thus, we discovered new morphological characters based on anchor shaft shape, the length between the inner root point and the outer root

  11. 24 CFR 3285.401 - Anchoring instructions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Anchorage Against Wind § 3285.401... wind by use of anchor assembly type installations or by connecting the home to an alternative... must require the home to be secured against the wind, as described in this section. The...

  12. 24 CFR 3285.401 - Anchoring instructions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Anchorage Against Wind § 3285.401... wind by use of anchor assembly type installations or by connecting the home to an alternative... must require the home to be secured against the wind, as described in this section. The...

  13. 24 CFR 3285.401 - Anchoring instructions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Anchorage Against Wind § 3285.401... wind by use of anchor assembly type installations or by connecting the home to an alternative... must require the home to be secured against the wind, as described in this section. The...

  14. International Lunar Network (ILN) Anchor Nodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Barbara A.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the United States' contribution to the International Lunar Network (ILN) project, the Anchor Nodes project. The ILN is an initiative of 9 national space agencies to establish a set of robotic geophysical monitoring stations on the surface of the Moon. The project is aimed at furthering the understanding of the lunar composition, and interior structure.

  15. 30 CFR 57.7032 - Anchoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Anchoring. 57.7032 Section 57.7032 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet...

  16. 30 CFR 57.7032 - Anchoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Anchoring. 57.7032 Section 57.7032 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet...

  17. 30 CFR 57.7032 - Anchoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Anchoring. 57.7032 Section 57.7032 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet...

  18. 30 CFR 57.7032 - Anchoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Anchoring. 57.7032 Section 57.7032 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet...

  19. 30 CFR 57.7032 - Anchoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Anchoring. 57.7032 Section 57.7032 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet...

  20. Anchoring the Panic Disorder Severity Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keough, Meghan E.; Porter, Eliora; Kredlow, M. Alexandra; Worthington, John J.; Hoge, Elizabeth A.; Pollack, Mark H.; Shear, M. Katherine; Simon, Naomi M.

    2012-01-01

    The Panic Disorder Severity Scale (PDSS) is a clinician-administered measure of panic disorder symptom severity widely used in clinical research. This investigation sought to provide clinically meaningful anchor points for the PDSS both in terms of clinical severity as measured by the Clinical Global Impression-Severity Scale (CGI-S) and to extend…

  1. Finding Chemical Anchors in the Kitchen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haim, Liliana

    2005-01-01

    ''The Chemistry Kitchen'', a unit composed of five activities with kitchen elements for elementary students ages 9-11, introduces the children to the skills and chemical working ideas to be used later as anchors for chemical concepts. These activities include kitchen elements, determining the relative mass and so on.

  2. Weighing Anchor in the "Ragged Times"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Tonya B.

    2012-01-01

    In today's middle school classroom, grouping is an essential learning tool that enhances students' ability to collaborate with others and deepen their own thinking. Implementing group work effectively, though, can be a challenge, especially since groups tend to end their work at "ragged" or staggered times. Creating "anchor activities"--respectful…

  3. 76 FR 30301 - Commercial Acquisition; Anchor Tenancy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-25

    .... ACTION: Proposed rule with request for comments. SUMMARY: NASA proposes to revise the NASA FAR Supplement (NFS) to include guidance consistent with NASA's authority under Section 401 of the Commercial Space Competitiveness Act (CSCA) of 1992. NASA may enter into multi-year anchor tenancy contracts for commercial...

  4. 345. Caltrans, Photographer September 20, 1935 "WEST ANCHOR ARM"; DETAIL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    345. Caltrans, Photographer September 20, 1935 "WEST ANCHOR ARM"; DETAIL VIEW OF CANTILEVER TRUSS WEST ANCHOR ARM UNDER CONSTRUCTION. 7-1023 - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  5. Influence of Anchoring on Burial Depth of Submarine Pipelines

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Yuan; Li, Yang; Su, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Since the beginning of the twenty-first century, there has been widespread construction of submarine oil-gas transmission pipelines due to an increase in offshore oil exploration. Vessel anchoring operations are causing more damage to submarine pipelines due to shipping transportation also increasing. Therefore, it is essential that the influence of anchoring on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines is determined. In this paper, mathematical models for ordinary anchoring and emergency anchoring have been established to derive an anchor impact energy equation for each condition. The required effective burial depth for submarine pipelines has then been calculated via an energy absorption equation for the protection layer covering the submarine pipelines. Finally, the results of the model calculation have been verified by accident case analysis, and the impact of the anchoring height, anchoring water depth and the anchor weight on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines has been further analyzed. PMID:27166952

  6. Influence of Anchoring on Burial Depth of Submarine Pipelines.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yuan; Li, Yang; Su, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Since the beginning of the twenty-first century, there has been widespread construction of submarine oil-gas transmission pipelines due to an increase in offshore oil exploration. Vessel anchoring operations are causing more damage to submarine pipelines due to shipping transportation also increasing. Therefore, it is essential that the influence of anchoring on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines is determined. In this paper, mathematical models for ordinary anchoring and emergency anchoring have been established to derive an anchor impact energy equation for each condition. The required effective burial depth for submarine pipelines has then been calculated via an energy absorption equation for the protection layer covering the submarine pipelines. Finally, the results of the model calculation have been verified by accident case analysis, and the impact of the anchoring height, anchoring water depth and the anchor weight on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines has been further analyzed.

  7. 9. CABLE ANCHORAGE DETAIL, NORTHWEST ABUTMENT (NOTE MOSSCOVERED CONCRETE ANCHOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. CABLE ANCHORAGE DETAIL, NORTHWEST ABUTMENT (NOTE MOSS-COVERED CONCRETE ANCHOR LEFT OF ANCHOR BOLTS) - Nisqually Suspension Bridge, Spanning Nisqually River on Service Road, Longmire, Pierce County, WA

  8. Inositolphosphoglycan mediators structurally related to glycosyl phosphatidylinositol anchors: synthesis, structure and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Martín-Lomas, M; Khiar, N; García, S; Koessler, J L; Nieto, P M; Rademacher, T W

    2000-10-02

    The preparation of the pseudopentasaccharide 1a, an inositol-phosphoglycan (IPG) that contains the conserved linear structure of glycosyl phosphatidylinositol anchors (GPI anchors), was carried out by using a highly convergent 2+3-block synthesis approach which involves imidate and sulfoxide glycosylation reactions. The preferred solution conformation of this structure was determined by using NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations prior to carrying out quantitative structure--activity relationship studies in connection with the insulin signalling process. The ability of 1a to stimulate lipogenesis in rat adipocytes as well as to inhibit cAMP dependent protein kinase and to activate pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase was investigated. Compound 1a did not show any significant activity, which may be taken as a strong indication that the GPI anchors are not the precursors of the IPG mediators.

  9. Students' Anchoring Predisposition: An Illustration from Spring Training Baseball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohrweis, Lawrence C.

    2014-01-01

    The anchoring tendency results when decision makers anchor on initial values and then make final assessments that are adjusted insufficiently away from the initial values. The professional literature recognizes that auditors often risk falling into the judgment trap of anchoring and adjusting (Ranzilla et al., 2011). Students may also be unaware…

  10. Cell-permeable peptide-based disruption of endogenous PKA-AKAP complexes: a tool for studying the molecular roles of AKAP-mediated PKA subcellular anchoring.

    PubMed

    Faruque, Omar M; Le-Nguyen, Dung; Lajoix, Anne-Dominique; Vives, Eric; Petit, Pierre; Bataille, Dominique; Hani, El-Habib

    2009-02-01

    Stimulation of numerous G protein-coupled receptors leads to the elevation of intracellular concentrations of cAMP, which subsequently activates the PKA pathway. Specificity of the PKA signaling module is determined by a sophisticated subcellular targeting network that directs the spatiotemporal activation of the kinase. This specific compartmentalization mechanism occurs through high-affinity interactions of PKA with A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs), the role of which is to target the kinase to discrete subcellular microdomains. Recently, a peptide designated "AKAPis" has been proposed to competitively inhibit PKA-AKAP interactions in vitro. We therefore sought to characterize a cell-permeable construct of the AKAPis inhibitor and use it as a tool to characterize the impact of PKA compartmentalization by AKAPs. Using insulin-secreting pancreatic beta-cells (INS-1 cells), we showed that TAT-AKAPis (at a micromolar range) dose dependently disrupted a significant fraction of endogenous PKA-AKAP interactions. Immunoflurescent analysis also indicated that TAT-AKAPis significantly affected PKA subcellular localization. Furthermore, TAT-AKAPis markedly attenuated glucagon-induced phosphorylations of p44/p42 MAPKs and cAMP response element binding protein, which are downstream effectors of PKA. In parallel, TAT-AKAPis dose dependently inhibited the glucagon-induced potentiation of insulin release. Therefore, AKAP-mediated subcellular compartmentalization of PKA represents a key mechanism for PKA-dependent phosphorylation events and potentiation of insulin secretion in intact pancreatic beta-cells. More interestingly, our data highlight the effectiveness of the cell-permeable peptide-mediated approach to monitoring in cellulo PKA-AKAP interactions and delineating PKA-dependent phosphorylation events underlying specific cellular responses.

  11. Electrochromic mirror using viologen-anchored nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Han Na; Cho, Seong M.; Ah, Chil Seong; Song, Juhee; Ryu, Hojun; Kim, Yong Hae

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Three types of ECM device were fabricated using viologen-anchored ECDs. • The devices were investigated according to their optical structures. • The anti-reflection material affects the reflectance and the coloration efficiency. • The device design of ECMs is a crucial factor for clear reflected images. - Abstract: Electrochromic mirrors (ECMs) that are used in automobile mirrors need to have high reflectance, a high contrast ratio, and a clear image. In particular, it is critical that distortions of clear images are minimized for safety. Therefore, an ECM is fabricated using viologen-anchored nanoparticles and a magnesium fluoride (MgF{sub 2}) layer with an anti-reflection function. The ECM has approximately 30.42% in the reflectance dynamic range and 125 cm{sup 2}/C high coloration efficiency.

  12. Composite materials formed with anchored nanostructures

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2015-03-10

    A method of forming nano-structure composite materials that have a binder material and a nanostructure fiber material is described. A precursor material may be formed using a mixture of at least one metal powder and anchored nanostructure materials. The metal powder mixture may be (a) Ni powder and (b) NiAl powder. The anchored nanostructure materials may comprise (i) NiAl powder as a support material and (ii) carbon nanotubes attached to nanoparticles adjacent to a surface of the support material. The process of forming nano-structure composite materials typically involves sintering the mixture under vacuum in a die. When Ni and NiAl are used in the metal powder mixture Ni.sub.3Al may form as the binder material after sintering. The mixture is sintered until it consolidates to form the nano-structure composite material.

  13. Lash Transported Anchor for a Tanker Mooring.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    Port Hueneme, California 93043 L_. Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. 81 3 26 008 CONVERSION FACTORS, U.S. CUSTOMARY TO SI U.S...DOCUMENTATION PAGE READ INSTRUCTIONSREFORE COMPLETING FORM . EPORT NUMBER F, T CESSION NO. 3 RECiPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER TN-1587 , /" 92__" 4. TITLE (,dSbI1tI...1 ANCHOR LOADING .. .......................... 2 SEAFLOOR CHARACTERISTICS. .............. ........ 3 TRANSPORT SHIP CAPABILITIES

  14. International Lunar Network (ILN) Anchor Nodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Barbara A.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews what we know about the interior and surface of the moon and the need to establish a robotic set of geophysical monitoring stations on the surface of the Moon for the purpose of providing significant scientific value to the exploration of the Moon. The ILN Anchor Nodes will provide the backbone of the network in a way that accomplishes new science and allows other nodes to be flexible contributors to the network.

  15. Anchoring in a novel bimanual coordination pattern.

    PubMed

    Maslovat, Dana; Lam, Melanie Y; Brunke, Kirstin M; Chua, Romeo; Franks, Ian M

    2009-02-01

    Anchoring in cyclical movements has been defined as regions of reduced spatial or temporal variability [Beek, P. J. (1989). Juggling dynamics. PhD thesis. Amsterdam: Free University Press] that are typically found at movement reversal points. For in-phase and anti-phase movements, synchronizing reversal points with a metronome pulse has resulted in decreased anchor point variability and increased pattern stability [Byblow, W. D., Carson, R. G., & Goodman, D. (1994). Expressions of asymmetries and anchoring in bimanual coordination. Human Movement Science, 13, 3-28; Fink, P. W., Foo, P., Jirsa, V. K., & Kelso, J. A. S. (2000). Local and global stabilization of coordination by sensory information. Experimental Brain Research, 134, 9-20]. The present experiment examined anchoring during acquisition, retention, and transfer of a 90 degrees phase-offset continuous bimanual coordination pattern (whereby the right limb lags the left limb by one quarter cycle), involving horizontal flexion about the elbow. Three metronome synchronization strategies were imposed: participants either synchronized maximal flexion of the right arm (i.e., single metronome), both flexion and extension of the right arm (i.e., double metronome within-limb), or flexion of each arm (i.e., double metronome between-limb) to an auditory metronome. In contrast to simpler in-phase and anti-phase movements, synchronization of additional reversal points to the metronome did not reduce reversal point variability or increase pattern stability. Furthermore, practicing under different metronome synchronization strategies did not appear to have a significant effect on the rate of acquisition of the pattern.

  16. Resisting anchoring effects: The roles of metric and mapping knowledge.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew R; Windschitl, Paul D

    2015-10-01

    The biasing influence of anchors on numerical estimates is well established, but the relationship between knowledge level and the susceptibility to anchoring effects is less clear. In two studies, we addressed the potential mitigating effects of having knowledge in a domain on vulnerability to anchoring effects in that domain. Of critical interest was a distinction between two forms of knowledge-metric and mapping knowledge. In Study 1, participants who had studied question-relevant information-that is, high-knowledge participants-were less influenced by anchors than were participants who had studied irrelevant information. The results from knowledge measures suggested that the reduction in anchoring was tied to increases in metric rather than mapping knowledge. In Study 2, participants studied information specifically designed to influence different types of knowledge. As we predicted, increases in metric knowledge-and not mapping knowledge-led to reduced anchoring effects. Implications for debiasing anchoring effects are discussed.

  17. Electropermanent magnetic anchoring for surgery and endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Tugwell, Josef; Brennan, Philip; O'Shea, Conor; O'Donoghue, Kilian; Power, Timothy; O'Shea, Michael; Griffiths, James; Cahill, Ronan; Cantillon-Murphy, Padraig

    2015-03-01

    The use of magnets for anchoring of instrumentation in minimally invasive surgery and endoscopy has become of increased interest in recent years. Permanent magnets have significant advantages over electromagnets for these applications; larger anchoring and retraction force for comparable size and volume without the need for any external power supply. However, permanent magnets represent a potential hazard in the operating field where inadvertent attraction to surgical instrumentation is often undesirable. The current work proposes an interesting hybrid approach which marries the high forces of permanent magnets with the control of electromagnetic technology including the ability to turn the magnet OFF when necessary. This is achieved through the use of an electropermanent magnet, which is designed for surgical retraction across the abdominal and gastric walls. Our electropermanent magnet, which is hand-held and does not require continuous power, is designed with a center lumen which may be used for trocar or needle insertion. The device in this application has been demonstrated successfully in the porcine model where coupling between an intraluminal ring magnet and our electropermanent magnet facilitated guided insertion of an 18 Fr Tuohy needle for guidewire placement. Subsequent investigations have demonstrated the ability to control the coupling distance of the system alleviating shortcomings with current methods of magnetic coupling due to variation in transabdominal wall thicknesses. With further refinement, the magnet may find application in the anchoring of endoscopic and surgical instrumentation for minimally invasive interventions in the gastrointestinal tract.

  18. Liquid-phase synthesis of bridged peptides using olefin metathesis of a protected peptide with a long aliphatic chain anchor.

    PubMed

    Aihara, Keisuke; Komiya, Chiaki; Shigenaga, Akira; Inokuma, Tsubasa; Takahashi, Daisuke; Otaka, Akira

    2015-02-06

    Bridged peptides including stapled peptides are attractive tools for regulating protein-protein interactions (PPIs). An effective synthetic methodology in a heterogeneous system for the preparation of these peptides using olefin metathesis and hydrogenation of protected peptides with a long aliphatic chain anchor is reported.

  19. Nanofabricated racks of aligned and anchored DNA substrates for single-molecule imaging.

    PubMed

    Gorman, Jason; Fazio, Teresa; Wang, Feng; Wind, Shalom; Greene, Eric C

    2010-01-19

    Single-molecule studies of biological macromolecules can benefit from new experimental platforms that facilitate experimental design and data acquisition. Here we develop new strategies to construct curtains of DNA in which the molecules are aligned with respect to one another and maintained in an extended configuration by anchoring both ends of the DNA to the surface of a microfluidic sample chamber that is otherwise coated with an inert lipid bilayer. This "double-tethered" DNA substrate configuration is established through the use of nanofabricated rack patterns comprised of two distinct functional elements: linear barriers to lipid diffusion that align DNA molecules anchored by one end to the bilayer and antibody-coated pentagons that provide immobile anchor points for the opposite ends of the DNA. These devices enable the alignment and anchoring of thousands of individual DNA molecules, which can then be visualized using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy under conditions that do not require continuous application of buffer flow to stretch the DNA. This unique strategy offers the potential for studying protein-DNA interactions on large DNA substrates without compromising measurements through application of hydrodynamic force. We provide a proof-of-principle demonstration that double-tethered DNA curtains made with nanofabricated rack patterns can be used in a one-dimensional diffusion assay that monitors the motion of quantum dot-tagged proteins along DNA.

  20. Robotic Ankle for Omnidirectional Rock Anchors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parness, Aaron; Frost, Matthew; Thatte, Nitish

    2013-01-01

    Future robotic exploration of near-Earth asteroids and the vertical and inverted rock walls of lava caves and cliff faces on Mars and other planetary bodies would require a method of gripping their rocky surfaces to allow mobility without gravitational assistance. In order to successfully navigate this terrain and drill for samples, the grippers must be able to produce anchoring forces in excess of 100 N. Additionally, the grippers must be able to support the inertial forces of a moving robot, as well gravitational forces for demonstrations on Earth. One possible solution would be to use microspine arrays to anchor to rock surfaces and provide the necessary load-bearing abilities for robotic exploration of asteroids. Microspine arrays comprise dozens of small steel hooks supported on individual suspensions. When these arrays are dragged along a rock surface, the steel hooks engage with asperities and holes on the surface. The suspensions allow for individual hooks to engage with asperities while the remaining hooks continue to drag along the surface. This ensures that the maximum possible number of hooks engage with the surface, thereby increasing the load-bearing abilities of the gripper. Using the microspine array grippers described above as the end-effectors of a robot would allow it to traverse terrain previously unreachable by traditional wheeled robots. Furthermore, microspine-gripping robots that can perch on cliffs or rocky walls could enable a new class of persistent surveillance devices for military applications. In order to interface these microspine grippers with a legged robot, an ankle is needed that can robotically actuate the gripper, as well as allow it to conform to the large-scale irregularities in the rock. The anchor serves three main purposes: deploy and release the anchor, conform to roughness or misalignment with the surface, and cancel out any moments about the anchor that could cause unintentional detachment. The ankle design contains a

  1. Structural Basis for Membrane Anchoring of HIV-1 Envelope Spike

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qingshan; Chen, Jia; Ha, Heather Jiwon; Ghantous, Fadi; Herrmann, Tobias; Chang, Weiting; Liu, Zhijun; Frey, Gary; Seaman, Michael S.; Chen, Bing; Chou, James J.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 envelope spike (Env) is a type I membrane protein that mediates viral entry. We use NMR to determine an atomic structure of the transmembrane (TM) domain of HIV-1 Env reconstituted in bicelles that mimic a lipid bilayer. The TM forms a well-ordered trimer that protects a conserved membrane-embedded arginine. An N-terminal coiled-coil and a C-terminal hydrophilic core stabilize the trimer. Individual mutations of conserved residues did not disrupt the TM trimer and minimally affected membrane fusion and infectivity. Major changes in the hydrophilic core, however, altered the antibody sensitivity of Env. These results show how a TM domain anchors, stabilizes and modulates a viral envelope spike and suggest that its influence on Env conformation is an important consideration for HIV-1 immunogen design. PMID:27338706

  2. The ubiquitin-like protein LC3 regulates the Rho-GEF activity of AKAP-Lbc.

    PubMed

    Baisamy, Laurent; Cavin, Sabrina; Jurisch, Nathalie; Diviani, Dario

    2009-10-09

    AKAP-Lbc is a member of the A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) family that has been recently associated with the development of pathologies, such as cardiac hypertrophy and cancer. We have previously demonstrated that, at the molecular level, AKAP-Lbc functions as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) that promotes the specific activation of RhoA. In the present study, we identified the ubiquitin-like protein LC3 as a novel regulatory protein interacting with AKAP-Lbc. Mutagenesis studies revealed that LC3, through its NH(2)-terminal alpha-helical domain, interacts with two binding sites located within the NH(2)-terminal regulatory region of AKAP-Lbc. Interestingly, LC3 overexpression strongly reduced the ability of AKAP-Lbc to interact with RhoA, profoundly impairing the Rho-GEF activity of the anchoring protein and, as a consequence, its ability to promote cytoskeletal rearrangements associated with the formation of actin stress fibers. Moreover, AKAP-Lbc mutants that fail to interact with LC3 show a higher basal Rho-GEF activity as compared with the wild type protein and become refractory to the inhibitory effect of LC3. This suggests that LC3 binding maintains AKAP-Lbc in an inactive state that displays a reduced ability to promote downstream signaling. Collectively, these findings provide evidence for a previously uncharacterized role of LC3 in the regulation of Rho signaling and in the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton.

  3. Binding constants of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands: A general theory corroborated by Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guang-Kui; Hu, Jinglei; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Weikl, Thomas R

    2015-12-28

    Adhesion processes of biological membranes that enclose cells and cellular organelles are essential for immune responses, tissue formation, and signaling. These processes depend sensitively on the binding constant K2D of the membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins that mediate adhesion, which is difficult to measure in the "two-dimensional" (2D) membrane environment of the proteins. An important problem therefore is to relate K2D to the binding constant K3D of soluble variants of the receptors and ligands that lack the membrane anchors and are free to diffuse in three dimensions (3D). In this article, we present a general theory for the binding constants K2D and K3D of rather stiff proteins whose main degrees of freedom are translation and rotation, along membranes and around anchor points "in 2D," or unconstrained "in 3D." The theory generalizes previous results by describing how K2D depends both on the average separation and thermal nanoscale roughness of the apposing membranes, and on the length and anchoring flexibility of the receptors and ligands. Our theoretical results for the ratio K2D/K3D of the binding constants agree with detailed results from Monte Carlo simulations without any data fitting, which indicates that the theory captures the essential features of the "dimensionality reduction" due to membrane anchoring. In our Monte Carlo simulations, we consider a novel coarse-grained model of biomembrane adhesion in which the membranes are represented as discretized elastic surfaces, and the receptors and ligands as anchored molecules that diffuse continuously along the membranes and rotate at their anchor points.

  4. Aurora A kinase activates YAP signaling in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Chang, S-S; Yamaguchi, H; Xia, W; Lim, S-O; Khotskaya, Y; Wu, Y; Chang, W-C; Liu, Q; Hung, M-C

    2017-03-02

    The Yes-associated protein (YAP) is an effector that transduces the output of the Hippo pathway to transcriptional modulation. Considering the role of YAP in cancers, this protein has emerged as a key node in malignancy development. In this study, we determined that Aurora A kinase acts as a positive regulator for YAP-mediated transcriptional machinery. Specifically, YAP associates with Aurora A predominantly in the nucleus. Activation of Aurora A can impinge on YAP activity through direct phosphorylation. Moreover, aberrant expression of YAP and Aurora A signaling is highly correlated with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). We herein provide evidence to establish the functional relevance of this newly discovered regulatory axis in TNBC.

