Science.gov

Sample records for a-si-based solar cells

  1. Application of Ce3+ single-doped complexes as solar spectral downshifters for enhancing photoelectric conversion efficiencies of a-Si-based solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Pei; Jiang, Chun

    2013-05-01

    The effect on photoelectric conversion efficiency of an a-Si-based solar cell by applying a solar spectral downshifter of rare earth ion Ce3+ single-doped complexes including yttrium aluminum garnet Y3Al5O12 single crystals, nanostructured ceramics, microstructured ceramics and B2O3-SiO2-Gd2O3-BaO glass is studied. The photoluminescence excitation spectra in the region 360-460 nm convert effectively into photoluminescence emission spectra in the region 450-550 nm where a-Si-based solar cells exhibit a higher spectral response. When these Ce3+ single-doped complexes are placed on the top of an a-Si-based solar cell as precursors for solar spectral downshifting, theoretical relative photoelectric conversion efficiencies of nc-Si:H and a-Si:H solar cells approach 1.09-1.13 and 1.04-1.07, respectively, by means of AMPS-1D numerical modeling, potentially benefiting an a-Si-based solar cell with a photoelectric efficiency improvement.

  2. Evidence of significant down-conversion in a Si-based solar cell using CuInS2/ZnS core shell quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardelis, Spiros; Nassiopoulou, Androula G.

    2014-05-01

    We report on the increase of up to 37.5% in conversion efficiency of a Si-based solar cell after deposition of light-emitting Cd-free, CuInS2/ZnS core shell quantum dots on the active area of the cell due to the combined effect of down-conversion and the anti- reflecting property of the dots. We clearly distinguished the effect of down-conversion from anti-reflection and estimated an enhancement of up to 10.5% in the conversion efficiency due to down-conversion.

  3. High Efficiency Thin Film CdTe and a-Si Based Solar Cells: Final Technical Report, 4 March 1998--15 October 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Compaan, A. D.; Deng, X.; Bohn, R. G.

    2003-10-01

    This is the final report covering about 42 months of this subcontract for research on high-efficiency CdTe-based thin-film solar cells and on high-efficiency a-Si-based thin-film solar cells. Phases I and II have been extensively covered in two Annual Reports. For this Final Report, highlights of the first two Phases will be provided and then detail will be given on the last year and a half of Phase III. The effort on CdTe-based materials is led by Prof. Compaan and emphasizes the use of sputter deposition of the semiconductor layers in the fabrication of CdS/CdTe cells. The effort on high-efficiency a-Simore » materials is led by Prof. Deng and emphasizes plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition for cell fabrication with major efforts on triple-junction devices.« less

  4. Solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuquel, A.; Roussel, M.

    The physical and electronic characteristics of solar cells are discussed in terms of space applications. The principles underlying the photovoltaic effect are reviewed, including an analytic model for predicting the performance of individual cells and arrays of cells. Attention is given to the effects of electromagnetic and ionizing radiation, micrometeors, thermal and mechanical stresses, pollution and degassing encountered in space. The responses of different types of solar cells to the various performance-degrading agents are examined, with emphasis on techniques for quality assurance in the manufacture and mounting of Si cells.

  5. Solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treble, F. C.

    1980-11-01

    The history, state of the art, and future prospects of solar cells are reviewed. Solar cells are already competitive in a wide range of low-power applications, and during the 1980's they are expected to become cheaper to run than diesel or gasoline generators, the present mainstay of isolated communities. At this stage they will become attractive for water pumping, irrigation, and rural electrification, particularly in developing countries. With further cost reduction, they may be used to augment grid supplies in domestic, commercial, institutional, and industrial premises. Cost reduction to the stage where photovoltaics becomes economic for large-scale power generation in central stations depends on a technological breakthrough in the development of thin-film cells. DOE aims to reach this goal by 1990, so that by the end of the century about 20% of the estimated annual additions to their electrical generating capacity will be photovoltaic.

  6. Nanostructured Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guanying; Ning, Zhijun; Ågren, Hans

    2016-08-09

    We are glad to announce the Special Issue "Nanostructured Solar Cells", published in Nanomaterials. This issue consists of eight articles, two communications, and one review paper, covering major important aspects of nanostructured solar cells of varying types. From fundamental physicochemical investigations to technological advances, and from single junction solar cells (silicon solar cell, dye sensitized solar cell, quantum dots sensitized solar cell, and small molecule organic solar cell) to tandem multi-junction solar cells, all aspects are included and discussed in this issue to advance the use of nanotechnology to improve the performance of solar cells with reduced fabrication costs.

  7. Amorphous silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, K.; Konagai, M.

    The fabrication, performance, and applications of a-Si solar cells are discussed, summarizing the results of recent experimental investigations and trial installations. Topics examined include the fundamental principles and design strategies of solar power installations; the characteristics of monocrystalline-Si solar cells; techniques for reducing the cost of solar cells; independent, linked, and hybrid solar power systems; proposed satellite solar power systems; and the use of solar cells in consumer appliances. Consideration is given to the history of a-Si, a-Si fabrication techniques, quality criteria for a-Si films, solar cells based on a-Si, and techniques for increasing the efficiency and lowering the cost of a-Si solar cells. Graphs, diagrams, drawings, and black-and-white and color photographs are provided.

  8. Solar Photovoltaic Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mickey, Charles D.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews information on solar radiation as an energy source. Discusses these topics: the key photovoltaic material; the bank theory of solids; conductors, semiconductors, and insulators; impurity semiconductors; solid-state photovoltaic cell operation; limitations on solar cell efficiency; silicon solar cells; cadmium sulfide/copper (I) sulfide…

  9. Photovoltaic solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Gupta, Vipin P.; Okandan, Murat; Watts, Michael R.

    2015-09-08

    A photovoltaic solar concentrator is disclosed with one or more transverse-junction solar cells (also termed point contact solar cells) and a lens located above each solar cell to concentrate sunlight onto the solar cell to generate electricity. Piezoelectric actuators tilt or translate each lens to track the sun using a feedback-control circuit which senses the electricity generated by one or more of the solar cells. The piezoelectric actuators can be coupled through a displacement-multiplier linkage to provide an increased range of movement of each lens. Each lens in the solar concentrator can be supported on a frame (also termed a tilt plate) having three legs, with the movement of the legs being controlled by the piezoelectric actuators.

  10. Heterojunction solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.

    1994-01-01

    A high-efficiency single heterojunction solar cell wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga.sub.0.52 In.sub.0.48 P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. The conversion effiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the emitter layer.

  11. Heterojunction solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.M.

    1994-08-30

    A high-efficiency single heterojunction solar cell is described wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga[sub 0.52]In[sub 0.48]P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the emitter layer. 1 fig.

  12. Solar cell shingle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forestieri, A. F.; Ratajczak, A. F.; Sidorak, L. G. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A solar cell shingle was made of an array of solar cells on a lower portion of a substantially rectangular shingle substrate made of fiberglass cloth or the like. The solar cells may be encapsulated in flourinated ethylene propylene or some other weatherproof translucent or transparent encapsulant to form a combined electrical module and a roof shingle. The interconnected solar cells were connected to connectors at the edge of the substrate through a connection to a common electrical bus or busses. An overlap area was arranged to receive the overlap of a cooperating similar shingle so that the cell portion of the cooperating shingle may overlie the overlap area of the roof shingle. Accordingly, the same shingle serves the double function of an ordinary roof shingle which may be applied in the usual way and an array of cooperating solar cells from which electrical energy may be collected.

  13. Heterostructure solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, K. I.; Yeh, Y. C. M.; Iles, P. A.; Morris, R. K.

    1987-01-01

    The performance of gallium arsenide solar cells grown on Ge substrates is discussed. In some cases the substrate was thinned to reduce overall cell weight with good ruggedness. The conversion efficiency of 2 by 2 cm cells under AMO reached 17.1 percent with a cell thickness of 6 mils. The work described forms the basis for future cascade cell structures, where similar interconnecting problems between the top cell and the bottom cell must be solved. Applications of the GaAs/Ge solar cell in space and the expected payoffs are discussed.

  14. Solar cell radiation handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tada, H. Y.; Carter, J. R., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Solar cell theory cells are manufactured, and how they are modeled mathematically is reviewed. The interaction of energetic charged particle radiation with solar cells is discussed in detail and the concept of 1 MeV equivalent electron fluence is introduced. The space radiation environment is described and methods of calculating equivalent fluences for the space environment are developed. A computer program was written to perform the equivalent fluence calculations and a FORTRAN listing of the program is included. Finally, an extensive body of data detailing the degradation of solar cell electrical parameters as a function of 1 MeV electron fluence is presented.

  15. Solar cell radiation handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tada, H. Y.; Carter, J. R., Jr.; Anspaugh, B. E.; Downing, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    The handbook to predict the degradation of solar cell electrical performance in any given space radiation environment is presented. Solar cell theory, cell manufacturing and how they are modeled mathematically are described. The interaction of energetic charged particles radiation with solar cells is discussed and the concept of 1 MeV equivalent electron fluence is introduced. The space radiation environment is described and methods of calculating equivalent fluences for the space environment are developed. A computer program was written to perform the equivalent fluence calculations and a FORTRAN listing of the program is included. Data detailing the degradation of solar cell electrical parameters as a function of 1 MeV electron fluence are presented.

  16. Solar cell array interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Carey, P.G.; Thompson, J.B.; Colella, N.J.; Williams, K.A.

    1995-11-14

    Electrical interconnects are disclosed for solar cells or other electronic components using a silver-silicone paste or a lead-tin (Pb-Sn) no-clean fluxless solder cream, whereby the high breakage of thin (<6 mil thick) solar cells using conventional solder interconnect is eliminated. The interconnects of this invention employs copper strips which are secured to the solar cells by a silver-silicone conductive paste which can be used at room temperature, or by a Pb-Sn solder cream which eliminates undesired residue on the active surfaces of the solar cells. Electrical testing using the interconnects of this invention has shown that no degradation of the interconnects developed under high current testing, while providing a very low contact resistance value. 4 figs.

  17. Solar cell array interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Carey, Paul G.; Thompson, Jesse B.; Colella, Nicolas J.; Williams, Kenneth A.

    1995-01-01

    Electrical interconnects for solar cells or other electronic components using a silver-silicone paste or a lead-tin (Pb-Sn) no-clean fluxless solder cream, whereby the high breakage of thin (<6 mil thick) solar cells using conventional solder interconnect is eliminated. The interconnects of this invention employs copper strips which are secured to the solar cells by a silver-silicone conductive paste which can be used at room temperature, or by a Pb-Sn solder cream which eliminates undesired residue on the active surfaces of the solar cells. Electrical testing using the interconnects of this invention has shown that no degradation of the interconnects developed under high current testing, while providing a very low contact resistance value.

  18. Photovoltaic solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Nielson, Gregory N; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Okandan, Murat; Resnick, Paul J

    2014-05-20

    A photovoltaic solar cell for generating electricity from sunlight is disclosed. The photovoltaic solar cell comprises a plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions formed in a semiconductor body to receive the sunlight and generate the electricity therefrom, the plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions having a first plurality of regions having a first doping type and a second plurality of regions having a second doping type. In addition, the photovoltaic solar cell comprises a first electrical contact electrically connected to each of the first plurality of regions and a second electrical contact electrically connected to each of the second plurality of regions, as well as a passivation layer covering major surfaces and sidewalls of the photovoltaic solar cell.

  19. Photovoltaic solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Nielson, Gregory N; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Resnick, Paul J

    2013-11-26

    A photovoltaic solar cell for generating electricity from sunlight is disclosed. The photovoltaic solar cell comprises a plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions formed in a semiconductor body to receive the sunlight and generate the electicity therefrom, the plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions having a first plurality of regions having a first doping type and a second plurality of regions having a second doping type. In addition, the photovoltaic solar cell comprises a first electrical contact electrically connected to each of the first plurality of regions and a second electrical contact electrically connected to each of the second plurality of regions, as well as a passivation layer covering major surfaces and sidewalls of the photovoltaic solar cell.

  20. Photoelectrochemical Solar Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDevitt, John T.

    1984-01-01

    This introduction to photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells reviews topics pertaining to solar energy conversion and demonstrates the ease with which a working PEC cell can be prepared with n-type silicon as the photoanode and a platinum counter electrode (both immersed in ethanolic ferrocene/ferricenium solutions). Experiments using the cell are…

  1. Four-cell solar tracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdahl, C. M.

    1981-01-01

    Forty cm Sun tracker, consisting of optical telescope and four solar cells, stays pointed at Sun throughout day for maximum energy collection. Each solar cell generates voltage proportional to part of solar image it receives; voltages drive servomotors that keep image centered. Mirrored portion of cylinder extends acquisition angle of device by reflecting Sun image back onto solar cells.

  2. Broad spectrum solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw [Kensington, CA; Yu, Kin Man [Lafayette, CA; Wu, Junqiao [Richmond, CA; Schaff, William J [Ithaca, NY

    2007-05-15

    An alloy having a large band gap range is used in a multijunction solar cell to enhance utilization of the solar energy spectrum. In one embodiment, the alloy is In.sub.1-xGa.sub.xN having an energy bandgap range of approximately 0.7 eV to 3.4 eV, providing a good match to the solar energy spectrum. Multiple junctions having different bandgaps are stacked to form a solar cell. Each junction may have different bandgaps (realized by varying the alloy composition), and therefore be responsive to different parts of the spectrum. The junctions are stacked in such a manner that some bands of light pass through upper junctions to lower junctions that are responsive to such bands.

  3. Cadmium sulfide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, A. G.

    1975-01-01

    Development, fabrication and applications of CdS solar cells are reviewed in detail. The suitability of CdS cells for large solar panels and microcircuitry, and their low cost, are emphasized. Developments are reviewed by manufacturer-developer. Vapor phase deposition of thin-film solar cells, doping and co-evaporation, sputtering, chemical spray, and sintered layers are reviewed, in addition to spray deposition, monograin layer structures, and silk screening. Formation of junctions by electroplating, evaporation, brushing, CuCl dip, and chemiplating are discussed, along with counterelectrode fabrication, VPD film structures, the Cu2S barrier layer, and various photovoltaic effects (contact photovoltage, light intensity variation, optical enhancement), and various other CdS topics.

  4. Solar cell radiation handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, J. R., Jr.; Tada, H. Y.

    1973-01-01

    A method is presented for predicting the degradation of a solar array in a space radiation environment. Solar cell technology which emphasizes the cell parameters that degrade in a radiation environment, is discussed along with the experimental techniques used in the evaluation of radiation effects. Other topics discussed include: theoretical aspects of radiation damage, methods for developing relative damage coefficients, nature of the space radiation environment, method of calculating equivalent fluence from electron and proton energy spectrums and relative damage coefficients, and comparison of flight data with estimated degradation.

  5. Monolithic tandem solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, Mark W.

    1991-01-01

    A single-crystal, monolithic, tandem, photovoltaic solar cell is described which includes (a) an InP substrate having upper and lower surfaces, (b) a first photoactive subcell on the upper surface of the InP substrate, and (c) a second photoactive subcell on the first subcell. The first photoactive subcell is GaInAsP of defined composition. The second subcell is InP. The two subcells are lattice matched. The solar cell can be provided as a two-terminal device or a three-terminal device.

  6. Flexible Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Solar cell "modules" are plastic strips coated with thin films of photovoltaic silicon that collect solar energy for instant conversion into electricity. Lasers divide the thin film coating into smaller cells to build up voltage. Developed by Iowa Thin Film Technologies under NASA and DOE grants, the modules are used as electrical supply for advertising displays, battery rechargers for recreational vehicles, and to power model airplanes. The company is planning other applications both in consumer goods and as a power source in underdeveloped countries.

  7. NASA Facts, Solar Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    The design and function of solar cells as a source of electrical power for unmanned space vehicles is described in this pamphlet written for high school physical science students. The pamphlet is one of the NASA Facts Science Series (each of which consists of four pages) and is designed to fit in the standard size three-ring notebook. Review…

  8. Amorphous semiconductor solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Dalal, Vikram L.

    1981-01-01

    A solar cell comprising a back electrical contact, amorphous silicon semiconductor base and junction layers and a top electrical contact includes in its manufacture the step of heat treating the physical junction between the base layer and junction layer to diffuse the dopant species at the physical junction into the base layer.

  9. Phthalimide Copolymer Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Hao; Guo, Xugang; Ren, Guoqiang; Kim, Felix; Watson, Mark; Jenekhe, Samson

    2010-03-01

    Photovoltaic properties of bulk heterojunction solar cells based on phthalimide donor-acceptor copolymers have been investigated. Due to the strong π-π stacking of the polymers, the state-of-the-art thermal annealing approach resulted in micro-scale phase separation and thus negligible photocurrent. To achieve ideal bicontinuous morphology, different strategies including quickly film drying and mixed solvent for film processing have been explored. In these films, nano-sale phase separation was achieved and a power conversion efficiency of 3.0% was obtained. Absorption and space-charge limited current mobility measurements reveal similar light harvesting and hole mobilities in all the films, indicating that the morphology is the dominant factor determining the photovoltaic performance. Our results demonstrate that for highly crystalline and/or low-solubility polymers, finding a way to prevent polymer aggregation and large scale phase separation is critical to realizing high performance solar cells.

  10. Solar-cell defect analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gauthier, M. K.; Miller, E. L.; Shumka, A.

    1980-01-01

    Laser-Scanning System pinpoints imperfections in solar cells. Entire solar panels containing large numbers of cells can be scanned. Although technique is similar to use of scanning electron microscope (SEM) to locate microscopic imperfections, it differs in that large areas may be examined, including entire solar panels, and it is not necessary to remove cover glass or encapsulants.

  11. Assembling solar-cell arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloch, J. T.; Hanger, R. T.; Nichols, F. W.

    1979-01-01

    Modified 70 mm movie film editor automatically attaches solar cells to flexible film substrate. Machine can rapidly and inexpensively assemble cells for solar panels at rate of 250 cells per minute. Further development is expected to boost production rate to 1000 cells per minute.

  12. Epitaxial solar cells fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daiello, R. V.; Robinson, P. H.; Kressel, H.

    1975-01-01

    Silicon epitaxy has been studied for the fabrication of solar cell structures, with the intent of optimizing efficiency while maintaining suitability for space applications. SiH2CL2 yielded good quality layers and junctions with reproducible impurity profiles. Diode characteristics and lifetimes in the epitaxial layers were investigated as a function of epitaxial growth conditions and doping profile, as was the effect of substrates and epitaxial post-gettering on lifetime. The pyrolytic decomposition of SiH4 was also used in the epitaxial formation of highly doped junction layers on bulk Si wafers. The effects of junction layer thickness and bulk background doping level on cell performance, in particular, open-circuit voltage, were investigated. The most successful solar cells were fabricated with SiH2 CL2 to grow p/n layers on n(+) substrates. The best performance was obtained from a p(+)/p/n/n(+) structure grown with an exponential grade in the n-base layer.

  13. Solar cell module lamination process

    DOEpatents

    Carey, Paul G.; Thompson, Jesse B.; Aceves, Randy C.

    2002-01-01

    A solar cell module lamination process using fluoropolymers to provide protection from adverse environmental conditions and thus enable more extended use of solar cells, particularly in space applications. A laminate of fluoropolymer material provides a hermetically sealed solar cell module structure that is flexible and very durable. The laminate is virtually chemically inert, highly transmissive in the visible spectrum, dimensionally stable at temperatures up to about 200.degree. C. highly abrasion resistant, and exhibits very little ultra-violet degradation.

  14. Bifacial tandem solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Wojtczuk, Steven J.; Chiu, Philip T.; Zhang, Xuebing; Gagnon, Edward; Timmons, Michael

    2016-06-14

    A method of fabricating on a semiconductor substrate bifacial tandem solar cells with semiconductor subcells having a lower bandgap than the substrate bandgap on one side of the substrate and with subcells having a higher bandgap than the substrate on the other including, first, growing a lower bandgap subcell on one substrate side that uses only the same periodic table group V material in the dislocation-reducing grading layers and bottom subcells as is present in the substrate and after the initial growth is complete and then flipping the substrate and growing the higher bandgap subcells on the opposite substrate side which can be of different group V material.

  15. Monolithic tandem solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, M.W.

    1994-06-21

    A single-crystal, monolithic, tandem, photovoltaic solar cell is described which includes (a) an InP substrate having upper and lower surfaces, (b) a first photoactive subcell on the upper surface of the InP substrate, (c) a second photoactive subcell on the first subcell; and (d) an optically transparent prismatic cover layer over the second subcell. The first photoactive subcell is GaInAsP of defined composition. The second subcell is InP. The two subcells are lattice matched. 9 figs.

  16. Monolithic tandem solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, Mark W.

    1994-01-01

    A single-crystal, monolithic, tandem, photovoltaic solar cell is described which includes (a) an InP substrate having upper and lower surfaces, (b) a first photoactive subcell on the upper surface of the InP substrate, (c) a second photoactive subcell on the first subcell; and (d) an optically transparent prismatic cover layer over the second subcell. The first photoactive subcell is GaInAsP of defined composition. The second subcell is InP. The two subcells are lattice matched.

  17. Quantum junction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jiang; Liu, Huan; Zhitomirsky, David; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Wang, Xihua; Furukawa, Melissa; Levina, Larissa; Sargent, Edward H

    2012-09-12

    Colloidal quantum dot solids combine convenient solution-processing with quantum size effect tuning, offering avenues to high-efficiency multijunction cells based on a single materials synthesis and processing platform. The highest-performing colloidal quantum dot rectifying devices reported to date have relied on a junction between a quantum-tuned absorber and a bulk material (e.g., TiO(2)); however, quantum tuning of the absorber then requires complete redesign of the bulk acceptor, compromising the benefits of facile quantum tuning. Here we report rectifying junctions constructed entirely using inherently band-aligned quantum-tuned materials. Realizing these quantum junction diodes relied upon the creation of an n-type quantum dot solid having a clean bandgap. We combine stable, chemically compatible, high-performance n-type and p-type materials to create the first quantum junction solar cells. We present a family of photovoltaic devices having widely tuned bandgaps of 0.6-1.6 eV that excel where conventional quantum-to-bulk devices fail to perform. Devices having optimal single-junction bandgaps exhibit certified AM1.5 solar power conversion efficiencies of 5.4%. Control over doping in quantum solids, and the successful integration of these materials to form stable quantum junctions, offers a powerful new degree of freedom to colloidal quantum dot optoelectronics.

  18. Schottky barrier solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stirn, R. J.; Yeh, Y. C. M. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A method of fabricating a Schottky barrier solar cell is described. The cell consists of a thin substrate of low cost material with at least the top surface of the substrate being electrically conductive. A thin layer of heavily doped n-type polycrystalling germanium is deposited on the substrate after a passivation layer is deposited to prevent migration of impurities into the polycrystalline germanium. The polycrystalline germanium is recrystallized to increase the crystal sizes to serve as a base layer on which a thin layer of gallium arsenide is vapor-epitaxilly grown followed by a thermally-grown oxide layer. A metal layer is deposited on the oxide layer and a grid electrode is deposited to be in electrical contact with the top surface of the metal layer.

  19. Silicon MINP solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, L. C.; Addis, F. W.; Miller, W. A.

    1985-01-01

    The MINP solar cell concept refers to a cell structure designed to be a base region dominated device. Thus, it is desirable that recombination losses are reduced to the point that they occur only in the base region. The most unique feature of the MINP cell design is that a tunneling contact is utilized for the metallic contact on the front surface. The areas under the collector grid and bus bar are passivated by a thin oxide of tunneling thickness. Efforts must also be taken to minimize recombination at the surface between grid lines, at the junction periphery and within the emitter. Results of both theoretical and experimental studies of silicon MINP cells are given. Performance calculations are described which give expected efficiencies as a function of base resistivity and junction depth. Fabrication and characterization of cells are discussed which are based on 0.2 ohm-cm substrates, diffused emitters on the order of 0.15 to 0.20 microns deep, and with Mg MIS collector grids. A total area AM 1 efficiency of 16.8% was achieved. Detailed analyses of photocurrent and current loss mechanisms are presented and utilized to discuss future directions of research. Finally, results reported by other workers are discussed.

  20. Lunar production of solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Perino, Maria Antonietta

    1989-01-01

    The feasibility of manufacturing of solar cells on the moon for spacecraft applications is examined. Because of the much lower escape velocity, there is a great advantage in lunar manufacture of solar cells compared to Earth manufacture. Silicon is abundant on the moon, and new refining methods allow it to be reduced and purified without extensive reliance on materials unavailable on the moon. Silicon and amorphous silicon solar cells could be manufactured on the moon for use in space. Concepts for the production of a baseline amorphous silicon cell are discussed, and specific power levels are calculated for cells designed for both lunar and Earth manufacture.

  1. An Introduction to Solar Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Bernard J.

    2010-01-01

    Most likely, solar cells will play a significant role in this country's strategy to address the two interrelated issues of global warming and dependence on imported oil. The purpose of this paper is to present an explanation of how solar cells work at an introductory high school, college, or university physics course level. The treatment presented…

  2. World's Most Efficient Solar Cell

    Science.gov Websites

    on the cost effectiveness and revenue-generating capabilities of high-power space satellites over the ) and Spectrolab. The high efficiency makes the cells attractive for use in solar concentrator systems ." Similar high-efficiency solar cells - invented and developed over 10 years at NREL before being

  3. Thin film solar cell workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Joe; Jeffrey, Frank

    1993-01-01

    A summation of responses to questions posed to the thin-film solar cell workshop and the ensuing discussion is provided. Participants in the workshop included photovoltaic manufacturers (both thin film and crystalline), cell performance investigators, and consumers.

  4. Inversion layer MOS solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Fat Duen

    1986-01-01

    Inversion layer (IL) Metal Oxide Semiconductor (MOS) solar cells were fabricated. The fabrication technique and problems are discussed. A plan for modeling IL cells is presented. Future work in this area is addressed.

  5. GaAs Solar Cell Radiation Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.

    1996-01-01

    History of GaAs solar cell development is provided. Photovoltaic equations are described along with instrumentation techniques for measuring solar cells. Radiation effects in solar cells, electrical performance, and spacecraft flight data for solar cells are discussed. The space radiation environment and solar array degradation calculations are addressed.

  6. A new lightweight solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindmayer, J.; Wrigley, C.

    1976-01-01

    Highly reproducible, very thin (40-80 microns thick) silicon solar cells are examined. These cells are the product of silicon thinning techniques that produce very flexible, resilient slices as compared to other techniques. Measurements on solar cells 2 cm by 2 cm by 50 microns thick producing 60 mW or more at AM0 are described. These cells have fine-line metallizations, tantalum oxide antireflection coatings and back-surface aluminum alloy.

  7. High Performance Perovskite Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Xin; Lin, Feng; Wu, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Perovskite solar cells fabricated from organometal halide light harvesters have captured significant attention due to their tremendously low device costs as well as unprecedented rapid progress on power conversion efficiency (PCE). A certified PCE of 20.1% was achieved in late 2014 following the first study of long‐term stable all‐solid‐state perovskite solar cell with a PCE of 9.7% in 2012, showing their promising potential towards future cost‐effective and high performance solar cells. Here, notable achievements of primary device configuration involving perovskite layer, hole‐transporting materials (HTMs) and electron‐transporting materials (ETMs) are reviewed. Numerous strategies for enhancing photovoltaic parameters of perovskite solar cells, including morphology and crystallization control of perovskite layer, HTMs design and ETMs modifications are discussed in detail. In addition, perovskite solar cells outside of HTMs and ETMs are mentioned as well, providing guidelines for further simplification of device processing and hence cost reduction. PMID:27774402

  8. Upconversion in solar cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The possibility to tune chemical and physical properties in nanosized materials has a strong impact on a variety of technologies, including photovoltaics. One of the prominent research areas of nanomaterials for photovoltaics involves spectral conversion. Modification of the spectrum requires down- and/or upconversion or downshifting of the spectrum, meaning that the energy of photons is modified to either lower (down) or higher (up) energy. Nanostructures such as quantum dots, luminescent dye molecules, and lanthanide-doped glasses are capable of absorbing photons at a certain wavelength and emitting photons at a different (shorter or longer) wavelength. We will discuss upconversion by lanthanide compounds in various host materials and will further demonstrate upconversion to work for thin-film silicon solar cells. PMID:23413889

  9. Back wall solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, H. W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A solar cell is disclosed which comprises a first semiconductor material of one conductivity type with one face having the same conductivity type but more heavily doped to form a field region arranged to receive the radiant energy to be converted to electrical energy, and a layer of a second semiconductor material, preferably highly doped, of opposite conductivity type on the first semiconductor material adjacent the first semiconductor material at an interface remote from the heavily doped field region. Instead of the opposite conductivity layer, a metallic Schottky diode layer may be used, in which case no additional back contact is needed. A contact such as a gridded contact, previous to the radiant energy may be applied to the heavily doped field region of the more heavily doped, same conductivity material for its contact.

  10. Germanium Nanocrystal Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, Zachary Charles

    Greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere are approaching historically unprecedented levels from burning fossil fuels to meet the ever-increasing world energy demand. A rapid transition to clean energy sources is necessary to avoid the potentially catastrophic consequences of global warming. The sun provides more than enough energy to power the world, and solar cells that convert sunlight to electricity are commercially available. However, the high cost and low efficiency of current solar cells prevent their widespread implementation, and grid parity is not anticipated to be reached for at least 15 years without breakthrough technologies. Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) show promise for cheap multi-junction photovoltaic devices. To compete with photovoltaic materials that are currently commercially available, NCs need to be inexpensively cast into dense thin films with bulk-like electrical mobilities and absorption spectra that can be tuned by altering the NC size. The Group II-VI and IV-VI NC communities have had some success in achieving this goal by drying and then chemically treating colloidal particles, but the more abundant and less toxic Group IV NCs have proven more challenging. This thesis reports thin films of plasma-synthesized Ge NCs deposited using three different techniques, and preliminary solar cells based on these films. Germanium tetrachloride is dissociated in the presence of hydrogen in a nonthermal plasma to nucleate Ge NCs. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction indicate that the particles are nearly monodisperse (standard deviations of 10-15% the mean particle diameter) and the mean diameter can be tuned from 4-15 nm by changing the residence time of the Ge NCs in the plasma. In the first deposition scheme, a Ge NC colloid is formed by reacting nanocrystalline powder with 1-dodecene and dispersing the functionalized NCs in a solvent. Films are then formed on substrates by drop-casting the colloid and allowing it to dry

  11. Module level solutions to solar cell polarization

    DOEpatents

    Xavier, Grace , Li; Bo, [San Jose, CA

    2012-05-29

    A solar cell module includes interconnected solar cells, a transparent cover over the front sides of the solar cells, and a backsheet on the backsides of the solar cells. The solar cell module includes an electrical insulator between the transparent cover and the front sides of the solar cells. An encapsulant protectively packages the solar cells. To prevent polarization, the insulator has resistance suitable to prevent charge from leaking from the front sides of the solar cells to other portions of the solar cell module by way of the transparent cover. The insulator may be attached (e.g., by coating) directly on an underside of the transparent cover or be a separate layer formed between layers of the encapsulant. The solar cells may be back junction solar cells.

  12. Dust removal from solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David E. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A solar panel cleaning device includes a solar panel having a plurality of photovoltaic cells arranged in rows and embedded in the solar panel with space between the rows. A transparent dielectric overlay is affixed to the solar panel. A plurality of electrode pairs each of which includes an upper and a lower electrode are arranged on opposite sides of the transparent dielectric and are affixed thereto. The electrodes may be transparent electrodes which may be arranged without concern for blocking sunlight to the solar panel. The solar panel may be a dielectric and its dielectric properties may be continuously and spatially variable. Alternatively the dielectric used may have dielectric segments which produce different electrical field and which affects the wind "generated."

  13. Dust Removal from Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David E. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A solar panel cleaning device includes a solar panel having a plurality of photovoltaic cells arranged in rows and embedded in the solar panel with space between the rows. A transparent dielectric overlay is affixed to the solar panel. A plurality of electrode pairs each of which includes an upper and a lower electrode are arranged on opposite sides of the transparent dielectric and are affixed thereto. The electrodes may be transparent electrodes which may be arranged without concern for blocking sunlight to the solar panel. The solar panel may be a dielectric and its dielectric properties may be continuously and spatially variable. Alternatively the dielectric used may have dielectric segments which produce different electrical field and which affects the wind "generated."

  14. Solar cell with back side contacts

    DOEpatents

    Nielson, Gregory N; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Resnick, Paul J; Wanlass, Mark Woodbury; Clews, Peggy J

    2013-12-24

    A III-V solar cell is described herein that includes all back side contacts. Additionally, the positive and negative electrical contacts contact compoud semiconductor layers of the solar cell other than the absorbing layer of the solar cell. That is, the positive and negative electrical contacts contact passivating layers of the solar cell.

  15. Achieving 15% Tandem Polymer Solar Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-23

    solar cell structures – both polymer only and hybrid tandem cells to constantly pushing the envelope of solution processed solar cell ...performance – 11.6% polymer tandem cell , 7% transparent tandem polymer cell , and over 10% PCE hybrid tandem solar cells were achieved. In addition, AFOSR’s...final support also enabled us to explore novel hybrid perovskite solar cells in depth. For example, single junction cell efficiency

  16. Advances in Perovskite Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Chuantian; Bolink, Henk J.; Han, Hongwei; Huang, Jinsong

    2016-01-01

    Organolead halide perovskite materials possess a combination of remarkable optoelectronic properties, such as steep optical absorption edge and high absorption coefficients, long charge carrier diffusion lengths and lifetimes. Taken together with the ability for low temperature preparation, also from solution, perovskite‐based devices, especially photovoltaic (PV) cells have been studied intensively, with remarkable progress in performance, over the past few years. The combination of high efficiency, low cost and additional (non‐PV) applications provides great potential for commercialization. Performance and applications of perovskite solar cells often correlate with their device structures. Many innovative device structures were developed, aiming at large‐scale fabrication, reducing fabrication cost, enhancing the power conversion efficiency and thus broadening potential future applications. This review summarizes typical structures of perovskite solar cells and comments on novel device structures. The applications of perovskite solar cells are discussed. PMID:27812475

  17. Gap/silicon Tandem Solar Cell with Extended Temperature Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A two-junction solar cell has a bottom solar cell junction of crystalline silicon, and a top solar cell junction of gallium phosphide. A three (or more) junction solar cell has bottom solar cell junctions of silicon, and a top solar cell junction of gallium phosphide. The resulting solar cells exhibit improved extended temperature operation.

  18. Evaluation of solar cell materials for a Solar Power Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, P. E.; Almgren, D. W.; Csigi, K. I.

    1980-01-01

    Alternative solar cell materials being considered for the solar power satellite are described and price, production, and availability projections through the year 2000 are presented. The chief materials considered are silicon and gallium arsenide.

  19. Gallium Phosphide Integrated with Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chaomin

    It has been a long-standing goal to epitaxially integrate III-V alloys with Si substrates which can enable low-cost microelectronic and optoelectronic systems. Among the III-V alloys, gallium phosphide (GaP) is a strong candidate, especially for solar cells applications. Gallium phosphide with small lattice mismatch ( 0.4%) to Si enables coherent/pseudomorphic epitaxial growth with little crystalline defect creation. The band offset between Si and GaP suggests that GaP can function as an electron-selective contact, and it has been theoretically shown that GaP/Si integrated solar cells have the potential to overcome the limitations of common a-Si based heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells. Despite the promising potential of GaP/Si heterojunction solar cells, there are two main obstacles to realize high performance photovoltaic devices from this structure. First, the growth of the polar material (GaP) on the non-polar material (Si) is a challenge in how to suppress the formation of structural defects, such as anti-phase domains (APD). Further, it is widely observed that the minority-carrier lifetime of the Si substrates is significantly decreased during epitaxially growth of GaP on Si. In this dissertation, two different GaP growth methods were compared and analyzed, including migration-enhanced epitaxy (MEE) and traditional molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). High quality GaP can be realized on precisely oriented (001) Si substrates by MBE growth, and the investigation of structural defect creation in the GaP/Si epitaxial structures was conducted using high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The mechanisms responsible for lifetime degradation were further investigated, and it was found that external fast diffusors are the origin for the degradation. Two practical approaches including the use of both a SiNx diffusion barrier layer and P-diffused layers, to suppress the Si minority-carrier lifetime degradation

  20. New mounting improves solar-cell efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, N. F., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Method boosts output by about 20 percent by trapping and redirecting solar radiation without increasing module depth. Mounted solar-cell array is covered with internally reflecting plate. Plate is attached to each cell by transparent adhesive, and space between cells is covered with layer of diffusely reflecting material. Solar energy falling on space between cells is diffused and reflected internally by plate until it is reflected onto solar cell.

  1. Solar cell circuit and method for manufacturing solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, Nick (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The invention is a novel manufacturing method for making multi-junction solar cell circuits that addresses current problems associated with such circuits by allowing the formation of integral diodes in the cells and allows for a large number of circuits to readily be placed on a single silicon wafer substrate. The standard Ge wafer used as the base for multi-junction solar cells is replaced with a thinner layer of Ge or a II-V semiconductor material on a silicon/silicon dioxide substrate. This allows high-voltage cells with multiple multi-junction circuits to be manufactured on a single wafer, resulting in less array assembly mass and simplified power management.

  2. Impurities in silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    Metallic impurities, both singly and in combinations, affect the performance of silicon solar cells. Czochralski silicon web crystals were grown with controlled additions of secondary impurities. The primary electrical dopants were boron and phosphorus. The silicon test ingots were grown under controlled and carefully monitored conditions from high-purity charge and dopant material to minimize unintentional contamination. Following growth, each crystal was characterized by chemical, microstructural, electrical, and solar cell tests to provide a detailed and internally consistent description of the relationships between silicon impurity concentration and solar cell performance. Deep-level spectroscopy measurements were used to measure impurity concentrations at levels below the detectability of other techniques and to study thermally-induced changes in impurity activity. For the majority of contaminants, impurity-induced performance loss is due to a reduction of the base diffusion length. From these observations, a semi-empirical model which predicts cell performance as a function of metal impurity concentration was formulated. The model was then used successfully to predict the behavior of solar cells bearing as many as 11 different impurities.

  3. Graded bandgap perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Ergen, Onur; Gilbert, S Matt; Pham, Thang; Turner, Sally J; Tan, Mark Tian Zhi; Worsley, Marcus A; Zettl, Alex

    2017-05-01

    Organic-inorganic halide perovskite materials have emerged as attractive alternatives to conventional solar cell building blocks. Their high light absorption coefficients and long diffusion lengths suggest high power conversion efficiencies, and indeed perovskite-based single bandgap and tandem solar cell designs have yielded impressive performances. One approach to further enhance solar spectrum utilization is the graded bandgap, but this has not been previously achieved for perovskites. In this study, we demonstrate graded bandgap perovskite solar cells with steady-state conversion efficiencies averaging 18.4%, with a best of 21.7%, all without reflective coatings. An analysis of the experimental data yields high fill factors of ∼75% and high short-circuit current densities up to 42.1 mA cm -2 . The cells are based on an architecture of two perovskite layers (CH 3 NH 3 SnI 3 and CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3-x Br x ), incorporating GaN, monolayer hexagonal boron nitride, and graphene aerogel.

  4. Semi-transparent solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J.; Jasieniak, J. J.

    2017-03-01

    Semi-transparent solar cells are a type of technology that combines the benefits of visible light transparency and light-to-electricity conversion. One of the biggest opportunities for such technologies is in their integration as windows and skylights within energy-sustainable buildings. Currently, such building integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) are dominated by crystalline silicon based modules; however, the opaque nature of silicon creates a unique opportunity for the adoption of emerging photovoltaic candidates that can be made truly semi-transparent. These include: amorphous silicon-, kesterite-, chalcopyrite-, CdTe-, dye-sensitized-, organic- and perovskite- based systems. For the most part, amorphous silicon has been the workhorse in the semi-transparent solar cell field owing to its established, low-temperature fabrication processes. Excitement around alternative classes, particularly perovskites and the inorganic candidates, has recently arisen because of the major efficiency gains exhibited by these technologies. Importantly, each of these presents unique opportunities and challenges within the context of BIPV. This topic review provides an overview into the broader benefits of semi-transparent solar cells as building-integrated features, as well as providing the current development status into all of the major types of semi-transparent solar cells technologies.

  5. Compensated amorphous silicon solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.

    1980-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell incorporates a region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon fabricated by a glow discharge wherein said intrinsic region is compensated by P-type dopants in an amount sufficient to reduce the space charge density of said region under illumination to about zero.

  6. Process of making solar cell module

    DOEpatents

    Packer, M.; Coyle, P.J.

    1981-03-09

    A process is presented for the manufacture of solar cell modules. A solution comprising a highly plasticized polyvinyl butyral is applied to a solar cell array. The coated array is dried and sandwiched between at last two sheets of polyvinyl butyral and at least two sheets of a rigid transparent member. The sandwich is laminated by the application of heat and pressure to cause fusion and bonding of the solar cell array with the rigid transparent members to produce a solar cell module.

  7. Low cost solar cell arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iles, P. A.; Mclennan, H.

    1975-01-01

    Limitations in both space and terrestial markets for solar cells are described. Based on knowledge of the state-of-the-art, six cell options are discussed; as a result of this discussion, the three most promising options (involving high, medium and low efficiency cells respectively) were selected and analyzed for their probable costs. The results showed that all three cell options gave promise of costs below $10 per watt in the near future. Before further cost reductions can be achieved, more R and D work is required; suggestions for suitable programs are given.

  8. Sheet plastic filters for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wizenick, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVF) film protects solar cells on Mars surface from radiation and prevents degradation of solar cell surfaces by Martian dust storms. PVF films may replace glass or quartz windows on solar cell arrays used to generate power on earth.

  9. A novel chlorophyll solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludlow, J. C.

    The photosynthetic process is reviewed in order to produce a design for a chlorophyll solar cell. In a leaf, antenna chlorophyll absorbs light energy and conducts it to an energy trap composed of a protein and two chlorophyll molecules, which perform the oxidation-reduction chemistry. The redox potential of the trap changes from 0.4 to -0.6 V, which is sufficient to reduce nearby molecules with redox potentials in that range. The reduction occurs by transfer of an electron, and a chlorophyll solar cell would direct the transferred electron to a current carrier. Chlorophyll antenna and traps are placed on a metallic support immersed in an electron acceptor solution, and resulting electrons from exposure to light are gathered by a metallic current collector. Spinach chlorophyll extracted, purified, and applied in a cell featuring a Pt collector and an octane water emulsion resulted in intensity independent voltages.

  10. Nanostructured Materials for Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila; Raffaelle, Ryne; Castro, Stephanie; Fahey, S.; Gennett, T.; Tin, P.

    2003-01-01

    The use of both inorganic and organic nanostructured materials in producing high efficiency photovoltaics is discussed in this paper. Recent theoretical results indicate that dramatic improvements in device efficiency may be attainable through the use of semiconductor quantum dots in an ordinary p-i-n solar cell. In addition, it has also recently been demonstrated that quantum dots can also be used to improve conversion efficiencies in polymeric thin film solar cells. A similar improvement in these types of cells has also been observed by employing single wall carbon nanotubes. This relatively new carbon allotrope may assist both in the disassociation of excitons as well as carrier transport through the composite material. This paper reviews the efforts that are currently underway to produce and characterize these nanoscale materials and to exploit their unique properties.

  11. Towards stable silicon nanoarray hybrid solar cells.

    PubMed

    He, W W; Wu, K J; Wang, K; Shi, T F; Wu, L; Li, S X; Teng, D Y; Ye, C H

    2014-01-16

    Silicon nanoarray hybrid solar cells benefit from the ease of fabrication and the cost-effectiveness of the hybrid structure, and represent a new research focus towards the utilization of solar energy. However, hybrid solar cells composed of both inorganic and organic components suffer from the notorious stability issue, which has to be tackled before the hybrid solar cells could become a viable alternative for harvesting solar energy. Here we show that Si nanoarray/PEDOT:PSS hybrid solar cells with improved stability can be fabricated via eliminating the water inclusion in the initial formation of the heterojunction between Si nanoarray and PEDOT:PSS. The Si nanoarray hybrid solar cells are stable against rapid degradation in the atmosphere environment for several months without encapsulation. This finding paves the way towards the real-world applications of Si nanoarray hybrid solar cells.

  12. Towards stable silicon nanoarray hybrid solar cells

    PubMed Central

    He, W. W.; Wu, K. J.; Wang, K.; Shi, T. F.; Wu, L.; Li, S. X.; Teng, D. Y.; Ye, C. H.

    2014-01-01

    Silicon nanoarray hybrid solar cells benefit from the ease of fabrication and the cost-effectiveness of the hybrid structure, and represent a new research focus towards the utilization of solar energy. However, hybrid solar cells composed of both inorganic and organic components suffer from the notorious stability issue, which has to be tackled before the hybrid solar cells could become a viable alternative for harvesting solar energy. Here we show that Si nanoarray/PEDOT:PSS hybrid solar cells with improved stability can be fabricated via eliminating the water inclusion in the initial formation of the heterojunction between Si nanoarray and PEDOT:PSS. The Si nanoarray hybrid solar cells are stable against rapid degradation in the atmosphere environment for several months without encapsulation. This finding paves the way towards the real-world applications of Si nanoarray hybrid solar cells. PMID:24430057

  13. GaAs Solar Cell Radiation Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.

    1996-01-01

    The handbook discusses the history of GaAs solar cell development, presents equations useful for working with GaAs solar cells, describes commonly used instrumentation techniques for assessing radiation effects in solar cells and fundamental processes occurring in solar cells exposed to ionizing radiation, and explains why radiation decreases the electrical performance of solar cells. Three basic elements required to perform solar array degradation calculations: degradation data for GaAs solar cells after irradiation with 1 MeV electrons at normal incidence; relative damage coefficients for omnidirectional electron and proton exposure; and the definition of the space radiation environment for the orbit of interest, are developed and used to perform a solar array degradation calculation.

  14. Mixed ternary heterojunction solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Wen S.; Stewart, John M.

    1992-08-25

    A thin film heterojunction solar cell and a method of making it has a p-type layer of mixed ternary I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor material in contact with an n-type layer of mixed binary II-VI semiconductor material. The p-type semiconductor material includes a low resistivity copper-rich region adjacent the back metal contact of the cell and a composition gradient providing a minority carrier mirror that improves the photovoltaic performance of the cell. The p-type semiconductor material preferably is CuInGaSe.sub.2 or CuIn(SSe).sub.2.

