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Sample records for a-si flat panel

  1. Analysis of a free-running synchronization artifact correction for MV-imaging with aSi:H flat panels

    SciTech Connect

    Mooslechner, Michaela; Mitterlechner, Bernhard; Weichenberger, Harald

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Solid state flat panel electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are widely used for megavolt (MV) photon imaging applications in radiotherapy. In addition to their original purpose in patient position verification, they are convenient to use in quality assurance and dosimetry to verify beam geometry and dose deposition or to perform linear accelerator (linac) calibration procedures. However, native image frames from amorphous silicon (aSi:H) detectors show a range of artifacts which have to be eliminated by proper correction algorithms. When a panel is operated in free-running frame acquisition mode, moving vertical stripes (periodic synchronization artifacts) are a disturbing feature inmore » image frames. Especially for applications in volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy (VMAT) or motion tracking, the synchronization (sync) artifacts are the limiting factor for potential and accuracy since they become even worse at higher frame rates and at lower dose rates, i.e., linac pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs). Methods: The authors introduced a synchronization correction method which is based on a theoretical model describing the interferences of the panel's readout clocking with the linac's dose pulsing. Depending on the applied PRF, a certain number of dose pulses is captured per frame which is readout columnwise, sequentially. The interference of the PRF with the panel readout is responsible for the period and the different gray value levels of the sync stripes, which can be calculated analytically. Sync artifacts can then be eliminated multiplicatively in precorrected frames without additional information about radiation pulse timing. Results: For the analysis, three aSi:H EPIDs of various types were investigated with 6 and 15 MV photon beams at varying PRFs of 25, 50, 100, 200, and 400 pulses per second. Applying the sync correction at panels with gadolinium oxysulfide scintillators improved single frame flood field image quality drastically

  2. Microgap flat panel display

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, Craig R.

    1998-01-01

    A microgap flat panel display which includes a thin gas-filled display tube that utilizes switched X-Y "pixel" strips to trigger electron avalanches and activate a phosphor at a given location on a display screen. The panel utilizes the principal of electron multiplication in a gas subjected to a high electric field to provide sufficient electron current to activate standard luminescent phosphors located on an anode. The X-Y conductive strips of a few micron widths may for example, be deposited on opposite sides of a thin insulating substrate, or on one side of the adjacent substrates and function as a cathode. The X-Y strips are separated from the anode by a gap filled with a suitable gas. Electrical bias is selectively switched onto X and Y strips to activate a "pixel" in the region where these strips overlap. A small amount of a long-lived radioisotope is used to initiate an electron avalanche in the overlap region when bias is applied. The avalanche travels through the gas filled gap and activates a luminescent phosphor of a selected color. The bias is adjusted to give a proportional electron multiplication to control brightness for given pixel.

  3. Microgap flat panel display

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, C.R.

    1998-12-08

    A microgap flat panel display is disclosed which includes a thin gas-filled display tube that utilizes switched X-Y ``pixel`` strips to trigger electron avalanches and activate a phosphor at a given location on a display screen. The panel utilizes the principal of electron multiplication in a gas subjected to a high electric field to provide sufficient electron current to activate standard luminescent phosphors located on an anode. The X-Y conductive strips of a few micron widths may for example, be deposited on opposite sides of a thin insulating substrate, or on one side of the adjacent substrates and function as a cathode. The X-Y strips are separated from the anode by a gap filled with a suitable gas. Electrical bias is selectively switched onto X and Y strips to activate a ``pixel`` in the region where these strips overlap. A small amount of a long-lived radioisotope is used to initiate an electron avalanche in the overlap region when bias is applied. The avalanche travels through the gas filled gap and activates a luminescent phosphor of a selected color. The bias is adjusted to give a proportional electron multiplication to control brightness for given pixel. 6 figs.

  4. Ultrasonic scanner for radial and flat panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, R. L.; Hill, E. K. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An ultrasonic scanning mechanism is described that scans panels of honeycomb construction or with welded seams. It incorporates a device which by simple adjustment is adapted to scan either a flat panel or a radial panel. The supporting structure takes the form of a pair of spaced rails. An immersion tank is positioned between the rails and below their level. A work holder is mounted in the tank and is adapted to hold the flat or radial panel. A traveling bridge is movable along the rails and a carriage is mounted on the bridge.

  5. Flat panel ferroelectric electron emission display system

    DOEpatents

    Sampayan, Stephen E.; Orvis, William J.; Caporaso, George J.; Wieskamp, Ted F.

    1996-01-01

    A device which can produce a bright, raster scanned or non-raster scanned image from a flat panel. Unlike many flat panel technologies, this device does not require ambient light or auxiliary illumination for viewing the image. Rather, this device relies on electrons emitted from a ferroelectric emitter impinging on a phosphor. This device takes advantage of a new electron emitter technology which emits electrons with significant kinetic energy and beam current density.

  6. Flat panel ferroelectric electron emission display system

    DOEpatents

    Sampayan, S.E.; Orvis, W.J.; Caporaso, G.J.; Wieskamp, T.F.

    1996-04-16

    A device is disclosed which can produce a bright, raster scanned or non-raster scanned image from a flat panel. Unlike many flat panel technologies, this device does not require ambient light or auxiliary illumination for viewing the image. Rather, this device relies on electrons emitted from a ferroelectric emitter impinging on a phosphor. This device takes advantage of a new electron emitter technology which emits electrons with significant kinetic energy and beam current density. 6 figs.

  7. Miniaturized LEDs for flat-panel displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radauscher, Erich J.; Meitl, Matthew; Prevatte, Carl; Bonafede, Salvatore; Rotzoll, Robert; Gomez, David; Moore, Tanya; Raymond, Brook; Cok, Ronald; Fecioru, Alin; Trindade, António Jose; Fisher, Brent; Goodwin, Scott; Hines, Paul; Melnik, George; Barnhill, Sam; Bower, Christopher A.

    2017-02-01

    Inorganic light emitting diodes (LEDs) serve as bright pixel-level emitters in displays, from indoor/outdoor video walls with pixel sizes ranging from one to thirty millimeters to micro displays with more than one thousand pixels per inch. Pixel sizes that fall between those ranges, roughly 50 to 500 microns, are some of the most commercially significant ones, including flat panel displays used in smart phones, tablets, and televisions. Flat panel displays that use inorganic LEDs as pixel level emitters (μILED displays) can offer levels of brightness, transparency, and functionality that are difficult to achieve with other flat panel technologies. Cost-effective production of μILED displays requires techniques for precisely arranging sparse arrays of extremely miniaturized devices on a panel substrate, such as transfer printing with an elastomer stamp. Here we present lab-scale demonstrations of transfer printed μILED displays and the processes used to make them. Demonstrations include passive matrix μILED displays that use conventional off-the shelf drive ASICs and active matrix μILED displays that use miniaturized pixel-level control circuits from CMOS wafers. We present a discussion of key considerations in the design and fabrication of highly miniaturized emitters for μILED displays.

  8. Military market for flat panel displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Hopper, Darrel G.

    1997-07-01

    This paper addresses the number, function and size of primary military displays and establishes a basis to determine the opportunities for technology insertion in the immediate future and into the next millennium. The military displays market is specified by such parameters as active area and footprint size, and other characteristics such as luminance, gray scale, resolution, color capability and night vision imaging system capability. A select grouping of funded, future acquisitions, planned and predicted cockpit kits, and form-fit-function upgrades are taken into account. It is the intent of this paper to provide an overview of the DoD niche market, allowing both government and industry a timely reference to insure meeting DoD requirements for flat-panel displays on schedule and in a cost-effective manner. The aggregate DoD market for direct view displays is presently estimated to be in excess of 157,000. Helmet/head mounted displays will add substantially to this total. The vanishing vendor syndrome for older display technologies is becoming a growing, pervasive problem throughout DoD, which consequently just leverage the more modern display technologies being developed for civil-commercial markets.

  9. Flat or curved thin optical display panel

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1995-01-10

    An optical panel includes a plurality of waveguides stacked together, with each waveguide having a first end and an opposite second end. The first ends collectively define a first face, and the second ends collectively define a second face of the panel. The second face is disposed at an acute face angle relative to the waveguides to provide a panel which is relatively thin compared to the height of the second face. In an exemplary embodiment for use in a projection TV, the first face is substantially smaller in height than the second face and receives a TV image, with the second face defining a screen for viewing the image enlarged. 7 figures.

  10. Flat or curved thin optical display panel

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    1995-01-10

    An optical panel 10 includes a plurality of waveguides 12 stacked together, with each waveguide 12 having a first end 12a and an opposite second end 12b. The first ends 12a collectively define a first face 16, and the second ends 12b collectively define a second face 18 of the panel 10. The second face 18 is disposed at an acute face angle relative to the waveguides 12 to provide a panel 10 which is relatively thin compared to the height of the second face. In an exemplary embodiment for use in a projection TV, the first face 16 is substantially smaller in height than the second face 18 and receives a TV image, with the second face 18 defining a screen for viewing the image enlarged.

  11. Technical advances of interventional fluoroscopy and flat panel image receptor.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pei-Jan Paul

    2008-11-01

    In the past decade, various radiation reducing devices and control circuits have been implemented on fluoroscopic imaging equipment. Because of the potential for lengthy fluoroscopic procedures in interventional cardiovascular angiography, these devices and control circuits have been developed for the cardiac catheterization laboratories and interventional angiography suites. Additionally, fluoroscopic systems equipped with image intensifiers have benefited from technological advances in x-ray tube, x-ray generator, and spectral shaping filter technologies. The high heat capacity x-ray tube, the medium frequency inverter generator with high performance switching capability, and the patient dose reduction spectral shaping filter had already been implemented on the image intensified fluoroscopy systems. These three underlying technologies together with the automatic dose rate and image quality (ADRIQ) control logic allow patients undergoing cardiovascular angiography procedures to benefit from "lower patient dose" with "high image quality." While photoconductor (or phosphor plate) x-ray detectors and signal capture thin film transistor (TFT) and charge coupled device (CCD) arrays are analog in nature, the advent of the flat panel image receptor allowed for fluoroscopy procedures to become more streamlined. With the analog-to-digital converter built into the data lines, the flat panel image receptor appears to become a digital device. While the transition from image intensified fluoroscopy systems to flat panel image receptor fluoroscopy systems is part of the on-going "digitization of imaging," the value of a flat panel image receptor may have to be evaluated with respect to patient dose, image quality, and clinical application capabilities. The advantage of flat panel image receptors has yet to be fully explored. For instance, the flat panel image receptor has its disadvantages as compared to the image intensifiers; the cost of the equipment is probably the most

  12. Flat display panel in liquid crystal technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbeck, J.; Schiekel, M.; Unbehaun, R.; Herzog, H. J.; Haeberle, G.; Biskupek, R.

    1980-06-01

    Liquid crystal display panels were built using matrix configurations. With predeformed liquid crystal structures, steep electro-optic characteristics, and small on-off switching ratios, electrically controllable birefringence is obtainable. This allows the addressing of projection color matrix displays with up to 90 scanned lines in a two color representation and up to 40 lines in a four color representation at a rate of 50 frames per sec. The same holds for predeformed liquid crystals having the advantage of low operating voltages, such as commercially available CMOS IC's Matrix displays with 32 x 32 and 80 x 80 picture elements with the corresponding electronic addressing devices for projection images with controllable color were assembled. Using these twisted nematic (TN) liquid crystal displays, the possibility of color switching filters in a sequential color selection mode was investigated. An experimental setup consisting of a CRT with two color phosphor screen, a color switching filter with a TN cell, and on electronic addressing device for the synchronized switching of image signals and of the corresponding colors is described.

  13. Software Simulates Sight: Flat Panel Mura Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    In the increasingly sophisticated world of high-definition flat screen monitors and television screens, image clarity and the elimination of distortion are paramount concerns. As the devices that reproduce images become more and more sophisticated, so do the technologies that verify their accuracy. By simulating the manner in which a human eye perceives and interprets a visual stimulus, NASA scientists have found ways to automatically and accurately test new monitors and displays. The Spatial Standard Observer (SSO) software metric, developed by Dr. Andrew B. Watson at Ames Research Center, measures visibility and defects in screens, displays, and interfaces. In the design of such a software tool, a central challenge is determining which aspects of visual function to include while accuracy and generality are important, relative simplicity of the software module is also a key virtue. Based on data collected in ModelFest, a large cooperative multi-lab project hosted by the Optical Society of America, the SSO simulates a simplified model of human spatial vision, operating on a pair of images that are viewed at a specific viewing distance with pixels having a known relation to luminance. The SSO measures the visibility of foveal spatial patterns, or the discriminability of two patterns, by incorporating only a few essential components of vision. These components include local contrast transformation, a contrast sensitivity function, local masking, and local pooling. By this construction, the SSO provides output in units of "just noticeable differences" (JND) a unit of measure based on the assumed smallest difference of sensory input detectable by a human being. Herein is the truly amazing ability of the SSO, while conventional methods can manipulate images, the SSO models human perception. This set of equations actually defines a mathematical way of working with an image that accurately reflects the way in which the human eye and mind behold a stimulus. The SSO is

  14. Flat Panel Space Based Space Surveillance Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, R.; Duncan, A.; Wilm, J.; Thurman, S. T.; Stubbs, D. M.; Ogden, C.

    2013-09-01

    limited telescope is, therefore, replaced by in-process integration and test as part of the PIC fabrication that substantially reduces associated schedule and cost. The low profile and low SWaP of a SPIDER system enables high resolution imaging with a payload that is similar in size and aspect ratio to a solar panel. This allows high resolution low cost options for space based space surveillance telescopes. The low SWaP design enables hosted payloads, cubesat designs as well as traditional bus options that are lower cost. We present a description of the concept and preliminary simulation and experimental data that demonstrate the imaging capabilities of the SPIDER technique.

  15. Development of Surfaces Optically Suitable for Flat Solar Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desmet, D.; Jason, A.

    1978-01-01

    Three areas of research in the development of flat solar panels are described. (1) A reflectometer which can separately evaluate the spectral and diffuse reflectivities of surfaces was developed. The reflectometer has a phase locked detection system. (2) A coating composed of strongly bound copper oxide that is formed by an etching process performed on an aluminum alloy with high copper content was also developed. Because of this one step fabrication process, fabrication costs are expected to be small. (3) A literature search was conducted and conclusions on the required optical properties of flat plate solar collectors are presented.

  16. Diffractive flat panel solar concentrators of a novel design.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Ties M; de Boer, Dick K G; Bastiaansen, Cees W M

    2016-07-11

    A novel design for a flat panel solar concentrator is presented which is based on a light guide with a grating applied on top that diffracts light into total internal reflection. By combining geometrical and diffractive optics the geometrical concentration ratio is optimized according to the principles of nonimaging optics, while the thickness of the device is minimized due to the use of total internal reflection.

  17. Carbon Nanotube Thin Film Transistors for Flat Panel Display Application.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xuelei; Xia, Jiye; Dong, Guodong; Tian, Boyuan; Peng, Lianmao

    2016-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising materials for both high performance transistors for high speed computing and thin film transistors for macroelectronics, which can provide more functions at low cost. Among macroelectronics applications, carbon nanotube thin film transistors (CNT-TFT) are expected to be used soon for backplanes in flat panel displays (FPDs) due to their superior performance. In this paper, we review the challenges of CNT-TFT technology for FPD applications. The device performance of state-of-the-art CNT-TFTs are compared with the requirements of TFTs for FPDs. Compatibility of the fabrication processes of CNT-TFTs and current TFT technologies are critically examined. Though CNT-TFT technology is not yet ready for backplane production line of FPDs, the challenges can be overcome by close collaboration between research institutes and FPD manufacturers in the short term.

  18. Testing and analysis of flat and curved panels with multiple cracks

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1994-08-01

    An experimental and analytical investigation of multiple cracking in various types of test specimens is described in this paper. The testing phase is comprised of a flat unstiffened panel series and curved stiffened and unstiffened panel series. The ...

  19. Development of a flat-panel X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Edwin Joseph

    A novel flat-panel transmission type X-ray source was developed for both medical and industrial use. Depending on the geometry of the given situation, the flat-panel X-ray source could be used in tomography, radiography or tomosynthesis. Furthermore, the unit could be used as a portable X-ray scanner or an integral part of an existing detection system. The design incorporates a field emission cathode made of ultra-nanocrystalline diamonds (UNCD) doped with nitrogen. These field emitters show good electron output at low power and can be deposited over large areas as is the case with carbon nanotube "forest" (CNT) cathodes. This work presents the first generation of the UNCD based FEA prototype which was manufactured at the Center of Nanoscale Material, within Argonne National Laboratory, with standard microfabrication techniques. The prototype is a 3 x 3 pixel field emission array (FEA), with a pixel size of 225 mum by 225 mum and a pitch of 500 mum. The fabricated cathode was developed using a microfabrication process which allows for individual electrically addressable UNCD gated arrays on-chip which demonstrated monolithic integration of the electron extraction grid. The transmission target consists of tungsten for X-ray generation, which is sputtered directly upon a thin aluminum sheet as an X-ray filter. A low voltage power supply allows for electron extraction between the cathode and the grid; while a high voltage power supply accelerates the electrons towards the anode. A low energy X-ray high purity germanium detector (HPGe) is mounted outside of the vacuum chamber for X-ray detection and measurement.

  20. Hybrid solar cell based on a-Si/polymer flat heterojunction on flexible substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares Vargas, A. J.; Mansurova, S.; Cosme, I.; Kosarev, A.; Ospina Ocampo, C. A.; Martinez Mateo, H. E.

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we present the results of investigation of thin film hybrid organic-inorganic photovoltaic structures based on flat heterojunction hydrogenated silicon (a-Si:H) and poly(3,4 ethylene dioxythiophene):poly(4-styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) fabricated on polyethylene naphthalate (PEN). Different thicknesses of transparent AL doped Zn:O (AZO) electrodes have been tested on PEN substrate and studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The AZO films on PEN substrate were statistically processed to obtain surface morphological characteristics, such as root mean square roughness RQ, skewness SK and kurtosis KU. Performance characteristics of fabricated photovoltaic structures have been measured and analyzed for different thicknesses of the transparent electrodes under standard illumination (AM 1.5 I0= 100mW/cm2). Structures on flexible substrates show reproducible performance characteristic as their glass substrate counterpart with values of JSC= 6 mA/cm2, VOC= 0.535 V, FF= 43 % and PCE= 1.41%.

  1. Multiple-Flat-Panel System Displays Multidimensional Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gundo, Daniel; Levit, Creon; Henze, Christopher; Sandstrom, Timothy; Ellsworth, David; Green, Bryan; Joly, Arthur

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Ames hyperwall is a display system designed to facilitate the visualization of sets of multivariate and multidimensional data like those generated in complex engineering and scientific computations. The hyperwall includes a 77 matrix of computer-driven flat-panel video display units, each presenting an image of 1,280 1,024 pixels. The term hyperwall reflects the fact that this system is a more capable successor to prior computer-driven multiple-flat-panel display systems known by names that include the generic term powerwall and the trade names PowerWall and Powerwall. Each of the 49 flat-panel displays is driven by a rack-mounted, dual-central-processing- unit, workstation-class personal computer equipped with a hig-hperformance graphical-display circuit card and with a hard-disk drive having a storage capacity of 100 GB. Each such computer is a slave node in a master/ slave computing/data-communication system (see Figure 1). The computer that acts as the master node is similar to the slave-node computers, except that it runs the master portion of the system software and is equipped with a keyboard and mouse for control by a human operator. The system utilizes commercially available master/slave software along with custom software that enables the human controller to interact simultaneously with any number of selected slave nodes. In a powerwall, a single rendering task is spread across multiple processors and then the multiple outputs are tiled into one seamless super-display. It must be noted that the hyperwall concept subsumes the powerwall concept in that a single scene could be rendered as a mosaic image on the hyperwall. However, the hyperwall offers a wider set of capabilities to serve a different purpose: The hyperwall concept is one of (1) simultaneously displaying multiple different but related images, and (2) providing means for composing and controlling such sets of images. In place of elaborate software or hardware crossbar switches, the

  2. Solid-state, flat-panel, digital radiography detectors and their physical imaging characteristics.

    PubMed

    Cowen, A R; Kengyelics, S M; Davies, A G

    2008-05-01

    Solid-state, digital radiography (DR) detectors, designed specifically for standard projection radiography, emerged just before the turn of the millennium. This new generation of digital image detector comprises a thin layer of x-ray absorptive material combined with an electronic active matrix array fabricated in a thin film of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). DR detectors can offer both efficient (low-dose) x-ray image acquisition plus on-line readout of the latent image as electronic data. To date, solid-state, flat-panel, DR detectors have come in two principal designs, the indirect-conversion (x-ray scintillator-based) and the direct-conversion (x-ray photoconductor-based) types. This review describes the underlying principles and enabling technologies exploited by these designs of detector, and evaluates their physical imaging characteristics, comparing performance both against each other and computed radiography (CR). In standard projection radiography indirect conversion DR detectors currently offer superior physical image quality and dose efficiency compared with direct conversion DR and modern point-scan CR. These conclusions have been confirmed in the findings of clinical evaluations of DR detectors. Future trends in solid-state DR detector technologies are also briefly considered. Salient innovations include WiFi-enabled, portable DR detectors, improvements in x-ray absorber layers and developments in alternative electronic media to a-Si:H.

  3. Solid-state flat panel imager with avalanche amorphous selenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuermann, James R.; Howansky, Adrian; Goldan, Amir H.; Tousignant, Olivier; Levéille, Sébastien; Tanioka, K.; Zhao, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Active matrix flat panel imagers (AMFPI) have become the dominant detector technology for digital radiography and fluoroscopy. For low dose imaging, electronic noise from the amorphous silicon thin film transistor (TFT) array degrades imaging performance. We have fabricated the first prototype solid-state AMFPI using a uniform layer of avalanche amorphous selenium (a-Se) photoconductor to amplify the signal to eliminate the effect of electronic noise. We have previously developed a large area solid-state avalanche a-Se sensor structure referred to as High Gain Avalanche Rushing Photoconductor (HARP) capable of achieving gains of 75. In this work we successfully deposited this HARP structure onto a 24 x 30 cm2 TFT array with a pixel pitch of 85 μm. An electric field (ESe) up to 105 Vμm-1 was applied across the a-Se layer without breakdown. Using the HARP layer as a direct detector, an X-ray avalanche gain of 15 +/- 3 was achieved at ESe = 105 Vμm-1. In indirect mode with a 150 μm thick structured CsI scintillator, an optical gain of 76 +/- 5 was measured at ESe = 105 Vμm-1. Image quality at low dose increases with the avalanche gain until the electronic noise is overcome at a constant exposure level of 0.76 mR. We demonstrate the success of a solid-state HARP X-ray imager as well as the largest active area HARP sensor to date.

  4. Second generation large area microchannel plate flat panel phototubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertley, C. D.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Jelinsky, S. R.; Tedesco, J.; Minot, M. J.; O'Mahony, A.; Craven, C. A.; Popecki, M.; Lyashenko, A. V.; Foley, M. R.

    2016-07-01

    Very large (20 cm × 20 cm) flat panel phototubes are being developed which employ novel microchannel plates (MCPs). The MCPs are manufactured using borosilicate microcapillary arrays which are functionalized by the application of resistive and secondary emissive layers using atomic layer deposition (ALD). This allows the operational parameters to be set by tailoring sequential ALD deposition processes. The borosilicate substrates are robust, including the ability to be produced in large formats (20 cm square). ALD MCPs have performance characteristics (gain, pulse amplitude distributions, and imaging) that are equivalent or better than conventional MCPs. They have low intrinsic background (0.045 events cm-2 sec-1)., high open area ratios (74% for the latest generation of borosilicate substrates), and stable gain during >7 C cm-2 charge extraction after preconditioning (vacuum bake and burn-in). The tube assemblies use a pair of 20 cm × 20 cm ALD MCPs comprised of a borosilicate entrance window, a proximity focused bialkali photocathode, and a strip-line readout anode. The second generation design employs an all glass body with a hot indium seal and a transfer photocathode. We have achieved >20% quantum efficiency and good gain uniformity over the 400 cm2 field of view, spatial resolution of <1 cm and obtained event timing accuracy of close to 100 ps FWHM.

  5. Sarnoff JND Vision Model for Flat-Panel Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brill, Michael H.; Lubin, Jeffrey

    1998-01-01

    This document describes adaptation of the basic Sarnoff JND Vision Model created in response to the NASA/ARPA need for a general-purpose model to predict the perceived image quality attained by flat-panel displays. The JND model predicts the perceptual ratings that humans will assign to a degraded color-image sequence relative to its nondegraded counterpart. Substantial flexibility is incorporated into this version of the model so it may be used to model displays at the sub-pixel and sub-frame level. To model a display (e.g., an LCD), the input-image data can be sampled at many times the pixel resolution and at many times the digital frame rate. The first stage of the model downsamples each sequence in time and in space to physiologically reasonable rates, but with minimum interpolative artifacts and aliasing. Luma and chroma parts of the model generate (through multi-resolution pyramid representation) a map of differences-between test and reference called the JND map, from which a summary rating predictor is derived. The latest model extensions have done well in calibration against psychophysical data and against image-rating data given a CRT-based front-end. THe software was delivered to NASA Ames and is being integrated with LCD display models at that facility,

  6. Cryogenic flat-panel gas-gap heat switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanapalli, S.; Keijzer, R.; Buitelaar, P.; ter Brake, H. J. M.

    2016-09-01

    A compact additive manufactured flat-panel gas-gap heat switch operating at cryogenic temperature is reported in this paper. A guarded-hot-plate apparatus has been developed to measure the thermal conductance of the heat switch with the heat sink temperature in the range of 100-180 K. The apparatus is cooled by a two-stage GM cooler and the temperature is controlled with a heater and a braided copper wire connection. A thermal guard is mounted on the hot side of the device to confine the heat flow axially through the sample. A gas handling system allows testing the device with different gas pressures in the heat switch. Experiments are performed at various heat sink temperatures, by varying gas pressure in the gas-gap and with helium, hydrogen and nitrogen gas. The measured off-conductance with a heat sink temperature of 115 K and the hot plate at 120 K is 0.134 W/K, the on-conductance with helium and hydrogen gases at the same temperatures is 4.80 W/K and 4.71 W/K, respectively. This results in an on/off conductance ratio of 37 ± 7 and 35 ± 6 for helium and hydrogen respectively. The experimental results matches fairly well with the predicted heat conductance at cryogenic temperatures.

  7. Imaging detector designs based on flat panel PMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Cinti, M. N.; Trotta, C.; Bennati, P.; Cusanno, F.; Garibaldi, F.

    2004-07-01

    Over the last 10 years, because of close proximity positioning, small field of view imagers have demonstrated superior spatial resolution and sensitivity at multiple orientations compared to the conventional nuclear camera. Design favoring high spatial resolution at a reasonable cost is the main goal and to this aim a number of photodetector designs have been proposed. The recent availability of Hamamatsu Flat Panel photomultiplier (PMT) makes it a promising and realistic candidate by significant improving compactness, packing fraction of PSPMT designs and lowering costs. In this paper we analyze the spatial resolution potential of a small gamma imager based on Hamamatsu H8500 PMT coupled to different scintillation material arrays like CsI(Tl) and NaI(Tl), with crystal pixel size ranging between 0.2 and 1.8 mm. The imaging performances and limitations for application in scintimammography, linphoscintigraphy and small animal imaging are critically explored. The results show very good position linearity, spatial resolution and gain. Furthermore the array structure of anodes favours the exploiting of new methods of charge analysis for a precise calculation of gamma ray interaction position. Unfortunately the light sampling is still limited by too big anode size that impairs photodetector performances for ultra high spatial resolution applications.

  8. Comparative dental radiographic identification using flat panel CT.

    PubMed

    Birngruber, Christoph G; Obert, Martin; Ramsthaler, Frank; Kreutz, Kerstin; Verhoff, Marcel A

    2011-06-15

    A skull without lower jaw was found and brought in for identification. It was suspected to be that of a man reported missing five years ago. An undated antemortal dental chart and two dental films of the 1st and 2nd dental quadrants, both taken about 4 years before the man went missing, were available for comparison. The method of choice in solving the identity question was comparative dental radiography. Despite numerous attempts, it was not possible to obtain radiographs of the upper jaw that duplicated the X-ray beam angulation of the antemortem dental films. The skull was thus scanned with a multislice computed tomography (MSCT) scanner, and virtual radiographs with the desired angulation were generated from the data with the maximum intensity projection (MIP) technique. The resulting virtual radiographs could, however, not be used for superimposition with the antemortem radiographs because of their poor resolution and the occurrence of artifacts caused by metallic dental fillings. The upper jaw was therefore scanned again, this time with a high resolution eLU-CT (eXplore Locus Ultra flat panel CT). The resulting eLU-CT datasets were visualized with the MIP technique and yielded virtual radiographs that could be compared with the antemortem radiographs. Positive identification could be assumed with near certainty after dental features could be matched in the superimposition of antemortem and postmortem radiographs. In the presented case, eLU-CT was used for the first time for a comparative dental radiographic identification. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Thiogallate Blue Phosphors for Thin Film Electroluminescent Flat Panel Displays

    SciTech Connect

    Dye, Robert C.; Tuenge, Richard T.

    1997-04-03

    This project helped to develop a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) method that could improve the efficiency of the blue phosphor for full color thin-film electroluminescent (TFEL) flat panel displays. High quality SrS and SrS:Ce thin films were deposited from Sr(thd)2, Ce(thd)4 and H2S via a low pressure MOCVD process. Film characteristics were found to be insensitive to the presence of the cerium dopant in the concn. range investigated. Depositions were carried out for a wide temp. range (250-550°C). Deposition rates were found to be relatively insensitive for the temp. range investigated. The films produced were found to be highlymore » cryst. at all temps. investigated. Deposited material showed texturing as a function of substrate material and temp. FWHM of the a 111 ii reflections were found to have a 2Q values of 0.15-0.18 deg. for all temps. RBS and AES shows stoichiometric 1 : 1 SrS with less than 2% carbon and oxygen contaminates. ERO indicates the films to have 1- 2.5% hydrogen. Films doped with 0.019-0.043 atom % Ce showed weak blue-green to green PL with increasing dopant concn. Doped films yielded up to 3.2 cd/m2 EL emission with CIE coordinates of x = 0.22 and y = 0.32 and turn-on voltages of 150-250 V.« less

  10. Acquisition of flat panel displays for military applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Atta, Richard H.; Goodell, Larry; Cohen, Brian S.; Lippitz, Michael J.; Marks, Michael B.; Bardsley, James N.; Kimzey, Charles H.

    1998-09-01

    Congress requested the Department of Defense (DoD) to study the acquisition of flat panel displays (FPDs) for military applications with specific attention to tradeoffs made in acquiring 'consumer-grade displays' rather than 'FPD systems that are custom designed to meet military requirements.' The study addresses: life cycle cost and performance tradeoffs, environmental and performance requirements and test data on performance of both custom and consumer-grade FPDs, life cycle cost and support issues such as commonality, supportability, and availability, potential benefits of FPD system interface standards and open systems approaches. The study found that appropriately ruggedized consumer-grade FPDs can meet the environmental and performance requirements for a broad range of military applications, including shipboard, command and control, army ground vehicles, military transport aviation, and soldier-portable computer systems. Currently, ruggedized consumer-grade FPDs cannot meet the specifications for some highly stressful applications, particularly tactical cockpit avionics. Due to lack of comparable and available data, programs have reached different judgments about the environmental tolerance and optical performance of ruggedized consumer-grade FPDs. There appear to be few systematic assessments of display performance impact on mission effectiveness. FPD availability concerns pivot on (1) the potentially rapid obsolescence of commercial FPDs and (2) the economic viability of domestic custom FPD suppliers. Display integrators using commercial FPDs are working to establish long-term supply arrangements with foreign producers of displays, but it is unclear how responsive these relationships will be in the future. Some DoD display integrators using custom FPDs believe that until the FPD market matures and stabilizes, it would be imprudent for DoD to become dependent on foreign, commercial FPD producers. However, many of these integrators are also concerned about

  11. Motion-compensated defect interpolation for flat-panel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aach, Til; Barth, Erhardt; Mayntz, Claudia

    2004-05-01

    One advantage of flat-panel X-ray detectors is the immediate availability of the acquired images for display. Current limitations in large-area active-matrix manufacturing technology, however, require that the images read out from such detectors be processed to correct for inactive pixels. In static radiographs, these defects can only be interpolated by spatial filtering. Moving X-ray image modalities, such as fluoroscopy or cine-angiography, permit to use temporal information as well. This paper describes interframe defect interpolation algorithms based on motion compensation and filtering. Assuming the locations of the defects to be known, we fill in the defective areas from past frames, where the missing information was visible due to motion. The motion estimator is based on regularized block matching, with speedup obtained by successive elimination and related measures. To avoid the motion estimator locking on to static defects, these are cut out of each block during matching. Once motion is estimated, three methods are available for defect interpolation: direct filling-in by the motion-compensated predecessor, filling-in by a 3D-multilevel median filtered value, and spatiotemporal mean filtering. Results are shown for noisy fluoroscopy sequences acquired in clinical routine with varying amounts of motion and simulated defects up to six lines wide. They show that the 3D-multilevel median filter appears as the method of choice since it causes the least blur of the interpolated data, is robust with respect to motion estimation errors and works even in non-moving areas.

  12. Heat Transfar Properties of Flat-Panel Evacuated Porous Insrlators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneno, Hirosyi; Yamamoto, Ryoichi

    Flat Panel evacuated porous insulators have been produced by filling powder or fiber (such as perlite powder, diatomaceous earth powder, silica aerogel powder, g lass fiber and ceramic fiber) in film-like laminated plastic container and by evacuating to form vacuum in it is interior. Heat transfer properties of these evacuated insulators have been studied under various conditions (such as particle diameter, surface area, packing density, solid volume fraction and void dimension). The apparent mean thermal conductivity has been measured for the boundary surface temperature at cold face temperature 13°C and hot face temperature 35°. The effect of air pressure ranging from 1 Pa to one atomosphere (105 Pa) was examined. The results were as follows. (1) For each powder the apparent mean thermal conductivity decreases with decreasing residual air pressure, and at very low pressure bellow 1 -103 Pa the conductivity becomes indeqendent of pressure. The thermal conductivity at 1.3Pa is 0.0053 W/mK for perlite powder, 0.0048W/mK for diatomaceous earth powder, 0.0043 W/mK for silica aerogel powder and 0.0029W/mK for glass fiber. (2) With decreasing particle size, the apparent mean thermal conductivity is constant independent of residual air pressure in higher pressure region. It is that void dimension continues to decrease with particle size and the mean free path of air becomes comparable with void dimension. (3) In the range of minor solid volume fraction, the apparent mean thermal conductivity at very low precreases with decreasing particle size. This shows the thermal contact resistance of the solid particle increases with decreasing particle size.

  13. Flat-panel detectors: how much better are they?

    PubMed

    Seibert, J Anthony

    2006-09-01

    Interventional and fluoroscopic imaging procedures for pediatric patients are becoming more prevalent because of the less-invasive nature of these procedures compared to alternatives such as surgery. Flat-panel X-ray detectors (FPD) for fluoroscopy are a new technology alternative to the image intensifier/TV (II/TV) digital system that has been in use for more than two decades. Two major FPD technologies have been implemented, based on indirect conversion of X-rays to light (using an X-ray scintillator) and then to proportional charge (using a photodiode), or direct conversion of X-rays into charge (using a semiconductor material) for signal acquisition and digitization. These detectors have proved very successful for high-exposure interventional procedures but lack the image quality of the II/TV system at the lowest exposure levels common in fluoroscopy. The benefits for FPD image quality include lack of geometric distortion, little or no veiling glare, a uniform response across the field-of-view, and improved ergonomics with better patient access. Better detective quantum efficiency indicates the possibility of reducing the patient dose in accordance with ALARA principles. However, first-generation FPD devices have been implemented with less than adequate acquisition flexibility (e.g., lack of tableside controls/information, inability to easily change protocols) and the presence of residual signals from previous exposures, and additional cost of equipment and long-term maintenance have been serious impediments to purchase and implementation. Technological advances of second generation and future hybrid FPD systems should solve many current issues. The answer to the question "how much better are they?" is "significantly better", and they are certainly worth consideration for replacement or new implementation of an imaging suite for pediatric fluoroscopy.

  14. Additive noise properties of active matrix flat-panel imagers.

    PubMed

    Maolinbay, M; El-Mohri, Y; Antonuk, L E; Jee, K W; Nassif, S; Rong, X; Zhao, Q

    2000-08-01

    A detailed theoretical and empirical investigation of additive noise for indirect detection, active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) has been performed. Such imagers comprise a pixelated array, incorporating photodiodes and thin-film transistors (TFTs), and an associated electronic acquisition system. A theoretical model of additive noise, defined as the noise of an imaging system in the absence of radiation, has been developed. This model is based upon an equivalent-noise-circuit representation of an AMFPI. The model contains a number of uncorrelated noise components which have been designated as pixel noise, data line thermal noise, externally coupled noise, preamplifier noise and digitization noise. Pixel noise is further divided into the following components: TFT thermal noise, shot and 1/f noise associated with the TFT and photodiode leakage currents, and TFT transient noise. Measurements of various additive noise components were carried out on a prototype imaging system based on a 508 microm pitch, 26 x 26 cm2 array. Other measurements were performed in the absence of the array, involving discrete components connected to the preamplifier input. Overall, model predictions of total additive noise as well as of pixel, preamplifier, and data line thermal noise components were in agreement with results of their measured counterparts. For the imaging system examined, the model predicts that pixel noise is dominated by shot and 1/f noise components of the photodiode and TFT at frame times above approximately 1 s. As frame time decreases, pixel noise is increasingly dominated by TFT thermal noise. Under these conditions, the reasonable degree of agreement observed between measurements and model predictions provides strong evidence that the role of TFT thermal noise has been properly incorporated into the model. Finally, the role of the resistance and capacitance of array data lines in the model was investigated using discrete component circuits at the preamplifier

  15. Performance comparison of flat static and adjustable angle solar panels for sunny weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, Yaw Long; Yong, Yoon Kuang

    2017-04-01

    Nowadays solar panels are commonly used to collect sunlight so that it could convert solar energy into electrical energy. The power generated by the solar panels depends on the amount of sunlight collected on the solar panels. This paper presents a study that was carried out to study how changing the angle of the solar panels will impact the amount of electrical energy collected after conversion and the efficiencies of the solar panels. In this paper, the solar panels were placed at 30°, 35° and 40° angles throughout different days. The energy collected is then compared with energy collected by a flat static solar panel. It turns out that the solar panels with 40° angle performed best among the other angle solar panels.

  16. Buckling coefficients for simply supported and camped flat, rectangular sandwich panels under edgewise compression

    Treesearch

    Edward W. Kuenzi; Charles B. Norris; Paul M. Jenkinson

    1964-01-01

    “This report presents curves of coefficients and formulas for use in calculating the buckling of flat panels of sandwich construction under edgewise compressive loads. The curves were derived for sandwich panels having one facing of either of two orthotropic materials, the other facing of an isotropic material; both facings of orthotropic material; both facings of...

  17. Shin-Etsu super-high-flat substrate for FPD panel photomask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishitsuka, Youkou; Harada, Daijitsu; Watabe, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Masaki

    2017-07-01

    Recently, high-resolution exposure machine has been developed for production of high-definition (HD) panels, and higher-flat photomask substrates for FPD is being expected for panel makers to produce HD panels. In this presentation, we introduce about Shin-Etsu's advanced technique of producing super-high-flat photomask substrates. Shin-Etsu has developed surface polishing and planarization technology with No.1-quality-IC photomask substrates. Our most advanced IC photomask substrates have gained the highest estimation and appreciation from our customers because of their surface quality (non-defect surface without sub-0.1um size defects) and ultimate flatness (sub-0.1um order having achieved). By scaling up those IC photomask substrate technologies and developing unique large-size processing technologies, we have achieved creating high-flat large substrates, even G10-photomask size as well as regular G6-G8 photomask size. The core technology is that the surface shape of the substrate is completely controlled by the unique method. For example, we can regularly produce a substrate with its flatness of triple 5ums; front side flatness, back side flatness and total thickness variation are all less than 5μm. Furthermore, we are able to supply a substrate with its flatness of triple 3ums for G6-photomask size advanced grade, believed to be needed in near future.

  18. Evaluation of a metal artifacts reduction algorithm applied to postinterventional flat panel detector CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Stidd, D A; Theessen, H; Deng, Y; Li, Y; Scholz, B; Rohkohl, C; Jhaveri, M D; Moftakhar, R; Chen, M; Lopes, D K

    2014-01-01

    Flat panel detector CT images are degraded by streak artifacts caused by radiodense implanted materials such as coils or clips. A new metal artifacts reduction prototype algorithm has been used to minimize these artifacts. The application of this new metal artifacts reduction algorithm was evaluated for flat panel detector CT imaging performed in a routine clinical setting. Flat panel detector CT images were obtained from 59 patients immediately following cerebral endovascular procedures or as surveillance imaging for cerebral endovascular or surgical procedures previously performed. The images were independently evaluated by 7 physicians for metal artifacts reduction on a 3-point scale at 2 locations: immediately adjacent to the metallic implant and 3 cm away from it. The number of visible vessels before and after metal artifacts reduction correction was also evaluated within a 3-cm radius around the metallic implant. The metal artifacts reduction algorithm was applied to the 59 flat panel detector CT datasets without complications. The metal artifacts in the reduction-corrected flat panel detector CT images were significantly reduced in the area immediately adjacent to the implanted metal object (P = .05) and in the area 3 cm away from the metal object (P = .03). The average number of visible vessel segments increased from 4.07 to 5.29 (P = .1235) after application of the metal artifacts reduction algorithm to the flat panel detector CT images. Metal artifacts reduction is an effective method to improve flat panel detector CT images degraded by metal artifacts. Metal artifacts are significantly decreased by the metal artifacts reduction algorithm, and there was a trend toward increased vessel-segment visualization. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  19. Driver-Array Based Flat-Panel Loudspeakers: Theoretical Background and Design Guidelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, David Allan

    This thesis relates to the simulation and design of flat-panel loudspeakers using moving-coil driver elements. A brief history of the industry is given, including a collection of products and patents from 1925 until the present, an overview of research papers, and a discussion of current products available. The mechanics of bending flat panels are developed with respect to localized driving forces, both in the frequency domain and the time domain as an impulse response. These simulations are compared to measurements on prototype panels. Additional resonant elements influence the behavior of the system: an optional ported rear enclosure and the resonant characteristics of the drivers. The governing equations for these systems are derived and solutions are implemented using equivalent mechanical circuits and numerical methods. The idea of using driver arrays to independently actuate modes of the panel is discussed at length with respect to modal addressability, modal spillover, and experimental validation. The numerical approach to determining the optimal driver placement for a given set of modes is derived and experimentally validated. An investigation of the acoustic behavior of flat panel loudspeakers is presented, using mechanical simulation results to predict the acoustic radiation. The simulations are compared to measurements and found to accurately predict important mechanical and acoustical behaviors. It is demonstrated that a driver array, with the proper biasing, is capable of creating a flat panel loudspeaker which acts more like a piston than a "diffuse radiator" flat panel loudspeaker. The techniques of "Modal Crossover Networks" are introduced, which use multi-band filters to bias the driver array differently for different frequency bands, optimized for audio reproduction. The question of how many drivers are necessary for a modal crossover network is addressed and found to be dependent on the estimated quality factor (Q) of the panel material and edge

  20. High-energy and thermal-neutron imaging and modeling with an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector.

    PubMed

    Claytor, Thomas N; Taddeucci, Terry N; Hills, Charles R; Summa, Deborah A; Davis, Anthony W; McDonald, Thomas E; Schwab, Mark J

    2004-10-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) operates two spallation neutron sources dedicated to research in materials science, condensed-matter physics, and fundamental and applied nuclear physics. Prior to 1995, all thermal neutron radiography at Los Alamos was done on a beam port attached to the Omega West reactor, a small 8MW research reactor used primarily for radioisotope production and prompt and delayed neutron activation analysis. After the closure of this facility, two largely independent radiography development efforts were begun at LANSCE using moderated cold and thermal neutrons from the Target-1 source and high-energy neutrons from the Target-4 source. Investigations with cold and thermal neutrons employed a neutron converter and film, a scintillation screen and CCD camera system, and a new high-resolution amorphous silicon (a-Si) flat-panel detector system. Recent work with high-energy neutrons (En > 1 MeV) has involved storage-phosphor image plates. Some comparison high-energy images were obtained with both image plates and the a-Si panel and showed equivalent image quality for approximately equal exposure times.

  1. Recommendations for the performance rating of flat plate terrestrial photovoltaic solar panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treble, F. C.

    1976-01-01

    A review of recommendations for standardizing the performance rating of flat plate terrestrial solar panels is given to develop an international standard code of practice for performance rating. Required data to characterize the performance of a solar panel are listed. Other items discussed are: (1) basic measurement procedures; (2) performance measurement in natural sunlight and simulated sunlight; (3) standard solar cells; (4) the normal incidence method; (5) global method and (6) definition of peak power.

  2. Beam-Steerable Flat-Panel Reflector Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Choon Sae; Lee, Chanam; Miranda, Felix A.

    2005-01-01

    Many space applications require a high-gain antenna that can be easily deployable in space. Currently, the most common high-gain antenna for space-born applications is an umbrella-type reflector antenna that can be folded while being lifted to the Earth orbit. There have been a number of issues to be resolved for this type of antenna. The reflecting surface of a fine wire mesh has to be light in weight and flexible while opening up once in orbit. Also the mesh must be a good conductor at the operating frequency. In this paper, we propose a different type of high-gain antenna for easy space deployment. The proposed antenna is similar to reflector antennas except the curved main reflector is replaced by a flat reconfigurable surface for easy packing and deployment in space. Moreover it is possible to steer the beam without moving the entire antenna system.

  3. Transparent Fingerprint Sensor System for Large Flat Panel Display.

    PubMed

    Seo, Wonkuk; Pi, Jae-Eun; Cho, Sung Haeung; Kang, Seung-Youl; Ahn, Seong-Deok; Hwang, Chi-Sun; Jeon, Ho-Sik; Kim, Jong-Uk; Lee, Myunghee

    2018-01-19

    In this paper, we introduce a transparent fingerprint sensing system using a thin film transistor (TFT) sensor panel, based on a self-capacitive sensing scheme. An armorphousindium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) TFT sensor array and associated custom Read-Out IC (ROIC) are implemented for the system. The sensor panel has a 200 × 200 pixel array and each pixel size is as small as 50 μm × 50 μm. The ROIC uses only eight analog front-end (AFE) amplifier stages along with a successive approximation analog-to-digital converter (SAR ADC). To get the fingerprint image data from the sensor array, the ROIC senses a capacitance, which is formed by a cover glass material between a human finger and an electrode of each pixel of the sensor array. Three methods are reviewed for estimating the self-capacitance. The measurement result demonstrates that the transparent fingerprint sensor system has an ability to differentiate a human finger's ridges and valleys through the fingerprint sensor array.

  4. Using Flat-Panel Perfusion Imaging to Measure Cerebral Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chung-Jung; Guo, Wan-Yuo; Chang, Feng-Chi; Hung, Sheng-Che; Chen, Ko-Kung; Yu, Deuerling-Zheng; Wu, Chun-Hsien Frank; Liou, Jy-Kang Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Flat-detector CT perfusion (FD-CTP) imaging has demonstrated efficacy in qualitatively accessing the penumbra in acute stroke equivalent to that of magnetic resonance perfusion (MRP). The aim of our study was to evaluate the feasibility of quantifying oligemia in the brain in patients with carotid stenosis. Ten patients with unilateral carotid stenosis of >70% were included. All MRPs and FD-CTPs were performed before stenting. Region-of-interests (ROIs) including middle cerebral artery territory at basal ganglia level on both stenotic and contralateral sides were used for quantitative analysis. Relative time to peak (rTTP) was defined as TTP of the stenotic side divided by TTP of the contralateral side, and so as relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), relative mean transit time (rMTT), and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF). Absolute and relative TTP, CBV, MTT, CBF between two modalities were compared. For absolute quantitative analysis, the correlation of TTP was highest (r = 0.56), followed by CBV (r = 0.47), MTT (r = 0.47), and CBF (r = 0.43); for relative quantitative analysis, rCBF was the highest (r = 0.79), followed by rTTP (r = 0.75) and rCBV (r = 0.50). We confirmed that relative quantitative assessment of FD-CTP is feasible in chronic ischemic disease. Absolute quantitative measurements between MRP and FD-CTP only expressed moderate correlations. Optimization of acquisitions and algorithms is warranted to achieve better quantification. PMID:27196456

  5. Scan equalization digital radiography (SEDR) implemented with an amorphous Selenium flat-panel detector: initial experience

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinming; Lai, Chao-Jen; Chen, Lingyun; Han, Tao; Zhong, Yuncheng; Shen, Youtao; Wang, Tianpeng; Shaw, Chris C.

    2010-01-01

    It is well recognized in projection radiography that low-contrast detectability suffered in heavily attenuating regions due to excessively low x-ray fluence to the image receptor and higher noise levels. Exposure equalization can improve image quality by increasing the x-ray exposure to heavily attenuating regions, resulting in a more uniform distribution of exposure to the detector. Image quality is also expected to be improved by using the slot-scan geometry to reject scattered radiation effectively without degrading primary x-rays. This paper describes the design of prototype scan equalization digital radiography (SEDR) system implemented with an amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin-film transistor (TFT) array based flat-panel detector. With this system, the slot-scan geometry with the alternate line erasure and readout (ALER) technique was used to achieve scatter rejection. A seven-segment beam height modulator assembly was mounted onto the fore-collimator to regulate exposure regionally for chest radiography. The beam modulator assembly, consisting of micro linear motors, lead screw cartridge with lead beam blocks attached, position feedback sensors, and motor driver circuitry, has been tested and found to have an acceptable response for exposure equalization in chest radiography. An anthropomorphic chest phantom was imaged in the posterior-anterior (PA) view under clinical conditions. Scatter component, primary x-rays, scatter-to-primary ratios (SPRs), and primary signal-to-noise ratios (PSNRs) were measured in the SEDR images to evaluate the rejection and redistribution of scattered radiation, and compared with those for conventional full-field imaging with and without anti-scatter grid methods. SPR reduction ratios (SPRRRs, defined as the differences between the non-grid full-field SPRs and the reduced SPRs divided by the former) yielded approximately 59% for the full-field imaging with grid and 82% for SEDR technique in the lungs; and 77% for the full

  6. Flat panel display using Ti-Cr-Al-O thin film

    DOEpatents

    Jankowski, Alan F.; Schmid, Anthony P.

    2002-01-01

    Thin films of Ti--Cr--Al--O are used as a resistor material. The films are rf sputter deposited from ceramic targets using a reactive working gas mixture of Ar and O.sub.2. Resistivity values from 10.sup.4 to 10.sup.10 Ohm-cm have been measured for Ti--Cr--Al--O film <1 .mu.m thick. The film resistivity can be discretely selected through control of the target composition and the deposition parameters. The application of Ti--Cr--Al--O as a thin film resistor has been found to be thermodynamically stable, unlike other metal-oxide films. The Ti--Cr--Al--O film can be used as a vertical or lateral resistor, for example, as a layer beneath a field emission cathode in a flat panel display; or used to control surface emissivity, for example, as a coating on an insulating material such as vertical wall supports in flat panel displays.

  7. Evaluation of imaging quality for flat-panel detector based low dose C-arm CT system

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Chang-Woo; Cha, Bo Kyung; Jeon, Sungchae

    2015-07-01

    The image quality associated with the extent of the angle of gantry rotation, the number of projection views, and the dose of X-ray radiation was investigated in flat-panel detector (FPD) based C-arm cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) system for medical applications. A prototype CBCT system for the projection acquisition used the X-ray tube (A-132, Varian inc.) having rhenium-tungsten molybdenum target and flat panel a-Si X-ray detector (PaxScan 4030CB, Varian inc.) having a 397 x 298 mm active area with 388 μm pixel pitch and 1024 x 768 pixels in 2 by 2 binning mode. The performance comparison of X-ray imaging qualitymore » was carried out using the Feldkamp, Davis, and Kress (FDK) reconstruction algorithm between different conditions of projection acquisition. In this work, head-and-dental (75 kVp/20 mA) and chest (90 kVp/25 mA) phantoms were used to evaluate the image quality. The 361 (30 fps x 12 s) projection data during 360 deg. gantry rotation with 1 deg. interval for the 3D reconstruction were acquired. Parke weighting function were applied to handle redundant data and improve the reconstructed image quality in a mobile C-arm system with limited rotation angles. The reconstructed 3D images were investigated for comparison of qualitative image quality in terms of scan protocols (projection views, rotation angles and exposure dose). Furthermore, the performance evaluation in image quality will be investigated regarding X-ray dose and limited projection data for a FPD based mobile C-arm CBCT system. (authors)« less

  8. Modeling Microalgae Productivity in Industrial-Scale Vertical Flat Panel Photobioreactors.

    PubMed

    Endres, Christian H; Roth, Arne; Brück, Thomas B

    2018-04-11

    Potentially achievable biomass yields are a decisive performance indicator for the economic viability of mass cultivation of microalgae. In this study, a computer model has been developed and applied to estimate the productivity of microalgae for large-scale outdoor cultivation in vertical flat panel photobioreactors. Algae growth is determined based on simulations of the reactor temperature and light distribution. Site-specific weather and irradiation data are used for annual yield estimations in six climate zones. Shading and reflections between opposing panels and between panels and the ground are dynamically computed based on the reactor geometry and the position of the sun. The results indicate that thin panels (≤0.05 m) are best suited for the assumed cell density of 2 g L -1 and that reactor panels should face in north-south direction. Panel spacings of 0.4-0.75 m at a panel height of 1 m appear most suitable for commercial applications. Under these preconditions, yields of around 10 kg m -2 a -1 are possible for most locations in the U.S. Only in hot climates significantly lower yields have to be expected, as extreme reactor temperatures limit overall productivity.

  9. Flat-panel electronic displays: a triumph of physics, chemistry and engineering.

    PubMed

    Hilsum, Cyril

    2010-03-13

    This paper describes the history and science behind the development of modern flat-panel displays, and assesses future trends. Electronic displays are an important feature of modern life. For many years the cathode ray tube, an engineering marvel, was universal, but its shape was cumbersome and its operating voltage too high. The need for a flat-panel display, working at a low voltage, became imperative, and much research has been applied to this need. Any versatile flat-panel display will exploit an electro-optical effect, a transparent conductor and an addressing system to deliver data locally. The first need is to convert an electrical signal into a visible change. Two methods are available, the first giving emission of light, the second modulating ambient illumination. The most useful light-emitting media are semiconductors, historically exploiting III-V or II-VI compounds, but more recently organic or polymer semiconductors. Another possible effect uses gas plasma discharges. The modulating, or subtractive, effects that have been studied include liquid crystals, electrophoresis, electrowetting and electrochromism. A transparent conductor makes it possible to apply a voltage to an extended area while observing the results. The design is a compromise, since the free electrons that carry current also absorb light. The first materials used were metals, but some semiconductors, when heavily doped, give a better balance, with high transmission for a low resistance. Delivering data unambiguously to a million or so picture elements across the display area is no easy task. The preferred solution is an amorphous silicon thin-film transistor deposited at each cross-point in an X-Y matrix. Success in these endeavours has led to many applications for flat-panel displays, including television, flexible displays, electronic paper, electronic books and advertising signs.

  10. Flat-panel electronic displays: a triumph of physics, chemistry and engineering

    PubMed Central

    Hilsum, Cyril

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the history and science behind the development of modern flat-panel displays, and assesses future trends. Electronic displays are an important feature of modern life. For many years the cathode ray tube, an engineering marvel, was universal, but its shape was cumbersome and its operating voltage too high. The need for a flat-panel display, working at a low voltage, became imperative, and much research has been applied to this need. Any versatile flat-panel display will exploit an electro-optical effect, a transparent conductor and an addressing system to deliver data locally. The first need is to convert an electrical signal into a visible change. Two methods are available, the first giving emission of light, the second modulating ambient illumination. The most useful light-emitting media are semiconductors, historically exploiting III–V or II–VI compounds, but more recently organic or polymer semiconductors. Another possible effect uses gas plasma discharges. The modulating, or subtractive, effects that have been studied include liquid crystals, electrophoresis, electrowetting and electrochromism. A transparent conductor makes it possible to apply a voltage to an extended area while observing the results. The design is a compromise, since the free electrons that carry current also absorb light. The first materials used were metals, but some semiconductors, when heavily doped, give a better balance, with high transmission for a low resistance. Delivering data unambiguously to a million or so picture elements across the display area is no easy task. The preferred solution is an amorphous silicon thin-film transistor deposited at each cross-point in an X–Y matrix. Success in these endeavours has led to many applications for flat-panel displays, including television, flexible displays, electronic paper, electronic books and advertising signs. PMID:20123746

  11. Qualification test results for DOE solar photovoltaic flat panel procurement - PRDA 38

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffith, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Twelve types of prototypes modules for the DOE Photovoltaic Flat Panel Procurement (PRDA 38) were subjected to qualification tests at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory according to a new specification. Environmental exposures were carried out separately and included temperature cycling, humidity, wind simulation, and hail. The most serious problems discovered were reduced insulation resistance to ground and ground continuity of the metal frames, electrical degradation, erratic power readings, and delamination. The electrical and physical characteristics of the newly received modules are also given.

  12. Investigation of the signal behavior at diagnostic energies of prototype, direct detection, active matrix, flat-panel imagers incorporating polycrystalline HgI2.

    PubMed

    Du, Hong; Antonuk, Larry E; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua; Su, Zhong; Yamamoto, Jin; Wang, Yi

    2008-03-07

    Active matrix, flat-panel x-ray imagers based on a-Si:H thin-film transistors offer many advantages and are widely utilized in medical imaging applications. Unfortunately, the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of conventional flat-panel imagers incorporating scintillators or a-Se photoconductors is significantly limited by their relatively modest signal-to-noise ratio, particularly in applications involving low x-ray exposures or high spatial resolution. For this reason, polycrystalline HgI2 is of considerable interest by virtue of its low effective work function, high atomic number and the possibility of large-area deposition. In this study, a detailed investigation of the properties of prototype, flat-panel arrays coated with two forms of this high-gain photoconductor are reported. Encouragingly, high x-ray sensitivity, low dark current and spatial resolution close to the theoretical limits were observed from a number of prototypes. In addition, input-quantum-limited DQE performance was measured from one of the prototypes at relatively low exposures. However, high levels of charge trapping, lag and polarization, as well as pixel-to-pixel variations in x-ray sensitivity are of concern. While the results of the current study are promising, further development will be required to realize prototypes exhibiting the characteristics necessary to allow practical implementation of this approach.

  13. Investigation of the signal behavior at diagnostic energies of prototype, direct detection, active matrix, flat-panel imagers incorporating polycrystalline HgI2

    PubMed Central

    Du, Hong; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua; Su, Zhong; Yamamoto, Jin; Wang, Yi

    2009-01-01

    Active matrix, flat-panel x-ray imagers based on a-Si:H thin film transistors offer many advantages and are widely utilized in medical imaging applications. Unfortunately, the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of conventional flat-panel imagers incorporating scintillators or a-Se photoconductors is significantly limited by their relatively modest signal to noise ratio, particularly in applications involving low x-ray exposures or high spatial resolution. For this reason, polycrystalline HgI2 is of considerable interest by virtue of its low effective work function, high atomic number, and the possibility of large-area deposition. In this study, a detailed investigation of the properties of prototype, flat-panel arrays coated with two forms of this high-gain photoconductor are reported. Encouragingly, high x-ray sensitivity, low dark current, and spatial resolution close to the theoretical limits were observed from a number of prototypes. In addition, input-quantum-limited DQE performance was measured from one of the prototypes at relatively low exposures. However, high levels of charge trapping, lag, and polarization, as well as pixel-to-pixel variations in x-ray sensitivity are of concern. While the results of the current study are promising, further development will be required to realize prototypes exhibiting the characteristics necessary to allow practical implementation of this approach. PMID:18296765

  14. Physical properties of a new flat panel detector with irradiated side sampling (ISS) technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiebich, Martin; Burg, Jan M.; Piel, Christina; Rodenheber, Laura; Penchev, Petar; Krombach, Gabriele A.

    2014-03-01

    Flat panel detectors have become the standard technology in projection radiography. Further progress in detector technology will result in an improvement of MTF and DQE. The new detector (FDR D-Evo plus C24i, Fuji, Japan) is based on cesium-iodine crystals and has a change in the detector layout. The read-out electrodes are moved to the irradiated side of the detector. The physical properties of the detector were determined following IEC 62220-1-1 as close as possible. The MTF showed a significant improvement compared to other cesium-iodine based flat-panel detectors. Thereby the DQE is improved to other cesium-iodine based detectors especially for the higher frequencies. The average distance between the point of interaction of the x-rays in the detector and the light collector is shorter, due to the exponential absorption law in the detector. Thereby there is a reduction in light scatter and light absorption in the cesium-iodine needle crystals. This might explain the improvement of the MTF and DQE results in our measurements. The new detector design results in an improvement in the physical properties of flat-panel detectors. This enables a potential for further dose reductions in clinical imaging.

