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Sample records for a-mode ultrasound devices

  1. Comparison of the biometric values obtained by two different A-mode ultrasound devices (Eye Cubed vs. PalmScan): A Transversal, descriptive, and comparative study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To assess the reliability of the measurements obtained with the PalmScan™, when compared with another standardized A-mode ultrasound device, and assess the consistency and correlation between the two methods. Methods Transversal, descriptive, and comparative study. We recorded the axial length (AL), anterior chamber depth (ACD) and lens thickness (LT) obtained with two A-mode ultrasounds (PalmScan™ A2000 and Eye Cubed™) using an immersion technique. We compared the measurements with a two-sample t-test. Agreement between the two devices was assessed with Bland-Altman plots and 95% limits of agreement. Results 70 eyes of 70 patients were enrolled in this study. The measurements with the Eye Cubed™ of AL and ACD were shorter than the measurements taken by the PalmScan™. The differences were not statistically significant regarding AL (p < 0.4) but significant regarding ACD (p < 0.001). The highest agreement between the two devices was obtained during LT measurement. The PalmScan™ measurements were shorter, but not statistically significantly (p < 0.2). Conclusions The values of AL and LT, obtained with both devices are not identical, but within the limits of agreement. The agreement is not affected by the magnitude of the ocular dimensions (but only between range of 20 mm to 27 mm of AL and 3.5 mm to 5.7 mm of LT). A correction of about 0.5 D could be considered if an intraocular lens is being calculated. However due to the large variability of the results, the authors recommend discretion in using this conversion factor, and to adjust the power of the intraocular lenses based upon the personal experience of the surgeon. PMID:20334670

  2. Ultrasound tomography device

    SciTech Connect

    Hassler, D.; Trautenberg, E.

    1984-10-23

    An ultrasound tomography device for scanning an object under examination from a plurality of directions. Coronal slice images of the plane or planes near or at the female breast wall are obtained. A sagittal scanner is used to obtain numerous small sectional oblique views of the slice to be viewed. A full image of the coronal slice plane is reconstructed through section by section combination of the images obtained from the several small sagittal sections. By providing the sagittal scanner with a scanning motion as well as with translational mobility a full composite view is provided.

  3. Implantable ultrasound devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilkomerson, David; Chilipka, Thomas; Bogan, John; Blebea, John; Choudry, Rashad; Wang, John; Salvatore, Michael; Rotella, Vittorio; Soundararajan, Krishnan

    2008-03-01

    Using medical implants to wirelessly report physiological data is a technique that is rapidly growing. Ultrasound is well-suited for implants -- it requires little power and this form of radiated energy has no ill effects on the body. We report here on techniques we have developed in our experience gained in implanting over a dozen Doppler ultrasound flow-measuring implants in dogs. The goal of our implantable device is to measure flow in an arterial graft. To accomplish this, we place a Doppler transducer in the wall of a graft and an implant unit under the skin that energizes the 20 MHz Doppler transducer system, either when started by external command or by internal timetable. The implant records the digitized Doppler real and imaginary channels and transmits the data to a nearby portable computer for storage and evaluation. After outlining the overall operation of the system, we will concentrate on three areas of implant design where special techniques are required: ensuring safety, including biocompatibility to prevent the body from reacting to its invasion; powering the device, including minimizing energy used so that a small battery can provide long-life; and transmitting the data obtained.

  4. Plane reconstruction ultrasound tomography device

    SciTech Connect

    Hassler, D.

    1984-10-23

    An ultrasound tomography device for scanning an object under examination from a plurality of directions. Coronal slice images of the plane areas near or at the female breast wall are obtained. Ultrasound lobes from ultrasound transducers are electronically directed or mechanically positioned to obliquely strike the coronal slice located at or near the breast wall. A full image of the coronal slice plane is reconstructed through section by section combination of the images obtained from the several ultrasound lobes.

  5. Handheld ultrasound array imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Juin-Jet; Quistgaard, Jens

    1999-06-01

    A handheld ultrasound imaging device, one that weighs less than five pounds, has been developed for diagnosing trauma in the combat battlefield as well as a variety of commercial mobile diagnostic applications. This handheld device consists of four component ASICs, each is designed using the state of the art microelectronics technologies. These ASICs are integrated with a convex array transducer to allow high quality imaging of soft tissues and blood flow in real time. The device is designed to be battery driven or ac powered with built-in image storage and cineloop playback capability. Design methodologies of a handheld device are fundamentally different to those of a cart-based system. As system architecture, signal and image processing algorithm as well as image control circuit and software in this device is deigned suitably for large-scale integration, the image performance of this device is designed to be adequate to the intent applications. To elongate the battery life, low power design rules and power management circuits are incorporated in the design of each component ASIC. The performance of the prototype device is currently being evaluated for various applications such as a primary image screening tool, fetal imaging in Obstetrics, foreign object detection and wound assessment for emergency care, etc.

  6. Validity and Reliability of A-Mode Ultrasound for Body Composition Assessment of NCAA Division I Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Dale R.; Cain, Dustin L.; Clark, Nicolas W.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the validity and reliability of the BodyMetrix™ BX2000 A-mode ultrasound for estimating percent body fat (%BF) in athletes by comparing it to skinfolds and the BOD POD. Forty-five (22 males, 23 females) National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division-I athletes volunteered for this study. Subjects were measured once in the BOD POD then twice by two technicians for skinfolds and ultrasound. A one-way repeated-measures ANOVA revealed significant differences between body composition methods (F = 13.24, p < 0.01, η² = 0.24). This difference was further explained by a sex-specific effect such that the mean difference between ultrasound and BOD POD was large for females (~ 5% BF) but small for males (~ 1.5% BF). Linear regression using the %BF estimate from ultrasound to predict %BF from BOD POD resulted in an R2 = 0.849, SEE = 2.6% BF and a TE = 4.4% BF. The inter-rater intraclass correlation (ICC) for skinfold was 0.966 with a large 95% confidence interval (CI) of 0.328 to 0.991. The inter-rater ICC for ultrasound was 0.987 with a much smaller 95% CI of 0.976 to 0.993. Both skinfolds and ultrasound had test-retest ICCs ≥ 0.996. The BX2000 ultrasound device had excellent test-retest reliability, and its inter-rater reliability was superior to the skinfold method. The validity of this method is questionable, particularly for female athletes. However, due to its excellent reliability, coaches and trainers should consider this portable and easy to use A-mode ultrasound to assess body composition changes in athletes. PMID:27073854

  7. A-mode ultrasound-based registration in computer-aided surgery of the skull.

    PubMed

    Amstutz, Christoph; Caversaccio, Marco; Kowal, Jens; Bächler, Richard; Nolte, Lutz-Peter; Häusler, Rudolf; Styner, Martin

    2003-12-01

    To evaluate the integration and accuracy of A (amplitude)-mode ultrasound-based surface matching for noninvasive registration of the head into a frameless computer-aided surgery system for otorhinology and skull base surgery. Experimental study and case series. Academic medical center. Twelve patients underwent anterior and paranasal skull base surgery with the routine use of a computer-aided surgery system. A computer-aided surgery system, based on an optoelectronic localizer, was used to track the skull and the surgical tools, including the A-mode ultrasound probe. The A-mode probe was a 10-MHz immersion transducer. An acoustic lens attached to the transducer focused the ultrasonic beam to a depth of 1 to 10 mm. Accuracy tests were performed for the ultrasound setup. Different surface point distributions were evaluated with respect to matching accuracy on a human cadaver skull specimen equipped with fiducial markers. The matching comparison was based on the fiducial registration error. For the clinical evaluation, the laboratory setup was transferred to the operating room. Noninvasive registration of the skull by using A-mode ultrasound in computer-aided surgery (practical and clinical measurements). The accuracy tests on the human skull specimen revealed that the mean +/- SD fiducial registration error was 1.00 +/- 0.19 mm in the best series for A-mode ultrasound surface matchings and was robust with respect to different sets of surface points. The mean +/- SD root mean square error from the 12 A-mode ultrasound matchings in the patient study was 0.49 +/- 0.20 mm. A-mode ultrasound surface matching can be used as a noninvasive and accurate registration procedure in computer-aided surgery of the head.

  8. Ultrasound appearances of Implanon implanted contraceptive devices.

    PubMed

    McNeill, G; Ward, E; Halpenny, D; Snow, A; Torreggiani, W

    2009-01-01

    Subdermal contraceptive devices represent a popular choice of contraception. Whilst often removed without the use of imaging, circumstances exist where imaging is required. Ultrasound is the modality of choice. The optimal technique and typical sonographic appearances are detailed in this article.

  9. Acupoint stimulation device using focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Tsuruoka, N; Watanabe, M; Seki, T; Matsunaga, T; Hagaa, Y

    2010-01-01

    Acupuncture is used widely in oriental medicine. But it is difficult to stimulate continuously or intermittently in daily life with conventional acupuncture. An acupoint stimulation device using focused ultrasound has been developed. Because the device size is about 6 mm in diameter, it can be easily put on the skin during daily life. Appropriate stimulation intensity and pattern can be chosen by changing driving voltage and pattern. In this paper, we stimulated acupoints with this device and measured the blood flow volume of brachial artery. As a result, the blood flow volume increased significantly as well as acupuncture. Because the device stimulate acupoints with intactness of skin, advantages of this device is free from infection and fear and pain by insertion of acupuncture needles.

  10. Experimental validation of A-mode ultrasound acquisition system for computer assisted orthopaedic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lorenzo, Danilo; De Momi, Elena; Beretta, Elisa; Cerveri, Pietro; Perona, Franco; Ferrigno, Giancarlo

    2009-02-01

    Computer Assisted Orthopaedic Surgery (CAOS) systems improve the results and the standardization of surgical interventions. Anatomical landmarks and bone surface detection is straightforward to either register the surgical space with the pre-operative imaging space and to compute biomechanical parameters for prosthesis alignment. Surface points acquisition increases the intervention invasiveness and can be influenced by the soft tissue layer interposition (7-15mm localization errors). This study is aimed at evaluating the accuracy of a custom-made A-mode ultrasound (US) system for non invasive detection of anatomical landmarks and surfaces. A-mode solutions eliminate the necessity of US images segmentation, offers real-time signal processing and requires less invasive equipment. The system consists in a single transducer US probe optically tracked, a pulser/receiver and an FPGA-based board, which is responsible for logic control command generation and for real-time signal processing and three custom-made board (signal acquisition, blanking and synchronization). We propose a new calibration method of the US system. The experimental validation was then performed measuring the length of known-shape polymethylmethacrylate boxes filled with pure water and acquiring bone surface points on a bovine bone phantom covered with soft-tissue mimicking materials. Measurement errors were computed through MR and CT images acquisitions of the phantom. Points acquisition on bone surface with the US system demonstrated lower errors (1.2mm) than standard pointer acquisition (4.2mm).

  11. Large area MEMS based ultrasound device for cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wodnicki, Robert; Thomenius, Kai; Ming Hooi, Fong; Sinha, Sumedha P.; Carson, Paul L.; Lin, Der-Song; Zhuang, Xuefeng; Khuri-Yakub, Pierre; Woychik, Charles

    2011-08-01

    We present image results obtained using a prototype ultrasound array that demonstrates the fundamental architecture for a large area MEMS based ultrasound device for detection of breast cancer. The prototype array consists of a tiling of capacitive Micromachined Ultrasound Transducers (cMUTs) that have been flip-chip attached to a rigid organic substrate. The pitch on the cMUT elements is 185 μm and the operating frequency is nominally 9 MHz. The spatial resolution of the new probe is comparable to those of production PZT probes; however the sensitivity is reduced by conditions that should be correctable. Simulated opposed-view image registration and Speed of Sound volume reconstruction results for ultrasound in the mammographic geometry are also presented.

  12. Feasibility of A-mode ultrasound attenuation as a monitoring method of local hyperthermia treatment.

    PubMed

    Manaf, Noraida Abd; Aziz, Maizatul Nadwa Che; Ridzuan, Dzulfadhli Saffuan; Mohamad Salim, Maheza Irna; Wahab, Asnida Abd; Lai, Khin Wee; Hum, Yan Chai

    2016-06-01

    Recently, there is an increasing interest in the use of local hyperthermia treatment for a variety of clinical applications. The desired therapeutic outcome in local hyperthermia treatment is achieved by raising the local temperature to surpass the tissue coagulation threshold, resulting in tissue necrosis. In oncology, local hyperthermia is used as an effective way to destroy cancerous tissues and is said to have the potential to replace conventional treatment regime like surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy. However, the inability to closely monitor temperature elevations from hyperthermia treatment in real time with high accuracy continues to limit its clinical applicability. Local hyperthermia treatment requires real-time monitoring system to observe the progression of the destroyed tissue during and after the treatment. Ultrasound is one of the modalities that have great potential for local hyperthermia monitoring, as it is non-ionizing, convenient and has relatively simple signal processing requirement compared to magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography. In a two-dimensional ultrasound imaging system, changes in tissue microstructure during local hyperthermia treatment are observed in terms of pixel value analysis extracted from the ultrasound image itself. Although 2D ultrasound has shown to be the most widely used system for monitoring hyperthermia in ultrasound imaging family, 1D ultrasound on the other hand could offer a real-time monitoring and the method enables quantitative measurement to be conducted faster and with simpler measurement instrument. Therefore, this paper proposes a new local hyperthermia monitoring method that is based on one-dimensional ultrasound. Specifically, the study investigates the effect of ultrasound attenuation in normal and pathological breast tissue when the temperature in tissue is varied between 37 and 65 °C during local hyperthermia treatment. Besides that, the total protein content measurement was also

  13. Predicting back fat thickness in beef cattle using A-mode ultrasound

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Because fat thickness in feedlot cattle can be a predictor of carcass quality and yield grade, estimates of fat thickness during the later stages of the finishing period can be used to make marketing decisions. Ultrasound technology is a nondestructive and humane technique used to estimate fat thick...

  14. Implementation of an Economical Parking Helper Device Using Ultrasound Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamil, Tariq

    2010-06-01

    Every motorist dreams of a car that will take the stress out of parking by finding a suitable space and then maneuvers itself into the space with minimal assistance from the driver. This paper describes a parking helper device using ultrasound sensors, mounted on the car, to monitor both sides of the street for a suitable parking space, and when a large enough parking space is detected, the helper instructs the driver to stop the car and guides him/her via a display screen and voice about steering maneuvers which will ultimately result in the car being properly parked in the given parking space. Ultrasound sensors mounted on the front and rear bumpers of the car will ensure that a safe distance is maintained to other vehicles and objects and the driver will need to operate only the accelerator and the brake pedals. A warning signal sounds if the vehicle gets too close to other objects in the parking space.

  15. Ultrasound assessment of the Essure contraceptive devices: is three-dimensional ultrasound really needed?

    PubMed

    Paladini, Dario; Di Spiezio Sardo, Attilio; Coppola, Carmela; Zizolfi, Brunella; Pastore, Gaetano; Nappi, Carmine

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of 3-dimensional ultrasound (3DUS) for sonographic localization of Essure microinserts, comparing it with 2-dimensional ultrasound (2DUS) insofar as time to visualize the inserts and accuracy in determining their localization. Prospective study (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). University clinic. Twenty-seven consecutive women undergoing hysteroscopic Essure device placement. Essure microinserts were inserted in the outpatient hysteroscopy clinic following the manufacturer's recommendations, leaving from 3 to 8 loops of the inserts in the uterine cavity. In all patients, 2DUS and 3DUS were performed 3 months after the procedure. 2DUS was performed first; the device(s) were located, and their position was recorded. Then 3DUS scans were acquired, trying when possible to have both devices at least at a 45-degree angle with the insonation beam for optimal rendering on 3DUS. The OmniView method with volume contrast imaging was used to show the relationships of the microinserts within the uterine cavity when possible. To define the position of the Essure device in relation to the uterus and the salpinges, we used the classification developed by Legendre and colleagues. After sonographic evaluation all women underwent hysterosalpingography to assess the success of sterilization. Hysteroscopic insertion was successful in all patients, with 2 Essure devices placed in 25 patients and 1 device in 2 patients (due to previous salpingectomy performed because of ectopic pregnancy), for a total of 52 devices. One spontaneous late (within 3 months) expulsion of the device occurred; the device had migrated almost completely into the uterine cavity. At 3-month follow-up, all 51 correctly placed devices were easily observed at 2DUS (mean [SD] duration of the procedure, 2.25 [0.8] minutes). At 3DUS in 51 cases, the device was in perfect position (1+2+3) in 21 (41.2%), in position 2+3 in 14 (27.4%), and in position +3 in 16 (31.4%). Both microinserts

  16. Minimally-invasive Ultrasound Devices for Treating Low Back Pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nau, William; Diederich, C.; Shu, R.; Kinsey, A.; Lotz, J.; Ferrier, W.; Sutton, J.; Pellegrino, R.

    2006-05-01

    demonstrated with both applicator design configurations. Results from these studies demonstrated the capability to control temperature distributions within targeted regions of the disc using interstitial ultrasound with greater thermal penetration than can be achieved with the RF heating devices currently in clinical use. Thus interstitial ultrasound offers a potential alternative heating modality for the clinical management of low back pain.

  17. Interstitial fluid shifts in simulated long-haul flights monitored by a miniature ultrasound device.

    PubMed

    Iblher, Peter; Paarmann, Hauke; Stuckert, Kristina; Werner, Andreas; Klotz, Friedrich K; Eichler, Wolfgang

    2013-05-01

    Long-haul flights (LHF) are known to be connected with an increased risk of deep vein thrombosis. There is still some lack of clarity about the impact of hypoxia and lower levels of air pressure and humidity on passengers during flight. This cross-over study researched interstitial fluid shifts traced by measurements of tissue thickness (TT) under controlled simulated conditions of a LHF. There were 18 male volunteers (28.4 +/- 8.1 yr) who were subjected to both procedure 1 (altitude: 2500 m/humidity: 15%)and procedure 2 (altitude: 0 m/humidity: 50%), each lasting 8 h. Measurements forTT at tibia (TT-t) and forehead sites (TT-f) were made using a miniature A-mode ultrasonic device. Fluid intake, bodyweight, heart rate, oxygen saturation, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were recorded over time. Blood samples were collected before (t0) and after 8 h (t8) to analyze plasma viscosity (PV). We found an increased TT-t over time at an altitude of 0 m (t0: 4.8 +/- 1.2; t8: 5.2 +/- 1.3) and 2500 m (t0: 4.7 +/- 1.2; t8: 5.3 +/- 1.2), respectively, without differences between study groups. TT-f increased significantly over time at 2500 m (t0: 4.6 +/- 0.8; t8: 4.9 +/- 0.8) with significantly higher TT compared to 0 m at t8 (4.5 +/- 0.7). No further significant differences were found. This study suggests that the controlled variable "sitting position" seems to have the strongest influence on leg edema formation during LHF. PV appears not to be affected as long as passengers receive adequate fluid intake. Further studies should be conducted to investigate different methods of preventing venous congestion. These pre-emptive efforts could be tested easily using a miniature handheld ultrasound device.

  18. Transthoracic needle biopsy of thoracic tumours by a colour Doppler ultrasound puncture guiding device.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, H. C.; Yu, C. J.; Chang, D. B.; Yuan, A.; Lee, Y. C.; Yang, P. C.; Kuo, S. H.; Luh, K. T.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Ultrasound guided transthoracic needle aspiration biopsy has recently been used to obtain specimens for histological diagnosis of pulmonary and mediastinal tumours. Conventional real time, grey scale puncture guiding devices cannot differentiate vascular structures, and clear visualisation of the needle shaft or tip within a desired target is not always possible. This study describes a new built-in colour Doppler ultrasound puncture guiding device and assesses the relative safety of transthoracic needle aspiration biopsy of thoracic tumours by grey scale or colour Doppler ultrasound guidance. METHODS--Thirty patients with radiographic evidence of pulmonary (22 patients) or mediastinal tumours (eight patients) underwent ultrasonographic evaluation and transthoracic needle aspiration biopsy by using the colour Doppler ultrasound puncture guiding device (Aloka UST 5045P-3.5). These tumours were initially examined by grey scale ultrasound, and colour Doppler imaging was then used to evaluate the number of blood vessels surrounding and within the target tumour and the possibility of visualisation of the needle shaft or needle tip during the aspiration biopsy procedure. RESULTS--The colour Doppler ultrasound guiding device was far superior to the grey scale device for identification of the number of vessels surrounding or within the target tumour (83% v 20%) and for visualisation of the needle shaft or needle tip (80% v 17%). CONCLUSIONS--By using the colour Doppler ultrasound puncture device, vascular structures surrounding or within the target tumour can be verified. Visualisation of the needle shaft or tip is also better. Biopsy routes can be selected to avoid puncturing vessels. This approach should be particularly helpful for guiding biopsies of mediastinal tumours, where puncturing the heart or great vessels is a potential complication. Images PMID:8553297

  19. Safe and cost-effective ultrasound guided removal of retained intrauterine device: our experience.

    PubMed

    Verma, Usha; Astudillo-Dávalos, Fausto E; Gerkowicz, Sabrina A

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and difference in cost of ultrasound guided removal of retained intrauterine device (IUD). A total of 23 women underwent ultrasound-guided retrieval of retained IUDs between January 2013 and March 2014. Transvaginal ultrasound was performed in all cases to assess the localization of the IUD. Under transabdominal ultrasound guidance, either the crochet type IUD hook (Gyneas, Goussainville, France) or Alligator forceps were used to grasp the IUD and remove it from the uterine cavity. The costs of the ultrasound guided procedure and the hysteroscopic removal of the IUD were compared. Twenty-three patients who failed IUD removal in the clinic were referred to our department for ultrasound-guided removal. All patients had an IUD present in the uterine cavity. Eleven patients had Paragard IUDs (48%), eight had Mirena IUDs (35%), three had Lippes loop (13%), and one had a ring IUD (4%). The patients' ages ranged from 20-56 years. The IUDs were in place for 8 months to 23 years. Of the 23 patients with retained IUDs, 19 were successfully removed (83%), and 4 underwent hysteroscopic removal of IUD. The IUD removal cost in the operating room on average was $3562 US dollars and the cost of ultrasound-guided removal was $465 US dollars. Retained intrauterine devices with or without strings can often be safely removed in an office-based setting under ultrasound guidance at less cost than in the operating room, even in cases with embedded IUDs. Our experience leads us to propose in-office IUD removal under ultrasound guidance as the first line in management of retained IUDs after failed removal by conventional practices. Ultrasound provides numerous advantages including direct visualization in a less invasive manner than hysteroscopy. Three-dimensional imaging can also be used for enhanced perspective. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Ultrasound is a type of imaging. It uses high-frequency sound waves to look at organs and ... liver, and other organs. During pregnancy, doctors use ultrasound to view the fetus. Unlike x-rays, ultrasound ...

  1. 76 FR 43119 - Medical Devices; General and Plastic Surgery Devices; Classification of the Focused Ultrasound...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ... classifying the Ulthera\\TM\\ Focused Ultrasound Stimulator System for Aesthetic Use into class III, because it... reclassified into class I or class II. On April 11, 2008, Ulthera, Inc. submitted a petition requesting classification of the Ulthera\\TM\\ Focused Ultrasound Stimulator System for Aesthetic Use under section 513(f)(2...

  2. Fast Track ultrasound protocol to detect acute complications after totally implantable venous access device placement.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chun-Yu; Lin, Feng-Sheng; Wang, Yi-Chia; Chou, Wei-Han; Lin, Wen-Ying; Sun, Wei-Zen; Lin, Chih-Peng

    2015-01-01

    The role of ultrasound examination in detection of postprocedure complications from totally implantable venous access devices (TIVAD) placement is still uncertain. In a cohort of 665 cancer outpatients, we assessed a quick ultrasound examination protocol in early detection of mechanical complications of catheterization. Immediately after TIVAD placement, an ultrasound examination and chest radiography were performed to detect hemothorax, pneumothorax, and catheter malposition. The two methods were compared. Of the 668 catheters inserted, 628 were placed into axillary veins and 40 into internal jugular veins. The ultrasound examination took 2.5 ± 1.1 min. No hemothorax was detected, and neither pneumothorax nor catheter malposition was evident among the 40 internal jugular vein cannulations. Ultrasound and chest radiography examinations of the 628 axillary vein cannulations detected five and four instances of pneumothorax, respectively. Ultrasound detected all six catheter malpositions into the internal jugular vein. However, ultrasound failed to detect two out of three malpositions in the contralateral brachiocephalic vein and one kinking inside the superior vena cava. Without revision surgery, the operating time was 34.1 ± 15.6 min. With revision surgery, the operating time was shorter when ultrasound detected catheter malposition than when chest radiography was used (96.8 ± 12.9 vs. 188.8 ± 10.3 min, p < 0.001). Postprocedure ultrasound examination is a quick and sensitive method to detect TIVAD-related pneumothorax. It also precisely detects catheter malposition to internal jugular vein thus reduces time needed for revision surgery while chest radiography remains necessary to confirm catheter final position.

  3. Ultrasound radiation from a three-layer thermoacoustic transformation device.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Takuya; Teshima, Yu; Mano, Takashi; Sakai, Ken; Asada, Takaaki; Matsukawa, Mami; Ohta, Tetsuo; Hiryu, Shizuko

    2015-03-01

    A thermophone is a thermoacoustic transducer, which generates sound via time-varying Joule heating of an electrically conductive layer, which leads to expansion and contraction of a small pocket of air near the surface of the film. In this work, a 10-μm-thick Ag-Pd conductive film was coupled with heat-insulating and heat-releasing layers to fabricate a three-layer thermophone for generating ultrasound. The heat-insulating layer was 47 μm thick, and was made of glass. The heat-releasing layer was 594 μm thick, and was made of 94% alumina. Because of the simple sound-generation mechanism, which does not require mechanical moving parts, the Ag-Pd conductive film on the glass substrate can produce ultrasound radiation with broadband frequency characteristics, where exiting commercial electrode materials were used. We also demonstrate that the measured directivity patterns are in good agreement with theoretical predictions, assuming a rectangular diaphragm with the same size as the metallic film. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Integrated Interventional Devices For Real Time 3D Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Stephen W.; Lee, Warren; Gentry, Kenneth L.; Pua, Eric C.; Light, Edward D.

    2006-05-01

    Two recent advances have expanded the potential of medical ultrasound: the introduction of real-time 3-D ultrasound imaging with catheter, transesophageal and laparoscopic probes and the development of interventional ultrasound therapeutic systems for focused ultrasound surgery, ablation and ultrasound enhanced drug delivery. This work describes devices combining both technologies. A series of transducer probes have been designed, fabricated and tested including: 1) a 12 French side scanning catheter incorporating a 64 element matrix array for imaging at 5MHz and a piston ablation transducer operating at 10 MHz. 2) a 14 Fr forward-scanning catheter integrating a 112 element 2-D array for imaging at 5 MHz encircled by an ablation annulus operating at 10 MHz. Finite element modeling was then used to simulate catheter annular and linear phased array transducers for ablation. 3) Linear phased array transducers were built to confirm the finite element analysis at 4 and 8 MHz including a mechanically focused 86 element 9 MHz array which transmits an ISPTA of 29.3 W/cm2 and creates a lesion in 2 minutes. 4) 2-D arrays of 504 channels operating at 5 MHz have been developed for transesophageal and laparascopic 3D imaging as well as therapeutic heating. All the devices image the heart anatomy including atria, valves, septa and en face views of the pulmonary veins.

  5. Monitoring of Diaphragm Position in Pulsatile Pnumatic Ventricular Assisted Device by Ultrasound Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamimura, Tadayuki; Homma, Akihiko; Tsukiya, Tomonori; Kakuta, Yukihide; Lee, Hwansung; Tatsumi, Eisuke; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki; Kitamura, Soichiro

    A new method using ultrasound sensors to detect the diaphragm position of a ventricular assist device (VAD) was proposed. Two small ultrasound sensors of 2.4mm diameter were attached to the outside surface of blood chamber of a pneumatic VAD. The receiving crystal received the ultrasound from the transmitting crystal reflected by the diaphragm. The diaphragm position was calculated by using geometric relation among two sensors and ultrasound propagation time. Validity of this method was evaluated in a mock circulation test under various driving conditions of VAD by comparing the ultrasound signals with driving pressure waveforms. The ultrasound signals could detect full-fill (FF) and full-eject (FE) status shortly before the spikes appeared on pressure waves, which are currently available to detect FE and FF but accompanies excessive extension of the diaphragm. This method would be helpful to avoid overloading of diaphragm. Linear correlation was observed between the output from VAD and blood volume calculated from the change of diaphragm position multiplied by the heart rate. This monitoring method of diaphragm of a VAD was proven to have advantages over the current method toward better control of a pneumatic VAD.

  6. Multimodality imaging of intrauterine devices with an emphasis on the emerging role of 3-dimensional ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Jeffrey S; Brindle, Kathleen A; Khati, Nadia Juliet

    2012-12-01

    The intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD) is one of the most widely used reversible contraception methods throughout the world. With advancing technology, it has rapidly gained acceptance through its increased effectiveness and practicality compared with more invasive means such as laparoscopic tubal ligation. This pictorial essay will present the IUDs most commonly used today. It will illustrate both normal and abnormal positions of IUDs across all cross-sectional imaging modalities including 2-dimensional ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging, with a focus on the emerging role of 3-dimensional ultrasound as the modality of choice.

  7. The FDA Perspective on Pre-Clinical Testing for High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Gerald R.

    2006-05-01

    In the U. S., the pre-market review of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) devices is carried out under the authority of the 1976 Medical Device Amendments to the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. Different regulatory mechanisms may apply depending on the complexity of the HIFU device and the indications for use, but in all cases pre-clinical testing is required. This testing typically includes ultrasound field characterization, thermal modeling and measurement, and may include demonstrating the accuracy of targeting and monitoring, if applicable. Because there are no guidance documents or standards for these tests at present, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) welcomes working with interested parties to develop acceptable procedures that can be incorporated into the regulatory review process.

  8. Reproducibility and Validity of A-Mode Ultrasound for Body Composition Measurement and Classification in Overweight and Obese Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Smith-Ryan, Abbie E.; Fultz, Sarah N.; Melvin, Malia N.; Wingfield, Hailee L.; Woessner, Mary N.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying portable methods to measure body composition may be more advantageous than using body mass index (BMI) to categorize associated health consequences. Purpose: To compare the validity and reliability of a portable A-mode ultrasound (US) to a criterion three compartment model (3C) for the measurement of body composition. Methods: Forty-seven overweight and obese subjects participated in this study. Body composition was measured once via air displacement plethysmography for body density (Bd) and bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy for total body water (TBW) for the 3C calculations. Ultrasound measurements (BodyMetrix, Intelametrix) were made using an A mode, 2.5- MHz transmitter. All measurements were made on the right side of the body at 7 skinfold sites. The US software calculated percent body fat (%BF), fat mass (FM) and fat free mass (FFM) from the 7-site Jackson and Pollock equation. Results: %BF and FM, respectively, measured by the US (29.1±6.5%; 27.4±8.1 kg) was significantly lower compared to the 3C model (33.7±7.6%; 31.8±9.8 kg; p<0.0005). Fat free mass was significantly higher for the US (66.7±13.0 kg) compared to the 3C model (62.3±12.6; p = 0.001). The US demonstrated respectable reliability for %BF, FM, and FFM with intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) ranging from 0.84–0.98 and standard error of the measurement (SEM) values and 2.2%BF, 1.9 kg, 1.9 kg, respectively. Discussion: The US was found to under predict %BF and FM with large deviations from the criterion (n = 10>4%BF error). While the US was not valid in this population, it was reliable producing results with minimal error, suggesting this technique may be effective for tracking changes in a weight loss or clinical setting. PMID:24618841

  9. A review of Doppler ultrasound quality assurance protocols and test devices.

    PubMed

    Browne, Jacinta E

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, an overview of Doppler ultrasound quality assurance (QA) testing will be presented in three sections. The first section will review the different Doppler ultrasound parameters recommended by professional bodies for use in QA protocols. The second section will include an evaluation and critique of the main test devices used to assess Doppler performance, while the final section of this paper will discuss which of the wide range of test devices have been found to be most suitable for inclusion in Doppler QA programmes. Pulsed Wave Spectral Doppler, Colour Doppler Imaging QA test protocols have been recommended over the years by various professional bodies, including the UK's Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM), the American Institute for Ultrasound in Medicine (AIUM), and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). However, despite the existence of such recommended test protocols, very few commercial or research test devices exist which can measure the full range of both PW Doppler ultrasound and colour Doppler imaging performance parameters, particularly quality control measurements such as: (i) Doppler sensitivity (ii) colour Doppler spatial resolution (iii) colour Doppler temporal resolution (iv) colour Doppler velocity resolution (v) clutter filter performance and (vi) tissue movement artefact suppression. In this review, the merits of the various commercial and research test devices will be considered and a summary of results obtained from published studies which have made use of some of these Doppler test devices, such as the flow, string, rotating and belt phantom, will be presented. Copyright © 2014 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Ultrasound-guided retrieval of lost intrauterine devices using very fine grasping forceps: a case series.

    PubMed

    Moro, Francesca; Knez, Jure; Pateman, Katie; Derdelis, Grigorios; Foo, Xulin; Jurkovic, Davor

    2015-07-01

    To assess the efficacy of a novel ultrasound-guided procedure for the retrieval of intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUDs) when the threads are not visible at the external cervical os ('lost threads'). This was a prospective cohort study of consecutive women referred for ultrasound examination because of lost IUD threads. The procedures were performed under local anaesthesia in the outpatient setting. After injection of local anaesthetic, the anterior cervical lip was grasped with a vulsellum forceps. A 5Fr hysteroscopy grasping forceps was introduced transcervically into the uterine cavity under continuous transabdominal ultrasound guidance. The IUD was then grasped and removed from the uterus. Patients' demographic data, gynaecological history, ultrasound findings, duration of procedure, success rate and pain score were recorded. Twenty-three consecutive women were included in the study. Ultrasound examination showed an IUD correctly sited in the centre of the uterine cavity in 20/23 (87%), in 2/23 (9%) it was partially embedded in the myometrium and in 1/23 (4%) the IUD was partially sited in the cervical canal. In 8/23 (35%) women the IUD threads were not visible on ultrasound scan. Removal of the IUD was successful in 22/23 (96%) cases with a median operating time of 3 (interquartile range 1.25-4.75) minutes. 15/23 (65%) women experienced no or minimal pain (pain score ≤3), 4/23 (17%) reported moderate pain (pain score 4-6) and 4/23 (17%) described the pain as severe (pain score 7-10). No complications were recorded during or immediately after the procedure. Ultrasound-guided retrieval of lost IUDs using fine hysteroscopy grasping forceps is a highly successful technique and is well tolerated by women. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. Military family physicians' perceptions of a pocket point-of-care ultrasound device in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Bornemann, Paul; Bornemann, Gina

    2014-12-01

    Point-of-care ultrasonography with a pocket ultrasound device, General Electric Medical Systems Vscan (Milwaukee, Wisconsin), has been shown to be effective and easy to learn. However, no studies to date have evaluated its use in the military primary care setting where its portability and value in bedside diagnosis would be especially beneficial. We tested the feasibility of the Vscan in the day-to-day care of patients by family physicians in their clinic, inpatient wards, and its potential for use in the military-deployed setting. Participants were trained and credentialed in the use of the point-of-care ultrasonography. Then, participants were provided with a pocket ultrasound device to use in their normal day-to-day practice. Additionally, participants completed surveys and provided ratings on their perceptions regarding the use of the device. According to the survey analysis, participants found the devices to be easy to use, valuable in discerning a diagnosis, and were not prohibitively time consuming. Moreover, patients were perceived by the participants to have been satisfied with the use of the device. Overall, participants had high satisfaction with the Vscan and perceived that the device would be highly valuable in the military-deployed setting. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  12. Engineering considerations for integrating laser angioplasty with ultrasound diagnostics in a single device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passafaro, James D.; Zalesky, Paul J.

    1990-07-01

    The application of direct laser energy for the ablation of atherosclerotic plaque has been investigated extensively. It has been recognized that the need for an onboard guidance capability which can direct the laser energy is essential for controlled plaque removal. Intravascular ultrasound represents one approach for identifying diseased tissue and directing laser therapy. The design of a catheter with combined laser and ultrasound capabilities is discussed. The design considers the optical and acoustical requirements. In addition, vascular anatomical constraints and their impact on the mechanical aspects of the device configuration are considered. The optical considerations dictate safe and predictable high energy laser transmission. The acoustic requirements consider material properties and ultrasonic beam resolution. The vascular anatomy imposes constraints on maximum catheter size and it requires a means for conventional delivery of the device to the targeted lesion.

  13. 2D array transducers for real-time 3D ultrasound guidance of interventional devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Light, Edward D.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2009-02-01

    We describe catheter ring arrays for real-time 3D ultrasound guidance of devices such as vascular grafts, heart valves and vena cava filters. We have constructed several prototypes operating at 5 MHz and consisting of 54 elements using the W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc. micro-miniature ribbon cables. We have recently constructed a new transducer using a braided wiring technology from Precision Interconnect. This transducer consists of 54 elements at 4.8 MHz with pitch of 0.20 mm and typical -6 dB bandwidth of 22%. In all cases, the transducer and wiring assembly were integrated with an 11 French catheter of a Cook Medical deployment device for vena cava filters. Preliminary in vivo and in vitro testing is ongoing including simultaneous 3D ultrasound and x-ray fluoroscopy.

  14. Catheter-based ultrasound devices and MR thermal monitoring for conformal prostate thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Diederich, Chris J; Nau, Will H; Kinsey, Adam; Ross, Tony; Wootton, Jeff; Juang, Titania; Butts-Pauly, Kim; Rieke, Viola; Chen, Jing; Bouley, Donna M; Sommer, Graham

    2008-01-01

    Catheter-based ultrasound applicators have been developed for delivering hyperthermia or high-temperature thermal ablation of cancer and benign disease of the prostate. These devices allow for control of heating along the length and angular expanse during therapy delivery. Four types of transurethral applicators were devised for thermal treatment of prostate combined with MR thermal monitoring: sectored tubular transducer devices with directional heating patterns and rotation; planar and curvilinear devices with narrow heating patterns and rotation; and multi-sectored tubular devices capable of dynamic angular control without applicator movement. Interstitial devices (2.4 mm OD) have been developed for percutaneous implantation with directional or dynamic angular control. In vivo experiments in canine prostate under MR temperature imaging were used to evaluate these devices and develop treatment delivery strategies. MR thermal imaging was used to monitor temperature and thermal dose in multiple slices through the target volume. Multi-sectored transurethral applicators can dynamically control the angular heating profile and target large regions of the gland in short treatment times without applicator manipulation. The sectored tubular, planar, and curvilinear transurethral devices produce directional coagulation zones, extending 15-20 mm radial distance to the outer prostate capsule. Sequential rotation under motor control and modulated dwell time can be used to tightly conform thermal ablation to selected regions. Interstitial implants with directional devices can be used to effectively ablate targeted regions of the gland while protecting the rectum. The MR derived 52 degrees C and lethal thermal dose contours (t43=240 min) effectively defined the extent of thermal damage and provided a means for real-time control of the applicators. Catheter-based ultrasound devices, combined with MR thermal monitoring, can produce relatively fast (5-40 min) and precise thermal

  15. Therapeutic ultrasound for glaucoma: clinical use of a low-frequency low-power ultrasound device for lowering intraocular pressure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This is a first-in-human study to determine the efficacy and tolerability of a new method of treating glaucoma using a low-power, low-frequency, focused therapeutic ultrasound for glaucoma (TUG) device designed to trigger an inflammatory reaction in the anterior chamber angle and trabecular meshwork to enhance outflow. The use of the device is anticipated for mild or moderate open-angle glaucoma as an enhancement to outflow. Methods In a two-branch clinical trial, a total of 26 primary open-angle glaucoma patients underwent a procedure consisting of the external application of the TUG device. In branch 1, nine of these patients were naïve to pharmaceutical treatment or had been off of medication for over 6 months. In branch 2, 17 patients were treated after a medication washout period. All patients in the study were followed for 12 months. Results In branch 1, there was a decrease in intraocular pressure averaging over 20% lasting at least a year in 74% of the eyes with non-normotensive open-angle glaucoma. In branch 2, an average of two visits while on medication provided the comparison intraocular pressure (IOP) to the effect of the TUG treatment after washout. It was seen that the intraocular pressure over the year post-treatment was equal to or better than the pharmaceutical control in close to 80% of measurements. Conclusion A novel device for lowering intraocular pressure is described with a potential for adding to our armamentarium for treating glaucoma. This is a small cohort study which indicates beneficial trends. Trial registration number The study was a registered clinical trial, #ISRCTN50904302. PMID:25512870

  16. The Feasibility of Thermal Imaging as a Future Portal Imaging Device for Therapeutic Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Miloro, Piero; Civale, John; Rivens, Ian; Shaw, Adam

    2016-08-01

    This technical note describes a prototype thermally based portal imaging device that allows mapping of energy deposition on the surface of a tissue mimicking material in a focused ultrasound surgery (FUS) beam by using an infrared camera to measure the temperature change on that surface. The aim of the work is to explore the feasibility of designing and building a system suitable for rapid quality assurance (QA) for use with both ultrasound- and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-guided clinical therapy ultrasound systems. The prototype was tested using an MR-guided Sonalleve FUS system (with the treatment couch outside the magnet bore). The system's effective thermal noise was 0.02°C, and temperature changes as low as 0.1°C were easily quantifiable. The advantages and drawbacks of thermal imaging for QA are presented through analysis of the results of an experimental session. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ultrasound-guided breast biopsy using a 10-gauge self-contained vacuum-assisted device.

    PubMed

    Vag, Tibor; Pfleiderer, Stefan O R; Böttcher, Joachim; Wurdinger, Susanne; Gajda, Mieczyslaw; Camara, Oumar; Kaiser, Werner A

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of a self-contained battery-driven vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (VABB) system for the sampling of breast masses under ultrasound guidance. Sixty-five patients with 70 lesions underwent percutaneous 10-gauge ultrasound-guided VABB using the coaxial technique. In 38 lesions, subsequent surgery and comparison of histology was performed. The remaining 32 cases were followed-up and defined as true negative after a cancer-free interval of 24 months. VABB revealed malignant histology in 28 (40%) cases. Twenty-four malignancies were confirmed after surgery. Four invasive cancers verified in VABB were not found during surgery because they were completely removed, as proved by a disease-free interval of 24 months. One cancer missed in ultrasound-guided VABB due to its small size was successfully diagnosed with stereotactic VABB and thus turned out to be false negative, resulting in an overall sensitivity of 96.6%. Forty-one patients were free of cancer during the follow-up period of at least 24 months. In conclusion, the self-contained VABB device is well suited for ultrasound-guided breast biopsies.

  18. Evaluation of a simplified augmented reality device for ultrasound-guided vascular access in a vascular phantom.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yunseok; Choi, Seungpyo; Kim, Heechan

    2014-09-01

    To investigate whether a novel ultrasound device may be used with a simplified augmented reality technique, and to compare this device with conventional techniques during vascular access using a vascular phantom. Prospective, randomized study. Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine departments of a university-affiliated hospital. 20 physicians with no experience with ultrasound-guided techniques. All participants performed the vascular access technique on the vascular phantom model using both a conventional device and the new ultrasound device. Time and the number of redirections of the needle until aspiration of dye into a vessel of the vascular phantom were measured. The median/interquartile range of time was 39.5/41.7 seconds versus 18.6/10.0 seconds (P < 0.001) and number of redirections was 3/3.5 versus 1/0 (P < 0.001) for the conventional and novel ultrasound devices, respectively. During vascular access in a vascular phantom model, the novel device decreased the time and the number of redirections significantly. The device successfully improved the efficiency of the ultrasound-guided vascular access technique. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Practical application to composite materials of a portable digital ultrasound device controlled by a microprocessor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castel, J. G.; Husarek, V.

    1987-06-01

    The usefulness of a portable microprocessor-controlled ultrasound device for the periodic assessment of aircraft parts made of composite materials is shown. The performance of the device is demonstrated with the examples of a metallic honeycomb with a carbon-fiber skin, a phenolic honeycomb with a carbon skin, and a phenolic honeycomb with a Kevlar skin. Also considered are assessments of homogeneous carbon-fiber parts, including the study of artificial defects consisting of 1-2 mm diameter holes, and the assessment of the behavior of a carbon-titanium interface with separated zones. Advantages of the device include ease of adjustment, automated evaluation of the depth of defects, and the nearly-absolute reproducibility of adjustments.

  20. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... baby's development in the uterus. Ultrasound uses inaudible sound waves to produce a two-dimensional image of the baby while inside the mother's uterus. The sound waves bounce off solid structures in the body ...

  1. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... called multiples) To screen for birth defects, like spina bifida or heart defects . Screening means seeing if your ... example, if the ultrasound shows your baby has spina bifida, she may be treated in the womb before ...

  2. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... a pregnant woman and assess her fetus Diagnose gallbladder disease Evaluate flow in blood vessels Guide a ... For some ultrasound exams, such as of the gallbladder, your doctor may ask that you not eat ...

  3. A Family of Intracardiac Ultrasound Imaging Devices Designed for Guidance of Electrophysiology Ablation Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Sahn, David J.; Stephens, Douglas N.; Cannata, Jonathan M.; Shung, K. Kirk; Oralkan, Ömer; Nikoozadeh, Amin; (Pierre) Khuri-Yakub, B. T.; Nguyen, Hien; Chen, Peter; Dentinger, Aaron M.; Wildes, Douglas; Thomenius, Kai E.; Mahajan, Aman; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; O’Donnell, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Our Bioengineering Research Partnership grant, “High Frequency Ultrasound Arrays for Cardiac Imaging”, including the individuals cited at the end of this paper - Douglas N. Stephens (UC Davis), Matthew O’Donnell (UW Seattle), Kai Thomenius (GE Global Research), Aaron M. Dentinger (GE Global Research), Douglas Wildes (GE Global Research), Peter Chen (St. Jude Medical), K. Kirk Shung (University of Southern California), Jonathan M. Cannata (University of Southern California), Butrus (Pierre) T. Khuri-Yakub (Stanford University), Omer Oralkan (Stanford University), Aman Mahajan (UCLA School of Medicine), Kalyanam Shivkumar (UCLA School of Medicine) and David J. Sahn (Oregon Health & Science University) – is in its sixth year of NIH funding, having proposed to develop a family of high frequency miniaturized forward and side-looking ultrasound imaging devices equipped with electrophysiology mapping and localization sensors and eventually to include a family of capactive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (cMUT) devices – a forward-looking cMUT MicroLinear array and a ring array capable of 3-dimensional imaging and a 5Fr lumen large enough to admit an electrode and ablation devices. PMID:19963529

  4. Development of a confocal ultrasound device using an inertial cavitation control for transfection in-vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mestas, J. L.; Chettab, K.; Roux, S.; Prieur, F.; Lafond, M.; Dumontet, C.; Lafon, C.

    2015-12-01

    Sonoporation using low-frequency high-pressure ultrasound (US) is a non-viral approach for in vitro and in vivo gene delivery. We developed a new sonoporation device designed for spatial and temporal control of ultrasound cavitation. This device was evaluated for the in vitro transfection efficiency of a plasmid coding for Green Fluorescent Protein (peGFP- C1) in adherent and non-adherent cell lines. The frequency spectrum of the signal receive by a hydrophone is used to compute a cavitation index (CI) representative of the inertial cavitation activity. The influence of the CI on transfection efficiency, as well as reproducibility were determined. A real-time feedback loop control on CI was integrated in the process to regulate the cavitation level during sonoporation. In both adherent and non-adherent cell lines, the sonoporation device produced a highly efficient transfection of peGFP-C1 (40-80%), as determined by flow cytometry analysis of GFP expression, along with a low rate of mortality assessed by propidium iodide staining. Moreover, the sonoporation of non-adherent cell lines Jurkat and K562 was found to be equivalent to nucleofection in terms of efficiency and toxicity while these two cell lines were resistant to transfection with lipofection.

  5. A 10.5 cm ultrasound link for deep implanted medical devices.

    PubMed

    Mazzilli, Francesco; Lafon, Cyril; Dehollain, Catherine

    2014-10-01

    A study on ultrasound link for wireless energy transmission dedicated to deeply implanted medical devices is presented. The selection of the frequency to avoid biological side effects (e.g., cavitations), the choice of the power amplifier to drive the external transducers and the design of the rectifier to maximize the energy extraction from the implanted transducer are described in details. The link efficiency is characterized in water using a phantom material for a transmitter-receiver distance of 105 mm, transducers active area of 30 mm × 96 mm and 5 mm × 10 mm, respectively, and a system efficiency of 1.6% is measured.

  6. Single mode excitation of microtubules using a double slit ultrasound device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samarbakhsh, Abdorreza; Tuszynski, Jack

    2010-03-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are a major part of the cytoskeleton of all eukaryotic cells. They directly contribute to the process of cell division by forming mitotic spindles and providing force for the segregation of chromosomes. In this work we present analytical solutions to the problem of the vibrational dynamics of a MT that is attached at its two ends (of relevance mitosis) inside a viscous solution, driven by an ultrasound plane wave. We have shown that the ultrasound plane waves excite all modes of microtubule vibration at the same time which prevents the generation of resonance with a large enough amplitude. Specifically, when the MT is excited with a plane wave, the amplitude of each mode is inversely proportional to its mode number. Having a large enough amplitude for the vibrational effect is crucial in order to maximize the bending moment of a MT. Also achieving resonance is important in order to establish frequency control on the system. In order to overcome this difficulty, we propose to excite just a single mode of the MT using an ultrasound generation device using a double slit design that allows for both the frequency control and optimized energy transfer to the MT.

  7. The use of portable ultrasound devices in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Becker, Dawn M; Tafoya, Chelsea A; Becker, Sören L; Kruger, Grant H; Tafoya, Matthew J; Becker, Torben K

    2016-03-01

    To review the scientific literature pertaining to the use of hand-carried and hand-held ultrasound devices in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC), with a focus on clinical applications, geographical areas of use, the impact on patient management and technical features of the devices used. The electronic databases PubMed and Google Scholar were searched. No language or date restrictions were applied. Case reports and original research describing the use of hand-carried ultrasound devices in LMIC were included if agreed upon as relevant by two-reviewer consensus based on our predefined research questions. A total of 644 articles were found and screened, and 36 manuscripts were included for final review. Twenty-seven studies were original research articles, and nine were case reports. Several reports describe the successful diagnosis and management of difficult, often life-threatening conditions, using hand-carried and hand-held ultrasound. These portable ultrasound devices have also been studied for cardiac screening exams, as well as a rapid triage tool in rural areas and after natural disaster. Most applications focus on obstetrical and abdominal complaints. Portable ultrasound may have an impact on clinical management in up to 70% of all cases. However, no randomised controlled trials have evaluated the impact of ultrasound-guided diagnosis and treatment in resource-constrained settings. The exclusion of articles published in journals not listed in the large databases may have biased our results. Our findings are limited by the lack of higher quality evidence (e.g. controlled trials). Hand-carried and hand-held ultrasound is successfully being used to triage, diagnose and treat patients with a variety of complaints in LMIC. However, the quality of the current evidence is low. There is an urgent need to perform larger clinical trials assessing the impact of hand-carried ultrasound in LMIC. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Measurement of the Doppler power of flowing blood using ultrasound Doppler devices.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Chung; Chou, Hung-Lung; Chen, Pay-Yu

    2015-02-01

    Measurement of the Doppler power of signals backscattered from flowing blood (henceforth referred to as the Doppler power of flowing blood) and the echogenicity of flowing blood have been used widely to assess the degree of red blood cell (RBC) aggregation for more than 20 y. Many studies have used Doppler flowmeters based on an analogue circuit design to obtain the Doppler shifts in the signals backscattered from flowing blood; however, some recent studies have mentioned that the analogue Doppler flowmeter exhibits a frequency-response problem whereby the backscattered energy is lost at higher Doppler shift frequencies. Therefore, the measured Doppler power of flowing blood and evaluations of RBC aggregation obtained using an analogue Doppler device may be inaccurate. To overcome this problem, the present study implemented a field-programmable gate array-based digital pulsed-wave Doppler flowmeter to measure the Doppler power of flowing blood, in the aim of providing more accurate assessments of RBC aggregation. A clinical duplex ultrasound imaging system that can acquire pulsed-wave Doppler spectrograms is now available, but its usefulness for estimating the ultrasound scattering properties of blood is still in doubt. Therefore, the echogenicity and Doppler power of flowing blood under the same flow conditions were measured using a laboratory pulser-receiver system and a clinical ultrasound system, respectively, for comparisons. The experiments were carried out using porcine blood under steady laminar flow with both RBC suspensions and whole blood. The experimental results indicated that a clinical ultrasound system used to measure the Doppler spectrograms is not suitable for quantifying Doppler power. However, the Doppler power measured using a digital Doppler flowmeter can reveal the relationship between backscattering signals and the properties of blood cells because the effects of frequency response are eliminated. The measurements of the Doppler power and

  9. Prostate thermal therapy with catheter-based ultrasound devices and MR thermal monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diederich, Chris J.; Nau, Will H.; Kinsey, Adam; Ross, Tony; Wootton, Jeff; Juang, Titania; Butts-Pauly, Kim; Ricke, Viola; Liu, Erin H.; Chen, Jing; Bouley, Donna M.; Van den Bosch, Maurice; Sommer, Graham

    2007-02-01

    Four types of transurethral applicators were devised for thermal ablation of prostate combined with MR thermal monitoring: sectored tubular transducer devices with directional heating patterns; planar and curvilinear devices with narrow heating patterns; and multi-sectored tubular devices capable of dynamic angular control without applicator movement. These devices are integrated with a 4 mm delivery catheter, incorporate an inflatable cooling balloon (10 mm OD) for positioning within the prostate and capable of rotation via an MR-compatible motor. Interstitial devices (2.4 mm OD) have been developed for percutaneous implantation with directional or dynamic angular control. In vivo experiments in canine prostate under MR temperature imaging were used to evaluate the heating technology and develop treatment control strategies. MR thermal imaging in a 0.5 T interventional MRI was used to monitor temperature and thermal dose in multiple slices through the target volume. Sectored tubular, planar, and curvilinear transurethral devices produce directional coagulation zones, extending 15-20 mm radial distance to the outer prostate capsule. Sequential rotation and modulated dwell time can conform thermal ablation to selected regions. Multi-sectored transurethral applicators can dynamically control the angular heating profile and target large regions of the gland in short treatment times without applicator manipulation. Interstitial implants with directional devices can be used to effectively ablate the posterior peripheral zone of the gland while protecting the rectum. The MR derived 52 °C and lethal thermal dose contours (t 43=240 min) allowed for real-time control of the applicators and effectively defined the extent of thermal damage. Catheter-based ultrasound devices, combined with MR thermal monitoring, can produce relatively fast and precise thermal ablation of prostate, with potential for treatment of cancer or BPH.

  10. A real-time device for converting Doppler ultrasound audio signals into fluid flow velocity.

    PubMed

    Herr, Michael D; Hogeman, Cynthia S; Koch, Dennis W; Krishnan, Anandi; Momen, Afsana; Leuenberger, Urs A

    2010-05-01

    A Doppler signal converter has been developed to facilitate cardiovascular and exercise physiology research. This device directly converts audio signals from a clinical Doppler ultrasound imaging system into a real-time analog signal that accurately represents blood flow velocity and is easily recorded by any standard data acquisition system. This real-time flow velocity signal, when simultaneously recorded with other physiological signals of interest, permits the observation of transient flow response to experimental interventions in a manner not possible when using standard Doppler imaging devices. This converted flow velocity signal also permits a more robust and less subjective analysis of data in a fraction of the time required by previous analytic methods. This signal converter provides this capability inexpensively and requires no modification of either the imaging or data acquisition system.

  11. Theoretical study for safe and efficient energy transfer to deeply implanted devices using ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Cotté, Benjamin; Lafon, Cyril; Dehollain, Catherine; Chapelon, Jean-Yves

    2012-08-01

    The goal of this paper is to prove that a safe and efficient energy transfer is possible between an external transducer located on the patient's skin and a device deeply implanted in the abdomen. An ultrasound propagation model based on the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction integral is coupled with the data from the Visible Human Project to account for the geometry of the organs in the body. The model is able to predict the amount of acoustic power received by the device for different acoustic paths. The acoustic model is validated by comparison with measurements in water and in heterogeneous liquid phantoms. Care is taken to minimize adverse bioeffects-mainly temperature rise and cavitation in tissues. Simulations based on the bio-heat transfer equation are performed to check that thermal effects are indeed small.

  12. Design evolution enhances patient compliance for low-intensity pulsed ultrasound device usage

    PubMed Central

    Pounder, Neill M; Jones, John T; Tanis, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Poor patient compliance or nonadherence with prescribed treatments can have a significant unfavorable impact on medical costs and clinical outcomes. In the current study, voice-of-the-customer research was conducted to aid in the development of a next-generation low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) bone healing product. An opportunity to improve patient compliance reporting was identified, resulting in the incorporation into the next-generation device of a visual calendar that provides direct feedback to the patient, indicating days for which they successfully completed treatment. Further investigation was done on whether inclusion of the visual calendar improved patient adherence to the prescribed therapy (20 minutes of daily treatment) over a 6-month period. Thus, 12,984 data files were analyzed from patients prescribed either the earlier- or the next-generation LIPUS device. Over the 6-month period, overall patient compliance was 83.8% with the next-generation LIPUS device, compared with 74.2% for the previous version (p<0.0001). Incorporation of the calendar feature resulted in compliance never decreasing below 76% over the analysis period, whereas compliance with the earlier-generation product fell to 51%. A literature review on the LIPUS device shows a correlation between clinical effectiveness and compliance rates more than 70%. Incorporation of stakeholder feedback throughout the design and innovation process of a next-generation LIPUS device resulted in a measurable improvement in patient adherence, which may help to optimize clinical outcomes. PMID:27942237

  13. Design evolution enhances patient compliance for low-intensity pulsed ultrasound device usage.

    PubMed

    Pounder, Neill M; Jones, John T; Tanis, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Poor patient compliance or nonadherence with prescribed treatments can have a significant unfavorable impact on medical costs and clinical outcomes. In the current study, voice-of-the-customer research was conducted to aid in the development of a next-generation low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) bone healing product. An opportunity to improve patient compliance reporting was identified, resulting in the incorporation into the next-generation device of a visual calendar that provides direct feedback to the patient, indicating days for which they successfully completed treatment. Further investigation was done on whether inclusion of the visual calendar improved patient adherence to the prescribed therapy (20 minutes of daily treatment) over a 6-month period. Thus, 12,984 data files were analyzed from patients prescribed either the earlier- or the next-generation LIPUS device. Over the 6-month period, overall patient compliance was 83.8% with the next-generation LIPUS device, compared with 74.2% for the previous version (p<0.0001). Incorporation of the calendar feature resulted in compliance never decreasing below 76% over the analysis period, whereas compliance with the earlier-generation product fell to 51%. A literature review on the LIPUS device shows a correlation between clinical effectiveness and compliance rates more than 70%. Incorporation of stakeholder feedback throughout the design and innovation process of a next-generation LIPUS device resulted in a measurable improvement in patient adherence, which may help to optimize clinical outcomes.

  14. Adaptive Kinematic Control of a Robotic Venipuncture Device Based on Stereo Vision, Ultrasound, and Force Guidance.

    PubMed

    Balter, Max L; Chen, Alvin I; Maguire, Timothy J; Yarmush, Martin L

    2017-02-01

    Robotic systems have slowly entered the realm of modern medicine; however, outside the operating room, medical robotics has yet to be translated to more routine interventions such as blood sampling or intravenous fluid delivery. In this paper, we present a medical robot that safely and rapidly cannulates peripheral blood vessels-a procedure commonly known as venipuncture. The device uses near-infrared and ultrasound imaging to scan and select suitable injection sites, and a 9-DOF robot to insert the needle into the center of the vessel based on image and force guidance. We first present the system design and visual servoing scheme of the latest generation robot, and then evaluate the performance of the device through workspace simulations and free-space positioning tests. Finally, we perform a series of motion tracking experiments using stereo vision, ultrasound, and force sensing to guide the position and orientation of the needle tip. Positioning experiments indicate sub-millimeter accuracy and repeatability over the operating workspace of the system, while tracking studies demonstrate real-time needle servoing in response to moving targets. Lastly, robotic phantom cannulations demonstrate the use of multiple system states to confirm that the needle has reached the center of the vessel.

  15. Comparison of two- and three-dimensional transvaginal ultrasound in the visualisation of intrauterine devices.

    PubMed

    Kerr, N K; Dunham, R; Wolstenhulme, S; Wilson, J

    2014-08-01

    The aims of the study were to evaluate whether three-dimensional transvaginal ultrasound (3D TV US) is superior to two-dimensional transvaginal ultrasound (2D TV US) at visualising intrauterine devices and determining their position. This prospective study included 52 participants with an intrauterine device fitted, who underwent 2D TV US and 3D TV US. 2D TV US and 3D-reconstructed coronal images were reviewed by two gynaecological radiologists to assess ease of visualisation and position of the intrauterine devices. Statistical analysis was performed using Wilcoxon signed-rank, McNemar and Chi-squared tests. The inter-observer agreement was measured using Cohen's Kappa. Intrauterine device visualisation scores were significantly higher with 2D TV US compared with 3D TV US (Radiologist 1 p = <0.001, Radiologist 2 p = 0.007). A significant number of T-arms appeared to perforate into the adjacent myometrium on the 3D-reconstructed coronal image, but were normal on the 2D images (Radiologist 1 p = <0.001, Radiologist 2 p = 0.008). Radiologist 1 found 19 perforated T-arms on 3D TV US compared with four on 2D TV US. Radiologist 2 found 13 perforated T-arms on 3D TV US compared with five on 2D TV US. Both radiologists agreed on the positions of the intrauterine devices substantially with 3D TV US (Kappa = 0.69) and moderately with 2D TV US (Kappa = 0.55). The 3D TV US did not visualise an intrauterine device better than 2D TV US. The 3D-reconstructed coronal image of the uterus can reliably display cases of T-arm perforation into the adjacent myometrium, which could be missed on 2D TV US images. The 3D TV US should be used in addition to 2D TV US in all cases where an intrauterine device is under evaluation.

