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Sample records for a-si electronic portal

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of the transit dosimetric response of an a-Si electronic portal imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, S. J.; McNamara, A. L.; Vial, P.; Holloway, L.; Greer, P. B.; Kuncic, Z.

    2014-03-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are x-ray detectors frequently used in radiotherapy imaging and dosimetry applications. EPIDs employ a copper plate and gadolinium oxysulfide phosphor screen with an array of a-Si photodiodes to indirectly detect incident radiation. In this study, a previously developed Monte Carlo (MC) model of an a-Si EPID has been extended for transit dosimetry. The GEANT4 MC toolkit was used to integrate an a-Si EPID model with two phantoms and a 6 MV x-ray source. A solid water phantom was used to simulate EPID transmission factors, field size output factors and relative dose profiles and results were compared to experimental measurements. An anthropomorphic head phantom was used to qualitatively compare simulated and measured portal images of humanoid anatomy. Calculated transmission factors and field size output factors agreed to within 2.0% and 1.9% of experimental measurements, respectively. A comparison of calculated and measured relative dose profiles yielded >98% of points passing a gamma analysis with 3%/3 mm criterion for all field sizes. The simulated anthropomorphic head phantom image shows macroscopic anatomical features and qualitatively agrees with the measured image. Results validate the suitability of the MC model for predicting EPID response in transit dosimetry.

  2. Pesticide Electronic Application Submission Portal Updated with New Features

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has published an updated version of the Pesticide Submission Portal. This Web-based system for electronic submission of pesticide registration applications to EPA, with new features and functionality.

  3. Use of electronic portal imaging devices for electron treatment verification.

    PubMed

    Kairn, T; Aland, T; Crowe, S B; Trapp, J V

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to help broaden the use of electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) for pre-treatment patient positioning verification, from photon-beam radiotherapy to photon- and electron-beam radiotherapy, by proposing and testing a method for acquiring clinically-useful EPID images of patient anatomy using electron beams, with a view to enabling and encouraging further research in this area. EPID images used in this study were acquired using all available beams from a linac configured to deliver electron beams with nominal energies of 6, 9, 12, 16 and 20 MeV, as well as photon beams with nominal energies of 6 and 10 MV. A widely-available heterogeneous, approximately-humanoid, thorax phantom was used, to provide an indication of the contrast and noise produced when imaging different types of tissue with comparatively realistic thicknesses. The acquired images were automatically calibrated, corrected for the effects of variations in the sensitivity of individual photodiodes, using a flood field image. For electron beam imaging, flood field EPID calibration images were acquired with and without the placement of blocks of water-equivalent plastic (with thicknesses approximately equal to the practical range of electrons in the plastic) placed upstream of the EPID, to filter out the primary electron beam, leaving only the bremsstrahlung photon signal. While the electron beam images acquired using a standard (unfiltered) flood field calibration were observed to be noisy and difficult to interpret, the electron beam images acquired using the filtered flood field calibration showed tissues and bony anatomy with levels of contrast and noise that were similar to the contrast and noise levels seen in the clinically acceptable photon beam EPID images. The best electron beam imaging results (highest contrast, signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios) were achieved when the images were acquired using the higher energy electron beams (16 and 20 MeV) when the EPID was

  4. Electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma deposition of a-Si:H and a-SiC:H films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Y. H.; Pool, F. S.

    1991-01-01

    The paper reports electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) deposition of a-Si:H and a-SiC:H thin films using SiH4, CH4, and hydrogen mixed gas plasmas. The ECR deposition conditions were investigated in the pressure region of 0.1 to 100 mtorr, and the film properties were characterized by light and dark conductivity measurements, XRD, Raman spectroscopy, optical transmission, and IR spectroscopy. In addition, the hydrogen dilution effect on ECR-deposited a-SiC:H was investigated.

  5. A radiation-tolerant electronic readout system for portal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Östling, J.; Brahme, A.; Danielsson, M.; Iacobaeus, C.; Peskov, V.

    2004-06-01

    A new electronic portal imaging device, EPID, is under development at the Karolinska Institutet and the Royal Institute of Technology. Due to considerable demands on radiation tolerance in the radiotherapy environment, a dedicated electronic readout system has been designed. The most interesting aspect of the readout system is that it allows to read out ˜1000 pixels in parallel, with all electronics placed outside the radiation beam—making the detector more radiation resistant. In this work we are presenting the function of a small prototype (6×100 pixels) of the electronic readout board that has been tested. Tests were made with continuous X-rays (10-60 keV) and with α particles. The results show that, without using an optimised gas mixture and with an early prototype only, the electronic readout system still works very well.

  6. Front-end electronics for the Muon Portal project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garozzo, S.; Marano, D.; Bonanno, G.; Grillo, A.; Romeo, G.; Timpanaro, M. C.; Lo Presti, D.; Riggi, F.; Russo, V.; Bonanno, D.; La Rocca, P.; Longhitano, F.; Bongiovanni, D. G.; Fallica, G.; Valvo, G.

    2016-10-01

    The Muon Portal Project was born as a joint initiative between Italian research and industrial partners, aimed at the construction of a real-size working detector prototype to inspect the content of traveling containers by means of secondary cosmic-ray muon radiation and recognize potentially dangerous hidden materials. The tomographic image is obtained by reconstructing the incoming and outgoing muon trajectories when crossing the inspected volume, employing two tracker planes located above and below the container under inspection. In this paper, the design and development of the front-end electronics of the Muon Portal detector is presented, with particular emphasis being devoted to the photo-sensor devices detecting the scintillation light and to the read-out circuitry which is in charge of processing and digitizing the analog pulse signals. In addition, the remote control system, mechanical housing, and thermal cooling system of all structural blocks of the Muon Portal tracker are also discussed, demonstrating the effectiveness and functionality of the adopted design.

  7. Dosimetric verification of radiation therapy including intensity modulated treatments, using an amorphous-silicon electronic portal imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chytyk-Praznik, Krista Joy

    Radiation therapy is continuously increasing in complexity due to technological innovation in delivery techniques, necessitating thorough dosimetric verification. Comparing accurately predicted portal dose images to measured images obtained during patient treatment can determine if a particular treatment was delivered correctly. The goal of this thesis was to create a method to predict portal dose images that was versatile and accurate enough to use in a clinical setting. All measured images in this work were obtained with an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device (a-Si EPID), but the technique is applicable to any planar imager. A detailed, physics-motivated fluence model was developed to characterize fluence exiting the linear accelerator head. The model was further refined using results from Monte Carlo simulations and schematics of the linear accelerator. The fluence incident on the EPID was converted to a portal dose image through a superposition of Monte Carlo-generated, monoenergetic dose kernels specific to the a-Si EPID. Predictions of clinical IMRT fields with no patient present agreed with measured portal dose images within 3% and 3 mm. The dose kernels were applied ignoring the geometrically divergent nature of incident fluence on the EPID. A computational investigation into this parallel dose kernel assumption determined its validity under clinically relevant situations. Introducing a patient or phantom into the beam required the portal image prediction algorithm to account for patient scatter and attenuation. Primary fluence was calculated by attenuating raylines cast through the patient CT dataset, while scatter fluence was determined through the superposition of pre-calculated scatter fluence kernels. Total dose in the EPID was calculated by convolving the total predicted incident fluence with the EPID-specific dose kernels. The algorithm was tested on water slabs with square fields, agreeing with measurement within 3% and 3 mm. The

  8. Atomistic study of the structural and electronic properties of a-Si:H/c-Si interfaces.

    PubMed

    Santos, Iván; Cazzaniga, Marco; Onida, Giovanni; Colombo, Luciano

    2014-03-05

    We investigate the structural and electronic properties of the interface between hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and crystalline silicon (c-Si) by combining tight-binding molecular dynamics and DFT ab initio electronic structure calculations. We focus on the c-Si(100)(1×1)/a-Si:H, c-Si(100)(2×1)/a-Si:H and c-Si(111)/a-Si:H interfaces, due to their technological relevance. The analysis of atomic rearrangements induced at the interface by the interaction between H and Si allowed us to identify the relevant steps that lead to the transformation from c-Si(100)(1×1)/a-Si:H to c-Si(100)(2×1)/a-Si:H. The interface electronic structure is found to be characterized by spatially localized mid-gap states. Through them we have identified the relevant atomic structures responsible for the interface defect states, namely: dangling-bonds, H bridges, and strained bonds. Our analysis contributes to a better understanding of the role of such defects in c-Si/a-Si:H interfaces.

  9. Personal health records as portal to the electronic medical record.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Jennifer E; Gilbert, Mark R; Armstrong, Terri S

    2014-03-01

    This topic review discusses the evolving clinical challenges associated with the implementation of electronic personal health records (PHR) that are fully integrated with electronic medical records (EMR). The benefits of facilitating patient access to the EMR through web-based, PHR-portals may be substantial; foremost is the potential to enhance the flow of information between patient and healthcare practitioner. The benefits of improved communication and transparency of care are presumed to be a reduction in clinical errors, increased quality of care, better patient-management of disease, and better disease and symptom comprehension. Yet PHR databases allow patients open access to newly-acquired clinical data without the benefit of concurrent expert clinical interpretation, and therefore may create the potential for greater patient distress and uncertainty. With specific attention to neuro-oncology patients, this review focuses on the developing conflicts and consequences associated with the use of a PHR that parallels data acquisition of the EMR in real-time. We conclude with a discussion of recommendations for implementing fully-integrated PHR for neuro-oncology patients.

  10. The Wired Patient: Patterns of Electronic Patient Portal Use Among Patients With Cardiac Disease or Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Jonathan P; Shah, Nirav R; Stewart, Walter F

    2015-01-01

    Background As providers develop an electronic health record–based infrastructure, patients are increasingly using Web portals to access their health information and participate electronically in the health care process. Little is known about how such portals are actually used. Objective In this paper, our goal was to describe the types and patterns of portal users in an integrated delivery system. Methods We analyzed 12 months of data from Web server log files on 2282 patients using a Web-based portal to their electronic health record (EHR). We obtained data for patients with cardiovascular disease and/or diabetes who had a Geisinger Clinic primary care provider and were registered “MyGeisinger” Web portal users. Hierarchical cluster analysis was applied to longitudinal data to profile users based on their frequency, intensity, and consistency of use. User types were characterized by basic demographic data from the EHR. Results We identified eight distinct portal user groups. The two largest groups (41.98%, 948/2258 and 24.84%, 561/2258) logged into the portal infrequently but had markedly different levels of engagement with their medical record. Other distinct groups were characterized by tracking biometric measures (10.54%, 238/2258), sending electronic messages to their provider (9.25%, 209/2258), preparing for an office visit (5.98%, 135/2258), and tracking laboratory results (4.16%, 94/2258). Conclusions There are naturally occurring groups of EHR Web portal users within a population of adult primary care patients with chronic conditions. More than half of the patient cohort exhibited distinct patterns of portal use linked to key features. These patterns of portal access and interaction provide insight into opportunities for electronic patient engagement strategies. PMID:25707036

  11. Research on the stability, electronic properties, and structure of a-Si:H and its alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Street, R.A.; Jackson, W.B.; Johnson, N.; Nebel, C.; Hack, M.; Santos, P.; Thompson, R.; Tsai, C.C.; Walker, J. )

    1992-12-01

    Objective is to obtain a comprehensive understanding of structure and electronic properties of a-Si:H as they apply to solar cells. First observations were of light enhancement and field suppression of H diffusion in a-Si:H. Theoretical studies were made of hydrogen density of states distribution and its relation to defect metastability. Reduced density of light induced defect is observed in a-Si:H deposited in a remote hydrogen plasma reactor at 400 C. Kinetics of metastable defect creation using forward bias in a p-i-n diode to induce defects were studied and compared to light-induced defect creation in the same devices. Studies were made of transport at high electric field and low temperature. Detailed studies were made of kinetics of dopant metastability in n-type and p-type a-Si:H.

  12. Directed vapor deposition of amorphous and polycrystalline electronic materials: Nonhydrogenated a-Si

    SciTech Connect

    Groves, J.F.; Jones, S.H.; Globus, T.; Hsiung, L.M.; Wadley, H.

    1995-10-01

    A novel directed vapor deposition (DVD) process for creating amorphous and polycrystalline electronic materials is reported. Initial experimental results for DVD of nonhydrogenated a-Si indicate that growth rates at least between 0.02 and 1.0 {micro}m/min can be achieved. In this process, evaporated silicon is efficiently entrained in a previously formed low pressure supersonic He jet. The silicon is evaporated using a high energy, high voltage, electron beam. The collimated jet of He entrained with silicon is used to deposit thin films of a-Si at room temperature on glass substrates. Initial TEM microstructure analysis and optical absorption analysis is presented.

  13. Real-time portal imaging devices operating on high-pressure gaseous electronic principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giakos, George C.; Richardson, Donna B.; Ghotra, P.; Pillai, Bindu; Seetharaman, Lakshmi; Passalaqua, Anthony M.; DiBianca, Frank A.; Endorf, Robert J.; Devidas, Sreenivas

    1995-05-01

    A novel real-time portal imaging scanning detector, based on high-pressure gaseous electronics principles and operating up to 60 atmospheres, is presented and the predicted performance of this detector is analyzed. The idea is to utilize high pressure gaseous electronics imaging detectors operating in the saturation regime, aimed at improving image performance characteristics in real time portal imaging. As a result, beam localization errors are controlled, identified and corrected accurately and the patient radiotherapy treatment becomes more effective.

  14. A generalized calibration procedure for in vivo transit dosimetry using siemens electronic portal imaging devices.

    PubMed

    Fidanzio, Andrea; Greco, Francesca; Gargiulo, Laura; Cilla, Savino; Sabatino, Domenico; Cappiello, Massimo; Di Felice, Cinzia; Di Castro, Elisabetta; Azario, Luigi; Russo, Mariateresa; Pompei, Luciano; D'Onofrio, Guido; Piermattei, Angelo

    2011-03-01

    A practical and accurate generalized in vivo dosimetry procedure has been implemented for Siemens linacs supplying 6, 10, and 15 MV photon beams, equipped with aSi electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs). The in vivo dosimetry method makes use of correlation ratios between EPID transit signal, s (t) (0) (TPR,w,L), and phantom mid-plane dose, D (0)(TPR,w,L), as functions of phantom thickness, w, square field dimensions, L, and tissue-phantom ratio TPR(20,10). The s (t) (0) (TPR,w,L) and D (0)(TPR,w,L) values were defined to be independent of the EPID sensitivity and monitor unit calibration, while their dependence on TPR(20,10) was investigated to determine a set of generalized correlation ratios to be used for beams with TPR(20,10) falling in the examined range. This way, other radiotherapy centers can use the method with no need to locally perform the whole set of measurements in solid water phantoms, required to implement it. Tolerance levels for 3D conformal treatments, ranging between ±5 and ±6% according to tumor type and location, were estimated for comparison purposes between reconstructed isocenter dose, D (iso), and treatment planning system (TPS) computed dose D (iso,TPS). Finally a dedicated software, interfaceable with record and verify (R&V) systems used in the centers, was developed to obtain in vivo dosimetry results in less than 2 min after beam delivery.

  15. An electronic portal to support using information to improve healthcare.

    PubMed

    Strachan, Heather; Dallest, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    The Scottish Government supports a culture of knowledge management and organisational learning for nurses, midwives and allied health professionals (NMAHP). To help facilitate this the National eHealth Programme has developed a portal, Using Information - Improving Healthcare, to enable sharing of international and national good practice in information use. The portal provides short stories of how information has been used to improve healthcare or services via text, sound bites or video, with links to resources and people connected with these examples. Evidence based user success criteria and governance arrangements ensure that the site remains a high quality resource.

  16. Visualization of the Herpes Simplex Virus Portal in situ by Cryo-electron Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Cardone, Giovanni; Winkler, Dennis C.; Trus, Benes L.; Cheng, Naiqian; Heuser, John E.; Newcomb, William W.; Brown, Jay C.; Steven, Alasdair C.

    2007-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), the prototypical herpesvirus, has an icosahedral nucleocapsid surrounded by a proteinaceous tegument and a lipoprotein envelope. As in tailed bacteriophages, the icosahedral symmetry of the capsid is broken at one of the twelve vertices, which is occupied by a dodecameric ring of portal protein, UL6, instead of a pentamer of the capsid protein, UL19. The portal ring serves as a conduit for DNA entering and exiting the capsid. From a cryo-EM reconstruction of capsids immuno-gold-labeled with anti-UL6 antibodies, we confirmed that UL6 resides at a vertex. To visualize the portal in the context of the assembled capsid, we used cryo-electron tomography to determine the three-dimensional structures of individual A-capsids (empty, mature capsids). The similarity in size and overall shape of the portal and a UL19 pentamer - both are cylinders of ~ 800 kDa - combined with residual noise in the tomograms, prevented us from identifying the portal vertices directly; however, this was accomplished by a computational classification procedure. Averaging the portal-containing subtomograms produced a structure that tallies with the isolated portal, as previously reconstructed by cryo-EM. The portal is mounted on the outer surface of the capsid floor layer, with its narrow end pointing outwards. This disposition differs from that of known phage portals in that the bulk of its mass lies outside, not inside, the floor. This distinction may be indicative of functional divergence at the level of portal-related functions other than its role as a DNA channel. PMID:17188319

  17. Visualization of the herpes simplex virus portal in situ by cryo-electron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Cardone, Giovanni; Winkler, Dennis C.; Trus, Benes L.; Cheng, Naiqian; Heuser, John E.; Newcomb, William W.; Brown, Jay C.; Steven, Alasdair C. . E-mail: Alasdair_Steven@nih.gov

    2007-05-10

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), the prototypical herpesvirus, has an icosahedral nucleocapsid surrounded by a proteinaceous tegument and a lipoprotein envelope. As in tailed bacteriophages, the icosahedral symmetry of the capsid is broken at one of the 12 vertices, which is occupied by a dodecameric ring of portal protein, UL6, instead of a pentamer of the capsid protein, UL19. The portal ring serves as a conduit for DNA entering and exiting the capsid. From a cryo-EM reconstruction of capsids immuno-gold-labeled with anti-UL6 antibodies, we confirmed that UL6 resides at a vertex. To visualize the portal in the context of the assembled capsid, we used cryo-electron tomography to determine the three-dimensional structures of individual A-capsids (empty, mature capsids). The similarity in size and overall shape of the portal and a UL19 pentamer - both are cylinders of {approx} 800 kDa - combined with residual noise in the tomograms, prevented us from identifying the portal vertices directly; however, this was accomplished by a computational classification procedure. Averaging the portal-containing subtomograms produced a structure that tallies with the isolated portal, as previously reconstructed by cryo-EM. The portal is mounted on the outer surface of the capsid floor layer, with its narrow end pointing outwards. This disposition differs from that of known phage portals in that the bulk of its mass lies outside, not inside, the floor. This distinction may be indicative of divergence at the level of portal-related functions other than its role as a DNA channel.

  18. Quality assurance of electron beams using a Varian electronic portal imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Heaton, R.; Norrlinger, B.; Islam, M.

    2013-08-01

    The feasibility of utilizing an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for the quality assurance of electron beams was investigated. This work was conducted on a Varian 2100iX machine equipped with an amorphous silicon (aS1000) portal imager. The linearity of the imager pixel response as a function of exposed dose was first confirmed. The short-term reproducibility of the EPID response to electron beams was verified. Low (6 MeV), medium (12 MeV) and high (20 MeV) energies were tested, each along with small (6 × 6 cm2), medium (10 × 10 cm2) and large (20 × 20 cm2) applicators. Acquired EPID images were analyzed using an in-house MATLAB code for radiation field size, penumbra, symmetry and flatness. Field sizes and penumbra values agreed with those from film dosimetry to within 1 mm. Field symmetry and flatness constancies were measured over a period of three weeks. The results indicate that EPID can be used for routine quality assurance of electron beams.

  19. Study of a prototype high quantum efficiency thick scintillation crystal video-electronic portal imaging device.

    PubMed

    Samant, Sanjiv S; Gopal, Arun

    2006-08-01

    Image quality in portal imaging suffers significantly from the loss in contrast and spatial resolution that results from the excessive Compton scatter associated with megavoltage x rays. In addition, portal image quality is further reduced due to the poor quantum efficiency (QE) of current electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs). Commercial video-camera-based EPIDs or VEPIDs that utilize a thin phosphor screen in conjunction with a metal buildup plate to convert the incident x rays to light suffer from reduced light production due to low QE (<2% for Eastman Kodak Lanex Fast-B). Flat-panel EPIDs that utilize the same luminescent screen along with an a-Si:H photodiode array provide improved image quality compared to VEPIDs, but they are expensive and can be susceptible to radiation damage to the peripheral electronics. In this article, we present a prototype VEPID system for high quality portal imaging at sub-monitor-unit (subMU) exposures based on a thick scintillation crystal (TSC) that acts as a high QE luminescent screen. The prototype TSC system utilizes a 12 mm thick transparent CsI(Tl) (thallium-activated cesium iodide) scintillator for QE=0.24, resulting in significantly higher light production compared to commercial phosphor screens. The 25 X 25 cm2 CsI(Tl) screen is coupled to a high spatial and contrast resolution Video-Optics plumbicon-tube camera system (1240 X 1024 pixels, 250 microm pixel width at isocenter, 12-bit ADC). As a proof-of-principle prototype, the TSC system with user-controlled camera target integration was adapted for use in an existing clinical gantry (Siemens BEAMVIEW(PLUS)) with the capability for online intratreatment fluoroscopy. Measurements of modulation transfer function (MTF) were conducted to characterize the TSC spatial resolution. The measured MTF along with measurements of the TSC noise power spectrum (NPS) were used to determine the system detective quantum efficiency (DQE). A theoretical expression of DQE(0) was developed

  20. The Impact of Electronic Patient Portals on Patient Care: A Systematic Review of Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Ammenwerth, Elske; Schnell-Inderst, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Background Modern information technology is changing and provides new challenges to health care. The emergence of the Internet and the electronic health record (EHR) has brought new opportunities for patients to play a more active role in his/her care. Although in many countries patients have the right to access their clinical information, access to clinical records electronically is not common. Patient portals consist of provider-tethered applications that allow patients to electronically access health information that are documented and managed by a health care institution. Although patient portals are already being implemented, it is still unclear in which ways these technologies can influence patient care. Objective To systematically review the available evidence on the impact of electronic patient portals on patient care. Methods A systematic search was conducted using PubMed and other sources to identify controlled experimental or quasi-experimental studies on the impact of patient portals that were published between 1990 and 2011. A total of 1,306 references from all the publication hits were screened, and 13 papers were retrieved for full text analysis. Results We identified 5 papers presenting 4 distinct studies. There were no statistically significant changes between intervention and control group in the 2 randomized controlled trials investigating the effect of patient portals on health outcomes. Significant changes in the patient portal group, compared to a control group, could be observed for the following parameters: quicker decrease in office visit rates and slower increase in telephone contacts; increase in number of messages sent; changes of the medication regimen; and better adherence to treatment. Conclusions The number of available controlled studies with regard to patient portals is low. Even when patient portals are often discussed as a way to empower patients and improve quality of care, there is insufficient evidence to support this

  1. Verifying 4D gated radiotherapy using time-integrated electronic portal imaging: a phantom and clinical study

    PubMed Central

    van Sörnsen de Koste, John R; Cuijpers, Johan P; de Geest, Frank GM; Lagerwaard, Frank J; Slotman, Ben J; Senan, Suresh

    2007-01-01

    Background Respiration-gated radiotherapy (RGRT) can decrease treatment toxicity by allowing for smaller treatment volumes for mobile tumors. RGRT is commonly performed using external surrogates of tumor motion. We describe the use of time-integrated electronic portal imaging (TI-EPI) to verify the position of internal structures during RGRT delivery Methods TI-EPI portals were generated by continuously collecting exit dose data (aSi500 EPID, Portal vision, Varian Medical Systems) when a respiratory motion phantom was irradiated during expiration, inspiration and free breathing phases. RGRT was delivered using the Varian RPM system, and grey value profile plots over a fixed trajectory were used to study object positions. Time-related positional information was derived by subtracting grey values from TI-EPI portals sharing the pixel matrix. TI-EPI portals were also collected in 2 patients undergoing RPM-triggered RGRT for a lung and hepatic tumor (with fiducial markers), and corresponding planning 4-dimensional CT (4DCT) scans were analyzed for motion amplitude. Results Integral grey values of phantom TI-EPI portals correlated well with mean object position in all respiratory phases. Cranio-caudal motion of internal structures ranged from 17.5–20.0 mm on planning 4DCT scans. TI-EPI of bronchial images reproduced with a mean value of 5.3 mm (1 SD 3.0 mm) located cranial to planned position. Mean hepatic fiducial markers reproduced with 3.2 mm (SD 2.2 mm) caudal to planned position. After bony alignment to exclude set-up errors, mean displacement in the two structures was 2.8 mm and 1.4 mm, respectively, and corresponding reproducibility in anatomy improved to 1.6 mm (1 SD). Conclusion TI-EPI appears to be a promising method for verifying delivery of RGRT. The RPM system was a good indirect surrogate of internal anatomy, but use of TI-EPI allowed for a direct link between anatomy and breathing patterns. PMID:17760960

  2. Use of an Electronic Patient Portal Among the Chronically Ill: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Linna, Miika; Rönkkö, Ilona; Kröger, Virpi

    2014-01-01

    Background Electronic patient portals may enhance effective interaction between the patient and the health care provider. To grasp the full potential of patient portals, health care providers need more knowledge on which patient groups prefer electronic services and how patients should be served through this channel. Objective The objective of this study was to assess how chronically ill patients’ state of health, comorbidities, and previous care are associated with their adoption and use of a patient portal. Methods A total of 222 chronically ill patients, who were offered access to a patient portal with their health records and secure messaging with care professionals, were included in the study. Differences in the characteristics of non-users, viewers, and interactive users of the patient portal were analyzed before access to the portal. Patients’ age, gender, diagnoses, levels of the relevant physiological measurements, health care contacts, and received physiological measurements were collected from the care provider’s electronic health record. In addition, patient-reported health and patient activation were assessed by a survey. Results Despite the broad range of measures used to indicate the patients’ state of health, the portal user groups differed only in their recorded diagnosis for hypertension, which was most common in the non-user group. However, there were significant differences in the amount of care received during the year before access to the portal. The non-user group had more nurse visits and more measurements of relevant physiological outcomes than viewers and interactive users. They also had fewer referrals to specialized care during the year before access to the portal than the two other groups. The viewers and the interactive users differed from each other significantly in the number of nurse calls received, the interactive users having more calls than the viewers. No significant differences in age, gender, or patient activation were

  3. Megavoltage image contrast with low-atomic number target materials and amorphous silicon electronic portal imagers.

    PubMed

    Orton, E J; Robar, J L

    2009-03-07

    Low-atomic number (Z) targets have been shown to improve contrast in megavoltage (MV) images when using film-screen detection systems. This research aims to quantify the effect of low-Z targets on MV image contrast using an amorphous silicon electronic portal image detector (a-Si EPID) through both experimental measurement and Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. Experimental beams were produced with the linac running in the 6 MeV electron mode and with a 1.0 cm aluminum (Al, Z = 13) target replacing flattening filtration in the carousel, (6 MeV/Al). A 2100EX Varian linac equipped with an aS500 EPID was used with the QC3 MV phantom for the majority of contrast measurements. The BEAMnrc/EGSnrc MC package was used to build a model of the full imaging system including beam generation (linac head), the a-Si detector and the contrast phantom. The model accurately reproduces contrast measurements to within 2.5% for both the standard 6 MV therapy beam and the 6 MeV/Al beam. The contrast advantage of 6 MeV/Al over 6 MV, as quantified with the QC3 phantom, ranged from a factor increase of 1.6 +/- 0.1 to 2.8 +/- 0.2. Only a modest improvement in contrast was seen when the incident electron energy was reduced to 4 MeV (up to factor of 1.2 +/- 0.1 over 6 MeV/Al) or with removal of the copper build-up layer in the detector, (up to factor of 1.2 +/- 0.1 over 6 MeV/Al). Further decreasing the target Z, to beryllium (Be, Z = 4), at 4 MeV showed no significant improvement over 4 MeV/Al. Experimentally, the contrast advantage of 6 MeV/Al over 6 MV was found to decrease with increasing patient thickness, as can be expected due to selective attenuation of low-energy photons. At head and neck-like thicknesses, the low-Z advantage is a factor increase of 1.7 +/- 0.1.

  4. TOPICAL REVIEW: Electronic portal imaging devices: a review and historical perspective of contemporary technologies and research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonuk, Larry E.

    2002-03-01

    A review of electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) used in external beam, megavoltage radiation therapy is presented. The review consists of a brief introduction to the definition, role and clinical significance of portal imaging, along with a discussion of radiotherapy film systems and the motivations for EPIDs. This is followed by a summary of the challenges and constraints inherent to portal imaging along with a concise, historical review of the technologies that have been explored and developed. The paper then examines, in greater depth, the two first-generation technologies that have found widespread clinical use starting from the late 1980s. This is followed by a broad overview of the physics, operation, properties and advantages of active matrix, flat-panel, megavoltage imagers, presently being commercially introduced to clinical environments or expected to be introduced in the future. Finally, a survey of contemporary research efforts focused on improving portal imaging performance by addressing various weaknesses in existing commercial systems is presented.

  5. Transit Dosimetry for Patient Treatment Verification with an Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Sean L.

    The complex and individualized photon fluence patterns constructed during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning must be verified before they are delivered to the patient. There is a compelling argument for additional verification throughout the course of treatment due to the possibility of data corruption, unintentional modification of the plan parameters, changes in patient anatomy, errors in patient alignment, and even mistakes in identifying the correct patient for treatment. Amorphous silicon (aSi) Electronic Portal Imaging Devices (EPIDs) can be utilized for IMRT verification. The goal of this thesis is to implement EPID transit dosimetry, measurement of the dose at a plane behind the patient during their treatment, within the clinical process. In order to achieve this goal, a number of the EPID's dosimetric shortcomings were studied and subsequently resolved. Portal dose images (PDIs) acquired with an aSi EPID suffer from artifacts related to radiation backscattered asymmetrically from the EPID support structure. This backscatter signal varies as a function of field size (FS) and location on the EPID. Its presence can affect pixel values in the measured PDI by up to 3.6%. Two methods to correct for this artifact are offered: discrete FS specific correction matrices and a single generalized equation. The dosimetric comparison between the measured and predicted through-air dose images for 49 IMRT treatment fields was significantly improved (p << .001) after the application of these FS specific backscatter corrections. The formulation of a transit dosimetry algorithm followed the establishment of the backscatter correction and a confirmation of the EPID's positional stability with linac gantry rotation. A detailed characterization of the attenuation, scatter, and EPID response behind an object in the beam's path is necessary to predict transit PDIs. In order to validate the algorithm's performance, 49 IMRT fields were delivered to a

  6. The Influence of Acquisition Mode on the Dosimetric Performance of an Amorphous Silicon Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    PubMed Central

    Bawazeer, Omemh; Herath, Sisira; Sarasanandarajah, Siva; Kron, Tomas; Deb, Pradip

    2017-01-01

    Aims: This study investigates the impact of cine acquisition mode on the dosimetric characteristics of a Varian aS500 amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device (a-Si EPID). Materials and Methods: The performance of an a-Si EPID operated in cine mode was assessed and compared to its performance when operated in an integrated mode and dose measurements using an ionization chamber. This study was conducted at different photon energies and the EPID performance was assessed as function of the delivered dose, dose rate, multileaf collimator speed, field size, phantom thickness, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy fields. Results: The worst nonlinearity was observed at low monitor unit (MU) settings < 100 MU with the highest dose per frame. The nonlinearity of response at a low MU setting was attributed due to the loss of four cine images during each delivery. The EPID response with changing dose rate for 10 MU delivered had similar results to its performance in an integrated mode and ionization chamber. Despite the nonlinearity of response with low MU delivered, EPID performance operated in cine and integrated acquisition modes had comparable responses within 2%. Conclusions: For EPID dosimetry application using cine mode, this study recommends the calibration of the EPID images to be undertaken at a large MU. There were no additional corrections that were required when the EPID operated in cine acquisition mode as compared to calibration in integrated mode. PMID:28706355

  7. Electron cyclotron resonance deposition of a-Si:H and a-C:H films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Y. H.; Yang, C. L.; Allevato, C. E.; Pool, F. S.

    1989-01-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films have been deposited by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave plasma enhanced CVD. A high deposition rate of 25 A/sec and a light-to-dark conductivity ratio of 500,000 for a-Si:H films have been achieved by the ECR process using a pure silane plasma. ECR microwave plasmas have been analyzed by in situ optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and have shown a strong H-asterisk emission at 434 nm indicating higher chemical reactivity than RF plasmas. The linear correlation between the film deposition rate and the SiH-asterisk emission intensity of ECR silane plasma suggests that SiH-asterisk species are related to the neutral radicals which are responsible for the a-Si:H film deposition. Hard and soft a-C:H films have been deposited by ECR with and without RF bias power, respectively. The RF bias to the substrate is found to play a critical role in determining the film structure and the carbon bonding configuration of ECR deposited a-C:H films. Raman spectra of these films indicate that ECR deposition conditions can be optimized to produce diamond films.

  8. Optical emission diagnostics of electron cyclotron resonance and glow discharge plasmas for a-Si:H and a-SiC:H film depositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, C. L.; Shing, Y. H.; Allevato, C. E.

    1988-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the steady-state and kinetic characteristics of ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) and RF glow discharge plasmas can be readily monitored by OES (optical emission spectroscopy) in real time during a-Si:H and a-SiC:H film depositions using an OMA detection system. The ECR and RF glow discharge plasmas used for a-Si:H and a-SiC:H film depositions were studied by monitoring the emission of SiH(asterisk), H(asterisk), H(asterisk)2, and CH(asterisk) excited states. The OES of the ECR plasma shows a strong emission at 434 nm from H(asterisk), which is not detectable in the glow discharge plasma. Steady-state OES studies have established preliminary correlations between SiH(asterisk) and CH(asterisk) emission intensities and the film deposition rate. Transient OES spectra of SiH4 and CH4 plasmas have shown different kinetics in SiH(asterisk) and CH(asterisk) emission intensities. Transient studies of the SiH(asterisk) emission intensity have indicated that additional mechanisms for producing the SiH(asterisk) species become evident in hydrogen-diluted silane plasmas.

  9. Feasibility study of patient positioning verification in electron beam radiotherapy with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID).

    PubMed

    Ramm, U; Köhn, J; Rodriguez Dominguez, R; Licher, J; Koch, N; Kara, E; Scherf, C; Rödel, C; Weiß, C

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of verification and documentation in electron beam radiotherapy using the photon contamination detected with an electronic portal imaging device. For investigation of electron beam verification with an EPID, the portal images are acquired irradiating two different tissue equivalent phantoms at different electron energies. Measurements were performed on an Elekta SL 25 linear accelerator with an amorphous-Si electronic portal imaging device (EPID: iViewGT, Elekta Oncology Systems, Crawley, UK). As a measure of EPID image quality contrast (CR) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) are determined. For characterisation of the imaging of the EPID RW3 slabs and a Gammex 467 phantom with different material inserts are used. With increasing electron energy the intensity of photon contamination increases, yielding an increasing signal-to-noise ratio, but images are showing a decreasing contrast. As the signal-to-noise ratio saturates with increasing dose a minimum of 50 MUs is recommended. Even image quality depends on electron energy and diameter of the patient, the acquired results are mostly sufficient to assess the accuracy of beam positioning. In general, the online EPID acquisition has been demonstrated to be an effective electron beam verification and documentation method. The results are showing that this procedure can be recommended to be routinely and reliably done in patient treatment with electron beams.

  10. Electronic Health Record Patient Portal Adoption by Health Care Consumers: An Acceptance Model and Survey

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The future of health care delivery is becoming more citizen centered, as today’s user is more active, better informed, and more demanding. Worldwide governments are promoting online health services, such as electronic health record (EHR) patient portals and, as a result, the deployment and use of these services. Overall, this makes the adoption of patient-accessible EHR portals an important field to study and understand. Objective The aim of this study is to understand the factors that drive individuals to adopt EHR portals. Methods We applied a new adoption model using, as a starting point, Ventkatesh's Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology in a consumer context (UTAUT2) by integrating a new construct specific to health care, a new moderator, and new relationships. To test the research model, we used the partial least squares (PLS) causal modelling approach. An online questionnaire was administrated. We collected 360 valid responses. Results The statistically significant drivers of behavioral intention are performance expectancy (beta=.200; t=3.619), effort expectancy (beta=.185; t=2.907), habit (beta=.388; t=7.320), and self-perception (beta=.098; t=2.285). The predictors of use behavior are habit (beta=0.206; t=2.752) and behavioral intention (beta=0.258; t=4.036). The model explained 49.7% of the variance in behavioral intention and 26.8% of the variance in use behavior. Conclusions Our research helps to understand the desired technology characteristics of EHR portals. By testing an information technology acceptance model, we are able to determine what is more valued by patients when it comes to deciding whether to adopt EHR portals or not. The inclusion of specific constructs and relationships related to the health care consumer area also had a significant impact on understanding the adoption of EHR portals. PMID:26935646

  11. Maternity patients' access to their electronic medical records: use and perspectives of a patient portal.

    PubMed

    Megan Forster, Megan; Dennison, Kerrie; Callen, Joanne; Andrew, Andrew; Westbrook, Johanna I

    2015-01-01

    Patients have been able to access clinical information from their paper-based health records for a number of years. With the advent of Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) access to this information can now be achieved online using a secure electronic patient portal. The purpose of this study was to investigate maternity patients' use and perceptions of a patient portal developed at the Mater Mothers' Hospital in Brisbane, Australia. A web-based patient portal, one of the first developed and deployed in Australia, was introduced on 26 June 2012. The portal was designed for maternity patients booked at Mater Mothers' Hospital, as an alternative to the paper-based Pregnancy Health Record. Through the portal, maternity patients are able to complete their hospital registration form online and obtain current health information about their pregnancy (via their EMR), as well as access a variety of support tools to use during their pregnancy such as tailored public health advice. A retrospective cross-sectional study design was employed. Usage statistics were extracted from the system for a one year period (1 July 2012 to 30 June 2013). Patients' perceptions of the portal were obtained using an online survey, accessible by maternity patients for two weeks in February 2013 (n=80). Descriptive statistics were employed to analyse the data. Between July 2012 and June 2013, 10,892 maternity patients were offered a patient portal account and access to their EMR. Of those 6,518 created one (60%; 6,518/10,892) and 3,104 went on to request access to their EMR (48%; 3,104/6,518). Of these, 1,751 had their access application granted by 30 June 2013. The majority of maternity patients submitted registration forms online via the patient portal (56.7%). Patients could view their EMR multiple times: there were 671 views of the EMR, 2,781 views of appointment schedules and 135 birth preferences submitted via the EMR. Eighty survey responses were received from EMR account holders, (response

  12. Impact of Patient Portal Secure Messages and Electronic Visits on Adult Primary Care Office Visits

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Sarah J.; Chaudhry, Rajeev; Ebbert, Jon O.; Ytterberg, Karen; Tulledge-Scheitel, Sidna M.; Stroebel, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Secure messages and electronic visits (“e-visits”) through patient portals provide patients with alternatives to face-to-face appointments, telephone contact, letters, and e-mails. Limited information exists on how portal messaging impacts face-to-face visits in primary care. Materials and Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 2,357 primary care patients who used electronic messaging (both secure messages and e-visits) on a patient portal. Face-to-face appointment frequencies (visits/year) of each patient were calculated before and after the first message in a matched-pairs analysis. We analyzed visit frequencies with and without adjustments for a first message surge in visits, and we examined subgroups of high message utilizers and long-term users. Results: Primary care patients who sent at least one message (secure message or e-visit) had a mean of 2.43 (standard deviation [SD] 2.3) annual face-to-face visits before the first message and 2.47 (SD 2.8) after, a nonsignificant difference (p=0.45). After adjustment for a first message surge in visits, no significant visit frequency differences were observed (mean, 2.35 annual visits per patient both before and after first message; p=0.93). Subgroup analysis also showed no significant change in visit frequency for patients with higher message utilization or for those who had used the messaging feature longer. Conclusions: No significant change in face-to-face visit frequency was observed following implementation of portal messaging. Secure messaging and e-visits through a patient portal may not result in a change of adult primary care face-to-face visits. PMID:24350803

  13. A region-based Retinex with data filling for the enhancement of electronic portal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuan-Po; Yeh, Shyh-An; Huang, Yung-Hui; Chang, Li-Yun; Kuo, Chung-Ming; Ding, Hueisch-Jy

    2013-05-01

    PurposePortal images are acquired by electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) with megavoltage (MV) x-ray, but they are inherently poor in terms of contrast, due to Compton Effect. In comparison with diagnostic x-ray images, portal images usually lack sufficient detail information for normal human vision. Therefore, an effective method of enhancing these images would be very useful. This paper proposes a new approach that combines global and local enhancement techniques. Materials and methodsA portal image usually has a high dynamic range (HDR) of up to 16 bits, so it could records details that are imperceptible to the naked eye. However, this property provides the potential for enhancement of the portal image. In order to overcome the low contrast appearance caused by innate physical properties, two phases and four sequential steps were proposed. At phase 1, global enhancement, HE is used to stretch narrow range histogram of original raw image to reasonable wide range so that we can easily partition the image into regions for local enhancement. At phase 2, local enhancement, EPIs were first segmented into regions based on histogram distribution. Then a new concept of local enhancement, pseudo-data filling, in which enhancement is controlled by manipulating the pseudo-data, is proposed in order to maximize the regional enhancement. Finally each region of EPI is enhanced by Retinex with optimized parameter and synthesized as output image. ResultsAt phase 1, HE can successfully improve EPIs contrast at varies body sites by redistribution histogram. This step provides possibility of histogram analyzing at phase 2. Therefore, histogram-based segmentation is feasible for nearly every patient as we expected. Simulation of pseudo-data filling and region-based Retinex enhancement demonstrate that the proposed method provides a more detailed portal image, which is proved by objective evaluation of two groups of radiation oncology staffs. ConclusionsAn effective enhancement

  14. Increase in Cancer Center Staff Effort Related to Electronic Patient Portal Use

    PubMed Central

    Laccetti, Andrew L.; Chen, Beibei; Cai, Jennifer; Gates, Samantha; Xie, Yang; Lee, Simon J. Craddock

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Electronic portals provide patients with real-time access to personal health records. Use of this technology by individuals with cancer is particularly intensive. We therefore examined patterns of use of electronic portals by clinic staff at a National Cancer Institute–designated comprehensive cancer center. Methods: We identified and characterized cancer center providers and clinic staff who performed electronic activities related to MyChart, the institution’s personal health records portal, from 2009 to 2014. Total MyChart actions and messages received were quantified and characterized according to type, timing, and staff category. Results: Two hundred eighty-nine employees were included in our analysis: 85 nurses (29%), 79 ancillary staff (27%), 49 clerical/managerial staff (17%), 47 physicians (16%), and 29 advanced practice providers (10%). These individuals performed 740,613 MyChart actions and received 117,799 messages. Seventy-seven percent of actions were performed by nurses, 11% by ancillary staff, 6% by advanced practice providers, 5% by physicians, and 1% by clerical/managerial staff. From 2011 to 2014, staff MyChart activity increased approximately 10-fold. On average, 6.3 staff MyChart actions were performed per patient-initiated message. In 2014, nurses performed an average of 3,838 MyChart actions and received an average of 589 messages, compared with 591 actions and 87 messages in 2011 (P < .001). Sixteen percent of all actions occurred outside clinic hours. Conclusion: Cancer center employee effort related to an electronic patient portal has increased markedly over time, particularly among nursing staff. Because further uptake of this technology is expected, it is critical to consider potential effects on clinical resources, employee and patient satisfaction, and patient safety. PMID:27601511

  15. The stability of liquid-filled matrix ionization chamber electronic portal imaging devices for dosimetry purposes.

    PubMed

    Louwe, R J W; Tielenburg, R; van Ingen, K M; Mijnheer, B J; van Herk, M B

    2004-04-01

    This study was performed to determine the stability of liquid-filled matrix ionization chamber (LiFi-type) electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) for dosimetric purposes. The short- and long-term stability of the response was investigated, as well as the importance of factors influencing the response (e.g., temperature fluctuations, radiation damage, and the performance of the electronic hardware). It was shown that testing the performance of the electronic hardware as well as the short-term stability of the imagers may reveal the cause of a poor long-term stability of the imager response. In addition, the short-term stability was measured to verify the validity of the fitted dose-response curve immediately after beam startup. The long-term stability of these imagers could be considerably improved by correcting for room temperature fluctuations and gradual changes in response due to radiation damage. As a result, the reproducibility was better than 1% (1 SD) over a period of two years. The results of this study were used to formulate recommendations for a quality control program for portal dosimetry. The effect of such a program was assessed by comparing the results of portal dosimetry and in vivo dosimetry using diodes during the treatment of 31 prostate patients. The improvement of the results for portal dosimetry was consistent with the deviations observed with the reproducibility tests in that particular period. After a correction for the variation in response of the imager, the average difference between the measured and prescribed dose during the treatment of prostate patients was -0.7%+/-1.5% (1 SD), and -0.6%+/-1.1% (1 SD) for EPID and diode in vivo dosimetry, respectively. It can be concluded that a high stability of the response can be achieved for this type of EPID by applying a rigorous quality control program.

  16. The expert network and electronic portal for children with respiratory and allergic symptoms: rationale and design

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Data on baseline characteristics of children with asthma to predict individual treatment responses are lacking. We aimed to set up a data-collection system which can easily fill this gap in clinical practice. A web-based application was developed, named 'Portal for children with respiratory and allergic symptoms', hereafter called Electronic Portal (EP). It contains health- and disease-related questionnaires on respiratory- and allergic diseases. All patients, 1–18 years of age, with respiratory- and/or allergic complaints are invited to enter the EP before their first visit. By using the EP large amounts of data, gathered during routine patient care can be used for research purposes. This may help to further investigate the different treatment related asthma phenotypes and will be helpful to monitor risk factors for other atopic diseases and respiratory infections. PMID:23324209

  17. Quality Control of Portal Imaging with PTW EPID QC PHANTOM.

    PubMed

    Pesznyák, Csilla; Fekete, Gábor; Mózes, Arpád; Kiss, Balázs; Király, Réka; Polgár, István; Zaránd, Pál; Mayer, Arpád

    2009-01-01

    Quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) of different electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) and portal images with the PTW EPID QC PHANTOM. Characteristic properties of images of different file formats were measured on Siemens OptiVue500aSi, Siemens BeamView Plus, Elekta iView, and Varian PortalVision and analyzed with the epidSoft 2.0 program in four radiation therapy centers. The portal images were taken with Kodak X-OMAT V and the Kodak Portal Localisation ReadyPack films and evaluated with the same program. The optimal exposition both for EPIDs and portal films of different kind was determined. For double exposition, the 2+1 MU values can be recommended in the case of Siemens OptiVue500aSi Elekta iView and Kodak Portal Localisation ReadyPack films, while for Siemens BeamView Plus, Varian PortalVision and Kodak X-OMAT V film 7+7 MU is recommended. The PTW EPID QC PHANTOM can be used not only for amorphous silicon EPIDs but also for images taken with a video-based system or by using an ionization chamber matrix or for portal film. For analysis of QC tests, a standardized format (used at the acceptance test) should be applied, as the results are dependent on the file format used.

  18. Portal verification of high-energy electron beams using their photon contamination by film-cassette systems.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Peter; Baus, Wolfgang W; Baumann, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Though electron beams are widely used in radiotherapy, their verification is not well established in clinical practice. The present study compares the suitability of several sensitive film-cassette systems for electron-portal verification by contaminating photons. The characteristics of the optical density curves of film-cassette combinations were determined by exposing them to the bremsstrahlung contamination of a variety of electron beams. Using a Las-Vegas Phantom the spatial low-contrast resolution of the combinations was investigated. The absorbed dose rates due to the contaminant photons were measured for different geometric conditions. Suitable film-cassette combinations were found for portal verification of all usual electron energies. The best image quality was obtained using the EC film and the EC-L cassettes. For electron energies higher than 6 MeV some film-cassette combinations are suitable to verify abutted electron and photon portals using the same film sheet. The verification of electron portals and of abutted electron-photon portals can be performed by sensitive film-cassette systems with an image quality comparable to photon-beam verification.

  19. Effect of fluorine on the structural and electronic properties of a-Si:H:F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, A. A.; Mahan, A. H.; Fleet, M. L.; Bender, J.

    1990-04-01

    The effects of fluorine incorporation on the microstructural and electronic properties of a-Si:H:F with 1-7 at. % F have been systematically studied. Infrared spectra show that as the fluorine content increases, silicon dihydride bonding increases. Density measurements confirm that this is associated with an increase in microvoid content, suggesting that fluorine induces the formation of voids which are lined with SiH2. With the increase in F and SiH2, the photoconductivity of the material decreases over 4 orders of magnitude. A review of the literature shows that the appearance of SiH2 is a universal result of >1 at. % F incorporation by many techniques and is not limited to the present study. Mechanisms by which fluorine can induce structural changes are evaluated. These results are contrasted with the use of fluorinated process gases to deposit microcrystalline films and Si-Ge alloys. This has implications for the incorporation of fluorine in photovoltaic devices.

  20. Theoretical analysis and experimental evaluation of a Csl(TI) based electronic portal imaging system.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Amit; Zeman, Herbert; Samant, Sanjiv; Lovhoiden, Gunnar; Weinberg, Brent; DiBianca, Frank

    2002-06-01

    This article discusses the design and analysis of a portal imaging system based on a thick transparent scintillator. A theoretical analysis using Monte Carlo simulation was performed to calculate the x-ray quantum detection efficiency (QDE), signal to noise ratio (SNR) and the zero frequency detective quantum efficiency [DQE(0)] of the system. A prototype electronic portal imaging device (EPID) was built, using a 12.7 mm thick, 20.32 cm diameter, Csl(Tl) scintillator, coupled to a liquid nitrogen cooled CCD TV camera. The system geometry of the prototype EPID was optimized to achieve high spatial resolution. The experimental evaluation of the prototype EPID involved the determination of contrast resolution, depth of focus, light scatter and mirror glare. Images of humanoid and contrast detail phantoms were acquired using the prototype EPID and were compared with those obtained using conventional and high contrast portal film and a commercial EPID. A theoretical analysis was also carried out for a proposed full field of view system using a large area, thinned CCD camera and a 12.7 mm thick CsI(TI) crystal. Results indicate that this proposed design could achieve DQE(0) levels up to 11%, due to its order of magnitude higher QDE compared to phosphor screen-metal plate based EPID designs, as well as significantly higher light collection compared to conventional TV camera based systems.

  1. Comprehensive research on the stability and electronic properties of a-Si:H and a-SiGe:H alloys and devices. Final subcontract report, 10 March 1991--30 August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Dalal, V.

    1995-04-01

    This report describes work on the growth of a-Si:H and a-(Si,Ge):H materials and devices using well-controlled growth techniques. The a-Si:H materials were grown at higher temperatures (300{degrees}-375{degrees}C) using electron-cyclotron-resonance (ECR) plasma techniques with a remote H beam. These films have excellent electronic quality and show significant improvements in stability compared with glow-discharge-produced a-Si:H materials. Several problems were encountered during the fabrication of devices in these materials, and we were able to overcome them by a systematic work on buffer layers in these cells. We also studied alternative designs for improving the stability of a-Si:H cells and produced graded-gap a-Si:H cells using glow-discharge that are more stable than comparable standard, ungraded glow discharge devices. Finally, systematic work was done to produce good-quality a-(Si,Ge):H films, using triode radio frequency (RF) glow-discharge with ion bombardment during growth. Diagnostic devices were made using these films, and the properties of the material, such as Urbach energies and hole mobility-lifetime products, were measured in these devices. We found a systematic increase in the Urbach energies, and a corresponding decrease in the hole and electron {mu}{tau} products, as the Ge content of the alloys increases.

  2. Identifying electronic properties relevant to improving stability in a-Si:H-based cells and overall performance in a-Si,Ge:H-based cells. Annual subcontract report, 18 April 1995--17 April 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, J.D.

    1997-03-01

    The work done during this second phase of the University of Oregon`s NREL subcontract focused on degradation studies in both pure a-Si:H and a-Si,Ge:H alloys, as well as a detailed study of the interface between these two materials in a-Si:H/a-Si, Ge:H heterostructures. All samples discussed in this report were produced by the glow-discharge method and were obtained either in collaboration with United Solar Systems Corporation or with researchers at Lawrence Berkeley laboratory. First, the results from the a-Si, Ge:H degradation studies support the conclusion that considerable quantities of charged defects exist in nominally intrinsic material. Researchers found that on light-soaking, all the observed defect sub-bands increased; however, their ratios varied significantly. Second, researchers performed voltage pulse stimulated capacitance transient measurements on a-Si:H/a-Si, Ge:H heterostructure samples and found a clear signature of trapped hole emission extending over long times. Finally, researchers began comparison studies of the electronic properties of a-Si:H grown by glow discharge either with 100% silane, or with silane diluted in H{sub 2} or He gas. The results on these samples indicate that the films grown under high hydrogen dilution exhibit roughly a factor of 3 lower deep defect densities than those grown using pure silane.

  3. SU-E-T-781: Using An Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) for Correlating Linac Photon Beam Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Yaddanapudi, S; Cai, B; Sun, B; Noel, C; Goddu, S; Mutic, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have proven to be useful for measuring several parameters of interest in linear accelerator (linac) quality assurance (QA). The purpose of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of using EPIDs for determining linac photon beam energies. Methods: Two non-clinical Varian TrueBeam linacs (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) with 6MV and 10MV photon beams were used to perform the measurements. The linacs were equipped with an amorphous silicon based EPIDs (aSi1000) that were used for the measurements. We compared the use of flatness versus percent depth dose (PDD) for predicting changes in linac photon beam energy. PDD was measured in 1D water tank (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne FL) and the profiles were measured using 2D ion-chamber array (IC-Profiler, Sun Nuclear) and the EPID. Energy changes were accomplished by varying the bending magnet current (BMC). The evaluated energies conformed with the AAPM TG142 tolerance of ±1% change in PDD. Results: BMC changes correlating with a ±1% change in PDD corresponded with a change in flatness of ∼1% to 2% from baseline values on the EPID. IC Profiler flatness values had the same correlation. We observed a similar trend for the 10MV beam energy changes. Our measurements indicated a strong correlation between changes in linac photon beam energy and changes in flatness. For all machines and energies, beam energy changes produced change in the uniformity (AAPM TG-142), varying from ∼1% to 2.5%. Conclusions: EPID image analysis of beam profiles can be used to determine linac photon beam energy changes. Flatness-based metrics or uniformity as defined by AAPM TG-142 were found to be more sensitive to linac photon beam energy changes than PDD. Research funding provided by Varian Medical Systems. Dr. Sasa Mutic receives compensation for providing patient safety training services from Varian Medical Systems, the sponsor of this study.

  4. Preferences of Current and Potential Patients and Family Members Regarding Implementation of Electronic Communication Portals in Intensive Care Units.

    PubMed

    Brown, Samuel M; Bell, Sigall K; Roche, Stephanie D; Dente, Erica; Mueller, Ariel; Kim, Tae-Eun; O'Reilly, Kristin; Lee, Barbara Sarnoff; Sands, Ken; Talmor, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    The quality of communication with patients and family members in intensive care units (ICUs) is a focus of current interest for clinical care improvement. Electronic communication portals are commonly used in other healthcare settings to improve communication. We do not know whether patients and family members desire such portals in ICUs, and if so, what functionality they should provide. To define interest in and desired elements of an electronic communication portal among current and potential ICU patients and their family members. We surveyed, via an Internet panel, 1,050 English-speaking adults residing in the United States with a personal or family history of an ICU admission within 10 years (cohort A) and 1,050 individuals without a history of such admission (cohort B). We also administered a survey instrument in person to 105 family members of patients currently admitted to ICUs at an academic medical center in Boston (cohort C). Respondents, especially current ICU family members, supported an electronic communication portal, including access via an electronic tablet. They wanted at least daily updates, one-paragraph summaries of family meetings including a list of key decisions made, and knowledge of the role and experience of treating clinicians. Overall, they preferred detailed rather than "big picture" information. Respondents were generally comfortable sharing information with their family members. Preferences regarding a communication portal varied significantly by age, sex, ethnicity, and prior experience with ICU hospitalization. Electronic communication portals appear welcome in contemporary ICUs. Frequent updates, knowledge about the professional qualifications of clinicians, detailed medical information, and documentation of family meetings are particularly desired.

  5. A Patient Portal With Electronic Messaging: Controlled Before-and-After Study

    PubMed Central

    Linna, Miika; Rönkkö, Ilona

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients’ access to their medical records, along with electronic messaging, offers an efficient means of information transition between patients and their caregivers. Easier access to information and interaction with health care professionals may reduce use of other services while increasing patients’ activation in the management of their own health. Patient portals may therefore have a favorable impact on the cost-effectiveness of care. Objective The aim was to assess the benefits and risks of providing electronic messaging services to patients with chronic conditions. Using cost-effectiveness analysis, the outcomes and costs of providing access to an electronic patient portal were evaluated in a real-life treatment process in primary care. Methods A total of 876 chronically ill patients from public primary care were allocated to either an intervention group receiving immediate access to a patient portal that included their medical records, care plan, and secure messaging with a care team, or to a control group receiving standard care. Incremental direct heath care costs, health status based on the Short-Form Health Survey, version 2 (SF-36v2), and patient activation based on the short form of the Patient Activation Measure (PAM13) were compared to standard care in a 6-month follow-up. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were calculated using a sample of 80 patients in the intervention group and 57 patients in the control group; thus, a total of 137 patients were included in the final analysis. Propensity-score matching was used to assess the sensitivity of the results to the possible attrition bias. Results Patient activation improved more in the intervention group but the effect was not statistically significant. The effect on cost of care was ambiguous; costs decreased by an average of €91 in the unadjusted model, but increased by €48 in the adjusted model. Due to the controversial results on cost, the unadjusted analysis showed an 89

  6. NOTE: Radiological thickness measurement using a liquid ionization chamber electronic portal imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Philip M.; Donovan, Ellen M.; Partridge, Mike; Bidmead, A. Margaret; Garton, Andrew; Mubata, Cephas

    1999-06-01

    We present a method of calibrating the Portal Vision electronic portal imaging device to obtain radiological thickness maps for compensator design. In this method, coefficients are derived to describe the relationship between intensity and thickness for a set of water-equivalent blocks. The effects of four parameters were studied: (a) The dose response of the system was measured and found to be describable by a square-root function. (b) The calibration data and images were taken with a wedge in situ. The effects of using different wedges and different wedge orientations were investigated. The intrinsic accuracy of the accelerator/imager system was found to be 1.9 mm, for both 15° and 30° wedges. Changing the wedge orientation between calibration and imaging and rotating the calibration coefficients accordingly led to an error of 3.5 mm. (c) The variation in detector response with gantry angle was measured and corrected. The residual error in this process was 2.4 mm. (d) The use of a model to correct the effects of imaging with different field sizes was investigated and found to yield a residual error of 2.9 mm. The overall error in image calibrations was approx 4 mm or 2% in dose. This is considered to be sufficiently small for the intended use of designing compensators for tangential breast irradiation.

  7. Using multileaf collimator interleaf leakage to extract absolute spatial information from electronic portal imaging device images.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhanrong; Szanto, Janos; Gerig, Lee

    2005-12-15

    Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are potentially valuable tools for linear accelerator quality assurance and for measuring and analyzing geometric variations in radiation treatment delivery. Geometric analysis is more robust if referenced against an absolute position such as the isocenter (collimator axis of rotation), allowing the observer to discriminate between various setup errors and jaw or multileaf collimator (MLC) calibration errors. Unfortunately, mechanical instabilities in EPIDs make such analysis difficult. In the present work, we describe how MLC interleaf radiation leakage, hidden in the background of portal images, can be extracted and analyzed to find the field isocenter perpendicular to leaf travel direction. The signal from the interleaf radiation leakage is extracted to provide a precise and accurate determination of the isocenter location in the direction perpendicular to MLC leaf travel. In the direction of leaf travel, the minimization of residuals between planned and measured leaf positions is used to determine the isocenter. This method assumes that leaf positioning errors are randomly distributed. The validity of the method for determining the angular deviation between EPID image grid lines and collimator angle and for determining the known isocenter position is experimentally established.

  8. Structural and electronic studies of a-SiGe:H alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, W. )

    1993-04-01

    This report describes work to produce alloys of a-Si[sub 1-x]Ge[sub x]:H of improved photoelectronic quality by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The goal was to discover optimum preparation conditions for the end-component, a-Ge:H, to establish whether modification of the usual practice of starting from a-Si:H preparation conditions was advisable. Such modification, found to be necessary, gave films of a-Ge:H with efficiency-mobility-lifetime products ([eta][mu][tau]) 10[sup 2] to 10[sup 3] higher than were earlier available, in homogeneous environmentally stable material. Both a-Ge:H and a-Si[sub 1-x]Ge[sub x]:H of large x were studied in detail. Alloy material was shown to have [eta][mu][tau] 10[sup 2] larger than found earlier. However, just as the [eta][mu][tau] of a-Si:H decreases when Ge is added, so also the [eta][mu][tau] of these alloys with Si addition. By contrast, the ambipolar diffusion lengths, L[sub o] which are governed by the hole mobility, vary by only a factor of two over the whole alloy series. Using the experimental finding of a small valence band offset between a-Si:H and a-Ge:H compositional fluctuations on a 10-mm scale are suggested to explain the behavior of [eta][mu][tau] and L[sub o] The implications for eventual improvement of the alloys are profound, but require direct experimental tests of the postulated compositional fluctuations.

  9. The Advent of Portals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Mary E.

    2002-01-01

    Explains portals as tools that gather a variety of electronic information resources, including local library resources, into a single Web page. Highlights include cross-database searching; integration with university portals and course management software; the ARL (Association of Research Libraries) Scholars Portal Initiative; and selected vendors…

  10. Impact and user satisfaction of a clinical information portal embedded in an electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Tannery, Nancy H; Epstein, Barbara A; Wessel, Charles B; Yarger, Frances; LaDue, John; Klem, Mary Lou

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, a clinical information tool was developed and embedded in the electronic health record system of an academic medical center. In 2009, the initial information tool, Clinical-e, was superseded by a portal called Clinical Focus, with a single search box enabling a federated search of selected online information resources. To measure the usefulness and impact of Clinical Focus, a survey was used to gather feedback about users' experience with this clinical resource. The survey determined what type of clinicians were using this tool and assessed user satisfaction and perceived impact on patient care decision making. Initial survey results suggest the majority of respondents found Clinical Focus easy to navigate, the content easy to read, and the retrieved information relevant and complete. The majority would recommend Clinical Focus to their colleagues. Results indicate that this tool is a promising area for future development.

  11. Impact and User Satisfaction of a Clinical Information Portal Embedded in an Electronic Health Record

    PubMed Central

    Tannery, Nancy H; Epstein, Barbara A; Wessel, Charles B; Yarger, Frances; LaDue, John; Klem, Mary Lou

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, a clinical information tool was developed and embedded in the electronic health record system of an academic medical center. In 2009, the initial information tool, Clinical-e, was superseded by a portal called Clinical Focus, with a single search box enabling a federated search of selected online information resources. To measure the usefulness and impact of Clinical Focus, a survey was used to gather feedback about users' experience with this clinical resource. The survey determined what type of clinicians were using this tool and assessed user satisfaction and perceived impact on patient care decision making. Initial survey results suggest the majority of respondents found Clinical Focus easy to navigate, the content easy to read, and the retrieved information relevant and complete. The majority would recommend Clinical Focus to their colleagues. Results indicate that this tool is a promising area for future development. PMID:22016670

  12. Usefulness of the functionalities of an electronic medical record on a Latin American medical web portal.

    PubMed

    Flichtentrei, Daniel; Braga, Florencia; García, Darío; Jamsech, Jorge; Otero, Carlos; Waldhorn, Martín; Luna, Daniel; de Quiros, Fernan Gonzalez Bernaldo

    2010-01-01

    The medical record is a key component in the modern health systems, a fundamental basis of higher functionalities that guaranties quality care and the possibility of improved clinical management. The dissemination of information systems for the electronic medical record (EMR) has a growing acceptance and use in developed countries. This type of recognition however has not been widespread in Latin America. Realizing this we conducted a web survey to users of a Latin American medical portal to assess their perception of the EMRs usefulness. Among the results we found that over 90% of respondents were in favor of its use, with values that exceed 80% in the analysis of the utilities by categories. More in-depth studies are needed to determine the reasons for the lack of dissemination and implementation of EMR in our region.

