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Sample records for a-priori traveling salesman

  1. Addressing the Travelling Salesman Problem through Evolutionary Adaptation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    M FILE Cun ARI Research Note 87-04 -- w CM o> < i Q < ADDRESSING THE TRAVELLING SALESMAN PROBLEM THROUGH EVOLUTIONARY ADAPTATION David B...TITLE raid SubMII«; ’ 1 Addressing the Travelling Salesman Problem 1 Through Evolutionary...1 Optimizing the " travelling salesman" problem continues to

  2. Traveling Salesman Problem: A Foveating Pyramid Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pizlo, Zygmunt; Stefanov, Emil; Saalweachter, John; Li, Zheng; Haxhimusa, Yll; Kropatsch, Walter G.

    2006-01-01

    We tested human performance on the Euclidean Traveling Salesman Problem using problems with 6-50 cities. Results confirmed our earlier findings that: (a) the time of solving a problem is proportional to the number of cities, and (b) the solution error grows very slowly with the number of cities. We formulated a new version of a pyramid model. The…

  3. Traveling Salesman Problem: A Foveating Pyramid Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pizlo, Zygmunt; Stefanov, Emil; Saalweachter, John; Li, Zheng; Haxhimusa, Yll; Kropatsch, Walter G.

    2006-01-01

    We tested human performance on the Euclidean Traveling Salesman Problem using problems with 6-50 cities. Results confirmed our earlier findings that: (a) the time of solving a problem is proportional to the number of cities, and (b) the solution error grows very slowly with the number of cities. We formulated a new version of a pyramid model. The…

  4. Diffusive behavior of a greedy traveling salesman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipowski, Adam; Lipowska, Dorota

    2011-06-01

    Using Monte Carlo simulations we examine the diffusive properties of the greedy algorithm in the d-dimensional traveling salesman problem. Our results show that for d=3 and 4 the average squared distance from the origin is proportional to the number of steps t. In the d=2 case such a scaling is modified with some logarithmic corrections, which might suggest that d=2 is the critical dimension of the problem. The distribution of lengths also shows marked differences between d=2 and d>2 versions. A simple strategy adopted by the salesman might resemble strategies chosen by some foraging and hunting animals, for which anomalous diffusive behavior has recently been reported and interpreted in terms of Lévy flights. Our results suggest that broad and Lévy-like distributions in such systems might appear due to dimension-dependent properties of a search space.

  5. Adapting the traveling salesman problem to an adiabatic quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Richard H.

    2013-04-01

    We show how to guide a quantum computer to select an optimal tour for the traveling salesman. This is significant because it opens a rapid solution method for the wide range of applications of the traveling salesman problem, which include vehicle routing, job sequencing and data clustering.

  6. The Traveling Salesman and Related Stochastic Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percus, A. G.

    1998-03-01

    In the traveling salesman problem, one must find the length of the shortest closed tour visiting given ``cities''. We study the stochastic version of the problem, taking the locations of cities and the distances separating them to be random variables drawn from an ensemble. We consider first the ensemble where cities are placed in Euclidean space. We investigate how the optimum tour length scales with number of cities and with number of spatial dimensions. We then examine the analytical theory behind the random link ensemble, where distances between cities are independent random variables. Finally, we look at the related geometric issue of nearest neighbor distances, and find some remarkable universalities.

  7. The cost-constrained traveling salesman problem

    SciTech Connect

    Sokkappa, P.R.

    1990-10-01

    The Cost-Constrained Traveling Salesman Problem (CCTSP) is a variant of the well-known Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP). In the TSP, the goal is to find a tour of a given set of cities such that the total cost of the tour is minimized. In the CCTSP, each city is given a value, and a fixed cost-constraint is specified. The objective is to find a subtour of the cities that achieves maximum value without exceeding the cost-constraint. Thus, unlike the TSP, the CCTSP requires both selection and sequencing. As a consequence, most results for the TSP cannot be extended to the CCTSP. We show that the CCTSP is NP-hard and that no K-approximation algorithm or fully polynomial approximation scheme exists, unless P = NP. We also show that several special cases are polynomially solvable. Algorithms for the CCTSP, which outperform previous methods, are developed in three areas: upper bounding methods, exact algorithms, and heuristics. We found that a bounding strategy based on the knapsack problem performs better, both in speed and in the quality of the bounds, than methods based on the assignment problem. Likewise, we found that a branch-and-bound approach using the knapsack bound was superior to a method based on a common branch-and-bound method for the TSP. In our study of heuristic algorithms, we found that, when selecting modes for inclusion in the subtour, it is important to consider the neighborhood'' of the nodes. A node with low value that brings the subtour near many other nodes may be more desirable than an isolated node of high value. We found two types of repetition to be desirable: repetitions based on randomization in the subtour buildings process, and repetitions encouraging the inclusion of different subsets of the nodes. By varying the number and type of repetitions, we can adjust the computation time required by our method to obtain algorithms that outperform previous methods.

  8. Branch and Bound Methods for the Traveling Salesman Problem.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    42 318 BRANCH AND ROUND METHODS FOR THE TRAVELING SALESMAN I PRO EM U) CARNEGIE-MELLON UNIV PITSBURGH PA MANAGEMENT SCIENCES RESEARCH GROUP E RU AS...fl 2.2 1 1 6 5 4 .6 MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAL BUREAU Of SIANARDS ) Qh A i . ’i ’V aBRANCH AND BOUND METHODS FOR THE TRAVELING ...06 20 126 a 77 W.P.#45-82-83 Management Science Research Report No. MSRR 488 BRANCH AND BOUND METHODS FOR THE TRAVELING SALESMAN PROBLEM by Egon Balas

  9. Computational Performance of Three Subtour Elimination Algorithms for Solving Asymmetric Traveling Salesman Problems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    In this paper we develop and computationally test three implicit enumeration algorithms for solving the asymmetric traveling salesman problem. All...three algorithms use the assignment problem relaxation of the traveling salesman problem with subtour elimination similar to the previous approaches by...previous subtour elimination algorithms and (2) the 1-arborescence approach of Held and Karp for the asymmetric traveling salesman problem.

  10. Development of the PEBLebl Traveling Salesman Problem Computerized Testbed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Shane T.; Perelman, Brandon S.; Tan, Yin Yin; Thanasuan, Kejkaew

    2015-01-01

    The traveling salesman problem (TSP) is a combinatorial optimization problem that requires finding the shortest path through a set of points ("cities") that returns to the starting point. Because humans provide heuristic near-optimal solutions to Euclidean versions of the problem, it has sometimes been used to investigate human visual…

  11. Development of the PEBLebl Traveling Salesman Problem Computerized Testbed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Shane T.; Perelman, Brandon S.; Tan, Yin Yin; Thanasuan, Kejkaew

    2015-01-01

    The traveling salesman problem (TSP) is a combinatorial optimization problem that requires finding the shortest path through a set of points ("cities") that returns to the starting point. Because humans provide heuristic near-optimal solutions to Euclidean versions of the problem, it has sometimes been used to investigate human visual…

  12. 2D and 3D Traveling Salesman Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haxhimusa, Yll; Carpenter, Edward; Catrambone, Joseph; Foldes, David; Stefanov, Emil; Arns, Laura; Pizlo, Zygmunt

    2011-01-01

    When a two-dimensional (2D) traveling salesman problem (TSP) is presented on a computer screen, human subjects can produce near-optimal tours in linear time. In this study we tested human performance on a real and virtual floor, as well as in a three-dimensional (3D) virtual space. Human performance on the real floor is as good as that on a…

  13. Improved mapping of the travelling salesman problem for quantum annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troyer, Matthias; Heim, Bettina; Brown, Ethan; Wecker, David

    2015-03-01

    We consider the quantum adiabatic algorithm as applied to the travelling salesman problem (TSP). We introduce a novel mapping of TSP to an Ising spin glass Hamiltonian and compare it to previous known mappings. Through direct perturbative analysis, unitary evolution, and simulated quantum annealing, we show this new mapping to be significantly superior. We discuss how this advantage can translate to actual physical implementations of TSP on quantum annealers.

  14. Critical transition in the constrained traveling salesman problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrecut, M.; Ali, M. K.

    2001-04-01

    We investigate the finite size scaling of the mean optimal tour length as a function of density of obstacles in a constrained variant of the traveling salesman problem (TSP). The computational experience pointed out a critical transition (at ρc~85%) in the dependence between the excess of the mean optimal tour length over the Held-Karp lower bound and the density of obstacles.

  15. 2D and 3D Traveling Salesman Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haxhimusa, Yll; Carpenter, Edward; Catrambone, Joseph; Foldes, David; Stefanov, Emil; Arns, Laura; Pizlo, Zygmunt

    2011-01-01

    When a two-dimensional (2D) traveling salesman problem (TSP) is presented on a computer screen, human subjects can produce near-optimal tours in linear time. In this study we tested human performance on a real and virtual floor, as well as in a three-dimensional (3D) virtual space. Human performance on the real floor is as good as that on a…

  16. Algorithms and Heuristics for Time-Window-Constrained Traveling Salesman Problems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    California G0 lI DTIC S-. E CTE 985 THESIS ALGORITHMS AND HEURISTICS FOR TIME-WI NDOW-CONSTRAINED TRAVELING SALESMAN PROBLEMS by Chun, Bock Jin and Lee...strained Traveling Salesman Problems September 1985 6. PERFORMING ORo. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR() 0. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(e) Chun, Bock Jin Lee...Penalty Cost, Traveling Salesman Problem, State-Space Relaxation 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse side It necessary and Identify by block ns ber) This

  17. A quantum heuristic algorithm for the traveling salesman problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, Jeongho; Ryu, Junghee; Lee, Changhyoup; Yoo, Seokwon; Lim, James; Lee, Jinhyoung

    2012-12-01

    We propose a quantum heuristic algorithm to solve the traveling salesman problem by generalizing the Grover search. Sufficient conditions are derived to greatly enhance the probability of finding the tours with the cheapest costs reaching almost to unity. These conditions are characterized by the statistical properties of tour costs and are shown to be automatically satisfied in the large-number limit of cities. In particular for a continuous distribution of the tours along the cost, we show that the quantum heuristic algorithm exhibits a quadratic speedup compared to its classical heuristic algorithm.

  18. The Asymmetric Assignment Problem and Some New Facets of the Traveling Salesman Polytope.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    vAD-A±6L2 365 THE ASYMMETRIC ASSIGNMENT PROBLEM AND SOME NEW FACETS 1.11 OF THE TRAVELING SR..(U) CARNEGIE-MELLON UNIV PITTSBURGH PA MANAGEMENT...FACETS OF THE TRAVELING SALESMAN POLYTOPE by Egon Balas Graduate School of Industrial Administration William Larimer Mellon, Founder Pittsburgh, PA...SOME NEW FACETS OF THE TRAVELING SALESMAN POLYTOPE by Eson Balas May 1987 The research underlying this report was supported by Grant ECS 8601660 of the

  19. Solving large scale traveling salesman problems by chaotic neurodynamics.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Mikio; Ikeguch, Tohru; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2002-03-01

    We propose a novel approach for solving large scale traveling salesman problems (TSPs) by chaotic dynamics. First, we realize the tabu search on a neural network, by utilizing the refractory effects as the tabu effects. Then, we extend it to a chaotic neural network version. We propose two types of chaotic searching methods, which are based on two different tabu searches. While the first one requires neurons of the order of n2 for an n-city TSP, the second one requires only n neurons. Moreover, an automatic parameter tuning method of our chaotic neural network is presented for easy application to various problems. Last, we show that our method with n neurons is applicable to large TSPs such as an 85,900-city problem and exhibits better performance than the conventional stochastic searches and the tabu searches.

  20. Water flow algorithm decision support tool for travelling salesman problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamarudin, Anis Aklima; Othman, Zulaiha Ali; Sarim, Hafiz Mohd

    2016-08-01

    This paper discuss about the role of Decision Support Tool in Travelling Salesman Problem (TSP) for helping the researchers who doing research in same area will get the better result from the proposed algorithm. A study has been conducted and Rapid Application Development (RAD) model has been use as a methodology which includes requirement planning, user design, construction and cutover. Water Flow Algorithm (WFA) with initialization technique improvement is used as the proposed algorithm in this study for evaluating effectiveness against TSP cases. For DST evaluation will go through usability testing conducted on system use, quality of information, quality of interface and overall satisfaction. Evaluation is needed for determine whether this tool can assists user in making a decision to solve TSP problems with the proposed algorithm or not. Some statistical result shown the ability of this tool in term of helping researchers to conduct the experiments on the WFA with improvements TSP initialization.

  1. Modified reactive tabu search for the symmetric traveling salesman problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Yai-Fung; Hong, Pei-Yee; Ramli, Razamin; Khalid, Ruzelan

    2013-09-01

    Reactive tabu search (RTS) is an improved method of tabu search (TS) and it dynamically adjusts tabu list size based on how the search is performed. RTS can avoid disadvantage of TS which is in the parameter tuning in tabu list size. In this paper, we proposed a modified RTS approach for solving symmetric traveling salesman problems (TSP). The tabu list size of the proposed algorithm depends on the number of iterations when the solutions do not override the aspiration level to achieve a good balance between diversification and intensification. The proposed algorithm was tested on seven chosen benchmarked problems of symmetric TSP. The performance of the proposed algorithm is compared with that of the TS by using empirical testing, benchmark solution and simple probabilistic analysis in order to validate the quality of solution. The computational results and comparisons show that the proposed algorithm provides a better quality solution than that of the TS.

  2. Combination of Chaotic Neurodynamics with the 2-opt Algorithm to Solve Traveling Salesman Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, M.; Ikeguchi, T.; Aihara, K.

    1997-09-01

    We propose a novel approach for combinatorial optimization problems. For solving the traveling salesman problems, we combine chaotic neurodynamics with heuristic algorithm. We select the heuristic algorithm of 2-opt as a basic part, because it is well understood that this simple algorithm is very effective for the traveling salesman problems. Although the conventional approaches with chaotic neurodynamics were only applied to such very small problems as 10 cities, our method exhibits higher performance for larger size problems with the order of 102.

  3. 20 CFR 404.1008 - Agent-driver or commission-driver, full-time life insurance salesman, home worker, or traveling...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... commission-driver, full-time life insurance salesman, home worker, or traveling or city salesman. (a) General... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Agent-driver or commission-driver, full-time life insurance salesman, home worker, or traveling or city salesman. 404.1008 Section 404.1008...

  4. Solving the Traveling Salesman's Problem Using the African Buffalo Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Odili, Julius Beneoluchi; Mohmad Kahar, Mohd Nizam

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes the African Buffalo Optimization (ABO) which is a new metaheuristic algorithm that is derived from careful observation of the African buffalos, a species of wild cows, in the African forests and savannahs. This animal displays uncommon intelligence, strategic organizational skills, and exceptional navigational ingenuity in its traversal of the African landscape in search for food. The African Buffalo Optimization builds a mathematical model from the behavior of this animal and uses the model to solve 33 benchmark symmetric Traveling Salesman's Problem and six difficult asymmetric instances from the TSPLIB. This study shows that buffalos are able to ensure excellent exploration and exploitation of the search space through regular communication, cooperation, and good memory of its previous personal exploits as well as tapping from the herd's collective exploits. The results obtained by using the ABO to solve these TSP cases were benchmarked against the results obtained by using other popular algorithms. The results obtained using the African Buffalo Optimization algorithm are very competitive. PMID:26880872

  5. Fast marching methods for the continuous traveling salesman problem

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, June; Sethian, J. A.

    2007-01-01

    We consider a problem in which we are given a domain, a cost function which depends on position at each point in the domain, and a subset of points (“cities”) in the domain. The goal is to determine the cheapest closed path that visits each city in the domain once. This can be thought of as a version of the traveling salesman problem, in which an underlying known metric determines the cost of moving through each point of the domain, but in which the actual shortest path between cities is unknown at the outset. We describe algorithms for both a heuristic and an optimal solution to this problem. The complexity of the heuristic algorithm is at worst case M·N log N, where M is the number of cities, and N the size of the computational mesh used to approximate the solutions to the shortest paths problems. The average runtime of the heuristic algorithm is linear in the number of cities and O(N log N) in the size N of the mesh. PMID:17220271

  6. Exact and Approximate Stability of Solutions to Traveling Salesman Problems.

    PubMed

    Niendorf, Moritz; Girard, Anouck R

    2017-01-17

    This paper presents the stability analysis of an optimal tour for the symmetric traveling salesman problem (TSP) by obtaining stability regions. The stability region of an optimal tour is the set of all cost changes for which that solution remains optimal and can be understood as the margin of optimality for a solution with respect to perturbations in the problem data. It is known that it is not possible to test in polynomial time whether an optimal tour remains optimal after the cost of an arbitrary set of edges changes. Therefore, this paper develops tractable methods to obtain under and over approximations of stability regions based on neighborhoods and relaxations. The application of the results to the two-neighborhood and the minimum 1 tree (M1T) relaxation are discussed in detail. For Euclidean TSPs, stability regions with respect to vertex location perturbations and the notion of safe radii and location criticalities are introduced. Benefits of this paper include insight into robustness properties of tours, minimum spanning trees, M1Ts, and fast methods to evaluate optimality after perturbations occur. Numerical examples are given to demonstrate the methods and achievable approximation quality.

  7. List-Based Simulated Annealing Algorithm for Traveling Salesman Problem

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Shi-hua; Lin, Juan; Zhang, Ze-jun

    2016-01-01

    Simulated annealing (SA) algorithm is a popular intelligent optimization algorithm which has been successfully applied in many fields. Parameters' setting is a key factor for its performance, but it is also a tedious work. To simplify parameters setting, we present a list-based simulated annealing (LBSA) algorithm to solve traveling salesman problem (TSP). LBSA algorithm uses a novel list-based cooling schedule to control the decrease of temperature. Specifically, a list of temperatures is created first, and then the maximum temperature in list is used by Metropolis acceptance criterion to decide whether to accept a candidate solution. The temperature list is adapted iteratively according to the topology of the solution space of the problem. The effectiveness and the parameter sensitivity of the list-based cooling schedule are illustrated through benchmark TSP problems. The LBSA algorithm, whose performance is robust on a wide range of parameter values, shows competitive performance compared with some other state-of-the-art algorithms. PMID:27034650

  8. Solving the Traveling Salesman Problem through Extended Changing Crossover Operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Ryouei

    In order to efficiently obtain an approximate solution of the traveling salesman problem (TSP), extended changing crossover operators (ECXOs) which can substitute any crossover operator of genetic algorithms (GAs) and ant colony optimization (ACO) for another crossover operator at any time is proposed. In this investigation our ECXO uses both EX (or ACO) and EXX (Edge Exchange Crossover) in early generations to create local optimum sub-paths, and it uses EAX (Edge Assembly Crossover) to create a global optimum solution after generations. With EX or ACO any individual or any ant determines the next city he visits from lengths of edges or tours' lengths deposited on edges as pheromone, and he generates local optimum paths. With EXX the generated path converges to a provisional optimal path. With EAX a parent exchanges his edges with another parent's ones reciprocally to create sub-cyclic paths, before restructuring a cyclic path by combining the sub-cyclic paths with making distances between them minimum. In this paper validity of ECXO is verified by our C experiments using medium-sized problems in TSPLIB, and it is shown that ECXO can find the best solution earlier than EAX.

  9. Solving the Traveling Salesman's Problem Using the African Buffalo Optimization.

    PubMed

    Odili, Julius Beneoluchi; Mohmad Kahar, Mohd Nizam

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes the African Buffalo Optimization (ABO) which is a new metaheuristic algorithm that is derived from careful observation of the African buffalos, a species of wild cows, in the African forests and savannahs. This animal displays uncommon intelligence, strategic organizational skills, and exceptional navigational ingenuity in its traversal of the African landscape in search for food. The African Buffalo Optimization builds a mathematical model from the behavior of this animal and uses the model to solve 33 benchmark symmetric Traveling Salesman's Problem and six difficult asymmetric instances from the TSPLIB. This study shows that buffalos are able to ensure excellent exploration and exploitation of the search space through regular communication, cooperation, and good memory of its previous personal exploits as well as tapping from the herd's collective exploits. The results obtained by using the ABO to solve these TSP cases were benchmarked against the results obtained by using other popular algorithms. The results obtained using the African Buffalo Optimization algorithm are very competitive.

  10. Multiagent optimization system for solving the traveling salesman problem (TSP).

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiao-Feng; Liu, Jiming

    2009-04-01

    The multiagent optimization system (MAOS) is a nature-inspired method, which supports cooperative search by the self-organization of a group of compact agents situated in an environment with certain sharing public knowledge. Moreover, each agent in MAOS is an autonomous entity with personal declarative memory and behavioral components. In this paper, MAOS is refined for solving the traveling salesman problem (TSP), which is a classic hard computational problem. Based on a simplified MAOS version, in which each agent manipulates on extremely limited declarative knowledge, some simple and efficient components for solving TSP, including two improving heuristics based on a generalized edge assembly recombination, are implemented. Compared with metaheuristics in adaptive memory programming, MAOS is particularly suitable for supporting cooperative search. The experimental results on two TSP benchmark data sets show that MAOS is competitive as compared with some state-of-the-art algorithms, including the Lin-Kernighan-Helsgaun, IBGLK, PHGA, etc., although MAOS does not use any explicit local search during the runtime. The contributions of MAOS components are investigated. It indicates that certain clues can be positive for making suitable selections before time-consuming computation. More importantly, it shows that the cooperative search of agents can achieve an overall good performance with a macro rule in the switch mode, which deploys certain alternate search rules with the offline performance in negative correlations. Using simple alternate rules may prevent the high difficulty of seeking an omnipotent rule that is efficient for a large data set.

  11. A Simple Algorithm for the Metric Traveling Salesman Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimm, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    An algorithm was designed for a wire list net sort problem. A branch and bound algorithm for the metric traveling salesman problem is presented for this. The algorithm is a best bound first recursive descent where the bound is based on the triangle inequality. The bounded subsets are defined by the relative order of the first K of the N cities (i.e., a K city subtour). When K equals N, the bound is the length of the tour. The algorithm is implemented as a one page subroutine written in the C programming language for the VAX 11/750. Average execution times for randomly selected planar points using the Euclidean metric are 0.01, 0.05, 0.42, and 3.13 seconds for ten, fifteen, twenty, and twenty-five cities, respectively. Maximum execution times for a hundred cases are less than eleven times the averages. The speed of the algorithms is due to an initial ordering algorithm that is a N squared operation. The algorithm also solves the related problem where the tour does not return to the starting city and the starting and/or ending cities may be specified. It is possible to extend the algorithm to solve a nonsymmetric problem satisfying the triangle inequality.

  12. An evolutionary algorithm for large traveling salesman problems.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Huai-Kuang; Yang, Jinn-Moon; Tsai, Yuan-Fang; Kao, Cheng-Yan

    2004-08-01

    This work proposes an evolutionary algorithm, called the heterogeneous selection evolutionary algorithm (HeSEA), for solving large traveling salesman problems (TSP). The strengths and limitations of numerous well-known genetic operators are first analyzed, along with local search methods for TSPs from their solution qualities and mechanisms for preserving and adding edges. Based on this analysis, a new approach, HeSEA is proposed which integrates edge assembly crossover (EAX) and Lin-Kernighan (LK) local search, through family competition and heterogeneous pairing selection. This study demonstrates experimentally that EAX and LK can compensate for each other's disadvantages. Family competition and heterogeneous pairing selections are used to maintain the diversity of the population, which is especially useful for evolutionary algorithms in solving large TSPs. The proposed method was evaluated on 16 well-known TSPs in which the numbers of cities range from 318 to 13509. Experimental results indicate that HeSEA performs well and is very competitive with other approaches. The proposed method can determine the optimum path when the number of cities is under 10,000 and the mean solution quality is within 0.0074% above the optimum for each test problem. These findings imply that the proposed method can find tours robustly with a fixed small population and a limited family competition length in reasonable time, when used to solve large TSPs.

  13. Fast marching methods for the continuous traveling salesman problem

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J.; Sethian, J.A.

    2008-12-01

    We consider a problem in which we are given a domain, a cost function which depends on position at each point in the domain, and a subset of points ('cities') in the domain. The goal is to determine the cheapest closed path that visits each city in the domain once. This can be thought of as a version of the Traveling Salesman Problem, in which an underlying known metric determines the cost of moving through each point of the domain, but in which the actual shortest path between cities is unknown at the outset. We describe algorithms for both a heuristic and an optimal solution to this problem. The order of the heuristic algorithm is at worst case M * N logN, where M is the number of cities, and N the size of the computational mesh used to approximate the solutions to the shortest paths problems. The average runtime of the heuristic algorithm is linear in the number of cities and O(N log N) in the size N of the mesh.

  14. Stability of Solutions to Classes of Traveling Salesman Problems.

    PubMed

    Niendorf, Moritz; Kabamba, Pierre T; Girard, Anouck R

    2016-04-01

    By performing stability analysis on an optimal tour for problems belonging to classes of the traveling salesman problem (TSP), this paper derives margins of optimality for a solution with respect to disturbances in the problem data. Specifically, we consider the asymmetric sequence-dependent TSP, where the sequence dependence is driven by the dynamics of a stack. This is a generalization of the symmetric non sequence-dependent version of the TSP. Furthermore, we also consider the symmetric sequence-dependent variant and the asymmetric non sequence-dependent variant. Amongst others these problems have applications in logistics and unmanned aircraft mission planning. Changing external conditions such as traffic or weather may alter task costs, which can render an initially optimal itinerary suboptimal. Instead of optimizing the itinerary every time task costs change, stability criteria allow for fast evaluation of whether itineraries remain optimal. This paper develops a method to compute stability regions for the best tour in a set of tours for the symmetric TSP and extends the results to the asymmetric problem as well as their sequence-dependent counterparts. As the TSP is NP-hard, heuristic methods are frequently used to solve it. The presented approach is also applicable to analyze stability regions for a tour obtained through application of the k -opt heuristic with respect to the k -neighborhood. A dimensionless criticality metric for edges is proposed, such that a high criticality of an edge indicates that the optimal tour is more susceptible to cost changes in that edge. Multiple examples demonstrate the application of the developed stability computation method as well as the edge criticality measure that facilitates an intuitive assessment of instances of the TSP.

  15. Human Performance on the Traveling Salesman and Related Problems: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacGregor, James N.; Chu, Yun

    2011-01-01

    The article provides a review of recent research on human performance on the traveling salesman problem (TSP) and related combinatorial optimization problems. We discuss what combinatorial optimization problems are, why they are important, and why they may be of interest to cognitive scientists. We next describe the main characteristics of human…

  16. Human Performance on the Traveling Salesman and Related Problems: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacGregor, James N.; Chu, Yun

    2011-01-01

    The article provides a review of recent research on human performance on the traveling salesman problem (TSP) and related combinatorial optimization problems. We discuss what combinatorial optimization problems are, why they are important, and why they may be of interest to cognitive scientists. We next describe the main characteristics of human…

  17. Use of a Colony of Cooperating Agents and MAPLE To Solve the Traveling Salesman Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerrieri, Bruno

    This paper reviews an approach for finding optimal solutions to the traveling salesman problem, a well-known problem in combinational optimization, and describes implementing the approach using the MAPLE computer algebra system. The method employed in this approach to the problem is similar to the way ant colonies manage to establish shortest…

  18. The Random Link Approximation for the Euclidean Traveling Salesman Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerf, N. J.; Boutet de Monvel, J.; Bohigas, O.; Martin, O. C.; Percus, A. G.

    1997-01-01

    The traveling salesman problem (TSP) consists of finding the length of the shortest closed tour visiting N “cities”. We consider the Euclidean TSP where the cities are distributed randomly and independently in a d-dimensional unit hypercube. Working with periodic boundary conditions and inspired by a remarkable universality in the kth nearest neighbor distribution, we find for the average optimum tour length <~ngle L_Erangle =β_E(d)N^{1-1/d}[1+O(1/N)] with β_E=0.7120± 0.0002 and β_E(3)=0.6979± 0.0002. We then derive analytical predictions for these quantities using the random link approximation, where the lengths between cities are taken as independent random variables. From the “cavity” equations developed by Krauth, Mézard and Parisi, we calculate the associated random link values β_RL(d). For d=1, 2, 3, numerical results show that the random link approximation is a good one, with a discrepancy of less than 2.1% between β_E(d) and β_RL(d). For large d, we argue that the approximation is exact up to O(1d^2) and give a conjecture for β_E(d), in terms of a power series in 1/d, specifying both leading and subleading coefficients. Le problème du voyageur de commerce (TSP) consiste à trouver le chemin fermé le plus court qui relie N “villes”. Nous étudions le TSP euclidien où les villes sont distribuées au hasard de manière décorrélée dans l'hypercube de côté 1, en dimension d. En imposant des conditions aux bords périodiques et guidés par une universalité remarquable de la distribution des kièmes voisins, nous trouvons la longueur moyenne du chemin optimal <~ngle L_Erangle = β_E(d)N^{1-1/d}[1+O(1/N)] , avec β_E= 0,7120 ± 0,0002 et β_E(3)= 0,6979 ± 0,0002. Nous établissons ensuite des prédictions analytiques sur ces quantités à l'aide de l'approximation de liens aléatoires, où les longueurs entre les villes sont des variables aléatoires indépendantes. Grâce aux équations “cavité” développées par Krauth, M

  19. Regional Travel-Time Uncertainty and Seismic Location Improvement Using a Three- Dimensional a priori Velocity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, M. P.; Myers, S. C.; Koper, K. D.

    2006-12-01

    We demonstrate our ability to improve regional travel-time prediction and seismic event location accuracy using ana priori, three-dimensional velocity model of Western Eurasia and North Africa (WENA1.0). Travel- time residuals are assessed relative to the iasp91 model for approximately 6,000 Pg, Pn, and P arrivals, from seismic events having 2sigma epicenter accuracy between 1 km and 25 km (GT1 and GT25, respectively), recorded at 39 stations throughout the model region. Ray paths range in length between 0 and 40 degrees epicentral distance (local, regional, and near teleseismic) providing depth sounding that spans the crust and upper mantle. The dataset also provides representative geographic sampling across Eurasia and North Africa including aseismic areas. The WENA1.0 model markedly improves travel-time predictions for most stations with an average variance reduction of 29% for all ray paths from the GT25 events; when we consider GT5 and better events alone the variance reduction is 49%. For location tests we use 196 geographically distributed GT5 and better events. In 134 cases (68% of the events), locations are improved, and average mislocation is reduced from 24.9 km to 17.7 km. We develop a travel time uncertainty model that is used to calculate location coverage ellipses. The coverage ellipses for WENA1.0 are validated to be representative of epicenter error and are smaller than those for iasp91 by 37%. We conclude that a priori, models are directly applicable where data coverage limits tomographic and empirical approaches, and the development of the uncertainty model enables merging of a priori, and data-driven approaches using Bayesian techniques. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48, Contribution UCRL- JRNL-220179.

  20. Solving a four-destination traveling salesman problem using Escherichia coli cells as biocomputers.

    PubMed

    Esau, Michael; Rozema, Mark; Zhang, Tuo Huang; Zeng, Dawson; Chiu, Stephanie; Kwan, Rachel; Moorhouse, Cadence; Murray, Cameron; Tseng, Nien-Tsu; Ridgway, Doug; Sauvageau, Dominic; Ellison, Michael

    2014-12-19

    The Traveling Salesman Problem involves finding the shortest possible route visiting all destinations on a map only once before returning to the point of origin. The present study demonstrates a strategy for solving Traveling Salesman Problems using modified E. coli cells as processors for massively parallel computing. Sequential, combinatorial DNA assembly was used to generate routes, in the form of plasmids made up of marker genes, each representing a path between destinations, and short connecting linkers, each representing a given destination. Upon growth of the population of modified E. coli, phenotypic selection was used to eliminate invalid routes, and statistical analysis was performed to successfully identify the optimal solution. The strategy was successfully employed to solve a four-destination test problem.

  1. Planning times during traveling salesman's problem: differences between closed head injury and normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Basso, D; Bisiacchi, P S; Cotelli, M; Farinello, C

    2001-01-01

    We studied planning behavior in a group of normal subjects and a group of closed head injury patients (CHI). A computerized version of the traveling salesman's problem was used as a visuospatial planning ability task. The program collected measurements of partial times, number of moves, and number of skipped subgoals. These measures allow us to calculate a "planning index" of subjects' planning ability. Results show that CHI patients present limitations in the planning process due to the lack of ongoing planning.

  2. A neural-network-based approach to the double traveling salesman problem.

    PubMed

    Plebe, Alessio; Anile, Angelo Marcello

    2002-02-01

    The double traveling salesman problem is a variation of the basic traveling salesman problem where targets can be reached by two salespersons operating in parallel. The real problem addressed by this work concerns the optimization of the harvest sequence for the two independent arms of a fruit-harvesting robot. This application poses further constraints, like a collision-avoidance function. The proposed solution is based on a self-organizing map structure, initialized with as many artificial neurons as the number of targets to be reached. One of the key components of the process is the combination of competitive relaxation with a mechanism for deleting and creating artificial neurons. Moreover, in the competitive relaxation process, information about the trajectory connecting the neurons is combined with the distance of neurons from the target. This strategy prevents tangles in the trajectory and collisions between the two tours. Results of tests indicate that the proposed approach is efficient and reliable for harvest sequence planning. Moreover, the enhancements added to the pure self-organizing map concept are of wider importance, as proved by a traveling salesman problem version of the program, simplified from the double version for comparison.

  3. A traveling-salesman-based approach to aircraft scheduling in the terminal area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luenberger, Robert A.

    1988-01-01

    An efficient algorithm is presented, based on the well-known algorithm for the traveling salesman problem, for scheduling aircraft arrivals into major terminal areas. The algorithm permits, but strictly limits, reassigning an aircraft from its initial position in the landing order. This limitation is needed so that no aircraft or aircraft category is unduly penalized. Results indicate, for the mix of arrivals investigated, a potential increase in capacity in the 3 to 5 percent range. Furthermore, it is shown that the computation time for the algorithm grows only linearly with problem size.

  4. Electronic neural network for solving traveling salesman and similar global optimization problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Anilkumar P. (Inventor); Moopenn, Alexander W. (Inventor); Duong, Tuan A. (Inventor); Eberhardt, Silvio P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    This invention is a novel high-speed neural network based processor for solving the 'traveling salesman' and other global optimization problems. It comprises a novel hybrid architecture employing a binary synaptic array whose embodiment incorporates the fixed rules of the problem, such as the number of cities to be visited. The array is prompted by analog voltages representing variables such as distances. The processor incorporates two interconnected feedback networks, each of which solves part of the problem independently and simultaneously, yet which exchange information dynamically.

  5. Ant Colony Optimization with Memory and Its Application to Traveling Salesman Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rong-Long; Zhao, Li-Qing; Zhou, Xiao-Fan

    Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) is one of the most recent techniques for solving combinatorial optimization problems, and has been unexpectedly successful. Therefore, many improvements have been proposed to improve the performance of the ACO algorithm. In this paper an ant colony optimization with memory is proposed, which is applied to the classical traveling salesman problem (TSP). In the proposed algorithm, each ant searches the solution not only according to the pheromone and heuristic information but also based on the memory which is from the solution of the last iteration. A large number of simulation runs are performed, and simulation results illustrate that the proposed algorithm performs better than the compared algorithms.

  6. Quantum speedup of the traveling-salesman problem for bounded-degree graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moylett, Dominic J.; Linden, Noah; Montanaro, Ashley

    2017-03-01

    The traveling-salesman problem is one of the most famous problems in graph theory. However, little is currently known about the extent to which quantum computers could speed up algorithms for the problem. In this paper, we prove a quadratic quantum speedup when the degree of each vertex is at most 3 by applying a quantum backtracking algorithm to a classical algorithm by Xiao and Nagamochi. We then use similar techniques to accelerate a classical algorithm for when the degree of each vertex is at most 4, before speeding up higher-degree graphs via reductions to these instances.

  7. Efficient constraint handling in electromagnetism-like algorithm for traveling salesman problem with time windows.

    PubMed

    Yurtkuran, Alkın; Emel, Erdal

    2014-01-01

    The traveling salesman problem with time windows (TSPTW) is a variant of the traveling salesman problem in which each customer should be visited within a given time window. In this paper, we propose an electromagnetism-like algorithm (EMA) that uses a new constraint handling technique to minimize the travel cost in TSPTW problems. The EMA utilizes the attraction-repulsion mechanism between charged particles in a multidimensional space for global optimization. This paper investigates the problem-specific constraint handling capability of the EMA framework using a new variable bounding strategy, in which real-coded particle's boundary constraints associated with the corresponding time windows of customers, is introduced and combined with the penalty approach to eliminate infeasibilities regarding time window violations. The performance of the proposed algorithm and the effectiveness of the constraint handling technique have been studied extensively, comparing it to that of state-of-the-art metaheuristics using several sets of benchmark problems reported in the literature. The results of the numerical experiments show that the EMA generates feasible and near-optimal results within shorter computational times compared to the test algorithms.

  8. Efficient Constraint Handling in Electromagnetism-Like Algorithm for Traveling Salesman Problem with Time Windows

    PubMed Central

    Yurtkuran, Alkın

    2014-01-01

    The traveling salesman problem with time windows (TSPTW) is a variant of the traveling salesman problem in which each customer should be visited within a given time window. In this paper, we propose an electromagnetism-like algorithm (EMA) that uses a new constraint handling technique to minimize the travel cost in TSPTW problems. The EMA utilizes the attraction-repulsion mechanism between charged particles in a multidimensional space for global optimization. This paper investigates the problem-specific constraint handling capability of the EMA framework using a new variable bounding strategy, in which real-coded particle's boundary constraints associated with the corresponding time windows of customers, is introduced and combined with the penalty approach to eliminate infeasibilities regarding time window violations. The performance of the proposed algorithm and the effectiveness of the constraint handling technique have been studied extensively, comparing it to that of state-of-the-art metaheuristics using several sets of benchmark problems reported in the literature. The results of the numerical experiments show that the EMA generates feasible and near-optimal results within shorter computational times compared to the test algorithms. PMID:24723834

  9. A hybrid genetic algorithm for solving bi-objective traveling salesman problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Mei; Li, Hecheng

    2017-08-01

    The traveling salesman problem (TSP) is a typical combinatorial optimization problem, in a traditional TSP only tour distance is taken as a unique objective to be minimized. When more than one optimization objective arises, the problem is known as a multi-objective TSP. In the present paper, a bi-objective traveling salesman problem (BOTSP) is taken into account, where both the distance and the cost are taken as optimization objectives. In order to efficiently solve the problem, a hybrid genetic algorithm is proposed. Firstly, two satisfaction degree indices are provided for each edge by considering the influences of the distance and the cost weight. The first satisfaction degree is used to select edges in a “rough” way, while the second satisfaction degree is executed for a more “refined” choice. Secondly, two satisfaction degrees are also applied to generate new individuals in the iteration process. Finally, based on genetic algorithm framework as well as 2-opt selection strategy, a hybrid genetic algorithm is proposed. The simulation illustrates the efficiency of the proposed algorithm.

  10. Large neighborhood search for the double traveling salesman problem with multiple stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Bent, Russell W; Van Hentenryck, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers a complex real-life short-haul/long haul pickup and delivery application. The problem can be modeled as double traveling salesman problem (TSP) in which the pickups and the deliveries happen in the first and second TSPs respectively. Moreover, the application features multiple stacks in which the items must be stored and the pickups and deliveries must take place in reserve (LIFO) order for each stack. The goal is to minimize the total travel time satisfying these constraints. This paper presents a large neighborhood search (LNS) algorithm which improves the best-known results on 65% of the available instances and is always within 2% of the best-known solutions.

  11. The stochastic traveling salesman problem: Finite size scaling and the cavity prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Percus, A.G.; Martin, O.C.

    1999-03-01

    The authors study the random link traveling salesman problem, where lengths l{sub ij} between city i and city j are taken to be independent, identically distributed random variables. They discuss a theoretical approach, the cavity method, that has been proposed for finding the optimum tour length over this random ensemble, given the assumption of replica symmetry. Using finite size scaling and a renormalized model, they test the cavity predictions against the results of simulations, and find excellent agreement over a range of distributions. They thus provide numerical evidence that the replica symmetric solution to this problem is the correct one. Finally, the authors note a surprising result concerning the distribution of kth-nearest neighbor links in optimal tours, and invite a theoretical understanding of this phenomenon.

  12. A High-Performance Genetic Algorithm: Using Traveling Salesman Problem as a Case

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chun-Wei; Tseng, Shih-Pang; Yang, Chu-Sing

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a simple but efficient algorithm for reducing the computation time of genetic algorithm (GA) and its variants. The proposed algorithm is motivated by the observation that genes common to all the individuals of a GA have a high probability of surviving the evolution and ending up being part of the final solution; as such, they can be saved away to eliminate the redundant computations at the later generations of a GA. To evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithm, we use it not only to solve the traveling salesman problem but also to provide an extensive analysis on the impact it may have on the quality of the end result. Our experimental results indicate that the proposed algorithm can significantly reduce the computation time of GA and GA-based algorithms while limiting the degradation of the quality of the end result to a very small percentage compared to traditional GA. PMID:24892038

  13. A high-performance genetic algorithm: using traveling salesman problem as a case.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chun-Wei; Tseng, Shih-Pang; Chiang, Ming-Chao; Yang, Chu-Sing; Hong, Tzung-Pei

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a simple but efficient algorithm for reducing the computation time of genetic algorithm (GA) and its variants. The proposed algorithm is motivated by the observation that genes common to all the individuals of a GA have a high probability of surviving the evolution and ending up being part of the final solution; as such, they can be saved away to eliminate the redundant computations at the later generations of a GA. To evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithm, we use it not only to solve the traveling salesman problem but also to provide an extensive analysis on the impact it may have on the quality of the end result. Our experimental results indicate that the proposed algorithm can significantly reduce the computation time of GA and GA-based algorithms while limiting the degradation of the quality of the end result to a very small percentage compared to traditional GA.

  14. Ant Colony Optimization with Genetic Operation and Its Application to Traveling Salesman Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rong-Long; Zhou, Xiao-Fan; Okazaki, Kozo

    Ant colony optimization (ACO) algorithms are a recently developed, population-based approach which has been successfully applied to optimization problems. However, in the ACO algorithms it is difficult to adjust the balance between intensification and diversification and thus the performance is not always very well. In this work, we propose an improved ACO algorithm in which some of ants can evolve by performing genetic operation, and the balance between intensification and diversification can be adjusted by numbers of ants which perform genetic operation. The proposed algorithm is tested by simulating the Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP). Experimental studies show that the proposed ACO algorithm with genetic operation has superior performance when compared to other existing ACO algorithms.

  15. Implementation of an effective hybrid GA for large-scale traveling salesman problems.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hung Dinh; Yoshihara, Ikuo; Yamamori, Kunihito; Yasunaga, Moritoshi

    2007-02-01

    This correspondence describes a hybrid genetic algorithm (GA) to find high-quality solutions for the traveling salesman problem (TSP). The proposed method is based on a parallel implementation of a multipopulation steady-state GA involving local search heuristics. It uses a variant of the maximal preservative crossover and the double-bridge move mutation. An effective implementation of the Lin-Kernighan heuristic (LK) is incorporated into the method to compensate for the GA's lack of local search ability. The method is validated by comparing it with the LK-Helsgaun method (LKH), which is one of the most effective methods for the TSP. Experimental results with benchmarks having up to 316228 cities show that the proposed method works more effectively and efficiently than LKH when solving large-scale problems. Finally, the method is used together with the implementation of the iterated LK to find a new best tour (as of June 2, 2003) for a 1904711-city TSP challenge.

  16. A Method for Solving Asymmetric Traveling Salesman Problems Using Block Shift Operation and Chaotic Neurodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachibana, Toshihiro; Adachi, Masaharu

    An asymmetric traveling salesman problem is one in which the costs for travel between one city and another are not symmetric. In this paper, we propose a method for solving such problems based on chaotic search method. It uses block-city exchange method, block insertion method, and 2-opt exchange as exchanging methods. In the block-city exchange method, we consider several cities as a block, and the whole block is exchanged with other city. In the block insertion method, we consider several cities as a block, and the block is inserted at the specified location. In the proposed method, a switching between two exchange methods is determined by chaotic neurodynamics. In the proposed method, the block-city exchange method uses one of exchange method for any instance. The other exchange method is selected from the 2-opt exchange and block insertion methods according to the standard deviations of the costs city-wise and that of all branches in the instance. The proposed method obtains better or equivalent solutions with the conventional heuristic methods for asymmetric TSPs.

  17. Experimental demonstration of a quantum annealing algorithm for the traveling salesman problem in a nuclear-magnetic-resonance quantum simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Hongwei; Kong Xi; Qin Gan; Zhou Xianyi; Peng Xinhua; Du Jiangfeng; Chong Bo

    2011-03-15

    The method of quantum annealing (QA) is a promising way for solving many optimization problems in both classical and quantum information theory. The main advantage of this approach, compared with the gate model, is the robustness of the operations against errors originated from both external controls and the environment. In this work, we succeed in demonstrating experimentally an application of the method of QA to a simplified version of the traveling salesman problem by simulating the corresponding Schroedinger evolution with a NMR quantum simulator. The experimental results unambiguously yielded the optimal traveling route, in good agreement with the theoretical prediction.

  18. A Discrete Fruit Fly Optimization Algorithm for the Traveling Salesman Problem

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zi-bin; Yang, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    The fruit fly optimization algorithm (FOA) is a newly developed bio-inspired algorithm. The continuous variant version of FOA has been proven to be a powerful evolutionary approach to determining the optima of a numerical function on a continuous definition domain. In this study, a discrete FOA (DFOA) is developed and applied to the traveling salesman problem (TSP), a common combinatorial problem. In the DFOA, the TSP tour is represented by an ordering of city indices, and the bio-inspired meta-heuristic search processes are executed with two elaborately designed main procedures: the smelling and tasting processes. In the smelling process, an effective crossover operator is used by the fruit fly group to search for the neighbors of the best-known swarm location. During the tasting process, an edge intersection elimination (EXE) operator is designed to improve the neighbors of the non-optimum food location in order to enhance the exploration performance of the DFOA. In addition, benchmark instances from the TSPLIB are classified in order to test the searching ability of the proposed algorithm. Furthermore, the effectiveness of the proposed DFOA is compared to that of other meta-heuristic algorithms. The results indicate that the proposed DFOA can be effectively used to solve TSPs, especially large-scale problems. PMID:27812175

  19. Traveling salesman problems with PageRank Distance on complex networks reveal community structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhongzhou; Liu, Jing; Wang, Shuai

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a new algorithm for community detection problems (CDPs) based on traveling salesman problems (TSPs), labeled as TSP-CDA. Since TSPs need to find a tour with minimum cost, cities close to each other are usually clustered in the tour. This inspired us to model CDPs as TSPs by taking each vertex as a city. Then, in the final tour, the vertices in the same community tend to cluster together, and the community structure can be obtained by cutting the tour into a couple of paths. There are two challenges. The first is to define a suitable distance between each pair of vertices which can reflect the probability that they belong to the same community. The second is to design a suitable strategy to cut the final tour into paths which can form communities. In TSP-CDA, we deal with these two challenges by defining a PageRank Distance and an automatic threshold-based cutting strategy. The PageRank Distance is designed with the intrinsic properties of CDPs in mind, and can be calculated efficiently. In the experiments, benchmark networks with 1000-10,000 nodes and varying structures are used to test the performance of TSP-CDA. A comparison is also made between TSP-CDA and two well-established community detection algorithms. The results show that TSP-CDA can find accurate community structure efficiently and outperforms the two existing algorithms.

  20. A Discrete Fruit Fly Optimization Algorithm for the Traveling Salesman Problem.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zi-Bin; Yang, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    The fruit fly optimization algorithm (FOA) is a newly developed bio-inspired algorithm. The continuous variant version of FOA has been proven to be a powerful evolutionary approach to determining the optima of a numerical function on a continuous definition domain. In this study, a discrete FOA (DFOA) is developed and applied to the traveling salesman problem (TSP), a common combinatorial problem. In the DFOA, the TSP tour is represented by an ordering of city indices, and the bio-inspired meta-heuristic search processes are executed with two elaborately designed main procedures: the smelling and tasting processes. In the smelling process, an effective crossover operator is used by the fruit fly group to search for the neighbors of the best-known swarm location. During the tasting process, an edge intersection elimination (EXE) operator is designed to improve the neighbors of the non-optimum food location in order to enhance the exploration performance of the DFOA. In addition, benchmark instances from the TSPLIB are classified in order to test the searching ability of the proposed algorithm. Furthermore, the effectiveness of the proposed DFOA is compared to that of other meta-heuristic algorithms. The results indicate that the proposed DFOA can be effectively used to solve TSPs, especially large-scale problems.

  1. Automatic Combination of Operators in a Genetic Algorithm to Solve the Traveling Salesman Problem

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Genetic algorithms are powerful search methods inspired by Darwinian evolution. To date, they have been applied to the solution of many optimization problems because of the easy use of their properties and their robustness in finding good solutions to difficult problems. The good operation of genetic algorithms is due in part to its two main variation operators, namely, crossover and mutation operators. Typically, in the literature, we find the use of a single crossover and mutation operator. However, there are studies that have shown that using multi-operators produces synergy and that the operators are mutually complementary. Using multi-operators is not a simple task because which operators to use and how to combine them must be determined, which in itself is an optimization problem. In this paper, it is proposed that the task of exploring the different combinations of the crossover and mutation operators can be carried out by evolutionary computing. The crossover and mutation operators used are those typically used for solving the traveling salesman problem. The process of searching for good combinations was effective, yielding appropriate and synergic combinations of the crossover and mutation operators. The numerical results show that the use of the combination of operators obtained by evolutionary computing is better than the use of a single operator and the use of multi-operators combined in the standard way. The results were also better than those of the last operators reported in the literature. PMID:26367182

  2. An application of traveling salesman problem using the improved genetic algorithm on android google maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narwadi, Teguh; Subiyanto

    2017-03-01

    The Travelling Salesman Problem (TSP) is one of the best known NP-hard problems, which means that no exact algorithm to solve it in polynomial time. This paper present a new variant application genetic algorithm approach with a local search technique has been developed to solve the TSP. For the local search technique, an iterative hill climbing method has been used. The system is implemented on the Android OS because android is now widely used around the world and it is mobile system. It is also integrated with Google API that can to get the geographical location and the distance of the cities, and displays the route. Therefore, we do some experimentation to test the behavior of the application. To test the effectiveness of the application of hybrid genetic algorithm (HGA) is compare with the application of simple GA in 5 sample from the cities in Central Java, Indonesia with different numbers of cities. According to the experiment results obtained that in the average solution HGA shows in 5 tests out of 5 (100%) is better than simple GA. The results have shown that the hybrid genetic algorithm outperforms the genetic algorithm especially in the case with the problem higher complexity.

  3. Efficient convex-elastic net algorithm to solve the Euclidean traveling salesman problem.

    PubMed

    Al-Mulhem, M; Al-Maghrabi, T

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a hybrid algorithm that combines an adaptive-type neural network algorithm and a nondeterministic iterative algorithm to solve the Euclidean traveling salesman problem (E-TSP). It begins with a brief introduction to the TSP and the E-TSP. Then, it presents the proposed algorithm with its two major components: the convex-elastic net (CEN) algorithm and the nondeterministic iterative improvement (NII) algorithm. These two algorithms are combined into the efficient convex-elastic net (ECEN) algorithm. The CEN algorithm integrates the convex-hull property and elastic net algorithm to generate an initial tour for the E-TSP. The NII algorithm uses two rearrangement operators to improve the initial tour given by the CEN algorithm. The paper presents simulation results for two instances of E-TSP: randomly generated tours and tours for well-known problems in the literature. Experimental results are given to show that the proposed algorithm ran find the nearly optimal solution for the E-TSP that outperform many similar algorithms reported in the literature. The paper concludes with the advantages of the new algorithm and possible extensions.

  4. An efficient self-organizing map designed by genetic algorithms for the traveling salesman problem.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hui-Dong; Leung, Kwong-Sak; Wong, Man-Leung; Xu, Z B

    2003-01-01

    As a typical combinatorial optimization problem, the traveling salesman problem (TSP) has attracted extensive research interest. In this paper, we develop a self-organizing map (SOM) with a novel learning rule. It is called the integrated SOM (ISOM) since its learning rule integrates the three learning mechanisms in the SOM literature. Within a single learning step, the excited neuron is first dragged toward the input city, then pushed to the convex hull of the TSP, and finally drawn toward the middle point of its two neighboring neurons. A genetic algorithm is successfully specified to determine the elaborate coordination among the three learning mechanisms as well as the suitable parameter setting. The evolved ISOM (eISOM) is examined on three sets of TSP to demonstrate its power and efficiency. The computation complexity of the eISOM is quadratic, which is comparable to other SOM-like neural networks. Moreover, the eISOM can generate more accurate solutions than several typical approaches for TSP including the SOM developed by Budinich, the expanding SOM, the convex elastic net, and the FLEXMAP algorithm. Though its solution accuracy is not yet comparable to some sophisticated heuristics, the eISOM is one of the most accurate neural networks for the TSP.

  5. 1/f Noise in the Simple Genetic Algorithm Applied to a Traveling Salesman Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Mitsuhiro

    Complex dynamical systems are observed in physics, biology, and even economics. Such systems in balance are considered to be in a critical state, and 1/f noise is considered to be a footprint. Complex dynamical systems have also been investigated in the field of evolutionary algorithms inspired by biological evolution. The genetic algorithm (GA) is a well-known evolutionary algorithm in which many individuals interact, and the simplest GA is referred to as the simple GA (SGA). However, the GA has not been examined from the viewpoint of the emergence of 1/f noise. In the present paper, the SGA is applied to a traveling salesman problem in order to investigate the SGA from such a viewpoint. The timecourses of the fitness of the candidate solution were examined. As a result, when the mutation and crossover probabilities were optimal, the system evolved toward a critical state in which the average maximum fitness over all trial runs was maximum. In this situation, the fluctuation of the fitness of the candidate solution resulted in the 1/f power spectrum, and the dynamics of the system had no intrinsic time or length scale.

  6. Fast Implementation of Genetic Algorithm by Localized EAX Crossover for the Traveling Salesman Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Yuichi

    We propose an genetic algorithm (GA) that applies to the traveling salesman problem (TSP). The GA uses edge assembly crossover (EAX), which is known to be effective for solving the TSP. We first propose a fast implementation of a localized EAX where localized edge exchanges are used in the EAX procedure. We also propose a selection model with an effective combination of the localized EAX that can maintain population diversity at negligible computational costs. Edge entropy measure is used to evaluate population diversity. We demonstrate that the proposed GA is comparable to state-of-the-art heuristics for the TSP. Especially, the GA is superior to them on large instances more than 10,000 cities. For example, the GA found an optimal solution of brd14051 (14,051 cities instance) with a reasonable computational cost. The results are quite impressive because the GA does not use Lin-Kernighan local search (LKLS) even though almost all existing state-of-the-art heuristics for the TSP based on LKLS and its variants.