  16. Comparison of two- and three-dimensional transvaginal ultrasound in the visualisation of intrauterine devices

    PubMed Central

    Dunham, R; Wolstenhulme, S; Wilson, J

    2014-01-01

    The aims of the study were to evaluate whether three-dimensional transvaginal ultrasound (3D TV US) is superior to two-dimensional transvaginal ultrasound (2D TV US) at visualising intrauterine devices and determining their position. This prospective study included 52 participants with an intrauterine device fitted, who underwent 2D TV US and 3D TV US. 2D TV US and 3D-reconstructed coronal images were reviewed by two gynaecological radiologists to assess ease of visualisation and position of the intrauterine devices. Statistical analysis was performed using Wilcoxon signed-rank, McNemar and Chi-squared tests. The inter-observer agreement was measured using Cohen’s Kappa. Intrauterine device visualisation scores were significantly higher with 2D TV US compared with 3D TV US (Radiologist 1 p = <0.001, Radiologist 2 p = 0.007). A significant number of T-arms appeared to perforate into the adjacent myometrium on the 3D-reconstructed coronal image, but were normal on the 2D images (Radiologist 1 p = <0.001, Radiologist 2 p = 0.008). Radiologist 1 found 19 perforated T-arms on 3D TV US compared with four on 2D TV US. Radiologist 2 found 13 perforated T-arms on 3D TV US compared with five on 2D TV US. Both radiologists agreed on the positions of the intrauterine devices substantially with 3D TV US (Kappa = 0.69) and moderately with 2D TV US (Kappa = 0.55). The 3D TV US did not visualise an intrauterine device better than 2D TV US. The 3D-reconstructed coronal image of the uterus can reliably display cases of T-arm perforation into the adjacent myometrium, which could be missed on 2D TV US images. The 3D TV US should be used in addition to 2D TV US in all cases where an intrauterine device is under evaluation. PMID:27433211

  17. Are Ultrasound-Guided Ophthalmic Blocks Injurious to the Eye? A Comparative Rabbit Model Study of Two Ultrasound Devices Evaluating Intraorbital Thermal and Structural Changes

    PubMed Central

    Palte, Howard D.; Gayer, Steven; Arrieta, Esdras; Shaw, Eric Scot; Nose, Izuru; Lee, Elizabete; Arheart, Kristopher L.; Dubovy, Sander; Birnbach, David J.; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Background Since Atkinson’s original description of retrobulbar block in 1936, needle-based anesthetic techniques have become integral to ophthalmic anesthesia. These techniques are unfortunately associated with rare, grave complications such as globe perforation. Ultrasound has gained widespread acceptance for peripheral nerve blockade but its translation to ocular anesthesia has been hampered because sonic energy, in the guise of thermal or biomechanical insult, is potentially injurious to vulnerable eye tissue. The United States Food and Drug Administration have defined guidelines for safe use of ultrasound for ophthalmic examination but most ultrasound devices used by anesthesiologists are not Food and Drug Administration-approved for ocular application because they generate excessive energy. Regulating agencies state that ultrasound examination can be safely undertaken as long as tissue temperatures do not increase >1.5°C above physiological levels. Methods Using a rabbit model, we investigated the thermal and mechanical ocular effects after prolonged ultrasonic exposure to single orbital and non-orbital-rated devices. In a dual-phase study, aimed at detecting ocular injury, the eyes of 8 rabbits were exposed to continuous 10-minute ultrasound examinations from two devices: 1) the Sonosite Micromaxx (non-orbital-rated) and 2) the Sonomed VuMax (orbital-rated) machines. In Phase I temperatures were continuously monitored via thermocouples implanted within specific eye structures (n=4). In Phase II the eyes were subjected to ultrasonic exposure without surgical intervention (n=4). All eyes underwent light microscopy examinations followed, at different intervals, by histology evaluations conducted by an ophthalmic pathologist. Results Temperature changes were monitored in the eyes of four rabbits. The non-orbital-rated transducer produced increases in ocular tissue temperature that surpassed the safe limit (increases> 1.50C ) in the lens of three rabbits (at 5

  18. Are ultrasound-guided ophthalmic blocks injurious to the eye? A comparative rabbit model study of two ultrasound devices evaluating intraorbital thermal and structural changes.

    PubMed

    Palte, Howard D; Gayer, Steven; Arrieta, Esdras; Scot Shaw, Eric; Nose, Izuru; Lee, Elizabete; Arheart, Kristopher L; Dubovy, Sander; Birnbach, David J; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2012-07-01

    Since Atkinson's original description of retrobulbar block in 1936, needle-based anesthetic techniques have become integral to ophthalmic anesthesia. These techniques are unfortunately associated with rare, grave complications such as globe perforation. Ultrasound has gained widespread acceptance for peripheral nerve blockade, but its translation to ocular anesthesia has been hampered because sonic energy, in the guise of thermal or biomechanical insult, is potentially injurious to vulnerable eye tissue. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has defined guidelines for safe use of ultrasound for ophthalmic examination, but most ultrasound devices used by anesthesiologists are not FDA-approved for ocular application because they generate excessive energy. Regulating agencies state that ultrasound examinations can be safely undertaken as long as tissue temperatures do not increase >1.5°C above physiological levels. Using a rabbit model, we investigated the thermal and mechanical ocular effects after prolonged ultrasonic exposure to single orbital- and nonorbital-rated devices. In a dual-phase study, aimed at detecting ocular injury, the eyes of 8 rabbits were exposed to continuous 10-minute ultrasound examinations from 2 devices: (1) the Sonosite Micromaxx (nonorbital rated) and (2) the Sonomed VuMax (orbital rated) machines. In phase I, temperatures were continuously monitored via thermocouples implanted within specific eye structures (n = 4). In phase II the eyes were subjected to ultrasonic exposure without surgical intervention (n = 4). All eyes underwent light microscopy examinations, followed at different intervals by histology evaluations conducted by an ophthalmic pathologist. Temperature changes were monitored in the eyes of 4 rabbits. The nonorbital-rated transducer produced increases in ocular tissue temperature that surpassed the safe limit (increases >1.5°C) in the lens of 3 rabbits (at 5.0, 5.5, and 1.5 minutes) and cornea of 2 rabbits (both at 1

  19. Pocket ultrasound device as a complement to physical examination for ascites evaluation and guided paracentesis.

    PubMed

    Keil-Ríos, Daniel; Terrazas-Solís, Hiram; González-Garay, Alejandro; Sánchez-Ávila, Juan Francisco; García-Juárez, Ignacio

    2016-04-01

    The pocket ultrasound device (PUD) is a new tool that may be of use in the early detection of ascites. Abdominal ultrasound-guided paracentesis has been reported to decrease the rate of complications due to the procedure, but must be performed in a healthcare setting; this new tool may be a useful on an ambulatory basis. The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic usefulness of the PUD in the diagnosis of ascites and the safety of guided paracentesis. We conducted a retrospective study that included adult patients suspected of having ascites and in whom an evaluation was performed with the PUD to identify it. Concordance with abdominal ultrasound (AUS) was determined with the Kappa coefficient. Sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp) and likelihood ratios (LR) were determined and compared with physical examination, AUS, computed tomography and procurement of fluid by paracentesis. Complications resulting from the guided paracentesis were analyzed. 89 participants were included and 40 underwent a paracentesis. The PUD for ascites detection had 95.8 % Se, 81.8 % Sp, 5.27 +LR and 0.05 -LR. It had a concordance with AUS of 0.781 (p < 0.001). Technical problems during the guided paracentesis were present in only two participants (5 %) and three patients (7.5 %) developed minor complications that required no further intervention. There were no severe complications or deaths. This study suggests that the PUD is a reliable tool for ascites detection as a complement to physical examination and appears to be a safe method to perform guided paracentesis.

  20. Is it Time to Replace Physical Examination with a Hand-Held Ultrasound Device?

    PubMed

    Kaul, Sanjiv

    2014-01-01

    Attempts at using physical examination (PE) go back centuries, with inspection, palpation, and percussion being the mainstay of this approach until 2 centuries ago when the stethoscope was invented and auscultation became probably the most important element of PE for patients with known or suspected cardiovascular disease (CVD). Despite its several limitations, PE is still used, sometimes as the only means, of evaluating and following patients with CVD. In this paper I shall argue for the substitution of this inaccurate and archaic approach by direct visualization of the heart using a hand-held ultrasound (HHU) device. I am not in any way suggesting the substitution of a comprehensive echocardiographic examination by an expert sonographer/echocardiographer by HHU in patients with significant CVD. Instead, I am arguing for the replacement of PE for evaluation of the heart at the point of care as well as at the bedside, simply because HHU is more accurate and provides more meaningful information.

  1. Is it Time to Replace Physical Examination with a Hand-Held Ultrasound Device?

    PubMed Central

    Kaul, Sanjiv

    2014-01-01

    Attempts at using physical examination (PE) go back centuries, with inspection, palpation, and percussion being the mainstay of this approach until 2 centuries ago when the stethoscope was invented and auscultation became probably the most important element of PE for patients with known or suspected cardiovascular disease (CVD). Despite its several limitations, PE is still used, sometimes as the only means, of evaluating and following patients with CVD. In this paper I shall argue for the substitution of this inaccurate and archaic approach by direct visualization of the heart using a hand-held ultrasound (HHU) device. I am not in any way suggesting the substitution of a comprehensive echocardiographic examination by an expert sonographer/echocardiographer by HHU in patients with significant CVD. Instead, I am arguing for the replacement of PE for evaluation of the heart at the point of care as well as at the bedside, simply because HHU is more accurate and provides more meaningful information. PMID:28465916

  2. Multiple applicator hepatic ablation with interstitial ultrasound devices: Theoretical and experimental investigation

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Punit; Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Clif Burdette, E.; Diederich, Chris J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate multiple applicator implant configurations of interstitial ultrasound devices for large volume ablation of liver tumors. Methods: A 3D bioacoustic-thermal model using the finite element method was implemented to assess multiple applicator implant configurations for thermal ablation with interstitial ultrasound energy. Interstitial applicators consist of linear arrays of up to four 10 mm-long tubular ultrasound transducers, each under separate and dynamic power control, enclosed within a water-cooled delivery catheter (2.4 mm OD). The authors considered parallel implants with two and three applicators (clustered configuration), spaced 2–3 cm apart, to simulate open surgical placement. In addition, the authors considered two applicator implants with applicators converging and diverging at angles of ∼20°, 30°, and 45° to simulate percutaneous placement. Heating experiments (10–15 min) were performed and compared against simulations employing the same experimental parameters. To estimate the performance of parallel, multiple applicator configurations in an in vivo setting, simulations were performed taking into account a range of blood perfusion levels (0, 5, 12, and 15 kg m−3 s−1) that may occur in tumors of varying vascularity. The impact of tailoring the power supplied to individual transducer elements along the length of applicators is explored for applicators inserted in non-parallel (converging and diverging) configurations. Thermal dose (t43 > 240 min) and temperature thresholds (T > 52 °C) were used to define the ablation zones, with dynamic changes to tissue acoustic and thermal properties incorporated within the model. Results: Experiments in ex vivo bovine liver yielded ablation zones ranging between 4.0–5.6 cm × 3.2–4.9 cm, in cross section. Ablation zone dimensions predicted by simulations with similar parameters to the experiments were in close agreement (within 5 mm). Simulations of in vivo heating showed that 15

  3. Comparison of sound speed measurements on two different ultrasound tomography devices.

    PubMed

    Sak, Mark; Duric, Neb; Littrup, Peter; Bey-Knight, Lisa; Sherman, Mark; Gierach, Gretchen; Malyarenko, Antonina

    2014-03-20

    Ultrasound tomography (UST) employs sound waves to produce three-dimensional images of breast tissue and precisely measures the sound speed of breast tissue composition. High breast density is a strong breast cancer risk factor and sound speed is directly proportional to breast density. UST provides a quantitative measure of breast density based on three-dimensional imaging without compression, thereby overcoming the shortcomings of many other imaging modalities. The quantitative nature of the UST breast density measures are tied to an external standard, so sound speed measurement in breast tissue should be independent of specific hardware. The work presented here compares breast sound speed measurement obtained with two different UST devices. The Computerized Ultrasound Risk Evaluation (CURE) system located at the Karmanos Cancer Institute in Detroit, Michigan was recently replaced with the SoftVue ultrasound tomographic device. Ongoing clinical trials have used images generated from both sets of hardware, so maintaining consistency in sound speed measurements is important. During an overlap period when both systems were in the same exam room, a total of 12 patients had one or both of their breasts imaged on both systems on the same day. There were 22 sound speed scans analyzed from each system and the average breast sound speeds were compared. Images were either reconstructed using saved raw data (for both CURE and SoftVue) or were created during the image acquisition (saved in DICOM format for SoftVue scans only). The sound speed measurements from each system were strongly and positively correlated with each other. The average difference in sound speed between the two sets of data was on the order of 1-2 m/s and this result was not statistically significant. The only sets of images that showed a statistical difference were the DICOM images created during the SoftVue scan compared to the SoftVue images reconstructed from the raw data. However, the discrepancy

  4. Evaluation of Variation in the Palatal Gingival Biotypes Using an Ultrasound Device

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Aarati; Nayak, Ranganath; Bankur, Praveen Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background: The dimensions of gingiva and different parts of the masticatory mucosa have become a subject of considerable interest in Periodontics. Studies assessing the thickness of the facial gingiva are often seen in the literature. The thickness of the palatal gingiva is a subject still less researched in periodontal therapy and implantology. Objectives: To measure the thickness of the palatal gingiva using an ultrasound device ‘Biometric A- Scan’ and to evaluate the variation in the thickness of the palatal gingiva at the sites examined. Materials and Methods: In the 50 subjects examined, the thickness of the palatal gingiva was assessed at the maxillary anteriors, premolars and molars by an ultrasound device ‘Biometric A-Scan’. The results were subjected to statistical analysis using one-way ANOVA test and Newman-Keuls multiple post hoc procedure. Results: Statistically significant variations existed in the palatal gingival thickness. The thickness was highest at the lateral incisor region, followed by canine, premolars, molars and central incisor. Interpretation and Conclusion: In the subjects assessed, the thickness of the palatal gingiva at the lateral–canine area was the highest followed by the premolar area. In periodontal root coverage procedures and during implant therapy, we suggest the inclusion of the lateral incisor area, apart from the canine and premolar area, as a potential donor site for harvesting soft tissue grafts from the palatal area. However, the effect of several factors like age and sex of the patient, the anatomy of the palatal area, the influence of rugae patterns and racial and geographical differences should be taken into consideration prior to harvesting a graft from these sites. Apart from this, the study suggests that, the ultrasonographic measurements provide an elegant means of obtaining the measurements of gingival and mucosal tissues rapidly, accurately and non-invasively. Our endeavour in this research project

  5. Comparison of sound speed measurements on two different ultrasound tomography devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sak, Mark; Duric, Neb; Littrup, Peter; Bey-Knight, Lisa; Sherman, Mark; Gierach, Gretchen; Malyarenko, Antonina

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound tomography (UST) employs sound waves to produce three-dimensional images of breast tissue and precisely measures the attenuation of sound speed secondary to breast tissue composition. High breast density is a strong breast cancer risk factor and sound speed is directly proportional to breast density. UST provides a quantitative measure of breast density based on three-dimensional imaging without compression, thereby overcoming the shortcomings of many other imaging modalities. The quantitative nature of the UST breast density measures are tied to an external standard, so sound speed measurement in breast tissue should be independent of specific hardware. The work presented here compares breast sound speed measurement obtained with two different UST devices. The Computerized Ultrasound Risk Evaluation (CURE) system located at the Karmanos Cancer Institute in Detroit, Michigan was recently replaced with the SoftVue ultrasound tomographic device. Ongoing clinical trials have used images generated from both sets of hardware, so maintaining consistency in sound speed measurements is important. During an overlap period when both systems were in the same exam room, a total of 12 patients had one or both of their breasts imaged on both systems on the same day. There were 22 sound speed scans analyzed from each system and the average breast sound speeds were compared. Images were either reconstructed using saved raw data (for both CURE and SoftVue) or were created during the image acquisition (saved in DICOM format for SoftVue scans only). The sound speed measurements from each system were strongly and positively correlated with each other. The average difference in sound speed between the two sets of data was on the order of 1-2 m/s and this result was not statistically significant. The only sets of images that showed a statistical difference were the DICOM images created during the SoftVue scan compared to the SoftVue images reconstructed from the raw data

  6. Comparison of sound speed measurements on two different ultrasound tomography devices

    PubMed Central

    Sak, Mark; Duric, Neb; Littrup, Peter; Bey-Knight, Lisa; Sherman, Mark; Gierach, Gretchen; Malyarenko, Antonina

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound tomography (UST) employs sound waves to produce three-dimensional images of breast tissue and precisely measures the sound speed of breast tissue composition. High breast density is a strong breast cancer risk factor and sound speed is directly proportional to breast density. UST provides a quantitative measure of breast density based on three-dimensional imaging without compression, thereby overcoming the shortcomings of many other imaging modalities. The quantitative nature of the UST breast density measures are tied to an external standard, so sound speed measurement in breast tissue should be independent of specific hardware. The work presented here compares breast sound speed measurement obtained with two different UST devices. The Computerized Ultrasound Risk Evaluation (CURE) system located at the Karmanos Cancer Institute in Detroit, Michigan was recently replaced with the SoftVue ultrasound tomographic device. Ongoing clinical trials have used images generated from both sets of hardware, so maintaining consistency in sound speed measurements is important. During an overlap period when both systems were in the same exam room, a total of 12 patients had one or both of their breasts imaged on both systems on the same day. There were 22 sound speed scans analyzed from each system and the average breast sound speeds were compared. Images were either reconstructed using saved raw data (for both CURE and SoftVue) or were created during the image acquisition (saved in DICOM format for SoftVue scans only). The sound speed measurements from each system were strongly and positively correlated with each other. The average difference in sound speed between the two sets of data was on the order of 1-2 m/s and this result was not statistically significant. The only sets of images that showed a statistical difference were the DICOM images created during the SoftVue scan compared to the SoftVue images reconstructed from the raw data. However, the discrepancy

  7. In vivo demonstration of ultrasound power delivery to charge implanted medical devices via acute and survival porcine studies.

    PubMed

    Radziemski, Leon; Makin, Inder Raj S

    2016-01-01

    Animal studies are an important step in proving the utility and safety of an ultrasound based implanted battery recharging system. To this end an Ultrasound Electrical Recharging System (USER™) was developed and tested. Experiments in vitro demonstrated power deliveries at the battery of up to 600 mW through 10-15 mm of tissue, 50 mW of power available at tissue depths of up to 50 mm, and the feasibility of using transducers bonded to titanium as used in medical implants. Acute in vivo studies in a porcine model were used to test reliability of power delivery, temperature excursions, and cooling techniques. The culminating five-week survival study involved repeated battery charging, a total of 10.5h of ultrasound exposure of the intervening living tissue, with an average RF input to electrical charging efficiency of 20%. This study was potentially the first long term cumulative living-tissue exposure using transcutaneous ultrasound power transmission to an implanted receiver in situ. Histology of the exposed tissue showed changes attributable primarily due to surgical implantation of the prototype device, and no damage due to the ultrasound exposure. The in vivo results are indicative of the potential safe delivery of ultrasound energy for a defined set of source conditions for charging batteries within implants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. In vivo demonstration of ultrasound power delivery to charge implanted medical devices via acute and survival porcine studies

    PubMed Central

    Radziemski, Leon; Makin, Inder Raj S.

    2015-01-01

    Animal studies are an important step in proving the utility and safety of an ultrasound based implanted battery recharging system. To this end an Ultrasound Electrical Recharging System (USER™) was developed and tested. Experiments in vitro demonstrated power deliveries at the battery of up to 600 mW through 10 – 15 mm of tissue, 50 mW of power available at tissue depths of up to 50 mm, and the feasibility of using transducers bonded to titanium as used in medical implants. Acute in vivo studies in a porcine model were used to test reliability of power delivery, temperature excursions, and cooling techniques. The culminating five-week survival study involved repeated battery charging, a total of 10.5 hours of ultrasound exposure of the intervening living tissue, with an average RF input to electrical charging efficiency of 20%. This study was potentially the first long term cumulative living-tissue exposure using transcutaneous ultrasound power transmission to an implanted receiver in situ. Histology of the exposed tissue showed changes attributable primarily due to surgical implantation of the prototype device, and no damage due to the ultrasound exposure. The in vivo results are indicative of the potential safe delivery of ultrasound energy for a defined set of source conditions for charging batteries within implants. PMID:26243566

  9. Diagnostic performance of multi-organ ultrasound with pocket-sized device in the management of acute dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Sforza, Alfonso; Mancusi, Costantino; Carlino, Maria Viviana; Buonauro, Agostino; Barozzi, Marco; Romano, Giuseppe; Serra, Sossio; de Simone, Giovanni

    2017-06-19

    The availability of ultra-miniaturized pocket ultrasound devices (PUD) adds diagnostic power to the clinical examination. Information on accuracy of ultrasound with handheld units in immediate differential diagnosis in emergency department (ED) is poor. The aim of this study is to test the usefulness and accuracy of lung ultrasound (LUS) alone or combined with ultrasound of the heart and inferior vena cava (IVC) using a PUD for the differential diagnosis of acute dyspnea (AD). We included 68 patients presenting to the ED of "Maurizio Bufalini" Hospital in Cesena (Italy) for AD. All patients underwent integrated ultrasound examination (IUE) of lung-heart-IVC, using PUD. The series was divided into patients with dyspnea of cardiac or non-cardiac origin. We used 2 × 2 contingency tables to analyze sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of the three ultrasonic methods and their various combinations for the diagnosis of cardiogenic dyspnea (CD), comparing with the final diagnosis made by an independent emergency physician. LUS alone exhibited a good sensitivity (92.6%) and specificity (80.5%). The highest accuracy (90%) for the diagnosis of CD was obtained with the combination of LUS and one of the other two methods (heart or IVC). The IUE with PUD is a useful extension of the clinical examination, can be readily available at the bedside or in ambulance, requires few minutes and has a reliable diagnostic discriminant ability in the setting of AD.

  10. Catheter-based high-intensity ultrasound for epicardial ablation of the left ventricle: device design and in vivo feasiblity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Nazer, Babak; Jones, Peter D.; Tanaka, Yasuaki; Martin, Alastair; Ng, Bennett; Duggirala, Srikant; Diederich, Chris J.; Gerstenfeld, Edward P.

    2015-03-01

    The development and in vivo testing of a high-intensity ultrasound thermal ablation catheter for epicardial ablation of the left ventricle (LV) is presented. Scar tissue can occur in the mid-myocardial and epicardial space in patients with nonischemic cardiomyopathy and lead to ventricular tachycardia. Current ablation technology uses radiofrequency energy, which is limited epicardially by the presence of coronary vessels, phrenic nerves, and fat. Ultrasound energy can be precisely directed to deliver targeted deep epicardial ablation while sparing intervening epicardial nerve and vessels. The proof-of-concept ultrasound applicators were designed for sub-xyphoid access to the pericardial space through a steerable 14-Fr sheath. The catheter consists of two rectangular planar transducers, for therapy (6.4 MHz) and imaging (5 MHz), mounted at the tip of a 3.5-mm flexible nylon catheter coupled and encapsulated within a custom-shaped balloon for cooling. Thermal lesions were created in the LV in a swine (n = 10) model in vivo. The ultrasound applicator was positioned fluoroscopically. Its orientation and contact with the LV were verified using A-mode imaging and a radio-opaque marker. Ablations employed 60-s exposures at 15 - 30 W (electrical power). Histology indicated thermal coagulation and ablative lesions penetrating 8 - 12 mm into the left ventricle on lateral and anterior walls and along the left anterior descending artery. The transducer design enabled successful sparing from the epicardial surface to 2 - 4 mm of intervening ventricle tissue and epicardial fat. The feasibility of targeted epicardial ablation with catheter-based ultrasound was demonstrated.

  11. Training Program for Cardiology Residents to Perform Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Examination with Portable Device.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Vicente N; Mancuso, Frederico J N; Campos, Orlando; De Paola, Angelo A; Carvalho, Antonio C; Moises, Valdir A

    2015-10-01

    Training requirements for general cardiologists without echocardiographic expertise to perform focused cardiac ultrasound (FCU) with portable devices have not yet been defined. The objective of this study was to evaluate a training program to instruct cardiology residents to perform FCU with a hand-carried device (HCD) in different clinical settings. Twelve cardiology residents were subjected to a 50-question test, 4 lectures on basic echocardiography and imaging interpretation, the supervised interpretation of 50 echocardiograms and performance of 30 exams using HCD. After this period, they repeated the written test and were administered a practical test comprising 30 exams each (360 patients) in different clinical settings. They reported on 15 parameters and a final diagnosis; their findings were compared to the HCD exam of a specialist in echocardiography. The proportion of correct answers on the theoretical test was higher after training (86%) than before (51%; P = 0.001). The agreement was substantial among the 15 parameters analyzed (kappa ranging from 0.615 to 0.891; P < 0.001). The percentage of correct interpretation was lower for abnormal (75%) than normal (95%) items, for valve abnormalities (85%) compared to other items (92%) and for graded scale (87%) than for dichotomous (95%) items (P < 0.0001, for all). For the final diagnoses, the kappa value was higher than 0.941 (P < 0.001; 95% CI [0.914, 0.955]). The training proposed enabled residents to perform FCU with HCD, and their findings were in good agreement with those of a cardiologist specialized in echocardiography. © 2015, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Devices for the diagnosis and treatment of temporomandibular disorders. Part III: Thermography, ultrasound, electrical stimulation, and electromyographic biofeedback.

    PubMed

    Mohl, N D; Ohrbach, R K; Crow, H C; Gross, A J

    1990-04-01

    This last article in the three-part series on devices for the diagnosis and treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) compared the claimed diagnostic usefulness of thermography with the present scientific evidence. In a similar manner, the therapeutic efficacy of ultrasound, electrical stimulation, and electromyographic biofeedback was also reviewed. This evaluation concluded that the application of thermography to the diagnosis of TMD is limited by variations within and among subjects and by intrinsic problems with controls of the test environment. It also concluded that evidence that therapeutic ultrasound alone is useful for the treatment of TMD is lacking, that positive clinical results of electrical stimulation may not be due to specific therapeutic effects, and that it is doubtful that the use of electrical stimulation devices can produce a position of the mandible that has any diagnostic or therapeutic significance. There is evidence, however, that relaxation training, assisted by EMG biofeedback, can reduce daytime muscle activity.

  13. Modeling of endoluminal and interstitial ultrasound hyperthermia and thermal ablation: applications to device design, feedback control, and treatment planning

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Punit; Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Diederich, Chris J.

    2014-01-01

    Endoluminal and catheter-based ultrasound applicators are currently under development and are in clinical use for minimally invasive hyperthermia and thermal ablation of various tissue targets. Computational models play a critical role in in device design and optimization, assessment of therapeutic feasibility and safety, devising treatment monitoring and feedback control strategies, and performing patient-specific treatment planning with this technology. The critical aspects of theoretical modeling, applied specifically to endoluminal and interstitial ultrasound thermotherapy, are reviewed. Principles and practical techniques for modeling acoustic energy deposition, bioheat transfer, thermal tissue damage, and dynamic changes in the physical and physiological state of tissue are reviewed. The integration of these models and applications of simulation techniques in identification of device design parameters, development of real time feedback-control platforms, assessing the quality and safety of treatment delivery strategies, and optimization of inverse treatment plans are presented. PMID:23738697

  14. Intrauterine devices in early pregnancy: findings on ultrasound and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Moschos, Elysia; Twickler, Diane M

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this study was to describe ultrasound findings, clinical symptoms, and outcomes of first-trimester pregnancies with intrauterine devices (IUDs). This was a retrospective review of 42 women with history of IUD placement and positive serum human chorionic gonadotropin in the first trimester. There were 31 intrauterine pregnancies (IUPs), 3 ectopic pregnancies, and 8 pregnancies of unknown location. Of 36 IUDs visualized, 15 were normally positioned and 21 malpositioned. Of 31 IUPs, 8 IUDs were within the endometrium, 17 were malpositioned, and 6 were not seen. Indications included bleeding (14 of 31), pain (12 of 31), and missing strings (5 of 31); 11 had no symptoms. Of 26 IUPs with known pregnancy outcomes, 20 were term deliveries and 6 had failed pregnancies of 20 weeks or less. More than half of IUDs identified in the first trimester were malpositioned. IUP was 3 times as likely with a malpositioned or missing IUD. Three quarters of the IUPs with known outcomes had term deliveries. Symptoms were not predictive of IUD malposition. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A Microfluidics-based Pulpal Arteriole Blood Flow Phantom for Validation of Doppler Ultrasound Devices in Pulpal Blood Flow Velocity Measurement.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dohyun; Park, Sung-Ho

    2016-11-01

    Recently, Doppler ultrasound has been used for the measurement of pulpal blood flow in human teeth. However, the reliability of this method has not been verified. In this study, we developed a model to simulate arteriole blood flow within the dental pulp by using microfluidics. This arteriole simulator, or flow phantom, was used to determine the reliability of measurements obtained by using a Doppler ultrasound device. A microfluidic chip was fabricated by using the soft lithography technique, and blood-mimicking fluid was pumped through the channel by a microfluidic system. A Doppler ultrasound device was used for the measurement of flow velocity. The peak, mean, and minimal flow velocities obtained from the phantom and the Doppler ultrasound device were compared by using linear regression analysis and Pearson correlation coefficient. Bland-Altman analyses were performed to evaluate the velocity differences between the flow generated by the phantom and the flow measurements made with the Doppler ultrasound device. The microfluidic system was able to generate the flow profiles as intended, and the fluid flow could be monitored and controlled by the software program. There were excellent linear correlations between the peak, mean, and minimal flow velocities of the phantom and those of the Doppler ultrasound device (r = 0.94-0.996, P < .001). However, the velocities were overestimated by the Doppler ultrasound device. This phantom provides opportunities for research and education involving the Doppler ultrasound technique in dentistry. Although Doppler ultrasound can be an effective tool for the measurement of pulpal blood flow velocity, it is essential to validate and calibrate the device before clinical use. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of a novel high-intensity focused ultrasound device: preclinical studies in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Jewell, Mark L; Desilets, Charles; Smoller, Bruce R

    2011-05-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been applied clinically for the noninvasive treatment of pathological conditions in various organs for over 50 years; however, there are little data describing the use of thermal HIFU to ablate fat for body contouring and treatment of collagen-rich layers. A novel device under clinical investigation (LipoSonix; Medicis Technologies Corporation, Bothell, Washington) uses HIFU to eliminate unwanted adipose tissue. The authors describe the results of HIFU treatment in a series of preclinical studies performed in a validated porcine model. Preclinical research included in vivo treatment of the abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue of swine with transcutaneous HIFU therapy. Endpoint analyses included thermocouple temperature data, full-body necropsy, local pathology and histology studies, clinical hematology, urinalysis, and blood chemistry parameters, including lipid panels. The application of HIFU energy levels of 166 to 372 J/cm(2) generated tissue temperature approaching 70°C, which was restricted to the focal area (n = seven). Application of 68 and 86 J/cm(2) did not produce clinically-significant changes in serum liver function tests, free fatty acids, or cholesterol (n = eight). Gross examination of tissue from various organs showed no evidence of fat emboli or accumulation (n = two). Histology demonstrated well-preserved vasculature and intact nerve fibers within the HIFU focal area (n = three). Following treatment with 85.3 to 270 J/cm(2), normal healing response included the migration of macrophages into the damaged tissue and removal of disrupted cellular debris and lipids (n = 8). In a preclinical swine model, the controlled thermal effect of HIFU appears to provide a safe and effective means for ablating subcutaneous adipose tissue.

  17. Initial Experience with a Wireless Ultrasound-Guided Vacuum-Assisted Breast Biopsy Device.

    PubMed

    Choi, E-Ryung; Han, Boo-Kyung; Ko, Eun Sook; Ko, Eun Young; Choi, Ji Soo; Cho, Eun Yoon; Nam, Seok Jin

    2015-01-01

    To determine the imaging characteristic of frequent target lesions of wireless ultrasound (US)-guided, vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (Wi-UVAB) and to evaluate diagnostic yield, accuracy and complication of the device in indeterminate breast lesions. From March 2013 to October 2014, 114 women (age range, 29-76 years; mean age, 50.0 years) underwent Wi-UVAB using a 13-gauge needle (Mammotome Elite®; Devicor Medical Products, Cincinnati, OH, USA). In 103 lesions of 96 women with surgical (n = 81) or follow-up (n = 22) data, complications, biopsy procedure, imaging findings of biopsy targets and histologic results were reviewed. Mean number of biopsy cores was 10 (range 4-25). Nine patients developed moderate bleeding. All lesions were suspicious on US, and included non-mass lesions (67.0%) and mass lesions (33.0%). Visible calcifications on US were evident in 57.3% of the target lesions. Most of the lesions (93.2%) were nonpalpable. Sixty-six (64.1%) were malignant [ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) rate, 61%] and 12 were high-risk lesions (11.7%). Histologic underestimation was identified in 11 of 40 (27.5%). DCIS cases and in 3 of 9 (33.3%) high-risk lesions necessitating surgery. There was no false-negative case. Wi-UVAB is very handy and advantageous for US-unapparent non-mass lesions to diagnose DCIS, especially for calcification cases. Histologic underestimation is unavoidable; still, Wi-UVAB is safe and accurate to diagnose a malignancy.

  18. Co-registration of angiography and intravascular ultrasound images through image-based device tracking.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Megha; Cassar, Andrew; Fetterly, Kenneth A; Bell, Malcolm; Theessen, Heike; Ecabert, Olivier; Bresnahan, John F; Lerman, Amir

    2016-12-01

    To determine the feasibility of automated co-registration of angiography and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) to facilitate integration of these two imaging modalities in a synchronous manner. IVUS provides cross-sectional imaging of coronary arteries but lacks overview of the vascular territory provided by angiography. Co-registration of angiography and IVUS would increase utility of IVUS in the clinical setting. Forty-nine consecutive patients undergoing surveillance for cardiac allograft vasculopathy with angiography and IVUS of the left anterior descending artery (LAD) were enrolled. A pre-IVUS angiogram of the LAD was performed followed by an ECG-triggered fluoroscopy (ECGTF) during IVUS pullback at 0.5 mm/s using an automatic pullback device. ECGTF was used to track the IVUS catheter during pullback and establish a spatial relationship to the pre-IVUS angiogram. Angio-IVUS co-registration was performed with a research prototype (Siemens Healthcare, Germany) and accuracy was evaluated by distance mismatch between angiography and IVUS images at vessel bifurcations. Median age was 54 (44.5, 67) years. The population was 82.6% male with minimal risk factors. The median (IQR) co-registration distance mismatch measured at 108 bifurcations in 42 (85%) patients was 0.35 (0.00-1.16) mm. Seven patients were excluded due to inappropriate data acquisition (n = 3) and failure of tracking (n = 4), e.g., due to overlapping sternal wires. Estimated effective radiation dose for ECGTF was 0.09 mSv. This study demonstrates the feasibility of angio-IVUS co-registration which may be used as a clinical tool for localizing IVUS cross-sections along an angiographic roadmap. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. A Disposable Microfluidic Device for Controlled Drug Release from Thermal-Sensitive Liposomes by High Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Long; Deng, Zhiting; Niu, Lili; Li, Fei; Yan, Fei; Wu, Junru; Cai, Feiyan; Zheng, Hairong

    2015-01-01

    The drug release triggered thermally by high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been considered a promising drug delivery strategy due to its localized energy and non-invasive characters. However, the mechanism underlying the HIFU-mediated drug delivery remains unclear due to its complexity at the cellular level. In this paper, micro-HIFU (MHIFU) generated by a microfluidic device is introduced which is able to control the drug release from temperature-sensitive liposomes (TSL) and evaluate the thermal and mechanical effects of ultrasound on the cellular drug uptake and apoptosis. By simply adjusting the input electrical signal to the device, the temperature of sample can be maintained at 37 °C, 42 °C and 50 °C with the deviation of ± 0.3 °C as desired. The flow cytometry results show that the drug delivery under MHIFU sonication leads to a significant increase in apoptosis compared to the drug release by incubation alone at elevated temperature of 42 °C. Furthermore, increased squamous and protruding structures on the surface membrane of cells were detected by atomic force microscopy (AFM) after MHIFU irradiation of TSL. We demonstrate that compared to the routine HIFU treatment, MHIFU enables monitoring of in situ interactions between the ultrasound and cell in real time. Furthermore, it can quantitatively analyze and characterize the alterations of the cell membrane as a function of the treatment time. PMID:26379786

  20. Opening of the blood-brain barrier with an unfocused ultrasound device in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Beccaria, Kevin; Canney, Michael; Goldwirt, Lauriane; Fernandez, Christine; Adam, Clovis; Piquet, Julie; Autret, Gwennhael; Clément, Olivier; Lafon, Cyril; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Carpentier, Alexandre

    2013-10-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a major impediment to the intracerebral diffusion of drugs used in the treatment of gliomas. Previous studies have demonstrated that pulsed focused ultrasound (US) in conjunction with a microbubble contrast agent can be used to open the BBB. To apply the US-induced opening of the BBB in clinical practice, the authors designed an innovative unfocused US device that can be implanted in the skull and used to transiently and repeatedly open the BBB during a standard chemotherapy protocol. The goal of this preliminary work was to study the opening of the BBB induced by the authors' small unfocused US transducer and to evaluate the effects of the sonications on brain parenchyma. Craniectomy was performed in 16 healthy New Zealand White rabbits; epidural application of a single-element planar ultrasonic transducer operating at 1 MHz was then used with a pulse-repetition frequency of 1 Hz, pulse lengths of 10-35 msec, in situ acoustic pressure levels of 0.3-0.8 MPa, and sonication for 60-120 seconds. SonoVue was intravenously injected during the US applications, and opening of the BBB was determined by detecting extravasation of Evans blue dye (EBD) in brain tissues, quantitative measurement of EBD with UV-visible spectrophotometry, and contrast enhancement after Gd injection in 4.7-T MRI. A histological study was performed to determine adverse effects. An opening of the BBB was observed over a large extent of the US beam in the brain corresponding to in situ pressures of greater than 0.2 MPa. The BBB opening observed was highly significant for both EBD (p < 0.01) and MRI Gd enhancement (p < 0.0001). The BBB opening was associated with minor adverse effects that included perivascular red blood cell extravasations that were less than 150 μm in size and not visible on MR images. Moderate edema was visible on FLAIR sequences and limited to the extent of the sonication field. The results demonstrate that the BBB can be opened in large areas of

  1. Measuring derived acoustic power of an ultrasound surgical device in the linear and nonlinear operating modes.

    PubMed

    Petosić, Antonio; Ivancević, Bojan; Svilar, Dragoljub

    2009-06-01

    The method for measuring derived acoustic power of an ultrasound point source in the form of a sonotrode tip has been considered in the free acoustic field, according to the IEC 61847 standard. The main objective of this work is measuring averaged pressure magnitude spatial distribution of an sonotrode tip in the free acoustic field conditions at different electrical excitation levels and calculation of the derived acoustic power at excitation frequency (f0 approximately 25 kHz). Finding the derived acoustic power of an ultrasonic surgical device in the strong cavitation regime of working, even in the considered laboratory conditions (anechoic pool), will enable better understanding of the biological effects on the tissue produced during operation with the considered device. The pressure magnitude spatial distribution is measured using B&K 8103 hydrophone connected with a B&K 2626 conditioning amplifier, digital storage oscilloscope LeCroy Waverunner 474, where pressure waveforms in the field points are recorded. Using MATLAB with DSP processing toolbox, averaged power spectrum density of recorded pressure signals in different field positions is calculated. The measured pressure magnitude spatial distributions are fitted with the appropriate theoretical models. In the linear operating mode, using the acoustic reciprocity principle, the sonotrode tip is theoretically described as radially oscillating sphere (ROS) and transversely oscillating sphere (TOS) in the vicinity of pressure release boundary. The measured pressure magnitude spatial distribution is fitted with theoretical curves, describing the pressure field of the considered theoretical models. The velocity and displacement magnitudes with derived acoustic power of equivalent theoretical sources are found, and the electroacoustic efficiency factor is calculated. When the transmitter is excited at higher electrical power levels, the displacement magnitude of sonotrode tip is increased, and nonlinear behaviour

  2. Transvaginal ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Uterine bleeding - transvaginal ultrasound; Menstrual bleeding - transvaginal ultrasound; Infertility - transvaginal ultrasound; Ovarian - transvaginal ultrasound; Abscess - transvaginal ultrasound

  3. Ultrasound pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Pregnancy sonogram; Obstetric ultrasonography; Obstetric sonogram; Ultrasound - pregnancy; IUGR - ultrasound; Intrauterine growth - ultrasound; Polyhydramnios - ultrasound; Oligohydramnios - ultrasound; ...

  4. Actual use of pocket-sized ultrasound devices for cardiovascular examination by trained physicians during a hospitalist rotation

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Benjamin T.; Dahms, Eric B.; Waalen, Jill; Kimura, Bruce J.

    2016-01-01

    Background In actual clinical practice as opposed to published studies, the application of bedside ultrasound requires a perception of need, confidence in one's skills, and convenience. Objective As the frequency of ultrasound usage is evidence to its perceived value in patient care, we observed the pattern of autonomous use of a pocket-sized device (PSD) by ultrasound-trained residents during a night hospitalist rotation. Methods Consecutive internal medicine residents (n=24), trained in a cardiac limited ultrasound examination (CLUE) as a mandatory part of their curriculum, were sampled on their PSD use after their admitting nights, regarding perceived necessity, deterring factors, detected abnormalities, and imaging difficulties. A detailed analysis was performed with one resident who used a PSD on every admission to compare the proportion of abnormal CLUEs and utility in patients with and without a perceived need. Results Residents admitted 542 patients (mean age: 55±17 years, range: 17–95 years) during 101 shifts and performed CLUE on 230 patients (42%, range: 17–85%). Residents elected not to scan 312 (58%) patients due to 1) lack of perceived necessity (231, 74%), 2) time constraints (44, 14%), and 3) patient barriers (37, 12%). In the detailed analysis (n=71), the resident felt CLUE was necessary in 32 (45%) patients versus unnecessary in 39 (55%) patients, with abnormality rates of 50% versus 20.5% (p=0.01) and utility rates of 28.1% versus 15.4% (p=0.25), respectively. Conclusion When unbiased residents acting as hospitalists are provided with a PSD to augment initial cardiac examination, usage is frequent and suggests clinical value in hospital medicine. PMID:27987287

  5. 4D Ultrasound - Medical Devices for Recent Advances on the Etiology of Cerebral Palsy.

    PubMed

    Tomasovic, Sanja; Predojevic, Maja

    2011-12-01

    Children cerebral palsy (CCP) encompasses a group of nonprogessive and noninfectious conditions, which cause light, moderate, and severe deviations in neurological development. Diagnosis of CCP is set mostly by the age of 3 years. The fact that a large number of cerebral damage occurs prenatally and the fact that early intervention in cases of neurological damage is successful, prompted some researchers to explore the possibility of detecting neurologically damaged fetus in the uterus. This research was made possible thanks to the development of two-dimensional ultrasound technology in a real time, which enabled the display of the mobility of the fetus. Advancement of the ultrasound technology has enabled the development of 4D ultrasound where a spontaneous fetal movement can be observed almost in a real time. Estimate of the number and quality of spontaneous fetal movements and stitches on the head, the neurology thumb and a high palate were included in the prenatal neurological screening of the fetus. This raises the question, as to does the fetal behavior reflect, (which was revealed in 2D or 4D ultrasound), fetal neurological development in a manner that will allow the detection of the brain damage.

  6. 4D Ultrasound - Medical Devices for Recent Advances on the Etiology of Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Tomasovic, Sanja; Predojevic, Maja

    2011-01-01

    Children cerebral palsy (CCP) encompasses a group of nonprogessive and noninfectious conditions, which cause light, moderate, and severe deviations in neurological development. Diagnosis of CCP is set mostly by the age of 3 years. The fact that a large number of cerebral damage occurs prenatally and the fact that early intervention in cases of neurological damage is successful, prompted some researchers to explore the possibility of detecting neurologically damaged fetus in the uterus. This research was made possible thanks to the development of two-dimensional ultrasound technology in a real time, which enabled the display of the mobility of the fetus. Advancement of the ultrasound technology has enabled the development of 4D ultrasound where a spontaneous fetal movement can be observed almost in a real time. Estimate of the number and quality of spontaneous fetal movements and stitches on the head, the neurology thumb and a high palate were included in the prenatal neurological screening of the fetus. This raises the question, as to does the fetal behavior reflect, (which was revealed in 2D or 4D ultrasound), fetal neurological development in a manner that will allow the detection of the brain damage. PMID:23407920

  7. Fast Conformal Thermal Ablation in the Prostate with Transurethral Multi-Sectored Ultrasound Devices and MR Guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsey, Adam M.; Diederich, Chris J.; Nau, William H.; Ross, Anthony B.; Pauly, Kim Butts; Rieke, Viola; Sommer, Graham

    2007-05-01

    Transurethral ultrasound applicators incorporating an array of multisectored tubular transducers were evaluated in theoretical simulations and in vivo canine prostates under MR guidance as a method for fast, conformal thermal therapy of the prostate. Comprehensive simulations with a biothermal model investigated the effect on lesion creation of sector size, perfusion, treatment time, rectal cooling, prostate target dimensions, and feedback controller parameters (maximum temperature, pilot points at boundary, update times). In vivo canine prostates (n = 4) were treated with trisectored ultrasound transducers (3 mm OD) under MR temperature monitoring to contour the ablation zone (>52 C for 1-2 min) to the boundary of the prostate. Contiguous thermal lesions extended 2 cm in radius from the urethra in less than 15 min and independent sector control simultaneously allowed for conformal treatment in the angular dimension. Experiments investigated sequential translation of the transducer assembly within the catheter for tailoring heat treatments to different partitions in the prostate (base, apex) without changing the initial setup. This treatment method offered greater lesion shape control in three dimensions and slightly lengthened the overall treatment time. The MR temperature images correlated with post-treatment histology and accurately controlled the heating to the target boundary. MR-based control of transurethral ultrasound devices appeared more practical with multisectored transducers compared to rotating curvilinear and planar applicators due to less stringent requirements on spatial and temporal MR parameters. This study demonstrated the applicability of these devices in the prostate for anterior-lateral BPH treatment, and whole gland or quadrant target volumes for cancer treatment.

  8. SonoKnife: Feasibility of a line-focused ultrasound device for thermal ablation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Duo; Xia, Rongmin; Chen, Xin; Shafirstein, Gal; Corry, Peter M.; Griffin, Robert J.; Penagaricano, Jose A.; Tulunay-Ugur, Ozlem E.; Moros, Eduardo G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of line-focused ultrasound for thermal ablation of superficially located tumors. Methods: A SonoKnife is a cylindrical-section ultrasound transducer designed to radiate from its concave surface. This geometry generates a line-focus or acoustic edge. The motivation for this approach was the noninvasive thermal ablation of advanced head and neck tumors and positive neck nodes in reasonable treatment times. Line-focusing may offer advantages over the common point-focusing of spherically curved radiators such as faster coverage of a target volume by scanning of the acoustic edge. In this paper, The authors report studies using numerical models and phantom and ex vivo experiments using a SonoKnife prototype. Results: Acoustic edges were generated by cylindrical-section single-element ultrasound transducers numerically, and by the prototype experimentally. Numerically, simulations were performed to characterize the acoustic edge for basic design parameters: transducer dimensions, line-focus depth, frequency, and coupling thickness. The dimensions of the acoustic edge as a function of these parameters were determined. In addition, a step-scanning simulation produced a large thermal lesion in a reasonable treatment time. Experimentally, pressure distributions measured in degassed water agreed well with acoustic simulations, and sonication experiments in gel phantoms and ex vivo porcine liver samples produced lesions similar to those predicted with acoustic and thermal models. Conclusions: Results support the feasibility of noninvasive thermal ablation with a SonoKnife. PMID:21859038

  9. Use of a novel combined radiofrequency and ultrasound device for lipolysis, skin tightening and cellulite treatment.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Rinky; Shome, Debraj; Ranjan, Anima

    2017-10-01

    Skin laxity and excessive subcutaneous fat are growing cosmetic concerns. The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a novel radiofrequency and ultrasound workstation for lipolysis, circumference reduction, treatment of skin laxity and cellulite. Two hundred seventy-five (235 women and 40 men) patients were enrolled into the study. Each patient received 3 treatment sessions, each session comprising Ultrasound and Radiofrequency treatments, at two-week intervals. Some received treatment for the abdomen, some for the thighs and some for both. Efficacy was assessed accordingly by measuring changes in abdominal circumference, thigh circumference and appearance of cellulite. Any adverse effect was noted. Paired t-test between measurements at baseline and 4 weeks after 3rd session was significant amongst all the groups, showing that most patients showed improvement in abdominal and/or thigh circumferences. No significant adverse effects were noted during or after the treatment. A combination of alternating hot and cold module Ultrasound and Radiofrequency technologies is a safe and effective modality for lipolysis and to treat skin laxity and cellulite.

  10. Lost intrauterine devices during pregnancy: maternal and fetal outcome after ultrasound-guided extraction. An analysis of 82 cases.

    PubMed

    Schiesser, M; Lapaire, O; Tercanli, S; Holzgreve, W

    2004-05-01

    It is generally agreed that intrauterine devices (IUDs) with visible strings in pregnancy should be removed because of the increased risk of miscarriage, septic complications and premature delivery. The precise management of pregnancies in association with so-called 'lost IUDs', and especially the technique of their removal, has remained controversial. We present our experience of the management of intrauterine pregnancies with a lost IUD. Ultrasound-guided extraction of a lost IUD was performed in 82 intrauterine pregnancies. The subsequent outcome of the pregnancies is described. There were no intra- or post-procedure maternal complications. Although the miscarriage rate in the first 3 weeks after the procedure was higher than that in normal pregnancy, the complication rate approached that of normal pregnancy as the pregnancies progressed. The total miscarriage rate of 22% was comparable to that following extraction of IUDs with visible filaments. The rate of live births was 77.0%. Delivery before 37 weeks occurred in 13.5% of cases. Ultrasound-guided extraction is a minimally invasive and inexpensive procedure that is associated with few postoperative complications. It has a high success rate and is associated with a moderate miscarriage rate and no maternal complications. Copyright 2004 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Dual-modality image guided high intensity focused ultrasound device design for prostate cancer: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobson, Dexter; Curiel, Laura; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Pichardo, Samuel

    2012-10-01

    In this study the feasibility of designing a multi-element prostate cancer treatment device using Magnetic Resonance Imaging and ultrasound imaging for guidance was determined. A parametric study was performed to determine the optimal focal length (L), operating frequency (f), element size (a) and central hole radius for lodging an imaging probe (r) of a device that would safely treat cancerous tissue within the prostate. Images from the Visible Human Project were used to determine simulated organ sizes and treatment locations. Elliptical tumors were placed throughout the simulated prostate and their lateral and axial limits were selected as test locations. Using Tesla C1060 (NVIDIA, Santa Clara, CA, USA) graphics processors, the Bio-Heat Transfer Equation was implemented to calculate the heating produced during the simulated treatment. L, f a and r were varied from 45 to 75mm, 2.25 to 3.00MHz, 1.5 to 8 times λ and 9 to 11mm, respectively. Results indicated that a device of 761 elements with a combination of L, f a and r of 68mm, 2.75MHz, 2.05λ and 9mm, respectively, could safely ablate tumors within the prostate and spare the surrounding organs.

  12. A robotics-based flat-panel ultrasound device for continuous intraoperative transcutaneous imaging.

    PubMed

    Gumprecht, Jan D J; Bauer, Thomas; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Lueth, Tim C

    2011-01-01

    Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy has become more and more popular in the last decade. Video laparoscopes remain the gold standard of intraoperative imaging during laparoscopic interventions. However, providing only superficial images of the target tissue. In contrast, ultrasound (US) imaging may offer crucial information of the interior of the target tissue that could improve surgical outcome. In this paper, we propose a new concept and prototype system to manipulate an US-probe during laparoscopic partial nephrectomies. Our primary goal was to provide the surgeon with US-images during the intervention in real-time. The prototype system consists of three components: a conventional US-machine, a manipulator to guide the US-probe, and a joystick console to control the manipulator. The results of our experiments show that the concept is feasible for US-imaging during laparoscopic partial nephrectomy.

  13. Removal efficiency of a constructed wetland combined with ultrasound and UV devices for wastewater reuse in agriculture.

    PubMed

    Toscano, Attilio; Hellio, Claire; Marzo, Alessia; Milani, Mirco; Lebret, Karen; Cirelli, Giuseppe L; Langergraber, Günter

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluates the treatment efficiency of a chemical-free water treatment for treating the secondary effluent of a municipal wastewater treatment plant with the aim of reusing the water for agriculture. Urban wastewater was treated by three units run in series: a full-scale horizontal sub-surface flow constructed wetland, a small pond with an ultrasound (US) system and a UV device. The treatment efficiency was evaluated in terms of the Italian wastewater limits for irrigation reuse, water quality improvement (removal percentage) and algae bloom control. The tolerable infection risk, associated with the use of wastewaters for irrigating crops, was also assessed by applying the microbial risk analyses proposed in the WHO guidelines for wastewater reuse. The constructed wetland was efficient in reducing physical-chemical and microbiological concentrations, and its efficiency was very steady over the investigation period. The UV system significantly improved water quality (p<0.05) in terms of pathogen concentration with a further average decrease from 0.35 to 1.23 log units, depending on the microbiological parameter. The US device was able to prevent algae bloom on a free water surface and maintain Chlorophyll-a concentration stable and low 2 months after activation.

  14. A random phased array device for delivery of high intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Hand, J W; Shaw, A; Sadhoo, N; Rajagopal, S; Dickinson, R J; Gavrilov, L R

    2009-10-07

    Randomized phased arrays can offer electronic steering of a single focus and simultaneous multiple foci concomitant with low levels of secondary maxima and are potentially useful as sources of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). This work describes laboratory testing of a 1 MHz random phased array consisting of 254 elements on a spherical shell of radius of curvature 130 mm and diameter 170 mm. Acoustic output power and efficiency are measured for a range of input electrical powers, and field distributions for various single- and multiple-focus conditions are evaluated by a novel technique using an infrared camera to provide rapid imaging of temperature changes on the surface of an absorbing target. Experimental results show that the array can steer a single focus laterally to at least +/-15 mm off axis and axially to more than +/-15 mm from the centre of curvature of the array and patterns of four and five simultaneous foci +/-10 mm laterally and axially whilst maintaining low intensity levels in secondary maxima away from the targeted area in good agreement with linear theoretical predictions. Experiments in which pork meat was thermally ablated indicate that contiguous lesions several cm(3) in volume can be produced using the patterns of multiple foci.

  15. Design of an exposimetry system for analysis of high-frequency ultrasound devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snook, Kevin A.; Huang, Bin; Smith, Nadine B.; Shung, K. Kirk

    2001-05-01

    An exposimetry system for characterization of high frequency ultrasound fields has been developed and built. By extrapolating the recommendations of the AIUM and IEC standards to higher frequencies, an exposimetry system operating above 15 MHz was outlined. The system incorporates a five degrees-of-freedom positioning system, including three automated translational motors that provide 0.5 micron resolution. Two manual rotational axes utilize a worm-gear and concentric cylinder arrangement to insure orthogonal rotational adjustment. Overall bandwidth of the system is 100 MHz and is limited by the type of hydrophone used. Using a calibrated 0.04 mm diameter needle-type hydrophone, measurements of single element transducers of 25-50 MHz have been made. LiNbO3 and PVDF transducers of f-numbers from 2-3 have been tested and 2D intensity beam profiles plotted. Results from a 50 MHz LiNbO3 transducer show good agreement between empirical (8.6 mm) and theoretical (9.0 mm) focal points. The -3 dB beamwidth was also measured (108 micron) to be comparable to that of the calculated value (86 micron). It is shown that this system provides a good means for characterization and analysis of the beam profiles of high frequency transducers.

  16. A new pocket-sized transcranial ultrasound device (NeuroDop): comparison with standard TCD.

    PubMed

    Kidwell, C S; Martin, N A; Saver, J L

    2000-04-01

    The NeuroDop is a new bedside assessment tool consisting of a continuous wave ultrasound probe attached to a stethoscope earpiece. This study was designed to compare middle cerebral artery (MCA) velocity assessment obtained with the NeuroDop versus standard transcranial Doppler (TCD). TCD technologists performed continuous wave NeuroDop studies followed by standard TCD studies on 60 subjects. Technologists recorded presence of MCA signal and estimated velocity based on NeuroDop auditory characteristics. Signal was obtained in 108 MCA vessels with the portable unit and in 112 vessels using standard TCD. For detection of patency, sensitivity was 96%, specificity 88%, positive predictive value 99%, and negative predictive value 58%. Auditorially estimated velocities from the NeuroDop strongly correlated with TCD velocity measures (r = 0.71). Categorical estimates of velocity as decreased (< 37 cm/sec), normal (37-81 cm/sec), or increased (> 81 cm/sec) demonstrated an accuracy rate of 85%. This novel stethoscope-continuous wave unit has excellent sensitivity in detecting presence of MCA patency. Moreover, MCA velocities can be characterized to a reasonable degree of accuracy based on NeuroDop auditory characteristics. The NeuroDop shows promise as a tool to rapidly assess and serially monitor presence and amplitude of MCA velocity and may help guide thrombolytic and other emergency management decisions in stroke patients.

  17. Percutaneous puncture of renal calyxes guided by a novel device coupled with ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chen Jen; Srougi, Victor; Tanno, Fabio Yoshiaki; Jordão, Ricardo Duarte; Srougi, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To evaluate the efficiency of a novel device coupled with ultrassound for renal percutaneous puncture. Materials and Methods: After establishing hydronephrosis, ten pigs had three calyxes of each kidney punctured by the same urology resident, with and without the new device (“Punctiometer”). Time for procedure completion, number of attempts to reach the calyx, puncture precision and puncture complications were recorded in both groups and compared. Results: Puncture success on the first attempt was achieved in 25 punctures (83%) with the Punctiometer and in 13 punctures (43%) without the Punctiometer (p=0.011). The mean time required to perform three punctures in each kidney was 14.5 minutes with the Punctiometer and 22.4 minutes without the Punctiometer (p=0.025). The only complications noted were renal hematomas. In the Punctiometer group, all kidneys had small hematomas. In the no Punctiometer group 80% had small hematomas, 10% had a medium hematoma and 10% had a big hematoma. There was no difference in complications between both groups. Conclusions: The Punctiometer is an effective device to increase the likelihood of an accurate renal calyx puncture during PCNL, with a shorter time required to perform the procedure. PMID:26689521

  18. Comparison of high definition oscillometric and Doppler ultrasound devices with invasive blood pressure in anaesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Seliškar, Alenka; Zrimšek, Petra; Sredenšek, Jerneja; Petrič, Aleksandra D

    2013-01-01

    To use the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM) validation criteria to evaluate the performance of high definition oscillometric (HDO) and Doppler blood pressure measurement techniques against invasive blood pressure measurements in anaesthetized dogs. Prospective clinical study. Twenty client-owned dogs. Invasive blood pressure was measured using a catheter inserted into a pedal artery and an electronic transducer. The sites of cuff placement for the HDO measurements were the mid antebrachium or the proximal tail and, for the Doppler technique, the distal tibia. Agreement between invasive and non-invasive blood pressure measurements was estimated by the Bland-Altman method. Only 10% and 34% of Doppler measurements were within 10 and 20 mmHg of invasive blood pressure values, respectively. The Doppler device failed to meet the ACVIM validation criteria for blood pressure measurement devices. The best agreement between HDO and invasive blood pressure measurement technique was observed for mean arterial blood pressure (MAP); 67% and 95% of readings were within 10 and 20 mmHg of invasive blood pressure values respectively. In addition, 52% and 87% of diastolic arterial blood pressure (DAP) measurements were within 10 and 20 mmHg of invasive readings. High definition oscillometric readings did not meet ACVIM recommended limits for SAP. The Doppler technique overestimated and the HDO device showed limited agreement with invasive blood pressure measurement in anaesthetized dogs. High definition oscillometry met most of the ACVIM requirements for MAP and DAP while the Doppler technique did not. © 2012 The Authors. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia. © 2012 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesiologists.