  15. Hybrid emitter all back contact solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Loscutoff, Paul; Rim, Seung

    2016-04-12

    An all back contact solar cell has a hybrid emitter design. The solar cell has a thin dielectric layer formed on a backside surface of a single crystalline silicon substrate. One emitter of the solar cell is made of doped polycrystalline silicon that is formed on the thin dielectric layer. The other emitter of the solar cell is formed in the single crystalline silicon substrate and is made of doped single crystalline silicon. The solar cell includes contact holes that allow metal contacts to connect to corresponding emitters.

  16. Compensated amorphous silicon solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Devaud, Genevieve

    1983-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell including an electrically conductive substrate, a layer of glow discharge deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon over said substrate and having regions of differing conductivity with at least one region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The layer of hydrogenated amorphous silicon has opposed first and second major surfaces where the first major surface contacts the electrically conductive substrate and an electrode for electrically contacting the second major surface. The intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon region is deposited in a glow discharge with an atmosphere which includes not less than about 0.02 atom percent mono-atomic boron. An improved N.I.P. solar cell is disclosed using a BF.sub.3 doped intrinsic layer.

  17. Solar Cells for Lunar Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freundlich, Alex; Ignatiev, Alex

    1997-01-01

    In this work a preliminary study of the vacuum evaporation of silicon extracted from the lunar regolith has been undertaken. An electron gun vacuum evaporation system has been adapted for this purpose. Following the calibration of the system using ultra high purity silicon deposited on Al coated glass substrates, thin films of lunar Si were evaporated on a variety of crystalline substrates as well as on glass and lightweight 1 mil (25 microns) Al foil. Extremely smooth and featureless films with essentially semiconducting properties were obtained. Optical absorption analysis sets the bandgap (about 1.1 eV) and the refractive index (n=3.5) of the deposited thin films close to that of crystalline silicon. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis indicated that these films are essentially comparable to high purity silicon and that the evaporation process resulted in a substantial reduction of impurity levels. All layers exhibited a p-type conductivity suggesting the presence of a p-type dopant in the fabricated layers. While the purity of the 'lunar waste material' is below that of the 'microelectronic-grade silicon', the vacuum evaporated material properties seems to be adequate for the fabrication of average performance Si-based devices such as thin film solar cells. Taking into account solar cell thickness requirements (greater than 10 microns) and the small quantities of lunar material available for this study, solar cell fabrication was not possible. However, the high quality of the optical and electronic properties of evaporated thin films was found to be similar to those obtained using ultra-high purity silicon suggest that thin film solar cell production on the lunar surface with in situ resource utilization may be a viable approach for electric power generation on the moon.

  18. Silicon Carbide Solar Cells Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.

    2001-01-01

    The semiconductor silicon carbide (SiC) has long been known for its outstanding resistance to harsh environments (e.g., thermal stability, radiation resistance, and dielectric strength). However, the ability to produce device-quality material is severely limited by the inherent crystalline defects associated with this material and their associated electronic effects. Much progress has been made recently in the understanding and control of these defects and in the improved processing of this material. Because of this work, it may be possible to produce SiC-based solar cells for environments with high temperatures, light intensities, and radiation, such as those experienced by solar probes. Electronics and sensors based on SiC can operate in hostile environments where conventional silicon-based electronics (limited to 350 C) cannot function. Development of this material will enable large performance enhancements and size reductions for a wide variety of systems--such as high-frequency devices, high-power devices, microwave switching devices, and high-temperature electronics. These applications would supply more energy-efficient public electric power distribution and electric vehicles, more powerful microwave electronics for radar and communications, and better sensors and controls for cleaner-burning, more fuel-efficient jet aircraft and automobile engines. The 6H-SiC polytype is a promising wide-bandgap (Eg = 3.0 eV) semiconductor for photovoltaic applications in harsh solar environments that involve high-temperature and high-radiation conditions. The advantages of this material for this application lie in its extremely large breakdown field strength, high thermal conductivity, good electron saturation drift velocity, and stable electrical performance at temperatures as high as 600 C. This behavior makes it an attractive photovoltaic solar cell material for devices that can operate within three solar radii of the Sun.

  19. Silicon solar cell fabrication technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stafsudd, O. M.

    1979-01-01

    The laser cell scanner was used to characterize a number of solar cells made in various materials. An electron beam-induced current (EBIC) study was performed using a stereoscan scanning electron microscope. Planar p-n junctions were analyzed. A theory for the EBIC based on the analytical solution of the ambipolar diffusion equation under the influence of electron beam excitation parameter z (which is related to beam penetration), the junction depth Z sub j, the beam current and the surface recombination, was formulated and tested. The effect of a grain boundary was studied.

  20. Three-junction solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Ludowise, Michael J.

    1986-01-01

    A photovoltaic solar cell is formed in a monolithic semiconductor. The cell contains three junctions. In sequence from the light-entering face, the junctions have a high, a medium, and a low energy gap. The lower junctions are connected in series by one or more metallic members connecting the top of the lower junction through apertures to the bottom of the middle junction. The upper junction is connected in voltage opposition to the lower and middle junctions by second metallic electrodes deposited in holes 60 through the upper junction. The second electrodes are connected to an external terminal.

  1. Recent Advances in Solar Cell Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Bailey, Sheila G.; Piszczor, Michael F., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The advances in solar cell efficiency, radiation tolerance, and cost over the last decade are reviewed. Potential performance of thin-film solar cells in space are discussed, and the cost and the historical trends in production capability of the photovoltaics industry are considered with respect to the requirements of space power systems. Concentrator cells with conversion efficiency over 30%, and nonconcentrating solar cells with efficiency over 25% are now available, and advanced radiation-tolerant cells and lightweight, thin-film arrays are both being developed. Nonsolar applications of solar cells, including thermophotovoltaics, alpha- and betavoltaics, and laser power receivers, are also discussed.

  2. Solar cell contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, D. L.; Campbell, R. B.; Davis, J. R., Jr.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Sienkiewicz, L. J.

    1982-01-01

    Two experimental contact systems were examined and compared to a baseline contact system consisting of evaporated layers of titanium, palladium, and silver and an electroplated layer of copper. The first experimental contact system consisted of evaporated layers of titanium, nickel, and copper and an electroplated layer of copper. This system performed as well as the baseline system in all respects, including its response to temperature stress tests, to a humidity test, and to an accelerated aging test. In addition, the cost of this system is estimated to be only 43 percent of the cost of the baseline system at a production level of 25 MW/year. The second experimental contact system consisted of evaporated layers of nickel and copper and an electroplated layer of copper. Cells with this system show serious degradation in a temperature stress test at 350 C for 30 minutes. Auger electron spectroscopy was used to show that the evaporated nickel layer is not an adequate barrier to copper diffusion even at temperatures as low as 250 C. This fact brings into question the long-term reliability of this contact system.

  3. Spectral sensitization of nanocrystalline solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Spitler, Mark T.; Ehret, Anne; Stuhl, Louis S.

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to dye sensitized polycrystalline photoelectrochemical solar cells for use in energy transduction from light to electricity. It concerns the utility of highly absorbing organic chromophores as sensitizers in such cells and the degree to which they may be utilized alone and in combination to produce an efficient photoelectrochemical cell, e.g., a regenerative solar cell.

  4. Work Station For Inverting Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feder, H.; Frasch, W.

    1982-01-01

    Final work station along walking-beam conveyor of solar-array assembly line turns each pretabbed solar cell over, depositing it back-side-up onto landing pad, which centers cell without engaging collector surface. Solar cell arrives at inverting work station collector-side-up with two interconnect tabs attached to collector side. Cells are inverted so that second soldering operation takes place in plain view of operator. Inversion protects collector from damage when handled at later stages of assembly.

  5. Extended Temperature Solar Cell Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Jenkins, Phillip; Scheiman, David; Rafaelle, Ryne

    2004-01-01

    Future NASA missions will require solar cells to operate both in regimes closer to the sun, and farther from the sun, where the operating temperatures will be higher and lower than standard operational conditions. NASA Glenn is engaged in testing solar cells under extended temperature ranges, developing theoretical models of cell operation as a function of temperature, and in developing technology for improving the performance of solar cells for both high and low temperature operation.

  6. Hybrid Perovskites: Prospects for Concentrator Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qianqian; Wang, Zhiping; Snaith, Henry J; Johnston, Michael B; Herz, Laura M

    2018-04-01

    Perovskite solar cells have shown a meteoric rise of power conversion efficiency and a steady pace of improvements in their stability of operation. Such rapid progress has triggered research into approaches that can boost efficiencies beyond the Shockley-Queisser limit stipulated for a single-junction cell under normal solar illumination conditions. The tandem solar cell architecture is one concept here that has recently been successfully implemented. However, the approach of solar concentration has not been sufficiently explored so far for perovskite photovoltaics, despite its frequent use in the area of inorganic semiconductor solar cells. Here, the prospects of hybrid perovskites are assessed for use in concentrator solar cells. Solar cell performance parameters are theoretically predicted as a function of solar concentration levels, based on representative assumptions of charge-carrier recombination and extraction rates in the device. It is demonstrated that perovskite solar cells can fundamentally exhibit appreciably higher energy-conversion efficiencies under solar concentration, where they are able to exceed the Shockley-Queisser limit and exhibit strongly elevated open-circuit voltages. It is therefore concluded that sufficient material and device stability under increased illumination levels will be the only significant challenge to perovskite concentrator solar cell applications.

  7. Hybrid Perovskites: Prospects for Concentrator Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qianqian; Wang, Zhiping; Snaith, Henry J.; Johnston, Michael B.

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Perovskite solar cells have shown a meteoric rise of power conversion efficiency and a steady pace of improvements in their stability of operation. Such rapid progress has triggered research into approaches that can boost efficiencies beyond the Shockley–Queisser limit stipulated for a single‐junction cell under normal solar illumination conditions. The tandem solar cell architecture is one concept here that has recently been successfully implemented. However, the approach of solar concentration has not been sufficiently explored so far for perovskite photovoltaics, despite its frequent use in the area of inorganic semiconductor solar cells. Here, the prospects of hybrid perovskites are assessed for use in concentrator solar cells. Solar cell performance parameters are theoretically predicted as a function of solar concentration levels, based on representative assumptions of charge‐carrier recombination and extraction rates in the device. It is demonstrated that perovskite solar cells can fundamentally exhibit appreciably higher energy‐conversion efficiencies under solar concentration, where they are able to exceed the Shockley–Queisser limit and exhibit strongly elevated open‐circuit voltages. It is therefore concluded that sufficient material and device stability under increased illumination levels will be the only significant challenge to perovskite concentrator solar cell applications. PMID:29721426

  8. Thermochromic halide perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jia; Lai, Minliang; Dou, Letian; Kley, Christopher S; Chen, Hong; Peng, Fei; Sun, Junliang; Lu, Dylan; Hawks, Steven A; Xie, Chenlu; Cui, Fan; Alivisatos, A Paul; Limmer, David T; Yang, Peidong

    2018-03-01

    Smart photovoltaic windows represent a promising green technology featuring tunable transparency and electrical power generation under external stimuli to control the light transmission and manage the solar energy. Here, we demonstrate a thermochromic solar cell for smart photovoltaic window applications utilizing the structural phase transitions in inorganic halide perovskite caesium lead iodide/bromide. The solar cells undergo thermally-driven, moisture-mediated reversible transitions between a transparent non-perovskite phase (81.7% visible transparency) with low power output and a deeply coloured perovskite phase (35.4% visible transparency) with high power output. The inorganic perovskites exhibit tunable colours and transparencies, a peak device efficiency above 7%, and a phase transition temperature as low as 105 °C. We demonstrate excellent device stability over repeated phase transition cycles without colour fade or performance degradation. The photovoltaic windows showing both photoactivity and thermochromic features represent key stepping-stones for integration with buildings, automobiles, information displays, and potentially many other technologies.

  9. Thermochromic halide perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jia; Lai, Minliang; Dou, Letian; Kley, Christopher S.; Chen, Hong; Peng, Fei; Sun, Junliang; Lu, Dylan; Hawks, Steven A.; Xie, Chenlu; Cui, Fan; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Limmer, David T.; Yang, Peidong

    2018-03-01

    Smart photovoltaic windows represent a promising green technology featuring tunable transparency and electrical power generation under external stimuli to control the light transmission and manage the solar energy. Here, we demonstrate a thermochromic solar cell for smart photovoltaic window applications utilizing the structural phase transitions in inorganic halide perovskite caesium lead iodide/bromide. The solar cells undergo thermally-driven, moisture-mediated reversible transitions between a transparent non-perovskite phase (81.7% visible transparency) with low power output and a deeply coloured perovskite phase (35.4% visible transparency) with high power output. The inorganic perovskites exhibit tunable colours and transparencies, a peak device efficiency above 7%, and a phase transition temperature as low as 105 °C. We demonstrate excellent device stability over repeated phase transition cycles without colour fade or performance degradation. The photovoltaic windows showing both photoactivity and thermochromic features represent key stepping-stones for integration with buildings, automobiles, information displays, and potentially many other technologies.

  10. Supramolecular photochemistry and solar cells

    PubMed

    Iha

    2000-01-01

    Supramolecular photochemistry as well as solar cells are fascinating topics of current interest in Inorganic Photochemistry and very active research fields which have attracted wide attention in last two decades. A brief outline of the investigations in these fields carried out in our Laboratory of Inorganic Photochemistry and Energy Conversion is given here with no attempt of an exhaustive coverage of the literature. The emphasis is placed on recent work and information on the above mentioned subjects. Three types of supramolecular systems have been the focus of this work: (i) cage-type coordination compounds; (ii) second-sphere coordination compounds, exemplified by ion-pair photochemistry of cobalt complexes and (iii) covalently-linked systems. In the latter, modulation of the photoluminescence and photochemistry of some rhenium complexes are discussed. Solar energy conversion and development of thin-layer photoelectrochemical solar cells based on sensitization of nanocrystalline semiconductor films by some ruthenium polypyridyl complexes are presented as an important application that resulted from specifically engineered artificial assemblies.

  11. Status of multijunction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Y. C. M.; Chu, C. L.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes Applied Solar's present activity on Multijunction (MJ) space cells. We have worked on a variety of MJ cells, both monolithic and mechanically stacked. In recent years, most effort has been directed to GaInP2/GaAs monolithic cells, grown on Ge substrates, and the status of this cell design will be reviewed here. MJ cells are in demand to provide satellite power because of the acceptance of the overwhelming importance of high efficiency to reduce the area, weight and cost of space PV power systems. The need for high efficiencies has already accelerated the production of GaAs/Ge cells, with efficiencies 18.5-19%. When users realized that MJ cells could provide higher efficiencies (from 22% to 26%) with only fractional increase in costs, the demand for production MJ cells increased rapidly. The main purpose of the work described is to transfer the MOCVD growth technology of MJ high efficiency cells to a production environment, providing all the space requirements of users.

  12. Energy Conversion: Nano Solar Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahaya, Muhammad; Yap, Chi Chin; Mat Salleh, Muhamad

    2009-09-01

    Problems of fossil-fuel-induced climate change have sparked a demand for sustainable energy supply for all sectors of economy. Most laboratories continue to search for new materials and new technique to generate clean energy at affordable cost. Nanotechnology can play a major role in solving the energy problem. The prospect for solar energy using Si-based technology is not encouraging. Si photovoltaics can produce electricity at 20-30 c//kWhr with about 25% efficiency. Nanoparticles have a strong capacity to absorb light and generate more electrons for current as discovered in the recent work of organic and dye-sensitized cell. Using cheap preparation technique such as screen-printing and self-assembly growth, organic cells shows a strong potential for commercialization. Thin Films research group at National University Malaysia has been actively involved in these areas, and in this seminar, we will present a review works on nanomaterials for solar cells and particularly on hybrid organic solar cell based on ZnO nanorod arrays. The organic layer consisting of poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1, 4-phenylenevinylene] (MEHPPV) and [6, 6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid 3-ethylthiophene ester (PCBE) was spin-coated on ZnO nanorod arrays. ZnO nanorod arrays were grown on FTO glass substrates which were pre-coated with ZnO nanoparticles using a low temperature chemical solution method. A gold electrode was used as the top contact. The device gave a short circuit current density of 2.49×10-4 mA/cm2 and an open circuit voltage of 0.45 V under illumination of a projector halogen light at 100 mW/cm2.

  13. Silicon solar cells as a high-solar-intensity radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spisz, E. W.; Robson, R. R.

    1971-01-01

    The characteristics of a conventional, 1- by 2-cm, N/P, gridded silicon solar cell when used as a radiometer have been determined for solar intensity levels to 2800 mW/sq cm (20 solar constants). The short-circuit current was proportional to the radiant intensity for levels only to 700 mW/sq cm (5 solar constants). For intensity levels greater than 700 mW/sq cm, it was necessary to operate the cell in a photoconductive mode in order to obtain a linear relation between the measured current and the radiant intensity. When the solar cell was biased with a reverse voltage of -1 V, the measured current and radiant intensity were linearly related over the complete intensity range from 100 to 2800 mW/sq cm.

  14. Eutectic Contact Inks for Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, B.

    1985-01-01

    Low-resistance electrical contacts formed on solar cells by melting powders of eutectic composition of semiconductor and dopant. Process improves cell performance without subjecting cell to processing temperatures high enough to degrade other characteristics.

  15. Quantum Dots for Solar Cell Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poudyal, Uma

    Solar energy has been anticipated as the most important and reliable source of renewable energy to address the ever-increasing energy demand. To harvest solar energy efficiently, diverse kinds of solar cells have been studied. Among these, quantum dot sensitized solar cells have been an interesting group of solar cells mainly due to tunable, size-dependent electronic and optical properties of quantum dots. Moreover, doping these quantum dots with transition metal elements such as Mn opens avenue for improved performance of solar cells as well as for spin based technologies. In this dissertation, Mn-doped CdSe QDs (Mn-CdSe) have been synthesized by Successive Ionic Layer Adsorption and Reaction (SILAR) method. They are used in solar cells to study the effect of Mn doping in the performance of solar cells. Incident photon to current-conversion efficiency (IPCE) is used to record the effect of Mn-doping. Intensity modulated photovoltage and photocurrent spectroscopy (IMVS/PS) has been used to study the carrier dynamics in these solar cells. Additionally, the magnetic properties of Mn-CdSe QDs is studied and its possible origin is discussed. Moreover, CdS/CdSe QDs have been used to study the effect of liquid, gel and solid electrolyte in the performance and stability of the solar cells. Using IPCE spectra, the time decay measurements are presented and the possible reactions between the QD and the electrolytes are explained.

  16. Cadmium Telluride Solar Cells | Photovoltaic Research | NREL

    Science.gov Websites

    Cadmium Telluride Solar Cells Cadmium Telluride Solar Cells Photovoltaic (PV) solar cells based on leadership. The United States is the leader in CdTe PV manufacturing, and NREL has been at the forefront of research and development (R&D) in this area. PV Research Other Materials & Devices pages: High

  17. Solar Cell Modules With Improved Backskin

    DOEpatents

    Gonsiorawski, Ronald C.

    2003-12-09

    A laminated solar cell module comprises a front light transmitting support, a plurality of interconnected solar cells encapsulated by a light-transmitting encapsulant material, and an improved backskin formed of an ionomer/nylon alloy. The improved backskin has a toughness and melting point temperature sufficiently great to avoid any likelihood of it being pierced by any of the components that interconnect the solar cells.

  18. New experimental techniques for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenk, R.

    1993-01-01

    Solar cell capacitance has special importance for an array controlled by shunting. Experimental measurements of solar cell capacitance in the past have shown disagreements of orders of magnitude. Correct measurement technique depends on maintaining the excitation voltage less than the thermal voltage. Two different experimental methods are shown to match theory well, and two effective capacitances are defined for quantifying the effect of the solar cell capacitance on the shunting system.

  19. Novel Flexible Plastic-Based Solar Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-19

    Fabrication of newly designed hybrid solar cells that are composed of a electron transport layer ( TiO2 ), a light sensitizing layer (NCs), and a hole...coating and spraying techniques, to produce broad-band light harvesting hybrid solar cells with bulk and layered heterojunction of inorganic...fabrication of hybrid bulk heterojunction photovoltaic cell using a blend film of polymer-inorganic NCs, 2) Fabrication of newly designed hybrid solar

  20. Bypass diode for a solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Rim, Seung Bum [Palo Alto, CA; Kim, Taeseok [San Jose, CA; Smith, David D [Campbell, CA; Cousins, Peter J [Menlo Park, CA

    2012-03-13

    Bypass diodes for solar cells are described. In one embodiment, a bypass diode for a solar cell includes a substrate of the solar cell. A first conductive region is disposed above the substrate, the first conductive region of a first conductivity type. A second conductive region is disposed on the first conductive region, the second conductive region of a second conductivity type opposite the first conductivity type.

  1. Organic Photovoltaic Solar Cells | Photovoltaic Research | NREL

    Science.gov Websites

    Organic Photovoltaic Solar Cells Organic Photovoltaic Solar Cells The National Center for Photovoltaics (NCPV) at NREL has strong complementary research capabilities in organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells pages: High-Efficiency Crystalline PV Polycrystalline Thin-Film PV Perovskite and Organic PV Advanced PV

  2. Solar cell system having alternating current output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. C., Jr. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A monolithic multijunction solar cell was modified by fabricating an integrated circuit inverter on the back of the cell to produce a device capable of generating an alternating current output. In another embodiment, integrated curcuit power conditioning electronics was incorporated in a module containing a solar cell power supply.

  3. Solar cells using quantum funnels.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Illan J; Levina, Larissa; Debnath, Ratan; Zhitomirsky, David; Sargent, Edward H

    2011-09-14

    Colloidal quantum dots offer broad tuning of semiconductor bandstructure via the quantum size effect. Devices involving a sequence of layers comprised of quantum dots selected to have different diameters, and therefore bandgaps, offer the possibility of funneling energy toward an acceptor. Here we report a quantum funnel that efficiently conveys photoelectrons from their point of generation toward an intended electron acceptor. Using this concept we build a solar cell that benefits from enhanced fill factor as a result of this quantum funnel. This concept addresses limitations on transport in soft condensed matter systems and leverages their advantages in large-area optoelectronic devices and systems.

  4. Solar power satellites - Heat engine or solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oman, H.; Gregory, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    A solar power satellite is the energy-converting element of a system that can deliver some 10 GW of power to utilities on the earth's surface. We evaluated heat engines and solar cells for converting sunshine to electric power at the satellite. A potassium Rankine cycle was the best of the heat engines, and 50 microns thick single-crystal silicon cells were the best of the photovoltaic converters. Neither solar cells nor heat engines had a clear advantage when all factors were considered. The potassium-turbine power plant, however, was more difficult to assemble and required a more expensive orbital assembly base. We therefore based our cost analyses on solar-cell energy conversion, concluding that satellite-generated power could be delivered to utilities for around 4 to 5 cents a kWh.

  5. Recent advances of flexible hybrid perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dong Hee; Heo, Jin Hyuck; Im, Sang Hyuk

    2017-11-01

    Recently, hybrid perovskite solar cells have attracted great interest because they can be fabricated to low cost, flexible, and highly efficient solar cells. Here, we introduced recent advances of flexible hybrid perovskite solar cells. We introduced research background of flexible perovskite solar cells in introduction part. Then we composed the main body to i) structure and properties of hybrid perovskite solar cells, ii) why flexible hybrid perovskite solar cells are important?, iii) transparent conducting oxide (TCO) based flexible hybrid perovskite solar cells, and iv) TCO-free transparent conducting electrode (TCE) based flexible hybrid perovskite solar cells. Finally, we summarized research outlook of flexible hybrid perovskite solar cells.

  6. Front contact solar cell with formed emitter

    DOEpatents

    Cousins, Peter John

    2014-11-04

    A bipolar solar cell includes a backside junction formed by an N-type silicon substrate and a P-type polysilicon emitter formed on the backside of the solar cell. An antireflection layer may be formed on a textured front surface of the silicon substrate. A negative polarity metal contact on the front side of the solar cell makes an electrical connection to the substrate, while a positive polarity metal contact on the backside of the solar cell makes an electrical connection to the polysilicon emitter. An external electrical circuit may be connected to the negative and positive metal contacts to be powered by the solar cell. The positive polarity metal contact may form an infrared reflecting layer with an underlying dielectric layer for increased solar radiation collection.

  7. Front contact solar cell with formed emitter

    DOEpatents

    Cousins, Peter John [Menlo Park, CA

    2012-07-17

    A bipolar solar cell includes a backside junction formed by an N-type silicon substrate and a P-type polysilicon emitter formed on the backside of the solar cell. An antireflection layer may be formed on a textured front surface of the silicon substrate. A negative polarity metal contact on the front side of the solar cell makes an electrical connection to the substrate, while a positive polarity metal contact on the backside of the solar cell makes an electrical connection to the polysilicon emitter. An external electrical circuit may be connected to the negative and positive metal contacts to be powered by the solar cell. The positive polarity metal contact may form an infrared reflecting layer with an underlying dielectric layer for increased solar radiation collection.

  8. Method for processing silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Tsuo, Y.S.; Landry, M.D.; Pitts, J.R.

    1997-05-06

    The instant invention teaches a novel method for fabricating silicon solar cells utilizing concentrated solar radiation. The solar radiation is concentrated by use of a solar furnace which is used to form a front surface junction and back-surface field in one processing step. The present invention also provides a method of making multicrystalline silicon from amorphous silicon. The invention also teaches a method of texturing the surface of a wafer by forming a porous silicon layer on the surface of a silicon substrate and a method of gettering impurities. Also contemplated by the invention are methods of surface passivation, forming novel solar cell structures, and hydrogen passivation. 2 figs.

  9. Method for processing silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Tsuo, Y. Simon; Landry, Marc D.; Pitts, John R.

    1997-01-01

    The instant invention teaches a novel method for fabricating silicon solar cells utilizing concentrated solar radiation. The solar radiation is concentrated by use of a solar furnace which is used to form a front surface junction and back-surface field in one processing step. The present invention also provides a method of making multicrystallline silicon from amorphous silicon. The invention also teaches a method of texturing the surface of a wafer by forming a porous silicon layer on the surface of a silicon substrate and a method of gettering impurities. Also contemplated by the invention are methods of surface passivation, forming novel solar cell structures, and hydrogen passivation.

  10. NREL Scientists Report First Solar Cell Producing More Electrons In

    Science.gov Websites

    Photocurrent Than Solar Photons Entering Cell | News | NREL NREL Scientists Report First Solar Cell Producing More Electrons In Photocurrent Than Solar Photons Entering Cell News Release: NREL Scientists Report First Solar Cell Producing More Electrons In Photocurrent Than Solar Photons Entering Cell

  11. Organic solar cells and physics education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csernovszky, Zoltán; Horváth, Ákos

    2018-07-01

    This paper explains the operational principles of a home-made organic solar cell with the representation of an electron-cycle on an energy-level diagram. We present test data for a home-made organic solar cell which operates as a galvanic cell and current source in an electrical circuit. To determine the maximum power of the cell, the optimal current was estimated with a linear approximation. Using different light sources and dyes, the electrical properties of organic solar cells were compared. The solar cells were studied by looking at spectrophotometric data from different sensitizer dyes, generated by a do-it-yourself diffraction grating spectroscope. The sensitizer dyes of solar cells were tested by the diffraction grating spectroscope. The data were analysed on a light-intensity‑wavelength diagram to discover which photons were absorbed and to understand the colours of the fruits containing these dyes. In terms of theoretical applications, the paper underlines the analogous nature of organic solar cells, a conventional single p‑n junction solar cell and the light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis, using energy-level diagrams of electron-cycles. To conclude, a classification of photon‑electron interactions in molecular systems and crystal lattices is offered, to show the importance of organic solar cells.

  12. Current and lattice matched tandem solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.

    1987-01-01

    A multijunction (cascade) tandem photovoltaic solar cell device is fabricated of a Ga.sub.x In.sub.1-x P (0.505.ltoreq.X.ltoreq.0.515) top cell semiconductor lattice matched to a GaAs bottom cell semiconductor at a low-resistance heterojunction, preferably a p+/n+ heterojunction between the cells. The top and bottom cells are both lattice matched and current matched for high efficiency solar radiation conversion to electrical energy.

  13. Plasmon Enhanced Hetero-Junction Solar Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Gen; Ching, Levine; Sadoqi, Mostafa; Xu, Huizhong

    2015-03-01

    Here we report a systematic study of plasmon-enhanced hetero-junction solar cells made of colloidal quantum dots (PbS) and nanowires (ZnO), with/without metal nanoparticles (Au). The structure of solar cell devices was characterized by AFM, SEM and profilometer, etc. The power conversion efficiencies of solar cell devices were characterized by solar simulator (OAI TriSOL, AM1.5G Class AAA). The enhancement in the photocurrent due to introduction of metal nanoparticles was obvious. We believe this is due to the plasmonic effect from the metal nanoparticles. The correlation between surface roughness, film uniformity and device performance was also studied.

  14. Perovskite Solar Cells with Large-Area CVD-Graphene for Tandem Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Lang, Felix; Gluba, Marc A; Albrecht, Steve; Rappich, Jörg; Korte, Lars; Rech, Bernd; Nickel, Norbert H

    2015-07-16

    Perovskite solar cells with transparent contacts may be used to compensate for thermalization losses of silicon solar cells in tandem devices. This offers a way to outreach stagnating efficiencies. However, perovskite top cells in tandem structures require contact layers with high electrical conductivity and optimal transparency. We address this challenge by implementing large-area graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition as a highly transparent electrode in perovskite solar cells, leading to identical charge collection efficiencies. Electrical performance of solar cells with a graphene-based contact reached those of solar cells with standard gold contacts. The optical transmission by far exceeds that of reference devices and amounts to 64.3% below the perovskite band gap. Finally, we demonstrate a four-terminal tandem device combining a high band gap graphene-contacted perovskite top solar cell (Eg = 1.6 eV) with an amorphous/crystalline silicon bottom solar cell (Eg = 1.12 eV).

  15. Amorphous silicon solar cell allowing infrared transmission

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.

    1979-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell with a layer of high index of refraction material or a series of layers having high and low indices of refraction material deposited upon a transparent substrate to reflect light of energies greater than the bandgap energy of the amorphous silicon back into the solar cell and transmit solar radiation having an energy less than the bandgap energy of the amorphous silicon.

  16. Solar cells and methods of fabrication thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Shumate, Seth Daniel; Hutchings, Douglas Arthur; Mohammed, Hafeezuddin

    A passivation layer is deposited on a first portion of a region of the solar cell. A grid line is deposited on a second portion of the region. The passivation layer is annealed to drive chemical species from the passivation layer to deactivate an electrical activity of a dopant in the first portion of the region of the solar cell.

  17. Hybrid Tandem Solar Cells | Photovoltaic Research | NREL

    Science.gov Websites

    Hybrid Tandem Solar Cells Hybrid Tandem Solar Cells To achieve aggressive cost reductions in photovoltaics (PV) beyond the 6¢/kWh SunShot Initiative 2020 goal, module efficiency must be increased beyond on a silicon platform and that aim to provide viable prototypes for commercialization. PV Research

  18. Introduction to basic solar cell measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The basic approaches to solar cell performance and diagnostic measurements are described. The light sources, equipment for I-V curve measurement, and the test conditions and procedures for performance measurement are detailed. Solar cell diagnostic tools discussed include analysis of I-V curves, series resistance and reverse saturation current determination, spectral response/quantum yield measurement, and diffusion length/lifetime determination.

  19. Fullerene surfactants and their use in polymer solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Jen, Kwan-Yue; Yip, Hin-Lap; Li, Chang-Zhi

    2015-12-15

    Fullerene surfactant compounds useful as interfacial layer in polymer solar cells to enhance solar cell efficiency. Polymer solar cell including a fullerene surfactant-containing interfacial layer intermediate cathode and active layer.

  20. A simplified solar cell array modelling program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    As part of the energy conversion/self sufficiency efforts of DSN engineering, it was necessary to have a simplified computer model of a solar photovoltaic (PV) system. This article describes the analysis and simplifications employed in the development of a PV cell array computer model. The analysis of the incident solar radiation, steady state cell temperature and the current-voltage characteristics of a cell array are discussed. A sample cell array was modelled and the results are presented.

  1. High Radiation Resistance IMM Solar Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, Noren

    2015-01-01

    Due to high launch costs, weight reduction is a key driver for the development of new solar cell technologies suitable for space applications. This project is developing a unique triple-junction inverted metamorphic multijunction (IMM) technology that enables the manufacture of very lightweight, low-cost InGaAsP-based multijunction solar cells. This IMM technology consists of indium (In) and phosphorous (P) solar cell active materials, which are designed to improve the radiation-resistant properties of the triple-junction solar cell while maintaining high efficiency. The intrinsic radiation hardness of InP materials makes them of great interest for building solar cells suitable for deployment in harsh radiation environments, such as medium Earth orbit and missions to the outer planets. NASA Glenn's recently developed epitaxial lift-off (ELO) process also will be applied to this new structure, which will enable the fabrication of the IMM structure without the substrate.

  2. Bonder for Solar-Cell Strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garwood, G.; Frasch, W.

    1982-01-01

    String bonder for solar-cell arrays eliminates tedious manual assembly procedure that could damage cell face. Vacuum arm picks up face-down cell from cell-inverting work station and transfers it to string conveyor without changing cell orientation. Arm is activated by signal from microprocessor.

  3. Coating Processes Boost Performance of Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    NASA currently has spacecraft orbiting Mercury (MESSENGER), imaging the asteroid Vesta (Dawn), roaming the red plains of Mars (the Opportunity rover), and providing a laboratory for humans to advance scientific research in space (the International Space Station, or ISS). The heart of the technology that powers those missions and many others can be held in the palm of your hand - the solar cell. Solar, or photovoltaic (PV), cells are what make up the panels and arrays that draw on the Sun s light to generate electricity for everything from the Hubble Space Telescope s imaging equipment to the life support systems for the ISS. To enable NASA spacecraft to utilize the Sun s energy for exploring destinations as distant as Jupiter, the Agency has invested significant research into improving solar cell design and efficiency. Glenn Research Center has been a national leader in advancing PV technology. The Center s Photovoltaic and Power Technologies Branch has conducted numerous experiments aimed at developing lighter, more efficient solar cells that are less expensive to manufacture. Initiatives like the Forward Technology Solar Cell Experiments I and II in which PV cells developed by NASA and private industry were mounted outside the ISS have tested how various solar technologies perform in the harsh conditions of space. While NASA seeks to improve solar cells for space applications, the results are returning to Earth to benefit the solar energy industry.

  4. Solar cells for terrestrial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernow, F.

    1975-01-01

    The power efficiency curves of photovoltaic solar cells were investigated as a function of the forbidden energy gap (E sub g) and the current-voltage characteristic of the diode. Minority carrier injection, depletion layer recombination, and interface recombination terms were considered in models for the I-V characteristic. The collection efficiency for photons with energy between (E sub g) and an upper energy cutoff (E sub w) was assumed to be 100% and zero otherwise. Results are presented in terms of a single parameter related to the ratio of depletion layer width and minority carrier diffusion length. It was found that increasing depletion layer recombination shifts the efficiency curves to larger values of the energy without changing the shape of the efficiency curve appreciably. It is believed that similar results would be obtained whenever the quality factors in the exponential energy gap and forward bias terms are equal.

  5. High-Temperature Solar Cell Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Merritt, Danielle

    2004-01-01

    The vast majority of satellites and near-earth probes developed to date have relied upon photovoltaic power generation. If future missions to probe environments close to the sun will be able to use photovoltaic power, solar cells that can function at high temperatures, under high light intensity, and high radiation conditions must be developed. For example, the equilibrium temperature of a Mercury surface station will be about 450 C, and the temperature of solar arrays on the proposed "Solar Probe" mission will extend to temperatures as high as 2000 C (although it is likely that the craft will operate on stored power rather than solar energy during the closest approach to the sun). Advanced thermal design principles, such as replacing some of the solar array area with reflectors, off-pointing, and designing the cells to reflect rather than absorb light out of the band of peak response, can reduce these operating temperature somewhat. Nevertheless, it is desirable to develop approaches to high-temperature solar cell design that can operate under temperature extremes far greater than today's cells. Solar cells made from wide bandgap (WBG) compound semiconductors are an obvious choice for such an application. In order to aid in the experimental development of such solar cells, we have initiated a program studying the theoretical and experimental photovoltaic performance of wide bandgap materials. In particular, we have been investigating the use of GaP, SiC, and GaN materials for space solar cells. We will present theoretical results on the limitations on current cell technologies and the photovoltaic performance of these wide-bandgap solar cells in a variety of space conditions. We will also give an overview of some of NASA's cell developmental efforts in this area and discuss possible future mission applications.

  6. Vapor Grown Perovskite Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdussamad Abbas, Hisham

    Perovskite solar cells has been the fastest growing solar cell material till date with verified efficiencies of over 22%. Most groups in the world focuses their research on solution based devices that has residual solvent in the material bulk. This work focuses extensively on the fabrication and properties of vapor based perovskite devices that is devoid of solvents. The initial part of my work focuses on the detailed fabrication of high efficiency consistent sequential vapor NIP devices made using P3HT as P-type Type II heterojunction. The sequential vapor devices experiences device anomalies like voltage evolution and IV hysteresis owing to charge trapping in TiO2. Hence, sequential PIN devices were fabricated using doped Type-II heterojunctions that had no device anomalies. The sequential PIN devices has processing restriction, as organic Type-II heterojunction materials cannot withstand high processing temperature, hence limiting device efficiency. Thereby bringing the need of co-evaporation for fabricating high efficiency consistent PIN devices, the approach has no-restriction on substrates and offers stoichiometric control. A comprehensive description of the fabrication, Co-evaporator setup and how to build it is described. The results of Co-evaporated devices clearly show that grain size, stoichiometry and doped transport layers are all critical for eliminating device anomalies and in fabricating high efficiency devices. Finally, Formamidinium based perovskite were fabricated using sequential approach. A thermal degradation study was conducted on Methyl Ammonium Vs. Formamidinium based perovskite films, Formamidinium based perovskites were found to be more stable. Lastly, inorganic films such as CdS and Nickel oxide were developed in this work.

  7. Planar multijunction high voltage solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. C., Jr.; Chai, A. T.; Goradia, C.

    1980-01-01

    Technical considerations, preliminary results, and fabrication details are discussed for a family of high-voltage planar multi-junction (PMJ) solar cells which combine the attractive features of planar cells with conventional or interdigitated back contacts and the vertical multijunction (VMJ) solar cell. The PMJ solar cell is internally divided into many voltage-generating regions, called unit cells, which are internally connected in series. The key to obtaining reasonable performance from this device was the separation of top surface field regions over each active unit cell. Using existing solar cell fabricating methods, output voltages in excess of 20 volts per linear centimeter are possible. Analysis of the new device is complex, and numerous geometries are being studied which should provide substantial benefits in both normal sunlight usage as well as with concentrators.

  8. Tandem photovoltaic solar cells and increased solar energy conversion efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loferski, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    Tandem photovoltaic cells, as proposed by Jackson (1955) to increase the efficiency of solar energy conversion, involve the construction of a system of stacked p/n homojunction photovoltaic cells composed of different semiconductors. It had been pointed out by critics, however, that the total power which could be extracted from the cells in the stack placed side by side was substantially greater than the power obtained from the stacked cells. A reexamination of the tandem cell concept in view of the development of the past few years is conducted. It is concluded that the use of tandem cell systems in flat plate collectors, as originally envisioned by Jackson, may yet become feasible as a result of the development of economically acceptable solar cells for large scale terrestrial power generation.

  9. Solar Cell Panel and the Method for Manufacturing the Same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarver, Charles F. (Inventor); Richards, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Naidenkova, Maria (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    According to an aspect of an embodiment of the present disclosure, there is provided a solar cell panel and a method for manufacturing the same. The solar cell panel comprises: a solar cell for generating electric power from sunlight; a coverglass for covering the solar cell; transparent shims, which are disposed between the solar cell and the coverglass at the points where the distance between the solar cell and the coverglass needs to be controlled, and form a space between the solar cell and the coverglass; and adhesive layer, which fills the space between the solar cell and the coverglass and has the thickness the same as that of the transparent shims.

  10. Semiconductor quantum dot-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jianjun; Cao, Guozhong

    2013-10-31

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have been drawing great attention recently as a material for solar energy conversion due to their versatile optical and electrical properties. The QD-sensitized solar cell (QDSC) is one of the burgeoning semiconductor QD solar cells that shows promising developments for the next generation of solar cells. This article focuses on recent developments in QDSCs, including 1) the effect of quantum confinement on QDSCs, 2) the multiple exciton generation (MEG) of QDs, 3) fabrication methods of QDs, and 4) nanocrystalline photoelectrodes for solar cells. We also make suggestions for future research on QDSCs. Although the efficiency of QDSCs is still low, we think there will be major breakthroughs in developing QDSCs in the future.

  11. Modeling the Effects of Solar Cell Distribution on Optical Cross Section for Solar Panel Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    cell material. The solar panel was created as a CAD model and simulated with the imaging facility parameters with TASAT. TASAT uses a BRDF to apply...1 MODELING THE EFFECTS OF SOLAR CELL DISTRIBUTION ON OPTICAL CROSS SECTION FOR SOLAR PANEL SIMULATION Kelly Feirstine Meiling Klein... model of a solar panel with various solar cell tip and tilt distribution statistics. Modeling a solar panel as a single sheet of “solar cell” material

  12. Comprehensive silicon solar-cell computer modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamorte, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive silicon solar cell computer modeling scheme was developed to perform the following tasks: (1) model and analysis of the net charge distribution in quasineutral regions; (2) experimentally determined temperature behavior of Spire Corp. n+pp+ solar cells where n+-emitter is formed by ion implantation of 75As or 31P; and (3) initial validation results of computer simulation program using Spire Corp. n+pp+ cells.

  13. NREL Scientists Demonstrate Remarkable Stability in Perovskite Solar Cells

    Science.gov Websites

    environmentally stable, high-efficiency perovskite solar cell, bringing the emerging technology a step closer to needed to make the devices durable enough for long-term use. NREL's unencapsulated solar cell-a cell used Unencapsulated Perovskite Solar Cells for >1000 Hours of Operational Stability." "A solar cell in

  14. Characterising dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, Laura L.; O'Reilly, Thomas; Zerulla, Dominic; Sheridan, John T.

    2009-08-01

    With growing energy and environmental concerns due to fossil fuel depletion and global warming there is an increasing attention being attracted by alternative and/or renewable sources of power such as biomass, hydropower, geothermal, wind and solar energy. In today's society there is a vast and in many cases not fully appreciated dependence on electrical power for everyday life and therefore devices such as PV cells are of enormous importance. The more widely used and commercially available silicon (semiconductor) based cells currently have the greatest efficiencies, however the manufacturing of these cells is complex and costly due to the cost and difficulty of producing and processing pure silicon. One new direction being explored is the development of dye-sensitised solar cells (DSSC). The SFI Strategic Research Centre for Solar Energy Conversion is a new research cluster based in Ireland, formed with the express intention of bringing together industry and academia to produce renewable energy solutions. Our specific area of research is in biomimetic dye sensitised solar cells and their electrical properties. We are currently working to develop test equipment, and optoelectronic models describing the performance and behaviors of dye-sensitised solar cells (Grätzel Cells). In this paper we describe some of the background to our work and also some of our initial experimental results. Based on these results we intend to characterise the opto-electrical properties and bulk characteristics of simple dye-sensitised solar cells and then to proceed to test new cell compositions.

  15. Researcher and Mechanic with Solar Collector in Solar Simulator Cell

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1976-08-21

    Researcher Susan Johnson and a mechanic examine a flat-plate solar collector in the Solar Simulator Cell in the High Temperature Composites Laboratory at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center. The Solar Simulator Cell allowed the researchers to control the radiation levels, air temperature, airflow, and fluid flow. The flat-plate collector, seen in a horizontal position here, was directed at the solar simulator, seen above Johnson, during the tests. Lewis researchers were studying the efficiency of various flat- plate solar collector designs in the 1970s for temperature control systems in buildings. The collectors consisted of a cover material, absorber plate, and parallel flow configuration. The collector’s absorber material and coating, covers, honeycomb material, mirrors, vacuum, and tube attachment could all be modified. Johnson’s study analyzed 35 collectors. Johnson, a lifelong pilot, joined NASA Lewis in 1974. The flat-plate solar collectors, seen here, were her first research project. Johnson also investigated advanced heat engines for general aviation and evaluated variable geometry combustors and liners. Johnson earned the Cleveland Technical Society’s Technical Achievement Award in 1984.

  16. Heterojunction solar cell with passivated emitter surface

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1994-05-31

    A high-efficiency heterojunction solar cell is described wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga[sub 0.52]In[sub 0.48]P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. A passivating window layer of defined composition is disposed over the emitter layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the window layer. 1 fig.

  17. Heterojunction solar cell with passivated emitter surface

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    1994-01-01

    A high-efficiency heterojunction solar cell wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga.sub.0.52 In.sub.0.48 P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. A passivating window layer of defined composition is disposed over the emitter layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the window layer.

  18. Bypass diode for a solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Rim, Seung Bum; Kim, Taeseok; Smith, David D; Cousins, Peter J

    2013-11-12

    Methods of fabricating bypass diodes for solar cells are described. In once embodiment, a method includes forming a first conductive region of a first conductivity type above a substrate of a solar cell. A second conductive region of a second conductivity type is formed on the first conductive region. In another embodiment, a method includes forming a first conductive region of a first conductivity type above a substrate of a solar cell. A second conductive region of a second conductivity type is formed within, and surrounded by, an uppermost portion of the first conductive region but is not formed in a lowermost portion of the first conductive region.

  19. Solar cell with silicon oxynitride dielectric layer

    DOEpatents

    Shepherd, Michael; Smith, David D

    2015-04-28

    Solar cells with silicon oxynitride dielectric layers and methods of forming silicon oxynitride dielectric layers for solar cell fabrication are described. For example, an emitter region of a solar cell includes a portion of a substrate having a back surface opposite a light receiving surface. A silicon oxynitride (SiO.sub.xN.sub.y, 0

  20. Metamorphic Epitaxy for Multijunction Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    France, Ryan M.; Dimroth, Frank; Grassman, Tyler J.

