Science.gov

Sample records for a-site ionic radius

  1. The Origin of the Ionic-Radius Ratio Rules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, William B.

    2010-01-01

    In response to a reader query, this article traces the origins of the ionic-radius ratio rules and their incorrect attribution to Linus Pauling in the chemical literature and to Victor Goldschmidt in the geochemical literature. In actual fact, the ionic-radius ratio rules were first proposed within the context of the coordination chemistry…

  2. Effects of Dopant Ionic Radius on Cerium Reduction in Epitaxial Cerium Oxide Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Nan; Orgiani, Pasquale; Di Bartolomeo, Elisabetta

    The role of trivalent rare-earth dopants in ceria epitaxial films on surface ion exchange reactivity and ion conductivity has been systematically studied. Single-crystal epitaxial films with unique crystal orientation and micro-structure nature have allowed us to rule out the influence of structural defects on both transport and surface ion exchange properties. The films conductivities were larger than those reported in literature for both polycrystalline ceramic pellets and crystalline films. An increase in oxygen vacancies and Ce 3+ concentration while decreasing the dopant ionic radius from La 3+ to Yb 3+ was observed, thus explaining the measured increased activation energy andmore » enhanced surface reactivity. The more significant ability of smaller dopant ionic radius in releasing the stress strength induced by the larger Ce 3+ ionic radius allows promoting the formation of oxygen vacancies and Ce 3+, which are two precious species in determining the efficiency of ion transport and surface ion exchange processes. This can open new perspectives in designing ceria-based materials in tailoring functional properties, either ion migration or surface reactivity, by rational cation substitutions.« less

  3. Effects of Dopant Ionic Radius on Cerium Reduction in Epitaxial Cerium Oxide Thin Films

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Nan; Orgiani, Pasquale; Di Bartolomeo, Elisabetta; ...

    2017-04-17

    The role of trivalent rare-earth dopants in ceria epitaxial films on surface ion exchange reactivity and ion conductivity has been systematically studied. Single-crystal epitaxial films with unique crystal orientation and micro-structure nature have allowed us to rule out the influence of structural defects on both transport and surface ion exchange properties. The films conductivities were larger than those reported in literature for both polycrystalline ceramic pellets and crystalline films. An increase in oxygen vacancies and Ce 3+ concentration while decreasing the dopant ionic radius from La 3+ to Yb 3+ was observed, thus explaining the measured increased activation energy andmore » enhanced surface reactivity. The more significant ability of smaller dopant ionic radius in releasing the stress strength induced by the larger Ce 3+ ionic radius allows promoting the formation of oxygen vacancies and Ce 3+, which are two precious species in determining the efficiency of ion transport and surface ion exchange processes. This can open new perspectives in designing ceria-based materials in tailoring functional properties, either ion migration or surface reactivity, by rational cation substitutions.« less

  4. Minor elements incorporation control by ionic radius and growth rate on a stalagmite from the Chauvet Cave (SE-France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdin, C.; Douville, E.; Genty, D.

    2009-12-01

    A multi-elemental study focusing on earth-alkalis (Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba), uranium and rare-earth elements (REE) in the calcite of a stalagmite from the Chauvet Cave (SE of France) has been achieved by ICP-MS. The Chau-stm6 stalagmite which grew from 33 to 11.5 ky had already been dated and the published d13C and d18O profile is used as a paleoclimatic benchmark. Ba and Sr profiles show an abrupt concentration increase at the beginning of the last deglaciation whereas U and Mg feature a decreasing trend. REY (REE+yttrium) concentrations decrease markedly during early deglaciation (between 15 and 14.5 ky). The transition corresponds to a change from a slow to a fast growth rate. These variations can be explained by the crystallographic control of ionic radii of the minor elements: incorporation of small ions compared to Ca such as U, Mg, heavy REE are favoured during slow growth period (i.e. glacial) whereas large ions such as Ba, Sr and light REE are preferentially precipitated during fast growth period (i.e. Bolling-Allerod). This crystallographic effect seems to be dominant here because the soil above the cave is sparse. And may not have played a major role on the opposite to the water-limestone interaction.

  5. CdO as the archetypical transparent conducting oxide. Systematics of dopant ionic radius and electronic structure effects on charge transport and band structure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Jin, Shu; Medvedeva, Julia E; Ireland, John R; Metz, Andrew W; Ni, Jun; Hersam, Mark C; Freeman, Arthur J; Marks, Tobin J

    2005-06-22

    A series of yttrium-doped CdO (CYO) thin films have been grown on both amorphous glass and single-crystal MgO(100) substrates at 410 degrees C by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), and their phase structure, microstructure, electrical, and optical properties have been investigated. XRD data reveal that all as-deposited CYO thin films are phase-pure and polycrystalline, with features assignable to a cubic CdO-type crystal structure. Epitaxial films grown on single-crystal MgO(100) exhibit biaxial, highly textured microstructures. These as-deposited CYO thin films exhibit excellent optical transparency, with an average transmittance of >80% in the visible range. Y doping widens the optical band gap from 2.86 to 3.27 eV via a Burstein-Moss shift. Room temperature thin film conductivities of 8,540 and 17,800 S/cm on glass and MgO(100), respectively, are obtained at an optimum Y doping level of 1.2-1.3%. Finally, electronic band structure calculations are carried out to systematically compare the structural, electronic, and optical properties of the In-, Sc-, and Y-doped CdO systems. Both experimental and theoretical results reveal that dopant ionic radius and electronic structure have a significant influence on the CdO-based TCO crystal and band structure: (1) lattice parameters contract as a function of dopant ionic radii in the order Y (1.09 A) < In (0.94 A) < Sc (0.89 A); (2) the carrier mobilities and doping efficiencies decrease in the order In > Y > Sc; (3) the dopant d state has substantial influence on the position and width of the s-based conduction band, which ultimately determines the intrinsic charge transport characteristics.

  6. Effects of ionic radius of redox-inactive bio-related metal ions on the radical-scavenging activity of flavonoids evaluated using photometric titration.

    PubMed

    Waki, Tsukasa; Kobayashi, Shigeki; Matsumoto, Ken-ichiro; Ozawa, Toshihiko; Kamada, Tadashi; Nakanishi, Ikuo

    2013-10-28

    Mg(2+) enhanced the scavenging activity of (+)-catechin and quercetin against the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH˙), while Al(3+) decreased their activity. Such effects of Mg(2+) and Al(3+) were not observed for kaempferol. Na(+) and Ca(2+) with large ionic radii showed little effect on the DPPH˙-scavenging activity of these three flavonoids.

  7. Pluto's Radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Eliot F.; Young, L. A.; Buie, M.

    2007-10-01

    The size of Pluto has been difficult to measure. Stellar occultations by Pluto have not yet probed altitudes lower than 1198 km, assuming the clear atmosphere model of Elliot, Person and Qu (2003). Differential refraction by Pluto's atmosphere attenuates the light from an occulted star to a level that is indistinguishable from the zero-level baseline long before Pluto's solid surface is a factor. Since Charon has no detectable atmosphere, its radius was well determined from a stellar occultation in 2005 (Gulbis et al. 2006, Sicardy et al. 2006). Combined with the mutual event photometry (Charon transited Pluto every 6.38 days between 1986 through 1992) - for which differential refraction is a negligible effect - the well-known radius of Charon translates into a more accurate radius for Pluto's solid surface. Our preliminary solid radius estimate for Pluto is 1161 km. We will discuss error bars and the correlations of this determination with Pluto albedo maps. We will also discuss the implications for Pluto's thermal profile, surface temperature and pressure, and constraints on the presence of a haze layer. This work is funded by NASA's Planetary Astronomy program. References Elliot, J.L., Person, M.J., & Qu, S. 2003, "Analysis of Stellar Occultation Data. II. Inversion, with Application to Pluto and Triton." AJ, 126, 1041. Gulbis, A.A.S. et al. 2006, "Charon's radius and atmospheric constraints from observations of a stellar occultation." Nature, 49, 48. Sicardy, B. et al. 2006, "Charon's size and an upper limit on its atmosphere from a stellar occultation." Nature, 49, 52.

  8. Critical role of the coupling between the octahedral rotation and A -site ionic displacements in PbZr O3 -based antiferroelectric materials investigated by in situ neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Teng; Studer, Andrew J.; Yu, Dehong; Withers, Ray L.; Feng, Yujun; Chen, Hua; Islam, S. S.; Xu, Zhuo; Liu, Yun

    2017-12-01

    This in situ neutron-diffraction study on antiferroelectric (AFE) P b0.99(N b0.02Z r0.65S n0.28T i0.05 ) O3 polycrystalline materials describes systematic structural and associated preferred orientation changes as a function of applied electric field and temperature. It is found that the pristine AFE phase can be poled into the metastable ferroelectric (FE) phase at room temperature. At this stage, both AFE and FE phases consist of modes associated with octahedral rotation and A -site ionic displacements. The temperature-induced phase transition indicates that the octahedral rotation and ionic displacements are weakly coupled in the room-temperature FE phase and decoupled in the high-temperature FE phase. However, both temperature and E -field-induced phase transitions between the AFE and high-temperature FE phase demonstrate the critical role of coupling between octahedral rotation and A -site ionic displacements in stabilizing the AFE structure, which provides not only experimental evidence to support previous theoretical calculations, but also an insight into the design and development of AFE materials. Moreover, the associated preferred orientation evolution in both AFE and FE phases is studied during the phase transitions. It is found that the formation of the preferred orientation can be controlled to tune the samples' FE and AFE properties.

  9. Crystal chemistry and the role of ionic radius in rare earth tetrasilicates: Ba2RE2Si4O12F2 (RE = Er3+-Lu3+) and Ba2RE2Si4O13 (RE = La3+-Ho3+).

    PubMed

    Fulle, Kyle; Sanjeewa, Liurukara D; McMillen, Colin D; Kolis, Joseph W

    2017-10-01

    Structural variations across a series of barium rare earth (RE) tetrasilicates are studied. Two different formulas are observed, namely those of a new cyclo-silicate fluoride, BaRE 2 Si 4 O 12 F 2 (RE = Er 3+ -Lu 3+ ) and new compounds in the Ba 2 RE 2 Si 4 O 13 (RE = La 3+ -Ho 3+ ) family, covering the whole range of ionic radii for the rare earth ions. The Ba 2 RE 2 Si 4 O 13 series is further subdivided into two polymorphs, also showing a dependence on rare earth ionic radius (space group P{\\overline 1} for La 3+ -Nd 3+ , and space group C2/c for Sm 3+ -Ho 3+ ). Two of the structure types identified are based on dinuclear rare earth units that differ in their crystal chemistries, particularly with respect to the role of fluorine as a structural director. The broad study of rare earth ions provides greater insight into understanding structural variations within silicate frameworks and the nature of f-block incorporation in oxyanion frameworks. The single crystals are grown from high-temperature (ca 953 K) hydrothermal fluids, demonstrating the versatility of the technique to access new phases containing recalcitrant rare earth oxides, enabling the study of structural trends.

  10. Radius Ratio Rule Rescue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michmerhuizen, Anna; Rose, Karine; Annankra, Wentiirim; Vander Griend, Douglas A.

    2017-01-01

    Making optimal pedagogical and predictive use of the radius ratio rule to distinguish between solid state structures that feature tetrahedral, octahedral and cubic holes requires several updated insights. A comparative analysis of the Born-Landé equation for lattice energy is developed to show that the rock salt structure is a suitable choice for…

  11. The proton radius puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonesini, Maurizio

    2017-12-01

    The FAMU (Fisica degli Atomi Muonici) experiment has the goal to measure precisely the proton Zemach radius, thus contributing to the solution of the so-called proton radius "puzzle". To this aim, it makes use of a high-intensity pulsed muon beam at RIKEN-RAL impinging on a cryogenic hydrogen target with an high-Z gas admixture and a tunable mid-IR high power laser, to measure the hyperfine (HFS) splitting of the 1S state of the muonic hydrogen. From the value of the exciting laser frequency, the energy of the HFS transition may be derived with high precision ( 10-5) and thus, via QED calculations, the Zemach radius of the proton. The experimental apparatus includes a precise fiber-SiPMT beam hodoscope and a crown of eight LaBr3 crystals and a few HPGe detectors for detection of the emitted characteristic X-rays. Preliminary runs to optimize the gas target filling and its operating conditions have been taken in 2014 and 2015-2016. The final run, with the pump laser to drive the HFS transition, is expected in 2018.

  12. Ionic skin.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jeong-Yun; Keplinger, Christoph; Whitesides, George M; Suo, Zhigang

    2014-12-03

    Electronic skins (i.e., stretchable sheets of distributed sensors) report signals using electrons, whereas natural skins report signals using ions. Here, ionic conductors are used to create a new type of sensory sheet, called "ionic skin". Ionic skins are highly stretchable, transparent, and biocompatible. They readily measure strains from 1% to 500%, and pressures as low as 1 kPa. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Ionic Graphitization of Ultrathin Films of Ionic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Kvashnin, A G; Pashkin, E Y; Yakobson, B I; Sorokin, P B

    2016-07-21

    On the basis of ab initio density functional calculations, we performed a comprehensive investigation of the general graphitization tendency in rocksalt-type structures. In this paper, we determine the critical slab thickness for a range of ionic cubic crystal systems, below which a spontaneous conversion from a cubic to a layered graphitic-like structure occurs. This conversion is driven by surface energy reduction. Using only fundamental parameters of the compounds such as the Allen electronegativity and ionic radius of the metal atom, we also develop an analytical relation to estimate the critical number of layers.

  14. Ionic Blocks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevcik, Richard S.; Gamble, Rex; Martinez, Elizabet; Schultz, Linda D.; Alexander, Susan V.

    2008-01-01

    "Ionic Blocks" is a teaching tool designed to help middle school students visualize the concepts of ions, ionic compounds, and stoichiometry. It can also assist high school students in reviewing their subject mastery. Three dimensional blocks are used to represent cations and anions, with color indicating charge (positive or negative) and size…

  15. Measurement of solar radius changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labonte, B. J.; Howard, R.

    1981-01-01

    Results of daily photometric measurements of the solar radius from Mt. Wilson over the past seven years are reported. Reduction of the full disk magnetograms yields a formal error of 0.1 arcsec in the boustrophedonic scans in the 5250.2 A FeI line. 150 scan lines comprise each observation; 1,412 observations were made from 1974-1981. Measurement procedures, determination of the scattered light of the optics and the atmosphere, and error calculations are described, noting that days of poor atmospheric visibility are omitted from the data. The horizontal diameter of the sun remains visually fixed while the vertical component changes due to atmospheric diffraction; error accounting for thermal effects, telescope aberrations, and instrument calibration are discussed, and results, within instrument accuracy, indicate no change in the solar radius over the last seven years.

  16. Predictions of Crystal Structure Based on Radius Ratio: How Reliable Are They?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathan, Lawrence C.

    1985-01-01

    Discussion of crystalline solids in undergraduate curricula often includes the use of radius ratio rules as a method for predicting which type of crystal structure is likely to be adopted by a given ionic compound. Examines this topic, establishing more definitive guidelines for the use and reliability of the rules. (JN)

  17. PREFACE: Ionic fluids Ionic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Yan; Kornyshev, Alexei; Barbosa, Marcia C.

    2009-10-01

    In spite of its apparent simplicity Coulomb law, when applied to many body systems, leads to an amazingly rich mathematical structure. The simple idea that two similarly charged objects always repel, is not necessarily true in a colloidal suspension or a dusty plasma. Neither can one simply predict the direction of the electrophoretic motion of a polyion from only knowing its chemical charge. Strong Coulomb correlations in ionic fluids result in instabilities very similar to the gas--liquid phase separation observed in atomic fluids. It is fair to say that bulk behavior of simple aqueous monovalent electrolytes is now very well understood. Unfortunately this is not the case for multivalent electrolytes or molten salts. In these systems cation-anion association leads to strong non-linear effects which manifest themselves in formations of tightly bound ionic clusters. In spite of the tremendous effort invested over the years, our understanding of these systems remains qualitative. In this special issue we have collected articles from some of the biggest experts working on ionic fluids. The papers are both experimental and theoretical. They range from simple electrolytes in the bulk and near interfaces, to polyelectrolytes, colloids, and molten salts. The special issue, covers a wide spectrum of the ongoing research on ionic fluids. All readers should find something of interest here.

  18. Radius of curvature controlled mirror

    DOEpatents

    Neil, George R.; Rathke, John Wickham; Schultheiss, Thomas John; Shinn, Michelle D.; Dillon-Townes, Lawrence A.

    2006-01-17

    A controlled radius of curvature mirror assembly comprising: a distortable mirror having a reflective surface and a rear surface; and in descending order from the rear surface; a counter-distortion plate; a flow diverter having a flow diverter aperture at the center thereof; a flow return plate having a flow return aperture at the center thereof; a thermal isolation plate having a thermal isolation plate aperture at the center thereof and a flexible heater having a rear surface and a flexible heater aperture at the center thereof; a double walled tube defining a coolant feed chamber and a coolant return chamber; said coolant feed chamber extending to and through the flow diverter aperture and terminating at the counter-distortion plate and the coolant return chamber extending to and through the thermal isolation backplate and terminating at the flow diverter; and a coolant feed and a coolant return exit at the rear of said flexible heater.

  19. Mirror with thermally controlled radius of curvature

    DOEpatents

    Neil, George R.; Shinn, Michelle D.

    2010-06-22

    A radius of curvature controlled mirror for controlling precisely the focal point of a laser beam or other light beam. The radius of curvature controlled mirror provides nearly spherical distortion of the mirror in response to differential expansion between the front and rear surfaces of the mirror. The radius of curvature controlled mirror compensates for changes in other optical components due to heating or other physical changes. The radius of curvature controlled mirror includes an arrangement for adjusting the temperature of the front surface and separately adjusting the temperature of the rear surface to control the radius of curvature. The temperature adjustment arrangements can include cooling channels within the mirror body or convection of a gas upon the surface of the mirror. A control system controls the differential expansion between the front and rear surfaces to achieve the desired radius of curvature.

  20. Critical cladding radius for hybrid cladding modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyard, Romain; Leduc, Dominique; Lupi, Cyril; Lecieux, Yann

    2018-05-01

    In this article we explore some properties of the cladding modes guided by a step-index optical fiber. We show that the hybrid modes can be grouped by pairs and that it exists a critical cladding radius for which the modes of a pair share the same electromagnetic structure. We propose a robust method to determine the critical cladding radius and use it to perform a statistical study on the influence of the characteristics of the fiber on the critical cladding radius. Finally we show the importance of the critical cladding radius with respect to the coupling coefficient between the core mode and the cladding modes inside a long period grating.

  1. Trace element partitioning between ionic crystal and liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, T.; Philpotts, J. A.; Yin, L.

    1978-01-01

    The partitioning of trace elements between ionic crystals and the melt has been correlated with lattice energy of the host. The solid-liquid partition coefficient has been expressed in terms of the difference in relative ionic radius of the trace element and the homogeneous and heterogeneous strain of the host lattice. Predictions based on this model appear to be in general agreement with data for alkali nitrates and for rare-earth elements in natural garnet phenocrysts.

  2. Thermotropic Ionic Liquid Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Axenov, Kirill V.; Laschat, Sabine

    2011-01-01

    The last five years’ achievements in the synthesis and investigation of thermotropic ionic liquid crystals are reviewed. The present review describes the mesomorphic properties displayed by organic, as well as metal-containing ionic mesogens. In addition, a short overview on the ionic polymer and self-assembled liquid crystals is given. Potential and actual applications of ionic mesogens are also discussed. PMID:28879986

  3. Thermotropic Ionic Liquid Crystals.

    PubMed

    Axenov, Kirill V; Laschat, Sabine

    2011-01-14

    The last five years' achievements in the synthesis and investigation of thermotropic ionic liquid crystals are reviewed. The present review describes the mesomorphic properties displayed by organic, as well as metal-containing ionic mesogens. In addition, a short overview on the ionic polymer and self-assembled liquid crystals is given. Potential and actual applications of ionic mesogens are also discussed.

  4. Ionic Liquids Database- (ILThermo)

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 147 NIST Ionic Liquids Database- (ILThermo) (Web, free access)   IUPAC Ionic Liquids Database, ILThermo, is a free web research tool that allows users worldwide to access an up-to-date data collection from the publications on experimental investigations of thermodynamic, and transport properties of ionic liquids as well as binary and ternary mixtures containing ionic liquids.

  5. Structure, ionic conductivity and mobile carrier density in fast ionic conducting chalcogenide glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Wenlong

    2006-01-01

    This thesis consists of six sections. The first section gives the basic research background on the ionic conduction mechanism in glass, polarization in the glass, and the method of determining the mobile carrier density in glass. The proposed work is also included in this section. The second section is a paper that characterizes the structure of MI + M 2S + (0.1 Ga 2S 3 + 0.9 GeS 2) (M = Li, Na, K and Cs) glasses using Raman and IR spectroscopy. Since the ionic radius plays an important role in determining the ionic conductivity in glasses, the glass formingmore » range for the addition of different alkalis into the basic glass forming system 0.1 Ga 2S 3 + 0.9 GeS 2 was studied. The study found that the change of the alkali radius for the same nominal composition causes significant structure change to the glasses. The third section is a paper that investigates the ionic conductivity of MI + M 2S + (0.1Ga 2S 3 + 0.9 GeS 2) (M = Li, Na, K and Cs) glasses system. Corresponding to the compositional changes in these fast ionic conducting glasses, the ionic conductivity shows changes due to the induced structural changes. The ionic radius effect on the ionic conductivity in these glasses was investigated. The fourth section is a paper that examines the mobile carrier density based upon the measurements of space charge polarization. For the first time, the charge carrier number density in fast ionic conducting chalcogenide glasses was determined. The experimental impedance data were fitted using equivalent circuits and the obtained parameters were used to determine the mobile carrier density. The influence of mobile carrier density and mobility on the ionic conductivity was separated. The fifth section is a paper that studies the structures of low-alkali-content Na 2S + B 2S 3 (x ≤ 0.2) glasses by neutron and synchrotron x-ray diffraction. Similar results were obtained both in neutron and synchrotron x-ray diffraction experiments. The results provide direct structural

  6. Management of Complications of Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kevin C.; Mathews, Alexandra L.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Treating a fracture of the distal radius may require the surgeon to make a difficult decision between surgical treatment and nonsurgical management. The use of surgical fixation has recently increased owing to complications associated with conservative treatment. However, conservative action may be necessary depending on certain patient factors. The treating surgeon must be aware of the possible complications associated with distal radius fracture treatments to prevent their occurrence. Prevention can be achieved with a proper understanding of the mechanism of these complications. This article discusses the most recent evidence on how to manage and prevent complications following a fracture of the distal radius. PMID:25934197

  7. Puzzling out the proton radius puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Mihovilovič, M.; Merkel, H.; Weber, A.

    2016-01-22

    The discrepancy between the proton charge radius extracted from the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift measurement and the best present value obtained from the elastic scattering experiments, remains unexplained and represents a burning problem of today’s nuclear physics: after more than 50 years of research the radius of a basic constituent of matter is still not understood. This paper presents a summary of the best existing proton radius measurements, followed by an overview of the possible explanations for the observed inconsistency between the hydrogen and the muonic-hydrogen data. In the last part the upcoming experiments, dedicated to remeasuring the proton radius,more » are described.« less

  8. Track Reconstruction and the Proton Radius Puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Steven; Cline, Ethan; Gilman, Ron; MUSE Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    In 2010, Pohl et al. measured the proton charge radius to be 0.84184(67) fm using muonic hydrogen spectroscopy. This value differs about 5 σ from the CODATA proton radius from measurements with electrons. Other experiments with muons and electrons have confirmed the difference and the discrepancy has been termed the `Proton Radius Puzzle.' Currently there are no explanations for the puzzle. The MUon proton Scattering Experiment (MUSE) will make a significant measurement of the proton radius with muon scattering for the first time. The experiment tracks elastic scattering of electrons and muons off of liquid hydrogen. Particle tracks are reconstructed with track fitting software GenFit. Using a simulation of MUSE, GenFit has been determined to be proficient at track reconstruction. This project has been supported by funding from National Science Foundation Grant PHY-1560077.

  9. The Thermochemical Stability of Ionic Noble Gas Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purser, Gordon H.

    1988-01-01

    Presents calculations that suggest stoichiometric, ionic, and noble gas-metal compounds may be stable. Bases calculations on estimated values of electron affinity, anionic radius for the noble gases and for the Born exponents of resulting crystals. Suggests the desirability of experiments designed to prepare compounds containing anionic,…

  10. Acidic Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Amarasekara, Ananda S

    2016-05-25

    Ionic liquid with acidic properties is an important branch in the wide ionic liquid field and the aim of this article is to cover all aspects of these acidic ionic liquids, especially focusing on the developments in the last four years. The structural diversity and synthesis of acidic ionic liquids are discussed in the introduction sections of this review. In addition, an unambiguous classification system for various types of acidic ionic liquids is presented in the introduction. The physical properties including acidity, thermo-physical properties, ionic conductivity, spectroscopy, and computational studies on acidic ionic liquids are covered in the next sections. The final section provides a comprehensive review on applications of acidic ionic liquids in a wide array of fields including catalysis, CO2 fixation, ionogel, electrolyte, fuel-cell, membrane, biomass processing, biodiesel synthesis, desulfurization of gasoline/diesel, metal processing, and metal electrodeposition.

  11. A Maximum Radius for Habitable Planets.

    PubMed

    Alibert, Yann

    2015-09-01

    We compute the maximum radius a planet can have in order to fulfill two constraints that are likely necessary conditions for habitability: 1- surface temperature and pressure compatible with the existence of liquid water, and 2- no ice layer at the bottom of a putative global ocean, that would prevent the operation of the geologic carbon cycle to operate. We demonstrate that, above a given radius, these two constraints cannot be met: in the Super-Earth mass range (1-12 Mearth), the overall maximum that a planet can have varies between 1.8 and 2.3 Rearth. This radius is reduced when considering planets with higher Fe/Si ratios, and taking into account irradiation effects on the structure of the gas envelope.

  12. External fixation techniques for distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Capo, John T; Swan, Kenneth G; Tan, Virak

    2006-04-01

    Fractures of the distal radius are common injuries. Low-energy or high-energy mechanisms may be involved. Unstable distal radius fractures present a challenge to the treating orthopaedic surgeon. External fixation is a valuable instrument for fracture reduction and stabilization. Limited open incisions, early range of motion, and treatment of complex wounds are a few of the benefits of external fixation. Fixators may be spanning or nonbridging and may be used alone or in combination with other stabilization methods to obtain and maintain distal radius fracture reduction. Augmentation with percutaneous wires allows for optimal fracture stabilization with physiologic alignment of the wrist. Moderate distraction at the carpus does not induce postoperative stiffness. The distal radioulnar joint must be assessed and may need to be stabilized. Complications of external fixation are usually minor, but must be anticipated and treated early. Level V (expert opinion).

  13. Proton radius from electron scattering data

    SciTech Connect

    Higinbotham, Douglas W.; Kabir, Al Amin; Lin, Vincent

    Background: The proton charge radius extracted from recent muonic hydrogen Lamb shift measurements is significantly smaller than that extracted from atomic hydrogen and electron scattering measurements. The discrepancy has become known as the proton radius puzzle. Purpose: In an attempt to understand the discrepancy, we review high-precision electron scattering results from Mainz, Jefferson Lab, Saskatoon and Stanford. Methods: We make use of stepwise regression techniques using the F-test as well as the Akaike information criterion to systematically determine the predictive variables to use for a given set and range of electron scattering data as well as to provide multivariate errormore » estimates. Results: Starting with the precision, low four-momentum transfer (Q 2) data from Mainz (1980) and Saskatoon (1974), we find that a stepwise regression of the Maclaurin series using the F-test as well as the Akaike information criterion justify using a linear extrapolation which yields a value for the proton radius that is consistent with the result obtained from muonic hydrogen measurements. Applying the same Maclaurin series and statistical criteria to the 2014 Rosenbluth results on GE from Mainz, we again find that the stepwise regression tends to favor a radius consistent with the muonic hydrogen radius but produces results that are extremely sensitive to the range of data included in the fit. Making use of the high-Q 2 data on G E to select functions which extrapolate to high Q 2, we find that a Pad´e (N = M = 1) statistical model works remarkably well, as does a dipole function with a 0.84 fm radius, G E(Q 2) = (1 + Q 2/0.66 GeV 2) -2. Conclusions: Rigorous applications of stepwise regression techniques and multivariate error estimates result in the extraction of a proton charge radius that is consistent with the muonic hydrogen result of 0.84 fm; either from linear extrapolation of the extreme low-Q 2 data or by use of the Pad´e approximant for extrapolation

  14. Proton radius from electron scattering data

    DOE PAGES

    Higinbotham, Douglas W.; Kabir, Al Amin; Lin, Vincent; ...

    2016-05-31

    Background: The proton charge radius extracted from recent muonic hydrogen Lamb shift measurements is significantly smaller than that extracted from atomic hydrogen and electron scattering measurements. The discrepancy has become known as the proton radius puzzle. Purpose: In an attempt to understand the discrepancy, we review high-precision electron scattering results from Mainz, Jefferson Lab, Saskatoon and Stanford. Methods: We make use of stepwise regression techniques using the F-test as well as the Akaike information criterion to systematically determine the predictive variables to use for a given set and range of electron scattering data as well as to provide multivariate errormore » estimates. Results: Starting with the precision, low four-momentum transfer (Q 2) data from Mainz (1980) and Saskatoon (1974), we find that a stepwise regression of the Maclaurin series using the F-test as well as the Akaike information criterion justify using a linear extrapolation which yields a value for the proton radius that is consistent with the result obtained from muonic hydrogen measurements. Applying the same Maclaurin series and statistical criteria to the 2014 Rosenbluth results on GE from Mainz, we again find that the stepwise regression tends to favor a radius consistent with the muonic hydrogen radius but produces results that are extremely sensitive to the range of data included in the fit. Making use of the high-Q 2 data on G E to select functions which extrapolate to high Q 2, we find that a Pad´e (N = M = 1) statistical model works remarkably well, as does a dipole function with a 0.84 fm radius, G E(Q 2) = (1 + Q 2/0.66 GeV 2) -2. Conclusions: Rigorous applications of stepwise regression techniques and multivariate error estimates result in the extraction of a proton charge radius that is consistent with the muonic hydrogen result of 0.84 fm; either from linear extrapolation of the extreme low-Q 2 data or by use of the Pad´e approximant for extrapolation

  15. Proton radius from electron scattering data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higinbotham, Douglas W.; Kabir, Al Amin; Lin, Vincent; Meekins, David; Norum, Blaine; Sawatzky, Brad

    2016-05-01

    Background: The proton charge radius extracted from recent muonic hydrogen Lamb shift measurements is significantly smaller than that extracted from atomic hydrogen and electron scattering measurements. The discrepancy has become known as the proton radius puzzle. Purpose: In an attempt to understand the discrepancy, we review high-precision electron scattering results from Mainz, Jefferson Lab, Saskatoon, and Stanford. Methods: We make use of stepwise regression techniques using the F test as well as the Akaike information criterion to systematically determine the predictive variables to use for a given set and range of electron scattering data as well as to provide multivariate error estimates. Results: Starting with the precision, low four-momentum transfer (Q2) data from Mainz (1980) and Saskatoon (1974), we find that a stepwise regression of the Maclaurin series using the F test as well as the Akaike information criterion justify using a linear extrapolation which yields a value for the proton radius that is consistent with the result obtained from muonic hydrogen measurements. Applying the same Maclaurin series and statistical criteria to the 2014 Rosenbluth results on GE from Mainz, we again find that the stepwise regression tends to favor a radius consistent with the muonic hydrogen radius but produces results that are extremely sensitive to the range of data included in the fit. Making use of the high-Q2 data on GE to select functions which extrapolate to high Q2, we find that a Padé (N =M =1 ) statistical model works remarkably well, as does a dipole function with a 0.84 fm radius, GE(Q2) =(1+Q2/0.66 GeV2) -2 . Conclusions: Rigorous applications of stepwise regression techniques and multivariate error estimates result in the extraction of a proton charge radius that is consistent with the muonic hydrogen result of 0.84 fm; either from linear extrapolation of the extremely-low-Q2 data or by use of the Padé approximant for extrapolation using a larger

  16. On the radius of habitable planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alibert, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Context. The conditions that a planet must fulfill to be habitable are not precisely known. However, it is comparatively easier to define conditions under which a planet is very likely not habitable. Finding such conditions is important as it can help select, in an ensemble of potentially observable planets, which ones should be observed in greater detail for characterization studies. Aims: Assuming, as in the Earth, that the presence of a C-cycle is a necessary condition for long-term habitability, we derive, as a function of the planetary mass, a radius above which a planet is likely not habitable. We compute the maximum radius a planet can have to fulfill two constraints: surface conditions compatible with the existence of liquid water, and no ice layer at the bottom of a putative global ocean. We demonstrate that, above a given radius, these two constraints cannot be met. Methods: We compute internal structure models of planets, using a five-layer model (core, inner mantle, outer mantle, ocean, and atmosphere), for different masses and composition of the planets (in particular, the Fe/Si ratio of the planet). Results: Our results show that for planets in the super-Earth mass range (1-12 M⊕), the maximum that a planet, with a composition similar to that of the Earth, can have varies between 1.7 and 2.2 R⊕. This radius is reduced when considering planets with higher Fe/Si ratios and taking radiation into account when computing the gas envelope structure. Conclusions: These results can be used to infer, from radius and mass determinations using high-precision transit observations like those that will soon be performed by the CHaracterizing ExOPlanet Satellite (CHEOPS), which planets are very likely not habitable, and therefore which ones should be considered as best targets for further habitability studies.

  17. Fullerol ionic fluids.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Nikhil; Dallas, Panagiotis; Rodriguez, Robert; Bourlinos, Athanasios B; Georgakilas, Vasilios; Giannelis, Emmanuel P

    2010-09-01

    We report for the first time an ionic fluid based on hydroxylated fullerenes (fullerols). The ionic fluid was synthesized by neutralizing the fully protonated fullerol with an amine terminated polyethylene/polypropylene oxide oligomer (Jeffamine). The ionic fluid was compared to a control synthesized by mixing the partially protonated form (sodium form) of the fullerols with the same oligomeric amine in the same ratio as in the ionic fluids (20 wt% fullerol). In the fullerol fluid the ionic bonding significantly perturbs the thermal transitions and melting/crystallization behavior of the amine. In contrast, both the normalized heat of fusion and crystallization of the amine in the control are similar to those of the neat amine consistent with a physical mixture of the fullerols/amine with minimal interactions. In addition to differences in thermal behavior, the fullerol ionic fluid exhibits a complex viscoelastic behavior intermediate between the neat Jeffamine (liquid-like) and the control (solid-like).

  18. Fullerol ionic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Nikhil; Dallas, Panagiotis; Rodriguez, Robert; Bourlinos, Athanasios B.; Georgakilas, Vasilios; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.

    2010-09-01

    We report for the first time an ionic fluid based on hydroxylated fullerenes (fullerols). The ionic fluid was synthesized by neutralizing the fully protonated fullerol with an amine terminated polyethylene/polypropylene oxide oligomer (Jeffamine®). The ionic fluid was compared to a control synthesized by mixing the partially protonated form (sodium form) of the fullerols with the same oligomeric amine in the same ratio as in the ionic fluids (20 wt% fullerol). In the fullerol fluid the ionic bonding significantly perturbs the thermal transitions and melting/crystallization behavior of the amine. In contrast, both the normalized heat of fusion and crystallization of the amine in the control are similar to those of the neat amine consistent with a physical mixture of the fullerols/amine with minimal interactions. In addition to differences in thermal behavior, the fullerol ionic fluid exhibits a complex viscoelastic behavior intermediate between the neat Jeffamine® (liquid-like) and the control (solid-like).

  19. Theoretical interpretation of the limiting electric conductivity in ionic solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraenkel, Dan

    2017-12-01

    The physical essence of the limiting equivalent ionic conductivity in solution, λ0i, has been a continuing challenge over almost a century. Here I briefly present an ab initio theoretical treatment providing (1) a new insight into the nature of λ0i, and (2) a mathematical formula for computing λ0i. In the new treatment, one assumes that any chosen ion i is surrounded by a spherical body of oriented solvent dipoles carrying the charge of the counterion, and the bulk solvent is a continuum with no molecular detail. λ0i is thus the result of the tandem operation, at hydrodynamic equilibrium, of the dipole body's electrophoretic and relaxation forces exerted on the drifting ion. λ0i is found to be proportional to the radius of ion i, and independent of the ionic charge. From experimental λ0i's, the ion radius can be computed as 'electric radius.' An electric ion-radius scale so derived compares well with other ion-size scales. The current theory expresses λ0i using only universal constants and unitary factors of the ionic solution, and it sheds new light on the fundamental nature of ion and charge transport in a polar liquid medium.

  20. Variations of Solar Radius Observed with RHESSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fivian, M. D.; Hudson, H. S.; Lin, R. P.

    2003-12-01

    The Solar Aspect System (SAS) of the rotating (at 15 rpm) RHESSI spacecraft has three subsystems. Each of these measures the position of the limb by sampling the full solar chord profile with a linear CCD using a narrow bandwidth filter at 670 nm. With a resolution of each CCD of 1.7 arcsec/pixel, the accuracy of each of the 6 limb positions is theoretically better than 50 mas using 4 pixels at each limb. Since the launch of RHESSI early 2002, solar limbs are sampled with at least 100 Hz. That provides a database of currently 4 x 109 single radius measurements. The main function of SAS is to determine the RHESSI pointing relative to Sun center. The observed precision of this determination has a typical instantaneous (16 Hz) value of about 200 mas (rms). We show and discuss first results of variations of solar radius observed with RHESSI.

  1. Nanoscale Ionic Liquids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    Technical Report 11 December 2005 - 30 November 2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Nanoscale Ionic Liquids 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-06-1-0012...Title: Nanoscale Ionic Liquids Principal Investigator: Emmanuel P. Giannelis Address: Materials Science and Engineering, Bard Hall, Cornell University...based fluids exhibit high ionic conductivity. The NFs are typically synthesized by grafting a charged, oligomeric corona onto the nanoparticle cores

  2. Solar radius change between 1925 and 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofia, S.; Dunham, D. W.; Dunham, J. B.; Fiala, A. D.

    1983-01-01

    From an analysis of numerous reports from different locations on the duration of totality of the solar eclipses on January 24, 1925, and February 26, 1979, it is found that the solar radius at the earlier date was 0.5 arcsec (or 375 km) larger than at the later date. The correction to the standard solar radius found for each eclipse is different when different subsets of the observations are used (for example, edge of path of totality timings compared with central timings). This is seen as suggesting the existence of systematic inaccuracies in our knowledge of the lunar figure. The differences between the corrections for both eclipses, however, are very similar for all subsets considered, indicating that changes of the solar size may be reliably inferred despite the existence of the lunar figure errors so long as there is proper consideration of the distribution of the observations. These results are regarded as strong evidence in support of the occurrence of solar radius changes on shorter than evolutionary time scales.

  3. Spontaneous Ionic Polarization in Ammonia-Based Ionic Liquid [Spontaneous Ionic Polarization in Ionic Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ki-jeong; Yuan, Hongtao; Jang, Hoyoung

    Ionic liquids and gels have attracted attention for a variety of energy storage applications, as well as for high performance electrolytes for batteries and super-capacitors. Although the electronic structure of ionic electrolytes in these applications is of practical importance for device design and improved performance, the understanding of the electronic structure of ionic liquids and gels is still at an early stage. Here we report soft x-ray spectroscopic measurements of the surface electronic structure of a representative ammonia-based ionic gel (DEME-TFSI with PSPMMA- PS copolymer). We observe that near the outermost surface, the area of the anion peak (1s Nmore » - core level in TFSI) is relatively larger than that of the cation peak (N + in DEME). This spontaneous ionic polarization of the electrolyte surface, which is absent for the pure ionic liquid without copolymer, can be directly tuned by the copolymer content in the ionic gel, and further results in a modulation in work function. Finally, these results shed new light on the control of surface electronic properties of ionic electrolytes, as well as a difference between their implementation in ionic liquids and gels.« less

  4. Spontaneous Ionic Polarization in Ammonia-Based Ionic Liquid [Spontaneous Ionic Polarization in Ionic Liquid

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Ki-jeong; Yuan, Hongtao; Jang, Hoyoung; ...

    2018-05-24

    Ionic liquids and gels have attracted attention for a variety of energy storage applications, as well as for high performance electrolytes for batteries and super-capacitors. Although the electronic structure of ionic electrolytes in these applications is of practical importance for device design and improved performance, the understanding of the electronic structure of ionic liquids and gels is still at an early stage. Here we report soft x-ray spectroscopic measurements of the surface electronic structure of a representative ammonia-based ionic gel (DEME-TFSI with PSPMMA- PS copolymer). We observe that near the outermost surface, the area of the anion peak (1s Nmore » - core level in TFSI) is relatively larger than that of the cation peak (N + in DEME). This spontaneous ionic polarization of the electrolyte surface, which is absent for the pure ionic liquid without copolymer, can be directly tuned by the copolymer content in the ionic gel, and further results in a modulation in work function. Finally, these results shed new light on the control of surface electronic properties of ionic electrolytes, as well as a difference between their implementation in ionic liquids and gels.« less

  5. Interacting charges and the classical electron radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Luca, Roberto; Di Mauro, Marco; Faella, Orazio; Naddeo, Adele

    2018-03-01

    The equation of the motion of a point charge q repelled by a fixed point-like charge Q is derived and studied. In solving this problem useful concepts in classical and relativistic kinematics, in Newtonian mechanics and in non-linear ordinary differential equations are revised. The validity of the approximations is discussed from the physical point of view. In particular the classical electron radius emerges naturally from the requirement that the initial distance is large enough for the non-relativistic approximation to be valid. The relevance of this topic for undergraduate physics teaching is pointed out.

  6. 21 CFR 886.1450 - Corneal radius measuring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corneal radius measuring device. 886.1450 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1450 Corneal radius measuring device. (a) Identification. A corneal radius measuring device is an AC-powered device intended to measure...

  7. Research of Precataclysmic Variables with Radius Excesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deminova, N. R.; Shimansky, V. V.; Borisov, N. V.; Gabdeev, M. M.; Shimanskaya, N. N.

    2017-06-01

    The results of spectroscopic observations of the pre-cataclysmic variable NSVS 14256825, which is a HW Vir binary system, were analyzed. The chemical composition is determined, the radial velocities and equivalent widths of a given star are measured. The fundamental parameters of the components were determined (R1 = 0.166 R⊙ , M2 = 0.100 M⊙ , R2 = 0.122 R⊙). It is shown that the secondary component has a mass close to the mass of brown dwarfs. A comparison of two close binary systems is made: HS 2333 + 3927 and NSVS 14256825. A radius-to-mass relationship for the secondary components of the studied pre-cataclysmic variables is constructed. It is concluded that an excess of radii relative to model predictions for MS stars is observed in virtually all systems.

  8. Ionic liquids in tribology.

    PubMed

    Minami, Ichiro

    2009-06-24

    Current research on room-temperature ionic liquids as lubricants is described. Ionic liquids possess excellent properties such as non-volatility, non-flammability, and thermo-oxidative stability. The potential use of ionic liquids as lubricants was first proposed in 2001 and approximately 70 articles pertaining to fundamental research on ionic liquids have been published through May 2009. A large majority of the cations examined in this area are derived from 1,3-dialkylimidazolium, with a higher alkyl group on the imidazolium cation being beneficial for good lubrication, while it reduces the thermo-oxidative stability. Hydrophobic anions provide both good lubricity and significant thermo-oxidative stability. The anions decompose through a tribochemical reaction to generate metal fluoride on the rubbed surface. Additive technology to improve lubricity is also explained. An introduction to tribology as an interdisciplinary field of lubrication is also provided.

  9. Radius morphology and its effects on rotation with contoured and noncontoured plating of the proximal radius.

    PubMed

    Rupasinghe, Shavantha L; Poon, Peter C

    2012-05-01

    The radius has a sagittal bow and a coronal bow. Fractures are often treated with volar anterior plating. However, the sagittal bow is often overlooked when plating. This study looks at radial morphology and the effect of plating the proximal radius with straight plates and then contoured plates bowed in the sagittal plane. We report our findings and their effect on forearm rotation. Morphology was investigated in 14 radii. Attention was paid to the proximal shaft of the radius and its sagittal bow; from this, 6-, 7-, and 8-hole plates were contoured to fit this bow. A simple transverse fracture was then made at the apex of this bow in 23 cadaver arms. Supination and pronation were compared when plating with a straight plate and a contoured plate. Ten cadavers underwent ulna plating at the same level. The effect on rotation of fractures plated in the distal-third shaft was also measured. A significant reduction in rotation was found when a proximal radius fracture was plated with a straight plate compared with a contoured plate: 10.8°, 12.8°, and 21.7° for 6-, 7-, and 8-hole plates, respectively (P < .05). Forearm rotation was decreased further when a longer plate was used. Ulna or distal shaft plating did not reduce rotation. This study has shown a significant sagittal bow of the proximal shaft of the radius. Plating this with contoured plates in the sagittal plane improves rotation when compared with straight plates. Additional ulna plating is not a source of reduced forearm rotation. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ionics of nanoheterogeneous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uvarov, Nikolay F.

    2007-05-01

    The results of studies of composite ionic conductors are considered. The relationship between their properties and the ionic salt disordering and the interfacial interaction between the components of the material is analysed. Special attention is paid to models that describe the surface disordering and the mechanism of defect formation. The methods of calculation of physicochemical characteristics of composites, the thermodynamic stability and peculiarities of the genesis of the nanocomposite morphology are discussed.