  19. Comparison between high-intensity focused ultrasound devices for the treatment of patients with localized prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hakushi; Tomonaga, Tetsuro; Shoji, Sunao; Uchida, Toyoaki

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the association between long-term clinical outcomes and morbidity of patients with prostate cancer who underwent high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). We included 918 patients with stage T1c-T3N0M0 prostate cancer who were treated with Sonablate™ (SB) devices during 1999-2012 and followed-up for >2 years. Risk stratification and complication rates were compared between the treatment groups. The 10-year overall and cancer-specific survival rates were 89.6% and 97.4%, respectively. The 5-year biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) rates in the SB200/500, SB500 version 4, and SB500 tissue change monitor groups were 48.3%, 62.3%, and 82.0%, respectively (p < 0.0001). In the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk categories, the 10-year bDFS rates for all patients were 63%, 52%, and 32%, respectively (p < 0.0001), whereas the 5-year bDFS rates in the tissue change monitor group were 95%, 84%, and 72%, respectively (p = 0.0134). The overall negative biopsy rate was 87.3%. Multivariate analysis showed pre-treatment serum prostate-specific antigen levels, neoadjuvant hormonal therapy, and devices as significant predictors (p < 0.0001). Urethral stricture, epididymitis, and urinary incontinence were observed in 19.7%, 6.2%, and 2.3% of the cases, respectively. Long-term follow-up with HIFU demonstrated improved clinical outcomes owing to technical, imaging, and technological advancements.

  20. [Adequacy of the device intrauterine by ultrasound evaluation: postpartum and post-abortion insertion versus insertion during the menstrual cycle].

    PubMed

    de Holanda, Antônio Arildo Reginaldo; Pessoa, Aline de Melo; Holanda, Julita de Campos Pipolo; de Melo, Maria Helena Vieira; Maranhão, Técia Maria de Oliveira

    2013-08-01

    To compare by transvaginal ultrasound the position of the intrauterine device (IUD) inside the uterine cavity, depending on the time of insertion, postpartum and post-abortion, and during the menstrual cycle. Epidemiologic, observational and cross-sectional study carried out between February and July, 2013. A total of 290 women were included, 205 of them with insertion during the menstrual cycle and 85 during the postpartum and post-abortion periods. The independent variables were: age, parity, time of use, insertion time, number of returns to family planning, satisfaction with the method, wish to continue using the device, symptoms and complications. The dependent variable was the adequate position of the IUD inside the uterine cavity. The χ² test with Pearson's correction and the Fisher exact test were used for statistical analysis, with the level of significance set at 5%. The average age was 29.4 years and the average time of IUD use was 2.7 years; 39.3% of the women had symptoms associated with the method, the most frequent being menorrhagia (44.7%). The degree of satisfaction was 85% and 61.4% of the women returned two or more times for consultation about family planning. Age, parity and the position of the uterus in the pelvic cavity was not associated with a poor position of the IUD inside the uterine cavity (p>0.05). Insertion during the menstrual cycle was significantly more associated with a correct position of the IUD than postpartum and post-abortion insertion (p<0.028). Postpartum and post-abortion insertion showed worse results regarding the adequacy of IUD position, a fact that was not observed regarding age, parity or position of the uterus in the pelvic cavity.

  1. Green light emitting nanostructures of Tb3+ doped LaOF prepared via ultrasound route applicable in display devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, C.; Nagabhushana, H.; Basavaraj, R. B.; Prasad, B. Daruka

    2017-05-01

    For the first time Tb3+ (1-5 mol %) doped LaOF nanophosphors using Aloe vera (AV) leaves extract as bio-surfactant were synthesized by facile ultrasound supported sonochemical route at relatively high temperature (700°C) and short duration of 3h. The powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) profiles of LaOF nanophosphors showed tetragonal structure. The morphological features of LaOF with effect of Sonication time and concentration of bio-surfactant were studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The particle size were estimated from transmission electron microscope (TEM) image was found to be in the range of 20-30 nm. The characteristic photoluminescence emission peaks at 487, 541, 586 and 620 nm in green region corresponding to 5D4→7Fj (j=6, 5, 4, 3) transitions of Tb3+ were observed. The LaOF: Tb3+ nanophosphors exhibit green luminescence with better chromaticity coordinates, colour purity and higher intensity under low-voltage electron beam excitation were observed by Commission International De I'Eclairage (CIE) along with colour correlated temperature (CCT). All results indicate that these obtained nanophosphors have potential applications in field emission display device.

  2. [Use of ultrasound in ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    Trier, H G

    1982-12-01

    In ophthalmology, ultrasound is applied in diagnostics as well as in surgery and therapy. This paper gives a short survey on both applications. Ultrasonic phacoemulsification is of considerable practical importance for modern cataract micro-surgery with intraocular lens implantation. Applications of that kind require consideration of ultrasonic bioeffects and equipment safety. Diagnostic use of ultrasound includes biometry (echometry), tissue examination and characterization, and vascular investigations in eye and orbit. The application of diagnostic ultrasound on in-patients, its individual indications, and the appropriate methods (A, B, automatic biometric devices for axial length measuring, M, Doppler) are described. Examples of commercially available instruments for the different applications are given. In comparison with other disciplines ophthalmic A-mode and B-mode echography is characterized by: refined depth resolution and lateral resolution; the important part of quantitative methods for clinical evaluation of echograms; and the advanced level of quality assurance for equipment performance. Refined tissue evaluation requires optimized and reproducible equipment parameters. To ensure these conditions the clinical echographer must be educated and willing to test performance and quality of his equipment. Finally, a perspective of actual research in diagnostic ultrasound of the eye is given.

  3. Refractive Results Using a New Optical Biometry Device: Comparison With Ultrasound Biometry Data.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Serdar; Aktas, Hatice; Tetikoglu, Mehmet; Sagdk, Hac Murat; Özcura, Fatih

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the measurements of optical (AL-Scan; Nidek Co., Ltd.) and ultrasonic (Echo Scan US-800; Nidek Co., Ltd.) biometry devices and to assess refractive results after cataract surgery. Eighty-one cataractous eyes of 81 patients were included in this study. Biometry was performed using the AL-Scan and an ultrasonic biometer (USB). Axial length (AL), keratometry (K) data, and intraocular lens (IOL) power calculations using the SRK/T formula were compared. Bland-Altman analysis was used to assess the extent of agreement between AL-Scan and USB data in terms of AL measurement and IOL power calculation. The K measurements of the AL-Scan were compared to autorefractor data (Canon Autorefractor RK-F1). The AL-Scan assessed the AL as longer (average difference 0.06 ± 0.18 mm; ICC = 0.987; P < 0.001) and the IOL power as greater (average difference 0.19 ± 0.66 D; ICC = 0.964; P < 0.001) than the USB. The AL-Scan also measured average K values (average difference 0.25 ± 0.25 D; ICC = 0.985; P < 0.001) greater than those given by the autorefractor. The postoperative mean absolute error was +0.30 ± 0.04 D (minimum: -0.51 D, maximum +1.04 D). The postoperative mean K value change was 0.36 ± 0.29 D (P < 0.05). The differences between measurements afforded by the AL-Scan and USB may be clinically acceptable. Keratometric changes that develop after cataract operations compromise the attainment of good refractive outcomes.

  4. The use of a pocket-sized ultrasound device improves physical examination: results of an in- and outpatient cohort study.

    PubMed

    Colli, Agostino; Prati, Daniele; Fraquelli, Mirella; Segato, Sergio; Vescovi, Pier Paolo; Colombo, Fabrizio; Balduini, Carlo; Della Valle, Serena; Casazza, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The performance of pocket mobile ultrasound devices (PUDs) is comparable with that of standard ultrasonography, whereas the accuracy of a physical examination is often poor requiring further tests to assess diagnostic hypotheses. Adding the use of PUD to physical examination could lead to an incremental benefit. We assessed whether the use of PUD in the context of physical examination can reduce the prescription of additional tests when used by physicians in different clinical settings. We conducted a cohort impact study in four hospital medical wards, one gastroenterological outpatient clinic, and 90 general practices in the same geographical area. The study involved 135 physicians who used PUD, after a short predefined training course, to examine 1962 consecutive patients with one of 10 diagnostic hypotheses: ascites, pleural effusion, pericardial effusion, urinary retention, urinary stones, gallstones, biliary-duct dilation, splenomegaly, abdominal mass, abdominal aortic aneurysm. According to the physicians' judgment, PUD examination could rule out or in the diagnostic hypothesis or require further testing; the concordance with the final diagnosis was assessed. The main outcome was the proportion of cases in which additional tests were required after PUD. The PUD diagnostic accuracy was assessed in patients submitted to further testing. The 1962 patients included 37% in-patients, 26% gastroenterology outpatients, 37% from general practices. Further testing after PUD examination was deemed unnecessary in 63%. Only 5% of patients with negative PUD not referred for further testing were classified false negatives with respect to the final diagnosis. In patients undergoing further tests, the sensitivity was 91%, and the specificity 83%. After a simple and short training course, a PUD examination can be used in addition to a physical examination to improve the answer to ten common clinical questions concerning in- and outpatients, and can reduce the need for further

  5. The Use of a Pocket-Sized Ultrasound Device Improves Physical Examination: Results of an In- and Outpatient Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Colli, Agostino; Prati, Daniele; Fraquelli, Mirella; Segato, Sergio; Vescovi, Pier Paolo; Colombo, Fabrizio; Balduini, Carlo; Della Valle, Serena; Casazza, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Background The performance of pocket mobile ultrasound devices (PUDs) is comparable with that of standard ultrasonography, whereas the accuracy of a physical examination is often poor requiring further tests to assess diagnostic hypotheses. Adding the use of PUD to physical examination could lead to an incremental benefit. Aim We assessed whether the use of PUD in the context of physical examination can reduce the prescription of additional tests when used by physicians in different clinical settings. Methods We conducted a cohort impact study in four hospital medical wards, one gastroenterological outpatient clinic, and 90 general practices in the same geographical area. The study involved 135 physicians who used PUD, after a short predefined training course, to examine 1962 consecutive patients with one of 10 diagnostic hypotheses: ascites, pleural effusion, pericardial effusion, urinary retention, urinary stones, gallstones, biliary-duct dilation, splenomegaly, abdominal mass, abdominal aortic aneurysm. According to the physicians’ judgment, PUD examination could rule out or in the diagnostic hypothesis or require further testing; the concordance with the final diagnosis was assessed. The main outcome was the proportion of cases in which additional tests were required after PUD. The PUD diagnostic accuracy was assessed in patients submitted to further testing. Findings The 1962 patients included 37% in-patients, 26% gastroenterology outpatients, 37% from general practices. Further testing after PUD examination was deemed unnecessary in 63%. Only 5% of patients with negative PUD not referred for further testing were classified false negatives with respect to the final diagnosis. In patients undergoing further tests, the sensitivity was 91%, and the specificity 83%. Conclusions After a simple and short training course, a PUD examination can be used in addition to a physical examination to improve the answer to ten common clinical questions concerning in- and

  6. Thermal ablation of pancreatic cyst with a prototype endoscopic ultrasound capable radiofrequency needle device: A pilot feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Moris, Maria; Atar, Mustafa; Kadayifci, Abdurrahman; Krishna, Murli; Librero, Ariston; Richie, Eugene; Brugge, William; Wallace, Michael B

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cysts are evaluated by endoscopic ultrasound and fine needle aspiration (EUS). The only accepted treatment is pancreatectomy, which is associated with morbidity and mortality. This study evaluated the optimal thermal dosimetry of a novel radiofrequency ablation device using a standard electrosurgical unit in ex vivo cyst models. A modified EUS 22-gauge monopolar needle prototype with a tip electrode connected to a standard electrosurgical unit (Erbe USA, Marietta, GA, USA) was used to induce a subboiling point temperature. A cyst model was created using 2-cm sections of porcine small intestine ligated and filled with saline. After ablation, the cyst models were prepared for pathological evaluation. The epithelial layers were measured in at least two different sites with a micrometer and compared with the corresponding control sample. Thirty-two cyst models were ablated with maximum temperatures of 50°C, 60°C, 90°C, and 97°C in 8, 11, 11, and 2 cysts, respectively. Longer ablation times were required to induce higher temperatures. A trend in the reduction in thickness of the measured layers was observed after exposure to higher temperatures. A temperature over 50°C was required for the ablation of the muscularis, submucosa, and villi, and over 60°C was required to ablate the mucosal crypts. In a preclinical model, a novel radiofrequency EUS-capable needle connected to a standard electrosurgical unit using standard low-voltage coagulation provided ablation in a temperature-dependent fashion with a threshold of at least 60°C and a safe cyst margin below 97°C. This potentially will allow low-cost, convenient cyst ablation.

  7. Twelve years' experience with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) using sonablate™ devices for the treatment of localized prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Toyoaki; Nakano, Muyura; Shoji, Sunao; Nagata, Yoshihiro; Usui, Yukio; Terachi, Toshiro

    2012-10-01

    To report on the long-term results of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) in the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Patients with clinical Stage T1c-T3N0M0, biopsy proven, localized prostate cancer, with a serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) level of <30 ng/ml, any Gleason score were included. All patients underwent HIFU using the Sonablate™ (S) device and were required to have a minimal follow-up of 2 years after the last HIFU session to be included in this analysis. Four different generation HIFU devices, S200, S500, S500 version 4 and S500 TCM, have been used for this study. Biochemical failure was defined according to the Phoenix definition (PSA nadir+2ng/ml). Seven hundred and fifty-three men with prostate cancer were included. The patients were divided into two groups: in the Former group, 421 patients were treated with S200 and 500 from 1990 to 2005; in the Latter group, 332 patients were treated with S500 ver. 4 and TCM from 2005 to 2009. The mean age, PSA, Gleason score, operation time, and follow-up period in the Former and Latter groups were 68 and 67 years, 11.3 and 9.7 ng/ml, 6.2 and 6.6, 167 and 101 min, and 49 and 38 months, respectively. The biochemical disease-free rate (BDFR) in the groups at 5 years was, respectively, 67% and 53%, and was 50% at 10 years in the Former group (p<0.0001). The BDFR in patients in the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups in the Former group at 5 and 10 years were 68% and 65%, 52% and 48%, and 43% and 40%, respectively (p<0.0001). The BDFR in patients in the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups in the Latter group at 5 years were 83%, 76%, and 42% (p<0.0001). The negative prostate biopsy rate in the Former and Latter groups was 81% and 93%, respectively. Postoperative erectile dysfunction was noted in 45%, 38%, and 24% of patients at 6 months, 12 months, and 2 years after HIFU. The results after long-term follow-up have indicated that HIFU is an efficient and safe treatment for patients with

  8. Sublethal effect assessment of a low-power and dual-frequency anti-cyanobacterial ultrasound device on the common carp (Cyprinus carpio): a field study.

    PubMed

    Techer, Didier; Milla, Sylvain; Banas, Damien

    2016-12-30

    The use of ultrasonication for cyanobacterial control in freshwater bodies has become increasingly popular during the last decades despite controversial efficiency on large scale application. Apart from that, little information is currently available regarding ultrasound toxicity potential towards non-target species. This work was designed to address this issue in the common carp using a low-power (7-9 W output) and dual-frequency (23 and 46 kHz) anti-cyanobacterial ultrasound device. Results showed that carps were unaffected by ultrasound exposure when exposed in floating cages in fish ponds over a 30-day period. The experiment duration was the main factor influencing all measured biological parameters in exposed and non-exposed organisms. Indeed, it was positively associated with an increase in fish condition factor. Cortisol level also tended to slightly increase over the number of days of experiment but its variation did not enable to sort out any ultrasound exposure-related stress. Moreover, an overall diminution along the experimental period of the expression level of a set of biomarkers could be reported, encompassing cellular antioxidant enzyme activities such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxydase (GPx), catalase and glutathione S-transferase (GST), and lactate dehydrogenase activity. Subtle changes in these biomarkers were dependent of the type of enzyme activity and especially of the origin of fish (i.e., sampled pond) regardless of the presence of ultrasound equipment, reflecting thereby fish adaptation to local environmental conditions in each pond. In conclusion, this study does not provide indication that ultrasonication in the aforementioned conditions affects the welfare and physiological homeostasis of carps.

  9. Randomized sham-controlled trial to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a high-intensity focused ultrasound device for noninvasive body sculpting.

    PubMed

    Jewell, Mark L; Baxter, Richard A; Cox, Sue Ellen; Donofrio, Lisa M; Dover, Jeffrey S; Glogau, Richard G; Kane, Michael A; Weiss, Robert A; Martin, Patrick; Schlessinger, Joel

    2011-07-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound presents a noninvasive approach to body sculpting for nonobese patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a high-intensity focused ultrasound device for sculpting of the abdomen and flanks. Adults (aged 18 to 65 years) with subcutaneous abdominal fat greater than or equal to 2.5 cm thick who met screening criteria were randomized to receive high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment of the anterior abdomen and flanks at energy levels (a total of three passes each) of 47 J/cm (141 J/cm total), 59 J/cm (177 J/cm), or 0 J/cm (no energy applied, sham control). The primary endpoint was change from baseline waist circumference at the iliac crest level at posttreatment week 12. Subjective aesthetic assessments included the Global Aesthetic Improvement Scale and a patient satisfaction questionnaire. Safety assessments included adverse events, laboratory values, and physical examinations. For the primary endpoint, in the intent-to-treat population, statistical significance versus sham was achieved for the 59-J/cm (-2.44; p = 0.01) but not the 47-J/cm treatment group (-2.06 cm; p = 0.13). In a per-protocol population, statistical significance versus sham was achieved for both the 59-J/cm (-2.52 cm; p = 0.002) and the 47-J/cm treatment groups (-2.10 cm; p = 0.04). Investigator subjective measures of global aesthetic improvement and patient satisfaction also favored each active treatment versus sham. Adverse events included mild to moderate discomfort, bruising, and edema. Laboratory values and physical examinations were unremarkable. Treatment with this high-intensity focused ultrasound device reduced waist circumference and was generally well tolerated for noninvasive body sculpting. Reduction in waist circumference was statistically significant with both active treatments (per protocol). Therapeutic, II.(Figure is included in full-text article.).

  10. Improved cardiovascular diagnostic accuracy by pocket size imaging device in non-cardiologic outpatients: the NaUSiCa (Naples Ultrasound Stethoscope in Cardiology) study.

    PubMed

    Galderisi, Maurizio; Santoro, Alessandro; Versiero, Marco; Lomoriello, Vincenzo Schiano; Esposito, Roberta; Raia, Rosa; Farina, Francesca; Schiattarella, Pier Luigi; Bonito, Manuela; Olibet, Marinella; de Simone, Giovanni

    2010-11-26

    Miniaturization has evolved in the creation of a pocket-size imaging device which can be utilized as an ultrasound stethoscope. This study assessed the additional diagnostic power of pocket size device by both experts operators and trainees in comparison with physical examination and its appropriateness of use in comparison with standard echo machine in a non-cardiologic population. Three hundred four consecutive non cardiologic outpatients underwent a sequential assessment including physical examination, pocket size imaging device and standard Doppler-echo exam. Pocket size device was used by both expert operators and trainees (who received specific training before the beginning of the study). All the operators were requested to give only visual, qualitative insights on specific issues. All standard Doppler-echo exams were performed by expert operators. One hundred two pocket size device exams were performed by experts and two hundred two by trainees. The time duration of the pocket size device exam was 304 ± 117 sec. Diagnosis of cardiac abnormalities was made in 38.2% of cases by physical examination and in 69.7% of cases by physical examination + pocket size device (additional diagnostic power = 31.5%, p < 0.0001). The overall K between pocket size device and standard Doppler-echo was 0.67 in the pooled population (0.84 by experts and 0.58 by trainees). K was suboptimal for trainees in the eyeball evaluation of ejection fraction, left atrial dilation and right ventricular dilation. Overall sensitivity was 91% and specificity 76%. Sensitivity and specificity were lower in trainees than in experts. In conclusion, pocket size device showed a relevant additional diagnostic value in comparison with physical examination. Sensitivity and specificity were good in experts and suboptimal in trainees. Specificity was particularly influenced by the level of experience. Training programs are needed for pocket size device users.

  11. Safety of embolic protection device-assisted and unprotected intravascular ultrasound in evaluating carotid artery atherosclerotic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Musialek, Piotr; Pieniazek, Piotr; Tracz, Wieslawa; Tekieli, Lukasz; Przewlocki, Tadeusz; Kablak-Ziembicka, Anna; Motyl, Rafal; Moczulski, Zbigniew; Stepniewski, Jakub; Trystula, Mariusz; Zajdel, Wojciech; Roslawiecka, Agnieszka; Zmudka, Krzysztof; Podolec, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Significant atherosclerotic stenosis of internal carotid artery (ICA) origin is common (5–10% at ≥60 years). Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) enables high-resolution (120 μm) plaque imaging, and IVUS-elucidated features of the coronary plaque were recently shown to be associated with its symptomatic rupture/thrombosis risk. Safety of the significant carotid plaque IVUS imaging in a large unselected population is unknown. Material/Methods We prospectively evaluated the safety of embolic protection device (EPD)-assisted vs. unprotected ICA-IVUS in a series of consecutive subjects with ≥50% ICA stenosis referred for carotid artery stenting (CAS), including 104 asymptomatic (aS) and 187 symptomatic (S) subjects (age 47–83 y, 187 men). EPD use was optional for IVUS, but mandatory for CAS. Results Evaluation was performed of 107 ICAs (36.8%) without EPD and 184 with EPD. Lesions imaged under EPD were overall more severe (peak-systolic velocity 2.97±0.08 vs. 2.20±0.08m/s, end-diastolic velocity 1.0±0.04 vs. 0.7±0.03 m/s, stenosis severity of 85.7±0.5% vs. 77.7±0.6% by catheter angiography; mean ±SEM; p<0.01 for all comparisons) and more frequently S (50.0% vs. 34.6%, p=0.01). No ICA perforation or dissection, and no major stroke or death occurred. There was no IVUS-triggered cerebral embolization. In the procedures of (i) unprotected IVUS and no CAS, (ii) unprotected IVUS followed by CAS (filters – 39, flow reversal/blockade – 3), (iii) EPD-protected (filters – 135, flow reversal/blockade – 48) IVUS+CAS, TIA occurred in 1.5% vs. 4.8% vs. 2.7%, respectively, and minor stroke in 0% vs. 2.4% vs. 2.1%, respectively. EPD intolerance (on-filter ICA spasm or flow reversal/blockade intolerance) occurred in 9/225 (4.0%). IVUS increased the procedure duration by 7.27±0.19 min. Conclusions Carotid IVUS is safe and, for the less severe lesions in particular, it may not require mandatory EPD use. High-risk lesions can be safely evaluated with

  12. Ultrasound biomicroscopy in pupillary block glaucoma secondary to ophthalmic viscosurgical device remnants in the posterior chamber after anterior chamber phakic intraocular lens implantation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chuan-Bin; Liu, Zhe; Yao, Ke

    2010-12-01

    A 25-year-old woman developed pupillary block glaucoma in the right eye after implantation of an angle-supported phakic intraocular lens despite a preexisting moderate-sized iridectomy. Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) showed ophthalmic viscosurgical device retention in the posterior chamber and a full-thickness, patent-appearing iridectomy at 12 o'clock. The intraocular pressure gradually decreased to normal after a neodymium:YAG laser iridotomy was performed midperipherally at 9 o'clock. To our knowledge, this is the first report of UBM findings of this complication.

  13. Ultrasound assisted dialysis of semi-permeable membrane devices for the simultaneous analysis of a wide number of persistent organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Julen; Navarro, Patricia; Arana, Gorka; de Diego, Alberto; Madariaga, Juan Manuel

    2013-09-30

    A new procedure based on ultrasound assisted dialysis (UAD) for the simultaneous and quantitative extraction of a wide number of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) or some other organochlorinated pesticides (OCPs) contained in semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMDs) has been developed. This extraction technique combines the advantages of the organic solvent dialysis (OSD) and the speed of the ultrasound assisted extraction. The extraction was performed in an ultrasound bath for 32 min placing the SPMD in a glass flask covered with 80 mL of hexane. This set-up is able to extract simultaneously up to 8 samples. The proposed method entails good repeatabilities (RSD 2-13%) and recoveries (around 100% for almost every analyte). Limits of detection were at ng SPMD(-1) level and enough for the determination of the target analytes in a slightly polluted aquatic environment, as it was tested by successfully comparing the OSD to the proposed methodology. Therefore, the results obtained show that the UAD can be a good alternative for the extraction of POPs in SPMDs as it requires short extraction times and solvent volumes, and provides a cleaner extract for the subsequent clean-up step. Moreover, it fits better than the OSD to the general requirements of Green Chemistry.

  14. Guideline for Technical Quality Assurance (TQA) of ultrasound devices (B-Mode)--version 1.0 (July 2012): EFSUMB Technical Quality Assurance Group--US-TQA/B.

    PubMed

    Kollmann, C; deKorte, C; Dudley, N J; Gritzmann, N; Martin, K; Evans, D H

    2012-12-01

    The Technical Quality Assurance group was initiated by the EFSUMB Board in 2007 and met firstly in 2008 to discuss and evaluate methods and procedures published for performing technical quality assurance for diagnostic ultrasound devices. It is the aim of this group of experts to advise the EFSUMB Board of effective and efficacious methods for routine use and to make recommendations regarding the technical aspects of EFSUMB by-law 9, parts 11.6. & 11.7. The group's work focused on new developments and related European projects to establish a common guideline. There is a great need of a well established protocol and dedicated processing software for the performance testing of medical ultrasound equipment. The measurements should be user independent as much as physically possible. Only if these goals are achieved in an international (firstly European) context, the optimal quality of ultrasound imaging can be offered and maintained to the medical community. This guideline aims to offer and summarize suitable procedures and evaluation processes to lend support for an optimal Technical Quality Assurance (TQA) scheme. The content of this guideline was presented to the EFSUMB Board of Directors (delegates) and approved by the EFSUMB Executive Board (ExB) at the regular meeting during EUROSON 2012 in Madrid April 2012.

  15. MR guided thermal therapy of pancreatic tumors with endoluminal, intraluminal and interstitial catheter-based ultrasound devices: preliminary theoretical and experimental investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Punit; Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Scott, Serena J.; Jones, Peter; Hensley, Daniel; Holbrook, Andrew; Plata, Juan; Sommer, Graham; Diederich, Chris J.

    2013-02-01

    Image-guided thermal interventions have been proposed for potential palliative and curative treatments of pancreatic tumors. Catheter-based ultrasound devices offer the potential for temporal and 3D spatial control of the energy deposition profile. The objective of this study was to apply theoretical and experimental techniques to investigate the feasibility of endogastric, intraluminal and transgastric catheter-based ultrasound for MR guided thermal therapy of pancreatic tumors. The transgastric approach involves insertion of a catheter-based ultrasound applicator (array of 1.5 mm OD x 10 mm transducers, 360° or sectored 180°, ~7 MHz frequency, 13-14G cooling catheter) directly into the pancreas, either endoscopically or via image-guided percutaneous placement. An intraluminal applicator, of a more flexible but similar construct, was considered for endoscopic insertion directly into the pancreatic or biliary duct. An endoluminal approach was devised based on an ultrasound transducer assembly (tubular, planar, curvilinear) enclosed in a cooling balloon which is endoscopically positioned within the stomach or duodenum, adjacent to pancreatic targets from within the GI tract. A 3D acoustic bio-thermal model was implemented to calculate acoustic energy distributions and used a FEM solver to determine the transient temperature and thermal dose profiles in tissue during heating. These models were used to determine transducer parameters and delivery strategies and to study the feasibility of ablating 1-3 cm diameter tumors located 2-10 mm deep in the pancreas, while thermally sparing the stomach wall. Heterogeneous acoustic and thermal properties were incorporated, including approximations for tumor desmoplasia and dynamic changes during heating. A series of anatomic models based on imaging scans of representative patients were used to investigate the three approaches. Proof of concept (POC) endogastric and transgastric applicators were fabricated and experimentally

  16. MR guided thermal therapy of pancreatic tumors with endoluminal, intraluminal and interstitial catheter-based ultrasound devices: Preliminary theoretical and experimental investigations

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Punit; Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Scott, Serena J.; Jones, Peter; Hensley, Daniel; Holbrook, Andrew; Plata, Juan; Sommer, Graham; Diederich, Chris J.

    2014-01-01

    Image-guided thermal interventions have been proposed for potential palliative and curative treatments of pancreatic tumors. Catheter-based ultrasound devices offer the potential for temporal and 3D spatial control of the energy deposition profile. The objective of this study was to apply theoretical and experimental techniques to investigate the feasibility of endogastric, intraluminal and transgastric catheter-based ultrasound for MR guided thermal therapy of pancreatic tumors. The transgastric approach involves insertion of a catheter-based ultrasound applicator (array of 1.5 mm OD x 10 mm transducers, 360° or sectored 180°, ~7 MHz frequency, 13–14G cooling catheter) directly into the pancreas, either endoscopically or via image-guided percutaneous placement. An intraluminal applicator, of a more flexible but similar construct, was considered for endoscopic insertion directly into the pancreatic or biliary duct. An endoluminal approach was devised based on an ultrasound transducer assembly (tubular, planar, curvilinear) enclosed in a cooling balloon which is endoscopically positioned within the stomach or duodenum, adjacent to pancreatic targets from within the GI tract. A 3D acoustic bio-thermal model was implemented to calculate acoustic energy distributions and used a FEM solver to determine the transient temperature and thermal dose profiles in tissue during heating. These models were used to determine transducer parameters and delivery strategies and to study the feasibility of ablating 1–3 cm diameter tumors located 2–10 mm deep in the pancreas, while thermally sparing the stomach wall. Heterogeneous acoustic and thermal properties were incorporated, including approximations for tumor desmoplasia and dynamic changes during heating. A series of anatomic models based on imaging scans of representative patients were used to investigate the three approaches. Proof of concept (POC) endogastric and transgastric applicators were fabricated and

  17. High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Using Sonablate® Devices for the Treatment of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia and Localized Prostate Cancer: 18-year experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Toyoaki

    2011-09-01

    From 1993 to 2010, we have treated 156 patients benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and 1,052 patients localized prostate cancer high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Four different HIFU devices, SonablateR-200, SonablateR-500, SonablateR-500 version 4 and Sonablate® TCM, have been used for this study. Clinical outcome of HIFU for BPH did not show any superior effects to transurethral resection of the prostate, laser surgery or transurethral vapolization of the prostate. However, HIFU appears to be a safe and minimally invasive therapy for patients with localized prostate cancer, especially low- and intermediate-risk patients. The rate of clinical outcome has significantly improved over the years due to technical improvements in the device.

  18. Circumferential lesion formation around the pulmonary veins in the left atrium with focused ultrasound using a 2D-array endoesophageal device: a numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichardo, Samuel; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2007-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most frequently sustained cardiac arrhythmia affecting humans. The electrical isolation by ablation of the pulmonary veins (PVs) in the left atrium (LA) of the heart has been proven as an effective cure of AF. The ablation consists mainly in the formation of a localized circumferential thermal coagulation of the cardiac tissue surrounding the PVs. In the present numerical study, the feasibility of producing the required circumferential lesion with an endoesophageal ultrasound probe is investigated. The probe operates at 1 MHz and consists of a 2D array with enough elements (114 × 20) to steer the acoustic field electronically in a volume comparable to the LA. Realistic anatomical conditions of the thorax were considered from the segmentation of histological images of the thorax. The cardiac muscle and the blood-filled cavities in the heart were identified and considered in the sound propagation and thermal models. The influence of different conditions of the thermal sinking in the LA chamber was also studied. The circumferential ablation of the PVs was achieved by the sum of individual lesions induced with the proposed device. Different scenarios of lesion formation were considered where ultrasound exposures (1, 2, 5 and 10 s) were combined with maximal peak temperatures (60, 70 and 80 °C). The results of this numerical study allowed identifying the limits and best conditions for controlled lesion formation in the LA using the proposed device. A controlled situation for the lesion formation surrounding the PVs was obtained when the targets were located within a distance from the device in the range of 26 ± 7 mm. When combined with a maximal temperature of 70 °C and an exposure time between 5 and 10 s, this distance ensured preservation of the esophageal structures, controlled lesion formation and delivery of an acoustic intensity at the transducer surface that is compatible with existing materials. With a peak temperature of 70

  19. Evaluation of the sensitivity of an in vitro high frequency ultrasound device to monitor the coagulation process: study of the effects of heparin treatment in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Callé, Rachel; Rochefort, Gaël Y; Desbuards, Nicolas; Plag, Camille; Antier, Daniel; Ossant, Frédéric

    2010-02-01

    This study evaluates the sensitivity of a new in vitro high frequency ultrasound test of the whole blood coagulation process. A rat model of anticoagulant treatment is reported. Many recent studies of the role of red blood cells in the whole blood coagulation process have revealed an increasing demand for global tests of the coagulation process performed on whole blood instead of plasma samples. In contrast to existing optical tests, high frequency ultrasound presents the advantages of characterizing the mechanical properties of whole blood clotting. Ultrasound longitudinal wave velocity and integrated attenuation coefficient (IAC) were simultaneously assessed in a 10 to 30 MHz frequency range during the whole blood coagulation process in vitro in rats under anticoagulant therapy. Differences between humans and rats were also clearly emphasized in non-clotting blood and in clotting blood using specific criteria deduced from acoustic parameters (ultrasound velocity for non-clotting blood:=1574+/-2m/s for rats and 1583+/-3m/s for humans and IAC=2.25+/-0.14 dB/cm for rats and 1.5+/-0.23 dB/cm for humans). We also measured the coagulation time t(0) from the acoustic velocity (t(0) =11.15+/-7 min for control rat blood and 43.3+/-11.4 min for human blood). Different doses of heparin were administered to rats. The sensitivity of the ultrasound device to the effects of heparin was evaluated. Differences between non-treated rats and chronically and acutely treated rats were recorded and quantified. We particularly noted that the slope S and the amplitude I of the variations in acoustic velocity were linked to clot retraction, which is a good indicator of the platelet function. The amplitude of the variations in S was between (20+/-8) x1 0(-3) m/s(2) for control group rats, and (0.92+/-0.35) x 10(-3) m/s(2) for chronic heparin-treated group rats. The values of I were 15 times higher for control group rats than for chronic heparin-treated group rats.

  20. Abdominal Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ultrasound - Abdomen Ultrasound imaging of the abdomen uses sound waves to produce pictures of the structures within ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  1. Hip Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Hip Ultrasound Hip ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures of muscles, tendons, ligaments, ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  2. Ultrasound - Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ultrasound - Breast Ultrasound imaging of the breast uses sound waves to produce pictures of the internal structures ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  3. Obstetrical Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Obstetric Ultrasound Obstetric ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures of a baby (embryo ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  4. Intravascular ultrasound imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Cavaye, D.M.; White, R.A. )

    1992-01-01

    This book will give vascular surgeons, cardiologists, radiologists, and technologists a complete working knowledge of intravascular ultrasound imaging and the crucial role of this new technology in endovascular diagnosis and therapy. The book reviews the essential principles of vascular pathology and ultrasound imaging and then provides state-of-the-art information on intraluminal ultrasound imaging devices and techniques, including practical guidelines for using catheters, optimizing image quality, and avoiding artifacts. Image interpretation and computerized image reconstruction are also discussed in detail. The first section explains the diagnostic, therapeutic, and experimental applications of intravascular ultrasound, particularly as a adjunct to angioplasty and other current interventional procedures.

  5. Feasibility of remote real-time guidance of a cardiac examination performed by novices using a pocket-sized ultrasound device.

    PubMed

    Mai, Tuan V; Ahn, David T; Phillips, Colin T; Agan, Donna L; Kimura, Bruce J

    2013-01-01

    Background. The potential of pocket-sized ultrasound devices (PUDs) to improve global healthcare delivery is limited by the lack of a suitable imaging protocol and trained users. Therefore, we investigated the feasibility of performing a brief, evidence-based cardiac limited ultrasound exam (CLUE) through wireless guidance of novice users. Methods. Three trainees applied PUDs on 27 subjects while directed by an off-site cardiologist to obtain a CLUE to screen for LV systolic dysfunction (LVSD), LA enlargement (LAE), ultrasound lung comets (ULC+), and elevated CVP (eCVP). Real-time remote audiovisual guidance and interpretation by the cardiologist were performed using the iPhone 4/iPod (FaceTime, Apple, Inc.) attached to the PUD and transmitted data wirelessly. Accuracy and technical quality of transmitted images were compared to on-site, gold-standard echo thresholds. Results. Novice versus sonographer imaging yielded technically adequate views in 122/135 (90%) versus 130/135 (96%) (P < 0.05). CLUE's combined SN, SP, and ACC were 0.67, 0.96, and 0.90. Technical adequacy (%) and accuracy for each abnormality (n) were LVSD (85%, 0.93, n = 5), LAE (89%, 0.74, n = 16), ULC+ (100%, 0.94, n = 5), and eCVP (78%, 0.91, n = 1). Conclusion. A novice can perform the CLUE using PUD when wirelessly guided by an expert. This method could facilitate PUD use for off-site bedside medical decision making and triaging of patients.

  6. Real-time hand-held ultrasound medical-imaging device based on a new digital quadrature demodulation processor.

    PubMed

    Levesque, Philippe; Sawan, Mohamad

    2009-08-01

    A fully hardware-based real-time digital wideband quadrature demodulation processor based on the Hilbert transform is proposed to process ultrasound radio frequency signals. The presented architecture combines 2 finite impulse response (FIR) filters to process in-phase and quadrature signals and includes a piecewise linear approximation architecture that performs the required square root operations. The proposed implementation enables flexibility to support different transducers with its ability to load on-the-fly different FIR filter coefficient sets. The complexity and accuracy of the demodulator processor are analyzed with simulated RF data; a normalized residual sum-of-squares cost function is used for comparison with the Matlab Hilbert function. Three implementations are integrated into a hand-held ultrasound system for experimental accuracy and performance evaluation. Real-time images were acquired from a reference phantom, demonstrating the feasibility of using the presented architecture to perform real-time digital quadrature demodulation of ultrasonic signal echoes. Experimental results show that the implementation, using only 2942 slices and 3 dedicated digital multipliers of a low-cost and low-power field-programmable gate array (FPGA) is accurate relative to a comparable software- based system; axial and lateral resolution of 1 mm and 2 mm, respectively, were obtained with a 12-mm piezoelectric transducer without postprocessing. Because the processing and sampling rates are the same, high-frequency ultrasound signals can be processed as well. For a 15-frame-per-second display, the hand-held ultrasonic imaging-processing core (FPGA, memory) requires only 45 mW (dynamic) when using a 5-MHz single-element piezoelectric transducer.

  7. 21 CFR 878.4410 - Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. 878.4410... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4410 Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. (a) Identification. A low energy ultrasound wound cleaner is a device that...

  8. 21 CFR 878.4410 - Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. 878.4410... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4410 Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. (a) Identification. A low energy ultrasound wound cleaner is a device that...

  9. 21 CFR 878.4410 - Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. 878.4410... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4410 Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. (a) Identification. A low energy ultrasound wound cleaner is a device that...

  10. 21 CFR 878.4410 - Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. 878.4410... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4410 Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. (a) Identification. A low energy ultrasound wound cleaner is a device that...

  11. 21 CFR 878.4410 - Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. 878.4410... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4410 Low energy ultrasound wound cleaner. (a) Identification. A low energy ultrasound wound cleaner is a device that...

  12. Polymer bragg waveguide ultrasound detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindan, Vishnupriya; Ashkenazi, Shai

    2011-03-01

    Polymer Bragg Grating Waveguides (BGW) are demonstrated as ultrasound detectors. The device is fabricated by direct electron beam lithography technique using SU-8 as the core material with grating features fabricated on the side walls of the rib waveguide. The main motivation for this design is the linear geometry of the device, which can be used in a linear array facilitating high frequency ultrasound imaging. The fabricated BGW device has a grating periodicity of 530 nm and the grating length is 500 μm. The device is tested for optical resonance spectrum. The BGW device is characterized both optically and acoustically. The BGW device is experimentally demonstrated for the detection of ultrasound waves emitted by a 25 MHz transducer. Detection sensitivity depends on optimal grating design for a steep resonance. The results demonstrate the potential use of BGW devices in highly compact array of optoacoustic detectors for high sensitivity ultrasound detection and photoacoustic imaging.

  13. A phase separation method for analyses of fluoroquinones in meats based on ultrasound-assisted salt-induced liquid-liquid microextraction and a new integrated device.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huili; Gao, Ming; Xu, Youqu; Wang, Wenwei; Zheng, Lian; Dahlgren, Randy A; Wang, Xuedong

    2015-08-01

    Herein, we developed a novel integrated device to perform phase separation based on ultrasound-assisted, salt-induced, liquid-liquid microextraction for determination of five fluoroquinones in meats by HPLC analysis. The novel integrated device consisted of three simple HDPE (high density polyethylene) parts that were used to separate the solvent from the aqueous solution prior to retrieving the extractant. The extraction parameters were optimized using the response surface method based on central composite design: 589μL of acetone solvent, pH2.1, 4.1min extraction time and 3.5g of Na2SO4. The limits of detection were 0.056-0.64 μgkg(-1) and recoveries were 87.2-110.6% for the five fluoroquinones in muscle tissue from fish, chicken, pork and beef. This method is easily constructed from inexpensive materials, extraction efficiency is high, and the approach is compatible with HPLC analysis. Thus, it has excellent prospects for sample pre-treatment and analysis of fluoroquinones in meat samples.

  14. Three-dimensional versus two-dimensional ultrasound for assessing levonorgestrel intrauterine device location: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Carla Maria Araujo; Araujo Júnior, Edward; Torloni, Maria Regina; Moron, Antonio Fernandes; Guazzelli, Cristina Aparecida Falbo

    2016-02-01

    To compare the rates of success of two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) sonographic (US) examinations in locating and adequately visualizing levonorgestrel intrauterine devices (IUDs) and to explore factors associated with the unsuccessful viewing on 2D US. Transvaginal 2D and 3D US examinations were performed on all patients 1 month after insertion of levonorgestrel IUDs. The devices were considered adequately visualized on 2D US if both the vertical (shadow, upper and lower extremities) and the horizontal (two echogenic lines) shafts were identified. 3D volumes were also captured to assess the location of levonorgestrel IUDs on 3D US. Thirty women were included. The rates of adequate device visualization were 40% on 2D US (95% confidence interval [CI], 24.6; 57.7) and 100% on 3D US (95% CI, 88.6; 100.0). The device was not adequately visualized in all six women who had a retroflexed uterus, but it was adequately visualized in 12 of the 24 women (50%) who had a nonretroflexed uterus (95% CI, -68.6; -6.8). We found that 3D US is better than 2D US for locating and adequately visualizing levonorgestrel IUDs. Other well-designed studies with adequate power should be conducted to confirm this finding. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Abdominal Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  16. Musculoskeletal Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  17. Ultrasound - Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  18. Hip Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  19. Ultrasound - Scrotum

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  20. Obstetrical Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  1. Duplex ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... duplex ultrasound combines: Traditional ultrasound: This uses sound waves that bounce off blood vessels to create pictures. Doppler ultrasound: This records sound waves reflecting off moving objects, such as blood, to ...

  2. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  3. Prostate Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  4. A novel liquid plasma AOP device integrating microwaves and ultrasounds and its evaluation in defluorinating perfluorooctanoic acid in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Horikoshi, Satoshi; Sato, Susumu; Abe, Masahiko; Serpone, Nick

    2011-09-01

    A simplified and energy-saving integrated device consisting of a microwave applicator and an ultrasonic homogenizer has been fabricated to generate liquid plasma in a medium possessing high dielectric factors, for example water. The microwave waveguide and the ultrasonic transducer were interconnected through a tungsten/titanium alloy stick acting both as the microwave antenna and as the horn of the ultrasonic homogenizer. Both microwaves and ultrasonic waves are simultaneously transmitted to the aqueous media through the tungsten tip of the antenna. The microwave discharge liquid plasma was easily generated in solution during ultrasonic cavitation. The simple device was evaluated by carrying out the degradation of the perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), a system highly recalcitrant to degradation by conventional advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). PFOA is 59% degraded in an aqueous medium after only 90 s of irradiation by the plasma. Intermediates were identified by electrospray mass spectral techniques in the negative ion mode.

  5. Cranial Ultrasound/Head Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  6. Endoscopic ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration core biopsy: comparison between an automatic biopsy device and two conventional needle systems.

    PubMed

    Ardengh, José Celso; Paulo, Gustavo Andrade de; Nakao, Frank Shigueo; Venco, Filadélfio; Santo, Giulio Cesare; Geocze, Stephan

    2008-06-01

    endoscopic ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) allows cytologic and/or histologic diagnosis of lesions within or adjacent to the gastrointestinal tract. However, the amount of tissue obtained with a regular 22 gauge needle is not always satisfactory. With the development of a needle XNA-10J-KB (Shot-Gun) that resembles the automatic liver biopsy needle, it is expected that significant samples be obtained more frequently (core biopsy), optimizing histological analysis. to compare samples obtained with EUS-FNA using 3 different needle systems: GIP, NA-10J-1 and Shot-Gun. 19 patients underwent EUS-FNA for diagnosis (5) or tumor staging (14). Mean age was 58.9 years (range 27-82), being 50% men. All patients were submitted to EUS-FNA with the 3 needle models. The Shot-Gun model was "shot" when its tip was near the target inside the lesion, followed by aspiration. Samples were submitted for cytologic and histologic examination. mean lesion size was 3.0 cm (range 0.8-5.5 cm). Final diagnoses were made after surgery or intra-operative biopsy: 13 pancreatic tumors (12 adenocarcinomas and 1 neuroendocrine tumor), 4 chronic pancreatitis, 1 acute pancreatitis, and 1 cholangiocarcinoma. Specimens adequate for cytologic diagnosis were obtained in 13/19 (68. 4%) patients using GIP model, in 14/19 (73.7%) with NA10J-1 model, and in 17/19 (89.5%) with ShotGun, model (p=0.039). Histologic analysis was possible in 10/19 (52.6%) patients using the GIP model, in 14/19 (73.7%) with NA10J-1, and in 17/19 (89.5%) with Shot-Gun, model (p=0.005). Adequate samples for cytologic or histologic assessment in 16/19 (84.2%) patients using the GIP model, in 17/19 (89.5%) with NA10J-1, and in 18/19 (94.7%) with Shot-Gun, model (p=0.223). In two cases biopsies were negative due to very hard tumors. the Shot-Gun needle obtained better samples for histological diagnosis than NA10J-1 needle and GIP.

  7. Safe long-term repeated disruption of the blood-brain barrier using an implantable ultrasound device: a multiparametric study in a primate model.

    PubMed

    Horodyckid, Catherine; Canney, Michael; Vignot, Alexandre; Boisgard, Raphael; Drier, Aurélie; Huberfeld, Gilles; François, Chantal; Prigent, Annick; Santin, Mathieu D; Adam, Clovis; Willer, Jean-Claude; Lafon, Cyril; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Carpentier, Alexandre

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE The main limitation to the efficacy of chemotherapy for brain tumors is the restricted access to the brain because of the limited permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Previous animal studies have shown that the application of pulsed ultrasound (US), in combination with the intravenous injection of microbubbles, can temporarily disrupt the BBB to deliver drugs that normally cannot reach brain tissue. Although many previous studies have been performed with external focused US transducers, the device described in the current work emits US energy using an unfocused transducer implanted in the skull thickness. This method avoids distortion of the US energy by the skull bone and allows for simple, repetitive, and broad disruption of the BBB without the need for MRI monitoring. The purpose of the present study was to determine if the BBB can be safely and repeatedly disrupted using such an implantable unfocused US device in a primate model. METHODS An 11.5-mm-diameter, 1-MHz, planar US device was implanted via a bur hole into the skull of 3 primates (2 Papio anubis [olive] baboons and 1 Macaca fascicularis [macaque]) for 4 months. Pulsed US sonications were applied together with the simultaneous intravenous injection of sulfur hexafluoride microbubbles (SonoVue) every 2 weeks to temporarily disrupt the BBB. In each primate, a total of 7 sonications were performed with a 23.2-msec burst length (25,000 cycles) and a 1-Hz pulse repetition frequency at acoustic pressure levels of 0.6-0.8 MPa. Potential toxicity induced by repeated BBB opening was analyzed using MRI, PET, electroencephalography (EEG), somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP) monitoring, behavioral scales, and histopathological analysis. RESULTS The T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MR images acquired after each sonication exhibited a zone of hypersignal underneath the transducer that persisted for more than 4 hours, indicating a broad region of BBB opening in the acoustic field of the implant

  8. High intensity focused ultrasound with Focal-One(®) device: Prostate-specific antigen impact and morbidity evaluation during the initial experience.

    PubMed

    Perez-Reggeti, J I; Sanchez-Salas, R; Sivaraman, A; Linares Espinos, E; de Gracia-Nieto, A E; Barret, E; Galiano, M; Rozet, F; Fregeville, A; Renard-Penna, R; Cathala, N; Mombet, A; Prapotnich, D; Cathelineau, X

    2016-12-01

    We report our initial experience in the treatment of prostate cancer (PCa) with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) using the Focal-One(®) device. Retrospective review of the prospectively populated database. Between June 2014 to October 2015, 85 patients underwent HIFU (focal/whole-gland) treatment for localized PCa. Preoperative cancer localization was done with multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) and transperineal mapping biopsies. Treatment was carried out using the Focal-One(®) device under general anesthesia. Oncological follow-up: PSA measurement and control biopsy with mpMRI according to protocol. Questionnaire-based functional outcome assessment was done. Complications were reported using Clavien classification. The median PSA was 7.79ng/ml (IQR 6.32-9.16), with a median prostate volume of 38cc (IQR: 33-49.75). Focal and whole-gland therapy was performed in 64 and 21 patients respectively. Ten patients received salvage HIFU. Complications were encountered in 15% of cases, all Clavien 2 graded. Mean hospital stay was 1.8 days (0-7) and bladder catheter was removed on day 2 (1-6). Mean percentage reduction of PSA was 54%. Median follow-up was 3 months (IQR: 2-8). Functional outcomes: All patients were continents at 3 months and potency was maintained in 83% of the preoperatively potent. Focal-One(®) HIFU treatment appears to be a safe procedure with few complications. Functional outcomes proved no urinary incontinence and sexual function were maintained in 83%. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  9. PAN-ASIAN CONSENSUS-Key Recommendations for Adapting the World Congress of Dermatology Consensus on Combination Treatment with Injectable Fillers, Toxins, and Ultrasound Devices in Asian Patients.

    PubMed

    Chao, Yates Y Y; Chhabra, Chiranjiv; Corduff, Niamh; Fabi, Sabrina Guillen; Kerscher, Martina; Lam, Stephanie C K; Pavicic, Tatjana; Rzany, Berthold; Peng, Peter H L; Suwanchinda, Atchima; Tseng, Fang-Wen; Seo, Kyle K

    2017-08-01

    BACKGROUND. The demand for minimally invasive aesthetic procedures has driven requests by physicians for guidance on their use in Asian patients, who have unique cultural preferences, social trends, and anatomy. However, few guidelines exist, particularly on combination treatment strategies for different facial shapes or indications such as the modification of face shapes to the "oval ideal."Physicians must, therefore, apply Caucasian patient-optimized guidelines to their Asian patients. METHODS. Eleven specialists developed a consensus on the use of botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A), calcium hydroxylapatite (CaHA) and hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers, and microfocused ultrasound with visualization (MFU-V) devices in Asian patients on upper-, middle-, and lower-face indications, including strategies to modify different facial shapes to the oval shape. Approval from 70 to 90 percent of all participants led to moderate consensus, while 90 percent agreement denoted a strong consensus. RESULTS. For early intervention/enhancement and restoration, most combination strategies are similar between Asian and Caucasian patients. Compared to Caucasian patients, however, beautification is a more common focus in Asian patients. The "ideal" oval facial shape can be created using different interventions depending on the patient's baseline characteristics. CONCLUSIONS. Although treatments and treatment sequences for early intervention/enhancement and restoration for beautification in Asian patients are similar to those in Caucasian patients, different treatment strategies may be required.

  10. PAN-ASIAN CONSENSUS—Key Recommendations for Adapting the World Congress of Dermatology Consensus on Combination Treatment with Injectable Fillers, Toxins, and Ultrasound Devices in Asian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Chiranjiv; Corduff, Niamh; Fabi, Sabrina Guillen; Kerscher, Martina; Lam, Stephanie C.K.; Pavicic, Tatjana; Rzany, Berthold; Peng, Peter H.L.; Suwanchinda, Atchima; Tseng, Fang-Wen; Seo, Kyle K.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The demand for minimally invasive aesthetic procedures has driven requests by physicians for guidance on their use in Asian patients, who have unique cultural preferences, social trends, and anatomy. However, few guidelines exist, particularly on combination treatment strategies for different facial shapes or indications such as the modification of face shapes to the “oval ideal.”Physicians must, therefore, apply Caucasian patient-optimized guidelines to their Asian patients. METHODS. Eleven specialists developed a consensus on the use of botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A), calcium hydroxylapatite (CaHA) and hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers, and microfocused ultrasound with visualization (MFU-V) devices in Asian patients on upper-, middle-, and lower-face indications, including strategies to modify different facial shapes to the oval shape. Approval from 70 to 90 percent of all participants led to moderate consensus, while 90 percent agreement denoted a strong consensus. RESULTS. For early intervention/enhancement and restoration, most combination strategies are similar between Asian and Caucasian patients. Compared to Caucasian patients, however, beautification is a more common focus in Asian patients. The “ideal” oval facial shape can be created using different interventions depending on the patient’s baseline characteristics. CONCLUSIONS. Although treatments and treatment sequences for early intervention/enhancement and restoration for beautification in Asian patients are similar to those in Caucasian patients, different treatment strategies may be required. PMID:28979659

  11. Ultrasound -- Vascular

    MedlinePlus

    ... ultrasound uses sound waves to evaluate the body’s circulatory system and help identify blockages in the arteries and ... is a useful way of evaluating the body's circulatory system. Vascular ultrasound is performed to: help monitor the ...

  12. Abdominal ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidney - blood and urine flow Abdominal ultrasound References Chen L. Abdominal ultrasound imaging. In: Sahani DV, Samir ... the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should not be used ...

  13. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... needles are used to extract a sample of cells from organs for laboratory testing. Doppler ultrasound images ... ultrasound, measures the direction and speed of blood cells as they move through vessels. The movement of ...

  14. Ultrasound -- Vascular

    MedlinePlus

    ... ultrasound uses sound waves to evaluate the body’s circulatory system and help identify blockages and detect blood clots. ... is a useful way of evaluating the body's circulatory system. Vascular ultrasound is performed to: help monitor the ...

  15. Thyroid ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Bano, Shahina

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid ultrasonography has established itself as a popular and useful tool in the evaluation and management of thyroid disorders. Advanced ultrasound techniques in thyroid imaging have not only fascinated the radiologists but also attracted the surgeons and endocrinologists who are using these techniques in their daily clinical and operative practice. This review provides an overview of indications for ultrasound in various thyroid diseases, describes characteristic ultrasound findings in these diseases, and illustrates major diagnostic pitfalls of thyroid ultrasound. PMID:23776892

  16. Carotid Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Carotid Ultrasound Also known as carotid duplex. Carotid ultrasound is a painless imaging test that uses high- ... of your carotid arteries. This test uses an ultrasound machine, which includes a computer, a screen, and ...

  17. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) using Sonablate{trade mark, serif} devices for the treatment of localized prostate cancer: 13-year experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Toyoaki; Tomonaga, Tetsuro; Shoji, Sunao; Kim, Hakushi; Nagata, Yoshihiro

    2012-11-01

    To report on the long-term results of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) in the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Eight hundred and eighty-four men with prostate cancer treated with Sonablate® (SB) devices were included. All patients were followed for more than 2 years. The patients were divided into three groups: in the first group, 419 patients were treated with SB200/500 from 1999 to 2006; in the second group, 263 patients were treated with SB 500 ver. 4 from 2005 to 2009: in the third group, 202 patients were treated with SB 500 TCM from 2007 up to present. Biochemical failure was defined according to the Phoenix definition (PSA nadir + 2 ng/ml). The mean age, PSA, Gleason score, operation time, and follow-up period in each group were 68, 66 and 67 years, 11.2, 9.7 and 9.3 ng/ml, 6.2, 6.6 and 6.7, 167, 101 and 106 min, and 56, 48 and 36 months, respectively. The biochemical disease-free rate (bDFR) in each group at 5 years was, respectively, 54%, 61% and 84%, and was 50% at 10 years in the SB200/500 group (p<0.0001). The bDFR in patients in the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups in all patients at 10 years were 72% and 58%, 44%, respectively (p<0.0001). The BDFR in patients in the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups in the SB500 TCM group at 5 years were 97%, 83%, and 74% (p=0.0056). The negative prostate biopsy rates in 3 groups were 81%, 92% and 88%, respectively. As post HIFU complications, urethral stricture, acute epididymitis and urinary incontinence were noted in 18.0%, 6.2% and 1.9%, respectively. Rectourethral fistula was occurred in 0.6% in the first HIFU cases, Postoperative erectile dysfunction was noted in 27% of patients at 2 years after HIFU. HIFU therapy appears to be minimally invasive, efficacious, and safe for patients with localized prostate cancer. Technological advances as well as cultural and economic vectors have caused a shift from to minimally invasive techniques.

  18. Rapid formation of Ni3Sn4 joints for die attachment of SiC-based high temperature power devices using ultrasound-induced transient liquid phase bonding process.

    PubMed

    Li, Z L; Dong, H J; Song, X G; Zhao, H Y; Feng, J C; Liu, J H; Tian, H; Wang, S J

    2017-05-01

    High melting point Ni3Sn4 joints for the die attachment of SiC-based high temperature power devices was successfully achieved using an ultrasound-induced transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding process within a remarkably short bonding time of 8s. The formed intermetallic joints, which are completely composed of the refined equiaxial Ni3Sn4 grains with the average diameter of 2μm, perform the average shear strength of 26.7MPa. The sonochemical effects of ultrasonic waves dominate the mechanism and kinetics of the rapid formation of Ni3Sn4 joints.

  19. Therapeutic ultrasound: Recent trends and future perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Lawrence; Bailey, Michael; Hwang, Joo Ha; Khokhlova, Vera; Sapozhnikov, Oleg

    2010-01-01

    Before ultrasound-imaging systems became widely available, ultrasound therapy devices showed great promise for general use in medicine. However, it is only in the last decade that ultrasound therapy has begun to obtain clinical acceptance. Recently, a variety of novel applications of therapeutic ultrasound have been developed that include sonothrombolysis, site-specific and ultrasound-mediated drug delivery, shock wave therapy, lithotripsy, tumor ablation, acoustic hemostasis and several others. This paper reviews a few selected applications of therapeutic ultrasound. It will address some of the basic scientific questions and future challenges in developing these methods and technologies for general use in our society. As a plenary presentation, its audience is intended for the ultrasound scientist or engineer, and thus is not presented at the level of the experienced medical ultrasound professional.

  20. History of intraoperative ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Makuuchi, M; Torzilli, G; Machi, J

    1998-11-01

    Intraoperative ultrasound (IOUS) using A-mode or non-real-time B-mode imaging started in the 1960s; however, it was not widely accepted mainly because of difficulty in image interpretation. In the late 1970s, IOUS became one of the topics in the surgical communities upon the introduction of high-frequency real-time B-mode ultrasound. Special probes for operative use were developed. In the 1980s, all over the world the use of IOUS spread to a variety of surgical fields, such as hepatobiliary pancreatic surgery, neurosurgery, and cardiovascular surgery. IOUS changed hepatic surgery dramatically because IOUS was the only modality that was capable of delineating and examining the interior of the liver during surgery. After 1990, color Doppler imaging and laparoscopic ultrasound were incorporated into IOUS. Currently, IOUS is considered an indispensable operative procedure for intraoperative decision-making and guidance of surgical procedures. For better surgical practice, education of surgeons in the use of ultrasound is the most important issue.

  1. Localizing and Assessing Amputee Pain with Intense Focused Ultrasound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    ig-iFU device uses ultrasound imaging to locate neuromas, nerves, and tissue, and individual, short pulses of high- intensity ultrasound to...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0291 TITLE: Localizing and Assessing Amputee Pain with Intense Focused Ultrasound PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Pierre D...patient pain. 2. KEYWORDS:  Image-guided intense focused ultrasound (ig-iFU)  Intense focused ultrasound (iFU)  Targeted muscle Reinnervation

  2. Interventional ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Holm, H.H.; Kristensen, J.K.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses: Introduction to interventional ultrasound/handling of aspirated material/general principles of fine needle aspiration cytology/procedure and principles in ultrasonically guided puncture/puncture of focal liver lesions/intraoperative puncture of the liver guided by ultrasound/Interventional ultrasound in cancer therapy/Interventional echocardiography/Fine-needle aspiration biopsy: Are there any risks./Puncture of renal mass lesions/Intrauterine needle diagnosis/Percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

  3. Medical ultrasound systems.

    PubMed

    Powers, Jeff; Kremkau, Frederick

    2011-08-06

    Medical ultrasound imaging has advanced dramatically since its introduction only a few decades ago. This paper provides a short historical background, and then briefly describes many of the system features and concepts required in a modern commercial ultrasound system. The topics addressed include array beam formation, steering and focusing; array and matrix transducers; echo image formation; tissue harmonic imaging; speckle reduction through frequency and spatial compounding, and image processing; tissue aberration; Doppler flow detection; and system architectures. It then describes some of the more practical aspects of ultrasound system design necessary to be taken into account for today's marketplace. It finally discusses the recent explosion of portable and handheld devices and their potential to expand the clinical footprint of ultrasound into regions of the world where medical care is practically non-existent. Throughout the article reference is made to ways in which ultrasound imaging has benefited from advances in the commercial electronics industry. It is meant to be an overview of the field as an introduction to other more detailed papers in this special issue.