  15. Tracking brachytherapy sources using emission imaging with one flat panel detector

    SciTech Connect

    Song Haijun; Bowsher, James; Das, Shiva

    2009-04-15

    This work proposes to use the radiation from brachytherapy sources to track their dwell positions in three-dimensional (3D) space. The prototype device uses a single flat panel detector and a BB tray. The BBs are arranged in a defined pattern. The shadow of the BBs on the flat panel is analyzed to derive the 3D coordinates of the illumination source, i.e., the dwell position of the brachytherapy source. A kilovoltage x-ray source located 3.3 m away was used to align the center BB with the center pixel on the flat panel detector. For a test plan of 11 dwell positions,more » with an Ir-192 high dose rate unit, one projection was taken for each dwell point, and locations of the BB shadows were manually identified on the projection images. The 3D coordinates for the 11 dwell positions were reconstructed based on two BBs. The distances between dwell points were compared with the expected values. The average difference was 0.07 cm with a standard deviation of 0.15 cm. With automated BB shadow recognition in the future, this technique possesses the potential of tracking the 3D trajectory and the dwell times of a brachytherapy source in real time, enabling real time source position verification.« less

  16. High-performance flat-panel solar thermoelectric generators with high thermal concentration.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Daniel; Poudel, Bed; Feng, Hsien-Ping; Caylor, J Christopher; Yu, Bo; Yan, Xiao; Ma, Yi; Wang, Xiaowei; Wang, Dezhi; Muto, Andrew; McEnaney, Kenneth; Chiesa, Matteo; Ren, Zhifeng; Chen, Gang

    2011-05-01

    The conversion of sunlight into electricity has been dominated by photovoltaic and solar thermal power generation. Photovoltaic cells are deployed widely, mostly as flat panels, whereas solar thermal electricity generation relying on optical concentrators and mechanical heat engines is only seen in large-scale power plants. Here we demonstrate a promising flat-panel solar thermal to electric power conversion technology based on the Seebeck effect and high thermal concentration, thus enabling wider applications. The developed solar thermoelectric generators (STEGs) achieved a peak efficiency of 4.6% under AM1.5G (1 kW m(-2)) conditions. The efficiency is 7-8 times higher than the previously reported best value for a flat-panel STEG, and is enabled by the use of high-performance nanostructured thermoelectric materials and spectrally-selective solar absorbers in an innovative design that exploits high thermal concentration in an evacuated environment. Our work opens up a promising new approach which has the potential to achieve cost-effective conversion of solar energy into electricity. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved

  17. Thermal Reactor Model for Large-Scale Algae Cultivation in Vertical Flat Panel Photobioreactors.

    PubMed

    Endres, Christian H; Roth, Arne; Brück, Thomas B

    2016-04-05

    Microalgae can grow significantly faster than terrestrial plants and are a promising feedstock for sustainable value added products encompassing pharmaceuticals, pigments, proteins and most prominently biofuels. As the biomass productivity of microalgae strongly depends on the cultivation temperature, detailed information on the reactor temperature as a function of time and geographical location is essential to evaluate the true potential of microalgae as an industrial feedstock. In the present study, a temperature model for an array of vertical flat plate photobioreactors is presented. It was demonstrated that mutual shading of reactor panels has a decisive effect on the reactor temperature. By optimizing distance and thickness of the panels, the occurrence of extreme temperatures and the amplitude of daily temperature fluctuations in the culture medium can be drastically reduced, while maintaining a high level of irradiation on the panels. The presented model was developed and applied to analyze the suitability of various climate zones for algae production in flat panel photobioreactors. Our results demonstrate that in particular Mediterranean and tropical climates represent favorable locations. Lastly, the thermal energy demand required for the case of active temperature control is determined for several locations.

  18. Active pixel and photon counting imagers based on poly-Si TFTs: rewriting the rule book on large area flat panel x-ray devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonuk, Larry E.; Koniczek, Martin; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua

    2009-02-01

    The near-ubiquity of large area, active matrix, flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) in medical x-ray imaging applications is a testament to the usefulness and adaptability of the relatively simple concept of array pixels based on a single amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) TFT coupled to a pixel storage capacitor. Interestingly, the fundamental advantages of a-Si:H thin film electronics (including compatibility with very large area processing, high radiation damage resistance, and continued development driven by interest in mainstream consumer products) are shared by the rapidly advancing technology of polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) TFTs. Moreover, the far higher mobilities of poly-Si TFTs, compared to those of a- Si:H, facilitate the creation of faster and more complex circuits than are possible with a-Si:H TFTs, leading to the possibility of new classes of large area, flat panel imagers. Given recent progress in the development of initial poly-Si imager prototypes, the creation of increasingly sophisticated active pixel arrays offering pixel-level amplification, variable gain, very high frame rates, and excellent signal-to-noise performance under all fluoroscopic and radiographic conditions (including very low exposures and high spatial frequencies), appears within reach. In addition, it is conceivable that the properties of poly-Si TFTs could allow the development of large area imagers providing single xray photon counting capabilities. In this article, the factors driving the possible realization of clinically practical active pixel and photon counting imagers based on poly-Si TFTs are described and simple calculational estimates related to photon counting imagers are presented. Finally, the prospect for future development of such imagers is discussed.

  19. The forced radiation efficiency of finite size flat panels that are excited by incident sound.

    PubMed

    Davy, John L

    2009-08-01

    The radiation efficiency of an infinite flat panel that radiates a plane wave into a half space is equal to the inverse of the cosine of the angle between the direction of propagation of the plane wave and the normal to the panel. The fact that this radiation efficiency tends to infinity as the angle tends to 90 degrees causes problems with simple theories of sound insulation. Sato calculated numerical values of radiation efficiency for a finite size rectangular panel in an infinite baffle whose motion is forced by sound incident at an angle to the normal from the other side. This paper presents a simple two dimensional analytic strip theory, which agrees reasonably well with Sato's numerical calculations for a rectangular panel. This leads to the conclusion that it is mainly the length of the panel in the direction of radiation, rather than its width that is important in determining its radiation efficiency. A low frequency correction is added to the analytic strip theory. The theory is analytically integrated over all angles of incidence, with the appropriate weighting function, to obtain the diffuse sound field forced radiation efficiency of a panel.

  20. Designing, Modeling, Constructing, and Testing a Flat Panel Speaker and Sound Diffuser for a Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillon, Christina

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this project was to design, model, build, and test a flat panel speaker and frame for a spherical dome structure being made into a simulator. The simulator will be a test bed for evaluating an immersive environment for human interfaces. This project focused on the loud speakers and a sound diffuser for the dome. The rest of the team worked on an Ambisonics 3D sound system, video projection system, and multi-direction treadmill to create the most realistic scene possible. The main programs utilized in this project, were Pro-E and COMSOL. Pro-E was used for creating detailed figures for the fabrication of a frame that held a flat panel loud speaker. The loud speaker was made from a thin sheet of Plexiglas and 4 acoustic exciters. COMSOL, a multiphysics finite analysis simulator, was used to model and evaluate all stages of the loud speaker, frame, and sound diffuser. Acoustical testing measurements were utilized to create polar plots from the working prototype which were then compared to the COMSOL simulations to select the optimal design for the dome. The final goal of the project was to install the flat panel loud speaker design in addition to a sound diffuser on to the wall of the dome. After running tests in COMSOL on various speaker configurations, including a warped Plexiglas version, the optimal speaker design included a flat piece of Plexiglas with a rounded frame to match the curvature of the dome. Eight of these loud speakers will be mounted into an inch and a half of high performance acoustic insulation, or Thinsulate, that will cover the inside of the dome. The following technical paper discusses these projects and explains the engineering processes used, knowledge gained, and the projected future goals of this project

  1. A semiempirical linear model of indirect, flat-panel x-ray detectors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Ying; Yang, Kai; Abbey, Craig K; Boone, John M

    2012-04-01

    It is important to understand signal and noise transfer in the indirect, flat-panel x-ray detector when developing and optimizing imaging systems. For optimization where simulating images is necessary, this study introduces a semiempirical model to simulate projection images with user-defined x-ray fluence interaction. The signal and noise transfer in the indirect, flat-panel x-ray detectors is characterized by statistics consistent with energy-integration of x-ray photons. For an incident x-ray spectrum, x-ray photons are attenuated and absorbed in the x-ray scintillator to produce light photons, which are coupled to photodiodes for signal readout. The signal mean and variance are linearly related to the energy-integrated x-ray spectrum by empirically determined factors. With the known first- and second-order statistics, images can be simulated by incorporating multipixel signal statistics and the modulation transfer function of the imaging system. To estimate the semiempirical input to this model, 500 projection images (using an indirect, flat-panel x-ray detector in the breast CT system) were acquired with 50-100 kilovolt (kV) x-ray spectra filtered with 0.1-mm tin (Sn), 0.2-mm copper (Cu), 1.5-mm aluminum (Al), or 0.05-mm silver (Ag). The signal mean and variance of each detector element and the noise power spectra (NPS) were calculated and incorporated into this model for accuracy. Additionally, the modulation transfer function of the detector system was physically measured and incorporated in the image simulation steps. For validation purposes, simulated and measured projection images of air scans were compared using 40 kV∕0.1-mm Sn, 65 kV∕0.2-mm Cu, 85 kV∕1.5-mm Al, and 95 kV∕0.05-mm Ag. The linear relationship between the measured signal statistics and the energy-integrated x-ray spectrum was confirmed and incorporated into the model. The signal mean and variance factors were linearly related to kV for each filter material (r(2) of signal mean to k

  2. Percutaneous foot joint needle placement using a C-arm flat-panel detector CT.

    PubMed

    Wiewiorski, Martin; Takes, Martin Thanh Long; Valderrabano, Victor; Jacob, Augustinus Ludwig

    2012-03-01

    Image guidance is valuable for diagnostic injections in foot orthopaedics. Flat-detector computed tomography (FD-CT) was implemented using a C-arm, and the system was tested for needle guidance in foot joint injections. FD-CT-guided joint infiltration was performed in 6 patients referred from the orthopaedic department for diagnostic foot injections. All interventions were performed utilising a flat-panel fluoroscopy system utilising specialised image guidance and planning software. Successful infiltration was defined by localisation of contrast media depot in the targeted joint. The pre- and post-interventional numeric analogue scale (NAS) pain score was assessed. All injections were technically successful. Contrast media deposit was documented in all targeted joints. Significant relief of symptoms was noted by all 6 participants. FD-CT-guided joint infiltration is a feasible method for diagnostic infiltration of midfoot and hindfoot joints. The FD-CT approach may become an alternative to commonly used 2D-fluoroscopically guidance.

  3. Postbuckling analysis of shear deformable composite flat panels taking into account geometrical imperfections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Librescu, L.; Stein, M.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of initial geometrical imperfections on the postbuckling response of flat laminated composite panels to uniaxial and biaxial compressive loading are investigated analytically. The derivation of the mathematical model on the basis of first-order transverse shear deformation theory is outlined, and numerical results for perfect and imperfect, single-layer and three-layer square plates with free-free, clamped-clamped, or free-clamped edges are presented in graphs and briefly characterized. The present approach is shown to be more accurate than analyses based on the classical Kirchhoff plate model.

  4. Gaseous flat-panel detector with glass gas electron multiplier coupled with micro-photodiode array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuya, Yuki; Miyoshi, Hiroaki; Fujiwara, Takeshi; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Takahashi, Hiroyuki

    2017-11-01

    In this study, we propose and demonstrate a novel imaging system, a gaseous flat-panel detector (FPD). The gaseous FPD consists of a glass gas electron multiplier (G-GEM) with a scintillation gas, which is optically coupled with photodiode panel fabricated with liquid crystal display technology. The G-GEM is ideal as a low energy deposition radiation detector because of its single stage high gas-gain and hence, its high photon yield. We obtained a preliminary X-ray image with the system by using a Ne/CF4 90/10 gas mixture. The typical position resolution was 0.93 mm in FWHM, which was obtained from the fitting of edge profiles

  5. Impact damage resistance of flat glass/cellular glass solar mirror experimental panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varner, J. R.; Akbar Ali, M.; Adams, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    An attempt is made to characterize the hail-impact behavior of a solar concentrator structural material which consists of thin, second-surface silvered glass sheets bonded to structural support panels of cellular glass. The resulting glass/cellular glass panel can be described as a thin, brittle plate supported by an elastic foundation, with the adhesive bonding the two as a third component. The plate will bend during impact. Attention is experimentally given to how variations in the characteristics or geometry of the flat glass, adhesive and cellular glass affect hail-impact damage resistance. The critical energy needed to cause impact damage is calculated from the critical velocity of the iceball by means of the kinetic energy formula. The complexity of this structural system and the variability of the specimens render it impossible to completely develop an analytical treatment for the prediction of impact damage resistance.

  6. Scaling the Non-linear Impact Response of Flat and Curved Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.; Chunchu, Prasad B.; Rose, Cheryl A.; Feraboli, Paolo; Jackson, Wade C.

    2005-01-01

    The application of scaling laws to thin flat and curved composite panels exhibiting nonlinear response when subjected to low-velocity transverse impact is investigated. Previous research has shown that the elastic impact response of structural configurations exhibiting geometrically linear response can be effectively scaled. In the present paper, a preliminary experimental study is presented to assess the applicability of the scaling laws to structural configurations exhibiting geometrically nonlinear deformations. The effect of damage on the scalability of the structural response characteristics, and the effect of scale on damage development are also investigated. Damage is evaluated using conventional methods including C-scan, specimen de-plying and visual inspection of the impacted panels. Coefficient of restitution and normalized contact duration are also used to assess the extent of damage. The results confirm the validity of the scaling parameters for elastic impacts. However, for the panels considered in the study, the extent and manifestation of damage do not scale according to the scaling laws. Furthermore, the results indicate that even though the damage does not scale, the overall panel response characteristics, as indicated by contact force profiles, do scale for some levels of damage.

  7. AAPM/RSNA physics tutorial for residents: physics of flat-panel fluoroscopy systems: Survey of modern fluoroscopy imaging: flat-panel detectors versus image intensifiers and more.

    PubMed

    Nickoloff, Edward Lee

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the design and operation of both flat-panel detector (FPD) and image intensifier fluoroscopy systems. The different components of each imaging chain and their functions are explained and compared. FPD systems have multiple advantages such as a smaller size, extended dynamic range, no spatial distortion, and greater stability. However, FPD systems typically have the same spatial resolution for all fields of view (FOVs) and are prone to ghosting. Image intensifier systems have better spatial resolution with the use of smaller FOVs (magnification modes) and tend to be less expensive. However, the spatial resolution of image intensifier systems is limited by the television system to which they are coupled. Moreover, image intensifier systems are degraded by glare, vignetting, spatial distortions, and defocusing effects. FPD systems do not have these problems. Some recent innovations to fluoroscopy systems include automated filtration, pulsed fluoroscopy, automatic positioning, dose-area product meters, and improved automatic dose rate control programs. Operator-selectable features may affect both the patient radiation dose and image quality; these selectable features include dose level setting, the FOV employed, fluoroscopic pulse rates, geometric factors, display software settings, and methods to reduce the imaging time. © RSNA, 2011.

  8. View-dependent geometric calibration for offset flat-panel cone beam computed tomography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Van-Giang

    2016-04-01

    Geometric parameters that define the geometry of imaging systems are crucial for image reconstruction and image quality in x-ray computed tomography (CT). The problem of determining geometric parameters for an offset flat-panel cone beam CT (CBCT) system, a recently introduced modality with a large field of view, with the assumption of an unstable mechanism and geometric parameters that vary in each view, is considered. To accurately and rapidly find the geometric parameters for each projection view, we use the projection matrix method and design a dedicated phantom that is partially visible in all projection views. The phantom consists of balls distributed symmetrically in a cylinder to ensure the inclusion of the phantom in all views, and a large portion of the phantom is covered in the projection image. To efficiently use calibrated geometric information in the reconstruction process and get rid of approximation errors, instead of decomposing the projection matrix into actual geometric parameters that are manually corrected before being used in reconstruction, as in conventional methods, we directly use the projection matrix and its pseudo-inverse in projection and backprojection operations of reconstruction algorithms. The experiments illustrate the efficacy of the proposed method with a real offset flat-panel CBCT system in dental imaging.

  9. Transmission type flat-panel X-ray source using ZnO nanowire field emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Daokun; Song, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Zhipeng

    2015-12-14

    A transmission type flat-panel X-ray source in diode structure was fabricated. Large-scale patterned ZnO nanowires grown on a glass substrate by thermal oxidation were utilized as field emitters, and tungsten thin film coated on silica glass was used as the transmission anode. Uniform distribution of X-ray generation was achieved, which benefited from the uniform electron emission from ZnO nanowires. Self-ballasting effect induced by the intrinsic resistance of ZnO nanowire and decreasing of screening effect caused by patterned emitters account for the uniform emission. Characteristic X-ray peaks of W-L lines and bremsstrahlung X-rays have been observed under anode voltages at amore » range of 18–20 kV, the latter of which were the dominant X-ray signals. High-resolution X-ray images with spatial resolution less than 25 μm were obtained by the flat-panel X-ray source. The high resolution was attributed to the small divergence angle of the emitted X-rays from the transmission X-ray source.« less

  10. Flat panel detectors--closing the (digital) gap in chest and skeletal radiology.

    PubMed

    Reiff, K J

    1999-08-01

    In the radiological department today the majority of all X-ray procedures on chest and skeletal radiography is performed with classical film-screen-systems. Using digital luminescence radiography (DLR or CR, which stands for Computed Radiography) as a technique has shown a way to replace this 100-year-old procedure of doing general radiography work by acquiring the X-rays digitally via phosphor screens, but this approach has faced criticism from lots of radiologists world wide and therefore has not been widely accepted except in the intensive care environment. A new technology is now rising based on the use of so called flat panel X-ray (FD) detectors. Semi-conducting material detects the X-rays in digital form directly and creates an instantaneous image for display, distribution and diagnosis. This ability combined with a large field of view and compared to existing methods--excellent detective quantum efficiency represents a revolutionary step for chest and skeletal radiography and will put basic X-ray-work back into the focus of radiological solutions. This paper will explain the basic technology of flat panel detectors, possible system solutions based on this new technology, aspects of the user interface influencing the system utilization and versatility as well as the possibility to redefine the patient examination process for chest and skeletal radiography. Furthermore the author discusses limitations for the first released systems, upgrades for the installed base and possible scenarios for the future, e.g. fluoroscopy or angiography application.

  11. An iterative algorithm for soft tissue reconstruction from truncated flat panel projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langan, D.; Claus, B.; Edic, P.; Vaillant, R.; De Man, B.; Basu, S.; Iatrou, M.

    2006-03-01

    The capabilities of flat panel interventional x-ray systems continue to expand, enabling a broader array of medical applications to be performed in a minimally invasive manner. Although CT is providing pre-operative 3D information, there is a need for 3D imaging of low contrast soft tissue during interventions in a number of areas including neurology, cardiac electro-physiology, and oncology. Unlike CT systems, interventional angiographic x-ray systems provide real-time large field of view 2D imaging, patient access, and flexible gantry positioning enabling interventional procedures. However, relative to CT, these C-arm flat panel systems have additional technical challenges in 3D soft tissue imaging including slower rotation speed, gantry vibration, reduced lateral patient field of view (FOV), and increased scatter. The reduced patient FOV often results in significant data truncation. Reconstruction of truncated (incomplete) data is known an "interior problem", and it is mathematically impossible to obtain an exact reconstruction. Nevertheless, it is an important problem in 3D imaging on a C-arm to address the need to generate a 3D reconstruction representative of the object being imaged with minimal artifacts. In this work we investigate the application of an iterative Maximum Likelihood Transmission (MLTR) algorithm to truncated data. We also consider truncated data with limited views for cardiac imaging where the views are gated by the electrocardiogram(ECG) to combat motion artifacts.

  12. Chemically amplified i-line positive resist for next-generation flat panel display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hsing-Chieh; Lu, Ying-Hao; Huang, Shin-Yih; Lan, Wei-Jen; Hanabata, Makoto

    2017-03-01

    Traditional diazonaphthoquinone (DNQ) positive photoresists are widely used for TFT-LCD array process. Current LTPS technology has more than 600ppi resolution is required for small or middle-sized TFT liquid crystal display panels. One of the ways to enhance resolution is to apply i-line single exposure system instead of traditional g/h/ibroadband exposure system. We have been developing i-line chemically amplified photoresist ECA 200 series for the next generation flat panel display (FPD). ECA 200 consists of three components: a phenol resin, a photo acid generator and dissolution enhancer. We applied two different types of dissolution enhancers with two different kinds of protected groups to our resist materials. As a result, we achieved higher sensitivity, higher resolution, less footing of the resist profile and reduced standing wave effect compared with traditional DNQ photoresists. In addition, we have found further property of photoresist that does not need post exposure bake (PEB) process. This resist has a great advantage at most of current panel plants without PEB process.

  13. Direct-conversion flat-panel imager with avalanche gain: feasibility investigation for HARP-AMFPI.

    PubMed

    Wronski, M M; Rowlands, J A

    2008-12-01

    The authors are investigating the concept of a direct-conversion flat-panel imager with avalanche gain for low-dose x-ray imaging. It consists of an amorphous selenium (a-Se) photoconductor partitioned into a thick drift region for x-ray-to-charge conversion and a relatively thin region called high-gain avalanche rushing photoconductor (HARP) in which the charge undergoes avalanche multiplication. An active matrix of thin film transistors is used to read out the electronic image. The authors call the proposed imager HARP active matrix flat panel imager (HARP-AMFPI). The key advantages of HARP-AMFPI are its high spatial resolution, owing to the direct-conversion a-Se layer, and its programmable avalanche gain, which can be enabled during low dose fluoroscopy to overcome electronic noise and disabled during high dose radiography to prevent saturation of the detector elements. This article investigates key design considerations for HARP-AMFPI. The effects of electronic noise on the imaging performance of HARP-AMFPI were modeled theoretically and system parameters were optimized for radiography and fluoroscopy. The following imager properties were determined as a function of avalanche gain: (1) the spatial frequency dependent detective quantum efficiency; (2) fill factor; (3) dynamic range and linearity; and (4) gain nonuniformities resulting from electric field strength nonuniformities. The authors results showed that avalanche gains of 5 and 20 enable x-ray quantum noise limited performance throughout the entire exposure range in radiography and fluoroscopy, respectively. It was shown that HARP-AMFPI can provide the required gain while maintaining a 100% effective fill factor and a piecewise dynamic range over five orders of magnitude (10(-7)-10(-2) R/frame). The authors have also shown that imaging performance is not significantly affected by the following: electric field strength nonuniformities, avalanche noise for x-ray energies above 1 keV and direct interaction

  14. Direct-conversion flat-panel imager with avalanche gain: Feasibility investigation for HARP-AMFPI

    PubMed Central

    Wronski, M. M.; Rowlands, J. A.

    2008-01-01

    The authors are investigating the concept of a direct-conversion flat-panel imager with avalanche gain for low-dose x-ray imaging. It consists of an amorphous selenium (a-Se) photoconductor partitioned into a thick drift region for x-ray-to-charge conversion and a relatively thin region called high-gain avalanche rushing photoconductor (HARP) in which the charge undergoes avalanche multiplication. An active matrix of thin film transistors is used to read out the electronic image. The authors call the proposed imager HARP active matrix flat panel imager (HARP-AMFPI). The key advantages of HARP-AMFPI are its high spatial resolution, owing to the direct-conversion a-Se layer, and its programmable avalanche gain, which can be enabled during low dose fluoroscopy to overcome electronic noise and disabled during high dose radiography to prevent saturation of the detector elements. This article investigates key design considerations for HARP-AMFPI. The effects of electronic noise on the imaging performance of HARP-AMFPI were modeled theoretically and system parameters were optimized for radiography and fluoroscopy. The following imager properties were determined as a function of avalanche gain: (1) the spatial frequency dependent detective quantum efficiency; (2) fill factor; (3) dynamic range and linearity; and (4) gain nonuniformities resulting from electric field strength nonuniformities. The authors results showed that avalanche gains of 5 and 20 enable x-ray quantum noise limited performance throughout the entire exposure range in radiography and fluoroscopy, respectively. It was shown that HARP-AMFPI can provide the required gain while maintaining a 100% effective fill factor and a piecewise dynamic range over five orders of magnitude (10−7–10−2 R∕frame). The authors have also shown that imaging performance is not significantly affected by the following: electric field strength nonuniformities, avalanche noise for x-ray energies above 1 keV and direct

  15. Low-cost fabrication and direct bond installation of flat, single-curvature and compound-curvature ablative heat shield panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norwood, L. B.

    1972-01-01

    Procedures for low cost fabrication and direct bond installation of flat, single curved, and compound curvature ablative heat shields on a DC-3 aircraft are discussed. The panel sizes and attachment locations are identified. In addition to the bonding of the four contoured panels, two flat panels were bonded to the nearly flat, lower surface of the center wing section. The detailed requirements and objectives of the investigation are described.

  16. Method of forming a spacer for field emission flat panel displays

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.; Contolini, Robert J.

    1997-01-01

    Spacers for applications such as field emission flat panel displays and vacuum microelectronics, and which involves the application of aerogel/xerogel technology to the formation of the spacer. In a preferred approach the method uses a mold and mold release agent wherein the gel precursor is a liquid which can be applied to the mold filling holes which expose the substrate (either the baseplate or the faceplate). A release agent is applied to the mold prior to precursor application to ease removal of the mold after formation of the dielectric spacer. The shrinkage of the gel during solvent extraction also improves mold removal. The final spacer material is a good dielectric, such as silica, secured to the substrate.

  17. Method of forming a spacer for field emission flat panel displays

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, A.F.; Contolini, R.J.

    1997-08-19

    Spacers are disclosed for applications such as field emission flat panel displays and vacuum microelectronics, and which involves the application of aerogel/xerogel technology to the formation of the spacer. In a preferred approach the method uses a mold and mold release agent wherein the gel precursor is a liquid which can be applied to the mold filling holes which expose the substrate (either the baseplate or the faceplate). A release agent is applied to the mold prior to precursor application to ease removal of the mold after formation of the dielectric spacer. The shrinkage of the gel during solvent extraction also improves mold removal. The final spacer material is a good dielectric, such as silica, secured to the substrate. 3 figs.

  18. A large-area flat panel multi-function display for military and space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruitt, James S.

    The Collins Avionics and Communications Division (CACD) of Rockwell International is developing a flat panel multifunction display (MFD) for military and space applications. The MFD offers the size and reliability benefits of liquid crystal display technology while achieving near-CRT display quality. CACD's experience in cockpit display systems has resulted in display generation algorithms that provide exceptional display quality. These algorithms are being implemented in custom VLSI components to minimize MFD size. A high-performance processor converts user-specified display lists to graphics commands used by these components, resulting in high-speed updates of two-dimensional and three-dimensional images. The MFD will use the application specific ICs and a high-level graphics language to provide high performance, simplified programming, and a standard MIL-STD-1553B interface.

  19. A typical flat-panel membrane bioreactor with a composite membrane for sulfur removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Jian; Xiao, Yuan; Song, Jimin; Miao, Junhe

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this work was to provide a concrete study to understand the effects of operation on biofilm morphology and microstructure and degradation efficiency for the disposal of sulfur dioxide produced by coal-fired power plants. For this purpose, a flat-panel reactor-membrane bioreactor (MBR) with a composite membrane consisting of a dense layer and a support layer was designed; the membrane bioreactors inoculated with Thiobacillus ferrooxidans were further conducted for the removal of sulfur dioxide. Dry weight, active biomass, pressure drop, removal efficiency, morphology and structure of the formed biofilms were investigated and analyzed over period of biofilm formation. The results found that the dry weight, biomass, pressure drops and removal efficiency increased rapidly during biofilm formation, remained relatively stable in the stabilization period of biofilm growth, and finally reached 0.085 g, 7.00 μg, 180 Pa, and 78%, respectively. Our results suggested the MBR is available for flue-gas desulfurization.

  20. Response of laminated composite flat panels to sonic boom and explosive blast loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Librescu, L.; Nosier, A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper deals with a theoretical analysis of the dynamic response of shear deformable symmetrically laminated rectangular composite flat panels exposed to sonic boom and explosive blast loadings. The pertinent governing equations incorporating transverse shear deformation, transverse normal stress, as well as the higher-order effects are solved by using the integral-transform technique. The obtained results are compared with their counterparts obtained within the framework of the first-order transverse shear deformation and the classical plate theories and some conclusions concerning their range of applicability are outlined. The paper also contains a detailed analysis of the influence played by the various parameters characterizing the considered pressure pulses as well as the material and geometry of the plate.

  1. Quantitative carbon ion beam radiography and tomography with a flat-panel detector.

    PubMed

    Telsemeyer, Julia; Jäkel, Oliver; Martišíková, Mária

    2012-12-07

    High dose gradients are inherent to ion beam therapy. This results in high sensitivity to discrepancies between planned and delivered dose distributions. Therefore an accurate knowledge of the ion stopping power of the traversed tissue is critical. One proposed method to ensure high quality dose deposition is to measure the stopping power by ion radiography. Although the idea of imaging with highly energetic ions is more than forty years old, there is a lack of simple detectors suitable for this purpose. In this study the performance of an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector, originally designed for photon imaging, was investigated for quantitative carbon ion radiography and tomography. The flat-panel detector was exploited to measure the water equivalent thickness (WET) and water equivalent path length (WEPL) of a phantom at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT). To do so, the ambiguous correlation of detector signal to particle energy was overcome by active or passive variation of carbon ion beam energy and measurement of the signal-to-beam energy correlation. The active method enables one to determine the WET of the imaged object with an uncertainty of 0.5 mm WET. For tomographic WEPL measurements the passive method was exploited resulting in an accuracy of 0.01 WEPL. The developed imaging technique presents a method to measure the two-dimensional maps of WET and WEPL of phantoms with a simple and commercially available detector. High spatial resolution of 0.8 × 0.8 mm(2) is given by the detector design. In the future this powerful tool will be used to evaluate the performance of the treatment planning algorithm by studying WET uncertainties.

  2. Development of next generation digital flat panel catheterization system: design principles and validation methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belanger, B.; Betraoui, F.; Dhawale, P.; Gopinath, P.; Tegzes, Pal; Vagvolgyi, B.

    2006-03-01

    The design principles that drove the development of a new cardiovascular x-ray digital flat panel (DFP) detector system are presented, followed by assessments of imaging and dose performance achieved relative to other state of the art FPD systems. The new system (GE Innova 2100 IQ TM) incorporates a new detector with substantially improved DQE at fluoroscopic (73%@1μR) and record (79%@114uR) doses, an x-ray tube with higher continuous fluoro power (3.2kW), a collimator with a wide range of copper spectral filtration (up to 0.9mm), and an improved automatic x-ray exposure management system. The performance of this new system was compared to that of the previous generation GE product (Innova 2000) and to state-of-the art cardiac digital x-ray flat panel systems from two other major manufacturers. Performance was assessed with the industry standard Cardiac X-ray NEMA/SCA and I phantom, and a new moving coronary artery stent (MCAS) phantom, designed to simulate cardiac clinical imaging conditions, composed of an anthropomorphic chest section with stents moving in a manner simulating normal coronary arteries. The NEMA/SCA&I phantom results showed the Innova 2100 IQ to exceed or equal the Innova 2000 in all of the performance categories, while operating at 28% lower dose on average, and to exceed the other DFP systems in most of the performance categories. The MCAS phantom tests showed the Innova 2100 IQ to be significantly better (p << 0.05) than the Innova 2000, and significantly better than the other DFP systems in most cases at comparable or lower doses, thereby verifying excellent performance against design goals.

  3. Data pre-processing for quantification in tomography and radiography with a digital flat panel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinkel, Jean; Gerfault, Laurent; Estève, François; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2006-03-01

    In order to obtain accurate quantitative results, flat panel detectors require specific calibration and correction of acquisitions. Main artefacts are due to bad pixels, variations of photodiodes characteristics and inhomogeneity of X-rays sensitivity of the scintillator layer. Other limitations for quantification are the non-linearity of the detector due to charge trapping in the transistors and the scattering generated inside the detector, called detector scattering. Based on physical models of artefacts generation, this paper presents an unified framework for the calibration and correction of these artefacts. The following specific algorithms have been developed to correct them. A new method for correction of deviation to linearity is based on the comparison between experimental and simulated data. A method of detector scattering correction is performed in two steps: off-line characterization of detector scattering by considering its spatial distribution through a convolution model and on-line correction based on a deconvolution approach. Radiographic results on an anthropomorphic thorax phantom imaged with a flat panel detector, that convert X-rays into visible light using scintillator coupled to an amorphous silicon transistor frame for photons to electrons conversion, demonstrate that experimental X-rays attenuation images are significantly improved qualitatively and quantitatively by applying non-linearity correction and detector scattering correction. Results obtained on tomographic reconstructions from pre-processed acquisitions of the phantom are in very good agreement with expected attenuation coefficients values obtained with a multi-slice CT scanner. Thus, this paper demonstrates the efficiency of the proposed pre-processings to perform accurate quantification on radiographies and tomographies.

  4. Technical trends of large-size photomasks for flat panel displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Koichiro

    2017-06-01

    Currently, flat panel displays (FPDs) are one of the main parts for information technology devices and sets. From 1990's to 2000's, liquid crystal displays (LCDs) and plasma displays had been mainstream FPDs. In the middle of 2000's, demand of plasma displays declined and organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) newly came into FPD market. And today, major technology of FPDs are LCDs and OLEDs. Especially for mobile devices, the penetration of OLEDs is remarkable. In FPDs panel production, photolithography is the key technology as same as LSI. Photomasks for FPDs are used not only as original master of circuit pattern, but also as a tool to form other functional structures of FPDs. Photomasks for FPDs are called as "Large Size Photomasks(LSPMs)", since the remarkable feature is " Size" which reaches over 1- meter square and over 100kg. In this report, we discuss three LSPMs technical topics with FPDs technical transition and trend. The first topics is upsizing of LSPMs, the second is the challenge for higher resolution patterning, and the last is "Multi-Tone Mask" for "Half -Tone Exposure".

  5. Modelling the drying of three-dimensional pulp moulded structures. Part II, Drying data obtained from flat panels using virgin and recycled paper fibre

    Treesearch

    John F. Hunt; Margit. Tamasy-Bano; Heike. Nyist

    1999-01-01

    A three-dimensional structural panel, called FPL Spaceboard, was developed at the USDA Forest Products Laboratory. Spaceboard panels have been formed using a variety of fibrous materials using either a wet- or dry-forming process. Geometrically, the panel departs from the traditional two-dimensional flat panel by integrally forming an array of perpendicular ribs and...

  6. Investigation of time-resolved proton radiography using x-ray flat-panel imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jee, K.-W.; Zhang, R.; Bentefour, E. H.; Doolan, P. J.; Cascio, E.; Sharp, G.; Flanz, J.; Lu, H.-M.

    2017-03-01

    Proton beam therapy benefits from the Bragg peak and delivers highly conformal dose distributions. However, the location of the end-of-range is subject to uncertainties related to the accuracy of the relative proton stopping power estimates and thereby the water-equivalent path length (WEPL) along the beam. To remedy the range uncertainty, an in vivo measurement of the WEPL through the patient, i.e. a proton-range radiograph, is highly desirable. Towards that goal, we have explored a novel method of proton radiography based on the time-resolved dose measured by a flat panel imager (FPI). A 226 MeV pencil beam and a custom-designed range modulator wheel (MW) were used to create a time-varying broad beam. The proton imaging technique used exploits this time dependency by looking at the dose rate at the imager as a function of time. This dose rate function (DRF) has a unique time-varying dose pattern at each depth of penetration. A relatively slow rotation of the MW (0.2 revolutions per second) and a fast image acquisition (30 frames per second, ~33 ms sampling) provided a sufficient temporal resolution for each DRF. Along with the high output of the CsI:Tl scintillator, imaging with pixel binning (2  ×  2) generated high signal-to-noise data at a very low radiation dose (~0.1 cGy). Proton radiographs of a head phantom and a Gammex CT calibration phantom were taken with various configurations. The results of the phantom measurements show that the FPI can generate low noise and high spatial resolution proton radiographs. The WEPL values of the CT tissue surrogate inserts show that the measured relative stopping powers are accurate to ~2%. The panel did not show any noticeable radiation damage after the accumulative dose of approximately 3831 cGy. In summary, we have successfully demonstrated a highly practical method of generating proton radiography using an x-ray flat panel imager.

  7. 75 FR 51285 - In the Matter of Certain Flat Panel Digital Televisions and Components Thereof; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-19

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Inv. No. 337-TA-733] In the Matter of Certain Flat Panel Digital Televisions and Components Thereof; Notice of Investigation AGENCY: U.S. International Trade Commission... individuals are advised that information on this matter can be obtained by contacting the Commission's TDD...

  8. Cone beam breast CT with a high pitch (75 μm), thick (500 μm) scintillator CMOS flat panel detector: Visibility of simulated microcalcifications

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Youtao; Zhong, Yuncheng; Lai, Chao-Jen

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To measure and investigate the improvement of microcalcification (MC) visibility in cone beam breast CT with a high pitch (75 μm), thick (500 μm) scintillator CMOS/CsI flat panel detector (Dexela 2923, Perkin Elmer).Methods: Aluminum wires and calcium carbonate grains of various sizes were embedded in a paraffin cylinder to simulate imaging of calcifications in a breast. Phantoms were imaged with a benchtop experimental cone beam CT system at various exposure levels. In addition to the Dexela detector, a high pitch (50 μm), thin (150 μm) scintillator CMOS/CsI flat panel detector (C7921CA-09, Hamamatsu Corporation, Hamamatsu City, Japan) and a widelymore » used low pitch (194 μm), thick (600 μm) scintillator aSi/CsI flat panel detector (PaxScan 4030CB, Varian Medical Systems) were also used in scanning for comparison. The images were independently reviewed by six readers (imaging physicists). The MC visibility was quantified as the fraction of visible MCs and measured as a function of the estimated mean glandular dose (MGD) level for various MC sizes and detectors. The modulation transfer functions (MTFs) and detective quantum efficiencies (DQEs) were also measured and compared for the three detectors used.Results: The authors have demonstrated that the use of a high pitch (75 μm) CMOS detector coupled with a thick (500 μm) CsI scintillator helped make the smaller 150–160, 160–180, and 180–200 μm MC groups more visible at MGDs up to 10.8, 9, and 10.8 mGy, respectively. It also made the larger 200–212 and 212–224 μm MC groups more visible at MGDs up to 7.2 mGy. No performance improvement was observed for 224–250 μm or larger size groups. With the higher spatial resolution of the Dexela detector based system, the apparent dimensions and shapes of MCs were more accurately rendered. The results show that with the aforementioned detector, a 73% visibility could be achieved in imaging 160–180 μm MCs as compared to 28% visibility

  9. Compressive Strength of 24S-T Aluminum-alloy Flat Panels with Longitudinal Formed Hat-section Stiffeners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuette, Evan H; Barab, Sual; Mccracken, Howard L

    1946-01-01

    Results are presented for a part of a test program on 24S-T aluminum alloy flat compression panels with longitudinal formed hat-section stiffeners. This part of the program is concerned with panels in which the thickness of the stiffener materials is 0.625 times the skin thickness. The results, presented in tabular and graphical form, show the effect of the relative dimensions of the panel on the buckling stress and the average stress at maximum load. Comparative envelope curves are presented for hat-stiffened and Z-stiffened panels having the same ratio of stiffener thickness to sheet thickness. These curves provide some indication of the relative structural efficiencies of the two types of panel.

  10. Impact and Penetration of Thin Aluminum 2024 Flat Panels at Oblique Angles of Incidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruggeri, Charles R.; Revilock, Duane M.; Pereira, J. Michael; Emmerling, William; Queitzsch, Gilbert K., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    under more extreme conditions, using a projectile with a more complex shape and sharp contacts, impacting flat panels at oblique angles of incidence.

  11. Flat panel displays for ubiquitous product applications and related impurity doping technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2006-06-01

    Various kinds of flat panel displays such as liquid crystal displays (LCDs), plasma display panels and organic light emitting diode (OLED) displays are briefly evaluated from the perspective of applicability to ubiquitous products. It is clarified that the LCDs and OLED displays are suitable for realizing mobile electronic products with a high quality display, since these displays can use active devices on the backplanes to form active matrix displays and can integrate peripheral circuits of the displays and functional circuits of mobile electronics for a ubiquitous era. It is clarified further that the low temperature polycrystalline silicon (LTPS) thin film transistor (TFT) is the most promising active device for the backplane of such active matrix displays because the LTPS TFT has the possibility to enhance its performance without raising the cost. The low temperature poly-Si TFT fabrication process is introduced, and its key technologies such as crystallization, gate oxide formation, and impurity doping are surveyed. As the property of polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) influences not only the TFT performance itself but also the efficiency of impurity doping and the integrity of the gate oxide, the crystallinity of the poly-Si is reviewed. After that, the history of the development and the state of the art in impurity doping technology and its issues are addressed in detail. Finally, foreseeing the application of LTPS TFT, the realization of OLED displays, and the progress of LTPS TFT for integrating higher functional circuits for ubiquitous applications, the requirements for impurity doping in such progress are addressed. In particular, the single grain silicon technology and the scaling down of the TFT size, which are thought to be highly effective to enhance the performance of TFTs, and issues of impurity doping technology relating to them are discussed.

  12. Dynamic flat panel detector versus image intensifier in cardiac imaging: dose and image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vano, E.; Geiger, B.; Schreiner, A.; Back, C.; Beissel, J.

    2005-12-01

    The practical aspects of the dosimetric and imaging performance of a digital x-ray system for cardiology procedures were evaluated. The system was configured with an image intensifier (II) and later upgraded to a dynamic flat panel detector (FD). Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) to phantoms of 16, 20, 24 and 28 cm of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and the image quality of a test object were measured. Images were evaluated directly on the monitor and with numerical methods (noise and signal-to-noise ratio). Information contained in the DICOM header for dosimetry audit purposes was also tested. ESAK values per frame (or kerma rate) for the most commonly used cine and fluoroscopy modes for different PMMA thicknesses and for field sizes of 17 and 23 cm for II, and 20 and 25 cm for FD, produced similar results in the evaluated system with both technologies, ranging between 19 and 589 µGy/frame (cine) and 5 and 95 mGy min-1 (fluoroscopy). Image quality for these dose settings was better for the FD version. The 'study dosimetric report' is comprehensive, and its numerical content is sufficiently accurate. There is potential in the future to set those systems with dynamic FD to lower doses than are possible in the current II versions, especially for digital cine runs, or to benefit from improved image quality.

  13. Astaxanthin induction in Microalga H. pluvialis with flat panel airlift photobioreactors under indoor and outdoor conditions.

    PubMed

    Poonkum, Woradej; Powtongsook, Sorawit; Pavasant, Prasert

    2015-01-01

    Astaxanthin was induced from Haematococcus pluvialis (NIES-144) under indoor and outdoor conditions using 17-, 50-, and 90-L flat-panel airlift photobioreactors (FP-APBRs). Preliminary experiments in 1.5-L bubble column photobioreactors (BC-PBRs) revealed that sterilized clean water with 3% CO2 aeration (1.47 cm(3) s(-1) CO2 loading) could best encourage astaxanthin accumulation at 18.21 g m(-3) (3.63% by weight). Operating 17-L FP-APBRs with these bubble column parameters under indoor conditions could further enhance astaxanthin to 26.63 g m(-3) (5.34% by weight). This was potentially due to the inherited up-lift force from the reactor that helped avoid cell precipitation by allowing the cells to be circulated within the reactor. In addition, the various sizes of FP-APBRs exhibited similar performance, implying a potential scale-up opportunity. However, similar operation under outdoor condition exhibited slightly poorer performance due to the light inhibition effect. The best outdoor performance was obtained with the FP-APBR covered with one layer of shading net, where 20.11 g m(-3) (4.47% by weight) of astaxanthin was resulted.

  14. Continuous production of diatom Entomoneis sp. in mechanically stirred tank and flat-panel airlift photobioreactors.

    PubMed

    Viriyayingsiri, Thunyaporn; Sittplangkoon, Pantaporn; Powtongsook, Sorawit; Nootong, Kasidit

    2016-10-02

    Continuous production of diatom Entomonies sp. was performed in mechanically stirred tank and flat-panel airlift photobioreactors (FPAP). The maximum specific growth rate of diatom from the batch experiment was 0.98 d(-1). A series of dilution rate and macronutrient concentration adjustments were performed in a stirred tank photobioreactor and found that the dilution rate ranged from 0.7 to 0.8 d(-1) and modified F/2 growth media containing nitrate at 3.09 mg N/L, phosphate at 2.24 mg P/L, and silicate at 11.91 mg Si/L yielded the maximum cell number density. Finally, the continuous cultivation of Entomonies sp. was conducted in FPAP using the optimal conditions determined earlier, resulting in the maximum cell number density of 19.69 × 10(4) cells/mL, which was approximately 47 and 73% increase from the result using the stirred tank photobioreactor fed with modified and standard F/2 growth media, respectively.

  15. Dynamic chest radiography: flat-panel detector (FPD) based functional X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic chest radiography is a flat-panel detector (FPD)-based functional X-ray imaging, which is performed as an additional examination in chest radiography. The large field of view (FOV) of FPDs permits real-time observation of the entire lungs and simultaneous right-and-left evaluation of diaphragm kinetics. Most importantly, dynamic chest radiography provides pulmonary ventilation and circulation findings as slight changes in pixel value even without the use of contrast media; the interpretation is challenging and crucial for a better understanding of pulmonary function. The basic concept was proposed in the 1980s; however, it was not realized until the 2010s because of technical limitations. Dynamic FPDs and advanced digital image processing played a key role for clinical application of dynamic chest radiography. Pulmonary ventilation and circulation can be quantified and visualized for the diagnosis of pulmonary diseases. Dynamic chest radiography can be deployed as a simple and rapid means of functional imaging in both routine and emergency medicine. Here, we focus on the evaluation of pulmonary ventilation and circulation. This review article describes the basic mechanism of imaging findings according to pulmonary/circulation physiology, followed by imaging procedures, analysis method, and diagnostic performance of dynamic chest radiography.

  16. Practical expressions describing detective quantum efficiency in flat-panel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. K.

    2011-11-01

    In radiology, image quality excellence is a balance between system performance and patient dose, hence x-ray systems must be designed to ensure the maximum image quality is obtained for the lowest consistent dose. The concept of detective quantum efficiency (DQE) is widely used to quantify, understand, measure, and predict the performance of x-ray detectors and imaging systems. Cascaded linear-systems theory can be used to estimate DQE based on the system design parameters and this theoretical DQE can be utilized for determining the impact of various physical processes, such as secondary quantum sinks, noise aliasing, reabsorption noise, and others. However, the prediction of DQE usually requires tremendous efforts to determine each parameter consisting of the cascaded linear-systems model. In this paper, practical DQE formalisms assessing both the photoconductor- and scintillator-based flat-panel detectors under quantum-noise-limited operation are described. The developed formalisms are experimentally validated and discussed for their limits. The formalisms described in this paper would be helpful for the rapid prediction of the DQE performances of developing systems as well as the optimal design of systems.

  17. Generalized DQE analysis of dual-energy imaging using flat-panel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, S.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Jaffray, D. A.; Moseley, D. J.; Bakhtiar, B.

    2005-04-01

    Dual-energy (DE) imaging is a promising x-ray modality for the screening and early detection of lung cancer but has seen limited application primarily due to the lack of an adequate image detector. Recent development of flat-panel detectors (FPDs) for advanced imaging applications provide a promising technology for DE imaging, and a theoretical framework to quantify the imaging performance of FPD-based DE imaging systems is useful for system design and optimization. Traditional methods employed to describe imaging performance in radiographic systems [i.e., detective quantum efficiency (DQE) and noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ)] are extended in this paper to DE imaging systems using FPDs. To quantify the essential advantage imparted by DE imaging, we incorporate a spatial-frequency-dependent "anatomical noise" term associated with overlying structures to yield the generalized DQE and NEQ. We estimate anatomical noise in DE images through measurements using an anthropomorphic chest phantom and parameterize the measurements using a 1/f model. Cascaded systems analysis of the generalized NEQ is shown to reveal the tradeoffs between anatomical noise and quantum noise in DE image reconstructions. The generalized dual-energy NEQ is combined with idealized task functions to compute the detectability index, providing an estimate of ideal observer performance in a variety of detection and discrimination tasks. The generalized analysis is employed to investigate optimal tissue cancellation and kVp selection as a function of dose and imaging task.

  18. Diagnostic performance of flat-panel CT arthrography for cartilage defect detection in the ankle joint: comparison with MDCT arthrography with gross anatomy as the reference standard.

    PubMed

    Chemouni, David; Champsaur, Pierre; Guenoun, Daphné; Desrousseaux, Julie; Pauly, Vanessa; Le Corroller, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the diagnostic performance and radiation exposure of flat-panel CT arthrography for cartilage defect detection in the ankle joint to standard MDCT arthrography, using gross anatomy and thermoluminescent dosimetry as reference standards. Ten cadaveric ankle specimens were obtained from individuals who had willed their bodies to science. Five milliliters of a mixture of diluted ioxaglate and saline were injected. Specimens were examined consecutively with the use of flat-panel CT and MDCT. Radiation doses of flat-panel CT and MDCT were recorded using thermoluminescent dosimeters. Flat-panel CT and MDCT arthrography examinations were blinded and randomly evaluated by two musculoskeletal radiologists in consensus. In each ankle specimen, eight cartilage areas were assessed separately: medial talar surface, medial talar trochlea, lateral talar trochlea, lateral talar surface, tibial malleolus, medial tibial pla-fond, lateral tibial plafond, and fibular malleolus. Findings at flat-panel CT and MDCT arthrography were compared with macroscopic assessments in 80 cartilage areas. For the detection of cartilage lesions, flat-panel CT showed a sensitivity of 80%, specificity of 98%, and accuracy of 94%, and MDCT arthrography showed a sensitivity of 55%, specificity of 98%, and accuracy of 88%. Flat-panel CT and MDCT arthrography showed almost perfect (κ = 0.83) and substantial (κ = 0.65) agreement, respectively, with anatomic examination. Radiation dose was significantly lower for flat-panel CT (mean, 2.1 mGy; range, 1.1-3.0 mGy) than for MDCT (mean, 47.2 mGy; range, 39.3-53.8 mGy) (p < 0.01). Flat-panel CT arthrography is accurate for detecting cartilage defects in the ankle joint and is an alternative to MDCT arthrography that may have better diagnostic performance and may permit the use of a lower radiation dose.

  19. A flat-panel detector based micro-CT system: performance evaluation for small-animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang Chul; Kim, Ho Kyung; Chun, In Kon; Hye Cho, Myung; Lee, Soo Yeol; Cho, Min Hyoung

    2003-12-01

    A dedicated small-animal x-ray micro computed tomography (micro-CT) system has been developed to screen laboratory small animals such as mice and rats. The micro-CT system consists of an indirect-detection flat-panel x-ray detector with a field-of-view of 120 × 120 mm2, a microfocus x-ray source, a rotational subject holder and a parallel data processing system. The flat-panel detector is based on a matrix-addressed photodiode array fabricated by a CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) process coupled to a CsI:Tl (thallium-doped caesium iodide) scintillator as an x-ray-to-light converter. Principal imaging performances of the micro-CT system have been evaluated in terms of image uniformity, voxel noise and spatial resolution. It has been found that the image non-uniformity mainly comes from the structural non-uniform sensitivity pattern of the flat-panel detector and the voxel noise is about 48 CT numbers at the voxel size of 100 × 100 × 200 µm3 and the air kerma of 286 mGy. When the magnification ratio is 2, the spatial resolution of the micro-CT system is about 14 lp/mm (line pairs per millimetre) that is almost determined by the flat-panel detector showing about 7 lp/mm resolving power. Through low-contrast phantom imaging studies, the minimum resolvable contrast has been found to be less than 36 CT numbers at the air kerma of 95 mGy. Some laboratory rat imaging results are presented.

  20. Functional shoulder radiography with use of a dynamic flat panel detector.

    PubMed

    Sakuda, Keita; Sanada, Shigeru; Tanaka, Rie; Kitaoka, Katsuhiko; Hayashi, Norio; Matsuura, Yukihiro

    2014-07-01

    Our purpose in this study was to develop a functional form of radiography and to perform a quantitative analysis for the shoulder joint using a dynamic flat panel detector (FPD) system. We obtained dynamic images at a rate of 3.75 frames per second (fps) using an FPD system. Three patients and 5 healthy controls were studied with a clinically established frontal projection, with abduction of the arms. The arm angle, glenohumeral angle (G-angle), and scapulothoracic angle (S-angle) were measured on dynamic images. The ratio of the G-angle to the S-angle (GSR) was also evaluated quantitatively. In normal subjects, the G-angle and S-angle changed gradually along with the arm angle. The G-angle was approximately twice as large as the S-angle, resulting in a GSR of 2 throughout the abduction of the shoulder. Changes in G-angle and S-angle tended to be irregular in patients with shoulder disorders. The GSR of the thoracic outlet syndrome, recurrent dislocation of the shoulder joint, and anterior serratus muscle paralysis were 3-7.5, 4-9.5, and 3.5-7.5, respectively. The GSR of the anterior serratus muscle paralysis improved to approximately 2 after orthopedic treatment. Our preliminary results indicated that functional radiography by FPD and computer-aided quantitative analysis is useful for diagnosis of some shoulder disorders, such as the thoracic outlet syndrome, recurrent dislocation of the shoulder joint, and anterior serratus muscle paralysis. The technique and procedures described comprise a simple, functional shoulder radiographic method for evaluation of the therapeutic effects of surgery and/or rehabilitation.

  1. Optimization of outdoor cultivation in flat panel airlift reactors for lipid production by Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Münkel, Ronja; Schmid-Staiger, Ulrike; Werner, Achim; Hirth, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Microalgae are discussed as a potential renewable feedstock for biofuel production. The production of highly concentrated algae biomass with a high fatty acid content, accompanied by high productivity with the use of natural sunlight is therefore of great interest. In the current study an outdoor pilot plant with five 30 L Flat Panel Airlift reactors (FPA) installed southwards were operated in 2011 in Stuttgart, Germany. The patented FPA reactor works on the basis of an airlift loop reactor and offers efficient intermixing for homogeneous light distribution. A lipid production process with the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris (SAG 211-12), under nitrogen and phosphorous deprivation, was established and evaluated in regard to the fatty acid content, fatty acid productivity and light yield. In the first set of experiments limitations caused by restricted CO₂ availability were excluded by enriching the media with NaOH. The higher alkalinity allows a higher CO₂ content of supplied air and leads to doubling of fatty acid productivity. The second set of experiments focused on how the ratio of light intensity to biomass concentration in the reactor impacts fatty acid content, productivity and light yield. The specific light availability was specified as mol photons on the reactor surface per gram biomass in the reactor. This is the first publication based on experimental data showing the quantitative correlation between specific light availability, fatty acid content and biomass light yield for a lipid production process under nutrient deprivation and outdoor conditions. High specific light availability leads to high fatty acid contents. Lower specific light availability increases fatty acid productivity and biomass light yield. An average fatty acid productivity of 0.39 g L⁻¹  day⁻¹ for a 12 days batch process with a final fatty acid content of 44.6% [w/w] was achieved. Light yield of 0.4 g mol photons⁻¹ was obtained for the first 6 days of

  2. Iodine 125 Imaging in Mice Using NaI(Tl)/Flat Panel PMT Integral Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinti, M. N.; Majewski, S.; Williams, M. B.; Bachmann, C.; Cominelli, F.; Kundu, B. K.; Stolin, A.; Popov, V.; Welch, B. L.; De Vincentis, G.; Bennati, P.; Betti, M.; Ridolfi, S.; Pani, R.

    2007-06-01

    Radiolabeled agents that bind to specific receptors have shown great promise in diagnosing and characterizing tumor cell biology. In vivo imaging of gene transcription and protein expression represents an other area of interest. The radioisotope I is commercially available as a label for molecular probes and utilized by researchers in small animal studies. We propose an advanced imaging detector based on planar NaI(T1) integral assembly with a Hamamatsu Flat Panel Photomultiplier (MA-PMT) representing one of the best trade-offs between spatial resolution and detection efficiency. We characterized the imaging performances of this planar detector, in comparison with a gamma camera based on a pixellated scintillator. We also tested the in-vivo image capability by acquiring images of mice as a part of a study of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In this study, four 25g mice with an IBD-like phenotype (SAMP1/YitFc) were injected with 375, 125, 60 and 30 muCi of I-labelled antibody against mucosal vascular addressin cell adhesion molecule (MAdCAM-1), which is up-regulated in the presence of inflammation. Two mice without bowel inflammation were injected with 150 and 60 muCi of the labeled anti-MAdCAM-1 antibody as controls. To better evaluate the performances of the integral assembly detector, we also acquired mice images with a dual modality (X and Gamma Ray) camera dedicated for small animal imaging. The results coming from this new detector are considerable: images of SAMP1/YitFc injected with 30 muCi activity show inflammation throughout the intestinal tract, with the disease very well defined at two hours post-injection.

  3. MO-AB-BRA-07: Low Dose Imaging with Avalanche Amorphous Selenium Flat Panel Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Scheuermann, J; Howansky, A; Goldan, A

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: We present the first active matrix flat panel imager (AMFPI) capable of producing x-ray quantum noise limited images at low doses by overcoming the electronic noise through signal amplification by photoconductive avalanche gain (gav). The indirect detector fabricated uses an optical sensing layer of amorphous selenium (a-Se) known as High-Gain Avalanche Rushing Photoconductor (HARP). The detector design is called Scintillator HARP (SHARP)-AMFPI. This is the first image sensor to utilize solid-state HARP technology. Methods: The detector’s electronic readout is a 24 × 30 cm{sup 2} array of thin film transistors (TFT) with a pixel pitch of 85 µm. Themore » HARP structure consists of a 15 µm layer of a-Se isolated from the high voltage (HV) and signal electrode by a 2 µm thick hole blocking layer and electron blocking layer, respectively, to reduce dark current. A 150 µm thick structured CsI scintillator with reflective backing and a fiber optic faceplate (FOP) was coupled to the semi-transparent HV bias electrode of the HARP structure. Images were acquired using a 30 kVp Mo/Mo spectrum typically used in mammography. Results: Optical sensitivity measurements demonstrate that gav = 76 ± 5 can be achieved over the entire active area of the detector. At a constant dose to the detector of 6.67 µGy, image quality increases with gav until the effective electronic noise is negligible. Quantum noise limited images can be obtained with doses as low as 0.18 µGy. Conclusion: We demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing avalanche gain to overcome electronic noise. The indirect detector fabricated is the first solid-state imaging sensor to use HARP, and the largest active area HARP sensor to date. Our future work is to improve charge transport within the HARP structure and utilize a transparent HV electrode.« less

  4. Image quality assessment of a pre-clinical flat-panel volumetric micro-CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Louise Y.; Lee, Ting-Yim; Holdsworth, David W.

    2006-03-01

    Small animal imaging has recently become an area of increased interest because more human diseases can be modeled in transgenic and knockout rodents. Current micro-CT systems are capable of achieving spatial resolution on the order of 10 μm, giving highly detailed anatomical information. However, the speed of data acquisition of these systems is relatively slow, when compared with clinical CT systems. Dynamic CT perfusion imaging has proven to be a powerful tool clinically in detecting and diagnosing cancer, stroke, pulmonary and ischemic heart diseases. In order to perform this technique in mice and rats, quantitative CT images must be acquired at a rate of at least 1 Hz. Recently, a research pre-clinical CT scanner (eXplore Ultra, GE Healthcare) has been designed specifically for dynamic perfusion imaging in small animals. Using an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector and a clinical slip-ring gantry, this system is capable of acquiring volumetric image data at a rate of 1 Hz, with in-plane resolution of 150 μm, while covering the entire thoracic region of a mouse or whole organs of a rat. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the principal imaging performance of the micro-CT system, in terms of spatial resolution, image uniformity, linearity, dose and voxel noise for the feasibility of imaging mice and rats. Our investigations show that 3D images can be obtained with a limiting spatial resolution of 2.7 line pairs per mm and noise of 42 HU, using an acquisition interval of 8 seconds at an entrance dose of 6.4 cGy.

  5. Do LCDs have a chance to keep a leading position on flat panel display market?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Jerzy; Olifierczuk, Marek

    2004-09-01

    A lot of significant discoveries and inventions in the field of technology of displays were made in the latter part of the twentieth century. Apart from well-known CRT, the plasma-, luminescence- and liquid crystal-displays are commercially available. One can notice that a leading position on that flat panel displays market belong to LCD. But the progress in Organic LED materials and devices is impressive. Threshold voltage for light emission have fallen from several thousands V to just 2 - 3 V for today's OLEDs (polymer and small molecule). Luminous efficiency has increased from 0,01 to more than 10 lm/W. These improvements have brought PLED technology to the point where serious consideration is being given to OLED graphic and video display product. The question given some years ago by Dr. M. E. Becker, [Display Metrology and Systems]: "...is the current OLED enthusiasm justified because OLED displays feature significant improvements in visual and ergonomic performance, and because they are much cheaper to manufacture; Or it is just another hope for those who missed the LCD train?...," is trite. During SID Conference in Baltimore in 2003 two companies claiming to have built the largest organic LED. International Display Technology demonstrated a 20 inch display driven by "super amorphous silicon" technology; Sony showed off its 24 inch screen, which consists of a 2x2 tiled array of OLED displays. The presented work will be oriented towards specifying the characteristic features of liquid crystal and electro luminescence organic compounds which make these groups of displays so attractive and prospective among other imagery systems devices existing nowadays.

  6. Theoretical investigation of flutter of two-dimensional flat panels with one surface exposed to supersonic potential flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Herbert C; Cunningham, Herbert J

    1956-01-01

    A Rayleigh type analysis involving chosen modes of the panel as degrees of freedom is used to treat the flutter of a two-dimensional flat panel supported at its leading and trailing edges and subjected to a middle-plane tensile force. The panel has a supersonic stream passing over its upper surface and still air below. The aerodynamic forces due to the supersonic stream are obtained from the theory for linearized two-dimensional unsteady flow and the forces due to the still air are obtained from acoustical theory. In order to study the effect of increasing the number of modes in the analysis, two and then four modes are employed. The modes used are the first four natural modes of the panel in a vacuum with no tensile force acting. The analysis includes these variables: Mach number, structural damping, tensile force, density of the still air, and edge fixity (clamped and pinned). For certain combinations of these variables, stability boundaries are obtained which can be used to determine the panel thickness required to prevent flutter for any panel material and altitude.

  7. Effects of Tangential Edge Constraints on the Postbuckling Behavior of Flat and Curved Panels Subjected to Thermal and Mechanical Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, W.; Librescu, L.; Nemeth, M. P.; Starnes, J. H. , Jr.

    1994-01-01

    A parametric study of the effects of tangential edge constraints on the postbuckling response of flat and shallow curved panels subjected to thermal and mechanical loads is presented. The mechanical loads investigated are uniform compressive edge loads and transverse lateral pressure. The temperature fields considered are associated with spatially nonuniform heating over the panels, and a linear through-the-thickness temperature gradient. The structural model is based on a higher-order transverse-shear-deformation theory of shallow shells that incorporates the effects of geometric nonlinearities, initial geometric imperfections, and tangential edge motion constraints. Results are presented for three-layer sandwich panels made from transversely isotropic materials. Simply supported panels are considered in which the tangential motion of the unloaded edges is either unrestrained, partially restrained, or fully restrained. These results focus on the effects of the tangential edge restraint on the postbuckling response. The results of this study indicate that tangentially restraining the edges of a curved panel can make the panel insensitive to initial geometric imperfections in some cases.

  8. High-resolution secondary reconstructions with the use of flat panel CT in the clinical assessment of patients with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Pearl, M S; Roy, A; Limb, C J

    2014-06-01

    Radiologic assessment of cochlear implants can be limited because of metallic streak artifacts and the high attenuation of the temporal bones. We report on 14 patients with 18 cochlear implants (17 Med-El standard 31.5-mm arrays, 1 Med-El medium 24-mm array) who underwent flat panel CT with the use of high-resolution secondary reconstruction techniques. Flat panel CT depicted the insertion site, cochlear implant course, and all 216 individual electrode contacts. The calculated mean angular insertion depth for standard arrays was 591.9° (SD = 70.9; range, 280°). High-resolution secondary reconstructions of the initial flat panel CT dataset, by use of a manually generated field of view, Hounsfield unit kernel type, and sharp image characteristics, provided high-quality images with improved spatial resolution. Flat panel CT is a promising imaging tool for the postoperative evaluation of cochlear implant placement. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  9. Amorphous and Polycrystalline Photoconductors for Direct Conversion Flat Panel X-Ray Image Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Kasap, Safa; Frey, Joel B.; Belev, George; Tousignant, Olivier; Mani, Habib; Greenspan, Jonathan; Laperriere, Luc; Bubon, Oleksandr; Reznik, Alla; DeCrescenzo, Giovanni; Karim, Karim S.; Rowlands, John A.

