Science.gov

Sample records for a-sin films caused

  1. Study of mechanism which causes film formation on mercury surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frohnsdorff, G.; Dunn, D.

    1972-01-01

    The mechanism by which small quantities of dissolved tin, sodium, and lithium lower the rate of evaporation of mercury in vacuum is determined. An apparatus was built in which dilute amalgams could be prepared and studied in an oxygen-free environment before being exposed to oxygen under controlled conditions. The apparatus was able to maintain a pressure of less than 1.3 x 0.000001 N/sqm (10 to the minus 8th power torr) of gases and vapors other than mercury and less than 1.3 x 10 to the minus 8th N/sq m (10 to the minus 10th power torr) partial pressure of oxygen; also, it provided for mechanical sweeping of the liquid metal surfaces in the vacuum environment. The rates of evaporation of pure mercury and of dilute amalgams of tin (52 ppm), sodium (229 ppm), and lithium (165 ppm) were determined at temperature between 25 and 55 C both before and after 70 minute exposures to an approximately 270 N/sq m (2 torr) pressure of oxygen. The rates of evaporation of the pure mercury and the amalgams as first prepared were similar but the rates for the amalgams were reduced by at least 80% at 25 C as a result of the exposure to oxygen. The effect of the oxygen treatment could be completely removed by sweeping the amalgam surfaces. It was concluded that the reduced rates of evaporation resulted from the formation of transparent, insoluble, oxide films on the amalgam surfaces.

  2. Microscopic degradation mechanism of polyimide film caused by surface discharge under bipolar continuous square impulse voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yang; Wu, Guang-Ning; Liu, Ji-Wu; Peng, Jia; Gao, Guo-Qiang; Zhu, Guang-Ya; Wang, Peng; Cao, Kai-Jiang

    2014-02-01

    Polyimide (PI) film is an important type of insulating material used in inverter-fed motors. Partial discharge (PD) under a sequence of high-frequency square impulses is one of the key factors that lead to premature failures in insulation systems of inverter-fed motors. In order to explore the damage mechanism of PI film caused by discharge, an aging system of surface discharge under bipolar continuous square impulse voltage (BCSIV) is designed based on the ASTM 2275 01 standard and the electrical aging tests of PI film samples are performed above the partial discharge inception voltage (PDIV). The chemical bonds of PI polymer chains are analyzed through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and the dielectric properties of unaged and aged PI samples are investigated by LCR testers HIOKI 3532-50. Finally, the micro-morphology and micro-structure changes of PI film samples are observed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show that the physical and chemical effects of discharge cut off the chemical bonds of PI polymer chains. The fractures of ether bond (C—O—C) and imide ring (C—N—C) on the backbone of a PI polymer chain leads to the decrease of molecular weight, which results in the degradation of PI polymers and the generation of new chemical groups and materials, like carboxylic acid, ketone, aldehydes, etc. The variation of microscopic structure of PI polymers can change the orientation ability of polarizable units when the samples are under an AC electric field, which would cause the dielectric constant ɛ to increase and dielectric loss tan δ to decrease. The SEM images show that the degradation path of PI film is initiated from the surface and then gradually extends to the interior with continuous aging. The injection charge could result in the PI macromolecular chain degradation and increase the trap density in the PI polymer bulk.

  3. The Usability of a Pressure-Indicating Film to Measure the Teat Load Caused by a Collapsing Liner

    PubMed Central

    Demba, Susanne; Elsholz, Sabrina; Ammon, Christian; Rose-Meierhöfer, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Prevention of damage to the teat and mastitis requires determination of the teat load caused by a collapsing liner. The aim of this study was to test a pressure-indicating film designed to measure the pressure between a collapsing liner and artificial teats. The Ultra Super Low and the Extreme Low pressure-indicating films were tested on two types of artificial teat. The experiments were performed with a conventional milking cluster equipped with round silicone liners. For each teat and film type, 30 repetitions were performed. Each repetition was performed with a new piece of film. Kruskal-Wallis tests were performed to detect differences between the pressure values for the different teats. The area of regions where pressure-indication color developed was calculated to determine the most suitable film type. Both film types measured the pressure applied to both artificial teats by the teat cup liner. Thus, the pressure-indicating films can be used to measure the pressure between a collapsing liner and an artificial teat. Based on the results of the present investigation, a pressure-indicating film with the measurement ranges of both film types combined would be an optimal tool to measure the overall pressure between an artificial teat and a collapsing liner. PMID:27690033

  4. The Usability of a Pressure-Indicating Film to Measure the Teat Load Caused by a Collapsing Liner.

    PubMed

    Demba, Susanne; Elsholz, Sabrina; Ammon, Christian; Rose-Meierhöfer, Sandra

    2016-09-28

    Prevention of damage to the teat and mastitis requires determination of the teat load caused by a collapsing liner. The aim of this study was to test a pressure-indicating film designed to measure the pressure between a collapsing liner and artificial teats. The Ultra Super Low and the Extreme Low pressure-indicating films were tested on two types of artificial teat. The experiments were performed with a conventional milking cluster equipped with round silicone liners. For each teat and film type, 30 repetitions were performed. Each repetition was performed with a new piece of film. Kruskal-Wallis tests were performed to detect differences between the pressure values for the different teats. The area of regions where pressure-indication color developed was calculated to determine the most suitable film type. Both film types measured the pressure applied to both artificial teats by the teat cup liner. Thus, the pressure-indicating films can be used to measure the pressure between a collapsing liner and an artificial teat. Based on the results of the present investigation, a pressure-indicating film with the measurement ranges of both film types combined would be an optimal tool to measure the overall pressure between an artificial teat and a collapsing liner.

  5. Holographic image generation with a thin-film resonance caused by chalcogenide phase-change material

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Yeol; Kim, Yong-Hae; Cho, Seong-M.; Kim, Gi Heon; Kim, Tae-Youb; Ryu, Hojun; Kim, Han Na; Kang, Han Byeol; Hwang, Chi-Young; Hwang, Chi-Sun

    2017-01-01

    The development of digital holography is anticipated for the viewing of 3D images by reconstructing both the amplitude and phase information of the object. Compared to analog holograms written by a laser interference, digital hologram technology has the potential to realize a moving 3D image using a spatial light modulator. However, to ensure a high-resolution 3D image with a large viewing angle, the hologram panel requires a near-wavelength scale pixel pitch with a sufficient large numbers of pixels. In this manuscript, we demonstrate a digital hologram panel based on a chalcogenide phase-change material (PCM) which has a pixel pitch of 1 μm and a panel size of 1.6 × 1.6 cm2. A thin film of PCM encapsulated by dielectric layers can be used for the hologram panel by means of excimer laser lithography. By tuning the thicknesses of upper and lower dielectric layers, a color-selective diffraction panel is demonstrated since a thin film resonance caused by dielectric can affect to the absorption and diffraction spectrum of the proposed hologram panel. We also show reflection color of a small active region (1 μm × 4 μm) made by ultra-thin PCM layer can be electrically changed. PMID:28117346

  6. Holographic image generation with a thin-film resonance caused by chalcogenide phase-change material.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Yeol; Kim, Yong-Hae; Cho, Seong-M; Kim, Gi Heon; Kim, Tae-Youb; Ryu, Hojun; Kim, Han Na; Kang, Han Byeol; Hwang, Chi-Young; Hwang, Chi-Sun

    2017-01-24

    The development of digital holography is anticipated for the viewing of 3D images by reconstructing both the amplitude and phase information of the object. Compared to analog holograms written by a laser interference, digital hologram technology has the potential to realize a moving 3D image using a spatial light modulator. However, to ensure a high-resolution 3D image with a large viewing angle, the hologram panel requires a near-wavelength scale pixel pitch with a sufficient large numbers of pixels. In this manuscript, we demonstrate a digital hologram panel based on a chalcogenide phase-change material (PCM) which has a pixel pitch of 1 μm and a panel size of 1.6 × 1.6 cm(2). A thin film of PCM encapsulated by dielectric layers can be used for the hologram panel by means of excimer laser lithography. By tuning the thicknesses of upper and lower dielectric layers, a color-selective diffraction panel is demonstrated since a thin film resonance caused by dielectric can affect to the absorption and diffraction spectrum of the proposed hologram panel. We also show reflection color of a small active region (1 μm × 4 μm) made by ultra-thin PCM layer can be electrically changed.

  7. Holographic image generation with a thin-film resonance caused by chalcogenide phase-change material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Yeol; Kim, Yong-Hae; Cho, Seong-M.; Kim, Gi Heon; Kim, Tae-Youb; Ryu, Hojun; Kim, Han Na; Kang, Han Byeol; Hwang, Chi-Young; Hwang, Chi-Sun

    2017-01-01

    The development of digital holography is anticipated for the viewing of 3D images by reconstructing both the amplitude and phase information of the object. Compared to analog holograms written by a laser interference, digital hologram technology has the potential to realize a moving 3D image using a spatial light modulator. However, to ensure a high-resolution 3D image with a large viewing angle, the hologram panel requires a near-wavelength scale pixel pitch with a sufficient large numbers of pixels. In this manuscript, we demonstrate a digital hologram panel based on a chalcogenide phase-change material (PCM) which has a pixel pitch of 1 μm and a panel size of 1.6 × 1.6 cm2. A thin film of PCM encapsulated by dielectric layers can be used for the hologram panel by means of excimer laser lithography. By tuning the thicknesses of upper and lower dielectric layers, a color-selective diffraction panel is demonstrated since a thin film resonance caused by dielectric can affect to the absorption and diffraction spectrum of the proposed hologram panel. We also show reflection color of a small active region (1 μm × 4 μm) made by ultra-thin PCM layer can be electrically changed.

  8. Morphological instability of Ag films caused by phase transition in the underlying Ta barrier layer

    SciTech Connect

    Mardani, Shabnam Vallin, Örjan; Wätjen, Jörn Timo; Norström, Hans; Olsson, Jörgen; Zhang, Shi-Li

    2014-08-18

    Wide-bandgap (WBG) semiconductor technologies are maturing and may provide increased device performance in many fields of applications, such as high-temperature electronics. However, there are still issues regarding the stability and reliability of WBG devices. Of particular importance is the high-temperature stability of interconnects for electronic systems based on WBG-semiconductors. For metallization without proper encapsulation, morphological degradation can occur at elevated temperatures. Sandwiching Ag films between Ta and/or TaN layers in this study is found to be electrically and morphologically stabilize the Ag metallization up to 800 °C, compared to 600 °C for uncapped films. However, the barrier layer plays a key role and TaN is found to be superior to Ta, resulting in the best achieved stability, whereas the difference between Ta and TaN caps is negligible. The β-to-α phase transition in the underlying Ta barrier layer is identified as the major cause responsible for the morphological instability observed above 600 °C. It is shown that this phase transition can be avoided using a stacked Ta/TaN barrier.

  9. Structural changes in nanocrystalline Bi2Te3/Bi2Se3 multilayer thin films caused by thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Jun; Takashiri, Masayuki

    2017-06-01

    To assess the performance of thermoelectric devices with nanostructured materials at high operating temperatures, we investigated the effects of structural changes on the thermoelectric properties of nanocrystalline bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3)/bismuth selenide (Bi2Se3) multilayer thin films caused by thermal annealing. Multilayer thin films with 12 and 48 layers were fabricated by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering. These thin films were then thermally annealed at temperatures ranging from 250 to 350 °C. As the annealing temperature increased, flake-like nanocrystals were grown in the 12- and 48-layer thin films. X-ray diffraction peaks from three alloys, which were determined to be Bi2Te3, Bi2Se3, and (Bi2Te3)0.4(Bi2Se3)0.6, were observed in the thin films. This indicates that Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se3 layers were not completely diffused mutually in this range of annealing temperature. The 12- and 48-layer thin films exhibited increases in both the electrical conductivity and the absolute value of the Seebeck coefficient at the annealing temperature of 300 °C. One possible explanation for this improvement is that the band structure is tuned by inducing strain during the variation of atomic composition in the multilayer thin films. As a result, the power factor was significantly improved by the thermal annealing. In particular, the maximum power factor reached 13.7 μW/(cm K2) in the 12-layer thin film at the annealing temperature of 350 °C. Therefore, we may conclude that if the multilayer thin films undergo structural changes at higher operating temperature (≈350 °C), thermoelectric devices composed of multilayer thin films are expected to exhibit suitable thermoelectric performance.

  10. All-inkjet-printed thin-film transistors: manufacturing process reliability by root cause analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sowade, Enrico; Ramon, Eloi; Mitra, Kalyan Yoti; Martínez-Domingo, Carme; Pedró, Marta; Pallarès, Jofre; Loffredo, Fausta; Villani, Fulvia; Gomes, Henrique L.; Terés, Lluís; Baumann, Reinhard R.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the detailed electrical investigation of all-inkjet-printed thin-film transistor (TFT) arrays focusing on TFT failures and their origins. The TFT arrays were manufactured on flexible polymer substrates in ambient condition without the need for cleanroom environment or inert atmosphere and at a maximum temperature of 150 °C. Alternative manufacturing processes for electronic devices such as inkjet printing suffer from lower accuracy compared to traditional microelectronic manufacturing methods. Furthermore, usually printing methods do not allow the manufacturing of electronic devices with high yield (high number of functional devices). In general, the manufacturing yield is much lower compared to the established conventional manufacturing methods based on lithography. Thus, the focus of this contribution is set on a comprehensive analysis of defective TFTs printed by inkjet technology. Based on root cause analysis, we present the defects by developing failure categories and discuss the reasons for the defects. This procedure identifies failure origins and allows the optimization of the manufacturing resulting finally to a yield improvement. PMID:27649784

  11. All-inkjet-printed thin-film transistors: manufacturing process reliability by root cause analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowade, Enrico; Ramon, Eloi; Mitra, Kalyan Yoti; Martínez-Domingo, Carme; Pedró, Marta; Pallarès, Jofre; Loffredo, Fausta; Villani, Fulvia; Gomes, Henrique L.; Terés, Lluís; Baumann, Reinhard R.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the detailed electrical investigation of all-inkjet-printed thin-film transistor (TFT) arrays focusing on TFT failures and their origins. The TFT arrays were manufactured on flexible polymer substrates in ambient condition without the need for cleanroom environment or inert atmosphere and at a maximum temperature of 150 °C. Alternative manufacturing processes for electronic devices such as inkjet printing suffer from lower accuracy compared to traditional microelectronic manufacturing methods. Furthermore, usually printing methods do not allow the manufacturing of electronic devices with high yield (high number of functional devices). In general, the manufacturing yield is much lower compared to the established conventional manufacturing methods based on lithography. Thus, the focus of this contribution is set on a comprehensive analysis of defective TFTs printed by inkjet technology. Based on root cause analysis, we present the defects by developing failure categories and discuss the reasons for the defects. This procedure identifies failure origins and allows the optimization of the manufacturing resulting finally to a yield improvement.

  12. All-inkjet-printed thin-film transistors: manufacturing process reliability by root cause analysis.

    PubMed

    Sowade, Enrico; Ramon, Eloi; Mitra, Kalyan Yoti; Martínez-Domingo, Carme; Pedró, Marta; Pallarès, Jofre; Loffredo, Fausta; Villani, Fulvia; Gomes, Henrique L; Terés, Lluís; Baumann, Reinhard R

    2016-09-21

    We report on the detailed electrical investigation of all-inkjet-printed thin-film transistor (TFT) arrays focusing on TFT failures and their origins. The TFT arrays were manufactured on flexible polymer substrates in ambient condition without the need for cleanroom environment or inert atmosphere and at a maximum temperature of 150 °C. Alternative manufacturing processes for electronic devices such as inkjet printing suffer from lower accuracy compared to traditional microelectronic manufacturing methods. Furthermore, usually printing methods do not allow the manufacturing of electronic devices with high yield (high number of functional devices). In general, the manufacturing yield is much lower compared to the established conventional manufacturing methods based on lithography. Thus, the focus of this contribution is set on a comprehensive analysis of defective TFTs printed by inkjet technology. Based on root cause analysis, we present the defects by developing failure categories and discuss the reasons for the defects. This procedure identifies failure origins and allows the optimization of the manufacturing resulting finally to a yield improvement.

  13. REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE: A PSYCHOANALYTIC AND FAMILY-LIFE-CYCLE VIEW OF EMERGING ADULTHOOD IN THE FILM.

    PubMed

    Fulmer, Richard H

    2017-07-01

    The period during which grown children leave home and establish a new, self-supporting family is called emerging adulthood. This paper uses psychoanalytic concepts and family-life-cycle theory to analyze the film Rebel without a Cause () as a dramatic example of three families going through this phase. Freud's () rescue-motif of the child trying to save an endangered peer to repay his parents for having been nurtured is also characteristic of this period and is considered practice for parenting the next generation. Proximate conflict and support enable two of the film's families to continue the path to reproduce themselves. © 2017 The Psychoanalytic Quarterly, Inc.

  14. Delayed onset of photochromism in molybdenum oxide films caused by photoinduced defect formation.

    PubMed

    Rouhani, Mehdi; Gorelik, Sergey; Hobley, Jonathan; Wang, Shi Jie; Williams, Evan Laurence; Foo, Yong Lim

    2011-10-01

    We report the photochromic properties of amorphous MoO3 films deposited by dc sputtering with different O2 flow rates. The kinetics of film coloration under UV light irradiation is determined using optical transmission spectroscopy. Changes in the absorbance and refractive index were derived from the analysis of transmittance spectra. The absorbance spectra exhibited a growing broad peak centered around 830 nm, which was induced by the UV irradiation. In the early stages of irradiation, the absorbance of the films did not change but their refractive indices did change. This induction time was correlated with the O2 partial pressure during the film deposition, which was controlled by the O2 flow rate. The origins of this observation are discussed.

  15. Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philadelphia Board of Education, PA. Div. of Instructional Materials.

    The Affective Curriculum Research Project produced five films and two records during a series of experimental summer programs. The films and records form part of a curriculum designed to teach to the concerns of students. The films were an effort to describe the Philadelphia Cooperative Schools Program, to explain its importance, and to…

  16. Surface superconductivity as the primary cause of broadening of superconducting transition in Nb films at high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeinali, A.; Golod, T.; Krasnov, V. M.

    2016-12-01

    We study the origin of broadening of superconducting transition in sputtered Nb films at high magnetic fields. From simultaneous tunneling and transport measurements we conclude that the upper critical field Hc 2 always corresponds to the bottom of transition R ˜0 , while the top R ˜Rn occurs close to the critical field for destruction of surface superconductivity Hc 3≃1.7 Hc 2 . The two-dimensional nature of superconductivity at H >Hc 2 is confirmed by cusplike angular dependence of magnetoresistance. Our data indicates that surface superconductivity is remarkably robust even in disordered polycrystalline films and, surprisingly, even in perpendicular magnetic fields. We conclude that surface superconductivity, rather than flux-flow phenomenon, inhomogeneity, or superconducting fluctuations, is the primary cause of broadening of superconducting transition in magnetic field.

  17. Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Zhang, Yang; Shao, Yayun; Zeng, Min; Zhang, Zhang; Gao, Xingsen; Lu, Xubing; Liu, J.-M.; Ishiwara, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we investigated the microstructure and electrical properties of Bi2SiO5 (BSO) doped SrBi2Ta2O9 (SBT) films deposited by chemical solution deposition. X-ray diffraction observation indicated that the crystalline structures of all the BSO-doped SBT films are nearly the same as those of a pure SBT film. Through BSO doping, the 2Pr and 2Ec values of SBT films were changed from 15.3 μC/cm2 and 138 kV/cm of pure SBT to 1.45 μC/cm2 and 74 kV/cm of 10 wt.% BSO-doped SBT. The dielectric constant at 1 MHz for SBT varied from 199 of pure SBT to 96 of 10 wt.% BSO-doped SBT. The doped SBT films exhibited higher leakage current than that of non-doped SBT films. Nevertheless, all the doped SBT films still had small dielectric loss and low leakage current. Our present work will provide useful insights into the BSO doping effects to the SBT films, and it will be helpful for the material design in the future nonvolatile ferroelectric memories.

  18. Kelvin–Helmholtz instability in an ultrathin air film causes drop splashing on smooth surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Tan, Peng; Xu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    When a fast-moving drop impacts onto a smooth substrate, splashing will be produced at the edge of the expanding liquid sheet. This ubiquitous phenomenon lacks a fundamental understanding. Combining experiment with model, we illustrate that the ultrathin air film trapped under the expanding liquid front triggers splashing. Because this film is thinner than the mean free path of air molecules, the interior airflow transfers momentum with an unusually high velocity comparable to the speed of sound and generates a stress 10 times stronger than the airflow in common situations. Such a large stress initiates Kelvin–Helmholtz instabilities at small length scales and effectively produces splashing. Our model agrees quantitatively with experimental verifications and brings a fundamental understanding to the ubiquitous phenomenon of drop splashing on smooth surfaces. PMID:25713350

  19. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in an ultrathin air film causes drop splashing on smooth surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Tan, Peng; Xu, Lei

    2015-03-17

    When a fast-moving drop impacts onto a smooth substrate, splashing will be produced at the edge of the expanding liquid sheet. This ubiquitous phenomenon lacks a fundamental understanding. Combining experiment with model, we illustrate that the ultrathin air film trapped under the expanding liquid front triggers splashing. Because this film is thinner than the mean free path of air molecules, the interior airflow transfers momentum with an unusually high velocity comparable to the speed of sound and generates a stress 10 times stronger than the airflow in common situations. Such a large stress initiates Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities at small length scales and effectively produces splashing. Our model agrees quantitatively with experimental verifications and brings a fundamental understanding to the ubiquitous phenomenon of drop splashing on smooth surfaces.

  20. Wafer warp caused by thick film resists acting as a permanent part of the device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuschner, R.; Franosch, M.; Dow, T.

    2008-03-01

    Epoxy-novolak thick film resists are of interest for applications where the resist pattern remains in the device serving as mechanical alignment aids, micro channels or protection layers. For these applications, good mechanical properties are of interest. Unfortunately mechanical strength comes with high cross-linking density and, therefore, high tensile stress. We report here on a comparison of three commercially available thick film resists with respect to the following criteria: thickness and uniformity on high topography wafers, i-line photo speed, adhesion on Si 3N 4, hardness and plasticity, glass transition temperature and wafer warp. The three resists (2 types of SU-8 [MicroChem Corp.] and one type of TMMR [Tokyo Ohka Co., LTD]) show different behavior as a result of the different solvent, photo-acid-generator (PAG) and polymer properties, and trade-offs have to be made depending on the applications.

  1. Unexpected behavior of transient current in thin PZT films caused by grain-boundary conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delimova, L. A.; Guschina, E. V.; Seregin, D. S.; Vorotilov, K. A.; Sigov, A. S.

    2017-06-01

    The behavior of the transient current at different preliminary polarizations has been studied in Pb(ZrTi)O3 (PZT) films with various grain structures. To affect the grain structure, PZT films were prepared by chemical solution deposition with a two-step crystallization process using combination of seed layers with a low Pb excess and the main layers with a 30 wt. % Pb excess. Some films were prepared with a fixed Pb excess in all the deposited layers. We found that the lead excess and the seed layer crystalline structure can affect the grain-boundary conduction which, in turn, influences the polarization dependence of the transient current and the appearance of current peaks which look like the so-called negative differential resistance region in the current-voltage curves. We show that the emergence of the current peaks in the PZT films depends on (i) whether the current flows inside the ferroelectric phase (grains) or outside, along grain boundaries and (ii) whether the applied bias direction is parallel or opposite to the polarization vector. A correlation between the grain-boundary conduction and current-polarization dependences is confirmed by the local current distribution measured by conductive atomic force microscopy. Possible mechanisms responsible for specific features of the transient current and appearance of the current peaks are discussed. The effect of grain-boundary conduction on the behavior of the current may be significant and should be taken into account in ferroelectric random access memory whose readout operation assumes registration of the magnitude of the polarization switching current under positive bias.

  2. Fouling of cooling tower film fill: Causes, cleanup techniques and operating guidelines to minimize reoccurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Robinette, D.J.; Puckorius, P.R.

    1996-10-01

    The old adage an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure could not be more appropriate than in the case of film fill fouling. It is relatively easy to keep new film fill from fouling if a good chemical treatment program is established from day one. On the other hand, if fill becomes fouled, it often goes undetected until the problem has progressed to such an extent that--at best, the tower performance is severely impaired, or--at worst, a portion of the tower collapses from the weight of the deposit. It is usually an extremely difficult, costly, and time-consuming task to restore the fill`s cleanliness under the latter circumstances. It requires proper foulant diagnosis and development of an effective cleanup procedure, but restoration to near 100% cleanliness can be achieved. This paper discusses the phenomenon of film fill fouling from a perspective developed through numerous actual case histories in which the authors were called in to diagnose and correct the problem.

  3. [Anesthetic circle system failure caused by a plastic film--a case report].

    PubMed

    Hara, Naoki; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Minami, Toshiaki

    2006-02-01

    A 44-year-old woman, ASA I, with breast cancer was scheduled for mastectomy. The anesthetic induction was performed by inhalation of 5% sevoflurane and 66% nitrous oxide in oxygen. After the loss of eyelash reflex assisted ventilation was initiated. At this point, the capnograph indicated inspired carbon dioxide tension of 18mmHg. Anesthetic machine check was soon carried out again. A visual check of non-return valves detected a plastic film, 18 x 21mm large, caught in the expiratory valve. This plastic film impaired complete occlusion of the orifice for the expiratory gas flow. As a result, the patient was rebreathing carbon dioxide. After removing it, the wave form of the capnograph was normalized and end-tidal carbon dioxide tension decreased immediately from 45mmHg to 33mmHg. As we did not detect any foreign matters at the non-return valves on anesthetic machine check before use, the plastic film might have already existed in the disposable corrugated tube before use. The capnograph is a useful device for detecting anesthetic circle system failure in such a case. It is important that the patients' airway is separated from the anesthetic circle system through the use of a filter to prevent foreign matter from being inhaled.

  4. Refractive-index change caused by electrons in amorphous AsS and AsSe thin films doped with different metals by photodiffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nordman, Olli; Nordman, Nina; Pashkevich, Valfrid

    2001-08-01

    The refractive-index change caused by electrons was measured in amorphous AsS and AsSe thin films. Films were coated with different metals. Diffraction gratings were written by electron-beam lithography. The interactions of electrons in films with and without the photodiffusion of overcoated metal were compared. Incoming electrons caused metal atom and ion diffusion in both investigated cases. The metal diffusion was dependent on the metal and it was found to influence the refractive index. In some cases lateral diffusion of the metal was noticed. The conditions for applications were verified. {copyright} 2001 Optical Society of America

  5. Mathematical modeling of pattern formation caused by drying of colloidal film under a mask.

    PubMed

    Tarasevich, Yuri Yu; Vodolazskaya, Irina V; Sakharova, Lyudmila V

    2016-02-01

    In our model, we simulate an experiment (D.J. Harris, H. Hu, J.C. Conrad, J.A. Lewis, Patterning colloidal films via evaporative lithography, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 148301 (2007)). A thin colloidal sessile droplet is allowed to dry out on a horizontal hydrophilic surface. A mask just above the droplet predominantly allows evaporation from the droplet free surface directly beneath the holes in the mask. We consider one special case, when the holes in the mask are arranged so that the system has rotational symmetry of order m . We use a speculative evaporative flux to mimic the real system. Advection, diffusion, and sedimentation are taken into account. FlexPDE is utilized to solve an advection-diffusion equation using the finite element method. The simulation demonstrates that the colloidal particles accumulate below the holes as the solvent evaporates. Diffusion can reduce this accumulation.

  6. Rates and causes of disagreement in interpretation of full-field digital mammography and film-screen mammography in a diagnostic setting.

    PubMed

    Venta, L A; Hendrick, R E; Adler, Y T; DeLeon, P; Mengoni, P M; Scharl, A M; Comstock, C E; Hansen, L; Kay, N; Coveler, A; Cutter, G

    2001-05-01

    This study was performed to determine the rates and causes of disagreements in interpretation between full-field digital mammography and film-screen mammography in a diagnostic setting. Patients undergoing diagnostic mammography were invited to participate in the digital mammography study. Three views, selected by the radiologist interpreting the film-screen mammography, were obtained in both film-screen mammography and digital mammography. Radiologists independently assigned a Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) category to the film-screen mammography and the digital mammography images. The BI-RADS categories were grouped into the general categories of agreement, partial agreement, or disagreement. A third and different radiologist reviewed all cases of disagreement, reached a decision as to management, and determined the primary cause of disagreement. Six radiologists reviewed digital mammography and film-screen mammography diagnostic images in a total of 1147 breasts in 692 patients. Agreement between digital mammography and final film-screen mammography assessment was present in 937 breasts (82%), partial agreement in 159 (14%), and disagreement in 51 (4%), for a kappa value of 0.29. The primary causes of disagreement were differences in management approach of the radiologists (52%), information derived from sonography or additional film-screen mammograms (34%), and technical differences between the two mammographic techniques (10%). Significant disagreement between film-screen mammography and digital mammography affecting follow-up management was present in only 4% of breasts. The most frequent cause of disagreement in interpretation was a difference in management approach between radiologists (interobserver variability). This source of variability was larger than that due to differences in lesion visibility between film-screen mammography and digital mammography.

  7. Beam modulation caused by the plasma scalds in the multilayer dielectric films.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hu; Qi, Hongji; Guo, Meng; Chai, Yingjie; Wang, Bin; Yi, Kui; Shao, Jianda

    2015-06-15

    The near-field phase modulation (NFPM) caused by the plasma scalds is investigated with a newly proposed mixed overcoat layer model. Based on the NFPM, the far-field intensity modulation (FFIM) is calculated and discussed with the scalar diffraction theory. The results indicate that both the NFPM and FFIM are sensitive to the scalding depth. A feature curve is developed to analyze the NFPM for arbitrary scalding depth. The modulation can be ignored when the scalding depth is less than the first feature point in the feature curve. Even though the diffraction intensity in the Fresnel region can be enhanced dozens of times, the FFIM in the Fraunhofer region can recover gradually if the scalding depth is below a critical value. The preliminary experimental results are consistent with the theoretical prediction.

  8. Two Simultaneous Mechanisms Causing Glass Transition Temperature Reductions in High Molecular Weight Freestanding Polymer Films as Measured by Transmission Ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pye, Justin E.; Roth, Connie B.

    2011-12-01

    We study the glass transition in confined polymer films and present the first experimental evidence indicating that two separate mechanisms can act simultaneously on the film to propagate enhanced mobility from the free surface into the material. Using transmission ellipsometry, we have measured the thermal expansion of ultrathin, high molecular-weight (MW), freestanding polystyrene films over an extended temperature range. For two different MWs, we observed two distinct reduced glass transition temperatures (Tg’s), separated by up to 60 K, within single films with thicknesses h less than 70 nm. The lower transition follows the expected MW dependent, linear Tg(h) behavior previously seen in high MW freestanding films. We also observe a much stronger upper transition with no MW dependence that exhibits the same Tg(h) dependence as supported and low MW freestanding polymer films.

  9. Atomic disorder of Li0.5Ni0.5O thin films caused by Li doping: estimation from X-ray Debye–Waller factors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Anli; Sakata, Osami; Yamauchi, Ryosuke; Kumara, L. S. R.; Song, Chulho; Katsuya, Yoshio; Matsuda, Akifumi; Yoshimoto, Mamoru

    2015-01-01

    Cubic type room-temperature (RT) epitaxial Li0.5Ni0.5O and NiO thin films with [111] orientation grown on ultra-smooth sapphire (0001) substrates were examined using synchrotron-based thin-film X-ray diffraction. The 11 and 22 rocking curves including six respective equivalent reflections of the Li0.5Ni0.5O and NiO thin films were recorded. The RT B 1 factor, which appears in the Debye–Waller factor, of a cubic Li0.5Ni0.5O thin film was estimated to be 1.8 (4) Å2 from its 11 and 22 reflections, even though the Debye model was originally derived on the basis of one cubic element. The corresponding Debye temperature is 281 (39) K. Furthermore, the B 2 factor in the pseudo-Debye–Waller factor is proposed. This parameter, which is evaluated using one reflection, was also determined for the Li0.5Ni0.5O thin film by treating Li0.5Ni0.5O and NiO as ideal NaCl crystal structures. A structural parameter for the atomic disorder is introduced and evaluated. This parameter includes the combined effects of thermal vibration, interstitial atoms and defects caused by Li doping using the two Debye–Waller factors. PMID:26664345

  10. Formation of (111) nanotwin lamellae hillocks in polycrystalline silicon thin films caused by deposition of silicon dioxide layer

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, Shigeki; Fujimoto, Masayuki

    2006-01-09

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition was used to deposit layers of tetraethylorthosilicate at different temperatures. In the case of low-temperature deposition (300 deg. C), the deposited film surface was smooth and the major surface defects of the polycrystalline silicon (poly-silicon) film surface were grooves of grain boundaries. In contrast, in the case of high-temperature deposition (500 deg. C), the deposited silicon oxide surface exhibited hillocks, and these hillocks were derived from the top end of inclined silicon (111) where protruding nanotwin lamellae penetrated the poly-silicon thin film. The observed hillocks stemming from nanotwin lamellae could have been formed by compressive stress during high-temperature silicon dioxide deposition.

  11. Alternation of Side-Chain Mesogen Orientation Caused by the Backbone Structure in Liquid-Crystalline Polymer Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Daisuke; Nagashima, Yuki; Hara, Mitsuo; Nagano, Shusaku; Seki, Takahiro

    2015-10-27

    In side-chain-type liquid-crystalline (LC) polymers, the main chain rigidity significantly affects the LC structure and properties. We show herein a relevant new effect regarding the orientation of side-chain mesogenic groups of LC polymers in a thin-film state. A subtle change in the main chain structure, i.e., polyacrylate and polymethacrylate, leads to a clear alternation of mesogens in the homeotropic and planar modes, respectively. This orientational discrimination is triggered from the free surface region (film-air interface) as revealed by surface micropatterning via inkjet printing.

  12. Formation and control of line defects caused by tectonics of water droplet arrays during self-organized honeycomb-patterned polymer film formation.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hidekazu; Ito, Koju; Yabu, Hiroshi; Shimomura, Masatsugu

    2014-04-28

    This study describes the formation of macro-scale defects of the honeycomb-patterned polymer film and we discovered two types of new line defects which differ from the defects reported in the past studies. We examined the formation mechanisms of the line defects and clarified two types of formation mechanisms of the "Divergent" mode line defects and the "Convergent" mode line defects caused by the "tectonics" of water droplet arrays on polymer solutions. The regions causing the macro-scale line defects are made clear in the phase diagram represented by the radius and the density of the micro-scale water droplets. In addition, the results of our calculations made it possible to theoretically predict the water droplet growth time for the water droplets to grow to the ideal size for uniform packing that is necessary for fabrication of the defect-free honeycomb-patterned polymer film. With the use of these techniques, A4-sized, defect-free, honeycomb-patterned polymer films can be fabricated.

  13. Temperature distributions measurement of high intensity focused ultrasound using a thin-film thermocouple array and estimation of thermal error caused by viscous heating.

    PubMed

    Matsuki, Kosuke; Narumi, Ryuta; Azuma, Takashi; Yoshinaka, Kiyoshi; Sasaki, Akira; Okita, Kohei; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2013-01-01

    To improve the throughput of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment, we have considered a focus switching method at two points. For this method, it is necessary to evaluate the thermal distribution under exposure to ultrasound. The thermal distribution was measured using a prototype thin-film thermocouple array, which has the advantage of minimizing the influence of the thermocouple on the acoustic and temperature fields. Focus switching was employed to enlarge the area of temperature increase and evaluate the proposed evaluation parameters with respect to safety and uniformity. The results indicate that focus switching can effectively expand the thermal lesion while maintaining a steep thermal boundary. In addition, the influence caused by the thin-film thermocouple array was estimated experimentally. This thermocouple was demonstrated to be an effective tool for the measurement of temperature distributions induced by HIFU.

  14. War. Peace. Film Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougall, Lucy

    The revised and expanded film guide designed for educators includes annotations of over 200 films, plus a large number of program resources for intelligent film use. Selected from over five hundred films previewed from 1969, up-to-date films were chosen that would help interpret the causes of war, increase awareness of the dehumanizing effects of…

  15. Origins of the two simultaneous mechanisms causing glass transition temperature reductions in high molecular weight freestanding polymer films

    SciTech Connect

    Prevosto, Daniele E-mail: Prevosto@df.unipi.it; Capaccioli, Simone; Ngai, K. L. E-mail: Prevosto@df.unipi.it

    2014-02-21

    From ellipsometry measurements, Pye and Roth [Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 235701 (2011)] presented evidence of the presence of two glass transitions originating from two distinctly different and simultaneous mechanisms to reduce the glass transition temperature within freestanding polystyrene films with thickness less than 70 nm. The upper transition temperature T{sub g}{sup u}(h) is higher than the lower transition temperature T{sub g}{sup l}(h) in the ultrathin films. After comparing their data with the findings of others, using the same or different techniques, they concluded that new theoretical interpretation is needed to explain the two transitions and the different dependences of T{sub g}{sup u}(h) and T{sub g}{sup l}(h) on film thickness and molecular weight. We address the problem based on advance in delineating the different viscoelastic mechanisms in the glass-rubber transition zone of polymers. Theoretical considerations as well as experiments have shown in time-scales immediately following the segmental α-relaxation are the sub-Rouse modes with longer length scale but shorter than that of the Rouse modes. The existence of the sub-Rouse modes in various polymers including polystyrene has been repeatedly confirmed by experiments. We show that the sub-Rouse modes can account for the upper transition and the properties observed. The segmental α-relaxation is responsible for the lower transition. This is supported by the fact that the segmental α-relaxation in ultrathin freestanding PS films had been observed by dielectric relaxation measurements and photon correlation spectroscopy. Utilizing the temperature dependence of the segmental relaxation times from these experiments, the glass transition temperature T{sub g}{sup α} associated with the segmental relaxation in the ultrathin film is determined. It turns out that T{sub g}{sup α} is nearly the same as T{sub g}{sup l}(h) of the lower transition, and hence definitely segmental α-relaxation is the

  16. Nanoscale magnetization reversal caused by electric field-induced ion migration and redistribution in cobalt ferrite thin films.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinxin; Zhu, Xiaojian; Xiao, Wen; Liu, Gang; Feng, Yuan Ping; Ding, Jun; Li, Run-Wei

    2015-04-28

    Reversible nanoscale magnetization reversal controlled merely by electric fields is still challenging at the moment. In this report, first-principles calculation indicates that electric field-induced magnetization reversal can be achieved by the appearance of unidirectional magnetic anisotropy along the (110) direction in Fe-deficient cobalt ferrite (CoFe(2-x)O4, CFO), as a result of the migration and local redistribution of the Co(2+) ions adjacent to the B-site Fe vacancies. In good agreement with the theoretical model, we experimentally observed that in the CFO thin films the nanoscale magnetization can be reversibly and nonvolatilely reversed at room temperature via an electrical ion-manipulation approach, wherein the application of electric fields with appropriate polarity and amplitude can modulate the size of magnetic domains with different magnetizations up to 70%. With the low power consumption (subpicojoule) characteristics and the elimination of external magnetic field, the observed electric field-induced magnetization reversal can be used for the construction of energy-efficient spintronic devices, e.g., low-power electric-write and magnetic-read memories.

  17. Increase in the water contact angle of composite film surfaces caused by the assembly of hydrophilic nanocellulose fibrils and nanoclay platelets.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chun-Nan; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Yang, Quanling; Fukuzumi, Hayaka; Isogai, Akira

    2014-08-13

    Controlling the assembly modes of different crystalline nanoparticles in composites is important for the expression of specific characteristics of the assembled structures. We report a unique procedure for increasing water contact angles (CAs) of composite film surfaces via the assembly of two different hydrophilic components, nanocellulose fibrils and nanoclay platelets. The nanocellulose fibrils and nanoclay platelets used have ionic groups on their surfaces in high densities (∼1 mmol g(-1)) and have no hydrophobic surface. The increase in the CA of the nanocellulose/nanoclay composite films was thus analyzed on the basis of the air area fractions of their nanostructured surfaces following Cassie's law. The air area fractions were geographically estimated from the atomic force microscopy height profiles of the composite film surfaces. The CAs of the composite film surfaces were found to be well described by Cassie's law. Interestingly, the composite films consisting of two hydrophilic nanoelements with different shapes exhibited CAs larger than those of the individual neat films.

  18. The Red Blood Cell Transfusion Trigger: Has the Sin of Commission Now Become a Sin of Omission?.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-05-01

    concentration of 10 to 12 g/dl. Human recombinant erythropoietin is also recommended for the reduction of allogeneic blood transfusions in surgical...patients. Human recombinant erythropoietin is recommended for anemic patients with hemoglobin concentrations of ■, greater than 10 g/dl and less than 13...with recombinant erythropoietin also reduces the defects in platelet adhesion and aggregation caused by uremic plasma. Thromb. Haemost. 1991;66:638

  19. Hydrodynamic film thickness measurements and CFD analysis identify the root causes of repetitive thrust bearing failures on a 45 MW hydro generating unit at Hydro-Québec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauvin, P.; Huard, P.

    2016-11-01

    High temperature level recorded on the thrust bearing of a 45 MW hydro generating unit was resulting in frequent production stoppage. In spite of improvements brought to the oil cooling system since the rehabilitation in 2008, the operator had to activate the bearing oil lift system to keep the temperature below acceptable limits. Primary root cause analysis first pointed to the design of the shoe that was centrally pivoted, not allowing the formation of a thick hydrodynamic film. The removal of a strip of the soft metal layer near the trailing edge of the shoe resulted in a significant surface temperature reduction (about 15 deg. C), as predicted by a CFD model of the oil film. The goal of this machining was to increase the pivoting angle by moving the centre of hydrodynamic pressure. Proximity sensors were installed at each corner of the redesigned shoe to measure the film thickness and the bearing attitude. Signal analysis revealed a step of a magnitude close to the oil film thickness between the two halves of the rotating thrust block. This was the cause of another failure few hours since restarting the unit. The lessons learnt through these measurements and analyses were carefully applied to the ultimate build. The unit now runs with a robust thrust bearing and even survived a significant cooling flow reduction event. This paper presents the CFD analysis results and the measurements acquired during these events.

  20. Interaction of bipolaron with the H2O/O2 redox couple causes current hysteresis in organic thin-film transistors.

    PubMed

    Qu, Minni; Li, Hui; Liu, Ran; Zhang, Shi-Li; Qiu, Zhi-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Hysteresis in the current-voltage characteristics is one of the major obstacles to the implementation of organic thin-film transistors in large-area integrated circuits. The hysteresis has been correlated either extrinsically to various charge-trapping/transfer mechanisms arising from gate dielectrics or surrounding ambience or intrinsically to the polaron-bipolaron reaction in low-mobility conjugated polymer thin-film transistors. However, a comprehensive understanding essential for developing viable solutions to eliminate hysteresis is yet to be established. By embedding carbon nanotubes in the polymer-based conduction channel of various lengths, here we show that the bipolaron formation/recombination combined with the H2O/O2 electrochemical reaction is responsible for the hysteresis in organic thin-film transistors. The bipolaron-induced hysteresis is a thermally activated process with an apparent activation energy of 0.29 eV for the bipolaron dissociation. This finding leads to a hysteresis model that is generally valid for thin-film transistors with both band transport and hopping conduction in semiconducting thin films.

