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Sample records for a-si alloy production

  1. Large-area, triple junction a-Si alloy production

    SciTech Connect

    Oswald, R.; Jansen, K.; Johnson, B.; Willing, F.; Raquet, J.; Kloss, T.; Morris, J.; Weiss, P.; Yang, L.; Hainsworth, M.C.; Ashenfelter, W.; Stabinsky, B.; Twesme, E.; Chen, L.F.; O'Dowd, J. )

    1994-06-30

    Amorphous silicon alloy based triple junction 0.1 m[sup 2] modules with initial efficiencies greater than 11% have been produced using manufacturing equipment. Scale-up of equipment to process substrates 0.56 m[sup 2] in area is nearly complete.

  2. Large-area, triple-junction a-Si alloy production scale-up

    SciTech Connect

    Oswald, R.; O'Dowd, J. . Thin Film Div.)

    1993-04-01

    This report describes Solarex's work to advance its photovoltaic manufacturing technologies, reduce its a-Si:H module production costs, increase module performance, and expand the Solarex commercial production capacity. Solarex will meet these objectives by improving the deposition and quality of the transport front contact; optimizing the laser patterning process; scaling up the semiconductor deposition process; improving the back-contact deposition; and scaling up and improving the encapsulation and testing of its a-Si:H modules. In the Phase 1 portion of this subcontract, Solarex focused on scaling up components of the chemical vapor deposition system for deposition of the system contact, scaling up laser scribing techniques; triple-junction recipes for module production; and metal-oxide back contacts. The goal of these efforts is to adopt all portions of the manufacturing line to handle substrates larger than 0.37 m[sup 2].

  3. Large-area, triple-junction a-Si alloy production scale-up. Semiannual technical progress report, 17 March 1992--18 September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Oswald, R.; O`Dowd, J.

    1993-04-01

    This report describes Solarex`s work to advance its photovoltaic manufacturing technologies, reduce its a-Si:H module production costs, increase module performance, and expand the Solarex commercial production capacity. Solarex will meet these objectives by improving the deposition and quality of the transport front contact; optimizing the laser patterning process; scaling up the semiconductor deposition process; improving the back-contact deposition; and scaling up and improving the encapsulation and testing of its a-Si:H modules. In the Phase 1 portion of this subcontract, Solarex focused on scaling up components of the chemical vapor deposition system for deposition of the system contact, scaling up laser scribing techniques; triple-junction recipes for module production; and metal-oxide back contacts. The goal of these efforts is to adopt all portions of the manufacturing line to handle substrates larger than 0.37 m{sup 2}.

  4. Large-area, triple-junction a-Si alloy production scale-up. Semiannual subcontract report, 17 March 1994--18 September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Oswald, R.; Morris, J.

    1995-03-01

    This report describes work performed under a 3-year subcontract to advance Solarex`s photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing technologies, reduce its hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) module production costs, increase module performance, and expand the Solarex commercial production capacity. During the period covered by this report, Solarex focused on (1) improving deposition of the front contact, (2) investigating alternate feed stocks for the front contact, (3) maximizing throughput and area utilization for all laser scribes, (4) optimizing a-Si:H deposition equipment to achieve uniform deposition over large areas, (5) optimizing the triple-junction module fabrication process, (6) evaluating the materials to deposit the rear contact, and (7) optimizing the combination of isolation scribe and encapsulant to pass the wet high-potential test.

  5. Large-area triple-junction a-Si alloy production scaleup. Annual subcontract report, 17 March 1993--18 March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Oswald, R.; Morris, J.

    1994-11-01

    The objective of this subcontract over its three-year duration is to advance Solarex`s photovoltaic manufacturing technologies, reduce its a-Si:H module production costs, increase module performance and expand the Solarex commercial production capacity. Solarex shall meet these objectives by improving the deposition and quality of the transparent front contact, by optimizing the laser patterning process, scaling-up the semiconductor deposition process, improving the back contact deposition, scaling-up and improving the encapsulation and testing of its a-Si:H modules. In the Phase 2 portion of this subcontract, Solarex focused on improving deposition of the front contact, investigating alternate feed stocks for the front contact, maximizing throughput and area utilization for all laser scribes, optimizing a-Si:H deposition equipment to achieve uniform deposition over large-areas, optimizing the triple-junction module fabrication process, evaluating the materials to deposit the rear contact, and optimizing the combination of isolation scribe and encapsulant to pass the wet high potential test. Progress is reported on the following: Front contact development; Laser scribe process development; Amorphous silicon based semiconductor deposition; Rear contact deposition process; Frit/bus/wire/frame; Materials handling; and Environmental test, yield and performance analysis.

  6. Large-area, triple-junction a-Si alloy production scale-up. Semiannual subcontract report, 17 March 1993--18 September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Oswald, R.; O`Dowd, J.; Ashenfelter, W.

    1994-03-01

    This report describes work to improve the efficiency of large-area, multi-junction amorphous silicon (a-Si) alloy modules. Equipment capable of producing modules up to 0.74 m{sup 2} in area is on line and process development has begun. Preliminary cost analysis/reduction has begun to ensure that these development efforts will result in a commercialization of the large-area technology. The approach was to transfer the high-efficiency multi-junction technology from R&D into the manufacturing environment by using three different substrate sizes. Initial attempts to transfer the multijunction silicon process were made using a 0.1-m{sup 2} substrate (approximately 1 ft{sup 2}). These efforts resulted in a module with a measured aperture area efficiency of 10.32%. Simultaneous with the transfer of the silicon technology, the most complicated aspect of the technology transfer, Solarex began process development techniques on large-area modules by using the 0.37-m{sup 2} substrates. These efforts resulted in modules with a total area efficiency of 7%. Finally, initial runs on substrates 0.74 m{sup 2} were made to debug the large-area equipment in preparation of transferring the knowledge gained in the processing of the smaller substrates.

  7. a-Si:H and a-SiGe:H alloys fabricated close to powder regime of rf PECVD

    SciTech Connect

    Middya, A.R.; Hazra, S.; Ray, S.; Longeaud, C.; Kleider, J.P.

    1997-07-01

    The authors have been observing that a-Si:H and a-SiGe:H films deposited under high chamber pressure or close to powder regime (500 to 2,000 mT for a-Si:H and 200 to 1,000 mT for a-SiGe:H) show many new features: the mobility lifetime product is 10 to 100 times higher and the density of states above Fermi level of a-Si:H and a-SiGe:H ([Ge] {le} 0.20) is lower than that of standard samples. This enhancement in photoconductivity can neither be attributed to autodoping nor to creation of sensitization centers in the samples. Hydrogen bonding of these films, is mostly monohydride and the density of microstructural (polyhydrides and microvoids) defects is low. Evidence for the presence of nanocrystals is noted. Though the films seems amorphous by all conventional techniques, they crystallize easily under low laser intensity. Kinetics of light induced degradation is very fast (less than 20 hrs), for a-Si:H and the value of photoconductivity in the light soaked state is comparable to that of the standard samples in the annealed state. The process gas utilization efficiency in this regime is also higher than in the low power and pressure regime.

  8. Transient photoconductivity of a -Si sub 1 minus x Ge sub x :H alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kunst, M.; Neitzert, H.C. ); Ruebel, H. )

    1991-07-15

    Contactless measurements of the transient photoconductivity in {ital a}-Si:H and in {ital a}-Si{sub 1{minus}{ital x}}Ge{sub {ital x}}:H alloys are reported. A decrease of the effective electron mobility with increasing Ge content is observed. Because of a difference of dependence of the excitation density, two different processes are distinguished that lead to this decrease of the mobility. One is attributed to trapping and the other one leads to a decrease of the drift mobility. No increase of the recombination rate upon alloying of {ital a}-Si:H with Ge is observed as, on the contrary, the long-time decay in alloys is slower than in pure {ital a}-Si:H.

  9. Development of high stable-efficiency, triple-junction a-Si alloy solar cells. Annual subcontract report, July 18, 1994--July 17, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, X.

    1996-02-01

    This report describes work performed by Energy Conversion Devices, Inc. (ECD) under a 3-year, cost-shared amorphous silicon (a-Si) research program to develop advanced technologies and to demonstrate stable 14%-efficient, triple-junction a-Si alloy solar cells. The technologies developed under the program will then be incorporated into ECD`s continuous roll-to-roll deposition process to further enhance ECD`s photovoltaic manufacturing technology. In ECD`s solar cell design, triple-junction a-Si alloy solar cells are deposited onto stainless-steel substrates coated with Ag/ZnO back-reflector layers. This type of cell design enabled ECD to use a continuous roll- to-roll deposition process to manufacture a-Si PV materials in high volume at low cost. Using this cell design, ECD previously achieved 13.7% initial solar cell efficiency using the following features: (1) a triple-junction, two-band-gap, spectrum-splitting solar cell design; (2) a microcrystalline silicon p-layer; (3) a band-gap-profiled a- SiGe alloy as the bottom cell i-layer; (4) a high-performance AgZnO back-reflector; and (5) a high-performance tunnel junction between component cells. ECD also applied the technology into its 2-MW/yr a- Si production line and achieved the manufacturing of 4-ft{sup 2} PV modules with 8% stable efficiency. During this program, ECD is also further advancing its existing PV technology toward the goal of 14% stable solar cells by performing the following four tasks: (1) improving the stability of the intrinsic a-Si alloy materials; (2) improving the quality of low-band-gap a-SiGe alloy; (3) improving p{sup +} window layers, and (4) developing high stable-efficiency triple-junction a-Si alloy solar cells.

  10. Comprehensive research on the stability and electronic properties of a-Si:H and a-SiGe:H alloys and devices. Final subcontract report, 10 March 1991--30 August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Dalal, V.

    1995-04-01

    This report describes work on the growth of a-Si:H and a-(Si,Ge):H materials and devices using well-controlled growth techniques. The a-Si:H materials were grown at higher temperatures (300{degrees}-375{degrees}C) using electron-cyclotron-resonance (ECR) plasma techniques with a remote H beam. These films have excellent electronic quality and show significant improvements in stability compared with glow-discharge-produced a-Si:H materials. Several problems were encountered during the fabrication of devices in these materials, and we were able to overcome them by a systematic work on buffer layers in these cells. We also studied alternative designs for improving the stability of a-Si:H cells and produced graded-gap a-Si:H cells using glow-discharge that are more stable than comparable standard, ungraded glow discharge devices. Finally, systematic work was done to produce good-quality a-(Si,Ge):H films, using triode radio frequency (RF) glow-discharge with ion bombardment during growth. Diagnostic devices were made using these films, and the properties of the material, such as Urbach energies and hole mobility-lifetime products, were measured in these devices. We found a systematic increase in the Urbach energies, and a corresponding decrease in the hole and electron {mu}{tau} products, as the Ge content of the alloys increases.

  11. Microscopic origins of metastable effects in a-Si:H and deep defect characterization in a-Si,Ge:H alloys. Annual subcontract report, 1 February 1992--31 January 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, J.D.

    1993-08-01

    This report describes work to evaluate low-mobility-gap a-Si,Ge:H alloy films. Results are based on junction capacitance techniques of admittance spectroscopy, transient photocapacitance (and photocurrent), and drive-level capacitance profiling. Eight a-Si,Ge:H alloy samples grown by photo-CVD encompassed the range of optical gaps from 1.3 to 1.6 eV, and corresponding Ge fractions from about 20 to 60 at%. We employed junction capacitance techniques to determine deep defect energies and densities, Urbach band-tail energies, and {mu}{tau} products for holes. Electron microprobe analysis provided accurate Ge fractions for our samples, thus enabling us to establish clear trends in measured electronic properties vs Ge fraction. We concluded that these photo-CVD samples exhibited equal or superior properties in terms of band-tail widths, and stable defect densities compared to any reported results on a-Si,Ge:H samples grown by glow discharge. By assigning defect energy levels from analysis of transient subband-gap photocapacitance and photocurrent spectra, we found clear evidence for two distinct defect subbands, one at roughly midgap and the other in the upper half of the gap. The trapping lifetime related {mu}{tau} products for holes decreased in direct proportion to the density of mid-gap defects in these samples. This appears to be the case regardless of whether we are dealing with stable defects or defects created by light-soaking.

  12. Development of high, stable-efficiency triple-junction a-Si alloy solar cells. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, X.; Jones, S.J.; Liu, T.; Izu, M.

    1998-04-01

    This report summarizes Energy Conversion Devices, Inc.`s (ECD) research under this program. ECD researchers explored the deposition of a-Si at high rates using very-high-frequency plasma MHz, and compared these VHF i-layers with radio-frequency (RF) plasma-deposited i-layers. ECD conducted comprehensive research to develop a {mu}c-Si p{sup +} layer using VHF deposition process with the objectives of establishing a wider process window for the deposition of high-quality p{sup +} materials and further enhancing their performance of a-Si solar cells by improving its p-layers. ECD optimized the deposition of the intrinsic a-Si layer and the boron-doped {mu}c-Si p{sup +} layer to improve the V{sub oc}. Researchers deposited wide-bandgap a-Si films using high hydrogen dilution; investigated the deposition of the ZnO layer (for use in back-reflector) using a sputter deposition process involving metal Zn targets; and obtained a baseline fabrication for single-junction a-Si n-i-p devices with 10.6% initial efficiency and a baseline fabrication for triple-junction a-Si devices with 11.2% initial efficiency. ECD researchers also optimized the deposition parameters for a-SiGe with high Ge content; designed a novel structure for the p-n tunnel junction (recombination layer) in a multiple-junction solar cell; and demonstrated, in n-i-p solar cells, the improved stability of a-Si:H:F materials when deposited using a new fluorine precursor. Researchers investigated the use of c-Si(n{sup +})/a-Si alloy/Pd Schottky barrier device as a tool for the effective evaluation of photovoltaic performance on a-Si alloy materials. Through alterations in the deposition conditions and system hardware, researchers improved their understanding for the deposition of uniform and high-quality a-Si and a-SiGe films over large areas. ECD researchers also performed extensive research to optimize the deposition process of the newly constructed 5-MW back-reflector deposition machine.

  13. Research on the stability, electronic properties, and structure of a-Si:H and its alloys. Final subcontract report, 1 June 1991--31 May 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, W.B.; Johnson, N.; Nickel, N.; Schumm, G.; Street, R.A.; Thompson, R.; Tsai, C.C.; Van de Walle, C.; Walker, J.

    1995-07-01

    The authors research has focused on defect metastability and a-Si:C:H alloys. A new aspect of the metastability is the growing interest in the defect recovery process. They have continued to explore the role of hydrogen in the metastability and other properties of a-Si:H. This has led them to perform first principles calculations of Si-H bonding configurations. Another new feature of the metastability work is the study of the effects in hydrogenated poly-silicon. They have grown and studied the properties of a-Si:C:H alloys, particularly to observe the effects of hydrogen dilution. Finally they have also studied the recent defect relaxation phenomenon, and concluded that the effects arise from contact effects and are not an intrinsic effect in a-Si:H. Section A presents some recent models of metastability. Section B discusses the metastability and equilibration effects in hydrogenated polysilicon, studied because of it`s close similarity to a-Si:H. Section C describes results on a-Si:C:H alloys. Section D contains first principle LDA calculations of Si-H bonds and relates these results to the a-Si:H diffusion and metastability properties. In section E the authors report capacitance measurements aimed at exploring the recent results by Cohen et al who find an anomalous relaxation process from the trap filling kinetics of a DLTS experiment.

  14. Efficiency and Throughput Advances in Continuous Roll-to-Roll a-Si Alloy PV Manufacturing Technology: Final Subcontract Report, 22 June 1998 -- 5 October 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, T.

    2002-04-01

    This report describes a roll-to-roll triple-junction amorphous silicon alloy PV manufacturing technology developed and commercialized by Energy Conversion Devices (ECD) and United Solar Systems. This low material cost, roll-to-roll production technology has the economies of scale needed to meet the cost goals necessary for widespread use of PV. ECD has developed and built six generations of a-Si production equipment, including the present 5 MW United Solar manufacturing plant in Troy, Michigan. ECD is now designing and building a new 25-MW facility, also in Michigan. United Solar holds the world's record for amorphous silicon PV conversion efficiency, and manufactures and markets a wide range of PV products, including flexible portable modules, power modules, and innovative building-integrated PV (BIPV) shingle and metal-roofing modules that take advantage of this lightweight, rugged, and flexible PV technology. All of United Solar's power and BIPV products are approved by Underwriters Laboratories and carry a 10-year warranty. In this PVMaT 5A subcontract, ECD and United Solar are addressing issues to reduce the cost and improve the manufacturing technology for the ECD/United Solar PV module manufacturing process. ECD and United Solar identified five technology development areas that would reduce the module manufacturing cost in the present 5-MW production facility, and also be applicable to future larger-scale manufacturing facilities.

  15. Precipitation Sequence of a SiC Particle Reinforced Al-Mg-Si Alloy Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Rujuan; Wang, Yihan; Guo, Baisong; Song, Min

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the precipitation sequence of a 5 vol.% SiC particles reinforced Al-1.12 wt.%Mg-0.77 wt.%Si alloy composite fabricated by traditional powder metallurgy method was investigated by transmission electron microscopy and hardness measurements. The results indicated that the addition of SiC reinforcements not only suppresses the initial aging stage but also influences the subsequent precipitates. The precipitation sequence of the composite aged at 175 °C can be described as: Guinier-Preston (G.P.) zone → β″ → β' → B', which was confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. This work might provide the guidance for the design and fabrication of hardenable automobile body sheet by Al-based composites with enhanced mechanical properties.

  16. Investigation of current mechanisms in a-Si:H alloy solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lord, K.R. II; Syed, F.U.; Walters, M.R.; Woodyard, J.R.

    1994-12-31

    The characteristics of a-Si:H solar cells depend on their past histories, namely, voltage and light soaking times and thermal annealing. The effect of light soaking is known to reduce cell efficiencies at the 10% level. The details of the role of cell history on the basic current mechanisms are not well understood. The objective of this work is to identify the current mechanisms in I-V characteristics and elucidate their roles in cell stability. Commercial-grade single-junction cells with 0.35 cm{sup 2} active areas and 200, 500 and 800 nm thick intrinsic layers were the focus of the investigations. The cells were characterized with light and dark I-V measurements. The effects of temperature and annealing cycles were investigated. A parametric fitting model was used to quantify four current mechanisms under forward-bias conditions, namely, shunt and series resistances, current injection and depletion. The current mechanisms under reverse-bias conditions are not understood but have been characterized. The investigations show the greatest instability under forward-bias conditions occurs in the shunt resistance mechanism.

  17. Tritium Production from Palladium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Claytor, T.N.; Schwab, M.J.; Thoma, D.J.; Teter, D.F.; Tuggle, D.G.

    1998-04-19

    A number of palladium alloys have been loaded with deuterium or hydrogen under low energy bombardment in a system that allows the continuous measurement of tritium. Long run times (up to 200 h) result in an integration of the tritium and this, coupled with the high intrinsic sensitivity of the system ({approximately}0.1 nCi/l), enables the significance of the tritium measurement to be many sigma (>10). We will show the difference in tritium generation rates between batches of palladium alloys (Rh, Co, Cu, Cr, Ni, Be, B, Li, Hf, Hg and Fe) of various concentrations to illustrate that tritium generation rate is dependent on alloy type as well as within a specific alloy, dependent on concentration.

  18. FIB-assisted a-SiGe:H/a-SiC:H alloy analysis for ultra-low biased multispectral pixn sensors with enhanced color separation features and low reflective ZnO:Al back-contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bablich, Andreas; Watty, Krystian; Merfort, Christian; Böhm, Markus

    2012-06-01

    Common security CCD and CMOS imaging systems are not able to distinguish colorimetrically between dangerous chemical substances, for example whitish powders [1]. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) with profiled bandgaps can be found in solar cells to optimize the collection of incoming photons [2]. We developed multicolor photodiodes based on a-Si:H with different spectral response characteristics for a reliable, fast, cheap and non-destructive identification of potentially dangerous substances. Optical and I-V measurements were performed to explore the effect of combining linearly graded a-SiC:H-/a-SiGe:H layers with low reflective aluminum doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al) cathodes. We determined absorption coefficients and mobility-lifetime products (μτ) of graded and non-graded absorbers to calculate the penetration depth of photons at different energies into the device structure. This set of parameters enables an optimization of the intrinsic layers so that charge accumulations are generated precisely at defined device depths. Significant color separation improvements could be achieved by using ZnO:Al cathodes instead of commonly used ZnO:Al/Chromium (Cr) reflectors. As a result, we obtained multicolor diodes with highly precise adjustment of the spectral sensitivity ranging from 420 nm to 580 nm, reduced interference fringes and a very low reverse bias voltage of -2.5 V maximum. Three terminal device architectures with similar absorbers exhibit a shift from 440 nm to 630 nm by applying reverse voltages of, for instance, -11.5 V at 580 nm [3]. Present research efforts concentrate on further improvements of the absorption region to reduce the bias without affecting the optical sensor performance, using extensive bandgap engineering techniques.

  19. Powder and particulate production of metallic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, N. J.

    1982-01-01

    Developments of particulate metallurgy of alloyed materials where the final products is a fully dense body are discussed. Particulates are defined as powders, flakes, foils, silvers, ribbons and strip. Because rapid solidification is an important factor in particulate metallurgy, all of the particulates must have at least one dimension which is very fine, sometimes as fine as 10 to 50 microns, but move typically up to several hundred microns, provided that the dimension permits a minimum solidification rate of at least 100 K/s.

  20. Non-Heat Treatable Alloy Sheet Products

    SciTech Connect

    Hayden, H.W.; Barthold, G.W.; Das, S.K.

    1999-08-01

    ALCAR is an innovative approach for conducting multi-company, pre-competitive research and development programs. ALCAR has been formed to crate a partnership of aluminum producers, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Center for Research and Technology Development (ASME/CRTD), the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), three USDOE National Laboratories, and a Technical Advisory Committee for conducting cooperative, pre-competitive research on the development of flower-cost, non-heat treated (NHT) aluminum alloys for automotive sheet applications with strength, formability and surface appearance similar to current heat treated (HT) aluminum alloys under consideration. The effort has been supported by the USDOE, Office of Transportation Technology (OTT) through a three-year program with 50/50 cost share at a total program cost of $3 million. The program has led to the development of new and modified 5000 series aluminum ally compositions. Pilot production-size ingots have bee n melted, cast, hot rolled and cold rolled. Stamping trials on samples of rolled product for demonstrating production of typical automotive components have been successful.

  1. REGENERATION OF FISSION-PRODUCT-CONTAINING MAGNESIUM-THORIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Chiotti, P.

    1964-02-01

    A process of regenerating a magnesium-thorium alloy contaminated with fission products, protactinium, and uranium is presented. A molten mixture of KCl--LiCl-MgCl/sub 2/ is added to the molten alloy whereby the alkali, alkaline parth, and rare earth fission products (including yttrium) and some of the thorium and uranium are chlorinated and

  2. Measurement protocol dependent magnetocaloric properties in a Si-doped Mn-rich Mn-Ni-Sn-Si off-stoichiometric Heusler alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Arup; Sen, Pintu; Mandal, Kalyan

    2016-05-01

    This work reports the magnetocaloric properties in a Si-doped, Mn-rich Mn46Ni39.5Sn10Si4.5 alloy in the aspects of different measurement protocols across its martensitic and reverse transition. A good agreeable value of the magnetic entropy changes (ΔSM ˜ 20 J/kg K due to a ΔH = 50 kOe) along with large refrigerant capacity (RC ˜ 110 J/kg) has been obtained from the high field M-T measurements, which can be a very handy tool for magnetocaloric study. We have analyzed the field dependent magnetization data during heating and cooling near the structural transition for different field changes and fitted them universally using a Lorentz function. The isothermal measurement by ramping the temperature discontinuously during cooling is found to be one of the most convenient and energy efficient ways to minimize the field induced losses, which helps to achieve a very high RC in similar materials exhibiting first order phase transition. A significant amount of zero field cooled exchange bias field (˜720 Oe at 5 K) and magnetoresistance (˜-25% due to a ΔH = 80 kOe) has also been achieved from this sample.

  3. Production and processing of Cu-Cr-Nb alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.; Michal, Gary M.; Orth, Norman W.

    1990-01-01

    A new Cu-based alloy possessing high strength, high conductivity, and good stability at elevated temperatures was recently produced. This paper details the melting of the master alloys, production of rapidly solidified ribbon, and processing of the ribbon to sheet by hot pressing and hot rolling.

  4. An electrolytic process for magnesium and its alloys production

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R.

    1996-10-01

    The largest amount of magnesium is used for aluminum-magnesium alloy production. The second largest use is in desulfurization of steel. A magnesium {minus}10 weight percent (w/o) aluminum alloy can also be used in both the above processes. Pure magnesium metal is not of much use for structural purposes. However, a magnesium {minus}10 w/o aluminum alloy melt which is also suitable for structural applications, can be produced as a bottom layer in an electrolytic magnesium production cell using a potassium chloride-magnesium chloride electrolyte at {approximately} 750 C. In this situation, the magnesium production process and the cell can be similar to the aluminum production process and its cell. The magnesium-aluminum alloys can be produced by electrolysis at far less cost than these alloys produced from the respective metals. The process can also be used to produce other magnesium alloys for use in the auto industry at comparatively far less cost. The largest increase in the magnesium usage in the future is going to be only in the magnesium alloys sector.

  5. Production feature of soft magnetic amorphous alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagunov, A. G.; Baryshev, E. E.; Shmakova, K. Yu

    2016-06-01

    Methods for making nanocrystalline alloys have been discussed. Temperature dependences of the surface tension (σ), electric resistivity (ρ), magnetic susceptibility (χ) and kinematic viscosity (ν) have been obtained. Comparison of the properties of amorphous ribbons obtained by the pilot and serial technologies has been conducted. Science-based technology of multi-component alloy smelting makes it possible to prepare equilibrium smelt, the structure of which has a significant effect on the properties of the amorphous ribbon before spinning and kinetics of its crystallization has been offered.

  6. Comprehensive research on stability and performance of a-Si:H and alloys. Phase I team annual technical report, 31, May 1994--30, May 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Dalal, V

    1996-08-01

    This report covers the research done during the first phase of the subcontract. During this period, we have concentrated on two areas: improving the voltage and stability of a-Si:H devices made using ECR deposition, and improving the properties of a-(Si,Ge):H films also using ECR deposition.

  7. Efficiency and throughput advances in continuous roll-to-roll a-Si alloy PV manufacturing technology: Annual technical progress report: 22 June 1998--21 June 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Izu, M.

    1999-11-09

    This document reports on work performed by Energy Conversion Devices, Inc. (ECD) during Phase 1 of this subcontract. During this period, ECD researchers: (1) Completed design and construction of new, improved substrate heater; (2) Tested and verified improved performance of the new substrate heater in the pilot machine; (3) Verified improved performance of the new substrate heater in the production machine; (4) Designed and bench-tested a new infrared temperature sensor; (5) Installed a prototype new infrared temperature sensor in the production machine for evaluation; (6) Designed a new rolling thermocouple temperature sensor; (7) Designed and bench-tested a reflectometer for the backreflector deposition machine; (8) Designed and bench-tested in-line non-contacting cell diagnostic sensor and PV capacitive diagnostic system; (9) Installed the in-line cell diagnostic sensor in the 5-MW a-Si deposition machine for evaluation; (10) Demonstrated a new low-cost zinc metal process in the pilot back reflector machine; and (11) Fully tested a new cathode design for improved uniformity.

  8. Efficiency and Throughput Advances in Continuous Roll-To-Roll a{_}Si Alloy PV Manufacturing Technology: Phase II Annual Subcontract Technical Report; June 1999--August 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, T.

    2000-12-07

    This report describes the project by Energy Conversion Devices, Inc. (ECD) and its American joint venture, United Solar Systems Corp. (United Solar), to develop and commercialize a roll-to-roll triple-junction amorphous silicon alloy PV manufacturing technology. This low material cost, roll-to-roll production technology has the economies of scale to meet the cost goals necessary for widespread use of PV. ECD developed and built the present 5-MW United Solar manufacturing plant in Troy, Michigan, and is now designing and building a new 25-MW facility, also in Michigan. United Solar holds the world's record for amorphous silicon PV conversion efficiency, and manufactures and markets a wide range of PV products including flexible portable modules, power modules, and innovative building-integrated PV (BIPV) shingle and metal-roofing modules that take advantage of this lightweight, rugged, and flexible PV technology. All of United Solar's power and BIPV products are approved by Underwriters Laboratories and carry a 10-year warranty. ECD and United Solar are addressing issues to reduce the cost and to improve the manufacturing technology for the ECD/United Solar PV module manufacturing process. ECD and United Solar identified five technology development tasks that would reduce the module manufacturing cost in the present 5-MW production facility and would also be applicable to future larger-scale manufacturing facilities. These development tasks are: Task 5: Improved substrate heating and monitoring systems; Task 6: The development of new on-line diagnostic systems; Task 7: Development of new back-reflector deposition technology; Task 8: Development of improved RF PECVD reactor cathode and gas distribution configurations; and Task 8A: Development of new pinch valve technology.

  9. [Evaluating occupational health risk in titanium alloys production workers].

    PubMed

    Bazarova, E L

    2007-01-01

    The authors present data on evaluation of personified and non-personified occupational risk of health disorders in titanium alloys production workers, concerning hygienic, medical and biologic, social and psychologic criteria. One-digit assessment of the work conditions is suggested.

  10. Study of gap states in a-Si:H alloys by measurements of photoconductivity and spectral response of MIS solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanier, P. E.; Delahoy, A. E.; Griffith, R. W.

    1981-06-01

    A picture of the density of gap states n (E) in glow discharge a-Si:H is constructed using four different kinds of transport measurement on a large number of samples. The minimum in n (E) lies 0.4 eV below Ec, rather than in the middle of the gap. A distribution of fast recombination centers lies at mid-gap, and two sets of hole traps lie between mid-gap and the valence band. Modifications in n (E) have been studied by the effects of selected impurities on the conversion efficiency and spectral response of MIS and pin solar cells.

  11. Identification of the Chemical Bonding Prompting Adhesion of a-C:H Thin Films on Ferrous Alloy Intermediated by a SiCx:H Buffer Layer.

    PubMed

    Cemin, F; Bim, L T; Leidens, L M; Morales, M; Baumvol, I J R; Alvarez, F; Figueroa, C A

    2015-07-29

    Amorphous carbon (a-C) and several related materials (DLCs) may have ultralow friction coefficients that can be used for saving-energy applications. However, poor chemical bonding of a-C/DLC films on metallic alloys is expected, due to the stability of carbon-carbon bonds. Silicon-based intermediate layers are employed to enhance the adherence of a-C:H films on ferrous alloys, although the role of such buffer layers is not yet fully understood in chemical terms. The chemical bonding of a-C:H thin films on ferrous alloy intermediated by a nanometric SiCx:H buffer layer was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The chemical profile was inspected by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES), and the chemical structure was evaluated by Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. The nature of adhesion is discussed by analyzing the chemical bonding at the interfaces of the a-C:H/SiCx:H/ferrous alloy sandwich structure. The adhesion phenomenon is ascribed to specifically chemical bonding character at the buffer layer. Whereas carbon-carbon (C-C) and carbon-silicon (C-Si) bonds are formed at the outermost interface, the innermost interface is constituted mainly by silicon-iron (Si-Fe) bonds. The oxygen presence degrades the adhesion up to totally delaminate the a-C:H thin films. The SiCx:H deposition temperature determines the type of chemical bonding and the amount of oxygen contained in the buffer layer.

  12. Research on the stability, electronic properties, and structure of a-Si:H and its alloys. Annual subcontract report, 1 June 1992--31 May 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, W.B.; Johnson, N.; Nickel, N.

    1994-02-01

    This report describes work focusing on the defect and transport properties of a-Si:H with particular emphasis on defect metastability. Light-induced defects remain the major impediment to higher stabilized solar cell efficiencies. The many years of research have shown that this is a difficult problem to solve, and we take the view that a solution can be found only with a deep understanding of the mechanism; this has been our main goal. The metastability is closely related to the intrinsic defect properties, so these studies have also led to a greatly improved model of all the electronic properties of a-Si:H. Section A of the report discusses a theoretical analysis of the defect pool model for the equilibrium dark defect density, with particular reference to whether there are significant charged defects. Section B discusses the use of an electronic transport model to analyze forward and reverse currents and extends it to the calculation of field dependences of bulk and contact currents, which give more precision to the analysis of defects from reverse bias thermal generation currents. Electronic transport is discussed in Section C. Work done on H transport and bonding is described in Section D.

  13. Study of gap states in a-Si:H alloys by measurements of photoconductivity and spectral response of MIS solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Vanier, P.E.; Delahoy, A.E.; Griffith, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    A picture of the density of gap states n(E) in glow discharge a-Si:H is constructed using four different kinds of transport measurement on a large number of samples. The minimum in n(E) lies 0.4 eV below E/sub c/, rather than in the middle of the gap. A distribution of fast recombination centers lies at mid-gap, and two sets of hole traps lie between mid-gap and the valence band. Modifications in n(E) have been studied by the effects of selected impurities on the conversion efficiency and spectral response of MIS and p-i-n solar cells.

  14. The effects of a SiO2 coating on the corrosion parameters cpTi and Ti-6Al-7Nb alloy

    PubMed Central

    Basiaga, Marcin; Walke, Witold; Paszenda, Zbigniew; Karasiński, Paweł; Szewczenko, Janusz

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to evaluate the usefulness of the sol-gel method application, to modificate the surface of the Ti6Al7Nb alloy and the cpTi titanium (Grade 4) with SiO2 oxide, applied on the vascular implants to improve their hemocompatibility. Mechanical treatment was followed by film deposition on surface of the titanium samples. An appropriate selection of the process parameters was verified in the studies of corrosion, using potentiodynamic and impedance method. A test was conducted in the solution simulating blood vessels environment, in simulated body fluid at t = 37.0 ± 1 °C and pH = 7.0 ± 0.2. Results showed varied electrochemical properties of the SiO2 film, depending on its deposition parameters. Correlations between corrosion resistance and layer adhesion to the substrate were observed, depending on annealing temperature. PMID:25482412

  15. Investigation of the radiation resistance of triple-junction a-Si:H alloy solar cells irradiated with 1.00 MeV protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lord, Kenneth R., II; Walters, Michael R.; Woodyard, James R.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of 1.00 MeV proton irradiation on hydrogenated amorphous silicon alloy triple-junction solar cells is reported for the first time. The cells were designed for radiation resistance studies and included 0.35 cm(sup 2) active areas on 1.0 by 2.0 cm(sup 2) glass superstrates. Three cells were irradiated through the bottom contact at each of six fluences between 5.10E12 and 1.46E15 cm(sup -2). The effect of the irradiations was determined with light current-voltage measurements. Proton irradiation degraded the cell power densities from 8.0 to 98 percent for the fluences investigated. Annealing irradiated cells at 200 C for two hours restored the power densities to better than 90 percent. The cells exhibited radiation resistances which are superior to cells reported in the literature for fluences less than 1E14 cm(sup -2).

  16. Effects of heat treatment and reinforcement size on reinforcement fracture during tension testing of a SiC[sub p] discontinuously reinforced aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, P.M.; Lewandowski, J.J. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-11-01

    The effects of heat-treatment, matrix microstructure, and reinforcement size on the evolution of damage, in the form of SiC[sub p] cracking, during uniaxial tension testing of an aluminum-alloy based composite have been determined. A powder metallurgy Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy reinforced with 15 vol pct of either 5 or 13 [mu]m average size SiC[sub p] was heat treated to solution annealed (SA), underaged (UA), and overaged (OA) conditions. The SA treatment exhibited lower yield strength and higher ductility for both particulate sizes compared to the UA and OA conditions. The evolution of damage, in the form of SiC[sub p] fracture, was monitored quantitatively using metallography and changes in modulus on sequentially strained specimens. It is shown that the evolution of SiC[sub p] fracture is very dependent on particulate size, matrix aging condition, and the details of the matrix-reinforcement interfacial regions. SiC[sub p] fracture was exhibited by the UA and OA treatment over a range of strains, while a preference for failure near the SiC[sub p]/matrix interfaces and in the matrix was exhibited in the OA material. While the percentage of cracked SiC[sub p] at each global strain typically was equal or somewhat lower in the material reinforced with 5[mu]m average size SiC[sub p], the absolute number of cracked SiC[sub p] was always higher at each heat treatment. Damage (e.g., voids) in matrix and near the SiC[sub p]/matrix interfaces was additionally observed, although its extent was highly matrix and particle-size dependent. It was always observed that increases in stress (and strain) produced a larger amount of fractures SiC[sub p]. However, neither a global stress-based nor a global strain-based model was sufficient in converging the amount of SiC[sub p] fractured for all heat treatments and particle sizes tested.

  17. Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Hayden, Jr., Howard W.; Horton, James A.; Elliott, Guy R. B.

    1995-01-01

    A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO.sub.3), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO.sub.2). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl.sub.4), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation.

  18. Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Hayden, H.W. Jr.; Horton, J.A.; Elliott, G.R.B.

    1995-06-06

    A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO{sub 3}), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl{sub 4}), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation. 4 figs.

  19. Atomic scale modelling of hexagonal structured metallic fission product alloys.

    PubMed

    Middleburgh, S C; King, D M; Lumpkin, G R

    2015-04-01

    Noble metal particles in the Mo-Pd-Rh-Ru-Tc system have been simulated on the atomic scale using density functional theory techniques for the first time. The composition and behaviour of the epsilon phases are consistent with high-entropy alloys (or multi-principal component alloys)-making the epsilon phase the only hexagonally close packed high-entropy alloy currently described. Configurational entropy effects were considered to predict the stability of the alloys with increasing temperatures. The variation of Mo content was modelled to understand the change in alloy structure and behaviour with fuel burnup (Mo molar content decreases in these alloys as burnup increases). The predicted structures compare extremely well with experimentally ascertained values. Vacancy formation energies and the behaviour of extrinsic defects (including iodine and xenon) in the epsilon phase were also investigated to further understand the impact that the metallic precipitates have on fuel performance.

  20. Atomic scale modelling of hexagonal structured metallic fission product alloys

    PubMed Central

    Middleburgh, S. C.; King, D. M.; Lumpkin, G. R.

    2015-01-01

    Noble metal particles in the Mo-Pd-Rh-Ru-Tc system have been simulated on the atomic scale using density functional theory techniques for the first time. The composition and behaviour of the epsilon phases are consistent with high-entropy alloys (or multi-principal component alloys)—making the epsilon phase the only hexagonally close packed high-entropy alloy currently described. Configurational entropy effects were considered to predict the stability of the alloys with increasing temperatures. The variation of Mo content was modelled to understand the change in alloy structure and behaviour with fuel burnup (Mo molar content decreases in these alloys as burnup increases). The predicted structures compare extremely well with experimentally ascertained values. Vacancy formation energies and the behaviour of extrinsic defects (including iodine and xenon) in the epsilon phase were also investigated to further understand the impact that the metallic precipitates have on fuel performance. PMID:26064629

  1. Production of Cu-Al-Ni Shape Memory Alloys by Mechanical Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Goegebakan, Musa; Soguksu, Ali Kemal; Uzun, Orhan; Dogan, Ali

    2007-04-23

    The mechanical alloying technique has been used to produce shape memory Cu83Al13Ni4 alloy. The structure and thermal properties were examined by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The morphology of the surface suggests the presence of martensite.

  2. Spiked Alloy Production for Accelerated Aging of Plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Wilk, P A; McNeese, J A; Dodson, K E; Williams, W L; Krikorian, O H; Blau, M S; Schmitz, J E; Bajao, F G; Mew, D A; Matz, T E; Torres, R A; Holck, D M; Moody, K J; Kenneally, J M

    2009-07-10

    The accelerated aging effects on weapons grade plutonium alloys are being studied using {sup 238}Pu-enriched plutonium metal to increase the rate of formation of defect structures. Pyrochemical processing methods have been used to produce two {sup 238}Pu-spiked plutonium alloys with nominal compositions of 7.5 wt% {sup 238}Pu. Processes used in the preparation of the alloys include direct oxide reduction of PuO{sub 2} with calcium and electrorefining. Rolled disks were prepared from the spiked alloys for sampling. Test specimens were cut out of the disks for physical property measurements.

  3. Process for making a martensitic steel alloy fuel cladding product

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Gerald D.; Lobsinger, Ralph J.; Hamilton, Margaret L.; Gelles, David S.

    1990-01-01

    This is a very narrowly defined martensitic steel alloy fuel cladding material for liquid metal cooled reactors, and a process for making such a martensitic steel alloy material. The alloy contains about 10.6 wt. % chromium, about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, about 0.85 wt. % manganese, about 0.2 wt. % niobium, about 0.37 wt. % silicon, about 0.2 wt. % carbon, about 0.2 wt. % vanadium, 0.05 maximum wt. % nickel, about 0.015 wt. % nitrogen, about 0.015 wt. % sulfur, about 0.05 wt. % copper, about 0.007 wt. % boron, about 0.007 wt. % phosphorous, and with the remainder being essentially iron. The process utilizes preparing such an alloy and homogenizing said alloy at about 1000.degree. C. for 16 hours; annealing said homogenized alloy at 1150.degree. C. for 15 minutes; and tempering said annealed alloy at 700.degree. C. for 2 hours. The material exhibits good high temperature strength (especially long stress rupture life) at elevated temperature (500.degree.-760.degree. C.).

  4. Ni-Si Alloys for the S-I Reactor-Hydrogen Production Process Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph W. Newkirk; Richard K. Brow

    2010-01-21

    The overall goal of this project was to develop Ni-Si alloys for use in vessels to contain hot, pressurized sulfuric acid. The application was to be in the decomposition loop of the thermochemical cycle for production of hydrogen.

  5. [MEDICAL AND PREVENTIVE MEASURES FOR REDUCING CHEMICAL OCCUPATIONAL RISKS IN THE PRODUCTION OF TITANIUM ALLOYS].

    PubMed

    Bazarova, E L; Osherov, I S; Roslyĭ, O F; Tartakovskaia, L Ia

    2015-01-01

    An innovative approach in the prevention and rehabilitation of workers employed in the production of titanium alloys envisages the implementation of targeted multi-stage rehabilitation measures in groups with high occupational risk.

  6. Sintered rare earth-iron Laves phase magnetostrictive alloy product and preparation thereof

    DOEpatents

    Malekzadeh, Manoochehr; Pickus, Milton R.

    1979-01-01

    A sintered rare earth-iron Laves phase magnetostrictive alloy product characterized by a grain oriented morphology. The grain oriented morphology is obtained by magnetically aligning powder particles of the magnetostrictive alloy prior to sintering. Specifically disclosed are grain oriented sintered compacts of Tb.sub.x Dy.sub.1-x Fe.sub.2 and their method of preparation. The present sintered products have enhanced magnetostrictive properties.

  7. Some problems of the production and application of titanium carbide alloys with steel bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Kyubarsepp, Ya.P.; Val'dma, L.E.; Annuka, Kh.I.

    1987-09-01

    The authors assess the feasibility of recreating the mechanical properties of tungsten carbides in a titanium carbide-chromium steel composite for the purpose of conserving tungsten and reducing materials costs in the production of highly wear-resistant alloys. To this end they investigate the effects of production, materials content, surface hardening, and tempering on the abrasive wear resistance and impact and flexural strength of several alloy compositions.

  8. Production and fabrication of vanadium alloys for the radiative divertor program of DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.R.; Smith, J.P.; Stambaugh, R.D.

    1996-04-01

    V-4Cr-4-Ti alloy has been recently selected for use in the manufacture of a portion of the DIII-D Radiative Divertor modification, as part of an overall DIII-D vanadium alloy deployment effort developed by General Atomics (GA) in conjunction with the Argonne and Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ANL or ORNL). The goal of this work is to produce a production-scale heat of the alloy and fabricate it into product forms for the manufacture of a portion of the Radiative Divertor (RD) for the DIII-D tokamak, to develop the fabrications technology for manufacture of the vanadium alloy radiative Divertor components, and to determine the effects of typical tokamak environments in the behavior of the vanadium alloy. The production of a {approx}1300-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy is currently in progress at Teledyne Wah Chang of Albany, oregon (TWCA) to provide sufficient material for applicable product forms. Two unalloyed vanadium ingots for the alloy have already been produced by electron beam melting of raw processes vanadium. Chemical compositions of one ingot and a portion of the second were acceptable, and Charpy V-Notch (CVN) impact test performed on processed ingot samples indicated ductile behavior. Material from these ingots are currently being blended with chromium and titanium additions, and will be vacuum-arc remelted into a V-4Cr-4Ti alloy ingot and converted into product forms suitable for components of the DIII-D RD structure. Several joining methods selected for specific applications in fabrication of the RD components are being investigated, and preliminary trials have been successful in the joining of V-alloy to itself by both resistance and inertial welding processes and to Inconel 625 by inertial welding.

  9. Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabeza, Sandra; Garcés, Gerardo; Pérez, Pablo; Adeva, Paloma

    2014-07-01

    The Mg98.5Gd1Zn0.5 alloy produced by a powder metallurgy route was studied and compared with the same alloy produced by extrusion of ingots. Atomized powders were cold compacted and extruded at 623 K and 673 K (350 °C and 400 °C). The microstructure of extruded materials was characterized by α-Mg grains, and Mg3Gd and 14H-LPSO particles located at grain boundaries. Grain size decreased from 6.8 μm in the extruded ingot, down to 1.6 μm for powders extruded at 623 K (350 °C). Grain refinement resulted in an increase in mechanical properties at room and high temperatures. Moreover, at high temperatures the PM alloy showed superplasticity at high strain rates, with elongations to failure up to 700 pct.

  10. Production and fabrication of vanadium alloys for the radiative divertor program of DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.R.; Smith, J.P.; Trester, P.W.

    1997-04-01

    V-4Cr-4Ti alloy has been selected for use in the manufacture of a portion of the DIII-D Radiative Divertor upgrade. The production of a 1200-kg ingot of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy, and processing into final sheet and rod product forms suitable for components of the DIII-D Radiative Divertor structure, has been completed at Wah Chang (formerly Teledyne Wah Chang) of Albany, Oregon (WCA). Joining of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy has been identified as the most critical fabrication issue for its use in the RD Program, and research into several joining methods for fabrication of the RD components, including resistance seam, friction, and electron beam welding, is continuing. Preliminary trials have been successful in the joining of V-alloy to itself by electron beam, resistance, and friction welding processes, and to Inconel 625 by friction welding. An effort to investigate the explosive bonding of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy to Inconel 625 has also been initiated, and results have been encouraging. In addition, preliminary tests have been completed to evaluate the susceptibility of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy to stress corrosion cracking in DIII-D cooling water, and the effects of exposure to DIII-D bakeout conditions on the tensile and fracture behavior of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy.

  11. [Using Raman spectrum analysis to research corrosive productions occurring in alloy of ancient bronze wares].

    PubMed

    Jia, La-jiang; Jin, Pu-jun

    2015-01-01

    The present paper analyzes the interior rust that occurred in bronze alloy sample from 24 pieces of Early Qin bronze wares. Firstly, samples were processed by grinding, polishing and ultrasonic cleaning-to make a mirror surface. Then, a confocal micro-Raman spectrometer was employed to carry out spectroscopic study on the inclusions in samples. The conclusion indicated that corrosive phases are PbCO3 , PbO and Cu2O, which are common rusting production on bronze alloy. The light-colored circular or massive irregular areas in metallographic structure of samples are proved as Cu2O, showing that bronze wares are not only easy to be covered with red Cu2O rusting layer, but also their alloy is easy to be eroded by atomic oxygen. In other words, the rust Cu2O takes place in both the interior and exterior parts of the bronze alloy. In addition, Raman spectrum analysis shows that the dark grey materials are lead corrosive products--PbCO3 and PbO, showing the corroding process of lead element as Pb -->PbO-->PbCO3. In the texture of cast state of bronze alloy, lead is usually distributed as independent particles between the different alloy phases. The lead particles in bronze alloy would have oxidation reaction and generate PbO when buried in the soil, and then have chemical reaction with CO3(2-) dissolved in the underground water to generate PbCO3, which is a rather stable lead corrosive production. A conclusion can be drawn that the external corrosive factors (water, dissolved oxygen and carbonate, etc) can enter the bronze ware interior through the passageway between different phases and make the alloy to corrode gradually. PMID:25993834

  12. [Using Raman spectrum analysis to research corrosive productions occurring in alloy of ancient bronze wares].

    PubMed

    Jia, La-jiang; Jin, Pu-jun

    2015-01-01

    The present paper analyzes the interior rust that occurred in bronze alloy sample from 24 pieces of Early Qin bronze wares. Firstly, samples were processed by grinding, polishing and ultrasonic cleaning-to make a mirror surface. Then, a confocal micro-Raman spectrometer was employed to carry out spectroscopic study on the inclusions in samples. The conclusion indicated that corrosive phases are PbCO3 , PbO and Cu2O, which are common rusting production on bronze alloy. The light-colored circular or massive irregular areas in metallographic structure of samples are proved as Cu2O, showing that bronze wares are not only easy to be covered with red Cu2O rusting layer, but also their alloy is easy to be eroded by atomic oxygen. In other words, the rust Cu2O takes place in both the interior and exterior parts of the bronze alloy. In addition, Raman spectrum analysis shows that the dark grey materials are lead corrosive products--PbCO3 and PbO, showing the corroding process of lead element as Pb -->PbO-->PbCO3. In the texture of cast state of bronze alloy, lead is usually distributed as independent particles between the different alloy phases. The lead particles in bronze alloy would have oxidation reaction and generate PbO when buried in the soil, and then have chemical reaction with CO3(2-) dissolved in the underground water to generate PbCO3, which is a rather stable lead corrosive production. A conclusion can be drawn that the external corrosive factors (water, dissolved oxygen and carbonate, etc) can enter the bronze ware interior through the passageway between different phases and make the alloy to corrode gradually.

  13. Production and fabrication of vanadium alloys for the radiative divertor program of DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.R.; Smith, J.P.

    1997-08-01

    V-4Cr-4Ti alloy has been selected for use in the manufacture of a portion of the DIII-D Radiative Divertor upgrade. The production of a 1200-kg ingot of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy, and processing into final sheet and rod product forms suitable for components of the DIII-D Radiative Divertor Program (RDP), has been completed by Wah Chang (formerly Teledyne Wah Chang) of Albany, Oregon (WCA). CVN impact tests on sheet material indicate that the material has properties comparable to other previously-processed V-4Cr-4Ti and V-5Cr-5Ti alloys. Joining of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy has been identified as the most critical fabrication issue for its use in the RDP, and research into several joining methods for fabrication of the RDP components, including resistance seam, friction, and electron beam welding, and explosive bonding is being pursued. Preliminary trials have been successful in the joining of V-alloy to itself by resistance, friction, and electron beam welding processes, and to Inconel 625 by friction welding. In addition, an effort to investigate the explosive bonding of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy to Inconel 625, in both tube-to-bar and sheet-to-sheet configurations, has been initiated, and results have been encouraging.

  14. Alloy waste forms for metal fission products and actinides isolated by spent nuclear fuel treatment

    SciTech Connect

    McDeavitt, S.M.; Abraham, D.P.; Keiser, D.D. Jr.; Park, J.Y.

    1996-10-01

    Waste form alloys are being developed at Argonne National Laboratory for the disposal of remnant metallic wastes from an electrometallurgical process developed to treat spent nuclear fuel. This metal waste form consists of the fuel cladding (stainless steel or Zircaloy), noble metal fission products (e.g., Ru, Pd, Mo and Tc), and other metallic wastes. The main constituents of the metal waste stream are the cladding hulls (85 to 90 wt%); using the hulls as the dominant alloying component minimizes the overall waste volume as compared to vitrification or metal encapsulation. Two nominal compositions for the waste form are being developed: (1) stainless steel-15 wt% zirconium for stainless steel-clad fuels and (2) zirconium-8 wt% stainless steel for Zircaloy-clad fuels. The noble metal fission products are the primary source of radiation in the metal waste form. However, inclusion of actinides in the metal waste form is being investigated as an option for interim or ultimate storage. Simulated waste form alloys were prepared and analyzed to determine the baseline alloy microstructures and the microstructural distribution of noble metals and actinides. Corrosion tests of the metal waste form alloys indicate that they are highly resistant to corrosion.

  15. Cerium-based, intermetallic-strengthened aluminum casting alloy: High-volume co-product development

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sims, Zachary C.; Weiss, D.; McCall, S. K.; McGuire, M. A.; Ott, R. T.; Geer, Tom; Rios, Orlando; Turchi, P. A. E.

    2016-05-23

    Here, several rare earth elements are considered by-products to rare earth mining efforts. By using one of these by-product elements in a high-volume application such as aluminum casting alloys, the supply of more valuable rare earths can be globally stabilized. Stabilizing the global rare earth market will decrease the long-term criticality of other rare earth elements. The low demand for Ce, the most abundant rare earth, contributes to the instability of rare earth extraction. In this article, we discuss a series of intermetallic-strengthened Al alloys that exhibit the potential for new high-volume use of Ce. The castability, structure, and mechanicalmore » properties of binary, ternary, and quaternary Al-Ce based alloys are discussed. We have determined Al-Ce based alloys to be highly castable across a broad range of compositions. Nanoscale intermetallics dominate the microstructure and are the theorized source of the high ductility. In addition, room-temperature physical properties appear to be competitive with existing aluminum alloys with extended high-temperature stability of the nanostructured intermetallic.« less

  16. Cerium-Based, Intermetallic-Strengthened Aluminum Casting Alloy: High-Volume Co-product Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, Zachary C.; Weiss, D.; McCall, S. K.; McGuire, M. A.; Ott, R. T.; Geer, Tom; Rios, Orlando; Turchi, P. A. E.

    2016-07-01

    Several rare earth elements are considered by-products to rare earth mining efforts. By using one of these by-product elements in a high-volume application such as aluminum casting alloys, the supply of more valuable rare earths can be globally stabilized. Stabilizing the global rare earth market will decrease the long-term criticality of other rare earth elements. The low demand for Ce, the most abundant rare earth, contributes to the instability of rare earth extraction. In this article, we discuss a series of intermetallic-strengthened Al alloys that exhibit the potential for new high-volume use of Ce. The castability, structure, and mechanical properties of binary, ternary, and quaternary Al-Ce based alloys are discussed. We have determined Al-Ce based alloys to be highly castable across a broad range of compositions. Nanoscale intermetallics dominate the microstructure and are the theorized source of the high ductility. In addition, room-temperature physical properties appear to be competitive with existing aluminum alloys with extended high-temperature stability of the nanostructured intermetallic.

  17. High-Efficiency Amorphous Silicon Alloy Based Solar Cells and Modules; Final Technical Progress Report, 30 May 2002--31 May 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Guha, S.; Yang, J.

    2005-10-01

    The principal objective of this R&D program is to expand, enhance, and accelerate knowledge and capabilities for development of high-efficiency hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and amorphous silicon-germanium alloy (a-SiGe:H) related thin-film multijunction solar cells and modules with low manufacturing cost and high reliability. Our strategy has been to use the spectrum-splitting triple-junction structure, a-Si:H/a-SiGe:H/a-SiGe:H, to improve solar cell and module efficiency, stability, and throughput of production. The methodology used to achieve the objectives included: (1) explore the highest stable efficiency using the triple-junction structure deposited using RF glow discharge at a low rate, (2) fabricate the devices at a high deposition rate for high throughput and low cost, and (3) develop an optimized recipe using the R&D batch large-area reactor to help the design and optimization of the roll-to-roll production machines. For short-term goals, we have worked on the improvement of a-Si:H and a-SiGe:H alloy solar cells. a-Si:H and a-SiGe:H are the foundation of current a-Si:H based thin-film photovoltaic technology. Any improvement in cell efficiency, throughput, and cost reduction will immediately improve operation efficiency of our manufacturing plant, allowing us to further expand our production capacity.

  18. oxide and FeNi alloy: product dependence on the reduction ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jungang; Qin, Yuyang; Li, Minglun; Zhao, Shuyuan; Li, Jianjun

    2014-12-01

    Based on the sol-gel combustion method, stoichiometric Fe3+, Mn2+, Ni2+ ions and citric acid were chosen as the initial reactants for the preparation of magnetic particles. Due to the different reduction ability of metal ions, completely different magnetic products (MnFe2O4 oxide and FeNi alloy) were obtained by heating the flakes at 600 °C under nitrogen atmosphere. MnFe2O4 particles exhibit superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature, and martensitic phase transformation is observed magnetically at 125 K for FeNi alloy particles.

  19. Thermal Exposure Effects on Properties of Al-Li Alloy Plate Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Sandeep; Wells, Douglas; Wagner, John; Babel, Henry

    2002-01-01

    Aluminum-Lithium (AL-Li) alloys offer significant performance benefits for aerospace structural applications due to their higher specific properties compared with conventional aluminum alloys. For example, the application of an Al-Li alloy to the space shuttle external cryogenic fuel tank contributed to the weight savings that enabled successful deployment of International Space Station components. The composition and heat treatment of this alloy were optimized specifically for strength-toughness considerations for an expendable cryogenic tank. Time dependent properties related to reliability, such as thermal stability, fatigue, and corrosion, will be of significant interest when materials are evaluated for a reusable cryotank structure. As most aerospace structural hardware is weight sensitive, a reusable cryotank will be designed to the limits of the materials mechanical properties. Therefore, this effort was designed to establish the effects of thermal exposure on the mechanical properties and microstructure of one relatively production mature alloy and two developmental alloys C458 and L277. Tensile and fracture toughness behavior was evaluated after exposure to temperatures as high as 3oooF for up to IO00 hrs. Microstructural changes were also evaluated to correlate with the observed data trends. The ambient temperature parent metal data showed an increase in strength and reduction in elongation after exposure at lower temperatures. Strength reached a peak with intermediate temperature exposure followed by a decrease at highest exposure temperature. Characterizing the effect of thermal exposure on the properties of Al-Li alloys is important to defining a service limiting temperature, exposure time, and end-of-life properties.

  20. Production of Magnesium and Aluminum-Magnesium Alloys from Recycled Secondary Aluminum Scrap Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gesing, Adam J.; Das, Subodh K.; Loutfy, Raouf O.

    2016-02-01

    An experimental proof of concept was demonstrated for a patent-pending and trademark-pending RE12™ process for extracting a desired amount of Mg from recycled scrap secondary Al melts. Mg was extracted by electrorefining, producing a Mg product suitable as a Mg alloying hardener additive to primary-grade Al alloys. This efficient electrorefining process operates at high current efficiency, high Mg recovery and low energy consumption. The Mg electrorefining product can meet all the impurity specifications with subsequent melt treatment for removing alkali contaminants. All technical results obtained in the RE12™ project indicate that the electrorefining process for extraction of Mg from Al melt is technically feasible. A techno-economic analysis indicates high potential profitability for applications in Al foundry alloys as well as beverage—can and automotive—sheet alloys. The combination of technical feasibility and potential market profitability completes a successful proof of concept. This economical, environmentally-friendly and chlorine-free RE12™ process could be disruptive and transformational for the Mg production industry by enabling the recycling of 30,000 tonnes of primary-quality Mg annually.