  5. SERS and MD simulation studies of a kinase inhibitor demonstrate the emergence of a potential drug discovery tool.

    PubMed

    Karthigeyan, Dhanasekaran; Siddhanta, Soumik; Kishore, Annavarapu Hari; Perumal, Sathya S R R; Ågren, Hans; Sudevan, Surabhi; Bhat, Akshay V; Balasubramanyam, Karanam; Subbegowda, Rangappa Kanchugarakoppal; Kundu, Tapas K; Narayana, Chandrabhas

    2014-07-22

    We demonstrate the use of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) as an excellent tool for identifying the binding site of small molecules on a therapeutically important protein. As an example, we show the specific binding of the common antihypertension drug felodipine to the oncogenic Aurora A kinase protein via hydrogen bonding interactions with Tyr-212 residue to specifically inhibit its activity. Based on SERS studies, molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, biochemical assays, and point mutation-based validation, we demonstrate the surface-binding mode of this molecule in two similar hydrophobic pockets in the Aurora A kinase. These binding pockets comprise the same unique hydrophobic patches that may aid in distinguishing human Aurora A versus human Aurora B kinase in vivo. The application of SERS to identify the specific interactions between small molecules and therapeutically important proteins by differentiating competitive and noncompetitive inhibition demonstrates its ability as a complementary technique. We also present felodipine as a specific inhibitor for oncogenic Aurora A kinase. Felodipine retards the rate of tumor progression in a xenografted nude mice model. This study reveals a potential surface pocket that may be useful for developing small molecules by selectively targeting the Aurora family kinases.

  6. SERS and MD simulation studies of a kinase inhibitor demonstrate the emergence of a potential drug discovery tool

    PubMed Central

    Karthigeyan, Dhanasekaran; Siddhanta, Soumik; Kishore, Annavarapu Hari; Perumal, Sathya S. R. R.; Ågren, Hans; Sudevan, Surabhi; Bhat, Akshay V.; Balasubramanyam, Karanam; Subbegowda, Rangappa Kanchugarakoppal; Kundu, Tapas K.; Narayana, Chandrabhas

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) as an excellent tool for identifying the binding site of small molecules on a therapeutically important protein. As an example, we show the specific binding of the common antihypertension drug felodipine to the oncogenic Aurora A kinase protein via hydrogen bonding interactions with Tyr-212 residue to specifically inhibit its activity. Based on SERS studies, molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, biochemical assays, and point mutation-based validation, we demonstrate the surface-binding mode of this molecule in two similar hydrophobic pockets in the Aurora A kinase. These binding pockets comprise the same unique hydrophobic patches that may aid in distinguishing human Aurora A versus human Aurora B kinase in vivo. The application of SERS to identify the specific interactions between small molecules and therapeutically important proteins by differentiating competitive and noncompetitive inhibition demonstrates its ability as a complementary technique. We also present felodipine as a specific inhibitor for oncogenic Aurora A kinase. Felodipine retards the rate of tumor progression in a xenografted nude mice model. This study reveals a potential surface pocket that may be useful for developing small molecules by selectively targeting the Aurora family kinases. PMID:24972791

  7. Binding equilibrium and kinetics of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands in cell adhesion: Insights from computational model systems and theory.

    PubMed

    Weikl, Thomas R; Hu, Jinglei; Xu, Guang-Kui; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2016-09-02

    The adhesion of cell membranes is mediated by the binding of membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins. In this article, we review recent results from simulations and theory that lead to novel insights on how the binding equilibrium and kinetics of these proteins is affected by the membranes and by the membrane anchoring and molecular properties of the proteins. Simulations and theory both indicate that the binding equilibrium constant [Formula: see text] and the on- and off-rate constants of anchored receptors and ligands in their 2-dimensional (2D) membrane environment strongly depend on the membrane roughness from thermally excited shape fluctuations on nanoscales. Recent theory corroborated by simulations provides a general relation between [Formula: see text] and the binding constant [Formula: see text] of soluble variants of the receptors and ligands that lack the membrane anchors and are free to diffuse in 3 dimensions (3D).

  8. A cell-free assay for glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchoring in African trypanosomes. Demonstration of a transamidation reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sharma, D K; Vidugiriene, J; Bangs, J D; Menon, A K

    1999-06-04

    We established an in vitro assay for the addition of glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors to proteins using procyclic trypanosomes engineered to express GPI-anchored variant surface glycoprotein (VSG). The assay is based on the premise that small nucleophiles, such as hydrazine, can substitute for the GPI moiety and effect displacement of the membrane anchor of a GPI-anchored protein or pro-protein causing release of the protein into the aqueous medium. Cell membranes containing pulse-radiolabeled VSG were incubated with hydrazine, and the VSG released from the membranes was measured by carbonate extraction, immunoprecipitation, and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis/fluorography. Release of VSG was time- and temperature-dependent, was stimulated by hydrazine, and occurred only for VSG molecules situated in early compartments of the secretory pathway. No nucleophile-induced VSG release was seen in membranes prepared from cells expressing a VSG variant with a conventional transmembrane anchor (i.e. a nonfunctional GPI signal sequence). Pro-VSG was shown to be a substrate in the reaction by assaying membranes prepared from cells treated with mannosamine, a GPI biosynthesis inhibitor. When a biotinylated derivative of hydrazine was used instead of hydrazine, the released VSG could be precipitated with streptavidin-agarose, indicating that the biotin moiety was covalently incorporated into the protein. Hydrazine was shown to block the C terminus of the released VSG hydrazide because the released material, unlike a truncated form of VSG lacking a GPI signal sequence, was not susceptible to proteolysis by carboxypeptidases. These results firmly establish that the released material in our assay is VSG hydrazide and strengthen the proof that GPI anchoring proceeds via a transamidation reaction mechanism. The reaction could be inhibited with sulfhydryl alkylating reagents, suggesting that the transamidase enzyme contains a functionally important sulfhydryl

  9. Phospholipase C from two bacterial strains acts differently on pure phospholipids and membrane bound glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Arshi; Hutchinson, Tarun E; Pereira, Ben M J

    2005-04-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) was purified to homogeneity from the culture filtrate of Bacillus cereus (65-fold, 540 U/mg protein) and B. thuringiensis (76-fold, 306 U/mg protein) by conventional techniques of enzyme purification. The purified enzymes have the molecular mass of 34 kDa and 38 kDa respectively, as determined by SDS-PAGE. Both the PLCs exhibited identical sensitivity to pH, temperature, cations, anions and inhibitors like glutathione and p-chloromercuribenzoate. PLC-Bc showed a preference for phosphatidylinositol, while PLC-Bt favoured phosphatidylcholine as the substrate. Although both the enzymes were able to hydrolyze pure phosphatidylinositol, distinct differences were observed in their activity on phosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane proteins. PLC-Bc cleaved and released alkaline phosphatase, a GPI-anchored marker enzyme from microsomal membranes to a greater extent, than PLC-Bt. Experiments with sperm membranes, followed by SDS-PAGE revealed that the pattern of proteins released from their GPI-anchors by PLC-Bc and PLC-Bt were dissimilar. Although some proteins were cleaved in common by both PLCs, some others including a prominent 57 kDa protein were resistant to PLC-Bt, but sensitive to cleavage by PLC-Bc. The type of modification in the GPI anchor, special environment on membranes, and relative charge of host plasma membrane to the charge of PLC may be the factors that are responsible for the differential action of two enzymes.

  10. GPI anchor attachment is required for Gas1p transport from the endoplasmic reticulum in COP II vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Doering, T L; Schekman, R

    1996-01-01

    Inositol starvation of auxotrophic yeast interrupts glycolipid biosynthesis and prevents lipid modification of a normally glycosyl phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked protein, Gas1p. The unanchored Gas1p precursor undergoes progressive modification in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but is not modified by Golgi-specific glycosylation. Starvation-induced defects in anchor assembly and protein processing are rapid, and occur without altered maturation of other proteins. Cells remain competent to manufacture anchor components and to process Gas1p efficiently once inositol is restored. Newly synthesized Gas1p is packaged into vesicles formed in vitro from perforated yeast spheroplasts incubated with either yeast cytosol or the purified Sec proteins (COP II) required for vesicle budding from the ER. In vitro synthesized vesicles produced by inositol-starved membranes do not contain detectable Gas1p. These studies demonstrate that COP II components fulfill the soluble protein requirements for packaging a GPI-anchored protein into ER-derived transport vesicles. However, GPI anchor attachment is required for this packaging to occur. Images PMID:8598201

  11. Anchor Toolkit - a secure mobile agent system

    SciTech Connect

    Mudumbai, Srilekha S.; Johnston, William; Essiari, Abdelilah

    1999-05-19

    Mobile agent technology facilitates intelligent operation insoftware systems with less human interaction. Major challenge todeployment of mobile agents include secure transmission of agents andpreventing unauthorized access to resources between interacting systems,as either hosts, or agents, or both can act maliciously. The Anchortoolkit, designed by LBNL, handles the transmission and secure managementof mobile agents in a heterogeneous distributed computing environment. Itprovides users with the option of incorporating their security managers.This paper concentrates on the architecture, features, access control anddeployment of Anchor toolkit. Application of this toolkit in a securedistributed CVS environment is discussed as a case study.

  12. PAQR3 modulates cholesterol homeostasis by anchoring Scap/SREBP complex to the Golgi apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Daqian; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Yuxue; Jiang, Wei; Pan, Yi; Song, Bao-Liang; Chen, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol biosynthesis is regulated by transcription factors SREBPs and their escort protein Scap. On sterol depletion, Scap/SREBP complex is transported from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi apparatus where SREBP is activated. Under cholesterol sufficient condition, Insigs act as anchor proteins to retain Scap/SREBP in the ER. However, the anchor protein of Scap/SREBP in the Golgi is unknown. Here we report that a Golgi-localized membrane protein progestin and adipoQ receptors 3 (PAQR3) interacts with Scap and SREBP and tethers them to the Golgi. PAQR3 promotes Scap/SREBP complex formation, potentiates SREBP processing and enhances lipid synthesis. The mutually exclusive interaction between Scap and PAQR3 or Insig-1 is regulated by cholesterol level. PAQR3 knockdown in liver blunts SREBP pathway and decreases hepatic cholesterol content. Disrupting the interaction of PAQR3 with Scap/SREBP by a synthetic peptide inhibits SREBP processing and activation. Thus, PAQR3 regulates cholesterol homeostasis by anchoring Scap/SREBP to the Golgi and disruption of such function reduces cholesterol biosynthesis. PMID:26311497

  13. PAQR3 modulates cholesterol homeostasis by anchoring Scap/SREBP complex to the Golgi apparatus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Daqian; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Yuxue; Jiang, Wei; Pan, Yi; Song, Bao-Liang; Chen, Yan

    2015-08-27

    Cholesterol biosynthesis is regulated by transcription factors SREBPs and their escort protein Scap. On sterol depletion, Scap/SREBP complex is transported from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi apparatus where SREBP is activated. Under cholesterol sufficient condition, Insigs act as anchor proteins to retain Scap/SREBP in the ER. However, the anchor protein of Scap/SREBP in the Golgi is unknown. Here we report that a Golgi-localized membrane protein progestin and adipoQ receptors 3 (PAQR3) interacts with Scap and SREBP and tethers them to the Golgi. PAQR3 promotes Scap/SREBP complex formation, potentiates SREBP processing and enhances lipid synthesis. The mutually exclusive interaction between Scap and PAQR3 or Insig-1 is regulated by cholesterol level. PAQR3 knockdown in liver blunts SREBP pathway and decreases hepatic cholesterol content. Disrupting the interaction of PAQR3 with Scap/SREBP by a synthetic peptide inhibits SREBP processing and activation. Thus, PAQR3 regulates cholesterol homeostasis by anchoring Scap/SREBP to the Golgi and disruption of such function reduces cholesterol biosynthesis.

  14. Intrinsic disorder within an AKAP-protein kinase A complex guides local substrate phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Smith, F Donelson; Reichow, Steve L; Esseltine, Jessica L; Shi, Dan; Langeberg, Lorene K; Scott, John D; Gonen, Tamir

    2013-11-05

    Anchoring proteins sequester kinases with their substrates to locally disseminate intracellular signals and avert indiscriminate transmission of these responses throughout the cell. Mechanistic understanding of this process is hampered by limited structural information on these macromolecular complexes. A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) spatially constrain phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinases (PKA). Electron microscopy and three-dimensional reconstructions of type-II PKA-AKAP18γ complexes reveal hetero-pentameric assemblies that adopt a range of flexible tripartite configurations. Intrinsically disordered regions within each PKA regulatory subunit impart the molecular plasticity that affords an ∼16 nanometer radius of motion to the associated catalytic subunits. Manipulating flexibility within the PKA holoenzyme augmented basal and cAMP responsive phosphorylation of AKAP-associated substrates. Cell-based analyses suggest that the catalytic subunit remains within type-II PKA-AKAP18γ complexes upon cAMP elevation. We propose that the dynamic movement of kinase sub-structures, in concert with the static AKAP-regulatory subunit interface, generates a solid-state signaling microenvironment for substrate phosphorylation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01319.001.

  15. Allosteric inhibition of Aurora-A kinase by a synthetic vNAR domain

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Selena G.; Oleksy, Arkadiusz; Cavazza, Tommaso; Richards, Mark W.; Vernos, Isabelle; Matthews, David

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of clinically approved protein kinase inhibitors target the ATP-binding pocket directly. Consequently, many inhibitors have broad selectivity profiles and most have significant off-target effects. Allosteric inhibitors are generally more selective, but are difficult to identify because allosteric binding sites are often unknown or poorly characterized. Aurora-A is activated through binding of TPX2 to an allosteric site on the kinase catalytic domain, and this knowledge could be exploited to generate an inhibitor. Here, we generated an allosteric inhibitor of Aurora-A kinase based on a synthetic, vNAR single domain scaffold, vNAR-D01. Biochemical studies and a crystal structure of the Aurora-A/vNAR-D01 complex show that the vNAR domain overlaps with the TPX2 binding site. In contrast with the binding of TPX2, which stabilizes an active conformation of the kinase, binding of the vNAR domain stabilizes an inactive conformation, in which the αC-helix is distorted, the canonical Lys-Glu salt bridge is broken and the regulatory (R-) spine is disrupted by an additional hydrophobic side chain from the activation loop. These studies illustrate how single domain antibodies can be used to characterize the regulatory mechanisms of kinases and provide a rational basis for structure-guided design of allosteric Aurora-A kinase inhibitors. PMID:27411893

  16. Allosteric inhibition of Aurora-A kinase by a synthetic vNAR domain.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Selena G; Oleksy, Arkadiusz; Cavazza, Tommaso; Richards, Mark W; Vernos, Isabelle; Matthews, David; Bayliss, Richard

    2016-07-01

    The vast majority of clinically approved protein kinase inhibitors target the ATP-binding pocket directly. Consequently, many inhibitors have broad selectivity profiles and most have significant off-target effects. Allosteric inhibitors are generally more selective, but are difficult to identify because allosteric binding sites are often unknown or poorly characterized. Aurora-A is activated through binding of TPX2 to an allosteric site on the kinase catalytic domain, and this knowledge could be exploited to generate an inhibitor. Here, we generated an allosteric inhibitor of Aurora-A kinase based on a synthetic, vNAR single domain scaffold, vNAR-D01. Biochemical studies and a crystal structure of the Aurora-A/vNAR-D01 complex show that the vNAR domain overlaps with the TPX2 binding site. In contrast with the binding of TPX2, which stabilizes an active conformation of the kinase, binding of the vNAR domain stabilizes an inactive conformation, in which the αC-helix is distorted, the canonical Lys-Glu salt bridge is broken and the regulatory (R-) spine is disrupted by an additional hydrophobic side chain from the activation loop. These studies illustrate how single domain antibodies can be used to characterize the regulatory mechanisms of kinases and provide a rational basis for structure-guided design of allosteric Aurora-A kinase inhibitors.

  17. Anchor-induced chondral damage in the hip.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Dean K; Bharam, Srino; White, Brian J; Matsuda, Nicole A; Safran, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the outcomes from anchor-induced chondral damage of the hip, both with and without frank chondral penetration. A multicenter retrospective case series was performed of patients with chondral deformation or penetration during initial hip arthroscopic surgery. Intra-operative findings, post-surgical clinical courses, hip outcome scores and descriptions of arthroscopic treatment in cases requiring revision surgery and anchor removal are reported. Five patients (three females) of mean age 32 years (range, 16-41 years) had documented anchor-induced chondral damage with mean 3.5 years (range, 1.5-6.0 years) follow-up. The 1 o'clock position (four cases) and anterior and mid-anterior portals (two cases each) were most commonly implicated. Two cases of anchor-induced acetabular chondral deformation without frank penetration had successful clinical and radiographic outcomes, while one case progressed from deformation to chondral penetration with clinical worsening. Of the cases that underwent revision hip arthroscopy, all three had confirmed exposed hard anchors which were removed. Two patients have had clinical improvement and one patient underwent early total hip arthroplasty. Anchor-induced chondral deformation without frank chondral penetration may be treated with close clinical and radiographic monitoring with a low threshold for revision surgery and anchor removal. Chondral penetration should be treated with immediate removal of offending hard anchor implants. Preventative measures include distal-based portals, small diameter and short anchors, removable hard anchors, soft suture-based anchors, curved drill and anchor insertion instrumentation and attention to safe trajectories while visualizing the acetabular articular surface.

  18. Engineered liquid crystal anchoring energies with nanopatterned surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gear, Christopher; Diest, Kenneth; Liberman, Vladimir; Rothschild, Mordechai

    2015-01-26

    The anchoring energy of liquid crystals was shown to be tunable by surface nanopatterning of periodic lines and spaces. Both the pitch and height were varied using hydrogen silsesquioxane negative tone electron beam resist, providing for flexibility in magnitude and spatial distribution of the anchoring energy. Using twisted nematic liquid crystal cells, it was shown that this energy is tunable over an order of magnitude. These results agree with a literature model which predicts the anchoring energy of sinusoidal grooves.

  19. Nonrotating, self-centering anchor assembly for anchoring a bolt in a borehole

    DOEpatents

    Bevan, John E.; King, Grant W.

    1998-01-01

    An expandable anchor assembly is provided for anchoring the threaded end portion of an elongated roof bolt in a borehole. The anchoring assembly includes a hollow outer sleeve in the form of a plurality of symmetrically arranged, longitudinal segmented wall portions with exterior gripping teeth and an inner expander sleeve in the form of a corresponding plurality of longitudinal wall portions symmetrically arranged about a central axis to define an inner threaded cylindrical section. The inner sleeve is captured within and moveable axially relative to the outer sleeve. As the threaded end portion of the elongated bolt is inserted into the inner threaded cylindrical section of the inner sleeve from the trailing end to the leading end thereof, the inner sleeve expands over and clamps around the threaded end portion of the elongated bolt. Thereafter, partial withdrawal of the elongated bolt from the borehole causes the inner sleeve to axially move relative to the outer sleeve from the leading end toward the trailing end of the outer sleeve in a wedging action to cause the outer sleeve to radially expand and force engagement of the gripping teeth against the sidewall of the borehole to thereby secure the expandable anchor assembly and therewith the threaded end portion of the elongated bolt within the borehole.

  20. Nonrotating, self-centering anchor assembly for anchoring a bolt in a borehole

    DOEpatents

    Bevan, J.E.; King, G.W.

    1998-12-08

    An expandable anchor assembly is provided for anchoring the threaded end portion of an elongated roof bolt in a borehole. The anchoring assembly includes a hollow outer sleeve in the form of a plurality of symmetrically arranged, longitudinal segmented wall portions with exterior gripping teeth and an inner expander sleeve in the form of a corresponding plurality of longitudinal wall portions symmetrically arranged about a central axis to define an inner threaded cylindrical section. The inner sleeve is captured within and moveable axially relative to the outer sleeve. As the threaded end portion of the elongated bolt is inserted into the inner threaded cylindrical section of the inner sleeve from the trailing end to the leading end thereof, the inner sleeve expands over and clamps around the threaded end portion of the elongated bolt. Thereafter, partial withdrawal of the elongated bolt from the borehole causes the inner sleeve to axially move relative to the outer sleeve from the leading end toward the trailing end of the outer sleeve in a wedging action to cause the outer sleeve to radially expand and force engagement of the gripping teeth against the sidewall of the borehole to thereby secure the expandable anchor assembly and therewith the threaded end portion of the elongated bolt within the borehole. 8 figs.

  1. Nonrotating, self-centering anchor assembly for anchoring a bolt in a borehole

    SciTech Connect

    Bevan, John E.; King, Grant W.

    1997-12-01

    An expandable anchor assembly is provided for anchoring the threaded end portion of an elongated roof bolt in a borehole. The anchoring assembly includes a hollow outer sleeve in the form of a plurality of symmetrically arranged, longitudinal segmented wall portions with exterior gripping teeth and an inner expander sleeve in the form of a corresponding plurality of longitudinal wall portions symmetrically arranged about a central axis to define an inner threaded cylindrical section. The inner sleeve is captured within and moveable axially relative to the outer sleeve. As the threaded end portion of the elongated bolt is inserted into the inner threaded cylindrical section of the inner sleeve from the trailing end to the leading end thereof, the inner sleeve expands over and clamps around the threaded end portion of the elongated bolt. Thereafter, partial withdrawal of the elongated bolt from the borehole causes the inner sleeve to axially move relative to the outer sleeve from the leading end toward the trailing end of the outer sleeve in a wedging action to cause the outer sleeve to radially expand and force engagement of the gripping teeth against the sidewall of the borehole to thereby secure the expandable anchor assembly and therewith the threaded end portion of the elongated bolt within the borehole.

  2. Anchor-based classification and type-C inhibitors for tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Kai-Cheng; Sung, Tzu-Ying; Lin, Chih-Ta; Chiu, Yi-Yuan; Hsu, John T.-A.; Hung, Hui-Chen; Sun, Chung-Ming; Barve, Indrajeet; Chen, Wen-Liang; Huang, Wen-Chien; Huang, Chin-Ting; Chen, Chun-Hwa; Yang, Jinn-Moon

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosine kinases regulate various biological processes and are drug targets for cancers. At present, the design of selective and anti-resistant inhibitors of kinases is an emergent task. Here, we inferred specific site-moiety maps containing two specific anchors to uncover a new binding pocket in the C-terminal hinge region by docking 4,680 kinase inhibitors into 51 protein kinases, and this finding provides an opportunity for the development of kinase inhibitors with high selectivity and anti-drug resistance. We present an anchor-based classification for tyrosine kinases and discover two type-C inhibitors, namely rosmarinic acid (RA) and EGCG, which occupy two and one specific anchors, respectively, by screening 118,759 natural compounds. Our profiling reveals that RA and EGCG selectively inhibit 3% (EGFR and SYK) and 14% of 64 kinases, respectively. According to the guide of our anchor model, we synthesized three RA derivatives with better potency. These type-C inhibitors are able to maintain activities for drug-resistant EGFR and decrease the invasion ability of breast cancer cells. Our results show that the type-C inhibitors occupying a new pocket are promising for cancer treatments due to their kinase selectivity and anti-drug resistance. PMID:26077136

  3. Venue Recommendation and Web Search Based on Anchor Text

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    experimented with the use of anchor text representations in the language modeling framework, and base our runs ei- ther on full ClueWeb12 or the subset of...anchor text representations in the language modeling framework, and base our runs ei- ther on full ClueWeb12 or the subset of touristic aggregators...ClueWeb12- full anchor text , and run our proposed model based on this dataset. This model is exactly the same as Model-Anchor, but based on the

  4. Infrastructure anchor bolt inspection program with NDE applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fish, Philip E.

    1996-11-01

    In 1990, Wisconsin Department of Transportation found a high mast light pole with two of six anchor bolts failed. This failure along with published reports from Michigan DOT about anchor bolt failures on cantilever sign structures, raised concern about the quality and condition of anchor bolts on the Wisconsin DOT system. Wisconsin Department of Transportation implemented an Anchor Bolt Inspection Program in 1990 for cantilever sign structures, high mast light towers, interstate light towers, and signal masts. The program requires an experienced inspection team and a practical inspection approach. Inspection preparation includes review of all background information such as design plans, design computations, construction plans, shop plans, and maintenance history. An inspection plan is developed. Special emphasis is placed on determining material type, cut or rolled threads, and type of coating for anchor bolts. Inspection emphasis are on "hands on" and Nondestructive evaluation. Special emphasis is placed on visual conditions of anchor bolts (cut or rolled threads, straightness, corrosion, nut tension etc.) along with ultrasonic inspection. This program places a strong emphasis on Non Destructive Testing (NDT), especially ultrasonic. Procedures and inspection calibrations are developed from similar anchor bolt geometry and material type. Cut notches are placed in the anchor bolts at locations of possible failure. NDT inspection calibrations are performed from these bolts. Report documentation includes all design plans, pictorial documentation of structural deficiencies, sketches, nondestructive evaluation reports, conclusions, and recommendations. This program has been successful in locating failed anchor bolts and critical cracks before failure of an entire structure.

  5. New Retrievable Coil Anchors: Preliminary In Vivo Experiences in Swine

    SciTech Connect

    Konya, A. Wright, K.C.