  1. Modifications of aluminum film caused by micro-plasmoids and plasma spots in the effluent of an argon non-equilibrium plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Max; Ries, Stefan; Hermanns, Patrick; Bibinov, Nikita; Awakowicz, Peter

    2017-09-01

    A smooth layer of hard aluminium film is deposited onto a glass substrate with a multi-frequency CCP discharge and then treated in the effluent of a non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (N-APPJ) operated with Ar flow. A thin filament is formed in the argon N-APPJ through contraction of a diffuse feather-like discharge. The aluminium surface treated in the effluents of the N-APPJ is significantly modified. Erosion tracks of different forms and micro-balls composed of aluminium are observed on the treated surface. Based on CCD images of active plasma discharge channels, SEM images of the treated surface and current-voltage characteristics, these surface modifications are interpreted as traces of plasma spots and plasmoids. Plasma spots are focused plasma channels, which are characterized by an intense emission in CCD images at the contact point of a plasma channel with the treated metal surface and by deep short tracks on the aluminium surface, observed in SEM images. Plasmoids are plasma objects without contact to any power supply which can produce long, thin and shallow traces, as can be observed on the treated surface using electron microscopy. Based on observed traces and numerous transformations of plasma spots to plasmoids and vice versa, it is supposed that both types of plasma objects are formed by an extremely high axial magnetic field and differ from each other due to the existence or absence of contact to a power supply and the consequential transport of electric current. The reason for the magnetic field at the axis of these plasma objects is possibly a circular current of electron pairs in vortices, which are formed in plasma by the interaction of ionization waves with the substrate surface. The extremely high magnetic field of plasma spots and plasmoids leads to a local destruction of the metal film and top layer of the glass substrate and to an attraction of paramagnetic materials, namely aluminium and oxygen. The magnetic attraction of

  2. Film Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lance, Larry M.; Atwater, Lynn

    1987-01-01

    Reviews four Human Sexuality films and videos. These are: "Personal Decisions" (Planned Parenthood Federation of America, 1985); "The Touch Film" (Sterling Production, 1986); "Rethinking Rape" (Film Distribution Center, 1985); "Not A Love Story" (National Film Board of Canada, 1981). (AEM)

  3. Efficient construction of producer cell lines for a SIN lentiviral vector for SCID-X1 gene therapy by concatemeric array transfection.

    PubMed

    Throm, Robert E; Ouma, Annastasia A; Zhou, Sheng; Chandrasekaran, Anantharaman; Lockey, Timothy; Greene, Michael; De Ravin, Suk See; Moayeri, Morvarid; Malech, Harry L; Sorrentino, Brian P; Gray, John T

    2009-05-21

    Retroviral vectors containing internal promoters, chromatin insulators, and self-inactivating (SIN) long terminal repeats (LTRs) may have significantly reduced genotoxicity relative to the conventional retroviral vectors used in recent, otherwise successful clinical trials. Large-scale production of such vectors is problematic, however, as the introduction of SIN vectors into packaging cells cannot be accomplished with the traditional method of viral transduction. We have derived a set of packaging cell lines for HIV-based lentiviral vectors and developed a novel concatemeric array transfection technique for the introduction of SIN vector genomes devoid of enhancer and promoter sequences in the LTR. We used this method to derive a producer cell clone for a SIN lentiviral vector expressing green fluorescent protein, which when grown in a bioreactor generated more than 20 L of supernatant with titers above 10(7) transducing units (TU) per milliliter. Further refinement of our technique enabled the rapid generation of whole populations of stably transformed cells that produced similar titers. Finally, we describe the construction of an insulated, SIN lentiviral vector encoding the human interleukin 2 receptor common gamma chain (IL2RG) gene and the efficient derivation of cloned producer cells that generate supernatants with titers greater than 5 x 10(7) TU/mL and that are suitable for use in a clinical trial for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1).

  4. Capacitor film surface assessment studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galperin, I.; White, W.

    1985-02-01

    In the present investigation of the optical surface of the three widely used, biaxially oriented capacitor films, polypropylene, polyvinylidene fluoride, and polyester, with attention to film surface defects and thickness variation, the defects and their rate of occurrence proved traceable in terms of polymer structure, chemical grouping, and fabrication processing. Film thickness variation was small, yet differed for each film type. Film breakdown voltages have been determined, and alternative causes for the voltage values obtained are proposed. A reciprocal relation is noted between the film breakdown voltage and the dielectric constant.

  5. Virus-PEDOT Biocomposite Films

    PubMed Central

    Donavan, Keith C.; Arter, Jessica A.

    2012-01-01

    Virus-poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (virus-PEDOT) biocomposite films are prepared by electropolymerizing 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) in aqueous electrolytes containing 12 mM LiClO4 and the bacteriophage M13. The concentration of virus in these solutions, [virus]soln, is varied from 3 nM to 15 nM. A quartz crystal microbalance is used to directly measure the total mass of the biocomposite film during its electrodeposition. In combination with a measurement of the electrodeposition charge, the mass of the virus incorporated into the film is calculated. These data show that concentration of the M13 within the electropolymerized film, [virus]film, increases linearly with [virus]soln. The incorporation of virus particles into the PEDOT film from solution is efficient, resulting in a concentration ratio: [virus]film:[virus]soln ≈450. Virus incorporation into the PEDOT causes roughening of the film topography that is observed using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The electrical conductivity of the virus-PEDOT film, measured perpendicular to the plane of the film using conductive tip AFM, decreases linearly with virus loading, from 270 μS/cm for pure PE-DOT films to 50 μS/cm for films containing 100 μM virus. The presence on the virus surface of displayed affinity peptides did not significantly influence the efficiency of incorporation into virus-PEDOT biocomposite films. PMID:22856875

  6. Hochschule fur Film und Fernsehen (Babelsberg).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, Roland

    1992-01-01

    Describes the Hochschule fur Film und Fernsehen, an institution of higher education for the study of film and television production in Babelsberg, Germany (formerly the German Democratic Republic). Discusses the major reorientations in the school caused by Germany's reunification. (SR)

  7. Borosilicate films as permeability barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applegate, J. R.; Steinmetz, C. E.; Hettinger, J. D.; Carroll, J. F.; Krchnavek, R.

    2009-03-01

    Borosilicate films have been deposited using rf-sputtering techniques from a composite target at room temperature onto polypropylene (PP), high density polyethylene(HDPE), low density polyethylene(LDPE), and polyethylene terephthalate (PETG) substrates. Films were found to be smooth, flexible, with excellent adhesion to the substrates. Repeated rolling the coated substrates on a radius of 0.5mm resulted in no discernable damage for films less than 200nm in thickness. Creasing the substrates did result in local damage. However excellent adhesion did not allow the fractured glass to come off the substrate. Heat generated during deposition only influenced the films grown on LDPE where the thermal expansion mismatch between the film and substrate induced strains caused fractures in thick films. Modifications to processing parameters allowed thick films to be grown without fractures. Permeability measurements of nitrogen resulted in significant improvements in comparison to uncoated substrates.

  8. Film Boxes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osterer, Irv

    2002-01-01

    Presents an art lesson in which students created three-dimensional designs for 35mm film packages to improve graphic arts learning. Describes how the students examined and created film boxes using QuarkXPress software. (CMK)

  9. Film Boxes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osterer, Irv

    2002-01-01

    Presents an art lesson in which students created three-dimensional designs for 35mm film packages to improve graphic arts learning. Describes how the students examined and created film boxes using QuarkXPress software. (CMK)

  10. Film Reviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling, John, Ed.

    1976-01-01

    Reviews five instructional films on: P-N junctions; crystal diodes; nuclear fusion research; Schlieren photography; and the energy crisis; including discussions of solar, nuclear, and fossil fuel energy. Also lists numerous other available films. (MLH)

  11. Film Reviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling, John, Ed.

    1976-01-01

    Reviews five instructional films on: P-N junctions; crystal diodes; nuclear fusion research; Schlieren photography; and the energy crisis; including discussions of solar, nuclear, and fossil fuel energy. Also lists numerous other available films. (MLH)

  12. Humanistic Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaffney, Maureen, Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Designed for media specialists and educators, this issue includes seven articles focusing on humanistic films for children. Following a brief editorial encouraging the ideals of humanism, the first article presents an analysis of seven films with positive sex-role models. Included is a model for evaluating children's films. The second article…

  13. On Film

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Marty

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the role of window films in enhancing indoor air quality in schools. Historically, window film has been used to reduce temperatures in buildings prone to overheating. Too much solar energy entering through windows makes occupants uncomfortable and air conditioning more costly. Film has been a simple solution…

  14. On Film

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Marty

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the role of window films in enhancing indoor air quality in schools. Historically, window film has been used to reduce temperatures in buildings prone to overheating. Too much solar energy entering through windows makes occupants uncomfortable and air conditioning more costly. Film has been a simple solution…

  15. Nanocomposite films

    DOEpatents

    Mitlin, David; , Ophus, Colin; Evoy, Stephane; Radmilovic, Velimir; Mohammadi, Reza; Westra, Ken; Nelson-Fitzpatrick, Nathaniel; Lee, Zonghoon

    2010-07-20

    A thin-film composition of nanocrystal molybdenum in an amorphous metallic matrix may be formed by co-sputtering Mo with aluminum or nickel. NEMS cantilevers may be formed from the film. The films exhibit high nanoindentation hardness and a reduction in roughness and intrinsic stress, while maintaining resistivity in the metallic range.

  16. Film ispalators

    SciTech Connect

    Startsev, Aleksandr V; Stoilov, Yurii Yu

    2002-05-31

    New physical objects, ispalators based on free soap films, exhibit persistent flows of the soap solution in open and closed volumes in air with additions of gases of the C{sub 8}F{sub 18} type (p = 20 Torr) at temperature drops on the films of the order of tenths and hundredths of kelvin. The flows move continuously at a velocity of 5 - 20 cm s{sup -1}. It is found that the parts of an inclined ispalator film show anomalous behaviour upon heating: their weight increases and they move downward over the film, whereas the unheated parts of the film move upward. Continuous radial vortex flows accompanied by the formation and washing of the regions of a thin black film are observed on circular films in closed volumes upon their uniform external cooling by evaporating water for 5 - 10 hours. The rapid flows make film ispalators the efficient heat carriers, which operate at small temperature drops (tenths and hundredths of kelvin) and surpass copper in the amount of thermal energy being transferred. The outlook for the further study and applications of film ispalators for detecting thermal fields and laser radiation is discussed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  17. Film Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudlin, Edward W.

    1979-01-01

    The author briefly surveys some of the claims made about the presumed nature of film as language and some of the problems that arise. He considers the views of two influential schools of film criticism: the Russian formalists (Pudovkin and Eisenstein) and the British semiologist (Peter Wollen). (Author/SJL)

  18. Thin Film?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kariper, İ. Afşin

    2014-09-01

    This study focuses on the critical surface tension of lead sulfite (PbSO3) crystalline thin film produced with chemical bath deposition on substrates (commercial glass).The PbSO3 thin films were deposited at room temperature at different deposition times. The structural properties of the films were defined and examined according to X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the XRD results such as dislocation density, average grain size, and no. of crystallites per unit area. Atomic force microscopy was used to measure the film thickness and the surface properties. The critical surface tension of the PbSO3 thin films was measured with an optical tensiometer instrument and calculated using the Zisman method. The results indicated that the critical surface tension of films changed in accordance with the average grain size and film thickness. The film thickness increased with deposition time and was inversely correlated with surface tension. The average grain size increased according to deposition time and was inversely correlated with surface tension.

  19. Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorshidi, Zahra; Bahari, Ali; Gholipur, Reza

    2014-11-01

    Effect of annealing temperature on the characteristics of sol-gel-driven Ta ax La(1- a) x O y thin film spin-coated on Si substrate as a high- k gate dielectric was studied. Ta ax La(1- a) x O y thin films with different amounts of a were prepared (as-prepared samples). X-ray diffraction measurements of the as-prepared samples indicated that Ta0.3 x La0.7 x Oy film had an amorphous structure. Therefore, Ta0.3 x La0.7 x O y film was chosen to continue the present studies. The morphology of Ta0.3 x La0.7 x O y films was studied using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy techniques. The obtained results showed that the size of grain boundaries on Ta0.3 x La0.7 x O y film surfaces was increased with increasing annealing temperature. Electrical and optical characterizations of the as-prepared and annealed films were investigated as a function of annealing temperature using capacitance-voltage ( C- V) and current density-voltage ( J- V) measurements and the Tauc method. The obtained results demonstrated that Ta0.3 x La0.7 x O y films had high dielectric constant (≈27), wide band gap (≈4.5 eV), and low leakage current density (≈10-6 A/cm2 at 1 V).

  20. About Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christman, Robert; Krockover, Gerald H.

    1984-01-01

    Lists and briefly describes 46 college-level films. Films are arranged in the following categories: volcanism and earthquakes; plate tectonics; energy, water, and environmental concerns; petroleum and coal; astronomy; space exploration, space shuttle; paleontology; geomorphology; and mineralogy, petrology, and economic geology. (BC)

  1. About Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christman, Robert; Krockover, Gerald H.

    1984-01-01

    Lists and briefly describes 46 college-level films. Films are arranged in the following categories: volcanism and earthquakes; plate tectonics; energy, water, and environmental concerns; petroleum and coal; astronomy; space exploration, space shuttle; paleontology; geomorphology; and mineralogy, petrology, and economic geology. (BC)

  2. Film Makers On Film Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geduld, Harry M., Ed.

    This collection includes essays by and interviews with more than 30 film-makers, both classic and contemporary, on the subjects of their major interests and procedures in making films. The directors are: Louis Lumiere, Cecil Hepworth, Edwin S. Porter, Mack Sennett, David W. Griffith, Robert Flaherty, Charles Chaplin, Eric von Stroheim, Dziga…

  3. Film Makers On Film Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geduld, Harry M., Ed.

    This collection includes essays by and interviews with more than 30 film-makers, both classic and contemporary, on the subjects of their major interests and procedures in making films. The directors are: Louis Lumiere, Cecil Hepworth, Edwin S. Porter, Mack Sennett, David W. Griffith, Robert Flaherty, Charles Chaplin, Eric von Stroheim, Dziga…

  4. Physical properties and antifungal activity of bioactive films containing Wickerhamomyces anomalus killer yeast and their application for preservation of oranges and control of postharvest green mold caused by Penicillium digitatum.

    PubMed

    Aloui, Hajer; Licciardello, Fabio; Khwaldia, Khaoula; Hamdi, Moktar; Restuccia, Cristina

    2015-05-04

    This study assessed the ability of two bio-based films, obtained from sodium alginate (NaAlg) and locust bean gum (LBG), to protect the viability of Wickerhamomyces anomalus cells and control the growth of Penicillium digitatum. The effect of microbial cell incorporation on physical properties of the developed films was evaluated in terms of barrier, mechanical and optical properties. Furthermore, the application of these two matrices as bioactive coatings was investigated in order to evaluate their efficacy in preserving the postharvest quality of 'Valencia' oranges and inhibiting the growth of P. digitatum on artificially inoculated fruits. Results showed that NaAlg and LBG films were able to maintain more than 85% of the initial W. anomalus yeast population and that the developed films incorporating the killer yeast completely inhibited the growth of P. digitatum in synthetic medium. Likewise, NaAlg and LBG coatings enriched with W. anomalus yeast were effective at reducing weight loss and maintaining firmness of 'Valencia' oranges during storage, and reduced green mold in inoculated fruits by more than 73% after 13 days.

  5. Polymer films

    DOEpatents

    Granick, Steve; Sukhishvili, Svetlana A.

    2008-12-30

    A film contains a first polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond donating moieties, and a second polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond accepting moieties. The second polymer is hydrogen bonded to the first polymer.

  6. Polymer films

    DOEpatents

    Granick, Steve; Sukhishvili, Svetlana A.

    2004-05-25

    A film contains a first polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond donating moieties, and a second polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond accepting moieties. The second polymer is hydrogen bonded to the first polymer.

  7. Film Reviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladd, George T.

    1974-01-01

    Briefly describes films about the following topics: water cycles, the energy crisis, the eruption of Mt. Aetna, the hot springs of Yellowstone National Park, and methods of using pine cones to determine the ages of ancient civilizations. (MLH)

  8. Piezoelectric Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, Steve

    1992-01-01

    Presents activities that utilize piezoelectric film to familiarize students with fundamental principles of electricity. Describes classroom projects involving chemical sensors, microbalances, microphones, switches, infrared sensors, and power generation. (MDH)

  9. Piezoelectric Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, Steve

    1992-01-01

    Presents activities that utilize piezoelectric film to familiarize students with fundamental principles of electricity. Describes classroom projects involving chemical sensors, microbalances, microphones, switches, infrared sensors, and power generation. (MDH)

  10. Film Reviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladd, George T.

    1974-01-01

    Briefly describes films about the following topics: water cycles, the energy crisis, the eruption of Mt. Aetna, the hot springs of Yellowstone National Park, and methods of using pine cones to determine the ages of ancient civilizations. (MLH)

  11. Thin film oxygen partial pressure sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wortman, J. J.; Harrison, J. W.; Honbarrier, H. L.; Yen, J.

    1972-01-01

    The development is described of a laboratory model oxygen partial pressure sensor using a sputtered zinc oxide thin film. The film is operated at about 400 C through the use of a miniature silicon bar. Because of the unique resistance versus temperature relation of the silicon bar, control of the operational temperature is achieved by controlling the resistance. A circuit for accomplishing this is described. The response of sputtered zinc oxide films of various thicknesses to oxygen, nitrogen, argon, carbon dioxide, and water vapor caused a change in the film resistance. Over a large range, film conductance varied approximately as the square root of the oxygen partial pressure. The presence of water vapor in the gas stream caused a shift in the film conductance at a given oxygen partial pressure. A theoretical model is presented to explain the characteristic features of the zinc oxide response to oxygen.

  12. Method of lift-off patterning thin films in situ employing phase change resists

    DOEpatents

    Bahlke, Matthias Erhard; Baldo, Marc A; Mendoza, Hiroshi Antonio

    2014-09-23

    Method for making a patterned thin film of an organic semiconductor. The method includes condensing a resist gas into a solid film onto a substrate cooled to a temperature below the condensation point of the resist gas. The condensed solid film is heated selectively with a patterned stamp to cause local direct sublimation from solid to vapor of selected portions of the solid film thereby creating a patterned resist film. An organic semiconductor film is coated on the patterned resist film and the patterned resist film is heated to cause it to sublime away and to lift off because of the phase change.

  13. Science Fiction on Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burmester, David

    1985-01-01

    Reviews science fiction films used in a science fiction class. Discusses feature films, short science fiction films, short story adaptations, original science fiction pieces and factual science films that enrich literature. (EL)

  14. Science Fiction on Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burmester, David

    1985-01-01

    Reviews science fiction films used in a science fiction class. Discusses feature films, short science fiction films, short story adaptations, original science fiction pieces and factual science films that enrich literature. (EL)

  15. Important considerations for radiochromic film dosimetry with flatbed CCD scanners and EBT GAFCHROMIC film.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Bart D; Kozelka, Jakub; Ranade, Manisha K; Li, Jonathan G; Simon, William E; Dempsey, James F

    2006-12-01

    In this study, we present three significant artifacts that have the potential to negatively impact the accuracy and precision of film dosimetry measurements made using GAFCHROMIC EBT radiochromic film when read out with CCD flatbed scanners. Films were scanned using three commonly employed instruments: a Macbeth TD932 spot densitometer, an Epson Expression 1680 CCD array scanner, and a Microtek ScanMaker i900 CCD array scanner. For the two scanners we assessed the variation in optical density (OD) of GAFCHROMIC EBT film with scanning bed position, angular rotation of the film with respect to the scan line direction, and temperature inside the scanner due to repeated scanning. Scanning uniform radiochromic films demonstrated a distinct bowing effect in profiles in the direction of the CCD array with a nonuniformity of up to 17%. Profiles along a direction orthogonal to the CCD array demonstrated a 7% variation. A strong angular dependence was found in measurements made with the flatbed scanners; the effect could not be reproduced with the spot densitometer. An IMRT quality assurance film was scanned twice rotating the film 90' between the scans. For films scanned on the Epson scanner, up to 12% variation was observed in unirradiated EBT films rotated between 0 degrees and 90 degrees, which decreased to approximately 8% for EBT films irradiated to 300 cGy. Variations of up to 80% were observed for films scanned with the Microtek scanner. The scanners were found to significantly increase the film temperature with repeated scanning. Film temperature between 18 and 33 degrees C caused OD changes of approximately 7%. Considering these effects, we recommend adherence to a strict scanning protocol that includes: maintaining the orientation of films scanned on flatbed scanners, limiting scanning to the central portion of the scanner bed, and limiting the number of consecutive scans to minimize changes in OD caused by film heating.

  16. Variable temperature semiconductor film deposition

    DOEpatents

    Li, Xiaonan; Sheldon, Peter

    1998-01-01

    A method of depositing a semiconductor material on a substrate. The method sequentially comprises (a) providing the semiconductor material in a depositable state such as a vapor for deposition on the substrate; (b) depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while heating the substrate to a first temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a first film layer having a first grain size; (c) continually depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while cooling the substrate to a second temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a second film layer deposited on the first film layer and having a second grain size smaller than the first grain size; and (d) raising the substrate temperature, while either continuing or not continuing to deposit semiconductor material to form a third film layer, to thereby anneal the film layers into a single layer having favorable efficiency characteristics in photovoltaic applications. A preferred semiconductor material is cadmium telluride deposited on a glass/tin oxide substrate already having thereon a film layer of cadmium sulfide.

  17. Variable temperature semiconductor film deposition

    DOEpatents

    Li, X.; Sheldon, P.

    1998-01-27

    A method of depositing a semiconductor material on a substrate is disclosed. The method sequentially comprises (a) providing the semiconductor material in a depositable state such as a vapor for deposition on the substrate; (b) depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while heating the substrate to a first temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a first film layer having a first grain size; (c) continually depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while cooling the substrate to a second temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a second film layer deposited on the first film layer and having a second grain size smaller than the first grain size; and (d) raising the substrate temperature, while either continuing or not continuing to deposit semiconductor material to form a third film layer, to thereby anneal the film layers into a single layer having favorable efficiency characteristics in photovoltaic applications. A preferred semiconductor material is cadmium telluride deposited on a glass/tin oxide substrate already having thereon a film layer of cadmium sulfide.

  18. Preparation of a semiconductor thin film

    DOEpatents

    Pehnt, Martin; Schulz, Douglas L.; Curtis, Calvin J.; Ginley, David S.

    1998-01-01

    A process for the preparation of a semiconductor film. The process comprises depositing nanoparticles of a semiconductor material onto a substrate whose surface temperature during nanoparticle deposition thereon is sufficient to cause substantially simultaneous fusion of the nanoparticles to thereby coalesce with each other and effectuate film growth.

  19. Preparation of a semiconductor thin film

    DOEpatents

    Pehnt, M.; Schulz, D.L.; Curtis, C.J.; Ginley, D.S.

    1998-01-27

    A process is disclosed for the preparation of a semiconductor film. The process comprises depositing nanoparticles of a semiconductor material onto a substrate whose surface temperature during nanoparticle deposition thereon is sufficient to cause substantially simultaneous fusion of the nanoparticles to thereby coalesce with each other and effectuate film growth.

  20. Diamond film growth from fullerene precursors

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Liu, Shengzhong; Krauss, Alan R.; Pan, Xianzheng

    1997-01-01

    A method and system for manufacturing diamond film. The method involves forming a fullerene vapor, providing a noble gas stream and combining the gas with the fullerene vapor, passing the combined fullerene vapor and noble gas carrier stream into a chamber, forming a plasma in the chamber causing fragmentation of the fullerene and deposition of a diamond film on a substrate.

  1. Diamond film growth argon-carbon plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Krauss, Alan R.; Liu, Shengzhong; Pan, Xianzheng; Zuiker, Christopher D.

    1998-01-01

    A method and system for manufacturing diamond film. The method involves forming a carbonaceous vapor, providing a gas stream of argon, hydrogen and hydrocarbon and combining the gas with the carbonaceous vapor, passing the combined carbonaceous vapor and gas carrier stream into a chamber, forming a plasma in the chamber causing fragmentation of the carbonaceous and deposition of a diamond film on a substrate.

  2. Film Credits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borja, Rhea R.

    2006-01-01

    With the advent of easy-to-use digital technology, schools are responding to the interests of their media-savvy students by offering more courses in filmmaking. In this article, the author features different films produced by students. Among other things, she discusses the students' growing interest in filmmaking.

  3. Film Credits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borja, Rhea R.

    2006-01-01

    With the advent of easy-to-use digital technology, schools are responding to the interests of their media-savvy students by offering more courses in filmmaking. In this article, the author features different films produced by students. Among other things, she discusses the students' growing interest in filmmaking.

  4. Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naffouti, Wafa; Nasr, Tarek Ben; Mehdi, Ahmed; Kamoun-Turki, Najoua

    2014-11-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) thin films were synthesized on glass substrates by spray pyrolysis. The effect of solution flow rate on the physical properties of the films was investigated by use of x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and spectrophotometry techniques. XRD analysis revealed the tetragonal anatase phase of TiO2 with highly preferred (101) orientation. AFM images showed that grain size on top of TiO2 thin films depended on solution flow rate. An indirect band gap energy of 3.46 eV was determined by means of transmission and reflection measurements. The envelope method, based on the optical transmission spectrum, was used to determine film thickness and optical constants, for example real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant, refractive index, and extinction coefficient. Ultraviolet and visible photoluminescence emission peaks were observed at room temperature. These peaks were attributed to the intrinsic emission and to the surface defect states, respectively.

  5. The Shortcomings of Medical Education Highlighted through Film

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahajan, Pranav

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this report are to highlight the shortcomings in medical education. To use a student made short film as an example of how issues that cause medical student distress can be displayed. To show that the process of film-making is a useful tool in reflection. To display that film is an effective device in raising awareness. (Contains 3…

  6. Black Films and Film-Makers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Lindsay, Ed.

    The development of black films and the attitudes of the film industry toward black films and black actors are some of the topics examined in this anthology of essays. Section 1, "Nigger to Supernigger," contains such articles as "The Death of Rastus: Negroes in American Films" by Thomas R. Cripps and "Folk Values in a New Medium" by Alain Locke…

  7. Black Films and Film-Makers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Lindsay, Ed.

    The development of black films and the attitudes of the film industry toward black films and black actors are some of the topics examined in this anthology of essays. Section 1, "Nigger to Supernigger," contains such articles as "The Death of Rastus: Negroes in American Films" by Thomas R. Cripps and "Folk Values in a New Medium" by Alain Locke…

  8. Stability of Intershaft Squeeze Film Dampers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Shafei, A.

    1991-01-01

    Intershaft squeeze film dampers were investigated for damping of dual rotor aircraft jet engines. It was thought that the intershaft damper would enhance the stability of the rotor-bearing system. Unfortunately, it was determined that the intershaft squeeze film damper was unstable above the engine's first critical speed. Here, a stability analysis of rotors incorporating intershaft squeeze film dampers is discussed. A rotor model consisting of two Jeffcott rotors with two intershaft squeeze film dampers was investigated. Examining the system characteristic equation for the conditions at which the roots indicate an ever-growing unstable motion results in the stability conditions. The cause of the instability is identified as the rotation of the oil in the damper clearance. Several proposed configurations of intershaft squeeze film dampers are discussed, and it is shown that the intershaft dampers are stable supercritically only with a configuration in which the oil film does not rotate.

  9. Recent progress of obliquely deposited thin films for industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Motofumi; Itoh, Tadayoshi; Taga, Yasunori

    1999-06-01

    More than 10 years ago, birefringent films of metal oxides were formed by oblique vapor deposition and investigated with a view of their application to optical retardation plates. The retardation function of the films was explained in terms of the birefringence caused by the characteristic anisotropic nanostructure inside the films. These films are now classified in the genre of the so-called sculptured thin films. However, the birefringent films thus prepared are not yet industrialized even now due to the crucial lack of the durability and the yield of products. In this review paper, we describe the present status of application process of the retardation films to the information systems such as compact disc and digital versatile disc devices with a special emphasis on the uniformity of retardation properties in a large area and the stability of the optical properties of the obliquely deposited thin films. Finally, further challenges for wide application of the obliquely deposited thin films are also discussed.

  10. Carboxymethylcellulose film for bacterial wound infection control and healing.

    PubMed

    Wong, Tin Wui; Ramli, Nor Amlizan

    2014-11-04

    Infection control and wound healing profiles of sodium carboxymethylcellulose (SCMC) films were investigated as a function of their anti-bacterial action, physical structures, polymer molecular weights and carboxymethyl substitution degrees. The films were prepared with in vitro polymer/film and in vivo microbe-colonized wound healing/systemic infection profiles examined. Adhesive high carboxymethyl substituted SCMC films aided healing via attaching to microbes and removing them from wound. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was removed via encapsulating in gelling low molecular weight SCMC film, whereas Staphylococcus aureus was trapped in tight folds of high molecular weight SCMC film. Incomplete microbe removal from wound did not necessary translate to inability to heal as microbe remnant at wound induced fibroblast migration and aided tissue reconstruction. Using no film nonetheless will cause systemic blood infection. SCMC films negate infection and promote wound healing via specific polymer-microbe adhesion, and removal of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa requires films of different polymer characteristics.

  11. Formation of diamond nanoparticle thin films by electrophoretic deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Yosuke; Ohishi, Fujio; Tanaka, Kuniaki; Usui, Hiroaki

    2016-03-01

    Thin films of diamond nanoparticles were prepared by electrophoretic deposition (EPD) using 0.5 wt % dispersions in water, ethanol, and 2-propanol. The film growth rate increased with increasing voltage applied to the electrodes. However, an excessive increase in voltage caused the degradation of film morphology. The optimum voltage was 4 V with an electrode separation of 5 mm. The film growth rate was higher in organic solvents than in water. The deposited film had a smooth surface with an average surface roughness comparable to the size of primary particles of the source material. It is notable that the EPD films had a considerably higher physical stability than spin-coated and cast films. The stability was further improved by thermally annealing the films. IR analysis revealed that the diamond nanoparticles have carboxy and amino groups on their surfaces. It is considered that the stability of the EPD films originate from a chemical reaction between these functional groups.

  12. Quicker, faster, darker: Changes in Hollywood film over 75 years.

    PubMed

    Cutting, James E; Brunick, Kaitlin L; Delong, Jordan E; Iricinschi, Catalina; Candan, Ayse

    2011-01-01

    We measured 160 English-language films released from 1935 to 2010 and found four changes. First, shot lengths have gotten shorter, a trend also reported by others. Second, contemporary films have more motion and movement than earlier films. Third, in contemporary films shorter shots also have proportionately more motion than longer shots, whereas there is no such relation in older films. And finally films have gotten darker. That is, the mean luminance value of frames across the length of a film has decreased over time. We discuss psychological effects associated with these four changes and suggest that all four linear trends have a single cause: Filmmakers have incrementally tried to exercise more control over the attention of filmgoers. We suggest these changes are signatures of the evolution of popular film; they do not reflect changes in film style.

  13. Quicker, faster, darker: Changes in Hollywood film over 75 years

    PubMed Central

    Cutting, James E; Brunick, Kaitlin L; DeLong, Jordan E; Iricinschi, Catalina; Candan, Ayse

    2011-01-01

    We measured 160 English-language films released from 1935 to 2010 and found four changes. First, shot lengths have gotten shorter, a trend also reported by others. Second, contemporary films have more motion and movement than earlier films. Third, in contemporary films shorter shots also have proportionately more motion than longer shots, whereas there is no such relation in older films. And finally films have gotten darker. That is, the mean luminance value of frames across the length of a film has decreased over time. We discuss psychological effects associated with these four changes and suggest that all four linear trends have a single cause: Filmmakers have incrementally tried to exercise more control over the attention of filmgoers. We suggest these changes are signatures of the evolution of popular film; they do not reflect changes in film style. PMID:23145246

  14. Film: An Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fell, John L.

    "Understanding Film," the opening section of this book, discusses perceptions of and responses to film and the way in which experiences with and knowledge of other media affect film viewing. The second section, "Film Elements," analyzes the basic elements of film: the use of space and time, the impact of editing, sound and color, and the effects…

  15. Film and History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaber, Robin L.

    2002-01-01

    Provides an annotated bibliography of Web sites that focus on using film to teach history. Includes Web sites in five areas: (1) film and education; (2) history of cinema; (3) film and history resources; (4) film and women; and (5) film organizations. (CMK)

  16. International Film Guide 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowie, Peter, Ed.

    Brief descriptions of film production activity in 44 countries and reviews of important films from these countries are presented, along with lists of films recently in production. A paragraph-long description of film festivals slated for 1972 is given. Sound track music available on records, 16mm films available in the United Kingdom and the…

  17. Film and History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaber, Robin L.

    2002-01-01

    Provides an annotated bibliography of Web sites that focus on using film to teach history. Includes Web sites in five areas: (1) film and education; (2) history of cinema; (3) film and history resources; (4) film and women; and (5) film organizations. (CMK)

  18. Ferroelectric ultrathin perovskite films

    DOEpatents

    Rappe, Andrew M; Kolpak, Alexie Michelle

    2013-12-10

    Disclosed herein are perovskite ferroelectric thin-film. Also disclosed are methods of controlling the properties of ferroelectric thin films. These films can be used in a variety materials and devices, such as catalysts and storage media, respectively.

  19. Filming The Man Hunters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hockings, Paul

    1976-01-01

    "The Man Hunters" is a film about paleoanthropology. This article is a personal account of how the film was put together using anthropological knowledge and numerous anthropologists and how the film was received by the American public. (Author)

  20. Microwave bonding of thin film metal coated substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor); Mai, John D. (Inventor); Jackson, Henry W. (Inventor); Budraa, Nasser K. (Inventor); Pike, William T. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Bonding of materials such as MEMS materials is carried out using microwaves. High microwave absorbing films are placed within a microwave cavity containing other less microwave absorbing materials, and excited to cause selective heating in the skin depth of the films. This causes heating in one place more than another. This thereby minimizes unwanted heating effects during the microwave bonding process.

  1. Modeling Tear Film Evaporation and Breakup with Duplex Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapf, Michael; Braun, Richard; Begley, Carolyn; Driscoll, Tobin; King-Smith, Peter Ewen

    2015-11-01

    Tear film thinning, hyperosmolarity, and breakup can irritate and damage the ocular surface. Recent research hypothesizes deficiencies in the lipid layer may cause locally increased evaporation, inducing conditions for breakup. We consider a model for team film evolution incorporating two mobile fluid layers, the aqueous and lipid layers. In addition, we include the effects of salt concentration, osmosis, evaporation as modified by the lipid layer, and the polar portion of the lipid layer. Numerically solving the resulting model, we explore the conditions for tear film breakup and analyze the response of the system to changes in our parameters. Our studies indicate sufficiently fast peak values or sufficiently wide areas of evaporation promote TBU, as does diffusion of solutes. In addition, the Marangoni effect representing polar lipids dominates viscous dissipation from the non-polar lipid layer in the model. This work was supported in part by NSF grant 1412085 and NIH grant 1R01EY021794.

  2. Evaporation of Sunscreen Films: How the UV Protection Properties Change.

    PubMed

    Binks, Bernard P; Brown, Jonathan; Fletcher, Paul D I; Johnson, Andrew J; Marinopoulos, Ioannis; Crowther, Jonathan M; Thompson, Michael A

    2016-06-01

    We have investigated the evaporation of thin sunscreen films and how the light absorption and the derived sun protection factor (SPF) change. For films consisting of solutions of common UV filters in propylene glycol (PG) as solvent, we show how evaporation generally causes three effects. First, the film area can decrease by dewetting leading to a transient increase in the average film thickness. Second, the film thins by evaporative loss of the solvent. Third, precipitation of the UV filter occurs when solvent loss causes the solubility limit to be reached. These evaporation-induced changes cause the UV absorbance of the film to decrease with resultant loss of SPF over the time scale of the evaporation. We derive an approximate model which accounts semiquantitatively for the variation of SPF with evaporation. Experimental results for solutions of different UV filters on quartz, different skin mimicking substrates, films with added nanoparticles, films with an added polymer and films with fast-evaporating decane as solvent (instead of slow evaporating PG) are discussed and compared with model calculations. Addition of either nanoparticles or polymer suppress film dewetting. Overall, it is hoped that the understanding gained about the mechanisms whereby film evaporation affects the SPF will provide useful guidance for the formulation of more effective sunscreens.

  3. Cracking in Drying Colloidal Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Karnail B.; Tirumkudulu, Mahesh S.

    2007-05-01

    It has long been known that thick films of colloidal dispersions such as wet clays, paints, and coatings crack under drying. Although capillary stresses generated during drying have been recently identified as the cause for cracking, the existence of a maximum crack-free film thickness that depends on particle size, rigidity, and packing has not been understood. Here, we identify two distinct regimes for crack-free films based on the magnitude of compressive strain at the maximum attainable capillary pressure and show remarkable agreement of measurements with our theory. We anticipate our results to not only form the basis for design of coating formulations for the paints, coatings, and ceramics industry but also assist in the production of crack-free photonic band gap crystals.

  4. Technical aspects of screen-film radiography, film processing, and quality control.

    PubMed

    Gray, J E

    1997-01-01

    The broad goal of quality control (QC) of screen-film radiography and film processing is to provide radiographs of consistent, high quality. Achievement of this goal requires attention to several areas, including QC of the screen-film system and photographic processor, acceptance testing of all components, and skill in analysis of film artifacts to "diagnose" the processor problems causing the aberrations. Methods to reduce waste, recycle by-products, and reuse resources such as silver are also part of the QC process. To optimize the photographic process, one should use the film, chemical solutions, processor, and screens and cassettes produced by one manufacturer or the combination recommended by the film manufacturer. Important variables in film processing (eg, density, density difference, and base plus fog) are recorded on control charts, which plot the variables as a function of time and allow easy analysis of changes in operating levels. Many variables can affect any component in the screen-film imaging system; problems caused by manufacturing batch-to-batch variation, which is perhaps the most pervasive variable, can be lessened by purchasing film, screens, and cassettes in large batches and of the same batch and by purchasing photographic chemicals in concentrated form and mixing them as needed. Acceptance testing ensures that the product meets expectations, ensures that its performance meets specifications, and establishes the operating level for the ongoing QC program.

  5. A Multilayered Thin Film Insulator for Harsh Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Blaha, Charles A.; Busfield, A. Rachel; Thomas, Valarie D.

    2002-01-01

    The status of work to develop a reliable high temperature dielectric thin film for use with thin film sensors is presented. The use of thin films to electrically insulate thin film sensors on engine components minimizes the intrusiveness of the sensor and allows a more accurate measurement of the environment. A variety of insulating films were investigated for preventing electrical shorting caused by insulator failure between the sensor and the component. By alternating layers of sputtered high temperature ceramics, a sequence of insulating layers was devised that prevents pinholes from forming completely through the insulator and maintains high electrical resistivity at high temperatures. The major technical challenge remaining is to optimize the fabrication of the insulator with respect to composition to achieve a reliable high temperature insulating film. Data from the testing of various potentially insulating thin film systems is presented and their application to thin film sensors is also discussed.

  6. Spontaneous rupture of thinning liquid films with Plateau borders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Anthony; Brush, Lucien; Davis, Stephen

    2009-11-01

    Spontaneous film rupture from van der Waals instability is investigated in 2D. A thin liquid film between adjacent bubbles in a foam has finite length, curved boundaries (Plateau borders), and a drainage flow from capillary suction that causes thinning. A full linear stability analysis of this thinning film shows that rupture occurs once the film has thinned to tens of nanometers. Whereas, in an unbounded, quiescent, flat free film, rupture occurs when the thickness is hundreds of nanometers. Finite length, Plateau borders and flow are all found to contribute to the stabilization. The drainage flow leads to several distinct qualitative features as well. In particular, unstable disturbances are advected by the flow to the edges of the thin film. As a result, the edges of the film close to the Plateau borders are more susceptible to rupture that the center of the film.

  7. Masked PDAMNA Film On Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Polydiacetylenes are a unique class of highly conjugated organic polymers that are of interest for both electronic and photonic applications. Photodeposition from solutions is a novel process superior to those grown by conventional techniques. Evidence of this is seen when the films are viewed under a microscope; they exhibit small particles of solid polymer which form in the bulk solution, get transported by convection to the surface of the growing film, and become embedded. Also convection tends to cause the film thickness to be less uniform, and may even affect the molecular orientation of the films. The thrust of the research is to investigate in detail, both in 1-g and low-g, the effects of convection (and lack thereof) on this novel and interesting reaction. In this example, a portion of the substrate was blocked from exposure to the UV light by the mask, which was placed on the opposite side of the glass disk as the film, clearly demonstrating that photodeposition occurs only where the substrate is irradiated directly.

  8. Positron annihilation study of cavities in black Au films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melikhova, O.; Čížek, J.; Hruška, P.; Vlček, M.; Procházka, I.; Anwand, W.; Novotný, M.; Bulíř, J.

    2017-01-01

    Defects in a black Au film were studied using variable energy positron annihilation spectroscopy. Black Au films exhibit porous morphology similar to cauliflower. This type of structure enhances the optical absorption due to a multiple reflections in the micro-cavities. A nanostructured black Au film was compared with conventional smooth Au films with high reflectivity. The black Au film exhibited a remarkably enhanced S-parameter in sub-surface region. This is caused by a narrow para-Positronium contribution to the annihilation peak.

  9. Films on Oceanography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuzon du Rest, R. P.

    This film list compiled by the U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office is separated into six categories: general oceanography, biology, chemistry, engineering, geology, and physics. An index of films is followed by addresses of Naval Districts and lists of distribution centers. Each film listed is described as to content, running time, type of film,…

  10. Film Presentation Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monod, Pierre

    1976-01-01

    This article discusses three types of films and their use in the second language classroom. The description film is objective and static, and elicits adjectives and adverbs. This kind of film should be presented three times, each time followed by a different set of learning exercises. The culture film - characterized by descriptions, scenes from…

  11. [Films: China and Japan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gumport, Roberta H.

    The history of filmmaking in China and Japan and film usage in teaching are considered in this document. Pointing out how films describe historical context and culture, the document also describes various techniques of film making. Films in China were heavily influenced by western models and have tended to be tools of the power structure, as…

  12. An Opinion on the Nitrate Film Fire, Suitland, Maryland, 7 December 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utterback, W. H., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Examines the storage conditions and the circumstances surrounding the film storage facility fire in Suitland, Maryland, which destroyed over 13 million feet of film. Outlines possible causes for the fire and offers recommendations for prevention of such future disasters. (JMF)

  13. To Film or Not to Film: Effects of Anti-Shatter Film on Blunt Trauma Lethality From Tempered Glass

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-01

    is the generation of high-velocity glass debris . While seldom the cause of fatalities, glass fragments are responsible for a large proportion of the... glass is to apply anti-shatter film (ASF) to the interior of the glass pane. The film, generally made of mylar or other plastic materials and...after the test. Figure 5 shows some of the glass debris recovered from DB 24 / 4, where the loads were more benign. These fragments, which were

  14. How flatbed scanners upset accurate film dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Battum, L. J.; Huizenga, H.; Verdaasdonk, R. M.; Heukelom, S.

    2016-01-01

    Film is an excellent dosimeter for verification of dose distributions due to its high spatial resolution. Irradiated film can be digitized with low-cost, transmission, flatbed scanners. However, a disadvantage is their lateral scan effect (LSE): a scanner readout change over its lateral scan axis. Although anisotropic light scattering was presented as the origin of the LSE, this paper presents an alternative cause. Hereto, LSE for two flatbed scanners (Epson 1680 Expression Pro and Epson 10000XL), and Gafchromic film (EBT, EBT2, EBT3) was investigated, focused on three effects: cross talk, optical path length and polarization. Cross talk was examined using triangular sheets of various optical densities. The optical path length effect was studied using absorptive and reflective neutral density filters with well-defined optical characteristics (OD range 0.2-2.0). Linear polarizer sheets were used to investigate light polarization on the CCD signal in absence and presence of (un)irradiated Gafchromic film. Film dose values ranged between 0.2 to 9 Gy, i.e. an optical density range between 0.25 to 1.1. Measurements were performed in the scanner’s transmission mode, with red-green-blue channels. LSE was found to depend on scanner construction and film type. Its magnitude depends on dose: for 9 Gy increasing up to 14% at maximum lateral position. Cross talk was only significant in high contrast regions, up to 2% for very small fields. The optical path length effect introduced by film on the scanner causes 3% for pixels in the extreme lateral position. Light polarization due to film and the scanner’s optical mirror system is the main contributor, different in magnitude for the red, green and blue channel. We concluded that any Gafchromic EBT type film scanned with a flatbed scanner will face these optical effects. Accurate dosimetry requires correction of LSE, therefore, determination of the LSE per color channel and dose delivered to the film.