    Multijunction solar cells have proven to be capable of extremely high efficiencies by combining multiple semiconductor materials with bandgaps tuned to the solar spectrum. Reaching the optimum set of semiconductors often requires combining high-quality materials with different lattice constants into a single device, a challenge particularly suited for metamorphic epitaxy. In this article, we describe different approaches to metamorphic multijunction solar cells, including traditional upright metamorphic, state-of-the-art inverted metamorphic, and forward-looking multijunction designs on silicon. We also describe the underlying materials science of graded buffers that enables metamorphic subcells with low dislocation densities. Following nearly two decades of research, recentmore » efforts have demonstrated high-quality lattice-mismatched multijunction solar cells with very little performance loss related to the mismatch, enabling solar-to-electric conversion efficiencies over 45%.« less

  1. Coupling of Luminescent Solar Concentrators to Plasmonic Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shu-Yi

    To make inexpensive solar cells is a continuous goal for solar photovoltaic (PV) energy industry. Thin film solar cells of various materials have been developed and continue to emerge in order to replace bulk silicon solar cells. A thin film solar cell not only uses less material but also requires a less expensive refinery process. In addition, other advantages coming along with small thickness are higher open circuit voltage and higher conversion efficiency. However, thin film solar cells, especially those made of silicon, have significant optical losses. In order to address this problem, this thesis investigates the spectral coupling of thin films PV to luminescent solar concentrators (LSC). LSC are passive devices, consisting of plastic sheets embedded with fluorescent dyes which absorb part of the incoming radiation spectrum and emit at specific wavelength. The emitted light is concentrated by total internal reflection to the edge of the sheet, where the PVs are placed. Since the light emitted from the LSC edge is usually in a narrow spectral range, it is possible to employ diverse strategies to enhance PV absorption at the peak of the emission wavelength. Employing plasmonic nanostructures has been shown to enhance absorption of thin films via forward scattering, diffraction and localized surface plasmon. These two strategies are theoretically investigated here for improving the absorption and elevating the output power of a thin film solar cell. First, the idea of spectral coupling of luminescent solar concentrators to plasmonic solar cells is introduced to assess its potential for increasing the power output. This study is carried out employing P3HT/PC60BM organic solar cells and LSC with Lumogen Red dyes. A simplified spectral coupling analysis is employed to predict the power density, considering the output spectrum of the LSC equivalent to the emission spectrum of the dye and neglecting any angular dependence. Plasmonic tuning is conducted to enhance

  2. Solar cell with a gallium nitride electrode

    DOEpatents

    Pankove, Jacques I.

    1979-01-01

    A solar cell which comprises a body of silicon having a P-N junction therein with a transparent conducting N-type gallium nitride layer as an ohmic contact on the N-type side of the semiconductor exposed to solar radiation.

  3. Indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Tom; Ghosh, Amal K.

    1982-12-28

    A high photo-conversion efficiency indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cell is spray deposited from a solution containing indium trichloride. The solar cell exhibits an Air Mass One solar conversion efficiency in excess of about 10%.

  4. Cascade solar cell having conductive interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Borden, Peter G.; Saxena, Ram R.

    1982-10-26

    Direct ohmic contact between the cells in an epitaxially grown cascade solar cell is obtained by means of conductive interconnects formed through grooves etched intermittently in the upper cell. The base of the upper cell is directly connected by the conductive interconnects to the emitter of the bottom cell. The conductive interconnects preferably terminate on a ledge formed in the base of the upper cell.

  5. Solar cell anomaly detection method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Emmett L. (Inventor); Shumka, Alex (Inventor); Gauthier, Michael K. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A method is provided for detecting cracks and other imperfections in a solar cell, which includes scanning a narrow light beam back and forth across the cell in a raster pattern, while monitoring the electrical output of the cell to find locations where the electrical output varies significantly. The electrical output can be monitored on a television type screen containing a raster pattern with each point on the screen corresponding to a point on the solar cell surface, and with the brightness of each point on the screen corresponding to the electrical output from the cell which was produced when the light beam was at the corresponding point on the cell. The technique can be utilized to scan a large array of interconnected solar cells, to determine which ones are defective.

  6. Dye-sensitized solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Skotheim, T.A.

    1980-03-04

    A low-cost dye-sensitized Schottky barrier solar cell is comprised of a substrate of semiconductor with an ohmic contact on one face, a sensitizing dye adsorbed onto the opposite face of the semiconductor, a transparent thin-film layer of a reducing agent over the dye, and a thin-film layer of metal over the reducing agent. The ohmic contact and metal layer constitute electrodes for connection to an external circuit and one or the other or both are made transparent to permit light to penetrate to the dye and be absorbed therein for generating electric current. The semiconductor material chosen to be the substrate is one having a wide bandgap and which therefore is transparent; the dye selected is one having a ground state within the bandgap of the semiconductor to generate carriers in the semiconductor, and a first excited state above the conduction band edge of the semiconductor to readily conduct electrons from the dye to the semiconductor; the reducing agent selected is one having a ground state above the ground state of the sensitizer to provide a plentiful source of electrons to the dye during current generation and thereby enhance the generation; and the metal for the thin-film layer of metal is selected to have a Fermi level in the vicinity of or above the ground state of the reducing agent to thereby amply supply electrons to the reducing agent. 3 figs.

  7. Dye-sensitized solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Skotheim, Terje A. [Berkeley, CA

    1980-03-04

    A low-cost dye-sensitized Schottky barrier solar cell comprised of a substrate of semiconductor with an ohmic contact on one face, a sensitizing dye adsorbed onto the opposite face of the semiconductor, a transparent thin-film layer of a reducing agent over the dye, and a thin-film layer of metal over the reducing agent. The ohmic contact and metal layer constitute electrodes for connection to an external circuit and one or the other or both are made transparent to permit light to penetrate to the dye and be absorbed therein for generating electric current. The semiconductor material chosen to be the substrate is one having a wide bandgap and which therefore is transparent; the dye selected is one having a ground state within the bandgap of the semiconductor to generate carriers in the semiconductor, and a first excited state above the conduction band edge of the semiconductor to readily conduct electrons from the dye to the semiconductor; the reducing agent selected is one having a ground state above the ground state of the sensitizer to provide a plentiful source of electrons to the dye during current generation and thereby enhance the generation; and the metal for the thin-film layer of metal is selected to have a Fermi level in the vicinity of or above the ground state of the reducing agent to thereby amply supply electrons to the reducing agent.

  8. Radiation Damage Workshop report. [solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahilly, W. P.

    1980-01-01

    The starting material, cell design/geometry, and cell processing/fabrication for silicon and gallium arsenide solar cells are addressed with reference to radiation damage. In general, it is concluded that diagnostic sensitivities and material purities are basic to making significant gains in end-of-life performance and thermal annealability. Further, GaAs material characterization is so sketchy that a well defined program to evaluate such material for solar cell application is needed to maximize GaAs cell technology benefits.

  9. Semitransparent Fully Air Processed Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Bu, Lingling; Liu, Zonghao; Zhang, Meng; Li, Wenhui; Zhu, Aili; Cai, Fensha; Zhao, Zhixin; Zhou, Yinhua

    2015-08-19

    Semitransparent solar cells are highly attractive for application as power-generating windows. In this work, we present semitransparent perovskite solar cells that employ conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) ( PSS) film as the transparent counter electrode. The PSS electrode is prepared by transfer lamination technique using plastic wrap as the transfer medium. The use of the transfer lamination technique avoids the damage of the CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite film by direct contact of PSS aqueous solution. The semitransparent perovskite solar cells yield a power conversion efficiency of 10.1% at an area of about 0.06 cm(2) and 2.9% at an area of 1 cm(2). The device structure and the fabrication technique provide a facile way to produce semitransparent perovskite solar cells.

  10. Solar cell array design handbook, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschenbach, H. S.

    1976-01-01

    Twelve chapters discuss the following: historical developments, the environment and its effects, solar cells, solar cell filters and covers, solar cell and other electrical interconnections, blocking and shunt diodes, substrates and deployment mechanisms, material properties, design synthesis and optimization, design analysis, procurement, production and cost aspects, evaluation and test, orbital performance, and illustrative design examples. A comprehensive index permits rapid locating of desired topics. The handbook consists of two volumes: Volume 1 is of an expository nature while Volume 2 contains detailed design data in an appendix-like fashion. Volume 2 includes solar cell performance data, applicable unit conversion factors and physical constants, and mechanical, electrical, thermal optical, magnetic, and outgassing material properties. Extensive references are provided.

  11. Solar cell efficiency tables (version 49)

    DOE PAGES

    Green, Martin A.; Emery, Keith; Hishikawa, Yoshihiro; ...

    2016-11-28

    Consolidated tables showing an extensive listing of the highest independently confirmed efficiencies for solar cells and modules are presented. Here, guidelines for inclusion of results into these tables are outlined, and new entries since June 2016 are reviewed.

  12. Solar cell efficiency tables (version 50)

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Martin A.; Hishikawa, Yoshihiro; Warta, Wilhelm

    Consolidated tables showing an extensive listing of the highest independently confirmed efficiencies for solar cells and modules are presented. Guidelines for inclusion of results into these tables are outlined, and new entries since January 2017 are reviewed.

  13. Solar cell efficiency tables (version 49)

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Martin A.; Emery, Keith; Hishikawa, Yoshihiro

    Consolidated tables showing an extensive listing of the highest independently confirmed efficiencies for solar cells and modules are presented. Here, guidelines for inclusion of results into these tables are outlined, and new entries since June 2016 are reviewed.

  14. Multijunction Solar Cells Optimized for the Mars Surface Solar Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmondson, Kenneth M.; Fetzer, Chris; Karam, Nasser H.; Stella, Paul; Mardesich, Nick; Mueller, Robert

    2007-01-01

    This paper gives an update on the performance of the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) which have been continually performing for more than 3 years beyond their original 90-day missions. The paper also gives the latest results on the optimization of a multijunction solar cell that is optimized to give more power on the surface of Mars.

  15. Investigating dye-sensitised solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, Laura L.; O'Reilly, Thomas; Zerulla, Dominic; Sheridan, John T.

    2010-05-01

    At present there is considerable global concern in relation to environmental issues and future energy supplies, for instance climate change (global warming) and the rapid depletion of fossil fuel resources. This trepidation has initiated a more critical investigation into alternative and renewable sources of power such as geothermal, biomass, hydropower, wind and solar energy. The immense dependence on electrical power in today's society has prompted the manufacturing of devices such as photovoltaic (PV) cells to help alleviate and replace current electrical demands of the power grid. The most popular and commercially available PV cells are silicon solar cells which have to date the greatest efficiencies for PV cells. The drawback however is that the manufacturing of these cells is complex and costly due to the expense and difficulty of producing and processing pure silicon. One relatively inexpensive alternative to silicon PV cells that we are currently studying are dye-sensitised solar cells (DSSC or Grätzel Cells). DSSC are biomimetic solar cells which are based on the process of photosynthesis. The SFI Strategic Research Centre for Solar Energy Conversion is a research cluster based in Ireland formed with the express intention of bringing together industry and academia to produce renewable energy solutions. Our specific research area is in DSSC and their electrical properties. We are currently developing testing equipment for arrays of DSSC and developing optoelectronic models which todescribe the performance and behaviour of DSSCs.

  16. Laser-assisted solar cell metallization processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, S.

    1984-01-01

    Laser assisted processing techniques utilized to produce the fine line, thin metal grid structures that are required to fabricate high efficiency solar cells are investigated. The tasks comprising these investigations are summarized. Metal deposition experiments are carried out utilizing laser assisted pyrolysis of a variety of metal bearing polymer films and metalloorganic inks spun onto silicon substrates. Laser decomposition of spun on silver neodecanoate ink yields very promising results. Solar cell comb metallization patterns are written using this technique.

  17. High-temperature Solar Cell Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Merritt, Danielle; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Scheiman, David

    2005-01-01

    The vast majority of space probes to date have relied upon photovoltaic power generation. If future missions designed to probe environments close to the sun (Figure 1) will be able to use such power generation, solar cells that can function at high temperatures, under high light intensity, and high radiation conditions must be developed. The significant problem is that solar cells lose performance at high temperatures.

  18. Coatings Boost Solar-Cell Outputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, Ajeet; Campbell, Robert B.; O'Keefe, T. W.; Rai-Choudbury, Posenjit; Hoffman, Richard A.

    1988-01-01

    Efficiencies increased by more-complete utilization of incident light. Electrical outputs of thin solar photovoltaic cells made of dendritic-web silicon increased by combination of front-surface, antireflective coatings and back-surface, reflective coatings. Improvements achieved recently through theoretical and experimental studies of ways to optimize coatings for particular wavelengths of incident light, cell thicknesses, and cell materials.

  19. Transparent superstrate terrestrial solar cell module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The design, development, fabrication, and testing of the transparent solar cell module were examined. Cell performance and material process characteristics were determined by extensive tests and design modifications were made prior to preproduction fabrication. These tests included three cell submodules and two full size engineering modules. Along with hardware and test activity, engineering documentation was prepared and submitted.

  20. Perovskite solar cells: from materials to devices.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyun Suk; Park, Nam-Gyu

    2015-01-07

    Perovskite solar cells based on organometal halide light absorbers have been considered a promising photovoltaic technology due to their superb power conversion efficiency (PCE) along with very low material costs. Since the first report on a long-term durable solid-state perovskite solar cell with a PCE of 9.7% in 2012, a PCE as high as 19.3% was demonstrated in 2014, and a certified PCE of 17.9% was shown in 2014. Such a high photovoltaic performance is attributed to optically high absorption characteristics and balanced charge transport properties with long diffusion lengths. Nevertheless, there are lots of puzzles to unravel the basis for such high photovoltaic performances. The working principle of perovskite solar cells has not been well established by far, which is the most important thing for understanding perovksite solar cells. In this review, basic fundamentals of perovskite materials including opto-electronic and dielectric properties are described to give a better understanding and insight into high-performing perovskite solar cells. In addition, various fabrication techniques and device structures are described toward the further improvement of perovskite solar cells. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Electrospinning Nanofiber Based Organic Solar Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhenhua; Liu, Ying; Moffa, Maria; Nam, Chang-Yong; Pisignano, Dario; Rafailovich, Miriam

    Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) polymer solar cells are an area of intense interest due to their potential to result in printable, inexpensive solar cells which can be processed onto flexible substrates. The active layer is typically spin coated from the solution of polythiophene derivatives (donor) and fullerenes (acceptor) and interconnected domains are formed because of phase separation. However, the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of BHJ solar cell is restricted by the presence of unfavorable morphological features, including dead ends or isolated domains. Here we MEH-PPV:PVP:PCBM electrospun nanofiber into BHJ solar cell for the active layer morphology optimization. Larger interfacial area between donor and acceptor is abtained with electrospinning method and the high aspect ratio of the MEH-PPV:PVP:PCBM nanofibers allow them to easily form a continuous pathway. The surface morphology is investigated with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Electrospun nanofibers are discussed as a favorable structure for application in bulk-heterojunction organic solar cells. Electrospinning Nanofiber Based Bulk Heterojunction Organic Solar Cell.

  2. Fabrication of nanostructured CIGS solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongwang; Wang, Fang; Parry, James; Perera, Samanthe; Zeng, Hao

    2012-02-01

    We present the work on Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2 based nanostructured solar cells based on nanowire arrays. CIGS as the light absorber for thin-film solar cells has been widely studied recently, due to its high absorption coefficient, long-term stability, and low-cost of fabrication. Recently, solution phase processed CIGS thin film solar cells attracted great attention due to their extremely low fabrication cost. However, the performance is lower than vacuum based thin films possibly due to higher density of defects and lower carrier mobility. On the other hand, one dimensional ordered nanostructures such as nanowires and nanorods can be used to make redial junction solar cells, where the orthogonality between light absorption and charge carrier separation can lead to enhanced PV performance. Since the charge carriers only need to traverse a short distance in the radial direction before they are separated at the heterojunction interface, the radial junction scheme can be more defect tolerant than their planar junction scheme. In this work, a wide band gap nanowire or nanotube array such as TiO2 is used as a scaffold where CIGS is conformally coated using solution phase to obtain a radial heterojunction solar cell. Their performance is compared that of the planar thin film solar cells fabricated with the same materials.

  3. Achieving High Performance Perovskite Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang

    2015-03-01

    Recently, metal halide perovskite based solar cell with the characteristics of rather low raw materials cost, great potential for simple process and scalable production, and extreme high power conversion efficiency (PCE), have been highlighted as one of the most competitive technologies for next generation thin film photovoltaic (PV). In UCLA, we have realized an efficient pathway to achieve high performance pervoskite solar cells, where the findings are beneficial to this unique materials/devices system. Our recent progress lies in perovskite film formation, defect passivation, transport materials design, interface engineering with respect to high performance solar cell, as well as the exploration of its applications beyond photovoltaics. These achievements include: 1) development of vapor assisted solution process (VASP) and moisture assisted solution process, which produces perovskite film with improved conformity, high crystallinity, reduced recombination rate, and the resulting high performance; 2) examination of the defects property of perovskite materials, and demonstration of a self-induced passivation approach to reduce carrier recombination; 3) interface engineering based on design of the carrier transport materials and the electrodes, in combination with high quality perovskite film, which delivers 15 ~ 20% PCEs; 4) a novel integration of bulk heterojunction to perovskite solar cell to achieve better light harvest; 5) fabrication of inverted solar cell device with high efficiency and flexibility and 6) exploration the application of perovskite materials to photodetector. Further development in film, device architecture, and interfaces will lead to continuous improved perovskite solar cells and other organic-inorganic hybrid optoelectronics.

  4. High-voltage solar-cell chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapoor, V. J.; Valco, G. J.; Skebe, G. G.; Evans, J. C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Integrated circuit technology has been successfully applied to the design and fabrication of 0.5 x 0.5-cm planar multijunction solar-cell chips. Each of these solar cells consisted of six voltage-generating unit cells monolithically connected in series and fabricated on a 75-micron-thick, p-type, single crystal, silicon substrate. A contact photolithic process employing five photomask levels together with a standard microelectronics batch-processing technique were used to construct the solar-cell chip. The open-circuit voltage increased rapidly with increasing illumination up to 5 AM1 suns where it began to saturate at the sum of the individual unit-cell voltages at a maximum of 3.0 V. A short-circuit current density per unit cell of 240 mA/sq cm was observed at 10 AM1 suns.

  5. Manufacture of Solar Cells on the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freundich, Alex; Ignatiev, Alex; Horton, Charles; Duke, Mike; Curren, Peter; Sibille, Laurent

    2005-01-01

    In support of the space exploration initiative a new architecture for the production of solar cells on the lunar surface is devised. The paper discusses experimental data on the fabrication and properties of lunar glass substrates, evaporated lunar regolith thin film (antireflect coatings and insulators), and preliminary attempts in the fabrication of thin film (silicon/II-VI) photovoltaic materials on lunar regolith substrates. A conceptual design for a solar powered robotic rover capable of fabricating solar cells directly on the lunar surface is provided. Technical challenges in the development of such a facility and strategies to alleviate perceived difficulties are discussed. Finally, preliminary cost benefit ratio analysis for different in situ solar cell production scenarios (using exclusively in-situ planetary resources or hybrid) are discussed.

  6. Advanced Solar Cells for Satellite Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, Dennis J.; Weinberg, Irving

    1994-01-01

    The multiple natures of today's space missions with regard to operational lifetime, orbital environment, cost and size of spacecraft, to name just a few, present such a broad range of performance requirements to be met by the solar array that no single design can suffice to meet them all. The result is a demand for development of specialized solar cell types that help to optimize overall satellite performance within a specified cost range for any given space mission. Historically, space solar array performance has been optimized for a given mission by tailoring the features of silicon solar cells to account for the orbital environment and average operating conditions expected during the mission. It has become necessary to turn to entirely new photovoltaic materials and device designs to meet the requirements of future missions, both in the near and far term. This paper will outline some of the mission drivers and resulting performance requirements that must be met by advanced solar cells, and provide an overview of some of the advanced cell technologies under development to meet them. The discussion will include high efficiency, radiation hard single junction cells; monolithic and mechanically stacked multiple bandgap cells; and thin film cells.

  7. Advanced solar cells for satellite power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flood, Dennis J.; Weinberg, Irving

    1994-11-01

    The multiple natures of today's space missions with regard to operational lifetime, orbital environment, cost and size of spacecraft, to name just a few, present such a broad range of performance requirements to be met by the solar array that no single design can suffice to meet them all. The result is a demand for development of specialized solar cell types that help to optimize overall satellite performance within a specified cost range for any given space mission. Historically, space solar array performance has been optimized for a given mission by tailoring the features of silicon solar cells to account for the orbital environment and average operating conditions expected during the mission. It has become necessary to turn to entirely new photovoltaic materials and device designs to meet the requirements of future missions, both in the near and far term. This paper will outline some of the mission drivers and resulting performance requirements that must be met by advanced solar cells, and provide an overview of some of the advanced cell technologies under development to meet them. The discussion will include high efficiency, radiation hard single junction cells; monolithic and mechanically stacked multiple bandgap cells; and thin film cells.

  8. Thickness dependences of solar cell performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sah, C. T.

    1982-01-01

    The significance of including factors such as the base resistivity loss for solar cells thicker than 100 microns and emitter and BSF layer recombination for thin cells in predicting the fill factor and efficiency of solar cells is demonstrated analytically. A model for a solar cell is devised with the inclusion of the dopant impurity concentration profile, variation of the electron and hole mobility with dopant concentration, the concentration and thermal capture and emission rates of the recombination center, device temperature, the AM1 spectra and the Si absorption coefficient. Device equations were solved by means of the transmission line technique. The analytical results were compared with those of low-level theory for cell performance. Significant differences in predictions of the fill factor resulted, and inaccuracies in the low-level approximations are discussed.

  9. Third Working Meeting on Gallium Arsenide Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, G. H. (Compiler)

    1976-01-01

    Research results are reported for GaAs Schottky barrier solar cells, GaAlAs/GaAs heteroface solar cells, and GaAlAs graded band gap solar cells. Related materials studies are presented. A systems study for GaAs and Si solar concentrator systems is given.

  10. Plastic Schottky-barrier solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Waldrop, J.R.; Cohen, M.J.

    1981-12-30

    A photovoltaic cell structure is fabricated from an active medium including an undoped polyacetylene, organic semiconductor. When a film of such material is in rectifying contact with a metallic area electrode, a Schottky-barrier junction is obtained within the body of the cell structure. Also, a gold overlayer passivates a magnesium layer on the undoped polyacetylene film. With the proper selection and location of elements a photovoltaic cell structure and solar cell are obtained.

  11. Multijunction high-voltage solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. C., Jr.; Goradia, C.; Chai, A. T.

    1981-01-01

    Multijunction cell allows for fabrication of high-voltage solar cell on single semiconductor wafer. Photovoltaic energy source using cell is combined on wafer with circuit it is to power. Cell consists of many voltage-generating regions internally or externally interconnected to give desired voltage and current combination. For computer applications, module is built on silicon wafer with energy for internal information processing and readouts derived from external light source.

  12. Origin of Open-Circuit Voltage Loss in Polymer Solar Cells and Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Do; Yanagawa, Nayu; Shimazaki, Ai; Endo, Masaru; Wakamiya, Atsushi; Ohkita, Hideo; Benten, Hiroaki; Ito, Shinzaburo

    2017-06-14

    Herein, the open-circuit voltage (V OC ) loss in both polymer solar cells and perovskite solar cells is quantitatively analyzed by measuring the temperature dependence of V OC to discuss the difference in the primary loss mechanism of V OC between them. As a result, the photon energy loss for polymer solar cells is in the range of about 0.7-1.4 eV, which is ascribed to temperature-independent and -dependent loss mechanisms, while that for perovskite solar cells is as small as about 0.5 eV, which is ascribed to a temperature-dependent loss mechanism. This difference is attributed to the different charge generation and recombination mechanisms between the two devices. The potential strategies for the improvement of V OC in both solar cells are further discussed on the basis of the experimental data.

  13. Automated solar cell assembly team process research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowlan, M. J.; Hogan, S. J.; Darkazalli, G.; Breen, W. F.; Murach, J. M.; Sutherland, S. F.; Patterson, J. S.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes work done under the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project, Phase 3A, which addresses problems that are generic to the photovoltaic (PV) industry. Spire's objective during Phase 3A was to use its light soldering technology and experience to design and fabricate solar cell tabbing and interconnecting equipment to develop new, high-yield, high-throughput, fully automated processes for tabbing and interconnecting thin cells. Areas that were addressed include processing rates, process control, yield, throughput, material utilization efficiency, and increased use of automation. Spire teamed with Solec International, a PV module manufacturer, and the University of Massachusetts at Lowell's Center for Productivity Enhancement (CPE), automation specialists, who are lower-tier subcontractors. A number of other PV manufacturers, including Siemens Solar, Mobil Solar, Solar Web, and Texas instruments, agreed to evaluate the processes developed under this program.

  14. Nanoplasmonics: a frontier of photovoltaic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Min; Ouyang, Zi; Jia, Baohua; Stokes, Nicholas; Chen, Xi; Fahim, Narges; Li, Xiangping; Ventura, Michael James; Shi, Zhengrong

    2012-12-01

    Nanoplasmonics recently has emerged as a new frontier of photovoltaic research. Noble metal nanostructures that can concentrate and guide light have demonstrated great capability for dramatically improving the energy conversion efficiency of both laboratory and industrial solar cells, providing an innovative pathway potentially transforming the solar industry. However, to make the nanoplasmonic technology fully appreciated by the solar industry, key challenges need to be addressed; including the detrimental absorption of metals, broadband light trapping mechanisms, cost of plasmonic nanomaterials, simple and inexpensive fabrication and integration methods of the plasmonic nanostructures, which are scalable for full size manufacture. This article reviews the recent progress of plasmonic solar cells including the fundamental mechanisms, material fabrication, theoretical modelling and emerging directions with a distinct emphasis on solutions tackling the above-mentioned challenges for industrial relevant applications.

  15. Optical designs for improved solar cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosten, Emily Dell

    The solar resource is the most abundant renewable resource on earth, yet it is currently exploited with relatively low efficiencies. To make solar energy more affordable, we can either reduce the cost of the cell or increase the efficiency with a similar cost cell. In this thesis, we consider several different optical approaches to achieve these goals. First, we consider a ray optical model for light trapping in silicon microwires. With this approach, much less material can be used, allowing for a cost savings. We next focus on reducing the escape of radiatively emitted and scattered light from the solar cell. With this angle restriction approach, light can only enter and escape the cell near normal incidence, allowing for thinner cells and higher efficiencies. In Auger-limited GaAs, we find that efficiencies greater than 38% may be achievable, a significant improvement over the current world record. To experimentally validate these results, we use a Bragg stack to restrict the angles of emitted light. Our measurements show an increase in voltage and a decrease in dark current, as less radiatively emitted light escapes. While the results in GaAs are interesting as a proof of concept, GaAs solar cells are not currently made on the production scale for terrestrial photovoltaic applications. We therefore explore the application of angle restriction to silicon solar cells. While our calculations show that Auger-limited cells give efficiency increases of up to 3% absolute, we also find that current amorphous silicion-crystalline silicon heterojunction with intrinsic thin layer (HIT) cells give significant efficiency gains with angle restriction of up to 1% absolute. Thus, angle restriction has the potential for unprecedented one sun efficiencies in GaAs, but also may be applicable to current silicon solar cell technology. Finally, we consider spectrum splitting, where optics direct light in different wavelength bands to solar cells with band gaps tuned to those

  16. Solar Cell Calibration and Measurement Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila; Brinker, Dave; Curtis, Henry; Jenkins, Phillip; Scheiman, Dave

    1997-01-01

    The increasing complexity of space solar cells and the increasing international markets for both cells and arrays has resulted in workshops jointly sponsored by NASDA, ESA and NASA. These workshops are designed to obtain international agreement on standardized values for the AMO spectrum and constant, recommend laboratory measurement practices and establish a set of protocols for international comparison of laboratory measurements. A working draft of an ISO standard, WDI 5387, 'Requirements for Measurement and Calibration Procedures for Space Solar Cells' was discussed with a focus on the scope of the document, a definition of primary standard cell, and required error analysis for all measurement techniques. Working groups addressed the issues of Air Mass Zero (AMO) solar constant and spectrum, laboratory measurement techniques, and the international round robin methodology. A summary is presented of the current state of each area and the formulation of the ISO document.

  17. Solar Cell Calibration and Measurement Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila; Brinker, Dave; Curtis, Henry; Jenkins, Phillip; Scheiman, Dave

    2004-01-01

    The increasing complexity of space solar cells and the increasing international markets for both cells and arrays has resulted in workshops jointly sponsored by NASDA, ESA and NASA. These workshops are designed to obtain international agreement on standardized values for the AMO spectrum and constant, recommend laboratory measurement practices and establish a set of protocols for international comparison of laboratory measurements. A working draft of an ISO standard, WD15387, "Requirements for Measurement and Calibration Procedures for Space Solar Cells" was discussed with a focus on the scope of the document, a definition of primary standard cell, and required error analysis for all measurement techniques. Working groups addressed the issues of Air Mass Zero (AMO) solar constant and spectrum, laboratory measurement techniques, and te international round robin methodology. A summary is presented of the current state of each area and the formulation of the ISO document.

  18. Method of restoring degraded solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Staebler, David L.

    1983-01-01

    Amorphous silicon solar cells have been shown to have efficiencies which degrade as a result of long exposure to light. Annealing such cells in air at a temperature of about 200.degree. C. for at least 30 minutes restores their efficiency.

  19. Hotspot Endurance Of Solar-Cell Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, C. C.; Sugimura, R. S.; Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Procedure for evaluating modules for use with concentrators now available. Solar simulator illuminates photovoltaic cells through Fresnel lens of concentrator module. Module and test cells inspected visually at 24-h intervals during test and again when test completed. After test, electrical characteristics of module measured for comparison with pretest characteristics.

  20. New Solar Cells to Boost Satellite Power

    Science.gov Websites

    New Solar Cells to Boost Satellite Power For more information contact: George Douglas (303) 275 much as doubled, each satellite and its services can be more economical and offer a greater return to satellite customers. The new cells will also have a longer useful life. Because of their construction they

  1. Walking-Beam Solar-Cell Conveyor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feder, H.; Frasch, W.

    1982-01-01

    Microprocessor-controlled walking-beam conveyor moves cells between work stations in automated assembly line. Conveyor has arm at each work station. In unison arms pick up all solar cells and advance them one station; then beam retracks to be in position for next step. Microprocessor sets beam stroke, speed, and position.

  2. Method of restoring degraded solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Staebler, D.L.

    1983-02-01

    Amorphous silicon solar cells have been shown to have efficiencies which degrade as a result of long exposure to light. Annealing such cells in air at a temperature of about 200 C for at least 30 minutes restores their efficiency. 2 figs.

  3. Liquid cooled, linear focus solar cell receiver

    DOEpatents

    Kirpich, A.S.

    1983-12-08

    Separate structures for electrical insulation and thermal conduction are established within a liquid cooled, linear focus solar cell receiver for use with parabolic or Fresnel optical concentrators. The receiver includes a V-shaped aluminum extrusion having a pair of outer faces each formed with a channel receiving a string of solar cells in thermal contact with the extrusion. Each cell string is attached to a continuous glass cover secured within the channel with spring clips to isolate the string from the external environment. Repair or replacement of solar cells is effected simply by detaching the spring clips to remove the cover/cell assembly without interrupting circulation of coolant fluid through the receiver. The lower surface of the channel in thermal contact with the cells of the string is anodized to establish a suitable standoff voltage capability between the cells and the extrusion. Primary electrical insulation is provided by a dielectric tape disposed between the coolant tube and extrusion. Adjacent solar cells are soldered to interconnect members designed to accommodate thermal expansion and mismatches. The coolant tube is clamped into the extrusion channel with a releasably attachable clamping strip to facilitate easy removal of the receiver from the coolant circuit.

  4. Liquid cooled, linear focus solar cell receiver

    DOEpatents

    Kirpich, Aaron S.

    1985-01-01

    Separate structures for electrical insulation and thermal conduction are established within a liquid cooled, linear focus solar cell receiver for use with parabolic or Fresnel optical concentrators. The receiver includes a V-shaped aluminum extrusion having a pair of outer faces each formed with a channel receiving a string of solar cells in thermal contact with the extrusion. Each cell string is attached to a continuous glass cover secured within the channel with spring clips to isolate the string from the external environment. Repair or replacement of solar cells is effected simply by detaching the spring clips to remove the cover/cell assembly without interrupting circulation of coolant fluid through the receiver. The lower surface of the channel in thermal contact with the cells of the string is anodized to establish a suitable standoff voltage capability between the cells and the extrusion. Primary electrical insulation is provided by a dielectric tape disposed between the coolant tube and extrusion. Adjacent solar cells are soldered to interconnect members designed to accommodate thermal expansion and mismatches. The coolant tube is clamped into the extrusion channel with a releasably attachable clamping strip to facilitate easy removal of the receiver from the coolant circuit.

  5. Thermal stability of gallium arsenide solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papež, Nikola; Škvarenina, Ľubomír.; Tofel, Pavel; Sobola, Dinara

    2017-12-01

    This article summarizes a measurement of gallium arsenide (GaAs) solar cells during their thermal processing. These solar cells compared to standard silicon cells have better efficiency and high thermal stability. However, their use is partly limited due to high acquisition costs. For these reasons, GaAs cells are deployed only in the most demanding applications where their features are needed, such as space applications. In this work, GaAs solar cells were studied in a high temperature range within 30-650 °C where their functionality and changes in surface topology were monitored. These changes were recorded using an electron microscope which determined the position of the defects; using an atomic force microscope we determined the roughness of the surface and an infrared camera that showed us the thermal radiated places of the defected parts of the cell. The electrical characteristics of the cells during processing were determined by its current-voltage characteristics. Despite the occurrence of subtle changes on the solar cell with newly created surface features after 300 °C thermal processing, its current-voltage characteristic remained without a significant change.

  6. High voltage solar cell power generating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, E., Jr.; Opjorden, R. W.; Hoffman, A. C.

    1974-01-01

    A laboratory solar power system regulated by on-panel switches has been delivered for operating high power (3 kW), high voltage (15,000 volt) loads (communication tubes, ion thrusters). The modular system consists of 26 solar arrays, each with an integral light source and cooling system. A typical array contains 2,560 series-connected cells. Each light source consists of twenty 500-watt tungsten iodide lamps providing plus or minus 5 percent uniformity at one solar constant. An array temperature of less than 40 C is achieved using an infrared filter, a water-cooled plate, a vacuum hold-down system, and air flushing.

  7. Glass-Si heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental studies and models for In2O3/Si and SnO2/N-Si solar cells are considered for their suitability in terrestrial applications. The silicon is the active material, and the glass serves as the window to solar radiation, an antireflection coating of the Si, and a low resistance contact. Results show that amorphous windows or layers suppress photocurrent. The interfacial SiO2 layer suppresses photocurrent and increases series resistance. Suppression increases with illumination.

  8. Silicon solar cell process. Development, fabrication and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoo, H. I.; Iles, P. A.; Tanner, D. P.

    1978-01-01

    Solar cells were fabricated from unconventional silicon sheets, and the performances were characterized with an emphasis on statistical evaluation. A number of solar cell fabrication processes were used and conversion efficiency was measured under AMO condition at 25 C. Silso solar cells using standard processing showed an average efficiency of about 9.6%. Solar cells with back surface field process showed about the same efficiency as the cells from standard process. Solar cells from grain boundary passivation process did not show any improvements in solar cell performance.

  9. Solar heating of GaAs nanowire solar cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shao-Hua; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2015-11-30

    We use a coupled thermal-optical approach to model the operating temperature rise in GaAs nanowire solar cells. We find that despite more highly concentrated light absorption and lower thermal conductivity, the overall temperature rise in a nanowire structure is no higher than in a planar structure. Moreover, coating the nanowires with a transparent polymer can increase the radiative cooling power by 2.2 times, lowering the operating temperature by nearly 7 K.

  10. Solar heating of GaAs nanowire solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Shao-Hua; Povinelli, Michelle L.

    2015-09-25

    We use a coupled thermal-optical approach to model the operating temperature rise in GaAs nanowire solar cells. Our findings show that despite more highly concentrated light absorption and lower thermal conductivity, the overall temperature rise in a nanowire structure is no higher than in a planar structure. Moreover, coating the nanowires with a transparent polymer can increase the radiative cooling power by 2.2 times, lowering the operating temperature by nearly 7 K.

  11. Light-trapping in perovskite solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Qing Guo; Shen, Guansheng; John, Sajeev

    We numerically demonstrate enhanced light harvesting efficiency in both CH 3NH 3PbI 3 and CH(NH 2) 2PbI 3-based perovskite solar cells using inverted verticalcone photonic-crystal nanostructures. For CH 3NH 3PbI 3 perovskite solar cells, the maximum achievable photocurrent density (MAPD) reaches 25.1 mA/cm 2, corresponding to 92% of the total available photocurrent in the absorption range of 300 nm to 800 nm. Our cell shows 6% absorption enhancement compared to the Lambertian limit (23.7 mA/cm 2) and has a projected power conversion efficiency of 12.9%. Excellent solar absorption is numerically demonstrated over a broad angular range from 0 to 60more » degree for both S- and P- polarizations. For the corresponding CH(NH 2) 2PbI 3 based perovskite solar cell, with absorption range of 300 nm to 850 nm, we find a MAPD of 29.1 mA/cm 2, corresponding to 95.4% of the total available photocurrent. Furthermore, the projected power conversion efficiency of the CH(NH 2) 2PbI 3 based photonic crystal solar cell is 23.4%, well above the current world record efficiency of 20.1%.« less

  12. Light-trapping in perovskite solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Du, Qing Guo; Shen, Guansheng; John, Sajeev

    2016-06-01

    We numerically demonstrate enhanced light harvesting efficiency in both CH 3NH 3PbI 3 and CH(NH 2) 2PbI 3-based perovskite solar cells using inverted verticalcone photonic-crystal nanostructures. For CH 3NH 3PbI 3 perovskite solar cells, the maximum achievable photocurrent density (MAPD) reaches 25.1 mA/cm 2, corresponding to 92% of the total available photocurrent in the absorption range of 300 nm to 800 nm. Our cell shows 6% absorption enhancement compared to the Lambertian limit (23.7 mA/cm 2) and has a projected power conversion efficiency of 12.9%. Excellent solar absorption is numerically demonstrated over a broad angular range from 0 to 60more » degree for both S- and P- polarizations. For the corresponding CH(NH 2) 2PbI 3 based perovskite solar cell, with absorption range of 300 nm to 850 nm, we find a MAPD of 29.1 mA/cm 2, corresponding to 95.4% of the total available photocurrent. Furthermore, the projected power conversion efficiency of the CH(NH 2) 2PbI 3 based photonic crystal solar cell is 23.4%, well above the current world record efficiency of 20.1%.« less

  13. High efficiency solar cell processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, F.; Iles, P. A.

    1985-01-01

    At the time of writing, cells made by several groups are approaching 19% efficiency. General aspects of the processing required for such cells are discussed. Most processing used for high efficiency cells is derived from space-cell or concentrator cell technology, and recent advances have been obtained from improved techniques rather than from better understanding of the limiting mechanisms. Theory and modeling are fairly well developed, and adequate to guide further asymptotic increases in performance of near conventional cells. There are several competitive cell designs with promise of higher performance ( 20%) but for these designs further improvements are required. The available cell processing technology to fabricate high efficiency cells is examined.

  14. Method of fabricating a solar cell array

    DOEpatents

    Lazzery, Angelo G.; Crouthamel, Marvin S.; Coyle, Peter J.

    1982-01-01

    A first set of pre-tabbed solar cells are assembled in a predetermined array with at least part of each tab facing upward, each tab being fixed to a bonding pad on one cell and abutting a bonding pad on an adjacent cell. The cells are held in place with a first vacuum support. The array is then inverted onto a second vacuum support which holds the tabs firmly against the cell pads they abut. The cells are exposed to radiation to melt and reflow the solder pads for bonding the tab portions not already fixed to bonding pads to these pads.

  15. Fabricating solar cells with silicon nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Loscutoff, Paul; Molesa, Steve; Kim, Taeseok

    2014-09-02

    A laser contact process is employed to form contact holes to emitters of a solar cell. Doped silicon nanoparticles are formed over a substrate of the solar cell. The surface of individual or clusters of silicon nanoparticles is coated with a nanoparticle passivation film. Contact holes to emitters of the solar cell are formed by impinging a laser beam on the passivated silicon nanoparticles. For example, the laser contact process may be a laser ablation process. In that case, the emitters may be formed by diffusing dopants from the silicon nanoparticles prior to forming the contact holes to the emitters. As another example, the laser contact process may be a laser melting process whereby portions of the silicon nanoparticles are melted to form the emitters and contact holes to the emitters.

  16. Space solar cell research: Problems and potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    The value of a passive, maintenance-free, renewable energy source was apparent in the early days of the space program, and the silicon solar cell was pressed into service. Efficiencies of those early space solar arrays were low, and lifetimes shorter than hoped for, but within a decade significant advances had been made in both areas. Better performance was achieved through improvements in silicon single crystal material, better device designs, and a better understanding of the factors that affect the performance of a solar cell in space. Chief among the latter, particularly for the mid-to-high altitude (HEO) and geosynchronous (GEO) orbits, are the effects of the naturally occurring particulate radiation environment. Although not as broadly important to the photovoltaic community at large as increased efficiency, the topic of radiation damage is critically important to use of solar cells in space, and is a major component of the NASA research program in space photovoltaics. A brief overview of some of the opportunities and challenges for space photovoltaic applications is given, and some of the current research directed at achieving high efficiency and controlling radiation damage in space solar cells is discussed.

  17. Space solar cell research - Problems and potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, Dennis J.

    1986-01-01

    The value of a passive, maintenance-free, renewable energy source was immediately recognized in the early days of the space program, and the silicon solar cell, despite its infancy, was quickly pressed into service. Efficiencies of those early space solar arrays were low, and lifetimes shorter than hoped for, but within a decade significant advances had been made in both areas. Better performance was achieved because of a variety of factors, ranging from improvements in silicon single crystal material, to better device designs, to a better understanding of the factors that affect the performance of a solar cell in space. Chief among the latter, particularly for the mid-to-high altitude (HEO) and geosynchronous (GEO) orbits, are the effects of the naturally occurring particulate radiation environment. Although not as broadly important to the photovoltaic community at large as increased efficiency, the topic of radiation damage is critically important to use of solar cells in space, and is a major component of the NASA research program in space photovoltaics. This paper will give a brief overview of some of the opportunities and challenges for space photovoltaic applications, and will discuss some of the current reseach directed at achieving high efficiency and controlling the effects of radiation damage in space solar cells.

  18. Application of porous silicon in solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniya, Nalin H.; Ashokan, Jibinlal; Srivastava, Divesh N.

    2018-05-01

    Silicon is widely used in solar cell applications with over 95% of all solar cells produced worldwide composed of silicon. Nanostructured thin porous silicon (PSi) layer acting as anti-reflecting coating is used in photovoltaic solar cells due to its advantages including simple and low cost fabrication, highly textured surfaces enabling lowering of reflectance, controllability of thickness and porosity of layer, and high surface area. PSi layers have previously been reported to reduce the reflection of light and replaced the conventional anti-reflective coating layers on solar cells. This can essentially improve the efficiency and decrease the cost of silicon solar cells. Here, we investigate the reflectance of different PSi layers formed by varying current density and etching time. PSi layers were formed by a combination of current density including 60 and 80 mA/cm2 and time for fabrication as 2, 4, 6, and 8 seconds. The fabricated PSi layers were characterized using reflectance spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy. Thickness and pore size of PSi layer were increased with increase in etching time and current density, respectively. The reflectance of PSi layers was decreased with increase in etching time until 6 seconds and increased again after 6 seconds, which was observed across both the current density. Reduction in reflectance indicates the increase of absorption of light by silicon due to the thin PSi layer. In comparison with the reflectance of silicon wafer, PSi layer fabricated at 80 mA/cm2 for 6 seconds gave the best result with reduction in reflectance up to 57%. Thus, the application of PSi layer as an effective anti-reflecting coating for the fabrication of solar cell has been demonstrated.

  19. Preliminary Measurements of Thin Film Solar Cells

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1967-06-21

    George Mazaris, works with an assistant to obtain the preliminary measurements of cadmium sulfide thin-film solar cells being tested in the Space Environmental Chamber at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center. Lewis’ Photovoltaic Fundamentals Section was investigating thin-film alternatives to the standard rigid and fragile solar cells. The cadmium sulfide semiconductors were placed in a light, metallized substrate that could be rolled or furled during launch. The main advantage of the thin-film solar cells was their reduced weight. Lewis researchers, however, were still working on improving the performance of the semiconductor. The new thin-film solar cells were tested in a space simulation chamber in the CW-6 test cell in the Engine Research Building. The chamber created a simulated altitude of 200 miles. Sunlight was simulated by a 5000-watt xenon light. Some two dozen cells were exposed to 15 minutes of light followed by 15 minutes of darkness to test their durability in the constantly changing illumination of Earth orbit. This photograph was taken for use in a NASA recruiting publication.

  20. Design issues for optimum solar cell configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Atul; Thakur, Ajay D.

    2018-05-01

    A computer based simulation of solar cell structure is performed to study the optimization of pn junction configuration for photovoltaic action. The fundamental aspects of photovoltaic action viz, absorption, separation collection, and their dependence on material properties and deatails of device structures is discussed. Using SCAPS 1D we have simulated the ideal pn junction and shown the effect of band offset and carrier densities on solar cell performance. The optimum configuration can be achieved by optimizing transport of carriers in pn junction under effect of field dependent recombination (tunneling) and density dependent recombination (SRH, Auger) mechanisms.

  1. Solar recharging system for hearing aid cells.

    PubMed

    Gòmez Estancona, N; Tena, A G; Torca, J; Urruticoechea, L; Muñiz, L; Aristimuño, D; Unanue, J M; Torca, J; Urruticoechea, A

    1994-09-01

    We present a solar recharging system for nickel-cadmium cells of interest in areas where batteries for hearing aids are difficult to obtain. The charger has sun cells at the top. Luminous energy is converted into electrical energy, during the day and also at night if there is moonlight. The cost of the charger and hearing aid is very low at 35 US$. The use of solar recharging for hearing aids would be useful in alleviating the problems of deafness in parts of developing countries where there is no electricity.