    2005-04-15

    Purpose. To design and test retrievable coil anchors to improve the safety and efficacy of coil embolization. Methods. Fifty-two 0.038-inch homemade retrievable stainless steel coils were equipped with one of four different pre-shaped nitinol anchors and tested in 38 pigs. All coils with the anchor were completely retrieved and redeployed 3-18 times (median 7 times) prior to release. Types 1 and 2 anchored coils were acutely deployed in the external iliac arteries (n = 10 each), and chronically tested (1 week) in the common carotid arteries (n = 6 each). Larger type 1 (n = 4), type 3 (n = 6), and type 4 (n = 4) anchored coils were acutely deployed in the abdominal aorta. The largest type 1 anchors (n = 6) were acutely tested in the inferior vena cava. Results. All anchored coils were successfully retrieved and repositioned several times. All but two coils formed a compact plug and there was no coil migration except with two mechanically defective type 3 anchors. Conclusion. The use of retrievable anchors allowed the coils to be retrieved and repositioned, prevented coil migration, and enabled compact coil configuration.

  6. Promotion of PDGF-induced endothelial cell migration by phosphorylated VASP depends on PKA anchoring via AKAP.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Deling; Ouyang, Jingping; Wang, Nian; Zhang, Yahui; Bie, Jinghua; Zhang, Yemin

    2010-02-01

    Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP), an important substrate of PKA, plays a critical role in remodeling of actin cytoskeleton and actin-based cell motility. However, how PKA accurately transfers extracellular signals to VASP and then how phosphorylation of VASP regulates endothelial cell migration have not been clearly defined. Protein kinase A anchoring proteins (AKAPs) are considered to regulate intracellular-specific signal targeting of PKA via AKAP-mediated PKA anchoring. Thus, our study investigated the relationship among AKAP anchoring of PKA, PKA activity, and VASP phosphorylation, which is to clarify the exact role of VASP and its upstream regulatory mechanism in PKA-dependent migration. Our results show that chemotactic factor PDGF activated PKA, increased phosphorylation of VASP at Ser157, and enhanced ECV304 endothelial cell migration. However, phosphorylation site-directed mutation of VASP at Ser157 attenuated the chemotactic effect of PDGF on endothelial cells, suggesting phosphorylation of VASP at Ser157 promotes PKA-mediated endothelial cell migration. Furthermore, disrupting PKA anchoring to AKAP or PKA activity significantly attenuated the PKA activity, VASP phosphorylation, and subsequent cell migration. Meanwhile, disrupting PKA anchoring to AKAP abolished PDGF-induced lamellipodia formation and special VASP accumulation at leading edge of lamellipodia. These results indicate that PKA activation and PKA-mediated substrate responses in VASP phosphorylation and localization depend on PKA anchoring via AKAP in PDGF-induced endothelial cell migration. In conclusion, AKAP anchoring of PKA is an essential upstream event in regulation of PKA-mediated VASP phosphorylation and subsequent endothelial cell migration, which contributes to explore new methods for controlling endothelial cell migration related diseases and angiogenesis.

  7. Num1 anchors mitochondria to the plasma membrane via two domains with different lipid binding specificities.

    PubMed

    Ping, Holly A; Kraft, Lauren M; Chen, WeiTing; Nilles, Amy E; Lackner, Laura L

    2016-06-06

    The mitochondria-ER cortex anchor (MECA) is required for proper mitochondrial distribution and functions by tethering mitochondria to the plasma membrane. The core component of MECA is the multidomain protein Num1, which assembles into clusters at the cell cortex. We show Num1 adopts an extended, polarized conformation. Its N-terminal coiled-coil domain (Num1CC) is proximal to mitochondria, and the C-terminal pleckstrin homology domain is associated with the plasma membrane. We find that Num1CC interacts directly with phospholipid membranes and displays a strong preference for the mitochondria-specific phospholipid cardiolipin. This direct membrane interaction is critical for MECA function. Thus, mitochondrial anchoring is mediated by a protein that interacts directly with two different membranes through lipid-specific binding domains, suggesting a general mechanism for interorganelle tethering.

  8. Num1 anchors mitochondria to the plasma membrane via two domains with different lipid binding specificities

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Holly A.; Kraft, Lauren M.; Chen, WeiTing; Nilles, Amy E.

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondria–ER cortex anchor (MECA) is required for proper mitochondrial distribution and functions by tethering mitochondria to the plasma membrane. The core component of MECA is the multidomain protein Num1, which assembles into clusters at the cell cortex. We show Num1 adopts an extended, polarized conformation. Its N-terminal coiled-coil domain (Num1CC) is proximal to mitochondria, and the C-terminal pleckstrin homology domain is associated with the plasma membrane. We find that Num1CC interacts directly with phospholipid membranes and displays a strong preference for the mitochondria-specific phospholipid cardiolipin. This direct membrane interaction is critical for MECA function. Thus, mitochondrial anchoring is mediated by a protein that interacts directly with two different membranes through lipid-specific binding domains, suggesting a general mechanism for interorganelle tethering. PMID:27241910

  9. End-anchored polymers in good solvents from the single chain limit to high anchoring densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, Mark D.; Grest, Gary S.; Douglas, Jack F.; Kent, Michael S.; Suo, Tongchuan

    2016-11-01

    An increasing number of applications utilize grafted polymer layers to alter the interfacial properties of solid substrates, motivating refinement in our theoretical understanding of such layers. To assess existing theoretical models of them, we have investigated end-anchored polymer layers over a wide range of grafting densities, σ, ranging from a single chain to high anchoring density limits, chain lengths ranging over two orders of magnitude, for very good and marginally good solvent conditions. We compare Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations, numerical self-consistent field calculations, and experimental measurements of the average layer thickness, h, with renormalization group theory, the Alexander-de Gennes mushroom theory, and the classical brush theory. Our simulations clearly indicate that appreciable inter-chain interactions exist at all simulated areal anchoring densities so that there is no mushroom regime in which the layer thickness is independent of σ. Moreover, we find that there is no high coverage regime in which h follows the predicted scaling, h ˜ Nσ1/3, for classical polymer brushes either. Given that no completely adequate analytic theory seems to exist that spans wide ranges of N and σ, we applied scaling arguments for h as a function of a suitably defined reduced anchoring density, defined in terms of the solution radius of gyration of the polymer chains and N. We find that such a scaling approach enables a smooth, unified description of h in very good solvents over the full range of anchoring density and chain lengths, although this type of data reduction does not apply to marginal solvent quality conditions.

  10. Phosphatidylinositol anchor of HeLa cell alkaline phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Jemmerson, R.; Low, M.G.

    1987-09-08

    Alkaline phosphatase from cancer cells, HeLa TCRC-1, was biosynthetically labeled with either /sup 3/H-fatty acids or (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine as analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography of immunoprecipitated material. Phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) released a substantial proportion of the /sup 3/H-fatty acid label from immunoaffinity-purified alkaline phosphatase but had no effect on the radioactivity of (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine-labeled material. PI-PLC also liberated catalytically active alkaline phosphatase from viable cells, and this could be selectively blocked by monoclonal antibodies to alkaline phosphatase. However, the alkaline phosphatase released from /sup 3/H-fatty acid labeled cells by PI-PLC was not radioactive. By contrast, treatment with bromelain removed both the /sup 3/H-fatty acid and the (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine label from purified alkaline phosphatase. Subtilisin was also able to remove the (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine label from the purified alkaline phosphatase. The /sup 3/H radioactivity in alkaline phosphatase purified from (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine-labeled cells comigrated with authentic (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine by anion-exchange chromatography after acid hydrolysis. The data suggest that the /sup 3/H-fatty acid and (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine are covalently attached to the carboxyl-terminal segment since bromelain and subtilisin both release alkaline phosphatase from the membrane by cleavage at that end of the polypeptide chain. The data are consistent with findings for other proteins recently shown to be anchored in the membrane through a glycosylphosphatidylinositol structure and indicate that a similar structure contributes to the membrane anchoring of alkaline phosphatase.

  11. A Novel Acetivibrio cellulolyticus Anchoring Scaffoldin That Bears Divergent Cohesins

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qi; Barak, Yoav; Kenig, Rina; Shoham, Yuval; Bayer, Edward A.; Lamed, Raphael

    2004-01-01

    Sequencing of a cellulosome-integrating gene cluster in Acetivibrio cellulolyticus was completed. The cluster contains four tandem scaffoldin genes (scaA, scaB, scaC, and scaD) bounded upstream and downstream, respectively, by a presumed cellobiose phosphorylase and a nucleotide methylase. The sequences and properties of scaA, scaB, and scaC were reported previously, and those of scaD are reported here. The scaD gene encodes an 852-residue polypeptide that includes a signal peptide, three cohesins, and a C-terminal S-layer homology (SLH) module. The calculated molecular weight of the mature ScaD is 88,960; a 67-residue linker segment separates cohesins 1 and 2, and two ∼30-residue linkers separate cohesin 2 from 3 and cohesin 3 from the SLH module. The presence of an SLH module in ScaD indicates its role as an anchoring protein. The first two ScaD cohesins can be classified as type II, similar to the four cohesins of ScaB. Surprisingly, the third ScaD cohesin belongs to the type I cohesins, like the seven ScaA cohesins. ScaD is the first scaffoldin to be described that contains divergent types of cohesins as integral parts of the polypeptide chain. The recognition properties among selected recombinant cohesins and dockerins from the different scaffoldins of the gene cluster were investigated by affinity blotting. The results indicated that the divergent types of ScaD cohesins also differ in their preference of dockerins. ScaD thus plays a dual role, both as a primary scaffoldin, capable of direct incorporation of a single dockerin-borne enzyme, and as a secondary scaffoldin that anchors the major primary scaffoldin, ScaA and its complement of enzymes to the cell surface. PMID:15317783

  12. Structure of a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored domain from a trypanosome variant surface glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Jones, Nicola G; Nietlispach, Daniel; Sharma, Reuben; Burke, David F; Eyres, Isobel; Mues, Marsilius; Mott, Helen R; Carrington, Mark

    2008-02-08

    The cell surface of African trypanosomes is covered by a densely packed monolayer of a single protein, the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG). The VSG protects the trypanosome cell surface from effector molecules of the host immune system and is the mediator of antigenic variation. The sequence divergence between VSGs that is necessary for antigenic variation can only occur within the constraints imposed by the structural features necessary to form the monolayer barrier. Here, the structures of the two domains that together comprise the C-terminal di-domain of VSG ILTat1.24 have been determined. The first domain has a structure similar to the single C-terminal domain of VSG MITat1.2 and provides proof of structural conservation in VSG C-terminal domains complementing the conservation of structure present in the N-terminal domain. The second domain, although based on the same fold, is a minimized version missing several structural features. The structure of the second domain contains the C-terminal residue that in the native VSG is attached to a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor that retains the VSG on the external face of the plasma membrane. The solution structures of this domain and a VSG GPI glycan have been combined to produce the first structure-based model of a GPI-anchored protein. The model suggests that the core glycan of the GPI anchor lies in a groove on the surface of the domain and that there is a close association between the GPI glycan and protein. More widely, the GPI glycan may be an integral part of the structure of other GPI-anchored proteins.

  13. Spatio-temporal segregation of Ras signals: one ship, three anchors, many harbors.

    PubMed

    Rocks, Oliver; Peyker, Anna; Bastiaens, Philippe I H

    2006-08-01

    Dynamic assembly of spatially separated signaling platforms enables a cell to tune cellular outputs in response to different input stimuli. Understanding how a vast diversity in signaling responses can be generated from a limited protein repertoire requires knowledge of how cells maintain the segregation of proteins and thereby orchestrate their local activities. Ras proteins are subject to this type of precise regulation of localization, and thus activity, in space and time. A model emerges where different lipid anchors dynamically shuttle Ras between specific membrane compartments, where differences in the accessibility of signaling environments and in the residence time of Ras therein account for isoform-specific signaling responses.

  14. Two Membrane-Anchored Aspartic Proteases Contribute to Pollen and Ovule Development1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hui; Zhang, Yinghui; Wang, Wanlei; Zhao, Keke; Liu, Chunmei; Bai, Lin; Li, Rui

    2017-01-01

    Aspartic proteases are a class of proteolytic enzymes with conserved aspartate residues, which are implicated in protein processing, maturation, and degradation. Compared with yeast and animals, plants possess a larger aspartic protease family. However, little is known about most of these enzymes. Here, we characterized two Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) putative glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored aspartic protease genes, A36 and A39, which are highly expressed in pollen and pollen tubes. a36 and a36 a39 mutants display significantly reduced pollen activity. Transmission electron microscopy and terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end labeling assays further revealed that the unviable pollen in a36 a39 may undergo unanticipated apoptosis-like programmed cell death. The degeneration of female gametes also occurred in a36 a39. Aniline Blue staining, scanning electron microscopy, and semi in vitro guidance assays indicated that the micropylar guidance of pollen tubes is significantly compromised in a36 a39. A36 and A39 that were fused with green fluorescent protein are localized to the plasma membrane and display punctate cytosolic localization and colocalize with the GPI-anchored protein COBRA-LIKE10. Furthermore, in a36 a39, the abundance of highly methylesterified homogalacturonans and xyloglucans was increased significantly in the apical pollen tube wall. These results indicate that A36 and A39, two putative GPI-anchored aspartic proteases, play important roles in plant reproduction in Arabidopsis. PMID:27872247

  15. In resting COS1 cells a dominant negative approach shows that specific, anchored PDE4 cAMP phosphodiesterase isoforms gate the activation, by basal cyclic AMP production, of AKAP-tethered protein kinase A type II located in the centrosomal region.

    PubMed

    McCahill, Angela; McSorley, Theresa; Huston, Elaine; Hill, Elaine V; Lynch, Martin J; Gall, Irene; Keryer, Guy; Lygren, Birgitte; Tasken, Kjetil; van Heeke, Gino; Houslay, Miles D

    2005-09-01

    We employ a novel, dominant negative approach to identify a key role for certain tethered cyclic AMP specific phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4) isoforms in regulating cyclic AMP dependent protein kinase A (PKA) sub-populations in resting COS1 cells. A fraction of PKA is clearly active in resting COS1 cells and this activity increases when cells are treated with the selective PDE4 inhibitor, rolipram. Point mutation of a critical, conserved aspartate residue in the catalytic site of long PDE4A4, PDE4B1, PDE4C2 and PDE4D3 isoforms renders them catalytically inactive. Overexpressed in resting COS1 cells, catalytically inactive forms of PDE4C2 and PDE4D3, but not PDE4A4 and PDE4B1, are constitutively PKA phosphorylated while overexpressed active versions of all these isoforms are not. Inactive and active versions of all these isoforms are PKA phosphorylated in cells where protein kinase A is maximally activated with forskolin and IBMX. By contrast, rolipram challenge of COS1 cells selectively triggers the PKA phosphorylation of recombinant, active PDE4D3 and PDE4C2 but not recombinant, active PDE4A4 and PDE4B1. Purified, recombinant PDE4D3 and PDE4A4 show a similar dose-dependency for in vitro phosphorylation by PKA. Disruption of the tethering of PKA type-II to PKA anchor proteins (AKAPs), achieved using the peptide Ht31, prevents inactive forms of PDE4C2 and PDE4D3 being constitutively PKA phosphorylated in resting cells as does siRNA-mediated knockdown of PKA-RII, but not PKA-RI. PDE4C2 and PDE4D3 co-immunoprecipitate from COS1 cell lysates with 250 kDa and 450 kDa AKAPs that tether PKA type-II and not PKA type-I. PKA type-II co-localises with AKAP450 in the centrosomal region of COS1 cells. The perinuclear distribution of recombinant, inactive PDE4D3, but not inactive PDE4A4, overlaps with AKAP450 and PKA type-II. The distribution of PKA phosphorylated inactive PDE4D3 also overlaps with that of AKAP450 in the centrosomal region of COS1 cells. We propose that a novel role

  16. Structural variations in anchoring fibrils in dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa: correlation with type VII collagen expression.

    PubMed

    McGrath, J A; Ishida-Yamamoto, A; O'Grady, A; Leigh, I M; Eady, R A

    1993-04-01

    Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa is characterized by various abnormalities of anchoring fibrils, which are mainly composed of type VII collagen, at the dermal-epidermal junction. To define these changes more clearly, we examined skin samples from 22 patients with different forms of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa by pre-embedding immunoelectron microscopy using an antibody (LH 7:2) that binds to the NC-1 globular domain of type VII collagen, followed by 1 nm colloidal gold-labeled secondary antibodies and subsequent silver enhancement. In dominant dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa cases, there was only a slight but variable reduction in the immunolabeling density on anchoring fibrils and on the lamina densa, in parts similar to normal human skin. In localized recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa skin, some fibrillar structures just below the lamina densa (and particularly subjacent to hemidesmosomes) had specific antibody labeling despite their lack of resemblance to definitive anchoring fibrils. Immunolabeling with LH 7:2 was also seen within basal keratinocyte endoplasmic reticulum and cytoplasmic vesicles in some dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa patients, usually with milder phenotypic features. Even in the most severe cases of generalized recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, occasional immunolabeling was found within the lamina densa and on scanty thin filamentous structures at sub-lamina densa sites usually occupied by anchoring fibrils. This study suggests that dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa patients express some type VII collagen NC-1 domain epitopes that may be variably reduced at the dermal-epidermal junction or retained within basal keratinocytes. The clinical heterogeneity in dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa is mirrored by a range of immunoelectron microscopy findings, indicating variability in completeness of anchoring fibril formation and a possible spectrum of underlying type VII collagen structural protein abnormalities.

  17. Retention of internal anchor tags by juvenile striped bass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Den Avyle, M.J.; Wallin, J.E.

    2001-01-01

    We marked hatchery-reared striped bass Morone saxatilis (145-265 mm total length) with internal anchor tags and monitored retention for 28 months after stocking in the Savannah River, Georgia and South Carolina. Anchor tags (with an 18-mm, T-shaped anchor and 42-mm streamer) were surgically implanted ventrally, and coded wire tags (1 mm long and 0.25 mm in diameter) were placed into the cheek muscle to help identify subsequent recaptures. The estimated probability of retention (SD) of anchor tags was 0.94 (0.05) at 4 months, 0.64 (0.13) at 16 months, and 0.33 (0.19) at 28 months. Of 10 fish recaptured with only coded wire tags, 5 showed an externally visible wound or scar near the point of anchor tag insertion. The incidence of wounds or scars, which we interpreted as evidence of tag shedding, increased to 50% in recaptures taken at 28 months (three of six fish). Our estimates for retention of anchor tags were generally lower than those in other studies of striped bass, possibly because of differences in the style of anchor or sizes of fish used. Because of its low rate of retention, the type of anchor tag we used may not be suitable for long-term assessments of stock enhancement programs that use striped bass of the sizes we evaluated.

  18. Understanding Rasch Measurement: Partial Credit Model and Pivot Anchoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bode, Rita K.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Rasch measurement partial credit model, what it is, how it differs from other Rasch models, and when and how to use it. Also describes the calibration of instruments with increasingly complex items. Explains pivot anchoring and illustrates its use and describes the effect of pivot anchoring on step calibrations, item hierarchy, and…

  19. 107. View showing open caisson Pier 4 with anchor bolts ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    107. View showing open caisson Pier 4 with anchor bolts placed ready for last pour of concrete. Also pile driver driving falsework piles for south anchor arm. Located at end of the old ferry landing slip at Crockett side of straits. - Carquinez Bridge, Spanning Carquinez Strait at Interstate 80, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  20. Using Anchored Instruction to Evaluate Mathematical Growth and Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurz, Terri L.; Batarelo, Ivana

    2005-01-01

    Anchored instruction is designed to present problems in a meaningful context to allow for investigations into real life environments. The Jasper Project was created to allow students to investigate mathematical dilemmas using anchored instruction techniques. This study uses case study methods to examine the perceptions that preservice teachers…

  1. Software Note: Using BILOG for Fixed-Anchor Item Calibration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMars, Christine E.; Jurich, Daniel P.

    2012-01-01

    The nonequivalent groups anchor test (NEAT) design is often used to scale item parameters from two different test forms. A subset of items, called the anchor items or common items, are administered as part of both test forms. These items are used to adjust the item calibrations for any differences in the ability distributions of the groups taking…

  2. Electrically insulated MLI and thermal anchor

    SciTech Connect

    Kamiya, Koji; Furukawa, Masato; Murakami, Haruyuki; Kizu, Kaname; Tsuchiya, Katsuhiko; Koidea, Yoshihiko; Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Hatakenaka, Ryuta; Miyakita, Takeshi

    2014-01-29

    The thermal shield of JT-60SA is kept at 80 K and will use the multilayer insulation (MLI) to reduce radiation heat load to the superconducting coils at 4.4 K from the cryostat at 300 K. Due to plasma pulse operation, the MLI is affected by eddy current in toroidal direction. The MLI is designed to suppress the current by electrically insulating every 20 degree in the toroidal direction by covering the MLI with polyimide films. In this paper, two kinds of designs for the MLI system are proposed, focusing on a way to overlap the layers. A boil-off calorimeter method and temperature measurement has been performed to determine the thermal performance of the MLI system. The design of the electrical insulated thermal anchor between the toroidal field (TF) coil and the thermal shield is also explained.

  3. Scaffold State Switching Amplifies, Accelerates, and Insulates Protein Kinase C Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Greenwald, Eric C.; Redden, John M.; Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly L.; Saucerman, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    Scaffold proteins localize two or more signaling enzymes in close proximity to their downstream effectors. A-kinase-anchoring proteins (AKAPs) are a canonical family of scaffold proteins known to bind protein kinase A (PKA) and other enzymes. Several AKAPs have been shown to accelerate, amplify, and specify signal transduction to dynamically regulate numerous cellular processes. However, there is little theory available to mechanistically explain how signaling on protein scaffolds differs from solution biochemistry. In our present study, we propose a novel kinetic mechanism for enzymatic reactions on protein scaffolds to explain these phenomena, wherein the enzyme-substrate-scaffold complex undergoes stochastic state switching to reach an active state. This model predicted anchored enzymatic reactions to be accelerated, amplified, and insulated from inhibition compared with those occurring in solution. We exploited a direct interaction between protein kinase C (PKC) and AKAP7α as a model to validate these predictions experimentally. Using a genetically encoded PKC activity reporter, we found that both the strength and speed of substrate phosphorylation were enhanced by AKAP7α. PKC tethered to AKAP7α was less susceptible to inhibition from the ATP-competitive inhibitor Gö6976 and the substrate-competitive inhibitor PKC 20-28, but not the activation-competitive inhibitor calphostin C. Model predictions and experimental validation demonstrated that insulation is a general property of scaffold tethering. Sensitivity analysis indicated that these findings may be applicable to many other scaffolds as well. Collectively, our findings provide theoretical and experimental evidence that scaffold proteins can amplify, accelerate, and insulate signal transduction. PMID:24302730

  4. A localized multimeric anchor attaches the Caulobacter holdfast to the cell pole

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Gail G.; Allen, Rebecca C.; Toh, Evelyn; Long, Maria; Brown, Pamela J. B.; Cole-Tobian, Jennifer L.; Brun, Yves V.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Caulobacter crescentus attachment is mediated by the holdfast, a complex of polysaccharide anchored to the cell by HfaA, HfaB and HfaD. We show that all three proteins are surface-exposed outer membrane (OM) proteins. HfaA is similar to fimbrial proteins and assembles into a high molecular weight (HMW) form requiring HfaD, but not holdfast polysaccharide. The HfaD HMW form is dependent on HfaA but not on holdfast polysaccharide. We show that HfaA and HfaD form homomultimers and that they require HfaB for stability and OM translocation. All three proteins localize to the late predivisional flagellar pole, remain at this pole in swarmer cells, and localize at the stalk tip after the stalk is synthesized at the same pole. Hfa protein localization requires the holdfast polysaccharide secretion proteins and the polar localization factor PodJ. A hfaB mutant is much more severely deficient in adherence and holdfast attachment than hfaA and hfaD mutants. A hfaA, hfaD double mutant phenocopies either single mutant, suggesting that HfaB is involved in holdfast attachment beyond secretion of HfaA and HfaD. We hypothesize HfaB secretes HfaA and HfaD across the outer membrane, and the three proteins form a complex anchoring the holdfast to the stalk. PMID:20233308

  5. Anchoring submersible ultrasonic receivers in river channels with stable substrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bettoli, Phillip William; Scholten, G.D.; Hubbs, D.