  13. The Patient Portal of the Personal Cross-Enterprise Electronic Health Record (PEHR) in the Rhine-Neckar-Region.

    PubMed

    Brandner, Antje; Schreiweis, Björn; Aguduri, Lakshmi S; Bronsch, Tobias; Kunz, Aline; Pensold, Peter; Stein, Katharina E; Weiss, Nicolas; Yüksekogul, Nilay; Bergh, Björn; Heinze, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Over the last years we stepwise implemented our vision of a personal cross-enterprise electronic health record (PEHR) in the Rhine-Neckar-Region in Germany. The patient portal is one part of the PEHR architecture with IHE connectivity. The patient is enabled to access and manage his medical record by use of the patient portal. Moreover, he can give his consent regarding which healthcare providers are allowed to send data into or read data from his medical record. Forthcoming studies will give evidence for improvements and further requirements to develop.

  14. Use of a line-pair resolution phantom for comprehensive quality assurance of electronic portal imaging devices based on fundamental imaging metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal, Arun; Samant, Sanjiv S.

    2009-06-15

    linear systems metrics such as robustness, sensitivity across the full spatial frequency range of interest, and normalization to imaging conditions (magnification, system gain settings, and exposure), with the simplicity, ease, and speed of traditional phantom imaging. The algorithm was analyzed for accuracy and sensitivity by comparing with a commercial portal imaging QA method (PIPSPRO, Standard Imaging, Middleton, WI) on both first-generation lens-coupled and modern a-Si flat-panel based clinical EPID systems. The bar-pattern based QA measurements were found to be far more sensitive to even small levels of degradation in spatial resolution and noise. The bar-pattern based QA methodology offers a comprehensive image quality assessment tool suitable for both commissioning and routine EPID QA.

  15. Facilitators and Barriers of Electronic Health Record Patient Portal Adoption by Older Adults: A Literature Study.

    PubMed

    Wildenbos, Gaby Anne; Peute, Linda; Jaspers, Monique

    2017-01-01

    Patient portal usage by older adults, patients aged 50 years old and above, is intended to improve their access and quality of care. Acceptance of patient portals by this target group is low. This paper discusses the results of a literature review to determine the facilitators and barriers that drive or inhibit older patients to adopt patient portals. Articles were included when they described an acceptance, adoption or usability evaluation study of a patient portal. From a total of 245 potentially relevant articles, 8 articles were finally included. We used the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) as a classification model to analyze factors influencing older adults' acceptance of patient portals. Main facilitators for acceptance were 'performance expectancy' and 'voluntariness of use' related to a higher level of education and experienced health. Main barriers were limited health literacy and motivation related to involuntariness to use a patient portal. Poor facilitation conditions (limited technology access and no prior knowledge on existence of a patient portal) hampered access to a portal. More thorough insight into the latter is needed to improve the reach and effectiveness of patient portals among older patients.

  16. Clinical Trial Electronic Portals for Expedited Safety Reporting: Recommendations from the Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative Investigational New Drug Safety Advancement Project

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Raymond P; Finnigan, Shanda; Patel, Krupa; Whitney, Shanell

    2016-01-01

    Background Use of electronic clinical trial portals has increased in recent years to assist with sponsor-investigator communication, safety reporting, and clinical trial management. Electronic portals can help reduce time and costs associated with processing paperwork and add security measures; however, there is a lack of information on clinical trial investigative staff’s perceived challenges and benefits of using portals. Objective The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative (CTTI) sought to (1) identify challenges to investigator receipt and management of investigational new drug (IND) safety reports at oncologic investigative sites and coordinating centers and (2) facilitate adoption of best practices for communicating and managing IND safety reports using electronic portals. Methods CTTI, a public-private partnership to improve the conduct of clinical trials, distributed surveys and conducted interviews in an opinion-gathering effort to record investigator and research staff views on electronic portals in the context of the new safety reporting requirements described in the US Food and Drug Administration’s final rule (Code of Federal Regulations Title 21 Section 312). The project focused on receipt, management, and review of safety reports as opposed to the reporting of adverse events. Results The top challenge investigators and staff identified in using individual sponsor portals was remembering several complex individual passwords to access each site. Also, certain tasks are time-consuming (eg, downloading reports) due to slow sites or difficulties associated with particular operating systems or software. To improve user experiences, respondents suggested that portals function independently of browsers and operating systems, have intuitive interfaces with easy navigation, and incorporate additional features that would allow users to filter, search, and batch safety reports. Conclusions Results indicate that an ideal system for sharing expedited IND

  17. Clinical Trial Electronic Portals for Expedited Safety Reporting: Recommendations from the Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative Investigational New Drug Safety Advancement Project.

    PubMed

    Perez, Raymond P; Finnigan, Shanda; Patel, Krupa; Whitney, Shanell; Forrest, Annemarie

    2016-12-15

    Use of electronic clinical trial portals has increased in recent years to assist with sponsor-investigator communication, safety reporting, and clinical trial management. Electronic portals can help reduce time and costs associated with processing paperwork and add security measures; however, there is a lack of information on clinical trial investigative staff's perceived challenges and benefits of using portals. The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative (CTTI) sought to (1) identify challenges to investigator receipt and management of investigational new drug (IND) safety reports at oncologic investigative sites and coordinating centers and (2) facilitate adoption of best practices for communicating and managing IND safety reports using electronic portals. CTTI, a public-private partnership to improve the conduct of clinical trials, distributed surveys and conducted interviews in an opinion-gathering effort to record investigator and research staff views on electronic portals in the context of the new safety reporting requirements described in the US Food and Drug Administration's final rule (Code of Federal Regulations Title 21 Section 312). The project focused on receipt, management, and review of safety reports as opposed to the reporting of adverse events. The top challenge investigators and staff identified in using individual sponsor portals was remembering several complex individual passwords to access each site. Also, certain tasks are time-consuming (eg, downloading reports) due to slow sites or difficulties associated with particular operating systems or software. To improve user experiences, respondents suggested that portals function independently of browsers and operating systems, have intuitive interfaces with easy navigation, and incorporate additional features that would allow users to filter, search, and batch safety reports. Results indicate that an ideal system for sharing expedited IND safety information is through a central portal used by

  18. Commentary: opportunities for innovation and improvement in advance care planning using a tethered patient portal in the electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Bose-Brill, Seuli; Pressler, Taylor R

    2012-10-01

    In the last 20 years, progress has been made to develop resources for advance care planning (ACP). Several ACP delivery tools have demonstrated progress, but more are needed to improve ACP delivery systems. Providers continue to indicate that increasing patient volume, increasing patient complexity, and an increasing paperwork burden have adversely affected quality ACP delivery. An increasing and ubiquitous use of health information technology, such as electronic health records and electronic health record-tethered patient portals, affords opportunities for innovation to streamline communication methods between providers and patients. In a medical culture that provides only limited time for physician and patient interactions, physician-patient communication using electronic health record-tethered patient portals may provide a time-efficient, low-cost mechanism for effective ACP.

  19. Using a Patient Portal to Transmit Patient Reported Health Information into the Electronic Record: Workflow Implications and User Experience

    PubMed Central

    Sorondo, Barbara; Allen, Amy; Bayleran, Janet; Doore, Stacy; Fathima, Samreen; Sabbagh, Iyad; Newcomb, Lori

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This project implemented an integrated patient self-reported screening tool in a patient portal and assessed clinical workflow and user experience in primary care practices. Methods: An electronic health risk assessment based on the CMS Annual Wellness Visit (AWV) was developed to integrate self-reported health information into the patient’s electronic health record (EHR). Patients enrolled in care coordination tested the implementation. The evaluation plan included quantitative and qualitative measures of patient adoption, provider adoption, workflow impact, financial impact, and technology impact. Findings: Seventy-two patients completed the sample AWV, and 80% of the questionnaires had clinical findings that required provider follow-up. Patients expressed satisfaction with the portal, as it enabled them to view their health record and enter information. Implementation did not reduce office staff time. Providers and office staff agreed that an electronic system for adding information to their record would increase patient satisfaction, but they expressed concern with the need to promptly review the information and the time involved to accomplish this prior to an office visit. Discussion: Despite satisfaction among patients, portal adoption is still low, due to technological limitations and to the lack of adaptability to primary care practice workflow. Notwithstanding those barriers, the use of the portal for completion of repetitive tasks, such as screening tools, should be encouraged. Conclusions: Patients can effectively use portals to complete the patient reported section of the CMS AWV. However, if the information is not completed during the same day of the office visit, the time required to address health findings outside of a regular office visit is uncompensated, and diminished the enthusiasm for this process among primary care practice staff. PMID:27683669

  20. Using a Patient Portal to Transmit Patient Reported Health Information into the Electronic Record: Workflow Implications and User Experience.

    PubMed

    Sorondo, Barbara; Allen, Amy; Bayleran, Janet; Doore, Stacy; Fathima, Samreen; Sabbagh, Iyad; Newcomb, Lori

    2016-01-01

    This project implemented an integrated patient self-reported screening tool in a patient portal and assessed clinical workflow and user experience in primary care practices. An electronic health risk assessment based on the CMS Annual Wellness Visit (AWV) was developed to integrate self-reported health information into the patient's electronic health record (EHR). Patients enrolled in care coordination tested the implementation. The evaluation plan included quantitative and qualitative measures of patient adoption, provider adoption, workflow impact, financial impact, and technology impact. Seventy-two patients completed the sample AWV, and 80% of the questionnaires had clinical findings that required provider follow-up. Patients expressed satisfaction with the portal, as it enabled them to view their health record and enter information. Implementation did not reduce office staff time. Providers and office staff agreed that an electronic system for adding information to their record would increase patient satisfaction, but they expressed concern with the need to promptly review the information and the time involved to accomplish this prior to an office visit. Despite satisfaction among patients, portal adoption is still low, due to technological limitations and to the lack of adaptability to primary care practice workflow. Notwithstanding those barriers, the use of the portal for completion of repetitive tasks, such as screening tools, should be encouraged. Patients can effectively use portals to complete the patient reported section of the CMS AWV. However, if the information is not completed during the same day of the office visit, the time required to address health findings outside of a regular office visit is uncompensated, and diminished the enthusiasm for this process among primary care practice staff.

  1. A self-sufficient method for calibration of Varian electronic portal imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Baozhou; Yaddanapudi, Sridhar; Goddu, Sreekrishna M.; Mutic, Sasa

    2015-01-01

    Electronic portal imaging device (EPID) is currently used for dosimetric verification of IMRT fields and linac quality assurance (QA). It is critical to understand the dosimetric response and perform an accurate and robust calibration of EPID. We present the implementation of an efficient method for the calibration and the validation of a Varian EPID, which relies only on data collected with that specific device. The calibration method is based on images obtained with five shifts of EPID panel. With this method, the relative gain (sensitivity) of each element of a detector matrix is calculated and applied on top of the calibration determined with the flood-field procedure. The calibration procedure was verified using a physical wedge inserted in the beam line and the corrected profile shows consistent results with the measurements using a calibrated 2D array. This method does not rely on the beam profile used in the flood-field calibration process, which allows EPID calibration in 10 minutes with no additional equipment compared to at least 2 hours to obtain beam profile and scanning beam equipment requirement with the conventional method.

  2. Initial Clinical Experience Performing Patient Treatment Verification With an Electronic Portal Imaging Device Transit Dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Sean L.; Polvorosa, Cynthia; Cheng, Simon; Deutsch, Israel; Chao, K. S. Clifford; Wuu, Cheng-Shie

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate a 2-dimensional transit dosimetry algorithm's performance on a patient population and to analyze the issues that would arise in a widespread clinical adoption of transit electronic portal imaging device (EPID) dosimetry. Methods and Materials: Eleven patients were enrolled on the protocol; 9 completed and were analyzed. Pretreatment intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) patient-specific quality assurance was performed using a stringent local 3%, 3-mm γ criterion to verify that the planned fluence had been appropriately transferred to and delivered by the linear accelerator. Transit dosimetric EPID images were then acquired during treatment and compared offline with predicted transit images using a global 5%, 3-mm γ criterion. Results: There were 288 transit images analyzed. The overall γ pass rate was 89.1% ± 9.8% (average ± 1 SD). For the subset of images for which the linear accelerator couch did not interfere with the measurement, the γ pass rate was 95.7% ± 2.4%. A case study is presented in which the transit dosimetry algorithm was able to identify that a lung patient's bilateral pleural effusion had resolved in the time between the planning CT scan and the treatment. Conclusions: The EPID transit dosimetry algorithm under consideration, previously described and verified in a phantom study, is feasible for use in treatment delivery verification for real patients. Two-dimensional EPID transit dosimetry can play an important role in indicating when a treatment delivery is inconsistent with the original plan.

  3. Planning target volume margins for prostate radiotherapy using daily electronic portal imaging and implanted fiducial markers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Fiducial markers and daily electronic portal imaging (EPI) can reduce the risk of geographic miss in prostate cancer radiotherapy. The purpose of this study was to estimate CTV to PTV margin requirements, without and with the use of this image guidance strategy. Methods 46 patients underwent placement of 3 radio-opaque fiducial markers prior to prostate RT. Daily pre-treatment EPIs were taken, and isocenter placement errors were corrected if they were ≥ 3 mm along the left-right or superior-inferior axes, and/or ≥ 2 mm along the anterior-posterior axis. During-treatment EPIs were then obtained to estimate intra-fraction motion. Results Without image guidance, margins of 0.57 cm, 0.79 cm and 0.77 cm, along the left-right, superior-inferior and anterior-posterior axes respectively, are required to give 95% probability of complete CTV coverage each day. With the above image guidance strategy, these margins can be reduced to 0.36 cm, 0.37 cm and 0.37 cm respectively. Correction of all isocenter placement errors, regardless of size, would permit minimal additional reduction in margins. Conclusions Image guidance, using implanted fiducial markers and daily EPI, permits the use of narrower PTV margins without compromising coverage of the target, in the radiotherapy of prostate cancer. PMID:20537161

  4. Pulsed Electrically Detected Magnetic Resonance of 2D Electrons in a Si/SiGe Quantum Well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyryshkin, Alexei; Lyon, Stephen; Jantsch, Wolfgang; Schaffler, Friedrich

    2005-03-01

    We have developed a new method of pulsed EDMR (Electrically Detected Magnetic Resonance) and applied it to measure spin relaxation times of 2D electrons in a Si/SiGe quantum well. The method is based on spin-dependent transport in the 2D channel: Conduction electrons scatter off each other, and their scattering cross section depends on the relative orientation of their spins [1]. The initial, thermal polarization of 2D electron spins (at H=350 mT and T=4 K) is altered by applying the resonant 10 GHz microwave pulses. A change in the spin polarization results in a variation of the device conductivity (˜10-4), and its recovery back to the thermal equilibrium is measured after the microwave pulse. The recovery time measures the spin relaxation, and we find T1 = 1.4 μs for 2D electrons in a modulation-doped Si quantum well, the same time as we measure with conventional pulsed spin resonance. This new pulsed EDMR method will allow the measurement of T1 and T2 on small semiconductor structures with sensitivity down to a few spins, possibly a single spin. [1] Ghosh and Silsbee, Phys. Rev. B 42, 12508(1992).

  5. A Monte Carlo calculation model of electronic portal imaging device for transit dosimetry through heterogeneous media

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jihyung; Jung, Jae Won; Kim, Jong Oh; Yeo, Inhwan

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a fast Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation model of electronic portal imaging device (EPID) based on its effective atomic number modeling in the XVMC code. Methods: A previously developed EPID model, based on the XVMC code by density scaling of EPID structures, was modified by additionally considering effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}) of each structure and adopting a phase space file from the EGSnrc code. The model was tested under various homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms and field sizes by comparing the calculations in the model with measurements in EPID. In order to better evaluate the model, the performance of the XVMC code was separately tested by comparing calculated dose to water with ion chamber (IC) array measurement in the plane of EPID. Results: In the EPID plane, calculated dose to water by the code showed agreement with IC measurements within 1.8%. The difference was averaged across the in-field regions of the acquired profiles for all field sizes and phantoms. The maximum point difference was 2.8%, affected by proximity of the maximum points to penumbra and MC noise. The EPID model showed agreement with measured EPID images within 1.3%. The maximum point difference was 1.9%. The difference dropped from the higher value of the code by employing the calibration that is dependent on field sizes and thicknesses for the conversion of calculated images to measured images. Thanks to the Z{sub eff} correction, the EPID model showed a linear trend of the calibration factors unlike those of the density-only-scaled model. The phase space file from the EGSnrc code sharpened penumbra profiles significantly, improving agreement of calculated profiles with measured profiles. Conclusions: Demonstrating high accuracy, the EPID model with the associated calibration system may be used for in vivo dosimetry of radiation therapy. Through this study, a MC model of EPID has been developed, and their performance has been rigorously

  6. Tracking lung tumour motion using a dynamically weighted optical flow algorithm and electronic portal imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, P. T.; Crow, R.; Van Nest, S.; Sasaki, D.; Pistorius, S.

    2013-07-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility and accuracy of using a computer vision algorithm and electronic portal images to track the motion of a tumour-like target from a breathing phantom. A multi-resolution optical flow algorithm that incorporates weighting based on the differences between frames was used to obtain a set of vectors corresponding to the motion between two frames. A global value representing the average motion was obtained by computing the average weighted mean from the set of vectors. The tracking accuracy of the optical flow algorithm as a function of the breathing rate and target visibility was investigated. Synthetic images with different contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) were created, and motions were tracked. The accuracy of the proposed algorithm was compared against potentiometer measurements giving average position errors of 0.6 ± 0.2 mm, 0.2 ± 0.2 mm and 0.1 ± 0.1 mm with average velocity errors of 0.2 ± 0.2 mm s-1, 0.4 ± 0.3 mm s-1 and 0.6 ± 0.5 mm s-1 for 6, 12 and 16 breaths min-1 motions, respectively. The cumulative average position error reduces more rapidly with the greater number of breathing cycles present in higher breathing rates. As the CNR increases from 4.27 to 5.6, the average relative error approaches zero and the errors are less dependent on the velocity. When tracking a tumour on a patient's digitally reconstructed radiograph images, a high correlation was obtained between the dynamically weighted optical flow algorithm, a manual delineation process and a centroid tracking algorithm. While the accuracy of our approach is similar to that of other methods, the benefits are that it does not require manual delineation of the target and can therefore provide accurate real-time motion estimation during treatment.

  7. Verification of multileaf collimator leaf positions using an electronic portal imaging device.

    PubMed

    Samant, Sanjiv S; Zheng, Wei; Parra, Nestor Andres; Chandler, Jason; Gopal, Arun; Wu, Jian; Jain, Jinesh; Zhu, Yunping; Sontag, Marc

    2002-12-01

    An automated method is presented for determining individual leaf positions of the Siemens dual focus multileaf collimator (MLC) using the Siemens BEAMVIEW(PLUS) electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Leaf positions are computed with an error of 0.6 mm at one standard deviation (sigma) using separate computations of pixel dimensions, image distortion, and radiation center. The pixel dimensions are calculated by superimposing the film image of a graticule with the corresponding EPID image. A spatial correction is used to compensate for the optical distortions of the EPID, reducing the mean distortion from 3.5 pixels (uncorrected) per localized x-ray marker to 2 pixels (1 mm) for a rigid rotation and 1 pixel for a third degree polynomial warp. A correction for a nonuniform dosimetric response across the field of view of the EPID images is not necessary due to the sharp intensity gradients across leaf edges. The radiation center, calculated from the average of the geometric centers of a square field at 0 degrees and 180 degrees collimator angles, is independent of graticule placement error. Its measured location on the EPID image was stable to within 1 pixel based on 3 weeks of repeated extensions/retractions of the EPID. The MLC leaf positions determined from the EPID images agreed to within a pixel of the corresponding values measured using film and ionization chamber. Several edge detection algorithms were tested: contour, Sobel, Roberts, Prewitt, Laplace, morphological, and Canny. These agreed with each other to within < or = 1.2 pixels for the in-air EPID images. Using a test pattern, individual MLC leaves were found to be typically within 1 mm of the corresponding record-and-verify values, with a maximum difference of 1.8 mm, and standard deviations of <0.3 mm in the daily reproducibility. This method presents a fast, automatic, and accurate alternative to using film or a light field for the verification and calibration of the MLC.

  8. Research on the stability, electronic properties, and structure of a-Si:H and its alloys. Annual subcontract report, 1 June 1991--31 May 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Street, R.A.; Jackson, W.B.; Johnson, N.; Nebel, C.; Hack, M.; Santos, P.; Thompson, R.; Tsai, C.C.; Walker, J.

    1992-12-01

    Objective is to obtain a comprehensive understanding of structure and electronic properties of a-Si:H as they apply to solar cells. First observations were of light enhancement and field suppression of H diffusion in a-Si:H. Theoretical studies were made of hydrogen density of states distribution and its relation to defect metastability. Reduced density of light induced defect is observed in a-Si:H deposited in a remote hydrogen plasma reactor at 400 C. Kinetics of metastable defect creation using forward bias in a p-i-n diode to induce defects were studied and compared to light-induced defect creation in the same devices. Studies were made of transport at high electric field and low temperature. Detailed studies were made of kinetics of dopant metastability in n-type and p-type a-Si:H.

  9. Evaluation of an aSi-EPID with flattening filter free beams: applicability to the GLAaS algorithm for portal dosimetry and first experience for pretreatment QA of RapidArc.

    PubMed

    Nicolini, G; Clivio, A; Vanetti, E; Krauss, H; Fenoglietto, P; Cozzi, L; Fogliata, A

    2013-11-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of portal dosimetry with an amorphous silicon mega voltage imager for flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams by means of the GLAaS methodology and to validate it for pretreatment quality assurance of volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc). The GLAaS algorithm, developed for flattened beams, was applied to FFF beams of nominal energy of 6 and 10 MV generated by a Varian TrueBeam (TB). The amorphous silicon electronic portal imager [named mega voltage imager (MVI) on TB] was used to generate integrated images that were converted into matrices of absorbed dose to water. To enable GLAaS use under the increased dose-per-pulse and dose-rate conditions of the FFF beams, new operational source-detector-distance (SDD) was identified to solve detector saturation issues. Empirical corrections were defined to account for the shape of the profiles of the FFF beams to expand the original methodology of beam profile and arm backscattering correction. GLAaS for FFF beams was validated on pretreatment verification of RapidArc plans for three different TB linacs. In addition, the first pretreatment results from clinical experience on 74 arcs were reported in terms of γ analysis. MVI saturates at 100 cm SDD for FFF beams but this can be avoided if images are acquired at 150 cm for all nominal dose rates of FFF beams. Rotational stability of the gantry-imager system was tested and resulted in a minimal apparent imager displacement during rotation of 0.2 ± 0.2 mm at SDD = 150 cm. The accuracy of this approach was tested with three different Varian TrueBeam linacs from different institutes. Data were stratified per energy and machine and showed no dependence with beam quality and MLC model. The results from clinical pretreatment quality assurance, provided a gamma agreement index (GAI) in the field area for six and ten FFF beams of (99.8 ± 0.3)% and (99.5 ± 0.6)% with distance to agreement and dose difference criteria set to 3 mm/3% with 2 mm/2

  10. First-principles investigation of electronic, structural, and vibrational properties of a-Si3N4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomazzi, Luigi; Umari, P.

    2009-10-01

    Using a density-functional scheme, we investigate the electronic, structural, and vibrational properties of amorphous silicon nitride. Through a Car-Parrinello molecular-dynamics simulation, we generate a model structure formed mainly by a network of SiN4 tetrahedra a large fraction of which are edge sharing. Only a small fraction of atoms are overcoordinated and undercoordinated. First, the structural properties such as angular distributions, atomic arrangements in first-neighbor shells, the neutron total structure factor, the radial distribution function, and pair-correlation functions are examined. Next, the electronic properties are analyzed by considering the quasiparticle density of states which is calculated through the GW method. Good agreement is found with experimental data when available. Successively, we focus on a range of vibrational spectra. First, the vibrational density of states is analyzed in terms of its decomposition into N and Si contributions. Then, we investigate the Born effective charge tensors, the high-frequency, and static dielectric constants and calculate the real and imaginary parts of the dielectric function in the infrared. Therefrom we obtain the infrared-absorption spectrum and the refractive index that are found to be in accord with experimental measurements. Moreover, we address the Raman spectrum which is compared with available experimental data. Electronic structure and vibrational properties of the point defects present in our model are also discussed. Density-functional and GW schemes appear to be appropriate for modeling materials based on silicon nitride. In particular, our modeling of silicon nitride achieved a successful level of comparison with experiments. This allows us to infer that a-Si3N4 features a high content of edge-sharing tetrahedra, which are absent in the crystalline phases of silicon nitride at ambient conditions.

  11. Development and testing of an improved dosimetry system using a backscatter shielded electronic portal imaging device

    SciTech Connect

    King, Brian W.; Morf, Daniel; Greer, Peter B.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: To investigate the properties of a modified backscatter shielded electronic portal imaging device (BSS-EPID) and to develop a dose model to convert BSS-EPID images to dose in water as part of an improved system for dosimetry using EPIDs. Methods: The effectiveness of the shielding of the BSS-EPID was studied by comparing images measured with the BSS-EPID mounted on the support arm to images measured with the BSS-EPID removed from the support arm. A dose model was developed and optimized to reconstruct dose in water at different depths from measured BSS-EPID images. The accuracy of the dose model was studied using BSS-EPID images of 28 IMRT fields to reconstruct dose in water at depths of 2, 5, 10, and 20 cm and comparing to measured dose in water from a two-dimensional diode array at the same depths. The ability of the BSS-EPID system to operate independently of detector position was demonstrated by comparing the dose reconstruction of a 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} field using different detector offsets to that measured by a two-dimensional diode array. Results: The shielding of the BSS-EPID was found to be effective, with more than 99% of pixels showing less than 0.5% change due to the presence of the support arm and at most a 0.2% effect on the central axis for 2 x 2 cm{sup 2} fields to fully open 30 x 40 cm{sup 2} images. The dose model was shown to accurately reconstruct measurements of dose in water using BSS-EPID images with average {gamma} pass rates (2%, 2 mm criteria) of 92.5%, 98.7%, 97.4%, and 97.2% at depths of 2, 5, 10, and 20 cm, respectively, when compared to two-dimensional diode array measurements. When using 3%, 3 mm {gamma} criteria, the average pass rate was greater than 97% at all depths. Reconstructed dose in water for a 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} field measured with detector offsets as large as 10 cm agreed with each other and two-dimensional diode array measurements within 0.9%. Conclusions: The modified BSS-EPID and associated dose model provide an

  12. Analysis of the kinestatic charge detection system as a high detective quantum efficiency electronic portal imaging device.

    PubMed

    Samant, Sanjiv S; Gopal, Arun

    2006-09-01

    Megavoltage x-ray imaging suffers from reduced image quality due to low differential x-ray attenuation and large Compton scatter compared with kilovoltage imaging. Notwithstanding this, electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are now widely used in portal verification in radiotherapy as they offer significant advantages over film, including immediate digital imaging and superior contrast range. However video-camera-based EPIDs (VEPIDs) are limited by problems of low light collection efficiency and significant light scatter, leading to reduced contrast and spatial resolution. Indirect and direct detection-based flat-panel EPIDs have been developed to overcome these limitations. While flat-panel image quality has been reported to exceed that achieved with portal film, these systems have detective quantum efficiency (DQE) limited by the thin detection medium and are sensitive to radiation damage to peripheral read-out electronics. An alternative technology for high-quality portal imaging is presented here: kinesatic charge detection (KCD). The KCD is a scanning tri-electrode ion-chamber containing high-pressure noble gas (xenon at 100 atm) used in conjunction with a strip-collimated photon beam. The chamber is scanned across the patient, and an external electric field is used to regulate the cation drift velocity. By matching the scanning velocity with that of the cation (i.e., ion) drift velocity, the cations remain static in the object frame of reference, allowing temporal integration of the signal. The KCD offers several advantages as a portal imaging system. It has a thick detector geometry with an active detection depth of 6.1 cm, compared to the sub-millimeter thickness of the phosphor layer in conventional phosphor screens, leading to an order of magnitude advantage in quantum efficiency (>0.3). The unique principle of and the use of the scanning strip-collimated x-ray beam provide further integration of charges in time, reduced scatter, and a significantly

  13. Analysis of the kinestatic charge detection system as a high detective quantum efficiency electronic portal imaging device

    SciTech Connect

    Samant, Sanjiv S.; Gopal, Arun

    2006-09-15

    Megavoltage x-ray imaging suffers from reduced image quality due to low differential x-ray attenuation and large Compton scatter compared with kilovoltage imaging. Notwithstanding this, electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are now widely used in portal verification in radiotherapy as they offer significant advantages over film, including immediate digital imaging and superior contrast range. However video-camera-based EPIDs (VEPIDs) are limited by problems of low light collection efficiency and significant light scatter, leading to reduced contrast and spatial resolution. Indirect and direct detection-based flat-panel EPIDs have been developed to overcome these limitations. While flat-panel image quality has been reported to exceed that achieved with portal film, these systems have detective quantum efficiency (DQE) limited by the thin detection medium and are sensitive to radiation damage to peripheral read-out electronics. An alternative technology for high-quality portal imaging is presented here: kinesatic charge detection (KCD). The KCD is a scanning tri-electrode ion-chamber containing high-pressure noble gas (xenon at 100 atm) used in conjunction with a strip-collimated photon beam. The chamber is scanned across the patient, and an external electric field is used to regulate the cation drift velocity. By matching the scanning velocity with that of the cation (i.e., ion) drift velocity, the cations remain static in the object frame of reference, allowing temporal integration of the signal. The KCD offers several advantages as a portal imaging system. It has a thick detector geometry with an active detection depth of 6.1 cm, compared to the sub-millimeter thickness of the phosphor layer in conventional phosphor screens, leading to an order of magnitude advantage in quantum efficiency (>0.3). The unique principle of kinestatis and the use of the scanning strip-collimated x-ray beam provide further integration of charges in time, reduced scatter, and a

  14. Feasibility of fully automated detection of fiducial markers implanted into the prostate using electronic portal imaging: A comparison of methods

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Emma J. . E-mail: eharris@icr.ac.uk; McNair, Helen A.; Evans, Phillip M.

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of fully automated detection of fiducial markers implanted into the prostate using portal images acquired with an electronic portal imaging device. Methods and Materials: We have made a direct comparison of 4 different methods (2 template matching-based methods, a method incorporating attenuation and constellation analyses and a cross correlation method) that have been published in the literature for the automatic detection of fiducial markers. The cross-correlation technique requires a-priory information from the portal images, therefore the technique is not fully automated for the first treatment fraction. Images of 7 patients implanted with gold fiducial markers (8 mm in length and 1 mm in diameter) were acquired before treatment (set-up images) and during treatment (movie images) using 1MU and 15MU per image respectively. Images included: 75 anterior (AP) and 69 lateral (LAT) set-up images and 51 AP and 83 LAT movie images. Using the different methods described in the literature, marker positions were automatically identified. Results: The method based upon cross correlation techniques gave the highest percentage detection success rate of 99% (AP) and 83% (LAT) set-up (1MU) images. The methods gave detection success rates of less than 91% (AP) and 42% (LAT) set-up images. The amount of a-priory information used and how it affects the way the techniques are implemented, is discussed. Conclusions: Fully automated marker detection in set-up images for the first treatment fraction is unachievable using these methods and that using cross-correlation is the best technique for automatic detection on subsequent radiotherapy treatment fractions.

  15. SU-C-304-02: Robust and Efficient Process for Acceptance Testing of Varian TrueBeam Linacs Using An Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID)

    SciTech Connect

    Yaddanapudi, S; Cai, B; Sun, B; Li, H; Noel, C; Goddu, S; Mutic, S; Harry, T; Pawlicki, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this project was to develop a process that utilizes the onboard kV and MV electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) to perform rapid acceptance testing (AT) of linacs in order to improve efficiency and standardize AT equipment and processes. Methods: In this study a Varian TrueBeam linac equipped with an amorphous silicon based EPID (aSi1000) was used. The conventional set of AT tests and tolerances was used as a baseline guide, and a novel methodology was developed to perform as many tests as possible using EPID exclusively. The developer mode on Varian TrueBeam linac was used to automate the process. In the current AT process there are about 45 tests that call for customer demos. Many of the geometric tests such as jaw alignment and MLC positioning are performed with highly manual methods, such as using graph paper. The goal of the new methodology was to achieve quantitative testing while reducing variability in data acquisition, analysis and interpretation of the results. The developed process was validated on two machines at two different institutions. Results: At least 25 of the 45 (56%) tests which required customer demo can be streamlined and performed using EPIDs. More than half of the AT tests can be fully automated using the developer mode, while others still require some user interaction. Overall, the preliminary data shows that EPID-based linac AT can be performed in less than a day, compared to 2–3 days using conventional methods. Conclusions: Our preliminary results show that performance of onboard imagers is quite suitable for both geometric and dosimetric testing of TrueBeam systems. A standardized AT process can tremendously improve efficiency, and minimize the variability related to third party quality assurance (QA) equipment and the available onsite expertise. Research funding provided by Varian Medical Systems. Dr. Sasa Mutic receives compensation for providing patient safety training services from Varian Medical

  16. WE-E-18A-08: Towards a Next-Generation Electronic Portal Device for Simultaneous Imaging and Dose Verification in Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, S; Vial, P; Holloway, L; Kuncic, Z

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: This work forms part of an ongoing study to develop a next-generation electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for simultaneous imaging and dose verification in radiotherapy. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were used to characterize the imaging performance of a novel EPID that has previously been demonstrated to exhibit a water-equivalent response. The EPID ' s response was quantified in several configurations and model parameters were empirically validated against experimental measurements. Methods: A MC model of a novel a-Si EPID incorporating an array of plastic scintillating fibers was developed. Square BCF-99-06A scintillator fibers with PMMA cladding (Saint-Gobain Crystals) were modelled in a matrix with total area measuring 150×150 mm{sup 2}. The standard electromagnetic and optical physics Geant4 classes were used to simulate radiation transport from an angled slit source (6 MV energy spectrum) through the EPID and optical photons reaching the photodiodes were scored. The prototype's modulation transfer function (MTF) was simulated and validated against experimental measurements. Several optical transport parameters, fiber lengths and thicknesses of an air gap between the scintillator and photodiodes were investigated to quantify their effects on the prototype's detection efficiency, sensitivity and MTF. Results: Simulated EPID response was more sensitive to variations in geometry than in the optical parameters studied. The MTF was particularly sensitive to the introduction of a 0.5–1.0 mm air gap between the scintillator and photodiodes, which lowered the MTF relative to that simulated without the gap. As expected, increasing the fiber length increased the detector efficiency and sensitivity while decreasing the MTF. Conclusion: A model of a novel water-equivalent EPID has been developed and benchmarked against measurements using a physical prototype. We have demonstrated the feasibility of this new device and are continuing to optimize the design

  17. Development of a one-stop beam verification system using electronic portal imaging devices for routine quality assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Sangwook; Ma, Sun Young; Jeung, Tae Sig; Yi, Byong Yong; Lee, Sang Hoon; Lee, Suk; Cho, Sam Ju; Choi, Jinho

    2012-10-01

    In this study, a computer-based system for routine quality assurance (QA) of a linear accelerator (linac) was developed by using the dosimetric properties of an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device (EPID). An acrylic template phantom was designed such that it could be placed on the EPID and be aligned with the light field of the collimator. After irradiation, portal images obtained from the EPID were transferred in DICOM format to a computer and analyzed using a program we developed. The symmetry, flatness, field size, and congruence of the light and radiation fields of the photon beams from the linac were verified simultaneously. To validate the QA system, the ion chamber and film (X-Omat V2; Kodak, New York, NY) measurements were compared with the EPID measurements obtained in this study. The EPID measurements agreed with the film measurements. Parameters for beams with energies of 6 MV and 15 MV were obtained daily for 1 month using this system. It was found that our QA tool using EPID could substitute for the film test, which is a time-consuming method for routine QA assessment.

  18. Dose response characteristics of a novel CCD camera-based electronic portal imaging device comparison with OCTAVIUS detector.

    PubMed

    Anvari, Akbar; Aghamiri, Seyed Mahmoud Reza; Mahdavi, Seyed Rabie; Alaei, Parham

    2015-01-01

    Dosimetric properties of a CCD camera-based Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) for clinical dosimetric application have been evaluated. Characteristics obtained by EPID also compared with commercial 2D array of ion chambers. Portal images acquired in dosimetry mode then exported raw fluence or uncorrected images were investigated. Integration time of image acquisition mode has adjusted on 1 s per frame. As saturation of camera of the EPID, dose response does not have linear behavior. The slight nonlinearity of the camera response can be corrected by a logarithmic expression. A fourth order polynomial regression model with coefficient of determination of 0.998 predicts a response to absolute dose values at less than 50 cGy. A field size dependent response of up to 7% (0.99-1.06) relative OCTAVIUS detector measurement was found. The EPID response can be fitted by a cubic regression for field size changes, yielded coefficient of determination of 0.999. These results indicate that the EPID is well suited for accurate dosimetric purposes, the major limitation currently being due to integration time and dead-time in frame acquisition.

  19. Assessment of flatness and symmetry of megavoltage x-ray beam with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID).

    PubMed

    Liu, G; van Doorn, T; Bezak, E

    2002-07-01

    The input/output characteristics of the Wellhofer BIS 710 electronic portal imaging device (EPID) have been investigated to establish its efficacy for periodic quality assurance (QA) applications. Calibration curves have been determined for the energy fluence incident on the detector versus the pixel values. The effect of the charge coupled device (CCD) camera sampling time and beam parameters (such as beam field size, dose rate, photon energy) on the calibration have been investigated for a region of interest (ROI) around the central beam axis. The results demonstrate that the pixel output is a linear function of the incident exposure, as expected for a video-based electronic portal imaging system. The field size effects of the BIS 710 are similar to that of an ion chamber for smaller field sizes up to 10 x 10 cm2. However, for larger field sizes the pixel value increases more rapidly. Furthermore, the system is slightly sensitive to dose rate and is also energy dependent The BIS 710 has been used in the current study to develop a QA procedure for measurements of flatness and symmetry of a linac x-ray beam. As a two-dimensional image of the radiation field is obtained from a single exposure of the BIS 710, a technique has been developed to calculate flatness and symmetry from a defined radiation area. The flatness and symmetry values obtained are different from those calculated conventionally from major axes only (inplane, crossplane). This demonstrates that the technique can pick up the "cold" and "hot" spots in the analysed area, providing thus more information about the radiation beam. When calibrated against the water tank measurements, the BIS 710 can be used as a secondary device to monitor the x-ray beam flatness and symmetry.

  20. Formation and microstructural properties of locally distributed ZnSiO3 nanoparticles embedded in a SiO2 layer by using a focused electron beam.

    PubMed

    Shin, J W; No, Y S; Kim, T W; Choi, W K

    2008-10-01

    Locally distributed crystalline ZnSiO3 nanoparticles embedded in a SiO2 layer inserted between the ZnO thin film and the Si substrate were formed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with a focused electron beam irradiation process. High-resolution TEM (HRTEM) images and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) profiles showed that ZnSiO3 nanocrystals with a size of approximately 6 nm were formed in the SiO2 layer. The formation mechanisms of the ZnSiO3 nanocrystals in the SiO2 layer are described on the basis of the HRTEM images and the EDS profiles.

  1. Patterns of Electronic Portal Use among Vulnerable Patients in a Nationwide Practice-based Research Network: From the OCHIN Practice-based Research Network (PBRN)

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Lorraine S.; Angier, Heather; Huguet, Nathalie; Gaudino, James A.; Krist, Alex; Dearing, Marla; Killerby, Marie; Marino, Miguel; DeVoe, Jennifer E.

    2017-01-01

    Background Underserved patient populations experience barriers to accessing and engaging within the complex health care system. Electronic patient portals have been proposed as a potential new way to improve access and engagement. We studied patient portal use for 12 consecutive months (365 days) among a large, nationally distributed, underserved patient population within the OCHIN (originally created as the Oregon Community Health Information Network and renamed OCHIN as other states joined) practice-based research network (PBRN). Methods We retrospectively assessed adoption and use of Epic’s MyChart patient portal in the first 12 months after MyChart was made available to the OCHIN PBRN. We examined electronic health record data from 36,549 patients aged ≥18 years who were offered a MyChart access code between May 1, 2012, and April 30, 2013, across the OCHIN PBRN in 13 states. Results Overall, 29% of patients offered an access code logged into their MyChart account. Superusers (minimum of 2 logins per month over a 12-month period) accounted for 6% of users overall. Men, nonwhite patients, Hispanic patients, Spanish-speaking patients, and those with the lowest incomes were significantly less likely to activate. Publicly insured and uninsured patients were also less likely to log in to their MyChart account, but once activated they were more likely than privately insured patients to use MyChart functions. Conclusions Our findings suggest that, compared with others, certain patient groups may be less interested in using patient portals or may have experienced significant barriers that prevented use. Making portal access available is a first step. Additional studies need to specifically identify health system–, clinic-, and patient-level barriers and facilitators to portal adoption and use. PMID:27613792

  2. Investigation of the mechanical performance of Siemens linacs components during arc: gantry, MLC, and electronic portal imaging device

    PubMed Central

    Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; Häring, Peter; Riis, Hans L; Zimmermann, Sune J; Ebert, Martin A

    2015-01-01

    Background In radiotherapy treatments, it is crucial to monitor the performance of linac components including gantry, collimation system, and electronic portal imaging device (EPID) during arc deliveries. In this study, a simple EPID-based measurement method is suggested in conjunction with an algorithm to investigate the stability of these systems at various gantry angles with the aim of evaluating machine-related errors in treatments. Methods The EPID sag, gantry sag, changes in source-to-detector distance (SDD), EPID and collimator skewness, EPID tilt, and the sag in leaf bank assembly due to linac rotation were separately investigated by acquisition of 37 EPID images of a simple phantom with five ball bearings at various gantry angles. A fast and robust software package was developed for automated analysis of image data. Three Siemens linacs were investigated. Results The average EPID sag was within 1 mm for all tested linacs. Two machines showed >1 mm gantry sag. Changes in the SDD values were within 7.5 mm. EPID skewness and tilt values were <1° in all machines. The maximum sag in leaf bank assembly was <1 mm. Conclusion The method and software developed in this study provide a simple tool for effective investigation of the behavior of Siemens linac components with gantry rotation. Such a comprehensive study has been performed for the first time on Siemens machines. PMID:26604840

  3. Investigation of the mechanical performance of Siemens linacs components during arc: gantry, MLC, and electronic portal imaging device.

    PubMed

    Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; Häring, Peter; Riis, Hans L; Zimmermann, Sune J; Ebert, Martin A

    2015-01-01

    In radiotherapy treatments, it is crucial to monitor the performance of linac components including gantry, collimation system, and electronic portal imaging device (EPID) during arc deliveries. In this study, a simple EPID-based measurement method is suggested in conjunction with an algorithm to investigate the stability of these systems at various gantry angles with the aim of evaluating machine-related errors in treatments. The EPID sag, gantry sag, changes in source-to-detector distance (SDD), EPID and collimator skewness, EPID tilt, and the sag in leaf bank assembly due to linac rotation were separately investigated by acquisition of 37 EPID images of a simple phantom with five ball bearings at various gantry angles. A fast and robust software package was developed for automated analysis of image data. Three Siemens linacs were investigated. The average EPID sag was within 1 mm for all tested linacs. Two machines showed >1 mm gantry sag. Changes in the SDD values were within 7.5 mm. EPID skewness and tilt values were <1° in all machines. The maximum sag in leaf bank assembly was <1 mm. The method and software developed in this study provide a simple tool for effective investigation of the behavior of Siemens linac components with gantry rotation. Such a comprehensive study has been performed for the first time on Siemens machines.

  4. SU-E-T-335: Transit Dosimetry for Verification of Dose Delivery Using Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID)

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, T; Chung, E; Lee, S; Yoon, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of transit dose, measured with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID), in verifying actual dose delivery to patients. Methods: Plans of 5 patients with lung cancer, who received IMRT treatment, were examined using homogeneous solid water phantom and inhomogeneous anthropomorphic phantom. To simulate error in patient positioning, the anthropomorphic phantom was displaced from 5 mm to 10 mm in the inferior to superior (IS), superior to inferior (SI), left to right (LR), and right to left (RL) directions. The transit dose distribution was measured with EPID and was compared to the planed dose using gamma index. Results: Although the average passing rate based on gamma index (GI) with a 3% dose and a 3 mm distance-to-dose agreement tolerance limit was 94.34 % for the transit dose with homogeneous phantom, it was reduced to 84.63 % for the transit dose with inhomogeneous anthropomorphic phantom. The Result also shows that the setup error of 5mm (10mm) in IS, SI, LR and SI direction can Result in the decrease in values of GI passing rates by 1.3% (3.0%), 2.2% (4.3%), 5.9% (10.9%), and 8.9% (16.3%), respectively. Conclusion: Our feasibility study suggests that the transit dose-based quality assurance may provide information regarding accuracy of dose delivery as well as patient positioning.

  5. Electronic Portfolios as Living Portals: A Narrative Inquiry into College Student Learning, Identity, and Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Celeste Fowles

    2013-01-01

    As universities increasingly utilize electronic portfolios, college students are asked more than ever to create ePortfolios for academics, assessment, or advising. This study shifts an analysis of ePortfolios from prior epistemological approaches, where ePortfolios have been explored as a tool to measure student progress, onto an ontological…

  6. Electronic Portfolios as Living Portals: A Narrative Inquiry into College Student Learning, Identity, and Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Celeste Fowles

    2013-01-01

    As universities increasingly utilize electronic portfolios, college students are asked more than ever to create ePortfolios for academics, assessment, or advising. This study shifts an analysis of ePortfolios from prior epistemological approaches, where ePortfolios have been explored as a tool to measure student progress, onto an ontological…

  7. Electronic prescribing problems reported to the Pharmacy and Provider ePrescribing Experience Reporting (PEER) portal.

    PubMed

    Hincapie, Ana L; Warholak, Terri; Altyar, Ahmed; Snead, Rebecca; Modisett, Tara

    2014-01-01

    Electronic prescribing (e-prescribing) may prevent medication errors caused by prescription illegibility; however, information technologies also may introduce different kinds of medication errors. To identify and quantify e-prescribing problems reported through an electronic prescribing incident reporting tool in the United States. Voluntary and anonymous reports to a web-based, e-prescribing incident reporting tool were collected during 18 months using convenience sampling. Questions in the reporting tool were designed to elicit information on pharmacists' experiences with e-prescribing. Data were analyzed to characterize the different types of e-prescribing concerns. A total of 484 reports were collected through the incident reporting tool. Out of 484 reports, 75% corresponded to electronic prescriptions received directly into pharmacies' computers and 23% were computer-generated prescriptions faxed to pharmacies. Most of reports corresponded to comments, complaints or identified unsafe conditions regarding electronic prescriptions (49%), followed by incidents that did not reach the patient (44%) and those that reached patients (6%). The majority of problems reported involved directions (24%) and quantity selection (12%). The use of an incident reporting tool revealed a variety of issues regarding e-prescribing. The majority of the issues reported in this study were related to directions and quantity selection. The findings in this study indicate that software system changes and appropriate prescriber training are required to decrease or eliminate some of these issues. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Tsao, G

    2001-05-01

    Portal hypertension is the main complication of cirrhosis and is responsible for its most common complications: variceal hemorrhage, ascites, and portosystemic encephalopathy. Portal hypertension is the result of increased intrahepatic resistance and increased portal venous inflow, which in turn is the result of splanchnic vasodilatation. Vasodilatation (splanchnic and systemic) and hyperdynamic circulation are hemodynamic abnormalities typical of cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Gastroesophageal varices result almost solely from portal hypertension, although the hyperdynamic circulation contributes to variceal growth and hemorrhage. Ascites results from sinusoidal hypertension and sodium retention, which is, in turn, secondary to vasodilatation and activation of neurohumoral systems. The hepatorenal syndrome represents the result of extreme vasodilatation with an extreme decrease in effective blood volume that leads to maximal activation of vasoconstrictive systems, renal vasoconstriction, and renal failure. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is a potentially lethal infection of ascites that occurs in the absence of a local source of infection. Portosystemic encephalopathy is a consequence of both portal hypertension (shunting of blood through portosystemic collaterals) and hepatic insufficiency that result in the accumulation of neurotoxins in the brain. This paper reviews the recent advances in the pathophysiology and management of the complications of portal hypertension.

  9. Portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe

    2003-05-01

    Portal hypertension, the main complication of cirrhosis, is responsible for its most common complications: variceal hemorrhage, ascites, and portosystemic encephalopathy. Portal hypertension is the result of increased intrahepatic resistance and increased portal venous inflow. Vasodilatation (splanchnic and systemic) and the hyperdynamic circulation are hemodynamic abnormalities typical of cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Gastroesophageal varices result almost solely from portal hypertension, although the hyperdynamic circulation contributes to variceal growth and hemorrhage. Ascites results from sinusoidal hypertension and sodium retention, which, in turn, is secondary to vasodilatation and activation of neurohumoral systems. The hepatorenal syndrome represents the result of extreme vasodilatation, with an extreme decrease in effective blood volume that leads to maximal activation of vasoconstrictive systems, renal vasoconstriction, and renal failure. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is a potentially lethal infection of ascites that occurs in the absence of a local source of infection. Portosystemic encephalopathy is a consequence of both portal hypertension (shunting of blood through portosystemic collaterals) and hepatic insufficiency that result in the accumulation of neurotoxins in the brain. This review covers the recent advances in the pathophysiology and management of the complications of portal hypertension.

  10. Portal Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Affairs, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University Get the Quick Facts For this topic NOTE: ... at least 6 months) Drinking large amounts of alcohol over a long period of time Portal hypertension ...

  11. Portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe

    2002-05-01

    Portal hypertension is the main complication of cirrhosis and is responsible for its most common complications: variceal hemorrhage, ascites, and portosystemic encephalopathy. Portal hypertension is the result of increased intrahepatic resistance and increased portal venous inflow. Vasodilatation (splanchnic and systemic) and the hyperdynamic circulation are hemodynamic abnormalities typical of cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Gastroesophageal varices result almost solely from portal hypertension, although the hyperdynamic circulation contributes to variceal growth and hemorrhage. Ascites results from sinusoidal hypertension and sodium retention, which is in turn secondary to vasodilatation and activation of neurohumoral systems. Hepatic hydrothorax results from the passage of ascites across the diaphragm and into the pleural space. The hepatorenal syndrome represents the result of extreme vasodilatation with an extreme decrease in effective blood volume that leads to maximal activation of vasoconstrictive systems, renal vasoconstriction, and renal failure. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is a potentially lethal infection of ascites that occurs in the absence of a local source of infection. Portosystemic encephalopathy is a consequence of both portal hypertension (shunting of blood through portosystemic collaterals) and hepatic insufficiency resulting in the accumulation of neurotoxins in the brain.

  12. Portal biliopathy

    PubMed Central

    Khuroo, Mohammad S; Rather, Ajaz A; Khuroo, Naira S; Khuroo, Mehnaaz S

    2016-01-01

    Portal biliopathy refers to cholangiographic abnormalities which occur in patients with portal cavernoma. These changes occur as a result of pressure on bile ducts from bridging tortuous paracholedochal, epicholedochal and cholecystic veins. Bile duct ischemia may occur due prolonged venous pressure effect or result from insufficient blood supply. In addition, encasement of ducts may occur due fibrotic cavernoma. Majority of patients are asymptomatic. Portal biliopathy is a progressive disease and patients who have long standing disease and more severe bile duct abnormalities present with recurrent episodes of biliary pain, cholangitis and cholestasis. Serum chemistry, ultrasound with color Doppler imaging, magnetic resonance imaging with magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and magnetic resonance portovenography are modalities of choice for evaluation of portal biliopathy. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography being an invasive procedure is indicated for endotherapy only. Management of portal biliopathy is done in a stepwise manner. First, endotherapy is done for dilation of biliary strictures, placement of biliary stents to facilitate drainage and removal of bile duct calculi. Next portal venous pressure is reduced by formation of surgical porto-systemic shunt or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt. This causes significant resolution of biliary changes. Patients who persist with biliary symptoms and bile duct changes may benefit from surgical biliary drainage procedures (hepaticojejunostomy or choledechoduodenostomy). PMID:27672292

  13. Portal biliopathy.

    PubMed

    Khuroo, Mohammad S; Rather, Ajaz A; Khuroo, Naira S; Khuroo, Mehnaaz S

    2016-09-21

    Portal biliopathy refers to cholangiographic abnormalities which occur in patients with portal cavernoma. These changes occur as a result of pressure on bile ducts from bridging tortuous paracholedochal, epicholedochal and cholecystic veins. Bile duct ischemia may occur due prolonged venous pressure effect or result from insufficient blood supply. In addition, encasement of ducts may occur due fibrotic cavernoma. Majority of patients are asymptomatic. Portal biliopathy is a progressive disease and patients who have long standing disease and more severe bile duct abnormalities present with recurrent episodes of biliary pain, cholangitis and cholestasis. Serum chemistry, ultrasound with color Doppler imaging, magnetic resonance imaging with magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and magnetic resonance portovenography are modalities of choice for evaluation of portal biliopathy. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography being an invasive procedure is indicated for endotherapy only. Management of portal biliopathy is done in a stepwise manner. First, endotherapy is done for dilation of biliary strictures, placement of biliary stents to facilitate drainage and removal of bile duct calculi. Next portal venous pressure is reduced by formation of surgical porto-systemic shunt or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt. This causes significant resolution of biliary changes. Patients who persist with biliary symptoms and bile duct changes may benefit from surgical biliary drainage procedures (hepaticojejunostomy or choledechoduodenostomy).

  14. Fast 3D dosimetric verifications based on an electronic portal imaging device using a GPU calculation engine.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jinhan; Chen, Lixin; Chen, Along; Luo, Guangwen; Deng, Xiaowu; Liu, Xiaowei

    2015-04-11

    To use a graphic processing unit (GPU) calculation engine to implement a fast 3D pre-treatment dosimetric verification procedure based on an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). The GPU algorithm includes the deconvolution and convolution method for the fluence-map calculations, the collapsed-cone convolution/superposition (CCCS) algorithm for the 3D dose calculations and the 3D gamma evaluation calculations. The results of the GPU-based CCCS algorithm were compared to those of Monte Carlo simulations. The planned and EPID-based reconstructed dose distributions in overridden-to-water phantoms and the original patients were compared for 6 MV and 10 MV photon beams in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans based on dose differences and gamma analysis. The total single-field dose computation time was less than 8 s, and the gamma evaluation for a 0.1-cm grid resolution was completed in approximately 1 s. The results of the GPU-based CCCS algorithm exhibited good agreement with those of the Monte Carlo simulations. The gamma analysis indicated good agreement between the planned and reconstructed dose distributions for the treatment plans. For the target volume, the differences in the mean dose were less than 1.8%, and the differences in the maximum dose were less than 2.5%. For the critical organs, minor differences were observed between the reconstructed and planned doses. The GPU calculation engine was used to boost the speed of 3D dose and gamma evaluation calculations, thus offering the possibility of true real-time 3D dosimetric verification.

  15. Breast Patient Setup Error Assessment: Comparison of Electronic Portal Image Devices and Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Matching Results

    SciTech Connect

    Topolnjak, Rajko; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Nijkamp, Jasper; Rasch, Coen; Minkema, Danny; Remeijer, Peter; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To quantify the differences in setup errors measured with the cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and electronic portal image devices (EPID) in breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Repeat CBCT scan were acquired for routine offline setup verification in 20 breast cancer patients. During the CBCT imaging fractions, EPID images of the treatment beams were recorded. Registrations of the bony anatomy for CBCT to planning CT and EPID to digitally reconstructed-radiographs (DRRs) were compared. In addition, similar measurements of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom were acquired. Bland-Altman and linear regression analysis were performed for clinical and phantom registrations. Systematic and random setup errors were quantified for CBCT and EPID-driven correction protocols in the EPID coordinate system (U, V), with V parallel to the cranial-caudal axis and U perpendicular to V and the central beam axis. Results: Bland-Altman analysis of clinical EPID and CBCT registrations yielded 4 to 6-mm limits of agreement, indicating that both methods were not compatible. The EPID-based setup errors were smaller than the CBCT-based setup errors. Phantom measurements showed that CBCT accurately measures setup error whereas EPID underestimates setup errors in the cranial-caudal direction. In the clinical measurements, the residual bony anatomy setup errors after offline CBCT-based corrections were {Sigma}{sub U} = 1.4 mm, {Sigma}{sub V} = 1.7 mm, and {sigma}{sub U} = 2.6 mm, {sigma}{sub V} = 3.1 mm. Residual setup errors of EPID driven corrections corrected for underestimation were estimated at {Sigma}{sub U} = 2.2mm, {Sigma}{sub V} = 3.3 mm, and {sigma}{sub U} = 2.9 mm, {sigma}{sub V} = 2.9 mm. Conclusion: EPID registration underestimated the actual bony anatomy setup error in breast cancer patients by 20% to 50%. Using CBCT decreased setup uncertainties significantly.

  16. SU-E-T-438: Commissioning of An In-Vivo Quality Assurance Method Using the Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    SciTech Connect

    Morin, O; Held, M; Pouliot, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Patient specific pre-treatment quality assurance (QA) using arrays of detectors or film have been the standard approach to assure the correct treatment is delivered to the patient. This QA approach is expensive, labor intensive and does not guarantee or document that all remaining fractions were treated properly. The purpose of this abstract is to commission and evaluate the performance of a commercially available in-vivo QA software using the electronic portal imaging device (EPID) to record the daily treatments. Methods: The platform EPIgray V2.0.2 (Dosisoft), which machine model compares ratios of TMR with EPID signal to predict dose was commissioned for an Artiste (Siemens Oncology Care Systems) and a Truebeam (Varian medical systems) linear accelerator following the given instructions. The systems were then tested on three different phantoms (homogeneous stack of solid water, anthropomorphic head and pelvis) and on a library of patient cases. Simple and complex fields were delivered at different exposures and for different gantry angles. The effects of the table attenuation and the EPID sagging were evaluated. Gamma analysis of the measured dose was compared to the predicted dose for complex clinical IMRT cases. Results: Commissioning of the EPIgray system for two photon energies took 8 hours. The difference between the dose planned and the dose measured with EPIgray was better than 3% for all phantom scenarios tested. Preliminary results on patients demonstrate an accuracy of 5% is achievable in high dose regions for both 3DCRT and IMRT. Large discrepancies (>5%) were observed due to metallic structures or air cavities and in low dose areas. Flat panel sagging was visible and accounted for in the EPIgray model. Conclusion: The accuracy achieved by EPIgray is sufficient to document the safe delivery of complex IMRT treatments. Future work will evaluate EPIgray for VMAT and high dose rate deliveries. This work is supported by Dosisoft, Cachan, France.

  17. Comparison of CT on Rails With Electronic Portal Imaging for Positioning of Prostate Cancer Patients With Implanted Fiducial Markers

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Rebecca Kron, Tomas; Foroudi, Farshad; Milner, Alvin; Cox, Jennifer; Duchesne, Gillian; Cleeve, Laurence; Zhu Li; Cramb, Jim; Sparks, Laura; Laferlita, Marcus

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: The objective of this investigation was to measure the agreement between in-room computed tomography (CT) on rails and electronic portal image (EPI) radiography. Methods and Materials: Agreement between the location of the center of gravity (COG) of fiducial markers (FMs) on CT and EPI images was determined in phantom studies and a patient cohort. A secondary analysis between the center of volume (COV) of the prostate on CT and the COG of FMs on CT and EPI was performed. Agreement was defined as the 95% probability of a difference of {<=}3.0 mm between images. Systematic and random errors from CT and EPI are reported. Results: From 8 patients, 254 CT and EPI pairs were analyzed. FMs were localized to within 3 mm on CT and EPI images 96.9% of the time in the left-right (LR) plane, 85.8% superior-inferior (SI), and 89% anterior-posterior (AP). The differences between the COV on CT and the COG on EPI were not within 3 mm in any plane: 87.8% (LR), 64.2% (SI), and 70.9% (AP). The systematic error varied from 1.2 to 2.9 mm (SI) and 1.8-2.9 mm (AP) between the COG on EPI and COV on CT. Conclusions: Considerable differences between in-room CT and EPI exist. The phantom measurements showed slice thickness affected the accuracy of localization in the SI plane, and couch sag that occurs at the CT on rails gantry could not be totally corrected for in the AP plane. Other confounding factors are the action of rotating the couch and associated time lag between image acquisitions (prostate motion), EPI image quality, and outlining uncertainties.

  18. Automatic Prostate Tracking and Motion Assessment in Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy With an Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    SciTech Connect

    Azcona, Juan Diego; Li, Ruijiang; Mok, Edward; Hancock, Steven; Xing, Lei

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To assess the prostate intrafraction motion in volumetric modulated arc therapy treatments using cine megavoltage (MV) images acquired with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Methods and Materials: Ten prostate cancer patients were treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy using a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator equipped with an EPID for acquiring cine MV images during treatment. Cine MV images acquisition was scheduled for single or multiple treatment fractions (between 1 and 8). A novel automatic fiducial detection algorithm that can handle irregular multileaf collimator apertures, field edges, fast leaf and gantry movement, and MV image noise and artifacts in patient anatomy was used. All sets of images (approximately 25,000 images in total) were analyzed to measure the positioning accuracy of implanted fiducial markers and assess the prostate movement. Results: Prostate motion can vary greatly in magnitude among different patients. Different motion patterns were identified, showing its unpredictability. The mean displacement and standard deviation of the intrafraction motion was generally less than 2.0 ± 2.0 mm in each of the spatial directions. In certain patients, however, the percentage of the treatment time in which the prostate is displaced more than 5 mm from its planned position in at least 1 spatial direction was 10% or more. The maximum prostate displacement observed was 13.3 mm. Conclusion: Prostate tracking and motion assessment was performed with MV imaging and an EPID. The amount of prostate motion observed suggests that patients will benefit from its real-time monitoring. Megavoltage imaging can provide the basis for real-time prostate tracking using conventional linear accelerators.

  19. A new approach for the pixel map sensitivity (PMS) evaluation of an electronic portal imaging device (EPID).

    PubMed

    Boriano, Alberto; Lucio, Francesco; Calamia, Elisa; Russi, Elvio; Marchetto, Flavio

    2013-11-04

    When using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for dosimetric verifications, the calibration of the sensitive area is of paramount importance. Two calibration methods are generally adopted: one, empirical, based on an external reference dosimeter or on multiple narrow beam irradiations, and one based on the EPID response simulation. In this paper we present an alternative approach based on an intercalibration procedure, independent from external dosimeters and from simulations, and is quick and easy to perform. Each element of a detector matrix is characterized by a different gain; the aim of the calibration procedure is to relate the gain of each element to a reference one. The method that we used to compute the relative gains is based on recursive acquisitions with the EPID placed in different positions, assuming a constant fluence of the beam for subsequent deliveries. By applying an established procedure and analysis algorithm, the EPID calibration was repeated in several working conditions. Data show that both the photons energy and the presence of a medium between the source and the detector affect the calibration coefficients less than 1%. The calibration coefficients were then applied to the acquired images, comparing the EPID dose images with films. Measurements were performed with open field, placing the film at the level of the EPID. The standard deviation of the distribution of the point-to-point difference is 0.6%. An approach of this type for the EPID calibration has many advantages with respect to the standard methods - it does not need an external dosimeter, it is not related to the irradiation techniques, and it is easy to implement in the clinical practice. Moreover, it can be applied in case of transit or nontransit dosimetry, solving the problem of the EPID calibration independently from the dose reconstruction method.

  20. Portal dosimetry in wedged beams.

    PubMed

    Spreeuw, Hanno; Rozendaal, Roel; Camargo, Priscilla; Mans, Anton; Wendling, Markus; Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Van Herk, Marcel; Mijnheer, Ben

    2015-05-08

    Portal dosimetry using electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) is often applied to verify high-energy photon beam treatments. Due to the change in photon energy spectrum, the resulting dose values are, however, not very accurate in the case of wedged beams if the pixel-to-dose conversion for the situation without wedge is used. A possible solution would be to consider a wedged beam as another photon beam quality requiring separate beam modeling of the dose calculation algorithm. The aim of this study was to investigate a more practical solution: to make aSi EPID-based dosimetry models also applicable for wedged beams without an extra commissioning effort of the parameters of the model. For this purpose two energy-dependent wedge multiplication factors have been introduced to be applied for portal images taken with and without a patient/phantom in the beam. These wedge multiplication factors were derived from EPID and ionization chamber measurements at the EPID level for wedged and nonwedged beams, both with and without a polystyrene slab phantom in the beam. This method was verified for an EPID dosimetry model used for wedged beams at three photon beam energies (6, 10, and 18 MV) by comparing dose values reconstructed in a phantom with data provided by a treatment planning system (TPS), as a function of field size, depth, and off-axis distance. Generally good agreement, within 2%, was observed for depths between dose maximum and 15 cm. Applying the new model to EPID dose measurements performed during ten breast cancer patient treatments with wedged 6 MV photon beams showed that the average isocenter underdosage of 5.3% was reduced to 0.4%. Gamma-evaluation (global 3%/3 mm) of these in vivo data showed an increase in percentage of points with γ ≤ 1 from 60.2% to 87.4%, while γmean reduced from 1.01 to 0.55. It can be concluded that, for wedged beams, the multiplication of EPID pixel values with an energy-dependent correction factor provides good agreement

  1. Effect of recombination in a high quantum efficiency prototype ionization-chamber-based electronic portal imaging device.