  15. How flatbed scanners upset accurate film dosimetry.

    PubMed

    van Battum, L J; Huizenga, H; Verdaasdonk, R M; Heukelom, S

    2016-01-21

    Film is an excellent dosimeter for verification of dose distributions due to its high spatial resolution. Irradiated film can be digitized with low-cost, transmission, flatbed scanners. However, a disadvantage is their lateral scan effect (LSE): a scanner readout change over its lateral scan axis. Although anisotropic light scattering was presented as the origin of the LSE, this paper presents an alternative cause. Hereto, LSE for two flatbed scanners (Epson 1680 Expression Pro and Epson 10000XL), and Gafchromic film (EBT, EBT2, EBT3) was investigated, focused on three effects: cross talk, optical path length and polarization. Cross talk was examined using triangular sheets of various optical densities. The optical path length effect was studied using absorptive and reflective neutral density filters with well-defined optical characteristics (OD range 0.2-2.0). Linear polarizer sheets were used to investigate light polarization on the CCD signal in absence and presence of (un)irradiated Gafchromic film. Film dose values ranged between 0.2 to 9 Gy, i.e. an optical density range between 0.25 to 1.1. Measurements were performed in the scanner's transmission mode, with red-green-blue channels. LSE was found to depend on scanner construction and film type. Its magnitude depends on dose: for 9 Gy increasing up to 14% at maximum lateral position. Cross talk was only significant in high contrast regions, up to 2% for very small fields. The optical path length effect introduced by film on the scanner causes 3% for pixels in the extreme lateral position. Light polarization due to film and the scanner's optical mirror system is the main contributor, different in magnitude for the red, green and blue channel. We concluded that any Gafchromic EBT type film scanned with a flatbed scanner will face these optical effects. Accurate dosimetry requires correction of LSE, therefore, determination of the LSE per color channel and dose delivered to the film.

  16. Thin film interference of colloidal thin films.

    PubMed

    Cong, Hailin; Cao, Weixiao

    2004-09-14

    A stairlike colloidal crystal thin film composed of poly(styrene-methyl methacrylate-acrylic acid) (P(St-MMA-AA)) monodispersed colloids was fabricated on an inclined silicon substrate. Different bright colors were observed on the various parts of the film with different layers as white light irradiated perpendicularly on it. The relationship between the colors and layers of the film was investigated and discussed according to the principle of thin film interference. On the basis of the phenomenon of thin film interference, a one-layer colloidal film having uniform color was researched and it would display diverse colors before and after swollen by styrene (St). A circular stairlike colloidal film was achieved to mimic the colors of the peacock tail feather.

  17. Hydrogen film cooling investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousar, D. C.; Ewen, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Effects of flow turning, flow acceleration, and supersonic flow on film cooling were determined experimentally and correlated in terms of an entrainment film cooling model. Experiments were conducted using thin walled metal test sections, hot nitrogen mainstream gas, and ambient hydrogen or nitrogen as film coolants. The entrainment film cooling model relates film cooling effectiveness to the amount of mainstream gases entrained with the film coolant in a mixing layer. The experimental apparatus and the analytical model used are described in detail and correlations for the entrainment fraction and film coolant-to-wall heat transfer coefficient are presented.

  18. Carbon thin film thermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, R. S.; Sparks, L. L.; Strobridge, T. R.

    1973-01-01

    The work concerning carbon thin film thermometry is reported. Optimum film deposition parameters were sought on an empirical basis for maximum stability of the films. One hundred films were fabricated for use at the Marshall Space Flight Center; 10 of these films were given a precise quasi-continuous calibration of temperature vs. resistance with 22 intervals between 5 and 80 K using primary platinum and germanium thermometers. Sensitivity curves were established and the remaining 90 films were given a three point calibration and fitted to the established sensitivity curves. Hydrogen gas-liquid discrimination set points are given for each film.

  19. Durable solar mirror films

    DOEpatents

    O'Neill, Mark B.; Henderson, Andrew J.; Hebrink, Timothy J.; Katare, Rajesh K.; Jing, Naiyong; North, Diane; Peterson, Eric M.

    2017-02-14

    The present disclosure generally relates to durable solar mirror films, methods of making durable solar mirror films, and constructions including durable solar mirror films. In one embodiment, the present disclosure relates to a solar mirror film comprising: a multilayer optical film layer including having a coefficient of hygroscopic expansion of less than about 30 ppm per percent relative humidity; and a reflective layer having a coefficient of hygroscopic expansion.

  20. Diamond film growth from fullerene precursors

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.; Liu, S.; Krauss, A.R.; Pan, X.

    1997-04-15

    A method and system are disclosed for manufacturing diamond film. The method involves forming a fullerene vapor, providing a noble gas stream and combining the gas with the fullerene vapor, passing the combined fullerene vapor and noble gas carrier stream into a chamber, forming a plasma in the chamber causing fragmentation of the fullerene and deposition of a diamond film on a substrate. 10 figs.

  1. Diamond film growth argon-carbon plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.; Krauss, A.R.; Liu, S.Z.; Pan, X.Z.; Zuiker, C.D.

    1998-12-15

    A method and system are disclosed for manufacturing diamond film. The method involves forming a carbonaceous vapor, providing a gas stream of argon, hydrogen and hydrocarbon and combining the gas with the carbonaceous vapor, passing the combined carbonaceous vapor and gas carrier stream into a chamber, forming a plasma in the chamber causing fragmentation of the carbonaceous and deposition of a diamond film on a substrate. 29 figs.

  2. Properties of solid polymer electrolyte fluorocarbon film. [used in hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, W. B.

    1973-01-01

    The ionic fluorocarbon film used as the solid polymer electrolyte in hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells was found to exhibit delamination failures. Polarized light microscopy of as-received film showed a lined region at the center of the film thickness. It is shown that these lines were not caused by incomplete saponification but probably resulted from the film extrusion process. The film lines could be removed by an annealing process. Chemical, physical, and tensile tests showed that annealing improved or sustained the water contents, spectral properties, thermo-oxidative stability, and tensile properties of the film. The resistivity of the film was significantly decreased by the annealing process.

  3. Ultrathin Chitosan Films with Tailored Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Chris; Stukalov, Oleg; Dutcher, John

    2004-03-01

    Chitosan is a biodegradable polysaccharide derived from seashell waste products. Though abundant, the industrial use of this polymer has up until recently been limited to water treatment products. The high water absorbency and biocompatibility of chitosan have enabled its use as a hydrogel in specialty applications such as wound dressings and drug delivery systems. The most convenient method of processing chitosan is solution casting to form films, since the polymer is soluble in weakly acidic solvents. Based on previous work with synthetic polymers, we have developed a protocol for preparing thin, uniform films of chitosan by spincoating from solution onto silicon substrates. Films with thicknesses between 30 and 600 nm (as measured by ellipsometry) and rms roughnesses of less than 1 nm (as measured by atomic force microscopy) were prepared. After preparation, these films quickly absorb water in the presence of high humidity. Heating of the films to high temperature causes large reductions in film thickness h and index of refraction n. After cooling the films to room temperature, h and n remain constant in the presence of high humidity. Using this simple procedure, we are able to produce films with tailored thickness, optical properties and water absorbency.

  4. Thin films, asphaltenes, and reservoir wettability

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminsky, R.; Bergeron, V.; Radke, C.J. |

    1993-04-01

    Reservoir wettability impacts the success of oil recovery by waterflooding and other methods. To understand wettability and its alteration, thin-film forces in solid-aqueous-oil systems must be elucidated. Upon rupture of thick aqueous films separating the oil and rock phases, asphaltene components in the crude oil adsorb irreversibly on the solid surface, changing it from water-wet to oil-wet. Conditions of wettability alteration can be found by performing adhesion tests, in which an oil droplet is brought into contact with a solid surface. Exceeding a critical capillary pressure destabilizes the film, causing spontaneous film rupture to a molecularly adsorbed layer and oil adhesion accompanied by pinning at the three-phase contact line. The authors conduct adhesion experiments similar to those of Buckley and Morrow and simultaneously examine the state of the underlying thin film using optical microscopy and microinterferometry. Aqueous thin films between an asphaltic Orcutt crude oil and glass surfaces are studied as a function of aqueous pH and salinity. For the first time, they prove experimentally that strongly water-wet to strongly oil-wet wettability alteration and contact-angle pinning occur when thick aqueous films thin to molecularly adsorbed films and when the oil phase contains asphaltene molecules.

  5. Interferometric characterization of tear film dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primeau, Brian Christopher

    The anterior refracting surface of the eye is the thin tear film that forms on the surface of the cornea. When a contact lens is on worn, the tear film covers the contact lens as it would a bare cornea, and is affected by the contact lens material properties. Tear film irregularity can cause both discomfort and vision quality degradation. Under normal conditions, the tear film is less than 10 microns thick and the thickness and topography change in the time between blinks. In order to both better understand the tear film, and to characterize how contact lenses affect tear film behavior, two interferometers were designed and built to separately measure tear film behavior in vitro and in vivo. An in vitro method of characterizing dynamic fluid layers applied to contact lenses mounted on mechanical substrates has been developed using a phase-shifting Twyman-Green interferometer. This interferometer continuously measures light reflected from the surface of the fluid layer, allowing precision analysis of the dynamic fluid layer. Movies showing this fluid layer behavior can be generated. The fluid behavior on the contact lens surface is measured, allowing quantitative analysis beyond what typical contact angle or visual inspection methods provide. The in vivo interferometer is a similar system, with additional modules included to provide capability for human testing. This tear film measurement allows analysis beyond capabilities of typical fluorescein visual inspection or videokeratometry and provides better sensitivity and resolution than shearing interferometry methods.

  6. Ferromagnetic properties of fcc Gd thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Bertelli, T. P. Passamani, E. C.; Larica, C.; Nascimento, V. P.; Takeuchi, A. Y.

    2015-05-28

    Magnetic properties of sputtered Gd thin films grown on Si (100) substrates kept at two different temperatures were investigated using X-ray diffraction, ac magnetic susceptibility, and dc magnetization measurements. The obtained Gd thin films have a mixture of hcp and fcc structures, but with their fractions depending on the substrate temperature T{sub S} and film thickness x. Gd fcc samples were obtained when T{sub S} = 763 K and x = 10 nm, while the hcp structure was stabilized for lower T{sub S} (300 K) and thicker film (20 nm). The fcc structure is formed on the Ta buffer layer, while the hcp phase grows on the fcc Gd layer as a consequence of the lattice relaxation process. Spin reorientation phenomenon, commonly found in bulk Gd species, was also observed in the hcp Gd thin film. This phenomenon is assumed to cause the magnetization anomalous increase observed below 50 K in stressed Gd films. Magnetic properties of fcc Gd thin films are: Curie temperature above 300 K, saturation magnetization value of about 175 emu/cm{sup 3}, and coercive field of about 100 Oe at 300 K; features that allow us to classify Gd thin films, with fcc structure, as a soft ferromagnetic material.

  7. Photopatternable sorbent and functionalized films

    DOEpatents

    Grate, Jay W.; Nelson, David A.

    2006-01-31

    A composition containing a polymer, a crosslinker and a photo-activatable catalyst is placed on a substrate. The composition is exposed to a predetermined pattern of light, leaving an unexposed region. The light causes the polymer to become crosslinked by hydrosilylation. A solvent is used to remove the unexposed composition from the substrate, leaving the exposed pattern to become a sorbent polymer film that will absorb a predetermined chemical species when exposed to such chemical species.

  8. Tribological properties of nanocrystalline diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.; Kraus, A. R.; Gruen, D. M.; McCauley, T.; Csencsits, R. T.

    2000-01-26

    In this paper, the authors present the friction and wear properties of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films grown in A-fullerene (C{sub 60}) and Ar-CH{sub 4} microwave plasmas. Specifically, they address the fundamental tribological issues posed by these films during sliding against Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} counterfaces in ambient air and inert gases. Grain sizes of the films grown by the new method are very small (10--30 nm) and are much smoother (20-40 nm, root mean square) than those of films grown by the conventional H{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} microwave-assisted chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD) process. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that the grain boundaries of these films are very sharp and free of nondiamond phases. The microcrystalline diamond (MCD) films grown by most conventional methods consist of large grains and a rough surface finish, which can cause severe abrasion during sliding against other materials. The friction coefficients of films grown by the new method (i.e., in Ar-C{sub 60} and Ar-CH{sub 4} plasmas) are comparable to those of natural diamond, and wear damage on counterface materials is minimal. Fundamental tribological studies indicate that these films may undergo phase transformation during long-duration, high-speed and/or high-load sliding tests and that the transformation products trapped at the sliding interfaces can intermittently dominate friction and wear performance. Using results from a combination of TEM, electron diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), they describe the structural chemistry of the debris particles trapped at the sliding interfaces and elucidate their possible effects on friction and wear of NCD films in dry N{sub 2}. Finally, they suggest a few potential applications in which NCD films can improve performance and service lives.

  9. Silver nanowire composite thin films as transparent electrodes for Cu(In,Ga)Se₂/ZnS thin film solar cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiao-Hui; Chen, Yu; Liu, Ye-Xiang

    2014-05-20

    Solution processed silver nanowire indium-tin oxide nanoparticle (AgNW-ITONP) composite thin films were successfully applied as the transparent electrodes for Cu(In,Ga)Se₂ (CIGS) thin film solar cells with ZnS buffer layers. Properties of the AgNW-ITONP thin film and its effects on performance of CIGS/ZnS thin film solar cells were studied. Compared with the traditional sputtered ITO electrodes, the AgNW-ITONP thin films show comparable optical transmittance and electrical conductivity. Furthermore, the AgNW-ITONP thin film causes no physical damage to the adjacent surface layer and does not need high temperature annealing, which makes it very suitable to use as transparent conductive layers for heat or sputtering damage-sensitive optoelectronic devices. By using AgNW-ITONP electrodes, the required thickness of the ZnS buffer layers for CIGS thin film solar cells was greatly decreased.

  10. Periodic cracking of films supported on compliant substrates

    PubMed Central

    Thouless, M. D.; Li, Z.; Douville, N. J.; Takayama, S.

    2011-01-01

    When a tensile strain is applied to a film supported on a compliant substrate, a pattern of parallel cracks can channel through both the film and substrate. A linear-elastic fracture-mechanics model for the phenomenon is presented to extend earlier analyses in which cracking was limited to the film. It is shown how failure of the substrate reduces the critical strain required to initiate fracture of the film. This effect is more pronounced for relatively tough films. However, there is a critical ratio of the film to substrate toughness above which stable cracks do not form in response to an applied load. Instead, catastrophic failure of the substrate occurs simultaneously with the propagation of a single channel crack. This critical toughness ratio increases with the modulus mismatch between the film and substrate, so that periodic crack patterns are more likely to be observed with relatively stiff films. With relatively low values of modulus mismatch, even a film that is more brittle than the substrate can cause catastrophic failure of the substrate. Below the critical toughness ratio, there is a regime in which stable crack arrays can be formed in the film and substrate. The depth of these arrays increases, while the spacing decreases, as the strain is increased. Eventually, the crack array can become deep enough to cause substrate failure. PMID:21927507

  11. The Educational Film Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tortora, Vincent R.; Schillaci, Peter

    1975-01-01

    Increased dialog is needed among educational film producers, distributors, and consumers in order to be sure that what is being produced meets educators' needs and also to help solve the financial problems of the film industry. (LS)

  12. The Educational Film Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tortora, Vincent R.; Schillaci, Peter

    1975-01-01

    Increased dialog is needed among educational film producers, distributors, and consumers in order to be sure that what is being produced meets educators' needs and also to help solve the financial problems of the film industry. (LS)

  13. Electrochromism in copper oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, T.J.; Slack, J.L.; Rubin, M.D.

    2000-08-15

    Transparent thin films of copper(I) oxide prepared on conductive SnO2:F glass substrates by anodic oxidation of sputtered copper films or by direct electrodeposition of Cu2O transformed reversibly to opaque metallic copper films when reduced in alkaline electrolyte. In addition, the same Cu2O films transform reversibly to black copper(II) oxide when cycled at more anodic potentials. Copper oxide-to-copper switching covered a large dynamic range, from 85% and 10% photopic transmittance, with a coloration efficiency of about 32 cm2/C. Gradual deterioration of the switching range occurred over 20 to 100 cycles. This is tentatively ascribed to coarsening of the film and contact degradation caused by the 65% volume change on conversion of Cu to Cu2O. Switching between the two copper oxides (which have similar volumes) was more stable and more efficient (CE = 60 cm2/C), but covered a smaller transmittance range (60% to 44% T). Due to their large electrochemical storage capacity and tolerance for alkaline electrolytes, these cathodically coloring films may be useful as counter electrodes for anodically coloring electrode films such as nickel oxide or metal hydrides.

  14. Films and Video: Literature Film Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale.

    Intended for teachers of literature, this 37-page film catalog lists a wide selection of film adaptations of literary works and literary topics that are available for rental through the Learning Resources Services of the Southern Illinois University at Carbondale. The catalog is organized both by title and author. Entries include plays, short…

  15. Film as Film; Understanding and Judging Movies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, V. F.

    The criteria for judging movies which are presented here are based on the belief that film criticism becomes rational, if not "objective", when it displays and inspects the nature of its evidence and the bases of its arguments. The author dissents from the view of early film theorists that montage is the essence of cinema, and that cinema is to be…

  16. Film as Film; Understanding and Judging Movies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, V. F.

    The criteria for judging movies which are presented here are based on the belief that film criticism becomes rational, if not "objective", when it displays and inspects the nature of its evidence and the bases of its arguments. The author dissents from the view of early film theorists that montage is the essence of cinema, and that cinema is to be…

  17. Mechanics of Thin Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-06

    32 (1991). INTRODUCTION Many technological areas currently use designs that rely on thin films for a variety of effects that include mechanical...film thickness, d is the width of the columnar grains, and Q is the atomic volume. The current film thickness h0 increases in proportion to the film...temperature and on the level of the far field uniform stress (121. h careful examination of these assumptions is currently under way. This work has

  18. Exploring the Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhns, William; Stanley, Robert

    The purpose of film study is defined here in the words of D. W. Griffiths: "My goal is above all to make you see." This book is intended to be used as a text in a film study course. It traces the development of films from a scientific curiosity through silent films to modern wide screen productions. A comic strip is used to demonstrate the effect…

  19. The Primal Screen: Essays on Film and Related Subjects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarris, Andrew

    This book is a collection of essays by the author on film criticism. An auteurist and historical approach is taken to the primarily American films discussed. The essays are organized by basic theme: "Critical Credos and Causes,""Personal Styles,""Genres,""Politics,""Odes and Obits," and "Arts and Letters." Each essay centers either on an important…

  20. The Primal Screen: Essays on Film and Related Subjects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarris, Andrew

    This book is a collection of essays by the author on film criticism. An auteurist and historical approach is taken to the primarily American films discussed. The essays are organized by basic theme: "Critical Credos and Causes,""Personal Styles,""Genres,""Politics,""Odes and Obits," and "Arts and Letters." Each essay centers either on an important…

  1. Introduction to Film Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Robert E.

    This booklet is intended for teachers who are now teaching units in film production as part of a program in communication or who wish to begin work with filmmaking in such a program. The first section is intended to serve as a brief introduction to film theory, while a major portion of the rest of the booklet is devoted to film projects which may…

  2. Mental Retardation Film List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Library of Medicine (DHEW), Bethesda, MD.

    A list of films on mental retardation includes titles, publication information, physical descriptions, language revisions when other than English, series reference, technical description of film content, sale source, and distributor. Films intended for the general public are grouped under the heading Nonprofessional; others are listed as…

  3. 8MM Film Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kone, Grace Ann, Comp.

    All 8mm films in general distribution in the United States, regardless of length or subject, are listed in this directory: Standard or Super 8, silent or sound, cartridge or reel-to-reel. Indexed alphabetically and by the Dewey Decimal System, films and film series are entered under the headings of Arts, Education, Fiction, Language, Recreation,…

  4. Health Careers Film Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD. Bureau of Health Manpower Education.

    This document, which represents a survey of the entire health career film field, was designed to provide information for people interested in a health career. The guide indicates that a major criteria for film selection was recency; however, some older films that give a fairly accurate image of a profession were included, with some emphasis given…

  5. Marine Science Film Catalogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Frank L.

    Forty-eight motion picture films and filmstrips in the field of marine science are catalogued in this booklet. Following the alphabetical index, one page is devoted to each film indicating its type, producer, recommended grade level, running time, and presence of color and/or sound. A summary of film content, possible uses, and outstanding…

  6. The Language of Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Rod

    This book, designed for the film maker, critic, and serious filmgoer, explores elements of filmic expression from the creative and perceptual points of view. Chapters (1) trace the linguistic and mechanical development of film, (2) discuss the contributions of image and sound to film content, (3) suggest the contributions of editing and montage,…

  7. Analysis of Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stupp, Vicki O'Donnell

    In order to understand the communicative interaction of film, it is necessary to carefully analyze the special qualities of film as a visual medium, to understand the elements of audience identification with what happens in the film, and to interpret the use of symbolism that enables an audience to derive meaning from it. Among the special…

  8. Getting into Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    London, Mel

    This book describes the various aspects of the film industry and the many jobs related to filmmaking, stressing that no "formula" exists for finding a successful career in the film industry. Chapters provide information on production, writing for film, cinematography, editing, music, sound, animation and graphics, acting and modeling, the "unsung…

  9. Australian Film Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breen, Myles P.

    Although Australia had a vigorous film industry in the silent film era, it was stifled in the 1930s when United States and British interests bought up the Australian distribution channels and closed down the indigenous industry. However, the industry and film study have undergone a renaissance since the advent of the Labor government in 1972,…

  10. Getting into Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    London, Mel

    This book describes the various aspects of the film industry and the many jobs related to filmmaking, stressing that no "formula" exists for finding a successful career in the film industry. Chapters provide information on production, writing for film, cinematography, editing, music, sound, animation and graphics, acting and modeling, the "unsung…

  11. The Language of Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Rod

    This book, designed for the film maker, critic, and serious filmgoer, explores elements of filmic expression from the creative and perceptual points of view. Chapters (1) trace the linguistic and mechanical development of film, (2) discuss the contributions of image and sound to film content, (3) suggest the contributions of editing and montage,…

  12. Thick Film Interference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trefil, James

    1983-01-01

    Discusses why interference effects cannot be seen with a thick film, starting with a review of the origin of interference patterns in thin films. Considers properties of materials in films, properties of the light source, and the nature of light. (JN)

  13. Thick Film Interference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trefil, James

    1983-01-01

    Discusses why interference effects cannot be seen with a thick film, starting with a review of the origin of interference patterns in thin films. Considers properties of materials in films, properties of the light source, and the nature of light. (JN)

  14. Australian Film Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breen, Myles P.

    Although Australia had a vigorous film industry in the silent film era, it was stifled in the 1930s when United States and British interests bought up the Australian distribution channels and closed down the indigenous industry. However, the industry and film study have undergone a renaissance since the advent of the Labor government in 1972,…

  15. 99 Films on Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, David O., Ed.

    This catalog describes and evaluates 16-millimeter films about various aspects of drug use. Among the subjects covered by the 99 films are the composition and effects of different drugs, reasons why people use drugs, life in the drug culture, the problem of law enforcement, and various means of dealing with drug users. Each film is synopsized. Two…

  16. Focus on Shakespearean Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckert, Charles W., Ed.

    This is an anthology of reviews and critical pieces of the significant and available Shakespearean films made between 1935 and 1966. Included are three general essays on Shakespearean film by Ian Johnson, Henri Lemaitre, and Geoffrey Reeves. The specific films and their reviewers are: A Midsummer's Night Dream (1935) Allardyce Nicoll and Richard…

  17. Playing With Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaffney, Maureen, Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Designed for media specialists and educators, this issue includes five articles on innovative museum film programs. The first article describes a successful film program conducted at the Staten Island Children's Museum. The second article describes inventive children's programs at the Delaware Museum of Art. The programs use films and activities…

  18. Focus on Shakespearean Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckert, Charles W., Ed.

    This is an anthology of reviews and critical pieces of the significant and available Shakespearean films made between 1935 and 1966. Included are three general essays on Shakespearean film by Ian Johnson, Henri Lemaitre, and Geoffrey Reeves. The specific films and their reviewers are: A Midsummer's Night Dream (1935) Allardyce Nicoll and Richard…

  19. Extraordinary optical transmission in nanopatterned ultrathin metal films without holes

    SciTech Connect

    Peer, Akshit; Biswas, Rana

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we experimentally and theoretically demonstrate that a continuous gold film on a periodically textured substrate exhibits extraordinary optical transmission, even though no holes were etched in the film. Our film synthesis started by nanoimprinting a periodic array of nanocups with a period of ~750 nm on a polystyrene film over a glass substrate. A thin non-conformal gold film was sputter-deposited on the polystyrene by angle-directed deposition. The gold film was continuous with spatial thickness variation, the film being thinnest at the bottom of the nanocup. Measurements revealed an extraordinary transmission peak at a wavelength just smaller than the period, with an enhancement of ~2.5 compared to the classically expected value. Scattering matrix simulations model well the transmission and reflectance measurements when an ultrathin gold layer (~5 nm), smaller than the skin depth is retained at the bottom of the nanocups. Electric field intensities are enhanced by >100 within the nanocup, and ~40 in the ultrathin gold layer causing transmission through it. We show a wavelength red-shift of ~30 nm in the extraordinary transmission peak when the nanocups are coated with a thin film of a few nanometers, which can be utilized for biosensing. The continuous corrugated metal films are far simpler structures to observe extraordinary transmission, circumventing the difficult process of etching the metal film. Such continuous metal films with ultrathin regions are simple platforms for non-linear optics, plasmonics, and biological and chemical sensing.

  20. Extraordinary optical transmission in nanopatterned ultrathin metal films without holes

    DOE PAGES

    Peer, Akshit; Biswas, Rana

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we experimentally and theoretically demonstrate that a continuous gold film on a periodically textured substrate exhibits extraordinary optical transmission, even though no holes were etched in the film. Our film synthesis started by nanoimprinting a periodic array of nanocups with a period of ~750 nm on a polystyrene film over a glass substrate. A thin non-conformal gold film was sputter-deposited on the polystyrene by angle-directed deposition. The gold film was continuous with spatial thickness variation, the film being thinnest at the bottom of the nanocup. Measurements revealed an extraordinary transmission peak at a wavelength just smaller thanmore » the period, with an enhancement of ~2.5 compared to the classically expected value. Scattering matrix simulations model well the transmission and reflectance measurements when an ultrathin gold layer (~5 nm), smaller than the skin depth is retained at the bottom of the nanocups. Electric field intensities are enhanced by >100 within the nanocup, and ~40 in the ultrathin gold layer causing transmission through it. We show a wavelength red-shift of ~30 nm in the extraordinary transmission peak when the nanocups are coated with a thin film of a few nanometers, which can be utilized for biosensing. The continuous corrugated metal films are far simpler structures to observe extraordinary transmission, circumventing the difficult process of etching the metal film. Such continuous metal films with ultrathin regions are simple platforms for non-linear optics, plasmonics, and biological and chemical sensing.« less

  1. Preparation and Evaluation of Stomatitis Film Using Xyloglucan Containing Loperamide.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Yayoi; Sasatsu, Masanaho; Mizutani, Ayako; Hirose, Kaoru; Hanawa, Takehisa; Onishi, Hiraku

    2016-06-01

    Stomatitis induced by radiation therapy or cancer chemotherapy is a factor in sleep disorders and/or eating disorders, markedly decreasing patient quality of life. In recent years, disintegrating oral films that are easy to handle have been developed; therefore, we focused on the formulation of these films. We prepared an adhesive film for the oral cavity using xyloglucan (Xylo), which is a water-soluble macromolecule. We used loperamide, which has been reported to relieve pain caused by stomatitis effectively, as a model drug in this study. Films were prepared from Xylo solutions (3% (w/w)) and hypromellose (HPMC) solutions (1% (w/w)). Xylo and HPMC solutions were mixed at ratios of 1 : 1, 2 : 1, or 3 : 1 for each film, and films 2×2 cm weighing 3 g were prepared and dried at 37°C for 24 h. Physicochemical properties such as strength, adhesiveness, disintegration behavior, and dissolution of loperamide from films were evaluated. Films prepared from Xylo solution alone had sufficient strength and mucosal adhesion. On the other hand, films prepared from a mixture of Xylo and HPMC were inferior to those made from Xylo, but showed sufficient strength and mucosal adhesion and were flexible and easy to handle. The films prepared in this study are useful as adhesion films in the oral cavity.

  2. 2D Magnetic Texture Analysis of Co-Cu Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayirli, Mehmet; Karaagac, Oznur; Kockar, Hakan; Alper, Mursel

    2017-05-01

    The magnetic textures for the produced magnetic materials are important concepts in accordance with technical applications. Therefore, the aim of this article is to determine 2D magnetic textures of electrodeposited Co-Cu films by the measurement of hysteresis loops at the incremented angles. For that, Co-Cu films were deposited with different Co2+ in the electrolyte. In addition, the easy-axis orientation in the films from the squareness values of the angles, Mp(β) obtained by the hysteresis loops have been numerically studied using the Fourier series analysis. The differences observed in the magnetic easy-axis distributions were attributed to changes of the incorporation of Co in the films with the change of Co2+ in the electrolyte. The coefficients of Fourier series (A0 and A2n ) were also computed for 2D films. It is seen that a systematic and small decrease in A0 and an obvious decrease in A2n (n=1) were observed with increasing incorporated Co in the films. Results imply that interactions cause slightly demagnetization effect accordance with higher incorporation of Co in the films. Furthermore, the crystal structure of the Co-Cu films analysed by X-ray diffraction revealed that the films have dominantly face-centred cubic structure. Film contents analysed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and film morphologies observed by scanning electron microscope also support the magnetic texture analysis results found by numerical computation.

  3. Transport properties of epitaxial lift off films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mena, R. A.; Schacham, S. E.; Young, P. G.; Haugland, E. J.; Alterovitz, S. A.

    1993-01-01

    Transport properties of epitaxially lifted-off (ELO) films were characterized using conductivity, Hall, and Shubnikov-de Haas measurements. A 10-15 percent increase in the 2D electron gas concentration was observed in these films as compared with adjacent conventional samples. We believe this result to be caused by a backgating effect produced by a charge build up at the interface of the ELO film and the quartz substrate. This increase results in a substantial decrease in the quantum lifetime in the ELO samples, by 17-30 percent, but without a degradation in carrier mobility. Under persistent photoconductivity, only one subband was populated in the conventional structure, while in the ELO films the population of the second subband was clearly visible. However, the increase of the second subband concentration with increasing excitation is substantially smaller than anticipated due to screening of the backgating effect.

  4. What Causes Lymphocytopenia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... low lymphocyte counts with no underlying cause. Acquired Causes Many acquired diseases, conditions, and factors can cause ... anemia . Radiation and chemotherapy (treatments for cancer). Inherited Causes Certain inherited diseases and conditions can lead to ...

  5. Film Program Notes from the Current Holdings of the Anthology Film Archives; Outlines of 41 Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthology Film Archives, New York, NY.

    This collection of film program notes includes mixed commentary on some of the films held in the Anthology Film Archives (a film and book library in New York City). Some of the films are described by synopsis of the episodes and others by translation into English of the foreign language subtitles. However, each film noted is identified by full…

  6. The Science of Filming Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harned, D.

    2016-12-01

    Filmmaking is a science. It is observation, data collection, analysis, experimentation, structure, and presentation. Filmmaking is a process that is familiar to scientists. Observation - what we know is gained from observation of the world around us. Film allows us to focus this observation, to pick out details, to understand nuance, to direct seeing. Filmmaking is a tool for learning about the world. Data collection - to study what we observe we must see what it is now, and how it is changing. This element of filmmaking is collecting images, video, documenting events, and gathering information. Analysis - to understand the film data we have collected we must understand connections, correlations, and cause and effect. We ask questions. We discover. Experimentation - film allows us to experiment with different scenarios, to test observations and make models. Structure - what we find or what we want to present must be sorted into a structured format using the tools of writing, filming, and editing. Presentation - the final film is the result of what we observe, what observations we collect, what we learn from those observations, how we test what we've learned, and how we organize and show what we find. Online video is transforming the way we see the world. We now have easy access to lectures by the famous and the obscure; we can observe lab experiments, documentaries of field expeditions, and actually see recent research results. Video is omnipresent in our culture and supplements or even replaces writing in many applications. We can easily present our own scientific results to new and important audiences. Video can do a lot for science and scientists: It can provide an expanded audience for scientific news and information, educate thousands, spread the word about scientific developments, help frame controversial science issues, show real scientists at work in the real world, promote interest in scientific publications, and report on science-agency programs. It can

  7. An experimental test of the fractal model for drainage of foam films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakashev, S. I.; Ivanova, D. S.; Manev, E. D.; Kirilova, R.; Tsekov, R.

    2011-01-01

    Drainage of foam films with different radii (50-150 μm), stabilized by hexathylene glycol dodecyl ether C12E6 and in a presence of 0.024 M NaCl, were analyzed in the light of a recent dynamic fractal classification [1]. The latter accounts for the effect of film surface corrugations developed during the film drainage. For simplicity, the film surface mobility is neglected since the presence of surfactants reduces dramatically the film surface velocity [2]. The magnitude of surface non-homogeneities, caused by the film drainage, is accounted via a dynamic fractal dimension parameter ? being spanned between zero and two. Depending on the α-value the film drains by different kinetic laws. For example, if the thin film is planar α = 2 and it drains according to the Reynolds law [3]; if α = 1 the film contains an axisymmetric dimple causing faster drainage; if α = 1/2 the film exhibits number of asymmetric dimples [4] and the film drains even faster; finally if α = 0 the film contains spatially uncorrelated domains causing the fastest possible drainage. The present analysis of experimental data suggests that the parameter α is inversely proportional to the film radius R and it is independent of the type and concentration of surfactants. A semi-empirical model for α is proposed, thus completing the generic dynamic fractal classification.

  8. Pyrolyzed thin film carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Liger, Matthieu (Inventor); Harder, Theodore (Inventor); Konishi, Satoshi (Inventor); Miserendino, Scott (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method of making carbon thin films comprises depositing a catalyst on a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon in contact with the catalyst and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon. A method of controlling a carbon thin film density comprises etching a cavity into a substrate, depositing a hydrocarbon into the cavity, and pyrolyzing the hydrocarbon while in the cavity to form a carbon thin film. Controlling a carbon thin film density is achieved by changing the volume of the cavity. Methods of making carbon containing patterned structures are also provided. Carbon thin films and carbon containing patterned structures can be used in NEMS, MEMS, liquid chromatography, and sensor devices.

  9. Electrically Conductive Polyimide Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, Anne K.; Ezzel, Stephen A.; Taylor, Larry T.; Boston, Harold G.

    1993-01-01

    Semiconducting surfaces of SnO2 formed by curing polyamic acids containing tin complexes. Polyimide films made semiconductive via incorporation of semiconductive surface layers of SnO2. If SnO2-surfaced polyimide film used as free-standing film, then semiconductive layer protected by top coat of polyimide, deposited as film from solution directly onto SnO2. Resultant films flexible and resistant to both weather and high temperature. Used on aircraft to provide resistance to lightning strikes, and in microelectronics and flexible circuitry.

  10. Wetting and absorption of water drops on Nafion films.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Sharonmoyee; Klaus, Shannon; Benziger, Jay

    2008-08-19

    Water drops on Nafion films caused the surface to switch from being hydrophobic to being hydrophilic. Contact angle hysteresis of >70 degrees between advancing and receding values were obtained by the Wilhelmy plate technique. Sessile drop measurements were consistent with the advancing contact angle; the sessile drop contact angle was 108 degrees . Water drop adhesion, as measured by the detachment angle on an inclined plane, showed much stronger water adhesion on Nafion than Teflon. Sessile water and methanol drops caused dry Nafion films to deflect. The flexure went through a maximum with time. Flexure increased with contact area of the drop, but was insensitive to the film thickness. Methanol drops spread more on Nafion and caused larger film flexure than water. The results suggest that the Nafion surface was initially hydrophobic but water and methanol drops caused hydrophilic sulfonic acid domains to be drawn to the Nafion surface. Local swelling of the film beneath the water drop caused the film to buckle. The maximum flexure is suggested to result from motion of a water swelling front through the Nafion film.

  11. Antimicrobial and physical-mechanical properties of agar-based films incorporated with grapefruit seed extract.

    PubMed

    Kanmani, Paulraj; Rhim, Jong-Whan

    2014-02-15

    The use of synthetic petroleum based packaging films caused serious environmental problems due to their difficulty in recycling and poor biodegradability. Therefore, present study was aimed to develop natural biopolymer-based antimicrobial packaging films as an alternative for the synthetic packaging films. As a natural antimicrobial agent, grapefruit seed extract (GSE) has been incorporated into agar to prepare antimicrobial packaging film. The films with different concentrations of GSE were prepared by a solvent casting method and the resulting composite films were examined physically and mechanically. In addition, the films were characterized by FE-SEM, XRD, FT-IR and TGA. The incorporation of GSE caused increase in color, UV barrier, moisture content, water solubility and water vapor permeability, while decrease in surface hydrophobicity, tensile strength and elastic modulus of the films. As the concentration of GSE increased from 0.6 to 13.3 μg/mL, the physical and mechanical properties of the films were affected significantly. The addition of GSE changed film microstructure of the film, but did not influence the crystallinity of agar and thermal stability of the agar-based films. The agar/GSE films exhibited distinctive antimicrobial activity against three test food pathogens, such as Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli. These results suggest that agar/GSE films have potential to be used in an active food packaging systems for maintaining food safety and extending the shelf-life of the packaged food.

  12. pH-Induced Release of Polyanions from Multilayer Films

    SciTech Connect

    Kharlampieva, Dr. Eugenia; Ankner, John Francis; Rubinstein, Michael; Sukhishvili, Prof. Svetlana A.

    2008-01-01

    We discovered pH-induced selective desorption and re-adsorption of weak polyacid chains from polyacid/polybase layer-by-layer films. In situ ATR-FTIR confirms the selectivity of polyacid release and shows that film response is caused by pH-induced charge imbalance. Experimentally, the characteristic time of chain release, τ, scales with molar mass, Mw, as Mw1.1 0.1. A new theoretical model of "sticky gel electrophoresis" of entangled polyacids agrees with experiments and predicts τ ~ Mw H, where H is film thickness. Neutron reflectivity shows that polyacid release results in disordering of the film structure.

  13. Chronicles of foam films.

    PubMed

    Gochev, G; Platikanov, D; Miller, R

    2016-07-01

    The history of the scientific research on foam films, traditionally known as soap films, dates back to as early as the late 17th century when Boyle and Hooke paid special attention to the colours of soap bubbles. Their inspiration was transferred to Newton, who began systematic study of the science of foam films. Over the next centuries, a number of scientists dealt with the open questions of the drainage, stability and thickness of foam films. The significant contributions of Plateau and Gibbs in the middle/late 19th century are particularly recognized. After the "colours" method of Newton, Reinold and Rücker as well as Johhonnot developed optical methods for measuring the thickness of the thinner "non-colour" films (first order black) that are still in use today. At the beginning of the 20th century, various aspects of the foam film science were elucidated by the works of Dewar and Perrin and later by Mysels. Undoubtedly, the introduction of the disjoining pressure by Derjaguin and the manifestation of the DLVO theory in describing the film stability are considered as milestones in the theoretical development of foam films. The study of foam films gained momentum with the introduction of the microscopic foam film methodology by Scheludko and Exerowa, which is widely used today. This historical perspective serves as a guide through the chronological development of knowledge on foam films achieved over several centuries.

  14. Ceramic Composite Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, Rodney S. (Inventor); Stankovich, Sasha (Inventor); Dikin, Dmitriy A. (Inventor); Nguyen, SonBinh T. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A ceramic composite thin film or layer includes individual graphene oxide and/or electrically conductive graphene sheets dispersed in a ceramic (e.g. silica) matrix. The thin film or layer can be electrically conductive film or layer depending the amount of graphene sheets present. The composite films or layers are transparent, chemically inert and compatible with both glass and hydrophilic SiOx/silicon substrates. The composite film or layer can be produced by making a suspension of graphene oxide sheet fragments, introducing a silica-precursor or silica to the suspension to form a sol, depositing the sol on a substrate as thin film or layer, at least partially reducing the graphene oxide sheets to conductive graphene sheets, and thermally consolidating the thin film or layer to form a silica matrix in which the graphene oxide and/or graphene sheets are dispersed.

  15. Depositing Diamondlike Carbon Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Sovey, J. S.; Banks, B. A.

    1986-01-01

    New process demonstrated to make thin films (usually thousands of angstroms to few microns thick) that have properties of diamonds. Various plasma and ion-beam techniques employed to generate films. Films made by radio-frequency plasma decomposition of hydrocarbon gas or other alkanes, by low-energy carbon-ion-beam deposition, or by ion plating and dual ion technique using carbon target. Advantages of new process over others are films produced, though amorphous, are clear, extremely hard, chemically inert, of high resistivity, and have index of refraction of 3.2 properties similar to those of single-crystal diamonds. Films have possible uses in microelectronic applications, high-energy-laser and plastic windows, corrosion protection for metals, and other applications where desired properties of film shaped during the film-formation process.