  1. The production of fine grained magnesium alloys through thermomechanical processing for the optimization of microstructural and mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, John Paul

    The low density and high strength to weight ratio of magnesium alloys makes them ideal candidates to replace many of the heavier steel and aluminum alloys currently used in the automotive and other industries. Although cast magnesium alloys components have a long history of use in the automotive industry, the integration of wrought magnesium alloys components has been hindered by a number of factors. Grain refinement through thermomechanical processing offers a possible solution to many of the inherent problems associated with magnesium alloys. This work explores the development of several thermomechanical processing techniques and investigates their impact on the microstructural and mechanical properties of magnesium alloys. In addition to traditional thermomechanical processing, this work includes the development of new severe plastic deformation techniques for the production of fine grain magnesium plate and pipe and develops a procedure by which the thermal microstructural stability of severely plastically deformed microstructures can be assessed.

  2. The consequences of helium production on microstructural development in isotopically tailored ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.

    1996-10-01

    A series of alloys have been made adding various isotopes of nickel in order to vary the production of helium during irradiation by a two step nuclear reaction in a mixed spectrum reactor. The alloys use a base composition of Fe-12Cr with an addition of 1.5% nickel, either in the form of {sup 60}Ni which produces no helium, {sup 59}Ni which produces helium at a rate of about 10 appm He/dpa, or natural nickel ({sup Nat}Ni) which provides an intermediate level of helium due to delayed development of {sup 59}Ni. Specimens were irradiated in the HFIR at Oak Ridge, TN to {approx}7 dpa at 300 and 400{degrees}C. Microstructural examinations indicated that nickel additions promote precipitation in all alloys, but the effect appears to be much stronger at 400{degrees}C than at 300{degrees}C. There is sufficient dose by 7 dpa (and with 2 appm He) to initiate void swelling in ferritic/martensitic alloys. Little difference was found between response from {sup 59}Ni and {sup Nat}Ni. Also, helium bubble development for high helium generation conditions appeared to be very different at 300 and 400{degrees}C. At 300{degrees}C, it appeared that high densities of bubbles formed whereas at 400{degrees}C, bubbles could not be identified, possibly because of the complexity of the microstructure, but more likely because helium accumulated at precipitate interfaces.

  3. Feasibility study of the production of biomedical Ti-6Al-4V alloy by powder metallurgy.

    PubMed

    Bolzoni, L; Ruiz-Navas, E M; Gordo, E

    2015-04-01

    Titanium and its alloys are characterized by an exceptional combination of properties like high strength, good corrosion resistance and biocompatibility which makes them suitable materials for biomedical prosthesis and devices. The wrought Ti-6Al-4V alloy is generally favored in comparison to other metallic biomaterials due to its relatively low elastic modulus and it has been long used to obtain products for biomedical applications. In this work an alternative route to fabricate biomedical implants made out of the Ti-6Al-4V alloy is investigated. Specifically, the feasibility of the conventional powder metallurgy route of cold uniaxial pressing and sintering is addressed by considering two types of powders (i.e. blended elemental and prealloyed). The characterization of physical properties, chemical analysis, mechanical behavior and microstructural analysis is carried out in-depth and the properties are correlated among them. On the base of the results found, the produced alloys are promising materials for biomedical applications as well as cheaper surgical devices and tools.

  4. [Biologic age as a criterion for work evaluation (exemplified by titanium alloys production)].

    PubMed

    Afanas'eva, R F; Prokopenko, L V

    2009-01-01

    The article deals with results of studies concerning biologic age of workers (males) under occupational hazards of titanium alloys (jeopardy classes 3.3, 3.4.4) in Verkhne-Saldinsky metallurgic production association. Based on mathematic statistic analysis, the authors worked out an equation of multiple regression for ageing pace to forecast the ageing with consideration of age, length of service, occupation. The authors determined occupational groups characterized by premature ageing and increased risk of health disorders.

  5. Production Process of Biocompatible Magnesium Alloy Tubes Using Extrusion and Dieless Drawing Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kustra, Piotr; Milenin, Andrij; Płonka, Bartłomiej; Furushima, Tsuyoshi

    2016-06-01

    Development of technological production process of biocompatible magnesium tubes for medical applications is the subject of the present paper. The technology consists of two stages—extrusion and dieless drawing process, respectively. Mg alloys for medical applications such as MgCa0.8 are characterized by low technological plasticity during deformation that is why optimization of production parameters is necessary to obtain good quality product. Thus, authors developed yield stress and ductility model for the investigated Mg alloy and then used the numerical simulations to evaluate proper manufacturing conditions. Grid Extrusion3d software developed by authors was used to determine optimum process parameters for extrusion—billet temperature 400 °C and extrusion velocity 1 mm/s. Based on those parameters the tube with external diameter 5 mm without defects was manufactured. Then, commercial Abaqus software was used for modeling dieless drawing. It was shown that the reduction in the area of 60% can be realized for MgCa0.8 magnesium alloy. Tubes with the final diameter of 3 mm were selected as a case study, to present capabilities of proposed processes.

  6. In-situ monitoring of surface hydrogen on the a-SiGe:H films

    SciTech Connect

    Toyoshima, Y.; Ganguly, G.; Ikeda, T.; Saitoh, K.; Kondo, M.; Matsuda, A.

    1997-07-01

    The bonded hydrogen on the growing surface of hydrogenated amorphous silicon germanium (a-SiGe:H) alloy films has been investigated by use of infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IR-RAS). When the alloy films are Si-rich, the surface hydrogen bonded to Si atoms is found to behave in a similar way to those on the hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films. This means that the thermal desorption stability of surface Si hydride species is not significantly affected by the coexistence of a small amount (typically 20 at.%) of Ge. On the contrary, the desorption behavior of surface hydrogen depends on the alloy composition when the a-SiGe:H films are Ge-rich. A surface reaction scheme is provided in an attempt to explain this series of behavior in surface hydrogen on the a-SiGe:H films.

  7. Ion implantation induced modification of a-SiC : H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzenov, N.; Tzolov, M.; Dimova-Malinovska, D.; Tsvetkova, T.; Angelov, C.; Adriaenssens, G.; Pattyn, H.

    1994-02-01

    Optical transmission measurements have been carried out on thin a-SiC:H alloy films, implanted with ions of group IV elements. High doses of the order of 10 17 cm -2 have been used leading to a considerable shift of the absorption edge to lower photon energies. This shift may be attributed both to additional defect introduction and to accompanying formation of bonds between implanted ions and the atoms of the alloy, as confirmed by IR and Raman measurements. The observed chemical modification results from the high concentration of introduced atoms which is of the order of those for the host elements.

  8. [Influence of corrosion products of the dental alloys on the excitable tissues].

    PubMed

    Panaite, S; Mârţu, S; Tatarciuc, M; Viţalariu, A

    2000-01-01

    The surface of dental alloys in contact with well conducting electricity solutions are electrochemically corroded. This phenomenon is determined by a proper electric wave generated by electrochemical phenomena present at the limit between the two phases. Because during dental treatments similar conditions with the generation of corrosion waves are present, we decided to study the electrochemical behaviour of the most commonly used dental alloys. The method used in our study is based on the anodic and catodic reactions developed simultaneously, represented by the global curve of polarization that gives informations on the intensity of corrosion waves. We have also studied the influence of corrosion products on the excitable tissues. The results demonstrate the significant influence of metallic ions on the excitable tissues.

  9. The huastec region: a second locus for the production of bronze alloys in ancient mesoamerica.

    PubMed

    Hosler, D; Stresser-Pean, G

    1992-08-28

    Chemical analyses of 51 metal artifacts, one ingot, and two pieces of intermediate processed material from two Late Post Classic archeological sites in the Huastec area of Eastern Mesoamerica point to a second production locus for copper-arsenic-tin alloys, copper-arsenic-tin artifacts, and probably copper-tin and copper-arsenic bronze artifacts. Earlier evidence had indicated that these bronze alloys were produced exclusively in West Mexico. West Mexico was the region where metallurgy first developed in Mesoamerica, although major elements of that technology had been introduced from the metallurgies of Central and South America. The bronze working component of Huastec metallurgy was transmitted from the metalworking regions of West Mexico, most likely through market systems that distributed Aztec goods.

  10. Continuous roll-to-roll serpentine deposition for high throughput a-Si PV manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Izu, M.; Ovshinsky, H.C.; Deng, X.; Krisko, A.J.; Narasimhan, K.L.; Crucet, R.; Laarman, T.; Myatt, A.; Ovshinsky, S.R.

    1994-12-31

    In order to further improve the economies of scale which are inherent in ECD`s continuous roll-to-roll amorphous silicon alloy solar cell manufacturing process, the authors have developed a concept for a serpentine web plasma CVD deposition process to maximize throughput while keeping the size of the deposition chambers small. When this technique is incorporated into a continuous roll-to-roll PV manufacturing process, it will maximize the throughput for a high volume production plant, reduce the machine cost, improve gas utilization, reduce power consumption, and improve the solar cell stability. To demonstrate the serpentine web deposition concept, the authors have constructed a single loop serpentine deposition chamber to deposit a-Si for n-i-p structure solar cells. During the initial process of optimization, they have produced single-junction a-Si solar cells with 8.6% efficiency, and triple-junction a-Si solar cells with a 9.5% initial efficiency, where the top cell intrinsic layer was deposited in the serpentine deposition chamber.

  11. Factors affectig the production and performance of thick section high chromium-molybdenum alloy iron castings

    SciTech Connect

    Dodd, J.; Parks, J.L.

    1980-01-01

    Massive high chromium-molybdenum alloy iron castings are now being produced in large tonnages for the mining industry, for use in large roller pulverizers, in heavy duty abrasion resistant pumps, and for many other applications demanding a combination of abrasion resistance and toughness unobtainable in other alloy irons. Systematic research, particularly over the past decade, on the interrelated parameters which can cause problems in the foundry or failures in service has played a significant part in the success of the high chromium irons in thick section castings. Data from this research are presented on the separate and combined effects of C, Ch, Mo, Ni, Cu, Mn, Si, Ti and Al on the hardenability, toughness and abrasion resistance of the high chromium irons in both the as-cast and heat treated conditions. Changes in production techniques have helped avoid foundry problems and wasteful use of alloys and energy. These changes are reflected in more consistent performance in service and reduced incidence of casting failures. Changes in composition which facilitate cryogenic transformation of retained austenite, or provide wider latitude in subcritical transformation of austenite, are discussed as these techniques may prove increasingly important as energy becomes more expensive. A summary is presented of the physical metallurgy of high chromium-molybdenum irons, with emphasis on the microstructures obtained in thick section castings, the influence of alloying elements on hardenability and the types of heat treatments available for controlling microstructure. The production and utilization of these irons in thick section castings, particularly the ways of avoiding problems in the foundry and of obtaining castings which provide more consistent performance and reduce incidence of catastrophic failure in service are discussed.

  12. Degradation of bioabsorbable Mg-based alloys: Assessment of the effects of insoluble corrosion products and joint effects of alloying components on mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Claudia A; Alvarez, Florencia; Fernández Lorenzo de Mele, Mónica A

    2016-01-01

    This work is focused on the processes occurring at the bioabsorbable metallic biomaterial/cell interfaces that may lead to toxicity. A critical analysis of the results obtained when degradable metal disks (pure Mg and rare earth-containing alloys (ZEK100 alloys)) are in direct contact with cell culture and those obtained with indirect methods such as the use of metal salts and extracts was made. Viability was assessed by Acridine Orange dye, neutral red and clonogenic assays. The effects of concentration of corrosion products and possible joint effects of the binary and ternary combinations of La, Zn and Mg ions, as constituents of ZEK alloys, were evaluated on a mammalian cell culture. In all cases more detrimental effects were found for pure Mg than for the alloys. Experiments with disks showed that gradual alterations in pH and in the amount of corrosion products were better tolerated by cells and resulted in higher viability than abrupt changes. In addition, viability was dependent on the distance from the source of ions. Experiments with extracts showed that the effect of insoluble degradation products was highly detrimental. Indirect tests with Zn ions revealed that harmful effects may be found at concentrations ≥ 150 μM and at ≥ 100 μM in mixtures with Mg. These mixtures lead to more deleterious effects than single ions. Results highlight the need to develop a battery of tests to evaluate the biocompatibility of bioabsorbable biomaterials. PMID:26478323

  13. Degradation of bioabsorbable Mg-based alloys: Assessment of the effects of insoluble corrosion products and joint effects of alloying components on mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Claudia A; Alvarez, Florencia; Fernández Lorenzo de Mele, Mónica A

    2016-01-01

    This work is focused on the processes occurring at the bioabsorbable metallic biomaterial/cell interfaces that may lead to toxicity. A critical analysis of the results obtained when degradable metal disks (pure Mg and rare earth-containing alloys (ZEK100 alloys)) are in direct contact with cell culture and those obtained with indirect methods such as the use of metal salts and extracts was made. Viability was assessed by Acridine Orange dye, neutral red and clonogenic assays. The effects of concentration of corrosion products and possible joint effects of the binary and ternary combinations of La, Zn and Mg ions, as constituents of ZEK alloys, were evaluated on a mammalian cell culture. In all cases more detrimental effects were found for pure Mg than for the alloys. Experiments with disks showed that gradual alterations in pH and in the amount of corrosion products were better tolerated by cells and resulted in higher viability than abrupt changes. In addition, viability was dependent on the distance from the source of ions. Experiments with extracts showed that the effect of insoluble degradation products was highly detrimental. Indirect tests with Zn ions revealed that harmful effects may be found at concentrations ≥ 150 μM and at ≥ 100 μM in mixtures with Mg. These mixtures lead to more deleterious effects than single ions. Results highlight the need to develop a battery of tests to evaluate the biocompatibility of bioabsorbable biomaterials.

  14. Identifying electronic properties relevant to improving stability in a-Si:H-based cells and overall performance in a-Si,Ge:H-based cells. Annual subcontract report, April 18, 1994--April 17, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, J D

    1995-11-01

    This report describes work performed by the University of Oregon focusing on the characterization and evaluation of amorphous semiconductor materials produced by novel deposition conditions and/or methods. The results are based on a variety of junction capacitance techniques: admittance spectroscopy, transient photocapacitance (and photocurrent), and drive-level capacitance profiling. These methods allow the determination of deep defect densities and their energy distributions, Urbach bandtail energies, and, in some cases, {mu}{tau} products for hole transport. During this phase, the authors completed several tasks: (1) they carried out measurements on a-Si, Ge:H alloy samples produced at Harvard University by a cathodic glow discharge process, measurement indicated a smaller value of ({mu}{tau}){sub h} for these samples than would have been expected given their lower defect densities; (2) they characterized several hot-wire a-Si:H samples produced with varying hydrogen levels, studies indicate that hot-wire-produced a-Si:H, with H levels between 2--5 at.% should lead to mid-gap devices with superior properties; (3) they reported some results on a-Si:H glow discharge material grown under hydrogen dilution conditions. Preliminary studies point to film strain as playing a primary role for the observed differences in behavior.

  15. Stoichiometrically controlled production of bimetallic Gold-Silver alloy colloids using micro-alga cultures.

    PubMed

    Dahoumane, Si Amar; Wijesekera, Kushlani; Filipe, Carlos D M; Brennan, John D

    2014-02-15

    This paper reports the production of well-defined, highly stable Ag-Au alloy nanoparticles (NPs) using living cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, with the composition of the bimetallic alloys being solely determined by the stoichiometric ratio in which the metal salts were added to the cultures. The NPs exhibited a single, well-defined surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band confirming that they were made of a homogeneous population of bimetallic alloys. Particle creation by the cells occurred in three stages: (1) internalization of the noble metals by the cells and their reduction resulting in the formation of the NPs; (2) entrapment of the NPs in the extracellular matrix (ECM) surrounding the cells, where they are colloidally stabilized; and (3) release of the NPs from the ECM to the culture medium. We also investigated the effect of the addition of the metals salts on cell viability and the impact on characteristics of the NPs formed. When silver was added to the cultures, cell viability was decreased and this resulted in a ~30nm red shift on the SPR band due to changes in the surrounding environment into which the NPs were released. The same observations (in SPR and cell viability) was made when gold was added to a final concentration of 2 × 10(-4)M, but not when the concentration was equal to 10(-4)M, where cell viability was high and the red shift was negligible. PMID:24370403

  16. Stoichiometrically controlled production of bimetallic Gold-Silver alloy colloids using micro-alga cultures.

    PubMed

    Dahoumane, Si Amar; Wijesekera, Kushlani; Filipe, Carlos D M; Brennan, John D

    2014-02-15

    This paper reports the production of well-defined, highly stable Ag-Au alloy nanoparticles (NPs) using living cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, with the composition of the bimetallic alloys being solely determined by the stoichiometric ratio in which the metal salts were added to the cultures. The NPs exhibited a single, well-defined surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band confirming that they were made of a homogeneous population of bimetallic alloys. Particle creation by the cells occurred in three stages: (1) internalization of the noble metals by the cells and their reduction resulting in the formation of the NPs; (2) entrapment of the NPs in the extracellular matrix (ECM) surrounding the cells, where they are colloidally stabilized; and (3) release of the NPs from the ECM to the culture medium. We also investigated the effect of the addition of the metals salts on cell viability and the impact on characteristics of the NPs formed. When silver was added to the cultures, cell viability was decreased and this resulted in a ~30nm red shift on the SPR band due to changes in the surrounding environment into which the NPs were released. The same observations (in SPR and cell viability) was made when gold was added to a final concentration of 2 × 10(-4)M, but not when the concentration was equal to 10(-4)M, where cell viability was high and the red shift was negligible.

  17. Structure and optical properties of aSiAl and aSiAlHx magnetron sputtered thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thøgersen, Annett; Stange, Marit; Jensen, Ingvild J. T.; Røyset, Arne; Ulyashin, Alexander; Diplas, Spyros

    2016-03-01

    Thin films of homogeneous mixture of amorphous silicon and aluminum were produced with magnetron sputtering using 2-phase Al-Si targets. The films exhibited variable compositions, with and without the presence of hydrogen, aSi1-xAlx and aSi1-xAlxHy. The structure and optical properties of the films were investigated using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV-VisNIR spectrometry, ellipsometry, and atomistic modeling. We studied the effect of alloying aSi with Al (within the range 0-25 at. %) on the optical band gap, refractive index, transmission, and absorption. Alloying aSi with Al resulted in a non-transparent film with a low band gap (<1 eV). Hydrogenation of the films increased the band gap to values >1 eV. Variations of the Al and hydrogen content allowed for tuning of the optoelectronic properties. The films are stable up to a temperature of 300 °C. At this temperature, we observed Al induced crystallization of the amorphous silicon and the presence of large Al particles in a crystalline Si matrix.

  18. Production of Fe from Fe2O3 using a dry Mechanical Alloying Process

    SciTech Connect

    Waanders, F.B.; Mulaba-Bafubiandi, A.F.

    2005-04-26

    Mechanical alloying has been, and is still being employed extensively to synthesize a variety of alloy phases. The primary interest is to produce materials for scientific research and technological applications for magnetic recording media and permanent magnetic field devices. In the present investigation however the aim was not to produce a special alloy phases but to prove the viability of the production of iron from naturally occurring hematite, using mechanical alloying. Discard fines from the biggest hematite producer, Kumba Resources, Sishen, South Africa, were obtained and mixed with aluminum powder in the ratio of 25 at.% Al, balance hematite. About 50 g of the hematite-Al mixture, to be mechanically milled, was dry milled in a planetary ball milling equipment. The milling times varied between 30 min. and 30 hours and samples for Moessbauer spectroscopy, SEM analyses and Malvern sizing were obtained for each milling interval. Milling of the fine hematite with the much coarser Al resulted in a mixture with a particle size distribution of d0.5 = 54{mu}m to be extracted from the mill after 30 min. The Moessbauer spectra yielded 93% Fe2O3 and a 7% intermetallic Fe-Al component for this milling period. A final particle size of d0.5 = 20{mu}m for the milled product was obtained after milling for up to 30 h. However, within an hour all the hematite was completely converted to iron ({approx_equal} 86%) and two intermetallic Fe-Al compounds of combined intensity {approx_equal} 14%. The intensity ratio of the two intermetallic Fe-Al alloys that were observed as two doublets, changed after 3 h milling time and the averaged Moessbauer parameters for the two doublets are reported as: D1 = ({delta} = 0.50 {+-} 0.03 mm.s-1 and {delta} = 0.24 {+-} 0.03 mm.s-1) and D2 = ({delta} = 2.07 {+-} 0.03 mm.s-1 and {delta} = 0.98 {+-} 0.03 mm.s-1) respectively.

  19. Production of Al-Co-Ni Ternary Alloys by the SHS Method for Use in Nickel Based Superalloys Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkan, Murat; Sonmez, M. Seref; Derin, Bora; Yücel, Onuralp; Andreev, Dmitrii E.; Sanin, Vladimir N.; Yukhvid, Vladimir I.

    2015-05-01

    In this study, Al-Co-Ni ternary alloys were synthesized, in order to obtain low-cost starting material for Ni-based superalloy production, by a self-propagating high temperature synthesis (SHS) both under normal gravity conditions (a = 9.81 m/s2) and under high gravity conditions (up to 1000 g-force) by using a centrifugal machine. The mixture of Co3O4-NiO powder were reduced by Al powder for the production of SHS alloys with the estimated compositions of 5-10 mass% Al, 20-65 mass% Co, 25-75 mass% Ni. The effect of green mixture compositions and centrifugal overload on combustion temperature, alloy/slag separations, chemical composition and microstructure of final alloys were investigated. The chemical analysis results showed that production of SHS alloys were achieved by having up to 86.12% of Co and 92.32% of Ni recoveries. The highest metal recovery value was obtained in SHS alloy with the estimated composition of 10%Al-65%Co-25%Ni by the addition of 20% Al2O3 into the green mixture. The metal/slag separation efficiency increased by increasing the centrifugal overload.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations of high energy cascade in ordered alloys: Defect production and subcascade division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocombette, Jean-Paul; Van Brutzel, Laurent; Simeone, David; Luneville, Laurence

    2016-06-01

    Displacement cascades have been calculated in two ordered alloys (Ni3Al and UO2) in the molecular dynamics framework using the CMDC (Cell Molecular Dynamics for Cascade) code (J.-P. Crocombette and T. Jourdan, Nucl. Instrum. Meth. B 352, 9 (2015)) for energies ranking between 0.1 and 580 keV. The defect production has been compared to the prediction of the NRT (Norgett, Robinson and Torrens) standard. One observes a decrease with energy of the number of defects compared to the NRT prediction at intermediate energies but, unlike what is commonly observed in elemental solids, the number of produced defects does not always turn to a linear variation with ballistic energy at high energies. The fragmentation of the cascade into subcascades has been studied through the analysis of surviving defect pockets. It appears that the common knowledge equivalence of linearity of defect production and subcascades division does not hold in general for alloys. We calculate the average number of subcascades and average number of defects per subcascades as a function of ballistic energy. We find an unexpected variety of behaviors for these two average quantities above the threshold for subcascade formation.

  1. Production of pristine, sulfur-coated and silicon-alloyed germanium nanoparticles via laser pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seongbeom; Park, Song Yi; Jeong, Jaeki; Kim, Gi-Hwan; Rohani, Parham; Kim, Dong Suk; Swihart, Mark T.; Kim, Jin Young

    2015-07-01

    Here we demonstrate production of three types of germanium containing nanoparticles (NPs) by laser pyrolysis of GeH4 and characterize their sizes, structures and composition. Pristine Ge NPs were fabricated with 50 standard cubic centimeter per minute (sccm) of GeH4 and 25 sccm of SF6 as a photosensitizer gas, while sulfur-coated Ge NPs were produced with 25 sccm of GeH4 and 50 sccm of SF6. The laser pyrolysis of SiH4/GeH4 mixtures produced Si1-xGex alloy NPs. Effects of key process parameters including laser intensity and gas flow rates on NP properties have been investigated. The ability of the laser pyrolysis technique to flexibly produce a variety of germanium-containing NPs, as illustrated in this study shows promise for commercial-scale production of new nanomaterials as high purity dry powders.

  2. Fundamental studies on electrochemical production of dendrite-free aluminum and titanium-aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Debabrata

    A novel dendrite-free electrorefining of aluminum scrap was investigated by using AlCl3-1-Ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium chloride (EMIC) ionic liquid electrolyte. Electrodeposition of aluminum were conducted on copper/aluminum cathodes at voltage of 1.5 V, temperatures (50-110°C), stirring rate (0-120 rpm), molar ratio (MR) of AlCl3:EMIC (1.25-2.0) and electrode surface modification (modified/unmodified). The study was focused to investigate the effect of process variables on deposit morphology, cathode current density and their role in production of dendrite-free aluminum. The deposits were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Modified electrodes and stirring rate (60 rpm) eliminate dendritic deposition by reducing cathode overpotential below critical overpotential (etacrt≈ -0.54 V) for dendrite formation. Pure aluminum (>99%) was deposited with current efficiency of 84-99%. Chronoamperometry study was conducted using AlCl3-EMIC and AlCl3-1-Butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium chloride (BMIC) (MR = 1.65:1) at 90°C to understand the mechanism of aluminum electrodeposition and find out diffusion parameter of electroactive species Al2C 7-. It was concluded that electrodeposition of aluminum is a diffusion controlled instantaneous nucleation process and diffusion coefficient of Al2C7- was found to be 5.2-6.9 x 10-11 m2/s and 2.2 x 10-11 m2/s for AlCl3-EMIC and AlCl3-BMIC, respectively. A novel production route of Ti-Al alloys was investigated using AlCl 3-BMIC-TiCl4 (MR = 2:1:0.019) and AlCl3-BMIC (MR = 2:1) electrolytes at constant voltages of 1.5-3.0 V and temperatures (70-125°C). Ti sheet was used as anode and cathode. Characterization of electrodeposited Ti-Al alloys was carried out using SEM, EDS, XRD and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). Effect of voltage and temperature on cathode current density, current efficiency, composition and morphology of Ti

  3. MECHANICAL ALLOYING AND THERMAL TREATMENT FOR PRODUCTION OF ZIRCONIUM IRON HYDROGEN ISOTOPE GETTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K.

    2008-02-20

    The objective of this task was to demonstrate that metal hydrides could be produced by mechanical alloying in the quantities needed to support production-scale hydrogen isotope separations. Three starting compositions (ratios of elemental Zr and Fe powders) were selected and attritor milled under argon for times of 8 to 60 hours. In general, milling times of at least 24 hours were required to form the desired Zr{sub 2}Fe and Zr{sub 3}Fe phases, although a considerable amount of unalloyed Zr and Fe remained. Milling in liquid nitrogen does not appear to provide any advantages over milling in hexane, particularly due to the formation of ZrN after longer milling times. Carbides of Zr formed during some of the milling experiments in hexane. Elemental Zr was present in the as-milled material but not detected after annealing for milling times of 48 and 60 hours. It may be that after intimate mixing of the powders in the attritor mill the annealing temperature was sufficient to allow for the formation of a Zr-Fe alloy. Further investigation of this conversion is necessary, and could provide an opportunity for reducing the amount of unreacted metal powder after milling.

  4. Shape and Composition Effects on Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production for Pt-Pd Alloy Cocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Luo, Muhua; Lu, Pan; Yao, Weifeng; Huang, Cunping; Xu, Qunjie; Wu, Qiang; Kuwahara, Yasutaka; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2016-08-17

    The shape and composition effects of platinum-palladium (Pt-Pd) alloy nanoparticle cocatalysts on visible-light photocatalytic hydrogen evolution from an aqueous ammonium sulphite solution have been reported and discussed. The activity of Pt-Pd nanoparticles loaded Pt-Pd/CdS photocatalysts are affected based on both the Pt-Pd alloy nanoparticles' shape and their compositions. In this research, two shapes of Pt-Pd nanoparticles have been studied. One is Pt-Pd nanocubes enclosed by {100} crystal planes and the other is nano-octahedra covered with {111} crystal facets. Results show that the photocatalytic turnover frequency (TOF), defined as moles of hydrogen produced per surface mole of Pt-Pd metal atom per second, for Pt-Pd nanocubes/CdS (Pt-Pd NCs/CdS) photocatalyst can be 3.4 times more effective than Pt-Pd nano-octahedra/CdS (Pt-Pd NOTa/CdS) nanocomposite photocatalyst. Along with the shape effect, the atomic ratio of Pt to Pd can also impact the efficiency of Pt-Pd/CdS photocatalysts. When the Pt to Pd atomic ratio changes from 1:0 to about 2:1, the rate of hydrogen production increases from 900 μmol/h for Pt NCs/CdS catalyst to 1837 μmol/h for Pt-Pd (2:1) NCs/CdS photocatalyst-a 104% rate increase. This result suggests that the 33 mol % of more expensive Pt can be replaced with less costly Pd, resulting in a more than 100% hydrogen production rate increase. The finding of this research will lead to the research and development of highly effective catalysts for photocatalytic hydrogen production using solar photonic energy. PMID:27439590

  5. Development of Low Cost Gas Atomization of Precursor Powders for Simplified ODS Alloy Production

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Iver

    2014-08-05

    A novel gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) method was developed in this project to enable production (at our partner’s facility) a precursor Ni-Cr-Y-Ti powder with a surface oxide and an internal rare earth (RE) containing intermetallic compound (IMC) phase. Consolidation and heat-treatment experiments were performed at Ames Lab to promote the exchange of oxygen from the surface oxide to the RE intermetallic to form nano-metric oxide dispersoids. Alloy selection was aided by an internal oxidation and serial grinding experiments at Ames Lab and found that Hf-containing alloys may form more stable dispersoids than Ti-containing alloy, i.e., the Hf-containing system exhibited five different oxide phases and two different intermetallics compared to the two oxide phases and one intermetallic in the Ti-containing alloys. Since the simpler Ti-containing system was less complex to characterize, and make observations on the effects of processing parameters, the Ti-containing system was selected by Ames Lab for experimental atomization trials at our partner. An internal oxidation model was developed at Ames Lab and used to predict the heat treatment times necessary for dispersoid formation as a function of powder size and temperature. A new high-pressure gas atomization (HPGA) nozzle was developed at Ames Lab with the aim of promoting fine powder production at scales similar to that of the high gas-flow and melt-flow of industrial atomizers. The atomization nozzle was characterized using schlieren imaging and aspiration pressure testing at Ames Lab to determine the optimum melt delivery tip geometry and atomization pressure to promote enhanced secondary atomization mechanisms. Six atomization trials were performed at our partner to investigate the effects of: gas atomization pressure and reactive gas concentration on the particle size distribution (PSD) and the oxygen content of the resulting powder. Also, the effect on the rapidly solidified microstructure (as a

  6. Advancements in Ti Alloy Powder Production by Close-Coupled Gas Atomization

    SciTech Connect

    Heidloff, Andy; Rieken, Joel; Anderson, Iver; Byrd, David

    2011-04-01

    As the technology for titanium metal injection molding (Ti-MIM) becomes more readily available, efficient Ti alloy fine powder production methods are required. An update on a novel close-coupled gas atomization system has been given. Unique features of the melting apparatus are shown to have measurable effects on the efficiency and ability to fully melt within the induction skull melting system (ISM). The means to initiate the melt flow were also found to be dependent on melt apparatus. Starting oxygen contents of atomization feedstock are suggested based on oxygen pick up during the atomization and MIM processes and compared to a new ASTM specification. Forming of titanium by metal injection molding (Ti-MIM) has been extensively studied with regards to binders, particle shape, and size distribution and suitable de-binding methods have been discovered. As a result, the visibility of Ti-MIM has steadily increased as reviews of technology, acceptability, and availability have been released. In addition, new ASTM specification ASTM F2885-11 for Ti-MIM for biomedical implants was released in early 2011. As the general acceptance of Ti-MIM as a viable fabrication route increases, demand for economical production of high quality Ti alloy powder for the preparation of Ti-MIM feedstock correspondingly increases. The production of spherical powders from the liquid state has required extensive pre-processing into different shapes thereby increasing costs. This has prompted examination of Ti-MIM with non-spherical particle shape. These particles are produced by the hydride/de-hydride process and are equi-axed but fragmented and angular which is less than ideal. Current prices for MIM quality titanium powder range from $40-$220/kg. While it is ideal for the MIM process to utilize spherical powders within the size range of 0.5-20 {mu}m, titanium's high affinity for oxygen to date has prohibited the use of this powder size range. In order to meet oxygen requirements the top size

  7. Fission Product Release from Molten U/Al Alloy Fuel: A Vapor Transpiration Model

    SciTech Connect

    Whitkop, P.G.

    2001-06-26

    This report describes the application of a vapor transportation model to fission product release data obtained for uranium/aluminum alloy fuel during early Oak Ridge fuel melt experiments. The Oak Ridge data validates the vapor transpiration model and suggests that iodine and cesium are released from the molten fuel surface in elemental form while tellurium and ruthenium are released as oxides. Cesium iodide is postulated to form in the vapor phase outside of the fuel matrix. Kinetic data indicates that cesium iodide can form from Cs atoms and diatomic iodine in the vapor phase. Temperatures lower than those capable of melting fuel are necessary in order to maintain a sufficient I2 concentration. At temperatures near the fuel melting point, cesium can react with iodine atoms to form CsI only on solid surfaces such as aerosols.

  8. Large-scale production of Si{sub 0.8}Ge{sub 0.2} thermoelectric alloys by mechanical alloying

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, B.A.; Harringa, J.L.; Loughin, S.; Centurioni, D.X.

    1993-10-01

    Advanced processing techniques were combined with refinements in composition to produce homogeneous, production-scale quantities of n- and p-type Si{sub 0.8}Ge{sub 0.2} alloys with improved thermoelectric properties. Two p-type compacts of Si{sub 0.8}Ge{sub 0.2} doped with 0.8 atom% boron and one n-type compact doped with 0.8 m/o GaP and a P/Ga ratio of 2.38 were prepared by mechanical alloying. Resulting powders were consolidated into 7.62 cm diameter compacts by vacuum hot pressing. Transport and thermoelectric properties were measured. As-pressed samples were found to have low carrier mobility. Metallographic analysis revealed a sub-micron grain size which would suggest a high density of grain boundary potential barriers. A heat treatment was applied and the measurements were repeated. The post-treatment p-type samples showed a 33% grain growth and an integrated average figure of merit of 0.6{times}10{sup {minus}3} K{sup {minus}1} over the 573--1273 K range. This paper presents the details of fabrication method and compares the thermoelectric properties with the properties of similar alloys manufactured by traditional vacuum casting and hot pressing.

  9. Energetics of gaseous and volatile fission products in molten U-10Zr alloy: A density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ning; Tian, Jie; Jiang, Tao; Yang, Yanqiu; Hu, Sheng; Peng, Shuming; Yan, Liuming

    2015-11-01

    Gaseous and volatile fission products have a number of adverse effects on the safety and efficiency of the U-10Zr alloy fuel. The theoretical calculations were applied to investigate the energetics related to the formation, nucleation, and degassing of gaseous and volatile fission products (Kr, Xe and I) in molten U-10Zr alloy. The molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were applied to generate equilibrium configurations. The density functional theory (DFT) calculations were used to build atomistic models including molten U-10Zr alloy as well as its fission products substituted systems. The vacancy formation in liquid U-10Zr alloy were studied using DFT calculations, with average Gibbs free formation energies at 8.266 and 6.333 eV for U- and Zr-vacancies, respectively. And the interaction energies were -1.911 eV, -2.390 eV, and -1.826 eV for the I-I, Xe-Xe, and Kr-Kr interaction in lattice when two of the adjacent uranium atoms were substituted by gaseous atoms. So it could be concluded that the interaction between I, Kr, and Xe in lattice is powerful than the interaction between these two atoms and the other lattice atoms in U-10Zr.

  10. Production and fabrication of vanadium alloys for the radiative divertor program of DIII-D - Annual report input for 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.R.; Smith, J.P.; Stambaugh, R.D.

    1996-10-01

    V-4Cr-4Ti alloy has been selected for use in the manufacture of a portion of the DIII-D Radiative Divertor (RD) upgrade. The production of a 1200-kg ingot of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy has been completed at Teledyne Wah Chang of Albany, Oregon (TWCA) to provide {approximately}800-kg of applicable product forms, and two billets have been extruded from the ingot. Chemical compositions of the ingot and both extruded billets were acceptable. Material from these billets will be converted into product forms suitable for components of the DIII-D Radiative Divertor structure. Joining of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy has been identified as the most critical fabrication issue for its use in the RD Program, and research into several joining methods for fabrication of the RD components, including resistance seam, friction, and electron beam welding, is continuing. Preliminary trials have been successful in the joining of V-alloy to itself by electron beam, resistance, and friction welding processes and to Inconel 625 by friction welding.

  11. Preliminary investigations on magnetic properties of NdFeB alloys with high magnetic energy product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen-xi; Gong, Wei; Wang, Yi-zhon; Feng, Min-ying; Wu, Zhon-lin; Huong, Yong-cheng; Cao, Yong-jing

    1985-02-01

    NdFeB permanent magnets of (BH)max=41MGOe were prepared by powder metallurgy. A typical specimen, Nd16.4Fe76.6B7 alloy, was measured and analyzed. The crystallization process of this alloy near 1400K appeared very complicated. Non-uniform distribution of Nd atoms in the alloy shows that a second phase may exist. At low temperatures the easy direction for magnetization will become canting.

  12. Commercialization of multijunction a-Si modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, D. E.; Arya, R. R.; Chen, L.-F.; Oswald, R.; Newton, J.; Rajan, K.; Romero, R.; Willing, F.; Yang, L.

    1997-02-01

    Solarex has just completed building a plant in James City County, Virginia that has the capacity to produce 10 MW per year of multijunction amorphous silicon PV modules. The plant will start commercial production of 8.6 ft2 tandem modules in early 1997. The tandem device structure consists of two stacked p-i-n junctions, a front junction containing amorphous silicon and a back junction containing an amorphous silicon germanium alloy. All amorphous silicon alloys are deposited using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and the large-area monolithic modules are interconnected using computerized laser scribing coupled with a machine vision system. The principle products will be monolithic modules (26″×48″) with nominal stabilized power ratings of 56, 50 and 43 peak watts. All modules will be fabricated using a glass-EVA-glass encapsulation to ensure long-term reliability. These products are expected to be widely used in both remote and grid-tied applications.

  13. Production and blast-furnace smelting of boron-alloyed iron-ore pellets

    SciTech Connect

    A.A. Akberdin; A.S. Kim

    2008-08-15

    Industrial test data are presented regarding the production (at Sokolovsk-Sarbaisk mining and enrichment enterprise) and blast-furnace smelting (at Magnitogorsk metallurgical works) of boron-alloyed iron-ore pellets (500000 t). It is shown that, thanks to the presence of boron, the compressive strength of the roasted pellets is increased by 18.5%, while the strength in reduction is doubled; the limestone consumption is reduced by 11%, the bentonite consumption is halved, and the dust content of the gases in the last section of the roasting machines is reduced by 20%. In blast-furnace smelting, the yield of low-sulfur (<0.02%) hot metal is increased from 65-70 to 85.1% and the furnace productivity from 2.17-2.20 to 2.27 t/(m{sup 3} day); coke consumption is reduced by 3-8 kg/t of hot metal. The plasticity and stamping properties of 08IO auto-industry steel are improved by microadditions of boron.

  14. Overcoming residual stresses and machining distortion in the production of aluminum alloy satellite boxes.

    SciTech Connect

    Younger, Mandy S.; Eckelmeyer, Kenneth Hall

    2007-11-01

    Distortion frequently occurs during machining of age hardening aluminum alloys due to residual stresses introduced during the quenching step in the heat treatment process. This report quantifies, compares, and discusses the effectiveness of several methods for minimizing residual stresses and machining distortion in aluminum alloys 7075 and 6061.

  15. Continuous production of granular or powder Ti, Zr and Hf or their alloy products

    DOEpatents

    White, Jack C.; Oden, Laurance L.

    1993-01-01

    A continuous process for producing a granular metal selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr or Hf under conditions that provide orderly growth of the metal free of halide inclusions comprising: a) dissolving a reducing metal selected from the group consisting of Na, Mg, Li or K in their respective halide salts to produce a reducing molten salt stream; b) preparing a second molten salt stream containing the halide salt of Ti, Zr or Hf; c) mixing and reacting the two molten streams of steps a) and b) in a continuous stirred tank reactor; d) wherein steps a) through c) are conducted at a temperature range of from about 800.degree. C. to about 1100.degree. C. so that a weight percent of equilibrium solubility of the reducing metal in its respective halide salt varies from about 1.6 weight percent at about 900.degree. C. to about 14.4 weight percent at about 1062.degree. C.; and wherein a range of concentration of the halide salt of Ti, Zn or Hf in molten halides of Na, Mg, Li or K is from about 1 to about 5 times the concentration of Na, Mg, Li or K; e) placing the reacted molten stream from step c) in a solid-liquid separator to recover an impure granular metal product by decantation, centrifugation, or filtration; and f) removing residual halide salt impurity by vacuum evaporator or inert gas sweep at temperatures from about 850.degree. C. to 1000.degree. C. or cooling the impure granular metal product to ambient temperature and water leaching off the residual metal halide salt.

  16. MN rule in a-Si:H alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Himanshu; Purohit, L. P.; Gill, F. S.; Kumar, R.

    2013-02-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated silicon films doped with S/Se doping were prepared by PECVD technique on corning glass substrate and conductivity was measured in the temperature range of 300-470K. The films exhibit two different transport mechanisms. In the higher temperature range (370-470 K) the conduction was found to be thermally activated type while at low temperatures (less than 370 K) it is observed to follow variable range hopping. The conductivity variations have been analyzed using MN Rule.

  17. Effects of recasting on the amount of corrosion products released from two Ni-Cr base metal alloys.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, S; Arikan, A

    1998-12-01

    The corrosion products released from two recast Ni-Cr base metal alloys Wirolloy and Wiron 99 were investigated. Cast samples were placed in Meyer's modified Fusayama solution for 2 months and in 0.1M Lactic acid 0.1M NaCl solution for 7 days. The release of Ni, Cr and Mo ions from both alloys was measured by using a flame model Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. A Scanning Electron Microscope was used to evaluate the surface morphology of the samples before and after corrosion tests. Release of Ni and Cr from Wirolloy samples immersed in 0.1M Lactic acid 0.1M NaCl solution were much higher than those of Wiron 99. The number of recastings was found to have negligible effect on surface texture and on the amount of corrosion products released. PMID:10596615

  18. Silicon purification using a Cu-Si alloy source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, R. C.; Tejedor, P.; Olson, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Production of 99.9999% pure silicon from 98% pure metallurgical grade (MG) silicon by a vapor transport filtration process (VTP) is described. The VTF process is a cold wall version of an HCl chemical vapor transport technique using a Si:Cu3Si alloy as the silicon source. The concentration, origin, and behavior of the various impurities involved in the process were determined by chemically analyzing alloys of different purity, the slag formed during the alloying process, and the purified silicon. Atomic absorption, emission spectrometry, inductively coupled plasma, spark source mass spectrometry, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy were used for these analyses. The influence of the Cl/H ratio and the deposition temperature on the transport rate was also investigated.

  19. Cost-Effective Method for Producing Self Supported Palladium Alloy Membranes for Use in Efficient Production of Coal Derived Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    K. Coulter

    2008-03-31

    Southwest Research Institute{reg_sign} (SwRI{reg_sign}) has utilized its expertise in large-area vacuum deposition methods to conduct research into the fabrication of dense, freestanding Pd-alloy membranes that are 3-5 microns thick and over 100 in{sup 2} in area. The membranes were deposited onto flexible and rigid supports that were subsequently removed and separated using novel techniques developed over the course of the project. Using these methods, the production of novel alloy compositions centered around the Pd-Cu system were developed with the objective of producing a thermally stable, nano-crystalline grain structure with the highest flux recorded as 242 SCFH/ft{sup 2} for a 2 {micro}m thick Pd{sub 53}Cu{sub 47} at 400 C and 20 psig feed pressure which when extrapolated is over twice the 2010 Department of Energy pure H{sub 2} flux target. Several membranes were made with the same permeability, but with different thicknesses and these membranes were highly selective. Researchers at the Colorado School of Mines supported the effort with extensive testing of experimental membranes as well as design and modeling of novel alloy composite structures. IdaTech provided commercial bench testing and analysis of SwRI-manufactured membranes. The completed deliverables for the project include test data on the performance of experimental membranes fabricated by vacuum deposition and several Pd-alloy membranes that were supplied to IdaTech for testing.

  20. Examination of an alternative method for the pyrometallurgical production of copper-chromium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenk, J.; Hassan-Pour, S.; Spiess, P.; Friedrich, B.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper an alternative to the usual route for the production of copper-chromium alloys by Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) followed by Vacuum Arc Remelting (VAR) is investigated. Therefore the HIP is replaced by an aluminothermic reduction. As oxidizing agents for this aluminothermic reduction (ATR) chromium oxide (Cr2O3) and copper oxide (CuO) are used. These oxidants are mixed in a stoichiometric relation with aluminium (Al) to get the following aluminothermic reactions going: As ATRs always are exothermic reductions, it is important to control the heat output of the reaction. A common simplification for the heat calculation in the field of ATR is the “Shemshushny Factor” (Sh-Factor). This factor determines the rate of energy input per reactant mass: To avoid a secondary melt phase after ATR, inline casting is used to directly obtain vacuum arc remeltable electrodes out of the liquid melt of the ATR. The second part of this work deals with the remelting of these electrodes via VAR. The first VAR trials aim at finding process parameters for remelting a copper-chromium ingot. As demixing is to avoid, it is necessary to control process parameters within a small range to obtain a shallow melt pool.

  1. Purification of uranium alloys by differential solubility of oxides and production of purified fuel precursors

    DOEpatents

    McLean, W. II; Miller, P.E.

    1997-12-16

    A method is described for purifying metallic alloys of uranium for use as nuclear reactor fuels in which the metal alloy is first converted to an oxide and then dissolved in nitric acid. Initial removal of metal oxide impurities not soluble in nitric acid is accomplished by filtration or other physical means. Further purification can be accomplished by carbonate leaching of uranyl ions from the partially purified solution or using traditional methods such as solvent extraction. 3 figs.

  2. Purification of uranium alloys by differential solubility of oxides and production of purified fuel precursors

    DOEpatents

    McLean, II, William; Miller, Philip E.

    1997-01-01

    A method for purifying metallic alloys of uranium for use as nuclear reactor fuels in which the metal alloy is first converted to an oxide and then dissolved in nitric acid. Initial removal of metal oxide impurities not soluble in nitric acid is accomplished by filtration or other physical means. Further purification can be accomplished by carbonate leaching of uranyl ions from the partially purified solution or using traditional methods such as solvent extraction.

  3. Production of Gas-Solid Structures in Aluminum and Nickel Alloys by Gasar Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Apprill, J.M.; Baldwin, M.D.; Maguire, M.C.; Miszkiel, M.E.; Shapovalov, V.I.

    1999-01-06

    Experimental data on directional and bulk solidification of hydrogen-charged samples of aluminum alloy A356 and nickel alloy Inconel 718 are discussed. The solidification structure of the porous zone is shown to be dependent on many process variables. Of these variables, hydrogen content in the melt prior to solidification, and furnace atmospheric pressure during solidification play the decisive role. Also important are the furnace atmosphere composition, the solidification velocity, and the temperature distribution of the liquid metal inside the mold.

  4. A solid state approach to the production of kilogram quantities of Si[sub 80]Ge[sub 20] thermoelectric alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, B.A.; Harringa, J.L.; Beaudry, B.J.

    1992-01-01

    An important consideration in the development of improved materials for thermal-to-electrical power generation is whether a research-scale process or methodology is amenable to production of kilogram quantities. Research efforts on the solid state technique of mechanical alloying have shown that both n- and p-type Si-20 at. % Ge alloys can be produced which have improved thermoelectric properties compared to state-of-the-art MOD-RTG materials. Studies on the production of large quantities of mechanically alloyed powder alloys using a planetary mill indicate that properties similar to those observed in alloys prepared in smaller quantities by a vibratory mill can be obtained. The characterization of several p-type alloys doped with 0.8 at. % B in the form SiB[sub 4] by X-ray diffraction, scanning laser mass spectroscopy, Hall effect, and high temperature electrical resistivity and Seebeck coefficient measurements are described. The transport properties of these alloys are shown to be comparable to those measured on similar samples prepared in small quantities by a research-grade vibratory mill.

  5. Binary synaptic connections based on memory switching in a-Si:H for artificial neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, A. P.; Lamb, J. L.; Moopenn, A.; Khanna, S. K.

    1987-01-01

    A scheme for nonvolatile associative electronic memory storage with high information storage density is proposed which is based on neural network models and which uses a matrix of two-terminal passive interconnections (synapses). It is noted that the massive parallelism in the architecture would require the ON state of a synaptic connection to be unusually weak (highly resistive). Memory switching using a-Si:H along with ballast resistors patterned from amorphous Ge-metal alloys is investigated for a binary programmable read only memory matrix. The fabrication of a 1600 synapse test array of uniform connection strengths and a-Si:H switching elements is discussed.

  6. Near-Net-Shape Production of Hollow Titanium Alloy Components via Electrochemical Reduction of Metal Oxide Precursors in Molten Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Di; Xiao, Wei; Chen, George Z.

    2013-04-01

    Metal oxide precursors (ca. 90 wt pct Ti, 6 wt pct Al, and 4 wt pct V) were prepared with a hollow structure in various shapes such as a sphere, miniature golf club head, and cup using a one-step solid slip-casting process. The precursors were then electro-deoxidized in molten calcium chloride [3.2 V, 1173 K (900 °C)] against a graphite anode. After 24 hours of electrolysis, the near-net-shape Ti-6Al-4V product maintained its original shape with controlled shrinkage. Oxygen contents in the Ti-6Al-4V components were typically below 2000 ppm. The maximum compressive stress and modulus of electrolytic products obtained in this work were approximately 243 MPa and 14 GPa, respectively, matching with the requirement for medical implants. Further research directions are discussed for mechanical improvement of the products via densification during or after electrolysis. This simple, fast, and energy-efficient near-net-shape manufacturing method could allow titanium alloy components with desired geometries to be prepared directly from a mixture of metal oxides, promising an innovative technology for the low-cost production of titanium alloy components.

  7. Characterization of corrosion products of AB{sub 5}-type hydrogen storage alloys for nickel-metal hydride batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Maurel, F.; Knosp, B.; Backhaus-Ricoult, M.

    2000-01-01

    To better understand the decrease in storage capacity of AB{sub 5}-type alloys in rechargeable Ni/MH batteries undergoing repeated charge/discharge cycles, the corrosion of a MnNi{sub 3.55}Co{sub 0.75}Mn{sub 0.4}Al{sub 0.3} alloy in aqueous KOH electrolyte was studied. The crystal structure, chemical composition, and distribution of corrosion products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Hollow and filed needles of a mixed rare earth hydroxide Mn(OH){sub 3} were found to cover a continuous nanocrystalline corrosion scale composed of metal (Ni, Co) solid solution, oxide (Ni,Co)O solid solution and rare earth hydroxide, and a Mn-depleted alloy subscale. Corrosion kinetics were measured for three different temperatures. Growth kinetics of the continuous corrosion scale and of the Mm(OH){sub 3} needles obeyed linear and parabolic rate laws, respectively. Models for the corrosion mechanism were developed on the basis of diffusional transport of Mn and OH through the hydroxide needles and subsequent diffusion along grain boundaries through the nanocrystalline scale.

  8. Synergic Catalysis of PdCu Alloy Nanoparticles within a Macroreticular Basic Resin for Hydrogen Production from Formic Acid.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kohsuke; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Dojo, Masahiro; Yoshizawa, Kazunari; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2015-08-17

    Highly dispersed PdCu alloy nanoparticles have been successfully prepared within a macroreticular basic resin bearing N(CH3 )2 functional groups. This previously unappreciated combination of alloy is first proven to be responsible for the efficient production of high-purity H2 from formic acid (HCOOH) dehydrogenation for chemical hydrogen storage. By the addition of Cu, the electronically promoted Pd sites show significantly higher catalytic activity as well as a better tolerance towards CO poisoning as compared to their monometallic Pd counterparts. Experimental and DFT calculation studies revealed not only the synergic alloying effect but also cooperative action by the N(CH3 )2 groups within the resin play crucial roles in achieving exceptional catalytic performances. In addition to the advantages such as, facile preparation method, free of additives, recyclable without leaching of active component, and suppression of unfavorable CO formation less than 3 ppm, the present catalytic system is cost-effective because of the superior catalytic activity compared with that of well-established precious PdAg or PdAu catalysts. The present catalytic system is particularly desirable for an ideal hydrogen vector in terms of potential industrial application for fuel cells. PMID:26178687

  9. Turbine Blade Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacKay, Rebecca

    2001-01-01

    The High Speed Research Airfoil Alloy Program developed a fourth-generation alloy with up to an +85 F increase in creep rupture capability over current production airfoil alloys. Since improved strength is typically obtained when the limits of microstructural stability are exceeded slightly, it is not surprising that this alloy has a tendency to exhibit microstructural instabilities after high temperature exposures. This presentation will discuss recent results obtained on coated fourth-generation alloys for subsonic turbine blade applications under the NASA Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program. Progress made in reducing microstructural instabilities in these alloys will be presented. In addition, plans will be presented for advanced alloy development and for computational modeling, which will aid future alloy development efforts.

  10. Photovoltaic semiconductor materials based on alloys of tin sulfide, and methods of production

    DOEpatents

    Lany, Stephan

    2016-06-07

    Photovoltaic thin-film materials comprising crystalline tin sulfide alloys of the general formula Sn.sub.1-x(R).sub.xS, where R is selected from magnesium, calcium and strontium, as well as methods of producing the same, are disclosed.

  11. Influence of absorber doping in a-SiC:H/a-Si:H/a-SiGe:H solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawaz, Muhammad; Ahmad, Ashfaq

    2012-04-01

    This work deals with the design evaluation and influence of absorber doping for a-Si:H/a-SiC:H/a-SiGe:H based thin-film solar cells using a two-dimensional computer aided design (TCAD) tool. Various physical parameters of the layered structure, such as doping and thickness of the absorber layer, have been studied. For reliable device simulation with realistic predictability, the device performance is evaluated by implementing necessary models (e.g., surface recombinations, thermionic field emission tunneling model for carrier transport at the heterojunction, Schokley—Read Hall recombination model, Auger recombination model, bandgap narrowing effects, doping and temperature dependent mobility model and using Fermi—Dirac statistics). A single absorber with a graded design gives an efficiency of 10.1% for 800 nm thick multiband absorption. Similarly, a tandem design shows an efficiency of 10.4% with a total absorber of thickness of 800 nm at a bandgap of 1.75 eV and 1.0 eV for the top a-Si and bottom a-SiGe component cells. A moderate n-doping in the absorber helps to improve the efficiency while p doping in the absorber degrades efficiency due to a decrease in the VOC (and fill factor) of the device.

  12. Identifying electronic properties relevant to improving stability in a-Si:H-based cells and overall performance in a-Si,Ge:H-based cells. Annual subcontract report, 18 April 1995--17 April 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, J.D.

    1997-03-01

    The work done during this second phase of the University of Oregon`s NREL subcontract focused on degradation studies in both pure a-Si:H and a-Si,Ge:H alloys, as well as a detailed study of the interface between these two materials in a-Si:H/a-Si, Ge:H heterostructures. All samples discussed in this report were produced by the glow-discharge method and were obtained either in collaboration with United Solar Systems Corporation or with researchers at Lawrence Berkeley laboratory. First, the results from the a-Si, Ge:H degradation studies support the conclusion that considerable quantities of charged defects exist in nominally intrinsic material. Researchers found that on light-soaking, all the observed defect sub-bands increased; however, their ratios varied significantly. Second, researchers performed voltage pulse stimulated capacitance transient measurements on a-Si:H/a-Si, Ge:H heterostructure samples and found a clear signature of trapped hole emission extending over long times. Finally, researchers began comparison studies of the electronic properties of a-Si:H grown by glow discharge either with 100% silane, or with silane diluted in H{sub 2} or He gas. The results on these samples indicate that the films grown under high hydrogen dilution exhibit roughly a factor of 3 lower deep defect densities than those grown using pure silane.

  13. Hot corrosivity of coal conversion product on high temperature alloys. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, G.H.

    1984-08-29

    This report describes research begun under Contract AS01-76-ET-10577, most of which was continued when the same project was continued under a new number, Contract AC01-79-ET-13547. The areas studied are thermochemistry of high temperature corrosion, hot corrosion of turbine alloys and coatings, and electrochemistry of sulfate melts. A background to the problem of hot corrosion is presented first followed by a description of results obtained in the three areas of this project.

  14. Induction heat treatment and technique of bioceramic coatings production on medical titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, Aleksandr A.; Rodionov, Igor V.; Fomina, Marina A.; Poshivalova, Elena Y.; Krasnikov, Aleksandr V.; Petrova, Natalia N.; Zakharevich, Andrey M.; Skaptsov, Alexander A.; Gribov, Andrey N.; Atkin, Vsevolod S.

    2015-03-01

    Prospective composite bioceramic titania coatings were obtained on intraosseous implants fabricated from medical titanium alloy VT16 (Ti-2.5Al-5Mo-5V). Consistency changes of morphological characteristics, physico-mechanical properties and biocompatibility of experimental titanium implant coatings obtained by oxidation during induction heat treatment are defined. Technological recommendations for obtaining bioceramic coatings with extremely high strength on titanium items surface are given.

  15. Removing hydrochloric acid exhaust products from high performance solid rocket propellant using aluminum-lithium alloy.

    PubMed

    Terry, Brandon C; Sippel, Travis R; Pfeil, Mark A; Gunduz, I Emre; Son, Steven F

    2016-11-01

    Hydrochloric acid (HCl) pollution from perchlorate based propellants is well known for both launch site contamination, as well as the possible ozone layer depletion effects. Past efforts in developing environmentally cleaner solid propellants by scavenging the chlorine ion have focused on replacing a portion of the chorine-containing oxidant (i.e., ammonium perchlorate) with an alkali metal nitrate. The alkali metal (e.g., Li or Na) in the nitrate reacts with the chlorine ion to form an alkali metal chloride (i.e., a salt instead of HCl). While this technique can potentially reduce HCl formation, it also results in reduced ideal specific impulse (ISP). Here, we show using thermochemical calculations that using aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloy can reduce HCl formation by more than 95% (with lithium contents ≥15 mass%) and increase the ideal ISP by ∼7s compared to neat aluminum (using 80/20 mass% Al-Li alloy). Two solid propellants were formulated using 80/20 Al-Li alloy or neat aluminum as fuel additives. The halide scavenging effect of Al-Li propellants was verified using wet bomb combustion experiments (75.5±4.8% reduction in pH, ∝ [HCl], when compared to neat aluminum). Additionally, no measurable HCl evolution was detected using differential scanning calorimetry coupled with thermogravimetric analysis, mass spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared absorption. PMID:27289269

  16. Removing hydrochloric acid exhaust products from high performance solid rocket propellant using aluminum-lithium alloy.