  4. Ultrasound spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, C. L.

    An ultrasound spectrometer was designed, constructed and used to measure the frequency dependence of forward scattered ultrasound from biological specimens. A piezoelectric transducer was continuously tuned through the frequency range of 150 to 400 MHz, producing ultrasound of the same frequency. Pulse modulation of the input signal permitted a frequency resolution of 2 MHz. The received pulse was detected at various temporal positions of its amplitude, thereby allowing measurement of the interference of the scattered and unscattered ultrasound radiation. Because of system nonlinearities all received signals were calibrated with respect to the attenuation of ultrasound in water over the system frequency range. The attenuation of water over the frequency range of 150 to 400 MHz was measured. Forward scattering experiments were performed with both physical objects and biological specimens. Sapphire spheres and plastic cylinders exhibited the expected Mie scattering resonant structure.

  5. [High frequency ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Sattler, E

    2015-07-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound has become a standard procedure in clinical dermatology. Devices with intermediate high frequencies of 7.5-15 MHz are used in dermato-oncology for the staging and postoperative care of skin tumor patients and in angiology for improved vessel diagnostics. In contrast, the high frequency ultrasound systems with 20-100 MHz probes offer a much higher resolution, yet with a lower penetration depth of about 1 cm. The main indications are the preoperative measurements of tumor thickness in malignant melanoma and other skin tumors and the assessment of inflammatory and soft tissue diseases, offering information on the course of these dermatoses and allowing therapy monitoring. This article gives an overview on technical principles, devices, mode of examination, influencing factors, interpretation of the images, indications but also limitations of this technique.

  6. Cranial Ultrasound/Head Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... sickle cell disease. It is also used to measure conditions affecting blood flow to and within the brain, such as: Stenosis : ... saved. Doppler ultrasound, a special application of ultrasound, measures ... represent the flow of blood through the blood vessels. top of ...

  7. Ultrasound physics.

    PubMed

    Shriki, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    Bedside ultrasound has become an important modality for obtaining critical information in the acute care of patients. It is important to understand the physics of ultrasound in order to perform and interpret images at the bedside. The physics of both continuous wave and pulsed wave sound underlies diagnostic ultrasound. The instrumentation, including transducers and image processing, is important in the acquisition of appropriate sonographic images. Understanding how these concepts interplay with each other enables practitioners to obtain the best possible images. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Endoscopic ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pancreatitis References Lee LS. Endoscopic ultrasound. In: McNalley PR, ed. GI/Liver Secrets Plus . 5th ed. Philadelphia, ... member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www. ...

  9. Trauma Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wongwaisayawan, Sirote; Suwannanon, Ruedeekorn; Prachanukool, Thidathit; Sricharoen, Pungkava; Saksobhavivat, Nitima; Kaewlai, Rathachai

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasound plays a pivotal role in the evaluation of acute trauma patients through the use of multi-site scanning encompassing abdominal, cardiothoracic, vascular and skeletal scans. In a high-speed polytrauma setting, because exsanguinations are the primary cause of trauma morbidity and mortality, ultrasound is used for quick and accurate detection of hemorrhages in the pericardial, pleural, and peritoneal cavities during the primary Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) survey. Volume status can be assessed non-invasively with ultrasound of the inferior vena cava (IVC), which is a useful tool in the initial phase and follow-up evaluations. Pneumothorax can also be quickly detected with ultrasound. During the secondary survey and in patients sustaining low-speed or localized trauma, ultrasound can be used to help detect abdominal organ injuries. This is particularly helpful in patients in whom hemoperitoneum is not identified on an initial scan because findings of organ injuries will expedite the next test, often computed tomography (CT). Moreover, ultrasound can assist in detection of fractures easily obscured on radiography, such as rib and sternal fractures.

  10. A Tactile Sensor for Ultrasound Imaging Systems

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yiyan; Shkel, Yuri M.; Hall, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Medical ultrasound systems are capable of monitoring a variety of health conditions while avoiding invasive procedures. However this function is complicated by ultrasound contrast of the tissue varying with contact pressure exerted by the probe. The knowledge of the contact pressure is beneficial for a variety of screening and diagnostic procedures involving ultrasound. This paper introduces a solid-state sensor array which measures the contact pressure distribution between the probe and the tissue marginally affecting the ultrasound imaging capabilities. The probe design utilizes the dielectrostriction mechanism which relates the change in dielectric properties of the sensing layer to deformation. The concept, structure, fabrication, and performance of this sensor array are discussed. The prototype device is highly tolerant to overloads (>1 MPa tested) and provides stress measurements in the range of 0.14 to 10 kPa. Its loss of ultrasound transmissivity is less 3dB at 9 MHz ultrasound frequency. This performance is satisfactory for clinical and biomedical research in ultrasound image formation and interpretation, however for commercial product, a higher ultrasound transmissivity is desired. Directions for improving the sensor ultrasound transparency and electrical performance are discussed. The sensor array described in this paper has been developed specifically for ultrasound diagnosis during breast cancer screening. However, the same sensing mechanism, similar configuration and sensor array structure can be applied to other applications involving ultrasound tools for medical diagnostics. PMID:26880870

  11. A Tactile Sensor for Ultrasound Imaging Systems.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yiyan; Shkel, Yuri M; Hall, Timothy J

    2016-02-15

    Medical ultrasound systems are capable of monitoring a variety of health conditions while avoiding invasive procedures. However this function is complicated by ultrasound contrast of the tissue varying with contact pressure exerted by the probe. The knowledge of the contact pressure is beneficial for a variety of screening and diagnostic procedures involving ultrasound. This paper introduces a solid-state sensor array which measures the contact pressure distribution between the probe and the tissue marginally affecting the ultrasound imaging capabilities. The probe design utilizes the dielectrostriction mechanism which relates the change in dielectric properties of the sensing layer to deformation. The concept, structure, fabrication, and performance of this sensor array are discussed. The prototype device is highly tolerant to overloads (>1 MPa tested) and provides stress measurements in the range of 0.14 to 10 kPa. Its loss of ultrasound transmissivity is less 3dB at 9 MHz ultrasound frequency. This performance is satisfactory for clinical and biomedical research in ultrasound image formation and interpretation, however for commercial product, a higher ultrasound transmissivity is desired. Directions for improving the sensor ultrasound transparency and electrical performance are discussed. The sensor array described in this paper has been developed specifically for ultrasound diagnosis during breast cancer screening. However, the same sensing mechanism, similar configuration and sensor array structure can be applied to other applications involving ultrasound tools for medical diagnostics.

  12. Reflections on ultrasound image analysis.

    PubMed

    Alison Noble, J

    2016-10-01

    Ultrasound (US) image analysis has advanced considerably in twenty years. Progress in ultrasound image analysis has always been fundamental to the advancement of image-guided interventions research due to the real-time acquisition capability of ultrasound and this has remained true over the two decades. But in quantitative ultrasound image analysis - which takes US images and turns them into more meaningful clinical information - thinking has perhaps more fundamentally changed. From roots as a poor cousin to Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance (MR) image analysis, both of which have richer anatomical definition and thus were better suited to the earlier eras of medical image analysis which were dominated by model-based methods, ultrasound image analysis has now entered an exciting new era, assisted by advances in machine learning and the growing clinical and commercial interest in employing low-cost portable ultrasound devices outside traditional hospital-based clinical settings. This short article provides a perspective on this change, and highlights some challenges ahead and potential opportunities in ultrasound image analysis which may both have high impact on healthcare delivery worldwide in the future but may also, perhaps, take the subject further away from CT and MR image analysis research with time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Carotid Ultrasound Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Ultrasound - Carotid Carotid ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures of the carotid arteries ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  14. An implantable compound-releasing capsule triggered on demand by ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Ordeig, Olga; Chin, Sau Yin; Kim, Sohyun; Chitnis, Parag V.; Sia, Samuel K.

    2016-01-01

    Implantable devices have a large potential to improve human health, but they are often made of biofouling materials that necessitate special coatings, rely on electrical connections for external communication, and require a continuous power source. This paper demonstrates an alternative platform, which we call iTAG (implantable thermally actuated gel), where an implanted capsule can be wirelessly controlled by ultrasound to trigger the release of compounds. We constructed a millimeter-sized capsule containing a co-polymer gel (NiPAAm-co-AAm) that contracts above body temperature (i.e. at 45 °C) to release compounds through an opening. This gel-containing capsule is biocompatible and free of toxic electronic or battery components. An ultrasound hardware, with a focused ultrasound (FUS) transducer and a co-axial A-mode imaging transducer, was used to image the capsule (to monitor in real time its position, temperature, and effectiveness of dose delivery), as well as to trigger a rapid local rise in temperature, contraction of gel, and release of compounds in vitro and in vivo. The combination of this gel-based capsule and compact ultrasound hardware can serve as a platform for triggering local release of compounds, including potentially in deep tissue, to achieve tailored personalized therapy. PMID:26965207

  15. An implantable compound-releasing capsule triggered on demand by ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordeig, Olga; Chin, Sau Yin; Kim, Sohyun; Chitnis, Parag V.; Sia, Samuel K.

    2016-03-01

    Implantable devices have a large potential to improve human health, but they are often made of biofouling materials that necessitate special coatings, rely on electrical connections for external communication, and require a continuous power source. This paper demonstrates an alternative platform, which we call iTAG (implantable thermally actuated gel), where an implanted capsule can be wirelessly controlled by ultrasound to trigger the release of compounds. We constructed a millimeter-sized capsule containing a co-polymer gel (NiPAAm-co-AAm) that contracts above body temperature (i.e. at 45 °C) to release compounds through an opening. This gel-containing capsule is biocompatible and free of toxic electronic or battery components. An ultrasound hardware, with a focused ultrasound (FUS) transducer and a co-axial A-mode imaging transducer, was used to image the capsule (to monitor in real time its position, temperature, and effectiveness of dose delivery), as well as to trigger a rapid local rise in temperature, contraction of gel, and release of compounds in vitro and in vivo. The combination of this gel-based capsule and compact ultrasound hardware can serve as a platform for triggering local release of compounds, including potentially in deep tissue, to achieve tailored personalized therapy.

  16. An implantable compound-releasing capsule triggered on demand by ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ordeig, Olga; Chin, Sau Yin; Kim, Sohyun; Chitnis, Parag V; Sia, Samuel K

    2016-03-11

    Implantable devices have a large potential to improve human health, but they are often made of biofouling materials that necessitate special coatings, rely on electrical connections for external communication, and require a continuous power source. This paper demonstrates an alternative platform, which we call iTAG (implantable thermally actuated gel), where an implanted capsule can be wirelessly controlled by ultrasound to trigger the release of compounds. We constructed a millimeter-sized capsule containing a co-polymer gel (NiPAAm-co-AAm) that contracts above body temperature (i.e. at 45 °C) to release compounds through an opening. This gel-containing capsule is biocompatible and free of toxic electronic or battery components. An ultrasound hardware, with a focused ultrasound (FUS) transducer and a co-axial A-mode imaging transducer, was used to image the capsule (to monitor in real time its position, temperature, and effectiveness of dose delivery), as well as to trigger a rapid local rise in temperature, contraction of gel, and release of compounds in vitro and in vivo. The combination of this gel-based capsule and compact ultrasound hardware can serve as a platform for triggering local release of compounds, including potentially in deep tissue, to achieve tailored personalized therapy.

  17. Ultrasound microscope: the new field in ultrasound diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novyc'kyy, Victor V.; Lushchyk, Ulyana B.

    2001-06-01

    A device which is a new stage in the development of medical equipment has been developed. The device works as an ultrasound microscope in vivo and provides 4 up to 32 colored histological image. It gives possibility to estimate tissue acoustic density with the help of 4 up to 32 gradation coloring different tissues and enables tissue microcirculation visualization. With the help of the device a doctor can objectify fatty hepatitis and cirrhosis, edema of different organs and tissues as well as microcirculation in organs and tissues (e.g. muscles, myocard and bone system). New promising applications of ultrasound systems in diagnostics and for choosing individual treatment tactics, with pathogenesis being taken into account, may be developed with the help of the device.

  18. [Ultrasound for peripheral neural block].

    PubMed

    Kefalianakis, F

    2005-03-01

    Ultrasound is well established in medicine. Unfortunately, ultrasound is still rarely used in the area of anesthesia. The purpose of the article is to illustrate the possibilities and limitations of ultrasound in regional anesthesia. The basic principles of ultrasound are the piezoelectric effect and the behaviour of acoustic waveforms in human tissue. Ultrasound imaging in medicine uses high frequency pulses of sound waves (2.5-10 MHz). The following images are built up from the reflected sounds. The ultrasound devices used in regional anesthesia (commonly by 10 MHz) deliver a two-dimensional view. The main step for a successful regional anaesthesia is to identify the exact position of the nerve. In addition, specific surface landmarks and the use of peripheral nerve stimulator help to detect the correct position of the needle. Nerves are demonstrated as an composition of hyperechogenic (white) and hypoechogenic (black) areas. The surrounding hyperechogenic parts are epi- and perineurium, the dark hypoechogenic part is the neural tissue. The composition of peripheral nerves are always similar, but the quantities of each part, of surrounding perineurium and nerval structures, differ. Further the imaging of nerves is significantly influenced by the angle of beam to the nerve and the surrounding anatomic structures. Only experience and correct interpretation make the ultrasound a valid method in clinical practice. Correct interpretation has to be learned by standardized education. Three examples of peripheral nerve blocks are described. The detection of nerves and the visualization of the correct spread of local anesthetics to the nerves are the main principles of effective ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia, whereas closest proximity of the needle to the target nerve is not necessary. The described examples of ultrasound guidance for nerval block illustrates the specific procedures with reduced probability of nerval irritation, high success and low rate of

  19. Hot topics in biomedical ultrasound: ultrasound therapy and its integration with ultrasonic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everbach, E. Carr

    2005-09-01

    Since the development of biomedical ultrasound imaging from sonar after WWII, there has been a clear divide between ultrasonic imaging and ultrasound therapy. While imaging techniques are designed to cause as little change as possible in the tissues through which ultrasound propagates, ultrasound therapy typically relies upon heating or acoustic cavitation to produce a desirable therapeutic effect. Concerns over the increasingly high acoustic outputs of diagnostic ultrasound scanners prompted the adoption of the Mechanical Index (MI) and Thermal Index (TI) in the early 1990s. Therapeutic applications of ultrasound, meanwhile, have evolved from deep tissue heating in sports medicine to include targeted drug delivery, tumor and plaque ablation, cauterization via high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), and accelerated dissolution of blood clots. The integration of ultrasonic imaging and therapy in one device is just beginning, but the promise of improved patient outcomes is balanced by regulatory and practical impediments.

  20. Ultrasound: a window to the womb?: Obstetric ultrasound and the abortion rights debate.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Joanne

    2004-01-01

    This paper explores the rhetoric of obstetric ultrasound technology as it relates to the abortion debate, specifically the interpretation given to ultrasound images by opponents of abortion. The tenor of the anti-abortion approach is precisely captured in the videotape, Ultrasound: A Window to the Womb. Aspects of this videotape are analyzed in order to tease out the assumptions about the (female) body and about the access to truth yielded by scientific technology (ultrasound) held by militant opponents of abortion. It is argued that the ultrasound images do not offer transparent confirmation of the ontological status of the embryo and fetus. Rather, the "window " of ultrasound is constructed through a complex combination of visual and verbal devices: ultrasound images, photographic images, verbal argument, and emotional appeal.

  1. Comparison between the traditional non-guided and a novel ultrasound-guided technique for office fitting of intrauterine contraceptive devices.

    PubMed

    Elsedeek, Mervat S

    2016-06-01

    To investigate a novel method for in-office fitting of intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUCDs) by comparing it to the traditional non-guided technique. A prospective cohort study comparing the application of intrauterine contraceptives was conducted between January 1, 2013 and January 31, 2015 at a university contraception clinic, in Alexandria, Egypt. Patients aged 20-45years who were parous, had previously undergone vaginal or abdominal deliveries, and were requesting device insertion were included. Patients were randomly assigned to have devices fitted using the non-guided approach, with vaginal ultrasonography to plan and confirm device placement, or by the abdominal ultrasonography-guided technique. The primary outcomes were successful IUCD insertion and ideal device position 1week after insertion. Participants, counselors, and data analysts were masked to treatment assignments. Analyses included 40 patients in each treatment arm. Successful fitting was achieved in 32 (80%) patients in the non-guided arm and 39 (98%) patients in the ultrasonography-guided arm (P=0.04). Ideal placement was achieved in 38 (95%) patients in the ultrasonography-guided arm compared with 27 (68%) patients in the non-guided arm (P=0.02). Ultrasonography-guided IUCD insertion demonstrated improved success and fitting accuracy in comparison with a traditional, non-guided approach. ANZCTR trial ID: ACTRN12615000526572. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Ultrasound - Scrotum

    MedlinePlus

    ... especially when the mass is solid). Blood flow images of the testicles are not always reliable in determining the presence or absence of blood supply to a testicle that has twisted. When searching for an absent testicle, ultrasound may not be ...

  3. A pilot proof-of-concept study of a modified device for one-step endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage in a new experimental biliary dilatation animal model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tae Hoon; Choi, Jun Hyuck; Lee, Sang Soo; Cho, Hyun Deuk; Seo, Dong Wan; Park, Sang-Heum; Lee, Sung Koo; Kim, Myung-Hwan; Park, Do Hyun

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the technical feasibility of a modified tapered metal tip and low profile introducer for one-step endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) in a new experimental biliary dilatation porcine model. METHODS: A novel dedicated device for one-step EUS-guided biliary drainage system (DEUS) introducer has size 3F tapered catheter with size 4F metal tip for simple puncture of the intestinal wall and liver parenchyma without graded dilation. A self-expandable metal stent, consisting of both uncovered and nitinol-covered portions, was preloaded into DEUS introducer. After establishment of a biliary dilatation model using endoscopic hemoclips or band ligation with argon plasma coagulation in 9 mini-pigs, EUS-BD using a DEUS was performed following 19-G needle puncture without the use of fistula dilation devices. RESULTS: One-step EUS-BD was technically successful in seven pigs [7/9 (77.8%) as intention to treat] without the aid of devices for fistula dilation from the high body of stomach or far distal esophagus to the intrahepatic (n = 2) or common hepatic (n = 5) duct. Primary technical failure occurred in two cases that did not show adequate biliary dilatation. In seven pigs with a successful bile duct dilatation, the technical success rate was 100% (7/7 as per protocol). Median procedure time from confirmation of the dilated bile duct to successful placement of a metallic stent was 10 min (IQR; 8.9-18.1). There were no immediate procedure-related complications. CONCLUSION: Modified tapered metal tip and low profile introducer may be technically feasible for one-step EUS-BD in experimental porcine model. PMID:24914346

  4. Elucidation of the role of biological factors and device design in cerebral NIRS using an in vivo hematoma model based on high-intensity focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianting; Huang, Stanley; Myers, Matthew; Chen, Yu; Welle, Cristin; Pfefer, Joshua

    2016-03-01

    Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) is an emerging medical countermeasure for rapid, field detection of hematomas caused by traumatic brain injury (TBI). Bench and animal tests to determine NIRS sensitivity and specificity are needed. However, current animal models involving non-invasively induced, localized neural damage are limited. We investigated an in vivo murine hematoma model in which cerebral hemorrhage was induced noninvasively by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) with calibrated positioning and parameters. To characterize the morphology of induced hematomas, we used skull-intact histological evaluation. A multi-wavelength fiber-optic NIRS system with three source-detector separation distances was used to detect hematoma A 1.1 MHz transducer produced consistent small-to-medium hematoma localized to a single hemisphere, along with bruising of the scalp, with a low mortality rate. A 220 kHz transducer produced larger, more diffuse hematomas, with higher variability in size and a correspondingly higher mortality rate. No skin bruising or blood accumulation between the skin and skull was observed following injury application with the 220 kHz transducer. Histological analysis showed higher sensitivity for larger hematomas (>4x4 mm2). NIRS optical density change after HIFU was able to detect all hematomas, with sensitivity dependent on wavelength and separation distance. While improvements in methods for validating cerebral blood distribution are needed, the HIFU hematoma model provided useful insights that will inform development of biologically relevant, performance test methods for cerebral NIRS systems.

  5. Ultrasound Annual, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, R.C.; Hill, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    The 1984 edition of Ultrasound Annual explores new applications of ultrasound in speech and swallowing and offers guidelines on the use of ultrasound and nuclear medicine in thyroid and biliary tract disease. Other areas covered include Doppler sonography of the abdomen, intraoperative abdominal ultrasound, sonography of the placenta, ultrasound of the neonatal head and abdomen, and sonographic echo patterns created by fat.

  6. Prostate Focused Ultrasound Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Rouvière, Olivier; Crouzet, Sébastien; Gelet, Albert

    2016-01-01

    The tremendous progress in engineering and computing power coupled with ultrasound transducer technology and imaging modalities over the past 20 years have encouraged a revival of clinical interest in ultrasound therapy, mainly in High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). So far, the most extensive results from HIFU obtained in urology involve transrectal prostate ablation, which appears to be an effective therapeutic alternative for patients with malignant prostate tumors. Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers in men. Several treatment options with different therapeutic approaches exist, including HIFU for localized PCa that has been in use for over 15 years. Since the early 2000s, two systems have been marketed for this application, and other devices are currently in clinical trials. HIFU treatment can be used either alone or in combination with (before- or after-) external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) (before or after HIFU) and can be repeated multiple times. HIFU treatment is performed under real-time monitoring with ultrasound or guided by MRI. Two indications are validated today: Primary care treatment and EBRT failure. The results of HIFU for primary care treatment are similar to standard conformal EBRT, even though no randomized comparative studies have been performed and no 10-year follow up data is yet available for HIFU. Salvage HIFU after EBRT failure is increasing with oncological outcomes, similar to those achieved with surgery but with the advantage of fewer adverse effects. HIFU is an evolving technology perfectly adapted for focal treatment. Thus, HIFU focal therapy is another pathway that must be explored when considering the accuracy and reliability for PCa mapping techniques. HIFU would be particularly suited for such a therapy since it is clear that HIFU outcomes and toxicity are relative to the volume of prostate treated.

  7. Emerging Non-Cancer Applications of Therapeutic Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    O’Reilly, Meaghan A.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound therapy has been investigated for over half a century. Ultrasound can act on tissue through a variety of mechanisms, including thermal, shockwave and cavitation mechanisms, and through these can elicit different responses. Ultrasound therapy can provide a non-invasive or minimally invasive treatment option, and ultrasound technology has advanced to the point where devices can be developed to investigate a wide range of applications. This review focuses on non-cancer, clinical applications of therapeutic ultrasound, with an emphasis on treatments that have recently reached clinical investigations, and preclinical research programs that have great potential to impact patient care. PMID:25792225

  8. Carotid Ultrasound Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  9. General Ultrasound Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  10. MO-DE-210-04: Repositioning and Monitoring of Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy with a New 4D Ultrasound Intra-Modality IGRT Device

    SciTech Connect

    Fargier-Voiron, M; Sarrut, D; Guillet, L; Pommier, P; Biston, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We report our clinical experience using a non-invasive transperineal (TP) ultrasound (US) probe dedicated to pre-positioning and monitoring of prostate cancer patients. The accuracy of pre-treatment positioning was compared to CBCT for prostate and post-prostatectomy patients. Intrafraction motions were recorded for both localizations. The dosimetric impact of these displacements was finally investigated on prostate patients. Methods: Differences between CBCT/CT and TP-US/TP-US registrations were analyzed on 427 and 453 sessions for 13 prostate and 14 post-prostatectomy patients, respectively. Ten prostate patients’ dosimetries were retrospectively planned using 2 different protocols: 80Gy in 40 fractions and 36.25Gy in 5 fractions with a 5mm CTV- to- PTV margin. The delivery time was measured in order to analyze ranges of intrafraction motions related to each protocol. Mean prostate displacements were calculated for each patient and applied to the treatment isocenter coordinates to evaluate the dosimetric impact of these motions. Results: CBCT and TP-US shifts agreements at ±5mm were 76.6%, 95.1%, 96.3% and 90.3%, 85.0%, 97.6% in anterior- posterior, superior- inferior and left-right directions, for prostate and post-prostatectomy patients, respectively. Intrafraction motions were analyzed considering delivery times of 140 and 290s with an additional time of 120s for patient installation for doses of 2 and 7.25Gy, respectively. Intrafraction motions were patient-dependent and were larger as the irradiation time increased. Larger displacements were observed for prostate compared to post-prostatectomy localizations. Shifts above 3mm were observed on 17.6% and 4.5% of the 2Gy sessions against 30.6% and 7.3% of the 7.25Gy sessions in the anterior-posterior direction for prostate and post-prostatectomy localizations, respectively. Preliminary dosimetric results showed that intrafraction motions mainly impact the PTV coverage. Conclusion: 4D TP-US modality

  11. [Ultrasound and color Doppler in nephrology. Physical and technical principles].

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2012-01-01

    Sonography is an imaging technique that generates tomographic images using ultrasound. The sound constitutes mechanical energy transmitted in a medium by pressure waves. Sound waves with frequencies greater than 20 kHz are called ultrasounds. Diagnostic ultrasounds use frequencies from 1 to 20 MHz. Ultrasound equipment is composed of a scanner, an image monitor, and different transducers that transform acoustic energy into electrical signals and electrical energy into acoustic energy (piezoelectric effect). The spatial resolution defines the minimum distance between two reflectors or echogenic regions that can be imaged as separate reflectors. The spatial resolution is mainly determined by the array design (linear, curved and sectorial) and by the operative system of the transducer. Modern ultrasound machines are very sophisticated medical devices that often support many transducers, imaging modes and display devices. The scan converter memory is the device in which images are formed and then presented to the monitor and to the hard copy devices.

  12. Breast ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ueno, E

    1996-03-01

    In ultrasound, ultrasonic images are formed by means of echoes among tissues with different acoustic impedance. Acoustic impedance is the product of sound speed and bulk modulus. The bulk modulus expresses the elasticity of an object, and in the human body, the value is increased by conditions such as fibrosis and calcification. The sound speed is usually high in elastic tissues and low in water. In the body, it is lowest in the fatty tissue. Ultrasound echoes are strong on the surface of bones which are hard and have a high sound speed. In organs filled with air such as the lungs, the bulk modulus is low and the sound speed is extremely low at 340 m/s, which produce strong echoes (the sound speed in solid tissues is 1,530 m/s). Human tissue is constructed of units smaller than the ultrasonic beam, and it is necessary to understand back-scattering in order to understand the ultrasonic images of these tissues. When ultrasound passes through tissue, it is absorbed as thermal energy and attenuated. Fiber is a tissue with a high absorption and attenuation rate. When the rate increases, the posterior echoes are attenuated. However, in masses with a high water content such as cysts, the posterior echoes are accentuated. This phenomenon is an important, basic finding for determining the properties of tumors. Breast cancer can be classified into two types: stellate carcinoma and circumscribed carcinoma. Since stellate carcinoma is rich in fiber, the posterior echoes are attenuated or lacking. However, circumscribed carcinoma has a high cellularity and the posterior echoes are accentuated. The same tendency is also seen in benign tumors. In immature fibroadenomas, posterior echoes are accentuated, while in fibroadenomas with hyalinosis, the posterior echoes are attenuated. Therefore, if the fundamentals of this tissue characterization and the histological features are understood, reading of ultrasound becomes easy. Color Doppler has also been developed and has contributed

  13. Eye and orbit ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Echography - eye orbit; Ultrasound - eye orbit; Ocular ultrasonography; Orbital ultrasonography ... ophthalmology department of a hospital or clinic. Your eye is numbed with medicine (anesthetic drops). The ultrasound ...

  14. Ten-year Biochemical Disease-free Survival After High-intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) for Localized Prostate Cancer: Comparison with Four Different Generation Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, T.; Nakano, M.; Shoji, S.; Omata, T.; Harano, Y.; Nagata, Y.; Usui, Y.; Terachi, T.

    2010-03-09

    HIFU has been recognized as a minimally invasive treatment option for localized prostate cancer. The purpose of the study was to assess with a long-term outcome of HIFU for prostate cancer. From January 1999, a total of 657 patients who had HIFU with at least 2 year follow-up were treated with four different types of Sonablate registered (Focus Surgery, Indianapolis, USA) devices. Thirty-three patients were treated with Sonablate registered 200 (S200) from 1999 to 2001, 406 patients with Sonablate registered 500 (S500) from 2001 to 2005, 200 patients with Sonablate registered 500 version 4 (V4) from 2005-2008 and 19 patients with Sonablate registered 500 TCM (TCM) from 2007. Biochemical disease-free survival rate (bDFS) in all patients was 59% in 8 years. bDFS in 8 years in patients with S200 and S500 groups were 55% and 56%, and bDFS in 4 and 2 years in patients with V4 and TCM group were 72% and 84%, respectively. bDFS in low, intermediate, and high risk groups were 75%, 54%, and 43% in S200/S500 and 93%, 72%, and 58% in V4/TCM group. Negative prostate biopsy rate after HIFU was 97% in S200, 79% in S500, 94% in V4 and 100% in TCM group. HIFU as primary therapy for prostate cancer is indicated in patients with low- and intermediate-risk (T1-T2b N0M0 disease, a Gleason score of <=7, a PSA level of <20 ng/mL) and a prostate volume of less than 40 mL. The rate of clinical outcome has significantly improved over the years due to technical improvements in the device.

  15. French military general practitioner: ultrasound practice.

    PubMed

    Maurin, Olga; De Regloix, S; Lefort, H; Delort, G; Domanski, L; Tourtier, J-P; Palmier, B

    2014-09-01

    Ultrasound has been used in the field and in emergency departments for more than two decades. In a military setting, its use has grown rapidly as it has gained widespread acceptance among emergency physicians and as the range of diagnostic and triage applications has continued to expand. Technological changes have enabled ultrasound devices to become accessible to general practitioners (GP), and it could be of particular interest for military GPs in isolated environments. We have investigated both the training of French military GPs in the area of ultrasonography and the use of ultrasound devices, in daily practice and abroad, in isolated military settings. In 2011, a questionnaire was sent to all 147 in-the-field GPs of the French southeast regional military health service. The questionnaire evaluated the training of military GPs in ultrasonography, the use of ultrasound in France in daily practice, and during military operations in isolated environments abroad during 2010. The response rate was 52%. On the one hand, half the responding GPs had been specially trained in ultrasound, mainly (97%) in military institutes. On the other hand, only a quarter of doctors used ultrasound in daily practice. Among those GPs performing ultrasound examinations in France, 75% used it in 2010 during isolated operations abroad. Ultrasound examinations performed in such an austere environment were retrospectively declared useful to guide clinical reasoning (41% of examinations carried out), diagnosis (21%) and decision making as regards evacuation (11%). The challenge for the future is to make ultrasound courses mandatory for all military GPs going on overseas operations, to develop daily practice, and to investigate effective triage systems, combining both ultrasound imagery and physical examination. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. General Ultrasound Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Conventional ultrasound displays the images in thin, flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats ...

  17. [Ultrasound in emergency medicine].

    PubMed

    Lapostolle, F; Deltour, S; Petrovic, T

    2015-12-01

    Ultrasound has revolutionized the practice of emergency medicine, particularly in prehospital setting. About a patient with dyspnea, we present the role of ultrasound in the diagnosis and emergency treatment. Echocardiography, but also hemodynamic ultrasound (vena cava) and lung exam are valuable tools. Achieving lung ultrasound and diagnostic value of B lines B are detailed.

  18. Ultrasound annual, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, R.C.; Hill, M.C.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides an analyses of developments in the field of diagnostic ultrasound. Endoscopic ultrasound and ultrasound-guided aspiration of ovarian follicles for in vitro fertilization are addressed. The use of Doppler ultrasound to measure blood flow in obstetrics is also examined.

  19. Ultrasound and Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafon, Cyril

    This paper begins with an overview and a description of the interactions between ultrasound and biological tissues encountered during treatment protocols. In a second part of this seminar, two clinical applications of therapeutic ultrasound will be described in details: -Kidney stone destruction by ultrasound (lithotripsy) and High Intensity Focused Ultrasound for treating prostate cancer (HIFU).

  20. Method and system to synchronize acoustic therapy with ultrasound imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Neil (Inventor); Bailey, Michael R. (Inventor); Hossack, James (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Interference in ultrasound imaging when used in connection with high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is avoided by employing a synchronization signal to control the HIFU signal. Unless the timing of the HIFU transducer is controlled, its output will substantially overwhelm the signal produced by ultrasound imaging system and obscure the image it produces. The synchronization signal employed to control the HIFU transducer is obtained without requiring modification of the ultrasound imaging system. Signals corresponding to scattered ultrasound imaging waves are collected using either the HIFU transducer or a dedicated receiver. A synchronization processor manipulates the scattered ultrasound imaging signals to achieve the synchronization signal, which is then used to control the HIFU bursts so as to substantially reduce or eliminate HIFU interference in the ultrasound image. The synchronization processor can alternatively be implemented using a computing device or an application-specific circuit.

  1. Why Anesthesiologists Must Incorporate Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Into Daily Practice.

    PubMed

    Coker, Bradley J; Zimmerman, Josh M

    2017-03-01

    The size, availability, cost, and quality of modern ultrasound devices have, for the first time in modern medicine, enabled point-of-care ultrasound by the noncardiologist physician. The appropriate application of focused cardiac ultrasound (FoCUS) by anesthesiologists has the potential to alter management and affect outcomes for a wide range of patients. In this article, the indications, benefits, and limitations of FoCUS are described. The training and equipment required to perform FoCUS are also discussed.

  2. Ultrasound in Space Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Sargsyan, A.E.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of ultrasound as a diagnostic tool in microgravity environments. The goals of research in ultrasound usage in space environments are: (1) Determine accuracy of ultrasound in novel clinical conditions. (2) Determine optimal training methodologies, (3) Determine microgravity associated changes and (4) Develop intuitive ultrasound catalog to enhance autonomous medical care. Also uses of Ultrasound technology in terrestrial applications are reviewed.

  3. Endocavity Ultrasound Probe Manipulators.

    PubMed

    Stoianovici, Dan; Kim, Chunwoo; Schäfer, Felix; Huang, Chien-Ming; Zuo, Yihe; Petrisor, Doru; Han, Misop

    2013-06-01

    We developed two similar structure manipulators for medical endocavity ultrasound probes with 3 and 4 degrees of freedom (DoF). These robots allow scanning with ultrasound for 3-D imaging and enable robot-assisted image-guided procedures. Both robots use remote center of motion kinematics, characteristic of medical robots. The 4-DoF robot provides unrestricted manipulation of the endocavity probe. With the 3-DoF robot the insertion motion of the probe must be adjusted manually, but the device is simpler and may also be used to manipulate external-body probes. The robots enabled a novel surgical approach of using intraoperative image-based navigation during robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP), performed with concurrent use of two robotic systems (Tandem, T-RALP). Thus far, a clinical trial for evaluation of safety and feasibility has been performed successfully on 46 patients. This paper describes the architecture and design of the robots, the two prototypes, control features related to safety, preclinical experiments, and the T-RALP procedure.

  4. Endocavity Ultrasound Probe Manipulators

    PubMed Central

    Stoianovici, Dan; Kim, Chunwoo; Schäfer, Felix; Huang, Chien-Ming; Zuo, Yihe; Petrisor, Doru; Han, Misop

    2014-01-01

    We developed two similar structure manipulators for medical endocavity ultrasound probes with 3 and 4 degrees of freedom (DoF). These robots allow scanning with ultrasound for 3-D imaging and enable robot-assisted image-guided procedures. Both robots use remote center of motion kinematics, characteristic of medical robots. The 4-DoF robot provides unrestricted manipulation of the endocavity probe. With the 3-DoF robot the insertion motion of the probe must be adjusted manually, but the device is simpler and may also be used to manipulate external-body probes. The robots enabled a novel surgical approach of using intraoperative image-based navigation during robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP), performed with concurrent use of two robotic systems (Tandem, T-RALP). Thus far, a clinical trial for evaluation of safety and feasibility has been performed successfully on 46 patients. This paper describes the architecture and design of the robots, the two prototypes, control features related to safety, preclinical experiments, and the T-RALP procedure. PMID:24795525

  5. Aesthetic ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthe, Peter G.; Slayton, Michael H.

    2012-10-01

    Ultrasound provides key benefits in aesthetic surgery compared to laser and RF based energy sources. We present results of research, development, pre-clinical and clinical studies, regulatory clearance and commercialization of a revolutionary non-invasive aesthetic ultrasound imaging and therapy system. Clinical applications for this platform include non-invasive face-lifts, brow-lifts, and neck-lifts achieved through fractionated treatment of the superficial musculoaponeurotic system (SMAS) and subcutaneous tissue. Treatment consists of placing a grid of micro-coagulative lesions on the order of 1 mm3 at depths in skin of 1 to 6 mm, source energy levels of 0.1 to 3 J, and spacing on the order of 1.5 mm, from 4 to 10 MHz dual-mode image/treat transducers. System details are described, as well as a regulatory pathway consisting of acoustic and bioheat simulations, source characterization (hydrophone, radiation force, and Schlieren), pre-clinical studies (porcine skin ex vivo, in vivo, and human cadaver), human safety studies (treat and resect) and efficacy trials which culminated in FDA clearance (2009) under a new device classification and world-wide usage. Clinical before and after photographs are presented which validate the clinical approach.

  6. Holistic ultrasound in trauma: An update.

    PubMed

    Saranteas, Theodosios; Mavrogenis, Andreas F

    2016-10-01

    Holistic ultrasound is a total body examination using an ultrasound device aiming to achieve immediate patient care and decision making. In the setting of trauma, it is one of the most fundamental components of care of the injured patients. Ground-breaking imaging software allows physicians to examine various organs thoroughly, recognize imaging signs early, and potentially foresee the onset or the possible outcome of certain types of injuries. Holistic ultrasound can be performed on a routine basis at the bedside of the patients, at admission and during the perioperative period. Trauma care physicians should be aware of the diagnostic and guidance benefits of ultrasound and should receive appropriate training for the optimal management of their patients. In this paper, the findings of holistic ultrasound in trauma patients are presented, with emphasis on the lungs, heart, cerebral circulation, abdomen, and airway. Additionally, the benefits of ultrasound imaging in interventional anaesthesia techniques such as ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blocks and central vein catheterization are described. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Ultrasound of the Thyroid Gland

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Ultrasound - Thyroid Thyroid ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures of the thyroid gland ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  8. Ultrasound in Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Schueller-Weidekamm, Claudia; Plagou, Athena; Teh, James

    2017-09-01

    Ultrasound is currently performed in everyday rheumatologic practice. It is used for early diagnosis, to monitor treatment results, and to diagnose remission. The spectrum of pathologies seen in arthritis with ultrasound includes early inflammatory features and associated complications. This article discusses the spectrum of ultrasound features of arthritides seen in rheumatoid arthritis and other connective tissue diseases in adults, such as Sjögren syndrome, lupus erythematosus, dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Ultrasound findings in spondyloarthritis, osteoarthritis, and crystal-induced diseases are presented. Ultrasound-guided interventions in patients with arthritis are listed, and the advantages and disadvantages of ultrasound are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Ultrasound Annual, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, R.C.; Hill, M.C.

    1983-01-01

    The 1983 edition of Ultrasound Annual features a state-of-the-art assessment of real-time ultrasound technology and a look at improvements in real-time equipment. Chapters discuss important new obstetric applications of ultrasound in measuring fetal umbilical vein blood flow and monitoring ovarian follicular development in vivo and in vitro fertilization. Other topics covered include transrectal prostate ultrasound using a linear array system; ultrasound of the common bile duct; ultrasound in tropical diseases; prenatal diagnosis of craniospinal anomalies; scrotal ultrasonography; opthalmic ultrasonography; and sonography of the upper abdominal venous system.

  10. Breast Ultrasound: Indications and Findings.

    PubMed

    Gundry, Kathleen R

    2016-06-01

    Breast ultrasound is a widely used adjuvant to mammography for the detection of breast cancer. This chapter will review some of the basic ultrasound technical factors and techniques, describe findings on ultrasound with an emphasis on the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System terminology, and present the indications for breast ultrasound. New innovations in breast ultrasound, such as elastography, ultrasound contrast, 3-dimensional, and automated whole-breast ultrasound, will be reviewed. Ultrasound-guided breast procedures are also presented.

  11. Medical Ultrasound Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Explains the basic principles of ultrasound using everyday physics. Topics include the generation of ultrasound, basic interactions with material, and the measurement of blood flow using the Doppler effect. (Author/MM)

  12. Transvaginal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Transvaginal ultrasound is a method of imaging the genital tract in females. A hand held probe is inserted directly ... vaginal cavity to scan the pelvic structures, while ultrasound pictures are viewed on a monitor. The test ...

  13. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X-ray, MRI, ... it has its place as a diagnostic tool. Ultrasound scans use high frequency sound waves to produce ...

  14. Medical Ultrasound Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Explains the basic principles of ultrasound using everyday physics. Topics include the generation of ultrasound, basic interactions with material, and the measurement of blood flow using the Doppler effect. (Author/MM)

  15. Clinical ultrasound physics.

    PubMed

    Abu-Zidan, Fikri M; Hefny, Ashraf F; Corr, Peter

    2011-10-01

    Understanding the basic physics of ultrasound is essential for acute care physicians. Medical ultrasound machines generate and receive ultrasound waves. Brightness mode (B mode) is the basic mode that is usually used. Ultrasound waves are emitted from piezoelectric crystals of the ultrasound transducer. Depending on the acoustic impedance of different materials, which depends on their density, different grades of white and black images are produced. There are different methods that can control the quality of ultrasound waves including timing of ultrasound wave emission, frequency of waves, and size and curvature of the surface of the transducer. The received ultrasound signal can be amplified by increasing the gain. The operator should know sonographic artifacts which may distort the studied structures or even show unreal ones. The most common artifacts include shadow and enhancement artifacts, edge artifact, mirror artifact and reverberation artifact.

  16. Endobronchial ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Falcone, Franco; Fois, Flavio; Grosso, Daniele

    2003-01-01

    Complex technical problems interfered with the application of thoracic ultrasound (US) for studies and clinical research. Moreover, in contrast to radiologists, cardiologists, gastroenterologists, internists, obstetricians, gynecologists and others, pulmonologists were not trained in the basics of US images. However, endoscopic US methods were developed in the last 20 years and these methods also provided important results for pulmonologists. As soon as the technical problems interfering with US application in air-containing spaces were solved, endobronchial US (EBUS) became a valuable technique as well. With EBUS, the delicate multilayer structure of the tracheobronchial wall can be analyzed. This knowledge became decisive for the management of early cancer in the central airways. These lesions can undergo local treatment instead of surgical intervention if the bronchial cartilage is intact and if the adjacent lymph nodes are not involved. EBUS proved valuable as well for the staging of more advanced lung cancer, especially with regard to endoluminal, intramural and extraluminal tumor spread. Endobronchial endosonographers are able to diagnose mediastinal lymph nodes similar to the experience of gastrointestinal endosonographers. EBUS-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA) improved the results of N-staging of lung cancer, especially in difficult lymph node levels without any clear endoscopic landmarks. The possibility of identifying N2 and N3 stages by means of a nonsurgical procedure can modify the management of lung cancer and decrease the number of unnecessary surgical interventions. EBUS can reduce the need for more invasive procedures such as thoracoscopy or mediastinoscopy. It is also useful for biopsying peripheral lesions or solitary pulmonary nodules instead of fluoroscopic guidance and also plays an important role in the strategy of interventional endoscopy.

  17. Ultrasound Imaging System Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In this video, astronaut Peggy Whitson uses the Human Research Facility (HRF) Ultrasound Imaging System in the Destiny Laboratory of the International Space Station (ISS) to image her own heart. The Ultrasound Imaging System provides three-dimension image enlargement of the heart and other organs, muscles, and blood vessels. It is capable of high resolution imaging in a wide range of applications, both research and diagnostic, such as Echocardiography (ultrasound of the heart), abdominal, vascular, gynecological, muscle, tendon, and transcranial ultrasound.

  18. Ultrasound Imaging System Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In this video, astronaut Peggy Whitson uses the Human Research Facility (HRF) Ultrasound Imaging System in the Destiny Laboratory of the International Space Station (ISS) to image her own heart. The Ultrasound Imaging System provides three-dimension image enlargement of the heart and other organs, muscles, and blood vessels. It is capable of high resolution imaging in a wide range of applications, both research and diagnostic, such as Echocardiography (ultrasound of the heart), abdominal, vascular, gynecological, muscle, tendon, and transcranial ultrasound.

  19. Ultrasound and microstructures--a promising combination?

    PubMed

    Hübner, S; Kressirer, S; Kralisch, D; Bludszuweit-Philipp, C; Lukow, K; Jänich, I; Schilling, A; Hieronymus, H; Liebner, C; Jähnisch, K

    2012-02-13

    Short diffusion paths and high specific interfacial areas in microstructured devices can increase mass transfer rates and thus accelerate multiphase reactions. This effect can be intensified by the application of ultrasound. Herein, we report on the design and testing of a novel versatile setup for a continuous ultrasound-supported multiphase process in microstructured devices on a preparative scale. The ultrasonic energy is introduced indirectly into the microstructured device through pressurized water as transfer medium. First, we monitored the influence of ultrasound on the slug flow of a liquid/liquid two-phase system in a channel with a high-speed camera. To quantify the influence of ultrasound, the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl acetate was utilized as a model reaction. Microstructured devices with varying channel diameter, shape, and material were applied with and without ultrasonication at flow rates in the mL min(-1) range. The continuous procedures were then compared and evaluated by performing a simplified life cycle assessment. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Ultrasound: Abdomen (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Ultrasound: Abdomen KidsHealth > For Parents > Ultrasound: Abdomen Print A A A What's in this article? ... Child If You Have Questions en español Ultrasonido: abdomen What It Is An abdominal ultrasound is a ...

  1. Synergy of ultrasound microbubbles and vancomycin against Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ying; Chen, Shaojie; Wang, Zhigang; Peng, Ningning; Yu, Jialin

    2013-04-01

    Device-associated biofilm infections primarily caused by Staphylococcus epidermidis are difficult to treat effectively with conventional antibiotics. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-biofilm effect of ultrasound-mediated microbubbles combined with vancomycin and to explore underlying mechanisms. Twenty-four hour S. epidermidis biofilms were established in OptiCell(TM) chambers to facilitate ultrasound exposure. Microbubbles were prepared and diluted to concentrations of 1% and 4% (v/v). Ultrasound was applied for 5 min at 300 kHz and 0.5 W/cm(2), with a 50% duty cycle. Vancomycin at the peak serum concentration of 32 mg/L was used on preformed biofilms for 24 h. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were conducted on biofilms to confirm the synergy between ultrasound and vancomycin. Biofilms exposed to ultrasound-mediated microbubbles combined with vancomycin were subjected to plate counting and microscopic examinations. A vancomycin penetration test was also performed. Ultrasound and ultrasound-mediated microbubbles both enhanced biofilm susceptibility to vancomycin. Ultrasound-mediated microbubbles without vancomycin could exert a bactericidal effect on biofilms. A bubble dose-dependent bioeffect was also observed. In the presence of vancomycin, biofilms exposed to ultrasound-mediated microbubbles exhibited significantly more micropores and more reduction in biofilm thickness than other treatment groups (P<0.05). The transportation of vancomycin through S. epidermidis biofilms was significantly enhanced by ultrasound, and microbubbles could further increase biofilm permeability to vancomycin. Ultrasound-mediated microbubbles may provide an efficient and non-invasive alternative to treat device-related biofilm infections. Future research is needed to optimize ultrasound parameters and microbubble concentrations so that this technology can be both effectively and safely applied in clinical practice.

  2. Hand-carried cardiac ultrasound enhances healthcare delivery in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Kobal, Sergio L; Lee, Steve S; Willner, Richard; Aguilar Vargas, Francisco E; Luo, Huai; Watanabe, Colin; Neuman, Yoram; Miyamoto, Takashi; Siegel, Robert J

    2004-08-15

    The availability of cardiac ultrasound is limited in developing countries. We evaluated the feasibility and diagnostic capability of a hand-carried cardiac ultrasound device in 126 patients (age 44 +/- 24 years) referred for consultation to a cardiology clinic in rural Mexico. The hand-carried cardiac ultrasound device identified 86 cardiac findings and obviated the need for further comprehensive echocardiographic evaluation in 90% of patients (113 of 126).

  3. Simplified stereo-optical ultrasound plane calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoßbach, Martin; Noll, Matthias; Wesarg, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    Image guided therapy is a natural concept and commonly used in medicine. In anesthesia, a common task is the injection of an anesthetic close to a nerve under freehand ultrasound guidance. Several guidance systems exist using electromagnetic tracking of the ultrasound probe as well as the needle, providing the physician with a precise projection of the needle into the ultrasound image. This, however, requires additional expensive devices. We suggest using optical tracking with miniature cameras attached to a 2D ultrasound probe to achieve a higher acceptance among physicians. The purpose of this paper is to present an intuitive method to calibrate freehand ultrasound needle guidance systems employing a rigid stereo camera system. State of the art methods are based on a complex series of error prone coordinate system transformations which makes them susceptible to error accumulation. By reducing the amount of calibration steps to a single calibration procedure we provide a calibration method that is equivalent, yet not prone to error accumulation. It requires a linear calibration object and is validated on three datasets utilizing di erent calibration objects: a 6mm metal bar and a 1:25mm biopsy needle were used for experiments. Compared to existing calibration methods for freehand ultrasound needle guidance systems, we are able to achieve higher accuracy results while additionally reducing the overall calibration complexity. Ke

  4. Local frequency dependence in transcranial ultrasound transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, P. J.; Clement, G. T.; Hynynen, K.

    2006-05-01

    The development of large-aperture multiple-source transducer arrays for ultrasound transmission through the human skull has demonstrated the possibility of controlled and substantial acoustic energy delivery into the brain parenchyma without the necessitation of a craniotomy. The individual control of acoustic parameters from each ultrasound source allows for the correction of distortions arising from transmission through the skull bone and also opens up the possibility for electronic steering of the acoustic focus within the brain. In addition, the capability to adjust the frequency of insonation at different locations on the skull can have an effect on ultrasound transmission. To determine the efficacy and applicability of a multiple-frequency approach with such a device, this study examined the frequency dependence of ultrasound transmission in the range of 0.6-1.4 MHz through a series of 17 points on four ex vivo human skulls. Effects beyond those that are characteristic of frequency-dependent attenuation were examined. Using broadband pulses, it was shown that the reflected spectra from the skull revealed information regarding ultrasound transmission at specific frequencies. A multiple-frequency insonation with optimized frequencies over the entirety of five skull specimens was found to yield on average a temporally brief 230% increase in the transmitted intensity with an 88% decrease in time-averaged intensity transmission within the focal volume. This finding demonstrates a potential applicability of a multiple-frequency approach in transcranial ultrasound transmission.

  5. Local Frequency Dependence in Transcranial Ultrasound Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, P. J.; Clement, G. T.; Hynynen, K.

    2006-05-01

    The development of large-aperture multiple-source transducer arrays for ultrasound transmission through the human skull has demonstrated the possibility of controlled and substantial acoustic energy delivery into the brain parenchyma without the necessitation of a craniotomy. The individual control of acoustic parameters from each ultrasound source allows for the correction of distortions arising from transmission through the skull bone and also opens up the possibility for electronic steering of the acoustic focus within the brain. In addition, the capability to adjust the frequency of sonication at different locations on the skull can have an effect on ultrasound transmission. To determine the efficacy and applicability of a multiple-frequency approach with such a device, this study examined the frequency dependence of ultrasound transmission in the range of 0.6-1.4 MHz through a series of seventeen points on four ex vivo human skulls. Effects beyond those that are characteristic of frequency-dependent attenuation were examined. Using broadband pulses, it was shown that the reflected spectra from the skull revealed information regarding ultrasound transmission at specific frequencies. This finding demonstrates a potential applicability of a multiple-frequency approach in transcranial ultrasound transmission.

  6. New heights in ultrasound: first report of spinal ultrasound from the international space station.

    PubMed

    Marshburn, Thomas H; Hadfield, Chris A; Sargsyan, Ashot E; Garcia, Kathleen; Ebert, Douglas; Dulchavsky, Scott A

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the lumbar and sacral spine occur with exposure to microgravity in astronauts; monitoring these alterations without radiographic capabilities on the International Space Station (ISS) requires novel diagnostic solutions to be developed. We evaluated the ability of point-of-care ultrasound, performed by nonexpert-operator astronauts, to provide accurate anatomic information about the spine in long-duration crewmembers in space. Astronauts received brief ultrasound instruction on the ground and performed in-flight cervical and lumbosacral ultrasound examinations using just-in-time training and remote expert tele-ultrasound guidance. Ultrasound examinations on the ISS used a portable ultrasound device with real-time communication/guidance with ground experts in Mission Control. The crewmembers were able to obtain diagnostic-quality examinations of the cervical and lumbar spine that would provide essential information about acute or chronic changes to the spine. Spinal ultrasound provides essential anatomic information in the cervical and lumbosacral spine; this technique may be extensible to point-of-care situations in emergency departments or resource-challenged areas without direct access to additional radiologic capabilities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ultrasound findings in cutaneous sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Dybiec, Ewa; Pietrzak, Aldona; Kieszko, Robert; Kanitakis, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of cutaneous sarcoidosis relies mainly on the patient's history, presence of characteristic skin lesions and histological examination that shows a granulomatous, non-necrotizing dermal infiltration. The aim of the study was to assess the ultrasonographic features of cutaneous lesions of sarcoidosis before and after treatment. A 38-year-old woman with systemic sarcoidosis and specific cutaneous lesions was treated with systemic steroids followed by hydroxychloroquine. Ultrasonographic examination of the cutaneous sarcoidosis lesions was performed with a Philips iU 22 and Siemens Acuson S 2000 device, with the use of linear 15 MHz and 17 MHz transducers. Histological examination of skin lesions showed characteristic, naked, non-necrotizing granulomas in the upper dermis. Ultrasound examination revealed well-demarcated, hypoechogenic changes. Power-Doppler scan revealed increased vascularity within the lesions and the surrounding tissue. Clinical improvement of the skin lesions was confirmed by ultrasound examination, which showed a decrease in their size and normalization of dermal echogenicity and vascularity. Ultrasound examination can show cutaneous sarcoidosis lesions and their regression after appropriate treatment. PMID:25821428

  8. Ultrasound-mediated nail drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Abadi, Danielle; Zderic, Vesna

    2011-12-01

    A novel ultrasound-mediated drug delivery system has been developed for treatment of a nail fungal disorder (onychomycosis) by improving delivery to the nail bed using ultrasound to increase the permeability of the nail. The slip-in device consists of ultrasound transducers and drug delivery compartments above each toenail. The device is connected to a computer, where a software interface allows users to select their preferred course of treatment. In in vitro testing, canine nails were exposed to 3 energy levels (acoustic power of 1.2 W and exposure durations of 30, 60, and 120 seconds). A stereo -microscope was used to determine how much of a drug-mimicking compound was delivered through the nail layers by measuring brightness on the cross section of each nail tested at each condition, where brightness level decreases coincide with increases in permeability. Each of the 3 energy levels tested showed statistical significance when compared to the control (P < .05) with a permeability factor of 1.3 after 30 seconds of exposure, 1.3 after 60 seconds, and 1.5 after 120 seconds, where a permeability factor of 1 shows no increase in permeability. Current treatments for onychomycosis include systemic, topical, and surgical. Even when used all together, these treatments typically take a long time to result in nail healing, thus making this ultrasound-mediated device a promising alternative.

  9. JSUM ultrasound elastography practice guidelines: pancreas.

    PubMed

    Hirooka, Yoshiki; Kuwahara, Takamichi; Irisawa, Atsushi; Itokawa, Fumihide; Uchida, Hiroki; Sasahira, Naoki; Kawada, Natsuko; Itoh, Yuya; Shiina, Tsuyoshi

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasound elastography is a relatively new diagnostic technique for measuring the elasticity (hardness) of tissue. Eleven years have passed since the debut of elastography. Various elastography devices are currently being marketed by manufacturers under different names. Pancreatic elastography can be used not only with transabdominal ultrasonography but also with endoscopic ultrasonography, but some types of elastography are difficult to perform for the pancreas. These guidelines aim to classify the various types of elastography into two major categories depending on the differences in the physical quantity (strain, shear wave), and to present the evidence for pancreatic elastography and how to use pancreatic elastography in the present day. But the number of reports on ultrasound elastography for the pancreas is still small, and there are no reports on some elastography devices for the pancreas. Therefore, these guidelines do not recommend methods of imaging and analysis by elastography device.

  10. Ultrasound stylet for non-image-guided ventricular catheterization.

    PubMed

    Coulson, Nathaniel K; Chiarelli, Peter A; Su, David K; Chang, Jason J; MacConaghy, Brian; Murthy, Revathi; Toms, Peter; Robb, Terrence L; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Browd, Samuel R; Mourad, Pierre D

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT Urgent ventriculostomy placement can be a lifesaving procedure in the setting of hydrocephalus or elevated intracranial pressure. While external ventricular drain (EVD) insertion is common, there remains a high rate of suboptimal drain placement. Here, the authors seek to demonstrate the feasibility of an ultrasound-based guidance system that can be inserted into an existing EVD catheter to provide a linear ultrasound trace that guides the user toward the ventricle. METHODS The ultrasound stylet was constructed as a thin metal tube, with dimensions equivalent to standard catheter stylets, bearing a single-element, ceramic ultrasound transducer at the tip. Ultrasound backscatter signals from the porcine ventricle were processed by custom electronics to offer real-time information about ventricular location relative to the catheter. Data collected from the prototype device were compared with reference measurements obtained using standard clinical ultrasound imaging. RESULTS A study of porcine ventricular catheterization using the experimental device yielded a high rate of successful catheter placement after a single pass (10 of 12 trials), despite the small size of pig ventricles and the lack of prior instruction on porcine ventricular architecture. A characteristic double-peak signal was identified, which originated from ultrasound reflections off of the near and far ventricular walls. Ventricular dimensions, as obtained from the width between peaks, were in agreement with standard ultrasound reference measurements (p < 0.05). Furthermore, linear ultrasound backscatter data permitted in situ measurement of the stylet distance to the ventricular wall (p < 0.05), which assisted in catheter guidance. CONCLUSIONS The authors have demonstrated the ability of the prototype ultrasound stylet to guide ventricular access in the porcine brain. The alternative design of the device makes it potentially easy to integrate into the standard workflow for bedside EVD

  11. Development of Flexible Capacitive Ultrasound Transducers and the Use of Ultrasound for Bone Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentzell, Scott A.

    devices have the potential to mediate both bone resorption and deposition, and also provide a new functional system for generating ultrasound on the irregular surfaces encountered in clinical settings.

  12. Wireless communication of real-time ultrasound data and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobias, Richard J.

    2015-03-01

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is expected to grow to 26 billion connected devices by 2020, plus the PC, smart phone, and tablet segment that includes mobile Health (mHealth) connected devices is projected to account for another 7.3 billion units by 2020. This paper explores some of the real-time constraints on the data-flow and control of a wireless connected ultrasound machine. The paper will define an ultrasound server and the capabilities necessary for real-time use of the device. The concept of an ultrasound server wirelessly (or over any network) connected to multiple lightweight clients on devices like an iPad, iPhone, or Android-based tablet, smartphone and other network-attached displays (i.e., Google Glass) is explored. Latency in the ultrasound data stream is one of the key areas to measure and to focus on keeping as small as possible (<30ms) so that the ultrasound operator can see what is at the probe at that moment, instead of where the probe was a short period earlier. By keeping the latency less than 30ms, the operator will feel like the data he sees on the wireless connected devices is running in real-time with the operator. The second parameter is the management of bandwidth. At minimum we need to be able to see 20 frames-per- second. It is possible to achieve ultrasound in triplex mode at >20 frames-per-second on a properly configured wireless network. The ultrasound server needs to be designed to accept multiple ultrasound data clients and multiple control clients. A description of the server and some of its key features will be described.

  13. Sustained acoustic medicine: a novel long duration approach to biomodulation utilizing low intensity therapeutic ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, Matthew D.; Lewis, George K.

    2015-05-01

    Therapeutic ultrasound is an established technique for biomodulation used by physical therapists. Typically it is used to deliver energy locally for the purpose of altering tissue plasticity and increasing local circulation. Access to ultrasound therapy has been limited by equipment and logistic requirements, which has reduced the overall efficacy of the therapy. Ultrasound miniaturization allows for development of portable, wearable, self-applied ultrasound devices that sidestep these limitations. Additionally, research has shown that the timescale of acoustic stimulation matters, and directly affects the quality of result. This paper describes a novel, long duration approach to therapeutic ultrasound and reviews the current data available for a variety of musculoskeletal conditions.