  7. Million city traveling salesman problem solution by divide and conquer clustering with adaptive resonance neural networks.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Samuel A; Wunsch, Donald C

    2003-01-01

    The Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP) is a very hard optimization problem in the field of operations research. It has been shown to be NP-complete, and is an often-used benchmark for new optimization techniques. One of the main challenges with this problem is that standard, non-AI heuristic approaches such as the Lin-Kernighan algorithm (LK) and the chained LK variant are currently very effective and in wide use for the common fully connected, Euclidean variant that is considered here. This paper presents an algorithm that uses adaptive resonance theory (ART) in combination with a variation of the Lin-Kernighan local optimization algorithm to solve very large instances of the TSP. The primary advantage of this algorithm over traditional LK and chained-LK approaches is the increased scalability and parallelism allowed by the divide-and-conquer clustering paradigm. Tours obtained by the algorithm are lower quality, but scaling is much better and there is a high potential for increasing performance using parallel hardware.

  8. Optimal solution for travelling salesman problem using heuristic shortest path algorithm with imprecise arc length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakar, Sumarni Abu; Ibrahim, Milbah

    2017-08-01

    The shortest path problem is a popular problem in graph theory. It is about finding a path with minimum length between a specified pair of vertices. In any network the weight of each edge is usually represented in a form of crisp real number and subsequently the weight is used in the calculation of shortest path problem using deterministic algorithms. However, due to failure, uncertainty is always encountered in practice whereby the weight of edge of the network is uncertain and imprecise. In this paper, a modified algorithm which utilized heuristic shortest path method and fuzzy approach is proposed for solving a network with imprecise arc length. Here, interval number and triangular fuzzy number in representing arc length of the network are considered. The modified algorithm is then applied to a specific example of the Travelling Salesman Problem (TSP). Total shortest distance obtained from this algorithm is then compared with the total distance obtained from traditional nearest neighbour heuristic algorithm. The result shows that the modified algorithm can provide not only on the sequence of visited cities which shown to be similar with traditional approach but it also provides a good measurement of total shortest distance which is lesser as compared to the total shortest distance calculated using traditional approach. Hence, this research could contribute to the enrichment of methods used in solving TSP.

  9. Modeling surgical tool selection patterns as a "traveling salesman problem" for optimizing a modular surgical tool system.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Carl A; Miller, David J; Oleynikov, Dmitry

    2008-01-01

    As modular systems come into the forefront of robotic telesurgery, streamlining the process of selecting surgical tools becomes an important consideration. This paper presents a method for optimal queuing of tools in modular surgical tool systems, based on patterns in tool-use sequences, in order to minimize time spent changing tools. The solution approach is to model the set of tools as a graph, with tool-change frequency expressed as edge weights in the graph, and to solve the Traveling Salesman Problem for the graph. In a set of simulations, this method has shown superior performance at optimizing tool arrangements for streamlining surgical procedures.

  10. WHAMII - An enumeration and insertion procedure with binomial bounds for the stochastic time-constrained traveling salesman problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Roy W.; Keating, Karen; Salamone, Daryl J.; Levy, Laurence; Nag, Barindra; Sanborn, Joan A.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm (WHAMII) designed to solve the Artificial Intelligence Design Challenge at the 1987 AIAA Guidance, Navigation and Control Conference. The problem under consideration is a stochastic generalization of the traveling salesman problem in which travel costs can incur a penalty with a given probability. The variability in travel costs leads to a probability constraint with respect to violating the budget allocation. Given the small size of the problem (eleven cities), an approach is considered that combines partial tour enumeration with a heuristic city insertion procedure. For computational efficiency during both the enumeration and insertion procedures, precalculated binomial probabilities are used to determine an upper bound on the actual probability of violating the budget constraint for each tour. The actual probability is calculated for the final best tour, and additional insertions are attempted until the actual probability exceeds the bound.

  11. WHAMII - An enumeration and insertion procedure with binomial bounds for the stochastic time-constrained traveling salesman problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahl, Roy W.; Keating, Karen; Salamone, Daryl J.; Levy, Laurence; Nag, Barindra; Sanborn, Joan A.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm (WHAMII) designed to solve the Artificial Intelligence Design Challenge at the 1987 AIAA Guidance, Navigation and Control Conference. The problem under consideration is a stochastic generalization of the traveling salesman problem in which travel costs can incur a penalty with a given probability. The variability in travel costs leads to a probability constraint with respect to violating the budget allocation. Given the small size of the problem (eleven cities), an approach is considered that combines partial tour enumeration with a heuristic city insertion procedure. For computational efficiency during both the enumeration and insertion procedures, precalculated binomial probabilities are used to determine an upper bound on the actual probability of violating the budget constraint for each tour. The actual probability is calculated for the final best tour, and additional insertions are attempted until the actual probability exceeds the bound.

  12. An Ant Colony Optimization algorithm for solving the fixed destination multi-depot multiple traveling salesman problem with non-random parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadhani, T.; Hertono, G. F.; Handari, B. D.

    2017-07-01

    The Multiple Traveling Salesman Problem (MTSP) is the extension of the Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP) in which the shortest routes of m salesmen all of which start and finish in a single city (depot) will be determined. If there is more than one depot and salesmen start from and return to the same depot, then the problem is called Fixed Destination Multi-depot Multiple Traveling Salesman Problem (MMTSP). In this paper, MMTSP will be solved using the Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) algorithm. ACO is a metaheuristic optimization algorithm which is derived from the behavior of ants in finding the shortest route(s) from the anthill to a form of nourishment. In solving the MMTSP, the algorithm is observed with respect to different chosen cities as depots and non-randomly three parameters of MMTSP: m, K, L, those represents the number of salesmen, the fewest cities that must be visited by a salesman, and the most number of cities that can be visited by a salesman, respectively. The implementation is observed with four dataset from TSPLIB. The results show that the different chosen cities as depots and the three parameters of MMTSP, in which m is the most important parameter, affect the solution.

  13. An Investigation of Starting Point Preferences in Human Performance on Traveling Salesman Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacGregor, James N.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that people start traveling sales problem tours significantly more often from boundary than from interior nodes. There are a number of possible reasons for such a tendency: first, it may arise as a direct result of the processes involved in tour construction; second, boundary points may be perceptually more salient than…

  14. An Investigation of Starting Point Preferences in Human Performance on Traveling Salesman Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacGregor, James N.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that people start traveling sales problem tours significantly more often from boundary than from interior nodes. There are a number of possible reasons for such a tendency: first, it may arise as a direct result of the processes involved in tour construction; second, boundary points may be perceptually more salient than…

  15. Amoeba-based computing for traveling salesman problem: long-term correlations between spatially separated individual cells of Physarum polycephalum.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liping; Aono, Masashi; Kim, Song-Ju; Hara, Masahiko

    2013-04-01

    A single-celled, multi-nucleated amoeboid organism, a plasmodium of the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum, can perform sophisticated computing by exhibiting complex spatiotemporal oscillatory dynamics while deforming its amorphous body. We previously devised an "amoeba-based computer (ABC)" to quantitatively evaluate the optimization capability of the amoeboid organism in searching for a solution to the traveling salesman problem (TSP) under optical feedback control. In ABC, the organism changes its shape to find a high quality solution (a relatively shorter TSP route) by alternately expanding and contracting its pseudopod-like branches that exhibit local photoavoidance behavior. The quality of the solution serves as a measure of the optimality of which the organism maximizes its global body area (nutrient absorption) while minimizing the risk of being illuminated (exposure to aversive stimuli). ABC found a high quality solution for the 8-city TSP with a high probability. However, it remains unclear whether intracellular communication among the branches of the organism is essential for computing. In this study, we conducted a series of control experiments using two individual cells (two single-celled organisms) to perform parallel searches in the absence of intercellular communication. We found that ABC drastically lost its ability to find a solution when it used two independent individuals. However, interestingly, when two individuals were prepared by dividing one individual, they found a solution for a few tens of minutes. That is, the two divided individuals remained correlated even though they were spatially separated. These results suggest the presence of a long-term memory in the intrinsic dynamics of this organism and its significance in performing sophisticated computing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. People efficiently explore the solution space of the computationally intractable traveling salesman problem to find near-optimal tours.

    PubMed

    Acuña, Daniel E; Parada, Víctor

    2010-07-29

    Humans need to solve computationally intractable problems such as visual search, categorization, and simultaneous learning and acting, yet an increasing body of evidence suggests that their solutions to instantiations of these problems are near optimal. Computational complexity advances an explanation to this apparent paradox: (1) only a small portion of instances of such problems are actually hard, and (2) successful heuristics exploit structural properties of the typical instance to selectively improve parts that are likely to be sub-optimal. We hypothesize that these two ideas largely account for the good performance of humans on computationally hard problems. We tested part of this hypothesis by studying the solutions of 28 participants to 28 instances of the Euclidean Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP). Participants were provided feedback on the cost of their solutions and were allowed unlimited solution attempts (trials). We found a significant improvement between the first and last trials and that solutions are significantly different from random tours that follow the convex hull and do not have self-crossings. More importantly, we found that participants modified their current better solutions in such a way that edges belonging to the optimal solution ("good" edges) were significantly more likely to stay than other edges ("bad" edges), a hallmark of structural exploitation. We found, however, that more trials harmed the participants' ability to tell good from bad edges, suggesting that after too many trials the participants "ran out of ideas." In sum, we provide the first demonstration of significant performance improvement on the TSP under repetition and feedback and evidence that human problem-solving may exploit the structure of hard problems paralleling behavior of state-of-the-art heuristics.

  17. People Efficiently Explore the Solution Space of the Computationally Intractable Traveling Salesman Problem to Find Near-Optimal Tours

    PubMed Central

    Acuña, Daniel E.; Parada, Víctor

    2010-01-01

    Humans need to solve computationally intractable problems such as visual search, categorization, and simultaneous learning and acting, yet an increasing body of evidence suggests that their solutions to instantiations of these problems are near optimal. Computational complexity advances an explanation to this apparent paradox: (1) only a small portion of instances of such problems are actually hard, and (2) successful heuristics exploit structural properties of the typical instance to selectively improve parts that are likely to be sub-optimal. We hypothesize that these two ideas largely account for the good performance of humans on computationally hard problems. We tested part of this hypothesis by studying the solutions of 28 participants to 28 instances of the Euclidean Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP). Participants were provided feedback on the cost of their solutions and were allowed unlimited solution attempts (trials). We found a significant improvement between the first and last trials and that solutions are significantly different from random tours that follow the convex hull and do not have self-crossings. More importantly, we found that participants modified their current better solutions in such a way that edges belonging to the optimal solution (“good” edges) were significantly more likely to stay than other edges (“bad” edges), a hallmark of structural exploitation. We found, however, that more trials harmed the participants' ability to tell good from bad edges, suggesting that after too many trials the participants “ran out of ideas.” In sum, we provide the first demonstration of significant performance improvement on the TSP under repetition and feedback and evidence that human problem-solving may exploit the structure of hard problems paralleling behavior of state-of-the-art heuristics. PMID:20686597

  18. The importance of the convex hull for human performance on the traveling salesman problem: a comment on MacGregor and Ormerod (1996)

    PubMed

    Lee, M D; Vickers, D

    2000-01-01

    MacGregor and Ormerod (1996) have presented results purporting to show that human performance on visually presented traveling salesman problems, as indexed by a measure of response uncertainty, is strongly determined by the number of points in the stimulus array falling inside the convex hull, as distinct from the total number of points. It is argued that this conclusion is artifactually determined by their constrained procedure for stimulus construction, and, even if true, would be limited to arrays with fewer than around 50 points.

  19. An Adaptive Evolutionary Algorithm for Traveling Salesman Problem with Precedence Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Jinmo; Jeong, Bongju

    2014-01-01

    Traveling sales man problem with precedence constraints is one of the most notorious problems in terms of the efficiency of its solution approach, even though it has very wide range of industrial applications. We propose a new evolutionary algorithm to efficiently obtain good solutions by improving the search process. Our genetic operators guarantee the feasibility of solutions over the generations of population, which significantly improves the computational efficiency even when it is combined with our flexible adaptive searching strategy. The efficiency of the algorithm is investigated by computational experiments. PMID:24701158

  20. Multi-step routes of capuchin monkeys in a laser pointer traveling salesman task.

    PubMed

    Howard, Allison M; Fragaszy, Dorothy M

    2014-09-01

    Prior studies have claimed that nonhuman primates plan their routes multiple steps in advance. However, a recent reexamination of multi-step route planning in nonhuman primates indicated that there is no evidence for planning more than one step ahead. We tested multi-step route planning in capuchin monkeys using a pointing device to "travel" to distal targets while stationary. This device enabled us to determine whether capuchins distinguish the spatial relationship between goals and themselves and spatial relationships between goals and the laser dot, allocentrically. In Experiment 1, two subjects were presented with identical food items in Near-Far (one item nearer to subject) and Equidistant (both items equidistant from subject) conditions with a laser dot visible between the items. Subjects moved the laser dot to the items using a joystick. In the Near-Far condition, one subject demonstrated a bias for items closest to self but the other subject chose efficiently. In the second experiment, subjects retrieved three food items in similar Near-Far and Equidistant arrangements. Both subjects preferred food items nearest the laser dot and showed no evidence of multi-step route planning. We conclude that these capuchins do not make choices on the basis of multi-step look ahead strategies.

  1. Verification and rectification of the physical analogy of simulated annealing for the solution of the traveling salesman problem.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, M

    2011-03-01

    The aim of the present study is to elucidate how simulated annealing (SA) works in its finite-time implementation by starting from the verification of its conventional optimization scenario based on equilibrium statistical mechanics. Two and one supplementary experiments, the design of which is inspired by concepts and methods developed for studies on liquid and glass, are performed on two types of random traveling salesman problems. In the first experiment, a newly parameterized temperature schedule is introduced to simulate a quasistatic process along the scenario and a parametric study is conducted to investigate the optimization characteristics of this adaptive cooling. In the second experiment, the search trajectory of the Metropolis algorithm (constant-temperature SA) is analyzed in the landscape paradigm in the hope of drawing a precise physical analogy by comparison with the corresponding dynamics of glass-forming molecular systems. These two experiments indicate that the effectiveness of finite-time SA comes not from equilibrium sampling at low temperature but from downward interbasin dynamics occurring before equilibrium. These dynamics work most effectively at an intermediate temperature varying with the total search time and thus this effective temperature is identified using the Deborah number. To test directly the role of these relaxation dynamics in the process of cooling, a supplementary experiment is performed using another parameterized temperature schedule with a piecewise variable cooling rate and the effect of this biased cooling is examined systematically. The results show that the optimization performance is not only dependent on but also sensitive to cooling in the vicinity of the above effec-tive temperature and that this feature is interpreted as a consequence of the presence or absence of the workable interbasin dynamics. It is confirmed for the present instances that the effectiveness of finite-time SA derives from the glassy relaxation

  2. Multi-Objective Ant Colony Optimization Based on the Physarum-Inspired Mathematical Model for Bi-Objective Traveling Salesman Problems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zili; Gao, Chao; Lu, Yuxiao; Liu, Yuxin; Liang, Mingxin

    2016-01-01

    Bi-objective Traveling Salesman Problem (bTSP) is an important field in the operations research, its solutions can be widely applied in the real world. Many researches of Multi-objective Ant Colony Optimization (MOACOs) have been proposed to solve bTSPs. However, most of MOACOs suffer premature convergence. This paper proposes an optimization strategy for MOACOs by optimizing the initialization of pheromone matrix with the prior knowledge of Physarum-inspired Mathematical Model (PMM). PMM can find the shortest route between two nodes based on the positive feedback mechanism. The optimized algorithms, named as iPM-MOACOs, can enhance the pheromone in the short paths and promote the search ability of ants. A series of experiments are conducted and experimental results show that the proposed strategy can achieve a better compromise solution than the original MOACOs for solving bTSPs.

  3. Multi-Objective Ant Colony Optimization Based on the Physarum-Inspired Mathematical Model for Bi-Objective Traveling Salesman Problems

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zili; Gao, Chao; Lu, Yuxiao; Liu, Yuxin; Liang, Mingxin

    2016-01-01

    Bi-objective Traveling Salesman Problem (bTSP) is an important field in the operations research, its solutions can be widely applied in the real world. Many researches of Multi-objective Ant Colony Optimization (MOACOs) have been proposed to solve bTSPs. However, most of MOACOs suffer premature convergence. This paper proposes an optimization strategy for MOACOs by optimizing the initialization of pheromone matrix with the prior knowledge of Physarum-inspired Mathematical Model (PMM). PMM can find the shortest route between two nodes based on the positive feedback mechanism. The optimized algorithms, named as iPM-MOACOs, can enhance the pheromone in the short paths and promote the search ability of ants. A series of experiments are conducted and experimental results show that the proposed strategy can achieve a better compromise solution than the original MOACOs for solving bTSPs. PMID:26751562

  4. A Priori Analysis of Natural Language Queries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiegler, Israel; Elata, Smadar

    1988-01-01

    Presents a model for the a priori analysis of natural language queries which uses an algorithm to transform the query into a logical pattern that is used to determine the answerability of the query. The results of testing by a prototype system implemented in PROLOG are discussed. (20 references) (CLB)

  5. Predictive a priori pressure-dependent kinetics.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Ahren W; Pelzer, Kenley M; Miller, James A; Kamarchik, Eugene; Harding, Lawrence B; Klippenstein, Stephen J

    2014-12-05

    The ability to predict the pressure dependence of chemical reaction rates would be a great boon to kinetic modeling of processes such as combustion and atmospheric chemistry. This pressure dependence is intimately related to the rate of collision-induced transitions in energy E and angular momentum J. We present a scheme for predicting this pressure dependence based on coupling trajectory-based determinations of moments of the E,J-resolved collisional transfer rates with the two-dimensional master equation. This completely a priori procedure provides a means for proceeding beyond the empiricism of prior work. The requisite microcanonical dissociation rates are obtained from ab initio transition state theory. Predictions for the CH4 = CH3 + H and C2H3 = C2H2 + H reaction systems are in excellent agreement with experiment.

  6. Measurement, coordination, and the relativized a priori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padovani, Flavia

    2015-11-01

    The problem of measurement is a central issue in the epistemology and methodology of the physical sciences. In recent literature on scientific representation, large emphasis has been put on the "constitutive role" played by measurement procedures as forms of representation. Despite its importance, this issue hardly finds any mention in writings on constitutive principles, viz. in Michael Friedman's account of relativized a priori principles. This issue, instead, was at the heart of Reichenbach's analysis of coordinating principles that has inspired Friedman's interpretation. This paper suggests that these procedures should have a part in an account of constitutive principles of science, and that they could be interpreted following the intuition originally present (but ultimately not fully developed) in Reichenbach's early work.

  7. Integrating a priori information in edge-linking algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farag, Aly A.; Cao, Yu; Yeap, Yuen-Pin

    1992-09-01

    This research presents an approach to integrate a priori information to the path metric of the LINK algorithm. The zero-crossing contours of the $DEL2G are taken as a gross estimate of the boundaries in the image. This estimate of the boundaries is used to define the swath of important information, and to provide a distance measure for edge localization. During the linking process, a priori information plays important roles in (1) dramatically reducing the search space because the actual path lies within +/- 2 (sigma) f from the prototype contours ((sigma) f is the standard deviation of the Gaussian kernel used in the edge enhancement step); (2) breaking the ties when the search metrics give uncertain information; and (3) selecting the set of goal nodes for the search algorithm. We show that the integration of a priori information in the LINK algorithms provides faster and more accurate edge linking.

  8. The Influence of "a priori" Ideas on the Experimental Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cauzinille-Marmeche, Evelyne; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Investigated the role of "a priori" ideas in planning experiments and data processing leading to inferences. Thirty-one students (ages 11-13) observed a "combustion/candle in a closed container" experiment and were asked to interpret sets of measurements. Findings, among others, show that children preferentially experiment on…

  9. "A Priori" Assessment of Language Learning Tasks by Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westhoff, Gerard J.

    2009-01-01

    Teachers' competence to estimate the effectiveness of learning materials is important and often neglected in programmes for teacher education. In this lecture I will try to explore the possibilities of designing scaffolding instruments for a "priori" assessment of language learning tasks, based on insights from SLA and cognitive psychology, more…

  10. The Influence of "a priori" Ideas on the Experimental Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cauzinille-Marmeche, Evelyne; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Investigated the role of "a priori" ideas in planning experiments and data processing leading to inferences. Thirty-one students (ages 11-13) observed a "combustion/candle in a closed container" experiment and were asked to interpret sets of measurements. Findings, among others, show that children preferentially experiment on…

  11. "A Priori" Assessment of Language Learning Tasks by Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westhoff, Gerard J.

    2009-01-01

    Teachers' competence to estimate the effectiveness of learning materials is important and often neglected in programmes for teacher education. In this lecture I will try to explore the possibilities of designing scaffolding instruments for a "priori" assessment of language learning tasks, based on insights from SLA and cognitive psychology, more…

  12. 3SMAC: an a priori tomographic model of the upper mantle based on geophysical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nataf, Henri-Claude; Ricard, Yanick

    1996-05-01

    We present an a priori three-dimensional 'tomographic' model of the upper mantle. We construct this model (called 3SMAC — three-dimensional seismological model a priori constrained) in four steps: we compile information on the thickness of 'chemical' layers in the Earth (water, sediments, upper and lower crust, etc); we get a 3D temperature distribution from thermal plate models applied to the oceans and continents; we deduce the mineralogy in the mantle from pressure and temperature and we finally get a three-dimensional model of density, seismic velocities, and attenuation by introducing laboratory measurements of these quantities as a function of pressure and temperature. The model is thus consistent with various geophysical data, such as ocean bathymetry, and surface heat flux. We use this model to compute synthetic travel-times of body waves, and we compare them with observations. A similar exercise is performed for surface waves and normal modes in a companion paper (Ricard et al., 1996, J. Geophys. Res., in press). We find that our model predicts the bulk of the observed travel-time variations. Both the amplitude and general pattern are well recovered. The discrepancies suggest that tomography can provide useful regional information on the thermal state of the continents. In the oceans, the flattening of the sea-floor beond 70 Ma seems difficult to reconcile with the seismic observations. Overall, our 3SMAC model is both a realistic model, which can be used to test various tomographic methods, and a model of the minimum heterogeneities to be expected from geodynamical modeling. Therefore, it should be a useful a priori model to be used in tomographic inversions, in order to retrieve reliable images of heterogeneities in the transition zone, which should, in turn, greatly improve our understanding of geodynamical processes in the deep Earth. 3SMAC and accompanying software can be retrieved by anonymous ftp at geoscope.ipgp.jussieu.fr.

  13. Structural a priori information in near-infrared optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghani, Hamid; Carpenter, Colin M.; Yalavarthy, Phaneendra K.; Pogue, Brian W.; Culver, Joseph P.

    2007-02-01

    Recent interest in the use of dual modality imaging in the field of optical Near Infrared (NIR) Tomography has increased, specifically with use of structural information, from for example, MRI. Although MRI images provide high resolution structural information about tissue, they lack the contrast and functional information needed to investigate physiology, whereas NIR data has been established as a high contrast imaging modality, but one which suffers from low resolution. To this effect, the use of dual modality data has been shown to increase the qualitative and quantitative accuracy of clinical information that can be obtained from tissue. Results so far have indicated that providing accurate apriori structural information is available, such dual modality imaging techniques can be used for the detection and characterization of breast cancer in-vivo, as well as the investigation of brain function and physiology in both human and small animal studies. Although there has been much interest and research into the best suitable and robust use of a-priori structural information within the reconstruction of optical properties of tissue, little work has been done into the investigation of how much accuracy is needed from the structural MRI images in order to obtain the most clinically reliable information. In this paper, we will present and demonstrate the two most common application of a-priori information into image reconstruction, namely soft and hard priori. The effect of inaccuracies of the a-priori structural information within the reconstructed NIR images are presented showing that providing that the error of the a-priori information is within 20% in terms of size and location, adequate NIR images can be reconstructed.

  14. A priori SNR estimation and noise estimation for speech enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Rui; Zeng, ZeQing; Zhu, Ping

    2016-12-01

    A priori signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) estimation and noise estimation are important for speech enhancement. In this paper, a novel modified decision-directed (DD) a priori SNR estimation approach based on single-frequency entropy, named DDBSE, is proposed. DDBSE replaces the fixed weighting factor in the DD approach with an adaptive one calculated according to change of single-frequency entropy. Simultaneously, a new noise power estimation approach based on unbiased minimum mean square error (MMSE) and voice activity detection (VAD), named UMVAD, is proposed. UMVAD adopts different strategies to estimate noise in order to reduce over-estimation and under-estimation of noise. UMVAD improves the classical statistical model-based VAD by utilizing an adaptive threshold to replace the original fixed one and modifies the unbiased MMSE-based noise estimation approach using an adaptive a priori speech presence probability calculated by entropy instead of the original fixed one. Experimental results show that DDBSE can provide greater noise suppression than DD and UMVAD can improve the accuracy of noise estimation. Compared to existing approaches, speech enhancement based on UMVAD and DDBSE can obtain a better segment SNR score and composite measure c ovl score, especially in adverse environments such as non-stationary noise and low-SNR.

  15. A priori SNR estimation and noise estimation for speech enhancement.

    PubMed

    Yao, Rui; Zeng, ZeQing; Zhu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    A priori signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) estimation and noise estimation are important for speech enhancement. In this paper, a novel modified decision-directed (DD) a priori SNR estimation approach based on single-frequency entropy, named DDBSE, is proposed. DDBSE replaces the fixed weighting factor in the DD approach with an adaptive one calculated according to change of single-frequency entropy. Simultaneously, a new noise power estimation approach based on unbiased minimum mean square error (MMSE) and voice activity detection (VAD), named UMVAD, is proposed. UMVAD adopts different strategies to estimate noise in order to reduce over-estimation and under-estimation of noise. UMVAD improves the classical statistical model-based VAD by utilizing an adaptive threshold to replace the original fixed one and modifies the unbiased MMSE-based noise estimation approach using an adaptive a priori speech presence probability calculated by entropy instead of the original fixed one. Experimental results show that DDBSE can provide greater noise suppression than DD and UMVAD can improve the accuracy of noise estimation. Compared to existing approaches, speech enhancement based on UMVAD and DDBSE can obtain a better segment SNR score and composite measure covl score, especially in adverse environments such as non-stationary noise and low-SNR.

  16. First-arrival traveltime sound speed inversion with a priori information

    PubMed Central

    Hooi, Fong Ming; Carson, Paul L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A first-arrival travel-time sound speed algorithm presented byTarantola [Inverse Problem Theory and Methods for Model Parameter Estimation (SIAM, Philadelphia, PA, 2005)] is adapted to the medical ultrasonics setting. Through specification of a covariance matrix for the object model, the algorithm allows for natural inclusion of physical a priori information of the object. The algorithm's ability to accurately and robustly reconstruct a complex sound speed distribution is demonstrated on simulation and experimental data using a limited aperture. Methods: The algorithm is first demonstrated generally in simulation with a numerical breast phantom imaged in different geometries. As this work is motivated by the authors' limited aperture dual sided ultrasound breast imaging system, experimental data are acquired with a Verasonics system with dual, 128 element, linear L7-4 arrays. The transducers are automatically calibrated for usage in the eikonal forward model.A priori information such as knowledge of correlated regions within the object is obtained via segmentation of B-mode images generated from synthetic aperture imaging. Results: As one illustration of the algorithm's facility for inclusion ofa priori information, physically grounded regularization is demonstrated in simulation. The algorithm's practicality is then demonstrated through experimental realization in limited aperture cases. Reconstructions of sound speed distributions of various complexity are improved through inclusion of a priori information. The sound speed maps are generally reconstructed with accuracy within a few m/s. Conclusions: This paper demonstrates the ability to form sound speed images using two opposed commercial linear arrays to mimic ultrasound image acquisition in the compressed mammographic geometry. The ability to create reasonably good speed of sound images in the compressed mammographic geometry allows images to be readily coregistered to tomosynthesis image volumes for

  17. First-arrival traveltime sound speed inversion with a priori information.

    PubMed

    Hooi, Fong Ming; Carson, Paul L

    2014-08-01

    A first-arrival travel-time sound speed algorithm presented by Tarantola [Inverse Problem Theory and Methods for Model Parameter Estimation (SIAM, Philadelphia, PA, 2005)] is adapted to the medical ultrasonics setting. Through specification of a covariance matrix for the object model, the algorithm allows for natural inclusion of physical a priori information of the object. The algorithm's ability to accurately and robustly reconstruct a complex sound speed distribution is demonstrated on simulation and experimental data using a limited aperture. The algorithm is first demonstrated generally in simulation with a numerical breast phantom imaged in different geometries. As this work is motivated by the authors' limited aperture dual sided ultrasound breast imaging system, experimental data are acquired with a Verasonics system with dual, 128 element, linear L7-4 arrays. The transducers are automatically calibrated for usage in the eikonal forward model.A priori information such as knowledge of correlated regions within the object is obtained via segmentation of B-mode images generated from synthetic aperture imaging. As one illustration of the algorithm's facility for inclusion ofa priori information, physically grounded regularization is demonstrated in simulation. The algorithm's practicality is then demonstrated through experimental realization in limited aperture cases. Reconstructions of sound speed distributions of various complexity are improved through inclusion of a priori information. The sound speed maps are generally reconstructed with accuracy within a few m/s. This paper demonstrates the ability to form sound speed images using two opposed commercial linear arrays to mimic ultrasound image acquisition in the compressed mammographic geometry. The ability to create reasonably good speed of sound images in the compressed mammographic geometry allows images to be readily coregistered to tomosynthesis image volumes for breast cancer detection and

  18. A priori discretization quality metrics for distributed hydrologic modeling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongli; Tolson, Bryan; Craig, James; Shafii, Mahyar; Basu, Nandita

    2016-04-01

    In distributed hydrologic modelling, a watershed is treated as a set of small homogeneous units that address the spatial heterogeneity of the watershed being simulated. The ability of models to reproduce observed spatial patterns firstly depends on the spatial discretization, which is the process of defining homogeneous units in the form of grid cells, subwatersheds, or hydrologic response units etc. It is common for hydrologic modelling studies to simply adopt a nominal or default discretization strategy without formally assessing alternative discretization levels. This approach lacks formal justifications and is thus problematic. More formalized discretization strategies are either a priori or a posteriori with respect to building and running a hydrologic simulation model. A posteriori approaches tend to be ad-hoc and compare model calibration and/or validation performance under various watershed discretizations. The construction and calibration of multiple versions of a distributed model can become a seriously limiting computational burden. Current a priori approaches are more formalized and compare overall heterogeneity statistics of dominant variables between candidate discretization schemes and input data or reference zones. While a priori approaches are efficient and do not require running a hydrologic model, they do not fully investigate the internal spatial pattern changes of variables of interest. Furthermore, the existing a priori approaches focus on landscape and soil data and do not assess impacts of discretization on stream channel definition even though its significance has been noted by numerous studies. The primary goals of this study are to (1) introduce new a priori discretization quality metrics considering the spatial pattern changes of model input data; (2) introduce a two-step discretization decision-making approach to compress extreme errors and meet user-specified discretization expectations through non-uniform discretization threshold

  19. Effects of a priori liking on the elicitation of mimicry.

    PubMed

    Stel, Mariëlle; van Baaren, Rick B; Blascovich, Jim; van Dijk, Eric; McCall, Cade; Pollmann, Monique M H; van Leeuwen, Matthijs L; Mastop, Jessanne; Vonk, Roos

    2010-01-01

    Mimicry and prosocial feelings are generally thought to be positively related. However, the conditions under which mimicry and liking are related largely remain unspecified. We advance this specification by examining the relationship between mimicry and liking more thoroughly. In two experiments, we manipulated an individual's a priori liking for another and investigated whether it influenced mimicry of that person. Our experiments demonstrate that in the presence of a reason to like a target, automatic mimicry is increased. However, mimicry did not decrease when disliking a target. These studies provide further evidence of a link between mimicry and liking and extend previous research by showing that a certain level of mimicry even occurs when mimicry behavior is inconsistent with one's goals or motivations.

  20. Onboard star identification without a priori attitude information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketchum, Eleanor A.; Tolson, Robert H.

    1995-03-01

    Many algorithms used today determine spacecraft attitude by identifying stars in the field of view of a star tracker. However, each of these methods require some a priori knowledge of the spacecraft attitude. Some algorithms have been extended to implement a computation-intense full-sky scan. Others require large data bases. Both storage and speed are concerns for autonomous onboard systems. This paper presents an algorithm that, by discretizing the sky and filtering by visual magnitude of the brightest observed star, provides a star identification process that is computationally efficient, compared to existing techniques. A savings in onboard storage of over 80% compared with a popular existing technique is documented. Results of random tests with simulated star fields are presented without false identification and with dramatic increase in speed over full-sky scan methods.

  1. A priori physicalism, lonely ghosts and Cartesian doubt.

    PubMed

    Goff, Philip

    2012-06-01

    A zombie is a physical duplicates of a human being which lacks consciousness. A ghost is a phenomenal duplicate of a human being whose nature is exhausted by consciousness. Discussion of zombie arguments, that is anti-physicalist arguments which appeal to the conceivability of zombies, is familiar in the philosophy of mind literature, whilst ghostly arguments, that is, anti-physicalist arguments which appeal to the conceivability of ghosts, are somewhat neglected. In this paper I argue that ghostly arguments have a number of dialectical advantages over zombie arguments. I go onto explain how the conceivability of ghosts is inconsistent with two kinds of a priori physicalism: analytic functionalism and the Australian physicalism of Armstrong and Lewis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A priori discretization error metrics for distributed hydrologic modeling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongli; Tolson, Bryan A.; Craig, James R.; Shafii, Mahyar

    2016-12-01

    Watershed spatial discretization is an important step in developing a distributed hydrologic model. A key difficulty in the spatial discretization process is maintaining a balance between the aggregation-induced information loss and the increase in computational burden caused by the inclusion of additional computational units. Objective identification of an appropriate discretization scheme still remains a challenge, in part because of the lack of quantitative measures for assessing discretization quality, particularly prior to simulation. This study proposes a priori discretization error metrics to quantify the information loss of any candidate discretization scheme without having to run and calibrate a hydrologic model. These error metrics are applicable to multi-variable and multi-site discretization evaluation and provide directly interpretable information to the hydrologic modeler about discretization quality. The first metric, a subbasin error metric, quantifies the routing information loss from discretization, and the second, a hydrological response unit (HRU) error metric, improves upon existing a priori metrics by quantifying the information loss due to changes in land cover or soil type property aggregation. The metrics are straightforward to understand and easy to recode. Informed by the error metrics, a two-step discretization decision-making approach is proposed with the advantage of reducing extreme errors and meeting the user-specified discretization error targets. The metrics and decision-making approach are applied to the discretization of the Grand River watershed in Ontario, Canada. Results show that information loss increases as discretization gets coarser. Moreover, results help to explain the modeling difficulties associated with smaller upstream subbasins since the worst discretization errors and highest error variability appear in smaller upstream areas instead of larger downstream drainage areas. Hydrologic modeling experiments under

  3. Precise regional baseline estimation using a priori orbital information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindqwister, Ulf J.; Lichten, Stephen M.; Blewitt, Geoffrey

    1990-01-01

    A solution using GPS measurements acquired during the CASA Uno campaign has resulted in 3-4 mm horizontal daily baseline repeatability and 13 mm vertical repeatability for a 729 km baseline, located in North America. The agreement with VLBI is at the level of 10-20 mm for all components. The results were obtained with the GIPSY orbit determination and baseline estimation software and are based on five single-day data arcs spanning the 20, 21, 25, 26, and 27 of January, 1988. The estimation strategy included resolving the carrier phase integer ambiguities, utilizing an optial set of fixed reference stations, and constraining GPS orbit parameters by applying a priori information. A multiday GPS orbit and baseline solution has yielded similar 2-4 mm horizontal daily repeatabilities for the same baseline, consistent with the constrained single-day arc solutions. The application of weak constraints to the orbital state for single-day data arcs produces solutions which approach the precise orbits obtained with unconstrained multiday arc solutions.

  4. Impact of modellers' decisions on hydrological a priori predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holländer, H. M.; Bormann, H.; Blume, T.; Buytaert, W.; Chirico, G. B.; Exbrayat, J.-F.; Gustafsson, D.; Hölzel, H.; Krauße, T.; Kraft, P.; Stoll, S.; Blöschl, G.; Flühler, H.

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to stimulate a re-thinking of how we, the catchment hydrologists, could become reliable forecasters. A group of catchment modellers predicted the hydrological response of a man-made 6 ha catchment in its initial phase (Chicken Creek) without having access to the observed records. They used conceptually different model families. Their modelling experience differed largely. The prediction exercise was organized in three steps: (1) for the 1st prediction modellers received a basic data set describing the internal structure of the catchment (somewhat more complete than usually available to a priori predictions in ungauged catchments). They did not obtain time series of stream flow, soil moisture or groundwater response. (2) Before the 2nd improved prediction they inspected the catchment on-site and attended a workshop where the modellers presented and discussed their first attempts. (3) For their improved 3rd prediction they were offered additional data by charging them pro forma with the costs for obtaining this additional information. Holländer et al. (2009) discussed the range of predictions obtained in step 1. Here, we detail the modeller's decisions in accounting for the various processes based on what they learned during the field visit (step 2) and add the final outcome of step 3 when the modellers made use of additional data. We document the prediction progress as well as the learning process resulting from the availability of added information. For the 2nd and 3rd step, the progress in prediction quality could be evaluated in relation to individual modelling experience and costs of added information. We learned (i) that soft information such as the modeller's system understanding is as important as the model itself (hard information), (ii) that the sequence of modelling steps matters (field visit, interactions between differently experienced experts, choice of model, selection of available data, and methods for parameter guessing

  5. Impact of modellers' decisions on hydrological a priori predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holländer, H. M.; Bormann, H.; Blume, T.; Buytaert, W.; Chirico, G. B.; Exbrayat, J.-F.; Gustafsson, D.; Hölzel, H.; Krauße, T.; Kraft, P.; Stoll, S.; Blöschl, G.; Flühler, H.

    2014-06-01

    In practice, the catchment hydrologist is often confronted with the task of predicting discharge without having the needed records for calibration. Here, we report the discharge predictions of 10 modellers - using the model of their choice - for the man-made Chicken Creek catchment (6 ha, northeast Germany, Gerwin et al., 2009b) and we analyse how well they improved their prediction in three steps based on adding information prior to each following step. The modellers predicted the catchment's hydrological response in its initial phase without having access to the observed records. They used conceptually different physically based models and their modelling experience differed largely. Hence, they encountered two problems: (i) to simulate discharge for an ungauged catchment and (ii) using models that were developed for catchments, which are not in a state of landscape transformation. The prediction exercise was organized in three steps: (1) for the first prediction the modellers received a basic data set describing the catchment to a degree somewhat more complete than usually available for a priori predictions of ungauged catchments; they did not obtain information on stream flow, soil moisture, nor groundwater response and had therefore to guess the initial conditions; (2) before the second prediction they inspected the catchment on-site and discussed their first prediction attempt; (3) for their third prediction they were offered additional data by charging them pro forma with the costs for obtaining this additional information. Holländer et al. (2009) discussed the range of predictions obtained in step (1). Here, we detail the modeller's assumptions and decisions in accounting for the various processes. We document the prediction progress as well as the learning process resulting from the availability of added information. For the second and third steps, the progress in prediction quality is evaluated in relation to individual modelling experience and costs of

  6. The consequences of learnability for the a priori knowledge in a world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, Hanns

    1998-07-01

    The precondition for the evolution of intelligent beings in a world (modelled by anticipatory systems) is the learnability of some regularities in that world. The consequences, that can be deduced from the learnability property in a world, form the a priori knowledge. This a priori knowledge is independent of the empirical facts in a special world. It will be shown that the a priori knowledge consists not only of logical tautologies. Also some well-known non trivial theorems in physics and psychology form part of the a priori knowledge. The a priori knowledge obtained in different worlds is necessarily organised by the same structures. Examples from physics and psychology show the use of a separation between a priori knowledge and empirical knowledge.

  7. Validating Affordances as an Instrument for Design and a Priori Analysis of Didactical Situations in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sollervall, Håkan; Stadler, Erika

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the presented case study is to investigate how coherent analytical instruments may guide the a priori and a posteriori analyses of a didactical situation. In the a priori analysis we draw on the notion of affordances, as artefact-mediated opportunities for action, to construct hypothetical trajectories of goal-oriented actions that have…

  8. The Travelling Salesman Polytope and (0,2)-Matchings.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    characterizing those graphs having perfect 1-mat- chings is the following: Theorem 2.8 ( Tutte [16]). G has a perfect 1 -matching if and only if for every...graphs is polynomially equivalent to the more general problem. An interestinz feature of the results of the previous sections is that they do apply... Tutte , "The factorization of linear graphs", Journal of the London Mathematical Society 22 (1947) 107-111. LI a . n Ud nt.. . R E A D - REj) i E3ORT

  9. Traveling Salesman Problem for Surveillance Mission Using Particle Swarm Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-26

    individuals are used [Bdck96, 65]. It is interesting to note that asexual and sexual reproduction model popular strategies in the biological world, and are... Asexual , where only one individual is used by the operator, sexual, in which two individuals are worked with, and panmictic, in which more than two

  10. Use of a priori statistics to minimize acquisition time for RFI immune spread spectrum systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, J. K.; Woo, K. T.

    1978-01-01

    The optimum acquisition sweep strategy was determined for a PN code despreader when the a priori probability density function was not uniform. A psuedo noise spread spectrum system was considered which could be utilized in the DSN to combat radio frequency interference. In a sample case, when the a priori probability density function was Gaussian, the acquisition time was reduced by about 41% compared to a uniform sweep approach.

  11. Conventional Principles in Science: On the foundations and development of the relativized a priori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, Milena; Farr, Matt

    2015-11-01

    The present volume consists of a collection of papers originally presented at the conference Conventional Principles in Science, held at the University of Bristol, August 2011, which featured contributions on the history and contemporary development of the notion of 'relativized a priori' principles in science, from Henri Poincaré's conventionalism to Michael Friedman's contemporary defence of the relativized a priori. In Science and Hypothesis, Poincaré assessed the problematic epistemic status of Euclidean geometry and Newton's laws of motion, famously arguing that each has the status of 'convention' in that their justification is neither analytic nor empirical in nature. In The Theory of Relativity and A Priori Knowledge, Hans Reichenbach, in light of the general theory of relativity, proposed an updated notion of the Kantian synthetic a priori to account for the dynamic inter-theoretic status of geometry and other non-empirical physical principles. Reichenbach noted that one may reject the 'necessarily true' aspect of the synthetic a priori whilst preserving the feature of being constitutive of the object of knowledge. Such constitutive principles are theory-relative, as illustrated by the privileged role of non-Euclidean geometry in general relativity theory. This idea of relativized a priori principles in spacetime physics has been analysed and developed at great length in the modern literature in the work of Michael Friedman, in particular the roles played by the light postulate and the equivalence principle - in special and general relativity respectively - in defining the central terms of their respective theories and connecting the abstract mathematical formalism of the theories with their empirical content. The papers in this volume guide the reader through the historical development of conventional and constitutive principles in science, from the foundational work of Poincaré, Reichenbach and others, to contemporary issues and applications of the

  12. The constitutive a priori and the distinction between mathematical and physical possibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    This paper is concerned with Friedman's recent revival of the notion of the relativized a priori. It is particularly concerned with addressing the question as to how Friedman's understanding of the constitutive function of the a priori has changed since his defence of the idea in his Dynamics of Reason. Friedman's understanding of the a priori remains influenced by Reichenbach's initial defence of the idea; I argue that this notion of the a priori does not naturally lend itself to describing the historical development of space-time physics. Friedman's analysis of the role of the rotating frame thought experiment in the development of general relativity - which he suggests made the mathematical possibility of four-dimensional space-time a genuine physical possibility - has a central role in his argument. I analyse this thought experiment and argue that it is better understood by following Cassirer and placing emphasis on regulative principles. Furthermore, I argue that Cassirer's Kantian framework enables us to capture Friedman's key insights into the nature of the constitutive a priori.

  13. Mediterranean Diet and Cardiovascular Disease: A Critical Evaluation of A Priori Dietary Indexes

    PubMed Central

    D’Alessandro, Annunziata; De Pergola, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze the a priori dietary indexes used in the studies that have evaluated the role of the Mediterranean Diet in influencing the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. All the studies show that this dietary pattern protects against cardiovascular disease, but studies show quite different effects on specific conditions such as coronary heart disease or cerebrovascular disease. A priori dietary indexes used to measure dietary exposure imply quantitative and/or qualitative divergences from the traditional Mediterranean Diet of the early 1960s, and, therefore, it is very difficult to compare the results of different studies. Based on real cultural heritage and traditions, we believe that the a priori indexes used to evaluate adherence to the Mediterranean Diet should consider classifying whole grains and refined grains, olive oil and monounsaturated fats, and wine and alcohol differently. PMID:26389950

  14. Bayesian classification of polarimetric SAR images using adaptive a priori probabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Zyl, J. J.; Burnette, C. F.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of classifying earth terrain by observed polarimetric scattering properties is tackled with an iterative Bayesian scheme using a priori probabilities adaptively. The first classification is based on the use of fixed and not necessarily equal a priori probabilities, and successive iterations change the a priori probabilities adaptively. The approach is applied to an SAR image in which a single water body covers 10 percent of the image area. The classification accuracy for ocean, urban, vegetated, and total area increase, and the percentage of reclassified pixels decreases greatly as the iteration number increases. The iterative scheme is found to improve the a posteriori classification accuracy of maximum likelihood classifiers by iteratively using the local homogeneity in polarimetric SAR images. A few iterations can improve the classification accuracy significantly without sacrificing key high-frequency detail or edges in the image.

  15. Incorporation of a priori gravity field information in satellite orbit determination using bin parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jiun-Tsong; Wu, Sien-Chong

    1992-01-01

    A method to determine satellite orbits using tracking data and a priori gravitational field is described. The a priori constraint on the orbit dynamics is determined by the covariance matrix of the spherical harmonic coefficients for the gravity model, so that the optimal combination of the measurements and gravitational field is achieved. A set of bin parameters is introduced to represent the perturbation of the gravitational field on the position of the satellite orbit. The covariance matrix of a conventional gravity model is transformed into that for the bin parameters by the variational partial derivatives. The covariance matrices of the bin parameters and the epoch state are combined to form the covariance matrix of the satellite positions at the measurement times. The combined matrix is used as the a priori information to estimate the satellite positions with measurements.

  16. Bayesian classification of polarimetric SAR images using adaptive a priori probabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Zyl, J. J.; Burnette, C. F.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of classifying earth terrain by observed polarimetric scattering properties is tackled with an iterative Bayesian scheme using a priori probabilities adaptively. The first classification is based on the use of fixed and not necessarily equal a priori probabilities, and successive iterations change the a priori probabilities adaptively. The approach is applied to an SAR image in which a single water body covers 10 percent of the image area. The classification accuracy for ocean, urban, vegetated, and total area increase, and the percentage of reclassified pixels decreases greatly as the iteration number increases. The iterative scheme is found to improve the a posteriori classification accuracy of maximum likelihood classifiers by iteratively using the local homogeneity in polarimetric SAR images. A few iterations can improve the classification accuracy significantly without sacrificing key high-frequency detail or edges in the image.

  17. Incorporation of a priori gravity field information in satellite orbit determination using bin parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jiun-Tsong; Wu, Sien-Chong

    1992-01-01

    A method to determine satellite orbits using tracking data and a priori gravitational field is described. The a priori constraint on the orbit dynamics is determined by the covariance matrix of the spherical harmonic coefficients for the gravity model, so that the optimal combination of the measurements and gravitational field is achieved. A set of bin parameters is introduced to represent the perturbation of the gravitational field on the position of the satellite orbit. The covariance matrix of a conventional gravity model is transformed into that for the bin parameters by the variational partial derivatives. The covariance matrices of the bin parameters and the epoch state are combined to form the covariance matrix of the satellite positions at the measurement times. The combined matrix is used as the a priori information to estimate the satellite positions with measurements.

  18. Allocating Sample Material to Increase the Precision of a Priori Contrasts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Sheldon B.; Huck, Schuyler W.

    In true experiments in which sample material can be randomly assigned to treatment conditions, most researchers presume that the condition of equal sample sizes is statistically desirable. When one or more a priori contrasts can be identified which represent a few overriding experimental concerns, however, allocating sample material unequally will…

  19. Simplified multi-track detection schemes using a priori information for bit patterned media recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Gyuyeol; Choi, Sooyong

    2012-04-01

    Simplified multi-track detection schemes using a priori information for bit patterned magnetic recording (BPMR) are proposed in this paper. The proposed detection schemes adopt the simplified trellis diagram, use a priori information, and detect the main-track data in the along- and cross-track directions. The simplified trellis diagram, which has 4 states and 8 branches, can be obtained by setting the corner entries of the generalized partial response (GPR) target to zero and replacing the four parallel branches with a single branch. However, these simplified techniques seriously suffer from performance degradation in high density BPMR channels. To overcome the performance degradation, a priori information is used to give higher reliability to the branch metric. In addition, to fully use the characteristics of channel detection with a two-dimensional (2D) GPR target, the proposed schemes estimate a priori information and detect the main-track data in the along- and cross-track directions by using a 2D equalizer with a 2D GPR target. The bit error rate performances of the proposed schemes are compared with the previous detection schemes when areal density is 3 Tb/in2. Simulation results show that the proposed schemes with simpler structures have more than 2 dB gains compared with the other detection schemes.

  20. Background and Attitude Questionnaire Items and A Priori Weights. Table 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Dept. of Education, Lansing. Research, Evaluation, and Assessment Services.

    Background and attitude questionnaire items used in the Michigan Educational Assessment battery to measure socioeconomic status and attitudes toward self, school, and the importance of school achievement are presented. A priori weights for item responses are provided. (For related document, see TM 002 329.) (KM)

  1. A priori L∞ estimates for solutions of a class of reaction-diffusion systems.

    PubMed

    Du, Zengji; Peng, Rui

    2016-05-01

    In this short paper, we establish a priori L∞-norm estimates for solutions of a class of reaction-diffusion systems which can be used to model the spread of infectious disease. The developed technique may find applications in other reaction-diffusion systems.

  2. Unequal a priori probability multiple hypothesis testing in space domain awareness with the space surveillance telescope.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Tyler; Cain, Stephen; Blake, Travis

    2016-05-20

    This paper investigates the ability to improve Space Domain Awareness (SDA) by increasing the number of detectable Resident Space Objects (RSOs) from space surveillance sensors. With matched filter based techniques, the expected impulse response, or Point Spread Function (PSF), is compared against the received data. In the situation where the images are spatially undersampled, the modeled PSF may not match the received data if the RSO does not fall in the center of the pixel. This aliasing can be accounted for with a Multiple Hypothesis Test (MHT). Previously, proposed MHTs have implemented a test with an equal a priori prior probability assumption. This paper investigates using an unequal a priori probability MHT. To determine accurate a priori probabilities, three metrics are computed; they are correlation, physical distance, and empirical. Using the calculated a priori probabilities, a new algorithm is developed, and images from the Space Surveillance Telescope (SST) are analyzed. The number of detected objects by both an equal and unequal prior probabilities are compared while keeping the false alarm rate constant. Any additional number of detected objects will help improve SDA capabilities.

  3. Realism, functions, and the a priori: Ernst Cassirer's philosophy of science.

    PubMed

    Heis, Jeremy

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents the main ideas of Cassirer's general philosophy of science, focusing on the two aspects of his thought that--in addition to being the most central ideas in his philosophy of science--have received the most attention from contemporary philosophers of science: his theory of the a priori aspects of physical theory, and his relation to scientific realism.

  4. Automatic Artifact Removal from Electroencephalogram Data Based on A Priori Artifact Information.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Tong, Li; Zeng, Ying; Jiang, Jingfang; Bu, Haibing; Yan, Bin; Li, Jianxin

    2015-01-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) is susceptible to various nonneural physiological artifacts. Automatic artifact removal from EEG data remains a key challenge for extracting relevant information from brain activities. To adapt to variable subjects and EEG acquisition environments, this paper presents an automatic online artifact removal method based on a priori artifact information. The combination of discrete wavelet transform and independent component analysis (ICA), wavelet-ICA, was utilized to separate artifact components. The artifact components were then automatically identified using a priori artifact information, which was acquired in advance. Subsequently, signal reconstruction without artifact components was performed to obtain artifact-free signals. The results showed that, using this automatic online artifact removal method, there were statistical significant improvements of the classification accuracies in both two experiments, namely, motor imagery and emotion recognition.

  5. A priori estimates, existence and non-existence for quasilinear cooperative elliptic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, H

    2008-04-30

    Let m>1 be a real number and let {omega} subset of R{sup n}, n>=2, be a connected smooth domain. Consider the system of quasi-linear elliptic differential equations ; div(|{nabla}u|{sup m-2}{nabla}u)+f(u,v); =0 in {omega}; div(|{nabla}v|{sup m-2}{nabla}v)+g(u,v); =0 in {omega}; where u>=0, v>=0, f and g are real functions. Relations between the Liouville non-existence and a priori estimates and existence on bounded domains are studied. Under appropriate conditions, a variety of results on a priori estimates, existence and non-existence of positive solutions have been established. Bibliography: 11 titles.

  6. Learning to improve medical decision making from imbalanced data without a priori cost.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiang; Liu, Jiming; Cheung, William K; Tong, Tiejun

    2014-12-05

    In a medical data set, data are commonly composed of a minority (positive or abnormal) group and a majority (negative or normal) group and the cost of misclassifying a minority sample as a majority sample is highly expensive. This is the so-called imbalanced classification problem. The traditional classification functions can be seriously affected by the skewed class distribution in the data. To deal with this problem, people often use a priori cost to adjust the learning process in the pursuit of optimal classification function. However, this priori cost is often unknown and hard to estimate in medical decision making. In this paper, we propose a new learning method, named RankCost, to classify imbalanced medical data without using a priori cost. Instead of focusing on improving the class-prediction accuracy, RankCost is to maximize the difference between the minority class and the majority class by using a scoring function, which translates the imbalanced classification problem into a partial ranking problem. The scoring function is learned via a non-parametric boosting algorithm. We compare RankCost to several representative approaches on four medical data sets varying in size, imbalanced ratio, and dimension. The experimental results demonstrate that unlike the currently available methods that often perform unevenly with different priori costs, RankCost shows comparable performance in a consistent manner. It is a challenging task to learn an effective classification model based on imbalanced data in medical data analysis. The traditional approaches often use a priori cost to adjust the learning of the classification function. This work presents a novel approach, namely RankCost, for learning from medical imbalanced data sets without using a priori cost. The experimental results indicate that RankCost performs very well in imbalanced data classification and can be a useful method in real-world applications of medical decision making.

  7. A priori Estimates and Existence for Elliptic Systems via Bootstrap in Weighted Lebesgue Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quittner, P.; Souplet, Ph.