    PubMed

    Terry, Brandon C; Sippel, Travis R; Pfeil, Mark A; Gunduz, I Emre; Son, Steven F

    2016-11-01

    Hydrochloric acid (HCl) pollution from perchlorate based propellants is well known for both launch site contamination, as well as the possible ozone layer depletion effects. Past efforts in developing environmentally cleaner solid propellants by scavenging the chlorine ion have focused on replacing a portion of the chorine-containing oxidant (i.e., ammonium perchlorate) with an alkali metal nitrate. The alkali metal (e.g., Li or Na) in the nitrate reacts with the chlorine ion to form an alkali metal chloride (i.e., a salt instead of HCl). While this technique can potentially reduce HCl formation, it also results in reduced ideal specific impulse (ISP). Here, we show using thermochemical calculations that using aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloy can reduce HCl formation by more than 95% (with lithium contents ≥15 mass%) and increase the ideal ISP by ∼7s compared to neat aluminum (using 80/20 mass% Al-Li alloy). Two solid propellants were formulated using 80/20 Al-Li alloy or neat aluminum as fuel additives. The halide scavenging effect of Al-Li propellants was verified using wet bomb combustion experiments (75.5±4.8% reduction in pH, ∝ [HCl], when compared to neat aluminum). Additionally, no measurable HCl evolution was detected using differential scanning calorimetry coupled with thermogravimetric analysis, mass spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared absorption.

  17. Effectivity of fluoride treatment on hydrogen and corrosion product generation in temporal implants for different magnesium alloys.

    PubMed

    Trinidad, Javier; Arruebarrena, Gurutze; Marco, Iñigo; Hurtado, Iñaki; Sáenz de Argandoña, Eneko

    2013-12-01

    The increasing interest on magnesium alloys relies on their biocompatibility, bioabsorbility and especially on their mechanical properties. Due to these characteristics, magnesium alloys are becoming a promising solution to be used, as temporary implants. However, magnesium alloys must overcome their poor corrosion resistance. This article analyses the corrosion behaviour in phosphate-buffered saline solution of three commercial magnesium alloys (AZ31B, WE43 and ZM21) as well as the influence of fluoride treatment on their corrosion behaviour. It is shown that the corrosion rate of all the alloys is decreased by fluoride treatment. However, fluoride treatment affects each alloy differently.

  18. Preparation of a-Si:H and a-SiGe:H nip cells at high rates using a 70 MHz VHF PECVD technique

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.J.; Liu, T.; Izu, M.

    1999-03-01

    A 70 MHz Very High Frequency (VHF) Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) technique has been used to prepare i-layers for small area, single-junction a-Si:H and a-SiGe:H nip cells and triple-junction devices at deposition rates as high as 10 {Angstrom}/s. For both the a-Si:H and a-SiGe:H single-junction cells under optimized deposition conditions, the efficiencies and the light stability remain relatively constant as the i-layer deposition rate is varied from 1 to 10 {Angstrom}/s. Also the stable efficiencies for both types of cells are similar to those for similar cells made in the same deposition system at low deposition rates (1 {Angstrom}/s) using the standard 13.56 MHz PECVD technique. Triple-junction a-Si:H/a-SiGe:H/a-SiGe:H cells have been fabricated using the VHF technique to prepare all of the i-layers at deposition rates near 10 {Angstrom}/s. These devices have pre-light soaked active area efficiencies between 9.5 and 10{percent} and total area efficiencies between 9.0 and 9.5{percent}. Considering these results, the VHF method is a promising technique to increase the growth rate of i-layers for a-Si:H based devices, and when applied to the production of large area a-Si:H based multi-junction solar modules, it will allow for higher manufacturing throughput and reduced module cost. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Studies of a-Si:H and a-Si:D

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, D. L.; Marr, D. W. M.; Nelson, B. P.; Iwaniczko, E.; Yang, J.; Yan, B.; Guha, S.

    2000-01-01

    The heterogeneity of hydrogen and deuterium on the nanometer scale has been probed by samll-angle neutron scattering (SANS) from a-Si:H and a-Si:D films. Films were depsoited by two techniques, plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) and hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) using conditions that yield high quality films and devices.

  20. [Risk of exposure to metals in the production and processing of copper alloys].

    PubMed

    Crippa, M; Apostoli, P; Quarta, C; Alessio, L

    1991-01-01

    A study was carried out in 3 copper alloy industries: a foundry for scrap of various origin producing brass and bronze alloys (foundry A) and 2 foundries that used these same alloys (foundries B and C). An environmental investigation and biological monitoring of the employees for Pb, ZPP, Cu, Zn, Be, Sb, Mn, Ni and Cr were performed in each foundry. The results of biological and environmental monitoring showed that the Pb exposure levels were distinctly higher than those of the other metals in all 3 foundries. The highest levels of PbA and PbB were observed in foundry A, especially during scrap grinding operations, where the limit values were exceeded. The environmental concentrations and the levels of the biological indicators for all other metals, except Pb, were within reasonable limits. Therefore, in the investigated working situations and for the metals under study, except Pb, it would appear that a situation exists of exposure to "microdoses" which, even though not implying a risk of appearance of the classic signs and symptoms of intoxication, raises the problem of the possibility of identifying early effects and interpreting the biological indicators. Biological monitoring of exposed subjects has shown that the levels of the indicators for Cu, Ni and Cr are markedly different from the reference values on a group basis, whereas in individual workers the values are generally below the "upper limits". A comparison with the "limit values'' was only possible for the biological indicators of Pb; for the others, although differences were observed indicating that absorption had taken place, no univocal interpretation criteria exist, considering also the relatively low mean increases observed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Regularities of crystallographic texture formation in cladding tubes from Zr-based alloys during their production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaenkova, M.; Perlovich, Yu; Fesenko, V.

    2016-04-01

    This paper summarizes researches of the authors, which are directed on the development of the methodological basis of X-ray studies in the materials science of zirconium and on the systematization of new experimental results obtained using developed methods. The paper describes regularities of the formation of the crystallographic texture and the substructure inhomogeneity of cladding tubes from zirconium alloys at various stages of their manufacturing, i.e. during hot and cold deformation, recrystallization, phase transformations and interactions of the above processes.

  2. Production of copper and Heusler alloy Cu 2MnAl mosaic single crystals for neutron monochromators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtois, P.; Hamelin, B.; Andersen, K. H.

    2004-08-01

    The growth of high-quality, large single crystals of copper allows the production of very efficient double focusing copper monochromators at ILL. The main difficulty of adapting the crystal mosaic to the instrument requirements has been overcome through the development of specific techniques such as the "onion peel" method and plastic deformations at high temperature. Several instruments have been equipped with new copper monochromators allowing a significant gain in the neutron flux onto the sample. ILL also produces Heusler single crystals with a controlled mosaic for polarized neutrons. Recently, an order of magnitude increase in polarized neutron flux has been reached on the triple axis spectrometer IN20 using a new Heusler monochromator. In addition, the Neutron Optics Laboratory carries out developments in the field of new materials for neutron monochromators. Mixed gradient crystals have been successfully grown with a variation in the d spacing Δ d/ d≈10 -2. Studies on new polarizing crystal alloys are also in progress and NiMnSb Heusler alloy having partially enriched Ni with 60Ni may be interesting for polarized neutron applications.

  3. Catalyst Alloys Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xincai

    2014-10-01

    Catalysts are one of the key materials used for diamond formation at high pressures. Several such catalyst products have been developed and applied in China and around the world. The catalyst alloy most widely used in China is Ni70Mn25Co5 developed at Changsha Research Institute of Mining and Metallurgy. In this article, detailed techniques for manufacturing such a typical catalyst alloy will be reviewed. The characteristics of the alloy will be described. Detailed processing of the alloy will be presented, including remelting and casting, hot rolling, annealing, surface treatment, cold rolling, blanking, finishing, packaging, and waste treatment. An example use of the catalyst alloy will also be given. Industrial experience shows that for the catalyst alloy products, a vacuum induction remelt furnace can be used for remelting, a metal mold can be used for casting, hot and cold rolling can be used for forming, and acid pickling can be used for metal surface cleaning.

  4. Direct production of nanostructured copper-nickel (Cu-Ni) alloy particles

    SciTech Connect

    Apaydin, Ramazan Oguzhan; Ebin, Burcak; Gurmen, Sebahattin

    2013-12-16

    Copper-Nickel (CuNi) nanostructured alloy particles were produced by Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis and Hydrogen Reduction Method (USP-HR) from high purity copper and nickel nitrate aqueous solutions. The effect of the precursor solution in the range of 0.1 and 0.5 mol/L on the morphology and crystallite size of CuNi nanoparticles were investigated under 2 h running time, 700 °C operating temperature and 0.5 L/min H{sub 2} flow rate. Particle size, morphology, composition and crystallite structure were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Particle characterization studies show that nanostructured alloy particles have cubic crystal structure and they are in submicron size range with spherical morphology. The crystallite sizes of the particles calculated with Scherrer formula are 40 and 34 nm and average particles sizes observed from the SEM images are 300 and 510 nm for each experiment respectively.

  5. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, David S.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Powell, Roger W.

    1986-01-01

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  6. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, D.S.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Powell, R.W.

    1985-02-07

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  7. Integral bypass diodes in an amorphous silicon alloy photovoltaic module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanak, J. J.; Flaisher, H.

    1991-01-01

    Thin-film, tandem-junction, amorphous silicon (a-Si) photovoltaic modules were constructed in which a part of the a-Si alloy cell material is used to form bypass protection diodes. This integral design circumvents the need for incorporating external, conventional diodes, thus simplifying the manufacturing process and reducing module weight.

  8. Weldability of High Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Maroef, I

    2003-01-22

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of silicon and iron on the weldability of HAYNES HR-160{reg_sign} alloy. HR-I60 alloy is a solid solution strengthened Ni-Co-Cr-Si alloy. The alloy is designed to resist corrosion in sulfidizing and other aggressive high temperature environments. Silicon is added ({approx}2.75%) to promote the formation of a protective oxide scale in environments with low oxygen activity. HR-160 alloy has found applications in waste incinerators, calciners, pulp and paper recovery boilers, coal gasification systems, and fluidized bed combustion systems. HR-160 alloy has been successfully used in a wide range of welded applications. However, the alloy can be susceptible to solidification cracking under conditions of severe restraint. A previous study by DuPont, et al. [1] showed that silicon promoted solidification cracking in the commercial alloy. In earlier work conducted at Haynes, and also from published work by DuPont et al., it was recognized that silicon segregates to the terminal liquid, creating low melting point liquid films on solidification grain boundaries. Solidification cracking has been encountered when using the alloy as a weld overlay on steel, and when joining HR-160 plate in a thickness greater than19 millimeters (0.75 inches) with matching filler metal. The effect of silicon on the weldability of HR-160 alloy has been well documented, but the effect of iron is not well understood. Prior experience at Haynes has indicated that iron may be detrimental to the solidification cracking resistance of the alloy. Iron does not segregate to the terminal solidification product in nickel-base alloys, as does silicon [2], but iron may have an indirect or interactive influence on weldability. A set of alloys covering a range of silicon and iron contents was prepared and characterized to better understand the welding metallurgy of HR-160 alloy.

  9. New Amorphous Silicon Alloy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapur, Mridula N.

    1990-01-01

    The properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) have been modified by alloying with Al, Ga and S respectively. The Al and Ga alloys are in effect quaternary alloys as they were fabricated in a carbon-rich discharge. The alloys were prepared by the plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD) method. This method has several advantages, the major one being the relatively low defect densities of the resulting materials. The PACVD system used to grow the alloy films was designed and constructed in the laboratory. It was first tested with known (a-Si:H and a-Si:As:H) materials. Thus, it was established that device quality alloy films could be grown with the home-made PACVD setup. The chemical composition of the alloys was characterized by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The homogeneous nature of hydrogen distribution in the alloys was established by SIMS depth profile analysis. A quantitative analysis of the bulk elemental content was carried out by EPMA. The analysis indicated that the alloying element was incorporated in the films more efficiently at low input gas concentrations than at the higher concentrations. A topological model was proposed to explain the observed behavior. The optical energy gap of the alloys could be varied in the 0.90 to 1.92 eV range. The Al and Ga alloys were low band gap materials, whereas alloying with S had the effect of widening the energy gap. It was observed that although the Si-Al and Si-Ga alloys contained significant amounts of C and H, the magnitude of the energy gap was determined by the metallic component. The various trends in optical properties could be related to the binding characteristics of the respective alloy systems. A quantitative explanation of the results was provided by White's tight binding model. The dark conductivity-temperature dependence of the alloys was examined. A linear dependence was observed for the Al and Ga systems. Electronic conduction in

  10. Transformation process for production of ultrahigh carbon steels and new alloys

    DOEpatents

    Strum, M.J.; Goldberg, A.; Sherby, O.D.; Landingham, R.L.

    1995-08-29

    Ultrahigh carbon steels with superplastic properties are produced by heating a steel containing ferrite and carbide phases to a soaking temperature approximately 50 C above the A{sub 1} transformation temperature, soaking the steel above the A{sub 1} temperature for a sufficient time that the major portion of the carbides dissolve into the austenite matrix, and then cooling the steel in a controlled manner within predetermined limits of cooling rate or transformation temperature, to obtain a steel having substantially spheroidal carbides. New alloy compositions contain aluminum and solute additions which promote the formation of a fine grain size and improve the resistance of the carbides to coarsening at the forming temperature. 9 figs.

  11. Transformation process for production of ultrahigh carbon steels and new alloys

    DOEpatents

    Strum, Michael J.; Goldberg, Alfred; Sherby, Oleg D.; Landingham, Richard L.

    1995-01-01

    Ultrahigh carbon steels with superplastic properties are produced by heating a steel containing ferrite and carbide phases to a soaking temperature approximately 50.degree. C. above the A.sub.1 transformation temperature, soaking the steel above the A.sub.1 temperature for a sufficient time that the major portion of the carbides dissolve into the austenite matrix, and then cooling the steel in a controlled manner within predetermined limits of cooling rate or transformation temperature, to obtain a steel having substantially spheroidal carbides. New alloy compositions contain aluminum and solute additions which promote the formation of a fine grain size and improve the resistance of the carbides to coarsening at the forming temperature.

  12. Properties Evaluation and Studying Production Mechanism of Nanocrystalline NiAl Intermetallic Compound by Mechanical Alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khajesarvi, Ali; Akbari, Golamhossein

    2016-04-01

    Ni50Al50 intermetallic compound was synthesized by mechanical alloying (MA) of elemental mixtures of Ni and Al powders in a planetary ball mill. After 16 hours of milling and obtaining crystallites with a critical size, the initial NiAl compound was formed along with the combustive reaction after opening the vial lid. In the time interval of 16 to 128 hours, the reaction from combustive state reached the explosive state. Finally, after 128 hours of milling, the initial powders were wholly transformed into NiAl before completion of the milling time. Structural changes of powder particles during MA were studied by X-ray diffractometry and scanning electron microscopy. The crystallite size measurements revealed that the grain size of the NiAl phase decreased from 155 to 26 nm with increasing MA time from 8 to 128 hours. Microhardness for nanocrystalline Ni50Al50 intermetallic compound produced after 128 hours of milling was measured as about 350 Hv.

  13. Fe-Zn Alloy Coating on Galvannealed (GA) Steel Sheet to Improve Product Qualities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Debabrata; Guin, Akshya Kumar; Raju, Pankaj; Manna, Manindra; Dutta, Monojit; Venugopalan, T.

    2014-09-01

    Galvannealed steel sheets (GA) have become the mainstream steel sheet for automobile applications because of their superior corrosion resistance, paintability, and weldability. To impart specific properties, different coatings on GA steel sheet were reported to improve properties further. In this context, we have developed an electroplating process (flash coating) for bright and adherent Fe-Zn alloy coating on GA steel sheet to enhance performances such as weldability, frictional behavior, phosphatability, and defect coverage. A comparative study with bare GA steel sheet was carried out for better elastration. The electroplating time was reduced below 10 s for practical applicability in an industrial coating line by modulating the bath composition. Electroplating was performed at current density of 200-500 A/m2 which yielded with higher cathode current efficiency of 85-95%. The performance results show that Fe-10 wt.% Zn-coated GA steel sheet (coating time 7 s) has better spot weldability, lower dynamic coefficient of friction (0.06-0.07 in lubrication), and better corrosion resistance compared to bare GA steel sheet. Uniform phosphate coating with globular crystal size of 2-5 µm was obtained on Fe-Zn flash-coated GA steel sheet. Hopeite was the main phosphate compound (77.9 wt.%) identified along with spencerite (13.6 wt.%) and phosphophyllite (8.5 wt.%).

  14. Production of aluminum-silicon alloy and ferrosilicon and commercial purity aluminum by the direct reduction process. Third interim technical report, Phase C for the period 1980 July 1-1980 September 30

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, M.J.

    1980-10-01

    Pilot reactor VSR-3 operation in the third quarter was directed to tapping molten alloy product. Modifications to the hearth region included a tapping furnace to maintain taphole temperature, a graphite ring filter to separate carbides from matal and an alumina liner to eliminate carbiding from reaction of alloy with the graphite hearth walls. Tapping was not successful, however, due to high alloy viscosity from a large concentration of carbides. Three runs were made on the pilot crystallizer to determine the effects of alloy composition, cooling rate, tamping rate, remelt temperature and rate on eutectic Al-Si yield.

  15. Production of aluminum-silicon alloy and ferrosilicon and commercial purity aluminum by the direct reduction process. First interim technical report, Phase D, January 1-March 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, M.J.

    1981-04-01

    Operation of the bench AF-reactor on burden with all reducing carbon exterior to the ore pellet resulted in low metal alloy product yields and prematurely terminated runs, indicating the need for intimate contact between alumina and carbon to produce oxycarbide liquid prior to reaction with solid silicon carbide. Carbon solubility tests made on 60Al-40Si alloys at 2200/sup 0/C in graphite crucibles indicated continued reaction to form SiC for one hour. Efficiency of reduction to SiC ranged from 68 to 100%. The A-C two-electrode submerged arc reactor pilot, SAR-II, was successfully operated on both alumina-clay-coke and alumina-silicon carbide-coke (from the VSR prereduction) burdens. Metal alloy was produced and tapped in each of four runs. The pilot crystallizer was operated to evalute the two-stage (stop and go) crystallization technique on obtaining high yields of Al in Al-Si eutectic, with a limit of 1.0% Fe and 0.1% Ti in the alloy product. 18 figures, 19 tables. (DLC)

  16. Nano-Scale Fission Product Phases in an Irradiated U-7Mo Alloy Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Keiser, Jr.; Brandon Miller; James Madden; Jan-Fong Jue; Jian Gan

    2014-09-01

    Irradiated nuclear fuel is a very difficult material to characterize. Due to the large radiation fields associated with these materials, they are hard to handle and typically have to be contained in large hot cells. Even the equipment used for performing characterization is housed in hot cells or shielded glove boxes. The result is not only a limitation in the techniques that can be employed for characterization, but also a limitation in the size of features that can be resolved The most standard characterization techniques include light optical metallography (WM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). These techniques are applied to samples that are typically prepared using grinding and polishing approaches that will always generate some mechanical damage on the sample surface. As a result, when performing SEM analysis, for example, the analysis is limited by the quality of the sample surface that can be prepared. However, a new approach for characterizing irradiated nuclear fuel has recently been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. It allows for a dramatic improvement in the quality of characterization that can be performed when using an instrument like an SEM. This new approach uses a dual-beam scanning microscope, where one of the beams isa focused ion beam (FIB), which can be used to generate specimens of irradiated fuel (-10µm x 10µm) for microstructural characterization, and the other beam is the electron beam of an SEM. One significant benefit of this approach is that the specimen surface being characterized has received much less damage (and smearing) than is caused by the more traditional approaches, which enables the imaging of nanometer­ sized microstructural features in the SEM. The process details are for an irradiated low-enriched uranium (LEU) U-Mo alloy fuel Another type of irradiated fuel that has been characterized using this technique is a mixed oxide fuel.

  17. Improvement of parameters in a-Si(p)/c-Si(n)/a-Si(n) solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustafa Bouzaki, Mohammed; Aillerie, Michel; Ould Saad Hamady, Sidi; Chadel, Meriem; Benyoucef, Boumediene

    2016-10-01

    We analyzed and discussed the influence of thickness and doping concentration of the different layers in a-Si(p)/c-Si(n)/a-Si(n) photovoltaic (PV) cells with the aim of increasing its efficiency while decreasing its global cost. Compared to the efficiency of a standard marketed PV cell, elaborated with a ZnO transparent conductive oxide (TCO) layer but without Back Surface Field (BSF) layer, an optimization of the thickness and dopant concentration of both the emitter a-Si(p) and absorber c-Si(n) layers will gain about 3% in the global efficiency of the cell. The results also reveal that with introduction of the third layer, i.e. the BSF layer, the efficiency always achieves values above 20% and all other parameters of the cell, such as the open-circuit voltage, the short-circuit current and the fill-factor, are strongly affected by the thickness and dopant concentration of the layers. The values of all parameters are given and discussed in the paper. Thereby, the simulation results give for an optimized a-Si(p)/c-Si(n)/a-Si(n) PV cells the possibility to decrease the thickness of the absorber layer down to 50 μm which is lower than in the state-of-the-art. This structure of the cell achieves suitable properties for high efficiency, cost-effectiveness and reliable heterojunction (HJ) solar cell applications.

  18. Light induced degradation and structure of high efficiency a-Si:H, a-SiGe:H and a-SiC:H solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fortmann, C.M.; O'Dowd, J.; Newton, J.; Fischer, J.

    1987-06-25

    The electrical and optical properties of a-Si:H, a-SiGe:H and a-SiC:H films prepared by d.c. glow discharge method have been characterized. High performance p-i-n devices have also been prepared. The relative stability as well as initial properties of these materials was examined as a function of growth rate. Notable solar cells include efficiencies of 9.36% for a-Si:H deposited at 10Asec, 8.6% for a-SiGe:H and 7% for a-SiC:H. Cells employing I-layers of a-Si:H grown at rates greater than 10Asec were significantly less stable than standard material. Cells using I-layers of either a-SiGe:H or a-SiC:H were stable (compared to standard a-Si:H) when they were prepared at growth rates of less than 1.0Asec. An increase in the infrared absorption at 845 cm/sup -1/ was associated with an increase in the rate of light induced degradation. Absorption at 845 cm/sup -1/, is usually associated with the bending modes of (SiH/sub 2/)/sub n/ polymeric chains

  19. Comparative life-cycle energy payback analysis of multi-junction a-SiGe and nanocrystalline/a-Si modules

    SciTech Connect

    Fthenakis, V.; Kim, H.

    2010-07-15

    Despite the publicity of nanotechnologies in high tech industries including the photovoltaic sector, their life-cycle energy use and related environmental impacts are understood only to a limited degree as their production is mostly immature. We investigated the life-cycle energy implications of amorphous silicon (a-Si) PV designs using a nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) bottom layer in the context of a comparative, prospective life-cycle analysis framework. Three R and D options using nc-Si bottom layer were evaluated and compared to the current triple-junction a-Si design, i.e., a-Si/a-SiGe/a-SiGe. The life-cycle energy demand to deposit nc-Si was estimated from parametric analyses of film thickness, deposition rate, precursor gas usage, and power for generating gas plasma. We found that extended deposition time and increased gas usages associated to the relatively high thickness of nc-Si lead to a larger primary energy demand for the nc-Si bottom layer designs, than the current triple-junction a-Si. Assuming an 8% conversion efficiency, the energy payback time of those R and D designs will be 0.7-0.9 years, close to that of currently commercial triple-junction a-Si design, 0.8 years. Future scenario analyses show that if nc-Si film is deposited at a higher rate (i.e., 2-3 nm/s), and at the same time the conversion efficiency reaches 10%, the energy-payback time could drop by 30%.

  20. Alloy Selection System

    SciTech Connect

    2001-02-01

    Software will Predict Corrosion Rates to Improve Productivity in the Chemical Industry. Many aspects of equipment design and operation are influenced by the choice of the alloys used to fabricate process equipment.

  1. High Efficiency Triple-Junction Amorphous Silicon Alloy Photovoltaic Technology, Final Technical Report, 6 March 1998 - 15 October 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Guha, S.

    2001-11-08

    This report describes the research program intended to expand, enhance, and accelerate knowledge and capabilities for developing high-performance, two-terminal multijunction amorphous silicon (a-Si) alloy cells, and modules with low manufacturing cost and high reliability. United Solar uses a spectrum-splitting, triple-junction cell structure. The top cell uses an amorphous silicon alloy of {approx}1.8-eV bandgap to absorb blue photons. The middle cell uses an amorphous silicon germanium alloy ({approx}20% germanium) of {approx}1.6-eV bandgap to capture green photons. The bottom cell has {approx}40% germanium to reduce the bandgap to {approx}1.4-eV to capture red photons. The cells are deposited on a stainless-steel substrate with a predeposited silver/zinc oxide back reflector to facilitate light-trapping. A thin layer of antireflection coating is applied to the top of the cell to reduce reflection loss. The major research activities conducted under this program were: (1) Fundamental studies to improve our understanding of materials and devices; the work included developing and analyzing a-Si alloy and a-SiGe alloy materials prepared near the threshold of amorphous-to-microcrystalline transition and studying solar cells fabricated using these materials. (2) Deposition of small-area cells using a radio-frequency technique to obtain higher deposition rates. (3) Deposition of small-area cells using a modified very high frequency technique to obtain higher deposition rates. (4) Large-area cell research to obtain the highest module efficiency. (5) Optimization of solar cells and modules fabricated using production parameters in a large-area reactor.

  2. Reducing metal alloy powder costs for use in powder bed fusion additive manufacturing: Improving the economics for production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Fransisco

    Titanium and its associated alloys have been used in industry for over 50 years and have become more popular in the recent decades. Titanium has been most successful in areas where the high strength to weight ratio provides an advantage over aluminum and steels. Other advantages of titanium include biocompatibility and corrosion resistance. Electron Beam Melting (EBM) is an additive manufacturing (AM) technology that has been successfully applied in the manufacturing of titanium components for the aerospace and medical industry with equivalent or better mechanical properties as parts fabricated via more traditional casting and machining methods. As the demand for titanium powder continues to increase, the price also increases. Titanium spheroidized powder from different vendors has a price range from 260/kg-450/kg, other spheroidized alloys such as Niobium can cost as high as $1,200/kg. Alternative titanium powders produced from methods such as the Titanium Hydride-Dehydride (HDH) process and the Armstrong Commercially Pure Titanium (CPTi) process can be fabricated at a fraction of the cost of powders fabricated via gas atomization. The alternative powders can be spheroidized and blended. Current sectors in additive manufacturing such as the medical industry are concerned that there will not be enough spherical powder for production and are seeking other powder options. It is believed the EBM technology can use a blend of spherical and angular powder to build fully dense parts with equal mechanical properties to those produced using traditional powders. Some of the challenges with angular and irregular powders are overcoming the poor flow characteristics and the attainment of the same or better packing densities as spherical powders. The goal of this research is to demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing alternative and lower cost powders in the EBM process. As a result, reducing the cost of the raw material to reduce the overall cost of the product produced with

  3. Utilization of amorphous silicon carbide (a-Si:C:H) as a resistive layer in gas microstrip detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, W.S.; Cho, H.S.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Gong, W.G.

    1995-04-01

    Thin semiconducting films of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and its carbon alloy (a-Si:C:H) were applied to gas microstrip detectors in order to control gain instabilities due to charges on the substrate. Thin ({approximately}100nm) layers of a-Si:H or p-doped a-Si:C:H were placed either over or under the electrodes using the plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technique to provide the substrate with a suitable surface conductivity. By changing the carbon content and boron doping density, the sheet resistance of the a-Si:C:H coating could be successfully controlled in the range of 10{sup 12} {approximately} 10{sup 17} {Omega}/{four_gradient}, and the light sensitivity, which causes the resistivity to vary with ambient light conditions, was minimized. An avalanche gain of 5000 and energy resolution of 20% FWHM were achieved and the gain remained constant over a week of operation. A-Si:C:H film is an attractive alternative to ion-implanted or semiconducting glass due to the wide range of resistivities possible and the feasibility of making deposits over a large area at low cost.

  4. Electrospun a-Si using Liquid Silane/Polymer Inks

    SciTech Connect

    Doug Schulz

    2010-12-09

    Amorphous silicon nanowires (a-SiNWs) were prepared by electrospinning cyclohexasilane (Si{sub 6}H{sub 12}) admixed with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) in toluene. Raman spectroscopy characterization of these wires (d {approx} 50-2000 nm) shows 350 C treatment yields a-SiNWs. Porous a-SiNWs are obtained using a volatile polymer.

  5. Electrospun a-Si using Liquid Silane/Polymer Inks

    SciTech Connect

    D.L. Schulz; J.M. Hoey; J. Smith; J. Lovaasen; C. Braun; X. Dai; K. Anderson; A. Elangovan; X. Wu; S. Payne; K. Pokhodnya; I. Akhatov; L. Pederson; P. Boudjouk

    2010-12-01

    Amorphous silicon nanowires (a-SiNWs) were prepared by electrospinning cyclohexasilane (Si{sub 6}H{sub 12}) admixed with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) in toluene. Raman spectroscopy characterization of these wires (d {approx} 50-2000 nm) shows 350 C treatment yields a-SiNWs. Porous a-SiNWs are obtained using a volatile polymer.

  6. Valence x-ray-emission bands of a-Si:H/a-SiNx:H superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nithianandam, Jeyasingh; Schnatterly, Stephen E.

    1990-11-01

    Si L2,3 x-ray-emission spectra from amorphous superlattices made with a-Si:H and a-SiNx:H are presented and interpreted using a two-phase linear superposition model for the valence-band region. The average thickness of buried interfaces in these superlattices was found to be 1.8 Å and the interfaces were shown to be of silicon-nitride character. A direct measurement of the fluorescence yield ratio in the soft-x-ray spectral range for any two materials is also presented.

  7. Effec of high-temperature decomposition of the solid solution on the low-cycle fatigue resistance of semifinished products made of aluminum alloy 1163

    SciTech Connect

    Teleshov, V.V.; Kuzginov, V.I.; Golovleva, A.P.

    1995-11-01

    The surface of anodized parts made of 1163T aluminum alloy that are produced by mechanical treatment of large pressed or rolled semifinished products exhibits dark regions. These regions have a higher electrical conductivity {gamma} than the rest of the anodized surface, colored light-yellow. Some authors explain the appearance of the dark stains by high-temperature decomposition of the solid solution, which is initiated by secondary heating of these surface regions due to the heat of surrounding volumes in random interruptions of the cooling process. The aim of the present work is to refine the dependence of {gamma}on the endurance in tests for low-cycle fatigue of specimens from semifinished products made of 1163 alloy in order to establish the intensity of the decrease of the endurance and the admissible increase of {gamma} in the region of dark stains.

  8. High efficiency thin film CdTe and a-Si based solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Compaan, A. D.; Deng, X.; Bohn, R. G.

    2000-01-04

    This report describes work done by the University of Toledo during the first year of this subcontract. During this time, the CdTe group constructed a second dual magnetron sputter deposition facility; optimized reactive sputtering for ZnTe:N films to achieve 10 ohm-cm resistivity and {approximately}9% efficiency cells with a copper-free ZnTe:N/Ni contact; identified Cu-related photoluminescence features and studied their correlation with cell performance including their dependence on temperature and E-fields; studied band-tail absorption in CdS{sub x}Te{sub 1{minus}x} films at 10 K and 300 K; collaborated with the National CdTe PV Team on (1) studies of high-resistivity tin oxide (HRT) layers from ITN Energy Systems, (2) fabrication of cells on the HRT layers with 0, 300, and 800-nm CdS, and (3) preparation of ZnTe:N-based contacts on First Solar materials for stress testing; and collaborated with Brooklyn College for ellipsometry studies of CdS{sub x}Te{sub 1{minus}x} alloy films, and with the University of Buffalo/Brookhaven NSLS for synchrotron X-ray fluorescence studies of interdiffusion in CdS/CdTe bilayers. The a-Si group established a baseline for fabricating a-Si-based solar cells with single, tandem, and triple-junction structures; fabricated a-Si/a-SiGe/a-SiGe triple-junction solar cells with an initial efficiency of 9.7% during the second quarter, and 10.6% during the fourth quarter (after 1166 hours of light-soaking under 1-sun light intensity at 50 C, the 10.6% solar cells stabilized at about 9%); fabricated wide-bandgap a-Si top cells, the highest Voc achieved for the single-junction top cell was 1.02 V, and top cells with high FF (up to 74%) were fabricated routinely; fabricated high-quality narrow-bandgap a-SiGe solar cells with 8.3% efficiency; found that bandgap-graded buffer layers improve the performance (Voc and FF) of the narrow-bandgap a-SiGe bottom cells; and found that a small amount of oxygen partial pressure ({approximately}2 {times} 10

  9. Alloy materials

    DOEpatents

    Hans Thieme, Cornelis Leo; Thompson, Elliott D.; Fritzemeier, Leslie G.; Cameron, Robert D.; Siegal, Edward J.

    2002-01-01

    An alloy that contains at least two metals and can be used as a substrate for a superconductor is disclosed. The alloy can contain an oxide former. The alloy can have a biaxial or cube texture. The substrate can be used in a multilayer superconductor, which can further include one or more buffer layers disposed between the substrate and the superconductor material. The alloys can be made a by process that involves first rolling the alloy then annealing the alloy. A relatively large volume percentage of the alloy can be formed of grains having a biaxial or cube texture.

  10. Oxidation products of Inconel alloys 600 and 690 in hydrogenated steam environments and their role in stress corrosion cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, J. Bryce

    Inconel Alloys 600 and 690 are used extensively in components of Nuclear Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) in the primary water loop which consists of H2 supersaturated steam. Alloy 600 has been found to crack intergranularly when exposed to primary water conditions. Alloy 690 was designed as a replacement and is generally regarded as immune to cracking. There is no consensus as to the mechanism which is responsible for cracking or the lack thereof in these alloys. In this work thermodynamic arguments for the stability of Ni and Cr compounds developed under pressurized water reactor environments ( PH2O and PH2 ) were experimentally tested. A mechanism is proposed to explain crack initiation and propagation alloy 600 along the grain boundaries where Cr2O3 has formed from the leaching of Cr from the matrix leaving behind a porous Ni-rich region. The mechanism is based on the thermodynamic potential for the transformation of a protective NiO surface layer into an amorphous non-protective Ni(OH)2 gel. This gel would also form along the grain boundaries and when hydrogenated steam reaches the porous Ni-rich regions. Crack initiation is then favored by tensile stressing of the grain boundary regions which can easily rupture the gelatinous film. The leaching of matrix Cr to form non-protective CrOOH gel at the crack tip followed by the exposure of fresh porous Ni to the environment also explains crack propagation in inconel alloy 600. The proposed crack initiation mechanism is not expected to occur in alloy 690 where a protective Cr2O 3 film covers the entire metal surface. However, crack propagation along the grain boundaries in alloy 600 and pre-cracked alloy 690 is expected to be active as hydroxide-forming reactions weaken the material at the grain boundaries.

  11. Structure and properties study of V-based membrane alloys for ultra-high purity hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipatov, I.; Sidorov, N.; Pryanichnikov, S.; Pastukhov, E.

    2016-09-01

    Experimental data of hydrogen permeability within the temperature range from 450 to 600 °C and hydrogen pressure ˜4.5 kPa for the V85Ni15, V90Ti10 (atom %) alloys are reported. The higher temperature is, the higher hydrogen permeability of the alloys is within the temperature range under investigation. Microstructure of the alloys was investigated before and after hydrogen permeability tests. No changes in microstructure after continuous heat treatment at 650 °C and further exposure in hydrogen atmosphere at elevated temperatures were found.

  12. Continuous roll-to-roll a-Si photovoltaic manufacturing technology. Annual subcontractor report, 1 April 1992--31 March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Izu, M.

    1993-12-01

    This report describes work done under a 3-year program to advance ECD`s roll-to-roll, triple-junction photovoltaic manufacturing technologies, to reduce the module production costs, to increase the stabilized module performance, and to expand commercial capacity utilizing ECD technology. The specific 3-year goal is to develop advanced large-scale manufacturing technology incorporating ECD`s earlier research advances with the capability of producing modules with stable 11% efficiency at a cost of approximately $1.00 per peak watt. Accomplishments during Phase 1 included: (1) ECD successfully incorporated a high-performance Ag/metal-oxide back-reflector system into its continuous roll-to-roll commercial production operation. (2) High-quality a-Si-Ge narrow-band-gap solar cells were incorporated into the manufacturing. (3) ECD demonstrated the continuous roll-to-roll production of high-efficiency, triple-junction, two-band-gap solar cells consistently and uniformly throughout a 762-m (2500-ft) run with high yield. (4) ECD achieved 11.1% initial sub-cell efficiency of triple-junction, two-band-gap a-Si alloy solar cells in the production line. (5) The world`s first 0.37-m{sup 2} (4-ft{sup 2}) PV modules were produced utilizing triple-junction spectrum-splitting solar cells manufactured in the production line. (6) As a result of process optimization to reduce the layer thickness and to improve the gas utilization, ECD achieved a 77% material cost reduction for germane and 58% reduction for disilane. Additionally, ECD developed a new low-cost module that saves approximately 30% in assembly material costs.

  13. Grinding as an approach to the production of high-strength, dispersion-strengthened nickel-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orth, N. W.; Quatinetz, M.; Weeton, J. W.

    1970-01-01

    Mechanical process produces dispersion-strengthened metal alloys. Power surface contamination during milling is removed by a cleaning method that involves heating thin shapes or partially-compacted milled powder blends in hydrogen to carefully controlled temperature schedules.

  14. Method for the production of strongly adhesive films on titanium and titanium alloys with a metallization process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, H. J.

    1986-01-01

    A process for the spray-application of a strongly adhesive, thick antifriction layer on titanium and titanium alloys is proposed. The titanium/titanium alloy component to be coated is first subjected to cleaning in a pickling bath with reducing additives and sand-blasting, then coated with an intermediate layer of nickel, after which the final layer is applied. The formation of TiNi at the interface ensures strong bonding of the antifriction layer.

  15. Production of hydroxyapatite layers on the plasma electrolytically oxidized surface of titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Lugovskoy, Alex; Lugovskoy, Svetlana

    2014-10-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) is a bioactive material that is widely used for improving the osseointegration of titanium dental implants. Titanium can be coated with HA by various methods, such as chemical vapor deposition (CVD), thermal spray, or plasma spray. HA coatings can also be grown on titanium surfaces by hydrothermal, chemical, and electrochemical methods. Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO), or microarc oxidation (MAO), is an electrochemical method that enables the production of a thick porous oxide layer on the surface of a titanium implant. If the electrolyte in which PEO is performed contains calcium and phosphate ions, the oxide layer produced may contain hydroxyapatite. The HA content can then be increased by subsequent hydrothermal treatment. The HA thus produced on titanium surfaces has attractive properties, such as a high porosity, a controllable thickness, and a considerable density, which favor its use in dental and bone surgery. This review summarizes the state of the art and possible further development of PEO for the production of HA on Ti implants.

  16. Performance of the Lead-Alloy Cooled Concept Balanced for Actinide Burning and Electricity Production

    SciTech Connect

    Pavel Hejzlar; Cliff Davis

    2004-09-01

    A lead-bismuth-cooled fast reactor concept targeted for a balanced mission of actinide burning and low-cost electricity production is proposed and its performance analyzed. The design explores the potential benefits of thorium-based fuel in actinide-burning cores, in particular in terms of the reduction of the large reactivity swing and enhancement of the small Doppler coefficient typical of fertile-free actinide burners. Reduced electricity production cost is pursued through a longer cycle length than that used for fertile-free burners and thus a higher capacity factor. It is shown that the concept can achieve a high transuranics destruction rate, which is only 20% lower than that of an accelerator-driven system with fertile-free fuel. The small negative fuel temperature reactivity coefficient, small positive coolant temperature reactivity coefficient, and negative core radial expansion coefficient provide self-regulating characteristics so that the reactor is capable of inherent shutdown during major transients without scram, as in the Integral Fast Reactor. This is confirmed by thermal-hydraulic analysis of several transients without scram, including primary coolant pump trip, station blackout, and reactivity step insertion, which showed that the reactor was able to meet all identified thermal limits. However, the benefits of high actinide consumption and small reactivity swing can be attained only if the uranium from the discharged fuel is separated and not recycled. This additional uranium separation step and thorium reprocessing significantly increase the fuel cycle costs. Because the higher fuel cycle cost has a larger impact on the overall cost of electricity than the savings from the higher capacity factor afforded through use of thorium, this concept appears less promising than the fertile-free actinide burners.

  17. Performance of the Lead-Alloy-Cooled Reactor Concept Balanced for Actinide Burning and Electricity Production

    SciTech Connect

    Hejzlar, Pavel; Davis, Cliff B.

    2004-09-15

    A lead-bismuth-cooled fast reactor concept targeted for a balanced mission of actinide burning and low-cost electricity production is proposed and its performance analyzed. The design explores the potential benefits of thorium-based fuel in actinide-burning cores, in particular in terms of the reduction of the large reactivity swing and enhancement of the small Doppler coefficient typical of fertile-free actinide burners. Reduced electricity production cost is pursued through a longer cycle length than that used for fertile-free burners and thus a higher capacity factor. It is shown that the concept can achieve a high transuranics destruction rate, which is only 20% lower than that of an accelerator-driven system with fertile-free fuel. The small negative fuel temperature reactivity coefficient, small positive coolant temperature reactivity coefficient, and negative core radial expansion coefficient provide self-regulating characteristics so that the reactor is capable of inherent shutdown during major transients without scram, as in the Integral Fast Reactor. This is confirmed by thermal-hydraulic analysis of several transients without scram, including primary coolant pump trip, station blackout, and reactivity step insertion, which showed that the reactor was able to meet all identified thermal limits. However, the benefits of high actinide consumption and small reactivity swing can be attained only if the uranium from the discharged fuel is separated and not recycled. This additional uranium separation step and thorium reprocessing significantly increase the fuel cycle costs. Because the higher fuel cycle cost has a larger impact on the overall cost of electricity than the savings from the higher capacity factor afforded through use of thorium, this concept appears less promising than the fertile-free actinide burners.

  18. X-ray diffraction study of the structural evolution in a grade 1469 (Al-Cu-Li) alloy during the production of hot-rolled sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamrai, V. F.; Grushko, O. E.; Lazarev, E. M.; Gordeev, A. S.; Timofeev, V. N.

    2008-06-01

    X-ray diffraction is used to study the structural changes in a grade 1469 (Al-Cu-Li) alloy with a high lithium content that occur during the production of hot-rolled sheets according to the ingot → pressed strip → hot-rolled sheet schedule. In the pressed strip, a multicomponent Bs {110}<112>, Cu {211}<111>, and S {123}<111> texture forms, which is typical of articles pressed from such alloys, and an unusual intense single-component texture of the Ex1 {011}<111> type forms in the hot-rolled sheets. Its formation is stimulated by cross rolling of the sheets. The low strength characteristics of the hot-rolled sheets after heat treatment are related to an elevated heating temperature used for quenching and to the oriented precipitation of the lamellar particles of the hardening T 1 phase.

  19. Defect formation mechanism during PECVD of a-Si:H

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Keiji; Umezu, Ikurou

    1997-07-01

    Defect formation mechanism in a-Si:H during PECVD at substrate temperature below 250 C is considered to be breaking of weak bonds in the Urbach tail. To break weak bonds, an extra energy is necessary. This energy is supplied by the reaction energy of SiH{sub 3} precursor at the growing surface incorporating SiH{sub 2} into the network. The defect density is experimentally shown to be proportional to a product of the energy supply frequency, i.e., SiH{sub 2} density, and the weak bond density which is obtained by the Urbach energy. By analysis using the configurational coordinate diagram the energy level of the broken weak bond is determined to be 0.2 eV above the valence band mobility edge. There is similarity of the defect formation mechanism during deposition to that of the Staebler-Wronski effect.

  20. Hydrogen populations in PECVD a-Si:H,D

    SciTech Connect

    Cull, T.S.; Kernan, M.J.; Chan, P.H.; Fedders, P.A.; Leopold, D.J.; Norberg, R.E.; Wickboldt, P.; Paul, W.

    1997-07-01

    Proton NMR and deuteron NMR (DMR) have been used to measure hydrogen populations in a series of PECVD a-Si:H,D films. The sharp DMR doublet from Si-D is fitted and subtracted out. The residual spectra then show specific signatures for molecular D{sub 2} and HD. The fitting procedures yield quantitative measures of Si-bonded and molecular species. A particular comparison is made between a pair of films prepared as the powered and unpowered electrodes in the same plasma deposition. Both silicon-bonded and molecular populations are significantly different in the two films and correlate with photoresponse products {eta}{mu}{tau} and with IR as well as other materials characterizations.

  1. Correlation of the energy product with evolution of the nanostructure in Y,Dy,Nd-(Fe,Co)-B magnetic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.Q; Tang, W.; Kramer, M.J.; Dennis, K.W.; Oster, N.; McCallum, R.W.; Anderson, I.E.

    2009-07-24

    The devitrification behavior of nanocrystalline MRE{sub 2}(Fe,Co){sub 14}B+ZrC (MRE = Nd+Y+Dy) was studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), synchrotron high temperature x-ray diffraction, and analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. Alloy ribbons were melt spun at 25 m/s to obtain an amorphous structure. Optimum hard magnetic properties (B{sub r} = 7.2 kG, H{sub c} = 12.7 kOe and (BH){sub max} = 10.8 MG Oe) were obtained in ribbons annealed at 750 C for 15 min. A reduced annealing temperature of 638 C and holding time from 0 to 11 min were chosen based on DSC analysis. Large changes in both microstructure and hard magnetic properties were found in a narrow window of annealing time, 4.5-6 min, resulting in a dramatic increase in energy product, remanence and coercivity: 0.96 MG Oe, 5.2 kG, 2.7 kOe to 5.7 MG Oe, 7.2 kG, 8.5 kOe for (BH){sub max}, B{sub r} and H{sub c}, respectively. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and energy filtered TEM analyses indicate that Zr- and C-rich particles ({approx} 5 nm) and thin grain boundary layers (1-2 nm thick) are formed surrounding 2-14-1 hard phase grains when the annealing time is over 6 min. Further annealing resulted in a more distinct hard phase surrounded by a nonmagnetic grain boundary phase {approx} 1 nm in thickness. The thin grain boundary layer phase starts to disappear with annealing time over 11 min. The partitioning behavior of various elements at different annealing conditions appears to be associated with significant changes in magnetic properties, leading to an improved optimum microstructure.

  2. The effect of prolonged irradiation on defect production and ordering in Fe-Cr and Fe-Ni alloys.

    PubMed

    Vörtler, K; Juslin, N; Bonny, G; Malerba, L; Nordlund, K

    2011-09-01

    The understanding of the primary radiation damage in Fe-based alloys is of interest for the use of advanced steels in future fusion and fission reactors. In this work Fe-Cr alloys (with 5, 6.25, 10 and 15% Cr content) and Fe-Ni alloys (with 10, 40, 50 and 75% Ni content) were used as model materials for studying the features of steels from a radiation damage perspective. The effect of prolonged irradiation (neglecting diffusion), i.e. the overlapping of single 5 keV displacement cascade events, was studied by molecular dynamics simulation. Up to 200 single cascades were simulated, randomly induced in sequence in one simulation cell, to study the difference between fcc and bcc lattices, as well as initially ordered and random crystals. With increasing numbers of cascades we observed a saturation of Frenkel pairs in the bcc alloys. In fcc Fe-Ni, in contrast, we saw a continuous accumulation of defects: the growth of stacking-fault tetrahedra and a larger number of self-interstitial atom clusters were seen in contrast to bcc alloys. For all simulations the defect clusters and the short range order parameter were analysed in detail depending on the number of cascades in the crystal. We also report the modification of the repulsive part of the Fe-Ni interaction potential, which was needed to study the non-equilibrium processes. PMID:21846941

  3. Production and Precipitation Hardening of Beta-Type Ti-35Nb-10Cu Alloy Foam for Implant Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutlu, Ilven; Yeniyol, Sinem; Oktay, Enver

    2016-04-01

    In this study, beta-type Ti-35Nb-10Cu alloy foams were produced by powder metallurgy method for dental implant applications. 35% Nb was added to stabilize the beta-Ti phase with low Young's modulus. Cu addition enhanced sinterability and gave precipitation hardening capacity to the alloy. Sintered specimens were precipitation hardened in order to enhance the mechanical properties. Electrochemical corrosion behavior of the specimens was examined by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in artificial saliva. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results indicated that the oxide film on the surface of foam is a bi-layer structure consisting of outer porous layer and inner barrier layer. Impedance values of barrier layer were higher than porous layer. Corrosion resistance of specimens decreased at high fluoride concentrations and at low pH of artificial saliva. Corrosion resistance of alloys was slightly decreased with aging. Mechanical properties, microstructure, and surface roughness of the specimens were also examined.

  4. Stimulatory effects of the degradation products from Mg-Ca-Sr alloy on the osteogenesis through regulating ERK signaling pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mei; He, Peng; Wu, Yuanhao; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Hong; Zheng, Yufeng; Han, Yong

    2016-09-01

    The influence of Mg-1Ca-xwt.% Sr (x = 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0) alloys on the osteogenic differentiation and mineralization of pre-osteoblast MC3T3-E1 were studied through typical differentiation markers, such as intracellular alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, extracellular collagen secretion and calcium nodule formation. It was shown that Mg-1Ca alloys with different content of Sr promoted cell viability and enhanced the differentiation and mineralization levels of osteoblasts, and Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy had the most remarkable and significant effect among all. To further investigate the underlying mechanisms, RT-PCR and Western Blotting assays were taken to analyze the mRNA expression level of osteogenesis-related genes and intracellular signaling pathways involved in osteogenesis, respectively. RT-PCR results showed that Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy significantly up-regulated the expressions of the transcription factors of Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and Osterix (OSX), Integrin subunits, as well as alkaline phosphatase (ALP), Bone sialoprotein (BSP), Collagen I (COL I), Osteocalcin (OCN) and Osteopontin (OPN). Western Blotting results suggested that Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy rapidly induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation but showed no obvious effects on c-Jun N terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase of MAPK. Taken together, our results demonstrated that Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy had excellent biocompatibility and osteogenesis via the ERK pathway and is expected to be promising as orthopedic implants and bone repair materials.

  5. Stimulatory effects of the degradation products from Mg-Ca-Sr alloy on the osteogenesis through regulating ERK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei; He, Peng; Wu, Yuanhao; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Hong; Zheng, Yufeng; Han, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The influence of Mg-1Ca-xwt.% Sr (x = 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0) alloys on the osteogenic differentiation and mineralization of pre-osteoblast MC3T3-E1 were studied through typical differentiation markers, such as intracellular alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, extracellular collagen secretion and calcium nodule formation. It was shown that Mg-1Ca alloys with different content of Sr promoted cell viability and enhanced the differentiation and mineralization levels of osteoblasts, and Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy had the most remarkable and significant effect among all. To further investigate the underlying mechanisms, RT-PCR and Western Blotting assays were taken to analyze the mRNA expression level of osteogenesis-related genes and intracellular signaling pathways involved in osteogenesis, respectively. RT-PCR results showed that Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy significantly up-regulated the expressions of the transcription factors of Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and Osterix (OSX), Integrin subunits, as well as alkaline phosphatase (ALP), Bone sialoprotein (BSP), Collagen I (COL I), Osteocalcin (OCN) and Osteopontin (OPN). Western Blotting results suggested that Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy rapidly induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation but showed no obvious effects on c-Jun N terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase of MAPK. Taken together, our results demonstrated that Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy had excellent biocompatibility and osteogenesis via the ERK pathway and is expected to be promising as orthopedic implants and bone repair materials. PMID:27580744

  6. Stimulatory effects of the degradation products from Mg-Ca-Sr alloy on the osteogenesis through regulating ERK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mei; He, Peng; Wu, Yuanhao; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Hong; Zheng, Yufeng; Han, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The influence of Mg-1Ca-xwt.% Sr (x = 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0) alloys on the osteogenic differentiation and mineralization of pre-osteoblast MC3T3-E1 were studied through typical differentiation markers, such as intracellular alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, extracellular collagen secretion and calcium nodule formation. It was shown that Mg-1Ca alloys with different content of Sr promoted cell viability and enhanced the differentiation and mineralization levels of osteoblasts, and Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy had the most remarkable and significant effect among all. To further investigate the underlying mechanisms, RT-PCR and Western Blotting assays were taken to analyze the mRNA expression level of osteogenesis-related genes and intracellular signaling pathways involved in osteogenesis, respectively. RT-PCR results showed that Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy significantly up-regulated the expressions of the transcription factors of Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and Osterix (OSX), Integrin subunits, as well as alkaline phosphatase (ALP), Bone sialoprotein (BSP), Collagen I (COL I), Osteocalcin (OCN) and Osteopontin (OPN). Western Blotting results suggested that Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy rapidly induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation but showed no obvious effects on c-Jun N terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase of MAPK. Taken together, our results demonstrated that Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy had excellent biocompatibility and osteogenesis via the ERK pathway and is expected to be promising as orthopedic implants and bone repair materials. PMID:27580744

  7. Stimulatory effects of the degradation products from Mg-Ca-Sr alloy on the osteogenesis through regulating ERK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei; He, Peng; Wu, Yuanhao; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Hong; Zheng, Yufeng; Han, Yong

    2016-09-01

    The influence of Mg-1Ca-xwt.% Sr (x = 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0) alloys on the osteogenic differentiation and mineralization of pre-osteoblast MC3T3-E1 were studied through typical differentiation markers, such as intracellular alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, extracellular collagen secretion and calcium nodule formation. It was shown that Mg-1Ca alloys with different content of Sr promoted cell viability and enhanced the differentiation and mineralization levels of osteoblasts, and Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy had the most remarkable and significant effect among all. To further investigate the underlying mechanisms, RT-PCR and Western Blotting assays were taken to analyze the mRNA expression level of osteogenesis-related genes and intracellular signaling pathways involved in osteogenesis, respectively. RT-PCR results showed that Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy significantly up-regulated the expressions of the transcription factors of Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and Osterix (OSX), Integrin subunits, as well as alkaline phosphatase (ALP), Bone sialoprotein (BSP), Collagen I (COL I), Osteocalcin (OCN) and Osteopontin (OPN). Western Blotting results suggested that Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy rapidly induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation but showed no obvious effects on c-Jun N terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase of MAPK. Taken together, our results demonstrated that Mg-1Ca-2.0Sr alloy had excellent biocompatibility and osteogenesis via the ERK pathway and is expected to be promising as orthopedic implants and bone repair materials.

  8. Study of the corrosion products formed on a multiphase CuAlBe alloy in a sodium chloride solution by micro-Raman and in situ AFM measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montecinos, S.; Simison, S. N.

    2011-06-01

    The corrosion products formed on a multiphase Cu-11.40Al-0.55Be (wt.%) alloy in 3.5% NaCl at open circuit potential, and their evolution with immersion time were studied mainly by micro-Raman and in situ AFM measurements. The aluminium content of each phase affects the formation of the corrosion products on them. After 1 day of immersion, γ 2 precipitates were more susceptible to dealuminization, while α' phase exhibited a high corrosion stability. The corrosion products evolved with immersion time, and CuCl 2 and a Cu 2O/CuO double layer film were the stable products formed on all the phases after long times.

  9. Molybdenum carbide supported nickel-molybdenum alloys for synthesis gas production via partial oxidation of surrogate biodiesel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Shreya; Marin-Flores, Oscar G.; Norton, M. Grant; Ha, Su

    2015-10-01

    In this study, NiMo alloys supported on Mo2C are synthesized by wet impregnation for partial oxidation of methyl oleate, a surrogate biodiesel, to produce syngas. When compared to single phase Mo2C, the H2 yield increases from 70% up to >95% at the carbon conversion of ∼100% for NiMo alloy nanoparticles that are dispersed over the Mo2C surface. Supported NiMo alloy samples are prepared at two different calcination temperatures in order to determine its effect on particle dispersion, crystalline phase and catalytic properties. The reforming test data indicate that catalyst prepared at lower calcination temperature shows better nanoparticle dispersion over the Mo2C surface, which leads to higher initial performance when compared to catalysts synthesized at higher calcination temperature. Activity tests using the supported NiMo alloy on Mo2C that are calcined at the lower temperature of 400 °C shows 100% carbon conversion with 90% H2 yield without deactivation due to coking over 24 h time-on-stream.

  10. Airborne manganese as dust vs. fume determining blood levels in workers at a manganese alloy production plant.

    PubMed

    Park, Robert M; Baldwin, Mary; Bouchard, Maryse F; Mergler, Donna

    2014-12-01

    The appropriate exposure metrics for characterizing manganese (Mn) exposure associated with neurobehavioral effects have not been established. Blood levels of Mn (B-Mn) provide a potentially important intermediate marker of Mn airborne exposures. Using data from a study of a population of silicon- and ferro-manganese alloy production workers employed between 1973 and 1991, B-Mn levels were modeled in relation to prior Mn exposure using detailed work histories and estimated respirable Mn concentrations from air-sampling records. Despite wide variation in exposure levels estimated for individual jobs, duration of employment (exposure) was itself a strong predictor of B-Mn levels and strongest when an 80-day half-life was applied to contributions over time (t=6.95, 7.44, respectively; p<10(-5)). Partitioning exposure concentrations based on process origin into two categories: (1) "large" respirable particulate (Mn-LRP) derived mainly from mechanically generated dust, and (2) "small" respirable particulate (Mn-SRP) primarily electric furnace condensation fume, revealed that B-Mn levels largely track the small, fume exposures. With a half-life of 65 days applied in a model with cumulative exposure terms for both Mn-LRP (t=-0.16, p=0.87) and Mn-SRP (t=6.45, p<10(-5)), the contribution of the large-size fraction contribution was negligible. Constructing metrics based on the square root of SRP exposure concentrations produced a better model fit (t=7.87 vs. 7.44, R(2)=0.2333 vs. 0.2157). In a model containing both duration (t=0.79, p=0.43) and (square root) fume (t=2.47, p=0.01) metrics, the duration term was a weak contributor. Furnace-derived, small respirable Mn particulate appears to be the primary contributor to B-Mn levels, with a dose-rate dependence in a population chronically exposed to Mn, with air-concentrations declining in recent years. These observations may reflect the presence of homeostatic control of Mn levels in the blood and other body tissues and be

  11. Defects in a-Si and a-Si:H: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knief, Simone; von Niessen, Wolfgang; Koslowski, Thorsten

    1998-08-01

    We present a numerical study of the electronic properties of various structural models of amorphous silicon and hydrogenated amorphous silicon. Starting from an ideal random network, dangling bonds, floating bonds, double bonds, microvoids, hydrogenated dangling bonds, and hydrogenated floating bonds are introduced. The concentrations of these defects can be varied independently, the amount of disorder introduced to the system is therefore strictly controllable. Two continuous random networks, the vacancy model of Duffy, Boudreaux, and Polk and the bond switching model of Wooten, Winer, and Weaire (WWW model) are investigated. For the relaxation of the structures the potentials of Keating and of Stillinger and Weber are employed. The electronic structure is described by a tight-binding Hamiltonian; the localized or extended character of the eigenstates is investigated via a scaling approach. The vacancy model shows a band gap for small defect concentrations but this fills up with increasing disorder. Similar behavior is found for the case of the other models. In general defects introduce states into the gap region of a-Si, where the dangling bonds lead to the largest density of states in the gap region for a given defect concentration. This model turns out to be unique. For small system sizes an impurity band results that dramatically changes its character for large systems above 4000 atoms to a nearly uniform density of states as observed experimentally. In a-Si:H the dangling and floating bonds are removed and a mobility gap results with a width in good agreement with experiment. The experimentally observed tailing of the band into the gap region (first linear, then exponential) is well described only for the a-Si:H model derived from the vacancy model and for very large system sizes above 4000 atoms. The WWW model does not lead to this tail behavior. Localized states are found at all band edges but states at the bottom of the conduction band are more strongly

  12. Optimization of the procedure for determining integral texture parameters of products from zirconium-based alloys using the orientation distribution function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlovich, Yu A.; Isaenkova, M. G.; Krymskaya, O. A.; Fesenko, V. A.; Babich, Y. A.