  14. Microfocused ultrasound for skin tightening.

    PubMed

    MacGregor, Jennifer L; Tanzi, Elizabeth L

    2013-03-01

    The demand for noninvasive skin tightening procedures is increasing as patients seek safe and effective alternatives to aesthetic surgical procedures of the face, neck, and body. Over the past decade, radiofrequency and infrared laser devices have been popularized owing to their ability to deliver controlled heat to the dermis, stimulate neocollagenesis, and effect modest tissue tightening with minimal recovery. However, these less invasive approaches are historically associated with inferior efficacy so that surgery still remains the treatment of choice to address moderate to severe tissue laxity. Microfocused ultrasound was recently introduced as a novel energy modality for transcutaneous heat delivery that reaches the deeper subdermal connective tissue in tightly focused zones at consistent programmed depths. The goal is to produce a deeper wound healing response at multiple levels with robust collagen remodeling and a more durable clinical response. The Ulthera device (Ulthera, Inc, Meza, AZ), with refined microfocused ultrasound technology, has been adapted specifically for skin tightening and lifting with little recovery or risk of complications since its introduction in 2009. As clinical parameters are studied and optimized, enhanced efficacy and consistency of clinical improvement is expected.

  15. Ultrasound of the Thyroid Gland

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  17. Dual Flat Flextensional Ultrasound Transducers for Enhancement of Transdermal Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong-Ye; Yeo, Swee-Hock

    2004-09-01

    The development of a lightweight, simple-structure and low-power-consumption sonophoresis device for drug delivery is required. For this purpose, a new sonophoresis device with dual flat flextensional ultrasound transducers was fabricated and investigated in this work. When both ultrasound transducers were operated at their fundamental resonance frequency (26.83 kHz), the radiated acoustic intensity (Isptp) was about 2 to 4 times higher than that generated by a single ultrasound transducer in the proposed device. The proposed sonophoresis device has the capability to reduce the applied voltage at least twofold. Compared to the ultrasonic probe or converter from a commercial sonicator that weighs about one kilogram, the proposed sonophoresis device with double ultrasound transducers weighs only 73.3 g. All the results showed that the proposed sonophoresis device is feasible for use in practical applications.

  18. Assistive technology for ultrasound-guided central venous catheter placement.

    PubMed

    Ikhsan, Mohammad; Tan, Kok Kiong; Putra, Andi Sudjana

    2017-04-19

    This study evaluated the existing technology used to improve the safety and ease of ultrasound-guided central venous catheterization. Electronic database searches were conducted in Scopus, IEEE, Google Patents, and relevant conference databases (SPIE, MICCAI, and IEEE conferences) for related articles on assistive technology for ultrasound-guided central venous catheterization. A total of 89 articles were examined and pointed to several fields that are currently the focus of improvements to ultrasound-guided procedures. These include improving needle visualization, needle guides and localization technology, image processing algorithms to enhance and segment important features within the ultrasound image, robotic assistance using probe-mounted manipulators, and improving procedure ergonomics through in situ projections of important information. Probe-mounted robotic manipulators provide a promising avenue for assistive technology developed for freehand ultrasound-guided percutaneous procedures. However, there is currently a lack of clinical trials to validate the effectiveness of these devices.

  19. Breast ultrasound tomography with total-variation regularization

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lianjie; Li, Cuiping; Duric, Neb

    2009-01-01

    Breast ultrasound tomography is a rapidly developing imaging modality that has the potential to impact breast cancer screening and diagnosis. A new ultrasound breast imaging device (CURE) with a ring array of transducers has been designed and built at Karmanos Cancer Institute, which acquires both reflection and transmission ultrasound signals. To extract the sound-speed information from the breast data acquired by CURE, we have developed an iterative sound-speed image reconstruction algorithm for breast ultrasound transmission tomography based on total-variation (TV) minimization. We investigate applicability of the TV tomography algorithm using in vivo ultrasound breast data from 61 patients, and compare the results with those obtained using the Tikhonov regularization method. We demonstrate that, compared to the Tikhonov regularization scheme, the TV regularization method significantly improves image quality, resulting in sound-speed tomography images with sharp (preserved) edges of abnormalities and few artifacts.

  20. Ultrasound contrast agents for ultrasound molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Tranquart, F; Arditi, M; Bettinger, T; Frinking, P; Hyvelin, J M; Nunn, A; Pochon, S; Tardy, I

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasound is a real-time imaging technique which is widely used in many clinical applications for its capacity to provide anatomic information with high spatial and temporal resolution. The advent of ultrasound contrast agents in combination with contrast-specific imaging modes has given access to perfusion assessments at an organ level, leading to an improved diagnostic accuracy. More recently, the development of biologically-targeted ultrasound contrast agents has expanded the role of ultrasound even further into molecular imaging applications. Ultrasound molecular imaging can be used to visualize the expression of intravascular markers, and to assess their local presence over time and/or during therapeutic treatment. Major applications are in the field of inflammation and neoangiogenesis due to the strictly intravascular presence of microbubbles. Various technologies have been investigated for attaching the targeting moiety to the shell from simple biotin-avidin constructs to more elaborated insertion within the shell through attachment to PEG residues. This important improvement has allowed a clinical translation of initial pre-clinical investigations, opening the way for an early detection and an accurate characterization of lesions in patients. The combination of anatomic, functional and molecular information/data provided by contrast ultrasound is a powerful tool which is still in its infancy due to the lack of agents suitable for clinical use. The advantages of ultrasound techniques combined with the molecular signature of lesions will represent a significant advance in imaging in the field of personalized medicine. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy. Biopty gun superior to aspiration.

    PubMed

    Ragde, H; Aldape, H C; Bagley, C M

    1988-12-01

    We used a 7 MHz transrectal ultrasound scanner to perform guided core biopsy and aspiration cytologies on 292 patients with findings suspicious for prostate cancer. One hundred two cancers were identified, 35 of which were not palpable and were detected only by ultrasound. Aspiration needles were guided by ultrasound through the center of the suspicious lesion. Core biopsies were performed using an 18-gauge Tru-Cut type of needle with an automatic, spring-powered needle biopsy device (Biopty). All patients received only local anesthetic and biopsies were done as an outpatient office procedure. The core biopsies gave excellent specimens which detected 89 percent of the cancers, whereas the aspiration method detected 51 percent (P less than 0.001). Aspiration cytology was significantly less sensitive among well-differentiated compared with moderately differentiated cancers. High-resolution transrectal ultrasound and the Biopty device are detecting and documenting prostate cancer with much greater sensitivity than preceding techniques have achieved.

  2. Tracked 3D ultrasound in radio-frequency liver ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boctor, Emad M.; Fichtinger, Gabor; Taylor, Russell H.; Choti, Michael A.

    2003-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that radio frequency (RF) ablation is a simple, safe and potentially effective treatment for selected patients with liver metastases. Despite all recent therapeutic advancements, however, intra-procedural target localization and precise and consistent placement of the tissue ablator device are still unsolved problems. Various imaging modalities, including ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) have been tried as guidance modalities. Transcutaneous US imaging, due to its real-time nature, may be beneficial in many cases, but unfortunately, fails to adequately visualize the tumor in many cases. Intraoperative or laparoscopic US, on the other hand, provides improved visualization and target imaging. This paper describes a system for computer-assisted RF ablation of liver tumors, combining navigational tracking of a conventional imaging ultrasound probe to produce 3D ultrasound imaging with a tracked RF ablation device supported by a passive mechanical arm and spatially registered to the ultrasound volume.

  3. Acoustic propagation effects in therapeutic ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mast, T. Douglas; Faidi, Waseem; Makin, Inder Raj S.

    2006-05-01

    Accurate understanding of ultrasound-tissue interaction is important for realization of clinically useful therapeutic ultrasound methods and devices. Linear acoustic propagation in homogeneous media, including diffraction and absorption effects, provides a useful first approximation but fails to accurately model many problems of interest. Depending on the therapy regime, other important effects can include cavitation and other gas activity, inhomogeneous tissue structure, finite-amplitude propagation, temperature-dependent tissue properties, and irreversible tissue modification. For ablation of soft tissue using ultrasound, prediction of therapeutic effects requires accurate knowledge of space- and time-dependent heat deposition from acoustic absorption. In addition to perfusion losses, acoustically inhomogeneous tissue structure, even in nominally homogeneous organs such as the liver, can modify heating patterns enough to change treatment outcomes. Gas activity due to boiling and tissue property changes due to local ablation, both of which markedly affect treatment, can be approximated by appropriate modification of the initial heat deposition pattern. These issues are illustrated by simulations of ultrasound therapy and comparison with in vivo and in vitro ultrasound ablation experiments.

  4. Acoustic field modeling in therapeutic ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mast, T. Douglas; Faidi, Waseem; Makin, Inder Raj S.

    2006-05-01

    Understanding of ultrasound-tissue interaction is important for realization of clinically useful therapeutic ultrasound methods and devices. Linear acoustic propagation in homogeneous media, including diffraction and absorption effects, provides a useful first approximation but fails to accurately model many problems of interest. Depending on the therapy regime, other important effects can include finite-amplitude propagation, cavitation and other gas activity, inhomogeneous tissue structure, temperature-dependent tissue properties, and irreversible tissue modification. For bulk ablation of soft tissue using ultrasound, prediction of therapeutic effects requires accurate knowledge of space- and time-dependent heat deposition from acoustic absorption. A primary factor affecting heat deposition is local heat loss due to blood flow, both from bulk perfusion and large vessels. Gas activity due to boiling and tissue property changes due to local ablation, both of which markedly affect treatment, can be approximated by appropriate modification of the initial heat deposition pattern. Acoustically inhomogeneous tissue structure, even in nominally homogeneous organs such as the liver, can modify heating patterns enough to change treatment outcomes. These issues are illustrated by simulations of ultrasound therapy and comparison with in vivo and in vitro ultrasound ablation experiments.

  5. A resonance-free nano-film airborne ultrasound emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daschewski, Maxim; Harrer, Andrea; Prager, Jens; Kreutzbruck, Marc; Beck, Uwe; Lange, Thorid; Weise, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution we present a novel thermo-acoustic approach for the generation of broad band airborne ultrasound and investigate the applicability of resonance-free thermo-acoustic emitters for very short high pressure airborne ultrasound pulses. We report on measurements of thermo-acoustic emitter consisting of a 30 nm thin metallic film on a usual soda-lime glass substrate, generating sound pressure values of more than 140 dB at 60 mm distance from the transducer and compare the results with conventional piezoelectric airborne ultrasound transducers. Our experimental investigations show that such thermo-acoustic devices can be used as broad band emitters using pulse excitation.

  6. Broadband acoustic cloak for ultrasound waves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu; Xia, Chunguang; Fang, Nicholas

    2011-01-14

    Invisibility devices based on coordinate transformation have opened up a new field of considerable interest. We present here the first practical realization of a low-loss and broadband acoustic cloak for underwater ultrasound. This metamaterial cloak is constructed with a network of acoustic circuit elements, namely, serial inductors and shunt capacitors. Our experiment clearly shows that the acoustic cloak can effectively bend the ultrasound waves around the hidden object, with reduced scattering and shadow. Because of the nonresonant nature of the building elements, this low-loss (∼6  dB/m) cylindrical cloak exhibits invisibility over a broad frequency range from 52 to 64 kHz. Furthermore, our experimental study indicates that this design approach should be scalable to different acoustic frequencies and offers the possibility for a variety of devices based on coordinate transformation.

  7. Broadband Acoustic Cloak for Ultrasound Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shu; Xia, Chunguang; Fang, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    Invisibility devices based on coordinate transformation have opened up a new field of considerable interest. We present here the first practical realization of a low-loss and broadband acoustic cloak for underwater ultrasound. This metamaterial cloak is constructed with a network of acoustic circuit elements, namely, serial inductors and shunt capacitors. Our experiment clearly shows that the acoustic cloak can effectively bend the ultrasound waves around the hidden object, with reduced scattering and shadow. Because of the nonresonant nature of the building elements, this low-loss (˜6dB/m) cylindrical cloak exhibits invisibility over a broad frequency range from 52 to 64 kHz. Furthermore, our experimental study indicates that this design approach should be scalable to different acoustic frequencies and offers the possibility for a variety of devices based on coordinate transformation.

  8. Physical acoustics of ultrasound-assisted lipoplasty.

    PubMed

    Weninger, K; Camara, C; Putterman, S

    1999-07-01

    The acoustic fields generated by probes and cannulas used for ultrasound-assisted lipoplasty (UAL) are sources of cavitation and sonoluminescence. The localized stress fields and heating caused by cavitation are strong enough to lyse cells and, in the authors' opinion, constitute the means of therapeutic action of UAL. The spectrum of sonoluminescence extends into the ultraviolet. Various devices have been calibrated and various issues relating to health risks are discussed.

  9. Design of an ergonomic ultrasound system: accommodation of user anthropometrics.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung; Yim, Jinho; Lee, Goeun

    2012-01-01

    Long-term use of medical imaging devices requires significant improvements to the user experience. One factor that impact upon such experience is whether the device is ergonomically built, ecologically designed, and leverages the current medical practice. In this research, we took a holistic and systematic approach to design an effective and biomechanically-fit ultrasound system. Research methods from behavior science (e.g., contextual inquiry, pseudo experiments) had been adopted to involve the users (sonographers) early in the design process. The end results - product design guideline for a cart type ultrasound system and control panel layout - were reviewed by the users and adjusted so that the design is within the range of an acceptable learning curve while maintaining innovativeness, a differentiated value over competitor's ultrasound devices.

  10. Ultrasound in regional anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Griffin, J; Nicholls, B

    2010-04-01

    Ultrasound guidance is rapidly becoming the gold standard for regional anaesthesia. There is an ever growing weight of evidence, matched with improving technology, to show that the use of ultrasound has significant benefits over conventional techniques, such as nerve stimulation and loss of resistance. The improved safety and efficacy that ultrasound brings to regional anaesthesia will help promote its use and realise the benefits that regional anaesthesia has over general anaesthesia, such as decreased morbidity and mortality, superior postoperative analgesia, cost-effectiveness, decreased postoperative complications and an improved postoperative course. In this review we consider the evidence behind the improved safety and efficacy of ultrasound-guided regional anaesthesia, before discussing its use in pain medicine, paediatrics and in the facilitation of neuraxial blockade. The Achilles' heel of ultrasound-guided regional anaesthesia is that anaesthetists are far more familiar with providing general anaesthesia, which in most cases requires skills that are achieved faster and more reliably. To this ends we go on to provide practical advice on ultrasound-guided techniques and the introduction of ultrasound into a department.

  11. Wireless ultrasound-powered biotelemetry for implants.

    PubMed

    Towe, Bruce C; Larson, Patrick J; Gulick, Daniel W

    2009-01-01

    A miniature piezoelectric receiver coupled to a diode is evaluated as a simple device for wireless transmission of bioelectric events to the body surface. The device converts the energy of a surface-applied ultrasound beam to a high frequency carrier current in solution. Bioelectrical currents near the implant modulate the carrier amplitude, and this signal is remotely detected and demodulated to recover the biopotential waveform. This technique achieves millivolt sensitivity in saline tank tests, and further attention to system design is expected to improve sensitivity.

  12. Current Status of Interventional Endoscopic Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ryozawa, Shomei; Fujita, Naotaka; Irisawa, Atsushi; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Mine, Tetsuya

    2017-03-20

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is being used increasingly in the management of pancreatic fluid collection, biliary and pancreatic duct drainage in cases of failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, drainage of the gallbladder, and other conditions. The role of interventional EUS is rapidly expanding and new interventions are continuously emerging. The development of devices could be a major breakthrough in the field of interventional EUS. New devices would enable the expansion of its role even further and prompt its widespread use in clinical practice. This review focuses on the current status of interventional EUS, especially highlighting the topics that are drawing endoscopists' interest at present. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Into thin air: extreme ultrasound on Mt Everest.

    PubMed

    Otto, Christian; Hamilton, Douglas R; Levine, Benjamin D; Hare, Craig; Sargsyan, Ashot E; Altshuler, Peter; Dulchavsky, Scott A

    2009-01-01

    Mountaineers face a variety of health risks at altitude including pulmonary edema; portable ultrasound may be used to diagnose high altitude pulmonary edema. This report tests the functionality of electronic equipment in a hypobaric test environment and the ability of remotely guided nonexperts to use ultrasound to evaluate respiratory status on Mt Everest. Two ultrasound devices and associated video equipment were tested in a cooled (4 degrees C-5 degrees C) hypobaric chamber to 27000 feet (8230 m) before travel to Mt Everest. The ultrasound system was connected via satellite phone to a video streaming device and portable computer to stream video through the Internet for remote guidance of a novice user by an expert. Pulmonary interstitial fluid was quantified by the presence of "comet tail" artifacts. There was no notable degradation in equipment performance in cold, hypobaric conditions; ultrasound confirmation of increased comet tails was noted in the chamber despite oxygen supplementation and the very brief exposure. Two pulmonary surveys of asymptomatic participants were completed by novice operators within 25 minutes on Mt Everest. The remote expert was able to guide and identify comet tails suggestive of intermediate pulmonary interstitial fluid. Image quality was excellent. The tested ultrasound devices functioned nominally in cold, hypobaric conditions; acute changes in lung fluid content were noted in these conditions despite normoxia. We successfully used a satellite telemedical connection with a remote expert to guide thoracic ultrasound examinations at Advanced Base Camp on Mt Everest. Coupling portable ultrasound with remote expert guidance telemedicine provides a robust diagnostic capability in austere locations.

  14. [Ultrasound in pediatric dermatology].

    PubMed

    García-Martínez, F J; Muñoz-Garza, F Z; Hernández-Martín, A

    2015-11-01

    Cutaneous ultrasound is particularly useful in pediatric dermatology to diagnose numerous diseases without the need to use invasive tests. The present articles reviews some frequent dermatological entities in children whose study can be simplified through cutaneous ultrasound. This article also provides practical recommendations reported in the literature that may facilitate ultrasound examination, with special mention of benign tumoural disease, both congenital and acquired, and vascular anomalies. Copyright © 2015 Academia Española de Dermatología y Venereología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Intravascular ultrasound chirp imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maresca, D.; Jansen, K.; Renaud, G.; van Soest, G.; Li, X.; Zhou, Q.; de Jong, N.; Shung, K. K.; van der Steen, A. F. W.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) chirp imaging as well as chirp reversal ultrasound contrast imaging at intravascular ultrasound frequency. Chirp excitations were emitted with a 34 MHz single crystal intravascular transducer and compared to conventional Gaussian-shaped pulses of equal acoustic pressure. The signal to noise ratio of the chirp images was increased by up to 9 dB relative to the conventional images. Imaging of contrast microbubbles was implemented by chirp reversal, achieving a contrast to tissue ratio of 12 dB. The method shows potential for intravascular imaging of structures in and beyond coronary atherosclerotic plaques including vasa vasorum.

  16. Spectral image reconstruction for transcranial ultrasound measurement.

    PubMed

    Clement, Greg T

    2005-12-07

    An approach aimed at improved ultrasound resolution and signal strength through highly attenuating media is presented. The method delivers a series of multiple-cycle bursts in order to construct a discrete spectral (frequency domain) response in one dimension. Cross-correlation of this ultrasound A-mode response with its transmitted signal results in time-localized peaks that correspond to scattering locations. The approach is particularly relevant to the problem of transcranial ultrasound imaging, as it combines numerous smaller signals into a single signal whose net power may exceed that which could be achieved using a single burst. Tests are performed with human skull fragments and nylon-wire targets embedded in a tissue phantom. Skulls are oriented to produce both lateral and shear modes of transcranial propagation. A total of nine locations distributed over three ex vivo human skull samples are studied. Compared with pulsed and chirped signals, results indicate more localized peaks when using the multi-cycle approach, with more accurate positioning when combined with the transcranial shear mode.

  17. Spectral image reconstruction for transcranial ultrasound measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, Greg T.

    2005-12-01

    An approach aimed at improved ultrasound resolution and signal strength through highly attenuating media is presented. The method delivers a series of multiple-cycle bursts in order to construct a discrete spectral (frequency domain) response in one dimension. Cross-correlation of this ultrasound A-mode response with its transmitted signal results in time-localized peaks that correspond to scattering locations. The approach is particularly relevant to the problem of transcranial ultrasound imaging, as it combines numerous smaller signals into a single signal whose net power may exceed that which could be achieved using a single burst. Tests are performed with human skull fragments and nylon-wire targets embedded in a tissue phantom. Skulls are oriented to produce both lateral and shear modes of transcranial propagation. A total of nine locations distributed over three ex vivo human skull samples are studied. Compared with pulsed and chirped signals, results indicate more localized peaks when using the multi-cycle approach, with more accurate positioning when combined with the transcranial shear mode.

  18. Therapeutic aspects of endoscopic ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, Timothy A.

    1999-06-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is a technology that had been used primarily as a passive imaging modality. Recent advances have enabled us to move beyond the use of EUS solely as a staging tool to an interventional device. Current studies suggest that interventional applications of EUS will allow for minimally invasive assessment and therapies in a cost-effective manner. Endoscopic ultrasound with fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has been demonstrated to be a technically feasible, relatively safe method of obtaining cytologic specimens. The clinical utility of EUS- FNA appears to be greatest in the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer and in the nodal staging of gastrointestinal and pulmonary malignancies. In addition, EUS-FNA has demonstrated utility in the sampling pleural and ascitic fluid not generally appreciated or assessable to standard interventions. Interventional applications of EUS include EUS-guided pseudocyst drainage, EUS-guided injection of botulinum toxin in the treatment of achalasia, and EUS- guided celiac plexus neurolysis in the treatment of pancreatic cancer pain. Finally, EUS-guided fine-needle installation is being evaluated, in conjunction with recent bimolecular treatment modalities, as a delivery system in the treatment of certain gastrointestinal tumors.

  19. Thyroid and parathyroid ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ghervan, Cristina

    2011-03-01

    Thyroid ultrasound is easy to perform due to the superficial location of the thyroid gland, but appropriate equipment is mandatory with a linear high frequency transducer (7.5 - 12) MHz. Some pathological aspects of the thyroid gland are easily diagnosed by ultrasound, like the enlargement of the thyroid volume (goiter) or the presence of nodules and cysts; while other aspects are more difficult and need more experience (diffuse changes in the structure, echogenicity and vascularization of the parenchyma, differential diagnosis of malignant nodules). Ultrasound has become the diagnostic procedure of choice in guidelines for the management of thyroid nodules; most structural abnormalities of the thyroid need evaluation and monitoring but not intervention. A good knowledge of the normal appearance of the thyroid gland is compulsory for an accurate ultrasound diagnosis.

  20. Venous Ultrasound (Extremities)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the leg – a condition often referred to as deep vein thrombosis. Ultrasound does not use ionizing radiation ... leg. This condition is often referred to as deep vein thrombosis or DVT. These clots may break ...

  1. Ultrasound: Infant Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... hip area, and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  2. Ultrasound: Pelvis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... pelvic area and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  3. Ultrasound: Head (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the head and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  4. Ultrasound: Bladder (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... bladder area and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  5. Ultrasound: Abdomen (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... abdominal area and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  6. Ultrasound: Infant Hip

    MedlinePlus

    ... hip area, and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  7. Ultrasound: Bladder (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... bladder area and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  8. Ultrasound: Head (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding ... A radiologist (a doctor who's specially trained in reading and interpreting X-ray and ultrasound images) will ...

  9. Ultrasound: Pelvis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding ... A radiologist (a doctor who's specially trained in reading and interpreting X-ray, ultrasound, and other imaging ...

  10. Ultrasound Contrast Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cachard, Christian; Basset, Olivier

    While the use of contrast agents in other imaging modalities (X ray, MRI, PET, …) has been routinely accepted for many years, the development and commercialization of contrast agents designed specifically for ultrasound imaging has occurred only very recently. As in the other imaging modalities, the injection of contrast agents during an ultrasound examination is intended to facilitate the detection and diagnosis of specific pathologies. Contrast agents efficiency is based on the backscattering of ultrasound by microbubbles. These microparticules are intravenously injected in the blood flow. After an introduction and generalities on ultrasound contrast agents (UCA) the microbubble physics in an acoustic field will be developed. Second, physics characteristics of contrast agents will be compared (bubbles with or without shell, gas nature, size distribution). Influence of acoustic pressure on the behaviour of the microparticules (linear, non linear and destruction) will be discussed. Finally, a review of specific imaging adapted to contrast agent properties as harmonic imaging, pulse inversion imaging will be presented.

  11. Ultrasound in pregnancy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The ultrasound has become a standard procedure used during pregnancy. It can demonstrate fetal growth and can detect increasing ... abnormalities, hydrocephalus, anencephaly, club feet, and other ... does not produce ionizing radiation and is considered ...

  12. Pelvic ultrasound - abdominal

    MedlinePlus

    ... you Bladder growths or other problems Kidney stones Pelvic inflammatory disease , an infection of a woman's uterus, ovaries, or tubes Abnormal vaginal bleeding Menstrual problems Problems ... the uterus Pelvic pain Pelvic ultrasound is also used during a ...

  13. Ultrasound skin imaging.

    PubMed

    Alfageme Roldán, F

    2014-12-01

    The interaction of high-frequency ultrasound waves with the skin provides the basis for noninvasive, fast, and accessible diagnostic imaging. This tool is increasingly used in skin cancer and inflammatory conditions as well as in cosmetic dermatology. This article reviews the basic principles of skin ultrasound and its applications in the different areas of dermatology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y AEDV. All rights reserved.

  14. Controversial ultrasound findings.

    PubMed

    Rochon, Meredith; Eddleman, Keith

    2004-03-01

    This article has reviewed a few of the more controversial findings in the field of obstetric ultrasound. For each one evidence-based strategies for the management of affected pregnancies have been suggested, derived from what the authors believe is the best information available. In some cases, this information is very limited, which can make counseling these patients extremely difficult. Some physicians find using specific likelihood ratios helpful in these complex discussions. An example of the relative likelihood ratios for several markers of trisomy 21 is illustrated in Table 10. Although the management of each of the findings discussed in this article is different, a few generalizations can be made. To begin with, the detection of any abnormal finding on ultrasound should prompt an immediate detailed ultrasound evaluation of the fetus by someone experienced in the diagnosis of fetal anomalies. If there is more than one abnormal finding on ultrasound, if the patient is over the age of 35, or if the multiple marker screen is abnormal, an amniocentesis to rule out aneuploidy should be recommended. Of the six ultrasound findings reviewed here, the authors believe that only echogenic bowel as an isolated finding confers a high enough risk of aneuploidy to recommend an amniocentesis in a low-risk patient. The other findings in isolation in a low-risk patient seem to confer only a modest increased risk of aneuploidy, if any, and this risk is certainly less than the risk of unintended loss from amniocentesis. Wherever possible, modifiers of this risk, such as maternal age, history, and first and second multiple marker screening, should be used to define more clearly the true risk of aneuploidy. As obstetric ultrasound moves forward, particularly into the uncharted waters of clinical use of three- and four-dimensional ultrasound, one can expect a whole new crop of ultrasound findings with uncertain clinical significance. Clinicians are well advised to await well

  15. Endoscopic ultrasound hemostasis techniques.

    PubMed

    Artifon, Everson L A; Aparicio, Dayse P S; Otoch, Jose P; Carvalho, Paulo B; Marson, Fernando P; Fernandes, Kaie; Tchekmedyian, Asadur J

    2014-04-01

    Since its development, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has evolved from a simple diagnostic technique to an important therapeutic tool for interventional endoscopy. EUS analysis provides real-time imaging of most major thoracic and abdominal vessels, and the possibility to use needle puncture with a curved linear array echoendoscope as a vascular intervention. In this review, we describe the endoscopic ultrasound approach to vascular therapy outside of the gastrointestinal wall.

  16. Focused ultrasound in ophthalmology.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Ronald H

    2016-01-01

    The use of focused ultrasound to obtain diagnostically significant information about the eye goes back to the 1950s. This review describes the historical and technological development of ophthalmic ultrasound and its clinical application and impact. Ultrasound, like light, can be focused, which is crucial for formation of high-resolution, diagnostically useful images. Focused, single-element, mechanically scanned transducers are most common in ophthalmology. Specially designed transducers have been used to generate focused, high-intensity ultrasound that through thermal effects has been used to treat glaucoma (via ciliodestruction), tumors, and other pathologies. Linear and annular transducer arrays offer synthetic focusing in which precise timing of the excitation of independently addressable array elements allows formation of a converging wavefront to create a focus at one or more programmable depths. Most recently, linear array-based plane-wave ultrasound, in which the array emits an unfocused wavefront and focusing is performed solely on received data, has been demonstrated for imaging ocular anatomy and blood flow. While the history of ophthalmic ultrasound extends back over half-a-century, new and powerful technologic advances continue to be made, offering the prospect of novel diagnostic capabilities.

  17. [Ultrasound findings in rhabdomyolysis].

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Esper, Raúl; Galván-Talamantes, Yazmin; Meza-Ayala, Cynthia Margarita; Cruz-Santana, Julio Alberto; Bonilla-Reséndiz, Luis Ignacio

    Rhabdomyolysis is defined as skeletal muscle necrosis. Ultrasound assessment has recently become a useful tool for the diagnosis and monitoring of muscle diseases, including rhabdomyolysis. A case is presented on the ultrasound findings in a patient with rhabdomyolysis. To highlight the importance of ultrasound as an essential part in the diagnosis in rhabdomyolysis, to describe the ultrasound findings, and review the literature. A 30 year-old with post-traumatic rhabdomyolysis of both thighs. Ultrasound was performed using a Philips Sparq model with a high-frequency linear transducer (5-10MHz), in low-dimensional scanning mode (2D), in longitudinal and transverse sections at the level of both thighs. The images obtained showed disorganisation of the orientation of the muscle fibres, ground glass image, thickening of the muscular fascia, and the presence of anechoic areas. Ultrasound is a useful tool in the evaluation of rhabdomyolysis. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  18. Focused ultrasound in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Ronald H

    2016-01-01

    The use of focused ultrasound to obtain diagnostically significant information about the eye goes back to the 1950s. This review describes the historical and technological development of ophthalmic ultrasound and its clinical application and impact. Ultrasound, like light, can be focused, which is crucial for formation of high-resolution, diagnostically useful images. Focused, single-element, mechanically scanned transducers are most common in ophthalmology. Specially designed transducers have been used to generate focused, high-intensity ultrasound that through thermal effects has been used to treat glaucoma (via ciliodestruction), tumors, and other pathologies. Linear and annular transducer arrays offer synthetic focusing in which precise timing of the excitation of independently addressable array elements allows formation of a converging wavefront to create a focus at one or more programmable depths. Most recently, linear array-based plane-wave ultrasound, in which the array emits an unfocused wavefront and focusing is performed solely on received data, has been demonstrated for imaging ocular anatomy and blood flow. While the history of ophthalmic ultrasound extends back over half-a-century, new and powerful technologic advances continue to be made, offering the prospect of novel diagnostic capabilities. PMID:27757007

  19. Ultrasound in trauma.

    PubMed

    Rippey, James C R; Royse, Alistair G

    2009-09-01

    Point-of-care ultrasound is well suited for use in the emergency setting for assessment of the trauma patient. Currently, portable ultrasound machines with high-resolution imaging capability allow trauma patients to be imaged in the pre-hospital setting, emergency departments and operating theatres. In major trauma, ultrasound is used to diagnose life-threatening conditions and to prioritise and guide appropriate interventions. Assessment of the basic haemodynamic state is a very important part of ultrasound use in trauma, but is discussed in more detail elsewhere. Focussed assessment with sonography for Trauma (FAST) rapidly assesses for haemoperitoneum and haemopericardium, and the Extended FAST examination (EFAST) explores for haemothorax, pneumothorax and intravascular filling status. In regional trauma, ultrasound can be used to detect fractures, many vascular injuries, musculoskeletal injuries, testicular injuries and can assess foetal viability in pregnant trauma patients. Ultrasound can also be used at the bedside to guide procedures in trauma, including nerve blocks and vascular access. Importantly, these examinations are being performed by the treating physician in real time, allowing for immediate changes to management of the patient. Controversy remains in determining the best training to ensure competence in this user-dependent imaging modality.

  20. Assessment of coronary vasomotion by intracoronary ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupouy, Patrick J.; Dubois-Rande, Jean Luc; Pelle, Gabriel; Gallot, Dominique; Geschwind, Herbert J.

    1993-06-01

    Recently, new intravascular ultrasound devices for intracoronary use became available. The aim of the study was to evaluate the accuracy of intravascular ultrasound for the assessment of coronary artery vasomotion and endothelial function in patients with atherosclerosis. Twenty patients with luminal irregularities on coronary angiogram and a high cholesterol level (287 +/- 19 mg/dl) (group 1) and 6 patients with angiographically smooth arteries and a minimally elevated cholesterol level (197 +/- 12 mg/dl) (group 2) were studied. A mechanical intravascular ultrasound probe (4.3 French, 30 MHz, Cardiovascular Imaging Systems) was placed into the proximal segment of the coronary artery. Off-line measurements of the lumen area and calculation of mean intimal thickness indice was performed using digitized ultrasound images. Endothelial function was studied during a sympathetic stimulation by a cold pressor test and after intracoronary administration of papaverine and linsidomine. Mean intimal thickness was higher in group 1 than in group 2 (1.52 +/- 0.64 mm vs. 0.18 +/- 0.08 mm, p < 0.001). Linsidomine infusion induced a significant vasodilating effect in both groups (p < 0.001).

  1. 21 CFR 878.4590 - Focused ultrasound stimulator system for aesthetic use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Focused ultrasound stimulator system for aesthetic use. 878.4590 Section 878.4590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices §...

  2. 21 CFR 878.4590 - Focused ultrasound stimulator system for aesthetic use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Focused ultrasound stimulator system for aesthetic use. 878.4590 Section 878.4590 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices §...

  3. Virtual Ultrasound Guidance for Inexperienced Operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caine, Timothy; Martin, David

    2012-01-01

    Medical ultrasound or echocardiographic studies are highly operator-dependent and generally require lengthy training and internship to perfect. To obtain quality echocardiographic images in remote environments, such as on-orbit, remote guidance of studies has been employed. This technique involves minimal training for the user, coupled with remote guidance from an expert. When real-time communication or expert guidance is not available, a more autonomous system of guiding an inexperienced operator through an ultrasound study is needed. One example would be missions beyond low Earth orbit in which the time delay inherent with communication will make remote guidance impractical. The Virtual Ultrasound Guidance system is a combination of hardware and software. The hardware portion includes, but is not limited to, video glasses that allow hands-free, full-screen viewing. The glasses also allow the operator a substantial field of view below the glasses to view and operate the ultrasound system. The software is a comprehensive video program designed to guide an inexperienced operator through a detailed ultrasound or echocardiographic study without extensive training or guidance from the ground. The program contains a detailed description using video and audio to demonstrate equipment controls, ergonomics of scanning, study protocol, and scanning guidance, including recovery from sub-optimal images. The components used in the initial validation of the system include an Apple iPod Classic third-generation as the video source, and Myvue video glasses. Initially, the program prompts the operator to power-up the ultrasound and position the patient. The operator would put on the video glasses and attach them to the video source. After turning on both devices and the ultrasound system, the audio-video guidance would then instruct on patient positioning and scanning techniques. A detailed scanning protocol follows with descriptions and reference video of each view along with

  4. Portable bladder ultrasound: an evidence-based analysis.

    PubMed

    2006-01-01

    retention, requiring intermittent catheterization, whereas a PVR urine volume of 100 mL to 150 mL or less is generally considered an acceptable result of bladder training. Urinary retention has been associated with poor outcomes including UTI, bladder overdistension, and higher hospital mortality rates. The standard method of determining PVR urine volumes is intermittent catheterization, which is associated with increased risk of UTI, urethral trauma and discomfort. Portable bladder ultrasound products are transportable ultrasound devices that use automated technology to register bladder volume digitally, including PVR volume, and provide three-dimensional images of the bladder. The main clinical use of portable bladder ultrasound is as a diagnostic aid. Health care professionals (primarily nurses) administer the device to measure PVR volume and prevent unnecessary catheterization. An adjunctive use of the bladder ultrasound device is to visualize the placement and removal of catheters. Also, portable bladder ultrasound products may improve the diagnosis and differentiation of urological problems and their management and treatment, including the establishment of voiding schedules, study of bladder biofeedback, fewer UTIs, and monitoring of potential urinary incontinence after surgery or trauma. To determine the effectiveness and clinical utility of portable bladder ultrasound as reported in the published literature, the Medical Advisory Secretariat used its standard search strategy to retrieve international health technology assessments and English-language journal articles from selected databases. Nonsystematic reviews, nonhuman studies, case reports, letters, editorials, and comments were excluded. Of the 4 included studies that examined the clinical utility of portable bladder ultrasound in the elderly population, all found the device to be acceptable. One study reported that the device underestimated catheterized bladder volume In patients with urology problems, 2 of

  5. Ultrasound Location of Misplaced Levonorgestrel Releasing Intrauterine System (LNG-IUS) – is it easy?

    PubMed Central

    Gowri, Vaidyanathan; Mathew, Mariam

    2009-01-01

    The Levonorgestrel intrauterine device (LNG-IUD) is a hormone-containing device licensed for treatment of menorrhagia and contraception. Though complications such as perforation have been reported similar to other non-hormonal intrauterine devices, the diagnosis of such complications is difficult with this device because the LNG-IUD has a different ultrasound appearance compared to copper devices and these case reports are intended to emphasize this point. PMID:22303513

  6. Ultrasound Location of Misplaced Levonorgestrel Releasing Intrauterine System (LNG-IUS) - is it easy?

    PubMed

    Gowri, Vaidyanathan; Mathew, Mariam

    2009-01-01

    The Levonorgestrel intrauterine device (LNG-IUD) is a hormone-containing device licensed for treatment of menorrhagia and contraception. Though complications such as perforation have been reported similar to other non-hormonal intrauterine devices, the diagnosis of such complications is difficult with this device because the LNG-IUD has a different ultrasound appearance compared to copper devices and these case reports are intended to emphasize this point.

  7. Portable ultrasound in disaster triage: a focused review.

    PubMed

    Wydo, S M; Seamon, M J; Melanson, S W; Thomas, P; Bahner, D P; Stawicki, S P

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound technology has become ubiquitous in modern medicine. Its applications span the assessment of life-threatening trauma or hemodynamic conditions, to elective procedures such as image-guided peripheral nerve blocks. Sonographers have utilized ultrasound techniques in the pre-hospital setting, emergency departments, operating rooms, intensive care units, outpatient clinics, as well as during mass casualty and disaster management. Currently available ultrasound devices are more affordable, portable, and feature user-friendly interfaces, making them well suited for use in the demanding situation of a mass casualty incident (MCI) or disaster triage. We have reviewed the existing literature regarding the application of sonology in MCI and disaster scenarios, focusing on the most promising and practical ultrasound-based paradigms applicable in these settings.

  8. Acoustic bubble sorting for ultrasound contrast agent enrichment.

    PubMed

    Segers, Tim; Versluis, Michel

    2014-05-21

    An ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) suspension contains encapsulated microbubbles with a wide size distribution, with radii ranging from 1 to 10 μm. Medical transducers typically operate at a single frequency, therefore only a small selection of bubbles will resonate to the driving ultrasound pulse. Thus, the sensitivity can be improved by narrowing down the size distribution. Here, we present a simple lab-on-a-chip method to sort the population of microbubbles on-chip using a traveling ultrasound wave. First, we explore the physical parameter space of acoustic bubble sorting using well-defined bubble sizes formed in a flow-focusing device, then we demonstrate successful acoustic sorting of a commercial UCA. This novel sorting strategy may lead to an overall improvement of the sensitivity of contrast ultrasound by more than 10 dB.

  9. Intracranial Applications of MR Imaging-Guided Focused Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Khanna, N; Gandhi, D; Steven, A; Frenkel, V; Melhem, E R

    2017-03-01

    Initially used in the treatment of prostate cancer and uterine fibroids, the role of focused ultrasound has expanded as transcranial acoustic wave distortion and other limitations have been overcome. Its utility relies on focal energy deposition via acoustic wave propagation. The duty cycle and intensity of focused ultrasound influence the rate of energy deposition and result in unique physiologic and biomechanical effects. Thermal ablation via high-intensity continuous exposure generates coagulative necrosis of tissues. High-intensity, pulsed application reduces temporally averaged energy deposition, resulting in mechanical effects, including reversible, localized BBB disruption, which enhances neurotherapeutic agent delivery. While the precise mechanisms remain unclear, low-intensity, pulsed exposures can influence neuronal activity with preservation of cytoarchitecture. Its noninvasive nature, high-resolution, radiation-free features allow focused ultrasound to compare favorably with other modalities. We discuss the physical characteristics of focused ultrasound devices, the biophysical mechanisms at the tissue level, and current and emerging applications.

  10. Quo vadis medical ultrasound?

    PubMed

    Lewin, Peter A

    2004-04-01

    The last three decades of development in diagnostic ultrasound imaging and technology are briefly reviewed and the impact of the crucial link between the two apparently independent research efforts, which eventually facilitated implementation of harmonic imaging modality is explored. These two efforts included the experiments with piezoelectric PVDF polymer material and studies of the interaction between ultrasound energy and biological tissue. Harmonic imaging and its subsequent improvements revolutionized the diagnostic power of clinical ultrasound and brought along images of unparalleled resolution, close to that of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) quality. The nonlinear propagation effects and their implications for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications of ultrasound are also briefly addressed. In diagnostic applications, the impact of these effects on image resolution and tissue characterization is reviewed; in therapeutic applications, the influence of nonlinear propagation effects on highly localized tissue ablation and cauterization is examined. Next, the most likely developments and future trends in clinical ultrasound technology, including 3D and 4D imaging, distant palpation, image enhancement using contrast agents, monitoring, and merger of diagnostic and therapeutic applications by e.g. introducing ultrasonically controlled targeted drug delivery are reviewed. Finally, a possible competition from other imaging modalities is discussed.

  11. Human Factors Engineering and testing for a wearable, long duration ultrasound system self-applied by an end user.

    PubMed

    Taggart, Rebecca; Langer, Matthew D; Lewis, George K

    2014-01-01

    One of the major challenges in the design of a new class of medical device is ensuring that the device will have a safe and effective user interface for the intended users. Human Factors Engineering addresses these concerns through direct study of how a user interacts with newly designed devices with unique features. In this study, a novel long duration, low intensity therapeutic ultrasound device is tested by 20 end users representative of the intended user population. Over 90% of users were able to operate the device successfully. The therapeutic ultrasound device was found to be reasonably safe and effective for the intended users, uses, and use environments.

  12. Ultrasound-Guided Placement of Central Venous Port Systems via the Right Internal Jugular Vein: Are Chest X-Ray and/or Fluoroscopy Needed to Confirm the Correct Placement of the Device?

    PubMed

    Miccini, Michelangelo; Cassini, Diletta; Gregori, Matteo; Gazzanelli, Sergio; Cassibba, Simone; Biacchi, Daniele

    2016-10-01

    Percutaneous central venous port (CVP) placement using ultrasound-guidance (USG) via right internal jugular vein is described as a safe and effective procedure. The aim of this study is to determine whether intraoperative fluoroscopy (IF) and/or postoperative chest X-ray (CXR) are required to confirm the correct position of the catheter. Between January 2012 and December 2014, 302 adult patients underwent elective CVP system placement under USG. The standard venous access site was the right internal jugular vein. The length of catheter was calculated based on the height of the patient. IF was always performed to confirm US findings. 176 patients were men and 126 were women and average height was 176.2 cm (range 154-193 cm). The average length of the catheter was 16.4 cm (range 14-18). Catheter malposition and pneumothorax were observed in 4 (1.3 %) and 3 (1 %) patients, respectively. IF confirmed the correct position of the catheter in all cases. Catheter misplacement (4 cases) was previously identified and corrected on USG. Our rates of pneumothorax are in accordance with those of the literature (0.5-3 %). Ultrasonography has resulted in improved safety and effectiveness of port system implantation. The routine use of CXR and IF should be considered unnecessary.

  13. Ultrasound physics in a nutshell.

    PubMed

    Coltrera, Marc D

    2010-12-01

    This content presents to the neophyte ultrasonographer the essential nutshell of information needed to properly interpret ultrasound images. Basic concepts of physics related to ultrasound are supported with formulas and related to clinical use.

  14. Closed-Loop Noninvasive Ultrasound Glucose Sensing and Insulin Delivery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    used in a drug delivery application, such as the low frequency flextensional resonators (Stansfield 1990), tonpilz transducers (Wilson 1988), or...34cymbal" transducer , a potentially portable ultrasound array of will be designed. Moreover the feasibility of a "smart" diabetes management system...constructed transducers . These large industrial devices are impractical for a compact and transportable diabetes management device. The goal of this

  15. Focused Ultrasound Surgery in Oncology: Overview and Principles

    PubMed Central

    McDannold, Nathan J.; Hynynen, Kullervo; Jolesz, Ferenc A.

    2011-01-01

    Focused ultrasound surgery (FUS) is a noninvasive image-guided therapy and an alternative to surgical interventions. It presents an opportunity to revolutionize cancer therapy and to affect or change drug delivery of therapeutic agents in new focally targeted ways. In this article the background, principles, technical devices, and clinical cancer applications of image-guided FUS are reviewed. © RSNA, 2011 PMID:21436096

  16. Mechanics of ultrasound elastography

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guo-Yang

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound elastography enables in vivo measurement of the mechanical properties of living soft tissues in a non-destructive and non-invasive manner and has attracted considerable interest for clinical use in recent years. Continuum mechanics plays an essential role in understanding and improving ultrasound-based elastography methods and is the main focus of this review. In particular, the mechanics theories involved in both static and dynamic elastography methods are surveyed. They may help understand the challenges in and opportunities for the practical applications of various ultrasound elastography methods to characterize the linear elastic, viscoelastic, anisotropic elastic and hyperelastic properties of both bulk and thin-walled soft materials, especially the in vivo characterization of biological soft tissues. PMID:28413350

  17. Ultrasound in analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Priego Capote, F; Luque de Castro, M D

    2007-01-01

    Ultrasound is a type of energy which can help analytical chemists in almost all their laboratory tasks, from cleaning to detection. A generic view of the different steps which can be assisted by ultrasound is given here. These steps include preliminary operations usually not considered in most analytical methods (e.g. cleaning, degassing, and atomization), sample preparation being the main area of application. In sample preparation ultrasound is used to assist solid-sample treatment (e.g. digestion, leaching, slurry formation) and liquid-sample preparation (e.g. liquid-liquid extraction, emulsification, homogenization) or to promote heterogeneous sample treatment (e.g. filtration, aggregation, dissolution of solids, crystallization, precipitation, defoaming, degassing). Detection techniques based on use of ultrasonic radiation, the principles on which they are based, responses, and the quantities measured are also discussed.

  18. Ultrasound of Peripheral Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Jung Im; Walker, Francis O.; Cartwright, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, neuromuscular ultrasound has emerged as a useful tool for the diagnosis of peripheral nerve disorders. This article reviews sonographic findings of normal nerves including key quantitative ultrasound measurements that are helpful in the evaluation of focal and possibly generalized peripheral neuropathies. It also discusses several recent papers outlining the evidence base for the use of this technology, as well as new findings in compressive, traumatic, and generalized neuropathies. Ultrasound is well suited for use in electrodiagnostic laboratories where physicians, experienced in both the clinical evaluation of patients and the application of hands-on technology, can integrate findings from the patient’s history, physical examination, electrophysiological studies, and imaging for diagnosis and management. PMID:23314937

  19. Ultrasound in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, David S.; South, Donna A.; Garcia, Kathleen M.; Arbeille, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    Physiology of the human body in space has been a major concern for space-faring nations since the beginning of the space era. Ultrasound (US) is one of the most cost effective and versatile forms of medical imaging. As such, its use in characterizing microgravity-induced changes in physiology is being realized. In addition to the use of US in related ground-based studies, equipment has also been modified to fly in space. This involves alteration to handle the stresses of launch and different power and cooling requirements. Study protocols also have been altered to accommodate the microgravity environment. Ultrasound studies to date have shown a pattern of adaptation to microgravity that includes changes in cardiac chamber sizes and vertebral spacing. Ultrasound has been and will continue to be an important component in the investigation of physiological and, possibly, pathologic changes occurring in space or as a result of spaceflight.

  20. Endometrial receptivity: evaluation with ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Bonilla-Musoles, Fernando; Raga, Francisco; Osborne, Newton G; Castillo, Juan Carlos; Bonilla, Francisco

    2013-03-01

    An adequate endometrial receptivity is a crucial factor for embryo implantation. We describe endometrial morphology (endometrial appearance or pattern, endometrial thickness, volume, and delimitation), based on the concepts and possibilities of the new ultrasound modalities (3-dimensional/4-dimensional ultrasound, automatic volume calculation, virtual organ computer-aided analysis, tomographic ultrasound image, inverse mode, and 3-dimensional Doppler angiography) as markers of endometrial receptivity.

  1. [Ultrasound and regional anaesthesia].

    PubMed

    Delaunay, L; Plantet, F; Jochum, D

    2009-02-01

    The use of ultrasound is the latest major evolution in regional anaesthesia. Review of available literature shows significant changes in clinical practice. Ultrasound guidance allows the visualization of anatomical variations or unsuspected intraneural injections, reduces the volume of local anaesthetic injections and confirms correct local anaesthetic distribution or catheter placement. No study has found a statistical difference in success rates and safety because all studies were underpowered. However, the ability to visualize an invasive procedure that has been performed blindly in the past is an undeniable progress in terms of safety. The necessity to be familiar with the machine and the learning curve can be repulsive. The aim of this article is to demystify ultrasound guidance by explaining the fundamentals of the clinical use of ultrasound. With the help of different chapters, the authors explain the different adjustments and possible artefacts and give easy solutions for the use of bedside ultrasound. Training is essential and can be performed on manikins or training phantom. For each region the main anatomical landmarks are explained. One must be familiar with several imaging techniques: short axis (transverse) or long axis (longitudinal) nerve imaging, in-plane or out-of-plane imaging and hydrolocalization. Viewing the needle's tip position during its progression remains the main safety endpoint. Therefore, electrical nerve stimulation and ultrasound guidance should be combined, especially for beginners, to confirm proximity to neural structures and to help in case of difficulty. Optimizing safety and clinical results must remain a key priority in regional anaesthesia. Finally, specific regulations concerning the transducers are described. Paediatric specificities are also mentioned.

  2. Combined ultrasound and MR imaging to guide focused ultrasound therapies in the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvanitis, Costas D.; Livingstone, Margaret S.; McDannold, Nathan

    2013-07-01

    Several emerging therapies with potential for use in the brain, harness effects produced by acoustic cavitation—the interaction between ultrasound and microbubbles either generated during sonication or introduced into the vasculature. Systems developed for transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) thermal ablation can enable their clinical translation, but methods for real-time monitoring and control are currently lacking. Acoustic emissions produced during sonication can provide information about the location, strength and type of the microbubble oscillations within the ultrasound field, and they can be mapped in real-time using passive imaging approaches. Here, we tested whether such mapping can be achieved transcranially within a clinical brain MRgFUS system. We integrated an ultrasound imaging array into the hemisphere transducer of the MRgFUS device. Passive cavitation maps were obtained during sonications combined with a circulating microbubble agent at 20 targets in the cingulate cortex in three macaques. The maps were compared with MRI-evident tissue effects. The system successfully mapped microbubble activity during both stable and inertial cavitation, which was correlated with MRI-evident transient blood-brain barrier disruption and vascular damage, respectively. The location of this activity was coincident with the resulting tissue changes within the expected resolution limits of the system. While preliminary, these data clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that it is possible to construct maps of stable and inertial cavitation transcranially, in a large animal model, and under clinically relevant conditions. Further, these results suggest that this hybrid ultrasound/MRI approach can provide comprehensive guidance for targeted drug delivery via blood-brain barrier disruption and other emerging ultrasound treatments, facilitating their clinical translation. We anticipate that it will also prove to be an important research tool that will

  3. Combined ultrasound and MR imaging to guide focused ultrasound therapies in the brain.

    PubMed

    Arvanitis, Costas D; Livingstone, Margaret S; McDannold, Nathan

    2013-07-21

    Several emerging therapies with potential for use in the brain, harness effects produced by acoustic cavitation--the interaction between ultrasound and microbubbles either generated during sonication or introduced into the vasculature. Systems developed for transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) thermal ablation can enable their clinical translation, but methods for real-time monitoring and control are currently lacking. Acoustic emissions produced during sonication can provide information about the location, strength and type of the microbubble oscillations within the ultrasound field, and they can be mapped in real-time using passive imaging approaches. Here, we tested whether such mapping can be achieved transcranially within a clinical brain MRgFUS system. We integrated an ultrasound imaging array into the hemisphere transducer of the MRgFUS device. Passive cavitation maps were obtained during sonications combined with a circulating microbubble agent at 20 targets in the cingulate cortex in three macaques. The maps were compared with MRI-evident tissue effects. The system successfully mapped microbubble activity during both stable and inertial cavitation, which was correlated with MRI-evident transient blood-brain barrier disruption and vascular damage, respectively. The location of this activity was coincident with the resulting tissue changes within the expected resolution limits of the system. While preliminary, these data clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that it is possible to construct maps of stable and inertial cavitation transcranially, in a large animal model, and under clinically relevant conditions. Further, these results suggest that this hybrid ultrasound/MRI approach can provide comprehensive guidance for targeted drug delivery via blood-brain barrier disruption and other emerging ultrasound treatments, facilitating their clinical translation. We anticipate that it will also prove to be an important research tool that will

  4. Xampling in ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Noam; Eldar, Yonina C.; Feuer, Arie; Danin, Gilad; Friedman, Zvi

    2011-03-01

    Recent developments of new medical treatment techniques put challenging demands on ultrasound imaging systems in terms of both image quality and raw data size. Traditional sampling methods result in very large amounts of data, thus, increasing demands on processing hardware and limiting the flexibility in the postprocessing stages. In this paper, we apply Compressed Sensing (CS) techniques to analog ultrasound signals, following the recently developed Xampling framework. The result is a system with significantly reduced sampling rates which, in turn, means significantly reduced data size while maintaining the quality of the resulting images.

  5. Cardiac 4D Ultrasound Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'hooge, Jan

    Volumetric cardiac ultrasound imaging has steadily evolved over the last 20 years from an electrocardiography (ECC) gated imaging technique to a true real-time imaging modality. Although the clinical use of echocardiography is still to a large extent based on conventional 2D ultrasound imaging it can be anticipated that the further developments in image quality, data visualization and interaction and image quantification of three-dimensional cardiac ultrasound will gradually make volumetric ultrasound the modality of choice. In this chapter, an overview is given of the technological developments that allow for volumetric imaging of the beating heart by ultrasound.

  6. [WHEN ULTRASOUND MEETS THE INTERNIST].

    PubMed

    Katz, David; Dadon, Ziv; Zalut, Todd; Avraham Alpert, Evan

    2017-06-01

    Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) is an important modality with many advantages. At the Shaare Zedek Medical Centre, we developed a case-based course to teach POCUS to internal medicine residents and attendings. The topics include: "Introduction to Point-of-Care Ultrasound", "Focused Assessment with Sonography of Trauma", "Basic Cardiac, Pulmonary and Vascular Ultrasound", "Rapid Ultrasound in Shock" and "Ultrasound Guided Central Lines". The use of POCUS should aid in rapid diagnosis, decrease complications associated with bed-side procedures, and ultimately improve patient care.

  7. Ultrasound probe and needle-guide calibration for robotic ultrasound scanning and needle targeting.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chunwoo; Chang, Doyoung; Petrisor, Doru; Chirikjian, Gregory; Han, Misop; Stoianovici, Dan

    2013-06-01

    Image-to-robot registration is a typical step for robotic image-guided interventions. If the imaging device uses a portable imaging probe that is held by a robot, this registration is constant and has been commonly named probe calibration. The same applies to probes tracked by a position measurement device. We report a calibration method for 2-D ultrasound probes using robotic manipulation and a planar calibration rig. Moreover, a needle guide that is attached to the probe is also calibrated for ultrasound-guided needle targeting. The method is applied to a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) probe for robot-assisted prostate biopsy. Validation experiments include TRUS-guided needle targeting accuracy tests. This paper outlines the entire process from the calibration to image-guided targeting. Freehand TRUS-guided prostate biopsy is the primary method of diagnosing prostate cancer, with over 1.2 million procedures performed annually in the U.S. alone. However, freehand biopsy is a highly challenging procedure with subjective quality control. As such, biopsy devices are emerging to assist the physician. Here, we present a method that uses robotic TRUS manipulation. A 2-D TRUS probe is supported by a 4-degree-of-freedom robot. The robot performs ultrasound scanning, enabling 3-D reconstructions. Based on the images, the robot orients a needle guide on target for biopsy. The biopsy is acquired manually through the guide. In vitro tests showed that the 3-D images were geometrically accurate, and an image-based needle targeting accuracy was 1.55 mm. These validate the probe calibration presented and the overall robotic system for needle targeting. Targeting accuracy is sufficient for targeting small, clinically significant prostatic cancer lesions, but actual in vivo targeting will include additional error components that will have to be determined.

  8. [Ultrasound guided percutaneous nephrolithotripsy].

    PubMed

    Guliev, B G

    2014-01-01

    The study was aimed to the evaluation of the effectiveness and results of ultrasound guided percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PNL) for the treatment of patients with large stones in renal pelvis. The results of PNL in 138 patients who underwent surgery for kidney stones from 2011 to 2013 were analyzed. Seventy patients (Group 1) underwent surgery with combined ultrasound and radiological guidance, and 68 patients (Group 2)--only with ultrasound guidance. The study included patients with large renal pelvic stones larger than 2.2 cm, requiring the formation of a single laparoscopic approach. Using the comparative analysis, the timing of surgery, the number of intra- and postoperative complications, blood loss and length of stay were evaluated. Percutaneous access was successfully performed in all patients. Postoperative complications (exacerbation of chronic pyelonephritis, gross hematuria) were observed in 14.3% of patients in Group 1 and in 14.7% of patients in Group 2. Bleeding requiring blood transfusion, and injuries of adjacent organs were not registered. Efficacy of PNL in the Group 1 was 95.7%; 3 (4.3%) patients required additional interventions. In Group 2, the effectiveness of PNL was 94.1%, 4 (5.9%) patients additionally underwent extracorporeal lithotripsy. There were no significant differences in the effectiveness of PNL, the volume of blood loss and duration of hospitalization. Ultrasound guided PNL can be performed in large pelvic stones and sufficient expansion of renal cavities, thus reducing radiation exposure of patients and medical staff.

  9. Venous Ultrasound (Extremities)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the leg – a condition often referred to as deep vein thrombosis. Ultrasound does not use ionizing radiation and has no known harmful effects. If the veins in your abdomen are to be examined, you may be asked not to eat or drink anything but water for six to eight hours beforehand. Otherwise, little ...

  10. ICV Echo Ultrasound Scan

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-31

    View of Integrated Cardiovascular (ICV) Echo Ultrasound Scan,in the Columbus module. ICV aims to quantify the extent,time course and clinical significance of cardiac atrophy (decrease in the size of the heart muscle) in space. Photo was taken during Expedition 34.

  11. Ultrasound and the IRB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Melissa A.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assist researchers in writing their research protocols and subject consent forms so that both the Institutional Review Board (IRB) and subjects are assured of the minimal risk associated with diagnostic B-scan ultrasound as it is used in speech research. There have been numerous epidemiological studies on fetal…

  12. Doppler ultrasound monitoring technology.

    PubMed

    Docker, M F

    1993-03-01

    Developments in the signal processing of Doppler ultrasound used for the detection of fetal heart rate (FHR) have improved the operation of cardiotocographs. These developments are reviewed and the advantages and disadvantages of the various Doppler and signal processing methods are compared.

  13. Intravascular ultrasound elastography.

    PubMed

    van der Steen, A F; de Korte, C L; Céspedes, E I

    1998-10-01

    Intravascular Ultrasound Blastography. The response of a tissue to mechanical excitation is a function of its mechanical properties. Excitation can be dynamic or quasistatic in nature. The response (e.g. displacement, velocity, compression) can be measured via ultrasound. This is the main principle underlying ultrasound elasticity imaging, sonoelasticity imaging, or ultrasound elastography. It is of great interest to know the local hardness of vessel wall and plaques. Intravascular elastography yields information unavailable or inconclusive if obtained from IVUS alone and thus contributes to more correct diagnosis. Potentially it can be used for therapy guidance. During the last decade several working groups used elastography in intravascular applications with varying success. In this paper we discuss the various approaches by different working groups. Focus will be on the approach of the Rotterdam group. Using a 30 MHz IVUS catheter, RF data are acquired from vessels in vitro at different intraluminal pressures. Local tissue displacement estimation by cross-correlation is followed by computation of the local strain. The resulting image supplies local information on the elastic properties of the vessel and plaque with high spatial resolution. Feasibility and usefulness are shown by means of phantom measurements. Furthermore, initial in vitro results of femoral arteries and correlation with histology are discussed. Phantom data show that the elastograms reveal information not presented by the echogram. In vitro artery data prove that in principle elastography is capable of identifying plaque composition where echography fails.

  14. Recent advances in medical ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Lawrence

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound has become one of the most widely used imaging modalities in medicine; yet, before ultrasound-imaging systems became available, high intensity ultrasound was used as early as the 1950s to ablate regions in the brains of human patients. Recently, a variety of novel applications of ultrasound have been developed that include site-specific and ultrasound-mediated drug delivery, acoustocautery, lipoplasty, histotripsy, tissue regeneration, and bloodless surgery, among many others. This lecture will review several new applications of therapeutic ultrasound and address some of the basic scientific questions and future challenges in developing these methods and technologies for general use in our society. We shall particularly emphasize the use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in the treatment of benign and malignant tumors.