  11. Sensitivities of ionic explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Politzer, Peter; Lane, Pat; Murray, Jane S.

    2017-03-01

    We have investigated the relevance for ionic explosive sensitivity of three factors that have been demonstrated to be related to the sensitivities of molecular explosives. These are (1) the maximum available heat of detonation, (2) the amount of free space per molecule (or per formula unit) in the crystal lattice and (3) specific features of the electrostatic potential on the molecular or ionic surface. We find that for ionic explosives, just as for molecular ones, there is an overall tendency for impact sensitivity to increase as the maximum detonation heat release is greater. This means that the usual emphasis upon designing explosives with large heats of detonation needs to be tempered somewhat. We also show that a moderate detonation heat release does not preclude a high level of detonation performance for ionic explosives, as was already demonstrated for molecular ones. Relating the free space per formula unit to sensitivity may require a modified procedure for ionic explosives; this will continue to be investigated. Finally, an encouraging start has been made in linking impact sensitivities to the electrostatic potentials on ionic surfaces, although limited so far to ammonium salts.

  12. Canopy Dynamics in Nanoscale Ionic Materials Probed by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirau, Peter

    2013-03-01

    Nanoscale ionic materials (NIMs) are hybrids prepared from ionically functionalized nanoparticles (NP) neutralized by oligomeric polymer counter-ions. NIMs are designed to behave as liquids under ambient conditions in the absence of solvent and have no volatile organic content, making them useful for a number of applications. We have used NMR relaxation and pulse-field gradient NMR to probe local and collective canopy dynamics in NIMs based on silica nanoparticles (NP), fullerols and proteins in order to understand the relationship between the core and canopy structure and the bulk properties. The NMR studies show that the canopy dynamics depend on the degree of neutralization, the canopy radius of gyration and molecular crowding at the ionically modified NP surface. The viscosity in NIMs can be directly controlled with the addition of ions that enhance the exchange rate for polymers at the NP surface. These results show that NIMs for many applications can be prepared by controlling the dynamics of the NP interface.

  13. Ionic liquids as novel solvents for ionic polymer transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Matthew D.; Leo, Donald J.

    2004-07-01

    The use of ionic liquids as solvents for ionic polymer (specifically, Nafion) transducers is demonstrated. Ionic liquids are attractive for this application because of their high inherent stability. Ionic liquids are salts that exist as liquids at room temperature and have no measureable vapor pressure. Therefore, the use of ionic liquids as solvents for ionic polymer transducers can eliminate the traditional problem of water evaporation in these devices. Another benefit of the use of ionic liquids in this way is the reduction or elimination of the characteristic back-relaxation common in water-solvated ionic polymer actuators. The results demonstrate that the viscosity of the ionic liquid and the degree to which the ionic liquid swells the membrane are the important physical parameters to consider. Five ionic liquids were studied, based on substituted pyrrolidinium, phosphonium, or imidazolium cations and fluoroanions. Of these five ionic liquids, transduction is demonstrated in three of them and the best results are obtained with 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate ionic liquid. This substance has an electrochemical stability window of 4.1 V, a melting point of -10 °C, and a viscosity of 35-45 cP [19]. Results demonstrate that platinum-plated Nafion transducers solvated with this ionic liquid exhibit sensing and actuation responses and that these transducers are stable in air. Endurance testing of this sample reveals a decrease in the free strain of only 25 % after 250,000 actuation cycles in air.

  14. Understanding the mass-radius relation for sub-Neptunes: radius as a proxy for composition

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Eric D.; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2014-09-01

    Transiting planet surveys like Kepler have provided a wealth of information on the distribution of planetary radii, particularly for the new populations of super-Earth- and sub-Neptune-sized planets. In order to aid in the physical interpretation of these radii, we compute model radii for low-mass rocky planets with hydrogen-helium envelopes. We provide model radii for planets 1-20 M {sub ⊕}, with envelope fractions 0.01%-20%, levels of irradiation 0.1-1000 times Earth's, and ages from 100 Myr to 10 Gyr. In addition we provide simple analytic fits that summarize how radius depends on each of these parameters. Most importantly, we show that atmore » fixed H/He envelope fraction, radii show little dependence on mass for planets with more than ∼1% of their mass in their envelope. Consequently, planetary radius is to a first order a proxy for planetary composition, i.e., H/He envelope fraction, for Neptune- and sub-Neptune-sized planets. We recast the observed mass-radius relationship as a mass-composition relationship and discuss it in light of traditional core accretion theory. We discuss the transition from rocky super-Earths to sub-Neptune planets with large volatile envelopes. We suggest ∼1.75 R {sub ⊕} as a physically motivated dividing line between these two populations of planets. Finally, we discuss these results in light of the observed radius occurrence distribution found by Kepler.« less

  15. An iterative algorithm for calculating stylus radius unambiguously

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorburger, T. V.; Zheng, A.; Renegar, T. B.; Song, J.-F.; Ma, L.

    2011-08-01

    The stylus radius is an important specification for stylus instruments and is commonly provided by instrument manufacturers. However, it is difficult to measure the stylus radius unambiguously. Accurate profiles of the stylus tip may be obtained by profiling over an object sharper than itself, such as a razor blade. However, the stylus profile thus obtained is a partial arc, and unless the shape of the stylus tip is a perfect sphere or circle, the effective value of the radius depends on the length of the tip profile over which the radius is determined. We have developed an iterative, least squares algorithm aimed to determine the effective least squares stylus radius unambiguously. So far, the algorithm converges to reasonable results for the least squares stylus radius. We suggest that the algorithm be considered for adoption in documentary standards describing the properties of stylus instruments.

  16. Lewis Acidic Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lucy C; Hogg, James M; Swadźba-Kwaśny, Małgorzata

    2017-08-21

    Until very recently, the term Lewis acidic ionic liquids (ILs) was nearly synonymous with halometallate ILs, with a strong focus on chloroaluminate(III) systems. The first part of this review covers the historical context in which these were developed, speciation of a range of halometallate ionic liquids, attempts to quantify their Lewis acidity, and selected recent applications: in industrial alkylation processes, in supported systems (SILPs/SCILLs) and in inorganic synthesis. In the last decade, interesting alternatives to halometallate ILs have emerged, which can be divided into two sub-sections: (1) liquid coordination complexes (LCCs), still based on halometallate species, but less expensive and more diverse than halometallate ionic liquids, and (2) ILs with main-group Lewis acidic cations. The two following sections cover these new liquid Lewis acids, also highlighting speciation studies, Lewis acidity measurements, and applications.

  17. Functionalized ionic liquids and their applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hariprakasha, Humcha Krishnamurthy; Rangan, Krishnaswamy Kasthuri; Sudarshan, Tirumalai Srinivas

    2018-01-16

    Disclosure of functionalized ionic liquids. Use of disclosed ionic liquids as solvent for carbon dioxide. Use of disclosed ionic liquids as flame retardant. Use of disclosed ionic liquids for coating fabric to obtain flame retardant fabric.

  18. Ionic liquids in chemical engineering.

    PubMed

    Werner, Sebastian; Haumann, Marco; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The development of engineering applications with ionic liquids stretches back to the mid-1990s when the first examples of continuous catalytic processes using ionic liquids and the first studies of ionic liquid-based extractions were published. Ever since, the use of ionic liquids has seen tremendous progress in many fields of chemistry and engineering, and the first commercial applications have been reported. The main driver for ionic liquid engineering applications is to make practical use of their unique property profiles, which are the result of a complex interplay of coulombic, hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions. Remarkably, many ionic liquid properties can be tuned in a wide range by structural modifications at their cation and anion. This review highlights specific examples of ionic liquid applications in catalysis and in separation technologies. Additionally, the application of ionic liquids as working fluids in process machines is introduced.

  19. Fun with Ionic Compounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logerwell, Mollianne G.; Sterling, Donna R.

    2007-01-01

    Ionic bonding is a fundamental topic in high school chemistry, yet it continues to be a concept that students struggle to understand. Even if they understand atomic structure and ion formation, it can be difficult for students to visualize how ions fit together to form compounds. This article describes several engaging activities that help…

  20. Synthesis of ionic liquids

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng [Knoxville, TN; Luo, Huimin [Knoxville, TN

    2008-09-09

    Ionic compounds which are liquids at room temperature are formed by the method of mixing a neutral organic liqand with the salt of a metal cation and its conjugate anion. The liquids are hydrophobic, conductive and stable and have uses as solvents and in electrochemical devices.

  1. Synthesis of ionic liquids

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng [Knoxville, TN; Luo, Huimin [Knoxville, TN

    2011-11-01

    Ionic compounds which are liquids at room temperature are formed by the method of mixing a neutral organic ligand with the salt of a metal cation and its conjugate anion. The liquids are hydrophobic, conductive and stable and have uses as solvents and in electrochemical devices.

  2. Effect of ionic radii on the Curie temperature in Ba1-x-ySrxCayTiO3 compounds.

    PubMed

    Berenov, A; Le Goupil, F; Alford, N

    2016-06-21

    A series of Ba1-x-ySrxCayTiO3 compounds were prepared with varying average ionic radii and cation disorder on A-site. All samples showed typical ferroelectric behavior. A simple empirical equation correlated Curie temperature, TC, with the values of ionic radii of A-site cations. This correlation was related to the distortion of TiO6 octahedra observed during neutron diffraction studies. The equation was used for the selection of compounds with predetermined values of TC. The effects of A-site ionic radii on the temperatures of phase transitions in Ba1-x-ySrxCayTiO3 were discussed.

  3. Amino acid ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Hiroyuki; Fukumoto, Kenta

    2007-11-01

    The preparation of ionic liquids derived from amino acids, and their properties, are outlined. Since amino acids have both a carboxylic acid residue and an amino group in a single molecule, they can be used as either anions or cations. These groups are also useful in their ability to introduce functional group(s). Twenty different natural amino acids were used as anions, to couple with the 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium cation. The salts obtained were all liquid at room temperature. The properties of the resulting ionic liquids (AAILs) depend on the side groups of the amino acids involved. These AAILs, composed of an amino acid with some functional groups such as a hydrogen bonding group, a charged group, or an aromatic ring, had an increased glass transition (or melting) temperature and/or higher viscosity as a result of additional interactions among the ions. Viscosity is reduced and the decomposition temperature of imidazolium-type salts is improved by using the tetrabutylphosphonium cation. The chirality of AAILs was maintained even upon heating to 150 degrees C after acetylation of the free amino group. The amino group was also modified to introduce a strong acid group so as to form hydrophobic and chiral ionic liquids. Unique phase behavior of the resulting hydrophobic ionic liquids and water mixture is found; the mixture is clearly phase separated at room temperature, but the solubility of water in this IL increases upon cooling, to give a homogeneous solution. This phase change is reversible, and separation occurs again by raising the temperature a few degrees. It is extraordinary for an IL/water mixture to display such behavior with a lower critical solution temperature. Some likely applications are proposed for these amino acid derived ionic liquids.

  4. Biocatalytic transformations in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    van Rantwijk, Fred; Madeira Lau, Rute; Sheldon, Roger A

    2003-03-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids are non-volatile, thermally stable and highly polar; they are also moderately hydrophilic solvents. Here, we discuss their use as reaction media for biocatalysis. Enzymes of widely diverging types are catalytically active in ionic liquids or aqueous biphasic ionic liquid systems. Lipases, in particular, maintain their activity in anhydrous ionic liquid media; the (enantio)selectivity and operational stability are often better than in traditional media. The unconventional solvent properties of ionic liquids have been exploited in biocatalyst recycling and product recovery schemes that are not feasible with traditional solvent systems.

  5. An Investigation of Ionic Wind Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jack; Perkins, Hugh D.; Thompson, William K.

    2009-01-01

    A corona discharge device generates an ionic wind and thrust, when a high voltage corona discharge is struck between sharply pointed electrodes and larger radius ground electrodes. The objective of this study was to examine whether this thrust could be scaled to values of interest for aircraft propulsion. An initial experiment showed that the thrust observed did equal the thrust of the ionic wind. Different types of high voltage electrodes were tried, including wires, knife-edges, and arrays of pins. A pin array was found to be optimum. Parametric experiments, and theory, showed that the thrust per unit power could be raised from early values of 5 N/kW to values approaching 50 N/kW, but only by lowering the thrust produced, and raising the voltage applied. In addition to using DC voltage, pulsed excitation, with and without a DC bias, was examined. The results were inconclusive as to whether this was advantageous. It was concluded that the use of a corona discharge for aircraft propulsion did not seem very practical.

  6. Precise measurement of scleral radius using anterior eye profilometry.

    PubMed

    Jesus, Danilo A; Kedzia, Renata; Iskander, D Robert

    2017-02-01

    To develop a new and precise methodology to measure the scleral radius based on anterior eye surface. Eye Surface Profiler (ESP, Eaglet-Eye, Netherlands) was used to acquire the anterior eye surface of 23 emmetropic subjects aged 28.1±6.6years (mean±standard deviation) ranging from 20 to 45. Scleral radius was obtained based on the approximation of the topographical scleral data to a sphere using least squares fitting and considering the axial length as a reference point. To better understand the role of scleral radius in ocular biometry, measurements of corneal radius, central corneal thickness, anterior chamber depth and white-to-white corneal diameter were acquired with IOLMaster 700 (Carl Zeiss Meditec AG, Jena, Germany). The estimated scleral radius (11.2±0.3mm) was shown to be highly precise with a coefficient of variation of 0.4%. A statistically significant correlation between axial length and scleral radius (R 2 =0.957, p<0.001) was observed. Moreover, corneal radius (R 2 =0.420, p<0.001), anterior chamber depth (R 2 =0.141, p=0.039) and white-to-white corneal diameter (R 2 =0.146, p=0.036) have also shown statistically significant correlations with the scleral radius. Lastly, no correlation was observed comparing scleral radius to the central corneal thickness (R 2 =0.047, p=0.161). Three-dimensional topography of anterior eye acquired with Eye Surface Profiler together with a given estimate of the axial length, can be used to calculate the scleral radius with high precision. Copyright © 2016 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Ionic electroactive hybrid transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akle, Barbar J.; Bennett, Matthew D.; Leo, Donald J.

    2005-05-01

    Ionic electroactive actuators have received considerable attention in the past ten years. Ionic electroactive polymers, sometimes referred to as artificial muscles, have the ability to generate large bending strain and moderate stress at low applied voltages. Typical types of ionic electroactive polymer transducers include ionic polymers, conducting polymers, and carbon nanotubes. Preliminary research combining multiple types of materials proved to enhance certain transduction properties such as speed of response, maximum strain, or quasi-static actuation. Recently it was demonstrated that ionomer-ionic liquid transducers can operate in air for long periods of time (>250,000 cycles) and showed potential to reduce or eliminate the back-relaxation issue associated with ionomeric polymers. In addition, ionic liquids have higher electrical stability window than those operated with water as the solvent thereby increasing the maximum strain that the actuator can produce. In this work, a new technique developed for plating metal particulates on the surface of ionomeric materials is applied to the development of hybrid transducers that incorporate carbon nanotubes and conducting polymers as electrode materials. The new plating technique, named the direct assembly process, consists of mixing a conducting powder with an ionomer solution. This technique has demonstrated improved response time and strain output as compared to previous methods. Furthermore, the direct assembly process is less costly to implement than traditional impregnation-reduction methods due to less dependence on reducing agents, it requires less time, and is easier to implement than other processes. Electrodes applied using this new technique of mixing RuO2 (surface area 45~65m2/g) particles and Nafion dispersion provided 5x the displacement and 10x the force compared to a transducer made with conventional methods. Furthermore, the study illustrated that the response speed of the transducer is optimized

  8. Ionic liquid marbles.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lichao; McCarthy, Thomas J

    2007-10-09

    Liquid marbles have been reported during this decade and have been argued to be potentially useful for microfluidic and lab-on-a-chip applications. The liquid marbles described to date have been composed of either water or glycerol as the liquid and hydrophobized lycopodium or silica as the stabilizing particles. Both of these components are potentially reactive and do not permit the use of organic chemistry; the liquids are volatile. We report the use of perfluoroalkyl particles (oligomeric (OTFE) and polymeric (PTFE) tetrafluoroethylene, which are unreactive) to support/stabilize a range of ionic liquid marbles. Ionic liquids are not volatile and have been demonstrated to be versatile solvents for chemical transformations. Water marbles prepared with OTFE are much more robust than those prepared with hydrophobized lycopodium or silica.

  9. Super ionic conductive glass

    DOEpatents

    Susman, Sherman; Volin, Kenneth J.

    1984-01-01

    An ionically conducting glass for use as a solid electrolyte in a power or secondary cell containing an alkali metal-containing anode and a cathode separated by an alkali metal ion conducting glass having an ionic transference number of unity and the general formula: A.sub.1+x D.sub.2-x/3 Si.sub.x P.sub.3-x O.sub.12-2x/3, wherein A is a network modifier for the glass and is an alkali metal of the anode, D is an intermediate for the glass and is selected from the class consisting of Zr, Ti, Ge, Al, Sb, Be, and Zn and X is in the range of from 2.25 to 3.0. Of the alkali metals, Na and Li are preferred and of the intermediate, Zr, Ti and Ge are preferred.

  10. Super ionic conductive glass

    DOEpatents

    Susman, S.; Volin, K.J.

    Described is an ionically conducting glass for use as a solid electrolyte in a power or secondary cell containing an alkali metal-containing anode and a cathode separated by an alkali metal ion conducting glass having an ionic transference number of unity and the general formula: A/sub 1 + x/D/sub 2-x/3/Si/sub x/P/sub 3 - x/O/sub 12 - 2x/3/, wherein A is a network modifier for the glass and is an alkali metal of the anode, D is an intermediate for the glass and is selected from the class consisting of Zr, Ti, Ge, Al, Sb, Be, and Zn and X is in the range of from 2.25 to 3.0. Of the alkali metals, Na and Li are preferred and of the intermediate, Zr, Ti and Ge are preferred.

  11. ON THE VARIATION OF SOLAR RADIUS IN ROTATION CYCLES

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Z. N.; Kong, D. F.; Xiang, N. B.

    2015-01-10

    The Date Compensated Discrete Fourier Transform and CLEANest algorithm are used to study the temporal variations of the solar radius observed at Rio de Janeiro Observatory from 1998 March 2 to 2009 November 6. The CLEANest spectra show several significant periodicities around 400, 312, 93.5, 86.2, 79.4, 70.9, 53.2, and 26.3 days. Then, combining the data on the daily solar radius measured at Calern Observatory and Rio de Janeiro Observatory and the corresponding daily sunspot areas, we study the short-term periodicity of the solar radius and the role of magnetic field in the variation of the solar radius. The rotation periodmore » of the daily solar radius is determined to be statistically significant. Moreover, its temporal evolution is anti-phase with that of sunspot activity, and it is found anti-phase with solar activity. Generally, the stronger solar activity is, the more obvious is the anti-phase relation of radius with solar activity. This indicates that strong magnetic fields have a greater inhibitive effect than weak magnetic fields on the variation of the radius.« less

  12. POSS Ionic Liquid.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kazuo; Ishiguro, Fumiyasu; Chujo, Yoshiki

    2010-12-22

    We report the synthesis of a stable room-temperature ionic liquid consisting of an octacarboxy polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) anion and an imidazolium cation. The introduction of the POSS moiety enhances the thermal stability and reduces the melting temperature. From an evaluation of the thermodynamic parameters during the melting, it was found that the rigidity and cubic structure of POSS can contribute to the enhancement of these thermal properties.

  13. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Paschoal, Vitor H; Faria, Luiz F O; Ribeiro, Mauro C C

    2017-05-24

    Vibrational spectroscopy has continued use as a powerful tool to characterize ionic liquids since the literature on room temperature molten salts experienced the rapid increase in number of publications in the 1990's. In the past years, infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies have provided insights on ionic interactions and the resulting liquid structure in ionic liquids. A large body of information is now available concerning vibrational spectra of ionic liquids made of many different combinations of anions and cations, but reviews on this literature are scarce. This review is an attempt at filling this gap. Some basic care needed while recording IR or Raman spectra of ionic liquids is explained. We have reviewed the conceptual basis of theoretical frameworks which have been used to interpret vibrational spectra of ionic liquids, helping the reader to distinguish the scope of application of different methods of calculation. Vibrational frequencies observed in IR and Raman spectra of ionic liquids based on different anions and cations are discussed and eventual disagreements between different sources are critically reviewed. The aim is that the reader can use this information while assigning vibrational spectra of an ionic liquid containing another particular combination of anions and cations. Different applications of IR and Raman spectroscopies are given for both pure ionic liquids and solutions. Further issues addressed in this review are the intermolecular vibrations that are more directly probed by the low-frequency range of IR and Raman spectra and the applications of vibrational spectroscopy in studying phase transitions of ionic liquids.

  14. Spectroscopy of muonic atoms and the proton radius puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antognini, Aldo

    2017-09-01

    We have measured several 2 S -2 P transitions in muonic hydrogen (μp), muonic deuterium (μd) and muonic helium ions (μ3He, μ4He). From muonic hydrogen we extracted a proton charge radius 20 times more precise than obtained from electron-proton scattering and hydrogen high-precision laser spectroscopy but at a variance of 7 σ from these values. This discrepancy is nowadays referred to as the proton radius puzzle. New insight has been recently provided by the first determination of the deuteron charge radius from laser spectroscopy of μd. The status of the proton charge radius puzzle including the new insights obtained by μd spectroscopy will be discussed. Work supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation SNF-200021-165854 and the ERC CoG. #725039.

  15. Applying Occam's Razor To The Proton Radius Puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higinbotham, Douglas

    2016-09-01

    Over the past five decades, ever more complex mathematical functions have been used to extract the radius of the proton from electron scattering data. For example, in 1963 the proton radius was extracted with linear and quadratic fits of low Q2 data (< 3 fm-2) and by 2014 a non-linear regression of two tenth order power series functions with thirty-one normalization parameters and data out to 25 fm-2 was used. But for electron scattering, the radius of the proton is determined by extracting the slope of the charge form factor at a Q2 of zero. By using higher precision data than was available in 1963 and focusing on the low Q2 data from 1974 to today, we find extrapolating functions consistently produce a proton radius of around 0.84 fm. A result that is in agreement with modern Lamb shift measurements.

  16. Correlation between quarter-point angle and nuclear radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wei-Hu; Wang, Jian-Song; Mukherjee, S.; Wang, Qi; Patel, D.; Yang, Yan-Yun; Ma, Jun-Bing; Ma, Peng; Jin, Shi-Lun; Bai, Zhen; Liu, Xing-Quan

    2017-04-01

    The correlation between quarter-point angle of elastic scattering and nuclear matter radius is studied systematically. Various phenomenological formulae with parameters for nuclear radius are adopted and compared by fitting the experimental data of quarter point angle extracted from nuclear elastic scattering reaction systems. A parameterized formula related to binding energy is recommended, which gives a good reproduction of nuclear matter radii of halo nuclei. It indicates that the quarter-point angle of elastic scattering is quite sensitive to the nuclear matter radius and can be used to extract the nuclear matter radius. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (U1432247, 11575256), National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program)(2014CB845405 and 2013CB83440x) and (SM) Chinese Academy of Sciences President’s International Fellowship Initiative (2015-FX-04)

  17. Radius of Curvature of Off-Axis Paraboloids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Brian; Reardon, Patrick; Hadaway, James; Geary, Joseph; Russell, Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present several methods for measuring the vertex radius of curvature of off-axis paraboloidal mirrors. One is based on least-squares fitting of interferometer output, one on comparison of sagittal and tangential radii of curvature, and another on measurement of displacement of the nulled test article from the ideal reference wave. Each method defines radius of curvature differently and, as a consequence, produces its own sort of errors.

  18. Risk factors for distal radius fracture in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenting; Ni, Cheng; Yu, Ren; Gu, Guoqing; Wang, Zheren; Zheng, Guoqing

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this work was to explore the risk factors for distal radius fracture in postmenopausal women. A total of 611 postmenopausal women with distal radius fractures were included. In all, 173 patients with unstable distal radius fractures were included (unstable fracture group), while there were 438 patients with stable distal radius fractures (stable fracture group). The control group comprised 800 postmenopausal women with no fracture. A questionnaire survey was conducted. Compared with the control group, the 611 postmenopausal women with distal radius fractures had a higher body mass index (BMI). Advanced age and higher BMI were more common in the unstable fracture group than in the stable fracture group (P <0.05). A higher proportion of the 611 postmenopausal women with a distal radius fracture had fallen in the last 12 months than in the control group. Comorbidities and the frequency of falls in the last 12 months were higher in the unstable fracture group than in the stable fracture group (P < 0.05). A higher proportion of the control group was taking calcium supplements, while the proportion taking calcium supplementation in the unstable fracture group was lower than that in the stable fracture group (P < 0.05). Osteoporosis in the two fracture groups (P < 0.05) was significantly higher than in the control group and was the highest in the unstable fracture group (P < 0.05). In postmenopausal women, obesity, falls, unknown osteoporosis status, and osteoporosis are associated with high risk of distal radius fracture. If comorbidities and advanced age are also present, this group of persons may be at higher risk for unstable distal radius fractures.

  19. Graphene-ionic liquid composites

    DOEpatents

    Aksay, Ilhan A.; Korkut, Sibel; Pope, Michael; Punckt, Christian

    2016-11-01

    Method of making a graphene-ionic liquid composite. The composite can be used to make elec-trodes for energy storage devices, such as batteries and supercapacitors. Dis-closed and claimed herein is method of making a graphene-ionic liquid com-posite, comprising combining a graphene source with at least one ionic liquid and heating the combination at a temperature of at least about 130 .degree. C.

  20. Ionic Liquids for Advanced Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    optical clarity to completely opacity with increased amounts of ionic liquid . This transition was not previously observed in Nafion ® membranes swollen...1 IONIC LIQUIDS FOR ADVANCED MATERIALS Timothy E. Long, Sean M. Ramirez, Randy Heflin, Harry W. Gibson, Louis A. Madsen, Donald J. Leo, Nakhiah...is to develop a micromechanical model for the electrochemomechanical transduction mechanisms in newly synthesized ionic liquid polymers in order to

  1. Identification of Apical and Cervical Curvature Radius of Human Molars.

    PubMed

    Estrela, Carlos; Bueno, Mike R; Barletta, Fernando B; Guedes, Orlando A; Porto, Olavo C; Estrela, Cyntia R A; Pécora, Jesus Djalma

    2015-01-01

    To determine the frequency of apical and cervical curvatures in human molars using the radius method and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. Four hundred images of mandibular and maxillary first and second molars were selected from a database of CBCT exams. The radius of curvature of curved root canals was measured using a circumcenter based on three mathematical points. Radii were classified according to the following scores: 0 - straight line; 1 - large radius (r > 8 mm, mild curvature); 2 - intermediate radius (r > 4 and r < 8 mm, moderate curvature); and 3 - small radius (r ≤ 4 mm, severe curvature). The frequency of curved root canals was analyzed according to root canal, root thirds, and coronal and sagittal planes, and assessed using the chi-square test (significance at α = 0.05). Of the 1,200 evaluated root canals, 92.75% presented curved root canals in the apical third and 73.25% in the cervical third on coronal plane images; sagittal plane analysis yielded 89.75% of curved canals in the apical third and 77% in the cervical third. Root canals with a large radius were significantly more frequent when compared with the other categories, regardless of root third or plane. Most root canals of maxillary and mandibular first and second molars showed some degree of curvature in the apical and cervical thirds, regardless of the analyzed plane (coronal or sagittal).

  2. Effect of A-site La and Ba doping on threshold field and characteristic temperatures of PbSc0.5Ta0.5O3 relaxor studied by acoustic emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dul'kin, E.; Mihailova, B.; Gospodinov, M.; Roth, M.

    2012-09-01

    The structural transitions in Pb1-xLaxSc(1+x)/2Ta(1-x)/2O3, x = 0.08 (PLST) relaxor crystals were studied by means of acoustic emission (AE) under an external electric field (E) and compared with those observed in pure PbSc0.5Ta0.5O3 (PST) and Pb0.78Ba0.22Sc0.5Ta0.5O3 (PBST) [E. Dul'kin et al., EPL 94, 57002 (2011)]. Similar to both the PST and PBST compounds, in zero field PLST exhibits AE corresponding to a para-to-antiferroelectric incommensurate phase transition at Tn = 276 K, lying in the vicinity of dielectric temperature maximum (Tm). This AE signal exhibits a nontrivial behavior when applying E resembling the electric-field-dependence of Tn previously observed for both the PST and PBST, namely, Tn initially decreases with the increase of E, attains a minimum at a threshold field Eth = 0.5 kV/cm, accompanied by a pronounced maximum of the AE count rate Ṅ = 12 s-1, and then starts increasing as E enhances. The similarities and difference between PST, PLST, and PBST with respect to Tn, Eth, and Ṅ are discussed from the viewpoint of three mechanisms: (i) chemically induced random local electric field due to the extra charge on the A-site ion, (ii) disturbance of the system of stereochemically active lone-pair electrons of Pb2+ by the isotropic outermost electron shell of substituting ion, and (iii) change in the tolerance factor and elastic field to the larger ionic radius of the substituting A-site ion due to the different radius of the substituting ion. The first two mechanisms influence the actual values of Tn and Eth, whereas the latter is shown to affect the normalized Ṅ, indicating the fractions undergoing a field-induced crossover from a modulated antiferroelectric to a ferroelectric state. Creation of secondary random electric field, caused by doping-induced A-site-O ionic chemical bonding, is discussed.

  3. Ionic liquids, electrolyte solutions including the ionic liquids, and energy storage devices including the ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Gering, Kevin L.; Harrup, Mason K.; Rollins, Harry W.

    2015-12-08

    An ionic liquid including a phosphazene compound that has a plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units and at least one pendant group bonded to each phosphorus atom of the plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units. One pendant group of the at least one pendant group comprises a positively charged pendant group. Additional embodiments of ionic liquids are disclosed, as are electrolyte solutions and energy storage devices including the embodiments of the ionic liquid.

  4. Specialist gelator for ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Hanabusa, Kenji; Fukui, Hiroaki; Suzuki, Masahiro; Shirai, Hirofusa

    2005-11-08

    Cyclo(l-beta-3,7-dimethyloctylasparaginyl-L-phenylalanyl) (1) and cyclo(L-beta-2-ethylhexylasparaginyl-L-phenylalanyl) (2), prepared from L-asparaginyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester, have been found to be specialist gelators for ionic liquids. They can gel a wide variety of ionic liquids, including imizazolium, pyridinium, pyrazolidinium, piperidinium, morpholinium, and ammonium salts. The mean minimum gel concentrations (MGCs) necessary to make gels at 25 degrees C were determined for ionic liquids. The gel strength increased at a rate nearly proportional to the concentration of added gelator. The strength of the transparent gel of 1-butylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate ([C(4)py]BF(4)), prepared at a concentration of 60 g L(-1) (gelator 1/[C(4)py]BF(4)), was ca. 1500 g cm(-2). FT-IR spectroscopy indicated that a driving force for gelation was intermolecular hydrogen bonding between amides and that the phase transition from gel to liquid upon heating was brought about by the collapse of hydrogen bonding. The gels formed from ionic liquids were very thermally stable; no melting occurs up to 140 degrees C when the gels were prepared at a concentration of 70 g L(-1) (gelator/ionic liquid). The ionic conductivities of the gels were nearly the same as those of pure ionic liquids. The gelator had electrochemical stability and a wide electrochemical window. When the gels were prepared from ionic liquids containing propylene carbonate, the ionic conductivities of the resulting gels increased to levels rather higher than those of pure ionic liquids. The gelators also gelled ionic liquids containing supporting electrolytes.

  5. A-site cationic disorder induced significantly large magnetoresistance in polycrystalline La0.2Gd0.5Ba0.3MnO3 compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Suvayan; Das, Kalipada; Bandyopadhyay, Sudipta; Das, I.

    2017-11-01

    The observation of significantly large magnetoresistance at the liquid nitrogen temperature range in the polycrystalline La0.2Gd0.5Ba0.3MnO3 (LGBMO) compound has been addressed in the present manuscript. The motivation of considering LGBMO sample is the average 'A' site ionic radius 〈rA 〉 and tolerance factor (t), almost same as that of La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO), which is a well studied colossal magnetoresistive material. Magnetoresistance of the LGBMO compound has been compared with the LSMO as well as parent compound La0.7Ba0.3MnO3(LBMO) to show the enhancement of magnetoresistance in LGBMO compound. This observed nature has been elucidated considering the disorder induced short range magnetic interaction due to the enhance size disorder parameter (σ2). Our study revels that, size disorder parameter plays the crucial role for enhancing the colossal magnetoresistance.

  6. Ionic liquids comprising heteraromatic anions

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, William F.; Brennecke, Joan F.; Maginn, Edward J.

    2018-04-24

    Some embodiments described herein relate to ionic liquids comprising an anion of a heteraromatic compound such as optionally substituted pyrrolide, optionally substituted pyrazolide, optionally substituted indolide, optionally substituted phospholide, or optionally substituted imidazolide. Methods and devices for gas separation or gas absorption related to these ionic liquids are also described herein.

  7. Ionic Channels as Natural Nanodevices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    introduce the numerical techniques required to simulate charge transport in ion channels. [1] Using Poisson- Nernst -Planck-type (PNP) equations ...Eisenberg. 2003. Ionic diffusion through protein channels: from molecular description to continuum equations . Nanotech 2003, 3: 439-442. 4...Nadler, B., Schuss, Z., Singer, A., and R. S. Eisenberg. 2004. Ionic diffusion through confined geometries: from Langevin equations to partial

  8. Correlation between obesity and severity of distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Acosta-Olivo, C; Gonzalez-Saldivar, J C; Villarreal-Villarreal, G; Torres-Botello, A; Gomez-Garcia, E; Tamez-Mata, Y; Peña-Martinez, V

    2017-04-01

    The incidence of obesity has increased significantly worldwide. Our hypothesis was that patients with obesity have a more severe distal radius fracture and we realized a study to evaluate this correlation between obesity and severity of distal radius fractures caused by low-energy injuries. A total of 114 patients with distal radius fracture were examined in a cross-sectional, observational study. Fractures were classified according to the international AO-Müller/Orthopedic Trauma Association (AO/OTA) classification in order to determine the severity. The patient's Body Mass Index (BMI) was calculated and a Pearson correlation was performed. The patients were predominantly female, and left side was more frequently affected. Most of the fractures were AO/OTA type A (71 patients). The majority of the involved patients in our study were overweighed or obese. We do not observe a direct correlation between grade of obesity and distal radius fracture severity. Based on the results of this study obesity and severity of distal radius fractures do not correlate. Prognostic. Level IV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Optimal network modification for spectral radius dependent phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Yonatan; Kirsch, Lior; Louzoun, Yoram

    2016-09-01

    The dynamics of contact processes on networks is often determined by the spectral radius of the networks adjacency matrices. A decrease of the spectral radius can prevent the outbreak of an epidemic, or impact the synchronization among systems of coupled oscillators. The spectral radius is thus tightly linked to network dynamics and function. As such, finding the minimal change in network structure necessary to reach the intended spectral radius is important theoretically and practically. Given contemporary big data resources such as large scale communication or social networks, this problem should be solved with a low runtime complexity. We introduce a novel method for the minimal decrease in weights of edges required to reach a given spectral radius. The problem is formulated as a convex optimization problem, where a global optimum is guaranteed. The method can be easily adjusted to an efficient discrete removal of edges. We introduce a variant of the method which finds optimal decrease with a focus on weights of vertices. The proposed algorithm is exceptionally scalable, solving the problem for real networks of tens of millions of edges in a short time.

  10. The evolution of discharge current and channel radius in cloud-to-ground lightning return stroke process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Tingting; Yuan, Ping; Wang, Xuejuan; Cen, Jianyong; Chang, Xuan; Zhao, Yanyan

    2017-09-01

    The spectra of two negative cloud-to-ground lightning discharge processes with multi-return strokes are obtained by a slit-less high-speed spectrograph, which the temporal resolution is 110 μs. Combined with the synchronous electrical observation data and theoretical calculation, the physical characteristics during return strokes process are analysed. A positive correlation between discharge current and intensity of ionic lines in the spectra is verified, and based on this feature, the current evolution characteristics during four return strokes are investigated. The results show that the time from peak current to the half-peak value estimated by multi point-fitting is about 101 μs-139 μs. The Joule heat in per unit length of four return strokes channel is in the order of 105J/m-106 J/m. The radius of arc discharge channel is positively related to the discharge current, and the more intense the current is, the greater the radius of channel is. Furthermore, the evolution for radius of arc core channel in the process of return stroke is consistent with the change trend of discharge current after the peak value. Compared with the decay of the current, the temperature decreases more slowly.

  11. CADDIS Volume 2. Sources, Stressors and Responses: Ionic Strength

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Introduction to the ionic strength module, when to list ionic strength as a candidate cause, ways to measure ionic strength, simple and detailed conceptual diagrams for ionic strength, ionic strength module references and literature reviews.

  12. Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Expression in Distal Radius Fracture.

    PubMed

    Hoberück, Sebastian; Michler, Enrico; Kaiser, Daniel; Röhnert, Anne; Zöphel, Klaus; Kotzerke, Jörg

    2018-06-12

    A 79-year old man with prostate cancer under active surveillance for 5 years was referred for a PSMA-PET/MRI for re-evaluation because of a rising prostate-specific antigen value. PET/MRI revealed a ribbonlike tracer accumulation in a healing fracture of the distal radius. This case illustrates that PSMA expression may occur in healing bone fractures in the distal radius. It can be assumed that benign causes of tracer accumulations in the upper extremities are missed in PET/CT due to elevated position of the arms during image acquisition.

  13. Future treatment and research directions in distal radius fracture.

    PubMed

    Jupiter, Jesse

    2012-05-01

    Whether or not they will have their lives dramatically extended in the next few decades, it is clear that people are living longer, healthier, and more active lives. The two peak incidences of distal radius fractures will remain within the pediatric and geriatric age groups, with the latter experiencing a substantial increase in the coming years. This article attempts to project future developments with regard to epidemiology, risk and prevention, fracture assessment, and treatment of distal radius fractures, and the ever increasing concern for the economic impact of this prevalent injury. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Hydrogen bonding in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Patricia A; Ashworth, Claire R; Matthews, Richard P

    2015-03-07

    Ionic liquids (IL) and hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) are two diverse fields for which there is a developing recognition of significant overlap. Doubly ionic H-bonds occur when a H-bond forms between a cation and anion, and are a key feature of ILs. Doubly ionic H-bonds represent a wide area of H-bonding which has yet to be fully recognised, characterised or explored. H-bonds in ILs (both protic and aprotic) are bifurcated and chelating, and unlike many molecular liquids a significant variety of distinct H-bonds are formed between different types and numbers of donor and acceptor sites within a given IL. Traditional more neutral H-bonds can also be formed in functionalised ILs, adding a further level of complexity. Ab initio computed parameters; association energies, partial charges, density descriptors as encompassed by the QTAIM methodology (ρBCP), qualitative molecular orbital theory and NBO analysis provide established and robust mechanisms for understanding and interpreting traditional neutral and ionic H-bonds. In this review the applicability and extension of these parameters to describe and quantify the doubly ionic H-bond has been explored. Estimating the H-bonding energy is difficult because at a fundamental level the H-bond and ionic interaction are coupled. The NBO and QTAIM methodologies, unlike the total energy, are local descriptors and therefore can be used to directly compare neutral, ionic and doubly ionic H-bonds. The charged nature of the ions influences the ionic characteristics of the H-bond and vice versa, in addition the close association of the ions leads to enhanced orbital overlap and covalent contributions. The charge on the ions raises the energy of the Ylp and lowers the energy of the X-H σ* NBOs resulting in greater charge transfer, strengthening the H-bond. Using this range of parameters and comparing doubly ionic H-bonds to more traditional neutral and ionic H-bonds it is clear that doubly ionic H-bonds cover the full range of weak

  15. Defining the measurand in radius of curvature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Angela; Schmitz, Tony L.

    2003-11-01

    Traceable radius of curvature measurements are critical for precision optics manufacture. An optical bench measurement of radius is very repeatable and is the preferred method for low-uncertainty applications. On an optical bench, the displacement of the optic is measured as it is moved between the cat's eye and confocal positions, each identified using a figure measuring interferometer. Traceability requires connection to a basic unit (the meter, here) in addition to a defensible uncertainty analysis, and the identification and proper propagation of all uncertainty sources in this measurement is challenging. Recent work has focused on identifying all uncertainty contributions; measurement biases have been approximately taken into account and uncertainties combined in an RSS sense for a final measurement estimate and uncertainty. In this paper we report on a new mathematical definition of the radius measurand, which is a single function that depends on all uncertainty sources, such as error motions, alignment uncertainty, displacement gauge uncertainty, etc. The method is based on a homogeneous transformation matrix (HTM) formalism, and intrinsically defines an unbiased estimate for radius, providing a single mathematical expression for uncertainty propagation through a Taylor-series expansion.

  16. Influence of asymmetrical drawing radius deviation in micro deep drawing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, L.; Kobayashi, H.; Shimizu, T.; Yang, M.; Vollertsen, F.

    2017-09-01

    Nowadays, an increasing demand for small metal parts in electronic and automotive industries can be observed. Deep drawing is a well-suited technology for the production of such parts due to its excellent qualities for mass production. However, the downscaling of the forming process leads to new challenges in tooling and process design, such as high relative deviation of tool geometry or blank displacement compared to the macro scale. FEM simulation has been a widely-used tool to investigate the influence of symmetrical process deviations as for instance a global variance of the drawing radius. This study shows a different approach that allows to determine the impact of asymmetrical process deviations on micro deep drawing. In this particular case the impact of an asymmetrical drawing radius deviation and blank displacement on cup geometry deviation was investigated for different drawing ratios by experiments and FEM simulation. It was found that both variations result in an increasing cup height deviation. Nevertheless, with increasing drawing ratio a constant drawing radius deviation has an increasing impact, while blank displacement results in a decreasing offset of the cups geometry. This is explained by different mechanisms that result in an uneven cup geometry. While blank displacement leads to material surplus on one side of the cup, an unsymmetrical radius deviation on the other hand generates uneven stretching of the cups wall. This is intensified for higher drawing ratios. It can be concluded that the effect of uneven radius geometry proves to be of major importance for the production of accurately shaped micro cups and cannot be compensated by intentional blank displacement.

  17. Ionic Liquid Crystals: Versatile Materials.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Karel; Lava, Kathleen; Bielawski, Christopher W; Binnemans, Koen

    2016-04-27

    This Review covers the recent developments (2005-2015) in the design, synthesis, characterization, and application of thermotropic ionic liquid crystals. It was designed to give a comprehensive overview of the "state-of-the-art" in the field. The discussion is focused on low molar mass and dendrimeric thermotropic ionic mesogens, as well as selected metal-containing compounds (metallomesogens), but some references to polymeric and/or lyotropic ionic liquid crystals and particularly to ionic liquids will also be provided. Although zwitterionic and mesoionic mesogens are also treated to some extent, emphasis will be directed toward liquid-crystalline materials consisting of organic cations and organic/inorganic anions that are not covalently bound but interact via electrostatic and other noncovalent interactions.

  18. Ionic thermoelectric gating organic transistors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dan; Fabiano, Simone; Berggren, Magnus; Crispin, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Temperature is one of the most important environmental stimuli to record and amplify. While traditional thermoelectric materials are attractive for temperature/heat flow sensing applications, their sensitivity is limited by their low Seebeck coefficient (∼100 μV K−1). Here we take advantage of the large ionic thermoelectric Seebeck coefficient found in polymer electrolytes (∼10,000 μV K−1) to introduce the concept of ionic thermoelectric gating a low-voltage organic transistor. The temperature sensing amplification of such ionic thermoelectric-gated devices is thousands of times superior to that of a single thermoelectric leg in traditional thermopiles. This suggests that ionic thermoelectric sensors offer a way to go beyond the limitations of traditional thermopiles and pyroelectric detectors. These findings pave the way for new infrared-gated electronic circuits with potential applications in photonics, thermography and electronic-skins. PMID:28139738

  19. Ionic Liquid Epoxy Resin Monomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paley, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Ionic liquid epoxide monomers capable of reacting with cross-linking agents to form polymers with high tensile and adhesive strengths. Ionic liquid epoxide monomers comprising at least one bis(glycidyl) N-substituted nitrogen heterocyclic cation are made from nitrogen heterocycles corresponding to the bis(glycidyl) N-substituted nitrogen heterocyclic cations by a method involving a non-nucleophilic anion, an alkali metal cation, epichlorohydrin, and a strong base.

  20. Calorimetric and Neutron Scattering Studies on Glass Transitions and Ionic Diffusions in Imidazolium-based Ionic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamuro, O.; Kofu, M.

    2017-05-01

    Glass transition is one of the central research issues of ionic liquids (ILs). In particular, the most typical ILs, imidazolium-basedones (ImILs) are readily supercooled and exhibit glass transitions below room temperature. We have measured the heat capacities of several ImILs, encoded as CnmimX (n: alkyl carbon number, n = 2-8, X: anion, X = Cl, I, FeCl4, TFSI) using an adiabatic calorimeter. We found that most of ImILs exhibit glass transitions with large Cp jumps in a temperature range between 170 K and 230 K. The large Cp jumps reflect that these ILs are fragile liquids that exhibit large structural change depending on temperature near the glass transition temperature T g. It is also revealed that T g does not depend much on n but on the anion radius. We have investigated the dynamics of CnmimX (n = 2-8, X = Cl, NO3, PF6, TF, FSI, TFSI) by means of a quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) technique. It was clarified that the ionic diffusion is directly associated with the viscosity and glass transition. The activation energy ΔE a of the ionic diffusion increases with decreasing anion size but remains almost unchanged with n as found for T g. These systematic change of T g and ΔE a can be explained well by taking account the nano-domain structure which is the most characteristic feature of ImILs.