    PubMed

    Gopal, A; Samant, S S

    2007-08-01

    The quantum efficiency (QE) of an imaging detector can be increased by utilizing a thick, high-density detection medium to increase the number of quantum interactions. However, image quality is more accurately described by the detection quantum efficiency (DQE). If a significant fraction of the increase in the number of detected quanta from a thick, dense detector were to result in useful imaging signal, this represents a favorable case where enhanced QE leads to increased DQE. However, for ionization-type detectors, one factor that limits DQE is the recombination between ion pairs that acts as a secondary quantum sink due to which enhancement in QE may not result in higher DQE depending on the extent of the signal loss from recombination. Therefore, an analysis of signal loss mechanisms or quantum sinks in an imaging system is essential for validating the overall benefit of high QE detectors. In this paper, a study of ion recombination as a secondary quantum sink is presented for a high QE prototype ion-chamber-based electronic portal imaging device (EPID): the kinestatic charge detector (KCD). The KCD utilizes a high pressure noble gas (krypton or xenon at 100 atm) and an arbitrarily large detector thickness (of the order of centimeters), resulting in a high QE imager. Compared with commercial amorphous silicon flat panel imagers that provide DQE(0) approximately 0.01, the KCD has much higher DQE. Studies indicated that DQE(0) = 0.20 for 6.1 cm thick, 100 atm (rho = 3.4 g/cm3) xenon chamber, and DQE(0)=0.34 for a 9.1 cm thick chamber. A series of experiments was devised and conducted to determine the signal loss due to recombination for a KCD chamber. The measurements indicated a fractional recombination loss of about 14% for a krypton chamber and about 18% for a xenon chamber under standard operating conditions (100 atm chamber pressure and 1275 V/cm electric field intensity). A theoretical treatment of the effect of recombination on imaging signal

  2. The Effect of Registration Surrogate and Patient Factors on the Interobserver Variability of Electronic Portal Image Guidance During Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Vickie Lockwood, Gina; Yan Jing; Catton, Charles; Chung, Peter; Bayley, Andrew; Rosewall, Tara

    2011-01-01

    Intraprostatic fiducial markers (IPM) and electronic portal imaging (EPI) are commonly used to identify and correct for prostate motion during radiotherapy. However, little data is available on the precision of this image-guidance technique. This study quantified impact of different registration surrogates and patient factors on the interobserver variability of manual EPI alignment during prostate radiotherapy. For 50 prostate radiotherapy patients previously implanted with 3 IPM, five observers manually aligned 150 pairs of orthogonal EPI to the reference digital reconstructed radiograph using Varian Vision EPI analysis software. Images were aligned using: Bony anatomy (BA), single mid-prostate IPM (SM); and 2 strategies using 3 IPM: center of mass (COM) and rotate and translate (R and T). Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were calculated to quantify interobserver variability. The absolute displacements measured using SM and R and T were compared with those using COM. The impact of patients' pelvic diameter and adjuvant hormone therapy on interobserver variability were also evaluated. Twelve thousand displacement values were collected for analysis. The maximum discrepancy between the 5 observers was >2 mm in 47% of measurements using BA, 5% using SM, 4% using R and T, and 3% using COM. Both of the 3 IPM alignment strategies demonstrated lower interobserver variability than the single IPM strategy (ICC 0.94-0.97 vs. 0.82-0.94). BA had the highest interobserver variability (ICC = 0.43-0.90). Pelvic diameter and hormone therapy had no discernible impact on interobserver variability. Compared with COM, the absolute displacements measured using the other IPM strategies were statistically different (p < 0.001), but 95% of the absolute magnitude of differences between the strategies were {<=}1 mm. The high reproducibility among the observers demonstrated the precision of prostate localization using multiple IPM and EPI, which was not influenced by the patient

  3. A study of Winston-Lutz test on two different electronic portal imaging devices and with low energy imaging.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Paul B

    2016-09-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery requires sub-millimetre accuracy in patient positioning and target localization. Therefore, verification of the linear accelerator (linac) isocentre and the laser alignment to the isocentre is performed in some clinics prior to the treatment using the Winston-Lutz (W-L) test with films and more recently with images obtained using the electronic portal imaging devices (EPID). The W-L test is performed by acquiring EPID images of a radio-opaque ball of 6 mm diameter (the W-L phantom) placed at the isocentre of the linac at various gantry and table angles, with a predefined small square or circular radiation beam. In this study, the W-L test was performed on two linacs having EPIDs of different size and resolution, viz, a TrueBeam™ linac with aS1000 EPID of size 40 × 30 cm(2) with 1024 × 768 pixel resolution and an EDGE™ linac having an EPID of size 43 × 43 cm(2) with pixel resolution of 1280 × 1280. In order to determine the displacement of the radio-opaque ball centre from the radiation beam centre of the W-L test, an in-house MATLAB™ image processing code was developed using morphological operations. The displacement in radiation beam centre at each gantry and couch position was obtained by determining the distance between the radiation field centre and the radio-opaque ball centre for every image. Since the MATLAB code was based on image processing that was dependent on the image contrast and resolution, the W-L test was also compared for images obtained with different beam energies. The W-L tests were performed for 6 and 8 MV beams on the TrueBeam™ linac and for 2.5 and 6 MV beams on the EDGE™ linac with a higher resolution EPID. It was observed that the images obtained with the EPID of higher resolution resulted in same accuracy in the determination of the displacement between the centres of the radio-opaque ball and the radiation beam, and significant difference was not observed with images acquired with

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of a novel water-equivalent electronic portal imaging device using plastic scintillating fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Teymurazyan, A.; Pang, G.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Most electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) developed so far use a thin Cu plate/phosphor screen to convert x-ray energies into light photons, while maintaining a high spatial resolution. This results in a low x-ray absorption and thus a low quantum efficiency (QE) of approximately 2-4% for megavoltage (MV) x-rays. A significant increase of QE is desirable for applications such as MV cone-beam computed tomography (MV-CBCT). Furthermore, the Cu plate/phosphor screen contains high atomic number (high-Z) materials, resulting in an undesirable over-response to low energy x-rays (due to photoelectric effect) as well as high energy x-rays (due to pair production) when used for dosimetric verification. Our goal is to develop a new MV x-ray detector that has a high QE and uses low-Z materials to overcome the obstacles faced by current MV x-ray imaging technologies. Methods: A new high QE and low-Z EPID is proposed. It consists of a matrix of plastic scintillating fibers embedded in a water-equivalent medium and coupled to an optically sensitive 2D active matrix flat panel imager (AMFPI) for image readout. It differs from the previous approach that uses segmented crystalline scintillators made of higher density and higher atomic number materials to detect MV x-rays. The plastic scintillating fibers are focused toward the x-ray source to avoid image blurring due to oblique incidence of off-axis x-rays. When MV x-rays interact with the scintillating fibers in the detector, scintillation light will be produced. The light photons produced in a fiber core and emitted within the acceptance angle of the fiber will be guided toward the AMFPI by total internal reflection. A Monte Carlo simulation has been used to investigate imaging and dosimetric characteristics of the proposed detector under irradiation of MV x-rays. Results: Properties, such as detection efficiency, modulation transfer function, detective quantum efficiency (DQE), energy dependence of detector

  5. Imaging Techniques and Scanning Electron Microscopy as Tools for Characterizing a Si-Based Material Used in Air Monitoring Applications.

    PubMed

    Beatriz, Suárez-Peña; Luis, Negral; Leonor, Castrillón; Laura, Megido; Elena, Marañón; Yolanda, Fernández-Nava

    2016-02-11

    This paper presents a study of the quartz fibrous filters used as a substrate for capturing the particulate matter (PM) present in the air. Although these substrates are widely used in environmental applications, their microstructure has been barely studied. The behavior of these devices during the filtration process was investigated in terms of their microstructure and the quartz fibers. Surface and cross sections were monitored. Scanning electronic microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX), imaging and stereology techniques were used as tools for this purpose. The results show that most of the quartz filter fibers have sizes that allow them to be classified as nanofibers. It was also observed that, while the mechanisms of the mechanical capture of particles via impaction, interception and diffusion operate simultaneously in the outer zones of the filter cross section, the mechanism of capture by impaction is virtually non-existent in the innermost zones. Particles between 0.1 and 0.5 μm are known to be the most difficult to have captured by means of fibrous substrates. The fibers in inner zones were highly efficient in capturing this type of particle.

  6. Imaging Techniques and Scanning Electron Microscopy as Tools for Characterizing a Si-Based Material Used in Air Monitoring Applications

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Peña, Beatriz; Negral, Luis; Castrillón, Leonor; Megido, Laura; Marañón, Elena; Fernández-Nava, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the quartz fibrous filters used as a substrate for capturing the particulate matter (PM) present in the air. Although these substrates are widely used in environmental applications, their microstructure has been barely studied. The behavior of these devices during the filtration process was investigated in terms of their microstructure and the quartz fibers. Surface and cross sections were monitored. Scanning electronic microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX), imaging and stereology techniques were used as tools for this purpose. The results show that most of the quartz filter fibers have sizes that allow them to be classified as nanofibers. It was also observed that, while the mechanisms of the mechanical capture of particles via impaction, interception and diffusion operate simultaneously in the outer zones of the filter cross section, the mechanism of capture by impaction is virtually non-existent in the innermost zones. Particles between 0.1 and 0.5 μm are known to be the most difficult to have captured by means of fibrous substrates. The fibers in inner zones were highly efficient in capturing this type of particle. PMID:28787908

  7. Measured and Simulated Dark J-V Characteristics of a-Si:H Single Junction p-i-n Solar Cells Irradiated with 40 keV Electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lord, Kenneth; Woodyard, James R.

    2002-01-01

    The effect of 40 keV electron irradiation on a-Si:H p-i-n single-junction solar cells was investigated using measured and simulated dark J-V characteristics. EPRI-AMPS and PC-1D simulators were explored for use in the studies. The EPRI-AMPS simulator was employed and simulator parameters selected to produce agreement with measured J-V characteristics. Three current mechanisms were evident in the measured dark J-V characteristics after electron irradiation, namely, injection, shunting and a term of the form CV(sup m). Using a single discrete defect state level at the center of the band gap, good agreement was achieved between measured and simulated J-V characteristics in the forward-bias voltage region where the dark current density was dominated by injection. The current mechanism of the form CV(sup m) was removed by annealing for two hours at 140 C. Subsequent irradiation restored the CV(sup m) current mechanism and it was removed by a second anneal. Some evidence of the CV(sup m) term is present in device simulations with a higher level of discrete density of states located at the center of the bandgap.

  8. Secure portal.

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Cynthia Lee

    2007-09-01

    There is a need in security systems to rapidly and accurately grant access of authorized personnel to a secure facility while denying access to unauthorized personnel. In many cases this role is filled by security personnel, which can be very costly. Systems that can perform this role autonomously without sacrificing accuracy or speed of throughput are very appealing. To address the issue of autonomous facility access through the use of technology, the idea of a ''secure portal'' is introduced. A secure portal is a defined zone where state-of-the-art technology can be implemented to grant secure area access or to allow special privileges for an individual. Biometric technologies are of interest because they are generally more difficult to defeat than technologies such as badge swipe and keypad entry. The biometric technologies selected for this concept were facial and gait recognition. They were chosen since they require less user cooperation than other biometrics such as fingerprint, iris, and hand geometry and because they have the most potential for flexibility in deployment. The secure portal concept could be implemented within the boundaries of an entry area to a facility. As a person is approaching a badge and/or PIN portal, face and gait information can be gathered and processed. The biometric information could be fused for verification against the information that is gathered from the badge. This paper discusses a facial recognition technology that was developed for the purposes of providing high verification probabilities with low false alarm rates, which would be required of an autonomous entry control system. In particular, a 3-D facial recognition approach using Fisher Linear Discriminant Analysis is described. Gait recognition technology, based on Hidden Markov Models has been explored, but those results are not included in this paper. Fusion approaches for combining the results of the biometrics would be the next step in realizing the secure portal

  9. Improving Rates of Influenza Vaccination Through Electronic Health Record Portal Messages, Interactive Voice Recognition Calls and Patient-Enabled Electronic Health Record Updates: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sreedhara, Meera; Goff, Sarah L; Fisher, Lloyd D; Preusse, Peggy; Jackson, Madeline; Sundaresan, Devi; Garber, Lawrence D; Mazor, Kathleen M

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical decision support (CDS), including computerized reminders for providers and patients, can improve health outcomes. CDS promoting influenza vaccination, delivered directly to patients via an electronic health record (EHR) patient portal and interactive voice recognition (IVR) calls, offers an innovative approach to improving patient care. Objective To test the effectiveness of an EHR patient portal and IVR outreach to improve rates of influenza vaccination in a large multispecialty group practice in central Massachusetts. Methods We describe a nonblinded, randomized controlled trial of EHR patient portal messages and IVR calls designed to promote influenza vaccination. In our preparatory phase, we conducted qualitative interviews with patients, providers, and staff to inform development of EHR portal messages with embedded questionnaires and IVR call scripts. We also provided practice-wide education on influenza vaccines to all physicians and staff members, including information on existing vaccine-specific EHR CDS. Outreach will target adult patients who remain unvaccinated for more than 2 months after the start of the influenza season. Using computer-generated randomization and a factorial design, we will assign 20,000 patients who are active users of electronic patient portals to one of the 4 study arms: (1) receipt of a portal message promoting influenza vaccines and offering online appointment scheduling; (2) receipt of an IVR call with similar content but without appointment facilitation; (3) both (1) and (2); or (4) neither (1) nor (2) (usual care). We will randomize patients without electronic portals (10,000 patients) to (1) receipt of IVR call or (2) usual care. Both portal messages and IVR calls promote influenza vaccine completion. Our primary outcome is percentage of eligible patients with influenza vaccines administered at our group practice during the 2014-15 influenza season. Both outreach methods also solicit patient self

  10. Patient portal doldrums: does an exam room promotional video during an office visit increase patient portal registrations and portal use?

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Barbara K; Crane, Sarah J; Smith, Steven A; Tulledge-Scheitel, Sidna M; Stroebel, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    The patient portal is a web service which allows patients to view their electronic health record, communicate online with their care teams, and manage healthcare appointments and medications. Despite advantages of the patient portal, registrations for portal use have often been slow. Using a secure video system on our existing exam room electronic health record displays during regular office visits, the authors showed patients a video which promoted use of the patient portal. The authors compared portal registrations and portal use following the video to providing a paper instruction sheet and to a control (no additional portal promotion). From the 12 050 office appointments examined, portal registrations within 45 days of the appointment were 11.7%, 7.1%, and 2.5% for video, paper instructions, and control respectively (p<0.0001). Within 6 months following the interventions, 3.5% in the video cohort, 1.2% in the paper, and 0.75% of the control patients demonstrated portal use by initiating portal messages to their providers (p<0.0001). PMID:21976028

  11. Patient portal doldrums: does an exam room promotional video during an office visit increase patient portal registrations and portal use?

    PubMed

    North, Frederick; Hanna, Barbara K; Crane, Sarah J; Smith, Steven A; Tulledge-Scheitel, Sidna M; Stroebel, Robert J

    2011-12-01

    The patient portal is a web service which allows patients to view their electronic health record, communicate online with their care teams, and manage healthcare appointments and medications. Despite advantages of the patient portal, registrations for portal use have often been slow. Using a secure video system on our existing exam room electronic health record displays during regular office visits, the authors showed patients a video which promoted use of the patient portal. The authors compared portal registrations and portal use following the video to providing a paper instruction sheet and to a control (no additional portal promotion). From the 12,050 office appointments examined, portal registrations within 45 days of the appointment were 11.7%, 7.1%, and 2.5% for video, paper instructions, and control respectively (p<0.0001). Within 6 months following the interventions, 3.5% in the video cohort, 1.2% in the paper, and 0.75% of the control patients demonstrated portal use by initiating portal messages to their providers (p<0.0001).

  12. Four-dimensional dose reconstruction through in vivo phase matching of cine images of electronic portal imaging device.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jihyung; Jung, Jae Won; Kim, Jong Oh; Yi, Byong Yong; Yeo, Inhwan

    2016-07-01

    A method is proposed to reconstruct a four-dimensional (4D) dose distribution using phase matching of measured cine images to precalculated images of electronic portal imaging device (EPID). (1) A phantom, designed to simulate a tumor in lung (a polystyrene block with a 3 cm diameter embedded in cork), was placed on a sinusoidally moving platform with an amplitude of 1 cm and a period of 4 s. Ten-phase 4D computed tomography (CT) images of the phantom were acquired. A planning target volume (PTV) was created by adding a margin of 1 cm around the internal target volume of the tumor. (2) Three beams were designed, which included a static beam, a theoretical dynamic beam, and a planning-optimized dynamic beam (PODB). While the theoretical beam was made by manually programming a simplistic sliding leaf motion, the planning-optimized beam was obtained from treatment planning. From the three beams, three-dimensional (3D) doses on the phantom were calculated; 4D dose was calculated by means of the ten phase images (integrated over phases afterward); serving as "reference" images, phase-specific EPID dose images under the lung phantom were also calculated for each of the ten phases. (3) Cine EPID images were acquired while the beams were irradiated to the moving phantom. (4) Each cine image was phase-matched to a phase-specific CT image at which common irradiation occurred by intercomparing the cine image with the reference images. (5) Each cine image was used to reconstruct dose in the phase-matched CT image, and the reconstructed doses were summed over all phases. (6) The summation was compared with forwardly calculated 4D and 3D dose distributions. Accounting for realistic situations, intratreatment breathing irregularity was simulated by assuming an amplitude of 0.5 cm for the phantom during a portion of breathing trace in which the phase matching could not be performed. Intertreatment breathing irregularity between the time of treatment and the time of planning CT was

  13. Excitation and deexcitation of the Si-H stretching mode in a Si:H with picosecond free electron laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Z.; Fauchet, M.; Rella, C.W.

    1995-12-31

    Hydrogen in amorphous and crystalline silicon has been the topic of intense theoretical and experimental investigations for more than one decade. To better understand how the Si-H bonds interact with the Si matrix and how they can be broken, it would be useful to excite selectively these bonds and monitor the energy flow from the Si-H bonds into the bulk Si modes. One attractive way of exciting the Si-H modes selectively is with an infrared laser tuned to a Si-H vibrational mode. Unfortunately, up to now, this type of experiment had not been possible because of the lack of a laser producing intense, ultrashort pulses that are tunable in the mid infrared. In this presentation, we report the first measurement where a 1 picosecond long laser pulse was used to excite the Si-H stretching modes near 2000 cm{sup -1} and another identical laser pulse was used to measure the deexcitation from that specific vibrational mode. The laser was the Stanford free electron laser generating {approximately}1 ps-long pulses, tunable in the 5 {mu}m region and focussed to an intensity of {approximately}1 GW/cm{sup 2}. The pump-probe measurements were performed in transmission at room temperature on several 2 {mu}m thick a-Si:H films deposited on c-Si. Samples with predominant Si-H{sub 1} modes, predominant Si-H{sub n>1} modes and with a mixture of modes were prepared. The laser was tuned on resonance with either of these modes. Immediately after excitation, we observe a bleaching of the infrared absorption, which can be attributed to excitation of the Si-H mode. Beaching is expected since, as a result of anharmonicity, the detuning between the (E{sub 3} - E{sub 2}) resonance and the (E{sub 2} - E{sub 1}) resonance is larger than the laser bandwidth. Note that despite the anharmonicity, it should be possible to climb the vibrational ladder due to power broadening.

  14. Research on the stability, electronic properties, and structure of a-Si:H and its alloys. Final subcontract report, 1 June 1991--31 May 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, W.B.; Johnson, N.; Nickel, N.; Schumm, G.; Street, R.A.; Thompson, R.; Tsai, C.C.; Van de Walle, C.; Walker, J.

    1995-07-01

    The authors research has focused on defect metastability and a-Si:C:H alloys. A new aspect of the metastability is the growing interest in the defect recovery process. They have continued to explore the role of hydrogen in the metastability and other properties of a-Si:H. This has led them to perform first principles calculations of Si-H bonding configurations. Another new feature of the metastability work is the study of the effects in hydrogenated poly-silicon. They have grown and studied the properties of a-Si:C:H alloys, particularly to observe the effects of hydrogen dilution. Finally they have also studied the recent defect relaxation phenomenon, and concluded that the effects arise from contact effects and are not an intrinsic effect in a-Si:H. Section A presents some recent models of metastability. Section B discusses the metastability and equilibration effects in hydrogenated polysilicon, studied because of it`s close similarity to a-Si:H. Section C describes results on a-Si:C:H alloys. Section D contains first principle LDA calculations of Si-H bonds and relates these results to the a-Si:H diffusion and metastability properties. In section E the authors report capacitance measurements aimed at exploring the recent results by Cohen et al who find an anomalous relaxation process from the trap filling kinetics of a DLTS experiment.

  15. 77 FR 59670 - Electronic Filing of H-2A and H-2B Labor Certification Applications Through the iCERT Visa Portal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ... Through the iCERT Visa Portal System AGENCY: Employment and Training Administration, Department of Labor... under the H-2A and H-2B visa programs through the Department of Labor's (Department) iCERT Visa Portal... Help Desk by sending an email to oflc.portal@dol.gov . Additionally, the Chicago NPC maintains a...

  16. A simple quality assurance test tool for the visual verification of light and radiation field congruent using electronic portal images device and computed radiography

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The radiation field on most megavoltage radiation therapy units are shown by a light field projected through the collimator by a light source mounted inside the collimator. The light field is traditionally used for patient alignment. Hence it is imperative that the light field is congruent with the radiation field. Method A simple quality assurance tool has been designed for rapid and simple test of the light field and radiation field using electronic portal images device (EPID) or computed radiography (CR). We tested this QA tool using Varian PortalVision and Elekta iViewGT EPID systems and Kodak CR system. Results Both the single and double exposure techniques were evaluated, with double exposure technique providing a better visualization of the light-radiation field markers. The light and radiation congruency could be detected within 1 mm. This will satisfy the American Association of Physicists in Medicine task group report number 142 recommendation of 2 mm tolerance. Conclusion The QA tool can be used with either an EPID or CR to provide a simple and rapid method to verify light and radiation field congruence. PMID:22452821

  17. Use of an electronic clinical experience portal for the education of nurses in a critical care unit.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Maureen; Baldwin, Ian; Fealy, Nigel

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines a clinical experience portal (CEP) that was developed for critical care nurses to access on a personal digital assistant (PDA) while undertaking a 12-month postgraduate program. The increasing complexity of care provided to patients in intensive care units (ICU) in Australia and overseas requires that health care practitioners working in this area are competent and highly skilled, to prevent errors and adverse events. The CEP - unlike the traditional approach which is often lacking, antiquated or encompassed in paper records - provides opportunity for collaborative activities to occur between the learner and the teacher in an auditable environment to enhance the quality of the education provided. The CEP provided a method for the nurses to record their competencies and access educational material within the framework of a postgraduate program. The benefits of using the CEP for the education of all healthcare professionals' are also discussed.

  18. The provider perspective: investigating the effect of the Electronic Patient-Reported Outcome (ePRO) mobile application and portal on primary care provider workflow.

    PubMed

    Hans, Parminder K; Gray, Carolyn Steele; Gill, Ashlinder; Tiessen, James

    2017-09-13

    Aim This qualitative study investigates how the Electronic Patient-Reported Outcome (ePRO) mobile application and portal system, designed to capture patient-reported measures to support self-management, affected primary care provider workflows. The Canadian health system is facing an ageing population that is living with chronic disease. Disruptive innovations like mobile health technologies can help to support health system transformation needed to better meet the multifaceted needs of the complex care patient. However, there are challenges with implementing these technologies in primary care settings, in particular the effect on primary care provider workflows. Over a six-week period interdisciplinary primary care providers (n=6) and their complex care patients (n=12), used the ePRO mobile application and portal to collaboratively goal-set, manage care plans, and support self-management using patient-reported measures. Secondary thematic analysis of focus groups, training sessions, and issue tracker reports captured user experiences at a Toronto area Family Health Team from October 2014 to January 2015. Findings Key issues raised by providers included: liability concerns associated with remote monitoring, increased documentation activities due to a lack of interoperability between the app and the electronic patient record, increased provider anxiety with regard to the potential for the app to disrupt and infringe upon appointment time, and increased demands for patient engagement. Primary care providers reported the app helped to focus care plans and to begin a collaborative conversation on goal-setting. However, throughout our investigation we found a high level of provider resistance evidenced by consistent attempts to shift the app towards fitting with existing workflows rather than adapting much of their behaviour. As health systems seek innovative and disruptive models to better serve this complex patient population, provider change resistance will need to

  19. Comprehensive fluence model for absolute portal dose image prediction.

    PubMed

    Chytyk, K; McCurdy, B M C

    2009-04-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) continue to be investigated as treatment verification tools, with a particular focus on intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). This verification could be accomplished through a comparison of measured portal images to predicted portal dose images. A general fluence determination tailored to portal dose image prediction would be a great asset in order to model the complex modulation of IMRT. A proposed physics-based parameter fluence model was commissioned by matching predicted EPID images to corresponding measured EPID images of multileaf collimator (MLC) defined fields. The two-source fluence model was composed of a focal Gaussian and an extrafocal Gaussian-like source. Specific aspects of the MLC and secondary collimators were also modeled (e.g., jaw and MLC transmission factors, MLC rounded leaf tips, tongue and groove effect, interleaf leakage, and leaf offsets). Several unique aspects of the model were developed based on the results of detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the linear accelerator including (1) use of a non-Gaussian extrafocal fluence source function, (2) separate energy spectra used for focal and extrafocal fluence, and (3) different off-axis energy spectra softening used for focal and extrafocal fluences. The predicted energy fluence was then convolved with Monte Carlo generated, EPID-specific dose kernels to convert incident fluence to dose delivered to the EPID. Measured EPID data were obtained with an a-Si EPID for various MLC-defined fields (from 1 x 1 to 20 x 20 cm2) over a range of source-to-detector distances. These measured profiles were used to determine the fluence model parameters in a process analogous to the commissioning of a treatment planning system. The resulting model was tested on 20 clinical IMRT plans, including ten prostate and ten oropharyngeal cases. The model predicted the open-field profiles within 2%, 2 mm, while a mean of 96.6% of pixels over all

  20. Reconstruction of four-dimensional computed tomography images during treatment time using electronic portal imaging device images based on a dynamic 2D/3D registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamoto, T.; Arimura, H.; Hirose, T. A.; Ohga, S.; Umezu, Y.; Nakamura, Y.; Honda, H.; Sasaki, T.

    2017-03-01

    The goal of our study was to develop a computational framework for reconstruction of four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) images during treatment time using electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images based on a dynamic 2D/3D registration. The 4D-CT images during treatment time ("treatment" 4D-CT images) were reconstructed by performing an affine transformation-based dynamic 2D/3D registration between dynamic clinical portal dose images (PDIs) derived from the EPID images with planning CT images through planning PDIs for all frames. Elements of the affine transformation matrices (transformation parameters) were optimized using a Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm so that the planning PDIs could be similar to the dynamic clinical PDIs for all frames. Initial transformation parameters in each frame should be determined for finding optimum transformation parameters in the LM algorithm. In this study, the optimum transformation parameters in a frame employed as the initial transformation parameters for optimizing the transformation parameter in the consecutive frame. Gamma pass rates (3 mm/3%) were calculated for evaluating a similarity of the dose distributions between the dynamic clinical PDIs and "treatment" PDIs, which were calculated from "treatment" 4D-CT images, for all frames. The framework was applied to eight lung cancer patients who were treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). A mean of the average gamma pass rates between the dynamic clinical PDIs and the "treatment" PDIs for all frames was 98.3+/-1.2% for eight cases. In conclusion, the proposed framework makes it possible to dynamically monitor patients' movement during treatment time.

  1. Structural and electronic studies of a-SiGe:H alloys. Final subcontract report, 1 January 1991--28 February 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, W.

    1993-04-01

    This report describes work to produce alloys of a-Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}:H of improved photoelectronic quality by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The goal was to discover optimum preparation conditions for the end-component, a-Ge:H, to establish whether modification of the usual practice of starting from a-Si:H preparation conditions was advisable. Such modification, found to be necessary, gave films of a-Ge:H with efficiency-mobility-lifetime products ({eta}{mu}{tau}) 10{sup 2} to 10{sup 3} higher than were earlier available, in homogeneous environmentally stable material. Both a-Ge:H and a-Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}:H of large x were studied in detail. Alloy material was shown to have {eta}{mu}{tau} 10{sup 2} larger than found earlier. However, just as the {eta}{mu}{tau} of a-Si:H decreases when Ge is added, so also the {eta}{mu}{tau} of these alloys with Si addition. By contrast, the ambipolar diffusion lengths, L{sub o} which are governed by the hole mobility, vary by only a factor of two over the whole alloy series. Using the experimental finding of a small valence band offset between a-Si:H and a-Ge:H compositional fluctuations on a 10-mm scale are suggested to explain the behavior of {eta}{mu}{tau} and L{sub o} The implications for eventual improvement of the alloys are profound, but require direct experimental tests of the postulated compositional fluctuations.

  2. Portal radiation monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kruse, L.W.

    1982-03-23

    A portal radiation monitor combines .1% FAR with high sensitivity to special nuclear material. The monitor utilizes pulse shape discrimination, dynamic compression of the photomultiplier output and scintillators sized to maintain efficiency over the entire portal area.

  3. Portal radiation monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kruse, Lyle W.

    1985-01-01

    A portal radiation monitor combines 0.1% FAR with high sensitivity to special nuclear material. The monitor utilizes pulse shape discrimination, dynamic compression of the photomultiplier output and scintillators sized to maintain efficiency over the entire portal area.

  4. Determination of dosimetric leaf gap using amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device and its influence on intensity modulated radiotherapy dose delivery

    PubMed Central

    Balasingh, S. Timothy Peace; Singh, I. Rabi Raja; Rafic, K. Mohamathu; Babu, S. Ebenezer Suman; Ravindran, B. Paul

    2015-01-01

    As complex treatment techniques such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) entail the modeling of rounded leaf-end transmission in the treatment planning system, it is important to accurately determine the dosimetric leaf gap (DLG) value for a precise calculation of dose. The advancements in the application of the electronic portal imaging device (EPID) in quality assurance (QA) and dosimetry have facilitated the determination of DLG in this study. The DLG measurements were performed using both the ionization chamber (DLGion) and EPID (DLGEPID) for sweeping gap fields of different widths. The DLGion values were found to be 1.133 mm and 1.120 mm for perpendicular and parallel orientations of the 0.125 cm3 ionization chamber, while the corresponding DLGEPID values were 0.843 mm and 0.819 mm, respectively. It was found that the DLG was independent of volume and orientation of the ionization chamber, depth, source to surface distance (SSD), and the rate of dose delivery. Since the patient-specific QA tests showed comparable results between the IMRT plans based on the DLGEPID and DLGion, it is concluded that the EPID can be a suitable alternative in the determination of DLG. PMID:26500398

  5. Optimisation of the imaging and dosimetric characteristics of an electronic portal imaging device employing plastic scintillating fibres using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, S. J.; McNamara, A. L.; Vial, P.; Holloway, L.; Kuncic, Z.

    2014-11-01

    A Monte Carlo model of a novel electronic portal imaging device (EPID) has been developed using Geant4 and its performance for imaging and dosimetry applications in radiotherapy has been characterised. The EPID geometry is based on a physical prototype under ongoing investigation and comprises an array of plastic scintillating fibres in place of the metal plate/phosphor screen in standard EPIDs. Geometrical and optical transport parameters were varied to investigate their impact on imaging and dosimetry performance. Detection efficiency was most sensitive to variations in fibre length, achieving a peak value of 36% at 50 mm using 400 keV x-rays for the lengths considered. Increases in efficiency for longer fibres were partially offset by reductions in sensitivity. Removing the extra-mural absorber surrounding individual fibres severely decreased the modulation transfer function (MTF), highlighting its importance in maximising spatial resolution. Field size response and relative dose profile simulations demonstrated a water-equivalent dose response and thus the prototype’s suitability for dosimetry applications. Element-to-element mismatch between scintillating fibres and underlying photodiode pixels resulted in a reduced MTF for high spatial frequencies and quasi-periodic variations in dose profile response. This effect is eliminated when fibres are precisely matched to underlying pixels. Simulations strongly suggest that with further optimisation, this prototype EPID may be capable of simultaneous imaging and dosimetry in radiotherapy.

  6. Evaluating Open Source Portals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goh, Dion; Luyt, Brendan; Chua, Alton; Yee, See-Yong; Poh, Kia-Ngoh; Ng, How-Yeu

    2008-01-01

    Portals have become indispensable for organizations of all types trying to establish themselves on the Web. Unfortunately, there have only been a few evaluative studies of portal software and even fewer of open source portal software. This study aims to add to the available literature in this important area by proposing and testing a checklist for…

  7. Evaluating Open Source Portals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goh, Dion; Luyt, Brendan; Chua, Alton; Yee, See-Yong; Poh, Kia-Ngoh; Ng, How-Yeu

    2008-01-01

    Portals have become indispensable for organizations of all types trying to establish themselves on the Web. Unfortunately, there have only been a few evaluative studies of portal software and even fewer of open source portal software. This study aims to add to the available literature in this important area by proposing and testing a checklist for…

  8. Peculiarities of the electronic structure and phase composition of amorphous (SiO2) x (a-Si: H) x-1 composite films according to X-ray spectroscopy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terekhov, V. A.; Parinova, E. V.; Domashevskaya, E. P.; Sadchikov, A. S.; Terukov, E. I.; Undalov, Yu. K.; Sen'kovskii, B. V.; Turishchev, S. Yu.

    2015-10-01

    Amorphous (SiO2) x (a-Si: H) x-1 composite films have been deposited from plasma of dc magnetron discharge switched on and off for variable periods of time. The electronic structure and phase composition of obtained films were studied by methods of ultrasoft X-ray emission spectroscopy (USXES) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation. The results of a qualitative and semiquantitative analysis of the phase composition of films with the use of a special method of computer simulation showed that the content of amorphous a-Si: H clusters in SiO2 matrix can be varied within wide limits by changing the period of dc magnetron discharge switching. It is established that the formation of a large number of silicon nanoclusters in the (SiO2) x (a-Si: H) x-1 composite film leads to the appearance of anomalies in the XANES spectra, which are related to the scattering of synchrotron radiation on nanoclusters with dimensions comparable to the radiation wavelength near the X-ray absorption edge of silicon.

  9. Noncirrhotic portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rajekar, Harshal; Vasishta, Rakesh K; Chawla, Yogesh K; Dhiman, Radha K

    2011-09-01

    Portal hypertension is characterized by an increase in portal pressure (> 10 mmHg) and could be a result of cirrhosis of the liver or of noncirrhotic diseases. When portal hypertension occurs in the absence of liver cirrhosis, noncirrhotic portal hypertension (NCPH) must be considered. The prognosis of this disease is much better than that of cirrhosis. Noncirrhotic diseases are the common cause of portal hypertension in developing countries, especially in Asia. NCPH is a heterogeneous group of diseases that is due to intrahepatic or extrahepatic etiologies. In general, the lesions in NCPH are vascular in nature and can be classified based on the site of resistance to blood flow. In most cases, these disorders can be explained by endothelial cell lesions, intimal thickening, thrombotic obliterations, or scarring of the intrahepatic portal or hepatic venous circulation. Many different conditions can determine NCPH through the association of these various lesions in various degrees. Many clinical manifestations of NCPH result from the secondary effects of portal hypertension. Patients with NCPH present with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, splenomegaly, ascites after gastrointestinal bleeding, features of hypersplenism, growth retardation, and jaundice due to portal hypertensive biliopathy. Other sequelae include hyperdynamic circulation, pulmonary complications, and other effects of portosystemic collateral circulation like portosystemic encephalopathy. At present, pharmacologic and endoscopic treatments are the treatments of choice for portal hypertension. The therapy of all disorders causing NCPH involves the reduction of portal pressure by pharmacotherapy or portosystemic shunting, apart from prevention and treatment of complications of portal hypertension.

  10. Noncirrhotic Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rajekar, Harshal; Vasishta, Rakesh K; Chawla, Yogesh K; Dhiman, Radha K

    2011-01-01

    Portal hypertension is characterized by an increase in portal pressure (> 10 mmHg) and could be a result of cirrhosis of the liver or of noncirrhotic diseases. When portal hypertension occurs in the absence of liver cirrhosis, noncirrhotic portal hypertension (NCPH) must be considered. The prognosis of this disease is much better than that of cirrhosis. Noncirrhotic diseases are the common cause of portal hypertension in developing countries, especially in Asia. NCPH is a heterogeneous group of diseases that is due to intrahepatic or extrahepatic etiologies. In general, the lesions in NCPH are vascular in nature and can be classified based on the site of resistance to blood flow. In most cases, these disorders can be explained by endothelial cell lesions, intimal thickening, thrombotic obliterations, or scarring of the intrahepatic portal or hepatic venous circulation. Many different conditions can determine NCPH through the association of these various lesions in various degrees. Many clinical manifestations of NCPH result from the secondary effects of portal hypertension. Patients with NCPH present with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, splenomegaly, ascites after gastrointestinal bleeding, features of hypersplenism, growth retardation, and jaundice due to portal hypertensive biliopathy. Other sequelae include hyperdynamic circulation, pulmonary complications, and other effects of portosystemic collateral circulation like portosystemic encephalopathy. At present, pharmacologic and endoscopic treatments are the treatments of choice for portal hypertension. The therapy of all disorders causing NCPH involves the reduction of portal pressure by pharmacotherapy or portosystemic shunting, apart from prevention and treatment of complications of portal hypertension. PMID:25755321

  11. Assessment of a 2D electronic portal imaging devices-based dosimetry algorithm for pretreatment and in-vivo midplane dose verification

    PubMed Central

    Jomehzadeh, Ali; Shokrani, Parvaneh; Mohammadi, Mohammad; Amouheidari, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: The use of electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) is a method for the dosimetric verification of radiotherapy plans, both pretreatment and in vivo. The aim of this study is to test a 2D EPID-based dosimetry algorithm for dose verification of some plans inside a homogenous and anthropomorphic phantom and in vivo as well. Materials and Methods: Dose distributions were reconstructed from EPID images using a 2D EPID dosimetry algorithm inside a homogenous slab phantom for a simple 10 × 10 cm2 box technique, 3D conformal (prostate, head-and-neck, and lung), and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) prostate plans inside an anthropomorphic (Alderson) phantom and in the patients (one fraction in vivo) for 3D conformal plans (prostate, head-and-neck and lung). Results: The planned and EPID dose difference at the isocenter, on an average, was 1.7% for pretreatment verification and less than 3% for all in vivo plans, except for head-and-neck, which was 3.6%. The mean γ values for a seven-field prostate IMRT plan delivered to the Alderson phantom varied from 0.28 to 0.65. For 3D conformal plans applied for the Alderson phantom, all γ1% values were within the tolerance level for all plans and in both anteroposterior and posteroanterior (AP-PA) beams. Conclusion: The 2D EPID-based dosimetry algorithm provides an accurate method to verify the dose of a simple 10 × 10 cm2 field, in two dimensions, inside a homogenous slab phantom and an IMRT prostate plan, as well as in 3D conformal plans (prostate, head-and-neck, and lung plans) applied using an anthropomorphic phantom and in vivo. However, further investigation to improve the 2D EPID dosimetry algorithm for a head-and-neck case, is necessary. PMID:28028511

  12. Linear array measurements of enhanced dynamic wedge and treatment planning system (TPS) calculation for 15 MV photon beam and comparison with electronic portal imaging device (EPID) measurements.

    PubMed

    Petrovic, Borislava; Grzadziel, Aleksandra; Rutonjski, Laza; Slosarek, Krzysztof

    2010-09-01

    Enhanced dynamic wedges (EDW) are known to increase drastically the radiation therapy treatment efficiency. This paper has the aim to compare linear array measurements of EDW with the calculations of treatment planning system (TPS) and the electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for 15 MV photon energy. The range of different field sizes and wedge angles (for 15 MV photon beam) were measured by the linear chamber array CA 24 in Blue water phantom. The measurement conditions were applied to the calculations of the commercial treatment planning system XIO CMS v.4.2.0 using convolution algorithm. EPID measurements were done on EPID-focus distance of 100 cm, and beam parameters being the same as for CA24 measurements. Both depth doses and profiles were measured. EDW linear array measurements of profiles to XIO CMS TPS calculation differ around 0.5%. Profiles in non-wedged direction and open field profiles practically do not differ. Percentage depth doses (PDDs) for all EDW measurements show the difference of not more than 0.2%, while the open field PDD is almost the same as EDW PDD. Wedge factors for 60 deg wedge angle were also examined, and the difference is up to 4%. EPID to linear array differs up to 5%. The implementation of EDW in radiation therapy treatments provides clinicians with an effective tool for the conformal radiotherapy treatment planning. If modelling of EDW beam in TPS is done correctly, a very good agreement between measurements and calculation is obtained, but EPID cannot be used for reference measurements.

  13. SU-F-P-36: Automation of Linear Accelerator Star Shot Measurement with Advanced XML Scripting and Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, N; Knutson, N; Schmidt, M; Price, M

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To verify a method used to automatically acquire jaw, MLC, collimator and couch star shots for a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator utilizing Developer Mode and an Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID). Methods: An XML script was written to automate motion of the jaws, MLC, collimator and couch in TrueBeam Developer Mode (TBDM) to acquire star shot measurements. The XML script also dictates MV imaging parameters to facilitate automatic acquisition and recording of integrated EPID images. Since couch star shot measurements cannot be acquired using a combination of EPID and jaw/MLC collimation alone due to a fixed imager geometry, a method utilizing a 5mm wide steel ruler placed on the table and centered within a 15×15cm2 open field to produce a surrogate of the narrow field aperture was investigated. Four individual star shot measurements (X jaw, Y jaw, MLC and couch) were obtained using our proposed as well as traditional film-based method. Integrated EPID images and scanned measurement films were analyzed and compared. Results: Star shot (X jaw, Y jaw, MLC and couch) measurements were obtained in a single 5 minute delivery using the TBDM XML script method compared to 60 minutes for equivalent traditional film measurements. Analysis of the images and films demonstrated comparable isocentricity results, agreeing within 0.3mm of each other. Conclusion: The presented automatic approach of acquiring star shot measurements using TBDM and EPID has proven to be more efficient than the traditional film approach with equivalent results.

  14. Effect of fluid shear stress on portal vein remodeling in a rat model of portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wen, Bin; Liang, Jian; Deng, Xin; Chen, Ran; Peng, Peichun

    2015-01-01

    Aims. To explore the effects and mechanisms of fluid shear stress on portal vein remodeling in a rat model of portal hypertension. Methods. Subcutaneous injections of CCl4 were given to establish a rat model of liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Biomechanical technology was adopted to determine the dynamic changes of haemodynamic indices and fluid shear stress. Nitric oxide (NO), synthase (NOS), and endothelin-1 (ET-1) of the portal vein blood were measured. Changes in geometric structure and ultrastructure of the portal vein were observed using optical and electron microscopy. Results. After the CC14 injections, rat haemodynamics were notably altered. From week 4 onwards, PVP, PVF, and PVR gradually and significantly increased (P < 0.05 versus baseline). The fluid shear stress declined from week 4 onwards (P < 0.01 versus control group). NO, NOS, and ET-1 increased after repeated CCI4 injections. Hematoxylin and eosin staining showed thickened portal vein walls, with increased inside and outside diameters. Electron microscopy revealed different degrees of endothelial cell degeneration, destruction of basement membrane integrity, proliferating, and hypertrophic smooth muscle cells. Conclusions. Fluid shear stress not only influenced the biomechanical environment of the portal vein but also participated in vascular remodeling.

  15. SU-E-T-775: Use of Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) for Quality Assurance (QA) of Electron Beams On Varian Truebeam System

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, B; Yaddanapudi, S; Sun, B; Li, H; Noel, C; Mutic, S; Goddu, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In a previous study we have demonstrated the feasibility of using EPID to QA electron beam parameters on a single Varian TrueBeam LINAC. This study aims to provide further investigation on (1) reproducibility of using EPID to detect electron beam energy changes on multiple machines and (2) evaluation of appropriate calibration methods to compare results from different EPIDs. Methods: Ad-hoc mode electron beam images were acquired in developer mode with XML code. Electron beam data were collected on a total of six machines from four institutions. A custom-designed double-wedge phantom was placed on the EPID detector. Two calibration methods - Pixel Sensitivity Map (PSM) and Large Source-to-Imager Distance Flood Field (LSID-FF) - were used. To test the sensitivity of EPID in detecting energy drifts, Bending Magnet Current (BMC) was detuned to invoke energy changes corresponding to ∼±1.5 mm change in R50% of PDD on two machines from two institutions. Percent depth ionization (PDI) curves were then analyzed and compared with the respective baseline images using LSID-FF calibration. For reproducibility testing, open field EPID images and images with a standard testing phantom were collected on multiple machines. Images with and without PSM correction for same energies on different machines were overlaid and compared. Results: Two pixel shifts were observed in PDI curve when energy changes exceeded the TG142 tolerance. PSM showed the potential to correct the differences in pixel response of different imagers. With PSM correction, the histogram of images differences obtained from different machines showed narrower distributions than those images without PSM correction. Conclusion: EPID is sensitive for electron energy changes and the results are reproducible on different machines. When overlaying images from different machines, PSM showed the ability to partially eliminate the intrinsic variation of various imagers. Research Funding from Varian Medical Systems

  16. WE-D-BRA-03: Four-Dimensional Dose Reconstruction Through Retrospective Phase Determination Using Cine Images of Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, J; Jung, J; Yi, B; Kim, J; Yeo, I

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To test a method to reconstruct a four-dimensional (4D) dose distribution using the correlation of pre-calculated 4D electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images and measured cine-EPID images. Methods: 1. A phantom designed to simulate a tumor in lung (a polystyrene block with 3.0 cm diameter embedded in cork) was placed on a sinusoidally moving platform with 2 cm amplitude and 4 sec/cycle. Ten-phase 4D CT images were acquired for treatment planning and dose reconstruction. A 6MV photon beam was irradiated on the phantom with static (field size=5×8.5 cm{sup 2}) and dynamic fields (sliding windows, 10×10 cm{sup 2}, X1 MLC closing in parallel with the tumor movement). 2. 4D and 3D doses were calculated forwardly on PTV (1 cm margin). 3. Dose images on EPID under the fields were calculated for 10 phases. 4. Cine EPID images were acquired during irradiation. 5. Their acquisition times were correlated to the phases of the phantom at which irradiation occurred by inter-comparing calculated “reference” EPID images with measured images (2D gamma comparison). For the dynamic beam, the tumor was hidden under MLCs during a portion of irradiation time; the correlation performed when the tumor was visible was extrapolated. 6. Dose for each phase was reconstructed on the 4D CT images and summed over all phases. The summation was compared with forwardly calculated 4D and 3D dose distributions. Monte Carlo methods were used for all calculations. Results: For the open and dynamic beams, the 4D reconstructed doses showed the pass rates of 92.7 % and 100 %, respectively, at the isocenter plane given 3% / 3 mm criteria. The better agreement of the dynamic beam was from its dose gradient which blurred the otherwise sharp difference between forward and reconstructed doses. This also contributed slightly better agreement in DVH of PTV. Conclusion: The feasibility of 4D reconstruction was demonstrated.

  17. SU-C-201-05: Silicon Array Dosimeter in Situ with Electronic Portal Image Device for Simultaneous Transit Dose and Image Verification in Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, S; Alhujaili, S; Vial, P; Holloway, L; Petasecca, M; Rozenfeld, A; Metcalfe, P

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate an Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) coupled to a 2D array dosimeter to provide simultaneous imaging and dose verification. Methods: The novel dual detector configuration comprised of a 2D diode array dosimeter, referred to as a Magic Plate (MP) placed directly on a standard EPID. Dose response of the MP was evaluated by measuring the detector’s response with respect to off-axis position and field size with 30 cm of solid water (SW) acting as a transit object in the beam. Measurements were performed with 3, 5, 10 and 15 mm SW build-up and compared to 2D ionisation chamber array (ICA) measurements and the PinnacleTM treatment planning system (TPS) at a source to detector distance of 150 cm with a 6 MV beam. Clinical dosimetric performance was evaluated by measuring a number of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) beams in transit geometry. Imaging performance of the EPID was quantified by measuring the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and spatial resolution. Images of a Rando phantom were used for qualitative assessment. Results: Measured MP off-axis and field size response agreed within 2% of TPS and ICA responses when measured using 15 mm SW build-up. Clinical IMRT beams had gamma pass rates of ≥95% at 3%/3mm criteria. Measured CNR and spatial resolution (f50) were 264.96, 210.6, and 0.41, 0.40 with build-up of 5 and 15 mm respectively for the dual detector configuration. CNR and spatial resolution of 643.9 and 0.41 were measured for standard EPID. CNR was quantitatively worse in the dual detector configuration. Differences in imaging performance were not visible in a qualitative assessment using a Rando phantom. Conclusion: Combining a prototype MP 2D dosimeter with a conventional EPID did not significantly detract from the performance of either device and has the potential for simultaneous on-line patient transit dosimetry and image assessment in radiation therapy. Cancer Institute NSW Australia(Research Equipment Grant 10

  18. Prepancreatic preduodenal portal vein.

    PubMed

    Lal, N S; Kuruvila, A P; Natesh, P B; Koshy, M M; Anandakumar, M

    1992-10-01

    We report a 17 year old girl with prepancreatic and preduodenal portal vein. She presented with recurrent vomiting. Barium study revealed malrotation of the gut. Laparotomy confirmed malrotation of the gut with a prepancreatic and preduodenal portal vein. The patient is asymptomatic after gastrojejunostomy and vagotomy.

  19. Patient web portals, disease management, and primary prevention.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, Steven S; Prochaska, Judith J; Williams, Lovoria B; Besenyi, Gina M; Heboyan, Vahé; Goggans, D Stephen; Yoo, Wonsuk; De Leo, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    Efforts aimed at health care reform and continued advances in information technologies have prompted interest among providers and researchers in patient web portals. Patient web portals are password-protected online websites that offer the patients 24-hour access to personal health information from anywhere with an Internet connection. This article, which is based upon bibliographic searches in PubMed, reviews important developments in web portals for primary and secondary disease prevention, including patient web portals tethered to electronic medical records, disease-specific portals, health disparities, and health-related community web portals. Although findings have not been uniformly positive, several studies of the effectiveness of health care system patient portals in chronic disease management have shown promising results with regard to patient outcomes. Patient web portals have also shown promising results in increasing adherence with screening recommendations. Racial and ethnic minorities, younger persons, and patients who are less educated or have lower health literacy have been found to be less likely to use patient portals. Additional studies are needed of the utility and effectiveness of different elements of web portals for different patient populations. This should include additional diseases and health topics such as smoking cessation and weight management.

  20. Portal Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Mallet, Thierry; Soltys, Remigiusz; Loarte, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is the blockage or narrowing of the portal vein by a thrombus. It is relatively rare and has been linked with the presence of an underlying liver disease or prothrombotic disorders. We present a case of a young male who presented with vague abdominal symptoms for approximately one week. Imaging revealed the presence of multiple nonocclusive thrombi involving the right portal vein, the splenic vein, and the left renal vein, as well as complete occlusion of the left portal vein and the superior mesenteric vein. We discuss pathogenesis, clinical presentation, and management of both acute and chronic thrombosis. The presence of PVT should be considered as a clue for prothrombotic disorders, liver disease, and other local and general factors that must be carefully investigated. It is hoped that this case report will help increase awareness of the complexity associated with portal vein thrombosis among the medical community. PMID:25802795

  1. Roadside Tracker Portal-less Portal Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Cheriyadat, Anil M.; Bradley, Eric Craig; Cunningham, Mark F.; Fabris, Lorenzo; Goddard, Jr, James Samuel; Hornback, Donald Eric; Karnowski, Thomas Paul; Kerekes, Ryan A.; Newby, Jason

    2013-07-01

    This report documents the full development cycle of the Roadside Tracker (RST) Portal-less Portal monitor (Fig. 1) funded by DHS DNDO. The project started with development of a proof-of-feasibility proto-type, proceeded through design and construction of a proof-of-concept (POC) prototype, a test-and-evaluation phase, participation in a Limited Use Exercise that included the Standoff Radiation Detections Systems developed under an Advanced Technology Demonstration and concluded with participation in a Characterization Study conducted by DNDO.

  2. 3. East portal of Tunnel 39, view to west with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. East portal of Tunnel 39, view to west with east portal of Tunnel 38 (HAER CA-211) visible in distance, 135mm lens with electronic flash fill. - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Tunnel No. 39, Milepost 180.95, Cisco, Placer County, CA

  3. Portal Vein Stenting for Portal Biliopathy with Jaundice.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Dongho; Park, Kwang Bo; Lim, Seong Joo; Hwang, Jin Ho; Sinn, Dong Hyun

    2016-04-01

    Portal biliopathy refers to obstruction of the bile duct by dilated peri- or para-ductal collateral channels following the main portal vein occlusion from various causes. Surgical shunt operation or endoscopic treatment has been reported. Herein, we report a case of portal biliopathy that was successfully treated by interventional portal vein recanalization.

  4. Dosimetry in radiotherapy using a-Si EPIDs: Systems, methods, and applications focusing on 3D patient dose estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCurdy, B. M. C.

    2013-06-01

    An overview is provided of the use of amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) for dosimetric purposes in radiation therapy, focusing on 3D patient dose estimation. EPIDs were originally developed to provide on-treatment radiological imaging to assist with patient setup, but there has also been a natural interest in using them as dosimeters since they use the megavoltage therapy beam to form images. The current generation of clinically available EPID technology, amorphous-silicon (a-Si) flat panel imagers, possess many characteristics that make them much better suited to dosimetric applications than earlier EPID technologies. Features such as linearity with dose/dose rate, high spatial resolution, realtime capability, minimal optical glare, and digital operation combine with the convenience of a compact, retractable detector system directly mounted on the linear accelerator to provide a system that is well-suited to dosimetric applications. This review will discuss clinically available a-Si EPID systems, highlighting dosimetric characteristics and remaining limitations. Methods for using EPIDs in dosimetry applications will be discussed. Dosimetric applications using a-Si EPIDs to estimate three-dimensional dose in the patient during treatment will be overviewed. Clinics throughout the world are implementing increasingly complex treatments such as dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy, as well as specialized treatment techniques using large doses per fraction and short treatment courses (ie. hypofractionation and stereotactic radiosurgery). These factors drive the continued strong interest in using EPIDs as dosimeters for patient treatment verification.

  5. SU-E-T-582: On-Line Dosimetric Verification of Respiratory Gated Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Using the Electronic Portal Imaging Device

    SciTech Connect

    Schaly, B; Gaede, S; Xhaferllari, I

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical utility of on-line verification of respiratory gated VMAT dosimetry during treatment. Methods: Portal dose images were acquired during treatment in integrated mode on a Varian TrueBeam (v. 1.6) linear accelerator for gated lung and liver patients that used flattening filtered beams. The source to imager distance (SID) was set to 160 cm to ensure imager clearance in case the isocenter was off midline. Note that acquisition of integrated images resulted in no extra dose to the patient. Fraction 1 was taken as baseline and all portal dose images were compared to that of the baseline, where the gamma comparison and dose difference were used to measure day-to-day exit dose variation. All images were analyzed in the Portal Dosimetry module of Aria (v. 10). The portal imager on the TrueBeam was calibrated by following the instructions for dosimetry calibration in service mode, where we define 1 calibrated unit (CU) equal to 1 Gy for 10×10 cm field size at 100 cm SID. This reference condition was measured frequently to verify imager calibration. Results: The gamma value (3%, 3 mm, 5% threshold) ranged between 92% and 100% for the lung and liver cases studied. The exit dose can vary by as much as 10% of the maximum dose for an individual fraction. The integrated images combined with the information given by the corresponding on-line soft tissue matched cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were useful in explaining dose variation. For gated lung treatment, dose variation was mainly due to the diaphragm position. For gated liver treatment, the dose variation was due to both diaphragm position and weight loss. Conclusion: Integrated images can be useful in verifying dose delivery consistency during respiratory gated VMAT, although the CBCT information is needed to explain dose differences due to anatomical changes.

  6. Portal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Yogesh K; Bodh, Vijay

    2015-03-01

    Portal vein thrombosis is an important cause of portal hypertension. PVT occurs in association with cirrhosis or as a result of malignant invasion by hepatocellular carcinoma or even in the absence of associated liver disease. With the current research into its genesis, majority now have an underlying prothrombotic state detectable. Endothelial activation and stagnant portal blood flow also contribute to formation of the thrombus. Acute non-cirrhotic PVT, chronic PVT (EHPVO), and portal vein thrombosis in cirrhosis are the three main variants of portal vein thrombosis with varying etiological factors and variability in presentation and management. Procoagulant state should be actively investigated. Anticoagulation is the mainstay of therapy for acute non-cirrhotic PVT, with supporting evidence for its use in cirrhotic population as well. Chronic PVT (EHPVO) on the other hand requires the management of portal hypertension as such and with role for anticoagulation in the setting of underlying prothrombotic state, however data is awaited in those with no underlying prothrombotic states. TIPS and liver transplant may be feasible even in the setting of PVT however proper selection of candidates and type of surgery is warranted. Thrombolysis and thrombectomy have some role. TARE is a new modality for management of HCC with portal vein invasion.

  7. Portal Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Yogesh K.; Bodh, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis is an important cause of portal hypertension. PVT occurs in association with cirrhosis or as a result of malignant invasion by hepatocellular carcinoma or even in the absence of associated liver disease. With the current research into its genesis, majority now have an underlying prothrombotic state detectable. Endothelial activation and stagnant portal blood flow also contribute to formation of the thrombus. Acute non-cirrhotic PVT, chronic PVT (EHPVO), and portal vein thrombosis in cirrhosis are the three main variants of portal vein thrombosis with varying etiological factors and variability in presentation and management. Procoagulant state should be actively investigated. Anticoagulation is the mainstay of therapy for acute non-cirrhotic PVT, with supporting evidence for its use in cirrhotic population as well. Chronic PVT (EHPVO) on the other hand requires the management of portal hypertension as such and with role for anticoagulation in the setting of underlying prothrombotic state, however data is awaited in those with no underlying prothrombotic states. TIPS and liver transplant may be feasible even in the setting of PVT however proper selection of candidates and type of surgery is warranted. Thrombolysis and thrombectomy have some role. TARE is a new modality for management of HCC with portal vein invasion. PMID:25941431

  8. Portal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Basit, Syed Abdul; Stone, Christian D; Gish, Robert

    2015-02-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is a rare event in the general medical setting that commonly complicates cirrhosis with portal hypertension, and can also occur with liver tumors. The diagnosis is often incidental when a thrombus is found in the portal vein on imaging tests. However, PVT may also present with clinical symptoms and can progress to life-threatening complications of ischemic hepatitis, liver failure, and/or small intestinal infarction. This article reviews the pathophysiology of this disorder, with a major focus on PVT in patients with cirrhosis, and presents detailed guidelines on optimal diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Denoising techniques combined to Monte Carlo simulations for the prediction of high-resolution portal images in radiotherapy treatment verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazaro, D.; Barat, E.; Le Loirec, C.; Dautremer, T.; Montagu, T.; Guérin, L.; Batalla, A.

    2013-05-01

    This work investigates the possibility of combining Monte Carlo (MC) simulations to a denoising algorithm for the accurate prediction of images acquired using amorphous silicon (a-Si) electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs). An accurate MC model of the Siemens OptiVue1000 EPID was first developed using the penelope code, integrating a non-uniform backscatter modelling. Two already existing denoising algorithms were then applied on simulated portal images, namely the iterative reduction of noise (IRON) method and the locally adaptive Savitzky-Golay (LASG) method. A third denoising method, based on a nonparametric Bayesian framework and called DPGLM (for Dirichlet process generalized linear model) was also developed. Performances of the IRON, LASG and DPGLM methods, in terms of smoothing capabilities and computation time, were compared for portal images computed for different values of the RMS pixel noise (up to 10%) in three different configurations, a heterogeneous phantom irradiated by a non-conformal 15 × 15 cm2 field, a conformal beam from a pelvis treatment plan, and an IMRT beam from a prostate treatment plan. For all configurations, DPGLM outperforms both IRON and LASG by providing better smoothing performances and demonstrating a better robustness with respect to noise. Additionally, no parameter tuning is required by DPGLM, which makes the denoising step very generic and easy to handle for any portal image. Concerning the computation time, the denoising of 1024 × 1024 images takes about 1 h 30 min, 2 h and 5 min using DPGLM, IRON, and LASG, respectively. This paper shows the feasibility to predict within a few hours and with the same resolution as real images accurate portal images, combining MC simulations with the DPGLM denoising algorithm.

  10. Calibration of portal imaging devices for radiotherapy in-vivo dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piermattei, Angelo; Cilla, Savino; Fidanzio, Andrea; Greco, Francesca; Sabatino, Domenico; Gargiulo, Laura; Azario, Luigi

    2010-11-01

    The complexity of radiotherapy techniques requires an accurate verification of the dose delivered to the patient during treatment. Recently, the present authors have developed an in patient dose reconstruction method with X-ray beams for 3D conformal radiotherapy. The procedure is based on correlation functions defined by the ratios of the transit signal measured by an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) to the mid-plane dose measured by calibrated ion chambers in a solid water phantom. The dosimetric characterization of aSi EPIDs in terms of signal stability, linearity and dependence on field dimension pointed out that these detectors are useful for the transit dosimetry of photon beams. However, the aSi EPIDs manufactured by Varian, Elekta and Siemens for their linacs are at present used for the visual inspection of the patient's set-up, and their use as transit dosimeters needs a special calibration that requires an effort for every beam. The aim of this paper has been the determination of a generalized EPID calibration that can be used by linacs of different manufacturers equipped with aSi EPIDs. The transit dosimetry method here proposed could supply for every linac the reconstruction in real time of the isocenter dose in patients with a tolerance level ranging between ±4% and ±6% depending on the treatment type and body district.

  11. Classification of cryo electron microscopy images, noisy tomographic images recorded with unknown projection directions, by simultaneously estimating reconstructions and application to an assembly mutant of Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus and portals of the bacteriophage P22

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Junghoon; Zheng, Yili; Yin, Zhye; Doerschuk, Peter C.; Johnson, John E.

    2010-08-01

    Cryo electron microscopy is frequently used on biological specimens that show a mixture of different types of object. Because the electron beam rapidly destroys the specimen, the beam current is minimized which leads to noisy images (SNR substantially less than 1) and only one projection image per object (with an unknown projection direction) is collected. For situations where the objects can reasonably be described as coming from a finite set of classes, an approach based on joint maximum likelihood estimation of the reconstruction of each class and then use of the reconstructions to label the class of each image is described and demonstrated on two challenging problems: an assembly mutant of Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus and portals of the bacteriophage P22.

  12. Space Development Grid Portal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaziri, Arsi

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the development of a portal to provide secure and distributed grid computing for Payload Operations Integrated Center and Mission Control Center ground services.

  13. Calibration of Elekta aSi EPIDs used as transit dosimeter.

    PubMed

    Cilla, S; Fidanzio, A; Greco, F; Sabatino, D; Russo, A; Gargiulo, L; Azario, L; Piermattei, A

    2011-02-01

    The transit in vivo dosimetry performed by the Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID), avoids the problem of solid-state detector positioning on the patient. Moreover, the dosimetric characterization of the recent Elekta aSi EPIDs in terms of signal stability and linearity enables these detectors adaptable for the transit in vivo dosimetry with 6, 10 and 15 MV photon beams. However, the implementation of the EPID transit dosimetry requires several measurements. Recently, the present authors have developed an in vivo dosimetry method for the 3D CRT based on correlation functions defined by the ratios between the transit signal, s(t) (w,L), by the EPID and the phantom mid-plane dose, D(m)(w,L), at the Source to Axis Distance (SAD) as a function of the phantom thickness, w, and the square field dimensions, L. When the phantom mid-plane was positioned at distance d from the SAD, the ratios st(w,L)/s't(d,w,L), were used to take into account the variation of the scattered photon contributions on the EPID as a function of, d and L. The aim of this paper was the implementation of a procedure that uses generalized correlation functions obtained by nine Elekta Precise linac beams. The procedure can be used by other Elekta Precise linacs equipped with the same aSi EPIDs assuring the stabilities of the beam output factors and the EPID signals. The calibration procedure of the aSi EPID here reported avoids measurements in solid water equivalent phantoms needed to implement the in vivo dosimetry method in the radiotherapy center. A tolerance level ranging between ±5% and ±6% (depending on the type of tumor) was estimated for the comparison between the reconstructed isocenter dose, D(iso) and the computed dose D(iso,TPS) by the treatment planning system (TPS).