  15. Combined photoacoustic and ultrasound biomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Tyler; Ranasinghesagara, Janaka C; Lu, Huihong; Mathewson, Kory; Walsh, Andrew; Zemp, Roger J

    2009-11-23

    We report on the development of an imaging system capable of combined ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging based on a fast-scanning single-element 25-MHz ultrasound transducer and a unique light-delivery system. The system is capable of 20 ultrasound frames per second and slower photoacoustic frame rates limited by laser pulse-repetition rates. Laser and ultrasound pulses are interlaced for co-registration of photoacoustic and ultrasound images. In vivo imaging of a human finger permits ultrasonic visualization of vessel structures and speckle changes indicative of blood flow, while overlaid photoacoustic images highlight some small vessels that are not clear from the ultrasound scan. Photoacoustic images provide optical absorption contrast co-registered in the structural and blood-flow context of ultrasound with high-spatial resolution and may prove important for clinical diagnostics and basic science of the microvasculature.

  16. Signal processing in ultrasound. [for diagnostic medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Croissette, D. H.; Gammell, P. M.

    1978-01-01

    Signal is the term used to denote the characteristic in the time or frequency domain of the probing energy of the system. Processing of this signal in diagnostic ultrasound occurs as the signal travels through the ultrasonic and electrical sections of the apparatus. The paper discusses current signal processing methods, postreception processing, display devices, real-time imaging, and quantitative measurements in noninvasive cardiology. The possibility of using deconvolution in a single transducer system is examined, and some future developments using digital techniques are outlined.

  17. Role of pelvic ultrasound simulation.

    PubMed

    Arya, Sushila; Mulla, Zuber D; Kupesic Plavsic, Sanja

    2017-10-10

    Pelvic ultrasound is a critical diagnostic imaging tool in obstetrics and gynaecology. Training opportunities in transvaginal ultrasound have not kept pace with the demand among learners because of the increased complexity of modern ultrasound technology and duty-hour restrictions. Ultrasound simulation training has the potential to overcome this gap. Training opportunities in transvaginal ultrasound have not kept pace with the demand OBJECTIVE: Our study aimed to determine the usefulness, applicability and attitudes toward pelvic ultrasound simulation training among residents, sonographers and practising doctors. Pelvic ultrasound simulation activity using high-fidelity virtual reality ultrasound simulators lasted 4 hours and consisted of three modules: abnormal uterine bleeding, adnexal masses and bleeding in pregnancy. All learners completed a pre- and post-encounter quiz, and an anonymous post-simulation survey on the relevance of ultrasound simulation to clinical learning, and its usefulness to improve scanning performance and interpretation skills. Thirty-one participants attended the workshop, and 28 (90.3%) of them responded to the survey. Five respondents agreed and 23 strongly agreed that pelvic ultrasound simulation applies to their clinical ultrasound practice, and seven of them agreed and 21 strongly agreed that their performance of ultrasound and interpretation skills will be improved following their simulation training. The average post-activity knowledge score for all three topics significantly increased (paired Student's t-test, p < 0.0001). All 28 respondents believe that ultrasound simulation is a useful complement to learning with real patients, with the potential to improve their pelvic ultrasound performance, interpretation skills and clinical reasoning. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  18. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging for the Detection of Focused Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Opening

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ching-Hsiang; Lin, Wun-Hao; Ting, Chien-Yu; Chai, Wen-Yen; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Liu, Hao-Li; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) can be transiently and locally opened by focused ultrasound (FUS) in the presence of microbubbles (MBs). Various imaging modalities and contrast agents have been used to monitor this process. Unfortunately, direct ultrasound imaging of BBB opening with MBs as contrast agent is not feasible, due to the inability of MBs to penetrate brain parenchyma. However, FUS-induced BBB opening is accompanied by changes in blood flow and perfusion, suggesting the possibility of perfusion-based ultrasound imaging. Here we evaluated the use of MB destruction-replenishment, which was originally developed for analysis of ultrasound perfusion kinetics, for verifying and quantifying FUS-induced BBB opening. MBs were intravenously injected and the BBB was disrupted by 2 MHz FUS with burst-tone exposure at 0.5-0.7 MPa. A perfusion kinetic map was estimated by MB destruction-replenishment time-intensity curve analysis. Our results showed that the scale and distribution of FUS-induced BBB opening could be determined at high resolution by ultrasound perfusion kinetic analysis. The accuracy and sensitivity of this approach was validated by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. Our successful demonstration of ultrasound imaging to monitor FUS-induced BBB opening provides a new approach to assess FUS-dependent brain drug delivery, with the benefit of high temporal resolution and convenient integration with the FUS device. PMID:25161701

  19. Musculoskeletal ultrasound in rheumatology in Korea: targeted ultrasound initiative survey.

    PubMed

    Kang, Taeyoung; Wakefield, Richard J; Emery, Paul

    2016-04-01

    In collaboration with the Targeted Ultrasound Initiative (TUI), to conduct the first study in Korea to investigate current practices in ultrasound use among Korean rheumatologists. We translated the TUI Global Survey into Korean and added questions to better understand the specific challenges facing rheumatologists in Korea. To target as many rheumatologists in Korea as possible, we created an on-line version of this survey, which was conducted from March to April 2013. Rheumatologists are in charge of ultrasound in many Korean hospitals. Rheumatologists in hospitals and private clinics use ultrasound to examine between one and five patients daily; they use ultrasound for diagnosis more than monitoring and receive compensation of about US$30-50 per patient. There are marked differences in the rates of ultrasound usage between rheumatologists who work in private practice compared with tertiary hospitals. Korean rheumatologists not currently using ultrasound in their practice appear eager to do so. This survey provides important insights into the current status of ultrasound in rheumatology in Korea and highlights several priorities; specifically, greater provision of formal training, standardization of reporting and accrual of greater experience among ultrasound users. If these needs are addressed, all rheumatology departments in Korea are likely to use ultrasound or have access to it in the future. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Simulation and training of ultrasound supported anaesthesia: a low-cost approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, T.; Lamontain, M.; Hilpert, J.; Schilling, F.; Tolxdorff, T.

    2010-03-01

    The use of ultrasound imaging technology during techniques of peripheral nerve blockade offers several clinical benefits. Here we report on a new method to educate residents in ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia. The daily challenge for the anesthesiologists is the 3D angle-depending handling of the stimulation needle and the ultrasound probe while watching the 2D ultrasound image on the monitor. Purpose: Our approach describes how a computer-aided simulation and training set for ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia could be built based on wireless low-cost devices and an interactive simulation of a 2D ultrasound image. For training purposes the injection needle and the ultrasound probe are replaced by wireless Bluetooth-connected 3D tracking devices, which are embedded in WII-mote controllers (Nintendo-Brand). In correlation to the tracked 3D positions of the needle and transducer models the visibility and position of the needle should be simulated in the 2D generated ultrasound image. Conclusion: In future, this tracking and visualization software module could be integrated in a more complex training set, where complex injection paths could be trained based on a 3D segmented model and the training results could be part of a curricular e-learning module.

  1. Application of ultrasound in bone surgery: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Escoda-Francolí, Jaume; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Araceli; Berini-Aytés, Leonardo; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2010-11-01

    The present study describes some of the applications of ultrasound in bone surgery, based on the presentation of two clinical cases. The Piezosurgery® ultrasound device was used (Tecnología Mectron Medical, Carasco, Italy). In one case the instrument was used to harvest a chin bone graft for placement in a bone defect at level 1.2, while in the other case a bony window osteotomy was made in the external wall of the maxillary sinus, in the context of a sinus membrane lift procedure. The Piezosurgery® device produces specific ultrasound frequency modulation (25-29 kHz), and has been designed to secure increased precision in application to bone surgery. This instrument produces selective sectioning of the mineralized bone structures, and causes less intra- and postoperative bleeding. One of the advantages of the Piezosurgery® device is that it can be used for maxillary sinus lift procedures in dental implant placement. In this context it considerably lessens the risk of sinus mucosa laceration by preparing the bony window in the external wall of the upper maxilla, and can be used to complete the lifting maneuver. The use of ultrasound in application to hard tissues can be regarded as a slow technique compared with the conventional rotary instruments, since it requires special surgical skill and involves a certain learning curve.

  2. Ultrasound in twin pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Morin, Lucie; Lim, Kenneth

    2011-06-01

    To review the literature with respect to the use of diagnostic ultrasound in the management of twin pregnancies. To make recommendations for the best use of ultrasound in twin pregnancies. Reduction in perinatal mortality and morbidity and short- and long-term neonatal morbidity in twin pregnancies. Optimization of ultrasound use in twin pregnancies. Published literature was retrieved through searches of PubMed and the Cochrane Library in 2008 and 2009 using appropriate controlled vocabulary (e.g., twin, ultrasound, cervix, prematurity) and key words (e.g., acardiac, twin, reversed arterial perfusion, twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome, amniotic fluid). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. There were no date restrictions. Studies were restricted to those with available English or French abstracts or text. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated into the guideline to September 2009. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology assessment-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. The evidence collected was reviewed by the Diagnostic Imaging Committee of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada, with input from members of the Maternal Fetal Medicine Committee and the Genetics Committee of the SOGC. The recommendations were made according to the guidelines developed by The Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table 1). The benefit expected from this guideline is facilitation and optimization of the use of ultrasound in twin pregnancy. SUMMARY STATEMENTS: 1. There are insufficient data to make recommendations on repeat anatomical assessments in twin pregnancies. Therefore, a complete anatomical survey at each scan may not be needed following a complete

  3. Point-of-care cardiac ultrasound techniques in the physical examination: better at the bedside.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Bruce J

    2017-03-04

    The development of hand-carried, battery-powered ultrasound devices has created a new practice in ultrasound diagnostic imaging, called 'point-of-care' ultrasound (POCUS). Capitalising on device portability, POCUS is marked by brief and limited ultrasound imaging performed by the physician at the bedside to increase diagnostic accuracy and expediency. The natural evolution of POCUS techniques in general medicine, particularly with pocket-sized devices, may be in the development of a basic ultrasound examination similar to the use of the binaural stethoscope. This paper will specifically review how POCUS improves the limited sensitivity of the current practice of traditional cardiac physical examination by both cardiologists and non-cardiologists. Signs of left ventricular systolic dysfunction, left atrial enlargement, lung congestion and elevated central venous pressures are often missed by physical techniques but can be easily detected by POCUS and have prognostic and treatment implications. Creating a general set of repetitive imaging skills for these entities for application on all patients during routine examination will standardise and reduce heterogeneity in cardiac bedside ultrasound applications, simplify teaching curricula, enhance learning and recollection, and unify competency thresholds and practice. The addition of POCUS to standard physical examination techniques in cardiovascular medicine will result in an ultrasound-augmented cardiac physical examination that reaffirms the value of bedside diagnosis.

  4. Resolution enhancement in medical ultrasound imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ploquin, Marie; Basarab, Adrian; Kouamé, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Image resolution enhancement is a problem of considerable interest in all medical imaging modalities. Unlike general purpose imaging or video processing, for a very long time, medical image resolution enhancement has been based on optimization of the imaging devices. Although some recent works purport to deal with image postprocessing, much remains to be done regarding medical image enhancement via postprocessing, especially in ultrasound imaging. We face a resolution improvement issue in the case of medical ultrasound imaging. We propose to investigate this problem using multidimensional autoregressive (AR) models. Noting that the estimation of the envelope of an ultrasound radio frequency (RF) signal is very similar to the estimation of classical Fourier-based power spectrum estimation, we theoretically show that a domain change and a multidimensional AR model can be used to achieve super-resolution in ultrasound imaging provided the order is estimated correctly. Here, this is done by means of a technique that simultaneously estimates the order and the parameters of a multidimensional model using relevant regression matrix factorization. Doing so, the proposed method specifically fits ultrasound imaging and provides an estimated envelope. Moreover, an expression that links the theoretical image resolution to both the image acquisition features (such as the point spread function) and a postprocessing feature (the AR model) order is derived. The overall contribution of this work is threefold. First, it allows for automatic resolution improvement. Through a simple model and without any specific manual algorithmic parameter tuning, as is used in common methods, the proposed technique simply and exclusively uses the ultrasound RF signal as input and provides the improved B-mode as output. Second, it allows for the a priori prediction of the improvement in resolution via the knowledge of the parametric model order before actual processing. Finally, to achieve

  5. Resolution enhancement in medical ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Ploquin, Marie; Basarab, Adrian; Kouamé, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Image resolution enhancement is a problem of considerable interest in all medical imaging modalities. Unlike general purpose imaging or video processing, for a very long time, medical image resolution enhancement has been based on optimization of the imaging devices. Although some recent works purport to deal with image postprocessing, much remains to be done regarding medical image enhancement via postprocessing, especially in ultrasound imaging. We face a resolution improvement issue in the case of medical ultrasound imaging. We propose to investigate this problem using multidimensional autoregressive (AR) models. Noting that the estimation of the envelope of an ultrasound radio frequency (RF) signal is very similar to the estimation of classical Fourier-based power spectrum estimation, we theoretically show that a domain change and a multidimensional AR model can be used to achieve super-resolution in ultrasound imaging provided the order is estimated correctly. Here, this is done by means of a technique that simultaneously estimates the order and the parameters of a multidimensional model using relevant regression matrix factorization. Doing so, the proposed method specifically fits ultrasound imaging and provides an estimated envelope. Moreover, an expression that links the theoretical image resolution to both the image acquisition features (such as the point spread function) and a postprocessing feature (the AR model) order is derived. The overall contribution of this work is threefold. First, it allows for automatic resolution improvement. Through a simple model and without any specific manual algorithmic parameter tuning, as is used in common methods, the proposed technique simply and exclusively uses the ultrasound RF signal as input and provides the improved B-mode as output. Second, it allows for the a priori prediction of the improvement in resolution via the knowledge of the parametric model order before actual processing. Finally, to achieve the

  6. Cardiac arrhythmias produced by ultrasound and contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rota, Claudio

    Ultrasound is used widely in medicine for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Ultrasound contrast agents are suspensions of gas-filled microbubbles used to enhance diagnostic imaging. Microbubble contrast agents can increase the likelihood of bioeffects of ultrasound associated with acoustic cavitation. Under certain exposure conditions, the interaction of ultrasound with cardiac tissues can produce cardiac arrhythmias. The general objective of this thesis was to develop a greater understanding of ultrasound-induced premature cardiac beats. The hypothesis guiding this work was that acoustic cavitation is the physical mechanism for the production of arrhythmias with ultrasound. This hypothesis was tested through a series of experiments with mice in vivo and theoretical investigations. Results of this research supported the acoustic cavitation hypothesis. The acoustic pressure threshold for premature beats was significantly lower with microbubble contrast agents present in the blood than without. With microbubbles, the threshold for premature beats was below the current output limits of diagnostic devices. The threshold was not significantly dependent upon contrast agent type and was not influenced by contrast agent dose over three orders of magnitude. Furthermore, the dependence of the threshold on acoustic frequency was consistent with the frequency dependence of acoustic cavitation. Experimentally determined thresholds for premature beats in vivo were in excellent agreement with theoretically estimated thresholds for inertial cavitation. A passive cavitation detector (PCD) was used to measure the acoustic emissions produced by cavitating microbubbles in vivo. A direct correlation between the amplitude of the PCD and the percentage of ultrasound pulses producing a premature beat was consistent with cavitation as a mechanism for this bioeffect. Although this thesis focused on the mechanistic understanding of ultrasound-induced arrhythmias, more persistent

  7. Evaluation of ultrasound velocity in enucleated equine aqueous humor, lens and vitreous body.

    PubMed

    Meister, Ulrike; Ohnesorge, Bernhard; Körner, Daniel; Boevé, Michael H

    2014-10-14

    Sonographic ophthalmic examinations have become increasingly important in veterinary medicine. If the velocity of ultrasound in ocular tissues is known, the A-mode ultrasound method may be used to determine the axial intraocular distances, such as anterior chamber depth, lens thickness, axial length of the vitreous and axial globe length, which are required for intraocular lens (IOL) power calculations. To the authors' knowledge, the velocity of ultrasound in the ocular tissues of the horse was not previously determined. In the present study, 33 lenses, 29 samples of aqueous and 31 of vitreous from 35 healthy equine eyes have been examined. The corresponding ultrasound velocities are reported in dependence of age, temperature, gender and elapsed time after enucleation. The velocity of ultrasound at 36°C in equine aqueous, lens and vitreous are 1529 ±10 m/s, 1654± 29 m/s and 1527 ±16 m/s respectively, and the corresponding conversion factors are 0.998± 0.007, 1.008 ±0.018 and 0.997 ±0.010. A linear increase of the speed of ultrasound with increasing temperature has been determined for aqueous and vitreous. No temperature dependence was found for the speed of ultrasound in the lens. The ultrasound velocity did not significantly differ (95%) on the basis of gender, age or time after enucleation during the first 72 hours after death. Compared to human eyes, the ultrasound velocity in equine lental tissue deviates by one percent. Therefore, axial length measurements obtained with ultrasound velocities for the human eye must be corrected using conversion factors. For the aqueous and vitreous, deviations are below one percent and can be neglected in clinical settings.

  8. Combinational light emitting diode-high frequency focused ultrasound treatment for HeLa cell.

    PubMed

    Choe, Se-Woon; Park, Kitae; Park, Chulwoo; Ryu, Jaemyung; Choi, Hojong

    2017-09-28

    Light sources such as laser and light emitting diode or ultrasound devices have been widely used for cancer therapy and regenerative medicines, since they are more cost-effective and less harmful than radiation therapy, chemotherapy or magnetic treatment. Compared to laser and low intensity ultrasound techniques, light emitting diode and high frequency focused ultrasound shows enhanced therapeutic effects, especially for small tumors. We propose combinational light emitting diode-high frequency focused ultrasound treatment for human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Individual red, green, and blue light emitting diode light only, high frequency focused ultrasound only, or light emitting diode light combined with high frequency focused ultrasound treatments were applied in order to characterize the responses of HeLa cells. Cell density exposed by blue light emitting diode light combined with high frequency focused ultrasound (2.19 ± 0.58%) was much lower than that of cells exposed by red and green light emitting diode lights (81.71 ± 9.92% and 61.81 ± 4.09%), blue light emitting diode light (11.19 ± 2.51%) or high frequency focused ultrasound only (9.72 ± 1.04%). We believe that the proposed combinational blue light emitting diode-high frequency focused ultrasound treatment could have therapeutic benefits to alleviate cancer cell proliferation.

  9. Fetal thermal effects of diagnostic ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Abramowicz, Jacques S; Barnett, Stanley B; Duck, Francis A; Edmonds, Peter D; Hynynen, Kullervo H; Ziskin, Marvin C

    2008-04-01

    Processes that can produce a biological effect with some degree of heating (ie, about 1 degrees C above the physiologic temperature) act via a thermal mechanism. Investigations with laboratory animals have documented that pulsed ultrasound can produce elevations of temperature and damage in biological tissues in vivo, particularly in the presence of bone (intracranial temperature elevation). Acoustic outputs used to induce these adverse bioeffects are within the diagnostic range, although exposure times are usually considerably longer than in clinical practice. Conditions present in early pregnancy, such as lack of perfusion, may favor bioeffects. Thermally induced teratogenesis has been shown in many animal studies, as well as several controlled human studies; however, human studies have not shown a causal relationship between diagnostic ultrasound exposure during pregnancy and adverse biological effects to the fetus. All human epidemiologic studies, however, were conducted with commercially available devices predating 1992, that is, with acoustic outputs not exceeding a spatial-peak temporal-average intensity of 94 mW/cm2. Current limits in the United States allow a spatial-peak temporal-average intensity of 720 mW/cm2 for fetal applications. The synergistic effect of a raised body temperature (febrile status) and ultrasound insonation has not been examined in depth. Available evidence, experimental or epidemiologic, is insufficient to conclude that there is a causal relationship between obstetric diagnostic ultrasound exposure and obvious adverse thermal effects to the fetus. However, very subtle effects cannot be ruled out and indicate a need for further research, although research in humans may be extremely difficult to realize.

  10. Ultrasound and ultrasound-related techniques in endocrine diseases.

    PubMed

    Trimboli, Pierpaolo; Dietrich, Christoph F; David, Emanuele; Mastroeni, Giampiero; Ventura Spagnolo, Orazio; Sidhu, Paul S; Letizia, Claudio; Messineo, Daniela; D'Ambrosio, Ferdinando; Radzina, Maija; Cantisani, Vito

    2017-09-05

    Ultrasound examination has become essential to evaluate morphology and size of several endocrine glands and detect the presence of lesions within these organs. Nevertheless, with the recent advances of ultrasound technology, we have opportunity to correlate the echostructure of thyroid, ovary, testis, parathyroids, etc. to their function. Thus, the ultrasound systems are in-office essential instruments for many clinical specialists. Herein we presented the most updated information about the use of ultrasound in specific endocrine-related issues, such as thyroid, parathyroid, adrenal gland, and testicle.

  11. Biofouling control with ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Bott, T.R.

    2000-06-01

    Experiments have been carried out on a small-scale simulated cooling water system using a monoculture of Pseudomonas fluorescens to represent the slime-forming microbial community, to examine the opportunities for control using ultrasound. Glass tubes (18 mm I.D. x 1 m long) through which contaminated water flowed at 1 m/s were dosed with ultrasound along the tube axis. Glass tubes were employed to facilitate the use of infrared absorbance for biofilm accumulation assessment. The preliminary results demonstrate that control of biofilm formation and the removal of established biofilms on the inside of tubes may be achieved by the technology, but there may be some limitations with respect to removal.

  12. Sparsity driven ultrasound imaginga)

    PubMed Central

    Tuysuzoglu, Ahmet; Kracht, Jonathan M.; Cleveland, Robin O.; C¸etin, Müjdat; Karl, W. Clem

    2012-01-01

    An image formation framework for ultrasound imaging from synthetic transducer arrays based on sparsity-driven regularization functionals using single-frequency Fourier domain data is proposed. The framework involves the use of a physics-based forward model of the ultrasound observation process, the formulation of image formation as the solution of an associated optimization problem, and the solution of that problem through efficient numerical algorithms. The sparsity-driven, model-based approach estimates a complex-valued reflectivity field and preserves physical features in the scene while suppressing spurious artifacts. It also provides robust reconstructions in the case of sparse and reduced observation apertures. The effectiveness of the proposed imaging strategy is demonstrated using experimental data. PMID:22352501

  13. Ultrasound-Assisted Freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, A. E.; Sun, Da-Wen

    Freezing is a well-known preservation method widely used in the food industry. The advantages of freezing are to a certain degree counterbalanced by the risk of damage caused by the formation and size of ice crystals. Over recent years new approaches have been developed to improve and control the crystallization process, and among these approaches sonocrystallization has proved to be very useful, since it can enhance both the nucleation rate and the crystal growth rate. Although ultrasound has been successfully used for many years in the evaluation of various aspects of foods and in medical applications, the use of power ultrasound to directly improve processes and products is less popular in food manufacturing. Foodstuffs are very complex materials, and research is needed in order to define the specific sound parameters that aid the freezing process and that can later be used for the scale-up and production of commercial frozen food products.

  14. Review of Quantitative Ultrasound: Envelope Statistics and Backscatter Coefficient Imaging and Contributions to Diagnostic Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Oelze, Michael L; Mamou, Jonathan

    2016-02-01

    Conventional medical imaging technologies, including ultrasound, have continued to improve over the years. For example, in oncology, medical imaging is characterized by high sensitivity, i.e., the ability to detect anomalous tissue features, but the ability to classify these tissue features from images often lacks specificity. As a result, a large number of biopsies of tissues with suspicious image findings are performed each year with a vast majority of these biopsies resulting in a negative finding. To improve specificity of cancer imaging, quantitative imaging techniques can play an important role. Conventional ultrasound B-mode imaging is mainly qualitative in nature. However, quantitative ultrasound (QUS) imaging can provide specific numbers related to tissue features that can increase the specificity of image findings leading to improvements in diagnostic ultrasound. QUS imaging can encompass a wide variety of techniques including spectral-based parameterization, elastography, shear wave imaging, flow estimation, and envelope statistics. Currently, spectral-based parameterization and envelope statistics are not available on most conventional clinical ultrasound machines. However, in recent years, QUS techniques involving spectral-based parameterization and envelope statistics have demonstrated success in many applications, providing additional diagnostic capabilities. Spectral-based techniques include the estimation of the backscatter coefficient (BSC), estimation of attenuation, and estimation of scatterer properties such as the correlation length associated with an effective scatterer diameter (ESD) and the effective acoustic concentration (EAC) of scatterers. Envelope statistics include the estimation of the number density of scatterers and quantification of coherent to incoherent signals produced from the tissue. Challenges for clinical application include correctly accounting for attenuation effects and transmission losses and implementation of QUS on

  15. Clinical ophthalmic ultrasound improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, J. B.; Piro, P. A.

    1981-01-01

    The use of digital synthetic aperture techniques to obtain high resolution ultrasound images of eye and orbit was proposed. The parameters of the switched array configuration to reduce data collection time to a few milliseconds to avoid eye motion problems in the eye itself were established. An assessment of the effects of eye motion on the performance of the system was obtained. The principles of synthetic techniques are discussed. Likely applications are considered.

  16. Tissue identification by ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lecroissette, D. H.; Heyser, R. C.; Gammell, P. M.; Wilson, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    The ultrasonic properties of animal and human soft tissue were measured over the frequency range of 1.5 to 10.0 MHz. The method employed a swept-frequency, coherent technique known as time delay spectrometry. Measurements of attenuation versus frequency on liver, backfat, kidney, pancreas, spleen, breast, and other tissue were made. Considerable attention was paid to tissue handling and in determining the effects of fixing on the attenuation of ultrasound in the tissue.

  17. Ultrasound Imaging Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    texture mapping hardware," IEEE Tranactions on Information Technology in Biomedicine, Submitted. [14] C.R. Castro Pareja , J.M. Jagadeesh and R. Shekhar...modulation in real-time three-dimensional sparse synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging systems "* Carlos R. Castro Pareja , Masters of Science, The Ohio...C.R. Castro Pareja , "An architecture for real-time image registration," M.S. Thesis, The Ohio State University, March 2002. 14. C.R. Castro Pareja , R

  18. Pleural ultrasound for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Porcel, J M

    2016-11-01

    Pleural ultrasonography is useful for identifying and characterising pleural effusions, solid pleural lesions (nodules, masses, swellings) and pneumothorax. Pleural ultrasonography is also considered the standard care for guiding interventionist procedures on the pleura at the patient's bedside (thoracentesis, drainage tubes, pleural biopsies and pleuroscopy). Hospitals should promote the acquisition of portable ultrasound equipment to increase the patient's safety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  19. Piezoelectrically actuated flextensional micromachined ultrasound transducers.

    PubMed

    Perçin, Gökhan; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T

    2002-05-01

    This paper presents novel micromachined two-dimensional array piezoelectrically actuated flextensional transducers that can be used to generate sound in air or water. Micromachining techniques to fabricate these devices are also presented. Individual unimorph array elements consist of a thin piezoelectric annular disk and a thin, fully clamped, circular plate. We manufacture the transducer in two-dimensional arrays using planar silicon micromachining and demonstrate ultrasound transmission in air at 2.85 MHz with 0.15 microm/V peak displacement. The devices have a range of operating resonance frequencies starting from 450 kHz up to 4.5 MHz. Such an array could be combined with on-board driving and addressing circuitry for different applications.

  20. New NIH-funded Ultrasound Technology is Changing Lives around the World | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. New NIH-funded Ultrasound Technology is Changing Lives around ... on applying these devices," says Dr. Thomenius. "The new targets are primary care doctors, anesthesiologists, interventionalists, and ...

  1. Mobile Ultrasound Plane Wave Beamforming on iPhone or iPad using Metal- based GPU Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewener, Holger J.; Tretbar, Steffen H.

    Mobile and cost effective ultrasound devices are being used in point of care scenarios or the drama room. To reduce the costs of such devices we already presented the possibilities of consumer devices like the Apple iPad for full signal processing of raw data for ultrasound image generation. Using technologies like plane wave imaging to generate a full image with only one excitation/reception event the acquisition times and power consumption of ultrasound imaging can be reduced for low power mobile devices based on consumer electronics realizing the transition from FPGA or ASIC based beamforming into more flexible software beamforming. The massive parallel beamforming processing can be done with the Apple framework "Metal" for advanced graphics and general purpose GPU processing for the iOS platform. We were able to integrate the beamforming reconstruction into our mobile ultrasound processing application with imaging rates up to 70 Hz on iPad Air 2 hardware.

  2. The age-related advancement of arterial disease measured by Doppler ultrasound diastolic flow analysis.

    PubMed

    Terenzi, T; Gallagher, D; DeMeersman, R; Beadle, E; Muller, D

    1993-10-01

    To quantify by A-mode Doppler sonography the age-related progression of arterial disease so that age dependent normal values may be established for the screening Doppler peripheral arterial exam. Arterial distensibility was assessed by A-mode Doppler diastolic flow analysis as a measure of atherogenesis. These values will increase the sensitivity and decrease the incidence of false-positive results when the Doppler exam is utilized to differentially diagnosis vascular and sciatic neurogenic claudication. The relationship between age and results from the standard ankle/arm index ultrasound pneumatic cuff examination was also analyzed. A two by three analysis of variance with orthogonal Helmert contrast codes and simple linear regression analysis was utilized for this cross-sectionally designed investigation. The dependent measures of diastolic flow analysis and ankle/arm pressure index were obtained within three nested successively increasing age groups. Chiropractic office. Studied were a total of 90 sedentary nonsmoking subjects, aged 23-79 yr, all of whom had normally accepted levels of serum glucose, cholesterol and blood pressure. Subjects were screened for evidence of aortic coarctation, myocardial infarction, tachyarrhythmia, aortic valve stenosis, mitral prolapse, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes and peripheral occlusive arterial disease. Anthropometric measurements and percent body fat were obtained. A predictive oxygen consumption bike ergometer test was performed to obtain aerobic capacity. The commonly utilized standard ankle/arm index ultrasound pneumatic cuff examination and arterial diastolic flow analysis were performed with A-mode Doppler ultrasound on all subjects. These results demonstrate that a significant inverse linear relationship exists between aging and arterial compliance (p < .0001) in our population. Diastolic flow analysis had a greater sensitivity to arterial disease than the standard ankle/arm index ultrasound pneumatic

  3. Ultrasound speed and attenuation in progressive trypsin digested articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Niu, HaiJun; Li, LiFeng; Sun, Feng; Yan, Yan; Wang, YueXiang; Li, DeYu; Fan, YuBo

    2011-11-01

    Subtle changes of articular cartilage (AC) can lead to tissue degeneration and even osteoarthritis (OA). The early degeneration of AC is closely related to a change in proteoglycans (PG) content. The observation of PG is therefore an appropriate way of studying OA and evaluating the degree of AC degeneration. In this study, 20 cartilage-bone samples were prepared from normal porcine femoral condyle cartilage and 10 samples were digested over 2 h using 0.25% trypsin solution. The dynamic process of PG-digestion was explored using a conventional A-mode ultrasound (US) experimental system with a 10 MHz center frequency. Quantitative acoustic parameters were calculated from ultrasonic radio-frequency echo signals and included US speed (USS), US amplitude attenuation coefficient (UAA) and broadband US attenuation coefficient (BUA). The experimental results showed that the conventional A-mode ultrasound is valuable for tracking the degree of PG-digestion. Histology also confirmed the validity of the ultrasound observations. For every AC sample, the degree of PG-digestion within a given time was different and was affected by individual differences. After two hours of degeneration, USS showed a mean decrease of 0.4% (P<0.05). UAA was significantly lower after a two-hour PG depletion period (from (2.45±0.23) to (2.28±0.41) dB mm⁻¹). BUA showed no significant differences during this process. In conclusion, conventional ultrasound can provide useful information about trypsin-induced progressive PG depletion in AC and can reflect variations of PG content via the quantitative acoustic parameters USS and UAA. The results of this study may be used to identify an indirect indicator of cartilage matrix integrity and OA disease progression.

  4. Ultrasound of adnexal masses.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Mukund; Ganesan, Karthik; Munshi, Harsha Navani; Ganesan, Subramania; Lawande, Ashwin

    2008-04-01

    Current advancements in imaging technology, especially three-dimensional/four-dimensional ultrasound and contrast-enhanced imaging, have increased the diagnostic yield of adnexal masses. The benefit of ultrasound is the characterization of an adnexal mass, suggesting the probable etiology of the mass. Masses may be divided as solid, cystic, or complex. It is predominantly the solid and complex masses that need a thorough evaluation. The role of color-flow imaging is now gaining importance and criteria for distinguishing between benign and malignant masses are often possible. Availability of a scoring system enables the differentiation of small adnexal masses. Several benign lesions may present as complex masses but can be distinguished and diagnosed on sonography. The availability of 3D ultrasound has been of great use to understand spatial relations and vascular morphology. Sonography allows a more detailed assessment of morphologic features of an adnexal mass. With a benign-appearing adnexal mass on sonography, the need for any further diagnostic tests is often obviated.

  5. Physics and instrumentation of ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, John P

    2007-08-01

    A thorough understanding of the physics of ultrasound waves and the instrumentation will provide the user with a better understanding of the capabilities and limitations of ultrasound equipment. The ultrasound machine combines two technologies: image production (M-mode and 2-dimensional imaging) with Doppler assessment (continuous and pulse wave as well as color-flow mapping). These distinct technologies have been combined to provide the examiner with the ability to make accurate and comprehensive diagnoses and guide therapeutic intervention.

  6. Open-source, high-throughput ultrasound treatment chamber.

    PubMed

    Yddal, Torstein; Cochran, Sandy; Gilja, Odd Helge; Postema, Michiel; Kotopoulis, Spiros

    2015-02-01

    Studying the effects of ultrasound on biological cells requires extensive knowledge of both the physical ultrasound and cellular biology. Translating knowledge between these fields can be complicated and time consuming. With the vast range of ultrasonic equipment available, nearly every research group uses different or unique devices. Hence, recreating the experimental conditions and results may be expensive or difficult. For this reason, we have developed devices to combat the common problems seen in state-of-the-art biomedical ultrasound research. In this paper, we present the design, fabrication, and characterisation of an open-source device that is easy to manufacture, allows for parallel sample sonication, and is highly reproducible, with complete acoustic calibration. This device is designed to act as a template for sample sonication experiments. We demonstrate the fabrication technique for devices designed to sonicate 24-well plates and OptiCell™ using three-dimensional (3D) printing and low-cost consumables. We increased the pressure output by electrical impedance matching of the transducers using transmission line transformers, resulting in an increase by a factor of 3.15. The devices cost approximately €220 in consumables, with a major portion attributed to the 3D printing, and can be fabricated in approximately 8 working hours. Our results show that, if our protocol is followed, the mean acoustic output between devices has a variance of <1%. We openly provide the 3D files and operation software allowing any laboratory to fabricate and use these devices at minimal cost and without substantial prior know-how.

  7. Evaluation of ultrasound techniques for brain injury detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobley, Joel; Kasili, Paul M.; Norton, Stephen J.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1998-05-01

    In this work, we examine the physics underlying wave propagation in the head to evaluate various ultrasonic transducers for use in a brian injury detection device. The results of measurements of the attenuation coefficient and phase velocity for ultrasonic propagation in samples of brain tissue and skull bone from sheep are presented. The material properties are then used to investigate the propagation of ultrasonic pressure fields in the head. The ultrasound fields for three different transducers are calculated for propagation in a simulated brain/skull model. The model is constructed using speed-of-sound and mass density values of the two tissue types. The impact of the attenuation on the ultrasound fields is then examined. Finally, the relevant points drawn from these discussions are summarized. We hope to minimize the confounding effects of the skull by using sub-MHz ultrasound while maintaining the necessary temporal and spatial resolution to successfully detect injury in the brain.

  8. Focused Ultrasound Surgery for Uterine Fibroids

    MedlinePlus

    Focused ultrasound surgery for uterine fibroids Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Focused ultrasound surgery (FUS) is a noninvasive treatment option for ... whether you're a good candidate for focused ultrasound surgery, your doctor may perform a pelvic magnetic ...

  9. Doppler Ultrasound: What Is It Used for?

    MedlinePlus

    ... in your neck (carotid artery stenosis) A Doppler ultrasound can estimate how fast blood flows by measuring the rate of change in its pitch (frequency). During a Doppler ultrasound, a technician trained in ultrasound imaging (sonographer) presses ...

  10. Surgical Removal of an Extrauterine Device Migrating to Appendix

    PubMed Central

    Tanridan Okçu, Nefise; Seyfettinoglu, Sevtap; Kazgan, Halil

    2016-01-01

    Intrauterine devices (IUDs) remain highly effective reversible family planning methods in developing countries. We aimed to report one of the complications of extrauterine and intrauterine devices. A 44-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with mislocated intrauterine device and abnormal uterine bleeding. Extrauterine IUD device was proven by ultrasound and X-ray. She had normal blood test count with a negative pregnancy test. There are several cases of complications with intrauterine devices, but this is the first case report about an extrauterine IUD embedded by inflame enlarged appendix presenting with abnormal uterine bleeding. Although intrauterine devices are a common safe method for contraception, there is no risk-free insertion even with advanced ultrasounds. A regular self-examination should be taught to the patients and ultrasonography should be performed in the follow-up of the patients especially for inserted devices during lactation period. Extrauterine IUDs can be successfully removed by laparotomy. PMID:27885327

  11. Clinician-performed thyroid ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Coltrera, Marc D

    2014-08-01

    This article is intended to demystify the process for those with a potential interest in acquiring ultrasound skills. It is not intended to be a comprehensive review of head and neck ultrasound but, rather, is focused on the bare minimum requirements and considerations involved in clinician-performed ultrasound. The article covers the initial diagnosis and the unparalleled usefulness of ultrasound for surgical planning just before incision. Further readings are listed at the end of the article to direct the reader to some excellent texts to help build confidence and experience.

  12. Students' Perceptions of Academic Writing as a Mode of Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majidi, Mojdeh

    2005-01-01

    Adopting the social theory of writing and new rhetorical genre studies (Bakhtin, 1986; Dias, Freedman, Medway, & Pare, 1999; Freedman & Medway, 1994; Miller, 1984/1994) as the theoretical framework in this study I made an attempt to explore graduate students' perceptions of academic writing as a mode of communication in academia. I interviewed…

  13. Apprenticeship as a Mode of Learning and Model of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billett, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Apprenticeships are now usually seen as a model of education focused on occupational preparation, albeit manifested in different ways across nation states. However, throughout human history, the majority of occupational preparation has been premised upon apprenticeship as a mode of learning. That is, a preparation arising mainly through…

  14. Apprenticeship as a Mode of Learning and Model of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billett, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Apprenticeships are now usually seen as a model of education focused on occupational preparation, albeit manifested in different ways across nation states. However, throughout human history, the majority of occupational preparation has been premised upon apprenticeship as a mode of learning. That is, a preparation arising mainly through…

  15. Photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Reese, Jason A.; Keenihan, James R.; Gaston, Ryan S.; Kauffmann, Keith L.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Lopez, Leonardo C.; Maak, Kevin D.; Mills, Michael E.; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R.

    2015-06-02

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly and a body portion joined at an interface region and including an intermediate layer, at least one interconnecting structural member, relieving feature, unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  16. Photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Reese, Jason A; Keenihan, James R; Gaston, Ryan S; Kauffmann, Keith L; Langmaid, Joseph A; Lopez, Leonardo; Maak, Kevin D; Mills, Michael E; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R

    2017-03-21

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly and a body portion joined at an interface region and including an intermediate layer, at least one interconnecting structural member, relieving feature, unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  17. Photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Reese, Jason A.; Keenihan, James R.; Gaston, Ryan S.; Kauffmann, Keith L.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Lopez, Leonardo C.; Maak, Kevin D.; Mills, Michael E.; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R.

    2015-09-01

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device (10) with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly (100) and a body portion (200) joined at an interface region (410) and including an intermediate layer (500), at least one interconnecting structural member (1500), relieving feature (2500), unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  18. Optical Micromachined Ultrasound Transducers (OMUT)-- A New Approach for High Frequency Ultrasound Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadayon, Mohammad Amin

    Piezoelectric technology is the backbone of most medical ultrasound imaging arrays, however, in scaling the technology to sizes required for high frequency operation (> 20 MHz), it encounters substantial difficulties in fabrication and signal transduction efficiency. These limitations particularly affect the design of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging probes whose operating frequency can approach 60 MHz. Optical technology has been proposed and investigated for several decades as an alternative approach for high frequency ultrasound transducers. However, to apply this promising technology in guiding clinical operations such as in interventional cardiology, brain surgery, and laparoscopic surgery further raise in the sensitivity is required. Here, in order to achieve the required sensitivity for an intravascular ultrasound imaging probe, we introduce design changes making use of alternative receiver mechanisms. First, we present an air cavity detector that makes use of a polymer membrane for increased mechanical deflection. We have also significantly raised the thin film detector sensitivity by improving its optical characteristics. This can be achieved by inducing a refractive index feature inside the Fabry-Perot resonator that simply creates a waveguide between the two mirrors. This approach eliminates the loss in energy due to diffraction in the cavity, and therefore the Q-factor is only limited by mirror loss and absorption. To demonstrate this optical improvements, a waveguide Fabry-Perot resonator has been fabricated consisting of two dielectric Bragg reflectors with a layer of photosensitive polymer between them. The measured finesse of the fabricated resonator was 692, and the Q-factor was 55000. The fabrication process of this device has been modified to fabricate an ultrasonically testable waveguide Fabry-Perot resonator. By applying this method, we have achieved a noise equivalent pressure of 178 Pa over a bandwidth of 28 MHz or 0.03 Pa/Hz1/2 which

  19. Non-Invasive Measurement of Intracranial Pressure Pulsation using Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueno, Toshiaki; Ballard, R. E.; Yost, W. T.; Hargens, A. R.

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to microgravity causes a cephalad fluid shift which may elevate intracranial pressure (ICP). Elevation in ICP may affect cerebral hemodynamics in astronauts during space flight. ICP is, however, a difficult parameter to measure due to the invasiveness of currently available techniques. We already reported our development of a non-invasive ultrasound device for measurement of ICP. We recently modified the device so that we might reproducibly estimate ICP changes in association with cardiac cycles. In the first experiment, we measured changes in cranial distance with the ultrasound device in cadavera while changing ICP by infusing saline into the lateral ventricle. In the second experiment, we measured changes in cranial distance in five healthy volunteers while placing them in 60 deg, 30 deg head-up tilt, supine, and 10 deg head-down tilt position. In the cadaver study, fast Fourier transformation revealed that cranial pulsation is clearly associated with ICP pulsation. The ratio of cranial distance and ICP pulsation is 1.3microns/mmHg. In the tilting study, the magnitudes of cranial pulsation are linearly correlated to tilt angles (r=0.87). The ultrasound device has sufficient sensitivity to detect cranial pulsation in association with cardiac cycles. By analyzing the magnitude of cranial pulsation, estimates of ICP during space flight are possible.

  20. Temperature elevation of biological tissue model exposed by focused ultrasound with acoustic radiation force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, Naotaka; Kudo, Nobuki; Akiyama, Iwaki

    2012-09-01

    Focused ultrasound with acoustic radiation force (ARF) is beginning to be used for imaging and measuring tissue elasticity. On the other hand, it was suggested that the temperature elevation near bone at focus may be significant within the limits of acoustic output regulation in diagnostic ultrasound devices (Herman; 2002). In this study, with the aim of obtaining the relationships between temperature elevations and parameters of ultrasound exposure with ARF, temperature elevations in two kinds of tissue models with or without bone were numerically evaluated. The results showed that the temperature elevation at focus on the surface of bone may exceed an allowable temperature elevation which WFUMB guideline recommends, even though the acoustic intensity is within the limits of acoustic output regulation in diagnostic ultrasound devices.

  1. An ergonomic, instrumented ultrasound probe for 6-axis force/torque measurement.

    PubMed

    Gilbertson, Matthew W; Anthony, Brian W

    2013-01-01

    An ergonomic, instrumented ultrasound probe has been developed for medical imaging applications. The device, which fits compactly in the hand of sonographers and permits rapid attachment & removal of the ultrasound probe, measures ultrasound probe-to-patient contact forces and torques in all six axes. The device was used to measure contact forces and torques applied by ten professional sonographers on five patients during thirty-six abdominal exams. Of the three contact forces, those applied along the probe axis were found to be largest, averaging 7.0N. Measurement noise was quantified for each axis, and found to be small compared with the axial force. Understanding the range of forces applied during ultrasound imaging enables the design of more accurate robotic imaging systems and could also improve understanding of the correlation between contact force and sonographer fatigue and injury.

  2. A Flexible Ultrasound Transducer Array with Micro-Machined Bulk PZT

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe; Xue, Qing-Tang; Chen, Yuan-Quan; Shu, Yi; Tian, He; Yang, Yi; Xie, Dan; Luo, Jian-Wen; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel flexible piezoelectric micro-machined ultrasound transducer, which is based on PZT and a polyimide substrate. The transducer is made on the polyimide substrate and packaged with medical polydimethylsiloxane. Instead of etching the PZT ceramic, this paper proposes a method of putting diced PZT blocks into holes on the polyimide which are pre-etched. The device works in d31 mode and the electromechanical coupling factor is 22.25%. Its flexibility, good conformal contacting with skin surfaces and proper resonant frequency make the device suitable for heart imaging. The flexible packaging ultrasound transducer also has a good waterproof performance after hundreds of ultrasonic electric tests in water. It is a promising ultrasound transducer and will be an effective supplementary ultrasound imaging method in the practical applications. PMID:25625905

  3. Chest wall segmentation in automated 3D breast ultrasound scans.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tao; Platel, Bram; Mann, Ritse M; Huisman, Henkjan; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic method to segment the chest wall in automated 3D breast ultrasound images. Determining the location of the chest wall in automated 3D breast ultrasound images is necessary in computer-aided detection systems to remove automatically detected cancer candidates beyond the chest wall and it can be of great help for inter- and intra-modal image registration. We show that the visible part of the chest wall in an automated 3D breast ultrasound image can be accurately modeled by a cylinder. We fit the surface of our cylinder model to a set of automatically detected rib-surface points. The detection of the rib-surface points is done by a classifier using features representing local image intensity patterns and presence of rib shadows. Due to attenuation of the ultrasound signal, a clear shadow is visible behind the ribs. Evaluation of our segmentation method is done by computing the distance of manually annotated rib points to the surface of the automatically detected chest wall. We examined the performance on images obtained with the two most common 3D breast ultrasound devices in the market. In a dataset of 142 images, the average mean distance of the annotated points to the segmented chest wall was 5.59 ± 3.08 mm. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Simulation of absolute amplitudes of ultrasound signals using equivalent circuits.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Jonny; Martinsson, Pär-Erik; Delsing, Jerker

    2007-10-01

    Equivalent circuits for piezoelectric devices and ultrasonic transmission media can be used to cosimulate electronics and ultrasound parts in simulators originally intended for electronics. To achieve efficient system-level optimization, it is important to simulate correct, absolute amplitude of the ultrasound signal in the system, as this determines the requirements on the electronics regarding dynamic range, circuit noise, and power consumption. This paper presents methods to achieve correct, absolute amplitude of an ultrasound signal in a simulation of a pulse-echo system using equivalent circuits. This is achieved by taking into consideration loss due to diffraction and the effect of the cable that connects the electronics and the piezoelectric transducer. The conductive loss in the transmission line that models the propagation media of the ultrasound pulse is used to model the loss due to diffraction. Results show that the simulated amplitude of the echo follows measured values well in both near and far fields, with an offset of about 10%. The use of a coaxial cable introduces inductance and capacitance that affect the amplitude of a received echo. Amplitude variations of 60% were observed when the cable length was varied between 0.07 m and 2.3 m, with simulations predicting similar variations. The high precision in the achieved results show that electronic design and system optimization can rely on system simulations alone. This will simplify the development of integrated electronics aimed at ultrasound systems.

  5. Ultrasound visualization of the lymphatic vessels in the lower leg.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Akitatsu; Yamamoto, Takumi; Yoshimatsu, Hidehiko; Hayashi, Nobuko; Furuya, Megumi; Harima, Mitsunobu; Narushima, Mitsunaga; Koshima, Isao

    2015-04-08

    Identification of lymphatic vessels for lymphaticovenular anastomosis (LVA), which is an effective surgical treatment for obstructive lymphedema, is important. Indocyanine green (ICG) lymphography is useful for that purpose, but is not common in many institutions. Although ultrasound is a very common modality, no research has yet underlined the feasibility of the device to detect the lymphatic vessels. First, identification of lymphatic vessels in the lower legs using ultrasound was performed in non-edematous limbs with linear-pattern on ICG lymphography (n = 12). The imaging findings and characteristic of the lymphatic vessels in ultrasonography were investigated on transverse scans. Second, to assess the ultrasound detection technique, ICG was injected to healthy volunteers after identification and marking of the lymphatic vessels using ultrasound (n = 14). Sensitivity and specificity of the examination were calculated. In the first part, the lymphatic vessels were detected by ultrasound in all cases. Characteristic ultrasonography findings of lymphatic vessels included homogeneous, hypoechoic and spicular misshapen images in all cases. In the second part, the overall sensitivity and specificity were 95.5 and 92.9%, respectively. Ultrasonography can identify lymphatic vessels of the lower leg with precision and may aid lymphatic microsurgery for lymphedema. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Microsurgery, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Three-dimensional ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Fenster, A; Downey, D B; Cardinal, H N

    2001-05-01

    Ultrasound is an inexpensive and widely used imaging modality for the diagnosis and staging of a number of diseases. In the past two decades, it has benefited from major advances in technology and has become an indispensable imaging modality, due to its flexibility and non-invasive character. In the last decade, research investigators and commercial companies have further advanced ultrasound imaging with the development of 3D ultrasound. This new imaging approach is rapidly achieving widespread use with numerous applications. The major reason for the increase in the use of 3D ultrasound is related to the limitations of 2D viewing of 3D anatomy, using conventional ultrasound. This occurs because: (a) Conventional ultrasound images are 2D, yet the anatomy is 3D, hence the diagnostician must integrate multiple images in his mind. This practice is inefficient, and may lead to variability and incorrect diagnoses. (b) The 2D ultrasound image represents a thin plane at some arbitrary angle in the body. It is difficult to localize the image plane and reproduce it at a later time for follow-up studies. In this review article we describe how 3D ultrasound imaging overcomes these limitations. Specifically, we describe the developments of a number of 3D ultrasound imaging systems using mechanical, free-hand and 2D array scanning techniques. Reconstruction and viewing methods of the 3D images are described with specific examples. Since 3D ultrasound is used to quantify the volume of organs and pathology, the sources of errors in the reconstruction techniques as well as formulae relating design specification to geometric errors are provided. Finally, methods to measure organ volume from the 3D ultrasound images and sources of errors are described.

  7. Biomedical engineering: A platform for research and innovation in ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Christy K.

    2004-05-01

    An undergraduate or graduate degree in biomedical engineering prepares students to solve problems at the interface between engineering and medicine. Biomedical engineering encompasses evolving areas such as advanced medical imaging for diagnosis and treatment of disease, tissue engineering for designing and manufacturing biological implants for damaged or diseased tissues and organs, and bioinformatics for determining which genes play a major role in health and disease. Biomedical engineering academic programs produce graduates with the ability to pursue successful careers in the biomedical device industry or to obtain advanced degrees leading to careers in biomedical engineering research, medicine, law or business. Biomedical engineering majors take courses in biology, anatomy, physics, chemistry, engineering, mathematics and medical product design and value life-long learning. Students learn to work effectively in interdisciplinary teams comprised of individuals with diverse social, cultural and technical backgrounds. Biomedical engineering is becoming increasingly important in imaging and image-guided research. Some examples of innovative ultrasound technology under development are ultrasound devices to accelerate the dissolution of blood clots, advanced surgical instruments with ultrasound guidance and ultrasound contrast agents for targeted drug delivery. Biomedical engineering is a great career choice for technically minded individuals who endeavor to work on applied problems that are medically relevant.

  8. Biomedical engineering: A platform for research and innovation in ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Christy K.

    2001-05-01

    An undergraduate or graduate degree in biomedical engineering prepares students to solve problems at the interface between engineering and medicine. Biomedical engineering encompasses evolving areas such as advanced medical imaging for diagnosis and treatment of disease, tissue engineering for designing and manufacturing biological implants for damaged or diseased tissues and organs, and bioinformatics for determining which genes play a major role in health and disease. Biomedical engineering academic programs produce graduates with the ability to pursue successful careers in the biomedical device industry or to obtain advanced degrees leading to careers in biomedical engineering research, medicine, law or business. Biomedical engineering majors take courses in biology, anatomy, physics, chemistry, engineering, mathematics and medical product design and value life-long learning. Students learn to work effectively in interdisciplinary teams comprised of individuals with diverse social, cultural and technical backgrounds. Biomedical engineering is becoming increasingly important in imaging and image-guided research. Some examples of innovative ultrasound technology under development are ultrasound devices to accelerate the dissolution of blood clots, advanced surgical instruments with ultrasound guidance and ultrasound contrast agents for targeted drug delivery. Biomedical engineering is a great career choice for technically minded individuals who endeavor to work on applied problems that are medically relevant.

  9. Real time image-based tracking of 4D ultrasound data.

    PubMed

    Øye, Ola Kristoffer; Wein, Wolfgang; Ulvang, Dag Magne; Matre, Knut; Viola, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    We propose a methodology to perform real time image-based tracking on streaming 4D ultrasound data, using image registration to deduce the positioning of each ultrasound frame in a global coordinate system. Our method provides an alternative approach to traditional external tracking devices used for tracking probe movements. We compare the performance of our method against magnetic tracking on phantom and liver data, and show that our method is able to provide results in agreement with magnetic tracking.

  10. An Electro-Optic Spatial Light Modulator for Thermoelastic Generation of Programmably Focused Ultrasound.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    The concept proposed is an electro - optic technique that would make it possible to spatially modulate a high power pulsed laser beam to thermoelastically induce focused ultrasound in a test material. Being a purely electro - optic device, the modulator, and therefore the depth at which the acoustic focus occurs, can be programmed electronically at electronic speeds. If successful, it would become possible to scan ultrasound continuously in three dimensions within the component or structure under test. (Author)

  11. Embedded ultrasound sensor in a silicon-on-insulator photonic platform

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, Amir; Omar, Murad; Estrada, Héctor; Kellnberger, Stephan; Razansky, Daniel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2014-01-13

    A miniaturized ultrasound sensor is demonstrated in a silicon-on-insulator platform. The sensor is based on a π-phase-shifted Bragg grating formed by waveguide corrugation. Ultrasound detection is performed by monitoring shifts in the resonance frequency of the grating using pulse interferometry. The device is characterized by measuring its response to a wideband acoustic point source generated using the optoacoustic effect. Experimental results show that the sensor's response is dominated by the formation of surface acoustic waves.

  12. [Quantitative ultrasound (ultrasonometry) in the diagnosis of osteoporosis. State of the art].

    PubMed

    Dubs, B

    2002-02-01

    The importance of ultrasound-based measuring methods in the diagnosis of osteoporosis has increased during the last few years. Measuring speed of sound (SOS) and broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) also allows assessment of density and elasticity of bone. Values measured show significant age dependence and correlate well with osteoporotic bone deterioration. The various ultrasound methods are quite equal and allow an adequate prediction of fracture risk comparable to the radiologic dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) method. At present, standardization of cutoff points and criteria to determine osteoporosis among the different devices is unsatisfactory. The suitability of the method for a general screening is growing.

  13. Introduction to hyperthermia device evaluation.

    PubMed

    Sapozink, M D; Cetas, T; Corry, P M; Egger, M J; Fessenden, P

    1988-01-01

    From 10/81 to 1/87, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) of the U.S. Department of Public Health Services (PHS) contracted with four institutions to evaluate hyperthermia technology to be applied in the treatment of human malignancy. During the five year period 1981-1986, data were collected which now reside in a consensus database representing treatments of 792 separate sites or fields in a total of 573 patients. These patients were treated with one or more of 49 devices by the four institutions. Sixteen ultrasound (US) devices were evaluated in 195 sites. Nine magnetic induction (MI) devices were evaluated in 208 sites. Twenty radiative electromagnetic (EM) devices were evaluated in 488 sites. Four interstitial (IRF) devices were evaluated in 37 sites. Many sites were treated with multiple hyperthermia modalities. This first in a series of 13 reports describes the general objectives of the Contractors' Group, basic methods of device evaluation and brief details of the large variety of devices tested.

  14. Evaluation of osteoporosis using ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maia, Joaquim M.; Costa, Eduardo T.; Nantes Button, Vera L. d. S.; Dantas, Ricardo G.

    2000-04-01

    We have developed an equipment using ultrasound transducers to help in the diagnosis of osteoporosis. The equipment consists of an X-Y axes displacement system controlled by a microcomputer and uses two ultrasound transducers in opposite sides to inspect the calcaneus region of the patient. We have used two pairs of transducers with 500 kHz and 1 MHz central frequencies. Each pair of transducers was fixed in the X-Y displacement system submerged in a small water tank with a support for the foot of the patient. The transmitter was excited with pulses of 400 - 600 kHz or 800 - 1200 kHz and the ultrasound waves propagating through the bone in the calcaneus region are received by the opposite transducer, amplified and acquired in a digital oscilloscope. The data are transferred to the microcomputer and the ultrasound attenuation and the ultrasound transmission velocity are determined. The system was tested in patients, selected from a group that had already been diagnosed using a DEXA equipment. The results showed that there is a decrease in the ultrasound transmission velocity and the ultrasound attenuation in osteoporotic patients when compared to healthy patients of the same sex and age group. The conclusion is that ultrasound attenuation and the transmission velocity in the calcaneus region may be used as parameters in the evaluation of osteoporosis using our new system.

  15. Ultrasound-guided synovial biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Sitt, Jacqueline C M; Wong, Priscilla

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided needle biopsy of synovium is an increasingly performed procedure with a high diagnostic yield. In this review, we discuss the normal synovium, as well as the indications, technique, tissue handling and clinical applications of ultrasound-guided synovial biopsy. PMID:26581578

  16. Thumb ultrasound: Technique and pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jatinder P; Kumar, Shwetam; Kathiria, Atman V; Harjai, Rachit; Jawed, Akram; Gupta, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound is ideally suited for the assessment of complex anatomy and pathologies of the thumb. Focused and dynamic thumb ultrasound can provide a rapid real-time diagnosis and can be used for guided treatment in certain clinical situations. We present a simplified approach to scanning technique for thumb-related pathologies and illustrate a spectrum of common and uncommon pathologies encountered. PMID:27857468

  17. Addressing Phonological Questions with Ultrasound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    Ultrasound can be used to address unresolved questions in phonological theory. To date, some studies have shown that results from ultrasound imaging can shed light on how differences in phonological elements are implemented. Phenomena that have been investigated include transitional schwa, vowel coalescence, and transparent vowels. A study of…

  18. Abdominal ultrasound and medical education.

    PubMed

    García de Casasola Sánchez, G; Torres Macho, J; Casas Rojo, J M; Cubo Romano, P; Antón Santos, J M; Villena Garrido, V; Diez Lobato, R

    2014-04-01

    Ultrasound is a very versatile diagnostic modality that permits real-time visualization of multiple internal organs. It is of invaluable help for the physical examination of the patients. To assess if ultrasound can be incorporated into medical education and if the students can perform a basic abdominal ultrasound examination without the necessity of a long period of training. Twelve medical students were trained in basic abdominal ultrasound during a 15-h training program including a 5-h theoretical and practical course and supervised practice in 20 selected patients. Subsequently, we conducted an evaluation test that assessed the ability of students to obtain the ultrasound views and to detect various pathologies in five different patients. The students were able to correctly identify the abdominal views more than 90% of the times. This percentage was only lower (80%) in the right subcostal view to locate the gallbladder. The accuracy or global efficiency of the ultrasound for the diagnosis of relevant pathological findings of the patients was greater than 90% (91.1% gallstones, abdominal aortic aneurysm 100%; splenomegaly 98.3%, ascites 100%; dilated inferior vena cava 100%; acute urinary retention 100%). The ultrasound may be a feasible learning tool in medical education. Ultrasound can help students to improve the physical examination. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  19. Ultrasound attenuation in ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Shliomis, Mark; Mond, Michael; Morozov, Konstantin

    2008-08-15

    The absorption of acoustic energy by internal degrees of freedom of short chains is proposed as a new viable mechanism of ultrasound attenuation in ferrofluids. It is demonstrated that even though the volume fraction of the chains may be quite small, such an effect may reach the order of magnitude of viscous damping. In addition, by investigating the statistical properties of dimers in ferrofluids, it is shown that an applied magnetic field modifies the sound attenuation in a highly anisotropic manner. The proposed mechanism provides new insight into the fundamental issue of colloidal response, and, in particular, may lead to its utilization in novel experimental concepts.