    2010-01-01

    We developed an anchoring system for submersible ultrasonic receivers (SURs) that we placed on the bottom of the riverine reaches of three main-stem reservoirs in the upper Tennessee River. Each anchor consisted of a steel tube (8.9 x 35.6 cm) welded vertically to a round plate of steel (5.1 x 40.6 cm). All seven SURs and their 57-kg anchors were successfully deployed and retrieved three times over 547 d by a dive team employing surface air-breathing equipment and a davit-equipped boat. All of the anchors and their SURs remained stationary over two consecutive winters on the hard-bottom, thalweg sites where they were deployed. The SUR and its anchor at the most downriver site experienced flows that exceeded 2,100 m(3)/s and mean water column velocities of about 0.9 m/s.

  6. Effects of accuracy motivation and anchoring on metacomprehension judgment and accuracy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qin

    2012-01-01

    The current research investigates how accuracy motivation impacts anchoring and adjustment in metacomprehension judgment and how accuracy motivation and anchoring affect metacomprehension accuracy. Participants were randomly assigned to one of six conditions produced by the between-subjects factorial design involving accuracy motivation (incentive or no) and peer performance anchor (95%, 55%, or no). Two studies showed that accuracy motivation did not impact anchoring bias, but the adjustment-from-anchor process occurred. Accuracy incentive increased anchor-judgment gap for the 95% anchor but not for the 55% anchor, which induced less certainty about the direction of adjustment. The findings offer support to the integrative theory of anchoring. Additionally, the two studies revealed a "power struggle" between accuracy motivation and anchoring in influencing metacomprehension accuracy. Accuracy motivation could improve metacomprehension accuracy in spite of anchoring effect, but if anchoring effect is too strong, it could overpower the motivation effect. The implications of the findings were discussed.

  7. TFPIβ is the GPI-anchored TFPI isoform on human endothelial cells and placental microsomes

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Thomas J.; Tuley, Elodee

    2012-01-01

    Tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) produces factor Xa-dependent feedback inhibition of factor VIIa/tissue factor-induced coagulation. Messages for 2 isoforms of TFPI have been identified. TFPIα mRNA encodes a protein with an acidic N-terminus, 3 Kunitz-type protease inhibitor domains and a basic C-terminus that has been purified from plasma and culture media. TFPIβ mRNA encodes a form in which the Kunitz-3 and C-terminal domains of TFPIα are replaced with an alternative C-terminus that directs the attachment of a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor, but whether TFPIβ protein is actually expressed is not clear. Moreover, previous studies have suggested that the predominant form of TFPI released from cells by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PIPLC) treatment is TFPIα, implying it is bound at cell surfaces to a separate GPI-anchored coreceptor. Our studies show that the form of TFPI released by PIPLC treatment of cultured endothelial cells and placental microsomes is actually TFPIβ based on (1) migration on SDS-PAGE before and after deglycosylation, (2) the lack of a Kunitz-3 domain, and (3) it contains a GPI anchor. Immunoassays demonstrate that, although endothelial cells secrete TFPIα, greater than 95% of the TFPI released by PIPLC treatment from the surface of endothelial cells and from placental microsomes is TFPIβ. PMID:22144186

  8. bicoid mRNA localises to the Drosophila oocyte anterior by random Dynein-mediated transport and anchoring

    PubMed Central

    Trovisco, Vítor; Belaya, Katsiaryna; Nashchekin, Dmitry; Irion, Uwe; Sirinakis, George; Butler, Richard; Lee, Jack J; Gavis, Elizabeth R; St Johnston, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    bicoid mRNA localises to the Drosophila oocyte anterior from stage 9 of oogenesis onwards to provide a local source for Bicoid protein for embryonic patterning. Live imaging at stage 9 reveals that bicoid mRNA particles undergo rapid Dynein-dependent movements near the oocyte anterior, but with no directional bias. Furthermore, bicoid mRNA localises normally in shot2A2, which abolishes the polarised microtubule organisation. FRAP and photo-conversion experiments demonstrate that the RNA is stably anchored at the anterior, independently of microtubules. Thus, bicoid mRNA is localised by random active transport and anterior anchoring. Super-resolution imaging reveals that bicoid mRNA forms 110–120 nm particles with variable RNA content, but constant size. These particles appear to be well-defined structures that package the RNA for transport and anchoring. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17537.001 PMID:27791980

  9. A novel membrane anchor for FtsZ is linked to cell wall hydrolysis in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Meier, Elizabeth L; Razavi, Shiva; Inoue, Takanari; Goley, Erin D

    2016-07-01

    In most bacteria, the tubulin-like GTPase FtsZ forms an annulus at midcell (the Z-ring) which recruits the division machinery and regulates cell wall remodeling. Although both activities require membrane attachment of FtsZ, few membrane anchors have been characterized. FtsA is considered to be the primary membrane tether for FtsZ in bacteria, however in Caulobacter crescentus, FtsA arrives at midcell after stable Z-ring assembly and early FtsZ-directed cell wall synthesis. We hypothesized that additional proteins tether FtsZ to the membrane and demonstrate that in C. crescentus, FzlC is one such membrane anchor. FzlC associates with membranes directly in vivo and in vitro and recruits FtsZ to membranes in vitro. As for most known membrane anchors, the C-terminal peptide of FtsZ is required for its recruitment to membranes by FzlC in vitro and midcell recruitment of FzlC in cells. In vivo, overproduction of FzlC causes cytokinesis defects whereas deletion of fzlC causes synthetic defects with dipM, ftsE and amiC mutants, implicating FzlC in cell wall hydrolysis. Our characterization of FzlC as a novel membrane anchor for FtsZ expands our understanding of FtsZ regulators and establishes a role for membrane-anchored FtsZ in the regulation of cell wall hydrolysis.

  10. The Role of Plasmalemmal-Cortical Anchoring on the Stability of Transmembrane Electropores

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, S. M.; Ji, Z.; Rockweiler, N. B.; Hahn, A. R.; Booske, J. H.; Hagness, S. C.

    2009-01-01

    The structure of eukaryotic cells is maintained by a network of filamentous actin anchored subjacently to the plasma membrane. This structure is referred to as the actin cortex. We present a locally constrained surface tension model for electroporation in order to address the influence of plasmalemmal-cortical anchoring on electropore dynamics. This model predicts that stable electropores are possible under certain conditions. The existence of stable electropores has been suggested in several experimental studies. The electropore radius at which stability is achieved is a function of the characteristic radii of locally constrained regions about the plasma membrane. This model opens the possibility of using actin-modifying compounds to physically manipulate cortical density, thereby manipulating electroporation dynamics. It also underscores the need to improve electroporation models further by incorporating the influence of trans-electropore ionic and aqueous flow, cortical flexibility, transmembrane protein mobility, and active cellular wound healing mechanisms. PMID:20490371

  11. Anchoring groups for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Cole, Jacqueline M

    2015-02-18

    The dyes in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) require one or more chemical substituents that can act as an anchor, enabling their adsorption onto a metal oxide substrate. This adsorption provides a means for electron injection, which is the process that initiates the electrical circuit in a DSSC. Understanding the structure of various DSSC anchors and the search for new anchors are critical factors for the development of improved DSSCs. Traditionally, carboxylic acid and cyanoacrylic acid groups are employed as dye anchors in DSSCs. In recent years, novel anchor groups have emerged, which make a larger pool of materials available for DSSC dyes, and their associated physical and chemical characteristics offer interesting effects at the interface between dye and metal oxide. This review focuses especially on the structural aspects of these novel dye anchors for TiO2-based DSSCs, including pyridine, phosphonic acid, tetracyanate, perylene dicarboxylic acid anhydride, 2-hydroxylbenzonitrile, 8-hydroxylquinoline, pyridine-N-oxide, hydroxylpyridium, catechol, hydroxamate, sulfonic acid, acetylacetanate, boronic acid, nitro, tetrazole, rhodanine, and salicylic acid substituents. We anticipate that further exploration and understanding of these new types of anchoring groups for TiO2 substrates will not only contribute to the development of advanced DSSCs, but also of quantum dot-sensitized solar cells, water splitting systems, and other self-assembled monolayer-based technologies.

  12. Anchored multi-DOF MEMS gyroscope having robust drive mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Payal; Khonina, S. N.; Pavelyev, V. S.; Fomchenkov, S. A.; Uma, B. V.

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents the new architecture of 2-DOF (degree-of-freedom) drive mode and 1-DOF sense mode gyroscope with the concept of additional anchoring that retains all the advantages of the Dynamic Vibration Absorber (DVA) concept while being operated at high frequencies. These concepts allow reduction of the bandwidth by varying the coupling parameter during the design, thereby increasing the mechanical sensitivity. In the present design, the anchoring concept has been implemented by adding a central anchor for the sense mass. The steady state response and design concept have been devised using analytical modeling.

  13. Multiple sequence alignment with user-defined anchor points

    PubMed Central

    Morgenstern, Burkhard; Prohaska, Sonja J; Pöhler, Dirk; Stadler, Peter F

    2006-01-01

    Background Automated software tools for multiple alignment often fail to produce biologically meaningful results. In such situations, expert knowledge can help to improve the quality of alignments. Results Herein, we describe a semi-automatic version of the alignment program DIALIGN that can take pre-defined constraints into account. It is possible for the user to specify parts of the sequences that are assumed to be homologous and should therefore be aligned to each other. Our software program can use these sites as anchor points by creating a multiple alignment respecting these constraints. This way, our alignment method can produce alignments that are biologically more meaningful than alignments produced by fully automated procedures. As a demonstration of how our method works, we apply our approach to genomic sequences around the Hox gene cluster and to a set of DNA-binding proteins. As a by-product, we obtain insights about the performance of the greedy algorithm that our program uses for multiple alignment and about the underlying objective function. This information will be useful for the further development of DIALIGN. The described alignment approach has been integrated into the TRACKER software system. PMID:16722533

  14. Chemical synthesis and functionalization of clickable glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchors.

    PubMed

    Swarts, Benjamin M; Guo, Zhongwu

    2011-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchorage is a common posttranslational modification of eukaryotic proteins. Chemical synthesis of structurally defined GPIs and GPI derivatives is a necessary step toward understanding the properties and functions of these molecules in biological systems. In this work, the synthesis of several functionalized GPI anchors was accomplished using the para-methoxybenzyl (PMB) group for permanent hydroxyl protection, which allowed the incorporation of functionalities that are incompatible with permanent protecting groups traditionally used in carbohydrate synthesis. A flexible convergent-divergent assembly strategy enabled efficient access to a diverse set of target structures, including "clickable" Alkynyl-GPIs 1 and 2 and Azido-GPI 3. For global deprotection, a one-pot reaction was employed to afford the target GPIs in excellent yields (85-97%). Fully deprotected clickable GPIs 2 and 3 were readily conjugated to imaging and affinity probes via Cu(I)-catalyzed and Cu-free strain-promoted [3+2] cycloaddition, respectively, resulting in GPI-Fluor 4 and GPI-Biotin 5.

  15. Intranuclear Anchoring of Repetitive DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Weipoltshammer, Klara; Schöfer, Christian; Almeder, Marlene; Philimonenko, Vlada V.; Frei, Klemens; Wachtler, Franz; Hozák, Pavel

    1999-01-01

    Centromeres, telomeres, and ribosomal gene clusters consist of repetitive DNA sequences. To assess their contributions to the spatial organization of the interphase genome, their interactions with the nucleoskeleton were examined in quiescent and activated human lymphocytes. The nucleoskeletons were prepared using “physiological” conditions. The resulting structures were probed for specific DNA sequences of centromeres, telomeres, and ribosomal genes by in situ hybridization; the electroeluted DNA fractions were examined by blot hybridization. In both nonstimulated and stimulated lymphocytes, centromeric alpha-satellite repeats were almost exclusively found in the eluted fraction, while telomeric sequences remained attached to the nucleoskeleton. Ribosomal genes showed a transcription-dependent attachment pattern: in unstimulated lymphocytes, transcriptionally inactive ribosomal genes located outside the nucleolus were eluted completely. When comparing transcription unit and intergenic spacer, significantly more of the intergenic spacer was removed. In activated lymphocytes, considerable but similar amounts of both rDNA fragments were eluted. The results demonstrate that: (a) the various repetitive DNA sequences differ significantly in their intranuclear anchoring, (b) telomeric rather than centromeric DNA sequences form stable attachments to the nucleoskeleton, and (c) different attachment mechanisms might be responsible for the interaction of ribosomal genes with the nucleoskeleton. PMID:10613900

  16. Ideals as Anchors for Relationship Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Frye, Margaret; Trinitapoli, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Research on young-adult sexuality in sub-Saharan Africa typically conceptualizes sex as an individual-level risk behavior. We introduce a new approach that connects the conditions surrounding the initiation of sex with subsequent relationship well-being, examines relationships as sequences of interdependent events, and indexes relationship experiences to individually held ideals. New card-sort data from southern Malawi capture young women’s relationship experiences and their ideals in a sequential framework. Using optimal matching, we measure the distance between ideal and experienced relationship sequences to (1) assess the associations between ideological congruence and perceived relationship well-being, (2) compare this ideal-based approach to other experience-based alternatives, and (3) identify individual- and couple-level correlates of congruence between ideals and experiences in the romantic realm. We show that congruence between ideals and experiences conveys relationship well-being along four dimensions: expressions of love and support, robust communication habits, perceived biological safety, and perceived relationship stability. We further show that congruence is patterned by socioeconomic status and supported by shared ideals within romantic dyads. We argue that conceiving of ideals as anchors for how sexual experiences are manifest advances current understandings of romantic relationships, and we suggest that this approach has applications for other domains of life. PMID:27110031

  17. Material Testing for Robotic Omnidirectional Anchor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witkoe, Kevin S.

    2012-01-01

    To successfully explore near-Earth Asteroids the question of mobility emerges as the key issue for any robotic mission. When small bodies have extremely low escape velocities, traditional methods, such as wheels, would send the robot hurtling off of the asteroid's surface. To solve this problem, JPL has developed an omni-directional anchoring mechanism for use in microgravity that utilizes microspine technology. These microspines are placed in circular arrays with 16 independent carriages biasing the surface of the rock. The asperities in the surface allow the gripper to hold nearly 150N in all directions. While the gripper has been proven successful on consolidated rocks, it had yet to be tested on a variety of other surfaces that are suspected to separate the large boulders on an asteroid. Since asteroid surfaces vary widely, from friable rocks to lose ponds of regolith, the gripper was tested in a large variety of materials such as, bonded pumice, sand, gravel, and loose rocks. The forces are applied tangent, at 45 degrees, and normal to the surface of the material. The immediate results from this experiment will give insight into the gripper's effectiveness across the wide spectrum of materials found on asteroids.

  18. Electrostatic anchoring precedes stable membrane attachment of SNAP25/SNAP23 to the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Pascal; Batoulis, Helena; Rink, Kerstin M; Dahlhoff, Stefan; Pinkwart, Kerstin; Söllner, Thomas H; Lang, Thorsten

    2017-01-01

    The SNAREs SNAP25 and SNAP23 are proteins that are initially cytosolic after translation, but then become stably attached to the cell membrane through palmitoylation of cysteine residues. For palmitoylation to occur, membrane association is a prerequisite, but it is unclear which motif may increase the affinities of the proteins for the target membrane. In experiments with rat neuroendocrine cells, we find that a few basic amino acids in the cysteine-rich region of SNAP25 and SNAP23 are essential for plasma membrane targeting. Reconstitution of membrane-protein binding in a liposome assay shows that the mechanism involves protein electrostatics between basic amino acid residues and acidic lipids such as phosphoinositides that play a primary role in these interactions. Hence, we identify an electrostatic anchoring mechanism underlying initial plasma membrane contact by SNARE proteins, which subsequently become palmitoylated at the plasma membrane. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19394.001 PMID:28240595

  19. Anchoring of development workings in a zone of influence of mining in case of the level anchoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demin, V. F.; Fofanov, O. B.; Demina, T. V.; Yavorskiy, V. V.

    2017-02-01

    Regularities of the change of the stress-strain state of coal containing rock masses, depending on mining-geological factors, were revealed. These factors allow establishing rational parameters of anchoring of wall rocks to enhance the stability of development workings. Specific conditions of the deflected mode, displays of rock pressure, terms of maintenance depending on technological parameters are investigated. Researches allowed determining the degree of their development influence on the efficiency of application of the anchoring of the hollow making and will allow a reasonable application of anchoring certificates, provide stability of the rocks mining and reduce expenses on its realization and maintenance.

  20. 34. View of pier 3, showing supporting main anchor arm ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. View of pier 3, showing supporting main anchor arm and cantilever arm spans, as seen from shore near pier 4, looking north - Williamstown-Marietta Bridge, Spanning Ohio River between Williamstown & Marietta, Williamstown, Wood County, WV

  1. 22. View showing main anchor arm, as viewed from main ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. View showing main anchor arm, as viewed from main cantilever arm looking south. Note upper chord eyebar arrangement. - Williamstown-Marietta Bridge, Spanning Ohio River between Williamstown & Marietta, Williamstown, Wood County, WV

  2. 43. DETAIL OF PINNED UPPER CHORD CONNECTION BETWEEN ANCHOR ARM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. DETAIL OF PINNED UPPER CHORD CONNECTION BETWEEN ANCHOR ARM AND SUSPENDED (PANEL 67). VIEW TO NORTH. - Blue Water Bridge, Spanning St. Clair River at I-69, I-94, & Canadian Route 402, Port Huron, St. Clair County, MI

  3. 20. DETAIL OF WEST ANCHOR SPAN, CANTILEVER ARMS AND WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. DETAIL OF WEST ANCHOR SPAN, CANTILEVER ARMS AND WEST HALF OF SUSPENDED SPAN OF THROUGH TRUSS. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - MacArthur Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River on Highway 34 between IA & IL, Burlington, Des Moines County, IA

  4. 19. WEST ANCHOR SPAN OF THROUGH TRUSS AND PIERS NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. WEST ANCHOR SPAN OF THROUGH TRUSS AND PIERS NO. 2 AND 3, FROM WEST RIVERBANK. VIEW TO NORTH. - MacArthur Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River on Highway 34 between IA & IL, Burlington, Des Moines County, IA

  5. Anchor Casting and Portal Strut at West Bank Abutment, Endpost ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Anchor Casting and Portal Strut at West Bank Abutment, Endpost Base and Granite Plinth - Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Bollman Bridge, Spanning Potomac River at Harpers Ferry, Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, WV

  6. Visual implant elastomer and anchor tag retention in largemouth bass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartman, K.J.; Janney, E.C.

    2006-01-01

    We double-marked largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides with Floy FD-68B anchor tags and visible implant elastomer (VIE) marks before stocking to compare retention of the two marks for age-0 (178 mm total length [TL]) and age-1 (273 mm TL) largemouth bass. In a short-term (31-d) evaluation, retention rate of anchor tags was over 94% for each age-class and retention of VIE marks was 98% in both age-classes. In a longer-term comparison of fish stocked into the Ohio River, retention was substantially higher for VIE marks (92.9%) than for anchor tags (42.9%) after 403 d (ages combined). Although anchor tags had high retention in two sizes of largemouth bass during the short-term experiment, they should not be used in situations where accurate identification of marked fish is required for periods longer than 123 d. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2006.

  7. 4. INTERIOR VIEW OF NORTH SECTION, SHOWING STEEL DOOR ANCHORS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. INTERIOR VIEW OF NORTH SECTION, SHOWING STEEL DOOR ANCHORS, LOOKING SOUTH-SOUTHEAST - Marvine Colliery, Oil House, West side Boulevard Avenue, between East Parker Street & Route 380, Scranton, Lackawanna County, PA

  8. The flagellar motility of Chlamydomonas pf25 mutant lacking an AKAP-binding protein is overtly sensitive to medium conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun; Yang, Pinfen

    2006-01-01

    Radial spokes are a conserved axonemal structural complex postulated to regulate the motility of 9 + 2 cilia and flagella via a network of phosphoenzymes and regulatory proteins. Consistently, a Chlamydomonas radial spoke protein, RSP3, has been identified by RII overlays as an A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) that localizes the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) holoenzyme by binding to the RIIa domain of PKA RII subunit. However, the highly conserved docking domain of PKA is also found in the N termini of several AKAP-binding proteins unrelated to PKA as well as a 24-kDa novel spoke protein, RSP11. Here, we report that RSP11 binds to RSP3 directly in vitro and colocalizes with RSP3 toward the spoke base near outer doublets and dynein motors in axonemes. Importantly, RSP11 mutant pf25 displays a spectrum of motility, from paralysis with flaccid or twitching flagella as other spoke mutants to wildtype-like swimming. The wide range of motility changes reversibly depending on the condition of liquid media without replacing defective proteins. We postulate that radial spokes use the RIIa/AKAP module to regulate ciliary and flagellar beating; absence of the spoke RIIa protein exposes a medium-sensitive regulatory mechanism that is not obvious in wild-type Chlamydomonas.

  9. Transport efficiency of membrane-anchored kinesin-1 motors depends on motor density and diffusivity.

    PubMed

    Grover, Rahul; Fischer, Janine; Schwarz, Friedrich W; Walter, Wilhelm J; Schwille, Petra; Diez, Stefan

    2016-11-15

    In eukaryotic cells, membranous vesicles and organelles are transported by ensembles of motor proteins. These motors, such as kinesin-1, have been well characterized in vitro as single molecules or as ensembles rigidly attached to nonbiological substrates. However, the collective transport by membrane-anchored motors, that is, motors attached to a fluid lipid bilayer, is poorly understood. Here, we investigate the influence of motors' anchorage to a lipid bilayer on the collective transport characteristics. We reconstituted "membrane-anchored" gliding motility assays using truncated kinesin-1 motors with a streptavidin-binding peptide tag that can attach to streptavidin-loaded, supported lipid bilayers. We found that the diffusing kinesin-1 motors propelled the microtubules in the presence of ATP. Notably, we found the gliding velocity of the microtubules to be strongly dependent on the number of motors and their diffusivity in the lipid bilayer. The microtubule gliding velocity increased with increasing motor density and membrane viscosity, reaching up to the stepping velocity of single motors. This finding is in contrast to conventional gliding motility assays where the density of surface-immobilized kinesin-1 motors does not influence the microtubule velocity over a wide range. We reason that the transport efficiency of membrane-anchored motors is reduced because of their slippage in the lipid bilayer, an effect that we directly observed using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy. Our results illustrate the importance of motor-cargo coupling, which potentially provides cells with an additional means of regulating the efficiency of cargo transport.

  10. Drag Embedment Anchor Tests in Sand and Mud

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    24.0 DISTANCE ACHOR TRAVELLED 24.0 TESI ME 1 FIX 84 FT - 2.185 I11 CHAIN 34 FT - 2 IN WIRE ROPE E BOTTOM 13. ANCHOR FLUKE TIP DEPTH NOTE - POSITIVE SHAN...ANChOIR TYPE .RUCL TIN SHANK ANCHOR "EIGHT 1100.90 Lý. FLUWF ANGLE-TYPE, **4** DEG. - I G= IGV I-FIX "CORING LINE JtSCR’PTI,,N 1l8G FT - 2.0 IN CHAIN

  11. Medial rectus muscle anchoring in complete oculomotor nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Si Hyung; Chang, Jee Ho

    2015-10-01

    The management of exotropia resulting from complete oculomotor nerve palsy is challenging. Conventional therapeutic interventions, including supramaximal resection and recession, superior oblique tendon resection and transposition, and several ocular anchoring procedures have yielded less-than-adequate results. Here we describe a novel surgical technique of anchoring the medial rectus muscle to the medial orbital wall in combination with lateral rectus disinsertion and reattachment to the lateral orbital wall.

  12. Photoinduced ordering and anchoring properties of azo-dye films.

    PubMed

    Kiselev, Alexei D; Chigrinov, Vladimir; Huang, Dan Ding

    2005-12-01

    We study both theoretically and experimentally the anchoring properties of photoaligning azo-dye films in contact with a nematic liquid crystal depending on the photoinduced ordering of azo-dye molecules. In the mean field approximation, we found that the bare surface anchoring energy depends linearly on the azo-dye order parameter and the azimuthal anchoring strength decays to zero in the limit of vanishing photoinduced ordering. From the absorption dichroism spectra measured in azo-dye films that are prepared from an azo-dye derivative with polymerizable terminal groups we obtain the dependence of the dichroic ratio on the irradiation dose. We also measure the polar and azimuthal anchoring strengths in nematic liquid crystal (NLC) cells aligned by the azo-dye films and derive the anchoring strengths as functions of the dichroic ratio, which is proportional to the photoinduced order parameter. Although linear fitting of the experimental data for both anchoring strengths gives reasonable results, it, predicts vanishing of the azimuthal anchoring strength at some nonzero value of the azo-dye order parameter, in contradiction with theory. By using a simple phenomenological model we show that this discrepancy can be attributed to the difference between the surface and bulk order parameters in the films. The measured polar anchoring energy is found to be an order of magnitude higher than the azimuthal strength. Our theory suggests that the quadrupole term of the spherical harmonics expansion for the azo-dye-NLC intermolecular potential might be of importance for the understanding of this difference.