    2011-01-01

    In the last ten to fifteen years there has been much research in using amorphous and polycrystalline semiconductors as x-ray photoconductors in various x-ray image sensor applications, most notably in flat panel x-ray imagers (FPXIs). We first outline the essential requirements for an ideal large area photoconductor for use in a FPXI, and discuss how some of the current amorphous and polycrystalline semiconductors fulfill these requirements. At present, only stabilized amorphous selenium (doped and alloyed a-Se) has been commercialized, and FPXIs based on a-Se are particularly suitable for mammography, operating at the ideal limit of high detective quantum efficiency (DQE). Further, these FPXIs can also be used in real-time, and have already been used in such applications as tomosynthesis. We discuss some of the important attributes of amorphous and polycrystalline x-ray photoconductors such as their large area deposition ability, charge collection efficiency, x-ray sensitivity, DQE, modulation transfer function (MTF) and the importance of the dark current. We show the importance of charge trapping in limiting not only the sensitivity but also the resolution of these detectors. Limitations on the maximum acceptable dark current and the corresponding charge collection efficiency jointly impose a practical constraint that many photoconductors fail to satisfy. We discuss the case of a-Se in which the dark current was brought down by three orders of magnitude by the use of special blocking layers to satisfy the dark current constraint. There are also a number of polycrystalline photoconductors, HgI2 and PbO being good examples, that show potential for commercialization in the same way that multilayer stabilized a-Se x-ray photoconductors were developed for commercial applications. We highlight the unique nature of avalanche multiplication in a-Se and how it has led to the development of the commercial HARP video-tube. An all solid state version of the HARP has been

  10. [Flat-panel detector technology -State-of-the-art and future prospects-].

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Tatsuya

    2002-01-01

    A flat-panel detector (FPD) is a long-awaited technology to implement the digital X-ray imaging technology into the radiological department. This paper describes the state-of-the-art technology and future prospects on the FPD technology. State-of-the-art technology was reviewed taking the CXDI series as an example. Several FPD-based systems have been introduced into the Japanese market since CXDI-11 opened it in November 1998. Accompanying CXDI-C2 for control, CXDI-22 for table position and CXDI-31 for portable, the CXDI series fulfills the requirement of the radiography room being a fully digitalized room. The FPD on the CXDI series is comprised of a scintillator (Gd(2)O(2)S:Tb(3+)) as a primary sensor in which the X-ray is captured and an amorphous silicon detector (LANMIT) as a secondary sensor in which the fluorescent light is detected. Since the scintillator is identical to that of the screen-film systems, it can be said as proven, durable and chemically stable and it is expected to produce the same image quality as the screen-film systems. CXDI-31, a portable FPD-based system, was developed targeting thinner dimensions, lightweight, durability and high spatial resolution. Thoroughly re-designing the mechanical structure and reducing the power consumption at the readout IC realized thinner dimensions. Introducing the portable note PC technologies successfully combined lightweight with durability. Improving the sensor process and re-designing the layout made the sensor high resolution without compromising the signal-to-noise ratio. Future prospects were overviewed in the aspect of technology and applications. Sensitivity, spatial resolution, frame rate and portability were described as the upcoming technology. Increasing gain and reducing noise will realize higher sensitivity, especially by adopting the PbI(2), HgI(2) or such photoconductor materials as the primary sensor. Pixelized amplifier will also achieve higher sensitivity. Layered sensor designed such

  11. An investigation of flat panel equipment variables on image quality with a dedicated cardiac phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragusin, O.; Bosmans, H.; Pappas, C.; Desmet, W.

    2008-09-01

    Image quality (IQ) evaluation plays a key role in the process of optimization of new x-ray systems. Ideally, this process should be supported by real clinical images, but ethical issues and differences in anatomy and pathology of patients make it impossible. Phantom studies might overcome these issues. This paper presents the IQ evaluation of 30 cineangiographic films acquired with a cardiac flat panel system. The phantom used simulates the anatomy of the heart and allows the circulation of contrast agent boluses through coronary arteries. Variables investigated with influence on IQ and radiation dose are: tube potential, detector dose, added Copper filters, dynamic density optimization (DDO) and viewing angle. The IQ evaluation consisted of scoring 4 simulated calcified lesions located on different coronary artery segments in terms of degree of visualization. Eight cardiologists rated the lesions using a five-point scale ((1) lesion not visible to (5) very good visibility). Radiation doses associated to the angiograms are expressed in terms of incident air kerma (IAK) and effective dose that has been calculated with PCXMX software (STUK, Finland) from the exposure settings assuming a standard sized patient of 70 Kg. Mean IQ scores ranged from 1.68 to 4.88. The highest IQ scores were obtained for the angiograms acquired with tube potential 80 kVp, no added Cu filters, DDO 60%, RAO and LAO views and the highest entrance detector dose that has been used in the present study, namely 0.17 μGy/im. Radiation doses (IAK ~40 mGy and effective dose of 1 mSv) were estimated for angiograms acquired at 15 frames s-1, detector field-of-view 20 cm, and a length of 5 s. The following parameters improved the IQ factor significantly: a change in tube potential from 96 to 80 kVp, detector dose from 0.10 μGy/im to 0.17 μGy/im, the absence of Copper filtration. DDO variable which is a post-processing parameter should be carefully evaluated because it alters the quality of the

  12. TU-FG-BRB-10: A New Approach to Proton Radiography Using the Beamline X-Ray Flat Panel

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, R; Jee, K; Sharp, G

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Proton radiography, which images the patients with the same type of particles that they are to be treated with, is a promising approach for image guidance and range uncertainties reduction. This study aimed to realize quality proton radiography by measuring dose rate functions (DRF) in time domain using a single flat panel and retrieve water equivalent path length (WEPL) from them. Methods: An amorphous silicon flat panel (PaxScan™ 4030CB, Varian Medical Systems, Inc., Palo Alto, CA) was placed behind phantoms to measure DRFs from a proton beam modulated by the modulator wheel. To retrieve WEPL and RSP, calibration modelsmore » based on the intensity of DRFs only, root mean square (RMS) of DRFs only and the intensity weighted RMS were tested. The quality of obtained WEPL images (in terms of spatial resolution and level of details) and the accuracy of WEPL were compared. Results: RSPs for most of the Gammex phantom inserts were retrieved within ± 1% errors by calibration models based on the RMS and intensity weighted RMS. The mean percentage error for all inserts was reduced from 1.08% to 0.75% by matching intensity in the calibration model. In specific cases such as the insert with a titanium rod, the calibration model based on RMS only fails while the that based on intensity weighted RMS is still valid. The quality of retrieved WEPL images were significantly improved for calibration models including intensity matching. Conclusion: For the first time, a flat panel, which is readily available in the beamline for image guidance, was tested to acquire quality proton radiography with WEPL accurately retrieved from it. This technique is promising to be applied for image-guided proton therapy as well as patient specific RSP determination to reduce uncertainties of beam ranges.« less

  13. Monte Carlo calculation of the spatial response (Modulated Transfer Function) of a scintillation flat panel and comparison with experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juste, Belén; Miró, Rafael; Monasor, Paula; Verdú, Gumersindo

    2015-11-01

    Phosphor screens are commonly used in many X-ray imaging applications. The design and optimization of these detectors can be achieved using Monte Carlo codes to simulate radiation transport in scintillation materials and to improve the spatial response. This work presents an exhaustive procedure to measure the spatial resolution of a scintillation flat panel image and to evaluate the agreement with data obtained by simulation. To evaluate the spatial response we have used the Modulated Transfer Function (MTF) parameter. According to this, we have obtained the Line Spread Function (LSF) of the system since the Fourier Transform (FT) of the LSF gives the MTF. The experimental images were carried out using a medical X-ray tube (Toshiba E7299X) and a flat panel (Hammamatsu C9312SK). Measurements were based on the slit methodology experimental implementation, which measures the response of the system to a line. LSF measurements have been performed using a 0.2 mm wide lead slit superimposed over the flat panel. The detector screen was modelled with MCNP (version 6) Monte Carlo simulation code in order to analyze the effect of the acquisition setup configuration and to compare the response of scintillator screens with the experimental results. MCNP6 offers the possibility of studying the optical physics parameters (optical scattering and absorption coefficients) that occur in the phosphor screen. The study has been tested for different X-ray tube voltages, from 100 to 140 kV. An acceptable convergence between the MTF results obtained with MCNP6 and the experimental measurements have been obtained.

  14. Volumetric soft tissue brain imaging on xCAT, a mobile flat-panel x-ray CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zbijewski, Wojciech; Stayman, J. Webster

    2009-02-01

    We discuss the ongoing development of soft-tissue imaging capabilities on xCAT, a highly portable, flat-panel based cone-beam X-ray CT platform. By providing the ability to rapidly detect intra-cranial bleeds and other symptoms of stroke directly at the patient's bedside, our new system can potentially significantly improve the management of neurological emergency and intensive care patients. The paper reports on the design of our system, as well as on the methods used to combat artifacts due to scatter, non-linear detector response and scintillator glare. Images of cadaveric head samples are also presented and compared with conventional CT scans.

  15. Radiation dose reduction using a CdZnTe-based computed tomography system: Comparison to flat-panel detectors

    PubMed Central

    Le, Huy Q.; Ducote, Justin L.; Molloi, Sabee

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Although x-ray projection mammography has been very effective in early detection of breast cancer, its utility is reduced in the detection of small lesions that are occult or in dense breasts. One drawback is that the inherent superposition of parenchymal structures makes visualization of small lesions difficult. Breast computed tomography using flat-panel detectors has been developed to address this limitation by producing three-dimensional data while at the same time providing more comfort to the patients by eliminating breast compression. Flat panels are charge integrating detectors and therefore lack energy resolution capability. Recent advances in solid state semiconductor x-ray detector materials and associated electronics allow the investigation of x-ray imaging systems that use a photon counting and energy discriminating detector, which is the subject of this article. Methods: A small field-of-view computed tomography (CT) system that uses CdZnTe (CZT) photon counting detector was compared to one that uses a flat-panel detector for different imaging tasks in breast imaging. The benefits afforded by the CZT detector in the energy weighting modes were investigated. Two types of energy weighting methods were studied: Projection based and image based. Simulation and phantom studies were performed with a 2.5 cm polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) cylinder filled with iodine and calcium contrast objects. Simulation was also performed on a 10 cm breast specimen. Results: The contrast-to-noise ratio improvements as compared to flat-panel detectors were 1.30 and 1.28 (projection based) and 1.35 and 1.25 (image based) for iodine over PMMA and hydroxylapatite over PMMA, respectively. Corresponding simulation values were 1.81 and 1.48 (projection based) and 1.85 and 1.48 (image based). Dose reductions using the CZT detector were 52.05% and 49.45% for iodine and hydroxyapatite imaging, respectively. Image-based weighting was also found to have the least beam

  16. Direct-reading design charts for 75S-T6 aluminum-alloy flat compression panels having longitudinal extruded Z-section stiffeners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickman, William A; Dow, Norris F

    1951-01-01

    Direct-reading design charts are presented for 75S-T6 aluminum-alloy flat compression panels having longitudinal extruded Z-section stiffeners. These charts, which cover a wide range of proportions, make possible the direct determination of the stress and all panel dimensions required to carry a given intensity of loading with a given skin thickness and effective length of panel.

  17. Performance of mobile digital X-ray fluoroscopy using a novel flat panel detector for intraoperative use.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Chang-Won; Ryu, Jong-Hyun; Joo, Su-Chong; Jun, Hong-Young; Heo, Dong-Woon; Lee, Jinseok; Kim, Kyong-Woo; Yoon, Kwon-Ha

    2015-01-01

    Technologies employing digital X-ray devices are developed for mobile settings. To develop a mobile digital X-ray fluoroscopy (MDF) for intraoperative guidance, using a novel flat panel detector to focus on diagnostics in outpatient clinics, operating and emergency rooms. An MDF for small-scale field diagnostics was configured using an X-ray source and a novel flat panel detector. The imager enabled frame rates reaching 30 fps in full resolution fluoroscopy with maximal running time of 5 minutes. Signal-to-noise (SNR), contrast-to-noise (CNR), and spatial resolution were analyzed. Stray radiation, exposure radiation dose, and effective absorption dose were measured for patients. The system was suitable for small-scale field diagnostics. SNR and CNR were 62.4 and 72.0. Performance at 10% of MTF was 9.6 lp/mm (53 μ m) in the no binned mode. Stray radiation at 100 cm and 150 cm from the source was below 0.2 μ Gy and 0.1 μ Gy. Exposure radiation in radiography and fluoroscopy (5 min) was 10.2 μ Gy and 82.6 mGy. The effective doses during 5-min-long fluoroscopy were 0.26 mSv (wrist), 0.28 mSv (elbow), 0.29 mSv (ankle), and 0.31 mSv (knee). The proposed MDF is suitable for imaging in operating rooms.

  18. An alternate line erasure and readout (ALER) method for implementing slot-scan imaging technique with a flat-panel detector--initial experiences.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinming; Shaw, Chris C; Altunbas, Mustafa C; Wang, Tianpeng

    2006-04-01

    This paper describes and demonstrates an electronic collimation method, referred to as the alternate line erasure and readout (ALER) technique, for implementing slot-scan digital radiography technique with an amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin-film transistor (TFT) array based flat-panel detector. An amorphus selenium (a-Se) flat-panel detector was modified to implement the ALER technique for slot-scan imaging. A stepping-motor driven fore-collimator was mounted in front of an X-ray tube to generate a scanning X-ray fan beam. The scanning speed and magnification were adjusted to synchronize the fan beam motion with the image line readout rate. The image lines on the leading and trailing edges of the fan beam were tracked and alternately reset and read out, respectively. The former operation resulted in the erasure of the scatter signals accumulated in the leading edge image line prior to the arrival of the fan beam. The latter operation resulted in the acquisition of fan beam exposure data integrated in the trailing edge image line right after the fan beam passed. To demonstrate the scatter rejection capability of this technique, an anthropomorphic chest phantom was placed in PA position and scanned at a speed of 576 lines (8.0 cm)/s at 117 kVp and 32 mA. A tungsten bar is placed at the entrance side of the chest phantom to measure the scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR), scatter reduction factor (SRF), and contrast-to-noise ratio degradation factor (CNRDF) in the slot-scan images to evaluate the effectiveness of scatter rejection and the resultant improvement of image quality. SPR and CNRDF in the open-field images were also measured and used as the reference for comparison. A scatter reduction by 86.4 to 95.4% across lower lung and heart regions has been observed with slot-scan imaging. The CNRs have been found to be improved by a factor of 2 in the mediastinum areas over the open-field image as well.

  19. Reduction of ring artifacts in CBCT: Detection and correction of pixel gain variations in flat panel detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Altunbas, Cem, E-mail: caltunbas@gmail.com; Lai, Chao-Jen; Zhong, Yuncheng

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: In using flat panel detectors (FPD) for cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), pixel gain variations may lead to structured nonuniformities in projections and ring artifacts in CBCT images. Such gain variations can be caused by change in detector entrance exposure levels or beam hardening, and they are not accounted by conventional flat field correction methods. In this work, the authors presented a method to identify isolated pixel clusters that exhibit gain variations and proposed a pixel gain correction (PGC) method to suppress both beam hardening and exposure level dependent gain variations. Methods: To modulate both beam spectrum and entrancemore » exposure, flood field FPD projections were acquired using beam filters with varying thicknesses. “Ideal” pixel values were estimated by performing polynomial fits in both raw and flat field corrected projections. Residuals were calculated by taking the difference between measured and ideal pixel values to identify clustered image and FPD artifacts in flat field corrected and raw images, respectively. To correct clustered image artifacts, the ratio of ideal to measured pixel values in filtered images were utilized as pixel-specific gain correction factors, referred as PGC method, and they were tabulated as a function of pixel value in a look-up table. Results: 0.035% of detector pixels lead to clustered image artifacts in flat field corrected projections, where 80% of these pixels were traced back and linked to artifacts in the FPD. The performance of PGC method was tested in variety of imaging conditions and phantoms. The PGC method reduced clustered image artifacts and fixed pattern noise in projections, and ring artifacts in CBCT images. Conclusions: Clustered projection image artifacts that lead to ring artifacts in CBCT can be better identified with our artifact detection approach. When compared to the conventional flat field correction method, the proposed PGC method enables characterization of

  20. Women with Anorexia Nervosa: Finite Element and Trabecular Structure Analysis by Using Flat-Panel Volume CT

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Catherine M.; Misra, Madhusmita; Bredella, Miriam A.; Miller, Karen K.; Fazeli, Pouneh K.; Bayraktar, Harun H.; Klibanski, Anne; Gupta, Rajiv

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To use finite element modeling based on flat-panel volume computed tomography (CT) and bone mineral density (BMD) provided by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) to compare bone failure load, stiffness, and trabecular structure in women with anorexia nervosa (AN) and age-matched normal-weight control subjects. Materials and Methods: The study was approved by the institutional review board and complied with HIPAA guidelines. Informed consent was obtained. Fourteen women, eight with AN (mean age, 26.6 years) and six control subjects (mean age, 26.3 years), underwent flat-panel volume CT of the distal radius to determine apparent trabecular bone volume fraction (BV/TV), apparent trabecular number (TbN), apparent trabecular thickness (TbTh), and apparent trabecular separation (TbSp). Bone strength and stiffness were calculated from uniaxial compression tests by using finite element models created from flat-panel volume CT. DXA was used to determine BMD of the radius, lumbar spine, and hip. Means ± standard deviations of all variables were calculated for both groups and compared (Student t test). Univariate regression analysis and stepwise regression modeling were performed. Results: Patients with AN had lower values for stiffness (284.77 kN/mm ± 76.14 vs 389.97 kN/mm ± 84.90, P = .04), failure load (4.98 kN ± 1.23 vs 7.01 kN ± 1.52, P = .02), BV/TV (0.32% ± 0.09 vs 0.44% ± 0.02, P = .007), and TbN (1.15 mm−3 ± 0.20 vs 1.43 mm−3 ± 0.13, P = .008) and higher values for TbSp (0.62 mm ± 0.20 vs 0.40 mm ± 0.04, P = .02) compared with normal-weight control subjects. TbTh was lower in women with AN (P = .1). BMD measurements were significantly lower for the AN group. BMD measurements and trabecular parameters (except TbTh) correlated with stiffness and failure load (r = 0.58 to 0.83). Conclusion: Failure load and stiffness are abnormal in women with AN compared with those in normal-weight control subjects and correlate with BMD and trabecular

  1. Prediction of the niche effect for single flat panels with or without attached sound absorbing materials.

    PubMed

    Sgard, Franck; Atalla, Noureddine; Nélisse, Hugues

    2015-01-01

    The sound transmission loss (STL) of a test sample measured in sound transmission facilities is affected by the opening in which it is located. This is called the niche effect. This paper uses a modal approach to study the STL of a rectangular plate with or without an attached porous material located inside a box-shaped niche. The porous material is modeled as a limp equivalent fluid. The proposed model is validated by comparison with finite element/boundary element computations. Using a condensation of the pressure fields in the niche, the niche effect is interpreted in terms of a modification of the modal blocked pressure fields acting on the panel induced by the front cavity and by a modification of the radiation efficiency of the panel modes due to the presence of the back cavity. The modal approach is then used to investigate the impact of (1) the presence of a porous material attached to the panel on the niche effect and (2) the niche effect on the assessment of the porous material insertion loss. A simplified model for the porous material based on a transfer matrix approach is also proposed to predict the STL of the system and its validity is discussed.

  2. Application of flat panel OLED display technology for the point-of-care detection of circulating cancer biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Katchman, Benjamin A; Smith, Joseph T; Obahiagbon, Uwadiae; Kesiraju, Sailaja; Lee, Yong-Kyun; O'Brien, Barry; Kaftanoglu, Korhan; Blain Christen, Jennifer; Anderson, Karen S

    2016-07-04

    Point-of-care molecular diagnostics can provide efficient and cost-effective medical care, and they have the potential to fundamentally change our approach to global health. However, most existing approaches are not scalable to include multiple biomarkers. As a solution, we have combined commercial flat panel OLED display technology with protein microarray technology to enable high-density fluorescent, programmable, multiplexed biorecognition in a compact and disposable configuration with clinical-level sensitivity. Our approach leverages advances in commercial display technology to reduce pre-functionalized biosensor substrate costs to pennies per cm(2). Here, we demonstrate quantitative detection of IgG antibodies to multiple viral antigens in patient serum samples with detection limits for human IgG in the 10 pg/mL range. We also demonstrate multiplexed detection of antibodies to the HPV16 proteins E2, E6, and E7, which are circulating biomarkers for cervical as well as head and neck cancers.

  3. Performance quantification of a flat-panel imager in industrial mega-voltage X-ray imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stritt, Carina; Plamondon, Mathieu; Hofmann, Jürgen; Flisch, Alexander; Sennhauser, Urs

    2017-03-01

    Active matrix flat-panel detectors have gained popularity amongst X-ray imaging systems due to their speed, resolution and high dynamic range. With appropriate shielding modern flat-panel imagers can even be used in high energy Computed Tomography (CT) systems of energies up to several mega-electronvolt (MeV). However, the performance of a digital detector is not independent of the rest of the radiographic system but depends on all other components of the system. Signal and noise transfer properties highly depend on all parameters of an imaging chain. This work focuses on quantifying the resolution capabilities and the noise in the signals of a MeV X-ray imaging system. The performance quantification is done by computing the modulation transfer function (MTF) using the standard edge method as well as the noise power spectrum (NPS) of the imaging system. We performed Monte Carlo (MC) simulations in order to understand the influence of scattered radiation on the measurements. A comparison of the horizontal and vertical MTF showed that the imaging behaviour of the detector is isotropic. Moreover, an additional investigation of the noise performance of the system showed that there is no measurable noise correlation present in the system. It was shown that the thickness of the edge device does not have a significant influence on the resulting system MTF. A rapid drop in the visibility could be observed resulting in a value of 1.2 line pairs per mm at 50% MTF. The visibility limit of line pair patterns was found to be at 2.3 line pairs per mm given by the 10% MTF value.

  4. Human health and ecological toxicity potentials due to heavy metal content in waste electronic devices with flat panel displays.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seong-Rin; Schoenung, Julie M

    2010-05-15

    Display devices such as cathode-ray tube (CRT) televisions and computer monitors are known to contain toxic substances and have consequently been banned from disposal in landfills in the State of California and elsewhere. New types of flat panel display (FPD) devices, millions of which are now purchased each year, also contain toxic substances, but have not previously been systematically studied and compared to assess the potential impact that could result from their ultimate disposal. In the current work, the focus is on the evaluation of end-of-life toxicity potential from the heavy metal content in select FPD devices with the intent to inform material selection and design-for-environment (DfE) decisions. Specifically, the metals antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, silver, vanadium, and zinc in plasma TVs, LCD (liquid crystal display) TVs, LCD computer monitors and laptop computers are considered. The human health and ecotoxicity potentials are evaluated through a life cycle assessment perspective by combining data on the respective heavy metal contents, the characterization factors in the U.S. EPA Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and other environmental Impacts (TRACI), and a pathway and impact model. Principal contributors to the toxicity potentials are lead, arsenic, copper, and mercury. Although the heavy metal content in newer flat panel display devices creates less human health toxicity potential than that in CRTs, for ecological toxicity, the new devices are worse, especially because of the mercury in LCD TVs and the copper in plasma TVs. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Performance of a static-anode/flat-panel x-ray fluoroscopy system in a diagnostic strength magnetic field: a truly hybrid x-ray/MR imaging system.

    PubMed

    Fahrig, R; Wen, Z; Ganguly, A; DeCrescenzo, G; Rowlands, J A; Stevens, G M; Saunders, R F; Pelc, N J

    2005-06-01

    Minimally invasive procedures are increasing in variety and frequency, facilitated by advances in imaging technology. Our hybrid imaging system (GE Apollo flat panel, custom Brand x-ray static anode x-ray tube, GE Lunar high-frequency power supply and 0.5 T Signa SP) provides both x-ray and MR imaging capability to guide complex procedures without requiring motion of the patient between two distant gantries. The performance of the x-ray tube in this closely integrated system was evaluated by modeling and measuring both the response of the filament to an externally applied field and the behavior of the electron beam for field strengths and geometries of interest. The performance of the detector was assessed by measuring the slanted-edge modulation transfer function (MTF) and when placed at zero field and at 0.5 T. Measured resonant frequencies of filaments can be approximated using a modified vibrating beam model, and were at frequencies well below the 25 kHz frequency of our generator for our filament geometry. The amplitude of vibration was not sufficient to cause shorting of the filament during operation within the magnetic field. A simple model of electrons in uniform electric and magnetic fields can be used to estimate the deflection of the electron beam on the anode for the fields of interest between 0.2 and 0.5 T. The MTF measured at the detector and the DQE showed no significant difference inside and outside of the magnetic field. With the proper modifications, an x-ray system can be fully integrated with a MR system, with minimal loss of image quality. Any x-ray tube can be assessed for compatibility when placed at a particular location within the field using the models. We have also concluded that a-Si electronics are robust against magnetic fields. Detailed knowledge of the x-ray system installation is required to provide estimates of system operation.

  6. Impact Testing on Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Flat Panels with Ice Projectiles for the Space Shuttle Return to Flight Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melis, Matthew E.; Revilock, Duane M.; Pereira, Michael J.; Lyle, Karen H.

    2009-01-01

    Following the tragedy of the Orbiter Columbia (STS-107) on February 1, 2003, a major effort commenced to develop a better understanding of debris impacts and their effect on the space shuttle subsystems. An initiative to develop and validate physics-based computer models to predict damage from such impacts was a fundamental component of this effort. To develop the models it was necessary to physically characterize reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) along with ice and foam debris materials, which could shed on ascent and impact the orbiter RCC leading edges. The validated models enabled the launch system community to use the impact analysis software LS-DYNA (Livermore Software Technology Corp.) to predict damage by potential and actual impact events on the orbiter leading edge and nose cap thermal protection systems. Validation of the material models was done through a three-level approach: Level 1--fundamental tests to obtain independent static and dynamic constitutive model properties of materials of interest, Level 2--subcomponent impact tests to provide highly controlled impact test data for the correlation and validation of the models, and Level 3--full-scale orbiter leading-edge impact tests to establish the final level of confidence for the analysis methodology. This report discusses the Level 2 test program conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) Ballistic Impact Laboratory with ice projectile impact tests on flat RCC panels, and presents the data observed. The Level 2 testing consisted of 54 impact tests in the NASA GRC Ballistic Impact Laboratory on 6- by 6-in. and 6- by 12-in. flat plates of RCC and evaluated three types of debris projectiles: Single-crystal, polycrystal, and "soft" ice. These impact tests helped determine the level of damage generated in the RCC flat plates by each projectile and validated the use of the ice and RCC models for use in LS-DYNA.

  7. Hypervelocity Impact (HVI). Volume 3; WLE Small-Scale Fiberglass Panel Flat Target C-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorman, Michael R.; Ziola, Steven M.

    2007-01-01

    During 2003 and 2004, the Johnson Space Center's White Sands Testing Facility in Las Cruces, New Mexico conducted hypervelocity impact tests on the space shuttle wing leading edge. Hypervelocity impact tests were conducted to determine if Micro-Meteoroid/Orbital Debris impacts could be reliably detected and located using simple passive ultrasonic methods. The objective of Target C-1 was to study hypervelocity impacts on the reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) panels of the Wing Leading Edge. Fiberglass was used in place of RCC in the initial tests. Impact damage was detected using lightweight, low power instrumentation capable of being used in flight.

  8. Hypervelocity Impact (HVI). Volume 4; WLE Small-Scale Fiberglass Panel Flat Target C-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorman, Michael R.; Ziola, Steven M.

    2007-01-01

    During 2003 and 2004, the Johnson Space Center's White Sands Testing Facility in Las Cruces, New Mexico conducted hypervelocity impact tests on the space shuttle wing leading edge. Hypervelocity impact tests were conducted to determine if Micro-Meteoroid/Orbital Debris impacts could be reliably detected and located using simple passive ultrasonic methods. The objective of Target C-2 was to study impacts through the reinforced carboncarbon (RCC) panels of the Wing Leading Edge. Fiberglass was used in place of RCC in the initial tests. Impact damage was detected using lightweight, low power instrumentation capable of being used in flight.

  9. SU-E-J-45: The Correlation Between CBCT Flat Panel Misalignment and 3D Image Guidance Accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Kenton, O; Valdes, G; Yin, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To simulate the impact of CBCT flat panel misalignment on the image quality, the calculated correction vectors in 3D image guided proton therapy and to determine if these calibration errors can be caught in our QA process. Methods The X-ray source and detector geometrical calibration (flexmap) file of the CBCT system in the AdaPTinsight software (IBA proton therapy) was edited to induce known changes in the rotational and translational calibrations of the imaging panel. Translations of up to ±10 mm in the x, y and z directions (see supplemental) and rotational errors of up to ±3° were induced. Themore » calibration files were then used to reconstruct the CBCT image of a pancreatic patient and CatPhan phantom. Correction vectors were calculated for the patient using the software’s auto match system and compared to baseline values. The CatPhan CBCT images were used for quantitative evaluation of image quality for each type of induced error. Results Translations of 1 to 3 mm in the x and y calibration resulted in corresponding correction vector errors of equal magnitude. Similar 10mm shifts were seen in the y-direction; however, in the x-direction, the image quality was too degraded for a match. These translational errors can be identified through differences in isocenter from orthogonal kV images taken during routine QA. Errors in the z-direction had no effect on the correction vector and image quality.Rotations of the imaging panel calibration resulted in corresponding correction vector rotations of the patient images. These rotations also resulted in degraded image quality which can be identified through quantitative image quality metrics. Conclusion Misalignment of CBCT geometry can lead to incorrect translational and rotational patient correction vectors. These errors can be identified through QA of the imaging isocenter as compared to orthogonal images combined with monitoring of CBCT image quality.« less

  10. Hydrometallurgical Recovery of Indium from Flat-Panel Displays of Spent Liquid Crystal Televisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Katsutoshi; Alam, Shafiq

    2015-02-01

    A recovery process for indium from waste liquid crystal display panels was developed on the basis of hydrometallurgical technology. The powdered sample was leached with 3 M HCl to extract its various metal constituents (indium, aluminum, tin, etc.). The mutual separation and subsequent recovery of the dissolved metals was achieved using two column adsorption tests: The first column was packed with a porous resin impregnated with Aliquat 336, a commercially available solvent extraction reagent based on a quaternary ammonium compound, and the resin contained in the second column was impregnated with Cyanex 923, also a commercially available solvent extraction reagent based on trialkylphosphine oxide. In the first column, tin, iron, and zinc were removed from the leach liquor. In the second column, only indium was selectively recovered. The metal ions trapped in these columns were eluted with 0.1 M H2SO4, yielding a solution purified indium solution with a concentration 10 times that of the feed solution.

  11. Dose reduction in patients undergoing chest imaging: digital amorphous silicon flat-panel detector radiography versus conventional film-screen radiography and phosphor-based computed radiography.

    PubMed

    Bacher, Klaus; Smeets, Peter; Bonnarens, Kris; De Hauwere, An; Verstraete, Koenraad; Thierens, Hubert

    2003-10-01

    We sought to compare the radiation dose delivered to patients undergoing clinical chest imaging on a full-field digital amorphous silicon flat-panel detector radiography system with the doses delivered by a state-of-the-art conventional film-screen radiography system and a storage phosphor-based computed radiography system. Image quality was evaluated to ensure that the potential reduction in radiation dose did not result in decreased image acuity. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. Three groups of 100 patients each were examined using the amorphous silicon flat-panel detector, film-screen, or computed radiography systems. All patient groups were matched for body mass index, sex, and age. To measure the entrance skin dose, we attached 24 calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters to every patient. The calculation of the effective dose, which represents the risk of late radiation-induced effects, was based on measurements on an anthropomorphic phantom. Image quality of all three systems was evaluated by five experienced radiologists, using the European Quality Criteria for Chest Radiology. In addition, a contrast-detail phantom study was set up to assess the low-contrast detection of all three systems. The amorphous silicon flat-panel detector radiography system allowed an important and significant reduction in both entrance skin dose and effective dose compared with the film-screen radiography (x 2.7 decrease) or computed radiography (x 1.7 decrease) system. In addition, image quality produced by the amorphous silicon flat-panel detector radiography system was significantly better than the image quality produced by the film-screen or computed radiography systems, confirming that the dose reduction was not detrimental to image quality. The introduction of digital flat-panel radiography systems based on amorphous silicon and cesium iodide is an important step forward in chest imaging that offers improved image quality combined with a significant reduction in the patient radiation

  12. Noise, sampling, and the number of projections in cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Z.; Gang, G. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H., E-mail: jeff.siewerdsen@jhu.edu

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of the number of projection views on image noise in cone-beam CT (CBCT) with a flat-panel detector. Methods: This fairly fundamental consideration in CBCT system design and operation was addressed experimentally (using a phantom presenting a uniform medium as well as statistically motivated “clutter”) and theoretically (using a cascaded systems model describing CBCT noise) to elucidate the contributing factors of quantum noise (σ{sub Q}), electronic noise (σ{sub E}), and view aliasing (σ{sub view}). Analysis included investigation of the noise, noise-power spectrum, and modulation transfer function as a function of the number of projections (N{sub proj}),more » dose (D{sub tot}), and voxel size (b{sub vox}). Results: The results reveal a nonmonotonic relationship between image noise andN{sub proj} at fixed total dose: for the CBCT system considered, noise decreased with increasing N{sub proj} due to reduction of view sampling effects in the regime N{sub proj} <∼200, above which noise increased with N{sub proj} due to increased electronic noise. View sampling effects were shown to depend on the heterogeneity of the object in a direct analytical relationship to power-law anatomical clutter of the form κ/f {sup β}—and a general model of individual noise components (σ{sub Q}, σ{sub E}, and σ{sub view}) demonstrated agreement with measurements over a broad range in N{sub proj}, D{sub tot}, and b{sub vox}. Conclusions: The work elucidates fairly basic elements of CBCT noise in a manner that demonstrates the role of distinct noise components (viz., quantum, electronic, and view sampling noise). For configurations fairly typical of CBCT with a flat-panel detector (FPD), the analysis reveals a “sweet spot” (i.e., minimum noise) in the rangeN{sub proj} ∼ 250–350, nearly an order of magnitude lower in N{sub proj} than typical of multidetector CT, owing to the relatively high electronic noise in FPDs. The analysis

  13. Small animal imaging using a flat panel detector-based cone beam computed tomography (FPD-CBCT) imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conover, David L.; Ning, Ruola; Yu, Yong; Lu, Xianghua; Wood, Ronald W.; Reeder, Jay E.; Johnson, Aimee M.

    2005-04-01

    Flat panel detector-based cone beam CT (FPD-CBCT) imaging system prototypes have been constructed based on modified clinical CT scanners (a modified GE 8800 CT system and a modified GE HighSpeed Advantage (HSA) spiral CT system) each with a Varian PaxScan 2520 imager. The functions of the electromechanical and radiographic subsystems of the CT system were controlled through specially made hardware, software and data acquisition modules to perform animal cone beam CT studies. Small animal (mouse) imaging studies were performed to demonstrate the feasibility of an optimized CBCT imaging system to have the capability to perform longitudinal studies to monitor the progression of cancerous tumors or the efficacy of treatments. Radiographic parameters were optimized for fast (~10 second) scans of live mice to produce good reconstructed image quality with dose levels low enough to avoid any detectable radiation treatment to the animals. Specifically, organs in the pelvic region were clearly imaged and contrast studies showed the feasibility to visualize small vasculature and space-filling bladder tumors. In addition, prostate and mammary tumors were monitored in volume growth studies.

  14. Construction of a ultrananocrystalline diamond-based cold cathode arrays for a flat-panel x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, E. J.; Posada, C. M.; Divan, R.; Sumant, A. V.; Rosenmann, D.; Stan, L.; Avachat, A.; Castano, C. H.; Lee, H. K.

    2013-06-01

    A novel cold cathode field emission array (FEA) X-ray source based on ultra-nanocrystalline diamond (UNCD) field emitters is being constructed as an alternative for detection of obscured objects and material. Depending on the geometry of the given situation the flat-panel X-ray source could be used in tomography, radiography, or tomosynthesis. Furthermore, the unit could be used as a portable X-ray scanner or an integral part of an existing detection system. UNCD field emitters show great field emission output and can be deposited over large areas as the case with carbon nanotube "forest" (CNT) cathodes. Furthermore, UNCDs have better mechanical and thermal properties as compared to CNT tips which further extend the lifetime of UNCD based FEA. This work includes the first generation of the UNCD based FEA prototype which is being manufactured at the Center for Nanoscale Materials within Argonne National Laboratory with standard microfabrication techniques. The prototype is a 3x3 pixel FEA, with a pixel pitch of 500 μm, where each pixel is individually controllable.

  15. Application of flat panel OLED display technology for the point-of-care detection of circulating cancer biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Katchman, Benjamin A.; Smith, Joseph T.; Obahiagbon, Uwadiae; Kesiraju, Sailaja; Lee, Yong-Kyun; O’Brien, Barry; Kaftanoglu, Korhan; Blain Christen, Jennifer; Anderson, Karen S.

    2016-01-01

    Point-of-care molecular diagnostics can provide efficient and cost-effective medical care, and they have the potential to fundamentally change our approach to global health. However, most existing approaches are not scalable to include multiple biomarkers. As a solution, we have combined commercial flat panel OLED display technology with protein microarray technology to enable high-density fluorescent, programmable, multiplexed biorecognition in a compact and disposable configuration with clinical-level sensitivity. Our approach leverages advances in commercial display technology to reduce pre-functionalized biosensor substrate costs to pennies per cm2. Here, we demonstrate quantitative detection of IgG antibodies to multiple viral antigens in patient serum samples with detection limits for human IgG in the 10 pg/mL range. We also demonstrate multiplexed detection of antibodies to the HPV16 proteins E2, E6, and E7, which are circulating biomarkers for cervical as well as head and neck cancers. PMID:27374875

  16. Image quality and effective dose of a robotic flat panel 3D C-arm vs computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Michael; Fischer, Eric; Gebhard, Florian; Richter, Peter H

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effective dose and corresponding image quality of different imaging protocols of a robotic 3D flat panel C-arm in comparison to computed tomography (CT). Dose measurements were performed using a Rando-Alderson Phantom. The phantom was exposed to different scanning protocols of the 3D C-arm and the CT. Pedicle screws were inserted in a fresh swine cadaver. Images were obtained using the same scanning protocols. At the thoracolumbar junction, the effective dose was comparable for 3D high-dose protocols, with (4.4 mSv) and without (4.3 mSv) collimation and routine CT (5 mSv), as well as a dose-reduction CT (4.0 mSv). A relevant reduction was achieved with the 3D low-dose protocol (1.0 mSv). Focusing on Th6, a similar reduction with the 3D low-dose protocol was achieved. The image quality of the 3D protocols using titanium screws was rated as 'good' by all viewers, with excellent correlation. Modern intra-operative 3D-C-arms produce images of CT-like quality with low-dose radiation. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Circular tomosynthesis implemented with a clinical interventional flat-panel based C-Arm: initial performance study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nett, Brian E.; Zambelli, Joseph; Riddell, Cyril; Belanger, Barry; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2007-03-01

    There exists a strong desire for a platform in which researchers may investigate planar tomosynthesis (i.e. all source positions reside in a single plane that is parallel to the reconstructed image planes) trajectories directly on an interventional C-arm system. In this work we describe an experimental system designed to accomplish this aim, as well as the potential of this system for testing multiple aspects of the tomosynthetic image acquisition process. The system enables one to evaluate the effect of the physical imaging parameters on the image quality, as well as the effect of the reconstruction algorithm utilized. The experimental data collection for this work is from the Innova 4100 (Flat-panel based interventional C-arm system manufactured by GE Healthcare). The system is calibrated using a phantom with known geometrical placement of multiple small metallic spheres. Initial performance was assessed with three physical phantoms and performance was assessed by varying: the reconstruction algorithm (backprojection, filtered backprojection), the half tomographic angle (15°, 25°, 35°), and the angular sampling (20,40,80 views / acquisition). Initial results demonstrate the ability to well differentiate simulated vessels separated by 1 cm, even with the modest half tomographic angle of 15° and modest sampling of 20 views/acquisition.

  18. Flat-panel detectors in the cardiac catheterization laboratory: revolution or evolution-what are the issues?

    PubMed

    Holmes, David R; Laskey, Warren K; Wondrow, Merrill A; Cusma, Jack T

    2004-11-01

    Continuous developments in digital imaging technology have contributed to the vital role held today by digital X-ray imaging in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Foremost among these developments is the replacement of cine film with digital data equivalents as the procedure record. Other improvements include software innovations and processing algorithms, along with new types of hardware capable of delivering required functionality more rapidly. A significant recent development is that of the flat-panel X-ray detector as a replacement for the image intensifier, which has served the needs of the cardiac catheterization laboratory for nearly 5 decades. Clinical users must evaluate the respective technologies and determine whether one or the other meets the needs of their own laboratories. In this review, the two competing detector technologies are reviewed and a summary of general advantages and disadvantages of each is provided. A qualitative description is provided of parameters that can be used to assess quantitatively the performance of detectors and imaging systems. Using such objective measurements, together with standard techniques for evaluating imaging systems, angiographers and managers can better arrive at informed decisions for their own situation.

  19. Performance of a static-anode/flat-panel x-ray fluoroscopy system in a diagnostic strength magnetic field: A truly hybrid x-ray/MR imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Fahrig, R.; Wen, Z.; Ganguly, A.

    2005-06-15

    Minimally invasive procedures are increasing in variety and frequency, facilitated by advances in imaging technology. Our hybrid imaging system (GE Apollo{sup TM} flat panel, custom Brand x-ray static anode x-ray tube, GE Lunar high-frequency power supply and 0.5 T Signa SP{sup TM}) provides both x-ray and MR imaging capability to guide complex procedures without requiring motion of the patient between two distant gantries. The performance of the x-ray tube in this closely integrated system was evaluated by modeling and measuring both the response of the filament to an externally applied field and the behavior of the electron beam for fieldmore » strengths and geometries of interest. The performance of the detector was assessed by measuring the slanted-edge modulation transfer function (MTF) and when placed at zero field and at 0.5 T. Measured resonant frequencies of filaments can be approximated using a modified vibrating beam model, and were at frequencies well below the 25 kHz frequency of our generator for our filament geometry. The amplitude of vibration was not sufficient to cause shorting of the filament during operation within the magnetic field. A simple model of electrons in uniform electric and magnetic fields can be used to estimate the deflection of the electron beam on the anode for the fields of interest between 0.2 and 0.5 T. The MTF measured at the detector and the DQE showed no significant difference inside and outside of the magnetic field. With the proper modifications, an x-ray system can be fully integrated with a MR system, with minimal loss of image quality. Any x-ray tube can be assessed for compatibility when placed at a particular location within the field using the models. We have also concluded that a-Si electronics are robust against magnetic fields. Detailed knowledge of the x-ray system installation is required to provide estimates of system operation.« less

  20. Enhanced solution velocity between dark and light areas with horizontal tubes and triangular prism baffles to improve microalgal growth in a flat-panel photo-bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zongbo; Cheng, Jun; Xu, Xiaodan; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2016-07-01

    Novel horizontal tubes and triangular prism (HTTP) baffles that generate flow vortices were developed to increase solution velocity between dark and light areas and thus improve microalgal growth in a flat-panel photo-bioreactor. Solution velocity, mass-transfer coefficient, and mixing time were measured with a particle-imaging velocimeter, dissolved oxygen probes, and pH probes. The solution mass-transfer coefficient increased by 30% and mixing time decreased by 21% when the HTTP baffles were used. The solution velocity between dark and light areas increased from ∼0.9cm/s to ∼3.5cm/s, resulting in a decreased dark-light cycle period to one-fourth. This enhanced flashing light effect with the HTTP baffles dramatically increased microalgae biomass yield by 70% in the flat-panel photo-bioreactor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector: From image science to image-guided surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2011-08-01

    The development of large-area flat-panel X-ray detectors (FPDs) has spurred investigation in a spectrum of advanced medical imaging applications, including tomosynthesis and cone-beam CT (CBCT). Recent research has extended image quality metrics and theoretical models to such applications, providing a quantitative foundation for the assessment of imaging performance as well as a general framework for the design, optimization, and translation of such technologies to new applications. For example, cascaded systems models of the Fourier domain metrics, such as noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ), have been extended to these modalities to describe the propagation of signal and noise through the image acquisition and reconstruction chain and to quantify the factors that govern spatial resolution, image noise, and detectability. Moreover, such models have demonstrated basic agreement with human observer performance for a broad range of imaging conditions and imaging tasks. These developments in image science have formed a foundation for the knowledgeable development and translation of CBCT to new applications in image-guided interventions—for example, CBCT implemented on a mobile surgical C-arm for intraoperative 3D imaging. The ability to acquire high-quality 3D images on demand during surgical intervention overcomes conventional limitations of surgical guidance in the context of preoperative images alone. A prototype mobile C-arm developed in academic-industry partnership demonstrates CBCT with low radiation dose, sub-mm spatial resolution, and soft-tissue visibility potentially approaching that of diagnostic CT. Integration of the 3D imaging system with real-time tracking, deformable registration, endoscopic video, and 3D visualization offers a promising addition to the surgical arsenal in interventions ranging from head-and-neck/skull base surgery to spine, orthopaedic, thoracic, and abdominal surgeries. Cadaver studies show the potential for significant boosts in

  2. Novel Na(+) doped Alq3 hybrid materials for organic light-emitting diode (OLED) devices and flat panel displays.

    PubMed

    Bhagat, S A; Borghate, S V; Kalyani, N Thejo; Dhoble, S J

    2015-05-01

    Pure and Na(+) -doped Alq3 complexes were synthesized by a simple precipitation method at room temperature, maintaining a stoichiometric ratio. These complexes were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), UV/Vis absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectra. The X-ray diffractogram exhibits well-resolved peaks, revealing the crystalline nature of the synthesized complexes, FTIR confirms the molecular structure and the completion of quinoline ring formation in the metal complex. UV/Vis absorption and PL spectra of sodium-doped Alq3 complexes exhibit high emission intensity in comparison with Alq3 phosphor, proving that when doped in Alq3 , Na(+) enhances PL emission intensity. The excitation spectra of the synthesized complexes lie in the range 242-457 nm when weak shoulders are also considered. Because the sharp excitation peak falls in the blue region of visible radiation, the complexes can be employed for blue chip excitation. The emission wavelength of all the synthesized complexes lies in the bluish green/green region ranging between 485 and 531 nm. The intensity of the emission wavelength was found to be elevated when Na(+) is doped into Alq3 . Because both the excitation and emission wavelengths fall in the visible region of electromagnetic radiation, these phosphors can also be employed to improve the power conversion efficiency of photovoltaic cells by using the solar spectral conversion principle. Thus, the synthesized phosphors can be used as bluish green/green light-emitting phosphors for organic light-emitting diodes, flat panel displays, solid-state lighting technology - a step towards the desire to reduce energy consumption and generate pollution free light. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Cone-Beam CT with a Flat-Panel Detector: From Image Science to Image-Guided Surgery.

    PubMed

    Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H

    2011-08-21

    The development of large-area flat-panel x-ray detectors (FPDs) has spurred investigation in a spectrum of advanced medical imaging applications, including tomosynthesis and cone-beam CT (CBCT). Recent research has extended image quality metrics and theoretical models to such applications, providing a quantitative foundation for the assessment of imaging performance as well as a general framework for the design, optimization, and translation of such technologies to new applications. For example, cascaded systems models of Fourier domain metrics, such as noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ), have been extended to these modalities to describe the propagation of signal and noise through the image acquisition and reconstruction chain and to quantify the factors that govern spatial resolution, image noise, and detectability. Moreover, such models have demonstrated basic agreement with human observer performance for a broad range of imaging conditions and imaging tasks. These developments in image science have formed a foundation for the knowledgeable development and translation of CBCT to new applications in image-guided interventions - for example, CBCT implemented on a mobile surgical C-arm for intraoperative 3D imaging. The ability to acquire high-quality 3D images on demand during surgical intervention overcomes conventional limitations of surgical guidance in the context of preoperative images alone. A prototype mobile C-arm developed in academic-industry partnership demonstrates CBCT with low radiation dose, sub-mm spatial resolution, and soft-tissue visibility potentially approaching that of diagnostic CT. Integration of the 3D imaging system with real-time tracking, deformable registration, endoscopic video, and 3D visualization offers a promising addition to the surgical arsenal in interventions ranging from head-and-neck / skull base surgery to spine, orthopaedic, thoracic, and abdominal surgeries. Cadaver studies show the potential for significant boosts in surgical

  4. Flat panel digital detector cinefluoroscopy late following SES or BMS implantation for detection of coronary stent fracture in asymptomatic patients.

    PubMed

    Davlouros, Periklis A; Chefneux, Corina; Xanthopoulou, Ioanna; Papathanasiou, Maria; Zaharioglou, Evaggelia; Tsigkas, Grigorios; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios

    2012-05-03

    Coronary stent fracture (SF), is rare and confined mainly in patients treated with sirolimus eluting stents (SES). The role of flat panel digital detector (FPDD) fluoroscopy in detecting SF has not been investigated. Assessment with FPDD fluoroscopy of asymptomatic patients, with 200 SES (Cypher, Cordis, J&J, Miami, Florida, US), and 200 bare metal stents (BMS), at 45.5 ± 15.7 and 38.4 ± 3.9 months post-stenting respectively. SF was defined as discontinuity of stent struts on fluoroscopy. Coronary angiography was reserved for patients with documented SF. Effective radiation dose was 0.26 ± 0.14 mSv. SF was depicted in 6 (3%) SES, and 1 BMS (0.5%). Stent length was an independent predictor of SF (OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.03-1.4, p=0.024). RCA location and vessel angulation were marginally significant (OR 7.7, 95% CI 0.8-74.2, p=0.077 and OR 5.1, 95% CI 0.8-34, p=0.089). Significant angiographic restenosis was detected in 4 SES (66.6%), and 1 BMS (0.5%). Re-intervention was needed in 3 (42.8%) cases, (2 SES and 1 BMS). Detection of SF with FPDD cinefluoroscopy late following coronary stenting is feasible, involves low radiation and is confined mainly to SES compared to BMS. Application of cinefluoroscopy as part of a routine stent surveillance programme in asymptomatic patients may be more appropriate in "high risk" settings (SES, long stents and adverse angiographic characteristics). The role of invasive imaging and subsequent management of such patients need further studying. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Design and performance of the prototype full field breast tomosynthesis system with selenium based flat panel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Baorui; Ruth, Chris; Stein, Jay; Smith, Andrew; Shaw, Ian; Jing, Zhenxue

    2005-04-01

    We have developed a breast tomosynthesis system utilizing a selenium-based direct conversion flat panel detector. This prototype system is a modification of Selenia, Hologic"s full field digital mammography system, using an add-on breast holding device to allow 3D tomosynthetic imaging. During a tomosynthesis scan, the breast is held stationary while the x-ray source and detector mounted on a c-arm rotate continuously around the breast over an angular range up to 30 degrees. The x-ray tube is pulsed to acquire 11 projections at desired c-arm angles. Images are reconstructed in planes parallel to the breastplate using a filtered backprojection algorithm. Processing time is typically 1 minute for a 50 mm thick breast at 0.1 mm in-plane pixel size, 1 mm slice-to-slice separation. Clinical studies are in progress. Performance evaluations were carried out at the system and the subsystem levels including spatial resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, spectra optimization, imaging technique, and phantom and patient studies. Experimental results show that we have successfully built a tomosynthesis system with images showing less structure noise and revealing 3D information compared with the conventional mammogram. We introduce, for the first time, the definition of "Depth of Field" for tomosynthesis based on a spatial resolution study. This parameter is used together with Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) to evaluate 3D resolution of a tomosynthesis system as a function of system design, imaging technique, and reconstruction algorithm. Findings from the on-going clinical studies will help the design of the next generation tomosynthesis system offering improved performance.

  6. [The future of bedside chest radiography: Comparative study of mobile flat-panels and needle-image plate storage phosphor systems].

    PubMed

    Bremicker, K; Gosch, D; Kahn, T; Borte, G

    2015-11-01

    Chest radiography is the most common diagnostic modality in intensive care units with new mobile flat-panels gaining more attention and availability in addition to the already used storage phosphor plates. Comparison of the image quality of mobile flat-panels and needle-image plate storage phosphor system in terms of bedside chest radiography. Retrospective analysis of 84 bedside chest radiographs of 42 intensive care patients (20 women, 22 men, average age: 65 years). All images were acquired during daily routine. For each patient, two images were analyzed, one from each system mentioned above. Two blinded radiologists evaluated the image quality based on ten criteria (e.g., diaphragm, heart contour, tracheal bifurcation, thoracic spine, lung structure, consolidations, foreign material, and overall impression) using a 5-point visibility scale (1 = excellent, 5 = not usable). There was no significant difference between the image quality of the two systems (p < 0.05). Overall some anatomical structures such as the diaphragm, heart, pulmonary consolidations and foreign material were considered of higher diagnostic quality compared to others, e.g., tracheal bifurcation and thoracic spine. Mobile flat-panels achieve an image quality which is as good as those of needle-image plate storage phosphor systems. In addition, they allow immediate evaluation of the image quality but in return are much more expensive in terms of purchase and maintenance.

  7. Flat-Panel Computed Tomography (DYNA-CT) in Neuroradiology. From High-Resolution Imaging of Implants to One-Stop-Shopping for Acute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Doerfler, A; Gölitz, P; Engelhorn, T; Kloska, S; Struffert, T

    2015-10-01

    Originally aimed at improving standard radiography by providing higher absorption efficiency and a wider dynamic range, flat-panel detector technology has meanwhile got widely accepted in the neuroradiological community. Especially flat-panel detector computed tomography (FD-CT) using rotational C-arm mounted flat-panel detector technology is capable of volumetric imaging with a high spatial resolution. By providing CT-like images of the brain within the angio suite, FD-CT is able to rapidly visualize hemorrhage and may thus improve complication management without the need of patient transfer. As "Angiographic CT" FD-CT may be helpful during many diagnostic and neurointerventional procedures and for noninvasive monitoring and follow-up. In addition, spinal interventions and high-resolution imaging of the temporal bone might also benefit from FD-CT. Finally, using novel dynamic perfusion and angiographic protocols, FD-CT may provide functional information on brain perfusion and vasculature with the potential to replace standard imaging in selected acute stroke patients.

  8. Low-power-consumption flat-panel light-emitting device driven by field-emission electron source using high-crystallinity single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimoi, Norihiro; Abe, Daisuke; Matsumoto, Kazuyuki; Sato, Yoshinori; Tohji, Kazuyuki

    2017-06-01

    Thin electrode films assembled through a wet process using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are expected to play a role in reducing power consumption and saving energy in field-emission electron sources. The flat-panel light-emitting device for this study featured a line-sequential-scanning-type electrode structure equipped with electrodes for on-and-off controls of electron emissions, on which high-crystallinity SWCNTs were uniformly distributed. The device successfully emitted electrons on the flat panel in a stable manner. A technology for amplifying the luminance output by controlling the persistence characteristics of a fluorescent screen was also successfully developed. By combining such elemental technologies, a flat-panel light-emission device, as a stand-alone planar lighting device, which achieves a high-luminance efficiency of 87 lm/W and energy-conserved driving, was assembled for the first time in the world. The creation of field-emission electron sources driven with ultralow power consumption, along with applications that utilize such devices, is expected in the future.

  9. X-ray performance of a wafer-scale CMOS flat panel imager for applications in medical imaging and nondestructive testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Bo Kyung; Jeon, Seongchae; Seo, Chang-Woo

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a wafer-scale complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-based X-ray flat panel detector for medical imaging and nondestructive testing applications. In this study, our proposed X-ray CMOS flat panel imager has been fabricated by using a 0.35 μm 1-poly/4-metal CMOS process. The pixel size is 100 μm×100 μm and the pixel array format is 1200×1200 pixels, which provide a field-of-view (FOV) of 120mm×120 mm. The 14.3-bit extended counting analog-to digital converter (ADC) with built-in binning mode was used to reduce the area and simultaneously improve the image resolution. The different screens such as thallium-doped CsI (CsI:Tl) and terbium gadolinium oxysulfide (Gd2O2S:Tb) scintillators were used as conversion materials for X-rays to visible light photons. The X-ray imaging performance such as X-ray sensitivity as a function of X-ray exposure dose, spatial resolution, image lag and X-ray images of various objects were measured under practical medical and industrial application conditions. This paper results demonstrate that our prototype CMOS-based X-ray flat panel imager has the significant potential for medical imaging and non-destructive testing (NDT) applications with high-resolution and high speed rate.

  10. JTEC panel on display technologies in Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tannas, Lawrence E., Jr.; Glenn, William E.; Credelle, Thomas; Doane, J. William; Firester, Arthur H.; Thompson, Malcolm

    1992-01-01

    This report is one in a series of reports that describes research and development efforts in Japan in the area of display technologies. The following are included in this report: flat panel displays (technical findings, liquid crystal display development and production, large flat panel displays (FPD's), electroluminescent displays and plasma panels, infrastructure in Japan's FPD industry, market and projected sales, and new a-Si active matrix liquid crystal display (AMLCD) factory); materials for flat panel displays (liquid crystal materials, and light-emissive display materials); manufacturing and infrastructure of active matrix liquid crystal displays (manufacturing logistics and equipment); passive matrix liquid crystal displays (LCD basics, twisted nematics LCD's, supertwisted nematic LCD's, ferroelectric LCD's, and a comparison of passive matrix LCD technology); active matrix technology (basic active matrix technology, investment environment, amorphous silicon, polysilicon, and commercial products and prototypes); and projection displays (comparison of Japanese and U.S. display research, and technical evaluation of work).

  11. Charts for the minimum-weight design of 24s-t aluminum-alloy flat compression panels with longitudinal z-section stiffeners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuette, Evan H

    1945-01-01

    Design charts are developed for 24s-t aluminum-alloy flat compression panels with longitudinal z-section stiffeners. These charts make possible the design of the lightest panels of this type for a wide range of design requirements. Examples of the use of the charts are given and it is pointed out on the basis of these examples that, over a wide range of design conditions, the maintenance of buckle-free surfaces does not conflict with the achievement of high structural efficiency. The achievement of the maximum possible structural efficiency with 24s-t aluminum-alloy panels, however, requires closer stiffener spacings than those now in common use.

  12. Flat-panel cone-beam CT on a mobile isocentric C-arm for image-guided brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffray, David A.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Edmundson, Gregory K.; Wong, John W.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    2002-05-01

    Flat-panel imager (FPI) based cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a strong candidate technology for intraoperative imaging in image-guided procedures such as brachytherapy. The soft-tissue imaging performance and potential navigational utility have been investigated using a computer-controlled benchtop system. These early results have driven the development of an isocentric C-arm for intraoperative FPI-CBCT, capable of collecting 94 projections over 180 degrees in 110 seconds. The C-arm system employs a large-area FPI with 400 micron pixel pitch and Gd2O2S:Tb scintillator. Image acquisition, processing and reconstruction are orchestrated under a single Windows-based application. Reconstruction is performed by a modified Feldkamp algorithm implemented on a high-speed reconstruction engine. Non-idealities in the source and detector trajectories during orbital motion has been quantified and tested for stability. Cone-beam CT imaging performance was tested through both quantitative and qualitative methods. The system MTF was measured using a wire phantom and demonstrated frequency pass out to 0.6 mm-1. Voxel noise was measured at 2.7 percent in a uniform 12 cm diameter water bath. Anatomical phantoms were employed for qualitative evaluation of the imaging performance. Images of an anaesthetized rabbit demonstrated the capacity of the system to discern soft-tissue structures within a living subject while offering sub-millimeter spatial resolution. The dose delivered in each of the imaging procedures was estimated from in-air exposure measurements to be approximately 0.1 cGy. Imaging studies of an anthropomorphic prostate phantom were performed with and without radioactive seeds. Soft-tissue imaging performance and seed detection appear to satisfy the imaging and navigation requirements for image-guided brachytherapy. These investigations advance the development and evaluation of such technology for image-guided surgical procedures, including brachytherapy

  13. Determination of vertebral and femoral trabecular morphology and stiffness using a flat-panel C-arm-based CT approach.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Lars; van Rietbergen, Bert; Noordhoek, Niels J; Ito, Keita

    2012-01-01

    The importance of assessing trabecular architecture together with bone mineral density to determine bone stiffness and fracture risk in osteoporosis has been well established. However, no imaging modalities are available to assess trabecular architecture at clinically relevant sites in the axial skeleton. Recently developed flat-panel CT devices, however, offer resolutions that are potentially good enough to resolve bone architecture at these sites. The goal of the present study was to investigate how accurate trabecular architecture and stiffness can be determined based on images from such a device (XperCT, Philips Healthcare). Ten cadaver human C3 vertebrae, twelve T12 vertebrae and 12 proximal femora were scanned with XperCT while mimicking in-vivo scanning conditions and compared to scans of the same bones with microCT. Standard segmentation and morphology quantification algorithms were applied as well as finite element (FE) simulation based on segmented and gray value images. Results showed that mean trabecular separation (Tb.Sp) and number (Tb.N) can be accurately determined at all sites. The accuracy of other parameters, however, depended on the site. For T12 no other structural parameters could be accurately quantified and no FE-results could be obtained from segmented images. When using gray-level images, however, accurate determination of cancellous bone stiffness was possible. For the C3 vertebrae and proximal femora, mean bone volume fraction (BV/TV), Tb.Sp, Tb.N, and anisotropy (C3 only) could be determined accurately. For Tb.Th, structure model index (SMI, femur only), and anisotropy good correlations were obtained but the values were not determined accurately. FE simulations based on segmented images were accurate for the C3 vertebrae, but severely underestimated bone stiffness for the femur. Here also, this was improved by using the gray value models. In conclusion, XperCT does provide a resolution that is good enough to determine trabecular

  14. Comparison of image quality and radiation dose between an image-intensifier system and a newer-generation flat-panel detector system — technical phantom measurements and evaluation of clinical imaging in children.