    2004-10-01

    We present a new general method to obtain regularity and a priori estimates for solutions of semilinear elliptic systems in bounded domains. This method is based on a bootstrap procedure, used alternatively on each component, in the scale of weighted Lebesgue spaces Lpδ(Ω)=Lp(Ωδ(x) dx), where δ(x) is the distance to the boundary. Using this method, we significantly improve the known existence results for various classes of elliptic systems.

  8. Implications of genome wide association studies for addiction: Are our a priori assumptions all wrong?

    PubMed Central

    Hall, F. Scott; Drgonova, Jana; Jain, Siddharth; Uhl, George R.

    2013-01-01

    Substantial genetic contributions to addiction vulnerability are supported by data from twin studies, linkage studies, candidate gene association studies and, more recently, Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS). Parallel to this work, animal studies have attempted to identify the genes that may contribute to responses to addictive drugs and addiction liability, initially focusing upon genes for the targets of the major drugs of abuse. These studies identified genes/proteins that affect responses to drugs of abuse; however, this does not necessarily mean that variation in these genes contributes to the genetic component of addiction liability. One of the major problems with initial linkage and candidate gene studies was an a priori focus on the genes thought to be involved in addiction based upon the known contributions of those proteins to drug actions, making the identification of novel genes unlikely. The GWAS approach is systematic and agnostic to such a priori assumptions. From the numerous GWAS now completed several conclusions may be drawn: (1) addiction is highly polygenic; each allelic variant contributing in a small, additive fashion to addiction vulnerability; (2) unexpected, compared to our a priori assumptions, classes of genes are most important in explaining addiction vulnerability; (3) although substantial genetic heterogeneity exists, there is substantial convergence of GWAS signals on particular genes. This review traces the history of this research; from initial transgenic mouse models based upon candidate gene and linkage studies, through the progression of GWAS for addiction and nicotine cessation, to the current human and transgenic mouse studies post-GWAS. PMID:23872493

  9. Effects of daily, high spatial resolution a priori profiles of satellite-derived NOx emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laughner, J.; Zare, A.; Cohen, R. C.

    2016-12-01

    The current generation of space-borne NO2 column observations provides a powerful method of constraining NOx emissions due to the spatial resolution and global coverage afforded by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). The greater resolution available in next generation instruments such as TROPOMI and the capabilities of geosynchronous platforms TEMPO, Sentinel-4, and GEMS will provide even greater capabilities in this regard, but we must apply lessons learned from the current generation of retrieval algorithms to make the best use of these instruments. Here, we focus on the effect of the resolution of the a priori NO2 profiles used in the retrieval algorithms. We show that for an OMI retrieval, using daily high-resolution a priori profiles results in changes in the retrieved VCDs up to 40% when compared to a retrieval using monthly average profiles at the same resolution. Further, comparing a retrieval with daily high spatial resolution a priori profiles to a more standard one, we show that emissions derived increase by 100% when using the optimized retrieval.

  10. Implications of genome wide association studies for addiction: are our a priori assumptions all wrong?

    PubMed

    Hall, F Scott; Drgonova, Jana; Jain, Siddharth; Uhl, George R

    2013-12-01

    Substantial genetic contributions to addiction vulnerability are supported by data from twin studies, linkage studies, candidate gene association studies and, more recently, Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS). Parallel to this work, animal studies have attempted to identify the genes that may contribute to responses to addictive drugs and addiction liability, initially focusing upon genes for the targets of the major drugs of abuse. These studies identified genes/proteins that affect responses to drugs of abuse; however, this does not necessarily mean that variation in these genes contributes to the genetic component of addiction liability. One of the major problems with initial linkage and candidate gene studies was an a priori focus on the genes thought to be involved in addiction based upon the known contributions of those proteins to drug actions, making the identification of novel genes unlikely. The GWAS approach is systematic and agnostic to such a priori assumptions. From the numerous GWAS now completed several conclusions may be drawn: (1) addiction is highly polygenic; each allelic variant contributing in a small, additive fashion to addiction vulnerability; (2) unexpected, compared to our a priori assumptions, classes of genes are most important in explaining addiction vulnerability; (3) although substantial genetic heterogeneity exists, there is substantial convergence of GWAS signals on particular genes. This review traces the history of this research; from initial transgenic mouse models based upon candidate gene and linkage studies, through the progression of GWAS for addiction and nicotine cessation, to the current human and transgenic mouse studies post-GWAS.

  11. A priori mesh grading for the numerical calculation of the head-related transfer functions.

    PubMed

    Ziegelwanger, Harald; Kreuzer, Wolfgang; Majdak, Piotr

    2016-12-15

    Head-related transfer functions (HRTFs) describe the directional filtering of the incoming sound caused by the morphology of a listener's head and pinnae. When an accurate model of a listener's morphology exists, HRTFs can be calculated numerically with the boundary element method (BEM). However, the general recommendation to model the head and pinnae with at least six elements per wavelength renders the BEM as a time-consuming procedure when calculating HRTFs for the full audible frequency range. In this study, a mesh preprocessing algorithm is proposed, viz., a priori mesh grading, which reduces the computational costs in the HRTF calculation process significantly. The mesh grading algorithm deliberately violates the recommendation of at least six elements per wavelength in certain regions of the head and pinnae and varies the size of elements gradually according to an a priori defined grading function. The evaluation of the algorithm involved HRTFs calculated for various geometric objects including meshes of three human listeners and various grading functions. The numerical accuracy and the predicted sound-localization performance of calculated HRTFs were analyzed. A-priori mesh grading appeared to be suitable for the numerical calculation of HRTFs in the full audible frequency range and outperformed uniform meshes in terms of numerical errors, perception based predictions of sound-localization performance, and computational costs.

  12. A priori mesh grading for the numerical calculation of the head-related transfer functions

    PubMed Central

    Ziegelwanger, Harald; Kreuzer, Wolfgang; Majdak, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Head-related transfer functions (HRTFs) describe the directional filtering of the incoming sound caused by the morphology of a listener’s head and pinnae. When an accurate model of a listener’s morphology exists, HRTFs can be calculated numerically with the boundary element method (BEM). However, the general recommendation to model the head and pinnae with at least six elements per wavelength renders the BEM as a time-consuming procedure when calculating HRTFs for the full audible frequency range. In this study, a mesh preprocessing algorithm is proposed, viz., a priori mesh grading, which reduces the computational costs in the HRTF calculation process significantly. The mesh grading algorithm deliberately violates the recommendation of at least six elements per wavelength in certain regions of the head and pinnae and varies the size of elements gradually according to an a priori defined grading function. The evaluation of the algorithm involved HRTFs calculated for various geometric objects including meshes of three human listeners and various grading functions. The numerical accuracy and the predicted sound-localization performance of calculated HRTFs were analyzed. A-priori mesh grading appeared to be suitable for the numerical calculation of HRTFs in the full audible frequency range and outperformed uniform meshes in terms of numerical errors, perception based predictions of sound-localization performance, and computational costs. PMID:28239186

  13. Geopositioning with a quadcopter: Extracted feature locations and predicted accuracy without a priori sensor attitude information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolloff, John; Hottel, Bryant; Edwards, David; Theiss, Henry; Braun, Aaron

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Full Motion Video-Geopositioning Test Bed (FMV-GTB) developed to investigate algorithm performance and issues related to the registration of motion imagery and subsequent extraction of feature locations along with predicted accuracy. A case study is included corresponding to a video taken from a quadcopter. Registration of the corresponding video frames is performed without the benefit of a priori sensor attitude (pointing) information. In particular, tie points are automatically measured between adjacent frames using standard optical flow matching techniques from computer vision, an a priori estimate of sensor attitude is then computed based on supplied GPS sensor positions contained in the video metadata and a photogrammetric/search-based structure from motion algorithm, and then a Weighted Least Squares adjustment of all a priori metadata across the frames is performed. Extraction of absolute 3D feature locations, including their predicted accuracy based on the principles of rigorous error propagation, is then performed using a subset of the registered frames. Results are compared to known locations (check points) over a test site. Throughout this entire process, no external control information (e.g. surveyed points) is used other than for evaluation of solution errors and corresponding accuracy.

  14. Travelers' Health: Immunocompromised Travelers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Books, Journals, Articles & Websites Resources for the Travel Industry Yellow Book Contents Chapter 8 (15) Immunocompromised Travelers ... with the patient’s permission) to discuss the traveler’s fitness to travel, give specific medical advice for the ...

  15. Examples of use of a-priori information to the inversion of AEM data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viezzoli, A.; Munday, T. J.; Sapia, V.

    2012-12-01

    There is a growing focus in the international near surface geophysical community in the merging of information (loosely termed "data") from different sources, in the modelling of the subsurface. The use of a-priori data as extra input to the inversion of Airborne Electromagnetic data is one illustrative example of such trend. It allows providing more robust results, for a number of reasons. The first one is probably the capability to cross check the geophysical derived model against ancillary information, in a more quantitative and objective way than it can be done a-posteriori. The second is that mitigates the inherent non uniqueness of the results of inversion of geophysical data, which is due to the fact that the problem is usually ill posed. The third is the ever higher level of accuracy of the derived output sought after by end users that, rightly so, demand results (either direct or derived) they can use directly for management. Last, but not least, is the drive to incorporate different physical parameters originating from different sources into one inversion problem, in order to derive directly, e.g., geological or hydrogeological models that fit all data sets at once. In this paper we present examples obtained adding information from geophysics (i.e., seismic, surface and borehole geoelectric) and from geology (e.g., lithology), to the inversion of Airborne EM data from different systems (e.g., VTEM, AeroTEM, SkyTEM, Resolve). Case studies are from several areas in the world, with varied geological settings. In our formulation, the a-priori information is treated as nothing but an extra data set, carrying location, values, uncertainty, and expected lateral variability. The information it contains is spread to the location of the neighbouring AEM soundings, using the Spatially Constrained Inversion approach. Constraints and uncertainties are usually different depending on data types and geology. Case studies show the effect on the inversion results of the a-priori

  16. Travelers' Health: Pregnant Travelers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Travel Families with Children Fish Poisoning in Travelers Food and Water Getting Health Care Abroad Getting Sick After Travel High Altitudes Hot Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador Insurance International Adoption Jet Lag Last-Minute Travel Long-Term ...

  17. Evaluating A Priori Ozone Profile Information Used in TEMPO Tropospheric Ozone Retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, M. S.; Sullivan, J. T.; Liu, X.; Newchurch, M.; Kuang, S.; McGee, T. J.; Langford, A. O.; Senff, C. J.; Leblanc, T.; Berkoff, T.; Gronoff, G.; Chen, G.; Strawbridge, K. B.

    2016-12-01

    Ozone (O3) is a greenhouse gas and toxic pollutant which plays a major role in air quality. Typically, monitoring of surface air quality and O3 mixing ratios is primarily conducted using in situ measurement networks. This is partially due to high-quality information related to air quality being limited from space-borne platforms due to coarse spatial resolution, limited temporal frequency, and minimal sensitivity to lower tropospheric and surface-level O3. The Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO) satellite is designed to address these limitations of current space-based platforms and to improve our ability to monitor North American air quality. TEMPO will provide hourly data of total column and vertical profiles of O3 with high spatial resolution to be used as a near-real-time air quality product. TEMPO O3 retrievals will apply the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory profile algorithm developed based on work from GOME, GOME-2, and OMI. This algorithm uses a priori O3 profile information from a climatological data-base developed from long-term ozone-sonde measurements (tropopause-based (TB) O3 climatology). It has been shown that satellite O3 retrievals are sensitive to a priori O3 profiles and covariance matrices. During this work we investigate the climatological data to be used in TEMPO algorithms (TB O3) and simulated data from the NASA GMAO Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) Forward Processing (FP) near-real-time (NRT) model products. These two data products will be evaluated with ground-based lidar data from the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet) at various locations of the US. This study evaluates the TB climatology, GEOS-5 climatology, and 3-hourly GEOS-5 data compared to lower tropospheric observations to demonstrate the accuracy of a priori information to potentially be used in TEMPO O3 algorithms. Here we present our initial analysis and the theoretical impact on TEMPO retrievals in the lower troposphere.

  18. A priori model independent inverse potential mapping: the impact of electrode positioning.

    PubMed

    van der Graaf, A W Maurits; Bhagirath, Pranav; de Hooge, Jacques; de Groot, Natasja M S; Götte, Marco J W

    2016-01-01

    In inverse potential mapping, local epicardial potentials are computed from recorded body surface potentials (BSP). When BSP are recorded with only a limited number of electrodes, in general biophysical a priori models are applied to facilitate the inverse computation. This study investigated the possibility of deriving epicardial potential information using only 62 torso electrodes in the absence of an a priori model. Computer simulations were used to determine the optimal in vivo positioning of 62 torso electrodes. Subsequently, three different electrode configurations, i.e., surrounding the thorax, concentrated precordial (30 mm inter-electrode distance) and super-concentrated precordial (20 mm inter-electrode distance) were used to record BSP from three healthy volunteers. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed to register the electrode positions with respect to the anatomy of the patient. Epicardial potentials were inversely computed from the recorded BSP. In order to determine the reconstruction quality, the super-concentrated electrode configuration was applied in four patients with an implanted MRI-conditional pacemaker system. The distance between the position of the ventricular lead tip on MRI and the inversely reconstructed pacing site was determined. The epicardial potential distribution reconstructed using the super-concentrated electrode configuration demonstrated the highest correlation (R = 0.98; p < 0.01) with the original epicardial source model. A mean localization error of 5.3 mm was found in the pacemaker patients. This study demonstrated the feasibility of deriving detailed anterior epicardial potential information using only 62 torso electrodes without the use of an a priori model.

  19. Evaluating A Priori Ozone Profile Information Used in TEMPO Tropospheric Ozone Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Matthew S.; Sullivan, John T.; Liu, Xiong; Newchurch, Mike; Kuang, Shi; McGee, Thomas J.; Langford, Andrew O'Neil; Senff, Christoph J.; Leblanc, Thierry; Berkoff, Timothy; Gronoff, Guillaume; Chen, Gao; Strawbridge, Kevin B.

    2016-01-01

    Ozone (O3) is a greenhouse gas and toxic pollutant which plays a major role in air quality. Typically, monitoring of surface air quality and O3 mixing ratios is primarily conducted using in situ measurement networks. This is partially due to high-quality information related to air quality being limited from space-borne platforms due to coarse spatial resolution, limited temporal frequency, and minimal sensitivity to lower tropospheric and surface-level O3. The Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO) satellite is designed to address these limitations of current space-based platforms and to improve our ability to monitor North American air quality. TEMPO will provide hourly data of total column and vertical profiles of O3 with high spatial resolution to be used as a near-real-time air quality product. TEMPO O3 retrievals will apply the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory profile algorithm developed based on work from GOME, GOME-2, and OMI. This algorithm uses a priori O3 profile information from a climatological data-base developed from long-term ozone-sonde measurements (tropopause-based (TB) O3 climatology). It has been shown that satellite O3 retrievals are sensitive to a priori O3 profiles and covariance matrices. During this work we investigate the climatological data to be used in TEMPO algorithms (TB O3) and simulated data from the NASA GMAO Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) Forward Processing (FP) near-real-time (NRT) model products. These two data products will be evaluated with ground-based lidar data from the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet) at various locations of the US. This study evaluates the TB climatology, GEOS-5 climatology, and 3-hourly GEOS-5 data compared to lower tropospheric observations to demonstrate the accuracy of a priori information to potentially be used in TEMPO O3 algorithms. Here we present our initial analysis and the theoretical impact on TEMPO retrievals in the lower troposphere.

  20. An a priori solar radiation pressure model for the QZSS Michibiki satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qile; Chen, Guo; Guo, Jing; Liu, Jingnan; Liu, Xianglin

    2017-07-01

    It has been noted that the satellite laser ranging (SLR) residuals of the Quasi-Zenith Satellite System (QZSS) Michibiki satellite orbits show very marked dependence on the elevation angle of the Sun above the orbital plane (i.e., the β angle). It is well recognized that the systematic error is caused by mismodeling of the solar radiation pressure (SRP). Although the error can be reduced by the updated ECOM SRP model, the orbit error is still very large when the satellite switches to orbit-normal (ON) orientation. In this study, an a priori SRP model was established for the QZSS Michibiki satellite to enhance the ECOM model. This model is expressed in ECOM's D, Y, and B axes (DYB) using seven parameters for the yaw-steering (YS) mode, and additional three parameters are used to compensate the remaining modeling deficiencies, particularly the perturbations in the Y axis, based on a redefined DYB for the ON mode. With the proposed a priori model, QZSS Michibiki's precise orbits over 21 months were determined. SLR validation indicated that the systematic β -angle-dependent error was reduced when the satellite was in the YS mode, and better than an 8-cm root mean square (RMS) was achieved. More importantly, the orbit quality was also improved significantly when the satellite was in the ON mode. Relative to ECOM and adjustable box-wing model, the proposed SRP model showed the best performance in the ON mode, and the RMS of the SLR residuals was better than 15 cm, which was a two times improvement over the ECOM without a priori model used, but was still two times worse than the YS mode.

  1. Note: Reconstruction of fluid flows in porous media using geometric a priori information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maisl, Michael; Scholl, Hagen; Schorr, Christian; Seemann, Ralf

    2016-12-01

    X-ray tomography typically suffers from insufficient temporal resolution when imaging dynamic processes. Using the example of multiphase flow in solid porous media, we adapt an iterative algorithm to compute 3d tomograms from 2d projections, which allows for a significant reduction of scan time while maintaining a high level of reconstruction quality. To this end, a priori knowledge about the porous medium is incorporated into the reconstruction algorithm. This algorithm is universal when monitoring dynamic changes in any static matrix and allows for an at least five times decreased imaging time with respect to standard reconstruction algorithms.

  2. Note: Reconstruction of fluid flows in porous media using geometric a priori information.

    PubMed

    Maisl, Michael; Scholl, Hagen; Schorr, Christian; Seemann, Ralf

    2016-12-01

    X-ray tomography typically suffers from insufficient temporal resolution when imaging dynamic processes. Using the example of multiphase flow in solid porous media, we adapt an iterative algorithm to compute 3d tomograms from 2d projections, which allows for a significant reduction of scan time while maintaining a high level of reconstruction quality. To this end, a priori knowledge about the porous medium is incorporated into the reconstruction algorithm. This algorithm is universal when monitoring dynamic changes in any static matrix and allows for an at least five times decreased imaging time with respect to standard reconstruction algorithms.

  3. Proportionality of Components, Liouville Theorems and a Priori Estimates for Noncooperative Elliptic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montaru, Alexandre; Sirakov, Boyan; Souplet, Philippe

    2014-07-01

    We study qualitative properties of positive solutions of noncooperative, possibly nonvariational, elliptic systems. We obtain new classification and Liouville type theorems in the whole Euclidean space, as well as in half-spaces, and deduce a priori estimates and the existence of positive solutions for related Dirichlet problems. We significantly improve the known results for a large class of systems involving a balance between repulsive and attractive terms. This class contains systems arising in biological models of Lotka-Volterra type, in physical models of Bose-Einstein condensates and in models of chemical reactions.

  4. Algorithms for magnetic tomography—on the role of a priori knowledge and constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauer, Karl-Heinz; Potthast, Roland; Wannert, Martin

    2008-08-01

    Magnetic tomography investigates the reconstruction of currents from their magnetic fields. Here, we will study a number of projection methods in combination with the Tikhonov regularization for stabilization for the solution of the Biot-Savart integral equation Wj = H with the Biot-Savart integral operator W:(L2(Ω))3 → (L2(∂G))3 where \\overline{\\Omega} \\subset G . In particular, we study the role of a priori knowledge when incorporated into the choice of the projection spaces X_n \\subset (L^2(\\Omega))^3, n\\in {\\bb N} , for example the conditions div j = 0 or the use of the full boundary value problem div σgrad phivE = 0 in Ω, ν sdot σgrad phivE = g on ∂Ω with some known function g, where j = σgrad phivE and σ is an anisotropic matrix-valued conductivity. We will discuss and compare these schemes investigating the ill-posedness of each algorithm in terms of the behaviour of the singular values of the corresponding operators both when a priori knowledge is incorporated and when the geometrical setting is modified. Finally, we will numerically evaluate the stability constants in the practical setup of magnetic tomography for fuel cells and, thus, calculate usable error bounds for this important application area.

  5. The a priori SDR Estimation Techniques with Reduced Speech Distortion for Acoustic Echo and Noise Suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoonsaengngam, Rattapol; Tangsangiumvisai, Nisachon

    This paper proposes an enhanced method for estimating the a priori Signal-to-Disturbance Ratio (SDR) to be employed in the Acoustic Echo and Noise Suppression (AENS) system for full-duplex hands-free communications. The proposed a priori SDR estimation technique is modified based upon the Two-Step Noise Reduction (TSNR) algorithm to suppress the background noise while preserving speech spectral components. In addition, a practical approach to determine accurately the Echo Spectrum Variance (ESV) is presented based upon the linear relationship assumption between the power spectrum of far-end speech and acoustic echo signals. The ESV estimation technique is then employed to alleviate the acoustic echo problem. The performance of the AENS system that employs these two proposed estimation techniques is evaluated through the Echo Attenuation (EA), Noise Attenuation (NA), and two speech distortion measures. Simulation results based upon real speech signals guarantee that our improved AENS system is able to mitigate efficiently the problem of acoustic echo and background noise, while preserving the speech quality and speech intelligibility.

  6. Normalization of T2W-MRI prostate images using Rician a priori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaître, Guillaume; Rastgoo, Mojdeh; Massich, Joan; Vilanova, Joan C.; Walker, Paul M.; Freixenet, Jordi; Meyer-Baese, Anke; Mériaudeau, Fabrice; Martí, Robert

    2016-03-01

    Prostate cancer is reported to be the second most frequently diagnosed cancer of men in the world. In practise, diagnosis can be affected by multiple factors which reduces the chance to detect the potential lesions. In the last decades, new imaging techniques mainly based on MRI are developed in conjunction with Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CAD) systems to help radiologists for such diagnosis. CAD systems are usually designed as a sequential process consisting of four stages: pre-processing, segmentation, registration and classification. As a pre-processing, image normalization is a critical and important step of the chain in order to design a robust classifier and overcome the inter-patients intensity variations. However, little attention has been dedicated to the normalization of T2W-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) prostate images. In this paper, we propose two methods to normalize T2W-MRI prostate images: (i) based on a Rician a priori and (ii) based on a Square-Root Slope Function (SRSF) representation which does not make any assumption regarding the Probability Density Function (PDF) of the data. A comparison with the state-of-the-art methods is also provided. The normalization of the data is assessed by comparing the alignment of the patient PDFs in both qualitative and quantitative manners. In both evaluation, the normalization using Rician a priori outperforms the other state-of-the-art methods.

  7. Solution of underdetermined systems of equations with gridded a priori constraints.

    PubMed

    Stiros, Stathis C; Saltogianni, Vasso

    2014-01-01

    The TOPINV, Topological Inversion algorithm (or TGS, Topological Grid Search) initially developed for the inversion of highly non-linear redundant systems of equations, can solve a wide range of underdetermined systems of non-linear equations. This approach is a generalization of a previous conclusion that this algorithm can be used for the solution of certain integer ambiguity problems in Geodesy. The overall approach is based on additional (a priori) information for the unknown variables. In the past, such information was used either to linearize equations around approximate solutions, or to expand systems of observation equations solved on the basis of generalized inverses. In the proposed algorithm, the a priori additional information is used in a third way, as topological constraints to the unknown n variables, leading to an R(n) grid containing an approximation of the real solution. The TOPINV algorithm does not focus on point-solutions, but exploits the structural and topological constraints in each system of underdetermined equations in order to identify an optimal closed space in the R(n) containing the real solution. The centre of gravity of the grid points defining this space corresponds to global, minimum-norm solutions. The rationale and validity of the overall approach are demonstrated on the basis of examples and case studies, including fault modelling, in comparison with SVD solutions and true (reference) values, in an accuracy-oriented approach.

  8. Developing detailed a priori 3D models of large environments to aid in robotic navigation tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinstead, Brad; Koschan, Andreas F.; Abidi, Mongi A.

    2004-09-01

    In order to effectively navigate any environment, a robotic vehicle needs to understand the terrain and obstacles native to that environment. Knowledge of its own location and orientation, and knowledge of the region of operation, can greatly improve the robot"s performance. To this end, we have developed a mobile system for the fast digitization of large-scale environments to develop the a priori information needed for prediction and optimization of the robot"s performance. The system collects ground-level video and laser range information, fusing them together to develop accurate 3D models of the target environment. In addition, the system carries a differential Global Positioning System (GPS) as well as an Inertial Navigation System (INS) for determining the position and orientation of the various scanners as they acquire data. Issues involved in the fusion of these various data modalities include: Integration of the position and orientation (pose) sensors" data at varying sampling rates and availability; Selection of "best" geometry in overlapping data cases; Efficient representation of large 3D datasets for real-time processing techniques. Once the models have been created, this data can be used to provide a priori information about negative obstacles, obstructed fields of view, navigation constraints, and focused feature detection.

  9. Determining the depth of certain gravity sources without a priori specification of their structural index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shuai; Huang, Danian

    2015-11-01

    We have developed a new method for the interpretation of gravity tensor data based on the generalized Tilt-depth method. Cooper (2011, 2012) extended the magnetic Tilt-depth method to gravity data. We take the gradient-ratio method of Cooper (2011, 2012) and modify it so that the source type does not need to be specified a priori. We develop the new method by generalizing the Tilt-depth method for depth estimation for different types of source bodies. The new technique uses only the three vertical tensor components of the full gravity tensor data observed or calculated at different height plane to estimate the depth of the buried bodies without a priori specification of their structural index. For severely noise-corrupted data, our method utilizes different upward continuation height data, which can effectively reduce the influence of noise. Theoretical simulations of the gravity source model with and without noise illustrate the ability of the method to provide source depth information. Additionally, the simulations demonstrate that the new method is simple, computationally fast and accurate. Finally, we apply the method using the gravity data acquired over the Humble Salt Dome in the USA as an example. The results show a good correspondence to the previous drilling and seismic interpretation results.

  10. Template based rotation: A method for functional connectivity analysis with a priori templates☆

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Aaron P.; Chhatwal, Jasmeer P.; Huijbers, Willem; Hedden, Trey; van Dijk, Koene R.A.; McLaren, Donald G.; Ward, Andrew M.; Wigman, Sarah; Sperling, Reisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) is a powerful tool for understanding the network level organization of the brain in research settings and is increasingly being used to study large-scale neuronal network degeneration in clinical trial settings. Presently, a variety of techniques, including seed-based correlation analysis and group independent components analysis (with either dual regression or back projection) are commonly employed to compute functional connectivity metrics. In the present report, we introduce template based rotation,1 a novel analytic approach optimized for use with a priori network parcellations, which may be particularly useful in clinical trial settings. Template based rotation was designed to leverage the stable spatial patterns of intrinsic connectivity derived from out-of-sample datasets by mapping data from novel sessions onto the previously defined a priori templates. We first demonstrate the feasibility of using previously defined a priori templates in connectivity analyses, and then compare the performance of template based rotation to seed based and dual regression methods by applying these analytic approaches to an fMRI dataset of normal young and elderly subjects. We observed that template based rotation and dual regression are approximately equivalent in detecting fcMRI differences between young and old subjects, demonstrating similar effect sizes for group differences and similar reliability metrics across 12 cortical networks. Both template based rotation and dual-regression demonstrated larger effect sizes and comparable reliabilities as compared to seed based correlation analysis, though all three methods yielded similar patterns of network differences. When performing inter-network and sub-network connectivity analyses, we observed that template based rotation offered greater flexibility, larger group differences, and more stable connectivity estimates as compared to dual regression and seed based

  11. Template based rotation: a method for functional connectivity analysis with a priori templates.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Aaron P; Chhatwal, Jasmeer P; Huijbers, Willem; Hedden, Trey; van Dijk, Koene R A; McLaren, Donald G; Ward, Andrew M; Wigman, Sarah; Sperling, Reisa A

    2014-11-15

    Functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) is a powerful tool for understanding the network level organization of the brain in research settings and is increasingly being used to study large-scale neuronal network degeneration in clinical trial settings. Presently, a variety of techniques, including seed-based correlation analysis and group independent components analysis (with either dual regression or back projection) are commonly employed to compute functional connectivity metrics. In the present report, we introduce template based rotation,(1) a novel analytic approach optimized for use with a priori network parcellations, which may be particularly useful in clinical trial settings. Template based rotation was designed to leverage the stable spatial patterns of intrinsic connectivity derived from out-of-sample datasets by mapping data from novel sessions onto the previously defined a priori templates. We first demonstrate the feasibility of using previously defined a priori templates in connectivity analyses, and then compare the performance of template based rotation to seed based and dual regression methods by applying these analytic approaches to an fMRI dataset of normal young and elderly subjects. We observed that template based rotation and dual regression are approximately equivalent in detecting fcMRI differences between young and old subjects, demonstrating similar effect sizes for group differences and similar reliability metrics across 12 cortical networks. Both template based rotation and dual-regression demonstrated larger effect sizes and comparable reliabilities as compared to seed based correlation analysis, though all three methods yielded similar patterns of network differences. When performing inter-network and sub-network connectivity analyses, we observed that template based rotation offered greater flexibility, larger group differences, and more stable connectivity estimates as compared to dual regression and seed based

  12. A priori analysis: an application to the estimate of the uncertainty in course grades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippi, G. L.

    2014-07-01

    A priori analysis (APA) is discussed as a tool to assess the reliability of grades in standard curricular courses. This unusual, but striking, application is presented when teaching the section on the data treatment of a laboratory course to illustrate the characteristics of the APA and its potential for widespread use, beyond the traditional physics curriculum. The conditions necessary for this kind of analysis are discussed, the general framework is set out and a specific example is given to illustrate its various aspects. Students are often struck by this unusual application and are more apt to remember the APA. Instructors may also benefit from some of the gathered information, as discussed in the paper.

  13. GNSS Precise Kinematic Positioning for Multiple Kinematic Stations Based on A Priori Distance Constraints.

    PubMed

    He, Kaifei; Xu, Tianhe; Förste, Christoph; Petrovic, Svetozar; Barthelmes, Franz; Jiang, Nan; Flechtner, Frank

    2016-04-01

    When applying the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) for precise kinematic positioning in airborne and shipborne gravimetry, multiple GNSS receiving equipment is often fixed mounted on the kinematic platform carrying the gravimetry instrumentation. Thus, the distances among these GNSS antennas are known and invariant. This information can be used to improve the accuracy and reliability of the state estimates. For this purpose, the known distances between the antennas are applied as a priori constraints within the state parameters adjustment. These constraints are introduced in such a way that their accuracy is taken into account. To test this approach, GNSS data of a Baltic Sea shipborne gravimetric campaign have been used. The results of our study show that an application of distance constraints improves the accuracy of the GNSS kinematic positioning, for example, by about 4 mm for the radial component.

  14. Microwave Radar Imaging of Heterogeneous Breast Tissue Integrating A Priori Information

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Thomas N.; Sarafianou, Mantalena; Craddock, Ian J.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional radar-based image reconstruction techniques fail when they are applied to heterogeneous breast tissue, since the underlying in-breast relative permittivity is unknown or assumed to be constant. This results in a systematic error during the process of image formation. A recent trend in microwave biomedical imaging is to extract the relative permittivity from the object under test to improve the image reconstruction quality and thereby to enhance the diagnostic assessment. In this paper, we present a novel radar-based methodology for microwave breast cancer detection in heterogeneous breast tissue integrating a 3D map of relative permittivity as a priori information. This leads to a novel image reconstruction formulation where the delay-and-sum focusing takes place in time rather than range domain. Results are shown for a heterogeneous dense (class-4) and a scattered fibroglandular (class-2) numerical breast phantom using Bristol's 31-element array configuration. PMID:25435861

  15. GNSS Precise Kinematic Positioning for Multiple Kinematic Stations Based on A Priori Distance Constraints

    PubMed Central

    He, Kaifei; Xu, Tianhe; Förste, Christoph; Petrovic, Svetozar; Barthelmes, Franz; Jiang, Nan; Flechtner, Frank

    2016-01-01

    When applying the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) for precise kinematic positioning in airborne and shipborne gravimetry, multiple GNSS receiving equipment is often fixed mounted on the kinematic platform carrying the gravimetry instrumentation. Thus, the distances among these GNSS antennas are known and invariant. This information can be used to improve the accuracy and reliability of the state estimates. For this purpose, the known distances between the antennas are applied as a priori constraints within the state parameters adjustment. These constraints are introduced in such a way that their accuracy is taken into account. To test this approach, GNSS data of a Baltic Sea shipborne gravimetric campaign have been used. The results of our study show that an application of distance constraints improves the accuracy of the GNSS kinematic positioning, for example, by about 4 mm for the radial component. PMID:27043580

  16. A priori mesh quality metrics for three-dimensional hybrid grids

    SciTech Connect

    Kallinderis, Y. Fotia, S.

    2015-01-01

    Use of general hybrid grids to attain complex-geometry field simulations poses a challenge on estimation of their quality. Apart from the typical problems of non-uniformity and non-orthogonality, the change in element topology is an extra issue to address. The present work derives and evaluates an a priori mesh quality indicator for structured, unstructured, as well as hybrid grids consisting of hexahedra, prisms, tetrahedra, and pyramids. Emphasis is placed on deriving a direct relation between the quality measure and mesh distortion. The work is based on use of the Finite Volume discretization for evaluation of first order spatial derivatives. The analytic form of the truncation error is derived and applied to elementary types of mesh distortion including typical hybrid grid interfaces. The corresponding analytic expressions provide relations between the truncation error and the degree of stretching, skewness, shearing, torsion, expansion, as well as the type of grid interface.

  17. A priori analysis of a LES subfilter model for soot-turbulence-chemistry interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lew, Jeffry K.; Mueller, Michael E.

    2016-11-01

    In a turbulent flame, soot interacts with turbulence and combustion chemistry at the smallest scales. An existing LES subfilter model proposes that soot-turbulence interactions are independent of chemistry due to the time scale separation between slow soot formation and rapid heat-releasing reactions. However, interactions between soot, turbulence, and chemistry occur even after the nucleation of soot from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) dimers. In fact, the interplay of soot and gas-phase chemistry may be intensified during oxidation and surface growth. To capture these effects, a dependence on the local mixture fraction has been introduced into the subfilter model. This modified model is evaluated a priori using a direct numerical simulation (DNS) database of soot evolution in a turbulent non-premixed n-heptane/air jet flame.

  18. A method to unmix multiple fluorophores in microscopy images with minimal a priori information.

    PubMed

    Schlachter, S; Schwedler, S; Esposito, A; Kaminski Schierle, G S; Moggridge, G D; Kaminski, C F

    2009-12-07

    The ability to quantify the fluorescence signals from multiply labeled biological samples is highly desirable in the life sciences but often difficult, because of spectral overlap between fluorescent species and the presence of autofluorescence. Several so called unmixing algorithms have been developed to address this problem. Here, we present a novel algorithm that combines measurements of lifetime and spectrum to achieve unmixing without a priori information on the spectral properties of the fluorophore labels. The only assumption made is that the lifetimes of the fluorophores differ. Our method combines global analysis for a measurement of lifetime distributions with singular value decomposition to recover individual fluorescence spectra. We demonstrate the technique on simulated datasets and subsequently by an experiment on a biological sample. The method is computationally efficient and straightforward to implement. Applications range from histopathology of complex and multiply labelled samples to functional imaging in live cells.

  19. A priori postulated and real power in cluster randomized trials: mind the gap.

    PubMed

    Guittet, Lydia; Giraudeau, Bruno; Ravaud, Philippe

    2005-08-18

    Cluster randomization design is increasingly used for the evaluation of health-care, screening or educational interventions. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) defines the clustering effect and be specified during planning. The aim of this work is to study the influence of the ICC on power in cluster randomized trials. Power contour graphs were drawn to illustrate the loss in power induced by an underestimation of the ICC when planning trials. We also derived the maximum achievable power given a specified ICC. The magnitude of the ICC can have a major impact on power, and with low numbers of clusters, 80% power may not be achievable. Underestimating the ICC during planning cluster randomized trials can lead to a seriously underpowered trial. Publication of a priori postulated and a posteriori estimated ICCs is necessary for a more objective reading: negative trial results may be the consequence of a loss of power due to a mis-specification of the ICC.

  20. A Priori Estimates for Free Boundary Problem of Incompressible Inviscid Magnetohydrodynamic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Chengchun; Luo, Tao

    2014-06-01

    In the present paper, we prove the a priori estimates of Sobolev norms for a free boundary problem of the incompressible inviscid magnetohydrodynamics equations in all physical spatial dimensions n = 2 and 3 by adopting a geometrical point of view used in Christodoulou and Lindblad (Commun Pure Appl Math 53:1536-1602, 2000), and estimating quantities such as the second fundamental form and the velocity of the free surface. We identify the well-posedness condition that the outer normal derivative of the total pressure including the fluid and magnetic pressures is negative on the free boundary, which is similar to the physical condition (Taylor sign condition) for the incompressible Euler equations of fluids.

  1. A Priori Estimates for Fractional Nonlinear Degenerate Diffusion Equations on Bounded Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonforte, Matteo; Vázquez, Juan Luis

    2015-10-01

    We investigate quantitative properties of the nonnegative solutions to the nonlinear fractional diffusion equation, , posed in a bounded domain, , with m > 1 for t > 0. As we use one of the most common definitions of the fractional Laplacian , 0 < s < 1, in a bounded domain with zero Dirichlet boundary conditions. We consider a general class of very weak solutions of the equation, and obtain a priori estimates in the form of smoothing effects, absolute upper bounds, lower bounds, and Harnack inequalities. We also investigate the boundary behaviour and we obtain sharp estimates from above and below. In addition, we obtain similar estimates for fractional semilinear elliptic equations. Either the standard Laplacian case s = 1 or the linear case m = 1 are recovered as limits. The method is quite general, suitable to be applied to a number of similar problems.

  2. Predicting thermal history a-priori for magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia of internal carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhar, Purbarun; Sirisha Maganti, Lakshmi

    2017-08-01

    This article proposes a simplistic and realistic method where a direct analytical expression can be derived for the temperature field within a tumour during magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia. The approximated analytical expression for thermal history within the tumour is derived based on the lumped capacitance approach and considers all therapy protocols and parameters. The present method is simplistic and provides an easy framework for estimating hyperthermia protocol parameters promptly. The model has been validated with respect to several experimental reports on animal models such as mice/rabbit/hamster and human clinical trials. It has been observed that the model is able to accurately estimate the thermal history within the carcinoma during the hyperthermia therapy. The present approach may find implications in a-priori estimation of the thermal history in internal tumours for optimizing magnetic hyperthermia treatment protocols with respect to the ablation time, tumour size, magnetic drug concentration, field strength, field frequency, nanoparticle material and size, tumour location, and so on.

  3. Rapid multi-wavelength optical assessment of circulating blood volume without a priori data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loginova, Ekaterina V.; Zhidkova, Tatyana V.; Proskurnin, Mikhail A.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2016-03-01

    The measurement of circulating blood volume (CBV) is crucial in various medical conditions including surgery, iatrogenic problems, rapid fluid administration, transfusion of red blood cells, or trauma with extensive blood loss including battlefield injuries and other emergencies. Currently, available commercial techniques are invasive and time-consuming for trauma situations. Recently, we have proposed high-speed multi-wavelength photoacoustic/photothermal (PA/PT) flow cytometry for in vivo CBV assessment with multiple dyes as PA contrast agents (labels). As the first step, we have characterized the capability of this technique to monitor the clearance of three dyes (indocyanine green, methylene blue, and trypan blue) in an animal model. However, there are strong demands on improvements in PA/PT flow cytometry. As additional verification of our proof-of-concept of this technique, we performed optical photometric CBV measurements in vitro. Three label dyes—methylene blue, crystal violet and, partially, brilliant green—were selected for simultaneous photometric determination of the components of their two-dye mixtures in the circulating blood in vitro without any extra data (like hemoglobin absorption) known a priori. The tests of single dyes and their mixtures in a flow system simulating a blood transfusion system showed a negligible difference between the sensitivities of the determination of these dyes under batch and flow conditions. For individual dyes, the limits of detection of 3×10-6 M‒3×10-6 M in blood were achieved, which provided their continuous determination at a level of 10-5 M for the CBV assessment without a priori data on the matrix. The CBV assessment with errors no higher than 4% were obtained, and the possibility to apply the developed procedure for optical photometric (flow cytometry) with laser sources was shown.

  4. Methods for improving limited field-of-view radiotherapy reconstructions using imperfect a priori images.

    PubMed

    Ruchala, Kenneth J; Olivera, Gustavo H; Kapatoes, Jeffrey M; Reckwerdt, Paul J; Mackie, Thomas R

    2002-11-01

    There are many benefits to having an online CT imaging system for radiotherapy, as it helps identify changes in the patient's position and anatomy between the time of planning and treatment. However, many current online CT systems suffer from a limited field-of-view (LFOV) in that collected data do not encompass the patient's complete cross section. Reconstruction of these data sets can quantitatively distort the image values and introduce artifacts. This work explores the use of planning CT data as a priori information for improving these reconstructions. Methods are presented to incorporate this data by aligning the LFOV with the planning images and then merging the data sets in sinogram space. One alignment option is explicit fusion, producing fusion-aligned reprojection (FAR) images. For cases where explicit fusion is not viable, FAR can be implemented using the implicit fusion of normal setup error, referred to as normal-error-aligned reprojection (NEAR). These methods are evaluated for multiday patient images showing both internal and skin-surface anatomical variation. The iterative use of NEAR and FAR is also investigated, as are applications of NEAR and FAR to dose calculations and the compensation of LFOV online MVCT images with kVCT planning images. Results indicate that NEAR and FAR can utilize planning CT data as imperfect a priori information to reduce artifacts and quantitatively improve images. These benefits can also increase the accuracy of dose calculations and be used for augmenting CT images (e.g., MVCT) acquired at different energies than the planning CT.

  5. A-Priori Rupture Models for Northern California Type-A Faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wills, Chris J.; Weldon, Ray J.; Field, Edward H.

    2008-01-01

    This appendix describes how a-priori rupture models were developed for the northern California Type-A faults. As described in the main body of this report, and in Appendix G, ?a-priori? models represent an initial estimate of the rate of single and multi-segment surface ruptures on each fault. Whether or not a given model is moment balanced (i.e., satisfies section slip-rate data) depends on assumptions made regarding the average slip on each segment in each rupture (which in turn depends on the chosen magnitude-area relationship). Therefore, for a given set of assumptions, or branch on the logic tree, the methodology of the present Working Group (WGCEP-2007) is to find a final model that is as close as possible to the a-priori model, in the least squares sense, but that also satisfies slip rate and perhaps other data. This is analogous the WGCEP- 2002 approach of effectively voting on the relative rate of each possible rupture, and then finding the closest moment-balance model (under a more limiting set of assumptions than adopted by the present WGCEP, as described in detail in Appendix G). The 2002 Working Group Report (WCCEP, 2003, referred to here as WGCEP-2002), created segmented earthquake rupture forecast models for all faults in the region, including some that had been designated as Type B faults in the NSHMP, 1996, and one that had not previously been considered. The 2002 National Seismic Hazard Maps used the values from WGCEP-2002 for all the faults in the region, essentially treating all the listed faults as Type A faults. As discussed in Appendix A, the current WGCEP found that there are a number of faults with little or no data on slip-per-event, or dates of previous earthquakes. As a result, the WGCEP recommends that faults with minimal available earthquake recurrence data: the Greenville, Mount Diablo, San Gregorio, Monte Vista-Shannon and Concord-Green Valley be modeled as Type B faults to be consistent with similarly poorly-known faults statewide

  6. Testing the plausibility of several a priori assumed error distributions for discharge measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Eerdenbrugh, Katrien; Verhoest, Niko E. C.

    2017-04-01

    Hydrologic measurements are used for a variety of research topics and operational projects. Regardless of the application, it is important to account for measurement uncertainty. In many projects, no local information is available about this uncertainty. Therefore, error distributions and accompanying parameters or uncertainty boundaries are often taken from literature without any knowledge about their applicability in the new context. In this research, an approach is proposed that uses relative differences between simultaneous discharge measurements to test the plausibility of several a priori assumed error distributions. For this test, simultaneous discharge measurements (measured with one type of device) from nine different Belgian rivers were available. This implies the assumption that their error distribution does not depend upon river, measurement location and measurement team. Moreover, it is assumed that the errors of two simultaneous measurements are not mutually dependent. This data set does not allow for a direct assessment of measurement errors. However, independently of the value of the real discharge, the relative difference between two simultaneous measurements can be expressed by their relative measurement errors. If a distribution is assumed for these errors, it is thus possible to test equality between the distributions of both the relative differences of the simultaneously measured discharge pairs and a created set of relative differences based on two equally sized samples of measurement errors from the assumed distribution. If the assumed error distribution is correct, these two data sets will have the same distribution. In this research, equality is tested with a two-sample nonparametric Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. The resulting p-value and the corresponding value of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistic (KS statistic) are used for this evaluation. The occurrence of a high p-value (and corresponding small value of the KS statistic) provides no

  7. On Evaluation of Recharge Model Uncertainty: a Priori and a Posteriori

    SciTech Connect

    Ming Ye; Karl Pohlmann; Jenny Chapman; David Shafer

    2006-01-30

    Hydrologic environments are open and complex, rendering them prone to multiple interpretations and mathematical descriptions. Hydrologic analyses typically rely on a single conceptual-mathematical model, which ignores conceptual model uncertainty and may result in bias in predictions and under-estimation of predictive uncertainty. This study is to assess conceptual model uncertainty residing in five recharge models developed to date by different researchers based on different theories for Nevada and Death Valley area, CA. A recently developed statistical method, Maximum Likelihood Bayesian Model Averaging (MLBMA), is utilized for this analysis. In a Bayesian framework, the recharge model uncertainty is assessed, a priori, using expert judgments collected through an expert elicitation in the form of prior probabilities of the models. The uncertainty is then evaluated, a posteriori, by updating the prior probabilities to estimate posterior model probability. The updating is conducted through maximum likelihood inverse modeling by calibrating the Death Valley Regional Flow System (DVRFS) model corresponding to each recharge model against observations of head and flow. Calibration results of DVRFS for the five recharge models are used to estimate three information criteria (AIC, BIC, and KIC) used to rank and discriminate these models. Posterior probabilities of the five recharge models, evaluated using KIC, are used as weights to average head predictions, which gives posterior mean and variance. The posterior quantities incorporate both parametric and conceptual model uncertainties.

  8. A priori data-driven multi-clustered reservoir generation algorithm for echo state network.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiumin; Zhong, Ling; Xue, Fangzheng; Zhang, Anguo

    2015-01-01

    Echo state networks (ESNs) with multi-clustered reservoir topology perform better in reservoir computing and robustness than those with random reservoir topology. However, these ESNs have a complex reservoir topology, which leads to difficulties in reservoir generation. This study focuses on the reservoir generation problem when ESN is used in environments with sufficient priori data available. Accordingly, a priori data-driven multi-cluster reservoir generation algorithm is proposed. The priori data in the proposed algorithm are used to evaluate reservoirs by calculating the precision and standard deviation of ESNs. The reservoirs are produced using the clustering method; only the reservoir with a better evaluation performance takes the place of a previous one. The final reservoir is obtained when its evaluation score reaches the preset requirement. The prediction experiment results obtained using the Mackey-Glass chaotic time series show that the proposed reservoir generation algorithm provides ESNs with extra prediction precision and increases the structure complexity of the network. Further experiments also reveal the appropriate values of the number of clusters and time window size to obtain optimal performance. The information entropy of the reservoir reaches the maximum when ESN gains the greatest precision.

  9. A priori mesh quality metric error analysis applied to a high-order finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowrie, W.; Lukin, V. S.; Shumlak, U.

    2011-06-01

    Characterization of computational mesh's quality prior to performing a numerical simulation is an important step in insuring that the result is valid. A highly distorted mesh can result in significant errors. It is therefore desirable to predict solution accuracy on a given mesh. The HiFi/SEL high-order finite element code is used to study the effects of various mesh distortions on solution quality of known analytic problems for spatial discretizations with different order of finite elements. The measured global error norms are compared to several mesh quality metrics by independently varying both the degree of the distortions and the order of the finite elements. It is found that the spatial spectral convergence rates are preserved for all considered distortion types, while the total error increases with the degree of distortion. For each distortion type, correlations between the measured solution error and the different mesh metrics are quantified, identifying the most appropriate overall mesh metric. The results show promise for future a priori computational mesh quality determination and improvement.

  10. Optimal quantum cloning based on the maximin principle by using a priori information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Peng; Dai, Hong-Yi; Wei, Jia-Hua; Zhang, Ming

    2016-10-01

    We propose an optimal 1 →2 quantum cloning method based on the maximin principle by making full use of a priori information of amplitude and phase about the general cloned qubit input set, which is a simply connected region enclosed by a "longitude-latitude grid" on the Bloch sphere. Theoretically, the fidelity of the optimal quantum cloning machine derived from this method is the largest in terms of the maximin principle compared with that of any other machine. The problem solving is an optimization process that involves six unknown complex variables, six vectors in an uncertain-dimensional complex vector space, and four equality constraints. Moreover, by restricting the structure of the quantum cloning machine, the optimization problem is simplified as a three-real-parameter suboptimization problem with only one equality constraint. We obtain the explicit formula for a suboptimal quantum cloning machine. Additionally, the fidelity of our suboptimal quantum cloning machine is higher than or at least equal to that of universal quantum cloning machines and phase-covariant quantum cloning machines. It is also underlined that the suboptimal cloning machine outperforms the "belt quantum cloning machine" for some cases.

  11. Control-relevant models for glucose control using a priori patient characteristics.

    PubMed

    van Heusden, Klaske; Dassau, Eyal; Zisser, Howard C; Seborg, Dale E; Doyle, Francis J

    2012-07-01

    One of the difficulties in the development of a reliable artificial pancreas for people with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is the lack of accurate models of an individual's response to insulin. Most control algorithms proposed to control the glucose level in subjects with T1DM are model-based. Avoiding postprandial hypoglycemia ( 60 mg/dl) while minimizing prandial hyperglycemia ( > 180 mg/dl) has shown to be difficult in a closed-loop setting due to the patient-model mismatch. In this paper, control-relevant models are developed for T1DM, as opposed to models that minimize a prediction error. The parameters of these models are chosen conservatively to minimize the likelihood of hypoglycemia events. To limit the conservatism due to large intersubject variability, the models are personalized using a priori patient characteristics. The models are implemented in a zone model predictive control algorithm. The robustness of these controllers is evaluated in silico, where hypoglycemia is completely avoided even after large meal disturbances. The proposed control approach is simple and the controller can be set up by a physician without the need for control expertise.

  12. A Second Order Expansion of the Separatrix Map for Trigonometric Perturbations of a Priori Unstable Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guardia, M.; Kaloshin, V.; Zhang, J.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we study a so-called separatrix map introduced by Zaslavskii-Filonenko (Sov Phys JETP 27:851-857, 1968) and studied by Treschev (Physica D 116(1-2):21-43, 1998; J Nonlinear Sci 12(1):27-58, 2002), Piftankin (Nonlinearity (19):2617-2644, 2006) Piftankin and Treshchëv (Uspekhi Mat Nauk 62(2(374)):3-108, 2007). We derive a second order expansion of this map for trigonometric perturbations. In Castejon et al. (Random iteration of maps of a cylinder and diffusive behavior. Preprint available at arXiv:1501.03319, 2015), Guardia and Kaloshin (Stochastic diffusive behavior through big gaps in a priori unstable systems (in preparation), 2015), and Kaloshin et al. (Normally Hyperbolic Invariant Laminations and diffusive behavior for the generalized Arnold example away from resonances. Preprint available at http://www.terpconnect.umd.edu/vkaloshi/, 2015), applying the results of the present paper, we describe a class of nearly integrable deterministic systems with stochastic diffusive behavior.

  13. A Priori Analysis of Flamelet-Based Modeling for a Dual-Mode Scramjet Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinlan, Jesse R.; McDaniel, James C.; Drozda, Tomasz G.; Lacaze, Guilhem; Oefelein, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    An a priori investigation of the applicability of flamelet-based combustion models to dual-mode scramjet combustion was performed utilizing Reynolds-averaged simulations (RAS). For this purpose, the HIFiRE Direct Connect Rig (HDCR) flowpath, fueled with a JP-7 fuel surrogate and operating in dual- and scram-mode was considered. The chemistry of the JP-7 fuel surrogate was modeled using a 22 species, 18-step chemical reaction mechanism. Simulation results were compared to experimentally-obtained, time-averaged, wall pressure measurements to validate the RAS solutions. The analysis of the dual-mode operation of this flowpath showed regions of predominately non-premixed, high-Damkohler number, combustion. Regions of premixed combustion were also present but associated with only a small fraction of the total heat-release in the flow. This is in contrast to the scram-mode operation, where a comparable amount of heat is released from non-premixed and premixed combustion modes. Representative flamelet boundary conditions were estimated by analyzing probability density functions for temperature and pressure for pure fuel and oxidizer conditions. The results of the present study reveal the potential for a flamelet model to accurately model the combustion processes in the HDCR and likely other high-speed flowpaths of engineering interest.

  14. Improving image reconstruction of bioluminescence imaging using a priori information from ultrasound imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayet, Baptiste; Ahmad, Junaid; Taylor, Shelley L.; Hill, Philip J.; Dehghani, Hamid; Morgan, Stephen P.

    2017-03-01

    Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is a commonly used imaging modality in biology to study cancer in vivo in small animals. Images are generated using a camera to map the optical fluence emerging from the studied animal, then a numerical reconstruction algorithm is used to locate the sources and estimate their sizes. However, due to the strong light scattering properties of biological tissues, the resolution is very limited (around a few millimetres). Therefore obtaining accurate information about the pathology is complicated. We propose a combined ultrasound/optics approach to improve accuracy of these techniques. In addition to the BLI data, an ultrasound probe driven by a scanner is used for two main objectives. First, to obtain a pure acoustic image, which provides structural information of the sample. And second, to alter the light emission by the bioluminescent sources embedded inside the sample, which is monitored using a high speed optical detector (e.g. photomultiplier tube). We will show that this last measurement, used in conjunction with the ultrasound data, can provide accurate localisation of the bioluminescent sources. This can be used as a priori information by the numerical reconstruction algorithm, greatly increasing the accuracy of the BLI image reconstruction as compared to the image generated using only BLI data.

  15. Double-difference traveltime tomography with edge-preserving regularization and a priori interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Youzuo; Syracuse, Ellen M.; Maceira, Monica; Zhang, Haijiang; Larmat, Carene

    2015-05-01

    Conventional traveltime seismic tomography methods with Tikhonov regularization (L2 norm) typically produce smooth models, but these models may be inappropriate when subsurface structure contains discontinuous features, such as faults or fractures, indicating that tomographic models should contain sharp boundaries. For this reason, we develop a double-difference (DD) traveltime tomography method that uses a modified total-variation regularization scheme incorporated with a priori information on interfaces to preserve sharp property contrasts and obtain accurate inversion results. In order to solve the inversion problem, we employ an alternating minimization method to decouple the original DD tomography problem into two separate subproblems: a conventional DD tomography with Tikhonov regularization and a L2 total-variation inversion. We use the LSQR linear solver to solve the Tikhonov inversion and the split-Bregman iterative method to solve the total-variation inversion. Through our numerical examples, we show that our new DD tomography method yields more accurate results than the conventional DD tomography method at almost the same computational cost.