    2016-04-01

    Integral texture Kearns parameters, or f-parameters, are the one of the characteristics that is controlled during the tube production of Zr-based alloys now. These parameters define the anisotropy of physical and mechanical properties of the products. f-parameters are the sum of effective fractions of basal normals aligned in a selected sample direction. However, so far there is no standardized procedure for their calculation. The widespread availability of X-ray diffractometers, the high statistical significance of the results and the software development for texture analysis causes the optimality of the f-parameters determination by complete pole figures (0001) calculated through orientation distribution function (ODF). Accuracy analysis of the ODF extraction by several incomplete pole figures using LaboTex software was carried out in this paper. The comparison of the calculated data was performed with experimental complete pole figures (0001) obtained by «sewing» method. Various texture types, different number and combinations of incomplete pole figures were considered. For this purpose, 6 incomplete pole figures - - were registered for each of three mutually perpendicular surfaces of the CANDU-tube sample. By comparison of experimental and calculated by ODF complete pole figures as well as f-parameters, procedures of their determination were optimized for products from Zr-based alloys.

  13. Molecular beam epitaxy of GaNAs alloys with high As content for potential photoanode applications in hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Novikov, S. V.; Staddon, C. R.; Foxon, C. T.; Yu, K. M.; Broesler, R.; Hawkridge, M.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Walukiewicz, W.; Denlinger, J.; Demchenko, I.

    2009-10-06

    The authors have succeeded in growing GaN1?xAsx alloys over a large composition range (0 < x < 0.8) by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The enhanced incorporation of As was achieved by growing the films with high As{sub 2} flux at low (as low as 100 C) growth temperatures, which is much below the normal GaN growth temperature range. Using x-ray and transmission electron microscopy, they found that the GaNAs alloys with high As content x > 0.17 are amorphous. Optical absorption measurements together with x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy results reveal a continuous gradual decrease in band gap from -3.4 to < 1 eV with increasing As content. The energy gap reaches its minimum of -0.8 eV at x - 0.8. The composition dependence of the band gap of the crystalline GaN{sub 1?x}As{sub x} alloys follows the prediction of the band anticrossing model (BAC). However, our measured band gap of amorphous GaN{sub 1?x}As{sub x} with 0.3 < x < 0.8 are larger than that predicted by BAC. The results seem to indicate that for this composition range the amorphous GaN{sub 1?x}As{sub x} alloys have short-range ordering that resembles random crystalline GaN{sub 1?x}As{sub x} alloys. They have demonstrated the possibility of the growth of amorphous GaN{sub 1?x}As{sub x} layers with variable As content on glass substrates

  14. Effect of biologically relevant ions on the corrosion products formed on alloy AZ31B: an improved understanding of magnesium corrosion.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yongseok; Collins, Boyce; Sankar, Jagannathan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2013-11-01

    Simulated physiological solutions mimicking human plasma have been utilized to study the in vitro corrosion of biodegradable metals. However, corrosion and corrosion product formation are different for different solutions with varied responses and, hence, the prediction of in vivo degradation behavior is not feasible based on these studies alone. This paper reports the role of physiologically relevant salts and their concentrations on the corrosion behavior of a magnesium alloy (AZ31B) and subsequent corrosion production formation. Immersion tests were performed for three different concentrations of Ca(2+), HPO4(2-), HCO3(-) to identify the effect of each ion on the corrosion of AZ31B assessed at 1, 3 and 10 days. Time-lapse morphological characterization of the samples was performed using X-ray computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy. The chemical composition of the surface corrosion products was determined by electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results show that: (1) calcium is not present in the corrosion product layer when only Cl(-) and OH(-) anions are available; (2) the presence of phosphate induces formation of a densely packed amorphous magnesium phosphate corrosion product layer when HPO4(2-) and Cl(-) are present in solution; (3) octacalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite (HAp) are deposited on the surface of the magnesium alloy when HPO4(2-) and Ca(2+) are present together in NaCl solution (this coating limits localized corrosion and increases general corrosion resistance); (4) addition of HCO3(-) accelerates the overall corrosion rate, which increases with increasing bicarbonate concentration; (5) the corrosion rate decreases due to the formation of insoluble HAp on the surface when HCO3(-), Ca(2+), and HPO4(2-) are present together.

  15. COST-EFFECTIVE METHOD FOR PRODUCING SELF SUPPORTED PALLADIUM ALLOY MEMBRANES FOR USE IN EFFICIENT PRODUCTION OF COAL DERIVED HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect

    B. Lanning; J. Arps

    2004-01-01

    Competed fabrication of an initial series of copper and palladium-copper alloy membranes in the range of 1-8 microns in thickness up to 6 inch x 8 inch in area. Films were produced using both e-beam evaporation (with and without ion assist) and magnetron sputtering from a 60%Pd/40%Cu alloy target. Pure copper and palladium-copper alloy films, with essential no intrinsic stress, were produced on both polystyrene and polyvinyl alcohol substrates. Various processing parameters and techniques were investigated in order to minimize defects and maximize uniformity in single layer films. Even though films to date are visually defect free, we are able to observe sub-micron size defects using a backlighting technique; we are currently investigating a number of methods to create a gas impermeable membrane. At present, the metal films are effectively removed from the polymer backing material by merely immersing the film in an appropriate solvent; chloroform for the polystyrene and water for the PVA. In the future we plan to investigate alternative methods for removing the polymer backing that are more suited to large scale, low-cost manufacturing.

  16. BRAZING ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, R.G.; Gilliland, R.G.; Slaughter, G.M.

    1963-02-26

    A brazing alloy which, in the molten state, is characterized by excellent wettability and flowability, said alloy being capable of forming a corrosion resistant brazed joint wherein at least one component of said joint is graphite and the other component is a corrosion resistant refractory metal, said alloy consisting essentially of 20 to 50 per cent by weight of gold, 20 to 50 per cent by weight of nickel, and 15 to 45 per cent by weight of molybdenum. (AEC)

  17. VANADIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Smith, K.F.; Van Thyne, R.J.

    1959-05-12

    This patent deals with vanadium based ternary alloys useful as fuel element jackets. According to the invention the ternary vanadium alloys, prepared in an arc furnace, contain from 2.5 to 15% by weight titanium and from 0.5 to 10% by weight niobium. Characteristics of these alloys are good thermal conductivity, low neutron capture cross section, good corrosion resistance, good welding and fabricating properties, low expansion coefficient, and high strength.

  18. Corrosion behaviors and effects of corrosion products of plasma electrolytic oxidation coated AZ31 magnesium alloy under the salt spray corrosion test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Huang, Zhiquan; Yan, Qin; Liu, Chen; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Yi; Guo, Changhong; Jiang, Guirong; Shen, Dejiu

    2016-08-01

    The effects of corrosion products on corrosion behaviors of AZ31 magnesium alloy with a plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating were investigated under the salt spray corrosion test (SSCT). The surface morphology, cross-sectional microstructure, chemical and phase compositions of the PEO coating were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), respectively. Further, the corrosion process of the samples under the SSCT was examined in a non-aqueous electrolyte (methanol) using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) coupled with equivalent circuit. The results show that the inner layer of the coating was destroyed firstly and the corrosion products have significant effects on the corrosion behaviors of the coating. The results above are discussed and an electrochemical corrosion model is proposed in the paper.

  19. URANIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Seybolt, A.U.

    1958-04-15

    Uranium alloys containing from 0.1 to 10% by weight, but preferably at least 5%, of either zirconium, niobium, or molybdenum exhibit highly desirable nuclear and structural properties which may be improved by heating the alloy to about 900 d C for an extended period of time and then rapidly quenching it.

  20. ZIRCONIUM ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Wilhelm, H.A.; Ames, D.P.

    1959-02-01

    A binary zirconiuin--antimony alloy is presented which is corrosion resistant and hard containing from 0.07% to 1.6% by weight of Sb. The alloys have good corrosion resistance and are useful in building equipment for the chemical industry.

  1. Nonswelling alloy

    DOEpatents

    Harkness, S.D.

    1975-12-23

    An aluminum alloy containing one weight percent copper has been found to be resistant to void formation and thus is useful in all nuclear applications which currently use aluminum or other aluminum alloys in reactor positions which are subjected to high neutron doses.

  2. Fe-15Ni-13Cr austenitic stainless steels for fission and fusion reactor applications - Part 1: Effects of minor alloying elements on precipitate phases in melt products and implication in alloy fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, E. H.; Mansur, L. K.

    2000-01-01

    In an effort to develop alloys for fission and fusion reactor applications, 28Fe-15Ni-13Cr base alloys were fabricated by adding various combinations of the minor alloying elements, Mo, Ti, C, Si, P, Nb, and B. The results showed that a significant fraction of undesirable residual oxygen was removed as oxides when Ti, C, and Si were added. Accordingly, the concentrations of the latter three essential alloying elements were reduced also. Among these elements, Ti was the strongest oxide former, but the largest oxygen removal (over 80%) was observed when carbon was added alone without Ti, since gaseous CO boiled off during melting. This paper recommends an alloy melting procedure to mitigate solute losses while reducing the undesirable residual oxygen. In this work, 14 different types of precipitate phases were identified. Compositions of precipitate phases and their crystallographic data are documented. Finally, stability of precipitate phases was examined in view of Gibbs free energy of formation.

  3. COST-EFFECTIVE METHOD FOR PRODUCING SELF SUPPORTED PALLADIUM ALLOY MEMBRANES FOR USE IN EFFICIENT PRODUCTION OF COAL DERIVED HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect

    J. Arps; K. Coulter

    2006-09-30

    In the past quarter, we have conducted additional characterization and permeation tests on different Pd alloy membranes including PdCuTa ternary alloy materials. We attempted to address some discrepancies between SwRI{reg_sign} and CSM relating to PdCu stoichiometry by preparing a range of PdCu membranes with compositions from {approx}58-65 at% Pd (bal. Cu). While some difficulties in cutting and sealing these thin membranes at CSM continue, some progress has been made in identifying improved membrane support materials. We have also completed an initial cost analysis for large-scale vacuum deposition and fabrication of thin Pd ally membranes and project that the process can meet DOE cost targets. Minimal progress was made in the past quarter relating to the testing of prototype membrane modules at Idatech. In the past quarter Idatech was acquired by a UK investment firm, which we believe may have impacted the ability of key technical personnel to devote sufficient time to support this effort. We are hopeful their work can be completed by the end of the calendar year.

  4. Charge collection in a-Si:H/a-Si{sub 1-x}C{sub x} multilayers photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, T.; Drewray, J.; Hong, W.S.; Lee, H.; Kaplan, S.N.; Mireshghi, A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Delgado, J.C.; Bertomeu, J.

    1994-04-01

    Amorphous semiconductors have been used as thin film transistor(TFT), solar cell, phototransistors. In this paper we study the charge collected properties of a-Si:H/a-Si{sub 1-x}C:H{sub x} multilayer pin photodiode. In a-Si:H pin photodiode, the photogenerated carriers can be totally collected under strong electric field under reverse bias. However, our measurements show that in the a-Si:H/a-Si{sub l-x}C:H{sub x} multilayer pin photodiode photogenerated electrons and holes drift toward the electrodes under a certain bias, the total collected charge shows no saturation with bias and exhibits a continuous increase with reverse bias. We classify that the device works at two regions. In Region 1, the device behaves like a photodiode. This charge collection efficiency drop from theoretical value may indicate charge capture or confinement at the interfaces and trapping at the a-Si:H potential wells. These charges trapped or confined can be released at the interface and quantum well at higher electric field. In Region 2, above a critical bias voltage, the device works as a breakdown diode with a series photosensitive resistor which contributes higher collection efficiency, namely optical gain greater than unity.

  5. [Evaluation of occupational exposure to nickel and other metals based on the analysis of air in the production of nickel alloys].

    PubMed

    Dobecki, M; Matych, S; Kamecki, R; Matczak, W

    1988-01-01

    The measurements of air pollutions in the rolling mill of non-ferrous metals aimed at the evaluation of occupational exposure to nickel and other metals (Cu, Zn, Mn, Mg) used during the production of nickel alloys. It was found that nickel fumes and dusts concentration can be the only hazardous factor for the workers' health. The majority (ca 85%) of the crew of 28 workers is exposed to the nickel concentration in air exceeding 0.05 mg/m3. Smelters (8 persons) at the stand of 97-99% nickel smelting are at the highest risk of the loss of health; average exposure of this group during 8 hours' shift may surpass 2 mg Ni/m3. Mean concentration in air of the fumes and dusts of copper, zinc, manganese and magnesium do not make a hygienic problem. PMID:3252104

  6. [Evaluation of occupational exposure to nickel and other metals based on the analysis of air in the production of nickel alloys].

    PubMed

    Dobecki, M; Matych, S; Kamecki, R; Matczak, W

    1988-01-01

    The measurements of air pollutions in the rolling mill of non-ferrous metals aimed at the evaluation of occupational exposure to nickel and other metals (Cu, Zn, Mn, Mg) used during the production of nickel alloys. It was found that nickel fumes and dusts concentration can be the only hazardous factor for the workers' health. The majority (ca 85%) of the crew of 28 workers is exposed to the nickel concentration in air exceeding 0.05 mg/m3. Smelters (8 persons) at the stand of 97-99% nickel smelting are at the highest risk of the loss of health; average exposure of this group during 8 hours' shift may surpass 2 mg Ni/m3. Mean concentration in air of the fumes and dusts of copper, zinc, manganese and magnesium do not make a hygienic problem.

  7. Testing and prediction of erosion-corrosion for corrosion resistant alloys used in the oil and gas production industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincon, Hernan E.

    The corrosion behavior of CRAs has been thoroughly investigated and documented in the public literature by many researchers; however, little work has been done to investigate erosion-corrosion of such alloys. When sand particles are entrained in the flow, the degradation mechanism is different from that observed for sand-free corrosive environment. There is a need in the oil and gas industry to define safe service limits for utilization of such materials. The effects of flow conditions, sand rate, pH and temperature on the erosion-corrosion of CRAs were widely studied. An extensive experimental work was conducted using scratch tests and flow loop tests using several experimental techniques. At high erosivity conditions, a synergistic effect between erosion and corrosion was observed. Under the high sand rate conditions tested, erosivity is severe enough to damage the passive layer protecting the CRA thereby enhancing the corrosion rate. In most cases there is likely a competition between the rates of protective film removal due to mechanical erosion and protective film healing. Synergism occurs for each of the three alloys examined (13Cr and Super13Cr and 22Cr); however, the degree of synergism is quite different for the three alloys and may not be significant for 22Cr for field conditions where erosivities are typically much lower that those occurring in the small bore loop used in this research. Predictions of the corrosion component of erosion-corrosion based on scratch test data compared reasonably well to test results from flow loops for the three CRAs at high erosivity conditions. Second order behavior appears to be an appropriate and useful model for representing the repassivation process of CRAs. A framework for a procedure to predict penetration rates for erosion-corrosion conditions was developed based on the second order model behavior observed for the re-healing process of the passive film of CRAs and on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations

  8. PLUTONIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Chynoweth, W.

    1959-06-16

    The preparation of low-melting-point plutonium alloys is described. In a MgO crucible Pu is placed on top of the lighter alloying metal (Fe, Co, or Ni) and the temperature raised to 1000 or 1200 deg C. Upon cooling, the alloy slug is broke out of the crucible. With 14 at. % Ni the m.p. is 465 deg C; with 9.5 at. % Fe the m.p. is 410 deg C; and with 12.0 at. % Co the m.p. is 405 deg C. (T.R.H.) l6262 l6263 ((((((((Abstract unscannable))))))))

  9. Production and characterization of high porosity porous Fe-Cr-C alloys by the space holder leaching technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Da-rong; Pang, Yu-hua; Yu, Liang; Sun, Li

    2016-07-01

    Spherical carbamide particles were employed to produce porous Fe-Cr-C alloy with high porosity and large aperture via the space-holder leaching technique. A series of porous samples were prepared by regulating the processing parameters, which included the carbamide content and the compaction pressure. The pore characteristics and compression properties of the produced samples were investigated. The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, image analysis, and compression tests. The results showed that the macro-porosity and the mean pore size were in the ranges 40.4%-82.4% and 0.6-1.5 mm, respectively. The compressive strength varied between 25.38 MPa and 127.9 MPa, and was observed to decrease with increasing total porosity.

  10. COST-EFFECTIVE METHOD FOR PRODUCING SELF SUPPORTED PALLADIUM ALLOY MEMBRANES FOR USE IN EFFICIENT PRODUCTION OF COAL DERIVED HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect

    J. Arps

    2006-01-01

    In the past quarter, significant progress has been made in optimize the deposition and release characteristics of ultrathin (less than 4 micron) membranes from rigid silicon substrates. Specifically, we have conducted a series of statistically designed experiments to examine the effects of plasma cleaning and compliant layer deposition conditions on the stress, release and pinhole density of membranes deposited on 4 inch and 6 inch round substrates. With this information we have progressed to the deposition and release of ultra-thin membranes from 12-inch diameter (113 sq. in.) rigid substrates, achieving a key milestone for large-area membrane fabrication. Idatech received and is beginning preparations to test the Pd alloy membranes fabricated at SwRI the previous quarter. They are currently evaluating alternate gasketing methods and support materials that will allow for effective sealing and mounting of such thin membranes. David Edlund has also recently left Idatech and Bill Pledger (Chief Engineer) has replaced him as the primary technical point of contact. At Idetech's request a small number of additional 16 sq. in, samples were provided in a 2 in. by 8 in. geometry for use in a new module design currently under development. Recent work at the Colorado School of Mines has focused on developing preconditioning methods for thin Pd alloy membranes (6 microns or less) and continuing tests of thin membranes produced at SwRI. Of particular note, a 300-hour short-term durability study was completed over a range of temperatures from 300-450 C on a foil that showed perfect hydrogen selectivity throughout the entire test. With a 20 psi driving force, pure hydrogen flow rates ranged from 500 to 700 cc/min. Calculated at DOE specified conditions, the H{sub 2} flux of this membrane exceeded the 2010 Fossil target value of 200 SCFH/ft{sup 2}.

  11. BRAZING ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, R.G.; Gilliland, R.G.; Slaughter, G.M.

    1962-02-20

    A brazing alloy is described which, in the molten state, is characterized by excellent wettability and flowability and is capable of forming a corrosion-resistant brazed joint. At least one component of said joint is graphite and the other component is a corrosion-resistant refractory metal. The brazing alloy consists essentially of 40 to 90 wt % of gold, 5 to 35 wt% of nickel, and 1 to 45 wt% of tantalum. (AEC)

  12. COATED ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Harman, C.G.; O'Bannon, L.S.

    1958-07-15

    A coating is described for iron group metals and alloys, that is particularly suitable for use with nickel containing alloys. The coating is glassy in nature and consists of a mixture containing an alkali metal oxide, strontium oxide, and silicon oxide. When the glass coated nickel base metal is"fired'' at less than the melting point of the coating, it appears the nlckel diffuses into the vitreous coating, thus providing a closely adherent and protective cladding.

  13. Influence of plasma etching in a multi chamber system on a-Si solar cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kausche, H.; Moeller, M.; Plaettner, R.

    The plasma-CVD deposition system consisting of two chambers and developed at Siemens can deposit 9 pin solar cells of 100 sq cm simultaneously. Cleaning of the internal surfaces coated with a-Si is performed by plasma etching. The etch gases CF4+O2, SF6 and NF3 were investigated with respect to their etch rates, their efficacy in cleaning 'hidden' parts in the chamber, and with respect to the etching reaction products affecting the performance of the subsequently deposited cells. Mass spectrometric cell performance measurements were therefore taken. The sequence of etching with CF4+O2 or NF3, glow discharge in Ar+H2, pre-deposition of a-Si and cell deposition proved to be a suitable method for achieving high cell performance.

  14. Numerical simulation of the performance of the a-Si:H/a-SiGe:H/a-SiGe:H tandem solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaoying, Ke; Chong, Wang; Tao, Pan; Jie, Yang; Yu, Yang

    2014-03-01

    The computer program AMPS-1D (analysis of microelectronic and photonic structures) has been employed to simulate the performance of the a-Si:H/a-SiGe:H/a-SiGe:H triple-junction solar cell at the radiation of AM1.5G (100 mW/cm2) and room temperature. Firstly, three sub-cells with band gaps of 1.8, 1.6 and 1.4 eV are simulated, respectively. The simulation results indicate that the density of defect states is an important factor, which affects the open circuit voltage and the filling factor of the solar cell. The two-step current matching method and the control variate method are employed in the simulation. The results show that the best solar cell performance would be achieved when the intrinsic layer thickness from top to bottom is set to be 70, 180 and 220 nm, respectively. We also optimize the tunnel-junction structure of the solar cell reasonably, the simulation results show that the open circuit voltage, filling factor and conversion efficiency are all improved and the S-shape current density—voltage curve disappears during optimizing the tunnel-junction structure. Besides, the diagram of the energy band and the carrier recombination rate are also analyzed. Finally, our simulation data are compared to the experimental data published in other literature. It is demonstrated that the numerical results agree with the experimental ones very well.

  15. Environmental fatigue in aluminum-lithium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Piascik, R.S.

    1992-07-01

    Aluminum-lithium alloys exhibit similar environmental fatigue crack growth characteristics compared to conventional 2000 series alloys and are more resistant to environmental fatigue compared to 7000 series alloys. The superior fatigue crack growth behavior of Al-Li alloys 2090, 2091, 8090, and 8091 is due to crack closure caused by tortuous crack path morphology and crack surface corrosion products. At high R and reduced closure, chemical environment effects are pronounced resulting in accelerated near threshold da/dN. The beneficial effects of crack closure are minimized for small cracks resulting in rapid growth rates. Limited data suggest that the 'chemically small crack' effect, observed in other alloy system, is not pronounced in Al-Li alloys. Modeling of environmental fatigue in Al-Li-Cu alloys related accelerated fatigue crack growth in moist air and salt water to hydrogen embrittlement.

  16. Tin induced a-Si crystallization in thin films of Si-Sn alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Neimash, V. E-mail: oleks.goushcha@nuportsoft.com; Poroshin, V.; Goushcha, A. O. E-mail: oleks.goushcha@nuportsoft.com; Shepeliavyi, P.; Yukhymchuk, V.; Melnyk, V.; Kuzmich, A.; Makara, V.

    2013-12-07

    Effects of tin doping on crystallization of amorphous silicon were studied using Raman scattering, Auger spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray fluorescence techniques. Formation of silicon nanocrystals (2–4 nm in size) in the amorphous matrix of Si{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x}, obtained by physical vapor deposition of the components in vacuum, was observed at temperatures around 300 °C. The aggregate volume of nanocrystals in the deposited film of Si{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} exceeded 60% of the total film volume and correlated well with the tin content. Formation of structures with ∼80% partial volume of the nanocrystalline phase was also demonstrated. Tin-induced crystallization of amorphous silicon occurred only around the clusters of metallic tin, which suggested the crystallization mechanism involving an interfacial molten Si:Sn layer.

  17. Structural and photoelectronic properties of a-SiGe:H thin films with varied Ge prepared by PECVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Rui; Li, Wei; He, Jian; Qi, Kang-Cheng; Jiang, Ya-Dong

    2011-12-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon-germanium (a-SiGe:H) alloy thin films were fabricated by conventional radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) with a gas mixture of silane (SiH4) and germane (GeH4). The structural, optical and electrical properties of the films with different gas volume fraction of germane were investigated by Raman and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, ultraviolet and visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and I-V curves, respectively. The amorphous network and structural disorder in the a-SiGe:H thin films were evaluated by Raman spectroscopy. Meanwhile, the Si-H and Ge-H configurations of the films were investigated by FTIR spectroscopy. From UV-vis spectroscopy and I-V curves, the optical and electrical properties of the testing films could be deduced with varied germanium. It can be concluded that the structural and photoelectronic properties of a-SiGe:H thin films can be influenced apparently by varing of GeH4/(SiH4+ GeH4) ratio in PECVD process.

  18. Well-Passivated a-Si:H Back Contacts for Double-Heterojunction Silicon Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Page, M. R.; Iwaniczko, E.; Xu, Y.; Wang, Q.; Yan, Y.; Roybal, L.; Branz, H. M.; Wang, T. H.

    2006-05-01

    We have developed hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a Si:H) back contacts to both p- and n-type silicon wafers, and employed them in double-heterojunction solar cells. These contacts are deposited entirely at low temperature (<250 C) and replace the standard diffused or alloyed back-surface-field contacts used in single-heterojunction (front-emitter only) cells. High-quality back contacts require excellent surface passivation, indicated by a low surface recombination velocity of minority-carriers (S) or a high open-circuit voltage (Voc). The back contact must also provide good conduction for majority carriers to the external circuit, as indicated by a high light I-V fill factor. We use hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) to grow a-Si:H layers for both the front emitters and back contacts. Our improved a-Si:H back contacts contribute to our recent achievement of a confirmed 18.2% efficiency in double-heterojunction silicon solar cells on p type textured silicon wafers.

  19. Effects of disorder on electronic structures of a-Si:H and a-SiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nithianandam, Jeyasingh; Schnatterly, Stephen E.

    1989-12-01

    Si L23 x-ray emission spectra from c-Si, doped and intrinsic a-Si:H, quartz, and a-SiO2 are presented. The first and second moments of the valence-band transition density of states of each of these samples were computed. The variance of the disorder potential that characterizes the amorphous network was found for the amorphous samples from their second moments. Lifetime broadening as a function of energy in the valence band of silicon samples was found to vary significantly between the crystalline and amorphous structures.

  20. Corrosion of a-Si cells and modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mon, G. R.; Wen, L.; Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The authors report on corrosion/erosion phonemena observed in exposing a-Si cells, modules, and specially designed test structures to natural and accelerated test environments. Relevant cell and module I-V curve data used for monitoring degradation are presented. The causes of the observed degradation, methods of mitigation, and consequences for fielded modules are discussed.

  1. Study and Simulation of the Heterojunction Thin Film Solar Cell a-Si( n)/a-Si( i)/c-Si( p)/a-Si( i)/a-Si( p)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toufik, Zarede; Hamza, Lidjici; Mohamed, Fathi; Achour, Mahrane

    2016-08-01

    In this article, we present a study based on numerical simulation of the electrical characteristics of a thin-film heterojunction solar cell (a-Si( n)/a-Si( i)/c-Si( p)/a-Si( i)/a-Si( p)), using the automat for simulation of hetero-structures (AFORS-Het) software. This cell is composed of four main layers of silicon (Si): (i) 5 nm amorphous silicon doped n, (ii) 100 μm crystalline silicon (substrate) doped p, (iii) 5 nm amorphous silicon doped p, and (iv) 3 nm amorphous silicon intrinsic. This cell has a front and rear metal contact of aluminum and zinc oxide (ZnO) front layer transparent conductive oxide of 80 nm thickness. The simulations were performed at conditions of "One Sun" irradiation with air mass 1.5 (AM1.5), and under absolute temperature T = 300 K. The simulation results have shown a high electrical conversion efficiency of about 30.29% and high values of open circuit voltage V oc = 779 mV. This study has also shown that the studied cell has good quality light absorption on a very broad spectrum.

  2. Imparting passivity to vapor deposited magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Ryan C.

    Magnesium has the lowest density of all structural metals. Utilization of low density materials is advantageous from a design standpoint, because lower weight translates into improved performance of engineered products (i.e., notebook computers are more portable, vehicles achieve better gas mileage, and aircraft can carry more payload). Despite their low density and high strength to weight ratio, however, the widespread implementation of magnesium alloys is currently hindered by their relatively poor corrosion resistance. The objective of this research dissertation is to develop a scientific basis for the creation of a corrosion resistant magnesium alloy. The corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys is affected by several interrelated factors. Among these are alloying, microstructure, impurities, galvanic corrosion effects, and service conditions, among others. Alloying and modification of the microstructure are primary approaches to controlling corrosion. Furthermore, nonequilibrium alloying of magnesium via physical vapor deposition allows for the formation of single-phase magnesium alloys with supersaturated concentrations of passivity-enhancing elements. The microstructure and surface morphology is also modifiable during physical vapor deposition through the variation of evaporation power, pressure, temperature, ion bombardment, and the source-to-substrate distance. Aluminum, titanium, yttrium, and zirconium were initially chosen as candidates likely to impart passivity on vapor deposited magnesium alloys. Prior to this research, alloys of this type have never before been produced, much less studied. All of these metals were observed to afford some degree of corrosion resistance to magnesium. Due to the especially promising results from nonequilibrium alloying of magnesium with yttrium and titanium, the ternary magnesium-yttrium-titanium system was investigated in depth. While all of the alloys are lustrous, surface morphology is observed under the scanning

  3. Imparting passivity to vapor deposited magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Ryan C.

    Magnesium has the lowest density of all structural metals. Utilization of low density materials is advantageous from a design standpoint, because lower weight translates into improved performance of engineered products (i.e., notebook computers are more portable, vehicles achieve better gas mileage, and aircraft can carry more payload). Despite their low density and high strength to weight ratio, however, the widespread implementation of magnesium alloys is currently hindered by their relatively poor corrosion resistance. The objective of this research dissertation is to develop a scientific basis for the creation of a corrosion resistant magnesium alloy. The corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys is affected by several interrelated factors. Among these are alloying, microstructure, impurities, galvanic corrosion effects, and service conditions, among others. Alloying and modification of the microstructure are primary approaches to controlling corrosion. Furthermore, nonequilibrium alloying of magnesium via physical vapor deposition allows for the formation of single-phase magnesium alloys with supersaturated concentrations of passivity-enhancing elements. The microstructure and surface morphology is also modifiable during physical vapor deposition through the variation of evaporation power, pressure, temperature, ion bombardment, and the source-to-substrate distance. Aluminum, titanium, yttrium, and zirconium were initially chosen as candidates likely to impart passivity on vapor deposited magnesium alloys. Prior to this research, alloys of this type have never before been produced, much less studied. All of these metals were observed to afford some degree of corrosion resistance to magnesium. Due to the especially promising results from nonequilibrium alloying of magnesium with yttrium and titanium, the ternary magnesium-yttrium-titanium system was investigated in depth. While all of the alloys are lustrous, surface morphology is observed under the scanning

  4. Effect of pH treatment on K-shell x-ray intensity ratios and K-shell x-ray-production cross sections in ZnCo alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kup Aylikci, N.; Aylikci, V.; Tirasoglu, E.; Cengiz, E.; Kahoul, A.; Karahan, I. H.

    2011-10-15

    In this study, empirical and semiempirical K-shell fluorescence yields ({omega}{sub K}) and K{beta}/K{alpha} intensity ratios from the available experimental data for elements with 23{<=}Z{<=}30 were calculated to compare them with elements in different alloys. The experimental data are fitted using the quantity [{omega}{sub K}/(1-{omega}{sub K})]{sup 1/4} vs Z to deduce the empirical K-shell fluorescence yields and K{beta}/K{alpha} intensity ratios. The empirical and semiempirical K-shell fluorescence yield values were used to calculate the K x-ray-production cross-section values for pure Co and Zn elements. Also, {sigma}{sub K{alpha}}, {sigma}{sub K{beta}} production cross sections and K{beta}/K{alpha} intensity ratios of Co and Zn have been measured in pure metals and in different alloy compositions which have different pH values. The samples were excited by 59.5-keV {gamma} rays from a {sup 241}Am annular radioactive source. K x rays emitted by samples were counted by an Ultra-LEGe detector with a resolution of 150 eV at 5.9 keV. The effect of pH values on alloy compositions and the effect of alloying on the fluorescence parameters of Co and Zn were investigated. The x-ray fluorescence parameters of Co and Zn in the alloying system indicate significant differences with respect to the pure metals. These differences are attributed to the reorganization of valence shell electrons and/or charge transfer phenomena.

  5. Structural Properties of Mismatched Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousseau, Normand

    The problem of understanding the local structure of disordered alloys has been around for a long time. In this thesis, I look more specifically at the effect of size-mismatch disorder in binary alloys under many forms: metallic and semiconductor alloys, bulk and surfaces, two and three dimensional systems. I have studied the limitations of a central-force model (CFM) and an embedded-atom potential (EAM) in describing the local structure of binary metallic alloys composed of Ag, Au, Cu, Ni, Pd, or Pt. Although an analytical model developed using the CFM explains qualitatively well the experimental and numerical results, in many cases, it is important to add electronic density effects through a more sophisticated potential like EAM in order to agree quantitatively with experiment. I have also looked at amorphous and crystalline silicon-germanium alloys. It turns out that the effect of size-mismatch is the same on a crystalline and an amorphous lattice. In the latter case, it can be seen as a perturbation of the much larger disorder due to the amorphisation process. However, the analytical predictions differ, for both the crystalline and amorphous alloys, from the experimental results. If one is to believe the data, there is only one possible explanation for this inconsistency: large amounts of hydrogen are present in the samples used for the measurements. Since the data analysis of EXAFS results is not always straightforward, I have proposed some experiments that could shed light on this problem. One of these experiments would be to look at the (111) surface of a Si-Ge alloy with a scanning tunneling microscope. I also present in this thesis the theoretical predictions for the height distribution at the surface as well as some more general structural information about the relaxation in the network as one goes away from the surface. Finally, I have studied the effect of size -mismatch in a purely two dimensional lattice, looking for mismatch-driven phase transitions

  6. Field profile tailoring in a-Si:H radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Fujieda, I.; Cho, G.; Conti, M.; Drewery, J.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Quershi, S.; Wildermuth, D. ); Street, R.A. )

    1990-03-01

    The capability of tailoring the field profile in reverse-biased a-Si:H diodes by doping and/or manipulating electrode shapes opens a way to many interesting device structures. Charge collection in a-Si:H radiation detectors is improved for high LET particle detection by inserting thin doped layers into the i-layer of the usual p-i-n diode. This buried p-i-n structure enables us to apply higher reverse-bias and the electric field is enhanced in the mid i-layer. Field profiles of the new structures are calculated and the improved charge collection process is discussed. Also discussed is the possibility of field profile tailoring by utilizing the fixed space charges in i-layers and/or manipulating electrode shapes of the reverse-biased p-i-n diodes. 10 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Nickel-base alloys combat corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, D.C.; Herda, W.

    1995-06-01

    The modern chemical process industry must increase production efficiency to remain competitive. Manufacturers typically meet this challenge by utilizing higher temperatures and pressures, and more-corrosive catalysts. At the same time, the industry has to solve the technical and commercial problems resulting from rigid environmental regulations. To overcome these obstacles, new alloys having higher levels of corrosion resistance have been developed. These materials are based on increased understanding of the physical metallurgy of nickel-base alloys, especially the role of alloying elements. Results of many studies have led to innovations in nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloys containing both high and low amounts of nickel. Higher molybdenum and chromium contents, together with nitrogen additions, have opened up an entirely new class of alloys having unique properties. In addition, a new chromium-base, fully wrought super stainless steel shows excellent promise in solving many corrosion problems. These newer alloys have the ability to combat uniform corrosion, localized corrosion, and stress-corrosion cracking in the harsh halogenic environment of the chemical process industry. This article briefly lists some of the major highlights and corrosion data on recent nickel-chromium-molybdenum and nickel-molybdenum alloys, and the development of a chromium-base, wrought super-austenitic alloy known as Nicrofer 3033 (Alloy 33). Some comparisons with existing alloys are presented, along with a few commercial applications.

  8. Powder metallurgy of vanadium and its alloys (review)

    SciTech Connect

    Radomysel'skii, I.D.; Solntsev, V.P.; Evtushenko, O.V.

    1987-10-01

    This article reviews the current powder metallurgy technology of vanadium and its alloys. Data are given on sintering, compacting, electrowinning and other current production techniques, as well as on the corrosion behavior and mechanical and physical properties of alloys produced by these different methods. The use of vanadium alloys as reactor and jet engine materials is also briefly discussed.

  9. Non-destructive electromagnetic-acoustic evaluation methods of anisotropy and elastic properties in structural alloy steel rolled products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muraviev, V. V.; Muravieva, O. V.; Gabbasova, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    Application opportunities of acoustic structural analysis methods for evaluation of elastic properties and anisotropy by the example of cold-rolled sheets and spring steel rods are presented. Methods are based on application of non-contact electromagnetic-acoustic transducers of encircling and laid-on types developed by the authors and measurements of volume, Rayleigh and Lamb waves parameters. The methods developed can be used as a research tool of material structural analysis, anisotropy of properties when choosing heat treatment techniques and conditions, under intensive plastic deformation and other external energy deposition, including non-conventional material production with hierarchy structure and development of new technologies and safe constructions.

  10. Alloy softening in binary molybdenum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of alloy additions of Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, and Pt on the hardness of Mo. Special emphasis was placed on alloy softening in these binary Mo alloys. Results showed that alloy softening was produced by those elements having an excess of s+d electrons compared to Mo, while those elements having an equal number or fewer s+d electrons than Mo failed to produce alloy softening. Alloy softening and hardening can be correlated with the difference in number of s+d electrons of the solute element and Mo.

  11. Thermal effects on the Ga+ ion beam induced structural modification of a-SiC:H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkova, T.; Wright, C. D.; Craciun, M. F.; Bischoff, L.; Angelov, O.; Dimova-Malinovska, D.

    2012-12-01

    The effects of implantation temperature and post-implantation thermal annealing on the Ga+ ion beam induced optical contrast formation in hydrogenated silicon-carbon alloy (a-SiC:H) films and underlying structural modifications have been studied. The optical contrast formed (between implanted and unimplanted regions of the film material) has been made use of in the form of optical pattern formation by computer-operated Ga+-focused ion beam. Possible applications of this effect in the area of submicron lithography and high-density optical data storage have been suggested with regard to the most widely spread focused micro-beam systems based on Ga+ liquid metal ion sources. The implanted samples were structurally analysed using vibrational spectroscopies, like Raman and infra-red (IR) spectroscopy, to define optimum implantation conditions. The precise role of implantation temperature effects, i.e. the target temperature during Ga+ ion irradiation, on the structural modification obtainable has been therefore a key part of this study. Appropriate post-implantation annealing treatments were also studied, since these are expected to offer further benefits in reducing the required ion dose and enhancing the optical contrast, thus increasing the cost-effectiveness of the method.

  12. Evolution of a Native Oxide Layer at the a-Si:H/c-Si Interface and Its Influence on a Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cell.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenzhu; Meng, Fanying; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Liu, Zhengxin

    2015-12-01

    The interface microstructure of a silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cell was investigated. We found an ultrathin native oxide layer (NOL) with a thickness of several angstroms was formed on the crystalline silicon (c-Si) surface in a very short time (∼30 s) after being etched by HF solution. Although the NOL had a loose structure with defects that are detrimental for surface passivation, it acted as a barrier to restrain the epitaxial growth of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) during the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The microstructure change of the NOL during the PECVD deposition of a-Si:H layers with different conditions and under different H2 plasma treatments were systemically investigated in detail. When a brief H2 plasma was applied to treat the a-Si:H layer after the PECVD deposition, interstitial oxygen and small-size SiO2 precipitates were transformed to hydrogenated amorphous silicon suboxide alloy (a-SiO(x):H, x ∼ 1.5). In the meantime, the interface defect density was reduced by about 50%, and the parameters of the SHJ solar cell were improved due to the post H2 plasma treatment.

  13. A Study of Tungsten-Technetium Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maltz, J. W.

    1965-01-01

    Technetium is a sister element to rhenium and has many properties that are similar to rhenium. It is predicted that technetium will have about the same effects on tungsten as rhenium in regard to increase in workability, lowered ductile to brittle transition temperature, and improved ductility. The objectives of the current work are to recover technetium from fission product wastes at Hanford Atomic Products Operation and reduce to purified metal; prepare W-Tc alloys containing up to 50 atomic% Tc; fabricate the alloy ingots to sheet stock, assessing the effect of technetium on workability; and perform metallurgical and mechanical properties evaluation of the fabricated alloys. Previous reports have described the separation and purification of 800 g of technetium metal powder, melting of technetium and W-Tc alloys, and some initial observation of the alloy material.

  14. Moly and moly alloys - properties and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Boehling, H.; Burman, R.

    1984-01-01

    Molybdenum is the most readily available, lowest cost and widely used refractory metal which has seen diverse ambient and high temperature service to 3000/sup 0/F and even higher temperatures. The most prominent application for molybdenum remains that of alloy additions to irons and steels of wide variety; as well as to heat and corrosion resistant alloys, magnetic alloys, and many high temp-high strength alloys that can tolerate less refined ferro-moly or molybdic oxide alloy additions. However, most heat and corrosion resistant alloys and virtually all present day superalloys that are vacuum melted require the extreme purity of metallic molybdenum powder or one of the powder metallurgy (P/M) consolidated forms, such as pellets, corrugates, or briquettes. Molybdenum as an alloy addition generally imparts improved hardenability to steels, good toughness at low temperatures, enhanced strength and toughness at elevated temperatures, better abrasion resistance, or improved chemical corrosion resistance; and it is a common alloy to most of the so-called superalloys for similar product property improvements. The properties and uses of molybdenum and molybdenum alloys are discussed.

  15. Ultralight amorphous silicon alloy photovoltaic modules for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanak, J. J.; Chen, Englade; Fulton, C.; Myatt, A.; Woodyard, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    Ultralight and ultrathin, flexible, rollup monolithic PV modules have been developed consisting of multijunction, amorphous silicon alloys for either terrestrial or aerospace applications. The rate of progress in increasing conversion efficiency of stable multijunction and multigap PV cells indicates that arrays of these modules can be available for NASA's high power systems in the 1990's. Because of the extremely light module weight and the highly automated process of manufacture, the monolithic a-Si alloy arrays are expected to be strongly competitive with other systems for use in NASA's space station or in other large aerospace applications.

  16. Coagulated silica - a-SiO2 admixture in cement paste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokorný, Jaroslav; Pavlíková, Milena; Záleská, Martina; Rovnaníková, Pavla; Pavlík, Zbyšek

    2016-07-01

    Amorphous silica (a-SiO2) in fine-grained form possesses a high pozzolanic activity which makes it a valuable component of blended binders in concrete production. The origin of a-SiO2 applied in cement-based composites is very diverse. SiO2 in amorphous form is present in various amounts in quite a few supplementary cementing materials (SCMs) being used as partial replacement of Portland cement. In this work, the applicability of a commercially produced coagulated silica powder as a partial replacement of Portland cement in cement paste mix design is investigated. Portland cement CEM I 42.5R produced according to the EU standard EN 197-1 is used as a reference binder. Coagulated silica is applied in dosages of 5 and 10 % by mass of cement. The water/binder ratio is kept constant in all the studied pastes. For the applied silica, specific surface area, density, loss on ignition, pozzolanic activity, chemical composition, and SiO2 amorphous phase content are determined. For the developed pastes on the basis of cement-silica blended binder, basic physical properties as bulk density, matrix density, and total open porosity are accessed. Pore size distribution is determined using MIP analysis. Initial and final setting times of fresh mixtures are measured by automatic Vicat apparatus. Effect of silica admixture on mechanical resistivity is evaluated using compressive strength, bending strength, and dynamic Young's modulus measurement. The obtained data gives evidence of a decreased workability of paste mixtures with silica, whereas the setting process is accelerated. On the other hand, reaction activity of silica with Portland cement minerals results in a slight decrease of porosity and improvement of mechanical resistivity of cement pastes containing a-SiO2.

  17. NASA-427: A New Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nabors, Sammy A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center researchers have developed a new, stronger aluminum alloy, ideal for cast aluminum products that have powder or paint-baked thermal coatings. With advanced mechanical properties, the NASA-427 alloy shows greater tensile strength and increased ductility, providing substantial improvement in impact toughness. In addition, this alloy improves the thermal coating process by decreasing the time required for heat treatment. With improvements in both strength and processing time, use of the alloy provides reduced materials and production costs, lower product weight, and better product performance. The superior properties of NASA-427 can benefit many industries, including automotive, where it is particularly well-suited for use in aluminum wheels.

  18. Study of fluoride corrosion of nickel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunther, W. H.; Steindler, M. J.

    1969-01-01

    Report contains the results of an investigation of the corrosion resistance of nickel and nickel alloys exposed to fluorine, uranium hexafluoride, and volatile fission product fluorides at high temperatures. Survey of the unclassified literature on the subject is included.

  19. Respiratory manganese particle size, time-course and neurobehavioral outcomes in workers at a manganese alloy production plant.

    PubMed

    Park, Robert M; Bouchard, Maryse F; Baldwin, Mary; Bowler, Rosemarie; Mergler, Donna

    2014-12-01

    The progression of manganism with chronic exposure to airborne manganese (Mn) is not well understood. Here, we further investigate the findings on exposure and neurobehavioral outcomes of workers from a silico- and ferromanganese production plant and non-exposed workers from the same community in 1990 and 2004, using a variety of exposure metrics that distinguish particle size and origin within the range of respirable airborne exposures. Mn exposure matrices for large respirable particulate (Mn-LRP, dust) and small respirable particulate (Mn-SRP, fume), based on process origins, were used together with detailed work histories since 1973 (plant opening), to construct exposure metrics including burdens and cumulative burdens with various clearance half-lives. For three out of eight 1990 neurobehavioral tests analyzed with linear regression models, duration of Mn exposure was the best predictor: Luria-Nebraska Neuropsychological Battery - Motor Scale, Trail-Making B and Finger Tapping. The Luria-Nebraska Motor Scale had the strongest association (t ∼ 5.0, p < 10(-6)). For outcomes on three other tests, the duration and Mn-SRP metrics were comparable: Trail Making Test A, Cancellation H and Stroop Color-Word Test (color/word subtest). Delayed Word Recall was best predicted by Mn-SRP (based on square root or truncated air-concentrations). The Word score on the Stroop Color-Word Test was the only outcome for which Mn-LRP was the leading predictor (t = -2.92, p = 0.003), while performance on the WAIS-R Digit Span Test was not significantly predicted by any metric. For outcomes evaluated in both 1990 and 2004, a mixed-effect linear regression model was used to examine estimates of within-individual trends. Duration and Mn-SRP were associated with performance on the Luria-Nebraska Motor Scale, as well as with other outcomes that appeared to have both reversible and progressive features, including Trail Making A and B, Cancellation H and Delayed Word Recall. With the mixed

  20. Final Assessment of Preindustrial Solid-State Route for High-Performance Mg-System Alloys Production: Concluding the EU Green Metallurgy Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Errico, Fabrizio; Plaza, Gerardo Garces; Giger, Franz; Kim, Shae K.

    2013-10-01

    The Green Metallurgy Project, a LIFE+ project co-financed by the European Union Commission, has now been completed. The purpose of the Green Metallurgy Project was to establish and assess a preindustrial process capable of using nanostructured-based high-performance Mg-Zn(Y) magnesium alloys and fully recycled eco-magnesium alloys. In this work, the Consortium presents the final outcome and verification of the completed prototype construction. To compare upstream cradle-to-grave footprints when ternary nanostructured Mg-Y-Zn alloys or recycled eco-magnesium chips are produced during the process cycle using the same equipment, a life cycle analysis was completed following the ISO 14040 methodology. During tests to fine tune the prototype machinery and compare the quality of semifinished bars produced using the scaled up system, the Buhler team produced interesting and significant results. Their tests showed the ternary Mg-Y-Zn magnesium alloys to have a highest specific strength over 6000 series wrought aluminum alloys usually employed in automotive components.

  1. Single-Step Production of Nanostructured Copper-Nickel (CuNi) and Copper-Nickel-Indium (CuNiIn) Alloy Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apaydın, Ramazan Oğuzhan; Ebin, Burçak; Gürmen, Sebahattin

    2016-07-01

    Nanostructured copper-nickel (CuNi) and copper-nickel-indium (CuNiIn) alloy particles were produced from aqueous solutions of copper, nickel nitrates and indium sulfate by hydrogen reduction-assisted ultrasonic spray pyrolysis. The effects of reduction temperatures, at 973 K, 1073 K, and 1173 K (700 °C, 800 °C, and 900 °C), on the morphology and crystalline structure of the alloy particles were investigated under the conditions of 0.1 M total precursor concentration and 0.5 L/min H2 volumetric flow rate. X-ray diffraction studies were performed to investigate the crystalline structure. Particle size and morphology were investigated by scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive spectroscopy was applied to determine the chemical composition of the particles. Spherical nanocrystalline binary CuNi alloy particles were prepared in the particle size range from 74 to 455 nm, while ternary CuNiIn alloy particles were obtained in the particle size range from 80 to 570 nm at different precursor solution concentrations and reduction temperatures. Theoretical and experimental chemical compositions of all the particles are nearly the same. Results reveal that the precursor solution and reduction temperature strongly influence the particle size of the produced alloy particles.

  2. Titanium Alloys and Processing for High Speed Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, William D.; Bird, R. Keith; Wallace, Terryl A.

    1996-01-01

    Commercially available titanium alloys as well as emerging titanium alloys with limited or no production experience are being considered for a variety of applications to high speed commercial aircraft structures. A number of government and industry programs are underway to improve the performance of promising alloys by chemistry and/or processing modifications and to identify appropriate alloys and processes for specific aircraft structural applications. This paper discusses some of the results on the effects of heat treatment, service temperatures from - 54 C to +177 C, and selected processing on the mechanical properties of several candidate beta and alpha-beta titanium alloys. Included are beta alloys Timetal 21S, LCB, Beta C, Beta CEZ, and Ti-10-2-3 and alpha-beta alloys Ti-62222, Ti-6242S, Timetal 550, Ti-62S, SP-700, and Corona-X. The emphasis is on properties of rolled sheet product form and on the superplastic properties and processing of the materials.

  3. Systems study of transport aircraft incorporating advanced aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakata, I. F.

    1982-01-01

    A study was performed to quantify the potential benefits of utilizing advanced aluminum alloys in commercial transport aircraft and to define the effort necessary to develop fully the alloys to a viable commercial production capability. The comprehensive investigation (1) established realistic advanced aluminum alloy property goals to maximize aircraft systems effectiveness (2) identified performance and economic benefits of incorporating the advanced alloy in future advanced technology commercial aircraft designs (3) provided a recommended plan for development and integration of the alloys into commercial aircraft production (4) provided an indication of the timing and investigation required by the metal producing industry to support the projected market and (5) evaluate application of advanced aluminum alloys to other aerospace and transit systems as a secondary objective. The results of the investigation provided a roadmap and identified key issues requiring attention in an advanced aluminum alloy and applications technology development program.

  4. Metal alloy identifier

    DOEpatents

    Riley, William D.; Brown, Jr., Robert D.

    1987-01-01

    To identify the composition of a metal alloy, sparks generated from the alloy are optically observed and spectrographically analyzed. The spectrographic data, in the form of a full-spectrum plot of intensity versus wavelength, provide the "signature" of the metal alloy. This signature can be compared with similar plots for alloys of known composition to establish the unknown composition by a positive match with a known alloy. An alternative method is to form intensity ratios for pairs of predetermined wavelengths within the observed spectrum and to then compare the values of such ratios with similar values for known alloy compositions, thereby to positively identify the unknown alloy composition.

  5. Alloy 718 for Oilfield Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    deBarbadillo, John J.; Mannan, Sarwan K.

    2012-02-01

    Alloy 718 (UNS N07718) was developed for use in aircraft gas turbine engines, but its unique combination of room-temperature strength and aqueous corrosion resistance made it a candidate for oilfield fasteners, valves, drill tools, and completion equipment. As well environments became more severe, stress corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement failures in production equipment drove the evolution of the composition and microstructure that distinguish today's oilfield-grade 718 from aerospace grades. This paper reviews the development of the grade and its applications and describes some of its unique characteristics, testing, and manufacturing methods as well as newer alloys designed for high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) conditions.

  6. Tarnish evaluation of gold-based dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Corso, P P; German, R M; Simmons, H D

    1985-05-01

    Three commercial gold dental alloys and three ternary (Au-Ag-Cu) alloys of constant nobility were subjected to a standardized test battery for tarnish. The tests included sodium sulfide and artificial saliva solutions, both at 37 degrees C, in sealed containers. Quantitative measurements of tarnish were made from the alloy color change during a three-day exposure. Alloy nobility is a relatively important factor in determining tarnish resistance; however, microstructure can have a negative effect on tarnish resistance. Alloys with a two-phase microstructure produce microgalvanic conditions which lead to either silver chloride or silver sulfide tarnish products. A solution heat treatment improves tarnish resistance by eliminating microstructural inhomogeneities.

  7. Electric melting methods for developing special alloys for radio electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esaulov, N. P.

    2012-06-01

    Possible methods for electric melting of special alloys intended for the production of metal alloy cathodes for electronic microwave devices are considered. The process of production of Pt-Ba and Pd-Ba alloys in a laboratory vacuum arc furnace is described, and the results of controlling the produced cathode materials are presented. This process has been put into operation on a commercial scale.

  8. Nickel alloys in the oral environment.

    PubMed

    Wataha, John C; Drury, Jeanie L; Chung, Whasun O

    2013-07-01

    The use of nickel casting alloys for long-term restorations in dentistry has long been controversial. A 'tug-of-war' between economic, engineering and biological considerations is central to this controversy; nickel-casting alloys have low costs and favorable physical properties, but are corrosion-prone in the oral environment. Clinicians and researchers have questioned the safety of nickel-containing dental alloys because several nickel compounds are known to cause adverse biological effects in vivo and in vitro in contexts outside of dentistry. The debate revolves around the extent to which corrosion products from oral restorations cause intraoral or systemic biological problems. Current evidence suggests that nickel alloys may be used successfully and safely in dentistry if clinical risks are taken into account. However, these alloys may cause significant clinical problems, primarily allergenic and inflammatory, if the risks are ignored.

  9. MBE growth of GaP on a Si substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolev, M. S. Lazarenko, A. A.; Nikitina, E. V.; Pirogov, E. V.; Gudovskikh, A. S.; Egorov, A. Yu.

    2015-04-15

    It is shown that single-crystal GaP buffer layers can be formed on a Si substrate by molecular-beam epitaxy, with the “migration-enhanced epitaxy” procedure applied in the stage in which the nucleating layer is formed. When a GaP layer is produced on a p-type silicon substrate, a p-n junction is created in a natural way between the p-Si substrate and the surface n-Si layer produced by the diffusion of phosphorus into the substrate during the course of the epitaxial growth of GaP. This p-n junction can be used as the first junction of a silicon-based multijunction photovoltaic converter.

  10. Use of a Si(Li) detector as β spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Dryák, P; Kovář, P

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this work is to demonstrate the capability of a Si(Li) detector for the measurement of β spectra, despite the energy absorption in air and in the Be window. A simple source holder fixes the source on the symmetry axis at 3mm from the detector window. The β-sources are produced by evaporation on a plastic backing plate. Absorbing materials between the source and the sensitive volume of the detector are 3 mm of air, a Be window, 0.1 μm Si and 20 nm of gold. A model of the detector was created for β spectra simulation using the MCNP 4A code. Experimental spectra of (14)C, (147)Pm, (204)Tl, (90)Sr/(90)Y were compared with simulated spectra.

  11. Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon (a-Si:H) Colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Justin T.; Hueso, Jose L.; Korgel, Brian A.

    2010-12-14

    Colloidal particles of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) were synthesized by decomposition of trisilane (Si{sub 3}H{sub 8}) in supercritical n-hexane (sc-hexane) at temperatures ranging from 380 to 550 °C. The reaction temperature, pressure and Si{sub 3}H{sub 8} concentration have a significant influence on the average particle size, Si bond order and hydrogen content. The particle diameter could be varied from 170 nm to 1.7 μm, with hydrogen loadings between 10% and 58%. Raman spectroscopy of the particles revealed significant differences in Si bond order that correlated with hydrogen content, with the lowest reaction temperatures yielding particles with the least structural order and most associated hydrogen. Particles synthesized at temperatures higher than 420 °C had sufficient bond order to allow crystallization under the Raman laser probe.

  12. Chrome alloy welding fume study.

    PubMed

    Vorpahl, K W; Jordan, P T; Mathews, E J

    1976-10-01

    Breathing zone samples obtained at a production arc welding operation employing approximately 90 welders demonstrated excessive exposure to chromium from the welding of high chromium alloy steel. Breathing zone samples were collected inside welding helmets. Methods considered for reducing employee exposure included local exhaust ventilation and the use of air-supplied helmets. Air-supplied helmets were chosen as best suited for the production scheme and suitable devices were subsequently developed that reduced breathing zone contaminant levels well below applicable standards.

  13. Silicon Solar Cells with Front Hetero-Contact and Aluminum Alloy Back Junction: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, H.-C.; Page, M. R.; Iwaniczko, E.; Xu, Y.; Roybal, L.; Wang, Q.; Branz, H. M.; Meier, D. L.

    2008-05-01

    We prototype an alternative n-type monocrystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cell structure that utilizes an n/i-type hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) front hetero-contact and a back p-n junction formed by alloying aluminum (Al) with the n-type Si wafer.

  14. Microstructure modelling of industrial alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlach, Dieter M.; Gandin, Charles-André; Garcia-Escorial, Asuncion; Henein, Hani; Grün, Gerd-Ulrich; Schneider, Marc; Guédou, Jean-Yves; Kieft, René; Grellier, André

    2005-10-01

    Solidification of alloys is a complex phenomenon arising in many modern experimental techniques and industrial technologies involving casting and surface processing. Deep undercooling of alloys below equilibrium liquidus temperature results in rapid solidification, yielding materials with improved mechanical, magnetic and electrical properties. This MAP project is focusing on the long-term perspective for industrial materials such as Ni- and Al-based alloys. Ni-based multicomponent superalloys are the basis material for the production of, for example, turbine blades; Al-based alloys are highly important for the aerospace and automotive industries. More than 90% of all metallic materials are now produced from the liquid state. So far, efforts have been directed towards optimising the industrial production routes in the casting and foundry industry by computer-assisted modelling and simulation of solidification under different conditions. The goal has been to reduce the time- and energy-consuming treatment of the cast material in order to produce a material with the desired properties.

  15. Corrosion behavior of stainless steel-zirconium alloy waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, D.P.; Simpson, L.J.; DeVries, M.J.; Callahan, D.E.

    1999-07-01

    Stainless steel-zirconium (SS-Zr) alloys are being considered as waste forms for the disposal of metallic waste generated during the electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The baseline waste form for spent fuels from the EBR-11 reactor is a stainless steel-15 wt.% zirconium (SS-15Zr) alloy. This article briefly reviews the microstructure of various SS-Zr waste form alloys and presents results of immersion corrosion and electrochemical corrosion tests performed on these alloys. The electrochemical tests show that the corrosion behavior of SS-Zr alloys is comparable to those of other alloys being considered for the Yucca Mountain geologic repository. The immersion tests demonstrate that the SS-Zr alloys are resistant to selective leaching of fission product elements and, hence, suitable as candidates for high-level nuclear waste forms.