  1. Variable radius cartography - History and perspectives of a new discipline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalera, Giancarlo

    2014-05-01

    The map that Toscanelli sent to Columbus was an unconscious application of cartography at a smaller radius than the real. The first really conscious attempts to represent the geography of Earth on globes of radius less than the current one occurred after the formulation of the concept of expanding Earth through geological time. The American chemist and geologist Richard Owen (1810-1890) in his book Key to the geology of the globe (1857) described the principles of what he himself called Anatomical Geology, with the Earth growing as a biological organism. The book contained a global paleogeographic map of the Earth that would have had a radius of about 4000 kilometers. In 1928 J.A.H. Kerkhoff (under the pseudonym Aero-dilettant) published a series of paleogeographic globes on which the modern oceans disappeared. With the same artisan methods of transfer continental outlines from a sphere to a smaller one, in 1933 O.C. Hilgenberg represented three different geological epochs, and, later, for the first time mapped paleopoles with their site-pole segments of meridian. Even today the traditional method of Hilgenberg is followed by senior researchers (Klaus Vogel, 2003) and younger geologists (James Maxlow). In England Hugh Owen applied the methods of traditional cartography to the variable radius one. His Atlas of Continental Displacement was in the 70s and 80s, for this discipline, a real milestone. While in the field of constant radius paleogeography the adherents to plate tectonics created many computer codes of automatic mapping (Bullard et al., 1965; Smith & Hallam, 1970; Scotese et al., 1979; and many others), in the variable radius field few tried to reach the same task. In 1972 in United States a first very simple attempt (but was not further developed) came from a private, R.B. Perry, followed by the still not-computerized Atlas of Owen, and both them constituted inspiration for the construction of a FORTRAN variable radius mapping code at INGV, with which it

  2. Hydrophobic ionic liquids

    DOEpatents

    Koch, Victor R.; Nanjundiah, Chenniah; Carlin, Richard T.

    1998-01-01

    Ionic liquids having improved properties for application in non-aqueous batteries, electrochemical capacitors, electroplating, catalysis and chemical separations are disclosed. Exemplary compounds have one of the following formulas: ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, and R.sub.6 are either H; F; separate alkyl groups of from 1 to 4 carbon atoms, respectively, or joined together to constitute a unitary alkylene radical of from 2 to 4 carbon atoms forming a ring structure converging on N; or separate phenyl groups; and wherein the alkyl groups, alkylene radicals or phenyl groups may be substituted with electron withdrawing groups, preferably F--, Cl--, CF.sub.3 --, SF.sub.5 --, CF.sub.3 S--, (CF.sub.3).sub.2 CHS-- or (CF.sub.3).sub.3 CS--; and X.sup.- is a non-Lewis acid-containing polyatomic anion having a van der Waals volume exceeding 100 .ANG..sup.3.

  3. Hydrophobic ionic liquids

    DOEpatents

    Koch, V.R.; Nanjundiah, C.; Carlin, R.T.

    1998-10-27

    Ionic liquids having improved properties for application in non-aqueous batteries, electrochemical capacitors, electroplating, catalysis and chemical separations are disclosed. Exemplary compounds have one of the following formulas shown in a diagram wherein R{sub 1}, R{sub 2}, R{sub 3}, R{sub 4}, R{sub 5}, and R{sub 6} are either H; F; separate alkyl groups of from 1 to 4 carbon atoms, respectively, or joined together to constitute a unitary alkylene radical of from 2 to 4 carbon atoms forming a ring structure converging on N; or separate phenyl groups; and wherein the alkyl groups, alkylene radicals or phenyl groups may be substituted with electron withdrawing groups, preferably F-, Cl-, CF{sub 3}-, SF{sub 5}-, CF{sub 3}S-, (CF{sub 3}){sub 2}CHS- or (CF{sub 3}){sub 3}CS-; and X{sup {minus}} is a non-Lewis acid-containing polyatomic anion having a van der Waals volume exceeding 100 {angstrom}{sup 3}. 4 figs.

  4. Motion perception during variable-radius swing motion in darkness.

    PubMed

    Rader, A A; Oman, C M; Merfeld, D M

    2009-10-01

    Using a variable-radius roll swing motion paradigm, we examined the influence of interaural (y-axis) and dorsoventral (z-axis) force modulation on perceived tilt and translation by measuring perception of horizontal translation, roll tilt, and distance from center of rotation (radius) at 0.45 and 0.8 Hz using standard magnitude estimation techniques (primarily verbal reports) in darkness. Results show that motion perception was significantly influenced by both y- and z-axis forces. During constant radius trials, subjects' perceptions of tilt and translation were generally almost veridical. By selectively pairing radius (1.22 and 0.38 m) and frequency (0.45 and 0.8 Hz, respectively), the y-axis acceleration could be tailored in opposition to gravity so that the combined y-axis gravitoinertial force (GIF) variation at the subject's ears was reduced to approximately 0.035 m/s(2) - in effect, the y-axis GIF was "nulled" below putative perceptual threshold levels. With y-axis force nulling, subjects overestimated their tilt angle and underestimated their horizontal translation and radius. For some y-axis nulling trials, a radial linear acceleration at twice the tilt frequency (0.25 m/s(2) at 0.9 Hz, 0.13 m/s(2) at 1.6 Hz) was simultaneously applied to reduce the z-axis force variations caused by centripetal acceleration and by changes in the z-axis component of gravity during tilt. For other trials, the phase of this radial linear acceleration was altered to double the magnitude of the z-axis force variations. z-axis force nulling further increased the perceived tilt angle and further decreased perceived horizontal translation and radius relative to the y-axis nulling trials, while z-axis force doubling had the opposite effect. Subject reports were remarkably geometrically consistent; an observer model-based analysis suggests that perception was influenced by knowledge of swing geometry.

  5. Effects of rare earth ionic doping on microstructures and electrical properties of CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Renzhong; Department of Technology and Physics, Zhengzhou University of Light Industry, Zhengzhou 450002; Chen, Zhenping, E-mail: xrzbotao@163.com

    2015-06-15

    Graphical abstract: The dielectric constant decreases monotonically with reduced RE doping ion radius and is more frequency independent compared with that of pure CCTO sample. - Highlights: • The mean grain sizes decrease monotonically with reduced RE doping ionic radius. • Doping gives rise to the monotonic decrease of ϵ{sub r} with reduced RE ionic radius. • The nonlinear coefficient and breakdown field increase with RE ionic doping. • α of all the samples is associated with the potential barrier width rather than Φ{sub b}. - Abstract: Ca{sub 1–x}R{sub x}Cu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12}(R = La, Nd, Eu, Gd, Er; xmore » = 0 and 0.005) ceramics were prepared by the conventional solid-state method. The influences of rare earth (RE) ion doping on the microstructure, dielectric and electrical properties of CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} (CCTO) ceramics were investigated systematically. Single-phase formation is confirmed by XRD analyses. The mean grain size decreases monotonically with reduced RE ion radius. The EDS results reveal that RE ionic doping reduces Cu-rich phase segregation at the grain boundaries (GBs). Doping gives rise to the monotonic decrease of dielectric constant with reduced RE ionic radius but significantly improves stability with frequency. The lower dielectric loss of doped samples is obtained due to the increase of GB resistance. In addition, the nonlinear coefficient and breakdown field increase with RE ionic doping. Both the fine grains and the enhancement of potential barrier at GBs are responsible for the improvement of the nonlinear current–voltage properties in doped CCTO samples.« less

  6. Maximal radius of the aftershock zone in earthquake networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezentsev, A. Yu.; Hayakawa, M.

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, several seismoactive regions were investigated (Japan, Southern California and two tectonically distinct Japanese subregions) and structural seismic constants were estimated for each region. Using the method for seismic clustering detection proposed by Baiesi and Paczuski [M. Baiesi, M. Paczuski, Phys. Rev. E 69 (2004) 066106; M. Baiesi, M. Paczuski, Nonlin. Proc. Geophys. (2005) 1607-7946], we obtained the equation of the aftershock zone (AZ). It was shown that the consideration of a finite velocity of seismic signal leads to the natural appearance of maximal possible radius of the AZ. We obtained the equation of maximal radius of the AZ as a function of the magnitude of the main event and estimated its values for each region.

  7. Evaluation of Effect of CMA Radius on SOQPSK Equalization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-23

    N/A 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Henry Umuolo, Habtamu Betelle and Solomon Thang, Dr. Arlene Cole-Rhodes and Dr. Farzad Moazzami 5d...MD 21251-0002 arlene.colerhodes@morgan.edu Attn: Farzad Moazzami 4 0 0 Cc: Henry Umuolo, Habtamu Betelle , Solomon Thang...EVALUATION OF EFFECT OF CMA RADIUS ON SOQPSK EQUALIZATION Henry Umuolo, Habtamu Betelle and Solomon Thang Faculty Advisors: Dr. Arlene Cole-Rhodes

  8. Finite-Larmor-radius effects on z-pinch stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheffel, Jan; Faghihi, Mostafa

    1989-06-01

    The effect of finite Larmor radius (FLR) on the stability of m = 1 small-axial-wavelength kinks in a z-pinch with purely poloidal magnetic field is investigated. We use the incompressible FLR MHD model; a collisionless fluid model that consistently includes the relevant FLR terms due to ion gyroviscosity, Hall effect and electron diamagnetism. With FLR terms absent, the Kadomtsev criterion of ideal MHD, 2r dp/dr + m2B2/μ0 ≥ 0 predicts instability for internal modes unless the current density is singular at the centre of the pinch. The same result is obtained in the present model, with FLR terms absent. When the FLR terms are included, a normal-mode analysis of the linearized equations yields the following results. Marginally unstable (ideal) modes are stabilized by gyroviscosity. The Hall term has a damping (but not absolutely stabilizing) effect - in agreement with earlier work. On specifying a constant current and particle density equilibrium, the effect of electron diamagnetism vanishes. For a z-pinch with parameters relevant to the EXTRAP experiment, the m = 1 modes are then fully stabilized over the crosssection for wavelengths λ/a ≤ 1, where a denotes the pinch radius. As a general z-pinch result a critical line-density limit Nmax = 5 × 1018 m-1 is found, above which gyroviscous stabilization near the plasma boundary becomes insufficient. This limit corresponds to about five Larmor radii along the pinch radius. The result holds for wavelengths close to, or smaller than, the pinch radius and for realistic equilibrium profiles. This limit is far below the required limit for a reactor with contained alpha particles, which is in excess of 1020 m-1.

  9. Optimizing interconnections to maximize the spectral radius of interdependent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huashan; Zhao, Xiuyan; Liu, Feng; Xu, Shouhuai; Lu, Wenlian

    2017-03-01

    The spectral radius (i.e., the largest eigenvalue) of the adjacency matrices of complex networks is an important quantity that governs the behavior of many dynamic processes on the networks, such as synchronization and epidemics. Studies in the literature focused on bounding this quantity. In this paper, we investigate how to maximize the spectral radius of interdependent networks by optimally linking k internetwork connections (or interconnections for short). We derive formulas for the estimation of the spectral radius of interdependent networks and employ these results to develop a suite of algorithms that are applicable to different parameter regimes. In particular, a simple algorithm is to link the k nodes with the largest k eigenvector centralities in one network to the node in the other network with a certain property related to both networks. We demonstrate the applicability of our algorithms via extensive simulations. We discuss the physical implications of the results, including how the optimal interconnections can more effectively decrease the threshold of epidemic spreading in the susceptible-infected-susceptible model and the threshold of synchronization of coupled Kuramoto oscillators.

  10. Host Star Dependence of Small Planet Mass–Radius Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neil, Andrew R.; Rogers, Leslie A.

    2018-05-01

    The planet formation environment around M dwarf stars is different than around G dwarf stars. The longer hot protostellar phase, activity levels and lower protoplanetary disk mass of M dwarfs all may leave imprints on the composition distribution of planets. We use hierarchical Bayesian modeling conditioned on the sample of transiting planets with radial velocity mass measurements to explore small planet mass–radius distributions that depend on host star mass. We find that the current mass–radius data set is consistent with no host star mass dependence. These models are then applied to the Kepler planet radius distribution to calculate the mass distribution of close-orbiting planets and how it varies with host star mass. We find that the average heavy element mass per star at short orbits is higher for M dwarfs compared to FGK dwarfs, in agreement with previous studies. This work will facilitate comparisons between microlensing planet surveys and Kepler, and will provide an analysis framework that can readily be updated as more M dwarf planets are discovered by ongoing and future surveys such as K2 and the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite.

  11. Conversion of radius of curvature to power (and vice versa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickenhagen, Sven; Endo, Kazumasa; Fuchs, Ulrike; Youngworth, Richard N.; Kiontke, Sven R.

    2015-09-01

    Manufacturing optical components relies on good measurements and specifications. One of the most precise measurements routinely required is the form accuracy. In practice, form deviation from the ideal surface is effectively low frequency errors, where the form error most often accounts for no more than a few undulations across a surface. These types of errors are measured in a variety of ways including interferometry and tactile methods like profilometry, with the latter often being employed for aspheres and general surface shapes such as freeforms. This paper provides a basis for a correct description of power and radius of curvature tolerances, including best practices and calculating the power value with respect to the radius deviation (and vice versa) of the surface form. A consistent definition of the sagitta is presented, along with different cases in manufacturing that are of interest to fabricators and designers. The results make clear how the definitions and results should be documented, for all measurement setups. Relationships between power and radius of curvature are shown that allow specifying the preferred metric based on final accuracy and measurement method. Results shown include all necessary equations for conversion to give optical designers and manufacturers a consistent and robust basis for decision-making. The paper also gives guidance on preferred methods for different scenarios for surface types, accuracy required, and metrology methods employed.

  12. Dual Ionic and Organic Nature of Ionic Liquids

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Rui; Wang, Yanting

    2016-01-01

    Inherited the advantages of inorganic salts and organic solvents, ionic liquids (ILs) exhibit many superior properties allowing them promising green solvents for the future. Although it has been widely acknowledged that the unique features of ILs originate from their dual ionic and organic nature, its microscopic physical origin still remains blurry. In this work, by comparing the ion/molecule cage structures obtained from molecular dynamics simulations for seven prototypic liquids—a molten inorganic salt, four ILs, a strongly polar organic solvent, and a weakly polar organic solvent, we have revealed that the depth of the cage energy landscape characterizes the ionic nature of ILs, whereas the slope and curvature of its mimimum determine the organic nature of ILs. This finding advances our understanding of ILs and thus will help their efficient utilization as well as the systematic design of novel functionalized ILs. PMID:26782660

  13. Quantitative, Comparative Assessment of Gait Between Single-Radius and Multi-Radius Total Knee Arthroplasty Designs.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Bethany; Jacofsky, Marc C; Jacofsky, David J

    2015-06-01

    Gait of single-radius (SR, n=16) and multi-radius (MR, n=16) posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasties was compared, along with controls (n=16), pre-op and 1 year post-op. Computer navigation and standard order sets controlled confounding variables. Post-operatively, SR knees did not differ from controls while MR knees continued to differ in important knee kinetic and kinematic properties. MR knees remained more extended (P=0.019) and had decreased power absorption (P=0.0001) during weight acceptance compared to the SR knees. Both surgical groups had similar KSS for Knee Scores (P=0.22) and Function Scores (P=0.58). The significant biomechanical differences are likely influenced by patella-femoral moment arm geometry and changing ligament laxity throughout the active range of motion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Lithium ion conducting ionic electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C.A.; Xu, K.; Liu, C.

    1996-01-16

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte is described which has exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100 C or lower, including room temperature. It comprises molten lithium salts or salt mixtures in which a small amount of an anionic polymer lithium salt is dissolved to stabilize the liquid against recrystallization. Further, a liquid ionic electrolyte which has been rubberized by addition of an extra proportion of anionic polymer, and which has good chemical and electrochemical stability, is described. This presents an attractive alternative to conventional salt-in-polymer electrolytes which are not cationic conductors. 4 figs.

  15. Lithium ion conducting ionic electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Angell, C. Austen; Xu, Kang; Liu, Changle

    1996-01-01

    A liquid, predominantly lithium-conducting, ionic electrolyte is described which has exceptionally high conductivity at temperatures of 100.degree. C. or lower, including room temperature. It comprises molten lithium salts or salt mixtures in which a small amount of an anionic polymer lithium salt is dissolved to stabilize the liquid against recrystallization. Further, a liquid ionic electrolyte which has been rubberized by addition of an extra proportion of anionic polymer, and which has good chemical and electrochemical stability, is described. This presents an attractive alternative to conventional salt-in-polymer electrolytes which are not cationic conductors.

  16. Factors associated with infection following open distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Glueck, Dane A; Charoglu, Constantine P; Lawton, Jeffrey N

    2009-09-01

    Open fractures are often classified according to a system described by Gustilo and Anderson. However, this system was applied to open long bone fractures, which may not predict the incidence of infection in open metaphyseal fractures of the upper extremity. Other studies have found that wound contamination and systemic illness were the best predictors of infections in open hand fractures. Our study assessed infection in open distal radius fractures and identifies factors that are associated with these infections. We hypothesize that contamination, rather than absolute wound size, is the best predictor of infection associated with open distal radius fractures. A review by CPT code yielded 42 patients with open distal radius fractures between 1997 and 2002 treated at a level one trauma center. Medical records and radiographic follow-up were reviewed to assess the time to irrigation and debridement, the number of debridements in initial treatment period, the method of operative stabilization, the Gustilo and Anderson type of fracture, the Swanson type of fracture, and description of wound contamination. Forty-two patients were followed up for an average of 15 months (range 4 to 68 months). Twenty-four fractures were classified as Gustilo and Anderson type I, ten were type II, and eight were type III, 30 were Swanson type I, and 12 were Swanson type II. Five of the 42 fractures were considered contaminated. Two were exposed to fecal contamination. The others were contaminated with tar, dirt/grass, and gravel, respectively. Three of 42 (7%) fractures developed infections. All three infected cases received a single irrigation and debridement. Two of five contaminated fractures (40%) developed a polymicrobial infection. Both were exposed to fecal contamination and, therefore, considered Swanson type II fractures. They were classified as Gustilo and Anderson type II and IIIB based solely upon the size of the wound. Both required multiple debridements and eventually wrist

  17. THE ARCHES CLUSTER: EXTENDED STRUCTURE AND TIDAL RADIUS

    SciTech Connect

    Hosek, Matthew W. Jr.; Lu, Jessica R.; Anderson, Jay

    At a projected distance of ∼26 pc from Sgr A*, the Arches cluster provides insight into star formation in the extreme Galactic center (GC) environment. Despite its importance, many key properties, such as the cluster’s internal structure and orbital history, are not well known. We present an astrometric and photometric study of the outer region of the Arches cluster ( R > 6.″25) using Hubble Space Telescope WFC3IR. Using proper motions, we calculate membership probabilities for stars down to F153M = 20 mag (∼2.5 M {sub ⊙}) over a 120″ × 120″ field of view, an area 144 times largermore » than previous astrometric studies of the cluster. We construct the radial profile of the Arches to a radius of 75″ (∼3 pc at 8 kpc), which can be well described by a single power law. From this profile we place a 3 σ lower limit of 2.8 pc on the observed tidal radius, which is larger than the predicted tidal radius (1–2.5 pc). Evidence of mass segregation is observed throughout the cluster, and no tidal tail structures are apparent along the orbital path. The absence of breaks in the profile suggests that the Arches has not likely experienced its closest approach to the GC between ∼0.2 and 1 Myr ago. If accurate, this constraint indicates that the cluster is on a prograde orbit and is located in front of the sky plane that intersects Sgr A*. However, further simulations of clusters in the GC potential are required to interpret the observed profile with more confidence.« less

  18. NEUTRON STAR MASS–RADIUS CONSTRAINTS USING EVOLUTIONARY OPTIMIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, A. L.; Morsink, S. M.; Fiege, J. D.

    The equation of state of cold supra-nuclear-density matter, such as in neutron stars, is an open question in astrophysics. A promising method for constraining the neutron star equation of state is modeling pulse profiles of thermonuclear X-ray burst oscillations from hot spots on accreting neutron stars. The pulse profiles, constructed using spherical and oblate neutron star models, are comparable to what would be observed by a next-generation X-ray timing instrument like ASTROSAT , NICER , or a mission similar to LOFT . In this paper, we showcase the use of an evolutionary optimization algorithm to fit pulse profiles to determinemore » the best-fit masses and radii. By fitting synthetic data, we assess how well the optimization algorithm can recover the input parameters. Multiple Poisson realizations of the synthetic pulse profiles, constructed with 1.6 million counts and no background, were fitted with the Ferret algorithm to analyze both statistical and degeneracy-related uncertainty and to explore how the goodness of fit depends on the input parameters. For the regions of parameter space sampled by our tests, the best-determined parameter is the projected velocity of the spot along the observer’s line of sight, with an accuracy of ≤3% compared to the true value and with ≤5% statistical uncertainty. The next best determined are the mass and radius; for a neutron star with a spin frequency of 600 Hz, the best-fit mass and radius are accurate to ≤5%, with respective uncertainties of ≤7% and ≤10%. The accuracy and precision depend on the observer inclination and spot colatitude, with values of ∼1% achievable in mass and radius if both the inclination and colatitude are ≳60°.« less

  19. Are distal radius fracture classifications reproducible? Intra and interobserver agreement.

    PubMed

    Belloti, João Carlos; Tamaoki, Marcel Jun Sugawara; Franciozi, Carlos Eduardo da Silveira; Santos, João Baptista Gomes dos; Balbachevsky, Daniel; Chap Chap, Eduardo; Albertoni, Walter Manna; Faloppa, Flávio

    2008-05-01

    Various classification systems have been proposed for fractures of the distal radius, but the reliability of these classifications is seldom addressed. For a fracture classification to be useful, it must provide prognostic significance, interobserver reliability and intraobserver reproducibility. The aim here was to evaluate the intraobserver and interobserver agreement of distal radius fracture classifications. This was a validation study on interobserver and intraobserver reliability. It was developed in the Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo - Escola Paulista de Medicina. X-rays from 98 cases of displaced distal radius fracture were evaluated by five observers: one third-year orthopedic resident (R3), one sixth-year undergraduate medical student (UG6), one radiologist physician (XRP), one orthopedic trauma specialist (OT) and one orthopedic hand surgery specialist (OHS). The radiographs were classified on three different occasions (times T1, T2 and T3) using the Universal (Cooney), Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen/Association for the Study of Internal Fixation (AO/ASIF), Frykman and Fernández classifications. The kappa coefficient (kappa) was applied to assess the degree of agreement. Among the three occasions, the highest mean intraobserver k was observed in the Universal classification (0.61), followed by Fernández (0.59), Frykman (0.55) and AO/ASIF (0.49). The interobserver agreement was unsatisfactory in all classifications. The Fernández classification showed the best agreement (0.44) and the worst was the Frykman classification (0.26). The low agreement levels observed in this study suggest that there is still no classification method with high reproducibility.

  20. Radiographic Outcomes of Volar Locked Plating for Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Mignemi, Megan E.; Byram, Ian R.; Wolfe, Carmen C.; Fan, Kang-Hsien; Koehler, Elizabeth A.; Block, John J.; Jordanov, Martin I.; Watson, Jeffry T.; Weikert, Douglas R.; Lee, Donald H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess the ability of volar locked plating to achieve and maintain normal radiographic parameters for articular stepoff, volar tilt, radial inclination, ulnar variance, and radial height in distal radius fractures. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 185 distal radius fractures that underwent volar locked plating with a single plate design over a 5-year period. We reviewed radiographs and recorded measurements for volar tilt, radial inclination, ulnar variance, radial height, and articular stepoff. We used logistic regression to determine the association between return to radiographic standard norms and fracture type. Results At the first and final postoperative follow-up visits, we observed articular congruence less than 2 mm in 92% of fractures at both times. Normal volar tilt (11°) was restored in 46% at the first follow-up and 48% at the final one. Radial inclination (22°) was achieved in 44% at the first follow-up and 43% at the final one, and ulnar variance (01 ± 2 mm) was achieved in 53% at the first follow-up and 53% at the final one. In addition, radial height (14 ± 1mm) was restored in 14% at the first follow-up and 12% at the final one. More complex, intra-articular fractures (AO class B and C and Frykman types 3, 4, 7, and 8) were less likely to be restored to normal radiographic parameters. However, because of the small sample size for some fracture types, it was difficult to discover significant associations between fracture type and radiographic outcome. Conclusions Volar locked plating for distal radius fractures achieved articular stepoff less than 2 mm in most fractures but only restored and maintained normal radiographic measurements for volar tilt, radial inclination, and ulnar variance in 50% of fractures. The ability of volar locked plating to restore and maintain ulnar variance and volar tilt decreased with more complex intra-articular fracture types. PMID:23218558

  1. Measurement of Capillary Radius and Contact Angle within Porous Media.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Saitej; Dharmarajan, Ramanathan; Moghaddam, Saeed

    2015-12-01

    The pore radius (i.e., capillary radius) and contact angle determine the capillary pressure generated in a porous medium. The most common method to determine these two parameters is through measurement of the capillary pressure generated by a reference liquid (i.e., a liquid with near-zero contact angle) and a test liquid. The rate of rise technique, commonly used to determine the capillary pressure, results in significant uncertainties. In this study, we utilize a recently developed technique for independently measuring the capillary pressure and permeability to determine the equivalent minimum capillary radii and contact angle of water within micropillar wick structures. In this method, the experimentally measured dryout threshold of a wick structure at different wicking lengths is fit to Darcy's law to extract the maximum capillary pressure generated by the test liquid. The equivalent minimum capillary radii of different wick geometries are determined by measuring the maximum capillary pressures generated using n-hexane as the working fluid. It is found that the equivalent minimum capillary radius is dependent on the diameter of pillars and the spacing between pillars. The equivalent capillary radii of micropillar wicks determined using the new method are found to be up to 7 times greater than the current geometry-based first-order estimates. The contact angle subtended by water at the walls of the micropillars is determined by measuring the capillary pressure generated by water within the arrays and the measured capillary radii for the different geometries. This mean contact angle of water is determined to be 54.7°.

  2. HABITABILITY OF EXOMOONS AT THE HILL OR TIDAL LOCKING RADIUS

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkel, Natalie R.; Kane, Stephen R., E-mail: natalie.hinkel@gmail.com

    2013-09-01

    Moons orbiting extrasolar planets are the next class of object to be observed and characterized for possible habitability. Like the host-planets to their host-star, exomoons have a limiting radius at which they may be gravitationally bound, or the Hill radius. In addition, they also have a distance at which they will become tidally locked and therefore in synchronous rotation with the planet. We have examined the flux phase profile of a simulated, hypothetical moon orbiting at a distant radius around the confirmed exoplanets {mu} Ara b, HD 28185 b, BD +14 4559 b, and HD 73534 b. The irradiated fluxmore » on a moon at its furthest, stable distance from the planet achieves its largest flux gradient, which places a limit on the flux ranges expected for subsequent (observed) moons closer in orbit to the planet. We have also analyzed the effect of planetary eccentricity on the flux on the moon, examining planets that traverse the habitable zone either fully or partially during their orbit. Looking solely at the stellar contributions, we find that moons around planets that are totally within the habitable zone experience thermal equilibrium temperatures above the runaway greenhouse limit, requiring a small heat redistribution efficiency. In contrast, exomoons orbiting planets that only spend a fraction of their time within the habitable zone require a heat redistribution efficiency near 100% in order to achieve temperatures suitable for habitability. This means that a planet does not need to spend its entire orbit within the habitable zone in order for the exomoon to be habitable. Because the applied systems comprise giant planets around bright stars, we believe that the transit detection method is most likely to yield an exomoon discovery.« less

  3. Porous ionic liquids: synthesis and application.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shiguo; Dokko, Kaoru; Watanabe, Masayoshi

    2015-07-15

    Solidification of fluidic ionic liquids into porous materials yields porous ionic networks that combine the unique characteristics of ionic liquids with the common features of polymers and porous materials. This minireview reports the most recent advances in the design of porous ionic liquids. A summary of the synthesis of ordered and disordered porous ionic liquid-based nanoparticles or membranes with or without templates is provided, together with the new concept of room temperature porous ionic liquids. As a versatile platform for functional materials, porous ionic liquids have shown widespread applications in catalysis, adsorption, sensing, actuation, etc. This new research direction towards ionic liquids chemistry is still in its early stages but has great potential.

  4. Ionic liquid-tolerant cellulase enzymes

    DOEpatents

    Gladden, John; Park, Joshua; Singer, Steven; Simmons, Blake; Sale, Ken

    2017-10-31

    The present invention provides ionic liquid-tolerant cellulases and method of producing and using such cellulases. The cellulases of the invention are useful in saccharification reactions using ionic liquid treated biomass.

  5. Natural convection in annular cone: Influence of radius ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, N. J. Salman; Kamangar, Sarfaraz; Al-Rashed, Abdullah A. A. A.; Govindaraju, Kalimuthu; Khan, T. M. Yunus

    2018-05-01

    The viscous dissipation in the fluid flow refers to the transformation of the kinetic energy to the internal energy due to the viscosity of the fluid. The current work investigates the effect of viscous dissipation and radius ratio on the heat transfer characteristics and fluid flow behavior in an annular cone embedded with the porous medium. It is observed that the viscous dissipation effect leads to the decrease in the heat transfer rate from the external wall of the cone to the inner region of the geometry.

  6. Trajectory Calculator for Finite-Radius Cutter on a Lathe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Strekalov, Dmitry; Yu, Nan

    2009-01-01

    A computer program calculates the two-dimensional trajectory (radial vs. axial position) of a finite-radius-of-curvature cutting tool on a lathe so as to cut a workpiece to a piecewise-continuous, analytically defined surface of revolution. (In the original intended application, the tool is a diamond cutter, and the workpiece is made of a crystalline material and is to be formed into an optical resonator disk.) The program also calculates an optimum cutting speed as F/L, where F is a material-dependent empirical factor and L is the effective instantaneous length of the cutting edge.

  7. Nanoparticle enhanced ionic liquid heat transfer fluids

    DOEpatents

    Fox, Elise B.; Visser, Ann E.; Bridges, Nicholas J.; Gray, Joshua R.; Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L.

    2014-08-12

    A heat transfer fluid created from nanoparticles that are dispersed into an ionic liquid is provided. Small volumes of nanoparticles are created from e.g., metals or metal oxides and/or alloys of such materials are dispersed into ionic liquids to create a heat transfer fluid. The nanoparticles can be dispersed directly into the ionic liquid during nanoparticle formation or the nanoparticles can be formed and then, in a subsequent step, dispersed into the ionic liquid using e.g., agitation.

  8. High-flux ionic diodes, ionic transistors and ionic amplifiers based on external ion concentration polarization by an ion exchange membrane: a new scalable ionic circuit platform.

    PubMed

    Sun, Gongchen; Senapati, Satyajyoti; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2016-04-07

    A microfluidic ion exchange membrane hybrid chip is fabricated using polymer-based, lithography-free methods to achieve ionic diode, transistor and amplifier functionalities with the same four-terminal design. The high ionic flux (>100 μA) feature of the chip can enable a scalable integrated ionic circuit platform for micro-total-analytical systems.

  9. High-flux ionic diodes, ionic transistors and ionic amplifiers based on external ion concentration polarization by an ion exchange membrane: a new scalable ionic circuit platform†

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Gongchen; Senapati, Satyajyoti

    2016-01-01

    A microfluidic-ion exchange membrane hybrid chip is fabricated by polymer-based, lithography-free methods to achieve ionic diode, transistor and amplifier functionalities with the same four-terminal design. The high ionic flux (> 100 μA) feature of the chip can enable a scalable integrated ionic circuit platform for micro-total-analytical systems. PMID:26960551

  10. Design of Energetic Ionic Liquids (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-07

    mesoscale-level simulations of bulk ionic liquids based upon multiscale coarse graining techniques. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY...simulations utilizing polarizable force fields, and mesoscale-level simulations of bulk ionic liquids based upon multiscale coarse graining...Simulations of the Energetic Ionic Liquid 1-hydroxyethyl-4-amino-1, 2, 4- triazolium Nitrate (HEATN): Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been

  11. The Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen and the proton radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antognini, A.; Pohl, R.; Amaro, F. D.; Biraben, F.; Cardoso, J. M. R.; Covita, D. S.; Dax, A.; Dhawan, S.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Giesen, A.; Gouvea, A. L.; Graf, T.; Ḧansch, T. W.; Hildebrandt, M.; Indelicato, P.; Julien, L.; Kao, C.-Y.; Kirch, K.; Knowles, P.; Le Bigot, E.-O.; Liu, Y.-W.; Lopes, J. A. M.; Ludhova, L.; Monteiro, C. M. B.; Mulhauser, F.; Nebel, T.; Nez, F.; Rabinowitz, P.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Schaller, L. A.; Schuhmann, K.; Schwob, C.; Taqqu, D.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Voss, A.; Kottmann, F.

    By means of pulsed laser spectroscopy applied to muonic hydrogen (μ- p) we have measured the 2S F = 1 1/2 - 2PF = 2 3/2 transition frequency to be 49881.88(76) GHz. By comparing this measurement with its theoretical prediction based on bound-state QED we have determined a proton radius value of rp = 0.84184 (67) fm. This new value is an order of magnitude preciser than previous results but disagrees by 5 standard deviations from the CODATA and the electronproton scattering values. An overview of the present effort attempting to solve the observed discrepancy is given. Using the measured isotope shift of the 1S-2S transition in regular hydrogen and deuterium also the rms charge radius of the deuteron rd = 2.12809 (31) fm has been determined. Moreover we present here the motivations for the measurements of the μ 4He + and μ 3He + 2S-2P splittings. The alpha and triton charge radii are extracted from these measurements with relative accuracies of few 10 - 4. Measurements could help to solve the observed discrepancy, lead to the best test of hydrogen-like energy levels and provide crucial tests for few-nucleon ab-initio theories and potentials.

  12. Artificial gravity: head movements during short-radius centrifugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, L. R.; Hecht, H.; Lyne, L. E.; Sienko, K. H.; Cheung, C. C.; Kavelaars, J.

    2001-01-01

    Short-radius centrifugation is a potential countermeasure to long-term weightlessness. Unfortunately, head movements in a rotating environment induce serious discomfort, non-compensatory vestibulo-ocular reflexes, and subjective illusions of body tilt. In two experiments we investigated the effects of pitch and yaw head movements in participants placed supine on a rotating bed with their head at the center of rotation, feet at the rim. The vast majority of participants experienced motion sickness, inappropriate vertical nystagmus and illusory tilt and roll as predicted by a semicircular canal model. However, a small but significant number of the 28 participants experienced tilt in the predicted plane but in the opposite direction. Heart rate was elevated following one-second duration head turns. Significant adaptation occurred following a series of head turns in the light. Vertical nystagmus, motion sickness and illusory tilt all decreased with adaptation. Consequences for artificial gravity produced by short-radius centrifuges as a countermeasure are discussed. Grant numbers: NCC 9-58. c 2001. Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Stellar Initial Mass Function: Trends With Galaxy Mass And Radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikh, Taniya

    2017-06-01

    There is currently no consensus about the exact shape and, in particular, the universality of the stellar initial mass function (IMF). For massive galaxies, it has been found that near-infrared (NIR) absorption features, which are sensitive to the ratio of dwarf to giant stars, deviate from a Milky Way-like IMF; their modelling seems to require a larger fraction of low mass stars. There are now increasing results looking at whether the IMF varies not only with galaxy mass, but also radially within galaxies. The SDSS-IV/MaNGA integral-field survey will provide spatially resolved spectroscopy for 10,000 galaxies at R 2000 from 360-1000nm. Spectra of early-type galaxies were stacked to achieve high S/N which is particularly important for features in the NIR. Trends with galaxy radius and mass were compared to stellar population models for a range of absorption features in order to separate degeneracies due to changes in stellar population parameters, such as age, metallicity and element abundances, with potential changes in the IMF. Results for 611 galaxies show that we do not require an IMF steeper than Kroupa as a function of galaxy mass or radius based on the NaI index. The Wing-Ford band hints towards a steeper IMF at large radii however we do not have reliable measurements for the most massive galaxies.

  14. Electromagnetic Charge Radius of the Pion at High Precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananthanarayan, B.; Caprini, Irinel; Das, Diganta

    2017-09-01

    We present a determination of the pion charge radius from high precision data on the pion vector form factor from both timelike and spacelike regions, using a novel formalism based on analyticity and unitarity. At low energies, instead of the poorly known modulus of the form factor, we use its phase, known with high accuracy from Roy equations for π π elastic scattering via the Fermi-Watson theorem. We use also the values of the modulus at several higher timelike energies, where the data from e+e- annihilation and τ decay are mutually consistent, as well as the most recent measurements at spacelike momenta. The experimental uncertainties are implemented by Monte Carlo simulations. The results, which do not rely on a specific parametrization, are optimal for the given input information and do not depend on the unknown phase of the form factor above the first inelastic threshold. Our prediction for the charge radius of the pion is rπ=(0.657 ±0.003 ) fm , which amounts to an increase in precision by a factor of about 2.7 compared to the Particle Data Group average.

  15. Finite Larmor radius effects on weak turbulence transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryukov, N.; Martinell, J. J.

    2018-06-01

    Transport of test particles in two-dimensional weak turbulence with waves propagating along the poloidal direction is studied using a reduced model. Finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects are included by gyroaveraging over one particle orbit. For low wave amplitudes the motion is mostly regular with particles trapped in the potential wells. As the amplitude increases the trajectories become chaotic and the Larmor radius modifies the orbits. For a thermal distribution of Finite Larmor radii the particle distribution function (PDF) is Gaussian for small th$ (thermal gyroradius) but becomes non-Gaussian for large th$ . However, the time scaling of transport is diffusive, as characterized by a linear dependence of the variance of the PDF with time. An explanation for this behaviour is presented that provides an expression for an effective diffusion coefficient and reproduces the numerical results for large wave amplitudes which implies generalized chaos. When a shear flow is added in the direction of wave propagation, a modified model is obtained that produces free-streaming particle trajectories in addition to trapped ones; these contribute to ballistic transport for low wave amplitude but produce super-ballistic transport in the chaotic regime. As in the previous case, the PDF is Gaussian for low th$ becoming non-Gaussian as it increases. The perpendicular transport presents the same behaviour as in the case with no flow but the diffusion is faster in the presence of the flow.

  16. Automated bone age assessment of older children using the radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsao, Sinchai; Gertych, Arkadiusz; Zhang, Aifeng; Liu, Brent J.; Huang, Han K.

    2008-03-01

    The Digital Hand Atlas in Assessment of Skeletal Development is a large-scale Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) project for automating the process of grading Skeletal Development of children from 0-18 years of age. It includes a complete collection of 1,400 normal hand X-rays of children between the ages of 0-18 years of age. Bone Age Assessment is used as an index of skeletal development for detection of growth pathologies that can be related to endocrine, malnutrition and other disease types. Previous work at the Image Processing and Informatics Lab (IPILab) allowed the bone age CAD algorithm to accurately assess bone age of children from 1 to 16 (male) or 14 (female) years of age using the Phalanges as well as the Carpal Bones. At the older ages (16(male) or 14(female) -19 years of age) the Phalanges as well as the Carpal Bones are fully developed and do not provide well-defined features for accurate bone age assessment. Therefore integration of the Radius Bone as a region of interest (ROI) is greatly needed and will significantly improve the ability to accurately assess the bone age of older children. Preliminary studies show that an integrated Bone Age CAD that utilizes the Phalanges, Carpal Bones and Radius forms a robust method for automatic bone age assessment throughout the entire age range (1-19 years of age).

  17. Mapping the Pressure-radius Relationship of Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubillos, Patricio; Fossati, Luca; Kubyshkina, Darya

    2017-10-01

    The radius of a planet is one of the most physically meaningful and readily accessible parameters of extra-solar planets. This parameter is extensively used in the literature to compare planets or study trends in the know population of exoplanets. However, in an atmosphere, the concept of a planet radius is inherently fuzzy. The atmospheric pressures probed by trasmission (transit) or emission (eclipse) spectra are not directly constrained by the observations, they vary as a function of the atmospheric properties and observing wavelengths, and further correlate with the atmospheric properties producing degenerate solutions.Here, we characterize the properties of exoplanet radii using a radiative-transfer model to compute clear- atmosphere transmission and emission spectra of gas-dominated planets. We explore a wide range of planetary temperatures, masses, and radii, sampling from 300 to 3000 K and Jupiter- to Earth-like values. We will discuss how transit and photospheric radii vary over the parameter space, and map the global trends in the atmospheric pressures associated with these radii. We will also highlight the biases introduced by the choice of an observing band, or the assumption of a clear/cloudy atmosphere, and the relevance that these biases take as better instrumentation improves the precision of photometric observations.

  18. Application of Ionic Liquids in Hydrometallurgy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jesik; Jung, Yeojin; Kusumah, Priyandi; Lee, Jinyoung; Kwon, Kyungjung; Lee, Churl Kyoung

    2014-01-01

    Ionic liquids, low temperature molten salts, have various advantages manifesting themselves as durable and environmentally friendly solvents. Their application is expanding into various fields including hydrometallurgy due to their unique properties such as non-volatility, inflammability, low toxicity, good ionic conductivity, and wide electrochemical potential window. This paper reviews previous literatures and our recent results adopting ionic liquids in extraction, synthesis and processing of metals with an emphasis on the electrolysis of active/light, rare earth, and platinum group metals. Because the research and development of ionic liquids in this area are still emerging, various, more fundamental approaches are expected to popularize ionic liquids in the metal manufacturing industry. PMID:25177864

  19. Radius of Curvature Measurements: An Independent Look at Accuracy Using Novel Optical Metrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Bryon; Kahan, Mark; Russell, Kevin (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The AMSD (Advanced Mirror System Demonstrator) program mirror specifications include the ability to manufacture the mirror to a radius of curvature of 10 m +/- 1 mm and to control its radius at 30K to the same specification. Therefore, it is necessary for the Government Team to be able to measure mirror radius of curvature to an accuracy of better than 0.5 mm. This presentation discusses a novel optical metrology system for measuring radius of curvature.

  20. Internal fixation of pilon fractures of the distal radius.

    PubMed Central

    Trumble, T. E.; Schmitt, S. R.; Vedder, N. B.

    1993-01-01

    When closed manipulation fails to restore articular congruity in comminuted, displaced fractures of the distal radius, open reduction and internal fixation is required. Results of surgical stabilization and articular reconstruction of these injuries are reviewed in this retrospective study of 49 patients with 52 displaced, intra-articular distal radius fractures. Forty-three patients (87%) with a mean age of 37 years (range of 17 to 79 years) were available for evaluation. The mean follow-up time was 38 months (range 22-69 months). When rated according to the Association for the Study of Internal Fixation (ASIF), 19 were type C2 and 21 were type C3. We devised an Injury Score System based on the initial injury radiographs to classify severely comminuted intra-articular fractures and to identify those associated with carpal injury (3 patients). Post-operative fracture alignment, articular congruity, and radial length were significantly improved following surgery (p < .01). Grip strength averaged 69% +/- 22% of the contralateral side, and the range of motion averaged 75% +/- 18% of the contralateral side post-operatively. A combined outcome rating system that included grip strength, range of motion, and pain relief averaged 76% +/- 19% of the contralateral side. There was a statistically significant decrease in the combined rating with more severe fracture patterns as defined by the ASIF system (p < .01), Malone classification (p < .03), and the Injury Score System (p < .001). The Injury Score System presented here, and in particular the number of fracture fragments, correlated most closely with outcome of all the classification systems studied. Operative treatment of these distal radius fractures with reconstruction of the articular congruity and correction of the articular surface alignment with internal fixation and/or external fixation, can significantly improve the radiographic alignment and functional outcome. Furthermore, the degree to which articular stepoff

  1. Nanoparticles in ionic liquids: interactions and organization.

    PubMed

    He, Zhiqi; Alexandridis, Paschalis

    2015-07-28

    Ionic liquids (ILs), defined as low-melting organic salts, are a novel class of compounds with unique properties and a combinatorially great chemical diversity. Ionic liquids are utilized as synthesis and dispersion media for nanoparticles as well as for surface functionalization. Ionic liquid and nanoparticle hybrid systems are governed by a combined effect of several intermolecular interactions between their constituents. For each interaction, including van der Waals, electrostatic, structural, solvophobic, steric, and hydrogen bonding, the characterization and quantitative calculation methods together with factors affecting these interactions are reviewed here. Various self-organized structures based on nanoparticles in ionic liquids are generated as a result of a balance of these intermolecular interactions. These structures, including colloidal glasses and gels, lyotropic liquid crystals, nanoparticle-stabilized ionic liquid-containing emulsions, ionic liquid surface-functionalized nanoparticles, and nanoscale ionic materials, possess properties of both ionic liquids and nanoparticles, which render them useful as novel materials especially in electrochemical and catalysis applications. This review of the interactions within nanoparticle dispersions in ionic liquids and of the structure of nanoparticle and ionic liquid hybrids provides guidance on the rational design of novel ionic liquid-based materials, enabling applications in broad areas.

  2. 21 CFR 886.1430 - Ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device... lens radius measuring device. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic contact lens radius measuring device is... lens. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket...