  16. A priori complete active space self consistent field localized orbitals: an application on linear polyenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeli, Celestino; Sparta, Manuel; Cimiraglia, Renzo

    2006-03-01

    A recently proposed a priori localization technique is used to exploit the possibility to reduce the number of active orbitals in a Complete Active Space Self Consistent Field calculation. The work relies on the fact that the new approach allows a strict control on the nature of the active orbitals and therefore makes it possible to include in the active space only the relevant orbitals. The idea is tested on the calculation of the energy barrier for rigid rotation of linear polyenes. In order to obtain a relevant set of data, a number of possible rotations around double bonds have been considered in the ethylene, butadiene, hexatriene, octatetraene, decapentaene, dodecahexaene molecules. The possibility to reduce the dimension of the active space has been investigated, considering for each possible rotation different active spaces ranging from the minimal dimension of 2 electrons in 2 π orbitals to the π-complete space. The results show that the rigid isomerization in the polyene molecules can be described with a negligible loss in accuracy with active spaces no larger than ten orbitals and ten electrons. In the special case of the rotation around the terminal double bond, the space can be further reduced to six orbitals and six electrons with a large decrease of the computational cost. An interesting summation rule has been found and verified for the stabilization of the energy barriers as a function of the dimension of the conjugated lateral chains and of the dimension of the active space.

  17. Do we use a priori knowledge of gravity when making elbow rotations?

    PubMed

    Pinter, Ilona J; van Soest, Arthur J; Bobbert, Maarten F; Smeets, Jeroen B J

    2012-03-01

    In this study, we aim to investigate whether motor commands, emanating from movement planning, are customized to movement orientation relative to gravity from the first trial on. Participants made fast point-to-point elbow flexions and extensions in the transverse plane. We compared movements that had been practiced in reclined orientation either against or with gravity with the same movement relative to the body axis made in the upright orientation (neutral compared to gravity). For each movement type, five rotations from reclined to upright orientation were made. For each rotation, we analyzed the first trial in upright orientation and the directly preceding trial in reclined orientation. Additionally, we analyzed the last five trials of a 30-trial block in upright position and compared these trials with the first trials in upright orientation. Although participants moved fast, gravitational torques were substantial. The change in body orientation affected movement planning: we found a decrease in peak angular velocity and a decrease in amplitude for the first trials made in the upright orientation, regardless of whether the previous movements in reclined orientation were made against or with gravity. We found that these decreases disappeared after participants familiarized themselves with moving in upright position in a 30-trial block. These results indicate that participants used a general strategy, corresponding to the strategy observed in situations with unreliable or limited information on external conditions. From this, we conclude that during movement planning, a priori knowledge of gravity was not used to specifically customize motor commands for the neutral gravity condition.

  18. SPARSE-A subgrid particle averaged Reynolds stress equivalent model: testing with a priori closure.

    PubMed

    Davis, Sean L; Jacobs, Gustaaf B; Sen, Oishik; Udaykumar, H S

    2017-03-01

    A Lagrangian particle cloud model is proposed that accounts for the effects of Reynolds-averaged particle and turbulent stresses and the averaged carrier-phase velocity of the subparticle cloud scale on the averaged motion and velocity of the cloud. The SPARSE (subgrid particle averaged Reynolds stress equivalent) model is based on a combination of a truncated Taylor expansion of a drag correction function and Reynolds averaging. It reduces the required number of computational parcels to trace a cloud of particles in Eulerian-Lagrangian methods for the simulation of particle-laden flow. Closure is performed in an a priori manner using a reference simulation where all particles in the cloud are traced individually with a point-particle model. Comparison of a first-order model and SPARSE with the reference simulation in one dimension shows that both the stress and the averaging of the carrier-phase velocity on the cloud subscale affect the averaged motion of the particle. A three-dimensional isotropic turbulence computation shows that only one computational parcel is sufficient to accurately trace a cloud of tens of thousands of particles.

  19. A Priori Attitudes Predict Amniocentesis Uptake in Women of Advanced Maternal Age: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Grinshpun-Cohen, Julia; Miron-Shatz, Talya; Rhee-Morris, Laila; Briscoe, Barbara; Pras, Elon; Towner, Dena

    2015-01-01

    Amniocentesis is an invasive procedure performed during pregnancy to determine, among other things, whether the fetus has Down syndrome. It is often preceded by screening, which gives a probabilistic risk assessment. Thus, ample information is conveyed to women with the goal to inform their decisions. This study examined the factors that predict amniocentesis uptake among pregnant women of advanced maternal age (older than 35 years old at the time of childbirth). Participants filled out a questionnaire regarding risk estimates, demographics, and attitudes on screening and pregnancy termination before their first genetic counseling appointment and were followed up to 24 weeks of gestation. Findings show that women's decisions are not always informed by screening results or having a medical indication. Psychological factors measured at the beginning of pregnancy: amniocentesis risk tolerance, pregnancy termination tolerance, and age risk perception affected amniocentesis uptake. Although most women thought that screening for Down syndrome risk would inform their decision, they later stated other reasons for screening, such as preparing for the possibility of a child with special needs. Findings suggest that women's decisions regarding amniocentesis are driven not only by medical factors, but also by a priori attitudes. The authors believe that these should be addressed in the dialogue on women's informed use of prenatal tests.

  20. Reconstruction of Consistent 3d CAD Models from Point Cloud Data Using a Priori CAD Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bey, A.; Chaine, R.; Marc, R.; Thibault, G.; Akkouche, S.

    2011-09-01

    We address the reconstruction of 3D CAD models from point cloud data acquired in industrial environments, using a pre-existing 3D model as an initial estimate of the scene to be processed. Indeed, this prior knowledge can be used to drive the reconstruction so as to generate an accurate 3D model matching the point cloud. We more particularly focus our work on the cylindrical parts of the 3D models. We propose to state the problem in a probabilistic framework: we have to search for the 3D model which maximizes some probability taking several constraints into account, such as the relevancy with respect to the point cloud and the a priori 3D model, and the consistency of the reconstructed model. The resulting optimization problem can then be handled using a stochastic exploration of the solution space, based on the random insertion of elements in the configuration under construction, coupled with a greedy management of the conflicts which efficiently improves the configuration at each step. We show that this approach provides reliable reconstructed 3D models by presenting some results on industrial data sets.

  1. The application of a priori structural information based regularization in image reconstruction in magnetic induction tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekdouk, B.; Ktistis, C.; Yin, W.; Armitage, D. W.; Peyton, A. J.

    2010-04-01

    Magnetic induction tomography (MIT) is a non-invasive contactless modality that could be capable of imaging the conductivity distribution of biological tissues. In this paper we consider the possibility of using absolute MIT voltage measurements for monitoring the progress of a peripheral hemorrhagic stroke in a human brain. The pathology is modelled as a local blood accumulation in the white matter. The solution of the MIT inverse problem is nonlinear and ill-posed and hence requires the use of a regularisation method. In this paper, we describe the construction and present the performance of a regularisation matrix based on a priori structural information of the head tissues obtained from a very recent MRI scan. The method takes the MRI scan as an initial state of the stroke and constructs a learning set containing the possible conductivity distributions of the current state of the stroke. This data is used to calculate an approximation of the covariance matrix and then a subspace is constructed using principal component analysis (PCA). It is shown by simulations the method is capable of producing a representative reconstruction of a stroke compared to smoothing Tikhonov regularization in a simplified model of the head.

  2. KIR Genes and Patterns Given by the A Priori Algorithm: Immunity for Haematological Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Escobedo, J Gilberto; García-Sepúlveda, Christian A; Cuevas-Tello, Juan C

    2015-01-01

    Killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) are membrane proteins expressed by cells of innate and adaptive immunity. The KIR system consists of 17 genes and 614 alleles arranged into different haplotypes. KIR genes modulate susceptibility to haematological malignancies, viral infections, and autoimmune diseases. Molecular epidemiology studies rely on traditional statistical methods to identify associations between KIR genes and disease. We have previously described our results by applying support vector machines to identify associations between KIR genes and disease. However, rules specifying which haplotypes are associated with greater susceptibility to malignancies are lacking. Here we present the results of our investigation into the rules governing haematological malignancy susceptibility. We have studied the different haplotypic combinations of 17 KIR genes in 300 healthy individuals and 43 patients with haematological malignancies (25 with leukaemia and 18 with lymphomas). We compare two machine learning algorithms against traditional statistical analysis and show that the "a priori" algorithm is capable of discovering patterns unrevealed by previous algorithms and statistical approaches.

  3. Source apportionment of urban air pollutants using constrained receptor models with a priori profile information.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ho-Tang; Yau, Yu-Chen; Huang, Chun-Sheng; Chen, Nathan; Chow, Judith C; Watson, John G; Tsai, Shih-Wei; Chou, Charles C-K; Wu, Chang-Fu

    2017-08-01

    Exposure to air pollutants such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) are associated with adverse health effects. This study applied multiple time resolution data of hourly VOCs and 24-h PM2.5 to a constrained Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) model for source apportionment in Taipei, Taiwan. Ninety-two daily PM2.5 samples and 2208 hourly VOC measurements were collected during four seasons in 2014 and 2015. With some a priori information, we used different procedures to constrain retrieved factors toward realistic sources. A total of nine source factors were identified as: natural gas/liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) leakage, solvent use/industrial process, contaminated marine aerosol, secondary aerosol/long-range transport, oil combustion, traffic related, evaporative gasoline emission, gasoline exhaust, and soil dust. Results showed that solvent use/industrial process was the largest contributor (19%) to VOCs while the largest contributor to PM2.5 mass was secondary aerosol/long-range transport (57%). A robust regression analysis showed that secondary aerosol was mostly contributed by regional transport related factor (25%). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Acoustic attenuation imaging of tissue bulk properties with a priori information

    PubMed Central

    Hooi, Fong Ming; Kripfgans, Oliver; Carson, Paul L.

    2016-01-01

    Attenuation of ultrasound waves traversing a medium is not only a result of absorption and scattering within a given tissue, but also of coherent scattering, including diffraction, refraction, and reflection of the acoustic wave at tissue boundaries. This leads to edge enhancement and other artifacts in most reconstruction algorithms, other than 3D wave migration with currently impractical, implementations. The presented approach accounts for energy loss at tissue boundaries by normalizing data based on variable sound speed, and potential density, of the medium using a k-space wave solver. Coupled with a priori knowledge of major sound speed distributions, physical attenuation values within broad ranges, and the assumption of homogeneity within segmented regions, an attenuation image representative of region bulk properties is constructed by solving a penalized weighted least squares optimization problem. This is in contradistinction to absorption or to conventional attenuation coefficient based on overall insertion loss with strong dependence on sound speed and impedance mismatches at tissue boundaries. This imaged property will be referred to as the bulk attenuation coefficient. The algorithm is demonstrated on an opposed array setup, with mean-squared-error improvements from 0.6269 to 0.0424 (dB/cm/MHz)2 for a cylindrical phantom, and 0.1622 to 0.0256 (dB/cm/MHz)2 for a windowed phantom. PMID:27914403

  5. Improving diffuse optical tomography with structural a priori from fluorescence diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wenjuan; Gao, Feng; Duan, Linjing; Zhu, Qingzhen; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Linhui; Yi, Xi; Zhao, Huijuan

    2012-03-01

    We obtain absorption and scattering reconstructed images by incorporating a priori information of target location obtained from fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (FDOT) into the diffuse optical tomography (DOT). The main disadvantage of DOT lies in the low spatial resolution resulting from highly scattering nature of tissue in the near-infrared (NIR), but one can use it to monitor hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation simultaneously, as well as several other cheomphores such as water, lipids, and cytochrome-c-oxidase. Up to date, extensive effort has been made to integrate DOT with other imaging modalities such as MRI, CT, to obtain accurate optical property maps of the tissue. However, the experimental apparatus is intricate. In this study, DOT image reconstruction algorithm that incorporates a prior structural information provided by FDOT is investigated in an attempt to optimize recovery of a simulated optical property distribution. By use of a specifically designed multi-channel time-correlated single photon counting system, the proposed scheme in a transmission mode is experimentally validated to achieve simultaneous reconstruction of the fluorescent yield, lifetime, absorption and scattering coefficient. The experimental results demonstrate that the quantitative recovery of the tumor optical properties has doubled and the spatial resolution improves as well by applying the new improved method.

  6. A Priori Analyses of Three Subgrid-Scale Models for One-Parameter Families of Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruett, C. David; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    1998-01-01

    The decay of isotropic turbulence a compressible flow is examined by direct numerical simulation (DNS). A priori analyses of the DNS data are then performed to evaluate three subgrid-scale (SGS) models for large-eddy simulation (LES): a generalized Smagorinsky model (M1), a stress-similarity model (M2), and a gradient model (M3). The models exploit one-parameter second- or fourth-order filters of Pade type, which permit the cutoff wavenumber k(sub c) to be tuned independently of the grid increment (delta)x. The modeled (M) and exact (E) SGS-stresses are compared component-wise by correlation coefficients of the form C(E,M) computed over the entire three-dimensional fields. In general, M1 correlates poorly against exact stresses (C < 0.2), M3 correlates moderately well (C approx. 0.6), and M2 correlates remarkably well (0.8 < C < 1.0). Specifically, correlations C(E, M2) are high provided the grid and test filters are of the same order. Moreover, the highest correlations (C approx.= 1.0) result whenever the grid and test filters are identical (in both order and cutoff). Finally, present results reveal the exact SGS stresses obtained by grid filters of differing orders to be only moderately well correlated. Thus, in LES the model should not be specified independently of the filter.

  7. A quantum question order model supported by empirical tests of an a priori and precise prediction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Busemeyer, Jerome R

    2013-10-01

    Question order effects are commonly observed in self-report measures of judgment and attitude. This article develops a quantum question order model (the QQ model) to account for four types of question order effects observed in literature. First, the postulates of the QQ model are presented. Second, an a priori, parameter-free, and precise prediction, called the QQ equality, is derived from these mathematical principles, and six empirical data sets are used to test the prediction. Third, a new index is derived from the model to measure similarity between questions. Fourth, we show that in contrast to the QQ model, Bayesian and Markov models do not generally satisfy the QQ equality and thus cannot account for the reported empirical data that support this equality. Finally, we describe the conditions under which order effects are predicted to occur, and we review a broader range of findings that are encompassed by these very same quantum principles. We conclude that quantum probability theory, initially invented to explain order effects on measurements in physics, appears to be a powerful natural explanation for order effects of self-report measures in social and behavioral sciences, too.

  8. The importance of using dynamical a-priori profiles for infrared O3 retrievals : the case of IASI.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peiro, H.; Emili, E.; Le Flochmoen, E.; Barret, B.; Cariolle, D.

    2016-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone (O3) is a trace gas involved in the global greenhouse effect. To quantify its contribution to global warming, an accurate determination of O3 profiles is necessary. The instrument IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer), on board satellite MetOP-A, is the more sensitive sensor to tropospheric O3 with a high spatio-temporal coverage. Satellite retrievals are often based on the inversion of the measured radiance data with a variational approach. This requires an a priori profile and the correspondent error covariance matrix (COV) as ancillary input. Previous studies have shown some biases ( 20%) in IASI retrievals for tropospheric column in the Southern Hemisphere (SH). A possible source of errors is caused by the a priori profile. This study aims to i) build a dynamical a priori profile O3 with a Chemistry Transport Model (CTM), ii) integrate and to demonstrate the interest of this a priori profile in IASI retrievals.Global O3 profiles are retrieved from IASI radiances with the SOFRID (Software for a fast Retrieval of IASI Data) algorithm. It is based on the RTTOV (Radiative Transfer for TOVS) code and a 1D-Var retrieval scheme. Until now, a constant a priori profile was based on a combination of MOZAIC, WOUDC-SHADOZ and Aura/MLS data named here CLIM PR. The global CTM MOCAGE (Modèle de Chimie Atmosphérique à Grande Echelle) has been used with a linear O3 chemistry scheme to assimilate Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) data. The model resolution of 2°x2°, with 60 sigma-hybrid vertical levels covering the stratosphere has been used. MLS level 2 products have been assimilated with a 4D-VAR variational algorithm to constrain stratospheric O3 and obtain high quality a priori profiles O3 above the tropopause. From this reanalysis, we built these profiles at a 6h frequency on a coarser resolution grid 10°x20° named MOCAGE+MLS PR.Statistical comparisons between retrievals and ozonesondes have shown better correlations and smaller biases for

  9. Development of a combined multifrequency MRI-DOT system for human breast imaging using a priori information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayer, David; Liu, Ning; Unlu, Burcin; Chen, Jeon-Hor; Su, Min-Ying; Nalcioglu, Orhan; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2010-02-01

    Breast cancer is a significant cause of mortality and morbidity among women with early diagnosis being vital to successful treatment. Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) is an emerging medical imaging modality that provides information that is complementary to current screening modalities such as MRI and mammography, and may improve the specificity in determining cancer malignancy. Using high-resolution anatomic images as a priori information improves the accuracy of DOT. Measurements are presented characterizing the performance of our system. Preliminary data is also shown illustrating the use of a priori MRI data in phantom studies.ä

  10. An algorithm for finding biologically significant features in microarray data based on a priori manifold learning.

    PubMed

    Hira, Zena M; Trigeorgis, George; Gillies, Duncan F

    2014-01-01

    Microarray databases are a large source of genetic data, which, upon proper analysis, could enhance our understanding of biology and medicine. Many microarray experiments have been designed to investigate the genetic mechanisms of cancer, and analytical approaches have been applied in order to classify different types of cancer or distinguish between cancerous and non-cancerous tissue. However, microarrays are high-dimensional datasets with high levels of noise and this causes problems when using machine learning methods. A popular approach to this problem is to search for a set of features that will simplify the structure and to some degree remove the noise from the data. The most widely used approach to feature extraction is principal component analysis (PCA) which assumes a multivariate Gaussian model of the data. More recently, non-linear methods have been investigated. Among these, manifold learning algorithms, for example Isomap, aim to project the data from a higher dimensional space onto a lower dimension one. We have proposed a priori manifold learning for finding a manifold in which a representative set of microarray data is fused with relevant data taken from the KEGG pathway database. Once the manifold has been constructed the raw microarray data is projected onto it and clustering and classification can take place. In contrast to earlier fusion based methods, the prior knowledge from the KEGG databases is not used in, and does not bias the classification process--it merely acts as an aid to find the best space in which to search the data. In our experiments we have found that using our new manifold method gives better classification results than using either PCA or conventional Isomap.

  11. An a priori DNS study of the shadow-position mixing model

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Xin -Yu; Bhagatwala, Ankit; Chen, Jacqueline H.; ...

    2016-01-15

    In this study, the modeling of mixing by molecular diffusion is a central aspect for transported probability density function (tPDF) methods. In this paper, the newly-proposed shadow position mixing model (SPMM) is examined, using a DNS database for a temporally evolving di-methyl ether slot jet flame. Two methods that invoke different levels of approximation are proposed to extract the shadow displacement (equivalent to shadow position) from the DNS database. An approach for a priori analysis of the mixing-model performance is developed. The shadow displacement is highly correlated with both mixture fraction and velocity, and the peak correlation coefficient of themore » shadow displacement and mixture fraction is higher than that of the shadow displacement and velocity. This suggests that the composition-space localness is reasonably well enforced by the model, with appropriate choices of model constants. The conditional diffusion of mixture fraction and major species from DNS and from SPMM are then compared, using mixing rates that are derived by matching the mixture fraction scalar dissipation rates. Good qualitative agreement is found, for the prediction of the locations of zero and maximum/minimum conditional diffusion locations for mixture fraction and individual species. Similar comparisons are performed for DNS and the IECM (interaction by exchange with the conditional mean) model. The agreement between SPMM and DNS is better than that between IECM and DNS, in terms of conditional diffusion iso-contour similarities and global normalized residual levels. It is found that a suitable value for the model constant c that controls the mixing frequency can be derived using the local normalized scalar variance, and that the model constant a controls the localness of the model. A higher-Reynolds-number test case is anticipated to be more appropriate to evaluate the mixing models, and stand-alone transported PDF simulations are required to more fully enforce

  12. An a priori DNS study of the shadow-position mixing model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xin -Yu; Bhagatwala, Ankit; Chen, Jacqueline H.; Haworth, Daniel C.; Pope, Stephen B.

    2016-01-15

    In this study, the modeling of mixing by molecular diffusion is a central aspect for transported probability density function (tPDF) methods. In this paper, the newly-proposed shadow position mixing model (SPMM) is examined, using a DNS database for a temporally evolving di-methyl ether slot jet flame. Two methods that invoke different levels of approximation are proposed to extract the shadow displacement (equivalent to shadow position) from the DNS database. An approach for a priori analysis of the mixing-model performance is developed. The shadow displacement is highly correlated with both mixture fraction and velocity, and the peak correlation coefficient of the shadow displacement and mixture fraction is higher than that of the shadow displacement and velocity. This suggests that the composition-space localness is reasonably well enforced by the model, with appropriate choices of model constants. The conditional diffusion of mixture fraction and major species from DNS and from SPMM are then compared, using mixing rates that are derived by matching the mixture fraction scalar dissipation rates. Good qualitative agreement is found, for the prediction of the locations of zero and maximum/minimum conditional diffusion locations for mixture fraction and individual species. Similar comparisons are performed for DNS and the IECM (interaction by exchange with the conditional mean) model. The agreement between SPMM and DNS is better than that between IECM and DNS, in terms of conditional diffusion iso-contour similarities and global normalized residual levels. It is found that a suitable value for the model constant c that controls the mixing frequency can be derived using the local normalized scalar variance, and that the model constant a controls the localness of the model. A higher-Reynolds-number test case is anticipated to be more appropriate to evaluate the mixing models, and stand-alone transported PDF simulations are required to more fully enforce localness and

  13. A review of a priori regression models for warfarin maintenance dose prediction.

    PubMed

    Francis, Ben; Lane, Steven; Pirmohamed, Munir; Jorgensen, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    A number of a priori warfarin dosing algorithms, derived using linear regression methods, have been proposed. Although these dosing algorithms may have been validated using patients derived from the same centre, rarely have they been validated using a patient cohort recruited from another centre. In order to undertake external validation, two cohorts were utilised. One cohort formed by patients from a prospective trial and the second formed by patients in the control arm of the EU-PACT trial. Of these, 641 patients were identified as having attained stable dosing and formed the dataset used for validation. Predicted maintenance doses from six criterion fulfilling regression models were then compared to individual patient stable warfarin dose. Predictive ability was assessed with reference to several statistics including the R-square and mean absolute error. The six regression models explained different amounts of variability in the stable maintenance warfarin dose requirements of the patients in the two validation cohorts; adjusted R-squared values ranged from 24.2% to 68.6%. An overview of the summary statistics demonstrated that no one dosing algorithm could be considered optimal. The larger validation cohort from the prospective trial produced more consistent statistics across the six dosing algorithms. The study found that all the regression models performed worse in the validation cohort when compared to the derivation cohort. Further, there was little difference between regression models that contained pharmacogenetic coefficients and algorithms containing just non-pharmacogenetic coefficients. The inconsistency of results between the validation cohorts suggests that unaccounted population specific factors cause variability in dosing algorithm performance. Better methods for dosing that take into account inter- and intra-individual variability, at the initiation and maintenance phases of warfarin treatment, are needed.

  14. A priori typology-based prediction of benthic macroinvertebrate fauna for ecological classification of rivers.

    PubMed

    Aroviita, Jukka; Koskenniemi, Esa; Kotanen, Juho; Hämäläinen, Heikki

    2008-11-01

    We evaluated a simple bioassessment method based on a priori river typology to predict benthic macroinvertebrate fauna in riffle sites of rivers in the absence of human influence. Our approach predicted taxon lists specific to four river types differing in catchment area with a method analogous to the site-specific RIVPACS-type models. The reference sites grouped in accordance with their type in NMS ordination, indicating that the typology efficiently accounted for natural variation in macroinvertebrate assemblages. Compared with a null model, typology greatly increased the precision of prediction and sensitivity to detect human impairment and strengthened the correlation of the ratio of observed-to-expected number of predicted taxa (O/E) with the measured stressor variables. The performance of the typology-based approach was equal to that of a RIVPACS-type predictive model that we developed. Exclusion of rarest taxa with low occurrence probabilities improved the performance of both approaches by all criteria. With an increasing inclusion threshold of occurrence probability, especially the predictive model sensitivity first increased but then decreased. Many common taxa with intermediate type-specific occurrence probabilities were consistently missing from impacted sites, a result suggesting that these taxa may be especially important in detecting human disturbances. We conclude that if a typology-based approach such as that suggested by the European Union's Water Framework Directive is required, the O/E ratio of type-specific taxa can be a useful metric for assessment of the status of riffle macroinvertebrate communities. Successful application of the approach, however, requires biologically meaningful river types with a sufficient pool of reference sites for each type.

  15. Limited angle breast ultrasound tomography with a priori information and artifact removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jintamethasawat, Rungroj; Zhu, Yunhao; Kripfgans, Oliver D.; Yuan, Jie; Goodsitt, Mitchell M.; Carson, Paul L.

    2017-03-01

    In B-mode images from dual-sided ultrasound, it has been shown that by delineating structures suspected of being relatively homogeneous, one can enhance limited angle tomography to produce speed of sound images in the same view as X-ray Digital Breast Tomography (DBT). This could allow better breast cancer detection and discrimination, as well as improved registration of the ultrasound and X-ray images, because of the similarity of SOS and X-ray contrast in the breast. However, this speed of sound reconstruction method relies strongly on B-mode or other reflection mode segmentation. If that information is limited or incorrect, artifacts will appear in the reconstructed images. Therefore, the iterative speed of sound reconstruction algorithm has been modified in a manner of simultaneously utilizing the image segmentations and removing most artifacts. The first step of incorporating a priori information is solved by any nonlinearnonconvex optimization method while artifact removal is accomplished by employing the fast split Bregman method to perform total-variation (TV) regularization for image denoising. The proposed method was demonstrated in simplified simulations of our dual-sided ultrasound scanner. To speed these computations two opposed 40-element ultrasound linear arrays with 0.5 MHz center frequency were simulated for imaging objects in a uniform background. The proposed speed of sound reconstruction method worked well with both bent-ray and full-wave inversion methods. This is also the first demonstration of successful full-wave medical ultrasound tomography in the limited angle geometry. Presented results lend credibility to a possible translation of this method to clinical breast imaging.

  16. AN A PRIORI INVESTIGATION OF ASTROPHYSICAL FALSE POSITIVES IN GROUND-BASED TRANSITING PLANET SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Tom M.; Sackett, Penny D.

    2010-03-20

    Astrophysical false positives due to stellar eclipsing binaries pose one of the greatest challenges to ground-based surveys for transiting hot Jupiters. We have used known properties of multiple star systems and hot Jupiter systems to predict, a priori, the number of such false detections and the number of genuine planet detections recovered in two hypothetical but realistic ground-based transit surveys targeting fields close to the galactic plane (b {approx} 10{sup 0}): a shallow survey covering a magnitude range 10 < V < 13 and a deep survey covering a magnitude range 15 < V < 19. Our results are consistent with the commonly reported experience of false detections outnumbering planet detections by a factor of {approx}10 in shallow surveys, while in our synthetic deep survey we find {approx}1-2 false detections for every planet detection. We characterize the eclipsing binary configurations that are most likely to cause false detections and find that they can be divided into three main types: (1) two dwarfs undergoing grazing transits, (2) two dwarfs undergoing low-latitude transits in which one component has a substantially smaller radius than the other, and (3) two eclipsing dwarfs blended with one or more physically unassociated foreground stars. We also predict that a significant fraction of hot Jupiter detections are blended with the light from other stars, showing that care must be taken to identify the presence of any unresolved neighbors in order to obtain accurate estimates of planetary radii. This issue is likely to extend to terrestrial planet candidates in the CoRoT and Kepler transit surveys, for which neighbors of much fainter relative brightness will be important.

  17. Lost in space: Onboard star identification using CCD star tracker data without an a priori attitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ketchum, Eleanor A.; Tolson, Robert H.

    1993-01-01

    There are many algorithms in use today which determine spacecraft attitude by identifying stars in the field of view of a star tracker. Some methods, which date from the early 1960's, compare the angular separation between observed stars with a small catalog. In the last 10 years, several methods have been developed which speed up the process and reduce the amount of memory needed, a key element to onboard attitude determination. However, each of these methods require some a priori knowledge of the spacecraft attitude. Although the Sun and magnetic field generally provide the necessary coarse attitude information, there are occasions when a spacecraft could get lost when it is not prudent to wait for sunlight. Also, the possibility of efficient attitude determination using only the highly accurate CCD star tracker could lead to fully autonomous spacecraft attitude determination. The need for redundant coarse sensors could thus be eliminated at substantial cost reduction. Some groups have extended their algorithms to implement a computation intense full sky scan. Some require large data bases. Both storage and speed are concerns for autonomous onboard systems. Neural network technology is even being explored by some as a possible solution, but because of the limited number of patterns that can be stored and large overhead, nothing concrete has resulted from these efforts. This paper presents an algorithm which, by descretizing the sky and filtering by visual magnitude of the brightness observed star, speeds up the lost in space star identification process while reducing the amount of necessary onboard computer storage compared to existing techniques.

  18. Lost in space: Onboard star identification using CCD star tracker data without an a priori attitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ketchum, Eleanor A.; Tolson, Robert H.

    1993-01-01

    There are many algorithms in use today which determine spacecraft attitude by identifying stars in the field of view of a star tracker. Some methods, which date from the early 1960's, compare the angular separation between observed stars with a small catalog. In the last 10 years, several methods have been developed which speed up the process and reduce the amount of memory needed, a key element to onboard attitude determination. However, each of these methods require some a priori knowledge of the spacecraft attitude. Although the Sun and magnetic field generally provide the necessary coarse attitude information, there are occasions when a spacecraft could get lost when it is not prudent to wait for sunlight. Also, the possibility of efficient attitude determination using only the highly accurate CCD star tracker could lead to fully autonomous spacecraft attitude determination. The need for redundant coarse sensors could thus be eliminated at substantial cost reduction. Some groups have extended their algorithms to implement a computation intense full sky scan. Some require large data bases. Both storage and speed are concerns for autonomous onboard systems. Neural network technology is even being explored by some as a possible solution, but because of the limited number of patterns that can be stored and large overhead, nothing concrete has resulted from these efforts. This paper presents an algorithm which, by descretizing the sky and filtering by visual magnitude of the brightness observed star, speeds up the lost in space star identification process while reducing the amount of necessary onboard computer storage compared to existing techniques.

  19. Travelers' Health: Immunocompromised Travelers

    MedlinePlus

    ... data are lacking. Box 8-01. Key patient education points for the immunocompromised traveler Develop plan in ... waterborne infections, patients should avoid swallowing water during swimming and other water-based recreational activities and should ...

  20. Musical Probabilities, Abductive Reasoning, and Brain Mechanisms: Extended Perspective of "A Priori" Listening to Music within the Creative Cognition Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Sebastian; Troge, Thomas A.; Lorrain, Denis

    2013-01-01

    A theory of listening to music is proposed. It suggests that, for listeners, the process of prediction is the starting point to experiencing music. This implies that perception of music starts through both a predisposed and an experience-based extrapolation into the future (this is labeled "a priori" listening). Indications for this…

  1. Musical Probabilities, Abductive Reasoning, and Brain Mechanisms: Extended Perspective of "A Priori" Listening to Music within the Creative Cognition Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Sebastian; Troge, Thomas A.; Lorrain, Denis

    2013-01-01

    A theory of listening to music is proposed. It suggests that, for listeners, the process of prediction is the starting point to experiencing music. This implies that perception of music starts through both a predisposed and an experience-based extrapolation into the future (this is labeled "a priori" listening). Indications for this…

  2. Traveling with breathing problems

    MedlinePlus

    Oxygen - travel; Collaped lung - travel; Chest surgery - travel; COPD - travel; Chronic obstructive airways disease - travel; Chronic obstructive lung disease - travel; Chronic bronchitis - travel; ...

  3. A priori patient-specific collision avoidance in radiotherapy using consumer grade depth cameras.

    PubMed

    Cardan, Rex A; Popple, Richard A; Fiveash, John

    2017-07-01

    In this study, we demonstrate and evaluate a low cost, fast, and accurate avoidance framework for radiotherapy treatments. Furthermore, we provide an implementation which is patient specific and can be implemented during the normal simulation process. Four patients and a treatment unit were scanned with a set of consumer depth cameras to create a polygon mesh of each object. Using a fast polygon interference algorithm, the models were virtually collided to map out feasible treatment positions of the couch and gantry. The actual physical collision space was then mapped in the treatment room by moving the gantry and couch until a collision occurred with either the patient or hardware. The physical and virtual collision spaces were then compared to determine the accuracy of the system. To improve the collision predictions, a buffer geometry was added to the scanned gantry mesh and performance was assessed as a function of buffer thickness. Each patient was optically scanned during simulation in less than 1 min. The average time to virtually map the collision space for 64, 800 gantry/couch states was 5.40 ± 2.88 s. The system had an average raw accuracy and negative prediction rate (NPR) across all patients of 97.3% ± 2.4% and 96.9% ± 2.2% respectively. Using a polygon buffer of 6 cm over the gantry geometry, the NPR was raised to unity for all patients, signifying the detection of all collision events. However, the average accuracy fell from 95.3% ± 3.1% to 91.5% ± 3.6% between the 3 and 6 cm buffer as more false positives were detected. We successfully demonstrated a fast and low cost framework which can map an entire collision space a priori for a given patient during the time of simulation. All collisions can be avoided using polygon interference, but a polygon buffer may be required to account for geometric uncertainties of scanned objects. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  4. Connected Traveler

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Alex

    2015-11-01

    The Connected Traveler project is a multi-disciplinary undertaking that seeks to validate potential for transformative transportation system energy savings by incentivizing efficient traveler behavior. This poster outlines various aspects of the Connected Traveler project, including market opportunity, understanding traveler behavior and decision-making, automation and connectivity, and a projected timeline for Connected Traveler's key milestones.

  5. Travelers' Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety Blood Clots Bug Bites Business Travel Cold Climates Counterfeit Drugs Cruise Ship Travel Families with Children ... Abroad Getting Sick After Travel High Altitudes Hot Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador ...

  6. Travelers' Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety Blood Clots Bug Bites Business Travel Cold Climates Counterfeit Drugs Cruise Ship Travel Families with Children ... Abroad Getting Sick After Travel High Altitudes Hot Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador ...

  7. Optical tomographic imaging of activation of the infant auditory cortex using perturbation Monte Carlo with anatomical a priori information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiskala, Juha; Kotilahti, Kalle; Lipiäinen, Lauri; Hiltunen, Petri; Grant, P. Ellen; Nissilä, Ilkka

    2007-07-01

    We have developed a perturbation Monte Carlo method for calculating forward and inverse solutions to the optical tomography imaging problem in the presence of anatomical a priori information. The method uses frequency domain data. In the present work, we consider the problem of imaging hemodynamic changes due to brain activation in the infant brain. We test finite element method and Monte Carlo based implementations using a homogeneous model with the exterior of the domain warped to match digitized points on the skin. With the perturbation Monte Carlo model, we also test a heterogeneous model based on anatomical a priori information derived from a previously recorded infant T1 magnetic resonance (MR) image. Our simulations show that the anatomical information improves the accuracy of reconstructions quite significantly even if the anatomical MR images are based on another infant. This suggests that significant benefits can be obtained by the use of generic infant brain atlas information in near-infrared spectroscopy and optical tomography studies.

  8. Novel post-Doppler STAP with a priori knowledge information for traffic monitoring applications: basic idea and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, André B. C.; Baumgartner, Stefan V.

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents a novel a priori knowledge-based algorithm for traffic monitoring applications. The powerful post-Doppler space-time adaptive processing (PD STAP) is combined with a known road network obtained from the freely available OpenStreetMap (OSM) database. The road information is applied after the PD STAP for recognizing and rejecting false detections, and moreover, for repositioning the vehicles detected in the vicinity of the roads. The algorithm presents great potential for real-time processing, decreased hardware complexity and low costs compared to state-of-the-art systems. The processor was tested using real multi-channel data acquired by DLR's airborne system F-SAR. The experimental results are shown and discussed, and the novelties are highlighted (e.g., the benefits of using a priori knowledge information).

  9. A priori error estimates for an hp-version of the discontinuous Galerkin method for hyperbolic conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bey, Kim S.; Oden, J. Tinsley

    1993-01-01

    A priori error estimates are derived for hp-versions of the finite element method for discontinuous Galerkin approximations of a model class of linear, scalar, first-order hyperbolic conservation laws. These estimates are derived in a mesh dependent norm in which the coefficients depend upon both the local mesh size h(sub K) and a number p(sub k) which can be identified with the spectral order of the local approximations over each element.

  10. Tomographic inversion of time-domain resistivity and chargeability data for the investigation of landfills using a priori information.

    PubMed

    De Donno, Giorgio; Cardarelli, Ettore

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new code for the modelling and inversion of resistivity and chargeability data using a priori information to improve the accuracy of the reconstructed model for landfill. When a priori information is available in the study area, we can insert them by means of inequality constraints on the whole model or on a single layer or assigning weighting factors for enhancing anomalies elongated in the horizontal or vertical directions. However, when we have to face a multilayered scenario with numerous resistive to conductive transitions (the case of controlled landfills), the effective thickness of the layers can be biased. The presented code includes a model-tuning scheme, which is applied after the inversion of field data, where the inversion of the synthetic data is performed based on an initial guess, and the absolute difference between the field and synthetic inverted models is minimized. The reliability of the proposed approach has been supported in two real-world examples; we were able to identify an unauthorized landfill and to reconstruct the geometrical and physical layout of an old waste dump. The combined analysis of the resistivity and chargeability (normalised) models help us to remove ambiguity due to the presence of the waste mass. Nevertheless, the presence of certain layers can remain hidden without using a priori information, as demonstrated by a comparison of the constrained inversion with a standard inversion. The robustness of the above-cited method (using a priori information in combination with model tuning) has been validated with the cross-section from the construction plans, where the reconstructed model is in agreement with the original design. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Travelers' Health: Travel and Breastfeeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador Insurance International Adoption Jet Lag Last-Minute Travel Long-Term Travel ... Vaccine Recommendations for Infants & Children Travel & Breastfeeding International Adoption Tables Maps Figures Boxes Updates About the Yellow ...

  12. A priori parameter estimates for global hydrological modeling using geographically based information: Application of the CREST hydrologic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Z.; Zhang, K.; Xue, X.; Huang, J.; Hong, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Floods are among the most common natural disasters with worldwide impacts that cause significant humanitarian and economic negative consequences. The increasing availability of satellite-based precipitation estimates and geospatial datasets with global coverage and improved temporal resolutions has enhanced our capability of forecasting floods and monitoring water resources across the world. This study presents an approach combing physically based and empirical methods for a-priori parameter estimates and a parameter dataset for the Coupled Routing and Excess Storage (CREST) hydrological model at the global scale. This approach takes advantage of geographic information such as topography, land cover, and soil properties to derive the distributed parameter values across the world. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the utility of a-priori parameter estimates to improve the performance of the CREST distributed hydrologic model and enable its prediction at poorly gauged or ungauged catchments. Using the CREST hydrologic model, several typical river basins in different continents were selected to serve as test areas. The results show that the simulated daily stream flows using the parameters derived from geographically based information outperform the results using the lumped parameters. Overall, this early study highlights that a priori parameter estimates for hydrologic model warrants improved model predictive capability in ungauged basins at regional to global scales.

  13. Evaluating a Priori Ozone Profile Information Used in TEMPO (Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution) Tropospheric Ozone Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Matthew Stephen

    2017-01-01

    A primary objective for TOLNet is the evaluation and validation of space-based tropospheric O3 retrievals from future systems such as the Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO) satellite. This study is designed to evaluate the tropopause-based O3 climatology (TB-Clim) dataset which will be used as the a priori profile information in TEMPO O3 retrievals. This study also evaluates model simulated O3 profiles, which could potentially serve as a priori O3 profile information in TEMPO retrievals, from near-real-time (NRT) data assimilation model products (NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) Forward Processing (FP) and Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications version 2 (MERRA2)) and full chemical transport model (CTM), GEOS-Chem, simulations. The TB-Clim dataset and model products are evaluated with surface (0-2 km) and tropospheric (0-10 km) TOLNet observations to demonstrate the accuracy of the suggested a priori dataset and information which could potentially be used in TEMPO O3 algorithms. This study also presents the impact of individual a priori profile sources on the accuracy of theoretical TEMPO O3 retrievals in the troposphere and at the surface. Preliminary results indicate that while the TB-Clim climatological dataset can replicate seasonally-averaged tropospheric O3 profiles observed by TOLNet, model-simulated profiles from a full CTM (GEOS-Chem is used as a proxy for CTM O3 predictions) resulted in more accurate tropospheric and surface-level O3 retrievals from TEMPO when compared to hourly (diurnal cycle evaluation) and daily-averaged (daily variability evaluation) TOLNet observations. Furthermore, it was determined that when large daily-averaged surface O3 mixing ratios are observed (65 ppb), which are important for air quality purposes, TEMPO retrieval values at the surface display higher correlations and less bias when applying CTM a priori profile information

  14. [Travelers' vaccines].

    PubMed

    Ouchi, Kazunobu

    2011-09-01

    The number of Japanese oversea travelers has gradually increased year by year, however they usually pay less attention to the poor physical condition at the voyage place. Many oversea travelers caught vaccine preventable diseases in developing countries. The Vaccine Guideline for Oversea Travelers 2010 published by Japanese Society of Travel Health will be helpful for spreading the knowledge of travelers' vaccine and vaccine preventable diseases in developing countries. Many travelers' vaccines have not licensed in Japan. I hope these travelers' vaccines, such as typhoid vaccine, meningococcal vaccine, cholera vaccine and so on will be licensed in the near future.

  15. Assessing the risk of work-related international travel.

    PubMed

    Druckman, Myles; Harber, Philip; Liu, Yihang; Quigley, Robert L

    2014-11-01

    To identify factors affecting the likelihood of requiring medical services during international business trips. Data from more than 800,000 international trips and medical assistance cases provided to 48 multinational corporations in 2009. Travel destination countries were grouped into four a priori risk-related categories. Travel to "low" medical risk countries in aggregate accounted for more hospitalizations and medical evacuations than travel to "high" medical risk countries. Nevertheless, the risk per trip was much higher for travel to higher medical risk countries. Corporations with employees on international travel should allocate sufficient resources to manage and ideally prevent medical issues during business travel. Travel medicine must focus on more than infectious diseases, and programs are necessary for both high- and low-risk regions. Improved understanding of travel-related needs determines resource allocation and risk mitigation efforts.

  16. Travelers' Health: Travel and Breastfeeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Travel Families with Children Fish Poisoning in Travelers Food and Water Getting Health Care Abroad Getting Sick After Travel High Altitudes Hot Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador Insurance International Adoption Jet Lag Last-Minute Travel Long-Term ...

  17. Travel medicine

    PubMed Central

    Aw, Brian; Boraston, Suni; Botten, David; Cherniwchan, Darin; Fazal, Hyder; Kelton, Timothy; Libman, Michael; Saldanha, Colin; Scappatura, Philip; Stowe, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To define the practice of travel medicine, provide the basics of a comprehensive pretravel consultation for international travelers, and assist in identifying patients who might require referral to travel medicine professionals. Sources of information Guidelines and recommendations on travel medicine and travel-related illnesses by national and international travel health authorities were reviewed. MEDLINE and EMBASE searches for related literature were also performed. Main message Travel medicine is a highly dynamic specialty that focuses on pretravel preventive care. A comprehensive risk assessment for each individual traveler is essential in order to accurately evaluate traveler-, itinerary-, and destination-specific risks, and to advise on the most appropriate risk management interventions to promote health and prevent adverse health outcomes during travel. Vaccinations might also be required and should be personalized according to the individual traveler’s immunization history, travel itinerary, and the amount of time available before departure. Conclusion A traveler’s health and safety depends on a practitioner’s level of expertise in providing pretravel counseling and vaccinations, if required. Those who advise travelers are encouraged to be aware of the extent of this responsibility and to refer all high-risk travelers to travel medicine professionals whenever possible. PMID:25500599

  18. Testing the hypothesis of neurodegeneracy in respiratory network function with a priori transected arterially perfused brain stem preparation of rat

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    Degeneracy of respiratory network function would imply that anatomically discrete aspects of the brain stem are capable of producing respiratory rhythm. To test this theory we a priori transected brain stem preparations before reperfusion and reoxygenation at 4 rostrocaudal levels: 1.5 mm caudal to obex (n = 5), at obex (n = 5), and 1.5 (n = 7) and 3 mm (n = 6) rostral to obex. The respiratory activity of these preparations was assessed via recordings of phrenic and vagal nerves and lumbar spinal expiratory motor output. Preparations with a priori transection at level of the caudal brain stem did not produce stable rhythmic respiratory bursting, even when the arterial chemoreceptors were stimulated with sodium cyanide (NaCN). Reperfusion of brain stems that preserved the pre-Bötzinger complex (pre-BötC) showed spontaneous and sustained rhythmic respiratory bursting at low phrenic nerve activity (PNA) amplitude that occurred simultaneously in all respiratory motor outputs. We refer to this rhythm as the pre-BötC burstlet-type rhythm. Conserving circuitry up to the pontomedullary junction consistently produced robust high-amplitude PNA at lower burst rates, whereas sequential motor patterning across the respiratory motor outputs remained absent. Some of the rostrally transected preparations expressed both burstlet-type and regular PNA amplitude rhythms. Further analysis showed that the burstlet-type rhythm and high-amplitude PNA had 1:2 quantal relation, with burstlets appearing to trigger high-amplitude bursts. We conclude that no degenerate rhythmogenic circuits are located in the caudal medulla oblongata and confirm the pre-BötC as the primary rhythmogenic kernel. The absence of sequential motor patterning in a priori transected preparations suggests that pontine circuits govern respiratory pattern formation. PMID:26888109

  19. A priori identifiability of a one-compartment model with two input functions for liver blood flow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Georg A.; Müller-Schauenburg, Wolfgang; Spilker, Mary E.; Machulla, Hans-Jürgen; Piert, Morand

    2005-04-01

    An extended dual-input Kety-Schmidt model can be applied to positron emission tomography data for the quantification of local arterial (fa) and local portal-venous blood flow (fp) in the liver by freely diffusible tracers (e.g., [15O]H2O). We investigated the a priori identifiability of the three-parameter model (fa, fp and distribution volume (Vd)) under ideal (noise-free) conditions. The results indicate that the full identifiability of the model depends on the form of the portal-venous input function (cp(t)), which is assumed to be a sum of m exponentials convolved with the arterial input function (ca(t)). When m >= 2, all three-model parameters are uniquely identifiable. For m = 1 identifiability of fp fails if cp(t) coincides with tissue concentration (q(t)/Vd), which occurs if cp(t) is generated from an intestinal compartment with transit time Vd/fa. Any portal input, fp cp(t), is balanced by the portal contribution, fp q(t)/Vd, to the liver efflux, leaving q(t) unchanged by fp and only fa and Vd are a priori uniquely identifiable. An extension to this condition of unidentifiability is obtained if we leave the assumption of a generating intestinal compartment system and allow for an arbitrary proportionality constant between cp(t) and q(t). In this case, only fa remains a priori uniquely identifiable. These findings provide important insights into the behaviour and identifiability of the model applied to the unique liver environment.

  20. Connected Traveler

    SciTech Connect

    2016-06-01

    The Connected Traveler framework seeks to boost the energy efficiency of personal travel and the overall transportation system by maximizing the accuracy of predicted traveler behavior in response to real-time feedback and incentives. It is anticipated that this approach will establish a feedback loop that 'learns' traveler preferences and customizes incentives to meet or exceed energy efficiency targets by empowering individual travelers with information needed to make energy-efficient choices and reducing the complexity required to validate transportation system energy savings. This handout provides an overview of NREL's Connected Traveler project, including graphics, milestones, and contact information.

  1. A New Bio-inspired Approach to the Traveling Salesman Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiang; Lau, Francis C. M.; Gao, Daqi

    The host-seeking behavior of mosquitoes is very interesting. In this paper, we propose a novel mosquito host-seeking algorithm (MHSA) as a new branch of biology-inspired algorithms for solving TSP problems. The MHSA is inspired by the host-seeking behavior of mosquitoes. We present the mathematical model, the algorithm, the motivation, and the biological model. The MHSA can work out the theoretical optimum solution, which is important and exciting, and we give the theoretical foundation and present experiment results that verify this fact.

  2. Optimization strategies with resource scarcity: From immunization of networks to the traveling salesman problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellingeri, Michele; Agliari, Elena; Cassi, Davide

    2015-10-01

    The best strategy to immunize a complex network is usually evaluated in terms of the percolation threshold, i.e. the number of vaccine doses which make the largest connected cluster (LCC) vanish. The strategy inducing the minimum percolation threshold represents the optimal way to immunize the network. Here we show that the efficacy of the immunization strategies can change during the immunization process. This means that, if the number of doses is limited, the best strategy is not necessarily the one leading to the smallest percolation threshold. This outcome should warn about the adoption of global measures in order to evaluate the best immunization strategy.

  3. The Voronoi Diagram for the Euclidean Traveling Salesman Problem Is Piecemeal Quartic and Hyperbolic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    meaningful and complete information. When a NTIS - Leave blank. report is prepared in more than one volume, repeat the primary title, add volume...included elsewhere such as: Prepared in cooperation A ith...; Trans. of...; To abstract. Enter either Ut. (unlimited) or SAR be published in.... When a...attach interior cities based on a two itep procedure [S4]. First, the sum of the distances from an interior city to the endpoints of an existing

  4. Grading vascularity from histopathological images based on traveling salesman distance and vessel size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niazi, M. Khalid Khan; Hemminger, Jessica; Kurt, Habibe; Lozanski, Gerard; Gurcan, Metin

    2014-03-01

    Vascularity represents an important element of tissue/tumor microenvironment and is implicated in tumor growth, metastatic potential and resistence to therapy. Small blood vessels can be visualized using immunohistochemical stains specific to vascular cells. However, currently used manual methods to assess vascular density are poorly reproducible and are at best semi quantitative. Computer based quantitative and objective methods to measure microvessel density are urgently needed to better understand and clinically utilize microvascular density information. We propose a new method to quantify vascularity from images of bone marrow biopsies stained for CD34 vascular lining cells protein as a model. The method starts by automatically segmenting the blood vessels by methods of maxlink thresholding and minimum graph cuts. The segmentation is followed by morphological post-processing to reduce blast and small spurious objects from the bone marrow images. To classify the images into one of the four grades, we extracted 20 features from the segmented blood vessel images. These features include first four moments of the distribution of the area of blood vessels, first four moments of the distribution of 1) the edge weights in the minimum spanning tree of the blood vessels, 2) the shortest distance between blood vessels, 3) the homogeneity of the shortest distance (absolute difference in distance between consecutive blood vessels along the shortest path) between blood vessels and 5) blood vessel orientation. The method was tested on 26 bone marrow biopsy images stained with CD34 IHC stain, which were evaluated by three pathologists. The pathologists took part in this study by quantifying blood vessel density using gestalt assessment in hematopoietic bone marrow portions of bone marrow core biopsies images. To determine the intra-reader variability, each image was graded twice by each pathologist with two-week interval in between their readings. For each image, the ground truth (grade) was acquired through consensus among the three pathologists at the end of the study. A ranking of the features reveals that the fourth moment of the distribution of the area of blood vessels along with the first moment of the distribution of the shortest distance between blood vessels can correctly grade 68.2% of the bone marrow biopsies, while the intra- and inter-reader variability among the pathologists are 66.9% and 40.0%, respectively.

  5. Parametric Study of Urban-Like Topographic Statistical Moments Relevant to a Priori Modelling of Bulk Aerodynamic Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaowei; Iungo, G. Valerio; Leonardi, Stefano; Anderson, William

    2017-02-01

    For a horizontally homogeneous, neutrally stratified atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), aerodynamic roughness length, z_0, is the effective elevation at which the streamwise component of mean velocity is zero. A priori prediction of z_0 based on topographic attributes remains an open line of inquiry in planetary boundary-layer research. Urban topographies - the topic of this study - exhibit spatial heterogeneities associated with variability of building height, width, and proximity with adjacent buildings; such variability renders a priori, prognostic z_0 models appealing. Here, large-eddy simulation (LES) has been used in an extensive parametric study to characterize the ABL response (and z_0) to a range of synthetic, urban-like topographies wherein statistical moments of the topography have been systematically varied. Using LES results, we determined the hierarchical influence of topographic moments relevant to setting z_0. We demonstrate that standard deviation and skewness are important, while kurtosis is negligible. This finding is reconciled with a model recently proposed by Flack and Schultz (J Fluids Eng 132:041203-1-041203-10, 2010), who demonstrate that z_0 can be modelled with standard deviation and skewness, and two empirical coefficients (one for each moment). We find that the empirical coefficient related to skewness is not constant, but exhibits a dependence on standard deviation over certain ranges. For idealized, quasi-uniform cubic topographies and for complex, fully random urban-like topographies, we demonstrate strong performance of the generalized Flack and Schultz model against contemporary roughness correlations.

  6. A priori evaluation of two-stage cluster sampling for accuracy assessment of large-area land-cover maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wickham, J.D.; Stehman, S.V.; Smith, J.H.; Wade, T.G.; Yang, L.

    2004-01-01

    Two-stage cluster sampling reduces the cost of collecting accuracy assessment reference data by constraining sample elements to fall within a limited number of geographic domains (clusters). However, because classification error is typically positively spatially correlated, within-cluster correlation may reduce the precision of the accuracy estimates. The detailed population information to quantify a priori the effect of within-cluster correlation on precision is typically unavailable. Consequently, a convenient, practical approach to evaluate the likely performance of a two-stage cluster sample is needed. We describe such an a priori evaluation protocol focusing on the spatial distribution of the sample by land-cover class across different cluster sizes and costs of different sampling options, including options not imposing clustering. This protocol also assesses the two-stage design's adequacy for estimating the precision of accuracy estimates for rare land-cover classes. We illustrate the approach using two large-area, regional accuracy assessments from the National Land-Cover Data (NLCD), and describe how the a priorievaluation was used as a decision-making tool when implementing the NLCD design.

  7. Use of a priori spectral information in the measurement of x-ray flux with filtered diode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrs, R. E.; Widmann, K.; Brown, G. V.; Heeter, R. F.; MacLaren, S. A.; May, M. J.; Moore, A. S.; Schneider, M. B.