  14. Regulations.gov Federal Regulatory Portal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashlin, John; Davis, Richard; Dalecky, Selene; Grasso, Richard; LaPlant, Lisa; Morales, Oscar; Nelson, Jennifer; White, Michael; Whitt, Sharon A.

    2004-01-01

    The Regulations.gov Online Rulemaking Project is 1 of the 24 e-Government Initiatives on the President's Management Agenda (PMA), which was announced by the White House in 2001. The Regulations.gov Web site is the central electronic rulemaking portal for the federal government. Through a single Web site, citizens can search, view, and comment on…

  15. 6. Detail, vertical guides adjacent to east portal of Tunnel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Detail, vertical guides adjacent to east portal of Tunnel 28, view to southwest, 135mm lens with electronic flash fill. - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Tunnel No. 28, Milepost 134.75, Applegate, Placer County, CA

  16. 7. Detail, machinery shed atop east portal of Tunnel 28, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Detail, machinery shed atop east portal of Tunnel 28, showing shaft and pulley system, 210mm lens with electronic flash fill. - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Tunnel No. 28, Milepost 134.75, Applegate, Placer County, CA

  17. 4. West portal of Tunnel 5, view to the northwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. West portal of Tunnel 5, view to the northwest from within the mudshed, 135mm lens with electronic flash fill. - Southern Pacific Railroad Natron Cutoff, Tunnel 5, Milepost 545.2, McCredie Springs, Lane County, OR

  18. Radioisotopic flow scanning for portal blood flow and portal hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Hesdorffer, C.S.; Bezwoda, W.R.; Danilewitz, M.D.; Esser, J.D.; Tobias, M.

    1987-08-01

    The use of a simple, noninvasive, isotope scanning technique for the determination of relative portal blood flow and detection of portal hypertension is described. Using this technique the presence of portal hypertension was demonstrated in seven of nine patients known to have elevated portal venous pressure. By contrast, esophageal varices were demonstrated in only five of these patients, illustrating the potential value of the method. Furthermore, this technique has been adapted to the study of portal blood flow in patients with myeloproliferative disorders with splenomegaly but without disturbances in hepatic architecture. Results demonstrate that the high relative splenic flow resulting from the presence of splenomegaly may in turn be associated with elevated relative portal blood flow and portal hypertension. The theoretic reasons for the development of flow-related portal hypertension and its relationship to splenic blood flow are discussed.

  19. Perspective view of south portal. Note how portal angles about ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view of south portal. Note how portal angles about 5' forward over the approach. - Red Oak Creek Bridge, Spanning (Big) Red Oak Creek, Huel Brown Road (Covered Bridge Road), Woodbury, Meriwether County, GA

  20. 8. EAST PORTAL AND DECK VIEW, FROM EAST, SHOWING PORTAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. EAST PORTAL AND DECK VIEW, FROM EAST, SHOWING PORTAL CONFIGURATION AND LATERAL BRACING, STEEL MESH FLOOR, METAL RAILINGS, AND PORTION OF EAST APPROACH - Glendale Road Bridge, Spanning Deep Creek Lake on Glendale Road, McHenry, Garrett County, MD

  1. 7. WEST PORTAL AND DECK VIEW, FROM WEST, SHOWING PORTAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. WEST PORTAL AND DECK VIEW, FROM WEST, SHOWING PORTAL CONFIGURATION AND LATERAL BRACING, STEEL MESH FLOOR, AND METAL RAILINGS - Glendale Road Bridge, Spanning Deep Creek Lake on Glendale Road, McHenry, Garrett County, MD

  2. Perspective looking due north, south portal. Note how the portal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective looking due north, south portal. Note how the portal angles out over the approach. - Swann Bridge, Spanning Locust Fork of Black Warrior River, Swann Bridge Road, Cleveland, Blount County, AL

  3. 17. VIEW OF NORTH BRIDGE PORTAL, SHOWING ORNAMENTAL UPPER PORTAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. VIEW OF NORTH BRIDGE PORTAL, SHOWING ORNAMENTAL UPPER PORTAL STRUT AND GEOMETRIC DECORATED GUSSET. FACING NORTHEAST. - Coverts Crossing Bridge, Spanning Mahoning River along Township Route 372 (Covert Road), New Castle, Lawrence County, PA

  4. 15. VIEW OF SOUTH BRIDGE PORTAL, SHOWING ORNAMENTAL UPPER PORTAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. VIEW OF SOUTH BRIDGE PORTAL, SHOWING ORNAMENTAL UPPER PORTAL STRUT AND GUSSETS (FLORAL MOTIF). FACING SOUTHWEST. - Coverts Crossing Bridge, Spanning Mahoning River along Township Route 372 (Covert Road), New Castle, Lawrence County, PA

  5. Elevation, west portal. Sign on portal reads Watson Mill Bridge, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevation, west portal. Sign on portal reads Watson Mill Bridge, est. 1885. - Watson Mill Bridge, Spanning South Fork Broad River, Watson Mill Road, Watson Mill Bridge State Park, Comer, Madison County, GA

  6. 1. VIEW NORTH OF GILBERT BRIDGE, PORTAL AND PORTAL CONNECTIONS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW NORTH OF GILBERT BRIDGE, PORTAL AND PORTAL CONNECTIONS AND BRACING, TRAFFIC DECK - Gilbert Bridge, U.S. Route 52, spanning Guyandotte River near confluence of Gilbert Creek, Gilbert, Mingo County, WV

  7. The NOAO NVO Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. J.; Gasson, D.; Fuentes, E.

    2007-10-01

    The NOAO NVO Portal is a web application for one-stop discovery, analysis, and access to VO-compliant imaging data and services. The current release allows for GUI-based discovery of nearly a half million images from archives such as the NOAO Science Archive, the Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 and ACS instruments, XMM-Newton, Chandra, and ESO's INT Wide-Field Survey, among others. The NOAO Portal allows users to view image metadata, footprint wire-frames, FITS image previews, and provides one-click access to science quality imaging data throughout the entire sky via the Firefox web browser (i.e., no applet or code to download). Users can stage images from multiple archives at the NOAO NVO Portal for quick and easy bulk downloads. The NOAO NVO Portal also provides simplified and direct access to VO analysis services, such as the WESIX catalog generation service. We highlight the features of the NOAO NVO Portal (http://nvo.noao.edu).

  8. Pregnancy with Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Neelam; Negi, Neha; Aggarwal, Aakash; Bodh, Vijay; Dhiman, Radha K.

    2014-01-01

    Even though pregnancy is rare with cirrhosis and advanced liver disease, but it may co-exist in the setting of non-cirrhotic portal hypertension as liver function is preserved but whenever encountered together is a complex clinical dilemma. Pregnancy in a patient with portal hypertension presents a special challenge to the obstetrician as so-called physiological hemodynamic changes associated with pregnancy, needed for meeting demands of the growing fetus, worsen the portal hypertension thereby putting mother at risk of potentially life-threatening complications like variceal hemorrhage. Risks of variceal bleed and hepatic decompensation increase many fold during pregnancy. Optimal management revolves round managing the portal hypertension and its complications. Thus management of such cases requires multi-speciality approach involving obstetricians experienced in dealing with high risk cases, hepatologists, anesthetists and neonatologists. With advancement in medical field, pregnancy is not contra-indicated in these women, as was previously believed. This article focuses on the different aspects of pregnancy with portal hypertension with special emphasis on specific cause wise treatment options to decrease the variceal bleed and hepatic decompensation. Based on extensive review of literature, management from pre-conceptional period to postpartum is outlined in order to have optimal maternal and perinatal outcomes. PMID:25755552

  9. Target detection portal

    DOEpatents

    Linker, Kevin L.; Brusseau, Charles A.

    2002-01-01

    A portal apparatus for screening persons or objects for the presence of trace amounts of target substances such as explosives, narcotics, radioactive materials, and certain chemical materials. The portal apparatus can have a one-sided exhaust for an exhaust stream, an interior wall configuration with a concave-shape across a horizontal cross-section for each of two facing sides to result in improved airflow and reduced washout relative to a configuration with substantially flat parallel sides; air curtains to reduce washout; ionizing sprays to collect particles bound by static forces, as well as gas jet nozzles to dislodge particles bound by adhesion to the screened person or object. The portal apparatus can be included in a detection system with a preconcentrator and a detector.

  10. The EBI enzyme portal.

    PubMed

    Alcántara, Rafael; Onwubiko, Joseph; Cao, Hong; Matos, Paula de; Cham, Jennifer A; Jacobsen, Jules; Holliday, Gemma L; Fischer, Julia D; Rahman, Syed Asad; Jassal, Bijay; Goujon, Mikael; Rowland, Francis; Velankar, Sameer; López, Rodrigo; Overington, John P; Kleywegt, Gerard J; Hermjakob, Henning; O'Donovan, Claire; Martín, María Jesús; Thornton, Janet M; Steinbeck, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    The availability of comprehensive information about enzymes plays an important role in answering questions relevant to interdisciplinary fields such as biochemistry, enzymology, biofuels, bioengineering and drug discovery. At the EMBL European Bioinformatics Institute, we have developed an enzyme portal (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/enzymeportal) to provide this wealth of information on enzymes from multiple in-house resources addressing particular data classes: protein sequence and structure, reactions, pathways and small molecules. The fact that these data reside in separate databases makes information discovery cumbersome. The main goal of the portal is to simplify this process for end users.

  11. The EBI enzyme portal

    PubMed Central

    Alcántara, Rafael; Onwubiko, Joseph; Cao, Hong; de Matos, Paula; Cham, Jennifer A.; Jacobsen, Jules; Fischer, Julia D.; Rahman, Syed Asad; Jassal, Bijay; Goujon, Mikael; Rowland, Francis; Velankar, Sameer; López, Rodrigo; Overington, John P.; Kleywegt, Gerard J.; Hermjakob, Henning; O’Donovan, Claire; Martín, María Jesús; Thornton, Janet M.; Steinbeck, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    The availability of comprehensive information about enzymes plays an important role in answering questions relevant to interdisciplinary fields such as biochemistry, enzymology, biofuels, bioengineering and drug discovery. At the EMBL European Bioinformatics Institute, we have developed an enzyme portal (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/enzymeportal) to provide this wealth of information on enzymes from multiple in-house resources addressing particular data classes: protein sequence and structure, reactions, pathways and small molecules. The fact that these data reside in separate databases makes information discovery cumbersome. The main goal of the portal is to simplify this process for end users. PMID:23175605

  12. Ten Keys to the Portal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2011-01-01

    Successful web portals help users stay informed, in touch, and up to speed. They are also a telling window into the efficiency of one's institution. To develop a cutting-edge portal takes planning, communication, and research. In this article, the author presents and discusses 10 keys to portal success: (1) make critical info visible; (2) make the…

  13. A Librarian's Perspective on Portals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, John R.

    2001-01-01

    Explains what Web portals are and discusses the benefits of a strategic alliance in portal building among campus information technology, libraries, and other campus groups. Suggests that by using robust channel capabilities, an enterprise portal can provide content from various parts of the university and promote resource discovery. (EV)

  14. Ten Keys to the Portal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2011-01-01

    Successful web portals help users stay informed, in touch, and up to speed. They are also a telling window into the efficiency of one's institution. To develop a cutting-edge portal takes planning, communication, and research. In this article, the author presents and discusses 10 keys to portal success: (1) make critical info visible; (2) make the…

  15. Total portal robotic pneumonectomy.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Jose R

    2013-09-01

    Robotic pulmonary lobectomies have been reported to be technically and oncologically achievable; however, only three robotic pneumonectomy cases have been described. Two of them used a mini thoracotomy. We describe one case of a total portal robotic pneumonectomy without utility incision. We describe the step-by-step process.

  16. Earthdata Developer Portal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plofchan, Peter; Reese, Mark; Siarto, Jeff; Clark, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    The Earthdata Developer Portal provides clear paths to get you started with core EOSDIS applications. Each path is accompanied by an overview page that explains the goal of the path and a short overview of each element along with links for detailed documentation of each component.

  17. Metadata requirements for portals.

    PubMed

    Benson, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Consensus around the requirements for metadata in patient and clinical portals would provide a sound basis for the adoption of standards. We propose a set of requirements for metadata in a way that is generic and platform independent. These requirements cover both Clinical Documents and Clinical Statements, addressing the what, who, when and where of each item.

  18. Variations in Patient Portal Adoption in Four Primary Care Practices

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Jonathan S.

    2010-01-01

    This case report reviews the patient portal adoption experiences of four primary care practices at Partners HealthCare during 2002 – 2009. Although each practice used the enterprise patient portal (Patient Gateway) and electronic health record, their patient enrollments varied substantially, as did their marketing approaches, new feature adoption, leadership approach, and staff involvement. Marketing limitations, leadership concerns, and limited staff engagement characterized the low-enrollment practices, but not the others. These factors, along with other practice characteristics such as location and patient demographics, should be explored in future research to identify best practices for successful adoption of a patient portal. PMID:21347096

  19. Are Lateral Electronic Portal Images Adequate for Accurate On-Line Daily Targeting of the Prostate? Results of a Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lometti, Michael W. Thurston, Damon; Aubin, Michele; Bock, Andrea; Verhey, Lynn; Lockhart, James M.; Bland, Roger; Pouliot, Jean; Roach, Mack

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this report was to evaluate the magnitude of the error that would be introduced if only a lateral (LAT) portal image, as opposed to a pair of orthogonal images, was used to verify and correct daily setup errors and organ motion in external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) of prostate cancer. The 3-dimensional (3D) coordinates of gold markers from 12 consecutive prostate patients were reconstructed using a pair of orthogonal images. The data were re-analyzed using only the LAT images. Couch moves from the 2-dimensional (2D)-only data were compared with the complete 3D data set. The 2D-only data provided couch moves that differed on average from the 3D data by 2.3 {+-} 3.0, 0.0 {+-} 0.0, and 0.8 {+-} 1.0 mm in the Lat, AP, and SI directions, respectively. Along AP and SI axes, the LAT image provided positional information similar to the orthogonal pair. The error along the LAT axis may be acceptable provided lateral margins are large enough. A LAT-only setup protocol reduces patient treatment times and increases patient throughput. In most circumstances, with exceptions such as morbidly obese patients, acquisition of only a LAT image for daily targeting of the prostate will provide adequate positional precision.

  20. 1. East portal of Tunnel 4, view to west with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. East portal of Tunnel 4, view to west with east portal of Tunnel 38 (HAER CA-211) visible in distance, 135mm lens with electronic flash fill. This tunnel was photographed to provide context, because even though somewhat enlarged, it illustrates the nature of the unlined hard rock tunnels typical of the original Central Pacific construction in 1868. - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Tunnel No. 4, Milepost 180.95, Cisco, Placer County, CA

  1. 8. Detail, east portal of Tunnel 41 inside Snowshed 33, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Detail, east portal of Tunnel 41 inside Snowshed 33, view to west-northwest, 135mm lens with electronic flash fill. The tiny white dot visible in the darkness of the tunnel is the west portal, two miles distant. The heavy steel beams carrying the concrete roof panels of the snowshed appear to be reused bridge girders. - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Tunnel No. 41, Milepost 193.3, Donner, Placer County, CA

  2. The Astrostatistics and Astroinformatics Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigelson, Eric; Hilbe, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    The Astrostatistics and Astroinformatics Portal (ASAIP, http://asaip.psu.edu) is a Web resource started in 2012 to foster research into advanced methodologies for astronomical research, and to promulgate such methods into the broader astronomy community. It provides searchable abstracts to Recent Papers in the field, several discussion Forums, various resources for researchers, brief Articles by experts, lists of Meetings, and access to various Web resources such as on-line courses, books and blogs. The material can be electronically searched. The site will be used for public outreach by organizations associated with the AAS, IAU, ISI (International Statistical Institute), and LSST. ASAIP has nearly 700 members who can contribute material, and its resources are readable by the general Web public. This presentation gives examples of recent ASAIP entries and encourages AAS members to use its resources.

  3. Consequences of the spectral response of an a-Si EPID and implications for dosimetric calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkby, C.; Sloboda, R.

    2005-08-15

    One of the attractive features of amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging devices (a-Si EPIDs) as dosimetric tools is that for open fields they are known to exhibit a generally linear relation between pixel value and incident energy fluence as measured by an ion chamber. It has also been established that a-Si EPIDs incorporating high atomic number phosphors such as Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb exhibit a disproportionately large response to low-energy (<1 MeV) photons. The present work examines the consequences of this hypersensitivity in a commercially available EPID, the Varian aS500, with respect to energy fluence calibration in a 6 MV radiotherapy beam. EPIDs may be deployed in situations where the spectrum of the incident beam is modified by passing through a compensator or through a patient or phantom. By examining the specific case of a beam hardened by passage through compensator material, we show that the discrepancy between open and attenuated beam calibration curves can be as high as 8%. A Monte Carlo study using a comprehensive model of the aS500 shows that this difference can be explained by spectral changes, and further suggests that it can be reduced by the addition of an external copper plate. We consider configurations with the plate placed directly on top of the EPID cassette and 15 cm above the cassette, supported by Styrofoam. In order to reduce the maximum discrepancy to <4%, it was found that a copper thickness of {approx}0.7 cm was required in the elevated configuration. Improvement was minimal with the copper in the contact configuration. Adding 0.7 cm of copper in the elevated configuration reduced the contrast-to-noise ratio by 19% and the modulation transfer for a given spatial frequency by 30%.

  4. Correlation functions for Elekta aSi EPIDs used as transit dosimeter for open fields.

    PubMed

    Cilla, Savino; Fidanzio, Andrea; Greco, Francesca; Sabatino, Domenico; Russo, Aniello; Gargiulo, Laura; Azario, Luigi; Piermattei, Angelo

    2010-10-27

    In-vivo dosimetry techniques are currently being applied only by a few Centers because they require time-consuming implementation measurements, and workload for detector positioning and data analysis. The transit in-vivo dosimetry performed by the electronic portal imaging device (EPID) avoids the problem of solid-state detector positioning on the patient. Moreover, the dosimetric characterization of the recent Elekta aSi EPIDs in terms of signal stability and linearity make these detectors useful for the transit in-vivo dosimetry with 6, 10 and 15 MV photon beams. However, the implementation of the EPID transit dosimetry requires several measurements. Recently, the present authors have developed an in-vivo dosimetry method for 3D CRT based on correlation functions defined by the ratios between the transit signal, st (w,L), by the EPID and the phantom midplane dose, Dm(w,L), at the source to axis distance (SAD) as a function of the phantom thickness, w, and the square field dimensions, L. When the phantom midplane was positioned at distance, d, from the SAD, the ratios st(w,L)/s't(d,w,L) were used to take into account the variation of the scattered photon contributions on the EPID as a function of d and L.The aim of this paper is the implementation of a procedure that uses generalized correlation functions obtained by nine Elekta Precise linac beams. The procedure can be used by other Elekta Precise linacs equipped with the same aSi EPIDs, assuming the stabilities of the beam output factors and the EPID signals. The procedure here reported avoids measurements in solid water equivalent phantoms needed to implement the in-vivo dosimetry method in the radiotherapy department. A tolerance level ranging between ± 5% and ± 6% (depending on the type of tumor) was estimated for the comparison between the reconstructed isocenter dose, Diso, and the computed dose, Diso,TPS, by the treatment planning system (TPS).

  5. CCI Open Data Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, H.; Pechorro, E.; Bennett, V.; Farquhar, C.; Blower, J.

    2016-08-01

    The European Space Agency's (ESA's) Climate Change Initiative (CCI) Programme, producing harmonised datasets from long term Earth Observation satellite data records for a number of Essential Climate Variables (ECV's), provides a solid basis for climate science and modelling, for specialist application development and ultimately for European and global policy making.The resulting Climate Data Records (CDRs) represent a major investment of science, funding and personal effort, therefore extended access to those products is a key element of programme success.ECV datasets are currently being distributed through individual ECV teams, and access procedures and interfaces vary. To compliment and unify the work of the individual teams and to maximise the visibility and uptake of ECV data in the climate data user community within and beyond the CCI, a new ESA CCI project has started, to create a central open data portal and metadata catalogue for the ESA CCI project.This paper highlights key features of the Portal to date.

  6. Portal Annular Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Harnoss, Jonathan M.; Harnoss, Julian C.; Diener, Markus K.; Contin, Pietro; Ulrich, Alexis B.; Büchler, Markus W.; Schmitz-Winnenthal, Friedrich H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Portal annular pancreas (PAP) is an asymptomatic congenital pancreas anomaly, in which portal and/or mesenteric veins are encased by pancreas tissue. The aim of the study was to determine the role of PAP in pancreatic surgery as well as its management and potential complication, specifically, postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF). On the basis of a case report, the MEDLINE and ISI Web of Science databases were systematically reviewed up to September 2012. All articles describing a case of PAP were considered. In summary, 21 studies with 59 cases were included. The overall prevalence of PAP was 2.4% and the patients' mean (SD) age was 55.9 (16.2) years. The POPF rate in patients with PAP (12 pancreaticoduodenectomies and 3 distal pancreatectomies) was 46.7% (in accordance with the definition of the International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery). Portal annular pancreas is a quite unattended pancreatic variant with high prevalence and therefore still remains a clinical challenge to avoid postoperative complications. To decrease the risk for POPF, attentive preoperative diagnostics should also focus on PAP. In pancreaticoduodenectomy, a shift of the resection plane to the pancreas tail should be considered; in extensive pancreatectomy, coverage of the pancreatic remnant by the falciform ligament could be a treatment option. PMID:25207658

  7. Transjugular Portal Venous Stenting in Inflammatory Extrahepatic Portal Vein Stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Schaible, Rolf; Textor, Jochen; Decker, Pan; Strunk, Holger; Schild, Hans

    2002-12-15

    We report the case of a 37-year-old man with necrotizing pancreatitis associated with inflammatory extrahepatic portal vein stenosis and progressive ascites. Four months after the acute onset, when no signs of infection were present, portal decompression was performed to treat refractory ascites. Transjugulartranshepatic venoplasty failed to dilate the stenosis in the extrahepatic portion of the portal vein sufficiently. Therefore a Wallstent was implanted, resulting in almost normal diameter of the vessel. In follow-up imaging studies the stent and the portal vein were still patent 12 months after the intervention and total resolution of the ascites was observed.

  8. Effect of Portal Venous Blood Flow Diversion on Portal Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Zimmon, David S.; Kessler, Richard E.

    1980-01-01

    To anticipate the hepatic vascular response to portacaval anastomosis, we studied portal pressure during diversion of portal blood through a temporary extracorporeal umbilical vein to saphenous vein shunt. The relationship of portal pressure to shunted flow was approximately linear. In five schistosomiasis patients (controls) portal diversion to 1,250 ml/min gave portal pressure-shunted flow curve slopes ranging from 0.13 to 0.57 cm water/100 ml per min (0.31±0.18, mean±SD). In 17 cirrhotic patients with portal hypertension a continuum of slopes was observed from within mean±2 SD of control (type A) to larger slopes (type B) indicating failure of portal pressure regulation. When portal flow was augmented by shunting from saphenous vein to portal vein, cirrhotic patients who had slopes less than mean±2 SD of controls during diversion (type A) exhibited a compliant system with small increases in portal pressure, whereas type B patients had significantly greater pressure increases. Selective investigations suggested that changes in portal pressure provoked compensatory changes in hepatic arterial blood flow that tended to maintain portal pressure at a set point. Type B patients demonstrated failure of this mechanism to varying degrees. After end-to-side portacaval shunt, seven type A cirrhotic patients maintained residual intrahepatic venous pressure unchanged from prior portal pressure, whereas six type B patients had a significant decrease. Residual intrahepatic venous pressure was measured after portacaval shunt in 40 cirrhotic patients who were followed for as long as 9 yr (median survival 4.0 yr). The 13 patients who developed chronic encephalopathy had significantly lower pressure (21.1±4.4 cm, mean±SD) and shorter survival (median 0.6 yr) than the other 27 patients (32.6±5.3 cm, 5.0 yr). The preoperative estimation of portal pressure-diverted portal flow curve slope anticipates the hepatic vascular response to portacaval anastomosis and identifies a

  9. Material properties and device evaluations of ECR-deposited a-Si:H and a-SiC:H films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Y. H.; Pool, F. S.; Essick, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    Device-quality a-Si:H and a-SiC:H films have been deposited using electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave plasmas of SiH4, CH4, and H2 mixtures. Typical material properties of ECR-deposited, photosensitive a-Si:H films are: (1) high photosensitivity up to 2 x 106 with a photoconductivity of 10 exp -5 to 10 exp -4/(Ohm-cm), (2) a Tauc gap of 1.75 to 1.85 eV, (3) an Urbach slope of 50-60 meV determined by the constant photocurrent method, and (4) an integrated defect density of 1-2 x 10 exp 16/cu cm determined by junction capacitance measurements. Highly conductive, p-type a-SiC:H films have been produced by ECR plasmas with a conductivity of 0.2/(Ohm-cm).

  10. Material properties and device evaluations of ECR-deposited a-Si:H and a-SiC:H films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Y. H.; Pool, F. S.; Essick, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    Device-quality a-Si:H and a-SiC:H films have been deposited using electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave plasmas of SiH4, CH4, and H2 mixtures. Typical material properties of ECR-deposited, photosensitive a-Si:H films are: (1) high photosensitivity up to 2 x 106 with a photoconductivity of 10 exp -5 to 10 exp -4/(Ohm-cm), (2) a Tauc gap of 1.75 to 1.85 eV, (3) an Urbach slope of 50-60 meV determined by the constant photocurrent method, and (4) an integrated defect density of 1-2 x 10 exp 16/cu cm determined by junction capacitance measurements. Highly conductive, p-type a-SiC:H films have been produced by ECR plasmas with a conductivity of 0.2/(Ohm-cm).

  11. 29 CFR 785.24 - Principles noted in Portal-to-Portal Bulletin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Principles noted in Portal-to-Portal Bulletin. 785.24... of Principles Preparatory and Concluding Activities § 785.24 Principles noted in Portal-to-Portal Bulletin. In November, 1947, the Administrator issued the Portal-to-Portal Bulletin (part 790 of...

  12. IDL Grid Web Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massimino, P.; Costa, A.

    2008-08-01

    Image Data Language is a software for data analysis, visualization and cross-platform application development. The potentiality of IDL is well-known in the academic scientific world, especially in the astronomical environment where thousands of procedures are developed by using IDL. The typical use of IDL is the interactive mode but it is also possible to run IDL programs that do not require any interaction with the user, submitting them in batch or background modality. Through the interactive mode the user immediately receives images or other data produced in the running phase of the program; in batch or background mode, the user will have to wait for the end of the program, sometime for many hours or days to obtain images or data that IDL produced as output: in fact in Grid environment it is possible to access to or retrieve data only after completion of the program. The work that we present gives flexibility to IDL procedures submitted to the Grid computer infrastructure. For this purpose we have developed an IDL Grid Web Portal to allow the user to access the Grid and to submit IDL programs granting a full job control and the access to images and data generated during the running phase, without waiting for their completion. We have used the PHP technology and we have given the same level of security that Grid normally offers to its users. In this way, when the user notices that the intermediate program results are not those expected, he can stop the job, change the parameters to better satisfy the computational algorithm and resubmit the program, without consuming the CPU time and other Grid resources. The IDL Grid Web Portal allows you to obtain IDL generated images, graphics and data tables by using a normal browser. All conversations from the user and the Grid resources occur via Web, as well as authentication phases. The IDL user has not to change the program source much because the Portal will automatically introduce the appropriate modification before

  13. USGS Urban Waters Portal Overview

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This presentation discusses urbanization and water quality trends, major stories on contaminants and biota, scientific and educational tools for watershed organizations, and the USGS Urban Waters Portal.

  14. Meaningful Use of a Confidential Adolescent Patient Portal.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Lindsay A; Martinko, Thomas; Budd, Pamela; Mercado, Rebeccah; Schentrup, Anzeela M

    2016-02-01

    To design and evaluate the usage of an adolescent patient portal specifically adapted for adolescent health care needs that also satisfied institutional meaningful use guidelines regarding electronic health records. Key stakeholders at one academic health care center adopted an online portal and opted to designate a patient portal specifically for adolescents to maximize confidentiality in compliance with state privacy laws. This study analyzed aggregate electronic health record data of adolescents' (ages 12-17.9 years) uptake, usage, and functionality of this portal and compared it to parent portal usage for younger children (ages 0-11 years). Differences in means were calculated using paired t tests. The portal was used similarly between parents of young children and adolescents, with almost 1,000 enrollees in each group from September 1, 2012 to March 31, 2015. There were no gender differences in enrollment. Adolescents were less likely than parents of younger children to review appointments (73% vs. 85%), laboratory tests (67% vs. 79%), problem lists (40% vs. 78%), or allergies (45% vs. 77%, all p values <.001). Parents of younger children more frequently messaged providers (3,297 messages) although adolescents sent 1,397 confidential messages. Institutional decisions for implementing meaningful use requirements can align with goals of adolescent health. Patient portals can enhance adolescent health care quality and adolescents readily use a confidential portal. Implementation of meaningful use requirements should be checked against adolescent health care needs to maximize confidentiality and promote health communication. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A systematic review of studies of web portals for patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, Steven S; Williams, Lovoria B; Hatzigeorgiou, Christos

    2017-01-01

    Patient web portals are password-protected online websites that offer patients 24-hour access to personal health information from anywhere with an Internet connection. Due to advances in health information technologies, there has been increasing interest among providers and researchers in patient web portals for use by patients with diabetes and other chronic conditions. This article, which is based upon bibliographic searches in PubMed, reviews web portals for patients with diabetes mellitus including patient web portals tethered to electronic medical records and web portals developed specifically for patients with diabetes. Twelve studies of the impact of patient web portals on the management of diabetes patients were identified. Three had a cross-sectional design, 1 employed mixed-methods, one had a matched-control design, 3 had a retrospective cohort design, and 5 were randomized controlled trials. Six (50%) of the studies examined web portals tethered to electronic medical records and the remainder were web portals developed specifically for diabetes patients. The results of this review suggest that secure messaging between adult diabetic patients and their clinician is associated with improved glycemic control. However, results from observational studies indicate that many diabetic patients do not take advantage of web portal features such as secure messaging, perhaps because of a lack of internet access or lack of experience in navigating web portal resources. Although results from randomized controlled trials provide stronger evidence of the efficacy of web portal use in improving glycemic control among diabetic patients, the number of trials is small and results from the trials have been mixed. Studies suggest that secure messaging between adult diabetic patients and their clinician is associated with improved glycemic control, but negative findings have also been reported. The number of randomized controlled trials that have examined the efficacy of web

  16. 8. Detail, skewed portal bracing at west portal, also showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Detail, skewed portal bracing at west portal, also showing boxed endposts, latticed upper transverse and diagonal sway bracing, laced vertical members, view to northeast, 210mm lens. - Southern Pacific Railroad Shasta Route, Bridge No. 301.85, Milepost 301.85, Pollard Flat, Shasta County, CA

  17. On flattening filter-free portal dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Eduardo; Castro Novais, Juan; Molina López, María Yolanda; Ruiz Maqueda, Sheila

    2016-07-08

    Varian introduced (in 2010) the option of removing the flattening filter (FF) in their C-Arm linacs for intensity-modulated treatments. This mode, called flattening filter-free (FFF), offers the advantage of a greater dose rate. Varian's "Portal Dosimetry" is an electronic portal imager device (EPID)-based tool for IMRT verification. This tool lacks the capability of verifying flattening filter-free (FFF) modes due to saturation and lack of an image prediction algorithm. (Note: the latest versions of this software and EPID correct these issues.) The objective of the present study is to research the feasibility of said verifications (with the older versions of the software and EPID). By placing the EPID at a greater distance, the images can be acquired without saturation, yielding a linearity similar to the flattened mode. For the image prediction, a method was optimized based on the clinically used algorithm (analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA)) over a homogeneous phantom. The depth inside the phantom and its electronic density were tailored. An application was developed to allow the conversion of a dose plane (in DICOM format) to Varian's custom format for Portal Dosimetry. The proposed method was used for the verification of test and clinical fields for the three qualities used in our institution for IMRT: 6X, 6FFF and 10FFF. The method developed yielded a positive verification (more than 95% of the points pass a 2%/2 mm gamma) for both the clinical and test fields. This method was also capable of "predicting" static and wedged fields. A workflow for the verification of FFF fields was developed. This method relies on the clinical algorithm used for dose calculation and is able to verify the FFF modes, as well as being useful for machine quality assurance. The procedure described does not require new hardware. This method could be used as a verification of Varian's Portal Dose Image Prediction.

  18. Charge collection in a-Si:H/a-Si{sub 1-x}C{sub x} multilayers photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, T.; Drewray, J.; Hong, W.S.; Lee, H.; Kaplan, S.N.; Mireshghi, A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Delgado, J.C.; Bertomeu, J.

    1994-04-01

    Amorphous semiconductors have been used as thin film transistor(TFT), solar cell, phototransistors. In this paper we study the charge collected properties of a-Si:H/a-Si{sub 1-x}C:H{sub x} multilayer pin photodiode. In a-Si:H pin photodiode, the photogenerated carriers can be totally collected under strong electric field under reverse bias. However, our measurements show that in the a-Si:H/a-Si{sub l-x}C:H{sub x} multilayer pin photodiode photogenerated electrons and holes drift toward the electrodes under a certain bias, the total collected charge shows no saturation with bias and exhibits a continuous increase with reverse bias. We classify that the device works at two regions. In Region 1, the device behaves like a photodiode. This charge collection efficiency drop from theoretical value may indicate charge capture or confinement at the interfaces and trapping at the a-Si:H potential wells. These charges trapped or confined can be released at the interface and quantum well at higher electric field. In Region 2, above a critical bias voltage, the device works as a breakdown diode with a series photosensitive resistor which contributes higher collection efficiency, namely optical gain greater than unity.

  19. NSTA Portal to Science Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Ken

    2010-01-01

    The National Science Teachers Association's (NSTA) Science Safety Advisory Board recently launched the Safety in the Science Classroom portal. This portal serves as a gateway to safety resources for teachers, supervisors, and administrators. It also contains an evolving list of safety resources for elementary, middle, and high schools. The list…

  20. All Roads Lead to Portal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heid, Susan D.

    2007-01-01

    Portals are taking off on campuses nationwide. According to "Campus Computing 2006," the Campus Computing Project's survey of 540 two- and four-year public and private colleges and universities across the US, portal deployment for four-year public residential universities jumped from 28 to 74 percent of responding institutions between the…

  1. Of Portals, Policies, and Poets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunt, Rick; Pennock, Lea

    2006-01-01

    Universities are drawn to portals as an effective way of organizing and delivering campus services and information. In a university environment, where the desire for local autonomy and the impetus for centralization are in constant tension, a portal seems especially appealing because it allows local solutions through a shared medium. But the fact…

  2. The Power in the Portal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlain, Cathy

    2005-01-01

    Educational portals put together links to sites and resources educators would be interested in viewing. They eliminate the hours of searching that might be invested if typical search engines were used. Educational portals feature lessons, units, printable resources, creative ideas, and more. Many of these sites are free, while others are…

  3. All Roads Lead to Portal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heid, Susan D.

    2007-01-01

    Portals are taking off on campuses nationwide. According to "Campus Computing 2006," the Campus Computing Project's survey of 540 two- and four-year public and private colleges and universities across the US, portal deployment for four-year public residential universities jumped from 28 to 74 percent of responding institutions between the…

  4. NSTA Portal to Science Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Ken

    2010-01-01

    The National Science Teachers Association's (NSTA) Science Safety Advisory Board recently launched the Safety in the Science Classroom portal. This portal serves as a gateway to safety resources for teachers, supervisors, and administrators. It also contains an evolving list of safety resources for elementary, middle, and high schools. The list…

  5. Of Portals, Policies, and Poets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunt, Rick; Pennock, Lea

    2006-01-01

    Universities are drawn to portals as an effective way of organizing and delivering campus services and information. In a university environment, where the desire for local autonomy and the impetus for centralization are in constant tension, a portal seems especially appealing because it allows local solutions through a shared medium. But the fact…

  6. Sensitivity of an Elekta iView GT a-Si EPID model to delivery errors for pre-treatment verification of IMRT fields.

    PubMed

    Herwiningsih, Sri; Hanlon, Peta; Fielding, Andrew

    2014-12-01

    A Monte Carlo model of an Elekta iViewGT amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device (a-Si EPID) has been validated for pre-treatment verification of clinical IMRT treatment plans. The simulations involved the use of the BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo codes to predict the response of the iViewGT a-Si EPID model. The predicted EPID images were compared to the measured images obtained from the experiment. The measured EPID images were obtained by delivering a photon beam from an Elekta Synergy linac to the Elekta iViewGT a-Si EPID. The a-Si EPID was used with no additional build-up material. Frame averaged EPID images were acquired and processed using in-house software. The agreement between the predicted and measured images was analyzed using the gamma analysis technique with acceptance criteria of 3 %/3 mm. The results show that the predicted EPID images for four clinical IMRT treatment plans have a good agreement with the measured EPID signal. Three prostate IMRT plans were found to have an average gamma pass rate of more than 95.0 % and a spinal IMRT plan has the average gamma pass rate of 94.3 %. During the period of performing this work a routine MLC calibration was performed and one of the IMRT treatments re-measured with the EPID. A change in the gamma pass rate for one field was observed. This was the motivation for a series of experiments to investigate the sensitivity of the method by introducing delivery errors, MLC position and dosimetric overshoot, into the simulated EPID images. The method was found to be sensitive to 1 mm leaf position errors and 10 % overshoot errors.

  7. Portal monitoring technology control process

    SciTech Connect

    York, R.L.

    1998-12-31

    Portal monitors are an important part of the material protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A) programs in Russia and the US. Although portal monitors are only a part of an integrated MPC and A system, they are an effective means of controlling the unauthorized movement of special nuclear material (SNM). Russian technical experts have gained experience in the use of SNM portal monitors from US experts ad this has allowed them to use the monitors more effectively. Several Russian institutes and companies are designing and manufacturing SNM portal monitors in Russia. Interactions between Russian and US experts have resulted in improvements to the instruments. SNM portal monitor technology has been effectively transferred from the US to Russia and should be a permanent part of the Russian MPC and A Program. Progress in the implementation of the monitors and improvements to how they are used are discussed.

  8. Factors Affecting the Use of an E-Learning Portal at University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cegarra-Navarro, Juan-Gabriel; Rodriguez, Francisco Javier Canovas

    2012-01-01

    Electronic learning (e-learning) portals can be defined as websites that store and present materials for online learning, training, performance assessment, and certification. Few, if any, studies have investigated the factors that might contribute to the integration or implementation of e-learning portals in universities. With the development of…

  9. Factors Affecting the Use of an E-Learning Portal at University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cegarra-Navarro, Juan-Gabriel; Rodriguez, Francisco Javier Canovas

    2012-01-01

    Electronic learning (e-learning) portals can be defined as websites that store and present materials for online learning, training, performance assessment, and certification. Few, if any, studies have investigated the factors that might contribute to the integration or implementation of e-learning portals in universities. With the development of…

  10. 3. East portal of Tunnel 34, view to southsouthwest, 135mm ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. East portal of Tunnel 34, view to south-southwest, 135mm lens with electronic flash fill. Note the shift, in these later tunnels east of Colfax, to concrete portal faces with granite masonry voussoirs and coping. - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Tunnel No. 34, Milepost 145.4, Colfax, Placer County, CA

  11. Opto-electronic properties of P-doped nc-Si–QD/a-SiC:H thin films as foundation layer for all-Si solar cells in superstrate configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Kar, Debjit; Das, Debajyoti

    2016-07-14

    With the advent of nc-Si solar cells having improved stability, the efficient growth of nc-Si i-layer of the top cell of an efficient all-Si solar cell in the superstrate configuration prefers nc-Si n-layer as its substrate. Accordingly, a wide band gap and high conducting nc-Si alloy material is a basic requirement at the n-layer. Present investigation deals with the development of phosphorous doped n-type nanocrystalline silicon quantum dots embedded in hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (nc-Si–QD/a-SiC:H) hetero-structure films, wherein the optical band gap can be widened by the presence of Si–C bonds in the amorphous matrix and the embedded high density tiny nc-Si–QDs could provide high electrical conductivity, particularly in P-doped condition. The nc-Si–QDs simultaneously facilitate further widening of the optical band gap by virtue of the associated quantum confinement effect. A complete investigation has been made on the electrical transport phenomena involving charge transfer by tunneling and thermionic emission prevailing in n-type nc-Si–QD/a-SiC:H thin films. Their correlation with different phases of the specific heterostructure has been carried out for detailed understanding of the material, in order to improve its device applicability. The n-type nc-Si–QD/a-SiC:H films exhibit a thermally activated electrical transport above room temperature and multi-phonon hopping (MPH) below room temperature, involving defects in the amorphous phase and the grain-boundary region. The n-type nc-Si–QD/a-SiC:H films grown at ∼300 °C, demonstrating wide optical gap ∼1.86–1.96 eV and corresponding high electrical conductivity ∼4.5 × 10{sup −1}–1.4 × 10{sup −2} S cm{sup −1}, deserve to be an effective foundation layer for the top nc-Si sub-cell of all-Si solar cells in n-i-p structure with superstrate configuration.

  12. Opto-electronic properties of P-doped nc-Si-QD/a-SiC:H thin films as foundation layer for all-Si solar cells in superstrate configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Debjit; Das, Debajyoti

    2016-07-01

    With the advent of nc-Si solar cells having improved stability, the efficient growth of nc-Si i-layer of the top cell of an efficient all-Si solar cell in the superstrate configuration prefers nc-Si n-layer as its substrate. Accordingly, a wide band gap and high conducting nc-Si alloy material is a basic requirement at the n-layer. Present investigation deals with the development of phosphorous doped n-type nanocrystalline silicon quantum dots embedded in hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (nc-Si-QD/a-SiC:H) hetero-structure films, wherein the optical band gap can be widened by the presence of Si-C bonds in the amorphous matrix and the embedded high density tiny nc-Si-QDs could provide high electrical conductivity, particularly in P-doped condition. The nc-Si-QDs simultaneously facilitate further widening of the optical band gap by virtue of the associated quantum confinement effect. A complete investigation has been made on the electrical transport phenomena involving charge transfer by tunneling and thermionic emission prevailing in n-type nc-Si-QD/a-SiC:H thin films. Their correlation with different phases of the specific heterostructure has been carried out for detailed understanding of the material, in order to improve its device applicability. The n-type nc-Si-QD/a-SiC:H films exhibit a thermally activated electrical transport above room temperature and multi-phonon hopping (MPH) below room temperature, involving defects in the amorphous phase and the grain-boundary region. The n-type nc-Si-QD/a-SiC:H films grown at ˜300 °C, demonstrating wide optical gap ˜1.86-1.96 eV and corresponding high electrical conductivity ˜4.5 × 10-1-1.4 × 10-2 S cm-1, deserve to be an effective foundation layer for the top nc-Si sub-cell of all-Si solar cells in n-i-p structure with superstrate configuration.

  13. The Portuguese Climate Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Sandra; Deus, Ricardo; Nogueira, Miguel; Viterbo, Pedro; Miranda, Miguel; Antunes, Sílvia; Silva, Alvaro; Miranda, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    The Portuguese Local Warming Website (http://portaldoclima.pt) has been developed in order to support the society in Portugal in preparing for the adaptation to the ongoing and future effects of climate change. The climate portal provides systematic and easy access to authoritative scientific data ready to be used by a vast and diverse user community from different public and private sectors, key players and decision makers, but also to high school students, contributing to the increase in knowledge and awareness on climate change topics. A comprehensive set of regional climate variables and indicators are computed, explained and graphically presented. Variables and indicators were built in agreement with identified needs after consultation of the relevant social partners from different sectors, including agriculture, water resources, health, environment and energy and also in direct cooperation with the Portuguese National Strategy for Climate Change Adaptation (ENAAC) group. The visual interface allows the user to dynamically interact, explore, quickly analyze and compare, but also to download and import the data and graphics. The climate variables and indicators are computed from state-of-the-art regional climate model (RCM) simulations (e.g., CORDEX project), at high space-temporal detail, allowing to push the limits of the projections down to local administrative regions (NUTS3) and monthly or seasonal periods, promoting local adaptation strategies. The portal provides both historical data (observed and modelled for the 1971-2000 period) and future climate projections for different scenarios (modelled for the 2011-2100 period). A large effort was undertaken in order to quantify the impacts of the risk of extreme events, such as heavy rain and flooding, droughts, heat and cold waves, and fires. Furthermore the different climate scenarios and the ensemble of RCM models, with high temporal (daily) and spatial (~11km) detail, is taken advantage in order to

  14. Digitalization and networking of analog simulators and portal images.

    PubMed

    Pesznyák, Csilla; Zaránd, Pál; Mayer, Arpád

    2007-03-01

    Many departments have analog simulators and irradiation facilities (especially cobalt units) without electronic portal imaging. Import of the images into the R&V (Record & Verify) system is required. Simulator images are grabbed while portal films scanned by using a laser scanner and both converted into DICOM RT (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine Radiotherapy) images. Image intensifier output of a simulator and portal films are converted to DICOM RT images and used in clinical practice. The simulator software was developed in cooperation at the authors' hospital. The digitalization of analog simulators is a valuable updating in clinical use replacing screen-film technique. Film scanning and digitalization permit the electronic archiving of films. Conversion into DICOM RT images is a precondition of importing to the R&V system.

  15. Defects in a-Si and a-Si:H: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knief, Simone; von Niessen, Wolfgang; Koslowski, Thorsten

    1998-08-01

    We present a numerical study of the electronic properties of various structural models of amorphous silicon and hydrogenated amorphous silicon. Starting from an ideal random network, dangling bonds, floating bonds, double bonds, microvoids, hydrogenated dangling bonds, and hydrogenated floating bonds are introduced. The concentrations of these defects can be varied independently, the amount of disorder introduced to the system is therefore strictly controllable. Two continuous random networks, the vacancy model of Duffy, Boudreaux, and Polk and the bond switching model of Wooten, Winer, and Weaire (WWW model) are investigated. For the relaxation of the structures the potentials of Keating and of Stillinger and Weber are employed. The electronic structure is described by a tight-binding Hamiltonian; the localized or extended character of the eigenstates is investigated via a scaling approach. The vacancy model shows a band gap for small defect concentrations but this fills up with increasing disorder. Similar behavior is found for the case of the other models. In general defects introduce states into the gap region of a-Si, where the dangling bonds lead to the largest density of states in the gap region for a given defect concentration. This model turns out to be unique. For small system sizes an impurity band results that dramatically changes its character for large systems above 4000 atoms to a nearly uniform density of states as observed experimentally. In a-Si:H the dangling and floating bonds are removed and a mobility gap results with a width in good agreement with experiment. The experimentally observed tailing of the band into the gap region (first linear, then exponential) is well described only for the a-Si:H model derived from the vacancy model and for very large system sizes above 4000 atoms. The WWW model does not lead to this tail behavior. Localized states are found at all band edges but states at the bottom of the conduction band are more strongly

  16. 29 CFR 785.34 - Effect of section 4 of the Portal-to-Portal Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Effect of section 4 of the Portal-to-Portal Act. 785.34 Section 785.34 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... of Principles Traveltime § 785.34 Effect of section 4 of the Portal-to-Portal Act. The Portal Act...

  17. 29 CFR 785.34 - Effect of section 4 of the Portal-to-Portal Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effect of section 4 of the Portal-to-Portal Act. 785.34 Section 785.34 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... of Principles Traveltime § 785.34 Effect of section 4 of the Portal-to-Portal Act. The Portal...

  18. The parallel virtual file system for portals.

    SciTech Connect

    Schutt, James Alan

    2004-04-01

    This report presents the result of an effort to re-implement the Parallel Virtual File System (PVFS) using Portals as the transport. This report provides short overviews of PVFS and Portals, and describes the design and implementation of PVFS over Portals. Finally, the results of performance testing of both stock PVFS and PVFS over Portals are presented.

  19. The NUCLEONICA Nuclear Science Portal

    SciTech Connect

    Magill, Joseph; Dreher, Raymond

    2009-08-19

    NUCLEONICA (www.nucleonica.net) is a new nuclear science web portal which provides a customisable, integrated environment and collaboration platform using the latest internet 'Web 2.0' technology. NUCLEONICA is aimed at professionals, academics and students working in nuclear power, health physics and radiation protection, nuclear and radio-chemistry, and astrophysics. A unique feature of the portal is the wide range of user friendly web-based nuclear science applications. The portal is also ideal for education and training purposes and as a knowledge management platform to preserve nuclear knowledge built up over many decades.

  20. The Higgs Portal and Cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Assamagan, Ketevi; Chien-Yi Chen; Chou, John Paul; Curtin, David; Fedderke, Michael A.; Gershtein, Yuri; He, Xiao-Gang; Klute, Markus; Kozaczuk, Jonathon; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Lowette, Steven; No, Jose Miguel; Plehn, Tilman; Qian, Jianming; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael; Safonov, Alexei; Shelton, Jessie; Spannowsky, Michael; Su, Shufang; Walker, Devin G. E.; Willocq, Stephane; Winslow, Peter

    2016-04-18

    Higgs portal interactions provide a simple mechanism for addressing two open problems in cosmology: dark matter and the baryon asymmetry. In the latter instance, Higgs portal interactions may contain the ingredients for a strong first-order electroweak phase transition as well as new CP-violating interactions as needed for electroweak baryogenesis. These interactions may also allow for a viable dark matter candidate. We survey the opportunities for probing the Higgs portal as it relates to these questions in cosmology at the LHC and possible future colliders.

  1. aSi EPIDs for the in-vivo dosimetry of static and dynamic beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piermattei, A.; Cilla, S.; Azario, L.; Greco, F.; Russo, M.; Grusio, M.; Orlandini, L.; Fidanzio, A.

    2015-10-01

    Portal imaging by amorphous silicon (aSi) photodiode is currently the most applied technology for in-vivo dosimetry (IVD) of static and dynamic radiotherapy beams. The strategy, adopted in this work to perform the IVD procedure by aSi EPID, is based on: in patient reconstruction of the isocenter dose and day to day comparison between 2D-portal images to verify the reproducibility of treatment delivery. About 20.000 tests have been carried out in this last 3 years in 8 radiotherapy centers using the SOFTDISO program. The IVD results show that: (i) the procedure can be implemented for linacs of different manufacturer, (ii) the IVD analysis can be obtained on a computer screen, in quasi real time (about 2 min after the treatment delivery) and (iii) once the causes of the discrepancies were eliminated, all the global IVD tests for single patient were within the acceptance criteria defined by: ±5% for the isocenter dose, and Pγ<1≥90% of the checked points for the 2D portal image γ-analysis. This work is the result of a project supported by the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) and Università Cattolica del S.Cuore (UCSC).

  2. First-principles simulations of vibrational decay and lifetimes in a -Si:H and a -Si:D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atta-Fynn, Raymond; Drabold, David A.; Elliott, Stephen R.; Biswas, Parthapratim

    2017-03-01

    Phonon lifetime in materials is an important observable that conveys basic information about structure, dynamics, and anharmonicity. Recent vibrational transient-grating measurements, using picosecond infrared pulses from free-electron lasers, have demonstrated that the vibrational-population decay rates of localized high-frequency stretching modes (HSMs) in hydrogenated and deuterated amorphous silicon (a -Si:H/D) increase with temperature and the vibrational energy redistributes among the bending modes of Si in a -Si:H/D. Motivated by this observation, we address the problem from first-principles density-functional calculations and study the time evolution of the vibrational-population decay in a -Si:H/D, the average decay times, and the possible decay channels for the redistribution of vibrational energy. The average lifetimes of the localized HSMs in a -Si:H and a -Si:D are found to be approximately 51-92 ps and 50-78 ps, respectively, in the temperature range of 25-200 K, which are consistent with experimental data. A weak temperature dependence of the vibrational-population decay rates has been observed via a slight increase of the decay rates with temperature, which can be attributed to stimulated emission and increased anharmonic coupling between the normal modes at high temperature.

  3. Hidden Magnetic Portals Around Earth

    NASA Image and Video Library

    A NASA-sponsored researcher at the University of Iowa has developed a way for spacecraft to hunt down hidden magnetic portals in the vicinity of Earth. These gateways link the magnetic field of our...

  4. The EarthScope Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baru, C.; Ahern, T.; Anderson, G.; Behrends, K.; Casey, R.; Hoyt, B.; Kamb, L.; Lin, K.; Meertens, C.; Memon, A.; Muench, J.; Stolte, C.; Weertman, B.; Weiland, C.

    2007-12-01

    The EarthScope Portal is being developed in order to provide a unified, single-point of access to EarthScope data products from USArray, PBO, and SAFOD experiments. The portal will feature basic search and data access capabilities to allow users to discover and access EarthScope data using spatial, temporal, and other metadata- based search conditions. In this presentation, we will describe the features and design of the portal, which is being developed by a team consisting of GEON (Geosciences Network, http://www.geongrid.org), IRIS, UNAVCO, and Stanford. The portal search module invokes Web services developed by IRIS, UNAVCO, and Stanford to search for EarthScope data in the archives at each of these locations. The Web services provide information about all resources (data) that match the specified search conditions. Users will be able to select from the returned data sets, add selected data to a "data cart", and request the selected data to be packaged for download to the user. The initial services being defined are for "station discovery", to find which stations are available for specified spatial and temporal bounds, and "data discovery", to find the data sets that are available from the stations. Users will subsequently be able to choose the specific datasets, which will be assembled in a user "workspace" and available for download. The EarthScope Portal leverages the significant portal development efforts of the GEON Project at the San Diego Supercomputer Center, SDSC (http://portal.geongrid.org), and the development of Web services interfaces at the three data archive facilities. The portal is implemented using the open source GridSphere portal software infrastructure which supports the well-known Java portlet interface, viz. JSR 168 or the Portlet API. It uses a set of "core" portlets that have been developed in GEON for Data Registration, Search, and Workspace Services. We will provide a report on the current state of development of the Portal. A

  5. Gaiaverse: the Gaia's outreach portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masana, E.

    2017-03-01

    Gaiaverse (http://gaiaverse.eu) is a dissemination portal on the ESA Gaia's mission developed within the GENIUS project, an European project funded by the European Commission to boost the impact of the next European breakthrough in astrophysics, the Gaia astrometric mission. The portal was opened in July 2015. Gaiaverse is administrated by the Universitat de Barcelona (UB) and the Consorci de Serveis Universitaris de Catalunya (CSUC).

  6. Prostacyclin Increases Portal Venous Flow.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    essociation with disease states like pancreatitis or sepsis.,... *.o -. - ,r :’. 1mncla-gsif imr % SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE(ften Data Ente@d) -’p...states. PGI is also elevated in plasma during sepsis or pancreatitis . The hemodynamic effect of PGI has not been 2 investigated with regard to the portal...and peritoneal ascites fluid 2 i-alha.during experimental hemorrhagic pancreatitis in the pig (7). Whenthis ascites fluid was injected into the portal

  7. 4. East portal of Tunnel 22, view to the eastsoutheast, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. East portal of Tunnel 22, view to the east-southeast, 135mm lens with electronic flash fill. Note the depth of water within the tunnel, a sympton of the spring-laden slope above the tunnel that led to its eventual abandonment. - Southern Pacific Railroad Natron Cutoff, Tunnel 23, Milepost 584.5, Westfir, Lane County, OR

  8. 1. West portal of Tunnel 34, contextual view to northeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. West portal of Tunnel 34, contextual view to northeast from inside east end of Tunnel 33 (Cape Horn Tunnel), 135mm lens with electronic flash fill. - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Tunnel No. 34, Milepost 145.4, Colfax, Placer County, CA

  9. The Electronic Patient Reported Outcome Tool: Testing Usability and Feasibility of a Mobile App and Portal to Support Care for Patients With Complex Chronic Disease and Disability in Primary Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Ashlinder; Khan, Anum Irfan; Hans, Parminder Kaur; Kuluski, Kerry; Cott, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    Background People experiencing complex chronic disease and disability (CCDD) face some of the greatest challenges of any patient population. Primary care providers find it difficult to manage multiple discordant conditions and symptoms and often complex social challenges experienced by these patients. The electronic Patient Reported Outcome (ePRO) tool is designed to overcome some of these challenges by supporting goal-oriented primary care delivery. Using the tool, patients and providers collaboratively develop health care goals on a portal linked to a mobile device to help patients and providers track progress between visits. Objectives This study tested the usability and feasibility of adopting the ePRO tool into a single interdisciplinary primary health care practice in Toronto, Canada. The Fit between Individuals, Fask, and Technology (FITT) framework was used to guide our assessment and explore whether the ePRO tool is: (1) feasible for adoption in interdisciplinary primary health care practices and (2) usable from both the patient and provider perspectives. This usability pilot is part of a broader user-centered design development strategy. Methods A 4-week pilot study was conducted in which patients and providers used the ePRO tool to develop health-related goals, which patients then monitored using a mobile device. Patients and providers collaboratively set goals using the system during an initial visit and had at least 1 follow-up visit at the end of the pilot to discuss progress. Focus groups and interviews were conducted with patients and providers to capture usability and feasibility measures. Data from the ePRO system were extracted to provide information regarding tool usage. Results Six providers and 11 patients participated in the study; 3 patients dropped out mainly owing to health issues. The remaining 8 patients completed 210 monitoring protocols, equal to over 1300 questions, with patients often answering questions daily. Providers and patients

  10. [Portal cavenorma: diagnosis, aetiologies and consequences].

    PubMed

    Vibert, Eric; Azoulay, Daniel; Castaing, Denis; Bismuth, Henri

    2002-12-01

    Portal cavernoma is a network of veins whose caliber, initially millimetric or microscopic, is increased and which contain hepatopedal portal blood. It results from occlusion, thrombotic and always chronic, of the extra-hepatic portal system. Diagnosis is mainly done by imaging. Clinical signs of portal cavernoma are usually related to extra-hepatic portal hypertension (hematemesis due to rupture of oeso-gastric varices, splenomegaly, rectal bleeding from ano-rectal varices, growth retardation in children) and sometimes to the cause of portal hypertension (abdominal pain, venous bowel infarction). Occurrence of portal thrombosis is often the conjunction of a local cause and a prothrombotic disorder which must be systematically detected. Biliary consequences of cavernoma are related to compression of common bile duct and are usually asymptomatic. In case of jaundice or cholangitis, portal decompression by portosystemic shunt can be performed to treat both biliary symptoms and portal hypertension.

  11. The quail anatomy portal.

    PubMed

    Ruparelia, Avnika A; Simkin, Johanna E; Salgado, David; Newgreen, Donald F; Martins, Gabriel G; Bryson-Richardson, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    The Japanese quail is a widely used model organism for the study of embryonic development; however, anatomical resources are lacking. The Quail Anatomy Portal (QAP) provides 22 detailed three-dimensional (3D) models of quail embryos during development from embryonic day (E)1 to E15 generated using optical projection tomography. The 3D models provided can be virtually sectioned to investigate anatomy. Furthermore, using the 3D nature of the models, we have generated a tool to assist in the staging of quail samples. Volume renderings of each stage are provided and can be rotated to allow visualization from multiple angles allowing easy comparison of features both between stages in the database and between images or samples in the laboratory. The use of JavaScript, PHP and HTML ensure the database is accessible to users across different operating systems, including mobile devices, facilitating its use in the laboratory.The QAP provides a unique resource for researchers using the quail model. The ability to virtually section anatomical models throughout development provides the opportunity for researchers to virtually dissect the quail and also provides a valuable tool for the education of students and researchers new to the field. DATABASE URL: http://quail.anatomyportal.org (For review username: demo, password: quail123).

  12. The quail anatomy portal

    PubMed Central

    Ruparelia, Avnika A.; Simkin, Johanna E.; Salgado, David; Newgreen, Donald F.; Martins, Gabriel G.; Bryson-Richardson, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    The Japanese quail is a widely used model organism for the study of embryonic development; however, anatomical resources are lacking. The Quail Anatomy Portal (QAP) provides 22 detailed three-dimensional (3D) models of quail embryos during development from embryonic day (E)1 to E15 generated using optical projection tomography. The 3D models provided can be virtually sectioned to investigate anatomy. Furthermore, using the 3D nature of the models, we have generated a tool to assist in the staging of quail samples. Volume renderings of each stage are provided and can be rotated to allow visualization from multiple angles allowing easy comparison of features both between stages in the database and between images or samples in the laboratory. The use of JavaScript, PHP and HTML ensure the database is accessible to users across different operating systems, including mobile devices, facilitating its use in the laboratory.The QAP provides a unique resource for researchers using the quail model. The ability to virtually section anatomical models throughout development provides the opportunity for researchers to virtually dissect the quail and also provides a valuable tool for the education of students and researchers new to the field. Database URL: http://quail.anatomyportal.org (For review username: demo, password: quail123) PMID:24715219

  13. Portal to the Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, Evalyn

    2011-04-01

    Museums are a portal connecting us to a deeper understanding of the world in which we live, from our own backyards to the most distant galaxies; an access point to the incredible discoveries we have made about the natural world and a flashpoint for inspiring the next generation of explorers. The Cleveland Museum of Natural History is poised to redefine what a natural history museum can be, offering visitors an opportunity to travel through space and time to explore the origins of our planet, follow the evolution of life on Earth and project into -- and plan for -- the future. The Museum will launch visitors into the future this summer via SmartHome Cleveland -- an extremely energy-efficient "passive house" that will demonstrate the future of green building technology. This unique exhibit is part of a special series of exhibits, programs and workshops on sustainability, including a major exhibit on Climate Change, which will be featured at the Museum this summer and fall.

  14. Earthdata Developer Portal poster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plofchan, P.

    2016-12-01

    A common theme at community conferences in the Earth science domain is the need for more integration with related services, clearer documentation for services available, and a general simplification of what it takes to leverage existing tools so that setup and administration time can be minimized and time spent researching can be maximized. NASA's Earthdata Developer Portal (EDP) is the newly-created central location for documentation related to interacting with services offered by the EOSDIS community. The EDP will provide technical documentation for APIs, process documentation that provides real-world examples of how to use existing APIs in the real world, release notes for applications and services so that the entire community can stay up to date on recent updates, and best practice suggestions to improve implementation of both front-end and back-end services. Application and service owners will own their documentation while the EDP will ingest the documentation, serve it up in an interface using both industry standard tools, such as Swagger, and custom "adapters". The content is then styled to ensure consistency with other documentation found throughout the site and will be made searchable from a single location. "Getting Started" paths will also provide those users new to the space a simple path to follow to perform common tasks such as "searching and getting data" or "hosting an application on the Earthdata platform."

  15. Probing the fermionic Higgs portal at lepton colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Fedderke, Michael A.; Lin, Tongyan; Wang, Lian -Tao

    2016-04-26

    Here, we study the sensitivity of future electron-positron colliders to UV completions of the fermionic Higgs portal operator HHχ¯χ. Measurements of precision electroweak S and T parameters and the e+e → Zh cross-section at the CEPC, FCC-ee, and ILC are considered. The scalar completion of the fermionic Higgs portal is closely related to the scalar Higgs portal, and we summarize existing results. We devote the bulk of our analysis to a singlet-doublet fermion completion. Assuming the doublet is sufficiently heavy, we construct the effective field theory (EFT) at dimension-6 in order to compute contributions to the observables. We also provide full one-loop results for S and T in the general mass parameter space. In both completions, future precision measurements can probe the new states at the (multi-)TeV scale, beyond the direct reach of the LHC.