  3. Catalytic Ignition of Ionic Liquid Fuels by Ionic Liquids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    catalytically decompose hydrogen peroxide. Catalytic approach for H2O2 decomposition Distribution NOT APPROVED through STINFO process Distribution...Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) July 2014- August 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-House Catalytic Ignition of Ionic...are highly hazardous. To gain a true advantage, a more environmentally friendly oxidizer must be considered. Hydrogen peroxide might be an attractive

  4. Massive radius-dependent flow slippage in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siria, Alessandro; Secchi, Eleonora; Marbach, Sophie; Niguès, Antoine; Stein, Derek; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2016-11-01

    Nanofluidics is the frontier where the continuum picture of fluid mechanics confronts the atomic nature of matter. Recent reports indicate that carbon nanotubes exhibit exceptional water transport properties due to nearly frictionless interfaces and this has stimulated interest in nanotube-based membranes for desalination, nano-filtration, and energy harvesting. However, the fundamental mechanisms of water transport inside nanotubes and at water-carbon interfaces remain controversial, as existing theories fail to provide a satisfying explanation for the limited experimental results. We report a study of water jets emerging from single nanotubes made of carbon and boron-nitride materials. Our experiments reveal extensive and radius-dependent surface slippage in carbon nanotubes (CNT). In stark contrast, boron-nitride nanotubes (BNNT), which are crystallographically similar to CNTs but electronically different, exhibit no slippage. This shows that slippage originates in subtle atomic-scale details of the solid-liquid interface. ERC StG - NanoSOFT.

  5. Inductive voltage adder (IVA) for submillimeter radius electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Mazarakis, M.G.; Poukey, J.W.; Maenchen, J.E.

    The authors have already demonstrated the utility of inductive voltage adder accelerators for production of small-size electron beams. In this approach, the inductive voltage adder drives a magnetically immersed foilless diode to produce high-energy (10--20 MeV), high-brightness pencil electron beams. This concept was first demonstrated with the successful experiments which converted the linear induction accelerator RADLAC II into an IVA fitted with a small 1-cm radius cathode magnetically immersed foilless diode (RADLAC II/SMILE). They present here first validations of extending this idea to mm-scale electron beams using the SABRE and HERMES-III inductive voltage adders as test beds. The SABRE experimentsmore » are already completed and have produced 30-kA, 9-MeV electron beams with envelope diameter of 1.5-mm FWHM. The HERMES-III experiments are currently underway.« less

  6. Hydrodynamic radius fluctuations in model DNA-grafted nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas-Lara, Fernando; Starr, Francis W.; Douglas, Jack F.

    2016-05-01

    We utilize molecular dynamics simulations (MD) and the path-integration program ZENO to quantify hydrodynamic radius (Rh) fluctuations of spherical symmetric gold nanoparticles (NPs) decorated with single-stranded DNA chains (ssDNA). These results are relevant to understanding fluctuation-induced interactions among these NPs and macromolecules such as proteins. In particular, we explore the effect of varying the ssDNA-grafted NPs structural parameters, such as the chain length (L), chain persistence length (lp), NP core size (R), and the number of chains (N) attached to the nanoparticle core. We determine Rh fluctuations by calculating its standard deviation (σRh) of an ensemble of ssDNA-grafted NPs configurations generated by MD. For the parameter space explored in this manuscript, σR h shows a peak value as a function of N, the amplitude of which depends on L, lp and R, while the broadness depends on R.

  7. [Manifestation of Dupuytren nodules following fracture of the distal radius].

    PubMed

    Wichelhaus, Alice; Wendt, M; Mielsch, N; Gradl, G; Mittlmeier, T

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the incidence of post-traumatic development of Dupuytren nodules in distal radius fractures treated operatively. In 2 prospective randomised studies for operative treatment of distal radius fractures, the formation of Dupuytren nodules was registered. One of the exclusion criteria was a pre-existing Dupuytren's disease at the date of trauma. In addition to the notification of the development of Dupuytren nodules, signs of a complex regional pain syndrome were registered as well as the wrist function, level of pain and grip strength. The Castaing and the Gartland and Werley scores were assessed. The clinical outcomes of patients with and without Dupuytren nodules were compared. 239 of 275 (87%) of the patients could be examined 1 year after the operation, consisting of 32 men and 207 women with a median age of 64.2 years. The patients with Dupuytren nodules were re-evaluated after 16-60 months (median 41.8) for progression of the disease. 21 patients (8.7%) developed changes of the palmar aponeurosis. In 20 patients nodules were stated, one patient showed a cord at the fourth ray of the injured hand. 19 out of 21 patients were female (90.5%). At re-evaluation after 41.8 months (16-60) progression could not be noted nor could similar changes be seen on the contralateral side. Patients with Dupuytren nodules were not handicapped in their hand function. 3 patients (14.3%) revealed a positive family history for Dupuytren's disease. Abuse of alcohol or diabetes was not present in any of the patients with Dupuytren nodules, 7 (33%) were smokers. The occurrence of Dupyutren nodules can be triggered by a trauma or operation. It may be speculated that these nodules are an entity of their own as no progression of the contracture could be seen during the follow-up period. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Maximum wind radius estimated by the 50 kt radius: improvement of storm surge forecasting over the western North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Hiroshi; Wu, Wenjie

    2016-03-01

    Even though the maximum wind radius (Rmax) is an important parameter in determining the intensity and size of tropical cyclones, it has been overlooked in previous storm surge studies. This study reviews the existing estimation methods for Rmax based on central pressure or maximum wind speed. These over- or underestimate Rmax because of substantial variations in the data, although an average radius can be estimated with moderate accuracy. As an alternative, we propose an Rmax estimation method based on the radius of the 50 kt wind (R50). Data obtained by a meteorological station network in the Japanese archipelago during the passage of strong typhoons, together with the JMA typhoon best track data for 1990-2013, enabled us to derive the following simple equation, Rmax = 0.23 R50. Application to a recent strong typhoon, the 2015 Typhoon Goni, confirms that the equation provides a good estimation of Rmax, particularly when the central pressure became considerably low. Although this new method substantially improves the estimation of Rmax compared to the existing models, estimation errors are unavoidable because of fundamental uncertainties regarding the typhoon's structure or insufficient number of available typhoon data. In fact, a numerical simulation for the 2013 Typhoon Haiyan as well as 2015 Typhoon Goni demonstrates a substantial difference in the storm surge height for different Rmax. Therefore, the variability of Rmax should be taken into account in storm surge simulations (e.g., Rmax = 0.15 R50-0.35 R50), independently of the model used, to minimize the risk of over- or underestimating storm surges. The proposed method is expected to increase the predictability of major storm surges and to contribute to disaster risk management, particularly in the western North Pacific, including countries such as Japan, China, Taiwan, the Philippines, and Vietnam.

  9. Ionic Conduction in Nanocrystalline Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-02-10

    In the following, we review studies performed films prepared by a polymer precursor process on on stabilized zirconia ceramics with grain sizes alumina ... titania , is reviewed. While it remains too early to make firm conclusions, the following observations are made. Additives which contribute to ion blocking...Keywords: Ionic conductivity; Nanocrystalline; Zirconia; Ceria; Titania ; Defects 1. Introduction tivity by nearly two orders of magnitude [6]. Given the

  10. Ionic Liquids to Replace Hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koelfgen, Syri; Sims, Joe; Forton, Melissa; Allan, Barry; Rogers, Robin; Shamshina, Julia

    2011-01-01

    A method for developing safe, easy-to-handle propellants has been developed based upon ionic liquids (ILs) or their eutectic mixtures. An IL is a binary combination of a typically organic cation and anion, which generally produces an ionic salt with a melting point below 100 deg C. Many ILs have melting points near, or even below, room temperature (room temperature ionic liquids, RTILs). More importantly, a number of ILs have a positive enthalpy of formation. This means the thermal energy released during decomposition reactions makes energetic ILs ideal for use as propellants. In this specific work, to date, a baseline set of energetic ILs has been identified, synthesized, and characterized. Many of the ILs in this set have excellent performance potential in their own right. In all, ten ILs were characterized for their enthalpy of formation, density, melting point, glass transition point (if applicable), and decomposition temperature. Enthalpy of formation was measured using a microcalorimeter designed specifically to test milligram amounts of energetic materials. Of the ten ILs characterized, five offer higher Isp performance than hydrazine, ranging between 10 and 113 seconds higher than the state-of-the-art propellant. To achieve this level of performance, the energetic cations 4- amino-l,2,4-triazolium and 3-amino-1,2,4-triazolium were paired with various anions in the nitrate, dicyanamide, chloride, and 3-nitro-l,2,4-triazole families. Protonation, alkylation, and butylation synthesis routes were used for creation of the different salts.

  11. Ionic Liquids in Biomass Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Suzie Su Yin; Macfarlane, Douglas R.

    Ionic liquids have been studied for their special solvent properties in a wide range of processes, including reactions involving carbohydrates such as cellulose and glucose. Biomass is a widely available and renewable resource that is likely to become an economically viable source of starting materials for chemical and fuel production, especially with the price of petroleum set to increase as supplies are diminished. Biopolymers such as cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin may be converted to useful products, either by direct functionalisation of the polymers or depolymerisation to monomers, followed by microbial or chemical conversion to useful chemicals. Major barriers to the effective conversion of biomass currently include the high crystallinity of cellulose, high reactivity of carbohydrates and lignin, insolubility of cellulose in conventional solvents, as well as heterogeneity in the native lignocellulosic materials and in lignin itself. This combination of factors often results in highly heterogeneous depolymerisation products, which make efficient separation difficult. Thus the extraction, depolymerisation and conversion of biopolymers will require novel reaction systems in order to be both economically attractive and environmentally benign. The solubility of biopolymers in ionic liquids is a major advantage of their use, allowing homogeneous reaction conditions, and this has stimulated a growing research effort in this field. This review examines current research involving the use of ionic liquids in biomass reactions, with perspectives on how it relates to green chemistry, economic viability, and conventional biomass processes.

  12. On the chemical stabilities of ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Sowmiah, Subbiah; Srinivasadesikan, Venkatesan; Tseng, Ming-Chung; Chu, Yen-Ho

    2009-09-25

    Ionic liquids are novel solvents of interest as greener alternatives to conventional organic solvents aimed at facilitating sustainable chemistry. As a consequence of their unusual physical properties, reusability, and eco-friendly nature, ionic liquids have attracted the attention of organic chemists. Numerous reports have revealed that many catalysts and reagents were supported in the ionic liquid phase, resulting in enhanced reactivity and selectivity in various important reaction transformations. However, synthetic chemists cannot ignore the stability data and intermolecular interactions, or even reactions that are directly applicable to organic reactions in ionic liquids. It is becoming evident from the increasing number of reports on use of ionic liquids as solvents, catalysts, and reagents in organic synthesis that they are not totally inert under many reaction conditions. While in some cases, their unexpected reactivity has proven fortuitously advantageous in others is has been a problem, it is imperative that when selecting an ionic liquid for a particular synthetic application, attention be paid to its compatibility with the reaction conditions. Even though, more than 200 room temperature ionic liquids are known, only a few reports have commented their effects on reaction mechanisms or rate/stability. Therefore, rather than attempting to give a comprehensive overview of ionic liquid chemistry, this review focuses on the non-innocent nature of ionic liquids, with a decided emphasis to clearly illuminate the ability of ionic liquids to affect the mechanistic aspects of some organic reactions thereby affecting and promoting the yield and selectivity.

  13. Ionic Liquids and Relative Process Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Lu, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhou, Q.; Sun, J.; Han, L.; Yue, G.; Liu, X.; Cheng, W.; Li, S.

    Ionic liquids have gained increasing attention in recent years due to their significant advantages, not only as alternative solvents but also as new materials and catalysts. Until now, most research work on ionic liquids has been at the laboratory or pilot scale. In view of the multifarious applications of ionic liquids, more new knowledge is needed and more systematic work on ionic liquids should be carried out deeply and broadly in order to meet the future needs of process design. For example, knowledge of the physicochemical properties is indispensable for the design of new ionic liquids and for the development of novel processes. The synthesis and application of ionic liquids are fundamental parts of engineering science, and the toxicity and environmental assessment of ionic liquids is critical importance for their large scale applications, especially for process design. These research aspects are closely correlated to the industrial applications of ionic liquids and to sustainable processes. However, material process design in the industrial applications of ionic liquids has hardly been implemented. Therefore, this chapter reviews several essential issues that are closely related to process design, such as the synthesis, structure-property relationships, important applications, and toxicity of ionic liquids.

  14. Radius of lunar core estimated by GRAIL results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, K.; Yamada, R.; Kikuchi, F.; Iwata, T.; Hanada, H.; Ishihara, Y.; Kamata, S.; Sasaki, S.

    2013-12-01

    Internal structure and composition of the Moon provide important clue and constraints on theories for how the Moon formed and evolved. The Apollo seismic network has contributed to the internal structure modeling. Efforts have been made to detect the lunar core from the noisy Apollo data (e.g., [1], [2]), but there is scant information about the structure below the deepest moonquakes at about 1000 km depth. On the other hand, there have been geodetic studies to infer the deep structure of the Moon. For example, LLR (Lunar Laser Ranging) data analyses detected a displacement of the lunar pole of rotation, indicating that dissipation is acting on the rotation arising from a fluid core [3]. Bayesian inversion using geodetic data (such as mass, moments of inertia, tidal Love numbers k2 and h2, and quality factor Q) also suggests a fluid core and partial melt in the lower mantle region [4]. Recent analyses of GRAIL data have achieved the improved k2 accuracy; JPL solution is 0.02405 × 0.00018 [5], and GSFC solution is 0.02427 × 0.00026 [6]. The two solutions are consistent with each other within their error bounds, and the accuracy of k2 is now about 1 %. Such an accurately-determined Love number will contribute to constrain the structure of the lunar deep interior, such as the radius of the possible liquid core. We used geodetic data of the mass, the mean moment of inertia, the Love numbers h2 and k2 to infer the size of liquid core. It is difficult to tightly constrain the internal structure from the geodetic data only because there are trade-offs among the structures of crust, mantle, and core. In our preliminary analysis we used a 5-layer model and the mantle structure was constrained by VPREMOON [2] with 5 % error for density and 10 % error for shear and bulk moduli being assumed. An inversion using Markov chain Monte Carlo method indicates that the core radius is 480 × 50 km, but the density values were sampled around the assumed lower limit of 3600 kg/m3. When

  15. Interaction of Cellulose Chains with Ionic Liquids and Water via MD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Ahmed; Rabideau, Brooks

    2012-02-01

    One promising route for combustible fuel sources which are both renewable and have a low environmental impact is the conversion of waste biomass into tailor-made fuels. An important aspect of this process is the low-energy separation of cellulose from the biomass. Ionic liquids (ILs) have proven to be very good in dissolving cellulose with the added benefit of being essentially non-volatile making them ideal for ``green'' processing. IL research, however, remains relatively new, with many parts of this dissolution process remaining uncertain. We examine the behavior of cellulose with the ionic liquids [BMIM]Cl, [EMIM]Ac and [DMIM]DMP as well as water via MD simulation. All three ionic liquids have been observed to dissolve cellulose quite well yet have differently sized anions. We explore these differences and the impacts they have on their interactions with cellulose. First we examine the dynamics of a single cellulose strand in these ionic liquids. We determine the radius of gyration and the hydrogen bonds that are formed between the anions and cellulose. Next, we probe the dissolution mechanism of multiple, bound cellulose strands examining of multiple, bound cellulose strands examining interactions at the IL/cellulose interface and the breakup of inter-cellulose hydrogen bonds.

  16. Ionic liquid induced dehydration and domain closure in lysozyme: FCS and MD simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Shirsendu; Parui, Sridip; Jana, Biman; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2015-09-01

    Effect of a room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL, [pmim][Br]) on the structure and dynamics of the protein, lysozyme, is investigated by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and molecular dynamic (MD) simulation. The FCS data indicate that addition of the RTIL ([pmim][Br]) leads to reduction in size and faster conformational dynamics of the protein. The hydrodynamic radius (rH) of lysozyme decreases from 18 Å in 0 M [pmim][Br] to 11 Å in 1.5 M [pmim][Br] while the conformational relaxation time decreases from 65 μs to 5 μs. Molecular origin of the collapse (size reduction) of lysozyme in aqueous RTIL is analyzed by MD simulation. The radial distribution function of water, RTIL cation, and RTIL anion from protein clearly indicates that addition of RTIL causes replacement of interfacial water by RTIL cation ([pmim]+) from the first solvation layer of the protein providing a comparatively dehydrated environment. This preferential solvation of the protein by the RTIL cation extends up to ˜30 Å from the protein surface giving rise to a nanoscopic cage of overall radius 42 Å. In the nanoscopic cage of the RTIL (42 Å), volume fraction of the protein (radius 12 Å) is only about 2%. RTIL anion does not show any preferential solvation near protein surface. Comparison of effective radius obtained from simulation and from FCS data suggests that the "dry" protein (radius 12 Å) alone diffuses in a nanoscopic cage of RTIL (radius 42 Å). MD simulation further reveals a decrease in distance ("domain closure") between the two domains (alpha and beta) of the protein leading to a more compact structure compared to that in the native state.

  17. Ionic liquid induced dehydration and domain closure in lysozyme: FCS and MD simulation.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Shirsendu; Parui, Sridip; Jana, Biman; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2015-09-28

    Effect of a room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL, [pmim][Br]) on the structure and dynamics of the protein, lysozyme, is investigated by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and molecular dynamic (MD) simulation. The FCS data indicate that addition of the RTIL ([pmim][Br]) leads to reduction in size and faster conformational dynamics of the protein. The hydrodynamic radius (rH) of lysozyme decreases from 18 Å in 0 M [pmim][Br] to 11 Å in 1.5 M [pmim][Br] while the conformational relaxation time decreases from 65 μs to 5 μs. Molecular origin of the collapse (size reduction) of lysozyme in aqueous RTIL is analyzed by MD simulation. The radial distribution function of water, RTIL cation, and RTIL anion from protein clearly indicates that addition of RTIL causes replacement of interfacial water by RTIL cation ([pmim](+)) from the first solvation layer of the protein providing a comparatively dehydrated environment. This preferential solvation of the protein by the RTIL cation extends up to ∼30 Å from the protein surface giving rise to a nanoscopic cage of overall radius 42 Å. In the nanoscopic cage of the RTIL (42 Å), volume fraction of the protein (radius 12 Å) is only about 2%. RTIL anion does not show any preferential solvation near protein surface. Comparison of effective radius obtained from simulation and from FCS data suggests that the "dry" protein (radius 12 Å) alone diffuses in a nanoscopic cage of RTIL (radius 42 Å). MD simulation further reveals a decrease in distance ("domain closure") between the two domains (alpha and beta) of the protein leading to a more compact structure compared to that in the native state.

  18. Study of nanostructural organization of ionic liquids by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Merunka, Dalibor; Peric, Mirna; Peric, Miroslav

    2015-02-19

    The X-band electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) of a stable, spherical nitroxide spin probe, perdeuterated 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-oxopiperidine-1-oxyl (pDTO) has been used to study the nanostructural organization of a series of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ionic liquids (ILs) with alkyl chain lengths from two to eight carbons. By employing nonlinear least-squares fitting of the EPR spectra, we have obtained values of the rotational correlation time and hyperfine coupling splitting of pDTO to high precision. The rotational correlation time of pDTO in ILs and squalane, a viscous alkane, can be fit very well to a power law functionality with a singular temperature, which often describes a number of physical quantities measured in supercooled liquids. The viscosity of the ILs and squalane, taken from the literature, can also be fit to the same power law expression, which means that the rotational correlation times and the ionic liquid viscosities have similar functional dependence on temperature. The apparent activation energy of both the rotational correlation time of pDTO and the viscous flow of ILs and squalane increases with decreasing temperature; in other words, they exhibit strong non-Arrhenius behavior. The rotational correlation time of pDTO as a function of η/T, where η is the shear viscosity and T is the temperature, is well described by the Stokes-Einstein-Debye (SED) law, while the hydrodynamic probe radii are solvent dependent and are smaller than the geometric radius of the probe. The temperature dependence of hyperfine coupling splitting is the same in all four ionic liquids. The value of the hyperfine coupling splitting starts decreasing with increasing alkyl chain length in the ionic liquids in which the number of carbons in the alkyl chain is greater than four. This decrease together with the decrease in the hydrodynamic radius of the probe indicates a possible existence of nonpolar nanodomains.

  19. Massive radius-dependent flow slippage in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secchi, Eleonora; Marbach, Sophie; Niguès, Antoine; Stein, Derek; Siria, Alessandro; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2016-09-01

    Measurements and simulations have found that water moves through carbon nanotubes at exceptionally high rates owing to nearly frictionless interfaces. These observations have stimulated interest in nanotube-based membranes for applications including desalination, nano-filtration and energy harvesting, yet the exact mechanisms of water transport inside the nanotubes and at the water-carbon interface continue to be debated because existing theories do not provide a satisfactory explanation for the limited number of experimental results available so far. This lack of experimental results arises because, even though controlled and systematic studies have explored transport through individual nanotubes, none has met the considerable technical challenge of unambiguously measuring the permeability of a single nanotube. Here we show that the pressure-driven flow rate through individual nanotubes can be determined with unprecedented sensitivity and without dyes from the hydrodynamics of water jets as they emerge from single nanotubes into a surrounding fluid. Our measurements reveal unexpectedly large and radius-dependent surface slippage in carbon nanotubes, and no slippage in boron nitride nanotubes that are crystallographically similar to carbon nanotubes, but electronically different. This pronounced contrast between the two systems must originate from subtle differences in the atomic-scale details of their solid-liquid interfaces, illustrating that nanofluidics is the frontier at which the continuum picture of fluid mechanics meets the atomic nature of matter.

  20. Radius of the neutron star magnetosphere during disk accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippova, E. V.; Mereminskiy, I. A.; Lutovinov, A. A.; Molkov, S. V.; Tsygankov, S. S.

    2017-11-01

    The dependence of the spin frequency derivative \\dot ν of accreting neutron stars with a strongmagnetic field (X-ray pulsars) on the mass accretion rate (bolometric luminosity, L bol) has been investigated for eight transient pulsars in binary systems with Be stars. Using data from the Fermi/GBM and Swift/BAT telescopes, we have shown that for seven of the eight systems the dependence \\dot ν ( L bol) can be fitted by the model of angular momentum transfer through an accretion disk, which predicts the relation \\dot ν ˜ L 6/7 bol. Hysteresis in the dependence \\dot ν ( L bol) has been confirmed in the system V 0332+53 and has been detected for the first time in the systems KS 1947+300, GRO J1008-57, and 1A 0535+26. Estimates for the radius of the neutron star magnetosphere in all of the investigated systems have been obtained. We show that this quantity varies from pulsar to pulsar and depends strongly on the analytical model and the estimates for the neutron star and binary system parameters.

  1. System Estimates Radius of Curvature of a Segmented Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rakoczy, John

    2008-01-01

    A system that estimates the global radius of curvature (GRoC) of a segmented telescope mirror has been developed for use as one of the subsystems of a larger system that exerts precise control over the displacements of the mirror segments. This GRoC-estimating system, when integrated into the overall control system along with a mirror-segment- actuation subsystem and edge sensors (sensors that measure displacements at selected points on the edges of the segments), makes it possible to control the GROC mirror-deformation mode, to which mode contemporary edge sensors are insufficiently sensitive. This system thus makes it possible to control the GRoC of the mirror with sufficient precision to obtain the best possible image quality and/or to impose a required wavefront correction on incoming or outgoing light. In its mathematical aspect, the system utilizes all the information available from the edge-sensor subsystem in a unique manner that yields estimates of all the states of the segmented mirror. The system does this by exploiting a special set of mirror boundary conditions and mirror influence functions in such a way as to sense displacements in degrees of freedom that would otherwise be unobservable by means of an edge-sensor subsystem, all without need to augment the edge-sensor system with additional metrological hardware. Moreover, the accuracy of the estimates increases with the number of mirror segments.

  2. Massive radius-dependent flow slippage in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Secchi, Eleonora; Marbach, Sophie; Niguès, Antoine; Stein, Derek; Siria, Alessandro; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2016-09-08

    Measurements and simulations have found that water moves through carbon nanotubes at exceptionally high rates owing to nearly frictionless interfaces. These observations have stimulated interest in nanotube-based membranes for applications including desalination, nano-filtration and energy harvesting, yet the exact mechanisms of water transport inside the nanotubes and at the water-carbon interface continue to be debated because existing theories do not provide a satisfactory explanation for the limited number of experimental results available so far. This lack of experimental results arises because, even though controlled and systematic studies have explored transport through individual nanotubes, none has met the considerable technical challenge of unambiguously measuring the permeability of a single nanotube. Here we show that the pressure-driven flow rate through individual nanotubes can be determined with unprecedented sensitivity and without dyes from the hydrodynamics of water jets as they emerge from single nanotubes into a surrounding fluid. Our measurements reveal unexpectedly large and radius-dependent surface slippage in carbon nanotubes, and no slippage in boron nitride nanotubes that are crystallographically similar to carbon nanotubes, but electronically different. This pronounced contrast between the two systems must originate from subtle differences in the atomic-scale details of their solid-liquid interfaces, illustrating that nanofluidics is the frontier at which the continuum picture of fluid mechanics meets the atomic nature of matter.

  3. Massive radius-dependent flow slippage in carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Secchi, Eleonora; Marbach, Sophie; Niguès, Antoine; Stein, Derek; Siria, Alessandro; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2016-01-01

    Simulations and measurements have established that water moves through carbon nanotubes with exceptionally high rates due to nearly frictionless interfaces1–4. These observations have stimulated interest in nanotube-based membranes for applications that range from desalination to nano-filtration and energy harvesting5–10, yet the exact water transport mechanisms inside the nanotubes and at the water-carbon interface continue to be controversially discussed11,12 because existing theories fail to provide a satisfying explanation for the limited number of experimental results available to date13. This is because even though controlled and systematic studies have explored transport through individual nanotubes8,9,14–7, none has met the considerable technical challenge of unambiguously measuring the permeability of a single nanotube11. Here we show that the pressure-driven flow rate across individual nanotubes can be determined with unprecedented sensitivity and without dyes from the hydrodynamics of water jets as they emerge from single nanotubes into a surrounding fluid. Our measurements reveal unexpectedly large and radius-dependent surface slippage in carbon nanotubes (CNT), and no slippage in boron-nitride nanotubes (BNNT) that are crystallographically similar to CNTs but differ electronically. This pronounced contrast between the two systems must originate from subtle differences in atomic-scale details of their solid-liquid interfaces, strikingly illustrating that nanofluidics is the frontier where the continuum picture of fluid mechanics confronts the atomic nature of matter. PMID:27604947

  4. Mass and Radius Constraints Using Magnetar Giant Flare Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deibel, Alex T.; Steiner, A. W.; Brown, E. F.

    2013-04-01

    We extend the study of oscillating neutron stars to include observed magnetic field strengths. The strong magnetic field will alter the equilibrium composition of the outer neutron star crust. We construct a new neutron star crust model which predicts nuclear masses with an accuracy very close to that of the Finite Range Droplet Model. The mass model for equilibrium nuclei also includes recent developments in the nuclear physics, in particular, shell corrections and an updated neutron-drip line. We perturb our crust model to predict axial crust modes and assign them to observed giant flare quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) frequencies from SGR 1806-20. The QPOs associated with the fundamental and harmonic crust modes can be used to constrain magnetar masses and radii. We use these modes and the phenomenological equations of state from Steiner et al. to find a magnetar crust which reproduces observations of SGR 1806-20. We find magnetar crusts which match observations for various magnetic field strengths and values of entrainment of the free neutron gas in the inner crust. For a crust without a magnetic field we obtain the approximate values of M = 1.35 Msun and R = 11.85 km. For a magnetized crust with the surface dipole field of SGR 1806-20 we obtain the approximate values of M = 1.25 Msun and R = 12.41 km. If there is less entrainment of the free neutron gas the magnetar requires a larger mass and radius to reproduce observations.

  5. AO Distal Radius Fracture Classification: Global Perspective on Observer Agreement.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, Prakash; Teunis, Teun; Giménez, Beatriz Bravo; Verstreken, Frederik; Di Mascio, Livio; Jupiter, Jesse B

    2017-02-01

    Background  The primary objective of this study was to test interobserver reliability when classifying fractures by consensus by AO types and groups among a large international group of surgeons. Secondarily, we assessed the difference in inter- and intraobserver agreement of the AO classification in relation to geographical location, level of training, and subspecialty. Methods  A randomized set of radiographic and computed tomographic images from a consecutive series of 96 distal radius fractures (DRFs), treated between October 2010 and April 2013, was classified using an electronic web-based portal by an invited group of participants on two occasions. Results  Interobserver reliability was substantial when classifying AO type A fractures but fair and moderate for type B and C fractures, respectively. No difference was observed by location, except for an apparent difference between participants from India and Australia classifying type B fractures. No statistically significant associations were observed comparing interobserver agreement by level of training and no differences were shown comparing subspecialties. Intra-rater reproducibility was "substantial" for fracture types and "fair" for fracture groups with no difference accounting for location, training level, or specialty. Conclusion  Improved definition of reliability and reproducibility of this classification may be achieved using large international groups of raters, empowering decision making on which system to utilize. Level of Evidence  Level III.

  6. AO Distal Radius Fracture Classification: Global Perspective on Observer Agreement

    PubMed Central

    Jayakumar, Prakash; Teunis, Teun; Giménez, Beatriz Bravo; Verstreken, Frederik; Di Mascio, Livio; Jupiter, Jesse B.

    2016-01-01

    Background The primary objective of this study was to test interobserver reliability when classifying fractures by consensus by AO types and groups among a large international group of surgeons. Secondarily, we assessed the difference in inter- and intraobserver agreement of the AO classification in relation to geographical location, level of training, and subspecialty. Methods A randomized set of radiographic and computed tomographic images from a consecutive series of 96 distal radius fractures (DRFs), treated between October 2010 and April 2013, was classified using an electronic web-based portal by an invited group of participants on two occasions. Results Interobserver reliability was substantial when classifying AO type A fractures but fair and moderate for type B and C fractures, respectively. No difference was observed by location, except for an apparent difference between participants from India and Australia classifying type B fractures. No statistically significant associations were observed comparing interobserver agreement by level of training and no differences were shown comparing subspecialties. Intra-rater reproducibility was “substantial” for fracture types and “fair” for fracture groups with no difference accounting for location, training level, or specialty. Conclusion Improved definition of reliability and reproducibility of this classification may be achieved using large international groups of raters, empowering decision making on which system to utilize. Level of Evidence Level III PMID:28119795

  7. Enzyme catalysis with small ionic liquid quantities.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Fabian; Mutschler, Julien; Zufferey, Daniel

    2011-04-01

    Enzyme catalysis with minimal ionic liquid quantities improves reaction rates, stereoselectivity and enables solvent-free processing. In particular the widely used lipases combine well with many ionic liquids. Demonstrated applications are racemate separation, esterification and glycerolysis. Minimal solvent processing is also an alternative to sluggish solvent-free catalysis. The method allows simplified down-stream processing, as only traces of ionic liquids have to be removed.

  8. Ionic Liquid Fuels for Chemical Propulsion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-31

    nucleophilicity in the ionic liquid is critical. Both gas -phase and condensed-phase (CPCM-GIL) density functional theory calculations support the...stability trends in dialkylimidazolium ionic liquids and could be used as a higher accuracy method than the gas -phase DFT approach for predicting thermal...stabilities of ionic liquids in general. One important finding from the comparison of the gas -phase basicities relative to the GIL condensed- phase

  9. Recombination radius of a Frenkel pair and capture radius of a self-interstitial atom by vacancy clusters in bcc Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, Kenichi; Stoller, Roger E.; Xu, Haixuan

    The recombination radius of a Frenkel pair is a fundamental parameter for the object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) and mean field rate theory (RT) methods that are used to investigate irradiation damage accumulation in neutron irradiated nuclear materials. The recombination radius in bcc Fe has been studied both experimentally and numerically, however there is no general consensus about its value. The detailed atomistic processes of recombination also remain uncertain. Values from 1:0a₀ to 3:3a₀ have been employed as a recombination radius in previous studies using OKMC and RT. The recombination process of a Frenkel pair is investigated at the atomicmore » level using the self-evolved atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC) method in this paper. SEAKMC calculations reveal that a self-interstitial atom recombines with a vacancy in a spontaneous reaction from several nearby sites following characteristic pathways. The recombination radius of a Frenkel pair is estimated to be 2.26a₀ by taking the average of the recombination distances from 80 simulation cases. This value agrees well with the experimental estimate. In addition, we apply these procedures to the capture radius of a self-interstitial atom by a vacancy cluster. The capture radius is found to gradually increase with the size of the vacancy cluster. The fitting curve for the capture radius is obtained as a function of the number of vacancies in the cluster.« less

  10. Recombination radius of a Frenkel pair and capture radius of a self-interstitial atom by vacancy clusters in bcc Fe

    DOE PAGES

    Nakashima, Kenichi; Stoller, Roger E.; Xu, Haixuan

    2015-08-04

    The recombination radius of a Frenkel pair is a fundamental parameter for the object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) and mean field rate theory (RT) methods that are used to investigate irradiation damage accumulation in neutron irradiated nuclear materials. The recombination radius in bcc Fe has been studied both experimentally and numerically, however there is no general consensus about its value. The detailed atomistic processes of recombination also remain uncertain. Values from 1:0a₀ to 3:3a₀ have been employed as a recombination radius in previous studies using OKMC and RT. The recombination process of a Frenkel pair is investigated at the atomicmore » level using the self-evolved atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC) method in this paper. SEAKMC calculations reveal that a self-interstitial atom recombines with a vacancy in a spontaneous reaction from several nearby sites following characteristic pathways. The recombination radius of a Frenkel pair is estimated to be 2.26a₀ by taking the average of the recombination distances from 80 simulation cases. This value agrees well with the experimental estimate. In addition, we apply these procedures to the capture radius of a self-interstitial atom by a vacancy cluster. The capture radius is found to gradually increase with the size of the vacancy cluster. The fitting curve for the capture radius is obtained as a function of the number of vacancies in the cluster.« less

  11. Recombination radius of a Frenkel pair and capture radius of a self-interstitial atom by vacancy clusters in bcc Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Kenichi; Stoller, Roger E.; Xu, Haixuan

    2015-08-01

    The recombination radius of a Frenkel pair is a fundamental parameter for the object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) and mean field rate theory (RT) methods that are used to investigate irradiation damage accumulation in irradiated materials. The recombination radius in bcc Fe has been studied both experimentally and numerically, however there is no general consensus about its value. The detailed atomistic processes of recombination also remain uncertain. Values from 1.0a0 to 3.3a0 have been employed as a recombination radius in previous studies using OKMC and RT. The recombination process of a Frenkel pair is investigated at the atomic level using the self-evolved atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC) method in this paper. SEAKMC calculations reveal that a self-interstitial atom recombines with a vacancy in a spontaneous reaction from several nearby sites following characteristic pathways. The recombination radius of a Frenkel pair is estimated to be 2.26a0 by taking the average of the recombination distances from 80 simulation cases. In addition, we apply these procedures to the capture radius of a self-interstitial atom by a vacancy cluster. The capture radius is found to gradually increase with the size of the vacancy cluster. The fitting curve for the capture radius is obtained as a function of the number of vacancies in the cluster.

  12. Membrane separation of ionic liquid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Campos, Daniel; Feiring, Andrew Edward; Majumdar, Sudipto; Nemser, Stuart

    2015-09-01

    A membrane separation process using a highly fluorinated polymer membrane that selectively permeates water of an aqueous ionic liquid solution to provide dry ionic liquid. Preferably the polymer is a polymer that includes polymerized perfluoro-2,2-dimethyl-1,3-dioxole (PDD). The process is also capable of removing small molecular compounds such as organic solvents that can be present in the solution. This membrane separation process is suitable for drying the aqueous ionic liquid byproduct from precipitating solutions of biomass dissolved in ionic liquid, and is thus instrumental to providing usable lignocellulosic products for energy consumption and other industrial uses in an environmentally benign manner.

  13. Ionic Structure at Dielectric Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Yufei

    The behavior of ions in liquids confined between macromolecules determines the outcome of many nanoscale assembly processes in synthetic and biological materials such as colloidal dispersions, emulsions, hydrogels, DNA, cell membranes, and proteins. Theoretically, the macromolecule-liquid boundary is often modeled as a dielectric interface and an important quantity of interest is the ionic structure in a liquid confined between two such interfaces. The knowledge gleaned from the study of ionic structure in such models can be useful in several industrial applications, such as biosensors, lithium-ion batteries double-layer supercapacitors for energy storage and seawater desalination. Electrostatics plays a critical role in the development of such functional materials. Many of the functions of these materials, result from charge and composition heterogeneities. There are great challenges in solving electrostatics problems in heterogeneous media with arbitrary shapes because electrostatic interactions remains unknown but depend on the particular density of charge distributions. Charged molecules in heterogeneous media affect the media's dielectric response and hence the interaction between the charges is unknown since it depends on the media and on the geometrical properties of the interfaces. To determine the properties of heterogeneous systems including crucial effects neglected in classical mean field models such as the hard core of the ions, the dielectric mismatch and interfaces with arbitrary shapes. The effect of hard core interactions accounts properly for short range interactions and the effect of local dielectric heterogeneities in the presence of ions and/or charged molecules for long-range interactions are both analyzed via an energy variational principle that enables to update charges and the medium's response in the same simulation time step. In particular, we compute the ionic structure in a model system of electrolyte confined by two planar dielectric

  14. Design of Energetic Ionic Liquids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    associated polarizable force fields, and mesoscale-level simulations with currently usedpropellants. of bulk ionic liquids based upon multiscale coarse A...pair. The 1H,3H cation paired with perchlorate ( nitrate ) has a proton transfer barrier of 2.7 0.08w ’I (3.0) kcal/mol. /.04 - M K I 373K<[Emimlllm-l Ion...series of ion clusters [Emim+]m[Im’]mn± 4-amino- 1,2,4-triazolium nitrate (HEATN) have (m=l-3) were computed using the hybrid B3LYP density identified a

  15. Business as a Site of Language Contact.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Sandra; Bargiela-Chiappini, Francesca

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the field of language for business. Argues for redressing the balance of research into business as a site of language contact in favor of less well-represented languages and cultures through indigenous discourse studies, and notes the increasing frequency and importance of work involving Asian languages. (Author/VWL)

  16. The strength of polyaxial locking interfaces of distal radius plates.

    PubMed

    Hoffmeier, Konrad L; Hofmann, Gunther O; Mückley, Thomas

    2009-10-01

    Currently available polyaxial locking plates represent the consequent enhancement of fixed-angle, first-generation locking plates. In contrast to fixed-angle locking plates which are sufficiently investigated, the strength of the new polyaxial locking options has not yet been evaluated biomechanically. This study investigates the mechanical strength of single polyaxial interfaces of different volar radius plates. Single screw-plate interfaces of the implants Palmar 2.7 (Königsee Implantate und Instrumente zur Osteosynthese GmbH, Allendorf, Germany), VariAx (Stryker Leibinger GmbH & Co. KG, Freiburg, Germany) und Viper (Integra LifeSciences Corporation, Plainsboro, NJ, USA) were tested by cantilever bending. The strength of 0 degrees, 10 degrees and 20 degrees screw locking angle was obtained during static and dynamic loading. The Palmar 2.7 interfaces showed greater ultimate strength and fatigue strength than the interfaces of the other implants. The strength of the VariAx interfaces was about 60% of Palmar 2.7 in both, static and dynamic loading. No dynamic testing was applied to the Viper plate because of its low ultimate strength. By static loading, an increase in screw locking angle caused a reduction of strength for the Palmar 2.7 and Viper locking interfaces. No influence was observed for the VariAx locking interfaces. During dynamic loading; angulation had no influence on the locking strength of Palmar 2.7. However, reduction of locking strength with increasing screw angulation was observed for VariAx. The strength of the polyaxial locking interfaces differs remarkably between the examined implants. Depending on the implant an increase of the screw locking angle causes a reduction of ultimate or fatigue strength, but not in all cases a significant impact was observed.

  17. A Large Radius Human Centrifuge: The Human Hypergravity Havitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loon, J. J. W. A.

    2008-06-01

    Life on Earth has developed at unit gravity, 9.81 m/s2, but how would plants and animals have evolved on a larger planet, i.e. larger than Earth? We are able to address this question simply by studies using centrifuges. In the past decades numerous experiments have been performed on cells, plants and animals grown for longer durations, even multi generations, under hypergravity conditions. Based on these studies we have gained interesting insights in the physiological process of these systems when exposed to artificial gravity. Animals and plants adapt themselves to this new high-g environment. Information of adaptation to hyper-g in mammals is interesting, or maybe even proof vital, for future human space flight programs especially in light of long duration missions to Moon and Mars. We know from long duration animal studies that numerous physiological processes and structures like muscles, bones, neuro-vestibular, or the cardiovascular system are affected. However, humans have never been exposed to a hyper-g environment for long durations. Human studies are mostly in the order of hours at most. Current work on human centrifuges is all focused on short arm systems to apply artificial gravity in long duration space missions. In this paper we want to address the possible usefulness of a large radius human centrifuge on Earth, or even on Moon or Mars, for both basic research and possible applications. In such a centrifuge a group of humans may be exposed to hypergravity for, in principle, an unlimited period of time.

  18. Improved automatic optic nerve radius estimation from high resolution MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrigan, Robert L.; Smith, Alex K.; Mawn, Louise A.; Smith, Seth A.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2017-02-01

    The optic nerve (ON) is a vital structure in the human visual system and transports all visual information from the retina to the cortex for higher order processing. Due to the lack of redundancy in the visual pathway, measures of ON damage have been shown to correlate well with visual deficits. These measures are typically taken at an arbitrary anatomically defined point along the nerve and do not characterize changes along the length of the ON. We propose a fully automated, three-dimensionally consistent technique building upon a previous independent slice-wise technique to estimate the radius of the ON and surrounding cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) on high-resolution heavily T2-weighted isotropic MRI. We show that by constraining results to be three-dimensionally consistent this technique produces more anatomically viable results. We compare this technique with the previously published slice-wise technique using a short-term reproducibility data set, 10 subjects, follow-up <1 month, and show that the new method is more reproducible in the center of the ON. The center of the ON contains the most accurate imaging because it lacks confounders such as motion and frontal lobe interference. Long-term reproducibility, 5 subjects, follow-up of approximately 11 months, is also investigated with this new technique and shown to be similar to short-term reproducibility, indicating that the ON does not change substantially within 11 months. The increased accuracy of this new technique provides increased power when searching for anatomical changes in ON size amongst patient populations.

  19. Improved Automatic Optic Nerve Radius Estimation from High Resolution MRI.

    PubMed

    Harrigan, Robert L; Smith, Alex K; Mawn, Louise A; Smith, Seth A; Landman, Bennett A

    2017-02-11

    The optic nerve (ON) is a vital structure in the human visual system and transports all visual information from the retina to the cortex for higher order processing. Due to the lack of redundancy in the visual pathway, measures of ON damage have been shown to correlate well with visual deficits. These measures are typically taken at an arbitrary anatomically defined point along the nerve and do not characterize changes along the length of the ON. We propose a fully automated, three-dimensionally consistent technique building upon a previous independent slice-wise technique to estimate the radius of the ON and surrounding cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) on high-resolution heavily T2-weighted isotropic MRI. We show that by constraining results to be three-dimensionally consistent this technique produces more anatomically viable results. We compare this technique with the previously published slice-wise technique using a short-term reproducibility data set, 10 subjects, follow-up <1 month, and show that the new method is more reproducible in the center of the ON. The center of the ON contains the most accurate imaging because it lacks confounders such as motion and frontal lobe interference. Long-term reproducibility, 5 subjects, follow-up of approximately 11 months, is also investigated with this new technique and shown to be similar to short-term reproducibility, indicating that the ON does not change substantially within 11 months. The increased accuracy of this new technique provides increased power when searching for anatomical changes in ON size amongst patient populations.

  20. Conservative Treatment of Distal Radius Fractures: A Prospective Descriptive Study.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Pilar; Izquierdo, Óscar; Castellanos, Juan

    2017-06-01

    Disability of the upper limb is one of the consequences of distal radius fracture (DRF). The outcome of DRF treatment is based on objective clinical variables, as strength or range of movement (ROM); sometimes these variables do not correlate with the functional level of the patient. The principal objective of our study was to assess the repercussion of conservative treatment of DRF on upper limb disability. This is a retrospective review of prospectively collected data. We collected data of 61 nonconsecutive DRFs treated conservatively from July 2007 to August 2008. Average Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) score before fracture was 20.8 points; average DASH score after the fracture was 42.6. There was a significant increase in the upper limb disability after 1 year of follow-up in the patients treated conservatively ( P < .001; size effect, 1.06). Average radial inclination, radial tilt, and radial length were 18.18°, 3.35°, and 5.76 mm, respectively. Average ROM for flexion-extension was 100.6° and for pronation-supination 144.0°. ROM for flexion-extension of the unaffected wrist was 128.2° and for pronation-supination 172.4°. We did not find any significant statistical correlation between the increase in disability and the decrease in the ROM ( P > .05). We did not find any significant statistical correlation between the increase in the disability and the worsening in the radiological parameters ( P > .05). Our results confirm the hypothesis that the conservative treatment of DRF produced an increase in the upper limb disability after 1 year of follow-up. Our study does not show a correlation between the increase in upper limb disability and the decrease in wrist ROM. Our study did not find a correlation between radiological measures and DASH scores.