  13. Greedy Successive Anchorization for Localizing Machine Type Communication Devices

    PubMed Central

    Imtiaz Ul Haq, Mian; Kim, Dongwoo

    2016-01-01

    Localization of machine type communication (MTC) devices is essential for various types of location-based applications. In this paper, we investigate a distributed localization problem in noisy networks, where an estimated position of blind MTC machines (BMs) is obtained by using noisy measurements of distance between BM and anchor machines (AMs). We allow positioned BMs also to work as anchors that are referred to as virtual AMs (VAMs) in this paper. VAMs usually have greater position errors than (original) AMs, and, if used as anchors, the error propagates through the whole network. However, VAMs are necessary, especially when many BMs are distributed in a large area with an insufficient number of AMs. To overcome the error propagation, we propose a greedy successive anchorization process (GSAP). A round of GSAP consists of consecutive two steps. In the first step, a greedy selection of anchors among AMs and VAMs is done by which GSAP considers only those three anchors that possibly pertain to the localization accuracy. In the second step, each BM that can select three anchors in its neighbor determines its location with a proposed distributed localization algorithm. Iterative rounds of GSAP terminate when every BM in the network finds its location. To examine the performance of GSAP, a root mean square error (RMSE) metric is used and the corresponding Cramér–Rao lower bound (CRLB) is provided. By numerical investigation, RMSE performance of GSAP is shown to be better than existing localization methods with and without an anchor selection method and mostly close to the CRLB. PMID:27983576

  14. Aurora-A kinase (AURKA) in normal and pathological cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Nikonova, Anna S.; Astsaturov, Igor; Serebriiskii, Ilya G.; Dunbrack, Roland L.; Golemis, Erica A.

    2013-01-01

    Temporally and spatially controlled activation of the Aurora-A kinase (AURKA) is regulates centrosome maturation, entry into mitosis, formation and function of the bipolar spindle, and cytokinesis. Genetic amplification, and mRNA and protein overexpression of Aurora-A are common in many types of solid tumor, and associated with aneuploidy, supernumerary centrosomes, defective mitotic spindles, and resistance to apoptosis. These properties have led Aurora-A to be considered a high value target for development of cancer therapeutics, with multiple agents currently in early phase clinical trials. More recently, identification of additional, non-mitotic functions and means of activation of Aurora-A during interphase neurite elongation and ciliary resorption have significantly expanded understanding of its function, and may offer insights into clinical performance of Aurora-A inhibitors. We here review mitotic and non-mitotic functions of Aurora-A, discuss Aurora-A regulation in the context of protein structural information, and evaluate progress in understanding and inhibiting Aurora-A in cancer. PMID:22864622

  15. Pattern-induced anchoring transitions in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas-Gómez, Óscar A.; Romero-Enrique, José M.; Silvestre, Nuno M.; Telo da Gama, Margarida M.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we revisit the problem of a nematic liquid crystal in contact with patterned substrates. The substrate is modelled as a periodic array of parallel infinite grooves of well-defined cross-section sculpted on a chemically homogeneous substrate which favours local homeotropic anchoring of the nematic. We consider three cases: a sawtooth, a crenellated and a sinusoidal substrate. We analyse this problem within the modified Frank-Oseen formalism. We argue that, for substrate periodicities much larger than the extrapolation length, the existence of different nematic textures with distinct far-field orientations, as well as the anchoring transitions between them, are associated with the presence of topological defects either on or close to the substrate. For the sawtooth and sinusoidal cases, we observe a homeotropic to planar anchoring transition as the substrate roughness increases. On the other hand, a homeotropic to oblique anchoring transition is observed for crenellated substrates. In this case, the anchoring phase diagram shows a complex dependence on the substrate roughness and substrate anchoring strength.

  16. Genome mapping by random anchoring: A discrete theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M. Q.; Marr, T. G.

    1993-11-01

    As a part of the international human genome project, large-scale genomic maps of human and other model organisms are being generated. More recently, mapping using various anchoring (as opposed to the traditional "fingerprinting") strategies have been proposed based largely on mathematical models. In all of the theoretical work dealing with anchoring, an anchor has been idealized as a point on a continuous, infinite-length genome. In general, it is not desirable to make these assumptions, since in practice they may be violated under a variety of actual biological situations. Here we analyze a discrete model that can be used to predict the expected progress made when mapping by random anchoring. By virtue of keeping all three length scales (genome length, clone length, and probe length) finite, our results for the random anchoring strategy are derived in full generality, which contain previous results as special cases and hence can have broad application for planning mapping experiments or assessing the accuracy of the continuum models. Finally, we pose a challenging nonrandom anchoring model corresponding to a more efficient mapping scheme.

  17. Poor anchoring limits dyslexics' perceptual, memory, and reading skills.

    PubMed

    Oganian, Yulia; Ahissar, Merav

    2012-07-01

    The basic deficits underlying the severe and persistent reading difficulties in dyslexia are still highly debated. One of the major topics of debate is whether these deficits are language specific, or affect both verbal and non-verbal stimuli. Recently, Ahissar and colleagues proposed the "anchoring-deficit hypothesis" (Ahissar, Lubin, Putter-Katz, & Banai, 2006), which suggests that dyslexics have a general difficulty in automatic extraction of stimulus regularities from auditory inputs. This hypothesis explained a broad range of dyslexics' verbal and non-verbal difficulties. However, it was not directly tested in the context of reading and verbal memory, which poses the main stumbling blocks to dyslexics. Here we assessed the abilities of adult dyslexics to efficiently benefit from ("anchor to") regularities embedded in repeated tones, orally presented syllables, and written words. We also compared dyslexics' performance to that of individuals with attention disorder (ADHD), but no reading disability. We found an anchoring effect in all groups: all gained from stimulus repetition. However, in line with the anchoring-deficit hypothesis, controls and ADHD participants showed a significantly larger anchoring effect in all tasks. This study is the first that directly shows that the same domain-general deficit, poor anchoring, characterizes dyslexics' performance in perceptual, working memory and reading tasks.

  18. Evaluation of mitral valve replacement anchoring in a phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, A. Jonathan; Moore, John; Lang, Pencilla; Bainbridge, Dan; Campbell, Gordon; Jones, Doug L.; Guiraudon, Gerard M.; Peters, Terry M.

    2012-02-01

    Conventional mitral valve replacement requires a median sternotomy and cardio-pulmonary bypass with aortic crossclamping and is associated with significant mortality and morbidity which could be reduced by performing the procedure off-pump. Replacing the mitral valve in the closed, off-pump, beating heart requires extensive development and validation of surgical and imaging techniques. Image guidance systems and surgical access for off-pump mitral valve replacement have been previously developed, allowing the prosthetic valve to be safely introduced into the left atrium and inserted into the mitral annulus. The major remaining challenge is to design a method of securely anchoring the prosthetic valve inside the beating heart. The development of anchoring techniques has been hampered by the expense and difficulty in conducting large animal studies. In this paper, we demonstrate how prosthetic valve anchoring may be evaluated in a dynamic phantom. The phantom provides a consistent testing environment where pressure measurements and Doppler ultrasound can be used to monitor and assess the valve anchoring procedures, detecting pararvalvular leak when valve anchoring is inadequate. Minimally invasive anchoring techniques may be directly compared to the current gold standard of valves sutured under direct vision, providing a useful tool for the validation of new surgical instruments.

  19. Pattern-induced anchoring transitions in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Gómez, Óscar A; Romero-Enrique, José M; Silvestre, Nuno M; Telo da Gama, Margarida M

    2017-02-15

    In this paper we revisit the problem of a nematic liquid crystal in contact with patterned substrates. The substrate is modelled as a periodic array of parallel infinite grooves of well-defined cross-section sculpted on a chemically homogeneous substrate which favours local homeotropic anchoring of the nematic. We consider three cases: a sawtooth, a crenellated and a sinusoidal substrate. We analyse this problem within the modified Frank-Oseen formalism. We argue that, for substrate periodicities much larger than the extrapolation length, the existence of different nematic textures with distinct far-field orientations, as well as the anchoring transitions between them, are associated with the presence of topological defects either on or close to the substrate. For the sawtooth and sinusoidal cases, we observe a homeotropic to planar anchoring transition as the substrate roughness increases. On the other hand, a homeotropic to oblique anchoring transition is observed for crenellated substrates. In this case, the anchoring phase diagram shows a complex dependence on the substrate roughness and substrate anchoring strength.

  20. Filamentous structures in skeletal muscle: anchors for the subsarcolemmal space.

    PubMed

    Khairani, Astrid Feinisa; Tajika, Yuki; Takahashi, Maiko; Ueno, Hitoshi; Murakami, Tohru; Soenggono, Arifin; Yorifuji, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    In skeletal muscle fibers, intermediate filaments and actin filaments provide structural support to the myofibrils and the sarcolemma. For many years, it was poorly understood from ultrastructural observations that how these filamentous structures were kept anchored. The present study was conducted to determine the architecture of filamentous anchoring structures in the subsarcolemmal space and the intermyofibrils. The diaphragms (Dp) of adult wild type and mdx mice (mdx is a model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy) were subjected to tension applied perpendicular to the long axis of the muscle fibers, with or without treatment with 1% Triton X-100 or 0.03% saponin. These experiments were conducted to confirm the presence and integrity of the filamentous anchoring structures. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that these structures provide firm transverse connections between the sarcolemma and peripheral myofibrils. Most of the filamentous structures appeared to be inserted into subsarcolemmal densities, forming anchoring connections between the sarcolemma and peripheral myofibrils. In some cases, actin filaments were found to run longitudinally in the subsarcolemmal space to connect to the sarcolemma or in some cases to connect to the intermyofibrils as elongated thin filaments. These filamentous anchoring structures were less common in the mdx Dp. Our data suggest that the transverse and longitudinal filamentous structures form an anchoring system in the subsarcolemmal space and the intermyofibrils.

  1. Mutations in PGAP3 impair GPI-anchor maturation, causing a subtype of hyperphosphatasia with mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Howard, Malcolm F; Murakami, Yoshiko; Pagnamenta, Alistair T; Daumer-Haas, Cornelia; Fischer, Björn; Hecht, Jochen; Keays, David A; Knight, Samantha J L; Kölsch, Uwe; Krüger, Ulrike; Leiz, Steffen; Maeda, Yusuke; Mitchell, Daphne; Mundlos, Stefan; Phillips, John A; Robinson, Peter N; Kini, Usha; Taylor, Jenny C; Horn, Denise; Kinoshita, Taroh; Krawitz, Peter M

    2014-02-06

    Glycosylphophatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins play important roles in many biological processes, and mutations affecting proteins involved in the synthesis of the GPI anchor are reported to cause a wide spectrum of intellectual disabilities (IDs) with characteristic additional phenotypic features. Here, we describe a total of five individuals (from three unrelated families) in whom we identified mutations in PGAP3, encoding a protein that is involved in GPI-anchor maturation. Three siblings in a consanguineous Pakistani family presented with profound developmental delay, severe ID, no speech, psychomotor delay, and postnatal microcephaly. A combination of autozygosity mapping and exome sequencing identified a 13.8 Mb region harboring a homozygous c.275G>A (p.Gly92Asp) variant in PGAP3 region 17q11.2-q21.32. Subsequent testing showed elevated serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP), a GPI-anchored enzyme, in all three affected children. In two unrelated individuals in a cohort with developmental delay, ID, and elevated ALP, we identified compound-heterozygous variants c.439dupC (p.Leu147Profs(∗)16) and c.914A>G (p.Asp305Gly) and homozygous variant c.314C>G (p.Pro105Arg). The 1 bp duplication causes a frameshift and nonsense-mediated decay. Further evidence supporting pathogenicity of the missense mutations c.275G>A, c.314C>G, and c.914A>G was provided by the absence of the variants from ethnically matched controls, phylogenetic conservation, and functional studies on Chinese hamster ovary cell lines. Taken together with recent data on PGAP2, these results confirm the importance of the later GPI-anchor remodelling steps for normal neuronal development. Impairment of PGAP3 causes a subtype of hyperphosphatasia with ID, a congenital disorder of glycosylation that is also referred to as Mabry syndrome.

  2. Two Approaches for Using Multiple Anchors in NEAT Equating: A Description and Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moses, Tim; Deng, Weiling; Zhang, Yu-Li

    2011-01-01

    Nonequivalent groups with anchor test (NEAT) equating functions that use a single anchor can have accuracy problems when the groups are extremely different and/or when the anchor weakly correlates with the tests being equated. Proposals have been made to address these issues by incorporating more than one anchor into NEAT equating functions. These…

  3. Lentiviral Engineered Fibroblasts Expressing Codon-Optimized COL7A1 Restore Anchoring Fibrils in RDEB

    PubMed Central

    Georgiadis, Christos; Syed, Farhatullah; Petrova, Anastasia; Abdul-Wahab, Alya; Lwin, Su M.; Farzaneh, Farzin; Chan, Lucas; Ghani, Sumera; Fleck, Roland A.; Glover, Leanne; McMillan, James R.; Chen, Mei; Thrasher, Adrian J.; McGrath, John A.; Di, Wei-Li; Qasim, Waseem

    2016-01-01

    Cells therapies, engineered to secrete replacement proteins, are being developed to ameliorate otherwise debilitating diseases. Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is caused by defects of type VII collagen, a protein essential for anchoring fibril formation at the dermal-epidermal junction. Whereas allogeneic fibroblasts injected directly into the dermis can mediate transient disease modulation, autologous gene-modified fibroblasts should evade immunological rejection and support sustained delivery of type VII collagen at the dermal-epidermal junction. We demonstrate the feasibility of such an approach using a therapeutic grade, self-inactivating-lentiviral vector, encoding codon-optimized COL7A1, to transduce RDEB fibroblasts under conditions suitable for clinical application. Expression and secretion of type VII collagen was confirmed with transduced cells exhibiting supranormal levels of protein expression, and ex vivo migration of fibroblasts was restored in functional assays. Gene-modified RDEB fibroblasts also deposited type VII collagen at the dermal-epidermal junction of human RDEB skin xenografts placed on NOD-scid IL2Rgammanull recipients, with reconstruction of human epidermal structure and regeneration of anchoring fibrils at the dermal-epidermal junction. Fibroblast-mediated restoration of protein and structural defects in this RDEB model strongly supports proposed therapeutic applications in man. PMID:26763448

  4. Trichoplein controls microtubule anchoring at the centrosome by binding to Odf2 and ninein.

    PubMed

    Ibi, Miho; Zou, Peng; Inoko, Akihito; Shiromizu, Takashi; Matsuyama, Makoto; Hayashi, Yuko; Enomoto, Masato; Mori, Daisuke; Hirotsune, Shinji; Kiyono, Tohru; Tsukita, Sachiko; Goto, Hidemasa; Inagaki, Masaki

    2011-03-15

    The keratin cytoskeleton performs several functions in epithelial cells and provides regulated interaction sites for scaffold proteins, including trichoplein. Previously, we found that trichoplein was localized on keratin intermediate filaments and desmosomes in well-differentiated, non-dividing epithelia. Here, we report that trichoplein is widely expressed and has a major function in the correct localization of the centrosomal protein ninein in epithelial and non-epithelial cells. Immunocytochemical analysis also revealed that this protein is concentrated at the subdistal to medial zone of both mother and daughter centrioles. Trichoplein binds the centrosomal proteins Odf2 and ninein, which are localized at the distal to subdistal ends of the mother centriole. Trichoplein depletion abolished the recruitment of ninein, but not Odf2, specifically at the subdistal end. However, Odf2 depletion inhibited the recruitment of trichoplein to a mother centriole, whereas ninein depletion did not. In addition, the depletion of each molecule impaired MT anchoring at the centrosome. These results suggest that trichoplein has a crucial role in MT-anchoring activity at the centrosome in proliferating cells, probably through its complex formation with Odf2 and ninein.

  5. A dynamic mechanism for AKAP binding to RII isoforms of cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Kinderman, Francis S; Kim, Choel; von Daake, Sventja; Ma, Yuliang; Pham, Bao Q; Spraggon, Glen; Xuong, Nguyen-Huu; Jennings, Patricia A; Taylor, Susan S

    2006-11-03

    A kinase-anchoring proteins (AKAPs) target PKA to specific microdomains by using an amphipathic helix that docks to N-terminal dimerization and docking (D/D) domains of PKA regulatory (R) subunits. To understand specificity, we solved the crystal structure of the helical motif from D-AKAP2, a dual-specific AKAP, bound to the RIIalpha D/D domain. The 1.6 Angstrom structure reveals how this dynamic, hydrophobic docking site is assembled. A stable, hydrophobic docking groove is formed by the helical interface of two RIIalpha protomers. The flexible N terminus of one protomer is then recruited to the site, anchored to the peptide through two essential isoleucines. The other N terminus is disordered. This asymmetry provides greater possibilities for AKAP docking. Although there is strong discrimination against RIalpha in the N terminus of the AKAP helix, the hydrophobic groove discriminates against RIIalpha. RIalpha, with a cavity in the groove, can accept a bulky tryptophan, whereas RIIalpha requires valine.

  6. Display of GPI-anchored anti-EGFR nanobodies on extracellular vesicles promotes tumour cell targeting

    PubMed Central

    Kooijmans, Sander A. A.; Aleza, Clara Gómez; Roffler, Steve R.; van Solinge, Wouter W.; Vader, Pieter; Schiffelers, Raymond M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are attractive candidate drug delivery systems due to their ability to functionally transport biological cargo to recipient cells. However, the apparent lack of target cell specificity of exogenously administered EVs limits their therapeutic applicability. In this study, we propose a novel method to equip EVs with targeting properties, in order to improve their interaction with tumour cells. Methods EV producing cells were transfected with vectors encoding for anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) nanobodies, which served as targeting ligands for tumour cells, fused to glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor signal peptides derived from decay-accelerating factor (DAF). EVs were isolated using ultrafiltration/size-exclusion liquid chromatography and characterized using western blotting, Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis, and electron microscopy. EV–tumour cell interactions were analyzed under static conditions using flow cytometry and under flow conditions using a live-cell fluorescence microscopy-coupled perfusion system. Results EV analysis showed that GPI-linked nanobodies were successfully displayed on EV surfaces and were highly enriched in EVs compared with parent cells. Display of GPI-linked nanobodies on EVs did not alter general EV characteristics (i.e. morphology, size distribution and protein marker expression), but greatly improved EV binding to tumour cells dependent on EGFR density under static conditions. Moreover, nanobody-displaying EVs showed a significantly improved cell association to EGFR-expressing tumour cells under flow conditions. Conclusions We show that nanobodies can be anchored on the surface of EVs via GPI, which alters their cell targeting behaviour. Furthermore, this study highlights GPI-anchoring as a new tool in the EV toolbox, which may be applied for EV display of a variety of proteins, such as antibodies, reporter proteins and signaling molecules. PMID:26979463

  7. Tripolin A, a Novel Small-Molecule Inhibitor of Aurora A Kinase, Reveals New Regulation of HURP's Distribution on Microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Kesisova, Iliana A.; Nakos, Konstantinos C.; Tsolou, Avgi; Angelis, Dimitrios; Lewis, Joe; Chatzaki, Aikaterini; Agianian, Bogos; Giannis, Athanassios; Koffa, Maria D.

    2013-01-01

    Mitotic regulators exhibiting gain of function in tumor cells are considered useful cancer therapeutic targets for the development of small-molecule inhibitors. The human Aurora kinases are a family of such targets. In this study, from a panel of 105 potential small-molecule inhibitors, two compounds Tripolin A and Tripolin B, inhibited Aurora A kinase activity in vitro. In human cells however, only Tripolin A acted as an Aurora A inhibitor. We combined in vitro, in vivo single cell and in silico studies to demonstrate the biological action of Tripolin A, a non-ATP competitive inhibitor. Tripolin A reduced the localization of pAurora A on spindle microtubules (MTs), affected centrosome integrity, spindle formation and length, as well as MT dynamics in interphase, consistent with Aurora A inhibition by RNAi or other specific inhibitors, such as MLN8054 or MLN8237. Interestingly, Tripolin A affected the gradient distribution towards the chromosomes, but not the MT binding of HURP (Hepatoma Up-Regulated Protein), a MT-associated protein (MAP) and substrate of the Aurora A kinase. Therefore Tripolin A reveals a new way of regulating mitotic MT stabilizers through Aurora A phosphorylation. Tripolin A is predicted to bind Aurora A similarly but not identical to MLN8054, therefore it could be used to dissect pathways orchestrated by Aurora kinases as well as a scaffold for further inhibitor development. PMID:23516487

  8. Membrane-anchoring stabilizes and favors secretion of New Delhi Metallo-β-lactamase

    PubMed Central

    González, Lisandro J.; Bahr, Guillermo; Nakashige, Toshiki G.; Nolan, Elizabeth M.; Bonomo, Robert A.; Vila, Alejandro J.

    2016-01-01

    Carbapenems, “last resort” β-lactam antibiotics, are inactivated by zinc-dependent metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs). The host innate immune response withholds nutrient metal ions from microbial pathogens by releasing metal-chelating proteins such as calprotectin. We show that metal sequestration is detrimental for the accumulation of MBLs in the bacterial periplasm, since these enzymes are readily degraded in their non-metallated form. However, the New Delhi Metallo-β-lactamase (NDM-1) is able to persist under conditions of metal depletion. NDM-1 is a lipidated protein anchored to the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Membrane-anchoring contributes to the unusual stability of NDM-1 and favors secretion of this enzyme in outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). OMVs containing NDM-1 can protect nearby populations of bacteria from otherwise lethal antibiotic levels, and OMVs from clinical pathogens expressing NDM-1 can carry this MBL and the blaNDM gene. We show that protein export into OMVs can be targeted, providing possibilities of new antibacterial therapeutic strategies. PMID:27182662

  9. The effect of anchor modality on the reliability of vocal severity ratings.

    PubMed

    Awan, Shaheen N; Lawson, Laura L

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this study was (1) to confirm if anchors (ie, perceptual references) and training affect the inter- and intrarater reliability of perceptual analysis of various voice types and severities compared to receiving training alone, and (2) to determine whether the modality in which the anchor is presented affects rater reliability. In this study, modality refers to whether the anchor is presented auditorily, visually via a written definition (a textual anchor), or a combination of both anchor types. A randomized multigroup comparison was performed. Forty inexperienced judges were selected to rate 36 sustained vowel voice samples of various voice types (ie, normal, breathy, hoarse, and rough) in terms of perceived vocal severity using four different methods (No Anchor, Textual Anchor, Auditory Anchor, and Combined Textual/Auditory Anchors). Subjects were randomly assigned to one of the four conditions. Before the rating task, all subject groups received a brief training sessions (15-20 minutes in duration) in which voice quality type and severity definitions were provided and representative voice samples were listened to. A computer program was developed to present anchors in the form of an auditory sample, written definition, or both. A no anchor condition was also presented. Results indicated that the combination of training and anchors significantly improves the interrater reliability of perceptual voice ratings. In addition, the use of auditory anchors resulted in 95% confidence intervals that were significantly smaller for rating mild voice disorders, and both breathy and hoarse voice qualities. Textual anchors did appear to show some improvement over training alone (ie, no anchors), but were generally not as strong as the use of auditory anchors. However, the combination of textual and auditory anchors resulted in the greatest degree of interrater reliability as assessed via mean correlations. The ratings produced by the Auditory and Combined Anchor

  10. The intermediate filament protein, synemin, is an AKAP in the heart.

    PubMed

    Russell, Mary A; Lund, Linda M; Haber, Roy; McKeegan, Kathleen; Cianciola, Nicholas; Bond, Meredith

    2006-12-15

    Targeting of protein kinase A (PKA) by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) contributes to high specificity of PKA signaling pathways. PKA phosphorylation of myofilament and cytoskeletal proteins may regulate myofibrillogenesis and myocyte remodeling during heart disease; however, known cardiac AKAPs do not localize to these regions. To identify novel AKAPs which target PKA to the cytoskeleton or myofilaments, a human heart cDNA library was screened and the intermediate filament (IF) protein, synemin, was identified as a putative RII (PKA regulatory subunit type II) binding protein. A predicted RII binding region was mutated and resulted in loss of RII binding. Furthermore, synemin co-localized with RII in SW13/cl.1-vim+ cells and co-immunoprecipitated with RII from adult rat cardiomyocytes. Synemin was localized at the level of Z-lines with RII and desmin in adult hearts, however, neonatal cardiomyocytes showed differential synemin and desmin localization. Quantitative Western blots also showed significantly more synemin was present in failing human hearts. We propose that synemin provides temporal and spatial targeting of PKA in adult and neonatal cardiac myocytes.