    2015-10-01

    Filtered x-ray diode (XRD) arrays are often used to measure x-ray spectra vs. time from spectrally continuous x-ray sources such as hohlraums. A priori models of the incident x-ray spectrum enable a more accurate unfolding of the x-ray flux as compared to the standard technique of modifying a thermal Planckian with spectral peaks or dips at the response energy of each filtered XRD channel. A model x-ray spectrum consisting of a thermal Planckian, a Gaussian at higher energy, and (in some cases) a high energy background provides an excellent fit to XRD-array measurements of x-ray emission from laser heated hohlraums. If high-resolution measurements of part of the x-ray emission spectrum are available, that information can be included in the a priori model. In cases where the x-ray emission spectrum is not Planckian, candidate x-ray spectra can be allowed or excluded by fitting them to measured XRD voltages. Examples are presented from the filtered XRD arrays, named Dante, at the National Ignition Facility and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  8. Use of a priori spectral information in the measurement of x-ray flux with filtered diode arrays.

    PubMed

    Marrs, R E; Widmann, K; Brown, G V; Heeter, R F; MacLaren, S A; May, M J; Moore, A S; Schneider, M B

    2015-10-01

    Filtered x-ray diode (XRD) arrays are often used to measure x-ray spectra vs. time from spectrally continuous x-ray sources such as hohlraums. A priori models of the incident x-ray spectrum enable a more accurate unfolding of the x-ray flux as compared to the standard technique of modifying a thermal Planckian with spectral peaks or dips at the response energy of each filtered XRD channel. A model x-ray spectrum consisting of a thermal Planckian, a Gaussian at higher energy, and (in some cases) a high energy background provides an excellent fit to XRD-array measurements of x-ray emission from laser heated hohlraums. If high-resolution measurements of part of the x-ray emission spectrum are available, that information can be included in the a priori model. In cases where the x-ray emission spectrum is not Planckian, candidate x-ray spectra can be allowed or excluded by fitting them to measured XRD voltages. Examples are presented from the filtered XRD arrays, named Dante, at the National Ignition Facility and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  9. A Priori and a Posteriori Dietary Patterns during Pregnancy and Gestational Weight Gain: The Generation R Study.

    PubMed

    Tielemans, Myrte J; Erler, Nicole S; Leermakers, Elisabeth T M; van den Broek, Marion; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Steegers, Eric A P; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C; Franco, Oscar H

    2015-11-12

    Abnormal gestational weight gain (GWG) is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. We examined whether dietary patterns are associated with GWG. Participants included 3374 pregnant women from a population-based cohort in the Netherlands. Dietary intake during pregnancy was assessed with food-frequency questionnaires. Three a posteriori-derived dietary patterns were identified using principal component analysis: a "Vegetable, oil and fish", a "Nuts, high-fiber cereals and soy", and a "Margarine, sugar and snacks" pattern. The a priori-defined dietary pattern was based on national dietary recommendations. Weight was repeatedly measured around 13, 20 and 30 weeks of pregnancy; pre-pregnancy and maximum weight were self-reported. Normal weight women with high adherence to the "Vegetable, oil and fish" pattern had higher early-pregnancy GWG than those with low adherence (43 g/week (95% CI 16; 69) for highest vs. lowest quartile (Q)). Adherence to the "Margarine, sugar and snacks" pattern was associated with a higher prevalence of excessive GWG (OR 1.45 (95% CI 1.06; 1.99) Q4 vs. Q1). Normal weight women with higher scores on the "Nuts, high-fiber cereals and soy" pattern had more moderate GWG than women with lower scores (-0.01 (95% CI -0.02; -0.00) per SD). The a priori-defined pattern was not associated with GWG. To conclude, specific dietary patterns may play a role in early pregnancy but are not consistently associated with GWG.

  10. A Priori Analysis of a Compressible Flamelet Model using RANS Data for a Dual-Mode Scramjet Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinlan, Jesse R.; Drozda, Tomasz G.; McDaniel, James C.; Lacaze, Guilhem; Oefelein, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to make large eddy simulation of hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet combustors more computationally accessible using realistic chemical reaction mechanisms, a compressible flamelet/progress variable (FPV) model was proposed that extends current FPV model formulations to high-speed, compressible flows. Development of this model relied on observations garnered from an a priori analysis of the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) data obtained for the Hypersonic International Flight Research and Experimentation (HI-FiRE) dual-mode scramjet combustor. The RANS data were obtained using a reduced chemical mechanism for the combustion of a JP-7 surrogate and were validated using avail- able experimental data. These RANS data were then post-processed to obtain, in an a priori fashion, the scalar fields corresponding to an FPV-based modeling approach. In the current work, in addition to the proposed compressible flamelet model, a standard incompressible FPV model was also considered. Several candidate progress variables were investigated for their ability to recover static temperature and major and minor product species. The effects of pressure and temperature on the tabulated progress variable source term were characterized, and model coupling terms embedded in the Reynolds- averaged Navier-Stokes equations were studied. Finally, results for the novel compressible flamelet/progress variable model were presented to demonstrate the improvement attained by modeling the effects of pressure and flamelet boundary conditions on the combustion.

  11. Travelers' diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Hill, David R; Beeching, Nick J

    2010-10-01

    Travelers' diarrhea affects 20-60% of travelers to low-income regions of the world. Much of the evidence for the clinical description and management of travelers' diarrhea was generated years ago, however, there is new information on geographic and host risk, etiology, and prevention strategies. Travel to South Asia, followed by sub-Saharan Africa and South America, carries the highest risk for diarrheal syndromes in returned travelers. Women are more susceptible to travel-related diarrhea than men. Host genetic studies have demonstrated that single nucleotide polymorphisms in the lactoferrin, osteoprotegerin, and IL-10 genes are associated with small but increased risks for diarrhea and enteric pathogens. Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis is likely to be a new agent identified as causing travelers' diarrhea, and heat-stable toxin-producing Escherichia coli appears to be more common than heat-labile toxin E. coli. Overall levels of sanitation at the travel destination, including individual eating establishments, are strong predictors for acquisition of travelers' diarrhea. A new transdermal LT vaccine shows promise in modifying the severity of travelers' diarrhea. It remains uncertain whether prophylaxis or prompt self-treatment of travelers' diarrhea will prevent late-onset irritable bowel syndrome. For self-treatment, azithromycin is the drug of choice in travelers to areas where there is a high risk of fluoroquinolone-resistant Campylobacter spp., such as South and Southeast Asia and possibly North Africa, Central and South America. There is increased understanding of the determinants of travelers' diarrhea. Despite this travelers' diarrhea remains one of the most common illnesses in travelers. Continued focus on intervention strategies may ultimately lead to decreased incidence.

  12. Traveller's diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Al-Abri, Seif S; Beeching, Nick J; Nye, Fred J

    2005-06-01

    Traveller's diarrhoea affects over 50% of travellers to some destinations and can disrupt holidays and business trips. This review examines the main causes and epidemiology of the syndrome, which is associated with poor public health infrastructure and hygiene practices, particularly in warmer climates. Although travellers may be given common sense advice on avoidance of high-risk foods and other measures to prevent traveller's diarrhoea, adherence to such advice is sometimes difficult and the evidence for its effectiveness is contradictory. However, non-antimicrobial means for prevention of traveller's diarrhoea are favoured in most settings. A simple stepwise approach to the management of traveller's diarrhoea includes single doses or 3-day courses of antimicrobials, often self administered. The antibiotics of choice are currently fluoroquinolones or azithromycin, with an emerging role for rifaximin. In the long term, there will be greater benefit and effect on the health of local inhabitants and travellers from improving public health and hygiene standards at tourist destinations.

  13. A Priori and a Posteriori Dietary Patterns during Pregnancy and Gestational Weight Gain: The Generation R Study

    PubMed Central

    Tielemans, Myrte J.; Erler, Nicole S.; Leermakers, Elisabeth T. M.; van den Broek, Marion; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; Steegers, Eric A. P.; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C.; Franco, Oscar H.

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal gestational weight gain (GWG) is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. We examined whether dietary patterns are associated with GWG. Participants included 3374 pregnant women from a population-based cohort in the Netherlands. Dietary intake during pregnancy was assessed with food-frequency questionnaires. Three a posteriori-derived dietary patterns were identified using principal component analysis: a “Vegetable, oil and fish”, a “Nuts, high-fiber cereals and soy”, and a “Margarine, sugar and snacks” pattern. The a priori-defined dietary pattern was based on national dietary recommendations. Weight was repeatedly measured around 13, 20 and 30 weeks of pregnancy; pre-pregnancy and maximum weight were self-reported. Normal weight women with high adherence to the “Vegetable, oil and fish” pattern had higher early-pregnancy GWG than those with low adherence (43 g/week (95% CI 16; 69) for highest vs. lowest quartile (Q)). Adherence to the “Margarine, sugar and snacks” pattern was associated with a higher prevalence of excessive GWG (OR 1.45 (95% CI 1.06; 1.99) Q4 vs. Q1). Normal weight women with higher scores on the “Nuts, high-fiber cereals and soy” pattern had more moderate GWG than women with lower scores (−0.01 (95% CI −0.02; −0.00) per SD). The a priori-defined pattern was not associated with GWG. To conclude, specific dietary patterns may play a role in early pregnancy but are not consistently associated with GWG. PMID:26569303

  14. Estimating a-priori kinematic wave model parameters based on regionalization for flash flood forecasting in the Conterminous United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergara, Humberto; Kirstetter, Pierre-Emmanuel; Gourley, Jonathan J.; Flamig, Zachary L.; Hong, Yang; Arthur, Ami; Kolar, Randall

    2016-10-01

    This study presents a methodology for the estimation of a-priori parameters of the widely used kinematic wave approximation to the unsteady, 1-D Saint-Venant equations for hydrologic flow routing. The approach is based on a multi-dimensional statistical modeling of the macro scale spatial variability of rating curve parameters using a set of geophysical factors including geomorphology, hydro-climatology and land cover/land use over the Conterminous United States. The main goal of this study was to enable prediction at ungauged locations through regionalization of model parameters. The results highlight the importance of regional and local geophysical factors in uniquely defining characteristics of each stream reach conforming to physical theory of fluvial hydraulics. The application of the estimates is demonstrated through a hydrologic modeling evaluation of a deterministic forecasting system performed on 1672 gauged basins and 47,563 events extracted from a 10-year simulation. Considering the mean concentration time of the basins of the study and the target application on flash flood forecasting, the skill of the flow routing simulations is significantly high for peakflow and timing of peakflow estimation, and shows consistency as indicated by the large sample verification. The resulting a-priori estimates can be used in any hydrologic model that employs the kinematic wave model for flow routing. Furthermore, probabilistic estimates of kinematic wave parameters are enabled based on uncertainty information that is generated during the multi-dimensional statistical modeling. More importantly, the methodology presented in this study enables the estimation of the kinematic wave model parameters anywhere over the globe, thus allowing flood modeling in ungauged basins at regional to global scales.

  15. Travelers' thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Raymond V; Hudson, Martin F

    2014-02-01

    The suggestion that venous thromboembolism (VTE) is associated with air travel has for several decades been the subject of both "media hype" and extensive debate in the medical literature. As emotion and anecdote is often a feature in this debate, it is therefore necessary to separate evidence from anecdote. "Travelers' thrombosis" is a more appropriate term because the evidence suggests that any form of travel involving immobility lasting more than 4 h can predispose to thrombosis. There is no unique factor in the air travel cabin environment that has been shown to have any effect on the coagulation cascade. Prevention of thrombosis in any form of travel, including air travel, requires being aware of the issue and making an adequate risk assessment together with appropriate prophylactic measures.

  16. Traveler's Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Giddings, Stanley L; Stevens, A Michal; Leung, Daniel T

    2016-03-01

    Traveler's diarrhea (TD) is the most common travel-related illness, and it can have a significant impact on the traveler. Pretravel consultation provides an excellent opportunity for the clinician to counsel the traveler and discuss strategies such as food and water hygiene, vaccinations, and medications for prophylaxis or self-treatment that may decrease the incidence and impact of TD. Postinfectious sequelae, such as postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome, reactive arthritis, and Guillain-Barre syndrome, may develop weeks or months after return. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Travelling diabetics.

    PubMed

    Chełmińska, Katarzyna; Jaremin, Bogdan

    2002-01-01

    During the past several decades, the number of both business and tourist travels has greatly increased. Among them are persons suffering from chronic diseases, including diabetics for whom travels pose the additional health-hazard. Irrespective of better education, self-control and constantly improving quality of specialistic equipment available, diabetics still are the group of patients requiring particular attention. In the case of travelling diabetics, problems may occur concerning the transport and storage of insulin, as well as control of glycaemia, all caused by irregularity of meals, variable diet, physical activity, stress, kinetosis (sea voyages), and the change of time zones. The travel may as well evoke ailments caused by the change of climate and concomitant diseases such as traveller's diarrhoea, malaria, etc. Apart from avoiding glycaemia fluctuations, important for retaining health of diabetics is the prevention of other diseases and carrying the necessary drugs.

  18. Layering ratios: a systematic approach to the inversion of surface wave data in the absence of a priori information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Brady R.; Teague, David P.

    2016-10-01

    Surface wave methods provide a cost effective means of developing shear wave velocity (Vs) profiles for applications such as dynamic site characterization and seismic site response analyses. However, the inverse problem involved in obtaining a realistic layered earth model from surface wave dispersion data is inherently ill-posed, non-linear and mix-determined, without a unique solution. When available, a priori information such as geotechnical boreholes or geologic well logs should be used to aid in constraining site-specific inversion parameters. Unfortunately, a priori information is often unavailable, particularly at significant depths, and a `blind analysis' must be performed. In these situations, the analyst must decide on an appropriate number of layers and ranges for their corresponding inversion parameters (i.e. trial number of layers and ranges in their respective thicknesses, shear wave velocities, compression wave velocities and mass densities). Selection of these parameters has been shown to significantly impact the results of an inversion. This paper presents a method for conducting multiple inversions utilizing systematically varied inversion layering parametrizations in order to identify and encompass the most reasonable layered earth models for a site. Each parametrization is defined by a unique layering ratio, which represents a multiplier that systemically increases the potential thickness of each layer in the inversion parametrization based on the potential thickness of the layer directly above it. The layering ratio method is demonstrated at two sites associated with the InterPacific Project, wherein it is shown to significantly aid in selecting reasonable Vs profiles that are close representations of the subsurface. While the goal of the layering ratio inversion methodology is not necessarily to find the `optimal' or `best' Vs profile for a site, it may be successful at doing so for certain sites/datasets. However, the primary reason for using

  19. [Travel medicine].

    PubMed

    Schubert, S; Grimm, M

    2009-07-01

    Travel medicine deals with travellers' diseases. The target group is therefore distinct from tropical medicine. It has gained in significance due to the increase in tourism and professional work abroad in the last 50 years. Dangerous and widespread diseases in tropical countries, in particular tropical malaria, have come into focus in industrialized countries because of their appearance in travellers. Travel medicine deals not only with infectious or transmittable diseases, but also with the ability of patients with chronic diseases to travel, the medical aspects of flying, as well as the health hazards of professional work or high-risk sports abroad. The risk of disease as a result of travelling can be minimized by advice and prophylactic measures, such as vaccinations and drug prophylaxis against malaria, if indicated. On return, medical symptoms should be investigated promptly to ensure early detection of life-threatening disease courses, particularly tropical malaria, as well as to prevent the occurrence of small-scale epidemics. A small number of diseases can also emerge after several years, such as benign types of malaria, amoebic liver abscess and visceral leishmaniasis (kala-azar). Aids also belongs to these diseases. Therefore, in this era of HIV pandemic travellers concerned should be made aware of the risks.

  20. Phillips-Tikhonov regularization with a priori information for neutron emission tomographic reconstruction on Joint European Torus

    SciTech Connect

    Bielecki, J.; Scholz, M.; Drozdowicz, K.; Giacomelli, L.; Kiptily, V.; Kempenaars, M.; Conroy, S.; Craciunescu, T.; Collaboration: EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB

    2015-09-15

    A method of tomographic reconstruction of the neutron emissivity in the poloidal cross section of the Joint European Torus (JET, Culham, UK) tokamak was developed. Due to very limited data set (two projection angles, 19 lines of sight only) provided by the neutron emission profile monitor (KN3 neutron camera), the reconstruction is an ill-posed inverse problem. The aim of this work consists in making a contribution to the development of reliable plasma tomography reconstruction methods that could be routinely used at JET tokamak. The proposed method is based on Phillips-Tikhonov regularization and incorporates a priori knowledge of the shape of normalized neutron emissivity profile. For the purpose of the optimal selection of the regularization parameters, the shape of normalized neutron emissivity profile is approximated by the shape of normalized electron density profile measured by LIDAR or high resolution Thomson scattering JET diagnostics. In contrast with some previously developed methods of ill-posed plasma tomography reconstruction problem, the developed algorithms do not include any post-processing of the obtained solution and the physical constrains on the solution are imposed during the regularization process. The accuracy of the method is at first evaluated by several tests with synthetic data based on various plasma neutron emissivity models (phantoms). Then, the method is applied to the neutron emissivity reconstruction for JET D plasma discharge #85100. It is demonstrated that this method shows good performance and reliability and it can be routinely used for plasma neutron emissivity reconstruction on JET.

  1. A Novel Principal Component Analysis-Based Acceleration Scheme for LES-ODT: An A Priori Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echekki, Tarek; Mirgolbabaei, Hessan

    2012-11-01

    A parameterization of the composition space based on principal component analysis (PCA) is proposed to represent the transport equations with the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) solutions of a hybrid large-eddy simulation (LES) and ODT scheme. An a priori validation of the proposed approach is implemented based on stand-alone ODT solutions of the Sandia Flame F flame, which is characterized by different regimes of combustion starting with pilot stabilization, to extinction and reignition and self-stabilized combustion. The PCA analysis is carried out with a full set of the thermo-chemical scalars' vector as well as a subset of this vector. The subset is made up primarily of major species and temperature. The results show that the different regimes are reproduced using only three principal components for the thermo-chemical scalars based on the full and a subset of the thermo-chemical scalars' vector. Reproduction of the source term of the principal component represents a greater challenge. It is found that using the subset of the thermo-chemical scalars' vector both minor species and the first three principal components source terms are reasonably well predicted.

  2. Phillips-Tikhonov regularization with a priori information for neutron emission tomographic reconstruction on Joint European Torus.

    PubMed

    Bielecki, J; Giacomelli, L; Kiptily, V; Scholz, M; Drozdowicz, K; Conroy, S; Craciunescu, T; Kempenaars, M

    2015-09-01

    A method of tomographic reconstruction of the neutron emissivity in the poloidal cross section of the Joint European Torus (JET, Culham, UK) tokamak was developed. Due to very limited data set (two projection angles, 19 lines of sight only) provided by the neutron emission profile monitor (KN3 neutron camera), the reconstruction is an ill-posed inverse problem. The aim of this work consists in making a contribution to the development of reliable plasma tomography reconstruction methods that could be routinely used at JET tokamak. The proposed method is based on Phillips-Tikhonov regularization and incorporates a priori knowledge of the shape of normalized neutron emissivity profile. For the purpose of the optimal selection of the regularization parameters, the shape of normalized neutron emissivity profile is approximated by the shape of normalized electron density profile measured by LIDAR or high resolution Thomson scattering JET diagnostics. In contrast with some previously developed methods of ill-posed plasma tomography reconstruction problem, the developed algorithms do not include any post-processing of the obtained solution and the physical constrains on the solution are imposed during the regularization process. The accuracy of the method is at first evaluated by several tests with synthetic data based on various plasma neutron emissivity models (phantoms). Then, the method is applied to the neutron emissivity reconstruction for JET D plasma discharge #85100. It is demonstrated that this method shows good performance and reliability and it can be routinely used for plasma neutron emissivity reconstruction on JET.

  3. Phillips-Tikhonov regularization with a priori information for neutron emission tomographic reconstruction on Joint European Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielecki, J.; Giacomelli, L.; Kiptily, V.; Scholz, M.; Drozdowicz, K.; Conroy, S.; Craciunescu, T.; Kempenaars, M.

    2015-09-01

    A method of tomographic reconstruction of the neutron emissivity in the poloidal cross section of the Joint European Torus (JET, Culham, UK) tokamak was developed. Due to very limited data set (two projection angles, 19 lines of sight only) provided by the neutron emission profile monitor (KN3 neutron camera), the reconstruction is an ill-posed inverse problem. The aim of this work consists in making a contribution to the development of reliable plasma tomography reconstruction methods that could be routinely used at JET tokamak. The proposed method is based on Phillips-Tikhonov regularization and incorporates a priori knowledge of the shape of normalized neutron emissivity profile. For the purpose of the optimal selection of the regularization parameters, the shape of normalized neutron emissivity profile is approximated by the shape of normalized electron density profile measured by LIDAR or high resolution Thomson scattering JET diagnostics. In contrast with some previously developed methods of ill-posed plasma tomography reconstruction problem, the developed algorithms do not include any post-processing of the obtained solution and the physical constrains on the solution are imposed during the regularization process. The accuracy of the method is at first evaluated by several tests with synthetic data based on various plasma neutron emissivity models (phantoms). Then, the method is applied to the neutron emissivity reconstruction for JET D plasma discharge #85100. It is demonstrated that this method shows good performance and reliability and it can be routinely used for plasma neutron emissivity reconstruction on JET.

  4. Enhancing the performance of model-based elastography by incorporating additional a priori information in the modulus image reconstruction process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyley, Marvin M.; Srinivasan, Seshadri; Dimidenko, Eugene; Soni, Nirmal; Ophir, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    Model-based elastography is fraught with problems owing to the ill-posed nature of the inverse elasticity problem. To overcome this limitation, we have recently developed a novel inversion scheme that incorporates a priori information concerning the mechanical properties of the underlying tissue structures, and the variance incurred during displacement estimation in the modulus image reconstruction process. The information was procured by employing standard strain imaging methodology, and introduced in the reconstruction process through the generalized Tikhonov approach. In this paper, we report the results of experiments conducted on gelatin phantoms to evaluate the performance of modulus elastograms computed with the generalized Tikhonov (GTK) estimation criterion relative to those computed by employing the un-weighted least-squares estimation criterion, the weighted least-squares estimation criterion and the standard Tikhonov method (i.e., the generalized Tikhonov method with no modulus prior). The results indicate that modulus elastograms computed with the generalized Tikhonov approach had superior elastographic contrast discrimination and contrast recovery. In addition, image reconstruction was more resilient to structural decorrelation noise when additional constraints were imposed on the reconstruction process through the GTK method.

  5. A priori testing of subgrid-scale models for the velocity-pressure and vorticity-velocity formulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winckelmans, G. S.; Lund, T. S.; Carati, D.; Wray, A. A.

    1996-01-01

    Subgrid-scale models for Large Eddy Simulation (LES) in both the velocity-pressure and the vorticity-velocity formulations were evaluated and compared in a priori tests using spectral Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) databases of isotropic turbulence: 128(exp 3) DNS of forced turbulence (Re(sub(lambda))=95.8) filtered, using the sharp cutoff filter, to both 32(exp 3) and 16(exp 3) synthetic LES fields; 512(exp 3) DNS of decaying turbulence (Re(sub(Lambda))=63.5) filtered to both 64(exp 3) and 32(exp 3) LES fields. Gaussian and top-hat filters were also used with the 128(exp 3) database. Different LES models were evaluated for each formulation: eddy-viscosity models, hyper eddy-viscosity models, mixed models, and scale-similarity models. Correlations between exact versus modeled subgrid-scale quantities were measured at three levels: tensor (traceless), vector (solenoidal 'force'), and scalar (dissipation) levels, and for both cases of uniform and variable coefficient(s). Different choices for the 1/T scaling appearing in the eddy-viscosity were also evaluated. It was found that the models for the vorticity-velocity formulation produce higher correlations with the filtered DNS data than their counterpart in the velocity-pressure formulation. It was also found that the hyper eddy-viscosity model performs better than the eddy viscosity model, in both formulations.

  6. Wiener filtering of surface EMG with a priori SNR estimation toward myoelectric control for neurological injury patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Ying, Dongwen; Zhou, Ping

    2014-12-01

    Voluntary surface electromyogram (EMG) signals from neurological injury patients are often corrupted by involuntary background interference or spikes, imposing difficulties for myoelectric control. We present a novel framework to suppress involuntary background spikes during voluntary surface EMG recordings. The framework applies a Wiener filter to restore voluntary surface EMG signals based on tracking a priori signal to noise ratio (SNR) by using the decision-directed method. Semi-synthetic surface EMG signals contaminated by different levels of involuntary background spikes were constructed from a database of surface EMG recordings in a group of spinal cord injury subjects. After the processing, the onset detection of voluntary muscle activity was significantly improved against involuntary background spikes. The magnitude of voluntary surface EMG signals can also be reliably estimated for myoelectric control purpose. Compared with the previous sample entropy analysis for suppressing involuntary background spikes, the proposed framework is characterized by quick and simple implementation, making it more suitable for application in a myoelectric control system toward neurological injury rehabilitation.

  7. Almost half of the Danish general practitioners have negative a priori attitudes towards a mandatory accreditation programme.

    PubMed

    Waldorff, Frans Boch; Nicolaisdóttir, Dagný Rós; Kousgaard, Marius Brostrøm; Reventlow, Susanne; Søndergaard, Jens; Thorsen, Thorkil; Andersen, Merethe Kirstine; Pedersen, Line Bjørnskov; Bisgaard, Louise; Hutters, Cecilie Lybeck; Bro, Flemming

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to analyse Danish general practitioners' (GPs) a priori attitudes and expectations towards a nationwide mandatory accreditation programme. This study is based on a nationwide electronic survey comprising all Danish GPs (n = 3,403). A total of 1,906 (56%) GPs completed the questionnaire. In all, 861 (45%) had a negative attitude towards accreditation, whereas 429 (21%) were very positive or posi-tive. The negative attitudes towards accreditation were associated with being older, male and with working in a singlehanded practice. A regional difference was observed as well. GPs with negative expectations were more likely to agree that accreditation was a tool meant for external control (odds ratio (OR) = 1.87 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.18-2.95)), less likely to agree that accreditation was a tool for quality improvement (OR = 0.018 (95% CI: 0.013-0.025)), more likely to agree that it would affect job satisfaction negatively (OR = 21.88 (95% CI: 16.10-29.72)), and they were generally less satisfied with their present job situation (OR = 2.51 (95% CI: 1.85-3.41)). Almost half of the GPs had negative attitudes towards accreditation. The three Research Units for General Practice in Odense, Aarhus and Copenhagen initiated and funded this study. The survey was recommended by the Danish Multipractice Committee (MPU 02-2015) and evaluated by the Danish Data Agency (2015-41-3684).

  8. 'Aussie normals': an a priori study to develop clinical chemistry reference intervals in a healthy Australian population.

    PubMed

    Koerbin, G; Cavanaugh, J A; Potter, J M; Abhayaratna, W P; West, N P; Glasgow, N; Hawkins, C; Armbruster, D; Oakman, C; Hickman, P E

    2015-02-01

    Development of reference intervals is difficult, time consuming, expensive and beyond the scope of most laboratories. The Aussie Normals study is a direct a priori study to determine reference intervals in healthy Australian adults. All volunteers completed a health and lifestyle questionnaire and exclusion was based on conditions such as pregnancy, diabetes, renal or cardiovascular disease. Up to 91 biochemical analyses were undertaken on a variety of analytical platforms using serum samples collected from 1856 volunteers. We report on our findings for 40 of these analytes and two calculated parameters performed on the Abbott ARCHITECTci8200/ci16200 analysers. Not all samples were analysed for all assays due to volume requirements or assay/instrument availability. Results with elevated interference indices and those deemed unsuitable after clinical evaluation were removed from the database. Reference intervals were partitioned based on the method of Harris and Boyd into three scenarios, combined gender, males and females and age and gender. We have performed a detailed reference interval study on a healthy Australian population considering the effects of sex, age and body mass. These reference intervals may be adapted to other manufacturer's analytical methods using method transference.

  9. Randomized clinical trials in orthodontics are rarely registered a priori and often published late or not at all

    PubMed Central

    Antonoglou, Georgios N.; Sándor, George K.; Eliades, Theodore

    2017-01-01

    A priori registration of randomized clinical trials is crucial to the transparency and credibility of their findings. Aim of this study was to assess the frequency with which registered and completed randomized trials in orthodontics are published. We searched ClinicalTrials.gov and ISRCTN for registered randomized clinical trials in orthodontics that had been completed up to January 2017 and judged the publication status and date of registered trials using a systematic protocol. Statistical analysis included descriptive statistics, chi-square or Fisher exact tests, and Kaplan-Meier survival estimates. From the 266 orthodontic trials registered up to January 2017, 80 trials had been completed and included in the present study. Among these 80 included trials, the majority (76%) were registered retrospectively, while only 33 (41%) were published at the time. The median time from completion to publication was 20.1 months (interquartile range: 9.1 to 31.6 months), while survival analysis indicated that less than 10% of the trials were published after 5 years from their completion. Finally, 22 (28%) of completed trials remain unpublished even after 5 years from their completion. Publication rates of registered randomized trials in orthodontics remained low, even 5 years after their completion date. PMID:28777820

  10. Randomized clinical trials in orthodontics are rarely registered a priori and often published late or not at all.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, Spyridon N; Antonoglou, Georgios N; Sándor, George K; Eliades, Theodore

    2017-01-01

    A priori registration of randomized clinical trials is crucial to the transparency and credibility of their findings. Aim of this study was to assess the frequency with which registered and completed randomized trials in orthodontics are published. We searched ClinicalTrials.gov and ISRCTN for registered randomized clinical trials in orthodontics that had been completed up to January 2017 and judged the publication status and date of registered trials using a systematic protocol. Statistical analysis included descriptive statistics, chi-square or Fisher exact tests, and Kaplan-Meier survival estimates. From the 266 orthodontic trials registered up to January 2017, 80 trials had been completed and included in the present study. Among these 80 included trials, the majority (76%) were registered retrospectively, while only 33 (41%) were published at the time. The median time from completion to publication was 20.1 months (interquartile range: 9.1 to 31.6 months), while survival analysis indicated that less than 10% of the trials were published after 5 years from their completion. Finally, 22 (28%) of completed trials remain unpublished even after 5 years from their completion. Publication rates of registered randomized trials in orthodontics remained low, even 5 years after their completion date.

  11. A Computationally Efficient, Exploratory Approach to Brain Connectivity Incorporating False Discovery Rate Control, A Priori Knowledge, and Group Inference

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Aiping; Li, Junning; Wang, Z. Jane; McKeown, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical models appear well suited for inferring brain connectivity from fMRI data, as they can distinguish between direct and indirect brain connectivity. Nevertheless, biological interpretation requires not only that the multivariate time series are adequately modeled, but also that there is accurate error-control of the inferred edges. The PCfdr algorithm, which was developed by Li and Wang, was to provide a computationally efficient means to control the false discovery rate (FDR) of computed edges asymptotically. The original PCfdr algorithm was unable to accommodate a priori information about connectivity and was designed to infer connectivity from a single subject rather than a group of subjects. Here we extend the original PCfdr algorithm and propose a multisubject, error-rate-controlled brain connectivity modeling approach that allows incorporation of prior knowledge of connectivity. In simulations, we show that the two proposed extensions can still control the FDR around or below a specified threshold. When the proposed approach is applied to fMRI data in a Parkinson's disease study, we find robust group evidence of the disease-related changes, the compensatory changes, and the normalizing effect of L-dopa medication. The proposed method provides a robust, accurate, and practical method for the assessment of brain connectivity patterns from functional neuroimaging data. PMID:23251232

  12. An A Priori Hot-Tearing Indicator Applied to Die-Cast Magnesium-Rare Earth Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Easton, Mark A.; Gibson, Mark A.; Zhu, Suming; Abbott, Trevor B.

    2014-07-01

    Hot-tearing susceptibility is an important consideration for alloy design. Based on a review of previous research, an a priori indicator for the prediction of an alloy's hot-tearing susceptibility is proposed in this article and is applied to a range of magnesium-rare earth (RE)-based alloys. The indicator involves taking the integral over the solid fraction/temperature curve between the temperature when feeding becomes restricted (coherency) and that when a three-dimension network of solid is formed (coalescence). The hot-tearing propensity of Mg-RE alloys is found to vary greatly depending on which RE is primarily used, due to the difference in the solidification range. Mg-Nd alloys are the most susceptible to hot tearing, followed by Mg-Ce-based alloys, while Mg-La alloys show almost no hot tearing. The proposed indicator can be well applied to hot-tearing propensity of the Mg-RE alloys. It is expected that the indicator could be used as an estimation of the relative hot-tearing propensity in other alloy systems as well.

  13. Tomographic image via background subtraction using an x-ray projection image and a priori computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin; Yi, Byongyong; Lasio, Giovanni; Suntharalingam, Mohan; Yu, Cedric

    2009-01-01

    Kilovoltage x-ray projection images (kV images for brevity) are increasingly available in image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) for patient positioning. These images are two-dimensional (2D) projections of a three-dimensional (3D) object along the x-ray beam direction. Projecting a 3D object onto a plane may lead to ambiguities in the identification of anatomical structures and to poor contrast in kV images. Therefore, the use of kV images in IGRT is mainly limited to bony landmark alignments. This work proposes a novel subtraction technique that isolates a slice of interest (SOI) from a kV image with the assistance of a priori information from a previous CT scan. The method separates structural information within a preselected SOI by suppressing contributions to the unprocessed projection from out-of-SOI-plane structures. Up to a five-fold increase in the contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) was observed in selected regions of the isolated SOI, when compared to the original unprocessed kV image. The tomographic image via background subtraction (TIBS) technique aims to provide a quick snapshot of the slice of interest with greatly enhanced image contrast over conventional kV x-ray projections for fast and accurate image guidance of radiation therapy. With further refinements, TIBS could, in principle, provide real-time tumor localization using gantry-mounted x-ray imaging systems without the need for implanted markers. PMID:19928074

  14. [Adventure travel].

    PubMed

    Beck, Bernhard R

    2013-06-01

    Extreme travelling experiences appear to be a quite popular kick offered by tourist operators and sought by some travellers. But some travellers expose themselves to increased risk also during normal holidays, either voluntarily by booking hikes or tours leading them to adventurous locations or to unexpectedly encountering dangerous situations. In planned adventures, precise information in advance, good physical condition, careful planning, and profound medical preparation may contribute to a less hazardous adventure. Advising medical persons may need an expert consultation for specific topics in order to optimise the preparation. Based on three specific environmental situations (jungle, desert, and cave) the specific conditions, dangers and some medical aspects are outlined.

  15. TRAVEL FORECASTER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauldin, L. E.

    1994-01-01

    Business travel planning within an organization is often a time-consuming task. Travel Forecaster is a menu-driven, easy-to-use program which plans, forecasts cost, and tracks actual vs. planned cost for business-related travel of a division or branch of an organization and compiles this information into a database to aid the travel planner. The program's ability to handle multiple trip entries makes it a valuable time-saving device. Travel Forecaster takes full advantage of relational data base properties so that information that remains constant, such as per diem rates and airline fares (which are unique for each city), needs entering only once. A typical entry would include selection with the mouse of the traveler's name and destination city from pop-up lists, and typed entries for number of travel days and purpose of the trip. Multiple persons can be selected from the pop-up lists and multiple trips are accommodated by entering the number of days by each appropriate month on the entry form. An estimated travel cost is not required of the user as it is calculated by a Fourth Dimension formula. With this information, the program can produce output of trips by month with subtotal and total cost for either organization or sub-entity of an organization; or produce outputs of trips by month with subtotal and total cost for international-only travel. It will also provide monthly and cumulative formats of planned vs. actual outputs in data or graph form. Travel Forecaster users can do custom queries to search and sort information in the database, and it can create custom reports with the user-friendly report generator. Travel Forecaster 1.1 is a database program for use with Fourth Dimension Runtime 2.1.1. It requires a Macintosh Plus running System 6.0.3 or later, 2Mb of RAM and a hard disk. The standard distribution medium for this package is one 3.5 inch 800K Macintosh format diskette. Travel Forecaster was developed in 1991. Macintosh is a registered trademark of

  16. TRAVEL FORECASTER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauldin, L. E.

    1994-01-01

    Business travel planning within an organization is often a time-consuming task. Travel Forecaster is a menu-driven, easy-to-use program which plans, forecasts cost, and tracks actual vs. planned cost for business-related travel of a division or branch of an organization and compiles this information into a database to aid the travel planner. The program's ability to handle multiple trip entries makes it a valuable time-saving device. Travel Forecaster takes full advantage of relational data base properties so that information that remains constant, such as per diem rates and airline fares (which are unique for each city), needs entering only once. A typical entry would include selection with the mouse of the traveler's name and destination city from pop-up lists, and typed entries for number of travel days and purpose of the trip. Multiple persons can be selected from the pop-up lists and multiple trips are accommodated by entering the number of days by each appropriate month on the entry form. An estimated travel cost is not required of the user as it is calculated by a Fourth Dimension formula. With this information, the program can produce output of trips by month with subtotal and total cost for either organization or sub-entity of an organization; or produce outputs of trips by month with subtotal and total cost for international-only travel. It will also provide monthly and cumulative formats of planned vs. actual outputs in data or graph form. Travel Forecaster users can do custom queries to search and sort information in the database, and it can create custom reports with the user-friendly report generator. Travel Forecaster 1.1 is a database program for use with Fourth Dimension Runtime 2.1.1. It requires a Macintosh Plus running System 6.0.3 or later, 2Mb of RAM and a hard disk. The standard distribution medium for this package is one 3.5 inch 800K Macintosh format diskette. Travel Forecaster was developed in 1991. Macintosh is a registered trademark of

  17. [Traveller's diarrhoea].

    PubMed

    Vila, Jordi; Oliveira, Ines; Zboromyrska, Yuliya; Gascon, Joaquim

    2016-11-01

    Traveller's diarrhoea (TD) is acquired primarily through ingestion of food and drinks contaminated with pathogens that cause diarrhoea. They can be bacteria, protozoa, helminths, and viruses. Globally, the most common causes of TD are two pathotypes of Escherichia coli (enterotoxigenic and enteroaggregative) and Campylobacter, although there are significant variations by geographic area visited. Most TD occurs in individuals traveling to low-middle income countries. The type of travel, length of stay, traveller's age, and the presence of certain underlying conditions are important risk factors to consider for the acquisition of TD. While TD is usually a mild and self-limiting disease, half of travellers with TD experience some limitation of activities during their trip, while up to 10% will experience persistent diarrhoea or other complications. The purpose of this article is to provide an updated microbiological, epidemiological, and clinical profile of traveller's diarrhoea, including known risk factors, as well as to make recommendations on the prevention and treatment of TD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  18. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Essentially all Gaussian two-party quantum states are a priori nonclassical but classically correlated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Paul B.

    2000-08-01

    Duan et al (Duan L-M, Giedke G, Cirac J I and Zoller P 2000 Phys. Rev. Lett. 84 2722) and, independently, Simon (Simon R 2000 Phys. Rev. Lett. 84 2726) have recently found necessary and sufficient conditions for the separability (classical correlation) of the Gaussian two-party (continuous variable) states. Duan et al remark that their criterion is based on a `much stronger bound' on the total variance of a pair of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-type operators than is required simply by the uncertainty relation. Here, we seek to formalize and test this particular assertion in both classical and quantum-theoretic frameworks. We first attach to these states the classical a priori probability (Jeffreys' prior), proportional to the volume element of the Fisher information metric on the Riemannian manifold of Gaussian (quadrivariate normal) probability distributions. Then, numerical evidence indicates that more than 99% of the Gaussian two-party states do, in fact, meet the more stringent criterion for separability. We collaterally note that the prior probability assigned to the classical states, that is those having positive Glauber-Sudarshan P-representations, is less than 0.001%. We, then, seek to attach as a measure to the Gaussian two-party states the volume element of the associated (quantum-theoretic) Bures (minimal monotone) metric. Our several extensive analyses, then, persistently yield probabilities of separability and classicality that are, to very high orders of accuracy, unity and zero, respectively, so the two quite distinct (classical and quantum-theoretic) forms of analysis are rather remarkably consistent in their findings.

  19. High-resolution teleseismic tomography of upper-mantle structure using an a priori three-dimensional crustal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldhauser, Felix; Lippitsch, Regina; Kissling, Edi; Ansorge, Jörg

    2002-08-01

    The effect of an a priori known 3-D crustal model in teleseismic tomography of upper-mantle structure is investigated. We developed a 3-D crustal P-wave velocity model for the greater Alpine region, encompassing the central and western Alps and the northern Apennines, to estimate the crustal contribution to teleseismic traveltimes. The model is constructed by comparative use of published information from active and passive seismic surveys. The model components are chosen to represent the present large-scale Alpine crustal structure and for their significant effect on the propagation of seismic wavefields. They are first-order structures such as the crust-mantle boundary, sedimentary basins and the high-velocity Ivrea body. Teleseismic traveltime residuals are calculated for a realistic distribution of azimuths and distances by coupling a finite-difference technique to the IASP91 traveltime tables. Residuals are produced for a synthetic upper-mantle model featuring two slab structures and the 3-D crustal model on top of it. The crustal model produces traveltime residuals in the range between -0.7 and 1.5 s that vary strongly as a function of backazimuth and epicentral distance. We find that the non-linear inversion of the synthetic residuals without correcting for the 3-D crustal structure erroneously maps the crustal anomalies into the upper mantle. Correction of the residuals for crustal structure before inversion properly recovers the synthetic slab structures placed in the upper mantle. We conclude that with the increasing amount of high-quality seismic traveltime data, correction for near-surface structure is essential for increasing resolution in tomographic images of upper-mantle structure.

  20. A priori assumptions about characters as a cause of incongruence between molecular and morphological hypotheses of primate interrelationships.

    PubMed

    Tornow, Matthew A; Skelton, Randall R

    2012-01-01

    When molecules and morphology produce incongruent hypotheses of primate interrelationships, the data are typically viewed as incompatible, and molecular hypotheses are often considered to be better indicators of phylogenetic history. However, it has been demonstrated that the choice of which taxa to include in cladistic analysis as well as assumptions about character weighting, character state transformation order, and outgroup choice all influence hypotheses of relationships and may positively influence tree topology, so that relationships between extant taxa are consistent with those found using molecular data. Thus, the source of incongruence between morphological and molecular trees may lie not in the morphological data themselves but in assumptions surrounding the ways characters evolve and their impact on cladistic analysis. In this study, we investigate the role that assumptions about character polarity and transformation order play in creating incongruence between primate phylogenies based on morphological data and those supported by multiple lines of molecular data. By releasing constraints imposed on published morphological analyses of primates from disparate clades and subjecting those data to parsimony analysis, we test the hypothesis that incongruence between morphology and molecules results from inherent flaws in morphological data. To quantify the difference between incongruent trees, we introduce a new method called branch slide distance (BSD). BSD mitigates many of the limitations attributed to other tree comparison methods, thus allowing for a more accurate measure of topological similarity. We find that releasing a priori constraints on character behavior often produces trees that are consistent with molecular trees. Case studies are presented that illustrate how congruence between molecules and unconstrained morphological data may provide insight into issues of polarity, transformation order, homology, and homoplasy.

  1. Local digital control of power electronic converters in a dc microgrid based on a-priori derivation of switching surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Bibaswan

    In power electronic basedmicrogrids, the computational requirements needed to implement an optimized online control strategy can be prohibitive. The work presented in this dissertation proposes a generalized method of derivation of geometric manifolds in a dc microgrid that is based on the a-priori computation of the optimal reactions and trajectories for classes of events in a dc microgrid. The proposed states are the stored energies in all the energy storage elements of the dc microgrid and power flowing into them. It is anticipated that calculating a large enough set of dissimilar transient scenarios will also span many scenarios not specifically used to develop the surface. These geometric manifolds will then be used as reference surfaces in any type of controller, such as a sliding mode hysteretic controller. The presence of switched power converters in microgrids involve different control actions for different system events. The control of the switch states of the converters is essential for steady state and transient operations. A digital memory look-up based controller that uses a hysteretic sliding mode control strategy is an effective technique to generate the proper switch states for the converters. An example dcmicrogrid with three dc-dc boost converters and resistive loads is considered for this work. The geometric manifolds are successfully generated for transient events, such as step changes in the loads and the sources. The surfaces corresponding to a specific case of step change in the loads are then used as reference surfaces in an EEPROM for experimentally validating the control strategy. The required switch states corresponding to this specific transient scenario are programmed in the EEPROM as a memory table. This controls the switching of the dc-dc boost converters and drives the system states to the reference manifold. In this work, it is shown that this strategy effectively controls the system for a transient condition such as step changes

  2. Travelers' diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Barrett-Connor, E

    1973-03-01

    On the average, one-fourth of North Americans visiting developing countries experience a self-limited diarrheal illness that interferes with holiday or business activities. Recent work suggests that these episodes are caused by a small inoculum of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli which are common in the country visited and rare in the country of origin. Neither antimicrobial treatment nor anti-diarrheal agents have proven benefit once the illness has begun. Despite its frequent use, iodochlorhydroxyquin has not been shown in double blind studies to be effective as a preventive agent, and may be dangerous. The status of furazolidone for prevention of tourist diarrhea is questionable. Both neomycin sulfate and phythalylsulfathiazole have demonstrated efficacy as chemoprophylactics in Mexico. However, their use should be restricted to limited types of travel and travelers. General admonitions concerning avoidance of certain ingestibles are recommended; despite questionable value in preventing travelers' diarrhea such precautions may prevent more serious gastrointestinal illness.

  3. Insights into organogelation and its kinetics from Hansen solubility parameters. Toward a priori predictions of molecular gelation.

    PubMed

    Diehn, Kevin K; Oh, Hyuntaek; Hashemipour, Reza; Weiss, Richard G; Raghavan, Srinivasa R

    2014-04-21

    Many small molecules can self-assemble by non-covalent interactions into fibrous networks and thereby induce gelation of organic liquids. However, no capability currently exists to predict whether a molecule in a given solvent will form a gel, a low-viscosity solution (sol), or an insoluble precipitate. Gelation has been recognized as a phenomenon that reflects a balance between solubility and insolubility; however, the distinction between these regimes has not been quantified in a systematic fashion. In this work, we focus on a well-known gelator, 1,3:2,4-dibenzylidene sorbitol (DBS), and study its self-assembly in various solvents. From these data, we build a framework for DBS gelation based on Hansen solubility parameters (HSPs). While the HSPs for DBS are not known a priori, the HSPs are available for each solvent and they quantify the solvent's ability to interact via dispersion, dipole-dipole, and hydrogen bonding interactions. Using the three HSPs, we construct three-dimensional plots showing regions of solubility (S), slow gelation (SG), instant gelation (IG), and insolubility (I) for DBS in the different solvents at a given temperature and concentration. Our principal finding is that the above regions radiate out as concentric shells: i.e., a central solubility (S) sphere, followed in order by spheres corresponding to SG, IG, and I regions. The distance (R0) from the origin of the central sphere quantifies the incompatibility between DBS and a solvent-the larger this distance, the more incompatible the pair. The elastic modulus of the final gel increases with R0, while the time required for a super-saturated sol to form a gel decreases with R0. Importantly, if R0 is too small, the gels are weak, but if R0 is too large, insolubility occurs-thus, strong gels fall within an optimal window of incompatibility between the gelator and the solvent. Our approach can be used to design organogels of desired strength and gelation time by judicious choice of a

  4. Reconciliation of Travel Advances and Travel Liquidations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    AD-A236 677 NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California DTIC ELECTE JN12 1981’ THESIS RECONCILIATION OF TRAVEL ADVANCES AND TRAVEL LIQUIDATIONS by...Classification) RECONCILIATION OF TRAVEL ADVANCES AND TRAVEL LIQUIDATIONS 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Conzales. Dnmingo 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b TIME COVERED 14 DATE OF...TERMS (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block numoer) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Travel orders, Travel advance, Travel liquida- tion

  5. Traveler's Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... cola).Hot drinks, such as tea or coffee.Carbonated or noncarbonated bottled water, as long as you are the one who ... borne illness, infectious gastroenteritis, intestinal flu, traveler's ... to your family doctor to find out if this information applies to you and to ...

  6. Traveling Apples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland Unified School District, Rowland Heights, CA.

    Teacher-developed materials for a basic computer literacy and utilization program for elementary students in grades 3-6 are included in this 4-part packet, which was originally prepared for use with or without the Apple IIe "traveling" microcomputers shared by 15 Rowland Unified School District elementary schools. Implementation…

  7. Plains Traveler

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-04-10

    This MOC image shows a dust devil traveling across a plain west-southwest of Schiaparelli Crater, in far eastern Sinus Meridiani. The dust devil is casting a shadow toward the northeast, just south below of an egg-shaped crater

  8. Seismicity patterns along the Ecuadorian subduction zone: new constraints from earthquake location in a 3-D a priori velocity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Font, Yvonne; Segovia, Monica; Vaca, Sandro; Theunissen, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    To improve earthquake location, we create a 3-D a priori P-wave velocity model (3-DVM) that approximates the large velocity variations of the Ecuadorian subduction system. The 3-DVM is constructed from the integration of geophysical and geological data that depend on the structural geometry and velocity properties of the crust and the upper mantle. In addition, specific station selection is carried out to compensate for the high station density on the Andean Chain. 3-D synthetic experiments are then designed to evaluate the network capacity to recover the event position using only P arrivals and the MAXI technique. Three synthetic earthquake location experiments are proposed: (1) noise-free and (2) noisy arrivals used in the 3-DVM, and (3) noise-free arrivals used in a 1-DVM. Synthetic results indicate that, under the best conditions (exact arrival data set and 3-DVM), the spatiotemporal configuration of the Ecuadorian network can accurately locate 70 per cent of events in the frontal part of the subduction zone (average azimuthal gap is 289° ± 44°). Noisy P arrivals (up to ± 0.3 s) can accurately located 50 per cent of earthquakes. Processing earthquake location within a 1-DVM almost never allows accurate hypocentre position for offshore earthquakes (15 per cent), which highlights the role of using a 3-DVM in subduction zone. For the application to real data, the seismicity distribution from the 3-D-MAXI catalogue is also compared to the determinations obtained in a 1-D-layered VM. In addition to good-quality location uncertainties, the clustering and the depth distribution confirm the 3-D-MAXI catalogue reliability. The pattern of the seismicity distribution (a 13 yr record during the inter-seismic period of the seismic cycle) is compared to the pattern of rupture zone and asperity of the Mw = 7.9 1942 and the Mw = 7.7 1958 events (the Mw = 8.8 1906 asperity patch is not defined). We observe that the nucleation of 1942, 1958 and 1906 events coincides with

  9. Improvement of Tidal Analysis Results by a Priori Rain Fall Modelling at the Vienna and Membach stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meurers, B.; van Camp, M.; Petermans, T.

    2005-12-01

    We investigate how far tidal analysis results can be improved when a rain fall admittance model is applied on the superconducting gravity (SG) data. For that purpose both Vienna and Membach data have been analysed with and without a priori rain fall correction. In Membach the residual drop for most events (80%) can be explained by the rain water load, while in Vienna only 50% of all events fit the model in detail. In the other cases the Newtonian effect of vertical air mass redistribution (vertical density variation without air pressure change), predominantly connected with high vertical convection activity, e.g. thunderstorms, plays an essential role: short-term atmospheric signals show up steep gravity residual decreases of a few nms-2 within 10 - 60 min, well correlated with outdoor air temperature in most cases. However, even in those cases the water load model is able to explain the dominating part of the residual drop especially during heavy rain fall. In Vienna more than 110 events have been detected over 10 years. 84% of them are associated with heavy rain starting at or up to 10 min later than the residual drop while the rest (16%) shows no or only little rainfall. The magnitude of the gravity drop depends on the total amount of rainfall accumulated during the meteorological event. Step like signals deteriorate the frequency spectrum estimates. This even holds for tidal analysis. As the drops are of physical origin, they should not be eliminated blindly but corrected using water load modeling constrained by high temporal resolution (1 min) rain data. 3D modeling of the water mass load due to a rain event is based on the following assumptions: (1) Rain water intrudes into the uppermost soil layer (close to the topography surface) and remains there at least until rain has stopped. This is justified for a period of some hours after the rainfall as evapotranspiration is not yet effective. (2) No run-off except of sealed areas or building roofs, where water can

  10. Travelers' Health: International Adoption

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Yellow Fever Vaccine Course Travel Medicine References: Books, Journals, Articles & Websites Resources for the Travel Industry Yellow Book Contents Chapter 7 Traveling Safely with Infants & Children ...

  11. Travelers' Health: Cruise Ship Travel

    MedlinePlus

    ... as well as unaccustomed changes in diet and physical activity. Foreign travel may increase the likelihood of risk-taking behaviors such as alcohol misuse, drug use, and unsafe sex. In spite of modern stabilizer systems, seasickness is a common complaint (affecting ...

  12. Granted travel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Geological Society of America (GSA)is accepting applications for the 30th International Geological Congress (IGC) Travel Grant Program. The 1996 congress will be held in Beijing, China, August 4-14. The program was formed at the end of the 28th IGC, held in Washington, D.C. in July 1989. The fund is to be used to support the attendance of young geoscientists to future IGCs until the United States again hosts an IGC. Travel grants consist of economy air-fare to China. To be eligible, an applicant must be a resident or citizen of the United States; must have been born after August 31, 1956; and must have an abstract included in the program of the 30th IGC. Official application forms are available from the grants administrator, GSA Headquarters, 3300 Penrose Place, P.O. Box 9140, Boulder, CO 80301.

  13. The fetal fraction of cell-free DNA in maternal plasma is not affected by a priori risk of fetal trisomy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the relationship between a priori risk for fetal trisomy and the fraction of fetal cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in maternal blood. Methods: A comparative analysis on fetal cfDNA amounts was performed in subjects stratified into a priori risk groups based on maternal age, prenatal screening results, or nuchal translucency measurement. Results: Across the highest and lowest deciles within each group, there were no significant differences in the fetal cfDNA fraction. Conclusions: These data support the concept that non-invasive prenatal test performance as determined by fetal cfDNA fraction is not predicted to be different based on patient risk classification. PMID:22913322

  14. Heavy metal and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in Quercus ilex L. leaves fit an a priori subdivision in site typologies based on human management.

    PubMed

    De Nicola, Flavia; Baldantoni, Daniela; Maisto, Giulia; Alfani, Anna

    2017-05-01

    Concentrations of four heavy metals (HMs) (Cd, Cr, Fe, Pb) and four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (fluoranthene, phenanthrene, chrysene, benzo[a]pyrene) in Quercus ilex L. leaves collected at the Campania Region (Southern Italy) in previous air biomonitoring studies were employed to (1) test the correspondence with an a priori site subdivision (remote, periurban, and urban) and (2) evaluate long temporal trends of HM (approximately 20 years) and PAH (approximately 10 years) air contaminations. Overall, Q. ilex leaf HM and PAH concentrations resulted along the gradient: remote < periurban < urban sites, reflecting the a priori subdivision based on human management. Over a long time, although a clear decrease of leaf Pb, chrysene, fluoranthene, and phenanthrene concentrations occurred at the urban sites, a high contamination level persists.