  16. Real-Time Deposition Monitor for Ultrathin Conductive Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Jacqueline

    2011-01-01

    A device has been developed that can be used for the real-time monitoring of ultrathin (2 or more) conductive films. The device responds in less than two microseconds, and can be used to monitor film depositions up to about 60 thick. Actual thickness monitoring capability will vary based on properties of the film being deposited. This is a single-use device, which, due to the very low device cost, can be disposable. Conventional quartz/crystal microbalance devices have proven inadequate to monitor the thickness of Pd films during deposition of ultrathin films for hydrogen sensor devices. When the deposited film is less than 100 , the QCM measurements are inadequate to allow monitoring of the ultrathin films being developed. Thus, an improved, high-sensitivity, real-time deposition monitor was needed to continue Pd film deposition development. The new deposition monitor utilizes a surface acoustic wave (SAW) device in a differential delay-line configuration to produce both a reference response and a response for the portion of the device on which the film is being deposited. Both responses are monitored simultaneously during deposition. The reference response remains unchanged, while the attenuation of the sensing path (where the film is being deposited) varies as the film thickness increases. This device utilizes the fact that on high-coupling piezoelectric substrates, the attenuation of an SAW undergoes a transition from low to very high, and back to low as the conductivity of a film on the device surface goes from nonconductive to highly conductive. Thus, the sensing path response starts with a low insertion loss, and as a conductive film is deposited, the film conductivity increases, causing the device insertion loss to increase dramatically (by up to 80 dB or more), and then with continued film thickness increases (and the corresponding conductivity increases), the device insertion loss goes back down to the low level at which it started. This provides a

  17. Analysis of Comparison of Human Meibomian Lipid Films and Mixtures with Cholesteryl Esters In Vitro Films using High Resolution Color Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Millar, Thomas J.; King-Smith, P. Ewen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. The lipid layer of the tears has been studied in vivo using high resolution color microscopy (HRCM). The purpose of these experiments was to gain further insight into the structure of the lipid layer by applying HRCM to in vitro meibomian lipid films. Methods. Films of human meibomian lipids, cholesteryl nervonate, cholesteryl palmitate, or their mixtures, were spread on a Langmuir trough. Changes to the films were monitored using HRCM as the films were compressed to different surface pressures. The penetration of albumin into a meibomian lipid film also was studied. Results. Small amounts of meibomian lipids at low pressures formed very thin films estimated to be 5.2 nm thick. Compression caused spots to appear in the films. At higher concentrations, micro lenses were a feature of the film. Cholesteryl nervonate formed a multilayered oil slick that did not change with surface pressure. Cholesteryl palmitate formed a stiff film that collapsed at high compression. Mixtures of cholesteryl nervonate and meibomian lipids showed that they mixed to increase surface pressures above that of the individual components. HRCM also allowed albumin to be seen penetrating the meibomian lipid film. Conclusions. HRCM combined with in vitro surface pressure measurements using a Langmuir trough is useful for modeling meibomian lipid films. The films often resemble the appearance of the lipid layer of in vivo films. The data indicate that the lipid layer might be modeled best as a duplex film containing an array of liquid crystals. PMID:22695957

  18. Thermally induced optical nonlinearity during transient heating of thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G. ); Tien, C.L. )

    1994-05-01

    This work studies the temperature field and the optical response of weakly absorbing thin films with thermally induced optical nonlinearity during picosecond to nanosecond pulsed-laser heating. A one-dimensional model is presented that examines the effects of the temperature dependent optical constants and the nonuniform absorption caused by interference. The energy equation is solved numerically, coupled with the matrix method in optical multilayer theory. Both cadmium sulfide (CdS) thin films and a zinc selenide (ZnSe) interference filter are considered. The computational results compare favorably with available experimental data on the ZnSe interference filter. This study shows that the transient temperature distributions in the films are highly nonuniform. Such nonuniformity yields Airy's formulae for calculating the thin-film reflectance and transmittance inapplicable. Applications of the work include optical bistability, localized change of the film structure, and measurement of the thermal diffusivity of thin films. 31 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Active naringin-chitosan films: impact of UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Iturriaga, Leire; Olabarrieta, Idoia; Castellan, Alain; Gardrat, Christian; Coma, Véronique

    2014-09-22

    Bioactive citrus extract-chitosan films were prepared through solvent casting-evaporation method. The impact of near UV irradiation was studied to reach a better understanding of the film behavior. The antimicrobial activity of films against Listeria innocua was maintained after UV irradiation. To study the interaction between chitosan and citrus extract components, naringin (main component) was selected as the model compound. UV treatment caused modifications of the flavanone regardless of the solvent used for its dissolution, depending on the concentration of naringin in the film: the greater the concentration the lower the modification. DSC results suggested cross-links due to UV irradiation and interactions between naringin and chitosan. This was confirmed by a decrease in the naringin release from the irradiated samples. Naringin- and citrus extract-chitosan films showed an increased absorbance in the UV region compared to pure chitosan films, showing potentiality for decreasing the lipid oxidation induced by UV light in foodstuffs.

  20. Hydrodynamic squeeze-film bearings for gyroscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, T.; Smith, R. L.

    1970-01-01

    Experimental tests are conducted on squeeze-film bearings by applying electricity to piezoelectric ceramics, causing vibrations at thousands or millions of Hz that are amplified and transmitted to the bearing. Rotor operation through 24,000 rpm without whirl instability proved bearing ability to support rotor weight without hydrodynamic action.

  1. Fabrication of Yttria stabilized zirconia thin films on poroussubstrates for fuel cell applications

    SciTech Connect

    Leming, Andres

    2003-06-16

    A process for the deposition of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) films, on porous substrates, has been developed. These films have possible applications as electrolyte membranes in fuel cells. The films were deposited from colloidal suspensions through the vacuum infiltration technique. Films were deposited on both fully sintered and partially sintered substrates. A critical cracking thickness for the films was identified and strategies are presented to overcome this barrier. Green film density was also examined, and a method for improving green density by changing suspension pH and surfactant was developed. A dependence of film density on film thickness was observed, and materials interactions are suggested as a possible cause. Non-shorted YSZ films were obtained on co-fired substrates, and a cathode supported solid oxide fuel cell was constructed and characterized.

  2. "Silent" Films Revisited: Captioned Films for the Deaf.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovalik, Gail L.

    1992-01-01

    Provides a history of the Captioned Films/Videos for the Deaf program and describes the kinds of films and videos available, including feature films and educational materials. Silent films are discussed; captioning processes are described; implications for librarians are discussed; and regional depository libraries for captioned films for the deaf…

  3. Occupational causes of constrictive bronchiolitis

    PubMed Central

    Kreiss, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review New literature from 2009 to 2012 regarding occupational constrictive bronchiolitis challenges textbook descriptions of this disease, formerly thought to be limited to fixed airflow limitation arising in the wake of accidental overexposure to noxious chemicals. Indolent evolution of dyspnea without a recognized hazardous exposure is a more common presentation. Recent findings Biopsy-confirmed case series of constrictive bronchiolitis from US soldiers, Iranian survivors of sulfur mustard gassing, hospital-based studies, and flavoring-related cases document that indolent constrictive bronchiolitis cases can have normal spirometry or either restrictive or obstructive abnormalities. High-resolution computerized tomography studies can be normal or reflect air-trapping and mosaic attenuation on expiratory films. Thus, in the absence of noninvasive abnormalities, the diagnosis in dyspneic patients may require thoracoscopic biopsy in settings in which exposure risk has not been recognized. Many workers with occupational constrictive bronchiolitis stabilize with cessation of exposures causing bronchiolar epithelial necrosis. Summary Clinicians need a high index of suspicion for constrictive bronchiolitis in young patients with rapidly progressing exertional dyspnea, regardless of spirometric and radiologic findings. Identification of novel causes and exposure-response relations for known causes are needed to provide guidance for protecting workers at risk for this largely irreversible lung disease. PMID:23407121

  4. Nature of corrosion films in simulated LWR water. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lumsden, J.B.

    1985-06-01

    Passive films on Alloy 600 and Type 304 stainless steel were characterized using surface analysis instruments. The films were formed under conditions suspected of causing cracking in nuclear systems and compared to those formed under conditions where cracking does not occur. Alloy 600 was investigated in the boric acid-lithium hydroxide thiosulfate solution. Susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking was correlated with the occurrence of a film containing sulfide ions. Environmental conditions which produce an oxide film do not cause stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in the system studied. Type 304 stainless steel was investigated in high purity water at 288/sup 0/C having levels of dissolved O/sub 2/ where Type 304 stainless steel is susceptible and not susceptible to stress corrosion cracking. A correlation was found between passive film chemistry and susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking.

  5. A Model for Tear Film Thinning With Osmolarity and Fluorescein

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Richard J.; Gewecke, Nicholas R.; Begley, Carolyn G.; King-Smith, P. Ewen; Siddique, Javed I.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We developed a mathematical model predicting dynamic changes in fluorescent intensity during tear film thinning in either dilute or quenching regimes and we model concomitant changes in tear film osmolarity. Methods. We solved a mathematical model for the thickness, osmolarity, fluorescein concentration, and fluorescent intensity as a function of time, assuming a flat and spatially uniform tear film. Results. The tear film thins to a steady-state value that depends on the relative importance of the rates of evaporation and osmotic supply, and the resulting increase of osmolarity and fluorescein concentrations are calculated. Depending on the initial thickness, the rate of osmotic supply and the tear film thinning rate, the osmolarity increase may be modest or it may increase by as much as a factor of eight or more from isosmotic levels. Regarding fluorescent intensity, the quenching regime occurs for initial concentrations at or above the critical fluorescein concentration where efficiency dominates, while lower concentrations show little change in fluorescence with tear film thinning. Conclusions. Our model underscores the importance of using fluorescein concentrations at or near the critical concentration clinically so that quenching reflects tear film thinning and breakup. In addition, the model predicts that, depending on tear film and osmotic factors, the osmolarity within the corneal compartment of the tear film may increase markedly during tear film thinning, well above levels that cause marked discomfort. PMID:24458153

  6. Common Cause Failure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Britton, Paul; Ring, Robert; Novack, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Space Launch System (SLS) Agenda: Objective; Key Definitions; Calculating Common Cause; Examples; Defense against Common Cause; Impact of varied Common Cause Failure (CCF) and abortability; Response Surface for various CCF Beta; Takeaways.

  7. What Causes Pulmonary Embolism?

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Pulmonary Embolism? Major Causes Pulmonary embolism (PE) usually begins as a blood ... from surgery or injured in other ways. Other Causes Rarely, an air bubble, part of a tumor, ...

  8. Do Allergies Cause Asthma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... or Too Short All About Puberty Do Allergies Cause Asthma? KidsHealth > For Kids > Do Allergies Cause Asthma? ... a tight feeling in the chest. Do Allergies Cause YOUR Asthma? If you have asthma, it's a ...

  9. Do Allergies Cause Asthma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthy Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Do Allergies Cause Asthma? ... Allergies Cause Asthma? Allergies don't cause asthma. But kids who have allergies , or a family history of allergies, are more likely to get asthma ...

  10. What Causes Cardiomyopathy?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and can damage the organs, including the heart. Sarcoidosis : A disease that causes inflammation and can affect ... believe that an abnormal immune response may cause sarcoidosis. This abnormal response causes tiny lumps of cells ...

  11. Anisotropy and Crystalline Structure in Polyaniline Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minto, C. D. G.; Vaughan, A. S.

    1996-03-01

    Films of polyaniline -- camphor sulphonic acid cast from m-cresol exhibit transport properties characteristic of a material stradelling the metal/insulator transition. This improvement in properties over traditional methods of polyaniline production has been suggested as being caused by the macromolecule adopting an expanded coil configuration in this solvent. Such films have been shown to be semi--crystalline and are presumed to be completely isotropic. We present here new results which demonstrate that such films are in fact appreciably aligned. X-ray scattering is utilised to expose the presence of molecular anisotropy within such films, the polymers forming a stacked structure with the molecules preferentially oriented parallel to the plane of the film. Similar measurements confirm that the molecules are randomly oriented within this plane. Such alignment considerably improves the transport properties. Anisotropy and the crystalline structure within these films, those cast from chloroform and those using the isolated enantiomeric counter ion are quantified and discussed. The results demonstrate that improved transport properties have arisen as a result of both polymer--solvent interactions and as a result of improved chain alignment.

  12. Books on Film and Filmmaking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruth, Deborah D.

    This annotated bibliography of books on film and filmmaking contains references on materials related to animation production, general reference materials, student film production, film study, experimental film, critics and directors, sources of funds for filmmaking, local resources, periodicals for filmmaking classes, sources of free films, and…

  13. Coating of plasma polymerized film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morita, S.; Ishibashi, S.

    1980-01-01

    Plasma polymerized thin film coating and the use of other coatings is suggested for passivation film, thin film used for conducting light, and solid body lubrication film of dielectrics of ultra insulators for electrical conduction, electron accessories, etc. The special features of flow discharge development and the polymerized film growth mechanism are discussed.

  14. Film Music. Factfile No. 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elsas, Diana, Ed.; And Others

    Organizations listed here with descriptive information include film music clubs and music guilds and associations. These are followed by a representative list of schools offering film music and/or film sound courses. Sources are listed for soundtrack recordings, sound effects/production music, films on film music, and oral history programs. The…

  15. Film Music. Factfile No. 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elsas, Diana, Ed.; And Others

    Organizations listed here with descriptive information include film music clubs and music guilds and associations. These are followed by a representative list of schools offering film music and/or film sound courses. Sources are listed for soundtrack recordings, sound effects/production music, films on film music, and oral history programs. The…

  16. Documentary Elements in Early Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, Richard A.

    Focusing on documentary elements, this study examines the film content and film techniques of 681 motion pictures produced in the United States prior to 1904. Analysis of films by type, subject matter, and trends in subject matter shows that one-third of the early films are documentary in type and three-fourths of the films use subject matter of a…

  17. Fast-response humidity-sensing films based on methylene blue aggregates formed on nanoporous semiconductor films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizaki, Ryota; Katoh, Ryuzi

    2016-05-01

    We prepared fast-response colorimetric humidity-sensing (vapochromic) films based on methylene blue adsorption onto nanoporous semiconductor (TiO2, Al2O3) films. Color changes caused by changes of humidity could be easily identified visually. A characteristic feature of the vapochromic films was their fast response to changes of humidity. We found that the response began to occur within 10 ms. The response was rapid because all the methylene blue molecules attached to the nanoporous semiconductor surface were directly exposed to the environment. We also deduced that the color changes were caused by structural changes of the methylene blue aggregates on the surface.

  18. Gravitationally driven drainage of thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naire, Shailesh

    In this thesis we develop theory for an experiment done by Snow and coworkers at Dow Corning that involves a vertically-oriented, thinned polyurethane film with silicone surfactant, draining under gravity. We present the mathematical formulation for a 1+1- and 2+1-dimensional model to study the evolution of a vertically-oriented thin liquid film draining under gravity when there is an insoluble surfactant with finite surface viscosity on its free surface. This formulation has all the ingredients that include: surface tension, gravity, surface viscosity, the Marangoni effect, convective and diffusive surfactant transport; essential to describe the behavior of a vertical draining film with surfactant. We study a hierarchy of mathematical models with increasing complexity starting with the flat film model where gravity balances viscous shear and surface tension is neglected, this is generalized to include surface tension. We further generalize to incorporate variable surface viscosity and more complicated constitutive laws for surface tension as a function of surfactant concentration. Lubrication theory is employed to derive three coupled nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs) describing the free surface shape, a component of surface velocity and the surfactant transport at leading order. A large surface viscosity limit recovers the tangentially-immobile model; for small surface viscosity, the film is mobile. Transition from a mobile to an immobile film is observed for intermediate values of surface viscosity and Marangoni number. The above models reproduce a number of features observed in experiments, these include film shapes and thinning rates which can be correlated to experiment. The 2+1-dimensional model for simplified surface properties has also been studied. Numerical experiments were performed to understand the stability of the system to perturbations across the film. An instability was seen in the mobile case; this was caused by a competition

  19. Design and characterization of complex protein films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, Holt P.

    Once a biomaterial is implanted into biological system, a layer of protein is immediately deposited on the surface of that material. The newly formed protein film will dictate how the implanted material will interact with the surrounding biological environment and lead to either the acceptance or rejection of the biomaterial. One method to enhance performance involves the activation the surface of the biomaterial with one or more proteins to direct specific interactions with the host environment. The focus of my dissertation was to develop and characterize model biomaterials surfaces that are activated with one or more proteins to help understand how the protein films may affect biological processes and a biomaterial's performance. One model system consisted of a patterned film of two proteins on a gold surface. Characterization of this protein pattern indicated that patterning protein films with a focused ion beam produced protein patterns with high biological contrast and high spatial control. The second model protein film involved the adsorption of fibronectin on surfaces with different surface energies. The characterization of the adsorbed fibronectin films suggest that fibronectin adsorbed on a hydrophilic surface is in an orientation that projects hydrophilic amino acid residues towards surface of the protein and dehydration causes reorientation to project hydrophobic amino acids towards the surface. In contrast, fibronectin is adsorbed onto a hydrophobic surface in a manner that resulted in dehydration and denaturation during the adsorption process. The last model protein film studied in this work consisted of fibronectin patterned in a manner so that the film consisted of spatially controlled domains of fibronectin adsorbed onto a hydrophilic surface as well as a hydrophobic surface. Lateral characterization of this pattern demonstrated a difference in secondary structure of fibronectin adsorbed on the two domains with varying surface energies.

  20. Renaissance of the Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellone, Julius, Ed.

    The post-World War II period was one of the liveliest in the history of the cinema. This is a collection of 33 critical articles on some of the best films of the perd. Most of the essays explicate the themes and symbols of the films. The essays deal with these films: "The Apu Trilogy,""L'Avventura,""Balthazar,""Blow-Up,""Bonnie and Clyde," Citizen…

  1. Horror films and psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Susan Hatters; Forcen, Fernando Espi; Shand, John Preston

    2014-10-01

    Horror films have been popular for generations. The purpose of this article is to illustrate psychiatric conditions, themes and practice seen in horror films. Horror films often either include psychiatrists as characters or depict (Hollywood's dangerous version of) serious mental illness. Demonic possession, zombies, and 'slasher' killers are described, as well as the horror genre's characterizations of psychiatrists. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2014.

  2. Clinical careers film.

    PubMed

    2015-09-01

    Those interested in developing clinical academic careers might be interested in a short animated film by Health Education England (HEE) and the National Institute for Health Research. The three-minute film, a frame from which is shown below, describes the sort of opportunities that are on offer to all professionals as part of the HEE's clinical academic careers framework. You can view the film on YouTube at tinyurl.com/pelb95c.

  3. Renaissance of the Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellone, Julius, Ed.

    The post-World War II period was one of the liveliest in the history of the cinema. This is a collection of 33 critical articles on some of the best films of the perd. Most of the essays explicate the themes and symbols of the films. The essays deal with these films: "The Apu Trilogy,""L'Avventura,""Balthazar,""Blow-Up,""Bonnie and Clyde," Citizen…

  4. Protective overcoating of films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maas, K. A.

    1972-01-01

    Kodak Film Type SO-212 was emulsion overcoated with gelatin and lacquer to evaluate the feasibility of application of the coatings, any image degradation, and the relative protection offered against abrasion. Evaluated were: Eastman motion picture film lacquer Type 485, water solutions of Eastman purified Calfskin gelatin, and experimental Eastman gelatin stripping film of 4 and 6 microns. Conclusions reached were: (1) All coatings can be applied with relative ease with the only limitation being that of equipment. (2) None of the coatings degrade the processed image. (3) All of the coatings provide protection to the emulsion. These conclusions apply to any film which may be considered for overcoating.

  5. Thermally processed keratin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, Justin; Schmidt, Walter

    2004-03-01

    Keratin obtained from poultry feathers is blended with -OH containing second phases. Films are prepared by pressing the blended keratin at temperatures concurrent with typical polymer processing temperatures. The films are completely cohesive as opposed to partially cohesive if pressed under the same conditions without blending. The films are "tough" and the mechanical properties show similarities to the properties of commercially available commodity thermoplastics. The keratin films are produced in a few minutes without reducing or oxidizing agents. The mobility of the keratin chains during blending is shown to relate to the serine (S), threonine (T), and tyrosine (Y) contents in the amino acid sequence relative to cystine (C).

  6. Film tension of liquid nano-film from molecular modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Tiefeng; Yang, Siyuan; Xiang, Fan; Liang, Yunpei; Li, Qibin; Gao, Xuechao; Liu, Sanjun

    2017-02-01

    Due to its geometry simplicity, the forces of thin liquid film are widely investigated and equivalently employed to explore the phys-chemical properties and mechanical stability of many other surfaces or colloid ensembles. The surface tension of bulk liquid (σ∞) and film tension (γ) are the most important parameters. Considering the insufficiency of detailed interpretation of film tension under micro-scale circumstances, a method for film tension was proposed based on numerical modeling. Assuming surface tension at different slab thicknesses being identical to the surface tension of film, the surface tension and disjoining pressure were subsequently used to evaluate the film tension based on the derivation of film thermodynamics, and a decreasing tendency was discovered for low temperature regions. The influence of saline concentration on nano-films was also investigated, and the comparison of film tensions suggested that higher concentration yielded larger film tension, with stronger decreasing intensity as a function of film thickness. Meanwhile, at thick film range (15-20 nm), film tension of higher concentration film continued to decrease as thickness increase, however it arrived to constant value for that of lower concentration. Finally, it was found that the film tension was almost independent on the film curvature, but varied with the thickness. The approach is applicable to symmetric emulsion films containing surfactants and bi-layer lipid films.

  7. Laser image recording on detonation nanodiamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikheev, G. M.; Mikheev, K. G.; Mogileva, T. N.; Puzyr, A. P.; Bondar, V. S.

    2014-01-01

    A focused He - Ne laser beam is shown to cause local blackening of semitransparent detonation nanodiamond (DND) films at incident power densities above 600 W cm-2. Data obtained with a Raman spectrometer and low-power 632.8-nm laser source indicate that the blackening is accompanied by a decrease in broadband background luminescence and emergence of sharp Raman peaks corresponding to the structures of nanodiamond and sp2 carbon. The feasibility of image recording on DND films by a focused He - Ne laser beam is demonstrated.

  8. The Possibility of Film Criticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poague, Leland; Cadbury, William

    1989-01-01

    Examines the role of critical language in film criticism. Compares and contrasts Monroe Beardsley's philosophy on film aesthetics with the New Criticism. Outlines some of the contributions Beardsley has made to the study of film criticism. (KM)

  9. Optical thin film devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Shuzheng

    1991-11-01

    Thin film devices are applied to almost all modern scientific instruments, and these devices, especially optical thin film devices, play an essential role in the performances of the instruments, therefore, they are attracting more and more attention. Now there are numerous kinds of thin film devices and their applications are very diversified. The 300-page book, 'Thin Film Device and Applications,' by Prof. K. L. Chopra gives some general ideas, and my paper also outlines the designs, fabrication, and applications of some optical thin film devices made in my laboratory. Optical thin film devices have been greatly developed in the recent decades. Prof. A. Thelan has given a number of papers on the theory and techniques, Prof. H. A. Macleod's book, 'Thin Film Optical Filters,' has concisely concluded the important concepts of optical thin film devices, and Prof. J. A. Dobrowobski has proposed many successful designs for optical thin film devices. Recently, fully-automatic plants make it easier to produce thin film devices with various spectrum requirements, and some companies, such as Balzers, Leybold AG, Satis Vacuum AG, etc., have manufactured such kinds of coating plants for research or mass-production, and the successful example is the production of multilayer antireflection coatings with high stability and reproducibility. Therefore, it could be said that the design of optical thin film devices and coating plants is quite mature. However, we cannot expect that every problem has been solved, the R&D work still continues, the competition still continues, and new design concepts, new techniques, and new film materials are continually developed. Meanwhile, the high-price of fully-automatic coating plants makes unpopular, and automatic design of coating stacks is only the technique for optimizing the manual design according to the physical concepts and experience, in addition, not only the optical system, but also working environment should be taken into account when

  10. Microfilm--Which Film Type, Which Application?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodson, Suzanne Cates

    1985-01-01

    Report on characteristics of different kinds of microfilm available indicates proper film for specific needs. Silver halide and nonsilver films, diazo film, vesicular film, reaction of films to light, effect of heat and humidity on films, film susceptibility to scratching, and potential longevity of film types are covered. (35 references) (EJS)

  11. Microfilm--Which Film Type, Which Application?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodson, Suzanne Cates

    1985-01-01

    Report on characteristics of different kinds of microfilm available indicates proper film for specific needs. Silver halide and nonsilver films, diazo film, vesicular film, reaction of films to light, effect of heat and humidity on films, film susceptibility to scratching, and potential longevity of film types are covered. (35 references) (EJS)

  12. Water depth penetration film test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, H. E.; Perry, L.; Sauer, G. E.; Lamar, N. T.

    1974-01-01

    As part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Earth Resources Program, a comparative and controlled evaluation of nine film-filter combinations was completed to establish the relative effectiveness in recording water subsurface detail if exposed from an aerial platform over a typical water body. The films tested, with one exception, were those which prior was suggested had potential. These included an experimental 2-layer positive color film, a 2-layer (minus blue layer) film, a normal 3-layer color film, a panchromatic black-and-white film, and a black-and-white infrared film. Selective filtration was used with all films.

  13. Water depth penetration film test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, H. E.; Perry, L.; Sauer, G. E.; Lamar, N. T.

    1974-01-01

    As part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Earth Resources Program, a comparative and controlled evaluation of nine film-filter combinations was completed to establish the relative effectiveness in recording water subsurface detail if exposed from an aerial platform over a typical water body. The films tested, with one exception, were those which prior was suggested had potential. These included an experimental 2-layer positive color film, a 2-layer (minus blue layer) film, a normal 3-layer color film, a panchromatic black-and-white film, and a black-and-white infrared film. Selective filtration was used with all films.

  14. Thin-film forces in pseudoemulsion films

    SciTech Connect

    Bergeron, V.; Radke, C.J. |

    1991-06-01

    Use of foam for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) has shown recent success in steam-flooding field applications. Foam can also provide an effective barrier against gas coning in thin oil zones. Both of these applications stem from the unique mobility-control properties a stable foam possesses when it exists in porous media. Unfortunately, oil has a major destabilizing effect on foam. Therefore, it is important for EOR applications to understand how oil destroys foam. Studies all indicate that stabilization of the pseudoemulsion film is critical to maintain foam stability in the presence of oil. Hence, to aid in design of surfactant formulations for foam insensitivity to oil the authors pursue direct measurement of the thin-film or disjoining forces that stabilize pseudoemulsion films. Experimental procedures and preliminary results are described.

  15. Filming for Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Englander, A. Arthur; Petzold, Paul

    Film makers, professional or amateur, will find in this volume an extensive discussion of the adaptation of film technique to television work, of the art of the camera operator, and of the productive relationships between people, organization, and hardware. Chapters include "The Beginnings," an overview of the interrelationship between roles in…

  16. Construction of Meaning: Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pryluck, Calvin

    1995-01-01

    Notes that film has no clear set of rules, unlike all languages, which are deductive systems interpreted according to clear sets of rules. Suggests that film is an inductive system whose interpretation is based on a general understanding of events depicted as modified by production variables such as lighting, camera angles, and the context of…

  17. Thick film hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Hoffheins, Barbara S.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors.

  18. Dental Training Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veterans Administration Medical Center, Washington, DC.

    This dental training films catalog is organized into two sections. Section I is a category listing of the films by number and title, indexed according to generalized headings; categories are as follow: anatomy, articulator systems, complete dentures, dental assisting, dental laboratory technology, dental materials, dental office emergencies,…

  19. Instructional Film Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Isabel; And Others

    This booklet is a compendium of instructional units designed to supplement and thereby increase the effectiveness of 39 16mm films related to Mexican American studies available on loan from the Mexican American Curriculum Office. Units and films deal with a variety of topics such as applying for a job; arts, crafts, and architecture of Mexico;…

  20. Stabilized chromium oxide film

    DOEpatents

    Garwin, Edward L.; Nyaiesh, Ali R.

    1988-01-01

    Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150.ANG. are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

  1. Elements of Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobker, Lee R.

    A film is the successful combination of two distinct groups of elements: (1) the technical elements by which the film is made (camera, lighting, sound and editing) and (2) the esthetic elements that transform the craft into an art. This book attempts to combine the study of these elements by providing technical information about the process of…

  2. Film Making in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowndes, Douglas

    A program which used practical film study to extend powers of observation and comment and to help young people (ages 12 through 16) develop an understanding of contemporary society is described in this manual. The role of film in school curricula and its integration with other studies is discussed in an opening section. The next section contains a…

  3. Films for Childhood Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winick, Mariann Pezzella

    This is a review of films in six thematic groupings: (1) The Open Classroom on Film, (2) The Developing Child, (3) Readiness and the Natural Abilities of Children, (4) Schools as Mirrors, (5) Families: Weavers of Civilization, (6) Children: The Legacy. Each review describes strengths and weaknesses, and gives guidance for follow-up usage. All…

  4. Authors on Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geduld, Harry M., Ed.

    Different authors' attitudes toward film are revealed through five different sections of this book: (1) articles, essays, and reviews pertaining to the silent cinema and the transition to sound; (2) general statements on the film medium or filmmakers and their messages; (3) essays dealing with the problems, involvements, and reflections of the…

  5. On Teaching Ethnographic Film

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarfield, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    The author of this article, a developmental anthropologist, illustrates how the instructor can use ethnographic films to enhance the study of anthropology and override notions about the scope and efficacy of Western intervention in the Third World, provided the instructor places such films in their proper historical and cultural context. He…

  6. Protolytic carbon film technology

    SciTech Connect

    Renschler, C.L.; White, C.A.

    1996-04-01

    This paper presents a technique for the deposition of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) on virtually any surface allowing carbon film formation with only the caveat that the substrate must withstand carbonization temperatures of at least 600 degrees centigrade. The influence of processing conditions upon the structure and properties of the carbonized film is discussed. Electrical conductivity, microstructure, and morphology control are also described.

  7. TEACHING COMPOSITION WITH FILM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    COURSEN, HERBERT R., JR.

    A COMPOSITION PROGRAM DESIGNED TO GIVE UPWARD BOUND STUDENTS A FEELING OF SUCCESS WAS BASED ON FILMS WHICH THE STUDENTS VIEWED, DISCUSSED, AND WROTE ABOUT. THE FILMS FELL ROUGHLY INTO THE CATEGORIES OF SOCIAL PROBLEMS, POLITICS AND PROPAGANDA, AND ART AND MUSIC. FOLLOWING CLASS DISCUSSIONS, STUDENTS WERE REQUIRED MERELY TO "WRITE ABOUT THE…

  8. FAA Film Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    Some 75 films from the U.S. Department of Transportation's Federal Aviation Administration are listed in this catalog. Topics dealt with include aerodynamics, airports, aviation history and careers, flying clubs, navigation and weather. Most of the films are 16mm sound and color productions. Filmstrips requiring a 35mm projector and phonograph or…

  9. Construction of Meaning: Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pryluck, Calvin

    1995-01-01

    Notes that film has no clear set of rules, unlike all languages, which are deductive systems interpreted according to clear sets of rules. Suggests that film is an inductive system whose interpretation is based on a general understanding of events depicted as modified by production variables such as lighting, camera angles, and the context of…

  10. Film and the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, John E., Ed.

    This report on a conference, which brought together representatives of various humanistic disciplines to explore the cross-disciplinary appeal of film study as well as the use of film in stimulating scholarship and teaching, includes a narrative summary of the day's conversations and issues raised, as well as of reprints of articles that suggest…

  11. Authors on Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geduld, Harry M., Ed.

    Different authors' attitudes toward film are revealed through five different sections of this book: (1) articles, essays, and reviews pertaining to the silent cinema and the transition to sound; (2) general statements on the film medium or filmmakers and their messages; (3) essays dealing with the problems, involvements, and reflections of the…

  12. Abstract Film and Beyond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Grice, Malcolm

    A theoretical and historical account of the main preoccupations of makers of abstract films is presented in this book. The book's scope includes discussion of nonrepresentational forms as well as examination of experiments in the manipulation of time in films. The ten chapters discuss the following topics: art and cinematography, the first…

  13. Radiographic film package

    SciTech Connect

    Muylle, W. E.

    1985-08-27

    A radiographic film package for non-destructive testing, comprising a radiographic film sheet, an intensifying screen with a layer of lead bonded to a paper foil, and a vacuum heat-sealed wrapper with a layer of aluminum and a heat-sealed easy-peelable thermoplastic layer.

  14. Creative Film-Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smallman, Kirk

    The fundamentals of motion picture photography are introduced with a physiological explanation for the illusion of motion in a film. Film stock formats and emulsions, camera features, and lights are listed and described. Various techniques of exposure control are illustrated in terms of their effects. Photographing action with a stationary or a…

  15. Stabilized chromium oxide film

    DOEpatents

    Nyaiesh, A.R.; Garwin, E.L.

    1986-08-04

    Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150A are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

  16. Film Canister Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferstl, Andrew; Schneider, Jamie L.

    2007-01-01

    Opaque film canisters are readily available, cheap, and useful for scientific inquiry in the classroom. They can also be surprisingly versatile and useful as a tool for stimulating scientific inquiry. In this article, the authors describe inquiry activities using film canisters for preservice teachers, including a "black box" activity and several…

  17. Film Canister Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferstl, Andrew; Schneider, Jamie L.

    2007-01-01

    Opaque film canisters are readily available, cheap, and useful for scientific inquiry in the classroom. They can also be surprisingly versatile and useful as a tool for stimulating scientific inquiry. In this article, the authors describe inquiry activities using film canisters for preservice teachers, including a "black box" activity and several…

  18. Abstract Film and Beyond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Grice, Malcolm

    A theoretical and historical account of the main preoccupations of makers of abstract films is presented in this book. The book's scope includes discussion of nonrepresentational forms as well as examination of experiments in the manipulation of time in films. The ten chapters discuss the following topics: art and cinematography, the first…

  19. Filming for Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Englander, A. Arthur; Petzold, Paul

    Film makers, professional or amateur, will find in this volume an extensive discussion of the adaptation of film technique to television work, of the art of the camera operator, and of the productive relationships between people, organization, and hardware. Chapters include "The Beginnings," an overview of the interrelationship between roles in…

  20. Film Study Hang Ups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grenier, Charles F.

    1969-01-01

    The interest and delight which students find in film should be preserved from a teacher's excessive zeal to analyze and explain. As the beauty of poetry is frequently diminished through exhaustive analyses of similes, rhyme schemes, and other technical devices, the value of film to high school students can be weakened through too great an emphasis…

  1. Thick film hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Hoffheins, B.S.; Lauf, R.J.

    1995-09-19

    A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors. 8 figs.

  2. The compression of a heavy floating elastic film.

    PubMed

    Jambon-Puillet, Etienne; Vella, Dominic; Protière, Suzie

    2016-11-23

    We study the effect of film density on the uniaxial compression of thin elastic films at a liquid-fluid interface. Using a combination of experiments and theory, we show that dense films first wrinkle and then fold as the compression is increased, similarly to what has been reported when the film density is neglected. However, we highlight the changes in the shape of the fold induced by the film's own weight and extend the model of Diamant and Witten [Phys. Rev. Lett., 2011, 107, 164302] to understand these changes. In particular, we suggest that it is the weight of the film that breaks the up-down symmetry apparent from previous models, but elusive experimentally. We then compress the film beyond the point of self-contact and observe a new behaviour dependent on the film density: the single fold that forms after wrinkling transitions into a closed loop after self-contact, encapsulating a cylindrical droplet of the upper fluid. The encapsulated drop either causes the loop to bend upward or to sink deeper as the compression is increased, depending on the relative buoyancy of the drop-film combination. We propose a model to qualitatively explain this behaviour. Finally, we discuss the relevance of the different buckling modes predicted in previous theoretical studies and highlight the important role of surface tension in the shape of the fold that is observed from the side-an aspect that is usually neglected in theoretical analyses.

  3. Commissioning a hobby cutting device for radiochromic film preparation.

    PubMed

    Zolfaghari, Somayeh; Francis, Kirby E; Kairn, Tanya; Crowe, Scott B

    2017-03-30

    In addition to a high spatial resolution and well characterised dose response, one of the major advantages of radiochromic film as a dosimeter is that sheets of film can be cut into pieces suitable for use as calibration films, and for in vivo and phantom measurements. The cutting of film is typically done using scissors or a guillotine, and this process can be time-consuming, limited in precision, requires extensive handling and does not allow holes to be cut from the film without cutting from an existing edge. This study investigated the use of a Brother ScanNCut hobby cutting system for EBT3 film preparation. The optimal operating parameters (blade size, pressure, speed) that resulted in precise cuts with minimal delamination at cut edges were identified using test cutting patterns. These parameters were then used to cut a large film insert for a stereotactic head phantom for comparison against an insert cut with scissors. While the hobby cutting system caused a wider region of delamination at the film edge (1.8 mm) compared to scissors (1 mm), the hobby cutting system was found to be able to produce reproducible cuts more efficiently and more accurately than scissors. The use of the hobby cutting system is recommended for complex phantom inserts (containing sharp corners or holes for alignment rods) or in situations where large numbers of film pieces need to be prepared.

  4. Tear Film Dynamics: the roles of complex structure and rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Mohar; Feng, James; Vivek, Atul S.; Dixit, Harish N.; Richhariya, Ashutosh

    2016-11-01

    Ocular surface infections such as microbial and fungal keratitis are among leading causes of blindness in the world. A thorough understanding of the pre-corneal tear film dynamics is essential to comprehend the role of various tear layer components in the escalation of such ocular infections. The pre-corneal tear film comprises of three layers of complex fluids, viz. the innermost mucin layer, a hydrophilic protective cover over the sensitive corneal epithelium, the intermediate aqueous layer that forms the bulk of the tear film and is often embedded with large number of bio-polymers either in the form of soluble mucins or pathogens, and finally the outermost lipid layer that stabilizes the film by decreasing the air/tear film interfacial tension. We have developed a comprehensive mathematical model to describe such a film by incorporating the effects of the non-uniform mucin distribution along with the complex rheology of the aqueous layer with/without pathogens, Marangoni effects from the lipid layer and the slip effects at the base of the tear film. A detailed linear stability analysis and a fully non-linear solution determine the break up time (BUT) of such a tear film. We also probe the role of the various components of the pre-corneal tear film in the dynamics of rupture.

  5. Selective inorganic thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, M.L.F.; Weisenbach, L.A.; Anderson, M.T.

    1995-05-01

    This project is developing inorganic thin films as membranes for gas separation applications, and as discriminating coatings for liquid-phase chemical sensors. Our goal is to synthesize these coatings with tailored porosity and surface chemistry on porous substrates and on acoustic and optical sensors. Molecular sieve films offer the possibility of performing separations involving hydrogen, air, and natural gas constituents at elevated temperatures with very high separation factors. We are focusing on improving permeability and molecular sieve properties of crystalline zeolitic membranes made by hydrothermally reacting layered multicomponent sol-gel films deposited on mesoporous substrates. We also used acoustic plate mode (APM) oscillator and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor elements as substrates for sol-gel films, and have both used these modified sensors to determine physical properties of the films and have determined the sensitivity and selectivity of these sensors to aqueous chemical species.

  6. Dynamic effects in thin liquid films containing ionic surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakashev, S. I.; Tsekov, R.; Ivanova, D. S.

    2010-03-01

    This paper is dedicated to studying dynamic effects in thin liquid films (TLF) containing ionic surfactants. The standard theory of TLF drainage has been developed without considering the electrical double layer (EDL) in the hydrodynamic equations, although EDL always exists. In addition, it has been found that this theory very well describes the drainage of TLF containing non-ionic surfactants in the presence of electrolytes. The inclusion of EDL into the hydrodynamics of TLF complicates the theory, producing additional dynamic effects during film drainage. For example, a gradient of electrostatic disjoining pressure across the film arises, thus causing non-uniform electrostatic repulsion between the film surfaces. This paper analyzes the hydrodynamics of TLF with EDL. A new equation of drainage was derived. This equation accounts for the non-uniform distribution of surface charges during the films drainage, which is coupled with non-uniform electrostatic repulsion between the film surfaces and results in faster film drainage. The theory was tested with drainage experiments on TLF with ionic surfactants. Foam films containing sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in the presence and in the absence of added electrolyte were studied and the experimental data compared to the theoretical predictions. The experimental results, however, disagree with the theory. For example, the kinetic equation predicted faster film drainage for foam films at low ionic strength; at high ionic strength the theory tends to wReynolds drainagew. Inversely, the experiment exhibited slower drainage than predicted by the Reynolds equation in both cases of low and high ionic strengths. Numerical simulations yielded V/VRe<1. In addition, cases of wpositivew and wnegativew velocity of film surfaces were shown. Despite the sign of the velocity the dependence V/VRe<1 remained. The analysis showed similarity between the experimental data and the prediction of the Manev-Tsekov-Radoev (MTR) drainage model at

  7. Two-stage evaporated ordered nanoporous ultrathin metal films using reusable template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zeping; Xu, Zhimou; Qu, Xiaopeng; Mei, Lihong

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we present a versatile procedure for the formation of ordered nanoporous ultrathin metal film using reusable anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template. Firstly, the Ag and Au films were evaporated on the bottom surface of AAO template sequentially, followed by selective removal of a sacrificial Ag film. This process results in an ultrathin nanoporous Au film was prepared without causing significant damage of the AAO replication template. The characterizations of SEM images indicate that obtained metal films have the hexagonal morphology similar to AAO template. The EDS analyses of the present Au film on the Si substrate indicate that Ag film was completely etched away. This novel fabrication method not only simplifies the preparation of ordered nanoporous ultrathin metal film, but also can be readily extended to other materials systems.

  8. Causes of High Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Causes of High Cholesterol Updated:Jul 5,2017 If you have high ... and procedures related to heart disease and stroke. Cholesterol • Home • About Cholesterol • HDL, LDL, and Triglycerides • Causes ...

  9. What Causes Polycythemia Vera?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Polycythemia Vera? Primary Polycythemia Polycythemia vera (PV) also is known as primary ... may play a role in causing PV. Secondary Polycythemia Another type of polycythemia, called secondary polycythemia, isn' ...

  10. What Causes Cystic Fibrosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Cystic Fibrosis? A defect in the CFTR gene causes cystic ... in the severity of the disease. How Is Cystic Fibrosis Inherited? Every person inherits two CFTR genes—one ...

  11. What Causes Atherosclerosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Atherosclerosis? The exact cause of atherosclerosis isn't known. ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is atherosclerosis? 05/22/2014 Describes how the build-up ...

  12. What Causes Atelectasis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Atelectasis? Atelectasis can occur if the lungs can' ... expand and fill with air. Atelectasis has many causes. Conditions and Factors That Prevent Deep Breathing and ...

  13. What Causes Down Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications What causes Down syndrome? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... Down Syndrome Registry​ . Chromosomal Changes That Can Cause Down Syndrome Research shows that three types of chromosomal changes ...

  14. What Causes Sarcoidosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Sarcoidosis? The cause of sarcoidosis isn't known. More ... Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Sarcoidosis 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  15. What Causes Cardiogenic Shock?

    MedlinePlus

    ... pumping enough oxygen-rich blood to the body. Heart Attack Most heart attacks occur as a result of ... or completely block blood flow. Conditions Caused by Heart Attack Heart attacks can cause some serious heart conditions ...

  16. Structural features of reconstituted wheat wax films

    PubMed Central

    Pambou, Elias; Li, Zongyi; Campana, Mario; Hughes, Arwel; Clifton, Luke; Gutfreund, Philipp; Foundling, Jill

    2016-01-01

    Cuticular waxes are essential for the well-being of all plants, from controlling the transport of water and nutrients across the plant surface to protecting them against external environmental attacks. Despite their significance, our current understanding regarding the structure and function of the wax film is limited. In this work, we have formed representative reconstituted wax film models of controlled thicknesses that facilitated an ex vivo study of plant cuticular wax film properties by neutron reflection (NR). Triticum aestivum L. (wheat) waxes were extracted from two different wheat straw samples, using two distinct extraction methods. Waxes extracted from harvested field-grown wheat straw using supercritical CO2 are compared with waxes extracted from laboratory-grown wheat straw via wax dissolution by chloroform rinsing. Wax films were produced by spin-coating the two extracts onto silicon substrates. Atomic force microscopy and cryo-scanning electron microscopy imaging revealed that the two reconstituted wax film models are ultrathin and porous with characteristic nanoscale extrusions on the outer surface, mimicking the structure of epicuticular waxes found upon adaxial wheat leaf surfaces. On the basis of solid–liquid and solid–air NR and ellipsometric measurements, these wax films could be modelled into two representative layers, with the diffuse underlying layer fitted with thicknesses ranging from approximately 65 to 70 Å, whereas the surface extrusion region reached heights exceeding 200 Å. Moisture-controlled NR measurements indicated that water penetrated extensively into the wax films measured under saturated humidity and under water, causing them to hydrate and swell significantly. These studies have thus provided a useful structural basis that underlies the function of the epicuticular waxes in controlling the water transport of crops. PMID:27466439

  17. The National Film Registry: Acquiring Our Film Heritage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziegler, Roy A.

    The National Film Registry, which is primarily a designated list of films to be preserved by the Library of Congress, is also a valuable tool for selecting "films that are culturally, historically, and aesthetically significant." Following a brief discussion of the history and selection process of the National Film Registry, Southeast…

  18. Film Theory and Hugo Munsterberg's "The Film": A Psychological Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wicclair, Mark R.