    PubMed

    Weis, Meike; Hagelstein, Claudia; Diehm, Theo; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Neff, K Wolfgang

    2016-02-01

    Many image-intensifier fluoroscopy systems have been replaced by flat-panel detectors in recent years. To compare the level of contrast, image resolution and radiation dose between an image-intensifier and a newer-generation flat-panel detector system in a pediatric radiology unit. We compared two systems — a conventional image intensifier and a newer-generation flat-panel system. We measured image quality and radiation dose using a technical phantom. Additionally, we retrospectively compared age-matched fluoroscopic pediatric voiding cystourethrography (n = 15) and upper gastrointestinal investigations (n = 25). In phantom studies image contrast was equal while image resolution was higher and mean radiation dose lower using the flat-panel system (P < 0.0001). In pediatric investigations, mean dose area product was significantly reduced on the flat-panel system for upper gastrointestinal investigation (45 ± 38 μGy*m2 vs. 11 ± 9 μGy*m2; P < 0.0001) and for voiding cystourethrography (18 ± 20 μGy*m2 vs. 10 ± 12 μGy*m2; P = 0.04). The newer flat-panel system performs at lower dose levels with equal to better image quality and therefore seems to be the more suitable technique for pediatric fluoroscopy in comparison to image-intensifier systems.

  15. Extra-oral dental radiography for disaster victims using a flat panel X-ray detector and a hand-held X-ray generator.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, M; Oshima, T; Mimasaka, S

    2017-12-01

    Forensic odontologists commonly incise the skin for post-mortem dental examinations when it is difficult to open the victim's mouth. However, it is prohibited by law to incise dead bodies without permission in Japan. Therefore, we attempted using extra-oral dental radiography, using a digital X-ray equipment with rechargeable batteries, to overcome this restriction. A phantom was placed in the prone position on a table, and three plain dental radiographs were used per case: "lateral oblique radiographs" for left and right posterior teeth and a "contact radiograph" for anterior teeth were taken using a flat panel X-ray detector and a hand-held X-ray generator. The resolving power of the images was measured by a resolution test chart, and the scattered X-ray dose was measured using an ionization chamber-type survey meter. The resolving power of the flat panel X-ray detector was 3.0 lp/mm, which was less than that of intra-oral dental methods, but the three extra-oral plain dental radiographs provided the overall dental information from outside of the mouth, and this approach was less time-consuming. In addition, the higher dose of scattered X-rays was laterally distributed, but the dose per case was much less than that of intra-oral dental radiographs. Extra-oral plain dental radiography can be used for disaster victim identification by dental methods even when it is difficult to open the mouth. Portable and rechargeable devices, such as a flat panel X-ray detector and a hand-held X-ray generator, are convenient to bring and use anywhere, even at a disaster scene lacking electricity and water.

  16. Technical Note: A Feasibility Study of Using the Flat Panel Detector on Linac for the kV X-ray Generator Test.

    PubMed

    Cai, Bin; Dolly, Steven; Kamal, Gregory; Yaddanapudi, Sridhar; Sun, Baozhou; Goddu, S Murty; Mutic, Sasa; Li, Hua

    2018-04-28

    To investigate the feasibility of using kV flat panel detector on linac for consistency evaluations of kV X-ray generator performance. An in-house designed aluminum (Al) array phantom with six 9×9 cm 2 square regions having various thickness was proposed and used in this study. Through XML script-driven image acquisition, kV images with various acquisition settings were obtained using the kV flat panel detector. Utilizing pre-established baseline curves, the consistency of X-ray tube output characteristics including tube voltage accuracy, exposure accuracy and exposure linearity were assessed through image quality assessment metrics including ROI mean intensity, ROI standard deviation (SD) and noise power spectrums (NPS). The robustness of this method was tested on two linacs for a three-month period. With the proposed method, tube voltage accuracy can be verified through conscience check with a 2% tolerance and 2 kVp intervals for forty different kVp settings. The exposure accuracy can be tested with a 4% consistency tolerance for three mAs settings over forty kVp settings. The exposure linearity tested with three mAs settings achieved a coefficient of variation (CV) of 0.1. We proposed a novel approach that uses the kV flat panel detector available on linac for X-ray generator test. This approach eliminates the inefficiencies and variability associated with using third party QA detectors while enabling an automated process. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Dual-energy cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector: Effect of reconstruction algorithm on material classification

    SciTech Connect

    Zbijewski, W., E-mail: wzbijewski@jhu.edu; Gang, G. J.; Xu, J.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) with a flat-panel detector (FPD) is finding application in areas such as breast and musculoskeletal imaging, where dual-energy (DE) capabilities offer potential benefit. The authors investigate the accuracy of material classification in DE CBCT using filtered backprojection (FBP) and penalized likelihood (PL) reconstruction and optimize contrast-enhanced DE CBCT of the joints as a function of dose, material concentration, and detail size. Methods: Phantoms consisting of a 15 cm diameter water cylinder with solid calcium inserts (50–200 mg/ml, 3–28.4 mm diameter) and solid iodine inserts (2–10 mg/ml, 3–28.4 mm diameter), as well as a cadaveric knee withmore » intra-articular injection of iodine were imaged on a CBCT bench with a Varian 4343 FPD. The low energy (LE) beam was 70 kVp (+0.2 mm Cu), and the high energy (HE) beam was 120 kVp (+0.2 mm Cu, +0.5 mm Ag). Total dose (LE+HE) was varied from 3.1 to 15.6 mGy with equal dose allocation. Image-based DE classification involved a nearest distance classifier in the space of LE versus HE attenuation values. Recognizing the differences in noise between LE and HE beams, the LE and HE data were differentially filtered (in FBP) or regularized (in PL). Both a quadratic (PLQ) and a total-variation penalty (PLTV) were investigated for PL. The performance of DE CBCT material discrimination was quantified in terms of voxelwise specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy. Results: Noise in the HE image was primarily responsible for classification errors within the contrast inserts, whereas noise in the LE image mainly influenced classification in the surrounding water. For inserts of diameter 28.4 mm, DE CBCT reconstructions were optimized to maximize the total combined accuracy across the range of calcium and iodine concentrations, yielding values of ∼88% for FBP and PLQ, and ∼95% for PLTV at 3.1 mGy total dose, increasing to ∼95% for FBP and PLQ, and ∼98% for PLTV at 15.6 mGy total

  18. Feasibility of real time dual-energy imaging based on a flat panel detector for coronary artery calcium quantification.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tong; Ducote, Justin L; Wong, Jerry T; Molloi, Sabee

    2006-06-01

    The feasibility of a real-time dual-energy imaging technique with dynamic filtration using a flat panel detector for quantifying coronary arterial calcium was evaluated. In this technique, the x-ray beam was switched at 15 Hz between 60 kVp and 120 kVp with the 120 kVp beam having an additional 0.8 mm silver filter. The performance of the dynamic filtration technique was compared with a static filtration technique (4 mm Al+0.2 mm Cu for both beams). The ability to quantify calcium mass was evaluated using calcified arterial vessel phantoms with 20-230 mg of hydroxylapatite. The vessel phantoms were imaged over a Lucite phantom and then an anthropomorphic chest phantom. The total thickness of Lucite phantom ranges from 13.5-26.5 cm to simulate patient thickness of 16-32 cm. The calcium mass was measured using a densitometric technique. The effective dose to patient was estimated from the measured entrance exposure. The effects of patient thickness on contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), effective dose, and the precision of calcium mass quantification (i.e., the frame to frame variability) were studied. The effects of misregistration artifacts were also measured by shifting the vessel phantoms manually between low- and high-energy images. The results show that, with the same detector signal level, the dynamic filtration technique produced 70% higher calcium contrast-to-noise ratio with only 4% increase in patient dose as compared to the static filtration technique. At the same time, x-ray tube loading increased by 30% with dynamic filtration. The minimum detectability of calcium with anatomical background was measured to be 34 mg of hydroxyapatite. The precision in calcium mass measurement, determined from 16 repeated dual-energy images, ranges from 13 mg to 41 mg when the patient thickness increased from 16 to 32 cm. The CNR was found to decrease with the patient thickness linearly at a rate of (-7%/cm). The anatomic background produced measurement root-mean-square (RMS

  19. A novel potential source of β-carotene: Eustigmatos cf. polyphem (Eustigmatophyceae) and pilot β-carotene production in bubble column and flat panel photobioreactors.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Ma, Xiaoqin; Li, Aifen; Zhang, Chengwu

    2012-08-01

    Carotenoids profile of the unicellular Eustigmatos cf. polyphem (Eustigmatophyceae) and β-carotene production of the microalga in bubble column and large flat panel bioreactors were studied. The microalga which contained β-carotene, violaxanthin and vaucheriaxanthin as the major carotenoids accumulated large amount of β-carotene. The β-carotene production of this microalga in the bubble column bioreactor was considerable, with the maximum intracellular β-carotene content reaching 60.76 mg g(-1), biomass reaching 9.2 g L(-1), and β-carotene yield up to 470.2 mg L(-1). The β-carotene productions in two large flat panel bioreactors were relatively lower, whereas over 100 mg β-carotene L(-1) was achieved. Besides, high light intensity helped to accumulate intracellular β-carotene and biomass. Deficient nitrate supply inhibited biomass growth, though it helped to accumulate β-carotene. Our results first proved that E. cf. polyphem was a potential source and producer of β-carotene, making it an interesting subject for further β-carotene study or commercial exploration. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Preliminary performance of image quality for a low-dose C-arm CT system with a flat-panel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyung Cha, Bo; Seo, Chang-Woo; Yang, Keedong; Jeon, Seongchae; Huh, Young

    2015-06-01

    Digital flat panel imager (FPI)-based cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been widely used in C-arm imaging for spine surgery and interventional procedures. The system provides real-time fluoroscopy with high spatial resolution and three-dimensional (3D) visualization of anatomical structure without the need for patient transportation in interventional suite. In this work, a prototype CBCT imaging platform with continuous single rotation about the gantry was developed by using a large-area flat-panel detector with amorphous Si-based thin film transistor matrix. The different 2D projection images were acquired during constant gantry velocity for reconstructed images at a tube voltage of 80-120 kVp, and different current (10-50 mA) conditions. Various scan protocols were applied to a chest phantom human by changing the number of projection images and scanning angles. The projections were then reconstructed into a volumetric data of sections by using a 3D reconstruction algorithm (e.g., filtered back projection). The preliminary quantitative X-ray performance of our CBCT system was investigated by using the American Association of Physicists in Medicine CT phantom in terms of spatial resolution, contrast resolution, and CT number linearity for mobile or fixed C-arm based CBCT application with limited rotational geometry. The novel results of the projection data with different scanning angles and angular increments in the orbital gantry platform were acquired and evaluated experimentally.

  1. High-quality 3D correction of ring and radiant artifacts in flat panel detector-based cone beam volume CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu Anas, Emran Mohammad; Kim, Jae Gon; Lee, Soo Yeol; Kamrul Hasan, Md

    2011-10-01

    The use of an x-ray flat panel detector is increasingly becoming popular in 3D cone beam volume CT machines. Due to the deficient semiconductor array manufacturing process, the cone beam projection data are often corrupted by different types of abnormalities, which cause severe ring and radiant artifacts in a cone beam reconstruction image, and as a result, the diagnostic image quality is degraded. In this paper, a novel technique is presented for the correction of error in the 2D cone beam projections due to abnormalities often observed in 2D x-ray flat panel detectors. Template images are derived from the responses of the detector pixels using their statistical properties and then an effective non-causal derivative-based detection algorithm in 2D space is presented for the detection of defective and mis-calibrated detector elements separately. An image inpainting-based 3D correction scheme is proposed for the estimation of responses of defective detector elements, and the responses of the mis-calibrated detector elements are corrected using the normalization technique. For real-time implementation, a simplification of the proposed off-line method is also suggested. Finally, the proposed algorithms are tested using different real cone beam volume CT images and the experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methods can effectively remove ring and radiant artifacts from cone beam volume CT images compared to other reported techniques in the literature.

  2. Image quality of digital direct flat-panel mammography versus an indirect small-field CCD technique using a high-contrast phantom.

    PubMed

    Krug, Kathrin Barbara; Stützer, Hartmut; Frommolt, Peter; Boecker, Julia; Bovenschulte, Henning; Sendler, Volker; Lackner, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    To compare the detection of microcalcifications on mammograms of an anthropomorphic breast phantom acquired by a direct digital flat-panel detector mammography system (FPM) versus a stereotactic breast biopsy system utilizing CCD (charge-coupled device) technology with either a 1024 or 512 acquisition matrix (1024 CCD and 512 CCD). Randomly distributed silica beads (diameter 100-1400 μm) and anthropomorphic scatter bodies were applied to 48 transparent films. The test specimens were radiographed on a direct digital FPM and by the indirect 1024 CCD and 512 CCD techniques. Four radiologists rated the monitor-displayed images independently of each other in random order. The rate of correct positive readings for the "number of detectable microcalcifications" for silica beads of 100-199 μm in diameter was 54.2%, 50.0% and 45.8% by FPM, 1024 CCD and 512 CCD, respectively. The inter-rater variability was most pronounced for silica beads of 100-199 μm in diameter. The greatest agreement with the gold standard was observed for beads >400 μm in diameter across all methods. Stereotactic spot images taken by 1024 matrix CCD technique are diagnostically equivalent to direct digital flat-panel mammograms for visualizing simulated microcalcifications >400 μm in diameter.

  3. Theoretical and Monte Carlo optimization of a stacked three-layer flat-panel x-ray imager for applications in multi-spectral medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Maurino, Sebastian Lopez; Badano, Aldo; Cunningham, Ian A; Karim, Karim S

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new design of a stacked three-layer flat-panel x-ray detector for dual-energy (DE) imaging. Each layer consists of its own scintillator of individual thickness and an underlying thin-film-transistor-based flat-panel. Three images are obtained simultaneously in the detector during the same x-ray exposure, thereby eliminating any motion artifacts. The detector operation is two-fold: a conventional radiography image can be obtained by combining all three layers' images, while a DE subtraction image can be obtained from the front and back layers' images, where the middle layer acts as a mid-filter that helps achieve spectral separation. We proceed to optimize the detector parameters for two sample imaging tasks that could particularly benefit from this new detector by obtaining the best possible signal to noise ratio per root entrance exposure using well-established theoretical models adapted to fit our new design. These results are compared to a conventional DE temporal subtraction detector and a single-shot DE subtraction detector with a copper mid-filter, both of which underwent the same theoretical optimization. The findings are then validated using advanced Monte Carlo simulations for all optimized detector setups. Given the performance expected from initial results and the recent decrease in price for digital x-ray detectors, the simplicity of the three-layer stacked imager approach appears promising to usher in a new generation of multi-spectral digital x-ray diagnostics.

  4. Impact of flat panel-imager veiling glare on scatter-estimation accuracy and image quality of a commercial on-board cone-beam CT imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Lazos, Dimitrios; Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purposes of this study is to measure the low frequency drop (LFD) of the modulation transfer function (MTF), associated with the long tails of the detector point spread function (PSF) of an on-board flat panel imager and study its impact on cone-beam CT (CBCT) image quality and scatter measurement accuracy. Methods: Two different experimental methods were used to characterize LFD and its associated PSF of a Varian OBI flat-panel detector system: the edge response function (ERF) method and the disk transfer function (DTF) method. PSF was estimated by fitting parametric models to these measurements for four values of the applied voltage (kVp). The resultant PSF was used to demonstrate the effect of LFD on image contrast and CT number accuracy in CBCT images reconstructed from synthetic datasets, as well as, accuracy of scatter measurements with the beam-stop method. Results: The MTFs derived from the measured ERF data revealed LFDs varying from 8% (at 60 kVp) to 10.5% (at 120 kVp), while the intensity of the long PSF tails was found to increase with increasing kVp. The veiling glare line spread functions derived from the ERF and DTF methods were in excellent agreement. Uncorrected veiling glare reduced contrast and the image intensity in CBCT reconstruction, near the phantom periphery (by 67 Hounsfield units in a 20 cm-in-diameter water phantom) and (to a smaller degree) near inhomogeneities. Use of the bow-tie filter mitigated these effects. Veiling glare also resulted in about 10%–15% overestimation of the scatter-to-primary ratio when measured with the beam-stop or beam-stop array method. Conclusions: The long tails of the detector PSF were found to have a modest dependence of beam spectrum, which is reflected on the MTF curve LFD. Our findings show that uncorrected veiling glare can affect quantitative accuracy and contrast in CBCT imaging, based on flat panel imager. In addition, it results in overestimation of the scatter-to-primary ratio

  5. Radiation exposure to operating staff during rotational flat-panel angiography and C-arm cone beam computed tomography (CT) applications.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Boris; Heidenreich, Ralf; Heidenreich, Monika; Eichler, Katrin; Thalhammer, Axel; Naeem, Naguib Nagy Naguib; Vogl, Thomas Josef; Zangos, Stefan

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the radiation exposure for operating personnel associated with rotational flat-panel angiography and C-arm cone beam CT. Using a dedicated angiography-suite, 2D and 3D examinations of the liver were performed on a phantom to generate scattered radiation. Exposure was measured with a dosimeter at predefined heights (eye, thyroid, breast, gonads and knee) at the physician's location. Analysis included 3D procedures with a field of view (FOV) of 24 cm × 18 cm (8s/rotation, 20s/rotation and 5s/2 rotations), and 47 cm×18 cm (16s/2 rotations) and standard 2D angiography (10s, FOV 24 cm×18 cm). Measurements showed the highest radiation dose at the eye and thyroid level. In comparison to 2D-DSA (3.9 μSv eye-exposure), the 3D procedures caused an increased radiation exposure both in standard FOV (8s/rotation: 28.0 μSv, 20s/rotation: 79.3 μSv, 5s/2 rotations: 32.5 μSv) and large FOV (37.6 μSv). Proportional distributions were measured for the residual heights. With the use of lead glass, irradiation of the eye lens was reduced to 0.2 μSv (2D DSA) and 10.6 μSv (3D technique with 20s/rotation). Rotational flat-panel angiography and C-arm cone beam applications significantly increase radiation exposure to the attending operator in comparison to 2D angiography. Our study indicates that the physician should wear protective devices and leave the examination room when performing 3D examinations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Development of high quantum efficiency, flat panel, thick detectors for megavoltage x-ray imaging: a novel direct-conversion design and its feasibility.

    PubMed

    Pang, G; Rowlands, J A

    2004-11-01

    Most electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) developed to date, including recently developed flat panel systems, have low x-ray absorption, i.e., low quantum efficiency (QE) of 2%-4% as compared to the theoretical limit of 100%. A significant increase of QE is desirable for applications such as a megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MVCT) and megavoltage fluoroscopy. However, the spatial resolution of an imaging system usually decreases significantly with an increase of QE. The key to the success in the design of a high QE detector is therefore to maintain the spatial resolution. Recently, we demonstrated theoretically that it is possible to design a portal imaging detector with both high QE and high resolution [see Pang and Rowlands, Med. Phys. 29, 2274 (2002)]. In this paper, we introduce such a novel design consisting of a large number of microstructured plates (made by, e.g., photolithographic patterning of evaporated or electroplated layers) packed together and aligned with the incident x rays. On each plate, microstrip charge collectors are focused toward the x-ray source to collect charges generated in the ionization medium (e.g., air or gas) surrounded by high-density materials that act as x-ray converters. The collected charges represent the x-ray image and can be read out by various means, including a two-dimensional (2-D) active readout matrix. The QE, spatial resolution, and sensitivity of the detector have been calculated. It has been shown that the new design will have a QE of more than an order of magnitude higher and a spatial resolution equivalent to that of flat panel systems currently used for portal imaging. The new design is also quantum noise limited down to very low doses (approximately 1-2 radiation pulses of the linear accelerator).

  7. Development of a cardiac evaluation method using a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD) system: a feasibility study using a cardiac motion phantom.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru; Tsujioka, Katsumi; Matsui, Takeshi; Takata, Tadanori; Matsui, Osamu

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of cardiac evaluation with a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD), based on changes in pixel values during cardiac pumping. To investigate the feasibility of cardiac evaluation with a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD), based on changes in pixel values during cardiac pumping. Sequential radiographs of a cardiac motion phantom and water-equivalent material step were obtained with an FPD system. Various combinations of cardiac output and heart rate were evaluated with and without contrast medium. The ventricular area and summation of pixel values in the ventricles were measured. The ejection fraction (EF) was calculated based on the rate of changes and then compared to EF obtained from computed tomography images. In addition, slight changes in pixel values were visualized by use of inter-frame subtraction and color-mapping. The result of a clinical case was examined according to cardiac physiology. There were strong correlations between EF and our results. There was no significant difference between the findings with and without contrast medium. When the heart rate was greater than 60 bpm, EF obtained with our method were underestimated. It is necessary for a patient to be examined at an imaging rate between 7.5 and 10 fps at least. In addition, a +/-1.2% change in pixel value was equivalent to a +/-10 mm change in the thickness of water. Color-mapping images were supported by cardiac physiology. Evaluating changes in pixel values on dynamic chest radiography with FPD has the potential to demonstrate cardiac function without contrast medium. Inter-frame subtraction and color-mapping are very useful for interpreting changes in pixel value as velocities of blood flow.

  8. Detection of Cement Leakage After Vertebroplasty with a Non-Flat-Panel Angio Unit Compared to Multidetector Computed Tomography - An Ex Vivo Study

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, Clemens, E-mail: clebaumann@yahoo.com; Fuchs, Heiko; Westphalen, Kerstin

    2008-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the detection of cement leakages after vertebroplasty using angiographic computed tomography (ACT) in a non-flat-panel angio unit compared to multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Vertebroplasty was performed in 19 of 33 cadaver vertebrae (23 thoracic and 10 lumbar segments). In the angio suite, ACT (190{sup o}; 1.5{sup o} per image) was performed to obtain volumetric data. Another volumetric data set of the specimen was obtained by MDCT using a standard algorithm. Nine multiplanar reconstructions in standardized axial, coronal, and sagittal planes of every vertebra were generated from both data sets. Images were evaluatedmore » on the basis of a nominal scale with 18 criteria, comprising osseous properties (e.g., integrity of the end plate) and cement distribution (e.g., presence of intraspinal cement). MDCT images were regarded as gold standard and analyzed by two readers in a consensus mode. Rotational acquisitions were analyzed by six blinded readers. Results were correlated with the gold standard using Cohen's {kappa}-coefficient analysis. Furthermore, interobserver variability was calculated. Correlation with the gold standard ranged from no correlation (osseous margins of the neuroforamen, {kappa} = 0.008) to intermediate (trace of vertebroplasty canula; {kappa} = 0.615) for criteria referring to osseous morphology. However, there was an excellent correlation for those criteria referring to cement distribution, with {kappa} values ranging from 0.948 (paravertebral cement distribution) to 0.972 (intraspinal cement distribution). With a minimum of {kappa} = 0.768 ('good correlation') and a maximum of {kappa} = 0.91 ('excellent'), interobserver variability was low. In conclusion, ACT in an angio suite without a flat-panel detector depicts a cement leakage after vertebroplasty as well as MDCT. However, the method does not provide sufficient depiction of osseous morphology.« less

  9. Model-based Iterative Reconstruction for Flat-Panel Cone-Beam CT with Focal Spot Blur, Detector Blur, and Correlated Noise

    PubMed Central

    Tilley, Steven; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Stayman, J. Webster

    2016-01-01

    While model-based reconstruction methods have been successfully applied to flat-panel cone-beam CT (FP-CBCT) systems, typical implementations ignore both spatial correlations in the projection data as well as system blurs due to the detector and focal spot in the x-ray source. In this work, we develop a forward model for flat-panel-based systems that includes blur and noise correlation associated with finite focal spot size and an indirect detector (e.g., scintillator). This forward model is used to develop a staged reconstruction framework where projection data are deconvolved and log-transformed, followed by a generalized least-squares reconstruction that utilizes a non-diagonal statistical weighting to account for the correlation that arises from the acquisition and data processing chain. We investigate the performance of this novel reconstruction approach in both simulated data and in CBCT test-bench data. In comparison to traditional filtered backprojection and model-based methods that ignore noise correlation, the proposed approach yields a superior noise-resolution tradeoff. For example, for a system with 0.34 mm FWHM scintillator blur and 0.70 FWHM focal spot blur, using the a correlated noise model instead of an uncorrelated noise model increased resolution by 42% (with variance matched at 6.9 × 10−8 mm−2). While this advantage holds across a wide range of systems with differing blur characteristics, the improvements are greatest for systems where source blur is larger than detector blur. PMID:26649783

  10. Metal artifact reduction for flat panel detector intravenous CT angiography in patients with intracranial metallic implants after endovascular and surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Pjontek, Rastislav; Önenköprülü, Belgin; Scholz, Bernhard; Kyriakou, Yiannis; Schubert, Gerrit A; Nikoubashman, Omid; Othman, Ahmed; Wiesmann, Martin; Brockmann, Marc A

    2016-08-01

    Flat panel detector CT angiography with intravenous contrast agent injection (IV CTA) allows high-resolution imaging of cerebrovascular structures. Artifacts caused by metallic implants like platinum coils or clips lead to degradation of image quality and are a significant problem. To evaluate the influence of a prototype metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithm on image quality in patients with intracranial metallic implants. Flat panel detector CT after intravenous application of 80 mL contrast agent was performed with an angiography system (Artis zee; Siemens, Forchheim, Germany) using a 20 s rotation protocol (200° rotation angle, 20 s acquisition time, 496 projections). The data before and after MAR of 26 patients with a total of 34 implants (coils, clips, stents) were independently evaluated by two blinded neuroradiologists. MAR improved the assessability of the brain parenchyma and small vessels (diameter <1 mm) in the neighborhood of metallic implants and at a distance of 6 cm (p<0.001 each, Wilcoxon test). Furthermore, MAR significantly improved the assessability of parent vessel patency and potential aneurysm remnants (p<0.005 each, McNemar test). MAR, however, did not improve assessability of stented vessels. When an intravenous contrast protocol is used, MAR significantly ameliorates the assessability of brain parenchyma, vessels, and treated aneurysms in patients with intracranial coils or clips. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Impact Testing on Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Flat Panels With BX-265 and PDL-1034 External Tank Foam for the Space Shuttle Return to Flight Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melis, Matthew E.; Revilock, Duane M.; Pereira, Michael J.; Lyle, Karen H.

    2009-01-01

    Following the tragedy of the Orbiter Columbia (STS-107) on February 1, 2003, a major effort commenced to develop a better understanding of debris impacts and their effect on the space shuttle subsystems. An initiative to develop and validate physics-based computer models to predict damage from such impacts was a fundamental component of this effort. To develop the models it was necessary to physically characterize reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) along with ice and foam debris materials, which could shed on ascent and impact the orbiter RCC leading edges. The validated models enabled the launch system community to use the impact analysis software LS-DYNA (Livermore Software Technology Corp.) to predict damage by potential and actual impact events on the orbiter leading edge and nose cap thermal protection systems. Validation of the material models was done through a three-level approach: Level 1-fundamental tests to obtain independent static and dynamic constitutive model properties of materials of interest, Level 2-subcomponent impact tests to provide highly controlled impact test data for the correlation and validation of the models, and Level 3-full-scale orbiter leading-edge impact tests to establish the final level of confidence for the analysis methodology. This report discusses the Level 2 test program conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) Ballistic Impact Laboratory with external tank foam impact tests on flat RCC panels, and presents the data observed. The Level 2 testing consisted of 54 impact tests in the NASA GRC Ballistic Impact Laboratory on 6- by 6-in. and 6- by 12-in. flat plates of RCC and evaluated two types of debris projectiles: BX-265 and PDL-1034 external tank foam. These impact tests helped determine the level of damage generated in the RCC flat plates by each projectile and validated the use of the foam and RCC models for use in LS-DYNA.

  12. The Effect of Round Window vs Cochleostomy Surgical Approaches on Cochlear Implant Electrode Position: A Flat-Panel Computed Tomography Study.

    PubMed

    Jiam, Nicole T; Jiradejvong, Patpong; Pearl, Monica S; Limb, Charles J

    2016-09-01

    The round window insertion (RWI) and cochleostomy approaches are the 2 most common surgical techniques used in cochlear implantation (CI). However, there is no consensus on which approach is ideal for electrode array insertion, in part because visualization of intracochlear electrode position is challenging, so postoperative assessment of intracochlear electrode contact is lacking. To measure and compare electrode array position between RWI and cochleostomy approaches for CI insertion. Retrospective case-comparison study of 17 CI users with Med-El standard-length electrode arrays who underwent flat-panel computed tomography scans after CI surgery at a tertiary referral center. The data was analyzed in October 2015. Flat-panel computed tomography scans were collected between January 1 and August 31, 2013, for 22 electrode arrays. The surgical technique was identified by a combination of operative notes and imaging. Eight cochleae underwent RWI and 14 cochleae underwent cochleostomy approaches anterior and inferior to the round window. Interscalar electrode position and electrode centroid distance to the osseous spiral lamina, lateral bony wall, and central axis of the modiolus. Nine participants were men, and 8, women; the mean age was 54.4 (range, 21-64) years. Electrode position was significantly closer to cochlear neural elements with RWI than cochleostomy approaches. Between the 2 surgical approaches, the RWI technique produced shorter distances between the electrode and the modiolus (mean difference, -0.33 [95% CI, -0.29 to -0.39] mm in the apical electrode; -1.42 [95% CI, -1.24 to -1.57] mm in the basal electrode). This difference, which was most prominent in the first third and latter third of the basal turn, decreased after the basal turn. The RWI approach was associated with an increased likelihood of perimodiolar placement. Opting to use RWI over cochleostomy approaches in CI candidates may position electrodes closer to cochlear neural substrates and

  13. Hydrogen production by the engineered cyanobacterial strain Nostoc PCC 7120 ΔhupW examined in a flat panel photobioreactor system.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Marcus; Heidorn, Thorsten; Lindblad, Peter

    2015-12-10

    Nitrogenase based hydrogen production was examined in a ΔhupW strain of the filamentous heterocystous cyanobacterium Nostoc PCC 7120, i.e., cells lacking the last step in the maturation system of the large subunit of the uptake hydrogenase and as a consequence with a non-functional uptake hydrogenase. The cells were grown in a developed flat panel photobioreactor system with 3.0L culture volume either aerobically (air) or anaerobically (Ar or 80% N2/20% Ar) and illuminated with a mixture of red and white LED. Aerobic growth of the ΔhupW strain of Nostoc PCC 7120 at 44μmolar photons m(-2)s(-1) PAR gave the highest hydrogen production of 0.7mL H2 L(-1)h(-1), 0.53mmol H2 mg chlorophyll a(-1)h(-1), and a light energy conversion efficiency of 1.2%. Anaerobic growth using 100% argon showed a maximal hydrogen production of 1.7mLL(-1)h(-1), 0.85mmol per mg chlorophyll a(-1) h(-1), and a light energy conversion efficiency of 2.7%. Altering between argon/N2 (20/80) and 100% argon phases resulted in a maximal hydrogen production at hour 128 (100% argon phase) with 6.2mL H2L(-1)h(-1), 0.71mL H2 mg chlorophyll a(-1)h(-1), and a light energy efficiency conversion of 4.0%. The highest buildup of hydrogen gas observed was 6.89% H2 (100% argon phase) of the total photobioreactor system with a maximal production of 4.85mL H2 L(-1)h(-1). The present study clearly demonstrates the potential to use purpose design cyanobacteria in developed flat panel photobioreactor systems for the direct production of the solar fuel hydrogen. Further improvements in the strain used, environmental conditions employed, and growth, production and collection systems used, are needed before a sustainable and economical cyanobacterial based hydrogen production can be realized. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. SU-C-16A-01: In Vivo Source Position Verification in High Dose Rate (HDR) Prostate Brachytherapy Using a Flat Panel Imager: Initial Clinical Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Franich, R; Smith, R; Millar, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We report our initial clinical experience with a novel position-sensitive source-tracking system based on a flat panel imager. The system has been trialled with 4 prostate HDR brachytherapy patients (8 treatment fractions) in this initial study. Methods: The flat panel imaging system was mounted under a customised carbon fibre couch top assembly (Figure 1). Three gold fiducial markers were implanted into the prostate of each patient at the time of catheter placement. X-ray dwell position markers were inserted into three catheters and a radiograph acquired to locate the implant relative to the imaging device. During treatment, as the HDRmore » source dwells were delivered, images were acquired and processed to determine the position of the source in the patient. Source positions measured by the imaging device were compared to the treatment plan for verification of treatment delivery. Results: Measured dwell positions provided verification of relative dwell spacing within and between catheters, in the coronal plane. Measurements were typically within 2.0mm (0.2mm – 3.3mm, s.d. 0.8mm) of the planned positions over 60 dwells (Figure 2). Discrimination between larger dwell intervals and catheter differentiation were clear. This confirms important delivery attributes such as correct transfer tube connection, source step size, relative catheter positions and therefore overall correct plan selection and delivery. The fiducial markers, visible on the radiograph, provided verification of treatment delivery to the correct anatomical location. The absolute position of the dwells was determined by comparing the measured dwell positions with the x-ray markers from the radiograph, validating the programmed treatment indexer length. The total impact on procedure time was less than 5 minutes. Conclusion: The novel, noninvasive HDR brachytherapy treatment verification system was used clinically with minor impact on workflow. The system allows verification of correct

  15. Measurement of effective detective quantum efficiency for a photon counting scanning mammography system and comparison with two flat panel full-field digital mammography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Tim J.; Moore, Craig S.; Saunderson, John R.; Beavis, Andrew W.

    2018-01-01

    Effective detective quantum efficiency (eDQE) describes the resolution and noise properties of an imaging system along with scatter and primary transmission, all measured under clinically appropriate conditions. Effective dose efficiency (eDE) is the eDQE normalised to mean glandular dose and has been proposed as a useful metric for the optimisation of clinical imaging systems. The aim of this study was to develop a methodology for measuring eDQE and eDE on a Philips microdose mammography (MDM) L30 photon counting scanning system, and to compare performance with two conventional flat panel systems. A custom made lead-blocker was manufactured to enable the accurate determination of dose measurements, and modulation transfer functions were determined free-in-air at heights of 2, 4 and 6 cm above the breast support platform. eDQE were calculated for a Philips MDM L30, Hologic Dimensions and Siemens Inspiration digital mammography system for 2, 4 and 6 cm thick poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). The beam qualities (target/filter and kilovoltage) assessed were those selected by the automatic exposure control, and anti-scatter grids were used where available. Measurements of eDQE demonstrate significant differences in performance between the slit- and scan-directions for the photon counting imaging system. MTF has been shown to be the limiting factor in the scan-direction, which results in a rapid fall in eDQE at mid-to-high spatial frequencies. A comparison with two flat panel mammography systems demonstrates that this may limit image quality for small details, such as micro-calcifications, which correlates with a more conventional image quality assessment with the CDMAM phantom. eDE has shown the scanning photon counting system offers superior performance for low spatial frequencies, which will be important for the detection of large low contrast masses. Both eDQE and eDE are proposed as useful metrics that should enable optimisation of the Philips MDM L30.

  16. A study on 100 MeV O7+ irradiated SnO2/Ag/SnO2 multilayer as transparent electrode for flat panel display application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Vikas; Singh, Satyavir; Asokan, K.; Sachdev, Kanupriya

    2016-07-01

    The multilayer thin films of SnO2/Ag/SnO2 were deposited using electron-beam and thermal evaporation for flat panel display application. The as-prepared SnO2/Ag/SnO2 specimen was irradiated with 100 MeV O7+ ions by varying the fluences 1 × 1012 and 5 × 1012 ions/cm2. The pristine and irradiated films were investigated using XRD, SEM, AFM and Raman to find out modification in the structure and surface morphology of the films. UV-Vis and Hall measurement techniques were used to investigate the optical and electrical properties respectively. It was observed that the roughness of the film after irradiation (for the fluence of 1 × 1012 ions/cm2) ​ decreased to 0.68 nm from 1.6 nm and showed an increase in roughness to 1.35 nm on increasing the fluence to 5 × 1012 ions/cm2. This oxide/metal/oxide structure fulfills the basic requirements of a TCE, like high-transmittance >75% for pristine and >80% for the fluence of 1 × 1012 ions/cm2 over a broad spectrum of visible light for practical applications. The multilayer structure shows change in the electrical resistivity from 1.6 × 10-3 Ω cm to 6.3 × 10-3 Ω cm after irradiation.

  17. Effect of gradual transition of substrate on performance of flat-panel air-cathode microbial fuel cells to treat domestic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Park, Younghyun; Park, Seonghwan; Nguyen, Van Khanh; Kim, Jung Rae; Kim, Hong Suck; Kim, Byung Goon; Yu, Jaecheul; Lee, Taeho

    2017-02-01

    In order to confirm the effects of the low conductivity and biodegradability of wastewater, flat-panel air-cathode microbial fuel cells (FA-MFCs) were operated by supplying substrates with different volume ratios of domestic wastewater mixed with an artificial medium: the artificial medium only, 25% wastewater, 50% wastewater, 75% wastewater, 100% of wastewater with 500mg-COD/L by adding acetate, and raw domestic wastewater (230mg-COD/L). With the increase of wastewater ratio, the maximum power density and organic removal efficiency decreased from 187 to 60W/m 3 and 51.5 to 37.4%, respectively, but the Coulombic efficiency was maintained in the range of 18.0-18.9%. The FA-MFCs could maintain their low internal resistances and overcome the decreasing conductivity. The acetate concentration was more important than the total organics for power production. This study suggests that the FA-MFC configuration has great applicability for practical applications when supplied by domestic wastewater with low conductivity and biodegradability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of anode spacing and flow rate on energy recovery of flat-panel air-cathode microbial fuel cells using domestic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Park, Younghyun; Nguyen, Van Khanh; Park, Seonghwan; Yu, Jaecheul; Lee, Taeho

    2018-06-01

    A flat-panel air-cathode microbial fuel cell (FA-MFC) is known to overcome the low conductivity and biodegradability of domestic wastewater. This study evaluated the normalized energy recovery (NER) based on the volume of wastewater treated (NER V ) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal (NER COD ) using FA-MFCs with three anode spacing conditions and different flow rates (within a hydraulic retention time of 30 min). Generation of current was similar (11.7 ± 0.5 mA) at different spacings; however, COD removal was affected by the flow rates. The NER V for both acetate and domestic wastewater showed good agreements with the flow rates in all anode spacing conditions. The NER COD results were negatively correlated with the COD removal rates, independent of the anode spacing. The FA-MFCs yielded an NER COD of 0.22 kWh/kg-COD from extremely low-strength domestic wastewater (150 mg-COD/L). The FA-MFC has a significant potential as an energy-sustainable wastewater treatment technology. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The impact of round window vs cochleostomy surgical approaches on interscalar excursions in the cochlea: Preliminary results from a flat-panel computed tomography study.

    PubMed

    Jiam, Nicole T; Limb, Charles J

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate incidence of interscalar excursions between round window (RW) and cochleostomy approaches for cochlear implant (CI) insertion. This was a retrospective case-comparison. Flat-panel CT (FPCT) scans for 8 CI users with Med-El standard length electrode arrays were collected. Surgical technique was identified by a combination of operative notes and FPCT imaging. Four cochleae underwent round window insertion and 4 cochleae underwent cochleostomy approaches anterior and inferior to the round window. In our pilot study, cochleostomy approaches were associated with a higher likelihood of interscalar excursion. Within the cochleostomy group, we found 29% of electrode contacts (14 of 48 electrodes) to be outside the scala tympani. On the other hand, 8.5% of the electrode contacts (4 of 47 electrodes) in the round window insertion group were extra-scalar to the scala tympani. These displacements occurred at a mean angle of occurrence of 364° ± 133°, near the apex of the cochlea. Round window electrode displacements tend to localize at angle of occurrences of 400° or greater. Cochleostomy electrodes occurred at an angle of occurrence of 19°-490°. Currently, the optimal surgical approach for standard CI electrode insertion is highly debated, to a certain extent due to a lack of post-operative assessment of intracochlear electrode contact. Based on our preliminary findings, cochleostomy approach is associated with an increased likelihood of interscalar excursions, and these findings should be further evaluated with future prospective studies.

  20. Comparison of Multidetector Computed Tomography and Flat-Panel Computed Tomography Regarding Visualization of Cortical Fractures, Cortical Defects, and Orthopedic Screws

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Jakob; Benndorf, Matthias; Lang, Hannah; Lampert, Florian; Kemna, Lars; Konstantinidis, Lukas; Neubauer, Claudia; Reising, Kilian; Zajonc, Horst; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias; Goerke, Sebastian M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To compare the visualization of cortical fractures, cortical defects, and orthopedic screws in a dedicated extremity flat-panel computed tomography (FPCT) scanner and a multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scanner. We used feet of European roe deer as phantoms for cortical fractures, cortical defects, and implanted orthopedic screws. FPCT and MDCT scans were performed with equivalent dose settings. Six observers rated the scans according to number of fragments, size of defects, size of defects opposite orthopedic screws, and the length of different screws. The image quality regarding depiction of the cortical bone was assessed. The gold standard (real number of fragments) was evaluated by autopsy. The correlation of reader assessment of fragments, cortical defects, and screws with the gold standard was similar for FPCT and MDCT. Three readers rated the subjective image quality of the MDCT to be higher, whereas the others showed no preferences. Although the image quality was rated higher in the MDCT than in the FPCT by 3 out of 6 observers, both modalities proved to be comparable regarding the visualization of cortical fractures, cortical defects, and orthopedic screws and of use to musculoskeletal radiology regarding fracture detection and postsurgical evaluation in our experimental setting. PMID:26252281

  1. Structural noise from automatic exposure control device and its relationship to X-ray tube voltage used for calibration of a flat-panel detector system.

    PubMed

    Mizuta, Masayoshi; Akazawa, Hiroyuki; Kasai, Toshifumi; Sanada, Shigeru; Abe, Shuji; Mitou, Shigeki

    2012-01-01

    In flat-panel detector (FPD) systems, the ion-chamber dosimeters used for automatic exposure control (AEC), which are placed between the detector and the source, should not affect clinical images because of FPD gain correction, but can sometimes still introduce fixed-pattern noise. In this study, we investigated whether such artifacts were caused by structural noise from the AEC detector on the basis of the noise power spectrum (NPS) and the mean square error (MSE) of FPD images taken at various tube voltages either with or without the AEC detector. When the NPS was measured without the AEC detector, the NPS did not increase in the low special-frequency band at all radiation qualities tested, irrespective of X-ray calibration tube voltages. However, when the NPS was measured while the AEC detector was used, the NPS increased in the low special-frequency band at all radiation qualities when the X-ray calibration tube voltages were at low levels. Similarly, the MSE increased when the X-ray calibration tube voltages were at low levels. From these results, artifacts in the AEC detector appear to be suppressed when a radiation quality of approximately 90 kV is used at four different standardized radiations quality (RQA3, RQA5, RQA7, and RQA9).

  2. Does Preinterventional Flat-Panel Computer Tomography Pooled Blood Volume Mapping Predict Final Infarct Volume After Mechanical Thrombectomy in Acute Cerebral Artery Occlusion?

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Marlies, E-mail: marlies.wagner@kgu.de; Kyriakou, Yiannis, E-mail: yiannis.kyriakou@siemens.com; Mesnil de Rochemont, Richard du, E-mail: mesnil@em.uni-frankfurt.de

    2013-08-01

    PurposeDecreased cerebral blood volume is known to be a predictor for final infarct volume in acute cerebral artery occlusion. To evaluate the predictability of final infarct volume in patients with acute occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) or the distal internal carotid artery (ICA) and successful endovascular recanalization, pooled blood volume (PBV) was measured using flat-panel detector computed tomography (FPD CT).Materials and MethodsTwenty patients with acute unilateral occlusion of the MCA or distal ACI without demarcated infarction, as proven by CT at admission, and successful Thrombolysis in cerebral infarction score (TICI 2b or 3) endovascular thrombectomy were included. Cerebralmore » PBV maps were acquired from each patient immediately before endovascular thrombectomy. Twenty-four hours after recanalization, each patient underwent multislice CT to visualize final infarct volume. Extent of the areas of decreased PBV was compared with the final infarct volume proven by follow-up CT the next day.ResultsIn 15 of 20 patients, areas of distinct PBV decrease corresponded to final infarct volume. In 5 patients, areas of decreased PBV overestimated final extension of ischemia probably due to inappropriate timing of data acquisition and misery perfusion.ConclusionPBV mapping using FPD CT is a promising tool to predict areas of irrecoverable brain parenchyma in acute thromboembolic stroke. Further validation is necessary before routine use for decision making for interventional thrombectomy.« less

  3. Pulmonary Function Diagnosis Based on Respiratory Changes in Lung Density With Dynamic Flat-Panel Detector Imaging: An Animal-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie; Tani, Tohru; Nitta, Norihisa; Tabata, Takahisa; Matsutani, Noritsugu; Muraoka, Shintaro; Yoneyama, Tsutomu; Sanada, Shigeru

    2018-03-02

    The aims of this study were to address the relationship between respiratory changes in image density of the lungs and tidal volume, to compare the changes between affected and unaffected lobes, and to apply this new technique to the diagnosis of atelectasis. Our animal care committee approved this prospective animal study. Sequential chest radiographs of 4 pigs were obtained under respiratory control with a ventilator using a dynamic flat-panel detector system. Porcine models of atelectasis were developed, and the correlation between the tidal volume and changes in pixel values measured in the lungs were analyzed. The mean difference in respiratory changes in pixel values between both lungs was tested using paired t tests. To facilitate visual evaluation, respiratory changes in pixel values were visualized in the form of a color display, that is, as changes in color scale. Average pixel values in the lung regions changed according to forced respiration. High linearity was observed between changes in pixel values and tidal volume in the normal models (r = 0.99). Areas of atelectasis displayed significantly reduced changes in pixel values (P < 0.05). Of all atelectasis models with air trapping and air inflow restriction, 92.7% (19/20) were visualized as color-defective or color-marked areas on functional images, respectively. Dynamic chest radiography allows for the relative evaluation of tidal volume, the detection of ventilation defects in the lobe unit, and a differential diagnosis between air trapping and air inflow restriction, based on respiratory changes in image density of the lungs, even without the use of contrast media.

  4. Imaging responses of on-site CsI and Gd2O2S flat-panel detectors: Dependence on the tube voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Hosang; Chung, Myung Jin; Youn, Seungman; Nam, Jiho; Lee, Jayoung; Park, Dahl; Kim, Wontaek; Ki, Yongkan; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2015-07-01

    One of the emerging issues in radiography is low-dose imaging to minimize patient's exposure. The scintillating materials employed in most indirect flat-panel detectors show a drastic change of X-ray photon absorption efficiency around their K-edge energies that consequently affects image quality. Using various tube voltages, we investigated the imaging performance of most popular scintillators: cesium iodide (CsI) and gadolinium oxysulfide (Gd2O2S). The integrated detective quantum efficiencies (iDQE) of four detectors installed in the same hospital were evaluated according to the standardized procedure IEC 62220-1 at tube voltages of 40 - 120 kVp. The iDQE values of the Gd2O2S detectors were normalized by those of CsI detectors to exclude the effects of image postprocessing. The contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) were also evaluated by using an anthropomorphic chest phantom. The iDQE of the CsI detector outperformed that of the Gd2O2S detector over all tube voltages. Moreover, we noted that the iDQE of the Gd2O2S detectors quickly rolled off with decreasing tube voltage under 70 kVp. The CNRs of the two scintillators were similar at 120 kVp. At 60 kVp, however, the CNR of Gd2O2S was about half that of CsI. Compared to the Gd2O2S detectors, variations in the DQE performance of the CsI detectors were relatively immune to variations in the applied tube voltages. Therefore, we claim that Gd2O2S detectors are inappropriate for use in low-tube-voltage imaging (e.g., extremities and pediatrics) with low patient exposure.

  5. Comparison of Radiation Exposure during Endovascular Treatment of Peripheral Arterial Disease with Flat-Panel Detectors on Mobile C-arm versus Fixed Systems.

    PubMed

    Guillou, Marie; Maurel, Blandine; Necib, Hatem; Vent, Pierre-Alexandre; Costargent, Alain; Chaillou, Philippe; Gouëffic, Yann; Kaladji, Adrien

    2018-02-01

    Flat-panel detectors on mobile C-arm (MC-arm) systems are currently challenging fixed C-arm (FC-arm) systems used in hybrid operating rooms. MC-arm systems offer an alternative to FC-arm systems in the endovascular treatment of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) but their efficiency has not been evaluated comparatively. Two series of patients undergoing arteriography with intention to treat were included. Each series consisted of 2 nonrandomized groups: an MC-arm group and an FC-arm group. Series 1 evaluated exposure to the patient (MC-arm, n = 113; FC-arm, n = 206) while series 2 evaluated exposure to patients and also health care personnel (MC-arm, n = 24; FC-arm, n = 76). The primary end points for evaluating exposure were air kerma (AK, in mGy) for patients and effective dose for health care personnel (in μSv). After adjustment for the effect of body mass index (analysis of covariance test), AK was found to be lower in the MC-arm group than in the FC-arm group (124.1 ± 142 vs. 173.3 ± 248.7, P = 0.025). There was no difference between the groups with regard to effective dose recorded for senior surgeons or for operating room nurses. However, a higher effective dose was recorded by the MC-arm group external dosimeter for the trainee resident and for nurse anesthetists. In endovascular treatment of lower limb PAD, use of an FC-arm system is associated with more radiation exposure to the patient than an MC-arm system. However, this type of imaging system does not appear to affect exposure to health care personnel. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector on a mobile C-arm: preclinical investigation in image-guided surgery of the head and neck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siewerdsen, J. H.; Chan, Y.; Rafferty, M. A.; Moseley, D. J.; Jaffray, D. A.; Irish, J. C.

    2005-04-01

    A promising imaging platform for combined low-dose fluoroscopy and cone-beam CT (CBCT) guidance of interventional procedures has been developed in our laboratory. Based on a mobile isocentric C-arm (Siemens PowerMobil) incorporating a high-performance flat-panel detector (Varian PaxScan 4030CB), the system demonstrates sub-mm 3D spatial resolution and soft-tissue visibility with field of view sufficient for head and body sites. For pre-clinical studies in head neck tumor surgery, we hypothesize that the 3D intraoperative information provided by CBCT permits precise, aggressive techniques with improved avoidance of critical structures. The objectives include: 1) quantify improvement in surgical performance achieved with CBCT guidance compared to open and endoscopic techniques; and 2) investigate specific, challenging surgical tasks under CBCT guidance. Investigations proceed from an idealized phantom model to cadaveric specimens. A novel surgical performance evaluation method based on statistical decision theory is applied to excision and avoidance tasks. Analogous to receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis in medical imaging, the method quantifies surgical performance in terms of Lesion-Excised (True-Positve), Lesion-Remaining (False-Negative), Normal-Excised (False-Positive), and Normal-Remaining (True-Negative) fractions. Conservative and aggressive excision and avoidance tasks are executed in 12 cadaveric specimens with and without CBCT guidance, including: dissection through dura, preservation of posterior lamina, ethmoid air cells removal, exposure of peri-orbita, and excision of infiltrated bone in the skull base (clivus). Intraoperative CBCT data was found to dramatically improve surgical performance and confidence in the execution of such tasks. Pre-clinical investigation of this platform in head and neck surgery, as well as spinal, trauma, biopsy, and other nonvascular procedures, is discussed.

  7. High-EPA Biomass from Nannochloropsis salina Cultivated in a Flat-Panel Photo-Bioreactor on a Process Water-Enriched Growth Medium

    PubMed Central

    Safafar, Hamed; Hass, Michael Z.; Møller, Per; Holdt, Susan L.; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Nannochloropsis salina was grown on a mixture of standard growth media and pre-gasified industrial process water representing effluent from a local biogas plant. The study aimed to investigate the effects of enriched growth media and cultivation time on nutritional composition of Nannochloropsis salina biomass, with a focus on eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Variations in fatty acid composition, lipids, protein, amino acids, tocopherols and pigments were studied and results compared to algae cultivated on F/2 media as reference. Mixed growth media and process water enhanced the nutritional quality of Nannochloropsis salina in laboratory scale when compared to algae cultivated in standard F/2 medium. Data from laboratory scale translated to the large scale using a 4000 L flat panel photo-bioreactor system. The algae growth rate in winter conditions in Denmark was slow, but results revealed that large-scale cultivation of Nannochloropsis salina at these conditions could improve the nutritional properties such as EPA, tocopherol, protein and carotenoids compared to laboratory-scale cultivated microalgae. EPA reached 44.2% ± 2.30% of total fatty acids, and α-tocopherol reached 431 ± 28 µg/g of biomass dry weight after 21 days of cultivation. Variations in chemical compositions of Nannochloropsis salina were studied during the course of cultivation. Nannochloropsis salina can be presented as a good candidate for winter time cultivation in Denmark. The resulting biomass is a rich source of EPA and also a good source of protein (amino acids), tocopherols and carotenoids for potential use in aquaculture feed industry. PMID:27483291

  8. High-EPA Biomass from Nannochloropsis salina Cultivated in a Flat-Panel Photo-Bioreactor on a Process Water-Enriched Growth Medium.

    PubMed

    Safafar, Hamed; Hass, Michael Z; Møller, Per; Holdt, Susan L; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2016-07-29

    Nannochloropsis salina was grown on a mixture of standard growth media and pre-gasified industrial process water representing effluent from a local biogas plant. The study aimed to investigate the effects of enriched growth media and cultivation time on nutritional composition of Nannochloropsis salina biomass, with a focus on eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Variations in fatty acid composition, lipids, protein, amino acids, tocopherols and pigments were studied and results compared to algae cultivated on F/2 media as reference. Mixed growth media and process water enhanced the nutritional quality of Nannochloropsis salina in laboratory scale when compared to algae cultivated in standard F/2 medium. Data from laboratory scale translated to the large scale using a 4000 L flat panel photo-bioreactor system. The algae growth rate in winter conditions in Denmark was slow, but results revealed that large-scale cultivation of Nannochloropsis salina at these conditions could improve the nutritional properties such as EPA, tocopherol, protein and carotenoids compared to laboratory-scale cultivated microalgae. EPA reached 44.2% ± 2.30% of total fatty acids, and α-tocopherol reached 431 ± 28 µg/g of biomass dry weight after 21 days of cultivation. Variations in chemical compositions of Nannochloropsis salina were studied during the course of cultivation. Nannochloropsis salina can be presented as a good candidate for winter time cultivation in Denmark. The resulting biomass is a rich source of EPA and also a good source of protein (amino acids), tocopherols and carotenoids for potential use in aquaculture feed industry.

  9. Quantitative comparison using Generalized Relative Object Detectability (G-ROD) metrics of an amorphous selenium detector with high resolution Microangiographic Fluoroscopes (MAF) and standard flat panel detectors (FPD).

    PubMed

    Russ, M; Shankar, A; Jain, A; Setlur Nagesh, S V; Ionita, C N; Scott, C; Karim, K S; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2016-02-27

    A novel amorphous selenium (a-Se) direct detector with CMOS readout has been designed, and relative detector performance investigated. The detector features include a 25 μ m pixel pitch, and 1000 μ m thick a-Se layer operating at 10V/ μ m bias field. A simulated detector DQE was determined, and used in comparative calculations of the Relative Object Detectability (ROD) family of prewhitening matched-filter (PWMF) observer and non-prewhitening matched filter (NPWMF) observer model metrics to gauge a-Se detector performance against existing high resolution micro-angiographic fluoroscopic (MAF) detectors and a standard flat panel detector (FPD). The PWMF-ROD or ROD metric compares two x-ray imaging detectors in their relative abilities in imaging a given object by taking the integral over spatial frequencies of the Fourier transform of the detector DQE weighted by an object function, divided by the comparable integral for a different detector. The generalized-ROD (G-ROD) metric incorporates clinically relevant parameters (focal-spot size, magnification, and scatter) to show the degradation in imaging performance for detectors that are part of an imaging chain. Preliminary ROD calculations using simulated spheres as the object predicted superior imaging performance by the a-Se detector as compared to existing detectors. New PWMF-G-ROD and NPWMF-G-ROD results still indicate better performance by the a-Se detector in an imaging chain over all sphere sizes for various focal spot sizes and magnifications, although a-Se performance advantages were degraded by focal spot blurring. Nevertheless, the a-Se technology has great potential to provide breakthrough abilities such as visualization of fine details including of neuro-vascular perforator vessels and of small vascular devices.

  10. Quantitative comparison using generalized relative object detectability (G-ROD) metrics of an amorphous selenium detector with high resolution microangiographic fluoroscopes (MAF) and standard flat panel detectors (FPD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russ, M.; Shankar, A.; Jain, A.; Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Ionita, C. N.; Scott, C.; Karim, K. S.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2016-03-01

    A novel amorphous selenium (a-Se) direct detector with CMOS readout has been designed, and relative detector performance investigated. The detector features include a 25μm pixel pitch, and 1000μm thick a-Se layer operating at 10V/μm bias field. A simulated detector DQE was determined, and used in comparative calculations of the Relative Object Detectability (ROD) family of prewhitening matched-filter (PWMF) observer and non-pre-whitening matched filter (NPWMF) observer model metrics to gauge a-Se detector performance against existing high resolution micro-angiographic fluoroscopic (MAF) detectors and a standard flat panel detector (FPD). The PWMF-ROD or ROD metric compares two x-ray imaging detectors in their relative abilities in imaging a given object by taking the integral over spatial frequencies of the Fourier transform of the detector DQE weighted by an object function, divided by the comparable integral for a different detector. The generalized-ROD (G-ROD) metric incorporates clinically relevant parameters (focal- spot size, magnification, and scatter) to show the degradation in imaging performance for detectors that are part of an imaging chain. Preliminary ROD calculations using simulated spheres as the object predicted superior imaging performance by the a-Se detector as compared to existing detectors. New PWMF-G-ROD and NPWMF-G-ROD results still indicate better performance by the a-Se detector in an imaging chain over all sphere sizes for various focal spot sizes and magnifications, although a-Se performance advantages were degraded by focal spot blurring. Nevertheless, the a-Se technology has great potential to provide break- through abilities such as visualization of fine details including of neuro-vascular perforator vessels and of small vascular devices.

  11. Integrated radiotherapy imaging system (IRIS): design considerations of tumour tracking with linac gantry-mounted diagnostic x-ray systems with flat-panel detectors.

    PubMed

    Berbeco, Ross I; Jiang, Steve B; Sharp, Gregory C; Chen, George T; Mostafavi, Hassan; Shirato, Hiroki

    2004-01-21

    The design of an integrated radiotherapy imaging system (IRIS), consisting of gantry mounted diagnostic (kV) x-ray tubes and fast read-out flat-panel amorphous-silicon detectors, has been studied. The system is meant to be capable of three main functions: radiographs for three-dimensional (3D) patient set-up, cone-beam CT and real-time tumour/marker tracking. The goal of the current study is to determine whether one source/panel pair is sufficient for real-time tumour/marker tracking and, if two are needed, the optimal position of each relative to other components and the isocentre. A single gantry-mounted source/imager pair is certainly capable of the first two of the three functions listed above and may also be useful for the third, if combined with prior knowledge of the target's trajectory. This would be necessary because only motion in two dimensions is visible with a single imager/source system. However, with previously collected information about the trajectory, the third coordinate may be derived from the other two with sufficient accuracy to facilitate tracking. This deduction of the third coordinate can only be made if the 3D tumour/marker trajectory is consistent from fraction to fraction. The feasibility of tumour tracking with one source/imager pair has been theoretically examined here using measured lung marker trajectory data for seven patients from multiple treatment fractions. The patients' selection criteria include minimum mean amplitudes of the tumour motions greater than 1 cm peak-to-peak. The marker trajectory for each patient was modelled using the first fraction data. Then for the rest of the data, marker positions were derived from the imager projections at various gantry angles and compared with the measured tumour positions. Our results show that, due to the three dimensionality and irregular trajectory characteristics of tumour motion, on a fraction-to-fraction basis, a 'monoscopic' system (single source/imager) is inadequate for

  12. A method for verification of treatment delivery in HDR prostate brachytherapy using a flat panel detector for both imaging and source tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Ryan L., E-mail: ryan.smith@wbrc.org.au; Millar, Jeremy L.; Franich, Rick D.