  15. [An a priori risk analysis study. Securisation of transfusion of blood product in a hospital: from the reception in the medical unit to its administration].

    PubMed

    Bertrand, E; Lévy, R; Boyeldieu, D

    2013-12-01

    Following an ABO accident after transfusion of red blood cells, an a priori risk analysis study is being performed in a hospital. The scope of this analysis covers from the reception of the blood product in the medical unit to its administration. The risk analysis enables to identify the potentially dangerous situations and the evaluation of the risks in order to propose corrective measures (precautionary or protective) and bring the system back to an acceptable risk level. The innovative concept of an a priori risk analysis in the medical field allows the extension of the analysis of this transfusion risk to other hospitals. In addition, it allows the extension of the use of this approach to other medical fields.

  16. Bonner sphere measurements of 241Am-B and 241Am-F neutron energy spectra unfolded using high-resolution a priori data.

    PubMed

    Roberts, N J; Jones, L N; Liu, Z Z; Tagziria, H; Thomas, D J

    2014-10-01

    High-resolution neutron energy spectra, covering the entire energy range of interest, for two standard radionuclide neutron sources ((241)Am-B and (241)Am-F) have been derived from Bonner sphere measurements by using high-resolution a priori data in the unfolding process. In each case, two a priori spectra were used, one from a two-stage calculation and also one from a combination of the calculated spectrum with a high-resolution measured spectrum. The unfolded spectra are compared with those published elsewhere and show significant differences from the ISO- and IAEA-recommended spectra for (241)Am-B and (241)Am-F, respectively. Values for the fluence-average energy and fluence-to-dose-equivalent conversion coefficients are presented for the new spectra, and the implications of the new spectra for the emission rates of the sources when measured by the manganese bath technique are also determined. © Crown copyright 2013.

  17. [Immunocompromised travelers].

    PubMed

    Delmont, J; Igo-Kemenes, A; Peyron, F; Ruiz, J M; Moreau, J; Bourgeade, A

    1997-01-01

    More and more immunocompromised people travel abroad especially in tropical countries where infectious risks are high. Before leaving, these subjects must consult their general practitioner who will determine their fitness in function of type of immunodeficiency, travel destination, availability of medical care at the destination, and possibility of medical evacuation. Counseling should also be provided concerning the precautions necessary to avoid the hazards of exposure to fecal material, venereal disease, insect bites, and sun. Antimalarial drug prophylaxis is the same as for uncompromised subjects. Advising immunocompromised subjects about vaccinations is difficult since there is no consensus on the subject. Administration of inert vaccines is usually recommended but their effectiveness is often diminished and harmful effects have been observed in HIV-infected subjects. Administration of live vaccines is always contraindicated in severely immunocompromised subjects but some live vaccines can be used in moderately immunocompromised subjects. The guidelines for vaccination differ depending on the underlying cause of immunodeficiency: congenital defects, cancer, hemopathy, treatment with immunosuppressors or corticosteroids (transplant patients and patients with systemic disease), HIV-infection, or spleen dysfunction. If there is a high risk of contracting a disease for which vaccination is contraindicated, drug prophylaxis or administration of immunoglobulins can be an alternative. If not, travel should either be postponed or the destination should be changed.

  18. A gridded version of the US EPA inventory of methane emissions for use as a priori and reference in methane source inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maasakkers, J. D.; Jacob, D. J.; Payer Sulprizio, M.; Turner, A. J.; Weitz, M.; Wirth, T. C.; Hight, C.; DeFigueiredo, M.; Desai, M.; Schmeltz, R.; Hockstad, L.; Bloom, A. A.; Bowman, K. W.

    2015-12-01

    The US EPA produces annual estimates of national anthropogenic methane emissions in the Inventory of US Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks (EPA inventory). These are reported to the UN and inform national climate policy. The EPA inventory uses best available information on emitting processes (IPCC Tier 2/3 approaches). However, inversions of atmospheric observations suggest that the inventory could be too low. These inversions rely on crude bottom-up estimates as a priori because the EPA inventory is only available as national totals for most sources. Reliance on an incorrect a priori greatly limits the value of inversions for testing and improving the EPA inventory as allocation of methane emissions by source types and regions can vary greatly between different bottom-up inventories. Here we present a 0.1° × 0.1° monthly version of the EPA inventory to serve as a priori for inversions of atmospheric data and to interpret inversion results. We use a wide range of process-specific information to allocate emissions, incorporating facility-level data reported through the EPA Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program where possible. As an illustration of used gridding strategies, gridded livestock emissions are based on EPA emission data per state, USDA livestock inventories per county, and USDA weighted land cover maps for sub-county localization. Allocation of emissions from natural gas systems incorporates monthly well-level production data, EIA compressor station and processing plant databases, and information on pipelines. Our gridded EPA inventory shows large differences in spatial emission patterns compared to the EDGAR v4.2 global inventory used as a priori in previous inverse studies. Our work greatly enhances the potential of future inversions to test and improve the EPA inventory and more broadly to improve understanding of the factors controlling methane concentrations and their trends. Preliminary inversion results using GOSAT satellite data will be presented.

  19. Comparative analysis of a-priori and a-posteriori dietary patterns using state-of-the-art classification algorithms: a case/case-control study.

    PubMed

    Kastorini, Christina-Maria; Papadakis, George; Milionis, Haralampos J; Kalantzi, Kallirroi; Puddu, Paolo-Emilio; Nikolaou, Vassilios; Vemmos, Konstantinos N; Goudevenos, John A; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B

    2013-11-01

    To compare the accuracy of a-priori and a-posteriori dietary patterns in the prediction of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and ischemic stroke. This is actually the first study to employ state-of-the-art classification methods for this purpose. During 2009-2010, 1000 participants were enrolled; 250 consecutive patients with a first ACS and 250 controls (60±12 years, 83% males), as well as 250 consecutive patients with a first stroke and 250 controls (75±9 years, 56% males). The controls were population-based and age-sex matched to the patients. The a-priori dietary patterns were derived from the validated MedDietScore, whereas the a-posteriori ones were extracted from principal components analysis. Both approaches were modeled using six classification algorithms: multiple logistic regression (MLR), naïve Bayes, decision trees, repeated incremental pruning to produce error reduction (RIPPER), artificial neural networks and support vector machines. The classification accuracy of the resulting models was evaluated using the C-statistic. For the ACS prediction, the C-statistic varied from 0.587 (RIPPER) to 0.807 (MLR) for the a-priori analysis, while for the a-posteriori one, it fluctuated between 0.583 (RIPPER) and 0.827 (MLR). For the stroke prediction, the C-statistic varied from 0.637 (RIPPER) to 0.767 (MLR) for the a-priori analysis, and from 0.617 (decision tree) to 0.780 (MLR) for the a-posteriori. Both dietary pattern approaches achieved equivalent classification accuracy over most classification algorithms. The choice, therefore, depends on the application at hand. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Travel during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Travel During Pregnancy Home For Patients Search FAQs Travel During Pregnancy ... Pregnancy FAQ055, April 2017 PDF Format Travel During Pregnancy Pregnancy Is travel safe during pregnancy? When is ...

  1. Quantitation of the a priori dosimetric capabilities of spatial points in inverse planning and its significant implication in defining IMRT solution space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shou, Z.; Yang, Y.; Cotrutz, C.; Levy, D.; Xing, Lei

    2005-04-01

    In inverse planning, the likelihood for the points in a target or sensitive structure to meet their dosimetric goals is generally heterogeneous and represents the a priori knowledge of the system once the patient and beam configuration are chosen. Because of this intrinsic heterogeneity, in some extreme cases, a region in a target may never meet the prescribed dose without seriously deteriorating the doses in other areas. Conversely, the prescription in a region may be easily met without violating the tolerance of any sensitive structure. In this work, we introduce the concept of dosimetric capability to quantify the a priori information and develop a strategy to integrate the data into the inverse planning process. An iterative algorithm is implemented to numerically compute the capability distribution on a case specific basis. A method of incorporating the capability data into inverse planning is developed by heuristically modulating the importance of the individual voxels according to the a priori capability distribution. The formalism is applied to a few specific examples to illustrate the technical details of the new inverse planning technique. Our study indicates that the dosimetric capability is a useful concept to better understand the complex inverse planning problem and an effective use of the information allows us to construct a clinically more meaningful objective function to improve IMRT dose optimization techniques. Part of this work was presented in the 14th International Conference on the Use of Computers in Radiation Therapy, Seoul, Korea, 2004.

  2. Travel Medical Kit.

    PubMed

    Terry, Anne C; Haulman, N Jean

    2016-03-01

    "The traveler's medical kit is an essential tool for both the novice and expert traveler. It is designed to treat travel-related illness and injury and to ensure preexisting medical conditions are managed appropriately. Travelers are at increased risk for common gastrointestinal issues during travel. Respiratory illnesses make up approximately 8% of the ailments present in returned international travelers. Approximately 12% of travelers experience a travel-related skin condition. First aid treatment for minor injuries is essential to all travel medical kits. The complexity ranges from a small, simple case for the urban traveler to a larger, extensive case for wilderness travel."

  3. Transportation and Travel: Travel Overseas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    responsibility of the soldier or the family members. It is expected that, in some cases, soldiers will have insufficient funds to defray the cost of...ports of embarkation (for example, billeting and food costs ). (See app C, fig C–6 for format of space available travel orders.) e. Family members who... cost of the move from the old PDS, to the new PDS. The designated place may be— (1) Any place in CONUS the soldier designates. (2) The place outside

  4. Plains Traveler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    10 April 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a dust devil traveling across a plain west-southwest of Schiaparelli Crater, in far eastern Sinus Meridiani. The dust devil is casting a shadow toward the northeast, just south (below) of an egg-shaped crater.

    Location near: 6.4oS, 349.3oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Southern Summer

  5. Plains Traveler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    10 April 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a dust devil traveling across a plain west-southwest of Schiaparelli Crater, in far eastern Sinus Meridiani. The dust devil is casting a shadow toward the northeast, just south (below) of an egg-shaped crater.

    Location near: 6.4oS, 349.3oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Southern Summer

  6. Prediction of extinction and reignition in nonpremixed turbulent flames using a flamelet/progress variable model. 1. A priori study and presumed PDF closure

    SciTech Connect

    Ihme, Matthias; Pitsch, Heinz

    2008-10-15

    Previously conducted studies of the flamelet/progress variable model for the prediction of nonpremixed turbulent combustion processes identified two areas for model improvements: the modeling of the presumed probability density function (PDF) for the reaction progress parameter and the consideration of unsteady effects [Ihme et al., Proc. Combust. Inst. 30 (2005) 793]. These effects are of particular importance during local flame extinction and subsequent reignition. Here, the models for the presumed PDFs for conserved and reactive scalars are re-examined and a statistically most likely distribution (SMLD) is employed and tested in a priori studies using direct numerical simulation (DNS) data and experimental results from the Sandia flame series. In the first part of the paper, the SMLD model is employed for a reactive scalar distribution. Modeling aspects of the a priori PDF, accounting for the bias in composition space, are discussed. The convergence of the SMLD with increasing number of enforced moments is demonstrated. It is concluded that information about more than two moments is beneficial to accurately represent the reactive scalar distribution in turbulent flames with strong extinction and reignition. In addition to the reactive scalar analysis, the potential of the SMLD for the representation of conserved scalar distributions is also analyzed. In the a priori study using DNS data it is found that the conventionally employed beta distribution provides a better representation for the scalar distribution. This is attributed to the fact that the beta-PDF implicitly enforces higher moment information that is in excellent agreement with the DNS data. However, the SMLD outperforms the beta distribution in free shear flow applications, which are typically characterized by strongly skewed scalar distributions, in the case where higher moment information can be enforced. (author)

  7. 26 CFR 31.3402(j)-1 - Remuneration other than in cash for service performed by retail commission salesman.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... performed by retail commission salesman. 31.3402(j)-1 Section 31.3402(j)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3402(j)-1.... (2) Section 3402(j) and this section are not applicable with respect to wages paid to the...

  8. 26 CFR 31.3402(j)-1 - Remuneration other than in cash for service performed by retail commission salesman.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... performed by retail commission salesman. 31.3402(j)-1 Section 31.3402(j)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3402(j)-1.... (2) Section 3402(j) and this section are not applicable with respect to wages paid to the employee...

  9. 26 CFR 31.3402(j)-1 - Remuneration other than in cash for service performed by retail commission salesman.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... performed by retail commission salesman. 31.3402(j)-1 Section 31.3402(j)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3402(j)-1.... (2) Section 3402(j) and this section are not applicable with respect to wages paid to the employee...

  10. 26 CFR 31.3402(j)-1 - Remuneration other than in cash for service performed by retail commission salesman.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... performed by retail commission salesman. 31.3402(j)-1 Section 31.3402(j)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... EMPLOYMENT TAXES AND COLLECTION OF INCOME TAX AT SOURCE Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3402(j)-1.... (2) Section 3402(j) and this section are not applicable with respect to wages paid to the employee...

  11. The utility of evolutionary psychology for generating novel, specific, and a priori hypotheses about psychopathology in a parsimonious fashion: reply to Hankin (2013).

    PubMed

    Martel, Michelle M

    2013-11-01

    The comment of Hankin (2013) elucidated several strengths of the target article (Martel, 2013), in which I reviewed extant literature on sex differences in common childhood-onset externalizing and adolescent-onset internalizing disorders. Hankin also raised important questions about the utility of evolutionary psychological principles, particularly those of sexual selection, to generate novel, specific, and a priori hypotheses about sex differences in common forms of psychopathology. I acknowledge these points, and I contend that a metatheory derived from evolutionary psychological principles is quite useful in 2 ways. First, it provides a parsimonious framework for understanding sex differences across multiple levels of analysis (e.g., hormones, gene by environment interactions, dispositional traits, behavioral and emotional symptoms). Second, it provides a framework for the generation of novel, specific, and a priori hypotheses such as those elucidated in my review. Existing disorder-specific theories cannot do as well in serving these functions. The pursuit of metatheories that both organize existing findings and generate novel cross-disorder hypotheses is crucial for ongoing progress in psychological science. Evolutionary psychology provides one such fruitful metatheory. © 2013 American Psychological Association

  12. Combined use of a priori data for fast system self-calibration of a non-rigid multi-camera fringe projection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavroulakis, Petros I.; Chen, Shuxiao; Sims-Waterhouse, Danny; Piano, Samanta; Southon, Nicholas; Bointon, Patrick; Leach, Richard

    2017-06-01

    In non-rigid fringe projection 3D measurement systems, where either the camera or projector setup can change significantly between measurements or the object needs to be tracked, self-calibration has to be carried out frequently to keep the measurements accurate1. In fringe projection systems, it is common to use methods developed initially for photogrammetry for the calibration of the camera(s) in the system in terms of extrinsic and intrinsic parameters. To calibrate the projector(s) an extra correspondence between a pre-calibrated camera and an image created by the projector is performed. These recalibration steps are usually time consuming and involve the measurement of calibrated patterns on planes, before the actual object can continue to be measured after a motion of a camera or projector has been introduced in the setup and hence do not facilitate fast 3D measurement of objects when frequent experimental setup changes are necessary. By employing and combining a priori information via inverse rendering, on-board sensors, deep learning and leveraging a graphics processor unit (GPU), we assess a fine camera pose estimation method which is based on optimising the rendering of a model of a scene and the object to match the view from the camera. We find that the success of this calibration pipeline can be greatly improved by using adequate a priori information from the aforementioned sources.

  13. A simulation study of the variability of indocyanine green kinetics and using structural a priori information in dynamic contrast enhanced diffuse optical tomography (DCE-DOT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burcin Unlu, Mehmet; Birgul, Ozlem; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2008-06-01

    We investigated (1) the variability of indocyanine green kinetics (ICG) between different cases in the existence of random noise, changing the size of the imaging region, the location and the size of the inclusion, (2) the use of structural a priori information to reduce the variability. We performed two-dimensional simulation studies for this purpose. In the simulations, we used a two-compartmental model to describe the ICG transport and obtained pharmacokinetic parameters. The transfer constant and the rate constant showed a wide variation, i.e. 60% and 95%, respectively, when random Gaussian noise with a standard deviation of 1% in amplitude and 0.4° in phase was added to data. Moreover, recovered peak ICG concentration and time to reach the peak concentration was different within different cases. When structural a priori information was used in the reconstructions, the variations in the transfer and the rate constant were reduced to 29%, 15%, respectively. As a result, although the recovered peak concentration was still case dependent, the variability of the shape of the kinetic curve was reduced.

  14. Travelers' Health: Leishmaniasis, Visceral

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety Blood Clots Bug Bites Business Travel Cold Climates Counterfeit Drugs Cruise Ship Travel Families with Children ... Abroad Getting Sick After Travel High Altitudes Hot Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador ...

  15. Travelers' Health: Varicella (Chickenpox)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety Blood Clots Bug Bites Business Travel Cold Climates Counterfeit Drugs Cruise Ship Travel Families with Children ... Abroad Getting Sick After Travel High Altitudes Hot Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador ...

  16. Travelers' Health: Yellow Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety Blood Clots Bug Bites Business Travel Cold Climates Counterfeit Drugs Cruise Ship Travel Families with Children ... Abroad Getting Sick After Travel High Altitudes Hot Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador ...

  17. Travelers' Health: Japanese Encephalitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety Blood Clots Bug Bites Business Travel Cold Climates Counterfeit Drugs Cruise Ship Travel Families with Children ... Abroad Getting Sick After Travel High Altitudes Hot Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador ...

  18. Travelers' Health: Meningococcal Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety Blood Clots Bug Bites Business Travel Cold Climates Counterfeit Drugs Cruise Ship Travel Families with Children ... Abroad Getting Sick After Travel High Altitudes Hot Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador ...

  19. Travelers' Health: Leishmaniasis, Cutaneous

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety Blood Clots Bug Bites Business Travel Cold Climates Counterfeit Drugs Cruise Ship Travel Families with Children ... Abroad Getting Sick After Travel High Altitudes Hot Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador ...

  20. Travelers' Health: Motion Sickness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety Blood Clots Bug Bites Business Travel Cold Climates Counterfeit Drugs Cruise Ship Travel Families with Children ... Abroad Getting Sick After Travel High Altitudes Hot Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador ...

  1. Travelers' Health: Scabies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety Blood Clots Bug Bites Business Travel Cold Climates Counterfeit Drugs Cruise Ship Travel Families with Children ... Abroad Getting Sick After Travel High Altitudes Hot Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador ...

  2. Travelers' Health: Leishmaniasis, Cutaneous

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety Blood Clots Bug Bites Business Travel Cold Climates Counterfeit Drugs Cruise Ship Travel Families with Children ... Abroad Getting Sick After Travel High Altitudes Hot Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador ...

  3. Travelers' Health: Pertussis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety Blood Clots Bug Bites Business Travel Cold Climates Counterfeit Drugs Cruise Ship Travel Families with Children ... Abroad Getting Sick After Travel High Altitudes Hot Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador ...

  4. Travelers' Health: Giardiasis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety Blood Clots Bug Bites Business Travel Cold Climates Counterfeit Drugs Cruise Ship Travel Families with Children ... Abroad Getting Sick After Travel High Altitudes Hot Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador ...

  5. Travelers' Health: Japanese Encephalitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Yellow Fever Vaccine Course Travel Medicine References: Books, Journals, Articles & Websites Resources for the Travel Industry Yellow Book Contents Chapter 3 (81) Japanese Encephalitis more Tables ...

  6. Comparison of a priori versus provisional heparin therapy on radial artery occlusion after transradial coronary angiography and patent hemostasis (from the PHARAOH Study).

    PubMed

    Pancholy, Samir B; Bertrand, Olivier F; Patel, Tejas

    2012-07-15

    Systemic anticoagulation decreases the risk of radial artery occlusion (RAO) after transradial catheterization and standard occlusive hemostasis. We compared the efficacy and safety of provisional heparin use only when the technique of patent hemostasis was not achievable to standard a priori heparin administration after radial sheath introduction. Patients referred for coronary angiography were randomized in 2 groups. In the a priori group, 200 patients received intravenous heparin (50 IU/kg) immediately after sheath insertion. In the provisional group, 200 patients did not receive heparin during the procedure. After sheath removal, hemostasis was obtained using a TR band (Terumo corporation, Tokyo, Japan) with a plethysmography-guided patent hemostasis technique. In the provisional group, no heparin was given if radial artery patency could be obtained and maintained. If radial patency was not achieved, a bolus of heparin (50 IU/kg) was given. Radial artery patency was evaluated at 24 hours (early RAO) and 30 days after the procedure (late RAO) by plethysmography. Patent hemostasis was obtained in 67% in the a priori group and 74% in the provisional group (p = 0.10). Incidence of RAO remained similar in the 2 groups at the early (7.5% vs 7.0%, p = 0.84) and late (4.5% vs 5.0%, p = 0.83) evaluations. Women, patients with diabetes, patients having not received heparin, and patients without radial artery patency during hemostasis had more RAO. By multivariate analysis, patent radial artery during hemostasis (odds ratio [OR] 0.03, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.004 to 0.28, p = 0.002) and diabetes (OR 11, 95% CI 3 to 38,p <0.0001) were independent predictors of late RAO, whereas heparin was not (OR 0.45 95% CI 0.13 to 1.54, p = 0.20). In conclusion, our results suggest that maintenance of radial artery patency during hemostasis is the most important parameter to decrease the risk of RAO. In selected cases, provisional use of heparin appears feasible and safe when

  7. Childhood and Travel Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espey, David

    If children are not present in most travel literature--precisely because the genre has most typically been the domain of solitary male travelers who are escaping domestic obligation, routine, the familiar, and the family--they nevertheless are an integral part of the genre. The traveler is in many ways a child, an innocent abroad. Traveler writers…

  8. Travelers' Health: Hepatitis E

    MedlinePlus

    ... Travel Families with Children Fish Poisoning in Travelers Food and Water Getting Health Care Abroad Getting Sick After Travel High Altitudes Hot Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador Insurance International Adoption Jet Lag Last-Minute Travel Long-Term ...

  9. Travelers' Health: Cryptosporidiosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Travel Families with Children Fish Poisoning in Travelers Food and Water Getting Health Care Abroad Getting Sick After Travel High Altitudes Hot Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador Insurance International Adoption Jet Lag Last-Minute Travel Long-Term ...

  10. Travelers' Health: Giardiasis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Travel Families with Children Fish Poisoning in Travelers Food and Water Getting Health Care Abroad Getting Sick After Travel High Altitudes Hot Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador Insurance International Adoption Jet Lag Last-Minute Travel Long-Term ...

  11. Travelers' Health: Scabies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Travel Families with Children Fish Poisoning in Travelers Food and Water Getting Health Care Abroad Getting Sick After Travel High Altitudes Hot Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador Insurance International Adoption Jet Lag Last-Minute Travel Long-Term ...

  12. Travelers' Health: Motion Sickness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Travel Families with Children Fish Poisoning in Travelers Food and Water Getting Health Care Abroad Getting Sick After Travel High Altitudes Hot Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador Insurance International Adoption Jet Lag Last-Minute Travel Long-Term ...

  13. Using a priori contrasts for multivariate repeated-measures ANOVA to analyze thermoregulatory responses of the dibbler (Parantechinus apicalis; Marsupialia, Dasyuridae).

    PubMed

    Withers, Philip C; Cooper, Christine E

    2011-01-01

    Physiological studies often involve the repeated measurement of individuals over a range of ordered categorical conditions, for example, varying ambient temperature. We illustrate here the use of a priori contrasts for multivariate repeated-measures ANOVA by analyzing the thermal responses of various physiological variables for a small marsupial, the dibbler (Parantechinus apicalis). Our analyses showed that dibblers conform closely to the Scholander-Irving model of endothermy. Body temperature was constant at low air temperatures, was 36.3 ± 0.24°C at thermoneutrality (30°C), and increased at 35°C. Metabolic rate decreased with increasing ambient temperature to a basal rate of 0.619 ± 0.036 mL O(2) g(-1) h(-1) at 30°C; it extrapolated closely to thermoneutral body temperature. Increased oxygen demand at lower ambient temperature was met by increased respiratory minute volume, achieved by increased respiratory frequency and tidal volume; oxygen extraction was constant at about 19%. Evaporative water loss and wet and dry thermal conductance increased markedly at high ambient temperatures but not sufficiently to maintain constant body temperature. Relative water economy was similar to that of other small marsupials, increasing linearly at lower air temperatures with a point of relative water economy of 20.3°C. We conclude that a priori contrasts provide a statistically appropriate and powerful analysis that can be used routinely to statistically describe the pattern of response of physiological variables to a categorical factor and are especially useful for repeated-measures ANOVA designs common to many physiological studies.

  14. Feasibility of improving a priori regional climate model estimates of Greenland ice sheet surface mass loss through assimilation of measured ice surface temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navari, M.; Margulis, S. A.; Bateni, S. M.; Tedesco, M.; Alexander, P.; Fettweis, X.

    2016-01-01

    The Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) has been the focus of climate studies due to its considerable impact on sea level rise. Accurate estimates of surface mass fluxes would contribute to understanding the cause of its recent changes and would help to better estimate the past, current and future contribution of the GrIS to sea level rise. Though the estimates of the GrIS surface mass fluxes have improved significantly over the last decade, there is still considerable disparity between the results from different methodologies (e.g., Rae et al., 2012; Vernon et al., 2013). The data assimilation approach can merge information from different methodologies in a consistent way to improve the GrIS surface mass fluxes. In this study, an ensemble batch smoother data assimilation approach was developed to assess the feasibility of generating a reanalysis estimate of the GrIS surface mass fluxes via integrating remotely sensed ice surface temperature measurements with a regional climate model (a priori) estimate. The performance of the proposed methodology for generating an improved posterior estimate was investigated within an observing system simulation experiment (OSSE) framework using synthetically generated ice surface temperature measurements. The results showed that assimilation of ice surface temperature time series were able to overcome uncertainties in near-surface meteorological forcing variables that drive the GrIS surface processes. Our findings show that the proposed methodology is able to generate posterior reanalysis estimates of the surface mass fluxes that are in good agreement with the synthetic true estimates. The results also showed that the proposed data assimilation framework improves the root-mean-square error of the posterior estimates of runoff, sublimation/evaporation, surface condensation, and surface mass loss fluxes by 61, 64, 76, and 62 %, respectively, over the nominal a priori climate model estimates.

  15. Regional Travel-Time Predictions, Uncertainty and Location Improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, M; Myers, S

    2004-07-15

    We investigate our ability to improve regional travel-time prediction and seismic event location using an a priori three-dimensional (3D) velocity model of Western Eurasia and North Africa (WENA 1.0). Three principal results are presented. First, the 3D WENA 1.0 velocity model improves travel-time prediction over the IASPI91 model, as measured by variance reduction, for regional phases recorded at 22 stations throughout the modeled region, including aseismic areas. Second, a distance-dependent uncertainty model is developed and tested for the WENA 1.0 model. Third, relocation using WENA 1.0 and the associated uncertainty model provides an end-to-end validation test. Model validation is based on a comparison of approximately 10,000 Pg, Pn, and P travel-time predictions and empirical observations from ground truth (GT) events. Ray coverage for the validation dataset provides representative, regional-distances sampling across Eurasia and North Africa. The WENA 1.0 model markedly improves travel-time predictions for most stations with an average variance reduction of 14% for all ray paths. We find that improvement is station dependent, with some stations benefiting greatly from WENA predictions (25% at OBN, and 16% at BKR), some stations showing moderate improvement (12% at ARU, and 17% at NIL), and some stations benefiting only slightly (7% at AAE, and 8% at TOL). We further test WENA 1.0 by relocating five calibration events. Again, relocation of these events is dependent on ray paths that evenly sample WENA 1.0 and therefore provide an unbiased assessment of location performance. These results highlight the importance of accurate GT datasets in assessing regional travel-time models and demonstrate that an a priori 3D model can markedly improve our ability to locate small magnitude events in a regional monitoring context.

  16. Travel-related illness.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Carol C

    2013-06-01

    Travel abroad for business and pleasure should be safe and meaningful for the traveler. To assure that safe experience, certain processes should be considered before travel. A thorough pretravel health assessment will offer patients and health care providers valuable information for anticipatory guidance before travel. The destination-based risk assessment will help determine the risks involved in travel to specific locations and guide in the development of contingency plans for all travelers, especially those with chronic conditions. Diseases are more prevalent overseas, and immunizations and vaccinations are all important considerations for persons traveling abroad.

  17. Rabies in travelers.

    PubMed

    Gautret, Philippe; Parola, Philippe

    2014-03-01

    Most cases of rabies in travelers are associated with dog bites and occur in adults who are commonly migrants. The incidence of injuries to travelers caused by potentially rabid animals is approximately 0.4 % per month of stay. Dogs account for 51 % of cases, but nonhuman primates are the leading animals responsible for injuries in travelers returning from Southeast Asia. Travel to Southeast Asia, India and North Africa, young age, and traveling for tourism are risk factors for potential exposure. More than 70 % of travelers are not immunized prior to departing and do not receive adequate care when injured. The intradermal vaccination route has been proven economical, safe and immunogenic in travelers. The immunity provided by the three-dose series is long-lasting and should be considered an investment for future travel. Abbreviated schedules may be used for last-minute travelers.

  18. International travel and vaccinations.

    PubMed Central

    Rizvon, M K; Qazi, S; Ward, L A

    1999-01-01

    With the increase in global travel, no disease is beyond the reach of any population. Traveling patients should be advised to follow food and water precautions and encouraged to receive the recommended immunizations. Travel medicine plays a vital role not only in limiting the morbidity of travel-related illnesses but also in limiting the spread of diseases. This article addresses the common issues related to travel, reviews the care of the immunocompromised traveler, and updates the available vaccinations and prophylactic regimens available to limit sickness abroad. PMID:10063396

  19. Identification of dietary patterns associated with obesity in a nationally representative survey of Canadian adults: application of a priori, hybrid, and simplified dietary pattern techniques.

    PubMed

    Jessri, Mahsa; Wolfinger, Russell D; Lou, Wendy Y; L'Abbé, Mary R

    2017-03-01

    Background: Analyzing the effects of dietary patterns is an important approach for examining the complex role of nutrition in the etiology of obesity and chronic diseases.Objectives: The objectives of this study were to characterize the dietary patterns of Canadians with the use of a priori, hybrid, and simplified dietary pattern techniques, and to compare the associations of these patterns with obesity risk in individuals with and without chronic diseases (unhealthy and healthy obesity).Design: Dietary recalls from 11,748 participants (≥18 y of age) in the cross-sectional, nationally representative Canadian Community Health Survey 2.2 were used. A priori dietary pattern was characterized with the use of the previously validated 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans Adherence Index (DGAI). Weighted partial least squares (hybrid method) was used to derive an energy-dense (ED), high-fat (HF), low-fiber density (LFD) dietary pattern with the use of 38 food groups. The associations of derived dietary patterns with disease outcomes were then tested with the use of multinomial logistic regression.Results: An ED, HF, and LFD dietary pattern had high positive loadings for fast foods, carbonated drinks, and refined grains, and high negative loadings for whole fruits and vegetables (≥|0.17|). Food groups with a high loading were summed to form a simplified dietary pattern score. Moving from the first (healthiest) to the fourth (least healthy) quartiles of the ED, HF, and LFD pattern and the simplified dietary pattern scores was associated with increasingly elevated ORs for unhealthy obesity, with individuals in quartile 4 having an OR of 2.57 (95% CI: 1.75, 3.76) and 2.73 (95% CI: 1.88, 3.98), respectively (P-trend < 0.0001). Individuals who adhered the most to the 2015 DGAI recommendations (quartile 4) had a 53% lower OR of unhealthy obesity (P-trend < 0.0001). The associations of dietary patterns with healthy obesity and unhealthy nonobesity were weaker, albeit

  20. Reliability of travel time data computed from interpreted migrated events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jannaud, L. R.

    1995-02-01

    In the Sequential Migration Aided Reflection Tomography (SMART) method, travel times used by reflection tomography are computed by tracing rays which propagate with the migration velocity and reflect from reflectors picked on migrated images. Because of limits of migration resolution, this picking involves inaccuracies, to which computed travel times are unfortunately very sensitive. The objective of this paper is to predict a priori the confidence we can have in emergence data, i.e., emergence point location and travel time, from the statistical information that describes the uncertainties of the reflectors. (These reflectors can be obtained by picking on migrated images as explained above or by any other method). The proposed method relies on a linearization of each step of the ray computation, allowing one to deduce, from the statistical properties of reflector fluctuations, the statistical properties of ray-tracing outputs. The computed confidences and correlations give access to a more realistic analysis of emergence data. Moreover, they can be used as inputs for reflection tomography to compute models that match travel times according to the confidence we have in the reflector. Applications on real data show that the uncertainties are generally large and, what is much more interesting, strongly varying from one ray to another. Taking them into account is therefore very important for both a better understanding of the kinematic information in the data and the computation of a model that matches these travel times.

  1. Travel and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... medical records with you while traveling. High Altitudes, Exotic Spots Traveling to higher altitudes shouldn’t necessarily ... The bigger concern, Gandy said, is that an exotic place may have less access to good medical ...

  2. Traveler's diarrhea diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... diarrhea. Function Bacteria and other substances in the water and food can cause traveler's diarrhea. People who live in ... your risk for getting traveler's diarrhea by avoiding water, ice, and food that may be contaminated. The goal of the ...

  3. Zika Travel Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... GeoSentinel Global TravEpiNet Mobile Apps RSS Feeds Zika Travel Information Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Language: ... Map of Areas with Risk of Zika Zika Travel Notices Zika Virus in Cape Verde Zika Virus ...

  4. Travelers' Health: Meningococcal Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Counterfeit Drugs Cruise Ship Travel Families with Children Fish Poisoning in Travelers Food and Water Getting Health ... Suppl 2: B26–36. Rosenstein NE, Perkins BA, Stephens DS, Popovic T, Hughes JM. Meningococcal disease. N ...

  5. A coupled radiative transfer and diffusion approximation model for the solution of the forward problem and the a-priori fluorophore distribution estimation in fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorpas, D.; Yova, D.; Politopoulos, K.

    2009-02-01

    Although fluorescence imaging has been applied in tumour diagnosis from the early 90s, just the last few years it has met an increasing scientific interest due to the advances in the biophotonics field and the combined technological progress of the acquisition and computational systems. In addition there are expectations that fluorescence imaging will be further developed and applied in deep tumour diagnosis in the years to come. However, this evolving field of imaging sciences has still to encounter important challenges. Among them is the expression of an accurate forward model for the solution of the reconstruction problem. The scope of this work is to introduce a three dimensional coupled radiative transfer and diffusion approximation model, applicable on the fluorescence imaging. Furthermore, the solver incorporates the super-ellipsoid models and sophisticated image processing algorithms to additionally provide a-priori estimation about the fluorophores distribution, information that is very important for the solution of the inverse problem. Simulation experiments have proven that the proposed methodology preserves the accuracy levels of the radiative transfer equation and the time efficacy of the diffusion approximation, while in the same time shows extended success on the registration between acquired and simulated images.

  6. Using models to guide field experiments: a priori predictions for the CO 2 response of a nutrient- and water-limited native Eucalypt woodland

    DOE PAGES

    Medlyn, Belinda E.; De Kauwe, Martin G.; Zaehle, Sönke; ...

    2016-05-09

    One major uncertainty in Earth System models is the response of terrestrial ecosystems to rising atmospheric CO2 concentration (Ca), particularly under nutrient-lim- ited conditions. The Eucalyptus Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (EucFACE) experiment, recently established in a nutrient- and water-limited woodlands, presents a unique opportunity to address this uncertainty, but can best do so if key model uncertainties have been identified in advance. Moreover, we applied seven vegetation models, which have previously been comprehensively assessed against earlier forest FACE experi- ments, to simulate a priori possible outcomes from EucFACE. Our goals were to provide quantitative projections against which to evaluate data asmore » they are collected, and to identify key measurements that should be made in the experiment to allow discrimination among alternative model assumptions in a postexperiment model intercompari- son. Simulated responses of annual net primary productivity (NPP) to elevated Ca ranged from 0.5 to 25% across models. The simulated reduction of NPP during a low-rainfall year also varied widely, from 24 to 70%. Key processes where assumptions caused disagreement among models included nutrient limitations to growth; feedbacks to nutri- ent uptake; autotrophic respiration; and the impact of low soil moisture availability on plant processes. Finally, knowledge of the causes of variation among models is now guiding data collection in the experiment, with the expectation that the experimental data can optimally inform future model improvements.« less

  7. Repeated evolution of net venation and fleshy fruits among monocots in shaded habitats confirms a priori predictions: evidence from an ndhF phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Givnish, Thomas J; Pires, J. Chris; Graham, Sean W; McPherson, Marc A; Prince, Linda M; Patterson, Thomas B; Rai, Hardeep S; Roalson, Eric H; Evans, Timothy M; Hahn, William J; Millam, Kendra C; Meerow, Alan W; Molvray, Mia; Kores, Paul J; O'Brien, Heath E; Hall, Jocelyn C; Kress, W. John; Sytsma, Kenneth J

    2005-01-01

    We present a well-resolved, highly inclusive phylogeny for monocots, based on ndhF sequence variation, and use it to test a priori hypotheses that net venation and vertebrate-dispersed fleshy fruits should undergo concerted convergence, representing independent but often concurrent adaptations to shaded conditions. Our data demonstrate that net venation arose at least 26 times and was lost eight times over the past 90 million years; fleshy fruits arose at least 21 times and disappeared 11 times. Both traits show a highly significant pattern of concerted convergence (p<10−9), arising 16 times and disappearing four times in tandem. This phenomenon appears driven by even stronger tendencies for both traits to evolve in shade and be lost in open habitats (p<10−13–10−29). These patterns are among the strongest ever demonstrated for evolutionary convergence in individual traits and the predictability of evolution, and the strongest evidence yet uncovered for concerted convergence. The rate of adaptive shifts per taxon has declined exponentially over the past 90 million years, as expected when large-scale radiations fill adaptive zones. PMID:16011923

  8. A Priori Analysis of Subgrid Mass Flux Vectors from Massively Parallel Direct Numerical Simulations of High Pressure H2/O2 Reacting Shear Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Justin; Miller, Richard

    2011-11-01

    Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) are conducted for temporally developing reacting H2/O2 shear layers at an ambient pressure of 100atm. The compressible form of the governing equations are coupled with the Peng Robinson real gas equation of state and are solved using eighth order central finite differences and fourth order Runge Kutta time integration with resolutions up to ~3/4 billion grid points. The formulation includes a detailed pressure dependent kinetics mechanism having 8 species and 19 steps, detailed property models, and generalized forms of the multicomponent heat and mass diffusion vectors derived from nonequilibrium thermodynamics and fluctuation theory. The DNS is performed over a range of Reynolds numbers up to 4500 based on the free stream velocity difference and initial vorticity thickness. The results are then analyzed in an a priori manner to illustrate the role of the subgrid mass flux vector within the filtered form of the governing equations relevant to Large Eddy Simulations. The subgrid mass flux vector is found to be a significant term; particularly within localized regions of the flame. Research supported by NSF Grant CBET-0965624 and Clemson University's Palmetto Cluster.

  9. Advancing techniques to constrain the geometry of the seismic rupture plane on subduction interfaces a priori: Higher-order functional fits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayes, G.P.; Wald, D.J.; Keranen, K.

    2009-01-01

    Ongoing developments in earthquake source inversions incorporate nonplanar fault geometries as inputs to the inversion process, improving previous approaches that relied solely on planar fault surfaces. This evolution motivates advancing the existing framework for constraining fault geometry, particularly in subduction zones where plate boundary surfaces that host highly hazardous earthquakes are clearly nonplanar. Here, we improve upon the existing framework for the constraint of the seismic rupture plane of subduction interfaces by incorporating active seismic and seafloor sediment thickness data with existing independent data sets and inverting for the most probable nonplanar subduction geometry. Constraining the rupture interface a priori with independent geological and seismological information reduces the uncertainty in the derived earthquake source inversion parameters over models that rely on simpler assumptions, such as the moment tensor inferred fault plane. Examples are shown for a number of wellconstrained global locations. We expand the coverage of previous analyses to a more uniform global data set and show that even in areas of sparse data this approach is able to accurately constrain the approximate subduction geometry, particularly when aided with the addition of data from local active seismic surveys. In addition, we show an example of the integration of many two-dimensional profiles into a threedimensional surface for the Sunda subduction zone and introduce the development of a new global threedimensional subduction interface model: Slab1.0. ?? 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Using models to guide field experiments: a priori predictions for the CO2 response of a nutrient- and water-limited native Eucalypt woodland.

    PubMed

    Medlyn, Belinda E; De Kauwe, Martin G; Zaehle, Sönke; Walker, Anthony P; Duursma, Remko A; Luus, Kristina; Mishurov, Mikhail; Pak, Bernard; Smith, Benjamin; Wang, Ying-Ping; Yang, Xiaojuan; Crous, Kristine Y; Drake, John E; Gimeno, Teresa E; Macdonald, Catriona A; Norby, Richard J; Power, Sally A; Tjoelker, Mark G; Ellsworth, David S

    2016-08-01

    The response of terrestrial ecosystems to rising atmospheric CO2 concentration (Ca ), particularly under nutrient-limited conditions, is a major uncertainty in Earth System models. The Eucalyptus Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (EucFACE) experiment, recently established in a nutrient- and water-limited woodland presents a unique opportunity to address this uncertainty, but can best do so if key model uncertainties have been identified in advance. We applied seven vegetation models, which have previously been comprehensively assessed against earlier forest FACE experiments, to simulate a priori possible outcomes from EucFACE. Our goals were to provide quantitative projections against which to evaluate data as they are collected, and to identify key measurements that should be made in the experiment to allow discrimination among alternative model assumptions in a postexperiment model intercomparison. Simulated responses of annual net primary productivity (NPP) to elevated Ca ranged from 0.5 to 25% across models. The simulated reduction of NPP during a low-rainfall year also varied widely, from 24 to 70%. Key processes where assumptions caused disagreement among models included nutrient limitations to growth; feedbacks to nutrient uptake; autotrophic respiration; and the impact of low soil moisture availability on plant processes. Knowledge of the causes of variation among models is now guiding data collection in the experiment, with the expectation that the experimental data can optimally inform future model improvements. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Intercity Travel Data Search.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Intercity Travel Data Search is an annotated bibliography on U.S. domestic intercity passenger travel by the four major modes of air, auto, bus and...socioeconomic, attitudinal and trip behavior characteristics of intercity travelers , and (3) demand models for predicting point-to-point intercity... travel . The bibliography totals 422 items, almost all published after 1964. Approximately 100 of these are in the first two subject areas and the

  12. Vaccines for international travel.

    PubMed

    McKinney, W P

    2001-12-01

    American travelers increasingly are selecting exotic destinations in the developing world. This poses a challenge to primary care clinicians who wish to provide recommendations to their patients regarding optimal protection from infectious disease risks. Recommendations should be individualized for each traveler and journey, accounting for personal health, health risks of specific destinations, style of travel, and activities anticipated. This article updates practitioners on the essentials of immunization before international travel.

  13. Travel Agent Course Outline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Dept. of Education, Victoria.

    Written for college entry-level travel agent training courses, this course outline can also be used for inservice training programs offered by travel agencies. The outline provides information on the work of a travel agent and gives clear statements on what learners must be able to do by the end of their training. Material is divided into eight…

  14. Traveling and Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Traveling and Asthma KidsHealth > For Kids > Traveling and Asthma A A A What's in this ... t have to get in the way of travel fun. Let's find out how to be prepared ...

  15. The Jet Travel Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2007-01-01

    Airplane travelers are dismayed by the long lines and seemingly chaotic activities that precede boarding a full airplane. Surely, the one who can solve this problem is going to make many travelers happy. This article describes the Jet Travel Challenge, an activity that challenges students to create some alternatives to this now frustrating…

  16. The Jet Travel Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2007-01-01

    Airplane travelers are dismayed by the long lines and seemingly chaotic activities that precede boarding a full airplane. Surely, the one who can solve this problem is going to make many travelers happy. This article describes the Jet Travel Challenge, an activity that challenges students to create some alternatives to this now frustrating…

  17. Preparing the traveller.

    PubMed

    Spira, Alan M

    2003-04-19

    The four steps for giving travellers the foundation for healthy journeys are to assess their health, analyse their itineraries, select vaccines, and provide education about prevention and self-treatment of travel-related diseases. This process takes time. Since there is a risk of information overload, travellers should leave the clinic with some written advice for reinforcement. The order of these steps can be tailored to what best suits the travel clinic, but vaccinating early in the process allows monitoring for adverse reactions. Face-to-face discussion is vital for explaining the use and side-effects of medications. Those who provide a travel medicine service should be seeing many travellers and should seek specialist training. In 2003, the International Society of Travel Medicine introduced a certificate of knowledge examination in travel medicine. We cannot make travellers bullet-proof but it is possible to make them bullet-resistant. The pre-travel visit should minimise health risks specific to the journey, give travellers the capability to handle most minor medical problems, and allow them to identify when to seek local care during the trip or on return.

  18. Travel/Travelers and Parasitic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can Be Acquired During Travel* Contaminated Food and Water More Common giardiasis cryptosporidiosis cyclosporiasis Less Common amebiasis ... Page last updated: July 28, 2016 Content source: Global Health - Division of Parasitic Diseases Email Recommend Tweet ...

  19. Improving health sector travel.

    PubMed

    Hurdle, David; Davis, Adrian

    2004-10-01

    Preventing ill health and obesity and building more physical activity into our daily lives have never been so high on the agenda, and the way we travel can help. Many workplaces and schools are drawing up travel plans, with the aims usually to minimise car use and encourage healthier and more environmentally friendly travel. The Transport White Paper of 1998 advocated travel plans and singled out hospitals for action. Travel plans continue to be a focus within the latest Transport White Paper, launched in July 2004. This article covers various prompts to the health sector to implement travel plans. It addresses issues and concerns facing NHS Trusts, the practical things Trusts can do, and the increasing amount of good practice available. Finally, it demonstrates that travel plans can work, and are working, in the health sector.

  20. A priori and a posteriori investigations for developing large eddy simulations of multi-species turbulent mixing under high-pressure conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Borghesi, Giulio; Bellan, Josette

    2015-03-15

    A Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) database was created representing mixing of species under high-pressure conditions. The configuration considered is that of a temporally evolving mixing layer. The database was examined and analyzed for the purpose of modeling some of the unclosed terms that appear in the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) equations. Several metrics are used to understand the LES modeling requirements. First, a statistical analysis of the DNS-database large-scale flow structures was performed to provide a metric for probing the accuracy of the proposed LES models as the flow fields obtained from accurate LESs should contain structures of morphology statistically similar to those observed in the filtered-and-coarsened DNS (FC-DNS) fields. To characterize the morphology of the large-scales structures, the Minkowski functionals of the iso-surfaces were evaluated for two different fields: the second-invariant of the rate of deformation tensor and the irreversible entropy production rate. To remove the presence of the small flow scales, both of these fields were computed using the FC-DNS solutions. It was found that the large-scale structures of the irreversible entropy production rate exhibit higher morphological complexity than those of the second invariant of the rate of deformation tensor, indicating that the burden of modeling will be on recovering the thermodynamic fields. Second, to evaluate the physical effects which must be modeled at the subfilter scale, an a priori analysis was conducted. This a priori analysis, conducted in the coarse-grid LES regime, revealed that standard closures for the filtered pressure, the filtered heat flux, and the filtered species mass fluxes, in which a filtered function of a variable is equal to the function of the filtered variable, may no longer be valid for the high-pressure flows considered in this study. The terms requiring modeling are the filtered pressure, the filtered heat flux, the filtered pressure work

  1. Genetic basis of delay discounting in frequent gamblers: examination of a priori candidates and exploration of a panel of dopamine-related loci

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Joshua C; MacKillop, James

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Delay discounting is a behavioral economic index of impulsivity that reflects preferences for small immediate rewards relative to larger delayed rewards. It has been consistently linked to pathological gambling and other forms of addictive behavior, and has been proposed to be a behavioral characteristic that may link genetic variation and risk of developing addictive disorders (i.e., an endophenotype). Studies to date have revealed significant associations with polymorphisms associated with dopamine neurotransmission. The current study examined associations between delay discounting and both previously linked variants and a novel panel of dopamine-related variants in a sample of frequent gamblers. Methods Participants were 175 weekly gamblers of European ancestry who completed the Monetary Choice Questionnaire to assess delay discounting preferences and provided a DNA via saliva. Results In a priori tests, two loci previously associated with delayed reward discounting (rs1800497 and rs4680) were not replicated, however, the long form of DRD4 VNTR was significantly associated with lower discounting of delayed rewards. Exploratory analysis of the dopamine-related panel revealed 11 additional significant associations in genes associated with dopamine synthesis, breakdown, reuptake, and receptor function (DRD3, SLC6A3, DDC, DBH, and SLC18A2). An aggregate genetic risk score from the nominally significant loci accounted for 17% of the variance in discounting. Mediational analyses largely supported the presence of indirect effects between the associated loci, delay discounting, and pathological gambling severity. Conclusions These findings do not replicate previously reported associations but identify several novel candidates and provide preliminary support for a systems biology approach to understand the genetic basis of delay discounting. PMID:25365808

  2. Chromosomal microarray analysis as a first-line test in pregnancies with a priori low risk for the detection of submicroscopic chromosomal abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Fiorentino, Francesco; Napoletano, Stefania; Caiazzo, Fiorina; Sessa, Mariateresa; Bono, Sara; Spizzichino, Letizia; Gordon, Anthony; Nuccitelli, Andrea; Rizzo, Giuseppe; Baldi, Marina

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to explore the utility of chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) in groups of pregnancies with a priori low risk for detection of submicroscopic chromosome abnormalities, usually not considered an indication for testing, in order to assess whether CMA improves the detection rate of prenatal chromosomal aberrations. A total of 3000 prenatal samples were processed in parallel using both whole-genome CMA and conventional karyotyping. The indications for prenatal testing included: advanced maternal age, maternal serum screening test abnormality, abnormal ultrasound findings, known abnormal fetal karyotype, parental anxiety, family history of a genetic condition and cell culture failure. The use of CMA resulted in an increased detection rate regardless of the indication for analysis. This was evident in high risk groups (abnormal ultrasound findings and abnormal fetal karyotype), in which the percentage of detection was 5.8% (7/120), and also in low risk groups, such as advanced maternal age (6/1118, 0.5%), and parental anxiety (11/1674, 0.7%). A total of 24 (0.8%) fetal conditions would have remained undiagnosed if only a standard karyotype had been performed. Importantly, 17 (0.6%) of such findings would have otherwise been overlooked if CMA was offered only to high risk pregnancies.The results of this study suggest that more widespread CMA testing of fetuses would result in a higher detection of clinically relevant chromosome abnormalities, even in low risk pregnancies. Our findings provide substantial evidence for the introduction of CMA as a first-line diagnostic test for all pregnant women undergoing invasive prenatal testing, regardless of risk factors. PMID:23211699

  3. Immunizations for foreign travel.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, D. R.

    1992-01-01

    One of the most important aspects of preparing travelers for destinations throughout the world is providing them with immunizations. Before administering any vaccines, however, a careful health and immunization history and travel itinerary should be obtained in order to determine vaccine indications and contraindications. There are three categories of immunizations for foreign travel. The first category includes immunizations which are routinely recommended whether or not the individual is traveling. Many travelers are due for primary vaccination or boosting against tetanus-diphtheria, measles-mumps-rubella, pneumococcal pneumonia, and influenza, for example, and the pre-travel visit is an ideal time to administer these. The second category are immunizations which might be required by a country as a condition for entry; these are yellow fever and cholera. The final category contains immunizations which are recommended because there is a risk of acquiring a particular disease during travel. Typhoid fever, meningococcal disease, rabies, and hepatitis are some examples. Travelers who are pregnant or who are infected with the human immunodeficiency virus require special consideration. Provision of appropriate immunizations for foreign travel is an important aspect of preventing illness in travelers. PMID:1337807

  4. Travel time inversion by Bayesian Inferential Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauerberger, Stefan; Holschneider, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    We are presenting a fully Bayesian approach in inferential statistics determining the posterior probability distribution for non- directly observable quantities (e. g. Earth model parameters). In contrast to deterministic methods established in Geophysics we are following a probabilistic approach focusing on exploring variabilities and uncertainties of model parameters. The aim of that work will be to quantify how well a parameter is determined by a priory knowledge (e. g. existing earth models, rock properties) completed by data obtained from multiple sources (e. g. seismograms, well logs, outcrops). Therefore we are considering the system in question as a Gaussian random process. As a consequence, the randomness in that system is completely determined by its mean and covariance function. Our prior knowledge of that conceptional random process is represented by its a priori mean. The associated covariance function - which quantifies the statistical correlation at two different points - forms the basis of rules for interpolating values at points for which there are no observations. Measurements are assumed to be linear (or linearized) observational functionals of the system. The desired quantities we want to predict are thought to be linear functionals, too. Due to linearity, observables and predictions are Gaussian distributed as well depending on the prior mean and covariance function. The presented approach calculates the prediction's conditional probability distribution posterior to a set of measurements. That conditional probability combines observations and prior knowledge yielding the posterior distribution, an updated distribution for the predictions. As proof of concept, the estimation of propagation velocities in a simple travel-time model is presented. The two observational functionals considered are travel-times and point measures of the velocity model. The system in question is the underlying velocity model itself, assumed as Gaussian random process

  5. Histoplasmosis in Israeli Travelers

    PubMed Central

    Segel, Michael J.; Rozenman, Judith; Lindsley, Mark D.; Lachish, Tamar; Berkman, Neville; Neuberger, Ami; Schwartz, Eli

    2015-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is a common endemic human mycoses acquired mostly in the Americas. We reviewed 23 cases of histoplasmosis in Israeli travelers; 22 had traveled to Central or South America and one to North America. Fourteen cases had been exposed to bat habitats and were symptomatic, presenting ≤ 3 months after their return. Asymptomatic patients (N = 9) were diagnosed during the evaluation of incidental radiological findings or because a travel partner had been suspected of Histoplasma infection, 16–120 months after their return. Serological testing was positive in 75% of symptomatic cases but only 22% of asymptomatic cases. Histoplasmosis should be considered in travelers returning from the Americas with respiratory or febrile illness within weeks of return, particularly if exposed to bat habitats. Travel history is essential in patients presenting with pulmonary nodules, even years after travel to endemic countries. PMID:25918200

  6. Histoplasmosis in Israeli travelers.

    PubMed

    Segel, Michael J; Rozenman, Judith; Lindsley, Mark D; Lachish, Tamar; Berkman, Neville; Neuberger, Ami; Schwartz, Eli

    2015-06-01

    Histoplasmosis is a common endemic human mycoses acquired mostly in the Americas. We reviewed 23 cases of histoplasmosis in Israeli travelers; 22 had traveled to Central or South America and one to North America. Fourteen cases had been exposed to bat habitats and were symptomatic, presenting ≤ 3 months after their return. Asymptomatic patients (N = 9) were diagnosed during the evaluation of incidental radiological findings or because a travel partner had been suspected of Histoplasma infection, 16-120 months after their return. Serological testing was positive in 75% of symptomatic cases but only 22% of asymptomatic cases. Histoplasmosis should be considered in travelers returning from the Americas with respiratory or febrile illness within weeks of return, particularly if exposed to bat habitats. Travel history is essential in patients presenting with pulmonary nodules, even years after travel to endemic countries.