    1978-01-01

    Hugo Munsterberg's "The Film: A Psychological Study" is one of the earliest essays in the area of film theory. Unfortunately, it has remained relatively unknown since its publication in 1916. The author discusses two concepts raised by Munsterberg: the contrast between films in the theatrical mode and films in the cinematic mode.…

  19. Film Theory and Hugo Munsterberg's "The Film": A Psychological Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wicclair, Mark R.

    1978-01-01

    Hugo Munsterberg's "The Film: A Psychological Study" is one of the earliest essays in the area of film theory. Unfortunately, it has remained relatively unknown since its publication in 1916. The author discusses two concepts raised by Munsterberg: the contrast between films in the theatrical mode and films in the cinematic mode.…

  20. Optical Characterization of Molecular Contaminant Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visentine, James T.

    2007-01-01

    A semi-empirical method of optical characterization of thin contaminant films on surfaces of optical components has been conceived. The method was originally intended for application to films that become photochemically deposited on such optical components as science windows, lenses, prisms, thinfilm radiators, and glass solar-cell covers aboard spacecraft and satellites in orbit. The method should also be applicable, with suitable modifications, to thin optical films (whether deposited deliberately or formed as contaminants) on optical components used on Earth in the computer microchip laser communications and thin-film industries. The method is expected to satisfy the need for a means of understanding and predicting the reductions in spectral transmittance caused by contaminant films and the consequent deterioration of performances of sensitive optical systems. After further development, this method could become part of the basis of a method of designing optical systems to minimize or compensate for the deleterious effects of contaminant films. In the original outer-space application, these deleterious effects are especially pronounced because after photochemical deposition, the films become darkened by further exposure to solar vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation. In this method, thin contaminant films are theoretically modeled as thin optical films, characterized by known or assumed values of thickness, index of refraction, and absorption coefficient, that form on the outer surfaces of the original antireflection coating on affected optical components. The assumed values are adjusted as needed to make actual spectral transmittance values approximate observed ones as closely as possible and to correlate these values with amounts of VUV radiation to which the optical components have been exposed. In an initial study, the method was applied in correlating measured changes in transmittance of high-purity fused silica photochemically coated with silicone films of

  1. Causes of Effects and Effects of Causes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearl, Judea

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes a conceptual framework and simple mathematical methods of estimating the probability that one event was a necessary cause of another, as interpreted by lawmakers. We show that the fusion of observational and experimental data can yield informative bounds that, under certain circumstances, meet legal criteria of causation.…

  2. Do Allergies Cause Asthma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Do Allergies Cause Asthma? KidsHealth > For Teens > Do Allergies Cause Asthma? Print A A A en español ¿Las alergias provocan asma? Do allergies cause asthma? The answer to that question is: yes and ...

  3. Do Allergies Cause Asthma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Do Allergies Cause Asthma? KidsHealth > For Teens > Do Allergies Cause Asthma? A A A en español ¿Las alergias provocan asma? Do allergies cause asthma? The answer to that question is: ...

  4. Falling Liquid Films in Absorption Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Toshihiko

    The absorption machines of the lithium bromide-water type have recently been established as heat source equipments for residential and industrial use, which include refrigerating machines, heat pumps, and heat transformers. Several advanced cycle machines have also been proposed and tested. All of the absorption machines consist fundamentally of four kinds of heat exchangers, i.e. evaporator, absorber, generator, and condenser. The horizontal or vertical falling film system is usually applied to these heat exchangers, since the pressure drop which causes an undesirable change in the fluid temperature is relatively small in either system. The horizontal system is popular for the present, while the vertical system is going to be developed promisingly. This may save an installation space and also fit a plan for the Lorentz cycle. The purpose of this paper is to survey the available information for increasing heat and mass transfer rates in the heat exchangers of absorption machines. Emphasis is placed on the hydrodynamic characteristics of falling liquid films in absorbers and generators. The following topics are covered in this paper: 1. Characteristics of thin liquid films over horizontal tubes 2. Characteristics of wavy thin liquid films flowing down the vertical or inclined wall surface 3. Effect of the artificial surface roughness on the heat and mass transfer rates 4. Enhancement in the heat and mass transfer rates by the Marangoni convection 5. Conditions of film breakdown and the minimum wetting rates.

  5. Thin film preparation of semiconducting iron pyrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smestad, Greg P.; Ennaoui, Ahmed; Fiechter, Sebastian; Hofmann, Wolfgang; Tributsch, Helmut; Kautek, Wolfgang

    1990-08-01

    Pyrite (Fe52) has been investigated as a promising new absorber material for thin film solar cell applications because of its high optical absorption coefficient of 1OL cm1, and its bandgap of 0.9 to 1.0 eV. Thin layers have been prepared by Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition, MOCVD, Chemical Spray Pyrolysis, CSP, Chemical Vapor Transport, CVT, and Sulfurization of Iron Oxide films, 510. It is postulated that for the material FeS2, if x is not zero, a high point defect concentration results from replacing 2 dipoles by single S atoms. This causes the observed photovoltages and solar conversion efficiencies to be lower than expected. Using the Fe-O-S ternary phase diagram and the related activity plots, a thermodynamic understanding is formulated for the resulting composition of each of these types of films. It is found that by operating in the oxide portion of the phase diagram, the resulting oxidation state favors pyrite formation over FeS. By proper orientation of the grains relative to the film surface, and by control of pinholes and stoichiometry, an efficient thin film photovolatic solar cell material could be achieved.

  6. Theory of rotating electrohydrodynamic flows in a liquid film.

    PubMed

    Shiryaeva, E V; Vladimirov, V A; Zhukov, M Yu

    2009-10-01

    The mathematical model of rotating electrohydrodynamic flows in a thin suspended liquid film is proposed and studied. The flows are driven by the given difference of potentials in one direction and constant external electric field E(out) in another direction in the plane of a film. To derive the model, we employ the spatial averaging over the normal coordinate to a film that leads to the average Reynolds stress that is proportional to |E(out)|3. This stress generates tangential velocity in the vicinity of the edges of a film that, in turn, causes the rotational motion of a liquid. The proposed model is used to explain the experimental observations of the liquid film motor.

  7. The anodic surface film and hydrogen evolution on Mg

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Guang -Ling; Unocic, Kinga A.

    2015-06-04

    This paper clarifies that the inner and outer layers of the anodic film consist of a nano/micro-porous MgO+Mg(OH)2 mixture. The film becomes thicker and more porous with increasing potential. It can rupture when potential is too positive in a non-corrosive Mg(OH)2 solution. Hydrogen evolution becomes more intensive as polarization potential increases, particularly when the potential at the film-covered Mg surface is close to or more positive than the hydrogen equilibrium potential, suggesting that an “anodic hydrogen evolution” (AHE) reaction occurs on the substrate Mg in film pores, and the significantly intensified AHE causes film rupture at high potential.

  8. The anodic surface film and hydrogen evolution on Mg

    DOE PAGES

    Song, Guang -Ling; Unocic, Kinga A.

    2015-06-04

    This paper clarifies that the inner and outer layers of the anodic film consist of a nano/micro-porous MgO+Mg(OH)2 mixture. The film becomes thicker and more porous with increasing potential. It can rupture when potential is too positive in a non-corrosive Mg(OH)2 solution. Hydrogen evolution becomes more intensive as polarization potential increases, particularly when the potential at the film-covered Mg surface is close to or more positive than the hydrogen equilibrium potential, suggesting that an “anodic hydrogen evolution” (AHE) reaction occurs on the substrate Mg in film pores, and the significantly intensified AHE causes film rupture at high potential.

  9. Engineering curvature in graphene ribbons using ultrathin polymer films.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunyu; Koslowski, Marisol; Strachan, Alejandro

    2014-12-10

    We propose a method to induce curvature in graphene nanoribbons in a controlled manner using an ultrathin thermoset polymer in a bimaterial strip setup and test it via molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Continuum mechanics shows that curvature develops to release the residual stress caused by the chemical and thermal shrinkage of the polymer during processing and that this curvature increases with decreasing film thickness; however, significant deformation is only achieved for ultrathin polymer films. Quite surprisingly, explicit MD simulations of the curing and annealing processes show that the predicted trend not just continues down to film thicknesses of 1-2 nm but that the curvature development is enhanced significantly in such ultrathin films due to surface tension effects. This combination of effects leads to very large curvatures of over 0.14 nm(-1) that can be tuned via film thickness. This provides a new avenue to engineer curvature and, thus, electromagnetic properties of graphene.

  10. Glassy boundary layers vs enhanced mobility in capped polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batistakis, C.; Michels, M. A. J.; Lyulin, A. V.

    2013-07-01

    Molecular-dynamics simulations have been carried out for a coarse-grained model of a random AB-copolymer confined between two crystalline substrates. The strength of substrate-polymer interactions, and the distance between the two substrates have been varied in a wide range. For thick films the film-averaged segmental mobility decreases for intermediate adsorption strengths, but start to increase for very high substrate-polymer attraction strength. We saw that this non-monotonic behavior is caused by a very strong heterogeneity of the segmental dynamics above the glass-transition temperature: the segmental mobility slows down drastically close to adsorbing substrates, but strongly increases in the middle part of the film. This effect, and its sensitive dependence on film thickness, are explained by finite-size effects in confinement, in combination with glassy boundary layers. It is demonstrated that film-averaged mobility as often measured cannot be understood without resolving local mobility in space and time.

  11. Formulation development and evaluation of fast dissolving film of telmisartan.

    PubMed

    Londhe, Vaishali Y; Umalkar, Kashmira B

    2012-03-01

    Hypertension is a major cause of concern not just in the elderly but also in the youngsters. An effort was made to formulate a fast dissolving film containing telmisartan which is used in the treatment of hypertension with a view to improve the onset of action, therapeutic efficacy, patient compliance and convenience. The major challenge in formulation of oral films of telmisatran is that it shows very less solubility in the pH range of 3-9. Various film forming agents and polyhydric alcohols were evaluated for optimizing composition of fast dissolving films. Fast dissolving films using hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, polyvinyl alcohol, glycerol, sorbitol, menthol and an alkalizer were formulated using solvent casting method. Optimized formulations were evaluated for their weight, thickness, folding endurance, appearance, tensile strength, disintegration time and dissolution profile.

  12. Formulation Development and Evaluation of Fast Dissolving Film of Telmisartan

    PubMed Central

    Londhe, Vaishali Y.; Umalkar, Kashmira B.

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension is a major cause of concern not just in the elderly but also in the youngsters. An effort was made to formulate a fast dissolving film containing telmisartan which is used in the treatment of hypertension with a view to improve the onset of action, therapeutic efficacy, patient compliance and convenience. The major challenge in formulation of oral films of telmisatran is that it shows very less solubility in the pH range of 3–9. Various film forming agents and polyhydric alcohols were evaluated for optimizing composition of fast dissolving films. Fast dissolving films using hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, polyvinyl alcohol, glycerol, sorbitol, menthol and an alkalizer were formulated using solvent casting method. Optimized formulations were evaluated for their weight, thickness, folding endurance, appearance, tensile strength, disintegration time and dissolution profile. PMID:23325992

  13. Heat treatment of cathodic arc deposited amorphous hard carbon films

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, S.; Ager, J.W. III; Brown, I.G.

    1997-02-01

    Amorphous hard carbon films of varying sp{sup 2}/sp{sup 3} fractions have been deposited on Si using filtered cathodic are deposition with pulsed biasing. The films were heat treated in air up to 550 C. Raman investigation and nanoindentation were performed to study the modification of the films caused by the heat treatment. It was found that films containing a high sp{sup 3} fraction sustain their hardness for temperatures at least up to 400 C, their structure for temperatures up to 500 C, and show a low thickness loss during heat treatment. Films containing at low sp{sup 3} fraction graphitize during the heat treatment, show changes in structure and hardness, and a considerable thickness loss.

  14. Electron-beam recording of patterns in chalcogenide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, S. A.; Iovu, M. S.; Iaseniuc, O. V.

    2015-02-01

    Thin films of chalcogenide glasses (ChG) of different composition have been used for e-beam recording of diffraction grating structures. The dependencies of diffraction efficiency of gratings on radiation dose were studied. The influence of ChG film composition on diffraction properties of gratings was shown. It was established that the refractive index gratings formed in As2S3 films exhibit high stability during their dark storage. The diffraction efficiency enhancement caused by uniform light irradiation was observed for gratings recorded in As4S3Se3 thin films, doped with Sn. With use of computer-controlled positioning of electron beam both the raster scan and vector patterns were recorded in As2S3 films. In the former case the images from BMP-files were patterned. In the latter case the mosaic of diffraction gratings, producing the multi-beam light diffraction was recorded.

  15. Effect of Layer and Film Thickness and Temperature on the Mechanical Property of Micro- and Nano-Layered PC/PMMA Films Subjected to Thermal Aging

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Mohti, Ahmed; Garbash, Alison N.; Almagahwi, Saad; Shen, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Multilayered polymer films with biomimicking, layered structures have unique microstructures and many potential applications. However, a major limitation of polymer films is the deterioration of mechanical properties in working environments. To facilitate the design and development of multilayered polymer films, the impact of thermal aging on the mechanical behavior of micro- and nano-layered polymer films has been investigated experimentally. The composition of the polymer films that have been studied is 50 vol% polycarbonate (PC) and 50 vol% poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). The current study focuses on the effect of film and layer thickness and temperature on the mechanical properties of the materials subjected to thermal aging. To study the effect of film and layer thickness, films with the same thickness, but various layer thicknesses, and films with the same layer thickness, but various film thicknesses, were thermally aged at 100 °C in a constant temperature oven for up to six weeks. The results show that as the layer thickness decreases to 31 nm, the film has a higher stiffness and strength, and the trend of the mechanical properties is relatively stable over aging. The ductility of all of the films decreases with aging time. To study the effect of temperature, the films with 4,096 layers (31 nm thick for each layer) were aged at 100 °C, 115 °C and 125 °C for up to four weeks. While the 100 °C aging results in a slight increase of the stiffness and strength of the films, the higher aging temperature caused a decrease of the stiffness and strength of the films. The ductility decreases with the aging time for all of the temperatures. The films become more brittle for higher aging temperatures.

  16. Controlling preferred orientation and electrical conductivity of zinc oxide thin films by post growth annealing treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, J.; Murmu, P. P.; Leveneur, J.; Markwitz, A.; Futter, J.

    2016-03-01

    We report the microstructural evolution of the preferred orientation and electrical conductivity of zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films prepared by ion beam sputtering. Elastic recoil detection analysis results showed 0.6 at% H in as-deposited film which decreased to 0.35 at% in air annealed film due to H diffusion. XRD results showed that the preferred orientation can be tuned by selecting annealing conditions. Vacuum annealed films exhibited (1 0 0) orientation, whereas air annealed film showed (0 0 2) orientation. The annealing conditions caused a dramatic increase in the resistivity of air annealed films (∼106 Ω cm), whereas vacuum annealed films showed lower resistivity (∼10-2 Ω cm). High resistivity in air annealed film is attributed to the lack of hydrogen interstitials and hydrogen-oxygen vacancy complexes. Raman results supported the XRD results which demonstrated that annealing assisted in recovery of the crystalline disorder in as-deposited films. Air annealed film exhibited the highest optical transmission (89.7%) in the UV-vis region compared to as-deposited and vacuum annealed films (∼85%). Optical bandgap was found to vary between 3.11 eV and 3.18 eV in as-deposited and annealed films, respectively. The bandgap narrowing is associated with the intrinsic defects which introduced defect states resulting in band tail in ZnO films.

  17. Chiral atomically thin films.

    PubMed

    Kim, Cheol-Joo; Sánchez-Castillo, A; Ziegler, Zack; Ogawa, Yui; Noguez, Cecilia; Park, Jiwoong

    2016-06-01

    Chiral materials possess left- and right-handed counterparts linked by mirror symmetry. These materials are useful for advanced applications in polarization optics, stereochemistry and spintronics. In particular, the realization of spatially uniform chiral films with atomic-scale control of their handedness could provide a powerful means for developing nanodevices with novel chiral properties. However, previous approaches based on natural or grown films, or arrays of fabricated building blocks, could not offer a direct means to program intrinsic chiral properties of the film on the atomic scale. Here, we report a chiral stacking approach, where two-dimensional materials are positioned layer-by-layer with precise control of the interlayer rotation (θ) and polarity, resulting in tunable chiral properties of the final stack. Using this method, we produce left- and right-handed bilayer graphene, that is, a two-atom-thick chiral film. The film displays one of the highest intrinsic ellipticity values (6.5 deg μm(-1)) ever reported, and a remarkably strong circular dichroism (CD) with the peak energy and sign tuned by θ and polarity. We show that these chiral properties originate from the large in-plane magnetic moment associated with the interlayer optical transition. Furthermore, we show that we can program the chiral properties of atomically thin films layer-by-layer by producing three-layer graphene films with structurally controlled CD spectra.

  18. Chiral atomically thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Cheol-Joo; Sánchez-Castillo, A.; Ziegler, Zack; Ogawa, Yui; Noguez, Cecilia; Park, Jiwoong

    2016-06-01

    Chiral materials possess left- and right-handed counterparts linked by mirror symmetry. These materials are useful for advanced applications in polarization optics, stereochemistry and spintronics. In particular, the realization of spatially uniform chiral films with atomic-scale control of their handedness could provide a powerful means for developing nanodevices with novel chiral properties. However, previous approaches based on natural or grown films, or arrays of fabricated building blocks, could not offer a direct means to program intrinsic chiral properties of the film on the atomic scale. Here, we report a chiral stacking approach, where two-dimensional materials are positioned layer-by-layer with precise control of the interlayer rotation (θ) and polarity, resulting in tunable chiral properties of the final stack. Using this method, we produce left- and right-handed bilayer graphene, that is, a two-atom-thick chiral film. The film displays one of the highest intrinsic ellipticity values (6.5 deg μm-1) ever reported, and a remarkably strong circular dichroism (CD) with the peak energy and sign tuned by θ and polarity. We show that these chiral properties originate from the large in-plane magnetic moment associated with the interlayer optical transition. Furthermore, we show that we can program the chiral properties of atomically thin films layer-by-layer by producing three-layer graphene films with structurally controlled CD spectra.

  19. Structural, optical and electronic structure studies of Al doped ZnO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Vanita; Kumar, Manish; Shukla, D. K.; Choudhary, R. J.; Phase, D. M.; Kumar, Ravindra; Joshi, B. C.

    2015-07-01

    Structural, optical and electronic structure of Al doped ZnO thin films grown using pulsed laser deposition on glass substrate are investigated. X-ray diffraction measurements reveal that all the films are textured along the c-axis and have wurtzite structure. Al doping in ZnO films leads to increase in grain size due to relaxation in compressive stress. Enhancement in band gap of ZnO films with the Al doping is also noticed which can be ascribed to the Brustein-Moss shift. The changes in the electronic structure caused by Al in the doped thin film samples are understood through X-ray absorption measurements.

  20. Characteristics of Cu-doped amorphous NiO thin films formed by RF magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kazuya; Kim, Sangcheol; Komuro, Shuji; Zhao, Xinwei

    2016-06-01

    Transparent conducting Cu-doped NiO thin films were deposited on quartz glass substrates by radio frequency magnetron spattering. The fabricated thin films were all in amorphous phase. A relatively high transmittance of 73% was achieved. The density ratio of Ni3+/(Ni2+ + Ni3+) ions in the films decreased with increasing O2 gas pressure in the fabrication chamber, which caused a decrease in the carrier concentration of the films. The increasing pressure also led to the increase in Hall mobility. By controlling the chamber pressure and substrate temperature, p-type transparent conducting NiO films with reasonable electrical properties were obtained.

  1. Physical and electronic properties of electrodeposited ZnO thin films: dependence on thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kıcır, N.; Ozkendir, O. M.; Farha, A. H.; Kırmızıgül, F.; Tuken, T.; Gumus, C.; Çabuk, S.; Erbil, M.; Ufuktepe, Y.

    2015-10-01

    ZnO films have been prepared on indium tin oxide-coated glass substrates, with the help of a potentiostatic method in aqueous zinc nitrate solution. Dependence of crystallographic, optical and electronic properties on thickness of the film is reported and discussed. An increase in the film thickness causes an increase in the band and leads to an improvement in crystallinity and conductivity. The experimental results suggest a strong correlation between electronic and crystal structure of the polycrystalline wurtzite ZnO films. These observations can be used to establish guidelines for optimizing the thickness and orientation to increase the control of device performance based on ZnO thin films.

  2. Diagnosing Disputes in Film Criticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Robert A.

    1979-01-01

    By classifying and analyzing actual disputes in film criticism, the author considers the following questions: Are there connections between film theory and film criticism? If so, which are healthy and which are diseased? If not, what alternative healthy function might film theory have? (Author/SJL)

  3. Film Scriptwriting: A Practical Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swain, Dwight V.

    Dealing with both documentary and feature films, this book is a guide to using particular tools and procedures in developing ideas and concepts for writing film scripts. Part one deals with the factual, or documentary, film and discusses the proposal outline, film treatment, sequence outline, shooting script, and narration writing. Part two…

  4. Feature Films in Your Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spehr, Paul

    1970-01-01

    Trained film librarians, given a well planned and carefully developed program can answer the needs of the new film students. Includes lists of motion picture distributors, cinema periodicals, significant feature films, and classic American feature-length films. (Author/JB)

  5. Film Images of Private Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resnick, David

    2000-01-01

    Examines public debate over private education in the context of the Hollywood dramatic feature film. Analyses four recent films that all portray private schools negatively. Film representation of public schools is more optimistic. Asserts that the films ignore or misrepresent three strengths of private education: effective leadership, small school…

  6. The Art of the Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindgren, Ernest

    The author prefaces his consideration of films as an art form with a discussion of the mechanics of filmmaking. He describes the division of talent on a movie set, details the history of the tools of filmmakers, and explains the production and reproduction of a film. The influence of film techniques on plot development in a fiction film is…

  7. Film: The Reality of Being.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheratsky, Rodney E.

    The visual media, particularly film, has challenged today's educators by competing for students' time and interests and by providing a relevancy that books designed for school use do not have. Using film study to combat the supposed immorality of theatrical films and employing instructional film to transmit information has provided a negative…

  8. Reference for radiographic film interpreters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, D. L.

    1970-01-01

    Reference of X-ray film images provides examples of weld defects, film quality, stainless steel welded tubing, and acceptable weld conditions. A summary sheet details the discrepancies shown on the film strip. This reference aids in interpreting and evaluating radiographic film of weldments.

  9. Children's Film Programming: A Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallery Association of New York State, Inc.

    Directed at the staffs of art institutions, community centers, libraries, historical societies, and schools, this practical guide is intended to help in the selection and use of films for children. "Film," in this handbook refers to 16mm films presented in public screenings--not videotape versions of films, and not material originally…

  10. Negative birefringent polyimide films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Frank W. (Inventor); Cheng, Stephen Z. D. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A negative birefringent film, useful in liquid crystal displays, and a method for controlling the negative birefringence of a polyimide film is disclosed which allows the matching of an application to a targeted amount of birefringence by controlling the degree of in-plane orientation of the polyimide by the selection of functional groups within both the diamine and dianhydride segments of the polyimide which affect the polyimide backbone chain rigidity, linearity, and symmetry. The higher the rigidity, linearity and symmetry of the polyimide backbone, the larger the value of the negative birefringence of the polyimide film.

  11. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Cheng, Yang-Tse; Poli, Andrea A.; Meltser, Mark Alexander

    1999-01-01

    A thin film hydrogen sensor, includes: a substantially flat ceramic substrate with first and second planar sides and a first substrate end opposite a second substrate end; a thin film temperature responsive resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the first substrate end; a thin film hydrogen responsive metal resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the fist substrate end and proximate to the temperature responsive resistor; and a heater on the second planar side of the substrate proximate to the first end.

  12. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Cheng, Y.T.; Poli, A.A.; Meltser, M.A.

    1999-03-23

    A thin film hydrogen sensor includes a substantially flat ceramic substrate with first and second planar sides and a first substrate end opposite a second substrate end; a thin film temperature responsive resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the first substrate end; a thin film hydrogen responsive metal resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the fist substrate end and proximate to the temperature responsive resistor; and a heater on the second planar side of the substrate proximate to the first end. 5 figs.

  13. Nopal cactus film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toxqui-López, S.; Olivares-Pérez, A.; Fuentes-Tapia, I.; Conde-Cuatzo, María. G.

    2017-03-01

    Nopal mucilage potentially has certain properties required for the preparation biofilms which can be used as holographic replication recording medium. In this study, mucilage from nopal was extracted and characterized by its ability to form films under different concentration with polyvinyl alcohol. The transmission holographic diffraction gratings (master) were replicated into nopal films. The results showed good diffraction efficiencies. Mucilage from nopal could represent a good option for the development of films to replication holographic, owing to; its low cost and its compatibility with the environmental.

  14. Biomimetic thin film synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Graff, G.L.; Campbell, A.A.; Gordon, N.R.

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this program is to develop a new process for forming thin film coatings and to demonstrate that the biomimetic thin film technology developed at PNL is useful for industrial applications. In the biomimetic process, mineral deposition from aqueous solution is controlled by organic functional groups attached to the underlying substrate surface. The coatings process is simple, benign, inexpensive, energy efficient, and particularly suited for temperature sensitive substrate materials (such as polymers). In addition, biomimetic thin films can be deposited uniformly on complex shaped and porous substrates providing a unique capability over more traditional line-of-sight methods.

  15. Ultrahard carbon nanocomposite films

    SciTech Connect

    SIEGAL,MICHAEL P.; TALLANT,DAVID R.; PROVENCIO,PAULA P.; OVERMYER,DONALD L.; SIMPSON,REGINA L.; MARTINEZ-MIRANDA,L.J.

    2000-01-27

    Modest thermal annealing to 600 C of diamondlike amorphous-carbon (a-C) films grown at room temperature results in the formation of carbon nanocomposites with hardness similar to diamond. These nanocomposite films consist of nanometer-sized regions of high density a-C embedded in an a-C matrix with a reduced density of 5--10%. The authors report on the evolution of density and bonding topologies as a function of annealing temperature. Despite a decrease in density, film hardness actually increases {approximately} 15% due to the development of the nanocomposite structure.

  16. Structural characterization of metastable hcp-Ni thin films epitaxially grown on Au(100) single-crystal underlayers

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtake, Mitsuru; Tanaka, Takahiro; Futamoto, Masaaki; Kirino, Fumiyoshi

    2010-05-15

    Ni(1120) epitaxial thin films with hcp structure were prepared on Au(100) single-crystal underlayers at 100 deg. C by ultra high vacuum molecular beam epitaxy. The detailed film structure is studied by in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction, x-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. The hcp-Ni film consists of two types of variants whose c-axes are rotated around the film normal by 90 deg. each other. An atomically sharp boundary is recognized between the film and the underlayer, where misfit dislocations are introduced. Presence of such dislocations seems to relieve the strain caused by the lattice mismatch between the film and the underlayer.

  17. Sub-10 ohm resistance gold films prepared by removal of ligands from thiol-stabilized 6 nm gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sugden, Mark W; Richardson, Tim H; Leggett, Graham

    2010-03-16

    The optical and electrical properties of dodecanethiol-stabilized nanoparticles (6 nm diameter gold core) have been investigated over a range of film thicknesses and temperatures. The surface plasmon resonance absorbance is found to be dependent on temperature. Heating of the nanoparticle film causes desorption of the thiol from the surface of the gold nanoparticle, resulting in irreversible changes to the absorption spectra of the nanoparticle film. Atomic force microscopy images of the samples before and after heating for different film thicknesses reveal structural changes and increased domain connectivity for thicker films leading to sub-10 ohm resistances measured for the 15-layer film.

  18. Ion beam deposited protective films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.

    1981-01-01

    Single or dual ion beam sources were used to deposit thin films for different applications. Metal and metal oxide films were evaluated as protective coatings for the materials. Film adherence was measured and the most promising films were then tested under environments similar to operating conditions. It was shown that some materials do protect die material (H-13 steel) and do reduce thermal fatigue. Diamondlike films have many useful applications. A series of experiments were conducted to define and optimize new approaches to the manufacture of such films. A dual beam system using argon and methane gases was developed to generate these films.

  19. Anatase titanium dioxide thin film based carbon monoxide gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Homoudi, Ibrahim Abdullah

    2005-11-01

    Gas sensors are finding increasing number of applications in home, industrial and automotive areas. Incomplete combustion in gas and coal fired electricity plants can generate harmful gases and pollutants. The purpose of the proposed research was to develop titanium dioxide (TiO2) thin film based materials for carbon monoxide (CO) gas sensing to detect a very low concentration (20--100 ppm) of CO gas. Anatase TiO2 thin films (100--1000 nm) have been developed using pulsed DC magnetron reactive sputtering technique on glass, Si(100) and sapphire substrates. Optimum deposition parameters were determined by studying the crystalline quality of the films using X-ray diffraction. The x-ray photo-emission (XPS) studies indicated a good stoichiometric TiO 2 surface with O to Ti ratio of 1.95 +/- 0.05. Film residual stress was measured using curvature measurements of the substrates before and after deposition of the films. The anatase TiO2 thin films on sapphire showed lower stress compared to glass and Si substrates. Raman spectroscopy measurements were further used to study the correlation between the residual stress and Raman shifts of characteristic peaks to obtain a calibration factor. Anatase TiO2 thin films showed n-type electrical conductivity indicating the presence of shallow electron donors caused by oxygen vacancies. The response of films was tested for 100 ppm of CO in 100 sccm of N2 gas flow as a function of temperature, film thickness, and the substrate. The films show the highest response at 200°C. The films grown on sapphire substrates show the highest response. The response is higher for a film with 1000 nm thickness than the 250 nm thickness film. The CO sensor was tested as a function of CO concentration and as well as under different environs: The films respond to very low concentration, 20--100 ppm, of CO gas, with good reversibility. The response and recovery time were from 2 min to 1 min as the concentration increased from 20 to 100 ppm. It can be

  20. Extraordinary optical transmission in nanopatterned ultrathin metal films without holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peer, Akshit; Biswas, Rana

    2016-02-01

    We experimentally and theoretically demonstrate that a continuous gold film on a periodically textured substrate exhibits extraordinary optical transmission, even though no holes were etched in the film. Our film synthesis started by nanoimprinting a periodic array of nanocups with a period of ~750 nm on a polystyrene film over a glass substrate. A thin non-conformal gold film was sputter-deposited on the polystyrene by angle-directed deposition. The gold film was continuous with spatial thickness variation, the film being thinnest at the bottom of the nanocup. Measurements revealed an extraordinary transmission peak at a wavelength just smaller than the period, with an enhancement of ~2.5 compared to the classically expected value. Scattering matrix simulations model well the transmission and reflectance measurements when an ultrathin gold layer (~5 nm), smaller than the skin depth is retained at the bottom of the nanocups. Electric field intensities are enhanced by >100 within the nanocup, and ~40 in the ultrathin gold layer causing transmission through it. We show a wavelength red-shift of ~30 nm in the extraordinary transmission peak when the nanocups are coated with a thin film of a few nanometers, which can be utilized for biosensing. The continuous corrugated metal films are far simpler structures to observe extraordinary transmission, circumventing the difficult process of etching the metal film. Such continuous metal films with ultrathin regions are simple platforms for non-linear optics, plasmonics, and biological and chemical sensing.We experimentally and theoretically demonstrate that a continuous gold film on a periodically textured substrate exhibits extraordinary optical transmission, even though no holes were etched in the film. Our film synthesis started by nanoimprinting a periodic array of nanocups with a period of ~750 nm on a polystyrene film over a glass substrate. A thin non-conformal gold film was sputter-deposited on the polystyrene by

  1. A New Analytic Alignment Method for a SINS.

    PubMed

    Tan, Caiming; Zhu, Xinhua; Su, Yan; Wang, Yu; Wu, Zhiqiang; Gu, Dongbing

    2015-11-04

    Analytic alignment is a type of self-alignment for a Strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS) that is based solely on two non-collinear vectors, which are the gravity and rotational velocity vectors of the Earth at a stationary base on the ground. The attitude of the SINS with respect to the Earth can be obtained directly using the TRIAD algorithm given two vector measurements. For a traditional analytic coarse alignment, all six outputs from the inertial measurement unit (IMU) are used to compute the attitude. In this study, a novel analytic alignment method called selective alignment is presented. This method uses only three outputs of the IMU and a few properties from the remaining outputs such as the sign and the approximate value to calculate the attitude. Simulations and experimental results demonstrate the validity of this method, and the precision of yaw is improved using the selective alignment method compared to the traditional analytic coarse alignment method in the vehicle experiment. The selective alignment principle provides an accurate relationship between the outputs and the attitude of the SINS relative to the Earth for a stationary base, and it is an extension of the TRIAD algorithm. The selective alignment approach has potential uses in applications such as self-alignment, fault detection, and self-calibration.

  2. A New Analytic Alignment Method for a SINS

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Caiming; Zhu, Xinhua; Su, Yan; Wang, Yu; Wu, Zhiqiang; Gu, Dongbing

    2015-01-01

    Analytic alignment is a type of self-alignment for a Strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS) that is based solely on two non-collinear vectors, which are the gravity and rotational velocity vectors of the Earth at a stationary base on the ground. The attitude of the SINS with respect to the Earth can be obtained directly using the TRIAD algorithm given two vector measurements. For a traditional analytic coarse alignment, all six outputs from the inertial measurement unit (IMU) are used to compute the attitude. In this study, a novel analytic alignment method called selective alignment is presented. This method uses only three outputs of the IMU and a few properties from the remaining outputs such as the sign and the approximate value to calculate the attitude. Simulations and experimental results demonstrate the validity of this method, and the precision of yaw is improved using the selective alignment method compared to the traditional analytic coarse alignment method in the vehicle experiment. The selective alignment principle provides an accurate relationship between the outputs and the attitude of the SINS relative to the Earth for a stationary base, and it is an extension of the TRIAD algorithm. The selective alignment approach has potential uses in applications such as self-alignment, fault detection, and self-calibration. PMID:26556353

  3. Causes and effects.

    PubMed

    Cone, Carol L; Feldman, Mark A; DaSilva, Alison T

    2003-07-01

    Most companies make charitable donations, but few approach their contributions with an eye toward enhancing their brands. Those that do take such an approach commit talent and know-how, not just dollars, to a pressing but carefully chosen social need and then tell the world about the cause and their service to it. Through the association, both the business and the cause benefit in ways they could not otherwise. Organizations such as Avon, ConAgra Foods, and Chevrolet have recognized that a sustained cause-branding program can improve their reputations, boost their employees' morale, strengthen relations with business partners, and drive sales. And the targeted causes receive far more money than they could have from direct corporate gifts alone. The authors examine these best practices and offer four principles for building successful cause-branding programs. First, they say, a company should select a cause that advances its corporate goals. That is, unless the competitive logic for supporting the cause is clear, a company shouldn't even consider putting its finite resources behind it. Second, a business should commit to a cause before picking its charitable partners. Otherwise, a cause-branding program may become too dependent on its partners. Third, a company should put all its assets to work, especially its employees. It should leverage the professional skills of its workers as well as its other assets such as distribution networks. And fourth, a company should promote its philanthropic initiatives through every possible channel. In addition to using the media, it should communicate its efforts through the Web, annual reports, direct mail, and so on. Cause branding is a way to turn the obligations of corporate citizenship into a valuable asset. When the cause is well chosen, the commitment genuine, and the program well executed, the cause helps the company, and the company helps the cause.

  4. Raman spectroscopy of thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, James Shaw

    Raman spectroscopy was used in conjunction with x-ray diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to elucidate structural and compositional information on a variety of samples. Raman was used on the unique La 2NiMnO6 mixed double perovskite which is a member of the LaMnO3 family of perovskites and has multiferroic properties. Raman was also used on nanodiamond films as well as some boron-doped carbon compounds. Finally, Raman was used to identify metal-dendrimer bonds that have previously been overlooked. Vibrational modes for La2NiMnO6 were ascribed by comparing spectra with that for LaMnO3 bulk and thin film spectra. The two most prominent modes were labeled as an asymmetric stretch (A g) centered around 535 cm-1 and a symmetric stretch (B g) centered around 678 cm. The heteroepitaxial quality of La2NiMnO 6 films on SrTiO3 (100) and LaAlO3 (100) substrates were examined using the Raman microscope by way of depth profile experiments and by varying the thickness of the films. It was found that thin films (10 nm) had much greater strain on the LaAlO3 substrate than on the SrTiO3 substrate by examining the shifts of the Ag and the Bg modes from their bulk positions. Changes in the unit cell owing to the presence of oxygen defects were also monitored using Raman spectroscopy. It was found that the Ag and Bg modes shifted between samples formed with different oxygen partial pressures. These shifts could be correlated to changes in the symmetry of the manganese centers due to oxygen defects. Raman spectroscopy was used to examine the structural and compositional characteristics of carbon materials. Nanocrystalline diamond coated cutting tools were examined using the Raman Microscope. Impact, abrasion, and depth profile experiments indicated that delamination was the primary cause of film failure in these systems. Boron doped material of interest as catalyst supports were also examined. Monitoring of the G-mode and intensities of the D- and G-modes indicated that

  5. Analysis of nitrogen species in titanium oxynitride ALD films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowińska, Małgorzata; Brizzi, Simone; Das, Chittaranjan; Kärkkänen, Irina; Schneidewind, Jessica; Naumann, Franziska; Gargouri, Hassan; Henkel, Karsten; Schmeißer, Dieter

    2016-09-01

    Titanium oxynitride films are prepared by plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition method using two different precursors and nitrogen sources. Synchrotron radiation-based X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy are used to characterize the nitrogen species incorporated within these films depending on the deposition parameters. It is found that nitrogen atoms in these films are differently bonded. In particular, it can be distinguished between Tisbnd ON and Tisbnd N bonding configurations and molecular nitrogen species caused by precursor fragments.

  6. Undulatory delamination of thin polymer films on gold surfaces.

    PubMed

    Chah, Soonwoo; Noolandi, Jaan; Zare, Richard N

    2005-10-20

    Using two-dimensional surface plasmon resonance measurements, we have observed the formation of traveling waves in the delamination of thin films of polydimethylsilane (PDMS) exposed to methanol. Films were spin-coated on a gold surface and the methanol was added to the top surface. The stress-induced instability caused by the swelling of the PDMS thin film when its edge is pinned to the gold surface leads to wrinkle formation and propagation at the interface. The periodic pattern is thought to be the result of an Asaro-Tiller-Grinfeld (ATG) instability.

  7. Remembered branches: towards a future of Korean homosexual film.

    PubMed

    Lee, J

    2000-01-01

    Korean cinema has long labored under an imported Confucian homophobia which, through its effects if not its causes, seems to mirror the Western conception of the closet. Recent cinematic developments in Korea, including a queer film festival in Seoul, are slowly but surely beginning to change that. Using as primary texts the recent Korean gay film Broken Branches and the long-forgotten lesbian film Ascetic: Woman and Woman, my essay hopes to serve as a set of introductory remarks on a queer Korean cinema culture whose surface has only just been broached.

  8. Optical isolator based on mode conversion in magnetic garnet films.

    PubMed

    Hemme, H; Dötsch, H; Menzler, H P

    1987-09-15

    Calculations are presented describing a novel optical isolator which works by complete TE(0)-TM(0) mode conversion in magnetic garnet films caused by stress-induced optical anisotropy (50%) and by Faraday rotation (50%). These conversions take place along two different, perpendicular light paths in the same crystal that are connected by an integrated mirror. Possible tolerances of the film parameters are given so that a 30-dB isolation is still guaranteed.

  9. Method for the preparation of nanocrystalline diamond thin films

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Krauss, Alan R.

    1998-01-01

    A method and system for manufacturing nanocrystalline diamond film on a substrate such as field emission tips. The method involves forming a carbonaceous vapor, providing a gas stream of argon, hydrocarbon and possibly hydrogen, and combining the gas with the carbonaceous vapor, passing the combined carbonaceous vapor and gas carrier stream into a chamber, forming a plasma in the chamber causing fragmentation of the carbonaceous vapor and deposition of a diamond film on the field emission tip.

  10. Method for the preparation of nanocrystalline diamond thin films

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.; Krauss, A.R.

    1998-06-30

    A method and system are disclosed for manufacturing nanocrystalline diamond film on a substrate such as field emission tips. The method involves forming a carbonaceous vapor, providing a gas stream of argon, hydrocarbon and possibly hydrogen, and combining the gas with the carbonaceous vapor, passing the combined carbonaceous vapor and gas carrier stream into a chamber, forming a plasma in the chamber causing fragmentation of the carbonaceous vapor and deposition of a diamond film on the field emission tip. 40 figs.

  11. Method and Apparatus for Measuring Corrosion Beneath Thin Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-19

    galvanic cell is created on a sensitive surface using alternating layers of anodic and cathodic materials such as steel and copper, which are electrically isolated by an insulation matrix. The surface is then cooled to below the dew point of the surrounding environment to cause condensation on the thin film. The galvanic current between the anodic and cathodic materials is then monitored for the first indication of environmental penetration through the film, i.e.,

  12. Sprites on Film

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Filmed at 10,000 frames per second by Japan's NHK television, movies like this of electromagnetic bursts called "sprites" will help scientists better understand how weather high in the atmosphere r...

  13. Quantitative film radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Devine, G.; Dobie, D.; Fugina, J.; Hernandez, J.; Logan, C.; Mohr, P.; Moss, R.; Schumacher, B.; Updike, E.; Weirup, D.

    1991-02-26

    We have developed a system of quantitative radiography in order to produce quantitative images displaying homogeneity of parts. The materials that we characterize are synthetic composites and may contain important subtle density variations not discernible by examining a raw film x-radiograph. In order to quantitatively interpret film radiographs, it is necessary to digitize, interpret, and display the images. Our integrated system of quantitative radiography displays accurate, high-resolution pseudo-color images in units of density. We characterize approximately 10,000 parts per year in hundreds of different configurations and compositions with this system. This report discusses: the method; film processor monitoring and control; verifying film and processor performance; and correction of scatter effects.

  14. Nanostructured thermoplastic polyimide films

    DOEpatents

    Aglan, Heshmat

    2015-05-19

    Structured films containing multi-walled carbon nanotubes ("MWCNTs") have enhanced mechanical performance in terms of strength, fracture resistance, and creep recovery of polyimide ("PI") films. Preferably, the loadings of MWCNTs can be in the range of 0.1 wt % to 0.5 wt %. The strength of the new PI films dried at 60.degree. C. increased by 55% and 72% for 0.1 wt % MWCNT and 0.5 wt % MWCNT loadings, respectively, while the fracture resistance increased by 23% for the 0.1 wt % MWCNTs and then decreases at a loading of 0.5 wt % MWCNTs. The films can be advantageously be created by managing a corresponding shift in the annealing temperature at which the maximum strength occurs as the MWCNT loadings increase.

  15. Amorphous diamond films

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.

    1998-06-09

    Amorphous diamond films having a significant reduction in intrinsic stress are prepared by biasing a substrate to be coated and depositing carbon ions thereon under controlled temperature conditions. 1 fig.

  16. Nanodiffusion in electrocatalytic films.

    PubMed

    Costentin, Cyrille; Di Giovanni, Carlo; Giraud, Marion; Savéant, Jean-Michel; Tard, Cédric

    2017-08-21

    In the active interest aroused by electrochemical reactions' catalysis, related to modern energy challenges, films deposited on electrodes are often preferred to homogeneous catalysts. A particularly promising variety of such films, in terms of efficiency and selectivity, is offered by sprinkling catalytic nanoparticles onto a conductive network. Coupled with the catalytic reaction, the competitive occurrence of various modes of substrate diffusion-diffusion toward nanoparticles ('nanodiffusion') against film linear diffusion and solution linear diffusion-is analysed theoretically. It is governed by a dimensionless parameter that contains all the experimental factors, thus allowing one to single out the conditions in which nanodiffusion is the dominant mode of mass transport. These theoretical predictions are illustrated experimentally by proton reduction on a mixture of platinum nanoparticles and carbon dispersed in a Nafion film deposited on a glassy carbon electrode. The density of nanoparticles and the scan rate are used as experimental variables to test the theory.