  16. Comparison of Three Primary Surface Recuperator Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Wendy; More, Karren Leslie; Walker, Larry R

    2010-01-01

    Extensive work performed by Capstone Turbine Corporation, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and various others has shown that the traditional primary surface recuperator alloy, type 347 stainless steel, is unsuitable for applications above 650 C ({approx}1200 F). Numerous studies have shown that the presence of water vapor greatly accelerates the oxidation rate of type 347 stainless steel at temperatures above 650 C ({approx}1200 F). Water vapor is present as a product of combustion in the microturbine exhaust, making it necessary to find replacement alloys for type 347 stainless steel that will meet the long life requirements of microturbine primary surface recuperators. It has been well established over the past few years that alloys with higher chromium and nickel contents than type 347 stainless steel have much greater oxidation resistance in the microturbine environment. One such alloy that has replaced type 347 stainless steel in primary surface recuperators is Haynes Alloy HR-120 (Haynes and HR-120 are trademarks of Haynes International, Inc.), a solid-solution-strengthened alloy with nominally 33 wt % Fe, 37 wt % Ni and 25 wt % Cr. Unfortunately, while HR-120 is significantly more oxidation resistant in the microturbine environment, it is also a much more expensive alloy. In the interest of cost reduction, other candidate primary surface recuperator alloys are being investigated as possible alternatives to type 347 stainless steel. An initial rainbow recuperator test has been performed at Capstone to compare the oxidation resistance of type 347 stainless steel, HR-120, and the Allegheny Ludlum austenitic alloy AL 20-25+Nb (AL 20-25+Nb is a trademark of ATI Properties, Inc. and is licensed to Allegheny Ludlum Corporation). Evaluation of surface oxide scale formation and associated alloy depletion and other compositional changes has been carried out at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The results of this initial rainbow test will be presented and discussed in this

  17. Palladium and its alloys as membrane catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Gryaznov, V.M.

    1983-05-01

    Possibilities have been examined for the use of selective transport of hydrogen through palladium alloy membranes in order to increase the efficiency of hydrogen recovery from gas mixtures and catalytic reactions in which hydrogen is consumed or formed. By varying the hydrogen concentration in the bulk and on the surface of a palladium alloy, it becomes possible to increase the selectivity of hydrogenation reactions. Continuous and semicontinuous methods have been developed for obtaining valuable products on membrane catalysts.

  18. Modeling of Alternative Compositions of Recycled Wrought Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevorkijan, Varužan

    2013-08-01

    Nowadays, a significant part of postconsumed wrought aluminum scrap is still used for the production of comparatively cheaper cast alloys, in that way losing an important part of the potential added value. The share of postconsumed scrap in wrought aluminum alloys could be increased either by sorting to fractions with the required chemical composition and/or by broadening the standard compositional tolerance limits of alloying elements. The first solution requires hand or automatic sorting of postconsumed scrap as alloys or groups of alloys to the degree of separation sufficient to enable the blending of standard compositions of wrought alloys; the second solution is much more radical, predicting changes in the existing standards for wrought aluminum alloys toward nonstandard alloys but yet having properties acceptable for customers. In this case, the degree of separation of incoming postconsumed scrap required is much less demanding. The model presented in this work enables the design of optimal (standard and nonstandard recycling-friendly) compositions and properties of wrought aluminum alloys with significantly increased amounts of postconsumed scrap. The following two routes were modeled in detail: (I) the blending of standard and nonstandard compositions of wrought aluminum alloys starting from postconsumed aluminum scrap sorted to various degrees simulated by the model and (II) changing the initial standard composition of wrought aluminum alloys to nonstandard "recycling-friendly" ones, with broader concentration tolerance limits of alloying elements and without influencing the selected alloy properties, specified in advance. The applied algorithms were found to be very useful in the industrial design of both procedures: (I) the computation of the required chemical composition of the scrap streams obtained by sorting (or, in other words, the postconsumed scrap sorting level), necessary for achieving the standard wrought alloy composition and (II) the

  19. Results of a Si/Cdte Compton Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Oonuki, Kousuke; Tanaka, Takaaki; Watanabe, Shin; Takeda, Shin'ichiro; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Mitani, Takefumi; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Nomachi, Masaharu; /Sagamihara, Inst. Space Astron. Sci. /Tokyo U. /SLAC /Hiroshima U. /Osaka U.

    2005-09-23

    We have been developing a semiconductor Compton telescope to explore the universe in the energy band from several tens of keV to a few MeV. We use a Si strip and CdTe pixel detector for the Compton telescope to cover an energy range from 60 keV. For energies above several hundred keV, the higher efficiency of CdTe semiconductor in comparison with Si is expected to play an important role as an absorber and a scatterer. In order to demonstrate the spectral and imaging capability of a CdTe-based Compton Telescope, we have developed a Compton telescope consisting of a stack of CdTe pixel detectors as a small scale prototype. With this prototype, we succeeded in reconstructing images and spectra by solving the Compton equation from 122 keV to 662 keV. The energy resolution (FWHM) of reconstructed spectra is 7.3 keV at 511 keV and 3.1 keV at 122 keV, respectively. The angular resolution obtained at 511 keV is measured to be 12.2{sup o}(FWHM).

  20. Antibacterial biodegradable Mg-Ag alloys.

    PubMed

    Tie, D; Feyerabend, F; Müller, W D; Schade, R; Liefeith, K; Kainer, K U; Willumeit, R

    2013-06-16

    The use of magnesium alloys as degradable metals for biomedical applications is a topic of ongoing research and the demand for multifunctional materials is increasing. Hence, binary Mg-Ag alloys were designed as implant materials to combine the favourable properties of magnesium with the well-known antibacterial property of silver. In this study, three Mg-Ag alloys, Mg2Ag, Mg4Ag and Mg6Ag that contain 1.87 %, 3.82 % and 6.00 % silver by weight, respectively, were cast and processed with solution (T4) and aging (T6) heat treatment. The metallurgical analysis and phase identification showed that all alloys contained Mg4Ag as the dominant β phase. After heat treatment, the mechanical properties of all Mg-Ag alloys were significantly improved and the corrosion rate was also significantly reduced, due to presence of silver. Mg(OH)₂ and MgO present the main magnesium corrosion products, while AgCl was found as the corresponding primary silver corrosion product. Immersion tests, under cell culture conditions, demonstrated that the silver content did not significantly shift the pH and magnesium ion release. In vitro tests, with both primary osteoblasts and cell lines (MG63, RAW 264.7), revealed that Mg-Ag alloys show negligible cytotoxicity and sound cytocompatibility. Antibacterial assays, performed in a dynamic bioreactor system, proved that the alloys reduce the viability of two common pathogenic bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus (DSMZ 20231) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (DSMZ 3269), and the results showed that the killing rate of the alloys against tested bacteria exceeded 90%. In summary, biodegradable Mg-Ag alloys are cytocompatible materials with adjustable mechanical and corrosion properties and show promising antibacterial activity, which indicates their potential as antibacterial biodegradable implant materials.

  1. Signal and noise analysis of a-Si:H radiation detector-amplifier system

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Gyuseong

    1992-03-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) has potential advantages in making radiation detectors for many applications because of its deposition capability on a large-area substrate and its high radiation resistance. Position-sensitive radiation detectors can be made out of a 1d strip or a 2-d pixel array of a Si:H pin diodes. In addition, signal processing electronics can be made by thin-film transistors on the same substrate. The calculated radiation signal, based on a simple charge collection model agreed well with results from various wave length light sources and 1 MeV beta particles on sample diodes. The total noise of the detection system was analyzed into (a) shot noise and (b) 1/f noise from a detector diode, and (c) thermal noise and (d) 1/f noise from the frontend TFT of a charge-sensitive preamplifier. the effective noise charge calculated by convoluting these noise power spectra with the transfer function of a CR-RC shaping amplifier showed a good agreement with the direct measurements of noise charge. The derived equations of signal and noise charge can be used to design an a-Si:H pixel detector amplifier system optimally. Signals from a pixel can be readout using switching TFTs, or diodes. Prototype tests of a double-diode readout scheme showed that the storage time and the readout time are limited by the resistances of the reverse-biased pixel diode and the forward biased switching diodes respectively. A prototype charge-sensitive amplifier was made using poly-Si TFTs to test the feasibility of making pixel-level amplifiers which would be required in small-signal detection. The measured overall gain-bandwidth product was {approximately}400 MHz and the noise charge {approximately}1000 electrons at a 1 {mu}sec shaping time. When the amplifier is connected to a pixel detector of capacitance 0.2 pF, it would give a charge-to-voltage gain of {approximately}0.02 mV/electron with a pulse rise time less than 100 nsec and a dynamic range of 48 dB.

  2. Interfacial transformations in the a-SiC/a-Si/6H-SiC structure caused by high-temperature (1500°C) annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, P. A.; Samsonova, T. P.

    2008-07-01

    We have studied the reactions that take place at interfaces in an a-SiC/a-Si/6H-SiC sandwich structure, which was obtained by the sequential deposition of amorphous silicon (a-Si) and amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC) onto a 6H-SiC substrate by ion sputtering in vacuum and then annealed at 1500°C (i.e., above the melting point of silicon). It is shown that the annealing leads to complete îdissipationî of the silicon film in SiC, probably as a result of the dissolution of carbon in the silicon melt and the diffusion of silicon into SiC.

  3. Hydrogen-plasma-induced Rapid, Low-Temperature Crystallization of μm-thick a-Si:H Films.

    PubMed

    Zhou, H P; Xu, M; Xu, S; Liu, L L; Liu, C X; Kwek, L C; Xu, L X

    2016-01-01

    Being a low-cost, mass-production-compatible route to attain crystalline silicon, post-deposition crystallization of amorphous silicon has received intensive research interest. Here we report a low-temperature (300 °C), rapid (crystallization rate of ~17 nm/min) means of a-Si:H crystallization based on high-density hydrogen plasma. A model integrating the three processes of hydrogen insertion, etching, and diffusion, which jointly determined the hydrogenation depth of the excess hydrogen into the treated micrometer thick a-Si:H, is proposed to elucidate the hydrogenation depth evolution and the crystallization mechanism. The effective temperature deduced from the hydrogen diffusion coefficient is far beyond the substrate temperature of 300 °C, which implies additional driving forces for crystallization, i.e., the chemical annealing/plasma heating and the high plasma sheath electric field. The features of LFICP (low-frequency inductively coupled plasma) and LFICP-grown a-Si:H are also briefly discussed to reveal the underlying mechanism of rapid crystallization at low temperatures. PMID:27600866

  4. Hydrogen-plasma-induced Rapid, Low-Temperature Crystallization of μm-thick a-Si:H Films

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, H. P.; Xu, M.; Xu, S.; Liu, L. L.; Liu, C. X.; Kwek, L. C.; Xu, L. X.

    2016-01-01

    Being a low-cost, mass-production-compatible route to attain crystalline silicon, post-deposition crystallization of amorphous silicon has received intensive research interest. Here we report a low-temperature (300 °C), rapid (crystallization rate of ~17 nm/min) means of a-Si:H crystallization based on high-density hydrogen plasma. A model integrating the three processes of hydrogen insertion, etching, and diffusion, which jointly determined the hydrogenation depth of the excess hydrogen into the treated micrometer thick a-Si:H, is proposed to elucidate the hydrogenation depth evolution and the crystallization mechanism. The effective temperature deduced from the hydrogen diffusion coefficient is far beyond the substrate temperature of 300 °C, which implies additional driving forces for crystallization, i.e., the chemical annealing/plasma heating and the high plasma sheath electric field. The features of LFICP (low-frequency inductively coupled plasma) and LFICP-grown a-Si:H are also briefly discussed to reveal the underlying mechanism of rapid crystallization at low temperatures. PMID:27600866

  5. Separation in Binary Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, D. O.; Facemire, B. R.; Kaukler, W. F.; Witherow, W. K.; Fanning, U.

    1986-01-01

    Studies of monotectic alloys and alloy analogs reviewed. Report surveys research on liquid/liquid and solid/liquid separation in binary monotectic alloys. Emphasizes separation processes in low gravity, such as in outer space or in free fall in drop towers. Advances in methods of controlling separation in experiments highlighted.

  6. SUPERCONDUCTING VANADIUM BASE ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Cleary, H.J.

    1958-10-21

    A new vanadium-base alloy which possesses remarkable superconducting properties is presented. The alloy consists of approximately one atomic percent of palladium, the balance being vanadium. The alloy is stated to be useful in a cryotron in digital computer circuits.

  7. PLUTONIUM-THORIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Schonfeld, F.W.

    1959-09-15

    New plutonium-base binary alloys useful as liquid reactor fuel are described. The alloys consist of 50 to 98 at.% thorium with the remainder plutonium. The stated advantages of these alloys over unalloyed plutonium for reactor fuel use are easy fabrication, phase stability, and the accompanying advantuge of providing a means for converting Th/sup 232/ into U/sup 233/.

  8. DELTA PHASE PLUTONIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Cramer, E.M.; Ellinger, F.H.; Land. C.C.

    1960-03-22

    Delta-phase plutonium alloys were developed suitable for use as reactor fuels. The alloys consist of from 1 to 4 at.% zinc and the balance plutonium. The alloys have good neutronic, corrosion, and fabrication characteristics snd possess good dimensional characteristics throughout an operating temperature range from 300 to 490 deg C.

  9. Structural alloys for high field superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1985-08-01

    Research toward structural alloys for use in high field superconducting magnets is international in scope, and has three principal objectives: the selection or development of suitable structural alloys for the magnet support structure, the identification of mechanical phenomena and failure modes that may influence service behavior, and the design of suitable testing procedures to provide engineering design data. This paper reviews recent progress toward the first two of these objectives. The structural alloy needs depend on the magnet design and superconductor type and differ between magnets that use monolithic and those that employ force-cooled or ICCS conductors. In the former case the central requirement is for high strength, high toughness, weldable alloys that are used in thick sections for the magnet case. In the latter case the need is for high strength, high toughness alloys that are used in thin welded sections for the conductor conduit. There is productive current research on both alloy types. The service behavior of these alloys is influenced by mechanical phenomena that are peculiar to the magnet environment, including cryogenic fatigue, magnetic effects, and cryogenic creep. The design of appropriate mechanical tests is complicated by the need for testing at 4/sup 0/K and by rate effects associated with adiabatic heating during the tests. 46 refs.

  10. High strength alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Phillip James [Oak Ridge, TN; Shingledecker, John Paul [Knoxville, TN; Santella, Michael Leonard [Knoxville, TN; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; John, Randy Carl [Houston, TX; Kim, Dong Sub [Sugar Land, TX

    2010-08-31

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tubular that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  11. High strength alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Phillip James; Shingledecker, John Paul; Santella, Michael Leonard; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Vinegar, Harold J.; John, Randy Carl; Kim, Dong Sub

    2012-06-05

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tublar that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  12. Preparation of triple junction a-Si:H nip based solar cells at deposition rates of 10{angstrom}/s using a very high frequency technique

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.J.; Deng, X.; Liu, T.; Izu, M.

    1999-07-01

    In an effort to find an alternative deposition method to the standard low deposition rate 13.56 MHz PECVD technique, the feasibility of using a 70 MHz rf plasma frequency to prepare a-Si:H based i-layer materials at high rates for nip based triple-junction solar cells has been tested. As a prelude to multi-junction cell fabrication, the deposition conditions used to make single-junction a-Si:H and a-SiGe:H cells using this Very High Frequency (VHF) method have been varied to optimize the material quality and the cell efficiencies. It was found that the efficiencies and the light stability for both a-Si:H and a-SiGe:H single-junction cells remain relatively constant as the i-layer deposition rate is varied from 1 to 10 {angstrom}/s. Also these stable efficiencies are similar to those for cells made at low deposition rates (1 {angstrom}/s) using the standard 13.56 MHz PECVD technique and the same deposition equipment. Using the knowledge obtained in the fabrication of the single-junction devices, a-Si:H/a-SiGe:H/a-SiGe:H triple-junction solar cells have been fabricated with all of the i-layers prepared using the VHF technique and deposition rates near 10 {angstrom}/s. Thin doped layers for these devices were prepared using the standard 13.56 MHz rf frequency and deposition rates near 1 {angstrom}/s. Pre-light soaked efficiencies of greater than 10% have been obtained for these cells prepared at the high rates. In addition, after 600 hrs. of light soaking under white light conditions, the cell efficiencies degraded by only 10--13%, values similar to the degree of degradation for high efficiency triple-junction cells made by the standard 13.56 MHz method using i-layer deposition rates near 1 {angstrom}/s. Thus, use of this VHF method in the production of large area a-Si:H based multi-junction solar modules will allow for higher i-layer deposition rates, higher module throughput and reduced module cost.

  13. Creep Resistant Zinc Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Frank E. Goodwin

    2002-12-31

    This report covers the development of Hot Chamber Die Castable Zinc Alloys with High Creep Strengths. This project commenced in 2000, with the primary objective of developing a hot chamber zinc die-casting alloy, capable of satisfactory service at 140 C. The core objectives of the development program were to: (1) fill in missing alloy data areas and develop a more complete empirical model of the influence of alloy composition on creep strength and other selected properties, and (2) based on the results from this model, examine promising alloy composition areas, for further development and for meeting the property combination targets, with the view to designing an optimized alloy composition. The target properties identified by ILZRO for an improved creep resistant zinc die-casting alloy were identified as follows: (1) temperature capability of 1470 C; (2) creep stress of 31 MPa (4500 psi); (3) exposure time of 1000 hours; and (4) maximum creep elongation under these conditions of 1%. The project was broadly divided into three tasks: (1) Task 1--General and Modeling, covering Experimental design of a first batch of alloys, alloy preparation and characterization. (2) Task 2--Refinement and Optimization, covering Experimental design of a second batch of alloys. (3) Task 3--Creep Testing and Technology transfer, covering the finalization of testing and the transfer of technology to the Zinc industry should have at least one improved alloy result from this work.

  14. All-Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition a-Si:H Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Iwaniczko, E.; Wang, Q.; Xu, Y.; Nelson, B. P.; Mahan, A. H.; Crandall, R. S.; Branz, H. M.

    2000-01-01

    Efficient hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) nip solar cells have been fabricated with all doped and undoped a-Si:H layers deposited by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD). The total deposition time of all layers, except the top ITO-contact, is less than 4 minutes.

  15. Laser surface processing on sintered PM alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Wilfred; Daurelio, Giuseppe; Ludovico, Antonio D.

    1997-08-01

    Usually the P.M. alloys are heat treated like case hardening, gas nitriding or plasma nitriding for a better wear resistance of the product surface. There is an additional method for gaining better tribological properties and this is the surface hardening (or remelting or alloying) of the P.M. alloy by laser treatment on a localized part of the product without heating the whole sample. This work gives a cured experimentation about the proper sintering powder alloys for laser surface processing from the point of view of wear, fatigue life and surface quality. As concerns the materials three different basic alloy groups with graduated carbon contents were prepared. Regarding these sintered powder alloys one group holds Fe, Mo and C and other group holds Fe, Ni, Mo and C and the last one holds Fe, Ni, Cu, Mo and C contents. Obviously each group has a different surface hardness, different porosity distribution, different density and diverse metallurgical structures (pearlite or ferrite-pearlite, etc.). ON the sample surfaces a colloidal graphite coating, in different thicknesses, has been sprayed to increase laser energy surface absorption. On some other samples a Mo coating, in different thicknesses, has been produced (on the bulk alloy) by diverse deposition techniques (D.C. Sputtering, P.V.D. and Flame Spraying). Only a few samples have a Mo coating and also an absorber coating, that is a bulk material- Mo and a colloidal graphite coating. All these sintered alloys have been tested by laser technology; so that, many laser working parameters (covering gas, work-speed, focussed and defocussed spot, rastered and integrated beam spots, square and rectangular beam shapes and so on) have been experimented for two different processes at constant laser power and at constant surface temperature (by using a temperature surface sensor and a closed controlled link). For all experiments a transverse fast axial flow CO2 2.5 kW c.w. laser source has been employed.

  16. Alloying of aluminum-beryllium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molchanova, L. V.; Ilyushin, V. N.

    2013-01-01

    The existing phase diagrams of Al-Be- X alloys, where X is an alloying element, are analyzed. Element X is noted to poorly dissolve in both aluminum and beryllium. It is shown that the absence of intermetallic compounds in the Al-Be system affects the phase equilibria in an Al-Be- X system. Possible phase equilibria involving phases based on aluminum, beryllium, and intermetallic compounds are proposed, and the types of strengthening of Al-Be alloys by an addition of a third element are classified.

  17. Calculations and First Results Obtained with a SiC Prototype of the SPES Direct Target

    SciTech Connect

    Barbui, Marina; Andrighetto, Alberto; Antonucci, C.; Biasetto, Lisa; Carturan, S.; Cervellera, F.; Cevolani, S.; Cinausero, Marco; Colombo, P.; Dainelli, A.; Di Bernardo, P.; Giacchini, Mauro; Gramegna, Fabiana; Lollo, M.; Maggioni, G.; Manzolaro, Mattia; Meneghetti, G.; Petrovich, C.; Piga, L.; Prete, Gianfranco; Re, Maurizio; Rizzi, Valentina; Stracener, Daniel W; Tonezzer, Michele; Zafiropoulos, D.; Zanonato, P.

    2008-01-01

    In the framework of the SPES project at LNL [A. Bracco, A. Pisent (Ed.), REP 181/02, LNL-INFN, 2002], the realization of a direct ISOL Target for a mid-term radioactive ion beam facility is in progress. Using a primary proton beam of energy 40 MeV and intensity 0.2 mA, a high number of fission products will be obtained in the SPES multi-foil uranium carbide target, keeping a low power density deposition in the refractory matrix [A. Andrighetto, S. Cevolani, C. Petrovich, Eur. Phys J. A 25 (2005) 41]. The exotic species produced by Uranium fission in the target are collected in the ion source after the diffusion and the effusion processes. When short lived isotopes are produced it is very important to optimize the release properties of the target. To this purpose the RIBO code (radioactive ion beam optimiser) [M. Santana Leitner, A Monte Carlo Code to Optimize the Production of Radioactive Ion Beams by the ISOL Technique, PhD. Thesis, UPC-ETSEIB/CERN] has been used in order to estimate the target release efficiency for some neutron-rich nuclei. A SiC prototype of the target was recently produced at LNL and tested at ORNL using a 42 MeV proton beam. The yield of some aluminum isotopes was measured as a function of the target temperature. Some preliminary results of the data analysis will be presented.

  18. Effects of Te on intergranular embrittlement of a Ni-16Mo-7Cr alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hongwei; Han, Fenfen; Jia, Yanyan; Li, Zhijun; Zhou, Xingtai

    2015-06-01

    Te was deposited on the surface of a Ni-16Mo-7Cr alloy by thermal evaporation at 700 °C, and the effect of Te on the intergranular cracking behavior and the tensile properties of the alloy was investigated. The results show that the reaction products formed on the surface of the alloy, the diffusion depth of Te in the alloy, and the yield strength of the alloy attacked by Te at room temperature are not changed remarkably with Te content increasing, whereas the ultimate tensile strength and elongation of the alloy is decreased distinctly. The primary surface reaction product are mainly composed of Ni3Te2, CrTe, and MoTe2, and the diffusion depth of Te in the alloys is about 50 μm. The intergranular embrittlement mechanism of the alloy induced by Te of is also discussed in this paper.

  19. Shape memory alloys: New materials for future engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornbogen, E.

    1988-01-01

    Shape memory is a new material property. An alloy which experiences relative severe plastic deformation resumes its original shape again after heating by 10 to 100 C. Besides simple shape memory, in similar alloys there is the second effect where the change in shape is caused exclusively by little temperature change. In pseudo-elasticity, the alloy exhibits a rubber-like behavior, i.e., large, reversible deformation at little change in tension. Beta Cu and beta NiTi alloys have been used in practice. The probability is that soon alloys based on Fe will become available. Recently increasing applications for this alloy were found in various areas of technology, even medical technology. A review with 24 references is given, including properties, production, applications and fundamental principles of the shape memory effect.

  20. Development of radiation detectors based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon and its alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Wan-Shick

    1995-04-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon and related materials have been applied to radiation detectors, utilizing their good radiation resistance and the feasibility of making deposits over a large area at low cost. Effects of deposition parameters on various material properties of a-Si:H have been studied to produce a material satisfying the requirements for specific detection application. Thick(-{approximately}50 {mu}m), device quality a-Si:H p-i-n diodes for direct detection of minimum ionizing particles have been prepared with low internal stress by a combination of low temperature growth, He-dilution of silane, and post annealing. The structure of the new film contained voids and tiny crystalline inclusions and was different from the one observed in conventional a-Si:H. Deposition on patterned substrates was attempted as an alternative to controlling deposition parameters to minimize substrate bending and delamination of thick a-Si:H films. Growth on an inversed-pyramid pattern reduced the substrate bending by a factor of 3{approximately}4 for the same thickness film. Thin (0.1 {approximately} 0.2 {mu}m) films of a-Si:H and a-SiC:H have been applied to microstrip gas chambers to control gain instabilities due to charges on the substrate. Light sensitivity of the a-Si:H sheet resistance was minimized and the surface resistivity was successfully` controlled in the range of 10{sup 12} {approximately} 10{sup 17} {Omega}/{four_gradient} by carbon alloying and boron doping. Performance of the detectors with boron-doped a-Si:C:H layers was comparable to that of electronic-conducting glass. Hydrogen dilution of silane has been explored to improve electrical transport properties of a-Si:H material for high speed photo-detectors and TFT applications.

  1. Iron and alloys of iron. [lunar resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastri, Sankar

    1992-01-01

    All lunar soil contains iron in the metallic form, mostly as an iron-nickel alloy in concentrations of a few tenths of 1 percent. Some of this free iron can be easily separated by magnetic means. It is estimated that the magnetic separation of 100,000 tons of lunar soil would yield 150-200 tons of iron. Agglutinates contain metallic iron which could be extracted by melting and made into powder metallurgy products. The characteristics and potential uses of the pure-iron and iron-alloy lunar products are discussed. Processes for working iron that might be used in a nonterrestrial facility are also addressed.

  2. Parameter variation of the one-diode model of a-Si and a- Si/μc-Si solar cells for modeling light-induced degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weicht, J. A.; Hamelmann, F. U.; Behrens, G.

    2014-11-01

    For analyzing the long-term behavior of thin film a-Si/μc-Si photovoltaic modules, it is important to observe the light-induced degradation (LID) in dependence of the temperature for the parameters of the one-diode model for solar cells. According to the IEC 61646 standard, the impact of LID on module parameters of these thin film cells is determined at a constant temperature of 50°C with an irradiation of 1000 W/m2 at open circuit conditions. Previous papers examined the LID of thin film a-Si cells with different temperatures and some others are about a-Si/μc-Si. In these previous papers not all parameters of the one-diode model are examined. We observed the serial resistance (Rs), parallel resistance (Rp), short circuit current (Isc), open circuit voltage (Uoc), the maximum power point (MPP: Umpp, Impp and Pmpp) and the diode factor (n). Since the main reason for the LID of silicon-based thin films is the Staebler Wronski effect in the a-Si part of the cell, the temperature dependence of the healing of defects for all parameters of the one-diode model is also taken into account. We are also measuring modules with different kind of transparent conductive oxides: In a-Si thin film solar cells fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) is used and for thin film solar cells of a-Si/μc-Si boron- doped zinc oxide is used. In our work we describe an approach for transferring the parameters of a one-diode model for tandem thin film solar cells into the one-diode model for each part of the solar cell. The measurement of degradation and regeneration at higher temperatures is the necessary base for optimization of the different silicon-based thin films in warm hot climate.

  3. Amorphous metal alloy

    DOEpatents

    Wang, R.; Merz, M.D.

    1980-04-09

    Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

  4. PLUTONIUM-ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Schonfeld, F.W.; Waber, J.T.

    1960-08-30

    A series of nuclear reactor fuel alloys consisting of from about 5 to about 50 at.% zirconium (or higher zirconium alloys such as Zircaloy), balance plutonium, and having the structural composition of a plutonium are described. Zirconium is a satisfactory diluent because it alloys readily with plutonium and has desirable nuclear properties. Additional advantages are corrosion resistance, excellent fabrication propenties, an isotropie structure, and initial softness.

  5. Reference Alloy Waste Form Fabrication and Initiation of Reducing Atmosphere and Reductive Additives Study on Alloy Waste Form Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    S.M. Frank; T.P. O'Holleran; P.A. Hahn

    2011-09-01

    This report describes the fabrication of two reference alloy waste forms, RAW-1(Re) and RAW-(Tc) using an optimized loading and heating method. The composition of the alloy materials was based on a generalized formulation to process various proposed feed streams resulting from the processing of used fuel. Waste elements are introduced into molten steel during alloy fabrication and, upon solidification, become incorporated into durable iron-based intermetallic phases of the alloy waste form. The first alloy ingot contained surrogate (non-radioactive), transition-metal fission products with rhenium acting as a surrogate for technetium. The second alloy ingot contained the same components as the first ingot, but included radioactive Tc-99 instead of rhenium. Understanding technetium behavior in the waste form is of particular importance due the longevity of Tc-99 and its mobility in the biosphere in the oxide form. RAW-1(Re) and RAW-1(Tc) are currently being used as test specimens in the comprehensive testing program investigating the corrosion and radionuclide release mechanisms of the representative alloy waste form. Also described in this report is the experimental plan to study the effects of reducing atmospheres and reducing additives to the alloy material during fabrication in an attempt to maximize the oxide content of waste streams that can be accommodated in the alloy waste form. Activities described in the experimental plan will be performed in FY12. The first aspect of the experimental plan is to study oxide formation on the alloy by introducing O2 impurities in the melt cover gas or from added oxide impurities in the feed materials. Reducing atmospheres will then be introduced to the melt cover gas in an attempt to minimize oxide formation during alloy fabrication. The second phase of the experimental plan is to investigate melting parameters associated with alloy fabrication to allow the separation of slag and alloy components of the melt.

  6. Method for Production of Powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoltzfus, Joel M. (Inventor); Sircar, Subhasish (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Apparatus and method are disclosed for producing oxides of metals and of metal alloys. The metal or alloy is placed in an oxygen atmosphere in a combustion chamber and ignited. Products of the combustion include one or more oxides of the metal or alloy in powdered form. In one embodiment of the invention a feeder is provided whereby material to be oxidized by combustion can be achieved into a combustion chamber continuously. A product remover receives the powder product of the combustion.

  7. NICKEL-BASE ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Inouye, H.; Manly, W.D.; Roche, T.K.

    1960-01-19

    A nickel-base alloy was developed which is particularly useful for the containment of molten fluoride salts in reactors. The alloy is resistant to both salt corrosion and oxidation and may be used at temperatures as high as 1800 deg F. Basically, the alloy consists of 15 to 22 wt.% molybdenum, a small amount of carbon, and 6 to 8 wt.% chromium, the balance being nickel. Up to 4 wt.% of tungsten, tantalum, vanadium, or niobium may be added to strengthen the alloy.

  8. [Copper and copper alloys. Technology updates].

    PubMed

    Loconsolo, V; Crespi, M

    2012-01-01

    The correlations between copper and copper alloys and human health have been the subject of some recent and extensive scientific researches. The voluntary risks evaluation, which anticipated the EU REACH Directive application, has shown that copper is a "safe" product for human health and for environment. In addition, it could be of great help thanks to its antibacterial properties. Copper tube can contribute in a relevant way to the prevention of water systems pollution by Legionella. Also the spreading of nosocomial infections is significantly contrasted by the use of copper and copper alloys for the production of articles intended for being frequently touched by people. The Environmental Protection Agency of the United States has in fact "registered" as antibacterial over 350 of copper alloys. PMID:23213799

  9. The fabrication of rapidly solidified high temperature aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, P. S.; Rateick, R. G.; Testa, A.

    The application of rapid solidification/powder metallurgy processing to metallic materials has led to a series of rapidly solidified aluminum-iron-vanadium-silicon alloys which combine a balanced set of elevated temperature strengths and ambient temperature properties critical for aerospace use. The rapidly solidified Al-Fe-V-Si alloys are finding widespread interest throughout the aerospace community. However, to be fully utilized the high temperature Al-Fe-V-Si alloys must be amendable to traditional metalworking, machining and finishing operations. Powder metallurgy derived high performance alloys at times have proven difficult to fabricate. Recent progress in the fabrication of the high temperature Al-Fe-V-Si alloys into desirable product forms will be discussed, for example the production of thin foils and spun metal components. The effects of various fabrication sequences on material properties will be described.

  10. Electron cyclotron resonance deposition of amorphous silicon alloy films and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Shing, Y.H. )

    1992-10-01

    This report describes work to develop a state-of-the-art electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system. The objective was to understand the deposition processes of amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and related alloys, with a best-effort improvement of optoelectronic material properties and best-effort stabilization of solar cell performance. ECR growth parameters were systematically and extensively investigated; materials characterization included constant photocurrent measurement (CPM), junction capacitance, drive-level capacitance profiling (DLCP), optical transmission, light and dark photoconductivity, and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Conventional ECR-deposited a-Si:H was compared to a new form, a-Si:(Xe, H), in which xenon gas was added to the ECR plasma. a-Si:(Xe,H) possessed low, stable dark conductivities and high photosensitivites. Light-soaking revealed photodegradation rates about 35% lower than those of comparable radio frequency (rf)-deposited material. ECR-deposited p-type a SiC:H and intrinsic a-Si:H films underwent evaluation as components of p-i-n solar cells with standard rf films for the remaining layers.

  11. Degradation behavior of oxygen-contaminated a-Si:H solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusian, W.; Günzel, E.; Krühler, W.; Pfleiderer, H.; Plätttner, R.; Bullemer, B.

    1987-06-01

    The degradation behavior of pin solar cells from hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) having uncontaminated i-layers and that of solar cells in whih the i-layer is intentionally contaminated with oxygen or water vapour, was studied using a voltage-biased spectral response measurement method. The light-soaked solar cells are characterized by a reduction of the transition voltage UT which separates the primary and the secondary photocurrent, by an enhancement of the secondary photocurrent, by a reduction of the μτ products of the charge carriers and by a kink of the collection efficiency curve in the blue part of the spectrum. A contamination of the i-layer with impurities like O and H2O amplifies this degradation behavior of the cells. The kink is removable by a bias light as well as by a reverse bias voltage. The shape of the measured collection efficiency curves ar explained in detail by the electric field distribution in the i-layer.

  12. Development and characterization of Powder Metallurgy (PM) 2XXX series Al alloy products and Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) 2XXX Al/SiC materials for high temperature aircraft structural applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chellman, D. J.; Gurganus, T. B.; Walker, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    The results of a series of material studies performed by the Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Company over the time period from 1980 to 1991 are discussed. The technical objective of these evaluations was to develop and characterize advanced aluminum alloy materials with temperature capabilities extending to 350 F. An overview is given of the first five alloy development efforts under this contract. Prior work conducted during the first five modifications of the alloy development program are listed. Recent developments based on the addition of high Zr levels to an optimum Al-Cu-Mg alloy composition by powder metallurgy processing are discussed. Both reinforced and SiC or B4C ceramic reinforced alloys were explored to achieve specific target goals for high temperature aluminum alloy applications.

  13. a-Si:H Grown by Hot-Wire CVD at Ultra-High Deposition Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.; Nelson, B. P.; Mahan, A. H.; Williamson, D. L.; Crandall, R. S.; Iwaniczko, E.; Wang, Q.

    2000-01-01

    We increase the deposition rate of growing hydrogenated amorphous-silicon (a-Si:H) by the hot-wire chemical vapor depositon (HWCVD) technique by adding filaments (two) and decreasing the filament(s) to substrate distance.

  14. Structural properties of a-Si films and their effect on aluminum induced crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Tankut, Aydin; Ozkol, Engin; Karaman, Mehmet; Turan, Rasit; Canli, Sedat

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, we report the influence of the structural properties of amorphous silicon (a-Si) on its subsequent crystallization behavior via the aluminum induced crystallization (AIC) method. Two distinct a-Si deposition techniques, electron beam evaporation and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), are compared for their effect on the overall AIC kinetics as well as the properties of the final poly-crystalline (poly-Si) silicon film. Raman and FTIR spectroscopy results indicate that the PECVD grown a-Si films has higher intermediate-range order, which is enhanced for increased hydrogen dilution during deposition. With increasing intermediate-range order of the a-Si, the rate of AIC is diminished, leading larger poly-Si grain size.

  15. Switching characteristic and capacitance analysis of a-Si:H pinpin photodiodes for visible range telecommunications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantoni, A.; Fernandes, M.; Louro, P.; Vieira, M.

    2016-05-01

    The device under study is an a-SiC:H/a-Si:H pinpin photodiodes produced by PECVD (Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition) and has a structure that consists of a p-i'(a-SiC:H)-n/p-i(a-Si:H)-n heterostructure with low conductivity doped layers. This device structure has been demonstrated useful in optical communications that use the WDM technique to encode multiple signals in the visible light range. We present in this work experimental results about C-V measurements of the device under complex conditions of illumination. Also it is presented an analysis based on the transient response of the device when illuminated by a pulsed light, with and without optical bias superposition. Rising and decaying times of the collected photocurrent will be outlined under the different conditions. A simulation study outlines the role played by each pin substructure on the response speed and gives some hint on the possible optimization of this device.

  16. Optical emission diagnostics of electron cyclotron resonance and glow discharge plasmas for a-Si:H and a-SiC:H film depositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, C. L.; Shing, Y. H.; Allevato, C. E.

    1988-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the steady-state and kinetic characteristics of ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) and RF glow discharge plasmas can be readily monitored by OES (optical emission spectroscopy) in real time during a-Si:H and a-SiC:H film depositions using an OMA detection system. The ECR and RF glow discharge plasmas used for a-Si:H and a-SiC:H film depositions were studied by monitoring the emission of SiH(asterisk), H(asterisk), H(asterisk)2, and CH(asterisk) excited states. The OES of the ECR plasma shows a strong emission at 434 nm from H(asterisk), which is not detectable in the glow discharge plasma. Steady-state OES studies have established preliminary correlations between SiH(asterisk) and CH(asterisk) emission intensities and the film deposition rate. Transient OES spectra of SiH4 and CH4 plasmas have shown different kinetics in SiH(asterisk) and CH(asterisk) emission intensities. Transient studies of the SiH(asterisk) emission intensity have indicated that additional mechanisms for producing the SiH(asterisk) species become evident in hydrogen-diluted silane plasmas.

  17. Hydrogen kinetics in a-Si:H and a-SiC:H thin films investigated by real-time ERD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halindintwali, S.; Khoele, J.; Nemroaui, O.; Comrie, C. M.; Theron, C. C.

    2015-04-01

    Hydrogen effusion from hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and amorphous silicon carbide (a-Si1-xCx:H) thin films during a temperature ramp between RT and 600 °C was studied by in situ real-time elastic recoil detection analysis. Point to point contour maps show the hydrogen depth profile and its evolution with the ramped temperature. This paper proposes a diffusion limited evolution model to study H kinetic properties from total retained H contents recorded in a single ramp. In a compact a-Si:H layer where H predominantly effuses at high temperatures between 500 and 600 °C, an activation energy value of ∼1.50 eV and a diffusion pre-factor of 0.41 × 10-4 cm2/s were obtained. Applied to an non-stoichiometric a-Si1-xCx:H film in the same range of temperature, the model led to reduced values of activation energy and diffusion prefactor of ∼0.33 eV and 0.59 × 10-11 cm2/s, respectively.

  18. Silicon germanium semiconductive alloy and method of fabricating same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A silicon germanium (SiGe) semiconductive alloy is grown on a substrate of single crystalline Al.sub.2O.sub.3. A {111} crystal plane of a cubic diamond structure SiGe is grown on the substrate's {0001} C-plane such that a <110> orientation of the cubic diamond structure SiGe is aligned with a <1,0,-1,0> orientation of the {0001} C-plane. A lattice match between the substrate and the SiGe is achieved by using a SiGe composition that is 0.7223 atomic percent silicon and 0.2777 atomic percent germanium.

  19. Photocapacitance and hole drift mobility measurements in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H)

    SciTech Connect

    Nurdjaja, I.; Schiff, E.A.

    1997-07-01

    The authors present measurements of the photocapacitance in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) Schottky barrier diodes under reverse bias. A calculation relating photocapacitance to hole drift mobility measurements is also presented; the calculation incorporates the prominent dispersion effect for holes in a-Si:H usually attributed to valence bandtail trapping. The calculation accounts quantitatively for the magnitude and voltage-dependence of the photocapacitance.

  20. The entrapment of corrosion products from CoCr implant alloys in the deposits of calcium phosphate: a comparison of serum, synovial fluid, albumin, EDTA, and water.

    PubMed

    Lewis, A C; Kilburn, M R; Heard, P J; Scott, T B; Hallam, K R; Allen, G C; Learmonth, I D

    2006-08-01

    Physical wear of orthopedic implants is inevitable. CoCr alloy samples, typically used in joint reconstruction, corrode rapidly after removal of the protective oxide layer. The behavior of CoCr pellets immersed in human serum, foetal bovine serum (FBS), synovial fluid, albumin in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), EDTA in PBS, and water were studied using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS). The difference in the corrosive nature of human serum, water, albumin in PBS and synovial fluid after 5 days of immersion was highlighted by the oxide layer, which was respectively 15, 3.5, 1.5, and 1.5 nm thick. The thickness of an additional calcium phosphate deposit from human serum and synovial fluid was 40 and 2 nm, respectively. Co and Cr ions migrated from the bulk metal surface and were trapped in this deposit by the phosphate anion. This may account for the composition of wear debris from CoCr orthopedic implants, which is known to consist predominantly of hydroxy-phosphate compounds. Known components of synovial fluid including proteoglycans, pyrophosphates, phospholipids, lubricin, and superficial zone protein (SZP), have been identified as possible causes for the lack of significant calcium phosphate deposition in this environment. Circulation of these compounds around the whole implant may inhibit calcium phosphate deposition.

  1. Coal-ash Corrosion of Alloys for Combustion Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Purohit, A.; Rink, D.L.

    2003-04-22

    A program on coal-ash corrosion is being conducted at Argonne National Laboratory to evaluate the performance of several structural alloys in the presence of mixtures of synthetic coal ash, alkali sulfates, and alkali chlorides. Candidate alloys are also exposed in a small-scale coal-fired combustor at the National Energy Technology Laboratory in Pittsburgh. Experiments in the present program, which addresses the effects of deposit chemistry, temperature, and alloy chemistry on the corrosion response of alloys, were conducted at temperatures in the range of 575-800 C for time periods up to {approx}1850 h. Fe-base alloys selected for the study included HR3C, 310TaN, HR120, SAVE 25, NF709, modified 800, 347HFG, and HCM12A. In addition, 800H clad with Alloy 671 was included in several of the exposures. Ni-base alloys selected for the study included 600, 601, 617, 690, 625, 602CA, 214, 230, 45TM, HR 160, and 693. Data were obtained on weight change, scale thickness, internal penetration, microstructural characteristics of corrosion products, mechanical integrity of the scales, and cracking of scales. Results showed that the relationship of corrosion rates to temperature followed a bell-shaped curve for Fe-base alloys, with peak rates at {approx}725 C, but the rate itself was dependent on the alloy chemistry. Several Fe-base alloys showed acceptable rates in the sulfate-containing coal-ash environment; but NaCl in the deposit led to catastrophic corrosion at 650 and 800 C. Ni-base alloys generally exhibited less corrosion than the Fe-base alloys under similar exposure conditions; however, they were susceptible to localized corrosion in the form of pits.

  2. High-temperature alloys: Single-crystal performance boost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütze, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Titanium aluminide alloys are lightweight and have attractive properties for high-temperature applications. A new growth method that enables single-crystal production now boosts their mechanical performance.

  3. Copper-tantalum alloy

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.

    1986-07-15

    A tantalum-copper alloy can be made by preparing a consumable electrode consisting of an elongated copper billet containing at least two spaced apart tantalum rods extending longitudinally the length of the billet. The electrode is placed in a dc arc furnace and melted under conditions which co-melt the copper and tantalum to form the alloy.

  4. Cesium iodide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Kim, H.E.; Moorhead, A.J.

    1992-12-15

    A transparent, strong CsI alloy is described having additions of monovalent iodides. Although the preferred iodide is AgI, RbI and CuI additions also contribute to an improved polycrystalline CsI alloy with outstanding multispectral infrared transmittance properties. 6 figs.

  5. Ductile transplutonium metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Conner, William V.

    1983-01-01

    Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as sources of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

  6. Nickel base coating alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A. (Inventor); Lowell, C. E. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    Zirconium is added to a Ni-30 Al (beta) intermetallic alloy in the range of 0.05 w/o to 0.25 w/o. This addition is made during melting or by using metal powders. The addition of zirconium improves the cyclic oxidation resistance of the alloys at temperatures above 1100 C.

  7. PLUTONIUM-CERIUM ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1959-01-01

    An alloy is presented for use as a reactor fuel. The binary alloy consists essentially of from about 5 to 90 atomic per cent cerium and the balance being plutonium. A complete phase diagram for the cerium--plutonium system is given.

  8. Neutron Absorbing Alloys

    DOEpatents

    Mizia, Ronald E.; Shaber, Eric L.; DuPont, John N.; Robino, Charles V.; Williams, David B.

    2004-05-04

    The present invention is drawn to new classes of advanced neutron absorbing structural materials for use in spent nuclear fuel applications requiring structural strength, weldability, and long term corrosion resistance. Particularly, an austenitic stainless steel alloy containing gadolinium and less than 5% of a ferrite content is disclosed. Additionally, a nickel-based alloy containing gadolinium and greater than 50% nickel is also disclosed.

  9. Aluminum battery alloys

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, D.S.; Scott, D.H.

    1984-09-28

    Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cells are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

  10. Aluminum battery alloys

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, David S.; Scott, Darwin H.

    1985-01-01

    Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cs are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

  11. Ductile transplutonium metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Conner, W.V.

    1981-10-09

    Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as souces of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

  12. EBIC study of electron generation function in a-Si:H.

    PubMed

    Najar, S; Equer, B

    1994-08-15

    The electron beam induced current technique was used to study electron energy loss in amorphous hydrogenated silicon a-Si:H. This study leads to the determination of the electron generation function which is needed when using the variable energy electron beam induced current technique (EBIC) analysis of a-Si:H device. A series of identical n-i-p a-Si:H diodes with a thin aluminium top electrodes were fabricated and varying thicknesses of a-Si:H layer were deposited on it. In EBIC measurements, the n-i-p diode was reverse biased at maximum potential. The electron range of a-Si:H was determined directly by measuring the energy at which the electron beam is completely stopped in the top layer and no carrier generation is possible in the n-i-p diode. The generation function is then deduced from EBIC contrast measurements between the aluminium electrode and the top a-Si:H layer.

  13. Cluster control plasma CVD for fabrication of stable a-Si:H solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiratani, Masaharu; Hashimoto, Yuuji; Kanemitsu, Yoshinori; Seo, Hyunwoong; Kamataki, Kunihiro; Uchida, Giichiro; Itagaki, Naho; Koga, Kazunori

    2013-09-01

    Light-induced degradation of a-Si:H is the key issue for a-Si:H solar cells, because light exposure initially causes a significant reduction of the efficiency of the cells due to the degradation. In SiH4 discharges employed for a-Si:H deposition, there coexist three deposition precursors; SiH3 radicals, HOS radicals, and amorphous clusters (nanoparticles). SiH3 radicals are the main deposition precursors for ``good'' quality films, whereas clusters are the precursors to cause the light induced degradation. To suppress cluster incorporation into films, we employ, 1) magnetic field which modifies EEDF, 2) gas heating to suppress polymerization reactions in gas phase, 3) gas flow which drives clusters downstream, 4) thermophoretic force which supresses cluster deposition, and 5) a cluster eliminating filter. Our a-Si:H films deposited at 3 nm/s show a low stabilized defect density of 5 × 1015 cm-3 . To evaluate their quality as an I layer of PIN solar cells, we have measured Fill Factor (FF) of N-type c-Si/a-Si:H/Ni Schottky cells of such cluster-free a-Si:H films. Our cell shows high initial FF of 0.516, high stable FF of 0.514, and little light induced degradation ratio of 0.39%. Work supported by NEDO, PVTEC, and MEXT.

  14. Corrosion of low-antimony lead-cadmium alloys in conditions of long-term polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuzhny, Alex

    Nowadays, lead-acid battery grids are manufactured mostly from low-antimony and lead-calcium alloys. A variable corrosion resistance of battery grids is caused by either battery operation conditions, purity of used alloy components, an alloy makeup, and the castings quality. Such compositions as usual lead-antimony alloy, low-antimony lead-arsenious alloy and lead-calcium alloy with moderate content of tin today may be regarded as the most studied ones. A significant share of published works has been devoted to low-antimony lead-tin alloys. In the present article, results of corrosion tests of the samples made with application of cadmium as the second component of low-antimony alloy, has been represented. Several samples were extra-alloyed by selenium and silver. Samples of lead-calcium and usual antimony alloys as well as pure lead samples were being tested simultaneously. Upon termination of polarization, weight of anodic films referred to a unit of the sample surface has been determined. Thus, the film covering lead-antimony alloy sample has the maximal weight, whereas the oxidation products on the pure lead surface have the lowest one. Among low-antimony alloys, the highest corrosion resistance has been found out with the samples alloyed by a low amount of silver. The microstructure of the castings surface has been analysed. Process of corrosion has been considered in connection with size of grains.

  15. Ion Beam Analysis, structure and corrosion studies of nc-TiN/a-Si3N4 nanocomposite coatings deposited by sputtering on AISI 316L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, J.; Canto, C. E.; Flores, M.; Andrade, E.; Rodríguez, E.; Jiménez, O.; Solis, C.; de Lucio, O. G.; Rocha, M. F.

    2014-07-01

    In this work, nanocomposite coatings of nc-TiN/a-Si3N4, were deposited on AISI 316L stainless steel substrate by a DC and RF reactive magnetron co-sputtering technique using an A-N2 plasma. The structure of the coatings was characterized by means of XRD (X-ray Diffraction). The substrate and coating corrosion resistance were evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization using a Ringer solution as electrolyte. Corrosion tests were conducted with the purpose to evaluate the potential of this coating to be used on biomedical alloys. IBA (Ion Beam Analysis) techniques were applied to measure the elemental composition profiles of the films and, XPS (X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy) were used as a complementary technique to obtain information about the compounds present in the films. The nanocomposite coatings of nc-TiN/a-Si3N4 show crystalline (TiN) and amorphous (Si3N4) phases which confer a better protection against the corrosion effects compared with that of the AISI 316L.

  16. Ultrahigh temperature intermetallic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, M.P.; Zhu, J.H.; Liu, C.T.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Wright, J.L.; Carmichael, C.A.; Walker, L.R.

    1997-12-01

    A new family of Cr-Cr{sub 2}X based alloys with fabricability, mechanical properties, and oxidation resistance superior to previously developed Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb and Cr-Cr{sub 2}Zr based alloys has been identified. The new alloys can be arc-melted/cast without cracking, and exhibit excellent room temperature and high-temperature tensile strengths. Preliminary evaluation of oxidation behavior at 1100 C in air indicates that the new Cr-Cr{sub 2}X based alloys form an adherent chromia-based scale. Under similar conditions, Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb and Cr-Cr{sub 2}Zr based alloys suffer from extensive scale spallation.

  17. Iron/Phosphorus Alloys for Continuous Casting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufresne, E. R.

    1986-01-01

    Continuous casting becomes practicable because of reduced eutectic temperature. Experimental ferrous alloy has melting point about 350 degrees C lower than conventional steels, making possible to cast structural members and eliminating need for hot rolling. Product has normal metal structure and good physical properties. Process used to make rails, beams, slabs, channels, and pipes.

  18. Failure mechanism characterization of platinum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, J. M.; Mcfarlen, W. T.

    1986-01-01

    This article describes procedures and results of testing performed on a platinum/10-percent rhodium, thin-wall tubular product. The purpose of the testing was to develop exemplar SEM fractographs to be used to characterize failures under various environmental conditions. Conditions evaluated for the platinum alloys included high temperature, hydrogen environment, braze metal contamination, and cyclic loading.

  19. Ultraprecision microelectroforming of metals and metal alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loewe, Holger; Ehrfeld, Wolfgang; Diebel, Joerg

    1997-09-01

    In recent years, microsystem technology and its growing importance for actuators, sensors, optics and microfluidics, only to name a few, have gained a lot of attention. Specific applications demand fabrication techniques allowing a fast and reliable replication of microstructure products in a variety of materials. An important technique for replication processes of microstructures in many applications of microsystem technology are microelectroforming processes, generating a variety of metals and metal alloys with tailored characteristics. Here, new results in the development of alloys for specific applications as well as their applications are reported: (1) Newly developed alloys: Nickel-iron alloys enable the production of soft magnetic microstructures e.g. for specific applications in microactuators. Nickel-cobalt and Nickel-tungsten alloys have been employed for the manufacture of microstructured tools with excellent mechanical properties regarding wear and mechanical durability. These tools have been applied to hot-embossing and injection molding processes successfully. (2) Microelectroforming within the frame of the LIGA technique allows the manufacturing of extremely precise electrodes with various cross-sections and heights for (mu) - electro discharge machining. The combination of these techniques enables the production of microstructures from non- electrodepositable materials, like stainless steel e.g. for large scale replication processes. (3) The precision of microelectroforming enables the replication of structured surfaces on a nanoscale for molecular microelectronics or special applications. The new types of alloys reported here significantly enlarge the applicability of microelectroforming processes for tool fabrication or direct use. Moreover combining this process with other microstructuring processes like injection molding or (mu) -EDM techniques generates a powerful tool for microsystem technology.

  20. Comparison of Module Performance Characterization Methods for Energy Production

    SciTech Connect

    Kroposki, B.; Marion, W.; King, D.; Boyson, W.; Kratochvil, J.

    2000-12-04

    This report compares the two methods of determining the performance of PV modules. The methods translate module performance characterized in a laboratory to actual or reference conditions using slightly different approaches. The accuracy of both methods is compared for both hourly and daily energy production over a year of data recorded at NREL in Golden, CO. The comparison of the two methods will be presented for five different PV module technologies: multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si), dual-junction amorphous silicon (a-Si/a-Si:Ge), triple-junction amorphous silicon (a-Si/a-Si/a-Si:Ge), cadmium telluride (CdTe), and copper indium diselenide (CIGSS).

  1. Process for alloying uranium and niobium

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Northcutt, Jr., Walter G.; Masters, David R.; Chapman, Lloyd R.

    1991-01-01

    Alloys such as U-6Nb are prepared by forming a stacked sandwich array of uraniun sheets and niobium powder disposed in layers between the sheets, heating the array in a vacuum induction melting furnace to a temperature such as to melt the uranium, holding the resulting mixture at a temperature above the melting point of uranium until the niobium dissolves in the uranium, and casting the uranium-niobium solution. Compositional uniformity in the alloy product is enabled by use of the sandwich structure of uranium sheets and niobium powder.

  2. Study of hydrogen states in a-Si:H films, dehydrogenization treatments and influence of hydrogen on nanosecond pulse laser crystallization of a-Si:H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volodin, V. A.; Galkov, M. S.; Safronova, N. A.; Kamaev, G. N.; Antonenko, A. H.; Kochubey, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    Structures based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films deposited on various substrates (including not refractory ones) are widely applied in giant microelectronics devices, such as flat panel displays based on active matrix thin-film transistors and solar cells. The a-Si:H films produced by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) methods, contain up to 40% atoms of hydrogen. The influence of hydrogen on the optical and electrical properties of the films and their degradation is important. Therefore, the development of express and non-destructive methods for control of the hydrogen concentration in thin films continues to be an actual task to date. Previously, from a comparative analysis of infrared (IR) spectroscopy and Raman scattering spectroscopy, the ratios of the integral intensities of Raman peaks due to scattering by vibrations of the Si-H and Si-H2 bonds to the intensity of Raman peak of the Si-Si bonds were experimentally determined. Knowing these ratios, it is possible to measure the hydrogen concentration, moreover, separately in Si-H and Si-H2 states. Proposed quantitative method for determining of the hydrogen concentration from analysis of the Raman spectra is an express, non-destructive method and can be used for "in situ" monitoring of the hydrogen. The aim of this work was to determine the polarization dependence of Raman scattering by stretching vibrations of Si-H bonds and find the form of the corresponding Raman tensors. From analysis of Raman intensities in different polarizations the Raman tensors for Si-H and Si-H2 bonds were determined. The regimes for dehydrogenization of thick (up to 1 micron) a-Si:H films were found. The nanosecond pulse XeCl laser with wavelength of 308 nm and pulse duration of 10 ns was used for pulse crystallization of as-deposited and dehydrogenated films. As it was studied earlier, for a-Si:H films with high hydrogen concentration, the threshold for crystallization is very close to threshold of

  3. Impact Behavior of A356 Foundry Alloys in the Presence of Trace Elements Ni and V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casari, Daniele; Ludwig, Thomas H.; Merlin, Mattia; Arnberg, Lars; Garagnani, Gian Luca

    2015-02-01

    In the present work, the impact behavior of unmodified A356 alloys with the addition of Ni or V in as-cast and T6 heat-treated conditions was assessed. Charpy V-notched specimens obtained from sand and permanent mold casting showed low total absorbed energy average values ( W t < 2 J). SEM analysis of fracture profiles and surfaces indicated a Si-driven crack propagation with a predominant transgranular fracture mode. Occasionally, intergranular contributions to fracture were detected in the permanent mold cast alloys due to the locally finer microstructure. Concurrent mechanisms related to the chemical composition, solidification conditions and heat treatment were found to control the impact properties of the alloys. While the trace element Ni exerted only minor effects on the impact toughness of the A356 alloy, V had a strong influence: (i) V-containing sand cast alloys absorbed slightly higher impact energies compared to the corresponding A356 base alloys; (ii) in the permanent mold cast alloys, V in solid solution led to a considerable loss of ductility, which in turn decreased the total absorbed energy.

  4. Application of a-Si:H radiation detectors in medical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyoung-Koo

    1995-06-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of a proposed a-Si:H-based current-integrating gamma camera were performed. The analysis showed that the intrinsic resolution of such a camera was 1 {approximately} 2.5 mm, which is somewhat better than that of a conventional gamma camera, and that the greater blurring, due to the detection of scattered {gamma}-rays, could be reduced considerably by image restoration techniques. This proposed gamma camera would be useful for imaging shallow organs such as the thyroid. Prototype charge-storage a-Si:H pixel detectors for such a camera were designed, constructed and tested. The detectors could store signal charge as long as 5 min at {minus}26C. The thermal generation current in reverse biased a-Si:H p-i-n photodetectors was investigated, and the Poole-Frenkel effect was found to be the most significant source of the thermal generation current. Based on the Poole-Frenkel effect, voltage- and time-dependent thermal generation current was modeled. Using the model, the operating conditions of the proposed a-Si:H gamma camera, such as the operating temperature, the operating bias and the {gamma}-scan period, could be predicted. The transient photoconductive gain mechanism in various a-Si:H devices was investigated for applications in digital radiography. Using the a-Si:H photoconductors in n-i-n configuration in pixel arrays, enhancement in signal collection (more than 200 times higher signal level) can be achieved in digital radiography, compared to the ordinary p-i-n type a-Si:H x-ray imaging arrays.