  20. Integrated medical school ultrasound: development of an ultrasound vertical curriculum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Physician-performed focused ultrasonography is a rapidly growing field with numerous clinical applications. Focused ultrasound is a clinically useful tool with relevant applications across most specialties. Ultrasound technology has outpaced the education, necessitating an early introduction to the technology within the medical education system. There are many challenges to integrating ultrasound into medical education including identifying appropriately trained faculty, access to adequate resources, and appropriate integration into existing medical education curricula. As focused ultrasonography increasingly penetrates academic and community practices, access to ultrasound equipment and trained faculty is improving. However, there has remained the major challenge of determining at which level is integrating ultrasound training within the medical training paradigm most appropriate. Methods The Ohio State University College of Medicine has developed a novel vertical curriculum for focused ultrasonography which is concordant with the 4-year medical school curriculum. Given current evidenced-based practices, a curriculum was developed which provides medical students an exposure in focused ultrasonography. The curriculum utilizes focused ultrasonography as a teaching aid for students to gain a more thorough understanding of basic and clinical science within the medical school curriculum. The objectives of the course are to develop student understanding in indications for use, acquisition of images, interpretation of an ultrasound examination, and appropriate decision-making of ultrasound findings. Results Preliminary data indicate that a vertical ultrasound curriculum is a feasible and effective means of teaching focused ultrasonography. The foreseeable limitations include faculty skill level and training, initial cost of equipment, and incorporating additional information into an already saturated medical school curriculum. Conclusions Focused

  1. Integrated medical school ultrasound: development of an ultrasound vertical curriculum.

    PubMed

    Bahner, David P; Adkins, Eric J; Hughes, Daralee; Barrie, Michael; Boulger, Creagh T; Royall, Nelson A

    2013-07-02

    Physician-performed focused ultrasonography is a rapidly growing field with numerous clinical applications. Focused ultrasound is a clinically useful tool with relevant applications across most specialties. Ultrasound technology has outpaced the education, necessitating an early introduction to the technology within the medical education system. There are many challenges to integrating ultrasound into medical education including identifying appropriately trained faculty, access to adequate resources, and appropriate integration into existing medical education curricula. As focused ultrasonography increasingly penetrates academic and community practices, access to ultrasound equipment and trained faculty is improving. However, there has remained the major challenge of determining at which level is integrating ultrasound training within the medical training paradigm most appropriate. The Ohio State University College of Medicine has developed a novel vertical curriculum for focused ultrasonography which is concordant with the 4-year medical school curriculum. Given current evidenced-based practices, a curriculum was developed which provides medical students an exposure in focused ultrasonography. The curriculum utilizes focused ultrasonography as a teaching aid for students to gain a more thorough understanding of basic and clinical science within the medical school curriculum. The objectives of the course are to develop student understanding in indications for use, acquisition of images, interpretation of an ultrasound examination, and appropriate decision-making of ultrasound findings. Preliminary data indicate that a vertical ultrasound curriculum is a feasible and effective means of teaching focused ultrasonography. The foreseeable limitations include faculty skill level and training, initial cost of equipment, and incorporating additional information into an already saturated medical school curriculum. Focused ultrasonography is an evolving concept in medicine

  2. Endoscopic ultrasound in mediastinal tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Malay; Ecka, Ruth Shifa; Somasundaram, Aravindh; Shoukat, Abid; Kirnake, Vijendra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tubercular lymphadenitis is the commonest extra pulmonary manifestation in cervical and mediastinal locations. Normal characteristics of lymph nodes (LN) have been described on ultrasonography as well as by Endoscopic Ultrasound. Many ultrasonic features have been described for evaluation of mediastinal lymph nodes. The inter and intraobserver agreement of the endosonographic features have not been uniformly established. Methods and Results: A total of 266 patients underwent endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration and 134 cases were diagnosed as mediastinal tuberculosis. The endoscopic ultrasound location and features of these lymph nodes are described. Conclusion: Our series demonstrates the utility of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration as the investigation of choice for diagnosis of mediastinal tuberculosis and also describes various endoscopic ultrasound features of such nodes. PMID:27051097

  3. What's new in urologic ultrasound?

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Anupam; Naranje, Priyanka; Pavunesan, Santhosh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is an imaging technology that has evolved swiftly and has come a long way since its beginnings. It is a commonly used initial diagnostic imaging modality as it is rapid, effective, portable, relatively inexpensive, and causes no harm to human health. In the last few decades, there have been significant technological improvements in the equipment as well as the development of contrast agents that allowed ultrasound to be even more widely adopted for urologic imaging. Ultrasound is an excellent guidance tool for an array of urologic interventional procedures and also has therapeutic application in the form of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for tumor ablation. This article focuses on the recent advances in ultrasound technology and its emerging clinical applications in urology. PMID:26166960

  4. Microwave thermal imaging of scanned focused ultrasound heating: Phantom results

    PubMed Central

    Meaney, Paul M.; Zhou, Tian; Fanning, Margaret W.; Geimer, Shireen D.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2009-01-01

    We are developing a microwave tomographic imaging system capable of monitoring thermal distributions based on the temperature dependence of the recovered dielectric properties. The system has been coupled to a high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy device which can be mechanically steered under computer control to generate arbitrarily shaped heating zones. Their integration takes advantage of the focusing capability of ultrasound for the therapy delivery and the isolation of the microwave imaging signal from the power deposition source to allow simultaneous treatment monitoring. We present several sets of phantom experiments involving different types of heating patterns that demonstrate the quality of both the spatial and temporal thermal imaging performance. This combined approach is adaptable to multiple anatomical sites and may have the potential to be developed into a viable alternative to current clinical temperature monitoring devices for HIFU, such magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. PMID:18608588

  5. Microwave thermal imaging of scanned focused ultrasound heating: phantom results.

    PubMed

    Meaney, Paul M; Zhou, Tian; Fanning, Margaret W; Geimer, Shireen D; Paulsen, Keith D

    2008-11-01

    We are developing a microwave tomographic imaging system capable of monitoring thermal distributions based on the temperature dependence of the recovered dielectric properties. The system has been coupled to a high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy device which can be mechanically steered under computer control to generate arbitrarily shaped heating zones. Their integration takes advantage of the focusing capability of ultrasound for the therapy delivery and the isolation of the microwave imaging signal from the power deposition source to allow simultaneous treatment monitoring. We present several sets of phantom experiments involving different types of heating patterns that demonstrate the quality of both the spatial and temporal thermal imaging performance. This combined approach is adaptable to multiple anatomical sites and may have the potential to be developed into a viable alternative to current clinical temperature monitoring devices for HIFU, such magnetic resonance (MR) imaging.

  6. Full-wave modeling of therapeutic ultrasound: Nonlinear ultrasound propagation in ideal fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginter, Siegfried; Liebler, Marko; Steiger, Eckard; Dreyer, Thomas; Riedlinger, Rainer E.

    2002-05-01

    The number of applications of high-intense, focused ultrasound for therapeutic purposes is growing. Besides established applications like lithotripsy, new applications like ultrasound in orthopedics or for the treatment of tumors arise. Therefore, new devices have to be developed which provide pressure waveforms and distributions in the focal zone specifically for the application. In this paper, a nonlinear full-wave simulation model is presented which predicts the therapeutically important characteristics of the generated ultrasound field for a given transducer and initial pressure signal. A nonlinear acoustic approximation in conservation form of the original hydrodynamic equations for ideal fluids rather than a wave equation provides the base for the nonlinear model. The equations are implemented with an explicit high-order finite-difference time-domain algorithm. The necessary coefficients are derived according to the dispersion relation preserving method. Simulation results are presented for two different therapeutic transducers: a self-focusing piezoelectric and one with reflector focusing. The computational results are validated by comparison with analytical solutions and measurements. An agreement of about 10% is observed between the simulation and experimental results.

  7. Microfluidic Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Lin, Jeffrey Chun-Hui (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey L. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Described herein are particular embodiments relating to a microfluidic device that may be utilized for cell sensing, counting, and/or sorting. Particular aspects relate to a microfabricated device that is capable of differentiating single cell types from dense cell populations. One particular embodiment relates a device and methods of using the same for sensing, counting, and/or sorting leukocytes from whole, undiluted blood samples.

  8. Sealing device

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2013-12-10

    A sealing device for sealing a gap between a dovetail of a bucket assembly and a rotor wheel is disclosed. The sealing device includes a cover plate configured to cover the gap and a retention member protruding from the cover plate and configured to engage the dovetail. The sealing device provides a seal against the gap when the bucket assemply is subjected to a centrifugal force.

  9. Microfluidic Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Lin, Jeffrey Chun-Hui (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Described herein are particular embodiments relating to a microfluidic device that may be utilized for cell sensing, counting, and/or sorting. Particular aspects relate to a microfabricated device that is capable of differentiating single cell types from dense cell populations. One particular embodiment relates a device and methods of using the same for sensing, counting, and/or sorting leukocytes from whole, undiluted blood samples.

  10. Microfluidic Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Lin, Jeffrey Chun-Hui (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey L. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Described herein are particular embodiments relating to a microfluidic device that may be utilized for cell sensing, counting, and/or sorting. Particular aspects relate to a microfabricated device that is capable of differentiating single cell types from dense cell populations. One particular embodiment relates a device and methods of using the same for sensing, counting, and/or sorting leukocytes from whole, undiluted blood samples.

  11. Microfluidic Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Lin, Jeffrey Chun-Hui (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey L. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Described herein are particular embodiments relating to a microfluidic device that may be utilized for cell sensing, counting, and/or sorting. Particular aspects relate to a microfabricated device that is capable of differentiating single cell types from dense cell populations. One particular embodiment relates a device and methods of using the same for sensing, counting, and/or sorting leukocytes from whole, undiluted blood samples.

  12. Accelerated Focused Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    White, P. Jason; Thomenius, Kai; Clement, Gregory T.

    2010-01-01

    One of the most, basic trade-offs in ultrasound imaging involves frame rate, depth, and number of lines. Achieving good spatial resolution and coverage requires a large number of lines, leading to decreases in frame rate. An even more serious imaging challenge occurs with imaging modes involving spatial compounding and 3-D/4-D imaging, which are severely limited by the slow speed of sound in tissue. The present work can overcome these traditional limitations, making ultrasound imaging many-fold faster. By emitting several beams at once, and by separating the resulting overlapped signals through spatial and temporal processing, spatial resolution and/or coverage can be increased by many-fold while leaving frame rates unaffected. The proposed approach can also be extended to imaging strategies that do not involve transmit beamforming, such as synthetic aperture imaging. Simulated and experimental results are presented where imaging speed is improved by up to 32-fold, with little impact on image quality. Object complexity has little impact on the method’s performance, and data from biological systems can readily be handled. The present work may open the door to novel multiplexed and/or multidimensional protocols considered impractical today. PMID:20040398

  13. Ultrasound in cardiac trauma.

    PubMed

    Saranteas, Theodosios; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Mandila, Christina; Poularas, John; Panou, Fotios

    2017-04-01

    In the perioperative period, the emergency department or the intensive care unit accurate assessment of variable chest pain requires meticulous knowledge, diagnostic skills, and suitable usage of various diagnostic modalities. In addition, in polytrauma patients, cardiac injury including aortic dissection, pulmonary embolism, acute myocardial infarction, and pericardial effusion should be immediately revealed and treated. In these patients, arrhythmias, mainly tachycardia, cardiac murmurs, or hypotension must alert physicians to suspect cardiovascular trauma, which would potentially be life threatening. Ultrasound of the heart using transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography are valuable diagnostic tools that can be used interchangeably in conjunction with other modalities such as the electrocardiogram and computed tomography for the diagnosis of cardiovascular abnormalities in trauma patients. Although ultrasound of the heart is often underused in the setting of trauma, it does have the advantages of being easily accessible, noninvasive, and rapid bedside assessment tool. This review article aims to analyze the potential cardiac injuries in trauma patients, and to provide an elaborate description of the role of echocardiography for their accurate diagnosis.

  14. Design Considerations and Performance of MEMS Acoustoelectric Ultrasound Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaohui; Ingram, Pier; Greenlee, Charles L.; Olafsson, Ragnar; Norwood, Robert A.; Witte, Russell S.

    2014-01-01

    Most single-element hydrophones depend on a piezoelectric material that converts pressure changes to electricity. These devices, however, can be expensive, susceptible to damage at high pressure, and/or have limited bandwidth and sensitivity. We have previously described the acoustoelectric (AE) hydrophone as an inexpensive alternative for mapping an ultrasound beam and monitoring acoustic exposure. The device exploits the AE effect, an interaction between electrical current flowing through a material and a propagating pressure wave. Previous designs required imprecise fabrication methods using common laboratory supplies, making it difficult to control basic features such as shape and size. This study describes a different approach based on microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) processing that allows for much finer control of several design features. In an effort to improve the performance of the AE hydrophone, we combine simulations with bench-top testing to evaluate key design features, such as thickness, shape, and conductivity of the active and passive elements. The devices were evaluated in terms of sensitivity, frequency response, and accuracy for reproducing the beam pattern. Our simulations and experimental results both indicated that designs using a combination of indium tin oxide (ITO) for the active element and gold for the passive electrodes (conductivity ratio = ~20) produced the best result for mapping the beam of a 2.25-MHz ultrasound transducer. Also, the AE hydrophone with a rectangular dumbbell configuration achieved a better beam pattern than other shape configurations. Lateral and axial resolutions were consistent with images generated from a commercial capsule hydrophone. Sensitivity of the best-performing device was 1.52 nV/Pa at 500 kPa using a bias voltage of 20 V. We expect a thicker AE hydrophone closer to half the acoustic wavelength to produce even better sensitivity, while maintaining high spectral bandwidth for characterizing medical

  15. Surgeon-performed ultrasound in the ICU setting.

    PubMed

    Habib, Fahim A; McKenney, Mark G

    2004-08-01

    Evaluation of critically ill patients is often challenging due to altered sensorium, underlying disease, and the presence of multiple drains or monitoring devices. In such circumstances, the ability of physicians to perform ultrasound examinations in the intensive care unit provides a useful diagnostic and therapeutic adjunct. In this article,we review the application of surgeon-performed ultrasonography in the evaluation and management of critically ill patients.

  16. Detection and quantification of insoluble particles by ultrasound spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Goodenough, T I J; Rajendram, V S; Meyer, S; Prêtre, D

    2005-02-01

    The Ultrafood system, a custom-built diagnostic ultrasound device, is used to accurately measure the concentration of particulate matter in a fluctuating high temperature liquid system. The two main problems, of thermal expansion and thermal variation in ultrasonic outputs were tackled by multi-distance measurement and low frequency spectroscopy, respectively. The resulting techniques have application at laboratory, scale for investigation of particulate suspensions and for online process monitoring.

  17. Bolt axial stress measurement based on a mode-converted ultrasound method using an electromagnetic acoustic transducer.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xu; Wu, Xinjun; Wang, Yugang

    2014-03-01

    A method is proposed to measure the stress on a tightened bolt using an electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT). A shear wave is generated by the EMAT, and a longitudinal wave is obtained from the reflection of the shear wave due to the mode conversion. The ray paths of the longitudinal and the shear wave are analyzed, and the relationship between the bolt axial stress and the ratio of time of flight between two mode waves is then formulated. Based on the above outcomes, an EMAT is developed to measure the bolt axial stress without loosening the bolt, which is required in the conventional EMAT test method. The experimental results from the measurement of the bolt tension show that the shear and the mode-converted longitudinal waves can be received successfully, and the ratio of the times of flight of the shear and the mode-converted longitudinal waves is linearly proportional to the bolt axial tension. The non-contact characteristic of EMAT eliminates the effect of the couplant and also makes the measurement more convenient than the measurement performed using the piezoelectric transducer. This method provides a promising way to measure the stress on tightened bolts.

  18. Determining Directions of Ultrasound in Solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, Edward R.; Roth, Don J.

    1987-01-01

    Ultrasound shadows cast by grooves. Improved method for determining direction of ultrasound in materials is shadow method using Scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM). Direction of ultrasound calculated from dimensions of groove and portion of surface groove shields from ultrasound. Method has variety of applications in nontraditional quality-control applications.

  19. Measuring the complex orbital angular momentum spectrum of light with a mode-matching method.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Peng; Li, Shikang; Feng, Xue; Cui, Kaiyu; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Yidong

    2017-03-15

    The relative phase shift among different components in the superposition of orbital angular momentum (OAM) states contains significant information. However, with existing methods of measuring the OAM spectrum, the phase term of the spectrum coefficient is hard to obtain. In this Letter, a mode-matching method is proposed to identify the complex OAM spectrum with a Mach-Zehnder interferometer and a charge-coupled device camera. It has the potential to extend the applications of OAM in scenarios sensitive to the phase factor, for instance, in imaging and quantum manipulation. The method is experimentally demonstrated with the superposition of two or three OAM states, while the maximum deviation of the energy ratio and the relative phase shift is 8.4% and 5.5% of 2π, respectively.

  20. Enhanced ultrasound for advanced diagnostics, ultrasound tomography for volume limb imaging and prosthetic fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Brian W.

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound imaging methods hold the potential to deliver low-cost, high-resolution, operator-independent and nonionizing imaging systems - such systems couple appropriate algorithms with imaging devices and techniques. The increasing demands on general practitioners motivate us to develop more usable and productive diagnostic imaging equipment. Ultrasound, specifically freehand ultrasound, is a low cost and safe medical imaging technique. It doesn't expose a patient to ionizing radiation. Its safety and versatility make it very well suited for the increasing demands on general practitioners, or for providing improved medical care in rural regions or the developing world. However it typically suffers from sonographer variability; we will discuss techniques to address user variability. We also discuss our work to combine cylindrical scanning systems with state of the art inversion algorithms to deliver ultrasound systems for imaging and quantifying limbs in 3-D in vivo. Such systems have the potential to track the progression of limb health at a low cost and without radiation exposure, as well as, improve prosthetic socket fitting. Current methods of prosthetic socket fabrication remain subjective and ineffective at creating an interface to the human body that is both comfortable and functional. Though there has been recent success using methods like magnetic resonance imaging and biomechanical modeling, a low-cost, streamlined, and quantitative process for prosthetic cup design and fabrication has not been fully demonstrated. Medical ultrasonography may inform the design process of prosthetic sockets in a more objective manner. This keynote talk presents the results of progress in this area.

  1. Droplets, Bubbles and Ultrasound Interactions.

    PubMed

    Shpak, Oleksandr; Verweij, Martin; de Jong, Nico; Versluis, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of droplets and bubbles with ultrasound has been studied extensively in the last 25 years. Microbubbles are broadly used in diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications, for instance, as ultrasound contrast agents. They have a similar size as red blood cells, and thus are able to circulate within blood vessels. Perfluorocarbon liquid droplets can be a potential new generation of microbubble agents as ultrasound can trigger their conversion into gas bubbles. Prior to activation, they are at least five times smaller in diameter than the resulting bubbles. Together with the violent nature of the phase-transition, the droplets can be used for local drug delivery, embolotherapy, HIFU enhancement and tumor imaging. Here we explain the basics of bubble dynamics, described by the Rayleigh-Plesset equation, bubble resonance frequency, damping and quality factor. We show the elegant calculation of the above characteristics for the case of small amplitude oscillations by linearizing the equations. The effect and importance of a bubble coating and effective surface tension are also discussed. We give the main characteristics of the power spectrum of bubble oscillations. Preceding bubble dynamics, ultrasound propagation is introduced. We explain the speed of sound, nonlinearity and attenuation terms. We examine bubble ultrasound scattering and how it depends on the wave-shape of the incident wave. Finally, we introduce droplet interaction with ultrasound. We elucidate the ultrasound-focusing concept within a droplets sphere, droplet shaking due to media compressibility and droplet phase-conversion dynamics.

  2. Unpowered wireless ultrasound tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahedi, Farshad; Huang, Haiying

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, an unpowered wireless ultrasound tomography system is presented. The system consists of two subsystems; the wireless interrogation unit (WIU) and three wireless nodes installed on the structure. Each node is designed to work in generation and sensing modes, but operates at a specific microwave frequency. Wireless transmission of the ultrasound signals between the WIU and the wireless nodes is achieved by converting ultrasound signals to microwave signals and vice versa, using a microwave carrier signal. In the generation mode, both a carrier signal and an ultrasound modulated microwave signal are transmitted to the sensor nodes. Only the node whose operating frequency matches the carrier signal will receive these signals and demodulate them to recover the original ultrasound signal. In the sensing mode, a microwave carrier signal with two different frequency components matching the operating frequencies of the sensor nodes is broadcasted by the WIU. The sensor nodes, in turn, receive the corresponding carrier signals, modulate it with the ultrasound sensing signal, and wirelessly transmit the modulated signal back to the WIU. The demodulation of the sensing signals is performed in the WIU using a digital signal processing. Implementing a software receiver significantly reduces the complexity and the cost of the WIU. A wireless ultrasound tomography system is realized by interchanging the carrier frequencies so that the wireless transducers can take turn to serve as the actuator and sensors.

  3. BRAKE DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    O'Donnell, T.J.

    1959-03-10

    A brake device is described for utilization in connection with a control rod. The device comprises a pair of parallelogram link mechanisms, a control rod moveable rectilinearly therebetween in opposite directions, and shoes resiliently supported by the mechanism for frictional engagement with the control rod.

  4. Josephson Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, Antonio; Pagano, Sergio

    In this chapter we briefly review the main applications of Josephson effect together with the most successful devices realized. We will give an overview of the various devices, providing also some basic concepts of the underlying physical mechanisms involved, and the associated limit performances. Some considerations on the concrete possibilities of successful "market ready" implementation will also be given.

  5. Optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperling, Leslie H.; Murphy, Clarence J.; Rosen, Warren A.; Jain, Himanshu

    1990-07-01

    This invention relates to acrylic polymers and more specifically to polyacrylamides and polyacrylates such as poly(2-((N-2-methyl-5-nitrophenylamino) ethyl acrylate)) and poly((N-2-methyl-4-nitrophenyl)acrylamide). These acrylic polymers are particularly useful as nonlinear optical components in various electrical devices for processing optical signals including interferometors, optical switches, optical amplifiers, generators, computational devices and the like.

  6. Electrochromic devices

    DOEpatents

    Allemand, Pierre M.; Grimes, Randall F.; Ingle, Andrew R.; Cronin, John P.; Kennedy, Steve R.; Agrawal, Anoop; Boulton, Jonathan M.

    2001-01-01

    An electrochromic device is disclosed having a selective ion transport layer which separates an electrochemically active material from an electrolyte containing a redox active material. The devices are particularly useful as large area architectural and automotive glazings due to there reduced back reaction.

  7. Superconducting devices

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, S.T. . Dept. of Physics); Rudman, D.A. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    This book presents a discussion of the theory, fabrication, and qualification of superconducting device elements and integrated circuitry. A look at issues key to the development of practical superconducting devices and systems is presented. Integrated systems, including the fabrication and application of SQUIDs, Josephson arrays, microwave detectors, digital signal processors and computers, and analog signal processors are discussed.

  8. Safety Assurance in Obstetrical Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Douglas L

    2008-01-01

    Safety assurance for diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics began with a tacit assumption of safety allowed by a federal law enacted in 1976 for then-existing medical ultrasound equipment. The implementation of the 510(k) pre-market approval process for diagnostic ultrasound resulted in the establishment of guideline upper limits for several examination categories in 1985. The obstetrical category has undergone substantial evolution from initial limits (I. e., 46 mW/cm2 spatial peak temporal average (SPTA) intensity) set in 1985. Thermal and mechanical exposure indices, which are displayed on-screen according to an Output Display Standard (ODS), were developed for safety assurance with relaxed upper limits. In 1992, with the adoption of the ODS, the allowable output for obstetrical ultrasound was increased both in terms of the average exposure (e. g. to a possible 720 mW/cm2 SPTA intensity) and of the peak exposure (via the Mechanical Index). There has been little or no subsequent research with the modern obstetrical ultrasound machines to systematically assess potential risks to the fetus using either relevant animal models of obstetrical exposure or human epidemiology studies. The assurance of safety for obstetrical ultrasound therefore is supported by three ongoing means: (I) review of a substantial but uncoordinated bioeffect research literature, (ii) the theoretical evaluation of diagnostic ultrasound exposure in terms of thermal and nonthermal mechanisms for bioeffects, and (iii) the skill and knowledge of professional sonographers. At this time, there is no specific reason to suspect that there is any significant health risk to the fetus or mother from exposure to diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics. This assurance of safety supports the prudent use of diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics by trained professionals for any medically indicated examination. PMID:18450141

  9. Delay and Standard Deviation Beamforming to Enhance Specular Reflections in Ultrasound Imaging.

    PubMed

    Bandaru, Raja Sekhar; Sornes, Anders Rasmus; Hermans, Jeroen; Samset, Eigil; D'hooge, Jan

    2016-12-01

    Although interventional devices, such as needles, guide wires, and catheters, are best visualized by X-ray, real-time volumetric echography could offer an attractive alternative as it avoids ionizing radiation; it provides good soft tissue contrast, and it is mobile and relatively cheap. Unfortunately, as echography is traditionally used to image soft tissue and blood flow, the appearance of interventional devices in conventional ultrasound images remains relatively poor, which is a major obstacle toward ultrasound-guided interventions. The objective of this paper was therefore to enhance the appearance of interventional devices in ultrasound images. Thereto, a modified ultrasound beamforming process using conventional-focused transmit beams is proposed that exploits the properties of received signals containing specular reflections (as arising from these devices). This new beamforming approach referred to as delay and standard deviation beamforming (DASD) was quantitatively tested using simulated as well as experimental data using a linear array transducer. Furthermore, the influence of different imaging settings (i.e., transmit focus, imaging depth, and scan angle) on the obtained image contrast was evaluated. The study showed that the image contrast of specular regions improved by 5-30 dB using DASD beamforming compared with traditional delay and sum (DAS) beamforming. The highest gain in contrast was observed when the interventional device was tilted away from being orthogonal to the transmit beam, which is a major limitation in standard DAS imaging. As such, the proposed beamforming methodology can offer an improved visualization of interventional devices in the ultrasound image with potential implications for ultrasound-guided interventions.

  10. Delay and Standard Deviation beamforming to enhance specular reflections in Ultrasound Imaging.

    PubMed

    Bandaru, Raja Sekhar; Sornes, Anders; Hermans, Jeroen; Samset, Eigil; D'hooge, Jan

    2016-09-27

    Although interventional devices such as needles, guide wires and catheters are best visualized by X-ray, real-time volumetric echography could offer an attractive alternative as it avoids ionizing radiation; it provides good soft tissue contrast and it is mobile and relatively cheap. Unfortunately, as echography is traditionally used to image soft tissue and blood flow, the appearance of interventional devices in conventional ultrasound images remains relatively poor which is a major obstacle towards ultrasound-guided interventions. The objective of the current study was therefore to enhance the appearance of interventional devices in ultrasound images. Thereto a modified ultrasound beamforming process using conventional focused transmit beams is proposed that exploits the properties of received signals containing specular reflections (as arising from these devices). This new beamforming approach referred to as Delay and Standard Deviation beamforming (DASD) was quantitatively tested using simulated as well as experimental data using a linear array transducer. Furthermore, the influence of different imaging settings (i.e. transmit focus, imaging depth and scan angle) on the obtained image contrast was evaluated. The study showed that the image contrast of specular regions improved by 5 to 30dB using DASD beamforming compared to traditional delay and sum (DAS) beamforming. The highest gain in contrast was observed when the interventional device was tilted away from being orthogonal to the transmit beam, which is a major limitation in standard DAS imaging. As such, the proposed beamforming methodology can offer an improved visualization of interventional devices in the ultrasound image with potential implications for ultrasound-guided interventions.

  11. Cellular inactivation by ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Li, G C; Hahn, G M; Tolmach, L J

    1977-05-12

    The lethal effect of ultrasound (US) on mammalian cells has received relatively little attention. Understandably, potential genetic aspects of US have been of prime concern to physicians who use US as a diagnostic tool; at the average power densities involved (<1 W cm(-2)) little, if any cell killing is to be expected. There have been sporadic attempts to use higher intensities ( approximately 1 W cm(-2)) as a treatment modality in cancer therapy, but those experiments seem to have been based on inadequate cellular studies. The effects of US usually were evaluated in terms of morphological criteria rather than on quantitative determination of the loss of viability as measured by colony formation. There are few reports of the effects of US on survival of mammalian cells, and none specifically examine hyperthermic interaction. With the increased interest in hyperthermia for tumour therapy, attention has been directed towards the use of ultrasound to achieve tumour heating. In preliminary experiments in which US was used to heat the EMT6 sarcoma and KHJJ carcinoma in mice, we found a high percentage of tumour cures with short (approximately 30 min) treatments at temperatures (43-44 degrees C) where in vitro results of hyperthermia-induced cell killing would not have led to a prediction of any cures. We therefore initiated an investigation of the effects of US on survival of Chinese hamster cells to see if direct cell killing by US could explain our in vivo results, or, as in the case of radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic heating, we would be forced to invoke host response(8). In particular, we examined the thermal and non-thermal components of cellular inactivation by US. We report here that there is a definite non-thermal cytotoxic effect of US. Its relative contribution to cell killing is a highly nonlinear function of the temperature of the cellular milieu. The survival curves show clearly that, beyond an initial threshold, small changes in temperature and/or US

  12. An ultrasound wearable system for the monitoring and acceleration of fracture healing in long bones.

    PubMed

    Protopappas, Vasilios C; Baga, Dina A; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I; Likas, Aristidis C; Papachristos, Athanasios A; Malizos, Konstantinos N

    2005-09-01

    An ultrasound wearable system for remote monitoring and acceleration of the healing process in fractured long bones is presented. The so-called USBone system consists of a pair of ultrasound transducers, implanted into the fracture region, a wearable device and a centralized unit. The wearable device is responsible to carry out ultrasound measurements using the axial-transmission technique and initiate therapy sessions of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound. The acquired measurements and other data are wirelessly transferred from the patient-site to the centralized unit, which is located in a clinical setting. The evaluation of the system on an animal tibial osteotomy model is also presented. A dataset was constructed for monitoring purposes consisting of serial ultrasound measurements, follow-up radiographs, quantitative computed tomography-based densitometry and biomechanical data. The animal study demonstrated the ability of the system to collect ultrasound measurements in an effective and reliable fashion and participating orthopaedic surgeons accepted the system for future clinical application. Analysis of the acquired measurements showed that the pattern of evolution of the ultrasound velocity through healing bones over the postoperative period monitors a dynamic healing process. Furthermore, the ultrasound velocity of radiographically healed bones returns to 80% of the intact bone value, whereas the correlation coefficient of the velocity with the material and mechanical properties of the healing bone ranges from 0.699 to 0.814. The USBone system constitutes the first telemedicine system for the out-hospital management of patients sustained open fractures and treated with external fixation devices.

  13. PLASMA DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Gow, J.D.; Wilcox, J.M.

    1961-12-26

    A device is designed for producing and confining highenergy plasma from which neutrons are generated in copious quantities. A rotating sheath of electrons is established in a radial electric field and axial magnetic field produced within the device. The electron sheath serves as a strong ionizing medium to gas introdueed thereto and also functions as an extremely effective heating mechanism to the resulting plasma. In addition, improved confinement of the plasma is obtained by ring magnetic mirror fields produced at the ends of the device. Such ring mirror fields are defined by the magnetic field lines at the ends of the device diverging radially outward from the axis of the device and thereafter converging at spatial annular surfaces disposed concentrically thereabout. (AFC)

  14. Ultrasound Despeckling for Contrast Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Peter C.; Garson, Christopher D.; Acton, Scott T.; Hossack, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Images produced by ultrasound systems are adversely hampered by a stochastic process known as speckle. A despeckling method based upon removing outlier is proposed. The method is developed to contrast enhance B-mode ultrasound images. The contrast enhancement is with respect to decreasing pixel variations in homogeneous regions while maintaining or improving differences in mean values of distinct regions. A comparison of the proposed despeckling filter is compared with the other well known despeckling filters. The evaluations of despeckling performance are based upon improvements to contrast enhancement, structural similarity, and segmentation results on a Field II simulated image and actual B-mode cardiac ultrasound images captured in vivo. PMID:20227984

  15. Neuromuscular ultrasound of cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Eman A; Walker, Francis O; Cartwright, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed.

  16. Value of Ultrasound in Rheumatologic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Taeyoung; Horton, Laura; Emery, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The use of musculoskeletal ultrasound in rheumatology clinical practice has rapidly increased over the past decade. Ultrasound has enabled rheumatologists to diagnose, prognosticate and monitor disease outcome. Although international standardization remains a concern still, the use of ultrasound in rheumatology is expected to grow further as costs fall and the opportunity to train in the technique improves. We present a review of value of ultrasound, focusing on major applications of ultrasound in rheumatologic diseases. PMID:23580002

  17. An Assessment of Iterative Reconstruction Methods for Sparse Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Solivan A.; Zibetti, Marcelo V. W.; Pipa, Daniel R.; Maia, Joaquim M.; Schneider, Fabio K.

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasonic image reconstruction using inverse problems has recently appeared as an alternative to enhance ultrasound imaging over beamforming methods. This approach depends on the accuracy of the acquisition model used to represent transducers, reflectivity, and medium physics. Iterative methods, well known in general sparse signal reconstruction, are also suited for imaging. In this paper, a discrete acquisition model is assessed by solving a linear system of equations by an ℓ1-regularized least-squares minimization, where the solution sparsity may be adjusted as desired. The paper surveys 11 variants of four well-known algorithms for sparse reconstruction, and assesses their optimization parameters with the goal of finding the best approach for iterative ultrasound imaging. The strategy for the model evaluation consists of using two distinct datasets. We first generate data from a synthetic phantom that mimics real targets inside a professional ultrasound phantom device. This dataset is contaminated with Gaussian noise with an estimated SNR, and all methods are assessed by their resulting images and performances. The model and methods are then assessed with real data collected by a research ultrasound platform when scanning the same phantom device, and results are compared with beamforming. A distinct real dataset is finally used to further validate the proposed modeling. Although high computational effort is required by iterative methods, results show that the discrete model may lead to images closer to ground-truth than traditional beamforming. However, computing capabilities of current platforms need to evolve before frame rates currently delivered by ultrasound equipments are achievable. PMID:28282862

  18. Shaken and stirred: mechanisms of ultrasound-enhanced thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Bader, Kenneth B; Gruber, Matthew J; Holland, Christy K

    2015-01-01

    The use of ultrasound and microbubbles as an effective adjuvant to thrombolytics has been reported in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. However, the specific mechanisms underlying ultrasound-enhanced thrombolysis have yet to be elucidated. We present visual observations illustrating two mechanisms of ultrasound-enhanced thrombolysis: acoustic cavitation and radiation force. An in vitro flow model was developed to observe human whole blood clots exposed to human fresh-frozen plasma, recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (0, 0.32, 1.58 or 3.15 μg/mL) and the ultrasound contrast agent Definity (2 μL/mL). Intermittent, continuous-wave ultrasound (120 kHz, 0.44 MPa peak-to-peak pressure) was used to insonify the perfusate. Ultraharmonic emissions indicative of stable cavitation were monitored with a passive cavitation detector. The clot was observed with an inverted microscope, and images were recorded with a charge-coupled device camera. The images were post-processed to determine the time-dependent clot diameter and root-mean-square velocity of the clot position. Clot lysis occurred preferentially surrounding large, resonant-sized bubbles undergoing stable oscillations. Ultraharmonic emissions from stable cavitation were found to correlate with the lytic rate. Clots were observed to translate synchronously with the initiation and cessation of the ultrasound exposure. The root-mean-square velocity of the clot correlated with the lytic rate. These data provide visual documentation of stable cavitation activity and radiation force during sub-megahertz sonothrombolysis. The observations of this study suggest that the process of clot lysis is complex, and both stable cavitation and radiation force are mechanistically responsible for this beneficial bio-effect in this in vitro model.

  19. Ultrasound image of the skin, apparatus and imaging basics

    PubMed Central

    Malinowska, Sylwia

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging of the skin is becoming more and more popular. Skin ultrasound examinations are used both in order to assess healthy skin and to evaluate pathological lesions. They are mainly performed in dermatology as well as in broadly understood aesthetic medicine and cosmetology. At present, skin imaging is enabled by high-frequency equipment and high-quality conventional devices. The introduction of high-frequency electronic transducers which are supported by conventional scanners may be a turning point in skin ultrasound equipment. Irrespective of the ultrasound scanner, three layers may be distinguished in the image of the healthy skin: epidermal echo, dermis and subcutaneous tissue. High-frequency equipment allows for detailed imaging of the epidermal echo, dermis and upper part of the subcutaneous tissue. It is also possible to visualize the skin appendages (hair with follicles and nails) as well as slight vessels that run in the dermis and upper subcutaneous tissue. Contrary to high-frequency equipment, conventional scanners do not allow for a detailed assessment of the epidermal and dermal echoes. Instead, they enable the visualization of the entire subcutaneous tissue. The following parameters are used for the assessment of skin ultrasound images: thickness of individual skin layers, caliber of blood vessels, echogenicity of the dermis or its individual layers, echogenicity of the subcutaneous tissue as well as the presence or absence of flow in slight venous vessels. Currently, the studies on the usage of sonoelastography for skin assessment are in progress. Considering the dynamic development of skin imaging equipment and its diagnostic possibilities, one might suspect that high-frequency examinations will become more common and will be fundamental for the evaluation of both healthy and pathologically altered skin. This paper is an introduction to a series of articles on the clinical application of high-frequency ultrasound. The next articles will

  20. Fast integrated intravascular photoacoustic/ultrasound catheter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Changhoon; Cho, Seunghee; Kim, Taehoon; Park, Sungjo; Park, Hyoeun; Kim, Jinmoo; Lee, Seunghoon; Kang, Yeonsu; Jang, Kiyuk; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    In cardiology, a vulnerable plaque is considered to be a key subject because it is strongly related to atherosclerosis and acute myocardial infarction. Because conventional intravascular imaging devices exhibit several limitations with regard to vulnerable plaque detection, the need for an effective lipid imaging modality has been continuously suggested. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a medical imaging technique with a high level of ultrasound (US) resolution and strong optical contrast. In this study, we successfully developed an integrated intravascular photoacoustic/ultrasound (IV-PAUS) imaging system with a catheter diameter of 1.2 mm for lipid-rich atherosclerosis imaging. An Nd:YAG pulsed laser with an excitation wavelength of 1064 nm was utilized. IV-PAUS offers 5-mm depth penetration and axial and lateral PA imaging resolutions of 94 μm and 203 μm, respectively, as determined by imaging a 6-μm carbon fiber. We initially obtained 3-dimensional (3D) co-registered PA/US images of metal stents. Subsequently, we successfully obtained 3D coregistered PA/US ex vivo images using an iliac artery from a rabbit atherosclerosis model. Accordingly, lipid-rich plaques were sufficiently differentiated from normal tissue in the ex vivo experiment. We validated these findings histologically to confirm the lipid content.

  1. Extrinsic and intrinsic fiberoptic Sagnac ultrasound sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomitchov, Pavel A.; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar; Achenbach, Jan D.

    2000-07-01

    A compact, dual-probe, fiberized Sagnac ultrasound sensor (SUS) capable of detecting ultrasonic waves of various types is described. The main advantages of the proposed device are (1) the ability to detect ultrasonic waves on the surface (extrinsic mode) as well as in the interior of structures (intrinsic mode); (2) improved SNR, which has been achieved using an optical frequency shifting technique for biasing to quadrature and for elimination of parasitic interference between the desired sampling beams and other nonessential beams in the interferometer; (3) the ability to detect ultrasonic signals on rough surfaces by the use of an electromechanical speckle-hunting technique (in the extrinsic mode); (4) dual-probe configuration; and (5) directional sensitivity to ultrasound when the system is operated in the intrinsic mode or on a polished surface in the extrinsic mode. Several applications of the SUS for nondestructive characterization of material properties and testing of structures for flaws are presented. Bulk longitudinal waves, Rayleigh waves and Lamb waves are measured using the SUS to (1) characterize piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer beam profiles, (2) study the scattering of ultrasonic waves by flaws, (3) identify and size surface breaking flaws in aircraft wheel components, and (4) monitor in real time the cure process of an epoxy resin.

  2. Ultrasound contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Ignee, Andre; Atkinson, Nathan S. S.; Schuessler, Gudrun; Dietrich, Christoph F.

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) plays an important role in imaging of the mediastinum and abdominal organs. Since the introduction of US contrast agents (UCA) for transabdominal US, attempts have been made to apply contrast-enhanced US techniques also to EUS. Since 2003, specific contrast-enhanced imaging was possible using EUS. Important studies have been published regarding contrast-enhanced EUS and the characterization of focal pancreatic lesions, lymph nodes, and subepithelial tumors. In this manuscript, we describe the relevant UCA, their application, and specific image acquisition as well as the principles of image tissue characterization using contrast-enhanced EUS. Safety issues, potential future developments, and EUS-specific issues are reviewed. PMID:27824024

  3. Therapeutic endoscopic ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Venkatachalapathy, Suresh; Nayar, Manu K

    2017-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is now firmly established as one of the essential tools for diagnosis in most gastrointestinal MDTs across the UK. However, the ability to provide therapy with EUS has resulted in a significant impact on the management of the patients. These include drainage of peripancreatic collections, EUS-guided endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatogram, EUS-guided coeliac plexus blocks, etc. The rapid development of this area in endoscopy is a combination of newer tools and increasing expertise by endosonographers to push the boundaries of intervention with EUS. However, the indications are limited and we are at the start of the learning curve for these high-risk procedures. These therapies should, therefore, be confined to centres with a robust multidisciplinary team, including interventional endoscopists, radiologists and surgeons. PMID:28261439

  4. Ultrasound guided fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baoqiang; Lesage, Frederic

    2012-10-01

    In this study, a hybrid-model imaging system combining fluorescence and ultrasound (US) was investigated with the motivation of providing structural priors towards improvement of fluorescence reconstruction. A single element transducer was scanned over the sample for anatomy. In the fluorescence part, a laser source was scanned over the sample with the emission received by an EMCCD camera. Synchronization was achieved by a pair of motorized linear stages. Structural information was derived from the US images and a profilometry and used to constrain reconstruction. In the reconstruction, we employed a GPU-based Monte Carlo simulation for forward modeling and a pattern-based method to take advantage of the huge dataset for the inverse problem. Performance of this system was validated with two phantoms with fluorophore inclusions. The results indicated that the fluorophore distribution could be accurately reconstructed. And the system has a potential for the future in-vivo study.

  5. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Migliori, Albert

    1991-01-01

    A resonant ultrasound spectroscopy method provides a unique characterization of an object for use in distinguishing similar objects having physical differences greater than a predetermined tolerance. A resonant response spectrum is obtained for a reference object by placing excitation and detection transducers at any accessible location on the object. The spectrum is analyzed to determine the number of resonant response peaks in a predetermined frequency interval. The distribution of the resonance frequencies is then characterized in a manner effective to form a unique signature of the object. In one characterization, a small frequency interval is defined and stepped though the spectrum frequency range. Subsequent objects are similarly characterized where the characterizations serve as signatures effective to distinguish objects that differ from the reference object by more than the predetermined tolerance.

  6. Introduction to ultrasound elastography

    PubMed Central

    Dobruch-Sobczak, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    For centuries tissue palpation has been an important diagnostic tool. During palpation, tumors are felt as tissues harder than the surrounding tissues. The significance of palpation is related to the relationship between mechanical properties of different tissue lesions. The assessment of tissue stiffness through palpation is based on the fact that mechanical properties of tissues are changing as a result of various diseases. A higher tissue stiffness translates into a higher elasticity modulus. In the 90's, ultrasonography was extended by the option of examining the stiffness of tissue by estimating the difference in backscattering of ultrasound in compressed and non-compressed tissue. This modality is referred to as the static, compression elastography and is based on tracking the deformation of tissue subjected to the slowly varying compression through the recording of the backscattered echoes. The displacement is estimated using the methods of cross-correlation between consecutive ultrasonic lines of examined tissue, so calculating the degree of similarity of ultrasonic echoes acquired from tissue before and after the compression was applied. The next step in the development of ultrasound palpation was to apply the local remote tissue compression by using the acoustic radiation force generated through the special beam forming of the ultrasonic beam probing the tissue. The acoustic radiation force causes a slight deformation the tissue thereby forming a shear wave propagating in the tissue at different speeds dependent on the stiffness of the tissue. Shear wave elastography, carries great hopes in the field of quantitative imaging of tissue lesions. This article describes the physical basis of both elastographic methods: compression elastography and shear wave elastography. PMID:27446596

  7. Rapid Diagnosis of an Ulnar Fracture with Portable Hand-Held Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, Andrew W.; Brown, Ross; Diebel, Lawrence N.; Nicolaou, Savvas; Marshburn, Tom; Dulchavsky, Scott A.

    2002-01-01

    Orthopedic fractures are a common injury in operational activities, injuries that often occur in isolated or hostile environments. Clinical ultrasound devices have become more user friendly and lighter allowing them to be easily transported with forward medical teams. The bone-soft tissue interface has a very large acoustic impedance, with a high reflectance that can be used to visualize breaks in contour including fractures. Herein reported is a case of an ulnar fracture that was quickly visualized in the early phase of a multi-system trauma resuscitation with a hand-held ultrasound device. The implications for operational medicine are discussed.

  8. Ultrasound elastomicroscopy for articular cartilage: from static to transient and 1D to 2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yongping; Bridal, Sharon L.; Shi, Jun; Saied, Amena; Lu, Minghua; Jaffre, Britta; Mak, Arthur F. T.; Laugier, Pascal; Qin, Ling

    2003-05-01

    Articular cartilage (AC) is a biological weight-bearing tissue covering the ends of articulating bones within synovial joints. Its function very much depends on the unique multi-layered structure and the depth-dependent material properties, which have not been well invetigated nondestructively. In this study, transient depth-dependent material properties of bovine patella cartilage were measured using ultrasound elastomicroscopy methods. A 50 MHz focused ultrasound transducer was used to collect A-mode ultrasound echoes from the articular cartilage during the compression and subsequent force-relaxation. The transient displacements of the cartilage tissues at different depths were calculated from the ultrasound echoes using a cross-correlation technique. It was observed that the strains in the superficial zone were much larger than those in the middle and deep zones as the equilibrium state was approached. The tissues inside the AC layer continued to move during the force-relaxation phase after the compression was completed. This process has been predicted by a biphasic theory. In this study, it has been verified experimentally. It was also observed that the tissue deformations at different depths of AC were much more evenly distributed before force-relaxation. AC specimens were also investigated using a 2D ultrasound elastomicroscopy system that included a 3D translating system for moving the ultrasound transducer over the specimens. B-mode RF ultrasound signals were collected from the specimens under different loading levels applied with a specially designed compressor. Preliminary results demonstrated that the scanning was repeatable with high correlation of radio frequency signals obtained from the same site during different scans when compression level was unchanged (R2 > 0.97). Strains of the AC specimens were mapped using data collected with this ultrasound elastomicroscope. This system can also be potentially used for the assessment of other biological

  9. Changes in the availability of bedside ultrasound practice in emergency rooms and prehospital settings in France.

    PubMed

    Bobbia, X; Abou-Badra, M; Hansel, N; Pes, P; Petrovic, T; Claret, P G; Lefrant, J Y; de La Coussaye, J E

    2017-08-04

    Ensuring the availability of ultrasound devices is the initial step in implementing clinical ultrasound (CUS) in emergency services. In France in 2011, 52% of emergency departments (EDs) and only 9% of mobile intensive care stations (MICS) were equipped with ultrasound devices. The main goal of this study was to determine the movement of these rates since 2011. We conducted a cross-sectional, descriptive, multicentre study in the form of a questionnaire. To estimate the numbers of EDs and MICS equipped with at least one ultrasound system with a confidence level of 95% and margin of error of 5%, 170 responding EDs and 145 MICS were required. Each service was solicited three times by secure online questionnaire and then by phone. Three hundred and twenty-eight (84%) services responded to the questionnaire: 179 (86%) EDs and 149 (82%) MICS. At least one ultrasound machine was available in 127 (71%, 95% CI [64; 78]) EDs vs. 52% in 2011 (P<0.01). 42 (28%, 95% CI [21; 35]) MICS were equipped vs. 9% in 2011 (P<0.01). In 97 (76%) EDs and 24 (55%) MICS, less than a half of physicians were trained. CUS was used at least three times a day in 52 (41%) EDs and in 8 (19%) MICS. Our study demonstrates improved access to ultrasound devices in French EDs and MICS. Almost three-quarters of EDs and nearly one-third of MICS are now equipped with at least one ultrasound device. However, the rate of physicians trained per service remains insufficient. Copyright © 2017 Société française d'anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Design of a Thermoacoustic Sensor for Low Intensity Ultrasound Measurements Based on an Artificial Neural Network

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Jida; Chen, Jie

    2015-01-01

    In therapeutic ultrasound applications, accurate ultrasound output intensities are crucial because the physiological effects of therapeutic ultrasound are very sensitive to the intensity and duration of these applications. Although radiation force balance is a benchmark technique for measuring ultrasound intensity and power, it is costly, difficult to operate, and compromised by noise vibration. To overcome these limitations, the development of a low-cost, easy to operate, and vibration-resistant alternative device is necessary for rapid ultrasound intensity measurement. Therefore, we proposed and validated a novel two-layer thermoacoustic sensor using an artificial neural network technique to accurately measure low ultrasound intensities between 30 and 120 mW/cm2. The first layer of the sensor design is a cylindrical absorber made of plexiglass, followed by a second layer composed of polyurethane rubber with a high attenuation coefficient to absorb extra ultrasound energy. The sensor determined ultrasound intensities according to a temperature elevation induced by heat converted from incident acoustic energy. Compared with our previous one-layer sensor design, the new two-layer sensor enhanced the ultrasound absorption efficiency to provide more rapid and reliable measurements. Using a three-dimensional model in the K-wave toolbox, our simulation of the ultrasound propagation process demonstrated that the two-layer design is more efficient than the single layer design. We also integrated an artificial neural network algorithm to compensate for the large measurement offset. After obtaining multiple parameters of the sensor characteristics through calibration, the artificial neural network is built to correct temperature drifts and increase the reliability of our thermoacoustic measurements through iterative training about ten seconds. The performance of the artificial neural network method was validated through a series of experiments. Compared to our previous

  11. Evaluation of chest ultrasound integrated teaching of respiratory system physiology to medical students.

    PubMed

    Paganini, Matteo; Bondì, Michela; Rubini, Alessandro

    2017-12-01

    Ultrasound imaging is a widely used diagnostic technique, whose integration in medical education is constantly growing. The aim of this study was to evaluate chest ultrasound usefulness in teaching respiratory system physiology, students' perception of chest ultrasound integration into a traditional lecture in human physiology, and short-term concept retention. A lecture about respiratory physiology was integrated with ultrasound and delivered to third-year medical students. It included basic concepts of ultrasound imaging and the physiology of four anatomic sectors of the body of a male volunteer, shown with a portable ultrasound device (pleural sliding, diaphragmatic movement, inferior vena cava diameter variations, cardiac movements). Students' perceptions of the integrated lecture were assessed, and attendance recorded. After 4 mo, four multiple-choice questions about respiratory physiology were administered during the normal human physiology examinations, and the results of students who attended the lesson and those of who did not were compared. One hundred thirty-four students attended the lecture. Most of them showed encouragement for the study of the subject and considered the ultrasound integrated lecture more interesting than a traditional one and pertinent to the syllabus. Exposed students achieved a better score at the examination and committed less errors than did nonexposed students. The chest ultrasound integrated lecture was appreciated by students. A possible association between the exposure to the lecture and short-term concept retention is shown by better performances of the exposed cohort at the examination. A systematic introduction of ultrasound into physiology traditional teaching will be promoted by the Ultrasound-Based Medical Education movement. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Design of a Thermoacoustic Sensor for Low Intensity Ultrasound Measurements Based on an Artificial Neural Network.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jida; Chen, Jie

    2015-06-23

    In therapeutic ultrasound applications, accurate ultrasound output intensities are crucial because the physiological effects of therapeutic ultrasound are very sensitive to the intensity and duration of these applications. Although radiation force balance is a benchmark technique for measuring ultrasound intensity and power, it is costly, difficult to operate, and compromised by noise vibration. To overcome these limitations, the development of a low-cost, easy to operate, and vibration-resistant alternative device is necessary for rapid ultrasound intensity measurement. Therefore, we proposed and validated a novel two-layer thermoacoustic sensor using an artificial neural network technique to accurately measure low ultrasound intensities between 30 and 120 mW/cm2. The first layer of the sensor design is a cylindrical absorber made of plexiglass, followed by a second layer composed of polyurethane rubber with a high attenuation coefficient to absorb extra ultrasound energy. The sensor determined ultrasound intensities according to a temperature elevation induced by heat converted from incident acoustic energy. Compared with our previous one-layer sensor design, the new two-layer sensor enhanced the ultrasound absorption efficiency to provide more rapid and reliable measurements. Using a three-dimensional model in the K-wave toolbox, our simulation of the ultrasound propagation process demonstrated that the two-layer design is more efficient than the single layer design. We also integrated an artificial neural network algorithm to compensate for the large measurement offset. After obtaining multiple parameters of the sensor characteristics through calibration, the artificial neural network is built to correct temperature drifts and increase the reliability of our thermoacoustic measurements through iterative training about ten seconds. The performance of the artificial neural network method was validated through a series of experiments. Compared to our previous

  13. Excitonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butov, L. V.

    2017-08-01

    Indirect excitons can be controlled by voltage, can travel over large distances before recombination, and can cool down close to the temperature of semiconductor crystal lattice and below the temperature of quantum degeneracy. These properties form the basis for the development of excitonic devices with indirect excitons. In this contribution, we overview our studies of excitonic devices. We present traps, lattices, conveyers, and ramps for studying basic properties of cold indirect excitons - cold bosons in semiconductor materials. We also present proof-of-principle demonstration for excitonic signal processing devices.

  14. Skin Ultrasound in Kaposi Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Carrascosa, R; Alfageme, F; Roustán, G; Suarez, M D

    2016-05-01

    The use of ultrasound imaging has recently been increasing in numerous dermatologic diseases. This noninvasive technique provides additional details on the structure and vascularization of skin lesions. Kaposi sarcoma is a vascular tumor that typically arises in the skin and mucosas. It can spread to lymph nodes and internal organs. We performed B-mode and color Doppler ultrasound studies in 3 patients with a clinical diagnosis of Kaposi sarcoma confirmed by histological examination. We found differences in the ultrasound pattern between nodular and plaque lesions, in both B-mode and color Doppler. We believe that skin ultrasound imaging could be a useful technique for studying cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma, providing additional information on the structural and vascular characteristics of the lesion.

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... children. It is also valuable for evaluating the brain, spinal cord and hip joints in newborns and infants. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of ...

  16. Ultrasound-modulated bioluminescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal, Guillaume; Schotland, John C.

    2014-03-01

    We propose a method to reconstruct the density of a luminescent source in a highly scattering medium from ultrasound-modulated optical measurements. Our approach is based on the solution to a hybrid inverse source problem for the diffusion equation.

  17. Assessing continence with bladder ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Addison, Ray

    Ray Addison outlines the principal uses of portable bladder ultrasound and reminds readers of the importance of reviewing the results of this investigation with other clinical investigations and the patient's health status.

  18. Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast Biopsy An ultrasound-guided breast biopsy uses sound waves to help locate a lump or abnormality ... exam. The transducer sends out inaudible, high—frequency sound waves into the body and then listens for ...

  19. QUS devices for assessment of osteoporosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langton, Christian

    2002-05-01

    The acronym QUS (Quantitative Ultrasound) is now widely used to describe ultrasound assessment of osteoporosis, a disease primarily manifested by fragility fractures of the wrist and hip along with shortening of the spine. There is currently available a plethora of commercial QUS devices, measuring various anatomic sites including the heel, finger, and tibia. Largely through commercial rather than scientific drivers, the parameters reported often differ significantly from the two fundamental parameters of velocity and attenuation. Attenuation at the heel is generally reported as BUA (broadband ultrasound attenuation, the linearly regressed increase in attenuation between 200 and 600 kHz). Velocity derivatives include bone, heel, TOF, and AdV. Further, velocity and BUA parameters may be mathematically combined to provide proprietary parameters including ``stiffness'' and ``QUI.'' In terms of clinical utility, the situation is further complicated by ultrasound being inherently dependent upon ``bone quality'' (e.g., structure) in addition to ``bone quantity'' (generally expressed as BMD, bone mineral density). Hence the BMD derived WHO criteria for osteoporosis and osteopenia may not be directly applied to QUS. There is therefore an urgent need to understand the fundamental dependence of QUS parameters, to perform calibration and cross-correlation studies of QUS devices, and to define its clinical utility.

  20. [Ultrasound of spleen and retroperitoneum].

    PubMed

    Salcedo Joven, I; Segura-Grau, A; Díaz Rodríguez, N; Segura-Cabral, J M

    2016-09-01

    Ultrasound provides data of extremely great value when studying spleen pathology, being diagnostic in splenomegaly and splenic trauma, as well as offering a good approach to the diagnosis of both benign and malignant focal pathology, particularly lymphoma. However, for the evaluation of adrenal and retroperitoneal diseases, other techniques such as CT or MRI are more suitable, even though ultrasound is still an excellent screening and monitoring method, as well as being useful in non-invasive therapeutic approaches.

  1. Cleaning devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Horst W. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Cleaning devices are described which include a vacuum cleaner wherein electrostatically charged brushes that brush dirt off a floor, are electrically grounded to remove charges that could tend to hold dirt to the brushes.

  2. Device Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-06-01

    In the Device Performance group, within the National Center for Photovoltaic's Measurements and Characterization Division, we measure the performance of PV cells and modules with respect to standard reporting conditions--defined as a reference temperature (25 C), total irradiance (1000 Wm-2), and spectral irradiance distribution (IEC standard 60904-3). Typically, these are ''global'' reference conditions, but we can measure with respect to any reference set. To determine device performance, we conduct two general categories of measurements: spectral responsivity (SR) and current versus voltage (I-V). We usually perform these measurements using standard procedures, but we develop new procedures when required by new technologies. We also serve as an independent facility for verifying device performance for the entire PV community. We help the PV community solve its special measurement problems, giving advice on solar simulation, instrumentation for I-V measurements, reference cells, measurement procedures, and anomalous results. And we collaborate with researchers to analyze devices and materials.

  3. PLUS: open-source toolkit for ultrasound-guided intervention systems.

    PubMed

    Lasso, Andras; Heffter, Tamas; Rankin, Adam; Pinter, Csaba; Ungi, Tamas; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2014-10-01

    A variety of advanced image analysis methods have been under the development for ultrasound-guided interventions. Unfortunately, the transition from an image analysis algorithm to clinical feasibility trials as part of an intervention system requires integration of many components, such as imaging and tracking devices, data processing algorithms, and visualization software. The objective of our paper is to provide a freely available open-source software platform-PLUS: Public software Library for Ultrasound-to facilitate rapid prototyping of ultrasound-guided intervention systems for translational clinical research. PLUS provides a variety of methods for interventional tool pose and ultrasound image acquisition from a wide range of tracking and imaging devices, spatial and temporal calibration, volume reconstruction, simulated image generation, and recording and live streaming of the acquired data. This paper introduces PLUS, explains its functionality and architecture, and presents typical uses and performance in ultrasound-guided intervention systems. PLUS fulfills the essential requirements for the development of ultrasound-guided intervention systems and it aspires to become a widely used translational research prototyping platform. PLUS is freely available as open source software under BSD license and can be downloaded from http://www.plustoolkit.org.

  4. PLUS: open-source toolkit for ultrasound-guided intervention systems

    PubMed Central

    Lasso, Andras; Heffter, Tamas; Rankin, Adam; Pinter, Csaba; Ungi, Tamas; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    A variety of advanced image analysis methods have been under development for ultrasound-guided interventions. Unfortunately, the transition from an image analysis algorithm to clinical feasibility trials as part of an intervention system requires integration of many components, such as imaging and tracking devices, data processing algorithms, and visualization software. The objective of our work is to provide a freely available open-source software platform – PLUS: Public software Library for Ultrasound – to facilitate rapid prototyping of ultrasound-guided intervention systems for translational clinical research. PLUS provides a variety of methods for interventional tool pose and ultrasound image acquisition from a wide range of tracking and imaging devices, spatial and temporal calibration, volume reconstruction, simulated image generation, and recording and live streaming of the acquired data. This paper introduces PLUS, explains its functionality and architecture, and presents typical uses and performance in ultrasound-guided intervention systems. PLUS fulfills the essential requirements for the development of ultrasound-guided intervention systems and it aspires to become a widely used translational research prototyping platform. PLUS is freely available as open source under BSD license, the code and documentation are available at http://www.plustoolkit.org. PMID:24833412

  5. Ultrasound Fracture Diagnosis in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Amponsah, David; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Garcia, Kathleen M.; Hamilton, Douglas R.; vanHolsbeeck, Marnix

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: This ground-based investigation accumulated high-level clinical evidence on the sensitivity and specificity of point of care ultrasound performed by expert and novice users for the rapid diagnosis of musculoskeletal (MSK) injuries. We developed preliminary educational methodologies to provide just-in-time training of novice users by creating multi-media training tools and imaging procedures for non expert operators and evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of non-expert performed musculoskeletal ultrasound to diagnose acute injuries in a Level 1 Trauma Center. Methods: Patients with potential MSK injuries were identified in the emergency room. A focused MSK ultrasound was performed by expert operators and compared to standard radiographs. A repeat examination was performed by non-expert operators who received a short, just-in-time multimedia education aid. The sensitivity and specificity of the expert and novice ultrasound examinations were compared to gold standard radiography. Results: Over 800 patients were enrolled in this study. The sensitivity and specificity of expert performed ultrasound exceeded 98% for MSK injuries. Novice operators achieved 97% sensitivity and 99% specificity for targeted examinations with the greatest error in fractures involving the hand and foot. Conclusion: Point of care ultrasound is a sensitive and specific diagnostic test for MSK injury when performed by experts and just-in-time trained novice operators.