  2. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David D.; Cousins, Peter John

    2015-07-21

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline material layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  3. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David; Cousins, Peter

    2012-12-04

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline material layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  4. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David D.; Cousins, Peter John

    2014-07-22

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline materiat layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  5. High throughput solar cell ablation system

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Pass, Thomas; Cousins, Peter John; Viatella, John

    2014-10-14

    A solar cell is formed using a solar cell ablation system. The ablation system includes a single laser source and several laser scanners. The laser scanners include a master laser scanner, with the rest of the laser scanners being slaved to the master laser scanner. A laser beam from the laser source is split into several laser beams, with the laser beams being scanned onto corresponding wafers using the laser scanners in accordance with one or more patterns. The laser beams may be scanned on the wafers using the same or different power levels of the laser source.

  6. High throughput solar cell ablation system

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Pass, Thomas; Cousins, Peter John; Viatella, John

    2012-09-11

    A solar cell is formed using a solar cell ablation system. The ablation system includes a single laser source and several laser scanners. The laser scanners include a master laser scanner, with the rest of the laser scanners being slaved to the master laser scanner. A laser beam from the laser source is split into several laser beams, with the laser beams being scanned onto corresponding wafers using the laser scanners in accordance with one or more patterns. The laser beams may be scanned on the wafers using the same or different power levels of the laser source.

  7. Design and fabrication of solar cell modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaughnessy, T. P.

    1978-01-01

    A program conducted for design, fabrication and evaluation of twelve silicon solar cell modules is described. The purpose of the program was to develop a module design consistent with the requirements and objectives of JPL specification and to also incorporate elements of new technologies under development to meet LSSA Project goals. Module development emphasized preparation of a technically and economically competitive design based upon utilization of ion implanted solar cells and a glass encapsulation system. The modules fabricated, tested and delivered were of nominal 2 X 2 foot dimensions and 20 watt minimum rating. Basic design, design rationale, performance and results of environmental testing are described.

  8. A review of high-efficiency silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, A.

    1986-01-01

    Various parameters that affect solar cell efficiency were discussed. It is not understood why solar cells produced from less expensive Czochralski (Cz) silicon are less efficient than cells fabricated from more expensive float-zone (Fz) silicon. Performance characteristics were presented for recently produced, high-efficient solar cells fabricated by Westinghouse Electric Corp., Spire Corp., University of New South Wales, and Stanford University.

  9. NREL Solar Cell Wins Federal Technology Transfer Prize | News | NREL

    Science.gov Websites

    Solar Cell Wins Federal Technology Transfer Prize News Release: NREL Solar Cell Wins Federal ) Solar Cell was named a winner of the 2009 Award for Excellence in Technology Transfer by the Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology Transfer. The original IMM cell was invented by Mark Wanlass of NREL's

  10. Back surface reflectors for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chai, A. T.

    1980-01-01

    Sample solar cells were fabricated to study the effects of various back surface reflectors on the device performance. They are typical 50 micrometers thick, space quality, silicon solar cells except for variations of the back contact configuration. The back surfaces of the sample cells are polished to a mirror like finish, and have either conventional full contacts or grid finger contacts. Measurements and evaluation of various metallic back surface reflectors, as well as cells with total internal reflection, are presented. Results indicate that back surface reflectors formed using a grid finger back contact are more effective reflectors than cells with full back metallization and that Au, Ag, or Cu are better back surface reflector metals than Al.

  11. Gaalas/Gaas Solar Cell Process Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almgren, D. W.; Csigi, K. I.

    1980-01-01

    Available information on liquid phase, vapor phase (including chemical vapor deposition) and molecular beam epitaxy growth procedures that could be used to fabricate single crystal, heteroface, (AlGa) As/GaAs solar cells, for space applications is summarized. A comparison of the basic cost elements of the epitaxy growth processes shows that the current infinite melt LPE process has the lower cost per cell for an annual production rate of 10,000 cells. The metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MO-CVD) process has the potential for low cost production of solar cells but there is currently a significant uncertainty in process yield, i.e., the fraction of active material in the input gas stream that ends up in the cell. Additional work is needed to optimize and document the process parameters for the MO-CVD process.

  12. Modeling and analysis of cascade solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, F. D.

    1986-01-01

    A brief review is given of the present status of the development of cascade solar cells. It is known that photovoltaic efficiencies can be improved through this development. The designs and calculations of the multijunction cells, however, are quite complicated. The main goal is to find a method which is a compromise between accuracy and simplicity for modeling a cascade solar cell. Three approaches are presently under way, among them (1) equivalent circuit approach, (2) numerical approach, and (3) analytical approach. Here, the first and the second approaches are discussed. The equivalent circuit approach using SPICE (Simulation Program, Integrated Circuit Emphasis) to the cascade cells and the cascade-cell array is highlighted. The methods of extracting parameters for modeling are discussed.

  13. Solar Cell Modules with Parallel Oriented Interconnections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Twenty-four solar modules, half of which were 48 cells in an all-series electrical configuration and half of a six parallel cells by eight series cells were provided. Upon delivery of environmentally tested modules, low power outputs were discovered. These low power modules were determined to have cracked cells which were thought to cause the low output power. The cracks tended to be linear or circular which were caused by different stressing mechanisms. These stressing mechanisms were fully explored. Efforts were undertaken to determine the causes of cell fracture. This resulted in module design and process modifications. The design and process changes were subsequently implemented in production.

  14. Multi-junction solar cell device

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, Daniel J.; Geisz, John F.

    2007-12-18

    A multi-junction solar cell device (10) is provided. The multi-junction solar cell device (10) comprises either two or three active solar cells connected in series in a monolithic structure. The multi-junction device (10) comprises a bottom active cell (20) having a single-crystal silicon substrate base and an emitter layer (23). The multi-junction device (10) further comprises one or two subsequent active cells each having a base layer (32) and an emitter layer (23) with interconnecting tunnel junctions between each active cell. At least one layer that forms each of the top and middle active cells is composed of a single-crystal III-V semiconductor alloy that is substantially lattice-matched to the silicon substrate (22). The polarity of the active p-n junction cells is either p-on-n or n-on-p. The present invention further includes a method for substantially lattice matching single-crystal III-V semiconductor layers with the silicon substrate (22) by including boron and/or nitrogen in the chemical structure of these layers.

  15. Quantum Dot Solar Cell Fabrication Protocols

    DOE PAGES

    Chernomordik, Boris D.; Marshall, Ashley R.; Pach, Gregory F.; ...

    2016-09-26

    Colloidally synthesized quantum-confined semiconducting spherical nanocrystals, often referred to as quantum dots (QDs), offer a high degree of chemical, optical, and electronic tunability. As a result, there is an increasing interest in employing colloidal QDs for electronic and optical applications that is reflected in a growing number of publications. In this protocol we provide detailed procedures for the fabrication of QD solar cells specifically employing PbSe and PbS QDs. Here we include details that are learned through experience, beyond those in typical methodology sections, and include example pictures and videos to aid in fabricating QD solar cells. Although successful solarmore » cell fabrication is ultimately learned through experience, this protocol is intended to accelerate that process. The protocol developed here is intended to be a general starting point for developing PbS and PbSe QD test bed solar cells. We include steps for forming conductive QD films via dip coating as well as spin coating. Finally, we provide protocols that detail the synthesis of PbS and PbSe QDs through a unique cation exchange reaction and discuss how different QD synthetic routes could impact the resulting solar cell performance.« less

  16. Printable CIGS thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiaojuan

    2014-03-01

    Among the various thin film solar cells in the market, CuInGaSe thin film cells have been considered as the most promising alternatives to silicon solar cells because of their high photo-electricity efficiency, reliability, and stability. However, many fabrication of CIGS thin film are based on vacuum processes such as evaporation sputtering techniques which are not cost efficient. This work develops a method using paste or ink liquid spin-coated on glass that would be to conventional ways in terms of cost effective, non-vacuum needed, quick processing. A mixture precursor was prepared by dissolving appropriate amounts of chemicals. After the mixture solution was cooled, a viscous paste prepared and ready for spin-coating process. A slight bluish CIG thin film substrate was then put in a tube furnace with evaporation of metal Se by depositing CdS layer and ZnO nanoparticle thin film coating to a solar cell fabrication. Structure, absorption spectrum, and photo-conversion efficiency for the as-grown CIGS thin film solar cell under study.

  17. Full space device optimization for solar cells.

    PubMed

    Baloch, Ahmer A B; Aly, Shahzada P; Hossain, Mohammad I; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Tabet, Nouar; Alharbi, Fahhad H

    2017-09-20

    Advances in computational materials have paved a way to design efficient solar cells by identifying the optimal properties of the device layers. Conventionally, the device optimization has been governed by single or double descriptors for an individual layer; mostly the absorbing layer. However, the performance of the device depends collectively on all the properties of the material and the geometry of each layer in the cell. To address this issue of multi-property optimization and to avoid the paradigm of reoccurring materials in the solar cell field, a full space material-independent optimization approach is developed and presented in this paper. The method is employed to obtain an optimized material data set for maximum efficiency and for targeted functionality for each layer. To ensure the robustness of the method, two cases are studied; namely perovskite solar cells device optimization and cadmium-free CIGS solar cell. The implementation determines the desirable optoelectronic properties of transport mediums and contacts that can maximize the efficiency for both cases. The resulted data sets of material properties can be matched with those in materials databases or by further microscopic material design. Moreover, the presented multi-property optimization framework can be extended to design any solid-state device.

  18. Quantum Dot Solar Cell Fabrication Protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Chernomordik, Boris D.; Marshall, Ashley R.; Pach, Gregory F.

    Colloidally synthesized quantum-confined semiconducting spherical nanocrystals, often referred to as quantum dots (QDs), offer a high degree of chemical, optical, and electronic tunability. As a result, there is an increasing interest in employing colloidal QDs for electronic and optical applications that is reflected in a growing number of publications. In this protocol we provide detailed procedures for the fabrication of QD solar cells specifically employing PbSe and PbS QDs. Here we include details that are learned through experience, beyond those in typical methodology sections, and include example pictures and videos to aid in fabricating QD solar cells. Although successful solarmore » cell fabrication is ultimately learned through experience, this protocol is intended to accelerate that process. The protocol developed here is intended to be a general starting point for developing PbS and PbSe QD test bed solar cells. We include steps for forming conductive QD films via dip coating as well as spin coating. Finally, we provide protocols that detail the synthesis of PbS and PbSe QDs through a unique cation exchange reaction and discuss how different QD synthetic routes could impact the resulting solar cell performance.« less

  19. Evaluation of solar cells for potential space satellite power applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The evaluation focused on the following subjects: (1) the relative merits of alternative solar cell materials, based on performance and availability, (2) the best manufacturing methods for various solar cell options and the effects of extremely large production volumes on their ultimate costs and operational characteristics, (3) the areas of uncertainty in achieving large solar cell production volumes, (4) the effects of concentration ratios on solar array mass and system performance, (5) the factors influencing solar cell life in the radiation environment during transport to and in geosynchronous orbit, and (6) the merits of conducting solar cell manufacturing operations in space.

  20. A Hybrid Tandem Solar Cell Combining a Dye-Sensitized and a Polymer Solar Cell.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhipeng; Chen, Shuanghong; Zhang, Xuhui; Zhu, Liangzheng; Ye, Jiajiu; Dai, Songyuan

    2016-06-01

    A hybrid tandem solar cell was assambled by connecting a dye sensitized solar cell and a polymer solar cell in series. A N719 sensitized TiO2 was used as photocathode in dye-sensitized subcell, and a MEH-PPV/PCBM composite was used as active layer in the polymer subcell. The polymer subcell fabricated on the counter electrode of the dye sensitized solar cell. A solution processed TiO(x) layer was used as electron collection layer of the polymer sub cell and the charge recombination layer. The effects of the TiO(x) interlayer and the spectral overlap between the two sub cells have been studied and optimized. The results shows that a proper thickness of the TiO(x) layer is needed for tandem solar cells. Thick TiO(x) will enhance the series resistance, but too thin TiO(x), layer will damage the hole blocking effect and its hydrophilic. The resulting optimized tandem solar cells exhibited a power conversion efficiency of 1.28% with a V(oc) of 0.95 V under simulated 100 mW cm(-2) AM 1.5 illumination.

  1. Photonic crystal geometry for organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Doo-Hyun; Tumbleston, John R; Zhang, Lei; Williams, Stuart; DeSimone, Joseph M; Lopez, Rene; Samulski, Edward T

    2009-07-01

    We report organic solar cells with a photonic crystal nanostructure embossed in the photoactive bulk heterojunction layer, a topography that exhibits a 3-fold enhancement of the absorption in specific regions of the solar spectrum in part through multiple excitation resonances. The photonic crystal geometry is fabricated using a materials-agnostic process called PRINT wherein highly ordered arrays of nanoscale features are readily made in a single processing step over wide areas (approximately 4 cm(2)) that is scalable. We show efficiency improvements of approximately 70% that result not only from greater absorption, but also from electrical enhancements. The methodology is generally applicable to organic solar cells and the experimental findings reported in our manuscript corroborate theoretical expectations.

  2. New Thin-Film Solar Cells Compared to Normal Solar Cells

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-06-21

    Adolph Spakowski, head of the Photovoltaic Fundamentals Section at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Lewis Research Center, illustrated the difference between conventional silicon solar cells (rear panel) and the new thin-film cells. The larger, flexible thin-film cells in the foreground were evaluated by Lewis energy conversion specialists for possible future space use. The conventional solar cells used on most spacecraft at the time were both delicate and heavy. For example, the Mariner IV spacecraft required 28,000 these solar cells for its flyby of Mars in 1964. NASA Lewis began investigating cadmium sulfide thin-film solar cells in 1961. The thin-film cells were made by heating semiconductor material until it evaporated. The vapor was then condensed onto an electricity-producing film only one-thousandth of an inch thick. The physical flexibility of the new thin-film cells allowed them to be furled, or rolled up, during launch. Spakowski led an 18-month test program at Lewis to investigate the application of cadmium sulfide semiconductors on a light metallized substrate. The new thin-film solar cells were tested in a space simulation chamber at a simulated altitude of 200 miles. Sunlight was recreated by a 5000-watt xenon light. Two dozen cells were exposed to 15 minutes of light followed by 15 minutes of darkness to test their durability in the constantly changing illumination of Earth orbit.

  3. Trough Coating Solar Cells Without Spillover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    Problem with trough coating of silicon on ceramic - spillover of molten silicon - overcome by combination of redesigned heaters and tiltable trough. Modifications make it possible to coat virtually any length of ceramic with film of solar-cell-grade silicon. Previously, maximum length coated before spillover occurred was 2 inches (5.1 cm).

  4. Tandem junction amorphous silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1981-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell has an active body with two or a series of layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in a tandem stacked configuration with one optical path and electrically interconnected by a tunnel junction. The layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in tandem configuration can have the same bandgap or differing bandgaps.

  5. Metal electrode for amorphous silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Richard

    1983-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell having an N-type region wherein the contact to the N-type region is composed of a material having a work function of about 3.7 electron volts or less. Suitable materials include strontium, barium and magnesium and rare earth metals such as gadolinium and yttrium.

  6. A Photoelectrochemical Solar Cell: An Undergraduate Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudreau, Sharon M.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Preparation and testing of a cadmium selenide photoelectrical solar cell was introduced into an environmental chemistry course to illustrate solid state semiconductor and electrochemical principles. Background information, procedures, and results are provided for the experiment which can be accomplished in a three- to four-hour laboratory session…

  7. Metalizing Solar Cells by Selective Electroplating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, S.; Palaschak, P. A.

    1986-01-01

    Contact patterns traced by laser scanning. Conductor paths deposited on silicon solar-cell wafers by laser irradiation followed by electroplating. Laser-assisted metalization technique offers better resolution and lower contact resistance than does conventional metalization by screen printing. At the same time, less expensive than metalization with masks and photolithography.

  8. Low cost silicon solar cell array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, F. T. C.

    1974-01-01

    The technological options available for producing low cost silicon solar cell arrays were examined. A project value of approximately $250/sq m and $2/watt is projected, based on mass production capacity demand. Recommendations are included for the most promising cost reduction options.

  9. Assembly jig assures reliable solar cell modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ofarrell, H. O.

    1966-01-01

    Assembly jig holds the components for a solar cell module in place as the assembly is soldered and bonded by the even heat of an oven. The jig is designed to the configuration of the planned module. It eliminates uneven thermal conditions caused by hand soldering methods.

  10. Phthalocyanine Blends Improve Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Varotto, Alessandro; Nam, Chang-Yong; Radivojevic, Ivana; Tomé, Joao; Cavaleiro, José A.S.; Black, Charles T.; Drain, Charles Michael

    2010-01-01

    A core phthalocyanine platform allows engineering the solubility properties the band gap; shifting the maximum absorption toward the red. A simple method to increase the efficiency of heterojunction solar cells uses a self-organized blend of the phthalocyanine chromophores fabricated by solution processing. PMID:20136126

  11. The dye-sensitized solar cell database.

    PubMed

    Venkatraman, Vishwesh; Raju, Rajesh; Oikonomopoulos, Solon P; Alsberg, Bjørn K

    2018-04-03

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have garnered a lot of attention in recent years. The solar energy to power conversion efficiency of a DSSC is influenced by various components of the cell such as the dye, electrolyte, electrodes and additives among others leading to varying experimental configurations. A large number of metal-based and metal-free dye sensitizers have now been reported and tools using such data to indicate new directions for design and development are on the rise. DSSCDB, the first of its kind dye-sensitized solar cell database, aims to provide users with up-to-date information from publications on the molecular structures of the dyes, experimental details and reported measurements (efficiencies and spectral properties) and thereby facilitate a comprehensive and critical evaluation of the data. Currently, the DSSCDB contains over 4000 experimental observations spanning multiple dye classes such as triphenylamines, carbazoles, coumarins, phenothiazines, ruthenium and porphyrins. The DSSCDB offers a web-based, comprehensive source of property data for dye sensitized solar cells. Access to the database is available through the following URL: www.dyedb.com .

  12. Method of fabricating a solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Pass, Thomas; Rogers, Robert

    2016-02-16

    Methods of fabricating solar cells are described. A porous layer may be formed on a surface of a substrate, the porous layer including a plurality of particles and a plurality of voids. A solution may be dispensed into one or more regions of the porous layer to provide a patterned composite layer. The substrate may then be heated.

  13. Method of fabricating a solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Pass, Thomas; Rogers, Robert

    2014-02-25

    Methods of fabricating solar cells are described. A porous layer may be formed on a surface of a substrate, the porous layer including a plurality of particles and a plurality of voids. A solution may be dispensed into one or more regions of the porous layer to provide a patterned composite layer. The substrate may then be heated.

  14. Solar Cell Efficiency Tables (Version 51)

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, Dean H; Green, Martin A.; Hishikawa, Yoshihiro

    Consolidated tables showing an extensive listing of the highest independently confirmed efficiencies for solar cells and modules are presented. Guidelines for inclusion of results into these tables are outlined and new entries since July 2017 are reviewed, together with progress over the last 25 years. Appendices are included documenting area definitions and also listing recognised test centres.

  15. Basic mechanisms governing solar-cell efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, F. A.; Neugroschel, A.; Sah, C. T.

    1976-01-01

    The efficiency of a solar cell depends on the material parameters appearing in the set of differential equations that describe the transport, recombination, and generation of electrons and holes. This paper describes the many basic mechanisms occurring in semiconductors that can control these material parameters.

  16. Studies of silicon pn junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, F. A.; Neugroschel, A.

    1977-01-01

    Modifications of the basic Shockley equations that result from the random and nonrandom spatial variations of the chemical composition of a semiconductor were developed. These modifications underlie the existence of the extensive emitter recombination current that limits the voltage over the open circuit of solar cells. The measurement of parameters, series resistance and the base diffusion length is discussed. Two methods are presented for establishing the energy bandgap narrowing in the heavily-doped emitter region. Corrections that can be important in the application of one of these methods to small test cells are examined. Oxide-charge-induced high-low-junction emitter (OCI-HLE) test cells which exhibit considerably higher voltage over the open circuit than was previously seen in n-on-p solar cells are described.

  17. New Materials for Chalcogenide Based Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosun, Banu Selin

    Thin film solar cells based on copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) have achieved efficiencies exceeding 20 %. The p-n junction in these solar cells is formed between a p-type CIGS absorber layer and a composite n-type film that consists of a 50-100 nm thin n-type CdS followed by a 50-200 nm thin n-type ZnO. This dissertation focuses on developing materials for replacing CdS and ZnO films to improve the damp-heat stability of the solar cells and for minimizing the use of Cd. Specifically, I demonstrate a new CIGS solar cell with better damp heat stability wherein the ZnO layer is replaced with SnO2. The efficiency of solar cells made with SnO2 decreased less than 5 % after 120 hours at 85 °C and 85 % relative humidity while the efficiency of solar cells made with ZnO declined by more than 70 %. Moreover, I showed that a SnO2 film deposited on top of completed CIGS solar cells significantly increased the device lifetime by forming a barrier against water diffusion. Semicrystalline SnO2 films deposited at room temperature had nanocrystals embedded in an amorphous matrix, which resulted in films without grain boundaries. These films exhibited better damp-heat stability than ZnO and crystalline SnO2 films deposited at higher temperature and this difference is attributed to the lack of grain boundary water diffusion. In addition, I studied CBD of Zn1-xCdxS from aqueous solutions of thiourea, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and zinc and cadmium sulfate. I demonstrated that films with varying composition (x) can be deposited through CBD and studied the structure and composition variation along the films' thickness. However, this traditional chemical bath deposition (CBD) approach heats the entire solution and wastes most of the chemicals by homogenous particle formation. To overcome this problem, I designed and developed a continuous-flow CBD approach to utilize the chemicals efficiently and to eliminate homogenous particle formation. Only the substrate is heated to

  18. Diketopyrrolopyrrole Polymers for Organic Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiwei; Hendriks, Koen H; Wienk, Martijn M; Janssen, René A J

    2016-01-19

    Conjugated polymers have been extensively studied for application in organic solar cells. In designing new polymers, particular attention has been given to tuning the absorption spectrum, molecular energy levels, crystallinity, and charge carrier mobility to enhance performance. As a result, the power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of solar cells based on conjugated polymers as electron donor and fullerene derivatives as electron acceptor have exceeded 10% in single-junction and 11% in multijunction devices. Despite these efforts, it is notoriously difficult to establish thorough structure-property relationships that will be required to further optimize existing high-performance polymers to their intrinsic limits. In this Account, we highlight progress on the development and our understanding of diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) based conjugated polymers for polymer solar cells. The DPP moiety is strongly electron withdrawing and its polar nature enhances the tendency of DPP-based polymers to crystallize. As a result, DPP-based conjugated polymers often exhibit an advantageously broad and tunable optical absorption, up to 1000 nm, and high mobilities for holes and electrons, which can result in high photocurrents and good fill factors in solar cells. Here we focus on the structural modifications applied to DPP polymers and rationalize and explain the relationships between chemical structure and organic photovoltaic performance. The DPP polymers can be tuned via their aromatic substituents, their alkyl side chains, and the nature of the π-conjugated segment linking the units along the polymer chain. We show that these building blocks work together in determining the molecular conformation, the optical properties, the charge carrier mobility, and the solubility of the polymer. We identify the latter as a decisive parameter for DPP-based organic solar cells because it regulates the diameter of the semicrystalline DPP polymer fibers that form in the photovoltaic blends with

  19. Solar cell efficiency tables (version 48): Solar cell efficiency tables (version 48)

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Martin A.; Emery, Keith; Hishikawa, Yoshihiro

    Consolidated tables showing an extensive listing of the highest independently confirmed efficiencies for solar cells and modules are presented. Guidelines for inclusion of results into these tables are outlined, and new entries since January 2016 are reviewed.

  20. Status of silicon solar cell technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Major progress in solar cell technology leading to increased efficiency has occurred since 1970. Technical approaches leading to this increased output include surface texturing, improved antireflection coatings, reduced grid pattern area coverage, shallow junctions and back surface fields. The status of these developments and their incorporation into cell production is discussed. Future research and technology trends leading to further efficiency increases and substantial cost reductions are described.

  1. Plastic Schottky barrier solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Waldrop, James R.; Cohen, Marshall J.

    1984-01-24

    A photovoltaic cell structure is fabricated from an active medium including an undoped, intrinsically p-type organic semiconductor comprising polyacetylene. When a film of such material is in rectifying contact with a magnesium electrode, a Schottky-barrier junction is obtained within the body of the cell structure. Also, a gold overlayer passivates the magnesium layer on the undoped polyacetylene film.

  2. Preparing Solar Cells for Soldering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagerty, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    Solder paste and contact ribbon dispensed in synchronism. Solder-paste dispenser operates on one cell at a time. Ribbon fed up ramps and into positioned while solder paste is applied. When ramps are moved out of way, ribbon lies down onto cell.

  3. High efficiency crystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sah, C. Tang

    1986-01-01

    A review of the entire research program since its inception ten years ago is given. The initial effort focused on the effects of impurities on the efficiency of silicon solar cells to provide figures of maximum allowable impurity density for efficiencies up to about 16 to 17%. Highly accurate experimental techniques were extended to characterize the recombination properties of the residual imputities in the silicon solar cell. A numerical simulator of the solar cell was also developed, using the Circuit Technique for Semiconductor Analysis. Recent effort focused on the delineation of the material and device parameters which limited the silicon efficiency to below 20% and on an investigation of cell designs to break the 20% barrier. Designs of the cell device structure and geometry can further reduce recombination losses as well as the sensitivity and criticalness of the fabrication technology required to exceed 20%. Further research is needed on the fundamental characterization of the carrier recombination properties at the chemical impurity and physical defect centers. It is shown that only single crystalline silicon cell technology can be successful in attaining efficiencies greater than 20%.

  4. Flexible thermal cycle test equipment for concentrator solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Hebert, Peter H [Glendale, CA; Brandt, Randolph J [Palmdale, CA

    2012-06-19

    A system and method for performing thermal stress testing of photovoltaic solar cells is presented. The system and method allows rapid testing of photovoltaic solar cells under controllable thermal conditions. The system and method presents a means of rapidly applying thermal stresses to one or more photovoltaic solar cells in a consistent and repeatable manner.

  5. Photon ratchet intermediate band solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, M.; Ekins-Daukes, N. J.; Farrell, D. J.; Phillips, C. C.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we propose an innovative concept for solar power conversion—the "photon ratchet" intermediate band solar cell (IBSC)—which may increase the photovoltaic energy conversion efficiency of IBSCs by increasing the lifetime of charge carriers in the intermediate state. The limiting efficiency calculation for this concept shows that the efficiency can be increased by introducing a fast thermal transition of carriers into a non-emissive state. At 1 sun, the introduction of a "ratchet band" results in an increase of efficiency from 46.8% to 48.5%, due to suppression of entropy generation.

  6. Hypervelocity Impact Studies on Solar Cell Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, Henry W., Jr.; Best, Stevie R.

    2001-01-01

    Space environmental effects have caused severe problems as satellites move toward increased power and operating voltage levels. The greatest unknown, however, is the effect of high velocity micrometeoroid impacts on high voltage arrays (>200V). Understanding such impact phenomena is necessary for the design of future reliable, high voltage solar arrays, especially for Space Solar Power applications. Therefore, the objective of this work was to study the effect of hypervelocity impacts on high voltage solar arrays. Initially, state of the art, 18% efficient GaAs solar cell strings were targeted. The maximum bias voltage on a two-cell string was -200 V while the adjacent string was held at -140 V relative to the plasma potential. A hollow cathode device provided the plasma. Soda lime glass particles 40-120 micrometers in diameter were accelerated in the Hypervelocity Impact Facility to velocities as high as 11.6 km/sec. Coordinates and velocity were obtained for each of the approximately 40 particle impact sites on each shot. Arcing did occur, and both discharging and recharging of arcs between the two strings was observed. The recharging phenomena appeared to stop at approximately 66V string differential. No arcing was observed at 400 V on concentrator cell modules for the Stretched Lens Array.

  7. Piezoresistance and solar cell efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, Victor G.

    1987-01-01

    Diffusion-induced stresses in silicon are shown to result in large localized changes in the minority-carrier mobility which in turn can have a significant effect on cell output. Evidence is given that both compressive and tensile stresses can be generated in either the emitter or the base region. Tensile stresses in the base appear to be much more effective in altering cell performance than do compressive stresses. While most stress-related effects appear to degrade cell efficiency, this is not always the case. Evidence is presented showing that arsenic-induced stresses can result in emitter characteristics comparable to those found in the MINP cell without requiring a high degree of surface passivation.

  8. Enhancing Solar Cell Efficiencies through 1-D Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The current global energy problem can be attributed to insufficient fossil fuel supplies and excessive greenhouse gas emissions resulting from increasing fossil fuel consumption. The huge demand for clean energy potentially can be met by solar-to-electricity conversions. The large-scale use of solar energy is not occurring due to the high cost and inadequate efficiencies of existing solar cells. Nanostructured materials have offered new opportunities to design more efficient solar cells, particularly one-dimensional (1-D) nanomaterials for enhancing solar cell efficiencies. These 1-D nanostructures, including nanotubes, nanowires, and nanorods, offer significant opportunities to improve efficiencies of solar cells by facilitating photon absorption, electron transport, and electron collection; however, tremendous challenges must be conquered before the large-scale commercialization of such cells. This review specifically focuses on the use of 1-D nanostructures for enhancing solar cell efficiencies. Other nanostructured solar cells or solar cells based on bulk materials are not covered in this review. Major topics addressed include dye-sensitized solar cells, quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells, and p-n junction solar cells.

  9. Space solar cell technology development - A perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott-Monck, J.

    1982-01-01

    The developmental history of photovoltaics is examined as a basis for predicting further advances to the year 2000. Transistor technology was the precursor of solar cell development. Terrestrial cells were modified for space through changes in geometry and size, as well as the use of Ag-Ti contacts and manufacture of a p-type base. The violet cell was produced for Comsat, and involved shallow junctions, new contacts, and an enhanced antireflection coating for better radiation tolerance. The driving force was the desire by private companies to reduce cost and weight for commercial satellite power supplies. Liquid phase epitaxial (LPE) GaAs cells are the latest advancement, having a 4 sq cm area and increased efficiency. GaAs cells are expected to be flight ready in the 1980s. Testing is still necessary to verify production techniques and the resistance to electron and photon damage. Research will continue in CVD cell technology, new panel technology, and ultrathin Si cells.

  10. Solar Airplanes and Regenerative Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bents, David J.

    2007-01-01

    A solar electric aircraft with the potential to "fly forever" has captured NASA's interest, and the concept for such an aircraft was pursued under Aeronautics Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project. Feasibility of this aircraft happens to depend on the successful development of solar power technologies critical to NASA's Exploration Initiatives; hence, there was widespread interest throughout NASA to bring these technologies to a flight demonstration. The most critical is an energy storage system to sustain mission power during night periods. For the solar airplane, whose flight capability is already limited by the diffuse nature of solar flux and subject to latitude and time of year constraints, the feasibility of long endurance flight depends on a storage density figure of merit better than 400-600 watt-hr per kilogram. This figure of merit is beyond the capability of present day storage technologies (other than nuclear) but may be achievable in the hydrogen-oxygen regenerative fuel cell (RFC). This potential has led NASA to undertake the practical development of a hydrogen-oxygen regenerative fuel cell, initially as solar energy storage for a high altitude UAV science platform but eventually to serve as the primary power source for NASAs lunar base and other planet surface installations. Potentially the highest storage capacity and lowest weight of any non-nuclear device, a flight-weight RFC aboard a solar-electric aircraft that is flown continuously through several successive day-night cycles will provide the most convincing demonstration that this technology's widespread potential has been realized. In 1998 NASA began development of a closed cycle hydrogen oxygen PEM RFC under the Aeronautics Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project and continued its development, originally for a solar electric airplane flight, through FY2005 under the Low Emissions Alternative Power (LEAP) project. Construction of

  11. Superstrate sub-cell voltage-matched multijunction solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Mascarenhas, Angelo; Alberi, Kirstin

    2016-03-15

    Voltage-matched thin film multijunction solar cell and methods of producing cells having upper CdTe pn junction layers formed on a transparent substrate which in the completed device is operatively positioned in a superstate configuration. The solar cell also includes a lower pn junction formed independently of the CdTe pn junction and an insulating layer between CdTe and lower pn junctions. The voltage-matched thin film multijunction solar cells further include a parallel connection between the CdTe pn junction and lower pn junctions to form a two-terminal photonic device. Methods of fabricating devices from independently produced upper CdTe junction layers and lower junction layers are also disclosed.

  12. High Aspect Ratio Semiconductor Heterojunction Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Redwing, Joan; Mallouk, Tom; Mayer, Theresa

    2013-05-17

    The project focused on the development of high aspect ratio silicon heterojunction (HARSH) solar cells. The solar cells developed in this study consisted of high density vertical arrays of radial junction silicon microwires/pillars formed on Si substrates. Prior studies have demonstrated that vertical Si wire/pillar arrays enable reduced reflectivity and improved light trapping characteristics compared to planar solar cells. In addition, the radial junction structure offers the possibility of increased carrier collection in solar cells fabricated using material with short carrier diffusion lengths. However, the high junction and surface area of radial junction Si wire/pillar array devices can be problematicmore » and lead to increased diode leakage and enhanced surface recombination. This study investigated the use of amorphous hydrogenated Si in the form of a heterojunction-intrinsic-thin layer (HIT) structure as a junction formation method for these devices. The HIT layer structure has widely been employed to reduce surface recombination in planar crystalline Si solar cells. Consequently, it was anticipated that it would also provide significant benefits to the performance of radial junction Si wire/pillar array devices. The overall goals of the project were to demonstrate a HARSH cell with a HIT-type structure in the radial junction Si wire/pillar array configuration and to develop potentially low cost pathways to fabricate these devices. Our studies demonstrated that the HIT structure lead to significant improvements in the open circuit voltage (V oc>0.5) of radial junction Si pillar array devices compared to devices fabricated using junctions formed by thermal diffusion or low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD). In addition, our work experimentally demonstrated that the radial junction structure lead to improvements in efficiency compared to comparable planar devices for devices fabricated using heavily doped Si that had reduced carrier diffusion

  13. Semiconductor Nanocrystals as Light Harvesters in Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Etgar, Lioz

    2013-01-01

    Photovoltaic cells use semiconductors to convert sunlight into electrical current and are regarded as a key technology for a sustainable energy supply. Quantum dot-based solar cells have shown great potential as next generation, high performance, low-cost photovoltaics due to the outstanding optoelectronic properties of quantum dots and their multiple exciton generation (MEG) capability. This review focuses on QDs as light harvesters in solar cells, including different structures of QD-based solar cells, such as QD heterojunction solar cells, QD-Schottky solar cells, QD-sensitized solar cells and the recent development in organic-inorganic perovskite heterojunction solar cells. Mechanisms, procedures, advantages, disadvantages and the latest results obtained in the field are described. To summarize, a future perspective is offered. PMID:28809318

  14. The NASA Lewis Research Center program in space solar cell research and technology. [efficient silicon solar cell development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Progress in space solar cell research and technology is reported. An 18 percent-AMO-efficient silicon solar cell, reduction in the radiation damage suffered by silicon solar cells in space, and high efficiency wrap-around contact and thin (50 micrometer) coplanar back contact silicon cells are among the topics discussed. Reduction in the cost of silicon cells for space use, cost effective GaAs solar cells, the feasibility of 30 percent AMO solar energy conversion, and reliable encapsulants for space blankets are also considered.

  15. Development of integral covers on solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, P.; Somberg, H.

    1971-01-01

    The electron-beam technique for evaporating a dielectric material onto solar cells is investigated. A process has been developed which will provide a highly transparent, low stress, 2 mil thick cover capable of withstanding conventional space type qualification tests including humidity, thermal shock, and thermal cycling. The covers have demonstrated the ability to withstand 10 to the 15th power 1 MeV electrons and UV irradiation with minor darkening. Investigation of the cell AR coating has produced a space qualifiable titanium oxide coating which will give an additional 6% current output over similar silicon oxide coated cells when covered by glass.

  16. Accelerated stress testing of terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, J. L.; Lathrop, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    A program to investigate the reliability characteristics of unencapsulated low-cost terrestrial solar cells using accelerated stress testing is described. Reliability (or parametric degradation) factors appropriate to the cell technologies and use conditions were studied and a series of accelerated stress tests was synthesized. An electrical measurement procedure and a data analysis and management system was derived, and stress test fixturing and material flow procedures were set up after consideration was given to the number of cells to be stress tested and measured and the nature of the information to be obtained from the process. Selected results and conclusions are presented.

  17. Advanced high efficiency wraparound contact solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott-Monck, J. A.; Uno, F. M.; Thornhill, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    A significant advancement in the development of thin high efficiency wraparound contact silicon solar cells has been made by coupling space and terrestrial processing procedures. Although this new method for fabricating cells has not been completely reduced to practice, some of the initial cells have delivered over 20 mW/sq cm when tested at 25 C under AMO intensity. This approach not only yields high efficiency devices, but shows promise of allowing complete freedom of choice in both the location and size of the wraparound contact pad area.

  18. Advanced high efficiency wraparound contact solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott-Monck, J. A.; Uno, F. M.; Thornhill, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    A significant advancement in the development of thin high efficiency wraparound contact silicon solar cells has been made by coupling space and terrestrial processing procedures. Although this new method for fabricating cells has not been completely reduced to practice, some of the initial cells have delivered over 20 mW/sq cm when tested at 25 C under AMO intensity. This approach not only yields high efficiency devices, but shows promise of allowing complete freedom of choice in both the location and size of the wraparound contact pad area

  19. Multijunction high voltage concentrator solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valco, G. J.; Kapoor, V. J.; Evans, J. C.; Chai, A.-T.

    1981-01-01

    The standard integrated circuit technology has been developed to design and fabricate new innovative planar multi-junction solar cell chips for concentrated sunlight applications. This 1 cm x 1 cm cell consisted of several voltage generating regions called unit cells which were internally connected in series within a single chip resulting in high open circuit voltages. Typical open-circuit voltages of 3.6 V and short-circuit currents of 90 ma were obtained at 80 AM1 suns. A dramatic increase in both short circuit current and open circuit voltage with increased light levels was observed.

  20. Rational Strategies for Efficient Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jangwon; Noh, Jun Hong; Seok, Sang Il

    2016-03-15

    A long-standing dream in the large scale application of solar energy conversion is the fabrication of solar cells with high-efficiency and long-term stability at low cost. The realization of such practical goals depends on the architecture, process and key materials because solar cells are typically constructed from multilayer heterostructures of light harvesters, with electron and hole transporting layers as a major component. Recently, inorganic-organic hybrid lead halide perovskites have attracted significant attention as light absorbers for the fabrication of low-cost and high-efficiency solar cells via a solution process. This mainly stems from long-range ambipolar charge transport properties, low exciton binding energies, and suitable band gap tuning by managing the chemical composition. In our pioneering work, a new photovoltaic platform for efficient perovskite solar cells (PSCs) was proposed, which yielded a high power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 12%. The platform consisted of a pillared architecture of a three-dimensional nanocomposite of perovskites fully infiltrating mesoporous TiO2, resulting in the formation of continuous phases and perovskite domains overlaid with a polymeric hole conductor. Since then, the PCE of our PSCs has been rapidly increased from 3% to over 20% certified efficiency. The unprecedented increase in the PCE can be attributed to the effective integration of the advantageous attributes of the refined bicontinuous architecture, deposition process, and composition of perovskite materials. Specifically, the bicontinuous architectures used in the high efficiency comprise a layer of perovskite sandwiched between mesoporous metal-oxide layer, which is a very thinner than that of used in conventional dye-sensitized solar cells, and hole-conducting contact materials with a metal back contact. The mesoporous scaffold can affect the hysteresis under different scan direction in measurements of PSCs. The hysteresis also greatly depends on

  1. Production technology for high efficiency ion implanted solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, A. R.; Minnucci, J. A.; Greenwald, A. C.; Josephs, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    Ion implantation is being developed for high volume automated production of silicon solar cells. An implanter designed for solar cell processing and able to properly implant up to 300 4-inch wafers per hour is now operational. A machine to implant 180 sq m/hr of solar cell material has been designed. Implanted silicon solar cells with efficiencies exceeding 16% AM1 are now being produced and higher efficiencies are expected. Ion implantation and transient processing by pulsed electron beams are being integrated with electrostatic bonding to accomplish a simple method for large scale, low cost production of high efficiency solar cell arrays.

  2. Universal solar-cell terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bashin, S.; Kelley, F. G.

    1977-01-01

    Terminal, which replaces stakes or lugs in conventional design with loop receptacles for wires from cell and harness, uses dissimilar bonding properties (metal-to-glass and/or ceramics) of iron-nickel-cobalt alloy in conjunction with standard termination.

  3. Gallium Arsenide solar cell radiation damage experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurer, R. H.; Kinnison, J. D.; Herbert, G. A.; Meulenberg, A.

    1991-01-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) solar cells for space applications from three different manufactures were irradiated with 10 MeV protons or 1 MeV electrons. The electrical performance of the cells was measured at several fluence levels and compared. Silicon cells were included for reference and comparison. All the GaAs cell types performed similarly throughout the testing and showed a 36 to 56 percent power areal density advantage over the silicon cells. Thinner (8-mil versus 12-mil) GaAs cells provide a significant weight reduction. The use of germanium (Ge) substrates to improve mechanical integrity can be implemented with little impact on end of life performance in a radiation environment.

  4. Variation of solar cell sensitivity and solar radiation on tilted surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klucher, T. M.

    1978-01-01

    The validity is studied that one of various insolation models used to compute solar radiation incident on tilted surfaces from global data measured on horizontal surfaces. The variation of solar cell sensitivity to solar radiation is determined over a wide range of atmospheric condition. A new model was formulated that reduced the deviations between measured and predicted insolation to less than 3 percent. Evaluation of solar cell sensitivity data indicates small change (2-3 percent) in sensitivity from winter to summer for tilted cells. The feasibility of using such global data as a means for calibrating terrestrial solar cells is discussed.

  5. Highly efficient light management for perovskite solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong-Lin; Cui, Hui-Juan; Hou, Guo-Jiao; Zhu, Zhen-Gang; Yan, Qing-Bo; Su, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Organic-inorganic halide perovskite solar cells have enormous potential to impact the existing photovoltaic industry. As realizing a higher conversion efficiency of the solar cell is still the most crucial task, a great number of schemes were proposed to minimize the carrier loss by optimizing the electrical properties of the perovskite solar cells. Here, we focus on another significant aspect that is to minimize the light loss by optimizing the light management to gain a high efficiency for perovskite solar cells. In our scheme, the slotted and inverted prism structured SiO2 layers are adopted to trap more light into the solar cells, and a better transparent conducting oxide layer is employed to reduce the parasitic absorption. For such an implementation, the efficiency and the serviceable angle of the perovskite solar cell can be promoted impressively. This proposal would shed new light on developing the high-performance perovskite solar cells. PMID:26733112

  6. Highly efficient light management for perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong-Lin; Cui, Hui-Juan; Hou, Guo-Jiao; Zhu, Zhen-Gang; Yan, Qing-Bo; Su, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Organic-inorganic halide perovskite solar cells have enormous potential to impact the existing photovoltaic industry. As realizing a higher conversion efficiency of the solar cell is still the most crucial task, a great number of schemes were proposed to minimize the carrier loss by optimizing the electrical properties of the perovskite solar cells. Here, we focus on another significant aspect that is to minimize the light loss by optimizing the light management to gain a high efficiency for perovskite solar cells. In our scheme, the slotted and inverted prism structured SiO2 layers are adopted to trap more light into the solar cells, and a better transparent conducting oxide layer is employed to reduce the parasitic absorption. For such an implementation, the efficiency and the serviceable angle of the perovskite solar cell can be promoted impressively. This proposal would shed new light on developing the high-performance perovskite solar cells.

  7. Highly efficient light management for perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong-Lin; Cui, Hui-Juan; Hou, Guo-Jiao; Zhu, Zhen-Gang; Yan, Qing-Bo; Su, Gang

    2016-01-06

    Organic-inorganic halide perovskite solar cells have enormous potential to impact the existing photovoltaic industry. As realizing a higher conversion efficiency of the solar cell is still the most crucial task, a great number of schemes were proposed to minimize the carrier loss by optimizing the electrical properties of the perovskite solar cells. Here, we focus on another significant aspect that is to minimize the light loss by optimizing the light management to gain a high efficiency for perovskite solar cells. In our scheme, the slotted and inverted prism structured SiO2 layers are adopted to trap more light into the solar cells, and a better transparent conducting oxide layer is employed to reduce the parasitic absorption. For such an implementation, the efficiency and the serviceable angle of the perovskite solar cell can be promoted impressively. This proposal would shed new light on developing the high-performance perovskite solar cells.

  8. Recent progress in Si thin film technology for solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwano, Yukinori; Nakano, Shoichi; Tsuda, Shinya

    1991-11-01

    Progress in Si thin film technology 'specifically amorphous Si (a-Si) and polycrystalline Si (poly-Si) thin film' for solar cells is summarized here from fabrication method, material, and structural viewpoints. In addition to a-Si, primary results on poly-Si thin film research are discussed. Various applications for a-Si solar cells are mentioned, and consumer applications and a-Si solar cell photovoltaic systems are introduced. New product developments include see-through solar cells, solar cell roofing tiles, and ultra-light flexible solar cells. As for new systems, air conditioning equipment powered by solar cells is described. Looking to the future, the proposed GENESIS project is discussed.

  9. Development of standardized specifications for silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott-Monck, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    A space silicon solar cell assembly (cell and coverglass) specification aimed at standardizing the diverse requirements of current cell or assembly specifications was developed. This specification was designed to minimize both the procurement and manufacturing costs for space qualified silicon solar cell assembilies. In addition, an impact analysis estimating the technological and economic effects of employing a standardized space silicon solar cell assembly was performed.