  16. Probing the fermionic Higgs portal at lepton colliders

    DOE PAGES

    Fedderke, Michael A.; Lin, Tongyan; Wang, Lian -Tao

    2016-04-26

    Here, we study the sensitivity of future electron-positron colliders to UV completions of the fermionic Higgs portal operator H†Hχ¯χ. Measurements of precision electroweak S and T parameters and the e+e– → Zh cross-section at the CEPC, FCC-ee, and ILC are considered. The scalar completion of the fermionic Higgs portal is closely related to the scalar Higgs portal, and we summarize existing results. We devote the bulk of our analysis to a singlet-doublet fermion completion. Assuming the doublet is sufficiently heavy, we construct the effective field theory (EFT) at dimension-6 in order to compute contributions to the observables. We also providemore » full one-loop results for S and T in the general mass parameter space. In both completions, future precision measurements can probe the new states at the (multi-)TeV scale, beyond the direct reach of the LHC.« less

  17. Patient Portal Integration - A Native IHE Connector Implementation for PEHR.

    PubMed

    Yüksekogul, Nilay; Schreiweis, Björn; Weiss, Nicolas; Aguduri, Lakshmi S; Brandner, Antje; Bronsch, Tobias; Pensold, Peter; Stein, Katharina E; Helmer, Axel; Bergh, Björn; Heinze, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Providing patients with access to their medical data has recently evolved as a topic in several countries. Different approaches are possible. For example patient portals are used for patient access towards medical data. The University Hospital Heidelberg is engaged in a research project to develop a personal cross-enterprise electronic health record (PEHR). The objective of this work is to describe the architecture and implementation of a component called IHE Connector which represents the native IHE-based integration between the patient portal and the PEHR core components. The architecture of the PEHR is accepted based on international standards. The core components consist out of ready to use software products like a master patient index. The patient portal has been developed using Liferay framework. The IHE Connector is mainly based on the Open eHealth Integration Platform (IPF) Framework, which has been deeply integrated into the patient portal to support the needed IHE transactions. Several IHE profiles for sharing documents and patient information are supported by the IHE Connector. As IPF already provides interfaces for some IHE profiles others had to be developed from scratch. The IHE Connector can not only be used for connectivity between patient portal and PEHR core, but also provide connectivity for third party apps and healthcare providers' information systems.

  18. Pretreatment verification of IMRT absolute dose distributions using a commercial a-Si EPID

    SciTech Connect

    Talamonti, C.; Casati, M.; Bucciolini, M.

    2006-11-15

    A commercial amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device (EPID) has been studied to investigate its potential in the field of pretreatment verifications of step and shoot, intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), 6 MV photon beams. The EPID was calibrated to measure absolute exit dose in a water-equivalent phantom at patient level, following an experimental approach, which does not require sophisticated calculation algorithms. The procedure presented was specifically intended to replace the time-consuming in-phantom film dosimetry. The dosimetric response was characterized on the central axis in terms of stability, linearity, and pulse repetition frequency dependence. The a-Si EPID demonstrated a good linearity with dose (within 2% from 1 monitor unit), which represent a prerequisite for the application in IMRT. A series of measurements, in which phantom thickness, air gap between the phantom and the EPID, field size and position of measurement of dose in the phantom (entrance or exit) varied, was performed to find the optimal calibration conditions, for which the field size dependence is minimized. In these conditions (20 cm phantom thickness, 56 cm air gap, exit dose measured at the isocenter), the introduction of a filter for the low-energy scattered radiation allowed us to define a universal calibration factor, independent of field size. The off-axis extension of the dose calibration was performed by applying a radial correction for the beam profile, distorted due to the standard flood field calibration of the device. For the acquisition of IMRT fields, it was necessary to employ home-made software and a specific procedure. This method was applied for the measurement of the dose distributions for 15 clinical IMRT fields. The agreement between the dose distributions, quantified by the gamma index, was found, on average, in 97.6% and 98.3% of the analyzed points for EPID versus TPS and for EPID versus FILM, respectively, thus suggesting a great

  19. Improvement of Varian a-Si EPID dosimetry measurements using a lead-shielded support-arm

    SciTech Connect

    Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; Sabet, Mahsheed; O'Connor, Daryl J.; Greer, Peter B.

    2012-07-01

    Dosimetry measurements with Varian amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging devices (a-Si EPIDs) are affected by the backscattered radiation from the EPID support arm. In this study, the nonuniform backscatter from an E-type support arm was reduced by fixing a thick (12.2 Multiplication-Sign 10.5 Multiplication-Sign 0.5 cm{sup 3}) piece of lead on top of the arm, and the remaining backscatter was modeled and included in an existing dose prediction algorithm. The applied backscatter kernel was the average of kernels on different regions of the EPID over the arm. The lead-shielded arm reduced the nonuniform backscatter component by about 50% for field sizes ranging from 3 Multiplication-Sign 3 to 30 Multiplication-Sign 30 cm{sup 2} and the field symmetry improved for medium to large fields up to 3%. Gamma evaluation of the measured and modeled doses (2%, 2-mm criteria) showed that using the lead-shielded arm in the model increased the number of points with Gamma index <1 by 5.7% and decreased the mean Gamma by 0.201. Even using the lead alone (no modeling) could increase the number of points with Gamma index <1 by 4.7% and decrease the mean Gamma by 0.153. This is a simple and easy method to decrease the nonuniform arm backscatter and improve the accuracy of dosimetry measurements with the existing EPIDs used for clinical applications.

  20. Meaningful Use and the Patient Portal: Patient enrollment, use and satisfaction with patient portals at a later-adopting center

    PubMed Central

    Neuner, Joan; Fedders, Megan; Caravella, Mary; Bradford, Lisa; Schapira, Marilyn

    2014-01-01

    Many physicians are adopting patient portals in response to governmental incentives for meaningful use (MU), but the stage 2 requirements for portal use may be particularly challenging for newer electronic health record (EHR) users. This study examined enrollment, use based on MU requirements, and satisfaction in a recently adopting fee-for-service multispecialty system. Between 2010–2012, overall portal enrollment increased from 13.2% to 23.1% but varied substantially by physician specialty. In 2013, over 97% of physicians would have met requirements for a stage 2 MU utilization measure requiring that patients download personal health information, but only 38% of all physicians (87% of primary care physicians [PCPs] and 37% of other specialists) would have met e-mail requirements. Satisfaction with the portal overall and with portal-based e-mails was high. These results suggest that later-adopting PCPs can succeed in providing satisfactory record and e-mail access but specialists may find reaching e-mail thresholds more difficult. PMID:24563085

  1. Meaningful use and the patient portal: patient enrollment, use, and satisfaction with patient portals at a later-adopting center.

    PubMed

    Neuner, Joan; Fedders, Megan; Caravella, Mary; Bradford, Lisa; Schapira, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    Many physicians are adopting patient portals in response to governmental incentives for meaningful use (MU), but the stage 2 requirements for portal use may be particularly challenging for newer electronic health record (EHR) users. This study examined enrollment, use based on MU requirements, and satisfaction in a recently adopting fee-for-service multispecialty system. Between 2010 and 2012, overall portal enrollment increased from 13.2% to 23.1% but varied substantially by physician specialty. In 2013, more than 97% of physicians would have met requirements for a stage 2 MU utilization measure requiring that patients download personal health information, but only 38% of all physicians (87% of primary care physicians [PCPs] and 37% of other specialists) would have met e-mail requirements. Satisfaction with the portal overall and with portal-based e-mails was high. These results suggest that later-adopting PCPs can succeed in providing satisfactory record and e-mail access but specialists may find reaching e-mail thresholds more difficult.

  2. A Si Integrated Waveguiding Polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevorkian, A. P.

    1987-09-01

    The technology and characteristics of a silicon-based polarimeter are presented. This device features guided mode polarization splitting, non-taper solution for guided light detection and electronic signal processing. The overall fabrication process is fully compatible with standard Si technology.

  3. Web Portal for Multicast Delivery Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mannaert, H.; De Gruyter, B.; Adriaenssens, P.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a Web portal for multicast communication management, which provides fully automatic service management with integrated provisioning of hardware equipment. Describes the software architecture, the implementation, and the application usage of the Web portal for multicast delivery. (Author/AEF)

  4. Web Portal for Multicast Delivery Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mannaert, H.; De Gruyter, B.; Adriaenssens, P.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a Web portal for multicast communication management, which provides fully automatic service management with integrated provisioning of hardware equipment. Describes the software architecture, the implementation, and the application usage of the Web portal for multicast delivery. (Author/AEF)

  5. Portal cavernoma cholangiopathy: diagnosis, imaging, and intervention.

    PubMed

    Moomjian, Lauren N; Winks, Sarah G

    2017-01-01

    The term portal cavernoma cholangiopathy refers to the biliary tract abnormalities that accompany extrahepatic portal vein obstruction (EHPVO) and subsequent cavernous transformation of the portal vein. EHPVO is a primary vascular disorder of the portal vein in children and adults manifested by longstanding thrombosis of the main portal vein. Nearly all patients with EHPVO have manifestations of portal cavernoma cholangiopathy, such as extrinsic indentation on the bile duct and mild bile duct narrowing, but the majority are asymptomatic. However, progressive portal cavernoma cholangiopathy may lead to severe complications, including secondary biliary cirrhosis. A spectrum of changes is seen radiologically in the setting of portal cavernoma cholangiopathy, including extrinsic indentation of the bile ducts, bile duct stricturing, bile duct wall thickening, angulation and displacement of the extrahepatic bile duct, cholelithiasis, choledocholithiasis, and hepatolithiasis. Radiologists must be aware of this disorder in order to provide appropriate imaging evaluation and interpretation, to facilitate appropriate treatment and to distinguish this entity from its potential radiologic mimics.

  6. The Reusable Astronomy Portal (TRAP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson, T.; Rogers, A.; Wallace, G.

    2012-09-01

    The Reusable Astronomy Portal (TRAP) aims to provide a common platform for rapidly deploying Astronomy Archives to the web. TRAP is currently under development for both the VAO Data Discovery Portal and the MAST Multi-Mission Portal (Figure 1). TRAP consists of 2 major software packages: the TRAP Client and the TRAP Server. The TRAP framework allows developers to deploy the Server, connect to data resources, then focus on building custom tools for the Client. TRAP is built upon proven industry technologies including the Ext/JS JavaScript Component Library, Mono.NET Web Services, and JSON message based APIs. The multi-layered architecture of TRAP decouples each layer: Client, Service and Data Access, enabling each to evolve independently over time. Although currently deployed to provide astronomy science data access, the TRAP architecture is flexible enough to thrive in any distributed data environment.

  7. The Higgs portal above threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, Nathaniel; Lou, Hou Keong; McCullough, Matthew; Thalapillil, Arun

    2016-02-18

    The discovery of the Higgs boson opens the door to new physics interacting via the Higgs Portal, including motivated scenarios relating to baryogenesis, dark matter, and electroweak naturalness. In this study, we systematically explore the collider signatures of singlet scalars produced via the Higgs Portal at the 14TeV LHC and a prospective 100TeV hadron collider. We focus on the challenging regime where the scalars are too heavy to be produced in the decays of an on-shell Higgs boson, and instead are produced primarily via an o ff-shell Higgs. Assuming these scalars escape the detector, promising channels include missing energy in association with vector boson fusion, monojets, and top pairs. In addition, we forecast the sensitivity of searches in these channels at √s = 14 & 100 TeV and compare collider reach to the motivated parameter space of singlet-assisted electroweak baryogenesis, Higgs Portal dark matter, and neutral naturalness.

  8. 29 CFR 785.50 - Section 4 of the Portal-to-Portal Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Section 4 of the Portal-to-Portal Act. 785.50 Section 785.50 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Provisions § 785.50 Section 4 of the Portal-to-Portal Act. Section 4 of this Act provides that: (a) Except...

  9. 29 CFR 785.50 - Section 4 of the Portal-to-Portal Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Section 4 of the Portal-to-Portal Act. 785.50 Section 785.50 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Provisions § 785.50 Section 4 of the Portal-to-Portal Act. Section 4 of this Act provides that: (a) Except...

  10. VisEL: Visualisation of Expertise Level in a Special Interest Group Knowledge Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulhafizsyam Wan Ahmad, Wan Muhammad; Sulaiman, Shahida; Yusof, Umi Kalsom

    A variety of portals are available nowadays to support diverse purposes such as commercial, publishing, personal, affinity and corporate portals. Affinity portals promote electronic communities who share common interest such as a special interest group (SIG). Knowledge portal is an emerging trend that benefits the existing portal technology by designing such portals with proper representation of the members' shared knowledge. Besides textual representation for diverse expertise levels, graphical visualisation will be able to support the requirements in searching and representing expertise level among e-community. There is a number of existing SIG portals available. However, they do not visualise effectively and accurately the expertise level of members and make it difficult for users to search their targeted experts for instance searching the highest expertise level to have a discussion and to solve their problems related to a project. The goal of this paper is to propose a graphical visualisation of expertise level method (VisEL) using an interactive tag cloud technique that represents expertise level of each member based on their knowledge in a software engineering SIG portal.

  11. Feasibility of portal dosimetry for flattening filter-free radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chuter, Robert W; Rixham, Philip A; Weston, Steve J; Cosgrove, Vivian P

    2016-01-08

    The feasibility of using portal dosimetry (PD) to verify 6 MV flattening filter-free (FFF) IMRT treatments was investigated. An Elekta Synergy linear accelerator with an Agility collimator capable of delivering FFF beams and a standard iViewGT amorphous silicon (aSi) EPID panel (RID 1640 AL5P) at a fixed SSD of 160 cm were used. Dose rates for FFF beams are up to four times higher than for conventional flattened beams, meaning images taken at maximum FFF dose rate can saturate the EPID. A dose rate of 800 MU/min was found not to saturate the EPID for open fields. This dose rate was subsequently used to characterize the EPID for FFF portal dosimetry. A range of open and phantom fields were measured with both an ion chamber and the EPID, to allow comparison between the two. The measured data were then used to create a model within The Nederlands Kanker Instituut's (NKI's) portal dosimetry software. The model was verified using simple square fields with a range of field sizes and phantom thicknesses. These were compared to calculations performed with the Monaco treatment planning system (TPS) and isocentric ion chamber measurements. It was found that the results for the FFF verification were similar to those for flattened beams with testing on square fields, indicating a difference in dose between the TPS and portal dosimetry of approximately 1%. Two FFF IMRT plans (prostate and lung SABR) were delivered to a homogeneous phantom and showed an overall dose difference at isocenter of ~0.5% and good agreement between the TPS and PD dose distributions. The feasibility of using the NKI software without any modifications for high-dose-rate FFF beams and using a standard EPID detector has been investigated and some initial limitations highlighted.

  12. From EGEE Operations Portal towards EGI Operations Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordier, Hélène; L'Orphelin, Cyril; Reynaud, Sylvain; Lequeux, Olivier; Loikkanen, Sinikka; Veyre, Pierre

    Grid operators in EGEE have been using a dedicated dashboard as their central operational tool, stable and scalable for the last 5 years despite continuous upgrade from specifications by users, monitoring tools or data providers. In EGEE-III, recent regionalisation of operations led the Operations Portal developers to conceive a standalone instance of this tool. We will see how the dashboard reorganization paved the way for the re-engineering of the portal itself. The outcome is an easily deployable package customized with relevant information sources and specific decentralized operational requirements. This package is composed of a generic and scalable data access mechanism, Lavoisier; a renowned php framework for configuration flexibility, Symfony and a MySQL database. VO life cycle and operational information, EGEE broadcast and Downtime notifications are next for the major reorganization until all other key features of the Operations Portal are migrated to the framework. Features specifications will be sketched at the same time to adapt to EGI requirements and to upgrade. Future work on feature regionalisation, on new advanced features or strategy planning will be tracked in EGI- Inspire through the Operations Tools Advisory Group, OTAG, where all users, customers and third parties of the Operations Portal are represented from January 2010.

  13. Portal Monitor Future Development Work: Hardware Improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Browne, Michael C.

    2012-07-03

    LANL portal monitor was a modification of a previously installed (permanent) unattended monitoring system (UMS). Modifications to the UMS to make the portal were sometimes based on mistaken assumptions about exercise-specific installation and access. Philosophical approach to real-time portal differs in some areas from UMS.

  14. 29 CFR 790.5 - Effect of Portal-to-Portal Act on determination of hours worked.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effect of Portal-to-Portal Act on determination of hours... GENERAL STATEMENT AS TO THE EFFECT OF THE PORTAL-TO-PORTAL ACT OF 1947 ON THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT OF... Effect of Portal-to-Portal Act on determination of hours worked. (a) In the application of the minimum...

  15. 29 CFR 790.5 - Effect of Portal-to-Portal Act on determination of hours worked.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Effect of Portal-to-Portal Act on determination of hours... GENERAL STATEMENT AS TO THE EFFECT OF THE PORTAL-TO-PORTAL ACT OF 1947 ON THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT OF... Effect of Portal-to-Portal Act on determination of hours worked. (a) In the application of the minimum...

  16. Software tool for portal dosimetry research.

    PubMed

    Vial, P; Hunt, P; Greer, P B; Oliver, L; Baldock, C

    2008-09-01

    This paper describes a software tool developed for research into the use of an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) to verify dose for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) beams. A portal dose image prediction (PDIP) model that predicts the EPID response to IMRT beams has been implemented into a commercially available treatment planning system (TPS). The software tool described in this work was developed to modify the TPS PDIP model by incorporating correction factors into the predicted EPID image to account for the difference in EPID response to open beam radiation and multileaf collimator (MLC) transmitted radiation. The processes performed by the software tool include; i) read the MLC file and the PDIP from the TPS, ii) calculate the fraction of beam-on time that each point in the IMRT beam is shielded by MLC leaves, iii) interpolate correction factors from look-up tables, iv) create a corrected PDIP image from the product of the original PDIP and the correction factors and write the corrected image to file, v) display, analyse, and export various image datasets. The software tool was developed using the Microsoft Visual Studio.NET framework with the C# compiler. The operation of the software tool was validated. This software provided useful tools for EPID dosimetry research, and it is being utilised and further developed in ongoing EPID dosimetry and IMRT dosimetry projects.

  17. Portal Hypertension as Immune Mediate Disease

    PubMed Central

    Manti, Sara; Marseglia, Lucia; D'Angelo, Gabriella; Filippelli, Martina; Cuppari, Caterina; Gitto, Eloisa; Romano, Claudio; Arrigo, Teresa; Salpietro, Carmelo

    2014-01-01

    Context: Portal Hypertension (PH) is a progressive complication due to chronic liver disease. In addition to pathophysiologic changes in the micro-circulation, in PH are established fibrous tissue (periportal fibrous septal) and regenerative hyperplastic nodules (from micro- to macro-nodules) promoting hepatic architectural distortion. Evidence Acquisition: A literature search of electronic databases was undertaken for the major studies published from 1981 to today. The databases searched were: PubMed, EMBASE, Orphanet, Midline and Cochrane Library. We used the keywords: "portal hypertension, children, immune system, endocrine system, liver fibrosis". Results: It is believed that PH results from three “phenotype”: ischemia-reperfusion, involving nervous system (NS); edema and oxidative damage, involving immune system; inflammation and angiogenesis, involving endocrine system. However, its exact cause still underdiagnosed and unknown. Conclusions: PH is a dynamic and potentially reversible process. Researchers have tried to demonstrate mechanisms underlying PH and its related-complications. This review focuses on the current knowledge regarding the pathogenesis, and immune, endocrine-metabolic factors of disease. The strong positive association between immune system and development of PH could be efficient to identify non-invasive markers of disease, to modify prognosis of PH, and to development and application of specific and individual anti-inflammatory therapy. PMID:24976841

  18. 76 FR 66721 - New Policies and Procedural Requirements for the Electronic Submission of Discretionary Grant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-27

    ..., grant applications electronically. The electronic portals used to support this effort are http://www... must be updated annually and is required of all applicants using the Grants.gov portal. About www...

  19. Synthesis of Ge nanocrystals embedded in a Si host matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngiam, Shih-Tung; Jensen, Klavs F.; Kolenbrander, K. D.

    1994-12-01

    The synthesis of a composite material consisting of Ge nanoclusters (greater than or equal to 2 nm in diameter) embedded in a Si host matrix is reported. The Ge nanoparticles are produced by pulsed laser ablation and are codeposited in a Si film simultaneously grown by chemical beam epitaxy using disilane. Scanning transmission electron microscopy, combined with energy-dispersive x-ray measurements, show that discrete Ge particles (greater than or equal to 2 nm diameter) are deposited within a polycrystalline Si host matrix. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals that the paricles are crystalline with a lattice spacing corresponding to that of Ge. The enhancement of Si deposition rates from silanes in the presence of Ge, previously demonstrated in chemical vapor deposition of Si(1 - x)Ge(x) alloys, is shown to facilitate the growth of a Si layer around the Ge nanocrystals. The overall composition of the Ge cluster/Si host composite material is determined by Rutherford backscattering measurements.

  20. Mortality after portal vein embolization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eung Chang; Park, Sang-Jae; Han, Sung-Sik; Park, Hyeong Min; Lee, Seung Duk; Kim, Seong Hoon; Lee, In Joon; Kim, Hyun Beom

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Portal vein embolization (PVE) is increasingly performed worldwide to reduce the possibility of liver failure after extended hepatectomy, by inducing future liver remnant (FLR) hypertrophy and atrophy of the liver planned for resection. The procedure is known to be very safe and to have few procedure-related complications. In this study, we described 2 elderly patients with Bismuth–Corlette type IV Klatskin tumor who underwent right trisectional PVE involving the embolization of the right portal vein, the left medial sectional portal branch, and caudate portal vein. Within 1 week after PVE, patients went into sepsis combined with bile leak and died within 1 month. Sepsis can cause acute liver failure in patients with chronic liver disease. In this study, the common patient characteristics other than sepsis, that is, trisectional PVE; chronic alcoholism; aged >65 years; heart-related comorbidity; and elevated serum total bilirubin (TB) level (7.0 mg/dL) at the time of the PVE procedure in 1 patient, and concurrent biliary procedure, that is, percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage in the other patient might have affected the outcomes of PVE. These cases highlight that PVE is not a safe procedure. Care should be taken to minimize the occurrence of infectious events because sepsis following PVE can cause acute liver failure. Additionally, prior to performing PVE, the extent of PVE, chronic alcohol consumption, age, comorbidity, long-lasting jaundice, concurrent biliary procedure, etc. should be considered for patient safety. PMID:28178122

  1. Teen use of a patient portal: a qualitative study of parent and teen attitudes.

    PubMed

    Bergman, David A; Brown, Nancy L; Wilson, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a qualitative study of the attitudes of teens and parents toward the use of a patient portal. We conducted two teen and two parent focus groups, one teen electronic bulletin board, and one parent electronic bulletin board. Videotapes and transcripts from the groups were independently analyzed by two reviewers for significant themes, which were then validated by two other members of the research team. Twenty-eight teens and 23 parents participated in the groups. Significant themes included issues about teens' control of their own healthcare; enthusiasm about the use of a patient portal to access their providers, seek health information, and make appointments; and concerns about confidentiality. In summary, there was considerable support among teens and parents for a patient portal as well as concerns about confidentiality. The teen portal affords an opportunity to negotiate issues of confidentiality.

  2. The new IAGOS Database Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulanger, Damien; Gautron, Benoit; Thouret, Valérie; Fontaine, Alain

    2016-04-01

    IAGOS (In-service Aircraft for a Global Observing System) is a European Research Infrastructure which aims at the provision of long-term, regular and spatially resolved in situ observations of the atmospheric composition. IAGOS observation systems are deployed on a fleet of commercial aircraft. The IAGOS database is an essential part of the global atmospheric monitoring network. It contains IAGOS-core data and IAGOS-CARIBIC (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the Atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container) data. The IAGOS Database Portal (http://www.iagos.fr, damien.boulanger@obs-mip.fr) is part of the French atmospheric chemistry data center AERIS (http://www.aeris-data.fr). The new IAGOS Database Portal has been released in December 2015. The main improvement is the interoperability implementation with international portals or other databases in order to improve IAGOS data discovery. In the frame of the IGAS project (IAGOS for the Copernicus Atmospheric Service), a data network has been setup. It is composed of three data centers: the IAGOS database in Toulouse; the HALO research aircraft database at DLR (https://halo-db.pa.op.dlr.de); and the CAMS data center in Jülich (http://join.iek.fz-juelich.de). The CAMS (Copernicus Atmospheric Monitoring Service) project is a prominent user of the IGAS data network. The new portal provides improved and new services such as the download in NetCDF or NASA Ames formats, plotting tools (maps, time series, vertical profiles, etc.) and user management. Added value products are available on the portal: back trajectories, origin of air masses, co-location with satellite data, etc. The link with the CAMS data center, through JOIN (Jülich OWS Interface), allows to combine model outputs with IAGOS data for inter-comparison. Finally IAGOS metadata has been standardized (ISO 19115) and now provides complete information about data traceability and quality.

  3. Patient portal readiness among postpartum patients in a safety net setting.

    PubMed

    Wieland, Daryl; Gibeau, Anne; Dewey, Caitlin; Roshto, Melanie; Frankel, Hilary

    2017-07-05

    Maternity patients interact with the healthcare system over an approximately ten-month interval, requiring multiple visits, acquiring pregnancy-specific education, and sharing health information among providers. Many features of a web-based patient portal could help pregnant women manage their interactions with the healthcare system; however, it is unclear whether pregnant women in safety-net settings have the resources, skills or interest required for portal adoption. In this study of postpartum patients in a safety net hospital, we aimed to: (1) determine if patients have the technical resources and skills to access a portal, (2) gain insight into their interest in health information, and (3) identify the perceived utility of portal features and potential barriers to adoption. We developed a structured questionnaire to collect demographics from postpartum patients and measure use of technology and the internet, self-reported literacy, interest in health information, awareness of portal functions, and perceived barriers to use. The questionnaire was administered in person to women in an inpatient setting. Of the 100 participants surveyed, 95% reported routine internet use and 56% used it to search for health information. Most participants had never heard of a patient portal, yet 92% believed that the portal functions were important. The two most appealing functions were to check results and manage appointments. Most participants in this study have the required resources such as a device and familiarity with the internet to access a patient portal including an interest in interacting with a healthcare institution via electronic means. Pregnancy is a critical episode of care where active engagement with the healthcare system can influence outcomes. Healthcare systems and portal developers should consider ways to tailor a portal to address the specific health needs of a maternity population including those in a safety net setting.

  4. Structure-function analysis of the DNA translocating portal of the bacteriophage T4 packaging machine.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Sanchez, Victor; Gao, Song; Kim, Hyung Rae; Kihara, Daisuke; Sun, Lei; Rossmann, Michael G; Rao, Venigalla B

    2014-03-06

    Tailed bacteriophages and herpesviruses consist of a structurally well conserved dodecameric portal at a special 5-fold vertex of the capsid. The portal plays critical roles in head assembly, genome packaging, neck/tail attachment, and genome ejection. Although the structures of portals from phages φ29, SPP1, and P22 have been determined, their mechanistic roles have not been well understood. Structural analysis of phage T4 portal (gp20) has been hampered because of its unusual interaction with the Escherichia coli inner membrane. Here, we predict atomic models for the T4 portal monomer and dodecamer, and we fit the dodecamer into the cryo-electron microscopy density of the phage portal vertex. The core structure, like that from other phages, is cone shaped with the wider end containing the "wing" and "crown" domains inside the phage head. A long "stem" encloses a central channel, and a narrow "stalk" protrudes outside the capsid. A biochemical approach was developed to analyze portal function by incorporating plasmid-expressed portal protein into phage heads and determining the effect of mutations on head assembly, DNA translocation, and virion production. We found that the protruding loops of the stalk domain are involved in assembling the DNA packaging motor. A loop that connects the stalk to the channel might be required for communication between the motor and the portal. The "tunnel" loops that project into the channel are essential for sealing the packaged head. These studies established that the portal is required throughout the DNA packaging process, with different domains participating at different stages of genome packaging. © 2013.

  5. Portals Reference Implementation v. 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, Ryan E.; Barrett, Brian W.; Pedretti, Kevin; Wheeler, Kyle; Levenhagen, Michael; Benner, Jr., Robert; Riesen, Rolf; Zago, Frank; Pearson, Bob; Welch, Steve

    2016-04-15

    The Portals reference implementation is based on the Portals 4.X API, published by Sandia National Laboratories as a freely available public document. It is designed to be an implementation of the Portals Networking Application Programming Interface and is used by several other upper layer protocols like SHMEM, GASNet and MPI. It is implemented over existing networks, specifically Ethernet and InfiniBand networks. This implementation provides Portals networks functionality and serves as a software emulation of Portals compliant networking hardware. It can be used to develop software using the Portals API prior to the debut of Portals networking hardware, such as Bull’s BXI interconnect, as well as a substitute for portals hardware on development platforms that do not have Portals compliant hardware. The reference implementation provides new capabilities beyond that of a typical network, namely the ability to have messages matched in hardware in a way compatible with upper layer software such as MPI or SHMEM. It also offers methods of offloading network operations via triggered operations, which can be used to create offloaded collective operations. Specific details on the Portals API can be found at http://portals4.org.

  6. Portal biliopathy treated with endoscopic biliary stenting

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Sung Jin; Min, Jae Ki; Kwon, So Young; Kim, Jun Hyun; Moon, Sun Young; Lee, Kang Hoon; Kim, Jeong Han; Choe, Won Hyeok; Cheon, Young Koog; Kim, Tae Hyung; Park, Hee Sun

    2016-01-01

    Portal biliopathy is defined as abnormalities in the extra- and intrahepatic ducts and gallbladder of patients with portal hypertension. This condition is associated with extrahepatic venous obstruction and dilatation of the venous plexus of the common bile duct, resulting in mural irregularities and compression of the biliary tree. Most patients with portal biliopathy remain asymptomatic, but approximately 10% of them advance to symptomatic abdominal pain, jaundice, and fever. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography are currently used as diagnostic tools because they are noninvasive and can be used to assess the regularity, length, and degree of bile duct narrowing. Management of portal biliopathy is aimed at biliary decompression and reducing the portal pressure. Portal biliopathy has rarely been reported in Korea. We present a symptomatic case of portal biliopathy that was complicated by cholangitis and successfully treated with biliary endoscopic procedures. PMID:27044769

  7. Portal Connecting Dark Photons and Axions.

    PubMed

    Kaneta, Kunio; Lee, Hye-Sung; Yun, Seokhoon

    2017-03-10

    The dark photon and the axion (or axionlike particle) are popular light particles of the hidden sector. Each of them has been actively searched for through the couplings called the vector portal and the axion portal. We introduce a new portal connecting the dark photon and the axion (axion-photon-dark photon, axion-dark photon-dark photon), which emerges in the presence of the two particles. This dark axion portal is genuinely new couplings, not just from a product of the vector portal and the axion portal, because of the internal structure of these couplings. We present a simple model that realizes the dark axion portal and discuss why it warrants a rich phenomenology.

  8. Developing Interoperable Air Quality Community Portals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falke, S. R.; Husar, R. B.; Yang, C. P.; Robinson, E. M.; Fialkowski, W. E.

    2009-04-01

    Web portals are intended to provide consolidated discovery, filtering and aggregation of content from multiple, distributed web sources targeted at particular user communities. This paper presents a standards-based information architectural approach to developing portals aimed at air quality community collaboration in data access and analysis. An important characteristic of the approach is to advance beyond the present stand-alone design of most portals to achieve interoperability with other portals and information sources. We show how using metadata standards, web services, RSS feeds and other Web 2.0 technologies, such as Yahoo! Pipes and del.icio.us, helps increase interoperability among portals. The approach is illustrated within the context of the GEOSS Architecture Implementation Pilot where an air quality community portal is being developed to provide a user interface between the portals and clearinghouse of the GEOSS Common Infrastructure and the air quality community catalog of metadata and data services.

  9. Portal Connecting Dark Photons and Axions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneta, Kunio; Lee, Hye-Sung; Yun, Seokhoon

    2017-03-01

    The dark photon and the axion (or axionlike particle) are popular light particles of the hidden sector. Each of them has been actively searched for through the couplings called the vector portal and the axion portal. We introduce a new portal connecting the dark photon and the axion (axion-photon-dark photon, axion-dark photon-dark photon), which emerges in the presence of the two particles. This dark axion portal is genuinely new couplings, not just from a product of the vector portal and the axion portal, because of the internal structure of these couplings. We present a simple model that realizes the dark axion portal and discuss why it warrants a rich phenomenology.

  10. Portal biliopathy treated with endoscopic biliary stenting.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Sung Jin; Min, Jae Ki; Kwon, So Young; Kim, Jun Hyun; Moon, Sun Young; Lee, Kang Hoon; Kim, Jeong Han; Choe, Won Hyeok; Cheon, Young Koog; Kim, Tae Hyung; Park, Hee Sun

    2016-03-01

    Portal biliopathy is defined as abnormalities in the extra- and intrahepatic ducts and gallbladder of patients with portal hypertension. This condition is associated with extrahepatic venous obstruction and dilatation of the venous plexus of the common bile duct, resulting in mural irregularities and compression of the biliary tree. Most patients with portal biliopathy remain asymptomatic, but approximately 10% of them advance to symptomatic abdominal pain, jaundice, and fever. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography are currently used as diagnostic tools because they are noninvasive and can be used to assess the regularity, length, and degree of bile duct narrowing. Management of portal biliopathy is aimed at biliary decompression and reducing the portal pressure. Portal biliopathy has rarely been reported in Korea. We present a symptomatic case of portal biliopathy that was complicated by cholangitis and successfully treated with biliary endoscopic procedures.

  11. Extrahepatic Portal Vein Obstruction and Portal Vein Thrombosis in Special Situations: Need for a New Classification

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Zeeshan A.; Bhat, Riyaz A.; Bhadoria, Ajeet S.; Maiwall, Rakhi

    2015-01-01

    Extrahepatic portal vein obstruction is a vascular disorder of liver, which results in obstruction and cavernomatous transformation of portal vein with or without the involvement of intrahepatic portal vein, splenic vein, or superior mesenteric vein. Portal vein obstruction due to chronic liver disease, neoplasm, or postsurgery is a separate entity and is not the same as extrahepatic portal vein obstruction. Patients with extrahepatic portal vein obstruction are generally young and belong mostly to Asian countries. It is therefore very important to define portal vein thrombosis as acute or chronic from management point of view. Portal vein thrombosis in certain situations such as liver transplant and postsurgical/liver transplant period is an evolving area and needs extensive research. There is a need for a new classification, which includes all areas of the entity. In the current review, the most recent literature of extrahepatic portal vein obstruction is reviewed and summarized. PMID:26021771

  12. 1. West portal of the mudshed abutting the west portal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. West portal of the mudshed abutting the west portal of Tunnel 5, view to the northwest, 135mm lens. The flat-roofed reinforced concrete mudsheds, rocksheds, and snowsheds are a common feature of the Natron Cutoff over the summit of the Cascades. With the railroad located on a sidehill bench cut into the precipitous slopes, the sheds protect the track from rock and mud slides, as well as from avalanches. With a solid wall on the uphill side and a series of columns on the downhill side, they form a gallery-like effect from within. This mudshed was built concurrent with the tunnel, in 1927. Though none of the mudsheds on the line are scheduled to be modified, this shed was documented as an integral element of Tunnel 5. - Southern Pacific Railroad Natron Cutoff, Tunnel 5, Milepost 545.2, McCredie Springs, Lane County, OR

  13. [Selective portal-systemic shunts for bleeding portal hypertension].

    PubMed

    Orozco, H; Mercado, M A; Takahashi, T; García-Tsao, G; Guevara, L; Hernandez-Ortiz, J; Tielve, M

    1990-07-01

    At the beginning of the seventies, we began to perform regularly selective shunts for the treatment of portal hypertension. In a 15 year period, 177 patients (155 with liver cirrhosis) were operated with three kinds of selective shunts: 128 with a Warren shunt, 29 with an end to end renosplenic shunt and 20 with a splenocaval shunt. 167 cases were operated in an elective fashion. The 15 years global operative mortality, was 14.4%. Operative mortality of the Child A patients, was 11.6%. Survival for the Child A group was 74.6% at 1 year, 68.2% at 5 years and 64.6% at 15 years. Incapacitating encephalopathy was observed in 6.9%, rebleeding 6.2% and shunt thrombosis in 6.2%. Portal vein alterations in the postoperative period were observed: in 13.3% a reduction in diameter ocurred and in 20.5%, thrombosis was recorded. It is concluded that when feasible, the selective shunts are the treatment of choice for portal hypertension in those patients with good liver function.

  14. Thermal stability of hydrogen and sulfur atoms in a-SiSx:H films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Takashi; Nitta, Shoji; Wang, S. L.; Taylor, P. C.

    1996-11-01

    The thermal stability of hydrogen and sulfur atoms in a-SiSx:H films is studied using gas effusion spectra and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis. Two evolution peaks of hydrogen are found above 400 °C in gas effusion spectra of a-SiSx:H films. Sulfur atoms are evolved only above 550 °C. The stability of sulfur and the relationship of dangling bonds to sulfur effusion are discussed.

  15. Vertical flow chemical detection portal

    DOEpatents

    Linker, Kevin L.; Hannum, David W.; Conrad, Frank James

    1999-01-01

    A portal apparatus for screening objects or persons for the presence of trace amounts of chemical substances such as illicit drugs or explosives. The apparatus has a test space, in which a person may stand, defined by two generally upright sides spanned by a horizontal transom. One or more fans in the transom generate a downward air flow (uni-directional) within the test space. The air flows downwardly from a high pressure upper zone, past the object or person to be screened. Air moving past the object dislodges from the surface thereof both volatile and nonvolatile particles of the target substance. The particles are entrained into the air flow which continues flowing downward to a lower zone of reduced pressure, where the particle-bearing air stream is directed out of the test space and toward preconcentrator and detection components. The sides of the portal are specially configured to partially contain and maintain the air flow.

  16. Vertical flow chemical detection portal

    DOEpatents

    Linker, K.L.; Hannum, D.W.; Conrad, F.J.

    1999-06-22

    A portal apparatus is described for screening objects or persons for the presence of trace amounts of chemical substances such as illicit drugs or explosives. The apparatus has a test space, in which a person may stand, defined by two generally upright sides spanned by a horizontal transom. One or more fans in the transom generate a downward air flow (uni-directional) within the test space. The air flows downwardly from a high pressure upper zone, past the object or person to be screened. Air moving past the object dislodges from the surface thereof both volatile and nonvolatile particles of the target substance. The particles are entrained into the air flow which continues flowing downward to a lower zone of reduced pressure, where the particle-bearing air stream is directed out of the test space and toward preconcentrator and detection components. The sides of the portal are specially configured to partially contain and maintain the air flow. 3 figs.

  17. Uzbekistan Radiation Portal Monnitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, J; Knapp, R; Loshak, A; Yuldashev, B; Petrenko, V

    2005-06-10

    The work proposed in this presentation builds on the foundation set by the DTRA funded demonstration project begun in 2000 and completed in December of 2003. This previous work consisted of two phases whose overall objective was to install portal radiation monitors at four select ports-of-entry in Uzbekistan (Tashkent International Airport, Gisht-Kuprik (Kazakhstan border), Alat (Turkmenistan border), and Termez (Afghanistan border)) in order to demonstrate their effectiveness in preventing the illicit trafficking of nuclear materials. The objectives also included developing and demonstrating capabilities in the design, installation, operation, training, and maintenance of a radiation portal monitoring system. The system and demonstration project has proved successful in many ways. An effective working relationship among the Uzbekistan Customs Services, Uzbekistan Border Guards, and Uzbekistan Institute of Nuclear Physics has been developed. There has been unprecedented openness with the sharing of portal monitor data with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The system has proved to be effective, with detection of illicit trafficking, and, at Alat, an arrest of three persons illegally transporting radioactive materials into Turkmenistan. The demonstration project has made Uzbekistan a model nonproliferation state in Central Asia and, with an expanded program, places them in a position to seal a likely transit route for illicit nuclear materials. These results will be described. In addition, this work is currently being expanded to include additional ports-of-entry in Uzbekistan. The process for deciding on which additional ports-of-entry to equip will also be described.

  18. The Higgs portal above threshold

    DOE PAGES

    Craig, Nathaniel; Lou, Hou Keong; McCullough, Matthew; ...

    2016-02-18

    The discovery of the Higgs boson opens the door to new physics interacting via the Higgs Portal, including motivated scenarios relating to baryogenesis, dark matter, and electroweak naturalness. In this study, we systematically explore the collider signatures of singlet scalars produced via the Higgs Portal at the 14TeV LHC and a prospective 100TeV hadron collider. We focus on the challenging regime where the scalars are too heavy to be produced in the decays of an on-shell Higgs boson, and instead are produced primarily via an o ff-shell Higgs. Assuming these scalars escape the detector, promising channels include missing energy inmore » association with vector boson fusion, monojets, and top pairs. In addition, we forecast the sensitivity of searches in these channels at √s = 14 & 100 TeV and compare collider reach to the motivated parameter space of singlet-assisted electroweak baryogenesis, Higgs Portal dark matter, and neutral naturalness.« less

  19. Z-portal dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Arcadi, Giorgio; Mambrini, Yann; Richard, Francois E-mail: yann.mambrini@th.u-psud.fr

    2015-03-01

    We propose to generalize the extensions of the Standard Model where the Z boson serves as a mediator between the Standard Model sector and the dark sector χ. We show that, like in the Higgs portal case, the combined constraints from the recent direct searches restrict severely the nature of the coupling of the dark matter to the Z boson and set a limit m{sub χ} ∼> 200 GeV (except in a very narrow region around the Z-pole region). Using complementarity between spin dependent, spin independent and FERMI limits, we predict the nature of this coupling, more specifically the axial/vectorial ratio that respects a thermal dark matter coupled through a Z-portal while not being excluded by the current observations. We also show that the next generation of experiments of the type LZ or XENON1T will test Z-portal scenario for dark matter mass up to 2 TeV . The condition of a thermal dark matter naturally predicts the spin-dependent scattering cross section on the neutron to be σ{sup SD}{sub χn} ≅ 10{sup −40} cm{sup 2}, which then becomes a clear prediction of the model and a signature testable in the near future experiments.

  20. Z-portal dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Arcadi, Giorgio; Mambrini, Yann; Richard, Francois

    2015-03-11

    We propose to generalize the extensions of the Standard Model where the Z boson serves as a mediator between the Standard Model sector and the dark sector χ. We show that, like in the Higgs portal case, the combined constraints from the recent direct searches restrict severely the nature of the coupling of the dark matter to the Z boson and set a limit m{sub χ}≳200 GeV (except in a very narrow region around the Z-pole region). Using complementarity between spin dependent, spin independent and FERMI limits, we predict the nature of this coupling, more specifically the axial/vectorial ratio that respects a thermal dark matter coupled through a Z-portal while not being excluded by the current observations. We also show that the next generation of experiments of the type LZ or XENON1T will test Z-portal scenario for dark matter mass up to 2 TeV. The condition of a thermal dark matter naturally predicts the spin-dependent scattering cross section on the neutron to be σ{sub χn}{sup SD}≃10{sup −40} cm{sup 2}, which then becomes a clear prediction of the model and a signature testable in the near future experiments.

  1. Z-portal dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcadi, Giorgio; Mambrini, Yann; Richard, Francois

    2015-03-01

    We propose to generalize the extensions of the Standard Model where the Z boson serves as a mediator between the Standard Model sector and the dark sector χ. We show that, like in the Higgs portal case, the combined constraints from the recent direct searches restrict severely the nature of the coupling of the dark matter to the Z boson and set a limit mχ gtrsim 200 GeV (except in a very narrow region around the Z-pole region). Using complementarity between spin dependent, spin independent and FERMI limits, we predict the nature of this coupling, more specifically the axial/vectorial ratio that respects a thermal dark matter coupled through a Z-portal while not being excluded by the current observations. We also show that the next generation of experiments of the type LZ or XENON1T will test Z-portal scenario for dark matter mass up to 2 TeV . The condition of a thermal dark matter naturally predicts the spin-dependent scattering cross section on the neutron to be σSDχn simeq 10-40 cm2, which then becomes a clear prediction of the model and a signature testable in the near future experiments.

  2. [Mexican consensus on portal hypertension].

    PubMed

    Narváez-Rivera, R M; Cortez-Hernández, C A; González-González, J A; Tamayo-de la Cuesta, J L; Zamarripa-Dorsey, F; Torre-Delgadillo, A; Rivera-Ramos, J F J; Vinageras-Barroso, J I; Muneta-Kishigami, J E; Blancas-Valencia, J M; Antonio-Manrique, M; Valdovinos-Andraca, F; Brito-Lugo, P; Hernández-Guerrero, A; Bernal-Reyes, R; Sobrino-Cossío, S; Aceves-Tavares, G R; Huerta-Guerrero, H M; Moreno-Gómez, N; Bosques-Padilla, F J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the Mexican Consensus on Portal Hypertension was to develop documented guidelines to facilitate clinical practice when dealing with key events of the patient presenting with portal hypertension and variceal bleeding. The panel of experts was made up of Mexican gastroenterologists, hepatologists, and endoscopists, all distinguished professionals. The document analyzes themes of interest in the following modules: preprimary and primary prophylaxis, acute variceal hemorrhage, and secondary prophylaxis. The management of variceal bleeding has improved considerably in recent years. Current information indicates that the general management of the cirrhotic patient presenting with variceal bleeding should be carried out by a multidisciplinary team, with such an approach playing a major role in the final outcome. The combination of drug and endoscopic therapies is recommended for initial management; vasoactive drugs should be started as soon as variceal bleeding is suspected and maintained for 5 days. After the patient is stabilized, urgent diagnostic endoscopy should be carried out by a qualified endoscopist, who then performs the corresponding endoscopic variceal treatment. Antibiotic prophylaxis should be regarded as an integral part of treatment, started upon hospital admittance and continued for 5 days. If there is treatment failure, rescue therapies should be carried out immediately, taking into account that interventional radiology therapies are very effective in controlling refractory variceal bleeding. These guidelines have been developed for the purpose of achieving greater clinical efficacy and are based on the best evidence of portal hypertension that is presently available.

  3. Experimental investigation of the response of an a-Si EPID to an unflattened photon beam from an Elekta Precise linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Tyner, Elaine; McClean, Brendan; McCavana, Patrick; af Wetterstedt, Sacha

    2009-04-01

    The characteristics of an Elekta amorphous silicon (a-Si) electronic portal imaging device (EPID) in response to a 6 MV photon beam generated without a flattening filter, an unflattened beam, have been determined. The characteristics were then compared to those for a conventional photon beam generated with a flattening filter in the beam, a flattened beam, in order to determine the suitability of an a-Si EPID for transit dosimetry. The response of the EPID to the unflattened beam increased by 7.3% compared to the flattened beam, and copper buildup of 3 mm reduces the variation in the EPID response over air gaps ranging from 60 to 40 cm to within 2.5%. The scattering properties of the EPID with changing field size for the unflattened beam agree with those measured for a flattened beam to within 2%. Due to the minimal variation in the energy spectrum of the unflattened beam with the distance from the central axis, it was expected and experimentally found that the profile shape of the unflattened beam changes minimally with increasing phantom thickness. For an unflattened beam, EPID measured profiles with and without a phantom in the beam agree to within 2% using confidence limits. The difference between EPID and ionization chamber profiles measured at a depth of 5 cm in water is reduced compared to a flattened beam and remains unchanged with increasing phantom thickness. A difference of 4% was found between EPID profiles and the corresponding profiles measured with an ionization chamber measured in water over a range of phantom thickness. A calibration procedure was developed to convert EPID images to the equivalent absolute dose in water, at the EPID plane. A gamma evaluation was performed comparing the calibrated EPID images to dose measured with an ionization chamber array for rectangular fields and an IMRT segment. The fields were situated on axis and at 5 cm off axis with and without a 25 cm thick phantom in the beam. The gamma evaluation criteria of 3% and 3 mm

  4. Optimum doping level in a-Si:H and a-SiC:H materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjadj, A.; St'ahel, P.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P.; Paret, V.; Bounouh, Y.; Martin, J. C.

    1998-01-01

    The changes in the optical and electrical properties of thick a-Si:H and a-SiC:H films doped with diborane are investigated. In situ spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements reveal that, at a ratio of diborane to silane Cg=[B2H6]/[SiH4]<10-3, the optical properties of both materials are not strongly modified by boron doping. However, in the case of a-Si:H films, an improvement of the morphological and optical properties is observed at Cg=0.45×10-3. The existence of an optimum doping level at Cg<10-3 in the case of an a-Si:H p layer is confirmed by the dependence of the open-circuit voltage of a-Si:H based solar cells on the doping level of the p layer.

  5. Healthcare Team Perceptions of a Portal for Parents of Hospitalized Children Before and After Implementation.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Michelle M; Dean, Shannon M; Carayon, Pascale; Wetterneck, Tosha B; Hoonakker, Peter L T

    2017-03-15

    Patient electronic health record (EHR) portals can enhance patient and family engagement by providing information and a way to communicate with their healthcare team (HCT). However, portal implementation has been limited to ambulatory settings and met with resistance from HCTs. We evaluated HCT perceptions before and 6-months after implementation of an inpatient EHR portal application on a tablet computer given to parents of hospitalized children. This repeated cross-sectional study was conducted with HCT members (nurses, physicians, ancillary staff) on a medical/surgical unit at a quaternary children's hospital. From December 2014-June 2015, parents of children <12 years old were given a portal application on a tablet computer. It provided real-time vitals, medications, lab results, schedules, education, HCT information and a way to send the HCT messages/requests. HCT members completed surveys pre- and post-implementation regarding their portal perceptions. Pre-post differences in HCT perceptions were compared using chi-squared, Mann-Whitney and Kruskall Wallis tests. Pre-implementation, HCT respondents (N=94) were generally optimistic about the benefits of a portal for parents; however, all anticipated challenges to portal use. Over the next 6-months, 296 parents used the portal, sending 176 requests and 36 messages. Post-implementation, HCT respondent (N=70) perceptions of these challenges were significantly reduced (all p<0.001), including: parents (will) have too many questions (69 vs. 3%, pre-post), parents (will) know results before the HCT (65 vs. 1%), staff (would be/are) skeptical (43 vs. 21%) and there (will be/is) not enough technical support (28 vs. 1%). All HCT respondents anticipated challenges in providing a portal to parents of hospitalized children; however, these concerns were minimized after implementation.

  6. Preduodenal portal vein: its surgical significance.

    PubMed

    Makey, D A; Bowen, J C

    1978-11-01

    Preduodenal portal vein is a rare anatomical variant which may be one of many anomalies in the neonate with duodenal "atresia." Preduodenal portal vein also may be an occasional finding in an adult undergoing biliary, gastric, or pancreatic surgery. Awareness and recognition of the anomaly are essential for the avoidance of injury during such operations. We report here a symptomless patient whose preduodenal portal vein was discovered at cholecystectomy.

  7. Congenital abnormalities associated with extrahepatic portal hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Odièvre, M; Pigé, G; Alagille, D

    1977-01-01

    Congenital abnormalities were present in 12 out of 30 (40%) children with extrahepatic portal hypertension of unknown cause, but in only 2 out of 17 (12%) children with extnahepatic portal hypertension secondary to umbilical vein catheterization or omphalitis. The most frequent abnormalities in this series and in published reports were atrial septal defect, malformation of the biliary tract, and anomalous inferior vena cava. These findings are consistent with the view that some cases with extrahepatic portal hypertension are congenital in origin. PMID:869567

  8. Congenital abnormalities associated with extrahepatic portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Odièvre, M; Pigé, G; Alagille, D

    1977-05-01

    Congenital abnormalities were present in 12 out of 30 (40%) children with extrahepatic portal hypertension of unknown cause, but in only 2 out of 17 (12%) children with extnahepatic portal hypertension secondary to umbilical vein catheterization or omphalitis. The most frequent abnormalities in this series and in published reports were atrial septal defect, malformation of the biliary tract, and anomalous inferior vena cava. These findings are consistent with the view that some cases with extrahepatic portal hypertension are congenital in origin.

  9. Noncirrhotic portal fibrosis after Wilms' tumor therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J.A.; Marshall, G.S.; Neblett, W.W.; Gray, G.; Ghishan, F.K.

    1986-04-01

    A 9-yr-old girl developed massive hemorrhage from esophageal varices 2 yr after combined modality therapy for Wilms' tumor. Evaluation showed a patent extrahepatic portal venous system and an elevated splenic pulp pressure. In contrast to previous reports of hepatopathy after irradiation injury, histologic sections of the liver did not demonstrate occlusion of the central veins, but rather a diffuse obliteration of intrahepatic portal venous radicles. This pattern of noncirrhotic portal fibrosis has not been described following antitumor therapy.

  10. 29 CFR 785.50 - Section 4 of the Portal-to-Portal Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Section 4 of the Portal-to-Portal Act. 785.50 Section 785.50 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Provisions § 785.50 Section 4 of the Portal-to-Portal Act. Section 4 of this Act provides that: (a) Except as...

  11. 29 CFR 785.50 - Section 4 of the Portal-to-Portal Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Section 4 of the Portal-to-Portal Act. 785.50 Section 785.50 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Provisions § 785.50 Section 4 of the Portal-to-Portal Act. Section 4 of this Act provides that: (a) Except as...

  12. Comparative Study of Portal Circulation Time in Patients with Portal Hypertension - USSR -

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1960-09-27

    clinical diagnosis of portal hypertension is the determination of the different hemodynamic changes and, in particular, the determination of the rate...clinical data induced us to share some of our experience accumulated in studying hemodynamic changes in patients with portal hypertension » Beginning...in 1954 we directed our principal attention to determining the rate of portal blood flow in studying hemodynamic changes in patients with portal

  13. Solutions for deploying multi-architecture EHRs on a single EHR educational portal.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Brian; Kushniruk, Andre; Borycki, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    In this paper technical issues are discussed related to the development and implementation of a remotely accessible portal that allows users to interact with a range of electronic health records (EHRs). The Portal (known as the UVic EHR Educational Portal) was designed to allow for the hosting of a range of types of EHRs, ranging from thick client systems to web-browser-based systems. The portal has been successfully deployed to allow simultaneous access by hundreds of users (i.e., health professional students) in order to work with representative EHRs for educational purposes. The overall architecture is described and issues related to the challenges in allowing for the hosting of systems of divers designs.

  14. Portal Hypertension Secondary to Isolated Liver Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mojtahedzadeh, Mona; Otoukesh, Salman; Shahsafi, Mohammad R.; Tahbaz, Mohammad O.; Rahvari, Seyed K.; Poorabdollah, Mihan; Sajadi, Mohammad M.

    2012-01-01

    In this report, we present a case of isolated liver tuberculosis (TB) as a cause of non-cirrhotic portal hypertension leading to bleeding esophageal varices. Although TB has been known to cause portal hypertension in a variety of ways, this case was notable for the presence of periportal inflammation and granulomas, also seen in hepatic schistosomiasis. Herein, we discuss isolated liver TB and the differential diagnosis of non-cirrhotic portal hypertension. In endemic areas, TB should be considered in the differential diagnosis of non-cirrhotic portal hypertension. PMID:22764308

  15. Preduodenal portal vein: surgery and radiographic appearance.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, E T; Burton, E M; Hixson, S D; Hollabaugh, R S

    1990-12-01

    Preduodenal portal vein is rare, with 63 cases reported in the literature. In general, this anomaly occurs in children with associated small bowel obstruction. We report a newborn infant who presented with duodenal stenosis, mongolism, and preduodenal portal vein. Treatment consisted of a duodenoduodenal anastomosis without mobilizing the portal vein. The correlation between imaging techniques and the operative findings is discussed. Because identification of preduodenal portal vein at surgery is important, preoperative sonography may be useful in selected cases to define the position of the vein.

  16. Patient portals - An online tool for your health

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000880.htm Patient portals - an online tool for your health To use ... private and secure. What is in a Patient Portal? With a patient portal, you can: Make appointments ( ...

  17. 2. PORTAL ONE (MANWAY) FROM SOUTHWEST Sublet Mine No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. PORTAL ONE (MANWAY) FROM SOUTHWEST - Sublet Mine No. 6, Portal One, South Portal, west side of Willow Creek Valley, east of County Road No. 306, 3 miles north of U.S. Highway 189, Kemmerer, Lincoln County, WY

  18. 2. PORTAL TWO FROM SOUTHEAST Sublet Mine No. 6, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. PORTAL TWO FROM SOUTHEAST - Sublet Mine No. 6, Portal Two, North portal, west side of Willow Creek Valley, east of County Road No. 306, 3 miles north of U.S. Highway 189, Kemmerer, Lincoln County, WY

  19. 1. PORTAL TWO FROM NORTHEAST Sublet Mine No. 6, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. PORTAL TWO FROM NORTHEAST - Sublet Mine No. 6, Portal Two, North portal, west side of Willow Creek Valley, east of County Road No. 306, 3 miles north of U.S. Highway 189, Kemmerer, Lincoln County, WY

  20. 1. PORTAL ONE (MANWAY) FROM SOUTHEAST Sublet Mine No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. PORTAL ONE (MANWAY) FROM SOUTHEAST - Sublet Mine No. 6, Portal One, South Portal, west side of Willow Creek Valley, east of County Road No. 306, 3 miles north of U.S. Highway 189, Kemmerer, Lincoln County, WY

  1. A Semantically Enabled Portal for Facilitating the Public Service Provision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loutas, Nikolaos; Giantsiou, Lemonia; Peristeras, Vassilios; Tarabanis, Konstantinos

    During the past years, governments have made significant efforts to improve both their internal processes and the services that they provide to citizens and businesses. These led to several successful e-Government applications (e.g., see www.epractice.eu). One of the most popular tools that was used by governments in order to modernize their services and make them accessible is e-Government portals, e.g., (Drigas et al. 2005), (Fang 2002). The main goals of such portals are: To make available complete, easy to understand, and structured information about public services and public administration's modus operandi, which will assist citizens during the service provision process. To facilitate the electronic execution of public services. Nevertheless, most of such efforts did not succeed. Gartner argues that most e-Government strategies have not achieved their objectives and have failed to trigger sustainable government transformation to greater efficiency and citizen-centricity (DiMaio 2007).

  2. Structural properties of a-Si films and their effect on aluminum induced crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Tankut, Aydin; Ozkol, Engin; Karaman, Mehmet; Turan, Rasit; Canli, Sedat

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, we report the influence of the structural properties of amorphous silicon (a-Si) on its subsequent crystallization behavior via the aluminum induced crystallization (AIC) method. Two distinct a-Si deposition techniques, electron beam evaporation and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), are compared for their effect on the overall AIC kinetics as well as the properties of the final poly-crystalline (poly-Si) silicon film. Raman and FTIR spectroscopy results indicate that the PECVD grown a-Si films has higher intermediate-range order, which is enhanced for increased hydrogen dilution during deposition. With increasing intermediate-range order of the a-Si, the rate of AIC is diminished, leading larger poly-Si grain size.

  3. ESO's User Portal: lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavan, A. M.; Tacconi-Garman, L. E.; Peron, M.; Sogni, F.; Dorigo, D.; Nass, P.; Fourniol, N.; Sforna, D.; Haggouchi, K.; Dolensky, M.

    2008-07-01

    ESO introduced a User Portal for its scientific services in November 2007. Registered users have a central entry point for the Observatory's offerings, the extent of which depends on the users' roles - see [1]. The project faced and overcame a number of challenging hurdles between inception and deployment, and ESO learned a number of useful lessons along the way. The most significant challenges were not only technical in nature; organization and coordination issues took a significant toll as well. We also indicate the project's roadmap for the future.

  4. Capsule endoscopy in portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rondonotti, Emanuele; Villa, Federica; Dell' Era, Alessandra; Tontini, Gian Eugenio; de Franchis, Roberto

    2010-05-01

    Since the introduction of small bowel capsule endoscopy, and more recently of esophageal capsule endoscopy, these diagnostic tools have become available for the evaluation of the consequences of portal hypertension in the esophagus, stomach, and small intestine. The main advantage of the esophageal and the small bowel capsule is the relatively less invasiveness that could potentially increase patients' adherence to endoscopic screening/surveillance programs. When esophageal capsule endoscopy was compared with traditional gastroscopy, it showed good sensitivity and specificity in recognizing the presence and the size of esophageal varices. However, the results are not consistent among studies, and more data are needed.

  5. SU-E-T-364: 6X FFF and 10X FFF Portal Dosimetry Output Factor Verification: Application for SRS/SBRT

    SciTech Connect

    Gulam, M; Bellon, M; Gopal, A; Wen, N; Chetty, I; Gordon, J; Hames, S; Schmidt, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To enhance portal dosimetry of high dose rate SRS/SBRT plan verifications with extensive imager measurement of output factors (OF). Methods: Electronic portal image dosimetry (EPID), implemented on the Varian Edge allows for acquisition of its two energies: 6X FFF and 10 FFF (1400 and 2400 MU/min, respectively) at source to imager distance (SID) =100cm without imager saturation. Square and rectangular aSi OF following EPID calibration were obtained. Data taken was similar to that obtained during beam commissioning (of almost all field sizes from 1×1 to 15×15 and 20×20 cm{sup 2}, [Trilogy] and [Edge], respectively) to construct a table using the OF tool for use in the Portal Dosimetry Prediction Algorithm (PDIP v11). The Trilogy 6x SRS 1000 MU/min EPID data were taken at 140 SID. The large number of OF were obtained for comparison to that obtained with diode detectors and ion chambers (cc13 for >3×3 field size). As Edge PDIP verification is currently ongoing, EPID measurements of three SRS/SBRT plans for the Trilogy were taken and compared to results obtained prior to these measurements. Results: The relative difference output factors of field sizes 2×2 and higher compared to commissioning data were (mean+/-SD, [range]): Edge 6X (−1.9+/−2.9%, [−5.9%,3.1%]), Edge 10X (−0.7+/−1.2%, [− 3.3%,0.8%] and Trilogy (0.03+/−0.5%, [−1.4%,1.1%]) with EPID over predicting. The results for the 140 SID showed excellent agreement throughout except at the 1×1 to 1×15 and 15×1 field sizes where differences were: −10.6%, −6.0% and −5.8%. The differences were also most pronounced for the 1×1 at 100 SID. They were −7.4% and −11.5% for 6X and 10X, respectively. The Gamma (3%, 1mm) for three clinical plans improved by 8.7+/−1.8%. Conclusion: Results indicate that imager output factor measurements at any SID of high dose rate SRS/SBRT are quite reliable for portal dosimetry plan verification except for the smallest fields. This work was not

  6. H2O incorporation in the phosphorene/a-SiO2 interface: a first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scopel, Wanderlã L.; Souza, Everson S.; Miwa, R. H.

    2017-02-01

    Based on first-principles calculations, we investigate (i) the energetic stability and electronic properties of single-layer phosphorene (SLP) adsorbed on an amorphous SiO2 surface (SLP/a-SiO2), and (ii) the further incorporation of water molecules at the phosphorene/a-SiO2 interface. In (i), we find that the phosphorene sheet binds to a-SiO2 through van der Waals interactions, even in the presence of oxygen vacancies on the surface. The SLP/a-SiO2 system presents a type-I band alignment, with the valence (conduction) band maximum (minimum) of the phosphorene lying within the energy gap of the a-SiO2 substrate. The structure and the surface-potential corrugations promote the formation of electron-rich and electron-poor regions on the phosphorene sheet and at the SLP/a-SiO2 interface. Such charge density puddles are strengthened by the presence of oxygen vacancies in a-SiO2. In (ii), because of the amorphous structure of the surface, we consider a number of plausible geometries for H2O embedded in the SLP/a-SiO2 interface. There is an energetic preference for the formation of hydroxyl (OH) groups on the a-SiO2 surface. Meanwhile, in the presence of oxygenated water or interstitial oxygen in the phosphorene sheet, we observe the formation of metastable OH bonded to the phosphorene, and the formation of energetically stable P-O-Si chemical bonds at the SLP/a-SiO2 interface. Further x-ray absorption spectra simulations are performed, which aim to provide additional structural/electronic information on the oxygen atoms forming hydroxyl groups or P-O-Si chemical bonds at the interface region.

  7. Adenoviral E4 34K protein interacts with virus packaging components and may serve as the putative portal.

    PubMed

    Ahi, Yadvinder S; Hassan, Ahmed O; Vemula, Sai V; Li, Kunpeng; Jiang, Wen; Zhang, Guang Jun; Mittal, Suresh K

    2017-08-08

    Studies on dsDNA bacteriophages have revealed that a DNA packaging complex assembles at a special vertex called the 'portal vertex' and consists of a portal, a DNA packaging ATPase and other components. AdV protein IVa2 is presumed to function as a DNA packaging ATPase. However, a protein that functions as a portal is not yet identified in AdVs. To identify the AdV portal, we performed secondary structure analysis on a set of AdV proteins and compared them with the clip region of the portal proteins of bacteriophages phi29, SPP1 and T4. Our analysis revealed that the E4 34K protein of HAdV-C5 contains a region of strong similarity with the clip region of the known portal proteins. E4 34K was found to be present in empty as well as mature AdV particles. In addition, E4 34K co-immunoprecipitates and colocalizes with AdV packaging proteins. Immunogold electron microscopy demonstrated that E4 34K is located at a single site on the virus surface. Finally, tertiary structure prediction of E4 34K and its comparison with that of single subunits of Phi29, SPP1 and T4 portal proteins revealed remarkable similarity. In conclusion, our results suggest that E4 34K is the putative AdV portal protein.