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: Verification of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment delivery is an important step, but is generally difficult to achieve. A technique is required to monitor the treatment as it is delivered, allowing comparison with the treatment plan and error detection. In this work, we demonstrate a method for monitoring the treatment as it is delivered and directly comparing the delivered treatment with the treatment plan in the clinical workspace. This treatment verification system is based on a flat panel detector (FPD) used for both pre-treatment imaging and source tracking. Methods: A phantom study was conducted to establish the resolutionmore » and precision of the system. A pretreatment radiograph of a phantom containing brachytherapy catheters is acquired and registration between the measurement and treatment planning system (TPS) is performed using implanted fiducial markers. The measured catheter paths immediately prior to treatment were then compared with the plan. During treatment delivery, the position of the {sup 192}Ir source is determined at each dwell position by measuring the exit radiation with the FPD and directly compared to the planned source dwell positions. Results: The registration between the two corresponding sets of fiducial markers in the TPS and radiograph yielded a registration error (residual) of 1.0 mm. The measured catheter paths agreed with the planned catheter paths on average to within 0.5 mm. The source positions measured with the FPD matched the planned source positions for all dwells on average within 0.6 mm (s.d. 0.3, min. 0.1, max. 1.4 mm). Conclusions: We have demonstrated a method for directly comparing the treatment plan with the delivered treatment that can be easily implemented in the clinical workspace. Pretreatment imaging was performed, enabling visualization of the implant before treatment delivery and identification of possible catheter displacement. Treatment delivery verification was performed by measuring

  13. TU-F-18C-02: Increasing Amorphous Selenium Thickness in Direct Conversion Flat-Panel Imagers for Contrast-Enhanced Dual-Energy Breast Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Scaduto, DA; Hu, Y-H; Zhao, W

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Contrast-enhanced (CE) breast imaging using iodinated contrast agents requires imaging with x-ray spectra at energies greater than those used in mammography. Optimizing amorphous selenium (a-Se) flat panel imagers (FPI) for this higher energy range may increase lesion conspicuity. Methods: We compare imaging performance of a conventional FPI with 200 μm a-Se conversion layer to a prototype FPI with 300 μm a-Se layer. Both detectors are evaluated in a Siemens MAMMOMAT Inspiration prototype digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) system using low-energy (W/Rh 28 kVp) and high-energy (W/Cu 49 kVp) x-ray spectra. Detectability of iodinated lesions in dual-energy images is evaluated usingmore » an iodine contrast phantom. Effects of beam obliquity are investigated in projection and reconstructed images using different reconstruction methods. The ideal observer signal-to-noise ratio is used as a figure-of-merit to predict the optimal a-Se thickness for CE lesion detectability without compromising conventional full-field digital mammography (FFDM) and DBT performance. Results: Increasing a-Se thickness from 200 μm to 300 μm preserves imaging performance at typical mammographic energies (e.g. W/Rh 28 kVp), and improves the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) for high energy (W/Cu 49 kVp) by 30%. While the more penetrating high-energy x-ray photons increase geometric blur due to beam obliquity in the FPI with thicker a-Se layer, the effect on lesion detectability in FBP reconstructions is negligible due to the reconstruction filters employed. Ideal observer SNR for CE objects shows improvements in in-plane detectability with increasing a-Se thicknesses, though small lesion detectability begins to degrade in oblique projections for a-Se thickness above 500 μm. Conclusion: Increasing a-Se thickness in direct conversion FPI from 200 μm to 300 μm improves lesion detectability in CE breast imaging with virtually no cost to conventional FFDM and DBT. This work was

  14. SU-E-I-11: Cascaded Linear System Model for Columnar CsI Flat Panel Imagers with Depth Dependent Gain and Blur

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, B; Lubinsky, A; Zheng, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To implement a depth dependent gain and blur cascaded linear system model (CLSM) for optimizing columnar structured CsI indirect conversion flat panel imager (FPI) for advanced imaging applications. Methods: For experimental validation, depth dependent escape efficiency, e(z), was extracted from PHS measurement of different CsI scintillators (thickness, substrate and light output). The inherent MTF and DQE of CsI was measured using high resolution CMOS sensor. For CLSM, e(z) and the depth dependent MTF(f,z), were estimated using Monte Carlo simulation (Geant4) of optical photon transport through columnar CsI. Previous work showed that Monte Carlo simulation for CsI was hindered bymore » the non-ideality of its columnar structure. In the present work we allowed variation in columnar width with depth, and assumed diffusive reflective backing and columns. Monte Carlo simulation was performed using an optical point source placed at different depth of the CsI layer, from which MTF(z,f) and e(z) were computed. The resulting e(z) with excellent matching with experimental measurements were then applied to the CLSM, Monte Carlo simulation was repeated until the modeled MTF, DQE(f) also match experimental measurement. Results: For a 150 micron FOS HL type CsI, e(z) varies between 0.56 to 0.45, and the MTF at 14 cycles/mm varies between 62.1% to 3.9%, from the front to the back of the scintillator. The overall MTF and DQE(f) at all frequencies are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements at all frequencies. Conclusion: We have developed a CLSM for columnar CsI scintillators with depth dependent gain and MTF, which were estimated from Monte Carlo simulation with novel optical simulation settings. Preliminary results showed excellent agreement between simulation results and experimental measurements. Future work is aimed at extending this approach to optimize CsI screen optic design and sensor structure for achieving higher DQE(f) in cone-beam CT, which

  15. An investigation of signal performance enhancements achieved through innovative pixel design across several generations of indirect detection, active matrix, flat-panel arrays

    PubMed Central

    Antonuk, Larry E.; Zhao, Qihua; El-Mohri, Youcef; Du, Hong; Wang, Yi; Street, Robert A.; Ho, Jackson; Weisfield, Richard; Yao, William

    2009-01-01

    Active matrix flat-panel imager (AMFPI) technology is being employed for an increasing variety of imaging applications. An important element in the adoption of this technology has been significant ongoing improvements in optical signal collection achieved through innovations in indirect detection array pixel design. Such improvements have a particularly beneficial effect on performance in applications involving low exposures and∕or high spatial frequencies, where detective quantum efficiency is strongly reduced due to the relatively high level of additive electronic noise compared to signal levels of AMFPI devices. In this article, an examination of various signal properties, as determined through measurements and calculations related to novel array designs, is reported in the context of the evolution of AMFPI pixel design. For these studies, dark, optical, and radiation signal measurements were performed on prototype imagers incorporating a variety of increasingly sophisticated array designs, with pixel pitches ranging from 75 to 127 μm. For each design, detailed measurements of fundamental pixel-level properties conducted under radiographic and fluoroscopic operating conditions are reported and the results are compared. A series of 127 μm pitch arrays employing discrete photodiodes culminated in a novel design providing an optical fill factor of ∼80% (thereby assuring improved x-ray sensitivity), and demonstrating low dark current, very low charge trapping and charge release, and a large range of linear signal response. In two of the designs having 75 and 90 μm pitches, a novel continuous photodiode structure was found to provide fill factors that approach the theoretical maximum of 100%. Both sets of novel designs achieved large fill factors by employing architectures in which some, or all of the photodiode structure was elevated above the plane of the pixel addressing transistor. Generally, enhancement of the fill factor in either discrete or continuous

  16. An investigation of signal performance enhancements achieved through innovative pixel design across several generations of indirect detection, active matrix, flat-panel arrays.

    PubMed

    Antonuk, Larry E; Zhao, Qihua; El-Mohri, Youcef; Du, Hong; Wang, Yi; Street, Robert A; Ho, Jackson; Weisfield, Richard; Yao, William

    2009-07-01

    Active matrix flat-panel imager (AMFPI) technology is being employed for an increasing variety of imaging applications. An important element in the adoption of this technology has been significant ongoing improvements in optical signal collection achieved through innovations in indirect detection array pixel design. Such improvements have a particularly beneficial effect on performance in applications involving low exposures and/or high spatial frequencies, where detective quantum efficiency is strongly reduced due to the relatively high level of additive electronic noise compared to signal levels of AMFPI devices. In this article, an examination of various signal properties, as determined through measurements and calculations related to novel array designs, is reported in the context of the evolution of AMFPI pixel design. For these studies, dark, optical, and radiation signal measurements were performed on prototype imagers incorporating a variety of increasingly sophisticated array designs, with pixel pitches ranging from 75 to 127 microm. For each design, detailed measurements of fundamental pixel-level properties conducted under radiographic and fluoroscopic operating conditions are reported and the results are compared. A series of 127 microm pitch arrays employing discrete photodiodes culminated in a novel design providing an optical fill factor of approximately 80% (thereby assuring improved x-ray sensitivity), and demonstrating low dark current, very low charge trapping and charge release, and a large range of linear signal response. In two of the designs having 75 and 90 microm pitches, a novel continuous photodiode structure was found to provide fill factors that approach the theoretical maximum of 100%. Both sets of novel designs achieved large fill factors by employing architectures in which some, or all of the photodiode structure was elevated above the plane of the pixel addressing transistor. Generally, enhancement of the fill factor in either

  17. Performance evaluation of a direct-conversion flat-panel detector system in imaging and quality assurance for a high-dose-rate 192Ir source.

    PubMed

    Miyahara, Yoshinori; Hara, Yuki; Nakashima, Hiroto; Nishimura, Tomonori; Itakura, Kanae; Inomata, Taisuke; Kitagaki, Hajime

    2018-03-08

    In high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, a direct-conversion flat-panel detector (d-FPD) clearly depicts a 192 Ir source without image halation, even under the emission of high-energy gamma rays. However, it was unknown why iridium is visible when using a d-FPD. The purpose of this study was to clarify the reasons for visibility of the source core based on physical imaging characteristics, including the modulation transfer functions (MTF), noise power spectral (NPS), contrast transfer functions, and linearity of d-FPD to high-energy gamma rays. The acquired data included: x-rays, [X]; gamma rays, [γ]; dual rays (X  +  γ), [D], and subtracted data for depicting the source ([D]  -  [γ]). In the quality assurance (QA) test for the positional accuracy of a source core, the coordinates of each dwelling point were compared between the planned and actual source core positions using a CT/MR-compatible ovoid applicator and a Fletcher-Williamson applicator. The profile curves of [X] and ([D]  -  [γ]) matched well on MTF and NPS. The contrast resolutions of [D] and [X] were equivalent. A strongly positive linear correlation was found between the output data of [γ] and source strength (r 2   >  0.99). With regard to the accuracy of the source core position, the largest coordinate difference (3D distance) was noted at the maximum curvature of the CT/MR-compatible ovoid and Fletcher-Williamson applicators, showing 1.74  ±  0.02 mm and 1.01  ±  0.01 mm, respectively. A d-FPD system provides high-quality images of a source, even when high-energy gamma rays are emitted to the detector, and positional accuracy tests with clinical applicators are useful in identifying source positions (source movements) within the applicator for QA.

  18. Performance evaluation of a direct-conversion flat-panel detector system in imaging and quality assurance for a high-dose-rate 192Ir source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyahara, Yoshinori; Hara, Yuki; Nakashima, Hiroto; Nishimura, Tomonori; Itakura, Kanae; Inomata, Taisuke; Kitagaki, Hajime

    2018-03-01

    In high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, a direct-conversion flat-panel detector (d-FPD) clearly depicts a 192Ir source without image halation, even under the emission of high-energy gamma rays. However, it was unknown why iridium is visible when using a d-FPD. The purpose of this study was to clarify the reasons for visibility of the source core based on physical imaging characteristics, including the modulation transfer functions (MTF), noise power spectral (NPS), contrast transfer functions, and linearity of d-FPD to high-energy gamma rays. The acquired data included: x-rays, [X]; gamma rays, [γ] dual rays (X  +  γ), [D], and subtracted data for depicting the source ([D]  -  [γ]). In the quality assurance (QA) test for the positional accuracy of a source core, the coordinates of each dwelling point were compared between the planned and actual source core positions using a CT/MR-compatible ovoid applicator and a Fletcher-Williamson applicator. The profile curves of [X] and ([D]  -  [γ]) matched well on MTF and NPS. The contrast resolutions of [D] and [X] were equivalent. A strongly positive linear correlation was found between the output data of [γ] and source strength (r 2  >  0.99). With regard to the accuracy of the source core position, the largest coordinate difference (3D distance) was noted at the maximum curvature of the CT/MR-compatible ovoid and Fletcher-Williamson applicators, showing 1.74  ±  0.02 mm and 1.01  ±  0.01 mm, respectively. A d-FPD system provides high-quality images of a source, even when high-energy gamma rays are emitted to the detector, and positional accuracy tests with clinical applicators are useful in identifying source positions (source movements) within the applicator for QA.

  19. Design, development, manufacture, testing, and delivery of devices for connection of solar cell panel circuitry to flat conductor cable solar cell array harness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillard, P. A.; Waddington, D.

    1971-01-01

    The technology status and problem areas which exist for the application of flat conductor cabling to solar cell arrays are summarized. Details covering the design, connector manufacture, and prototype test results are also summarized.

  20. Development of Surfaces Optically Suitable for Flat Solar Panels. [using a reflectometer which separately evaluates spectral and diffuse reflectivities of surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A reflectometer which can separately evaluate the spectral and diffuse reflectivities of surfaces is described. A phase locked detection system for the reflectometer is also described. A selective coating on aluminum potentially useful for flat plate solar collector applications is presented. The coating is composed of strongly bound copper oxide (divalent) and is formed by an etching process performed on an aluminum alloy with high copper content. Fabrication costs are expected to be small due to the one stop fabrication process. A number of conclusions gathered from the literature as to the required optical properties of flat plate solar collectors are discussed.

  1. A research program to reduce interior noise in general aviation airplanes. Influence of depressurization and damping material on the noise reduction characteristics of flat and curved stiffened panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navaneethan, R.; Streeter, B.; Koontz, S.; Roskam, J.

    1981-01-01

    Some 20 x 20 aluminum panels were studied in a frequency range from 20 Hz to 5000 Hz. The noise sources used were a swept sine wave generator and a random noise generator. The effect of noise source was found to be negligible. Increasing the pressure differential across the panel gave better noise reduction below the fundamental resonance frequency due to an increase in stiffness. The largest increase occurred in the first 1 psi pressure differential. The curved, stiffened panel exhibited similar behavior, but with a lower increase of low frequency noise reduction. Depressurization on these panels resulted in decreased noise reduction at higher frequencies. The effect of damping tapes on the overall noise reduction values of the test specimens was small away from the resonance frequency. In the mass-law region, a slight and proportional improvement in noise reduction was observed by adding damping material. Adding sound absorbtion material to a panel with damping material beneficially increased noise reduction at high frequencies.

  2. A research program to reduce interior noise in general aviation airplanes. Influence of depressurization and damping material on the noise reduction characteristics of flat and curved stiffened panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navaneethan, R.; Streeter, B.; Koontz, S.; Roskam, J.

    1981-10-01

    Some 20 x 20 aluminum panels were studied in a frequency range from 20 Hz to 5000 Hz. The noise sources used were a swept sine wave generator and a random noise generator. The effect of noise source was found to be negligible. Increasing the pressure differential across the panel gave better noise reduction below the fundamental resonance frequency due to an increase in stiffness. The largest increase occurred in the first 1 psi pressure differential. The curved, stiffened panel exhibited similar behavior, but with a lower increase of low frequency noise reduction. Depressurization on these panels resulted in decreased noise reduction at higher frequencies. The effect of damping tapes on the overall noise reduction values of the test specimens was small away from the resonance frequency. In the mass-law region, a slight and proportional improvement in noise reduction was observed by adding damping material. Adding sound absorbtion material to a panel with damping material beneficially increased noise reduction at high frequencies.

  3. Comparison of a-Se direct-conversion and CsI(Tl) indirect-conversion flat-panel digital detectors: a clinical assessment of image quality for general radiography applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barski, Lori L.; Wang, Xiaohui; Wandtke, John; Waldman, David; Davis, Delphine; Foos, David H.; Dupin, Michael; Huang, Weidong; Yorkston, John

    2006-03-01

    An observer study was conducted to compare the diagnostic quality of human-subject images obtained using a-Se (amorphous selenium) and CsI(Tl) (thalium-doped cesium iodide) flat-panel detectors. Each detector was attached to an X-ray source and gantry equipment of similar configuration and was installed in a university hospital radiology department in X-ray rooms within close proximity. One hundred image pairs that represent a stratified sampling of exam types were acquired. For a particular subject, image pairs were captured of the same body part and projection, using each of the two detectors. The images comprising a pair were captured within a few minutes of each other. Using manual exposure methods, the images were captured with technique factors that correspond to average exposure levels equivalent to approximately a 400-speed screen-film system. Raw image data from both digital radiography systems was stored to a research workstation. To achieve images having the same appearance, the same image-processing software was used to render the data from both systems, although different parameters were used in the frequency processing to account for the different MTF and noise properties of the CsI(Tl) and a-Se detectors. The processed images were evaluated by radiologists who used a research workstation that was equipped with a 3 MP flat-panel monitor, and software to facilitate the image comparisons. Radiologists used subjective rank-order criteria to evaluate overall diagnostic quality and preference. Radiologists' ratings indicate that both detectors produce images that have comparable satisfactory diagnostic quality for images captured using exposure technique factors that correspond to a 400-speed screen-film system, but the CsI(Tl) detector produces significantly higher preference, especially for larger and denser exam types.

  4. Hypervelocity Impact (HVI). Volume 2; WLE Small-Scale Fiberglass Panel Flat Multi-Layer Targets A-1, A-2, and B-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorman, Michael R.; Ziola, Steven M.

    2007-01-01

    During 2003 and 2004, the Johnson Space Center's White Sands Testing Facility in Las Cruces, New Mexico conducted hypervelocity impact tests on the space shuttle wing leading edge. Hypervelocity impact tests were conducted to determine if Micro-Meteoroid/Orbital Debris impacts could be reliably detected and located using simple passive ultrasonic methods. The objective of Targets A-1, A-2, and B-2 was to study hypervelocity impacts through multi-layered panels simulating Whipple shields on spacecraft. Impact damage was detected using lightweight, low power instrumentation capable of being used in flight.

  5. Radiation dose reduction without compromise of image quality in cardiac angiography and intervention with the use of a flat panel detector without an antiscatter grid.

    PubMed

    Partridge, J; McGahan, G; Causton, S; Bowers, M; Mason, M; Dalby, M; Mitchell, A

    2006-04-01

    To test the hypothesis that replacing the antiscatter grid with an air gap will reduce patient radiation exposure without significant compromise of image quality. 457 patients having either uncomplicated diagnostic studies or a single vessel angioplasty (percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA)) on a flat plate system (GE Innova) were studied. For two months their total dose-area product score was recorded on standard gridded images and then for two months on images made with the grid out, with an air gap used to reduce scatter. Detector magnification was reduced one step when an air gap was used to achieve the same final image size. A sample set of studies was reviewed blind by five observers, who scored sharpness and contrast on a non-linear scale. The average dose-area product was significantly reduced, both in the diagnostic group (n = 276), from a mean (SD) of 26.2 (14.7) Gy.cm2 with the grid in to 16.1 (12) Gy.cm2 with the grid out (p = 0.01), and in the PTCA group (n = 181), from 48.2 (36.2) to 37 (27.5) (p = 0.01). The mean image quality scores of the gridless cohort were not significantly different from those of the gridded cohort. With the use of a flat plate detector, air gap gridless angiography reduces the radiation dose to the patient and, in consequence, to the operator without significantly affecting image quality. It is proposed that gridless imaging should be the default technique for adults and children and in most installations.

  6. Utilizing flat-panel detector parenchymal blood volume imaging (FD-PBV) for quantitative kidney perfusion analysis during the process of percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty (PTRA): A case report.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Chenyang; Shao, Jiang; Liu, Xiu; Liu, Bao

    2017-11-01

    Traditional digital subtraction angiography (DSA) provides lumen morphology of renal artery as indicators for vascular patency in patients with renal artery stenosis (RAS). It, however, lacks hemodynamic information toward target kidney. To solve this shortcoming, a novel technique, flat-panel detector parenchymal blood volume imaging (FD-PBV), is introduced, which is able to evaluate hemodynamic changes of target kidney intraoperatively. A 77-year-old female presented with hypertension, intermittent dizziness, nausea, and fatigue. Ninety-nine percent stenosis of left RAS was found. Percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty was performed, along with FD-PBV acquisition protocol. Her symptoms relieved gradually after procedure. Intuitive FD-PBV maps showed her renal perfusion improved remarkably. Quantitative analysis of FD-PBV showed her kidney volume was 47.02 and 75.61 cm with average density of contrast medium (CM) 58.1 HU and 311.5 HU before and after stenting. Follow-up at 6 months showed patency of the stent and stable kidney blood perfusion. FD-PBV technique possesses a remarkable value in quantitatively assessing the changes of kidney blood perfusion and can be a useful auxiliary technique for DSA. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Optimization of flat-plate collector-flat mirror systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, D. C.

    1980-01-01

    Solar collection capabilities of a flat-plate collector with a flat specular mirror are analyzed in order to determine the optimal geometries and tilting strategies of the collector and mirror for a variety of solar energy applications. Maximum enhancement factors and associated tilt angles for year-round collection are graphically determined as a function of the mirror length relative to the panel length (L), and it is found that for mirror lengths ranging from one to two times the panel length the panel should be tilted phi + 15 deg (where phi is the latitude angle) from the horizontal and the front mirror tilt from the horizontal should increase from 55 - phi for L = 1 to 65 - phi for L = 2.

  8. Spatial resolution limits of multislice computed tomography (MS-CT), C-arm-CT, and flat panel-CT (FP-CT) compared to MicroCT for visualization of a small metallic stent.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Mircea; Metcalfe, Ralph W; Cody, Dianna; Alvarado, Miguel Valdivia Y; Hipp, John; Benndorf, Goetz

    2011-07-01

    Small metallic stents are increasingly used in the treatment of cerebral aneurysms and for revascularization in ischemic strokes. Realistic three-dimensional datasets of a stent were obtained by using three x-ray-based imaging methods in current clinical use. Multislice-CT (MS-CT), C-arm flat detector-CT (C-arm CT, ACT), and flat panel-CT (FP-CT) were compared with high-resolution laboratory MicroCT scans that served as a reference standard. The purpose was to assess and compare the quality and accuracy of current clinical three-dimensional reconstructions of a vascular stents. A 3 × 20 mm Cypher stent was deployed in a straight polytetrafluoroethylene tube and filled with nondiluted iodine contrast and BaSO(4). MS-CT images of the static tube phantom and stent were acquired using GE LightSpeed VCT Series, C-arm CT images were obtained using Artis (DynaCT, Siemens), FP-CT were obtained using a preclinical research CT (GE), and MicroCT images were obtained using eXplore Locus SP (GE). DICOM datasets were analyzed using Amira and Matlab. Because of blooming effects, the maximum intensity projections (MIPs) and volume renderings generated from MS-CT showed significantly increased strut dimensions with no distinction between the regular struts and connector struts while the lumen diameter is artificially reduced. The shape of the reconstructed stent surface differed remarkably from the real stent. C-arm CT and FP-CT volume renderings more accurately represented the struts. Consistently capturing the structure of the connectors and the strut shape definition was highly threshold dependent. The stent lumen was about 30% underestimated by MS-CT when compared to MicroCT. The spatial resolution of current clinical CT for imaging of small metallic stents is insufficient to visualize fine geometrical details. Further improvement in the spatial resolution of clinical imaging technologies combined with better software and hardware for image postprocessing will be necessary for

  9. Charlie Flats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's panoramic camera shows a region of the rock outcrop at Meridiani Planum, Mars, dubbed 'Charlie Flats.' This region is a rich science target for Opportunity because it contains a diverse assortment of small grains, pebbles and spherules, as well as both dark and light soil deposits. The area seen here measures approximately 0.6 meters (2 feet) across. The smallest grains visible in this image are only a few millimeters in size. The approximate true color image was acquired on Sol 20 of Opportunity's mission with panoramic camera filters red, green and blue. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger view Charlie Flats Spectra The chart above shows examples of spectra, or light wave patterns, extracted from the region of the Meridiani Planum rock outcrop dubbed 'Charlie Flats,' a rich science target for the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The spectra were extracted from the similarly colored regions in the image on the left, taken by the rover's panoramic camera. The green circle identifies a bright, dust-like soil deposit. The red circle identifies a dark soil region. The yellow identifies a small, angular rock chip with a strong near-infrared band. The pink identifies a sphere-shaped pebble with a different strong near-infrared band. The cyan circle shows a dark, grayish pebble.

  10. Digital subtraction angiography during transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt creation or revision: data on radiation exposure and image quality obtained using a standard and a low-dose acquisition protocol in a flat-panel detector-based system.

    PubMed

    Miraglia, Roberto; Maruzzelli, Luigi; Cortis, Kelvin; Tafaro, Corrado; Gerasia, Roberta; Parisi, Carmelo; Luca, Angelo

    2015-08-01

    To determine whether the use of a low-dose acquisition protocol (LDP) in digital subtraction angiography during transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation/revision results in significant reduction of patient radiation exposure and adequate image quality, as compared to a default reference standard-dose acquisition protocol (SDP). Two angiographic runs were performed during TIPS creation/revision: the first following catheterization of the portal venous system and the second after stent deployment/angioplasty. Constant field of view, object to image-detector distance, and source to image-receptor distance were maintained in each patient during the two angiographic runs. 17 consecutive adult patients who underwent TIPS creation (n = 11) or TIPS revision (n = 6) from December 2013 to March 2014 were considered eligible for this single centre prospective study. In each patient, the LDP and the SDP were used in a random order for the two runs, with each patient serving as his/her own control. The dose-area product (DAP) was calculated for each image and compared. Image quality was graded by two interventional radiologists other than the operator. In all runs acquired with the LDP, image quality was considered adequate for a successful procedural outcome. The DAP per image of the LDP was numerically inferior as compared to the DAP per image of the SDP in all patients. The mean reduction in DAP per image was 75.24% ± 5.7% (p < 0. 001). Radiation exposure during TIPS creation/revision was significantly reduced by selecting a LDP in our flat-panel detector-based system, while maintaining adequate image quality.

  11. Difference in diaphragmatic motion during tidal breathing in a standing position between COPD patients and normal subjects: Time-resolved quantitative evaluation using dynamic chest radiography with flat panel detector system ("dynamic X-ray phrenicography").

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yoshitake; Ueyama, Masako; Abe, Takehiko; Araki, Tetsuro; Abe, Takayuki; Nishino, Mizuki; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Hatabu, Hiroto; Kudoh, Shoji

    2017-02-01

    To quantitatively compare diaphragmatic motion during tidal breathing in a standing position between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and normal subjects using dynamic chest radiography. Thirty-nine COPD patients (35 males; age, 71.3±8.4years) and 47 normal subjects (non-smoker healthy volunteers) (20 males; age, 54.8±9.8years) underwent sequential chest radiographs during tidal breathing using dynamic chest radiography with a flat panel detector system. We evaluated the excursions and peak motion speeds of the diaphragms. The results were analyzed using an unpaired t-test and a multiple linear regression model. The excursions of the diaphragms in COPD patients were significantly larger than those in normal subjects (right, 14.7±5.5mm vs. 10.2±3.7mm, respectively, P<0.001; left, 17.2±4.9mm vs. 14.9±4.2mm, respectively, P=0.022). Peak motion speeds in inspiratory phase were significantly faster in COPD patients compared to normal subjects (right, 16.3±5.0mm/s vs. 11.8±4.2mm/s, respectively, P<0.001; left, 18.9±4.9mm/s vs. 16.7±4.0mm/s, respectively, P=0.022). The multivariate analysis demonstrated that having COPD and higher body mass index were independently associated with increased excursions of the bilateral diaphragm (all P<0.05), after adjusting for other clinical variables. Time-resolved quantitative evaluation of the diaphragm using dynamic chest radiography demonstrated that the diaphragmatic motion during tidal breathing in a standing position is larger and faster in COPD patients than in normal subjects. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Radiation Exposure in Biliary Procedures Performed to Manage Anastomotic Strictures in Pediatric Liver Transplant Recipients: Comparison Between Radiation Exposure Levels Using an Image Intensifier and a Flat-Panel Detector-Based System

    SciTech Connect

    Miraglia, Roberto, E-mail: rmiraglia@ismett.edu; Maruzzelli, Luigi; Tuzzolino, Fabio

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to estimate radiation exposure in pediatric liver transplants recipients who underwent biliary interventional procedures and to compare radiation exposure levels between biliary interventional procedures performed using an image intensifier-based angiographic system (IIDS) and a flat panel detector-based interventional system (FPDS). Materials and Methods: We enrolled 34 consecutive pediatric liver transplant recipients with biliary strictures between January 2008 and March 2013 with a total of 170 image-guided procedures. The dose-area product (DAP) and fluoroscopy time was recorded for each procedure. The mean age was 61 months (range 4-192), and mean weight was 17 kgmore » (range 4-41). The procedures were classified into three categories: percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and biliary catheter placement (n = 40); cholangiography and balloon dilatation (n = 55); and cholangiography and biliary catheter change or removal (n = 75). Ninety-two procedures were performed using an IIDS. Seventy-eight procedures performed after July 2010 were performed using an FPDS. The difference in DAP between the two angiographic systems was compared using Wilcoxon rank-sum test and a multiple linear regression model. Results: Mean DAP in the three categories was significantly greater in the group of procedures performed using the IIDS compared with those performed using the FPDS. Statistical analysis showed a p value = 0.001 for the PTBD group, p = 0.0002 for the cholangiogram and balloon dilatation group, and p = 0.00001 for the group with cholangiogram and biliary catheter change or removal. Conclusion: In our selected cohort of patients, the use of an FPDS decreases radiation exposure.« less

  13. "Roadrunner Flats"

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-10-14

    This enhanced color image of the Pathfinder landing site shows the eastern horizon. The elongated, reddish, low contrast region in the distance is "Roadrunner Flats." This image was taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP). Sojourner spent 83 days of a planned seven-day mission exploring the Martian terrain, acquiring images, and taking chemical, atmospheric and other measurements. The final data transmission received from Pathfinder was at 10:23 UTC on September 27, 1997. Although mission managers tried to restore full communications during the following five months, the successful mission was terminated on March 10, 1998. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00979

  14. Age-forming aluminum panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baxter, G. I.

    1976-01-01

    Contoured-stiffened 63 by 337 inch 2124 aluminum alloy panels are machined in-the-flat to make integral, tapered T-capped stringers, parallel with longitudinal centerline. Aging fixture, which includes net contour formers made from lofted contour templates, has eggcrate-like structure for use in forming and checking panels.

  15. SU-D-204-05: Quantitative Comparison of a High Resolution Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscopic (MAF) Detector with a Standard Flat Panel Detector (FPD) Using the New Metric of Generalized Measured Relative Object Detectability (GM-ROD)

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, M; Ionita, C; Bednarek, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In endovascular image-guided neuro-interventions, visualization of fine detail is paramount. For example, the ability of the interventionist to visualize the stent struts depends heavily on the x-ray imaging detector performance. Methods: A study to examine the relative performance of the high resolution MAF-CMOS (pixel size 75µm, Nyquist frequency 6.6 cycles/mm) and a standard Flat Panel Detector (pixel size 194µm, Nyquist frequency 2.5 cycles/mm) detectors in imaging a neuro stent was done using the Generalized Measured Relative Object Detectability (GM-ROD) metric. Low quantum noise images of a deployed stent were obtained by averaging 95 frames obtained by both detectors withoutmore » changing other exposure or geometric parameters. The square of the Fourier transform of each image is taken and divided by the generalized normalized noise power spectrum to give an effective measured task-specific signal-to-noise ratio. This expression is then integrated from 0 to each of the detector’s Nyquist frequencies, and the GM-ROD value is determined by taking a ratio of the integrals for the MAF-CMOS to that of the FPD. The lower bound of integration can be varied to emphasize high frequencies in the detector comparisons. Results: The MAF-CMOS detector exhibits vastly superior performance over the FPD when integrating over all frequencies, yielding a GM-ROD value of 63.1. The lower bound of integration was stepped up in increments of 0.5 cycles/mm for higher frequency comparisons. As the lower bound increased, the GM-ROD value was augmented, reflecting the superior performance of the MAF-CMOS in the high frequency regime. Conclusion: GM-ROD is a versatile metric that can provide quantitative detector and task dependent comparisons that can be used as a basis for detector selection. Supported by NIH Grant: 2R01EB002873 and an equipment grant from Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation.« less

  16. SU-E-I-53: Comparison of Kerma-Area-Product Between the Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) and a Flat Panel Detector (FPD) as Used in Neuro-Endovascular Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayan, S; Rana, V; Nagesh, S Setlur

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the reduction of integral dose to the patient when using the micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF) compared to when using the standard flat-panel detector (FPD) for the techniques used during neurointerventional procedures. Methods: The MAF is a small field-of-view, high resolution x-ray detector which captures 1024 x 1024 pixels with an effective pixel size of 35μm and is capable of real-time imaging up to 30 frames per second. The MAF was used in neuro-interventions during those parts of the procedure when high resolution was needed and the FPD was used otherwise. The technique parameters were recorded when each detectormore » was used and the kerma-area-product (KAP) per image frame was determined. KAP values were calculated for seven neuro interventions using premeasured calibration files of output as a function of kVp and beam filtration and included the attenuation of the patient table for the frontal projections to be more representative of integral patient dose. The air kerma at the patient entrance was multiplied by the beam area at that point to obtain the KAP values. The ranges of KAP values per frame were determined for the range of technique parameters used during the clinical procedures. To appreciate the benefit of the higher MAF resolution in the region of interventional activity, DA technique parameters were generally used with the MAF. Results: The lowest and highest values of KAP per frame for the MAF in DA mode were 4 and 50 times lower, respectively, compared to those of the FPD in pulsed fluoroscopy mode. Conclusion: The MAF was used in those parts of the clinical procedures when high resolution and image quality was essential. The integral patient dose as represented by the KAP value was substantially lower when using the MAF than when using the FPD due to the much smaller volume of tissue irradiated. This research was supported in part by Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation and NIH Grant R01EB002873.« less

  17. Design and construction of a flat-panel-based cone-beam computed tomography (FPD-CBCT) imaging system through the adaptation of a commercially available CT system: recent data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conover, David L.; Ning, Ruola

    2004-05-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to show how a commercially available spiral CT has been modified for use as the electro-mechanical scanner hardware for a prototype flat panel detector-based cone beam computed tomography (FPD-CBCT) imaging system. FPD-CBCT has the benefits of isotropic high resolution, low contrast sensitivity and 3D visualization. In contrast to spiral CT, which acquires a series of narrow slices, FPD-CBCT acquires a full volume of data (limited by the cone angle and the FPD active area) in one <= 360° scan. Our goal was to use a GE HighSpeed Advantage (HSA) CT system as the basis for an FPD-CBVCT imaging prototype for performing phantom, animal and patient imaging studies. Specific electromechanical and radiographic subsystems controlled include: gantry rotation and tilt, patient table positioning, rotor control, mA control, the high frequency generator (kVp, exposure time, repetition rate) and image data acquisition. Also, a 2D full field FPD replaced the 1D detector, as well as the existing slit collimator was retrofitted to a full field collimator to allow x-ray exposure over the entire active area of the FPD. In addition, x-ray projection data was acquired at 30 fps. Power and communication signals to control modules on the rotating part of the gantry were transmitted through integrated slip rings on the gantry. A stationary host computer controlled mechanical motion of the gantry and sent trigger signals to on-board electronic interface modules to control data acquisition and radiographic functions. Acquired image data was grabbed to the system memory of an on-board industrial computer, saved to hard disk and downloaded through a network connection to the stationary computer for 3D reconstruction. Through the synchronized control of the pulsed x-ray exposures, data acquisition, and gantry rotation the system achieved a circle cone beam image acquisition protocol. With integrated control of the gantry tilt and of the position and

  18. Time-Resolved Quantitative Analysis of the Diaphragms During Tidal Breathing in a Standing Position Using Dynamic Chest Radiography with a Flat Panel Detector System ("Dynamic X-Ray Phrenicography"): Initial Experience in 172 Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yoshitake; Ueyama, Masako; Abe, Takehiko; Araki, Tetsuro; Abe, Takayuki; Nishino, Mizuki; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Hatabu, Hiroto; Kudoh, Shoji

    2017-04-01

    Diaphragmatic motion in a standing position during tidal breathing remains unclear. The purpose of this observational study was to evaluate diaphragmatic motion during tidal breathing in a standing position in a health screening center cohort using dynamic chest radiography in association with participants' demographic characteristics. One hundred seventy-two subjects (103 men; aged 56.3 ± 9.8 years) underwent sequential chest radiographs during tidal breathing using dynamic chest radiography with a flat panel detector system. We evaluated the excursions of and peak motion speeds of the diaphragms. Associations between the excursions and participants' demographics (gender, height, weight, body mass index [BMI], smoking history, tidal volume, vital capacity, and forced expiratory volume) were investigated. The average excursion of the left diaphragm (14.9 ± 4.6 mm, 95% CI 14.2-15.5 mm) was significantly larger than that of the right (11.0 ± 4.0 mm, 95% CI 10.4-11.6 mm) (P <0.001). The peak motion speed of the left diaphragm (inspiratory, 16.6 ± 4.2 mm/s; expiratory, 13.7 ± 4.2 mm/s) was significantly faster than that of the right (inspiratory, 12.4 ± 4.4 mm/s; expiratory, 9.4 ± 3.8 mm/s) (both P <0.001). Both simple and multiple regression models demonstrated that higher BMI and higher tidal volume were associated with increased excursions of the bilateral diaphragm (all P <0.05). The average excursions of the diaphragms are 11.0 mm (right) and 14.9 mm (left) during tidal breathing in a standing position. The diaphragmatic motion of the left is significantly larger and faster than that of the right. Higher BMI and tidal volume are associated with increased excursions of the bilateral diaphragm. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The flat antenna - Now a reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Daniel R.

    1989-09-01

    A practical, high-performance, low-cost, consumer-oriented flat antenna is described. Advantages of the flat antenna include a thin profile which is less obtrusive than a parabolic dish, features less expensive shipping and installation costs due to its light weight, has the ability to squint the beam, and has improved aperture control for sidelobe suppression. R&D focuses on development of monolithic microwave integrated circuts which will be embedded into the array, thus adding the potential features of amenability to integrated electronics (which will improve noise performance and avoid the necessity of appending an external low-noise converter), and electronic steerability to the list of flat antenna advantages. The basic construction of the flat panel and the intended market for the first flat antennas and the subsequent effect on product design are discussed. Initial market results in Japan, and planned development of European and American markets are discussed.

  20. Solar collector panels (process-method). Rainwater collection and storage

    SciTech Connect

    Mowery, J.W.

    1981-10-15

    A process for producing panels for solar heating of potable water is described. The panels have PVC tubing flat-coiled into square or rectangular shapes. Also described is a cistern for collecting and storing rainwater. (LEW)

  1. Tunable photoluminescence from nc-Si/a-SiNx:H quantum dot thin films prepared by ICP-CVD.

    PubMed

    Sain, Basudeb; Das, Debajyoti

    2013-03-21

    Intense visible photoluminescence (PL) tunable within 1.66-2.47 eV, under UV 325 nm excitation, was obtained from nanocrystalline silicon quantum dots (∼5.72-1.67 nm in diameter) embedded in amorphous silicon-nitride matrix (nc-Si/a-SiN(x):H) prepared in RF-ICPCVD (13.56 MHz) at substrate temperatures between 400 to 150 °C. The dominant component of PL, having a narrow band width of ∼0.16-0.45 eV, originates from quasi-direct band-to-band recombination due to quantum confinement effect (QCE) in the nanocrystalline silicon quantum dots (nc-Si QDs) of appropriate size; however, the contribution of defects arose at lower substrate temperatures leading to asymmetric broadening. Intense atomic hydrogen flux in high-density inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) provides a very high surface coverage, passivates well the nonradiative dangling bonds, and thereby favors the PL intensity. The average size of nc-Si QDs measured by HR-TEM appears consistent with similar estimates from Raman studies. The red shift of the Raman line and corresponding line broadening originates from the confinement of optical phonons within nc-Si QDs. Photoluminescence emerging from nc-Si/a-SiN(x):H quantum dots obtained from the low temperature and single-step plasma processing holds great promise for the fabrication of light-emitting devices and flexible flat panel displays.

  2. Pressurized panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, E. C. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    Large area pressurized meteoroid penetration detector panels with maximum inherent structural rigidity are provided. The panels measure directly the penetration rate in materials to be used in spacecraft. Panel structure include an interconnected cellular configuration in which the cells have spaced periphery welds and tufts in their centers. A spot weld is made at the center point joining the panels.

  3. Collation of quarterly reports on air flat plate collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The solar 2 air flat plate collectors are described. The development and fabrication of a prototype air flat plate collector subsystem containing 320 square feet of collector area are described. Three instrumented panels were completely assembled with glazing and insulation. Manufacture of the last seven prototype collectors was completed in October 1977.

  4. The Stability of Isotropic or Orthotropic Cylinders or Flat or Curved Panels, between and Across Stiffeners, with any Edge Conditions between Hinged and Fixed, under any Combination of Compression and Shear

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1943-12-01

    which are required ties Dx.-.. ’Jr. de — red for flat sheets 8 ITA M = 4 [A sin4 e S=v4 [3 Bin* e P = 4...to make the unknown stability stress a minimum. The usual method of doing this is to set the de - rivatives of this stress with resp.:;t to Y, m ...iso— at ional; of the Reference 2 a b "h • e r— Y .V Per 4C r 1 ’ " ’ A Present theory b a/ m t 1/P (n-1) -8 S a Ss CE DE i

  5. Evaluating the warping of laminated particleboard panels

    Treesearch

    Zhiyong Cai

    2004-01-01

    Laminated wood composites have been used widely in the secondary manufacturing processes in the wood panel industries. Warping, which is defined as the out-of-plane deformation of an initially flat panel, is a longstanding problem associated with the use of laminated wood composites. The mechanism of warping is still not fully understood. A new two- dimensional warping...

  6. A 2kW photovoltaic power generating system using a-Si solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, S.; Fukatsu, T.; Nishiwaki, H.; Shibuya, H.; Tsukamoto, K.; Kuwano, Y.

    Integrated amorphous silicon (a-Si) solar panels have been developed and applied to an electric power generating system. The integrated a-Si solar panel consists of 20 integrated type a-Si solar cell modules, each with a size of 10 cm x 10 cm, which were developed for use in an electric power generating system. The power generating system is set in an experimental model house which was completed in the summer of 1981. The output performance of the solar panels has been measured, and a peak amount of 2kW was obtained. The conversion efficiency decreased about 10 percent within one month and then became stable. This stability has continued until the present time.

  7. The effect of oblique angle of sound incidence, realistic edge conditions, curvature and in-plane panel stresses on the noise reduction characteristics of general aviation type panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, F.; Lameris, J.; Dunn, D.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments and a theoretical analysis were conducted to predict the noise reduction of inclined and curved panels. These predictions are compared to the experimental results with reasonable agreement between theory and experiment for panels under an oblique angle of sound incidence. Theoretical as well as experimental results indicate a big increase in noise reduction when a flat test panel is curved. Further curving the panel slightly decreases the noise reduction. Riveted flat panels are shown to give a higher noise reduction in the stiffness-controlled frequency region, while bonded panels are superior in this region when the test panel is curved. Experimentally measured noise reduction characteristics of flat aluminum panels with uniaxial in-plane stresses are presented and discussed. These test results indicate an important improvement in the noise reduction of these panels in the frequency range below the fundamental panel/cavity frequency.

  8. Flat building blocks for flat silicene.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masae

    2017-09-07

    Silicene is the silicon equivalent of graphene, which is composed of a honeycomb carbon structure with one atom thickness and has attractive characteristics of a perfect two-dimensional π-conjugated sheet. However, unlike flat and highly stable graphene, silicene is relatively sticky and thus unstable due to its puckered or crinkled structure. Flatness is important for stability, and to obtain perfect π-conjugation, electron-donating atoms and molecules should not interact with the π electrons. The structural differences between silicene and graphene result from the differences in their building blocks, flat benzene and chair-form hexasilabenzene. It is crucial to design flat building blocks for silicene with no interactions between the electron donor and π-orbitals. Here, we report the successful design of such building blocks with the aid of density functional theory calculations. Our fundamental concept is to attach substituents that have sp-hybrid orbitals and act as electron donors in a manner that it does not interact with the π orbitals. The honeycomb silicon molecule with BeH at the edge designed according to our concept, clearly shows the same structural, charge distribution and molecular orbital characteristics as the corresponding carbon-based molecule.

  9. Flat Pack Toy Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutcheson, Brian

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author introduces the concept of flat pack toys. Flat pack toys are designed using a template on a single sheet of letter-sized card stock paper. Before being cut out and built into a three-dimensional toy, they are scanned into the computer and uploaded to a website. With the template accessible from the website, anyone with…

  10. 29. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTHEAST OF CONTROL PANEL AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. INTERIOR VIEW TO THE NORTHEAST OF CONTROL PANEL AND VIEWING WINDOW IN ROOM 105, THE CONTROL ROOM. - Nevada Test Site, Pluto Facility, Disassembly Building, Area 26, Wahmonie Flats, Cane Spring Road, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  11. [Early flat colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Castelletto, R H; Chiarenza, C; Ottino, A; Garay, M L

    1991-01-01

    We report three cases of flat early colorectal carcinoma which were detected during the examination of 51 surgical specimens of colorectal resection. Two of them were endoscopically diagnosed, but the smallest one was not seen in the luminal instrumental examination. From the bibliographic analysis and our own experience we deduce the importance of flat lesions in the development of early colorectal carcinoma, either originated from pre-existent adenoma or de novo. Flat variants of adenoma, and presumably flush or depressed ones, must be considered as important factors in the early sequence adenoma-cancer. An appropriate endoscopic equipment with employment of additional staining techniques (such as carmine indigo and methylene blue) and the correct investigation during inflation-deflation procedures facilitates the identification of small lesions, their eradication and prevention from advanced forms of colorectal carcinoma.

  12. Poker Flat improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The U.S. Senate Appropriations Committee approved on September 14 a $10.8 million upgrade to University of Alaska Fairbanks Poker Flat Research Range pending full House and Senate approval. The funding will provide for building design, scientific program planning, and initial road and foundation construction. Senator Ted Stevens (RAK) said, “It is an important recognition of the roles Poker Flat, the Geophysical Institute and this university play in the international science area,“ that the Senate approved the money in a time of budget pressure.Poker Flat's facilities include rocket assembly and launching capabilities, telemetry receiving stations and ground-based diagnostic systems needed for launch decisions for space, aeronomy and atmospheric science experiments.

  13. Flat shoes increase neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Flensmark, J

    2016-12-01

    The impairment of the horizontal is caused by elevation of the heel of the foot from the ground. Receptors in the soles of the feet provide a mapping of body orientation to the upright, and is identical to Mittelstaedt's idiotropic tendency. Initiation of gait wearing flat shoes without elevation of the heel is sufficient to change to a truthful horizontal. Using flat shoes increases neurogenesis and leads to a decreased frequency of diseases of the nervous system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Panel Sessions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proceedings of the ASIS Mid-Year Meeting, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Lists the speakers and summarizes the issues addressed for 12 panel sessions on topics related to networking, including libraries and national networks, federal national resources and energy programs, multimedia issues, telecommuting, remote image serving, accessing the Internet, library automation, scientific information, applications of Z39.50,…

  15. Flat conductor cable applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angele, W.

    1972-01-01

    Some of the numerous applications of flat conductor cable (FCC) systems are briefly described. Both government and commercial uses were considered, with applications designated as either aerospace, military, or commercial. The number and variety of ways in which FCC is being applied and considered for future designs are illustrated.

  16. Multilayer flat electrical cable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverman, P. G.

    1973-01-01

    Flat electrical cable is lightweight, flexible over wide temperature range, withstands continuous exposure to high levels of nuclear radiation, and can carry high currents with minimum of temperature rise. Its magnetic cleanliness is equal to or better than twisted pair of wires, and it can be terminated in conventional electrical connector.

  17. Is flat fair?

    SciTech Connect

    Bunzl, Martin

    2010-07-15

    Dynamic pricing holds out the promise of shifting peak demand as well as reducing overall demand. But it also raises thorny issues of fairness. All practical pricing systems involve tradeoffs between equity and efficiency. I examine the circumstances under which equity ought to be allowed to trump efficiency and whether or not this constitutes a defense of flat pricing. (author)

  18. Flat-plate /vapor-chamber/ heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleischman, G. L.; Marcus, B. D.; Mcintosh, R.; Ollendorf, S.

    1975-01-01

    This paper discusses the design, fabrication and testing of heat pipes constructed in the form of flat-plate panels. The test panels were constructed of copper with methyl alcohol as the working fluid. Capillary grooves etched on the internal surfaces provided evaporation and condensation heat-transfer coefficients on the order of 1600 Btu/hr-sq ft-deg F. Two panels were launched on board a sounding rocket; the payload reached an altitude of 140 miles, and zero gravity was achieved for almost six minutes. The panel with working fluid inside demonstrated a heat input flux of 2.5 watts/sq cm, with only a 3 to 5 C temperature difference throughout the entire panel.

  19. Foil Panel Mirrors for Nonimaging Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuyper, D. J.; Castillo, A. A.

    1984-01-01

    Large durable, lightweight mirrors made by bonding thick aluminum foil to honeycomb panels or other rigid, flat backings. Mirrors suitable for use as infrared shields, telescope doors, solar-furnance doors, advertising displays, or other reflectors that require low thermal emissivity and high specularity but do not require precise surface figure necessary for imaging.

  20. Multiple-Panel Cylindrical Solar Concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. M.

    1983-01-01

    Trough composed of many panels concentrates Sun's energy on solar cells, even when trough is not pointed directly at Sun. Tolerates deviation as great as 5 degrees from direction of sun. For terrestrial applications, multiple-flat-plate design offers potential cost reduction and ease of fabrication.

  1. Development of Surfaces Optically Suitable for Flat Solar Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desmet, D.; Jason, A.; Parr, A.

    1977-01-01

    Innovations in reflectometry techniques are described; and the development of an absorbing selective coating is discussed along with details of surface properties. Conclusions as to the parameterization desired for practical applications of selective surfaces are provided.

  2. A preliminary study of flat-panel displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yancey, K. E.

    1986-01-01

    Six display technologies that might be of future value in a spacelab workstation are discussed. Some have been developed to the point where they could be used as a computer display while others have not. The display technologies studied are electroluminescents, light-emitting didodes, gas plasma, liquid crystal, electrochromic, and electrophoretic. An explanation of each mechanism is provided along with the state-of-the-art development.

  3. Human Visual Performance and Flat Panel Display Image Quality

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    and Needs 411 Uniformity Data Needs 411 Large area uniformity research 412 Small area uniformity research 413 Line, cell loss (on and off...alphanumeric patterns . 68 20. X-Y. addressing scheme, from Tannas (1978) 76 21. Voltage applied to sneak path cells , after Tannas (1978) 78 22...discharge display, from Weston (1975) 133 40. Voltage, current, and light output waveforms for a plasma cell 135 41. Construction of tricolor plasma

  4. 16. VIEW OF THE STATIONARY OPERATING ENGINEER CONTROL PANEL INSTALLATION. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. VIEW OF THE STATIONARY OPERATING ENGINEER CONTROL PANEL INSTALLATION. THE PANEL CONTROLS AIR-HANDLING EQUIPMENT AND AIR PRESSURE WITHIN THE BUILDING. (10/6/69) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Manufacturing Facility, North-central section of Plant, just south of Building 776/777, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  5. 2. VIEW OF THE EXPERIMENT CONTROL PANEL IN 1970. THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF THE EXPERIMENT CONTROL PANEL IN 1970. THE NUCLEAR SAFETY GROUP CONDUCTED ABOUT 1,700 CRITICAL MASS EXPERIMENTS USING URANIUM AND PLUTONIUM IN SOLUTIONS (900 TESTS), COMPACTED POWDER (300), AND METALLIC FORMS (500). ALL 1,700 CRITICALITY ASSEMBLIES WERE CONTROLLED FROM THIS PANEL. - Rocky Flats Plant, Critical Mass Laboratory, Intersection of Central Avenue & 86 Drive, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  6. Experimental comparison between several photovoltaic panels, regarding the solar energy collection

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzo, E.; Laspiur, A.; Molledo, A.G.

    1984-05-01

    This paper summarizes the results of an experiment carried out at the Instituto de Energia Solar of the Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, whose main objective is the analysis of the energy collected by different kinds of photovoltaic panels. Special interest is paid to the study of bifacial flat panels and static concentrators using bifacial solar cells. Using the annual energy collected by a conventional static-monofacial flat panel as a basis for comparison, results show that static bifacial flat panels collect 60% more. The use of a two-axis tracking causes an increase of 40% and the combination of a bifacial flatmore » panel with a two-axes tracking causes an increase of 80%. Finally, it is shown that the performance of static concentrators and monofacial flat panels is very similar.« less

  7. Architectural Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Alliance Wall Corporation's Whyteboard, a porcelain enamel on steel panels wall board, owes its color stability to a KIAC engineering background study to identify potential technologies and manufacturers of equipment which could be used to detect surface flaws. One result of the data base search was the purchase of a spectrocolorimeter which enables the company to control some 250 standard colors, and match special colors.

  8. 61. Upper panel in cornerpower panel lcpa lower panel in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. Upper panel in corner-power panel lcpa lower panel in corner-oxygen regeneration unit, at right-air conditioner control panel, on floor-bio-pack 45 for emergency breathing, looking northwest - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Control Facility, County Road CS23A, North of Exit 127, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  9. Advanced surface paneling method for subsonic and supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, L. L.; Johnson, F. T.; Ehlers, F. E.

    1976-01-01

    Numerical results illustrating the capabilities of an advanced aerodynamic surface paneling method are presented. The method is applicable to both subsonic and supersonic flow, as represented by linearized potential flow theory. The method is based on linearly varying sources and quadratically varying doublets which are distributed over flat or curved panels. These panels are applied to the true surface geometry of arbitrarily shaped three dimensional aerodynamic configurations.

  10. Efficiency of geometric designs of flexible solar panels: mathematical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marciniak, Malgorzata; Hassebo, Yasser; Enriquez-Torres, Delfino; Serey-Roman, Maria Ignacia

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze various surfaces of flexible solar panels and compare them to the traditional at panels mathematically. We evaluated the efficiency based on the integral formulas that involve flux. We performed calculations for flat panels with different positions, a cylindrical panel, conical panels with various opening angles and segments of a spherical panel. Our results indicate that the best efficiency per unit area belongs to particular segments of spherically-shaped panels. In addition, we calculated the optimal opening angle of a cone-shaped panel that maximizes the annual accumulation of the sun radiation per unit area. The considered shapes are presented below with a suggestion for connections of the cells.

  11. Flat conductor cable commercialization project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogarth, P.; Wadsworth, E.

    1977-01-01

    An undercarpet flat conductor cable and a baseboard flat conductor cable system were studied for commercialization. The undercarpet system is designed for use in office and commercial buildings. It employs a flat power cable, protected by a grounded metal shield, that terminates in receptacles mounted on the floor. It is designed to interface with a flat conductor cable telephone system. The baseboard system consists of a flat power cable mounted in a plastic raceway; both the raceway and the receptacles are mounted on the surface of the baseboard. It is designed primarily for use in residential buildings, particularly for renovation and concrete and masonry construction.

  12. IR Earth Flats Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, Peter

    2009-07-01

    This program is an experimental path finder for Cycle 18 calibration. {The WFC3 UVIS version of this is program 11914 and contains additional detail in its description}. Infrared-wavelength flat fields will be obtained by observing the dark side of the Earth during periods of full moon illumination. The observations will consist of full-frame streaked WFC3 IR imagery: per single "dark-sky" orbit, we anticipate achieving Poisson S/N > 100 per pixel in each of three to five exposures, depending on sample sequence {SPARS25 or SPARS50}.Why not use the Sunlit Earth? It is too bright for WFC3 IR full-frame minimum exposure time of 3 sec. Similarly, for NICMOS the sunlit-Earth is too bright which saturates the detector too quickly and/or induces abnormal behaviors such as super-shading {Gilmore 1998, NIC 098-011}. In the narrowband IR filters the sunlit earth sometimes is faint enough to not saturate immediately, but based upon predictions {Cox et al. 1987 "Standard Astronomical Sources for HST: 6. Spatially Flat Fields."} and observations {Gilmore 1998}, we consider sunlit Earth unlikely to be successful unless it is twilight.Other possibilities? Cox et al.'s Section II.D addresses many other possible sources for flat fields, rejecting them for a variety of reasons. A remaining possibility would be the totally eclipsed moon. Such eclipses provide approximately 2 hours {1 HST orbit} of opportunity per year, so they are too rare to be generically useful. An advantage of the moon over the Earth is that the moon subtends less than 0.25 square degree, whereas the Earth subtends a steradian or more, so scattered light and light prior to the unshuttered exposure presents additional problems for the Earth. Also, we're unsure if HST can point 180 deg from the Sun.

  13. UVIS Earth Flats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, Peter

    2009-07-01

    This program is an experimental path finder for Cycle 18 calibration. Visible-wavelength flat fields will be obtained by observing the dark side of the Earth during periods of full moon illumination. The observations will consist of full-frame streaked WFC3 UVIS imagery: per 22-min total exposure time in a single "dark-sky" orbit, we anticipate collecting 7000 e/pix in F606W or 4500 e/pix in F814W. To achieve Poisson S/N > 100 per pixel, we requires at least 2 orbits of F606W and 3 orbits of F814W. For UVIS narrowband filters, exposures of 1 sec typically do not saturate on the sunlit Earth, so we will take sunlit Earth flats for three of the more-commonly used narrowband filters in Cycle 17 plus the also-popular long-wavelength quad filters, for which we get four filters at once.Why not use the Sunlit Earth for the wideband visible-light filters? It is too bright in the visible for WFC3 UVIS minimum exposure time of 0.5 sec. Similarly, for NICMOS the sunlit-Earth is too bright which saturates the detector too quickly and/or induces abnormal behaviors such as super-shading {Gilmore 1998, NIC 098-011}. In the narrowband visible and broadband near-UV its not too bright {predictions in Cox et al. 1987 "Standard Astronomical Sources for HST: 6. Spatially Flat Fields." and observations in ACS Program 10050}.Other possibilities? Cox et al.'s Section II.D addresses many other possible sources for flat fields, rejecting them for a variety of reasons. A remaining possibility would be the totally eclipsed moon. Such eclipses provide approximately 2 hours {1 HST orbit} of opportunity per year, so they are too rare to be generically useful. An advantage of the moon over the Earth is that the moon subtends less than 0.25 square degree, whereas the Earth subtends a steradian or more, so scattered light and light potentially leaking around the shutter presents additional problems for the Earth. Also, we're unsure if HST can point 180 deg from the Sun.

  14. Flat Surface Damage Detection System (FSDDS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha; Lewis, Mark; Gibson, Tracy; Lane, John; Medelius, Pedro; Snyder, Sarah; Ciarlariello, Dan; Parks, Steve; Carrejo, Danny; Rojdev, Kristina

    2013-01-01

    The Flat Surface Damage Detection system (FSDDS} is a sensory system that is capable of detecting impact damages to surfaces utilizing a novel sensor system. This system will provide the ability to monitor the integrity of an inflatable habitat during in situ system health monitoring. The system consists of three main custom designed subsystems: the multi-layer sensing panel, the embedded monitoring system, and the graphical user interface (GUI). The GUI LABVIEW software uses a custom developed damage detection algorithm to determine the damage location based on the sequence of broken sensing lines. It estimates the damage size, the maximum depth, and plots the damage location on a graph. Successfully demonstrated as a stand alone technology during 2011 D-RATS. Software modification also allowed for communication with HDU avionics crew display which was demonstrated remotely (KSC to JSC} during 2012 integration testing. Integrated FSDDS system and stand alone multi-panel systems were demonstrated remotely and at JSC, Mission Operations Test using Space Network Research Federation (SNRF} network in 2012. FY13, FSDDS multi-panel integration with JSC and SNRF network Technology can allow for integration with other complementary damage detection systems.

  15. Combined-load buckling behavior of metal-matrix composite sandwich panels under different thermal environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Jackson, Raymond H.

    1991-01-01

    Combined compressive and shear buckling analysis was conducted on flat rectangular sandwich panels with the consideration of transverse shear effects of the core. The sandwich panel is fabricated with titanium honeycomb core and laminated metal matrix composite face sheets. The results show that the square panel has the highest combined load buckling strength, and that the buckling strength decreases sharply with the increases of both temperature and panel aspect ratio. The effect of layup (fiber orientation) on the buckling strength of the panels was studied in detail. The metal matrix composite sandwich panel was much more efficient than the sandwich panel with nonreinforced face sheets and had the same specific weight.

  16. Sky Flats: Generating Improved WFC3 IR Flat-fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirzkal, N.; Mack, J.; Dahlen, T.; Sabbi, E.

    2011-05-01

    A significantly improved set of flat-fields are now available and are currently used as part of the WFC3 calibration pipeline. We describe the creation and testing of new in-orbit flat-field corrections for the WFC3 IR channel. While high signal to noise ground based flat-fields were generated prior to launch, photometry of dithered stellar fields showed that these flat-fields failed to fully flatten the large scale structure of the WFC3 IR flat-fields. In this ISR we show how we generated a correction to the ground based flat-fields using thousands of IR observations. This correction, or sky delta flat-field (SD-flat in this ISR), appears to be both wavelength and time independent and is stable down to better than 1% over most of the detector. Photometric accuracy using new corrected flat-fields is better than 0.5% (peak to peak variation of -1.5/+1.6%) if one avoid being within 128 pixels of the edge of the detector. For the "wagon-wheel" region and the edge of the detector, photometric accuracy is reduced to about 0.8% (peak to peak variation of -2.0/+1.9%).

  17. RECOMBINATION PROCESSES AND NATURE OF THE TAIL AND GAP STATES IN a-Si:H and a-Si:H/a-SiNx:H MULTILAYERS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morigaki, K.

    We discuss recombination processes and nature of the tail and gap states in a-Si:H and a-Si:H/a-SiNx:H multilayers on the basis of our ODMR, luminescence, photoinduced absorption and ENDOR measurements. We present other results relevant to this subject and attempt to interpret them in terms of our model.

  18. Fabric panel clean change-out frame

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Ronald M.

    1995-01-31

    A fabric panel clean change-out frame, for use on a containment structure having rigid walls, is formed of a compression frame and a closure panel. The frame is formed of elongated spacers, each carrying a plurality of closely spaced flat springs, and each having a hooked lip extending on the side of the spring facing the spacer. The closure panel is includes a perimeter frame formed of flexible, wedge-shaped frame members that are receivable under the springs to deflect the hooked lips. A groove on the flexible frame members engages the hooked lips and locks the frame members in place under the springs. A flexible fabric panel is connected to the flexible frame members and closes its center.

  19. UVIS Flat Field Uniformity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quijano, Jessica Kim

    2009-07-01

    The stability and uniformity of the low-frequency flat fields {L-flat} of the UVIS detector will be assessed by using multiple-pointing observations of the globular clusters 47 Tucanae {NGC104} and Omega Centauri {NGC5139}, thus imaging moderately dense stellar fields. By placing the same star over different portions of the detector and measuring relative changes in its brightness, it will be possible to determine local variations in the response of the UVIS detector. Based on previous experience with STIS and ACS, it is deemed that a total of 9 different pointings will suffice to provide adequate characterization of the flat field stability in any given band. For each filter to be tested, the baseline consists of 9 pointings in a 3X3 box pattern with dither steps of about 25% of the FOV, or 40.5", in either the x or y direction {useful also for CTE measurements, if needed in the future}. During SMOV, the complement of filters to be tested is limited to the following 6 filters: F225W, F275W, F336W, for Omega Cen, and F438W, F606W, and F814W for 47 Tuc. Three long exposures for each target are arranged such that the initial dither position is observed with the appropriate filters for that target within one orbit at a single pointing, so that filter-to-filter differences in the observed star positions can be checked. In addition to the 9 baseline exposures, two sets of short exposures will be taken:a} one short exposure will be taken of OmegaCen with each of the visible filters {F438W, F606W and F814W} in order to check the geometric distortion solution to be obtained with the data from proposal 11444;b} for each target, a single short exposure will be taken with each filter to facilitate the study of the PSF as a function of position on the detector by providing unsaturated images of sparsely-spaced bright stars.This proposal corresponds to Activity Description ID WF39. It should execute only after the following proposal has executed:WF21 - 11434

  20. Heat exchanger panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warburton, Robert E. (Inventor); Cuva, William J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heat exchanger panel which has broad utility in high temperature environments. The heat exchanger panel has a first panel, a second panel, and at least one fluid containment device positioned intermediate the first and second panels. At least one of the first panel and the second panel have at least one feature on an interior surface to accommodate the at least one fluid containment device. In a preferred embodiment, each of the first and second panels is formed from a high conductivity, high temperature composite material. Also, in a preferred embodiment, the first and second panels are joined together by one or more composite fasteners.

  1. Panel Discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, James

    1997-03-01

    Panelists: Arthur Bienenstock, Stanford University Cherry Ann Murray, Lucent Technologies Venkatesh Narayanamurti, University of California-Santa Barbara Paul Peercy, SEMI-SEMATECH Robert Richardson, Cornell University James Roberto, Oak Ridge National Laboratory The Board on Physics and Astronomy is undertaking a series of reassessments of all branches of physics as the foundation of a new physics survey. As part of this project, a Committee on Condensed Matter and Materials Physics has been established under the leadership of Venkatesh Narayanamurti of the University of California-Santa Barbara. The committee has been working since June on a study that will include an illustrative recounting of major recent achievements; identification of new opportunities and challenges facing the field; and articulation-for leaders in government, industry, universities, and the public at large-of the important roles played by the field in modern society. An especially urgent issue is how to maintain the intellectual vitality of condensed matter and materials physics, and its contributions to the well-being of the United States, in an era of limited resources. The forum will feature a panel of materials researchers who are members of the Committee on Condensed Matter and Materials Physics. They will give a brief report on the status of the study and engage in a dialogue with the audience about issues facing the condensed matter and materials physics community. Broad community input is vital to the success of the study. Please come and make your voice heard!