  10. Quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Rühle, Sven; Shalom, Menny; Zaban, Arie

    2010-08-02

    Quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSCs) are a promising low-cost alternative to existing photovoltaic technologies such as crystalline silicon and thin inorganic films. The absorption spectrum of quantum dots (QDs) can be tailored by controlling their size, and QDs can be produced by low-cost methods. Nanostructures such as mesoporous films, nanorods, nanowires, nanotubes and nanosheets with high microscopic surface area, redox electrolytes and solid-state hole conductors are borrowed from standard dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) to fabricate electron conductor/QD monolayer/hole conductor junctions with high optical absorbance. Herein we focus on recent developments in the field of mono- and polydisperse QDSCs. Stability issues are adressed, coating methods are presented, performance is reviewed and special emphasis is given to the importance of energy-level alignment to increase the light to electric power conversion efficiency.

  11. Advanced Solar Cell Testing and Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila; Curtis, Henry; Piszczor, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The topic for this workshop stems from an ongoing effort by the photovoltaic community and U.S. government to address issues and recent problems associated with solar cells and arrays experienced by a number of different space systems. In April 2003, a workshop session was held at the Aerospace Space Power Workshop to discuss an effort by the Air Force to update and standardize solar cell and array qualification test procedures in an effort to ameliorate some of these problems. The organizers of that workshop session thought it was important to continue these discussions and present this information to the entire photovoltaic community. Thus, it was decided to include this topic as a workshop at the following SPRAT conference.

  12. Perovskite Materials: Solar Cell and Optoelectronic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bin; Geohegan, David B; Xiao, Kai

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid organometallic trihalide perovskites are promising candidates in the applications for next-generation, high-performance, low-cost optoelectronic devices, including photovoltaics, light emitting diodes, and photodetectors. Particularly, the solar cells based on this type of materials have reached 22% lab scale power conversion efficiency in only about seven years, comparable to the other thin film photovoltaic technologies. Hybrid perovskite materials not only exhibit superior optoelectronic properties, but also show many interesting physical properties such as ion migration and defect physics, which may allow the exploration of more device functionalities. In this article, the fundamental understanding of the interrelationships between crystal structure, electronic structure,more » and material properties is discussed. Various chemical synthesis and processing methods for superior device performance in solar cells and optoelectronic devices are reviewed.« less

  13. Dip-Coating Fabrication of Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koepke, B.; Suave, D.

    1982-01-01

    Inexpensive silicon solar cells made by simple dip technique. Cooling shoes direct flow of helium on graphite-coated ceramic substrate to solidify film of liquid silicon on graphite surface as substrate is withdrawn from molten silicon. After heaters control cooling of film and substrate to prevent cracking. Gas jets exit at points about 10 mm from substrate surfaces and 6 to 10 mm above melt surface.

  14. Milestones Toward 50% Efficient Solar Cell Modules

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    efficiency, both at solar cells and module level. The optical system consists of a tiled nonimaging concentrating system, coupled with a spectral...which combines a nonimaging optical concentrator (which does not require tracking and is called a static concentrator) with spectral splitting...DESIGN AND RESULTS The optical design is based on non-symmetric, nonimaging optics, tiled into an array. The central issues in the optical system

  15. High efficiency silicon solar cell review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godlewski, M. P. (Editor)

    1975-01-01

    An overview is presented of the current research and development efforts to improve the performance of the silicon solar cell. The 24 papers presented reviewed experimental and analytic modeling work which emphasizes the improvment of conversion efficiency and the reduction of manufacturing costs. A summary is given of the round-table discussion, in which the near- and far-term directions of future efficiency improvements were discussed.

  16. New high-efficiency silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Crotty, G. T.

    1985-01-01

    A design for silicon solar cells was investigated as an approach to increasing the cell open-circuit voltage and efficiency for flat-plate terrestrial photovoltaic applications. This deviates from past designs, where either the entire front surface of the cell is covered by a planar junction or the surface is textured before junction formation, which results in an even greater (up to 70%) junction area. The heavily doped front region and the junction space charge region are potential areas of high recombination for generated and injected minority carriers. The design presented reduces junction area by spreading equidiameter dot junctions across the surface of the cell, spaced about a diffusion length or less from each other. Various dot diameters and spacings allowed variations in total junction area. A simplified analysis was done to obtain a first-order design optimization. Efficiencies of up to 19% can be obtained. Cell fabrication involved extra masking steps for selective junction diffusion, and made surface passivation a key element in obtaining good collection. It also involved photolithography, with line widths down to microns. A method is demonstrated for achieving potentially high open-circuit voltages and solar-cell efficiencies.

  17. Accelerated stress testing of terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.; Hawkins, D. C.; Prince, J. L.; Walker, H. A.

    1982-01-01

    The development of an accelerated test schedule for terrestrial solar cells is described. This schedule, based on anticipated failure modes deduced from a consideration of IC failure mechanisms, involves bias-temperature testing, humidity testing (including both 85-85 and pressure cooker stress), and thermal-cycle thermal-shock testing. Results are described for 12 different unencapsulated cell types. Both gradual electrical degradation and sudden catastrophic mechanical change were observed. These effects can be used to discriminate between cell types and technologies relative to their reliability attributes. Consideration is given to identifying laboratory failure modes which might lead to severe degradation in the field through second quadrant operation. Test results indicate that the ability of most cell types to withstand accelerated stress testing depends more on the manufacturer's design, processing, and worksmanship than on the particular metallization system. Preliminary tests comparing accelerated test results on encapsulated and unencapsulated cells are described.

  18. Gallium arsenide solar cell radiation damage study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurer, R. H.; Herbert, G. A.; Kinnison, J. D.; Meulenberg, A.

    1989-01-01

    A thorough analysis has been made of electron- and proton- damaged GaAs solar cells suitable for use in space. It is found that, although some electrical parametric data and spectral response data are quite similar, the type of damage due to the two types of radiation is different. An I-V analysis model shows that electrons damage the bulk of the cell and its currents relatively more, while protons damage the junction of the cell and its voltages more. It is suggested that multiple defects due to protons in a strong field region such as a p/n junction cause the greater degradation in cell voltage, whereas the individual point defects in the quasi-neutral minority-carrier-diffusion regions due to electrons cause the greater degradation in cell current and spectral response.

  19. Microchannel contacting of crystalline silicon solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Bullock, James; Ota, Hiroki; Wang, Hanchen; ...

    2017-08-22

    There is tremendous interest in reducing losses caused by the metal contacts in silicon photovoltaics, particularly the optical and resistive losses of the front metal grid. One commonly sought-after goal is the creation of high aspect-ratio metal fingers which provide an optically narrow and low resistance pathway to the external circuit. Currently, the most widely used metal contact deposition techniques are limited to widths and aspect-ratios of ~40 μm and ~0.5, respectively. In this study, we introduce the use of a micropatterned polydimethylsiloxane encapsulation layer to form narrow (~20 μm) microchannels, with aspect-ratios up to 8, on the surface ofmore » solar cells. We demonstrate that low temperature metal pastes, electroless plating and atomic layer deposition can all be used within the microchannels. Further, we fabricate proof-of-concept structures including simple planar silicon heterojunction and homojunction solar cells. While preliminary in both design and efficiency, these results demonstrate the potential of this approach and its compatibility with current solar cell architectures.« less

  20. Microchannel contacting of crystalline silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, James; Ota, Hiroki; Wang, Hanchen

    There is tremendous interest in reducing losses caused by the metal contacts in silicon photovoltaics, particularly the optical and resistive losses of the front metal grid. One commonly sought-after goal is the creation of high aspect-ratio metal fingers which provide an optically narrow and low resistance pathway to the external circuit. Currently, the most widely used metal contact deposition techniques are limited to widths and aspect-ratios of ~40 μm and ~0.5, respectively. In this study, we introduce the use of a micropatterned polydimethylsiloxane encapsulation layer to form narrow (~20 μm) microchannels, with aspect-ratios up to 8, on the surface ofmore » solar cells. We demonstrate that low temperature metal pastes, electroless plating and atomic layer deposition can all be used within the microchannels. Further, we fabricate proof-of-concept structures including simple planar silicon heterojunction and homojunction solar cells. While preliminary in both design and efficiency, these results demonstrate the potential of this approach and its compatibility with current solar cell architectures.« less

  1. (abstract) Scaling Nominal Solar Cell Impedances for Array Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert L; Wallace, Matthew T.; Iles, Peter

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses a task the objective of which is to characterize solar cell array AC impedance and develop scaling rules for impedance characterization of large arrays by testing single solar cells and small arrays. This effort is aimed at formulating a methodology for estimating the AC impedance of the Mars Pathfinder (MPF) cruise and lander solar arrays based upon testing single cells and small solar cell arrays and to create a basis for design of a single shunt limiter for MPF power control of flight solar arrays having very different inpedances.

  2. High-Bandgap Silicon Nanocrystal Solar Cells: Device Fabrication, Characterization, and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löper, Philipp; Canino, Mariaconcetta; Schnabel, Manuel; Summonte, Caterina; Janz, Stefan; Zacharias, Margit

    Silicon nanocrystals (Si NCs) embedded in Si-based dielectrics provide a Si-based high-bandgap material (1.7 eV) and enable the construction of crystalline Si tandem solar cells. This chapter focusses on Si NC embedded in silicon carbide, because silicon carbide offers electrical conduction through the matrix material. The material development is reviewed, and optical modeling is introduced as a powerful method to monitor the four material components, amorphous and crystalline silicon as well as amorphous and crystalline silicon carbide. In the second part of this chapter, recent device developments for the photovoltaic characterization of Si NCs are examined. The controlled growth of Si NCs involves high-temperature annealing which deteriorates the properties of any previously established selective contacts. A membrane-based device is presented to overcome these limitations. In this approach, the formation of both selective contacts is carried out after high-temperature annealing and is therefore not affected by the latter. We examine p-i-n solar cells with an intrinsic region made of Si NCs embedded in silicon carbide. Device failure due to damaged insulation layers is analyzed by light beam-induced current measurements. An optical model of the device is presented for improving the cell current. A characterization scheme for Si NC p-i-n solar cells is presented which aims at determining the fundamental transport and recombination properties, i.e., the effective mobility lifetime product, of the nanocrystal layer at device level. For this means, an illumination-dependent analysis of Si NC p-i-n solar cells is carried out within the framework of the constant field approximation. The analysis builds on an optical device model, which is used to assess the photogenerated current in each of the device layers. Illumination-dependent current-voltage curves are modelled with a voltage-dependent current collection function with only two free parameters, and excellent

  3. AlGaAs top solar cell for mechanical attachment in a multi-junction tandem concentrator solar cell stack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinetta, L. C.; Hannon, M. H.; Mcneely, J. B.; Barnett, A. M.

    1991-01-01

    The AstroPower self-supporting, transparent AlGaAs top solar cell can be stacked upon any well-developed bottom solar cell for improved system performance. This is an approach to improve the performance and scale of space photovoltaic power systems. Mechanically stacked tandem solar cell concentrator systems based on the AlGaAs top concentrator solar cell can provide near term efficiencies of 36 percent (AMO, 100x). Possible tandem stack efficiencies greater than 38 percent (100x, AMO) are feasible with a careful selection of materials. In a three solar cell stack, system efficiencies exceed 41 percent (100x, AMO). These device results demonstrate a practical solution for a state-of-the-art top solar cell for attachment to an existing, well-developed solar cell.

  4. High Efficiency Large Area Polysilicon Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, S. M.; Winter, C.

    1985-01-01

    Large area (100 sq cm) polysilicon solar cells having efficiencies of up to 14.1% (100 mW/sq cm, 25 C) were fabricated and a detailed analysis was performed to identify the efficiency loss mechanisms. The 1-5 characteristics of the best cell were dominated by recombination in the quasi-neutral base due to the combination of minority carrier diffusion length and base resistivity. An analysis of the microstructural defects present in the material and their effect on the electrical properties is presented.

  5. Inverted amorphous silicon solar cell utilizing cermet layers

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1979-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell incorporating a transparent high work function metal cermet incident to solar radiation and a thick film cermet contacting the amorphous silicon opposite to said incident surface.

  6. MANUFACTURE OF PHOTOVOLTAIC SOLAR CELL USING PLANT CHLOROPHYLL

    EPA Science Inventory

    To date, we have successfully manufactured working chlorophyll sensitized solar cells using chlorophyll (and b mixture) from spinach leaves. We have evaluated the electronic characteristics (voltage, current, and power outputs using different loading resistors) of this solar c...

  7. Measurement and Characterization of Concentrator Solar Cells II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheiman, Dave; Sater, Bernard L.; Chubb, Donald; Jenkins, Phillip; Snyder, Dave

    2005-01-01

    Concentrator solar cells are continuing to get more consideration for use in power systems. This interest is because concentrator systems can have a net lower cost per watt in solar cell materials plus ongoing improvements in sun-tracking technology. Quantitatively measuring the efficiency of solar cells under concentration is difficult. Traditionally, the light concentration on solar cells has been determined by using a ratio of the measured solar cell s short circuit current to that at one sun, this assumes that current changes proportionally with light intensity. This works well with low to moderate (<20 suns) concentration levels on "well-behaved" linear cells but does not apply when cells respond superlinearly, current increases faster than intensity, or sublinearly, current increases more slowly than intensity. This paper continues work on using view factors to determine the concentration level and linearity of the solar cell with mathematical view factor analysis and experimental results [1].

  8. Silicon solar cells by ion implantation and pulsed energy processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, A. R.; Minnucci, J. A.; Shaughnessy, T. S.; Greenwald, A. C.

    1976-01-01

    A new method for fabrication of silicon solar cells is being developed around ion implantation in conjunction with pulsed electron beam techniques to replace conventional furnace processing. Solar cells can be fabricated totally in a vacuum environment at room temperature. Cells with 10% AM0 efficiency have been demonstrated. High efficiency cells and effective automated processing capabilities are anticipated.

  9. Epitaxial solar-cell fabrication, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daiello, R. V.; Robinson, P. H.; Kressel, H.

    1977-01-01

    Dichlorosilane (SiH2Cl2) was used as the silicon source material in all of the epitaxial growths. Both n/p/p(+) and p/n/n(+) structures were studied. Correlations were made between the measured profiles and the solar cell parameters, especially cell open-circuit voltage. It was found that in order to obtain consistently high open-circuit voltage, the epitaxial techniques used to grow the surface layer must be altered to obtain very abrupt doping profiles in the vicinity of the junction. With these techniques, it was possible to grow reproducibly both p/n/n(+) and n/p/p(+) solar cell structures having open-circuit voltages in the 610- to 630-mV range, with fill-factors in excess of 0.80 and AM-1 efficiencies of about 13%. Combinations and comparisons of epitaxial and diffused surface layers were also made. Using such surface layers, we found that the blue response of epitaxial cells could be improved, resulting in AM-1 short-circuit current densities of about 30 mA/cm sq. The best cells fabricated in this manner had AM-1 efficiency of 14.1%.

  10. Special section guest editorial: Hybrid organic-inorganic solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Nogueira, Ana Flavia; Rumbles, Garry

    2015-04-06

    In this special section of the Journal of Photonics for Energy, there is a focus on some of the science and technology of a range of different hybrid organic-inorganic solar cells. Prior to 1991 there were many significant scientific research reports of hybrid organic-inorganic solar cells; finally, however, it wasn’t until the dye-sensitized solar cell entered the league table of certified research cell efficiencies that this area experienced an explosion of research activity.

  11. Luminescent solar concentrators and all-inorganic nanoparticle solar cells for solar energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sholin, Veronica

    Increasing energy demand and the parallel increase of greenhouse gas emissions are challenging researchers to find new and cleaner energy sources. Solar energy harvesting is arguably the most promising candidate for replacing fossil-fuel power generation. Photovoltaics are the most direct way of collecting solar energy; cost continues to hinder large-scale implementation of photovoltaics, however. Therefore, alternative technologies that will allow the extraction of solar power, while maintaining the overall costs of fabrication, installation, collection, and distribution low, must be explored. This thesis focuses on the fabrication and testing of two types of devices that step up to this challenge: the luminescent solar concentrator (LSC) and all-inorganic nanoparticle solar cells. In these devices I make use of novel materials, semiconducting polymers and inorganic nanoparticles, both of which have lower costs than the crystalline materials used in the fabrication of traditional photovoltaics. Furthermore, the cost of manufacturing LSCs and the nanoparticle solar cells is lower than the manufacturing cost of traditional optics-based concentrators and crystalline solar cells. An LSC is essentially a slab of luminescent material that acts as a planar light pipe. The LSC absorbs incoming photons and channels fluoresced photons toward appropriately located solar cells, which perform the photovoltaic conversion. By covering large areas with relatively inexpensive fluorescing organic dyes or semiconducting polymers, the area of solar cell needed is greatly reduced. Because semiconducting polymers and quantum dots may have small absorption/emission band overlaps, tunable absorption, and longer lifetimes, they are good candidates for LSC fabrication, promising improvement with respect to laser dyes traditionally used to fabricate LSCs. Here the efficiency of LSCs consisting of liquid solutions of semiconducting polymers encased in glass was measured and compared to the

  12. Materials That Enhance Efficiency and Radiation Resistance of Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiadong; Wang, Haorong

    2012-01-01

    A thin layer (approximately 10 microns) of a novel "transparent" fluorescent material is applied to existing solar cells or modules to effectively block and convert UV light, or other lower solar response waveband of solar radiation, to visible or IR light that can be more efficiently used by solar cells for additional photocurrent. Meanwhile, the layer of fluorescent coating material remains fully "transparent" to the visible and IR waveband of solar radiation, resulting in a net gain of solar cell efficiency. This innovation alters the effective solar spectral power distribution to which an existing cell gets exposed, and matches the maximum photovoltaic (PV) response of existing cells. By shifting a low PV response waveband (e.g., UV) of solar radiation to a high PV response waveband (e.g. Vis-Near IR) with novel fluorescent materials that are transparent to other solar-cell sensitive wavebands, electrical output from solar cells will be enhanced. This approach enhances the efficiency of solar cells by converting UV and high-energy particles in space that would otherwise be wasted to visible/IR light. This innovation is a generic technique that can be readily implemented to significantly increase efficiencies of both space and terrestrial solar cells, without incurring much cost, thus bringing a broad base of economical, social, and environmental benefits. The key to this approach is that the "fluorescent" material must be very efficient, and cannot block or attenuate the "desirable" and unconverted" waveband of solar radiation (e.g. Vis-NIR) from reaching the cells. Some nano-phosphors and novel organometallic complex materials have been identified that enhance the energy efficiency on some state-of-the-art commercial silicon and thin-film-based solar cells by over 6%.

  13. Quantum Dots Investigated for Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Castro, Stephanie L.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has been investigating the synthesis of quantum dots of CdSe and CuInS2 for use in intermediate-bandgap solar cells. Using quantum dots in a solar cell to create an intermediate band will allow the harvesting of a much larger portion of the available solar spectrum. Theoretical studies predict a potential efficiency of 63.2 percent, which is approximately a factor of 2 better than any state-of-the-art devices available today. This technology is also applicable to thin-film devices--where it offers a potential four-fold increase in power-to-weight ratio over the state of the art. Intermediate-bandgap solar cells require that quantum dots be sandwiched in an intrinsic region between the photovoltaic solar cell's ordinary p- and n-type regions (see the preceding figure). The quantum dots form the intermediate band of discrete states that allow sub-bandgap energies to be absorbed. However, when the current is extracted, it is limited by the bandgap, not the individual photon energies. The energy states of the quantum dot can be controlled by controlling the size of the dot. Ironically, the ground-state energy levels are inversely proportional to the size of the quantum dots. We have prepared a variety of quantum dots using the typical organometallic synthesis routes pioneered by Ba Wendi et al., in the early 1990's. The most studied quantum dots prepared by this method have been of CdSe. To produce these dots, researchers inject a syringe of the desired organometallic precursors into heated triocytlphosphine oxide (TOPO) that has been vigorously stirred under an inert atmosphere (see the following figure). The solution immediately begins to change from colorless to yellow, then orange and red/brown, as the quantum dots increase in size. When the desired size is reached, the heat is removed from the flask. Quantum dots of different sizes can be identified by placing them under a "black light" and observing the various color differences in

  14. Enhancing Solar Cell Efficiency Using Photon Upconversion Materials

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Yunfei; Hao, Shuwei; Yang, Chunhui; Chen, Guanying

    2015-01-01

    Photovoltaic cells are able to convert sunlight into electricity, providing enough of the most abundant and cleanest energy to cover our energy needs. However, the efficiency of current photovoltaics is significantly impeded by the transmission loss of sub-band-gap photons. Photon upconversion is a promising route to circumvent this problem by converting these transmitted sub-band-gap photons into above-band-gap light, where solar cells typically have high quantum efficiency. Here, we summarize recent progress on varying types of efficient upconversion materials as well as their outstanding uses in a series of solar cells, including silicon solar cells (crystalline and amorphous), gallium arsenide (GaAs) solar cells, dye-sensitized solar cells, and other types of solar cells. The challenge and prospect of upconversion materials for photovoltaic applications are also discussed. PMID:28347095

  15. Entirely screen printed CdS/CdTe solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikegami, S.; Matsumoto, H.; Uda, H.; Komatsu, Y.; Nakano, A.; Kuribayashi, K.

    An entirely screen printed CdS/CdTe solar cell has been manufactured on a borosilicate glass substrate by successively repeating screen printing and heating in a belt furnace of each paste of CdS, Cd+Te, C, Ag+In and Ag. In a small cell with 0.78 sq cm area, the intrinsic conversion efficiency of 12.8 percent has been obtained; this value is the highest in the thin film type solar cells. On a large glass substrate of 30 x 30 sq cm, 28 unit solar cells connected in series have been constructed by this printing technique, their intrinsic efficiency being 8.5 percent. Under the roof top condition, no change in output power is observed in the present solar cells encapsulated over 206 days. Thus, the entirely screen printed CdS/CdTe solar cells can be expected as low cost, highly efficient, and stable solar cells.

  16. OPTEC: A Cubesat for Solar Cell Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey; Hepp, Aloysius; Arutyunov, Dennis; White, Kelsey; Witsberger, Paul

    2014-01-01

    A new type of small spacecraft, the cubesat, has introduced a new concept for extremely small, low-cost missions into space. Cubesats are designed to be launched as secondary payloads on other missions, and are made up of unit elements (U) of size 10 cm by 10 cm by 10 cm, with a nominal mass of no more than 1.33 kg per U. We have designed a cubesat, OPTEC (Orbital Photovoltaic Testbed Cubesat) as a low-cost testbed to demonstrate, calibrate, and test solar cell technologies in space. Size of the cubesat is 2U (10x10x20cm, and the mass 2.66 kg. The cubesat deploys from the International Space Station into Low Earth Orbit at an altitude of about 420 km. Up to two 4x8cm test solar panels can be flown, with full I-V curves and temperature measurements taken.

  17. Martian environmental effects on solar cells and solar cell cover glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, F. A.

    1971-01-01

    The results of a study concerned with the effects of the Martian environment on the performance of solar cells are given. The results indicate that the efficiency of a power system composed of solar cells will be greatly reduced when subjected to dust storms such as may occur on Mars. Two factors are responsible for this, (1) accumulation of dust on the protective covers, and (2) damage to covers by pitting, cracking, and chipping. It is recommended that this type of power system not be used on Mars landing vehicles. Experimental procedures are described and results are summarized and damage assessed.

  18. Selecting tandem partners for silicon solar cells [Selecting tandem partners for silicon solar cells using spectral efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Zhengshan; Leilaeioun, Mehdi; Holman, Zachary

    Combining silicon and other materials in tandem solar cells is one approach to enhancing the overall power conversion efficiency of the cells. Here, we argue that top cell partners for silicon tandem solar cells should be selected on the basis of their spectral efficiency — their efficiency resolved by wavelength.

  19. Selecting tandem partners for silicon solar cells [Selecting tandem partners for silicon solar cells using spectral efficiency

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Zhengshan; Leilaeioun, Mehdi; Holman, Zachary

    2016-09-26

    Combining silicon and other materials in tandem solar cells is one approach to enhancing the overall power conversion efficiency of the cells. Here, we argue that top cell partners for silicon tandem solar cells should be selected on the basis of their spectral efficiency — their efficiency resolved by wavelength.

  20. Si Wire-Array Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Shannon

    2010-03-01

    Micron-scale Si wire arrays are three-dimensional photovoltaic absorbers that enable orthogonalization of light absorption and carrier collection and hence allow for the utilization of relatively impure Si in efficient solar cell designs. The wire arrays are grown by a vapor-liquid-solid-catalyzed process on a crystalline (111) Si wafer lithographically patterned with an array of metal catalyst particles. Following growth, such arrays can be embedded in polymethyldisiloxane (PDMS) and then peeled from the template growth substrate. The result is an unusual photovoltaic material: a flexible, bendable, wafer-thickness crystalline Si absorber. In this paper I will describe: 1. the growth of high-quality Si wires with controllable doping and the evaluation of their photovoltaic energy-conversion performance using a test electrolyte that forms a rectifying conformal semiconductor-liquid contact 2. the observation of enhanced absorption in wire arrays exceeding the conventional light trapping limits for planar Si cells of equivalent material thickness and 3. single-wire and large-area solid-state Si wire-array solar cell results obtained to date with directions for future cell designs based on optical and device physics. In collaboration with Michael Kelzenberg, Morgan Putnam, Joshua Spurgeon, Daniel Turner-Evans, Emily Warren, Nathan Lewis, and Harry Atwater, California Institute of Technology.

  1. Simulation of an electrowetting solar concentration cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Iftekhar; Rosengarten, Gary

    2015-09-01

    Electrowetting control of liquid lenses has emerged as a novel approach for solar tracking and concentration. Recent studies have demonstrated the concept of steering sunlight using thin electrowetting cells without the use of any bulky mechanical equipment. Effective application of this technique may facilitate designing thin and flat solar concentrators. Understanding the behavior of liquid-liquid and liquid-solid interface of the electrowetting cell through trial and error experimental processes is not efficient and is time consuming. In this paper, we present a simulation model to predict the liquid-liquid and liquid-solid interface behavior of electrowetting cell as a function of various parameters such as applied voltage, dielectric constant, cell size etc. We used Comsol Multiphysics simulations incorporating experimental data of different liquids. We have designed both two dimensional and three dimensional simulation models, which predict the shape of the liquid lenses. The model calculates the contact angle using the Young-Lippman equation and uses a moving mesh interface to solve the Navier-stokes equation with Navier slip wall boundary condition. Simulation of the electric field from the electrodes is coupled to the Young-Lippman equation. The model can also be used to determine operational characteristics of other MEMS electrowetting devices such as electrowetting display, optical switches, electronic paper, electrowetting Fresnel lens etc.

  2. Solar module having reflector between cells

    DOEpatents

    Kardauskas, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    A photovoltaic module comprising an array of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells disposed in a planar and mutually spaced relationship between a light-transparent front cover member in sheet form and a back sheet structure is provided with a novel light-reflecting means disposed between adjacent cells for reflecting light falling in the areas between cells back toward said transparent cover member for further internal reflection onto the solar cells. The light-reflecting comprises a flexible plastic film that has been embossed so as to have a plurality of small V-shaped grooves in its front surface, and a thin light-reflecting coating on said front surface, the portions of said coating along the sides of said grooves forming light-reflecting facets, said grooves being formed so that said facets will reflect light impinging thereon back into said transparent cover sheet with an angle of incidence greater than the critical angle, whereby substantially all of the reflected light will be internally reflected from said cover sheet back to said solar modules, thereby increasing the current output of the module.

  3. Radiation tolerance of low resistivity, high voltage silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, V. G.; Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.

    1984-01-01

    The radiation tolerance of the following three low resistivity, high voltage silicon solar cells was investigated: (1) the COMSAT MSD (multi-step diffused) cell, (2) the MinMIS cell, and (3) the MIND cell. A description of these solar cells is given along with drawings of their configurations. The diffusion length damage coefficients for the cells were calculated and presented. Solar cell spectral response was also discussed. Cells of the MinMIS type were judged to be unsuitable for use in the space radiation environment.

  4. Simulation of the Mars Surface Solar Spectra for Optimized Performance of Triple-Junction Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmondson, Kenneth M.; Joslin, David E.; Fetzer, Chris M.; King, RIchard R.; Karam, Nasser H.; Mardesich, Nick; Stella, Paul M.; Rapp, Donald; Mueller, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The unparalleled success of the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) powered by GaInP/GaAs/Ge triple-junction solar cells has demonstrated a lifetime for the rovers that exceeded the baseline mission duration by more than a factor of five. This provides confidence in future longer-term solar powered missions on the surface of Mars. However, the solar cells used on the rovers are not optimized for the Mars surface solar spectrum, which is attenuated at shorter wavelengths due to scattering by the dusty atmosphere. The difference between the Mars surface spectrum and the AM0 spectrum increases with solar zenith angle and optical depth. The recent results of a program between JPL and Spectrolab to optimize GaInP/GaAs/Ge solar cells for Mars are presented. Initial characterization focuses on the solar spectrum at 60-degrees zenith angle at an optical depth of 0.5. The 60-degree spectrum is reduced to 1/6 of the AM0 intensity and is further reduced in the blue portion of the spectrum. JPL has modeled the Mars surface solar spectra, modified an X-25 solar simulator, and completed testing of Mars-optimized solar cells previously developed by Spectrolab with the modified X-25 solar simulator. Spectrolab has focused on the optimization of the higher efficiency Ultra Triple-Junction (UTJ) solar cell for Mars. The attenuated blue portion of the spectrum requires the modification of the top sub-cell in the GaInP/GaAs/Ge solar cell for improved current balancing in the triple-junction cell. Initial characterization confirms the predicted increase in power and current matched operation for the Mars surface 60-degree zenith angle solar spectrum.

  5. An interim report on the NTS-2 solar cell experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statler, R. L.; Walker, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Data obtained from the fourteen solar cell modules on the NTS-2 satellite are presented together with a record of panel temperature and sun inclination. The following flight data are discussed: (1) state of the art solar cell configurations which embody improvements in solar cell efficiency through new silicon surface and bulk technology, (2) improved coverslip materials and coverslip bonding techniques, (3) short and long term effects of ultraviolet rejection filters vs. no filters on the cells, (4) degradation on a developmental type of liquid epitaxy gallium-aluminum-arsenide solar cell, and (5) space radiation effects.

  6. A theoretical analysis of the current-voltage characteristics of solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, R. C. Y.; Hauser, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: (1) dark current-voltage characteristics of solar cells; (2) high efficiency silicon solar cells; (3) short circuit current density as a function of temperature and the radiation intensity; (4) Keldysh-Franz effects and silicon solar cells; (5) thin silicon solar cells; (6) optimum solar cell designs for concentrated sunlight; (7) nonuniform illumination effects of a solar cell; and (8) high-low junction emitter solar cells.

  7. Advantages of thin silicon solar cells for use in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denman, O. S.

    1978-01-01

    A system definition study on the Solar Power Satellite System showed that a thin, 50 micrometers, silicon solar cell has significant advantages. The advantages include a significantly lower performance degradation in a radiation environment and high power-to-mass ratios. The advantages of such cells for an employment in space is further investigated. Basic questions concerning the operation of solar cells are considered along with aspects of radiation induced performance degradation. The question arose in this connection how thin a silicon solar cell had to be to achieve resistance to radiation degradation and still have good initial performance. It was found that single-crystal silicon solar cells could be as thin as 50 micrometers and still develop high conversion efficiencies. It is concluded that the use of 50 micrometer silicon solar cells in space-based photovoltaic power systems would be advantageous.

  8. Applications of Fluorogens with Rotor Structures in Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Ong, Kok-Haw; Liu, Bin

    2017-05-29

    Solar cells are devices that convert light energy into electricity. To drive greater adoption of solar cell technologies, higher cell efficiencies and reductions in manufacturing cost are necessary. Fluorogens containing rotor structures may be helpful in addressing some of these challenges due to their unique twisted structures and photophysics. In this review, we discuss the applications of rotor-containing molecules as dyes for luminescent down-shifting layers and luminescent solar concentrators, where their aggregation-induced emission properties and large Stokes shifts are highly desirable. We also discuss the applications of molecules containing rotors in third-generation solar cell technologies, namely dye-sensitized solar cells and organic photovoltaics, where the twisted 3-dimensional rotor structures are used primarily for aggregation control. Finally, we discuss perspectives on the future role of molecules containing rotor structures in solar cell technologies.

  9. Solare Cell Roof Tile And Method Of Forming Same

    DOEpatents

    Hanoka, Jack I.; Real, Markus

    1999-11-16

    A solar cell roof tile includes a front support layer, a transparent encapsulant layer, a plurality of interconnected solar cells and a backskin layer. The front support layer is formed of light transmitting material and has first and second surfaces. The transparent encapsulant layer is disposed adjacent the second surface of the front support layer. The interconnected solar cells has a first surface disposed adjacent the transparent encapsulant layer. The backskin layer has a first surface disposed adjacent a second surface of the interconnected solar cells, wherein a portion of the backskin layer wraps around and contacts the first surface of the front support layer to form the border region. A portion of the border region has an extended width. The solar cell roof tile may have stand-offs disposed on the extended width border region for providing vertical spacing with respect to an adjacent solar cell roof tile.

  10. Studies of silicon p-n junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugroschel, A.; Lindholm, F. A.

    1979-01-01

    To provide theoretical support for investigating different ways to obtain high open-circuit voltages in p-n junction silicon solar cells, an analytical treatment of heavily doped transparent-emitter devices is presented that includes the effects of bandgap narrowing, Fermi-Dirac statistics, a doping concentration gradient, and a finite surface recombination velocity at the emitter surface. Topics covered include: (1) experimental determination of bandgap narrowing in the emitter of silicon p-n junction devices; (2) heavily doped transparent regions in junction solar cells, diodes, and transistors; (3) high-low-emitter solar cell; (4) determination of lifetimes and recombination currents in p-n junction solar cells; (5) MOS and oxide-charged-induced BSF solar cells; and (6) design of high efficiency solar cells for space and terrestrial applications.

  11. Studies of silicon PN junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, F. A.

    1975-01-01

    Silicon pn junction solar cells made with low-resistivity substrates show poorer performance than traditional theory predicts. The purpose of this research was to identify and characterize the physical mechanisms responsible for the discrepancy. Attention was concentrated on the open circuit voltage in shallow junction cells of 0.1 ohm-cm substrate resistivity. A number of possible mechanisms that can occur in silicon devices were considered. Two mechanisms which are likely to be of main importance in explaining the observed low values of open-circuit voltage were found: (1) recombination losses associated with defects introduced during junction formation, and (2) inhomogeneity of defects and impurities across the area of the cell. To explore these theoretical anticipations, various diode test structures were designed and fabricated and measurement configurations for characterizing the defect properties and the areal inhomogeneity were constructed.

  12. Photonic Crystal Geometry for Organic Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samulski, Edward; Lopez, Rene; Ko, Doo-Hyun; Tumbleston, John

    2010-03-01

    Efficient absorption of light calls for thicker PV active layers whereas carrier transport always benefits from thinner ones, and this dichotomy is at the heart of an efficiency/cost conundrum that has kept solar energy expensive relative to fossil fuels. We report a 2-D, photonic crystal morphology that enhances the efficiency of organic photovoltaic cells relative to conventional planar cells.[1] The morphology is developed by patterning an organic photoactive bulk heterojunction blend using PRINT a process that lends itself to large area fabrication of nanostructures.[2] The photonic crystal cell morphology increases photocurrents generally, and particularly through the excitation of resonant modes near the band edge of the organic PV material. [1] Ko, D.-H.; Tumbleston, J. R.; Zhang, L.; Williams, S.; DeSimone, J. M.; Rene, L.; Samulski, E. T. Nano Lett. 2009, 9, 2742--2746. [2] Hampton et al. Adv. Mater. 2008, 20, 2667.

  13. Thin silicon solar cell performance characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gay, C. F.

    1978-01-01

    Refined techniques for surface texturizing, back surface field and back surface reflector formation were evaluated for use with shallow junction, single-crystal silicon solar cells. Each process was characterized individually and collectively as a function of device thickness and bulk resistivity. Among the variables measured and reported are open circuit voltage, short circuit current and spectral response. Substantial improvements were obtained by the utilization of a low cost aluminum paste process to simultaneously remove the unwanted n(+) diffused region, form the back surface field and produce an ohmic contact metallization. The highly effective BSF which results from applying this process has allowed fabrication of cells 0.05 mm thick with initial outputs as high as 79.5 mW/4 sq cm (28 C, AM0) and superior electron radiation tolerance. Cells of 0.02 mm to 0.04 mm thickness have been fabricated with power to mass ratios well in excess of 2 watts per gram.

  14. Solar Cell Nanotechnology Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Biswajit

    2014-05-07

    The objective of this project is to develop a low cost nonlithographic nanofabrication technology for the fabrication of thin film porous templates as well as uniform arrays of semiconductor nanostructures for the implementation of high efficiency solar cells. Solar cells based on semiconductor nanostructures are expected to have very high energy conversion efficiencies due to the increased absorption coefficients of semiconductor nanostructures. In addition, the thin film porous template can be used for optimum surface texturing of solar cells leading to additional enhancement in energy conversion efficiency. An important requirement for these applications is the ability to synthesize nanostructure arraysmore » of different dimensions with good size control. This project employed nanoporous alumina templates created by the anodization of aluminum thin films deposited on glass substrates for the fabrication of the nanostructures and optimized the process parameters to obtain uniform pore diameters. An additional requirement is uniformity or regularity of the nanostructure arrays. While constant current anodization was observed to provide controlled pore diameters, constant voltage anodization was needed for regularity of the nanostructure arrays. Thus a two-step anodization process was investigated and developed in this project for improving the pore size distribution and pore periodicity of the nanoporous alumina templates. CdTe was selected to be the active material for the nanowires, and the process for the successful synthesis of CdTe nanowires was developed in this project. Two different synthesis approaches were investigated in this project, electrochemical and electrophoretic deposition. While electrochemical synthesis was successfully employed for the synthesis of nanowires inside the pores of the alumina templates, the technique was determined to be non-optimum due to the need of elevated temperature that is detrimental to the structural integrity of the

  15. Reducing the Cost of Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Scanlon, B.

    2012-04-01

    Solar-powered electricity prices could soon approach those of power from coal or natural gas thanks to collaborative research with solar startup Ampulse Corporation at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Silicon wafers account for almost half the cost of today's solar photovoltaic panels, so reducing or eliminating wafer costs is essential to bringing prices down. Current crystalline silicon technology converts energy in a highly efficient manner; however, that technology is manufactured with processes that could stand some improvement. The industry needs a method that is less complex, creates less waste and uses less energy. First, half the refined silicon is lostmore » as dust in the wafer-sawing process, driving module costs higher. Wafers are sawn off of large cylindrical ingots, or boules, of silicon. A typical 2-meter boule loses as many as 6,000 potential wafers during sawing. Second, the wafers produced are much thicker than necessary. To efficiently convert sunlight into electricity, the wafers need be only one-tenth the typical thickness. NREL, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Ampulse have partnered on an approach to eliminate this waste and dramatically lower the cost of the finished solar panels. By using a chemical vapor deposition process to grow the silicon on inexpensive foil, Ampulse is able to make the solar cells just thick enough to convert most of the solar energy into electricity. No more sawdust - and no more wasting refined silicon materials. NREL developed the technology to grow high-quality silicon and ORNL developed the metal foil that has the correct crystal structure to support that growth. Ampulse is installing a pilot manufacturing line in NREL's Process Development Integration Laboratory, where solar companies can work closely with lab scientists on integrated equipment to answer pressing questions related to their technology development, as well as rapidly overcoming R and D challenges and risk. NREL's program is

  16. Hybrid Solar Cells: Materials, Interfaces, and Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, Giacomo; Wang, Yue; Kaner, Richard B.; Huffaker, Diana L.

    Photovoltaic technologies could play a pivotal role in tackling future fossil fuel energy shortages, while significantly reducing our carbon dioxide footprint. Crystalline silicon is pervasively used in single junction solar cells, taking up 80 % of the photovoltaic market. Semiconductor-based inorganic solar cells deliver relatively high conversion efficiencies at the price of high material and manufacturing costs. A great amount of research has been conducted to develop low-cost photovoltaic solutions by incorporating organic materials. Organic semiconductors are conjugated hydrocarbon-based materials that are advantageous because of their low material and processing costs and a nearly unlimited supply. Their mechanical flexibility and tunable electronic properties are among other attractions that their inorganic counterparts lack. Recently, collaborations in nanotechnology research have combined inorganic with organic semiconductors in a "hybrid" effort to provide high conversion efficiencies at low cost. Successful integration of these two classes of materials requires a profound understanding of the material properties and an exquisite control of the morphology, surface properties, ligands, and passivation techniques to ensure an optimal charge carrier generation across the hybrid device. In this chapter, we provide background information of this novel, emerging field, detailing the various approaches for obtaining inorganic nanostructures and organic polymers, introducing a multitude of methods for combining the two components to achieve the desired morphologies, and emphasizing the importance of surface manipulation. We highlight several studies that have fueled new directions for hybrid solar cell research, including approaches for maximizing efficiencies by controlling the morphologies of the inorganic component, and in situ molecular engineering via electrochemical polymerization of a polymer directly onto the inorganic nanowire surfaces. In the end, we

  17. High efficiency solar cells combining a perovskite and a silicon heterojunction solar cells via an optical splitting system

    SciTech Connect

    Uzu, Hisashi, E-mail: Hisashi.Uzu@kaneka.co.jp, E-mail: npark@skku.edu; Ichikawa, Mitsuru; Hino, Masashi

    2015-01-05

    We have applied an optical splitting system in order to achieve very high conversion efficiency for a full spectrum multi-junction solar cell. This system consists of multiple solar cells with different band gap optically coupled via an “optical splitter.” An optical splitter is a multi-layered beam splitter with very high reflection in the shorter-wave-length range and very high transmission in the longer-wave-length range. By splitting the incident solar spectrum and distributing it to each solar cell, the solar energy can be managed more efficiently. We have fabricated optical splitters and used them with a wide-gap amorphous silicon (a-Si) solar cellmore » or a CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} perovskite solar cell as top cells, combined with mono-crystalline silicon heterojunction (HJ) solar cells as bottom cells. We have achieved with a 550 nm cutoff splitter an active area conversion efficiency of over 25% using a-Si and HJ solar cells and 28% using perovskite and HJ solar cells.« less

  18. Spraylon fluorocarbon encapsulation for silicon solar cell arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A development program was performed for evaluating, modifying, and optimizing the Lockheed formulated liquid transparent filmforming Spraylon fluorocarbon protective coating for silicon solar cells and modules. The program objectives were designed to meet the requirements of the low-cost automated solar cell array fabrication process. As part of the study, a computer program was used to establish the limits of the safe working stress in the coated silicon solar cell array system under severe thermal shock.

  19. Cadmium telluride solar cells: Record-breaking voltages

    DOE PAGES

    Poplawsky, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Here, the performance of CdTe solar cells — cheaper alternatives to silicon photovoltaics — is hampered by their low output voltages, which are normally well below the theoretical limit. Now, record voltages of over 1 V have been reported in single-crystal CdTe heterostructure solar cells, which are close to those of benchmark GaAs cells.

  20. Thin n-i-p silicon solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meulenberg, A., Jr.; Allison, J. F.; Arndt, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    A space solar cell concept which combines high cell output with low diffusion length damage coefficients is presented for the purpose of reducing solar cell susceptibility to degradation from the radiation environment. High resistivity n-i-p silicon solar cells ranging from upward of 83 micron-cm were exposed to AM0 ultraviolet illumination. It is shown that high resistivity cells act as extrinsic devices under dark conditions and as intrinsic devices under AM0 illumination. Resistive losses in thin n-i-p cells are found to be comparable to those in low resistivity cells. Present voltage limitations appear to be due to generation and recombination in the diffused regions.

  1. [Advances in microbial solar cells--A review].

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoyun; Yu, Changping; Zheng, Tianling

    2015-08-04

    The energy crisis has become one of the major problems hindering the development of the world. The emergence of microbial fuel cells provides a new solution to the energy crisis. Microbial solar cells, integrating photosynthetic organisms such as plants and microalgae into microbial fuel cells, can convert solar energy into electrical energy. Microbial solar cell has steady electric energy, and broad application prospects in wastewater treatment, biodiesel processing and intermediate metabolites production. Here we reviewed recent progress of microbial solar cells from the perspective of the role of photosynthetic organisms in microbial fuel cells, based on a vast amount of literature, and discussed their advantages and deficiency. At last, brief analysis of the facing problems and research needs of microbial fuel cells are undertaken. This work was expected to be beneficial for the application of the microbial solar cells technology.

  2. Laser-assisted solar cell metallization processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, S.

    1984-01-01

    Laser-assisted processing techniques utilized to produce the fine line, thin metal grid structures that are required to fabricate high efficiency solar cells are examined. Two basic techniques for metal deposition are investigated; (1) photochemical decomposition of liquid or gas phase organometallic compounds utilizing either a focused, CW ultraviolet laser (System 1) or a mask and ultraviolet flood illumination, such as that provided by a repetitively pulsed, defocused excimer laser (System 2), for pattern definition, and (2) thermal deposition of metals from organometallic solutions or vapors utilizing a focused, CW laser beam as a local heat source to draw the metallization pattern.

  3. Cold crucible Czochralski for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trumble, T. M.

    1982-01-01

    The efficiency and radiation resistance of present silicon solar cells are a function of the oxygen and carbon impurities and the boron doping used to provide the proper resistivity material. The standard Czochralski process used grow single crystal silicon contaminates the silicon stock material due to the use of a quartz crucible and graphite components. The use of a process which replaces these elements with a water cooled copper to crucible has provided a major step in providing gallium doped (100) crystal orientation, low oxygen, low carbon, silicon. A discussion of the Cold Crucible Czochralski process and recent float Zone developments is provided.

  4. Method of fabricating bifacial tandem solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Wojtczuk, Steven J; Chiu, Philip T; Zhang, Xuebing; Gagnon, Edward; Timmons, Michael

    2014-10-07

    A method of fabricating on a semiconductor substrate bifacial tandem solar cells with semiconductor subcells having a lower bandgap than the substrate bandgap on one side of the substrate and with subcells having a higher bandgap than the substrate on the other including, first, growing a lower bandgap subcell on one substrate side that uses only the same periodic table group V material in the dislocation-reducing grading layers and bottom subcells as is present in the substrate and after the initial growth is complete and then flipping the substrate and growing the higher bandgap subcells on the opposite substrate side which can be of different group V material.