  1. Squat exercise biomechanics during short-radius centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Duda, Kevin R; Jarchow, Thomas; Young, Laurence R

    2012-02-01

    Centrifuge-induced artificial gravity (AG) with exercise is a promising comprehensive countermeasure against the physiological de-conditioning that results from exposure to weightlessness. However, body movements onboard a rotating centrifuge are affected by both the gravity gradient and Coriolis accelerations. The effect of centrifugation on squat exercise biomechanics was investigated, and differences between AG and upright squat biomechanics were quantified. There were 28 subjects (16 male) who participated in two separate experiments. Knee position, foot reaction forces, and motion sickness were recorded during the squats in a 1-G field while standing upright and while supine on a horizontally rotating 2 m radius centrifuge at 0, 23, or 30 rpm. No participants terminated the experiment due to motion sickness symptoms. Total mediolateral knee deflection increased by 1.0 to 2.0 cm during centrifugation, and did not result in any injuries. There was no evidence of an increased mediolateral knee travel "after-effect" during postrotation supine squats. Peak foot reaction forces increased with rotation rate up to approximately 200% bodyweight (iRED on ISS provides approximately 210% bodyweight resistance). The ratio of left-to-right foot force throughout the squat cycle on the centrifuge was nonconstant and approximately sinusoidal. Total foot reaction force versus knee flexion-extension angles differed between upright and AG squats due to centripetal acceleration on the centrifuge. A brief exercise protocol during centrifugation can be safely completed without significant after-effects in mediolateral knee position or motion sickness. Several recommendations are made for the design of future centrifuge-based exercise protocols for in-space applications.

  2. Radius of curvature variations for annular, dark hollow and flat topped beams in turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyyuboğlu, H. T.; Baykal, Y. K.; Ji, X. L.

    2010-06-01

    For propagation in turbulent atmosphere, the radius of curvature variations for annular, dark hollow and flat topped beams are examined under a single formulation. Our results show that for collimated beams, when examined against propagation length, the dark hollow, flat topped and annular Gaussian beams behave nearly the same as the Gaussian beam, but have larger radius of curvature values. Increased partial coherence and turbulence levels tend to lower the radius of curvature. Bigger source sizes on the other hand give rise to larger radius of curvature. Dark hollow and flat topped beams have reduced radius of curvature at longer wavelengths, whereas the annular Gaussian beam seems to be unaffected by wavelength changes; the radius of curvature of the Gaussian beam meanwhile rises with increasing wavelength.

  3. Minimum required capture radius in a coplanar model of the aerial combat problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breakwell, J. V.; Merz, A. W.

    1977-01-01

    Coplanar aerial combat is modeled with constant speeds and specified turn rates. The minimum capture radius which will always permit capture, regardless of the initial conditions, is calculated. This 'critical' capture radius is also the maximum range which the evader can guarantee indefinitely if the initial range, for example, is large. A composite barrier is constructed which gives the boundary, at any heading, of relative positions for which the capture radius is less than critical.

  4. Ionic Interactions in Actinide Tetrahalides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akdeniz, Z.; Karaman, A.; Tosi, M. P.

    2001-05-01

    We determine a model of the ionic interactions in AX 4 compounds (where A is an atom in the actinide series from Th to Am and X = F, Cl, Br or I) by an analysis of data on the static and dynamic structure of their molecular monomers. The potential energy function that we adopt is taken from earlier work on rare-earth trihalides [Z. Akdeniz, Z. Q q e k and M. P. Tosi, Z. Naturforsch. 55a, 861 (2000)] and in particular allows for the electronic polarizability of the actinide ion. This polarizability quantitatively determines the antisymmetric-bending vibrational mode, but its magnitude remains compatible with a symmetric tetrahedral shape of the molecule at equilibrium. The fluorides have an especially high degree of ionic character, and the interionic-force parameters for each halide of the U, Np, Pu and Am series show regular trends, suggesting that extrapolations to the other transuranic-element halides may usefully be made. The Th compounds show some deviations from these trends, and the interionic-force model that we determine for ThCl4 differs somewhat from that obtained in a previous study. We therefore return on the evaluation of the relative stability of charged oligomers of ThCl4 and ZrCl4 and find confirmation of our earlier results on this problem.

  5. Fullerene reinforced ionic polymer transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, J. H.; Cheng, T. H.; Oh, I. K.

    2009-07-01

    Novel fullerene reinforced nano-composite transducers based on nafion were developed inorder to improve the ionic polymer metal composite transducer. The fullerene reinforced nano-composite membranes were fabricated by recasting method with 0.1 and 0.5 weight percentage of a Fullerenes. Stress-Strain tests showed tremendous increase in stiffness and modulus of the nano-composite membranes even at these minute concentrations of Fullerenes. Ionic exchange capacity analysis and proton conductivity test were performed to calculate the electrical property of the composite films. Water uptake was measured to understand the liquid adsorbing characteristics of the membranes. Also, tip displacement of the nano-composite membrane transducer was investigated under AC excitations with various magnitudes and frequencies. Furthermore, the generated energy was measured from external sinusoidal physical input vibration with several displacements and frequencies by using a mechanical shaker. As a result, the fullerene reinforced nanocomposite membrane based on nafion shows higher stiffness and Young's modulus than that of pure nafion membrane. Also, the nano-composite membrane had better water uptake and proton conductivity than the pure membrane. Fullerene reinforced nano-composite membrane transducer actuates to a much larger deformations than pure nafion membrane transducer. The developed membrane transducer dissipates more energy from the physical input vibration than that of unfilled(or virgin) Nafion membrane transducer.

  6. Estimation of weapon-radius versus maneuverability trade-off for air-to-air combat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, H. J.; Lefton, L.

    1977-01-01

    A chase in a horizontal plane between a pursuer with a large capture radius and a more maneuverable evading vehicle is examined with constant-speed vehicle models. An approximation to the 'sidestepping' maneuver of the Homicidal Chauffeur Game is modified to account for the effect of evader turning rate, and an estimate of capture radius required is so obtained which agrees remarkably well with Cockayne's point-capture result. The maneuver assumes central importance for barrier surfaces appearing in the Game of Two Cars. Results are given for required weapon capture-radius in terms of the maneuverability of the two vehicles. Some calculations of capture radius are presented.

  7. An Alternative to the Ionic Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, R. T.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the "coordinated polymeric model," which yields more accurate energy calculations than the "ionic model" for compounds which exhibit considerable covalency. The dichotomy between ionic and covalent bonding is thus largely broken down for solids which are nonmolecular in the crystalline state. (MLH)

  8. Dielectric study on mixtures of ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Thoms, E; Sippel, P; Reuter, D; Weiß, M; Loidl, A; Krohns, S

    2017-08-07

    Ionic liquids are promising candidates for electrolytes in energy-storage systems. We demonstrate that mixing two ionic liquids allows to precisely tune their physical properties, like the dc conductivity. Moreover, these mixtures enable the gradual modification of the fragility parameter, which is believed to be a measure of the complexity of the energy landscape in supercooled liquids. The physical origin of this index is still under debate; therefore, mixing ionic liquids can provide further insights. From the chemical point of view, tuning ionic liquids via mixing is an easy and thus an economic way. For this study, we performed detailed investigations by broadband dielectric spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry on two mixing series of ionic liquids. One series combines an imidazole based with a pyridine based ionic liquid and the other two different anions in an imidazole based ionic liquid. The analysis of the glass-transition temperatures and the thorough evaluations of the measured dielectric permittivity and conductivity spectra reveal that the dynamics in mixtures of ionic liquids are well defined by the fractions of their parent compounds.

  9. Chemical and Electrochemical Studies in Ionic Liquids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-12

    Electrochemistry and Witchcraft ", Gordon Research Conference on Electrochemistry", Santa Barbara, CA, January, 1985. OR. A. Osteryoung, ’An Introduction to...Temperature Chloroaluminate Ionic Liquids: Chemistry, Electrochemistry and Witchcraft ", Chemistry Department Colloquium, University of Alabama...Tuscaloosa, Alabama, December 1, 1988. OR. A. Osteryoung, "Ambient Temperature Chloroaluminate Ionic Liquids: Chemistry, Electrochemistry and Witchcraft

  10. Lithium-Air and ionic Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Kellar, Michael

    2015-09-01

    The final portion of this project was accomplished at Sandia National Labs, Livermore, with the overall goal being to optimize lithium-air cells with an ionic liquid electrolyte. Both of these are potential future routes for lithium-ion technology. Lithiumair presents the advantage of higher gravimetric energy density, and ionic liquids present the advantage of greater hydrophobicity and much lower volatility, along with a larger window of electrochemical stability. Ionic liquids however have several drawbacks for the battery industry. Currently they are not as cost effective as many organic solvents. Additionally, because of the added viscosity of ionic interactions compared to themore » typical dipole interactions of a solvent, the ionic conductivity is lower than for common organic solvents.« less

  11. Evaluation of sarcopenia in patients with distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Roh, Young Hak; Koh, Young Do; Noh, Jung Ho; Gong, Hyun Sik; Baek, Goo Hyun

    2017-12-01

    Sarcopenia is more prevalent in patients with distal radius fracture (DRF) than in age- and sex-matched controls. Lower appendicular mass index in men and weaker grip strength in both men and women increase the likelihood of DRF. Sarcopenia is a core component of physical frailty that predisposes older people to falls and negatively impacts the activities of daily living. The objectives of this study were to compare the prevalence of sarcopenia in patients with DRF with that in age- and sex-matched controls without DRF; and evaluate the association between sarcopenia and the occurrence of DRF. We prospectively recruited 132 patients over 50 years of age who sustained DRF due to fall and 132 age- and sex-matched controls without DRF. A definition of sarcopenia was based on the consensus of the Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia. Sarcopenic components including appendicular lean body mass, grip strength, and gait speed were compared between the two groups. Other factors assessed for the occurrence of DRF were age, gender, body mass index (BMI), lumbar, and hip bone mineral density (BMD) values. A conditional logistic regression analysis was conducted to evaluate the associations between sarcopenia and the occurrence of DRF. A total of 39 (30%) of 132 DRF patients were sarcopenic, whereas 23 (17%) of the 132 controls were within the sarcopenic criteria (p = 0.048). The patient group had significantly lower lean body mass and weaker grip strength than those of the control group. However, there was no significant difference in gait speed between the two groups. According to regression analysis, lower appendicular mass index in men was associated with an increased incidence of DRF (odds ratio [OR] = 0.84, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.72, 0.95) while weaker grip strength and lower total hip BMD values were associated with the occurrence of DRF in both men (OR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.63, 0.92; and OR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.64, 0.94, respectively) and women (OR

  12. CADDIS Volume 2. Sources, Stressors and Responses: Ionic Strength - Simple Conceptual Diagram

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Introduction to the ionic strength module, when to list ionic strength as a candidate cause, ways to measure ionic strength, simple and detailed conceptual diagrams for ionic strength, ionic strength module references and literature reviews.

  13. CADDIS Volume 2. Sources, Stressors and Responses: Ionic Strength - Detailed Conceptual Diagram

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Introduction to the ionic strength module, when to list ionic strength as a candidate cause, ways to measure ionic strength, simple and detailed conceptual diagrams for ionic strength, ionic strength module references and literature reviews.

  14. Inelastic neutron scattering study on boson peaks of imidazolium-based ionic liquids

    DOE PAGES

    Kofu, Maiko; Inamura, Yasuhiro; Podlesnyak, Andrey A.; ...

    2015-07-26

    Low energy excitations of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium ionic liquids (ILs) have been investigated by means of neutron spectroscopy. In the spectra of inelastic scattering, a broad excitation peak referred to as a “boson peak” appeared at 1–3 meV in all of the ILs measured. The intensity of the boson peak was enhanced at the Q positions corresponding to the diffraction peaks, reflecting the in-phase vibrational nature of the boson peak. Furthermore the boson peak energy (E BP) was insensitive to the length of the alkyl-chain but changed depending on the radius of the anion. From the correlation among E BP, the anionmore » radius, and the glass transition temperature T g, we conclude that both E BP and T g in ILs are predominantly governed by the inter-ionic Coulomb interaction which is less influenced by the alkyl-chain length. Furthermore, we also found that the E BP is proportional to the inverse square root of the molecular weight as observed in molecular glasses.« less

  15. Comparative biokinetics of trivalent radionuclides with similar ionic dimensions: promethium-147, curium-242 and americium-241.

    PubMed

    Priest, N D

    2007-09-01

    Data on the distribution and redistribution patterns in the laboratory rat of three trivalent elements with a similar ionic radius have been compared. This showed that these distributions for the two ions with the same ionic radius (111 pm), i.e., those of promethium (a lanthanoid) and curium (an actinoid), were indistinguishable and that americium, with a slightly larger ion size (111.5 pm), behaved similarly. The results are consistent with the suggestion that ion size is the only important factor controlling the deposition and redistribution patterns of trivalent lanthanoids and actinoids in rats. The result is important because it suggests that the same radiological protection dosimetry models should be used for trivalent actinoids and lanthanoids, that human volunteer data generated for lanthanoid isotopes can be used to predict the behavior of actinoids with the same ion size, and that appropriate pairs of beta-particle-emitting lanthanoid and alpha-particle-emitting actinoids could be used to study the relative toxicity of alpha and beta particles in experimental animals.

  16. Lipid Biomembrane in Ionic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Brian; Jing, Benxin; Shah, Jindal; Maginn, Ed; Zhu, Y. Elaine; Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Team

    2014-03-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) have been recently explored as new ``green'' chemicals in several chemical and biomedical processes. In our pursuit of understanding their toxicities towards aquatic and terrestrial organisms, we have examined the IL interaction with lipid bilayers as model cell membranes. Experimentally by fluorescence microscopy, we have directly observed the disruption of lipid bilayer by added ILs. Depending on the concentration, alkyl chain length, and anion hydrophobicity of ILs, the interaction of ILs with lipid bilayers leads to the formation of micelles, fibrils, and multi-lamellar vesicles for IL-lipid complexes. By MD computer simulations, we have confirmed the insertion of ILs into lipid bilayers to modify the spatial organization of lipids in the membrane. The combined experimental and simulation results correlate well with the bioassay results of IL-induced suppression in bacteria growth, thereby suggesting a possible mechanism behind the IL toxicity. National Science Foundation, Center for Research Computing at Notre Dame.

  17. [Matrimonial radius and anthropologic differentiation of the population of the Peloponnese, Greece].

    PubMed

    Pitsios, T K

    1983-09-01

    Mean matrimonial radius (MMR) and mean breeding radius (MBR) were studied in the population of the Peloponnese (Greece). The historical and geographical causes of these important genetical variables are discussed considering, too, their effects on the anthropological differentiation of this population.

  18. Crown radius and diameter at breast height relationships for six bottomland hardwood species

    Treesearch

    Brian Roy Lockhart; Robert C. Weih; Keith M. Smith

    2005-01-01

    The relationship between a tree's crown radius and diameter at breast height (DBH) has a variety of uses including forest competition studies, tree crown densities, spacing and stocking relationships, wildlife habitat suitability models, and tree volume estimations. Estimating DBH from mean crown radius (MCR) is of interest to natural resource managers because MCR...

  19. Influence of the ionic liquid/gas surface on ionic liquid chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lovelock, Kevin R J

    2012-04-21

    Applications such as gas storage, gas separation, NP synthesis and supported ionic liquid phase catalysis depend upon the interaction of different species with the ionic liquid/gas surface. Consequently, these applications cannot proceed to the full extent of their potential without a profound understanding of the surface structure and properties. As a whole, this perspective contains more questions than answers, which demonstrates the current state of the field. Throughout this perspective, crucial questions are posed and a roadmap is proposed to answer these questions. A critical analysis is made of the field of ionic liquid/gas surface structure and properties, and a number of design rules are mined. The effects of ionic additives on the ionic liquid/gas surface structure are presented. A possible driving force for surface formation is discussed that has, to the best of my knowledge, not been postulated in the literature to date. This driving force suggests that for systems composed solely of ions, the rules for surface formation of dilute electrolytes do not apply. The interaction of neutral additives with the ionic liquid/gas surface is discussed. Particular attention is focussed upon H(2)O and CO(2), vital additives for many applications of ionic liquids. Correlations between ionic liquid/gas surface structure and properties, ionic liquid surfaces plus additives, and ionic liquid applications are given. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2012

  20. Influence of the ionic liquid [C4mpy][Tf2N] on the structure of the miniprotein Trp-cage.

    PubMed

    Baker, Joseph L; Furbish, Jeffrey; Lindberg, Gerrick E

    2015-11-01

    We examine the effect of the ionic liquid [C4mpy][Tf2N] on the structure of the miniprotein Trp-cage and contrast these results with the behavior of Trp-cage in water. We find the ionic liquid has a dramatic effect on Trp-cage, though many similarities with aqueous Trp-cage are observed. We assess Trp-cage folding by monitoring root mean square deviation from the crystallographic structure, radius of gyration, proline cis/trans isomerization state, protein secondary structure, amino acid contact formation and distance, and native and non-native contact formation. Starting from an unfolded configuration, Trp-cage folds in water at 298 K in less than 500 ns of simulation, but has very little mobility in the ionic liquid at the same temperature, which can be ascribed to the higher ionic liquid viscosity. At 365 K, the mobility of the ionic liquid is increased and initial stages of Trp-cage folding are observed, however Trp-cage does not reach the native folded state in 2 μs of simulation in the ionic liquid. Therefore, in addition to conventional molecular dynamics, we also employ scaled molecular dynamics to expedite sampling, and we demonstrate that Trp-cage in the ionic liquid does closely approach the aqueous folded state. Interestingly, while the reduced mobility of the ionic liquid is found to restrict Trp-cage motion, the ionic liquid does facilitate proline cis/trans isomerization events that are not seen in our aqueous simulations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Nanoarchitecture Control Enabled by Ionic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdoch, Heather A.; Limmer, Krista R.; Labukas, Joseph P.

    2017-04-01

    Ionic liquids have many advantages over traditional aqueous electrosynthesis for fabrication of functional nanoarchitectures, including enabling the integration of nanoparticles into traditional coatings, superhydrophobicity, nanofoams, and other hierarchical structures. Shape and size control through ionic liquid selection and processing conditions can synthesize nanoparticles and nanoarchitectures without the use of capping agents, surfactants, or templates that are often deleterious to the functionality of the resultant system. Here we give a brief overview of some recent and interesting applications of ionic liquids to the synthesis of nanoparticles and nanoarchitectures.

  2. Industrial uses and applications of ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutowski, Keith E.

    2018-02-01

    Ionic liquids are salts that melt at low temperatures (usually defined as less than 100 °C) and have a number of interesting properties that make them useful for industrial applications. Typical ionic liquid properties include high thermal stabilities, negligible vapor pressures, wide liquidus ranges, broad electrochemical windows, and unique solvation properties. Furthermore, the potential combinations of cations and anions provide nearly unlimited chemical tunability. This article will describe the diverse industrial uses of ionic liquids and how their unique properties are leveraged, with examples ranging from chemical processing to consumer packaged goods.

  3. Alkaline ionic liquids applied in supported ionic liquid catalyst for selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal

    PubMed Central

    Salminen, Eero; Virtanen, Pasi; Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka

    2014-01-01

    The challenge in preparation of ionic liquids containing a strong alkaline anion is to identify a suitable cation which can tolerate the harsh conditions induced by the anion. In this study, a commercial quaternary ammonium compound (quat) benzalkonium [ADBA] (alkyldimethylbenzylammonium) was used as a cation in the synthesis of different alkaline ionic liquids. In fact, the precursor, benzalkonium chloride, is a mixture of alkyldimethylbenzylammonium chlorides of various alkyl chain lengths and is commonly used in the formulation of various antiseptic products. The prepared ionic liquids were utilized as Supported Ionic Liquid Catalysts (SILCAs). Typically, a SILCA contains metal nanoparticles, enzymes, or metal complexes in an ionic liquid layer which is immobilized on a solid carrier material such as an active carbon cloth (ACC). The catalysts were applied in the selective hydrogenation of citral to citronellal which is an important perfumery chemical. Interestingly, 70% molar yield toward citronellal was achieved over a catalyst containing the alkaline ionic liquid benzalkonium methoxide. PMID:24790972

  4. Synthesis of hetero ionic compounds using dialkylcarbonate quaternization

    SciTech Connect

    Friesen, Cody A.; Wolfe, Derek; Johnson, Paul Bryan

    2017-09-19

    Methods of preparing hetero ionic complexes, and ionic liquids from bisulfate salts of heteroatomic compounds using dialkylcarbonates as a primary quaternizing reactant are disclosed. Also disclosed are methods of making electrochemical cells comprising the ionic liquids, and an electrochemical cell comprising an alkaline electrolyte and a hetero ionic complex additive.

  5. Synthesis of hetero ionic compounds using dialkylcarbonate quaternization

    SciTech Connect

    Friesen, Cody A.; Wolfe, Derek; Johnson, Paul Bryan

    2018-04-03

    Methods of preparing hetero ionic complexes, and ionic liquids from bisulfate salts of heteroatomic compounds using dialkylcarbonates as a primary quaternizing reactant are disclosed. Also disclosed are methods of making electrochemical cells comprising the ionic liquids, and an electrochemical cell comprising an alkaline electrolyte and a hetero ionic complex additive.

  6. Disaggregation of adenylate cyclase during polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis in mixtures of ionic and non-ionic detergents.

    PubMed

    Newby, A C; Chrambach, A

    1979-02-01

    1. Adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] solubilized from the rat liver plasma membrane with 1% Lubrol PX and partially purified by gel filtration in buffer containing 0.01% Lubrol PX was physically characterized by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. 2. The molecular radius determined for the partially purified enzyme was 4.9nm, compared with the value of 3.9nm obtained for the enzyme before gel filtration. 3. This difference, representing an approximate doubling of the molecular volume of the enzyme, implied that aggregation with itself or other proteins had occurred during partial purification. 4. Aggregation was not reversed by electrophoresis in the presence of high Lubrol concentrations. 5. Substitution of deoxycholate or N-dodecylsarcosinate for Lubrol PX either for solubilization or during electrophoresis led to poorer resolution of membrane proteins at concentrations giving greater than 70% loss of enzyme activity. 6. Partially purified adenylate cyclase was electrophoresed in the presence of mixed micelles of Lubrol PX and deoxycholate or Lubrol PX and N-dodecylsarcosinate. Different mixtures were examined simultaneously in a suitable apparatus. 7. Electrophoresis in the presence of 0.1% Lubrol plus 0.03% deoxycholate decreased the molecular radius of the cyclase to 4.0nm, with greater than 90% recovery of enzymic activity. The net charge of the enzyme was also increased, indicating ionic detergent binding. 8. With 0.1% Lubrol plus 0.03% N-dodecylsarcosinate the molecular radius was 4.3nm, recovery approx. 50% and net charge similar to that seen in Lubrol plus deoxycholate. 9. The resolution of cyclase from bulk protein, on an analytical scale, was improved in the presence of detergent mixtures, as compared with resolution in Lubrol alone. 10. The results demonstrate the usefulness of polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis to detect and overcome aggregation problems with membrane proteins and suggest that detergent mixtures in

  7. Disaggregation of adenylate cyclase during polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis in mixtures of ionic and non-ionic detergents

    PubMed Central

    Newby, Andrew C.; Chrambach, Andreas

    1979-01-01

    1. Adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] solubilized from the rat liver plasma membrane with 1% Lubrol PX and partially purified by gel filtration in buffer containing 0.01% Lubrol PX was physically characterized by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. 2. The molecular radius determined for the partially purified enzyme was 4.9nm, compared with the value of 3.9nm obtained for the enzyme before gel filtration. 3. This difference, representing an approximate doubling of the molecular volume of the enzyme, implied that aggregation with itself or other proteins had occurred during partial purification. 4. Aggregation was not reversed by electrophoresis in the presence of high Lubrol concentrations. 5. Substitution of deoxycholate or N-dodecylsarcosinate for Lubrol PX either for solubilization or during electrophoresis led to poorer resolution of membrane proteins at concentrations giving greater than 70% loss of enzyme activity. 6. Partially purified adenylate cyclase was electrophoresed in the presence of mixed micelles of Lubrol PX and deoxycholate or Lubrol PX and N-dodecylsarcosinate. Different mixtures were examined simultaneously in a suitable apparatus. 7. Electrophoresis in the presence of 0.1% Lubrol plus 0.03% deoxycholate decreased the molecular radius of the cyclase to 4.0nm, with greater than 90% recovery of enzymic activity. The net charge of the enzyme was also increased, indicating ionic detergent binding. 8. With 0.1% Lubrol plus 0.03% N-dodecylsarcosinate the molecular radius was 4.3nm, recovery approx. 50% and net charge similar to that seen in Lubrol plus deoxycholate. 9. The resolution of cyclase from bulk protein, on an analytical scale, was improved in the presence of detergent mixtures, as compared with resolution in Lubrol alone. 10. The results demonstrate the usefulness of polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis to detect and overcome aggregation problems with membrane proteins and suggest that detergent mixtures in

  8. Molecular dynamics study of the vaporization of an ionic drop.

    PubMed

    Galamba, N

    2010-09-28

    The melting of a microcrystal in vacuum and subsequent vaporization of a drop of NaCl were studied through molecular dynamics simulations with the Born-Mayer-Huggins-Tosi-Fumi rigid-ion effective potential. The vaporization was studied for a single isochor at increasing temperatures until the drop completely vaporized, and gaseous NaCl formed. Examination of the vapor composition shows that the vapor of the ionic drop and gaseous NaCl are composed of neutral species, the most abundant of which, ranging from simple NaCl monomers (ion pairs) to nonlinear polymers, (Na(n)Cl(n))(n=2-4). The enthalpies of sublimation, vaporization, and dissociation of the different vapor species are found to be in reasonable agreement with available experimental data. The decrease of the enthalpy of vaporization of the vapor species, with the radius of the drop decrease, accounts for a larger fraction of trimers and tetramers than that inferred from experiments. Further, the rhombic dimer is significantly more abundant than its linear isomer although the latter increases with the temperature. The present results suggest that both trimers and linear dimers may be important to explain the vapor pressure of molten NaCl at temperatures above 1500 K.

  9. Boundary layer charge dynamics in ionic liquid-ionic polymer transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Jacob D.; Goulbourne, N. C.

    2011-01-01

    Ionic polymer transducers (IPTs), also known as ionic polymer-metal composites, are soft sensors and actuators which operate through a coupling of microscale chemical, electrical, and mechanical interactions. The use of an ionic liquid as solvent for an IPT has been shown to dramatically increase transducer lifetime in free-air use, while also allowing for higher applied voltages without electrolysis. In this work, we apply Nernst-Planck/Poisson theory to model charge transport in an ionic liquid IPT by considering a certain fraction of the ionic liquid ions as mobile charge carriers, a phenomenon which is unique to ionic liquid IPTs compared to their water-based counterparts. Numerical simulations are performed using the finite element method to examine how the introduction of another pair of mobile ions affects boundary layer charge dynamics, concentration, and charge density distributions in the electric double layer, and the overall charge transferred and current response of the IPT. Due to interactions with the Nafion ionomer, not all of the ionic liquid ions will function as mobile charge carriers; only a certain fraction will exist as "free" ions. The presence of mobile ionic liquid ions in the transducer will increase the overall charge transferred when a voltage is applied, and cause the current in the transducer to decay more slowly. The additional mobile ions also cause the ionic concentration profiles to exhibit a nonlinear dynamic response, characterized by nonmonotonic ionic concentration profiles in space and time. Although the presence of mobile ionic liquid ions increases the overall amount of charge transferred, this additional charge transfer occurs in a somewhat symmetric manner. Therefore, the additional charge transferred due to the ionic liquid ions does not greatly increase the net bending moment of the transducer; in fact, it is possible that ionic liquid ion movement actually decreases the observed bending response. This suggests that an

  10. Phosphonium-based ionic liquids and uses

    DOEpatents

    Del Sesto, Rico E; Koppisch, Andrew T; Lovejoy, Katherine S; Purdy, Geraldine M

    2014-12-30

    Phosphonium-based room temperature ionic liquids ("RTILs") were prepared. They were used as matrices for Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry and also for preparing samples of dyes for analysis.

  11. Rare earth metal-containing ionic liquids

    DOE PAGES

    Prodius, Denis; Mudring, Anja-Verena

    2018-03-07

    As an innovative tool, ionic liquids (ILs) are widely employed as an alternative, smart, reaction media (vs. traditional solvents) offering interesting technology solutions for dissolving, processing and recycling of metal-containing materials. The costly mining and refining of rare earths (RE), combined with increasing demand for high-tech and energy-related applications around the world, urgently requires effective approaches to improve the efficiency of rare earth separation and recovery. In this context, ionic liquids appear as an attractive technology solution. Finally, this paper addresses the structural and coordination chemistry of ionic liquids comprising rare earth metals with the aim to add to understandingmore » prospects of ionic liquids in the chemistry of rare earths.« less

  12. Modeling electrokinetics in ionic liquids: General

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Chao; Bao, Jie; Pan, Wenxiao; ...

    2017-04-01

    Using direct numerical simulations, we provide a thorough study regarding the electrokinetics of ionic liquids. In particular, modified Poisson–Nernst–Planck equations are solved to capture the crowding and overscreening effects characteristic of an ionic liquid. For modeling electrokinetic flows in an ionic liquid, the modified Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations are coupled with Navier–Stokes equations to study the coupling of ion transport, hydrodynamics, and electrostatic forces. Specifically, we consider the ion transport between two parallel charged surfaces, charging dynamics in a nanopore, capacitance of electric double-layer capacitors, electroosmotic flow in a nanochannel, electroconvective instability on a plane ion-selective surface, and electroconvective flow on amore » curved ionselective surface. Lastly, we also discuss how crowding and overscreening and their interplay affect the electrokinetic behaviors of ionic liquids in these application problems.« less

  13. Rare earth metal-containing ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Prodius, Denis; Mudring, Anja-Verena

    As an innovative tool, ionic liquids (ILs) are widely employed as an alternative, smart, reaction media (vs. traditional solvents) offering interesting technology solutions for dissolving, processing and recycling of metal-containing materials. The costly mining and refining of rare earths (RE), combined with increasing demand for high-tech and energy-related applications around the world, urgently requires effective approaches to improve the efficiency of rare earth separation and recovery. In this context, ionic liquids appear as an attractive technology solution. Finally, this paper addresses the structural and coordination chemistry of ionic liquids comprising rare earth metals with the aim to add to understandingmore » prospects of ionic liquids in the chemistry of rare earths.« less

  14. IMPROVED SYNTHESIS OF ROOM TEMPERATURE IONIC LIQUIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), molten salts comprised of N-alkylimidazolium cations and various anions, have received significant attention due to their commercial potential in a variety of chemical applications especially as substitutes for conventional volatile organic...

  15. Modeling electrokinetics in ionic liquids: General

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chao; Bao, Jie; Pan, Wenxiao

    2017-04-07

    Using direct numerical simulations we provide a thorough study on the electrokinetics of ionic liquids. In particular, the modfied Poisson-Nernst-Planck (MPNP) equations are solved to capture the crowding and overscreening effects that are the characteristics of an ionic liquid. For modeling electrokinetic flows in an ionic liquid, the MPNP equations are coupled with the Navier-Stokes equations to study the coupling of ion transport, hydrodynamics, and electrostatic forces. Specifically, we consider the ion transport between two parallel plates, charging dynamics in a 2D straight-walled pore, electro-osmotic ow in a nano-channel, electroconvective instability on a plane ion-selective surface, and electroconvective ow onmore » a curved ion-selective surface. We discuss how the crowding and overscreening effects and their interplay affect the electrokinetic behaviors of ionic liquids in these application problems.« less

  16. Thioimidazolium Ionic Liquids as Tunable Alkylating Agents.

    PubMed

    Guterman, Ryan; Miao, Han; Antonietti, Markus

    2018-01-19

    Alkylating ionic liquids based on the thioimidazolium structure combine the conventional properties of ionic liquids, including low melting point and nonvolatility, with the alkylating function. Alkyl transfer occurs exclusively from the S-alkyl position, thus allowing for easy derivatization of the structure without compromising specificity. We apply this feature to tune the electrophilicty of the cation to profoundly affect the reactivity of these alkylating ionic liquids, with a caffeine-derived compound possessing the highest reactivity. Anion choice was found to affect reaction rates, with iodide anions assisting in the alkylation reaction through a "shuttling" process. The ability to tune the properties of the alkylating agent using the toolbox of ionic liquid chemistry highlights the modular nature of these compounds as a platform for alkylating agent design and integration in to future systems.

  17. Thermodynamic Analysis of Ionic Compounds: Synthetic Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, Claude H.

    1986-01-01

    Shows how thermodynamic cycles can be used to understand trends in heats of formation and aqueous solubilities and, most importantly, how they may be used to choose synthetic routes to new ionic compounds. (JN)

  18. Hand Surgeon Reporting of Tendon Rupture Following Distal Radius Volar Plating

    PubMed Central

    Monaco, Nathan A.; Dwyer, C. Liam; Ferikes, Alex J.; Lubahn, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Volar plate fixation with locked screws has become the preferred treatment of displaced distal radius fractures that cannot be managed nonoperatively. This treatment, however, is not without complication. The purpose of this study was to determine what percentage of hand surgeons, over a 12-month period, have experienced a tendon complication when using volar plates for the treatment of distal radius fractures. Methods: A total of 3022 hand surgeons were e-mailed a link to an online questionnaire regarding their observation and treatment of tendon injuries associated with volar plating of distal radius fractures. Responses were reported using descriptive statistics. Results: Of the 596 (20%) respondents, 199 (33%) surgeons reported encountering at least one flexor tendon injury after distal radius volar plating over the past year of practice. The flexor pollicis longus was the most commonly reported tendon injury (254, 75%). Palmaris longus grafting (118, 37%) and tendon transfer (114, 36%) were the most often reported treatments following this complication. A total of 216 respondents (36%) also encountered 324 cases of extensor tendon rupture after volar plating of distal radius fractures, with tendon transfer (88%) being the preferred treatment option. Conclusions: Both flexor and extensor tendon ruptures can be seen after volar plating of distal radius fractures. Surgeons should be aware of these complications. Critical assessment of hardware position at the time of index procedure is recommended to avoid complications. Long-term studies are needed to standardize approaches to managing tendon rupture following volar plating of distal radius fractures. PMID:27698628

  19. Hand Surgeon Reporting of Tendon Rupture Following Distal Radius Volar Plating.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Nathan A; Dwyer, C Liam; Ferikes, Alex J; Lubahn, John D

    2016-09-01

    Background: Volar plate fixation with locked screws has become the preferred treatment of displaced distal radius fractures that cannot be managed nonoperatively. This treatment, however, is not without complication. The purpose of this study was to determine what percentage of hand surgeons, over a 12-month period, have experienced a tendon complication when using volar plates for the treatment of distal radius fractures. Methods: A total of 3022 hand surgeons were e-mailed a link to an online questionnaire regarding their observation and treatment of tendon injuries associated with volar plating of distal radius fractures. Responses were reported using descriptive statistics. Results: Of the 596 (20%) respondents, 199 (33%) surgeons reported encountering at least one flexor tendon injury after distal radius volar plating over the past year of practice. The flexor pollicis longus was the most commonly reported tendon injury (254, 75%). Palmaris longus grafting (118, 37%) and tendon transfer (114, 36%) were the most often reported treatments following this complication. A total of 216 respondents (36%) also encountered 324 cases of extensor tendon rupture after volar plating of distal radius fractures, with tendon transfer (88%) being the preferred treatment option. Conclusions: Both flexor and extensor tendon ruptures can be seen after volar plating of distal radius fractures. Surgeons should be aware of these complications. Critical assessment of hardware position at the time of index procedure is recommended to avoid complications. Long-term studies are needed to standardize approaches to managing tendon rupture following volar plating of distal radius fractures.

  20. Coupled Evolution with Tides of the Radius and Orbit of Transiting Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibgui, Laurent; Burrows, A.

    2009-12-01

    Some transiting extrasolar giant planets have measured radii larger than predicted by the standard theory. We explore the possibility that an earlier episode of tidal heating can explain such radius anomalies and apply the formalism we develop to HD 209458b as an example. We find that for strong enough tides the planet's radius can undergo a transient phase of inflation that temporarily interrupts canonical, monotonic shrinking due to radiative losses. Importantly, an earlier episode of tidal heating can result in a planet with an inflated radius, even though its orbit has nearly circularized. Moreover, we confirm that at late times, and under some circumstances, by raising tides on the star itself a planet can spiral into its host. We note that a 3 to 10 solar planet atmospheric opacity with no tidal heating is sufficient to explain the observed radius of HD 209458b. However, our model demonstrates that with an earlier phase of episodic tidal heating we can fit the observed radius of HD 209458b even with lower (solar) atmospheric opacities. This work demonstrates that, if a planet is left with an appreciable eccentricity after early inward migration and/or dynamical interaction, coupling radius and orbit evolution in a consistent fashion that includes tidal heating, stellar irradiation, and detailed model atmospheres might offer a generic solution to the inflated radius puzzle for transiting extrasolar giant planets.

  1. Coupled Evolution with Tides of the Radius and Orbit of Transiting Giant Planets: General Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibgui, Laurent; Burrows, Adam

    2009-08-01

    Some transiting extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) have measured radii larger than predicted by the standard theory. In this paper, we explore the possibility that an earlier episode of tidal heating can explain such radius anomalies and apply the formalism we develop to HD 209458b as an example. We find that for strong enough tides the planet's radius can undergo a transient phase of inflation that temporarily interrupts canonical, monotonic shrinking due to radiative losses. Importantly, an earlier episode of tidal heating can result in a planet with an inflated radius, even though its orbit has nearly circularized. Moreover, we confirm that at late times, and under some circumstances, by raising tides on the star itself a planet can spiral into its host. We note that a 3× to 10× solar planet atmospheric opacity with no tidal heating is sufficient to explain the observed radius of HD 209458b. However, our model demonstrates that with an earlier phase of episodic tidal heating, we can fit the observed radius of HD 209458b even with lower (solar) atmospheric opacities. This work demonstrates that, if a planet is left with an appreciable eccentricity after early inward migration and/or dynamical interaction, coupling radius and orbit evolution in a consistent fashion that includes tidal heating, stellar irradiation, and detailed model atmospheres might offer a generic solution to the inflated radius puzzle for transiting EGPs such as WASP-12b, TrES-4, and WASP-6b.

  2. Evolution of the solar radius during the solar cycle 24 rise time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, Mustapha

    2015-08-01

    One of the real motivations to observe the solar radius is the suspicion that it might be variable. Possible temporal variations of the solar radius are important as an indicator of internal energy storage and as a mechanism for changes in the total solar irradiance. Measurements of the solar radius are of great interest within the scope of the debate on the role of the Sun in climate change. Solar energy input dominates the surface processes (climate, ocean circulation, wind, etc.) of the Earth. Thus, it appears important to know on what time scales the solar radius and other fundamental solar parameters, like the total solar irradiance, vary in order to better understand and assess the origin and mechanisms of the terrestrial climate changes. The current solar cycle is probably going to be the weakest in 100 years, which is an unprecedented opportunity for studying the variability of the solar radius during this period. This paper presents more than four years of solar radius measurements obtained with a satellite and a ground-based observatory during the solar cycle 24 rise time. Our measurements show the benefit of simultaneous measurements obtained from ground and space observatories. Space observations are a priori most favourable, however, space entails also technical challenges, a harsh environment, and a finite mission lifetime. The evolution of the solar radius during the rising phase of the solar cycle 24 show small variations that are out of phase with solar activity.

  3. The radius of the quiescent neutron star in the globular cluster M13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, A. W.; Heinke, C. O.; Steiner, A. W.; Campana, S.; Cohn, H. N.; Ho, W. C. G.; Lugger, P. M.; Servillat, M.

    2018-06-01

    X-ray spectra of quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries containing neutron stars can be fit with atmosphere models to constrain the mass and the radius. Mass-radius constraints can be used to place limits on the equation of state of dense matter. We perform fits to the X-ray spectrum of a quiescent neutron star in the globular cluster M13, utilizing data from ROSAT, Chandra, and XMM-Newton, and constrain the mass-radius relation. Assuming an atmosphere composed of hydrogen and a 1.4 M⊙ neutron star, we find the radius to be R_NS=12.2^{+1.5}_{-1.1} km, a significant improvement in precision over previous measurements. Incorporating an uncertainty on the distance to M13 relaxes the radius constraints slightly and we find R_NS=12.3^{+1.9}_{-1.7} km (for a 1.4M⊙ neutron star with a hydrogen atmosphere), which is still an improvement in precision over previous measurements, some of which do not consider distance uncertainty. We also discuss how the composition of the atmosphere affects the derived radius, finding that a helium atmosphere implies a significantly larger radius.

  4. Effects of the nucleon radius on neutron stars in a quark mean field model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhen-Yu; Li, Ang

    2018-03-01

    We study the effects of free space nucleon radius on nuclear matter and neutron stars within the framework of the quark mean field model. The nucleon radius is treated self-consistently with this model, where quark confinement is adjusted to fit different values of nucleon radius. Corrections due to center-of-mass motion, quark-pion coupling, and one gluon exchange are included to obtain the nucleon mass in vacuum. The meson coupling constants that describe the behavior of the many-body nucleonic system are constructed by reproducing the empirical saturation properties of nuclear matter, including the recent determinations of symmetry energy parameters. Our results show that the nucleon radius in free space has negligible effects on the nuclear matter equation of state and neutron star mass-radius relations, which is different from the conclusion drawn in previous studies. We further explore that the sensitivity of star radius on the nucleon radius found in earlier publications is actually from the symmetry energy and its slope.

  5. Mass, Radius, and Composition of the Transiting Planet 55 Cnc e: Using Interferometry and Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crida, Aurélien; Ligi, Roxanne; Dorn, Caroline; Lebreton, Yveline

    2018-06-01

    The characterization of exoplanets relies on that of their host star. However, stellar evolution models cannot always be used to derive the mass and radius of individual stars, because many stellar internal parameters are poorly constrained. Here, we use the probability density functions (PDFs) of directly measured parameters to derive the joint PDF of the stellar and planetary mass and radius. Because combining the density and radius of the star is our most reliable way of determining its mass, we find that the stellar (respectively planetary) mass and radius are strongly (respectively moderately) correlated. We then use a generalized Bayesian inference analysis to characterize the possible interiors of 55 Cnc e. We quantify how our ability to constrain the interior improves by accounting for correlation. The information content of the mass–radius correlation is also compared with refractory element abundance constraints. We provide posterior distributions for all interior parameters of interest. Given all available data, we find that the radius of the gaseous envelope is 0.08+/- 0.05{R}p. A stronger correlation between the planetary mass and radius (potentially provided by a better estimate of the transit depth) would significantly improve interior characterization and reduce drastically the uncertainty on the gas envelope properties.

  6. Theoretical uncertainties on the radius of low- and very-low-mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tognelli, E.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Degl'Innocenti, S.

    2018-05-01

    We performed an analysis of the main theoretical uncertainties that affect the radius of low- and very-low-mass stars predicted by current stellar models. We focused on stars in the mass range 0.1-1 M⊙, on both the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) and on 1, 2, and 5 Gyr isochrones. First, we quantified the impact on the radius of the uncertainty of several quantities, namely the equation of state, radiative opacity, atmospheric models, convection efficiency, and initial chemical composition. Then, we computed the cumulative radius error stripe obtained by adding the radius variation due to all the analysed quantities. As a general trend, the radius uncertainty increases with the stellar mass. For ZAMS structures the cumulative error stripe of very-low-mass stars is about ±2 and ±3 per cent, while at larger masses it increases up to ±4 and ±5 per cent. The radius uncertainty gets larger and age dependent if isochrones are considered, reaching for M ˜ 1 M⊙ about +12(-15) per cent at an age of 5 Gyr. We also investigated the radius uncertainty at a fixed luminosity. In this case, the cumulative error stripe is the same for both ZAMS and isochrone models and it ranges from about ±4 to +7 and +9(-5) per cent. We also showed that the sole uncertainty on the chemical composition plays an important role in determining the radius error stripe, producing a radius variation that ranges between about ±1 and ±2 per cent on ZAMS models with fixed mass and about ±3 and ±5 per cent at a fixed luminosity.

  7. On the critical flame radius and minimum ignition energy for spherical flame initiation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zheng; Burke, M. P.; Ju, Yiguang

    2011-01-01

    Spherical flame initiation from an ignition kernel is studied theoretically and numerically using different fuel/oxygen/helium/argon mixtures (fuel: hydrogen, methane, and propane). The emphasis is placed on investigating the critical flame radius controlling spherical flame initiation and its correlation with the minimum ignition energy. It is found that the critical flame radius is different from the flame thickness and the flame ball radius and that their relationship depends strongly on the Lewis number. Three different flame regimes in terms of the Lewis number are observed and a new criterion for the critical flame radius is introduced. For mixtures with Lewis numbermore » larger than a critical Lewis number above unity, the critical flame radius is smaller than the flame ball radius but larger than the flame thickness. As a result, the minimum ignition energy can be substantially over-predicted (under-predicted) based on the flame ball radius (the flame thickness). The results also show that the minimum ignition energy for successful spherical flame initiation is proportional to the cube of the critical flame radius. Furthermore, preferential diffusion of heat and mass (i.e. the Lewis number effect) is found to play an important role in both spherical flame initiation and flame kernel evolution after ignition. It is shown that the critical flame radius and the minimum ignition energy increase significantly with the Lewis number. Therefore, for transportation fuels with large Lewis numbers, blending of small molecule fuels or thermal and catalytic cracking will significantly reduce the minimum ignition energy.« less

  8. Probing Lipid Bilayers under Ionic Imbalance.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiaqi; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2016-12-06

    Biological membranes are normally under a resting transmembrane potential (TMP), which originates from the ionic imbalance between extracellular fluids and cytosols, and serves as electric power storage for cells. In cell electroporation, the ionic imbalance builds up a high TMP, resulting in the poration of cell membranes. However, the relationship between ionic imbalance and TMP is not clearly understood, and little is known about the effect of ionic imbalance on the structure and dynamics of biological membranes. In this study, we used coarse-grained molecular dynamics to characterize a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer system under ionic imbalances ranging from 0 to ∼0.06 e charges per lipid (e/Lip). We found that the TMP displayed three distinct regimes: 1) a linear regime between 0 and 0.045 e/Lip, where the TMP increased linearly with ionic imbalance; 2) a yielding regime between ∼0.045 and 0.060 e/Lip, where the TMP displayed a plateau; and 3) a poration regime above ∼0.060 e/Lip, where we observed pore formation within the sampling time (80 ns). We found no structural changes in the linear regime, apart from a nonlinear increase in the area per lipid, whereas in the yielding regime the bilayer exhibited substantial thinning, leading to an excess of water and Na + within the bilayer, as well as significant misalignment of the lipid tails. In the poration regime, lipid molecules diffused slightly faster. We also found that the fluid-to-gel phase transition temperature of the bilayer dropped below the normal value with increased ionic imbalances. Our results show that a high ionic imbalance can substantially alter the essential properties of the bilayer, making the bilayer more fluid like, or conversely, depolarization of a cell could in principle lead to membrane stiffening. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. New electrolytes for aluminum production: Ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mingming; Kamavarum, Venkat; Reddy, Ramana G.