  11. The in silico identification of small molecules for protein-protein interaction inhibition in AKAP-Lbc-RhoA signaling complex.

    PubMed

    Khan, Asifullah; Munir, Mehwish; Aiman, Sara; Wadood, Abdul; Khan, Arif-Ullah

    2017-04-01

    The rational design of small molecules that mimic key residues at the interface of interacting proteins can be a successful approach to target certain biological signaling cascades causing pathophysiological outcome. The A-Kinase Anchoring Protein, i.e. AKAP-Lbc, catalyses nucleotide exchange on RhoA and is involved in cardiac repolarization. The oncogenic AKAP-Lbc induces the RhoA GTPase hyperactivity and aberrantly amplifies the signaling pathway leading to hypertrophic cardiomyocytes. We took advantage of the AKAP-Lbc-RhoA complex crystal structure to design in silico small molecules predicted to inhibit the associated pathological signaling cascade. We adopted the strategies of pharmacophore building, virtual screening and molecular docking to identify the small molecules capable to target AKAP-Lbc and RhoA interactions. The pharmacophore model based virtual screening unveils two lead compounds from the TIMBAL database of small molecules modulating the targeted protein-protein interactions. The molecular docking analysis revealed the lead compounds' potentialities to establish the essential chemical interactions with the key interactive residues of the complex. These features provided a road map for designing additional potent chemical derivatives and fragments of the original lead compounds to perturb the AKAP-Lbc and RhoA interactions. Experimental validations may elucidate the therapeutic potential of these lead chemical scaffolds to deal with aberrant AKAP-Lbc signaling based cardiac hypertrophy.

  12. Mtap2 is a constituent of the protein network that regulates twik-related K+ channel expression and trafficking.

    PubMed

    Sandoz, Guillaume; Tardy, Magalie P; Thümmler, Susanne; Feliciangeli, Sylvain; Lazdunski, Michel; Lesage, Florian

    2008-08-20

    Twik-related K+ (TREK) channels produce background currents that regulate cell excitability. In vivo, TREK-1 is involved in neuronal processes including neuroprotection against ischemia, general anesthesia, pain perception, and mood. Recently, we demonstrated that A-kinase anchoring protein AKAP150 binds to a major regulatory domain of TREK-1, promoting drastic changes in channel regulation by polyunsaturated fatty acids, pH, and stretch, and by G-protein-coupled receptors to neurotransmitters and hormones. Here, we show that the microtubule-associated protein Mtap2 is another constituent of native TREK channels in the brain. Mtap2 binding to TREK-1 and TREK-2 does not affect directly channel properties but enhances channel surface expression and current density. This effect relies on Mtap2 binding to microtubules. Mtap2 and AKAP150 interacting sites in TREK-1 are distinct and both proteins can dock simultaneously. Their effects on TREK-1 surface expression and activation are cumulative. In neurons, the three proteins are simultaneously detected in postsynaptic dense bodies. AKAP150 and Mtap2 put TREK channels at the center of a complex protein network that finely tunes channel trafficking, addressing, and regulation.

  13. The Msd1–Wdr8–Pkl1 complex anchors microtubule minus ends to fission yeast spindle pole bodies

    PubMed Central

    Yukawa, Masashi; Ikebe, Chiho

    2015-01-01

    The minus ends of spindle microtubules are anchored to a microtubule-organizing center. The conserved Msd1/SSX2IP proteins are localized to the spindle pole body (SPB) and the centrosome in fission yeast and humans, respectively, and play a critical role in microtubule anchoring. In this paper, we show that fission yeast Msd1 forms a ternary complex with another conserved protein, Wdr8, and the minus end–directed Pkl1/kinesin-14. Individual deletion mutants displayed the identical spindle-protrusion phenotypes. Msd1 and Wdr8 were delivered by Pkl1 to mitotic SPBs, where Pkl1 was tethered through Msd1–Wdr8. The spindle-anchoring defect imposed by msd1/wdr8/pkl1 deletions was suppressed by a mutation of the plus end–directed Cut7/kinesin-5, which was shown to be mutual. Intriguingly, Pkl1 motor activity was not required for its anchoring role once targeted to the SPB. Therefore, spindle anchoring through Msd1–Wdr8–Pkl1 is crucial for balancing the Cut7/kinesin-5–mediated outward force at the SPB. Our analysis provides mechanistic insight into the spatiotemporal regulation of two opposing kinesins to ensure mitotic spindle bipolarity. PMID:25987607

  14. A reusable suture anchor for arthroscopy psychomotor skills training.

    PubMed

    Tillett, Edward D; Rogers, Rainie; Nyland, John

    2003-03-01

    For residents to adequately develop the early arthroscopy psychomotor skills required to better learn how to manage the improvisational situations they will encounter during actual patient cases, they need to experience sufficient practice repetitions within a contextually relevant environment. Unfortunately, the cost of suture anchors can be a practice repetition-limiting factor in learning arthroscopic knot-tying techniques. We describe a technique for creating inexpensive reusable suture anchors and provide an example of their application to repair the anterior glenoid labrum during an arthroscopy psychomotor skills laboratory training session.

  15. Modeling and Simulation of Anchoring Processess for Small Body Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quadrelli, Marco B.; Mazahar, Hammad; Negrut, Dan

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes recent work done in modeling and simulation of anchoring processes in granular media, with applications to anchoring on a Near Earth Object (NEO), where the forces due to interactions with the regolith are much stronger than the local surface gravity field. This effort is part of a larger systems engineering capability developed at JPL to answer key questions, validate requirements, conduct key system and mission trades,and evaluate performance and risk related to NEO operations for any proposed human or robotic missions to a NEO.

  16. 17. VIEW OF ANCHOR BRIDGE NUMBER 310 LOOKING EAST ALONG ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. VIEW OF ANCHOR BRIDGE NUMBER 310 LOOKING EAST ALONG THE MAIN LINE TRACK LOCATED TO THE NORTH OF THE COS COB POWER PLANT. ANCHOR BRIDGES LOCATED AT TWO MILE INTERVALS WITHSTAND CATENARY TENSION AND PROVIDE A PLATFORM FOR MOUNTING OIL FILLED CIRCUIT BREAKERS, LIGHTNING ARRESTORS AND OTHER ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT. THE ROOF OF THE LOAD DISPATCHER'S TOWER CAN BE SEEN DIRECTLY BEHIND THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE BRIDGE. - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Cos Cob Power Plant, Sound Shore Drive, Greenwich, Fairfield County, CT

  17. Overexpression of Aurora-A kinase promotes tumor cell proliferation and inhibits apoptosis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao Xia; Liu, Rong; Jin, Shun Qian; Fan, Fei Yue; Zhan, Qi Min

    2006-04-01

    Aurora-A kinase, a serine/threonine protein kinase, is a potential oncogene. Amplification and overexpression of Aurora-A have been found in several types of human tumors, including esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). It has been demonstrated that cells overexpressing Aurora-A are more resistant to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating these effects remain largely unknown. In this report, we showed that overexpression of Aurora-A through stable transfection of pEGFP-Aurora-A in human ESCC KYSE150 cells significantly promoted cell proliferation and inhibited cisplatin- or UV irradiation-induced apoptosis. Cleavages of caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) in Aurora-A overexpressing cells were substantially reduced after cisplatin or UV treatment. Furthermore, we found that silencing of endogenous Aurora-A kinase with siRNA substantially enhanced sensitivity to cisplatin- or UV-induced apoptosis in human ESCC EC9706 cells. In parallel, overexpression of Aurora-A potently upregulated the expression of Bcl-2. Moreover, the knockdown of Bcl-2 by siRNA abrogated the Aurora-A's effect on inhibiting apoptosis. Taken together, these data provide evidence that Aurora-A overexpression promoting cell proliferation and inhibiting apoptosis, suggesting a novel mechanism that is closely related to malignant phenotype and anti-cancer drugs resistance of ESCC cells.

  18. AKAP3 synthesis is mediated by RNA binding proteins and PKA signaling during mouse spermiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kaibiao; Yang, Lele; Zhao, Danyun; Wu, Yaoyao; Qi, Huayu

    2014-06-01

    Mammalian spermatogenesis is regulated by coordinated gene expression in a spatiotemporal manner. The spatiotemporal regulation of major sperm proteins plays important roles during normal development of the male gamete, of which the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. A-kinase anchoring protein 3 (AKAP3) is one of the major components of the fibrous sheath of the sperm tail that is formed during spermiogenesis. In the present study, we analyzed the expression of sperm-specific Akap3 and the potential regulatory factors of its protein synthesis during mouse spermiogenesis. Results showed that the transcription of Akap3 precedes its protein synthesis by about 2 wk. Nascent AKAP3 was found to form protein complex with PKA and RNA binding proteins (RBPs), including PIWIL1, PABPC1, and NONO, as revealed by coimmunoprecipitation and protein mass spectrometry. RNA electrophoretic gel mobility shift assay showed that these RBPs bind sperm-specific mRNAs, of which proteins are synthesized during the elongating stage of spermiogenesis. Biochemical and cell biological experiments demonstrated that PIWIL1, PABPC1, and NONO interact with each other and colocalize in spermatids' RNA granule, the chromatoid body. In addition, NONO was found in extracytoplasmic granules in round spermatids, whereas PIWIL1 and PABPC1 were diffusely localized in cytoplasm of elongating spermatids, indicating their participation at different steps of mRNA metabolism during spermatogenesis. Interestingly, type I PKA subunits colocalize with PIWIL1 and PABPC1 in the cytoplasm of elongating spermatids and cosediment with the RBPs in polysomal fractions on sucrose gradients. Further biochemical analyses revealed that activation of PKA positively regulates AKAP3 protein synthesis without changing its mRNA level in elongating spermatids. Taken together, these results indicate that PKA signaling directly participates in the regulation of protein translation in postmeiotic male germ cells

  19. Protein complex analysis of native brain potassium channels by proteomics.

    PubMed

    Sandoz, Guillaume; Lesage, Florian

    2008-01-01

    TREK potassium channels belong to a family of channel subunits with two-pore domains (K(2P)). TREK1 knockout mice display impaired polyunsaturated fatty acid-mediated protection against brain ischemia, reduced sensitivity to volatile anesthetics, resistance to depression and altered perception of pain. Recently, we isolated native TREK1 channels from mouse brain and identified their specific components by mass spectrometry. Among the identified partners, the A-Kinase Anchoring Protein AKAP150 binds to a regulatory domain of TREK1 and acts as a molecular switch. It transforms low activity, outwardly rectifying TREK1 currents into robust leak conductances resistant to stimulation by arachidonic acid, membrane stretch and acidification. Inhibition of the TREK1/AKAP150 channel by Gs-coupled receptors is as extensive as for TREK1 alone (but faster) whereas inhibition of TREK1/AKAP150 by Gq-coupled receptors is reduced. Furthermore, the association of AKAP150 with TREK1 channels integrates them into postsynaptic scaffolds where G protein-coupled membrane receptors and channels dock simultaneously. This chapter describes the proteomic approach used to study the composition of native TREK1 channels and point out its advantages and limitations over more classical methods (two-hybrid screenings in the yeast and bacteria or GST-pull down).

  20. Expression of GPI anchored human recombinant erythropoietin in CHO cells is devoid of glycosylation heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Devasahayam, Mercy; Devi, Sobita

    2015-04-01

    Erythropoietin is a glycohormone involved in the regulation of the blood cell levels. It is a 166 amino acid protein having 3 N-glycosylation and one O-linked glycosylation sites, and is used to treat anaemia related illness. Though human recombinant erythropoietin (rEPO) is produced in CHO cells, the loss in quality control is 80% due to incomplete glycosylation of the rEPO with low levels of fully glycosylated active rEPO. Here, we describe the expression from CHO cells of fully glycosylated human rEPO when expressed as a GPI anchored molecule (rEPO-g). The results demonstrated the production of a homogenous completely glycosylated human rEPO-g as a 42 kD band without any low molecular weight glycoform variants as shown by affinity chromatography followed by SDS-PAGE and anti-human EPO specific western blot. The western blot using specific monoclonal antibody is the available biochemical technique to prove the presence of homogeneity in the expressed recombinant protein. The GPI anchor can be removed during the purification process to yield a therapeutically relevant recombinant erythropoietin molecule cells with a higher in vivo biological activity due to its high molecular weight of 40 kD. This is possibly the first report on the production of a homogenous and completely glycosylated human rEPO from CHO cells for efficient therapy.

  1. Membrane anchoring of diacylglycerol lactones substituted with rigid hydrophobic acyl domains correlates with biological activities.

    PubMed

    Raifman, Or; Kolusheva, Sofiya; Comin, Maria J; Kedei, Noemi; Lewin, Nancy E; Blumberg, Peter M; Marquez, Victor E; Jelinek, Raz

    2010-01-01

    Synthetic diacylglycerol lactones (DAG lactones) are effective modulators of critical cellular signaling pathways downstream of the lipophilic second messenger diacylglycerol that activate a host of protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes as well as other non-kinase proteins that share with PKC similar C1 membrane-targeting domains. A fundamental determinant of the biological activity of these amphiphilic molecules is the nature of their interactions with cellular membranes. This study characterizes the membrane interactions and bilayer anchoring of a series of DAG lactones in which the hydrophobic moiety is a 'molecular rod', namely a rigid 4-[2-(R-phenyl)ethynyl]benzoate moiety in the acyl position. Use of assays employing chromatic biomimetic vesicles and biophysical techniques revealed that the mode of membrane anchoring of the DAG lactone derivatives was markedly affected by the presence of the hydrophobic diphenyl rod and by the size of the functional unit at the terminus of the rod. Two primary mechanisms of interaction were observed: surface binding of the DAG lactones at the lipid/water interface and deep insertion of the ligands into the alkyl core of the lipid bilayer. These membrane-insertion properties could explain the different patterns of the PKC translocation from the cytosol to membranes that is induced by the molecular-rod DAG lactones. This investigation emphasizes that the side residues of DAG lactones, rather than simply conferring hydrophobicity, profoundly influence membrane interactions, and thus may further contribute to the diversity of biological actions of these synthetic biomimetic ligands.

  2. Conservation anchors in the vertebrate genome

    PubMed Central

    Aloni, Ronny; Lancet, Doron

    2005-01-01

    Genomic segments that do not code for proteins yet show high conservation among vertebrates have recently been identified by various computational methodologies. We refer to them as ANCORs (ancestral non-coding conserved regions). The frequency of individual ANCORs within the genome, along with their (correlated) inter-species identity scores, helps in assessing the probability that they function in transcription regulation or RNA coding. PMID:15998454

  3. Current status of frameless anchored IUD for immediate intracesarean insertion.

    PubMed

    Wildemeersch, Dirk; Goldstuck, Norman D; Hasskamp, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Immediate postpartum intrauterine device (IUD) insertion deserves great attention as it can provide immediate, timely and convenient contraception plus the added benefit of preventing repeat unintended pregnancies. Although women post vaginal delivery can benefit from immediate post-placenta contraception, women undergoing Cesarean section clearly need contraception, as an inter-delivery interval shorter than 18 months places them at a high risk for uterine rupture. The main drawback of currently available framed IUD devices for immediate postpartum insertion of an IUD is their high expulsion and displacement rates when inserted immediately postpartum after both vaginal and Cesarean delivery. Current research suggests that a brief window of opportunity exists of 10 minutes for insertion of conventional IUDs after which time expulsion rates both immediately and over time are greatly enhanced. This paper summarizes the current research conducted to overcome the expulsion problems associated with conventional T-shaped devices as well as through the use of an anchored frameless device. In the 1970s and 1980s, attempts were made to solve the expulsion problem by modifying existing devices, such as adding absorbable sutures (Delta-T) or additional appendages. These attempts proved to be clinically unsuccessful as the catgut suture added to the transverse arms did not provide sufficient resistance to prevent downward displacement and expulsion. An anchoring technique to suspend a copper IUD to the fundus of the uterus was developed in Belgium in the 1980s and has been the subject of extensive ongoing clinical research since 1985. Recently the frameless copper releasing anchor IUD, GyneFix, has been tested for postplacental insertion. Initially, the anchor was modified by the inclusion of a biodegradable cone which was added below the anchoring knot. Clinical studies confirmed the adequacy of this approach suggesting that it was technically possible to anchor an IUD

  4. Probing the Huntingtin 1-17 membrane anchor on a phospholipid bilayer by using all-atom simulations.

    PubMed

    Côté, Sébastien; Binette, Vincent; Salnikov, Evgeniy S; Bechinger, Burkhard; Mousseau, Normand

    2015-03-10

    Mislocalization and aggregation of the huntingtin protein are related to Huntington's disease. Its first exon-more specifically the first 17 amino acids (Htt17)-is crucial for the physiological and pathological functions of huntingtin. It regulates huntingtin's activity through posttranslational modifications and serves as an anchor to membrane-containing organelles of the cell. Recently, structure and orientation of the Htt17 membrane anchor were determined using a combined solution and solid-state NMR approach. This prompted us to refine this model by investigating the dynamics and thermodynamics of this membrane anchor on a POPC bilayer using all-atom, explicit solvent molecular dynamics and Hamiltonian replica exchange. Our simulations are combined with various experimental measurements to generate a high-resolution atomistic model for the huntingtin Htt17 membrane anchor on a POPC bilayer. More precisely, we observe that the single α-helix structure is more stable in the phospholipid membrane than the NMR model obtained in the presence of dodecylphosphocholine detergent micelles. The resulting Htt17 monomer has its hydrophobic plane oriented parallel to the bilayer surface. Our results further unveil the key residues interacting with the membrane in terms of hydrogen bonds, salt-bridges, and nonpolar contributions. We also observe that Htt17 equilibrates at a well-defined insertion depth and that it perturbs the physical properties-order parameter, thickness, and area per lipid-of the bilayer in a manner that could favor its dimerization. Overall, our observations reinforce and refine the NMR measurements on the Htt17 membrane anchor segment of huntingtin that is of fundamental importance to its biological functions.

  5. Regulation of Aurora-A kinase on the mitotic spindle.

    PubMed

    Kufer, Thomas A; Nigg, Erich A; Silljé, Herman H W

    2003-12-01

    The error-free segregation of duplicated chromosomes during cell division is essential for the maintenance of an intact genome. This process is brought about by a highly dynamic bipolar array of microtubules, the mitotic spindle. The formation and function of the mitotic spindle during M-phase of the cell cycle is regulated by protein phosphorylation, involving multiple protein kinases and phosphatases. Prominent among the enzymes implicated in spindle assembly is the serine/threonine-specific protein kinase Aurora-A. In several common human tumors, Aurora-A is overexpressed, and deregulation of this kinase was shown to result in mitotic defects and aneuploidy. Moreover, recent genetic evidence directly links the human Aurora-A gene to cancer susceptibility. Several of the physiological substrates of Aurora-A presumably await identification, but recent studies are beginning to shed light on the regulation of this critical mitotic kinase. Here, we review these findings with particular emphasis on the role of TPX2, a prominent spindle component implicated in a Ran-GTP-mediated spindle assembly pathway.

  6. Doc Toxin Is a Kinase That Inactivates Elongation Factor Tu*

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Jonathan W.; Rothenbacher, Francesca P.; Maehigashi, Tatsuya; Lane, William S.; Dunham, Christine M.; Woychik, Nancy A.

    2014-01-01

    The Doc toxin from bacteriophage P1 (of the phd-doc toxin-antitoxin system) has served as a model for the family of Doc toxins, many of which are harbored in the genomes of pathogens. We have shown previously that the mode of action of this toxin is distinct from the majority derived from toxin-antitoxin systems: it does not cleave RNA; in fact P1 Doc expression leads to mRNA stabilization. However, the molecular triggers that lead to translation arrest are not understood. The presence of a Fic domain, albeit slightly altered in length and at the catalytic site, provided a clue to the mechanism of P1 Doc action, as most proteins with this conserved domain inactivate GTPases through addition of an adenylyl group (also referred to as AMPylation). We demonstrated that P1 Doc added a single phosphate group to the essential translation elongation factor and GTPase, elongation factor (EF)-Tu. The phosphorylation site was at a highly conserved threonine, Thr-382, which was blocked when EF-Tu was treated with the antibiotic kirromycin. Therefore, we have established that Fic domain proteins can function as kinases. This distinct enzymatic activity exhibited by P1 Doc also solves the mystery of the degenerate Fic motif unique to the Doc family of toxins. Moreover, we have established that all characterized Fic domain proteins, even those that phosphorylate, target pivotal GTPases for inactivation through a post-translational modification at a single functionally critical acceptor site. PMID:24448800

  7. Modified anchor shaped post core design for primary anterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, R; Baroudi, Kusai; Reddy, K Bala Kasi; Praveen, B H; Kumar, V Sumanth; Amit, S

    2014-01-01

    Restoring severely damaged primary anterior teeth is challenging to pedodontist. Many materials are tried as a post core but each one of them has its own drawbacks. This a case report describing a technique to restore severely damaged primary anterior teeth with a modified anchor shaped post. This technique is not only simple and inexpensive but also produces better retention.

  8. End Anchoring in Short-Term Order Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Simon; Lelievre, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Temporally grouping lists has systematic effects on immediate serial recall accuracy, order errors, and recall latencies, and is generally taken to reflect the use of multiple dimensions of ordering in short-term memory. It has been argued that these representations are fully relative, in that all sequence positions are anchored to both the start…

  9. The Effect of Anchor Test Construction on Scale Drift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antal, Judit; Proctor, Thomas P.; Melican, Gerald J.

    2014-01-01

    In common-item equating the anchor block is generally built to represent a miniature form of the total test in terms of content and statistical specifications. The statistical properties frequently reflect equal mean and spread of item difficulty. Sinharay and Holland (2007) suggested that the requirement for equal spread of difficulty may be too…

  10. Poor Anchoring Limits Dyslexics' Perceptual, Memory, and Reading Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oganian, Yulia; Ahissar, Merav

    2012-01-01

    The basic deficits underlying the severe and persistent reading difficulties in dyslexia are still highly debated. One of the major topics of debate is whether these deficits are language specific, or affect both verbal and non-verbal stimuli. Recently, Ahissar and colleagues proposed the "anchoring-deficit hypothesis" (Ahissar, Lubin,…

  11. 24 CFR 3285.402 - Ground anchor installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Anchorage Against Wind § 3285... anchoring. Manufactured homes must also be stabilized against wind in the longitudinal direction in all Wind Zones. Manufactured homes located in Wind Zones II and III must have longitudinal ground...

  12. 24 CFR 3285.402 - Ground anchor installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Anchorage Against Wind § 3285... anchoring. Manufactured homes must also be stabilized against wind in the longitudinal direction in all Wind Zones. Manufactured homes located in Wind Zones II and III must have longitudinal ground...

  13. 24 CFR 3285.402 - Ground anchor installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Anchorage Against Wind § 3285... anchoring. Manufactured homes must also be stabilized against wind in the longitudinal direction in all Wind Zones. Manufactured homes located in Wind Zones II and III must have longitudinal ground...

  14. 49 CFR 178.337-13 - Supporting and anchoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.337-13 Supporting and anchoring. (a) A cargo tank that is not permanently attached to or integral with a vehicle chassis must be secured by the...

  15. 49 CFR 178.337-13 - Supporting and anchoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.337-13 Supporting and anchoring. (a) A cargo tank that is not permanently attached to or integral with a vehicle chassis must be secured by the...

  16. 49 CFR 178.345-6 - Supports and anchoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.345-6 Supports and anchoring. (a) A cargo..., or turning of the cargo tank motor vehicle. The design calculations of the support elements...

  17. 49 CFR 178.338-13 - Supporting and anchoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.338-13 Supporting and anchoring. (a) On a cargo tank motor vehicle designed and constructed so that the cargo tank constitutes in whole or in...

  18. 49 CFR 178.337-13 - Supporting and anchoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.337-13 Supporting and anchoring. (a) A cargo tank that is not permanently attached to or integral with a vehicle chassis must be secured by the...

  19. 49 CFR 178.345-6 - Supports and anchoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.345-6 Supports and anchoring. (a) A cargo..., or turning of the cargo tank motor vehicle. The design calculations of the support elements...

  20. 49 CFR 178.337-13 - Supporting and anchoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.337-13 Supporting and anchoring. (a) A cargo tank that is not permanently attached to or integral with a vehicle chassis must be secured by the...

  1. Modified Anchor Shaped Post Core Design for Primary Anterior Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Rajesh, R.; Baroudi, Kusai; Reddy, K. Bala Kasi; Praveen, B. H.; Kumar, V. Sumanth; Amit, S.