  5. Bimetallic non-alloyed NPs for improving the broadband optical absorption of thin amorphous silicon substrates

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We propose the use of bimetallic non-alloyed nanoparticles (BNNPs) to improve the broadband optical absorption of thin amorphous silicon substrates. Isolated bimetallic NPs with uniform size distribution on glass and silicon are obtained by depositing a 10-nm Au film and annealing it at 600°C; this is followed by an 8-nm Ag film annealed at 400°C. We experimentally demonstrate that the deposition of gold (Au)-silver (Ag) bimetallic non-alloyed NPs (BNNPs) on a thin amorphous silicon (a-Si) film increases the film's average absorption and forward scattering over a broad spectrum, thus significantly reducing its total reflection performance. Experimental results show that Au-Ag BNNPs fabricated on a glass substrate exhibit resonant peaks at 437 and 540 nm and a 14-fold increase in average forward scattering over the wavelength range of 300 to 1,100 nm in comparison with bare glass. When deposited on a 100-nm-thin a-Si film, Au-Ag BNNPs increase the average absorption and forward scattering by 19.6% and 95.9% compared to those values for Au NPs on thin a-Si and plain a-Si without MNPs, respectively, over the 300- to 1,100-nm range. PMID:24725390

  6. THORIUM-SILICON-BERYLLIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Foote, F.G.

    1959-02-10

    Th, Si, anol Bt alloys where Be and Si are each present in anmounts between 0.1 and 3.5% by weight and the total weight per cent of the minor alloying elements is between 1.5 and 4.5% are discussed. These ternary alloys show increased hardness and greater resistant to aqueous corrosion than is found in pure Th, Th-Si alloys, or Th-Be alloys.

  7. Bulk glassy and nonequilibrium crystalline alloys by stabilization of supercooled liquid: fabrication, functional properties and applications (Part 2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, A.

    The novel stabilization phenomenon of supercooled liquid in special multi-component metallic alloys that follow the three component rules has enabled us to fabricate a number of bulk glassy and nonequilibrium crystalline alloys exhibiting useful characteristics. Following the previous review (Part 1; Proc. Jpn. Acad. Ser. B 81, 156-171), this paper (Part 2) reviews our recent results on the physical, chemical, mechanical and magnetic properties of the resulting bulk nonequilibrium materials including glassy single phase alloys, nanocrystal-, nanoquasicrystal- and dendritic crystal-dispersed glassy alloys and nanocrystalline alloys. Finally, the application potential of bulk glassy alloys is addressed, taking account of their novel engineering properties and production processes.

  8. Corrosion protection of aerospace grade magnesium alloy Elektron 43(TM) for use in aircraft cabin interiors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baillio, Sarah S.

    Magnesium alloys exhibit desirable properties for use in transportation technology. In particular, the low density and high specific strength of these alloys is of interest to the aerospace community. However, the concerns of flammability and susceptibility to corrosion have limited the use of magnesium alloys within the aircraft cabin. This work studies a magnesium alloy containing rare earth elements designed to increase resistance to ignition while lowering rate of corrosion. The microstructure of the alloy was documented using scanning electron microscopy. Specimens underwent salt spray testing and the corrosion products were examined using energy dispersive spectroscopy.

  9. Magnesium silicide intermetallic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gh.; Gill, H. S.; Varin, R. A.

    1993-11-01

    Methods of induction melting an ultra-low-density magnesium silicide (Mg2Si) intermetallic and its alloys and the resulting microstructure and microhardness were studied. The highest quality ingots of Mg2Si alloys were obtained by triple melting in a graphite crucible coated with boron nitride to eliminate reactivity, under overpressure of high-purity argon (1.3 X 105 Pa), at a temperature close to but not exceeding 1105 °C ± 5 °C to avoid excessive evaporation of Mg. After establishing the proper induction-melting conditions, the Mg-Si binary alloys and several Mg2Si alloys macroalloyed with 1 at. pct of Al, Ni, Co, Cu, Ag, Zn, Mn, Cr, and Fe were induction melted and, after solidification, investigated by optical microscopy and quantitative X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Both the Mg-rich and Si-rich eutectic in the binary alloys exhibited a small but systematic increase in the Si content as the overall composition of the binary alloy moved closer toward the Mg2Si line compound. The Vickers microhardness (VHN) of the as-solidified Mg-rich and Si-rich eutectics in the Mg-Si binary alloys decreased with increasing Mg (decreasing Si) content in the eutectic. This behavior persisted even after annealing for 75 hours at 0.89 pct of the respective eutectic temperature. The Mg-rich eutectic in the Mg2Si + Al, Ni, Co, Cu, Ag, and Zn alloys contained sections exhibiting a different optical contrast and chemical composition than the rest of the eutectic. Some particles dispersed in the Mg2Si matrix were found in the Mg2Si + Cr, Mn, and Fe alloys. The EDS results are presented and discussed and compared with the VHN data.

  10. Subtask 12D2: Baseline impact properties of vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Loomis, B.A.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-03-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the baseline impact properties of vanadium-base alloys as a function of compositional variables. Up-to-date results on impact properties of unirradiated V, V-Ti, V-Cr-Ti and V-Ti-Si alloys are presented and reviewed in this paper, with an emphasis on the most promising class of alloys, i.e., V-(4-5)Cr-(3-5)Ti containing 400-1000 wppm Si. Database on impact energy and ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) has been established from Charpy impact tests on small laboratory as well as production-scale heats. DBTT is influenced most significantly by Cr contents and, to a lesser extent, by Ti contents of the alloys. When combined contents of Cr and Ti were {le}10 wt.%, V-Cr-Ti alloys exhibit excellent impact properties, i.e., DBTT<-200{degrees}C and upper shelf energies of {approx}120-140 J/cm{sup 2}. Impact properties of the production-scale heat of the U.S. reference alloy V-4Cr- 4Ti were as good as those of the laboratory-scale heats. Optimal impact properties of the reference alloy were obtained after annealing the as-rolled products at 1000{degrees}C-1050{degrees}C for 1-2 h in high-quality vacuum. 17 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. The Mg impurity in nitride alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zvanut, M. E.; Willoughby, W. R.; Sunay, U. R.; Koleske, D. D.; Allerman, A. A.; Wang, Ke; Araki, Tsutomu; Nanishi, Yasushi

    2014-02-21

    Although several magnetic resonance studies address the Mg acceptor in GaN, there are few reports on Mg doping in the alloys, where hole production depends strongly on the Al or In content. Our electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements of the p-type alloys suggest that the Mg impurity retains the axial symmetry, characteristic of a p-type dopant in both alloys; however, In and Al produce additional, different characteristics of the acceptor. In InGaN, the behavior is consistent with a lowering of the acceptor level and increasing hole density as In concentration increases. For AlGaN, the amount of neutral Mg decreases with increasing Al content, which is attributed to different kinetics of hydrogen diffusion thought to occur in samples with higher Al mole fraction.

  12. Milling and Drilling Evaluation of Stainless Steel Powder Metallurgy Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, L.J.

    2001-12-10

    Near-net-shape components can be made with powder metallurgy (PM) processes. Only secondary operations such as milling and drilling are required to complete these components. In the past and currently production components are made from powder metallurgy (PM) stainless steel alloys. process engineers are unfamiliar with the difference in machining properties of wrought versus PM alloys and have had to make parts to develop the machining parameters. Design engineers are not generally aware that some PM alloy variations can be furnished with machining additives that greatly increase tool life. Specimens from a MANTEC PM alloy property study were made available. This study was undertaken to determine the machining properties of a number of stainless steel wrought and PM alloys under the same conditions so that comparisons of their machining properties could be made and relative tool life determined.

  13. Alloy development for irradiation performance in fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harling, O. K.; Grant, N. J.

    1980-12-01

    The development of improved structural alloys for the fusion reactor first wall application is addressed. Several new alloys were produced by rapid solidification. Emphasis in alloy design and production was placed on producing austenitic Type 316SS with fine dispersions of TiC and Al2O3 particles. Results of mechanical and microstructural tests are presented. A number of neutron irradiations were initiated on samples fabricated from alloys produced. A dual beam, heavy ion, and helium ion, irradiation was completed using several alloys and a range of temperatures, damage rates, and total doses. Modeling of irradiation phenomena was continued with emphasis on understanding the effect of recoil resolution on relatively stable second phase particles. The microstructure of several ZrB2 doped stainless steels was characterized.

  14. Refractory alloy technology for space nuclear power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, R.H. Jr.; Hoffman, E.E.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose of this symposium is twofold: (1) to review and document the status of refractory alloy technology for structural and fuel-cladding applications in space nuclear power systems, and (2) to identify and document the refractory alloy research and development needs for the SP-100 Program in both the short and the long term. In this symposium, an effort was made to recapture the space reactor refractory alloy technology that was cut off in midstream around 1973 when the national space nuclear reactor program began in the early 1960s, was terminated. The six technical areas covered in the program are compatibility, processing and production, welding and component fabrication, mechanical and physical properties, effects of irradiation, and machinability. The refractory alloys considered are niobium, molybdenum, tantalum, and tungsten. Thirteen of the 14 pages have been abstracted separately. The remaining paper summarizes key needs for further R and D on refractory alloys. (DLC)

  15. Security assessment of magnesium alloys used as biodegradable implant material.

    PubMed

    Sun, X; Cao, Z Y; Liu, J G; Feng, C

    2015-01-01

    The security risk of magnesium alloys used as biodegradable implant material was evaluated in this study. Dose-response assessment was conducted by using toxicological data from authoritative public health agencies (World Health Organization) and assuming 1~3 years of uniform corrosion. Through modification calculation, the tolerable corrosion rate of biodegradable magnesium alloys in vivo was proposed, which theoretically ensured the bio-safety of the degradation products. The tolerable limits corresponding to various component elements in magnesium alloys were considered separately, although there are deficits in the toxicological data of some component elements. The influence of corrosion on the strength of magnesium alloys was evaluated, which would contribute to the rationally utilization of magnesium alloys as degradable implant materials. This study illustrates that not only toxicological calculations but also mechanical performance should be taken into consideration when developing novel degradable metallic implant.

  16. Thermo-Mechanical Processing Parameters for the INCONEL ALLOY 740

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtka, G.M.; Smith, G.

    2007-11-19

    In 2000, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Special Metals Corporation (SMC) to determine the mechanical property response of the IN740 alloy to help establish thermo-mechanical processing parameters for the use of this alloy in supercritical and ultra-critical boiler tubes with the potential for other end uses. SMC had developed an alloy, commercially known as INCONEL alloy 740, which exhibited various beneficial physical, mechanical, and chemical properties. As part of SMC's on-going efforts to optimize this alloy for targeted boiler applications there was a need to develop an understanding of the thermo-mechanical response of the material, characterize the resulting microstructure from this processing, and possibly, utilize models to develop the appropriate processing scheme for this product.

  17. TUNGSTEN BASE ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Schell, D.H.; Sheinberg, H.

    1959-12-15

    A high-density quaternary tungsten-base alloy having high mechanical strength and good machinability composed of about 2 wt.% Ni, 3 wt.% Cu, 5 wt.% Pb, and 90wt.% W is described. This alloy can be formed by the powder metallurgy technique of hot pressing in a graphite die without causing a reaction between charge and the die and without formation of a carbide case on the final compact, thereby enabling re-use of the graphite die. The alloy is formable at hot- pressing temperatures of from about 1200 to about 1350 deg C. In addition, there is little component shrinkage, thereby eliminating the necessity of subsequent extensive surface machining.

  18. Microstructure and lateral conductivity control of hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon oxide and its application in a-Si:H/a-SiGe:H tandem solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian-Tian, Li; Tie, Yang; Jia, Fang; De-Kun, Zhang; Jian, Sun; Chang-Chun, Wei; Sheng-Zhi, Xu; Guang-Cai, Wang; Cai-Chi, Liu; Ying, Zhao; Xiao-Dan, Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Phosphorous-doped hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon oxide (n-nc-SiO x :H) films are prepared via radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD). Increasing deposition power during n-nc-SiO x :H film growth process can enhance the formation of nanocrystalline and obtain a uniform microstructure of n-nc-SiO x :H film. In addition, in 20s interval before increasing the deposition power, high density small grains are formed in amorphous SiO x matrix with higher crystalline volume fraction (I c) and have a lower lateral conductivity. This uniform microstructure indicates that the higher I c can leads to better vertical conductivity, lower refractive index, wider optical band-gap. It improves the back reflection in a-Si:H/a-SiGe:H tandem solar cells acting as an n-nc-SiO x :H back reflector prepared by the gradient power during deposition. Compared with the sample with SiO x back reflector, with a constant power used in deposition process, the sample with gradient power SiO x back reflector can enhance the total short-circuit current density (J sc) and the initial efficiency of a-Si:H/a-SiGe:H tandem solar cells by 8.3% and 15.5%, respectively. Project supported by the Hi-Tech Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2013AA050302), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61474065), Tianjin Municipal Research Key Program of Application Foundation and Advanced Technology, China (Grant No. 15JCZDJC31300), the Key Project in the Science & Technology Pillar Program of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. BE2014147-3), and the Specialized Research Fund for the Ph. D. Program of Higher Education, China (Grant No. 20120031110039).

  19. Thermal stability of photovoltaic a-Si:H determined by neutron reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Qviller, A. J. Haug, H.; You, C. C.; Hasle, I. M.; Marstein, E. S.; Frommen, C.; Hauback, B. C.; Dennison, A. J. C.; Vorobiev, A.; Østreng, E.; Fjellvåg, H.; Hjörvarsson, B.

    2014-12-08

    Neutron and X-ray reflectometry were used to determine the layer structure and hydrogen content of thin films of amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) deposited onto crystalline silicon (Si) wafers for surface passivation in solar cells. The combination of these two reflectometry techniques is well suited for non-destructive probing of the structure of a-Si:H due to being able to probe buried interfaces and having sub-nanometer resolution. Neutron reflectometry is also unique in its ability to allow determination of density gradients of light elements such as hydrogen (H). The neutron scattering contrast between Si and H is strong, making it possible to determine the H concentration in the deposited a-Si:H. In order to correlate the surface passivation properties supplied by the a-Si:H thin films, as quantified by obtainable effective minority carrier lifetime, photoconductance measurements were also performed. It is shown that the minority carrier lifetime falls sharply when H has been desorbed from a-Si:H by annealing.

  20. A weldability study of Haynes Alloy No 242

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, M.C.; Headley, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    The weldability of Haynes {reg sign} Alloy No. 242 {trademark}, a new alloy derived from the Ni-Mo-Cr system, was investigated. Susceptibility to fusion zone hot cracking was determined by Varestraint testing, and hot ductility was characterized by Gleeble testing. Solidification phase transformation data was recorded with differential thermal analysis (DTA). Weld microstructures were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), analytical electron microscopy (AEM), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The results of this study indicate that this alloy has better hot cracking resistance than high strength nickel base superalloy 718; however, it has lower resistance than other alloys derived from the Ni-Cr-Mo ternary such as the Hastelloy alloys B2, C-4, C-22, C-276, and W. Segregation patterns in weld microstructures agree well with established information concerning this family of alloys. Prediction of solidification products with the Ni-Mo-Cr phase diagram based on a chemical equivalence was unsuccessful due to the higher carbon content of this alloy which favors the formation of M{sub 6}C. Solidification in Alloy 242 terminates with the formation of two eutectic-like constituents: (1) a M{sub 6}C/austenite eutectic, and (2) a second eutectic with austenite and an undetermined phase. This latter phase has a composition similar to the M{sub 6}C phase, but with a different crystal structure (cubic, ao = 6.6 {Angstrom}). 11 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. On the cytocompatibility of biodegradable Fe-based alloys.

    PubMed

    Schinhammer, Michael; Gerber, Isabel; Hänzi, Anja C; Uggowitzer, Peter J

    2013-03-01

    Biodegradable iron-based alloys are potential candidates for application as temporary implant material. This study summarizes the design strategy applied in the development of biodegradable Fe-Mn-C-Pd alloys and describes the key factors which make them suitable for medical applications. The study's in vitro cytotoxicity tests using human umbilical vein endothelial cells revealed acceptable cytocompatibility based on the alloys' eluates. An analysis of the eluates revealed that Fe is predominantly bound in insoluble degradation products, whereas a considerable amount of Mn is in solution. The investigation's results are discussed using dose-response curves for the main alloying elements Fe and Mn. They show that it is mainly Mn which limits the cytocompatibility of the alloys. The study also supplies a summary of the alloying elements' influence on metabolic processes. The results and discussion presented are considered important and instructive for future alloy development. The Fe-based alloys developed show an advantageous combination of microstructural, mechanical and biological properties, which makes them interesting as degradable implant material.

  2. Half-Corbino short-channel amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O thin-film transistors with a-SiOx or a-SiOx/a-SiNx passivation layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chumin; Fung, Tze-Ching; Kanicki, Jerzy

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the electrical properties and stability of short-channel half-Corbino amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs). In the linear region, the fabricated half-Corbino a-IGZO TFT with a channel length of 4.5 μm achieves a geometrical factor (fg) of ∼2.7, a threshold voltage (VT) of ∼2.4 V, a field-effect mobility (μeff) of ∼15 cm2/Vs, a subthreshold swing (SS) of ∼320 mV/dec and an off-current (IOFF) < 10-13 A. In the saturation region, asymmetric electrical characteristics such as drain current were observed under different drain bias conditions. The electrical properties asymmetry of half-Corbino a-IGZO TFTs was explained by various geometrical factors owing to the short-channel effect. The reduced VT and increased SS at VDS = 15 V is explained by the drain-induced Schottky barrier lowering. In addition, the bias-temperature stress (BTS) was performed for half-Corbino a-IGZO TFTs with both amorphous silicon oxide (a-SiOx) single layer and a-SiOx/amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiNx) bilayer passivation (PV) structures. The device with bilayer PV shows a threshold voltage shift (ΔVT) of +2.07 and -0.5 V under positive (PBTS = +15 V) and negative BTS (NBTS = -15 V) at 70 °C for 10 ks, respectively. The origins of ΔVT during PBTS and NBTS for half-Corbino a-IGZO TFTs with single and bilayer PV structures were studied. To improve the device electrical stability, the bilayer PV structure should be used.

  3. Electroplating on titanium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    Activation process forms adherent electrodeposits of copper, nickel, and chromium on titanium alloy. Good adhesion of electroplated deposits is obtained by using acetic-hydrofluoric acid anodic activation process.

  4. Study on the optical property of P-C doped a-Si:H thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Haihong; Li, Wei; Jiang, Yadong; Gong, Yuguang; Li, Zhi

    2009-11-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films doped with Phosphorus (P) and Carbon (C) were deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The influence of carbon on the optical property and the content of hydrogen and carbon in the P-doped a-Si:H films were investigated by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, respectively. The results show that the C-Si bonds in the P-C doped a-Si:H thin films can be observed clearly, and the content of hydrogen and carbon as well as the optical band gap increases with increasing CH4 gas flow rate, but the refractive index decreases with increasing CH4 gas flow rate in the CVD chamber.

  5. Optical Design and Analysis of Textured a-Si Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Hegedus, S.; Paulson, P. D.; Sopori, B.

    2002-05-01

    The effect of texture on enhancement and losses in photocurrent in a-Si solar cells is explored using PVOPTICS software and measurements on a-Si device structures. The texture angle has a major impact on light trapping and internal reflection. Increasing the angle causes better internal trapping in the i-layer, but also higher SnO2/a-Si reflection losses, as well as SnO2 and metal absorption losses. Parasitic absorption in the textured SnO2 due to back reflected light is 1-2 mA/cm2 for typical designs. N-i-p cells have a fundamental advantage over p-i-n cells since the textured TCO is at the rear of the device leading to lower losses.

  6. Si6H12/Polymer Inks for Electrospinning a-Si Nanowire Lithium Ion Battery Anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, Douglas L.; Hoey, Justin; Smith, Jeremiah; Elangovan, Arumugasamy; Wu, Xiangfa; Akhatov, Iskander; Payne, Scott; Moore, Jayma; Boudjouk, Philip; Pederson, Larry; Xiao, Jie; Zhang, Jiguang

    2010-08-04

    Amorphous silicon nanowires 'a-SiNWs' have been prepared by electrospinning a liquid silane-based precursor. Cyclohexasilane 'Si6H12' was admixed with poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) in toluene giving an ink that was electrospun into the Si6H12/PPMA wires with diameters of 50-2000 nm. Raman spectroscopy revealed that thermal treatment at 350 C transforms this deposit into a-SiNWs. These materials were coated with a thin carbon layer and then tested as half-cells where a reasonable plateau in electrochemical cycling was observed after an initial capacity fade. Additionally, porous a-SiNWs were realized when the thermally decomposable binder polypropylene carbonate/polycyclohexene carbonate was used as the polymer carrier.

  7. PLUTONIUM-URANIUM ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.; Schonfeld, F.W.

    1959-09-01

    Pu-U-Fe and Pu-U-Co alloys suitable for use as fuel elements tn fast breeder reactors are described. The advantages of these alloys are ease of fabrication without microcracks, good corrosion restatance, and good resistance to radiation damage. These advantages are secured by limitation of the zeta phase of plutonium in favor of a tetragonal crystal structure of the U/sub 6/Mn type.

  8. Flexible micromorph tandem a-Si/{mu}c-Si solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Soederstroem, T.; Haug, F.-J.; Terrazzoni-Daudrix, V.; Ballif, C.

    2010-01-15

    The deposition of a stack of amorphous (a-Si:H) and microcrystalline ({mu}c-Si:H) tandem thin film silicon solar cells (micromorph) requires at least twice the time used for a single junction a-Si:H cell. However, micromorph devices have a higher potential efficiency, thanks to the broader absorption spectrum of {mu}c-Si:H material. High efficiencies can only be achieved by mitigating the nanocracks in the {mu}c-Si:H cell and the light-induced degradation of the a-Si:H cell. As a result, {mu}c-Si:H cell has to grow on a smooth substrate with large periodicity (>1 {mu}m) and the a-Si:H cell on sharp pyramids with smaller feature size ({approx}350 nm) to strongly scatter the light in the weak absorption spectra of a-Si:H material. The asymmetric intermediate reflector introduced in this work uncouples the growth and light scattering issues of the tandem micromorph solar cells. The stabilized efficiency of the tandem n-i-p/n-i-p micromorph is increased by a relative 15% compared to a cell without AIR and 32% in relative compared to an a-Si:H single junction solar cells. The overall process (T<200 deg. C) is kept compatible with low cost plastic substrates. The best stabilized efficiency of a cell deposited on polyethylene-naphthalate plastic substrate is 9.8% after 1000 h of light soaking at V{sub oc}, 1 sun, and 50 deg. C.

  9. Flexible micromorph tandem a-Si/μc-Si solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söderström, T.; Haug, F.-J.; Terrazzoni-Daudrix, V.; Ballif, C.

    2010-01-01

    The deposition of a stack of amorphous (a-Si:H) and microcrystalline (μc-Si:H) tandem thin film silicon solar cells (micromorph) requires at least twice the time used for a single junction a-Si:H cell. However, micromorph devices have a higher potential efficiency, thanks to the broader absorption spectrum of μc-Si:H material. High efficiencies can only be achieved by mitigating the nanocracks in the μc-Si:H cell and the light-induced degradation of the a-Si:H cell. As a result, μc-Si:H cell has to grow on a smooth substrate with large periodicity (>1 μm) and the a-Si:H cell on sharp pyramids with smaller feature size (˜350 nm) to strongly scatter the light in the weak absorption spectra of a-Si:H material. The asymmetric intermediate reflector introduced in this work uncouples the growth and light scattering issues of the tandem micromorph solar cells. The stabilized efficiency of the tandem n-i-p/n-i-p micromorph is increased by a relative 15% compared to a cell without AIR and 32% in relative compared to an a-Si:H single junction solar cells. The overall process (T <200 °C) is kept compatible with low cost plastic substrates. The best stabilized efficiency of a cell deposited on polyethylene-naphthalate plastic substrate is 9.8% after 1000 h of light soaking at Voc, 1 sun, and 50 °C.

  10. Disk Alloy Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Tim; Gayda, John; Telesman, Jack

    2001-01-01

    The advanced powder metallurgy disk alloy ME3 was designed using statistical screening and optimization of composition and processing variables in the NASA HSR/EPM disk program to have extended durability at 1150 to 1250 "Fin large disks. Scaled-up disks of this alloy were produced at the conclusion of this program to demonstrate these properties in realistic disk shapes. The objective of the UEET disk program was to assess the mechanical properties of these ME3 disks as functions of temperature, in order to estimate the maximum temperature capabilities of this advanced alloy. Scaled-up disks processed in the HSR/EPM Compressor / Turbine Disk program were sectioned, machined into specimens, and tested in tensile, creep, fatigue, and fatigue crack growth tests by NASA Glenn Research Center, in cooperation with General Electric Engine Company and Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Engines. Additional sub-scale disks and blanks were processed and tested to explore the effects of several processing variations on mechanical properties. Scaled-up disks of an advanced regional disk alloy, Alloy 10, were used to evaluate dual microstructure heat treatments. This allowed demonstration of an improved balance of properties in disks with higher strength and fatigue resistance in the bores and higher creep and dwell fatigue crack growth resistance in the rims. Results indicate the baseline ME3 alloy and process has 1300 to 1350 O F temperature capabilities, dependent on detailed disk and engine design property requirements. Chemistry and process enhancements show promise for further increasing temperature capabilities.

  11. Evaluation of the Collection Length and Optical Path Enhancement in a-Si:H Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortes, M.; Comesaña, E.; Rodríguez, J. A.; Otero, P.; Garcia-Loureiro, A. J.

    2015-10-01

    The characterization of the electrical parameters of solar cells is fundamental to improve their performance. In the case of a-Si:H thin film solar cells, the degrading effect of light has to be mitigated, among others, with thin absorber layers and light confinement techniques. The novelty of this paper is the development of method that evaluates both, the light trapping enhancement and the collection length of the carriers in these and other field-driven devices. In this research we compared experimental results of a-Si:H cells with our simulation model, obtaining good agreement.

  12. AM-1 short circuit currents in small area PIN a-SiH(x) solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberger, B. R.; Deckman, H. W.; Wronski, C. R.; Witzke, H.

    The potential pitfalls which may lead to an overestimation of AM-1 short-circuit current densities have been investigated for 0.02 sq cm a-SiH(x) solar cell structures. The investigators have spatially profiled carrier collection in a-Si PIN solar cells, using a scanned 10 micron diameter laser beam. The small beam size yields not only microscopic information about carrier collection efficiency spectra, but permits study of carrier collection at high light intensity without significantly heating the cell. Laser scans at low illumination levels were employed to determine the true active area of PIN solar cells, and these are compared to cell collection efficiency spectra.

  13. Screen printing technology for backside metallization of a-Si:H solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baert, K.; Willeke, G.; Honore, M.; Vandervorst, W.; Roggen, J.

    It is demonstrated that the back side metallization of a-Si:H solar cells can be performed by screen printing instead of aluminum evaporation if the n+ layer of the cell is microcrystalline (microc) instead of amorphous. Such microc-Si n+ layers have been grown at growth rates of 0.1 micron/h, which is comparable to the growth rate of high quality a-Si:H. The process proposed offers advantages over classical aluminum evaporation in terms of throughput, and eliminates the use of lift-off technique or laser patterning after metal deposition.

  14. Corrosion of alloy steels in oil field fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Laboratory and field tests have been conducted on two low alloy and two higher alloy steels at a range of brine salinities and sulfide contents typical of oil well production fluids. AISI types 4130 and 4340 show the same behavior in these fluids as mild steel. AISI type 410 stainless steel and 9% chromium - 1% molybdenum steel corrode at rates as great as that of mild steel at higher chloride or sulfide concentrations. Special corrosion inhibitors are required for higher alloy steels when they are exposed to these conditions.

  15. Accelerated decarburization of Fe-C metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Pal, Uday B.; Sadoway, Donald R.

    1997-01-01

    A process for improving the rate of metal production and FeO utilization in a steelmaking process or a process combining iron-making and steelmaking in a single reactor that uses or generates Fe-C metal alloy droplets submerged in an FeO-containing slag. The process involves discharging a charge build-up (electron accumulation) in the slag at the slag-metal alloy interface by means of an electron conductor connected between the metal alloy droplets and a gas at a gas-slag interface, said gas having an oxygen partial pressure of at least about 0.01 atmosphere.

  16. Accelerated decarburization of Fe-C metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Pal, U.B.; Sadoway, D.R.

    1997-05-27

    A process is described for improving the rate of metal production and FeO utilization in a steelmaking process or a process combining iron-making and steelmaking in a single reactor that uses or generates Fe-C metal alloy droplets submerged in an FeO-containing slag. The process involves discharging a charge build-up (electron accumulation) in the slag at the slag-metal alloy interface by means of an electron conductor connected between the metal alloy droplets and a gas at a gas-slag interface, said gas having an oxygen partial pressure of at least about 0.01 atmosphere. 2 figs.

  17. Correlation between diffusion barriers and alloying energy in binary alloys.

    PubMed

    Vej-Hansen, Ulrik Grønbjerg; Rossmeisl, Jan; Stephens, Ifan E L; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2016-01-28

    In this paper, we explore the notion that a negative alloying energy may act as a descriptor for long term stability of Pt-alloys as cathode catalysts in low temperature fuel cells. Using density functional theory calculations, we show that there is a correlation between the alloying energy of an alloy, and the diffusion barriers of the minority component. Alloys with a negative alloying energy may show improved long term stability, despite the fact that there is typically a greater thermodynamic driving force towards dissolution of the solute metal over alloying. In addition to Pt, we find that this trend also appears to hold for alloys based on Al and Pd. PMID:26750475

  18. Processing and properties of iridium alloys for space power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, E.K.

    1994-12-31

    Iridium alloys are used as fuel cladding in radioisotope thermoelectric generators due to their high-melting point, high- temperature strength, and oxidation and corrosion resistance. Although iridium has a face-centered cubic crystal structure, it undergoes a distinct ductile-to-brittle transition characteristic of many body-centered cubic metals. Improved ductility in the alloys is achieved through material purification and controlled alloy additions at the parts per million (ppm) level. A vacuum arc remelt operation produces a nearly defect-free casting, which is further processed to sheet products. A change in processing from drop castings of small arc-melted buttons to large arc-remelted ingots has substantially improved product yields. The effects of processing changes on alloy microstructure, sheet textures, oxidation effects, high-strain-rate ductility, and fabricability are discussed.

  19. Stretching the threshold of reversible dynamics in silicon clusters: A case of carbon alloyed Si6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazrulla, Mohammed Azeezulla; Krishnamurty, Sailaja

    2016-09-01

    Silicon clusters with 3-50 atoms undergo isomerization/reversible dynamics or structural deformation at significantly lower temperatures of 350 K-500 K. Through Born Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamical (BOMD) simulations, the current study demonstrates that carbon alloying enhances the thermal stability of a silicon cluster. The study is carried out on a Si6 cluster which has been recently reported to undergo reversible dynamical movements using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Present BOMD simulations validate the experimentally observed reversible atomic displacements (reversible dynamical movements) at finite temperatures which are seen to persist nearly up to 2000 K. Carbon alloying of Si6 is seen to stretch the threshold of reversible dynamics from 200 K to 600 K depending upon the alloying concentration of carbon in the cluster.

  20. Development of Formulations for a-SiC and Manganese CMP and Post-CMP Cleaning of Cobalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagudu, Uma Rames Krishna

    We have investigated the chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) of amorphous SiC (a-SiC) and Mn and Post CMP cleaning of cobalt for various device applications. During the manufacture of copper interconnects using the damascene process the polishing of copper is followed by the polishing of the barrier material (Co, Mn, Ru and their alloys) and its post CMP cleaning. This is followed by the a-SiC hard mask CMP. Silicon carbide thin films, though of widespread use in microelectronic engineering, are difficult to process by CMP because of their hardness and chemical inertness. The earlier part of the SiC work discusses the development of slurries based on silica abrasives that resulted in high a-SiC removal rates (RRs). The ionic strength of the silica dispersion was found to play a significant role in enhancing material removal rate, while also providing very good post-polish surface-smoothness. For example, the addition of 50 mM potassium nitrate to a pH 8 aqueous slurry consisting of 10 wt % of silica abrasives and 1.47 M hydrogen peroxide increased the RR from about 150 nm/h to about 2100 nm/h. The role of ionic strength in obtaining such high RRs was investigated using surface zeta-potentials measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Evidently, hydrogen peroxide promoted the oxidation of Si and C to form weakly adhered species that were subsequently removed by the abrasive action of the silica particles. The effect of potassium nitrate in increasing material removal is attributed to the reduction in the electrostatic repulsion between the abrasive particles and the SiC surface because of screening of surface charges by the added electrolyte. We also show that transition metal compounds when used as additives to silica dispersions enhance a-SiC removal rates (RRs). Silica slurries containing potassium permanganate gave RRs as high as 2000 nm/h at pH 4. Addition of copper sulfate to this slurry further enhanced the RRs to ˜3500 nm/h at pH 6

  1. Hydrogen incorporation during deposition of a-Si:H from an intense source of SiH{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Sanden, M.C.M.; Severens, R.J.; Kessels, W.M.M.; Van de Pas, F.; Van Ijzendoorn, L.; Schram, D.C.

    1997-07-01

    The incorporation of hydrogen during the fast deposition of a-Si:H from an expanding thermal arc is investigated by means of isotope labeling of the precursor gases silane and hydrogen. It is found that hydrogen in a-Si:H originates dominantly from the silyl radical. A small fraction of the hydrogen in a-Si:H is due to exchange reaction of atomic hydrogen in the plasma with hydrogen chemisorbed on the surface during growth.

  2. Method and Apparatus for Production of Powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storltzfus, Joel M. (Inventor); Sircar, Subhasish (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Apparatus and method are disclosed for producing oxides of metals and of metal alloys. The metal or alloy is placed in an oxygen atmosphere in a combustion chamber and ignited. Products of the combustion include one or more oxides of the metal or alloy in powdered form. In one embodiment of the invention a feeder is provided whereby material to be oxidized by combustion can be advanced into a combustion chamber continuously. A product remover receives the powder product of the combustion.

  3. Method and apparatus for production of powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolzfus, Joel M. (Inventor); Sircar, Subhasish (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Apparatus and method are disclosed for producing oxides of metals and of metal alloys. The metal or alloy is placed in an oxygen atmosphere in a combustion chamber and ignited. Products of the combustion include one or more oxides of the metal or alloy in powdered form. In one embodiment of the invention a feeder is provided whereby material to be oxidized by combustion can be advanced into a combustion chamber continuously. A product remover receives the powder product of the combustion.

  4. Implementation of a Comprehensive On-Line Closed-Loop Diagnostic System for Roll-to-Roll Amorphous Silicon Solar Cell Production: Annual Report, Year Two; 1 September 2003--31 August 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, T.

    2005-02-01

    Energy Conversion Devices, Inc. (ECD) has developed and built 7 generations of roll-to-roll amorphous silicon PV production equipment. In the ECD/United Solar Ovonic production process, we deposit about a 1-mm-thick, 12-layer coating consisting of a metal/oxide backreflector, a - layer a-Si/a-SiGe alloy triple-junction solar cell, and a top transparent conductive oxide coating onto 125-mm-thick, 35.5-cm-wide stainless steel webs in a series of three roll-to-roll deposition machines. ECD has now completed the Phase II work for this program. In the following report, we summarize the Phase II work in each of these tasks. We have involved United Solar production personnel in each of these Tasks. This is important for two reasons: Firstly, the collaboration of ECD and United Solar personnel keeps the projects responsive to the developing needs at United Solar. Secondly, most of the tasks affect operations and consequently need the support of United Solar production and QA/QC managers. In the process, we have developed a good working relationship between the production personnel and good balance between optimizing production, while also ''adiabatically'' improving the manufacturing equipment.

  5. In-situ characterization of growth and interfaces in a-Si:H devices

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, R.W.; Wronski, C.R.; An, I.; Li, Y. )

    1992-12-01

    This report describes the in-situ characterization of growth and interfaces in amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) devices. The growth of a-Si:H by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) is complex and involves many gas-phase and solid-surface chemical and physical processes, which are influenced by charged particle bombardment, ultraviolet light exposure, etc. The research consisted of two broad components. The first involved preparing a-Si:H by optimum'' PECVD and exposing the film to atomic hydrogen in-situ at the growth temperature. The processes of H-diffusion and incorporation in the exposed film were studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry, giving a picture of the processes by which the chemical potential in the film equilibrates with that in the gas phase. The properties of thin films were then prepared by alternating optimum'' PECVD growth and hydrogen exposure. Film properties were then studied again. The second component of the research is discussed only briefly in this report, as it is an outgrowth of previous work on single-wavelength ellipsometry. With the new spectroscopic capability developed at Penn State, it is now possible to quantify the nucleation and growth process of a-Si:H films.

  6. Deposition of a-Si:H devices in a RTR system for photovoltaic and macroelectronic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Scholz, M.; Peros, D.; Boehm, M.

    1999-07-01

    This work presents first results of potential manufacturing processes for integrated series connected hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin film solar modules and/or pin-diode/TFT based macroelectronic circuits on flexible tapes. A RTR (Reel-To-Reel) deposition system on laboratory scale has been built. The system consists of seven metal sealed UHV stainless steel chambers to obtain ultra high vacuum as a basis for high quality a-Si:H layers. In order to support continuous movement of the tape in the RTR process the chambers cannot be isolated from each other. The necessary pressure difference between the sputtering chambers and the PECVD (Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition) chambers is provided by pressure stages. They are optimized for high molecular flow resistance without any influence on the moving substrate tape. The back metal contacts and the semitransparent TCO (Transparent Conductive Oxide) contacts are deposited by rf magnetron sputtering, the a-Si:H film system is deposited by PECVD. Parallel to the film deposition a Nd:YAG laser patterning system is coupled into one chamber. This allows for instance a total manufacturing of integrated series connected solar modules in one system without breaking the vacuum. The present investigations focus on the deposition of doped and intrinsic high quality a-Si:H based layers in neighboring chambers. The quality of semiconducting films deposited in adjacent chambers is studied with regard to potential contamination effects.

  7. Hydrogen plasma induced modification of photoluminescence from a-SiNx:H thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bommali, R. K.; Ghosh, S.; Vijaya Prakash, G.; Gao, K.; Zhou, S.; Khan, S. A.; Srivastava, P.

    2014-02-01

    Low temperature (250-350 °C) hydrogen plasma annealing (HPA) treatments have been performed on amorphous hydrogenated silicon nitride (a-SiNx:H) thin films having a range of compositions and subsequent modification of photoluminescence (PL) is investigated. The PL spectral shape and peak positions for the as deposited films could be tuned with composition and excitation energies. HPA induced modification of PL of these films is found to depend on the N/Si ratio (x). Upon HPA, the PL spectra show an emergence of a red emission band for x ≤ 1, whereas an overall increase of intensity without change in the spectral shape is observed for x > 1. The emission observed in the Si rich films is attributed to nanoscale a-Si:H inclusions. The enhancement is maximum for off-stoichiometric films (x ˜ 1) and decreases as the compositions of a-Si (x = 0) and a-Si3N4 (x = 1.33) are approached, implying high density of non-radiative defects around x = 1. The diffusion of hydrogen in these films is also analyzed by Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis technique.

  8. Investigations of ultra-thin single layer a-Si:H films

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, S.A.

    1997-07-01

    Measurements are presented as direct evidence of tail states in ultra-thin a-Si:H single layer films. Including tail states in computer simulations completely removes the staircase structure in the differential optical spectra, previously associated with the quantum confinement of carriers.

  9. Optical losses in multi-junction a-Si:H based solar cells and modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedeman, S.; Morris, J.; Yang, L.

    A comprehensive optical model is described which is applicable to glass/textured CTO/a-Si:H/a-SiGe:H-based multijunction cells and allows the calculation of optical absorption in each layer of the solar cell. The major optical losses which limit the output current density of tandem cells using 1.72-eV/1.50-eV bandgap a-Si:H/a-SiGe:H and an ITO/Ag rear contact to about 20.8 mA/sq cm (sum of both junctions) are identified and discussed. It is shown that improvements in the reflectivity and scattering properties of the rear contact may be expected to result in current densities of 22.3 mA/sq cm in this type of cell using intrinsic layers of limited thickness. The use of low-cost materials, such as soda-lime glass and the aluminum rear contacts typically employed in the manufacture of large-area modules, should reduce the total current density available to 18.5 mA/sq cm.

  10. Local network structure of a-SiC:H and its correlation with dielectric function

    SciTech Connect

    Kageyama, Shota; Matsuki, Nobuyuki; Fujiwara, Hiroyuki

    2013-12-21

    The microscopic disordered structures of hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-Si{sub 1−x}C{sub x}:H) layers with different carbon contents have been determined based on the correlations between the dielectric function in the ultraviolet/visible region and the local bonding states studied by high-sensitivity infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy. We find that the microscopic structure of the a-Si{sub 1−x}C{sub x}:H layers fabricated by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition shows a sharp structural transition at a boundary of x = 6.3 at. %. In the regime of x ≤ 6.3 at. %, (i) the amplitude of the a-SiC:H dielectric function reduces and (ii) the SiH{sub 2} content increases drastically with x, even though most of the C atoms are introduced into the tetrahedral sites without bonding with H. In the regime of x > 6.3 at. %, on the other hand, (i) the amplitude of the dielectric function reduces further and (ii) the concentration of the sp{sup 3} CH{sub n} (n = 2,3) groups increases. Moreover, we obtained the direct evidence that the sp{sup 2} C bonding state in the a-SiC matrix exists in the configuration of C = CH{sub 2} and the generation of the graphite-like C = CH{sub 2} unit suppresses the band gap widening significantly. At high C contents of x > 6.3 at. %, the a-SiC:H layers show quite porous structures due to the formation of microvoids terminated with the SiH{sub 2}/CH{sub n} groups. By taking the SiH{sub 2}/CH{sub n} microvoid generation in the network and the high-energy shift of the dielectric function by the local bonding states into account, the a-SiC:H dielectric function model has been established. From the analysis using this model, we have confirmed that the a-SiC:H optical properties in the ultraviolet/visible region are determined almost completely by the local network structures.

  11. Burn-resistant behavior and mechanism of Ti14 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yong-nan; Huo, Ya-zhou; Song, Xu-ding; Bi, Zhao-zhao; Gao, Yang; Zhao, Yong-qing

    2016-02-01

    The direct-current simulation burning method was used to investigate the burn-resistant behavior of Ti14 titanium alloy. The results show that Ti14 alloy exhibits a better burn resistance than TC4 alloy (Ti-6Al-4V). Cu is observed to preferentially migrate to the surface of Ti14 alloy during the burning reaction, and the burned product contains Cu, Cu2O, and TiO2. An oxide layer mainly comprising loose TiO2 is observed beneath the burned product. Meanwhile, Ti2Cu precipitates at grain boundaries near the interface of the oxide layer, preventing the contact between O2 and Ti and forming a rapid diffusion layer near the matrix interface. Consequently, a multiple-layer structure with a Cu-enriched layer (burned product)/Cu-lean layer (oxide layer)/Cu-enriched layer (rapid diffusion layer) configuration is formed in the burn heat-affected zone of Ti14 alloy; this multiple-layer structure is beneficial for preventing O2 diffusion. Furthermore, although Al can migrate to form Al2O3 on the surface of TC4 alloy, the burn-resistant ability of TC4 is unimproved because the Al2O3 is discontinuous and not present in sufficient quantity.

  12. Investigation of slective laser melting of mecanically alloyed metastable Al5Fe2 powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montiel, Hugo

    Selective Laser Melting (SLM), an Additive Manufacturing (AM) technology, enables the production of complex structured metal products. Aluminum alloys are used in SLM as high-strength lightweight materials for weight reduction in structural components. Previous investigations report high laser powers (300 W) and slow scanning speeds (500 mm/s) to process aluminum alloys under SLM. This research investigates the SLM processing of Al-Fe alloy by utilizing metastable Al5Fe2 powder system produced by mechanical alloying. Metastable systems are thermodynamically activated with internal energy that can generate an energy shortcut when processing under SLM. The optimum laser power, scan speeds and scan distances were investigated by test series experiments. Results indicate that metastable Al5Fe2 alloy can be processed and stabilized under a 200 W laser scanning and a relative high scanning speed of 1000 mm/s. Thus, the internal energy of metastable powder contributes in reducing laser energy for SLM process for Al alloys.

  13. Semiconductor alloys - Structural property engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sher, A.; Van Schilfgaarde, M.; Berding, M.; Chen, A.-B.

    1987-01-01

    Semiconductor alloys have been used for years to tune band gaps and average bond lengths to specific applications. Other selection criteria for alloy composition, and a growth technique designed to modify their structural properties, are presently considered. The alloys Zn(1-y)Cd(y)Te and CdSe(y)Te(1-y) are treated as examples.

  14. De-alloyed platinum nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Strasser, Peter; Koh, Shirlaine; Mani, Prasanna; Ratndeep, Srivastava

    2011-08-09

    A method of producing de-alloyed nanoparticles. In an embodiment, the method comprises admixing metal precursors, freeze-drying, annealing, and de-alloying the nanoparticles in situ. Further, in an embodiment de-alloyed nanoparticle formed by the method, wherein the nanoparticle further comprises a core-shell arrangement. The nanoparticle is suitable for electrocatalytic processes and devices.

  15. PLUTONIUM-URANIUM-TITANIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1959-07-28

    A plutonium-uranium alloy suitable for use as the fuel element in a fast breeder reactor is described. The alloy contains from 15 to 60 at.% titanium with the remainder uranium and plutonium in a specific ratio, thereby limiting the undesirable zeta phase and rendering the alloy relatively resistant to corrosion and giving it the essential characteristic of good mechanical workability.

  16. Nanocrystalline SiC and Ti3SiC2 Alloys for Reactor Materials: Diffusion of Fission Product Surrogates

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.; Jiang, Weilin

    2014-11-01

    MAX phases, such as titanium silicon carbide (Ti3SiC2), have a unique combination of both metallic and ceramic properties, which make them attractive for potential nuclear applications. Ti3SiC2 has been suggested in the literature as a possible fuel cladding material. Prior to the application, it is necessary to investigate diffusivities of fission products in the ternary compound at elevated temperatures. This study attempts to obtain relevant data and make an initial assessment for Ti3SiC2. Ion implantation was used to introduce fission product surrogates (Ag and Cs) and a noble metal (Au) in Ti3SiC2, SiC, and a dual-phase nanocomposite of Ti3SiC2/SiC synthesized at PNNL. Thermal annealing and in-situ Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) were employed to study the diffusivity of the various implanted species in the materials. In-situ RBS study of Ti3SiC2 implanted with Au ions at various temperatures was also performed. The experimental results indicate that the implanted Ag in SiC is immobile up to the highest temperature (1273 K) applied in this study; in contrast, significant out-diffusion of both Ag and Au in MAX phase Ti3SiC2 occurs during ion implantation at 873 K. Cs in Ti3SiC2 is found to diffuse during post-irradiation annealing at 973 K, and noticeable Cs release from the sample is observed. This study may suggest caution in using Ti3SiC2 as a fuel cladding material for advanced nuclear reactors operating at very high temperatures. Further studies of the related materials are recommended.

  17. Diffusion bonding of aluminium alloy, 8090

    SciTech Connect

    Sunwoo, A. )

    1994-08-15

    Ability to diffusion bond aluminum (Al) alloys, in particular superplastic aluminum alloys, will complete the technology-base that is strongly needed to enhance the use of superplastic forming (SPF) technology. Diffusion bonding (DB) is an attractive manufacturing option for applications where the preservation of the base metal microstructure and, in turn, mechanical properties is important in the bond area. As the technology moves from the laboratory to production, the DB process has to be production-feasible and cost-effective. At the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the DB study of SPF Al alloys has been initiated. This paper describes the effect of surface chemistry on the DB properties of the Al alloy, 8090 (2.4Li-1.18Cu-0.57Mg-0.14Zr-Al). The integrity of the diffusion bonds was evaluated for both interlayered and bare surfaces. Two interlayer elements, copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn), were compared. Although the eutectic temperature of Al-Cu is 548 C, a thin Cu layer in contact with 8090 has been shown to lower its eutectic temperature to [approximately]521 C. In 8090, Cu is one of the primary alloying elements but has a limited solubility in Al at the bonding temperature. Zinc, on the other hand, forms a considerably lower eutectic (380 C) with Al and is highly soluble in Al. The diffusivity of Zn in Al is much faster than that of Cu, but Zn forms a more thermodynamically stable oxide. These subtle metallurgical differences will affect the transient liquid phase (TLP) formation at the interface, which will subsequently influence the bond quality.

  18. Processing studies of powder metallurgically-produced high temperature alloys (Processing studies of oxide dispersed alloys for service above 1000/sup 0/ C). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, N.J.; Smith, C.H.

    1986-01-01

    It was demonstrated that the use of homogeneous, fine, R.S. powders of Nickel-base Superalloy IN-100 (a commercial jet engine blade alloy), converted to very fine flake and blended with Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/, will produce an extremely stable alloy with outstanding creep and stress rupture properties from about 950 to at least 1100/sup 0/C. The RS OD IN-100 alloy has comparable properties to those reported for the MA-6000 alloy developed by Benjamin et al, but offers a cheaper, faster, much more reproducible product. An operating temperature advantage of 150 to 200/sup 0/C appears attainable for the RS OD IN-100 alloy over that for the commercial precision cast alloy of the same basic composition.

  19. A technique for determining Urbach edge, midgap states and electric field in a-Si:H and a-(Si,Ge):H devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalal, Vikram L.; Knox, Ralph D.; Moradi, Behnam

    1990-01-01

    A technique for measuring the Urbach energy of valence band tail states and midgap defect densities in a-Si:H and a-(Si,Ge):H devices is described. The Urbach energy is determined by measuring the quantum efficiency (QE) of delocalized holes in the devices, whereas the midgap state density (DOS) is estimated by measuring the QE of localized holes. The distinction between delocalized and localized holes is obtained from the behavior of the QE upon the application of reverse bias to the device. The QE of holes localized in midgap states increases significantly upon the application of reverse bias because of Frenkel-Poole tunneling, whereas the QE of holes in tail states does not show such an increase. It is shown that upon light soaking the Urbach edge does not change, but the midgap DOS does increase significantly. A primary consequence of the increase in DOS is a decrease in electric field in the low-field middle i region of the p-i-n cell. The decrease in electric field is experimentally estimated by fitting the increase in the reverse bias QE to Frenkel-Poole tunneling.

  20. Deriving the Metal and Alloy Networks of Modern Technology.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Hajime; Nuss, Philip; Chen, Wei-Qiang; Graedel, Thomas E

    2016-04-01

    Metals have strongly contributed to the development of the human society. Today, large amounts of and various metals are utilized in a wide variety of products. Metals are rarely used individually but mostly together with other metals in the form of alloys and/or other combinational uses. This study reveals the intersectoral flows of metals by means of input-output (IO) based material flow analysis (MFA). Using the 2007 United States IO table, we calculate the flows of eight metals (i.e., manganese, chromium, nickel, molybdenum, niobium, vanadium, tungsten, and cobalt) and simultaneously visualize them as a network. We quantify the interrelationship of metals by means of flow path sharing. Furthermore, by looking at the flows of alloys into metal networks, the networks of the major metals iron, aluminum, and copper together with those of the eight alloying metals can be categorized into alloyed-, nonalloyed-(i.e., individual), and both mixed. The result shows that most metals are used primarily in alloy form and that functional recycling thereby requires identification, separation, and alloy-specific reprocessing if the physical properties of the alloys are to be retained for subsequent use. The quantified interrelation of metals helps us consider better metal uses and develop a sustainable cycle of metals.

  1. Deriving the Metal and Alloy Networks of Modern Technology.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Hajime; Nuss, Philip; Chen, Wei-Qiang; Graedel, Thomas E

    2016-04-01

    Metals have strongly contributed to the development of the human society. Today, large amounts of and various metals are utilized in a wide variety of products. Metals are rarely used individually but mostly together with other metals in the form of alloys and/or other combinational uses. This study reveals the intersectoral flows of metals by means of input-output (IO) based material flow analysis (MFA). Using the 2007 United States IO table, we calculate the flows of eight metals (i.e., manganese, chromium, nickel, molybdenum, niobium, vanadium, tungsten, and cobalt) and simultaneously visualize them as a network. We quantify the interrelationship of metals by means of flow path sharing. Furthermore, by looking at the flows of alloys into metal networks, the networks of the major metals iron, aluminum, and copper together with those of the eight alloying metals can be categorized into alloyed-, nonalloyed-(i.e., individual), and both mixed. The result shows that most metals are used primarily in alloy form and that functional recycling thereby requires identification, separation, and alloy-specific reprocessing if the physical properties of the alloys are to be retained for subsequent use. The quantified interrelation of metals helps us consider better metal uses and develop a sustainable cycle of metals. PMID:26927531

  2. Fundamental studies of defect generation in amorphous silicon alloys grown by remote plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition (Remote PECVD)

    SciTech Connect

    Lucovsky, G.; Nemanich, R.J.; Bernholc, J.; Whitten, J.; Wang, C.; Davidson, B.; Williams, M.; Lee, D.; Bjorkman, C.; Jing, Z. )

    1993-01-01

    We demonstrated that the remote PECVD process can be used to deposit heavily doped n-type and p-type a-Si:H thin films. We optimized conditions for depositing undoped, near-intrinsic and heavily doped thin films of [mu]c(microcrystalline)-Si by remote PECVD. We extended the remote PECVD process to the deposition of undoped and doped a-Si,C:H and [mu]c-Si,C alloy films. We analyzed transport data for the dark conductivity in undoped and doped a-Si:H, a-Si,C:H, [mu]c-Si and [mu]c-Si,C films. We studied the properties of doped a-Si:H and [mu]c-Si in MOS capacitors using [approximately]10 [Omega]-cm p-type crystalline substrates and thermally grown Si0[sub 2] dielectric layers. We collaborated with a group at RWTH in Aachen, Germany, and studied the contributions of process induced defect states to the recombination of photogenerated electron pairs. We applied a tight-binding model to Si-Bethe lattice structures to investigate the effects of bond angle, and dihedral angle disorder. We used ab initio and empirical calculations to study non-random bonding arrangements in a-Si,O:H and doped a-Si:H films.

  3. Effect of alloying elements on the corrosion behaviour of copper-nickel alloys in a marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taher, Abulmaali M. Y.

    Copper-nickel alloys have been used in many applications in marine environments, because of excellent corrosion and biofouling resistance. In this study, the effect of alloying elements (including iron, aluminum, chromium, cobalt, titanium, molybdenum, indium, and vanadium) on the corrosion behaviour of 90 w% copper-10 w% nickel alloys in sea water are investigated. Experiments were performed at 298 K on a commercial copper-nickel alloy C70600 to serve as a reference point for the synthetic alloys. New copper-nickel alloys were prepared in an induction furnace, in an argon/7% vol. hydrogen atmosphere in cylindrical boron nitride crucibles. They were then homogenized at 950°C for 10 hours in the same protective atmosphere. The electrochemical behaviour was investigated by linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), cyclic polarization (CP), cyclic voltammetry (CV), Tafel extrapolation (TE) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The corrosion product that formed on the surface was characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The electrochemical behaviour of commercial alloy C70600 depends on the amount of sulphate in the solution. Increasing the amount of sulphate to more than 400 ppm in the electrolyte limits the ability of the passive film to protect the alloy. The behaviour of the commercial alloy in sea water was similar to that in a 2260 ppm sulphate artificial saline solution but was not exactly the same. The passive film formed on the surface was uniform in thickness and consisted of more than one layer. The passive film consisted mainly of chlorides in solutions with no sulphate. The presence of sulphate in the corrosive solutions produces a passive layer containing mainly chlorides with some sulphides (FeS, NiS, and CuS). The electrochemical behaviour of the synthetic Cu-Ni-Fe alloys

  4. Novel production method and in-vitro cell compatibility of porous Ti-6Al-4V alloy disk for hard tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Shanta Raj; Khalil, Khalil Abdel-Razek; Dewidar, Montasser; Hwang, Pyoung Han; Yi, Ho Keun; Kim, Hak Yong

    2008-08-01

    Porous metals are attractive due to its unique physical, mechanical, and new bone tissue ingrowth properties. In the present study, the production of highly porous Ti-6Al-4V parts by powder metallurgical technology and subsequently it's uses in in vitro bone tissue engineering is described. A space-holder method using carbamide with different particle size to produce parts with porosities between 35 and 70% were applied. The compressive strength and Young's modulus of porous Ti-6Al-4V were determined. Results indicated that stress and Young's modulus decrease with increasing porosity and pore size. The porous parts are characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore, study was to investigate the effects of three different porosities of porous Ti-6Al-4V (35, 50, and 70%) on proliferation, differentiation, and cell-matrix interaction of mouse osteoblast-like cells, MC-3T3. Results showed that the cell proliferation was significantly (p < 0.05) higher on 70% porous Ti-6Al-4V. However, synthesis of different types of extra cellular matrix proteins was also more abundant on 70% porous Ti-6Al-4V than 35 and 50% porous Ti-6Al-4V disk except some specific proteins. An increase in alkaline phosphate activity was significantly (p < 0.05) higher on 70 and 50% porous Ti-6Al-4V disk after 12 days of MC-3T3 cells incubation. Above all, results indicated that porosity (nearly 70%) of porous Ti-6Al-4V topography affects proliferation and differentiation of osteoblast-like MC-3T3 cells. The results showed that this novel process is a promise to fabricate porous biomaterials for bone implants.

  5. Gas-deposit-alloy corrosion interactions in simulated combustion environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luer, Kevin Raymond

    High temperature corrosion in aggressive coal combustion environments involves simultaneous corrosion reactions between combustion gases, ash deposits, and alloys. This research investigated the behavior of a ferritic steel (SA387-Gr11) and three weld claddings (309L SS, Alloy 72, and Alloy 622) in five combustion environments beneath solid deposits at 500°C for up to 1000 hours. The synthetic gases consisted of N2-CO-CO-H2-H2O-H 2S-SO2 mixtures that simulated a range of fuel-rich or fuel-lean combustion environments with a constant sulfur content. The synthetic deposits contained FeS2, FeS, Fe3O4 and/or carbon. Reaction kinetics was studied in individual gas-metal, gas deposit, and deposit-alloy systems. A test method was developed to investigate simultaneous gas-deposit-metal corrosion reactions. The results showed reaction kinetics varied widely, depending on the gas-alloy system and followed linear, parabolic, and logarithmic rate laws. Under reducing conditions, the alloys exhibited a range of corrosion mechanisms including carburization-sulfidation, sulfidation, and sulfidation-oxidation. Most alloys were not resistant to the highly reducing gases but offered moderate resistance to mixed oxidation-sulfidation by demonstrating parabolic or logarithmic behavior. Under oxidizing conditions, all of the alloys were resistant. Under oxidizing-sulfating conditions, alloys with high Fe or Cr contents sulfated whereas an alloy containing Mo and W was resistant. In the gas-deposit-metal tests, FeS2-bearing deposits were extremely corrosive to low alloy steel under both reducing and oxidizing conditions but they had little influence on the weld claddings. Accelerated corrosion was attributed to rapid decomposition or oxidation of FeS2 particles that generated sulfur-rich gases above the alloy surface. In contrast, FeS-type deposits had no influence under reducing conditions but they were aggressive to low alloy steel under oxidizing conditions. The extent of damage

  6. Surface modification of high temperature iron alloys

    DOEpatents

    Park, Jong-Hee

    1995-01-01

    A method and article of manufacture of a coated iron based alloy. The method includes providing an iron based alloy substrate, depositing a silicon containing layer on the alloy surface while maintaining the alloy at a temperature of about 700.degree. C.-1200.degree. C. to diffuse silicon into the alloy surface and exposing the alloy surface to an ammonia atmosphere to form a silicon/oxygen/nitrogen containing protective layer on the iron based alloy.