    2003-11-01

    In this article, the reduction, refining/recycling, and electroplating of aluminum from room-temperature molten salts are reviewed. In addition, the characteristics of several non-conventional organic solvents, electrolytes, and molten salts are evaluated, and the applicability of these melts for production of aluminum is discussed with special attention to ionic liquids. Also reviewed are electrochemical processes and conditions for electrodeposition of aluminum using ionic liquids at near room temperatures.

  10. Research and Development of Energetic Ionic Liquids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    Navy/ AF ) – USAF AF - M315E • Propellant uses ionic liquids to yield low vapor toxicity 22 – Sweden/ECAPS LMP-103S • Propellant uses ADN-based formulation...hydrazine replacement monopropellant objectives, relevant monopropellant properties, AF -M1028A monopropellant composition and physical properties...thruster tests of AF -M1028A, ionic liquids as explosives, predictive toxicology, predictive methods expected payoff. AFRL continues efforts in energetic

  11. Superbase-derived protic ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Sheng; Luo, Huimin; Baker, Gary A.

    2013-09-03

    Protic ionic liquids having a composition of formula (A.sup.-)(BH.sup.+) wherein A.sup.- is a conjugate base of an acid HA, and BH.sup.+ is a conjugate acid of a superbase B. In particular embodiments, BH.sup.+ is selected from phosphazenium species and guanidinium species encompassed, respectively, by the general formulas: ##STR00001## The invention is also directed to films and membranes containing these protic ionic liquids, with particular application as proton exchange membranes for fuel cells.

  12. Highly Selective Ionic Block Copolymer Membranes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-10

    Multicomponent Diffusion and Sorption in an Ionic Polymer Membrane We recently measured the diffusion and sorption of methanol/water mixtures in Nafion (most...methanol feed concentration (17 M). Figure 1 shows one experiment where hydrated Nafion was exposed to a 2 M methanol/water liquid mixture resulting...copolymer membranes revealed several surprising results. Contrary to what has been observed in most ionic polymer membranes (e.g., Nafion ), the proton

  13. The Solubility Parameters of Ionic Liquids

    PubMed Central

    Marciniak, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    The Hildebrand’s solubility parameters have been calculated for 18 ionic liquids from the inverse gas chromatography measurements of the activity coefficients at infinite dilution. Retention data were used for the calculation. The solubility parameters are helpful for the prediction of the solubility in the binary solvent mixtures. From the solubility parameters, the standard enthalpies of vaporization of ionic liquids were estimated. PMID:20559495

  14. Ionic conductors for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Krumpelt, Michael; Bloom, Ira D.; Pullockaran, Jose D.; Myles, Kevin M.

    1993-01-01

    An electrolyte that operates at temperatures ranging from 600.degree. C. to 800.degree. C. is provided. The electrolyte conducts charge ionically as well as electronically. The ionic conductors include molecular framework structures having planes or channels large enough to transport oxides or hydrated protons and having net-positive or net-negative charges. Representative molecular framework structures include substituted aluminum phosphates, orthosilicates, silicoaluminates, cordierites, apatites, sodalites, and hollandites.

  15. Fast Ignition and Sustained Combustion of Ionic Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Prakash B. (Inventor); Piper, Lawrence G. (Inventor); Oakes, David B. (Inventor); Sabourin, Justin L. (Inventor); Hicks, Adam J. (Inventor); Green, B. David (Inventor); Tsinberg, Anait (Inventor); Dokhan, Allan (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A catalyst free method of igniting an ionic liquid is provided. The method can include mixing a liquid hypergol with a HAN (Hydroxylammonium nitrate)-based ionic liquid to ignite the HAN-based ionic liquid in the absence of a catalyst. The HAN-based ionic liquid and the liquid hypergol can be injected into a combustion chamber. The HAN-based ionic liquid and the liquid hypergol can impinge upon a stagnation plate positioned at top portion of the combustion chamber.

  16. Mass-Radius Relationships for Low-Mass Planets: From Iron Planets to Water Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuchner, Marc

    2007-01-01

    Transit observations, and radial velocity measurements, have begun to populate the mass radius diagram for extrasolar planets; fubture astrometric measurements and direct images promise more mass and radius information. Clearly, the bulk density of a planet indicates something about a planet s composition--but what? I will attempt to answer this question in general for low-mass planets (radius relationship: an expansion whose first term is M approx. R(sup 3).

  17. Effect of microstructure and notch root radius on fracture toughness of an aluminum metal matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manoharan, M.; Lewandowski, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    Recent results on the effects of matrix aging condition (matrix temper) and notch root radius on the measured fracture toughness of a SiC particulate reinforced aluminum alloy are reviewed. Stress intensity factors at catastrophic fracture were obtained for both underaged and overaged composites reveal. The linear relation found between apparent fracture toughness and the square root of the notch root radius implies a linear dependence of the crack opening displacement on the notch root radius. The results suggest a strain controlled fracture process, and indicate that there are differences in the fracture micromechanisms of the two aging conditions.

  18. Correction of the exciton Bohr radius in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Run-Ze; Dong, Xi-Ying; Li, Zhi-Qing; Wang, Zi-Wu

    2018-07-01

    We theoretically investigate the correction of exciton Bohr radius in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) on different polar substrates arising from the exciton-optical phonon coupling, in which both the intrinsic longitudinal optical phonon and surface optical phonon modes couple with the exciton are taken into account. We find that the exciton Bohr radius is enlarged markedly due to these coupling. Moreover, it can be changed on a large scale by modulating the polarizability of polar substrate and the internal distance between the monolayer TMDCs and polar substrate. Theoretical result provides a potential explanation for the variation of the exciton Bohr radius in experimental measurement.

  19. Observations of a probable change in the solar radius between 1715 and 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunham, D. W.; Sofia, S.; Fiala, A. D.; Muller, P. M.; Herald, D.

    1980-01-01

    A decrease in the solar radius is determined using the technique of Dunham and Dunham (1973), in which timed observations are made just inside the path edges. When the method is applied to the solar eclipses of 1715, 1976, and 1979, the solar radius for 1715 is 0.34 + or - 0.2 arc second larger than the recent values, with no significant change between 1976 and 1979. The duration of totality is examined as a function of distance from the edges of the path. Corrections to the radius of the sun derived from observations of the 1976 and 1979 eclipses by the International Occultation Timing Association are also presented.

  20. Ionic liquids in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Shamshina, Julia L; Barber, Patrick S; Rogers, Robin D

    2013-10-01

    To overcome potential problems with solid-state APIs, such as polymorphism, solubility and bioavailability, pure liquid salt (ionic liquid) forms of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API-ILs) are considered here as a design strategy. After a critical review of the current literature, the recent development of the API-ILs strategy is presented, with a particular focus on the liquefaction of drugs. A variety of IL tools for control over the liquid salt state of matter are discussed including choice of counterion to produce an IL from a given API; the concept of oligomeric ions that enables liquefaction of solid ILs by changing the stoichiometry or complexity of the ions; formation of 'liquid co-crystals' where hydrogen bonding is the driving force in the liquefaction of a neutral acid-base complex; combining an IL strategy with the prodrug strategy to improve the delivery of solid APIs; using ILs as delivery agents via trapping a drug in a micelle and finally ILs designed with tunable hydrophilic-lipophilic balance that matches the structural requirements needed to solubilize poorly water-soluble APIs. The authors believe that API-IL approaches may save failed lead candidates, extend the patent life of current APIs, lead to new delivery options or even new pharmaceutical action. They encourage the pharmaceutical industry to invest more research into the API-IL platform as it could lead to fast-tracked approval based on similarities to the APIs already approved.

  1. Reynolds Number Effects on Leading Edge Radius Variations of a Supersonic Transport at Transonic Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, S. M. B.; Wahls, R. A.; Owens, L. R.

    2001-01-01

    A computational study focused on leading-edge radius effects and associated Reynolds number sensitivity for a High Speed Civil Transport configuration at transonic conditions was conducted as part of NASA's High Speed Research Program. The primary purposes were to assess the capabilities of computational fluid dynamics to predict Reynolds number effects for a range of leading-edge radius distributions on a second-generation supersonic transport configuration, and to evaluate the potential performance benefits of each at the transonic cruise condition. Five leading-edge radius distributions are described, and the potential performance benefit including the Reynolds number sensitivity for each is presented. Computational results for two leading-edge radius distributions are compared with experimental results acquired in the National Transonic Facility over a broad Reynolds number range.

  2. Self-equilibration of the radius distribution in self-catalyzed GaAs nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leshchenko, E. D.; Turchina, M. A.; Dubrovskii, V. G.

    2016-08-01

    This work addresses the evolution of radius distribution function in self-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid growth of GaAs nanowires from Ga droplets. Different growth regimes are analyzed depending on the V/III flux ratio. In particular, we find a very unusual selfequilibration regime in which the radius distribution narrows up to a certain stationary radius regardless of the initial size distribution of Ga droplets. This requires that the arsenic vapor flux is larger than the gallium one and that the V/III influx imbalance is compensated by a diffusion flux of gallium adatoms. Approximate analytical solution is compared to the numerical radius distribution obtained by solving the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation by the implicit difference scheme.

  3. Radius of Curvature of the Cornea--An Experiment for the Life-Science Physics Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLatchy, C. S.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a quantitative laboratory experiment in geometrical optics. It involves the student in the measurement of the radius of curvature of the cornea and is based on an old method devised by Kohlrausch in 1839. (Author/GA)

  4. Correlation between ion diffusional motion and ionic conductivity for different electrolytes based on ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Dilraj Preet; Yamada, K; Park, Jin-Soo; Sekhon, S S

    2009-04-23

    Room temperature ionic liquid 2,3-dimethyl-1-hexylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl)imide (DMHxImTFSI) has been synthesized and used in the preparation of polymer gel electrolytes containing polymethylmethacrylate and propylene carbonate (PC). The onset of ion diffusional motion has been studied by (1)H and (19)F NMR spectroscopy and the results obtained for ionic liquid, liquid electrolytes, and polymer gel electrolytes have been correlated with the ionic conductivity results for these electrolytes in the 100-400 K temperature range. The temperature at which (1)H and (19)F NMR lines show motional narrowing and hence ion diffusional motion starts has been found to be closely related to the temperature at which a large increase in ionic conductivity has been observed for these electrolytes. Polymer gel electrolytes have high ionic conductivity over a wide range of temperatures. Thermogravimetric analysis/differential scanning calorimetry studies show that the ionic liquid (DMHxImTFSI) used in the present study is thermally stable up to 400 degrees C, whereas the addition of PC lowers the thermal stability of polymer gel electrolytes containing the ionic liquid. Different electrolytes have been observed to show high ionic conductivity in different range of temperatures, which can be helpful in the design of polymer gel electrolytes for specific applications.

  5. Comparative study of bending characteristics of ionic polymer actuators containing ionic liquids for modeling actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Kunitomo; Sakamoto, Takumi; Tsuchitani, Shigeki; Asaka, Kinji

    2011-04-01

    Ionic polymer metal composites (IPMCs) that can operate in air have recently been developed by incorporating an ionic liquid in ionic polymers. To understand transduction in these composites, it is important to determine the role of the ionic liquid in the ionic polymer (Nafion®), to identify the counter cation, and to investigate the interaction of IPMCs with water vapor in the air. We used Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy to analyze three Nafion® membranes, which were soaked in mixtures of water and an ionic liquid (1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium tetrafluoroborate (EMIBF4), 1-buthyl-3-methyl-imidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMIBF4), and 1-buthyl-3-methyl-imidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BMIPF6)). The results demonstrate that only cations (EMI+ and BMI+) in the ionic liquids are taken into the Nafion® membranes as counter ions and that the water content of the membranes in air is less than ˜4% that of Nafion® swollen with water. Based on the experimental results, a transduction model is proposed for an IPMC with an ionic liquid. In this model, bending is caused by local swelling due to the volume effect of the bulky counter cations. This model can explain 30-50% of the experimentally observed bending curvature.

  6. Reliability of the pronator quadratus fat pad sign to predict the severity of distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Loesaus, Julia; Wobbe, Isabel; Stahlberg, Erik; Barkhausen, Joerg; Goltz, Jan Peter

    2017-09-28

    To evaluate the reliability of pronator quadratus fat pad sign to detect distal radius fracture and to predict its severity. Retrospectively we identified 89 consecutive patients (41 female, mean age 49 ± 18 years) who had X-ray (CR) and computed tomography (CT) within 24 h following distal forearm trauma. Thickness of pronator quadratus fat pad complex (PQC) was measured using lateral views (CR) and sagittal reconstructions (CT). Pearson's test was used to determine the correlation of the PQC thickness in CR and CT. A positive pronator quadratus sign (PQS) was defined as a PQC > 8.0 mm (female) or > 9.0 mm (male). Frykman classification was utilized to assess the severity of fractures. Forty-four/89 patients (49%) had a distal radius fracture (Frykman I n = 3, II n = 0, III n = 10, IV n = 5, V n = 2, VI n = 2, VII n = 9, VIII n = 13). Mean thickness of the PQC thickness can reliably be measured on X-ray views and was 7.5 ± 2.8 mm in lateral views (CR), respectively 9.4 ± 3.0 mm in sagittal reconstructions (CT), resulting in a significant correlation coefficient of 0.795. A positive PQS at CR was present in 21/44 patients (48%) with distal radius fracture and in 2/45 patients (4%) without distal radius fracture, resulting in a specificity of 96% and a sensitivity of 48% for the detection of distal radius fractures. There was no correlation between thickness of the PQC and severity of distal radius fractures. A positive PQS shows high specificity but low sensitivity for detection of distal radius fractures. The PQC thickness cannot predict the severity of distal radius fractures.

  7. Reliability of the pronator quadratus fat pad sign to predict the severity of distal radius fractures

    PubMed Central

    Loesaus, Julia; Wobbe, Isabel; Stahlberg, Erik; Barkhausen, Joerg; Goltz, Jan Peter

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the reliability of pronator quadratus fat pad sign to detect distal radius fracture and to predict its severity. METHODS Retrospectively we identified 89 consecutive patients (41 female, mean age 49 ± 18 years) who had X-ray (CR) and computed tomography (CT) within 24 h following distal forearm trauma. Thickness of pronator quadratus fat pad complex (PQC) was measured using lateral views (CR) and sagittal reconstructions (CT). Pearson’s test was used to determine the correlation of the PQC thickness in CR and CT. A positive pronator quadratus sign (PQS) was defined as a PQC > 8.0 mm (female) or > 9.0 mm (male). Frykman classification was utilized to assess the severity of fractures. RESULTS Forty-four/89 patients (49%) had a distal radius fracture (Frykman I n = 3, II n = 0, III n = 10, IV n = 5, V n = 2, VI n = 2, VII n = 9, VIII n = 13). Mean thickness of the PQC thickness can reliably be measured on X-ray views and was 7.5 ± 2.8 mm in lateral views (CR), respectively 9.4 ± 3.0 mm in sagittal reconstructions (CT), resulting in a significant correlation coefficient of 0.795. A positive PQS at CR was present in 21/44 patients (48%) with distal radius fracture and in 2/45 patients (4%) without distal radius fracture, resulting in a specificity of 96% and a sensitivity of 48% for the detection of distal radius fractures. There was no correlation between thickness of the PQC and severity of distal radius fractures. CONCLUSION A positive PQS shows high specificity but low sensitivity for detection of distal radius fractures. The PQC thickness cannot predict the severity of distal radius fractures. PMID:29098069

  8. Hubble Space Telescope secondary mirror vertex radius/conic constant test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, Robert

    1991-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope backup secondary mirror was tested to determine the vertex radius and conic constant. Three completely independent tests (to the same procedure) were performed. Similar measurements in the three tests were highly consistent. The values obtained for the vertex radius and conic constant were the nominal design values within the error bars associated with the tests. Visual examination of the interferometric data did not show any measurable zonal figure error in the secondary mirror.

  9. Mechanical heterogeneity in ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veldhorst, Arno A.; Ribeiro, Mauro C. C.

    2018-05-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of five ionic liquids based on 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cations, [CnC1im]+, have been performed in order to calculate high-frequency elastic moduli and to evaluate heterogeneity of local elastic moduli. The MD simulations of [CnC1im][NO3], n = 2, 4, 6, and 8, assessed the effect of domain segregation when the alkyl chain length increases, and [C8C1im][PF6] assessed the effect of strength of anion-cation interaction. Dispersion curves of excitation energies of longitudinal and transverse acoustic, LA and TA, modes were obtained from time correlation functions of mass currents at different wavevectors. High-frequency sound velocity of LA modes depends on the alkyl chain length, but sound velocity for TA modes does not. High-frequency bulk and shear moduli, K∞ and G∞, depend on the alkyl chain length because of a density effect. Both K∞ and G∞ are strongly dependent on the anion. The calculation of local bulk and shear moduli was accomplished by performing bulk and shear deformations of the systems cooled to 0 K. The simulations showed a clear connection between structural and elastic modulus heterogeneities. The development of nano-heterogeneous structure with increasing length of the alkyl chain in [CnC1im][NO3] implies lower values for local bulk and shear moduli in the non-polar domains. The mean value and the standard deviations of distributions of local elastic moduli decrease when [NO3]- is replaced by the less coordinating [PF6]- anion.

  10. Ionic liquid processing of cellulose.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Gurau, Gabriela; Rogers, Robin D

    2012-02-21

    Utilization of natural polymers has attracted increasing attention because of the consumption and over-exploitation of non-renewable resources, such as coal and oil. The development of green processing of cellulose, the most abundant biorenewable material on Earth, is urgent from the viewpoints of both sustainability and environmental protection. The discovery of the dissolution of cellulose in ionic liquids (ILs, salts which melt below 100 °C) provides new opportunities for the processing of this biopolymer, however, many fundamental and practical questions need to be answered in order to determine if this will ultimately be a green or sustainable strategy. In this critical review, the open fundamental questions regarding the interactions of cellulose with both the IL cations and anions in the dissolution process are discussed. Investigations have shown that the interactions between the anion and cellulose play an important role in the solvation of cellulose, however, opinions on the role of the cation are conflicting. Some researchers have concluded that the cations are hydrogen bonding to this biopolymer, while others suggest they are not. Our review of the available data has led us to urge the use of more chemical units of solubility, such as 'g cellulose per mole of IL' or 'mol IL per mol hydroxyl in cellulose' to provide more consistency in data reporting and more insight into the dissolution mechanism. This review will also assess the greenness and sustainability of IL processing of biomass, where it would seem that the choices of cation and anion are critical not only to the science of the dissolution, but to the ultimate 'greenness' of any process (142 references).

  11. Ionic liquids behave as dilute electrolyte solutions

    PubMed Central

    Gebbie, Matthew A.; Valtiner, Markus; Banquy, Xavier; Fox, Eric T.; Henderson, Wesley A.; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2013-01-01

    We combine direct surface force measurements with thermodynamic arguments to demonstrate that pure ionic liquids are expected to behave as dilute weak electrolyte solutions, with typical effective dissociated ion concentrations of less than 0.1% at room temperature. We performed equilibrium force–distance measurements across the common ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([C4mim][NTf2]) using a surface forces apparatus with in situ electrochemical control and quantitatively modeled these measurements using the van der Waals and electrostatic double-layer forces of the Derjaguin–Landau–Verwey–Overbeek theory with an additive repulsive steric (entropic) ion–surface binding force. Our results indicate that ionic liquids screen charged surfaces through the formation of both bound (Stern) and diffuse electric double layers, where the diffuse double layer is comprised of effectively dissociated ionic liquid ions. Additionally, we used the energetics of thermally dissociating ions in a dielectric medium to quantitatively predict the equilibrium for the effective dissociation reaction of [C4mim][NTf2] ions, in excellent agreement with the measured Debye length. Our results clearly demonstrate that, outside of the bound double layer, most of the ions in [C4mim][NTf2] are not effectively dissociated and thus do not contribute to electrostatic screening. We also provide a general, molecular-scale framework for designing ionic liquids with significantly increased dissociated charge densities via judiciously balancing ion pair interactions with bulk dielectric properties. Our results clear up several inconsistencies that have hampered scientific progress in this important area and guide the rational design of unique, high–free-ion density ionic liquids and ionic liquid blends. PMID:23716690

  12. The Effect of Pulse Length and Ejector Radius on Unsteady Ejector Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jack

    2005-01-01

    The thrust augmentation of a set of ejectors driven by a shrouded Hartmann-Sprenger tube has been measured at four different frequencies. Each frequency corresponded to a different length to diameter ratio of the pulse of air leaving the driver shroud. Two of the frequencies had length to diameter ratios below the formation number, and two above. The formation number is the value of length to diameter ratio below which the pulse converts to a vortex ring only, and above which the pulse becomes a vortex ring plus a trailing jet. A three level, three parameter Box-Behnken statistical design of experiment scheme was performed at each frequency, measuring the thrust augmentation generated by the appropriate ejectors from the set. The three parameters were ejector length, radius, and inlet radius. The results showed that there is an optimum ejector radius and length at each frequency. Using a polynomial fit to the data, the results were interpolated to different ejector radii and pulse length to diameter ratios. This showed that a peak in thrust augmentation occurs when the pulse length to diameter ratio equals the formation number, and that the optimum ejector radius is 0.87 times the sum of the vortex ring radius and the core radius.

  13. Measurement of super large radius optics in the detection of gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cheng; Han, Sen; Wu, Quanying; Liang, Binming; Hou, Changlun

    2015-10-01

    The existence of Gravitational Wave (GW) is one of the greatest predictions of Einstein's relative theory. It has played an important part in the radiation theory, black hole theory, space explore and so on. The GW detection has been an important aspect of modern physics. With the research proceeding further, there are still a lot of challenges existing in the interferometer which is the key instrument in GW detection especially the measurement of the super large radius optics. To solve this problem, one solution , Fizeau interference, for measuring the super large radius has been presented. We change the tradition that curved surface must be measured with a standard curved surface. We use a flat mirror as a reference flat and it can lower both the cost and the test requirement a lot. We select a concave mirror with the radius of 1600mm as a sample. After the precision measurement and analysis, the experimental results show that the relative error of radius is better than 3%, and it can fully meet the requirements of the measurement of super large radius optics. When calculating each pixel with standard cylinder, the edges are not sharp because of diffraction or some other reasons, we detect the edge and calculate the diameter of the cylinder automatically, and it can improve the precision a lot. In general, this method is simple, fast, non-traumatic, and highly precision, it can also provide us a new though in the measurement of super large radius optics.

  14. Does bone measurement on the radius indicate skeletal status. Concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Mazess, R.B.; Peppler, W.W.; Chesney, R.W.

    1984-03-01

    Single-photon (I-125) absorptiometry was used to measure bone mineral content (BMC) of the distal third of the radius, and dual-photon absorptiometry (Gd-153) was used to measure total-body bone mineral (TBBM), as well as the BMC of major skeletal regions. Measurements were done in normal females, normal males, osteoporotic females, osteoporotic males, and renal patients. The BMC of the radius predicted TBBM well in normal subjects, but was less satisfactory in the patient groups. The spinal BMC was predicted with even lower accuracy from radius measurement. The error in predicting areal density (bone mass per unit projected skeletal area) of themore » lumbar and thoracic spine from the radius BMC divided by its width was smaller, but the regressions differed significantly among normals, osteoporotics, and renal patients. There was a preferential spinal osteopenia in the osteoporotic group and in about half of the renal patients. Bone measurements on the radius can indicate overall skeletal status in normal subjects and to a lesser degree in patients, but these radius measurements are inaccurate, even on the average, as an indicator of spinal state.« less

  15. [Growth behaviour after fractures of the proximal radius: differences to the rest of the skeleton].

    PubMed

    Hell, A K; von Laer, L

    2014-12-01

    Fractures of the proximal end of the radius in the growth phase have three characteristics: the head of the radius articulates with two joint partners and is therefore indispensable for an undisturbed function of the elbow. The blood supply of the proximal end of the radius is via periosteal vessels in the sense of a terminal circulation which makes it extremely vulnerable. Severe trauma caused either by accidents or treatment, can result in partial or complete necrosis with deformity of the head and neck region of the radius. Radioulnar synostosis and chronic epiphysiolysis are irreversible complications which can occur after excessive physiotherapy. Despite a low potency growth plate, in young patients the proximal end of the radius shows an enormous spontaneous correction of dislocations. Side to side shifts, however, will not be remodeled. Therapy should be as atraumatic as possible. Due to the blood supply situation, with the appropriate indications the spontaneous correction and a brief period of immobilization without physiotherapy should be integrated into the therapy concept. If an operation is necessary, repeated traumatic repositioning maneuvers should be avoided and in case of doubt closed or careful open repositioning can be achieved with intramedullary nailing. In order to take the special characteristics of the proximal radius into consideration, the vulnerability and correction potential must be weighed up against each other. Therapy must be as atraumatic as possible. The spontaneous correction potential should be integrated into the primary therapy without overestimating this potential with respect to the extent and age of the patient.

  16. Solar Radius at Subterahertz Frequencies and Its Relation to Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, Fabian; Valio, Adriana

    2017-12-01

    The Sun emits radiation at several wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum. In the optical band, the solar radius is 695 700 km, and this defines the photosphere, which is the visible surface of the Sun. However, as the altitude increases, the electromagnetic radiation is produced at other frequencies, causing the solar radius to change as a function of wavelength. These measurements enable a better understanding of the solar atmosphere, and the radius dependence on the solar cycle is a good indicator of the changes that occur in the atmospheric structure. We measure the solar radius at the subterahertz frequencies of 0.212 and 0.405 THz, which is the altitude at which these emissions are primarily generated, and also analyze the radius variation over the 11-year solar activity cycle. For this, we used radio maps of the solar disk for the period between 1999 and 2017, reconstructed from daily scans made by the Solar Submillimeter-wave Telescope (SST), installed at El Leoncito Astronomical Complex (CASLEO) in the Argentinean Andes. Our measurements yield radii of 966.5'' ±2.8'' for 0.2 THz and 966.5'' ±2.7'' for 0.4 THz. This implies a height of 5.0 ±2.0 ×106 m above the photosphere. Furthermore, we also observed a strong anticorrelation between the radius variation and the solar activity at both frequencies.

  17. A-site ordered quadruple perovskite oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youwen, Long

    2016-07-01

    The A-site ordered perovskite oxides with chemical formula display many intriguing physical properties due to the introduction of transition metals at both A‧ and B sites. Here, research on the recently discovered intermetallic charge transfer occurring between A‧-site Cu and B-site Fe ions in LaCu3Fe4O12 and its analogues is reviewed, along with work on the magnetoelectric multiferroicity observed in LaMn3Cr4O12 with cubic perovskite structure. The Cu-Fe intermetallic charge transfer leads to a first-order isostructural phase transition accompanied by drastic variations in magnetism and electrical transport properties. The LaMn3Cr4O12 is a novel spin-driven multiferroic system with strong magnetoelectric coupling effects. The compound is the first example of cubic perovskite multiferroics to be found. It opens up a new arena for studying unexpected multiferroic mechanisms. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2014CB921500), the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB07030300), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11574378).

  18. Water Contaminant Mitigation in Ionic Liquid Propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conroy, David; Ziemer, John

    2009-01-01

    Appropriate system and operational requirements are needed in order to ensure mission success without unnecessary cost. Purity requirements applied to thruster propellants may flow down to materials and operations as well as the propellant preparation itself. Colloid electrospray thrusters function by applying a large potential to a room temperature liquid propellant (such as an ionic liquid), inducing formation of a Taylor cone. Ions and droplets are ejected from the Taylor cone and accelerated through a strong electric field. Electrospray thrusters are highly efficient, precise, scaleable, and demonstrate low thrust noise. Ionic liquid propellants have excellent properties for use as electrospray propellants, but can be hampered by impurities, owing to their solvent capabilities. Of foremost concern is the water content, which can result from exposure to atmosphere. Even hydrophobic ionic liquids have been shown to absorb water from the air. In order to mitigate the risks of bubble formation in feed systems caused by water content of the ionic liquid propellant, physical properties of the ionic liquid EMI-Im are analyzed. The effects of surface tension, material wetting, physisorption, and geometric details of the flow manifold and electrospray emitters are explored. Results are compared to laboratory test data.

  19. Ionic liquid stationary phases for gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Poole, Colin F; Poole, Salwa K

    2011-04-01

    This article provides a summary of the development of ionic liquids as stationary phases for gas chromatography beginning with early work on packed columns that established details of the retention mechanism and established working methods to characterize selectivity differences compared with molecular stationary phases through the modern development of multi-centered cation and cross-linked ionic liquids for high-temperature applications in capillary gas chromatography. Since there are many reviews on ionic liquids dealing with all aspects of their chemical and physical properties, the emphasis in this article is placed on the role of gas chromatography played in the design of ionic liquids of low melting point, high thermal stability, high viscosity, and variable selectivity for separations. Ionic liquids provide unprecedented opportunities for extending the selectivity range and temperature-operating range of columns for gas chromatography, an area of separation science that has otherwise been almost stagnant for over a decade. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Electroosmotic flow hysteresis for dissimilar ionic solutions

    PubMed Central

    Lim, An Eng; Lam, Yee Cheong

    2015-01-01

    Electroosmotic flow (EOF) with two or more fluids is commonly encountered in various microfluidics applications. However, no investigation has hitherto been conducted to investigate the hysteretic or flow direction-dependent behavior during the displacement flow of solutions with dissimilar ionic species. In this investigation, electroosmotic displacement flow involving dissimilar ionic solutions was studied experimentally through a current monitoring method and numerically through finite element simulations. The flow hysteresis can be characterized by the turning and displacement times; turning time refers to the abrupt gradient change of current-time curve while displacement time is the time for one solution to completely displace the other solution. Both experimental and simulation results illustrate that the turning and displacement times for a particular solution pair can be directional-dependent, indicating that the flow conditions in the microchannel are not the same in the two different flow directions. The mechanics of EOF hysteresis was elucidated through the theoretical model which includes the ionic mobility of each species, a major governing parameter. Two distinct mechanics have been identified as the causes for the EOF hysteresis involving dissimilar ionic solutions: the widening/sharpening effect of interfacial region between the two solutions and the difference in ion concentration distributions (and thus average zeta potentials) in different flow directions. The outcome of this investigation contributes to the fundamental understanding of flow behavior in microfluidic systems involving solution pair with dissimilar ionic species. PMID:25945139

  1. Counterion-induced swelling of ionic microgels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, Alan R.; Tang, Qiyun

    2016-10-01

    Ionic microgel particles, when dispersed in a solvent, swell to equilibrium sizes that are governed by a balance between electrostatic and elastic forces. Tuning of particle size by varying external stimuli, such as pH, salt concentration, and temperature, has relevance for drug delivery, microfluidics, and filtration. To model swelling of ionic microgels, we derive a statistical mechanical theorem, which proves exact within the cell model, for the electrostatic contribution to the osmotic pressure inside a permeable colloidal macroion. Applying the theorem, we demonstrate how the distribution of counterions within an ionic microgel determines the internal osmotic pressure. By combining the electrostatic pressure, which we compute via both Poisson-Boltzmann theory and molecular dynamics simulation, with the elastic pressure, modeled via the Flory-Rehner theory of swollen polymer networks, we show how deswelling of ionic microgels with increasing concentration of particles can result from a redistribution of counterions that reduces electrostatic pressure. A linearized approximation for the electrostatic pressure, which proves remarkably accurate, provides physical insight and greatly eases numerical calculations for practical applications. Comparing with experiments, we explain why soft particles in deionized suspensions deswell upon increasing concentration and why this effect may be suppressed at higher ionic strength. The failure of the uniform ideal-gas approximation to adequately account for counterion-induced deswelling below close packing of microgels is attributed to neglect of spatial variation of the counterion density profile and the electrostatic pressure of incompletely neutralized macroions.

  2. Solid state ionics: a Japan perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Osamu

    2017-12-01

    The 70-year history of scientific endeavor of solid state ionics research in Japan is reviewed to show the contribution of Japanese scientists to the basic science of solid state ionics and its applications. The term 'solid state ionics' was defined by Takehiko Takahashi of Nagoya University, Japan: it refers to ions in solids, especially solids that exhibit high ionic conductivity at a fairly low temperature below their melting points. During the last few decades of exploration, many ion conducting solids have been discovered in Japan such as the copper-ion conductor Rb4Cu16I7Cl13, proton conductor SrCe1-xYxO3, oxide-ion conductor La0.9Sr0.9Ga0.9Mg0.1O3, and lithium-ion conductor Li10GeP2S12. Rb4Cu16I7Cl13 has a conductivity of 0.33 S cm-1 at 25 °C, which is the highest of all room temperature ion conductive solid electrolytes reported to date, and Li10GeP2S12 has a conductivity of 0.012 S cm-1 at 25 °C, which is the highest among lithium-ion conductors reported to date. Research on high-temperature proton conducting ceramics began in Japan. The history, the discovery of novel ionic conductors and the story behind them are summarized along with basic science and technology.

  3. Weak charge form factor and radius of 208Pb through parity violation in electron scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Horowitz, C. J.; Ahmed, Z.; Jen, C. -M.; ...

    2012-03-26

    We use distorted wave electron scattering calculations to extract the weak charge form factor F W(more » $$\\bar{q}$$), the weak charge radius R W, and the point neutron radius R n, of 208Pb from the PREX parity violating asymmetry measurement. The form factor is the Fourier transform of the weak charge density at the average momentum transfer $$\\bar{q}$$ = 0.475 fm -1. We find F W($$\\bar{q}$$) = 0.204 ± 0.028(exp) ± 0.001(model). We use the Helm model to infer the weak radius from F W($$\\bar{q}$$). We find RW = 5.826 ± 0.181(exp) ± 0.027(model) fm. Here the exp error includes PREX statistical and systematic errors, while the model error describes the uncertainty in R W from uncertainties in the surface thickness σ of the weak charge density. The weak radius is larger than the charge radius, implying a 'weak charge skin' where the surface region is relatively enriched in weak charges compared to (electromagnetic) charges. We extract the point neutron radius R n = 5.751 ± 0.175 (exp) ± 0.026(model) ± 0.005(strange) fm, from R W. Here there is only a very small error (strange) from possible strange quark contributions. We find R n to be slightly smaller than R W because of the nucleon's size. As a result, we find a neutron skin thickness of R n-R p = 0.302 ± 0.175 (exp) ± 0.026 (model) ± 0.005 (strange) fm, where R p is the point proton radius.« less

  4. Key Developments in Ionic Liquid Crystals.

    PubMed

    Alvarez Fernandez, Alexandra; Kouwer, Paul H J

    2016-05-16

    Ionic liquid crystals are materials that combine the classes of liquid crystals and ionic liquids. The first one is based on the multi-billion-dollar flat panel display industry, whilst the latter quickly developed in the past decades into a family of highly-tunable non-volatile solvents. The combination yields materials with a unique set of properties, but also with many challenges ahead. In this review, we provide an overview of the key concepts in ionic liquid crystals, particularly from a molecular perspective. What are the important molecular parameters that determine the phase behavior? How should they be introduced into the molecules? Finally, which other tools does one have to realize specific properties in the material?

  5. Desulfurization of oxidized diesel using ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilfred, Cecilia D.; Salleh, M. Zulhaziman M.; Mutalib, M. I. Abdul

    2014-10-01

    The extraction of oxidized sulfur compounds from diesel were carried out using ten types of ionic liquids consisting of different cation and anion i.e. 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazoium thiocyanate, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazoium dicyanamide, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazoliumhexafluorophosphate, 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate, trioctylmethylammonium chloride, 1-propionitrile-3-butylimidazolium thiocyanate, 1-propionitrile-3-butylimidazolium dicyanamide and 1-butyl-6-methylquinolinium dicyanamide. The oxidation of diesel was successfully done using phosphotungstic acid as the catalyst, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as the oxidant and trioctylmethylammonium chloride as the phase transfer agent. The oxidation of diesel changes the sulfur compounds into sulfone which increases its polarity and enhances the ionic liquid's extraction performance. Result showed that ionic liquid [C4mquin][N(CN)2] performed the highest sulfur removal (91% at 1:5 diesel:IL ratio) compared to the others.

  6. Enzyme activity in dialkyl phosphate ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, M.F.; Dunn, J.; Li, L.-L.

    2011-12-01

    The activity of four metagenomic enzymes and an enzyme cloned from the straw mushroom, Volvariellavolvacea were studied in the following ionic liquids, 1,3-dimethylimidazolium dimethyl phosphate, [mmim][dmp], 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dimethyl phosphate, [emim][dmp], 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium diethyl phosphate, [emim][dep] and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate, [emim][OAc]. Activity was determined by analyzing the hydrolysis of para-nitrobenzene carbohydrate derivatives. In general, the enzymes were most active in the dimethyl phosphate ionic liquids, followed by acetate. Generally speaking, activity decreased sharply for concentrations of [emim][dep] above 10% v/v, while the other ionic liquids showed less impact on activity up to 20% v/v.

  7. Key Developments in Ionic Liquid Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez Fernandez, Alexandra; Kouwer, Paul H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Ionic liquid crystals are materials that combine the classes of liquid crystals and ionic liquids. The first one is based on the multi-billion-dollar flat panel display industry, whilst the latter quickly developed in the past decades into a family of highly-tunable non-volatile solvents. The combination yields materials with a unique set of properties, but also with many challenges ahead. In this review, we provide an overview of the key concepts in ionic liquid crystals, particularly from a molecular perspective. What are the important molecular parameters that determine the phase behavior? How should they be introduced into the molecules? Finally, which other tools does one have to realize specific properties in the material? PMID:27196890

  8. Atomic radii for atoms with the 6s shell outermost: The effective atomic radius and the van der Waals radius from {sub 55}Cs to {sub 80}Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Tatewaki, Hiroshi, E-mail: htatewak@nsc.nagoya-cu.ac.jp; Institute of Advanced Studies in Artificial Intelligence, Chukyo University, Toyota, Aichi 470-0393; Hatano, Yasuyo

    We consider, for atoms from {sub 55}Cs to {sub 80}Hg, the effective atomic radius (r{sub ear}), which is defined as the distance from the nucleus at which the magnitude of the electric field is equal to that in He at one half of the equilibrium bond length of He{sub 2}. The values of r{sub ear} are about 50% larger than the mean radius of the outermost occupied orbital of 6s, . The value of r{sub ear} decreases from {sub 55}Cs to {sub 56}Ba and undergoes increases and decreases with rising nuclear charge from {sub 57}La to {sub 70}Y b. Inmore » fact r{sub ear} is understood as comprising two interlaced sequences; one consists of {sub 57}La, {sub 58}Ce, and {sub 64}Gd, which have electronic configuration (4f{sup n−1})(5d{sup 1})(6s{sup 2}), and the remaining atoms have configuration (4f{sup n})(6s{sup 2}). The sphere defined by r{sub ear} contains 85%–90% of the 6s electrons. From {sub 71}Lu to {sub 80}Hg the radius r{sub ear} also involves two sequences, corresponding to the two configurations 5d{sup n+1}6s{sup 1} and 5d{sup n}6s{sup 2}. The radius r{sub ear} according to the present methodology is considerably larger than r{sub vdW} obtained by other investigators, some of who have found values of r{sub vdW} close to .« less

  9. Thermoelectric Generators Based on Ionic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laux, Edith; Uhl, Stefanie; Jeandupeux, Laure; López, Pilar Pérez; Sanglard, Pauline; Vanoli, Ennio; Marti, Roger; Keppner, Herbert

    2018-06-01

    Looking at energy harvesting using body or waste heat for portable electronic or on-board devices, Ionic liquids are interesting candidates as thermoactive materials in thermoelectric generators (TEGs) because of their outstanding properties. Two different kinds of ionic liquid, with alkylammonium and choline as cations, were studied, whereby different anions and redox couples were combined. This study focussed on the intention to find non-hazardous and environmentally friendly ionic liquids for TEGs to be selected among the thousands that can potentially be used. Seebeck coefficients (SEs) as high as - 15 mV/K were measured, in a particular case for an electrode temperature difference of 20 K. The bottleneck of our TEG device is still the abundance of negative SE liquids matching the internal resistance with the existing positive SE-liquids at series connections. In this paper, we show further progress in finding increased negative SE liquids. For current extraction from the TEG, the ionic liquid must be blended with a redox couple, allowing carrier exchange in a cyclic process under a voltage which is incuced by the asymmetry of the generator in terms of hot and cold electrodes. In our study, two types of redox pairs were tested. It was observed that a high SE of an ionic liquid/redox blend is not a sufficient condition for high power output. It appears that more complex effects between the ionic liquid and the electrode determine the magnitude of the final current/power output. The physico-chemical understanding of such a TEG cell is not yet available.

  10. Thermoelectric Generators Based on Ionic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laux, Edith; Uhl, Stefanie; Jeandupeux, Laure; López, Pilar Pérez; Sanglard, Pauline; Vanoli, Ennio; Marti, Roger; Keppner, Herbert

    2018-03-01

    Looking at energy harvesting using body or waste heat for portable electronic or on-board devices, Ionic liquids are interesting candidates as thermoactive materials in thermoelectric generators (TEGs) because of their outstanding properties. Two different kinds of ionic liquid, with alkylammonium and choline as cations, were studied, whereby different anions and redox couples were combined. This study focussed on the intention to find non-hazardous and environmentally friendly ionic liquids for TEGs to be selected among the thousands that can potentially be used. Seebeck coefficients (SEs) as high as - 15 mV/K were measured, in a particular case for an electrode temperature difference of 20 K. The bottleneck of our TEG device is still the abundance of negative SE liquids matching the internal resistance with the existing positive SE-liquids at series connections. In this paper, we show further progress in finding increased negative SE liquids. For current extraction from the TEG, the ionic liquid must be blended with a redox couple, allowing carrier exchange in a cyclic process under a voltage which is incuced by the asymmetry of the generator in terms of hot and cold electrodes. In our study, two types of redox pairs were tested. It was observed that a high SE of an ionic liquid/redox blend is not a sufficient condition for high power output. It appears that more complex effects between the ionic liquid and the electrode determine the magnitude of the final current/power output. The physico-chemical understanding of such a TEG cell is not yet available.

  11. Functional Materials from Polymeric Ionic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segalman, Rachel; Sanoja, Gabriel; Michenfelder-Schauser, Nicole; Mitragotri, Samir; Seshadri, Ram

    Ionic liquids (IL's) have been suggested for applications as diverse as solubilizing cellulose, antimicrobial treatments, and electrolytes in batteries due to their molten salt properties. A polymeric cation (such as imidazolium) is an excellent host for any associated anion. As a result, polymerized ionic liquids are not just solid counterparts to IL's, but are shown to be vectors for the inclusion of a wide variety of functionalities ranging from multi-valent ions to magnetic anions. Moreover, PIL block copolymers allow orthogonal control over mechanical and morphological properties, ultimately leading to a conceptual framework for processable, tunable, multifunctional materials.

  12. Electrowetting based infrared lens using ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Shiguo; Liu, Yu; Qu, Chao; Lu, Liujin; Ma, Xiangyuan; Zhang, Xiaoping; Deng, Youquan

    2011-11-01

    We demonstrated an infrared variable focus ionic liquids lens using electrowetting, which could overcome the problems caused by use of water, e.g., evaporation and poor thermostability, while keeping good optical transparency in visible light and near-infrared region. Besides, the type of lens (convex or concave) could be tuned by applied voltage or refractive index of ILs used, and the transmittance was measured to exceed 90% over the spectrum of visible light and near-infrared. We believe this infrared variable focus ionic liquids lens has a great application prospect in both visible light and infrared image systems.

  13. Steven's orbital reduction factor in ionic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajek, Z.; Mulak, J.

    1985-11-01

    General expressions for reduction coefficients of matrix elements of angular momentum operator in ionic clusters or molecular systems have been derived. The reduction in this approach results from overlap and covalency effects and plays an important role in the reconciling of magnetic and spectroscopic experimental data. The formulated expressions make possible a phenomenological description of the effect with two independent parameters for typical equidistant clusters. Some detailed calculations also suggest the possibility of a one-parameter description. The results of these calculations for some ionic uranium compounds are presented as an example.

  14. Ionic Liquids in Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Balducci, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    Lithium-ion batteries are among the most widespread energy storage devices in our society. In order to introduce these devices in new key applications such as transportation, however, their safety and their operative temperature range need to be significantly improved. These improvements can be obtained only by developing new electrolytes. Ionic liquids are presently considered among the most attractive electrolytes for the development of advanced and safer lithium-ion batteries. In this manuscript, the use of various types of ionic liquids, e.g. aprotic and protic, in lithium-ion batteries is considered. The advantages and the limits associated to the use of these innovative electrolytes are critically analysed.