  17. Nanodiffusion in electrocatalytic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costentin, Cyrille; di Giovanni, Carlo; Giraud, Marion; Savéant, Jean-Michel; Tard, Cédric

    2017-10-01

    In the active interest aroused by electrochemical reactions' catalysis, related to modern energy challenges, films deposited on electrodes are often preferred to homogeneous catalysts. A particularly promising variety of such films, in terms of efficiency and selectivity, is offered by sprinkling catalytic nanoparticles onto a conductive network. Coupled with the catalytic reaction, the competitive occurrence of various modes of substrate diffusion--diffusion toward nanoparticles (`nanodiffusion') against film linear diffusion and solution linear diffusion--is analysed theoretically. It is governed by a dimensionless parameter that contains all the experimental factors, thus allowing one to single out the conditions in which nanodiffusion is the dominant mode of mass transport. These theoretical predictions are illustrated experimentally by proton reduction on a mixture of platinum nanoparticles and carbon dispersed in a Nafion film deposited on a glassy carbon electrode. The density of nanoparticles and the scan rate are used as experimental variables to test the theory.

  18. Magnetron sputtered boron films

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Jankowski, A.F.

    1998-06-16

    A method is described for the production of thin boron and titanium/boron films by magnetron sputter deposition. The amorphous boron films contain no morphological growth features, unlike those found when thin films are prepared by various physical vapor deposition processes. Magnetron sputter deposition method requires the use of a high density crystalline boron sputter target which is prepared by hot isostatic pressing. Thin boron films prepared by this method are useful for producing hardened surfaces, surfacing machine tools, etc. and for ultra-thin band pass filters as well as the low Z element in low Z/high Z optical components, such as mirrors which enhance reflectivity from grazing to normal incidence. 8 figs.

  19. Magnetron sputtered boron films

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; Jankowski, Alan F.

    1998-01-01

    A method is described for the production of thin boron and titanium/boron films by magnetron sputter deposition. The amorphous boron films contain no morphological growth features, unlike those found when thin films are prepared by various physical vapor deposition processes. Magnetron sputter deposition method requires the use of a high density crystalline boron sputter target which is prepared by hot isostatic pressing. Thin boron films prepared by this method are useful for producing hardened surfaces, surfacing machine tools, etc. and for ultra-thin band pass filters as well as the low Z element in low Z/high Z optical components, such as mirrors which enhance reflectivity from grazing to normal incidence.

  20. TAMPERPROOF FILM BADGE

    DOEpatents

    Kocher, L.F.

    1958-10-01

    A persornel dosimeter film badge made of plastic, with provision for a picture of the wearer and an internal slide containing photographic film that is sensitive to various radiations, is described. Four windows made of differing material selectively attenuate alpha, beta, gamma rays, and neutrons so as to distinguish the particular type of radiation the wearer was subjected to. In addition, a lead shield has the identification number of the wearer perforated thereon so as to identify the film after processing. An internal magnetically actuated latch securely locks the slide within the body, and may be withdrawn only upon the external application of two strong magnetic forces in order to insure that the wearer or other curious persons will not accidentally expose the film to visual light.

  1. Optical and morphological characterizations of pyronin dye-poly (vinyl alcohol) thin films formed on glass substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Meral, Kadem Arik, Mustafa Onganer, Yavuz

    2016-04-18

    Thin films of pyronin dye mixed with poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) on glass substrate were prepared by using spin-coating technique. The optical and morphological properties of the thin films were studied by UV-Vis., steady-state fluorescence spectroscopies and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The thin films on glass substrate were fabricated at various [PVA]/[dye] (P/D) ratios. Hence, the monomeric and H-aggregates thin films of pyronin dye mixed with PVA were formed as a function of the dye and PVA concentration. It was determined that while the monomeric thin films showed strong fluorescence, the formation of H-aggregates in the thin film caused to decreasing the fluorescence intensity. AFM studies demonstrated that the morphology of the thin film was drastically varied with changing the optical property of the thin film such as monomeric and H-aggregates thin films.

  2. On tear film breakup (TBU): dynamics and imaging.

    PubMed

    Braun, Richard J; Driscoll, Tobin A; Begley, Carolyn G; King-Smith, P Ewen; Siddique, Javed I

    2017-02-20

    We report the results of some recent experiments to visualize tear film dynamics. We then study a mathematical model for tear film thinning and tear film breakup (TBU), a term from the ocular surface literature. The thinning is driven by an imposed tear film thinning rate which is input from in vivo measurements. Solutes representing osmolarity and fluorescein are included in the model. Osmolarity causes osmosis from the model ocular surface, and the fluorescein is used to compute the intensity corresponding closely to in vivo observations. The imposed thinning can be either one-dimensional or axisymmetric, leading to streaks or spots of TBU, respectively. For a spatially-uniform (flat) film, osmosis would cease thinning and balance mass lost due to evaporation; for these space-dependent evaporation profiles TBU does occur because osmolarity diffuses out of the TBU into the surrounding tear film, in agreement with previous results. The intensity pattern predicted based on the fluorescein concentration is compared with the computed thickness profiles; this comparison is important for interpreting in vivo observations. The non-dimensionalization introduced leads to insight about the relative importance of the competing processes; it leads to a classification of large vs small TBU regions in which different physical effects are dominant. Many regions of TBU may be considered small, revealing that the flow inside the film has an appreciable influence on fluorescence imaging of the tear film.

  3. Measuring Surface Tension of a Flowing Soap Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sane, Aakash; Kim, Ildoo; Mandre, Shreyas

    2016-11-01

    It is well known that surface tension is sensitive to the presence of surfactants and many conventional methods exist to measure it. These techniques measure surface tension either by intruding into the system or by changing its geometry. Use of conventional methods in the case of a flowing soap film is not feasible because intruding the soap film changes surface tension due to Marangoni effect. We present a technique in which we measure the surface tension in situ of a flowing soap film without intruding into the film. A flowing soap film is created by letting soap solution drip between two wires. The interaction of the soap film with the wires causes the wires to deflect which can be measured. Surface tension is calculated using a relation between curvature of the wires and the surface tension. Our measurements indicate that the surface tension of the flowing soap film for our setup is around 0.05 N/m. The nature of this technique makes it favorable for measuring surface tension of flowing soap films whose properties change on intrusion.

  4. Germanium nano-cluster films as humidity and hydrogen sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackenzie, D. M. A.; Brown, S. A.

    2012-10-01

    Films of germanium nano-clusters of 30 nm diameter were fabricated in a high-vacuum deposition apparatus utilizing an inert-gas-aggregation source. The germanium films readily formed an oxide layer in high vacuum along with a corresponding resistance increase, a process that accelerated when films were exposed to dry air. A decrease in resistance was observed when films were exposed to ambient air, and this was attributed to water vapour adsorbing on the surface. The effects of film-thickness were investigated. A reversible change in resistance of 2 orders of magnitude was observed for 99% humidity, with a response time of tens of minutes. It is proposed that the resistance-decrease occurs because water vapour creates surface defects which act as donors causing the electron concentration in the n-type film to increase. The films were also sensitive to hydrogen concentrations above 1% in dry air, with up to a factor of 25 decrease in resistance observed for 5% hydrogen concentration at room temperature. Unexpectedly, the sensitivity to hydrogen was only observed at temperatures below 100 °C, suggesting that surface moisture is necessary for films to show sensitivity to hydrogen.

  5. Dielectric Composite Thin Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    more compressive under deposition conditions, such as high temperature, low pressure or energetic ion bombardment, that produce a more densely packed...film porosity and silica content. Thus, films formed at high temperatures and low pressures , as well as under ion bombardment during deposition, have...and their mixtures were deposited on 100-300 *C substrates and under reactive gas III. RESULTS pressures of 1-10x 10- Torr 02. 02 was UHP grade with A

  6. Polymer film composite transducer

    DOEpatents

    Owen, Thomas E.

    2005-09-20

    A composite piezoelectric transducer, whose piezoeletric element is a "ribbon wound" film of piezolectric material. As the film is excited, it expands and contracts, which results in expansion and contraction of the diameter of the entire ribbon winding. This is accompanied by expansion and contraction of the thickness of the ribbon winding, such that the sound radiating plate may be placed on the side of the winding.

  7. Multifunctional thin film surface

    DOEpatents

    Brozik, Susan M.; Harper, Jason C.; Polsky, Ronen; Wheeler, David R.; Arango, Dulce C.; Dirk, Shawn M.

    2015-10-13

    A thin film with multiple binding functionality can be prepared on an electrode surface via consecutive electroreduction of two or more aryl-onium salts with different functional groups. This versatile and simple method for forming multifunctional surfaces provides an effective means for immobilization of diverse molecules at close proximities. The multifunctional thin film has applications in bioelectronics, molecular electronics, clinical diagnostics, and chemical and biological sensing.

  8. Magnetoresistance of Au films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D. L.; Song, X. H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Xiaoguang

    2014-12-10

    Measurement of the magnetoresistance (MR) of Au films as a function of temperature and film thickness reveals a strong dependence on grain size distribution and clear violation of the Kohler s rule. Using a model of random resistor network, we show that this result can be explained if the MR arises entirely from inhomogeneity due to grain boundary scattering and thermal activation of grain boundary atoms.

  9. Thin film tritium dosimetry

    DOEpatents

    Moran, Paul R.

    1976-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for tritium dosimetry. A dosimeter comprising a thin film of a material having relatively sensitive RITAC-RITAP dosimetry properties is exposed to radiation from tritium, and after the dosimeter has been removed from the source of the radiation, the low energy electron dose deposited in the thin film is determined by radiation-induced, thermally-activated polarization dosimetry techniques.

  10. Magnetoresistance of Au films

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, D. L.; Song, X. H.; Zhang, X.; ...

    2014-12-10

    Measurement of the magnetoresistance (MR) of Au films as a function of temperature and film thickness reveals a strong dependence on grain size distribution and clear violation of the Kohler s rule. Using a model of random resistor network, we show that this result can be explained if the MR arises entirely from inhomogeneity due to grain boundary scattering and thermal activation of grain boundary atoms.

  11. Peel testing metalized films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bivins, L.; Smith, T.

    1980-01-01

    Flimsy ultrathin sheets are mounted on glass for peel-strength measurements. Technique makes it easier to perform peel tests on metalized plastic films. Technique was developed for determining peel strength of thin (1,000 A) layers of aluminum on Kapton film. Previously, material has been difficult to test because it is flimsy and tends to curl up and blow away at slightest disturbance. Procedure can be used to measure effects on metalization bond strength of handling, humidity, sunlight, and heat.

  12. Multiresonant layered plasmonic films

    SciTech Connect

    DeVetter, Brent M.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Schemer-Kohrn, Alan; Alvine, Kyle J.

    2017-01-01

    Multi-resonant nanoplasmonic films have numerous applications in areas such as nonlinear optics, sensing, and tamper indication. While techniques such as focused ion beam milling and electron beam lithography can produce high-quality multi-resonant films, these techniques are expensive, serial processes that are difficult to scale at the manufacturing level. Here, we present the fabrication of multi-resonant nanoplasmonic films using a layered stacking technique. Periodically-spaced gold nanocup substrates were fabricated using self-assembled polystyrene nanospheres followed by oxygen plasma etching and metal deposition via magnetron sputter coating. By adjusting etch parameters and initial nanosphere size, it was possible to achieve an optical response ranging from the visible to the near-infrared. Singly resonant, flexible films were first made by performing peel-off using an adhesive-coated polyolefin film. Through stacking layers of the nanofilm, we demonstrate fabrication of multi-resonant films at a fraction of the cost and effort as compared to top-down lithographic techniques.

  13. Physics of thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Francombe, M.H. ); Vossen, J.L. )

    1992-01-01

    This book of Physics of Thin Films emphasizes two main technical themes. The first is essentially an extension of the topical thrust on Thin Films for Advance Electronic Devices, developed in Volume 15 of this series. The second deals primarily with the physical and mechanical behavior of films and the influence of these in relation to various applications. The first of the four articles in this volume, by Neelkanth G. Dhere, discusses high-transition-temperature (T{sub c}) superconducting films. Since their discovery in 1986, both world-wide research activity and published literature on high-T{sub c} oxide films have exploded at a phenomenal rate. In his treatment, the author presents an effective survey of the already vast literature on this subject, discusses the numerous techniques under development for the growth of these perovskite-related complex oxides, and describes their key properties and applications. In particular, factors affecting the epitaxial structure, critical current capability, and microwave conductivity in Y-Ba-Cu-O and Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O based film compositions are evaluated in relation to their use at 77K. An overview of potential applications in a variety of microwave devices, wide-band optical detectors, SQUID-type high-sensitivity magnetometers, etc., is included.

  14. Water Storage in Thin Films Maintaining the Total Film Thickness as Probed with in situ Neutron Reflectivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weinan; Metwalli, Ezzeldin; Perlich, Jan; Troll, Kordelia; Papadakis, Christine M; Cubitt, Robert; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter

    2009-01-16

    We investigate a new type of thin film material which allows for water storage without an increase in film thickness, whereas typically water storage in polymers and polymer films is accompanied with a strong swelling of the film, i.e., a strong increase in the film thickness. So these films will avoid problems related to strains which are caused by swelling. The basic key for the preparation of such thin films is the installation of a glassy network by the use of an asymmetric diblock copolymer polystyrene-block-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) [P(S-b-NIPAM)] with a long PS and short PNIPAM block in combination with a solvent which is more equal in interaction with both the blocks as compared to water. With in situ neutron reflectivity the water storage and removal are probed. The total film thickness increases only by 2.5% by allowing for a total water storage of 17.4%. Thus the material can be used for coatings to reduce humidity in nano-applications, which might suffer from changes in the water content of the surrounding environment.

  15. What Causes Bad Breath?

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness What Causes Bad Breath? KidsHealth > For Teens > What Causes Bad Breath? A A A en español ¿Qué es lo que provoca el mal aliento? Bad breath, or halitosis , can be a major problem, ...

  16. Determining concentration depth profiles of thin foam films with neutral impact collision ion scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridings, Christiaan; Andersson, Gunther G.

    2010-11-01

    Equipment is developed to measure the concentration depth profiles in foam films with the vacuum based technique neutral impact collision ion scattering spectroscopy. Thin foam films have not previously been investigated using vacuum based techniques, hence specialized methods and equipment have been developed for generating and equilibrating of foam films under vacuum. A specialized film holder has been developed that encloses the foam film in a pressure cell. The pressure cell is air-tight except for apertures that allow for the entrance and exit of the ion beam to facilitate the analysis with the ion scattering technique. The cell is supplied with a reservoir of solvent which evaporates upon evacuating the main chamber. This causes the cell to be maintained at the vapor pressure of the solvent, thus minimizing further evaporation from the films. In order to investigate the effect of varying the pressure over the films, a hydrostatic pressure is applied to the foam films. Concentration depth profiles of the elements in a thin foam film made from a solution of glycerol and the cationic surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (C16TAB) were measured. The measured concentration depth profiles are used to compare the charge distribution in foam films with the charge distribution at the surface of a bulk solution. A greater charge separation was observed at the films' surface compared to the bulk surface, which implies a greater electrostatic force contribution to the stabilization of thin foam films.

  17. Compensating the Degradation of Near-Infrared Absorption of Black Silicon Caused by Thermal Annealing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanchao; Gao, Jinsong; Yang, Haigui; Wang, Xiaoyi; Shen, Zhenfeng

    2016-12-01

    We propose the use of thin Ag film deposition to remedy the degradation of near-infrared (NIR) absorption of black Si caused by high-temperature thermal annealing. A large amount of random and irregular Ag nanoparticles are formed on the microstructural surface of black Si after Ag film deposition, which compensates the degradation of NIR absorption of black Si caused by thermal annealing. The formation of Ag nanoparticles and their contributions to NIR absorption of black Si are discussed in detail.

  18. Structural effects in UO2 thin films irradiated with fission-energy Xe ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popel, A. J.; Lebedev, V. A.; Martin, P. G.; Shiryaev, A. A.; Lampronti, G. I.; Springell, R.; Kalmykov, S. N.; Scott, T. B.; Monnet, I.; Grygiel, C.; Farnan, I.

    2016-12-01

    Uranium dioxide thin films have been successfully grown on LSAT (Al10La3O51Sr14Ta7) substrates by reactive magnetron sputtering. Irradiation by 92 MeV 129Xe23+ ions to simulate fission damage that occurs within nuclear fuels caused microstructural and crystallographic changes. Initially flat and continuous thin films were produced by magnetron sputtering with a root mean square roughness of 0.35 nm determined by AFM. After irradiation, this roughness increased to 60-70 nm, with the films developing discrete microstructural features: small grains (∼3 μm), along with larger circular (up to 40 μm) and linear formations with non-uniform composition according to the SEM, AFM and EDX results. The irradiation caused significant restructuring of the UO2 films that was manifested in significant film-substrate mixing, observed through EDX analysis. Diffusion of Al from the substrate into the film in unirradiated samples was also observed.

  19. Evaporation of Particle-Stabilized Emulsion Sunscreen Films.

    PubMed

    Binks, Bernard P; Fletcher, Paul D I; Johnson, Andrew J; Marinopoulos, Ioannis; Crowther, Jonathan M; Thompson, Michael A

    2016-08-24

    We recently showed (Binks et al., ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces, 2016, DOI: 10.1021/acsami.6b02696) how evaporation of sunscreen films consisting of solutions of molecular UV filters leads to loss of UV light absorption and derived sun protection factor (SPF). In the present work, we investigate evaporation-induced effects for sunscreen films consisting of particle-stabilized emulsions containing a dissolved UV filter. The emulsions contained either droplets of propylene glycol (PG) in squalane (SQ), droplets of SQ in PG or droplets of decane in PG. In these different emulsion types, the SQ is involatile and shows no evaporation, the PG is volatile and evaporates relatively slowly, whereas the decane is relatively very volatile and evaporates quickly. We have measured the film mass and area, optical micrographs of the film structure, and the UV absorbance spectra during evaporation. For emulsion films containing the involatile SQ, evaporation of the PG causes collapse of the emulsion structure with some loss of specular UV absorbance due to light scattering. However, for these emulsions with droplets much larger than the wavelength of light, the light is scattered only at small forward angles so does not contribute to the diffuse absorbance and the film SPF. The UV filter remains soluble throughout the evaporation and thus the UV absorption by the filter and the SPF remain approximately constant. Both PG-in-SQ and SQ-in-PG films behave similarly and do not show area shrinkage by dewetting. In contrast, the decane-in-PG film shows rapid evaporative loss of the decane, followed by slower loss of the PG resulting in precipitation of the UV filter and film area shrinkage by dewetting which cause the UV absorbance and derived SPF to decrease. Measured UV spectra during evaporation are in reasonable agreement with spectra calculated using models discussed here.

  20. Formation of cobalt disilicide films on (3×3)6H-SiC(0001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platow, W.; Wood, D. K.; Tracy, K. M.; Burnette, J. E.; Nemanich, R. J.; Sayers, D. E.

    2001-03-01

    This paper presents a detailed study of thin Co films grown directly, sequentially, and by codeposition with Si on the (3×3)-R30° surface of 6H-SiC(0001). The structure, chemistry, and morphology of the films were determined using x-ray absorption fine structure, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. For directly deposited Co films (1-8 nm) graphite layers form on top of the film surface during annealing, whereas Co stays mainly unreacted over a temperature range of 300-1000 °C. The formation of CoSi2 is achieved by sequential and codeposition of Co and Si. Films annealed at 550 °C are polycrystalline and further annealing to 650 °C causes no C segregation, but there is islanding of the films. Attempts to improve film morphology and homogeneity including applying a template method and varying growth temperature are also reported.

  1. The structure of ion plated films in relation to coating properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1985-01-01

    Ion plating is an ion assisted or glow discharge deposition technique, where ions or energetic atoms transfer energy, momentum and charge to the substrate and the growing film in a manner which can be controlled to favorably modify surface, subsurface chemistry, and microstructure. The glow discharge energizing effects from the initial nucleation stages to the final film growth are discussed. As a result, adherence, coherence, internal stresses, density and morphology of the coatings are significantly improved, over the conventional (nonion-assisted) techniques which in turn favorably affect the surface initiated failures caused by friction, wear, erosion, corrosion and fatigue. Ion plated films because of their graded coating/substrate interface, fine, uniform, densely packed film structure also induce a surface strengthening effect which improved the mechanical properties such as yield, tensile strength and fatigue life. Since a uniform, continuous film can be obtained at lower nominal film thickness, this effect is of great importance in solid film lubrication and in corrosion protection.

  2. Electrochromic properties of molybdenum trioxide thin films prepared by chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Toshiro; Kanagawa, Tetsuya

    1995-05-01

    Electrochromic molybdenum trioxide thin films were prepared by chemical vapor deposition. The source material was molybdenum carbonyl. Amorphous molybdenum trioxide thin films were produced at a substrate temperature 300 C. Reduction and oxidation of the films in a 0.3M LiClO{sub 4} propylene carbonate solution caused desirable changes in optical absorption. Coulometry indicated that the coloration efficiency was 25.8 cm{sup 2}/C.

  3. A Method to Estimate Local Towed Array Angles Using Flush Mounted Hot Film Wall Shear Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-05

    during turns. In the invention, a flush mounted hot film sensor and an anemometry system are used to measure the mean and fluctuating turbulent wall...decrease in towing speed necessitated by certain maneuvers can cause the towed array to fall or sink. Suitable flush mounted hot film sensors and anemometry ...the calculated shaped of the deployed towed array 100 and the physical restraints of incorporating the hot -film sensors 108 and associated wiring into

  4. Application technology of stacked film with highly controlled edge structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichino, Katsunori; Tanouchi, Keiji; Iseki, Tomohiro; Ogata, Nobuhiro; Yamamoto, Taro; Yoshihara, Kosuke; Fujimoto, Akihiro

    2008-03-01

    On the device manufacturing, the film edge control around the wafer edge has been critical at the point of edge control of deposited film. So far, the film edge control is operated by the wafer edge exposure system and/or the edge beam remover. The immersion lithography which is applied to the device generation below 65 nm node requires more additional and severe items for film edge control. These typical requirements are position control of coating film and wafer bevel cleanness. For examples, top coat film is widely applied to the immersion lithography. But this topcoat film is easily peeled off, if top coat film edge should be directly located on the wafer substrate like Si wafer. Thus, the edge position of topcoat film must be controlled very carefully. And the particle or residues on the wafer bevel is thought to be one of the causes to generate immersion defect. Wafer bevel must be clean in order to reduce the immersion defect. Then we have developed novel application technology in order to solve these kinds of immersion defectivities. This new application technology is based on rinse solution technology and new hardware concept. This new application technology can control the edge position of coating film with high accuracy and can reduce the particle and residues. We show the edge position accuracy using our application technology and furthermore, the stability of edge position accuracy in case of multi-layered resist process. We also show the cleanness of the wafer bevel area at the same time. And we can achieve the immersion process with wide process latitude with innovative application technology.

  5. The feline blood film.

    PubMed

    Harvey, John W

    2017-05-01

    Practical relevance: Many veterinary practices have invested in quality automated hematology instruments for use in-house. However, regardless of the specific choice of analyzer, there are important hematology findings that can only be determined by microscopic examination of stained blood films. For this reason, and also for the purpose of quality control for the analyzer, a quick blood film review should be performed alongside every automated complete blood count. Even those practices that submit their blood samples to outside diagnostic laboratories for evaluation, still require the capability to examine stained blood films in emergency situations. Series outline: This is the first of a two-part article series that aims to familiarize the practitioner with normal findings on feline blood films, with a particular focus on unique features in the cat, as well as to assist with interpretation of common abnormalities. Part 1 focuses on how to prepare and examine blood films in order to maximize the reliability of the information they convey, and describes the morphology of feline erythrocytes in health and disease. Evidence base: The information and guidance offered is based on the published literature and the author's own extensive clinical pathology research.

  6. Thin film scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Warren; McKinney, George; Tzolov, Marian

    2015-03-01

    Scintillating materials convert energy flux (particles or electromagnetic waves) into light with spectral characteristic matching a subsequent light detector. Commercial scintillators such as yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) and yttrium aluminum perovskite (YAP) are commonly used. These are inefficient at lower energies due to the conductive coating present on their top surface, which is needed to avoid charging. We hypothesize that nano-structured thin film scintillators will outperform the commercial scintillators at low electron energies. We have developed alternative thin film scintillators, zinc tungstate and zinc oxide, which show promise for higher sensitivity to lower energy electrons since they are inherently conductive. Zinc tungstate films exhibit photoluminescence quantum efficiency of 74%. Cathodoluminescence spectroscopy was applied in transmission and reflection geometries. The comparison between the thin films and the YAG and YAP commercial scintillators shows much higher light output from the zinc tungstate and zinc oxide at electron energies less than 5 keV. Our films were integrated in a backscattered electron detector. This detector delivers better images than an identical detector with commercial YAG scintillator at low electron energies. Dr. Nicholas Barbi from PulseTor LLC, Dr. Anura Goonewardene, NSF Grants: #0806660, #1058829, #0923047.

  7. Epitaxial thin films

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Andrew Tye; Deshpande, Girish; Lin, Wen-Yi; Jan, Tzyy-Jiuan

    2006-04-25

    Epitatial thin films for use as buffer layers for high temperature superconductors, electrolytes in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), gas separation membranes or dielectric material in electronic devices, are disclosed. By using CCVD, CACVD or any other suitable deposition process, epitaxial films having pore-free, ideal grain boundaries, and dense structure can be formed. Several different types of materials are disclosed for use as buffer layers in high temperature superconductors. In addition, the use of epitaxial thin films for electrolytes and electrode formation in SOFCs results in densification for pore-free and ideal gain boundary/interface microstructure. Gas separation membranes for the production of oxygen and hydrogen are also disclosed. These semipermeable membranes are formed by high-quality, dense, gas-tight, pinhole free sub-micro scale layers of mixed-conducting oxides on porous ceramic substrates. Epitaxial thin films as dielectric material in capacitors are also taught herein. Capacitors are utilized according to their capacitance values which are dependent on their physical structure and dielectric permittivity. The epitaxial thin films of the current invention form low-loss dielectric layers with extremely high permittivity. This high permittivity allows for the formation of capacitors that can have their capacitance adjusted by applying a DC bias between their electrodes.

  8. Dewetting of Thin Polymer Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, P. S.; Sorensen, J. L.; Kent, M.; Jeon, H. S.

    2001-03-01

    DEWETTING OF THIN POLYMER FILMS P. S. Dixit,(1) J. L. Sorensen,(2) M. Kent,(2) H. S. Jeon*(1) (1) Department of Petroleum and Chemical Engineering, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, 801 Leroy Place, Socorro, NM 87801, jeon@nmt.edu (2) Department 1832, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM. Dewetting of thin polymer films is of technological importance for a variety of applications such as protective coatings, dielectric layers, and adhesives. Stable and smooth films are required for the above applications. Above the glass transition temperature (Tg) the instability of polymer thin films on a nonwettable substrate can be occurred. The dewetting mechanism and structure of polypropylene (Tg = -20 ^circC) and polystyrene (Tg = 100 ^circC) thin films is investigated as a function of film thickness (25 Åh < 250 Åand quenching temperature. Contact angle measurements are used in conjunction with optical microscope to check the surface homogeneity of the films. Uniform thin films are prepared by spin casting the polymer solutions onto silicon substrates with different contact angles. We found that the stable and unstable regions of the thin films as a function of the film thickness and quenching temperature, and then constructed a stability diagram for the dewetting of thin polymer films. We also found that the dewetting patterns of the thin films are affected substantially by the changes of film thickness and quenching temperature.

  9. Leading Causes of Blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cataract. Photo courtesy of National Eye Institute, NIH Cataracts Cataracts are a clouding of the lenses in your ... older people. More than 22 million Americans have cataracts. They are the leading cause of blindness in ...

  10. What Causes Varicose Veins?

    MedlinePlus

    ... weak or damaged, blood can back up and pool in your veins. This causes the veins to ... pressure in your veins due to overweight or obesity or pregnancy. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: February ...

  11. What Causes Bronchitis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... exposed to tobacco smoke, dust, fumes, vapors, or air pollution raises your risk for the condition. These lung ... the major cause of the condition. Breathing in air pollution and dust or fumes from the environment or ...

  12. What Causes Pericarditis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Cough Heart Attack Heart Palpitations Heart Surgery Hypotension Send a link ...

  13. What Causes Hemochromatosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... each parent), you're at risk for iron overload and signs and symptoms of hemochromatosis. If you ... of another disease or condition that causes iron overload. Examples of such diseases and conditions include: Certain ...

  14. What Causes Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... to cause anemia. Lack of Red Blood Cell Production Both acquired and inherited conditions and factors can ... damage the red blood cells' ability to carry oxygen. If the bone marrow is damaged, it can' ...

  15. Do Allergies Cause Asthma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... have symptoms worsen if she's exposed to specific allergens (things that cause an allergic reaction). In fact, ... type, which specifically recognizes and attaches to the allergen when the body is exposed to it. When ...

  16. Viral causes of diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Goodgame, R W

    2001-09-01

    Viruses are important causes of diarrhea. In healthy adults, the main clinical manifestation is acute, self-limited gastroenteritis. Advances in molecular diagnostics have shown that epidemics of acute gastroenteritis most frequently are due to caliciviruses spread through contaminated food or through person-to-person contact. Application of similar technology is needed to make a definitive statement about the role of such candidate viruses as rotavirus, astrovirus, and adenovirus as the cause of nonepidemic acute gastroenteritis in adults. Rarely a previously healthy adult gets acute CMV colitis. CMV and EBV mainly cause diarrhea in immunocompromised patients, however. Advances in prophylaxis and treatment have reduced the frequency and severity of these diseases. Acute infantile gastroenteritis is caused by rotavirus, calcivirus, astrovirus, and adenovirus. These viral diseases of the gut are seen by the physician as routine and rare clinical problems.

  17. Causes of Ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Type 2 (AOA1 and AOA2). Affects the Nervous System The various abnormal genes that cause ataxia have ... cord. The details of which parts of the nervous system are most affected vary with the different types ...

  18. What Causes Lactose Intolerance?

    MedlinePlus

    ... FOIA Jobs at NICHD Meetings, Conferences & Events Partnering & Donating to the ... intolerance? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Not having enough lactase in the body is the cause of lactose intolerance. The names ...

  19. What Causes Respiratory Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Causing Respiratory Failure Figure A shows the location of the lungs, airways, diaphragm, rib cage, pulmonary arteries, brain, and spinal cord ... STATEMENT FOIA NO FEAR ACT OIG CONTACT US ...

  20. Filming eugenics: teaching the history of eugenics through film.

    PubMed

    Ooten, Melissa; Trembanis, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    In teaching eugenics to undergraduate students and general public audiences, film should he considered as a provocative and fruitful medium that can generate important discussions about the intersections among eugenics, gender, class, race, and sexuality. This paper considers the use of two films, A Bill of Divorcement and The Lynchburg Story, as pedagogical tools for the history of eugenics. The authors provide background information on the films and suggestions for using the films to foster an active engagement with the historical eugenics movement.

  1. Active superconducting devices formed of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Martens, Jon S.; Beyer, James B.; Nordman, James E.; Hohenwarter, Gert K. G.

    1991-05-28

    Active superconducting devices are formed of thin films of superconductor which include a main conduction channel which has an active weak link region. The weak link region is composed of an array of links of thin film superconductor spaced from one another by voids and selected in size and thickness such that magnetic flux can propagate across the weak link region when it is superconducting. Magnetic flux applied to the weak link region will propagate across the array of links causing localized loss of superconductivity in the links and changing the effective resistance across the links. The magnetic flux can be applied from a control line formed of a superconducting film deposited coplanar with the main conduction channel and weak link region on a substrate. The devices can be formed of any type to superconductor but are particularly well suited to the high temperature superconductors since the devices can be entirely formed from coplanar films with no overlying regions. The devices can be utilized for a variety of electrical components, including switching circuits, amplifiers, oscillators and modulators, and are well suited to microwave frequency applications.

  2. Polycrystalline thin film materials and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, B.N.; Birkmire, R.W.; Phillips, J.E.; Shafarman, W.N.; Hegedus, S.S.; McCandless, B.E. . Inst. of Energy Conversion)

    1992-10-01

    Results of Phase II of a research program on polycrystalline thin film heterojunction solar cells are presented. Relations between processing, materials properties and device performance were studied. The analysis of these solar cells explains how minority carrier recombination at the interface and at grain boundaries can be reduced by doping of windows and absorber layers, such as in high efficiency CdTe and CuInSe{sub 2} based solar cells. The additional geometric dimension introduced by the polycrystallinity must be taken into consideration. The solar cells are limited by the diode current, caused by recombination in the space charge region. J-V characteristics of CuInSe{sub 2}/(CdZn)S cells were analyzed. Current-voltage and spectral response measurements were also made on high efficiency CdTe/CdS thin film solar cells prepared by vacuum evaporation. Cu-In bilayers were reacted with Se and H{sub 2}Se gas to form CuInSe{sub 2} films; the reaction pathways and the precursor were studied. Several approaches to fabrication of these thin film solar cells in a superstrate configuration were explored. A self-consistent picture of the effects of processing on the evolution of CdTe cells was developed.

  3. [Does vaccination cause disease?].

    PubMed

    Zingg, W

    2005-10-01

    Not many inventions in medical history have influenced our society as much as vaccination. The concept is old and simple. When Edward Jenner published his work on cowpox, "variolation" was quite common. In this procedure, pus of patients with mild smallpox was transferred to healthy individuals. Meanwhile smallpox has been eradicated worldwide. Diseases such as poliomyelitis, diphtheria or tetanus almost disappeared in industrialized countries. The same happened with epiglottitis and meningitis due to Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) after vaccination against Hib was introduced in Switzerland in 1990. This success was possible because of routine vaccination. Immunization is a save procedure and adverse events are much lower than complications in the natural course of the prevented diseases. However vaccinations were accused to cause diseases themselves such as asthma, multiple sclerosis, diabetes mellitus, chronic arthritis or autism. Hitherto no large cohort study or case-control-study was able to proof responsibility of vaccines in any of these diseases. Public media are eager to publish early data from surveillance reports or case reports which are descriptive and never a principle of cause and effect. In large controlled trials there was no proof that vaccination causes asthma, hepatitis-B-vaccination causes multiple sclerosis or macrophagic myofasciitis, Hib-vaccination causes diabetes mellitus, rubella-vaccination causes chronic arthritis, measles-mumps-rubella-vaccination causes gait disturbance or thiomersal causes autism. These results are rarely published in newspapers or television. Thus, many caring parents are left with negative ideas about immunization. Looking for the best for their children they withhold vaccination and give way to resurgence of preventable diseases in our communities. This must be prevented. There is more evidence than expected that vaccination is safe and this can and must be told to parents.

  4. Thermal and electrical transport in ferromagnetic metal thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avery, Azure D.

    magnitude when compared with similar experiments conducted on thin films supported by bulk substrates. This confinement to the plane of the platform and film ensures a ▿T in the x- or y-direction only. The experiment therefore enables exploration of thermoelectric effects in a completely 2-D configuration. Next, I present results of several experiments probing thermal conductivity and the Lorenz number in thin films. Both the thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity of metallic thin films is lower that bulk values from literature. The deviation of the Lorenz number from the theoretically predicted Sommerfeld value in all films indicates imbalances between the heat and charge currents in the films from scattering or additional thermal conductivity contributions from magnons and phonons. I also present results from experiments measuring the Seebeck effect or thermopower, and anisotropic magnetoresistance in ferromagnetic thin films. In these films, the thermopower scales with resistance as predicted by the Mott equation, and the magnetic field dependence of the thermopower results from the same spin-dependent scattering responsible for the AMR. I present the first results from experiments designed to probe the PNE and related effects such as the SSE in ferromagnetic thin films. The results share features previously attributed to the SSE such as linear DeltaT dependence and sign reversal on hot and cold sides of the sample, however, the voltage generated transverse to the applied ▿T is always even in applied field due to spin-dependent scattering. The data display a sinθcosθ angular dependence predicted by the PNE rather than the cosθ angular dependence expected from the SSE. In these experiments, we observe no evidence of a thermally generated spin current, and the upper limit on the SSE coefficient in our experiment is 15-30 times smaller than previously reported by experiments conducted using bulk substrates. Finally, I present first results from experiments

  5. From Written Film History to Visual Film History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petric, Vladimir

    The poor quality of most university courses in film history is due to several factors, among them the fact that there is insufficient analytical documentation and direct cinematic illustration in existent written film histories. These histories examine films on a thematic level, offering noncinematic interpretation such as literary meaning, social…

  6. The dynamics and stability of lubricating oil films during droplet transport by electrowetting in microfluidic devices

    PubMed Central

    Kleinert, Jairus; Srinivasan, Vijay; Rival, Arnaud; Delattre, Cyril; Velev, Orlin D.; Pamula, Vamsee K.

    2015-01-01

    The operation of digital microfluidic devices with water droplets manipulated by electrowetting is critically dependent on the static and dynamic stability and lubrication properties of the oil films that separate the droplets from the solid surfaces. The factors determining the stability of the films and preventing surface fouling in such systems are not yet thoroughly understood and were experimentally investigated in this study. The experiments were performed using a standard digital microfluidic cartridge in which water droplets enclosed in a thin, oil-filled gap were transported over an array of electrodes. Stable, continuous oil films separated the droplets from the surfaces when the droplets were stationary. During droplet transport, capillary waves formed in the films on the electrode surfaces as the oil menisci receded. The waves evolved into dome-shaped oil lenses. Droplet deformation and oil displacement caused the films at the surface opposite the electrode array to transform into dimples of oil trapped over the centers of the droplets. Lower actuation voltages were associated with slower film thinning and formation of fewer, but larger, oil lenses. Lower ac frequencies induced oscillations in the droplets that caused the films to rupture. Films were also destabilized by addition of surfactants to the oil or droplet phases. Such a comprehensive understanding of the oil film behavior will enable more robust electrowetting-actuated lab-on-a-chip devices through prevention of loss of species from droplets and contamination of surfaces at points where films may break. PMID:26045729

  7. The dynamics and stability of lubricating oil films during droplet transport by electrowetting in microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Kleinert, Jairus; Srinivasan, Vijay; Rival, Arnaud; Delattre, Cyril; Velev, Orlin D; Pamula, Vamsee K

    2015-05-01

    The operation of digital microfluidic devices with water droplets manipulated by electrowetting is critically dependent on the static and dynamic stability and lubrication properties of the oil films that separate the droplets from the solid surfaces. The factors determining the stability of the films and preventing surface fouling in such systems are not yet thoroughly understood and were experimentally investigated in this study. The experiments were performed using a standard digital microfluidic cartridge in which water droplets enclosed in a thin, oil-filled gap were transported over an array of electrodes. Stable, continuous oil films separated the droplets from the surfaces when the droplets were stationary. During droplet transport, capillary waves formed in the films on the electrode surfaces as the oil menisci receded. The waves evolved into dome-shaped oil lenses. Droplet deformation and oil displacement caused the films at the surface opposite the electrode array to transform into dimples of oil trapped over the centers of the droplets. Lower actuation voltages were associated with slower film thinning and formation of fewer, but larger, oil lenses. Lower ac frequencies induced oscillations in the droplets that caused the films to rupture. Films were also destabilized by addition of surfactants to the oil or droplet phases. Such a comprehensive understanding of the oil film behavior will enable more robust electrowetting-actuated lab-on-a-chip devices through prevention of loss of species from droplets and contamination of surfaces at points where films may break.

  8. Drainage, rupture, and lifetime of deionized water films: effect of dissolved gases?

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phong T; Nguyen, Anh V

    2010-03-02

    Gas bubbles coalesce in deionized (DI) water because the water (foam) films between the bubbles are not stable. The so-called hydrophobic attraction has been suggested as the cause of the film instability and the bubble coalescence. In this work, microinterferometry experiments show that foam films of ultrapure DI water can last up to 10 s and the contact time between the two gas bubble surfaces at close proximity (approximately 1 microm separation distance) significantly influences the film drainage, rupture, and lifetime. Specifically, when the two bubbles were first brought into contact, the films instantly ruptured at 0.5 microm thickness. However, the film drainage rate and rupture thickness sharply decreased and the film lifetime steeply increased with increasing contact time up to 10 min, but then they leveled off. The constant thickness of film rupture was around 35 nm. Possible contamination was vigorously investigated and ruled out. It is argued that migration of gases inherently dissolved in water might cause the transient behavior of the water films at the short contact time. The film drainage rate and instability at the long contact time were analyzed employing Eriksson et al.'s phenomenological theory of long-range hydrophobic attraction (Eriksson, J. C.; Ljunggren, S.; Claesson, P. M., J. Chem. Soc., Faraday Trans. 2 1989, 85, 163-176) and the hypothesis of water molecular structure modified by dissolved gases, and the extended Stefan-Reynolds theory by incorporating the mobility of the air-DI-water interfaces.

  9. Thin films and uses

    DOEpatents

    Baskaran, Suresh; Graff, Gordon L.; Song, Lin

    1998-01-01

    The invention provides a method for synthesizing a titanium oxide-containing film comprising the following steps: (a) preparing an aqueous solution of a titanium chelate with a titanium molarity in the range of 0.01M to 0.6M. (b) immersing a substrate in the prepared solution, (c) decomposing the titanium chelate to deposit a film on the substrate. The titanium chelate maybe decomposed acid, base, temperature or other means. A preferred method provides for the deposit of adherent titanium oxide films from C2 to C5 hydroxy carboxylic acids. In another aspect the invention is a novel article of manufacture having a titanium coating which protects the substrate against ultraviolet damage. In another aspect the invention provides novel semipermeable gas separation membranes, and a method for producing them.

  10. Holographic thin film analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. R.; Norden, B. N. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A system for the analysis and measurement of thin films in which the light output of a laser is split into two beams is discribed. The first beam is focused to illuminate the entire area of a photographic plate and the second beam is colummated and directed through a relatively small portion of the photographic plate onto the sample with the film to be observed. The surface of the sample is positioned at a slight angle with respect to a plane normal to the second beam and the light reflected from the sample arrives back at the photographic plate in a region other than through which the second beam originally passes. By making two successive exposures during the deposition of material on the surface of the sample, holograms are recorded on the photographic plate. The plate is then developed and interference lines of the hologram provide a measurement of the film or material deposited between exposure.

  11. Thin θ -film optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta, Luis

    2016-12-01

    A Chern-Simons theory in 3D is accomplished by the so-called θ term in the action (θ /2 )∫F ∧F , which contributes only to observable effects on the boundaries of such a system. When electromagnetic radiation interacts with the system, the wave is reflected and its polarization is rotated at the interface, even when both the θ system and the environment are pure vacuum. These topics have been studied extensively. Here, we investigate the optical properties of a thin θ film, where multiple internal reflections could interfere coherently. The cases of pure vacuum and a material with magnetoelectric properties are analyzed. It is found that the film reflectance is enhanced compared to ordinary non-θ systems and the interplay between magnetoelectric properties and the θ parameter yield film opacity and polarization properties which could be interesting in the case of topological insulators, among other topological systems.