  8. The patient portal: Considerations for NPs.

    PubMed

    Elkind, Elizabeth C; Higgins, Kathleen M

    2017-03-07

    Hospitals, patient-centered medical homes, and provider practices have either introduced or are in the process of planning for patient portals. The NP plays an important role in the patient engagement initiative. This article explores patient portal strategies and resources to support this technology integration and practice change.

  9. Factors Affecting Faculty Web Portal Usability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bringula, Rex P.; Basa, Roselle S.

    2011-01-01

    The study investigated the factors that might significantly affect web portal usability. Results of the study were intended to serve as inputs for faculty web portal development of the University of the East-Manila. Descriptive statistics utilized questionnaire data from 82 faculty members. The data showed that most of the respondents were…

  10. Factors Affecting Faculty Web Portal Usability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bringula, Rex P.; Basa, Roselle S.

    2011-01-01

    The study investigated the factors that might significantly affect web portal usability. Results of the study were intended to serve as inputs for faculty web portal development of the University of the East-Manila. Descriptive statistics utilized questionnaire data from 82 faculty members. The data showed that most of the respondents were…

  11. Electronic Tools for Trustees Gaining Favor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaeffer, Marc; Schwartz, Merrill

    2009-01-01

    This article describes electronic board portals and how they can contribute to the efficiency of the functioning board in delivering timely information for decision making. The electronic board portals are provider-hosted services that allow those who prepare board materials to organize and place on the Web a secure version of board packets, with…

  12. Electronic Tools for Trustees Gaining Favor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaeffer, Marc; Schwartz, Merrill

    2009-01-01

    This article describes electronic board portals and how they can contribute to the efficiency of the functioning board in delivering timely information for decision making. The electronic board portals are provider-hosted services that allow those who prepare board materials to organize and place on the Web a secure version of board packets, with…

  13. a-Si:H solar cells: SiH(2)Cl(2) as a source gas and a-SiGe:H alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Adam More

    This thesis gives an overview of the reasons why solar cells are a necessity in this world of carbon constrained energy use. The most important factors upon which to work to improve the competitiveness of photovoltaic generated electricity with conventional, fossil fuel based generation are the cost of the solar cell and the cell conversion efficiency. The two main technical thrusts of this thesis--DCS as a source gas and a-SiGe:H alloys--attacked two aspects of these problems. a-SiGe:H is used in multijunction cells to achieve higher efficiencies and DCS can be used to increase the deposition rate of a-Si:H thus decreasing the time it takes to make a solar cell. We review the various experimental methods used to investigate the optical and electronic properties of a-Si:H thin films as well as the methods used to measure solar cell efficiency and determine the effectiveness of the various portions of a solar cell. Using DCS as a source gas helped us increase the deposition rate by factor of 5 while maintaining the film quality; however chlorinated intrinsic films had higher defect densities and lower photoconductivity than standard a-Si:H films. Use of DCS to deposit i-layers of a solar cell led us to the discovery that Cl enhances the doping efficiency of B in a-Si:H. The enhanced doping of a-SiC:H as the p-layer of a solar cell increased the cell's efficiency from 7.1% to 7.8%. A-SiGe:H alloys were investigated over a range of Tauc gaps from 1.7 eV down to 1.0 eV. The optical and electronic properties of these films were investigated as well as their incorporation in solar cells. Different bandgap graded structures were used in the i-layer of a solar cell with the conclusion that the bathtub shaped i-layer yields the highest stabilized efficiency. An attempt was made to fabricate solar cells using cathode-deposited a-SiGe:H alloys as the i-layer in collaboration with Harvard University. The cells fabricated could neither prove nor disprove the effectiveness of

  14. Idiopathic noncirrhotic portal hypertension: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Riggio, Oliviero; Gioia, Stefania; Pentassuglio, Ilaria; Nicoletti, Valeria; Valente, Michele; d’Amati, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    The term idiopathic noncirrhotic portal hypertension (INCPH) has been recently proposed to replace terms, such as hepatoportal sclerosis, idiopathic portal hypertension, incomplete septal cirrhosis, and nodular regenerative hyperplasia, used to describe patients with a hepatic presinusoidal cause of portal hypertension of unknown etiology, characterized by features of portal hypertension (esophageal varices, nonmalignant ascites, porto-venous collaterals), splenomegaly, patent portal, and hepatic veins and no clinical and histological signs of cirrhosis. Physicians should learn to look for this condition in a number of clinical settings, including cryptogenic cirrhosis, a disease known to be associated with INCPH, drug administration, and even chronic alterations in liver function tests. Once INCPH is clinically suspected, liver histology becomes mandatory for the correct diagnosis. However, pathologists should be familiar with the histological features of INCPH, especially in cases in which histology is not only requested to exclude liver cirrhosis. PMID:27555800

  15. Cholestasis in children with portal vein obstruction.

    PubMed

    Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Franchi, Stéphanie; Gauthier, Frédéric; Fabre, Monique; Pariente, Danièle; Bernard, Olivier

    2005-04-01

    We describe cholestasis as a result of bile duct abnormalities in 8 children with portal vein obstruction. In a clinical, biochemical and radiological investigation of 121 children with cavernous transformation of the portal vein seen between 1986 and 2000, 8 presented with jaundice, pruritus, and/or raised serum aminotransferases and/or gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (gamma GT) activities. Each displayed dilation and narrowing of intra- and/or extrahepatic bile ducts. Surgical decompression of the portal system (portal-systemic or Rex anastomosis) resulted in the regression of the signs of cholestasis in all children. We conclude that children with portal vein obstruction may exhibit clinically significant cholestasis as a result of external compression of the bile duct by the cavernoma.

  16. Idiopathic noncirrhotic portal hypertension: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Riggio, Oliviero; Gioia, Stefania; Pentassuglio, Ilaria; Nicoletti, Valeria; Valente, Michele; d'Amati, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    The term idiopathic noncirrhotic portal hypertension (INCPH) has been recently proposed to replace terms, such as hepatoportal sclerosis, idiopathic portal hypertension, incomplete septal cirrhosis, and nodular regenerative hyperplasia, used to describe patients with a hepatic presinusoidal cause of portal hypertension of unknown etiology, characterized by features of portal hypertension (esophageal varices, nonmalignant ascites, porto-venous collaterals), splenomegaly, patent portal, and hepatic veins and no clinical and histological signs of cirrhosis. Physicians should learn to look for this condition in a number of clinical settings, including cryptogenic cirrhosis, a disease known to be associated with INCPH, drug administration, and even chronic alterations in liver function tests. Once INCPH is clinically suspected, liver histology becomes mandatory for the correct diagnosis. However, pathologists should be familiar with the histological features of INCPH, especially in cases in which histology is not only requested to exclude liver cirrhosis.

  17. A new technique for rendering complex portals.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Nick; Datta, Amitava

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we identify a general paradigm for portal-based rendering and present an image-space algorithm for rendering complex portals. Our general paradigm is an abstraction of portal-based rendering that is independent of scene geometry. It provides a framework for flexible and dynamic scene composition by connecting cells with transformative portals. Our rendering algorithm maintains a visible volume in image-space and uses fragment culling to discard fragments outside of this volume. We discuss our implementation in OpenGL and present results that show it provides correct rendering of complex portals at interactive rates on current hardware. We believe that our work will be useful in many applications that require a means of creating dynamic and meaningful visual connections between different sets of data.

  18. Patient Portals and Patient Engagement: A State of the Science Review

    PubMed Central

    DeVito Dabbs, Annette; Curran, Christine R

    2015-01-01

    Background Patient portals (ie, electronic personal health records tethered to institutional electronic health records) are recognized as a promising mechanism to support greater patient engagement, yet questions remain about how health care leaders, policy makers, and designers can encourage adoption of patient portals and what factors might contribute to sustained utilization. Objective The purposes of this state of the science review are to (1) present the definition, background, and how current literature addresses the encouragement and support of patient engagement through the patient portal, and (2) provide a summary of future directions for patient portal research and development to meaningfully impact patient engagement. Methods We reviewed literature from 2006 through 2014 in PubMed, Ovid Medline, and PsycInfo using the search terms “patient portal” OR “personal health record” OR “electronic personal health record”. Final inclusion criterion dictated that studies report on the patient experience and/or ways that patients may be supported to make competent health care decisions and act on those decisions using patient portal functionality. Results We found 120 studies that met the inclusion criteria. Based on the research questions, explicit and implicit aims of the studies, and related measures addressed, the studies were grouped into five major topics (patient adoption, provider endorsement, health literacy, usability, and utility). We discuss the findings and conclusions of studies that address the five topical areas. Conclusions Current research has demonstrated that patients’ interest and ability to use patient portals is strongly influenced by personal factors such age, ethnicity, education level, health literacy, health status, and role as a caregiver. Health care delivery factors, mainly provider endorsement and patient portal usability also contribute to patient’s ability to engage through and with the patient portal. Future

  19. The BLUEPRINT Data Analysis Portal.

    PubMed

    Fernández, José María; de la Torre, Victor; Richardson, David; Royo, Romina; Puiggròs, Montserrat; Moncunill, Valentí; Fragkogianni, Stamatina; Clarke, Laura; Flicek, Paul; Rico, Daniel; Torrents, David; Carrillo de Santa Pau, Enrique; Valencia, Alfonso

    2016-11-23

    The impact of large and complex epigenomic datasets on biological insights or clinical applications is limited by the lack of accessibility by easy, intuitive, and fast tools. Here, we describe an epigenomics comparative cyber-infrastructure (EPICO), an open-access reference set of libraries to develop comparative epigenomic data portals. Using EPICO, large epigenome projects can make available their rich datasets to the community without requiring specific technical skills. As a first instance of EPICO, we implemented the BLUEPRINT Data Analysis Portal (BDAP). BDAP provides a desktop for the comparative analysis of epigenomes of hematopoietic cell types based on results, such as the position of epigenetic features, from basic analysis pipelines. The BDAP interface facilitates interactive exploration of genomic regions, genes, and pathways in the context of differentiation of hematopoietic lineages. This work represents initial steps toward broadly accessible integrative analysis of epigenomic data across international consortia. EPICO can be accessed at https://github.com/inab, and BDAP can be accessed at http://blueprint-data.bsc.es.

  20. Araport: the Arabidopsis information portal.

    PubMed

    Krishnakumar, Vivek; Hanlon, Matthew R; Contrino, Sergio; Ferlanti, Erik S; Karamycheva, Svetlana; Kim, Maria; Rosen, Benjamin D; Cheng, Chia-Yi; Moreira, Walter; Mock, Stephen A; Stubbs, Joseph; Sullivan, Julie M; Krampis, Konstantinos; Miller, Jason R; Micklem, Gos; Vaughn, Matthew; Town, Christopher D

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis Information Portal (https://www.araport.org) is a new online resource for plant biology research. It houses the Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence and associated annotation. It was conceived as a framework that allows the research community to develop and release 'modules' that integrate, analyze and visualize Arabidopsis data that may reside at remote sites. The current implementation provides an indexed database of core genomic information. These data are made available through feature-rich web applications that provide search, data mining, and genome browser functionality, and also by bulk download and web services. Araport uses software from the InterMine and JBrowse projects to expose curated data from TAIR, GO, BAR, EBI, UniProt, PubMed and EPIC CoGe. The site also hosts 'science apps,' developed as prototypes for community modules that use dynamic web pages to present data obtained on-demand from third-party servers via RESTful web services. Designed for sustainability, the Arabidopsis Information Portal strategy exploits existing scientific computing infrastructure, adopts a practical mixture of data integration technologies and encourages collaborative enhancement of the resource by its user community. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. The UCSC Ebola Genome Portal

    PubMed Central

    Haeussler, Maximilian; Karolchik, Donna; Clawson, Hiram; Raney, Brian J; Rosenbloom, Kate R.; Fujita, Pauline A.; Hinrichs, Angie S.; Speir, Matthew L; Eisenhart, Chris; Zweig, Ann S.; Haussler, David; Kent, W. James

    2014-01-01

    Background: With the Ebola epidemic raging out of control in West Africa, there has been a flurry of research into the Ebola virus, resulting in the generation of much genomic data. Methods: In response to the clear need for tools that integrate multiple strands of research around molecular sequences, we have created the University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC) Ebola Genome Browser, an adaptation of our popular UCSC Genome Browser web tool, which can be used to view the Ebola virus genome sequence from GenBank and nearly 30 annotation tracks generated by mapping external data to the reference sequence. Significant annotations include a multiple alignment comprising 102 Ebola genomes from the current outbreak, 56 from previous outbreaks, and 2 Marburg genomes as an outgroup; a gene track curated by NCBI; protein annotations curated by UniProt and antibody-binding epitopes curated by IEDB. We have extended the Genome Browser’s multiple alignment color-coding scheme to distinguish mutations resulting from non-synonymous coding changes, synonymous changes, or changes in untranslated regions. Discussion: Our Ebola Genome portal at http://genome.ucsc.edu/ebolaPortal/ links to the Ebola virus Genome Browser and an aggregate of useful information, including a collection of Ebola antibodies we are curating. PMID:25685613

  2. Araport: the Arabidopsis Information Portal

    PubMed Central

    Krishnakumar, Vivek; Hanlon, Matthew R.; Contrino, Sergio; Ferlanti, Erik S.; Karamycheva, Svetlana; Kim, Maria; Rosen, Benjamin D.; Cheng, Chia-Yi; Moreira, Walter; Mock, Stephen A.; Stubbs, Joseph; Sullivan, Julie M.; Krampis, Konstantinos; Miller, Jason R.; Micklem, Gos; Vaughn, Matthew; Town, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis Information Portal (https://www.araport.org) is a new online resource for plant biology research. It houses the Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence and associated annotation. It was conceived as a framework that allows the research community to develop and release ‘modules’ that integrate, analyze and visualize Arabidopsis data that may reside at remote sites. The current implementation provides an indexed database of core genomic information. These data are made available through feature-rich web applications that provide search, data mining, and genome browser functionality, and also by bulk download and web services. Araport uses software from the InterMine and JBrowse projects to expose curated data from TAIR, GO, BAR, EBI, UniProt, PubMed and EPIC CoGe. The site also hosts ‘science apps,’ developed as prototypes for community modules that use dynamic web pages to present data obtained on-demand from third-party servers via RESTful web services. Designed for sustainability, the Arabidopsis Information Portal strategy exploits existing scientific computing infrastructure, adopts a practical mixture of data integration technologies and encourages collaborative enhancement of the resource by its user community. PMID:25414324

  3. Can virtual simulation of breast tangential portals accurately predict lung and heart volumes?

    PubMed

    Cooke, Stacey; Rattray, Greg

    2003-03-01

    A treatment portal or simulator image has traditionally been used to demonstrate the lung and heart coverage of the breast tangential portal. In many cases, these images were acquired as a planning session on the linear accelerator. The patients were also CT scanned to assess the lung/heart volume and to determine the surgical site depth for the electron-boost energy. A study using 50 consecutive patients was performed comparing the digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) from the virtual simulation with treatment portal images. Modification to the patient's arm position is required when performing the planning CT scans due to the aperture size of the CT scanner. Virtual simulation was used to assess the potential variation of lung and heart measurements. The average difference in lung volume between the DRR and portal image was less than 2 mm, with a range of 0-5 mm. Arm position did not have a significant impact on field deviation; however, great care was taken to minimize any changes in arm position. The modification of the arm position for CT scanning did not lead to significant variations between the DRRs and portal images. The Advantage Sim software has proven capable of producing good quality DRR images, providing a realistic representation of the lung and heart volume included in the treatment portal.

  4. A Longitudinal Study of Undergraduate Students' Perceptions and Use Patterns of the University Libraries Web Portal: Does Information Literacy Instruction Play a Role?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yu-Hui

    2012-01-01

    As the availability of digital resources increased exponentially over the last two decades, academic libraries have heavily invested in electronic resources and made them accessible via library Web portals. Yet, underutilization of library Web portals is a common concern among academic libraries. According to the information systems (IS)…

  5. A Longitudinal Study of Undergraduate Students' Perceptions and Use Patterns of the University Libraries Web Portal: Does Information Literacy Instruction Play a Role?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yu-Hui

    2012-01-01

    As the availability of digital resources increased exponentially over the last two decades, academic libraries have heavily invested in electronic resources and made them accessible via library Web portals. Yet, underutilization of library Web portals is a common concern among academic libraries. According to the information systems (IS)…

  6. Encouraging Patient Portal Use in the Patient-Centered Medical Home: Three Stakeholder Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Health care organizations are increasingly offering patients access to their electronic medical record and the ability to communicate with their providers through Web-based patient portals, thus playing a prominent role within the patient-centered medical home (PCMH). However, despite enthusiasm, adoption remains low. Objective We examined factors in the PCMH context that may affect efforts to improve enrollment in a patient portal. Methods Using a sociotechnical approach, we conducted qualitative, semistructured interviews with patients and providers from 3 primary care clinics and with national leaders from across a large integrated health care system. Results We gathered perspectives and analyzed data from 4 patient focus groups and one-on-one interviews with 1 provider from each of 3 primary care clinics and 10 program leaders. We found that leaders were focused on marketing in primary care, whereas patients and providers were often already aware of the portal. In contrast, both patients and providers cited administrative and logistical barriers impeding enrollment. Further, although leadership saw the PCMH as the logical place to focus enrollment efforts, providers and patients were more circumspect and expressed concern about how the patient portal would affect their practice and experience of care. Further, some providers expressed ambivalence about patients using the portal. Despite absence of consensus on how and where to encourage portal adoption, there was wide agreement that promoting enrollment was a worthwhile goal. Conclusions Patients, clinicians, and national leaders agreed that efforts were needed to increase enrollment in the patient portal. Opinions diverged regarding the suitability of the PCMH and, specifically, the primary care clinic for promoting patient portal enrollment. Policymakers should consider diverse stakeholder perspectives in advance of interventions to increase technology adoption. PMID:27876686

  7. Encouraging Patient Portal Use in the Patient-Centered Medical Home: Three Stakeholder Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Fix, Gemmae M; Hogan, Timothy P; Amante, Daniel J; McInnes, D Keith; Nazi, Kim M; Simon, Steven R

    2016-11-22

    Health care organizations are increasingly offering patients access to their electronic medical record and the ability to communicate with their providers through Web-based patient portals, thus playing a prominent role within the patient-centered medical home (PCMH). However, despite enthusiasm, adoption remains low. We examined factors in the PCMH context that may affect efforts to improve enrollment in a patient portal. Using a sociotechnical approach, we conducted qualitative, semistructured interviews with patients and providers from 3 primary care clinics and with national leaders from across a large integrated health care system. We gathered perspectives and analyzed data from 4 patient focus groups and one-on-one interviews with 1 provider from each of 3 primary care clinics and 10 program leaders. We found that leaders were focused on marketing in primary care, whereas patients and providers were often already aware of the portal. In contrast, both patients and providers cited administrative and logistical barriers impeding enrollment. Further, although leadership saw the PCMH as the logical place to focus enrollment efforts, providers and patients were more circumspect and expressed concern about how the patient portal would affect their practice and experience of care. Further, some providers expressed ambivalence about patients using the portal. Despite absence of consensus on how and where to encourage portal adoption, there was wide agreement that promoting enrollment was a worthwhile goal. Patients, clinicians, and national leaders agreed that efforts were needed to increase enrollment in the patient portal. Opinions diverged regarding the suitability of the PCMH and, specifically, the primary care clinic for promoting patient portal enrollment. Policymakers should consider diverse stakeholder perspectives in advance of interventions to increase technology adoption.

  8. Growth temperature effect on a-Si:H thin films studied by constant photocurrent method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadibhasme, N. A.; Dusane, R. O.

    2013-02-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films are synthesized by tuning different process parameters among which substrate temperature of film growth plays an important role in monitoring the device quality of the film. In this paper we have used the constant photocurrent method (CPM) to study the effect of growth temperature on the electronic and optical parameters of a-Si:H films at different photon energies. This technique primarily measures the absorption coefficient which is a result of different electronic transitions that contribute to the photocurrent. The nature of absorption coefficient changes with growth temperature that explicitly provides the information about the density of defect states present in the mid gap of a-Si:H.

  9. The Portal to the Universe an IYA2009 Cornerstone Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindberg Christensen, Lars; Gay, P.; IYA2009 TPTTU Cornerstone Task Group

    2008-05-01

    The science of astronomy is extremely fast moving, and delivers new results on a daily basis, often in the form of spectacular news, images of forms and shapes not seen anywhere else, enhanced by illustrations and animations. Public astronomy communication has to develop apace with the other players in the mass market for electronic information such as the gaming and entertainment industries. The problem today is not so much the availability of excellent astronomy multimedia resources for use in education, outreach and the like, but rather finding and accessing these materials. The Portal to the Universe (TPTTU) seeks to fix this problem. The Portal to the Universe (TPTTU) is an IYA2009 Cornerstone project that will feature a comprehensive directory of observatories, facilities, astronomical societies, amateur astronomy societies, space artists, science communication universities, as well as news-, image-, event- and video- aggregators and Web 2.0 collaborative tools for astronomy multimedia community interaction. The Portal will enable innovative access to, and vastly multiply the use of, astronomy multimedia resources - including news, images, videos, events, podcasts, vodcasts etc. as a selective aggregator with a non-painful editorial mechanism in place. This talk will discuss the plans for the TPTTU content as well as the technology and editorial choices behind the scenes.

  10. From Prototype to Production: Lessons Learned from the Evolution of an EHR Educational Portal

    PubMed Central

    Borycki, Elizabeth M.; Armstrong, Brian; Kushniruk, Andre W.

    2009-01-01

    The use of electronic health records is rapidly increasing. However, the integration of this technology into the education of health professionals and health informaticians has largely remained to be explored. In this paper we describe an approach to providing remote access to electronic health records for use in health professional and health informatics education at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The University of Victoria EHR Educational Portal was designed by the authors to allow for remote Web-based access by students to a range of systems hosted on the portal. Architectural considerations and the evolution of the portal structure from prototype to production system are described. The paper also describes our initial applications of the approach in integrating EHRs into nursing, medical and health informatics educational programs. PMID:20351822

  11. From prototype to production: lessons learned from the evolution of an EHR educational portal.

    PubMed

    Borycki, Elizabeth M; Armstrong, Brian; Kushniruk, Andre W

    2009-11-14

    The use of electronic health records is rapidly increasing. However, the integration of this technology into the education of health professionals and health informaticians has largely remained to be explored. In this paper we describe an approach to providing remote access to electronic health records for use in health professional and health informatics education at the undergraduate and graduate levels. The University of Victoria EHR Educational Portal was designed by the authors to allow for remote Web-based access by students to a range of systems hosted on the portal. Architectural considerations and the evolution of the portal structure from prototype to production system are described. The paper also describes our initial applications of the approach in integrating EHRs into nursing, medical and health informatics educational programs.

  12. BSD Portals for LINUX 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNab, A. David; woo, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Portals, an experimental feature of 4.4BSD, extend the file system name space by exporting certain open () requests to a user-space daemon. A portal daemon is mounted into the file name space as if it were a standard file system. When the kernel resolves a pathname and encounters a portal mount point, the remainder of the path is passed to the portal daemon. Depending on the portal "pathname" and the daemon's configuration, some type of open (2) is performed. The resulting file descriptor is passed back to the kernel which eventually returns it to the user, to whom it appears that a "normal" open has occurred. A proxy portalfs file system is responsible for kernel interaction with the daemon. The overall effect is that the portal daemon performs an open (2) on behalf of the kernel, possibly hiding substantial complexity from the calling process. One particularly useful application is implementing a connection service that allows simple scripts to open network sockets. This paper describes the implementation of portals for LINUX 2.0.

  13. Portal vein aneurysm: What to know.

    PubMed

    Laurenzi, Andrea; Ettorre, Giuseppe Maria; Lionetti, Raffaella; Meniconi, Roberto Luca; Colasanti, Marco; Vennarecci, Giovanni

    2015-11-01

    Portal vein aneurysm is an unusual vascular dilatation of the portal vein, which was first described by Barzilai and Kleckner in 1956 and since then less than 200 cases have been reported. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the international literature to better clarify various aspects of this rare nosological entity and provide clear evidence-based summary, when available, of the clinical and surgical management. A systematic literature search of the Pubmed database was performed for all articles related to portal vein aneurysm. All articles published from 1956 to 2014 were examined for a total of 96 reports, including 190 patients. Portal vein aneurysm is defined as a portal vein diameter exceeding 1.9 cm in cirrhotic patients and 1.5 cm in normal livers. It can be congenital or acquired and portal hypertension represents the main cause of the acquired version. Surgical indication is considered in case of rupture, thrombosis or symptomatic aneurysms. Aneurysmectomy and aneurysmorrhaphy are considered in patients with normal liver, while shunt procedures or liver transplantation are the treatment of choice in case of portal hypertension. Being such a rare vascular entity its management should be reserved to high-volume tertiary hepato-biliary centres.

  14. Improvement of parameters in a-Si(p)/c-Si(n)/a-Si(n) solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustafa Bouzaki, Mohammed; Aillerie, Michel; Ould Saad Hamady, Sidi; Chadel, Meriem; Benyoucef, Boumediene

    2016-10-01

    We analyzed and discussed the influence of thickness and doping concentration of the different layers in a-Si(p)/c-Si(n)/a-Si(n) photovoltaic (PV) cells with the aim of increasing its efficiency while decreasing its global cost. Compared to the efficiency of a standard marketed PV cell, elaborated with a ZnO transparent conductive oxide (TCO) layer but without Back Surface Field (BSF) layer, an optimization of the thickness and dopant concentration of both the emitter a-Si(p) and absorber c-Si(n) layers will gain about 3% in the global efficiency of the cell. The results also reveal that with introduction of the third layer, i.e. the BSF layer, the efficiency always achieves values above 20% and all other parameters of the cell, such as the open-circuit voltage, the short-circuit current and the fill-factor, are strongly affected by the thickness and dopant concentration of the layers. The values of all parameters are given and discussed in the paper. Thereby, the simulation results give for an optimized a-Si(p)/c-Si(n)/a-Si(n) PV cells the possibility to decrease the thickness of the absorber layer down to 50 μm which is lower than in the state-of-the-art. This structure of the cell achieves suitable properties for high efficiency, cost-effectiveness and reliable heterojunction (HJ) solar cell applications.

  15. [Preduodenal portal vein (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Tovar, J A; Benavent, M; Bachiller, C; Díez-Pardo, J A

    1978-01-01

    Three cases of preduodenal portal vein (PDPV) observed in newborns and young infants are reported. In two patients the diagnosis was made during operations for duodenal stenosis and in the remaining one while operating for midgut volvulus and necrosis. In no case was the PDPV responsible for the clinical picture but in all three patients it was accompanied by other causes of obstruction: annular pancreas, extrinsic adhesive bands and malrotation. In one case there was also an asplenia, and polisplenia was present in another one. Both had malrotation and some degree of abnormal visceral asimmetry. The incidence of associated malformations in 52 previously reported cases is analyzed, and the more convincing embriological explanation for this anomaly is commented upon.

  16. The Seed Proteome Web Portal

    PubMed Central

    Galland, Marc; Job, Dominique; Rajjou, Loïc

    2012-01-01

    The Seed Proteome Web Portal (SPWP; http://www.seed-proteome.com/) gives access to information both on quantitative seed proteomic data and on seed-related protocols. Firstly, the SPWP provides access to the 475 different Arabidopsis seed proteins annotated from two dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) maps. Quantitative data are available for each protein according to their accumulation profile during the germination process. These proteins can be retrieved either in list format or directly on scanned 2DE maps. These proteomic data reveal that 40% of seed proteins maintain a stable abundance over germination, up to radicle protrusion. During sensu stricto germination (24 h upon imbibition) about 50% of the proteins display quantitative variations, exhibiting an increased abundance (35%) or a decreasing abundance (15%). Moreover, during radicle protrusion (24–48 h upon imbibition), 41% proteins display quantitative variations with an increased (23%) or a decreasing abundance (18%). In addition, an analysis of the seed proteome revealed the importance of protein post-translational modifications as demonstrated by the poor correlation (r2 = 0.29) between the theoretical (predicted from Arabidopsis genome) and the observed protein isoelectric points. Secondly, the SPWP is a relevant technical resource for protocols specifically dedicated to Arabidopsis seed proteome studies. Concerning 2D electrophoresis, the user can find efficient procedures for sample preparation, electrophoresis coupled with gel analysis, and protein identification by mass spectrometry, which we have routinely used during the last 12 years. Particular applications such as the detection of oxidized proteins or de novo synthesized proteins radiolabeled by [35S]-methionine are also given in great details. Future developments of this portal will include proteomic data from studies such as dormancy release and protein turnover through de novo protein synthesis analyses during germination. PMID

  17. The virtual space exploration education portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, C. A.

    2007-06-01

    New information technologies have evolved from space exploration—3-D visualisation ‘lenses’ and a growing suite of tools that allow access to exploration, analysis and interpretation of often complex information by a range of end users including the public, communicators, and policy makers. These tools have only become viable in the past year or two with the combination of the availability of inexpensive, but powerful, personal computers and widespread use of the Internet. A new study group under Commission 6 has been established, entitled ‘Future Directions of Space Exploration Education’, to build a Virtual Global Space Exploration Education Portal (VGSEEP) to open this revolution to all audiences, not just students. This paper describes the initial stages of VGSEEP. The NASA Learning Technologies suite of ‘lenses’ and tools will be demonstrated: World Wind, a 3-D globe that provides insights into our planet from space and almost down to ground level; the Virtual Field Trip that explores at ground level in 3-D; the Virtual Lab, which allows a range of samples to be examined via a virtual light microscope and/or a Scanning Electron Microscope and What’s the Difference?, which allows users to manipulate information in a multi-graphical interface.

  18. Portal hypertension: pathophysiology, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Bloom, S; Kemp, W; Lubel, J

    2015-01-01

    Portal hypertension is an important complication of liver disease. As a result of elevated pressures within the portal vein several complications can arise, including the development of oesophageal and gastric varices, ascites, hepatic encephalopathy as well as complications secondary to circulatory dysfunction, such as hepatorenal syndrome, portopulmonary syndrome and hepatopulmonary syndrome. This review outlines the pathogenesis and diagnosis of portal hypertension and outlines the management of these various important clinical sequelae. The management of oesophageal and gastric varices is particularly important, and both the emergency management together with prophylactic management of this condition are described.

  19. Distinct DNA Exit and Packaging Portals in the Virus Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus

    PubMed Central

    Zauberman, Nathan; Mutsafi, Yael; Halevy, Daniel Ben; Shimoni, Eyal; Klein, Eugenia; Xiao, Chuan; Sun, Siyang; Minsky, Abraham

    2008-01-01

    Icosahedral double-stranded DNA viruses use a single portal for genome delivery and packaging. The extensive structural similarity revealed by such portals in diverse viruses, as well as their invariable positioning at a unique icosahedral vertex, led to the consensus that a particular, highly conserved vertex-portal architecture is essential for viral DNA translocations. Here we present an exception to this paradigm by demonstrating that genome delivery and packaging in the virus Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus occur through two distinct portals. By using high-resolution techniques, including electron tomography and cryo-scanning electron microscopy, we show that Mimivirus genome delivery entails a large-scale conformational change of the capsid, whereby five icosahedral faces open up. This opening, which occurs at a unique vertex of the capsid that we coined the “stargate”, allows for the formation of a massive membrane conduit through which the viral DNA is released. A transient aperture centered at an icosahedral face distal to the DNA delivery site acts as a non-vertex DNA packaging portal. In conjunction with comparative genomic studies, our observations imply a viral packaging pathway akin to bacterial DNA segregation, which might be shared by diverse internal membrane–containing viruses. PMID:18479185

  20. Distinct DNA exit and packaging portals in the virus Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus.

    PubMed

    Zauberman, Nathan; Mutsafi, Yael; Halevy, Daniel Ben; Shimoni, Eyal; Klein, Eugenia; Xiao, Chuan; Sun, Siyang; Minsky, Abraham

    2008-05-13

    Icosahedral double-stranded DNA viruses use a single portal for genome delivery and packaging. The extensive structural similarity revealed by such portals in diverse viruses, as well as their invariable positioning at a unique icosahedral vertex, led to the consensus that a particular, highly conserved vertex-portal architecture is essential for viral DNA translocations. Here we present an exception to this paradigm by demonstrating that genome delivery and packaging in the virus Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus occur through two distinct portals. By using high-resolution techniques, including electron tomography and cryo-scanning electron microscopy, we show that Mimivirus genome delivery entails a large-scale conformational change of the capsid, whereby five icosahedral faces open up. This opening, which occurs at a unique vertex of the capsid that we coined the "stargate", allows for the formation of a massive membrane conduit through which the viral DNA is released. A transient aperture centered at an icosahedral face distal to the DNA delivery site acts as a non-vertex DNA packaging portal. In conjunction with comparative genomic studies, our observations imply a viral packaging pathway akin to bacterial DNA segregation, which might be shared by diverse internal membrane-containing viruses.

  1. Percutaneous Portal Vein Access and Transhepatic Tract Hemostasis

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Wael E. A.; Madoff, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Percutaneous portal vein interventions require minimally invasive access to the portal venous system. Common approaches to the portal vein include transjugular hepatic vein to portal vein access and direct transhepatic portal vein access. A major concern of the transhepatic route is the risk of postprocedural bleeding, which is increased when patients are anticoagulated or receiving pharmaceutical thrombolytic therapy. Thus percutaneous portal vein access and subsequent closure are important technical parts of percutaneous portal vein procedures. At present, various techniques have been used for either portal access or subsequent transhepatic tract closure and hemostasis. Regardless of the method used, meticulous technique is required to achieve the overall safety and effectiveness of portal venous procedures. This article reviews the various techniques of percutaneous transhepatic portal vein access and the various closure and hemostatic methods used to reduce the risk of postprocedural bleeding. PMID:23729976

  2. Zolmitriptan: A Novel Portal Hypotensive Agent Which Synergizes with Propranolol in Lowering Portal Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Reboredo, Mercedes; Chang, Haisul C. Y.; Barbero, Roberto; Rodríguez-Ortigosa, Carlos M.; Pérez-Vizcaíno, Francisco; Morán, Asunción; García, Mónica; Banales, Jesús M.; Carreño, Norberto; Alegre, Félix; Herrero, Ignacio; Quiroga, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Objective Only a limited proportion of patients needing pharmacological control of portal hypertension are hemodynamic responders to propranolol. Here we analyzed the effects of zolmitriptan on portal pressure and its potential interaction with propranolol. Methods Zolmitriptan, propranolol or both were tested in two rat models of portal hypertension: common bile duct ligation (CBDL) and CCl4-induced cirrhosis. In these animals we measured different hemodynamic parameters including portal venous pressure, arterial renal flow, portal blood flow and cardiac output. We also studied the changes in superior mesenteric artery perfusion pressure and in arterial wall cAMP levels induced by zolmitriptan, propranolol or both. Moreover, we determined the effect of splanchnic sympathectomy on the response of PVP to zolmitriptan. Results In both models of portal hypertension zolmitriptan induced a dose-dependent transient descent of portal pressure accompanied by reduction of portal flow with only slight decrease in renal flow. In cirrhotic rats, splanchnic sympathectomy intensified and prolonged zolmitriptan-induced portal pressure descent. Also, propranolol caused more intense and durable portal pressure fall when combined with zolmitriptan. Mesenteric artery perfusion pressure peaked for about 1 min upon zolmitriptan administration but showed no change with propranolol. However propranolol enhanced and prolonged the elevation in mesenteric artery perfusion pressure induced by zolmitriptan. In vitro studies showed that propranolol prevented the inhibitory effects of β2-agonists on zolmitriptan-induced vasoconstriction and the combination of propranolol and zolmitriptan significantly reduced the elevation of cAMP caused by β2-agonists. Conclusion Zolmitriptan reduces portal hypertension and non-selective beta-blockers can improve this effect. Combination therapy deserves consideration for patients with portal hypertension failing to respond to non-selective beta

  3. Electrospun a-Si using Liquid Silane/Polymer Inks

    SciTech Connect

    D.L. Schulz; J.M. Hoey; J. Smith; J. Lovaasen; C. Braun; X. Dai; K. Anderson; A. Elangovan; X. Wu; S. Payne; K. Pokhodnya; I. Akhatov; L. Pederson; P. Boudjouk

    2010-12-01

    Amorphous silicon nanowires (a-SiNWs) were prepared by electrospinning cyclohexasilane (Si{sub 6}H{sub 12}) admixed with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) in toluene. Raman spectroscopy characterization of these wires (d {approx} 50-2000 nm) shows 350 C treatment yields a-SiNWs. Porous a-SiNWs are obtained using a volatile polymer.

  4. Electrospun a-Si using Liquid Silane/Polymer Inks

    SciTech Connect

    Doug Schulz

    2010-12-09

    Amorphous silicon nanowires (a-SiNWs) were prepared by electrospinning cyclohexasilane (Si{sub 6}H{sub 12}) admixed with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) in toluene. Raman spectroscopy characterization of these wires (d {approx} 50-2000 nm) shows 350 C treatment yields a-SiNWs. Porous a-SiNWs are obtained using a volatile polymer.

  5. Portal-systemic encephalopathy in two patients without liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    K C, Sudhamshu; Matsutani, Shoichi; Maruyama, Hitoshi; Fukamachi, Tadahiro; Nomoto, Hiromasa; Akiike, Taro; Ebara, Masaaki; Saisho, Hiromitsu

    2002-06-01

    The portal-systemic venous shunt is uncommon in patients without portal hypertension. We present two cases of portal-systemic encephalopathy due to extrahepatic shunt without liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Two women in their seventies were admitted to our hospital because of recurrent episodes of altered sensorium, drowsiness, slurred speech, disorientation, asterexis and high blood ammonia levels. There was no history of abdominal surgery or abdominal trauma. Clinical examination revealed no signs of portal hypertension or stigmata of chronic liver diseases. Brain CT and MRI scanning were unremarkable except for a high intensity signal in the basal ganglia on T1 weighted MRI images. Laboratory tests were almost normal except for the hyperammonemia occurring on several occasions. There was no evidence of liver cirrhosis by imaging. However, color Doppler showed an extra-hepatic shunt in both patients and pulsed Doppler showed decreased velocity and volume of the portal venous flow. These sonographic findings were confirmed during percutaneous transhepatic portography (PTP). Portal pressures measured during PTP were 9 and 11 mmHg. Needle biopsy ruled out idiopathic portal hypertension and liver cirrhosis. The diagnosis was portal systemic encephalopathy due to extra-hepatic portosystemic venous shunting. Both patients were treated by embolization of the shunting vessel with metallic coils.

  6. MR imaging in idiopathic portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Arai, K; Matsui, O; Kadoya, M; Yoshikawa, J; Gabata, T; Takashima, T; Kobayashi, K; Unoura, M

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in four patients with biopsy proven idiopathic portal hypertension (IPH). The MR images show proximity of medium-sized intrahepatic vessels to each other and to the liver surface in all patients. Small vessels running parallel to the second order branches of the intrahepatic portal vein are commonly seen as collateral pathways of portal flow in IPH and were seen in two patients. These findings were clearly demonstrated on gradient-recalled echo images. Intrahepatic periportal abnormal high intensity was seen in all patients on T2-weighted images and may reflect abnormalities in the portal tracts such as fibrous enlargement and increase in the number of vascular channels. Tiny low-intensity nodules sometimes observed in liver cirrhosis were not seen in any patient. Magnetic resonance was a useful noninvasive method in the differentiation of IPH from liver cirrhosis.

  7. [Emphysematous gastritis with concomitant portal venous air].

    PubMed

    Jeong, Min Yeong; Kim, Jin Il; Kim, Jae Young; Kim, Hyun Ho; Jo, Ik Hyun; Seo, Jae Hyun; Kim, Il Kyu; Cheung, Dae Young

    2015-02-01

    Emphysematous gastritis is a rare form of gastritis caused by infection of the stomach wall by gas forming bacteria. It is a very rare condition that carries a high mortality rate. Portal venous gas shadow represents elevation of intestinal luminal pressure which manifests as emphysematous gastritis or gastric emphysema. Literature reviews show that the mortality rate is especially high when portal venous gas shadow is present on CT scan. Until recently, the treatment of emphysematous gastritis has been immediate surgical intervention. However, there is a recent trend of avoiding surgery because of the frequent occurrence of post-operative complications such as anastomosis leakage. In addition, aggressive surgical treatment has failed to show significant improvement in prognosis. Recently, the authors experienced a case of emphysematous gastritis accompanied by portal venous gas which was treated successfully by conservative treatment without immediate surgical intervention. Herein, we present a case of emphysematous gastritis with concomitant portal venous air along with literature review.

  8. The Fukushima Daiichi Accident Study Information Portal

    SciTech Connect

    Shawn St. Germain; Curtis Smith; David Schwieder; Cherie Phelan

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents a description of The Fukushima Daiichi Accident Study Information Portal. The Information Portal was created by the Idaho National Laboratory as part of joint NRC and DOE project to assess the severe accident modeling capability of the MELCOR analysis code. The Fukushima Daiichi Accident Study Information Portal was created to collect, store, retrieve and validate information and data for use in reconstructing the Fukushima Daiichi accident. In addition to supporting the MELCOR simulations, the Portal will be the main DOE repository for all data, studies and reports related to the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station. The data is stored in a secured (password protected and encrypted) repository that is searchable and accessible to researchers at diverse locations.

  9. 23. INCLINED END POST / VERTICAL / DIAGONAL / PORTAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. INCLINED END POST / VERTICAL / DIAGONAL / PORTAL BRACING DETAIL. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Abraham Lincoln Memorial Bridge, Spanning Missouri River on Highway 30 between Nebraska & Iowa, Blair, Washington County, NE

  10. Single Portal Knee Arthroscopy: 2015 Technique Update

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    A technique of single portal knee arthroscopy was reported in 2013. Using a parallel working cannula assembled to the arthroscope cannula, the instruments are passed into the joint in line with the arthroscope. The original technique video in Arthroscopy Techniques shows the use of a 25 mm tube assembly with a parallel portal through which biters and proximally bent cutter instruments are used to perform procedures in the knee. This 2015 technical update shows the current preferred and most versatile method of single portal knee arthroscopy using a parallel locking and rotating hub for passage of biters and double-bend cutters. The video shows adequate completion of a partial meniscectomy using only 1 portal. PMID:27073772

  11. The International Human Epigenome Consortium Data Portal.

    PubMed

    Bujold, David; Morais, David Anderson de Lima; Gauthier, Carol; Côté, Catherine; Caron, Maxime; Kwan, Tony; Chen, Kuang Chung; Laperle, Jonathan; Markovits, Alexei Nordell; Pastinen, Tomi; Caron, Bryan; Veilleux, Alain; Jacques, Pierre-Étienne; Bourque, Guillaume

    2016-11-23

    The International Human Epigenome Consortium (IHEC) coordinates the production of reference epigenome maps through the characterization of the regulome, methylome, and transcriptome from a wide range of tissues and cell types. To define conventions ensuring the compatibility of datasets and establish an infrastructure enabling data integration, analysis, and sharing, we developed the IHEC Data Portal (http://epigenomesportal.ca/ihec). The portal provides access to >7,000 reference epigenomic datasets, generated from >600 tissues, which have been contributed by seven international consortia: ENCODE, NIH Roadmap, CEEHRC, Blueprint, DEEP, AMED-CREST, and KNIH. The portal enhances the utility of these reference maps by facilitating the discovery, visualization, analysis, download, and sharing of epigenomics data. The IHEC Data Portal is the official source to navigate through IHEC datasets and represents a strategy for unifying the distributed data produced by international research consortia.

  12. Cryo-EM structure of the bacteriophage T4 portal protein assembly at near-atomic resolution.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lei; Zhang, Xinzheng; Gao, Song; Rao, Prashant A; Padilla-Sanchez, Victor; Chen, Zhenguo; Sun, Siyang; Xiang, Ye; Subramaniam, Sriram; Rao, Venigalla B; Rossmann, Michael G

    2015-07-06

    The structure and assembly of bacteriophage T4 has been extensively studied. However, the detailed structure of the portal protein remained unknown. Here we report the structure of the bacteriophage T4 portal assembly, gene product 20 (gp20), determined by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to 3.6 Å resolution. In addition, analysis of a 10 Å resolution cryo-EM map of an empty prolate T4 head shows how the dodecameric portal assembly interacts with the capsid protein gp23 at the special pentameric vertex. The gp20 structure also verifies that the portal assembly is required for initiating head assembly, for attachment of the packaging motor, and for participation in DNA packaging. Comparison of the Myoviridae T4 portal structure with the known portal structures of φ29, SPP1 and P22, representing Podo- and Siphoviridae, shows that the portal structure probably dates back to a time when self-replicating microorganisms were being established on Earth.

  13. Cryo-EM structure of the bacteriophage T4 portal protein assembly at near-atomic resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lei; Zhang, Xinzheng; Gao, Song; Rao, Prashant A.; Padilla-Sanchez, Victor; Chen, Zhenguo; Sun, Siyang; Xiang, Ye; Subramaniam, Sriram; Rao, Venigalla B.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2015-07-01

    The structure and assembly of bacteriophage T4 has been extensively studied. However, the detailed structure of the portal protein remained unknown. Here we report the structure of the bacteriophage T4 portal assembly, gene product 20 (gp20), determined by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to 3.6 Å resolution. In addition, analysis of a 10 Å resolution cryo-EM map of an empty prolate T4 head shows how the dodecameric portal assembly interacts with the capsid protein gp23 at the special pentameric vertex. The gp20 structure also verifies that the portal assembly is required for initiating head assembly, for attachment of the packaging motor, and for participation in DNA packaging. Comparison of the Myoviridae T4 portal structure with the known portal structures of φ29, SPP1 and P22, representing Podo- and Siphoviridae, shows that the portal structure probably dates back to a time when self-replicating microorganisms were being established on Earth.

  14. Portal imaging practice patterns of children's oncology group institutions: Dosimetric assessment and recommendations for minimizing unnecessary exposure.

    PubMed

    Olch, Arthur J; Geurts, Mark; Thomadsen, Bruce; Famiglietti, Robin; Chang, Eric L

    2007-02-01

    To determine and analyze the dosimetric consequences of current portal imaging practices for pediatric patients, and make specific recommendations for reducing exposure from portal imaging procedures. A survey was sent to approximately 250 Children's Oncology Group (COG) member institutions asking a series of questions about their portal imaging practices. Three case studies are presented with dosimetric analysis to illustrate the magnitude of unintended dose received by nontarget tissues using the most common techniques from the survey. The vast majority of centers use double-exposure portal image techniques with a variety of open field margins. Only 17% of portal images were obtained during treatment, and for other imaging methods, few centers subtract monitor units from the treatment delivery. The number of monitor units used was nearly the same regardless of imager type, including electronic portal imaging devices. Eighty-six percent imaged all fields the first week and 17% imaged all fields every week. An additional 1,112 cm3 of nontarget tissue received 1 Gy in one of the example cases. Eight new recommendations are made, which will lower nontarget radiation doses with minimal impact on treatment verification accuracy. Based on the survey, changes can be made in portal imaging practices that will lower nontarget doses. It is anticipated that treatment verification accuracy will be minimally affected. Specific recommendations made to decrease the imaging dose and help lower the rate of radiation-induced secondary cancers in children are proposed for inclusion in future COG protocols using radiation therapy.

  15. Learning from Public Television and the Web: Positioning Continuing Education as a Knowledge Portal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vedro, Steven R.

    1999-01-01

    Digital convergence--the merging of television and computing--challenges localized monopolies of public television and continuing education. Continuing educators can reposition themselves in the electronic marketplace by serving as an educational portal, bringing their strengths of "brand recognition," local customer base, and access to…

  16. Learning from Public Television and the Web: Positioning Continuing Education as a Knowledge Portal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vedro, Steven R.

    1999-01-01

    Digital convergence--the merging of television and computing--challenges localized monopolies of public television and continuing education. Continuing educators can reposition themselves in the electronic marketplace by serving as an educational portal, bringing their strengths of "brand recognition," local customer base, and access to…

  17. The Journal Usage Statistics Portal (JUSP): Helping Libraries Measure Use and Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mihlrad, Leigh

    2012-01-01

    The Joint Usage Statistics Portal (JUSP) (jusp.mimas.ac.uk), created by five U.K. libraries in 2009, gives participating libraries a single point of access for electronic journal statistics. It provides its more than 160 participants, including 140+ academic libraries in the United Kingdom, as well as 21 publishers and 3 intermediaries, with…

  18. The Journal Usage Statistics Portal (JUSP): Helping Libraries Measure Use and Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mihlrad, Leigh

    2012-01-01

    The Joint Usage Statistics Portal (JUSP) (jusp.mimas.ac.uk), created by five U.K. libraries in 2009, gives participating libraries a single point of access for electronic journal statistics. It provides its more than 160 participants, including 140+ academic libraries in the United Kingdom, as well as 21 publishers and 3 intermediaries, with…

  19. Web-Based Project Portfolio Management Portal Success: A Quantitative Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excellent, Frendy

    2013-01-01

    Due to its centralized content-sharing features, a project portfolio management (PPM) portal enables vertical, as well as horizontal, electronic exchanges between project professionals. Such exchanges, if effective, may deliver an individual impact through improved project performance. Effectiveness engenders use and satisfaction, reflecting the…

  20. Web-Based Project Portfolio Management Portal Success: A Quantitative Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excellent, Frendy

    2013-01-01

    Due to its centralized content-sharing features, a project portfolio management (PPM) portal enables vertical, as well as horizontal, electronic exchanges between project professionals. Such exchanges, if effective, may deliver an individual impact through improved project performance. Effectiveness engenders use and satisfaction, reflecting the…

  1. Binary synaptic connections based on memory switching in a-Si:H for artificial neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, A. P.; Lamb, J. L.; Moopenn, A.; Khanna, S. K.

    1987-01-01

    A scheme for nonvolatile associative electronic memory storage with high information storage density is proposed which is based on neural network models and which uses a matrix of two-terminal passive interconnections (synapses). It is noted that the massive parallelism in the architecture would require the ON state of a synaptic connection to be unusually weak (highly resistive). Memory switching using a-Si:H along with ballast resistors patterned from amorphous Ge-metal alloys is investigated for a binary programmable read only memory matrix. The fabrication of a 1600 synapse test array of uniform connection strengths and a-Si:H switching elements is discussed.

  2. Correlation between interface traps and paramagnetic defects in c-Si/a-Si:H heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoan, N. H.; Jivanescu, M.; O'Sullivan, B. J.; Pantisano, L.; Gordon, I.; Afanas'ev, V. V.; Stesmans, A.

    2012-04-01

    Low-temperature (77 K) capacitance-voltage measurements are proposed as a technique to quantify the densities of traps in c-Si/a-Si:H heterojunction solar cell structures. By comparing the inferred trap densities to the results of electron spin resonance spectroscopy, we found that the dangling bonds of silicon atoms at the surface of the (100)Si substrate (Pb0 centers) and in a-Si:H layer (D-centers) provide the most significant contributions to the density of traps.

  3. Binary synaptic connections based on memory switching in a-Si:H for artificial neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, A. P.; Lamb, J. L.; Moopenn, A.; Khanna, S. K.

    1987-01-01

    A scheme for nonvolatile associative electronic memory storage with high information storage density is proposed which is based on neural network models and which uses a matrix of two-terminal passive interconnections (synapses). It is noted that the massive parallelism in the architecture would require the ON state of a synaptic connection to be unusually weak (highly resistive). Memory switching using a-Si:H along with ballast resistors patterned from amorphous Ge-metal alloys is investigated for a binary programmable read only memory matrix. The fabrication of a 1600 synapse test array of uniform connection strengths and a-Si:H switching elements is discussed.

  4. Heterotopic Auxiliary Liver Transplantation With Portal Flow

    PubMed Central

    Lorente, Laureano; Aller, Maria Angeles; Ispizua, José Ignacio; Rodriguez, José; Durán, Hipólito

    1990-01-01

    One of the causes of auxiliary liver transplantation failure is the inter-liver competition between the host liver and the graft for the hepatotrophic factors of the portal blood. We have developed an experimental model of heterotopic partial (30%) liver isotransplant using Wistar rats so as to study this competition. Splenoportography and dissection demonstrate the existence of collateral circulation. The collaterals at 90 days post-transplant (PT) consisted of veins from the portal vein to the host liver (PR), paraesophageal veins (PE) and splenorenal veins (SR). At 60 days P.T., PR and SR veins but not PE ones appeared, and at 30 days P.T., there were only PR veins. Graft atrophy at 90 days P.T. was associated with a severe degree of bile duct proliferation. The gradual development of portal hypertension causes porto-systemic collateral circulation and the graft loses the portal hepatotrophic factors. The late development of the portal hypertension and the biliary proliferation could be caused by the hepatic arterial ischemia in this experimental model. Thus, as has been described in the orthotopic liver tansplantation, the heterotopic one might require a double vascularization, both portal and arterial. PMID:2278927

  5. SU-E-J-15: Automatically Detect Patient Treatment Position and Orientation in KV Portal Images

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, J; Yang, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In the course of radiation therapy, the complex information processing workflow will Result in potential errors, such as incorrect or inaccurate patient setups. With automatic image check and patient identification, such errors could be effectively reduced. For this purpose, we developed a simple and rapid image processing method, to automatically detect the patient position and orientation in 2D portal images, so to allow automatic check of positions and orientations for patient daily RT treatments. Methods: Based on the principle of portal image formation, a set of whole body DRR images were reconstructed from multiple whole body CT volume datasets, and fused together to be used as the matching template. To identify the patient setup position and orientation shown in a 2D portal image, the 2D portal image was preprocessed (contrast enhancement, down-sampling and couch table detection), then matched to the template image so to identify the laterality (left or right), position, orientation and treatment site. Results: Five day’s clinical qualified portal images were gathered randomly, then were processed by the automatic detection and matching method without any additional information. The detection results were visually checked by physicists. 182 images were correct detection in a total of 200kV portal images. The correct rate was 91%. Conclusion: The proposed method can detect patient setup and orientation quickly and automatically. It only requires the image intensity information in KV portal images. This method can be useful in the framework of Electronic Chart Check (ECCK) to reduce the potential errors in workflow of radiation therapy and so to improve patient safety. In addition, the auto-detection results, as the patient treatment site position and patient orientation, could be useful to guide the sequential image processing procedures, e.g. verification of patient daily setup accuracy. This work was partially supported by research grant from

  6. 2. West portal of Tunnel 35, view to east, 135mm ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. West portal of Tunnel 35, view to east, 135mm lens with electronic flash fill. Note the notched wingwalls that support steel posts of entrance snowshed; these would have originally held timber posts of the original timber snowsheds, miles of which once enclosed and protected the railroad from the ravages of Sierra winters. Note also that these tunnels, built in the 1920s, have dispensed with any use of stone masonry, and instead have all-concrete portals. - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Tunnel No. 35, Milepost 176.62, Yuba Pass, Nevada County, CA

  7. 2. West portal of Tunnel 39, view to east, 135mm ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. West portal of Tunnel 39, view to east, 135mm lens with electronic flash fill. Note the notched wingwalls that support steel posts of entrance snowshed; these would have originally held timber posts of the original timber snowsheds, miles of which once enclosed and protected the railroad from the ravages of Sierra winters. Note also that these tunnels, built in the 1920s, have dispensed with any use of stone masonry, and instead have all-concrete portals. - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Tunnel No. 39, Milepost 180.95, Cisco, Placer County, CA

  8. Molecular hydrogen in a-Si: H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlos, W. E.; Taylor, P. C.

    1982-01-01

    Recently Conradi and Norberg have proposed that a small density of molecular hydrogen in a-Si: H films provides the relaxation mechanism which is responsible for a minimum in the proton spin-lattice relaxation time T1 at about 30 K. Although we are unable to observe an NMR line attributable to the H2, we are able to observe the conversion of the H2 molecules from the ortho state to the para state at 4.2 K. The process is bimolecular with a rate constant of 0.010 h-1. The existence of a large number of sites able to trap such a small molecule may provide an important insight into the defect structure of these films.

  9. Whither Electronic Journals?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luther, Judy

    2000-01-01

    Discusses Web-based electronic journals for the academic market and presents a chart that includes sources of electronic journals and value added. Considers trends in collections, including remote access, outsourcing, hosting content versus linking, and subject portals; trends in access, including indexing, backfiles, and database usage; and…

  10. Whither Electronic Journals?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luther, Judy

    2000-01-01

    Discusses Web-based electronic journals for the academic market and presents a chart that includes sources of electronic journals and value added. Considers trends in collections, including remote access, outsourcing, hosting content versus linking, and subject portals; trends in access, including indexing, backfiles, and database usage; and…

  11. Structural and interfacial properties of large area n-a-Si:H/i-a-Si:H/p-c-Si heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pehlivan, Özlem; Menda, Deneb; Yilmaz, Okan; Kodolbaş, Alp Osman; Ödemir, Orhan; Duygulu, Özgur; Kutlu, Kubilay; Tomak, Mehmet

    2013-09-01

    Large area (72 cm2) doping inversed HIT solar cells (n-a-Si:H/i-a-Si:H/p-c-Si) were investigated by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR-TEM), Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (SE), Fourier Transform Infrared Attenuated Total Reflection spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR) and current-voltage (I-V) measurement. Mixture of microcrystalline and amorphous phase was identified via HR-TEM picture at the interface of i-a-Si:H/p-c-Si heterojunction. Using multilayer and Effective Medium Approximation (EMA) to the SE data, excellent fit was obtained, describing the evolution of microstructure of a-Si:H deposited at 225 °C on p-c-Si. Cody energy gap with combination of FTIR-ATR analyses were consistent with HRTEM and SE results in terms of mixture of microcrystalline and amorphous phase. Presence of such hetero-interface resulted poor open circuit voltage, Voc, of the fabricated solar cell devices, determined by I-V measurement under 1 sun. Moreover, Voc was also estimated from dark I-V analysis, revealing consistent Voc values. Efficiencies of fabricated cells over complete c-Si wafer (72 cm2) were calculated as 4.7 and 9.2 %. Improvement in efficiency was interpreted due to the back surface cleaning and selecting aluminum/silver alloy as front contact.

  12. Nitroglycerine effects on portal vein mechanics and oxidative stress in portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Vujanac, Andreja; Jakovljevic, Vladimir; Djordjevic, Dusica; Zivkovic, Vladimir; Stojkovic, Mirjana; Celikovic, Dragan; Andjelkovic, Nebojsa; Skevin, Aleksandra Jurisic; Djuric, Dragan

    2012-01-28

    Тo examine the effects of nitroglycerine on portal vein haemodynamics and oxidative stress in patients with portal hypertension. Thirty healthy controls and 39 patients with clinically verified portal hypertension and increased vascular resistance participated in the study. Liver diameters, portal diameters and portal flow velocities were recorded using color flow imaging/pulsed Doppler detection. Cross-section area, portal flow and index of vascular resistance were calculated. In collected blood samples, superoxide anion radical (O(2) (-)), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), index of lipid peroxidation (measured as TBARS) and nitric oxide (NO) as a marker of endothelial response (measured as nitrite-NO(2) (-)) were determined. Time-dependent analysis was performed at basal state and in 10th and 15th min after nitroglycerine (sublingual 0.5 mg) administration. Oxidative stress parameters changed significantly during the study. H(2)O(2) decreased at the end of study, probably via O(2) (-) mediated disassembling in Haber Weiss and Fenton reaction; O(2) (-) increased significantly probably due to increased diameter and tension and decreased shear rate level. Consequently O(2) (-) and H(2)O(2) degradation products, like hydroxyl radical, initiated lipid peroxidation. Increased blood flow was to some extent lower in patients than in controls due to double paradoxes, flow velocity decreased, shear rate decreased significantly indicating non Newtonian characteristics of portal blood flow. This pilot study could be a starting point for further investigation and possible implementation of some antioxidants in the treatment of portal hypertension.

  13. An Approach for harmonizing European Water Portals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesquer, Lluís; Stasch, Christoph; Masó, Joan; Jirka, Simon; Domingo, Xavier; Guitart, Francesc; Turner, Thomas; Hinderk Jürrens, Eike

    2017-04-01

    A number of European funded research projects is developing novel solutions for water monitoring, modeling and management. To generate innovations in the water sector, third parties from industry and the public sector need to take up the solutions and bring them into the market. A variety of portals exists to support this move into the market. Examples on the European level are the EIP Water Online Marketplace(1), the WaterInnEU Marketplace(2), the WISE RTD Water knowledge portal(3), the WIDEST- ICT for Water Observatory(4) or the SWITCH-ON Virtual Product Market and Virtual Water-Science Laboratory(5). Further innovation portals and initiatives exist on the national or regional level, for example, the Denmark knows water platform6 or the Dutch water alliance(7). However, the different portals often cover the same projects, the same products and the same services. Since they are technically separated and have their own data models and databases, people need to duplicate information and maintain it at several endpoints. This requires additional efforts and hinders the interoperable exchange between these portals and tools using the underlying data. In this work, we provide an overview on the existing portals and present an approach for harmonizing and integrating common information that is provided across different portals. The approach aims to integrate the common in formation in a common database utilizing existing vocabularies, where possible. An Application Programming Interface allows access the information in a machine-readable way and utilizing the information in other applications beyond description and discovery purposes. (1) http://www.eip-water.eu/my-market-place (2) https://marketplace.waterinneu.org (3) http://www.wise-rtd.info/ (4) http://iwo.widest.eu (5) http://www.switch-on-vwsl.eu/ (6) http://www.rethinkwater.dk/ (7) http://wateralliance.nl/

  14. Portal hypertension: angiographic and hemodynamic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Koolpe, H A; Koolpe, L

    1986-09-01

    There has been a correlation of three hemodynamic parameters with the etiology of portal hypertension and one of the major determinants of therapeutic success, namely, the direction of portal flow. The presence of a 4 mm Hg or greater gradient between the right atrium and the intrahepatic inferior vena cava associated with a "lumpy" pull-back tracing between the wedged and free positions has been associated with alcoholic liver disease. Such patients have antegrade portal flow when their AoD/HWP ratio is in the range of 2.6 to 2.0, and flow becomes stagnant or reversed below this range. Nonalcoholic liver disease is characterized by the absence of a gradient between the right atrium and the inferior vena cava and by a pull-back tracing that falls smoothly and rapidly to the free hepatic vein value. These patients have antegrade portal flow with an AoD/HWP ratio in the range of 1.7 to 1.5. The correct characterization of the cause for diffuse liver disease and direction of portal flow applies to the selection process for patients being considered for the selective distal splenorenal shunt as well as for the newer procedure of orthotopic liver transplantation. It is hoped that the wider application of these physiologic parameters, in the context of an increasing array of imaging tools for the portal system, including high-resolution ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), will continue to offer all clinicians interested in the problem of portal hypertension a reliable guide to prognosis and the success of the particular treatment provided.

  15. The Sydney West Knowledge Portal: Evaluating the Growth of a Knowledge Portal to Support Translational Research.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Anna; Robinson, Tracy Elizabeth; Provan, Pamela; Shaw, Tim

    2016-06-29

    The Sydney West Translational Cancer Research Centre is an organization funded to build capacity for translational research in cancer. Translational research is essential for ensuring the integration of best available evidence into practice and for improving patient outcomes. However, there is a low level of awareness regarding what it is and how to conduct it optimally. One solution to addressing this gap is the design and deployment of web-based knowledge portals to disseminate new knowledge and engage with and connect dispersed networks of researchers. A knowledge portal is an web-based platform for increasing knowledge dissemination and management in a specialized area. To measure the design and growth of an web-based knowledge portal for increasing individual awareness of translational research and to build organizational capacity for the delivery of translational research projects in cancer. An adaptive methodology was used to capture the design and growth of an web-based knowledge portal in cancer. This involved stakeholder consultations to inform initial design of the portal. Once the portal was live, site analytics were reviewed to evaluate member usage of the portal and to measure growth in membership. Knowledge portal membership grew consistently for the first 18 months after deployment, before leveling out. Analysis of site metrics revealed members were most likely to visit portal pages with community-generated content, particularly pages with a focus on translational research. This was closely followed by pages that disseminated educational material about translational research. Preliminary data from this study suggest that knowledge portals may be beneficial tools for translating new evidence and fostering an environment of communication and collaboration.