  2. SDO FlatSat Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amason, David L.

    2008-01-01

    The goal of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) is to understand and, ideally, predict the solar variations that influence life and society. It's instruments will measure the properties of the Sun and will take hifh definition images of the Sun every few seconds, all day every day. The FlatSat is a high fidelity electrical and functional representation of the SDO spacecraft bus. It is a high fidelity test bed for Integration & Test (I & T), flight software, and flight operations. For I & T purposes FlatSat will be a driver to development and dry run electrical integration procedures, STOL test procedures, page displays, and the command and telemetry database. FlatSat will also serve as a platform for flight software acceptance and systems testing for the flight software system component including the spacecraft main processors, power supply electronics, attitude control electronic, gimbal control electrons and the S-band communications card. FlatSat will also benefit the flight operations team through post-launch flight software code and table update development and verification and verification of new and updated flight operations products. This document highlights the benefits of FlatSat; describes the building of FlatSat; provides FlatSat facility requirements, access roles and responsibilities; and, and discusses FlatSat mechanical and electrical integration and functional testing.

  3. Absolute calibration of optical flats

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2005-04-05

    The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of absolute flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the absolute phase error of the optical flat is obtained.

  4. Jig for assembling large composite panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, J. T.

    1980-01-01

    Layup of composite panels as large as 15 by 60 ft is greatly facilitated by simple mechanism. Jig consists of flat, detachable table, and curved laminating-plate joined by rack and pinion to insure accurate registration. Vacuum holds thin plastic film to laminating-plate. Preimpregnated composite sheet is applied to plate, which is then lowered face down onto table. Release of vacuum leaves layer and film and table. Film is peeled off, and steps are repeated for next layer of laminate.

  5. Brushless Cleaning of Solar Panels and Windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, H. W.

    1982-01-01

    Machine proposed for cleaning solar panels and reflectors uses multiple vortexes of air, solvent, and water to remove dust and dirt. Uses no brushes that might abrade solar surfaces and thereby reduce efficiency. Machine can be readily automated and can be used on curved surfaces such as aparbolic reflectors as well as on flat ones. Cleaning fluids are recycled, so that large quantities of water and solvent are not needed.

  6. Deformation behavior of welded steel sandwich panels under quasi-static loading

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-03-01

    This report describes engineering studies that were conducted to examine the deformation behavior of flat, welded steel sandwich panels under two quasi-static loading conditions: (1) uniaxial compression; and (2) bending with an indenter. Testing and...

  7. From display and PWB to MCMs: Large panel manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.W.; Worobey, W.

    1994-03-01

    Considerable manufacturing development is currently aimed at reducing high density Multichip Module (MCM) cost through the use of large panels (>40 cm {times} 40 cm) to fabricate many interconnection substrates in parallel. This drive for low cost MCM manufacturing is aided by the growing base of similar panel technology for the Printed Wiring Board (PWB) and Flat Panel display industries. It is toward this experience that the infant large panel MCM efforts are looking. In particular, the MCM Consortium formed by the Electronic Industry Association (EIA) and funded under the federal TRP effort is charged with developing a line ofmore » equipment optimized for large panel, fine line manufacture. PWB line definition research into large panels of glass and smooth non-woven laminate at 2-4 mil lines and spaces reveals that present equipment and processes are extendible well beyond commercial PWB product. In contrast, the ultra-cleanliness and spin coating of the silicon integrated circuit technology prove too expensive when scaled from 150mm diameter wafers to 560mm panels. Thus low waste photoresist (and other polymer dielectrics) application methods are needed for large panel manufacture. Similarly, PWB contact photomasking is nearing limits at 2-4 mil feature size, and projection or maskless direct write processes may be needed. Even small hand-held flat panel displays are manufactured from large panels to reduce the cost per display for conductive and dielectric layer deposition and patterning. In addition, as low cost flat displays become larger and improve in resolution, the line pitch and density approach that needed in high density MCMs.« less

  8. Finite element buckling and postbuckling solutions for multilayered composite panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    1995-01-01

    A study is made of the buckling and postbuckling responses of flat, unstiffened composite panels subjected to various combinations of mechanical and thermal loads. The analysis is based on a first-order shear deformation von Karman-type plate theory. A mixed formulation is used with the fundamental unknowns consisting of the strain components, stress resultants and the generalized displacements of the plate. The stability boundary, postbuckling response and the sensitivity coefficients are evaluated. The sensitivity coefficients measure the sensitivity of the buckling and postbuckling responses to variations in the different lamination and material parameters of the panel. Numerical results are presented for both solid panels and panels with central circular cutouts. The results show the effects of the variations in the fiber orientation angels, aspect ratio of the panel, and the hole diameter (for panels with cutouts) on the stability boundary, postbuckling response and sensitivity coefficients.

  9. Loading and heating of a large flat plate at Mach 7 in the Langley 8-foot high-temperature structures tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deveikis, W. D.; Hunt, L. R.

    1973-01-01

    Surface pressure and cold-wall heating rate distributions (wall-temperature to total-temperature ratio approximately 0.2) were obtained on a large, flat calibration panel at a nominal Mach number of 7 in an 8-foot high-temperature structures tunnel. Panel dimensions were 42.5 by 60.0 in. Test objectives were: (1) to map available flat-plate loading and heating provided by the facility and (2) to determine effectiveness of leading-edge bluntness, boundary-layer trips, and aerodynamic fences in generating a uniform, streamwise turbulent flow field over the test surface of a flat-sided panel holder.

  10. Flat H Redundant Frangible Joint Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Chris

    2016-01-01

    changes to better disperse loads paths and to minimize air gaps. The design additionally added more structural strength to enhance the structural limits in static loads testing. The design also implemented a smoother load line through the assembly. Results / Knowledge Gained The new Flat H RFJ successfully fractured at WSTF with thicker ligaments and lower cord size. Where failure to separate occurred earlier, there is now excessive energy available for structural separation. The new challenge to provide some structural support to prevent secondary fracturing of the break plate remains to be completed. This future work is being funded by the JSC Engineering Directorate in 2017 to elevate the TRL on curved Flat H RFJs that configure with the Orion Service Panel Separation. Additional funding from JSC Engineering will provide new design testing to avoid secondary fracturing.

  11. APPLIED ORIGAMI. Origami of thick panels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Peng, Rui; You, Zhong

    2015-07-24

    Origami patterns, including the rigid origami patterns in which flat inflexible sheets are joined by creases, are primarily created for zero-thickness sheets. In order to apply them to fold structures such as roofs, solar panels, and space mirrors, for which thickness cannot be disregarded, various methods have been suggested. However, they generally involve adding materials to or offsetting panels away from the idealized sheet without altering the kinematic model used to simulate folding. We develop a comprehensive kinematic synthesis for rigid origami of thick panels that differs from the existing kinematic model but is capable of reproducing motions identical to that of zero-thickness origami. The approach, proven to be effective for typical origami, can be readily applied to fold real engineering structures. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. Deformation and fatigue resistance of Al/a-Si core-shell nanostructures subjected to cyclic nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steck, Jason G.; Fleming, Robert A.; Goss, Josue A.; Zou, Min

    2018-03-01

    Nanostructure-textured surfaces can reduce friction and adhesion of micro- and nano-electromechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS). For MEMS/NEMS incorporating moving parts, the fatigue properties of nanostructures pose a challenge to their reliability in long-term applications. In this study, the fatigue behavior of hemispherical Al/a-Si core-shell nanostructures (CSNs), bare hemispherical Al nanodots, and a flat Al/a-Si layered thin film have been studied using nanoindentation and nano-scale dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) techniques. Fatigue testing with nano-scale DMA shows that the deformation resistance of CSNs persists through 5.0 × 104 loading cycles at estimated contact pressures greater than 20 GPa. For bare Al nanodots which lack the hard a-Si shell, significant nanostructure deformation results due to repeated cyclic loading. In addition, for the Al/a-Si layered thin film which lacks the geometric and dislocation confinement properties of CSNs, cyclic loading results in fatigue failure of the a-Si layer. Even at elevated contact pressures, CSNs demonstrate none of the failure mechanisms exhibited by the other two control structures. The unique properties displayed by CSNs when subjected to fatigue testing establish their prolonged reliability and durability when implemented in micro- and nano-scale applications.

  13. 19. VIEW OF THE PLATING BATHS AND CONTROL PANELS. GOLD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. VIEW OF THE PLATING BATHS AND CONTROL PANELS. GOLD AND SILVER WERE AMONG THE MATERIALS PLATED ONTO PARTS MADE OF COPPER, STAINLESS STEEL AND STEEL. (11/15/89) - Rocky Flats Plant, Non-Nuclear Production Facility, South of Cottonwood Avenue, west of Seventh Avenue & east of Building 460, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  14. Nature of paramagnetic centers in a-Si and a-Si:H

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Stesmans, A.

    1988-08-01

    A comparative ESR study has been undertaken of various kinds of a-Si and a-Si:H. Experiments on sputtered samples reveal that the local configuration of the usual dangling-bond (DB) centers (gapprox. =2.0055) depends on the details of deposition. The g value may gradually be reduced to values as low as 2.0041 as a result of local-structure change. Regarding the g = 2.004 signal originated from conduction-band-tail (CBT) states, it is shown that the effective correlation energy (U/sub eff/) is large and the temperature dependence of its spin density is due to the presence of donor levels: not due to a small-U/submore » eff/ effect as has previously been concluded. Related to this, ample evidence is provided, indicating that the g = 2.004 signal in P-doped a-Si:H and the g = 2.005 DB line are in fact variants of the same kind of defect. Systematic analysis identifies the g = 2.004 CBT states signal with T/sub 3//sup -/-T/sub 3//sup +/+e/sup -/ defect centers thus showing that a great deal of the CBT states are defect states rather than disorder-induced localized states. Regarding the g = 2.013 signal in a-Si:H, evidence is provided showing that this cannot be associated with valence-band-tail states. Rather it concerns defects positioned at approx. =0.6 eV above the valence-band mobility edge, whose nature is as yet to be determined. Their presence relates directly or indirectly to H incorporation.« less

  15. Temporary bridge deck panels.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-03-01

    The research described here has resulted in the development of a simplistic and innovative interlocking : glulam bridge deck panel for use in temporary bridge deck applications. The key feature of this panel : system is the interlocking tongue and gr...

  16. 40 CFR 230.42 - Mud flats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Mud flats. 230.42 Section 230.42 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING SECTION 404(b)(1... Aquatic Sites § 230.42 Mud flats. (a) Mud flats are broad flat areas along the sea coast and in coastal...

  17. 40 CFR 230.42 - Mud flats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mud flats. 230.42 Section 230.42 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING SECTION 404(b)(1... Aquatic Sites § 230.42 Mud flats. (a) Mud flats are broad flat areas along the sea coast and in coastal...

  18. 40 CFR 230.42 - Mud flats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mud flats. 230.42 Section 230.42 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING SECTION 404(b)(1... Aquatic Sites § 230.42 Mud flats. (a) Mud flats are broad flat areas along the sea coast and in coastal...

  19. 40 CFR 230.42 - Mud flats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mud flats. 230.42 Section 230.42 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING SECTION 404(b)(1... Aquatic Sites § 230.42 Mud flats. (a) Mud flats are broad flat areas along the sea coast and in coastal...

  20. SOLAR PANEL TEST SET

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The report describes the Solar Panel Test Set developed for testing solar cell panels in artificial sunlight at an equivalent sunlight intensity of...totally diffused. An air conditioner, which is part of the test set, provides the cooling air necessary to control the temperature of the solar panel under

  1. TRMM Solar Array Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This final report presents conclusions/recommendations concerning the TRMM Solar Array; deliverable list and schedule summary; waivers and deviations; as-shipped performance data, including flight panel verification matrix, panel output detail, shadow test summary, humidity test summary, reverse bias test panel; and finally, quality assurance summary.

  2. Analysis and test of superplastically formed titanium hat-stiffened panels under compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Randall C.; Royster, Dick M.; Bales, Thomas T.

    1987-01-01

    Four hat-stiffened titanium panels with two different stiffener configurations were fabricated by superplastic forming/weld brazing and tested under a moderately heavy compressive load. The panels had the same overall dimensions but differed in the shape of the hat-stiffener webs; three panels had stiffeners with flat webs and the other panel had stiffeners with beaded webs. Analysis indicated that the local buckling strain of the flat stiffener web was considerably lower than the general panel buckling strain or cap buckling strain. The analysis also showed that beading the webs of the hat stiffeners removed them as the critical element for local buckling and improved the buckling strain of the panels. The analytical extensional stiffness and failure loads compared very well with experimental results.

  3. Study of noise reduction characteristics of multilayered panels and dual pane windows with Helmholtz resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navaneethan, R.

    1981-01-01

    The experimental noise attenuation characteristics of flat, general aviation type, multilayered panels are discussed. Experimental results of stiffened panels, damping tape, honeycomb materials and sound absorption materials are presented. Single degree of freedom theoretical models were developed for sandwich type panels with both shear resistant and non-shear resistant core material. The concept of Helmholtz resonators used in conjunction with dual panel windows in increasing the noise reduction around a small range of frequency was tested. It is concluded that the stiffening of the panels either by stiffeners or by sandwich construction increases the low frequency noise reduction.

  4. Sound transmission loss of integrally damped, curved panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Reed, Samuel A.

    1989-01-01

    Results are reported from acoustic transmission-loss measurements on 13 curved Al and composite aircraft-type panels (height 0.81 m, arc length 1.32 m, and curvature radius 2.29 m) without and with integral damping of various types. The fabrication of the panels and the test procedures are described and illustrated with photographs, and the results are presented in graphs. It is found that the loss of a curved panel exceeds the mass-law-predicted loss for a flat panel of the same material and thickness at frequencies below the ring frequency. At higher frequencies, the curved-panel loss is lower than the mass-law loss, being proportional to 20 time the log of thickness. Integral damping is found to be effective both below and above the ring frequency, but different mechanisms are responsible in each case.

  5. Thermomechanical postbuckling of multilayered composite panels with cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Peters, Jeanne M.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    The results of a study of the detailed thermomechanical postbuckling response characteristics of flat unstiffened composite panels with central circular cutouts are presented. The panels are subjected to combined temperature changes and applied edge loading (or edge displacements). The analysis is based on a first-order shear deformation plate theory. A mixed formulation is used with the fundamental unknowns consisting of the generalized displacements and the stress resultants of the plate. The postbuckling displacements, transverse shear stresses, transverse shear strain energy density, and their sensitivity coefficients are evaluated. The sensitivity coefficients measure the sensitivity of the post-buckling response to variations in the different lamination and material parameters of the panel. Numerical results are presented showing the effects of the variations in the hole diameter, laminate stacking sequence, fiber orientation, and aspect ratio of the panel on the thermomechanical postbuckling response and its sensitivity to changes in panel parameters.

  6. The Fallacies of Flatness: Thomas Friedman's "The World Is Flat"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abowitz, Kathleen Knight; Roberts, Jay

    2007-01-01

    Thomas Friedman's best-selling "The World is Flat" has exerted much influence in the west by providing both an accessible analysis of globalization and its economic and social effects, and a powerful cultural metaphor for globalization. In this review, we more closely examine Friedman's notion of the social contract, the moral center of his…

  7. Properties of flat-pressed wood plastic composites containing fire retardants

    Treesearch

    Nadir Ayrilmis; Jan. T. Benthien; Heiko Thoemen; Robert H. White

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated physical, mechanical, and fire properties of the flat-pressed wood plastic composites (WPCs) incorporated with various fire retardants (FRs) [5 or 15% by weight (wt)] at 50 wt % of the wood flour (WF). The WPC panels were made from dry-blended WF, polypropylene (PP) with maleic anhydride grafted PP (2 wt %), and FR powder formulations using a...

  8. Preliminary design review package on air flat plate collector for solar heating and cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Guidelines to be used in the development and fabrication of a prototype air flat plate collector subsystem containing 320 square feet (10-4 ft x 8 ft panels) of collector area are presented. Topics discussed include: (1) verification plan; (2) thermal analysis; (3) safety hazard analysis; (4) drawing list; (5) special handling, installation and maintenance tools; (6) structural analysis; and (7) selected drawings.

  9. Effects of fire retardants on physical, mechanical, and fire properties of flat-pressed WPCs

    Treesearch

    Nadir Ayrilmis; Jan T. Benthien; Heiko Thoemen; Robert H. White

    2012-01-01

    Physical, mechanical, and fire properties of the flat-pressed wood plastic composites (WPCs) incorporated with various fire retardants (10% by weight) at different levels of wood flour (WF) content, 40, 50, or 60 wt%, were investigated. The WPC panels were made from dry-blended WF, polypropylene (PP), and fire retardant (FR) powders with maleic anhydride-grafted PP (2...

  10. Safety Panel Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Christine E.

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to explore what resources are potentially available to safety panels and to provide some guidance on how to utilize those resources. While the examples used in this paper will concentrate on the Flight Equipment and Reliability Review Panel (FESRRP) and Extravehicular Activity (EVA) hardware that have come through that panel, as well as resources at Johnson Space Center, the paper will address how this applies to safety panels in general, and where possible cite examples for other safety panels.

  11. Interactive optical panel

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1995-10-03

    An interactive optical panel assembly includes an optical panel having a plurality of ribbon optical waveguides stacked together with opposite ends thereof defining panel first and second faces. A light source provides an image beam to the panel first face for being channeled through the waveguides and emitted from the panel second face in the form of a viewable light image. A remote device produces a response beam over a discrete selection area of the panel second face for being channeled through at least one of the waveguides toward the panel first face. A light sensor is disposed across a plurality of the waveguides for detecting the response beam therein for providing interactive capability. 10 figs.

  12. Interactive optical panel

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    1995-10-03

    An interactive optical panel assembly 34 includes an optical panel 10 having a plurality of ribbon optical waveguides 12 stacked together with opposite ends thereof defining panel first and second faces 16, 18. A light source 20 provides an image beam 22 to the panel first face 16 for being channeled through the waveguides 12 and emitted from the panel second face 18 in the form of a viewable light image 24a. A remote device 38 produces a response beam 40 over a discrete selection area 36 of the panel second face 18 for being channeled through at least one of the waveguides 12 toward the panel first face 16. A light sensor 42,50 is disposed across a plurality of the waveguides 12 for detecting the response beam 40 therein for providing interactive capability.

  13. Flat Feet and Fallen Arches

    MedlinePlus

    ... or painful. Shoe inserts won’t help your child develop an arch, and may cause more problems than ... seldom seen in an infant or very young child. (More often, rigid flat feet develop during the teen years and should be evaluated ...

  14. The complexity of flat origami

    SciTech Connect

    Bern, M.; Hayes, B.

    1996-12-31

    We study a basic problem in mathematical origami: determine if a given crease pattern can be folded to a flat origami. We show that assigning mountain and valley folds is NP-hard. We also show that determining a suitable overlap order for flaps is NP-hard, even assuming a valid mountain and valley assignment.

  15. Compressive and shear buckling analysis of metal matrix composite sandwich panels under different thermal environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Jackson, Raymond H.

    1993-01-01

    Combined inplane compressive and shear buckling analysis was conducted on flat rectangular sandwich panels using the Raleigh-Ritz minimum energy method with a consideration of transverse shear effect of the sandwich core. The sandwich panels were fabricated with titanium honeycomb core and laminated metal matrix composite face sheets. The results show that slightly slender (along unidirectional compressive loading axis) rectangular sandwich panels have the most desirable stiffness-to-weight ratios for aerospace structural applications; the degradation of buckling strength of sandwich panels with rising temperature is faster in shear than in compression; and the fiber orientation of the face sheets for optimum combined-load buckling strength of sandwich panels is a strong function of both loading condition and panel aspect ratio. Under the same specific weight and panel aspect ratio, a sandwich panel with metal matrix composite face sheets has much higher buckling strength than one having monolithic face sheets.

  16. Configuration and Sizing of a Test Fixture for Panels Under Combined Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovejoy, Andrew E.

    2006-01-01

    Future air and space structures are expected to utilize composite panels that are subjected to combined mechanical loads, such as bi-axial compression/tension, shear and pressure. Therefore, the ability to accurately predict the buckling and strength failures of such panels is important. While computational analysis can provide tremendous insight into panel response, experimental results are necessary to verify predicted performances of these panels to judge the accuracy of computational methods. However, application of combined loads is an extremely difficult task due to the complex test fixtures and set-up required. Presented herein is a comparison of several test set-ups capable of testing panels under combined loads. Configurations compared include a D-box, a segmented cylinder and a single panel set-up. The study primarily focuses on the preliminary sizing of a single panel test configuration capable of testing flat panels under combined in-plane mechanical loads. This single panel set-up appears to be best suited to the testing of both strength critical and buckling critical panels. Required actuator loads and strokes are provided for various square, flat panels.

  17. Titanium honeycomb panel testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, W. L.; Thompson, Randolph C.

    The paper describes the procedures of thermal mechanical tests carried out at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility on two tianium honeycomb wing panels bonded using liquid interface diffusion (LID) technique, and presents the results of these tests. The 58.4 cm square panels consisted of two 0.152-cm-thick Ti 6-2-4-2 face sheets LID-bonded to a 1.9-cm-thick honeycomb core, with bearing plates fastened to the perimeter of the upper and the lower panel surfaces. The panels were instrumented with sensors for measuring surface temperature, strain, and deflections to 315 C and 482 C. Thermal stress levels representative of those encountered during aerodynamic heating were produced by heating the upper panel surface and restraining all four edges. After more than 100 thermal cycles from room temperature to 315 C and 50 cycles from room temperature to 482 C, no significant structural degradation was detected in the panels.

  18. Aerospace safety advisory panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This report from the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) contains findings, recommendations, and supporting material concerning safety issues with the space station program, the space shuttle program, aeronautics research, and other NASA programs. Section two presents findings and recommendations, section three presents supporting information, and appendices contain data about the panel membership, the NASA response to the March 1993 ASAP report, and a chronology of the panel's activities during the past year.

  19. PANEL LIBRARY AND EDITOR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raible, E.

    1994-01-01

    The Panel Library and Editor is a graphical user interface (GUI) builder for the Silicon Graphics IRIS workstation family. The toolkit creates "widgets" which can be manipulated by the user. Its appearance is similar to that of the X-Windows System. The Panel Library is written in C and is used by programmers writing user-friendly mouse-driven applications for the IRIS. GUIs built using the Panel Library consist of "actuators" and "panels." Actuators are buttons, dials, sliders, or other mouse-driven symbols. Panels are groups of actuators that occupy separate windows on the IRIS workstation. The application user can alter variables in the graphics program, or fire off functions with a click on a button. The evolution of data values can be tracked with meters and strip charts, and dialog boxes with text processing can be built. Panels can be stored as icons when not in use. The Panel Editor is a program used to interactively create and test panel library interfaces in a simple and efficient way. The Panel Editor itself uses a panel library interface, so all actions are mouse driven. Extensive context-sensitive on-line help is provided. Programmers can graphically create and test the user interface without writing a single line of code. Once an interface is judged satisfactory, the Panel Editor will dump it out as a file of C code that can be used in an application. The Panel Library (v9.8) and Editor (v1.1) are written in C-Language (63%) and Scheme, a dialect of LISP, (37%) for Silicon Graphics 4D series workstations running IRIX 3.2 or higher. Approximately 10Mb of disk space is required once compiled. 1.5Mb of main memory is required to execute the panel editor. This program is available on a .25 inch streaming magnetic tape cartridge in UNIX tar format for an IRIS, and includes a copy of XScheme, the public-domain Scheme interpreter used by the Panel Editor. The Panel Library Programmer's Manual is included on the distribution media. The Panel Library and

  20. Solar reflection panels

    DOEpatents

    Diver, Jr., Richard B.; Grossman, James W [Albuquerque, NM; Reshetnik, Michael [Boulder, CO

    2006-07-18

    A solar collector comprising a glass mirror, and a composite panel, wherein the back of the mirror is affixed to a front surface of the composite panel. The composite panel comprises a front sheet affixed to a surface of a core material, preferably a core material comprising a honeycomb structure, and a back sheet affixed to an opposite surface of the core material. The invention may further comprise a sealing strip, preferably comprising EPDM, positioned between the glass mirror and the front surface of the composite panel. The invention also is of methods of making such solar collectors.

  1. Decorative power generating panels creating angle insensitive transmissive colors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Yong; Lee, Kyu-Tae; Seo, Sungyong; Guo, L Jay

    2014-02-28

    We present ultra-thin (6 to 31 nm) undoped amorphous silicon/organic hybrid solar cell structure, which can transmit desired color of light. The transmitted colors show great angular tolerance due to the negligible optical phase associated with light propagating in ultra-thin amorphous silicon (a-Si) layers. We achieved the power conversion efficiency of the hybrid cells up to 2 %; and demonstrated that most of the absorbed photons in the undoped a-Si layer contributed to the extracted electric charges due to the suppressed electron-hole recombination in the ultra-thin a-Si layer. We also show the resonance is invariant with respect to the angle of incidence up to ± 70° regardless of the polarization of the incident light. Our exploration provides a design to realize energy harvesting colored photovoltaic panels for innovative applications.

  2. Decorative power generating panels creating angle insensitive transmissive colors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Yong; Lee, Kyu-Tae; Seo, Sungyong; Guo, L. Jay

    2014-01-01

    We present ultra-thin (6 to 31 nm) undoped amorphous silicon/organic hybrid solar cell structure, which can transmit desired color of light. The transmitted colors show great angular tolerance due to the negligible optical phase associated with light propagating in ultra-thin amorphous silicon (a-Si) layers. We achieved the power conversion efficiency of the hybrid cells up to 2 %; and demonstrated that most of the absorbed photons in the undoped a-Si layer contributed to the extracted electric charges due to the suppressed electron-hole recombination in the ultra-thin a-Si layer. We also show the resonance is invariant with respect to the angle of incidence up to ±70° regardless of the polarization of the incident light. Our exploration provides a design to realize energy harvesting colored photovoltaic panels for innovative applications. PMID:24577075

  3. Experimental investigation of the accuracy of a vibroacoustic model for sandwich-composite panels.

    PubMed

    Cherif, Raef; Atalla, Noureddine

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a detailed experimental validation of a general laminate model to predict the vibroacoustic behavior of flat sandwich-composite panels. The accuracy of the model is investigated using a thin and a thick sandwich panel over a large frequency band. Several indicators are compared including the structural wavenumber, modal density, damping loss factor, radiation efficiency, and sound transmission loss. The accuracy of a simpler model based on identifying effective properties of an equivalent orthotropic panel from the General Laminate Model is also discussed. Results show that the vibroacoustic behaviors of flat sandwich-composite panels are accurately estimated using the used model and compare well to the equivalent panel model (for total transmission loss). This experimental investigation is generic and can be used as a benchmark to validate other sandwich models.

  4. Innovative Ballasted Flat Roof Solar PV Racking System

    SciTech Connect

    Peek, Richard T.

    2014-12-15

    The objective of this project was to reduce the cost of racking for PV solar on flat commercial rooftops. Cost reductions would come from both labor savings and material savings related to the installation process. The rack would need to accommodate the majority of modules available on the market. Cascade Engineering has a long history of converting traditional metal type applications over to plastic. Injection molding of plastics have numerous advantages including selection of resin for the application, placing the material exactly where it is needed, designing in features that will speed up the installation process, and weight reduction ofmore » the array. A plastic rack would need to meet the requirements of UL2703, Mounting systems, mounting devices, clamping/retention devices, and ground lugs for use with flat-plate photovoltaic modules and panels. Comparing original data to the end of project racking design, racking material costs were reduced 50% and labor costs reduced 64%. The racking product accommodates all 60 and 72 cell panels on the market, meets UL2703 requirements, contributes only 1.3 pounds per square foot of weight to the array, requires little ballast to secure the array, automatically grounds the module when the module is secured, stacks/nests well for shipping/fewer lifts to the roof, provides integrated wire routing, allows water to drain on the roof, and accommodates various seismic roof connections. Project goals were achieved as noted in the original funding application.« less

  5. 49 CFR 231.6 - Flat cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flat cars. 231.6 Section 231.6 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD SAFETY APPLIANCE STANDARDS § 231.6 Flat cars. (Cars with sides 12 inches or less above the floor may be equipped the same as flat cars.) (a) Hand brakes—(1) Number. Same as specified for...

  6. 49 CFR 231.6 - Flat cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Flat cars. 231.6 Section 231.6 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD SAFETY APPLIANCE STANDARDS § 231.6 Flat cars. (Cars with sides 12 inches or less above the floor may be equipped the same as flat cars.) (a) Hand brakes—(1) Number. Same as specified for...

  7. 49 CFR 231.6 - Flat cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Flat cars. 231.6 Section 231.6 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD SAFETY APPLIANCE STANDARDS § 231.6 Flat cars. (Cars with sides 12 inches or less above the floor may be equipped the same as flat cars.) (a) Hand brakes—(1) Number. Same as specified for...

  8. 49 CFR 231.6 - Flat cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Flat cars. 231.6 Section 231.6 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD SAFETY APPLIANCE STANDARDS § 231.6 Flat cars. (Cars with sides 12 inches or less above the floor may be equipped the same as flat cars.) (a) Hand brakes—(1) Number. Same as specified for...

  9. 49 CFR 231.6 - Flat cars.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Flat cars. 231.6 Section 231.6 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD SAFETY APPLIANCE STANDARDS § 231.6 Flat cars. (Cars with sides 12 inches or less above the floor may be equipped the same as flat cars.) (a) Hand brakes—(1) Number. Same as specified for...

  10. Durability of structural panels

    Treesearch

    Eddie W. Price; [Editor

    1984-01-01

    Twenty papers from the proceedings of a workshop are presented on the durability of a group of structural panels for use in roof, wall, and floor sheathing applications. The panel types are waferboard,flakeboard, strandboard, oriented structural board, and structural particleboard. A summary of the proceedings is given as the final presentation.

  11. Flexible optical panel

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2001-01-01

    A flexible optical panel includes laminated optical waveguides, each including a ribbon core laminated between cladding, with the core being resilient in the plane of the core for elastically accommodating differential movement thereof to permit winding of the panel in a coil.

  12. Thermomechanical buckling and postbuckling of multilayered composite panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Starnes, James H., Jr.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    1992-01-01

    A study is made of the thermomechanical buckling and postbuckling responses of flat unstiffened composite panels. The panels are subjected to combined temperature change and applied edge displacement. The analysis is based on a first-order shear deformation, von Karman type nonlinear plate theory. A mixed formulation is used with the fundamental unknowns consisting of the generalized displacements and the stress resultants of the plate. An efficient multiple-parameter reduction method is used in conjunction with mixed finite element models, for determining the stability boundary and postbuckling response. The reduction method is also used for evaluating the sensitivity coefficients which measure the sensitivity of the buckling and postbuckling responses to variations in the different lamination and material parameters of the panel. Numerical results are presented showing the effects of variations in the laminate stacking sequence, fiber orientation, number of layers and aspect ratio of the panels on their thermomechanical buckling and postbuckling responses and their sensitivity coefficients.

  13. Thermomechanical buckling of multilayered composite panels with cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Starnes, James H., Jr.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    1994-01-01

    A study is made of the thermomechanical buckling of flat unstiffened composite panels with central circular cutouts. The panels are subjected to combined temperature changes and applied edge loading (or edge displacements). The analysis is based on a first-order shear deformation plate theory. A mixed formulation is used with the fundamental unknowns consisting of the generalized displacements and the stress resultants of the plate. Both the stability boundary and the sensitivity coefficients are evaluated. The sensitivity coefficients measure the sensitivity of the buckling response to variations in the different lamination and material parameters of the panel. Numerical results are presented showing the effects of the variations in the hole diameter, laminate stacking sequence, fiber orientation, and aspect ratio of the panel on the thermomechanical buckling response and its sensitivity coefficients.

  14. Thermomechanical buckling of multilayered composite panels with cutouts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Starnes, James H., Jr.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    1993-01-01

    A study is made of the thermomechanical buckling of flat unstiffened composite panels with central circular cutouts. The panels are subjected to combined temperature changes and applied edge loading (or edge displacements). The analysis is based on a first-order shear deformation plate theory. A mixed formulation is used with the fundamental unknowns consisting of the generalized displacements and the stress resultants of the plate. Both the stability boundary and the sensitivity coefficients are evaluated. The sensitivity coefficients measure the sensitivity of the buckling response to variations in the different lamination and material parameters of the panel. Numerical results are presented showing the effects of the variations in the hole diameter, laminate stacking sequence, fiber orientation, and aspect ratio of the panel on the thermomechanical buckling response and its sensitivity coefficients.

  15. Panel 5: Microbiology and Immunology Panel

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Timothy F.; Chonmaitree, Tasnee; Barenkamp, Stephen; Kyd, Jennelle; Nokso-Koivisto, Johanna; Patel, Janak A.; Heikkinen, Terho; Yamanaka, Noboru; Ogra, Pearay; Swords, W. Edward; Sih, Tania; Pettigrew, Melinda M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective is to perform a comprehensive review of the literature from January 2007 through June 2011 on the virology, bacteriology, and immunology related to otitis media. Data Sources PubMed database of the National Library of Medicine. Review Methods Three subpanels with co-chairs comprising experts in the virology, bacteriology, and immunology of otitis media were formed. Each of the panels reviewed the literature in their respective fields and wrote draft reviews. The reviews were shared with all panel members, and a second draft was created. The entire panel met at the 10th International Symposium on Recent Advances in Otitis Media in June 2011 and discussed the review and refined the content further. A final draft was created, circulated, and approved by the panel. Conclusion Excellent progress has been made in the past 4 years in advancing an understanding of the microbiology and immunology of otitis media. Advances include laboratory-based basic studies, cell-based assays, work in animal models, and clinical studies. Implications for Practice The advances of the past 4 years formed the basis of a series of short-term and long-term research goals in an effort to guide the field. Accomplishing these goals will provide opportunities for the development of novel interventions, including new ways to better treat and prevent otitis media. PMID:23536533

  16. Panel 5: Microbiology and immunology panel.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Timothy F; Chonmaitree, Tasnee; Barenkamp, Stephen; Kyd, Jennelle; Nokso-Koivisto, Johanna; Patel, Janak A; Heikkinen, Terho; Yamanaka, Noboru; Ogra, Pearay; Swords, W Edward; Sih, Tania; Pettigrew, Melinda M

    2013-04-01

    The objective is to perform a comprehensive review of the literature from January 2007 through June 2011 on the virology, bacteriology, and immunology related to otitis media. PubMed database of the National Library of Medicine. Three subpanels with co-chairs comprising experts in the virology, bacteriology, and immunology of otitis media were formed. Each of the panels reviewed the literature in their respective fields and wrote draft reviews. The reviews were shared with all panel members, and a second draft was created. The entire panel met at the 10th International Symposium on Recent Advances in Otitis Media in June 2011 and discussed the review and refined the content further. A final draft was created, circulated, and approved by the panel. Excellent progress has been made in the past 4 years in advancing an understanding of the microbiology and immunology of otitis media. Advances include laboratory-based basic studies, cell-based assays, work in animal models, and clinical studies. The advances of the past 4 years formed the basis of a series of short-term and long-term research goals in an effort to guide the field. Accomplishing these goals will provide opportunities for the development of novel interventions, including new ways to better treat and prevent otitis media.

  17. Solar panel cleaning robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalladhimmu, Pavan Kumar Reddy; Priyadarshini, S.

    2018-04-01

    As the demand of electricity is increasing, there is need to using the renewable sources to produce the energy at present of power shortage, the use of solar energy could be beneficial to great extent and easy to get the maximum efficiency. There is an urgent in improving the efficiency of solar power generation. Current solar panels setups take a major power loss when unwanted obstructions cover the surface of the panels. To make solar energy more efficiency of solar array systems must be maximized efficiency evaluation of PV panels, that has been discussed with particular attention to the presence of dust on the efficiency of the PV panels have been highlighted. This paper gives the how the solar panel cleaning system works and designing of the cleaning system.

  18. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) provided oversight on the safety aspects of many NASA programs. In addition, ASAP undertook three special studies. At the request of the Administrator, the panel assessed the requirements for an assured crew return vehicle (ACRV) for the space station and reviewed the organization of the safety and mission quality function within NASA. At the behest of Congress, the panel formed an independent, ad hoc working group to examine the safety and reliability of the space shuttle main engine. Section 2 presents findings and recommendations. Section 3 consists of information in support of these findings and recommendations. Appendices A, B, C, and D, respectively, cover the panel membership, the NASA response to the findings and recommendations in the March 1992 report, a chronology of the panel's activities during the reporting period, and the entire ACRV study report.

  19. Investigation of pellicle influence on reticle flatness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Christopher; Racette, Kenneth; Barrett, Monica

    2005-06-01

    In lithography systems, the need for increased resolution requires larger numerical apertures and shorter illumination wavelengths. Both of these requirements cause a reduction in the system"s depth of focus resulting in the need for flatter photomasks with specifications under 0.5 micron. Currently the mask blank substrates are measured after polishing, and all subsequent process steps are assumed to have little or no impact on the final mask flatness. With today"s ever tightening flatness requirements, this assumption can no longer be taken for granted. This paper investigates the distortions seen at the reticle surface induced by the mounting of a standard optical pellicle frame to the photomask and relates these distortions to the pellicle frame flatness. The experiment involves using a set of mask blanks that are better than 0.5 micron flatness with similar form errors before attaching the pellicle. Two groups of pellicles are used to create two distinct frame flatness populations: one set assumed to be within specification as purchased; and a second set of pellicles that are intentionally distorted. Mask flatness is compared before and after mounting the pellicles, and all frames are measured for flatness. Correlation between the frame flatness and form to the measured distortion on the reticle surface are made and discussed, and a practical guideline for selecting an appropriate blank flatness and pellicle flatness to achieve the desired reticle flatness is suggested.

  20. Chiral flat bands: Existence, engineering, and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, Ajith; Andreanov, Alexei; Flach, Sergej

    2017-10-01

    We study flat bands in bipartite tight-binding networks with discrete translational invariance. Chiral flat bands with chiral symmetry eigenenergy E =0 and host compact localized eigenstates for finite range hopping. For a bipartite network with a majority sublattice chiral flat bands emerge. We present a simple generating principle of chiral flat-band networks and as a showcase add to the previously observed cases a number of new potentially realizable chiral flat bands in various lattice dimensions. Chiral symmetry respecting network perturbations—including disorder and synthetic magnetic fields—preserve both the flat band and the modified compact localized states. Chiral flat bands are spectrally protected by gaps and pseudogaps in the presence of disorder due to Griffiths effects.

  1. Blowup for flat slow manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristiansen, K. U.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we present a way of extending the blowup method, in the formulation of Krupa and Szmolyan, to flat slow manifolds that lose hyperbolicity beyond any algebraic order. Although these manifolds have infinite co-dimensions, they do appear naturally in certain settings; for example, in (a) the regularization of piecewise smooth systems by \\tanh , (b) a particular aircraft landing dynamics model, and finally (c) in a model of earthquake faulting. We demonstrate the approach using a simple model system and the examples (a) and (b).

  2. Flat Subduction and Dynamic Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lithgow-Bertelloni, C. R.; Dávila, F. M.; Eakin, C. M.; Crameri, F.

    2014-12-01

    Mantle dynamics manifests at the surface via the horizontal motions of plates and the vertical deflections that influence topography and the non-hydrostatic geoid. The pioneering work of Mitrovica et al. (1989) and Gurnis (1990) on this dynamic topography revolutionized our understanding of sedimentary basin formation, sea level changes and continental flooding. The temporal evolution of subduction can explain the migration of basins and even the drainage reversal of the Amazon (Shephard et al., 2012; Eakin et al., 2014). Until recently, flat subduction has been seen as enhancing downward deflection of the overriding plate and increasing flooding. However, this interpretation depends crucially on the details of the morphology and density structure of the slab, which controls the loci and amplitude of the deflection. We tend to ignore morphological details in mantle dynamics because flow can smooth out short wavelength variations. We have shown instead that details matter! Using South America as a natural laboratory because of the large changes in morphology of the Nazca slab along strike, we show that downward deflection of the overriding plate and hence basin formation, do not occur over flat segments but at the leading edge, where slabs plunge back into the mantle. This is true in both Argentina and Peru. The temporal evolution from a 'normally' dipplng slab to a flat slab leads to uplift over flat segments rather than enhanced subsidence. Critical for this result is the use of a detailed morphological model of the present-day Nazca slab with a spatial resolution of 50-100 km and based on relocated seismicity and magnetotelluric results. The density structure of the slab, due to age and the presence of overthickened crust from aseismic ridge subduction is essential. Overthickened crust leads to buoyant slabs. We reproduce formation and deposition of the Acres-Solimoes basin and the evolution of the Amazon drainage basin in Peru as well as the Mar Chiquita

  3. Compression response of laminated composite panels containing multiple delaminations

    SciTech Connect

    Kutlu, Z.S.

    1991-01-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation was performed to study the compression response of laminated composite panels containing multiple delaminations. Both flat and cylindrical panels were considered. An analytical model was developed for simulating the deformations, from initial loading to final collapse, of the laminated composite panels containing one or more through-the-width delaminations. The model consists of three parts: a stress analysis, a contact analysis, and a failure analysis. The stress analysis is based on the finite deformation theory and provides the stresses and strains during the large deformations of the panels; the contact analysis adopts the Lagrange multiplier technique formore » analyzing the delamination interface condition during loading; the failure analysis is based on fracture mechanics for predicting delamination growth and uses a set of failure criteria for predicting local fiber-matrix failure. These three analyses were incorporated into a nonlinear finite element program designated as PDE-LAM. Experiments on T300/976 graphite/epoxy composite panels (flat and cylindrical) were also performed to substantiate the model further.« less

  4. Shear buckling analysis of a hat-stiffened panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Jackson, Raymond H.

    1994-01-01

    A buckling analysis was performed on a hat-stiffened panel subjected to shear loading. Both local buckling and global buckling were analyzed. The global shear buckling load was found to be several times higher than the local shear buckling load. The classical shear buckling theory for a flat plate was found to be useful in predicting the local shear buckling load of the hat-stiffened panel, and the predicted local shear buckling loads thus obtained compare favorably with the results of finite element analysis.

  5. Thermo-elastoviscoplastic snapthrough behavior of cylindrical panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Y.; Simitses, G. J.

    1992-01-01

    The thermo-elastoviscoplastic snapthrough behavior of simply supported cylindrical panels is investigated. The analysis is based on nonlinear kinematic relations and nonlinear rate-dependent unified constitutive equations which include both Bodner-Partom's and Walker's material models. A finite element approach is employed to predict the inelastic buckling behavior. Numerical examples are given to demonstrate the effects of several parameters which include the temperature, thickness and flatness of the panel. Comparisons of buckling responses between Bodner-Partom's model and Walker's model are given. The creep buckling behavior, as an example of time-dependent inelastic deformation, is also presented.

  6. Make Your Own Solar Panel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suzuki, David

    1992-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students make a simulated solar panel to learn about the principles behind energy production using solar panels. Provides information about how solar panels function to produce energy. (MCO)

  7. Flutter Research on Skin Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kordes, Eldon E.; Tuovila, Weimer J.; Guy, Lawrence D.

    1960-01-01

    Representative experimental results are presented to show the current status of the panel flutter problem. Results are presented for unstiffened rectangular panels and for rectangular panels stiffened by corrugated backing. Flutter boundaries are established for all types of panels when considered on the basis of equivalent isotropic plates. The effects of Mach number, differential pressure, and aerodynamic heating on panel flutter are discussed. A flutter analysis of orthotropic panels is presented in the appendix.

  8. Flat Coalgebraic Fixed Point Logics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Lutz; Venema, Yde

    Fixed point logics are widely used in computer science, in particular in artificial intelligence and concurrency. The most expressive logics of this type are the μ-calculus and its relatives. However, popular fixed point logics tend to trade expressivity for simplicity and readability, and in fact often live within the single variable fragment of the μ-calculus. The family of such flat fixed point logics includes, e.g., CTL, the *-nesting-free fragment of PDL, and the logic of common knowledge. Here, we extend this notion to the generic semantic framework of coalgebraic logic, thus covering a wide range of logics beyond the standard μ-calculus including, e.g., flat fragments of the graded μ-calculus and the alternating-time μ-calculus (such as ATL), as well as probabilistic and monotone fixed point logics. Our main results are completeness of the Kozen-Park axiomatization and a timed-out tableaux method that matches ExpTime upper bounds inherited from the coalgebraic μ-calculus but avoids using automata.

  9. Piezoceramic Actuator Placement for Acoustic Control of Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bevan, Jeffrey S.; Turner, Travis L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Optimum placement of multiple traditional piezoceramic actuators is determined for active structural acoustic control of flat panels. The structural acoustic response is determined using acoustic radiation filters and structural surface vibration characteristics. Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) control is utilized to determine the optimum state feedback gain for active structural acoustic control. The optimum actuator location is determined by minimizing the structural acoustic radiated noise using a modified genetic algorithm. Experimental tests are conducted and compared to analytical results. Anisotropic piezoceramic actuators exhibits enhanced performance when compared to traditional isotropic piezoceramic actuators. As a result of the inherent isotropy, these advanced actuators develop strain along the principal material axis. The orientation of anisotropic actuators is investigated on the effect of structural vibration and acoustic control of curved and flat panels. A fully coupled shallow shell finite element formulation is developed to include anisotropic piezoceramic actuators for shell structures.

  10. Piezoceramic Actuator Placement for Acoustic Control of Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bevan, Jeffrey S.

    2000-01-01

    Optimum placement of multiple traditional piezoceramic actuators is determined for active structural acoustic control of flat panels. The structural acoustic response is determined using acoustic radiation filters and structural surface vibration characteristics. Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) control is utilized to determine the optimum state feedback gain for active structural acoustic control. The optimum actuator location is determined by minimizing the structural acoustic radiated noise using a modified genetic algorithm. Experimental tests are conducted and compared to analytical results. Anisotropic piezoceramic actuators exhibit enhanced performance when compared to traditional isotropic piezoceramic actuators. As a result of the inherent isotropy, these advanced actuators develop strain along the principal material axis. The orientation of anisotropic actuators is investigated on the effect of structural vibration and acoustic control of curved and flat panels. A fully coupled shallow shell finite element formulation is developed to include anisotropic piezoceramic actuators for shell structures.

  11. Fracture Analysis of the FAA/NASA Wide Stiffened Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshadri, B. R.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Dawicke, D. S.; Young, R. D.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents the fracture analyses conducted on the FAA/NASA stiffened and unstiffened panels using the STAGS (STructural Analysis of General Shells) code with the critical crack-tip-opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion. The STAGS code with the "plane-strain" core option was used in all analyses. Previous analyses of wide, flat panels have shown that the high-constraint conditions around a crack front, like plane strain, has to be modeled in order for the critical CTOA fracture criterion to predict wide panel failures from small laboratory tests. In the present study, the critical CTOA value was determined from a wide (unstiffened) panel with anti-buckling guides. The plane-strain core size was estimated from previous fracture analyses and was equal to about the sheet thickness. Rivet flexibility and stiffener failure was based on methods and criteria, like that currently used in industry. STAGS and the CTOA criterion were used to predict load-against-crack extension for the wide panels with a single crack and multiple-site damage cracking at many adjacent rivet holes. Analyses were able to predict stable crack growth and residual strength with a few percent (5%) of stiffened panel tests results but over predicted the buckling failure load on a unstiffened panel with a single crack by 10%.

  12. Fracture Analysis of the FAA/NASA Wide Stiffened Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seshadri, B. R.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Dawicke, D. S.; Young, R. D.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the fracture analyses conducted on the FAA/NASA stiffened and unstiffened panels using the STAGS (STructural Analysis of General Shells) code with the critical crack-tip-opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion. The STAGS code with the "plane-strain" core option was used in all analyses. Previous analyses of wide, flat panels have shown that the high-constraint conditions around a crack front, like plane strain, has to be modeled in order for the critical CTOA fracture criterion to predict wide panel failures from small laboratory tests. In the present study, the critical CTOA value was determined from a wide (unstiffened) panel with anti-buckling guides. The plane-strain core size was estimated from previous fracture analyses and was equal to about the sheet thickness. Rivet flexibility and stiffener failure was based on methods and criteria, like that currently used in industry. STAGS and the CTOA criterion were used to predict load-against-crack extension for the wide panels with a single crack and multiple-site damage cracking at many adjacent rivet holes. Analyses were able to predict stable crack growth and residual strength within a few percent (5%) of stiffened panel tests results but over predicted the buckling failure load on an unstiffened panel with a single crack by 10%.

  13. Comprehensive metabolic panel

    MedlinePlus

    A comprehensive metabolic panel is a group of blood tests. They provide an overall picture of your body's chemical balance and metabolism. Metabolism refers to all the physical and chemical processes ...

  14. ICFA neutrino panel report

    SciTech Connect

    Long, K.

    2015-07-15

    In the summer of 2013 the International Committee on Future Accelerators (ICFA) established a Neutrino Panel with the mandate: <<>>In its first year the Panel organised a series of regional Town Meetings to collect input from the community and to receive reports from the regional planning exercises. The Panel distilled its findings and presented them in a report to ICFA [1]. In this contribution the formation and composition of the Panel are presented together with a summary of the Panel’s findings from the three Regional Town Meetings. The Panel’s initial conclusions are then articulated and the steps that the Panelmore » seeks to take are outlined.« less

  15. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    MedlinePlus

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cholangitis (formerly called primary biliary cirrhosis). This group of tests helps ...

  16. FIFRA Scientific Advisory Panel

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Experts on the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Scientific Advisory Panel provide independent scientific advice to the EPA on a wide range of health and safety issues related to pesticides.

  17. Blue Ribbon Panel Report

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog by the NCI acting director thanking the cancer community for contributing to the Cancer Moonshot Blue Ribbon Panel report, which was presented to the National Cancer Advisory Board on September 7.

  18. Panel Library And Editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raible, Eric; Tristram, David; Walatka, Pam

    1992-01-01

    Panel Library and Editor computer program is grapical-user-interface builder program for use on workstations of Silicon Graphics IRIS family. Program creates "widgets" manipulated by user. Appearance similar to X-Windows System. Used by programmers to write user-friendly mouse-driven application programs for IRIS workstations. Panel Library (v9.8) and Editor (v1.1) written in C Language and Scheme.

  19. Ceramic Honeycomb Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cagliostro, Domenick E.; Riccitiello, Salvatore R.

    1989-01-01

    Ceramic honeycomb panels serve as lightweight, heat-resistant structural members. Depending on choice of ceramic materials, panels expected to withstand temperatures as high as 1,800 degree C. Honeycomb structure made by vapor-depositing ceramic on fabric substrate woven in honeycomb pattern, then eliminating substrate by oxidizing it. Fabric made of loosely woven polymer such as polyacrylonitrile. Impregnated with organic binder such as phenolic resin for stiffness.

  20. Hexagon solar power panel

    DOEpatents

    Rubin, Irwin

    1978-01-01

    A solar energy panel comprises a support upon which silicon cells are arrayed. The cells are wafer thin and of two geometrical types, both of the same area and electrical rating, namely hexagon cells and hourglass cells. The hourglass cells are composites of half hexagons. A near perfect nesting relationship of the cells achieves a high density packing whereby optimum energy production per panel area is achieved.

  1. Gas filled panel insulation

    DOEpatents

    Griffith, Brent T.; Arasteh, Dariush K.; Selkowitz, Stephen E.

    1993-01-01

    A structural or flexible highly insulative panel which may be translucent, is formed from multi-layer polymeric material in the form of an envelope surrounding a baffle. The baffle is designed so as to minimize heat transfer across the panel, by using material which forms substantially closed spaces to suppress convection of the low conductivity gas fill. At least a portion of the baffle carries a low emissivity surface for suppression of infrared radiation.

  2. Gas filled panel insulation

    DOEpatents

    Griffith, B.T.; Arasteh, D.K.; Selkowitz, S.E.

    1993-12-14

    A structural or flexible highly insulative panel which may be translucent, is formed from multi-layer polymeric material in the form of an envelope surrounding a baffle. The baffle is designed so as to minimize heat transfer across the panel, by using material which forms substantially closed spaces to suppress convection of the low conductivity gas fill. At least a portion of the baffle carries a low emissivity surface for suppression of infrared radiation. 18 figures.

  3. Hexagon solar power panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, I. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A solar energy panel support is described upon which silicon cells are arrayed. The cells are wafer thin and of two geometrical types, both of the same area and electrical rating, namely hexagon cells and hourglass cells. The hourglass cells are composites of half hexagons. A near perfect nesting relationship of the cells achieves a high density packing whereby optimum energy production per panel area is achieved.

  4. Pop-Art Panels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alford, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    James Rosenquist's giant Pop-art panels included realistic renderings of well-known contemporary foods and objects, juxtaposed with famous people in the news--largely from the 1960s, '70s and '80s--and really serve as visual time capsules. In this article, eighth-graders focus on the style of James Rosenquist to create their own Pop-art panel that…

  5. Comparison of hand laid-up tape and filament wound composite cylinders and panels with and without impact damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.; Lopez, Osvaldo F.

    1991-01-01

    Experimentally determined axial compressive failure loads, strains and failure modes of composite flat panels and cylinders are presented. A comparison of two types of filament wound flat graphite-epoxy panels indicates that the winding pattern can influence structural response. A comparison of hand laid-up tape and filament wound composite cylinders indicates that fabrication method may not significantly influence the failure mode or average failure strain of thick-walled (radius-to-thickness ratio less than 15) graphite-epoxy cylinders. The interaction of manufacturing-induced features (fiber cross-overs) and low-speed impact damage for graphite-epoxy specimens is also presented. Filament would flat panels with many fiber cross-overs exhibited lower failure strains than filament wound panels without fiber cross-overs for all impact speeds examined. Graphite-thermoplastic cylinders exhibited a significantly different failure mode from the graphite-epoxy cylinders.

  6. Acquired flat foot deformity: postoperative imaging.

    PubMed

    Dimmick, Simon; Chhabra, Avneesh; Grujic, Leslie; Linklater, James M

    2012-07-01

    Flat foot (pes planus) is a progressive and disabling pathology that is treated initially with conservative measures and often followed by a variety of surgeries. This article briefly reviews the pathology in acquired flat foot deformity, the classification of posterior tibial tendon dysfunction, discusses surgical techniques for the management of adult flat foot deformity, and reviews potential complications and their relevant imaging appearances. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  7. Stratification on the Skagit Bay Tidal Flats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    the prolonged high water of nearly diurnal tides when advection and straining with relatively weak flows increased stratification with little mixing...1.1 Overview Shallow, periodically submerged, low-sloped tidal flats bordering coasts and estuaries may affect water circulation and temperature...systems of natural water purification by the benthic organisms living inside the flats. The viability of tidal flat systems near river mouths is

  8. RAYWOOD FLAT ROADLESS AREAS, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matti, Jonathan C.; Iverson, Stephen R.

    1984-01-01

    The Raywood Flat Roadless Areas are situated adjacent to the San Gorgonio Wilderness in the southeastern San Bernardino Mountains, southern California. Geologic, geochemical, and geophysical studies, together with an investigation of mines and prospects, indicate that there is little likelihood for the occurrence of metallic mineral or energy resources in the roadless areas. In the eastern part of the roadless areas, a geochemical survey shows slightly anomalous amounts of lead, copper, molybdenum, tin, and bismuth and suggests that there are small and scattered occurrences of these metals in the bedrock. The inferred mineral occurrences lack the characteristics associated with metal concentrations that would identify resources. Marble and other construction materials occur in the area.

  9. Flat laminated microbial mat communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franks, Jonathan; Stolz, John F.

    2009-10-01

    Flat laminated microbial mats are complex microbial ecosystems that inhabit a wide range of environments (e.g., caves, iron springs, thermal springs and pools, salt marshes, hypersaline ponds and lagoons, methane and petroleum seeps, sea mounts, deep sea vents, arctic dry valleys). Their community structure is defined by physical (e.g., light quantity and quality, temperature, density and pressure) and chemical (e.g., oxygen, oxidation/reduction potential, salinity, pH, available electron acceptors and donors, chemical species) parameters as well as species interactions. The main primary producers may be photoautotrophs (e.g., cyanobacteria, purple phototrophs, green phototrophs) or chemolithoautophs (e.g., colorless sulfur oxidizing bacteria). Anaerobic phototrophy may predominate in organic rich environments that support high rates of respiration. These communities are dynamic systems exhibiting both spatial and temporal heterogeneity. They are characterized by steep gradients with microenvironments on the submillimeter scale. Diel oscillations in the physical-chemical profile (e.g., oxygen, hydrogen sulfide, pH) and species distribution are typical for phototroph-dominated communities. Flat laminated microbial mats are often sites of robust biogeochemical cycling. In addition to well-established modes of metabolism for phototrophy (oxygenic and non-oxygenic), respiration (both aerobic and anaerobic), and fermentation, novel energetic pathways have been discovered (e.g., nitrate reduction couple to the oxidation of ammonia, sulfur, or arsenite). The application of culture-independent techniques (e.g., 16S rRNA clonal libraries, metagenomics), continue to expand our understanding of species composition and metabolic functions of these complex ecosystems.

  10. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    During 1997, the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) continued its safety reviews of NASA's human space flight and aeronautics programs. Efforts were focused on those areas that the Panel believed held the greatest potential to impact safety. Continuing safe Space Shuttle operations and progress in the manufacture and testing of primary components for the International Space Station (ISS) were noteworthy. The Panel has continued to monitor the safety implications of the transition of Space Shuttle operations to the United Space Alliance (USA). One area being watched closely relates to the staffing levels and skill mix in both NASA and USA. Therefore, a section of this report is devoted to personnel and other related issues that are a result of this change in NASA's way of doing business for the Space Shuttle. Attention will continue to be paid to this important topic in subsequent reports. Even though the Panel's activities for 1997 were extensive, fewer specific recommendations were formulated than has been the case in recent years. This is indicative of the current generally good state of safety of NASA programs. The Panel does, however, have several longer term concerns that have yet to develop to the level of a specific recommendation. These are covered in the introductory material for each topic area in Section 11. In another departure from past submissions, this report does not contain individual findings and recommendations for the aeronautics programs. While the Panel devoted its usual efforts to examining NASA's aeronautic centers and programs, no specific recommendations were identified for inclusion in this report. In lieu of recommendations, a summary of the Panel's observations of NASA's safety efforts in aeronautics and future Panel areas of emphasis is provided. With profound sadness the Panel notes the passing of our Chairman, Paul M. Johnstone, on December 17, 1997, and our Staff Assistant, Ms. Patricia M. Harman, on October 5, 1997. Other

  11. Flat conductor cable design, manufacture, and installation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angele, W.; Hankins, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    Pertinent information for hardware selection, design, manufacture, and quality control necessary for flat conductor cable interconnecting harness application is presented. Comparisons are made between round wire cable and flat conductor cable. The flat conductor cable interconnecting harness systems show major cost, weight, and space savings, plus increased system performance and reliability. The design application section includes electrical characteristics, harness design and development, and a full treatise on EMC considerations. Manufacturing and quality control sections pertain primarily to the developed conductor-contact connector system and special flat conductor cable to round wire cable transitions.

  12. Xerographic dark discharge of a-Si:H(p)/a-Si:H(i)/a-Si1-x Cx:H photoreceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxendale, M.; Biswas, S.; Juhasz, C.

    1990-07-01

    There has been much interest recently in hydrogenated amorphous silicon-based photoreceptors. The conventional configuration has become a diode-like semiconductor structure with an insulator overcoat layer operated in reverse bias. We have investigated the electric field and temperature dependence of the xerographic dark discharge of a corona or capacitively charged a-Si :H photoreceptor of configuration Al/a-Si:H(p)/a-Si:H(i)/a-5i1 _xCx:H . The band gap mismatch at the semicondutor/insulator interface appears as an energy barrier in the conduction band only. The role of this energy barrier in the dark discharge mechanism has been investigated by us. With a high initial field charging regime thermal generation within the intrinsic region was identified as the rate-limiting process. The zero-field energy barrier for thermal emission is measured to be 0.94 eV. These observations are in agreement with other workers, but previously reported anomalous temperature-dependent high-field behaviour was not observed. An apparent bulk controlled negative differential resistance (NDR) was found by us to control the discharge in the low-initial field regime. A NDR has been observed previously in the d.c characteristic of these devices where an increasing bias was applied step-wise. The observation of a similar NDR in the xerographic discharge mode is somewhat surprising.

  13. Development of flat-plate solar collectors for the heating and cooling of buildings: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    An efficient, low cost, flat-plate solar collector was developed. Computer aided mathematical models of the heat process in the collector were used in defining absorber panel configuration; determining insulation thickness; and in selecting the number, spacing, and material of the covers. Prototypes were built and performance tested. Data from simulated operation of the collector are compared with predicted loads from a number of locations to determine the degree of solar utilization.

  14. Changing from image intensifier to flat detector technology for interventional cardiology procedures: a practical point of view.

    PubMed

    Bokou, C; Schreiner-Karoussou, A; Breisch, R; Beissel, J

    2008-01-01

    A small-scale internal audit has been used to evaluate the impact of the use of a dynamic flat panel detector in the clinical routine in the National Interventional Cardiology Centre in Luxembourg. The parameters tested during commissioning and constancy control of an X-ray system, the introduction of new clinical protocols, the patient and the personal staff dosimetry were considered. The technical parameters tested by the hospital physicist stay the same as for the image intensifier. No innovative protocols have been adopted due to the existence of the flat panel detector. A reduction in dose was noted after the installation of a flat detector, due mostly to the continuing education of the interventional cardiologists as well as the initial calibration of the radiological system. The understanding of the X-ray system and its possibilities is vital for the optimisation of clinical procedures in patient and staff exposure.