  12. Thin film temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, H. P.; Przybyszewski, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Thin film surface temperature sensors were developed. The sensors were made of platinum-platinum/10 percent rhodium thermocouples with associated thin film-to-lead wire connections and sputtered on aluminum oxide coated simulated turbine blades for testing. Tests included exposure to vibration, low velocity hydrocarbon hot gas flow to 1250 K, and furnace calibrations. Thermal electromotive force was typically two percent below standard type S thermocouples. Mean time to failure was 42 hours at a hot gas flow temperature of 1250 K and an average of 15 cycles to room temperature. Failures were mainly due to separation of the platinum thin film from the aluminum oxide surface. Several techniques to improve the adhesion of the platinum are discussed.

  13. Photographic film image enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horner, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    A series of experiments were undertaken to assess the feasibility of defogging color film by the techniques of optical spatial filtering. A coherent optical processor was built using red, blue, and green laser light input and specially designed Fourier transformation lenses. An array of spatial filters was fabricated on black and white emulsion slides using the coherent optical processor. The technique was first applied to laboratory white light fogged film, and the results were successful. However, when the same technique was applied to some original Apollo X radiation fogged color negatives, the results showed no similar restoration. Examples of each experiment are presented and possible reasons for the lack of restoration in the Apollo films are discussed.

  14. Watershed models for instructional films

    Treesearch

    Peter E. Black; Raymond E. Leonard

    1970-01-01

    Watershed models, with a special sponge material that simulates soil drainage, were used to make an instructional film on subsurface flow and stream flow. Construction of the models and filming techniques are described.

  15. Thin film solar cell workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Joe; Jeffrey, Frank

    1993-01-01

    A summation of responses to questions posed to the thin-film solar cell workshop and the ensuing discussion is provided. Participants in the workshop included photovoltaic manufacturers (both thin film and crystalline), cell performance investigators, and consumers.

  16. The Nuclear Debate in Film

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling, John

    1977-01-01

    Provides a nuclear film bibliography grouped into the areas of: building and using the bomb; living with the bomb; and living with nuclear power. These films are for mature high school students and older. (MLH)

  17. Thin films for material engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasa, Kiyotaka

    2016-07-01

    Thin films are defined as two-dimensional materials formed by condensing one by one atomic/molecular/ionic species of matter in contrast to bulk three-dimensional sintered ceramics. They are grown through atomic collisional chemical reaction on a substrate surface. Thin film growth processes are fascinating for developing innovative exotic materials. On the basis of my long research on sputtering deposition, this paper firstly describes the kinetic energy effect of sputtered adatoms on thin film growth and discusses on a possibility of room-temperature growth of cubic diamond crystallites and the perovskite thin films of binary compound PbTiO3. Secondly, high-performance sputtered ferroelectric thin films with extraordinary excellent crystallinity compatible with MBE deposited thin films are described in relation to a possible application for thin-film MEMS. Finally, the present thin-film technologies are discussed in terms of a future material science and engineering.

  18. The Nuclear Debate in Film

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling, John

    1977-01-01

    Provides a nuclear film bibliography grouped into the areas of: building and using the bomb; living with the bomb; and living with nuclear power. These films are for mature high school students and older. (MLH)

  19. Fabrication and properties of a branched (NH₄)xWO₃ nanowire array film and a porous WO3 nanorod array film.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ya; Zhao, Liang; Su, Jinzhan; Li, Mingtao; Guo, Liejin

    2015-02-18

    We describe the successful fabrication of a three-dimensional branched (NH4)xWO3 nanowire array film on fluorine-doped tin oxide coated glass by a facile one-step hydrothermal method. The porous WO3 nanorod array film formed after heat treatment and recrystallization. Specifically, the branched (NH4)xWO3 nanowire array film has very thin nanowires that were about 10 nm in diameter. The results of an optical and photoelectrochemical test show that the branched (NH4)xWO3 nanowire array film could be used as a near-infrared shielder, while the porous WO3 nanorod array film can be used as a photoanode for water splitting. Moreover, the morphology, structure, and composition of the as-prepared films are revealed, and the related changes caused by heat treatment are discussed in detail.

  20. Fabrication of β-CuGaO2 thin films by ion-exchange of β-NaGaO2 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Issei; Nagatani, Hiraku; Kita, Masao; Omata, Takahisa

    2017-09-01

    β-CuGaO2 shows promise as an absorber material for use in thin-film solar cells because of its direct and narrow band gap, causing intense light absorption and high theoretical maximum conversion efficiency. β-CuGaO2 thin films were fabricated using an ion-exchange whereby Na+ ions within a sputtered β-NaGaO2 thin film were replaced with Cu+ ions from a CuCl vapor. The band gap of the film was 1.45 eV, almost identical to that of the bulk material. The basic framework of the crystal structure and the orientation of the film were preserved following the ion-exchange. Methods of obtaining high-quality, stoichiometric β-CuGaO2 thin films free of cracks are discussed.

  1. Tear Film Dynamics Around a Rigid Model Blob

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketelaar, Christiaan; Zhong, Lan; Braun, Rj; Driscoll, Ta; King-Smith, Pe; Begley, Cg

    2015-11-01

    Tear film break up (TBU) can occur after imperfections in the lipid layer arise. The imperfections may cause elevated evaporation, which causes TBU for large enough spots and grooves and for fast enough evaporation. TBU also occurs near smaller features in the lipid layer. These are apparently blobs of lipids that do not spread and which are too small for the evaporative mechanism to account for the dynamics. We investigate the tear film dynamics near a model rigid blob with a fixed constant surfactant concentration. We develop the lubrication-type equations that govern the tear film thickness, surfactant concentration, and osmolarity in the tear film beneath and near the blob. We perform numerical simulations for the evolution of the tear film thickness and analyze how the size of the blob, as well as the surfactant properties and transport, affect tear film dynamics. The thinning induced by the blob is of the correct time scale to compare with in vivo observations, and close comparison with the experiments will be made.

  2. Current Film Periodicals in English. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, Adam, Comp.

    This bibliography of about 200 periodicals dealing with film covers several types of magazine: scholarly journals on film aesthetics, like "The Film Journal"; news notes for movie fans, like "Film Nut News"; magazines which cover films as well as the other arts, like "Cue" and "After Dark"; film education periodicals, like "Media and Methods";…

  3. Thin film photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Catalano, Anthony W.; Bhushan, Manjul

    1982-01-01

    A thin film photovoltaic solar cell which utilizes a zinc phosphide semiconductor is of the homojunction type comprising an n-type conductivity region forming an electrical junction with a p-type region, both regions consisting essentially of the same semiconductor material. The n-type region is formed by treating zinc phosphide with an extrinsic dopant such as magnesium. The semiconductor is formed on a multilayer substrate which acts as an opaque contact. Various transparent contacts may be used, including a thin metal film of the same chemical composition as the n-type dopant or conductive oxides or metal grids.

  4. The neonatal tear film.

    PubMed

    Lawrenson, John G; Murphy, Paul J; Esmaeelpour, Marieh

    2003-12-01

    The importance of the tear film for the integrity of the ocular surface is well established. Full-term neonates produce tears normally, but low spontaneous blink rates during early life raises important questions regarding tear dynamics and stability. Although an afferent neural pathway that could potentially detect tear break-up is in place at birth, there is indirect evidence that the neonatal tear film is adapted to resist evaporation-mediated tear thinning. This adaptation presumably prevents drying of the ocular surface during long inter-blink periods. However, low rates of tear turnover may have important implications for the defence of the eye against potential pathogens.

  5. Thin film ceramic thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Otto (Inventor); Fralick, Gustave (Inventor); Wrbanek, John (Inventor); You, Tao (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A thin film ceramic thermocouple (10) having two ceramic thermocouple (12, 14) that are in contact with each other in at least on point to form a junction, and wherein each element was prepared in a different oxygen/nitrogen/argon plasma. Since each element is prepared under different plasma conditions, they have different electrical conductivity and different charge carrier concentration. The thin film thermocouple (10) can be transparent. A versatile ceramic sensor system having an RTD heat flux sensor can be combined with a thermocouple and a strain sensor to yield a multifunctional ceramic sensor array. The transparent ceramic temperature sensor that could ultimately be used for calibration of optical sensors.

  6. Thin film photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Catalano, A.W.; Bhushan, M.

    1982-08-03

    A thin film photovoltaic solar cell which utilizes a zinc phosphide semiconductor is of the homojunction type comprising an n-type conductivity region forming an electrical junction with a p-type region, both regions consisting essentially of the same semiconductor material. The n-type region is formed by treating zinc phosphide with an extrinsic dopant such as magnesium. The semiconductor is formed on a multilayer substrate which acts as an opaque contact. Various transparent contacts may be used, including a thin metal film of the same chemical composition as the n-type dopant or conductive oxides or metal grids. 5 figs.

  7. Thin film resonator technology.

    PubMed

    Lakin, Kenneth M

    2005-05-01

    Advances in wireless systems have placed increased demands on high performance frequency control devices for operation into the microwave range. With spectrum crowding, high bandwidth requirements, miniaturization, and low cost requirements as a background, the thin film resonator technology has evolved into the mainstream of applications. This technology has been under development for over 40 years in one form or another, but it required significant advances in integrated circuit processing to reach microwave frequencies and practical manufacturing for high-volume applications. This paper will survey the development of the thin film resonator technology and describe the core elements that give rise to resonators and filters for today's high performance wireless applications.

  8. Superconducting Electronic Film Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-14

    superconductors, yttrium , barium, copper, oxides, high, critical, temperature, thin films, tunneling, barriers, thallium, sputtering. 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on...50*C lower than that required for YBCO. In common with YBCO, the best films grew epitaxially with a c-axis orientation on SrTiO3 , LaAIO 3, and NdGaO 3...for c-axis growth were (001) faces of LaAIO 3, NdGaO 3 , SrTiO3 , MgO. yttria-stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ), 11 and (1102) sapphire. Low substrate

  9. Thin Film Phosphor Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    followed in Fig. 1. Two different garnet phases are observed in the fired films. The "low temperature " phase observed in the film treated at 9(X)°C has a... garnets ,1 121 thle experimentall~v-ob,•crved lattice constar.als correspond to the followving lmh composition for the low and high temperature phases...deposited, which is probably an yttrium rich garnet (see Figure 1). At I100)°C we start to see the appearance of both phases. As the firing temperature

  10. Biomimetic thin film deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieke, P. C.; Campbell, A. A.; Tarasevich, B. J.; Fryxell, G. E.; Bentjen, S. B.

    1991-04-01

    Surfaces derivatized with organic functional groups were used to promote the deposition of thin films of inorganic minerals. These derivatized surfaces were designed to mimic the nucleation proteins that control mineral deposition during formation of bone, shell, and other hard tissues in living organisms. By the use of derivatized substrates control was obtained over the phase of mineral deposited, the orientation of the crystal lattice and the location of deposition. These features are of considerable importance in many technically important thin films, coatings, and composite materials. Methods of derivatizing surfaces are considered and examples of controlled mineral deposition are presented.

  11. Interfacial alkane films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, T. K.; Ouyang, Jian; Ribarsky, M. W.; Landman, Uzi

    1992-09-01

    Adsorbed n-hexadecane films of thickness ~10, 20, and 40 Å are studied at 350 K via molecular-dynamics simulations. In the thickest film periodic oscillations of the density extend ~18 Å from the solid-liquid interface, the roughness fluctuations at the liquid-vapor interface are Gaussian, and the density tail is fitted by an error function. Molecules in the first adsorbed layer lie preferentially parallel to the surface exhibiting domains of intermolecular orientational alignment. The diffusion is anisotropic with the component parallel to the surface greatly enhanced in the liquid-vapor region.

  12. Sebum/Meibum Surface Film Interactions and Phase Transitional Differences.

    PubMed

    Mudgil, Poonam; Borchman, Douglas; Gerlach, Dylan; Yappert, Marta C

    2016-05-01

    Sebum may contribute to the composition of the tear film lipid layer naturally or as a contaminant artifact from collection. The aims of this study were to determine: if sebum changes the rheology of meibum surface films; if the resonance near 5.2 ppm in the 1H-NMR spectra of sebum is due to squalene (SQ); and if sebum or SQ, a major component of sebum, interacts with human meibum. Human meibum was collected from the lid margin with a platinum spatula. Human sebum was collected using lipid absorbent tape. Langmuir trough technology was used to measure the rheology of surface films. Infrared spectroscopy was used to measure lipid conformation and phase transitions. We used 1H-NMR to measure composition and confirm the primary structure of SQ. The NMR resonance near 5.2 ppm in the spectra of human sebum was from SQ which composed 28 mole percent of sebum. Both sebum and SQ lowered the lipid order of meibum. Sebum expanded meibum films at lower concentrations and condensed meibum films at higher concentrations. Sebum caused meibum to be more stable at higher pressures (greater maximum surface pressure). Physiological levels of sebum would be expected to expand or fluidize meibum making it spread better and be more surface active (qualities beneficial for tear film stability). Sebum would also be expected to stabilize the tear film lipid layer, which may allow it to withstand the high shear pressure of a blink.

  13. Thin film thermocouples for high temperature measurement on ceramic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holanda, Raymond

    1992-01-01

    Thin film thermocouples have been developed for use on metal parts in jet engines to 1000 C. However, advanced propulsion systems are being developed that will use ceramic materials and reach higher temperatures. The purpose of this work is to develop thin film thermocouples for use on ceramic materials. The thin film thermocouples are Pt13Rh/Pt fabricated by the sputtering process. Lead wires are attached using the parallel-gap welding process. The ceramic materials are silicon nitride, silicon carbide, aluminum oxide, and mullite. Both steady state and thermal cycling furnace tests were performed in the temperature range to 1500 C. High-heating-rate tests were performed in an arc lamp heat-flux-calibration facility. The fabrication of the thin film thermocouples is described. The thin film thermocouple output was compared to a reference wire thermocouple. Drift of the thin film thermocouples was determined, and causes of drift are discussed. The results of high-heating-rate tests up to 2500 C/sec are presented. The stability of the ceramic materials is examined. It is concluded that Pt13Rh/Pt thin film thermocouples are capable of meeting lifetime goals of 50 hours or more up to temperatures of 1500 C depending on the stability of the particular ceramic substrate.

  14. Reactive sputter deposition of tungsten nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Colin C.; Shah, S. Ismat

    2002-09-01

    Tungsten nitride (WNx) thin films were deposited by reactively sputtering a pure W target in an argon/nitrogen atmosphere. The nitrogen concentration in the growth chamber was varied from 2% to 60%. Film growth and properties were studied as a function of nitrogen concentration in the films. The cathode current and voltage variations during the film growth indicated cathode poisoning when the nitrogen concentration in the chamber was in the range of 2%-5%. This poisoning was accompanied by a reduced film growth rate. However, both the cathode current and deposition rate decrease were small due to the low resistivity and similar sputter yield of the WNx phase formed at the surface of the target and pure W. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses showed that the films were composed of approx33 at. % nitrogen when the nitrogen concentration in the chamber was greater than 10%. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed that the films were predominantly W2N with the characteristic (111) peak at 2theta]=37.7[deg. Slight shifts in the (111) peak position were due to excess nitrogen incorporation in interstitial positions, which caused lattice distortions. Postdeposition annealing removed the excess interstitial nitrogen and the XRD peaks shifted closer to the characteristic value. copyright 2002 American Vacuum Society.

  15. Colored thin films for specific metal ion detection.

    PubMed

    Schauer, Caroline L; Chen, Mu-San; Price, Ronald R; Schoen, Paul E; Ligler, Frances S

    2004-08-15

    This paper describes the investigation of chitosan and poly(allylamine) (PAH) for the creation of a multi-film, color-based dipstick for the detection of metal ions in solution. Thin, colored films of chitosan and PAH cross-linked with hexamethylene 1,6-di(aminocarboxysulfonate) (HDACS) are created where color is due to film thickness and optical interference effects. The films are investigated for their ability to selectively detect aqueous metal ions via changes in thickness and/or color. Chitosan-HDACS films were selective for Cr(VI) over all other metal ions tested including Cr(acac)3 and Cr(NO3)3 x 9H2O, and PAH-HDACS films were selective for Cu(II) and Cu(I) salts over all other metal ions tested. The irreversible, selective changes due to metal ion solutions were not caused by varying the pH. Potomac River water was also tested using the two films, with results indicating the presence of Cu(II) in the aqueous sample.

  16. The sprayed ZnO films: nanostructures and physical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benhaliliba, M.; Tiburcio-Silver, A.; Avila-Garcia, A.; Tavira, A.; Ocak, Y. S.; Aida, M. S.; Benouis, C. E.

    2015-08-01

    We synthesized the pure and indium-doped (IZO) ZnO films with a facile composition control spray pyrolysis route. The substrate temperature (Ts) and In-doping effects on the properties of as-grown films are investigated. The X-ray pattern confirms that the as-synthesized ZnO phase is grown along a (002) preferential plane. It is revealed that the crystalline structure is improved with a substrate temperature of 350 °C. Moreover, the morphology of as-grown films, analyzed by AFM, shows nanostructures that have grown along the c-axis. The (3 × 3 μm2) area scanned AFM surface studies give the smooth film surface RMS < 40 nm. The UV-VIS-IR measurements reveal that the sprayed films are highly transparent in the visible and IR bands. The photoluminescence analysis shows that the strong blue and yellow luminescences of 2.11 and 2.81 eV are emitted from ZnO and IZO films with a slight shift in photon energy caused by In-doping. The band gap is a bit widened by In-doping, 3.21 eV (ZnO) and 3.31 eV (IZO) and the resistivity is reduced from 385 to 8 Ω·m. An interesting result is the resistivity linear dependence on the substrate temperature of pure ZnO films.

  17. Sebum/Meibum Surface Film Interactions and Phase Transitional Differences

    PubMed Central

    Mudgil, Poonam; Borchman, Douglas; Gerlach, Dylan; Yappert, Marta C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Sebum may contribute to the composition of the tear film lipid layer naturally or as a contaminant artifact from collection. The aims of this study were to determine: if sebum changes the rheology of meibum surface films; if the resonance near 5.2 ppm in the 1H-NMR spectra of sebum is due to squalene (SQ); and if sebum or SQ, a major component of sebum, interacts with human meibum. Methods Human meibum was collected from the lid margin with a platinum spatula. Human sebum was collected using lipid absorbent tape. Langmuir trough technology was used to measure the rheology of surface films. Infrared spectroscopy was used to measure lipid conformation and phase transitions. We used 1H-NMR to measure composition and confirm the primary structure of SQ. Results The NMR resonance near 5.2 ppm in the spectra of human sebum was from SQ which composed 28 mole percent of sebum. Both sebum and SQ lowered the lipid order of meibum. Sebum expanded meibum films at lower concentrations and condensed meibum films at higher concentrations. Sebum caused meibum to be more stable at higher pressures (greater maximum surface pressure). Conclusions Physiological levels of sebum would be expected to expand or fluidize meibum making it spread better and be more surface active (qualities beneficial for tear film stability). Sebum would also be expected to stabilize the tear film lipid layer, which may allow it to withstand the high shear pressure of a blink. PMID:27145473

  18. Stress effects in prism coupling measurements of thin polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agan, S.; Ay, F.; Kocabas, A.; Aydinli, A.

    2005-02-01

    Due to the increasingly important role of some polymers in optical waveguide technologies, precise measurement of their optical properties has become important. Typically, prism coupling to slab waveguides made of materials of interest is used to measure the relevant optical parameters. However, such measurements are often complicated by the softness of the polymer films when stress is applied to the prism to couple light into the waveguides. In this work, we have investigated the optical properties of three different polymers, polystyrene (PS), polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA), and benzocyclobutane (BCB). For the first time, the dependence of the refractive index, film thickness, and birefringence on applied stress in these thin polymer films was determined by means of the prism coupling technique. Both symmetric trapezoid shaped and right-angle prisms were used to couple the light into the waveguides. It was found that trapezoid shaped prism coupling gives better results in these thin polymer films. The refractive index of PMMA was found to be in the range of 1.4869 up to 1.4876 for both TE and TM polarizations under the applied force, which causes a small decrease in the film thickness of up to 0.06 μm. PMMA waveguide films were found not to be birefringent. In contrast, both BCB and PS films exhibit birefringence albeit of opposing signs.

  19. Process for preparing superconducting film having substantially uniform phase development

    DOEpatents

    Bharacharya, R.; Parilla, P.A.; Blaugher, R.D.

    1995-12-19

    A process is disclosed for preparing a superconducting film, such as a thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide superconducting film, having substantially uniform phase development. The process comprises providing an electrodeposition bath having one or more soluble salts of one or more respective potentially superconducting metals in respective amounts adequate to yield a superconducting film upon subsequent appropriate treatment. Should all of the metals required for producing a superconducting film not be made available in the bath, such metals can be a part of the ambient during a subsequent annealing process. A soluble silver salt in an amount between about 0.1% and about 4.0% by weight of the provided other salts is also provided to the bath, and the bath is electrically energized to thereby form a plated film. The film is annealed in ambient conditions suitable to cause formation of a superconductor film. Doping with silver reduces the temperature at which the liquid phase appears during the annealing step, initiates a liquid phase throughout the entire volume of deposited material, and influences the nucleation and growth of the deposited material. 3 figs.

  20. Process for preparing superconducting film having substantially uniform phase development

    DOEpatents

    Bharacharya, Raghuthan; Parilla, Philip A.; Blaugher, Richard D.

    1995-01-01

    A process for preparing a superconducting film, such as a thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide superconducting film, having substantially uniform phase development. The process comprises providing an electrodeposition bath having one or more soluble salts of one or more respective potentially superconducting metals in respective amounts adequate to yield a superconducting film upon subsequent appropriate treatment. Should all of the metals required for producing a superconducting film not be made available in the bath, such metals can be a part of the ambient during a subsequent annealing process. A soluble silver salt in an amount between about 0.1% and about 4.0% by weight of the provided other salts is also provided to the bath, and the bath is electrically energized to thereby form a plated film. The film is annealed in ambient conditions suitable to cause formation of a superconductor film. Doping with silver reduces the temperature at which the liquid phase appears during the annealing step, initiates a liquid phase throughout the entire volume of deposited material, and influences the nucleation and growth of the deposited material.

  1. NMR characterization of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Gerald II, Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2010-06-15

    A method, apparatus, and system for characterizing thin film materials. The method, apparatus, and system includes a container for receiving a starting material, applying a gravitational force, a magnetic force, and an electric force or combinations thereof to at least the starting material, forming a thin film material, sensing an NMR signal from the thin film material and analyzing the NMR signal to characterize the thin film of material.

  2. VACUUM DEPOSITION OF THIN FILMS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The book deals with methods of obtaining and processing thin films , methods of measuring the deposition rate and thickness of thin-film layers, and...the main fields of application of thin films . Vacuum requirements and the requirements for the composition of the residual medium in thermal...evaporation and cathode sputtering are given, and modern methods of producing and measuring vacuums and the equipment used in obtaining thin films are described. (Author)

  3. Push Tester For Laminated Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugimura, Russell S.

    1991-01-01

    Small instrument used to measure brittleness of polymer film adhesively bonded to hard substrate. Penlike instrument has microball tip. Small pointer in slot on side of instrument used to calibrate and indicate spring force applied by point. Microball dents only small area of specimen. Such measurements used to measure rates of embrittlement in environmental tests of candidate laminated-film covers for photovoltaic modules. Not limited to transparent films; also used on opaque laminated films on back panels of photovoltaic modules.

  4. Aging in Thin Metallic Films.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-03-01

    indicator of film composition . Compositions were adjusted for low values of ~ in the films of interest here. Strain sensitivity can occur as a result...of inadequate compositional control during deposition or compositional modification fol l owing deposition . 0 0 The films used for the experiments...months . All films Including the ternary gold composition (Figure 2) show large changes in due to magnetic annealing , when the bias field is positioned

  5. NMR characterization of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2008-11-25

    A method, apparatus, and system for characterizing thin film materials. The method, apparatus, and system includes a container for receiving a starting material, applying a gravitational force, a magnetic force, and an electric force or combinations thereof to at least the starting material, forming a thin film material, sensing an NMR signal from the thin film material and analyzing the NMR signal to characterize the thin film of material.

  6. Processing methods of ultrathin poly(epsilon-caprolactone) films for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Tiaw, Kay Siang; Teoh, Swee Hin; Chen, Ran; Hong, Ming Hui

    2007-03-01

    Ultrathin poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) films were fabricated through biaxially drawn films made from three different methods, namely, spin casting, 2-roll milling, and solution casting. Biaxial drawn spin cast films yield thickness of 1.2 microm which is 9 and 12 times thinner that 2-roll mill and solvent cast films, respectively. The films fabricated were found to exhibit different drawing ratios. 2-roll mill film exhibits the highest drawing ratio of 4 x 4 while spin cast films can only draw up to a ratio of 2 x 2. The morphology of the films, studied using a polarized microscope and atomic force microscope, showed fine fibrillar networks of different thicknesses. Biaxially drawn 2-roll mill and solvent cast films showed thicker fibrils as compared to those for the spin cast films. Such a difference can be attributed to larger spherulites caused by slower cooling rates during melt pressing for both 2-roll mill and solvent cast films and smaller spherulites because of fast cooling during evaporation for spin cast films. Thermal analysis through differential scanning calorimetry revealed a slight increase in the peak-melting temperature after biaxial drawing. A drop in percentage crystallinity was also noted. The result of the water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) was found to be dependent on fabrication techniques that determine the spherulites formation. It was also found that the WVTR was inversely proportional to the thickness of the films. Tensile strength and modulus of the films showed significant improvements after biaxial stretching. By identifying the unique strengths of each individual PCL film produced via different techniques, it is possible to apply to different areas of membrane tissue engineering such as dermatology, ophthalmology, vascular graft engineering, and soft tissue regeneration.

  7. Rare causes of osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Marcucci, Gemma; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Summary Osteoporosis is a metabolic bone disease characterized by loss of bone mass and strength, resulting in increased risk of fractures. It is classically divided into primary (post-menopausal or senile), secondary and idiopathic forms. There are many rare diseases, that cause directly or indirectly osteoporosis. The identification and classification of most of these rare causes of osteoporosis is crucial for the specialists in endocrinology and not, in order to prevent this bone complication and to provide for an early therapy. Several pathogenic mechanisms are involved, including various aspects of bone metabolism such as: decreased bone formation, increased bone resorption, altered calcium, phosphorus and/or vitamin D homeostasis, and abnormal collagen synthesis. In this review, less common forms of primary and secondary osteoporosis are described, specifying, if applicable: genetic causes, epidemiology, clinical features, and pathogenic mechanisms causing osteoporosis. A greater awareness of all rare causes of osteoporosis could reduce the number of cases classified as idiopathic osteoporosis and allow the introduction of appropriate and timely treatments. PMID:26604941

  8. Quoting Films in English Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fehlman, Richard H.

    1987-01-01

    Argues for the validity and effectiveness of using film excerpts to teach high school English. Suggests various methods for using commercial films on VCRs to study themes, formal elements of literature, literary terms, and the aesthetic decisions behind film adaptations. (JG)

  9. Teaching Argumentative Writing through Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fluitt-Dupuy, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how watching and discussing feature films and writing reviews of these films in the English-as-a-Second/Foreign-Language classroom can be instrumental in teaching the principles of good argumentative writing within the confines of the simple movie review. Six steps for teaching a film review unit are provided. (Author/VWL)

  10. Polyheterocycle Langmuir-Blodgett Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-29

    3-alkyl thiophene) and Stearic acid LB films. Thc oricntation of single- and Multi-laycr films on platinum substrates have bccn studicd by Ncar Edgc...not surface active. The LB films were obtained by spreading a mixture of the poly(3-alkvl thiophenes) and stearic acid (C,71-5 COOH ) onto the water

  11. Analysis of Film as Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stupp, Vicki O'Donnell

    Films function as a persuasive process in that they bring about a reinforcement or change in attitude, belief, or behavior by producing a cognitive restructuring of the audience's frame of reference. Organized research into the effects of films falls into two categories: macro-media studies exploring the way films reflect the psychological…

  12. Film Study in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, David C., Ed.

    This resource book on the place of film study today is designed to assist in the planning of college courses in the history, criticism, and appreciation of motion pictures. Representative course descriptions and appraisals are given by (1) Jack C. Ellis, who describes a two-part course in film aesthetics and types of films, (2) Edward Fischer, who…

  13. Making Diamondlike Films More Transparent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, Michael J.; Kussmaul, Michael T.; Sovey, James S.; Banks, Bruce A.

    1994-01-01

    Diamondlike carbon films highly transparent to visible light made by dual-ion-beam deposition process. Hard, resistant to scratching, and hermetic. Used as protective coatings on eyeglasses, magnetic recording heads, computer hard disks, and windows in bar-code scanners. Amorphous diamondlike carbon films preferable to polycrystalline diamond films in these and other applications. Smooth and adherent and deposited at room temperature.

  14. Instructional Films: Asset or Liability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braselman, Herbert P.

    1978-01-01

    The unique capabilities of film and research findings in educational psychology, learning psychology, and cost effectiveness indicate that film is an asset to the educational process. Sufficient resources and continued training should be provided to enable teachers to use the most effective film at the optimal time. (CMV)

  15. Nonfiction Film Theory and Criticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barsam, Richard Meran, Ed.

    This anthology offers significant writings on the subject of nonfiction film, with emphasis primarily on British and American films and film makers (although the work of Alberto Cavalcanti, Leni Riefenstahl, and Joris Ivens is also represented). The first section of the book offers essays that examine and define the essential nature and idea of…

  16. Longevity Of Dry Film Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kannel, J. W.; Stockwell, R. D.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes evaluation of dry film lubricants candidate for use in rotary joints of proposed Space Station. Study included experiments and theoretical analyses focused on longevity of sputtered molybdenum disulfide films and ion-plated lead films under conditions partially simulating rolling contact.

  17. Radical Pedagogy, Prison, and Film

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Dierdre

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the work of The Inside Film project. Inside Film works with a specific group of people (prisoners and ex-prisoners) in a particular set of circumstances (in prison or on parole) exploring how film making can be used within prison education or with people who have been to prison as a means of fostering a critical engagement…

  18. Radical Pedagogy, Prison, and Film

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Dierdre

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the work of The Inside Film project. Inside Film works with a specific group of people (prisoners and ex-prisoners) in a particular set of circumstances (in prison or on parole) exploring how film making can be used within prison education or with people who have been to prison as a means of fostering a critical engagement…

  19. Analysis of Film as Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stupp, Vicki O'Donnell

    Films function as a persuasive process in that they bring about a reinforcement or change in attitude, belief, or behavior by producing a cognitive restructuring of the audience's frame of reference. Organized research into the effects of films falls into two categories: macro-media studies exploring the way films reflect the psychological…

  20. The response of Kodak EDR2 film in high-energy electron beams.

    PubMed

    Gerbi, Bruce J; Dimitroyannis, Dimitri A

    2003-10-01

    Kodak XV2 film has been a key dosimeter in radiation therapy for many years. The advantages of the recently introduced Kodak EDR2 film for photon beam dosimetry have been the focus of several IMRT verification dosimetry publications. However, no description of this film's response to electron beams exists in the literature. We initiated a study to characterize the response and utility of this film for electron beam dosimetry. We exposed a series of EDR2 films to 6, 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV electrons in addition to 6 and 18 MV x rays to develop standard characteristic curves. The linac was first calibrated to ensure that the delivered dose was known accurately. All irradiations were done at dmax in polystyrene for both photons and electrons, all films were from the same batch, and were developed at the same time. We also exposed the EDR2 films in a solid water phantom to produce central axis depth dose curves. These data were compared against percent depth dose curves measured in a water phantom using an IC-10 ion chamber, Kodak XV2 film, and a PTW electron diode. The response of this film was the same for both 6 and 18 MV x rays, but showed an apparent energy-dependent enhancement for electron beams. The response of the film also increased with increasing electron energy. This caused the percent depth dose curves using film to be shifted toward the surface compared to the ion chamber data.

  1. Fabrication of electrically bistable organic semiconducting/ferroelectric blend films by temperature controlled spin coating.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinghang; Zhang, Jianchi; Fu, Zongyuan; Weng, Junhui; Chen, Weibo; Ding, Shijin; Jiang, Yulong; Zhu, Guodong

    2015-03-25

    Organic semiconducting/ferroelectric blend films attracted much attention due to their electrical bistability and rectification properties and thereof the potential in resistive memory devices. During film deposition from the blend solution, spinodal decomposition induced phase separation, resulting in discrete semiconducting phase whose electrical property could be modulated by the continuous ferroelectric phase. However, blend films processed by common spin coating method showed extremely rough surfaces, even comparable to the film thickness, which caused large electrical leakage and thus compromised the resistive switching performance. To improve film roughness and thus increase the productivity of these resistive devices, we developed temperature controlled spin coating technique to carefully adjust the phase separation process. Here we reported our experimental results from the blend films of ferroelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene (P(VDF-TrFE)) and semiconducting poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). We conducted a series of experiments at various deposition temperatures ranging from 20 to 90 °C. The resulting films were characterized by AFM, SEM, and VPFM to determine their structure and roughness. Film roughness first decreased and then increased with the increase of deposition temperature. Electrical performance was also characterized and obviously improved insulating property was obtained from the films deposited between 50 and 70 °C. By temperature control during film deposition, it is convenient to efficiently fabricate ferroelectric/semiconducting blend films with good electrical bistability.

  2. Effects of molecular weight on permeability and microstructure of mixed ethyl-hydroxypropyl-cellulose films.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Helene; Hjärtstam, Johan; Stading, Mats; von Corswant, Christian; Larsson, Anette

    2013-01-23

    Films of ethyl cellulose (EC) and water-soluble hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) can be used for extended release coatings in oral formulations. The permeability and microstructure of free EC/HPC films with 30% w/w HPC were studied to investigate effects of EC molecular weight. Phase separation during film spraying and subsequent HPC leaching after immersion in aqueous media cause pore formation in such films. It was found that sprayed films were porous throughout the bulk of the films after water immersion. The molecular weight affected HPC leaching, pore morphology and film permeability; increasing the molecular weight resulted in decreasing permeability. A model to distinguish the major factors contributing to diffusion retardation in porous films showed that the trend in permeability was determined predominantly by factors associated with the geometry and arrangement of pores, independent of the diffusing species. The film with the highest molecular weight did, however, show an additional contribution from pore wall/permeant interactions. In addition, rapid drying and increasing molecular weight resulted in smaller pores, which suggest that phase separation kinetics affects the final microstructure of EC/HPC films. Thus, the molecular weight influences the microstructural features of pores, which are crucial for mass transport in EC/HPC films. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Growth of nitric acid hydrates on thin sulfuric acid films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Wilson, Margaret A.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1994-01-01

    Type I polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are thought to nucleate and grow on stratospheric sulfate aerosols (SSAs). To model this system, thin sulfuric acid films were exposed to water and nitric acid vapors (1-3 x 10(exp -4) Torr H2O and 1-2.5 x 10(exp -6) Torr HNO3) and subjected to cooling and heating cycles. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to probe the phase of the sulfuric acid and to identify the HNO3/H2O films that condensed. Nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) was observed to grow on crystalline sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT) films. NAT also condensed in/on supercooled H2SO4 films without causing crystallization of the sulfuric acid. This growth is consistent with NAT nucleation from ternary solutions as the first step in PSC formation.

  4. A vapour-permeable film dressing used on superficial wounds.

    PubMed

    Meuleneire, Frans

    2014-08-12

    Films are an extremely versatile dressing type that can be effectively used in the treatment of many superficial wounds, such as skin grafts, surgical wounds and superficial burns; they provide an optimal moist environment to promote healing, act as a barrier to bacteria, and afford protection from urine and faecal contamination. Unfortunately, many film dressings are difficult to handle and use traditional adhesives, which can cause trauma to the wound and surrounding skin, as well as increased wound pain at dressing removal. Mepitel® Film is a new, easy-to-use wound dressing designed with Safetac® technology that helps to minimise dressing-related trauma and pain and assist undisturbed wound healing. This article presents case studies that examine Mepitel Film's use on a variety of wounds, and reviews the findings of research that was undertaken to evaluate the benefits of using this recently developed dressing.

  5. Anisotropic Electrical Properties of Nanostructured Metallic Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahoujja, Mo; Shah, Piyush; Saragan, Andrew; Elhamri, Said; Guliants, Elena

    2011-03-01

    High surface area, porous, metallic (Ti, Cr) nanorod thin films with columnar microstructure can be deposited using conventional physical vapor deposition technique of E-beam evaporation. The technique relies on the physical vapor deposition onto a static substrate oriented in a position where flux from the source material (Ti, Cr) arrives at oblique angle. The adatoms provides geometrical shadowing which results in growth of nanorod columns in the direction of vapor source. Deposition conditions such as angle of the incoming vapor flux, substrate temperature, surface diffusion etc. have strong influence on the shape and arrangement of the columnar thin films. In this work, we demonstrate the growth and electrical characterization of these nanostructured thin films. Preliminary results on these films exhibit electrical resistivity anisotropy, when characterized by measuring their electrical resistivity using conventional van der pauw method. Origin and possible causes of this resistivity anisotropy is discussed.

  6. Free-Standing Photonic Crystal Films with Gradient Structural Colors.

    PubMed

    Ding, Haibo; Liu, Cihui; Ye, Baofen; Fu, Fanfan; Wang, Huan; Zhao, Yuanjin; Gu, Zhongze

    2016-03-23

    Hydrogel colloidal crystal composite materials have a demonstrated value in responsive photonic crystals (PhCs) via controllable stimuli. Although they have been successfully exploited to generate a gradient of color distribution, the soft hydrogels have limitations in terms of stability and storage caused by dependence on environment. Here, we present a practical strategy to fabricate free-standing PhC films with a stable gradient of structural colors using binary polymer networks. A colloidal crystal hydrogel film was prepared for this purpose, with continuously varying photonic band gaps corresponding to the gradient of the press. Then, a second polymer network was used to lock the inside non-close-packed PhC structures and color distribution of the hydrogel film. It was demonstrated that our strategy could bring about a solution to the angle-dependent structural colors of the PhC films by coating the surface with special microstructures.

  7. Controlling magnetic anisotropy in epitaxial FePt(001) films

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Zhihong; Walock, M. J.; LeClair, P.; Butler, W. H.; Mankey, G. J.

    2009-07-15

    Epitaxial equiatomic Fe{sub 50}Pt{sub 50} thin films with a variable order parameter ranging from 0 to 0.9 and Fe{sub 100-x}Pt{sub x} thin films with x ranging from 33 to 50 were deposited on MgO (001) substrates by dc sputtering. A seed layer consisting of nonmagnetic Cr (4 nm)/Pt (12 nm) was used to promote the crystallinity of the magnetic films. The crystal structure and magnetic properties were gauged using x-ray diffraction and magnetometry. The magnetic anisotropy can be controlled by changing the order parameter. For Fe{sub 100-x}Pt{sub x} films, the increase in Fe composition leads to an increase in coercivity in the hard axis loop and causes a loss of perpendicular anisotropy.

  8. A film pressure sensor based on optical fiber Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhichun; Deng, Gang; Dai, Yongbo; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2010-03-01

    The measurement of pressure is essential for the design and flying controlling of aircraft. In order to measure the surface pressures of the aircraft, the common pressure tube method and Pressure sensitive paint measurement method have their own disadvantages, and are not applicable to all aircraft structures and real time pressure monitoring. In this paper, a novel thin film pressure sensor based on Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) is proposed, using FBG measuring the tangential strain of the disk sensing film. Theoretical circle strain of the disk sensing film of the pressure sensor under pressure and temperature variation are analyzed, and the linear relationship between FBG center wavelength shift and pressure, temperature variation is gotten. The pressure and temperature calibration experiments prove the theoretical analysis. But the calibration sensing parameters are small than the calculating ones, which is caused by the constraint of optical fibre to the thin sensing film.

  9. Methods for producing complex films, and films produced thereby

    DOEpatents

    Duty, Chad E.; Bennett, Charlee J. C.; Moon, Ji -Won; Phelps, Tommy J.; Blue, Craig A.; Dai, Quanqin; Hu, Michael Z.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Jellison, Jr., Gerald E.; Love, Lonnie J.; Ott, Ronald D.; Parish, Chad M.; Walker, Steven

    2015-11-24

    A method for producing a film, the method comprising melting a layer of precursor particles on a substrate until at least a portion of the melted particles are planarized and merged to produce the film. The invention is also directed to a method for producing a photovoltaic film, the method comprising depositing particles having a photovoltaic or other property onto a substrate, and affixing the particles to the substrate, wherein the particles may or may not be subsequently melted. Also described herein are films produced by these methods, methods for producing a patterned film on a substrate, and methods for producing a multilayer structure.

  10. Fluorescence detection of trace TNT by novel cross-linking electropolymerized films both in vapor and aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Nie, Heran; Lv, Ying; Yao, Liang; Pan, Yuyu; Zhao, Yang; Li, Peng; Sun, Guannan; Ma, Yuguang; Zhang, Ming

    2014-01-15

    Electropolymerized (EP) films with high fluorescent efficiency are introduced to the detection of trace 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). Three electroactive materials TCPC, OCPC and OCz have been synthesized and their EP films have been demonstrated to be sensitive to TNT. Among them, the TCPC EP films have displayed the highest sensitivity to TNT in both vapor and aqueous medium, even in the natural water. It is proposed that the good performances would be caused by the following two factors: first, the cross-linking network of EP films can generate the cavities which benefit the TNT penetration, and remarkably increase the contact area between the EP films and TNT; second, the frontier orbits distribution leads the fast photo-induced electron transfer (PET) from the TCPC EP films to TNT. Our results prove that these EP films are promising TNT sensing candidates and provide a new method to prepare fluorescent porous films.

  11. Studies on the Surface Morphology and Orientation of CeO2 Films Deposited by Pulsed Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Develos, Katherine; Kusunoki, Masanobu; Ohshima, Shigetoshi

    1998-11-01

    We studied the surface morphology and orientation of CeO2 films grown by pulsed laser ablation (PLA) on r-cut (1\\=102) Al2O3 substrates and evaluated the effects of predeposition annealing conditions of Al2O3 and film thickness of CeO2. The annealing of Al2O3 substrates improves the smoothness of the surface and performing this in high vacuum leads to better crystallinity and orientation of deposited CeO2 films compared to those annealed in oxygen. A critical value of the film thickness was found beyond which the surface roughness increases abruptly. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) study showed that the surface of CeO2 films is characterized by a mazelike pattern. Increasing the film thickness leads to the formation of larger islands which cause the increase in the surface roughness of the films. The areal density and height of these islands increased with film thickness.

  12. Viruses causing gastroenteritis.

    PubMed

    Wilhelmi, I; Roman, E; Sánchez-Fauquier, A

    2003-04-01

    Acute gastroenteritis is one of the most common diseases in humans worldwide. Viruses are recognized as important causes of this disease, particularly in children. Since the Norwalk virus was identified as a cause of gastroenteritis, the number of viral agents associated with diarrheal disease in humans has steadily increased. Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe diarrhea in children under 5 years of age. Astrovirus, calicivirus and enteric adenovirus are also important etiologic agents of acute gastroenteritis. Other viruses, such as toroviruses, coronaviruses, picobirnaviruses and pestiviruses, are increasingly being identified as causative agents of diarrhea. In recent years, the availability of diagnostic tests, mainly immunoassays or molecular biology techniques, has increased our understanding of this group of viruses. The future development of a safe and highly effective vaccine against rotavirus could prevent, at least, cases of severe diarrhea and reduce mortality from this disease.

  13. From "A" to "Yellow Jack"; A Film-Study Film Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana Univ., Bloomington. Audio-Visual Center.

    Illustrative material in the area of film study available from the Indiana University Audio-Visual Center is listed and described. Over 250 selected films are included, representing experimental films, film classics, historically interesting films, works of recognized directors, and films which are models of film techniques. Recent film…

  14. Meningococcal Disease: Causes and Transmission

    MedlinePlus

    ... Campaign Podcast: Meningitis Immunization for Adolescents Meningitis Sepsis Causes and Spread to Others Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Causes Bacteria called Neisseria meningitidis cause meningococcal disease. About ...