  5. Intermediate Bandgap Solar Cells From Nanostructured Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Marcie

    2014-10-30

    This project aimed to demonstrate increased electronic coupling in silicon nanostructures relative to bulk silicon for the purpose of making high efficiency intermediate bandgap solar cells using silicon. To this end, we formed nanowires with controlled crystallographic orientation, small diameter, <111> sidewall faceting, and passivated surfaces to modify the electronic band structure in silicon by breaking down the symmetry of the crystal lattice. We grew and tested these silicon nanowires with <110>-growth axes, which is an orientation that should produce the coupling enhancement.

  6. Transmutation doping of silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, R. F.; Westbrook, R. D.; Young, R. T.; Cleland, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Normal isotopic silicon contains 3.05% of Si-30 which transmutes to P-31 after thermal neutron absorption, with a half-life of 2.6 hours. This reaction is used to introduce extremely uniform concentrations of phosphorus into silicon, thus eliminating the areal and spatial inhomogeneities characteristic of chemical doping. Annealing of the lattice damage in the irradiated silicon does not alter the uniformity of dopant distribution. Transmutation doping also makes it possible to introduce phosphorus into polycrystalline silicon without segregation of the dopant at the grain boundaries. The use of neutron transmutation doped (NTD) silicon in solar cell research and development is discussed.

  7. Cold crucible Czochralski for solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trumble, T. M.

    The efficiency and radiation resistance of present silicon solar cells are a function of the oxygen and carbon impurities and the boron doping used to provide the proper resistivity material. The standard Czochralski process used grow single crystal silicon contaminates the silicon stock material due to the use of a quartz crucible and graphite components. The use of a process which replaces these elements with a water cooled copper to crucible has provided a major step in providing gallium doped (100) crystal orientation, low oxygen, low carbon, silicon. A discussion of the Cold Crucible Czochralski process and recent float Zone developments is provided.

  8. High efficiency thin-film GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stirn, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    Several oxidation techniques are discussed which have been found to increase the open circuit (V sub oc) of metal-GaAs Schottky barrier solar cells, the oxide chemistry, attempts to measure surface state parameters, the evolving characteristics of the solar cell as background contamination (has been decreased, but not eliminated), results of focused Nd/YAG laser beam recrystallization of Ge films evaporated onto tungsten, and studies of AMOS solar cells fabricated on sliced polycrystalline GaAs wafers. Also discussed are projected materials availability and costs for GaAs thin-film solar cells.

  9. Testing of gallium arsenide solar cells on the CRRES vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trumble, T. M.

    1985-01-01

    A flight experiment was designed to determine the optimum design for gallium arsenide (GaAs) solar cell panels in a radiation environment. Elements of the experiment design include, different coverglass material and thicknesses, welded and soldered interconnects, different solar cell efficiencies, different solar cell types, and measurement of annealing properties. This experiment is scheduled to fly on the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES). This satellite will simultaneously measure the radiation environment and provide engineering data on solar cell degradation that can be directly related to radiation damage.

  10. Investigation of back surface fields effect on bifacial solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepeai, Suhaila; Sulaiman, M. Y.; Sopian, Kamaruzzaman; Zaidi, Saleem H.

    2012-11-01

    A bifacial solar cell, in contrast with a conventional monofacial solar cell, produces photo-generated current from both front and back sides. Bifacial solar cell is an attractive candidate for enhancing photovoltaic (PV) market competitiveness as well as supporting the current efforts to increase efficiency and lower material costs. This paper reports on the fabrication of bifacial solar cells using phosphorus-oxytrichloride (POCl3) emitter formation on p-type, nanotextured silicon (Si) wafer. Backside surface field was formed through Al-diffusion using conventional screen-printing process. Bifacial solar cells with a structure of n+pp+ with and without back surface field (BSF) were fabricated in which silicon nitride (SiN) anti reflection and passivation films were coated on both sides, followed by screen printing of Argentum (Ag) and Argentum/Aluminum (Ag/Al) on front and back contacts, respectively. Bifacial solar cells without BSF exhibited open circuit voltage (VOC) of 535 mV for front and 480 mV for back surface. With Al-alloyed BSF bifacial solar cells, the VOC improved to 580 mV for the front surface and 560 mV for the back surface. Simulation of bifacial solar cells using PC1D and AFORS software demonstrated good agreement with experimental results. Simulations showed that best bifacial solar cells are achieved through a combination of high lifetime wafer, low recombination back surface field, reduced contact resistance, and superior surface passivation.

  11. Enhanced photovoltaic performance of an inclined nanowire array solar cell.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yao; Yan, Xin; Zhang, Xia; Ren, Xiaomin

    2015-11-30

    An innovative solar cell based on inclined p-i-n nanowire array is designed and analyzed. The results show that the inclined geometry can sufficiently increase the conversion efficiency of solar cells by enhancing the absorption of light in the active region. By tuning the nanowire array density, nanowire diameter, nanowire length, as well as the proportion of intrinsic region of the inclined nanowire solar cell, a remarkable efficiency in excess of 16% can be obtained in GaAs. Similar results have been obtained in InP and Si nanowire solar cells, demonstrating the universality of the performance enhancement of inclined nanowire arrays.

  12. Recyclable organic solar cells on cellulose nanocrystal substrates

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yinhua; Fuentes-Hernandez, Canek; Khan, Talha M.; Liu, Jen-Chieh; Hsu, James; Shim, Jae Won; Dindar, Amir; Youngblood, Jeffrey P.; Moon, Robert J.; Kippelen, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Solar energy is potentially the largest source of renewable energy at our disposal, but significant advances are required to make photovoltaic technologies economically viable and, from a life-cycle perspective, environmentally friendly, and consequently scalable. Cellulose nanomaterials are emerging high-value nanoparticles extracted from plants that are abundant, renewable, and sustainable. Here, we report on the first demonstration of efficient polymer solar cells fabricated on optically transparent cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) substrates. The solar cells fabricated on the CNC substrates display good rectification in the dark and reach a power conversion efficiency of 2.7%. In addition, we demonstrate that these solar cells can be easily separated and recycled into their major components using low-energy processes at room temperature, opening the door for a truly recyclable solar cell technology. Efficient and easily recyclable organic solar cells on CNC substrates are expected to be an attractive technology for sustainable, scalable, and environmentally-friendly energy production. PMID:23524333

  13. Recyclable organic solar cells on cellulose nanocrystal substrates.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yinhua; Fuentes-Hernandez, Canek; Khan, Talha M; Liu, Jen-Chieh; Hsu, James; Shim, Jae Won; Dindar, Amir; Youngblood, Jeffrey P; Moon, Robert J; Kippelen, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Solar energy is potentially the largest source of renewable energy at our disposal, but significant advances are required to make photovoltaic technologies economically viable and, from a life-cycle perspective, environmentally friendly, and consequently scalable. Cellulose nanomaterials are emerging high-value nanoparticles extracted from plants that are abundant, renewable, and sustainable. Here, we report on the first demonstration of efficient polymer solar cells fabricated on optically transparent cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) substrates. The solar cells fabricated on the CNC substrates display good rectification in the dark and reach a power conversion efficiency of 2.7%. In addition, we demonstrate that these solar cells can be easily separated and recycled into their major components using low-energy processes at room temperature, opening the door for a truly recyclable solar cell technology. Efficient and easily recyclable organic solar cells on CNC substrates are expected to be an attractive technology for sustainable, scalable, and environmentally-friendly energy production.

  14. Results of the 1970 balloon flight solar cell standardization program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    For the eighth consective year, high-altitude calibration of solar cells was accomplished with the aid of free-flight balloons. Flights were conducted to an altitude of 36,576 m which is above 99.5% of earth's atmosphere where all water vapor levels and significant ozone bands are absent. Solar cells calibrated in this manner are significant used as intensity references in solar simulators and in terrestrial sunlight. Discussed is the method employed for high altitude balloon flight solar cell calibration. Also presented are data collected on 52 standard solar cells on two flights conducted in 1970. Solar cells flown repeatedly on successive flights have shown correlation of better than + or - 1.0%.

  15. A life prediction methodology for encapsulated solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulbert, C. D.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to the development of a life prediction methodology for encapsulated solar cells which are intended to operate for twenty years or more in a terrestrial environment. Such a methodology, or solar cell life prediction model, requires the development of quantitative intermediate relationships between local environmental stress parameters and the basic chemical mechanisms of encapsulant aging leading to solar cell failures. The use of accelerated/abbreviated testing to develop these intermediate relationships and in revealing failure modes is discussed. Current field and demonstration tests of solar cell arrays and the present laboratory tests to qualify solar module designs provide very little data applicable to predicting the long-term performance of encapsulated solar cells. An approach to enhancing the value of such field tests to provide data for life prediction is described.

  16. Variation of solar cell sensitivity and solar radiation on tilted surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klucher, T. M.

    1978-01-01

    An empirical study was performed (1) to evaluate the validity of various insolation models used to compute solar radiation incident on tilted surfaces from global data measured on horizontal surfaces and (2) to determine the variation of solar cell sensitivity to solar radiation over a wide range of atmospheric condition. Evaluation of the insolation data indicates that the isotropic sky model of Liu and Jordan underestimates the amount of solar radiation falling on tilted surfaces by as much as 10%. An anisotropic-clear-sky model proposed by Temps and Coulson was also evaluated and found to be deficient under cloudy conditions. A new model, formulated herein, reduced the deviations between measured and predicted insolation to less than 3%. Evaluation of solar cell sensitivity data indicates small change (2-3%) in sensitivity from winter to summer for tilted cells. The feasibility of using such global data as a means for calibrating terrestrial solar cells as done by Treble is discussed.

  17. Solar Cell Fabrication Studies Pertinent to Developing Countries.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prah, Joseph Henry

    That there is a need in the world today, and in the Third World in particular, for developing renewable energy sources is a proposition without question. Toward that end, the harnessing of solar energy has attracted much attention recently. In this thesis, we have addressed the question of Photovoltaics among the many approaches to the problem as being of poignant relevance in the Third World. Based on our studies, which involved the physics of solar cells, various solar cell configurations, the materials for their fabrication and their fabrication sequences, we arrived at the conclusion that silicon homojunction solar cells are best suited to the present needs and environment of, and suitable for development in the Third World, though Cadmium Sulphide-Cuprous Sulphide solar cell could be considered as a viable future candidate. Attendant with the adoption of photovoltaics as electric energy supply, is the problem of technology transfer and development. Towards that goal, we carried out in the laboratory, the fabrication of solar cells using very simple fabrication sequences and materials to demonstrate that tolerable efficiencies are achievable by their use. The view is also presented that for a thriving and viable solar cell industry in the Third World, the sine qua non is an integrated national policies involving all facets of solar cell manufacture and application, namely, material processing and fabrication, basic research, and development and socio -economic acceptance of solar cell appliances. To demonstrate how basic research could benefit solar cell fabrication, we undertook a number of experiments, such as varying our fabrication sequences and materials, finding their radiation tolerance, and carrying out Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) studies, in an attempt to understand some of the fabrication and environmental factors which limit solar cell performance. We thus found that subjecting wafers to preheat treatments does not improve solar cell

  18. The calculated influence of atmospheric conditions on solar cell ISC under direct and global solar irradiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert L.

    1987-01-01

    Calculations of the influence of atmospheric conditions on solar cell short-circuit current (Isc) are made using a recently developed computer model for solar spectral irradiance distribution. The results isolate the dependence of Isc on changes in the spectral irradiance distribution without the direct influence of the total irradiance level. The calculated direct normal irradiance and percent diffuse irradiance are given as a reference to indicate the expected irradiance levels. This method can be applied to the calibration of photovoltaic reference cells. Graphic examples are provided for amorphous silicon and monocrystalline silicon solar cells under direct normal and global normal solar irradiances.

  19. Demonstration of the feasibility of automated silicon solar cell fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, W. E.; Schwartz, F. M.

    1975-01-01

    A study effort was undertaken to determine the process, steps and design requirements of an automated silicon solar cell production facility. Identification of the key process steps was made and a laboratory model was conceptually designed to demonstrate the feasibility of automating the silicon solar cell fabrication process. A detailed laboratory model was designed to demonstrate those functions most critical to the question of solar cell fabrication process automating feasibility. The study and conceptual design have established the technical feasibility of automating the solar cell manufacturing process to produce low cost solar cells with improved performance. Estimates predict an automated process throughput of 21,973 kilograms of silicon a year on a three shift 49-week basis, producing 4,747,000 hexagonal cells (38mm/side), a total of 3,373 kilowatts at an estimated manufacturing cost of $0.866 per cell or $1.22 per watt.

  20. A three solar cell system based on a self-supporting, transparent AlGaAs top solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negley, Gerald H.; Rhoads, Sandra L.; Terranova, Nancy E.; Mcneely, James B.; Barnett, Allen M.

    1989-01-01

    Development of a three solar cell stack can lead to practical efficiencies greater than 30 percent (1x,AM0). A theoretical efficiency limitation of 43.7 percent at AM0 and one sun is predicted by this model. Including expected losses, a practical system efficiency of 36.8 percent is anticipated. These calculations are based on a 1.93eV/1.43eV/0.89eV energy band gap combination. AlGaAs/GaAs/GaInAsP materials can be used with a six-terminal wiring configuration. The key issues for multijunction solar cells are the top and middle solar cell performance and the sub-bandgap transparency. AstroPower has developed a technique to fabricate AlGaAs solar cells on rugged, self-supporting, transparent AlGaAs substrates. Top solar cell efficiencies greater than 11 percent AM0 have been achieved. State-of-the-art GaAs or InP devices will be used for the middle solar cell. GaInAsP will be used to fabricate the bottom solar cell. This material is lattice-matched to InP and offers a wide range of bandgaps for optimization of the three solar cell stack. Liquid phase epitaxy is being used to grow the quaternary material. Initial solar cells have shown open-circuit voltages of 462 mV for a bandgap of 0.92eV. Design rules for the multijunction three solar cell stack are discussed. The progress in the development of the self-supporting AlGaAs top solar cell and the GaInAsP bottom solar cell is presented.

  1. Bifacial Perovskite Solar Cells Featuring Semitransparent Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Hanmandlu, Chintam; Chen, Chien-Yu; Boopathi, Karunakara Moorthy; Lin, Hao-Wu; Lai, Chao-Sung; Chu, Chih-Wei

    2017-09-27

    Inorganic-organic hybrid perovskite solar cells (PSCs) are promising devices for providing future clean energy because of their low cost, ease of fabrication, and high efficiencies, similar to those of silicon solar cells. These materials have been investigated for their potential use in bifacial PSCs, which can absorb light from both sides of the electrodes. Here, we fabricated bifacial PSCs featuring transparent BCP/Ag/MoO 3 rear electrodes, which we formed through low-temperature processing using thermal evaporation methods. We employed a comprehensive optical distribution program to calculate the distributions of the optical field intensities with constant thicknesses of the absorbing layer in the top electrode configuration. The best PSC having a transparent BCP/Ag/MoO 3 electrode achieved PCEs of 13.49% and 9.61% when illuminated from the sides of the indium tin oxide and BCP/Ag/MoO 3 electrodes, respectively. We observed significant power enhancement when operating this PSC using mirror reflectors and bifacial light illumination from both sides of the electrodes.

  2. nanostructures for dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashad, M. M.; Shalan, A. E.

    2014-08-01

    Hierarchical architectures consisting of one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures are of great interest for potential use in energy and environmental applications in recent years. In this work, hierarchical tungsten oxide (WO3) has been synthesized via a facile hydrothermal route from ammonium metatungstate hydrate and implemented as photoelectrode for dye-sensitized solar cells. The urchin-like WO3 micro-patterns are constructed by self-organized nanoscale length 1D building blocks, which are single crystalline in nature, grown along (001) direction and confirm an orthorhombic crystal phase. The obtained powders were investigated by XRD, SEM, TEM and UV-Vis Spectroscopy. The photovoltaic performance of dye-sensitized solar cells based on WO3 photoanodes was investigated. With increasing the calcination temperature of the prepared nanopowders, the light-electricity conversion efficiency ( η) was increased. The results were attributed to increase the crystallinity of the particles and ease of electron movement. The DSSC based on hierarchical WO3 showed a short-circuit current, an open-circuit voltage, a fill factor, and a conversion efficiency of 4.241 mA/cm2, 0.656 V, 66.74, and 1.85 %, respectively.

  3. Extrinsic ion migration in perovskite solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Zhen; Xiao, Chuanxiao; Yang, Ye; ...

    2017-04-10

    In this study, the migration of intrinsic ions (e.g., MA +, Pb 2+, I –) in organic–inorganic hybrid perovskites has received significant attention with respect to the critical roles of these ions in the hysteresis and degradation in perovskite solar cells (PSCs). Here, we demonstrate that extrinsic ions (e.g., Li +, H +, Na +), when used in the contact layers in PSCs, can migrate across the perovskite layer and strongly impact PSC operation. In a TiO 2/perovskite/spiro-OMeTAD-based PSC, Li +-ion migration from spiro-OMeTAD to the perovskite and TiO 2 layer is illustrated by time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry. The movementmore » of Li + ions in PSCs plays an important role in modulating the solar cell performance, tuning TiO 2 carrier-extraction properties, and affecting hysteresis in PSCs. The influence of Li +-ion migration was investigated using time-resolved photoluminescence, Kelvin probe force microscopy, and external quantum efficiency spectra. Other extrinsic ions such as H + and Na + also show a clear impact on the performance and hysteresis in PSCs. Understanding the impacts of extrinsic ions in perovskite-based devices could lead to new material and device designs to further advance perovskite technology for various applications.« less

  4. Hybrid Perovskite/Perovskite Heterojunction Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yinghong; Schlipf, Johannes; Wussler, Michael; Petrus, Michiel L; Jaegermann, Wolfram; Bein, Thomas; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter; Docampo, Pablo

    2016-06-28

    Recently developed organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite solar cells combine low-cost fabrication and high power conversion efficiency. Advances in perovskite film optimization have led to an outstanding power conversion efficiency of more than 20%. Looking forward, shifting the focus toward new device architectures holds great potential to induce the next leap in device performance. Here, we demonstrate a perovskite/perovskite heterojunction solar cell. We developed a facile solution-based cation infiltration process to deposit layered perovskite (LPK) structures onto methylammonium lead iodide (MAPI) films. Grazing-incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering experiments were performed to gain insights into the crystallite orientation and the formation process of the perovskite bilayer. Our results show that the self-assembly of the LPK layer on top of an intact MAPI layer is accompanied by a reorganization of the perovskite interface. This leads to an enhancement of the open-circuit voltage and power conversion efficiency due to reduced recombination losses, as well as improved moisture stability in the resulting photovoltaic devices.

  5. Solar energy from spinach and toothpaste: fabrication of a solar cell in schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemsen, F.; Bunk, A.; Fischer, K.; Korneck, F.; Engel, H.; Roux, D.

    1998-01-01

    We will show how pupils can make a solar cell with spinach, toothpaste and a few other items found in any school laboratory. This device is called a Graetzel cell, and could trigger off a revolution in photovoltaic technology.

  6. Inversion layer solar cell fabrication and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Call, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Silicon solar cells with induced junctions were created by forming an inversion layer near the surface of the silicon by supplying a sheet of positive charge above the surface. This charged layer was supplied through three mechanisms: (1) supplying a positive potential to a transparent electrode separated from the silicon surface by a dielectric, (2) contaminating the oxide layer with positive ions, and (3) forming donor surface states that leave a positive charge on the surface. A movable semi-infinite shadow delineated the extent of sensitivity of the cell due to the inversion region. Measurements of the inversion layer cell response to light of different wavelengths indicated it to be more sensitive to the shorter wavelengths of the sun's spectrum than conventional cells. Theory of the conductance of the inversion layer vs. strength of the inversion layer was compared with experiment and found to match. Theoretical determinations of junction depth and inversion layer strength were made as a function of the surface potential for the transparent electrode cell.

  7. High saturation solar light beam induced current scanning of solar cells.

    PubMed

    Vorster, F J; van Dyk, E E

    2007-01-01

    The response of the electrical parameters of photovoltaic cells under concentrated solar irradiance has been the subject of many studies performed in recent times. The high saturation conditions typically found in solar cells that are subjected to highly concentrated solar radiation may cause electrically active cell features to behave differently than under monochromatic laser illumination, normally used in light beam induced current (LBIC) investigations. A high concentration solar LBIC (S-LBIC) measurement system has been developed to perform localized cell characterization. The responses of silicon solar cells that were measured qualitatively include externally biased induced cell current at specific cell voltages, I(V), open circuit voltage, V(oc), and the average rate of change of the cell bias with the induced current, DeltaV/DeltaI(V), close to the zero bias region. These images show the relative scale of the parameters of a cell up to the penetration depth of the solar beam and can be obtained with relative ease, qualifying important electrical response features of the solar cell. The S-LBIC maps were also compared with maps that were similarly obtained using a high intensity He-Ne laser beam probe. This article reports on the techniques employed and initial results obtained.

  8. Development of a shingle-type solar cell module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, N. F., Jr.; Sanchez, L. E.

    1978-01-01

    The development of a solar cell module, which is suitable for use in place of shingles on the sloping roofs of residental or commercial buildings, is reported. The design consists of nineteen series-connected 53 mm diameter solar cells arranged in a closely packed hexagon configuration. The shingle solar cell module consists of two basic functional parts: an exposed rigid portion which contains the solar cell assembly, and a semi-flexible portion which is overlapped by the higher courses of the roof installation. Consideration is given to the semi-flexible substrate configuration and solar cell and module-to-module interconnectors. The results of an electrical performance analysis are given and it is noted that high specific power output can be attributed to the efficient packing of the circular cells within the hexagon shape. The shingle should function for at least 15 years, with a specific power output of 98 W/sq w.

  9. Numerical modelling of CIGS/CdS solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Nisha; Aziz, Anver; Datta, Shouvik

    2018-05-01

    In this work, we design and analyze the Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cell using simulation software "Solar Cell Capacitance Simulator in One Dimension (SCAPS-1D)". The conventional CIGS solar cell uses various layers, like intrinsic ZnO/Aluminium doped ZnO as transparent oxide, antireflection layer MgF2, and electron back reflection (EBR) layer at CIGS/Mo interface for good power conversion efficiency. We replace this conventional model by a simple model which is easy to fabricate and also reduces the cost of this cell because of use of lesser materials. The new designed model of CIGS solar cell is ITO/CIGS/OVC/CdS/Metal contact, where OVC is ordered vacancy compound. From this simple structure, even at very low illumination we are getting good results. We simulate this CIGS solar cell model by varying various physical parameters of CIGS like thickness, carrier density, band gap and temperature.

  10. The simulation of CZTS solar cell for performance improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Atul; Thakur, Ajay D.

    2018-05-01

    A Copper-Zinc-Tin-Sulphide (CZTS) based solar cell of Mo/CZTS/CdS/ZnO is simulated using SCAPS. Quantum efficiency and IV curve of the simulated output of CZTS solar cell is mapped with highest efficiency reported in literature for CZTS solar cell. A modification in back contact thus shottky barrier, spike type band alignment at the CZTS-n type layer junction and higher electron mobility (owing to alkali doping in CZT)S are implement in simulation of CZTS solar cell. An improvement in the solar cell efficiency compared to the standard cell configuration of Mo/CZTS/CdS/ZnO is found. CZTS is plagued with low Voc and low FF which can be increased by optimization as suggested in paper.

  11. Laser beam apparatus and method for analyzing solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Staebler, David L.

    1980-01-01

    A laser beam apparatus and method for analyzing, inter alia, the current versus voltage curve at the point of illumination on a solar cell and the open circuit voltage of a solar cell. The apparatus incorporates a lock-in amplifier, and a laser beam light chopper which permits the measurement of the AC current of the solar cell at an applied DC voltage at the position on the solar cell where the cell is illuminated and a feedback scheme which permits the direct scanning measurements of the open circuit voltage. The accuracy of the measurement is a function of the intensity and wavelength of the laser light with respect to the intensity and wavelength distribution of sunlight and the percentage the dark current is at the open circuit voltage to the short circuit current of the solar cell.

  12. Perovskite Solar Cell Stability Workshop: Quick Look Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-12

    Commercialization of Perovskite PV – Markets, Concerns, Opportunities” by Dirk Weiss, First Solar , USA j. “Expectations for PV Product Testing Today” by Sarah...Perovskite Solar Cell Stability Workshop Quick-Look Report Held by the Office of Naval Research at University...Workshop Summary, 11-12 Aug 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Perovskite Solar Cell Stability Workshop: Quick-Look Report 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S

  13. Cost study of solar cell space power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, D. T.

    1972-01-01

    Historical costs for solar cell space power systems were evaluated. The study covered thirteen missions that represented a broad cross section of flight projects over the past decade. Fully burdened costs in terms of 1971 dollars are presented for the system and the solar array. The costs correlate reasonably well with array area and do not increase in proportion to array area. The trends for array costs support the contention that solar cell and module standardization reduce costs.

  14. Low-cost production of solar-cell panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickler, D. B.; Gallagher, B. D.; Sanchez, L. E.

    1980-01-01

    Large-scale production model combines most modern manufacturing techniques to produce silicon-solar-cell panels of low costs by 1982. Model proposes facility capable of operating around the clock with annual production capacity of 20 W of solar cell panels.

  15. NREL: News - Scientific American' Recognizes Solar Cell Research

    Science.gov Websites

    Scientific American' Recognizes Solar Cell Research Monday November 11, 2002 Magazine Names NREL to . NREL's research into multi-junction solar cells for more than a decade has led the way to ever more photovoltaic research can be found at www.nrel.gov/ncpv/. Selected by the magazine's Board of Editors, the

  16. Silicon-fiber blanket solar-cell array concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eliason, J. T.

    1973-01-01

    Proposed economical manufacture of solar-cell arrays involves parallel, planar weaving of filaments made of doped silicon fibers with diffused radial junction. Each filament is a solar cell connected either in series or parallel with others to form a blanket of deposited grids or attached electrode wire mesh screens.

  17. Laser-assisted solar-cell metallization processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, S.

    1984-01-01

    A photolytic metal deposition system using a focused continuous wave ultraviolet laser, a photolytic metal deposition system using a mask and ultraviolet flood illumination, and a pyrolytic metal deposition system using a focused continuous wave laser were studied. Fabrication of solar cells, as well as characterization to determine the effects of transient heat on solar cell junctions were investigated.

  18. NREL, University of Washington Scientists Elevate Quantum Dot Solar Cell

    Science.gov Websites

    World Record to 13.4 Percent | NREL | News | NREL NREL, University of Washington Scientists Elevate Quantum Dot Solar Cell World Record to 13.4 Percent News Release: NREL, University of Washington Scientists Elevate Quantum Dot Solar Cell World Record to 13.4 Percent October 27, 2017 Researchers at the

  19. Recent progress in high-output-voltage silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muelenberg, A.; Arndt, R. A.; Allison, J. F.; Weizer, V.

    1980-01-01

    The status of the technology associated with the development of high output voltage silicon solar cells is reported. The energy conversion efficiency of a double diffusion process is compared to that of a single diffusion process. The efficiency of a 0.1 ohm/cm solar cell is characterized both before and after covering.

  20. Analytical determination of critical crack size in solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.

    1988-01-01

    Although solar cells usually have chips and cracks, no material specifications concerning the allowable crack size on solar cells are available for quality assurance and engineering design usage. Any material specifications that the cell manufacturers use were developed for cosmetic reasons that have no technical basis. Therefore, the Applied Solar Energy Corporation (ASEC) has sponsored a continuing program for the fracture mechanics evaluation of GaAs. Fracture mechanics concepts were utilized to develop an analytical model that can predict the critical crack size of solar cells. This model indicates that the edge cracks of a solar cell are more critical than its surface cracks. In addition, the model suggests that the material specifications on the allowable crack size used for Si solar cells should not be applied to GaAs solar cells. The analytical model was applied to Si and GaAs solar cells, but it would also be applicable to the semiconductor wafers of other materials, such as a GaAs thin film on a Ge substrate, using appropriate input data.

  1. Combined Silicon and Gallium Arsenide Solar Cell UV Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willowby, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    The near and long-term effect of UV on silicon solar cells is relatively understood. In an effort to learn more about the effects of UV radiation on the performance of GaAs/Ge solar cells, silicon and gallium arsenide on germanium (GaAs/Ge) solar cells were placed in a vacuum chamber and irradiated with ultraviolet light by a Spectrolab XT 10 solar simulator. Seventeen GaAs/Ge and 8 silicon solar cells were mounted on an 8 inch copper block. By having all the cells on the same test plate we were able to do direct comparison of silicon and GaAs/Ge solar cell degradation. The test article was attached to a cold plate in the vacuum chamber to maintain the cells at 25 degrees Celsius. A silicon solar cell standard was used to measure beam uniformity and any degradation of the ST-10 beam. The solar cell coverings tested included cells with AR-0213 coverglass, fused silica coverglass, BRR-0213 coverglass and cells without coverglass. Of interest in the test is the BRR-0213 coverglass material manufactured by OCLI. It has an added Infrared rejection coating to help reduce the solar cell operating temperature. This coverglass is relatively new and of interest to several current and future programs at Marshall. Due to moves of the laboratory equipment and location only 350 hours of UV degradation have been completed. During this testing a significant leveling off in the rate of degradation was reached. Data from the test and comparisons of the UV effect of the bare cells and cells with coverglass material will be presented.

  2. Development of high-efficiency solar cells on silicon web

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, A.; Meier, D. L.; Campbell, R. B.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Rai-Choudhury, P.

    1984-01-01

    The development of high efficiency solar cells on a silicon web is discussed. Heat treatment effects on web quality; the influence of twin plane lamellae, trace impurities and stress on minority carrier lifetime; and the fabrication of cells are discussed.

  3. Monolithic Perovskite Silicon Tandem Solar Cells with Advanced Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Goldschmidt, Jan C.; Bett, Alexander J.; Bivour, Martin

    2016-11-14

    For high efficiency monolithic perovskite silicon tandem solar cells, we develop low-temperature processes for the perovskite top cell, rear-side light trapping, optimized perovskite growth, transparent contacts and adapted characterization methods.

  4. Theory of back-surface-field solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonroos, O.

    1979-01-01

    Report describes simple concise theory of back-surface-field (BSF) solar cells (npp + junctions) based on Shockley's depletion-layer approximation and cites superiority of two-junction devices over conventional unijunction cells.

  5. Simulated space environment tests on cadmium sulfide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, D. R.; Oman, H.

    1971-01-01

    Cadmium sulfide (Cu2s - CdS) solar cells were tested under simulated space environmental conditions. Some cells were thermally cycled with illumination from a Xenon-arc solar simulator. A cycle was one hour of illumination followed immediately with one-half hour of darkness. In the light, the cells reached an equilibrium temperature of 60 C (333 K) and in the dark the cell temperature dropped to -120 C (153 K). Other cells were constantly illuminated with a Xenon-arc solar simulator. The equilibrium temperature of these cells was 55 C (328 K). The black vacuum chamber walls were cooled with liquid nitrogen to simulate a space heat sink. Chamber pressure was maintained at 0.000001 torr or less. Almost all of the solar cells tested degraded in power when exposed to a simulated space environment of either thermal cycling or constant illumination. The cells tested the longest were exposed to 10.050 thermal cycles.

  6. Annealing characteristics of irradiated hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payson, J. S.; Abdulaziz, S.; Li, Y.; Woodyard, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    It was shown that 1 MeV proton irradiation with fluences of 1.25E14 and 1.25E15/sq cm reduces the normalized I(sub SC) of a-Si:H solar cell. Solar cells recently fabricated showed superior radiation tolerance compared with cells fabricated four years ago; the improvement is probably due to the fact that the new cells are thinner and fabricated from improved materials. Room temperature annealing was observed for the first time in both new and old cells. New cells anneal at a faster rate than old cells for the same fluence. From the annealing work it is apparent that there are at least two types of defects and/or annealing mechanisms. One cell had improved I-V characteristics following irradiation as compared to the virgin cell. The work shows that the photothermal deflection spectroscopy (PDS) and annealing measurements may be used to predict the qualitative behavior of a-Si:H solar cells. It was anticipated that the modeling work will quantitatively link thin film measurements with solar cell properties. Quantitative predictions of the operation of a-Si:H solar cells in a space environment will require a knowledge of the defect creation mechanisms, defect structures, role of defects on degradation, and defect passivation and annealing mechanisms. The engineering data and knowledge base for justifying space flight testing of a-Si:H alloy based solar cells is being developed.

  7. AlGaAs top solar cell for mechanical attachment in a multi-junction tandem concentrator solar cell stack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinetta, L. C.; Hannon, M. H.; Cummings, J. R.; Mcneeley, J. B.; Barnett, Allen M.

    1990-01-01

    Free-standing, transparent, tunable bandgap AlxGa1-xAs top solar cells have been fabricated for mechanical attachment in a four terminal tandem stack solar cell. Evaluation of the device results has demonstrated 1.80 eV top solar cells with efficiencies of 18 percent (100 X, and AM0) which would yield stack efficiencies of 31 percent (100 X, AM0) with a silicon bottom cell. When fully developed, the AlxGa1-xAs/Si mechanically-stacked two-junction solar cell concentrator system can provide efficiencies of 36 percent (AM0, 100 X). AlxGa1-xAs top solar cells with bandgaps from 1.66 eV to 2.08 eV have been fabricated. Liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) growth techniques have been used and LPE has been found to yield superior AlxGa1-xAs material when compared to molecular beam epitaxy and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. It is projected that stack assembly technology will be readily applicable to any mechanically stacked multijunction (MSMJ) system. Development of a wide bandgap top solar cell is the only feasible method for obtaining stack efficiencies greater than 40 percent at AM0. System efficiencies of greater than 40 percent can be realized when the AlGaAs top solar cell is used in a three solar cell mechanical stack.

  8. Innovative laser based solar cell scribing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frei, Bruno; Schneeberger, Stefan; Witte, Reiner

    2011-03-01

    The solar photovoltaic market is continuously growing utilizing boths crystalline silicon (c-Si) as well as thin film technologies. This growth is directly dependant on the manufacturing costs for solar cells. Factors for cost reduction are innovative ideas for an optimization of precision and throughput. Lasers are excellent tools to provide highly efficient processes with impressive accuracy. They need to be used in combination with fast and precise motion systems for a maximum gain in the manufacturing process, yielding best cost of ownership. In this article such an innovative solution is presented for laser scribing in thin film Si modules. A combination of a new glass substrate holding system combined with a fast and precise motion system is the foundation for a cost effective scribing machine. In addition, the advantages of fiber lasers in beam delivery and beam quality guarantee not only shorter setup and down times but also high resolution and reproducibility for the scribing processes P1, P2 and P3. The precision of the whole system allows to reduce the dead zone to a minimum and therefore to improve the efficiency of the modules.

  9. Evaluation of solar cells and arrays for potential solar power satellite applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almgren, D. W.; Csigi, K.; Gaudet, A. D.

    1978-01-01

    Proposed solar array designs and manufacturing methods are evaluated to identify options which show the greatest promise of leading up to the develpment of a cost-effective SPS solar cell array design. The key program elements which have to be accomplished as part of an SPS solar cell array development program are defined. The issues focussed on are: (1) definition of one or more designs of a candidate SPS solar array module, using results from current system studies; (2) development of the necessary manufacturing requirements for the candidate SPS solar cell arrays and an assessment of the market size, timing, and industry infrastructure needed to produce the arrays for the SPS program; (3) evaluation of current DOE, NASA and DOD photovoltaic programs to determine the impacts of recent advances in solar cell materials, array designs and manufacturing technology on the candidate SPS solar cell arrays; and (4) definition of key program elements for the development of the most promising solar cell arrays for the SPS program.

  10. Block 2 solar cell module environmental test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, K. L.

    1978-01-01

    Environmental tests were performed of on 76 solar cell modules produced by four different manufacturers. The following tests were performed: (1) 28 day temperature and humidity; (2) rain and icing; (3) salt fog; (4) sand and dust; (5) vacuum/steam/pressure; (6) fungus; (7) temperature/altitude; and (8) thermal shock. Environmental testing of the solar cell modules produced cracked cells, cracked encapsulant and encapsulant delaminations on various modules. In addition, there was some minor cell and frame corrosion.

  11. Neutral- and Multi-Colored Semitransparent Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyu-Tae; Guo, L Jay; Park, Hui Joon

    2016-04-11

    In this review, we summarize recent works on perovskite solar cells with neutral- and multi-colored semitransparency for building-integrated photovoltaics and tandem solar cells. The perovskite solar cells exploiting microstructured arrays of perovskite "islands" and transparent electrodes-the latter of which include thin metallic films, metal nanowires, carbon nanotubes, graphenes, and transparent conductive oxides for achieving optical transparency-are investigated. Moreover, the perovskite solar cells with distinctive color generation, which are enabled by engineering the band gap of the perovskite light-harvesting semiconductors with chemical management and integrating with photonic nanostructures, including microcavity, are discussed. We conclude by providing future research directions toward further performance improvements of the semitransparent perovskite solar cells.

  12. Emerging Semitransparent Solar Cells: Materials and Device Design.

    PubMed

    Tai, Qidong; Yan, Feng

    2017-09-01

    Semitransparent solar cells can provide not only efficient power-generation but also appealing images and show promising applications in building integrated photovoltaics, wearable electronics, photovoltaic vehicles and so forth in the future. Such devices have been successfully realized by incorporating transparent electrodes in new generation low-cost solar cells, including organic solar cells (OSCs), dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) and organometal halide perovskite solar cells (PSCs). In this review, the advances in the preparation of semitransparent OSCs, DSCs, and PSCs are summarized, focusing on the top transparent electrode materials and device designs, which are all crucial to the performance of these devices. Techniques for optimizing the efficiency, color and transparency of the devices are addressed in detail. Finally, a summary of the research field and an outlook into the future development in this area are provided. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Design and Photovoltaic Properties of Graphene/Silicon Solar Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dikai; Yu, Xuegong; Yang, Lifei; Yang, Deren

    2018-04-01

    Graphene/silicon (Gr/Si) Schottky junction solar cells have attracted widespread attention for the fabrication of high-efficiency and low-cost solar cells. However, their performance is still limited by the working principles of Schottky junctions. Modulating the working mechanism of the solar cells into a quasi p-n junction has advantages, including higher open-circuit voltage (V OC) and less carrier recombination. In this study, Gr/Si quasi p-n junction solar cells were formed by inserting a tunneling Al2O3 interlayer in-between graphene and silicon, which led to obtain the PCE up to 8.48% without antireflection or chemical doping techniques. Our findings could pave a new way for the development of Gr/Si solar cells.

  14. Flexible, FEP-Teflon covered solar cell module development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschenbach, H. S.; Cannady, M. D.

    1976-01-01

    Techniques and equipment were developed for the large scale, low-cost fabrication of lightweight, roll-up and fold-up, FEP-Teflon encapsulated solar cell modules. Modules were fabricated by interconnecting solderless single-crystal silicon solar cells and heat laminating them at approximately 300 C between layers of optically clear FEP and to a loadbearing Kapton substrate sheet. Modules were fabricated from both conventional and wraparound contact solar cells. A heat seal technique was developed for mechanically interconnecting modules into an array. The electrical interconnections for both roll-up and fold-up arrays were also developed. The use of parallel-gap resistance welding, ultrasonic bonding, and thermocompression bonding processes for attaching interconnects to solar cells were investigated. Parallel-gap welding was found to be best suited for interconnecting the solderless solar cells into modules. Details of the fabrication equipment, fabrication processes, module and interconnect designs, environmental test equipment, and test results are presented.

  15. Micro Solar Cells with Concentration and Light Trapping Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lanfang; Breuckner, Eric; Corcoran, Christopher; Yao, Yuan; Xu, Lu; Nuzzo, Ralph

    2013-03-01

    Compared with conventional bulk plate semiconductor solar cells, micro solar cells provide opportunity for novel design geometry and provide test bed for light trapping at the device level as well as module level. Surface recombination, however, will have to be addressed properly as the much increased surface area due to the reduced dimension is more prominent in these devices than conventional solar cells. In this poster, we present experimental demonstration of silicon micro solar cells with concentration and light trapping optics. Silicon micro solar cell with optimized surface passivation and doping profile that exhibit high efficiency is demonstrated. Effective incorporation of high quantum yield fluorescent centers in the polymer matrix into which micro solar cell was encapsulated was investigated for luminescent solar concentration application. Micro-cell on a semi-transparent, nanopatterned reflector formed by soft-imprint lithography was investigated for near field effect related solar conversion performance enhancement. This work is supported by the DOE `Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion' Energy Frontier Research Center under grant DE-SC0001293

  16. Efficiency of silicon solar cells containing chromium

    DOEpatents

    Frosch, Robert A. Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space; Salama, Amal M.

    1982-01-01

    Efficiency of silicon solar cells containing about 10.sup.15 atoms/cm.sup.3 of chromium is improved about 26% by thermal annealing of the silicon wafer at a temperature of 200.degree. C. to form chromium precipitates having a diameter of less than 1 Angstrom. Further improvement in efficiency is achieved by scribing laser lines onto the back surface of the wafer at a spacing of at least 0.5 mm and at a depth of less than 13 micrometers to preferentially precipitate chromium near the back surface and away from the junction region of the device. This provides an economical way to improve the deleterious effects of chromium, one of the impurities present in metallurgical grade silicon material.

  17. Excess junction current of silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, E. Y.; Legge, R. N.; Christidis, N.

    1973-01-01

    The current-voltage characteristics of n(plus)-p silicon solar cells with 0.1, 1.0, 2.0, and 10 ohm-cm p-type base materials have been examined in detail. In addition to the usual I-V measurements, we have studied the temperature dependence of the slope of the I-V curve at the origin by the lock-in technique. The excess junction current coefficient (Iq) deduced from the slope at the origin depends on the square root of the intrinsic carrier concentration. The Iq obtained from the I-V curve fitting over the entire forward bias region at various temperatures shows the same temperature dependence. This result, in addition to the presence of an aging effect, suggest that the surface channel effect is the dominant cause of the excess junction current.

  18. Contact formation in gallium arsenide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, Victor G.; Fatemi, Navid S.

    1988-01-01

    Gold and gold-based alloys, commonly used as solar cell contact materials, are known to react readily with gallium arsenide. Experiments were performed to identify the mechanisms involved in these GaAs-metal interactions. It is shown that the reaction of GaAs with gold takes place via a dissociative diffusion process. It is shown further that the GaAs-metal reaction rate is controlled to a very great extent by the condition of the free surface of the contact metal, an interesting example of which is the previously unexplained increase in the reaction rate that has been observed for samples annealed in a vacuum environment as compared to those annealed in a gaseous ambient. A number of other hard-to-explain observations, such as the low-temperature formation of voids in the gold lattice and crystallite growth on the gold surface, are explained by invoking this mechanism.

  19. Multilayer solar cell waveguide structures containing metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamouche, Houria.; Shabat, Mohammed. M.; Schaadt, Daniel M.

    2017-01-01

    Multilayer antireflection coating structures made from silicon and metamaterials are designed and investigated using the Transfer Matrix Method (TMM). The Transfer Matrix Method is a very useful algorithm for the analysis of periodic structures. We investigate in this paper two anti-reflection coating structures for silicon solar cells with a metamaterial film layer. In the first structure, the metamaterial film layer is sandwiched between a semi-infinite glass cover layer and a semi-infinite silicon substrate layer. The second structure consists of a four layers, a pair of metamaterial-dielectric layer with opposite real part of refractive indices, is placed between the two semi-infinite cover and substrate. We have simulated the absorptivity property of the structures for adjustable thicknesses by using MAPLE software. The absorptivity of the structures achieves greater than 80% for incident electromagnetic wave of transverse magnetic (TM) polarization.

  20. Solar cells incorporating light harvesting arrays

    DOEpatents

    Lindsey, Jonathan S.; Meyer, Gerald J.

    2003-07-22

    A solar cell incorporates a light harvesting array that comprises: (a) a first substrate comprising a first electrode; and (b) a layer of light harvesting rods electrically coupled to the first electrode, each of the light harvesting rods comprising a polymer of Formula I: ##EQU1## wherein m is at least 1, and may be from two, three or four to 20 or more; X.sup.1 is a charge separation group (and preferably a porphyrinic macrocycle, which may be one ligand of a double-decker sandwich compound) having an excited-state of energy equal to or lower than that of X.sup.2 ; and X.sup.2 through X.sup.m+1 are chromophores (and again are preferably porphyrinic macrocycles).

  1. Solar cells incorporating light harvesting arrays

    DOEpatents

    Lindsey, Jonathan S.; Meyer, Gerald J.

    2002-01-01

    A solar cell incorporates a light harvesting array that comprises: (a) a first substrate comprising a first electrode; and (b) a layer of light harvesting rods electrically coupled to the first electrode, each of the light harvesting rods comprising a polymer of Formula I: X.sup.1.paren open-st.X.sup.m+1).sub.m (I) wherein m is at least 1, and may be from two, three or four to 20 or more; X.sup.1 is a charge separation group (and preferably a porphyrinic macrocycle, which may be one ligand of a double-decker sandwich compound) having an excited-state of energy equal to or lower than that of X.sup.2 ; and X.sup.2 through X.sup.m+1 are chromophores (and again are preferably porphyrinic macrocycles).

  2. Comprehensive silicon solar cell computer modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamorte, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    The development of an efficient, comprehensive Si solar cell modeling program that has the capability of simulation accuracy of 5 percent or less is examined. A general investigation of computerized simulation is provided. Computer simulation programs are subdivided into a number of major tasks: (1) analytical method used to represent the physical system; (2) phenomena submodels that comprise the simulation of the system; (3) coding of the analysis and the phenomena submodels; (4) coding scheme that results in efficient use of the CPU so that CPU costs are low; and (5) modularized simulation program with respect to structures that may be analyzed, addition and/or modification of phenomena submodels as new experimental data become available, and the addition of other photovoltaic materials.