    2014-01-01

    Restoring severely damaged primary anterior teeth is challenging to pedodontist. Many materials are tried as a post core but each one of them has its own drawbacks. This a case report describing a technique to restore severely damaged primary anterior teeth with a modified anchor shaped post. This technique is not only simple and inexpensive but also produces better retention. PMID:25379294

  2. 15. DETAIL OF ANCHOR BOLT WHICH FORMERLY SECURED A TIMBER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. DETAIL OF ANCHOR BOLT WHICH FORMERLY SECURED A TIMBER SILL BEAM TO THE GRANITE SILL ALONG THE EASTERLY EDGE OF THE SPILLWAY APRON (NOTE 3" SWISS ARMY KNIFE TO RIGHT OF BOLT FOR SCALE); VIEW TO WEST. - Blackstone Canal Millbury Segment, Beginning northwest of State Route 146 & McCracken Road, running along west side of Route 146, Millbury, Worcester County, MA

  3. Ten Anchor Points for Teaching Principles of Marketing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomkovick, Chuck

    2004-01-01

    Effective marketing instructors commonly share a love for their students, an affinity for the subject matter, and a devotion to continuous quality improvement. The purpose of this article is to highlight 10 anchor points for teaching Principles of Marketing, which are designed to better engage students in the learning process. These anchor…

  4. Corrected High-Frame Rate Anchored Ultrasound with Software Alignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Amanda L.; Finch, Kenneth B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To improve lingual ultrasound imaging with the Corrected High Frame Rate Anchored Ultrasound with Software Alignment (CHAUSA; Miller, 2008) method. Method: A production study of the IsiXhosa alveolar click is presented. Articulatory-to-acoustic alignment is demonstrated using a Tri-Modal 3-ms pulse generator. Images from 2 simultaneous…

  5. 20. DETAIL, ANCHOR BLOCK AND BUTTRESS AT SOUTH END OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. DETAIL, ANCHOR BLOCK AND BUTTRESS AT SOUTH END OF DAM, SHOWING PROMINENT GROOVE WHERE THE NEXT ARCH COULD HAVE BEEN JOINED TO THE NORTH-SOUTH TRENDING DAM. - Rock Creek Dam, East end of Rock Creek Road, Auburn, Placer County, CA

  6. 33 CFR 164.19 - Requirements for vessels at anchor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirements for vessels at anchor. 164.19 Section 164.19 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY NAVIGATION SAFETY REGULATIONS § 164.19 Requirements...

  7. 33 CFR 164.19 - Requirements for vessels at anchor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Requirements for vessels at anchor. 164.19 Section 164.19 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY NAVIGATION SAFETY REGULATIONS § 164.19 Requirements...

  8. Detecting Anchoring-and-Adjusting in Survey Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, Joe

    2014-01-01

    Proper survey design is essential to obtain reliable, replicable data from research subjects. One threat to inferences drawn from surveys is anchoring-and-adjusting. Tversky and Kahnemann (1974) observed that participants' responses to questions depended systematically on irrelevant information they received prior to answering. It is important for…

  9. 24 CFR 3285.402 - Ground anchor installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ground anchor installations. 3285.402 Section 3285.402 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Anchorage Against Wind §...

  10. 24 CFR 3285.402 - Ground anchor installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ground anchor installations. 3285.402 Section 3285.402 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MODEL MANUFACTURED HOME INSTALLATION STANDARDS Anchorage Against Wind §...

  11. Implementing Anchored Instruction: Guiding Principles for Curriculum Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLarty, Kim; And Others

    A curriculum based on "anchored instruction" was developed to enhance students' literacy development and acquisition of knowledge. The curriculum was designed to create a rich, shared environment that generates interest and enables students to identify and define problems while they explore the content from many perspectives. Based on…

  12. Equating without an Anchor for Nonequivalent Groups of Examinees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longford, Nicholas T.

    2015-01-01

    An equating procedure for a testing program with evolving distribution of examinee profiles is developed. No anchor is available because the original scoring scheme was based on expert judgment of the item difficulties. Pairs of examinees from two administrations are formed by matching on coarsened propensity scores derived from a set of…

  13. Anchor Test Study Supplement. Final Report. Volume 31, Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bianchini, John C.; Loret, Peter G.

    The Anchor Test Study provides a method for translating a pupil's score on any one of eight widely used standardized reading tests for Grades 4, 5, and 6 to a corresponding score on any of the other seven tests, as well as furnishing new nationally representative norms for each of the eight tests. In addition, the Study presents new estimates of…

  14. 24. STARBOARD PROFILE OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN); VESSEL AT ANCHOR ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. STARBOARD PROFILE OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN); VESSEL AT ANCHOR ON STATION IN GULF OF MEXICO WITH MOTOR BOAT TIED AT STERN Original 4-3/4'x6-3/4' photograph taken c. 1930? - Pilot Schooner "Alabama", Moored in harbor at Vineyard Haven, Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, MA

  15. Impact of Enhanced Anchored Instruction in Inclusive Math Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bottge, Brian A.; Toland, Michael D.; Gassaway, Linda; Butler, Mark; Choo, Sam; Griffen, Ann Katherine; Ma, Xin

    2015-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards for Mathematics will place more pressure on special education and math teachers to raise the skill levels of all students, especially those with disabilities in math (MD). The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of enhanced anchored instruction (EAI) on students with and without MD in co-taught general…

  16. Orbital views of molecular conductance perturbed by anchor units.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Yuta; Staykov, Aleksandar; Yoshizawa, Kazunari

    2011-04-20

    Site-specific electron transport phenomena through benzene and benzenedithiol derivatives are discussed on the basis of a qualitative Hückel molecular orbital analysis for better understanding of the effect of anchoring sulfur atoms. A recent work for the orbital control of electron transport through aromatic hydrocarbons provided an important concept for the design of high-conductance connections of a molecule with anchoring atoms. In this work the origin of the frontier orbitals of benzenedithiol derivatives, the effect of the sulfur atoms on the orbitals and on the electron transport properties, and the applicability of the theoretical concept on aromatic hydrocarbons with the anchoring units are studied. The results demonstrate that the orbital view predictions are applicable to molecules perturbed by the anchoring units. The electron transport properties of benzene are found to be qualitatively consistent with those of benzenedithiol with respect to the site dependence. To verify the result of the Hückel molecular orbital calculations, fragment molecular orbital analyses with the extended Hückel molecular orbital theory and electron transport calculations with density functional theory are performed. Calculated results are in good agreement with the orbital interaction analysis. The phase, amplitude, and spatial distribution of the frontier orbitals play an essential role in the design of the electron transport properties through aromatic hydrocarbons.

  17. Promises and Pitfalls of Anchoring Vignettes in Health Survey Research

    PubMed Central

    Verdes-Tennant, Emese; McEniry, Mary; Ispány, Márton

    2016-01-01

    Data harmonization is a topic of growing importance to demographers, who increasingly conduct domestic or international comparative research. Many self-reported survey items cannot be directly compared across demographic groups or countries because these groups differ in how they use subjective response categories. Anchoring vignettes, already appearing in numerous surveys worldwide, promise to overcome this problem. However, many anchoring vignettes have not been formally evaluated for adherence to the key measurement assumptions of vignette equivalence and response consistency. This article tests these assumptions in some of the most widely fielded anchoring vignettes in the world: the health vignettes in the World Health Organization (WHO) Study on Global AGEing and Adult Health (SAGE) and World Health Survey (WHS) (representing 10 countries; n = 52,388), as well as similar vignettes in the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) (n = 4,528). Findings are encouraging regarding adherence to response consistency, but reveal substantial violations of vignette equivalence both cross-nationally and across socioeconomic groups. That is, members of different sociocultural groups appear to interpret vignettes as depicting fundamentally different levels of health. The evaluated anchoring vignettes do not fulfill their promise of providing interpersonally comparable measures of health. Recommendations for improving future implementations of vignettes are discussed. PMID:26335547

  18. Culturally-Anchored Values and University Education Experience Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitsis, Ann; Foley, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine whether business students' gender, age and culturally-anchored values affect their perceptions of their university course experience. Design/methodology/approach: Culturally diverse business students (n 1/4 548) studying at an Australian university were surveyed using previously established scales.…

  19. Cardiac troponin T, a sarcomeric AKAP, tethers protein kinase A at the myofilaments.

    PubMed

    Sumandea, C Amelia; Garcia-Cazarin, Mary L; Bozio, Catherine H; Sievert, Gail A; Balke, C William; Sumandea, Marius P

    2011-01-07

    Efficient and specific phosphorylation of PKA substrates, elicited in response to β-adrenergic stimulation, require spatially confined pools of PKA anchored in proximity of its substrates. PKA-dependent phosphorylation of cardiac sarcomeric proteins has been the subject of intense investigations. Yet, the identity, composition, and function of PKA complexes at the sarcomeres have remained elusive. Here we report the identification and characterization of a novel sarcomeric AKAP (A-kinase anchoring protein), cardiac troponin T (cTnT). Using yeast two-hybrid technology in screening two adult human heart cDNA libraries, we identified the regulatory subunit of PKA as interacting with human cTnT bait. Immunoprecipitation studies show that cTnT is a dual specificity AKAP, interacting with both PKA-regulatory subunits type I and II. The disruptor peptide Ht31, but not Ht31P (control), abolished cTnT/PKA-R association. Truncations and point mutations identified an amphipathic helix domain in cTnT as the PKA binding site. This was confirmed by a peptide SPOT assay in the presence of Ht31 or Ht31P (control). Gelsolin-dependent removal of thin filament proteins also reduced myofilament-bound PKA-type II. Using a cTn exchange procedure that substitutes the endogenous cTn complex with a recombinant cTn complex we show that PKA-type II is troponin-bound in the myofilament lattice. Displacement of PKA-cTnT complexes correlates with a significant decrease in myofibrillar PKA activity. Taken together, our data propose a novel role for cTnT as a dual-specificity sarcomeric AKAP.

  20. A soluble acid invertase is directed to the vacuole by a signal anchor mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rae, Anne L; Casu, Rosanne E; Perroux, Jai M; Jackson, Mark A; Grof, Christopher P L

    2011-06-15

    Enzyme activities in the vacuole have an important impact on the net concentration of sucrose. In sugarcane (Saccharum hybrid), immunolabelling demonstrated that a soluble acid invertase (β-fructofuranosidase; EC 3.2.1.26) is present in the vacuole of storage parenchyma cells during sucrose accumulation. Examination of sequences from sugarcane, barley and rice showed that the N-terminus of the invertase sequence contains a signal anchor and a tyrosine motif, characteristic of single-pass membrane proteins destined for lysosomal compartments. The N-terminal peptide from the barley invertase was shown to be capable of directing the green fluorescent protein to the vacuole in sugarcane cells. The results suggest that soluble acid invertase is sorted to the vacuole in a membrane-bound form.

  1. New anchoring method for tarsal tendon transfers in myelomeningocele patients.

    PubMed

    Tomonori, Kenmoku; Makoto, Kamegaya; Takashi, Saisu

    2007-12-01

    We describe a new anchoring method for tarsal tendon transfers in myelomeningocele patients to protect the sole of the foot from pressure sores and skin necrosis and to loosen the tension of the transferred tendon.Tendon transfer procedures were performed in 51 feet (33 patients) with myelomeningocele. We transferred tibialis anterior tendons to the second or third cuneiform in 19 with equinovarus deformities, and transferred tibialis anterior tendons to the calcaneus through the interosseous membrane in 32 with talipes calcaneus. Clinical results were evaluated with the muscle power of transferred tendons using manual muscle testing 6 months after surgery. The muscle test result was classified as good, fair, and poor.After passing the tendon through the bony hole, a 2.0-mm Kirschner wire was inserted from the sole to the tibia through the ankle joint at neutral. (It extended from the sole through the posterior cortex of the tibia.) The remaining part of the wire was bent and formed into a loop shaped like the Greek letter "zeta" (zeta). The thread was then tied to the loop of the wire as tightly as possible. In this way, there was no contact with the sole during anchoring, thus avoiding ulcers. In addition, the transferred tendon could be kept stable because the patient's ankle was fixed by the Kirschner wire.No cases of wound infection or skin necrosis of the sole occurred. In 49 of the 51 cases, transferred tendons were firmly anchored to tarsal bones. Muscle strength was good for 83%, fair for 13%, and poor for 4%. Consequently, 45 feet could obtain plantigrade pattern during their walking with shoe inserts or occasional use of ankle-foot orthoses.Our anchoring method has the advantage of protecting the sole of the foot from pressure sores and skin necrosis, as well as maintaining tension on the transferred tendon until it settles down in an anchor hole.

  2. AKAP-independent localization of type-II protein kinase A to dynamic actin microspikes.

    PubMed

    Rivard, Robert L; Birger, Monique; Gaston, Kara J; Howe, Alan K

    2009-09-01

    Regulation of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) in subcellular space is required for cytoskeletal dynamics and chemotaxis. Currently, spatial regulation of PKA is thought to require the association of PKA regulatory (R) subunits with A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). Here, we show that the regulatory RIIalpha subunit of PKA associates with dynamic actin microspikes in an AKAP-independent manner. Both endogenous RIIalpha and a GFP-RIIalpha fusion protein co-localize with F-actin in microspikes within hippocampal neuron growth cones and the leading edge lamellae of NG108-15 cells. Live-cell imaging demonstrates that RIIalpha-associated microspikes are highly dynamic and that the coupling of RIIalpha to actin is tight, as the movement of both actin and RIIalpha are immediately and coincidently stopped by low-dose cytochalasin D. Importantly, co-localization of RIIalpha and actin in these structures is resistant to displacement by a cell-permeable disrupter of PKA-AKAP interactions. Biochemical fractionation confirms that a substantial pool of PKA RIIalpha is associated with the detergent-insoluble cytoskeleton and is resistant to extraction by a peptide inhibitor of AKAP interactions. Finally, mutation of the AKAP-binding domain of RIIalpha fails to disrupt its association with actin microspikes. These data provide the first demonstration of the physical association of a kinase with such dynamic actin structures, as well as the first demonstration of the ability of type-II PKA to localize to discrete subcellular structures independently of canonical AKAP function. This association is likely to be important for microfilament dynamics and cell migration and may prime the investigation of novel mechanisms for localizing PKA activity.

  3. AKAP-Independent Localization of Type-II Protein Kinase A to Dynamic Actin Microspikes

    PubMed Central

    Rivard, Robert L.; Birger, Monique; Gaston, Kara J.; Howe, Alan K.

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) in subcellular space is required for cytoskeletal dynamics and chemotaxis. Currently, spatial regulation of PKA is thought to require the association of PKA regulatory (R) subunits with A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). Here, we show that the regulatory RIIα subunit of PKA associates with dynamic actin microspikes in an AKAP-independent manner. Both endogenous RIIα and a GFP-RIIα fusion protein co-localize with F-actin in microspikes within hippocampal neuron growth cones and the leading edge lamellae of NG108-15 cells. Live-cell imaging demonstrates that RIIα-associated microspikes are highly dynamic and that the coupling of RIIα to actin is tight, as the movement of both actin and RIIα are immediately and coincidently stopped by low-dose cytochalasin D. Importantly, co-localization of RIIα and actin in these structures is resistant to displacement by a cell-permeable disrupter of PKA-AKAP interactions. Biochemical fractionation confirms that a substantial pool of PKA RIIα is associated with the detergent-insoluble cytoskeleton and is resistant to extraction by a peptide inhibitor of AKAP interactions. Finally, mutation of the AKAP-binding domain of RIIα fails to disrupt its association with actin microspikes. These data provide the first demonstration of the physical association of a kinase with such dynamic actin structures, as well as the first demonstration of the ability of type-II PKA to localize to discrete subcellular structures independently of canonical AKAP function. This association is likely to be important for microfilament dynamics and cell migration and may prime the investigation of novel mechanisms for localizing PKA activity. PMID:19536823

  4. Disintegration of an absorbable rotator cuff anchor six weeks after implantation.

    PubMed

    Kelly, James D

    2005-04-01

    Rotator cuff failure by suture-bone or suture anchor pull-out, suture breakage, knot slippage, and tendon pull-out are well described. I report a case of early disintegration of a bioabsorbable suture anchor. A 77-year-old woman underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. On suspecting failure, the repair was repeated 40 days later. Arthroscopy revealed disintegration of the suture loop from the anchor. Open rotator cuff repair was then performed with transosseous suture and metallic anchors.

  5. 46 CFR 108.705 - Anchors, chains, wire rope, and hawsers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Anchors, chains, wire rope, and hawsers. 108.705 Section... UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Miscellaneous Equipment § 108.705 Anchors, chains, wire rope, and hawsers. (a) Each unit must be fitted with anchors, chains, wire rope, and hawsers in agreement with the...

  6. 46 CFR 108.705 - Anchors, chains, wire rope, and hawsers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Anchors, chains, wire rope, and hawsers. 108.705 Section... UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Miscellaneous Equipment § 108.705 Anchors, chains, wire rope, and hawsers. (a) Each unit must be fitted with anchors, chains, wire rope, and hawsers in agreement with the...

  7. 46 CFR 108.705 - Anchors, chains, wire rope, and hawsers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Anchors, chains, wire rope, and hawsers. 108.705 Section... UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Miscellaneous Equipment § 108.705 Anchors, chains, wire rope, and hawsers. (a) Each unit must be fitted with anchors, chains, wire rope, and hawsers in agreement with the...

  8. 46 CFR 108.705 - Anchors, chains, wire rope, and hawsers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Anchors, chains, wire rope, and hawsers. 108.705 Section... UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Miscellaneous Equipment § 108.705 Anchors, chains, wire rope, and hawsers. (a) Each unit must be fitted with anchors, chains, wire rope, and hawsers in agreement with the...

  9. 46 CFR 108.705 - Anchors, chains, wire rope, and hawsers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Anchors, chains, wire rope, and hawsers. 108.705 Section... UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Miscellaneous Equipment § 108.705 Anchors, chains, wire rope, and hawsers. (a) Each unit must be fitted with anchors, chains, wire rope, and hawsers in agreement with the...

  10. Development of low anchoring strength liquid crystal mixtures for bistable nematic displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoenescu, D.; Gallaire, D.; Faget, L.; Lamarque-Forget, S.; Joly, S.; Dubois, J.-C.; Martinot-Lagarde, Ph.; Dozov, I.

    2006-02-01

    The recent Bistable Nematic (BiNem (R)) LCD technology presents long term bistability, high level passive matrix multiplexing and high optical quality. The BiNem device, based on anchoring breaking, needs specific low anchoring strength materials - alignment layers and liquid crystal mixtures. We present here our approach to develop nematic mixtures with wide enough temperature range and low zenithal anchoring energy.

  11. 78 FR 45104 - Model Manufactured Home Installation Standards: Ground Anchor Installations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... methods to determine ground anchor performance and resistance. The performance of conventional ground... apparatus for comparative testing purposes. Overall, 104 tests were performed. Ground anchor resistance... performance and should not be relied upon to determine anchor resistance, unless a significantly higher...

  12. Perception of the Raison d'Etre in Anchored Instruction: An Ecological Psychology Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Michael F.; Barab, Sasha A.

    1999-01-01

    Anchored instruction calls for the establishment of a macrocontext to "anchor" instruction within a realistic situation. Evidence is provided that video anchors encourage students to adopt certain contrived goals over their more naturalistic goals. Suggests that goals that enable the problem solver to detect the "raison d'etre"…

  13. NCME 2008 Presidential Address: The Impact of Anchor Test Configuration on Student Proficiency Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzpatrick, Anne R.

    2008-01-01

    Examined in this study were the effects of reducing anchor test length on student proficiency rates for 12 multiple-choice tests administered in an annual, large-scale, high-stakes assessment. The anchor tests contained 15 items, 10 items, or five items. Five content representative samples of items were drawn at each anchor test length from a…

  14. The presence of GPI-linked protein(s) in an archaeobacterium, Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, closely related to eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Nishizaki, R; Ikezawa, H

    1997-02-11

    GPI-anchored proteins are distributed ubiquitously in eukaryotes, but not in procaryotes. By metabolic-labeling of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius cells, 14C-radiolabeled precursors of GPI and caldarchaetidylinositol were incorporated into 120, 143 and 185 kDa proteins. The 185 kDa protein was specifically solubilized by bacterial phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C. Therefore, Sulfolobus proved to contain at least one GPI-anchored proteins.

  15. Matrix vesicles: Are they anchored exosomes?

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Irving M; Landis, William J; Risbud, Makarand V

    2015-10-01

    Numerous studies have documented that matrix vesicles are unique extracellular membrane-bound microparticles that serve as initial sites for mineral formation in the growth plate and most other vertebrate mineralizing tissues. Microparticle generation is not confined to hard tissues, as cells in soft tissues generate similar structures; numerous studies have shown that a common type of extracellular particle, termed an exosome, a product of the endosomal pathway, shares many characteristics of matrix vesicles. Indeed, analyses of size, morphology and lipid and protein content indicate that matrix vesicles and exosomes are homologous structures. Such a possibility impacts our understanding of the biogenesis, processing and function of matrix vesicles (exosomes) in vertebrate hard tissues and explains in part how cells control the earliest stages of mineral deposition. Moreover, since exosomes influence a spectrum of functions, including cell-cell communication, it is suggested that this type of microparticle may provide a mechanism for the transfer of signaling molecules between cells within the growth plate and thereby regulate endochondral bone development and formation.

  16. Multivalent anchored and crosslinked hyperbranched polyglycerol monolayers as antifouling coating for titanium oxide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qiang; Krysiak, Stefanie; Achazi, Katharina; Becherer, Tobias; Noeske, Paul-Ludwig Michael; Paulus, Florian; Liebe, Hendrik; Grunwald, Ingo; Dernedde, Jens; Hartwig, Andreas; Hugel, Thorsten; Haag, Rainer

    2014-10-01

    A set of new catecholic monolayer coatings was developed to improve the antifouling performance of TiO2 surfaces. To solve the problem of the weak charge-transfer interaction between a single catechol anchor and TiO2, multiple catechol groups were combined with hyperbranched polyglycerol (hPG) which is a distinct dendritic scaffold that exposes its multivalent anchor groups on the surface. Thus, multivalent catecholic hPGs can be easily prepared for surface modification. The immobilization of the compounds was monitored by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. Surface properties of the coatings were analyzed by water contact angle, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The antifouling ability and stability were investigated by protein adsorption and cell adhesion. By increasing the number of catechol groups on the hPG scaffold, the stability and surface coverage could be significantly enhanced. Moreover, the inner-layer crosslinking of the coatings by grafting and initiating vinyl groups clearly improved their long-term stability. As a result, hPG with a catecholic functional degree of 10% (hPG-Cat10) and hPG with both catecholic and vinylic functional degree of 5% (hPG-Cat5-V5) were identified as the best catecholic hPGs to prepare bioinert and stable monolayer coatings on TiO2.

  17. Raft-based interactions of gangliosides with a GPI-anchored receptor.

    PubMed

    Komura, Naoko; Suzuki, Kenichi G N; Ando, Hiromune; Konishi, Miku; Koikeda, Machi; Imamura, Akihiro; Chadda, Rahul; Fujiwara, Takahiro K; Tsuboi, Hisae; Sheng, Ren; Cho, Wonhwa; Furukawa, Koichi; Furukawa, Keiko; Yamauchi, Yoshio; Ishida, Hideharu; Kusumi, Akihiro; Kiso, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    Gangliosides, glycosphingolipids containing one or more sialic acid(s) in the glyco-chain, are involved in various important physiological and pathological processes in the plasma membrane. However, their exact functions are poorly understood, primarily because of the scarcity of suitable fluorescent ganglioside analogs. Here, we developed methods for systematically synthesizing analogs that behave like their native counterparts in regard to partitioning into raft-related membrane domains or preparations. Single-fluorescent-molecule imaging in the live-cell plasma membrane revealed the clear but transient colocalization and codiffusion of fluorescent ganglioside analogs with a fluorescently labeled glycosylphosphatidylinisotol (GPI)-anchored protein, human CD59, with lifetimes of 12 ms for CD59 monomers, 40 ms for CD59's transient homodimer rafts in quiescent cells, and 48 ms for engaged-CD59-cluster rafts, in cholesterol- and GPI-anchoring-dependent manners. The ganglioside molecules were always mobile in quiescent cells. These results show that gangliosides continually and dynamically exchange between raft domains and the bulk domain, indicating that raft domains are dynamic entities.