  7. Surface modification of high temperature iron alloys

    DOEpatents

    Park, J.H.

    1995-06-06

    A method and article of manufacture of a coated iron based alloy are disclosed. The method includes providing an iron based alloy substrate, depositing a silicon containing layer on the alloy surface while maintaining the alloy at a temperature of about 700--1200 C to diffuse silicon into the alloy surface and exposing the alloy surface to an ammonia atmosphere to form a silicon/oxygen/nitrogen containing protective layer on the iron based alloy. 13 figs.

  8. Work function of binary alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Ryusuke; Matsumura, Katsunori; Sakai, Akira; Sakata, Toyo

    2001-01-01

    By utilizing the field emission method, we have studied the composition dependence of work function in NiCu and PtRh alloys. In PtRh alloys, we find that the work function falls below the linear interpolation, in agreement with the experimental results on AgAu alloys [Fain and McDavid, Phys. Rev. B 9 (1974) 5099]. On the other hand, the work function of NiCu alloys is found to show little systematic deviation from the linear interpolation. The observed negative deviation in PtRh alloys is not compatible with a simple theoretical prediction based on the electronic density of states.

  9. Materials corrosion of high temperature alloys immersed in 600C binary nitrate salt.

    SciTech Connect

    Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Gill, David Dennis; LaFord, Marianne Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    Thirteen high temperature alloys were immersion tested in a 60/40 binary nitrate salt. Samples were interval tested up to 3000 hours at 600ÀC with air as the ullage gas. Chemical analysis of the molten salt indicated lower nitrite concentrations present in the salt, as predicted by the equilibrium equation. Corrosion rates were generally low for all alloys. Corrosion products were identified using x-ray diffraction and electron microprobe analysis. Fe-Cr based alloys tended to form mixtures of sodium and iron oxides, while Fe-Ni/Cr alloys had similar corrosion products plus oxides of nickel and chromium. Nickel based alloys primarily formed NiO, with chromium oxides near the oxide/base alloy interface. In625 exhibited similar corrosion performance in relation to previous tests, lending confidence in comparisons between past and present experiments. HA230 exhibited internal oxidation that consisted of a nickel/chromium oxide. Alloys with significant aluminum alloying tended to exhibit superior performance, due formation of a thin alumina layer. Soluble corrosion products of chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten were also formed and are thought to be a significant factor in alloy performance.

  10. Development of wider bandgap n-type a-SiOx:H and μc-SiOx:H as both doped and intermediate reflecting layer for a-Si:H/ a-Si1-xGex:H tandem solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Po-Wei; Chen, Pei-Ling; Tsai, Chuang-Chuang

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we developed a-SiOx:H(n) and μc-SiOx:H(n) films as n-type layer, intermediate reflecting layer (IRL), and back-reflecting layer (BRL) to improve the light management in silicon thin-film solar cells. In the development of SiOx:H films, by properly adjusting the oxygen content of the films, the optical bandgap of μc-SiOx:H(n) can be increased while maintaining sufficient conductivity. Similar effect was found for a-SiOx:H(n). In a-Si:H single-junction cells, employing a-SiOx:H(n) as the replacement for a-Si:H(n) resulted in a relative efficiency enhancement of 11.4% due to the reduced parasitic absorption loss. We have also found that μc-SiOx:H(n) can replace back ITO layer as BRL, leading to a relative efficiency gain of 7.6%. For a-Si:H/ a-Si1- x Ge x:H tandem cell, employing μc-SiOx:H(n) as IRL increased the current density of top cell. In addition, employing a-SiOx:H(n) as a replacement of a-Si:H(n) in the top cell increased the current density of bottom cell due to the reduction of absorption loss. Combining all the improvements, the a-Si:H/ a-Si1-xGex:H tandem cell with efficiency of 9.2%, V OC = 1.58 V, J SC = 8.43 mA/cm2, and FF = 68.4% was obtained. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. Development of wide band gap p- a-SiOxCy:H using additional trimethylboron as carbon source gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Dong-Won; Sichanugrist, Porponth; Janthong, Bancha; Khan, Muhammad Ajmal; Niikura, Chisato; Konagai, Makoto

    2016-07-01

    We report p-type a-SiOxCy:H thin films which were fabricated by introducing additional Trimethylboron (TMB, B(CH3)3) doping gas into conventional standard p-type a-SiOx:H films. The TMB addition into the condition of p-a-SiOx:H improved optical bandgap from 2.14 to 2.20 eV without deterioration of electrical conductivity, which is promising for p-type window layer of thin film solar cells. The suggested p-a-SiOxCy:H films were applied in amorphous silicon solar cells and we found an increase of quantum efficiency at short wavelength regions due to wide bandgap of the new p-layer, and thus efficiency improvement from 10.4 to 10.7% was demonstrated in a-Si:H solar cell by employing the p-a-SiOxCy:H film. In case of a-SiOx:H cell, high open circuit voltage of 1.01 V was confirmed by using the suggested the p-a-SiOxCy:H film as a window layer. This new p-layer can be highly promising as a wide bandgap window layer to improve the performance of thin film silicon solar cells. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. Alloyed coatings for dispersion strengthened alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wermuth, F. R.; Stetson, A. R.

    1971-01-01

    Processing techniques were developed for applying several diffusion barriers to TD-Ni and TD-NiCr. Barrier coated specimens of both substrates were clad with Ni-Cr-Al and Fe-Cr-Al alloys and diffusion annealed in argon. Measurement of the aluminum distribution after annealing showed that, of the readily applicable diffusion barriers, a slurry applied tungsten barrier most effectively inhibited the diffusion of aluminum from the Ni-Cr-Al clad into the TD-alloy substrates. No barrier effectively limited interdiffusion of the Fe-Cr-Al clad with the substrates. A duplex process was then developed for applying Ni-Cr-Al coating compositions to the tungsten barrier coated substrates. A Ni-(16 to 32)Cr-3Si modifier was applied by slurry spraying and firing in vacuum, and was then aluminized by a fusion slurry process. Cyclic oxidation tests at 2300 F resulted in early coating failure due to inadequate edge coverage and areas of coating porosity. EMP analysis showed that oxidation had consumed 70 to 80 percent of the aluminum in the coating in less than 50 hours.

  13. Processing of Refractory Metal Alloys for JOYO Irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    RF Luther; ME Petrichek

    2006-02-21

    This is a summary of the refractory metal processing experienced by candidate Prometheus materiats as they were fabricated into specimens destined for testing within the JOYO test reactor, ex-reactor testing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), or testing within the NRPCT. The processing is described for each alloy from the point of inception to the point where processing was terminated due to the cancellation of Naval Reactor's involvement in the Prometheus Project. The alloys included three tantalum-base alloys (T-111, Ta-10W, and ASTAR-811C), a niobium-base alloy, (FS-85), and two molybdenum-rhenium alloys, one containing 44.5 w/o rhenium, and the other 47.5 w/o rhenium. Each of these alloys was either a primary candidate or back-up candidate for cladding and structural applications within the space reactor. Their production was intended to serve as a forerunner for large scale production ingots that were to be procured from commercial refractory metal vendors such as Wah Chang.

  14. NDE detectability of fatigue type cracks in high strength alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christner, B. K.; Rummel, W. D.

    1983-01-01

    Specimens suitable for investigating the reliability of production nondestructive evaluation (NDE) to detect tightly closed fatigue cracks in high strength alloys representative of those materials used in spacecraft engine/booster construction were produced. Inconel 718 was selected as representative of nickel base alloys and Haynes 188 was selected as representative of cobalt base alloys used in this application. Cleaning procedures were developed to insure the reusability of the test specimens and a flaw detection reliability assessment of the fluorescent penetrant inspection method was performed using the test specimens produced to characterize their use for future reliability assessments and to provide additional NDE flaw detection reliability data for high strength alloys. The statistical analysis of the fluorescent penetrant inspection data was performed to determine the detection reliabilities for each inspection at a 90% probability/95% confidence level.

  15. Chemistry related to the procurement of vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.M.; Chung H.M.; Tsai, H.C.

    1997-08-01

    Evaluation of trace element concentrations in vanadium alloys is important to characterize the low-activation characteristics and possible effects of trace elements on the properties. Detailed chemical analysis of several vanadium and vanadium alloy heats procured for the Argonne vanadium alloy development program were analyzed by Johnson-Matthey (UK) as part of a joint activity to evaluate trace element effects on the performance characteristics. These heats were produced by normal production practices for high grade vanadium. The analyses include approximately 60 elements analyzed in most cases by glow-discharge mass spectrometry. Values for molybdenum and niobium, which are critical for low-activation alloys, ranged from 0.4 to 60 wppm for the nine heats.

  16. Achieving optimum loop shapes in quaternary Pr-Co alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branagan, D. J.; Kramer, M. J.; Tang, Yali; McCallum, R. W.

    2000-05-01

    The magnetic properties and microstructures of a quaternary Pr-Co-Ti-C alloy were investigated. After heat treating at 800 °C, the quaternary alloy developed high coercivity (16.7 kOe) and high energy product (8.6 MGOe). Hysteretic loop shapes exhibiting single-phase magnetic character were achieved which was a problem which previously plagued development of Pr-Co alloys. The optimum microstructure contained 75-100 nm Pr1Co5 hard magnetic grains, 75-100 nm Pr1Co2 second phases, and <10 nm TiC grain boundary precipitates. The important factors in achieving optimum loop shapes in Pr-Co alloys were examined in detail.

  17. Electrochemical method of producing eutectic uranium alloy and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Horton, James A.; Hayden, H. Wayne

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus and method for continuous production of liquid uranium alloys through the electrolytic reduction of uranium chlorides. The apparatus includes an electrochemical cell formed from an anode shaped to form an electrolyte reservoir, a cathode comprising a metal, such as iron, capable of forming a eutectic uranium alloy having a melting point less than the melting point of pure uranium, and molten electrolyte in the reservoir comprising a chlorine or fluorine containing salt and uranium chloride. The method of the invention produces an eutectic uranium alloy by creating an electrolyte reservoir defined by a container comprising an anode, placing an electrolyte in the reservoir, the electrolyte comprising a chlorine or fluorine containing salt and uranium chloride in molten form, positioning a cathode in the reservoir where the cathode comprises a metal capable of forming an uranium alloy having a melting point less than the melting point of pure uranium, and applying a current between the cathode and the anode.

  18. Recombination and metastability in amorphous silicon and silicon germanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, M.

    1992-07-01

    This report describes the first year of a continuing research study to understand how recombination, trapping, and band-mobility modification affecting the electronic properties of amorphous semiconductors can be measured, characterized, and described by an appropriate spectrum of defect states, and how light-induced defects in a-Si:H and native defects in a-SiGe:H affect transport properties in these materials. The objective was to determine how the Staebler-Wronski defects affect the electronic processes in a-Si:H and a-SiGe:H films. To do this, electroluminescence (EL) and forward bias current in p-i-n devices (i-layer thicknesses greater than 2 micron) were studied both experimentally and theoretically before and after light soaking. A simple picture was developed to compare forward bias current to the EL signal. The result was unexpected: the product of the final current times the rise time was not constant before and after light soaking as expected from the concept of gain band width, but instead changed radically. The rise time t(sub x) increased by more than one order of magnitude while the final current I(sub f) did not change significantly with light soaking. On the other hand the I(sub f)t(sub x) product did hold close to a constant when only the applied voltage changed.

  19. Recombination and metastability in amorphous silicon and silicon germanium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, M. )

    1992-07-01

    This report describes the first year of a continuing research study to understand how recombination, trapping, and band-mobility modification affecting the electronic properties of amorphous semiconductors can be measured, characterized, and described by an appropriate spectrum of defect states, and how light-induced defects in a-Si:H and native defects in a-SiGe:H affect transport properties in these materials. The objective was to determine how the Staebler-Wronski defects affect the electronic processes in a-Si:H and a-SiGe:H films. To do this, electroluminescence (EL) and forward bias current in p-i-n devices (i-layer thickness > 2 {mu}m) were studied both experimentally and theoretically before and after light soaking. A simple picture was developed to compare forward bias current to the EL signal. The result was unexpected: the product of the final current times the rise time was not constant before and after light soaking as expected from the concept of gain band width, but instead changed radically. The rise time t{sub x} increased by more than one order of magnitude while the final current I{sub f} did not change significantly with light soaking. On the other hand the I{sub f}t{sub x} product did hold close to a constant when only the applied voltage changed.

  20. Shape Memory Alloy Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention discloses and teaches a unique, remote optically controlled micro actuator particularly suitable for aerospace vehicle applications wherein hot gas, or in the alternative optical energy, is employed as the medium by which shape memory alloy elements are activated. In gas turbine powered aircraft the source of the hot gas may be the turbine engine compressor or turbine sections.

  1. Quinary metallic glass alloys

    DOEpatents

    Lin, X.; Johnson, W.L.

    1998-04-07

    At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10{sup 3}K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf){sub a}(Al,Zn){sub b}(Ti,Nb){sub c}(Cu{sub x}Fe{sub y}(Ni,Co){sub z}){sub d} wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d{hor_ellipsis}y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

  2. Quinary metallic glass alloys

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Xianghong; Johnson, William L.

    1998-01-01

    At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10.sup.3 K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf).sub.a (Al,Zn).sub.b (Ti,Nb).sub.c (Cu.sub.x Fe.sub.y (Ni,Co).sub.z).sub.d wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d.multidot.y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

  3. Structural Changes in a-Si:H Films Deposited on the Edge of Crystallinity

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, A. H.; Yang, J.; Guha, S.; Williamson, D. L.

    1999-05-24

    Using infrared, H evolution and x-ray diffraction (XRD), the structure of high H dilution, glow discharge deposited a-Si:H films ''on the edge of crystallinity'' is examined. From the Si-H wag mode peak frequency and the XRD results, we postulate the existence of very small Si crystallites contained within the amorphous matrix, with the vast majority of the bonded H located on these crystalline surfaces. Upon annealing at ramp rates of 8-15(degree)C/min, a H evolution both of which are far below those observed for a Si:H films grown without H dilution using similar ramp rates. While the crystallite volume fraction is too small to be detected by XRD in the as-grown films, these crystallites catalyze the crystallization of the remainder of the amorphous matrix upon moderate annealing, thus explaining the existence of the low temperature H evolution peak.

  4. In situ investigation of the a-Si:H/c-Si interface

    SciTech Connect

    Feist, H.; Swiatkowski, C.; Elmiger, J.R.; Zipfel, M.; Kunst, M.

    1996-12-31

    Amorphous silicon/crystalline silicon solar cells have become a very interesting photovoltaic device in the last few years. The deposition of a-Si:H films on crystalline silicon substrates was monitored in situ by transient photoconductivity measurements in the microwave frequency range. At the start of the deposition a drastic increase of the interface recombination velocity was observed, followed by a rapid decrease. The implications of these results for the structure of the interface are discussed. Changes of the interface after deposition were detected without a change of the temperature, even at 250 C. The long relaxation time of the structure of the interface will be discussed. Ex situ results on the samples produced will be compared to the in situ results in view of the passivation properties of a-Si:H films on c-Si substrates.

  5. Improved charge collection of the buried p-i-n a-Si:H radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Fujieda, I.; Cho, G.; Conti, M.; Drewery, J.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Qureshi, S.; Street, R.A.; Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, CA )

    1989-09-01

    Charge collection in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) radiation detectors is improved for high LET particle detection by adding thin intrinsic layers to the usual p-i-n structure. This buried p-i-n structure enables us to apply higher bias and the electric field is enhanced. When irradiated by 5.8 MeV {alpha} particles, the 5.7 {mu}m thick buried p-i-n detector with bias 300V gives a signal size of 60,000 electrons, compared to about 20,000 electrons with the simple p-i-n detectors. The improved charge collection in the new structure is discussed. The capability of tailoring the field profile by doping a-Si:H opens a way to some interesting device structures. 17 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Hypervelocity impact on carbon nanotube reinforced a-SiC composite targets: An atomistic simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makeev, Maxim; Srivastava, Deepak

    2007-03-01

    Atomistic simulation studies, employing the Tersoff many-body reactive potential, have been performed to investigate the hypersonic velocity impact protection properties of carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced a-SiC composites, for a diamond spherical projectile velocities ranging from 1 km/s to 20 km/s. The scaling relations and analytical forms are derived to describe the penetration depth as a function of the velocity and radius of the projectile. A theoretical framework has been developed to describe the penetration depth behavior in the case of impact of hard projectile on hard target material. The atomistic simulation results are found to compare well with the obtained analytical forms. The effects of diamond nanoparticle impact on the a-SiC composites, with CNTs aligned parallel and perpendicular to the impact direction, caused by impact induced shock absorption and damage creation, will be described in this presentation.

  7. Molecular dynamics investigations of boron doping in a-Si:H

    SciTech Connect

    Fedders, P.A.; Drabold, D.A.

    1997-07-01

    The rather low doping efficiency of B in a-Si:H is almost always explained by the argument that almost all of the B is incorporated into three-fold coordinated sites and that B is inert or non-doping in this configuration. Using ab initio molecular dynamics, the authors have studied the energetics and doping (electronic structure) consequences of B incorporation into a-Si:H both with and without H passivation. Their results suggest that the conventional view is in error and that the low doping efficiency is primarily due to H passivation. These results are consistent with the low doping efficiency of B as well as NMR studies on the large electric field gradients experienced by the B atoms and on NMR double resonance studies of B-H neighboring distances.

  8. Multi-Line Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Performance of a Si(Li) Detector Stack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, G. Scott; McMurray, Robert E., Jr.; Keller, Robert G.; Wercinski, Paul F.; Walton, J. T.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental data is presented which for the first time displays multi-line spectrometer performance of a Si(Li) detector stack at elevated temperature. The stack consists of four elements, each with a 2 cm diameter active area. Ba-133 and Ag-110m spectra are obtained using various techniques to enhance the peak-to-background ratio. Spectral data are shown as a function of temperature (94 K less than or = T less than or = 230 K) using optimized peak shaping.

  9. Materials Properties Database for Selection of High-Temperature Alloys and Concepts of Alloy Design for SOFC Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z Gary; Paxton, Dean M.; Weil, K. Scott; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

    2002-11-24

    To serve as an interconnect / gas separator in an SOFC stack, an alloy should demonstrate the ability to provide (i) bulk and surface stability against oxidation and corrosion during prolonged exposure to the fuel cell environment, (ii) thermal expansion compatibility with the other stack components, (iii) chemical compatibility with adjacent stack components, (iv) high electrical conductivity of the surface reaction products, (v) mechanical reliability and durability at cell exposure conditions, (vii) good manufacturability, processability and fabricability, and (viii) cost effectiveness. As the first step of this approach, a composition and property database was compiled for high temperature alloys in order to assist in determining which alloys offer the most promise for SOFC interconnect applications in terms of oxidation and corrosion resistance. The high temperature alloys of interest included Ni-, Fe-, Co-base superal

  10. Performance of Hydrogenated a-Si:H Solar Cells with Downshifting Coating: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Nemeth, B.; Xu, Y.; Wang, H.; Sun, T.; Lee, B. G.; Duda, A.; Wang, Q.

    2011-05-01

    We apply a thin luminescent downshifting (LDS) coating to a hydrogenated amorphous Si (a-Si:H) solar cell and study the mechanism of possible current enhancement. The conversion material used in this study converts wavelengths below 400 nm to a narrow line around 615 nm. This material is coated on the front of the glass of the a-Si:H solar cell with a glass/TCO/p/i/n/Ag superstrate configuration. The initial efficiency of the solar cell without the LDS coating is above 9.0 % with open circuit voltage of 0.84 V. Typically, the spectral response below 400 nm of an a-Si:H solar cell is weaker than that at 615 nm. By converting ultraviolet (UV) light to red light, the solar cell will receive more red photons; therefore, solar cell performance is expected to improve. We observe evidence of downshifting in reflectance spectra. The cell Jsc decreases by 0.13 mA/cm2, and loss mechanisms are identified.

  11. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) based gamma camera: Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.; Drewery, J.S.; Hong, W.S.; Jing, T.; Kaplan, S.N.; Mireshghi, A.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1994-01-01

    A new gamma camera using a-Si:H photodetectors has been designed for the imaging of heart and other small organs. In this new design the photomultiplier tubes and the position sensing circuitry are replaced by 2-D array of a-Si:H p-i-n pixel photodetectors and readout circuitry which are built on a substrate. Without the photomultiplier tubes this camera is light weight, hence can be made portable. To predict the characteristics and the performance of this new gamma camera we did Monte Carlo simulations. In the simulations 128 {times} 128 imaging array of various pixel sizes were used. {sup 99m}Tc (140keV) and {sup 201}Tl(70keV) were used as radiation sources. From the simulations we could obtain the resolution of the camera and the overall system, and the blurring effects due to scattering in the phantom. Using the Wiener filter for image processing, restoration of the blurred image could be achieved. Simulation results of a-Si:H based gamma camera were compared with those of a conventional gamma camera.

  12. Advanced ordered intermetallic alloy deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.; Maziasz, P.J.; Easton, D.S.

    1997-04-01

    The need for high-strength, high-temperature, and light-weight materials for structural applications has generated a great deal of interest in ordered intermetallic alloys, particularly in {gamma}-based titanium aluminides {gamma}-based TiAl alloys offer an attractive mix of low density ({approximately}4g/cm{sup 3}), good creep resistance, and high-temperature strength and oxidation resistance. For rotating or high-speed components. TiAl also has a high damping coefficient which minimizes vibrations and noise. These alloys generally contain two phases. {alpha}{sub 2} (DO{sub 19} structure) and {gamma} (L 1{sub 0}), at temperatures below 1120{degrees}C, the euticoid temperature. The mechanical properties of TiAl-based alloys are sensitive to both alloy compositions and microstructure. Depending on heat-treatment and thermomechanical processing, microstructures with near equiaxed {gamma}, a duplex structure (a mix of the {gamma} and {alpha}{sub 2} phases) can be developed in TiAl alloys containing 45 to 50 at. % Al. The major concern for structural use of TiAl alloys is their low ductility and poor fracture resistance at ambient temperatures. The purpose of this project is to improve the fracture toughness of TiAl-based alloys by controlling alloy composition, microstructure and thermomechanical treatment. This work is expected to lead to the development of TiAl alloys with significantly improved fracture toughness and tensile ductility for structural use.

  13. Preliminary study of oxide-dispersion-strengthened B-1900 prepared by mechanical alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasgow, T. K.; Quatinetz, M.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy based on the B-1900 composition was produced by the mechanical alloying process. Without optimization of the processing for the alloy or the alloy for the processing, recrystallization of the extruded product to large elongated grains was achieved. Materials having grain length-width ratios of 3 and 5.5 were tested in tension and stress-rupture. The ODS B-1900 exhibited tensile strength similar to that of cast B-1900. Its stress-rupture life was lower than that of cast B-1900 at 760 C. At 1095 C the ODS B-1900 with the higher grain length-width ratio (5.5) had stress-rupture life superior to that of cast B-1900. It was concluded that, with optimization, oxide dispersion strengthening of B-1900 and other complex cast nickel-base alloys has potential for improving high temperature properties over those of the cast alloy counterparts.

  14. Low Cost Al-Si Casting Alloy As In-Situ Composite for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A.

    2000-01-01

    A new aluminum-silicon (Al-Si) alloy has been successfully developed at NASA- Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) that has significant improvement in tensile and fatigue strength at elevated temperatures (500 F-700 F). The alloy offers a number of benefits such as light weight, high hardness, low thermal expansion and high surface wear resistance. In hypereutectic form, this alloy is considered as an in-situ Al-Si composite with tensile strength of about 90% higher than the auto industry 390 alloy at 600 F. This composite is very economically produced by using either conventional permanent steel molds or die casting. The projected material cost is less than $0.90 per pound, and automotive components such as pistons can be cast for high production rate using conventional casting techniques with a low and fully accounted cost. Key Words: Metal matrix composites, In-situ composite, aluminum-silicon alloy, hypereutectic alloy, permanent mold casting, die casting.

  15. Separation processes during binary monotectic alloy production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, D. O.; Facemire, B. R.; Kaukler, W. F.; Witherow, W. K.; Fanning, U.

    1984-01-01

    Observation of microgravity solidification processes indicates that outside of sedimentation, at least two other important effects can separate the phases: critical-point wetting and spreading; and thermal migration of second-phase droplets due to interfacial tension gradients. It is difficult to study these surface tension effects while in a unit gravity field. In order to investigate the processes occurring over a temperature range, i.e., between a consolute point and the monotectic temperature, it is necessary to use a low-gravity environment. The MSFC drop tube (and tower), the ballistic trajectory KC-135 airplane, and the Space Shuttle are ideal facilities to aid formation and testing of hypotheses. Much of the early work in this area focuses on transparent materials so that process dynamics may be studied by optical techniques such as photography for viewing macro-processes; holography for studying diffusional growth; spinodal decomposition and coalescence; ellipsometry for surface wetting and spreading effects; and interferometry and spectroscopy for small-scale spatial resolution of concentration profiles.

  16. Electrical transport in transverse direction through silicon carbon alloy multilayers containing regular size silicon quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Aparajita; Kole, Arindam; Dasgupta, Arup; Chaudhuri, Partha

    2016-11-01

    Electrical transport in the transverse direction has been studied through a series of hydrogenated silicon carbon alloy multilayers (SiC-MLs) deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method. Each SiC-ML consists of 30 cycles of the alternating layers of a nearly amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) and a microcrystalline silicon carbide (μc-SiC:H) that contains high density of silicon quantum dots (Si-QDs). A detailed investigation by cross sectional TEM reveals preferential growth of densely packed Si-QDs of regular sizes ∼4.8 nm in diameter in a vertically aligned columnar structure within the SiC-ML. More than six orders of magnitude increase in transverse current through the SiC-ML structure were observed for decrease in the a-SiC:H layer thickness from 13 nm to 2 nm. The electrical transport mechanism was established to be a combination of grain boundary or band tail hopping and Frenkel-Poole (F-P) type conduction depending on the temperature and externally applied voltage ranges. Evaluation of trap concentration within the multilayer structures from the fitted room temperature current voltage characteristics by F-P function shows reduction up-to two orders of magnitude indicating an improvement in the short range order in the a-SiC:H matrix for decrease in the thickness of a-SiC:H layer.

  17. Self-irradiation of Pu, its alloys and compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeeva, L. F.

    2000-07-01

    Self-irradiation of Pu, its alloys and compounds by products of known α-decomposition is a continuous complicated process, which includes numerous different phenomena. The accumulation of Pu decomposition products causes material structure and properties change. This problem is the subject of many works, most of them concerned with the behavior of Pu and its alloys at low (liquid He and N) temperatures. The survey is given of the results of our experiments connected with radiogenic helium behavior, crystal structure and properties of Pu metallic compounds and Pu oxide ceramics in a self-irradiation process at room temperature under isochronal heat treatments.

  18. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Santella, Michael L.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    1998-01-01

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

  19. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1998-03-10

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

  20. Conducting polymers and corrosion: Part 2 -- Polyaniline on aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tallman, D.E.; Pae, Y.; Bierwagen, G.P.

    2000-04-01

    The electrochemical behavior of conducting polyaniline coatings on various aluminum alloys subjected to immersion in dilute Harrison solution (0.35% ammonium sulfate [(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}], 0.05% sodium chloride [NaCl]) was studied. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy revealed that the charge-transfer resistance (R{sub ct}) of polyaniline-coated alloys increased as a function of immersion time. Polyaniline-coated platinum did not exhibit a significant increase in impedance under similar conditions, indicating that an active metal in contact with the polyaniline is required for the observed increase in R{sub ct}. A similar pattern of increasing R{sub ct} was observed for Alodine (Product A)-treated Al 7075T-6 (UNS A97075) alloys. Mean current and mean potential values obtained from electrochemical noise measurements also suggest a substantial electrochemical interaction between the polyaniline and the aluminum alloy during the early stages of immersion. Polarization experiments and open-circuit potential measurements revealed an ennobling of aluminum alloys to higher potential in the presence of polyaniline coatings. The corrosion protection afforded by a polyaniline/epoxy two-coat system on Al 2024T-3 (UNS A92024) alloy also was evaluated using impedance spectroscopy and compared with that for a single coat of epoxy on untreated and Product A-treated Al2024T-3 alloy. The Product A treatment and the polyaniline coating were found to increase the lifetime of the epoxy topcoat, although these two-coating systems exhibited rather different variations in low-frequency impedance with immersion time. A mechanism consistent with these observations was suggested.

  1. Diffusion bonding of superplastic aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sunwoo, A.J.

    1993-12-01

    Ability to diffusion bond aluminum alloys, in particular superplastic aluminum alloys, will complete the technology-base that is strongly needed to enhance the use of superplastic forming (SPF) technology. Concurrent diffusion bonding (DB)-SPF is considered to be an energy-saving manufacturing process since it simplifies the production of complex components. Moreover, because of increased design flexibility, overall manufacturing cost and component weight are significantly reduced. Diffusion bonding is an attractive manufacturing option for applications where the preservation of the base metal microstructure and, in turn, mechanical properties is imperative in the bond area. The process utilizes either the solid state or transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding to produce a bond with microstructure continuity in the joint. In addition, there is no localized thermal gradient present to induce distortion or to create residual stresses in the component, thereby increasing structural integrity.

  2. Alternate alloying for environmental resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Smolik, G.R.; Banerji, S.K.

    1986-01-01

    The 35 papers contained in this collection detail efforts being made toward achieving environmental resistance of alloys and conserved usage of strategic and critical materials. An in-depth look is taken at the roles played by various alloying elements in providing desired microstructures, properties, and influences upon environmental attack. Also presented are applications and performances of alternate alloys in aqueous and high temperature gaseous and molten salt environments. The book is broken down into five key sections covering: 1) philosophies and status of programs designing alloys for resistance to various environmental and microstructural stability of some of these alloys systems, 2) applications in hot corrosion and sulfidizing environments, 3) applications in oxidizing conditions, 4) corrosion resistance in aqueous environments, and 5) other properties, such as physical and mechanical, which are necessary to evaluate overall alloy performance.

  3. Two phase titanium aluminide alloy

    DOEpatents

    Deevi, Seetharama C.; Liu, C. T.

    2001-01-01

    A two-phase titanic aluminide alloy having a lamellar microstructure with little intercolony structures. The alloy can include fine particles such as boride particles at colony boundaries and/or grain boundary equiaxed structures. The alloy can include alloying additions such as .ltoreq.10 at % W, Nb and/or Mo. The alloy can be free of Cr, V, Mn, Cu and/or Ni and can include, in atomic %, 45 to 55% Ti, 40 to 50% Al, 1 to 5% Nb, 0.3 to 2% W, up to 1% Mo and 0.1 to 0.3% B. In weight %, the alloy can include 57 to 60% Ti, 30 to 32% Al, 4 to 9% Nb, up to 2% Mo, 2 to 8% W and 0.02 to 0.08% B.

  4. TERNARY ALLOY-CONTAINING PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Waber, J.T.

    1960-02-23

    Ternary alloys of uranium and plutonium containing as the third element either molybdenum or zirconium are reported. Such alloys are particularly useful as reactor fuels in fast breeder reactors. The alloy contains from 2 to 25 at.% of molybdenum or zirconium, the balance being a combination of uranium and plutonium in the ratio of from 1 to 9 atoms of uranlum for each atom of plutonium. These alloys are prepared by melting the constituent elements, treating them at an elevated temperature for homogenization, and cooling them to room temperature, the rate of cooling varying with the oomposition and the desired phase structure. The preferred embodiment contains 12 to 25 at.% of molybdenum and is treated by quenching to obtain a body centered cubic crystal structure. The most important advantage of these alloys over prior binary alloys of both plutonium and uranium is the lack of cracking during casting and their ready machinability.

  5. Corrosion performance of structural alloys.

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.

    1999-07-15

    Component reliability and long-term trouble-free performance of structural materials are essential in power-generating and gasification processes that utilize coal as a feedstock. During combustion and conversion of coal, the environments encompass a wide range of oxygen partial pressures, from excess-air conditions in conventional boilers to air-deficient conditions in 10W-NO{sub x} and gasification systems. Apart from the environmental aspects of the effluent from coal combustion and conversion, one concern from the systems standpoint is the aggressiveness of the gaseous/deposit environment toward structural components such as waterwall tubes, steam superheaters, syngas coolers, and hot-gas filters. The corrosion tests in the program described in this paper address the individual and combined effects of oxygen, sulfur, and chlorine on the corrosion response of several ASME-coded and noncoded structural alloys that were exposed to air-deficient and excess-air environments typical of coal-combustion and gasification processes. Data in this paper address the effects of preoxidation on the subsequent corrosion performance of structural materials such as 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel, Type 347 austenitic stainless steel, Alloys 800, 825, 625, 214, Hastelloy X, and iron aluminide when exposed at 650 C to various mixed-gas environments with and without HCI. Results are presented for scaling kinetics, microstructural characteristics of corrosion products, detailed evaluations of near-surface regions of the exposed specimens, gains in our mechanistic understanding of the roles of S and Cl in the corrosion process, and the effect of preoxidation on subsequent corrosion.

  6. Alloy Interface Interdiffusion Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Garces, Jorge E.; Abel, Phillip B.

    2003-01-01

    With renewed interest in developing nuclear-powered deep space probes, attention will return to improving the metallurgical processing of potential nuclear fuels so that they remain dimensionally stable over the years required for a successful mission. Previous work on fuel alloys at the NASA Glenn Research Center was primarily empirical, with virtually no continuing research. Even when empirical studies are exacting, they often fail to provide enough insight to guide future research efforts. In addition, from a fundamental theoretical standpoint, the actinide metals (which include materials used for nuclear fuels) pose a severe challenge to modern electronic-structure theory. Recent advances in quantum approximate atomistic modeling, coupled with first-principles derivation of needed input parameters, can help researchers develop new alloys for nuclear propulsion.

  7. Amorphous metal alloy and composite

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Rong; Merz, Martin D.

    1985-01-01

    Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

  8. Titanium-tantalum alloy development

    SciTech Connect

    Cotton, J.D.; Bingert, J.F.; Dunn, P.S.; Butt, D.P.; Margevicius, R.W.

    1996-04-01

    Research has been underway at Los Alamos National Laboratory for several years to develop an alloy capable of containing toxic materials in the event of a fire involving a nuclear weapon. Due to their high melting point, good oxidation resistance, and low solubility in molten plutonium, alloys based on the Ti-Ta binary system have been developed for this purpose. The course of the alloy development to-date, along with processing and property data, are presented in this overview.

  9. Low bandgap a-Si:H film with better stability prepared by RF PECVD method using helium dilution

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, S.; Hazra, S.; Middya, A.R.; Barua, A.K.

    1994-12-31

    Low bandgap a-Si:H films have been prepared by RF PECVD method (13.56 MHz) using helium as diluent to silane gas. Helium dilution and chamber pressure play an important role to reduce optical gap at substrate temperature {approximately}210 C. This highly photosensitive low bandgap material showed less light induced degradation compared to that for normal bandgap a-Si:H material. Single junction solar cell having efficiency 7.2% (1 cm{sup 2} area) and spectral response up to 850 nm have been fabricated using 1.6 eV a-Si:H film.

  10. Stability of single and tandem junction a-Si:H solar cells grown using the ECR process

    SciTech Connect

    Dalal, V.L.; Maxson, T.; Girvan, R.; Haroon, S.

    1997-07-01

    The authors report on the fabrication and stability tests of single junction a-Si:H, and tandem junction a-Si:H/A-Si:H solar cells using the ECR process under high hydrogen dilution (H-ECR process). They show that devices with high fill factors can be made using the H-ECR process. They also report on the stability studies of the solar cells under 1 and 2-sun illumination conditions. The solar cells show very little degradation even after 500 hours of illumination under 2 x sunlight illumination.

  11. Particulate and gaseous emissions when welding aluminum alloys.

    PubMed

    Cole, Homer; Epstein, Seymour; Peace, Jon

    2007-09-01

    Fabrication and repair of aluminum components and structures commonly involves the use of electric arc welding. The interaction of the arc and the metal being welded generates ultraviolet radiation, metallic oxides, fumes, and gases. Aluminum is seldom used as the pure metal but is often alloyed with other metals to improve strength and other physical properties. Therefore, the exact composition of any emissions will depend on the welding process and the particular aluminum alloy being welded. To quantify such emissions, The Aluminum Association sponsored several studies to characterize arc welding emissions by the gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) processes for various combinations of base and filler alloys. In all cases, the tests were conducted under conditions that could be found in a production weld shop without forced ventilation. The concentrations of each analyte that a welder could be exposed to were greatly affected by the welding process, the composition of the base and filler alloys, the position of the welder, and the welding helmet. The results obtained can be used by employers to identify and control potential hazards associated with the welding of aluminum alloys and can provide the basis for hazard communication to employees involved in the welding of these alloys.

  12. Effect of a metal alloy fuel catalyst on bacterial growth.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Ruma; Koerting, Claudia; Suib, Steven L; Best, Michael H; Berlin, Alvin J

    2005-11-01

    Many microorganisms have been demonstrated to utilize petroleum fuel products to fulfill their nutritional requirement for carbon. As a result, the ability of these microbes to degrade fuel has both a deleterious affect as well as beneficial applications. This study focused on the undesired ability of bacteria to grow on fuel and the potential for some metal alloys to inhibit this biodegradation. The objective of this study was to review the pattern of growth of two reference strains of petroleum-degrading bacteria, Pseudomonas oleovorans and Rhodococcus rhodocrous, in a specific hydrocarbon environment in the presence of a commercially available alloy. The alloy formulated and supplied by Advanced Power Systems International Inc. (APSI) is sold for fuel reformulation and other purposes. The components of the alloy used in the study were antimony, tin, lead, and mercury formulated as pellets. Surface characterization also showed the presence of tin oxide and lead amalgam phases. Hydrocarbon used for the study was primarily 87-octane gasoline. The growth of the bacteria in the water and mineral-supplemented gasoline mixture over 6-8 weeks was monitored by the viable plate count method. While an initial increase in bacteria occurred in the first week, overall bacterial growth was found to be suppressed in the presence of the alloy. Results also indicate that the alloy surface characteristics that convey the catalytic activity may also contribute to the observed antibacterial activity. PMID:16262333

  13. Development of materials and process technology for dual alloy disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marder, J. M.; Kortovich, C. S.

    1981-01-01

    Techniques for the preparation of dual alloy disks were developed and evaluated. Four material combinations were evaluated in the form of HIP consolidated and heat treated cylindrical and plate shapes in terms of elevated temperature tensile, stress rupture and low cycle fatigue properties. The process evaluation indicated that the pe-HIP AF-115 rim/loose powder Rene 95 hub combination offered the best overall range of mechanical properties for dual disk applications. The feasibility of this dual alloy concept for the production of more complex components was demonstrated by the scale up fabrication of a prototype CFM-56 disk made from this AF-115/Rene 95 combination. The hub alloy ultimate tensile strength was approximately 92 percent of the program goal of 1520 MPa (220 ksi) at 480 C (900 F) and the rim alloy stress rupture goal of 300 hours at 675 C (1250 F)/925 MPa (134 ksi) was exceeded by 200 hours. The low cycle fatigue properties were equivalent to those exhibited by HIP and heat treated alloys. There was an absence of rupture notch sensitivity in both alloys. The joint tensile properties were approximately 85 percent of the weaker of the two materials (Rene 95) and the stress rupture properties were equivalent to those of the weaker of the two materials (Rene 95).

  14. Local phase transformation in alloys during charged-particle irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.; Okamoto, P.R.

    1984-10-01

    Among the various mechanisms and processes by which energetic irradiation can alter the phase stability of alloys, radiation-induced segregation is one of the most important phenomena. Radiation-induced segregation in alloys occurs as a consequence of preferential coupling between persistent fluxes of excess defects and solute atoms, leading to local enrichment or depletion of alloying elements. Thus, this phenomenon tends to drive alloy systems away from thermodynamic equilibrium, on a local scale. During charged-particle irradiations, the spatial nonuniformity in the defect production gives rise to a combination of persistent defect fluxes, near the irradiated surface and in the peak-damage region. This defect-flux combination can modify the alloy composition in a complex fashion, i.e., it can destabilize pre-existing phases, causing spatially- and temporally-dependent precipitation of new metastable phases. The effects of radiation-induced segregation on local phase transformations in Ni-based alloys during proton bombardment and high-voltage electron-microscope irradiation at elevated temperatures are discussed.

  15. Duct and cladding alloy

    DOEpatents

    Korenko, Michael K.

    1983-01-01

    An austenitic alloy having good thermal stability and resistance to sodium corrosion at 700.degree. C. consists essentially of 35-45% nickel 7.5-14% chromium 0.8-3.2% molybdenum 0.3-1.0% silicon 0.2-1.0% manganese 0-0.1% zirconium 2.0-3.5% titanium 1.0-2.0% aluminum 0.02-0.1% carbon 0-0.01% boron and the balance iron.

  16. Shape memory alloy actuator

    DOEpatents

    Varma, Venugopal K.

    2001-01-01

    An actuator for cycling between first and second positions includes a first shaped memory alloy (SMA) leg, a second SMA leg. At least one heating/cooling device is thermally connected to at least one of the legs, each heating/cooling device capable of simultaneously heating one leg while cooling the other leg. The heating/cooling devices can include thermoelectric and/or thermoionic elements.

  17. Nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perepezko, John H. (Inventor); Allen, Donald R. (Inventor); Foley, James C. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Compositions and methods for obtaining nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys are described. A composition includes an amorphous matrix forming element (e.g., Al or Fe); at least one transition metal element; and at least one crystallizing agent that is insoluble in the resulting amorphous matrix. During devitrification, the crystallizing agent causes the formation of a high density nanocrystal dispersion. The compositions and methods provide advantages in that materials with superior properties are provided.

  18. In vitro biocorrosion of Co-Cr-Mo implant alloy by macrophage cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsin-Yi; Bumgardner, Joel D

    2004-11-01

    We hypothesized that macrophage cells and their released reactive chemical species (RCS) affect Co-Cr-Mo alloy's corrosion properties and that alloy corrosion products change macrophage cell behavior. A custom cell culture corrosion cell was used to evaluate how culture medium, cells, and RCS altered alloy corrosion in 3-day tests. Corrosion was evaluated by measuring total charge transfer at a constant potential using a potentiostat and metal ion release by atomic emission spectroscopy. Viability, proliferation, and NO (nitric oxide) and IL-1beta (interlukin-1beta) release were used to assess cellular response to alloy corrosion products. In the presence of activated cells, total charge transfers and Co ion release were the lowest (p < 0.05). This was attributed to an enhancement of the surface oxide by RCS. Cr and Mo release were not different between cells and activated cells. Low levels of metal ions did not affect cell viability, proliferation, or NO release, though IL-1beta released from the activated cells was higher on the alloy compared to the controls. These data support the hypothesis that macrophage cells and their RCS affect alloy corrosion. Changes in alloy corrosion by cells may be important to the development of host responses to the alloy and its corrosion products.

  19. Fabrication and Characterization of novel W80Ni10Nb10 alloy produced by mechanical alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, R.; Patra, A.; Karak, S. K.; Pattanaik, A.; Mishra, S. C.

    2016-02-01

    Nanostructured tungsten (W) based alloy with nominal composition of W80Ni10Nb10 (in wt. %) was synthesized by mechanical alloying of elemental powders of tungsten (W), nickel (Ni), niobium (Nb) in a high energy planetary ball-mill for 20 h using chrome steel as grinding media and toluene as process control agent followed by compaction at 500 MPa pressure for 5 mins and sintering at 1500°C for 2 h in Ar atmosphere. The phase evolution and the microstructure of the milled powder and consolidated product were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The crystallite size of W in W80Ni10Nb10 powder was reduced from 100 μm at 0 h to 45.6 nm at 10 h and 34.1 nm at 20 h of milling whereas lattice strain increases to 35% at 20 h of milling. The dislocation density shows sharp increase up to 5 h of milling and the rate of increase drops beyond 5 to 20 h of milling. The lattice parameter of tungsten in W80Ni10Nb10 expanded upto 0.04% at 10 h of milling and contracted upto 0.02% at 20 h of milling. The SEM micrograph revealed the presence of spherical and elongated particles in W80Ni10Nb10 powders at 20 h of milling. The particle size decreases from 100 μm to 2 μm with an increase in the milling time from 0 to 20 hours. The crystallite size of W in milled W80Ni10Nb10 alloy as evident from bright field TEM image was in well agreement with the measured crystallite size from XRD. Structure of W in 20 h milled W80Ni10Nb10 alloy was identified by indexing of selected area diffraction (SAD) pattern. Formation of NbNi intermetallic was evident from XRD pattern and SEM micrograph of sintered alloy. Maximum sinterability of 90.8% was achieved in 20 h milled sintered alloy. Hardness and wear study was also conducted to investigate the mechanical behaviour of the sintered product. Hardness of W80Ni10Nb10 alloy reduces with increasing load whereas wear rate increases with increasing load. The evaluated

  20. Comparison of different pressing techniques for the preparation of n-type silicon-germanium thermoelectric alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Harringa, J.L.; Cook, B.A.

    1996-06-01

    Improvements to state-of-the-art Si{sub 80}Ge{sub 20} thermoelectric alloys have been observed in laboratory-scale samples by the powder metallurgy techniques of mechanical alloying and hot pressing. Incorporating these improvements in large scale compacts for the production of thermoelectric generator elements is the next step in achieving higher efficiency RTGs. This paper discusses consolidation of large quantities of mechanically alloyed powders into production size compacts. Differences in thermoelectric properties are noted between the compacts prepared by the standard technique of hot uniaxial pressing and hot isostatic pressing. Most significant is the difference in carrier concentration between the alloys prepared by the two consolidation techniques.

  1. A Promising New Class of High-Temperature Alloys: Eutectic High-Entropy Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yiping; Dong, Yong; Guo, Sheng; Jiang, Li; Kang, Huijun; Wang, Tongmin; Wen, Bin; Wang, Zhijun; Jie, Jinchuan; Cao, Zhiqiang; Ruan, Haihui; Li, Tingju

    2014-08-01

    High-entropy alloys (HEAs) can have either high strength or high ductility, and a simultaneous achievement of both still constitutes a tough challenge. The inferior castability and compositional segregation of HEAs are also obstacles for their technological applications. To tackle these problems, here we proposed a novel strategy to design HEAs using the eutectic alloy concept, i.e. to achieve a microstructure composed of alternating soft fcc and hard bcc phases. As a manifestation of this concept, an AlCoCrFeNi2.1 (atomic portion) eutectic high-entropy alloy (EHEA) was designed. The as-cast EHEA possessed a fine lamellar fcc/B2 microstructure, and showed an unprecedented combination of high tensile ductility and high fracture strength at room temperature. The excellent mechanical properties could be kept up to 700°C. This new alloy design strategy can be readily adapted to large-scale industrial production of HEAs with simultaneous high fracture strength and high ductility.

  2. A promising new class of high-temperature alloys: eutectic high-entropy alloys.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yiping; Dong, Yong; Guo, Sheng; Jiang, Li; Kang, Huijun; Wang, Tongmin; Wen, Bin; Wang, Zhijun; Jie, Jinchuan; Cao, Zhiqiang; Ruan, Haihui; Li, Tingju

    2014-01-01

    High-entropy alloys (HEAs) can have either high strength or high ductility, and a simultaneous achievement of both still constitutes a tough challenge. The inferior castability and compositional segregation of HEAs are also obstacles for their technological applications. To tackle these problems, here we proposed a novel strategy to design HEAs using the eutectic alloy concept, i.e. to achieve a microstructure composed of alternating soft fcc and hard bcc phases. As a manifestation of this concept, an AlCoCrFeNi2.1 (atomic portion) eutectic high-entropy alloy (EHEA) was designed. The as-cast EHEA possessed a fine lamellar fcc/B2 microstructure, and showed an unprecedented combination of high tensile ductility and high fracture strength at room temperature. The excellent mechanical properties could be kept up to 700°C. This new alloy design strategy can be readily adapted to large-scale industrial production of HEAs with simultaneous high fracture strength and high ductility. PMID:25160691

  3. A Promising New Class of High-Temperature Alloys: Eutectic High-Entropy Alloys

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yiping; Dong, Yong; Guo, Sheng; Jiang, Li; Kang, Huijun; Wang, Tongmin; Wen, Bin; Wang, Zhijun; Jie, Jinchuan; Cao, Zhiqiang; Ruan, Haihui; Li, Tingju

    2014-01-01

    High-entropy alloys (HEAs) can have either high strength or high ductility, and a simultaneous achievement of both still constitutes a tough challenge. The inferior castability and compositional segregation of HEAs are also obstacles for their technological applications. To tackle these problems, here we proposed a novel strategy to design HEAs using the eutectic alloy concept, i.e. to achieve a microstructure composed of alternating soft fcc and hard bcc phases. As a manifestation of this concept, an AlCoCrFeNi2.1 (atomic portion) eutectic high-entropy alloy (EHEA) was designed. The as-cast EHEA possessed a fine lamellar fcc/B2 microstructure, and showed an unprecedented combination of high tensile ductility and high fracture strength at room temperature. The excellent mechanical properties could be kept up to 700°C. This new alloy design strategy can be readily adapted to large-scale industrial production of HEAs with simultaneous high fracture strength and high ductility. PMID:25160691

  4. Controlling remelting processes for superalloys and aerospace Ti alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melgaard, D. K.; Williamson, R. L.; Beaman, J. J.

    1998-03-01

    Remelting is performed to facilitate the production of clean, fully dense, homogeneous castings of superalloys and aerospace titanium alloys and is crucial to the defect-free production of these important materials. Modern electroslag remelting and vacuum arc remelting control systems are closed-loop, single input-single output systems that oversimplify the physical properties of the processes; the ever-increasing demand for cleaner, more highly engineered, chemically tuned alloys has pushed these control methodologies to their limit. A new generation of these controllers is being developed by the Specialty Metals Process Consortium and Sandia National Laboratories to answer the challenges of remelting control for the next generation of alloys; these control systems will use multiple sensor inputs and apply material-specific system and process models.

  5. The history of development of molybdenum alloys for structural applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wadsworth, J.; Wittenauer, J.P.

    1993-02-01

    Molybdenum was first isolated as an element in 1893 and found initial commercial application as a filament support for incandescent lamps in 1910. The advent of arc melting practice in the 1940s led to an increase in availability of Mo sheet, bar, and plate products. Alloy development programs were heavily supported starting in the 1950s and several key alloys emerged over the next twenty years that remain in use to the present time such as Mo-TZM, unalloyed Mo, and Mo-Re. In recent years, improved understanding of the role of oxygen and carbide distributions at grain boundaries have led to increased reliability and use of Mo in aerospace products. Current developmental programs in areas of propulsion and energy conversion will ensure the prominent position of Mo as a high-temperature structural material. This paper highlights some of these key developments in the evolution of Mo alloys.

  6. Characterization Results of a Novel Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collado, M.; Nava, N.; Herranz, S.; Ramiro, C.; San Juan, J. M.; Patti, S.; Lautier, J.-M.

    2012-07-01

    A novel Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) has been developed as an alternative to currently available alloys. This material, called SMARQ, shows a higher working range of temperatures with respect to the SMA materials used until now, mainly NiTi based alloys. SMARQ is a fully European material technology and production processes, which allows the manufacture of high quality products, with tuneable transformation temperatures up to 200oC. A full Characterization test campaign has been completed in order to obtain the material properties and check its suitability to be used as active material in space actuators. Details of the tests and results of the characterization test campaign, focused in the material unique properties for their use in actuators, will be presented in this work. Some application examples of space mechanisms and actuators, currently under development, will be summarized as part of this work, demonstrating the technology suitability for the development of space actuators.

  7. Role of the buffer at the interface of intrinsic a-Si:H and p-type a-Si:H on amorphous/crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Fanying; Shen, Leilei; Shi, Jianhua; Zhang, Liping; Liu, Jinning; Liu, Yucheng; Liu, Zhengxin

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the influence of the different buffer at the interface between the intrinsic a-Si:H and p-type a-Si:H layers on amorphous/crystalline silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells performance. It is demonstrated that the ultrathin buffer at interface of intrinsic a-Si:H and p-type a-Si:H, obtained by H-rich plasma treatment on the initial intrinsic a-Si:H passivation layer, can significantly enhance the minority carrier lifetime and decrease the emitter saturation current density. Spectroscopic ellipsometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses indicate that the initial intrinsic a-Si:H films become dense and less defected as a result of the relaxation and reconstruction when they are treated during the H-rich plasma environment. Based on this finding combined with the optimization of surface texturization of the silicon wafer, this work allows us to reach very high Voc values over 730 mV without losses on fill factor, the 100 μm, 125 × 125 mm2 SHJ solar cells were fabricated with industry-compatible process, yielding the efficiency up to 22.5%.

  8. Process for the production of hydrogen from water

    DOEpatents

    Miller, William E.; Maroni, Victor A.; Willit, James L.

    2010-05-25

    A method and device for the production of hydrogen from water and electricity using an active metal alloy. The active metal alloy reacts with water producing hydrogen and a metal hydroxide. The metal hydroxide is consumed, restoring the active metal alloy, by applying a voltage between the active metal alloy and the metal hydroxide. As the process is sustainable, only water and electricity is required to sustain the reaction generating hydrogen.

  9. Electron cyclotron resonance deposition of amorphous silicon alloy films and devices. Final subcontract report, 1 April 1991--31 March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Shing, Y.H.

    1992-10-01

    This report describes work to develop a state-of-the-art electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system. The objective was to understand the deposition processes of amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and related alloys, with a best-effort improvement of optoelectronic material properties and best-effort stabilization of solar cell performance. ECR growth parameters were systematically and extensively investigated; materials characterization included constant photocurrent measurement (CPM), junction capacitance, drive-level capacitance profiling (DLCP), optical transmission, light and dark photoconductivity, and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Conventional ECR-deposited a-Si:H was compared to a new form, a-Si:(Xe, H), in which xenon gas was added to the ECR plasma. a-Si:(Xe,H) possessed low, stable dark conductivities and high photosensitivites. Light-soaking revealed photodegradation rates about 35% lower than those of comparable radio frequency (rf)-deposited material. ECR-deposited p-type a SiC:H and intrinsic a-Si:H films underwent evaluation as components of p-i-n solar cells with standard rf films for the remaining layers.

  10. Large Electric Field–Enhanced–Hardness Effect in a SiO2 Film

    PubMed Central

    Revilla, Reynier I.; Li, Xiao-Jun; Yang, Yan-Lian; Wang, Chen

    2014-01-01

    Silicon dioxide films are extensively used in nano and micro–electromechanical systems. Here we studied the influence of an external electric field on the mechanical properties of a SiO2 film by using nanoindentation technique of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and friction force microscopy (FFM). A giant augmentation of the relative elastic modulus was observed by increasing the localized electric field. A slight decrease in friction coefficients was also clearly observed by using FFM with the increase of applied tip voltage. The reduction of the friction coefficients is consistent with the great enhancement of sample hardness by considering the indentation–induced deformation during the friction measurements. PMID:24681517

  11. A forward bias method for lag correction of an a-Si flat panel detector

    SciTech Connect

    Starman, Jared; Tognina, Carlo; Partain, Larry; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: Digital a-Si flat panel (FP) x-ray detectors can exhibit detector lag, or residual signal, of several percent that can cause ghosting in projection images or severe shading artifacts, known as the radar artifact, in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) reconstructions. A major contributor to detector lag is believed to be defect states, or traps, in the a-Si layer of the FP. Software methods to characterize and correct for the detector lag exist, but they may make assumptions such as system linearity and time invariance, which may not be true. The purpose of this work is to investigate a new hardware based method to reduce lag in an a-Si FP and to evaluate its effectiveness at removing shading artifacts in CBCT reconstructions. The feasibility of a novel, partially hardware based solution is also examined. Methods: The proposed hardware solution for lag reduction requires only a minor change to the FP. For pulsed irradiation, the proposed method inserts a new operation step between the readout and data collection stages. During this new stage the photodiode is operated in a forward bias mode, which fills the defect states with charge. A Varian 4030CB panel was modified to allow for operation in the forward bias mode. The contrast of residual lag ghosts was measured for lag frames 2 and 100 after irradiation ceased for standard and forward bias modes. Detector step response, lag, SNR, modulation transfer function (MTF), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) measurements were made with standard and forward bias firmware. CBCT data of pelvic and head phantoms were also collected. Results: Overall, the 2nd and 100th detector lag frame residual signals were reduced 70%-88% using the new method. SNR, MTF, and DQE measurements show a small decrease in collected signal and a small increase in noise. The forward bias hardware successfully reduced the radar artifact in the CBCT reconstruction of the pelvic and head phantoms by 48%-81%. Conclusions: Overall, the

  12. Simulation and Measurement of Absorbed Dose from 137 Cs Gammas Using a Si Timepix Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoffle, Nicholas; Pinsky, Lawrence; Empl, Anton; Semones, Edward

    2011-01-01

    The TimePix readout chip is a hybrid pixel detector with over 65k independent pixel elements. Each pixel contains its own circuitry for charge collection, counting logic, and readout. When coupled with a Silicon detector layer, the Timepix chip is capable of measuring the charge, and thus energy, deposited in the Silicon. Measurements using a NIST traceable 137Cs gamma source have been made at Johnson Space Center using such a Si Timepix detector, and this data is compared to simulations of energy deposition in the Si layer carried out using FLUKA.

  13. Multi-Line Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Performance of a Si(Li) Detector Stack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, G. Scott; McMurray, Robert E., Jr.; Keller, Robert G.; Wercinski, Paul F.; Walton, J. T.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental data is presented which for the first time displays multi-line spectrometer performance of a Si(Li) detector stack at elevated temperature. The stack consists of four elements, each with a 2 cm diameter active area. Ba-133 and Ag-110m spectra are obtained using various techniques to enhance the peak-to-background ratio. Spectral data are shown as a function of temperature (94 K less than or equal to T less than or equal to 230 K) using optimized peak shaping.

  14. Light-soaking effects on photoconductivity in a-Si:H thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Morgado, E.; Da Silva, M.R.; Henriques, R.T.

    1997-07-01

    Metastable defects have been created by light exposure in thin films of a-Si:H. The samples have been characterized by Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy, Electron Spin Resonance, dark- and photo-conductivity. The experimental results are consistent with numerical calculations with a recombination model involving band tails and one class of correlated dangling-bond states. The effects of light-soaking on the light intensity and defect density dependences of photoconductivity are reproduced by the calculations. The model allows to explain the experimental trends by changes in the electronic occupation of the gap states produced by light-induced defects.

  15. The influence of the substrate temperature on the recombination processes in a-Si:H

    SciTech Connect

    Lubianiker, Y.; Balberg, I.; Fonseca, L.; Weisz, S.Z.

    1997-07-01

    The authors have studied the four phototransport properties as a function of temperature in undoped a-Si:H films deposited with different substrate temperatures in the range 150--225 C. The analysis of the results indicates how T{sub s} determines the densities of the various defects. The general trend of decrease of both the density of dangling bonds and the Urbach energy is in agreement with the weak bond breaking model. However, they conclude that a slight modification of this model is required.