  15. What counts: outcome assessment after distal radius fractures in aged patients.

    PubMed

    Goldhahn, Jörg; Angst, Felix; Simmen, Beat R

    2008-09-01

    Outcome of surgical interventions at the distal radius does not only depend on the type of intervention used, it also depends on the way the outcome is measured. Substantial differences in outcome assessment between different measurement tools and poor correlation among them result in the question about the best instrument for the evaluation of treatment after distal radius fractures. The aim of the review is to discuss pros and cons of the parameters that are available to assess the outcome after distal radius fractures. The review should help to choose the appropriate instruments for a given research question in aged patients with distal radius fractures. Objective and subjective measures were reviewed with respect to their suitability in outcome assessment. Radiological parameters like inclination, palmar slope, and length of the radius are most common and used to determine especially surgical success. Grip strength and range of motion are considered objective and used as study endpoints in many studies. Functional tests like the Jebsen test provide a realistic feedback about disability but require special skills and resources of the testing personnel. Patient self-assessment adds perceived patient benefit. The patient-rated wrist evaluation (PRWE) provides a reliable and valid instrument for subjective outcome assessment. A combination of objective and subjective parameters should be used to assess the outcome of different treatment strategies due to the known discrepancies. Objective parameters like shortening, radial shift, or others should be clearly defined in the study methodology.

  16. High precision measurement of the proton charge radius: The PRad experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Meziane, Mehdi

    2013-11-01

    The recent high precision measurements of the proton charge radius performed at PSI from muonic hydrogen Lamb shift puzzled the hadronic physics community. A value of 0.8418 {+-} 0.0007 fm was extracted which is 7{sigma} smaller than the previous determinations obtained from electron-proton scattering experiments and based on precision spectroscopy of electronic hydrogen. An additional extraction of the proton charge radius from electron scattering at Mainz is also in good agreement with these "electronic" determinations. An independent measurement of the proton charge radius from unpolarized elastic ep scattering using a magnetic spectrometer free method was proposed and fully approved atmore » Jefferson Laboratory in June 2012. This novel technique uses the high precision calorimeter HyCal and a windowless hydrogen gas target which makes possible the extraction of the charge radius at very forward angles and thus very low momentum transfer Q{sup 2} up to 10{sup -4} (GeV/c){sup 2} with an unprecedented sub-percent precision for this type of experiment. In this paper, after a review of the recent progress on the proton charge radius extraction and the new high precision experiment PRad will be presented.« less

  17. Measuring the Solar Radius from Space during the 2012 Venus Transit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emilio, M.; Couvidat, S.; Bush, R. I.; Kuhn, J. R.; Scholl, I. F.

    2015-01-01

    We report in this work the determination of the solar radius from observations by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instruments on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory during the 2012 June Venus transit of the Sun. Two different methods were utilized to determine the solar radius using images of Sun taken by the HMI instrument. The first technique fit the measured trajectory of Venus in front of the Sun for seven wavelengths across the Fe I absorption line at 6173 Å. The solar radius determined from this method varies with the measurement wavelength, reflecting the variation in the height of line formation. The second method measured the area of the Sun obscured by Venus to determine the transit duration from which the solar radius was derived. This analysis focused on measurements taken in the continuum wing of the line, and applied a correction for the instrumental point spread function (PSF) of the HMI images. Measurements taken in the continuum wing of the 6173 Å line, resulted in a derived solar radius at 1 AU of 959.''57 ± 0.''02 (695, 946 ± 15 km). The AIA instrument observed the Venus transit at ultraviolet wavelengths. Using the solar disk obscuration technique, similar to that applied to the HMI images, analysis of the AIA data resulted in values of R ⊙ = 963.''04 ± 0.''03 at 1600 Å and R ⊙ = 961.''76 ± 0.''03 at 1700 Å.

  18. Distal radius osteotomy with volar locking plates based on computer simulation.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Junichi; Murase, Tsuyoshi; Moritomo, Hisao; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2011-06-01

    Corrective osteotomy using dorsal plates and structural bone graft usually has been used for treating symptomatic distal radius malunions. However, the procedure is technically demanding and requires an extensive dorsal approach. Residual deformity is a relatively frequent complication of this technique. We evaluated the clinical applicability of a three-dimensional osteotomy using computer-aided design and manufacturing techniques with volar locking plates for distal radius malunions. Ten patients with metaphyseal radius malunions were treated. Corrective osteotomy was simulated with the help of three-dimensional bone surface models created using CT data. We simulated the most appropriate screw holes in the deformed radius using computer-aided design data of a locking plate. During surgery, using a custom-made surgical template, we predrilled the screw holes as simulated. After osteotomy, plate fixation using predrilled screw holes enabled automatic reduction of the distal radial fragment. Autogenous iliac cancellous bone was grafted after plate fixation. The median volar tilt, radial inclination, and ulnar variance improved from -20°, 13°, and 6 mm, respectively, before surgery to 12°, 24°, and 1 mm, respectively, after surgery. The median wrist flexion improved from 33° before surgery to 60° after surgery. The median wrist extension was 70° before surgery and 65° after surgery. All patients experienced wrist pain before surgery, which disappeared or decreased after surgery. Surgeons can operate precisely and easily using this advanced technique. It is a new treatment option for malunion of distal radius fractures.

  19. Scattering properties of alumina particle clusters with different radius of monomers in aerocraft plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingying; Bai, Lu; Wu, Zhensen; Guo, Lixin; Gong, Yanjun

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) algorithm is improved to generate the alumina particle cluster with different radius of monomers in the plume. Scattering properties of these alumina clusters are solved by the multiple sphere T matrix method (MSTM). The effect of the number and radius of monomers on the scattering properties of clusters of alumina particles is discussed. The scattering properties of two types of alumina particle clusters are compared, one has different radius of monomers that follows lognormal probability distribution, another has the same radius of monomers that equals the mean of lognormal probability distribution. The result show that the scattering phase functions and linear polarization degrees of these two types of alumina particle clusters are of great differences. For the alumina clusters with different radius of monomers, the forward scatterings are bigger and the linear polarization degree has multiple peaks. Moreover, the vary of their scattering properties do not have strong correlative with the change of number of monomers. For larger booster motors, 25-38% of the plume being condensed alumina. The alumina can scatter radiation from other sources present in the plume and effect on radiation transfer characteristics of plume. In addition, the shape, size distribution and refractive index of the particles in the plume are estimated by linear polarization degree. Therefore, accurate scattering properties calculation is very important to decrease the deviation in the related research.

  20. Space Inside a Liquid Sphere Transforms into De Sitter Space by Hilbert Radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabounski, Dmitri; Borissova, Larissa

    2010-04-01

    Consider space inside a sphere of incompressible liquid, and space surrounding a mass-point. Metrics of the spaces were deduced in 1916 by Karl Schwarzschild. 1) Our calculation shows that a liquid sphere can be in the state of gravitational collapse (g00 = 0) only if its mass and radius are close to those of the Universe (M = 8.7x10^55 g, a = 1.3x10^28 cm). However if the same mass is presented as a mass-point, the radius of collapse rg (Hilbert radius) is many orders lesser: g00 = 0 realizes in a mass-point's space by other conditions. 2) We considered a liquid sphere whose radius meets, formally, the Hilbert radius of a mass-point bearing the same mass: a = rg, however the liquid sphere is not a collapser (see above). We show that in this case the metric of the liquid sphere's internal space can be represented as de Sitter's space metric, wherein λ = 3/a^2 > 0: physical vacuum (due to the λ-term) is the same as the field of an ideal liquid where ρ0 < 0 and p = -ρ0 c^2 > 0 (the mirror world liquid). The gravitational redshift inside the sphere is produced by the non-Newtonian force of repulsion (which is due to the λ-term, λ = 3/a^2 > 0); it is also calculated.

  1. Effect of the type of metal on the electrical conductivity and thermal properties of metal complexes: The relation between ionic radius of metal complexes and electrical conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Sh. M.; El-Ghamaz, N. A.; Diab, M. A.

    2018-05-01

    Co(II) complexes (1-4) and Ni(II) complexes (5-8) were prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectra and thermal analysis data. Thermal decomposition of all complexes was discussed using thermogravimetric analysis. The dielectric properties and alternating current conductivity were investigated in the frequency range 0.1-100 kHz and temperature range 300-660 K. The thermal activation energies of electrical conductivity (ΔE1 and ΔE2) values for complexes were calculated and discussed. The values of ΔE1 and ΔE2 for complexes (1-8) were found to decrease with increasing the frequency. Ac electrical conductivity (σac) values increases with increasing temperatures and the values of σac for Co(II) complexes are greater than Ni(II) complexes. Co(II) complexes showed a higher conductivity than other Ni(II) complexes due to the higher crystallinity as confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis.

  2. EXPEDITIOUS SYNTHESIS OF IONIC LIQUIDS USING ULTRASOUND AND MICROWAVE IRRADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmentally friendlier preparations of ionic liquids have been developed that proceed expeditiously under the influence of microwave or ultrasound irradiation conditions using neat reactants, alkylimidazoles and alkyl halides. A number of useful ionic liquids have been prepar...

  3. Elution of viruses by ionic and nonionic surfactants.

    PubMed Central

    Fujito, B T; Lytle, C D

    1996-01-01

    The ionic and nonionic surfactants sodium dodecyl sulfate and Triton X-100, respectively, eluted two viruses, phi X174 and PRD1, which were adsorbed to the ionic and nonionic binding membranes cationic polysulfone and nitrocellulose, respectively. Results indicated that complete elution was readily achieved only when combinations of surfactants and binding membranes were matched (i.e., ionic-ionic or nonionic-nonionic). PMID:8795240

  4. Application of Ionic Liquids in Amperometric Gas Sensors.

    PubMed

    Gębicki, Jacek; Kloskowski, Adam; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Stepnowski, Piotr; Namiesnik, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of available literature data on metrological parameters of the amperometric gas sensors containing ionic liquids as an electrolyte. Four mechanism types of signal generation in amperometric sensors with ionic liquid are described. Moreover, this article describes the influence of selected physico-chemical properties of the ionic liquids on the metrological parameters of these sensors. Some metrological parameters are also compared for amperometric sensors with GDE and SPE electrodes and with ionic liquids for selected analytes.

  5. Ionic Liquids as Extraction Media for Metal Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, Naoki

    In solvent extraction separation of metal ions, recently, many researchers have investigated possible use of hydrophobic ionic liquids as extraction media instead of organic solvents. Ionic liquids are salts of liquid state around room temperature and can act not only as solvents but also as ion-exchangers. Therefore, the extraction mechanism of metal ions into ionic liquids is complicated. This review presents current overview and perspective on evaluation of nature of hydrophobic ionic liquids as extraction media for metal ions.

  6. Theory of space-charge polarization for determining ionic constants of electrolytic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Atsushi

    2007-06-01

    A theoretical expression of the complex dielectric constant attributed to space-charge polarization has been derived under an electric field calculated using Poisson's equation considering the effects of bound charges on ions. The frequency dependence of the complex dielectric constant of chlorobenzene solutions doped with tetrabutylammonium tetraphenylborate (TBATPB) has been analyzed using the theoretical expression, and the impact of the bound charges on the complex dielectric constant has been clarified quantitatively in comparison with a theory that does not consider the effect of the bound charges. The Stokes radius of TBA +(=TPB-) determined by the present theory shows a good agreement with that determined by conductometry in the past; hence, the present theory should be applicable to the direct determination of the mobility of ion species in an electrolytic solution without the need to measure ionic limiting equivalent conductance and transport number.

  7. The white dwarf mass-radius relation with Gaia, Hubble and FUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Simon R. G.; Barstow, Martin A.; Casewell, Sarah L.; Holberg, Jay B.; Bond, Howard E.

    2018-04-01

    White dwarfs are becoming useful tools for many areas of astronomy. They can be used as accurate chronometers over Gyr timescales. They are also clues to the history of star formation in our galaxy. Many of these studies require accurate estimates of the mass of the white dwarf. The theoretical mass-radius relation is often invoked to provide these mass estimates. While the theoretical mass-radius relation is well developed, observational tests of this relation show a much larger scatter in the results than expected. High precision observational tests to confirm this relation are required. Gaia is providing distance measurements which will remove one of the main source of uncertainty affecting most previous observations. We combine Gaia distances with spectra from the Hubble and FUSE satelites to make precise tests of the white dwarf mass-radius relation.

  8. The binary Feige 24 - The mass, radius, and gravitational redshift of the DA white dwarf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vennes, Stephane; Shipman, Harry L.; Thorstensen, John R.; Thejll, Peter

    1991-01-01

    Observations are reported which refine the binary ephemeris of the Feige 24 system, which contains a peculiar hot DA white dwarf and an M dwarf with an atmosphere illuminated by extreme ultraviolet radiation from the white dwarf. With the new ephemeris and a set of IUE high-dispersion spectra, showing phase-dependent redshifted C IV, N V, and Si IV resonance lines, the orbital velocity, and hence the mass (0.54 + or - 0.20 solar masses), and the gravitational redshift of the white dwarf (14.1 + or - 5.2 km/s) are determined independently. It is shown that the measured Einstein redshift is consistent with an estimated radius for the white dwarf obtained from a model atmosphere solid angle and a parallax measurement. This radius is twice the Hamada-Salpeter radius for the given mass and offers a prospect to investigate the presence of a massive hydrogen envelope in that white dwarf star.

  9. Charge radius of the 13N* proton halo nucleus with Halo Effective Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosavi Khansari, M.; Khalili, H.; Sadeghi, H.

    2018-02-01

    We evaluated the charge radius of the first excited state of 13N with halo Effective Field Theory (hEFT) at the low energies. The halo effective field theory without pion is used to examine the halo nucleus bound state with a large S-wave scattering length. We built Lagrangian from the effective core and the valence proton of the fields and obtained the charge form factor at Leading-Order (LO). The charge radius at leading order for the first excited state of the proton halo nucleus, 13N, has been estimated as rc = 2.52 fm. This result is without any finite-size contributions included from the core and the proton. If we consider the contributions of the charge radius of the proton and the core, the result will be [rC]13N* = 5.85 fm.

  10. Formula for the rms blur circle radius of Wolter telescope based on aberration theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shealy, David L.; Saha, Timo T.

    1990-01-01

    A formula for the rms blur circle for Wolter telescopes has been derived using the transverse ray aberration expressions of Saha (1985), Saha (1984), and Saha (1986). The resulting formula for the rms blur circle radius over an image plane and a formula for the surface of best focus based on third-, fifth-, and seventh-order aberration theory predict results in good agreement with exact ray tracing. It has also been shown that one of the two terms in the empirical formula of VanSpeybroeck and Chase (1972), for the rms blur circle radius of a Wolter I telescope can be justified by the aberration theory results. Numerical results are given comparing the rms blur radius and the surface of best focus vs the half-field angle computed by skew ray tracing and from analytical formulas for grazing incidence Wolter I-II telescopes and a normal incidence Cassegrain telescope.

  11. Constraining the mass and radius of neutron star by future observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Kyujin; Lee, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Myungkuk; Kim, Young-Min

    2018-04-01

    The mass and radius of neutron star (NS) in the low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) can be measured simultaneously from the evolving spectra of the photospheric radius expansion (PRE) X-ray bursts (XRBs). Precise measurements require the distance to the target, information on the radiating surface, and the composition of accreted material. Future observations with large ground-based telescopes such as Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) and Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) may reduce the uncertainties in the estimation of the mass and radius of NS because they could provide information on the composition of accreted material by identifying the companion stars in LMXBs. We investigate these possibilities and present our results for selected targets.

  12. Reevaluating the Mass-Radius Relation for Low-mass, Main-sequence Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiden, Gregory A.; Chaboyer, Brian

    2012-09-01

    We examine the agreement between the observed and theoretical low-mass (<0.8 M ⊙) stellar main-sequence mass-radius relationship by comparing detached eclipsing binary (DEB) data with a new, large grid of stellar evolution models. The new grid allows for a realistic variation in the age and metallicity of the DEB population, characteristic of the local galactic neighborhood. Overall, our models do a reasonable job of reproducing the observational data. A large majority of the models match the observed stellar radii to within 4%, with a mean absolute error of 2.3%. These results represent a factor of two improvement compared to previous examinations of the low-mass mass-radius relationship. The improved agreement between models and observations brings the radius deviations within the limits imposed by potential starspot-related uncertainties for 92% of the stars in our DEB sample.

  13. Influence of Nose Radius of Blunt Cones on Drag in Supersonic and Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemateja, A.; Teja, B. Ravi; Dileep Kumar, A.; Rakesh, S. G.

    2017-08-01

    The objects moving at high speeds encounter forces which tend to decelerate the objects. This resistance in the medium is termed as drag which is one of the major concerns while designing high speed aircrafts. Another key factor which influences the design is the heat transfer. The main challenge faced by aerospace industries is to design the shape of the flying object that travels at high speeds with optimum values of heat generation and drag. This study deals with computational analysis of sharp and blunt cones with varying cone angles and nose radii. The effect of nose radius on the drag is studied at supersonic and hypersonic flows and at various angles of attack. It is observed that as the nose radius is increased, the heat transfer reduces & the drag increases and vice-versa. Looking at the results, the optimum value of nose radius can be chosen depending on the need of the problem.

  14. The Splashback Radius of Halos from Particle Dynamics. I. The SPARTA Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diemer, Benedikt

    2017-07-01

    Motivated by the recent proposal of the splashback radius as a physical boundary of dark-matter halos, we present a parallel computer code for Subhalo and PARticle Trajectory Analysis (SPARTA). The code analyzes the orbits of all simulation particles in all host halos, billions of orbits in the case of typical cosmological N-body simulations. Within this general framework, we develop an algorithm that accurately extracts the location of the first apocenter of particles after infall into a halo, or splashback. We define the splashback radius of a halo as the smoothed average of the apocenter radii of individual particles. This definition allows us to reliably measure the splashback radii of 95% of host halos above a resolution limit of 1000 particles. We show that, on average, the splashback radius and mass are converged to better than 5% accuracy with respect to mass resolution, snapshot spacing, and all free parameters of the method.

  15. Synthesis of electroactive ionic liquids for flow battery applications

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Travis Mark; Ingersoll, David; Staiger, Chad; Pratt, Harry

    2015-09-01

    The present disclosure is directed to synthesizing metal ionic liquids with transition metal coordination cations, where such metal ionic liquids can be used in a flow battery. A cation of a metal ionic liquid includes a transition metal and a ligand coordinated to the transition metal.

  16. Ionic liquid containing hydroxamate and N-alkyl sulfamate ions

    DOEpatents

    Friesen, Cody A.; Wolfe, Derek; Johnson, Paul Bryan

    2016-03-15

    Embodiments of the invention are related to ionic liquids and more specifically to ionic liquids used in electrochemical metal-air cells in which the ionic liquid includes a cation and an anion selected from hydroxamate and/or N-alkyl sulfamate anions.

  17. Ionic Liquids in Electro-active Devices (ILED)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-12

    Polyesters: Structure-Property Relationships in Thermal Behavior, Ionic Conductivity , and Morphology , Advanced Functional Materials, (01 2010...and Ionic Conductivities , Macromolecular Chemistry and Physics, (10 2011): . doi: M. Green, C. Schreiner, T. Long. Thermal , Rheological, and Ion...block giving thermal stability and ionic conductivity . Table 1 shows the molecular weight analysis of the triblock copolymers with increasing

  18. Sea quarks contribution to the nucleon magnetic moment and charge radius at the physical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sufian, Raza Sabbir; Yang, Yi-Bo; Liang, Jian; Draper, Terrence; Liu, Keh-Fei; χ QCD Collaboration

    2017-12-01

    We report a comprehensive analysis of the light and strange disconnected-sea quarks contribution to the nucleon magnetic moment, charge radius, and the electric and magnetic form factors. The lattice QCD calculation includes ensembles across several lattice volumes and lattice spacings with one of the ensembles at the physical pion mass. We adopt a model-independent extrapolation of the nucleon magnetic moment and the charge radius. We have performed a simultaneous chiral, infinite volume, and continuum extrapolation in a global fit to calculate results in the continuum limit. We find that the combined light and strange disconnected-sea quarks contribution to the nucleon magnetic moment is μM(DI )=-0.022 (11 )(09 ) μN and to the nucleon mean square charge radius is ⟨r2⟩E(DI ) =-0.019 (05 )(05 ) fm2 which is about 1 /3 of the difference between the ⟨rp2⟩E of electron-proton scattering and that of a muonic atom and so cannot be ignored in obtaining the proton charge radius in the lattice QCD calculation. The most important outcome of this lattice QCD calculation is that while the combined light-sea and strange quarks contribution to the nucleon magnetic moment is small at about 1%, a negative 2.5(9)% contribution to the proton mean square charge radius and a relatively larger positive 16.3(6.1)% contribution to the neutron mean square charge radius come from the sea quarks in the nucleon. For the first time, by performing global fits, we also give predictions of the light and strange disconnected-sea quarks contributions to the nucleon electric and magnetic form factors at the physical point and in the continuum and infinite volume limits in the momentum transfer range of 0 ≤Q2≤0.5 GeV2 .

  19. Malpractice in distal radius fracture management: an analysis of closed claims.

    PubMed

    DeNoble, Peter H; Marshall, Astrid C; Barron, O Alton; Catalano, Louis W; Glickel, Steven Z

    2014-08-01

    Distal radius fractures comprise the majority of hand- and wrist-related malpractice claims. We hypothesized that a majority of lawsuits would be for malunions resulting from nonsurgical treatment. Additional goals of this study were to quantify costs associated with claims, determine independent risk factors for making an indemnity payment, and illustrate trends over time. Seventy closed malpractice claims filed for alleged negligent treatment of distal radius fractures by orthopedic surgeons insured by the largest medical professional liability insurer in New York State (NYS) from 1981 to 2005 were reviewed. We separately reviewed defendants' personal closed malpractice claim histories from 1975 to 2011. Overall incidence of malpractice claims among distal radius fractures treated in NYS was calculated using the NYS Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System database and the 2008 American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons census data. The overall incidence of malpractice claims for distal radius fracture management was low. Malunion was the most common complaint across claims regardless of treatment type. Claims for surgically treated fractures increased over time. A majority of claims documented poor doctor-patient relationships. Male plaintiffs in this group were significantly older than males treated for distal radius fractures in NYS. Most defendants had a history of multiple malpractice suits, all were male, and only a small percentage were fellowship-trained in hand surgery. Defendants lacking American Board of Orthopedic Surgery certification were significantly more likely to make indemnity payments. Thirty-eight of 70 cases resulted in an indemnity payment. Malunion and poor doctor-patient relationships are the major features of malpractice litigation involving distal radius fracture management. Older defendant age and lack of American Board of Orthopedic Surgery certification increase the likelihood of making an indemnity payment. Economic and

  20. Ionic tracer movement through a Wyoming snowpack

    Treesearch

    Roger C. Bales; Richard A. Sommerfeld; David G. Kebler

    1990-01-01

    A meltwater ionic pulse with initial concentrations of 5-10 or more times the average was observed in lysimeters set at the base of a 2-m snowpack in an unpolluted, alpine watershed. Both background chemical species and added tracers exhibited the initial pulse. About 10 days after the onset of meltwater release, solute concentrations collected in the lysimeters...

  1. Water dynamics at neutral and ionic interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Fenn, Emily E.; Wong, Daryl B.; Fayer, M. D.

    2009-01-01

    The orientational dynamics of water at a neutral surfactant reverse micelle interface are measured with ultrafast infrared spectroscopy of the hydroxyl stretch, and the results are compared to orientational relaxation of water interacting with an ionic interface. The comparison provides insights into the influence of a neutral vs. ionic interface on hydrogen bond dynamics. Measurements are made and analyzed for large nonionic surfactant Igepal CO-520reverse micelles (water nanopool with a 9-nm diameter). The results are compared with those from a previous study of reverse micelles of the same size formed with the ionic surfactant Aerosol-OT (AOT). The results demonstrate that the orientational relaxation times for interfacial water molecules in the two types of reverse micelles are very similar (13 ps for Igepal and 18 ps for AOT) and are significantly slower than that of bulk water (2.6 ps). The comparison of water orientational relaxation at neutral and ionic interfaces shows that the presence of an interface plays the dominant role in determining the hydrogen bond dynamics, whereas the chemical nature of the interface plays a secondary role. PMID:19706895

  2. High H⁻ ionic conductivity in barium hydride.

    PubMed

    Verbraeken, Maarten C; Cheung, Chaksum; Suard, Emmanuelle; Irvine, John T S

    2015-01-01

    With hydrogen being seen as a key renewable energy vector, the search for materials exhibiting fast hydrogen transport becomes ever more important. Not only do hydrogen storage materials require high mobility of hydrogen in the solid state, but the efficiency of electrochemical devices is also largely determined by fast ionic transport. Although the heavy alkaline-earth hydrides are of limited interest for their hydrogen storage potential, owing to low gravimetric densities, their ionic nature may prove useful in new electrochemical applications, especially as an ionically conducting electrolyte material. Here we show that barium hydride shows fast pure ionic transport of hydride ions (H(-)) in the high-temperature, high-symmetry phase. Although some conductivity studies have been reported on related materials previously, the nature of the charge carriers has not been determined. BaH2 gives rise to hydride ion conductivity of 0.2 S cm(-1) at 630 °C. This is an order of magnitude larger than that of state-of-the-art proton-conducting perovskites or oxide ion conductors at this temperature. These results suggest that the alkaline-earth hydrides form an important new family of materials, with potential use in a number of applications, such as separation membranes, electrochemical reactors and so on.

  3. Esterification of Starch in Ionic Liquids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We shall discuss the use of various ionic liquids in the preparation of starch esters. Starch was reacted with vinyl acetate in different 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium (bmim) salts as solvents in an effort to produce starches with different acetylation patterns. Overall degree of substitution (DS) w...

  4. Reactions of Starch in Ionic Liquids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We found that starches are found to be soluble at 80 ºC in ionic liquids such as 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMIMCl) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide (BMIMdca) in concentration up to 10% (w/w). Higher concentrations of biopolymers in these novel solvents resulted in solutions w...

  5. Vaporisation of a dicationic ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Lovelock, Kevin R J; Deyko, Alexey; Corfield, Jo-Anne; Gooden, Peter N; Licence, Peter; Jones, Robert G

    2009-02-02

    Highest heat of vaporization yet: The dicationic ionic liquid [C(3)(C(1)Im)(2)][Tf(2)N](2) evaporates as a neutral ion triplet. These neutral ion triplets can then be ionised to form singly and doubly charged ions. The mass spectrum exhibits the dication attached to one remaining anion, and the naked dication itself (see picture).

  6. Ionic Association Ion-Selective Electrode Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emara, Mostafa M.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Describes an experiment that, using a commercially available solid-state selective electrode in conjunction with a pH-meter, determines the stability constants of sodium sulfate while varying the ionic strength of the media using sodium chloride. Detailed reproducible procedures of both the measurements and calculations are described. (BT)

  7. 1,2,3-triazolium ionic liquids

    DOEpatents

    Luebke, David; Nulwala, Hunaid; Tang, Chau

    2014-12-09

    The present invention relates to compositions of matter that are ionic liquids, the compositions comprising substituted 1,2,3-triazolium cations combined with any anion. Compositions of the invention should be useful in the separation of gases and, perhaps, as catalysts for many reactions.

  8. Symmetric supercapacitor: Sulphurized graphene and ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Jasmin S; Shaikh, Navajsharif S; Kharade, Rohini; Beknalkar, Sonali A; Patil, Jyoti V; Suryawanshi, Mahesh P; Kanjanaboos, Pongsakorn; Hong, Chang Kook; Kim, Jin Hyeok; Patil, Pramod S

    2018-10-01

    Symmetric supercapacitor is advanced over simple supercapacitor device due to their stability over a large potential window and high energy density. Graphene is a desired candidate for supercapacitor application since it has a high surface area, good electronic conductivity and high electro chemical stability. There is a pragmatic use of ionic liquid electrolyte for supercapacitor due to its stability over a large potential window, good ionic conductivity and eco-friendly nature. For high performance supercapacitor, the interaction between ionic liquid electrolyte and graphene are crucial for better charge transportation. In respect of this, a three-dimensional (3D) nanoporous honeycomb shaped sulfur embedded graphene (S-graphene) has been synthesized by simple chemical method. Here, the fabrication of high performance symmetric supercapacitor is done by using S-graphene as an electrode and [BMIM-PF 6 ] as an electrolyte. The particular architecture of S-graphene benefited to reduce the ion diffusion resistance, providing the large surface area for charge transportation and efficient charge storage. The S-graphene and ionic liquid-based symmetric supercapacitor device showed the large potential window of 3.2 V with high energy density 124 Wh kg -1 at 0.2 A g -1 constant applied current density. Furthermore, this device shows good cycling performance (stability) with a capacitive retention of 95% over 20,000 cycles at a higher current density of 2 A g -1 . Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Ionic liquid based multifunctional double network gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Kumkum; Higashihara, Tomoya; Arafune, Hiroyuki; Kamijo, Toshio; Morinaga, Takashi; Sato, Takaya; Furukawa, Hidemitsu

    2015-04-01

    Gels are a promising class of soft and wet materials with diverse application in tissue engineering and bio-medical purpose. In order to accelerate the development of gels, it is required to synthesize multi-functional gels of high mechanical strength, ultra low surface friction and suitable elastic modulus with a variety of methods and new materials. Among many types of gel ionic gel made from ionic liquids (ILs) could be used for diverse applications in electrochemical devices and in the field of tribology. IL, a promising materials for lubrication, is a salt with a melting point lower than 100 °C. As a lubricant, ILs are characterized by an extremely low vapor pressure, high thermal stability and high ion conductivity. In this work a novel approach of making double network DN ionic gel using IL has been made utilizing photo polymerization process. A hydrophobic monomer Methyl methacrylate (MMA) has been used as a first network and a hydrophobic IL monomer, N,N-diethyl-N-(2-mthacryloylethyl)-N-methylammonium bistrifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (DEMM-TFSI) has been used as a second network using photo initiator benzophenon and crosslinker triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA). The resulting DN ionic gel shows transparency, flexibility, high thermal stability, good mechanical toughness and low friction coefficient value which can be a potential candidate as a gel slider in different mechanical devices and can open a new area in the field of gel tribology.

  10. Transverse radius dependence for transverse velocity and elliptic flow in intermediate energy HIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ting-Zhi; Li, Shan

    2011-05-01

    The mean transverse velocity and elliptic flow of light fragments (A <= 2) as a function of transverse radius are studied for 25 MeV/nucleon 64Cu+64Cu collisions with impact parameters 3-5 fm by the isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics model. By comparison between the in-plane and the out-of-plane transverse velocities, the elliptic flow dependence on the transverse radius can be understood qualitatively, and variation of the direction of the resultant force on the fragments can be investigated qualitatively.

  11. Korean Type Distal Radius Anatomical Volar Plate System: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Hwan; Kim, Jihyeung; Kim, Min Bom; Rhee, Seung Hwan; Gong, Hyun Sik; Lee, Young Ho

    2014-01-01

    Background Distal radius fracture is the most common fracture of the upper extremity, and approximately 60,000 distal radius fractures occur annually in Korea. Internal fixation with an anatomical volar locking plate is widely used in the treatment of unstable distal radius fractures. However, most of the currently used distal radius anatomical plate systems were designed based on the anatomical characteristics of Western populations. Recently, the Korean-type distal radius anatomical volar plate (K-DRAVP) system was designed and developed based on the anatomical characteristics of the distal radius of Koreans. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the preliminary results of the new K-DRAVP system, and to compare its radiologic and functional results with those of the other systems. Methods From March 2012 to October 2012, 46 patients with acute distal radius fractures who were treated with the K-DRAVP system at three hospitals were enrolled in this study. Standard posteroanterior and lateral radiographs were obtained to assess fracture healing, and three radiographic parameters (volar tilt, radial inclination, and radial length) were assessed to evaluate radiographic outcomes. The range of motion and grip strength, the Gartland and Werley scoring system, and the disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) questionnaire were used to assess clinical and functional outcomes. Results All radiologic parameters were restored to normal values, and maintained without any loosening or collapse until the time of final follow-up. Grip strength was restored to 84% of the value for the unaffected side. The mean range of motion of the wrist at final follow-up was restored to 77%-95% of the value for the unaffected side. According to the Gartland and Werley scoring system, there were 16 excellent, 26 good, and 4 fair results. The mean DASH score was 8.4 points. There were no complications after surgery. Conclusions The newly developed K-DRAVP system could be used to

  12. A note on the upper bound of the spectral radius for SOR iteration matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, D.-W. Da-Wei

    2004-05-01

    Recently, Wang and Huang (J. Comput. Appl. Math. 135 (2001) 325, Corollary 4.7) established the following estimation on the upper bound of the spectral radius for successive overrelaxation (SOR) iteration matrix:ρSOR≤1-ω+ωρGSunder the condition that the coefficient matrix A is a nonsingular M-matrix and ω≥1, where ρSOR and ρGS are the spectral radius of SOR iteration matrix and Gauss-Seidel iteration matrix, respectively. In this note, we would like to point out that the above estimation is not valid in general.

  13. An Adaption Broadcast Radius-Based Code Dissemination Scheme for Low Energy Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shidi; Liu, Xiao; Liu, Anfeng; Xiong, Naixue; Cai, Zhiping; Wang, Tian

    2018-05-10

    Due to the Software Defined Network (SDN) technology, Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are getting wider application prospects for sensor nodes that can get new functions after updating program codes. The issue of disseminating program codes to every node in the network with minimum delay and energy consumption have been formulated and investigated in the literature. The minimum-transmission broadcast (MTB) problem, which aims to reduce broadcast redundancy, has been well studied in WSNs where the broadcast radius is assumed to be fixed in the whole network. In this paper, an Adaption Broadcast Radius-based Code Dissemination (ABRCD) scheme is proposed to reduce delay and improve energy efficiency in duty cycle-based WSNs. In the ABCRD scheme, a larger broadcast radius is set in areas with more energy left, generating more optimized performance than previous schemes. Thus: (1) with a larger broadcast radius, program codes can reach the edge of network from the source in fewer hops, decreasing the number of broadcasts and at the same time, delay. (2) As the ABRCD scheme adopts a larger broadcast radius for some nodes, program codes can be transmitted to more nodes in one broadcast transmission, diminishing the number of broadcasts. (3) The larger radius in the ABRCD scheme causes more energy consumption of some transmitting nodes, but radius enlarging is only conducted in areas with an energy surplus, and energy consumption in the hot-spots can be reduced instead due to some nodes transmitting data directly to sink without forwarding by nodes in the original hot-spot, thus energy consumption can almost reach a balance and network lifetime can be prolonged. The proposed ABRCD scheme first assigns a broadcast radius, which doesn’t affect the network lifetime, to nodes having different distance to the code source, then provides an algorithm to construct a broadcast backbone. In the end, a comprehensive performance analysis and simulation result shows that the

  14. The temperature and radius of the white dwarf Stein 2051B

    SciTech Connect

    Liebert, J.

    1976-12-15

    The temperature, radius, and other atmospheric parameters are derived for the cool DC white dwarf Stein 2051B (=G175-34B=EG 180), whose mass was recently determined by Strand. New spectrophotometric scans of this star and its dwarf M companion are discussed; these and existing Stroemgren photometry are fitted to model atmospheres with hydrogen/metal deficient compositions, and a temperature of 7050 +- 400 K is determined. The resulting radius of 0.0111 +- 0.0015 R/sub sun/ is marginally smaller than that of 40 Eri B. (AIP)

  15. Longitudinal afterbody grooves and shoulder radiusing for low-speed bluff body drag reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, F. G.; Quass, B. F.; Weinstein, L. M.; Bushnell, D. M.

    1981-01-01

    A new low-speed drag reduction approach is proposed which employs longitudinal surface V-shaped grooves cutting through the afterbody shoulder region. The test Reynolds number range was from 20,000 to 200,000 based on undisturbed free-stream flow and a body diameter of 6.08 cm. The V-grooves are shown to be most effective in reducing drag when the afterbody shoulder radius is zero. Reductions in drag of up to 33% have been measured for this condition. For large shoulder radius, the grooves are only effective at the lower Reynolds numbers of the test.

  16. Effect of tip radius on the incipient plasticity of chromium studied by nanoindentation

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Dong; Morris, James R.; Nieh, T. G.

    2014-10-01

    The onset of plasticity in Cr was investigated by nanoindentation using indenters with tip radii ranging from 60 to 759 nm. The stress for incipient plasticity was found to increase with decreasing tip radius. We find that the cumulative pop-in probability on load could be described successfully by a combined model over the full range of tip radius, indicating that the incipient plasticity might be triggered either by the homogeneous nucleation of dislocation or by the activation of existing dislocations underneath the indenter.

  17. On the ππ continuum in the nucleon form factors and the proton radius puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoferichter, M.; Kubis, B.; Ruiz de Elvira, J.; Hammer, H.-W.; Meißner, U.-G.

    2016-11-01

    We present an improved determination of the ππ continuum contribution to the isovector spectral functions of the nucleon electromagnetic form factors. Our analysis includes the most up-to-date results for the ππ→bar{N} N partial waves extracted from Roy-Steiner equations, consistent input for the pion vector form factor, and a thorough discussion of isospin-violating effects and uncertainty estimates. As an application, we consider the ππ contribution to the isovector electric and magnetic radii by means of sum rules, which, in combination with the accurately known neutron electric radius, are found to slightly prefer a small proton charge radius.

  18. An Adaption Broadcast Radius-Based Code Dissemination Scheme for Low Energy Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shidi; Liu, Xiao; Cai, Zhiping; Wang, Tian

    2018-01-01

    Due to the Software Defined Network (SDN) technology, Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are getting wider application prospects for sensor nodes that can get new functions after updating program codes. The issue of disseminating program codes to every node in the network with minimum delay and energy consumption have been formulated and investigated in the literature. The minimum-transmission broadcast (MTB) problem, which aims to reduce broadcast redundancy, has been well studied in WSNs where the broadcast radius is assumed to be fixed in the whole network. In this paper, an Adaption Broadcast Radius-based Code Dissemination (ABRCD) scheme is proposed to reduce delay and improve energy efficiency in duty cycle-based WSNs. In the ABCRD scheme, a larger broadcast radius is set in areas with more energy left, generating more optimized performance than previous schemes. Thus: (1) with a larger broadcast radius, program codes can reach the edge of network from the source in fewer hops, decreasing the number of broadcasts and at the same time, delay. (2) As the ABRCD scheme adopts a larger broadcast radius for some nodes, program codes can be transmitted to more nodes in one broadcast transmission, diminishing the number of broadcasts. (3) The larger radius in the ABRCD scheme causes more energy consumption of some transmitting nodes, but radius enlarging is only conducted in areas with an energy surplus, and energy consumption in the hot-spots can be reduced instead due to some nodes transmitting data directly to sink without forwarding by nodes in the original hot-spot, thus energy consumption can almost reach a balance and network lifetime can be prolonged. The proposed ABRCD scheme first assigns a broadcast radius, which doesn’t affect the network lifetime, to nodes having different distance to the code source, then provides an algorithm to construct a broadcast backbone. In the end, a comprehensive performance analysis and simulation result shows that the proposed

  19. Measuring Atmospheric Abundances and Rotation of a Brown Dwarf with a Measured Mass and Radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkby, Jayne

    2015-08-01

    There are no cool brown dwarfs with both a well-characterized atmosphere and a measured mass and radius. LHS 6343, a brown dwarf transiting one member of an M+M binary in the Kepler field, provides the first opportunity to tie theoretical atmospheric models to the observed brown dwarf mass-radius diagram. We propose four half-nights of observations with NIRSPAO in 2015B to measure spectral features in LHS 6343 C by detecting the relative motions of absorption features during the system's orbit. In addition to abundances, we will directly measure the brown dwarf's projected rotational velocity and mass.

  20. Optimization of ionic conductivity in doped ceria

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, David A.; Simak, Sergei I.; Skorodumova, Natalia V.; Abrikosov, Igor A.; Johansson, Börje

    2006-01-01

    Oxides with the cubic fluorite structure, e.g., ceria (CeO2), are known to be good solid electrolytes when they are doped with cations of lower valence than the host cations. The high ionic conductivity of doped ceria makes it an attractive electrolyte for solid oxide fuel cells, whose prospects as an environmentally friendly power source are very promising. In these electrolytes, the current is carried by oxygen ions that are transported by oxygen vacancies, present to compensate for the lower charge of the dopant cations. Ionic conductivity in ceria is closely related to oxygen-vacancy formation and migration properties. A clear physical picture of the connection between the choice of a dopant and the improvement of ionic conductivity in ceria is still lacking. Here we present a quantum-mechanical first-principles study of the influence of different trivalent impurities on these properties. Our results reveal a remarkable correspondence between vacancy properties at the atomic level and the macroscopic ionic conductivity. The key parameters comprise migration barriers for bulk diffusion and vacancy–dopant interactions, represented by association (binding) energies of vacancy–dopant clusters. The interactions can be divided into repulsive elastic and attractive electronic parts. In the optimal electrolyte, these parts should balance. This finding offers a simple and clear way to narrow the search for superior dopants and combinations of dopants. The ideal dopant should have an effective atomic number between 61 (Pm) and 62 (Sm), and we elaborate that combinations of Nd/Sm and Pr/Gd show enhanced ionic conductivity, as compared with that for each element separately. PMID:16478802

  1. Optimization of ionic conductivity in doped ceria.

    PubMed

    Andersson, David A; Simak, Sergei I; Skorodumova, Natalia V; Abrikosov, Igor A; Johansson, Börje

    2006-03-07

    Oxides with the cubic fluorite structure, e.g., ceria (CeO2), are known to be good solid electrolytes when they are doped with cations of lower valence than the host cations. The high ionic conductivity of doped ceria makes it an attractive electrolyte for solid oxide fuel cells, whose prospects as an environmentally friendly power source are very promising. In these electrolytes, the current is carried by oxygen ions that are transported by oxygen vacancies, present to compensate for the lower charge of the dopant cations. Ionic conductivity in ceria is closely related to oxygen-vacancy formation and migration properties. A clear physical picture of the connection between the choice of a dopant and the improvement of ionic conductivity in ceria is still lacking. Here we present a quantum-mechanical first-principles study of the influence of different trivalent impurities on these properties. Our results reveal a remarkable correspondence between vacancy properties at the atomic level and the macroscopic ionic conductivity. The key parameters comprise migration barriers for bulk diffusion and vacancy-dopant interactions, represented by association (binding) energies of vacancy-dopant clusters. The interactions can be divided into repulsive elastic and attractive electronic parts. In the optimal electrolyte, these parts should balance. This finding offers a simple and clear way to narrow the search for superior dopants and combinations of dopants. The ideal dopant should have an effective atomic number between 61 (Pm) and 62 (Sm), and we elaborate that combinations of Nd/Sm and Pr/Gd show enhanced ionic conductivity, as compared with that for each element separately.

  2. The shape-memory effect in ionic elastomers: fixation through ionic interactions.

    PubMed

    González-Jiménez, Antonio; Malmierca, Marta A; Bernal-Ortega, Pilar; Posadas, Pilar; Pérez-Aparicio, Roberto; Marcos-Fernández, Ángel; Mather, Patrick T; Valentín, Juan L

    2017-04-19

    Shape-memory elastomers based on a commercial rubber cross-linked by both ionic and covalent bonds have been developed. The elastomeric matrix was a carboxylated nitrile rubber (XNBR) vulcanized with magnesium oxide (MgO) providing ionic interactions that form hierarchical structures. The so-named ionic transition is used as the unique thermal transition responsible for the shape-memory effect (SME) in these elastomers. These ionic interactions fix the temporary shape due to their behavior as dynamic cross-links with temperature changes. Covalent cross-links were incorporated with the addition of different proportions of dicumyl peroxide (DCP) to the ionic elastomer to establish and recover the permanent shape. In this article, the SME was modulated by modifying the degree of covalent cross-linking, while keeping the ionic contribution constant. In addition, different programming parameters, such as deformation temperature, heating/cooling rate, loading/unloading rate and percentage of tensile strain, were evaluated for their effects on shape-memory behavior.

  3. Comparative Investigation of the Ionicity of Aprotic and Protic Ionic Liquids in Molecular Solvents by using Conductometry and NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Thawarkar, Sachin; Khupse, Nageshwar D; Kumar, Anil

    2016-04-04

    Electrical conductivity (σ), viscosity (η), and self-diffusion coefficient (D) measurements of binary mixtures of aprotic and protic imidazolium-based ionic liquids with water, dimethyl sulfoxide, and ethylene glycol were measured from 293.15 to 323.15 K. The temperature dependence study reveals typical Arrhenius behavior. The ionicities of aprotic ionic liquids were observed to be higher than those of protic ionic liquids in these solvents. The aprotic ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, [bmIm][BF4 ], displays 100 % ionicity in both water and ethylene glycol. The protic ionic liquids in both water and ethylene glycol are classed as good ionic candidates, whereas in DMSO they are classed as having a poor ionic nature. The solvation dynamics of the ionic species of the ionic liquids are illustrated on the basis of the (1) H NMR chemical shifts of the ionic liquids. The self-diffusion coefficients D of the cation and anion of [HmIm][CH3 COO] in D2 O and in [D6 ]DMSO are determined by using (1) H nuclei with pulsed field gradient spin-echo NMR spectroscopy. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Mean-Field Description of Ionic Size Effects with Non-Uniform Ionic Sizes: A Numerical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shenggao; Wang, Zhongming; Li, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Ionic size effects are significant in many biological systems. Mean-field descriptions of such effects can be efficient but also challenging. When ionic sizes are different, explicit formulas in such descriptions are not available for the dependence of the ionic concentrations on the electrostatic potential, i.e., there is no explicit, Boltzmann type distributions. This work begins with a variational formulation of the continuum electrostatics of an ionic solution with such non-uniform ionic sizes as well as multiple ionic valences. An augmented Lagrange multiplier method is then developed and implemented to numerically solve the underlying constrained optimization problem. The method is shown to be accurate and efficient, and is applied to ionic systems with non-uniform ionic sizes such as the sodium chloride solution. Extensive numerical tests demonstrate that the mean-field model and numerical method capture qualitatively some significant ionic size effects, particularly those for multivalent ionic solutions, such as the stratification of multivalent counterions near a charged surface. The ionic valence-to-volume ratio is found to be the key physical parameter in the stratification of concentrations. All these are not well described by the classical Poisson–Boltzmann theory, or the generalized Poisson–Boltzmann theory that treats uniform ionic sizes. Finally, various issues such as the close packing, limitation of the continuum model, and generalization of this work to molecular solvation are discussed. PMID:21929014

  5. Acidic precipitation at a site within the northeastern conurbation

    Treesearch

    Jay S. Jacobson; Laurence I. Heller; Paul Van Leuken

    1976-01-01

    Rain and snow were collected in plastic beakers either manually or with a Wong sampler during 58 precipitation events in 1974 at Yonkers, New York approximately 24 km north of the center of New York City. Determinations were made of total dissolved ionic species, free hydrogen ions, total hydrogen ions, sulfate, nitrate, chloride, and fluoride. Conductivity...