  7. [Travel and venous thromboembolism].

    PubMed

    Hallundbæk Mikkelsen, Kristian; Knudsen, Stine Ulrik; Nannestad Jørgensen, Lars

    2013-10-28

    A literature study on the association between travel and venous thromboembolism (VTE) is conducted. Studies examining the risk of travel-associated VTE, predisposing factors and prophylactic measures are presented. It is concluded that the absolute risk of travel-associated VTE is low and holds a 2-4 fold increase after travel. The risk increases with duration, presence of other risk factors for VTE and extremes of height. Stockings reduces the risk of asymptomatic VTE. Heparin is presumed to constitute protection whereas there is no evidence of a prophylactic effect of acetylsalicylic acid.

  8. Pregnancy and travel.

    PubMed

    Barry, M; Bia, F

    1989-02-03

    The special problems of travel during pregnancy have become clinically important as more women are traveling to remote places for business or recreation. Optimal maintenance of fetal and maternal health under these circumstances entails specific considerations for which data, unfortunately, remain incomplete. Nevertheless, questions regarding immunizations, antimalarials, therapy for traveler's diarrhea, and even the risks of high altitude or vigorous exercise for the pregnant woman may be examined clinically. With a few important exceptions, sufficient information is available to ensure relatively safe travel in pregnancy provided precautions are taken and preparations are made.

  9. Earthquake relocation using a 3D a-priori geological velocity model from the western Alps to Corsica: Implication for seismic hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béthoux, Nicole; Theunissen, Thomas; Beslier, Marie-Odile; Font, Yvonne; Thouvenot, François; Dessa, Jean-Xavier; Simon, Soazig; Courrioux, Gabriel; Guillen, Antonio

    2016-02-01

    The region between the inner zones of the Alps and Corsica juxtaposes an overthickened crust to an oceanic domain, which makes difficult to ascertain the focal depth of seismic events using routine location codes and average 1D velocity models. The aim of this article is to show that, even with a rather lose monitoring network, accurate routine locations can be achieved by using realistic 3D modelling and advanced location techniques. Previous earthquake tomography studies cover the whole region with spatial resolutions of several tens of kilometres on land, but they fail to resolve the marine domain due to the absence of station coverage and sparse seismicity. To overcome these limitations, we first construct a 3D a-priori P and S velocity model integrating known geophysical and geological information. Significant progress has been achieved in the 3D numerical modelling of complex geological structures by the development of dedicated softwares (e.g. 3D GeoModeller), capable at once of elaborating a 3D structural model from geological and geophysical constraints and, possibly, of refining it by inversion processes (Calcagno et al., 2008). Then, we build an arrival-time catalogue of 1500 events recorded from 2000 to 2011. Hypocentres are then located in this model using a numerical code based on the maximum intersection method (Font et al., 2004), updated by Theunissen et al. (2012), as well as another 3D location technique, the NonLinLoc software (Lomax and Curtis, 2001). The reduction of arrival-time residuals and uncertainties (dh, dz) with respect to classical 1D locations demonstrates the improved accuracy allowed by our approach and confirms the coherence of the 3D geological model built and used in this study. Our results are also compared with previous works that benefitted from the installation of dense temporary networks surrounding the studied epicentre area. The resulting 3D location catalogue allows us to improve the regional seismic hazard assessment

  10. A priori performance prediction in pharmaceutical wet granulation: testing the applicability of the nucleation regime map to a formulation with a broad size distribution and dry binder addition.

    PubMed

    Kayrak-Talay, Defne; Litster, James D

    2011-10-14

    In this study, Hapgood's nucleation regime map (Hapgood et al., 2003) was tested for a formulation that consists of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) of broad size distribution and a fine dry binder. Gabapentin was used as the API and hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) as the dry binder with deionized water as the liquid binder. The formulation was granulated in a 6l Diosna high shear granulator. The effect of liquid addition method (spray, dripping), liquid addition rate (29-245 g/min), total liquid content (2, 4 and 10%), and impeller speed (250 and 500 rpm) on the granule size distribution and lump formation were investigated. Standard methods were successfully used to characterize the process parameters (spray drop size, spray geometry and powder surface velocity) for calculating the dimensionless spray flux. However, the addition of dry binder had a very strong effect on drop penetration time that could not be predicted from simple capillary flow considerations. This is most likely due to preferential liquid penetration into the fine pores related to the dry binder particles and subsequent partial softening and dissolution of the binder. For systems containing a dry binder or other amorphous powders, it is recommended that drop penetration time be measured directly for the blended formulation and then scaled to the drop size during spraying. Using these approaches to characterize the key dimensionless groups (dimensionless spray flux and drop penetration time), Hapgood's nucleation regime map was successfully used to predict a priori the effect of process conditions on the quality of the granule size distribution as measured by lump formation and the span of the size distribution, both before and after wet massing for range of conditions studied. Wider granule size distributions and higher amount of lumps were obtained moving from intermediate to mechanical dispersion regime. Addition of the liquid in the dripping mode gave the broadest size distribution

  11. A retrospective cohort study on the risk of stroke in relation to a priori health knowledge level among people with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yun-Ju; Hu, Hsiao-Yun; Lee, Ya-Ling; Ku, Po-Wen; Yen, Yung-Feng; Chu, Dachen

    2017-05-22

    Intervention of diabetes care education with regular laboratory check-up in outpatient visits showed long-term benefits to reduce the risk of macrovascular complications among people with type 2 diabetes. However, research on the level of a priori health knowledge to the prevention of diabetic complications in community settings has been scarce. We therefore aimed to investigate the association of health knowledge and stroke incidence in patients with type 2 diabetes in Taiwan. A nationally representative sample of general Taiwanese population was selected using a multistage systematic sampling process from Taiwan National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) in 2005. Subjects were interviewed by a standardized face-to-face questionnaire in the survey, obtaining information of demographics, socioeconomic status, family medical history, obesity, health behaviors, and 15-item health knowledge assessment. The NHIS dataset was linked to Taiwan National Health Insurance claims data to retrieve the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes in NHIS participants at baseline and identify follow-up incidence of stroke from 2005 to 2013. Univariate and multivariate Cox regressions were used to estimate the effect of baseline health knowledge level to the risk of stroke incidence among this group of people with type 2 diabetes. A total of 597 diabetic patients with a mean age of 51.28 years old and nearly half of males were analyzed. During the 9-year follow-up period, 65 new stroke cases were identified among them. Kaplan-Meier curves comparing the three groups of low/moderate/high knowledge levels revealed a statistical significance (p-value of log-rank test <0.01). After controlling for potential confounders, comparing to the group of low health knowledge level, the relative risk of stroke was significantly lower for those with moderate (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] = 0.63; 95% CI, 0.33-1.19; p-value = 0.15) and high level of health knowledge (AHR = 0.43; 95% CI, 0.22-0.86; p

  12. 3-D multiobservable probabilistic inversion for the compositional and thermal structure of the lithosphere and upper mantle. I: a priori petrological information and geophysical observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afonso, J. C.; Fullea, J.; Griffin, W. L.; Yang, Y.; Jones, A. G.; D. Connolly, J. A.; O'Reilly, S. Y.

    2013-05-01

    Traditional inversion techniques applied to the problem of characterizing the thermal and compositional structure of the upper mantle are not well suited to deal with the nonlinearity of the problem, the trade-off between temperature and compositional effects on wave velocities, the nonuniqueness of the compositional space, and the dissimilar sensitivities of physical parameters to temperature and composition. Probabilistic inversions, on the other hand, offer a powerful formalism to cope with all these difficulties, while allowing for an adequate treatment of the intrinsic uncertainties associated with both data and physical theories. This paper presents a detailed analysis of the two most important elements controlling the outputs of probabilistic (Bayesian) inversions for temperature and composition of the Earth's mantle, namely the a priori information on model parameters, ρ(m), and the likelihood function, L(m). The former is mainly controlled by our current understanding of lithosphere and mantle composition, while the latter conveys information on the observed data, their uncertainties, and the physical theories used to relate model parameters to observed data. The benefits of combining specific geophysical datasets (Rayleigh and Love dispersion curves, body wave tomography, magnetotelluric, geothermal, petrological, gravity, elevation, and geoid), and their effects on L(m), are demonstrated by analyzing their individual and combined sensitivities to composition and temperature as well as their observational uncertainties. The dependence of bulk density, electrical conductivity, and seismic velocities to major-element composition is systematically explored using Monte Carlo simulations. We show that the dominant source of uncertainty in the identification of compositional anomalies within the lithosphere is the intrinsic nonuniqueness in compositional space. A general strategy for defining ρ(m) is proposed based on statistical analyses of a large database

  13. Pre-Travel Medical Preparation of Business and Occupational Travelers

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nomana M.; Jentes, Emily S.; Brown, Clive; Han, Pauline; Rao, Sowmya R.; Kozarsky, Phyllis; Hagmann, Stefan H.F.; LaRocque, Regina C.; Ryan, Edward T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to understand more about pre-travel preparations and itineraries of business and occupational travelers. Methods: De-identified data from 18 Global TravEpiNet clinics from January 2009 to December 2012 were analyzed. Results: Of 23,534 travelers, 61% were non-occupational and 39% occupational. Business travelers were more likely to be men, had short times to departure and shorter trip durations, and commonly refused influenza, meningococcal, and hepatitis B vaccines. Most business travelers indicated that employers suggested the pre-travel health consultation, whereas non-occupational travelers sought consultations because of travel health concerns. Conclusions: Sub-groups of occupational travelers have characteristic profiles, with business travelers being particularly distinct. Employers play a role in encouraging business travelers to seek pre-travel consultations. Such consultations, even if scheduled immediately before travel, can identify vaccination gaps and increase coverage. PMID:26479857

  14. Seismic Travel Time Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The report consists of an introduction in which is given a list of published papers on the travel times of body waves together with brief comments on...velocity distribution in the outer core have been based on the travel times of SKS. However, SKS arrivals can only be observed satisfactorily for arc

  15. Illness in Returned Travellers

    PubMed Central

    Lawee, D.; Scappatura, P.; Gutman, E.

    1989-01-01

    Intercontinental travel is more common now than it has ever been before, and so are travel-related diseases. A thorough history and physical examination provide many clues to possible pathogens, particularly when combined with knowledge of the geographic distribution of specific diseases. Prompt diagnosis and proper treatment are imperative. PMID:21249095

  16. Information for Travellers' Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Allison, David J.; Blinco, Kimberley

    1990-01-01

    Physicians can obtain advice about international travel for their patients from many different sources of information. The authors review some of the most common sources based on their experience at the International Travellers' Clinic operated by the New Brunswick Department of Health and Community Services in Fredericton. They identify readily available handbooks and periodicals and compare two computer software programs. PMID:21233910

  17. Air Travel Health Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... improved health Before your flightOne key to air travel is to prepare ahead of time. If you are carrying on a bag, make ... need to change if your eating and sleeping times will change at your destination.If you have diabetes or epilepsy, you should travel with your ID card. For instance, the American ...

  18. Dengue infections in travellers

    PubMed Central

    Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2012-01-01

    Dengue has been designated a major international public health problem by the World Health Organization (WHO). It is endemic in most tropical and sub-tropical countries, which are also popular tourist destinations. Travellers are not only at significant risk of acquiring dengue but they also contribute to its spread to non-endemic regions. Furthermore, they may serve as sentinels to alert the international community to epidemics in dengue-endemic regions. GeoSentinel, a global surveillance network, monitors all travel-related illnesses and estimates that dengue accounts for 2% of all illness in travellers returning from dengue-endemic regions. In fact, in travellers returning from South-east Asia, dengue is now a more frequent cause of febrile illness than malaria. Dengue-infected travellers returning home to countries where the vector exists can place the local population at risk of further spread of the disease with subsequent autochthonous cycles of infection. The true incidence of dengue amongst travellers may be underestimated because of variability in reporting requirements in different countries and under-diagnosis owing to the non-specific clinical presentation of the disease. Risk factors for acquiring dengue include duration of stay, season of travel and epidemic activity at the destination. Any pre-travel advice on the risks of developing dengue infections should consider these factors. PMID:22668447

  19. Travelers' Health: Mumps

    MedlinePlus

    ... about this message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Home Destinations Travel Notices Zika Travel Information World Map of Zika Questions and ... confirmation of mumps involves virus isolation with RT-PCR or culture. For further information on laboratory testing, see ... ...

  20. Information for travellers' physicians.

    PubMed

    Allison, D J; Blinco, K

    1990-07-01

    Physicians can obtain advice about international travel for their patients from many different sources of information. The authors review some of the most common sources based on their experience at the International Travellers' Clinic operated by the New Brunswick Department of Health and Community Services in Fredericton. They identify readily available handbooks and periodicals and compare two computer software programs.

  1. [Fever after travel return].

    PubMed

    Schedel, I

    2004-06-01

    Between 20 and 70 percent of the 50 million people who travel from the industrialized world to the developing world each year report some illness associated with their travel. Approximately 3 percent of people traveling internationally for short periods (<2 weeks) report fever even after travel. Careful assessment of the travel history, likely incubation period, exposure history, associated signs and symptoms, duration of fever, immunization status use or nonuse of antimalarial chemoprophylaxis, and degree of compliance with a chemoprophylactic regimen, if used, helps to establish the diagnosis. Determining an approximate incubation period can be particular helpful in ruling out possible causes of fever. Specific examinations targeting the individual infection, assumed to be responsible for the development of febrile disease may ascertain diagnosis and lead to effective treatment.

  2. Travelers' Health: Traveling Safely with Infants and Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety Blood Clots Bug Bites Business Travel Cold Climates Counterfeit Drugs Cruise Ship Travel Families with Children ... Abroad Getting Sick After Travel High Altitudes Hot Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador ...

  3. An Empirical Determination of Tasks Essential to Successful Performance as a Feed Salesman. Determination of a Common Core of Basic Skills in Agribusiness and Natural Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Daniel R.; And Others

    To improve vocational educational programs in agriculture, occupational information on a common core of basic skills within the occupational area of the feed salesman is presented in the revised task inventory survey. The purpose of the occupational survey was to identify a common core of basic skills which are performed and are essential for…

  4. Traveler's Health: Avoid Bug Bites

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety Blood Clots Bug Bites Business Travel Cold Climates Counterfeit Drugs Cruise Ship Travel Families with Children ... Abroad Getting Sick After Travel High Altitudes Hot Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador ...

  5. Understanding taxi travel patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Hua; Zhan, Xiaowei; Zhu, Ji; Jia, Xiaoping; Chiu, Anthony S. F.; Xu, Ming

    2016-09-01

    Taxis play important roles in modern urban transportation systems, especially in mega cities. While providing necessary amenities, taxis also significantly contribute to traffic congestion, urban energy consumption, and air pollution. Understanding the travel patterns of taxis is thus important for addressing many urban sustainability challenges. Previous research has primarily focused on examining the statistical properties of passenger trips, which include only taxi trips occupied with passengers. However, unoccupied trips are also important for urban sustainability issues because they represent potential opportunities to improve the efficiency of the transportation system. Therefore, we need to understand the travel patterns of taxis as an integrated system, instead of focusing only on the occupied trips. In this study we examine GPS trajectory data of 11,880 taxis in Beijing, China for a period of three weeks. Our results show that taxi travel patterns share similar traits with travel patterns of individuals but also exhibit differences. Trip displacement distribution of taxi travels is statistically greater than the exponential distribution and smaller than the truncated power-law distribution. The distribution of short trips (less than 30 miles) can be best fitted with power-law while long trips follow exponential decay. We use radius of gyration to characterize individual taxi's travel distance and find that it does not follow a truncated power-law as observed in previous studies. Spatial and temporal regularities exist in taxi travels. However, with increasing spatial coverage, taxi trips can exhibit dual high probability density centers.

  6. [Vaccinations for international travelers].

    PubMed

    Berens-Riha, N; Alberer, M; Löscher, T

    2014-03-01

    Vaccinations are a prominent part of health preparations before international travel. They can avoid or significantly reduce the risk of numerous infectious diseases. Until recently, vaccination against yellow fever was the only obligatory vaccination. However, according to updated international health regulations, other vaccinations and prophylactic measures may be required at entry from certain countries. For all routine vaccinations as recommended in Germany, necessary revaccination and catch-up of missed vaccinations should be administered before travel. At most destinations the risk of infection is higher than in Germany. Hepatitis A vaccine is generally recommended for travelers to areas of increased risk, polio vaccine for all destinations where eradication is not yet confirmed (Asia and Africa). The indications for other travel vaccines must take into consideration travel destination and itinerary, type and duration of travel, individual risk of exposure as well as the epidemiology of the disease to be prevented. Several vaccines of potential interest for travel medicine, e.g., new vaccines against malaria and dengue fever, are under development.

  7. [Traveling with immunosuppression].

    PubMed

    Birkenfeld, G

    2014-03-01

    The rapidly increasing number of patients with immunosuppression is followed by their expectation to lead-as much as possible-a "normal" life, including long-distance travel. The advice and preventive measures for diseases associated with travelling depend overall on the mode of the patient's immunosuppression. This report explains the individual preventive possibilities, limits and risks for travellers with asplenia, common variable immunodeficiency, chronic inflammatory bowel and rheumatic diseases, HIV, as well as for patients having undergone solid organ or bone marrow transplantation or chemotherapy.

  8. [Travel destinations South America].

    PubMed

    Neumayr, Andreas

    2013-06-01

    The number of tourists visiting South America comprises only a small fraction of the worldwide stream of international travellers (approx. 980 Mio. in 2011). Nevertheless, their number has markedly increased in the last years (2000: 15.3 Mio.; 2005: 18.3 Mio.; 2010: 23.6 Mio.; 2011: 26.1 Mio.) and in 2011, South America was ranked top in the list of worldwide travel destinations with the highest increase in annual international tourist arrivals (10.4 %)[1]. This article aims at providing a practice-oriented overview on vaccinations, malaria prophylaxis, and other relevant health risks to be considered when counselling travellers visiting South America.

  9. Space Traveler Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructor, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Describes the winners of the Space Traveler Project, a contest jointly sponsored by Rockwell International, NASA, and this magazine to identify worthwhile elementary science programs relating to the Space Shuttle. (SJL)

  10. Tips for Travel

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Avoid bringing bed bugs home by taking precautions when traveling such as inspecting bedding and luggage racks in hotel rooms, and upon returning home unpacking directly into a washing machine and dry at high temperatures.

  11. Traveling-wave photodetector

    SciTech Connect

    Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.

    1992-12-31

    The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size.

  12. Travelers' Health: Scuba Diving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Books, Journals, Articles & Websites Resources for the Travel Industry Yellow Book Contents Chapter 2 (21) Scuba Diving ... disease, and pregnancy raise special concerns about diving fitness. Special mention must be made regarding cardiovascular fitness. ...

  13. Travelers' Health: HIV Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share Compartir Chapter 3 - Histoplasmosis Chapter 3 - Influenza HIV Infection Philip J. Peters, John T. Brooks INFECTIOUS ... at 888-448-4911 ( www.nccc.ucsf.edu ). HIV TESTING REQUIREMENTS FOR US TRAVELERS ENTERING FOREIGN COUNTRIES ...

  14. Traveling-wave photodetector

    DOEpatents

    Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.

    1993-12-14

    The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size. 4 figures.

  15. Traveling-wave photodetector

    DOEpatents

    Hietala, Vincent M.; Vawter, Gregory A.

    1993-01-01

    The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size.

  16. [Diabetes and travel].

    PubMed

    Bauduceau, B; Mayaudon, H; Ducorps, M; Belmejdoub, G; Thiolet, C; Pellan, M; Cosson, E

    1997-01-01

    With the continuing expansion in international air travel, increasing numbers of diabetic patients consult physicians for advice before going abroad. Careful planning is required taking into account climatic and medical conditions at the destination. Diabetic travelers should pack an appropriate treatment kit and contract special insurance coverage for medical evacuation. Precautions are necessary to limit the effects of motion sickness and time differences on diabetes control and especially the risk of hypoglycemia. Special attention is needed to avoid digestive problems and prevent foot injuries which can lead to serious complications in diabetic patients. Diabetic patients cannot forget their health problem during vacation and must be especially cautious when traveling. However with proper training, the risks of foreign travel can be reduced to acceptable levels.

  17. Space Traveler Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Instructor, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Describes the winners of the Space Traveler Project, a contest jointly sponsored by Rockwell International, NASA, and this magazine to identify worthwhile elementary science programs relating to the Space Shuttle. (SJL)

  18. Traveling Space Museum

    NASA Image and Video Library

    In an effort to inspire and motivate the next generation of space explorers, NASA’s Ames Research Center teamed up with the Traveling Space Museum to teach students the way astronauts are taughtâ...

  19. Malaria and Travelers

    MedlinePlus

    ... a CDC Malaria Branch clinician. malaria@cdc.gov Malaria and Travelers Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... may be at risk for infection. Determine if malaria transmission occurs at the destinations Obtain a detailed ...

  20. Pregnancy and travel

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2016. Freedman DO. Protection of travelers. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and ... TP, Rothman AL, Barrett AD. Flaviviruses. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and ...

  1. Traveling Safely with Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... means taking a trip. To be sure that you can stay healthy on your trip, ask your pharmacist about how to travel safely with your medicines. Make sure that you always carry a list of all the medicines ...

  2. Travel Patterns in China

    PubMed Central

    Garske, Tini; Yu, Hongjie; Peng, Zhibin; Ye, Min; Zhou, Hang; Cheng, Xiaowen; Wu, Jiabing; Ferguson, Neil

    2011-01-01

    The spread of infectious disease epidemics is mediated by human travel. Yet human mobility patterns vary substantially between countries and regions. Quantifying the frequency of travel and length of journeys in well-defined population is therefore critical for predicting the likely speed and pattern of spread of emerging infectious diseases, such as a new influenza pandemic. Here we present the results of a large population survey undertaken in 2007 in two areas of China: Shenzhen city in Guangdong province, and Huangshan city in Anhui province. In each area, 10,000 randomly selected individuals were interviewed, and data on regular and occasional journeys collected. Travel behaviour was examined as a function of age, sex, economic status and home location. Women and children were generally found to travel shorter distances than men. Travel patterns in the economically developed Shenzhen region are shown to resemble those in developed and economically advanced middle income countries with a significant fraction of the population commuting over distances in excess of 50 km. Conversely, in the less developed rural region of Anhui, travel was much more local, with very few journeys over 30 km. Travel patterns in both populations were well-fitted by a gravity model with a lognormal kernel function. The results provide the first quantitative information on human travel patterns in modern China, and suggest that a pandemic emerging in a less developed area of rural China might spread geographically sufficiently slowly for containment to be feasible, while spatial spread in the more economically developed areas might be expected to be much more rapid, making containment more difficult. PMID:21311745

  3. Infections in travelers.

    PubMed

    Bomsztyk, Mayan; Arnold, Richard W

    2013-07-01

    Travel medicine continues to grow as international tourism and patient medical complexity increases. This article reflects the state of the current field, but new recommendations on immunizations, resistance patterns, and treatment modalities constantly change. The US Centers for Disease Control and the World Health Organization maintain helpful Web sites for both patient and physician. With thoughtful preparation and prevention, risks can be minimized and travel can continue as safely as possible.

  4. The New England travel market: changes in generational travel patterns

    Treesearch

    Rodney B. Warnick

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine and explore the New England domestic travel market trends, from 1979 through 1991 within the context of generations. The existing travel markets, who travel to New England, are changing by age cohorts and specifically within different generations. The New England changes in generational travel patterns do not reflect national...

  5. Travelers' Health: Traveling Safely with Infants and Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Travel Families with Children Fish Poisoning in Travelers Food and Water Getting Health Care Abroad Getting Sick After Travel High Altitudes Hot Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador Insurance International Adoption Jet Lag Last-Minute Travel Long-Term ...

  6. [Vaccination for international travelers].

    PubMed

    Arrazola, M Pilar; Serrano, Almudena; López-Vélez, Rogelio

    2016-05-01

    Traveler's vaccination is one of the key strategies for the prevention of infectious diseases during international travel. The risk of acquiring an infectious disease is determined in each case by the characteristics of the traveler and the travel, so the pre-departure medical advice of the traveler must be individualized. The World Health Organization classifies travelerś vaccines into three groups. - Vaccines for routine use in national immunization programs: Haemophilus influenzae type b, hepatitis B, polio, measles-mumps-rubella, tetanus-diphtheria-whooping a cough, and chickenpox. - Vaccinations required by law in certain countries before to enter them: yellow fever, meningococcal disease and poliomyelitis. - Vaccines recommended depending on the circumstances: cholera, japanese encephalitis, tick-borne encephalitis, meningococcal disease, typhoid fever, influenza, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, rabies and BCG. This review is intended to introduce the reader to the field of international vaccination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  7. [Travel thrombosis, 2008].

    PubMed

    Sándor, Tamás

    2009-01-18

    In Hungary, the first studies on travel thrombosis were published at the beginning of the 2000s. In this paper recent investigational results of this special type of venous thrombosis have been reviewed. Travel thrombosis is a subgroup of sitting thromboses. It is a consequence of prolonged sitting which is common of ground transportation and air travel. More and more computer-linked sitting thromboses have been observed as well. Long-haul air travel related venous thrombosis is a multifactorial disease. Possible contributory risk factors are in connection with the milieu of the cabin. Various investigations evaluated the effect of immobilization and hypobaric hypoxia on thrombin generation and fibrinolysis. The studies differed much in participants' characteristics, duration and type of exposure and statistical analysis, so the results are contradictory. Personal, traveller-related risk factors may be regarded as triggers. The presently available evidences do not permit to assess the exact actual risk. For healthy young passengers there seem to be low risk. However, passengers suffering from predisposing factors for venous thromboembolism can be exposed to serious hazards, if they fly more than 5000 km or travel more than 8 hours. Proper safety measures are summarized on the basis of recent international recommendations.

  8. Travel health attitudes among Turkish business travellers to African countries.

    PubMed

    Selcuk, Engin Burak; Kayabas, Uner; Binbasioglu, Hulisi; Otlu, Baris; Bayindir, Yasar; Bozdogan, Bulent; Karatas, Mehmet

    The number of international travellers is increasing worldwide. Although health risks related to international travel are important and generally well-understood, the perception of these risks was unclear among Turkish travellers. We aimed to evaluate the attitudes and health risk awareness of Turkish travellers travelling to African countries. A survey was performed of Turkish travellers bound for Africa from Istanbul International Ataturk Airport in July 2013. A total of 124 travellers were enrolled in the study. Among them, 62.9% had information about their destination but only 11.3% had looked for information on health problems related to travel and their destination. Of all travellers, 53.2% had at least one vaccination before travelling. The most commonly administered vaccine was for typhoid. Among the travellers, 69.3% and 80.6% had "no idea" about yellow fever vaccination and malaria prophylaxis, respectively. A positive correlation was found between a higher level of travellers' education and receiving the recommended vaccination for the destination. Our study revealed significant gaps in the vaccination and chemoprophylaxis uptake of Turkish travellers departing to Africa. An awareness and training program should be developed for travellers, as well as public health workers, to address health risks related to travel. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The inverse problem of refraction travel times, part I: Types of Geophysical Nonuniqueness through Minimization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanov, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.; Steeples, D.; Park, C.B.

    2005-01-01

    In a set of two papers we study the inverse problem of refraction travel times. The purpose of this work is to use the study as a basis for development of more sophisticated methods for finding more reliable solutions to the inverse problem of refraction travel times, which is known to be nonunique. The first paper, "Types of Geophysical Nonuniqueness through Minimization," emphasizes the existence of different forms of nonuniqueness in the realm of inverse geophysical problems. Each type of nonuniqueness requires a different type and amount of a priori information to acquire a reliable solution. Based on such coupling, a nonuniqueness classification is designed. Therefore, since most inverse geophysical problems are nonunique, each inverse problem must be studied to define what type of nonuniqueness it belongs to and thus determine what type of a priori information is necessary to find a realistic solution. The second paper, "Quantifying Refraction Nonuniqueness Using a Three-layer Model," serves as an example of such an approach. However, its main purpose is to provide a better understanding of the inverse refraction problem by studying the type of nonuniqueness it possesses. An approach for obtaining a realistic solution to the inverse refraction problem is planned to be offered in a third paper that is in preparation. The main goal of this paper is to redefine the existing generalized notion of nonuniqueness and a priori information by offering a classified, discriminate structure. Nonuniqueness is often encountered when trying to solve inverse problems. However, possible nonuniqueness diversity is typically neglected and nonuniqueness is regarded as a whole, as an unpleasant "black box" and is approached in the same manner by applying smoothing constraints, damping constraints with respect to the solution increment and, rarely, damping constraints with respect to some sparse reference information about the true parameters. In practice, when solving geophysical

  10. Risk assessment in travel medicine.

    PubMed

    Leggat, Peter A

    2006-01-01

    Risk assessment is an integral part of pre-travel and post- assessment. Risk assessment largely determines what health and safety advice and interventions are given within the relevant prevailing travel health guidelines. Risk assessment needs time and depends on information, including that given by the traveller. Risk assessment also needs to be documented. Risk assessment of the traveller preferably starts before they enter the consulting room, where travellers may complete a pre-travel health questionnaire. Armed with this information, risk assessment may be assisted by access to computerised travel health databases and the published literature. Experience of travel to the destination may also assist in risk assessment and the tour operator, overseas employer or agency, the traveller or even the travel health advisers themselves may provide this information.

  11. Travel Health Advisory Group: a joint travel industry and travel health Special Interest Group promoting healthy travel in Australia.

    PubMed

    Leggat, Peter A; Zwar, Nicholas; Hudson, Bernie

    2012-09-01

    The Travel Health Advisory Group (THAG), established in 1997, is a joint initiative between the travel industry and travel health professionals in Australia that aims to promote healthy travel. THAG seeks to promote cooperation in improving the health of travellers between the travel industry and travel medicine professionals and to raise public awareness of the importance of travel health. From 2011, THAG has been a Special Interest Group of The Australasian College of Tropical Medicine and its membership has been active in several areas, including web-based travel health information, travel health promotion, media releases, research and education in Australia. Information is given on the objectives, membership and an overview of the various activities of the group.

  12. Travel-related thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Cannegieter, Suzanne C

    2012-09-01

    Travel-related thrombosis is a serious public health concern considering the large and increasing number of travellers. Due to a lack of evidence, counselling air travellers on their venous thrombosis risk is not immediately straightforward, and advice will have to be based mostly on theoretical grounds. In this review a basis for these considerations is given. First of all it needs to be recognized that venous thrombosis is a multicausal disease, i.e. several risk factors have to be present before an event occurs. This is reflected in the literature where clearly increased risks have been described for certain groups, such as subjects with factor V Leiden, those who use oral contraceptives or are obese. Also, an increased risk for tall and short people has been reported. So, for subjects with a known risk factor who plan to travel, benefits and risks of thrombosis prophylaxis, (pharmacological or other), need to be weighed. This review provides some theoretical examples. For all other travellers, the advice to move and exercise as much as possible is likely to be sufficient.

  13. [Travellers to South America].

    PubMed

    Lloveras, Susana Cristina

    2011-12-01

    The geography, tourist attractions and the multiple sites of historical and cultural interest make South America as an important destination chosen by travelers. The continent has a wide climatic variation from north to south, making exposure to risk different between the tropics and the temperate or cold regions. In the countries of tropical South America, the greatest risk is associated with the possibility of acquiring vector-borne diseases, like yellow fever, dengue, malaria and leishmaniasis. The risk of acquiring traveler's diarrhea and food-borne illness is similar across the continent, with some variations according to country and to visit urban or rural areas. Rabies, pertussis and diphtheria have appeared as epidemics in several countries and other diseases such as rickettsiosis, hantavirosis and viral encephalitis have expanded their distribution. The geographic and epidemiological diversity of South America, promotes a challenge for travel medicine specialists because during the pre-travel advice they have to take in account the kind of trip, traveller's medical history, exposure to risk and the dynamics of endemic emerging and reemerging diseases in the region.

  14. [Counsel for traveling children].

    PubMed

    Sorge, F; Gendrel, D

    2013-01-01

    Consultation of child traveler has two main objectives: to assess of health risk related to the child's health status and history and also the risk related to travel environment; to counsel and prescribe preventive measure to reduce these travel health risks. The evaluation is based on physical examination and a detailed interview including personal history and information regarding the regions of proposed travel. Up to date knowledge of the epidemiology of visited sites, preventive measures and presumptive treatment is required. Essential health recommendations include, in case of exposure, prevention of malaria, arthropod borned diseases and vaccine preventable diseases. For all destinations advice regarding prevention of diarrhea, accident risks and aggravation of preexisting chronic diseases is needed. Universal primary prevention counselling is valuable for all travellers regardless of their age. In the case of children, special attention must be given to food and water hygiene, sun and heat exposure, swimming risks and transports security measures. Evaluation of risk and health education take time and often several visits are needed to complete the immunization schedule before departure.

  15. Nutrition for travel.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Thomas; Waterhouse, Jim; Burke, Louise M; Alonso, Juan Manuel

    2007-01-01

    The training and competitive programmes of elite athletes incorporate travel schedules, often long journeys, across multiple time zones. In such cases, travel causes both transient fatigue and a malaise known as "jet-lag" that persists for some days. Jet-lag is due to the disturbance of the body's circadian rhythms: diurnal and performance rhythms are displaced, depending on the direction of travel and the number of time zones crossed in flight. Attention to diet and hydration is relevant during the flight and following disembarkation until adjustment to the new meridian is complete. The consequences of jet-lag on rhythms in digestion may be compounded if food preparation and hygiene are inadequate in training camps or competitive venues overseas. The irony of travel is that it often places athletes at a greater risk of failing to meet their specific nutrition goals or succumbing to illness, at a time when the demands or outcomes of performance are of greatest importance. In addition, gastrointestinal infections related to travelling are frequent among athletes. Fastidious planning and organization among the support staff is recommended before the journey to prevent any such problems arising. Equally, athletes often need special education initiatives to assist them to cope with the challenges of a new and unusual food supply, or altered access to food.

  16. Travel, migration and HIV.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, S J; Hart, G J

    1993-01-01

    This is a review of recent publications on the subject of travel (taken in its widest sense) and HIV/AIDS. As with all epidemics caused by transmissible pathogens, AIDS has been seen in many countries as an imported problem. What this perspective fails to recognize is that with the explosion of international travel in the past thirty years it is virtually impossible to prevent the spread of infectious disease across international frontiers. Here we highlight the relative paucity of studies that describe or investigate the context in which sexual risk behaviour of travellers takes place, and suggest areas of further research which could increase understanding of the nature of sexual risk taking, and help in the design of health education programmes.

  17. Culture shock and travelers.

    PubMed

    Stewart, L; Leggat, P A

    1998-06-01

    As travel has become easier and more affordable, the number of people traveling has risen sharply. People travel for many and varied reasons, from the business person on an overseas assignment to backpackers seeking new and exotic destinations. Others may take up residence in different regions, states or countries for family, business or political reasons. Other people are fleeing religious or political persecution. Wherever they go and for whatever reason they go, people take their culture with them. Culture, like language, is acquired innately in early childhood and is then reinforced through formal and complex informal social education into adulthood. Culture provides a framework for interpersonal and social interactions. Therefore, the contact with a new culture is often not the exciting or pleasurable experience anticipated. When immersed in a different culture, people no longer know how to act when faced with disparate value systems. Contact with the unfamiliar culture can lead to anxiety, stress, mental illness and, in extreme cases, physical illness and suicide. "Culture shock" is a term coined by the anthropologist Oberg. It is the shock of the new. It implies that the experience of the new culture is an unpleasant surprise or shock, partly because it is unexpected and partly because it can lead to a negative evaluation of one's own culture. It is also known as cross-cultural adjustment, being that period of anxiety and confusion experienced when entering a new culture. It affects people intellectually, emotionally, behaviorally and physically and is characterized by symptoms of psychological distress. Culture shock affects both adults and children. In travelers or workers who have prolonged sojourns in foreign countries, culture shock may occur not only as they enter the new culture, but also may occur on their return to their original culture. Children may also experience readjustment problems after returning from leading sheltered lives in expatriate

  18. Intergalactic Travel Bureau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koski, Olivia; Rosin, Mark; Guerilla Science Team

    2014-03-01

    The Intergalactic Travel Bureau is an interactive theater outreach experience that engages the public in the incredible possibilities of space tourism. The Bureau is staffed by professional actors, who play the role of space travel agents, and professional astrophysicists, who play the role of resident scientists. Members of the public of all ages were invited to visit with bureau staff to plan the vacation of their dreams-to space. We describe the project's successful nine day run in New York in August 2013. Funded by the American Physical Society Public Outreach and Informing the Public Grants.

  19. A priori and a posteriori dietary patterns at the age of 1 year and body composition at the age of 6 years: the Generation R Study.

    PubMed

    Voortman, Trudy; Leermakers, Elisabeth T M; Franco, Oscar H; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Moll, Henriette A; Hofman, Albert; van den Hooven, Edith H; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C

    2016-08-01

    Dietary patterns have been linked to obesity in adults, however, not much is known about this association in early childhood. We examined associations of different types of dietary patterns in 1-year-old children with body composition at school age in 2026 children participating in a population-based cohort study. Dietary intake at the age of 1 year was assessed with a food-frequency questionnaire. At the children's age of 6 years we measured their body composition with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and we calculated body mass index, fat mass index (FMI), and fat-free mass index (FFMI). Three dietary pattern approaches were used: (1) An a priori-defined diet quality score; (2) dietary patterns based on variation in food intake, derived from principal-component-analysis (PCA); and (3) dietary patterns based on variations in FMI and FFMI, derived with reduced-rank-regression (RRR). Both the a priori-defined diet score and a 'Health-conscious' PCA-pattern were characterized by a high intake of fruit, vegetables, grains, and vegetable oils, and, after adjustment for confounders, children with higher adherence to these patterns had a higher FFMI at 6 years [0.19 SD (95 % CI 0.08;0.30) per SD increase in diet score], but had no different FMI. One of the two RRR-patterns was also positively associated with FFMI and was characterized by intake of whole grains, pasta and rice, and vegetable oils. Our results suggest that different a priori- and a posteriori-derived health-conscious dietary patterns in early childhood are associated with a higher fat-free mass, but not with fat mass, in later childhood.

  20. Travel health. Part 1: preparing the tropical traveller.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Bernadette; Daniel, Amanda; Behrens, Ron H

    The health threats of modern day travel change as population, wealth and tourism increase across the world. A series of three articles have been written to describe the spectrum of health issues associated with travel. Pre-travel health advice has become more focused on risk assessment and educating the traveller about infectious disease and the more frequent non-infectious hazards associated with travel, while ensuring they are not unnecessarily exposed to injury from vaccines and drugs. In part one, the role of the health advisor and the needs of the traveller are examined. The importance of risk assessment during a consultation is described and factors that influence recommendations and prescribing are explored. As most travel-associated morbidity and mortality is non-vaccine preventable, the focus of the pre-travel consultation should be on educating the traveller and influencing behaviour change. The second article in this series deals with the highest risk group of travellers--residents who visit friends and relatives. It highlights their specific problems and special needs and how to influence their risk of disease by addressing their health beliefs and their cultural dimension of risk. The third article explores the common, and not so common, clinical problems found in returned travellers. Nurses have to deal with a large range of clinical problems and diagnostic dilemmas when attending to the returned traveller. The review provides a perspective on the frequency and severity of problems and how nurses should manage travel associated disease.

  1. The stress of travel.

    PubMed

    Waterhouse, J; Reilly, T; Edwards, B

    2004-10-01

    International travel is an essential part of the life of elite athletes, both for competition and training. It is also becoming increasingly common among recreational sportspersons. Long-distance travel is associated with a group of transient negative effects, collectively referred to as 'travel fatigue', which result from anxiety about the journey, the change to an individual's daily routine, and dehydration due to time spent in the dry air of the aircraft cabin. Travel fatigue lasts for only a day or so, but for those who fly across several time zones, there are also the longer-lasting difficulties associated with 'jet lag'. The problems of jet lag can last for over a week if the flight crosses 10 time zones or more, and they can reduce performance and the motivation to train effectively. Knowledge of the properties of the body clock enables the cause of the difficulties to be understood (an unadjusted body clock), and forms the basis of using light in the new time zone to promote adjustment of the body clock. Sleep loss and its effects are important components of jet lag, and attempts to promote sleep by the use of melatonin and other hypnotics are also relevant. Sleep loss is also found in those who undertake challenges that involve long periods where the normal consolidated sleep of 8 h length is not possible. Advice on sleep regimens in such circumstances is given.

  2. Family travel: an overview.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Karl

    2006-01-01

    Paediatric travel medicine involves the education of parents about the numerous health and safety issues related to traveling with infants and young children--whether overseas or a weekend at a local lake. It includes providing children with vaccines and medications, giving telephone advice to parents while they are traveling, and treating children should they come home ill. Practitioners must be knowledgeable about such varied topics like avoiding diarrhoea, infant safety seats for air travel, altitude sickness, sun exposure, waterfront safety, insect protection, dealing with hot and cold environments, and at what age it is safe to begin scuba diving, to name just a very few. Practitioners must also know when adult recommendations can--and cannot--be adapted for children; that vaccine doses, needle size, and injection site may vary with the size of the child; and the answers to hundreds of everyday questions such as how to administer an essential but bitter tasting medication to an uncooperative child--and what to do when the child refuses to take the medication or vomits it.

  3. Travel trends and energy

    Treesearch

    Thomas M. Corsi; Milton E. Harvey

    1980-01-01

    This paper utilizes available data sources to construct a picture of adjustment patterns in vacation/recreation travel with respect to both past and prospective fuel price/availability developments. The increases in fuel prices coupled with supply uncertainties that have occurred during the 1970's have strained the traditional vacation patterns of many American...

  4. Hyperspace for Space Travel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, Giorgio; Murad, Paul; Baker, Robert M. L.

    2007-01-01

    In the Theory of Relativity time is treated as a dimension. This property of time has never been completely understood and accepted because we instinctively perceive time only as a running parameter. In recent developments of the Theory of Relativity, it has been proposed to apply a coordinate transformation by which the four coordinates all acquire the dimension of space, with time defined as a running parameter related to the speed of light. The transformation formally defines the Four-Space or, using a common word for spaces with more than three dimensions, the ``Hyperspace''. Under this paradigm, the entire story of the Universe is similar to a set of nested trajectories in which our ``reality'' develops along a membrane moving through the nested trajectories at the speed of light. The new paradigm implies the existence of multiple ``parallel'' membranes, or parallel local universes or multiverses and ``crossing'' membranes, or ``orthogonal'' local Universes, which do not emerge from the plain Theory of Relativity. In the Hyperspace everything normally travels at the speed of light, but a localized strong gravitational field, which creates a propagation speed discontinuity in Hyperspace, may allow travel to different local universes or Faster Than Light (FTL) travel within the same local universe. The collision or focusing of gravitational waves can produce effects comparable to those of short-lived black holes that can be projected into the Hyperspace to produce the required speed modification. Well known optical effects and four-dimensional rotation may also find application to Hyperspace travel.

  5. Gulliver's Travels. [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rooks, Kirsten; McLean, Mary

    Based on Jonathan Swift's novel "Gulliver's Travels," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that Swift comments on undesirable outcomes of advances in science; and other authors have also warned against abuse of science. The main activity of the lesson involves students developing a poster illustrating views of…

  6. Zika Travel Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners GeoSentinel Global TravEpiNet Mobile Apps RSS Feeds Zika Travel Information Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... visit CDC’s Zika website . Areas with Risk of Zika Because Zika infection during pregnancy can cause severe ...

  7. Teachers and Gypsy Travellers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Gwynedd; Stead, Joan; Jordan, Elizabeth; Norris, Claire

    1999-01-01

    Interviews in 12 Scottish schools examined how teachers and staff perceived and responded to the culture and behavior of Traveller children--both Gypsies and occupational migrants. The findings raise issues about "difference" versus deviance and the extent to which schools can accommodate cultural diversity when it challenges norms of…

  8. Mentors as Fellow Travelers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrosino, Roberta

    2009-01-01

    A junior faculty member arrives at an unfamiliar university for a new teaching assignment. She is poised for the adventure, but feels like a traveler at the edge of long, unknown road. She does not know what obstacles or vistas may appear on the road, and wants to avoid major potholes. She takes a nervous look around and finds an experienced…

  9. Traveling in France.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philyaw, Henry; And Others

    This minicourse guide for teachers of French is intended to help motivate and prepare students for travel in France. Activities are outlined in eleven related areas, including (1) planning for the trip, (2) currency, (3) going through customs, (4) tipping, (5) shopping, (6) guided tours, (7) touring on your own, (8) social life and entertainment,…

  10. Teachers and Gypsy Travellers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Gwynedd; Stead, Joan; Jordan, Elizabeth; Norris, Claire

    1999-01-01

    Interviews in 12 Scottish schools examined how teachers and staff perceived and responded to the culture and behavior of Traveller children--both Gypsies and occupational migrants. The findings raise issues about "difference" versus deviance and the extent to which schools can accommodate cultural diversity when it challenges norms of…

  11. Malaria: prevention in travellers

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Malaria transmission occurs most frequently in environments with humidity over 60% and ambient temperature of 25-30 °C. Risks increase with longer visits and depend on activity. Infection can follow a single mosquito bite. Incubation is usually 10-14 days but can be up to 18 months depending on the strain of parasite. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of non-drug preventive interventions in adult travellers? What are the effects of drug prophylaxis in adult travellers? What are the effects of antimalaria vaccines in travellers? What are the effects of antimalaria interventions in child travellers, pregnant travellers, and in airline pilots? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to February 2006 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 69 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acoustic buzzers, aerosol insecticides, amodiaquine, air conditioning and electric fans, atovaquone-proguanil, biological control measures, chloroquine (alone or with proguanil), diethyltoluamide (DEET), doxycycline, full-length and light-coloured clothing, insecticide-treated clothing/nets, mefloquine, mosquito coils and vaporising mats, primaquine, pyrimethamine-dapsone, pyrimethamine-sulfadoxine, smoke, topical (skin-applied) insect repellents, and vaccines. PMID:19450348

  12. Malaria: prevention in travellers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Malaria transmission occurs most frequently in environments with humidity greater than 60% and ambient temperature of 25 °C to 30 °C. Risks increase with longer visits and depend on activity. Infection can follow a single mosquito bite. Incubation is usually 10 to 14 days but can be up to 18 months depending on the strain of parasite. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of non-drug preventive interventions in non-pregnant adult travellers? What are the effects of drug prophylaxis in non-pregnant adult travellers? What are the effects of antimalaria vaccines in adult and child travellers? What are the effects of antimalaria interventions in child travellers, pregnant travellers, and in airline pilots? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to November 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 79 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: aerosol insecticides, amodiaquine, air conditioning and electric fans, atovaquone–proguanil, biological control measures, chloroquine (alone or with proguanil), diethyltoluamide (DEET), dietary supplementation, doxycycline, electronic mosquito repellents, full-length and light-coloured clothing, insecticide-treated clothing/nets, mefloquine, mosquito coils and vapourising mats, primaquine, pyrimethamine–dapsone, pyrimethamine–sulfadoxine, smoke

  13. Do British travel agents provide adequate health advice for travellers?

    PubMed Central

    Lawlor, D A; Burke, J; Bouskill, E; Conn, G; Edwards, P; Gillespie, D

    2000-01-01

    Travel-related illness is a burden for primary care, with more than two million travellers consulting a general practitioner each year. The annual cost of travel-related illness in the United Kingdom is 11 million Pounds. Travel agents are in a unique position to influence this burden as the most common and most serious problems are preventable with simple advice and/or immunisation. This study, using covert researchers, suggests this potential is not being fully utilised. PMID:10954940

  14. Evaluating School Travel Initiatives and Promoting "Healthy Travel" through PSHCE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baslington, Hazel

    2010-01-01

    The number of primary school children travelling to school by car in the UK has almost doubled from 22% to 43% in 20 years. A governmental policy response is school travel plans (STPs). This paper reports the findings of an empirical evaluation designed to measure the effectiveness of the travel initiative at three schools. Quantitative and…

  15. Evaluating School Travel Initiatives and Promoting "Healthy Travel" through PSHCE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baslington, Hazel

    2010-01-01

    The number of primary school children travelling to school by car in the UK has almost doubled from 22% to 43% in 20 years. A governmental policy response is school travel plans (STPs). This paper reports the findings of an empirical evaluation designed to measure the effectiveness of the travel initiative at three schools. Quantitative and…

  16. 20 CFR 404.1008 - Agent-driver or commission-driver, full-time life insurance salesman, home worker, or traveling...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... hired by another person to distribute meat products, vegetable products, fruit products, bakery products... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Agent-driver or commission-driver, full-time... Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE...

  17. 20 CFR 404.1008 - Agent-driver or commission-driver, full-time life insurance salesman, home worker, or traveling...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...- ) Employment, Wages, Self-Employment, and Self-Employment Income Employment § 404.1008 Agent-driver or... usually provided by employees nor transportation such as a car or truck. (3) The work must be performed as... you drive your own truck or the company's truck or whether you solicit the customers you serve. (c...

  18. 20 CFR 404.1008 - Agent-driver or commission-driver, full-time life insurance salesman, home worker, or traveling...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...- ) Employment, Wages, Self-Employment, and Self-Employment Income Employment § 404.1008 Agent-driver or... usually provided by employees nor transportation such as a car or truck. (3) The work must be performed as... you drive your own truck or the company's truck or whether you solicit the customers you serve. (c...

  19. 20 CFR 404.1008 - Agent-driver or commission-driver, full-time life insurance salesman, home worker, or traveling...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... usually provided by employees nor transportation such as a car or truck. (3) The work must be performed as... performed under the following conditions: (1) Under the work arrangement the worker is expected to do substantially all of the work personally. (2) The worker must not have a substantial investment in...

  20. A Whole-Brain Voxel Based Measure of Intrinsic Connectivity Contrast Reveals Local Changes in Tissue Connectivity with Anesthetic without A Priori Assumptions on Thresholds or Regions of Interest

    PubMed Central

    Martuzzi, Roberto; Ramani, Ramachandran; Qiu, Maolin; Shen, Xilin; Papademetris, Xenophon; Constable, R. Todd

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of spontaneous fluctuations of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signals has recently gained attention as a powerful tool for investigating brain circuits in a non-invasive manner. Correlation-based connectivity analysis investigates the correlations of spontaneous fluctuations of the fMRI signal either between a single seed region of interest (ROI) and the rest of the brain or between multiple ROIs. To do this, a priori knowledge is required for defining the ROI(s) and without such knowledge functional connectivity fMRI cannot be used as an exploratory tool for investigating the functional organization of the brain and its modulation under the different conditions. In this work we examine two indices that provide voxel based maps reflecting the intrinsic connectivity contrast (ICC) of individual tissue elements without the need for defining ROIs and hence require no a priori information or assumptions. These voxel based ICC measures can also be used to delineate regions of interest for further functional or network analyses. The indices were applied to the study of sevoflurane anesthesia-induced alterations in intrinsic connectivity. In concordance with previous studies, the results show that sevoflurane affects different brain circuits in a heterogeneous manner. In addition ICC analyses revealed changes in regions not previously identified using conventional ROI connectivity analyses, probably because of an inappropriate choice of the ROI in the earlier studies. This work highlights the importance of such voxel based connectivity methodology. PMID:21763437

  1. A priori and a posteriori approaches for finding genes of evolutionary interest in non-model species: osmoregulatory genes in the kidney transcriptome of the desert rodent Dipodomys spectabilis (banner-tailed kangaroo rat).

    PubMed

    Marra, Nicholas J; Eo, Soo Hyung; Hale, Matthew C; Waser, Peter M; DeWoody, J Andrew

    2012-12-01

    One common goal in evolutionary biology is the identification of genes underlying adaptive traits of evolutionary interest. Recently next-generation sequencing techniques have greatly facilitated such evolutionary studies in species otherwise depauperate of genomic resources. Kangaroo rats (Dipodomys sp.) serve as exemplars of adaptation in that they inhabit extremely arid environments, yet require no drinking water because of ultra-efficient kidney function and osmoregulation. As a basis for identifying water conservation genes in kangaroo rats, we conducted a priori bioinformatics searches in model rodents (Mus musculus and Rattus norvegicus) to identify candidate genes with known or suspected osmoregulatory function. We then obtained 446,758 reads via 454 pyrosequencing to characterize genes expressed in the kidney of banner-tailed kangaroo rats (Dipodomys spectabilis). We also determined candidates a posteriori by identifying genes that were overexpressed in the kidney. The kangaroo rat sequences revealed nine different a priori candidate genes predicted from our Mus and Rattus searches, as well as 32 a posteriori candidate genes that were overexpressed in kidney. Mutations in two of these genes, Slc12a1 and Slc12a3, cause human renal diseases that result in the inability to concentrate urine. These genes are likely key determinants of physiological water conservation in desert rodents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. International business travel: impact on families and travellers

    PubMed Central

    Espino, C; Sundstrom, S; Frick, H; Jacobs, M; Peters, M

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: Spouses and staff of the World Bank Group (WBG) were questioned about the impact of international business travel on families and travellers. Dependent variables were self reported stress, concern about the health of the traveller, and negative impact on the family. We hypothesised that several travel factors (independent variables) would be associated with these impacts. These travel factors had to do with the frequency, duration, and predictability of travel and its interference with family activities. Methods: Survey forms were developed and distributed to all spouses of travelling staff as well as a small sample of operational staff. Kendall's tau b correlation coefficients of response frequencies were computed with the data from scaled items. Written responses to open ended questions were categorised. Results: Response rates for spouses and staff were 24% and 36%, respectively. Half the spouse sample (n=533) and almost 75% of the staff sample (n=102) reported high or very high stress due to business travel. Self reported spouse stress was associated with six out of eight travel factors. Female spouses, those with children, and younger spouses reported greater stress. Self reported staff stress was significantly associated with four out of nine travel factors. Further insight into how business travel affects families and staff (including children's behavioural changes) and how families cope was gained through responses to written questions. Conclusions: The findings support the notion that lengthy and frequent travel and frequent changes in travel dates which affect family plans, all characteristic of WBG missions, negatively affects many spouses and children (particularly young children) and that the strain on families contributes significantly to the stress staff feel about their travel. Policies or management practices that take into consideration family activities and give staff greater leeway in controlling and refusing travel may help relieve

  3. Travel and Adventure Medicine Resources.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Christopher A; Pottinger, Paul S

    2016-03-01

    Given the ever-changing nature of travel medicine, practitioners who provide pretravel and posttravel care are obligatorily students for the duration of their professional careers. A large variety of resources are available for medical practitioners. Providers should join at least one travel or tropical medicine professional association, attend its annual meeting, and read its journal. The largest general travel medicine association is the International Society of Travel Medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [The fever of international travel].