  16. Influence of Deposition Pressure on the Properties of Round Pyramid Textured a-Si:H Solar Cells for Maglev.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaehyeong; Choi, Wonseok; Lee, Kyuil; Lee, Daedong; Kang, Hyunil

    2016-05-01

    HIT (Heterojunction with Intrinsic Thin-layer) photovoltaic cells is one of the highest efficiencies in the commercial solar cells. The pyramid texturization for reducing surface reflectance of HIT solar cells silicon wafers is widely used. For the low leakage current and high shunt of solar cells, the intrinsic amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) on substrate must be uniformly thick of pyramid structure. However, it is difficult to control the thickness in the traditional pyramid texturing process. Thus, we textured the intrinsic a-Si:H thin films with the round pyramidal structure by using HNO3, HF, and CH3COOH solution. The characteristics of round pyramid a-Si:H solar cells deposited at pressure of 500, 1000, 1500, and 2000 mTorr by PECVD (Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition) was investigated. The lifetime, open circuit voltage, fill factor and efficiency of a-Si:H solar cells were investigated with respect to various deposition pressure.

  17. Investigation of structural and electrical properties of flat a-Si/c-Si heterostructure fabricated by EBPVD technique

    SciTech Connect

    Demiroğlu, D.; Tatar, B.; Kazmanli, K.; Urgen, M.

    2013-12-16

    Flat amorphous silicon - crystal silicon (a-Si/c-Si) heterostructure were prepared by ultra-high vacuum electron beam evaporation technique on p-Si (111) and n-Si (100) single crystal substrates. Structural analyses were investigated by XRD, Raman and FEG-SEM analysis. With these analyses we determined that at the least amorphous structure shows modification but amorphous structure just protected. The electrical and photovoltaic properties of flat a-Si/c-Si heterojunction devices were investigated with current-voltage characteristics under dark and illumination conditions. Electrical properties of flat a-Si/c-Si heterorojunction; such as barrier height Φ{sub B}, diode ideality factor η were determined from current-voltage characteristics in dark conditions. These a-Si/c-Si heterostructure have good rectification behavior as a diode and exhibit high photovoltaic sensitivity.

  18. Influence of Deposition Pressure on the Properties of Round Pyramid Textured a-Si:H Solar Cells for Maglev.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaehyeong; Choi, Wonseok; Lee, Kyuil; Lee, Daedong; Kang, Hyunil

    2016-05-01

    HIT (Heterojunction with Intrinsic Thin-layer) photovoltaic cells is one of the highest efficiencies in the commercial solar cells. The pyramid texturization for reducing surface reflectance of HIT solar cells silicon wafers is widely used. For the low leakage current and high shunt of solar cells, the intrinsic amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) on substrate must be uniformly thick of pyramid structure. However, it is difficult to control the thickness in the traditional pyramid texturing process. Thus, we textured the intrinsic a-Si:H thin films with the round pyramidal structure by using HNO3, HF, and CH3COOH solution. The characteristics of round pyramid a-Si:H solar cells deposited at pressure of 500, 1000, 1500, and 2000 mTorr by PECVD (Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition) was investigated. The lifetime, open circuit voltage, fill factor and efficiency of a-Si:H solar cells were investigated with respect to various deposition pressure. PMID:27483880

  19. Radiation Effects in Refractory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinkle, Steven J.; Wiffen, F. W.

    2004-02-01

    In order to achieve the required low reactor mass per unit electrical power for space reactors, refractory alloys are essential due to their high operating temperature capability that in turn enables high thermal conversion efficiencies. One of the key issues associated with refractory alloys is their performance in a neutron irradiation environment. The available radiation effects data are reviewed for alloys based on Mo, W, Re, Nb and Ta. The largest database is associated with Mo alloys, whereas Re, W and Ta alloys have the least available information. Particular attention is focused on Nb-1Zr, which is a proposed cladding and structural material for the reactor in the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) project. All of the refractory alloys exhibit qualitatively similar temperature-dependent behavior. At low temperatures up to ~0.3TM, where TM is the melting temperature, the dominant effect of radiation is to produce pronounced radiation hardening and concomitant loss of ductility. The radiation hardening also causes a dramatic decrease in the fracture toughness of the refractory alloys. These low temperature radiation effects occur at relatively low damage levels of ~0.1 displacement per atom, dpa (~2×1024 n/m2, E>0.1 MeV). As a consequence, operation at low temperatures in the presence of neutron irradiation must be avoided for all refractory alloys. At intermediate temperatures (0.3 to 0.6 TM), void swelling and irradiation creep are the dominant effects of irradiation. The amount of volumetric swelling associated with void formation in refractory alloys is generally within engineering design limits (<5%) even for high neutron exposures (>>10 dpa). Very little experimental data exist on irradiation creep of refractory alloys, but data for other body centered cubic alloys suggest that the irradiation creep will produce negligible deformation for near-term space reactor applications.

  20. In vivo degradation behavior and biological activity of some new Mg-Ca alloys with concentration's gradient of Si for bone grafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trincă, Lucia Carmen; Fântânariu, Mircea; Solcan, Carmen; Trofin, Alina Elena; Burtan, Liviu; Acatrinei, Dumitru Mihai; Stanciu, Sergiu; Istrate, Bogdan; Munteanu, Corneliu

    2015-10-01

    Magnesium based alloys, especially Mg-Ca alloys, are biocompatible substrates with mechanical properties similar to those of bones. The biodegradable alloys of Mg-Ca provide sufficient mechanical strength in load carrying applications as opposed to biopolymers and also they avoid stress shielding and secondary surgery inherent with permanent metallic implant materials. The main issue facing a biodegradable Mg-Ca alloy is the fast degradation in the aggressive physiological environment of the body. The alloy's corrosion is proportional with the dissolution of the Mg in the body: the reaction with the water generates magnesium hydroxide and hydrogen. The accelerated corrosion will lead to early loss of the alloy's mechanical integrity. The degradation rate of an alloy can be improved mainly through tailoring the composition and by carrying out surface treatments. This research focuses on the ability to adjust degradation rate of Mg-Ca alloys by an original method and studies the biological activity of the resulted specimens. A new Mg-Ca alloy, with a Si gradient concentration from the surface to the interior of the material, was obtained. The surface morphology was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (VegaTescan LMH II, SE detector, 30 kV), X-ray diffraction (X'Pert equipment) and energy dispersive X-ray (Bruker EDS equipment). In vivo degradation behavior, biological compatibility and activity of Mg-Ca alloys with/without Si gradient concentration were studied with an implant model (subcutaneous and bony) in rats. The organism response to implants was characterized by using radiological (plain X-rays and computed tomography), biochemical and histological methods of investigation. The results sustained that Si gradient concentration can be used to control the rate of degradation of the Mg-Ca alloys for enhancing their biologic activity in order to facilitate bone tissue repair.

  1. Production of aluminum-silicon alloy and ferrosilicon and commercial-purity aluminum by the direct-reduction process. Third annual technical report, 1980 January 1-1980 December 31

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    Progress on the program to demonstrate the technical feasibility of a pilot-sized Direct Reduction Process for producing aluminium and aluminium-silicon alloy is reported for Phase C. Progress is reported on reduction including the following tasks: supply burden material; burden beneficiation; effects of pilot operating parameters; pilot modifications; reactor scale-up design; calculating heat and mass balance; processing mathematical modeling; effects of process variables; information on supportive analytical, phase identification, and mechanical engineering data. Progress on alloy purification is reported in the following tasks: pilot unit installation; effects of pilot operating parameters; pilot unit modifications; and supportive mechanical engineering. Progress on purification to commercial grade aluminum is reported on: pilot unit installation; effects of pilot operating parameters; pilot unit modifications; support pilot operations; and supportive expended man-hours. Plans for Phase D are noted. (MCW)

  2. Carrier transport mechanism in the SnO2:F/p-type a-Si:H heterojunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannella, G.; Principato, F.; Foti, M.; Di Marco, S.; Grasso, A.; Lombardo, S.

    2011-07-01

    We characterize SnO2:F/p-type a-Si:H/Mo structures by current-voltage (I-V) and capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements at different temperatures to determine the transport mechanism in the SnO2:F/p-type a-Si:H heterojunction. The experimental I-V curves of these structures, almost symmetric around the origin, are ohmic for |V|<0.1V and have a super-linear behavior (power law) for |V|<0.1V. The structure can be modeled as two diodes back to back connected so that the main current transport mechanisms are due to the reverse current of the diodes. To explain the measured C-V curves, the capacitance of the heterostructure is modeled as the series connection of the depletion capacitances of the two back to back connected SnO2:F/p-type a-Si:H and Mo/p-type a-Si:H junctions. We simulated the reverse I-V curves of the SnO2:F/p-type a-Si:H heterojunction at different temperatures by using the simulation software SCAPS 2.9.03. In the model the main transport mechanism is generation of holes enhanced by tunneling by acceptor-type interface defects with a trap energy of 0.4 eV above the valence bandedge of the p-type a-Si:H layer and with a density of 4.0 × 1013 cm-2. By using I-V simulations and the proposed C-V model the built-in potential (Vbi) of the SnO2:F/p-type a-Si:H (0.16 V) and p-type a-Si:H/Mo (0.14 V) heterojunctions are extracted and a band diagram of the characterized structure is proposed.

  3. Facile and fast fabrication of superhydrophobic surface on magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhongwei; Li, Qing; She, Zuxin; Chen, Funan; Li, Longqin; Zhang, Xiaoxu; Zhang, Peng

    2013-04-01

    Superhydrophobic surface has many special functions and is widely investigated by researchers. Magnesium alloy is one of the lightest metal materials among the practice metals. It plays an important role in automobile, airplane and digital product for reducing devices weight. But due to the low standard potential, magnesium alloy has a high chemical activity and easily be corroded. That seriously impedes the application of magnesium alloy. In the process of fabrication a superhydrophobic surface on magnesium alloy, there are two ineluctable problems that must be solved: (1) high chemical activity and (2) the chemical activity is inhomogeneous on surface. In this study, we solved those problems by using the two characters to gain a rough surface on magnesium alloy and obtained a superhydrophobic surface after following modification process. The results show that the as-prepared superhydrophobic surface has obvious anti-corrosion effect in typically corrosive solution and naturally humid air. The delay-icing and self-cleaning effects are also investigated. The presented method is low-cost, fast and has great potential value in large-scale industry production.

  4. Electroslag Strip Cladding of Steam Generators With Alloy 690

    SciTech Connect

    Consonni, M.; Maggioni, F.; Brioschi, F.

    2006-07-01

    The present paper details the results of electroslag cladding and tube-to-tubesheet welding qualification tests conducted by Ansaldo-Camozzi ESC with Alloy 690 (Alloy 52 filler metal) on steel for nuclear power stations' steam generators shell, tubesheet and head; the possibility of submerged arc cladding on first layer was also considered. Test results, in terms of chemical analysis, mechanical properties and microstructure are reproducible and confidently applicable to production cladding and show that electroslag process can be used for Alloy 52 cladding with exceptionally stable and regular operation and high productivity. The application of submerged arc cladding process to the first layer leads to a higher base metal dilution, which should be avoided. Moreover, though the heat affected zone is deeper with electroslag cladding, in both cases no coarsened grain zone is found due to recrystallization effect of second cladding layer. Finally, the application of electroslag process to cladding of Alloy 52 with modified chemical composition, was proved to be highly beneficial as it strongly reduces hot cracking sensitivity, which is typical of submerged arc cladded Alloy 52, both during tube-to-tubesheet welding and first re-welding. (authors)

  5. Superior metallic alloys through rapid solidification processing (RSP) by design

    SciTech Connect

    Flinn, J.E.

    1995-05-01

    Rapid solidification processing using powder atomization methods and the control of minor elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon can provide metallic alloys with superior properties and performance compared to conventionally processing alloys. Previous studies on nickel- and iron-base superalloys have provided the baseline information to properly couple RSP with alloy composition, and, therefore, enable alloys to be designed for performance improvements. The RSP approach produces powders, which need to be consolidated into suitable monolithic forms. This normally involves canning, consolidation, and decanning of the powders. Canning/decanning is expensive and raises the fabrication cost significantly above that of conventional, ingot metallurgy production methods. The cost differential can be offset by the superior performance of the RSP metallic alloys. However, without the performance database, it is difficult to convince potential users to adopt the RSP approach. Spray casting of the atomized molten droplets into suitable preforms for subsequent fabrication can be cost competitive with conventional processing. If the fine and stable microstructural features observed for the RSP approach are preserved during spray casing, a cost competitive product can be obtained that has superior properties and performance that cannot be obtained by conventional methods.

  6. Alloy Design Challenge: Development of Low Density Superalloys for Turbine Blade Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacKay, Rebecca A.; Gabb, Timothy P.; Smialek, James L.; Nathal, Michael V.

    2009-01-01

    New low density single crystal (LDS) alloys have been developed for turbine blade applications, which have the potential for significant improvements in the thrust to weight ratio over current production alloys. An innovative alloying strategy was identified to achieve high temperature creep resistance, alloy density reductions, microstructural stability, and cyclic oxidation resistance. The approach relies on the use of molybdenum (Mo) as a potent solid solution strengthener for the nickel (Ni)-base superalloy; Mo has a density much closer to Ni than other refractory elements, such as rhenium (Re) or tungsten (W). A host of testing and microstructural examinations was conducted on the superalloy single crystals, including creep rupture testing, microstructural stability, cyclic oxidation, and hot corrosion. The paper will provide an overview of the single crystal properties that were generated in this new superalloy design space. The paper will also demonstrate the feasibility of this innovative approach of low density single crystal superalloy design. It will be shown that the best LDS alloy possesses the best attributes of three generations of single crystal alloys: the low density of first-generation single crystal alloys, the excellent oxidation resistance of second-generation single crystal alloys, and a creep strength which exceeds that of second and third generation alloys.

  7. Hot corrosion of low cobalt alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    The hot corrosion attack susceptibility of various alloys as a function of strategic materials content are investigated. Preliminary results were obtained for two commercial alloys, UDIMET 700 and Mar-M 247, that were modified by varying the cobalt content. For both alloys the cobalt content was reduced in steps to zero. Nickel content was increased accordingly to make up for the reduced cobalt but all other constituents were held constant. Wedge bar test samples were produced by casting. The hot corrosion test consisted of cyclically exposing samples to the high velocity flow of combustion products from an air-fuel burner fueled with jet A-1 and seeded with a sodium chloride aqueous solution. The flow velocity was Mach 0.5 and the sodium level was maintained at 0.5 ppm in terms of fuel plus air. The test cycle consisted of holding the test samples at 900 C for 1 hour followed by 3 minutes in which the sample could cool to room temperature in an ambient temperature air stream.

  8. An Electron Microscopy Investigation of the Transient Stage Oxidation Products in an Fe-22Cr Alloy with Ce and La Additions Exposed to Dry Air at 800 [degrees]C

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Jingxi; Fernandez Diaz, Laura M; Holcomb, Gordon R; Jablonski, Paul; Cowen, Christopher; Laughlin, David E; Alman, Dave; Seetharaman, Sridhar

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the effects of Ce (270 ppm) and La (120 ppm) mischmetal additions on the transient oxidation of an Fe-22Cr alloy were investigated. The oxidation process was imaged in situ using a confocal scanning laser microscope. The oxidation microstructures were studied by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and transmission electron microscopy with the help of focused ion beam in situ lift-out specimen preparation. The Ce and La, referred to as reactive elements, were found in nonmetallic inclusion particles in the forms of oxides, sulfides, and phosphates. An affected zone formed around rare earth (RE)-containing inclusion particles at the alloy free surface during the transient oxidation. This zone consisted of an internal Cr-oxide formed beneath the particle as well as a thinner external oxide scale on the surface compared with the surroundings. The relation of this microstructure to oxidation kinetics is discussed. With time, the RE elements diffused into the scale from the RE particles on the alloy surface during the high-temperature exposure. A diffusion mechanism is presented to describe these observations.

  9. An Electron Microscopy Investigation of the Transient Stage Oxidation Products in an Fe-22Cr Alloy with Ce and La Additions Exposed to Dry Air at 1073 K (800 °C)

    SciTech Connect

    Jingxi Zhu; Laura Fernandez-Diaz; Gordon Holcomb; Paul Jablonski; Christopher Cowen; David Lauglin; and Sridhar Seetharaman

    2010-10-01

    In this study, the effects of Ce (270 ppm) and La (120 ppm) mischmetal additions on the transient oxidation of an Fe-22Cr alloy were investigated. The oxidation process was imaged in situ using a confocal scanning laser microscope. The oxidation microstructures were studied by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and transmission electron microscopy with the help of focused ion beam in situ lift-out specimen preparation. The Ce and La, referred to as reactive elements, were found in nonmetallic inclusion particles in the forms of oxides, sulfides, and phosphates. An affected zone formed around rare earth (RE)-containing inclusion particles at the alloy free surface during the transient oxidation. This zone consisted of an internal Cr-oxide formed beneath the particle as well as a thinner external oxide scale on the surface compared with the surroundings. The relation of this microstructure to oxidation kinetics is discussed. With time, the RE elements diffused into the scale from the RE particles on the alloy surface during the high-temperature exposure. A diffusion mechanism is presented to describe these observations.

  10. Dynamic mechanical deformation of a SiC{sub p}/Al-Li (8090) composite

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, R.U.; Zurek, A.K.

    1993-06-01

    The deformation behavior in compression of a silicon carbide particle-reinforced aluminum-lithium (8090) matrix composite, at strain rates in the range of 10{sup {minus}3} to 6500 s{sup {minus}1}, was investigated, and compared with that of unreinforced alloy samples. Dynamics strengthening in these composites was found to change depending on the direction of testing. These differences were attributed to differences in the orientation of the reinforcing particles. 4 refs, 5 figs.

  11. Dynamic mechanical deformation of a SiC[sub p]/Al-Li (8090) composite

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, R.U.; Zurek, A.K. )

    1994-07-10

    The deformation behavior in compression of a silicon carbide particle reinforced aluminum-lithium (8090) matrix composite, at strain rates in the range of 10[sup [minus]3] to 6500 s[sup [minus]1], was investigated, and compared with that of unreinforced alloy samples. Dynamic strenghening in these composites was found to change depending on the direction of testing. These differences were attributed to differences in the orientation of the reinforcing particles. [copyright] 1994 American Institute of Physics

  12. Dynamic mechanical deformation of a SiC[sub p]/Al-Li (8090) composite

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, R.U.; Zurek, A.K.

    1993-01-01

    The deformation behavior in compression of a silicon carbide particle-reinforced aluminum-lithium (8090) matrix composite, at strain rates in the range of 10[sup [minus]3] to 6500 s[sup [minus]1], was investigated, and compared with that of unreinforced alloy samples. Dynamics strengthening in these composites was found to change depending on the direction of testing. These differences were attributed to differences in the orientation of the reinforcing particles. 4 refs, 5 figs.

  13. Dynamic mechanical deformation of a SiCp/Al-Li (8090) composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidya, Rajendra U.; Zurek, Anna K.

    1994-07-01

    The deformation behavior in compression of a silicon carbide particle reinforced aluminum-lithium (8090) matrix composite, at strain rates in the range of 10-3 to 6500 s-1, was investigated, and compared with that of unreinforced alloy samples. Dynamic strenghening in these composites was found to change depending on the direction of testing. These differences were attributed to differences in the orientation of the reinforcing particles.

  14. An Experimental Investigation of Fe-Si Alloy Corrosion in the Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zega, Thomas J.; Lauretta, Dante S.; Buseck, Peter R.

    2001-01-01

    We have performed an experimental study of Fe-Si alloy corrosion under dust-rich nebular conditions. The reaction products are silica and fayalite. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  15. Directional Solidification of Monotectic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hellawell, A.

    1983-01-01

    Cooling at certain rates produced fibrous composite structures. Alloy samples melted in alumina or graphite crucibles under argon and then chillcast into 33-mm-diameter rods or sucked directly into 3-mm-bore alumina or silica tubes. Alloying not automatic with immiscible components of different densities and widely different melting points.

  16. Directional Solidification Of Monotectic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhindaw, B. K.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Singh, A. K.; Curreri, P. A.

    1990-01-01

    Conditions promoting formation of aligned fibers sought. Report describes experiments in directional solidification of Cu/Pb and Bi/Ga monotectic alloys. Study motivated by need to understand physical mechanism governing formation of rodlike or fiberlike aligned structures in solidifying alloy and to determine process conditions favoring such structures.

  17. Shape memory alloy thaw sensors

    DOEpatents

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Martinez, David R.

    1998-01-01

    A sensor permanently indicates that it has been exposed to temperatures exceeding a critical temperature for a predetermined time period. An element of the sensor made from shape memory alloy changes shape when exposed, even temporarily, to temperatures above the Austenitic temperature of the shape memory alloy. The shape change of the SMA element causes the sensor to change between two readily distinguishable states.

  18. PLUTONIUM-CERIUM-COPPER ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1959-05-12

    A low melting point plutonium alloy useful as fuel is a homogeneous liquid metal fueled nuclear reactor is described. Vessels of tungsten or tantalum are useful to contain the alloy which consists essentially of from 10 to 30 atomic per cent copper and the balance plutonium and cerium. with the plutontum not in excess of 50 atomic per cent.

  19. Aluminum and its light alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merica, Paul D

    1920-01-01

    Report is a summary of research work which has been done here and abroad on the constitution and mechanical properties of the various alloy systems with aluminum. The mechanical properties and compositions of commercial light alloys for casting, forging, or rolling, obtainable in this country are described.

  20. aSi EPIDs for the in-vivo dosimetry of static and dynamic beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piermattei, A.; Cilla, S.; Azario, L.; Greco, F.; Russo, M.; Grusio, M.; Orlandini, L.; Fidanzio, A.

    2015-10-01

    Portal imaging by amorphous silicon (aSi) photodiode is currently the most applied technology for in-vivo dosimetry (IVD) of static and dynamic radiotherapy beams. The strategy, adopted in this work to perform the IVD procedure by aSi EPID, is based on: in patient reconstruction of the isocenter dose and day to day comparison between 2D-portal images to verify the reproducibility of treatment delivery. About 20.000 tests have been carried out in this last 3 years in 8 radiotherapy centers using the SOFTDISO program. The IVD results show that: (i) the procedure can be implemented for linacs of different manufacturer, (ii) the IVD analysis can be obtained on a computer screen, in quasi real time (about 2 min after the treatment delivery) and (iii) once the causes of the discrepancies were eliminated, all the global IVD tests for single patient were within the acceptance criteria defined by: ±5% for the isocenter dose, and Pγ<1≥90% of the checked points for the 2D portal image γ-analysis. This work is the result of a project supported by the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) and Università Cattolica del S.Cuore (UCSC).

  1. Characterization of a gate-defined double quantum dot in a Si/SiGe nanomembrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, T. J.; Mohr, R. T.; Li, Yize Stephanie; Thorgrimsson, Brandur; Foote, Ryan H.; Wu, Xian; Ward, Daniel R.; Savage, D. E.; Lagally, M. G.; Friesen, Mark; Coppersmith, S. N.; Eriksson, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of a gate-defined double quantum dot formed in a Si/SiGe nanomembrane. In the past, all gate-defined quantum dots in Si/SiGe heterostructures were formed on top of strain-graded virtual substrates. The strain grading process necessarily introduces misfit dislocations into a heterostructure, and these defects introduce lateral strain inhomogeneities, mosaic tilt, and threading dislocations. The use of a SiGe nanomembrane as the virtual substrate enables the strain relaxation to be entirely elastic, eliminating the need for misfit dislocations. However, in this approach the formation of the heterostructure is more complicated, involving two separate epitaxial growth procedures separated by a wet-transfer process that results in a buried non-epitaxial interface 625 nm from the quantum dot. We demonstrate that in spite of this buried interface in close proximity to the device, a double quantum dot can be formed that is controllable enough to enable tuning of the inter-dot tunnel coupling, the identification of spin states, and the measurement of a singlet-to-triplet transition as a function of an applied magnetic field.

  2. Structural changes in a-Si:H films deposited on the edge of crystallinity

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, A.H.; Yang, J.; Guha, S.; Williamson, D.L.

    1999-07-01

    Using infrared, H evolution and x-ray diffraction (XRD), the structure of high H dilution, glow discharge deposited a-Si:H films on the edge of crystallinity is examined. From the Si-H wag mode peak frequency and the XRD results, the authors postulate the existence of very small Si crystallites contained within the as-grown amorphous matrix, with the vast majority of the bonded H located on these crystallite surfaces. Upon annealing at ramp rates of 8--15 C/min, a H evolution peak at {approximately} 400 C appears, and film crystallization is observed at temperatures as low as 500 C, both of which are far below those observed for a-Si:H films grown without H dilution using similar rates. While the crystallite volume fraction is too small to be detected by XRD in the as-grown films, these crystallites enable the crystallization of the remainder of the amorphous matrix upon moderate annealing, thus explaining the existence of the low temperature H evolution peak.

  3. A wide-gap a-SiC:H PV-powered electrochromic window coating

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, W.; Lee, S.H.; Xu, Y.; Benson, D.K.; Deb, S.K.; Branz, H.M.

    1998-09-01

    The authors report on the first monolithic, amorphous-silicon-based, photovoltaic-powered electrochromic window coating. The coating employs a wide bandgap a-Si{sub 1{minus}x}C{sub x}:H n-i-p photovoltaic (PV) cell as a semitransparent power supply, and a Li{sub y}WO{sub 3}/LiAlF{sub 4}/V{sub 2}O{sub 5} electrochromic (EC) device as an optical-transmittance modulator. The EC device is deposited directly on top of a PV cell that coats a glass substrate. The a-Si{sub 1{minus}x}C{sub x}:H PV cell has a Tauc gap of 2.2 eV and a transmittance of 60--80% over a large portion of the visible light spectrum. The authors reduced the thickness of the device to about 600 {angstrom} while maintaining a 1-sun open-circuit voltage of 0.9 V and short-circuit current of 2 mA/cm{sup 2}. The prototype 16 cm{sup 2} PV/EC device modulates the transmittance by more than 60% over a large portion of the visible spectrum. The coloring and bleaching times of the EC device are approximately 1 minute under normal operating conditions ({+-} 1 volt). A brief description of photoelectrochromic windows study is also given.

  4. Characterization of a gate-defined double quantum dot in a Si/SiGe nanomembrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, T. J.; Mohr, R. T.; Li, Yize Stephanie; Thorgrimsson, Brandur; Foote, Ryan H.; Wu, Xian; Ward, Daniel R.; Savage, D. E.; Lagally, M. G.; Friesen, Mark; Coppersmith, S. N.; Eriksson, M. A.

    We report the characterization of a gate-defined double quantum dot formed in a Si/SiGe nanomembrane. Previously, all heterostructures used to form quantum dots were created using the strain-grading method of strain relaxation, a method that necessarily introduces misfit dislocations into a heterostructure and thereby degrades the reproducibility of quantum devices. Using a SiGe nanomembrane as a virtual substrate eliminates the need for misfit dislocations but requires a wet-transfer process that results in a non-epitaxial interface in close proximity to the quantum dots. We show that this interface does not prevent the formation of quantum dots, and is compatible with a tunable inter-dot tunnel coupling, the identification of spin states, and the measurement of a singlet-to-triplet transition as a function of the applied magnetic field. This work was supported in part by ARO (W911NF-12-0607), NSF (DMR-1206915, PHY-1104660), and the United States Department of Defense. The views and conclusions contained in this document are those of the author and should not be interpreted as representing the official policies, either expressly or implied, of the US Government. T.J. Knapp et al. (2015). arXiv:1510.08888 [cond-mat.mes-hall].

  5. Characterization of a gate-defined double quantum dot in a Si/SiGe nanomembrane.

    PubMed

    Knapp, T J; Mohr, R T; Li, Yize Stephanie; Thorgrimsson, Brandur; Foote, Ryan H; Wu, Xian; Ward, Daniel R; Savage, D E; Lagally, M G; Friesen, Mark; Coppersmith, S N; Eriksson, M A

    2016-04-15

    We report the fabrication and characterization of a gate-defined double quantum dot formed in a Si/SiGe nanomembrane. In the past, all gate-defined quantum dots in Si/SiGe heterostructures were formed on top of strain-graded virtual substrates. The strain grading process necessarily introduces misfit dislocations into a heterostructure, and these defects introduce lateral strain inhomogeneities, mosaic tilt, and threading dislocations. The use of a SiGe nanomembrane as the virtual substrate enables the strain relaxation to be entirely elastic, eliminating the need for misfit dislocations. However, in this approach the formation of the heterostructure is more complicated, involving two separate epitaxial growth procedures separated by a wet-transfer process that results in a buried non-epitaxial interface 625 nm from the quantum dot. We demonstrate that in spite of this buried interface in close proximity to the device, a double quantum dot can be formed that is controllable enough to enable tuning of the inter-dot tunnel coupling, the identification of spin states, and the measurement of a singlet-to-triplet transition as a function of an applied magnetic field.

  6. Characterization of the response function of a Si(Li) detector using an absorber technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, N. P. O.; Tapper, U. A. S.; Martinsson, B. G.

    1989-10-01

    The non-Gaussian response function of a Si(Li) detector has been measured for characteristic K α X-rays in the energy interval 1.5-8.6 keV using an absorber technique. The method is based on the different response to an attenuating absorber placed in front of the detector for the detector tail as compared to fully absorbed photons in the same position in the spectrum. The shape of the tail of a K α X-ray peak could be derived from three X-ray spectra acquired with different attenuating absorbers using the PIXE or XRF method for excitation of single element standards. The line shape function could be described by a full energy Gaussian, a shelf, an exponential and a Si-escape component. The results presented are in good agreement with previously reported response functions obtained in measurements of monochromatic X-rays. The results will be implemented in a computer program for evaluating micro-PIXE spectra.

  7. Slag remelt purification of irradiated vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Carmack, W.J.; Smolik, G.R.; McCarthy, K.A.; Gorman, P.K.

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes theoretical and scoping experimental efforts to investigate the decontamination potential of a slag remelting process for decontaminating irradiated vanadium alloys. Theoretical calculations, using a commercial thermochemical computer code HSC Chemistry, determined the potential slag compositions and slag-vanadium alloy ratios. The experiment determined the removal characteristics of four surrogate transmutation isotopes (Ca, Y - to simulate Sc, Mn, and Ar) from a V-5Ti-5Cr alloy with calcium fluoride slag. An electroslag remelt furnace was used in the experiment to melt and react the constituents. The process achieved about a 90 percent removal of calcium and over 99 percent removal of yttrium. Analyses indicate that about 40 percent of the manganese may have been removed. Argon analyses indicates that 99.3% of the argon was released from the vanadium alloy in the first melt increasing to 99.7% during the second melt. Powder metallurgy techniques were used to incorporate surrogate transmutation products in the vanadium. A powder mixture was prepared with the following composition: 90 wt % vanadium, 4.7 wt % titanium, 4.7 wt % chromium, 0.35 wt % manganese, 0.35 wt % CaO, and 0.35 wt % Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}. This mixture was packed into 2.54 cm diameter stainless steel tubes. Argon was introduced into the powder mixture by evacuating and backfilling the stainless steel containers to a pressure of 20 kPa (0.2 atm). The tubes were hot isostatically pressed at 207 MPa (2000 atm) and 1473 K to consolidate the metal. An electroslag remelt furnace (crucible dimensions: 5.1 cm diameter by 15.2 cm length) was used to process the vanadium electrodes. Chemical analyses were performed on samples extracted from the slags and ingots. Ingot analyses results are shown below. Values are shown in percent removal of the four targeted elements of the initial compositions.

  8. Nanocrystal growth of single-phase Si1-xGex alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giang, Nguyen Truong; Cong, Le Thanh; Dung, Nguyen Duc; Quang, Tran Van; Ha, Ngo Ngoc

    2016-06-01

    We present the formation of single-phase Si1-xGex (x=0.2, 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8) alloy nanocrystals dispersed in a SiO2 matrix. The studied samples were prepared by co-sputtering with excess Si1-xGex in SiO2 of approximately 33 at%. Upon heat treatment, crystallization of Si1-xGex alloys was examined by using X-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy measurements. Single structure of face-centered cubic nanocrystals in a space group Fd-3m was concluded. The average nanocrystal size (from 2 nm to 10 nm) and the lattice constant a of the single-phase Si1-xGex nanocrystals were found to increase with the Ge composition parameter x. Density functional theory-generalized gradient approximation calculation showed the replacement of Ge into the Si sites and vice versa.

  9. Heat storage in alloy transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenall, C. E.; Gueceri, S. I.; Farkas, D.; Labdon, M. B.; Nagaswami, N.; Pregger, B.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of using metal alloys as thermal energy storage media was determined. The following major elements were studied: (1) identification of congruently transforming alloys and thermochemical property measurements; (2) development of a precise and convenient method for measuring volume change during phase transformation and thermal expansion coefficients; (3) development of a numerical modeling routine for calculating heat flow in cylindrical heat exchangers containing phase change materials; and (4) identification of materials that could be used to contain the metal alloys. Several eutectic alloys and ternary intermetallic phases were determined. A method employing X-ray absorption techniques was developed to determine the coefficients of thermal expansion of both the solid and liquid phases and the volume change during phase transformation from data obtained during one continuous experimental test. The method and apparatus are discussed and the experimental results are presented. The development of the numerical modeling method is presented and results are discussed for both salt and metal alloy phase change media.

  10. Equivalent crystal theory of alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Ferrante, John

    1991-01-01

    Equivalent Crystal Theory (ECT) is a new, semi-empirical approach to calculating the energetics of a solid with defects. The theory has successfully reproduced surface energies in metals and semiconductors. The theory of binary alloys to date, both with first-principles and semi-empirical models, has not been very successful in predicting the energetics of alloys. This procedure is used to predict the heats of formation, cohesive energy, and lattice parameter of binary alloys of Cu, Ni, Al, Ag, Au, Pd, and Pt as functions of composition. The procedure accurately reproduces the heats of formation versus composition curves for a variety of binary alloys. The results are then compared with other approaches such as the embedded atom and lattice parameters of alloys from pure metal properties more accurately than Vegard's law is presented.

  11. Mo-Si alloy development

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.; Heatherly, L.; Wright, J.L.

    1996-06-01

    The objective of this task is to develop new-generation corrosion-resistant Mo-Si intermetallic alloys as hot components in advanced fossil energy conversion and combustion systems. The initial effort is devoted to Mo{sub 5}-Si{sub 3}-base (MSB) alloys containing boron additions. Three MSB alloys based on Mo-10.5Si-1.1B (wt %), weighing 1500 g were prepared by hot pressing of elemental and alloy powders at temperatures to 1600{degrees}C in vacuum. Microporosities and glassy-phase (probably silicate phases) formations are identified as the major concerns for preparation of MSB alloys by powder metallurgy. Suggestions are made to alleviate the problems of material processing.

  12. METHOD OF MAKING ALLOYS OF BERYLLIUM WITH PLUTONIUM AND THE LIKE

    DOEpatents

    Runnals, O.J.C.

    1959-02-24

    The production of alloys of beryllium with one or more of the metals uranium, plutonium, actinium, americium, curium, thorium, and cerium are described. A halide salt of the metal to be alloyed with the beryllium is heated at 1300 deg C in the presence of beryllium to reduce the halide to metal and cause the latter to alloy directly with the beryllium. Although the heavy metal halides are more stable, thermodynamically, than the beryllium halides, the reducing reaction proceeds to completion if the beryllium halide product is continuously removed by vacuum distillation.

  13. Method of making alloys of beryllium with plutonium and the like

    DOEpatents

    Runnals, O J.C.

    1959-02-24

    The production or alloys of beryllium with one or more of the metals uranium, plutonium, actinium, americium, curium, thorium, and cerium is described. A halide salt or the metal to be alloyed with the beryllium is heated at l3O0 deg C in the presence of beryllium to reduce the halide to metal and cause the latter to alloy directly with the beryllium. Although the heavy metal halides are more stable, thermodynamically, than the beryllium halides, the reducing reaction proceeds to completion if the beryllium halide product is continuously removed by vacuum distillation.

  14. Tensile properties of V-(4-5)Cr-(4-5)Ti alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Nowicki, L.; Busch, D.; Smith, D.L.

    1996-04-01

    The current focus of the U.S program of research on V-base alloys is on V-(4-5)Cr(4-5)Ti that contains 500-1000 wppm Si. in this paper, we present experimental results on baseline tensile properties of two laboratory-scale heats of this alloy and of a 500-kg production heat of V-4Cr-4Ti (heat 832665) that were measured at 23-700 C. Both the production- and laboratory scale heats of the reference alloy V-4Cr-4Ti exhibited excellent tensile properties at temperatures up to {approx}650{degrees}C.

  15. Fundamental studies of defect generation in amorphous silicon alloys grown by remote plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition (Remote PECVD). Annual subcontract report, 1 September 1990--31 August 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Lucovsky, G.; Nemanich, R.J.; Bernholc, J.; Whitten, J.; Wang, C.; Davidson, B.; Williams, M.; Lee, D.; Bjorkman, C.; Jing, Z.

    1993-01-01

    We demonstrated that the remote PECVD process can be used to deposit heavily doped n-type and p-type a-Si:H thin films. We optimized conditions for depositing undoped, near-intrinsic and heavily doped thin films of {mu}c(microcrystalline)-Si by remote PECVD. We extended the remote PECVD process to the deposition of undoped and doped a-Si,C:H and {mu}c-Si,C alloy films. We analyzed transport data for the dark conductivity in undoped and doped a-Si:H, a-Si,C:H, {mu}c-Si and {mu}c-Si,C films. We studied the properties of doped a-Si:H and {mu}c-Si in MOS capacitors using {approximately}10 {Omega}-cm p-type crystalline substrates and thermally grown Si0{sub 2} dielectric layers. We collaborated with a group at RWTH in Aachen, Germany, and studied the contributions of process induced defect states to the recombination of photogenerated electron pairs. We applied a tight-binding model to Si-Bethe lattice structures to investigate the effects of bond angle, and dihedral angle disorder. We used ab initio and empirical calculations to study non-random bonding arrangements in a-Si,O:H and doped a-Si:H films.

  16. Casting Porosity-Free Grain Refined Magnesium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Schwam, David

    2013-08-12

    The objective of this project was to identify the root causes for micro-porosity in magnesium alloy castings and recommend remedies that can be implemented in production. The findings confirm the key role played by utilizing optimal gating and risering practices in minimizing porosity in magnesium castings. 

  17. The Effects of Chemical Wash Additives on the Corrosion of Aerospace Alloys in Marine Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacDowell, Louis; Calle, Luz Marina; Curran, Joseph; Hodge, Tim; Barile, Ronald; Heidersbach, Robert; Steinrock, T. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the methodology for comparing the relative effectiveness of four chemical products used for rinsing airplanes and helicopters. The products were applied on a weekly basis to a series of flat alloy panels exposed to an oceanfront marine environment for one year. The results are presented along with comparisons of exposures of the same alloys that were not washed, were washed with seawater, or washed with de-ionized water.

  18. Wedlable nickel aluminide alloy

    DOEpatents

    Santella, Michael L.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    2002-11-19

    A Ni.sub.3 Al alloy with improved weldability is described. It contains about 6-12 wt % Al, about 6-12 wt % Cr, about 0-3 wt % Mo, about 1.5-6 wt % Zr, about 0-0.02 wt % B and at least one of about 0-0.15 wt % C, about 0-0.20 wt % Si, about 0-0.01 wt % S and about 0-0.30 wt % Fe with the balance being Ni.

  19. Thermomechanical treatment of alloys

    DOEpatents

    Bates, John F.; Brager, Howard R.; Paxton, Michael M.

    1983-01-01

    An article of an alloy of AISI 316 stainless steel is reduced in size to predetermined dimensions by cold working in repeated steps. Before the last reduction step the article is annealed by heating within a temperature range, specifically between 1010.degree. C. and 1038.degree. C. for a time interval between 90 and 60 seconds depending on the actual temperature. By this treatment the swelling under neutron bombardment by epithermal neutrons is reduced while substantial recrystallization does not occur in actual use for a time interval of at least of the order of 5000 hours.

  20. Aluminum alloy and associated anode and battery

    SciTech Connect

    Tarcy, G.P.

    1990-08-21

    This patent describes an aluminum alloy. It comprises: eutectic amounts of at least two alloying elements selected from the group consisting of bismuth, cadmium, scandium, gallium, indium, lead, mercury, thallium, tin, and zinc with the balance being aluminum and the alloying elements being about 0.01 to 3.0 percent by weight of the alloy.

  1. Binary Colloidal Alloy Test-5: Phase Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, Matthew; Weitz, David A.; Lu, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    The Binary Colloidal Alloy Test - 5: Phase Separation (BCAT-5-PhaseSep) experiment will photograph initially randomized colloidal samples onboard the ISS to determine their resulting structure over time. This allows the scientists to capture the kinetics (evolution) of their samples, as well as the final equilibrium state of each sample. BCAT-5-PhaseSep studies collapse (phase separation rates that impact product shelf-life); in microgravity the physics of collapse is not masked by being reduced to a simple top and bottom phase as it is on Earth.

  2. ALLOY COATINGS AND METHOD OF APPLYING

    DOEpatents

    Eubank, L.D.; Boller, E.R.

    1958-08-26

    A method for providing uranium articles with a pro tective coating by a single dip coating process is presented. The uranium article is dipped into a molten zinc bath containing a small percentage of aluminum. The resultant product is a uranium article covered with a thin undercoat consisting of a uranium-aluminum alloy with a small amount of zinc, and an outer layer consisting of zinc and aluminum. The article may be used as is, or aluminum sheathing may then be bonded to the aluminum zinc outer layer.

  3. Study of high performance alloy electroforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.

    1985-01-01

    The nickel-manganese experimental electrolyte was hydrogen peroxide treated and carbon purified for removal of residual sodium saccharin and related organic decomposition products from the plating of previous test panels. The saccharin additive was used to reduce stress where high concentrations of manganese and high pulse peak current densities were used. A large quantity of nickel-manganese alloy plates containing 0.35 to 0.40 percent by weight manganese was electroformed for testing to supply data for a mechanical property data table. The aluminum billet required for the machining of the subscale SSME main combustion chamber was acquired.

  4. Galvanic cells including cobalt-chromium alloys.

    PubMed

    Gjerdet, N R

    1980-01-01

    Galvanic cells may be created when dentures made of cobalt-chromium alloys are placed on teeth with metallic restorations. The power of such cells was evaluated in an in vitro galvanic using amalgams, gold alloy, and nickel-chromium alloys. The amalgams and one of the nickel-chromium alloys revealed high corrosion currents when placed in contact with cobalt-chromium alloy, the conventional amalgam showing the highest values. The gold alloy and another nickel-chromium alloy exhibited low corrosion currents and they were noble with respect to cobalt-chromium.

  5. Statistical Analysis of Strength Data for an Aerospace Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neergaard, L.; Malone, T.

    2001-01-01

    Aerospace vehicles are produced in limited quantities that do not always allow development of MIL-HDBK-5 A-basis design allowables. One method of examining production and composition variations is to perform 100% lot acceptance testing for aerospace Aluminum (Al) alloys. This paper discusses statistical trends seen in strength data for one Al alloy. A four-step approach reduced the data to residuals, visualized residuals as a function of time, grouped data with quantified scatter, and conducted analysis of variance (ANOVA).

  6. Statistical Analysis of Strength Data for an Aerospace Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neergaard, Lynn; Malone, Tina; Gentz, Steven J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Aerospace vehicles are produced in limited quantities that do not always allow development of MIL-HDBK-5 A-basis design allowables. One method of examining production and composition variations is to perform 100% lot acceptance testing for aerospace Aluminum (Al) alloys. This paper discusses statistical trends seen in strength data for one Al alloy. A four-step approach reduced the data to residuals, visualized residuals as a function of time, grouped data with quantified scatter, and conducted analysis of variance (ANOVA).

  7. Adsorption interaction between Al-5% Pb alloy and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabina, A. V.; Shevchenko, V. G.

    2016-10-01

    The adsorption and structural features of Al-5% Pb alloy powder before and after reacting with water are analyzed. Results from studying the morphology and phase composition of the oxidation products are presented, and the specific surface area and porosity of the powders are calculated. It is shown experimentally that water treatment of Al-5% Pb alloy powder even at room temperature leads to the formation of new phases and affects the powder's morphology. It is established that a major role in the properties of the watertreated powders is played by nanopores that form between crystallites on a particle's surface during waterinduced oxidation and subsequent thermal dehydration.

  8. Fatigue of die cast zinc alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Schrems, K.K.; Dogan, O.N.; Goodwin, F.E.

    2006-04-01

    The rotating bending fatigue limit of die cast zinc alloy 2, alloy 3, alloy 5, AcuZinc 5, and ZA-8 were determined as a part of an on-going program by ILZRO into the mechanical properties of die cast zinc. The stress-life (S-N) curves of alloys 3, 5, AcuZinc 5, and ZA-8 were determined previously. This presentation reports the results of the S-N curve for Alloy 2 and the calculated fatigue limits for all five alloys. During the previous stress-life testing, the samples were stopped at 10 million cycles and the fatigue limit for alloy 3, alloy 5, and AcuZinc 5 appeared to be higher and the fatigue limit for ZA-8 appeared to be lower than the values reported in the literature. This was further investigated in alloy 5 and ZA-8 by testing continuous cast bulk alloy 5 and ZA-8.

  9. Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.

    2002-11-05

    A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800 C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800 C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700 C. at a low cost

  10. Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.

    2002-11-05

    A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800.degree. C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800.degree. C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700.degree. C. at a low cost

  11. High quality relaxed Ge layers grown directly on a Si(0 0 1) substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, V. A.; Dobbie, A.; Myronov, M.; Leadley, D. R.

    2011-08-01

    After a long period of developing integrated circuit technology through simple scaling of silicon devices, the semiconductor industry is now embracing technology boosters such as strain for higher mobility channel material. Germanium is the logical supplement to enhance existing technologies, as its material behaviour is very close to silicon, and to create new functional devices that cannot be fabricated from silicon alone (Hartmann et al. (2004) [1]). Germanium wafers are, however, both expensive and less durable than their silicon counterparts. Hence it is highly desirable to create a relaxed high quality Ge layer on a Si substrate, with the provision that this does not unduly compromise the planarity of the system. The two temperature method, proposed by Colace et al. (1997) [2], can give smooth (RMS surface roughness below 1 nm) and low threading dislocation density (TDD <10 8 cm -2) Ge layers directly on a Si(0 0 1) wafer (Halbwax et al. (2005) [3]), but these are currently of the order of 1-2 μm thick (Hartmann et al. (2009) [4]). We present an in depth study of two temperature Ge layers, grown by reduced pressure chemical vapour deposition (RP-CVD), in an effort to reduce the thickness. We report the effect of changing the thickness, of both the low temperature (LT) and the high temperature (HT) layers, emphasising the variation of TDD, surface morphology and relaxation. Within this study, the LT Ge layer is deposited directly on a Si(0 0 1) substrate at a low temperature of 400 °C. This low temperature is known to generate monolayer islands (Park et al. (2006) [5]), but is sufficiently high to maintain crystallinity whilst keeping the epitaxial surface as smooth as possible by suppressing further island growth and proceeding in a Frank-van der Merwe growth mode. This LT growth also generates a vast number of dislocations, of the order of 10 8-10 9 cm -2, that enable the next HT step to relax the maximum amount of strain possible. The effect of varying

  12. Surface roughness in XeF2 etching of a-Si/c-Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, A. A. E.; Beijerinck, H. C. W.

    2005-01-01

    Single wavelength ellipsometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been applied in a well-calibrated beam-etching experiment to characterize the dynamics of surface roughening induced by chemical etching of a ~12 nm amorphous silicon (a-Si) top layer and the underlying crystalline silicon (c-Si) bulk. In both the initial and final phase of etching, where either only a-Si or only c-Si is exposed to the XeF2 flux, we observe a similar evolution of the surface roughness as a function of the XeF2 dose proportional to D(XeF2)β with β~0.2. In the transition region from the pure amorphous to the pure crystalline silicon layer, we observe a strong anomalous increase of the surface roughness proportional to D(XeF2)β with β~1.5. Not only the growth rate of the roughness increases sharply in this phase, also the surface morphology temporarily changes to a structure that suggests a cusplike shape. Both features suggest that the remaining a-Si patches on the surface act effectively as a capping layer which causes the growth of deep trenches in the c-Si. The ellipsometry data on the roughness are corroborated by the AFM results, by equating the thickness of the rough layer to 6 σ, with σ the root-mean-square variation of the AFM's distribution function of height differences. In the AFM data, the anomalous behavior is reflected in a too small value of σ which again suggests narrow and deep surface features that cannot be tracked by the AFM tip. The final phase morphology is characterized by an effective increase in surface area by a factor of two, as derived from a simple bilayer model of the reaction layer, using the experimental etch rate as input. We obtain a local reaction layer thickness of 1.5 monolayer consistent with the 1.7 ML value of Lo et al. [Lo et al., Phys. Rev. B 47, 648 (1993)] that is also independent of surface roughness.

  13. Mechanistic Origin of the Ultrastrong Adhesion between Graphene and a-SiO2: Beyond van der Waals.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Parks, David; Kamrin, Ken

    2016-07-26

    The origin of the ultrastrong adhesion between graphene and a-SiO2 has remained a mystery. This adhesion is believed to be predominantly van der Waals (vdW) in nature. By rigorously analyzing recently reported blistering and nanoindentation experiments, we show that the ultrastrong adhesion between graphene and a-SiO2 cannot be attributed to vdW forces alone. Our analyses show that the fracture toughness of the graphene/a-SiO2 interface, when the interfacial adhesion is modeled with vdW forces alone, is anomalously weak compared to the measured values. The anomaly is related to an ultrasmall fracture process zone (FPZ): owing to the lack of a third dimension in graphene, the FPZ for the graphene/a-SiO2 interface is extremely small, and the combination of predominantly tensile vdW forces, distributed over such a small area, is bound to result in a correspondingly small interfacial fracture toughness. Through multiscale modeling, combining the results of finite element analysis and molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the adhesion between graphene and a-SiO2 involves two different kinds of interactions: one, a weak, long-range interaction arising from vdW adhesion and, second, discrete, short-range interactions originating from graphene clinging to the undercoordinated Si (≡Si·) and the nonbridging O (≡Si-O·) defects on a-SiO2. A strong resistance to relative opening and sliding provided by the latter mechanism is identified as the operative mechanism responsible for the ultrastrong adhesion between graphene and a-SiO2. PMID:27347793

  14. High performance alloy electroforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.; Winkelman, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    Electroformed copper and nickel are used in structural applications for advanced propellant combustion chambers. An improved process has been developed by Bell Aerospace Textron, Inc. wherein electroformed nickel-manganese alloy has demonstrated superior mechanical and thermal stability when compared to previously reported deposits from known nickel plating processes. Solution chemistry and parametric operating procedures are now established and material property data is established for deposition of thick, large complex shapes such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine. The critical operating variables are those governing the ratio of codeposited nickel and manganese. The deposition uniformity which in turn affects the manganese concentration distribution is affected by solution resistance and geometric effects as well as solution agitation. The manganese concentration in the deposit must be between 2000 and 3000 ppm for optimum physical properties to be realized. The study also includes data regarding deposition procedures for achieving excellent bond strength at an interface with copper, nickel-manganese or INCONEL 718. Applications for this electroformed material include fabrication of complex or re-entry shapes which would be difficult or impossible to form from high strength alloys such as INCONEL 718.

  15. Valence and conduction band offsets at low-k a-SiO{sub x}C{sub y}:H/a-SiC{sub x}N{sub y}:H interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    King, Sean W. Brockman, Justin; French, Marc; Jaehnig, Milt; Kuhn, Markus; French, Benjamin

    2014-09-21

    In order to understand the fundamental electrical leakage and reliability failure mechanisms in nano-electronic low-k dielectric/metal interconnect structures, we have utilized x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy to determine the valence and conduction band offsets present at interfaces between non-porous and porous low-k a-SiO{sub x}C{sub y}:H interlayer dielectrics and a-SiC{sub x}N{sub y}:H metal capping layers. The valence band offset for such interfaces was determined to be 2.7±0.2 eV and weakly dependent on the a-SiOC:H porosity. The corresponding conduction band offset was determined to be 2.1±0.2 eV. The large band offsets indicate that intra metal layer leakage is likely dominated by defects and trap states in the a-SiOC:H and a-SiCN:H dielectrics.

  16. Alloy 33, a new material resisting marine corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, D.C.; Koehler, M.

    1997-12-01

    A new austenitic chromium-based material alloyed with nominally (wt.%) 33 Cr, 32 Fe, 31 Ni, 1.6 Mo, 0.6 Cu and 0.4 N, having a pitting resistance equivalent of 50, has been developed recently. The alloy exhibits excellent local corrosion resistance in chloride-bearing media. When tested in 10% FeCl{sub 3} {center_dot} 6 H{sub 2}O solution, a critical pitting temperature of 85 C was determined. Low segregation in the matching weld metal means that the critical pitting temperature of a 5 mm PAW weld seam is only 10 C lower. Potentiostatic corrosion tests in artificial seawater at 0.3 V (SCE) with additions of 0.5 mol NaCl reveal no pitting corrosion at 85 C, and crevice corrosion in artificial seawater at 0.3 V (SCE) has not been observed at temperatures below 55 C. In saturated CaCl{sub 2} solutions at 125 C under constant load conditions the resistance to stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 33 is superior even to that of Alloy 926. The combination of excellent corrosion resistance to a broad variety of media with high yield strength, 30% above that of the nitrogen-alloyed 6% Mo stainless steels, not only offers a cost-effective alternative to higher-cost nickel alloys, but also allows for light weight structures in the Offshore Industry. Alloy 33 (UNS R20033) has been approved by ASME and VdTUEV for pressure vessels in the temperature range of {minus}196 C to 450 C and can be manufactured to all semi-finished products used in the marine and chemical industries.

  17. Ion beam synthesis of SiGe alloy layers

    SciTech Connect

    Im, Seongil

    1994-05-01

    Procedures required for minimizing structural defects generated during ion beam synthesis of SiGe alloy layers were studied. Synthesis of 200 mm SiGe alloy layers by implantation of 120-keV Ge ions into <100> oriented Si wafers yielded various Ge peak concentrations after the following doses, 2{times}10{sup 16}cm{sup {minus}2}, 3{times}10{sup 16}cm{sup {minus}2} (mid), and 5{times}10{sup 16}cm{sup {minus}2} (high). Following implantation, solid phase epitaxial (SPE) annealing in ambient N2 at 800C for 1 hr. resulted in only slight redistribution of the Ge. Two kinds of extended defects were observed in alloy layers over 3{times}l0{sup 16}cm{sup {minus}2}cm dose at room temperature (RT): end-of-range (EOR) dislocation loops and strain-induced stacking faults. Density of EOR dislocation loops was much lower in alloys produced by 77K implantation than by RT implantation. Decreasing the dose to obtain 5 at% peak Ge concentration prevents strain relaxation, while those SPE layers with more than 7 at% Ge peak show high densities of misfit- induced stacking faults. Sequential implantation of C following high dose Ge implantation (12 at% Ge peak concentration in layer) brought about a remarkable decrease in density of misfit-induced stacking faults. For peak implanted C > 0.55 at%, stacking fault generation in the epitaxial layer was suppressed, owing to strain compensation by C atoms in the SiGe lattice. A SiGe alloy layer with 0.9 at% C peak concentration under a 12 at% Ge peak exhibited the best microstructure. Results indicate that optimum Ge/C ratio for strain compensation is between 11 and 22. The interface between amorphous and regrown phases (a/c interface) had a dramatic morphology change during its migration to the surface. Initial <100> planar interface decomposes into a <111> faceted interface, changing the growth kinetics; this is associated with strain relaxation by stacking fault formation on (111) planes in the a/c interface.

  18. Heat storage in alloy transformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchenall, C. E.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of using metal alloys as thermal energy storage media was investigated. The elements selected as candidate media were limited to aluminum, copper, magnesium, silicon, zinc, calcium, and phosphorus on the basis of low cost and latent heat of transformation. Several new eutectic alloys and ternary intermetallic phases were determined. A new method employing X-ray absorption techniques was developed to determine the coefficients of thermal expansion of both the solid and liquid phases and the volume change during phase transformation. The method and apparatus are discussed and the experimental results are presented for aluminum and two aluminum-eutectic alloys. Candidate materials were evaluated to determine suitable materials for containment of the metal alloys. Graphite was used to contain the alloys during the volume change measurements. Silicon carbide was identified as a promising containment material and surface-coated iron alloys were also evaluated. System considerations that are pertinent if alloy eutectics are used as thermal energy storage media are discussed. Potential applications to solar receivers and industrial furnaces are illustrated schematically.

  19. Iridium alloy clad vent set manufacturing qualification studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, G.B. )

    1991-01-10

    Qualification studies have been successfully conducted to demonstrate iridium alloy Clad Vent Set (CVS) manufacturing readiness for the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. These studies were joint comparison evaluations of both the Y-12 Plant and EG G Mound Applied Technologies, Inc. (EG G-MAT) products. Note: EG G-MAT formerly manufactured the iridium alloy CVS. The comparison evaluations involved work in a number of areas; however, only the CVS cup metallurgical evalution will be presented here. The initial metallurgical comparisons in conjunction with follow-up metallurgical work showed the Y-12 Plant CVS product to be comparable to the fully qualified (for Galileo and Ulysses missions) EG G-MAT product. This allowed the Y-12 Plant to commence pilot production of CVS components for potential use in the CRAF and CASSINI missions.

  20. Dendritic Alloy Solidification Experiment (DASE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckermann, C.; Karma, A.; Steinbach, I.; deGroh, H. C., III

    2001-01-01

    A space experiment, and supporting ground-based research, is proposed to study the microstructural evolution in free dendritic growth from a supercooled melt of the transparent model alloy succinonitrile-acetone (SCN-ACE). The research is relevant to equiaxed solidification of metal alloy castings. The microgravity experiment will establish a benchmark for testing of equiaxed dendritic growth theories, scaling laws, and models in the presence of purely diffusive, coupled heat and solute transport, without the complicating influences of melt convection. The specific objectives are to: determine the selection of the dendrite tip operating state, i.e. the growth velocity and tip radius, for free dendritic growth of succinonitrile-acetone alloys; determine the growth morphology and sidebranching behavior for freely grown alloy dendrites; determine the effects of the thermal/solutal interactions in the growth of an assemblage of equiaxed alloy crystals; determine the effects of melt convection on the free growth of alloy dendrites; measure the surface tension anisotropy strength of succinon itrile -acetone alloys establish a theoretical and modeling framework for the experiments. Microgravity experiments on equiaxed dendritic growth of alloy dendrites have not been performed in the past. The proposed experiment builds on the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) of Glicksman and coworkers, which focused on the steady growth of a single crystal from pure supercooled melts (succinonitrile and pivalic acid). It also extends the Equiaxed Dendritic Solidification Experiment (EDSE) of the present investigators, which is concerned with the interactions and transients arising in the growth of an assemblage of equiaxed crystals (succinonitrile). However, these experiments with pure substances are not able to address the issues related to coupled heat and solute transport in growth of alloy dendrites.