  3. Predicting efficiency of solar cells based on transparent conducting electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ankush

    2017-01-01

    Efficiency of a solar cell is directly correlated with the performance of its transparent conducting electrodes (TCEs) which dictates its two core processes, viz., absorption and collection efficiencies. Emerging designs of a TCE involve active networks of carbon nanotubes, silver nanowires and various template-based techniques providing diverse structures; here, voids are transparent for optical transmittance while the conducting network acts as a charge collector. However, it is still not well understood as to which kind of network structure leads to an optimum solar cell performance; therefore, mostly an arbitrary network is chosen as a solar cell electrode. Herein, we propose a new generic approach for understanding the role of TCEs in determining the solar cell efficiency based on analysis of shadowing and recombination losses. A random network of wires encloses void regions of different sizes and shapes which permit light transmission; two terms, void fraction and equivalent radius, are defined to represent the TCE transmittance and wire spacings, respectively. The approach has been applied to various literature examples and their solar cell performance has been compared. To obtain high-efficiency solar cells, optimum density of the wires and their aspect ratio as well as active layer thickness are calculated. Our findings show that a TCE well suitable for one solar cell may not be suitable for another. For high diffusion length based solar cells, the void fraction of the network should be low while for low diffusion length based solar cells, the equivalent radius should be lower. The network with less wire spacing compared to the diffusion length behaves similar to continuous film based TCEs (such as indium tin oxide). The present work will be useful for architectural as well as material engineering of transparent electrodes for improvisation of solar cell performance.

  4. Silicon solar cells: Past, present and the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Youn-Jung; Kim, Byung-Sung; Ifitiquar, S. M.; Park, Cheolmin; Yi, Junsin

    2014-08-01

    There has been a great demand for renewable energy for the last few years. However, the solar cell industry is currently experiencing a temporary plateau due to a sluggish economy and an oversupply of low-quality cells. The current situation can be overcome by reducing the production cost and by improving the cell is conversion efficiency. New materials such as compound semiconductor thin films have been explored to reduce the fabrication cost, and structural changes have been explored to improve the cell's efficiency. Although a record efficiency of 24.7% is held by a PERL — structured silicon solar cell and 13.44% has been realized using a thin silicon film, the mass production of these cells is still too expensive. Crystalline and amorphous silicon — based solar cells have led the solar industry and have occupied more than half of the market so far. They will remain so in the future photovoltaic (PV) market by playing a pivotal role in the solar industry. In this paper, we discuss two primary approaches that may boost the silicon — based solar cell market; one is a high efficiency approach and the other is a low cost approach. We also discuss the future prospects of various solar cells.

  5. Structurally stable, thin silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, R. A.; Meulenberg, A.

    1984-01-01

    A fabrication process for structurally stable thin solar cell wafers that produce good power output after irradiation is described. The fabrication process is as follows. A 6 mil, circular wafer is oxidized on both sides. One side is then patterned with a rectangular array of holes in the oxide that are nominally 75 mils square and separated by 2 mil spacings. Wells are then etched into the silicon with KOH to a depth of 4 mils, leaving a 2 mil, unetched thickness. Two areas on the surface are left unetched to provide pads for bonding or testing. All oxide is then removed and the rest of the processing is normal; the unetched face is used as the illuminated face. When all other processing is complete, a 2 X 2 cm cell is sawed from the starting wafer leaving a border that is approximately 10 mils wide. The effective thickness, determined by weighing an unmetallized sample, of such a cell is about 2.4 mil.

  6. Scanning Probe Microscopy of Organic Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Obadiah G.

    Nanostructured composites of organic semiconductors are a promising class of materials for the manufacture of low-cost solar cells. Understanding how the nanoscale morphology of these materials affects their efficiency as solar energy harvesters is crucial to their eventual potential for large-scale deployment for primary power generation. In this thesis we describe the use of optoelectronic scanning-probe based microscopy methods to study this efficiency-structure relationship with nanoscale resolution. In particular, our objective is to make spatially resolved measurements of each step in the power conversion process from photons to an electric current, including charge generation, transport, and recombination processes, and correlate them with local device structure. We have achieved two aims in this work: first, to develop and apply novel electrically sensitive scanning probe microscopy experiments to study the optoelectronic materials and processes discussed above; and second, to deepen our understanding of the physics underpinning our experimental techniques. In the first case, we have applied conductive-, and photoconductive atomic force (cAFM & pcAFM) microscopy to measure both local photocurrent collection and dark charge transport properties in a variety of model and novel organic solar cell composites, including polymer/fullerene blends, and polymer-nanowire/fullerene blends, finding that local heterogeneity is the rule, and that improvements in the uniformity of specific beneficial nanostructures could lead to large increases in efficiency. We have used scanning Kelvin probe microscopy (SKPM) and time resolved-electrostatic force microscopy (trEFM) to characterize all-polymer blends, quantifying their sensitivity to photochemical degradation and the subsequent formation of local charge traps. We find that while trEFM provides a sensitive measure of local quantum efficiency, SKPM is generally unsuited to measurements of efficiency, less sensitive than tr

  7. Results from the IMP-J violet solar cell experiment and violet cell balloon flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, E. M.

    1976-01-01

    The Interplanetary Monitoring Platform-J violet solar cell experiment was flown in an orbit with mild thermal cycling and low hard-particle radiation. The results of the experiment show that violet cells degrade at about the same rate as conventional cells in such an orbit. Balloon flight measurements show that violet solar cells produce approximately 20% more power than conventional cells.

  8. Results from the IMP-J violet solar cell experiment and violet cell balloon flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, E. M.

    1976-01-01

    The IMP-J violet solar cell experiment was flown in an orbit with mild thermal cycling and low hard particle radiation. The results of the experiment show that violet cells degrade at about the same rate as conventional cells in such an orbit. Balloon flight measurements show that violet solar cells produce approximately 20% more power than conventional cells.

  9. Photovoltaic Test and Demonstration Project. [for solar cell power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forestieri, A. F.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.; Deyo, J. N.

    1976-01-01

    The Photovoltaic Test and Demonstration Project was initiated by NASA in June, 1975, to develop economically feasible photovoltaic power systems suitable for a variety of terrestrial applications. Objectives include the determination of operating characteristic and lifetimes of a variety of solar cell systems and components and development of methodology and techniques for accurate measurements of solar cell and array performance and diagnostic measurements for solar power systems. Initial work will be concerned with residential applications, with testing of the first prototype system scheduled for June, 1976. An outdoor 10 kW array for testing solar power systems is under construction.

  10. Recycling Perovskite Solar Cells To Avoid Lead Waste.

    PubMed

    Binek, Andreas; Petrus, Michiel L; Huber, Niklas; Bristow, Helen; Hu, Yinghong; Bein, Thomas; Docampo, Pablo

    2016-05-25

    Methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3) perovskite based solar cells have recently emerged as a serious competitor for large scale and low-cost photovoltaic technologies. However, since these solar cells contain toxic lead, a sustainable procedure for handling the cells after their operational lifetime is required to prevent exposure of the environment to lead and to comply with international electronic waste disposal regulations. Herein, we report a procedure to remove every layer of the solar cells separately, which gives the possibility to selectively isolate the different materials. Besides isolating the toxic lead iodide in high yield, we show that the PbI2 can be reused for the preparation of new solar cells with comparable performance and in this way avoid lead waste. Furthermore, we show that the most expensive part of the solar cell, the conductive glass (FTO), can be reused several times without any reduction in the performance of the devices. With our simple recycling procedure, we address both the risk of contamination and the waste disposal of perovskite based solar cells while further reducing the cost of the system. This brings perovskite solar cells one step closer to their introduction into commercial systems.

  11. Comparative modeling of InP solar cell structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, R. K.; Weinberg, I.; Flood, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    The comparative modeling of p(+)n and n(+)p indium phosphide solar cell structures is studied using a numerical program PC-1D. The optimal design study has predicted that the p(+)n structure offers improved cell efficiencies as compared to n(+)p structure, due to higher open-circuit voltage. The various cell material and process parameters to achieve the maximum cell efficiencies are reported. The effect of some of the cell parameters on InP cell I-V characteristics was studied. The available radiation resistance data on n(+)p and p(+)p InP solar cells are also critically discussed.

  12. SLAM examination of solar cells and solar cell welds. [Scanning Laser Acoustic Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, P. M.; Vorres, C. L.; Yuhas, D. E.

    1981-01-01

    The scanning laser acoustic microscope (SLAM) has been evaluated for non-destructive examination of solar cells and interconnector bonds. Using this technique, it is possible to view through materials in order to reveal regions of discontinuity such as microcracks and voids. Of particular interest is the ability to evaluate, in a unique manner, the bonds produced by parallel gap welding. It is possible to not only determine the area and geometry of the bond between the tab and cell, but also to reveal any microcracks incurred during the welding. By correlating the SLAM results with conventional techniques of weld evaluation a more confident weld parameter optimization can be obtained.

  13. Solar Cell and Array Technology Development for NASA Solar Electric Propulsion Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piszczor, Michael; McNatt, Jeremiah; Mercer, Carolyn; Kerslake, Tom; Pappa, Richard

    2012-01-01

    NASA is currently developing advanced solar cell and solar array technologies to support future exploration activities. These advanced photovoltaic technology development efforts are needed to enable very large (multi-hundred kilowatt) power systems that must be compatible with solar electric propulsion (SEP) missions. The technology being developed must address a wide variety of requirements and cover the necessary advances in solar cell, blanket integration, and large solar array structures that are needed for this class of missions. Th is paper will summarize NASA's plans for high power SEP missions, initi al mission studies and power system requirements, plans for advanced photovoltaic technology development, and the status of specific cell and array technology development and testing that have already been conducted.

  14. Developments toward an 18% efficient silicon solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meulenberg, A., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Limitations to increased open-circuit voltage were identified and experimentally verified for 0.1 ohm-cm solar cells with heavily doped emitters. After major reduction in the dark current contribution from the metal-silicon interface of the grid contacts, the surface recombination velocity of the oxide-silicon interface of shallow junction solar cells is the limiting factor. In deep junction solar cells, where the junction field does not aid surface collection, the emitter bulk is the limiting factor. Singly-diffused, shallow junction cells have been fabricated with open circuit voltages in excess of 645 mV. Double-diffusion shallow and deep junctions cells have displayed voltages above 650 mV. MIS solar cells formed on 0.1 ohm-cm substrates have exibited the lowest dark currents produced in the course of the contract work.

  15. A verified technique for calibrating space solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, Bruce

    1987-01-01

    Solar cells have been flown on high-altitude balloons for over 24 years, to produce solar cell standards that can be used to set the intensity of solar simulators. The events of a typical balloon calibration flight are reported. These are: the preflight events, including the preflight cell measurements and the assembly of the flight cells onto the solar tracker; the activities at the National Scientific Balloon Facility in Palestine, Texas, including the preflight calibrations, the mating of the tracker and cells onto the balloon, preparations for launch, and the launch; the payload recovery, which includes tracking the balloon by aircraft, terminating the flight, and retrieving the payload. In 1985, the cells flow on the balloon were also flown on a shuttle flight and measured independently. The two measurement methods are compared and shown to agree within 1 percent.

  16. Scalable fabrication of perovskite solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Zhen; Klein, Talysa R.; Kim, Dong Hoe; ...

    2018-03-27

    Perovskite materials use earth-abundant elements, have low formation energies for deposition and are compatible with roll-to-roll and other high-volume manufacturing techniques. These features make perovskite solar cells (PSCs) suitable for terawatt-scale energy production with low production costs and low capital expenditure. Demonstrations of performance comparable to that of other thin-film photovoltaics (PVs) and improvements in laboratory-scale cell stability have recently made scale up of this PV technology an intense area of research focus. Here, we review recent progress and challenges in scaling up PSCs and related efforts to enable the terawatt-scale manufacturing and deployment of this PV technology. We discussmore » common device and module architectures, scalable deposition methods and progress in the scalable deposition of perovskite and charge-transport layers. We also provide an overview of device and module stability, module-level characterization techniques and techno-economic analyses of perovskite PV modules.« less

  17. Development of a new integral solar cell protective cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naselow, A. B.; Dupont, P. S.; Scott-Monck, J.

    1983-01-01

    A unique polyimide polymer has been developed which shows promise as an encapsulant for interconnected solar cell modules. Such an integral cover offers important weight and cost advantages. The polymer has been characterized on silicon solar cells with respect to electrical output and spectral response. The response of the material-coated cells to electron, low-energy proton, and vacuum-ultraviolet radiation, thermal shock and humidity tests was determined.

  18. Improved High/Low Junction Silicon Solar Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugroschel, A.; Pao, S. C.; Lindholm, F. A.; Fossum, J. G.

    1986-01-01

    Method developed to raise value of open-circuit voltage in silicon solar cells by incorporating high/low junction in cell emitter. Power-conversion efficiency of low-resistivity silicon solar cell considerably less than maximum theoretical value mainly because open-circuit voltage is smaller than simple p/n junction theory predicts. With this method, air-mass-zero opencircuit voltage increased from 600 mV level to approximately 650 mV.

  19. Thin film solar cells grown by organic vapor phase deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan

    Organic solar cells have the potential to provide low-cost photovoltaic devices as a clean and renewable energy resource. In this thesis, we focus on understanding the energy conversion process in organic solar cells, and improving the power conversion efficiencies via controlled growth of organic nanostructures. First, we explain the unique optical and electrical properties of organic materials used for photovoltaics, and the excitonic energy conversion process in donor-acceptor heterojunction solar cells that place several limiting factors of their power conversion efficiency. Then, strategies for improving exciton diffusion and carrier collection are analyzed using dynamical Monte Carlo models for several nanostructure morphologies. Organic vapor phase deposition is used for controlling materials crystallization and film morphology. We improve the exciton diffusion efficiency while maintaining good carrier conduction in a bulk heterojunction solar cell. Further efficiency improvement is obtained in a novel nanocrystalline network structure with a thick absorbing layer, leading to the demonstration of an organic solar cell with 4.6% efficiency. In addition, solar cells using simultaneously active heterojunctions with broad spectral response are presented. We also analyze the efficiency limits of single and multiple junction organic solar cells, and discuss the challenges facing their practical implementations.

  20. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Il; Matsuo, Yutaka; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2018-01-22

    Photovoltaics, more generally known as solar cells, are made from semiconducting materials that convert light into electricity. Solar cells have received much attention in recent years due to their promise as clean and efficient light-harvesting devices. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) could play a crucial role in these devices and have been the subject of much research, which continues to this day. SWNTs are known to outperform multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) at low densities, because of the difference in their optical transmittance for the same current density, which is the most important parameter in comparing SWNTs and MWNTs. SWNT films show semiconducting features, which make SWNTs function as active or charge-transporting materials. This chapter, consisting of two sections, focuses on the use of SWNTs in solar cells. In the first section, we discuss SWNTs as a light harvester and charge transporter in the photoactive layer, which are reviewed chronologically to show the history of the research progress. In the second section, we discuss SWNTs as a transparent conductive layer outside of the photoactive layer, which is relatively more actively researched. This section introduces SWNT applications in silicon solar cells, organic solar cells, and perovskite solar cells each, from their prototypes to recent results. As we go along, the science and prospects of the application of solar cells will be discussed.

  1. Molecular and Nanoscale Engineering of High Efficiency Excitonic Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jenekhe, Samson A.; Ginger, David S.; Cao, Guozhong

    We combined the synthesis of new polymers and organic-inorganic hybrid materials with new experimental characterization tools to investigate bulk heterojunction (BHJ) polymer solar cells and hybrid organic-inorganic solar cells during the 2007-2010 period (phase I) of this project. We showed that the bulk morphology of polymer/fullerene blend solar cells could be controlled by using either self-assembled polymer semiconductor nanowires or diblock poly(3-alkylthiophenes) as the light-absorbing and hole transport component. We developed new characterization tools in-house, including photoinduced absorption (PIA) spectroscopy, time-resolved electrostatic force microscopy (TR-EFM) and conductive and photoconductive atomic force microscopy (c-AFM and pc-AFM), and used them to investigatemore » charge transfer and recombination dynamics in polymer/fullerene BHJ solar cells, hybrid polymer-nanocrystal (PbSe) devices, and dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs); we thus showed in detail how the bulk photovoltaic properties are connected to the nanoscale structure of the BHJ polymer solar cells. We created various oxide semiconductor (ZnO, TiO 2) nanostructures by solution processing routes, including hierarchical aggregates and nanorods/nanotubes, and showed that the nanostructured photoanodes resulted in substantially enhanced light-harvesting and charge transport, leading to enhanced power conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells.« less

  2. Application of carbon nanotubes in perovskite solar cells: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oo, Thet Tin; Debnath, Sujan

    2017-11-01

    Solar power, as alternative renewable energy source, has gained momentum in global energy generation in recent time. Solar photovoltaics (PV) systems now fulfill a significant portion of electricity demand and the capacity of solar PV capacity is growing every year. PV cells efficiency has improved significantly following decades of research, evolving into third generations of PV cells. These third generation PV cells are set out to provide low-cost and efficient PV systems, further improving the commercial competitiveness of solar energy generation. Among these latest generations of PV cells, perovskite solar cells have gained attraction due to the simple manufacturing process and the immense growth in PV efficiency in a short period of research and development. Despite these advantages, perovskite solar cells are known for the weak stability and decomposition in exposure to humidity and high temperature, hindering the possibility of commercialization. This paper will discuss the role of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in improving the efficiency and stability of perovskite solar cells, in various components such as perovskite layer and hole transport layer, as well as the application of CNTs in unique aspects. These includes the use of CNTs fiber in making the perovskite solar cells flexible, as well as simplification of perovskite PV production by using CNT flash evaporation printing process. Despite these advances, challenges remain in incorporation CNTs into perovskite such as lower conversion efficiency compared to rare earth metals and improvements need to be made. Thus, the paper will be also highlighting the CNTs materials suggested for further research and improvement of perovskite solar cells.

  3. Indium Phosphide Window Layers for Indium Gallium Arsenide Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.

    2005-01-01

    Window layers help in reducing the surface recombination at the emitter surface of the solar cells resulting in significant improvement in energy conversion efficiency. Indium gallium arsenide (In(x)Ga(1-x)As) and related materials based solar cells are quite promising for photovoltaic and thermophotovoltaic applications. The flexibility of the change in the bandgap energy and the growth of InGaAs on different substrates make this material very attractive for multi-bandgap energy, multi-junction solar cell approaches. The high efficiency and better radiation performance of the solar cell structures based on InGaAs make them suitable for space power applications. This work investigates the suitability of indium phosphide (InP) window layers for lattice-matched In(0.53)Ga(0.47)As (bandgap energy 0.74 eV) solar cells. We present the first data on the effects of the p-type InP window layer on p-on-n lattice-matched InGaAs solar cells. The modeled quantum efficiency results show a significant improvement in the blue region with the InP window. The bare InGaAs solar cell performance suffers due to high surface recombination velocity (10(exp 7) cm/s). The large band discontinuity at the InP/InGaAs heterojunction offers a great potential barrier to minority carriers. The calculated results demonstrate that the InP window layer effectively passivates the solar cell front surface, hence resulting in reduced surface recombination and therefore, significantly improving the performance of the InGaAs solar cell.

  4. Modeling Emerging Solar Cell Materials and Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thongprong, Non

    Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) and perovskite solar cells are emerging classes of solar cell that are promising for clean energy alternatives to fossil fuels. Understanding fundamental physics of these materials is crucial for improving their energy conversion efficiencies and promoting them to practical applications. Current density-voltage (JV) curves; which are important indicators of OPV efficiency, have direct connections to many fundamental properties of solar cells. They can be described by the Shockley diode equation, resulting in fitting parameters; series and parallel resistance (Rs and Rp), diode saturation current ( J0) and ideality factor (n). However, the Shockley equation was developed specifically for inorganic p-n junction diodes, so it lacks physical meanings when it is applied to OPVs. Hence, the puRposes of this work are to understand the fundamental physics of OPVs and to develop new diode equations in the same form as the Shockley equation that are based on OPV physics. We develop a numerical drift-diffusion simulation model to study bilayer OPVs, which will be called the drift-diffusion for bilayer interface (DD-BI) model. The model solves Poisson, drift-diffusion and current-continuity equations self-consistently for charge densities and potential profiles of a bilayer device with an organic heterojunction interface described by the GWWF model. We also derive new diode equations that have JV curves consistent with the DD-BI model and thus will be called self-consistent diode (SCD) equations. Using the DD-BI and the SCD model allows us to understand working principles of bilayer OPVs and physical definitions of the Shockley parameters. Due to low carrier mobilities in OPVs, space charge accumulation is common especially near the interface and electrodes. Hence, quasi-Fermi levels (i.e. chemical potentials), which depend on charge densities, are modified around the interface, resulting in a splitting of quasi-Fermi levels that works as a driving

  5. Solar cell with doped groove regions separated by ridges

    DOEpatents

    Molesa, Steven Edward; Pass, Thomas; Kraft, Steve

    2017-01-31

    Solar cells with doped groove regions separated by ridges and methods of fabricating solar cells are described. In an example, a solar cell includes a substrate having a surface with a plurality of grooves and ridges. A first doped region of a first conductivity type is disposed in a first of the grooves. A second doped region of a second conductivity type, opposite the first conductivity type, is disposed in a second of the grooves. The first and second grooves are separated by one of the ridges.

  6. Recombination imaging of III-V solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Virshup, G. F.

    1987-01-01

    An imaging technique based on the radiative recombination of minority carriers in forward-biased solar cells has been developed for characterization of III-V solar cells. When used in mapping whole wafers, it has helped identify three independent loss mechanisms (broken grid lines, shorting defects, and direct-to-indirect bandgap transitions), all of which resulted in lower efficiencies. The imaging has also led to improvements in processing techniques to reduce the occurrence of broken gridlines as well as surface defects. The ability to visualize current mechanisms in solar cells is an intuitive tool which is powerful in its simplicity.

  7. Highly doped layer for tunnel junctions in solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fetzer, Christopher M.

    A highly doped layer for interconnecting tunnel junctions in multijunction solar cells is presented. The highly doped layer is a delta doped layer in one or both layers of a tunnel diode junction used to connect two or more p-on-n or n-on-p solar cells in a multijunction solar cell. A delta doped layer is made by interrupting the epitaxial growth of one of the layers of the tunnel diode, depositing a delta dopant at a concentration substantially greater than the concentration used in growing the layer of the tunnel diode, and then continuing to epitaxially grow the remaining tunnel diode.

  8. Development of pulsed processes for the manufacture of solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnucci, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    The results of a 1-year program to develop the processes required for low-energy ion implantation for the automated production of silicon solar cells are described. The program included: (1) demonstrating state-of-the-art ion implantation equipment and designing an automated ion implanter, (2) making efforts to improve the performance of ion-implanted solar cells to 16.5 percent AM1, (3) developing a model of the pulse annealing process used in solar cell production, and (4) preparing an economic analysis of the process costs of ion implantation.

  9. Ionic Liquid Electrolytes for Flexible Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    High-Efficiency Solar - Cell Based on Dye-Sensitized Colloidal TiO2 Films,” a DSSC consists of four main components: a photoanode, a counter... solar cell modules. 2. Experiment and Calculations 2.1 Materials Commercial TiO2 paste was purchased from Dyesol, and additional nanophase TiO2 ...B.; Grätzel, M. A Low-Cost, High Efficiency Solar Cell Based on Dye_Sensitized Colloidal TiO2 Films. Nature 1991, 353, 737–740. 2. Snaith, H. J

  10. Air stable organic-inorganic nanoparticles hybrid solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Qian, Lei; Yang, Jihua; Xue, Jiangeng; Holloway, Paul H.

    2015-09-29

    A solar cell includes a low work function cathode, an active layer of an organic-inorganic nanoparticle composite, a ZnO nanoparticle layer situated between and physically contacting the cathode and active layers; and a transparent high work function anode that is a bilayer electrode. The inclusion of the ZnO nanoparticle layer results in a solar cell displaying a conversion efficiency increase and reduces the device degradation rate. Embodiments of the invention are directed to novel ZnO nanoparticles that are advantageous for use as the ZnO nanoparticle layers of the novel solar cells and a method to prepare the ZnO nanoparticles.

  11. Analysis of future generation solar cells and materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Masafumi; Zhu, Lin; Akiyama, Hidefumi; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko; Tampo, Hitoshi; Shibata, Hajime; Lee, Kan-Hua; Araki, Kenji; Kojima, Nobuaki

    2018-04-01

    The efficiency potentials of future generation solar cells such as wide bandgap chalcopyrite, Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS), Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 (CZTSSe), multi quantum well (MQW) and quantum dot (QD) solar cells are discussed on the basis of external radiative efficiency (ERE), open-circuit voltage loss, fill factor loss, and nonradiative recombination losses. CZTS and CZTSSe solar cells have efficiency potentials of more than 20% owing to the improvement in ERE from about 0.001 to 1%. MQW and QD cells have efficiency potentials of 24.8%, and 25.8% owing to the improvement in ERE from around 0.01 to 0.1%, and 1%, respectively. In this paper, the effects of nonradiative recombination on the properties of future generation solar cells are discussed.

  12. Development of high-performance GaInAsP solar cells for tandem solar cell applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanlass, M. W.; Ward, J. S.; Gessert, T. A.; Emery, K. A.; Horner, G. S.

    1990-01-01

    Recent results in the development of high-efficiency, low-bandgap GaInAsP solar cells epitaxially grown and lattice matched on InP substrates are presented. Such cells are intended to be used as optimum bottom cell components in tandem solar cells. Assuming that a GaAs-based top cell is used, computer simulation of the potential bottom cell performance as a function of the cell bandgap and incident spectrum indicates that two particular alloys are desirable: Ga0.47In0.53As (Eg = 0.75 eV) for space applications and Ga0.25In0.75As0.54P0.46 (Eg = 0.95 eV) for terrestrial applications. In each of these materials, solar cells with new record-level efficiencies have been fabricated. The efficiency boost available to tandem configurations from these low-bandgap cells is discussed.

  13. Space Qualification Test of a-Silicon Solar Cell Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Q.; Lawton, R. A.; Manion, S. J.; Okuno, J. O.; Ruiz, R. P.; Vu, D. T.; Vu, D. T.; Kayali, S. A.; Jeffrey, F. R.

    2004-01-01

    The basic requirements of solar cell modules for space applications are generally described in MIL-S-83576 for the specific needs of the USAF. However, the specifications of solar cells intended for use on space terrestrial applications are not well defined. Therefore, this qualifications test effort was concentrated on critical areas specific to the microseismometer probe which is intended to be included in the Mars microprobe programs. Parameters that were evaluated included performance dependence on: illuminating angles, terrestrial temperatures, lifetime, as well as impact landing conditions. Our qualification efforts were limited to these most critical areas of concern. Most of the tested solar cell modules have met the requirements of the program except the impact tests. Surprisingly, one of the two single PIN 2 x 1 amorphous solar cell modules continued to function even after the 80000G impact tests. The output power parameters, Pout, FF, Isc and Voc, of the single PIN amorphous solar cell module were found to be 3.14 mW, 0.40, 9.98 mA and 0.78 V, respectively. These parameters are good enough to consider the solar module as a possible power source for the microprobe seismometer. Some recommendations were made to improve the usefulness of the amorphous silicon solar cell modules in space terrestrial applications, based on the results obtained from the intensive short term lab test effort.

  14. All-Weather Solar Cells: A Rising Photovoltaic Revolution.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qunwei

    2017-06-16

    Solar cells have been considered as one of the foremost solutions to energy and environmental problems because of clean, high efficiency, cost-effective, and inexhaustible features. The historical development and state-of-the-art solar cells mainly focus on elevating photoelectric conversion efficiency upon direct sunlight illumination. It is still a challenging problem to realize persistent high-efficiency power generation in rainy, foggy, haze, and dark-light conditions (night). The physical proof-of-concept for all-weather solar cells opens a door for an upcoming photovoltaic revolution. Our group has been exploring constructive routes to build all-weather solar cells so that these advanced photovoltaic technologies can be an indication for global solar industry in bringing down the cost of energy harvesting. How the all-weather solar cells are built without reducing photo performances and why such architectures can realize electricity outputs with no visible-light are discussed. Potential pathways and opportunities to enrich all-weather solar cell families are envisaged. The aspects discussed here may enable researchers to develop undiscovered abilities and to explore wide applications of advanced photovoltaics. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Assembly and characterization of quantum-dot solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leschkies, Kurtis Siegfried

    Environmentally clean renewable energy resources such as solar energy have gained significant attention due to a continual increase in worldwide energy demand. A variety of technologies have been developed to harness solar energy. For example, photovoltaic (or solar) cells based on silicon wafers can convert solar energy directly into electricity with high efficiency, however they are expensive to manufacture, and thus unattractive for widespread use. As the need for low-cost, solar-derived energy becomes more dire, strategies are underway to identify materials and photovoltaic device architectures that are inexpensive yet efficient compared to traditional silicon solar cells. Nanotechnology enables novel approaches to solar-to-electric energy conversion that may provide both high efficiencies and simpler manufacturing methods. For example, nanometer-size semiconductor crystallites, or semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), can be used as photoactive materials in solar cells to potentially achieve a maximum theoretical power conversion efficiency which exceeds that of current mainstay solar technology at a much lower cost. However, the novel concepts of quantum dot solar cells and their energy conversion designs are still very much in their infancy, as a general understanding of their assembly and operation is limited. This thesis introduces various innovative and novel solar cell architectures based on semiconductor QDs and provides a fundamental understanding of the operating principles that govern the performance of these solar cells. Such effort may lead to the advancement of current nanotechnology-based solar power technologies and perhaps new initiatives in nextgeneration solar energy conversion devices. We assemble QD-based solar cells by depositing photoactive QDs directly onto thin ZnO films or ZnO nanowires. In one scheme, we combine CdSe QDs and single-crystal ZnO nanowires to demonstrate a new type of quantum-dot-sensitized solar cell (QDSSC). An array of Zn

  16. Therapeutic Angiogenesis via Solar Cell-Facilitated Electrical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Gun-Jae; Oh, Jin Young; Kim, Yeon-Ju; Bhang, Suk Ho; Jang, Hyeon-Ki; Han, Jin; Yoon, Jeong-Kee; Kwon, Sang-Mo; Lee, Tae Il; Kim, Byung-Soo

    2017-11-08

    Cell therapy has been suggested as a treatment modality for ischemic diseases, but the poor survival and engraftment of implanted cells limit its therapeutic efficacy. To overcome such limitation, we used electrical stimulation (ES) derived from a wearable solar cell for inducing angiogenesis in ischemic tissue. ES enhanced the secretion of angiogenic growth factors and the migration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), myoblasts, endothelial progenitor cells, and endothelial cells in vitro. In a mouse ischemic hindlimb model, ES generated by a solar cell and applied to the ischemic region promoted migration of MSCs toward the ischemic site and upregulated expression of angiogenic paracrine factors (vascular endothelial, basic fibroblast, and hepatocyte growth factors; and stromal cell-derived factor-1α). Importantly, solar cell-generated ES promoted the formation of capillaries and arterioles at the ischemic region, attenuated muscle necrosis and fibrosis, and eventually prevented loss of the ischemic limb. Solar cell ES therapy showed higher angiogenic efficacy than conventional MSC therapy. This study shows the feasibility of using solar cell ES as a novel treatment for therapeutic angiogenesis.

  17. Candidate solar cell materials for photovoltaic conversion in a solar power satellite /SPS/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, P. E.; Almgren, D. W.

    1978-01-01

    In recognition of the obstacles to solar-generated baseload power on earth, proposals have been made to locate solar power satellites in geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO), where solar energy would be available 24 hours a day during most of the time of the year. In an SPS, the electricity produced by solar energy conversion will be fed to microwave generators forming part of a planar phase-array transmitting antenna. The antenna is designed to precisely direct a microwave beam of very low intensity to one or more receiving antennas at desired locations on earth. At the receiving antenna, the microwave energy will be safely and efficiently reconverted to electricity and then be transmitted to consumers. An SPS system will include a number of satellites in GEO. Attention is given to the photovoltaic option for solar energy conversion in GEO, solar cell requirements, the availability of materials, the implication of large production volumes, requirements for high-volume manufacture of solar cell arrays, and the effects of concentration ratio on solar cell array area.

  18. Low temperature perovskite solar cells with an evaporated TiO 2 compact layer for perovskite silicon tandem solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bett, Alexander J.; Schulze, Patricia S. C.; Winkler, Kristina

    Silicon-based tandem solar cells can overcome the efficiency limit of single junction silicon solar cells. Perovskite solar cells are particularly promising as a top cell in monolithic tandem devices due to their rapid development towards high efficiencies, a tunable band gap with a sharp optical absorption edge and a simple production process. In monolithic tandem devices, the perovskite solar cell is deposited directly on the silicon cell, requiring low-temperature processes (< 200 °C) to maintain functionality of under-lying layers of the silicon cell in case of highly efficient silicon hetero-junction (SHJ) bottom solar cell. In this work, we present amore » complete low-temperature process for perovskite solar cells including a mesoporous titanium oxide (TiO 2) scaffold - a structure yielding the highest efficiencies for single-junction perovskite solar cells. We show that evaporation of the compact TiO 2 hole blocking layer and ultra-violet (UV) curing for the mesoporous TiO 2 layer allows for good performance, comparable to high-temperature (> 500 °C) processes. With both manufacturing routes, we obtain short-circuit current densities (J SC) of about 20 mA/cm 2, open-circuit voltages (V OC) over 1 V, fill factors (FF) between 0.7 and 0.8 and efficiencies (n) of more than 15%. We further show that the evaporated TiO 2 layer is suitable for the application in tandem devices. The series resistance of the layer itself and the contact resistance to an indium doped tin oxide (ITO) interconnection layer between the two sub-cells are low. Additionally, the low parasitic absorption for wavelengths above the perovskite band gap allow a higher absorption in the silicon bottom solar cell, which is essential to achieve high tandem efficiencies.« less

  19. Low temperature perovskite solar cells with an evaporated TiO 2 compact layer for perovskite silicon tandem solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Bett, Alexander J.; Schulze, Patricia S. C.; Winkler, Kristina; ...

    2017-09-21

    Silicon-based tandem solar cells can overcome the efficiency limit of single junction silicon solar cells. Perovskite solar cells are particularly promising as a top cell in monolithic tandem devices due to their rapid development towards high efficiencies, a tunable band gap with a sharp optical absorption edge and a simple production process. In monolithic tandem devices, the perovskite solar cell is deposited directly on the silicon cell, requiring low-temperature processes (< 200 °C) to maintain functionality of under-lying layers of the silicon cell in case of highly efficient silicon hetero-junction (SHJ) bottom solar cell. In this work, we present amore » complete low-temperature process for perovskite solar cells including a mesoporous titanium oxide (TiO 2) scaffold - a structure yielding the highest efficiencies for single-junction perovskite solar cells. We show that evaporation of the compact TiO 2 hole blocking layer and ultra-violet (UV) curing for the mesoporous TiO 2 layer allows for good performance, comparable to high-temperature (> 500 °C) processes. With both manufacturing routes, we obtain short-circuit current densities (J SC) of about 20 mA/cm 2, open-circuit voltages (V OC) over 1 V, fill factors (FF) between 0.7 and 0.8 and efficiencies (n) of more than 15%. We further show that the evaporated TiO 2 layer is suitable for the application in tandem devices. The series resistance of the layer itself and the contact resistance to an indium doped tin oxide (ITO) interconnection layer between the two sub-cells are low. Additionally, the low parasitic absorption for wavelengths above the perovskite band gap allow a higher absorption in the silicon bottom solar cell, which is essential to achieve high tandem efficiencies.« less

  20. Indium Gallium Nitride Multijunction Solar Cell Simulation Using Silvaco Atlas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    models is of great interest in space applications. By increasing the efficiency of photovoltaics, the number of solar panels is decreased. Therefore...obtained in single-junction solar cells by using Gallium Arsenide. Monocrystalline Gallium Arsenide has a maximum efficiency of approximately 25.1% [10

  1. New Solar Cell Is More Efficient, Less Costly | News | NREL

    Science.gov Websites

    rules for solar cells. Credit: Dennis Schroeder American innovators still have some cards to play when significant cost advantage when it comes to high-volume manufacturing. "It's a potentially disruptive . solar manufacturing when the approach hits the assembly line next year. The innovative design, simple

  2. $6 Million in Awards to Advance Solar Cell Research

    Science.gov Websites

    five companies for high tech research into non-conventional, photovoltaic technologies for creating can have significant cost advantages over conventional technologies. This non-conventional solar , Newbury Park, $498,000 (small business) Project Title: Non-Vacuum Processing of CIGS Solar Cells Project

  3. Panel fabrication utilizing GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, N.

    1984-01-01

    The development of the GaAs solar cells for space applications is described. The activities in the fabrication of GaAs solar panels are outlined. Panels were fabricated while introducing improved quality control, soldering laydown and testing procedures. These panels include LIPS II, San Marco Satellite, and a low concentration panel for Rockwells' evaluation. The panels and their present status are discussed.

  4. Solar Cells Light Up Prison Cells on 'The Rock' | News | NREL

    Science.gov Websites

    2 » Solar Cells Light Up Prison Cells on 'The Rock' Solar Cells Light Up Prison Cells on 'The Rock ' July 23, 2012 This photo shows an island in the middle of blue sea water, with industrial buildings taking up a good deal of the island. The 1,300 solar panels on the Cellhouse building are a dark blue

  5. High Performance Tandem Perovskite/Polymer Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yao; Bag, Monojit; Page, Zachariah; Renna, Lawrence; Kim, Paul; Choi, Jaewon; Emrick, Todd; Venkataraman, D.; Russell, Thomas

    Combining perovskites with other inorganic materials, such as copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) or silicon, is enabling significant improvement in solar cell device performance. Here, we demonstrate a highly efficient hybrid tandem solar cell fabricated through a facile solution deposition approach to give a perovskite front sub-cell and a polymer:fullerene blend back sub-cell. This methodology eliminates the adverse effects of thermal annealing during perovskite fabrication on polymer solar cells. The record tandem solar cell efficiency of 15.96% is 40% greater than the corresponding perovskite-based single junction device and 65% greater than the polymer-based single junction device, while mitigating deleterious hysteresis effects often associated with perovskite solar cells. The hybrid tandem devices demonstrate the synergistic effects arising from the combination of perovskite and polymer-based materials for solar cells. This work was supported by the Department of Energy-supported Energy Frontier Research Center at the University of Massachusetts (DE-SC0001087). The authors acknowledge the W.M. Keck Electron Microscopy.

  6. Method for forming indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Tom; Ghosh, Amal K.

    1984-03-13

    A high photo-conversion efficiency indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cell is spray deposited from a solution containing indium trichloride. The solar cell exhibits an Air Mass One solar conversion efficiency in excess of about 10%.

  7. Analysis of Direct Solar Illumination on the Backside of Space Station Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delleur, Ann M.; Kerslake, Thomas W.; Scheiman, David A.

    1999-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is a complex spacecraft that will take several years to assemble in orbit. During many of the assembly and maintenance procedures, the space station's large solar arrays must he locked, which can significantly reduce power generation. To date, power generation analyses have not included power generation from the backside of the solar cells in a desire to produce a conservative analysis. This paper describes the testing of ISS solar cell backside power generation, analytical modeling and analysis results on an ISS assembly mission.

  8. Core-shell silicon nanowire solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, M. M.; Anantram, M. P.; Karim, K. S.

    2013-01-01

    Silicon nanowires can enhance broadband optical absorption and reduce radial carrier collection distances in solar cell devices. Arrays of disordered nanowires grown by vapor-liquid-solid method are attractive because they can be grown on low-cost substrates such as glass, and are large area compatible. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that an array of disordered silicon nanowires surrounded by a thin transparent conductive oxide has both low diffuse and specular reflection with total values as low as < 4% over a broad wavelength range of 400 nm < λ < 650 nm. These anti-reflective properties together with enhanced infrared absorption in the core-shell nanowire facilitates enhancement in external quantum efficiency using two different active shell materials: amorphous silicon and nanocrystalline silicon. As a result, the core-shell nanowire device exhibits a short-circuit current enhancement of 15% with an amorphous Si shell and 26% with a nanocrystalline Si shell compared to their corresponding planar devices. PMID:23529071

  9. All-Inorganic Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jia; Wang, Caixing; Wang, Yanrong; Xu, Zhaoran; Lu, Zhipeng; Ma, Yue; Zhu, Hongfei; Hu, Yi; Xiao, Chengcan; Yi, Xu; Zhu, Guoyin; Lv, Hongling; Ma, Lianbo; Chen, Tao; Tie, Zuoxiu; Jin, Zhong; Liu, Jie

    2016-12-14

    The research field on perovskite solar cells (PSCs) is seeing frequent record breaking in the power conversion efficiency (PCE). However, organic-inorganic hybrid halide perovskites and organic additives in common hole-transport materials (HTMs) exhibit poor stability against moisture and heat. Here we report the successful fabrication of all-inorganic PSCs without any labile or expensive organic components. The entire fabrication process can be operated in ambient environment without humidity control (e.g., a glovebox). Even without encapsulation, the all-inorganic PSCs present no performance degradation in humid air (90-95% relative humidity, 25 °C) for over 3 months (2640 h) and can endure extreme temperatures (100 and -22 °C). Moreover, by elimination of expensive HTMs and noble-metal electrodes, the cost was significantly reduced. The highest PCE of the first-generation all-inorganic PSCs reached 6.7%. This study opens the door for next-generation PSCs with long-term stability under harsh conditions, making practical application of PSCs a real possibility.

  10. Carbonaceous Dye‐Sensitized Solar Cell Photoelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    Batmunkh, Munkhbayar

    2015-01-01

    High photovoltaic efficiency is one of the most important keys to the commercialization of dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) in the quickly growing renewable electricity generation market. The heart of the DSSC system is a wide bandgap semiconductor based photoelectrode film that helps to adsorb dye molecules and transport the injected electrons away into the electrical circuit. However, charge recombination, poor light harvesting efficiency and slow electron transport of the nanocrystalline oxide photoelectrode film are major issues in the DSSC's performance. Recently, semiconducting composites based on carbonaceous materials (carbon nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and graphene) have been shown to be promising materials for the photoelectrode of DSSCs due to their fascinating properties and low cost. After a brief introduction to development of nanocrystalline oxide based films, this Review outlines advancements that have been achieved in the application of carbonaceous‐based materials in the photoelectrode of DSSCs and how these advancements have improved performance. In addition, several of the unsolved issues in this research area are discussed and some important future directions are also highlighted. PMID:27980926

  11. Dye-sensitized Schottky barrier solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Skotheim, Terje A.

    1978-01-01

    A low-cost dye-sensitized Schottky barrier solar cell comprised of a substrate of semiconductor with an ohmic contact on one face, a sensitizing dye adsorbed onto the opposite face of the semiconductor, a transparent thin-film layer of a reducing agent over the dye, and a thin-film layer of metal over the reducing agent. The ohmic contact and metal layer constitute electrodes for connection to an external circuit and one or the other or both are made transparent to permit light to penetrate to the dye and be absorbed therein for generating electric current. The semiconductor material chosen to be the substrate is one having a wide bandgap and which therefore is transparent; the dye selected is one having a ground state within the bandgap of the semiconductor to generate carriers in the semiconductor, and a first excited state above the conduction band edge of the semiconductor to readily conduct electrons from the dye to the semiconductor; the reducing agent selected is one having a ground state above the ground state of the sensitizer to provide a plentiful source of electrons to the dye during current generation and thereby enhance the generation; and the metal for the thin-film layer of metal is selected to have a Fermi level in the vicinity of or above the ground state of the reducing agent to thereby amply supply electrons to the reducing agent.

  12. Current- and lattice-matched tandem solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.M.

    1985-10-21

    A multijunction (cascade) tandem photovoltaic solar cell device is fabricated of a Ga/sub x/In/sub 1-x/P (0.505 equal to or less than x equal to or less than 0.515) top cell semiconductor lattice-matched to a GaAs bottom cell semiconductor at a low resistance heterojunction, preferably a p/sup +//n/sup +/ heterojunction between the cells. The top and bottom cells are both lattice-matched and current-matched for high efficiency solar radiation conversion to electrical energy.

  13. Investigation of high efficiency GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Larry C.; Dunham, Glen; Addis, F. W.; Huber, Dan; Linden, Kurt

    1989-01-01

    Investigations of basic mechanisms which limit the performance of high efficiency GaAs solar cells are discussed. P/N heteroface structures have been fabricated from MOCVD epiwafers. Typical AM1 efficiencies are in the 21 to 22 percent range, with a SERI measurement for one cell being 21.5 percent. The cells are nominally 1.5 x 1.5 cm in size. Studies have involved photoresponse, T-I-V analyses, and interpretation of data in terms of appropriate models to determine key cell parameters. Results of these studies are utilized to determine future approaches for increasing GaAs solar cell efficiencies.

  14. Silver nanoparticles-coated glass frits for silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingfen; Gan, Weiping; Li, Biyuan

    2016-04-01

    Silver nanoparticles-coated glass frit composite powders for silicon solar cells were prepared by electroless plating. Silver colloids were used as the activating agent of glass frits. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. The characterization results indicated that silver nanoparticles with the melting temperature of 838 °C were uniformly deposited on glass frit surface. The particle size of silver nanoparticles could be controlled by adjusting the [Ag(NH3)2]NO3 concentration. The as-prepared composite powders were applied in the front side metallization of silicon solar cells. Compared with those based on pure glass frits, the solar cells containing the composite powders had the denser silver electrodes and the better silver-silicon ohmic contacts. Furthermore, the photovoltaic performances of solar cells were improved after the electroless plating.

  15. An analysis of quantum coherent solar photovoltaic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, A. P.

    2012-02-01

    A new hypothesis (Scully et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 108 (2011) 15097) suggests that it is possible to break the statistical physics-based detailed balance-limiting power conversion efficiency and increase the power output of a solar photovoltaic cell by using “noise-induced quantum coherence” to increase the current. The fundamental errors of this hypothesis are explained here. As part of this analysis, we show that the maximum photogenerated current density for a practical solar cell is a function of the incident spectrum, sunlight concentration factor, and solar cell energy bandgap and thus the presence of quantum coherence is irrelevant as it is unable to lead to increased current output from a solar cell.

  16. Pinhole induced efficiency variation in perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Sumanshu; Nair, Pradeep R.

    2017-10-01

    Process induced efficiency variation is a major concern for all thin film solar cells, including the emerging perovskite based solar cells. In this article, we address the effect of pinholes or process induced surface coverage aspects on the efficiency of such solar cells through detailed numerical simulations. Interestingly, we find that the pinhole size distribution affects the short circuit current and open circuit voltage in contrasting manners. Specifically, while the JS C is heavily dependent on the pinhole size distribution, surprisingly, the VO C seems to be only nominally affected by it. Further, our simulations also indicate that, with appropriate interface engineering, it is indeed possible to design a nanostructured device with efficiencies comparable to those of ideal planar structures. Additionally, we propose a simple technique based on terminal I-V characteristics to estimate the surface coverage in perovskite solar cells.