  15. Common Cause Failure Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherholt, Jon; Heimann, Timothy J.; Anderson, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    High technology industries with high failure costs commonly use redundancy as a means to reduce risk. Redundant systems, whether similar or dissimilar, are susceptible to Common Cause Failures (CCF). CCF is not always considered in the design effort and, therefore, can be a major threat to success. There are several aspects to CCF which must be understood to perform an analysis which will find hidden issues that may negate redundancy. This paper will provide definition, types, a list of possible causes and some examples of CCF. Requirements and designs from NASA projects will be used in the paper as examples.

  16. [Mydocalm causing anaphylaxis].

    PubMed

    Kwaśniewski, Artur; Korbuszewska-Gontarz, Beata; Mika, Sylwia

    2003-01-01

    The case of anaphylactic shock due to Mydocalm administration is presented. 49-year-old woman suffered from spinal osteoarthritis and she was treated with NSAIDs and Mydocalm for many years. 6 weeks before admission to hospital the first anaphylactic shock was developed with loss of consciousness after oral administration of Mydocalm. Then she was admitted to the hospital in order to diagnose and verify the suspicion whether Mydocalm caused this reaction. Percutaneous test with Mydocalm was performed and it caused anaphylactic shock. Only thirteen cases like this one have been documented in the world literature. It is the first case reported in Poland.

  17. Plasmons in layered films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, J. K.; Allen, P. B.

    1985-06-01

    A random-phase-approximation theory is given for the electronic collective modes of a film containing N equally spaced layers of two-dimensional electron gas. Raman line shapes are predicted. The Giuliani-Quinn surface-plasmon intensity is enhanced in transmission geometry.

  18. The feline blood film.

    PubMed

    Harvey, John W

    2017-07-01

    Practical relevance: Many veterinary practices have invested in quality automated hematology instruments for use in-house. However, regardless of their specific choice of analyzer, there are important hematology findings that can only be determined by microscopic examination of stained blood films. For this reason, and also for the purpose of quality control for the analyzer, a quick blood film review should be performed alongside every automated complete blood count. Even those practices that submit their blood samples to outside diagnostic laboratories for evaluation, still require the capability to examine stained blood films in emergency situations. Series outline: This is the second of a two-part article series that aims to familiarize the practitioner with normal findings on feline blood films, with a particular focus on unique features in the cat, as well as to assist with interpretation of common abnormalities. Part 2 focuses on the morphology of feline leukocytes and platelets in health and disease. Evidence base: The information and guidance offered is based on the published literature and the author's own extensive clinical pathology research.

  19. Diamond films: Historical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Messier, R.

    1993-01-01

    This section is a compilation of notes and published international articles about the development of methods of depositing diamond films. Vapor deposition articles are included from American, Russian, and Japanese publications. The international competition to develop new deposition methodologies is stressed. The current status of chemical vapor deposition of diamond is assessed.

  20. Paradoxes in Film Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Thomas L.

    2006-01-01

    The author selected a simple random sample of 100 movies from the "Movie and Video Guide" (1996), by Leonard Maltin. The author's intent was to obtain some basic information on the population of roughly 19,000 movies through a small sample. The "Movie and Video Guide" by Leonard Maltin is an annual ratings guide to movies. While not all films ever…

  1. Paradoxes in Film Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Thomas L.

    2006-01-01

    The author selected a simple random sample of 100 movies from the "Movie and Video Guide" (1996), by Leonard Maltin. The author's intent was to obtain some basic information on the population of roughly 19,000 movies through a small sample. The "Movie and Video Guide" by Leonard Maltin is an annual ratings guide to movies. While not all films ever…

  2. Films in Depth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrievogel, Paul A.; Prete, Anthony T.

    Bound in a slipcover rather than in signatures, this "book" is made up of thirteen separately bound booklets. The first booklet is an introduction to the use of film in the classroom both in teaching the filmic art and in increasing the visual literacy of students on the high school and early college levels. The twelve other booklets each treat a…

  3. Thin film photovoltaic cell

    DOEpatents

    Meakin, John D.; Bragagnolo, Julio

    1982-01-01

    A thin film photovoltaic cell having a transparent electrical contact and an opaque electrical contact with a pair of semiconductors therebetween includes utilizing one of the electrical contacts as a substrate and wherein the inner surface thereof is modified by microroughening while being macro-planar.

  4. Film as Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costanzo, William

    1986-01-01

    Describes the development of a freshman English program based on the analogy of film as composition and discusses implications of this program for other teachers of writing at a time when television and movies are giving unprecedented competition to the printed page for students' attention. (HTH)

  5. Intercultural Training with Films

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roell, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Films are a great medium to use not only to practice English, but also to facilitate intercultural learning. Today English is a global language spoken by people from many countries and cultural backgrounds. Since culture greatly impacts communication, it is helpful for teachers to introduce lessons and activities that reveal how different…

  6. Films on Deafness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parlato, Salvatore J., Jr., Comp.

    This filmography on deafness, which contains summaries of 192 16mm films arranged in alphabetical order by title, covers a wide variety of topics as evidenced by the categorical title index: communication, the nature of deafness, detection and measurement of deafness, education and training, multi-handicaps, and noise pollution. Running time, date…

  7. Protein thin film machines.

    PubMed

    Federici, Stefania; Oliviero, Giulio; Hamad-Schifferli, Kimberly; Bergese, Paolo

    2010-12-01

    We report the first example of microcantilever beams that are reversibly driven by protein thin film machines fueled by cycling the salt concentration of the surrounding solution. We also show that upon the same salinity stimulus the drive can be completely reversed in its direction by introducing a surface coating ligand. Experimental results are throughout discussed within a general yet simple thermodynamic model.

  8. Introduction to Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Gary

    There are numerous ways to structure the introduction to film course so as to meet the needs of the different types of students who typically enroll. Assuming there is no production component in the course, the teacher is left with two major approaches to choose from--historical and aesthetic. The units in the course will typically be built around…

  9. Rating Films on TV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Ginette; Leyens, Jacques-Philippe

    1977-01-01

    An analysis of the film viewing habits of Belgian television viewers reveals that movies with advisories regarding sex and violence are watched more than the movies without them. However, movies with qualifications tend to be judged less interesting than movies without qualifications. (JMF)

  10. Surrealism and Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, J. H.

    This book is a critical, genre study of surrealist films including a general discussion of the backgrounds, influences, and overall traits of surrealism as a mode of artistic response to an absurdist world. Citing the impetus of Jacques Vache and Andre Breton as the originators of surrealism, the work expands upon the themes of fractured realism…

  11. A Film Canister Colorimeter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, James; James, Alan; Harman, Stephanie; Weiss, Kristen

    2002-01-01

    A low-cost, low-tech colorimeter was constructed from a film canister. The student-constructed colorimeter was used to show the Beer-Lambert relationship between absorbance and concentration and to calculate the value of the molar absorptivity for permanganate at the wavelength emission maximum for an LED. Makes comparisons between this instrument…

  12. Balloon film strain measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rand, James L.

    In order to understand the state of stress in scientific balloons, a need exists for the measurement of film deformation in flight. The results of a flight test program are reported where material strain was measured for the first time during the inflation, launch, ascent and float of a typical natural shape, zero pressure scientific balloon.

  13. Rating Films on TV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Ginette; Leyens, Jacques-Philippe

    1977-01-01

    An analysis of the film viewing habits of Belgian television viewers reveals that movies with advisories regarding sex and violence are watched more than the movies without them. However, movies with qualifications tend to be judged less interesting than movies without qualifications. (JMF)

  14. Mobile Library Filming Device.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Claud E.

    This report contains details of the study and performance test of the Mobile Filming Library Device which consists of a camera and self contained power source. Because of the cost savings and service improvement characteristics, this technique involving the use of a microfilm intermediate in the preparation of copies of material filed in full size…

  15. Surrealism and Film.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, J. H.

    This book is a critical, genre study of surrealist films including a general discussion of the backgrounds, influences, and overall traits of surrealism as a mode of artistic response to an absurdist world. Citing the impetus of Jacques Vache and Andre Breton as the originators of surrealism, the work expands upon the themes of fractured realism…

  16. Film: The Creative Eye.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sohn, David A.

    Short films are often experimental in nature. They can place aspects of the environment which are usually unnoticed in such a way as to sharpen our observations of the world, and "create a new awareness, a fuller sense of life and being." Based on the premise that visual literacy is becoming increasingly important, this book describes several…

  17. Film, Radio, and Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardesty, Carolyn, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    This journal issue covers the history of film, radio, and television in Iowa. The first article, "When Pictures and Sound Came to Iowa," summarizes the origin of movies and radio and their early beginnings in Iowa. Using old photographs and measurement charts, the viewing, reading, and listening habits of young people in 1950 and 1958…

  18. Film: The Creative Eye.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sohn, David A.

    Short films are often experimental in nature. They can place aspects of the environment which are usually unnoticed in such a way as to sharpen our observations of the world, and "create a new awareness, a fuller sense of life and being." Based on the premise that visual literacy is becoming increasingly important, this book describes several…

  19. Oxide Films RF Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER SKOWRONSKI , Marek 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING...Report Title: Oxide Films RF applications University: Carnegie Mellon University PIs: M. Skowronski & P. Salvador Agency: Office of Naval Research Award

  20. Domain switching of fatigued ferroelectric thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Tak Lim, Yun; Yeog Son, Jong E-mail: hoponpop@ulsan.ac.kr; Shin, Young-Han E-mail: hoponpop@ulsan.ac.kr

    2014-05-12

    We investigate the domain wall speed of a ferroelectric PbZr{sub 0.48}Ti{sub 0.52}O{sub 3} (PZT) thin film using an atomic force microscope incorporated with a mercury-probe system to control the degree of electrical fatigue. The depolarization field in the PZT thin film decreases with increasing the degree of electrical fatigue. We find that the wide-range activation field previously reported in ferroelectric domains result from the change of the depolarization field caused by the electrical fatigue. Domain wall speed exhibits universal behavior to the effective electric field (defined by an applied electric field minus the depolarization field), regardless of the degree of the electrical fatigue.

  1. Films: 1971/72 Catalog of Films, Film Loops and Filmstrips for Schools, Colleges and Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning Corp. of America, New York, NY.

    The films in this catalog are available for sale or rent from Learning Corporation of America. For elementary grades, films are available for use in the language arts and social studies classes. For junior and senior high, college, and adult courses, films are listed for instruction in art, music, and dance; environmental studies; United States…

  2. Thin film mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Ryan C.

    This doctoral thesis details the methods of determining mechanical properties of two classes of novel thin films suspended two-dimensional crystals and electron beam irradiated microfilms of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Thin films are used in a variety of surface coatings to alter the opto-electronic properties or increase the wear or corrosion resistance and are ideal for micro- and nanoelectromechanical system fabrication. One of the challenges in fabricating thin films is the introduction of strains which can arise due to application techniques, geometrical conformation, or other spurious conditions. Chapters 2-4 focus on two dimensional materials. This is the intrinsic limit of thin films-being constrained to one atomic or molecular unit of thickness. These materials have mechanical, electrical, and optical properties ideal for micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems with truly novel device functionality. As such, the breadth of applications that can benefit from a treatise on two dimensional film mechanics is reason enough for exploration. This study explores the anomylously high strength of two dimensional materials. Furthermore, this work also aims to bridge four main gaps in the understanding of material science: bridging the gap between ab initio calculations and finite element analysis, bridging the gap between ab initio calculations and experimental results, nanoscale to microscale, and microscale to mesoscale. A nonlinear elasticity model is used to determine the necessary elastic constants to define the strain-energy density function for finite strain. Then, ab initio calculations-density functional theory-is used to calculate the nonlinear elastic response. Chapter 2 focuses on validating this methodology with atomic force microscope nanoindentation on molybdenum disulfide. Chapter 3 explores the convergence criteria of three density functional theory solvers to further verify the numerical calculations. Chapter 4 then uses this model to investigate

  3. Teacher Dismissal for Cause

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, Brad; Schumacher, Gary; Hammonds, Craig

    2013-01-01

    This case presents a discussion of events that led to the dismissal of a teacher for cause. A first year high school principal is confronted with teacher behavior that creates a dangerous situation for students. The decision process to determine the appropriate organizational response involves a number of individuals and systems. The…

  4. What Causes Rainbows?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, John

    2004-01-01

    If one looks at a rain cloud with the Sun behind one's back, the sunlight and water drops may interact just right, revealing the familiar arc of red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet. Many of people have been pleasantly surprised to see a rainbow in the sky, but probably have not considered why they occur. Rainbows are caused by…

  5. What Causes Thrombocytopenia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... also may cause a low platelet count. The Bone Marrow Doesn't Make Enough Platelets Bone marrow is the sponge-like tissue inside the bones. ... or lymphoma (lim-FO-ma), can damage the bone marrow and destroy blood stem cells. Cancer treatments, such ...

  6. What Causes Rainbows?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, John

    2004-01-01

    If one looks at a rain cloud with the Sun behind one's back, the sunlight and water drops may interact just right, revealing the familiar arc of red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet. Many of people have been pleasantly surprised to see a rainbow in the sky, but probably have not considered why they occur. Rainbows are caused by…

  7. Landslides - Cause and effect

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Radbruch-Hall, D. H.; Varnes, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    Landslides can cause seismic disturbances; landslides can also result from seismic disturbances, and earthquake-induced slides have caused loss of life in many countries. Slides can cause disastrous flooding, particularly when landslide dams across streams are breached, and flooding may trigger slides. Slope movement in general is a major process of the geologic environment that places constraints on engineering development. In order to understand and foresee both the causes and effects of slope movement, studies must be made on a regional scale, at individual sites, and in the laboratory. Areal studies - some embracing entire countries - have shown that certain geologic conditions on slopes facilitate landsliding; these conditions include intensely sheared rocks; poorly consolidated, fine-grained clastic rocks; hard fractured rocks underlain by less resistant rocks; or loose accumulations of fine-grained surface debris. Field investigations as well as mathematical- and physical-model studies are increasing our understanding of the mechanism of slope movement in fractured rock, and assist in arriving at practical solutions to landslide problems related to all kinds of land development for human use. Progressive failure of slopes has been studied in both soil and rock mechanics. New procedures have been developed to evaluate earthquake response of embankments and slopes. The finite element method of analysis is being extensively used in the calculation of slope stability in rock broken by joints, faults, and other discontinuities. ?? 1976 International Association of Engineering Geology.

  8. Causes of Paralysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... by a virus that attacks the nerves which control motor function. > Spina bifida A neural tube defect that causes incomplete closure in the spinal column. > Spinal cord injury Involves damage to the nerves ... control voluntary muscles. > Spinal tumors Tumors are abnormal tissue ...

  9. What Causes Thyroid Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... not yet known. Certain changes in a person’s DNA can cause thyroid cells to become cancerous. DNA is the chemical in each of our cells ... parents because they are the source of our DNA. But DNA affects more than just how we ...

  10. What Causes Rett Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... is caused by mutations in X-linked MECP2 . Nature Genetics , Oct;23(2), 185–188. [top] Schollen, ... 1581. Retrieved June 23, 2012, from http://www.nature.com/ejhg/journal/v17/n12/full/ejhg200995a.html [ ...

  11. Colorless, Transparent, Aromatic Polyimide Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, A. K.; St. Clair, T. L.; Ezzell, K. S.; Ely, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    New process yields aromatic condensation polyimide films essentially colorless. Films between 90- and 100-percent transparent at visible wavelength of 500 nm. Optically transparent polyimide films made from variety of aromatic condensation polyimides. Range from very pale in color to colorless, compared to bright yellow color of conventional/ commercial aromatic polyimide film. Increased transparency achieved at no sacrifice in thermal stability, flexibility, toughness, or mechanical properties. These features extremely attractive as films or coating materials for aerospace applications or for any other applications where high optical transparency or thermal stability is required.

  12. Orientation filtering for crystalline films

    DOEpatents

    Smith, H.I.; Atwater, H.A.; Thompson, C.V.; Geis, M.W.

    1986-12-30

    A substrate is coated with a film to be recrystallized. A pattern of crystallization barriers is created in the film, for example, by etching voids in the film. An encapsulation layer is generally applied to protect the film, fill the voids and otherwise enhance a recrystallization process. Recrystallization is carried out such that certain orientations pass preferentially through the barrier, generally as a result of growth-velocity anisotropy. The result is a film of a specific predetermined crystallographic orientation, a range of orientations or a set of discrete orientations. 7 figs.

  13. Process to form mesostructured films

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Anderson, Mark T.; Ganguli, Rahul; Lu, Yunfeng

    1999-01-01

    This invention comprises a method to form a family of supported films film with pore size in the approximate range 0.8-20 nm exhibiting highly ordered microstructures and porosity derived from an ordered micellar or liquid-crystalline organic-inorganic precursor structure that forms during film deposition. Optically transparent, 100-500-nm thick films exhibiting a unique range of microstructures and uni-modal pore sizes are formed in seconds in a continuous coating operation. Applications of these films include sensors, membranes, low dielectric constant interlayers, anti-reflective coatings, and optical hosts.

  14. Orientation filtering for crystalline films

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Henry I.; Atwater, Harry A.; Thompson, Carl V.; Geis, Michael W.

    1986-12-30

    A substrate is coated with a film to be recrystallized. A pattern of crystallization barriers is created in the film, for example, by etching voids in the film. An encapsulation layer is generally applied to protect the film, fill the voids and otherwise enhance a recrystallization process. Recrystallization is carried out such that certain orientations pass preferentially through the barrier, generally as a result of growth-velocity anisotropy. The result is a film of a specific predetermined crystallographic orientation, a range of orientations or a set of discrete orientations.

  15. [Spectral emissivity of thin films].

    PubMed

    Zhong, D

    2001-02-01

    In this paper, the contribution of multiple reflections in thin film to the spectral emissivity of thin films of low absorption is discussed. The expression of emissivity of thin films derived here is related to the thin film thickness d and the optical constants n(lambda) and k(lambda). It is shown that in the special case d-->infinity the emissivity of thin films is equivalent to that of the bulk material. Realistic numerical and more precise general numerical results for the dependence of the emissivity on d, n(lambda) and k(lambda) are given.

  16. Thin-film optical initiator

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, Kenneth L.

    2001-01-01

    A thin-film optical initiator having an inert, transparent substrate, a reactive thin film, which can be either an explosive or a pyrotechnic, and a reflective thin film. The resultant thin-film optical initiator system also comprises a fiber-optic cable connected to a low-energy laser source, an output charge, and an initiator housing. The reactive thin film, which may contain very thin embedded layers or be a co-deposit of a light-absorbing material such as carbon, absorbs the incident laser light, is volumetrically heated, and explodes against the output charge, imparting about 5 to 20 times more energy than in the incident laser pulse.

  17. Dimensional scaling of perovskite ferroelectric thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keech, Ryan R.

    polycrystalline films with {001}-Lotgering factors >0.96 were grown on Pt/TiO2/SiO2/Si substrates via chemical solution deposition. It was found that both film types exhibited similar, thickness-independent high-field epsilonr of ˜300 with highly crystalline electrode/dielectric interfaces. The dielectric data suggest that irreversible domain wall motion is the major contributor to the overall dielectric response and its thickness dependence. In epitaxial films the irreversible Rayleigh coefficients reduced 85% upon decreasing thickness from 350 to 100 nm. Tmax was the only measured small signal quantity which was more thickness dependent in polycrystalline than epitaxial films. This was attributed to the relaxor nature present in the films, potentially stabilized by defect concentrations, and/or chemical inhomogeneity. The effective interfacial layers are found to contribute to the measured thickness dependence in d33,f measured by X-ray diffraction. Finally, high field piezoelectric characterization revealed a field-induced rhombohedral to tetragonal phase transition in epitaxial films. While the mechanisms causing thickness dependence are mostly understood, the functional properties of blanket PMN-PT films remain about an order of magnitude lower than what is achieved in constraint-free bulk single crystals. These property reductions are attributed to substrate clamping, and the process of declamping via lateral subdivision was studied in 300-350 nm thick, {001} oriented 70PMN-30PT films on Si substrates. In the clamped state, the films exhibit relative permittivity near 1500 and loss tangents of approximately 0.01. The films showed slim hysteresis loops with remanent polarizations of about 8 muC/cm2 and breakdown fields over 1500 kV/cm. Using optical and electron beam lithography combined with reactive ion etching, the PMN-PT films were systematically patterned down to lateral feature sizes of 200 nm in spatial scale with nearly vertical sidewalls. Upon lateral scaling

  18. Physicochemical properties and anti-Propionibacterium acnes activity of film-forming solutions containing alpha-mangostin-rich extract.

    PubMed

    Asasutjarit, Rathapon; Larpmahawong, Papassara; Fuongfuchat, Asira; Sareedenchai, Vipaporn; Veeranondha, Sukitaya

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study was to study the effect of formulation compositions on physicochemical properties and anti-Propionibacterium acnes activity of film-forming solutions containing alpha-mangostin-rich extract (AM). Film-forming solution bases and film-forming solutions containing AM were prepared by using Eudragit RL PO or Klucel LF or combinations of them as film-forming polymers. Rheological properties, pH values of the solutions, and mechanical properties of the dry films were investigated. An optimized formulation was selected and evaluated for the film surface, in vitro AM release, an anti-P. acnes activity, and potential for being a skin irritant. It was found that mechanical properties of the dry films were affected by total polymer contents, ratios of Klucel LF/Eudragit RL PO, AM, and contents of triethyl citrate. The film-forming solutions containing AM had pH values around 7.0. Their flow curves exhibited Newtonian flow behaviors. The optimized formulation provided films possessing smooth and nonporous surfaces. These films showed greater anti-P. acnes activity than their base films without toxicity to skin fibroblasts. Furthermore, AM released from the film matrix obeyed Higuchi's equation. In conclusion, the film-forming solutions containing AM had potential for treatment of acne vulgaris caused by P. acnes. However, further in vivo study is necessary to determine their efficacy and safety for using in patients suffering from acne vulgaris.

  19. Sputtered Modified Barium Titanate for Thin-Film Capacitor Applications

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Glyn J.; Kratzer, Martin; Dubs, Martin; Felzer, Heinz; Mamazza, Robert

    2012-01-01

    New apparatus and a new process for the sputter deposition of modified barium titanate thin-films were developed. Films were deposited at temperatures up to 900 °C from a Ba0.96Ca0.04Ti0.82Zr0.18O3 (BCZTO) target directly onto Si, Ni and Pt surfaces and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Film texture and crystallinity were found to depend on both deposition temperature and substrate: above 600 °C, the as-deposited films consisted of well-facetted crystallites with the cubic perovskite structure. A strongly textured Pt (111) underlayer enhanced the (001) orientation of BCZTO films deposited at 900 °C, 10 mtorr pressure and 10% oxygen in argon. Similar films deposited onto a Pt (111) textured film at 700 °C and directly onto (100) Si wafers showed relatively larger (011) and diminished intensity (00ℓ) diffraction peaks. Sputter ambients containing oxygen caused the Ni underlayers to oxidize even at 700 °C: Raising the process temperature produced more diffraction peaks of NiO with increased intensities. Thin-film capacitors were fabricated using ~500 nm thick BCZTO dielectrics and both Pt and Ni top and bottom electrodes. Small signal capacitance measurements were carried out to determine capacitance and parallel resistance at low frequencies and from these data, the relative permittivity (εr) and resistivity (ρ) of the dielectric films were calculated; values ranged from ~50 to >2,000, and from ~104 to ~1010 Ω∙cm, respectively. PMID:28816997

  20. Common Cause Failure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Britton, Paul; Ring, Rob; Novack, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    Common Cause Failures (CCFs) are a known and documented phenomenon that defeats system redundancy. CCFS are a set of dependent type of failures that can be caused by: system environments; manufacturing; transportation; storage; maintenance; and assembly, as examples. Since there are many factors that contribute to CCFs, the effects can be reduced, but they are difficult to eliminate entirely. Furthermore, failure databases sometimes fail to differentiate between independent and CCF (dependent) failure and data is limited, especially for launch vehicles. The Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of NASA's Safety and Mission Assurance Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC) is using generic data from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's database of common cause failures at nuclear power plants to estimate CCF due to the lack of a more appropriate data source. There remains uncertainty in the actual magnitude of the common cause risk estimates for different systems at this stage of the design. Given the limited data about launch vehicle CCF and that launch vehicles are a highly redundant system by design, it is important to make design decisions to account for a range of values for independent and CCFs. When investigating the design of the one-out-of-two component redundant system for launch vehicles, a response surface was constructed to represent the impact of the independent failure rate versus a common cause beta factor effect on a system's failure probability. This presentation will define a CCF and review estimation calculations. It gives a summary of reduction methodologies and a review of examples of historical CCFs. Finally, it presents the response surface and discusses the results of the different CCFs on the reliability of a one-out-of-two system.

  1. Common Cause Failure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Britton, Paul; Ring, Rob; Novack, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    Common Cause Failures (CCFs) are a known and documented phenomenon that defeats system redundancy. CCFS are a set of dependent type of failures that can be caused by: system environments; manufacturing; transportation; storage; maintenance; and assembly, as examples. Since there are many factors that contribute to CCFs, the effects can be reduced, but they are difficult to eliminate entirely. Furthermore, failure databases sometimes fail to differentiate between independent and CCF (dependent) failure and data is limited, especially for launch vehicles. The Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of NASA's Safety and Mission Assurance Directorate at Marshal Space Flight Center (MFSC) is using generic data from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's database of common cause failures at nuclear power plants to estimate CCF due to the lack of a more appropriate data source. There remains uncertainty in the actual magnitude of the common cause risk estimates for different systems at this stage of the design. Given the limited data about launch vehicle CCF and that launch vehicles are a highly redundant system by design, it is important to make design decisions to account for a range of values for independent and CCFs. When investigating the design of the one-out-of-two component redundant system for launch vehicles, a response surface was constructed to represent the impact of the independent failure rate versus a common cause beta factor effect on a system's failure probability. This presentation will define a CCF and review estimation calculations. It gives a summary of reduction methodologies and a review of examples of historical CCFs. Finally, it presents the response surface and discusses the results of the different CCFs on the reliability of a one-out-of-two system.

  2. Dynamical mechanism for coercivity tunability in the electrically controlled FePt perpendicular films with small grain size

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Chun Li, Xujing; Jiang, Yong; Yu, Guanghua; Yang, Meiyin; Gong, Kui; Li, Baohe

    2014-01-14

    This article reports property manipulations and related dynamical evolution in electromigration controlled FePt perpendicular films. Through altering voltage and treatment time of the power supply applied on the films, electronic momentum was fleetly controlled to manipulate the kinetic energy of Fe and Pt atoms based on momentum exchanges. The electromigration control behavior was proven to cause steerable ordering degree and grain growth in the films without thermal treatment. Processed FePt films with small grain size, high magnetocrystalline anisotropy, and controllable coercivity can be easily obtained. The results provide a novel method for tuning magnetic properties of other L1{sub 0} structured films.

  3. The Study of the Effect of Solvents Absorption in PET Packaging Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denktaş, Cenk; Yildirim, Hüseyin

    2007-04-01

    The effects of absorption solvents into poly(ethylene terephtalete) (PET) films, which are used as food packaging materials, was investigated by DSC, SEM and mechanical methods at various temperatures (5, 25 and 40 °C) and for different periods (1-8 weeks), respectively. Due to the interaction of PET films with solvents, there had been serious deformation on the surface morphology of PET films. Plasticizer effects occurrence, because of absorption of solvents, caused weakening of mechanical properties of PET films. As a result, there had been a 42.88 % and 39.20 % decrease in stress at break at 5 °C for 8 weeks, respectively.

  4. Tungsten-rhenium thin film thermocouples for SiC-based ceramic matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Tian, Bian; Zhang, Zhongkai; Shi, Peng; Zheng, Chen; Yu, Qiuyue; Jing, Weixuan; Jiang, Zhuangde

    2017-01-01

    A tungsten-rhenium thin film thermocouple is designed and fabricated, depending on the principle of thermal-electric effect caused by the high temperature. The characteristics of thin film thermocouples in different temperatures are investigated via numerical analysis and analog simulation. The working mechanism and thermo-electric features of the thermocouples are analyzed depending on the simulation results. Then the thin film thermocouples are fabricated and calibrated. The calibration results show that the thin film thermocouples based on the tungsten-rhenium material achieve ideal static characteristics and work well in the practical applications.

  5. Tungsten-rhenium thin film thermocouples for SiC-based ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Bian; Zhang, Zhongkai; Shi, Peng; Zheng, Chen; Yu, Qiuyue; Jing, Weixuan; Jiang, Zhuangde

    2017-01-01

    A tungsten-rhenium thin film thermocouple is designed and fabricated, depending on the principle of thermal-electric effect caused by the high temperature. The characteristics of thin film thermocouples in different temperatures are investigated via numerical analysis and analog simulation. The working mechanism and thermo-electric features of the thermocouples are analyzed depending on the simulation results. Then the thin film thermocouples are fabricated and calibrated. The calibration results show that the thin film thermocouples based on the tungsten-rhenium material achieve ideal static characteristics and work well in the practical applications.

  6. Combustion effects on film cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousar, D. C.; Ewen, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of: (1) a reactive environment on film cooling effectiveness, and (2) film cooling on rocket engine performance were determined experimentally in a rocket thrust chamber assembly operating with hydrogen and oxygen propellants at 300 psi chamber pressure. Tests were conducted using hydrogen, helium, and nitrogen film coolants in an instrumented, thin walled, steel thrust chamber. The film cooling, performance loss, and heat transfer coefficient data were correlated with the ALRC entrainment film cooling model which relates film coolant effectiveness and mixture ratio at the wall to the amount of mainstream gases entrained with the film coolant in a mixing layer. In addition, a comprehensive thermal analysis computer program, HOCOOL, was prepared from previously existing ALRC computer programs and analytical techniques.

  7. Method for making carbon films

    DOEpatents

    Tan, Ming X.

    1999-01-01

    A method for treating an organic polymer material, preferably a vinylidene chloride/vinyl chloride copolymer (Saran) to produce a flat sheet of carbon film material having a high surface area (.apprxeq.1000 m.sup.2 /g) suitable as an electrode material for super capacitor applications. The method comprises heating a vinylidene chloride/vinyl chloride copolymer film disposed between two spaced apart graphite or ceramic plates to a first temperature of about 160.degree. C. for about 14 hours to form a stabilized vinylidene chloride/vinyl chloride polymer film, thereafter heating the stabilized film to a second temperature of about 750.degree. C. in an inert atmosphere for about one hour to form a carbon film; and finally activating the carbon film to increase the surface area by heating the carbon film in an oxidizing atmosphere to a temperature of at least 750-850.degree. C. for between 1-6 hours.

  8. Professor Camillo Negro's Neuropathological Films.

    PubMed

    Chiò, Adriano; Gianetto, Claudia; Dagna, Stella

    2016-01-01

    Camillo Negro, Professor in Neurology at the University of Torino, was a pioneer of scientific film. From 1906 to 1908, with the help of his assistant Giuseppe Roasenda and in collaboration with Roberto Omegna, one of the most experienced cinematographers in Italy, he filmed some of his patients for scientific and educational purposes. During the war years, he continued his scientific film project at the Military Hospital in Torino, filming shell-shocked soldiers. In autumn 2011, the Museo Nazionale del Cinema, in partnership with the Faculty of Neurosciences of the University of Torino, presented a new critical edition of the neuropathological films directed by Negro. The Museum's collection also includes 16 mm footage probably filmed in 1930 by Doctor Fedele Negro, Camillo's son. One of these films is devoted to celebrating the effects of the so-called "Bulgarian cure" on Parkinson's disease.

  9. Thin film superconductor magnetic bearings

    DOEpatents

    Weinberger, Bernard R.

    1995-12-26

    A superconductor magnetic bearing includes a shaft (10) that is subject to a load (L) and rotatable around an axis of rotation, a magnet (12) mounted to the shaft, and a stator (14) in proximity to the shaft. The stator (14) has a superconductor thin film assembly (16) positioned to interact with the magnet (12) to produce a levitation force on the shaft (10) that supports the load (L). The thin film assembly (16) includes at least two superconductor thin films (18) and at least one substrate (20). Each thin film (18) is positioned on a substrate (20) and all the thin films are positioned such that an applied magnetic field from the magnet (12) passes through all the thin films. A similar bearing in which the thin film assembly (16) is mounted on the shaft (10) and the magnet (12) is part of the stator (14) also can be constructed.

  10. Lonsdaleite Films with Nanometer Thickness.

    PubMed

    Kvashnin, Alexander G; Sorokin, Pavel B

    2014-02-06

    We investigate the properties of potentially the stiffest quasi-2-D films with lonsdaleite structure. Using a combination of ab initio and empirical potential approaches, we analyze the elastic properties of lonsdaleite films in both elastic and inelastic regimes and compare them with graphene and diamond films. We review possible fabrication methods of lonsdaleite films using the pure nanoscale "bottom-up" paradigm: by connecting carbon layers in multilayered graphene. We propose the realization of this method in two ways: by applying direct pressure and by using the recently proposed chemically induced phase transition. For both cases, we construct the phase diagrams depending on temperature, pressure, and film thickness. Finally, we consider the electronic properties of lonsdaleite films and establish the nonlinear dependence of the band gap on the films' thicknesses and their lower effective masses in comparison with bulk crystal.

  11. Method for making carbon films

    DOEpatents

    Tan, M.X.

    1999-07-29

    A method for treating an organic polymer material, preferably a vinylidene chloride/vinyl chloride copolymer (Saran) to produce a flat sheet of carbon film material having a high surface area ([approx equal]1000 m[sup 2] /g) suitable as an electrode material for super capacitor applications. The method comprises heating a vinylidene chloride/vinyl chloride copolymer film disposed between two spaced apart graphite or ceramic plates to a first temperature of about 160 C for about 14 hours to form a stabilized vinylidene chloride/vinyl chloride polymer film, thereafter heating the stabilized film to a second temperature of about 750 C in an inert atmosphere for about one hour to form a carbon film; and finally activating the carbon film to increase the surface area by heating the carbon film in an oxidizing atmosphere to a temperature of at least 750--850 C for between 1--6 hours. 2 figs.

  12. Observation of the planar Nernst effect in permalloy and nickel thin films with in-plane thermal gradients.

    PubMed

    Avery, A D; Pufall, M R; Zink, B L

    2012-11-09

    We present experimental evidence of a transverse thermopower, or planar Nernst effect, in ferromagnetic metal thin films driven by thermal gradients applied in the plane of the films. Samples of 20 nm thick Ni and Ni(80)Fe(20) were deposited on 500 nm thick suspended Si-N thermal isolation platforms with integrated platinum strips designed originally to allow measurement of thermally generated spin currents (the spin Seebeck effect). The low thermal conductivity of the thin supporting Si-N structure results in an essentially 2D geometry that approaches the zero substrate limit, dramatically reducing the contribution of thermal gradients perpendicular to the sample plane typically found in similar experiments on bulk substrates. The voltage on the platinum strips generated transverse to the applied thermal gradient (V(T)) is linear with increasing ΔT and exhibits a sign reversal on hot and cold sides of the sample. However, V(T) is always even in applied magnetic field and shows a sinθ cosθ angular dependence, both key indicators of the planar Nernst effect. Within the 5 nV estimated error of our experiment there is no evidence of a signal from the spin Seebeck effect, which would have cosθ angular dependence, suggesting a reduced spin Seebeck coefficient in a planar, entirely thin-film geometry.

  13. Space irradiation-induced damage to graphene films.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liping; Fan, Xiaoqiang; Li, Wen; Li, Hao; Zhu, Minhao; Pu, Jibin; Xue, Qunji

    2017-09-14

    Graphene with impressive electrical, optical, chemical and mechanical properties has promising potential applications for photoelectric devices and mechanical components installed on the space facilities, which will probably face hostile environments including high-energy particulate irradiation. Here we explored the effect of simulated space irradiation on the structure and properties of large-area single-layer and multi-layer graphene films (about four layers) including atomic oxygen (AO), electron (EL) and proton (PR). AO with strong oxidizing capacity reacts with carbon atoms of graphene films and generates carbon dioxide, high-energy PR leads to polymorphic atomic defects in graphene through collision and excitation effects. Miraculously, EL irradiation causes little damage to the graphene films because of the excellent conductivity. Graphene ripples are broken by irradiation and adapt their shape or structure with respect to the substrate via thermodynamic stability, which causes the change of the physical and mechanical properties of graphene.

  14. Metal-insulator transition in low dimensional La{sub 0.75}Sr{sub 0.25}VO{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Dao, Tran M.; Mondal, Partha S.; Takamura, Y.; Arenholz, E.; Lee, Jaichan

    2011-06-15

    We report on the metal-insulator transition that occurs as a function of film thickness in ultrathin La{sub 0.75}Sr{sub 0.25}VO{sub 3} films. The metal-insulator transition displays a critical thickness of 5 unit cell. Above the critical thickness, metallic films exhibit a temperature driven metal-insulator transition with weak localization behavior. With decreasing film thickness, oxygen octahedron rotation in the films increases, causing enhanced electron-electron correlation. The electronelectron correlations in ultrathin films induce the transition from metal to insulator in addition to Anderson localization.

  15. Host thin films incorporating nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, Uzma

    The focus of this research project was the investigation of the functional properties of thin films that incorporate a secondary nanoparticulate phase. In particular to assess if the secondary nanoparticulate material enhanced a functional property of the coating on glass. In order to achieve this, new thin film deposition methods were developed, namely use of nanopowder precursors, an aerosol assisted transport technique and an aerosol into atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition system. Aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) was used to deposit 8 series of thin films on glass. Five different nanoparticles silver, gold, ceria, tungsten oxide and zinc oxide were tested and shown to successfully deposit thin films incorporating nanoparticles within a host matrix. Silver nanoparticles were synthesised and doped within a titania film by AACVD. This improved solar control properties. A unique aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) into atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition (APCVD) system was used to deposit films of Au nanoparticles and thin films of gold nanoparticles incorporated within a host titania matrix. Incorporation of high refractive index contrast metal oxide particles within a host film altered the film colour. The key goal was to test the potential of nanopowder forms and transfer the suspended nanopowder via an aerosol to a substrate in order to deposit a thin film. Discrete tungsten oxide nanoparticles or ceria nanoparticles within a titanium dioxide thin film enhanced the self-cleaning and photo-induced super-hydrophilicity. The nanopowder precursor study was extended by deposition of zinc oxide thin films incorporating Au nanoparticles and also ZnO films deposited from a ZnO nanopowder precursor. Incorporation of Au nanoparticles within a VO: host matrix improved the thermochromic response, optical and colour properties. Composite VC/TiC and Au nanoparticle/V02/Ti02 thin films displayed three useful

  16. Colorimetric gas detection by the varying thickness of a thin film of ultrasmall PTSA-coated TiO2 nanoparticles on a Si substrate

    PubMed Central

    Joost, Urmas; Šutka, Andris; Visnapuu, Meeri; Tamm, Aile; Lembinen, Meeri; Antsov, Mikk; Utt, Kathriin; Smits, Krisjanis; Nõmmiste, Ergo

    2017-01-01

    Colorimetric gas sensing is demonstrated by thin films based on ultrasmall TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) on Si substrates. The NPs are bound into the film by p-toluenesulfonic acid (PTSA) and the film is made to absorb volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Since the color of the sensing element depends on the interference of reflected light from the surface of the film and from the film/silicon substrate interface, colorimetric detection is possible by the varying thickness of the NP-based film. Indeed, VOC absorption causes significant swelling of the film. Thus, the optical path length is increased, interference wavelengths are shifted and the refractive index of the film is decreased. This causes a change of color of the sensor element visible by the naked eye. The color response is rapid and changes reversibly within seconds of exposure. The sensing element is extremely simple and cheap, and can be fabricated by common coating processes. PMID:28243561

  17. Colorimetric gas detection by the varying thickness of a thin film of ultrasmall PTSA-coated TiO2 nanoparticles on a Si substrate.

    PubMed

    Joost, Urmas; Šutka, Andris; Visnapuu, Meeri; Tamm, Aile; Lembinen, Meeri; Antsov, Mikk; Utt, Kathriin; Smits, Krisjanis; Nõmmiste, Ergo; Kisand, Vambola

    2017-01-01

    Colorimetric gas sensing is demonstrated by thin films based on ultrasmall TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) on Si substrates. The NPs are bound into the film by p-toluenesulfonic acid (PTSA) and the film is made to absorb volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Since the color of the sensing element depends on the interference of reflected light from the surface of the film and from the film/silicon substrate interface, colorimetric detection is possible by the varying thickness of the NP-based film. Indeed, VOC absorption causes significant swelling of the film. Thus, the optical path length is increased, interference wavelengths are shifted and the refractive index of the film is decreased. This causes a change of color of the sensor element visible by the naked eye. The color response is rapid and changes reversibly within seconds of exposure. The sensing element is extremely simple and cheap, and can be fabricated by common coating processes.

  18. What Causes Lupus Flares?

    PubMed

    Fernandez, David; Kirou, Kyriakos A

    2016-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the prototypic systemic autoimmune disease, follows a chronic disease course, punctuated by flares. Disease flares often occur without apparent cause, perhaps from progressive inherent buildup of autoimmunity. However, there is evidence that certain environmental factors may trigger the disease. These include exposure to UV light, infections, certain hormones, and drugs which may activate the innate and adaptive immune system, resulting in inflammation, cytotoxic effects, and clinical symptoms. Uncontrolled disease flares, as well as their treatment, especially with glucocorticoids, can cause significant organ damage. Tight surveillance and timely control of lupus flares with judicial use of effective treatments to adequately suppress the excessive immune system activation are required to bring about long term remission of the disease. We hope that new clinical trials will soon offer additional effective and target-specific biologic treatments for SLE.

  19. Atypical causes of cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ken D; Sundaram, Vinay; Ayoub, Walid S

    2014-01-01

    Cholestatic liver disease consists of a variety of disorders. Primary sclerosing cholangitis and primary biliary cirrhosis are the most commonly recognized cholestatic liver disease in the adult population, while biliary atresia and Alagille syndrome are commonly recognized in the pediatric population. In infants, the causes are usually congenital or inherited. Even though jaundice is a hallmark of cholestasis, it is not always seen in adult patients with chronic liver disease. Patients can have “silent” progressive cholestatic liver disease for years prior to development of symptoms such as jaundice and pruritus. In this review, we will discuss some of the atypical causes of cholestatic liver disease such as benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis, progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis, Alagille Syndrome, biliary atresia, total parenteral nutrition induced cholestasis and cholestasis secondary to drug induced liver injury. PMID:25071336

  20. [Unusual causes of hyperprolactinaemia].

    PubMed

    de Haar-Holleman, Amy; Musson, Ruben E A; Eelkman Rooda, Sebo Jan; Wielders, Jos P M; Demir, Ayse Y

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary adenoma is the main cause of hyperprolactinaemia; however, physicians should be aware that the pituitary is not always to blame. There are many other physiological and pathological causes for hyperprolactinaemia, and the contribution of stress, medication and the presence of macroprolactin should not be overlooked. We describe three patients - a 19-year-old female, a 28-year-old female and a 20-year-old male - in whom hyperprolactinaemia was due to medication use, physical stimulation of the nipple and a combination of macroprolactianaemia with a microadenoma, respectively. The first two case reports show that conducting a thorough patient history can prevent unnecessary imaging and laboratory costs. The third case illustrates that macroprolactinaemia and true hyperprolactinaemia may coexist. While early screening for macroprolactinaemia in an asymptomatic patient can save money, finding macroprolactinaemia in a symptomatic patient still warrants further workup.