  16. The Sydney West Knowledge Portal: Evaluating the Growth of a Knowledge Portal to Support Translational Research

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The Sydney West Translational Cancer Research Centre is an organization funded to build capacity for translational research in cancer. Translational research is essential for ensuring the integration of best available evidence into practice and for improving patient outcomes. However, there is a low level of awareness regarding what it is and how to conduct it optimally. One solution to addressing this gap is the design and deployment of web-based knowledge portals to disseminate new knowledge and engage with and connect dispersed networks of researchers. A knowledge portal is an web-based platform for increasing knowledge dissemination and management in a specialized area. Objective To measure the design and growth of an web-based knowledge portal for increasing individual awareness of translational research and to build organizational capacity for the delivery of translational research projects in cancer. Methods An adaptive methodology was used to capture the design and growth of an web-based knowledge portal in cancer. This involved stakeholder consultations to inform initial design of the portal. Once the portal was live, site analytics were reviewed to evaluate member usage of the portal and to measure growth in membership. Results Knowledge portal membership grew consistently for the first 18 months after deployment, before leveling out. Analysis of site metrics revealed members were most likely to visit portal pages with community-generated content, particularly pages with a focus on translational research. This was closely followed by pages that disseminated educational material about translational research. Conclusions Preliminary data from this study suggest that knowledge portals may be beneficial tools for translating new evidence and fostering an environment of communication and collaboration. PMID:27357641

  17. The MISTRALS programme data portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissebrat, Guillaume; Belmahfoud, Nizar; Cloché, Sophie; Darras, Sabine; Descloitres, Jacques; Drocourt, Yoann; Ferré, Hélène; Henriot, Nicolas; Ramage, Karim

    2017-04-01

    different file formats and data processing tools. The MISTRALS data portal - http://mistrals.sedoo.fr/ - has been designed and developed as a unified tool for sharing scientific data in spite of many sources of heterogeneity, and for fostering collaboration between research communities. The metadata (data description) are standardized and comply with international standards (ISO 19115-19139; INSPIRE European Directive; Global Change Master Directory Thesaurus). A search tool allows to browse the catalog by keyword or multicriteria selection (area, period, physical property...) and to access data. Every in situ dataset is available in the native format, but the most commonly used datasets have been homogenized (property names, units, quality flags...) and inserted in a relational database, in order to enable accurate data selection, and download in standard formats. At present the MISTRALS data portal enables to access about 650 datasets. It counts more than 675 registered users and about 100 data requests every month. The number of available datasets is increasing daily, due to the provision of campaign datasets by several projects. Every scientist is invited to browse the catalog, complete the online registration and use MISTRALS data. Feel free to contact mistrals-contact@sedoo.fr for any question.

  18. The MISTRALS programme data portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissebrat, Guillaume; Albert-Aguilar, Alexandre; Belmahfoud, Nizar; Cloché, Sophie; Darras, Sabine; Descloitres, Jacques; Ferré, Hélène; Fleury, Laurence; Focsa, Loredana; Henriot, Nicolas; Labatut, Laurent; Petit de la Villéon, Loïc; Ramage, Karim; Schmechtig, Catherine; Vermeulen, Anne

    2016-04-01

    different file formats and data processing tools. The MISTRALS data portal - http://mistrals.sedoo.fr/ - has been designed and developed as a unified tool for sharing scientific data in spite of many sources of heterogeneity, and for fostering collaboration between research communities. The metadata (data description) are standardized and comply with international standards (ISO 19115-19139; INSPIRE European Directive; Global Change Master Directory Thesaurus). A search tool allows to browse the catalog by keyword or multicriteria selection (area, period, physical property...) and to access data. Data sets managed by different data centres (ICARE, IPSL, SEDOO, CORIOLIS) are available through interoperability protocols (OPeNDAP, xml requests...) or archive synchronisation. Every in situ data set is available in the native format, but the most commonly used data sets have been homogenized (property names, units, quality flags...) and inserted in a relational database, in order to enable accurate data selection, and download of different data sets in a shared format. At present the MISTRALS data portal enables to access about 600 datasets. It counts more than 675 registered users and about 100 data requests every month. The number of available datasets is increasing daily, due to the provision of campaign datasets by several projects. Every scientist is invited to browse the catalog, complete the online registration form and use MISTRALS data. Feel free to contact mistrals-contact@sedoo.fr for any question.

  19. The MISTRALS programme data portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Laurence; Brissebrat, Guillaume; Belmahfoud, Nizar; Boichard, Jean-Luc; Brosolo, Laetitia; Cloché, Sophie; Descloitres, Jacques; Ferré, Hélène; Focsa, Loredana; Henriot, Nicolas; Labatut, Laurent; Mière, Arnaud; Petit de la Villéon, Loïc; Ramage, Karim; Schmechtig, Catherine; Vermeulen, Anne; André, François

    2015-04-01

    different file formats and data processing tools. The MISTRALS data portal - http://mistrals.sedoo.fr/ - has been designed and developed as a unified tool for sharing scientific data in spite of many sources of heterogeneity, and for fostering collaboration between research communities. The metadata (data description) are standardized and comply with international standards (ISO 19115-19139; INSPIRE European Directive; Global Change Master Directory Thesaurus). A search tool allows to browse the catalog by keyword or multicriteria selection (area, period, physical property...) and to access data. Data sets managed by different data centres (ICARE, IPSL, SEDOO, CORIOLIS) are available through interoperability protocols (OPeNDAP, xml requests...) or archive synchronisation. Every in situ data set is available in the native format, but the most commonly used data sets have been homogenized (property names, units, quality flags...) and inserted in a relational database, in order to enable accurate data selection, and download of different data sets in a shared format. At present the MISTRALS data portal enables to access about 550 datasets. It counts more than 600 registered users and about 100 data requests every month. The number of available datasets is increasing daily, due to the provision of campaign datasets (2012, 2013, 2014) by several projects. Every scientist is invited to browse the catalog, complete the online registration form and use MISTRALS data. Feel free to contact mistrals-contact@sedoo.fr for any question.

  20. The MISTRALS programme data portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Laurence; Brissebrat, Guillaume; Belmahfoud, Nizar; Boichard, Jean-Luc; Brosolo, Laetitia; Cloché, Sophie; Descloitres, Jacques; Ferré, Hélène; Focsa, Loredana; Labatut, Laurent; Mastrorillo, Laurence; Mière, Arnaud; Petit de la Villéon, Loïc; Ramage, Karim; Schmechtig, Catherine

    2014-05-01

    different file formats and data processing tools. The MISTRALS data portal - http://mistrals.sedoo.fr/ - has been designed and developed as a unified tool to share scientific data in spite of many sources of heterogeneity, and to foster collaboration between research communities. The metadata (data description) are standardized and comply with international standards (ISO 19115-19139; INSPIRE European Directive; Global Change Master Directory Thesaurus). A search tool allows to browse the catalogue by keyword or by multicriteria selection (location, period, physical property...) and to access data. Data sets managed by different data centres (ICARE, IPSL, SEDOO, CORIOLIS) are available through interoperability protocols (OPeNDAP, xml requests...) or archive synchronisation. At present the MISTRALS data portal allows to access more than 400 datasets and counts more than 500 registered users. The number of available datasets is increasing daily, due to the provision of campaign datasets (2012, 2013) by several projects. Every in situ data set is available in the native format, but the favorite data sets have been homogenized (property names, units, quality flags...) and inserted in a relational database, in order to enable more accurate data selection, and download of different datasets in a shared format. Every scientist is invited to make use of the different MISTRALS tools and data. Do not hesitate to browse the catalogue and fill the online registration form. Feel free to contact mistrals-contact@sedoo.fr for any question.

  1. The double-dark portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtin, David; Tsai, Yuhsin

    2014-11-01

    In most models of the dark sector, dark matter is charged under some new symmetry to make it stable. We explore the possibility that not just dark matter, but also the force carrier connecting it to the visible sector is charged under this symmetry. This dark mediator then acts as a Double-Dark Portal. We realize this setup in the dark mediator Dark matter model (dmDM), featuring a fermionic DM candidate χ with Yukawa couplings to light scalars ϕ i . The scalars couple to SM quarks via the operator . This can lead to large direct detection signals via the 2 → 3 process χ N → χ N ϕ if one of the scalars has mass ≲ 10 keV. For dark matter Yukawa couplings y χ ˜ 10-3 -10-2, dmDM features a thermal relic dark matter candidate while also implementing the SIDM scenario for ameliorating inconsistencies between dwarf galaxy simulations and observations. We undertake the first systematic survey of constraints on light scalars coupled to the SM via the above operator. The strongest constraints are derived from a detailed examination of the light mediator's effects on stellar astrophysics. LHC experiments and cosmological considerations also yield important bounds. Observations of neutron star cooling exclude the minimal model with one dark mediator, but a scenario with two dark mediators remains viable and can give strong direct detection signals. We explore the direct detection consequences of this scenario and find that a heavy dmDM candidate fakes different WIMPs at different experiments. Large regions of dmDM parameter space are accessible above the irreducible neutrino background.

  2. Portal hypertensive gastric mucosa: an endoscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Papazian, A; Braillon, A; Dupas, J L; Sevenet, F; Capron, J P

    1986-01-01

    The endoscopic features of the gastric mucosa in patients with cirrhosis have not been systematically investigated. In these patients, we observed an endoscopic aspect, consisting of multiple small erythematous areas, outlined by a subtle yellowish network (resembling a mosaic), mainly located in the proximal part of the stomach. We tested the value of this sign by comparing two groups: 100 patients with portal hypertension due to cirrhosis, and 300 control patients without signs of liver disease or portal hypertension. This endoscopic pattern was observed in 94 of the patients with cirrhosis, whereas oesophageal varices were seen in 78 only. In contrast, only one patient of the control group had this aspect. Moreover, this sign was also found in seven of eight patients with non cirrhotic portal hypertension, but was seen neither in 100 patients with chronic alcoholism but without liver disease, nor in 10 cirrhotic patients with end-to-side portacaval shunts. These endoscopic changes might be because of mucosal and/or submucosal oedema and congestion highlighting the normal areae gastricae pattern and related to raised portal pressure. We conclude that the mosaic pattern of the gastric mucosa is a sensible and specific sign for diagnosis of portal hypertension, whatever the cause. Images Figure PMID:3781334

  3. Investigating the efficacy of subharmonic aided pressure estimation for portal vein pressures and portal hypertension monitoring.

    PubMed

    Dave, Jaydev K; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G; Eisenbrey, John R; Merton, Daniel A; Liu, Ji-Bin; Zhou, Jian-Hua; Wang, Hsin-Kai; Park, Suhyun; Dianis, Scott; Chalek, Carl L; Lin, Feng; Thomenius, Kai E; Brown, Daniel B; Forsberg, Flemming

    2012-10-01

    The efficacy of using subharmonic emissions from Sonazoid microbubbles (GE Healthcare, Oslo, Norway) to track portal vein pressures and pressure changes was investigated in 14 canines using either slow- or high-flow models of portal hypertension (PH). A modified Logiq 9 scanner (GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI, USA) operating in subharmonic mode (f(transmit): 2.5 MHz, f(receive): 1.25 MHz) was used to collect radiofrequency data at 10-40% incident acoustic power levels with 2-4 transmit cycles (in triplicate) before and after inducing PH. A pressure catheter (Millar Instruments, Inc., Houston, TX, USA) provided reference portal vein pressures. At optimum insonification, subharmonic signal amplitude changes correlated with portal vein pressure changes; r ranged from -0.82 to -0.94 and from -0.70 to -0.73 for PH models considered separately or together, respectively. The subharmonic signal amplitudes correlated with absolute portal vein pressures (r: -0.71 to -0.79). Statistically significant differences between subharmonic amplitudes, before and after inducing PH, were noted (p ≤ 0.01). Portal vein pressures estimated using subharmonic aided pressure estimation did not reveal significant differences (p > 0.05) with respect to the pressures obtained using the Millar pressure catheter. Subharmonic-aided pressure estimation may be useful clinically for portal vein pressure monitoring.

  4. Investigating the efficacy of subharmonic aided pressure estimation for portal vein pressures and portal hypertension monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Jaydev K.; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G.; Eisenbrey, John R.; Merton, Daniel A.; Liu, Ji-Bin; Zhou, Jian-Hua; Wang, Hsin-Kai; Park, Suhyun; Dianis, Scott; Chalek, Carl L.; Lin, Feng; Thomenius, Kai E.; Brown, Daniel B.; Forsberg, Flemming

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of using subharmonic emissions from Sonazoid microbubbles (GE Healthcare, Oslo, Norway) to track portal vein pressures and pressure changes was investigated in 14 canines using either slow- or high-flow models of portal hypertension (PH). A modified Logiq 9 scanner (GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI) operating in subharmonic mode (ftransmit:2.5MHz, freceive:1.25MHz) was used to collect RF data at 10-40% incident acoustic power levels with 2-4 transmit cycles (in triplicate), before and after inducing PH. A pressure catheter (Millar Instruments, Inc., Houston, TX) provided reference portal vein pressures. At optimum insonification, subharmonic signal amplitude changes correlated with portal vein pressure changes; r ranged from -0.82 to -0.94 and from -0.70 to -0.73 for PH models considered separately or together, respectively. The subharmonic signal amplitudes correlated with absolute portal vein pressures (r: -0.71 to -0.79). Statistically significant differences between subharmonic amplitudes, before and after inducing PH, were noted (p≤0.01). Portal vein pressures estimated using SHAPE did not reveal significant differences (p>0.05) with respect to the pressures obtained using the Millar pressure catheter. Subharmonic aided pressure estimation may be useful clinically for portal vein pressure monitoring. PMID:22920550

  5. View of Crane 55 above its arched portal over roadway ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Crane 55 above its arched portal over roadway atop pier at Drydock No. 2 - Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Portal Gantry Crane No. 55, Central Industrial Area, Farragut Avenue, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  6. 13. Detail, connection point of end post, top chord, portal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Detail, connection point of end post, top chord, portal strut, and tension members at upstream side of west portal, view to northwest. - Dry Creek Bridge, Spanning Dry Creek at Cook Road, Ione, Amador County, CA

  7. Effects of ondansetron on portal hemodynamics in liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Tripkovic, M; Kozjek, F; Krizman, I; Jereb, J; Francetic, I; Grabnar, I; Mrhar, A

    2000-09-01

    The double-blind randomized pilot study was undertaken to compare the effects of a 10-day course of ondansetron 8 mg/day and propranolol 80 mg/day perorally in treating portal hypertension. SUBIECTS AND METHODS: 16 patients with liver disease were enrolled in the study. Measurements of portal vein diameter, portal blood flow velocity and portal blood flow volume were done at days 1, 5 and 10 of treatment using duplex Doppler sonography. The propranolol group demonstrated a decrease in portal venous diameter, while patients treated with ondansetron exhibited reduced portal blood flow velocity values. A decreased portal blood flow volume was found in both groups after 10 days of therapy. No statistically significant differences were found between the groups with the exception of portal venous diameter which is significantly lower at the end of the treatment in the case of propranolol.

  8. 164. Twin Tunnels. View of the south portal of the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    164. Twin Tunnels. View of the south portal of the north tunnel from inside the finished north portal of the south tunnel looking north. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  9. 40. December 20, 1933 View of portal site, tunnel no. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. December 20, 1933 View of portal site, tunnel no. 1, CWA men facing the portal. "Stripping the hillside grule sic formation between tunnels 1 and 2." - Scotts Bluff Summit Road, Gering, Scotts Bluff County, NE

  10. 16. DETAIL VIEW OF ORNAMENTAL UPPER PORTAL STRUT AND FLORAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. DETAIL VIEW OF ORNAMENTAL UPPER PORTAL STRUT AND FLORAL MOTIF GUSSETS OF SOUTH BRIDGE PORTAL. FACING SOUTHWEST. - Coverts Crossing Bridge, Spanning Mahoning River along Township Route 372 (Covert Road), New Castle, Lawrence County, PA

  11. 13. Detail of connection of end portal, top chord, diagonal, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Detail of connection of end portal, top chord, diagonal, vertical and portal strut. Looking at east end, north side of east span. - Boomershine Bridge, Spanning Twin Creek, Farmersville, Montgomery County, OH

  12. 43. VIEW OF THE RAMP ABOVE LOWER PORTAL AND RAMP, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. VIEW OF THE RAMP ABOVE LOWER PORTAL AND RAMP, LOOKING NORTHWEST. THE RAMP WAS USED TO GUIDE RUN-OFF FROM THUNDERSTORMS AWAY FROM THE PORTAL. - Independent Coal & Coke Company, Kenilworth, Carbon County, UT

  13. 340. Caltrans, Photographer October 14, 1935 "TUNNEL WEST PORTAL"; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    340. Caltrans, Photographer October 14, 1935 "TUNNEL - WEST PORTAL"; VIEW OF TUNNEL - WEST PORTAL' UNDER CONSTRUCTION SHOWING EXCAVATION OF TUNNEL AFTER POUR. 5-1669 - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  14. The hospital library and the enterprise portal.

    PubMed

    Bandy, Margaret; Fosmire, Brenda

    2004-01-01

    At Exempla Healthcare, the medical librarians and the e-Business staff are creating an enterprise information portal where medical reference is targeted, easily accessible, and supported by the medical librarians. A team approach has been essential. The e-Business department has worked for nine months coordinating technical challenges required to support personalization, targeted communications, and a single access point for clinical patient data. Exempla medical librarians have been involved in the definition and design of information access needs from the very beginning. The Clinicians Portal was the first developed, with other customizations to follow. Many challenges remain, but by definition, a portal is designed to be flexible and adapt to the changing needs of the enterprise it supports.

  15. Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Complicated by Sinistral Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kaley, Kristin; Lamb, Lynne

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is known for vague symptoms that lead to a delay in diagnosis, and hence most cases are found at an advanced stage. Many complications can happen secondary to pancreatic cancer including diabetes, malabsorption, and deep venous thrombosis. Sinistral (segmental or left-sided) portal hypertension (SPH) refers to portal hypertension confined to the left-sided segment of the portal venous system namely the splenic side, and the most common etiology is splenic vein thrombosis (SVT). We present here a case of a 66-year-old male with advanced pancreatic cancer who died due to bleeding secondary to SVT. We advise physicians caring for these patients to be aware of this complication, which may also be the manifestation of an undiagnosed pancreatic cancer. PMID:27555987

  16. Best Practices for Building Web Data Portals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. A.; Drew, L.

    2013-12-01

    With a data archive of more than 1.5 petabytes and a key role as the NASA Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data, the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) has an imperative to develop effective Web data portals. As part of continuous enhancement and expansion of its website, ASF recently created two data portals for distribution of SAR data: one for the archiving and distribution of NASA's MEaSUREs Wetlands project and one for newly digitally processed data from NASA's 1978 Seasat satellite. These case studies informed ASF's development of the following set of best practices for developing Web data portals. 1) Maintain well-organized, quality data. This is fundamental. If data are poorly organized or contain errors, credibility is lost and the data will not be used. 2) Match data to likely data uses. 3) Identify audiences in as much detail as possible. ASF DAAC's Seasat and Wetlands portals target three groups of users: a) scientists already familiar with ASF DAAC's SAR archive and our data download tool, Vertex; b) scientists not familiar with SAR or ASF, but who can use the data for their research of oceans, sea ice, volcanoes, land deformation and other Earth sciences; c) audiences wishing to learn more about SAR and its use in Earth sciences. 4) Identify the heaviest data uses and the terms scientists search for online when trying to find data for those uses. 5) Create search engine optimized (SEO) Web content that corresponds to those searches. Because search engines do not yet search raw data, so Web data portals must include content that ties the data to its likely uses. 6) Create Web designs that best serves data users (user centered design), not for how the organization views itself or its data. Usability testing was conducted for the ASF DAAC Wetlands portal to improve the user experience. 7) Use SEO tips and techniques. The ASF DAAC Seasat portal used numerous SEO techniques, including social media, blogging

  17. Unifying access to services: ESO's user portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavan, A. M.; Tacconi-Garman, L. E.; Peron, M.; Sogni, F.; Canavan, T.; Nass, P.

    2006-06-01

    The European Southern Observatory (ESO) is in the process of creating a central access point for all services offered to its user community via the Web. That gateway, called the User Portal, will provide registered users with a personalized set of service access points, the actual set depending on each user's privileges. Correspondence between users and ESO will take place by way of "profiles", that is, contact information. Each user may have several active profiles, so that an investigator may choose, for instance, whether their data should be delivered to their own address or to a collaborator. To application developers, the portal will offer authentication and authorization services, either via database queries or an LDAP server. The User Portal is being developed as a Web application using Java-based technology, including servlets and JSPs.

  18. astronomia.pl: Polish Astronomy Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czart, K.

    2005-12-01

    Astronomia.pl is an educational internet service for students, teachers and all astronomy amateurs. It is the biggest and the most popular astronomical portal in Poland. Our main address is www.astronomia.pl, but we created additional services: Copernicus - biographies of famous astronomers (www.kopernik.pl), AstroWWW - a collection of interesting webpages created by amateur astronomers (www.astrowww. pl), AstroSHOP - an on-line shop (www.astronomia.com.pl), Planetarium - website about Polish planetaria (www.planetarium.pl). An English version of the portal is available at www.astronomia.pl/english. In this article we give a short introduction to many of the portal's projects.

  19. Patient Portal Preferences: Perspectives on Imaging Information.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Mary; Arnold, Corey; Sarma, Karthik; Aberle, Denise; Garon, Edward; Bui, Alex A T

    2015-08-01

    Patient portals have the potential to provide content that is specifically tailored to a patient's information needs based on diagnoses and other factors. In this work, we conducted a survey of 41 lung cancer patients at an outpatient lung cancer clinic at the medical center of the University of California Los Angeles, to gain insight into these perceived information needs and opinions on the design of a portal to fulfill them. We found that patients requested access to information related to diagnosis and imaging, with more than half of the patients reporting that they did not anticipate an increase in anxiety due to access to medical record information via a portal. We also found that patient educational background did not lead to a significant difference in desires for explanations of reports and definitions of terms.

  20. Portal cavernoma cholangiopathy-clinical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Duseja, Ajay

    2014-02-01

    Because of the presence of portal cavernoma, paracholedochal and pericholedochal varices, portal cavernoma cholangiopathy (PCC) has become an entity unique to patients with extrahepatic portal venous obstruction (EHPVO). Majority of patients with these abnormalities are asymptomatic and are incidentally detected to have the presence of biliary abnormalities on cholangiography. Minority of patients present with symptoms of chronic cholestasis with or without biliary pain or acute cholangitis related most often to the presence of biliary strictures or stones. Other than the age of the patient and duration of EHPVO, presence of gall stones and common bile duct stones are other risk factors for the causation of symptoms in patients with PCC. This review summarizes the clinical characteristics of asymptomatic and symptomatic patients with PCC giving details of the prevalence of symptoms, their risk factors and overall burden of symptomatic PCC.

  1. Grid portal architectures for scientific applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, M. P.; Burruss, J.; Cinquini, L.; Fox, G.; Gannon, D.; Gilbert, L.; von Laszewski, G.; Jackson, K.; Middleton, D.; Moore, R.; Pierce, M.; Plale, B.; Rajasekar, A.; Regno, R.; Roberts, E.; Schissel, D.; Seth, A.; Schroeder, W.

    2005-01-01

    Computational scientists often develop large models and codes intended to be used by larger user communities or for repetitive tasks such as parametric studies. Lowering the barrier of entry for access to these codes is often a technical and sociological challenge. Portals help bridge the gap because they are well known interfaces enabling access to a large variety of resources, services, applications, and tools for private, public, and commercial entities, while hiding the complexities of the underlying software systems to the user. This paper presents an overview of the current state-of-the-art in grid portals, based on a component approach that utilizes portlet frameworks and the most recent Grid standards, the Web Services Resource Framework and a summary of current DOE portal efforts.

  2. A Web-Based Patient Portal for Mental Health Care: Benefits Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Alexandra; Nguyen, Tan; Riahi, Sanaz

    2016-01-01

    Background Treatment for mental illness has shifted from focusing purely on treatment of symptoms to focusing on personal recovery. Patient activation is an important component of the recovery journey. Patient portals have shown promise to increase activation in primary and acute care settings, but the benefits to tertiary level mental health care remain unknown. Objective To conduct a benefits evaluation of a Web-based portal for patients undergoing treatment for serious or persistent mental illness in order to examine the effects on (1) patient activation, (2) recovery, (3) productivity, and (4) administrative efficiencies. Methods All registered inpatients and outpatients at a tertiary level mental health care facility were offered the opportunity to enroll and utilize the patient portal. Those who chose to use the portal and those who did not were designated as “users” and “nonusers,” respectively. All patients received usual treatment. Users had Web-based access to view parts of their electronic medical record, view upcoming appointments, and communicate with their health care provider. Users could attend portal training or support sessions led by either the engagement coordinator or peer support specialists. A subset of patients who created and utilized their portal account completed 2 Web-based surveys at baseline (just after enrollment; n=91) and at follow-up (6 and 10 months; n=65). The total score of the Mental Health Recovery Measure (MHRM) was a proxy for patient activation and the individual domains measured recovery. The System and Use Survey Tool (SUS) examined the use of functions and general feedback about the portal. Organizational efficiencies were evaluated by examining the odds of portal users and nonusers missing appointments (productivity) or requesting information from health information management (administrative efficiencies) in the year before (2014) and the year after (2015) portal implementation. Results A total of 461 patients

  3. Reasons and Barriers for Using a Patient Portal: Survey Among Patients With Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Dijkhorst-Oei, Lioe-Ting; Rutten, Guy EHM

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of a Web portal for patients with diabetes mellitus to access their own personal health record may result in improved diabetes outcomes. However, the adoption by patients is slow. This may be caused by patient characteristics, but also by the content, layout, and promotion of the portal. Detailed knowledge about this could help increase patients’ participation in Web portals. Objective The aim was to study the opinions of patients with diabetes and identify perceived barriers to using a Web portal to optimize its use. Methods We conducted a survey among patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus from 62 primary care practices and 1 outpatient hospital clinic in the central area of the Netherlands who all used the same electronic health record with a Web portal. Questionnaires about patient characteristics, opinions about reasons for use or nonuse, and about portal content were sent to 1500 patients with a login and 3000 patients without a login to the Web portal. Patient groups were stratified according to login frequency. Demographic and diabetes-related variables were analyzed with multivariable regression analysis. Results The total response rate was 66.63% (2391/4399); 1390 of 4399 patients (31.60%) were eligible for analysis. There were 413 regular users (login frequency more than once) and 758 nonusers (no login). Most nonusers (72.4%) stated that the main reason for not requesting a login was that they were unaware of the existence of the portal. Other barriers reported by patients were disinterest in managing their own disease (28.5%, 216/758) and feelings of inadequacy with the use of computers and Internet (11.6%, 88/758). Patients treated by a general practitioner were more frequently nonusers compared to patients treated by an internist (78.8%, 666/846 vs 28.3%, 92/325; P<.001) and more users than nonusers became aware of the Web portal through their physician (94.9%, 392/413 vs 48.8%, 102/209; P<.001). Nonusers perceived

  4. Reasons and barriers for using a patient portal: survey among patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ronda, Maaike C M; Dijkhorst-Oei, Lioe-Ting; Rutten, Guy E H M

    2014-11-25

    The use of a Web portal for patients with diabetes mellitus to access their own personal health record may result in improved diabetes outcomes. However, the adoption by patients is slow. This may be caused by patient characteristics, but also by the content, layout, and promotion of the portal. Detailed knowledge about this could help increase patients' participation in Web portals. The aim was to study the opinions of patients with diabetes and identify perceived barriers to using a Web portal to optimize its use. We conducted a survey among patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus from 62 primary care practices and 1 outpatient hospital clinic in the central area of the Netherlands who all used the same electronic health record with a Web portal. Questionnaires about patient characteristics, opinions about reasons for use or nonuse, and about portal content were sent to 1500 patients with a login and 3000 patients without a login to the Web portal. Patient groups were stratified according to login frequency. Demographic and diabetes-related variables were analyzed with multivariable regression analysis. The total response rate was 66.63% (2391/4399); 1390 of 4399 patients (31.60%) were eligible for analysis. There were 413 regular users (login frequency more than once) and 758 nonusers (no login). Most nonusers (72.4%) stated that the main reason for not requesting a login was that they were unaware of the existence of the portal. Other barriers reported by patients were disinterest in managing their own disease (28.5%, 216/758) and feelings of inadequacy with the use of computers and Internet (11.6%, 88/758). Patients treated by a general practitioner were more frequently nonusers compared to patients treated by an internist (78.8%, 666/846 vs 28.3%, 92/325; P<.001) and more users than nonusers became aware of the Web portal through their physician (94.9%, 392/413 vs 48.8%, 102/209; P<.001). Nonusers perceived specific portal content as not as useful

  5. Application of the smart portal in transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Kercel, S.W.; Baylor, V.M.; Dress, W.B.; Hickerson, T.W.; Jatko, W.B.; Labaj, L.E.; Muhs, J.D.; Pack, R.M.

    1996-12-31

    Under a program sponsored by the Department of Energy, the Oak Ridge complex is developed a ``Portal-of-the-Future``, or ``smart portal``. This is a security portal for vehicular traffic which is intended to quickly detect explosives, hidden passengers, etc. It uses several technologies, including microwaves, weigh-in-motion, digital image processing, and electroacoustic wavelet-based heartbeat detection. A novel component of particular interest is the Enclosed Space Detection System (ESDS), which detects the presence of persons hiding in a vehicle. The system operates by detecting the presence of a human ballistocardiographic signature. Each time the heart beats, it generates a small but measurable shock wave that propagates through the body. The wave, whose graph is called a ballistocardiogram, is the mechanical analog of the electrocardiogram, which is routinely used for medical diagnosis. The wave is, in turn, coupled to any surface or object with which the body is in contact. If the body is located in an enclosed space, this will result in a measurable deflection of the surface of the enclosure. Independent testing has shown ESDS to be highly reliable. The technologies used in the smart portal operate in real time and allow vehicles to be checked through the portal in much less time than would be required for human inspection. Although not originally developed for commercial transportation, the smart portal has the potential to solve several transportation problems. It could relieve congestion at international highway border crossings by reducing the time required to inspect each vehicle while increasing the level of security. It can reduce highway congestion at the entrance of secure facilities such as prisons. Also, it could provide security at intermodal transfer points, such as airport parking lots and car ferry terminals.

  6. Application of the smart portal in transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kercel, Stephen W.; Baylor, Vivian M.; Dress, William B.; Hickerson, Tim W.; Jatko, W. Bruce; Labaj, Leo E.; Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Pack, Richard M.

    1997-02-01

    Under a program sponsored by the Department of Energy, the Oak Ridge complex is developing a `Portal-of-the-Future', or `smart portal.' This is a security portal for vehicular traffic which is intended to quickly detect explosives, hidden passengers, etc. It uses several technologies, including microwaves, weigh-in-motion, digital image processing, and electroacoustic wavelet-based heartbeat detection. A novel component of particular interest is the Enclosed Space Detection System (ESDS), which detects the presence of persons hiding in a vehicle. The system operates by detecting the presence of a human ballistocardiographic signature. Each time the heart beats, it generates a small but measurable shock wave that propagates through the body. The wave, whose graph is called a ballistocardiogram, is the mechanical analog of the electrocardiograms, which is routinely used for medical diagnosis. The wave is, in turn, coupled to any surface or object with which the body is in contact. If the body is located in an enclosed space, this will result in a measurable deflection of the surface of the enclosure. Independent testing has shown ESDS to be highly reliable. The technologies used in the smart portal operate in real time and allow vehicles to be checked through the portal in much less time than would be required for human inspection. Although not originally developed for commercial transportation, the smart portal has the potential to solve several transportation problems. It could relieve congestion at international highway border crossings by reducing the time required to inspect each vehicle while increasing the level of security. It can reduce highway congestion at the entrance of secure facilities such as prisons. Also, it could provide security at intermodal transfer points, such as airport parking lots and car ferry terminals.

  7. The CeDRES data portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert-Aguilar, Alexandre; Delmotte, Pauline; André, François; Brissebrat, Guillaume; Canonici, Jean-Christophe; Piguet, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    SAFIRE is the French facility dedicated to airborne measurement for environmental research. The SAFIRE steering committee decided that access to its archives should be improved. If certain data, including recent campaigns, are available online, access to them is difficult for users because these data are dispersed in as many data portals as campaigns. Most of projects are not able to keep medium to long term online access to their database. Therefore, many airborne data, particularly the oldest, are not available online, stored on media whose sustainability is not guaranteed. SAFIRE also decided to identify old data stored in Meudon (France) on paper and hard media and to rescue with the help of an archivist. At the same time, the development of a centralized digital archive - containing data collected with the Fokker - 27 " ARAT " and Merlin IV aircraft - associated to a web portal was given to SEDOO. The first part of the project consisted in modelling the database. The second part, still in progess, was the development of the CeDRES (Centre de Données aéRoportées & SAFIRE) portal (http://cedres.sedoo.fr) which is responsive and bilingual (French and English) ; and metadata standardization (iso 19115). The main objectives of this project are data preservation and open data access. A first test version of CeDRES portal will be release in mid-February 2016. And operational version is planned for summer 2016. In the future, CeDRES portal will be able to receive and to distribute metadata and data of aircraft currently in service (FALCON-20, ATR-42 and PiperAztec-23). The interoperability implementation and data homogenization are planned in the medium term. The CeDRES portal is part of the French atmospheric chemistry data center AERIS (http://www.aeris-data.fr). Every scientist is invited to browse the catalog and use CEDRES data. Feel free to contact cedres-contact@sedoo.fr for any question.

  8. Application of the smart portal in transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kercel, Stephen W.; Baylor, Vivian M.; Dress, William B.; Hickerson, Tim W.; Jatko, William B.; Labaj, Leo E.; Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Pack, Richard M.

    1997-02-01

    Under a program sponsored by the Department of Energy, the Oak Ridge complex is developing a `Portal-of-the-Future', or `smart portal.' This is a security portal for vehicular traffic which is intended to quickly detect explosives, hidden passengers, etc. It uses several technologies, including microwaves, weigh-in-motion, digital image processing, and electroacoustic wavelet-based heartbeat detection. A novel component of particular interest is the Enclosed Space Detection System (ESDS), which detects the presence of persons hiding in a vehicle. The system operates by detecting the presence of a human ballistocardiographic signature. Each time the heart beats, it generates a small but measurable shock wave that propagates through the body. The wave, whose graph is called a ballistocardiogram, is the mechanical analog of the electrocardiograms, which is routinely used for medical diagnosis. The wave is, in turn, coupled to any surface or object with which the body is in contact. If the body is located in an enclosed space, this will result in a measurable deflection of the surface of the enclosure. Independent testing has shown ESDS to be highly reliable. The technologies used in the smart portal operate in real time and allow vehicles to be checked through the portal in much less time than would be required for human inspection. Although not originally developed for commercial transportation, the smart portal has the potential to solve several transportation problems. It could relieve congestion at international highway border crossings by reducing the time required to inspect each vehicle while increasing the level of security. It can reduce highway congestion at the entrance of secure facilities such as prisons. Also, it could provide security at intermodal transfer points, such as airport parking lots and car ferry terminals.

  9. Calcified wall portal venous aneurysm: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Khairallah, Safouane; Elmansouri, Abdelmajid; Jalal, Hicham; Idrissi, Mariem Ouali; Ganouni, Najat Cherif Idrissi

    2016-01-01

    Portal vein aneurysms are extremely rare, less than 200 cases have been reported until late 2015. They are defined as a portal vein diameter exceeding 19 mm for cirrhotic patients and 15 mm in normal livers. Most patients are asymptomatic, but complications may occur. We report a case of a 68-year-old female admitted for etiological assessment of a portal hypertension revealed by an upper gastro intestinal bleeding, who was incidentally diagnosed with a portal vein aneurysm. PMID:28292056

  10. Calcified wall portal venous aneurysm: a case report.

    PubMed

    Khairallah, Safouane; Elmansouri, Abdelmajid; Jalal, Hicham; Idrissi, Mariem Ouali; Ganouni, Najat Cherif Idrissi

    2016-01-01

    Portal vein aneurysms are extremely rare, less than 200 cases have been reported until late 2015. They are defined as a portal vein diameter exceeding 19 mm for cirrhotic patients and 15 mm in normal livers. Most patients are asymptomatic, but complications may occur. We report a case of a 68-year-old female admitted for etiological assessment of a portal hypertension revealed by an upper gastro intestinal bleeding, who was incidentally diagnosed with a portal vein aneurysm.

  11. Framework Development Supporting the Safety Portal

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, Steven Ralph; Kvarfordt, Kellie Jean; Vang, Leng; Smith, Curtis Lee

    2015-07-01

    In a collaborating scientific research arena it is important to have an environment where analysts have access to a shared repository of information, documents, and software tools, and be able to accurately maintain and track historical changes in models. The new Safety Portal cloud-based environment will be accessible remotely from anywhere regardless of computing platforms given that the platform has available Internet access and proper browser capabilities. Information stored at this environment would be restricted based on user assigned credentials. This report discusses current development of a cloud-based web portal for PRA tools.

  12. R2 Water Quality Portal Monitoring Stations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Water Quality Data Portal (WQP) provides an easy way to access data stored in various large water quality databases. The WQP provides various input parameters on the form including location, site, sampling, and date parameters to filter and customize the returned results. The The Water Quality Portal (WQP) is a cooperative service sponsored by the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the National Water Quality Monitoring Council (NWQMC) that integrates publicly available water quality data from the USGS National Water Information System (NWIS) the EPA STOrage and RETrieval (STORET) Data Warehouse, and the USDA ARS Sustaining The Earth??s Watersheds - Agricultural Research Database System (STEWARDS).

  13. Portal increases throughput with SCADA, distributed control

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, D.E.

    1983-06-01

    Portal Pipelines has added a distributed control system run by SCADA (supervisory control and data acquisition) in its Minot, North Dakota control center. The system keeps abreast of crude movements and quantities of oil being delivered. It was installed in specified stages from 5TI programmable controller, to a PM550 controller (in conjunction with FSK modems), to a full SCADA system. Expansion of the pipeline network in 1980 made integration to SCADA necessary. The Minot control center, CRT terminal, and alarm system are described. Backup consists of redundant computers. Portal's daily movement of 100,000 bbl of crude oil would not be possible without SCADA.

  14. Investigation of structural and electrical properties of flat a-Si/c-Si heterostructure fabricated by EBPVD technique

    SciTech Connect

    Demiroğlu, D.; Tatar, B.; Kazmanli, K.; Urgen, M.

    2013-12-16

    Flat amorphous silicon - crystal silicon (a-Si/c-Si) heterostructure were prepared by ultra-high vacuum electron beam evaporation technique on p-Si (111) and n-Si (100) single crystal substrates. Structural analyses were investigated by XRD, Raman and FEG-SEM analysis. With these analyses we determined that at the least amorphous structure shows modification but amorphous structure just protected. The electrical and photovoltaic properties of flat a-Si/c-Si heterojunction devices were investigated with current-voltage characteristics under dark and illumination conditions. Electrical properties of flat a-Si/c-Si heterorojunction; such as barrier height Φ{sub B}, diode ideality factor η were determined from current-voltage characteristics in dark conditions. These a-Si/c-Si heterostructure have good rectification behavior as a diode and exhibit high photovoltaic sensitivity.

  15. Kinetics of a-Si:H bulk defect and a-Si:H/c-Si interface-state reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wolf, Stefaan; Ballif, Christophe; Kondo, Michio

    2012-03-01

    Low-temperature annealing of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is investigated. An identical energy barrier is found for the reduction of deep defects in the bulk of a-Si:H films and at the interface such layers form with crystalline Si (c-Si) surfaces. This finding gives direct physical evidence that the defects determining a-Si:H/c-Si interface recombination are silicon dangling bonds and that also kinetically this interface has no unique features compared to the a-Si:H bulk.

  16. Portal verification using the KODAK ACR 2000 RT storage phosphor plate system and EC films. A semiquantitative comparison.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Peter; Blank, Hilbert; Alheit, Horst

    2006-03-01

    The suitability of the storage phosphor plate system ACR 2000 RT (Eastman Kodak Corp., Rochester, MN, USA), that is destined for portal verification as well as for portal simulation imaging in radiotherapy, had to be proven by the comparison with a highly sensitive verification film. The comparison included portal verification images of different regions (head and neck, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis) irradiated with 6- and 15-MV photons and electrons. Each portal verification image was done at the storage screen and the EC film as well, using the EC-L cassettes (both: Eastman Kodak Corp., Rochester, MN, USA) for both systems. The soft-tissue and bony contrast and the brightness were evaluated and compared in a ranking of the two compared images. Different phantoms were irradiated to investigate the high- and low-contrast resolution. To account for quality assurance application, the short-time exposure of the unpacked and irradiated storage screen by green and red room lasers was also investigated. In general, the quality of the processed ACR images was slightly higher than that of the films, mostly due to cases of an insufficient exposure to the film. The storage screen was able to verify electron portals even for low electron energies with only minor photon contamination. The laser lines were sharply and clearly visible on the ACR images. The ACR system may replace the film without any noticeable decrease in image quality thereby reducing processing time and saving the costs of films and avoiding incorrect exposures.

  17. Portal Hypertension Secondary to Spontaneous Arterio-Portal Venous Fistulas: Transcatheter Arterial Embolization with n-Butyl Cyanoacrylate and Microcoils

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagami, Takuji; Nakamura, Toshiyuki; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2000-09-15

    We report a 73-year-old man with recurrent variceal bleeding due to portal hypertension caused by multiple intrahepatic arterio-portal venous fistulas, which were successfully occluded by embolization with n-butyl cyanoacrylate and micro-coils.

  18. Fabrication of Source/Drain Electrodes for a-Si:H Thin-Film Transistors Using a Single Cu Alloy Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. H.; Lee, C. Y.; Nam, H. S.; Lee, J. G.; Yang, H. J.; Ho, W. J.; Jeong, J. Y.; Koo, D. H.

    2011-11-01

    A Cu alloy/Cu alloy oxide bilayer structure was formed on an n +-a-Si:H substrate using a single Cu alloy target. It was employed for the source/drain electrodes in the fabrication of a-Si:H thin-film transistors with good electrical performance, high thermal stability, and good adhesion. Transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy analyses revealed that the initial sputtering of the Cu alloy in O2/Ar allowed for preferential oxidation of Si and the formation of a SiO x /Cu-supersaturated a-Si:H bilayer at the copper oxide-a-Si:H interface. This bilayer turned into an SiO x /Cu3Si bilayer after annealing at 300°C. It provided a stable contact structure with low contact resistance.

  19. User Needs of Digital Service Web Portals: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heo, Misook; Song, Jung-Sook; Seol, Moon-Won

    2013-01-01

    The authors examined the needs of digital information service web portal users. More specifically, the needs of Korean cultural portal users were examined as a case study. The conceptual framework of a web-based portal is that it is a complex, web-based service application with characteristics of information systems and service agents. In…

  20. The Monash Portal: More Than Just a Virtual Gateway.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, David; Webster, Len; Benson, Robyn; James, Di; Bailey, Nathan

    The My Monash Portal (Portal) at Monash University (Australia) provides a virtual gateway to support student-centered flexible learning by coordinating several of the university's key resources to meet the needs of students and staff. The Portal is intended to help deliver innovative learning programs, foster opportunities to undertake research,…

  1. User Needs of Digital Service Web Portals: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heo, Misook; Song, Jung-Sook; Seol, Moon-Won

    2013-01-01

    The authors examined the needs of digital information service web portal users. More specifically, the needs of Korean cultural portal users were examined as a case study. The conceptual framework of a web-based portal is that it is a complex, web-based service application with characteristics of information systems and service agents. In…

  2. Preduodenal portal vein in an adult--angiography and CT.

    PubMed

    Sasai, K; Sano, A; Nishizawa, S; Imanaka, K; Kuroda, Y

    1985-01-01

    We report on an adult case of preduodenal portal vein illustrated by computed tomography (CT) and angiography. These diagnostic modalities were initially performed to evaluate a coexisting pancreatic cancer. Contrast-enhanced CT demonstrated unusual positioning of the portal vein ventral to the duodenum. The superior mesenteric-portal vein, which was L-shaped and convexly caudad, strongly suggested this anomalous condition.

  3. Factors Influencing Student Acceptance and Use of Academic Portals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Presley, Adrien; Presley, Theresa

    2009-01-01

    Institutions of higher education have increasing turned to web portals as a way to connect with students. These portals are designed to provide students a centralized point of access to information and services. In spite of the efforts put into developing and maintaining these portals, their use by students can be disappointing. The study…

  4. Factors Influencing Student Acceptance and Use of Academic Portals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Presley, Adrien; Presley, Theresa

    2009-01-01

    Institutions of higher education have increasing turned to web portals as a way to connect with students. These portals are designed to provide students a centralized point of access to information and services. In spite of the efforts put into developing and maintaining these portals, their use by students can be disappointing. The study…

  5. 13. Detail of west side of southwest portal showing the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Detail of west side of southwest portal showing the latticed top chord rivet-connected to the latticed inclined end post and the portal strut; also shown is the webbed portal bracing and the top lateral bracing with the pin connection of the hip vertical and the diagonal. - Post Road Bridge, State Route 7-A, Havre de Grace, Harford County, MD

  6. An interactive portal to empower cancer survivors: a qualitative study on user expectations.

    PubMed

    Kuijpers, Wilma; Groen, Wim G; Loos, Romy; Oldenburg, Hester S A; Wouters, Michel W J M; Aaronson, Neil K; van Harten, Wim H

    2015-09-01

    Portals are increasingly used to improve patient empowerment, but are still uncommon in oncology. In this study, we explored cancer survivors' and health professionals' expectations of possible features of an interactive portal. We conducted three focus groups with breast cancer survivors (n = 21), two with lung cancer survivors (n = 14), and four with health professionals (n = 31). Drafts of possible features of an interactive portal were presented as static screenshots: survivorship care plan (SCP), access to electronic medical record (EMR), appointments, e-consultation, online patient community, patient reported outcomes (PROs) plus feedback, telemonitoring service, online rehabilitation program, and online psychosocial self-management program. This presentation was followed by an open discussion. Focus groups were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim, and data were analyzed using content analysis. Important themes included fulfillment of information needs, communication, motivation, quality of feedback, and supervision. Cancer survivors were primarily interested in features that could fulfill their information needs: SCP, access to their EMR, and an overview of appointments. Health professionals considered PROs and telemonitoring as most useful features, as these provide relevant information about survivors' health status. We recommend to minimally include these features in an interactive portal for cancer survivors. This is the first study that evaluated the expectations of cancer survivors and health professionals concerning an interactive portal. Both groups were positive about the introduction of such a portal, although their preferences for the various features differed. These findings reflect their unique perspective and emphasize the importance of involving multiple stakeholders in the actual design process.

  7. Improved charge collection of the buried p-i-n a-Si:H radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Fujieda, I.; Cho, G.; Conti, M.; Drewery, J.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Qureshi, S.; Street, R.A.; Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, CA )

    1989-09-01

    Charge collection in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) radiation detectors is improved for high LET particle detection by adding thin intrinsic layers to the usual p-i-n structure. This buried p-i-n structure enables us to apply higher bias and the electric field is enhanced. When irradiated by 5.8 MeV {alpha} particles, the 5.7 {mu}m thick buried p-i-n detector with bias 300V gives a signal size of 60,000 electrons, compared to about 20,000 electrons with the simple p-i-n detectors. The improved charge collection in the new structure is discussed. The capability of tailoring the field profile by doping a-Si:H opens a way to some interesting device structures. 17 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Advanced millimeter-wave security portal imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2012-03-01

    Millimeter-wave (mm-wave) imaging is rapidly gaining acceptance as a security tool to augment conventional metal detectors and baggage x-ray systems for passenger screening at airports and other secured facilities. This acceptance indicates that the technology has matured; however, many potential improvements can yet be realized. The authors have developed a number of techniques over the last several years including novel image reconstruction and display techniques, polarimetric imaging techniques, array switching schemes, and high-frequency high-bandwidth techniques. All of these may improve the performance of new systems; however, some of these techniques will increase the cost and complexity of the mm-wave security portal imaging systems. Reducing this cost may require the development of novel array designs. In particular, RF photonic methods may provide new solutions to the design and development of the sequentially switched linear mm-wave arrays that are the key element in the mm-wave portal imaging systems. Highfrequency, high-bandwidth designs are difficult to achieve with conventional mm-wave electronic devices, and RF photonic devices may be a practical alternative. In this paper, the mm-wave imaging techniques developed at PNNL are reviewed and the potential for implementing RF photonic mm-wave array designs is explored.

  9. Resistance switching in a SiC nanowire/Au nanoparticle network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Y.; Kohno, H.

    2009-07-01

    Resistance switching in a semiconductor nanowire/metal nanoparticle system is demonstrated. SiC nanowires grown on a Si substrate and decorated with Au nanoparticles are measured using W microprobes in a scanning electron microscope, where one probe is grounded and the other is biased. HIGH and LOW states can be toggled by applying a negative or positive pulse voltage. The switching mechanism is attributed to a charge transfer between the SiC nanowires and the Au nanoparticles.

  10. Colorectal variceal bleeding in patients with extrahepatic portal vein thrombosis and idiopathic portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Orozco, H; Takahashi, T; Mercado, M A; Prado-Orozco, E; Ferral, H; Hernandez-Ortiz, J; Esquivel, E

    1992-03-01

    We report three patients with colonic variceal bleeding secondary to portal hypertension, 0.5% of all cases with hemorrhagic portal hypertension studied by us in the last 16 years. One patient had idiopathic portal hypertension, and the others had extrahepatic portal vein thrombosis. Colonic varices were documented in all three cases by angiogram; large arteriovenous fistulas in the territory of the superior mesenteric artery and between the inferior mesenteric artery and hemorrhoidal veins were demonstrated in one patient. Two patients underwent colonoscopy; colonic varices were seen in only one. Two patients also had bled from esophagogastric varices. One patient underwent descending colon and sigmoid resection after failure to control bleeding with ligation of arterial supply; one patient underwent the Sugiura procedure, plus transanal ligation of hemorrhoids and rectal varices. At 3 months, 2 years, and 4 years of follow-up, the patients were in good general condition without any evidence of rebleeding.

  11. Measuring Problem Solving Skills in "Portal 2"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shute, Valerie J.; Wang, Lubin

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines possible improvement to problem solving skills as a function of playing the video game "Portal 2." Stealth assessment is used in the game to evaluate students' problem solving abilities--specifically basic and flexible rule application. The stealth assessment measures will be validated against commonly accepted…

  12. Airport testing an explosives detection portal

    SciTech Connect

    Rhykerd, C.; Linker, K.; Hannum, D.; Bouchier, F.; Parmeter, J.

    1998-08-01

    At the direction of the US Congress, following the Pan Am 103 and TWA 800 crashes, the Federal Aviation Administration funded development of non-invasive techniques to screen airline passengers for explosives. Such an explosives detection portal, developed at Sandia National Laboratories, was field tested at the Albuquerque International airport in September 1997. During the 2-week field trial, 2,400 passengers were screened and 500 surveyed. Throughput, reliability, maintenance and sensitivity were studied. Follow-up testing at Sandia and at Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory was conducted. A passenger stands in the portal for five seconds while overhead fans blow air over his body. Any explosive vapors or dislodged particles are collected in vents at the feet. Explosives are removed from the air in a preconcentrator and subsequently directed into an ion mobility spectrometer for detection. Throughput measured 300 passengers per hour. The non-invasive portal can detect subfingerprint levels of explosives residue on clothing. A survey of 500 passengers showed a 97% approval rating, with 99% stating that such portals, if effective, should be installed in airports to improve security. Results of the airport test, as well as operational issues, are discussed.

  13. Duodenal web with preduodenal portal vein.

    PubMed

    Golombek, S; Bilgi, J; Ukabiala, O

    1995-06-01

    This article described an unusual case of an infant with duodenal atresia and preduodenal portal vein without Down's syndrome or other anatomical anomalies associated with this condition. Duodenoduodenostomy was effective. Enteral feeding was re-established 72 hours post-operatively and the patient was discharged home one day later.

  14. Collaboration Portals for NASA's Airborne Field Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conover, Helen; Kulkami, Ajinkya; Garrett, Michele; Goodman, Michael; Peterson, Walter Arthur; Drewry, Marilyn; Hardin, Danny M.; He, Matt

    2011-01-01

    The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), in collaboration with the Global Hydrology Resource Center, a NASA Earth Science Data Center, has provided information management for a number of NASA Airborne Field campaigns, both hurricane science investigations and satellite instrument validation. Effective field campaign management requires communication and coordination tools, including utilities for personnel to upload and share flight plans, weather forecasts, a variety of mission reports, preliminary science data, and personal photos. Beginning with the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) hurricane field campaign in 2010, we have provided these capabilities via a Drupal-based collaboration portal. This portal was reused and modified for the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), part of the Global Precipitation Measurement mission ground validation program. An end goal of these development efforts is the creation of a Drupal profile for field campaign management. This presentation will discuss experiences with Drupal in developing and using these collaboration portals. Topics will include Drupal modules used, advantages and disadvantages of working with Drupal in this context, and how the science teams used the portals in comparison with other communication and collaboration tools.

  15. Portal Schools Project, First Year Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutonsky, Linda

    This document discusses the theory and philosophy of the Portal School strategy. According to the author, that strategy is a process for making an environment responsive to change; a way of providing a setting in which site, specific and locally determined programs, and theories can be adapted, implemented, and diffused; and a method for closing…

  16. Collaboration Portals for NASA's Airborne Field Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conover, H.; Kulkarni, A.; Garrett, M.; Goodman, M.; Petersen, W. A.; Drewry, M.; Hardin, D. M.; He, M.

    2011-12-01

    The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), in collaboration with the Global Hydrology Resource Center, a NASA Earth Science Data Center, has provided information management for a number of NASA Airborne Field campaigns, both hurricane science investigations and satellite instrument validation. Effective field campaign management requires communication and coordination tools, including utilities for personnel to upload and share flight plans, weather forecasts, a variety of mission reports, preliminary science data, and personal photos. Beginning with the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) hurricane field campaign in 2010, we have provided these capabilities via a Drupal-based collaboration portal. This portal was reused and modified for the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), part of the Global Precipitation Measurement mission ground validation program. An end goal of these development efforts is the creation of a Drupal profile for field campaign management. This presentation will discuss experiences with Drupal in developing and using these collaboration portals. Topics will include Drupal modules used, advantages and disadvantages of working with Drupal in this context, and how the science teams used the portals in comparison with other communication and collaboration tools.

  17. ExPASy: SIB bioinformatics resource portal.

    PubMed

    Artimo, Panu; Jonnalagedda, Manohar; Arnold, Konstantin; Baratin, Delphine; Csardi, Gabor; de Castro, Edouard; Duvaud, Séverine; Flegel, Volker; Fortier, Arnaud; Gasteiger, Elisabeth; Grosdidier, Aurélien; Hernandez, Céline; Ioannidis, Vassilios; Kuznetsov, Dmitry; Liechti, Robin; Moretti, Sébastien; Mostaguir, Khaled; Redaschi, Nicole; Rossier, Grégoire; Xenarios, Ioannis; Stockinger, Heinz

    2012-07-01

    ExPASy (http://www.expasy.org) has worldwide reputation as one of the main bioinformatics resources for proteomics. It has now evolved, becoming an extensible and integrative portal accessing many scientific resources, databases and software tools in different areas of life sciences. Scientists can henceforth access seamlessly a wide range of resources in many different domains, such as proteomics, genomics, phylogeny/evolution, systems biology, population genetics, transcriptomics, etc. The individual resources (databases, web-based and downloadable software tools) are hosted in a 'decentralized' way by different groups of the SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics and partner institutions. Specifically, a single web portal provides a common entry point to a wide range of resources developed and operated by different SIB groups and external institutions. The portal features a search function across 'selected' resources. Additionally, the availability and usage of resources are monitored. The portal is aimed for both expert users and people who are not familiar with a specific domain in life sciences. The new web interface provides, in particular, visual guidance for newcomers to ExPASy.

  18. Liver surgery in cirrhosis and portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hackl, Christina; Schlitt, Hans J; Renner, Philipp; Lang, Sven A

    2016-03-07

    The prevalence of hepatic cirrhosis in Europe and the United States, currently 250 patients per 100000 inhabitants, is steadily increasing. Thus, we observe a significant increase in patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension needing liver resections for primary or metastatic lesions. However, extended liver resections in patients with underlying hepatic cirrhosis and portal hypertension still represent a medical challenge in regard to perioperative morbidity, surgical management and postoperative outcome. The Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer classification recommends to restrict curative liver resections for hepatocellular carcinoma in cirrhotic patients to early tumor stages in patients with Child A cirrhosis not showing portal hypertension. However, during the last two decades, relevant improvements in preoperative diagnostic, perioperative hepatologic and intensive care management as well as in surgical techniques during hepatic resections have rendered even extended liver resections in higher-degree cirrhotic patients with portal hypertension possible. However, there are few standard indications for hepatic resections in cirrhotic patients and risk stratifications have to be performed in an interdisciplinary setting for each individual patient. We here review the indications, the preoperative risk-stratifications, the morbidity and the mortality of extended resections for primary and metastatic lesions in cirrhotic livers. Furthermore, we provide a review of literature on perioperative management in cirrhotic patients needing extrahepatic abdominal surgery and an overview of surgical options in the treatment of hepatic cirrhosis.

  19. Collaboration Portals for NASA's Airborne Field Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conover, Helen; Kulkami, Ajinkya; Garrett, Michele; Goodman, Michael; Peterson, Walter Arthur; Drewry, Marilyn; Hardin, Danny M.; He, Matt

    2011-01-01

    The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), in collaboration with the Global Hydrology Resource Center, a NASA Earth Science Data Center, has provided information management for a number of NASA Airborne Field campaigns, both hurricane science investigations and satellite instrument validation. Effective field campaign management requires communication and coordination tools, including utilities for personnel to upload and share flight plans, weather forecasts, a variety of mission reports, preliminary science data, and personal photos. Beginning with the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) hurricane field campaign in 2010, we have provided these capabilities via a Drupal-based collaboration portal. This portal was reused and modified for the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), part of the Global Precipitation Measurement mission ground validation program. An end goal of these development efforts is the creation of a Drupal profile for field campaign management. This presentation will discuss experiences with Drupal in developing and using these collaboration portals. Topics will include Drupal modules used, advantages and disadvantages of working with Drupal in this context, and how the science teams used the portals in comparison with other communication and collaboration tools.

  20. [Portal hypertension in pediatrics: II: Hemorrhagic complications].

    PubMed

    Costaguta, Alejandro; Alvarez, Fernando

    2010-08-01

    Bleeding from esophageal varices is the most severe complication of portal hypertension, and should be managed in specially trained centers. Vasoactive drugs, mainly octreotide, plus endoscopic treatment are able to control bleeding in 90% of the cases. Rescue treatments like TIPS and surgery should be immediately available for those who do not stop bleeding or have varices difficult to manage.

  1. Intercomprehension: A Portal to Teachers' Intercultural Sensitivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinho, Ana Sofia

    2015-01-01

    The development of opportunities for teachers' professional development in plurilingual and intercultural education is a key issue in language teacher education and "intercomprehension" (IC) can provide a potential portal for the development of teachers' intercultural sensitivity. Particularly relevant to this is the creation of powerful…

  2. Cross-Cultural Dimensions of Internet Portals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zahir, Sajjad; Dobing, Brian; Hunter, M. Gordon

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of cultural influences on new technologies focuses on an analysis of full-service national Web portals from different countries that investigated whether the adoption of new technologies resulted in cultural convergence or divergence. Results showed differences in appearance and features offered that can be attributed to cultural…

  3. Cross-Cultural Dimensions of Internet Portals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zahir, Sajjad; Dobing, Brian; Hunter, M. Gordon

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of cultural influences on new technologies focuses on an analysis of full-service national Web portals from different countries that investigated whether the adoption of new technologies resulted in cultural convergence or divergence. Results showed differences in appearance and features offered that can be attributed to cultural…

  4. Creative Problem-Solving Software and Portals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hijazi, Sam; Smith, M. Leigh; Alvarado-Vazquez, Edgardo

    2004-01-01

    The available research dealing with information technology and creativity has been limited. There is an obvious need to explore this area. Fortunately there is some available software and portals that have undertaken this important topic. This research starts by discussing the value of information technology as a major input to sustain and…

  5. Portal hypertension as portrayed by marked hepatosplenomegaly: case report

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, R.A.

    1987-12-01

    The liver is vulnerable to as host of disease processes, including portal hypertension. This is a severe hepatic condition in which the liver is subject to numerous imbalances: increased hepatic blood flow, increased portal vein pressure due to extrahepatic portal vein obstruction, and/or increases in hepatic blood flow resistance. Although many diseases states may be responsible for the development of portal hypertension, it is most commonly associated with moderately severe or advanced cirrhosis. Advanced, untreated portal hypertension may cause additional complications such as hepatosplenomegaly, gastrointestinal bleeding, and ascites.

  6. Anatomy of the Portal Vein Bifurcation: Implication for Transjugular Intrahepatic Portal Systemic Shunts

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, Philip Chong-hei Ng, Wai Fu; Lam, Christine Suk-yee; Tsui, Polly Po; Faruqi, Asma

    2003-06-15

    Purpose: The relationship of the portalvein bifurcation to the liver capsule in Asians, which is an important landmark for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt, has not previously been described. Methods: The anatomy of the portal vein bifurcation was studied in 70 adult Chinese cadavers; it was characterized as intrahepatic or extrahepatic. The length of the exposed portion of the right and left portal veins was measured when the bifurcation was extrahepatic. Results: The portal vein bifurcation was intrahepatic in 37 cadavers (53%) and extrahepatic in 33 cadavers (47%). The mean length of the right and left extrahepatic portal veins was 0.96 cm and 0.85 cm respectively.Both were less than or equal to 2 cm in 94% of the cadavers with extrahepatic bifurcation. There was no correlation between the presence of cirrhosis and the location of the portal vein bifurcation(p 1.0). There was no statistically significant difference in liver mass in cadavers with either extrahepatic or intrahepatic bifurcation (p =0.40). Conclusions: These findings suggest that fortransjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt placement, a portal vein puncture 2 cm from the bifurcation will be safe in most cases.

  7. Restriction of drinking water abrogates splanchnic vasodilation and portal hypertension in portal vein-ligated rats.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Akos; Schuligoi, Rufina; Lippe, Irmgard T; Stauber, Rudolf E

    2009-01-01

    Portal hypertension is associated with splanchnic vasodilation which is claimed responsible for the maintenance of chronically elevated portal pressure. Vasopressin analogues are used in the treatment of acute variceal bleeding, since they effectively reduce splanchnic blood flow and portal pressure. Dehydration stimulates the release of endogenous vasopressin release. Here we compared the effects of deprivation of drinking water for 18 h with those of vasopressin infusion on mesenteric hemodynamics in portal vein-ligated (PVL) and sham-operated (SHAM) rats. Blood flow in the superior mesenteric artery was measured with the ultrasonic transit time shift technique. Deprivation of drinking water had no hemodynamic effects in SHAM rats, but completely reversed the mesenteric hyperemia and portal hypertension in PVL rats to figures measured in SHAM rats, without altering blood pressure. Similarly, intravenous infusion of low doses of arginine vasopressin (1-10 pmol/min) selectively reduced mesenteric blood flow in PVL rats but had little effect in SHAM rats. These data suggest that control of water balance or aquaretic drugs might have beneficial effects on splanchnic hemodynamics and portal pressure in advanced liver disease, possibly by stimulating endogenous vasopressin release.

  8. Synteny Portal: a web-based application portal for synteny block analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jongin; Hong, Woon-young; Cho, Minah; Sim, Mikang; Lee, Daehwan; Ko, Younhee; Kim, Jaebum

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in next-generation sequencing technologies and genome assembly algorithms have enabled the accumulation of a huge volume of genome sequences from various species. This has provided new opportunities for large-scale comparative genomics studies. Identifying and utilizing synteny blocks, which are genomic regions conserved among multiple species, is key to understanding genomic architecture and the evolutionary history of genomes. However, the construction and visualization of such synteny blocks from multiple species are very challenging, especially for biologists with a lack of computational skills. Here, we present Synteny Portal, a versatile web-based application portal for constructing, visualizing and browsing synteny blocks. With Synteny Portal, users can easily (i) construct synteny blocks among multiple species by using prebuilt alignments in the UCSC genome browser database, (ii) visualize and download syntenic relationships as high-quality images, (iii) browse synteny blocks with genetic information and (iv) download the details of synteny blocks to be used as input for downstream synteny-based analyses, all in an intuitive and easy-to-use web-based interface. We believe that Synteny Portal will serve as a highly valuable tool that will enable biologists to easily perform comparative genomics studies by compensating limitations of existing tools. Synteny Portal is freely available at http://bioinfo.konkuk.ac.kr/synteny_portal. PMID:27154270

  9. Portal hypertension associated with primary hypoplasia of the hepatic portal vein in dogs.

    PubMed

    Van den Ingh, T S; Rothuizen, J; Meyer, H P

    1995-10-21

    Portal hypertension caused by primary hypoplasia of the portal vein was diagnosed in 42 dogs. The portal hypertension was manifested by the presence of multiple portosystemic collateral vessels. The main clinical signs were retarded growth or weight loss, apathy, intermittent diarrhoea and vomiting, anorexia, abdominal distension and polydipsia. Major findings at physical examination were ascites in 23 dogs and neurological signs in 16 dogs. The dogs had increased activities of liver enzymes in plasma and increased fasting levels of total bile acids and ammonia; in many of the dogs the packed red cell volume, total serum protein and albumin were low. Gross inspection of the portal vein revealed a patent but underdeveloped extrahepatic vein in 13 of the dogs. Microscopic examination of the liver revealed hypoplasia of the intrahepatic portal veins in all the dogs, and this was associated with minor arteriolar proliferation and absence of fibrosis in 12 of them, with moderate to marked arteriolar proliferation often combined with ductular proliferation in 13, and with marked portal fibrosis (formerly described as hepatoportal fibrosis) with a varying number of arteriolar and bile ductular structures in 17 of the dogs. The disease affected mainly young dogs, and was most likely to have been of congenital origin.