  18. Direct visualization of membrane architecture of myelinating cells in transgenic mice expressing membrane-anchored EGFP.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yaqi; Kim, BongWoo; He, Xuelian; Kim, Sunja; Lu, Changqing; Wang, Haibo; Cho, Ssang-Goo; Hou, Yiping; Li, Jianrong; Zhao, Xianghui; Lu, Q Richard

    2014-04-01

    Myelinogenesis is a complex process that involves substantial and dynamic changes in plasma membrane architecture and myelin interaction with axons. Highly ramified processes of oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS) make axonal contact and then extrapolate to wrap around axons and form multilayer compact myelin sheathes. Currently, the mechanisms governing myelin sheath assembly and axon selection by myelinating cells are not fully understood. Here, we generated a transgenic mouse line expressing the membrane-anchored green fluorescent protein (mEGFP) in myelinating cells, which allow live imaging of details of myelinogenesis and cellular behaviors in the nervous systems. mEGFP expression is driven by the promoter of 2'-3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP) that is expressed in the myelinating cell lineage. Robust mEGFP signals appear in the membrane processes of oligodendrocytes in the CNS and Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system (PNS), wherein mEGFP expression defines the inner layers of myelin sheaths and Schmidt-Lanterman incisures in adult sciatic nerves. In addition, mEGFP expression can be used to track the extent of remyelination after demyelinating injury in a toxin-induced demyelination animal model. Taken together, the membrane-anchored mEGFP expression in the new transgenic line would facilitate direct visualization of dynamic myelin membrane formation and assembly during development and process remodeling during remyelination after various demyelinating injuries.

  19. Corrosion of rock anchors in US coal mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bylapudi, Gopi

    The mining industry is a major consumer of rock bolts in the United States. Due to the high humidity in the underground mining environment, the rock bolts corrode and loose their load bearing capacity which in turn reduces the life expectancy of the ground support and, thus, creates operational difficulties and number of safety concerns[1]. Research on rock anchor corrosion has not been adequately extensive in the past and the effects of several factors in the mine atmosphere and waters are not clearly understood. One of the probable reasons for this lack of research may be attributed to the time required for gathering meaningful data that makes the study of corrosion quite challenging. In this particular work underground water samples from different mines in the Illinois coal basin were collected and the major chemical content was analyzed and used for the laboratory testing. The corrosion performance of the different commercial rock anchors was investigated by techniques such as laboratory immersion tests in five different corrosion chambers, and potentiodynamic polarization tests in simulated ground waters based on the Illinois coal basin. The experiments were conducted with simulate underground mining conditions (corrosive). The tensile strengths were measured for the selected rock anchors taken every 3 months from the salt spray corrosion chambers maintained at different pH values and temperatures. The corrosion potential (Ecorr ), corrosion current (Icorr) and the corresponding corrosion rates (CR) of the selected commercial rock bolts: #5, #6, #6 epoxy coated and #7 forged head rebar steels, #6 and #7 threaded head rebar steels were measured at the solution pH values of 5 and 8 at room temperature. The open circuit potential (OCP) values of the different rock anchors were recorded in 3 selected underground coal mines (A, B & C) in the Illinois coal basin and the data compared with the laboratory electrochemical tests for analyzing the life of the rock

  20. Lipid bilayers covalently anchored to carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Dayani, Yasaman; Malmstadt, Noah

    2012-05-29

    The unique physical and electrical properties of carbon nanotubes make them an exciting material for applications in various fields such as bioelectronics and biosensing. Due to the poor water solubility of carbon nanotubes, functionalization for such applications has been a challenge. Of particular need are functionalization methods for integrating carbon nanotubes with biomolecules and constructing novel hybrid nanostructures for bionanoelectronic applications. We present a novel method for the fabrication of dispersible, biocompatible carbon nanotube-based materials. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are covalently modified with primary amine-bearing phospholipids in a carbodiimide-activated reaction. These modified carbon nanotubes have good dispersibility in nonpolar solvents. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy shows peaks attributable to the formation of amide bonds between lipids and the nanotube surface. Simple sonication of lipid-modified nanotubes with other lipid molecules leads to the formation of a uniform lipid bilayer coating the nanotubes. These bilayer-coated nanotubes are highly dispersible and stable in aqueous solution. Confocal fluorescence microscopy shows labeled lipids on the surface of bilayer-modified nanotubes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows the morphology of dispersed bilayer-coated MWCNTs. Fluorescence quenching of lipid-coated MWCNTs confirms the bilayer configuration of the lipids on the nanotube surface, and fluorescence anisotropy measurements show that the bilayer is fluid above the gel-to-liquid transition temperature. The membrane protein α-hemolysin spontaneously inserts into the MWCNT-supported bilayer, confirming the biomimetic membrane structure. These biomimetic nanostructures are a promising platform for the integration of carbon nanotube-based materials with biomolecules.

  1. A myristoyl/phosphoserine switch controls cAMP-dependent protein kinase association to membranes.

    PubMed

    Gaffarogullari, Ece C; Masterson, Larry R; Metcalfe, Emily E; Traaseth, Nathaniel J; Balatri, Erica; Musa, Musa M; Mullen, Daniel; Distefano, Mark D; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2011-08-26

    The cAMP-dependent protein kinase [protein kinase A (PKA)] mediates a myriad of cellular signaling events, and its activity is tightly regulated in both space and time. Among these regulatory mechanisms is N-myristoylation, whose biological role has been elusive. Using a combination of thermodynamics, kinetics, and spectroscopic methods, we analyzed the effects of N-myristoylation and phosphorylation at Ser10 on the interactions of PKA with model membranes. We found that, in the absence of lipids, the myristoyl group is tucked into the hydrophobic binding pocket of the enzyme (myr-in state). Upon association with lipid bilayers, the myristoyl group is extruded and inserts into the hydrocarbon region of the lipid bilayer (myr-out state). NMR data indicate that the enzyme undergoes conformational equilibrium between myr-in and myr-out states, which can be shifted byeither interaction with membranes and/or phosphorylation at Ser10. Our results provide evidence that the membrane binding motif of the myristoylated C-subunit of PKA (PKA-C) steers the enzyme toward lipids independent of its regulatory subunit or an A-kinase anchoring protein, providing an additional mechanism to localize the enzyme near membrane-bound substrates.

  2. Evidence for carboxyl-terminal processing and glycolipid-anchoring of human carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Takami, N; Misumi, Y; Kuroki, M; Matsuoka, Y; Ikehara, Y

    1988-09-05

    We have investigated the post-translational modification of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) for membrane-anchoring in QGP-1 cells derived from a human pancreatic carcinoma. Pulse-chase experiments with [3H]leucine demonstrated that CEA was initially synthesized as a precursor form with Mr 150,000 having N-linked high-mannose-type oligosaccharides, which was then converted to a mature form with Mr 200,000 containing the complex type sugar chains. The mature protein thus labeled was found to be released from the cell surface by treatment with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C, suggesting that CEA is a phosphatidylinositol-linked membrane protein. This was confirmed by metabolic incorporation into CEA of 3H-labeled compounds such as ethanolamine, myo-inositol, palmitic acid, and stearic acid. The 3H-labeled fatty acids incorporated were specifically removed from the protein by nitrous acid deamination as well as by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C treatment. Since the available cDNA sequence predicts that CEA contains a single methionine residue only in its carboxyl-terminal hydrophobic domain, processing of the carboxyl terminus was examined by pulse-chase experiments with [35S]methionine. It was found that CEA with Mr 150,000 was initially labeled with [35S]methionine but its radioactivity was immediately lost with chase. Taken together, these results suggest that CEA is anchored to the membrane by simultaneously occurring proteolysis of the carboxyl terminus and replacement by the glycophospholipid immediately after the synthesis.

  3. Equilibrium Configuration in a Nematic Liquid Crystal Droplet with Homeotropic Anchoring of Finite Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanke, Masaki; Sasaki, Kazuo

    2013-09-01

    Equilibrium configuration of order parameter in a nematic liquid crystal droplet with homeotropic anchoring of finite strength at the surface is studied numerically by using the Landau--de Gennes approach. It is found that a hedgehog-like configuration with a disclination loop of a small radius is stable for strong anchoring while an axial configuration without defect is stable for weak anchoring. A first-order phase transition from one configuration to the other occurs as the strength of the anchoring is varied. The critical anchoring strength turns out to increase almost linearly with the inverse of the droplet radius.

  4. Graphene nanoribbons anchored to SiC substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Nam B.; Woods, Lilia M.

    2016-09-01

    Graphene nanoribbons are quasi-one-dimensional planar graphene allotropes with diverse properties dependent on their width and types of edges. Graphene nanoribbons anchored to substrates is a hybrid system, which offers novel opportunities for property modifications as well as experimental control. Here we present electronic structure calculations of zigzag graphene nanoribbons chemically attached via the edges to the Si or C terminated surfaces of a SiC substrate. The results show that the edge characteristics are rather robust and the properties are essentially determined by the individual nanoribbon. While the localized spin polarization of the graphene nanoribbon edge atoms is not significantly affected by the substrate, secondary energy gaps in the highest conduction and lowest valence region may emerge in the anchored structures. The van der Waals interaction together with the electrostatic interactions due to the polarity of the surface bonds are found to be important for the structure parameters and energy stability.

  5. Membrane-anchored serine proteases in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Bugge, Thomas; Wu, Qingyu

    2013-01-01

    Serine proteases of the trypsin-like family have long been recognized to be critical effectors of biological processes as diverse as digestion, blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, and immunity. In recent years, a subgroup of these enzymes has been identified that are anchored directly to plasma membranes, either by a carboxy-terminal transmembrane domain (Type I), an amino-terminal transmembrane domain with a cytoplasmic extension (Type II or TTSP), or through a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) linkage. Recent biochemical, cellular, and in vivo analyses have now established that membrane-anchored serine proteases are key pericellular contributors to processes vital for development and the maintenance of homeostasis. This chapter will review our current knowledge of the biological and physiological functions of these proteases, their molecular substrates, and their contributions to disease. PMID:21238933

  6. Epidermolysis Bullosa Acquisita: Autoimmunity to Anchoring Fibril Collagen

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mei; Kim, Gene H.; Prakash, Lori; Woodley, David T.

    2012-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) is a rare and acquired autoimmune subepidermal bullous disease of the skin and mucosa. EBA includes various distinct clinical manifestations resembling Bullous Pemphigus, Brunsting-Perry pemphigoid, or cicatricial pemphigoid. These patients have autoantibodies against type VII collagen, an integral component of anchoring fibrils, which are responsible for attaching the dermis to the epidermis. Destruction or perturbation of the normally functioning anchoring fibrils clinically results in skin fragility, blisters, erosions, scars, milia and nail loss, all features reminiscent of genetic dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. These anti-type VII collagen antibodies are “pathogenic” because when injected into a mouse, the mouse develops an EBA-like blistering disease. Currently treatment is often unsatisfactory, however some success has been achieved with colchichine, dapsone, photopheresis, plasmaphresis, infliximab, rituximab and IVIG. PMID:21955050

  7. Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    1985-01-01

    Examines proteins which give rise to structure and, by virtue of selective binding to other molecules, make genes. Binding sites, amino acids, protein evolution, and molecular paleontology are discussed. Work with encoding segments of deoxyribonucleic acid (exons) and noncoding stretches (introns) provides new information for hypotheses. (DH)

  8. Recycling Suture Limbs from Knotless Suture Anchors for Arthroscopic Shoulder Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Timothy S; DiPompeo, Christine M; Ismaeli, Zahra C; Porter, Polly A; Nicholson, Shannon L; Johnson, David C

    2014-06-01

    Recurrent shoulder instability often leads to labral abnormality that requires surgical intervention that may require fixation with suture anchors. The proposed surgical technique allows the surgeon to achieve 2 points of fixation around the labrum and/or capsule with a single suture secured to the glenoid with a knotless anchor. Instead of cutting and discarding the residual suture limbs after anchor insertion, this technique uses the residual suture limbs of the knotless anchor for a second suture pass. This technique (1) creates a more cost- and time-efficient surgical procedure than using multiple single-loaded anchors or double-loaded anchors, (2) decreases the known risk of glenoid fracture from the stress riser at the implant tips of multi-anchor repairs by reducing the number of anchors required for stabilization, (3) decreases the surgical time compared with the use of double-loaded anchors through simpler suture management and less knot tying, (4) allows for the secure reapproximation of the labrum to the glenoid while offering a convenient option for capsulorrhaphy without the need to insert another anchor, and (5) yields more points of soft-tissue fixation with fewer anchors drilled into the glenoid.

  9. Effect of anchoring 4-anilidopiperidines to opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Ravil R; Lee, Yeon Sun; Vardanyan, Ruben S; Liu, Lu; Ma, Shou-wu; Davis, Peg; Lai, Josephine; Porreca, Frank; Vanderah, Todd W; Hruby, Victor J

    2013-06-01

    We report here the design, synthesis, and in vitro characterization of new opioid peptides featuring a 4-anilidopiperidine moiety. Despite the fact that the chemical structures of fentanyl surrogates have been found suboptimal per se for the opioid activity, the corresponding conjugates with opioid peptides displayed potent opioid activity. These studies shed an instructive light on the strategies and potential therapeutic values of anchoring the 4-anilidopiperidine scaffold to different classes of opioid peptides.

  10. Anchoring the Self to the Body in Bilateral Vestibular Failure

    PubMed Central

    Toupet, Michel; van Nechel, Christian; Duquesne, Ulla; Hautefort, Charlotte; Lopez, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that vestibular information plays a significant role in anchoring the self to the body. Out-of-body experiences of neurological origin are frequently associated with vestibular sensations, and galvanic vestibular stimulation in healthy participants anchors the self to the body. Here, we provide the first objective measures of anchoring the self to the body in chronic bilateral vestibular failure (BVF). We compared 23 patients with idiopathic BVF to 23 healthy participants in a series of experiments addressing several aspects of visuo-spatial perspective taking and embodiment. In Experiment 1, participants were involved in a virtual “dot-counting task” from their own perspective or the perspective of a distant avatar, to measure implicit and explicit perspective taking, respectively. In both groups, response times increased similarly when the avatar’s and participant’s viewpoint differed, for both implicit and explicit perspective taking. In Experiment 2, participants named ambiguous letters (such as “b” or “q”) traced on their forehead that could be perceived from an internal or external perspective. The frequency of perceiving ambiguous letters from an internal perspective was similar in both groups. In Experiment 3, participants completed a questionnaire measuring the experienced self/body and self/environment “closeness”. Both groups reported a similar embodied experience. Altogether, our data show that idiopathic BVF does not change implicit and explicit perspective taking nor subjective anchoring of the self to the body. Our negative findings offer insight into the multisensory mechanisms of embodiment. Only acute peripheral vestibular disorders and neurological disorders in vestibular brain areas (characterized by strong multisensory conflicts) may evoke disembodied experiences. PMID:28107424

  11. 19. VIEW OF ANCHOR BRIDGE NUMBER 310 LOOKING NORTHEAST FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. VIEW OF ANCHOR BRIDGE NUMBER 310 LOOKING NORTHEAST FROM THE ROOF OF THE NORTH SIDE OF THE EAST BOILER ROOM. THE ROOF OF THE LOAD DISPATCHER'S TOWER IS DIRECTLY BEHIND THE FEEDER TOWER ON THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE PHOTOGRAPH. THIS TERMINAL IS THE JUNCTION BETWEEN NORTHEAST UTILITIES LINES AND THE RAILROAD CATENARY. - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Cos Cob Power Plant, Sound Shore Drive, Greenwich, Fairfield County, CT

  12. Phosphonate-anchored monolayers for antibody binding to magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Benbenishty-Shamir, Helly; Gilert, Roni; Gotman, Irena; Gutmanas, Elazar Y; Sukenik, Chaim N

    2011-10-04

    Targeted delivery of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) to a specific tissue can be achieved by conjugation with particular biological ligands on an appropriately functionalized IONP surface. To take best advantage of the unique magnetic properties of IONPs and to maximize their blood half-life, thin, strongly bonded, functionalized coatings are required. The work reported herein demonstrates the successful application of phosphonate-anchored self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) as ultrathin coatings for such particles. It also describes a new chemical approach to the anchoring of antibodies on the surface of SAM-coated IONPs (using nucleophilic aromatic substitution). This anchoring strategy results in stable, nonhydrolyzable, covalent attachment and allows the reactivity of the particles toward antibody binding to be activated in situ, such that prior to the activation the modified surface is stable for long-term storage. While the SAMs do not have the well-packed crystallinity of other such monolayers, their structure was studied using smooth model substrates based on an iron oxide layer on a double-side polished silicon wafer. In this way, atomic force microscopy, ellipsometry, and contact angle goniometry (tools that could not be applied to the nanoparticles' surfaces) could contribute to the determination of their monomolecular thickness and uniformity. Finally, the successful conjugation of IgG antibodies to the SAM-coated IONPs such that the antibodies retain their biological activity is verified by their complexation to a secondary fluorescent antibody.

  13. N-Acetylglucosamine Deacetylases Modulate the Anchoring of the Gamma-Glutamyl Capsule to the Cell Wall of Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Candela, Thomas; Balomenou, Stavroula; Aucher, Willy; Bouriotis, Vassilis; Simore, Jean-Pierre; Fouet, Agnes

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis has a complex cell wall structure composed of a peptidoglycan (PG) layer to which major structures are anchored such as a neutral polysaccharide, an S-layer, and a poly-γ-D-glutamate (PDGA) capsule. Many of these structures have central roles in the biology of B. anthracis, particularly, in virulence. However, little attention has been devoted to structurally study the PG and how it is modified in the presence of these secondary cell wall components. We present here the fine structure of the PG of the encapsulated RPG1 strain harboring both pXO1 and pXO2 virulence plasmids. We show that B. anthracis has a high degree of cross-linking and its GlcNAc residues are highly modified by N-deacetylation. The PG composition is not dependent on the presence of either LPXTG proteins or the capsule. Using NMR analysis of the PG-PDGA complex, we provide evidence for the anchoring of the PDGA to the glucosamine residues. We show that anchoring of the PDGA capsule is impaired in two PG N-deacetylase mutants, Ba1961 and Ba3679. Thus, these multiple N-deactylase activities would constitute excellent drug targets in B. anthracis by simultaneously affecting its resistance to lysozyme and to phagocytosis impairing B. anthracis survival in the host. PMID:24833281

  14. N-acetylglucosamine deacetylases modulate the anchoring of the gamma-glutamyl capsule to the cell wall of Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Candela, Thomas; Balomenou, Stavroula; Aucher, Willy; Bouriotis, Vassilis; Simore, Jean-Pierre; Fouet, Agnes; Boneca, Ivo G

    2014-06-01

    Bacillus anthracis has a complex cell wall structure composed of a peptidoglycan (PG) layer to which major structures are anchored such as a neutral polysaccharide, an S-layer, and a poly-γ-D-glutamate (PDGA) capsule. Many of these structures have central roles in the biology of B. anthracis, particularly, in virulence. However, little attention has been devoted to structurally study the PG and how it is modified in the presence of these secondary cell wall components. We present here the fine structure of the PG of the encapsulated RPG1 strain harboring both pXO1 and pXO2 virulence plasmids. We show that B. anthracis has a high degree of cross-linking and its GlcNAc residues are highly modified by N-deacetylation. The PG composition is not dependent on the presence of either LPXTG proteins or the capsule. Using NMR analysis of the PG-PDGA complex, we provide evidence for the anchoring of the PDGA to the glucosamine residues. We show that anchoring of the PDGA capsule is impaired in two PG N-deacetylase mutants, Ba1961 and Ba3679. Thus, these multiple N-deactylase activities would constitute excellent drug targets in B. anthracis by simultaneously affecting its resistance to lysozyme and to phagocytosis impairing B. anthracis survival in the host.

  15. Increased Diversity of the HLA-B40 Ligandome by the Presentation of Peptides Phosphorylated at Their Main Anchor Residue*

    PubMed Central

    Marcilla, Miguel; Alpízar, Adán; Lombardía, Manuel; Ramos-Fernandez, Antonio; Ramos, Manuel; Albar, Juan Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules bind peptides derived from the intracellular degradation of endogenous proteins and present them to cytotoxic T lymphocytes, allowing the immune system to detect transformed or virally infected cells. It is known that HLA class I–associated peptides may harbor posttranslational modifications. In particular, phosphorylated ligands have raised much interest as potential targets for cancer immunotherapy. By combining affinity purification with high-resolution mass spectrometry, we identified more than 2000 unique ligands bound to HLA-B40. Sequence analysis revealed two major anchor motifs: aspartic or glutamic acid at peptide position 2 (P2) and methionine, phenylalanine, or aliphatic residues at the C terminus. The use of immobilized metal ion and TiO2 affinity chromatography allowed the characterization of 85 phosphorylated ligands. We further confirmed every sequence belonging to this subset by comparing its experimental MS2 spectrum with that obtained upon fragmentation of the corresponding synthetic peptide. Remarkably, three phospholigands lacked a canonical anchor residue at P2, containing phosphoserine instead. Binding assays showed that these peptides bound to HLA-B40 with high affinity. Together, our data demonstrate that the peptidome of a given HLA allotype can be broadened by the presentation of peptides with posttranslational modifications at major anchor positions. We suggest that ligands with phosphorylated residues at P2 might be optimal targets for T-cell-based cancer immunotherapy. PMID:24366607

  16. Anchor technique: Use of stent retrievers as an anchor to advance thrombectomy catheters in internal carotid artery occlusions

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Stacey Q; Janjua, Rashid M; Hedayat, Hirad; Burnette, Christofer

    2015-01-01

    In three recent cases of acute complete internal artery occlusions, we used stent retriever deployed through the mechanical aspiration/distal access catheters to achieve recanalization. In all cases the stent retriever was used as an anchor and supplemented mechanical thrombectomy. This report describes the technical details of the procedure and presents an alternative plan of action in difficult cases when standard thrombectomy techniques do not work. PMID:26494404

  17. Spatially confined polymer chains: implications of chromatin fibre flexibility and peripheral anchoring on telomere telomere interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehlen, L. R.; Rosa, A.; Klenin, K.; Langowski, J.; Gasser, S. M.; Bystricky, K.

    2006-04-01

    We simulate the extension of spatially confined chromatin fibres modelled as polymer chains and examine the effect of the flexibility of the fibre and its degree of freedom. The developed formalism was used to analyse experimental data of telomere-telomere distances in living yeast cells in the absence of confining factors as identified by the proteins Sir4 and yKu70. Our analysis indicates that intrinsic properties of the chromatin fibre, in particular its elastic properties and flexibility, can influence the juxtaposition of the telomeric ends of chromosomes. However, measurements in intact yeast cells showed that the telomeres of chromosomes 3 and 6 come even closer together than the parameters of constraint imposed on the simulations would predict. This juxtaposition was specific to telomeres on one contiguous chromosome and overrode a tendency for separation that is imposed by anchoring.

  18. Protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search for: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Email People Departments Calendar Careers Give my.harvard ... Nutrition Source Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health > The Nutrition Source > What Should I Eat? > Protein ...

  19. Protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... Go lean with protein. • Choose lean meats and poultry. Lean beef cuts include round steaks (top loin, ... main dishes. • Use nuts to replace meat or poultry, not in addition to meat or poultry (i. ...

  20. Construction and expression of bivalent membrane-anchored DNA vaccine encoding Sjl4FABP and Sj26GST genes.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ping; Dai, Wuxing; Liu, Shuojie; Yang, Ping; Cheng, Jizhong; Liang, Liang; Chen, Zhihao; Gao, Hong

    2006-01-01

    In order to construct a eukaryotic co-expression plasmid containing membrane-anchored Sjcl4FABP and Sjc26GST genes and identify their expression in vitro, Sj14 and Sj26 genes were obtained by RT-PCR with total RNA of Schistosoma japonicum adult worms as the template and cloned into eukaryotic expression plasmid pVAC to construct recombinant plasmids pVAC-Sj14 and pVAC-Sj26. Then a 23 amino-acid signal peptide of human interleukin-2 (IL-2) upstream Sj14 or Sj26 gene and a membrane-anchored sequence containing 32 amino-acids of carboxyl-terminal of human placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP) downstream were amplified by PCR as the template of plasmid pVAC-Sj14 or pVAC-Sj26 only to get two gene fragments including Sj14 gene and Sj26 gene. The two modified genes were altogether cloned into a eukaryotic co-expression plasmid pIRES, resulting in another new recombinant plasmid pIRES-Sj26-Sj14. The expression of Sj14 and Sj26 genes was detected by RT-PCR and indirect immunofluorescent assays (IFA) when the plasmid pIRES-Sj26-Sj14 was transfected into eukaryotic Hela cells. Restriction enzyme analysis, PCR and sequencing results revealed that the recombinant plasmids pVAC-Sj14, pVAC-Sj26 and plRES-Sj26-Sj14 were successfully constructed and the expression of modified Sj14 and Sj26 genes could be detected by RT-PCR and IFA. A bivalent membrane-anchored DNA vaccine encoding Sj14 and Sj26 genes was acquired and expressed proteins were proved to be mostly anchored in cellular membranes.