    PubMed

    Hristea, Adriana; Luka, A I; Aramă, Victoria; Moroti, Ruxandra

    2008-01-01

    Between 20 and 70 percent of the 50 million people who travel from the industrialized world to the developing world each year report some illness associated with their travel. Although most illness reported by travellers are mild, 20-70% of travellers become ill enough to seek medical attention, either during or immediately after travel. The full spectrum of health complaints is unknown. Nevertheless the usual presentation of a returned traveller is a particular syndrome-fever, respiratory infection, diarrhoea, eosinophilia, or skin and soft tissue infection- or screening for asymptomatic infection. The most common diseases diagnosed in returning travellers are more often of cosmopolitan than exotic origin. However, fever in returned travelers always should raise suspicion for a severe or potentially life-threatening tropical infection. Therefore, fever in a returned traveller requires prompt investigation focused on infections that are life-threatening, treatable or transmissible. Careful assessment of the travel history, likely incubation period, exposure history, associated signs and symptoms, duration of fever, immunization status, use or non-use of antimalarial chemoprophylaxis and degree of compliance with the prescribed regimen, if used, helps to establish the diagnosis. Determining an approximate incubation period can be particularly helpful in ruling out possible causes of fever. Malaria is the most important cause of fever in the returned traveller. While most travel-related infections present within 6 months of return, some infections with long latent periods or potential for lifetime persistence might be seen in those who have lived abroad.

  5. Program Tracks Cost Of Travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauldin, Lemuel E., III

    1993-01-01

    Travel Forecaster is menu-driven, easy-to-use computer program that plans, forecasts cost, and tracks actual vs. planned cost of business-related travel of division or branch of organization and compiles information into data base to aid travel planner. Ability of program to handle multiple trip entries makes it valuable time-saving device.

  6. Including Gypsy Travellers in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Gwynned; Stead, Joan

    2002-01-01

    Examined the educational exclusion and inclusion of Gypsy Traveller students, exploring how some Scottish schools responded to Traveller student culture and how this led to exclusion. Interviews with school staff, Traveller students, and parents indicated that continuing prejudice and harassment promoted inappropriate school placement and…

  7. Program Tracks Cost Of Travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauldin, Lemuel E., III

    1993-01-01

    Travel Forecaster is menu-driven, easy-to-use computer program that plans, forecasts cost, and tracks actual vs. planned cost of business-related travel of division or branch of organization and compiles information into data base to aid travel planner. Ability of program to handle multiple trip entries makes it valuable time-saving device.

  8. Including Gypsy Travellers in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Gwynned; Stead, Joan

    2002-01-01

    Examined the educational exclusion and inclusion of Gypsy Traveller students, exploring how some Scottish schools responded to Traveller student culture and how this led to exclusion. Interviews with school staff, Traveller students, and parents indicated that continuing prejudice and harassment promoted inappropriate school placement and…

  9. [Travel and renal insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Lavelle, O; Berland, Y

    1997-01-01

    Traveling can be dangerous for subjects with kidney insufficiency. Water loss or septic episodes can further increase renal dysfunction. Poor diet can lead to hyperkaliemia. Immunosuppression not only enhances the risk of infection but also complicates administration of live vaccines. Some antimalarial drugs are contraindicated (e.g. mefloquine) and others must be used with precaution. Prior to departure persons requiring hemodialysis should book sessions at centers listed in specialized guidebooks. In addition to infection, risks for hemodialysis patients include thrombosis of the arteriovenous fistula in case of dehydration or hypotension. In subjects with transplanted kidney, the risk of rejection can be enhanced either by poor compliance with immunodepressor treatment or by vaccination-induced antigenic stimulation. Pre-travel evaluation is necessary to determine metabolic, nutritional, and immune status. Subjects with kidney insufficiency and transplanted kidneys should be informed of the dangers and appropriate action in case of trouble.

  10. Travelers In The Night

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grauer, Albert D.

    2014-11-01

    Travelers In The Night is an engaging and informative series of two minute radio programs about asteroids, comets, spacecraft, and other objects in space. The pieces are evergreen in that they are current but not dated. They are published on the Public Radio Exchange and carried by a number of radio stations. For teachers, students, and kids of all ages, the script for each piece and the start of a path for further inquiry can be found on the website travelersinthenight.org . The Travelers InThe Night Pieces are written and produced by an observing member of the Catalina Sky Survey Team at the University of Arizona. DPS members are encouraged to submit program ideas which can be developed to feature their research efforts.

  11. Travel health: sun protection and skin cancer prevention for travellers.

    PubMed

    Wood, Cate

    The UK population likes to travel to sunny parts of the world, where the risk of sunburn is greater than it is at home. Sunburn and the cultural desire for a tan is one of the risk factors for the increase in skin cancer. The rise in foreign travel has resulted in an increased demand for pre-travel health services, with nurses in primary care acting as the main providers.Within these consultations, the traveller and their travel plans are risk assessed.Travel health consultations give an ideal opportunity to discuss and advise the public regarding sun burn and skin cancer protection. However, there are also other ways to impart safety in the sun message to travellers. Skin protection is a health promoting activity provided as a part of public health provision and all nurses can play a role in prevention.

  12. Aging and space travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohler, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    The matter of aging and its relation to space vehicle crewmembers undertaking prolonged space missions is addressed. The capabilities of the older space traveler to recover from bone demineralization and muscle atrophy are discussed. Certain advantages of the older person are noted, for example, a greater tolerance of monotony and repetitious activities. Additional parameters are delineated including the cardiovascular system, the reproductive system, ionizing radiation, performance, and group dynamics.

  13. Family planning for travellers.

    PubMed

    Rustom, A

    1990-11-01

    A public health nurse from London describes the customs of nomadic people in the British Isles, known as "travellers," as they affect provision of family planning services. Most are of British or Irish stock, some migrate and others live in caravan sites all year. Their traditions dictate that men work and women are housewives. Early, often arranged, marriage, early childbearing and large families are the norm. Sex and contraception are not considered appropriate for discussion between the sexes, or in the presence of children. Large families and financial hardship force many women to space pregnancies. Women often have to hide contraceptives from their husbands, difficult in conditions without privacy. Therefore they prefer IUDs, but some use oral contraceptives, although sometimes erratically because most are illiterate. Traveller women are usually unwilling to do self-examination, as needed with IUDs. They often have difficulty attending regular Pap smear clinics. Cervical cancer rates are high. They experience discrimination in clinics, and need extra care about modesty. It is worth while to take time to develop trust in the clinical relationship, to deal with the traveller woman's uneasy among outsiders.

  14. Neurological disorders and travel.

    PubMed

    Awada, Adnan; Kojan, Suleiman

    2003-02-01

    Travel is associated with a number of neurological disorders that can be divided into two categories: (1) Neurological infections including encephalitides, neurotuberculosis, neurobrucellosis, cysticercosis and trichinosis. Some of these disorders can be prevented by vaccinations, such as Japanese B encephalitis and rabies, some by the use of insect repellents and some by avoiding raw milk products and undercooked meat. (2) Non-infective neurological disorders, such as acute mountain sickness and high altitude cerebral oedema, problems occurring during air travel such as syncope, seizures, strokes, nerve compression, barotrauma and vertigo, motion sickness and foodborne neurotoxic disorders such as ciguatera, shellfish poisoning and intoxication by cassava. This group of diseases and disorders could be prevented if the traveller knows about them, applies simple physiological rules, takes some specific medications and knows how to avoid intoxications in certain geographical areas. Meningococcal meningitis, malaria and jet lag syndrome are extensively discussed in other articles of this issue. The discussion in this paper will be limited to the other disorders.

  15. [Travelers, mad, wandering].

    PubMed

    Vaschetto, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the notion of "wandering" through the use of some phenomena enrolled at the dawn of modernity such as the Rousseau dromomanie's philosopher and writer, the origin of the first mad traveler (Albert Dadas), epidemics of mad travelers Europe and romantic tourism (with renewed acquires significance in the "beat generation" of the twentieth century). These historical facts are "mounting" as play contemporary manifestations such as loss, disorientation, to lose one's way, and wandering without reducing them only to clinical psychosis. Readings of classic psychiatrists such as Régis, Foville, Sérieux and Capgras, Tissié, go hand in hand with the current readings of the philosopher Ian Hacking and critics of pop culture as S. Reynolds and D. Diederichsen, illustrating how the travel's phenomenon can make different subjective configurations depending on historical times. In conclusion it is noted that not only psychosis exposes the wandering soul of suffering but there are also subject positions (as will be exemplified in a clinical case) and go no further nesting wandering into human existence.

  16. Time - A Traveler's Guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickover, Clifford A.

    1999-09-01

    "Bucky Fuller thought big," Wired magazine recently noted, "Arthur C. Clarke thinks big, but Cliff Pickover outdoes them both." In his newest book, Cliff Pickover outdoes even himself, probing a mystery that has baffled mystics, philosophers, and scientists throughout history--What is the nature of time?In Time: A Traveler's Guide , Pickover takes readers to the forefront of science as he illuminates the most mysterious phenomenon in the universe--time itself. Is time travel possible? Is time real? Does it flow in one direction only? Does it have a beginning and an end? What is eternity? Pickover's book offers a stimulating blend of Chopin, philosophy, Einstein, and modern physics, spiced with diverting side-trips to such topics as the history of clocks, the nature of free will, and the reason gold glitters. Numerous diagrams ensure readers will have no trouble following along.By the time we finish this book, we understand a wide variety of scientific concepts pertaining to time. And most important, we will understand that time travel is, indeed, possible.

  17. Update on traveler's diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Strum, W B

    1988-07-01

    Traveler's diarrhea affects a substantial number of travelers to high-risk areas of the world. The key to controlling this troublesome disease is prevention. The most important preventive measures depend on educating patients to consume only safe foods and pure water. Physicians cannot overemphasize the importance of avoiding high-risk foods and of boiling water if a safe water supply is not available. Prophylactic medications are a secondary consideration and should be prescribed with discretion. In most cases, diarrhea is mild and self-limited, requiring only fluid and electrolyte replacement and perhaps an antidiarrheal agent. In moderate to severe cases, the addition of an antimicrobial agent may be of benefit. Until an efficacious polyvalent vaccine is developed, caution and common sense, together with discretionary dietary and hygienic practices, are the best defenses against traveler's diarrhea. The ultimate solution is greatly improved sanitation and personal hygiene, especially in high-risk countries. However, only dreamers will consider waiting for this transformation to occur.

  18. The pre-travel medical evaluation: the traveler with chronic illness and the geriatric traveler.

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    The pre-travel medical evaluation of elderly patients and patients with chronic illness requires special assessment and advice. Screening and special precautions are reviewed for traveling patients with respiratory disease, cardiac disease, sinusitis, diabetes mellitus, HIV infection, and other chronic medical conditions. Current guidelines for empiric therapy and prophylaxis of travelers' diarrhea are reviewed, with emphasis on concerns in geriatric or chronically ill travelers. Special considerations such as potential drug-drug interactions and insurance coverage are also discussed. PMID:1290273

  19. Evidence on global medical travel

    PubMed Central

    Záliš, Ladislav; Meurice, Christopher R; Hilton, Ian; Ly, Terry-Lisa; Zupan, Zorana; Hinrichs, Saba

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The potential benefits of travelling across national borders to obtain medical treatment include improved care, decreased costs and reduced waiting times. However, medical travel involves additional risks, compared to obtaining treatment domestically. We review the publicly-available evidence on medical travel. We suggest that medical travel needs to be understood in terms of its potential risks and benefits so that it can be evaluated against alternatives by patients who are seeking care. We propose three domains –quality standards, informed decision-making, economic and legal protection – in which better evidence could support the development of medical travel policies. PMID:26549906

  20. Evidence on global medical travel.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Kai; Záliš, Ladislav; Meurice, Christopher R; Hilton, Ian; Ly, Terry-Lisa; Zupan, Zorana; Hinrichs, Saba

    2015-11-01

    The potential benefits of travelling across national borders to obtain medical treatment include improved care, decreased costs and reduced waiting times. However, medical travel involves additional risks, compared to obtaining treatment domestically. We review the publicly-available evidence on medical travel. We suggest that medical travel needs to be understood in terms of its potential risks and benefits so that it can be evaluated against alternatives by patients who are seeking care. We propose three domains -quality standards, informed decision-making, economic and legal protection - in which better evidence could support the development of medical travel policies.

  1. Malaria: prevention in travellers

    PubMed Central

    Croft, Ashley

    2000-01-01

    Definition Malaria is caused by a protozoan infection of red blood cells with one of four species of the genus plasmodium: P falciparum, P vivax, P ovale, or P malariae.1 Clinically, malaria may present in different ways, but it is usually characterised by fever (which may be swinging), tachycardia, rigors, and sweating. Anaemia, hepatosplenomegaly, cerebral involvement, renal failure, and shock may occur. Incidence/prevalence Each year there are 300-500 million clinical cases of malaria. About 40% of the world's population is at risk of acquiring the disease.23 Each year 25-30 million people from non-tropical countries visit areas in which malaria is endemic,4 of whom between 10 000 and 30 000 contract malaria.5 Aetiology/risk factors Malaria is mainly a rural disease, requiring standing water nearby. It is transmitted by bites6 from infected female anopheline mosquitoes,7 mainly at dusk and during the night.18 In cities, mosquito bites are usually from female culicene mosquitoes, which are not vectors of malaria.9 Malaria is resurgent in most tropical countries and the risk to travellers is increasing.10 Prognosis Ninety per cent of travellers who contract malaria do not become ill until after they return home.5 “Imported malaria” is easily treated if diagnosed promptly, and it follows a serious course in only about 12% of people.1112 The most severe form of the disease is cerebral malaria, with a case fatality rate in adult travellers of 2-6%,3 mainly because of delays in diagnosis.5 Aims To reduce the risk of infection; to prevent illness and death. Outcomes Rates of malarial illness and death, and adverse effects of treatment. Proxy measures include number of mosquito bites and number of mosquitoes in indoor areas. We found limited evidence linking number of mosquito bites and risk of malaria.13 Methods Clinical Evidence search and appraisal in November 1999. We reviewed all identified systematic reviews and randomised controlled trials (RCTs

  2. Travelers with Disabilities and Medical Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Travel Redress Claims Travel Tips Travel Checklist FAQ Disabilities and Medical Conditions To ensure your security, all ... other questions or concerns about traveling with a disability please contact passenger support . If you are approved ...

  3. Home range and travels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stickel, L.F.; King, John A.

    1968-01-01

    The concept of home range was expressed by Seton (1909) in the term 'home region,' which Burr (1940, 1943) clarified with a definition of home range and exemplified in a definitive study of Peromyscus in the field. Burt pointed out the ever-changing characteristics of home-range area and the consequent absence of boundaries in the usual sense--a finding verified by investigators thereafter. In the studies summarized in this paper, sizes of home ranges of Peromyscus varied within two magnitudes, approximately from 0.1 acre to ten acres, in 34 studies conducted in a variety of habitats from the seaside dunes of Florida to the Alaskan forests. Variation in sizes of home ranges was correlated with both environmental and physiological factors; with habitat it was conspicuous, both in the same and different regions. Food supply also was related to size of home range, both seasonally and in relation to habitat. Home ranges generally were smallest in winter and largest in spring, at the onset of the breeding season. Activity and size also were affected by changes in weather. Activity was least when temperatures were low and nights were bright. Effects of rainfall were variable. Sizes varied according to sex and age; young mice remained in the parents' range until they approached maturity, when they began to travel more widely. Adult males commonly had larger home ranges than females, although there were a number of exceptions. An inverse relationship between population density and size of home range was shown in several studies and probably is the usual relationship. A basic need for activity and exploration also appeared to influence size of home range. Behavior within the home range was discussed in terms of travel patterns, travels in relation to home sites and refuges, territory, and stability of size of home range. Travels within the home range consisted of repeated use of well-worn trails to sites of food, shelter, and refuge, plus more random exploratory travels

  4. Rabies vaccination for international travelers.

    PubMed

    Gautret, Philippe; Parola, Philippe

    2012-01-05

    Rabies prevention in travelers is a controversial issue. According to experts, the decision to vaccinate results from an individual risk assessment based on the duration of stay, the likelihood of engagement in at-risk activities, the age of the traveler, the rabies endemicity and access to appropriate medical care in the country of destination. However, no detailed information is available regarding the last two determinants in many regions. Twenty-two cases of rabies were reported in tourists, expatriates and migrant travelers over the last decade, including three cases following short-term travel of no more than two weeks. Studies on rabies post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) in travelers show that overall, 0.4% (range 0.01-2.3%) of travelers have experienced an at-risk bite per month of stay in a rabies-endemic country, while 31% of expatriates and 12% of tourists were vaccinated against rabies before traveling. The main reason cited by travelers for not being vaccinated is the cost of the vaccine. The majority of patients who sustained a high risk injury was not vaccinated against rabies before traveling and were not properly treated abroad. From available studies, the following risk factors for injuries sustained from potentially rabid animals may be identified: traveling to South-East Asia, India or North Africa, young age, and traveling for tourism. The duration of travel does not appear to be a risk factor. It should be noted that "at-risk activities" have not been addressed in these studies. Detailed rabies distribution maps and information on the availability of rabies biologics are urgently needed in order to identify those travelers who need pre-travel vaccination. Meanwhile, cost-minimization of rabies pre-exposure vaccination may be achieved in several ways, notably by using the intra-dermal method of vaccination.

  5. Fellow travellers: Working memory and mental time travel in rodents.

    PubMed

    Dere, Ekrem; Dere, Dorothea; de Souza Silva, Maria Angelica; Huston, Joseph P; Zlomuzica, Armin

    2017-03-19

    The impairment of mental time travel is a severe cognitive symptom in patients with brain lesions and a number of neuropsychiatric disorders. Whether animals are also able to mentally travel in time both forward and backward is still a matter of debate. In this regard, we have proposed a continuum of mental time travel abilities across different animal species, with humans being the species with the ability to perform most sophisticated forms of mental time travel. In this review and perspective article, we delineate a novel approach to understand the evolution, characteristics and function of human and animal mental time travel. Furthermore, we propose a novel approach to measure mental time travel in rodents in a comprehensive manner using a test battery composed of well-validated and easy applicable tests.

  6. Time, travel and infection.

    PubMed

    Cliff, Andrew; Haggett, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The collapse of geographical space over the last 200 years has had profound effects on the circulation of human populations and on the transfer of infectious diseases. Three examples are used to illustrate the process: (a) the impact of the switch from sail to steamships in importing measles into Fiji over a 40-year period; (b) changes in measles epidemic behaviour in Iceland over a 150-year period; and (c) changes in the spread of cholera within the United States over a 35-year period. In each case, the link between time, travel and disease has been an intimate one.

  7. Travel Demand Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Southworth, Frank; Garrow, Dr. Laurie

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes the principal types of both passenger and freight demand models in use today, providing a brief history of model development supported by references to a number of popular texts on the subject, and directing the reader to papers covering some of the more recent technical developments in the area. Over the past half century a variety of methods have been used to estimate and forecast travel demands, drawing concepts from economic/utility maximization theory, transportation system optimization and spatial interaction theory, using and often combining solution techniques as varied as Box-Jenkins methods, non-linear multivariate regression, non-linear mathematical programming, and agent-based microsimulation.

  8. Vaccines for foreign travel.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, M S

    1990-06-01

    Exotic infections are a significant threat to the child traveling to or going to live in the developing world. Vaccines are available that can prevent some of these infections. It is essential that basic routine childhood vaccination be up to date and that necessary modifications be made from the usual schedule in the United States. The current requirements and local disease conditions (both endemic and epidemic) for each country to be visited must be known so that appropriate vaccines are received. Resources for this information are listed. Details for each vaccine are given, including indications, dose, booster, side effects, contraindications, and other specific information.

  9. [Travel and accidents].

    PubMed

    Cha, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    Traumatic pathologies are the most frequent medical events to be observed among French travellers. Accidents on the public highway by lack of respect of the fundamental rules of road security, particularly abroad, traffic conditions in bad repair in numerous emergent countries, usually the destination of mass tourism and underdeveloped organization of health care and local urgency help. Sports activities are also a source of accidents. A good physical training is essential. Drowning is a real plague, especially among children due to a lack of vigilance. Preventive measures are simple, keep them constantly in mind and apply them carefully so as to have beautiful memories of our trip back home.

  10. Health hazards of international travel.

    PubMed

    Cossar, J H; Reid, D

    1989-01-01

    The growth of travel and the increasing numbers of those affected by travel-related illnesses, some of a serious nature, will cause this subject to demand the attention of the medical profession, the travel trade, travellers themselves and the health authorities of countries receiving tourists. Provision of appropriate advice for the traveller is a shared responsibility, best channelled mainly through travel agencies; it can moreover be shown to be cost-beneficial. Continued monitoring of illness in travellers and provision of information systems geared to this problem and its prevention are fully justified. They should be based on traditional channels of communication and currently-available modern technology, and be readily accessible to medical and related workers. Increased collaboration between medical workers, health educators and those involved in the travel trade would be a positive and useful contribution towards the reduction of illness and discomfort among travellers and the associated expense incurred by the various national health services concerned. There are clearly economic benefits from the development of international tourism, but these have to be balanced in countries accepting tourists by attention to the prevention of illnesses associated with travel.

  11. A Priori Calculations of Thermodynamic Functions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    hypothetical molecules (hydroxy-methyl- amino)nitro-methanol, 2,4,6,8-tetraazabicyclo-[3.3.0]octane, and 1,2,3-oxadiazolo-1,2,3- oxadiazole -1,1 -dioxide...C.010 rs 13,4 Oxadiazole 1.267 1.297h 0.030 rs 13,4 Thiadiazole 1.277 1.302 i 0.025 rs Diazomethane 1.288 1.300J 0.012 rs Pyrazole 1.309 1.331k 0.022...1.330f 0.018 ra Pyrazole 1.335 1.590.016 rs Dimethyl Nitramine 1 .365h 1.383i 0.018 r 1,3,4 Thladiazole 1.378 1.371i -0.007 r 1,3,4 Oxadiazole 1.402 1.9k

  12. The Travelling Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murabona Oduori, Susan

    2015-08-01

    The telescope has been around for more than 400 years, and through good use of it scientists have made many astonishing discoveries and begun to understand our place in the universe. Most people, however, have never looked through one. Yet it is a great tool for cool science and observation especially in a continent and country with beautifully dark skies. The Travelling Telescope project aims to invite people outside under the stars to learn about those curious lights in the sky.The Travelling Telescope aims to promote science learning to a wide range of Kenyan schools in various locations exchanging knowledge about the sky through direct observations of celestial bodies using state of the art telescopes. In addition to direct observing we also teach science using various hands-on activities and astronomy software, ideal for explaining concepts which are hard to understand, and for a better grasp of the sights visible through the telescope. We are dedicated to promoting science using astronomy especially in schools, targeting children from as young as 3 years to the youth, teachers, their parents and members of the public. Our presentation focuses on the OAD funded project in rural coastal Kenya.

  13. Traveling-Wave Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.

    1998-01-01

    The traveling-wave tube (TWT) is a vacuum device invented in the early 1940's used for amplification at microwave frequencies. Amplification is attained by surrendering kinetic energy from an electron beam to a radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic wave. The demand for vacuum devices has been decreased largely by the advent of solid-state devices. However, although solid state devices have replaced vacuum devices in many areas, there are still many applications such as radar, electronic countermeasures and satellite communications, that require operating characteristics such as high power (Watts to Megawatts), high frequency (below 1 GHz to over 100 GHz) and large bandwidth that only vacuum devices can provide. Vacuum devices are also deemed irreplaceable in the music industry where musicians treasure their tube-based amplifiers claiming that the solid-state and digital counterparts could never provide the same "warmth" (3). The term traveling-wave tube includes both fast-wave and slow-wave devices. This article will concentrate on slow-wave devices as the vast majority of TWTs in operation fall into this category.

  14. Fungal infections in immunocompromised travelers.

    PubMed

    Lortholary, Olivier; Charlier, Caroline; Lebeaux, David; Lecuit, Marc; Consigny, Paul Henri

    2013-03-01

    Immunocompromised patients represent an increasing group of travelers, for business, tourism, and visiting friends and relatives. Those with severe cellular immunodeficiency (advanced human immunodeficiency virus infection and transplant recipients) display the highest risk of fungal infections. International travel is less risky in most other types of immunodeficiency (except those with neutropenia). A systematic visit in a travel clinic for immunocompromised patients traveling to the tropics ensures that the specific risks of acquiring fungal infections (and others) are understood. When immunocompromised hosts return to their area of residence, a nonbacteriologically documented, potentially severe, febrile pneumonia, with or without dissemination signs (skin lesions, cytopenia) should alert for travel-acquired fungal infection, even years after return. Localized subcutaneous nodule may be also ascribed to fungal infection. Finally, infectious diseases physicians should be aware of major clinical patterns of travel-acquired fungal infection, as well as the fungi involved, and risk factors according to the geographical area visited.

  15. Evaluation of the returned traveler.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, D. R.

    1992-01-01

    Recognition of clinical syndromes in returned travelers is an important part of providing care to international travelers. The first step is to take a history with attention to pre-travel preventive measures, the patient's itinerary, and potential exposure to infectious agents. The patient should then be examined to document physical signs, such as fever, rash, or hepatosplenomegaly, and to have basic laboratory data obtained. This evaluation will provide most physicians with the necessary information to generate a differential diagnosis. Each diagnosis should be matched against the incubation period of the disease, the geographic location of illness, the frequency of illness in returned travelers, and the pre-travel preventive measures. Careful attention to these aspects of patient care should result in the appropriate diagnosis and therapeutic intervention for the ill returned traveler. PMID:1290276

  16. Traveling wave model of uni-traveling carrier photodiode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanra, Senjuti; Das Barman, Abhirup

    2015-06-01

    A traveling wave time domain model of bulk InGaAs/InP uni-traveling carrier photodiode is presented in terms of integral carrier density rate equation. The wavelength dependent responsivity at different absorption width has been derived from quantum mechanical principle. Output photocurrent response with time is found in close agreement with the experimental value.

  17. Traveler: The Apiary Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Carl R.

    Observing and debugging concurrent actor programs on a distributed architecture such as the Apiary poses new problems not found in sequential systems. Since events are only partially ordered, the chronological order of events no longer corresponds to their causal ordering, so the execution trace of a computation must be more structured than a simple stream. Many events may execute concurrently, so a stepper must give the programmer control over the order in which events are stepped. Because of the arrival order nondeterminism of the actor model, different actors may have different views on the ordering of events. We conquer these problems by recording the activation ordering, the transaction pairing, and the arrival ordering of messages in the Apiary and displaying the resulting structures in Traveler's window oriented interface under user control.

  18. A traveling opera troupe.

    PubMed

    Gao, M

    1995-08-01

    In China, Mr. Chang Junjie, a retired middle school principal has personally organized and financed the "Family Planning Retired Cadre's Troupe," which travels around the countryside performing newly written costume operas. In the six years since he first began to organize the troupe, Chang's players have performed more than 1700 times for more than a million people. The operas draw their material from the real life situations faced by farmers and emphasize the importance of family planning by setting good examples. Chang's operas have been well received, and it is not unusual for his audiences to be moved to laughter and tears. Despite his widespread success, Chang is not content with what he has accomplished and is currently organizing a children's opera troupe and seeking ways to make a greater impact on the promotion of family planning.

  19. [Morbidity of Israeli travelers after traveling to developing countries].

    PubMed

    Mizrachi, Edit; Steinlauf, Shmuel; Schwartz, Eli

    2010-09-01

    International tourism, including traveling to developing countries, has become increasingly popular. The number of Israeli travelers to developing countries is estimated at approximately 170,000 annually. This study aims to analyze the morbidity among returning Israeli travelers. A retrospective evaluation was conducted of patient files for those attending the Tropical Disease clinic at the Sheba Medical Center between 1994-2004. A total of 842 patients attended the clinic during this period, with 1126 different diagnoses, including 20.9% of patients who were hospitalized in Israel and 6.2% abroad. Slightly more than half (56.7%) were male, 70% were in the 20-29 year age group. Most of the patients attended the clinic shortly after returning from traveling, but some attended the clinic more than 1 year later. The main destinations were Asia (49.2%), Latin America (23.4%) and Africa (23.2%). The most common diagnoses were gastrointestinal disease (41%), fatigue (25.8%), dermatological conditions (23.4%) and febrile diseases (22.7%). The typical diagnoses in travelers returning from Asia were chronic diarrhea and dengue fever. Dermatological conditions including leishmaniasis were prominent in travelers returning from Latin America, and in travelers returning from Africa--malaria, and schistosomiasis. In addition, there were gender differences; males acquired malaria, leishmaniasis and schistosomiasis more often, while females had more gastrointestinal complaints and fatigue. Travelers acquired different health problems in different continents. This must be taken into consideration when patients seek medical advice either before or after their journey. Furthermore, physicians must be aware of the importance of having a thorough travel history of their patients, since medical problems acquired during travel may manifest long after returning home.

  20. International Travelers' Sociodemographic, Health, and Travel Characteristics: An Italian Study.

    PubMed

    Troiano, Gianmarco; Mercone, Astrid; Bagnoli, Alessandra; Nante, Nicola

    Approximately the 8% of travelers requires medical care, with the diagnosis of a vaccine-preventable disease. The aim of our study was to analyze the socio-demographic, health and travel characteristics of the Italian international travelers. We conducted a cross sectional study from January 2015 to June 2016, at the Travel Medicine Clinic of Siena, asking the doctor to interview patients who attended the Clinic, recording socio-demographic and travel information, malaria prophylaxis, vaccinations. The data were organized in a database and processed by software Stata®. We collected 419 questionnaires. Patients chose 71 countries for their travels; the favorite destinations were: India (6.31%), Thailand (6.31%), and Brazil (5.10%). The mean length of stay was 36.17 days. Italians, students, and freelancers tended to stay abroad for a longer time (mean: 36.4 days, 59.87 days and 64.16 days respectively). 33.17% of our sample used drugs for malaria chemoprophylaxis: 71.9% of them used Atovaquone/Proguanil (Malarone®), 26.6% used Mefloquine (Lariam®), 1.5% other drugs. The vaccinations that travelers mostly got in our study were to prevent hepatitis A (n = 264), the typhoid fever (n = 187), the Tetanus + Diphtheria + Pertussis (n = 165), the Yellow fever (n = 118) and the cholera (n = 78). Twenty-eight (6.68%) refused some recommended vaccinations. The vaccines mostly refused were for Typhoid fever (n = 20), hepatitis a (n = 9), and cholera (n = 9). Our results demonstrated that Italian international travelers are at-risk because of their poor vaccinations adherence. This implies that pre-travel counseling is fundamental to increase the knowledge of the risks and the compliance of future travelers. Copyright © 2016 Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Winter Wilderness Travel and Camping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilchrest, Norman

    Knowledge and skill are needed for safe and enjoyable travel and camping in the wilderness in winter. The beauty of snow and ice, reduced human use, and higher tolerance of animals toward humans make the wilderness attractive during winter. The uniqueness of winter travel presents several challenges that are not present in other seasons. Safety is…

  2. Preparing for Travel in India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oswald, James M.

    The complexity of the Indian society can be overwhelming, and preparation for travel in India requires careful and detailed advance planning. Practical suggestions are provided for travelers to help them understand cultural differences, avoid illnesses, and select appropriate clothing for the intense heat. Explanations are given about the monetary…

  3. Reengineering the Air Travel Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-04-01

    Thesis 3. DATES COVERED (FROM - TO) xx-xx-1999 to xx-xx-1999 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Reengineering the Air Travel Process Unclassified 5a. CONTRACT...RELEASE , 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Every year, Department of Defense (DOD) travelers make thousands of trips that include air transportation

  4. Travel and Adult Transformative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindstrom, Steven K.

    2011-01-01

    This phenomenological research study examines the lived experience of individual adult transformation in the context of travel. Adults throughout history have experienced profound personal and perception changes as a result of significant travel events. Transformative learning occurs through experience, crisis, and reflection, all of which are…

  5. Travel and Adult Transformative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindstrom, Steven K.

    2011-01-01

    This phenomenological research study examines the lived experience of individual adult transformation in the context of travel. Adults throughout history have experienced profound personal and perception changes as a result of significant travel events. Transformative learning occurs through experience, crisis, and reflection, all of which are…

  6. Create a Traveling Literacy Trunk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fromherz, Robin Wright

    2003-01-01

    Considers how the concept of Traveling Literacy Trunk was designed to reach all corners of the state of Oregon with compelling, student-centered, developmentally appropriate writing activities that could be shared with teaching professionals. Outlines 12 steps for developing a Traveling Literacy Trunk. Describes many benefits of the Literacy…

  7. Travel and the Consumer 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idleman, Hillis K.

    The State Education Department of New York has prepared a series of modules--Expanded Programs in Consumer Education. "Travel and the Consumer" is the most recently produced module. It can be used as a discrete unit or with others in the series. The module stresses the importance of making travel creative, getting the most for one's…

  8. Pre-travel advice seeking from GPs by travellers with chronic illness seen at a travel clinic.

    PubMed

    Gagneux-Brunon, Amandine; Andrillat, Carole; Fouilloux, Pascale; Daoud, Fatiha; Defontaine, Christiane; Charles, Rodolphe; Lucht, Frédéric; Botelho-Nevers, Elisabeth

    2016-03-01

    Travellers are ageing and frequently report chronic illness. Pre-travel health advice is crucial, particularly in this subgroup, and general practitioners (GPs) are first in line for treatment adjustment before departure. Our aim is to evaluate pre-travel health advice seeking from GPs by travellers with chronic illness seen at a travel clinic. A cross-sectional observational survey using a questionnaire was conducted between August 2013 and July 2014 in travellers attending the travel medicine clinic of a tertiary university hospital in France. During the study, 2019 travellers were included. Mean age was 39.4 years (±18.8). Three hundred and ninety-one (19.4%) travellers reported a history of a chronic illness. Arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus were the most frequently reported illnesses, affecting, respectively, 168 (8.3%) travellers and 102 (5.1%). Hajj pilgrims were more likely to report a history of chronic illness than other travellers. Only 810 (40.1%) travellers sought pre-travel advice from their GP. Six hundred and fifty-two (40.1%) healthy travellers and 158 (40.5%) travellers reporting chronic illness sought pre-travel advice from their GP (P = 0.96). Travellers with a history of chronic illness do not seek pre-travel health advice from their GP more frequently than healthy travellers. Travel health specialists are generally not the best practitioners to manage the care of underlying medical conditions presenting risks during travel. However, GPs offer continuity and disease management expertise to improve the specificity of pre-travel planning. Thus, ongoing collaboration between the traveller, GP and travel health specialist is likely to yield the best outcomes. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2016. All rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Prophylaxis for the International Traveller

    PubMed Central

    MacPherson, D. W.

    1985-01-01

    Travellers should know as much as possible about the quality of food and drink in the areas of travel, and be prepared with safety measures if necessary. Routine immunization should be up to date; cholera and yellow fever vaccinations are required for travel to certain areas. Such prophylaxis should be sought, ideally, several months before departure. Resurgences of malaria are occurring in areas where the disease had previously been controlled, making prophylaxis essential for travel to endemic areas. Other mild disorders may be treated with medication appropriate to the type of travel and area. Patients may appreciate cautionary advice about behavior, to lessen the likelihood of physical or social harm. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:21274123

  10. [Travel and patients with allergies].

    PubMed

    Miltgen, J; N'Guyen, G; Cuguilliere, A; Marotel, C; Bonnet, D

    1997-01-01

    By changing their surroundings and lifestyle, travelers with allergic conditions exposed themselves to new risks. The main perennial allergens are house dust mites which thrive in tropical areas and can be especially sensitizing. The risk of seasonal reactions to grass-pollens varies from region to region. Reactions to some highly sensitizing respiratory allergens can occur in travelers who return to regions where they were previously exposed. Subjects with food allergies should beware of possible reactions to ingredients in exotic dishes. The bites of several insects can cause anaphylactic reactions. Some medications required for tropical travel (e.g. antimalarial drugs) can trigger severe hypersensitivity reactions. Avoidance of allergens is more difficult during travel. Travelers with allergic conditions should carry alert identification cards and medications for routine as well as emergency treatment including self-injectable adrenaline.

  11. Travel optimization by foraging bumblebees through readjustments of traplines after discovery of new feeding locations.

    PubMed

    Lihoreau, Mathieu; Chittka, Lars; Raine, Nigel E

    2010-12-01

    Animals collecting resources that replenish over time often visit patches in predictable sequences called traplines. Despite the widespread nature of this strategy, we still know little about how spatial memory develops and guides individuals toward suitable routes. Here, we investigate whether flower visitation sequences by bumblebees Bombus terrestris simply reflect the order in which flowers were discovered or whether they result from more complex navigational strategies enabling bees to optimize their foraging routes. We analyzed bee flight movements in an array of four artificial flowers maximizing interfloral distances. Starting from a single patch, we sequentially added three new patches so that if bees visited them in the order in which they originally encountered flowers, they would follow a long (suboptimal) route. Bees' tendency to visit patches in their discovery order decreased with experience. Instead, they optimized their flight distances by rearranging flower visitation sequences. This resulted in the development of a primary route (trapline) and two or three less frequently used secondary routes. Bees consistently used these routes after overnight breaks while occasionally exploring novel possibilities. We discuss how maintaining some level of route flexibility could allow traplining animals to cope with dynamic routing problems, analogous to the well-known traveling salesman problem.

  12. Travel, venous thromboembolism, and thrombophilia.

    PubMed

    Gallus, Alexander S

    2005-02-01

    Current evidence indicates that prolonged air travel predisposes to venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. An effect is seen once travel duration exceeds 6 to 9 hours and becomes obvious in long-haul passengers traveling for 12 or more hours. A recent records linkage study found that increase in thrombosis rate among arriving passengers peaked during the first week and was no longer apparent after 2 weeks. Medium- to long-distance travelers have a 2- to 4-fold increase in relative thrombosis risk compared with nontravelers, but the averaged absolute risk is small (approximately one symptomatic event per 2 million arrivals, with a case-fatality rate of approximately 2%) and there is no evidence that thrombosis is more likely in economy class than in business- or first-class passengers. It remains uncertain whether and to what extent thrombosis risk is increased by short-distance air travel or prolonged travel by motorcar, train, or other means. Most travelers who develop venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism also have one or more other predisposing risk factors that may include older age, obesity, recent injury or surgery, previous thrombosis, venous insufficiency, malignancy, hormonal therapies, or pregnancy. Limited (though theoretically plausible) evidence suggests that factor V Leiden and the prothrombin gene mutation predispose to thrombosis in otherwise healthy travelers. Given that very many passengers with such predispositions do not develop thrombosis, and a lack of prospective studies to link predisposition with disease, it is not now possible to allocate absolute thrombosis risk among intending passengers or to estimate benefit-to-risk ratios or benefit-to-cost ratios for prophylaxis. Randomized comparisons using ultrasound imaging indicate a measurable incidence of subclinical leg vein thrombosis after prolonged air travel, which appears to increase with travel duration and is reduced by graded pressure elastic support stockings. Whether this

  13. President's address: travel medicine and principles of safe travel.

    PubMed

    DuPont, Herbert L

    2008-01-01

    Persons crossing international boundaries away from their medical support systems are put at risk for illness and injury. Travel medicine is a new medical discipline that quantifies these health risks and develops strategies for reducing them. Obtaining health and evacuation insurance for a future trip is important for persons with medical conditions, those planning trips to developing tropical or semi-tropical regions of the world or when an international stay anywhere will be as long as a month. Pre-travel medical evaluation, vaccines against endemic infectious diseases and medications to reduce the occurrence of diarrhea and malaria during trips to endemic areas, and medications for self-treatment of common illnesses such as diarrhea are fundamental to travel medicine. There are a number of miscellaneous areas to consider in travel medicine including preventing deep vein thrombosis and minimizing jet lag during long haul air travel and reducing the occurrence of accidents and water- and altitude-related illnesses. An important recently defined challenge to the field is the growing number of ill-prepared persons put at great risk for illness while visiting friends and relatives living in areas of reduced hygiene. All persons need to have an idea of how and where they may find medical care if they develop illness while abroad. This article summarizes essential elements in travel medicine and offers 10 recommendations for safe travel.

  14. President's Address: Travel Medicine and Principles of Safe Travel

    PubMed Central

    DuPont, Herbert L.

    2008-01-01

    Persons crossing international boundaries away from their medical support systems are put at risk for illness and injury. Travel medicine is a new medical discipline that quantifies these health risks and develops strategies for reducing them. Obtaining health and evacuation insurance for a future trip is important for persons with medical conditions, those planning trips to developing tropical or semi-tropical regions of the world or when an international stay anywhere will be as long as a month. Pre-travel medical evaluation, vaccines against endemic infectious diseases and medications to reduce the occurrence of diarrhea and malaria during trips to endemic areas, and medications for self-treatment of common illnesses such as diarrhea are fundamental to travel medicine. There are a number of miscellaneous areas to consider in travel medicine including preventing deep vein thrombosis and minimizing jet lag during long haul air travel and reducing the occurrence of accidents and water- and altitude-related illnesses. An important recently defined challenge to the field is the growing number of ill-prepared persons put at great risk for illness while visiting friends and relatives living in areas of reduced hygiene. All persons need to have an idea of how and where they may find medical care if they develop illness while abroad. This article summarizes essential elements in travel medicine and offers 10 recommendations for safe travel. PMID:18596858

  15. Travel time seismic tomography on Reykjanes, SW Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jousset, Philippe; Ágústsson, Kristjan; Blanck, Hanna; Metz, Malte; Franke, Steven; Pàll Hersir, Gylfi; Bruhn, David; Flovenz, Ólafur; Friðleifsson, Guðmundur

    2017-04-01

    We present updated tomographic results obtained using seismic data recorded around geothermal reservoirs located both on-land Reykjanes, SW-Iceland and offshore along Reykjanes Ridge. We gathered records from a network of 234 seismic stations (including 24 Ocean Bottom Seismometers) deployed between April 2014 and August 2015. In order to determine the orientation of the OBS stations, we used Rayleigh waves planar particle motions from large magnitude earthquakes. This method proved suitable using the on-land stations: orientations determined using this method with the orientations measured using a giro-compass agreed. We focus on the 3D velocity images using local earthquakes to perform travel time tomography. The processing includes first arrival picking of P- and S- phases using an automatic detection and picking technique based on Akaike Information Criteria. We locate earthquakes by using a non-linear localization technique, as a priori information for deriving a 1D velocity model. We then computed 3D velocity model by joint inversion of each earthquake's location and velocity lateral anomalies with respect to the 1D model. Our models confirms previous models obtained in the area, with enhanced details. In a second step, we performed inversion of the Vp/Vs ratio. Results indicate a low Vp/Vs ratio anomaly at depth suggesting the absence of large magmatic body under Reykjanes, unlike results obtained at other geothermal field, sucha as Krafla and Hengill. We discuss implications of those results in the light of recent IDDP drilling in Reykjanes.

  16. Using models to guide field experiments: a priori predictions for the CO 2 response of a nutrient- and water-limited native Eucalypt woodland

    SciTech Connect

    Medlyn, Belinda E.; De Kauwe, Martin G.; Zaehle, Sönke; Walker, Anthony P.; Duursma, Remko A.; Luus, Kristina; Mishurov, Mikhail; Pak, Bernard; Smith, Benjamin; Wang, Ying-Ping; Yang, Xiaojuan; Crous, Kristine Y.; Drake, John E.; Gimeno, Teresa E.; Macdonald, Catriona A.; Norby, Richard J.; Power, Sally A.; Tjoelker, Mark G.; Ellsworth, David S.

    2016-05-09

    One major uncertainty in Earth System models is the response of terrestrial ecosystems to rising atmospheric CO2 concentration (Ca), particularly under nutrient-lim- ited conditions. The Eucalyptus Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (EucFACE) experiment, recently established in a nutrient- and water-limited woodlands, presents a unique opportunity to address this uncertainty, but can best do so if key model uncertainties have been identified in advance. Moreover, we applied seven vegetation models, which have previously been comprehensively assessed against earlier forest FACE experi- ments, to simulate a priori possible outcomes from EucFACE. Our goals were to provide quantitative projections against which to evaluate data as they are collected, and to identify key measurements that should be made in the experiment to allow discrimination among alternative model assumptions in a postexperiment model intercompari- son. Simulated responses of annual net primary productivity (NPP) to elevated Ca ranged from 0.5 to 25% across models. The simulated reduction of NPP during a low-rainfall year also varied widely, from 24 to 70%. Key processes where assumptions caused disagreement among models included nutrient limitations to growth; feedbacks to nutri- ent uptake; autotrophic respiration; and the impact of low soil moisture availability on plant processes. Finally, knowledge of the causes of variation among models is now guiding data collection in the experiment, with the expectation that the experimental data can optimally inform future model improvements.

  17. Using models to guide field experiments: a priori predictions for the CO 2 response of a nutrient- and water-limited native Eucalypt woodland

    SciTech Connect

    Medlyn, Belinda E.; De Kauwe, Martin G.; Zaehle, Sönke; Walker, Anthony P.; Duursma, Remko A.; Luus, Kristina; Mishurov, Mikhail; Pak, Bernard; Smith, Benjamin; Wang, Ying-Ping; Yang, Xiaojuan; Crous, Kristine Y.; Drake, John E.; Gimeno, Teresa E.; Macdonald, Catriona A.; Norby, Richard J.; Power, Sally A.; Tjoelker, Mark G.; Ellsworth, David S.

    2016-05-09

    One major uncertainty in Earth System models is the response of terrestrial ecosystems to rising atmospheric CO2 concentration (Ca), particularly under nutrient-lim- ited conditions. The Eucalyptus Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (EucFACE) experiment, recently established in a nutrient- and water-limited woodlands, presents a unique opportunity to address this uncertainty, but can best do so if key model uncertainties have been identified in advance. Moreover, we applied seven vegetation models, which have previously been comprehensively assessed against earlier forest FACE experi- ments, to simulate a priori possible outcomes from EucFACE. Our goals were to provide quantitative projections against which to evaluate data as they are collected, and to identify key measurements that should be made in the experiment to allow discrimination among alternative model assumptions in a postexperiment model intercompari- son. Simulated responses of annual net primary productivity (NPP) to elevated Ca ranged from 0.5 to 25% across models. The simulated reduction of NPP during a low-rainfall year also varied widely, from 24 to 70%. Key processes where assumptions caused disagreement among models included nutrient limitations to growth; feedbacks to nutri- ent uptake; autotrophic respiration; and the impact of low soil moisture availability on plant processes. Finally, knowledge of the causes of variation among models is now guiding data collection in the experiment, with the expectation that the experimental data can optimally inform future model improvements.

  18. Travelers' Health: MERS in the Arabian Peninsula

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety Blood Clots Bug Bites Business Travel Cold Climates Counterfeit Drugs Cruise Ship Travel Families with Children ... Abroad Getting Sick After Travel High Altitudes Hot Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador ...

  19. Travelers' Health: Animal-Associated Hazards

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety Blood Clots Bug Bites Business Travel Cold Climates Counterfeit Drugs Cruise Ship Travel Families with Children ... Abroad Getting Sick After Travel High Altitudes Hot Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador ...

  20. Travelers' Health: Trypanosomiasis, American (Chagas Disease)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety Blood Clots Bug Bites Business Travel Cold Climates Counterfeit Drugs Cruise Ship Travel Families with Children ... Abroad Getting Sick After Travel High Altitudes Hot Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador ...

  1. Travelers' Health: Natural Disasters and Environmental Hazards

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety Blood Clots Bug Bites Business Travel Cold Climates Counterfeit Drugs Cruise Ship Travel Families with Children ... Abroad Getting Sick After Travel High Altitudes Hot Climates Humanitarian Aid Workers Humanitarian Aid Workers in Ecuador ...

  2. 25 CFR 700.533 - Restrictions affecting travel and travel expense reimbursement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Restrictions affecting travel and travel expense... travel and travel expense reimbursement. (a) When an employee is on officially authorized travel his or... in cash or kind for travel expenses from any other source, even when the employee's expenses exceed...

  3. 25 CFR 700.533 - Restrictions affecting travel and travel expense reimbursement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Restrictions affecting travel and travel expense... travel and travel expense reimbursement. (a) When an employee is on officially authorized travel his or... in cash or kind for travel expenses from any other source, even when the employee's expenses exceed...

  4. 25 CFR 700.533 - Restrictions affecting travel and travel expense reimbursement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Restrictions affecting travel and travel expense... travel and travel expense reimbursement. (a) When an employee is on officially authorized travel his or... in cash or kind for travel expenses from any other source, even when the employee's expenses...

  5. 25 CFR 700.533 - Restrictions affecting travel and travel expense reimbursement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Restrictions affecting travel and travel expense... travel and travel expense reimbursement. (a) When an employee is on officially authorized travel his or... in cash or kind for travel expenses from any other source, even when the employee's expenses...

  6. 25 CFR 700.533 - Restrictions affecting travel and travel expense reimbursement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Restrictions affecting travel and travel expense... travel and travel expense reimbursement. (a) When an employee is on officially authorized travel his or... in cash or kind for travel expenses from any other source, even when the employee's expenses...

  7. An Empirical Determination of Tasks Essential to Successful Performance as a Retail Landscape and Garden Store Salesman. Determination of a Common Core of Basic Skills in Agribusiness and Natural Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Thomas W.; And Others

    To improve vocational educational programs in agriculture, occupational information on a common core of basic skills within the occupational area of the retail landscape and garden store salesman is presented in the revised task inventory survey. The purpose of the occupational survey was to identify a common core of basic skills which are…

  8. Travel-associated skin disease.

    PubMed

    Morris-Jones, Rachael; Morris-Jones, Stephen

    2012-09-01

    Travel associated skin disease is extremely common and a frequent cause of the returning traveller seeking medical attention. Widespread cutaneous eruptions usually represent reactive rashes, indicating an underlying systemic infection or allergic reaction. Patients with disseminated or spreading rashes following travel often present with fever and malaise. In contrast, those presenting with localised skin disease such as a blister, nodule, plaque, ulcer etc are usually well in themselves but have sustained a bite/sting/penetrating injury or introduction of infection directly into the skin at the affected site. As a general rule widespread rashes are investigated with blood tests/serology and localised lesions with a skin biopsy for culture and histology.

  9. Cardiology and Travel (Part I): Risk Assessment Prior to Travel.

    PubMed

    Leon; Lateef; Fuentes

    1996-09-01

    Traveling has always been a distinction of man. In Homer's Odyssey, we find a narrative description of the astonishing and long-standing adventures of Odysseus returning to Ithaca from Troy, and later on Thoukedides and Herodotos described different civilizations and historic events based on personal experiences obtained from traveling. At that time, the only available means of transportation were animals and ships. Therefore the trips were time consuming and frequently accompanied by unpredictable events. Nowadays, the use of modern means of transportation has made traveling much more enjoyable and faster; however, it can occasionally become stressful and, as a result, can be associated with a variety of medical problems both in healthy patients and in subjects with cardiovascular diseases. Previous epidemiologic studies have consistently demonstrated that cardiovascular events (including myocardial infarctions and cerebrovascular events) are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality among adult travelers.1-6 Since the population of many industrialized countries shows aging trends, the potential problems occurring in elderly passengers, many of whom are more likely to have cardiopulmonary problems, are anticipated to increase. Assessment of the risk of cardiopulmonary problems prior to travel in a mobile society becomes an issue for the public and, in particular, for physicians. The data regarding the cardiovascular risks prior to traveling are limited because of the lack of a central registry for the collection of information regarding health problems or emergencies among travelers. However, review of the literature provides us with important observations in which we can make specific recommendations for assessing cardiovascular status and risk prior to travel during a pretravel medical consultation.

  10. Travelers' Health: Typhoid and Paratyphoid Fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Yellow Fever Vaccine Course Travel Medicine References: Books, Journals, Articles & Websites Resources for the Travel Industry Yellow Book Contents Chapter 3 (81) Typhoid & Paratyphoid Fever more ...

  11. 49 CFR 230.76 - Piston travel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and...) Maximum piston travel. The maximum piston travel when steam locomotive is standing shall be as follows...

  12. 49 CFR 230.76 - Piston travel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and...) Maximum piston travel. The maximum piston travel when steam locomotive is standing shall be as follows...

  13. Commercial Travel Offices: Lessons Learned in the Fifth U.S. Army Region

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    jurisdiction of the Army and are relatively easy to solve. Keywords: Passenger traffic, Service contracting; Travel agency ; Travel contracting; Travel...management; Travel service; Commercial travel office; Travel service contractor; Travel support; Commercial travel services; Commercial travel agency .

  14. Travel and the home advantage.

    PubMed

    Pace, A; Carron, A V

    1992-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the relative contributions of various travel related variables to visiting team success in the National Hockey League. A multiple regression design was used with game outcome as the dependent variable. The independent variables of interest included, as main effects and interactions, number of time zones crossed, direction of travel, distance traveled, preparation/adjustment time, time of season, game number on the road trip, and the home stand. Visiting team success was negatively associated with the interaction of number of time zones crossed and increased preparation time between games, and was positively associated with game number on the road. It was concluded that only a small portion of the variance in the home advantage/visitor disadvantage can be explained by travel related factors.

  15. Travelers' Health: Injuries and Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Afghanistan). Motor vehicle crashes—not crime or terrorism—are the number 1 killer of healthy US ... are related to natural disasters, aviation accidents, drugs, terrorism, falls, burns, and poisoning. If a traveler is ...

  16. Josephson Traveling-Wave Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurin, V. V.; Vdovicheva, N. K.; Shereshevskii, I. A.

    2017-04-01

    We propose a new approach to the problem of obtaining coherent radiation from systems with a great number of Josephson junctions, which is based on the concept of traveling-wave antennas. The traveling wave in a line ensures identity of the electrodynamic conditions, under which the junctions operate, whereas the energy leakage to radiation in the lateral direction prevents saturation of the nonlinearity of the individual junctions having a small dynamic range. Simple analytical models, which demonstrate feasibility of the traveling-wave regime, are considered. A code for direct numerical simulation of Josephson microchips including microantennas, lumped elements, and power supply circuits have been developed. Using the direct numerical simulation, a version of the Josephson antenna, which is similar to the simplest single-wire antenna, is studied and the possibility to realize the traveling-wave regime is demonstrated.

  17. Influenza Prevention: Information for Travelers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Address What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine/Variant Pandemic Other Influenza Prevention: Information for Travelers Language: English (US) Españ ...

  18. Notification: Management of Travel Cards

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Project #OA-FY15-0156, April 20, 2015. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Office of Inspector General (OIG), plans to begin preliminary research for an audit of the management of travel cards.

  19. Immunizations for High Flyin' Travelers

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166883.html Immunizations for High Flyin' Travelers Don't leave home ... way to protect yourself is by getting certain vaccinations before you leave home. Regardless of your destination, ...

  20. Travelers' Health: Injuries and Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety Senior Citizens Sex Tourism STDs Sun Exposure Swimming and Diving Study Abroad Tick Bites Travelers' Diarrhea ... during, and after a plane ride. Drowning Avoid swimming alone or in unfamiliar waters. Wear life jackets ...