  6. Device Demonstration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-31

    effecting change in the electrical properties of the material. Due to the heating requirement in setting the state, stray radiation does not affect the...device as in traditional binary RAM, thus giving the device radiation-hard properties . Uniformity of the heater elements at a small size below 100 nm is...Molybdenum was chosen for the cathode tube material because it has a low sputtering coefficient, and it’s high temperature properties .. The tubes are

  7. Influence of cortical bone thickness on the ultrasound velocity

    PubMed Central

    Mandarano-Filho, Luiz Garcia; Bezuti, Márcio Takey; Mazzer, Nilton; Barbieri, Cláudio Henrique

    2012-01-01

    Objective An experimental in vitro study was carried out to evaluate the influence of cortical bone thickness on ultrasound propagation velocity. Methods Sixty bone plates were used, made from bovine femurs, with thickness ranging from 1 to 6 mm (10 of each). The ultrasound velocity measurements were performed using a device specially designed for this purpose, in an underwater acoustic tank and with direct contact using contact gel. The transducers were positioned in two ways: on opposite sides, with the bone between them, for the transverse measurement; and parallel to each other, on the same side of the bone plates, for the axial measurements. Results In the axial transmission mode, the ultrasound velocity speed increased with cortical bone thickness, regardless of the distance between the transducers, up to a thickness of 5 mm, then remained constant thereafter. There were no changes in velocity when the transverse measures were made. Conclusion Ultrasound velocity increased with cortical bone thickness in the axial transmission mode, until the thickness surpasses the wavelength, after which point it remained constant. Level of Evidence: Experimental Study. PMID:24453601

  8. Antibacterial effect of zinc oxide nanoparticles combined with ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seil, Justin T.; Webster, Thomas J.

    2012-12-01

    Using Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), the present study investigated the antibacterial effect of ZnO nanoparticles both in the absence and presence of ultrasound stimulation. While the antibacterial effect of control nanoparticle chemistries (Al2O3) alone was either weak or unobservable under the conditions tested, the antibacterial effect of ZnO alone was significant, providing over a four log reduction (equivalent to antibiotics) compared to no treatment after just 8 h. The antibacterial effect was enhanced as ZnO particle diameter decreased. Specifically, when testing the antibacterial effect against bacteria populations relevant to infection, a 500 μg ml-1 dose of zinc oxide nanoparticles with a diameter of 20 nm reduced S. aureus populations by four orders of magnitude after 8 and 24 h, compared to control groups with no nanoparticles. This was accomplished without the use of antibiotics, to which bacteria are developing a resistance anyway. The addition of ultrasound stimulation further reduced the number of viable colony-forming units present in a planktonic cell suspension by 76% compared to nanoparticles alone. Lastly, this study provided a mechanism for how ZnO nanoparticles in the presence of ultrasound decrease bacteria functions by demonstrating greater hydrogen peroxide generation by S. aureus compared to controls. These results indicated that small-diameter ZnO nanoparticles exhibited strong antibacterial properties that can be additionally enhanced in the presence of ultrasound and, thus, should be further studied for a wide range of medical device anti-infection applications.

  9. Antibacterial effect of zinc oxide nanoparticles combined with ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Seil, Justin T; Webster, Thomas J

    2012-12-14

    Using Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), the present study investigated the antibacterial effect of ZnO nanoparticles both in the absence and presence of ultrasound stimulation. While the antibacterial effect of control nanoparticle chemistries (Al(2)O(3)) alone was either weak or unobservable under the conditions tested, the antibacterial effect of ZnO alone was significant, providing over a four log reduction (equivalent to antibiotics) compared to no treatment after just 8 h. The antibacterial effect was enhanced as ZnO particle diameter decreased. Specifically, when testing the antibacterial effect against bacteria populations relevant to infection, a 500 μg ml(-1) dose of zinc oxide nanoparticles with a diameter of 20 nm reduced S. aureus populations by four orders of magnitude after 8 and 24 h, compared to control groups with no nanoparticles. This was accomplished without the use of antibiotics, to which bacteria are developing a resistance anyway. The addition of ultrasound stimulation further reduced the number of viable colony-forming units present in a planktonic cell suspension by 76% compared to nanoparticles alone. Lastly, this study provided a mechanism for how ZnO nanoparticles in the presence of ultrasound decrease bacteria functions by demonstrating greater hydrogen peroxide generation by S. aureus compared to controls. These results indicated that small-diameter ZnO nanoparticles exhibited strong antibacterial properties that can be additionally enhanced in the presence of ultrasound and, thus, should be further studied for a wide range of medical device anti-infection applications.

  10. The Feasibility of Transesophageal Cardiac Ablation by Focused Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hotaik; Francischelli, David; Smith, Nadine Barrie

    2007-05-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia, affecting over 2.2 million Americans. One effective treatment is cardiac ablation, which shows a high rate of success in treating paroxysmal AF. Focused ultrasound has gained interest for thermal ablation for decades due to its noninvasive characteristics. Based on the simulation results of transducer arrays, current transesophageal medical devices, and the throat anatomy, we have designed, fabricated, and tested a focused ultrasound applicator that can be inserted into the esophagus for incisionless cardiac ablation. The overall goal is to bring this applicator as closely as possible to the heart in order to effectively deliver ultrasound energy, and create electrically isolating lesions in myocardial tissue, which replicate the currently used Maze procedure. The transducer design is a two-dimensional sparse phased array with flat tapered elements operating at a frequency of 1.6 MHz. This array uses 64 active elements spatially sampled from 195 rectangular elements. Its probe head housing is 19 mm in diameter and incorporates an acoustic window. A prototype applicator has been successfully tested ex vivo using fresh porcine myocardial tissue. The results demonstrated a potential applicability of an ultrasound applicator to transesophageal cardiac surgery in AF treatment.

  11. Three-dimensional ultrasound imaging of the vasculature.

    PubMed

    Fenster, A; Lee, D; Sherebrin, S; Rankin, R; Downey, D

    1998-02-01

    With conventional ultrasonography, the diagnostician must view a series of two-dimensional images in order to form a mental impression of the three-dimensional anatomy, an efficient and time consuming practice prone to operator variability, which may cause variable or even incorrect diagnoses. Also, a conventional two-dimensional ultrasound image represents a thin slice of the patients anatomy at a single location and orientation, which is difficult to reproduce at a later time. These factors make conventional ultrasonography non-optimal for prospective or follow-up studies. Our efforts have focused on overcoming these deficiencies by developing three-dimensional ultrasound imaging techniques that are capable of acquiring B-mode, colour Doppler and power Doppler images of the vasculature, by using a conventional ultrasound system to acquire a series of two-dimensional images and then mathematically reconstructing them into a single three-dimensional image, which may then be viewed interactively on an inexpensive desktop computer. We report here on two approaches: (1) free-hand scanning, in which a magnetic positioning device is attached to the ultrasound transducer to record the position and orientation of each two-dimensional image needed for the three-dimensional image reconstruction; and (2) mechanical scanning, in which a motor-driven assembly is used to translate the transducer linearly across the neck, yielding a set of uniformly-spaced parallel two-dimensional images.

  12. Microchannel devices

    SciTech Connect

    Alman, David E.; Wilson, Rick D.

    2001-09-01

    The fabrication of stainless steel microchannel heat exchangers was examined through microlamination, the process of diffusion bonding precision machined metallic foils. The influence of diffusion bonding parameters, as well as the device geometry on the strength of the bond between the foils and embedded channel integrity, was investigated. During diffusion bonding, high temperatures and/or pressures result in well bonded foils, but these conditions cause the embedded channels to deform, which will degrade the efficiency of fluid flow through the channels. Alternatively, low temperatures and/or pressures result in undeformed channels but weakly bonded foils. This causes failure of the device due to fluid leakage. Thus, a processing envelope exists for producing a sound device with no fluid leakage and no degradation of fluid flow properties. The theoretical limit on aspect ratio within two-fluid counter-flow microchannel heat exchangers was also investigated. A counter-flow device is comprised of alternating layers of microchannels, which allow the two fluids to flow in opposite directions separated by fins. A theoretical model for interpreting the span of the fin as a function of the fin thickness was established. The model was verified experimentally by fabricating specimens to simulate the counter-flow device. The results of these investigations were used to aid in the design and processing of prototype microchannel devices.

  13. Applicator for in-vitro ultrasound-activated targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerold, B.; Gourevich, D.; Volovick, A.; Xu, D.; Arditti, F.; Prentice, P.; Cochran, S.; Gnaim, J.; Medan, Y.; Wang, L.; Melzer, A.

    2012-10-01

    Reducing toxicity and improving uptake of cancer drugs in tumors are important goals of targeted drug delivery (TDD). Ultrasonic drug release from various encapsulants has been a focus of many research groups. However, a single standard ultrasonic device, viable for use by biologists, is not currently present in the market. The device reported here is designed to allow investigation of the impact of ultrasound on cellular uptake and cell viability in-vitro. In it, single-element transducers with different operating frequencies are mounted below a standard 96-well plate. The plate is moved above the transducers, such that each line of wells can be sonicated at a different frequency. To assess the device, 96-well plates were seeded with cells and sonicated using different ultrasonic parameters, with and without doxorubicin. Cell viability was measured by colorimetric MTT assay and the uptake of doxorubicin by cells was also determined. The device proved to be highly viable in preliminary tests; it demonstrated that change in ultrasonic parameters produces different effect on cells. For example, increase in uptake of doxorubicin was demonstrated following ultrasound application. The growing interest in ultrasound-activated TDD emphasizes the need for standardization of the ultrasound device and the one reported here may offer some indications of how that may be achieved. It is planned to further improve the prototype by increasing the number of ultrasonic frequencies and degrees of freedom for each transducer.

  14. Ultrasound-Mediated Polymeric Micelle Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Xia, Hesheng; Zhao, Yue; Tong, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of multi-functional nanocarriers and the design of new stimuli-responsive means are equally important for drug delivery. Ultrasound can be used as a remote, non-invasive and controllable trigger for the stimuli-responsive release of nanocarriers. Polymeric micelles are one kind of potential drug nanocarrier. By combining ultrasound and polymeric micelles, a new modality (i.e., ultrasound-mediated polymeric micelle drug delivery) has been developed and has recently received increasing attention. A major challenge remaining in developing ultrasound-responsive polymeric micelles is the improvement of the sensitivity or responsiveness of polymeric micelles to ultrasound. This chapter reviews the recent advance in this field. In order to understand the interaction mechanism between ultrasound stimulus and polymeric micelles, ultrasound effects, such as thermal effect, cavitation effect, ultrasound sonochemistry (including ultrasonic degradation, ultrasound-initiated polymerization, ultrasonic in-situ polymerization and ultrasound site-specific degradation), as well as basic micellar knowledge are introduced. Ultrasound-mediated polymeric micelle drug delivery has been classified into two main streams based on the different interaction mechanism between ultrasound and polymeric micelles; one is based on the ultrasound-induced physical disruption of the micelle and reversible release of payload. The other is based on micellar ultrasound mechanochemical disruption and irreversible release of payload.

  15. Fabrication and Performance of a Miniaturized and Integrated Endoscope Ultrasound Convex Array for Digestive Tract Imaging.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jue; Peng, Xiaojian; Tang, Hu; Li, Xiaozhen; Chen, Ruimin; Li, Yang; Wang, Tianfu; Chen, Siping; Shung, Koping; Zhou, Qifa

    2017-04-24

    This work presents the design, fabrication and testing of a miniaturized and integrated ultrasound endoscope for use as an in situ digestive diagnostic device to facilitate real-time ultrasound guidance of intervention treatments. We designed an optimal structure to integrate an auto-focus 5-megapixel camera module with an 8-MHz, 64-element curvilinear ultrasonic array in one miniaturized package. A novel three-axis auto-focusing voice coil motor (VCM) was designed and manufactured for the camera module to move the lens position for auto-focusing and to adjust the lens tilt. The results showed that the array had a center frequency of 8.09 MHz and a -6-dB fractional bandwidth of 83%. At the center frequency, the two-way insertion loss was 40.6 dB. Endoscopic ultrasound imaging demonstrated satisfactory performance for imaging an anthropomorphic phantom of the esophagus. By slightly adjusting the tilt angle of the optical axis of the lens, the optical image captured by the auto-focusing lens obtained improved definition regardless of changes in the view angle of the camera with respect to the objects being captured. The integrated convex ultrasound endoscope, possessing minimal size, improved optical imaging definition, and good ultrasound imaging performance, can become a useful tool in digestive tract imaging. The miniaturized and integrated convex ultrasound endoscope can facilitate real-time ultrasound intervention guidance, reducing risks associated with the operation.

  16. Modeling and simulation of ultrasound fields generated by 2D phased array transducers for medical applications.

    PubMed

    Matrone, G; Quaglia, F; Magenes, G

    2010-01-01

    Modern ultrasound imaging instrumentation for clinical applications allows real-time volumetric scanning of the patients' body. 4D imaging has been made possible thanks to the development of new echographic probes which consist in 2D phased arrays of piezoelectric transducers. In these new devices it is the system electronics which properly drives the matrix elements and focuses the beam in order to obtain a sequence of volumetric images. This paper introduces an ultrasound field simulator based on the Spatial Impulse Response method which is being properly developed to analyze the characteristics of the ultrasound field generated by a 2D phased array of transducers. Thanks to its high configurability by the user, it will represent a very useful tool for electronics designers in developing 4D ultrasound imaging systems components.

  17. Passive Markers for Tracking Surgical Instruments in Real-Time 3-D Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Stoll, Jeffrey; Ren, Hongliang; Dupont, Pierre E.

    2013-01-01

    A family of passive echogenic markers is presented by which the position and orientation of a surgical instrument can be determined in a 3-D ultrasound volume, using simple image processing. Markers are attached near the distal end of the instrument so that they appear in the ultrasound volume along with the instrument tip. They are detected and measured within the ultrasound image, thus requiring no external tracking device. This approach facilitates imaging instruments and tissue simultaneously in ultrasound-guided interventions. Marker-based estimates of instrument pose can be used in augmented reality displays or for image-based servoing. Design principles for marker shapes are presented that ensure imaging system and measurement uniqueness constraints are met. An error analysis is included that can be used to guide marker design and which also establishes a lower bound on measurement uncertainty. Finally, examples of marker measurement and tracking algorithms are presented along with experimental validation of the concepts. PMID:22042148

  18. Passive markers for tracking surgical instruments in real-time 3-D ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Jeffrey; Ren, Hongliang; Dupont, Pierre E

    2012-03-01

    A family of passive echogenic markers is presented by which the position and orientation of a surgical instrument can be determined in a 3-D ultrasound volume, using simple image processing. Markers are attached near the distal end of the instrument so that they appear in the ultrasound volume along with the instrument tip. They are detected and measured within the ultrasound image, thus requiring no external tracking device. This approach facilitates imaging instruments and tissue simultaneously in ultrasound-guided interventions. Marker-based estimates of instrument pose can be used in augmented reality displays or for image-based servoing. Design principles for marker shapes are presented that ensure imaging system and measurement uniqueness constraints are met. An error analysis is included that can be used to guide marker design and which also establishes a lower bound on measurement uncertainty. Finally, examples of marker measurement and tracking algorithms are presented along with experimental validation of the concepts.

  19. International recommendations and guidelines for the safe use of diagnostic ultrasound in medicine.

    PubMed

    Barnett, S B; Ter Haar, G R; Ziskin, M C; Rott, H D; Duck, F A; Maeda, K

    2000-03-01

    Modern sophisticated ultrasonographic equipment is capable of delivering substantial levels of acoustic energy into the body when used at maximum outputs. The risk of producing bioeffects has been studied by international expert groups during symposia supported by the World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (WFUMB). These have resulted in the publication of internationally accepted conclusions and recommendations. National ultrasound safety committees have published guidelines as well. These recommendations and safety guidelines offer valuable information to help users apply diagnostic ultrasound in a safe and effective manner. Acoustic output from ultrasound medical devices is directly regulated only in the USA and this is done by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). However, there is also a modern trend towards self-regulation which has implications for the worldwide use of diagnostic ultrasound. It has resulted in a move away from the relatively simple scheme of FDA-enforced, application-specific limits on acoustic output to a scheme whereby risk of adverse effects of ultrasound exposure is assessed from information provided by the equipment in the form of a real-time display of safety indices. Under this option, the FDA allows a relaxation of some intensity limits, specifically approving the use of medical ultrasound devices that can expose the fetus or embryo to nearly eight times the intensity that was previously allowed. The shift of responsibility for risk assessment from a regulatory authority to the user creates an urgent need for awareness of risk and the development of knowledgeable and responsible attitudes to safety issues. To encourage this approach, it is incumbent on authorities, ultrasound societies and expert groups to provide relevant information on biological effects that might result from ultrasonographic procedures. It is obvious from the continued stream of enquiries received by ultrasound societies that effective

  20. Clinical agreement between automated and calculated ultrasound measurements of bladder volume.

    PubMed

    Dudley, N J; Kirkland, M; Lovett, J; Watson, A R

    2003-11-01

    Non-invasive urine volume measurement is an important tool in the management of dysfunctional and neuropathic bladders in children. Ultrasound imaging devices have been used for many years for this purpose. An automated scanner (Bladderscan) is now available and has been recommended by a number of authors, but there is conflicting evidence in the literature regarding the accuracy and appropriate clinical application of the device. We aimed to assess the level of clinical agreement between the two methods. 36 urine volume measurements were made on 11 children using both instruments. Although there was a good correlation between the methods (r=0.97), the clinical agreement was poor (limits of agreement +/-77 ml). 13 voided volumes were directly measured and compared with the difference between pre- and post-void ultrasound measurements. The systematic errors were small but the mean absolute errors were 54 ml and 23 ml, respectively, for the automated and ultrasound imaging methods. If used correctly, ultrasound imaging provides more accurate results and can compete with the cost, convenience and ease of use of the automated method. Low cost, highly portable ultrasound imaging devices are now available and should be used in preference to the Bladderscan.

  1. [How should anesthesiologists perform ultrasound examinations? Diagnostic use of ultrasound in emergency and intensive care and medicine].

    PubMed

    Maecken, T; Zinke, H; Zenz, M; Grau, T

    2011-03-01

    Ultrasound imaging has attained great significance as a tool for diagnostics in emergency and intensive care medicine. The major advantages of this technique are its instantaneous bedside availability and the possibility to perform repeatable examinations. These advantages are based on recent developments, such as portable ultrasound devices offering excellent imaging quality as well as a quick-start-function. Ultrasound imaging in critically ill patients is frequently performed under pressure of time depending on the current acute physical state. All standard examinations in echocardiography, vascular, abdominal and thoracic ultrasound scanning can be applied in these patients. Based on the clinical scenario the duration of examinations may vary from seconds during cardiopulmonary resuscitations to time-consuming repeated scanning. The transition from basic to subject-specific detailed examinations is flowing and has to be adjusted to local conditions. In the field of emergency and intensive care medicine the technique used is whole-body sonography. The goal is to classify the patient's present physical state and to define a targeted therapeutic approach. The characteristics of whole-body sonography are similar to the field of anesthesiology which is an interdisciplinary one. Currently, these characteristics deserve more attention in training in sonography.

  2. A new system for clincial ultrasound assessment of bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Jonathan J.; Luo, Gangming; Englander, Miriam; Siffert, Robert S.

    2004-10-01

    A new ultrasound device for noninvasive assessment of bone known as the QRT 2000 for Quantitative Real-Time-that is entirely self-contained, portable, and handheld is described. The QRT 2000 is powered by 4 AA rechargeable batteries and permits near real-time evaluation of a novel set of ultrasound parameters and their on-line display to the user. A clinical study has just been completed with the QRT 2000 in which 60 female subjects ranging in age from 25 to 88 were ultrasonically interrogated at their heels. The same heel was measured also using DEXA (PIXI, GE Medical Systems) and the bone mineral content (BMC) was compared with one ultrasound parameter which has been found to be extremely sensitive to bone mass. The parameter, known as the net time delay (NTD), and BMC had an associated R-squared value of 0.73, about a 13% improvement over presently marketed devices. This, coupled with the lower cost and portability of the system, makes the QRT 2000 ideally suited for use by primary care physicians in this country and abroad, and including for use in the developing world. Further improvements are being pursued through array methods (to improve reproducibility and correlations with BMD) and by incorporating other parameters particularly sensitive to architectural structure. [This research was supported by SBIR Grant No. 2R44AR045150 from the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases of the NIH.

  3. Resonant ultrasound spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Migliori, Albert; Visscher, William M.; Fisk, Zachary

    1990-01-01

    An ultrasound resonant spectrometer determines the resonant frequency spectrum of a rectangular parallelepiped sample of a high dissipation material over an expected resonant response frequency range. A sample holder structure grips corners of the sample between piezoelectric drive and receive transducers. Each transducer is mounted on a membrane for only weakly coupling the transducer to the holder structure and operatively contacts a material effective to remove system resonant responses at the transducer from the expected response range. i.e., either a material such as diamond to move the response frequencies above the range or a damping powder to preclude response within the range. A square-law detector amplifier receives the response signal and retransmits the signal on an isolated shield of connecting cabling to remove cabling capacitive effects. The amplifier also provides a substantially frequency independently voltage divider with the receive transducer. The spectrometer is extremely sensitive to enable low amplitude resonance to be detected for use in calculating the elastic constants of the high dissipation sample.

  4. [Ultrasound of the thyroid].

    PubMed

    Dietrich, C F; Bojunga, J

    2015-03-01

    Thyroid nodules and thyroid abnormalities are common findings in the general population. Ultrasonography is the most important imaging tool for diagnosing thyroid disease. In the majority of cases a correct diagnosis can already be made in synopsis of the sonographic together with clinical findings and basal thyroid hormone parameters and an appropriate therapy can be initiated thereafter. A differentiation of hormonally active versus inactive nodes, and in particular benign versus malignant nodules is sonographically, however, not reliably possible. In this context, radioscanning has its clinical significance predominantly in diagnosing hormonal activity of thyroid nodules. Efforts of the past years aimed to improve sonographic risk stratification to predict malignancy of thyroid nodules through standardized diagnostic assessment of evaluated risk factors in order to select patients, who need further diagnostic work up. According to the "Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System" (BI-RADS), "Thyroid Imaging Reporting and Data Systems" (TI-RADS) giving standardized categories with rates of malignancy were evaluated as a basis for further clinical management. Recent technological developments, such as elastography, also show promising data and could gain entrance into clinical practice. The ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration is the key element in the diagnosis of sonographically suspicious thyroid nodules and significantly contributes to the diagnosis of malignancy versus benignity.

  5. [Ultrasound of the Thyroid].

    PubMed

    Dietrich, C F; Bojunga, J

    2016-02-01

    Thyroid nodules and thyroid abnormalities are common findings in the general population. Ultrasonography is the most important imaging tool for diagnosing thyroid disease. In the majority of cases a correct diagnosis can already be made in synopsis of the sonographic together with clinical findings and basal thyroid hormone parameters and an appropriate therapy can be initiated thereafter. A differentiation of hormonally active vs. inactive nodes, and in particular benign vs. malignant nodules is sonographically, however, not reliably possible. In this context, radioscanning has its clinical significance predominantly in diagnosing hormonal activity of thyroid nodules. Efforts of the past years aimed to improve sonographic risk stratification to predict malignancy of thyroid nodules through standardized diagnostic assessment of evaluated risk factors in order to select patients, who need further diagnostic work up. According to the "Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System" (BI-RADS), "Thyroid Imaging Reporting and Data Systems" (TI-RADS) giving standardized categories with rates of malignancy were evaluated as a basis for further clinical management. Recent technological developments, such as elastography, also showpromising data and could gain entrance into clinical practice. The ultrasound-guided fineneedle aspiration is the key element in the diagnosis of sonographically suspicious thyroid nodules and significantly contributes to the diagnosis of malignancy versus benignity.

  6. Resonant nonlinear ultrasound spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Paul A.; TenCate, James A.; Guyer, Robert A.; Van Den Abeele, Koen E. A.

    2001-01-01

    Components with defects are identified from the response to strains applied at acoustic and ultrasound frequencies. The relative resonance frequency shift .vertline..DELTA..function./.function..sub.0.vertline., is determined as a function of applied strain amplitude for an acceptable component, where .function..sub.0 is the frequency of the resonance peak at the lowest amplitude of applied strain and .DELTA..function. is the frequency shift of the resonance peak of a selected mode to determine a reference relationship. Then, the relative resonance frequency shift .vertline..DELTA..function./.function..sub.0 is determined as a function of applied strain for a component under test, where fo .function..sub.0 the frequency of the resonance peak at the lowest amplitude of applied strain and .DELTA..function. is the frequency shift of the resonance peak to determine a quality test relationship. The reference relationship is compared with the quality test relationship to determine the presence of defects in the component under test.

  7. Glass-windowed ultrasound transducers.

    PubMed

    Yddal, Tostein; Gilja, Odd Helge; Cochran, Sandy; Postema, Michiel; Kotopoulis, Spiros

    2016-05-01

    In research and industrial processes, it is increasingly common practice to combine multiple measurement modalities. Nevertheless, experimental tools that allow the co-linear combination of optical and ultrasonic transmission have rarely been reported. The aim of this study was to develop and characterise a water-matched ultrasound transducer architecture using standard components, with a central optical window larger than 10 mm in diameter allowing for optical transmission. The window can be used to place illumination or imaging apparatus such as light guides, miniature cameras, or microscope objectives, simplifying experimental setups. Four design variations of a basic architecture were fabricated and characterised with the objective to assess whether the variations influence the acoustic output. The basic architecture consisted of a piezoelectric ring and a glass disc, with an aluminium casing. The designs differed in piezoelectric element dimensions: inner diameter, ID=10 mm, outer diameter, OD=25 mm, thickness, TH=4 mm or ID=20 mm, OD=40 mm, TH=5 mm; glass disc dimensions OD=20-50 mm, TH=2-4 mm; and details of assembly. The transducers' frequency responses were characterised using electrical impedance spectroscopy and pulse-echo measurements, the acoustic propagation pattern using acoustic pressure field scans, the acoustic power output using radiation force balance measurements, and the acoustic pressure using a needle hydrophone. Depending on the design and piezoelectric element dimensions, the resonance frequency was in the range 350-630 kHz, the -6 dB bandwidth was in the range 87-97%, acoustic output power exceeded 1 W, and acoustic pressure exceeded 1 MPa peak-to-peak. 3D stress simulations were performed to predict the isostatic pressure required to induce material failure and 4D acoustic simulations. The pressure simulations indicated that specific design variations could sustain isostatic pressures up to 4.8 MPa.The acoustic simulations were able to

  8. [Use of a portable ultrasound system in the perisurgical assessment of head and neck patients].

    PubMed

    Angerer, F; Zenk, J; Iro, H; Bozzato, A

    2013-10-01

    The use of high resolution ultrasound is an established diagnostic method. A disadvantage of current high end systems is that transporting the device into the operating theatre or an intensive care unit requires time and logistic effort. We report results of an evaluation of a portable ultrasound system in the diagnosis and treatment of the head and neck area. Indications and value of a portable device in the clinical setting of an operation theatre and intensive care unit were assessed. Within a period of 5 months, 48 patients were included in this prospectively designed study using a portable ultrasound system with B-scan/color Doppler mode (SonoSite TITAN, Firma SonoSite® Germany) and an 7.5 MHz broadband linear array transducer. Two experienced physicians recorded the location and examination conditions, imaging mode, time expenditure, indication and diagnosis. The examiner also commented about whether the use of a portable laptop system considerably improved the therapy decision. The analysis included descriptive statistics for interpretation of the results. The most frequent use of the ultrasound system was the pre- or intrasurgical "pinpointing" of tumours in the soft tissues of the neck or in salivary glands. The average time for the examination was 6 min. In 79 % of the cases, the examiner stated a definite improvement of the therapy decision through the use of the portable ultrasound. We could demonstrate that a portable ultrasound system is a time-saving, economic and ubiquitously applicable method of imaging. Diagnosis and surgical planning are optimized. Thus, in larger hospitals and clinics, a portable ultrasound device is a logical complement to a stationary unit.

  9. PLASMA DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.; Brathenahl, A.; Furth, H.P.

    1962-04-10

    A device for producing a confined high temperature plasma is described. In the device the concave inner surface of an outer annular electrode is disposed concentrically about and facing the convex outer face of an inner annular electrode across which electrodes a high potential is applied to produce an electric field there between. Means is provided to create a magnetic field perpendicular to the electric field and a gas is supplied at reduced pressure in the area therebetween. Upon application of the high potential, the gas between the electrodes is ionized, heated, and under the influence of the electric and magnetic fields there is produced a rotating annular plasma disk. The ionized plasma has high dielectric constant properties. The device is useful as a fast discharge rate capacitor, in controlled thermonuclear research, and other high temperature gas applications. (AEC)

  10. Real-time photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging: a simple solution for clinical ultrasound systems with linear arrays.

    PubMed

    Montilla, Leonardo G; Olafsson, Ragnar; Bauer, Daniel R; Witte, Russell S

    2013-01-07

    Recent clinical studies have demonstrated that photoacoustic imaging (PAI) provides important diagnostic information during a routine breast exam for cancer. PAI enhances contrast between blood vessels and background tissue, which can help characterize suspicious lesions. However, most PAI systems are either not compatible with commercial ultrasound systems or inefficiently deliver light to the region of interest, effectively reducing the sensitivity of the technique. To address and potentially overcome these limitations, we developed an accessory for a standard linear ultrasound array that optimizes light delivery for PAI. The photoacoustic enabling device (PED) exploits an optically transparent acoustic reflector to help direct laser illumination to the region of interest. This study compares the PED with standard fiber bundle illumination in scattering and non-scattering media. In scattering media with the same incident fluence, the PED enhanced the photoacoustic signal by 18 dB at a depth of 5 mm and 6 dB at a depth of 20 mm. To demonstrate in vivo feasibility, we also used the device to image a mouse with a pancreatic tumor. The PED identified blood vessels at the periphery of the tumor, suggesting that PAI provides complementary contrast to standard pulse echo ultrasound. The PED is a simple and inexpensive solution that facilitates the translation of PAI technology to the clinic for routine screening of breast cancer.

  11. Analytical Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    In the mid 60s under contract with NASA, Dr. Benjamin W. Grunbaum was responsible for the development of an automated electrophoresis device that would work in the weightless environment of space. The device was never used in space but was revived during the mid 70s as a technology utilization project aimed at an automated system for use on Earth. The advanced system became known as the Grunbaum System for electrophoresis. It is a versatile, economical assembly for rapid separation of specific blood proteins in very small quantities, permitting their subsequent identification and quantification.

  12. In-line positioning of ultrasound images using wireless remote display system with tablet computer facilitates ultrasound-guided radial artery catheterization.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Masahiko; Mizutani, Koh; Funai, Yusuke; Nakamoto, Tatsuo

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasound-guided procedures may be easier to perform when the operator's eye axis, needle puncture site, and ultrasound image display form a straight line in the puncture direction. However, such methods have not been well tested in clinical settings because that arrangement is often impossible due to limited space in the operating room. We developed a wireless remote display system for ultrasound devices using a tablet computer (iPad Mini), which allows easy display of images at nearly any location chosen by the operator. We hypothesized that the in-line layout of ultrasound images provided by this system would allow for secure and quick catheterization of the radial artery. We enrolled first-year medical interns (n = 20) who had no prior experience with ultrasound-guided radial artery catheterization to perform that using a short-axis out-of-plane approach with two different methods. With the conventional method, only the ultrasound machine placed at the side of the head of the patient across the targeted forearm was utilized. With the tablet method, the ultrasound images were displayed on an iPad Mini positioned on the arm in alignment with the operator's eye axis and needle puncture direction. The success rate and time required for catheterization were compared between the two methods. Success rate was significantly higher (100 vs. 70 %, P = 0.02) and catheterization time significantly shorter (28.5 ± 7.5 vs. 68.2 ± 14.3 s, P < 0.001) with the tablet method as compared to the conventional method. An ergonomic straight arrangement of the image display is crucial for successful and quick completion of ultrasound-guided arterial catheterization. The present remote display system is a practical method for providing such an arrangement.

  13. Characterization of the ultrasound beam produced by the MIST therapy, wound healing system.

    PubMed

    Keltie, K; Reay, C A; Bousfield, D R; Cole, H; Ward, B; Oates, C P; Sims, A J

    2013-07-01

    The MIST Therapy wound healing device (Celleration, Eden Prairie, MN, USA), which uses low-frequency ultrasound to deliver an atomized saline spray to acute wounds, was evaluated in a laboratory environment. The output of the MIST device was characterized by its frequency, transmission in the presence and absence of the saline spray and intensity. When measured up to 500 mm away from the transducer tip, the transmission of 39.5 kHz ultrasound was not significantly attenuated by the saline itself. In the absence of the saline spray, the acoustic intensity range of the MIST device was calculated to be 429-188 mW cm(-2) across the manufacturer-specified treatment range (12.5-20 mm). Because of the acoustic impedance mismatch between air and soft tissue, the MIST Therapy device would deliver only 0.1% of this incident intensity into the wound site.

  14. [Ultrasound-guided peripheral catheterization].

    PubMed

    Salleras-Duran, Laia; Fuentes-Pumarola, Concepció

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral catheterization is a technique that can be difficult in some patients. Some studies have recently described the use of ultrasound to guide the venous catheterization. To describe the success rate, time required, complications of ultrasound-guided peripheral venous catheterization. and patients and professionals satisfaction The search was performed in databases (Medline-PubMed, Cochrane Library, CINAHL and Cuiden Plus) for studies published about ultrasound-guided peripheral venous catheterization performed on patients that provided results on the success of the technique, complications, time used, patient satisfaction and the type of professional who performed the technique. A total of 21 studies were included. Most of them get a higher success rate 80% in the catheterization ecoguide and time it is not higher than the traditional technique. The Technical complications analyzed were arterial puncture rates and lower nerve 10%. In all studies measuring and comparing patient satisfaction in the art ecoguide is greater. Various professional groups perform the technique. The use of ultrasound for peripheral pipes has a high success rate, complications are rare and the time used is similar to that of the traditional technique. The technique of inserting catheters through ultrasound may be learned by any professional group performing venipuncture. Finally, it gets underscores the high patient satisfaction with the use of this technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Dual-frequency ultrasound for detecting and sizing bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckey, Jay C.; Knaus, Darin A.; Alvarenga, Donna L.; Kenton, Marc A.; Magari, Patrick J.

    2005-05-01

    ISS construction and Mars exploration require extensive extravehicular activity (EVA), exposing crewmembers to increased decompression sickness risk. Improved bubble detection technologies could help increase EVA efficiency and safety. Creare Inc. has developed a bubble detection and sizing instrument using dual-frequency ultrasound. The device emits "pump" and "image" signals at two frequencies. The low-frequency pump signal causes an appropriately-sized bubble to resonate. When the image frequency hits a resonating bubble, mixing signals are returned at the sum and difference of the two frequencies. To test the feasibility of transcutaneous intravascular detection, intravascular bubbles in anesthetized swine were produced using agitated saline and decompression stress. Ultrasonic transducers on the chest provided the two frequencies. Mixing signals were detected transthoracically in the right atrium using both methods. A histogram of estimated bubble sizes could be constructed. Bubbles can be detected and sized transthoracically in the right atrium using dual-frequency ultrasound.

  16. High-intensity therapeutic ultrasound: metrological requirements versus clinical usage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubry, J.-F.

    2012-10-01

    High-intensity therapeutic ultrasound (HITU) is an appealing non-invasive, non-ionizing therapeutic modality with a wide range of tissue interactions ranging from transient permeabilization of cell membranes to thermal ablation. The ability to guide and monitor the treatment with an associated ultrasonic or magnetic resonance imaging device has resulted in a dramatic rise in the clinical use of therapeutic ultrasound in the past two decades. Nevertheless, the range of clinical applications and the number of patients treated has grown at a much higher pace than the definition of standards. In this paper the metrological requirements of the therapeutic beams are reviewed and are compared with the current clinical use of image-guided HITU mostly based on a practical approach. Liver therapy, a particularly challenging clinical application, is discussed to highlight the differences between some complex clinical situations and the experimental conditions of the metrological characterization of ultrasonic transducers.

  17. [Ultrasound guided radial artery cannulation: procedure description and literature review].

    PubMed

    Carmona Monge, F J; Martínez Lareo, M; Núñez Reiz, A

    2011-01-01

    Arterial catheterization is the second most common invasive procedure performed in critical care units. These devices are essential in certain types of patients (the hemodinamically unstable or those who require regular evaluation of the gasometric values). Complications related to arterial cannulation are relatively scarce. However, there are no reliable indicators to predict the occurrence of radial artery occlusions or ischemic lesions in the hand after a radial cannulation procedure has been performed. Ultrasound-guided catheter insertion has been used for years to guide central venous cannulation in critical care, but its use has been more limited for arterial catheterization. This paper aims to describe the technique of ultrasound-guided radial artery catheterization and reviews the most important research papers that have evaluated the safety and efficacy of this procedure in the adult population.

  18. The use of ink jets in ultrasound registrations.

    PubMed

    Johansson, T; Nilsson, J; Almquist, L O; Holmer, N G

    1991-01-01

    The continuous ink jet method developed by Professor Hellmuth Hertz, Lund Institute of Technology, Sweden, is today used in printers that print digitally stored high-quality images rapidly and at low cost. The development started in the late 1950s when there was a need for a direct registration method for ultrasound echocardiograms. The development steps are described from the early ultrasound registrations to the true halftone printing of digital images today. Images from ultrasonic color Doppler examinations have been printed by an ink jet printer at our laboratory. The color capabilities of the printer are further illustrated by the printing of pseudo-colored gray-scale images and an image where color is used to highlight differences between two gray-scale images. The results show that the printer based on continuous ink jets is an interesting alternative to the existing hard-copy devices for medical images.

  19. A new shear wave imaging system for ultrasound elastography.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Weibao; Wang, Congzhi; Xiao, Yang; Qian, Ming; Zheng, Hairong

    2015-08-01

    Ultrasound elastography is able to provide a non-invasive measurement of tissue elasticity properties. Shear wave imaging (SWI) technique is a quantitative method for tissue stiffness assessment. However, traditional SWI implementations cannot acquire 2D quantitative images of tissue elasticity distribution. In this study, a new shear wave imaging system is proposed and evaluated. Detailed delineation of hardware and image processing algorithms are presented. Programmable devices are selected to support flexible control of the system and the image processing algorithms. Analytic signal based cross-correlation method and a Radon transform based shear wave speed determination method are proposed with parallel computation ability. Tissue mimicking phantom imaging, and in vitro imaging measurements are conducted to demonstrate the performance of the proposed system. The system has the ability to provide a new choice for quantitative mapping of the tissue elasticity, and has good potential to be implemented into commercial ultrasound scanner.

  20. Dual-frequency ultrasound for detecting and sizing bubbles.

    PubMed

    Buckey, Jay C; Knaus, Darin A; Alvarenga, Donna L; Kenton, Marc A; Magari, Patrick J

    2005-01-01

    ISS construction and Mars exploration require extensive extravehicular activity (EVA), exposing crewmembers to increased decompression sickness risk. Improved bubble detection technologies could help increase EVA efficiency and safety. Creare Inc. has developed a bubble detection and sizing instrument using dual-frequency ultrasound. The device emits "pump" and "image" signals at two frequencies. The low-frequency pump signal causes an appropriately-sized bubble to resonate. When the image frequency hits a resonating bubble, mixing signals are returned at the sum and difference of the two frequencies. To test the feasibility of transcutaneous intravascular detection, intravascular bubbles in anesthetized swine were produced using agitated saline and decompression stress. Ultrasonic transducers on the chest provided the two frequencies. Mixing signals were detected transthoracically in the right atrium using both methods. A histogram of estimated bubble sizes could be constructed. Bubbles can be detected and sized transthoracically in the right atrium using dual-frequency ultrasound. c2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. 3D ultrasound in fetal spina bifida.

    PubMed

    Schramm, T; Gloning, K-P; Minderer, S; Tutschek, B

    2008-12-01

    3D ultrasound can be used to study the fetal spine, but skeletal mode can be inconclusive for the diagnosis of fetal spina bifida. We illustrate a diagnostic approach using 2D and 3D ultrasound and indicate possible pitfalls.

  2. Development and implementation of ultrasound picture archiving and communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, Wolfram S.; Tessler, Franklin N.; Grant, Edward G.; Kangarloo, Hooshang; Huang, H. K.

    1990-08-01

    The Department of Radiological Sciences at the UCLA School of Medicine is developing an archiving and communication system (PACS) for digitized ultrasound images. In its final stage the system will involve the acquisition and archiving of ultrasound studies from four different locations including the Center for Health Sciences, the Department for Mental Health and the Outpatient Radiology and Endoscopy Departments with a total of 200-250 patient studies per week. The concept comprises two stages of image manipulation for each ultrasound work area. The first station is located close to the examination site and accomodates the acquisition of digital images from up to five ultrasound devices and provides for instantaneous display and primary viewing and image selection. Completed patient studies are transferred to a main workstation for secondary review, further analysis and comparison studies. The review station has an on-line storage capacity of 10,000 images with a resolution of 512x512 8 bit data to allow for immediate retrieval of active patient studies of up to two weeks. The main work stations are connected through the general network and use one central archive for long term storage and a film printer for hardcopy output. First phase development efforts concentrate on the implementation and testing of a system at one location consisting of a number of ultrasound units with video digitizer and network interfaces and a microcomputer workstation as host for the display station with two color monitors, each allowing simultaneous display of four 512x512 images. The discussion emphasizes functionality, performance and acceptance of the system in the clinical environment.

  3. Adverse Events of Extracorporeal Ultrasound-Guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tinghe; Luo, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Background High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is considered to be an alternative to surgery. Extracorporeal ultrasound-guided HIFU (USgFU) has been clinically used to treat solid tumors. Preliminary trials in a small sample of a Western population suggested that this modality was safe. Most trials are performed in China thereby providing comprehensive data for understanding the safety profile. The aim of this study was to evaluate adverse events of USgFU therapy. Methods and Findings Clinical data were searched in 2 Chinese databases. Adverse events of USgFU were summarized and compared with those of magnetic resonance-guided HIFU (MRgFU; for uterine, bone or breast tumor) and transrectal ultrasound-guided HIFU (for prostate cancer or benign prostate hyperplasia). USgFU treatment was performed using 7 types of device. Side effects were evaluated in 13262 cases. There were fewer adverse events in benign lesions than in malignant lesions (11.81% vs. 21.65%, p<0.0001). Rates of adverse events greatly varied between the disease types (0–280%, p<0.0001) and between the applied HIFU devices in both malignant (10.58–44.38%, p<0.0001) and benign lesions (1.67–17.57%, p<0.0001). Chronological analysis did not demonstrate a decrease in the rate of adverse events. Based upon evaluable adverse events, incidences in USgFU were consistent with those in MRgFU or transrectal HIFU. Some side effects frequently occurred following transrectal HIFU were not reported in USgFU. Several events including intrahepatic metastasis, intraoperative high fever, and occlusions of the superior mesenteric artery should be of particular concern because they have not been previously noted. The types of adverse events suggested that they were ultrasonic lesions. Conclusion The frequency of adverse events depended on the location of the lesion and the type of HIFU device; however, side effects of USgFU were not yet understood. USgFU did not decrease the incidence of adverse events compared

  4. Optical micromachined ultrasound transducers (OMUT) - a new approach for high resolution imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadayon, M. A.; Ashkenazi, S.

    2013-03-01

    Piezoelectric ultrasound (US) transducers are at the heart of almost any ultrasonic medical imaging probe. However, their sensitivity and reliability severely degrade in applications requiring high frequency (>20 MHz) and small element size (<0.1 mm). Alternative technologies such as capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducers (CMUT) and optical sensing and generation of ultrasound are being investigated. In this paper we present our first steps in developing optical micromachined ultrasound transducers (OMUT) technology. OMUTs rely on microfabrication techniques to construct micron-size air cavities capped by an elastic membrane. The membrane functions as the active ultrasound transmitter and receiver. We will describe the design and testing of prototype OMUT devices which implement a receive-only function. The cavity detector is an optical cavity which its top mirror is deflected under the application of pressure. The intensity of a reflected light beam is highly sensitive to displacement of the top membrane if the optical wavelength is at near-resonance condition. Therefore, US pulses can be detected by recording the reflected light intensity. The sensitivity of the device depends on the mechanical properties of the top membrane and optical characteristics of the optical cavity. The device was fabricated using SU8 as a structural material and gold as a mirror. We have developed a new bonding method to fabricate a sealed, low roughness, high quality optical cavity. The 60μm cavity with the 8.5 μm top membrane is tested in water with 25MHz ultrasound transducer. The NEP of the device for bandwidth of 28MHz was 9.25kPa. The optical cavity has a finesse of around 23.

  5. Cleaning devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Horst W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Cleaning devices are described which include a vacuum cleaner nozzle with a sharp rim for directing incoming air down against the floor; a vacuum cleaner wherein electrostatically charged brushes that brush dirt off a floor, are electrically grounded to remove charges that could tend to hold dirt to the brushes; a vacuum cleaner head having slots that form a pair of counter-rotating vortices, and that includes an outlet that blows a stream of air at the floor region which lies between the vortices; a cleaning device that sweeps a group of brushes against the ground along a first direction, and then sweeps them along the same ground area but in a second direction angled from the first by an amount such as 90.degree., to sweep up particles lying in crevices extending along any direction; a device that gently cleans a surface to remove bacteria for analysis, including an inclined wall along which cleaning fluid flows onto the surface, a vacuum chamber for drawing in the cleaning fluid, and a dividing wall spaced slightly from the surface to separate the fluid source from the vacuum cleaner chamber; and a device for providing pulses of pressured air including a chamber to which pressured air is supplied, a ball that circulates around the chamber to repeatedly close an outlet, and an air source that directs air circumferentially to move the ball around the chamber.

  6. Detection device

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jay E.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a detection device comprising: (1) an entrance chamber, (2) a central chamber, and (3) an exit chamber. The central chamber includes an ionizing gas, anode, and means for connecting the anode with an external power supply and pulse counter.

  7. Detection device

    DOEpatents

    Smith, J.E.

    1981-02-27

    The present invention is directed to a detection device comprising: (1) an entrance chamber; (2) a central chamber; and (3) an exit chamber. The central chamber includes an ionizing gas, anode, and means for connecting the anode with an external power supply and pulse counter.

  8. Electrochemical device

    DOEpatents

    Grimes, Patrick G.; Einstein, Harry; Bellows, Richard J.

    1988-01-12

    A tunnel protected electrochemical device features channels fluidically communicating between manifold, tunnels and cells. The channels are designed to provide the most efficient use of auxiliary power. The channels have a greater hydraulic pressure drop and electrical resistance than the manifold. This will provide a design with the optimum auxiliary energy requirements.

  9. [Intrauterine devices].

    PubMed

    Delavest, P; Engelmann, P

    1980-12-11

    Medicated IUDs such as copper IUDs and progesterone-releasing IUDs represent a new development in this form of contraception. All IUDs act by causing an inflammatory reaction at the endometrial level. Techniques of insertion vary from one model to the other; insertion always requires an experienced practitioner, and postabortion or midmenstruation insertions are to be preferred. Pregnancy with IUD in situ is a rare occurrence; the IUD must then be immediately removed. Ectopic pregnancies are about 5-10% of all pregnancies with the device in situ. IUD complications are uterine perforation, mostly done at time of insertion, and pelvic infection which, if untreated, can cause infertility; this is the reason why an IUD is never recommended to a nullipara. Pain and bleeding are the most common side effects. When the strings of the device are not visible, translocation of the device inside the uterine cavity must be suspected. The choice of the wrong type of IUD or a bad insertion can cause spontaneous expulsion of the device. IUD wearers must be regularly seen by a doctor; there is no correlation between IUD use and cervical or endometrial carcinoma.

  10. Characterization of a broadband all-optical ultrasound transducer-from optical and acoustical properties to imaging.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yang; Kim, Jin-Sung; Huang, Sheng-Wen; Ashkenazi, S; Guo, L J; O'Donnell, M

    2008-08-01

    A broadband all-optical ultrasound transducer has been designed, fabricated, and evaluated for high- frequency ultrasound imaging. The device consists of a 2-D gold nanostructure imprinted on top of a glass substrate, followed by a 3 microm PDMS layer and a 30 nm gold layer. A laser pulse at the resonance wavelength of the gold nanostructure is focused onto the surface for ultrasound generation, while the gold nanostructure, together with the 30 nm thick gold layer and the PDMS layer in between, forms an etalon for ultrasound detection, which uses a CW laser at a wavelength far from resonance as the probing beam. The center frequency of a pulse-echo signal recorded in the far field of the transducer is 40 MHz with -6 dB bandwidth of 57 MHz. The signal to noise ratio (SNR) from a 70 microm diameter transmit element combined with a 20 microm diameter receive element probing a near perfect reflector positioned 1.5 mm from the transducer surface is more than 10 dB and has the potential to be improved by at least another 40 dB. A high-frequency ultrasound array has been emulated using multiple measurements from the transducer while mechanically scanning an imaging target. Characterization of the device's optical and acoustical properties, as well as preliminary imaging results, strongly suggest that all-optical ultrasound transducers can be used to build high-frequency arrays for real-time high-resolution ultrasound imaging.

  11. Ultrasound field measurement using a binary lens

    PubMed Central

    Clement, G.T.; Nomura, H.; Kamakura, T.

    2014-01-01

    Field characterization methods using a scattering target in the absence of a point-like receiver have been well described in which scattering is recorded by a relatively large receiver located outside the field of measurement. Unfortunately, such methods are prone to artifacts due to averaging across the receiver surface. To avoid this problem while simultaneously increasing the gain of a received signal, the present study introduces a binary plate lens designed to focus spherically-spreading waves onto a planar region having a nearly-uniform phase proportional to that of the target location. The lens is similar to a zone plate, but modified to produce a biconvex-like behavior, such that it focuses both planar and spherically spreading waves. A measurement device suitable for characterizing narrowband ultrasound signals in air is designed around this lens by coupling it to a target and planar receiver. A prototype device is constructed and used to characterize the field of a highly-focused 400 kHz air transducer along 2 radial lines. Comparison of the measurements with numeric predictions formed from nonlinear acoustic simulation showed good relative pressure correlation, with mean differences of 10% and 12% over center 3dB FWHM drop and 12% and 17% over 6dB. PMID:25643084

  12. Sterile working in ultrasonography: the use of dedicated ultrasound covers and sterile ultrasound gel.

    PubMed

    Marhofer, Peter; Fritsch, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is currently an important tool for diagnostic and interventional procedures. Ultrasound imaging provides significant advantages as compared to other imaging methods. The widespread use of ultrasound also carries the risk of drawbacks such as cross-infections. A large body of literature reports this possibly life-threatening side effect and specific patient populations are particularly at risk (e.g., neonates). Various methods of ultrasound probe disinfection are described; however, none of the mechanical or chemical probe disinfection procedures is optimal and, in particular, disinfection with high concentration of alcohol might be associated with ultrasound probe damage. The preparation of ultrasound probes with dedicated probe covers is a useful alternative for sterile working conditions. One ultrasound probe cover discussed in this paper is directly glued on to the ultrasound probe without the use of ultrasound coupling gel. By the use of sterile ultrasound coupling gel at the outer surface, additional effects on aseptic working conditions can be obtained.

  13. Ultrasound Thrombolysis in Hemodialysis Access: In Vitro Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Wildberger, Joachim Ernst; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Haage, Patrick; Pfeffer, Joachim; Ruebben, Alexander; Guenther, Rolf W.

    2001-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of ultrasound thrombolysis in occluded hemodialysis access shunts using an in vitro model.Methods: Thrombosed hemodialysis accesses were simulated by clotted bovine blood in a flow model (silicone tubing; inner diameters 4, 6, and 9 mm). After retrograde and antegrade sheath placement (7 Fr), mechanical thrombolysis was performed using an ultrasound probe (Acolysis, Angiosonics, Morrisville, NC, USA). The tip of the device measured 2.2 mm in diameter. During sonication, the catheter was moved slowly back and forth using an over-the-wire system. Thirty complete occlusions [tubing diameters 4 mm (n = 12), 6 mm (n = 12), 9 mm (n = 6)] were treated. Initial thrombus weights were 3.5 ({+-} 0.76) g, 7.7 ({+-} 1.74) g, and 19.4 ({+-} 2.27) g for the three diameters. Maximum sonication time was 15 min for each probe.Results: With this device, we were able to restore a continuous lumen in all 12 occluded 4{approx}mm silicone tubes. No wall-adherent thrombi remained after sonication for 3.5-9.6 min. In hemodialysis access models with diameters of 6 mm, thrombus fragments persisted in 25% (3/12 accesses). These were located in the medial portion of the access loop and near to the puncture sites. However, flow was re-established after 5.0-13.0 min of treatment in all settings. Mechanical dissolution of thrombus material failed in five of six access models with diameters of 9 mm, even though ultrasound energy was applied for the maximum of 15 min.Conclusion: In a clotted hemodialysis shunt model, successful ultrasound thrombolysis was limited to small access diameters and small amounts of thrombus.

  14. Counterbalancing the use of ultrasound contrast agents by a cavitation-regulated system.

    PubMed

    Desjouy, C; Fouqueray, M; Lo, C W; Muleki Seya, P; Lee, J L; Bera, J C; Chen, W S; Inserra, C

    2015-09-01

    The stochastic behavior of cavitation can lead to major problems of initiation and maintenance of cavitation during sonication, responsible of poor reproducibility of US-induced bioeffects in the context of sonoporation for instance. To overcome these disadvantages, the injection of ultrasound contrast agents as cavitation nuclei ensures fast initiation and lower acoustic intensities required for cavitation activity. More recently, regulated-cavitation devices based on the real-time modulation of the applied acoustic intensity have shown their potential to maintain a stable cavitation state during an ultrasonic shot, in continuous or pulsed wave conditions. In this paper is investigated the interest, in terms of cavitation activity, of using such regulated-cavitation device or injecting ultrasound contrast agents in the sonicated medium. When using fixed applied acoustic intensity, results showed that introducing ultrasound contrast agents increases reproducibility of cavitation activity (coefficient of variation 62% and 22% without and with UCA, respectively). Moreover, the use of the regulated-cavitation device ensures a given cavitation activity (coefficient of variation less 0.4% in presence of UCAs or not). This highlights the interest of controlling cavitation over time to free cavitation-based application from the use of UCAs. Interestingly, during a one minute sonication, while ultrasound contrast agents progressively disappear, the regulated-cavitation device counterbalance their destruction to sustain a stable inertial cavitation activity.

  15. Ultrasound therapy applicators for controlled thermal modification of tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdette, E. Clif; Lichtenstiger, Carol; Rund, Laurie; Keralapura, Mallika; Gossett, Chad; Stahlhut, Randy; Neubauer, Paul; Komadina, Bruce; Williams, Emery; Alix, Chris; Jensen, Tor; Schook, Lawrence; Diederich, Chris J.

    2011-03-01

    Heat therapy has long been used for treatments in dermatology and sports medicine. The use of laser, RF, microwave, and more recently, ultrasound treatment, for psoriasis, collagen reformation, and skin tightening has gained considerable interest over the past several years. Numerous studies and commercial devices have demonstrated the efficacy of these methods for treatment of skin disorders. Despite these promising results, current systems remain highly dependent on operator skill, and cannot effectively treat effectively because there is little or no control of the size, shape, and depth of the target zone. These limitations make it extremely difficult to obtain consistent treatment results. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility for using acoustic energy for controlled dose delivery sufficient to produce collagen modification for the treatment of skin tissue in the dermal and sub-dermal layers. We designed and evaluated a curvilinear focused ultrasound device for treating skin disorders such as psoriasis, stimulation of wound healing, tightening of skin through shrinkage of existing collagen and stimulation of new collagen formation, and skin cancer. Design parameters were examined using acoustic pattern simulations and thermal modeling. Acute studies were performed in 201 freshly-excised samples of young porcine underbelly skin tissue and 56 in-vivo treatment areas in 60- 80 kg pigs. These were treated with ultrasound (9-11MHz) focused in the deep dermis. Dose distribution was analyzed and gross pathology assessed. Tissue shrinkage was measured based on fiducial markers and video image registration and analyzed using NIH Image-J software. Comparisons were made between RF and focused ultrasound for five energy ranges. In each experimental series, therapeutic dose levels (60degC) were attained at 2-5mm depth. Localized collagen changes ranged from 1-3% for RF versus 8-15% for focused ultrasound. Therapeutic ultrasound applied at high

  16. Sonoporation of adherent cells under regulated ultrasound cavitation conditions.

    PubMed

    Muleki Seya, Pauline; Fouqueray, Manuela; Ngo, Jacqueline; Poizat, Adrien; Inserra, Claude; Béra, Jean-Christophe

    2015-04-01

    A sonoporation device dedicated to the adherent cell monolayer has been implemented with a regulation process allowing the real-time monitoring and control of inertial cavitation activity. Use of the cavitation-regulated device revealed first that adherent cell sonoporation efficiency is related to inertial cavitation activity, without inducing additional cell mortality. Reproducibility is enhanced for the highest sonoporation rates (up to 17%); sonoporation efficiency can reach 26% when advantage is taken of the standing wave acoustic configuration by applying a frequency sweep with ultrasound frequency tuned to the modal acoustic modes of the cavity. This device allows sonoporation of adherent and suspended cells, and the use of regulation allows some environmental parameters such as the temperature of the medium to be overcome, resulting in the possibility of cell sonoporation even at ambient temperature.

  17. Beating heart mitral valve repair with integrated ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, A. Jonathan; Moore, John T.; Peters, Terry M.

    2015-03-01

    Beating heart valve therapies rely extensively on image guidance to treat patients who would be considered inoperable with conventional surgery. Mitral valve repair techniques including the MitrClip, NeoChord, and emerging transcatheter mitral valve replacement techniques rely on transesophageal echocardiography for guidance. These images are often difficult to interpret as the tool will cause shadowing artifacts that occlude tissue near the target site. Here, we integrate ultrasound imaging directly into the NeoChord device. This provides an unobstructed imaging plane that can visualize the valve lea ets as they are engaged by the device and can aid in achieving both a proper bite and spacing between the neochordae implants. A proof of concept user study in a phantom environment is performed to provide a proof of concept for this device.

  18. Power ultrasound in meat processing.

    PubMed

    Alarcon-Rojo, A D; Janacua, H; Rodriguez, J C; Paniwnyk, L; Mason, T J

    2015-09-01

    Ultrasound has a wide range of applications in various agricultural sectors. In food processing, it is considered to be an emerging technology with the potential to speed up processes without damaging the quality of foodstuffs. Here we review the reports on the applications of ultrasound specifically with a view to its use in meat processing. Emphasis is placed on the effects on quality and technological properties such as texture, water retention, colour, curing, marinating, cooking yield, freezing, thawing and microbial inhibition. After the literature review it is concluded that ultrasound is a useful tool for the meat industry as it helps in tenderisation, accelerates maturation and mass transfer, reduces cooking energy, increases shelf life of meat without affecting other quality properties, improves functional properties of emulsified products, eases mould cleaning and improves the sterilisation of equipment surfaces.

  19. Ultrasound: from Earth to space.

    PubMed

    Law, Jennifer; Macbeth, Paul B

    2011-06-01

    Ultrasonography is a versatile imaging modality that offers many advantages over radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. On Earth, the use of ultrasound has become standard in many areas of medicine including diagnosis of medical and surgical diseases, management of obstetric and gynecologic conditions, assessment of critically ill patients, and procedural guidance. Advances in telecommunications have enabled remotely-guided ultrasonography for both geographically isolated populations and astronauts aboard the International Space Station. While ultrasound has traditionally been used in spaceflight to study anatomical and physiological adaptations to microgravity and evaluate countermeasures, recent years have seen a growth of applications adapted from terrestrial techniques. Terrestrial, remote, and space applications for ultrasound are reviewed in this paper.

  20. Clinical applications of doppler ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, K.J.W.; Burns, P.N.; Well, P.N.T.

    1987-01-01

    This book introduces a guide to the physical principles and instrumentation of duplex Doppler ultrasound and its applications in obstetrics, gynecology, neonatology, gastroentology, and evaluation of peripheral vascular disease. The book provides information needed to perform Doppler ultrasound examinations and interpret the results. An introduction to Doppler physics and instrumentation is followed by a thorough review of hemodynamics, which explains the principles underlying interpretation of Doppler signals. Of special note is the state-of-the-art coverage of new applications of Doppler in recognition of high-risk pregnancy, diagnosis of intrauterine growth retardation, investigation of neonatal blood flow, evaluation of first-trimester pregnancy, and diagnosis of gastrointestinal disease. The book also offers guidelines on the use of Doppler ultrasound in diagnosing carotid disease, deep venous thrombosis, and aorta/femoral disease.