  10. Electrical transport mechanisms in a-Si:H/c-Si heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, T. F.; Korte, L.; Conrad, E.; Schmidt, M.; Rech, B.

    2010-01-01

    We present temperature-dependent measurements of I-V curves in the dark and under illumination in order to elucidate the dominant transport mechanisms in amorphous silicon-crystalline silicon (a-Si:H/c-Si) heterojunction solar cells. ZnO:Al/(p )a-Si:H/(n)c-Si/(n+)a-Si:H cells are compared with inversely doped structures and the impact of thin undoped a-Si:H buffer layers on charge carrier transport is explored. The solar cell I-V curves are analyzed employing a generalized two-diode model which allows fitting of the experimental data for a broad range of samples. The results obtained from the fitting are discussed using prevalent transport models under consideration of auxiliary data from constant-final-state-yield photoelectron spectroscopy, surface photovoltage, and minority carrier lifetime measurements. Thus, an in-depth understanding of the device characteristics is developed in terms of the electronic properties of the interfaces and thin films forming the heterojunction. It is shown that dark I-V curve fit parameters can unequivocally be linked to the open circuit voltage under illumination which opens a way to a simplified device assessment.

  11. Persistent photoconductivity studies in a-Si:H/nc-Si:H thin film superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Asha; Agarwal, Pratima

    2015-09-01

    The electronic properties of undoped a-Si:H/nc-Si:H superlattice structures have been investigated by photoconductivity measurements. Multilayer structures having alternate layers of a-Si:H and nc-Si:H were deposited on corning 1737 glass substrate by Hot wire chemical vapor deposition technique, keeping the total thickness of films constant at 700 nm. Dark and photo conductivity along with persistent photoconductivity (PPC) are measured in coplanar geometry using Ag paste as electrodes. Quite interestingly room temperature PPC has been observed in these undoped a-Si:H/nc-Si:H superlattice structures. PPC decay time constant, its dependence on exposure time, electric field, number of periods and annealing temperature have been studied in detail. The origin of PPC is understood in terms of competition between carriers transport in the lateral direction due to external field and along the depth due to band bending at a-Si:H/nc-Si:H interfaces. Carriers trapped in the interfaces states or the separation of carriers due to band bending are likely to be responsible for observed PPC.

  12. The Rules of Engagement: Perspectives on Secure Messaging From Experienced Ambulatory Patient Portal Users.

    PubMed

    Sieck, Cynthia J; Hefner, Jennifer L; Schnierle, Jeanette; Florian, Hannah; Agarwal, Aradhna; Rundell, Kristen; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2017-07-04

    Patient portals have shown promise in engaging individuals in self-management of chronic conditions by allowing patients to input and track health information and exchange secure electronic messages with their providers. Past studies have identified patient barriers to portal use including usability issues, low health literacy, and concerns about loss of personal contact as well as provider concerns such as increased time spent responding to messages. However, to date, studies of both patient and provider perspectives on portal use have focused on the pre-implementation or initial implementation phases and do not consider how these issues may change as patients and providers gain greater experience with portals. Our study examined the following research question: Within primary care offices with high rates of patient-portal use, what do experienced physician and patient users of the ambulatory portal perceive as the benefits and challenges of portal use in general and secure messaging in particular? This qualitative study involved 42 interviews with experienced physician and patient users of an ambulatory patient portal, Epic's MyChart. Participants were recruited from the Department of Family Medicine at a large Academic Medical Center (AMC) and included providers and their patients, who had been diagnosed with at least one chronic condition. A total of 29 patients and 13 primary care physicians participated in the interviews. All interviews were conducted by telephone and followed a semistructured interview guide. Interviews were transcribed verbatim to permit rigorous qualitative analysis. Both inductive and deductive methods were used to code and analyze the data iteratively, paying particular attention to themes involving secure messaging. Experienced portal users discussed several emergent themes related to a need for greater clarity on when and how to use the secure messaging feature. Patient concerns included worry about imposing on their physician's time

  13. The Rules of Engagement: Perspectives on Secure Messaging From Experienced Ambulatory Patient Portal Users

    PubMed Central

    Schnierle, Jeanette; Florian, Hannah; Agarwal, Aradhna; Rundell, Kristen; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2017-01-01

    Background Patient portals have shown promise in engaging individuals in self-management of chronic conditions by allowing patients to input and track health information and exchange secure electronic messages with their providers. Past studies have identified patient barriers to portal use including usability issues, low health literacy, and concerns about loss of personal contact as well as provider concerns such as increased time spent responding to messages. However, to date, studies of both patient and provider perspectives on portal use have focused on the pre-implementation or initial implementation phases and do not consider how these issues may change as patients and providers gain greater experience with portals. Objective Our study examined the following research question: Within primary care offices with high rates of patient-portal use, what do experienced physician and patient users of the ambulatory portal perceive as the benefits and challenges of portal use in general and secure messaging in particular? Methods This qualitative study involved 42 interviews with experienced physician and patient users of an ambulatory patient portal, Epic’s MyChart. Participants were recruited from the Department of Family Medicine at a large Academic Medical Center (AMC) and included providers and their patients, who had been diagnosed with at least one chronic condition. A total of 29 patients and 13 primary care physicians participated in the interviews. All interviews were conducted by telephone and followed a semistructured interview guide. Interviews were transcribed verbatim to permit rigorous qualitative analysis. Both inductive and deductive methods were used to code and analyze the data iteratively, paying particular attention to themes involving secure messaging. Results Experienced portal users discussed several emergent themes related to a need for greater clarity on when and how to use the secure messaging feature. Patient concerns included worry

  14. Hypersensitivity of mesenteric veins to 5-hydroxytryptamine- and ketanserin-induced reduction of portal pressure in portal hypertensive rats.

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, S. A.; Groszmann, R. J.; Kaumann, A. J.

    1986-01-01

    Isolated superior mesenteric veins from portal hypertensive rats were 3 to 10 times more sensitive to 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and 3 times less sensitive to (-)-noradrenaline than veins from sham-operated rats. The sensitivity to vasopressin did not differ in the 2 groups. Ketanserin competitively antagonized the effects of 5-HT in superior mesenteric veins and portal veins with high affinity (KB values 0.1-0.3 nM), as expected for 5-HT2-receptors. The affinity of ketanserin for 5-HT2-receptors was similar in veins from normal, sham-operated or portal-hypertensive rats. Intraportal injections of low doses of 5-HT caused increases in portal pressure which were more pronounced in portal hypertensive rats than in sham-operated rats and were blocked by 0.3 mg kg-1 ketanserin in both groups. Ketanserin 0.3 mg kg-1 did not block the portal pressor response to (-)-noradrenaline in either group of rats. In portal hypertensive rats but not in sham-operated rats, 0.3 mg kg-1 ketanserin caused decreases in portal pressure, portal flow and cardiac output, as estimated by radioactive microspheres. The reduction in portal pressure caused by ketanserin was due mainly to a decrease in portal venous inflow secondary to a decreased cardiac output. The reduction in cardiac output, which was observed only in the portal hypertensive rats but not in sham-operated rats, is consistent with venous dilatation and pooling of blood in the portal venous system. The venous pooling could be secondary to the blockade of 5-HT2-receptors in the portal venous system. It is proposed that ketanserin should be explored for the treatment of patients with portal hypertension. PMID:3801785

  15. In vitro vascular responsiveness to norepinephrine in experimental portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bomzon, A; Jacob, G; Lee, S S; Meddings, J

    1991-02-01

    It has been postulated that loss of response to norepinephrine accounts in part for the portal hypertension, systemic hypotension, and generalised vascular dilatation of chronic liver disease. The in vitro vascular responsiveness to norepinephrine was measured in aortic rings and portal veins excised from four different rat models of hepatic disease with and without portal hypertension, hepatocellular damage, and hyperbilirubinemia--the carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) cirrhotic rat with portal hypertension, the five-week chronic bile duct ligated and resected (CBDL) cirrhotic rat with portal hypertension and hyperbilirubinemia, the 10-day partial ligated portal vein (PVL) portal hypertensive rat without hepatocellular damage and hyperbilirubinemia, and the three-day bile duct ligated (ABDL) rat with acute hepatocellular damage and hyperbilirubinemia but without portal hypertension. Sham-treated or operated groups for each model were also prepared. Vascular reactivity of the aortic rings to norepinephrine was potentiated in the three portal hypertensive groups, and attenuated in the model of acute cholestasis. No consistent pattern of response to norepinephrine was evident in the portal veins. Based upon the presented in vitro data and the discussed limitations of an in vitro study, we conclude that it is unlikely that the loss of response to norepinephrine accounts for the portal hypertension, systemic hypotension, and generalised vascular dilatation of chronic liver disease.

  16. Analysis of a free-running synchronization artifact correction for MV-imaging with aSi:H flat panels

    SciTech Connect

    Mooslechner, Michaela; Mitterlechner, Bernhard; Weichenberger, Harald; Sedlmayer, Felix; Deutschmann, Heinz; Huber, Stefan

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Solid state flat panel electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are widely used for megavolt (MV) photon imaging applications in radiotherapy. In addition to their original purpose in patient position verification, they are convenient to use in quality assurance and dosimetry to verify beam geometry and dose deposition or to perform linear accelerator (linac) calibration procedures. However, native image frames from amorphous silicon (aSi:H) detectors show a range of artifacts which have to be eliminated by proper correction algorithms. When a panel is operated in free-running frame acquisition mode, moving vertical stripes (periodic synchronization artifacts) are a disturbing feature in image frames. Especially for applications in volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy (VMAT) or motion tracking, the synchronization (sync) artifacts are the limiting factor for potential and accuracy since they become even worse at higher frame rates and at lower dose rates, i.e., linac pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs). Methods: The authors introduced a synchronization correction method which is based on a theoretical model describing the interferences of the panel's readout clocking with the linac's dose pulsing. Depending on the applied PRF, a certain number of dose pulses is captured per frame which is readout columnwise, sequentially. The interference of the PRF with the panel readout is responsible for the period and the different gray value levels of the sync stripes, which can be calculated analytically. Sync artifacts can then be eliminated multiplicatively in precorrected frames without additional information about radiation pulse timing. Results: For the analysis, three aSi:H EPIDs of various types were investigated with 6 and 15 MV photon beams at varying PRFs of 25, 50, 100, 200, and 400 pulses per second. Applying the sync correction at panels with gadolinium oxysulfide scintillators improved single frame flood field image quality drastically

  17. Analysis of a free-running synchronization artifact correction for MV-imaging with aSi:H flat panels.

    PubMed

    Mooslechner, Michaela; Mitterlechner, Bernhard; Weichenberger, Harald; Huber, Stefan; Sedlmayer, Felix; Deutschmann, Heinz

    2013-03-01

    Solid state flat panel electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are widely used for megavolt (MV) photon imaging applications in radiotherapy. In addition to their original purpose in patient position verification, they are convenient to use in quality assurance and dosimetry to verify beam geometry and dose deposition or to perform linear accelerator (linac) calibration procedures. However, native image frames from amorphous silicon (aSi:H) detectors show a range of artifacts which have to be eliminated by proper correction algorithms. When a panel is operated in free-running frame acquisition mode, moving vertical stripes (periodic synchronization artifacts) are a disturbing feature in image frames. Especially for applications in volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy (VMAT) or motion tracking, the synchronization (sync) artifacts are the limiting factor for potential and accuracy since they become even worse at higher frame rates and at lower dose rates, i.e., linac pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs). The authors introduced a synchronization correction method which is based on a theoretical model describing the interferences of the panel's readout clocking with the linac's dose pulsing. Depending on the applied PRF, a certain number of dose pulses is captured per frame which is readout columnwise, sequentially. The interference of the PRF with the panel readout is responsible for the period and the different gray value levels of the sync stripes, which can be calculated analytically. Sync artifacts can then be eliminated multiplicatively in precorrected frames without additional information about radiation pulse timing. For the analysis, three aSi:H EPIDs of various types were investigated with 6 and 15 MV photon beams at varying PRFs of 25, 50, 100, 200, and 400 pulses per second. Applying the sync correction at panels with gadolinium oxysulfide scintillators improved single frame flood field image quality drastically [improvement of the signal

  18. Characterization of the visible photoluminescence from porous a-Si:H and porous a-Si:C:H thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Estes, M.J.; Hirsch, L.R.; Wichart, S.; Moddel, G.

    1996-12-31

    The authors report on the influence of doping, temperature, porosity, and bandgap on the visible photoluminescence properties of anodically-etched porous a-Si:H and a-Si:C:H thin films. Only boron-doped, p-type a-Si:H or a-Si:C:H samples exhibited any visible photoluminescence. The authors see evidence of discrete defect or impurity levels in temperature-dependent luminescence measurements. Unlike in porous crystalline silicon, they see no correlation of luminescence energy with porosity. The authors do, though, observe a correlation of luminescence energy with bandgap of the starting a-Si:C:H films. They discuss the implication of these observations on the nature of the luminescence mechanism.

  19. Noninvasive Evaluation of Portal Hypertension: Emerging Tools and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Snowdon, V. K.; Guha, N.; Fallowfield, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Portal hypertension is the main cause of complications in patients with cirrhosis. However, evaluating the development and progression of portal hypertension represents a challenge for clinicians. There has been considerable focus on the potential role of noninvasive markers of portal hypertension that could be used to stratify patients with respect to the stage of portal hypertension and to monitor disease progression or treatment response in a longitudinal manner without having to undertake repeated invasive assessment. The pathogenesis of portal hypertension is increasingly understood and emerging knowledge of the vascular processes that underpin portal hypertension has paved the way for exploring novel biomarkers of vascular injury, angiogenesis, and endothelial dysfunction. In this paper we focus on the pathogenesis of portal hypertension and potential non-invasive biomarkers with particular emphasis on serum analytes. PMID:22720166

  20. Successful Portal Vein Stent Placement in a Child with Cavernomatous Replacement of the Portal Vein After Partial Liver Transplantation: The Importance of a Recognizable Portal Vein Remnant.

    PubMed

    Miraglia, Roberto; Maruzzelli, Luigi; Caruso, Settimo; Ricotta, Calogero; Riva, Silvia; Burgio, Gaetano; Spada, Marco; Luca, Angelo

    2015-12-01

    Late portal vein thrombosis with cavernomatous replacement has been reported in 4.5% of pediatric patients who have undergone partial liver transplantation. In such cases, minimally invasive radiological treatments have a high failure rate. We report a successful case of percutaneous recanalization of the portal vein remnant, and subsequent stent placement, in a pediatric patient who underwent left lateral split liver transplantation with cavernomatous replacement of the portal vein.

  1. Real-time Cherenkov emission portal imaging during CyberKnife® radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Roussakis, Yiannis; Zhang, Rongxiao; Heyes, Geoff; Webster, Gareth; Mason, Suzannah; Green, Stuart; Pogue, Brian; Dehghani, Hamid

    2015-11-21

    The feasibility of real-time portal imaging during radiation therapy, through the Cherenkov emission (CE) effect is investigated via a medical linear accelerator (CyberKnife(®)) irradiating a partially-filled water tank with a 60 mm circular beam. A graticule of lead/plywood and a number of tissue equivalent materials were alternatively placed at the beam entrance face while the induced CE at the exit face was imaged using a gated electron-multiplying-intensified-charged-coupled device (emICCD) for both stationary and dynamic scenarios. This was replicated on an Elekta Synergy(®) linear accelerator with portal images acquired using the iViewGT(™) system. Profiles across the acquired portal images were analysed to reveal the potential resolution and contrast limits of this novel CE based portal imaging technique and compared against the current standard. The CE resolution study revealed that using the lead/plywood graticule, separations down to 3.4  ±  0.5 mm can be resolved. A 28 mm thick tissue-equivalent rod with electron density of 1.69 relative to water demonstrated a CE contrast of 15% through air and 14% through water sections, as compared to a corresponding contrast of 19% and 12% using the iViewGT(™) system. For dynamic scenarios, video rate imaging with 30 frames per second was achieved. It is demonstrated that CE-based portal imaging is feasible to identify both stationary and dynamic objects within a CyberKnife(®) radiotherapy treatment field.

  2. Real-time Cherenkov emission portal imaging during CyberKnife® radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussakis, Yiannis; Zhang, Rongxiao; Heyes, Geoff; Webster, Gareth; Mason, Suzannah; Green, Stuart; Pogue, Brian; Dehghani, Hamid

    2015-11-01

    The feasibility of real-time portal imaging during radiation therapy, through the Cherenkov emission (CE) effect is investigated via a medical linear accelerator (CyberKnife®) irradiating a partially-filled water tank with a 60 mm circular beam. A graticule of lead/plywood and a number of tissue equivalent materials were alternatively placed at the beam entrance face while the induced CE at the exit face was imaged using a gated electron-multiplying-intensified-charged-coupled device (emICCD) for both stationary and dynamic scenarios. This was replicated on an Elekta Synergy® linear accelerator with portal images acquired using the iViewGT™ system. Profiles across the acquired portal images were analysed to reveal the potential resolution and contrast limits of this novel CE based portal imaging technique and compared against the current standard. The CE resolution study revealed that using the lead/plywood graticule, separations down to 3.4  ±  0.5 mm can be resolved. A 28 mm thick tissue-equivalent rod with electron density of 1.69 relative to water demonstrated a CE contrast of 15% through air and 14% through water sections, as compared to a corresponding contrast of 19% and 12% using the iViewGT™ system. For dynamic scenarios, video rate imaging with 30 frames per second was achieved. It is demonstrated that CE-based portal imaging is feasible to identify both stationary and dynamic objects within a CyberKnife® radiotherapy treatment field.

  3. Percutaneous Transumbilical Portal Vein Embolization in a Patient with a Ruptured Hepatocellular Carcinoma Supplied by the Portal Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Soo Chin; Kim, Hyo-Cheol Chung, Jin Wook; Jae, Hwan Jun; Park, Jae Hyung

    2011-02-15

    We describe a case of a ruptured hepatocellular carcinoma supplied by the portal vein that was successfully treated with portal vein embolization via a percutaneous transumbilical approach. A contrast material-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) scan showed the presence of a large hypervascular tumor on portal venous phase as well as right hepatic vein thrombosis and hemoperitoneum that prevented portal vein embolization by the use of the percutaneous and transjugular transhepatic approach. The use of percutaneous transumbilical portal vein embolization can be an alternative option in this situation.

  4. The APHL/CDC Public Health Laboratory Interoperability Project Portal: A Web-based Collaborative Tool to Establish a National Harmonized Vocabulary for Public Health Data Exchange

    PubMed Central

    Lazo, Robert; Li, Wenkai; Meigs, Michelle; Abner, Sheila; Carroll, John; Miller, Charles; Zarcone, Patina; Hinrichs, Steven; Nordenberg, Dale

    2006-01-01

    Public health laboratories at all capacity levels are facing challenges in exchanging electronic data among themselves and with their partners. In response to this the Association of Public Health Laboratories working collaboratively with CDC launched an innovative portal development project in January 2006. This portal will enable public health laboratories to collaborate in a web-based environment to establish a standardized vocabulary for test identifications and test results, a cornerstone for creating interoperable information systems. PMID:17238618

  5. Data Archive and Portal Thrust Area Strategy Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaraman, Chitra; Stephan, Eric G.; Macduff, Matt C.; Hagler, Clay D.

    2014-09-01

    This report describes the Data Archive and Portal (DAP), a key capability of the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmosphere to Electron (A2e) initiative. The DAP Thrust Area Planning Group was organized to develop a plan for deploying this capability. Primarily, the report focuses on a distributed system--a DOE Wind Cloud--that functions as a repository for all A2e data. The Wind Cloud will be accessible via an open, easy-to-navigate user interface that facilitates community data access, interaction, and collaboration. DAP management will work with the community, industry, and international standards bodies to develop standards for wind data and to capture important characteristics of all data in the Wind Cloud.

  6. Patient Web Portals to Improve Diabetes Outcomes: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Mayberry, Lindsay Satterwhite; Mulvaney, Shelagh A.; Hess, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Patient web portals (PWPs), defined as the integration of electronic medical records and patient health records, have been related to enhanced patient outcomes. A literature review was conducted to characterize the design and evaluation of PWPs to improve health care processes and outcomes in diabetes. A summary of 26 articles revealed the positive impact PWPs have on patient outcomes, patient-provider communication, disease management, and access to and patient satisfaction with health care. Innovative and useful approaches included the evaluation of specific components of the PWPs, assessing the impact of PWPs on mediators of health behaviors, such as patient distress, identification of barriers to use, and patient willingness to pay for access. Future research should focus on relevant processes that mediate patient and provider use, impact on health care utilization, and a patient-centered approach to the design and integration of educational opportunities afforded through PWPs. PMID:20890688

  7. Portal blood insulin and metabolite changes with spontaneous feeding in steers.

    PubMed

    Chase, L E; Wangsness, P J; Martin, R J

    1977-03-01

    Four Holstein steers surgically prepared with a device for sampling blood from the portal vein were used to study changes in metabolites and insulin of portal blood associated with spontaneous meal feeding. The animals were fed a complete mixed ration (3.4 kcal/g digestible energy) in individual, electronically controlled feeding units. Blood was sampled before, during, and after meals. During the meal, blood samples were at 2-min intervals. Blood was sampled at 50 individual meals. Average meal length was 15.0 min and average consumption per meal was 631.7 g. Portal insulin increased within 2 min of meal initiation and remained elevated for the first 14 min of meals. Free fatty acids also increased at 8, 10, 12, 16, and 18 min after meal initiation. There were no consistent changes in packed cell volume, glucose, beta-hydroxybutyrate, or volatile fatty acids during this time. On control days when no feed was consumed, there were no significant changes in concentrations of metabolites or insulin. The increase in insulin of portal blood, which occurs upon meal initiation, preceded changes in metabolites. Therefore, the rapid change in insulin may be the result of a reflex neural stimulation rather than the result of a metabolite stimulating release of insulin.

  8. The portal protein of bacteriophage SPP1: a DNA pump with 13-fold symmetry.

    PubMed Central

    Dube, P; Tavares, P; Lurz, R; van Heel, M

    1993-01-01

    Electron microscopy in combination with image processing is a powerful method for obtaining structural information on non-crystallized biological macromolecules at the 10-50 A resolution level. The processing of noisy microscopical images requires advanced data processing methodologies in which one must carefully avoid the introduction of any form of bias into the data set. Using a novel multivariate statistical approach to the analysis of symmetry, we studied the structure of the bacteriophage SPP1 portal protein oligomer. This portal structure, ubiquitous in icosahedral bacteriophages which package dsDNA, is located at the site of symmetry mismatch between a 5-fold vertex of the icosahedral shell and the 6-fold symmetric (helical) tail. From previous studies such 'head-to-tail connector' structures were generally accepted to be homododecamers assembled in a 12-fold symmetric ring around a central channel. Using a new analysis methodology we have found that the phage SPP1 portal structure exhibits 13-fold cyclical symmetry: a new point group organization for oligomeric proteins. A model for the DNA packaging mechanism by 13-fold symmetric portal protein assemblies is presented which attributes a coherent functional meaning to their unusual symmetry. Images PMID:8467790

  9. Analysis of a-SiO2/ a-Si Multilayer Structures by Ion Beam Methods and Electron Spin Resonance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    layer from the stack influences the physical properties of the complete structure. Some amorphous materials from the chalcogenide glass family (e.g. InSe ...finished, the silicon surface is very reactive. Between the moment when the gases for the SiO 2 layer are introduced in vessel and the moment when

  10. Valence and conduction band offsets at low-k a-SiO{sub x}C{sub y}:H/a-SiC{sub x}N{sub y}:H interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    King, Sean W. Brockman, Justin; French, Marc; Jaehnig, Milt; Kuhn, Markus; French, Benjamin

    2014-09-21

    In order to understand the fundamental electrical leakage and reliability failure mechanisms in nano-electronic low-k dielectric/metal interconnect structures, we have utilized x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy to determine the valence and conduction band offsets present at interfaces between non-porous and porous low-k a-SiO{sub x}C{sub y}:H interlayer dielectrics and a-SiC{sub x}N{sub y}:H metal capping layers. The valence band offset for such interfaces was determined to be 2.7±0.2 eV and weakly dependent on the a-SiOC:H porosity. The corresponding conduction band offset was determined to be 2.1±0.2 eV. The large band offsets indicate that intra metal layer leakage is likely dominated by defects and trap states in the a-SiOC:H and a-SiCN:H dielectrics.

  11. Characteristics of patient portals developed in the context of health information exchanges: early policy effects of incentives in the meaningful use program in the United States.

    PubMed

    Otte-Trojel, Terese; de Bont, Antoinette; van de Klundert, Joris; Rundall, Thomas G

    2014-11-21

    In 2014, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services in the United States launched the second stage of its Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Program, providing financial incentives to providers to meaningfully use their electronic health records to engage patients online. Patient portals are electronic means to engage patients by enabling secure access to personal medical records, communication with providers, various self-management tools, and administrative functionalities. Outcomes of patient portals have mainly been reported in large integrated health systems. This may now change as the EHR Incentive Program enables and supports the use of patient portals in other types of health systems. In this paper, we focus on Health Information Exchanges (HIE): entities that facilitate data exchange within networks of independent providers. In response to the EHR Incentive Program, some Health Information Exchanges in the United States are developing patient portals and offering them to their network of providers. Such patient portals hold high value for patients, especially in fragmented health system contexts, due to the portals' ability to integrate health information from an array of providers and give patients one access point to this information. Our aim was to report on the early effects of the EHR incentives on patient portal development by HIEs. Specifically, we describe the characteristics of these portals, identify factors affecting adoption by providers during the 2013-2014 time frame, and consider what may be the primary drivers of providers' adoption of patient portals in the future. We identified four HIEs that were developing patient portals as of spring 2014. We collected relevant documents and conducted interviews with six HIE leaders as well as two providers that were implementing the portals in their practices. We performed content analysis on these data to extract information pertinent to our study objectives. Our findings suggest that there

  12. Improved power efficiency in phosphorus doped n-a-SiNxOy/p-Si heterojunction light emitting diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zewen; Chen, Kunji; Zhang, Pengzhan; Xu, Jun; Li, Wei; Yang, Huafeng; Huang, Xinfan

    2017-02-01

    The higher up to 60% internal quantum efficiency of photoluminescence (PL) from amorphous silicon oxynitride (a-SiNxOy) films has been reported in our previous work. In present work, the improved power efficiency visible light emitting diode (LED) has been realized based on phosphorus doped n-a-SiNxOy/p-Si heterojunction structure, which is at least three times higher than that of ITO/a-SiNxOy/p-Si (called MIS) LED. The n-a-SiNxOy films were doped by using phosphine (PH3) gas during the deposition by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique and the electron concentration is about 2.4 × 1015 cm-3 at room temperature obtained from Hall-effect measurements. The light emitting (electroluminescence (EL)) peak energy is coincided with that of PL of a-SiNxOy, which suggests that the EL emission is also originated from the radiative recombination via N-Si-O bonding defect states in n-a-SiNxOy layers. The transport mechanism and optical performance of the device have been investigated with the characteristics of current-voltage (I-V) and light output-voltage (L-V), in terms of the energy band diagram of n-a-SiNxOy/p-Si heterojunction structure. The power law like L ˜ Im of light output-current (L ˜ I) characteristic in n-a-SiNxOy/p-Si heterojunction has also been observed, which exhibits a superlinear behaviour with a slope of 1.35 in the low current range and becomes almost linear with a slope of 1.05 in the high current range, due to the saturation of nonradiative recombination centers.

  13. Improving Diabetes Management With a Patient Portal: Qualitative Study of a Diabetes Self-Management Portal

    PubMed Central

    Dupak, Kourtney; Kuehner, Zachary; Leonard, Kevin; Lovrics, Emily; Picton, Peter; Seto, Emily; Cafazzo, Joe

    2012-01-01

    Background Effective management and care of diabetes is crucial to reducing associated risks such as heart disease and kidney failure. With increasing access and use of the Internet, online chronic disease management is being explored as a means of providing patients with support and the necessary tools to monitor and manage their disease. Objective The objective of our study was to evaluate the experience of patients and providers using an online diabetes management portal for patients. Methods Participants were recruited from a large sample population of 887 for a follow-up questionnaire to be completed after 6 months of using the patient portal. Participants were presented with the option to participate in an additional interview and, if the participant agreed, a time and date was scheduled for the interview. A 5-item, open-ended questionnaire was used to capture providers' opinions of the patient portal. Providers included general practitioners (GPs), nurses, nurse practitioners (NPs), dieticians, diabetes educators (DECs), and other clinical staff. Results A total of 854 patients were consented for the questionnaire. Seventeen (8 male, 9 female) patients agreed to participate in a telephone interview. Sixty-four health care providers completed the five open-ended questions; however, an average of 48.2 responses were recorded per question. Four major themes were identified and will be discussed in this paper. These themes have been classified as: facilitators of disease management, barriers to portal use, patient-provider communication and relationship, and recommendations for portal improvements. Conclusions This qualitative study shows that online chronic disease management portals increase patient access to information and engagement in their health care, but improvements in the portal itself may improve usability and reduce attrition. Furthermore, this study identifies a grey area that exists in the roles that GPs and AHPs should play in the facilitation of

  14. Portals to Wonderland: Health portals lead to confusing information about the effects of health care

    PubMed Central

    Glenton, Claire; Paulsen, Elizabeth J; Oxman, Andrew D

    2005-01-01

    Background The Internet offers a seemingly endless amount of health information of varying quality. Health portals, which provide entry points to quality-controlled collections of websites, have been hailed as a solution to this problem. The objective of this study is to assess the extent to which government-run health portals provide access to relevant, valid and understandable information about the effects of health care. Methods We selected eight clinically relevant questions for which there was a systematic review, searched four portals for answers, and compared the answers we found to the results of the systematic reviews. Results Our searches resulted in 3400 hits, 155 of which mentioned both the condition and the intervention in one of the eight questions. Sixty-three of the 155 web pages did not give any information about the effect of the intervention. Seventy-seven qualitatively described the effects of the intervention. Twenty-six of these had information that was too unclear to be categorised; 15 were not consistent with the systematic review; and 36 were consistent with the review, but usually did not mention what happens without the intervention, what outcomes have been measured or when they were measured. Fifteen web pages quantitatively described effects. Four of these were abstracts from the systematic review, nine had information that was incomplete and potentially misleading because of a lack of information about people not receiving the intervention and the length of follow-up; one had information that was consistent with the review, but only referred to three trials whereas the review included six; and one was consistent with the review. Conclusion Information accessible through health portals is unlikely to be based on systematic reviews and is often unclear, incomplete and misleading. Portals are only as good as the websites they lead to. Investments in national health portals are unlikely to benefit consumers without investments in the

  15. Novel detector for portal imaging in radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostling, Janina; Wallmark, M.; Brahme, Anders; Danielsson, Mats; Iacobaeus, Christian; Fonte, P.; Peskov, Vladimir N.

    2000-04-01

    We are developing a novel concept for portal imaging that would allow for on-line control and verification of the radiation treatment of cancer patients both at diagnostic and therapeutic energies. This device will consist of two consecutive detectors confided in one gas chamber: a KeV- photon detector, which can visualize the internal soft tissue of the patient, and an MeV-photon detector, which will measure the absolute intensity of the therapeutic beam and its position with respect to the tumor and normal tissues. Both detectors are based on gas and solid photon to electron converters combined with recently invented gas electron multipliers. The device will have a common charge collecting pad-type readout plate equipped with ASIC-based electronics for both detectors. A first simplified prototype device has recently been built and extensively tested. Special efforts were made to find conditions for a safe and reliable operation of the readout electronics that can be damaged by plasma-type discharge effects induced specially at high dose rates. Results obtained so far indicate that our new detector concept may satisfy all requirements on advanced therapy beam monitoring systems.

  16. DES Science Portal: Computing Photometric Redshifts

    SciTech Connect

    Gschwend, Julia

    2016-01-01

    An important challenge facing photometric surveys for cosmological purposes, such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES), is the need to produce reliable photometric redshifts (photo-z). The choice of adequate algorithms and configurations and the maintenance of an up-to-date spectroscopic database to build training sets, for example, are challenging tasks when dealing with large amounts of data that are regularly updated and constantly growing. In this paper, we present the first of a series of tools developed by DES, provided as part of the DES Science Portal, an integrated web-based data portal developed to facilitate the scientific analysis of the data, while ensuring the reproducibility of the analysis. We present the DES Science Portal photometric redshift tools, starting from the creation of a spectroscopic sample to training the neural network photo-z codes, to the final estimation of photo-zs for a large photometric catalog. We illustrate this operation by calculating well calibrated photo-zs for a galaxy sample extracted from the DES first year (Y1A1) data. The series of processes mentioned above is run entirely within the Portal environment, which automatically produces validation metrics, and maintains the provenance between the different steps. This system allows us to fine tune the many steps involved in the process of calculating photo-zs, making sure that we do not lose the information on the configurations and inputs of the previous processes. By matching the DES Y1A1 photometry to a spectroscopic sample, we define different training sets that we use to feed the photo-z algorithms already installed at the Portal. Finally, we validate the results under several conditions, including the case of a sample limited to i<22.5 with the color properties close to the full DES Y1A1 photometric data. This way we compare the performance of multiple methods and training configurations. The infrastructure presented here is an effcient way to test several methods of

  17. Volar Central Portal in Wrist Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Corella, F.; Ocampos, M.; Cerro, M. Del; Larrainzar-Garijo, R.; Vázquez, T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Nowadays, the wrist is not limited to a dorsal visualization; the joint can be thought of as a “box,” which can be visualized from almost every perspective. The purpose of this study was to describe a new volar central portal for the wrist, following three principles: a single incision that allows access to both the radiocarpal and midcarpal joints, centered on the lunate, with the volar structures at risk protected not only by retractors, but also by tendons. Description of Technique The incision begins in the distal wrist crease and extended 1.5 cm proximally up to the proximal wrist crease, following the axis of the third intermetacarpal space. The flexor superficialis tendons are identified and retracted toward the radial side. Next, the fourth and fifth flexor digitorum profundus tendons are retracted toward the ulnar side, while the third and second tendons are retracted toward the radial side. The volar central midcarpal portal is performed under direct vision just over the anterior horn of the lunate through the Poirier space. The volar central radiocarpal portal is created under the lunate through the interval between the ulnocarpal ligaments and the short radioulnar ligament. Methods An anatomical study was performed on 14 cadaver specimens. Two data were recorded: iatrogenic injuries of the structures at risk and the distances to the structures at risk. Results The median (interquartile range [IQR]) distances from the volar central radiocarpal portal to the median nerve, palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve, and ulnar neurovascular bundle were 10.5 (7.8–15.0), 18.5 (15.8–20.3), and 7.0 (5.0–10.5) mm, respectively. The median (IQR) distances from the volar central midcarpal portal to the median nerve, palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve, and ulnar neurovascular bundle were 7.0 (4.8–10.3), 16.0 (14.8–19.0), and 4.5 (3.8–9.0) mm, respectively. No iatrogenic injuries were observed. Conclusion The volar

  18. Volar Central Portal in Wrist Arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Corella, F; Ocampos, M; Cerro, M Del; Larrainzar-Garijo, R; Vázquez, T

    2016-03-01

    Background Nowadays, the wrist is not limited to a dorsal visualization; the joint can be thought of as a "box," which can be visualized from almost every perspective. The purpose of this study was to describe a new volar central portal for the wrist, following three principles: a single incision that allows access to both the radiocarpal and midcarpal joints, centered on the lunate, with the volar structures at risk protected not only by retractors, but also by tendons. Description of Technique The incision begins in the distal wrist crease and extended 1.5 cm proximally up to the proximal wrist crease, following the axis of the third intermetacarpal space. The flexor superficialis tendons are identified and retracted toward the radial side. Next, the fourth and fifth flexor digitorum profundus tendons are retracted toward the ulnar side, while the third and second tendons are retracted toward the radial side. The volar central midcarpal portal is performed under direct vision just over the anterior horn of the lunate through the Poirier space. The volar central radiocarpal portal is created under the lunate through the interval between the ulnocarpal ligaments and the short radioulnar ligament. Methods An anatomical study was performed on 14 cadaver specimens. Two data were recorded: iatrogenic injuries of the structures at risk and the distances to the structures at risk. Results The median (interquartile range [IQR]) distances from the volar central radiocarpal portal to the median nerve, palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve, and ulnar neurovascular bundle were 10.5 (7.8-15.0), 18.5 (15.8-20.3), and 7.0 (5.0-10.5) mm, respectively. The median (IQR) distances from the volar central midcarpal portal to the median nerve, palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve, and ulnar neurovascular bundle were 7.0 (4.8-10.3), 16.0 (14.8-19.0), and 4.5 (3.8-9.0) mm, respectively. No iatrogenic injuries were observed. Conclusion The volar central portal is

  19. Assessment of percutaneous transhepatic portal vein embolization with portal vein stenting for perihilar cholangiocarcinoma with severe portal vein stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hyodo, Ryota; Suzuki, Kojiro; Ebata, Tomoki; Komada, Tomohiro; Mori, Yoshine; Yokoyama, Yukihiro; Igami, Tsuyoshi; Sugawara, Gen; Naganawa, Shinji; Nagino, Masato

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the clinical efficiency of portal vein (PV) stenting when performed with preoperative percutaneous transhepatic portal vein embolization (PTPVE) in patients with severe PV stenosis due to tumor invasion. Between 2007 and 2013, four consecutive patients (one male, three females; mean age, 52 years; age range, 25-73 years) with perihilar cholangiocarcinoma and PV stenosis underwent PTPVE and PV stenting. Patients were analyzed with regard to the procedure, hypertrophy of the future remnant liver (FRL), and plasma clearance rate of indocyanine green by the FRL (ICGK-F). Further, the %FRL volume increase in PTPVE was compared between the stenting group and the usual PTPVE group who have perihilar cholangiocarcinomas without PV stenosis. Preoperative PTPVE with PV stenting was successfully performed and portal flow to the FRL improved after stenting in all four patients. The %FRL volume increase was 18-60% (mean, 34%) in the stenting group and was 12-51% (mean, 21%) in the usual PTPVE group. The ICGK-F value after PTPVE exceeded 0.05 in all four patients. All patients achieved R0 resection. Preoperative PTPVE with PV stenting appears to be feasible in cases of severe PV tumor invasion and stenosis. This procedure may allow a broader indication for surgery. © 2014 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  20. Retropatellar Accessory Portals for Improved Access to the Patella

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Jason L.; Logli, Anthony L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Standard knee arthroscopy portals are frequently used to address retropatellar chondral pathology. Alternative portals may offer a safe and simple substitute, particularly when reaching the base of deep lesions is required. Purpose: To describe and assess the safety of accessory retropatellar portals. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: An anatomic study was performed on 10 fresh-frozen cadaveric knees. Medial and lateral retropatellar portals were created, and the distance to adjacent neurovascular structures (common peroneal nerve [CPN] and infrapatellar branch of the saphenous nerve [IPBSN]) and bony landmarks (medial and lateral epicondyles and margins of the midpatella) was recorded. A clinical account of portal use is provided through a retrospective chart review. Results: The medial and lateral retropatellar portals were a mean 15.8 ± 15.5 mm and 53.8 ± 7.2 mm from the IPBSN and CPN, respectively. No nerves were contacted in any specimens. Clinically, the portals have been used in 109 cases over a 7-year period without complication. Conclusion: The high level of IPBSN variability poses some risk to medial portal use; however, there is little to no risk laterally. Clinical experience with portals suggests that they can be used safely. We recommend careful blunt dissection to minimize chance of iatrogenic nerve injury. Clinical Relevance: Retropatellar portals may offer improved access to chondral lesions of the patella, thereby safely allowing one to maintain an arthroscopic approach. PMID:27900340

  1. Absorption in a-Si/SiO2 Superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilpelä, O.; Karppinen, M.; Novikov, S.; Sokolov, V.; Yliniemi, S.

    a-Si/SiO2 superlattices were grown on quartz by MBD (Molecular Beam Deposition) using in situ oxidation by an RF-plasma source. The a-Si layer thicknesses were varied from 0.5-2.5nm while the SiO2 layer thicknesses (1.0nm) were kept constant. Optical transmission and reflection measurements were performed on these samples at room temperature. The recorded spectra were then analyzed with a commercial optical thin film analysis program. The band gaps were derived from constant-n and non-constant-n forms of Tauc and Cody laws. The observed blueshift of the band gap, with decreasing a-Si layer thickness, is attributed to quantum confinement in the a-Si sublayers.

  2. Impact of Health Portal Enrollment With Email Reminders on Adherence to Clinic Appointments: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Janet; L'Engle, Pete; Carlson, Boyd; Ahmad, Asif; Ferranti, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Background Internet portal technologies that provide access to portions of electronic health records have the potential to revolutionize patients’ involvement in their care. However, relatively few descriptions of the demographic characteristics of portal enrollees or of the effects of portal technology on quality outcomes exist. This study examined data from patients who attended one of seven Duke Medicine clinics and who were offered the option of enrolling in and using the Duke Medicine HealthView portal (HVP). The HVP allows patients to manage details of their appointment scheduling and provides automated email appointment reminders in addition to the telephone and mail reminders that all patients receive. Objective Our objective was to test whether portal enrollment with an email reminder functionality is significantly related to decreases in rates of appointment “no-shows,” which are known to impair clinic operational efficiency. Methods Appointment activity during a 1-year period was examined for all patients attending one of seven Duke Medicine clinics. Patients were categorized as portal enrollees or as nonusers either by their status at time of appointment or at the end of the 1-year period. Demographic characteristics and no-show rates among these groups were compared. A binomial logistic regression model was constructed to measure the adjusted impact of HVP enrollment on no-show rates, given confounding factors. To demonstrate the effect of HVP use over time, monthly no-show rates were calculated for patient appointment keeping and contrasted between preportal and postportal deployment periods. Results Across seven clinics, 58,942 patients, 15.7% (9239/58,942) of whom were portal enrollees, scheduled 198,199 appointments with an overall no-show rate of 9.9% (19,668/198,199). We found that HVP enrollees were significantly more likely to be female, white, and privately insured compared with nonusers. Bivariate no-show rate differences between portal

  3. Impact of health portal enrollment with email reminders on adherence to clinic appointments: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Monica; Levy, Janet; L'Engle, Pete; Carlson, Boyd; Ahmad, Asif; Ferranti, Jeffrey

    2011-05-26

    Internet portal technologies that provide access to portions of electronic health records have the potential to revolutionize patients' involvement in their care. However, relatively few descriptions of the demographic characteristics of portal enrollees or of the effects of portal technology on quality outcomes exist. This study examined data from patients who attended one of seven Duke Medicine clinics and who were offered the option of enrolling in and using the Duke Medicine HealthView portal (HVP). The HVP allows patients to manage details of their appointment scheduling and provides automated email appointment reminders in addition to the telephone and mail reminders that all patients receive. Our objective was to test whether portal enrollment with an email reminder functionality is significantly related to decreases in rates of appointment "no-shows," which are known to impair clinic operational efficiency. Appointment activity during a 1-year period was examined for all patients attending one of seven Duke Medicine clinics. Patients were categorized as portal enrollees or as nonusers either by their status at time of appointment or at the end of the 1-year period. Demographic characteristics and no-show rates among these groups were compared. A binomial logistic regression model was constructed to measure the adjusted impact of HVP enrollment on no-show rates, given confounding factors. To demonstrate the effect of HVP use over time, monthly no-show rates were calculated for patient appointment keeping and contrasted between preportal and postportal deployment periods. Across seven clinics, 58,942 patients, 15.7% (9239/58,942) of whom were portal enrollees, scheduled 198,199 appointments with an overall no-show rate of 9.9% (19,668/198,199). We found that HVP enrollees were significantly more likely to be female, white, and privately insured compared with nonusers. Bivariate no-show rate differences between portal enrollment groups varied widely according

  4. Cavo-portal transposition in pediatric liver transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Marek; Kaliciński, Piotr; Kwiatkowski, Wojciech; Broniszczak, Dorota; Stefanowicz, Marek

    2014-06-10

    Cavo-portal transposition (CPT) at liver transplantation (LTx) allows portal revascularization of the liver in recipients in whom portal system thrombosis does not allow performance of porto-portal anastomosis. The aim was to present the cases of 2 children who underwent LTx and CPT in our institution. 1. A 10-year-old boy, after Kasai procedure and living donor LTx, was qualified for retransplantation 9 years after first LTx complicated with late portal vein thrombosis, portal hypertension, hypersplenism, and multiple GI bleeding episodes, after splenectomy and meso-caval shunt preventing GI bleeding. At retransplant surgery, CPT was done. Actual follow-up was 40 months. Doppler ultrasound and angio CT show normal flow within the graft's portal vein. Biochemical parameters were within normal range. There was no bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract. 2. A 14-month-old child after Kasai procedure was qualified for living donor liver transplantation. During surgery, thrombosis of the recipient portal system was found, which was not diagnosed before. The CPT was done. There were no complications during the postoperative course. The actual follow-up was 32 months, and the patient is doing well, with normal liver and renal function, without hypersplenism or ascites. There was no gastrointestinal bleeding. Doppler ultrasound showed normal intrahepatic portal and arterial flow in the transplanted liver. Cavo-portal transposition is an important option in portal vein revascularization in liver transplant recipients without access to the portal system. Long-term observation of these 2 cases did not show any late problems (e.g., bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract, renal function, hyperammonemia, ascites) related to cavo-portal transposition.

  5. NewProt - a protein engineering portal.

    PubMed

    Schwarte, Andreas; Genz, Maika; Skalden, Lilly; Nobili, Alberto; Vickers, Clare; Melse, Okke; Kuipers, Remko; Joosten, Henk-Jan; Stourac, Jan; Bendl, Jaroslav; Black, Jon; Haase, Peter; Baakman, Coos; Damborsky, Jiri; Bornscheuer, Uwe; Vriend, Gert; Venselaar, Hanka

    2017-06-01

    The NewProt protein engineering portal is a one-stop-shop for in silico protein engineering. It gives access to a large number of servers that compute a wide variety of protein structure characteristics supporting work on the modification of proteins through the introduction of (multiple) point mutations. The results can be inspected through multiple visualizers. The HOPE software is included to indicate mutations with possible undesired side effects. The Hotspot Wizard software is embedded for the design of mutations that modify a proteins' activity, specificity, or stability. The NewProt portal is freely accessible at http://newprot.cmbi.umcn.nl/ and http://newprot.fluidops.net/. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Sunshot Initiative High Penetration Solar Portal

    DOE Data Explorer

    The DOE SunShot Initiative is a collaborative national initiative to make solar energy cost-competitive with other forms of energy by the end of the decade. Reducing the installed cost of solar energy systems by about 75% will drive widespread large-scale adoption of this renewable energy and restore U.S. leadership in the global clean energy race. The High Penetration Solar Portal was created as a resource to aggregate the most relevant and timely information related to high penetration solar scenarios and integrating solar into the grid. The site is designed so that utilities, grant awardees, regulators, researchers, and other solar professionals can easily share data, case studies, lessons learned, and demonstration project findings. [from https://solarhighpen.energy.gov/about_the_high_penetration_solar_portal

  7. Phase contrast portal imaging using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Umetani, K.; Kondoh, T.

    2014-07-15

    Microbeam radiation therapy is an experimental form of radiation treatment with great potential to improve the treatment of many types of cancer. We applied a synchrotron radiation phase contrast technique to portal imaging to improve targeting accuracy for microbeam radiation therapy in experiments using small animals. An X-ray imaging detector was installed 6.0 m downstream from an object to produce a high-contrast edge enhancement effect in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. Images of a mouse head sample were obtained using therapeutic white synchrotron radiation with a mean beam energy of 130 keV. Compared to conventional portal images, remarkably clear images of bones surrounding the cerebrum were acquired in an air environment for positioning brain lesions with respect to the skull structure without confusion with overlapping surface structures.

  8. Culture differences in design of portal sites.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiaowen; Rau, Pei-Luen Patrick

    2003-01-15

    Two experiments were carried out to examine the effects of cultural differences between the Chinese and the US people on the perceived usability and search performance of World Wide Web (WWW) portal sites. Chinese users in Taiwan and US users in Chicago were recruited to perform searching tasks on two versions of Yahoo! portal site: the standard Yahoo! and Yahoo! Chinese. The layout of Yahoo! Chinese is the same as the layout of Yahoo!, and categories on Yahoo! Chinese have been translated from its US counterpart. A special browser was programmed to record all the keystroke data and participants were asked to fill out a satisfaction questionnaire after finishing the tasks. Significant differences of satisfaction and steps to perform some tasks were found between the two groups. The experiment results also provided more detailed insights into the cultural differences between the Chinese and the US users.

  9. Phase contrast portal imaging using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetani, K.; Kondoh, T.

    2014-07-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy is an experimental form of radiation treatment with great potential to improve the treatment of many types of cancer. We applied a synchrotron radiation phase contrast technique to portal imaging to improve targeting accuracy for microbeam radiation therapy in experiments using small animals. An X-ray imaging detector was installed 6.0 m downstream from an object to produce a high-contrast edge enhancement effect in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. Images of a mouse head sample were obtained using therapeutic white synchrotron radiation with a mean beam energy of 130 keV. Compared to conventional portal images, remarkably clear images of bones surrounding the cerebrum were acquired in an air environment for positioning brain lesions with respect to the skull structure without confusion with overlapping surface structures.

  10. Applications of a-Si:H radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Fujieda, I.; Cho, G.; Conti, M.; Drewery, J.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Qureshi, S.; Street, R.A.

    1989-07-01

    Device structures and operation principles are described for detecting various kinds of radiation with hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) layers. With some new configurations such as the buried p-i-n structure and the use of interdigitated electrodes, the a-Si:H radiation detectors will find their applications in many fields of science. Some applications in high energy physics, medical imaging, materials sciences and life sciences are discussed in this paper. 41 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  11. “I Want to Keep the Personal Relationship With My Doctor”: Understanding Barriers to Portal Use among African Americans and Latinos

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Jill Y; Poole, Dolly; Tieu, Lina; Kanter, Michael H; Garrido, Terhilda

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the widespread implementation of electronic health records (EHRs), there is growing evidence that racial/ethnic minority patients do not use portals as frequently as non-Hispanic whites to access their EHR information online. This differential portal use could be problematic for health care disparities since early evidence links portal use to better outcomes. Objective We sought to understand specific barriers to portal use among African American and Latino patients at Kaiser Permanente, which has had a portal in place for over a decade, and broad uptake among the patient population at large. Methods We conducted 10 focus groups with 87 participants in 2012 and 2013 among African American and Latino Kaiser Permanente members in the mid-Atlantic, Georgia, and Southern California regions. Members were eligible to participate if they were not registered for portal access. Focus groups were conducted within each racial/ethnic group, and each included individuals who were older, had a chronic disease, or were parents (as these are the three biggest users of the portal at Kaiser Permanente overall). We videotaped each focus group and transcribed the discussion for analysis. We used general inductive coding to develop themes for major barriers to portal use, overall and separately by racial/ethnic group. Results We found that lack of support was a key barrier to initiating portal use in our sample—both in terms of technical assistance as well as the fear of the portal eroding existing personal relationships with health care providers. This held true across a range of focus groups representing a mix of age, income, health conditions, and geographic regions. Conclusions Our study was among the first qualitative explorations of barriers to portal use among racial/ethnic subgroups. Our findings suggest that uniform adoption of portal use across diverse patient groups requires more usable and personalized websites, which may be particularly important for

  12. Thrombosis of the portal venous system.

    PubMed

    Sacerdoti, D; Serianni, G; Gaiani, S; Bolognesi, M; Bombonato, G; Gatta, A

    2007-03-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is a rare cause of portal hypertension. Its diagnosis has been facilitated by improvements in imaging techniques, in particular Doppler sonography. The prevalence is about 1% in the general population, but much higher rates are observed in patients with hepatic cirrhosis (7%, range 0.6-17%), particularly those who also have hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) (35%). The most common causes of PVT are myeloproliferative disorders, deficiencies of anticoagulant proteins, prothrombotic gene mutations, cirrhosis with portal hypertension, and HCC. Its development often requires the presence of two or more risk factors (local and/or systemic), e.g., a genetically determined thrombophilic state plus an infectious episode or abdominal surgery. It is clinically useful to distinguish between cirrhotic and noncirrhotic forms. Portal vein thrombosis is also traditionally classified as acute or chronic, but this distinction is often difficult. Color Doppler ultrasound is the first-line imaging study for diagnosis of PVT; magnetic resonance angiography and CT angiography are valid alternatives. The main complications are ischemic intestinal necrosis (in acute PVT) and esophageal varices (in chronic cases); the natural history of the latter differs depending on whether or not the thrombosis is associated with cirrhosis. The treatment of choice for PVT has never been adequately investigated. It is currently based on the use of anticoagulants associated, in some cases, with thrombolytics, but experience with the latter agents is too limited to draw any definite conclusions. In chronic thrombosis (even forms associated with cirrhosis), anticoagulant therapy is recommended and possibly, beta-blockers as well. Naturally, treatment of the underlying pathology is essential.

  13. Web portal on environmental sciences "ATMOS''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordov, E. P.; Lykosov, V. N.; Fazliev, A. Z.

    2006-06-01

    The developed under INTAS grant web portal ATMOS (http://atmos.iao.ru and http://atmos.scert.ru) makes available to the international research community, environmental managers, and the interested public, a bilingual information source for the domain of Atmospheric Physics and Chemistry, and the related application domain of air quality assessment and management. It offers access to integrated thematic information, experimental data, analytical tools and models, case studies, and related information and educational resources compiled, structured, and edited by the partners into a coherent and consistent thematic information resource. While offering the usual components of a thematic site such as link collections, user group registration, discussion forum, news section etc., the site is distinguished by its scientific information services and tools: on-line models and analytical tools, and data collections and case studies together with tutorial material. The portal is organized as a set of interrelated scientific sites, which addressed basic branches of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate Modeling as well as the applied domains of Air Quality Assessment and Management, Modeling, and Environmental Impact Assessment. Each scientific site is open for external access information-computational system realized by means of Internet technologies. The main basic science topics are devoted to Atmospheric Chemistry, Atmospheric Spectroscopy and Radiation, Atmospheric Aerosols, Atmospheric Dynamics and Atmospheric Models, including climate models. The portal ATMOS reflects current tendency of Environmental Sciences transformation into exact (quantitative) sciences and is quite effective example of modern Information Technologies and Environmental Sciences integration. It makes the portal both an auxiliary instrument to support interdisciplinary projects of regional environment and extensive educational resource in this important domain.

  14. Design and implementation of a portal for the medical equipment market: MEDICOM.

    PubMed

    Palamas, S; Kalivas, D; Panou-Diamandi, O; Zeelenberg, C; van Nimwegen, C

    2001-01-01

    The MEDICOM (Medical Products Electronic Commerce) Portal provides the electronic means for medical-equipment manufacturers to communicate online with their customers while supporting the Purchasing Process and Post Market Surveillance. The Portal offers a powerful Internet-based search tool for finding medical products and manufacturers. Its main advantage is the fast, reliable and up-to-date retrieval of information while eliminating all unrelated content that a general-purpose search engine would retrieve. The Universal Medical Device Nomenclature System (UMDNS) registers all products. The Portal accepts end-user requests and generates a list of results containing text descriptions of devices, UMDNS attribute values, and links to manufacturer Web pages and online catalogues for access to more-detailed information. Device short descriptions are provided by the corresponding manufacturer. The Portal offers technical support for integration of the manufacturers Web sites with itself. The network of the Portal and the connected manufacturers sites is called the MEDICOM system. To establish an environment hosting all the interactions of consumers (health care organizations and professionals) and providers (manufacturers, distributors, and resellers of medical devices). The Portal provides the end-user interface, implements system management, and supports database compatibility. The Portal hosts information about the whole MEDICOM system (Common Database) and summarized descriptions of medical devices (Short Description Database); the manufacturers servers present extended descriptions. The Portal provides end-user profiling and registration, an efficient product-searching mechanism, bulletin boards, links to on-line libraries and standards, on-line information for the MEDICOM system, and special messages or advertisements from manufacturers. Platform independence and interoperability characterize the system design. Relational Database Management Systems are used for

  15. Design and Implementation of a Portal for the Medical Equipment Market: MEDICOM

    PubMed Central

    Kalivas, Dimitris; Panou-Diamandi, Ourania; Zeelenberg, Cees; van Nimwegen, Chris

    2001-01-01

    Background The MEDICOM (Medical Products Electronic Commerce) Portal provides the electronic means for medical-equipment manufacturers to communicate online with their customers while supporting the Purchasing Process and Post Market Surveillance. The Portal offers a powerful Internet-based search tool for finding medical products and manufacturers. Its main advantage is the fast, reliable and up-to-date retrieval of information while eliminating all unrelated content that a general-purpose search engine would retrieve. The Universal Medical Device Nomenclature System (UMDNS) registers all products. The Portal accepts end-user requests and generates a list of results containing text descriptions of devices, UMDNS attribute values, and links to manufacturer Web pages and online catalogues for access to more-detailed information. Device short descriptions are provided by the corresponding manufacturer. The Portal offers technical support for integration of the manufacturers' Web sites with itself. The network of the Portal and the connected manufacturers' sites is called the MEDICOM system. Objective To establish an environment hosting all the interactions of consumers (health care organizations and professionals) and providers (manufacturers, distributors, and resellers of medical devices). Methods The Portal provides the end-user interface, implements system management, and supports database compatibility. The Portal hosts information about the whole MEDICOM system (Common Database) and summarized descriptions of medical devices (Short Description Database); the manufacturers' servers present extended descriptions. The Portal provides end-user profiling and registration, an efficient product-searching mechanism, bulletin boards, links to on-line libraries and standards, on-line information for the MEDICOM system, and special messages or advertisements from manufacturers. Platform independence and interoperability characterize the system design. Relational Database

  16. Portal imaging practice patterns of children's oncology group institutions: Dosimetric assessment and recommendations for minimizing unnecessary exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Olch, Arthur J. . E-mail: aolch@chla.usc.edu; Geurts, Mark; Thomadsen, Bruce; Famiglietti, Robin; Chang, Eric L.

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To determine and analyze the dosimetric consequences of current portal imaging practices for pediatric patients, and make specific recommendations for reducing exposure from portal imaging procedures. Methods and Materials: A survey was sent to approximately 250 Children's Oncology Group (COG) member institutions asking a series of questions about their portal imaging practices. Three case studies are presented with dosimetric analysis to illustrate the magnitude of unintended dose received by nontarget tissues using the most common techniques from the survey. Results: The vast majority of centers use double-exposure portal image techniques with a variety of open field margins. Only 17% of portal images were obtained during treatment, and for other imaging methods, few centers subtract monitor units from the treatment delivery. The number of monitor units used was nearly the same regardless of imager type, including electronic portal imaging devices. Eighty-six percent imaged all fields the first week and 17% imaged all fields every week. An additional 1,112 cm{sup 3} of nontarget tissue received 1 Gy in one of the example cases. Eight new recommendations are made, which will lower nontarget radiation doses with minimal impact on treatment verification accuracy. Conclusion: Based on the survey, changes can be made in portal imaging practices that will lower nontarget doses. It is anticipated that treatment verification accuracy will be minimally affected. Specific recommendations made to decrease the imaging dose and help lower the rate of radiation-induced secondary cancers in children are proposed for inclusion in future COG protocols using radiation therapy.

  17. Meaningful use in the safety net: a rapid ethnography of patient portal implementation at five community health centers in California.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Sara L; Sarkar, Urmimala; Tieu, Lina; Handley, Margaret A; Schillinger, Dean; Hahn, Kenneth; Hoskote, Mekhala; Gourley, Gato; Lyles, Courtney

    2017-09-01

    US health care institutions are implementing secure websites (patient portals) to achieve federal Meaningful Use (MU) certification. We sought to understand efforts to implement portals in "safety net" health care systems that provide services for low-income populations. Our rapid ethnography involved visits at 4 California safety net health systems and in-depth interviews at a fifth. Visits included interviews with clinicians and executives ( n  = 12), informal focus groups with front-line staff ( n  = 35), observations of patient portal sign-up procedures and clinic work, review of marketing materials and portal use data, and a brief survey ( n  = 45). Our findings demonstrate that the health systems devoted considerable effort to enlisting staff support for portal adoption and integrating portal-related work into clinic routines. Although all health systems had achieved, or were close to achieving, MU benchmarks, patients faced numerous barriers to portal use and our participants were uncertain how to achieve and sustain "meaningful use" as defined by and for their patients. Health systems' efforts to achieve MU certification united clinic staff under a shared ethos of improved quality of care. However, MU's assumptions about patients' demand for electronic access to health information and ability to make use of it directed clinics' attention to enrollment and message routing rather than to the relevance and usability of a tool that is minimally adaptable to the safety net context. We found a mismatch between MU-based metrics of patient engagement and the priorities and needs of safety net patient populations.

  18. Campus Portals: Supportive Mechanisms for University Communication, Collaboration, and Organizational Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisler, David L.

    2001-01-01

    University portals provide a new computerized interface between colleges and constituent groups. This article discusses: campus portals and possible features they may contain, nine strategies for portal projects, collaborative mechanisms to develop and implement portal projects, criteria for determination of campus portal readiness, potential…

  19. Portal vein thrombosis related to Cassia angustifolia.

    PubMed

    Soyuncu, Secgin; Cete, Yildiray; Nokay, Ali E

    2008-09-01

    Cassia angustifolia (Senna), used as a laxative, is a plant from the Fabaceae family. It includes hydroxyanthracene glycosides, also known as Senna Sennoside. These glycosides stimulate the peristalsis of the colon and alter colonic absorption and secretion resulting in fluid accumulation and expulsion. In the literature, there are reports illustrating the hepatotoxic effects of Cassia angustifolia but there is no report of portal vein thrombosis caused by Cassia Angustifolia. A 42-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency department with a five-day history of worsening epigastric pain, anorexia, episodic vomiting, and intermittent fever. She reported that she had boiled dried senna leaves she had bought from herbalists and drank approximately 200 mL daily for two years. Color Doppler screening found an echogen thrombus obliterating portal vein bifurcation and the right branch. The lumen was obstructed at this level and there was no blood flow through it. Treatment with thrombolytics was unsuccessful. Severe hepatotoxicity senna use is unusual. The cause of senna-related hepatotoxicity is unclear but could be explained by the exposure of the liver to unusual amounts of toxic metabolites of anthraquinone glycosides. Chronic use of Cassia angustifolia may rarely be associated with portal vein thrombosis.

  20. Interventional Radiologic Treatment for Idiopathic Portal Hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Hirota, Shozo; Ichikawa, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Shinichi; Motohara, Tomofumi; Fukuda, Tetsuya; Yoshikawa, Takeshi

    1999-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the usefulness of interventional radiological treatment for idiopathic portal hypertension. Methods: Between 1995 and 1998, we performed an interventional radiological treatment in five patients with idiopathic portal hypertension, four of whom had refused surgery and one of whom had undergone surgery. Three patients with gastroesophageal varices (GEV) were treated by partial splenic embolization (PSE), one patient with esophageal varices (EV) and massive ascites by transjugular intrahepatic portosytemic shunt (TIPS) and PSE, and one patient with GEV by percutaneous transhepatic obliteration (PTO). Midterm results were analyzed in terms of the effect on esophageal and/or gastric varices. Results: In one woman with severe GEV who underwent three sessions of PSE, there was endoscopic confirmation that the GEV had disappeared. In one man his EV shrunk markedly after two sessions of PSE. In two patients slight reduction of the EV was obtained with one application of PSE combined with endoscopic variceal ligation therapy. PTO for GV in one patient resulted in good control of the varices. All patients have survived for 16-42 months since the first interventional treatment, and varices are well controlled. Conclusion: Interventional radiological treatment is effective for patients with idiopathic portal hypertension, whether or not they have undergone surgery.