  15. Charactrization of a Li-ion battery based stand-alone a-Si photovoltaic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid Vishkasougheh, Mehdi; Tunaboylu, Bahadir

    2014-11-01

    The number of photovoltaic (PV) system installations is increasing rapidly. As more people learn about this versatile and often cost-effective power option, this trend will accelerate. This document presents a recommended design for a battery based stand-alone photovoltaic system (BSPV). BSPV system has the ability to be applied in different areas, including warning signals, lighting, refrigeration, communication, residential water pumping, remote sensing, and cathodic protection. The presented calculation method gives a proper idea for a system sizing technique. Based on application load, different scenarios are possible for designing a BSPV system. In this study, a battery based stand-alone system was designed. The electricity generation part is three a-Si panels, which are connected in parallel, and for the storage part LFP (lithium iron phosphate) battery was used. The high power LFP battery packs are 40 cells each 8S5P (configured 8 series 5 parallel). Each individual pack weighs 0.5 kg and is 25.6 V. In order to evaluate the efficiency of a-Si panels with respect to the temperature and the solar irradiation, cities of Istanbul, Ankara and Adana in Turkey were selected. Temperature and solar irradiation were gathered from reliable sources and by using translation equations, current and voltage output of panels were calculated. As a result of these calculations, current and energy outputs were computed by considering an average efficient solar irradiation time value per day in Turkey. The calculated power values were inserted to a battery cycler system, and the behavior of high power LFP batteries in a time sequence of 7.2 h was evaluated. The charging and discharging cycles were obtained and their behavior was discussed. According to the results, Istanbul has the lowest number of peak month's energy, it followed by Ankara, and ultimately Adana has the highest number of peak months and energy storage. It was observed during the tests that values up to 4 A was

  16. Aerospace safety advisory panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) monitored NASA's activities and provided feedback to the NASA Administrator, other NASA officials and Congress throughout the year. Particular attention was paid to the Space Shuttle, its launch processing and planned and potential safety improvements. The Panel monitored Space Shuttle processing at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and will continue to follow it as personnel reductions are implemented. There is particular concern that upgrades in hardware, software, and operations with the potential for significant risk reduction not be overlooked due to the extraordinary budget pressures facing the agency. The authorization of all of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Block II components portends future Space Shuttle operations at lower risk levels and with greater margins for handling unplanned ascent events. Throughout the year, the Panel attempted to monitor the safety activities related to the Russian involvement in both space and aeronautics programs. This proved difficult as the working relationships between NASA and the Russians were still being defined as the year unfolded. NASA's concern for the unique safety problems inherent in a multi-national endeavor appears appropriate. Actions are underway or contemplated which should be capable of identifying and rectifying problem areas. The balance of this report presents 'Findings and Recommendations' (Section 2), 'Information in Support of Findings and Recommendations' (Section 3) and Appendices describing Panel membership, the NASA response to the March 1994 ASAP report, and a chronology of the panel's activities during the reporting period (Section 4).

  17. Panel methods: An introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Larry L.

    1990-01-01

    Panel methods are numerical schemes for solving (the Prandtl-Glauert equation) for linear, inviscid, irrotational flow about aircraft flying at subsonic or supersonic speeds. The tools at the panel-method user's disposal are (1) surface panels of source-doublet-vorticity distributions that can represent nearly arbitrary geometry, and (2) extremely versatile boundary condition capabilities that can frequently be used for creative modeling. Panel-method capabilities and limitations, basic concepts common to all panel-method codes, different choices that were made in the implementation of these concepts into working computer programs, and various modeling techniques involving boundary conditions, jump properties, and trailing wakes are discussed. An approach for extending the method to nonlinear transonic flow is also presented. Three appendices supplement the main test. In appendix 1, additional detail is provided on how the basic concepts are implemented into a specific computer program (PANAIR). In appendix 2, it is shown how to evaluate analytically the fundamental surface integral that arises in the expressions for influence-coefficients, and evaluate its jump property. In appendix 3, a simple example is used to illustrate the so-called finite part of the improper integrals.

  18. Space deployable domed solar concentrator with foldable panels and hinge therefor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grayson, Fred G. (Inventor); Miller, Warren H. (Inventor); Sturgis, James D. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A space deployable solar energy concentrator is formed of a dome-shaped arrangement of compactly stowable flat panel segments mounted on a collapsible, space-deployable support structure of interconnected linear components. The support structure is comprised of a plurality of tensioned, curvilinear edge strips which extend in a radial direction from a prescribed vertex of a surrounding umbrella-like framework of radially extending rib members. Between a respective pair of radially-extending, curvilinear edge strips an individual wedge-shaped panel section is formed of a plurality of multi-segment lens panel strips each of which is supported in tension between the pair of edge strips by a pair of circumferentially extending catenary cord members connected to a pair of ribs of the surrounding umbrella-like framework. A respective lens panel strip is comprised of a plurality of flat, generally rectangular-shaped, energy-directing panels arranged side-by-side in the circumferential direction of the dome. Adjacent panels are interconnected by flexible U-shaped hinges which overlap opposing edges of adjacent panels and engage respective cylindrically-shaped, load distribution bars that slide within the flexible hinges. Because each U-shaped hinge is flexible, it is permitted to shift in the circumferential direction of the panel section to facilitate stowage and deployment of the dome.

  19. Vehicle Systems Panel deliberations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, Tom; Modlin, Tom; Suddreth, Jack; Wheeler, Tom; Tenney, Darrel R.; Bayless, Ernest O.; Lisagor, W. Barry; Bolstad, Donald A.; Croop, Harold; Dyer, J.

    1993-01-01

    The Vehicle Systems Panel addressed materials and structures technology issues related to launch and space vehicle systems not directly associated with the propulsion or entry systems. The Vehicle Systems Panel was comprised of two subpanels - Expendable Launch Vehicles & Cryotanks (ELVC) and Reusable Vehicles (RV). Tom Bales, LaRC, and Tom Modlin, JSC, chaired the expendable and reusable vehicles subpanels, respectively, and co-chaired the Vehicle Systems Panel. The following four papers are discussed in this section: (1) Net Section components for Weldalite Cryogenic Tanks, by Don Bolstad; (2) Build-up Structures for Cryogenic Tanks and Dry Bay Structural Applications, by Barry Lisagor; (3) Composite Materials Program, by Robert Van Siclen; (4) Shuttle Technology (and M&S Lessons Learned), by Stan Greenberg.

  20. Oven wall panel construction

    DOEpatents

    Ellison, Kenneth; Whike, Alan S.

    1980-04-22

    An oven roof or wall is formed from modular panels, each of which comprises an inner fabric and an outer fabric. Each such fabric is formed with an angle iron framework and somewhat resilient tie-bars or welded at their ends to flanges of the angle irons to maintain the inner and outer frameworks in spaced disposition while minimizing heat transfer by conduction and permitting some degree of relative movement on expansion and contraction of the module components. Suitable thermal insulation is provided within the module. Panels or skins are secured to the fabric frameworks and each such skin is secured to a framework and projects laterally so as slidingly to overlie the adjacent frame member of an adjacent panel in turn to permit relative movement during expansion and contraction.

  1. Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter FlatSat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of FlatSat as a platform for use during flight integration and testing (I&T) of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). Included in the presentations are requirements for the facility, a diagram of the LRO FlatSat lab, and discussion of the operational documentation, facility scheduling, and issues and lessons learned.

  2. The Flat Stanley Project. Promising Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubert, Dale

    2003-01-01

    Students make paper "Flat Stanleys" and send them with blank journals to classes in other states or countries. Recipients treat Stanley as a guest, record the things they do with him, and return him with the completed journals to the senders. Flat Stanley has sparked teacher and student creativity and motivation in 2,500 classes in 18 countries.…

  3. How is WFPC flat field made

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, J.-C.; Ritchie, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    An algorithm developed by the WFPC IDT to generate flat fields from Earth streak exposures is now implemented in STSDAS. We explain in detail how this algorithm works and possible deficiencies. We also present two associated tools which can be used to modify the flat field obtained from the standard procedure.

  4. Advanced solar panel designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ralph, E. L.; Linder, E.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes solar cell panel designs that utilize new hgih efficiency solar cells along with lightweight rigid panel technology. The resulting designs push the W/kg and W/sq m parameters to new high levels. These new designs are well suited to meet the demand for higher performance small satellites. This paper reports on progress made on two SBIR Phase 1 contracts. One panel design involved the use of large area (5.5 cm x 6.5 cm) GaAs/Ge solar cells of 19% efficiency combined with a lightweight rigid graphite fiber epoxy isogrid substrate configuration. A coupon (38 cm x 38 cm) was fabricated and tested which demonstrated an array specific power level of 60 W/kg with a potential of reaching 80 W/kg. The second panel design involved the use of newly developed high efficiency (22%) dual junction GaInP2/GaAs/Ge solar cells combined with an advanced lightweight rigid substrate using aluminum honeycomb core with high strength graphite fiber mesh facesheets. A coupon (38 cm x 38 cm) was fabricated and tested which demonstrated an array specific power of 105 W/kg and 230 W/sq m. This paper will address the construction details of the panels and an a analysis of the component weights. A strawman array design suitable for a typical small-sat mission is described for each of the two panel design technologies being studied. Benefits in respect to weight reduction, area reduction, and system cost reduction are analyzed and compared to conventional arrays.

  5. Study of noise reduction characteristics of double-wall panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navaneethan, R.; Quayle, B.; Stevenson, S.; Graham, M.

    1983-01-01

    The noise reduction characteristics of general aviation type, flat, double-wall structures were investigated. The experimental study was carried out on 20-by-20 inch panels with an exposed area of 18 by 18 inches. A frequency range from 20 to 5000 Hz was covered. The experimental results, in general, follow the expected trends. At low frequencies the double-wall structures are no better than the single-wall structures. However, for depths normally used in the general aviation industry, the double-wall panels are very attractive. The graphite-spoxy skin panels have higher noise reduction at very low frequencies ( 100 Hz) than the Kevlar skin panels. But the aluminum panels have higher noise reduction in the high frequency region, due to their greater mass. Use of fiberglass insulation is not effective in the low frequency region, and at times it is even negative. But the insulation is effective in the high-frequency region. The theoretical model for predicting the transmission loss of these multilayered panels is also discussed.

  6. PRSEUS Acoustic Panel Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolette, Velicki; Yovanof, Nicolette P.; Baraja, Jaime; Mathur, Gopal; Thrash, Patrick; Pickell, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the development of a novel structural concept, Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS), that addresses the demanding fuselage loading requirements for the Hybrid Wing or Blended Wing Body (BWB) airplane configuration with regards to acoustic response. A PRSEUS panel was designed and fabricated and provided to NASA-LaRC for acoustic response testing in the Structural Acoustics Loads and Transmission (SALT) facility). Preliminary assessments of the sound transmission characteristics of a PRSEUS panel subjected to a representative Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) operating environment were completed for the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program.

  7. Rocky Flats beryllium health surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Stange, A.W.; Furman, F.J.; Hilmas, D.E.

    1996-10-01

    The Rocky Flats Beryllium Health Surveillance Program (BHSP), initiated in June 1991, was designed to provide medical surveillance for current and former employees exposed to beryllium. The BHSP identifies individuals who have developed beryllium sensitivity using the beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT). A detailed medical evaluation to determine the prevalence of chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is offered to individuals identified as beryllium sensitized or to those who have chest X-ray changes suggestive of CBD. The BHSP has identified 27 cases of CBD and another 74 cases of beryllium sensitization out of 4268 individuals tested. The distribution of BeLPT values formore » normal, sensitized, and CBD-identified individuals is described. Based on the information collected during the first 3 1/3 years of the BHSP, the BeLPT is the most effective means for the early identification of beryllium-sensitized individuals and to identify individuals who may have CBD. The need for BeLPT retesting is demonstrated through the identification of beryllium sensitization in individuals who previously tested normal. Posterior/anterior chest X-rays were not effective in the identification of CBD. 12 refs., 8 tabs.« less

  8. Rocky Flats Neutron Detector Testing at Valduc, France

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S S; Dulik, G M

    2011-01-03

    Recent program requirements of the US Department of Energy/NNSA have led to a need for a criticality accident alarm system to be installed at a newly activated facility. The Criticality Safety Group of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was able to recover and store for possible future use approximately 200 neutron criticality detectors and 20 master alarm panels from the former Rocky Flats Plant in Golden, Colorado when the plant was closed. The Criticality Safety Group participated in a facility analysis and evaluation, the engineering design and review process, as well as the refurbishment, testing, and recalibration of themore » Rocky Flats criticality alarm system equipment to be used in the new facility. In order to demonstrate the functionality and survivability of the neutron detectors to the effects of an actual criticality accident, neutron detector testing was performed at the French CEA Valduc SILENE reactor from October 7 to October 19, 2010. The neutron detectors were exposed to three criticality events or pulses generated by the SILENE reactor. The first excursion was performed with a bare or unshielded reactor, and the second excursion was made with a lead shielded/reflected reactor, and the third excursion with a polyethylene reflected core. These tests of the Rocky Flats neutron detectors were performed as a part of the 2010 Criticality Accident Alarm System Benchmark Measurements at the SILENE Reactor. The principal investigators for this series of experiments were Thomas M. Miller and John C. Wagner of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with Nicolas Authier and Nathalie Baclet of CEA Valduc. Several other organizations were also represented, including the Y-12 National Security Complex, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, CEA Saclay, and Babcock International Group.« less

  9. The Panel Discussion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Summarizes the views of panel members at a symposium on the place of inorganic chemistry in the undergraduate curriculum. Suggests one semester of intermediate inorganic chemistry, followed by a year of physical chemistry and a semester of advanced inorganic chemistry as a reasonable prescription for the modern undergraduate curriculum. (Author/JN)

  10. Photovoltaic-Panel Laminator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keenan, R.

    1985-01-01

    Two-piece unit heats and presses protective layers to form laminate. Rubber diaphragm between upper and lower vacuum chambers alternates between neutral position and one that presses against solar-cell array, supplying distributed force necessary to press layers of laminate together. Encapsulation helps to protect cells from environment and to ensure long panel life while allowing efficient generation of electricity from Sunlight.

  11. Advanced Solar Panel Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ralph, E. L.; Linder, E. B.

    1995-01-01

    Solar panel designs that utilize new high-efficiency solar cells and lightweight rigid panel technologies are described. The resulting designs increase the specific power (W/kg) achievable in the near-term and are well suited to meet the demands of higher performance small satellites (smallsats). Advanced solar panel designs have been developed and demonstrated on two NASA SBIR contracts at Applied Solar. The first used 19% efficient, large area (5.5 cm x 6.5 cm) GaAs/Ge solar cells with a lightweight rigid graphite epoxy isogrid substrate configuration. A 1,445 sq cm coupon was fabricated and tested to demonstrate 60 W/kg with a high potential of achieving 80 W/kg. The second panel design used new 22% efficiency, dual-junction GaInP2/GaAs/Ge solar cells combined with a lightweight aluminum core/graphite fiber mesh facesheet substrate. A 1,445 sq cm coupon was fabricated and tested to demonstrate 105 W/kg with the potential of achieving 115 W/kg.

  12. Stepped inlet optical panel

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2001-01-01

    An optical panel includes stacked optical waveguides having stepped inlet facets collectively defining an inlet face for receiving image light, and having beveled outlet faces collectively defining a display screen for displaying the image light channeled through the waveguides by internal reflection.

  13. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This report covers the activities of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) for calendar year 1998-a year of sharp contrasts and significant successes at NASA. The year opened with the announcement of large workforce cutbacks. The slip in the schedule for launching the International Space Station (ISS) created a five-month hiatus in Space Shuttle launches. This slack period ended with the successful and highly publicized launch of the STS-95 mission. As the year closed, ISS assembly began with the successful orbiting and joining of the Functional Cargo Block (FGB), Zarya, from Russia and the Unity Node from the United States. Throughout the year, the Panel maintained its scrutiny of NASA's safety processes. Of particular interest were the potential effects on safety of workforce reductions and the continued transition of functions to the Space Flight Operations Contractor. Attention was also given to the risk management plans of the Aero-Space Technology programs, including the X-33, X-34, and X-38. Overall, the Panel concluded that safety is well served for the present. The picture is not as clear for the future. Cutbacks have limited the depth of talent available. In many cases, technical specialties are 'one deep.' The extended hiring freeze has resulted in an older workforce that will inevitably suffer significant departures from retirements in the near future. The resulting 'brain drain' could represent a future safety risk unless appropriate succession planning is started expeditiously. This and other topics are covered in the section addressing workforce. The major NASA programs are also limited in their ability to plan property for the future. This is of particular concern for the Space Shuttle and ISS because these programs are scheduled to operate well into the next century. In the case of the Space Shuttle, beneficial and mandatory safety and operational upgrades are being delayed because of a lack of sufficient present funding. Likewise, the ISS has

  14. Composite panel development at JPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcelroy, Paul; Helms, Rich

    1988-01-01

    Parametric computer studies can be use in a cost effective manner to determine optimized composite mirror panel designs. An InterDisciplinary computer Model (IDM) was created to aid in the development of high precision reflector panels for LDR. The materials properties, thermal responses, structural geometries, and radio/optical precision are synergistically analyzed for specific panel designs. Promising panels designs are fabricated and tested so that comparison with panel test results can be used to verify performance prediction models and accommodate design refinement. The iterative approach of computer design and model refinement with performance testing and materials optimization has shown good results for LDR panels.

  15. 42. Interior detail, parlor, paneled chimney breast. This paneling likely ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. Interior detail, parlor, paneled chimney breast. This paneling likely dates from the house's phase I construction spanning from 1728 into the 1730's. - John Bartram House & Garden, House, 54th Street & Lindbergh Boulevard, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  16. Detail east panel of east truss showing rollling panels and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail east panel of east truss showing rollling panels and counter weights. View south - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Fort Point Channel Rolling Lift Bridge, Spanning Fort Point Channel, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  17. Advanced solar panel designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ralph, E. L.; Linder, E. B.

    1996-01-01

    Solar panel designs that utilize new high-efficiency solar cells and lightweight rigid panel technologies are described. The resulting designs increase the specific power (W/kg) achievable in the near-term and are well suited to meet the demands of higher performance small satellites (smallsats). Advanced solar panel designs have been developed and demonstrated on two NASA SBIR contracts at Applied Solar. The first used 19% efficient, large area (5.5 cm x 6.5 cm) GaAs/Ge solar cells with a lightweight rigid graphite epoxy isogrid substrate configuration. A 1,445 cm(exp 2) coupon was fabricated and tested to demonstrate 60 W/kg with a high potential of achieving 80 W/kg. The second panel design used new 22% efficiency, dual junction GaInP2/GaAs/Ge solar cells combined with a lightweight aluminum core/graphite fiber mesh facesheet substrate. A 1,445 cm(exp 2) coupon was fabricated and tested to demonstrate 105 W/kg with the potential of achieving 115 W/kg. This paper will address the construction details for the GaAs/isogrid and dual-junction GaAs/carbon mesh panel configurations. These are ultimately sized to provide 75 Watts and 119 Watts respectively for smallsats or may be used as modular building blocks for larger systems. GaAs/isogrid and dual-junction GaAs/carbon mesh coupons have been fabricated and tested to successfully demonstrate critical performance parameters and results are also provided here.

  18. Imperfection and Thickness Measurement of Panels Using a Coordinate Measurement Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornburgh, Robert P.

    2006-01-01

    This paper summarizes the methodology used to measure imperfection and thickness variation for flat and curved panels using a Coordinate Measurement Machine (CMM) and the software program MeasPanel. The objective is to provide a reference document so that someone with a basic understanding of CMM operation can measure a panel with minimal training. Detailed information about both the measurement system setup and computer software is provided. Information is also provided about the format of the raw data, as well as how it is post-processed for use in finite-element analysis.

  19. SBC Internal Lamp P-flat Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, R. J.; Chiaberge, M.; Bohlin, R.

    2016-03-01

    We report on a Cycle 23 calibration program to monitor the status of the SBC P-flat. We find random pixel to pixel changes to be small, with only 2% of pixels having changed by more than 3. There are coherent changes that we measure to be above the poisson errors, in some regions as high as 4% peak to peak. We recommend that the ACS team obtain new observations in order to create a new P-flat. We also measured the degradation of the deuterium lamp used to create internal flats. The brightness of the lamp is currently 65% of its initial level, the degradation being dependent on lifetime usage.

  20. Deformation behavior of welded steel sandwich panels under quasi-static loading

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-03-16

    This paper summarizes basic research (i.e., testing and analysis) : conducted to examine the deformation behavior of flat-welded : steel sandwich panels under two types of quasi-static loading: : (1) uniaxial compression; and (2) bending through an i...

  1. Nonlinear and Buckling Behavior of Curved Panels Subjected to Combined Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Nemeth, Michael P.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    The results of an analytical study of the nonlinear and buckling response characteristics of curved panels subjected to combined loads are presented. Aluminum and laminated composite panels are considered in the study and a flat and shallow curved panel configurations are considered as well. The panels are subjected to combined axial compression and transverse tension or compression loads or combined axial compression and inplane shear loads. Results illustrating the effects of various combined load states on the buckling response of the panels are presented. In addition, results illustrating the effects of laminate orthotropy and anisotropy and panel curvature on the panel response are presented. The results indicate that panel curvature can have a significant effect on the nonlinear and buckling behavior of the panels subjected to combined loads. Results are included that show that geometrically perfect panels do not exhibit bifurcation points for some combined loads. Results are also presented that show the effects of laminate orthotropy and anisotropy on the interaction of combined loads.

  2. Report of Industry Panel Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallimore, Simon; Gier, Jochen; Heitland, Greg; Povinelli, Louis; Sharma, Om; VandeWall, Allen

    2006-01-01

    A final report is presented from the industry panel group. The contents include: 1) General comments; 2) Positive progress since Minnowbrook IV; 3) Industry panel outcome; 4) Prioritized turbine projects; 5) Prioritized compressor projects; and 6) Miscellaneous.

  3. Chemical weathering of flat continents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maffre, Pierre; Goddéris, Yves; Ladant, Jean-Baptiste; Carretier, Sébastien; Moquet, Jean-Sébastien; Donnadieu, Yannick; Labat, David; Vigier, Nathalie

    2017-04-01

    Mountain uplift is often cited as the main trigger of the end Cenozoic glacial state. Conversely, the absence of major uplift is invoked to explain the early Eocene warmth. This hypothesis relies on the fact that mountain uplift increases the supply of "fresh" silicate rocks through enhanced physical erosion, and boosts CO2 consumption by chemical weathering. Atmospheric CO2 —and therefore climate— then adjust to compensate for the changes in weatherability and keep the geological carbon cycle balanced (Walker's feedback). Yet, orography also strongly influences the global atmospheric and oceanic circulation. Consequently, building mountains does not only change the weathering regime in the restricted area of the orogen, but also modifies the worldwide distribution of the weathering flux. We conduct a numerical experiment in which we simulate the climate of the present day world, with all mountain ranges being removed. Up-to-date weathering and erosion laws (West, 2012; Carretier et al., 2014) are then used to quantify the global weathering for a "flat world". Specifically, the parameters of the weathering law are first carefully calculated such that the present day distribution of the weathering fluxes matches the riverine geochemical data. When removing mountains, we predict a warmer and wetter climate, especially in geographic spots located in the equatorial band. The calculated response of the global weathering flux ranges from an increase by 50% to a decrease by 70% (relative to the present day with mountains). These contrasted responses are pending on the parameterisation of the weathering model, that makes it more sensitive to reaction rate (kinetically-limited mode) or to rock supply by erosion (supply-limited mode). The most likely parameterisation —based on data-model comparison— predicts a decrease of CO2 consumption by weathering by 40% when mountains are removed. These results show that (1) the behaviour of the weathering engine depends on the

  4. Tow-Steered Panels With Holes Subjected to Compression or Shear Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.; Tatting, Brian F.; Guerdal, Zafer

    2005-01-01

    Tailoring composite laminates to vary the fiber orientations within a fiber layer of a laminate to address non-uniform stress states and provide structural advantages such as the alteration of principal load paths has potential application to future low-cost, light-weight structures for commercial transport aircraft. Evaluation of this approach requires the determination of the effectiveness of stiffness tailoring through the use of curvilinear fiber paths in flat panels including the reduction of stress concentrations around the holes and the increase in load carrying capability. Panels were designed through the use of an optimization code using a genetic algorithm and fabricated using a tow-steering approach. Manufacturing limitations, such as the radius of curvature of tows the machine could support, avoidance of wrinkling of fibers and minimization of gaps between fibers were considered in the design process. Variable stiffness tow-steered panels constructed with curvilinear fiber paths were fabricated so that the design methodology could be verified through experimentation. Finite element analysis where each element s stacking sequence was accurately defined is used to verify the behavior predicted based on the design code. Experiments on variable stiffness flat panels with central circular holes were conducted with the panels loaded in axial compression or shear. Tape and tow-steered panels are used to demonstrate the buckling, post-buckling and failure behavior of elastically tailored panels. The experimental results presented establish the buckling performance improvements attainable by elastic tailoring of composite laminates.

  5. Mounting clips for panel installation

    SciTech Connect

    Cavieres, Andres; Al-Haddad, Tristan; Goodman, Joseph

    2017-07-11

    A photovoltaic panel mounting clip comprising a base, central indexing tabs, flanges, lateral indexing tabs, and vertical indexing tabs. The mounting clip removably attaches one or more panels to a beam or the like structure, both mechanically and electrically. It provides secure locking of the panels in all directions, while providing guidance in all directions for accurate installation of the panels to the beam or the like structure.

  6. The manufacture of flat conductor cable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angele, W.

    1974-01-01

    The major techniques are described for fabricating flat conductor cable (FCC). Various types of FCC, including unshielded, shielded, power, and signal, in both existing and conceptual constructions, are covered.

  7. Ensuring flat cuts in longwall mining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, R. A.; Currie, J. R.; Deaton, E. T.; Kissel, R. R.

    1979-01-01

    Minicomputer-controlled towed vehicle automatically determines flatness of wall of coal or other mineral as it is being cut by mining machine and allows machine operator to correct cut as necessary. Vehicle is used for longwall mining.

  8. Fire whirlwind formation over flat terrain.

    Treesearch

    Donald A. Haines; Gerald H. Updike

    1971-01-01

    This paper examines the factors that lead to the genesis of fire whirlwinds over flat terrain. Also presented is an estimate of the number of days one might expect to encounter meteorological conditions that permit such formations.

  9. Payload advisory panel recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Berrien, III

    1991-01-01

    The Payload Advisory Panel proposes a restructured Earth Observing System (EOS) mission to address high-priority science and environmental policy issues in Earth System Science. These issues have been identified through studies conducted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Committee on Earth and Environmental Sciences (CEES). The restructured EOS defers efforts to improve the understanding of the middle and upper stratosphere and solid earth geophysics. The strategy of the mission combines high priority new measurements with continuation of critical data sets begun by missions which precede EOS. Collaborative arrangements with international partners are an essential part of the program and additional arrangements are posed. The need for continuity in Earth observations and the urgency of environmental questions require launch of some EOS elements as soon as possible. They further require maintenance of the EOS objective of obtaining consistent 15-year measurement records.

  10. Near-field flat focusing mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yu-Chieh; Staliunas, Kestutis

    2018-03-01

    This article reviews recent progress towards the design of near-field flat focusing mirrors, focusing/imaging light patterns in reflection. An important feature of such flat focusing mirrors is their transverse invariance, as they do not possess any optical axis. We start with a review of the physical background to the different focusing mechanisms of near- and far-field focusing. These near-field focusing devices like flat lenses and the reviewed near-field focusing mirrors can implement planar focusing devices without any optical axis. In contrast, various types of far-field planar focusing devices, such as high-contrast gratings and metasurfaces, unavoidably break the transverse invariance due to their radially symmetrical structures. The particular realizations of near-field flat focusing mirrors including Bragg-like dielectric mirrors and dielectric subwavelength gratings are the main subjects of the review. The first flat focusing mirror was demonstrated with a chirped mirror and was shown to manage an angular dispersion for beam focusing, similar to the management of chromatic dispersion for pulse compression. Furthermore, the reviewed optimized chirped mirror demonstrated a long near-field focal length, hardly achieved by a flat lens or a planar hyperlens. Two more different configurations of dielectric subwavelength gratings that focus a light beam at normal or oblique incidence are also reviewed. We also summarize and compare focusing performance, limitations, and future perspectives between the reviewed flat focusing mirrors and other planar focusing devices including a flat lens with a negative-index material, a planar hyperlens, a high-contrast grating, and a metasurface.

  11. COTS Initiative Panel Discussion

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-13

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden delivers remarks before a panel discussion on the Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) initiative at NASA Headquarters in Washington on Wednesday, November 13, 2013. Through COTS, NASA's partners Space Exploration Technologies Corp. (SpaceX) and Orbital Sciences Corp., developed new U.S. rockets and spacecraft, launched from U.S. soil, capable of transporting cargo to low-Earth orbit and the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Jay Westcott)

  12. COTS Initiative Panel Discussion

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-13

    Frank Slazer, Vice President of Space Systems, Aerospace Industries Association, delivers remarks panel discussion on the Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) initiative at NASA Headquarters in Washington on Wednesday, November 13, 2013. Through COTS, NASA's partners Space Exploration Technologies Corp. (SpaceX) and Orbital Sciences Corp., developed new U.S. rockets and spacecraft, launched from U.S. soil, capable of transporting cargo to low-Earth orbit and the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Jay Westcott)

  13. COTS Initiative Panel Discussion

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-13

    Phil McAlister, Director of Commercial Spaceflight Development at NASA, delivers remarks panel discussion on the Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) initiative at NASA Headquarters in Washington on Wednesday, November 13, 2013. Through COTS, NASA's partners Space Exploration Technologies Corp. (SpaceX) and Orbital Sciences Corp., developed new U.S. rockets and spacecraft, launched from U.S. soil, capable of transporting cargo to low-Earth orbit and the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Jay Westcott)

  14. COTS Initiative Panel Discussion

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-13

    Alan Lindenmoyer, Manager of Commercial Crew and Cargo Program at NASA, delivers remarks panel discussion on the Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) initiative at NASA Headquarters in Washington on Wednesday, November 13, 2013. Through COTS, NASA's partners Space Exploration Technologies Corp. (SpaceX) and Orbital Sciences Corp., developed new U.S. rockets and spacecraft, launched from U.S. soil, capable of transporting cargo to low-Earth orbit and the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Jay Westcott)

  15. COTS Initiative Panel Discussion

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-11-13

    Gwynne Shotwell, President of SpaceX, delivers remarks panel discussion on the Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) initiative at NASA Headquarters in Washington on Wednesday, November 13, 2013. Through COTS, NASA's partners Space Exploration Technologies Corp. (SpaceX) and Orbital Sciences Corp., developed new U.S. rockets and spacecraft, launched from U.S. soil, capable of transporting cargo to low-Earth orbit and the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Jay Westcott)

  16. Clinical Space Medicine Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baisden, Denise L.; Billica, Roger (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The practice of space medicine is diverse. It includes routine preventive medical care of astronauts and pilots, the development of inflight medical capability and training of flight crews as well as the preflight, inflight, and postflight medical assessment and monitoring. The Johnson Space Center Medical Operations Branch is a leader in the practice of space medicine. The papers presented in this panel will demonstrate some of the unique aspects of space medicine.

  17. Experimental analysis of buckling in aircraft skin panels by fibre optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güemes, J. A.; Menendez, J. M.; Frövel, M.; Fernandez, I.; Pintado, J. M.

    2001-06-01

    Three blade-stiffened CFRP panels with co-cured stiffener webs, manufactured by means of an elastomeric mould, have been tested under compressive load. Several Bragg grating sensors have been surface bonded on two of the stiffened panels and have been embedded into the stiffener webs of the third panel. The Bragg grating sensors measured the strain distribution in the stiffener web and in the skin panels. The bucking onset was clearly detected in every case, the post-buckling behaviour can be tracked, but the information is heavily dependent on the right choice of the sensor position and the buckling mode. To calibrate the system, and to evaluate the influence of different curing pressures, and the use of unidirectional or fabric prepreg material, tensile test specimens were made on flat panels. The strain measurements provided by the optical fibre sensors in tensile tests were compared with the strain measurements provided by conventional clamp extensometers.

  18. Analysis of Wind Forces on Roof-Top Solar Panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panta, Yogendra; Kudav, Ganesh

    2011-03-01

    Structural loads on solar panels include forces due to high wind, gravity, thermal expansion, and earthquakes. International Building Code (IBC) and the American Society of Civil Engineers are two commonly used approaches in solar industries to address wind loads. Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures (ASCE 7-02) can be used to calculate wind uplift loads on roof-mounted solar panels. The present study is primarily focused on 2D and 3D modeling with steady, and turbulent flow over an inclined solar panel on the flat based roof to predict the wind forces for designing wind management system. For the numerical simulation, 3-D incompressible flow with the standard k- ɛ was adopted and commercial CFD software ANSYS FLUENT was used. Results were then validated with wind tunnel experiments with a good agreement. Solar panels with various aspect ratios for various high wind speeds and angle of attacks were modeled and simulated in order to predict the wind loads in various scenarios. The present study concluded to reduce the strong wind uplift by designing a guide plate or a deflector before the panel. Acknowledgments to Northern States Metal Inc., OH (GK & YP) and School of Graduate Studies of YSU for RP & URC 2009-2010 (YP).

  19. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This Annual Report of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) presents results of activities during calendar year 2001. The year was marked by significant achievements in the Space Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS) programs and encouraging accomplishments by the Aerospace Technology Enterprise. Unfortunately, there were also disquieting mishaps with the X-43, a LearJet, and a wind tunnel. Each mishap was analyzed in an orderly process to ascertain causes and derive lessons learned. Both these accomplishments and the responses to the mishaps led the Panel to conclude that safety and risk management is currently being well served within NASA. NASA's operations evidence high levels of safety consciousness and sincere efforts to place safety foremost. Nevertheless, the Panel's safety concerns have never been greater. This dichotomy has arisen because the focus of most NASA programs has been directed toward program survival rather than effective life cycle planning. Last year's Annual Report focused on the need for NASA to adopt a realistically long planning horizon for the aging Space Shuttle so that safety would not erode. NASA's response to the report concurred with this finding. Nevertheless, there has been a greater emphasis on current operations to the apparent detriment of long-term planning. Budget cutbacks and shifts in priorities have severely limited the resources available to the Space Shuttle and ISS for application to risk-reduction and life-extension efforts. As a result, funds originally intended for long-term safety-related activities have been used for operations. Thus, while safety continues to be well served at present, the basis for future safety has eroded. Section II of this report develops this theme in more detail and presents several important, overarching findings and recommendations that apply to many if not all of NASA's programs. Section III of the report presents other significant findings, recommendations and supporting

  20. Calculated and measured stresses in simple panels subject to intense random acoustic loading including the near noise field of a turbojet engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lassiter, Leslie W; Hess, Robert W

    1958-01-01

    Flat 2024-t3 aluminum panels measuring 11 inches by 13 inches were tested in the near noise fields of a 4-inch air jet and turbojet engine. The stresses which were developed in the panels are compared with those calculated by generalized harmonic analysis. The calculated and measured stresses were found to be in good agreement. In order to make the stress calculations, supplementary data relating to the transfer characteristics, damping, and static response of flat and curved panels under periodic loading are necessary and were determined experimentally. In addition, an appendix containing detailed data on the near pressure field of the turbojet engine is included.

  1. Flat H Frangible Joint Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diegelman, Thomas E.; Hinkel, Todd J.; Benjamin, Andrew; Rochon, Brian V.; Brown, Christopher W.

    2016-01-01

    Space vehicle staging and separation events require pyrotechnic devices. They are single-use mechanisms that cannot be tested, nor can failure-tolerant performance be demonstrated in actual flight articles prior to flight use. This necessitates the implementation of a robust design and test approach coupled with a fully redundant, failure-tolerant explosive mechanism to ensure that the system functions even in the event of a single failure. Historically, NASA has followed the single failure-tolerant (SFT) design philosophy for all human-rated spacecraft, including the Space Shuttle Program. Following the end of this program, aerospace companies proposed building the next generation human-rated vehicles with off-the-shelf, non-redundant, zero-failure-tolerant (ZFT) separation systems. Currently, spacecraft and launch vehicle providers for both the Orion and Commercial Crew Programs (CCPs) plan to deviate from the heritage safety approach and NASA's SFT human rating requirements. Both programs' partners have base-lined ZFT frangible joints for vehicle staging and fairing separation. These joints are commercially available from pyrotechnic vendors. Non-human-rated missions have flown them numerous times. The joints are relatively easy to integrate structurally within the spacecraft. In addition, the separation event is debris free, and the resultant pyro shock is lower than that of other design solutions. It is, however, a serious deficiency to lack failure tolerance. When used for critical applications on human-rated vehicles, a single failure could potentially lead to loss of crew (LOC) or loss of mission (LOM)). The Engineering and Safety & Mission Assurance directorates within the NASA Johnson Space Center took action to address this safety issue by initiating a project to develop a fully redundant, SFT frangible joint design, known as the Flat H. Critical to the ability to retrofit on launch vehicles being developed, the SFT mechanisms must fit within the same

  2. Large thermal protection system panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Franklin K. (Inventor); Weinberg, David J. (Inventor); Tran, Tu T. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A protective panel for a reusable launch vehicle provides enhanced moisture protection, simplified maintenance, and increased temperature resistance. The protective panel includes an outer ceramic matrix composite (CMC) panel, and an insulative bag assembly coupled to the outer CMC panel for isolating the launch vehicle from elevated temperatures and moisture. A standoff attachment system attaches the outer CMC panel and the bag assembly to the primary structure of the launch vehicle. The insulative bag assembly includes a foil bag having a first opening shrink fitted to the outer CMC panel such that the first opening and the outer CMC panel form a water tight seal at temperatures below a desired temperature threshold. Fibrous insulation is contained within the foil bag for protecting the launch vehicle from elevated temperatures. The insulative bag assembly further includes a back panel coupled to a second opening of the foil bag such that the fibrous insulation is encapsulated by the back panel, the foil bag, and the outer CMC panel. The use of a CMC material for the outer panel in conjunction with the insulative bag assembly eliminates the need for waterproofing processes, and ultimately allows for more efficient reentry profiles.

  3. Development of Quiet Honeycomb Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Daniel L.; Klos, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Sandwich honeycomb composite panels are lightweight and strong, and, therefore, provide a reasonable alternative to the aluminum ring framelstringer architecture currently used for most aircraft airframes. The drawback to honeycomb panels is that they radiate noise into the aircraft cabin very efficiently provoking the need for additional sound treatment which adds weight and reduces the material's cost advantage. A series of honeycomb panels were made which incorporated different design strategies aimed at reducing the honeycomb panels' radiation efficiency while at the same time maintaining its strength. The majority of the desi gns were centered around the concept of creatin g areas of reduced stiffness in the panel by adding voids and recesses to the core. The effort culminated with a reinforced./recessed panel which had 6 dB higher transmission loss than the baseline solid core panel while maintaining comparable strength.

  4. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This report covers the activities of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) for calendar year 1998-a year of sharp contrasts and significant successes at NASA. The year opened with the announcement of large workforce cutbacks. The slip in the schedule for launching the International Space Station (ISS) created a 5-month hiatus in Space Shuttle launches. This slack period ended with the successful and highly publicized launch of the STS-95 mission. As the year closed, ISS assembly began with the successful orbiting and joining of the Functional Cargo Block (FGB), Zarya, from Russia and the Unity Node from the United States. Throughout the year, the Panel maintained its scrutiny of NASAs safety processes. Of particular interest were the potential effects on safety of workforce reductions and the continued transition of functions to the Space Flight Operations Contractor. Attention was also given to the risk management plans of the Aero-Space Technology programs, including the X-33, X-34, and X-38. Overall, the Panel concluded that safety is well served for the present. The picture is not as clear for the future. Cutbacks have limited the depth of talent available. In many cases, technical specialties are "one deep." The extended hiring freeze has resulted in an older workforce that will inevitably suffer significant departures from retirements in the near future. The resulting "brain drain" could represent a future safety risk unless appropriate succession planning is started expeditiously. This and other topics are covered in the section addressing workforce. In the case of the Space Shuttle, beneficial and mandatory safety and operational upgrades are being delayed because of a lack of sufficient present funding. Likewise, the ISS has little flexibility to begin long lead-time items for upgrades or contingency planning.

  5. Low Temperature Materials Growth and Processing Development for Flat Panel Display Technology Applications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-08-01

    measurements, SPICE parameters will be extracted and these results will be used for process monitoring and device and process optimization for display...LLNL and spice modeling is being pursued. The goal is process optimization for better performance of the devices. Especially, we are investigating

  6. A comparative study of scintillator combining methods for flat-panel X-ray image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, M. S.; Lim, K. T.; Kim, G.; Cho, G.

    2018-02-01

    An X-ray transmission imaging based on scintillation detection method is the most widely used radiation technique particularly in the medical and industrial areas. As the name suggests, scintillation detection uses a scintillator as an intermediate material to convert incoming radiation into visible-light particles. Among different types of scintillators, CsI(Tl) in a columnar configuration is the most popular type used for applications that require an energy less than 150 keV due to its capability in obtaining a high spatial resolution with a reduced light spreading effect. In this study, different methods in combining a scintillator with a light-receiving unit are investigated and their relationships are given in terms of the image quality. Three different methods of combining a scintillator with a light-receiving unit are selected to investigate their performance in X-ray imaging: upward or downward oriented needles structure of CsI(Tl), coating layer deposition around CsI(Tl), and insertion of FOP. A charge-coupled device was chosen to serve as the light-receiving unit for the proposed system. From the result, the difference of needle directions in CsI(Tl) had no significant effects in the X-ray image. In contrast, deposition of the coating material around CsI(Tl) showed 17.3% reduction in the DQE. Insertion of the FOP increased the spatial resolution by 38%, however, it decreased the light yield in the acquired image by 56%. In order to have the maximum scintillation performance in X-ray imaging, not only the reflection material but also the bonding method must be considered when combining the scintillator with the light-receiving unit. In addition, the use of FOP should be carefully decided based on the purpose of X-ray imaging, e.g., image sharpness or SNR.

  7. A flat-panel-shaped hybrid piezo/triboelectric nanogenerator for ambient energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Gul; Khan, Fasihullah; Hassan, Arshad; Ali, Shawkat; Bae, Jinho; Lee, Chong Hyun

    2017-04-01

    Recently, many researchers have been paying attention to nanogenerators (NGs) as energy sources for self-powered mirco-nano systems, and studying how to achieve their higher power generation. Hence, we propose a hybrid-type NG for harvesting both the piezoelectric and triboelectric effect simultaneously. In the proposed hybrid NG, the piezoelectric NG (PNG) and triboelectric NG (TENG) are fabricated using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and perovskite zinc stannite (ZnSnO3) nanocubes with a high charge polarization of 59 uC cm-2 composite (PDMS + ZnSnO3) and UV surface-treated PDMS, respectively. To effectively combine a high output current of PNG and a high voltage of TENG, these two NGs are stacked upon each other, and separated by sponge spacers providing a uniform air gap for the triboelectric effect. In particular, this fabricated structure has a low Young’s modulus for piezoelectricity. The proposed hybrid NG device effectively achieves a combined peak voltage of 300 V on an open circuit, a power density of 10.41 mW cm-2 at 1 MΩ load, and a maximum short circuit current density of 16 mA cm-2 at 50 Ω load. It is feasible that the proposed NG can be utilized as a source for various self-powered systems.

  8. 75 FR 51286 - Certain Flat Panel Digital Televisions and Components Thereof; Notice of Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-19

    ... the complaint is to be served: LG Electronics, Inc., LG Twin Towers, 20 Yoido-dong, Youngdungpo-Gu, Seoul, 150-721, South Korea. LG Electronics U.S.A., Inc., 1000 Sylvan Avenue, Englewood Cliffs, NJ 07632...

  9. 76 FR 63657 - Certain Flat Panel Display Devices, and Products Containing the Same; Notice of Commission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... BrandsMart USA, Inc. of Hollywood, Florida (``BrandsMart''). On August 31, 2011, AU Optronics filed an... of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, d/b/a BrandsMart U.S.A. (collectively, ``New Respondents''), and to terminate the investigation as to AT&T, Best Buy, and BrandsMart. On September 15, 2011, the ALJ issued the...

  10. Large area deposition of field emission cathodes for flat panel displays

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, J; Hayes, J; Jankowski, A F

    1999-02-11

    The convention for field emission cathode (FEC) synthesis involves coating with a very-high tolerance in thickness uniformity using a planetary substrate fixture and a large source-to-substrate separation. New criteria for a deposition process must facilitate a reduction in the operating voltage by increasing the density of emitters through a reduction of cathode size and spacing. The objective of scaling the substrate size from small (less than 30 cm{sup 2}) to large (greater than 500 cm{sup 2}) areas further compounds manufacturing requirements to a point beyond that easily obtained by modifications to the convention for FEC deposition. A new patented approachmore » to design, assemble, and operate a coating system enables FEC deposition over large areas through process control of source divergence coupled to incremental substrate positioning.« less

  11. Large Area Flat Panel Imaging Detectors for Astronomy and Night Time Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, O.; McPhate, J.; Frisch, H.; Elam, J.; Mane, A.; Wagner, R.; Varner, G.

    2013-09-01

    Sealed tube photo-sensing detectors for optical/IR detection have applications in astronomy, nighttime remote reconnaissance, and airborne/space situational awareness. The potential development of large area photon counting, imaging, timing detectors has significance for these applications and a number of other areas (High energy particle detection (RICH), biological single-molecule fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, neutron imaging, time of flight mass spectroscopy, diffraction imaging). We will present details of progress towards the development of a 20 cm sealed tube optical detector with nanoengineered microchannel plates for photon counting, imaging and sub-ns event time stamping. In the operational scheme of the photodetector incoming light passes through an entrance window and interacts with a semitransparent photocathode on the inside of the window. The photoelectrons emitted are accelerated across a proximity gap and are detected by an MCP pair. The pair of novel borosilicate substrate MCPs are functionalized by atomic layer deposition (ALD), and amplify the signal and the resulting electron cloud is detected by a conductive strip line anode for determination of the event positions and the time of arrival. The physical package is ~ 25 x 25 cm but only 1.5 cm thick. Development of such a device in a square 20 cm format presents challenges: hermetic sealing to a large entrance window, a 20 cm semitransparent photocathode with good efficiency and uniformity, 20 cm MCPs with reasonable cost and performance, robust construction to preserve high vacuum and withstand an atmosphere pressure differential. We will discuss the schemes developed to address these issues and present the results for the first test devices. The novel microchannel plates employing borosilicate micro-capillary arrays provide many performance characteristics typical of conventional MCPs, but have been made in sizes up to 20 cm, have low intrinsic background (0.08 events cm2 s-1) and have very stable gain behavior over > 7 C cm2 of charge extracted. They are high temperature compatible and have minimal outgassing, which shortens and simplifies the sealed tube production process and should improve overall lifetimes. Bialkali (NaKSb) semitransparent photocathodes with > 20% quantum efficiency have also been made on 20 cm borosilicate windows compatible with the window seals for the large sealed tube device. The photocathodes have good response uniformity and have been stable for > 5 months in testing. Tests with a 20 cm detector with a cross delay line readout have achieved ~50µm FWHM imaging with single photon sub-ns timing and MHz event rates, and tests with a 10 x 10cm detector with cross strip readout has achieved ~20µm FWHM imaging with >4 MHz event rates with ~10% deadtime. We will discuss the details and implications of these novel detector implementations and their potential applications.

  12. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This report presents the results of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) activities during 2002. The format of the report has been modified to capture a long-term perspective. Section II is new and highlights the Panel's view of NASA's safety progress during the year. Section III contains the pivotal safety issues facing NASA in the coming year. Section IV includes the program area findings and recommendations. The Panel has been asked by the Administrator to perform several special studies this year, and the resulting white papers appear in Appendix C. The year has been filled with significant achievements for NASA in both successful Space Shuttle operations and International Space Station (ISS) construction. Throughout the year, safety has been first and foremost in spite of many changes throughout the Agency. The relocation of the Orbiter Major Modifications (OMMs) from California to Kennedy Space Center (KSC) appears very successful. The transition of responsibilities for program management of the Space Shuttle and ISS programs from Johnson Space Center (JSC) to NASA Headquarters went smoothly. The decision to extend the life of the Space Shuttle as the primary NASA vehicle for access to space is viewed by the Panel as a prudent one. With the appropriate investments in safety improvements, in maintenance, in preserving appropriate inventories of spare parts, and in infrastructure, the Space Shuttle can provide safe and reliable support for the ISS for the foreseeable future. Indications of an aging Space Shuttle fleet occurred on more than one occasion this year. Several flaws went undetected in the early prelaunch tests and inspections. In all but one case, the problems were found prior to launch. These incidents were all handled properly and with safety as the guiding principle. Indeed, launches were postponed until the problems were fully understood and mitigating action could be taken. These incidents do, however, indicate the need to analyze the

  13. Photovoltaic panel clamp

    DOEpatents

    Mittan, Margaret Birmingham [Oakland, CA; Miros, Robert H. J. [Fairfax, CA; Brown, Malcolm P [San Francisco, CA; Stancel, Robert [Loss Altos Hills, CA

    2012-06-05

    A photovoltaic panel clamp includes an upper and lower section. The interface between the assembled clamp halves and the module edge is filled by a flexible gasket material, such as EPDM rubber. The gasket preferably has small, finger like protrusions that allow for easy insertion onto the module edge while being reversed makes it more difficult to remove them from the module once installed. The clamp includes mounting posts or an integral axle to engage a bracket. The clamp also may include a locking tongue to secure the clamp to a bracket.

  14. Photovoltaic panel clamp

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Malcolm P.; Mittan, Margaret Birmingham; Miros, Robert H. J.; Stancel, Robert

    2013-03-19

    A photovoltaic panel clamp includes an upper and lower section. The interface between the assembled clamp halves and the module edge is filled by a flexible gasket material, such as EPDM rubber. The gasket preferably has small, finger like protrusions that allow for easy insertion onto the module edge while being reversed makes it more difficult to remove them from the module once installed. The clamp includes mounting posts or an integral axle to engage a bracket. The clamp also may include a locking tongue to secure the clamp to a bracket.

  15. Microsphere Insulation Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohling, R.; Allen, M.; Baumgartner, R.

    2006-01-01

    Microsphere insulation panels (MIPs) have been developed as lightweight, longlasting replacements for the foam and vacuum-jacketed systems heretofore used for thermally insulating cryogenic vessels and transfer ducts. The microsphere core material of a typical MIP consists of hollow glass bubbles, which have a combination of advantageous mechanical, chemical, and thermal-insulation properties heretofore available only separately in different materials. In particular, a core filling of glass microspheres has high crush strength and low density, is noncombustible, and performs well in soft vacuum.

  16. Concentrating photovoltaic solar panel

    DOEpatents

    Cashion, Steven A; Bowser, Michael R; Farrelly, Mark B; Hines, Braden E; Holmes, Howard C; Johnson, Jr., Richard L; Russell, Richard J; Turk, Michael F

    2014-04-15

    The present invention relates to photovoltaic power systems, photovoltaic concentrator modules, and related methods. In particular, the present invention features concentrator modules having interior points of attachment for an articulating mechanism and/or an articulating mechanism that has a unique arrangement of chassis members so as to isolate bending, etc. from being transferred among the chassis members. The present invention also features adjustable solar panel mounting features and/or mounting features with two or more degrees of freedom. The present invention also features a mechanical fastener for secondary optics in a concentrator module.

  17. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The results of the Panel's activities are presented in a set of findings and recommendations. Highlighted here are both improvements in NASA's safety and reliability activities and specific areas where additional gains might be realized. One area of particular concern involves the curtailment or elimination of Space Shuttle safety and reliability enhancements. Several findings and recommendations address this area of concern, reflecting the opinion that safety and reliability enhancements are essential to the continued successful operation of the Space Shuttle. It is recommended that a comprehensive and continuing program of safety and reliability improvements in all areas of Space Shuttle hardware/software be considered an inherent component of ongoing Space Shuttle operations.

  18. A panel method study of vortex sheets with special emphasis on sheets of axisymmetric geometry. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugioka, I.; Widnall, S. E.

    1985-01-01

    The self induced evolution of a vortex sheet was simulated by modeling the sheet using an integration of discrete elements of vorticity. Replacing small sections of a vortex sheet by flat panels of constant vorticity is found to reproduce more accurately the initial conditions for the Lagrangian simulation technique than replacement by point vortices. The flat panel method for the vortex sheet was then extended to model axisymmetric vortex sheets. The local and far field velocities induced by the axisymmetric panels were obtained using matched asymptotic analysis, and some of the uncertainties involved in other models of the axisymmetric vortex sheet have been eliminated. One important result of this analysis is the determination of the proper choice of core size for a circular vortex filament which may replace a section of an axisymmetric vortex sheet. Roll-up of both two dimensional and axisymmetric vortex sheets was computed using the panel methods developed in the report.

  19. Can Integrated Micro-Optical Concentrator Technology Revolutionize Flat-Plate Photovoltaic Solar Energy Harvesting?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haney, Michael W.

    2015-12-01

    The economies-of-scale and enhanced performance of integrated micro-technologies have repeatedly delivered disruptive market impact. Examples range from microelectronics to displays to lighting. However, integrated micro-scale technologies have yet to be applied in a transformational way to solar photovoltaic panels. The recently announced Micro-scale Optimized Solar-cell Arrays with Integrated Concentration (MOSAIC) program aims to create a new paradigm in solar photovoltaic panel technology based on the incorporation of micro-concentrating photo-voltaic (μ-CPV) cells. As depicted in Figure 1, MOSAIC will integrate arrays of micro-optical concentrating elements and micro-scale PV elements to achieve the same aggregated collection area and high conversion efficiency of a conventional (i.e., macro-scale) CPV approach, but with the low profile and mass, and hopefully cost, of a conventional non-concentrated PV panel. The reduced size and weight, and enhanced wiring complexity, of the MOSAIC approach provide the opportunity to access the high-performance/low-cost region between the conventional CPV and flat-plate (1-sun) PV domains shown in Figure 2. Accessing this portion of the graph in Figure 2 will expand the geographic and market reach of flat-plate PV. This talk reviews the motivation and goals for the MOSAIC program. The diversity of the technical approaches to micro-concentration, embedded solar tracking, and hybrid direct/diffuse solar resource collection found in the MOSAIC portfolio of projects will also be highlighted.

  20. Flat-detector computed tomography (FD-CT).

    PubMed

    Kalender, Willi A; Kyriakou, Yiannis

    2007-11-01

    Flat-panel detectors or, synonymously, flat detectors (FDs) have been developed for use in radiography and fluoroscopy with the defined goal to replace standard X-ray film, film-screen combinations and image intensifiers by an advanced sensor system. FD technology in comparison to X-ray film and image intensifiers offers higher dynamic range, dose reduction, fast digital readout and the possibility for dynamic acquisitions of image series, yet keeping to a compact design. It appeared logical to employ FD designs also for computed tomography (CT) imaging. Respective efforts date back a few years only, but FD-CT has meanwhile become widely accepted for interventional and intra-operative imaging using C-arm systems. FD-CT provides a very efficient way of combining two-dimensional (2D) radiographic or fluoroscopic and 3D CT imaging. In addition, FD technology made its way into a number of dedicated CT scanner developments, such as scanners for the maxillo-facial region or for micro-CT applications. This review focuses on technical and performance issues of FD technology and its full range of applications for CT imaging. A comparison with standard clinical CT is of primary interest. It reveals that FD-CT provides higher spatial resolution, but encompasses a number of disadvantages, such as lower dose efficiency, smaller field of view and lower temporal resolution. FD-CT is not aimed at challenging standard clinical CT as regards to the typical diagnostic examinations; but it has already proven unique for a number of dedicated CT applications, offering distinct practical advantages, above all the availability of immediate CT imaging in the interventional suite or the operating room.

  1. High temperature solder device for flat cables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haehner, Carl L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A high temperature solder device for flat cables includes a microwelder, an anvil which acts as a heat sink and supports a flexible flat ribbon cable that is to be connected to a multiple pin connector. The microwelder is made from a modified commercially available resistance welding machine such as the Split Tip Electrode microwelder by Weltek, which consists of two separate electrode halves with a removable dielectric spacer in between. The microwelder is not used to weld the items together, but to provide a controlled compressive force on, and energy pulse to, a solder preform placed between a pin of the connector and a conductor of the flexible flat ribbon cable. When the microwelder is operated, an electric pulse will flow down one electrode, through the solder preform and back up the other electrode. This pulse of electrical energy will cause the solder preform to heat up and melt, joining the pin and conductor.

  2. Flat top surface plasmon polariton beams.

    PubMed

    Zundel, Lauren; Martinez-Herrero, Rosario; Manjavacas, Alejandro

    2017-10-15

    Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) have emerged as powerful tools for guiding and manipulating light below the diffraction limit. In this context, the availability of flat top SPP beams displaying a constant transversal profile can allow for uniform excitation and coupling scenarios, thus opening the door to developing novel applications that cannot be achieved using conventional Gaussian SPP beams. Here, we present a rigorous theoretical description of flat top SPP beams propagating along flat metal-dielectric interfaces. This is accomplished through the use of Hermite-Gaussian SPP modes that constitute a complete basis set for the solutions of Maxwell's equations for a metal-dielectric interface in the paraxial approximation. We provide a comprehensive analysis of the evolution of the transversal profiles of these beams as they propagate, which is complemented with the study of the width and kurtosis parameters. Our results serve to enlarge the capabilities of surface plasmon polaritons to control and manipulate light below the diffraction limit.

  3. Magnetized and Flat Beam Experiment at FAST

    SciTech Connect

    Halavanau, A.; Hyun, J.; Mihalcea, D.

    2017-05-22

    A photocathode, immersed in solenoidal magnetic field, can produce canonical-angular-momentum (CAM) dominated or “magnetized” electron beams. Such beams have an application in electron cooling of hadron beams and can also be uncoupled to yield asymmetric-emittance (“flat”) beams. In the present paper we explore the possibilities of the flat beam generation at Fermilab’s Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility. We present optimization of the beam flatness and four-dimensional transverse emittance and investigate the mapping and its limitations of the produced eigen-emittances to conventional emittances using a skew-quadrupole channel. Possible application of flat beams at the FAST facility are also discussed.

  4. Solar panel parallel mounting configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mutschler, Jr., Edward Charles (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A spacecraft includes a plurality of solar panels interconnected with a power coupler and an electrically operated device to provide power to the device when the solar cells are insolated. The solar panels are subject to bending distortion when entering or leaving eclipse. Spacecraft attitude disturbances are reduced by mounting each of the solar panels to an elongated boom made from a material with a low coefficient of thermal expansion, so that the bending of one panel is not communicated to the next. The boom may be insulated to reduce its bending during changes in insolation. A particularly advantageous embodiment mounts each panel to the boom with a single mounting, which may be a hinge. The single mounting prevents transfer of bending moments from the panel to the boom.

  5. Simulated hail impact testing of photovoltaic solar panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, D.; Wilson, A.; Ross, R.

    1978-01-01

    Techniques used to simulate and study the effect of hail on photovoltaic solar panels are described. Simulated hail stones (frozen ice spheres projected at terminal velocity) or steel balls were applied by air guns, gravity drop, or static loading. Tests with simulated hail and steel balls yielded different results. The impact strength of 10 commercially available flat-plate photovoltaic modules was tested. It was found that none of the six panel designs incorporating clear potting silicone material as the outermost layer remained undamaged by 1-in. simulated hailstones, while a photovoltaic module equipped with a 0.188-in.-thick acrylic cover sheet would be able to withstand the impact of a 2-in.-diameter hailstone.

  6. Detangling flat bands into Fano lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flach, Sergej; Leykam, Daniel; Bodyfelt, Joshua D.; Matthies, Peter; Desyatnikov, Anton S.

    2014-02-01

    Macroscopically degenerate flat bands (FB) in periodic lattices host compact localized states which appear due to destructive interference and local symmetry. Interference provides a deep connection between the existence of flat band states (FBS) and the appearance of Fano resonances for wave propagation. We introduce generic transformations detangling FBS and dispersive states into lattices of Fano defects. Inverting the transformation, we generate a continuum of FB models. Our procedure allows us to systematically treat perturbations such as disorder and explain the emergence of energy-dependent localization length scaling in terms of Fano resonances.

  7. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This annual report is based on the activities of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel in calendar year 2000. During this year, the construction of the International Space Station (ISS) moved into high gear. The launch of the Russian Service Module was followed by three Space Shuttle construction and logistics flights and the deployment of the Expedition One crew. Continuous habitation of the ISS has begun. To date, both the ISS and Space Shuttle programs have met or exceeded most of their flight objectives. In spite of the intensity of these efforts, it is clear that safety was always placed ahead of cost and schedule. This safety consciousness permitted the Panel to devote more of its efforts to examining the long-term picture. With ISS construction accelerating, demands on the Space Shuttle will increase. While Russian Soyuz and Progress spacecraft will make some flights, the Space Shuttle remains the primary vehicle to sustain the ISS and all other U.S. activities that require humans in space. Development of a next generation, human-rated vehicle has slowed due to a variety of technological problems and the absence of an approach that can accomplish the task significantly better than the Space Shuttle. Moreover, even if a viable design were currently available, the realities of funding and development cycles suggest that it would take many years to bring it to fruition. Thus, it is inescapable that for the foreseeable future the Space Shuttle will be the only human-rated vehicle available to the U.S. space program for support of the ISS and other missions requiring humans. Use of the Space Shuttle will extend well beyond current planning, and is likely to continue for the life of the ISS.

  8. Superconducting transitions in flat-band systems

    DOE PAGES

    Iglovikov, V. I.; Hébert, F.; Grémaud, B.; ...

    2014-09-11

    The physics of strongly correlated quantum particles within a flat band was originally explored as a route to itinerant ferromagnetism and, indeed, a celebrated theorem by Lieb rigorously establishes that the ground state of the repulsive Hubbard model on a bipartite lattice with unequal number of sites in each sublattice must have nonzero spin S at half-filling. Recently, there has been interest in Lieb geometries due to the possibility of novel topological insulator, nematic, and Bose-Einstein condensed (BEC) phases. In this paper, we extend the understanding of the attractive Hubbard model on the Lieb lattice by using Determinant Quantum Montemore » Carlo to study real space charge and pair correlation functions not addressed by the Lieb theorems. Specifically, our results show unusual charge and charge transfer signatures within the flat band, and a reduction in pairing order at ρ = 2/3 and ρ = 4/3, the points at which the flat band is first occupied and then completely filled. Lastly, we compare our results to the case of flat bands in the Kagome lattice and demonstrate that the behavior observed in the two cases is rather different.« less

  9. Promoting Employability in a "Flat" World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Polly

    2008-01-01

    T. L. Friedman (2005) described a "flat" world platform where competition and collaboration take place in real time among people all over the planet. Implications exist for people to assume responsibility for managing their own careers and ensuring their own security in a global economy. This article addresses those challenges from both the…

  10. Mass Distributions Implying Flat Galactic Rotation Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeports, David

    2010-01-01

    The rotational speeds of stars in the disc of a spiral galaxy are virtually independent of the distances of the stars from the centre of the galaxy. In common parlance, the stellar speed versus distance plot known as a galactic rotation curve is by observation typically nearly flat. This observation provides strong evidence that most galactic…

  11. Neal Lane: Science in a Flat World

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, Neal

    2006-09-12

    Lane discusses the changes that have taken place in the world since World War II that have made it "flatter," referring to Thomas L. Friedman's book, The World is Flat. Friedman's main premise is that inexpensive telecommunications is bringing about unhampered international competition, the demise of economic stability, and a trend toward outsourcing services, such as computer programming, engineering and science research.