  17. Enhanced light absorption of solar cells and photodetectors by diffraction

    DOEpatents

    Zaidi, Saleem H.; Gee, James M.

    2005-02-22

    Enhanced light absorption of solar cells and photodetectors by diffraction is described. Triangular, rectangular, and blazed subwavelength periodic structures are shown to improve performance of solar cells. Surface reflection can be tailored for either broadband, or narrow-band spectral absorption. Enhanced absorption is achieved by efficient optical coupling into obliquely propagating transmitted diffraction orders. Subwavelength one-dimensional structures are designed for polarization-dependent, wavelength-selective absorption in solar cells and photodetectors, while two-dimensional structures are designed for polarization-independent, wavelength-selective absorption therein. Suitable one and two-dimensional subwavelength periodic structures can also be designed for broadband spectral absorption in solar cells and photodetectors. If reactive ion etching (RIE) processes are used to form the grating, RIE-induced surface damage in subwavelength structures can be repaired by forming junctions using ion implantation methods. RIE-induced surface damage can also be removed by post RIE wet-chemical etching treatments.

  18. Status, technology and development of silicon solar cells at INER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jao, S. S.; Tseng, H. H.; Cheng, C.; Tzeng, Y. C.; Chang, H. H.; Hwang, H. L.

    Test runs using 200 5-cm-diameter silicon wafers are carried out, yielding 87% with an AM1 conversion efficiency greater than 11.5%. The highest efficiency is 12.7%. Concentrator solar cells of 2 x 2 sq cm are made with an AM1 efficiency of 14%. Solar cells with a diameter of 7.5 cm have attained AM1 efficiencies of more than 11.3%, and texturized solar cells of the same diameter fabricated from rejected wafers show AM1 efficiencies of 9.5-10.5%. It is noted that solar panels comprising 68 cells with a maximum output power of 13.5 W have been manufactured. The results of a 6-month test of a photovoltaic charge station for electric motorcycles are reported.

  19. Heavy doping effects in high efficiency silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, F. A.

    1984-01-01

    Several of the key parameters describing the heavily doped regions of silicon solar cells are examined. The experimentally determined energy gap narrowing and minority carrier diffusivity and mobility are key factors in the investigation.

  20. Graphene interfaced perovskite solar cells: Role of graphene flake size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakorikar, Tushar; Kavitha, M. K.; Tong, Shi Wun; Vayalamkuzhi, Pramitha; Loh, Kian Ping; Jaiswal, Manu

    2018-04-01

    Graphene interfaced inverted planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells are fabricated by facile solution method and studied its potential as hole conducting layer. Reduced graphene oxide (rGO) with small and large flake size and Polyethylenedioxythiophene:polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) are utilized as hole conducting layers in different devices. For the solar cell employing PEDOT:PSS as hole conducting layer, 3.8 % photoconversion efficiency is achieved. In case of solar cells fabricated with rGO as hole conducting layer, the efficiency of the device is strongly dependent on flake size. With all other fabrication conditions kept constant, the efficiency of graphene-interfaced solar cell improves by a factor of 6, by changing the flake size of graphene oxide. We attribute this effect to uniform coverage of graphene layer and improved electrical percolation network.

  1. Window structure for passivating solar cells based on gallium arsenide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, Allen M. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Passivated gallium arsenide solar photovoltaic cells with high resistance to moisture and oxygen are provided by means of a gallium arsenide phosphide window graded through its thickness from arsenic rich to phosphorus rich.

  2. Computing Spacecraft Solar-Cell Damage by Charged Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, Edward M.

    2006-01-01

    General EQFlux is a computer program that converts the measure of the damage done to solar cells in outer space by impingement of electrons and protons having many different kinetic energies into the measure of the damage done by an equivalent fluence of electrons, each having kinetic energy of 1 MeV. Prior to the development of General EQFlux, there was no single computer program offering this capability: For a given type of solar cell, it was necessary to either perform the calculations manually or to use one of three Fortran programs, each of which was applicable to only one type of solar cell. The problem in developing General EQFlux was to rewrite and combine the three programs into a single program that could perform the calculations for three types of solar cells and run in a Windows environment with a Windows graphical user interface. In comparison with the three prior programs, General EQFlux is easier to use.

  3. Crystalline silicon solar cells with high resistivity emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panek, P.; Drabczyk, K.; Zięba, P.

    2009-06-01

    The paper presents a part of research targeted at the modification of crystalline silicon solar cell production using screen-printing technology. The proposed process is based on diffusion from POCl3 resulting in emitter with a sheet resistance on the level of 70 Ω/□ and then, shaped by high temperature passivation treatment. The study was focused on a shallow emitter of high resistivity and on its influence on output electrical parameters of a solar cell. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has been employed for appropriate distinguishing the total donor doped profile. The solar cell parameters were characterized by current-voltage characteristics and spectral response (SR) methods. Some aspects playing a role in suitable manufacturing process were discussed. The situation in a photovoltaic industry with emphasis on silicon supply and current prices of solar cells, modules and photovoltaic (PV) systems are described. The economic and quantitative estimation of the PV world market is shortly discussed.

  4. Intermediate band solar cell with extreme broadband spectrum quantum efficiency.

    PubMed

    Datas, A; López, E; Ramiro, I; Antolín, E; Martí, A; Luque, A; Tamaki, R; Shoji, Y; Sogabe, T; Okada, Y

    2015-04-17

    We report, for the first time, about an intermediate band solar cell implemented with InAs/AlGaAs quantum dots whose photoresponse expands from 250 to ∼6000  nm. To our knowledge, this is the broadest quantum efficiency reported to date for a solar cell and demonstrates that the intermediate band solar cell is capable of producing photocurrent when illuminated with photons whose energy equals the energy of the lowest band gap. We show experimental evidence indicating that this result is in agreement with the theory of the intermediate band solar cell, according to which the generation recombination between the intermediate band and the valence band makes this photocurrent detectable.

  5. Terrestrial solar cell module automated array assembly, task 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A cost effective design and manufacturing process which would produce solar cell modules capable of meeting qualification test criteria was developed. Emphasis was placed on the development of an aluminum paste back contact process.

  6. A theoretical analysis of the current-voltage characteristics of solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, R. C. Y.; Hauser, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The correlation of theoretical and experimental data is discussed along with the development of a complete solar cell analysis. The dark current-voltage characteristics, and the parameters for solar cells are analyzed. The series resistance, and impurity gradient effects on solar cells were studied, the effects of nonuniformities on solar cell performance were analyzed.

  7. Interdigitated Back-Surface-Contact Solar Cell Modeling Using Silvaco Atlas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    11 2. Solar Spectrum ...................................................................................13 3. PV Cell Efficiency...Figure 10. Spectrum of solar radiance, from [12]. 14 3. PV Cell Efficiency There are many factors that affect the efficiency of a solar cell. Metal...BACK-SURFACE-CONTACT SOLAR CELL MODELING USING SILVACO ATLAS by Shawn E. Green June 2015 Thesis Advisor: Sherif Michael Second Reader

  8. Laser processing of solar cells with anti-reflective coating

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David D.; Dennis, Tim; Waldhauer, Ann; Kim, Taeseok; Cousins, Peter John

    2016-02-16

    Contact holes of solar cells are formed by laser ablation to accommodate various solar cell designs. Use of a laser to form the contact holes is facilitated by replacing films formed on the diffusion regions with a film that has substantially uniform thickness. Contact holes may be formed to deep diffusion regions to increase the laser ablation process margins. The laser configuration may be tailored to form contact holes through dielectric films of varying thicknesses.

  9. Novel duplex vapor-electrochemical method for silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nanis, L.; Sanjurjo, A.; Sancier, K. M.; Kapur, V. K.; Bartlett, R. W.; Westphal, S.

    1980-01-01

    A process was developed for the economic production of high purity Si from inexpensive reactants, based on the Na reduction of SiF4 gas. The products of reaction (NaF, Si) are separated by either aqueous leaching or by direct melting of the NaF-Si product mixture. Impurities known to degrade solar cell performance are all present at sufficiently low concentrations so that melt solidification (e.g., Czochralski) will provide a silicon material suitable for solar cells.

  10. Space Qualification Test of a-Silicon Solar Cell Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Q.; Lawton, R. A.; Manion, S. J.; Okuno, J. O.; Ruiz, R. P.; Vu, D. T.; Kayali, S. A.; Jeffrey, F. R.

    1997-01-01

    The basic requirement of solar cell modules for space applications are generally described in MIL-S-83576 for the specific needs of the USAF. However, the specifications of solar cells intended for use on space terrestrial applications are not well defined. Therefore this qualification test effort was concentrated on critical areas specific to the microseismometer probe which is intended to be included in the Mars microprobe programs.

  11. Low cost silicon-on-ceramic photovoltaic solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koepke, B. G.; Heaps, J. D.; Grung, B. L.; Zook, J. D.; Sibold, J. D.; Leipold, M. H.

    1980-01-01

    A technique has been developed for coating low-cost mullite-based refractory substrates with thin layers of solar cell quality silicon. The technique involves first carbonizing one surface of the ceramic and then contacting it with molten silicon. The silicon wets the carbonized surface and, under the proper thermal conditions, solidifies as a large-grained sheet. Solar cells produced from this composite silicon-on-ceramic material have exhibited total area conversion efficiencies of ten percent.

  12. Electro-optical characterization of GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Larry C.; Dunham, Glen; Addis, F. W.; Huber, Dan; Daling, Dave

    1987-01-01

    The electro-optical characterization of gallium arsenide p/n solar cells is discussed. The objective is to identify and understand basic mechanisms which limit the performance of high efficiency gallium arsenide solar cells. The approach involves conducting photoresponse and temperature dependent current-voltage measurements, and interpretation of the data in terms of theory to determine key device parameters. Depth concentration profiles are also utilized in formulating a model to explain device performance.

  13. Simple Photovoltaic Cells for Exploring Solar Energy Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appleyard, S. J.

    2006-01-01

    Low-efficiency solar cells for educational purposes can be simply made in school or home environments using wet-chemistry techniques and readily available chemicals of generally low toxicity. Instructions are given for making solar cells based on the heterojunctions Cu/Cu[subscript 2]O, Cu[subscript 2]O/ZnO and Cu[subscript 2]S/ZnO, together with…

  14. Five-Junction Solar Cell Optimization Using Silvaco Atlas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-09-01

    experimental sources [1], [4], [6]. f. Numerical Method The method selected for solving the non -linear equations that make up the simulation can be...and maximize efficiency. Optimization of solar cell efficiency is carried out via nearly orthogonal balanced design of experiments methodology . Silvaco...Optimization of solar cell efficiency is carried out via nearly orthogonal balanced design of experiments methodology . Silvaco ATLAS is utilized to

  15. Method of construction of a multi-cell solar array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Routh, D. E.; Hollis, B. R., Jr.; Feltner, W. R. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    The method of constructing a high voltage, low power, multicell solar array is described. A solar cell base region is formed in a substrate such as but not limited to silicon or sapphire. A protective coating is applied on the base and a patterned etching of the coating and base forms discrete base regions. A semiconductive junction and upper active region are formed in each base region, and defined by photolithography. Thus, discrete cells which are interconnected by metallic electrodes are formed.

  16. Thin film solar cell inflatable ultraviolet rigidizable deployment hinge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simburger, Edward J. (Inventor); Giants, Thomas W. (Inventor); Perry, Alan R. (Inventor); Rawal, Suraj (Inventor); Lin, John K. H. (Inventor); Matsumoto, James H. (Inventor); Garcia, III, Alec (Inventor); Marshall, Craig H. (Inventor); Day, Jonathan Robert (Inventor); Kerslake, Thomas W. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A flexible inflatable hinge includes curable resin for rigidly positioning panels of solar cells about the hinge in which wrap around contacts and flex circuits are disposed for routing power from the solar cells to the power bus further used for grounding the hinge. An indium tin oxide and magnesium fluoride coating is used to prevent static discharge while being transparent to ultraviolet light that cures the embedded resin after deployment for rigidizing the inflatable hinge.

  17. Multi-band gap and new solar cell options workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchby, J.; Timmons, M.; Olson, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    Discussions of the multi-band gap (MBG) and new solar cell options workshop are presented. Topics discussed include: greater than 2 terminal cells; radiation damage preventing development of MBG cells for space; lattice matching; measurement of true performance; future of II-VI materials in MBG devices; and quaternaries.

  18. Large area, low cost solar cell development and production readiness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michaels, D.

    1982-01-01

    A process sequence for a large area ( or = 25 sq. cm) silicon solar cell was investigated. Generic cell choice was guided by the expected electron fluence, by the packing factors of various cell envelope designs onto each panel to provide needed voltage as well as current, by the weight constraints on the system, and by the cost goals of the contract.

  19. The NASA Space Solar Cell Advanced Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, Dennis J.

    1989-01-01

    Two major requirements for space solar cells are high efficiency and survivability in the naturally occurring charged particle space radiation environment. Performance limits for silicon space cells are well understood. Advanced cells using GaAs and InP are under development to provide significantly improved capability for the future.

  20. Development of high efficiency solar cells on silicon web

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, A.; Meier, D. L.; Campbell, R. B.; Schmidt, D. N.; Rai-Choudhury, P.

    1984-01-01

    Web base material is being improved with a goal toward obtaining solar cell efficiencies in excess of 18% (AM1). Carrier loss mechanisms in web silicon was investigated, techniques were developed to reduce carrier recombination in the web, and web cells were fabricated using effective surface passivation. The effect of stress on web cell performance was also investigated.

  1. Flexible, highly efficient all-polymer solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Taesu; Kim, Jae-Han; Kang, Tae Eui; Lee, Changyeon; Kang, Hyunbum; Shin, Minkwan; Wang, Cheng; Ma, Biwu; Jeong, Unyong; Kim, Taek-Soo; Kim, Bumjoon J.

    2015-01-01

    All-polymer solar cells have shown great potential as flexible and portable power generators. These devices should offer good mechanical endurance with high power-conversion efficiency for viability in commercial applications. In this work, we develop highly efficient and mechanically robust all-polymer solar cells that are based on the PBDTTTPD polymer donor and the P(NDI2HD-T) polymer acceptor. These systems exhibit high power-conversion efficiency of 6.64%. Also, the proposed all-polymer solar cells have even better performance than the control polymer-fullerene devices with phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) as the electron acceptor (6.12%). More importantly, our all-polymer solar cells exhibit dramatically enhanced strength and flexibility compared with polymer/PCBM devices, with 60- and 470-fold improvements in elongation at break and toughness, respectively. The superior mechanical properties of all-polymer solar cells afford greater tolerance to severe deformations than conventional polymer-fullerene solar cells, making them much better candidates for applications in flexible and portable devices. PMID:26449658

  2. Metamorphic III–V Solar Cells: Recent Progress and Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Ivan; France, Ryan M.; Geisz, John F.

    Inverted metamorphic multijunction solar cells have been demonstrated to be a pathway to achieve the highest photovoltaic (PV) conversion efficiencies. Attaining high-quality lattice-mismatched (metamorphic) semiconductor devices is challenging. However, recent improvements to compositionally graded buffer epitaxy and junction structures have led to the achievement of high-quality metamorphic solar cells exhibiting internal luminescence efficiencies over 90%. For this high material quality, photon recycling is significant, and therefore, the optical environment of the solar cell becomes important. In this paper, we first present recent progress and performance results for 1- and 0.7-eV GaInAs solar cells grown on GaAs substrates. Then, an electroopticalmore » model is used to assess the potential performance improvements in current metamorphic solar cells under different realizable design scenarios. The results show that the quality of 1-eV subcells is such that further improving its electronic quality does not produce significant Voc increases in the four-junction inverted metamorphic subcells, unless a back reflector is used to enhance photon recycling, which would significantly complicate the structure. Conversely, improving the electronic quality of the 0.7-eV subcell would lead to significant Voc boosts, driving the progress of four-junction inverted metamorphic solar cells.« less

  3. Thin film solar cells: research in an industrial perspective.

    PubMed

    Edoff, Marika

    2012-01-01

    Electricity generation by photovoltaic conversion of sunlight is a technology in strong growth. The thin film technology is taking market share from the dominant silicon wafer technology. In this article, the market for photovoltaics is reviewed, the concept of photovoltaic solar energy conversion is discussed and more details are given about the present technological limitations of thin film solar cell technology. Special emphasis is given for solar cells which employ Cu(In,Ga)Se(2) and Cu(2)ZnSn(S,Se)(4) as the sunlight-absorbing layer.

  4. Near-infrared sensitization in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Jinhyung; Viscardi, Guido; Barolo, Claudia; Barbero, Nadia

    2013-01-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) are a low cost and colorful promising alternative to standard silicon photovoltaic cells. Though many of the highest efficiencies have been associated with sensitizers absorbing only in the visible portion of the solar radiation, there is a growing interest for NIR sensitization. This paper reviews the efforts made so far to find sensitizers able to absorb efficiently in the far-red NIR region of solar light. Panchromatic sensitizers as well as dyes absorbing mainly in the 650-920 nm region have been considered.

  5. Cost study of solar cell space power systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, D. T.

    1972-01-01

    A study of historical costs for solar cell space power systems was made by a NASA ad hoc study group. The study covered thirteen missions that represented a broad cross-section of flight projects over the past decade. Fully burdened costs in terms of 1971 dollars are presented for the system and the solar array. The costs correlate reasonably well with array area and do not increase in proportion to array area. The trends for array costs support the contention that solar cell and module standardization would reduce costs.

  6. Environmental testing of block 2 solar cell modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffith, J. S.

    1979-01-01

    The testing procedures and results of samples of the LSA Project Block 2 procurement of silicon solar cell modules are described. Block 2 was the second large scale procurement of silicon solar cell modules made by the JPL Low-cost Solar Array Project with deliveries in 1977 and early 1978. The results showed that the Block 2 modules were greatly improved over Block 1 modules. In several cases it was shown that design improvements were needed to reduce environmental test degradation. These improvements were incorporated during this production run.

  7. Production of solar photovoltaic cells on the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, David R.; Ignatiev, Alex

    1991-01-01

    Solar energy is directly available on the sunward lunar surface. Most, if not all, the materials are available on the Moon to make silicon based solar photovoltaic cells. A few additional types are possible. There is a small but growing literature on production of lunar derived solar cells. This literature is reviewed. Topics explored include trade-offs of local production versus import of key materials, processing options, the scale and nature of production equipment, implications of storage requirements, and the end-uses of the energy. Directions for future research and demonstrations are indicated.

  8. Potential high efficiency solar cells: Applications from space photovoltaic research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    NASA involvement in photovoltaic energy conversion research development and applications spans over two decades of continuous progress. Solar cell research and development programs conducted by the Lewis Research Center's Photovoltaic Branch have produced a sound technology base not only for the space program, but for terrestrial applications as well. The fundamental goals which have guided the NASA photovoltaic program are to improve the efficiency and lifetime, and to reduce the mass and cost of photovoltaic energy conversion devices and arrays for use in space. The major efforts in the current Lewis program are on high efficiency, single crystal GaAs planar and concentrator cells, radiation hard InP cells, and superlattice solar cells. A brief historical perspective of accomplishments in high efficiency space solar cells will be given, and current work in all of the above categories will be described. The applicability of space cell research and technology to terrestrial photovoltaics will be discussed.

  9. Rear surface effects in high efficiency silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wenham, S.R.; Robinson, S.J.; Dai, X.

    1994-12-31

    Rear surface effects in PERL solar cells can lead not only to degradation in the short circuit current and open circuit voltage, but also fill factor. Three mechanisms capable of changing the effective rear surface recombination velocity with injection level are identified, two associated with oxidized p-type surfaces, and the third with two dimensional effects associated with a rear floating junction. Each of these will degrade the fill factor if the range of junction biases corresponding to the rear surface transition, coincides with the maximum power point. Despite the identified non idealities, PERL cells with rear floating junctions (PERF cells)more » have achieved record open circuit voltages for silicon solar cells, while simultaneously achieving fill factor improvements relative to standard PERL solar cells. Without optimization, a record efficiency of 22% has been demonstrated for a cell with a rear floating junction. The results of both theoretical and experimental studies are provided.« less

  10. Large area low-cost space solar cell development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baraona, C. R.; Cioni, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    A development program to produce large-area (5.9 x 5.9 cm) space quality silicon solar cells with a cost goal of 30 $/watt is descibed. Five cell types under investigation include wraparound dielectric, mechanical wraparound and conventional contact configurations with combinations of 2 or 10 ohm-cm resistivity, back surface reflectors and/or fields, and diffused or ion implanted junctions. A single step process to cut cell and cover-glass simultaneously is being developed. A description of cell developments by Applied Solar Energy Corp., Spectrolab and Spire is included. Results are given for cell and array tests, performed by Lockheed, TRW and NASA. Future large solar arrays that might use cells of this type are discussed.

  11. Status of indium phosphide solar cell development at Spire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitzer, M. B.; Keavney, C. J.; Vernon, S. M.

    1987-01-01

    On-going development of indium phosphide solar cells for space applications is presented. The development is being carried out with a view towards both high conversion efficiency and simplicity of manufacture. The cell designs comprise the ion-implanted cell, the indium tin oxide top contact cell, and the epitaxial cell grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition. Modelling data on the limit to the efficiency are presented and comparison is made to measured performance data.

  12. Nanoscale Light Manipulation for Improved Organic Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Brett

    Organic Solar Cells can be made to be flexible, semi-transparent, and low-cost making them ideal for novel energy harvesting applications such as in greenhouses. However, the main disadvantage of this technology is its low energy conversion efficiency (<15%); mostly due to high recombination rates, compared with other higher performing technologies, such as thinfilm GaAs (>30% Efficiency), and Si-based (>20% Efficiency), solar cells, where recombination within these technologies is much less than Organic Solar Cells. There are still many challenges to overcome to improve the efficiency of Organic Solar Cells. Some of these challenges include: Maximising the absorption of the solar spectrum; improving the charge dynamics; and increasing the lifetime of the devices. One method to address some of these challenges is to include plasmonic nanoparticles into the devices, which has been shown to increase the absorption through scattering, and improve the charge dynamic through localised surface plasmon resonance effects. However, including nanoparticles into Organic Solar Cells has shown to adversely affect the performance of the devices in other ways, such as increasing the recombination of excitons. To address this, an additional (insulating) coating around the nanoparticles supresses this increase, and has shown to be able to increase the performance of the solar cells. In this work, we demonstrate the use of our all-inclusive optical model in the design and optimisation of bespoke colour-specific windows (i.e. Red, Green, and Blue), where the solar cells can be made to have a specific transparency and colour, whilst maximizing their efficiency. For example, we could specify that we wish the colour to be red, with 50% transmissivity; the model will then maximise the Power Conversion Efficiency. We also demonstrate how our extension to Mie theory can simulate nanoparticle systems and can be used to tune the plasmon resonance utilising different coatings, and

  13. Optimization of solar cells for air mass zero operation and a study of solar cells at high temperatures, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovel, H.; Woodall, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    Crystal growth procedures, fabrication techniques, and theoretical analysis were developed in order to make GaAlAs-GaAs solar cell structures which exhibit high performance at air mass 0 illumination and high temperature conditions.

  14. Multijunction Solar Cell Technology for Mars Surface Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, Paul M.; Mardesich, Nick; Ewell, Richard C.; Mueller, Robert L.; Endicter, Scott; Aiken, Daniel; Edmondson, Kenneth; Fetze, Chris

    2006-01-01

    Solar cells used for Mars surface applications have been commercial space qualified AM0 optimized devices. Due to the Martian atmosphere, these cells are not optimized for the Mars surface and as a result operate at a reduced efficiency. A multi-year program, MOST (Mars Optimized Solar Cell Technology), managed by JPL and funded by NASA Code S, was initiated in 2004, to develop tools to modify commercial AM0 cells for the Mars surface solar spectrum and to fabricate Mars optimized devices for verification. This effort required defining the surface incident spectrum, developing an appropriate laboratory solar simulator measurement capability, and to develop and test commercial cells modified for the Mars surface spectrum. This paper discusses the program, including results for the initial modified cells. Simulated Mars surface measurements of MER cells and Phoenix Lander cells (2007 launch) are provided to characterize the performance loss for those missions. In addition, the performance of the MER rover solar arrays is updated to reflect their more than two (2) year operation.

  15. Workshop on Heteroepitaxial InP Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Walters, R. W.

    1993-01-01

    In a generic sense, the justification for any sort of InP solar cell research applies, i.e. to take advantage of the inherently high radiation resistance and efficiency of InP solar cells. To be more specific, the approach is justified by its potential for significant cost reduction and the availability of greatly increased cell area afforded by substrates such as Si and Ge. The use of substrates, such as the latter two, would result in increased ruggedness, ease of handling, and improved manufacturability. The use of more rugged substrates would lead to a greatly increased capability for cell thinning leading to the desirable feature of reduced array weight.

  16. Increased radiation resistance in lithium-counterdoped silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.; Mehta, S.

    1984-01-01

    Lithium-counterdoped n(+)p silicon solar cells are found to exhibit significantly increased radiation resistance to 1-MeV electron irradiation when compared to boron-doped n(+)p silicon solar cells. In addition to improved radiation resistance, considerable damage recovery by annealing is observed in the counterdoped cells at T less than or equal to 100 C. Deep level transient spectroscopy measurements are used to identify the defect whose removal results in the low-temperature aneal. It is suggested that the increased radiation resistance of the counterdoped cells is primarily due to interaction of the lithium with interstitial oxygen.

  17. Thermodynamics of photon-enhanced thermionic emission solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reck, Kasper, E-mail: kasper.reck@nanotech.dtu.dk; Hansen, Ole, E-mail: ole.hansen@nanotech.dtu.dk; CINF Center for Individual Nanoparticle Functionality, Technical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby 2800

    2014-01-13

    Photon-enhanced thermionic emission (PETE) cells in which direct photon energy as well as thermal energy can be harvested have recently been suggested as a new candidate for high efficiency solar cells. Here, we present an analytic thermodynamical model for evaluation of the efficiency of PETE solar cells including an analysis of the entropy production due to thermionic emission of general validity. The model is applied to find the maximum efficiency of a PETE cell for given cathode and anode work functions and temperatures.

  18. Single Source Precursors for Thin Film Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banger, Kulbinder K.; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Harris, Jerry D.; Cowen, Jonathan; Buhro, William E.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2002-01-01

    The development of thin film solar cells on flexible, lightweight, space-qualified substrates provides an attractive cost solution to fabricating solar arrays with high specific power, (W/kg). The use of a polycrystalline chalcopyrite absorber layer for thin film solar cells is considered as the next generation photovoltaic devices. At NASA GRC we have focused on the development of new single source precursors (SSP) and their utility to deposit the chalcopyrite semi-conducting layer (CIS) onto flexible substrates for solar cell fabrication. The syntheses and thermal modulation of SSPs via molecular engineering is described. Thin-film fabrication studies demonstrate the SSPs can be used in a spray CVD (chemical vapor deposition) process, for depositing CIS at reduced temperatures, which display good electrical properties, suitable for PV (photovoltaic) devices.

  19. Visibly transparent polymer solar cells produced by solution processing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Chao; Dou, Letian; Zhu, Rui; Chung, Choong-Heui; Song, Tze-Bin; Zheng, Yue Bing; Hawks, Steve; Li, Gang; Weiss, Paul S; Yang, Yang

    2012-08-28

    Visibly transparent photovoltaic devices can open photovoltaic applications in many areas, such as building-integrated photovoltaics or integrated photovoltaic chargers for portable electronics. We demonstrate high-performance, visibly transparent polymer solar cells fabricated via solution processing. The photoactive layer of these visibly transparent polymer solar cells harvests solar energy from the near-infrared region while being less sensitive to visible photons. The top transparent electrode employs a highly transparent silver nanowire-metal oxide composite conducting film, which is coated through mild solution processes. With this combination, we have achieved 4% power-conversion efficiency for solution-processed and visibly transparent polymer solar cells. The optimized devices have a maximum transparency of 66% at 550 nm.

  20. Summary of solar cell data from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, David C.; Rose, M. Frank

    1994-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was composed of many separate experiments, some of which contained solar cells. These solar cells were distributed at various positions on the LDEF and, therefore, were exposed to the space environment with an orientational dependence. This report will address the space environmental effects on solar cells and solar cell assemblies (SCA's), including electrical interconnects and associated insulation blankets where flown in conjunction with solar cells.

  1. Modeling of the Electric Characteristics of Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, Benjamin; Tzolov, Marian

    The purpose of a solar cell is to covert solar energy, through means of photovoltaic action, into a sustainable electrical current that produces usable electricity. The electrical characteristics of solar cells can be modeled to better understand how they function. As an electrical device, solar cells can be conveniently represented as an equivalent electrical circuit with an ideal diode, ideal current source for the photovoltaic action, a shunt resistor for recombination, a resistor in series to account for contact resistance, and a resistor modeling external power consumption. The values of these elements have been modified to model dark and illumination states. Fitting the model to the experimental current voltage characteristics allows to determine the values of the equivalent circuit elements. Comparing values of open circuit voltage, short circuit current, and shunt resistor can determine factors such as the amount of recombination to diagnose problems in solar cells. The many measurable quantities of a solar cell's characteristics give guidance for the design when they are related with microscopic processes.

  2. Membrane transfer of crystalline silicon thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vempati, Venkata Kesari Nandan

    Silicon has been dominating the solar industry for many years and has been touted as the gold standard of the photovoltaic world. The factors for its dominance: government subsidies and ease of processing. Silicon holds close to 90% of the market share in the material being used for solar cell production. Of which 14% belongs to single-crystalline Silicon. Although 24% efficient bulk crystalline solar cells have been reported, the industry has been looking for thin film alternatives to reduce the cost of production. Moreover with the new avenues like flexible consumer electronics opening up, there is a need to introduce the flexibility into the solar cells. Thin film films make up for their inefficiency keeping their mechanical properties intact by incorporating Anti-reflective schemes such as surface texturing, textured back reflectors and low reflective surfaces. This thesis investigates the possibility of using thin film crystalline Silicon for fabricating solar cells and has demonstrated a low cost and energy efficient way for fabricating 2microm thick single crystalline Silicon solar cells with an efficiency of 0.8% and fill factor of 35%.

  3. Solar Cell Angle of Incidence Corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, Dale R.; Mueller, Robert L.

    1995-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder mission has three different solar arrays each of which sees changes in incidence angle during normal operation. When solar array angle of incidence effects was researched little published data was found. The small amount of-published data created a need to obtain and evaluate such data. The donation of the needed data, which was taken in the fall of 1994, was a major factor in the preparation of this paper.

  4. Solar cell angle of incidence corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, Dale R.; Mueller, Robert L.

    1995-01-01

    Literature on solar array angle of incidence corrections was found to be sparse and contained no tabular data for support. This lack along with recent data on 27 GaAs/Ge 4 cm by 4 cm cells initiated the analysis presented in this paper. The literature cites seven possible contributors to angle of incidence effects: cosine, optical front surface, edge, shadowing, UV degradation, particulate soiling, and background color. Only the first three are covered in this paper due to lack of sufficient data. The cosine correction is commonly used but is not sufficient when the incident angle is large. Fresnel reflection calculations require knowledge of the index of refraction of the coverglass front surface. The absolute index of refraction for the coverglass front surface was not known nor was it measured due to lack of funds. However, a value for the index of refraction was obtained by examining how the prediction errors varied with different assumed indices and selecting the best fit to the set of measured values. Corrections using front surface Fresnel reflection along with the cosine correction give very good predictive results when compared to measured data, except there is a definite trend away from predicted values at the larger incident angles. This trend could be related to edge effects and is illustrated by a use of a box plot of the errors and by plotting the deviation of the mean against incidence angle. The trend is for larger deviations at larger incidence angles and there may be a fourth order effect involved in the trend. A chi-squared test was used to determine if the measurement errors were normally distributed. At 10 degrees the chi-squared test failed, probably due to the very small numbers involved or a bias from the measurement procedure. All other angles showed a good fit to the normal distribution with increasing goodness-of-fit as the angles increased which reinforces the very small numbers hypothesis. The contributed data only went to 65 degrees

  5. 3D-printed external light trap for solar cells.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Lourens; Paetzold, Ulrich W; Blab, Gerhard A; Schropp, Ruud E I; di Vece, Marcel

    2016-05-01

    We present a universally applicable 3D-printed external light trap for enhanced absorption in solar cells. The macroscopic external light trap is placed at the sun-facing surface of the solar cell and retro-reflects the light that would otherwise escape. The light trap consists of a reflective parabolic concentrator placed on top of a reflective cage. Upon placement of the light trap, an improvement of 15% of both the photocurrent and the power conversion efficiency in a thin-film nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) solar cell is measured. The trapped light traverses the solar cell several times within the reflective cage thereby increasing the total absorption in the cell. Consequently, the trap reduces optical losses and enhances the absorption over the entire spectrum. The components of the light trap are 3D printed and made of smoothened, silver-coated thermoplastic. In contrast to conventional light trapping methods, external light trapping leaves the material quality and the electrical properties of the solar cell unaffected. To explain the theoretical operation of the external light trap, we introduce a model that predicts the absorption enhancement in the solar cell by the external light trap. The corresponding calculated path length enhancement shows good agreement with the empirically derived value from the opto-electrical data of the solar cell. Moreover, we analyze the influence of the angle of incidence on the parasitic absorptance to obtain full understanding of the trap performance. © 2015 The Authors. Progress in Photovoltaics: Research and Applications published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Space radiation effects in InP solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, R. J.; Messenger, S. R.; Summers, G. P.; Burke, E. A.; Keavney, C. J.

    1991-12-01

    InP solar cells and mesa diodes grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) were irradiated with electrons and protons at room temperature. The radiation-induced defects (RIDs) were characterized by deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), and the degradation of the solar cell performance was determined through I-V measurements. The nonionizing energy loss (NIEL) of electrons and protons in InP was calculated as a function of energy from 1 to 200 MeV and compared to the measured defect introduction rates. A linear dependence was evident. InP solar cells showed significantly more radiation resistance than c-Si or GaAs/Ge cells under 1 MeV electron irradiation. Using the calculated InP damage rates and measured damage factors, the performance of InP solar cells as a function of orbital altitude and time in orbit was predicted and compared with the performance of c-Si solar cells in the same environment. In all cases, the InP cells showed highly superior radiation resistance.

  7. Approaches to solar cell design for pulsed laser power receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1993-01-01

    Using a laser to beam power from Earth to a photovoltaic receiver in space could be a technology with applications to many space missions. Extremely high average-power lasers would be required in a wavelength range of 700-1000 nm. However, high-power lasers inherently operate in a pulsed format. Existing solar cells are not well designed to respond to pulsed incident power. To better understand cell response to pulsed illumination at high intensity, the PC-1D finite-element computer model was used to analyze the response of solar cells to continuous and pulsed laser illumination. Over 50 percent efficiency was calculated for both InP and GaAs cells under steady-state illumination near the optimum wavelength. The time-dependent response of a high-efficiency GaAs concentrator cell to a laser pulse was modeled, and the effect of laser intensity, wavelength, and bias point was studied. Three main effects decrease the efficiency of a solar cell under pulsed laser illumination: series resistance, L-C 'ringing' with the output circuit, and current limiting due to the output inductance. The problems can be solved either by changing the pulse shape or designing a solar cell to accept the pulsed input. Cell design possibilities discussed are a high-efficiency, light-trapping silicon cell, and a monolithic, low-inductance GaAs cell.

  8. Silicon Solar Cell Process Development, Fabrication and Analysis, Phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoo, H. I.; Iles, P. A.; Tanner, D. P.

    1979-01-01

    Solar cells from RTR ribbons, EFG (RF and RH) ribbons, dendritic webs, Silso wafers, cast silicon by HEM, silicon on ceramic, and continuous Czochralski ingots were fabricated using a standard process typical of those used currently in the silicon solar cell industry. Back surface field (BSF) processing and other process modifications were included to give preliminary indications of possible improved performance. The parameters measured included open circuit voltage, short circuit current, curve fill factor, and conversion efficiency (all taken under AM0 illumination). Also measured for typical cells were spectral response, dark I-V characteristics, minority carrier diffusion length, and photoresponse by fine light spot scanning. the results were compared to the properties of cells made from conventional single crystalline Czochralski silicon with an emphasis on statistical evaluation. Limited efforts were made to identify growth defects which will influence solar cell performance.

  9. Quantifying Low Energy Proton Damage in Multijunction Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, Scott R.; Burke, Edward A.; Walters, Robert J.; Warner, Jeffrey H.; Summers, Geoffrey P.; Lorentzen, Justin R.; Morton, Thomas L.; Taylor, Steven J.

    2007-01-01

    An analysis of the effects of low energy proton irradiation on the electrical performance of triple junction (3J) InGaP2/GaAs/Ge solar cells is presented. The Monte Carlo ion transport code (SRIM) is used to simulate the damage profile induced in a 3J solar cell under the conditions of typical ground testing and that of the space environment. The results are used to present a quantitative analysis of the defect, and hence damage, distribution induced in the cell active region by the different radiation conditions. The modelling results show that, in the space environment, the solar cell will experience a uniform damage distribution through the active region of the cell. Through an application of the displacement damage dose analysis methodology, the implications of this result on mission performance predictions are investigated.

  10. Silicon solar cell efficiency improvement: Status and outlook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, M.

    1985-01-01

    Efficiency and operating life is an economic attribute in silicon solar cells application. The efficiency improvements made during the 30 year existence of the silicon solar cells, from about 6% efficiency at the beginning to 19% in the most recent experimental cells is illustrated. In the more stationary periods, the effort was oriented towards improving radiation resistance and yields on the production lines, while, in other periods, the emphasis was on reaching new levels of efficiency through better cell design and improved material processing. First results were forthcoming from the recent efforts. Considerably more efficiency advancement in silicon solar cells is expected, and the anticipated attainment of efficiencies significantly above 20% is discussed. Major advances in material processing and in the resulting material perfection are required.

  11. Radiative efficiency of lead iodide based perovskite solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Tvingstedt, Kristofer; Malinkiewicz, Olga; Baumann, Andreas; Deibel, Carsten; Snaith, Henry J.; Dyakonov, Vladimir; Bolink, Henk J.

    2014-01-01

    The maximum efficiency of any solar cell can be evaluated in terms of its corresponding ability to emit light. We herein determine the important figure of merit of radiative efficiency for Methylammonium Lead Iodide perovskite solar cells and, to put in context, relate it to an organic photovoltaic (OPV) model device. We evaluate the reciprocity relation between electroluminescence and photovoltaic quantum efficiency and conclude that the emission from the perovskite devices is dominated by a sharp band-to-band transition that has a radiative efficiency much higher than that of an average OPV device. As a consequence, the perovskite have the benefit of retaining an open circuit voltage ~0.14 V closer to its radiative limit than the OPV cell. Additionally, and in contrast to OPVs, we show that the photoluminescence of the perovskite solar cell is substantially quenched under short circuit conditions in accordance with how an ideal photovoltaic cell should operate. PMID:25317958

  12. Method Of Making Solar Collectors By In-Situ Encapsulation Of Solar Cells

    DOEpatents

    Carrie, Peter J.; Chen, Kingsley D. D.

    2000-10-24

    A method of making solar collectors by encapsulating photovoltaic cells within a base of an elongated solar collector wherein heat and pressure are applied to the cells in-situ, after an encapsulating material has been applied. A tool is fashioned having a bladder expandable under gas pressure, filling a region of the collector where the cells are mounted. At the same time, negative pressure is applied outside of the bladder, enhancing its expansion. The bladder presses against a platen which contacts the encapsulated cells, causing outgassing of the encapsulant, while heat cures the encapsulant. After curing, the bladder is deflated and the tool may be removed from the collector and base and reflective panels put into place, if not already there, thereby allowing the solar collector to be ready for use.

  13. World-Record Solar Cell a Step Closer to Cheap Solar Energy

    Science.gov Websites

    envelope of solar-cell efficiency, we can begin to visualize the day when energy from the sun will be in efficiency translates into lower costs for harnessing energy from the sun. The cell's excellent

  14. Space satellite power system. [conversion of solar energy by photovoltaic solar cell arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, P. E.

    1974-01-01

    The concept of a satellite solar power station was studied. It is shown that it offers the potential to meet a significant portion of future energy needs, is pollution free, and is sparing of irreplaceable earth resources. Solar energy is converted by photovoltaic solar cell arrays to dc energy which in turn is converted into microwave energy in a large active phased array. The microwave energy is beamed to earth with little attenuation and is converted back to dc energy on the earth. Economic factors are considered.

  15. High voltage solar cell power generating system for regulated solar array development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, E., Jr.; Hoffman, A. C.

    1973-01-01

    A laboratory solar power system regulated by on-panel switches has been delivered for operating high power (3 kw), high voltage (15,000 volt) loads (communication tubes, ion thrusters). The modular system consists of 26 solar arrays, each with an integral light source and cooling system. A typical array contains 2560 series-connected cells. Each light source consists of twenty 500 watt tungsten iodide lamps providing plus or minus 5 per cent uniformity at one solar constant. An array temperature of less than 40 C is achieved using an infrared filter, a water cooled plate, a vacuum hold-down system, and air flushing.

  16. Preliminary Low Temperature Electron Irradiation of Triple Junction Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, Paul M.; Mueller, Robert L.; Scrivner, Roy L.; Helizon, Roger S.

    2007-01-01

    For many years extending solar power missions far from the sun has been a challenge not only due to the rapid falloff in solar intensity (intensity varies as inverse square of solar distance) but also because some of the solar cells in an array may exhibit a LILT (low intensity low temperature) degradation that reduces array performance. Recent LILT tests performed on commercial triple junction solar cells have shown that high performance can be obtained at solar distances as great as approx. 5 AU1. As a result, their use for missions going far from the sun has become very attractive. One additional question that remains is whether the radiation damage experienced by solar cells under low temperature conditions will be more severe than when measured during room temperature radiation tests where thermal annealing may take place. This is especially pertinent to missions such as the New Frontiers mission Juno, which will experience cell irradiation from the trapped electron environment at Jupiter. Recent testing2 has shown that low temperature proton irradiation (10 MeV) produces cell degradation results similar to room temperature irradiations and that thermal annealing does not play a factor. Although it is suggestive to propose the same would be observed for low temperature electron irradiations, this has not been verified. JPL has routinely performed radiation testing on commercial solar cells and has also performed LILT testing to characterize cell performance under far sun operating conditions. This research activity was intended to combine the features of both capabilities to investigate the possibility of any room temperature annealing that might influence the measured radiation damage. Although it was not possible to maintain the test cells at a constant low temperature between irradiation and electrical measurements, it was possible to obtain measurements with the cell temperature kept well below room temperature. A fluence of 1E15 1MeV electrons was

  17. Flat-plate solar array project. Volume 4: High-efficiency solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leipold, M.; Cheng, L.; Daud, T.; Mokashi, A.; Burger, D.; Christensen, E. (Editor); Murry, J. (Editor); Bengelsdorf, I. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The High Efficiency Solar Cell Task was assigned the objective of understanding and developing high efficiency solar cell devices that would meet the cost and performance goals of the Flat Plate Solar Array (FSA) Project. The need for research dealing with high efficiency devices was considered important because of the role efficiency plays in reducing price per watt of generated energy. The R&D efforts conducted during the 1982 to 1986 period are summarized to provide understanding and control of energy conversion losses associated with crystalline silicon solar cells. New levels of conversion efficiency were demonstrated. Major contributions were made both to the understanding and reduction of bulk and surface losses in solar cells. For example, oxides, nitrides, and polysilicon were all shown to be potentially useful surface passivants. Improvements in measurement techniques were made and Auger coefficients and spectral absorption data were obtained for unique types of silicon sheets. New modelling software was developed including a program to optimize a device design based on input characteristics of a cell.

  18. Design approach for solar cell and battery of a persistent solar powered GPS tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahraei, Nasim; Watson, Sterling M.; Pennes, Anthony; Marius Peters, Ian; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2017-08-01

    Sensors with wireless communication can be powered by photovoltaic (PV) devices. However, using solar power requires thoughtful design of the power system, as well as a careful management of the power consumption, especially for devices with cellular communication (because of their higher power consumption). A design approach can minimize system size, weight, and/or cost, while maximizing device performance (data transmission rate and persistence). In this contribution, we describe our design approach for a small form-factor, solar-powered GPS tracker with cellular communication. We evaluate the power consumption of the device in different stages of operation. Combining measured power consumption and the calculated energy-yield of a solar cell, we estimate the battery capacity and solar cell area required for 5 years of continuous operation. We evaluate trade-offs between PV and battery size by simulating the battery state of charge. The data show a trade-off between battery capacity and solar-cell area for given target data transmission rate and persistence. We use this analysis to determine the combination of solar panel area and battery capacity for a given application and the data transmission rate that results in minimum cost or total weight of the system.

  19. Measurement of solar spectra relating to photosynthesis and solar cells: an inquiry lab for secondary science.

    PubMed

    Ruggirello, Rachel M; Balcerzak, Phyllis; May, Victoria L; Blankenship, Robert E

    2012-07-01

    The process of photosynthesis is central to science curriculum at all levels. This article describes an inquiry-based laboratory investigation developed to explore the impact of light quality on photosynthesis and to connect this process to current research on harvesting solar energy, including bioenergy, artificial photosynthesis, and solar cells. This laboratory was used with high-school science teachers who then took this experience back to their classrooms. During this exercise, teachers used an economical spectroradiometer to measure the solar spectrum and relate this to photosynthetic light absorption by determining the quality of light beneath trees. Following this investigation, teachers learned about the plant-inspired dye-sensitized solar cells and constructed one. To connect their light quality investigation to the efficiency of photosynthesis and solar cells, teachers then collected data at locations with varying quality and intensity of light. In sum, this investigation provides a crucial connection between photosynthesis and cutting edge research on solar energy technologies. Our learning experience provides a new instructional model for understanding a little investigated aspect of photosynthesis and connects to authentic scientific research. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Development of an electronic device quality aluminum antimonide (AlSb) semiconductor for solar cell applications

    DOEpatents

    Sherohman, John W; Yee, Jick Hong; Combs, III, Arthur W

    2014-11-11

    Electronic device quality Aluminum Antimonide (AlSb)-based single crystals produced by controlled atmospheric annealing are utilized in various configurations for solar cell applications. Like that of a GaAs-based solar cell devices, the AlSb-based solar cell devices as disclosed herein provides direct conversion of solar energy to electrical power.