  12. 40 CFR 230.42 - Mud flats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... extremely low tides and inundated at high tides with the water table at or near the surface of the substrate... dewater the mud flat or disrupt periodic inundation, resulting in an increase in the rate of erosion or... in inundation patterns can affect the chemical and biological exchange and decomposition process...

  13. Computational Design of Flat-Band Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, I.; Yanagisawa, T.; Kawashima, K.

    2018-02-01

    Quantum mechanics states that hopping integral between local orbitals makes the energy band dispersive. However, in some special cases, there are bands with no dispersion due to quantum interference. These bands are called as flat band. Many models having flat band have been proposed, and many interesting physical properties are predicted. However, no real compound having flat band has been found yet despite the 25 years of vigorous researches. We have found that some pyrochlore oxides have quasi-flat band just below the Fermi level by first principles calculation. Moreover, their valence bands are well described by a tight-binding model of pyrochlore lattice with isotropic nearest neighbor hopping integral. This model belongs to a class of Mielke model, whose ground state is known to be ferromagnetic with appropriate carrier doping and on-site repulsive Coulomb interaction. We have also performed a spin-polarized band calculation for the hole-doped system from first principles and found that the ground state is ferromagnetic for some doping region. Interestingly, these compounds do not include magnetic element, such as transition metal and rare-earth elements.

  14. Computational Design of Flat-Band Material.

    PubMed

    Hase, I; Yanagisawa, T; Kawashima, K

    2018-02-26

    Quantum mechanics states that hopping integral between local orbitals makes the energy band dispersive. However, in some special cases, there are bands with no dispersion due to quantum interference. These bands are called as flat band. Many models having flat band have been proposed, and many interesting physical properties are predicted. However, no real compound having flat band has been found yet despite the 25 years of vigorous researches. We have found that some pyrochlore oxides have quasi-flat band just below the Fermi level by first principles calculation. Moreover, their valence bands are well described by a tight-binding model of pyrochlore lattice with isotropic nearest neighbor hopping integral. This model belongs to a class of Mielke model, whose ground state is known to be ferromagnetic with appropriate carrier doping and on-site repulsive Coulomb interaction. We have also performed a spin-polarized band calculation for the hole-doped system from first principles and found that the ground state is ferromagnetic for some doping region. Interestingly, these compounds do not include magnetic element, such as transition metal and rare-earth elements.

  15. Neal Lane: Science in a Flat World

    ScienceCinema

    Lane, Neal

    2017-12-22

    Lane discusses the changes that have taken place in the world since World War II that have made it "flatter," referring to Thomas L. Friedman's book, The World is Flat. Friedman's main premise is that inexpensive telecommunications is bringing about unhampered international competition, the demise of economic stability, and a trend toward outsourcing services, such as computer programming, engineering and science research.

  16. Exact Riemann solutions of the Ripa model for flat and non-flat bottom topographies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Asad; Ali, Ishtiaq; Qamar, Shamsul

    2018-03-01

    This article is concerned with the derivation of exact Riemann solutions for Ripa model considering flat and non-flat bottom topographies. The Ripa model is a system of shallow water equations accounting for horizontal temperature gradients. In the case of non-flat bottom topography, the mass, momentum and energy conservation principles are utilized to relate the left and right states across the step-type bottom topography. The resulting system of algebraic equations is solved iteratively. Different numerical case studies of physical interest are considered. The solutions obtained from developed exact Riemann solvers are compared with the approximate solutions of central upwind scheme.

  17. Development of flat-plate solar collectors for the heating and cooling of buildings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, J. W.; Borzoni, J. T.; Holland, T. H.

    1975-01-01

    The relevant design parameters in the fabrication of a solar collector for heating liquids were examined. The objective was to design, fabricate, and test a low-cost, flat-plate solar collector with high collection efficiency, high durability, and requiring little maintenance. Computer-aided math models of the heat transfer processes in the collector assisted in the design. The preferred physical design parameters were determined from a heat transfer standpoint and the absorber panel configuration, the surface treatment of the absorber panel, the type and thickness of insulation, and the number, spacing and material of the covers were defined. Variations of this configuration were identified, prototypes built, and performance tests performed using a solar simulator. Simulated operation of the baseline collector configuration was combined with insolation data for a number of locations and compared with a predicted load to determine the degree of solar utilization.

  18. Flat Metallicity Profiles in Rotating Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroyen, J.; de Rijcke, S.; Valcke, S.

    2011-07-01

    Dwarf irregulars (dIrr) and flat, rotating dwarf ellipticals (dE) generally posess flat metallicity profiles while round dEs show strong metallicity gradients (Koleva et al. 2009). Unlike dEs, dIrrs also exhibit ongoing star formation (SF) (Dolphin et al. 2005), in most cases compatible with a continuous star formation history (SFH). We show results based on a large suite of Nbody-SPH simulations of flat dwarf galaxies, both rotating and non-rotating, performed with a modified version of GADGET2. They have a range of masses, flattenings and rotations speeds and are based on the spherical models of (Valcke et al. 2008). Specifically, we want to see if it is possible to reproduce these characteristics in isolated DG models. These simulations show that using rotation to flatten a dwarf galaxy is particularly efficient in turning a so-called "breathing" SFH (Valcke et al. 2008) into a more continuous SFH, and in producing flat metallicity profiles. Non-rotating dEs in a flattened dark-matter halo are not able to reproduce these characteristics. Thus, it appears that rotation is key to reproducing the observed characteristics. Rotation causes a "centrifugal barrier" which slows down the infall of gas, so that the low-level star formation is not centrally concentrated but occurs galaxy-wide, and in this way also prevents large-scale oscillations in the SFR. This mechanism of smearing out the star formation in time and space proves to be the principal reason for the flat metallicity profiles, instead of the often referred to "fountain mechanism" (De Young & Heckman 1994; Barazza & Binggeli 2002; Mac Low & Ferrara 1999; Ferrara & Tolstoy 2000). We therefore propose a "centrifugal barrier mechanism" which is able to explain the observations.

  19. WFC3/IR Internal Flat Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlen, Tomas

    2013-03-01

    We report on the investigation of the WFC3 IR channel internal flat field images taken during Cycles 17, 18, and 19 using the Tungsten #2 calibration lamp. To complement this data, we also include observations taken during the Thermal Vacuum 3 testing on ground and the Servicing Mission Observatory Verification 4 program. Between the on ground testing in 2008 and the on orbit measurements starting 2009, we find an increase in the lamp flux of about ~8%, consistent with previous investigations. For the on orbit observations, we find that the lamp intensity has been stable within 0.4% during the timebetween SMOV4 (July 20 09) and Cycle 19 (September 2012) and between different filters. This scatter is, however, larger than expected from pure Poisson statistics. Possible systematic effects contributing to the scatter include variations in the flat field lamp flux, effects due to image persistence and systematic effects due to an excessive flagging of pixels as being hit by cosmic rays in the up-the-ramp fitting. We do not find any significant change in the illumination pattern between the three Cycles. We do possibly detect some small differences in the response in the pixels certain areas in the bottom right of the detector (e.g., pixels affected by the wagon wheel feature and other artifacts). The illumination pattern from the internal flat field lamp is significantly differ ent from that expected from actual science images. T he internal flat field images are therefore not well suited for creating flat field files to be used in the calibration of IR data.

  20. Installation of prestressed panel subdecks.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1977-01-01

    This report is concerned with the field installation of prestressed panel subdecks on the Rte 220 bridges over relocated 23rd St. in the city of Roanoke. These were the first bridges to be constructed in Virginia utilizing the precast subdeck panel c...

  1. Issues related to panel creep

    Treesearch

    Paul C. Van Deusen

    2002-01-01

    The annual inventory system was designed under the assumption that a fixed percentage of plots would be measured annually in each State. The initial plan was to assign plots to panels to provide systematic coverage of a State. One panel would be measured each year to allow for annual updates of each State using simple estimation procedures. The reality is that...

  2. Experimental Evaluation of Tuned Chamber Core Panels for Payload Fairing Noise Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Allen, Albert R.; Herlan, Jonathan W.; Rosenthal, Bruce N.

    2015-01-01

    Analytical models have been developed to predict the sound absorption and sound transmission loss of tuned chamber core panels. The panels are constructed of two facesheets sandwiching a corrugated core. When ports are introduced through one facesheet, the long chambers within the core can be used as an array of low-frequency acoustic resonators. To evaluate the accuracy of the analytical models, absorption and sound transmission loss tests were performed on flat panels. Measurements show that the acoustic resonators embedded in the panels improve both the absorption and transmission loss of the sandwich structure at frequencies near the natural frequency of the resonators. Analytical predictions for absorption closely match measured data. However, transmission loss predictions miss important features observed in the measurements. This suggests that higher-fidelity analytical or numerical models will be needed to supplement transmission loss predictions in the future.

  3. Wind loads on flat plate photovoltaic array fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. D.; Zimmerman, D. K.

    1981-01-01

    The results of an experimental analysis (boundary layer wind tunnel test) of the aerodynamic forces resulting from winds acting on flat plate photovoltaic arrays are presented. Local pressure coefficient distributions and normal force coefficients on the arrays are shown and compared to theoretical results. Parameters that were varied when determining the aerodynamic forces included tilt angle, array separation, ground clearance, protective wind barriers, and the effect of the wind velocity profile. Recommended design wind forces and pressures are presented, which envelop the test results for winds perpendicular to the array's longitudinal axis. This wind direction produces the maximum wind loads on the arrays except at the array edge where oblique winds produce larger edge pressure loads. The arrays located at the outer boundary of an array field have a protective influence on the interior arrays of the field. A significant decrease of the array wind loads were recorded in the wind tunnel test on array panels located behind a fence and/or interior to the array field compared to the arrays on the boundary and unprotected from the wind. The magnitude of this decrease was the same whether caused by a fence or upwind arrays.

  4. Mounting clips for panel installation

    DOEpatents

    Cavieres, Andres; Al-Haddad, Tristan; Goodman, Joseph; Valdes, Francisco

    2017-02-14

    An exemplary mounting clip for removably attaching panels to a supporting structure comprises a base, spring locking clips, a lateral flange, a lever flange, and a spring bonding pad. The spring locking clips extend upwardly from the base. The lateral flange extends upwardly from a first side of the base. The lateral flange comprises a slot having an opening configured to receive at least a portion of one of the one or more panels. The lever flange extends outwardly from the lateral flange. The spring bonding flange extends downwardly from the lever flange. At least a portion of the first spring bonding flange comprises a serrated edge for gouging at least a portion of the one or more panels when the one or more panels are attached to the mounting clip to electrically and mechanically couple the one or more panels to the mounting clip.

  5. Mounting clips for panel installation

    SciTech Connect

    Cavieres, Andres; Al-Haddad, Tristan; Goodman, Joseph

    2017-02-14

    An exemplary mounting clip for removably attaching panels to a supporting structure comprises a base, spring locking clips, a lateral flange, a lever flange, and a spring bonding pad. The spring locking clips extend upwardly from the base. The lateral flange extends upwardly from a first side of the base. The lateral flange comprises a slot having an opening configured to receive at least a portion of one of the one or more panels. The lever flange extends outwardly from the lateral flange. The spring bonding flange extends downwardly from the lever flange. At least a portion of the firstmore » spring bonding flange comprises a serrated edge for gouging at least a portion of the one or more panels when the one or more panels are attached to the mounting clip to electrically and mechanically couple the one or more panels to the mounting clip.« less

  6. Finite Element Analysis of the Random Response Suppression of Composite Panels at Elevated Temperatures using Shape Memory Alloy Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.; Zhong, Z. W.; Mei, Chuh

    1994-01-01

    A feasibility study on the use of shape memory alloys (SMA) for suppression of the random response of composite panels due to acoustic loads at elevated temperatures is presented. The constitutive relations for a composite lamina with embedded SMA fibers are developed. The finite element governing equations and the solution procedures for a composite plate subjected to combined acoustic and thermal loads are presented. Solutions include: 1) Critical buckling temperature; 2) Flat panel random response; 3) Thermal postbuckling deflection; 4) Random response of a thermally buckled panel. The preliminary results demonstrate that the SMA fibers can completely eliminate the thermal postbuckling deflection and significantly reduce the random response at elevated temperatures.

  7. Thermal and Mechanical Buckling Analysis of Hypersonic Aircraft Hat-Stiffened Panels With Varying Face Sheet Geometry and Fiber Orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    1996-01-01

    Mechanical and thermal buckling behavior of monolithic and metal-matrix composite hat-stiffened panels were investigated. The panels have three types of face-sheet geometry: Flat face sheet, microdented face sheet, and microbulged face sheet. The metal-matrix composite panels have three types of face-sheet layups, each of which is combined with various types of hat composite layups. Finite-element method was used in the eigenvalue extractions for both mechanical and thermal buckling. The thermal buckling analysis required both eigenvalue and material property iterations. Graphical methods of the dual iterations are shown. The mechanical and thermal buckling strengths of the hat-stiffened panels with different face-sheet geometry are compared. It was found that by just microdenting or microbulging of the face sheet, the axial, shear, and thermal buckling strengths of both types of hat-stiffened panels could be enhanced considerably. This effect is more conspicuous for the monolithic panels. For the metal-matrix composite panels, the effect of fiber orientations on the panel buckling strengths was investigated in great detail, and various composite layup combinations offering, high panel buckling strengths are presented. The axial buckling strength of the metal-matrix panel was sensitive to the change of hat fiber orientation. However, the lateral, shear, and thermal buckling strengths were insensitive to the change of hat fiber orientation.

  8. Necessity of the Ridge for the Flat Slab Subduction: Insights from the Peruvian Flat Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knezevic Antonijevic, S.; Wagner, L. S.; Beck, S. L.; Long, M. D.; Zandt, G.; Tavera, H.

    2014-12-01

    Flattening of the subducting plate has been linked to the formation of various geological features, including basement-cored uplifts, the cessation of arc volcanism, ignimbrite flare-ups, and the formation of high plateaus and ore deposits [Humphreys et al., 2003; Gutscher et al., 2000; Rosenbaum et al., 2005]. However, the mechanism responsible for the slab flattening is still poorly understood. Here we focus on the Peruvian flat slab, where the Nazca plate starts to bend at ~80 km depth and travels horizontally for several hundred kilometers, at which point steep subduction resumes. Based on a 1500 km long volcanic gap and intermediate depth seismicity patterns, the Peruvian flat slab appears to have the greatest along-strike extent and, therefore, has been suggested as a modern analogue to the putative flat slab during the Laramide orogeny in the western United States (~80-55 Ma). Combining 3D shear wave velocity structure and Rayleigh wave phase anisotropy between ~10° and 18° S, we find that the subducting Nazca plate is not uniformly flat along the entire region, but fails to the north of the subducting Nazca Ridge. Our results show that, in combination with trench retreat, rapid overriding plate motion, and/or presence of a thick cratonic root, the subduction of buoyant overthickened oceanic crust, such as the Nazca Ridge, is necessary for the formation and sustainability of flat slabs. This finding has important implications for the formation of flat slabs both past and present.

  9. Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This report provides findings, conclusions and recommendations regarding the National Space Transportation System (NSTS), the Space Station Freedom Program (SSFP), aeronautical projects and other areas of NASA activities. The main focus of the Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) during 1988 has been monitoring and advising NASA and its contractors on the Space Transportation System (STS) recovery program. NASA efforts have restored the flight program with a much better management organization, safety and quality assurance organizations, and management communication system. The NASA National Space Transportation System (NSTS) organization in conjunction with its prime contractors should be encouraged to continue development and incorporation of appropriate design and operational improvements which will further reduce risk. The data from each Shuttle flight should be used to determine if affordable design and/or operational improvements could further increase safety. The review of Critical Items (CILs), Failure Mode Effects and Analyses (FMEAs) and Hazard Analyses (HAs) after the Challenger accident has given the program a massive data base with which to establish a formal program with prioritized changes.

  10. Closed Axisymmetric Shells as Flat Jacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudin, S. A.; Sigaeva, T. V.

    Buildings during exploitation can be subjected to the external loadings leading to various kinds of heterogeneous strains or tilts. There is engineering technologies of uplift and flattening of multistory buildings by means of steel shells of the closed volume which are named as flat jacks (FJs) [1]. FJ represents two circular close plates which at the outer contour are joined to torus shell. The oil could be introduced into volume by hydraulic station creating a high pressure. As a result the plates diverge and through inserts from thick plywood create powerful force. The construction and working conditions of flat lifting jacks generates a set of problems of the mathematical modeling which are interesting to study. One of the directions is the geometry optimization. In the paper, we analyze variants of the axisymmetric shells modeling FJs. Stress states of shells with different shapes are compared at the initial loading stage.

  11. Towards a flat 45%-efficient concentrator module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohedano, Rubén; Hernandez, Maikel; Vilaplana, Juan; Chaves, Julio; Miñano, Juan C.; Benitez, Pablo; Sorgato, S.; Falicoff, Waqidi

    2015-09-01

    The so-called CCS4FK is an ultra-flat photovoltaic system of high concentration and high efficiency, with potential to convert, ideally, the equivalent of a 45% of direct solar radiation into electricity by optimizing the usage of sun spectrum and by collecting part of the diffuse radiation, as a flat plate does. LPI has recently finished a design based on this concept and is now developing a prototype based on this technology, thanks to the support of FUNDACION REPSOL-Fondo de Emprendedores, which promotes entrepreneur projects in different areas linked to energy. This works shows some details of the actual design and preliminary potential performance expected, according to accurate spectral simulations.

  12. Efficient flat metasurface lens for terahertz imaging.

    PubMed

    Yang, Quanlong; Gu, Jianqiang; Wang, Dongyang; Zhang, Xueqian; Tian, Zhen; Ouyang, Chunmei; Singh, Ranjan; Han, Jiaguang; Zhang, Weili

    2014-10-20

    Metamaterials offer exciting opportunities that enable precise control of amplitude, polarization and phase of the light beam at a subwavelength scale. A gradient metasurface consists of a class of anisotropic subwavelength metamaterial resonators that offer abrupt amplitude and phase changes, thus enabling new applications in optical device design such as ultrathin flat lenses. We propose a highly efficient gradient metasurface lens based on a metal-dielectric-metal structure that operates in the terahertz regime. The proposed structure consists of slotted metallic resonator arrays on two sides of a thin dielectric spacer. By varying the geometrical parameters, the metasurface lens efficiently manipulates the spatial distribution of the terahertz field and focuses the beam to a spot size on the order of a wavelength. The proposed flat metasurface lens design is polarization insensitive and works efficiently even at wide angles of incidence.

  13. Towards a flat 45%-efficient concentrator module

    SciTech Connect

    Mohedano, Rubén, E-mail: rmohedano@lpi-europe.com; Hernandez, Maikel; Vilaplana, Juan

    2015-09-28

    The so-called CCS{sup 4}FK is an ultra-flat photovoltaic system of high concentration and high efficiency, with potential to convert, ideally, the equivalent of a 45% of direct solar radiation into electricity by optimizing the usage of sun spectrum and by collecting part of the diffuse radiation, as a flat plate does. LPI has recently finished a design based on this concept and is now developing a prototype based on this technology, thanks to the support of FUNDACION REPSOL-Fondo de Emprendedores, which promotes entrepreneur projects in different areas linked to energy. This works shows some details of the actual design andmore » preliminary potential performance expected, according to accurate spectral simulations.« less

  14. Kinematic tests of exotic flat cosmological models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlton, Jane C.; Turner, Michael S.

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical prejudice and inflationary models of the very early universe strongly favor the flat, Einstein-de Sitter model of the universe. At present the observational data conflict with this prejudice. This conflict can be resolved by considering flat models of the universe which posses a smooth component of energy density. The kinematics of such models, where the smooth component is relativistic particles, a cosmological term, a network of light strings, or fast-moving, light strings is studied in detail. The observational tests which can be used to discriminate between these models are also discussed. These tests include the magnitude-redshift, lookback time-redshift, angular size-redshift, and comoving volume-redshift diagrams and the growth of density fluctuations.

  15. Mega-earthquakes rupture flat megathrusts.

    PubMed

    Bletery, Quentin; Thomas, Amanda M; Rempel, Alan W; Karlstrom, Leif; Sladen, Anthony; De Barros, Louis

    2016-11-25

    The 2004 Sumatra-Andaman and 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquakes highlighted gaps in our understanding of mega-earthquake rupture processes and the factors controlling their global distribution: A fast convergence rate and young buoyant lithosphere are not required to produce mega-earthquakes. We calculated the curvature along the major subduction zones of the world, showing that mega-earthquakes preferentially rupture flat (low-curvature) interfaces. A simplified analytic model demonstrates that heterogeneity in shear strength increases with curvature. Shear strength on flat megathrusts is more homogeneous, and hence more likely to be exceeded simultaneously over large areas, than on highly curved faults. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. Pressurized-Flat-Interface Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voss, F. E.; Howell, H. R.; Winkler, R. V.

    1990-01-01

    High thermal conductance obtained without leakage between loops. Heat-exchanger interface enables efficient transfer of heat between two working fluids without allowing fluids to intermingle. Interface thin, flat, and easy to integrate into thermal system. Possible application in chemical or pharmaceutical manufacturing when even trace contamination of process stream with water or other coolant ruins product. Reduces costs when highly corrosive fluids must be cooled or heated.

  17. [S2-Guideline: Pediatric Flat Foot].

    PubMed

    Hell, Anna K; Döderlein, Leo; Eberhardt, Oliver; Hösl, Matthias; von Kalle, Thekla; Mecher, Frauke; Simon, Angela; Stinus, Hartmut; Wilken, Bernd; Wirth, Thomas

    2018-04-09

    In pediatric flat foot a differentiation has to be made between the flexible and the rigid form. The diagnosis is based on the history, clinical examination as well as pedobarography, gait analysis and imaging techniques. It is important to rule out neuropediatric conditions such as muscular dystrophies, Ehlers-Danlos- or Marfan syndrome. In children six years of age and younger a flexible flat foot is nearly always physiological (97% of all 19 months old children). Up to the age of ten years the medial column of the foot is developing. Only a minority of children (4% in ten year olds) has a persistent or progressive deformity. Beyond to age of ten there is a danger of deformity decompensation as well as an increased rigidity. Only a minority of children develops some pain (< 2%). A clear risk factor for persistent pediatric flat foot is obesity (62% of six year old children with flat foot are obese). Pathogenetic factors include muscular, bony or soft tissue conditions. However, there specific rule is still unclear. Prevention consists in a thorough parent information about the normal development as well as encouragement of regular sportive activities. Soft and large enough shoes should be carried as a protection. Barfoot walking has to be encouraged on uneven grounds. If physiotherapy is needed different methods can be applied. Orthosis treatment should include a proprioceptive approach. Surgical interventions in children are rare. If surgical treatment is planned a detailed algorhythm should be used before utilizing one of the many different surgical methods. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Thermal Analysis of Solar Panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Nicolas; de Correia, João Pedro Magalhães; Ahzi, Saïd; Khaleel, Mohammad Ahmed

    In this work, we propose to analyze the thermal behavior of PV panels using finite element simulations (FEM). We applied this analysis to compute the temperature distribution in a PV panel BP 350 subjected to different atmospheric conditions. This analysis takes into account existing formulations in the literature and, based on NOCT conditions, meteorological data was used to validate our approach for different wind speed and solar irradiance. The electrical performance of the PV panel was also studied. The proposed 2D FEM analysis is applied to different region's climates and was also used to consider the role of thermal inertia on the optimization of the PV device efficiency.

  19. Panelized wall system with foam core insulation

    DOEpatents

    Kosny, Jan [Oak Ridge, TN; Gaskin, Sally [Houston, TX

    2009-10-20

    A wall system includes a plurality of wall members, the wall members having a first metal panel, a second metal panel, and an insulating core between the first panel and the second panel. At least one of the first panel and the second panel include ridge portions. The insulating core can be a foam, such as a polyurethane foam. The foam can include at least one opacifier to improve the k-factor of the foam.

  20. Glass/Epoxy Door Panel for Automobiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, J. L. JR.

    1985-01-01

    Lightweight panel cost-effective. Integrally-molded intrusion strap key feature of composite outer door panel. Strap replaces bulky and heavy steel instrusion beam of conventional door. Standard steel inner panel used for demonstration purposes. Door redesigned to exploit advantages of composite outer panel thinner. Outer panel for automobilie door, made of glass/epoxy composite material, lighter than conventional steel door panel, meets same strength requirements, and less expensive.

  1. Graphene nanoribbons production from flat carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Melo, W. S.; Guerini, S.; Diniz, E. M., E-mail: eduardo.diniz@ufma.br

    2015-11-14

    Graphene nanoribbons are of great interest for pure and applied sciences due to their unique properties which depend on the nanoribbon edges, as, for example, energy gap and antiferromagnetic coupling. Nevertheless, the synthesis of nanoribbons with well-defined edges remains a challenge. To collaborate with this subject, here we propose a new route for the production of graphene nanoribbons from flat carbon nanotubes filled with a one-dimensional chain of Fe atoms by first principles calculations based on density functional theory. Our results show that Fe-filled flat carbon nanotubes are energetically more stable than non flattened geometries. Also we find that bymore » hydrogenation or oxygenation of the most curved region of the Fe-filled flat armchair carbon nanotube, it occurred a spontaneous production of zigzag graphene nanoribbons which have metallic or semiconducting behavior depending on the edge and size of the graphene nanoribbon. Such findings can be used to create a new method of synthesis of regular-edge carbon nanoribbons.« less

  2. Gravitational multisoliton solutions on flat space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu

    2016-02-01

    It is well known that, for even n , the n -soliton solution on the Minkowski seed, constructed using the inverse-scattering method (ISM) of Belinski and Zakharov (BZ), is the multi-Kerr-NUT solution. We show that, for odd n , the natural seed to use is the Euclidean space with two manifest translational symmetries, and the n -soliton solution is the accelerating multi-Kerr-NUT solution. We thus define the n -soliton solution on flat space for any positive integer n . It admits both Lorentzian and Euclidean sections. In the latter section, we find that a number, say m , of solitons can be eliminated in a nontrivial way by appropriately fixing their corresponding so-called BZ parameters. The resulting solutions, which may split into separate classes, are collectively denoted as [n -m ]-soliton solutions on flat space. We then carry out a systematic study of the n - and [n -m ]-soliton solutions on flat space. This includes, in particular, an explicit presentation of their ISM construction, an analysis of their local geometries, and a classification of all separate classes of solutions they form. We also show how even-soliton solutions on the seeds of the collinearly centered Gibbons-Hawking and Taub-NUT arise from these solutions.

  3. Flat electron beam sources for DLA accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Ody, A.; Musumeci, P.; Maxson, J.

    2016-10-26

    In this study we discuss the application of the flat beam transform to generate beams suitable for injection into slab-symmetric dielectric laser-driven accelerators (DLAs). A study of the focusing requirements to keep the particles within the tight apertures characterizing these accelerators shows the benefits of employing ultralow beam emittances. The slab geometry of the many dielectric accelerating structures strongly favors the use of flat beams with large ratio between vertical and horizontal emittances. We employ particle tracking simulations to study the application of the flat beam transform for two injector designs, a DC non relativistic photogun and a 1.6 cellmore » S-band RF photoinjector, obtaining in both cases emittance ratios between the horizontal and vertical plane in excess of 100 in agreement with simple analytical estimates. The 4 MeV RF photoinjector study-case can be directly applied to the UCLA Pegasus beamline and shows normalized emittances down to < 3 nm in the vertical dimension for beam charges up to 20 fC, enabling a two-stage DLA experiment.« less

  4. Aluminum matrix composites with a SiC filler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugacheva, N. B.; Vichuzhanin, D. I.; Michurov, N. S.; Bykova, T. M.; Senaeva, E. I.

    2017-12-01

    The paper studies the structure of composites with a granulated D16 aluminum matrix and a SiC filler amounting to 5 and 10 vol % and the changes in their hardness, density, temperature coefficient of linear expansion and tensile strength. It is shown that after sintering, the composites have a cellular structure. Increasing the filler content has almost no effect on the hardness (84 HV 5) and density (2.7 g/cm3); the coefficient of linear expansion decreases from 20 to 18×10-6°C-1 and the ultimate strength decreases from 220 to 136 MPa. The composite containing 5 vol % SiC fails plastically with the formation of a characteristic dimple rupture for which σ0.2 = 205 MPa and δ = 0.3%. The composite with 10 vol % SiC, in addition to dimple rupture of its matrix, features brittle fracture regions at the boundaries of SiC particle clusters, and therefore, its strength is lower, measuring σ0.2 = 136 MPa.

  5. Acoustic fatigue and sound transmission characteristics of a ram composite panel design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockburn, J. A.; Chang, K. Y.; Kao, G. C.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental study to determine the acoustic fatigue characteristics of a flat multi-layered structural panel is described. The test panel represented a proposed design for the outer skin of a research application module to be housed within the space shuttle orbiter vehicle. The test specimen was mounted in one wall of the Wyle 100,000 cu ft reverberation room and exposed to a broadband acoustic environment having an overall level of 145 db. The test panel was exposed to nine separate applications of the acoustic environment, each application consisting of 250 seconds duration. Upon completion of the ninth test run, the specimen was exposed to a simulated micrometeoroid impact near the panel center. One additional test run of 250 seconds duration was then performed to complete the overall simulation of 50 flight missions. The experimental results show that no significant fatigue damage occurred until the test specimen was exposed to a simulated micrometeoroid impact. The intermediate foam layer forming the core of the test specimen suffered considerable damage due to this impact, causing a marked variation in the dynamic characteristics of the overall test panel. During the final application of the acoustic environment, the strain and acceleration response spectra showed considerable variation from those spectra obtained prior to impact of the panel. Fatigue damage from acoustic loading however, was limited to partial de-bonding around the edges of the composite panel.

  6. Surface modification of a-SiC photoelectrodes for photocurrent enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matulionis, Ilvydas; Hu, Jian; Zhu, Feng; Gallon, Josh; Gaillard, Nicolas; Deutsch, Todd; Miller, Eric; Madan, Arun

    2010-08-01

    Photoelectrochemical (PEC) water dissociation into hydrogen and oxygen at a semiconductor-liquid interface offers an environmentally benign approach to hydrogen production. We have developed an integrated PEC device using hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC or a-SiC:H) material as photoelectrode in conjunction with an amorphous silicon (a-Si) tandem photovoltaic device. Such a "hybrid PV/a-SiC" PEC cell produces photocurrent of about 1.3 mA/cm2 in a short-circuit configuration and is durable in a pH2 electrolyte. On the other hand, the aforementioned structure finished with ITO contacts and measured as a solid-state device features a current density of 5 mA/cm2, indicating a potential solar-to-hydrogen (STH) conversion efficiency of about 6% in the hybrid PV/a-SiC PEC cell. The much lower photocurrent measured in the hybrid PEC cell suggests that there exists an interfacial barrier between the a-SiC and electrolyte, which hinders the photocurrent extraction. In order to mitigate against the interfacial barrier and hence improve the photo-generated charge carrier transport through the a-SiC/electrolyte interface, we have explored several surface modification techniques, namely the use of metallic nano-particles (such as platinum or palladium) and the growth of an additional thin layer (a-SiNx, carbon-rich a-SiC, a-SiF, etc.) on the top of a-SiC by PECVD. In the latter case, it is observed that the addition of a thin PECVD-fabricated layer does not significantly improve the photocurrent, presumably due to a poor band alignment at the a-SiC/electrolyte interface. The use of lower work function nanoparticles like titanium has led to promising results in terms of photocurrent enhancement and an a nodic shift in the onset potential.

  7. Was there a Laramide "flat slab"?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    Slab-continent interactions drive most non-collisional orogenies; this has led us to usually anticipate that temporal changes or spatial variations in orogenic style are related to changes in the slab, most especially in the slab's dip. This is most dramatically evident for orogenies in the foreland, well away from the trench, such as the Laramide orogeny. However, the physical means of connecting slab geometry to crustal deformation remain obscure. Dickinson and Snyder (1978) and Bird (1984) laid out a conceptually elegant means of creating foreland deformation from shear between a slab and overriding continental lithosphere, but such strong shear removed all of the continental lithosphere in the western U.S. when included in a numerical simulation of flat slab subduction (Bird, 1988), a removal in conflict with observations of volcanic rocks and xenoliths in many locations. Relying on an increase in edge normal stresses results, for the Laramide, in requiring the little-deformed Colorado Plateau to either be unusually strong or to have risen rapidly enough and high enough to balance edge stresses with body forces. Early deformation in the Plateau rules out unusual strength, and the accumulation and preservation of Late Cretaceous near-sea level sedimentary rocks makes profound uplift unlikely (though not impossible). Relying on comparisons with the Sierras Pampeanas is also fraught with problems: the Sierras are not separated from the Andean fold-and-thrust belt by several hundred kilometers of little-deformed crust, nor were they buried under kilometers of marine muds as were large parts of the Laramide foreland. We have instead suggested that some unusual interactions of an obliquely subducting plate with a thick Archean continental root might provide a better explanation than a truly flat slab (Jones et al., 2011). From this, and given that several flat-slab segments today are not associated with foreland orogenesis and noting that direct evidence for truly

  8. PRSEUS Panel Fabrication Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linton, Kim A.; Velicki, Alexander; Hoffman, Krishna; Thrash, Patrick; Pickell, Robert; Turley, Robert

    2014-01-01

    NASA and the Boeing Company have been working together under the Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project to develop stitched unitized structure for reduced weight, reduced fuel burn and reduced pollutants in the next generation of commercial aircraft. The structural concept being evaluated is PRSEUS (Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure). In the PRSEUS concept, dry carbon fabric, pultruded carbon rods, and foam are stitched together into large preforms. Then these preforms are infused with an epoxy resin into large panels in an out-of-autoclave process. These panels have stiffeners in the length-wise and width-wise directions but contain no fasteners because all stiffeners are stitched to the panel skin. This document contains a description of the fabrication of panels for use in the 30-foot-long Multi-Bay Box test article to be evaluated at NASA LaRC.

  9. Evaluation of fiberglass sign panels.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1989-01-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of using fiberglass reinforced plastic material as an alternative to aluminum for highway sign panels. An analysis of shop fabrication, installation procedures, field performance, reclamation, and cost was made...

  10. Effects of Cutout Orientations on Natural Frequencies and Mode Shapes of Curved Rectangular Composite Panels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-01

    expending to the final form of the energy equation givest .,4.,* *b T4 U al/ A u i Bij, AXY dA (42) 1 KX Bi Di 4 Kx A Ky KyC K xJ Xx j In this section the...fo cutting the retnua holes i Walley’s thesis E151 was to press the panel flat and then clasp it into position for cutting. This process of flattening

  11. Panel to review EOSDIS plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Formed in Jan. 1992, the Panel to Review EOSDIS Plans was charged with advising NASA on its plans for developing the Earth Observing System (EOS) Data and Information System (EOSDIS). Specifically, the panel was asked to do the following: assess the validity of the engineering and technical underpinnings of the EOSDIS; assess its potential value to scientific users; suggest how technical risk can be minimized; and assess whether current plans are sufficiently resilient to be adaptable to changing technology and requirements such as budget environments, data volumes, new users, and new databases. The panel completed an interim report (Addendum A) and transmitted it to NASA and other interested parties in the government on 9 Apr. 1992. Because of a delay in NASA's plans to select the contractor for EOSDIS, the panel was not able to complete its review of the program according to the original government request. With the issuance of a letter report (Addendum B) on 28 Sep. 1992, the panel became inactive until such time as NASA could release the details of the contractor's proposed architecture, schedule, and costs for developing EOSDIS. In early 1993, NASA awarded the contract for the EOSDIS Core System (ECS). On 20 Apr. 1993, NASA asked the panel to reconvene to do the following: ( 1) complete its review of NASA's approach to the EOSDIS architecture and implementation; (2) appraise NASA's responses to the panel's previous recommendations; and (3) review the planning for EOSDIS in the context of NASA's role in the Global Change Data and Information System (GCDIS) implementation plan. To respond to the NASA charge, the panel met three times in 1993 including sessions with NASA officials and the EOSDIS contractor. In addition, several of the panel members visited individual Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAAC's) to obtain additional views of EOSDIS. The panel has now obtained substantial information on the EOSDIS budget, contractor work program, and current

  12. Two Thick Microwave Dichroic Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epp, Larry W.; Chen, Jacqueline C.; Stanton, Philip H.; Jorgenson, Roy E.

    1994-01-01

    Cross-shaped apertures enable relatively tight packing, eliminating some grating lobes. Two panels made of thin, honey-comblike metal walls constitute planar arrays of waveguidelike apertures designed to satisfy special requirements with respect to microwave transmittance and reflectance. Considered for use in multiplexing signals at various frequencies in microwave communication system. Both panels required to exhibit low insertion loss. Angle of incidence 30 degrees.

  13. Flat Urothelial Lesions With Atypia: Interobserver Concordance and Added Value of Immunohistochemical Profiling.

    PubMed

    Lawless, Margaret E; Tretiakova, Maria S; True, Lawrence D; Vakar-Lopez, Funda

    2018-03-01

    Distinguishing urothelial carcinoma in situ (CIS) from other flat lesions of the urinary bladder with cytologic atypia is critically important for the management of patients with bladder neoplasia. However, there is high interpathologist variability in making these distinctions. The aim of this study is to assess interobserver agreement between general and specialized genitourinary pathologists, and to compare these diagnoses with those rendered after an immunohistochemical panel is performed. We hypothesized that addition of a set of immunohistochemical stains would reduce the number of cases classified within intermediate categories of atypia of uncertain significance and low-grade dysplasia. Two genitourinary pathologists independently assessed haematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained sections of 127 bladder biopsies from each of the 4 International Society of Urological Pathology/World Health Organization categories of flat lesions diagnosed by general pathologists. A subset of biopsies from 49 patients was reassessed after staining with a 3-antibody panel (CD44, CK20, and p53) and the results were correlated with patient follow-up. Based on these immunohistochemistry (IHC) stains, 26 cases (53.1%) were recategorized. Of most clinical importance, 5 of 27 cases (18.5%) originally diagnosed as either atypia of uncertain significance or low-grade dysplasia were recategorized as CIS, and recurrent disease was identified on subsequent biopsies. None of the 10 cases diagnosed as CIS based on H&E stains were recategorized. This triad of IHC stains can improve the precision of pathologic diagnosis of histologically atypical urothelial lesions of flat bladder mucosa. We recommend that pathologists apply this set of IHC stains to such lesions they find problematic based on H&E stains.

  14. Rigidity of generalized Bach-flat vacuum static spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Gabjin; Hwang, Seungsu

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we study the structure of generalized Bach-flat vacuum static spaces. Generalized Bach-flat metrics are considered as extensions of both Einstein and Bach-flat metrics. First, we prove that a compact Riemannian n-manifold with n ≥ 4 which is a generalized Bach-flat vacuum static space is Einstein. A generalized Bach-flat vacuum static space with the potential function f having compact level sets is either Ricci-flat or a warped product with zero scalar curvature when n ≥ 5, and when n = 4, it is Einstein if f has its minimum. Secondly, we consider critical metrics for another quadratic curvature functional involving the Ricci tensor, and prove similar results. Lastly, by applying the technique developed above, we prove Besse conjecture when the manifold is generalized Bach-flat.

  15. Biomechanics and pathophysiology of flat foot.

    PubMed

    Van Boerum, Drew H; Sangeorzan, Bruce J

    2003-09-01

    When the foot works properly it is an amazing, adaptive, powerful aid during walking, running, jumping, and in locomotion up or down hill and over uneven ground. Dysfunction of the foot can often arise from the foot losing its normal structural support, thus altering is shape. An imbalance in the forces that tend to flatten the arch and those that support the arch can lead to loss of the medial longitudinal arch. An increase in the arch-flattening effects of the triceps surae or an increase in the weight of the body will tend to flatten the arch. Weakness of the muscular, ligamentous, or bony arch supporting structures will lead to collapse of the arch. The main factors that contribute to an acquired flat foot deformity are excessive tension in the triceps surae, obesity, PTT dysfunction, or ligamentous laxity in the spring ligament, plantar fascia, or other supporting plantar ligaments. Too little support for the arch or too much arch flattening effect will lead to collapse of the arch. Acquired flat foot most often arises from a combination of too much force flattening the arch in the face of too little support for the arch. Treatment of the adult acquired flat foot is often difficult. The clinician should remember the biomechanics of the normal arch and respond with a treatment that strengthens the supporting structures of the arch or weakens the arch-flattening effects on the arch. After osteotomies or certain hindfoot fusions, the role of the supporting muscles of the arch, in particular the PTT, play less of a role in supporting the arch. Rebalancing the forces that act on the arch can improve function and lessen the chance for further or subsequent development of deformity.

  16. The flat bottomed lines of Vega

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monier, R.; Gebran, M.; Royer, F.; Kılıcoǧlu, T.

    2017-12-01

    Using one high dispersion high quality spectrum of Vega (HR7001, A0V) obtained with the échelle spectrograph SOPHIE at Observatoire de Haute Provence, we have measured the centroids of 149 flat bottomed lines. The model atmosphere and spectrum synthesis modeling of the spectrum of Vega allows us to provide identifications for all these lines. Most of these lines are due to C I, O I, Mg I, Al I, Ca I, Sc II,Ti II, Cr I, Cr II, Mn I, Fe I, Fe II, Sr II, Ba II, the large majority being due to neutral species, in particular Fe I.

  17. Flat conductor cable for electrical packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angele, W.

    1972-01-01

    Flat conductor cable (FCC) is relatively new, highly promising means for electrical packaging and system integration. FCC offers numerous desirable traits (weight, volume and cost savings, flexibility, high reliability, predictable and repeatable electrical characteristics) which make it extremely attractive as a packaging medium. FCC, today, finds wide application in everything from integration of lunar equipment to the packaging of electronics in nuclear submarines. Described are cable construction and means of termination, applicable specifications and standards, and total FCC systems. A list of additional sources of data is also included for more intensive study.

  18. Flat-topped broadband rugate filters.

    PubMed

    Imenes, Anne G; McKenzie, David R

    2006-10-20

    A method of creating rugate interference filters that have flat-topped reflectance across an extended spectral region is presented. The method applies known relations from the classical coupled wave theory to develop a set of equations that gives the spatial frequency distribution of rugate cycles to achieve constant reflectance across a given spectral region. Two examples of the application of this method are discussed: a highly reflective coating for eye protection against harmful laser radiation incident from normal to 45 degrees , and a spectral beam splitter for efficient solar power conversion.

  19. Ice Particle Impacts on a Flat Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario; Ruggeri, Charles; Struk, Peter M.; Pereira, Mike; Revilock, Duane; Kreeger, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted at the Ballistic Laboratory of NASA Glenn Research Center to study the impact of ice particles on a stationary flat surface target set at 45 degrees with respect to the direction of motion of the impinging particle (Figure 1). The experiment is part of NASA efforts to study the physics involved in engine power-loss events due to ice-crystal ingestion and ice accretion formation inside engines. These events can occur when aircraft encounter high-altitude convective weather.

  20. Geotechnical risk analysis by flat dilatometer (DMT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoroso, Sara; Monaco, Paola

    2015-04-01

    In the last decades we have assisted at a massive migration from laboratory testing to in situ testing, to the point that, today, in situ testing is often the major part of a geotechnical investigation. The State of the Art indicates that direct-push in situ tests, such as the Cone Penetration Test (CPT) and the Flat Dilatometer Test (DMT), are fast and convenient in situ tests for routine site investigation. In most cases the DMT estimated parameters, in particular the undrained shear strength su and the constrained modulus M, are used with the common design methods of Geotechnical Engineering for evaluating bearing capacity, settlements etc. The paper focuses on the prediction of settlements of shallow foundations, that is probably the No. 1 application of the DMT, especially in sands, where undisturbed samples cannot be retrieved, and on the risk associated with their design. A compilation of documented case histories that compare DMT-predicted vs observed settlements, was collected by Monaco et al. (2006), indicating that, in general, the constrained modulus M can be considered a reasonable "operative modulus" (relevant to foundations in "working conditions") for settlement predictions based on the traditional linear elastic approach. Indeed, the use of a site investigation method, such as DMT, that improve the accuracy of design parameters, reduces risk, and the design can then center on the site's true soil variability without parasitic test variability. In this respect, Failmezger et al. (1999, 2015) suggested to introduce Beta probability distribution, that provides a realistic and useful description of variability for geotechnical design problems. The paper estimates Beta probability distribution in research sites where DMT tests and observed settlements are available. References Failmezger, R.A., Rom, D., Ziegler, S.R. (1999). "SPT? A better approach of characterizing residual soils using other in-situ tests", Behavioral Characterics of Residual Soils, B

  1. Q-balls in flat potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, Edmund J.; Tsumagari, Mitsuo I.

    2009-07-15

    We study the classical and absolute stability of Q-balls in scalar field theories with flat potentials arising in both gravity-mediated and gauge-mediated models. We show that the associated Q-matter formed in gravity-mediated potentials can be stable against decay into their own free particles as long as the coupling constant of the nonrenormalizable term is small, and that all of the possible three-dimensional Q-ball configurations are classically stable against linear fluctuations. Three-dimensional gauge-mediated Q-balls can be absolutely stable in the thin-wall limit, but are completely unstable in the thick-wall limit.

  2. Easy Attachment Of Panels To A Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, Mark; Gralewski, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Conceptual antenna dish, solar collector, or similar structure consists of hexagonal panels supported by truss erected in field. Truss built in increments to maintain access to panel-attachment nodes. Each panel brought toward truss at angle and attached to two nodes. Panel rotated into attachment at third node.

  3. Increasing the optical absorption in a-Si thin films by embedding gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraone, Gabriele; Modi, Ritika; Marom, Sarita; Podestà, Alessandro; Di Vece, Marcel

    2018-01-01

    The light conversion efficiency of traditional a-Si thin-film solar cells is limited by their low optical thicknesses, especially in the NIR. A possible approach to increase the light-trapping efficiency over the entire solar spectral range is to design solar-cell architectures which rely on the optical properties of plasmonic nanocomposite materials. We demonstrate that it is possible to have a controlled Gold nanoparticle optical absorption by varying the thickness of a covering a-Si thin-film. For thick a-Si films the Gold nanoparticle plasmon resonance vanishes likely due to the formation of a silicide. Optical absorption measurements as well as finite difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations were employed to determine the a-Si thickness-dependent optical absorption properties, which demonstrated a significantly increased optical absorption in a-Si.

  4. Risk, media, and stigma at Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, J.; Peters, E.; Mertz, C.K.

    1998-12-01

    Public responses to nuclear technologies are often strongly negative. Events, such as accidents or evidence of unsafe conditions at nuclear facilities, receive extensive and dramatic coverage by the news media. These news stories affect public perceptions of nuclear risks and the geographic areas near nuclear facilities. One result of these perceptions, avoidance behavior, is a form of technological stigma that leads to losses in property values near nuclear facilities. The social amplification of risk is a conceptual framework that attempts to explain how stigma is created through media transmission of information about hazardous places and public perceptions and decisions. Thismore » paper examines stigma associated with the US Department of energy`s Rocky Flats facility, a major production plant in the nation`s nuclear weapons complex, located near Denver, Colorado. This study, based upon newspaper analyses and a survey of Denver area residents, finds that the social amplification theory provides a reasonable framework for understanding the events and public responses that took place in regard to Rocky Flats during a 6-year period, beginning with an FBI raid of the facility in 1989.« less

  5. Pond fractals in a tidal flat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cael, B. B.; Lambert, Bennett; Bisson, Kelsey

    2015-11-01

    Studies over the past decade have reported power-law distributions for the areas of terrestrial lakes and Arctic melt ponds, as well as fractal relationships between their areas and coastlines. Here we report similar fractal structure of ponds in a tidal flat, thereby extending the spatial and temporal scales on which such phenomena have been observed in geophysical systems. Images taken during low tide of a tidal flat in Damariscotta, Maine, reveal a well-resolved power-law distribution of pond sizes over three orders of magnitude with a consistent fractal area-perimeter relationship. The data are consistent with the predictions of percolation theory for unscreened perimeters and scale-free cluster size distributions and are robust to alterations of the image processing procedure. The small spatial and temporal scales of these data suggest this easily observable system may serve as a useful model for investigating the evolution of pond geometries, while emphasizing the generality of fractal behavior in geophysical surfaces.

  6. Pond fractals in a tidal flat.

    PubMed

    Cael, B B; Lambert, Bennett; Bisson, Kelsey

    2015-11-01

    Studies over the past decade have reported power-law distributions for the areas of terrestrial lakes and Arctic melt ponds, as well as fractal relationships between their areas and coastlines. Here we report similar fractal structure of ponds in a tidal flat, thereby extending the spatial and temporal scales on which such phenomena have been observed in geophysical systems. Images taken during low tide of a tidal flat in Damariscotta, Maine, reveal a well-resolved power-law distribution of pond sizes over three orders of magnitude with a consistent fractal area-perimeter relationship. The data are consistent with the predictions of percolation theory for unscreened perimeters and scale-free cluster size distributions and are robust to alterations of the image processing procedure. The small spatial and temporal scales of these data suggest this easily observable system may serve as a useful model for investigating the evolution of pond geometries, while emphasizing the generality of fractal behavior in geophysical surfaces.

  7. Trophic relationships in tidal flat areas: To what extent are tidal flats dependent on imported food?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmus, Harald; Asmus, Ragnhild M.

    In four intertidal areas of 'Königshafen' (island of Sylt, FRG), biomass and production of macrozoobenthos were measured monthly in 1980 and 1984. The areas were characterized by different macrofauna assemblages ( Nereis-Corophium belt, seagrass bed, Arenicola flat and mussel bed). Biomass and production of macrofauna were partitioned with regard to food preference of single species as well as to the food availability within their habitat. In the Nereis-Corophium belt, seagrass bed and the Arenicola flat, most of the secondary production of the macrofauna was formed by grazing animals. Secondary production of mussel beds was nearly 10 times higher than in the other three assemblages. The suspension feeder assemblage depended on planktonic food imported from outside the bay. Considering the secondary production of the total tidal flat area, suspension feeders dominated the other trophic groups, indicating a key position of this group relative to the other macrofaunal assemblages. Mussel beds regulate the seston input to other communities situated further landward. Because of this dominance of the suspension feeder group, the energy and material flow of the total tidal flat is strongly dependent on the seston input from the coastal waters of the North Sea or from other parts of the Wadden Sea.

  8. a-Si:H solar cells: SiH(2)Cl(2) as a source gas and a-SiGe:H alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Adam More

    This thesis gives an overview of the reasons why solar cells are a necessity in this world of carbon constrained energy use. The most important factors upon which to work to improve the competitiveness of photovoltaic generated electricity with conventional, fossil fuel based generation are the cost of the solar cell and the cell conversion efficiency. The two main technical thrusts of this thesis--DCS as a source gas and a-SiGe:H alloys--attacked two aspects of these problems. a-SiGe:H is used in multijunction cells to achieve higher efficiencies and DCS can be used to increase the deposition rate of a-Si:H thus decreasing the time it takes to make a solar cell. We review the various experimental methods used to investigate the optical and electronic properties of a-Si:H thin films as well as the methods used to measure solar cell efficiency and determine the effectiveness of the various portions of a solar cell. Using DCS as a source gas helped us increase the deposition rate by factor of 5 while maintaining the film quality; however chlorinated intrinsic films had higher defect densities and lower photoconductivity than standard a-Si:H films. Use of DCS to deposit i-layers of a solar cell led us to the discovery that Cl enhances the doping efficiency of B in a-Si:H. The enhanced doping of a-SiC:H as the p-layer of a solar cell increased the cell's efficiency from 7.1% to 7.8%. A-SiGe:H alloys were investigated over a range of Tauc gaps from 1.7 eV down to 1.0 eV. The optical and electronic properties of these films were investigated as well as their incorporation in solar cells. Different bandgap graded structures were used in the i-layer of a solar cell with the conclusion that the bathtub shaped i-layer yields the highest stabilized efficiency. An attempt was made to fabricate solar cells using cathode-deposited a-SiGe:H alloys as the i-layer in collaboration with Harvard University. The cells fabricated could neither prove nor disprove the effectiveness of

  9. Out-of-autoclave manufacturing of a stiffened thermoplastic carbon fibre PEEK panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, M.; Goggins, J.; Doyle, A.; Weafer, B.; Ward, M.; Bizeul, M.; Canavan, R.; O'Bradaigh, C.; Doyle, K.; Harrison, N.

    2017-10-01

    Out-of-Autoclave manufacturing methods, specifically Automated Tape Placement (ATP) and induction welding, used in the fabrication of a stiffened thermoplastic demonstrator panel, are presented in this study. The demonstrator panel consists of two stiffeners induction welded to a flat skin, to form a typical load bearing aerospace sub-component. The skin of the panel is manufactured from uni-directional Carbon Fibre (CF) Polyetheretherkeytone (PEEK) using laser assisted Automated Tape Placement (ATP) and the stiffeners are press formed from woven CF-PEEK. The stiffeners are fusion bonded to the skin using a continuous induction welding process. A susceptor material is used at the interface to ensure the required heating is concentrated at the weldline. Microscopy was used to examine the manufactured coupons for defects. Destructive testing was carried out to evaluate the strength of the overall assembly. The work shows that assemblies manufactured using continuous induction welding and ATP are suitable for load bearing aerospace applications.

  10. Nonlinear Thermomechanical Response of Composite Panels with Continuous and Terminated Stiffeners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Peters, Jeanne M.; Starnes, James H., Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A two-phase approach and a computational procedure are used for predicting the variability of the response of stiffened composite panels associated with variations in the geometric and material parameters of the structures. In the first phase, hierarchical sensitivity analysis is used to identify the major parameters that have the most effect on the response quantities of interest. In the second phase, the major parameters are taken to be fuzzy parameters, and a fuzzy set analysis is used to determine the range of variation of the response, associated with preselected variations in the major parameters. Numerical results are presented showing the variability of the response of panels with both continuous and terminated stiffeners associated with variations in the micro mechanical and geometric parameters. Both flat and curved panels are considered.

  11. Enhancing Convective Heat Transfer over a Surrogate Photovoltaic Panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouladi, Fama

    This research is particularly focused on studying heat transfer enhancement of a photovoltaic (PV) panel by putting an obstacle at the panel's windward edge. The heat transfer enhancement is performed by disturbing the airflow over the surface and increasing the heat and momentum transfer. Different objects such as triangular, square, rectangular, and discrete rectangular ribs and partial grids were applied at the leading edge of a surrogate PV panel and flow and the heat transfer of the panel are investigated experimentally. This approach was selected to expand understanding of effect of these different objects on the flow and turbulence structures over a flat surface by analyzing the flow comprehensively. It is observed that, a transverse object at the plate's leading edge would cause some flow blockage in the streamwise direction, but at the same time creates some velocity in the normal and cross stream directions. In addition to that, the obstacle generates some turbulence over the surface which persists for a long downstream distance. Also, among all studied objects, discrete rectangular ribs demonstrate the highest heat transfer rate enhancement (maximum Nu/Nu0 of 1.5). However, ribs with larger gap ratios are observed to be more effective at enhancing the heat transfer augmentation at closer distances to the rib, while at larger downstream distances from the rib, discrete ribs with smaller gap ratios are more effective. Furthermore, this work attempted to recognize the most influential flow parameters on the heat transfer enhancement of the surface. It is seen that the flow structure over a surface downstream of an object (flow separation-reattachment behaviour) has a significant effect on the heat transfer enhancement trend. Also, turbulence intensities are the most dominant parameters in enhancing the heat transfer rate from the surface; however, flow velocity (mostly normal velocity) is also an important factor.

  12. Optimization of Blended Wing Body Composite Panels Using Both NASTRAN and Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovejoy, Andrew E.

    2006-01-01

    The blended wing body (BWB) is a concept that has been investigated for improving the performance of transport aircraft. A trade study was conducted by evaluating four regions from a BWB design characterized by three fuselage bays and a 400,000 lb. gross take-off weight (GTW). This report describes the structural optimization of these regions via computational analysis and compares them to the baseline designs of the same construction. The identified regions were simplified for use in the optimization. The regions were represented by flat panels having appropriate classical boundary conditions and uniform force resultants along the panel edges. Panel-edge tractions and internal pressure values applied during the study were those determined by nonlinear NASTRAN analyses. Only one load case was considered in the optimization analysis for each panel region. Optimization was accomplished using both NASTRAN solution 200 and Genetic Algorithm (GA), with constraints imposed on stress, buckling, and minimum thicknesses. The NASTRAN optimization analyses often resulted in infeasible solutions due to violation of the constraints, whereas the GA enforced satisfaction of the constraints and, therefore, always ensured a feasible solution. However, both optimization methods encountered difficulties when the number of design variables was increased. In general, the optimized panels weighed less than the comparable baseline panels.

  13. Program Helps Design Composite Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, Stephen H.; Davis, Randall C.

    1994-01-01

    Panel Analysis and Sizing Code (PASCO) computer program developed for buckling and vibration analysis and sizing of prismatic structures having arbitrary cross sections. Intended for analyzing and sizing stiffened panels made of laminated orthotropic materials, and of particular value in analyzing and sizing filamentary composite structures. Macintosh version of PASCO includes interactive, graphic preprocessor called MACPASCO. Main objective to make use of PASCO faster, simpler, and less error-prone. Includes graphical user interface (GUI). PASCO written in FORTRAN IV. MACPASCO written in Macintosh Programmers Workbench 3.0, MPW Pascal 3.0, and MacAPP 2.0.

  14. The "Virtual" Panel: A Computerized Model for LGBT Speaker Panels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beasley, Christopher; Torres-Harding, Susan; Pedersen, Paula J.

    2012-01-01

    Recent societal trends indicate more tolerance for homosexuality, but prejudice remains on college campuses. Speaker panels are commonly used in classrooms as a way to educate students about sexual diversity and decrease negative attitudes toward sexual diversity. The advent of computer-delivered instruction presents a unique opportunity to…

  15. Solar panel truss mounting systems and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Haddad, Tristan Farris; Cavieres, Andres; Gentry, Russell

    2015-10-20

    An exemplary embodiment of the present invention provides a solar panel truss mounting system comprising a base and a truss assembly coupled to the base. The truss assembly comprises a first panel rail mount, second panel rail mount parallel to the first panel rail mount, base rail mount parallel to the first and second panel rail mounts, and a plurality of support members. A first portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first and second panel rail mounts. A second portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first panel rail mount and the basemore » rail mount. A third portion of the plurality of support members extends between the second panel rail mount and the base rail mount. The system can further comprise a plurality of connectors for coupling a plurality of photovoltaic solar panels to the truss assembly.« less

  16. Solar panel truss mounting systems and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Haddad, Tristan Farris; Cavieres, Andres; Gentry, Russell

    2016-06-28

    An exemplary embodiment of the present invention provides a solar panel truss mounting system comprising a base and a truss assembly coupled to the base. The truss assembly comprises a first panel rail mount, second panel rail mount parallel to the first panel rail mount, base rail mount parallel to the first and second panel rail mounts, and a plurality of support members. A first portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first and second panel rail mounts. A second portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first panel rail mount and the basemore » rail mount. A third portion of the plurality of support members extends between the second panel rail mount and the base rail mount. The system can further comprise a plurality of connectors for coupling a plurality of photovoltaic solar panels to the truss assembly.« less

  17. Solar panel truss mounting systems and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Haddad, Tristan Farris; Cavieres, Andres; Gentry, Russell

    2018-01-30

    An exemplary embodiment of the present invention provides a solar panel truss mounting system comprising a base and a truss assembly coupled to the base. The truss assembly comprises a first panel rail mount, second panel rail mount parallel to the first panel rail mount, base rail mount parallel to the first and second panel rail mounts, and a plurality of support members. A first portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first and second panel rail mounts. A second portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first panel rail mount and the basemore » rail mount. A third portion of the plurality of support members extends between the second panel rail mount and the base rail mount. The system can further comprise a plurality of connectors for coupling a plurality of photovoltaic solar panels to the truss assembly.« less

  18. Solar panel truss mounting systems and methods

    DOEpatents

    Al-Haddad, Tristan Farris; Cavieres, Andres; Gentry, Russell; Goodman, Joseph; Nolan, Wade; Pitelka, Taylor; Rahimzadeh, Keyan; Brooks, Bradley; Lohr, Joshua; Crooks, Ryan; Porges, Jamie; Rubin, Daniel

    2015-10-20

    An exemplary embodiment of the present invention provides a solar panel truss mounting system comprising a base and a truss assembly coupled to the base. The truss assembly comprises a first panel rail mount, second panel rail mount parallel to the first panel rail mount, base rail mount parallel to the first and second panel rail mounts, and a plurality of support members. A first portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first and second panel rail mounts. A second portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first panel rail mount and the base rail mount. A third portion of the plurality of support members extends between the second panel rail mount and the base rail mount. The system can further comprise a plurality of connectors for coupling a plurality of photovoltaic solar panels to the truss assembly.

  19. Solar panel truss mounting systems and methods

    DOEpatents

    Al-Haddad, Tristan Farris; Cavieres, Andres; Gentry, Russell; Goodman, Joseph; Nolan, Wade; Pitelka, Taylor; Rahimzadeh, Keyan; Brooks, Bradley; Lohr, Joshua; Crooks, Ryan; Porges, Jamie; Rubin, Daniel

    2016-06-28

    An exemplary embodiment of the present invention provides a solar panel truss mounting system comprising a base and a truss assembly coupled to the base. The truss assembly comprises a first panel rail mount, second panel rail mount parallel to the first panel rail mount, base rail mount parallel to the first and second panel rail mounts, and a plurality of support members. A first portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first and second panel rail mounts. A second portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first panel rail mount and the base rail mount. A third portion of the plurality of support members extends between the second panel rail mount and the base rail mount. The system can further comprise a plurality of connectors for coupling a plurality of photovoltaic solar panels to the truss assembly.

  20. Solar panel truss mounting systems and methods

    DOEpatents

    Al-Haddad, Tristan Farris; Cavieres, Andres; Gentry, Russell; Goodman, Joseph; Nolan, Wade; Pitelka, Taylor; Rahimzadeh, Keyan; Brooks, Bradley; Lohr, Joshua; Crooks, Ryan; Porges, Jamie; Rubin, Daniel

    2018-01-30

    An exemplary embodiment of the present invention provides a solar panel truss mounting system comprising a base and a truss assembly coupled to the base. The truss assembly comprises a first panel rail mount, second panel rail mount parallel to the first panel rail mount, base rail mount parallel to the first and second panel rail mounts, and a plurality of support members. A first portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first and second panel rail mounts. A second portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first panel rail mount and the base rail mount. A third portion of the plurality of support members extends between the second panel rail mount and the base rail mount. The system can further comprise a plurality of connectors for coupling a plurality of photovoltaic solar panels to the truss assembly.