  6. Distal radius reconstruction with vascularized proximal fibular autograft after en-bloc resection of recurrent giant cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yun-Fa; Wang, Jian-Wei; Huang, Pin; Xu, Zhong-He

    2016-08-17

    Giant cell tumors (GCTs) located in the distal radius are likely to recur, and the treatment of such recurrent tumors is very difficult. Here, we report our clinical experience in distal radius reconstruction with vascularized proximal fibular autografts after en-bloc excision of the entire distal radius in 17 patients with recurrent GCT (RGCT) of the distal radius. All 17 patients with RGCT in distal radius underwent plain radiography and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the distal radius as the initial evaluation after hospitalization. Then the distal radius were replaced by vascularized proximal fibular autografts after en-bloc RGCT resection. We assessed all patients by using clinical examinations, plain radiography of the wrist and chest, and Mayo wrist scores in the follow-ups. After an average follow-up of 4.3 years (range: 1.5-10.0 years), no lung metastasis or local recurrence was detected in any of the 17 patients. In total, 14 patients had excellent or good functional wrist scores, 16 were pain free or had occasional pain, and 15 patients returned to work. The mean range of motion of the wrist was 101° (flexion-extension), and the mean grip strength was 77.2 % of the contralateral normal hand. En-bloc excision of the entire distal radius and distal radius reconstruction with a vascularized proximal fibular autograft can effectively achieve local tumor control and preserve wrist function in patients with RGCT of the distal radius.

  7. Proteins in Ionic Liquids: Current Status of Experiments and Simulations.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Christian

    2017-04-01

    In the last two decades, while searching for interesting applications of ionic liquids as potent solvents, their solvation properties and their general impact on biomolecules, and in particular on proteins, gained interest. It turned out that ionic liquids are excellent solvents for protein refolding and crystallization. Biomolecules showed increased solubilities and stabilities, both operational and thermal, in ionic liquids, which also seem to prevent self-aggregation during solubilization. Biomolecules can be immobilized, e.g. in highly viscous ionic liquids, for particular biochemical processes and can be designed to some extent by the proper choice of the ionic liquid cations and anions, which can be characterized by the Hofmeister series.

  8. Ionic liquids: Promising green solvents for lignocellulosic biomass utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Chang Geun; Pu, Yunqiao; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    Ionic liquids are effective solvents/media for the utilization of lignocellulosic biomass. The unique properties of ionic liquids enable them to effectively dissolve and/or convert the biomass into various types of products. This review aims to cover the latest progress achieved in applications of ionic liquids on biomass conversion and analysis. Specifically, several recently developed approaches on how to overcome current challenges on the use of ionic liquids in the biomass conversion were highlighted. Here, recent studies addressing the potential applications of ionic liquids for the production of novel biomass-derived chemicals and materials were also discussed.

  9. Ionic liquids: Promising green solvents for lignocellulosic biomass utilization

    DOE PAGES

    Yoo, Chang Geun; Pu, Yunqiao; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2017-06-01

    Ionic liquids are effective solvents/media for the utilization of lignocellulosic biomass. The unique properties of ionic liquids enable them to effectively dissolve and/or convert the biomass into various types of products. This review aims to cover the latest progress achieved in applications of ionic liquids on biomass conversion and analysis. Specifically, several recently developed approaches on how to overcome current challenges on the use of ionic liquids in the biomass conversion were highlighted. Here, recent studies addressing the potential applications of ionic liquids for the production of novel biomass-derived chemicals and materials were also discussed.

  10. Experimental demonstration of scaling behavior for ionic transport and its fluctuations in individual carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocquet, Lyderic; Secchi, Eleonora; Nigues, Antoine; Siria, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    We perform an experimental study of ionic transport and current fluctuations inside individual Carbon Nanotubes (CNT) with a size ranging from 40 down to 7 nanometers in radius. The conductance exhibits a power law behavior dependence on the salinity, with an exponent close to 1/3. This is in contrast to Boron-Nitride nanotubes which exhibits a constant surface conductance. This scaling behavior is rationalized in terms of a model accounting for hydroxide adsorption at the (hydrophobic) carbon surface. This predicts a density dependent surface charge with a exponent 1/3 in full agreement with the experimental observations. Then we measure the low frequency noise of the ionic current in single CNTs. The noise exhibits a robust 1/f characteristic, with an amplitude which scales proportionaly to the surface charge measured independently. Data for the various CNT at a given pH do collapse on a master curve. This behavior is rationalized in terms of the fluctuations of the surface charge based on the adsorption behavior. This suggests that the low frequency noise takes its origin in the process occuring at the surface of the carbon nanotube.

  11. Ionic liquids screening for desulfurization of natural gasoline by liquid-liquid extraction.

    PubMed

    Likhanova, Natalya V; Guzmán-Lucero, Diego; Flores, Eugenio A; García, Paloma; Domínguez-Aguilar, Marco A; Palomeque, Jorge; Martínez-Palou, Rafael

    2010-11-01

    Seventy five ionic liquids (ILs) were tested as a sequestering agent of sulfured compounds in natural gasoline (NG). Desulphurization of NG was performed by means of liquid-liquid extraction method at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Experimental ILs containing imidazolium, pyridinium, and ammonium cations along with organic and inorganic anions were synthesized conventionally and under microwave and sonochemical conditions. The effect of the molecular structure of ILs on the desulfurization efficiency of NG with high sulfur content was evaluated. Analysis indicated that the anion type played a more important role than the cation on the desulphurization process. ILs based on halogen-ferrates and halogen-aluminates exhibited the highest efficiency in sulfur removal, and their efficiency is further improved when there is an excess of metallic salt in a ratio of at least 1:1.3 during the synthesis of the corresponding IL. An explanation for the ability of metallic ILs to remove sulfur-containing compounds from natural gasoline based on the ratio of the ionic charge to the atomic radius is proposed. Furthermore, a method to recover and reuse water-sensitive to halogenated precursors is described.

  12. Anomalously large capacitance of an ionic liquid described by the restricted primitive model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loth, M. S.; Skinner, Brian; Shklovskii, B. I.

    2010-11-01

    We use Monte Carlo simulations to examine the simplest model of a room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL), called the “restricted primitive model,” at a metal surface. We find that at moderately low temperatures the capacitance of the metal-RTIL interface is so large that the effective thickness of the electrostatic double layer is up to three times smaller than the ion radius. To interpret these results we suggest an approach which is based on the interaction between discrete ions and their image charges in the metal surface and which therefore goes beyond the mean-field approximation. When a voltage is applied across the interface, the strong image attraction causes counterions to condense onto the metal surface to form compact ion-image dipoles. These dipoles repel each other to form a correlated liquid. When the surface density of these dipoles is low, the insertion of an additional dipole does not require much energy. This leads to a large capacitance C that decreases monotonically with voltage V , producing a “bell-shaped” curve C(V) . We also consider what happens when the electrode is made from a semimetal rather than a perfect metal. In this case, the finite screening radius of the electrode shifts the reflection plane for image charges to the interior of the electrode, and we arrive at a “camel-shaped” C(V) . These predictions seem to be in qualitative agreement with experiment.

  13. Interactions in ion pairs of protic ionic liquids: Comparison with aprotic ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuzuki, Seiji, E-mail: s.tsuzuki@aist.go.jp; Shinoda, Wataru; Miran, Md. Shah

    2013-11-07

    The stabilization energies for the formation (E{sub form}) of 11 ion pairs of protic and aprotic ionic liquids were studied by MP2/6-311G{sup **} level ab initio calculations to elucidate the difference between the interactions of ions in protic ionic liquids and those in aprotic ionic liquids. The interactions in the ion pairs of protic ionic liquids (diethylmethylammonium [dema] and dimethylpropylammonium [dmpa] based ionic liquids) are stronger than those of aprotic ionic liquids (ethyltrimethylammonium [etma] based ionic liquids). The E{sub form} for the [dema][CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}] and [dmpa][CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}] complexes (−95.6 and −96.4 kcal/mol, respectively) are significantly larger (more negative)more » than that for the [etma][CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}] complex (−81.0 kcal/mol). The same trend was observed for the calculations of ion pairs of the three cations with the Cl{sup −}, BF{sub 4}{sup −}, TFSA{sup −} anions. The anion has contact with the N–H bond of the dema{sup +} or dmpa{sup +} cations in the most stable geometries of the dema{sup +} and dmpa{sup +} complexes. The optimized geometries, in which the anions locate on the counter side of the cations, are 11.0–18.0 kcal/mol less stable, which shows that the interactions in the ions pairs of protic ionic liquids have strong directionality. The E{sub form} for the less stable geometries for the dema{sup +} and dmpa{sup +} complexes are close to those for the most stable etma{sup +} complexes. The electrostatic interaction, which is the major source of the attraction in the ion pairs, is responsible for the directionality of the interactions and determining the magnitude of the interaction energy. Molecular dynamic simulations of the [dema][TFSA] and [dmpa][TFSA] ionic liquids show that the N–H bonds of the cations have contact with the negatively charged (oxygen and nitrogen) atoms of TFSA{sup −} anion, while the strong directionality of the interactions was not suggested from the

  14. Active chemisorption sites in functionalized ionic liquids for carbon capture.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guokai; Wang, Jianji; Zhang, Suojiang

    2016-07-25

    Development of novel technologies for the efficient and reversible capture of CO2 is highly desired. In the last decade, CO2 capture using ionic liquids has attracted intensive attention from both academia and industry, and has been recognized as a very promising technology. Recently, a new approach has been developed for highly efficient capture of CO2 by site-containing ionic liquids through chemical interaction. This perspective review focuses on the recent advances in the chemical absorption of CO2 using site-containing ionic liquids, such as amino-based ionic liquids, azolate ionic liquids, phenolate ionic liquids, dual-functionalized ionic liquids, pyridine-containing ionic liquids and so on. Other site-containing liquid absorbents such as amine-based solutions, switchable solvents, and functionalized ionic liquid-amine blends are also investigated. Strategies have been discussed for how to activate the existent reactive sites and develop novel reactive sites by physical and chemical methods to enhance CO2 absorption capacity and reduce absorption enthalpy. The carbon capture mechanisms of these site-containing liquid absorbents are also presented. Particular attention has been paid to the latest progress in CO2 capture in multiple-site interactions by amino-free anion-functionalized ionic liquids. In the last section, future directions and prospects for carbon capture by site-containing ionic liquids are outlined.

  15. Advances in the analysis of biological samples using ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kevin D; Trujillo-Rodríguez, María J; Anderson, Jared L

    2018-02-12

    Ionic liquids are a class of solvents and materials that hold great promise in bioanalytical chemistry. Task-specific ionic liquids have recently been designed for the selective extraction, separation, and detection of proteins, peptides, nucleic acids, and other physiologically relevant analytes from complex biological samples. To facilitate rapid bioanalysis, ionic liquids have been integrated in miniaturized and automated procedures. Bioanalytical separations have also benefited from the modification of nonspecific magnetic materials with ionic liquids or the implementation of ionic liquids with inherent magnetic properties. Furthermore, the direct detection of the extracted molecules in the analytical instrument has been demonstrated with structurally tuned ionic liquids and magnetic ionic liquids, providing a significant advantage in the analysis of low-abundance analytes. This article gives an overview of these advances that involve the application of ionic liquids and derivatives in bioanalysis. Graphical abstract Ionic liquids, magnetic ionic liquids, and ionic liquid-based sorbents are increasing the speed, selectivity, and sensitivity in the analysis of biological samples.

  16. Team physician #5. Salter-Harris type I fracture of the distal radius due to weightlifting.

    PubMed

    Weiss, A P; Sponseller, P D

    1989-02-01

    A Salter-Harris Type I distal radius fracture was sustained by a skeletally immature adolescent while performing a supine bench press during weight training. Closed reduction was accomplished without difficulty. Fractures in adolescence due to weightlifting are rare but illustrate the need for proper instruction and supervision.

  17. Measuring the Radius of the Earth from a Mountain Top Overlooking the Ocean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gangadharan, Dhevan

    2009-01-01

    A clear view of the ocean may be used to measure the radius of the Earth. To an observer looking out at the ocean, the horizon will always form some angle [theta] with the local horizontal plane. As the observer's elevation "h" increases, so does the angle [theta]. From measurements of the elevation "h" and the angle [theta],…

  18. Constraining the mass and radius of neutron stars in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, A. W.; Heinke, C. O.; Bogdanov, S.; Li, C. K.; Ho, W. C. G.; Bahramian, A.; Han, S.

    2018-05-01

    We analyse observations of eight quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries in globular clusters and combine them to determine the neutron star mass-radius curve and the equation of state of dense matter. We determine the effect that several uncertainties may have on our results, including uncertainties in the distance, the atmosphere composition, the neutron star maximum mass, the neutron star mass distribution, the possible presence of a hotspot on the neutron star surface, and the prior choice for the equation of state of dense matter. The distance uncertainty is implemented in a new Gaussian blurring method that can be directly applied to the probability distribution over mass and radius. We find that the radius of a 1.4 solar mass neutron star is most likely from 10 to 14 km and that tighter constraints are only possible with stronger assumptions about the nature of the neutron stars, the systematics of the observations, or the nature of dense matter. Strong phase transitions in the equation of state are preferred, and in this case, the radius is likely smaller than 12 km. However, radii larger than 12 km are preferred if the neutron stars have uneven temperature distributions.

  19. Study on warning radius of diffuse reflection laser warning based on fish-eye lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bolin; Zhang, Weian

    2013-09-01

    The diffuse reflection type of omni-directional laser warning based on fish-eye lens is becoming more and more important. As one of the key parameters of warning system, the warning radius should be put into investigation emphatically. The paper firstly theoretically analyzes the energy detected by single pixel of FPA detector in the system under complicated environment. Then the least energy detectable by each single pixel of the system is computed in terms of detector sensitivity, system noise, and minimum SNR. Subsequently, by comparison between the energy detected by single pixel and the least detectable energy, the warning radius is deduced from Torrance-Sparrow five-parameter semiempirical statistic model. Finally, a field experiment was developed to validate the computational results. It has been found that the warning radius has a close relationship with BRDF parameters of the irradiated target, propagation distance, angle of incidence, and detector sensitivity, etc. Furthermore, an important fact is shown that the experimental values of warning radius are always less than that of theoretical ones, due to such factors as the optical aberration of fish-eye lens, the transmissivity of narrowband filter, and the packing ratio of detector.

  20. Testing the white dwarf mass-radius relationship with eclipsing binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, S. G.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Marsh, T. R.; Ashley, R. P.; Bours, M. C. P.; Breedt, E.; Burleigh, M. R.; Copperwheat, C. M.; Dhillon, V. S.; Green, M.; Hardy, L. K.; Hermes, J. J.; Irawati, P.; Kerry, P.; Littlefair, S. P.; McAllister, M. J.; Rattanasoon, S.; Rebassa-Mansergas, A.; Sahman, D. I.; Schreiber, M. R.

    2017-10-01

    We present high-precision, model-independent, mass and radius measurements for 16 white dwarfs in detached eclipsing binaries and combine these with previously published data to test the theoretical white dwarf mass-radius relationship. We reach a mean precision of 2.4 per cent in mass and 2.7 per cent in radius, with our best measurements reaching a precision of 0.3 per cent in mass and 0.5 per cent in radius. We find excellent agreement between the measured and predicted radii across a wide range of masses and temperatures. We also find the radii of all white dwarfs with masses less than 0.48 M⊙ to be fully consistent with helium core models, but they are on average 9 per cent larger than those of carbon-oxygen core models. In contrast, white dwarfs with masses larger than 0.52 M⊙ all have radii consistent with carbon-oxygen core models. Moreover, we find that all but one of the white dwarfs in our sample have radii consistent with possessing thick surface hydrogen envelopes (10-5 ≥ MH/MWD ≥ 10-4), implying that the surface hydrogen layers of these white dwarfs are not obviously affected by common envelope evolution.

  1. A Spitzer Infrared Radius for the Transiting Extrasolar Planet HD 209458 b

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, L. Jeremy; Harrington, Joseph; Seager, Sara; Deming, Drake

    2007-01-01

    We have measured the infrared transit of the extrasolar planet HD 209458 b using the Spitzer Space Telescope. We observed two primary eclipse events (one partial and one complete transit) using the 24 micrometer array of the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS). We analyzed a total of 2392 individual images (10-second integrations) of the planetary system, recorded before, during, and after transit. We perform optimal photometry on the images and use the local zodiacal light as a short-term flux reference. At this long wavelength, the transit curve has a simple box-like shape, allowing robust solutions for the stellar and planetary radii independent of stellar limb darkening, which is negligible at 24 micrometers. We derive a stellar radius of R(sub *) = 1.06 plus or minus 0.07 solar radius, a planetary radius of R(sub p) = 1.26 plus or minus 0.08 R(sub J), and a stellar mass of 1.17 solar mass. Within the errors, our results agree with the measurements at visible wavelengths. The 24 micrometer radius of the planet therefore does not differ significantly compared to the visible result. We point out the potential for deriving extrasolar transiting planet radii to high accuracy using transit photometry at slightly shorter IR wavelengths where greater photometric precision is possible.

  2. RADIUS: Research Archive on Disability in the United States. [CD-ROMs].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sociometrics Corp., Los Altos, CA.

    This Research Archive on Disability in the United States (RADIUS), a database on CD-ROM, contains 19 data sets on the prevalence, incidence, correlates, and consequences of disability in the United States. The 19 data sets are: (1) 1991 National Maternal and Infant Health Follow-Up Survey; (2) National Pediatric Trauma Registry, 1988-1994; (3)…

  3. Influence of radius of cylinder HTS bulk on guidance force in a maglev vehicle system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longcai, Zhang

    2014-07-01

    Bulk superconductors had great potential for various engineering applications, especially in a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) maglev vehicle system. In such a system, the HTS bulks were always exposed to AC external magnetic field, which was generated by the inhomogeneous surface magnetic field of the NdFeB guideway. In our previous work, it was observed that the guidance force of the YBCO bulk over the NdFeB guideway used in the HTS maglev vehicle system was decayed by the application of the AC external magnetic field. In this paper, we investigated the influence of the radius of the cylinder HTS bulk exposed to an AC magnetic field perturbation on the guidance force in the maglev vehicle system. From the results, it was found that the guidance force was stronger for the bulk with bigger radius and the guidance force decay rates of the bulks were approximately equal despite of the different radius in the maglev vehicle system. Therefore, in order to obtain higher guidance force in the maglev vehicle system, we could use the cylinder HTS bulks with the bigger radius.

  4. Fixed-Radius Point Counts in Forests: Factors Influencing Effectiveness and Efficiency

    Treesearch

    Daniel R. Petit; Lisa J. Petit; Victoria A. Saab; Thomas E. Martin

    1995-01-01

    The effectiveness of fixed-radius point counts in quantifying abundance and richness of bird species in oak-hickory, pine-hardwoods, mixed-mesophytic, beech-maple, and riparian cottonwood forests was evaluated in Arkansas, Ohio, Kentucky, and Idaho. Effects of count duration and numbers of stations and visits per stand were evaluated in May to July 1991 by conducting...

  5. Pole-strength of the earth from Magsat and magnetic determination of the core radius

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, G. V.; Benton, E. R.

    1982-01-01

    A model based on two days of Magsat data is used to numerically evaluate the unsigned magnetic flux linking the earth's surface, and a comparison of the 16.054 GWb value calculated with values from earlier geomagnetic field models reveals a smooth, monotonic, and recently-accelerating decrease in the earth's pole strength at a 50-year average rate of 8.3 MWb, or 0.052%/year. Hide's (1978) magnetic technique for determining the radius of the earth's electrically-conducting core is tested by (1) extrapolating main field models for 1960 and 1965 downward through the nearly-insulating mantle, and then separately comparing them to equivalent, extrapolated models of Magsat data. The two unsigned fluxes are found to equal the Magsat values at a radius which is within 2% of the core radius; and (2) the 1960 main field and secular variation and acceleration coefficients are used to derive models of 1930, 1940 and 1950. The same core magnetic radius value, within 2% of the seismic value, is obtained. It is concluded that the mantle is a nearly-perfect insulator, while the core is a perfect conductor, on the decade time scale.

  6. Addressing the missing matter problem in galaxies through a new fundamental gravitational radius

    SciTech Connect

    Capozziello, S.; Jovanović, P.; Jovanović, V. Borka

    We demonstrate that the existence of a Noether symmetry in f ( R ) theories of gravity gives rise to a further gravitational radius, besides the standard Schwarzschild one, determining the dynamics at galactic scales. By this feature, it is possible to explain the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation and the rotation curve of gas-rich galaxies without the dark matter hypothesis.

  7. ESTIMATING THE RADIUS OF THE CONVECTIVE CORE OF MAIN-SEQUENCE STARS FROM OBSERVED OSCILLATION FREQUENCIES

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Wuming, E-mail: yangwuming@bnu.edu.cn, E-mail: yangwuming@ynao.ac.cn

    The determination of the size of the convective core of main-sequence stars is usually dependent on the construction of models of stars. Here we introduce a method to estimate the radius of the convective core of main-sequence stars with masses between about 1.1 and 1.5 M {sub ⊙} from observed frequencies of low-degree p -modes. A formula is proposed to achieve the estimation. The values of the radius of the convective core of four known stars are successfully estimated by the formula. The radius of the convective core of KIC 9812850 estimated by the formula is 0.140 ± 0.028 Rmore » {sub ⊙}. In order to confirm this prediction, a grid of evolutionary models was computed. The value of the convective-core radius of the best-fit model of KIC 9812850 is 0.149 R {sub ⊙}, which is in good agreement with that estimated by the formula from observed frequencies. The formula aids in understanding the interior structure of stars directly from observed frequencies. The understanding is not dependent on the construction of models.« less

  8. Sex determination from the radius and ulna in a modern South African sample.

    PubMed

    Barrier, I L O; L'Abbé, E N

    2008-07-18

    With a large number of unidentified skeletal remains found in South Africa, the development of population specific osteometric standards is imperative. Forensic anthropologists need to have access to a variety of techniques to establish accurate demographic profiles from complete, fragmentary and/or commingled remains. No research has been done on the forearm of African samples, even though these bones have been shown to exhibit sexual dimorphism. The purpose of this paper is to develop discriminant function formulae to determine sex from the radius and ulna in a South African population. The sample consisted of 200 male and 200 female skeletons from the Pretoria Bone (University of Pretoria) and Raymond A. Dart (Witwatersrand University) collections. Sixteen standard anthropometric measurements were taken from the radius (9) and ulna (7) and subjected to stepwise and direct discriminant function analysis. Distal breadth, minimum mid-shaft diameter and maximum head diameter were the best discriminators of sex for the radius, while minimum mid-shaft diameter and olecranon breadth were selected for the ulna. Classification accuracy for the forearm ranged from 76 to 86%. The radius and ulna can be considered moderate discriminators for determining sex in a South African group. However, it is advised that these formulae are used in conjunction with additional methods to determine sex.

  9. The structure of first-ranked cluster galaxies and the radius-magnitude relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugger, P. M.

    1984-11-01

    To investigate theoretical predictions for the dynamical evolution of first-ranked galaxies, a quantitative study of their properties, as a function of cluster morphology, has been carried out using photographic plates obtained with the Palomar 48 inch (1.2 m) Schmidt telescope. Surface brightness profiles to radii of several hundred kpc for 35 first-ranked cluster galaxies have been analyzed. The dispersion in the metric magnitudes of first-ranked galaxies is quite small (about 0.4 mag), which is consistent with the results of Kristian, Sandage, and Westphal (1978) as well as those of Hoessel, Gunn, and Thuan (1980) and the recent work of Schneider, Gunn, and Hoessel (1983). For the cD (supergiant elliptical) galaxy sample, the mean metric magnitude is about 0.5 mag brighter than for the non-cD galaxies. The mean de Vaucouleurs effective radius for the cD galaxy sample is 80 percent larger than that of the non-cD sample. The relation between de Vaucouleurs effective radius and magnitude determined in the present study for first-ranked galaxies, log r(e) equal to about -0.26 M + constant is consistent with the relations found for fainter galaxies by Strom and Strom (1978) as well as Wirth (1982). The residuals in radius from the mean radius-magnitude relation for first-ranked galaxies do not correlate with the Bautz-Morgan (1970) type of the cluster.

  10. Extraction of the proton radius from electron-proton scattering data

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Gabriel; Arrington, John R.; Hill, Richard J.

    2015-07-27

    We perform a new analysis of electron-proton scattering data to determine the proton electric and magnetic radii, enforcing model-independent constraints from form factor analyticity. A wide-ranging study of possible systematic effects is performed. An improved analysis is developed that rebins data taken at identical kinematic settings and avoids a scaling assumption of systematic errors with statistical errors. Employing standard models for radiative corrections, our improved analysis of the 2010 Mainz A1 Collaboration data yields a proton electric radius r E = 0.895(20) fm and magnetic radius r M = 0.776(38) fm. A similar analysis applied to world data (excluding Mainzmore » data) implies r E = 0.916(24) fm and r M = 0.914(35) fm. The Mainz and world values of the charge radius are consistent, and a simple combination yields a value r E = 0.904(15) fm that is 4σ larger than the CREMA Collaboration muonic hydrogen determination. The Mainz and world values of the magnetic radius differ by 2.7σ, and a simple average yields r M = 0.851(26) fm. As a result, the circumstances under which published muonic hydrogen and electron scattering data could be reconciled are discussed, including a possible deficiency in the standard radiative correction model which requires further analysis.« less

  11. Effect of core cooling on the radius of sub-Neptune planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazan, A.; Ormel, C. W.; Dominik, C.

    2018-02-01

    Sub-Neptune planets are very common in our Galaxy and show a large diversity in their mass-radius relation. In sub-Neptunes most of the planet mass is in the rocky part (hereafter, core), which is surrounded by a modest hydrogen-helium envelope. As a result, the total initial heat content of such a planet is dominated by that of the core. Nonetheless, most studies contend that the core cooling only has a minor effect on the radius evolution of the gaseous envelope because the cooling of the core is in sync with the envelope; that is most of the initial heat is released early on timescales of 10-100 Myr. In this Letter we examined the importance of the core cooling rate for the thermal evolution of the envelope. Thus, we relaxed the early core cooling assumption and present a model in which the core is characterized by two parameters: the initial temperature and the cooling time. We find that core cooling can significantly enhance the radius of the planet when it operates on a timescale similar to the observed age, i.e. Gyr. Consequently, the interpretation of the mass-radius observations of sub-Neptunes depends on the assumed core thermal properties and the uncertainty therein. The degeneracy of composition and core thermal properties can be reduced by obtaining better estimates of the planet ages (in addition to their radii and masses) as envisioned by future observations.

  12. Study on high-precision measurement of long radius of curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dongcheng; Peng, Shijun; Gao, Songtao

    2016-09-01

    It is hard to get high-precision measurement of the radius of curvature (ROC), because of many factors that affect the measurement accuracy. For the measurement of long radius of curvature, some factors take more important position than others'. So, at first this paper makes some research about which factor is related to the long measurement distance, and also analyse the uncertain of the measurement accuracy. At second this article also study the influence about the support status and the adjust error about the cat's eye and confocal position. At last, a 1055micrometer radius of curvature convex is measured in high-precision laboratory. Experimental results show that the proper steady support (three-point support) can guarantee the high-precision measurement of radius of curvature. Through calibrating the gain of cat's eye and confocal position, is useful to ensure the precise position in order to increase the measurement accuracy. After finish all the above process, the high-precision long ROC measurement is realized.

  13. [Advances of poly (ionic liquid) materials in separation science].

    PubMed

    Liu, Cuicui; Guo, Ting; Su, Rina; Gu, Yuchen; Deng, Qiliang

    2015-11-01

    Ionic liquids, as novel ionization reagents, possess beneficial characteristics including good solubility, conductivity, thermal stability, biocompatibility, low volatility and non-flammability. Ionic liquids are attracting a mass of attention of analytical chemists. Poly (ionic liquid) materials have common performances of ionic liquids and polymers, and have been successfully applied in separation science area. In this paper, we discuss the interaction mechanisms between the poly(ionic liquid) materials and analytes including hydrophobic/hydrophilic interactions, hydrogen bond, ion exchange, π-π stacking and electrostatic interactions, and summarize the application advances of the poly(ionic liquid) materials in solid phase extraction, chromatographic separation and capillary electrophoresis. At last, we describe the future prospect of poly(ionic liquid) materials.

  14. PICARD SOL mission, a ground-based facility for long-term solar radius measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, M.; Irbah, A.; Corbard, T.; Morand, F.; Thuillier, G.; Hauchecorne, A.; Ikhlef, R.; Rouze, M.; Renaud, C.; Djafer, D.; Abbaki, S.; Assus, P.; Chauvineau, B.; Cissé, E. M.; Dalaudier, F.; D'Almeida, Eric; Fodil, M.; Laclare, F.; Lesueur, P.; Lin, M.; Marcovici, J. P.; Poiet, G.

    2012-09-01

    For the last thirty years, ground time series of the solar radius have shown different variations according to different instruments. The origin of these variations may be found in the observer, the instrument, the atmosphere and the Sun. These time series show inconsistencies and conflicting results, which likely originate from instrumental effects and/or atmospheric effects. A survey of the solar radius was initiated in 1975 by F. Laclare, at the Calern site of the Observatoire de la Cˆote d'Azur (OCA). PICARD is an investigation dedicated to the simultaneous measurements of the absolute total and spectral solar irradiance, the solar radius and solar shape, and to the Sun's interior probing by the helioseismology method. The PICARD mission aims to the study of the origin of the solar variability and to the study of the relations between the Sun and the Earth's climate by using modeling. These studies will be based on measurements carried out from orbit and from the ground. PICARD SOL is the ground segment of the PICARD mission to allow a comparison of the solar radius measured in space and on ground. PICARD SOL will enable to understand the influence of the atmosphere on the measured solar radius. The PICARD Sol instrumentation consists of: SODISM II, a replica of SODISM (SOlar Diameter Imager and Surface Mapper), a high resolution imaging telescope, and MISOLFA (Moniteur d'Images SOLaires Franco-Alǵerien), a seeing monitor. Additional instrumentation consists in a Sun photometer, which measures atmospheric aerosol properties, a pyranometer to measure the solar irradiance, a visible camera, and a weather station. PICARD SOL is operating since March 2011. First results from the PICARD SOL mission are briefly reported in this paper.

  15. Fracture heuristics: surgical decision for approaches to distal radius fractures. A surgeon's perspective.

    PubMed

    Wichlas, Florian; Tsitsilonis, Serafim; Kopf, Sebastian; Krapohl, Björn Dirk; Manegold, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of the present study is to develop a heuristic that could replace the surgeon's analysis for the decision on the operative approach of distal radius fractures based on simple fracture characteristics. Patients and methods: Five hundred distal radius fractures operated between 2011 and 2014 were analyzed for the surgeon's decision on the approach used. The 500 distal radius fractures were treated with open reduction and internal fixation through palmar, dorsal, and dorsopalmar approaches with 2.4 mm locking plates or underwent percutaneous fixation. The parameters that should replace the surgeon's analysis were the fractured palmar cortex, and the frontal and the sagittal split of the articular surface of the distal radius. Results: The palmar approach was used for 422 (84.4%) fractures, the dorsal approach for 39 (7.8%), and the combined dorsopalmar approach for 30 (6.0%). Nine (1.8%) fractures were treated percutaneously. The correlation between the fractured palmar cortex and the used palmar approach was moderate (r=0.464; p<0.0001). The correlation between the frontal split and the dorsal approach, including the dorsopalmar approach, was strong (r=0.715; p<0.0001). The sagittal split had only a weak correlation for the dorsal and dorsopalmar approach (r=0.300; p<0.0001). Discussion: The study shows that the surgical decision on the preferred approach is dictated through two simple factors, even in the case of complex fractures. Conclusion: When the palmar cortex is displaced in distal radius fractures, a palmar approach should be used. When there is a displaced frontal split of the articular surface, a dorsal approach should be used. When both are present, a dorsopalmar approach should be used. These two simple parameters could replace the surgeon's analysis for the surgical approach.

  16. MEASURING THE SOLAR RADIUS FROM SPACE DURING THE 2012 VENUS TRANSIT

    SciTech Connect

    Emilio, M.; Couvidat, S.; Bush, R. I.

    We report in this work the determination of the solar radius from observations by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instruments on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory during the 2012 June Venus transit of the Sun. Two different methods were utilized to determine the solar radius using images of Sun taken by the HMI instrument. The first technique fit the measured trajectory of Venus in front of the Sun for seven wavelengths across the Fe I absorption line at 6173 Å. The solar radius determined from this method varies with the measurement wavelength, reflectingmore » the variation in the height of line formation. The second method measured the area of the Sun obscured by Venus to determine the transit duration from which the solar radius was derived. This analysis focused on measurements taken in the continuum wing of the line, and applied a correction for the instrumental point spread function (PSF) of the HMI images. Measurements taken in the continuum wing of the 6173 Å line, resulted in a derived solar radius at 1 AU of 959.''57 ± 0.''02 (695, 946 ± 15 km). The AIA instrument observed the Venus transit at ultraviolet wavelengths. Using the solar disk obscuration technique, similar to that applied to the HMI images, analysis of the AIA data resulted in values of R {sub ☉} = 963.''04 ± 0.''03 at 1600 Å and R {sub ☉} = 961.''76 ± 0.''03 at 1700 Å.« less

  17. Three-dimensional tool radius compensation for multi-axis peripheral milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Youdong; Wang, Tianmiao

    2013-05-01

    Few function about 3D tool radius compensation is applied to generating executable motion control commands in the existing computer numerical control (CNC) systems. Once the tool radius is changed, especially in the case of tool size changing with tool wear in machining, a new NC program has to be recreated. A generic 3D tool radius compensation method for multi-axis peripheral milling in CNC systems is presented. The offset path is calculated by offsetting the tool path along the direction of the offset vector with a given distance. The offset vector is perpendicular to both the tangent vector of the tool path and the orientation vector of the tool axis relative to the workpiece. The orientation vector equations of the tool axis relative to the workpiece are obtained through homogeneous coordinate transformation matrix and forward kinematics of generalized kinematics model of multi-axis machine tools. To avoid cutting into the corner formed by the two adjacent tool paths, the coordinates of offset path at the intersection point have been calculated according to the transition type that is determined by the angle between the two tool path tangent vectors at the corner. Through the verification by the solid cutting simulation software VERICUT® with different tool radiuses on a table-tilting type five-axis machine tool, and by the real machining experiment of machining a soup spoon on a five-axis machine tool with the developed CNC system, the effectiveness of the proposed 3D tool radius compensation method is confirmed. The proposed compensation method can be suitable for all kinds of three- to five-axis machine tools as a general form.

  18. A method for determining the radius of an open cluster from stellar proper motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Néstor; Alfaro, Emilio J.; López-Martínez, Fátima

    2018-04-01

    We propose a method for calculating the radius of an open cluster in an objective way from an astrometric catalogue containing, at least, positions and proper motions. It uses the minimum spanning tree in the proper motion space to discriminate cluster stars from field stars and it quantifies the strength of the cluster-field separation by means of a statistical parameter defined for the first time in this paper. This is done for a range of different sampling radii from where the cluster radius is obtained as the size at which the best cluster-field separation is achieved. The novelty of this strategy is that the cluster radius is obtained independently of how its stars are spatially distributed. We test the reliability and robustness of the method with both simulated and real data from a well-studied open cluster (NGC 188), and apply it to UCAC4 data for five other open clusters with different catalogued radius values. NGC 188, NGC 1647, NGC 6603, and Ruprecht 155 yielded unambiguous radius values of 15.2 ± 1.8, 29.4 ± 3.4, 4.2 ± 1.7, and 7.0 ± 0.3 arcmin, respectively. ASCC 19 and Collinder 471 showed more than one possible solution, but it is not possible to know whether this is due to the involved uncertainties or due to the presence of complex patterns in their proper motion distributions, something that could be inherent to the physical object or due to the way in which the catalogue was sampled.

  19. Conversion of external fixation to open reduction and internal fixation for complex distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Natoli, R M; Baer, M R; Bednar, M S

    2016-05-01

    Distal radius fractures are common injuries treated in a multitude of ways. One treatment paradigm not extensively studied is initial treatment by external fixation (EF) followed by conversion to open reduction internal fixation (ORIF). Such a paradigm may be beneficial in damage control situations, when there is extensive soft tissue injury, or when appropriate personnel/hospital resources are not available for immediate internal fixation. There is no increased risk of infection when converting EF to ORIF in the treatment of complex distal radius fractures when conversion occurs early or if EF pin sites are overlapped by the definitive fixation. Using an IRB approved protocol, medical records over nine years were queried to identify patients with distal radius fractures that had undergone initial EF and were later converted to ORIF. Charts were reviewed for demographic data, injury characteristics, operative details, time to conversion from EF to ORIF, assessment of whether the EF pin sites overlapped the definitive fixation, presence of infection after ORIF, complications, and occupational therapy measurements of range of motion and strength. In total, 16 patients were identified, only one of which developed an infection following conversion to ORIF. Fisher's exact testing showed that infection did not depend on open fracture, time to conversion of one week or less, presence of EF pin sites overlapping definitive fixation, fracture classification, high energy mechanism of injury, or concomitant injury to the DRUJ. Planned staged conversion from EF to ORIF for complex distal radius fractures does not appear to result in an increased rate of infection if conversion occurs early or if the EF pin sites are overlapped by definitive fixation. This treatment paradigm may be reasonable for treating complex distal radius fractures in damage control situations, when there is extensive soft tissue injury, or when appropriate personnel/hospital resources are not available

  20. Reproducibility of three dimensional digital preoperative planning for the osteosynthesis of distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Yuichi; Kusakabe, Takuya; Akita, Kenichi; Tung, Wen Lin; Ishii, Tomoo

    2017-12-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) digital preoperative planning system for the osteosynthesis of distal radius fractures was developed for clinical practice. To assess the usefulness of the 3D planning for osteosynthesis, we evaluated the reproducibility of the reduction shapes and selected implants in the patients with distal radius fractures. Twenty wrists of 20 distal radius fracture patients who underwent osteosynthesis using volar locking plates were evaluated. The 3D preoperative planning was performed prior to each surgery. Four surgeons conducted the surgeries. The surgeons performed the reduction and the placement of the plate while comparing images between the preoperative plan and fluoroscopy. Preoperative planning and postoperative reductions were compared by measuring volar tilt and radial inclination of the 3D images. Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) of the volar tilt and radial inclination were evaluated. For the implant choices, the ICCs for the screw lengths between the preoperative plan and the actual choices were evaluated. The ICCs were 0.644 (p < 0.01) and 0.625 (p < 0.01) for the volar tilt and radial inclination in the 3D measurements, respectively. The planned size of plate was used in all of the patients. The ICC for the screw length between preoperative planning and actual choice was 0.860 (p < 0.01). Good reproducibility for the reduction shape and excellent reproducibility for the implant choices were achieved using 3D preoperative planning for distal radius fracture. Three-dimensional digital planning was useful to visualize the reduction process and choose a proper implant for distal radius fractures. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:2646-2651, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. The biomechanical analysis of three-dimensional distal radius fracture model with different fixed splints.

    PubMed

    Hua, Zhen; Wang, Jian-Wei; Lu, Zhen-Fei; Ma, Jian-Wei; Yin, Heng

    2018-01-01

    The distal radius fracture is one of the common clinical fractures. At present, there are no reports regarding application of the finite element method in studying the mechanism of Colles fracture and the biomechanical behavior when using splint fixation. To explore the mechanism of Colles fracture and the biomechanical behavior when using different fixed splints. Based on the CT scanning images of forearm for a young female volunteer, by using model construction technology combined with RPOE and ANSYS software, a 3-D distal radius fracture forearm finite element model with a real shape and bioactive materials is built. The material tests are performed to obtain the mechanical properties of the paper-based splint, the willow splint and the anatomical splint. The numerical results are compared with the experimental results to verify the correctness of the presented model. Based on the verified model, the stress distribution of different tissues are analyzed. Finally, the clinical tests are performed to observe and verify that the anatomical splint is the best fit for human body. Using the three kinds of splints, the transferred bone stress focus on the distal radius and ulna, which is helpful to maintain the stability of fracture. Also the stress is accumulated in the distal radius which may be attributed to flexion position. Such stress distribution may be helpful to maintain the ulnar declination. By comparing the simulation results with the experimental observations, the anatomical splint has the best fitting to the limb, which can effectively avoid the local compression. The anatomical splint is the most effective for fixing and curing the fracture. The presented model can provide theoretical basis and technical guide for further investigating mechanism of distal radius fracture and clinical application of anatomical splint.

  2. [Distal radius fractures--retrospective quality control after conservative and operative therapy].

    PubMed

    Sommer, C; Brendebach, L; Meier, R; Leutenegger, A

    2001-01-01

    The distal radius fracture is the most frequent fracture in the adult patient. The wide spectrum of different types of fracture and the coexisting factors make the choice for the optimal treatment difficult. As an interne quality control we retrospectively evaluated all patients with distal radius fractures treated in 1995 at our institution. The study included 69 adult patients with 71 distal radius fractures. After on average 26 months 58 patients with 59 fractures were clinically and radiologically evaluated. The patients were asked to give supplementary information about their follow-up treatment as well as any remaining physical difficulties and limitations in the daily life. All x-rays of the broken radius were carefully analysed and compared with the opposite side. The final results were evaluated according to the "Demerit Point System". Patients were treated with five different therapeutical methods. 76.3% of the patients showed a very good/good final result. In 56.7% of the cases secondary fracture dislocation occurred; the dislocation-rate of fractures treated with percutaneous k-wires was 93.3%! A clear correlation between secondary displacement and final results was found. A main factor for an optimal outcome is the anatomic restoration of length and axis of the distal radius as well as of joint congruency, also moderate angular deformities are well tolerated. Our collective showed an unexpected high rate of secondary displacement, especially in the k-wire group. The reasons for this unsatisfactory event are manifold: too optimistic indication, insufficient follow-up examination in the first four to six weeks, inconsequent change to a more stable fixation method in case of a secondary dislocation. The results of this retrospective evaluation had a major impact on our concept of treatment. The dorso-radial double-plate technique combined with bone graft will be more used in the future especially in younger patients. The new standardised concept is the

  3. Simultaneous Constraints on the Mass and Radius of Aql X–1 from Quiescence and X-Ray Burst Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhaosheng; Falanga, Maurizio; Chen, Li

    The measurement of neutron star mass and radius is one of the most direct ways to distinguish between various dense matter equations of state. The mass and radius of accreting neutron stars hosted in low-mass X-ray binaries can be constrained by several methods, including photospheric radius expansion from type I X-ray bursts and from quiescent spectra. In this paper, we apply for the first time these two methods simultaneously to constrain the mass and radius of Aql X–1. The quiescent spectra from Chandra and XMM-Newton , and photospheric radius expansion bursts from RXTE are used. The determination of the massmore » and radius of Aql X–1 is also used to verify the consistency between the two methods and to narrow down the uncertainties of the neutron star mass and radius. It is found that the distance to Aql X–1 should be in the range of 4.0–5.75 kpc, based on the overlapping confidence regions between photospheric radius expansion burst and quiescent spectra methods. In addition, we show that the mass and radius determined for the compact star in Aql X–1 are compatible with strange star equations of state and conventional neutron star models.« less

  4. Nontoxic Ionic Liquid Fuels for Exploration Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coil, Millicent

    2015-01-01

    The toxicity of propellants used in conventional propulsion systems increases not only safety risks to personnel but also costs, due to special handling required during the entire lifetime of the propellants. Orbital Technologies Corporation (ORBITEC) has developed and tested novel nontoxic ionic liquid fuels for propulsion applications. In Phase I of the project, the company demonstrated the feasibility of several ionic liquid formulations that equaled the performance of conventional rocket propellant monomethylhydrazine (MMH) and also provided low volatility and low toxicity. In Phase II, ORBITEC refined the formulations, conducted material property tests, and investigated combustion behavior in droplet and microreactor experiments. The company also explored the effect of injector design on performance and demonstrated the fuels in a small-scale thruster. The ultimate goal is to replace propellants such as MMH with fuels that are simultaneously high-performance and nontoxic. The fuels will have uses in NASA's propulsion applications and also in a range of military and commercial functions.

  5. Ionic liquids: dissecting the enthalpies of vaporization.

    PubMed

    Köddermann, Thorsten; Paschek, Dietmar; Ludwig, Ralf

    2008-03-14

    We calculate the heats of vaporisation for imidazolium-based ionic liquids [C(n)mim][NTf(2)] with n=1, 2, 4, 6, 8 by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and discuss their behavior with respect to temperature and the alkyl chain length. We use a force field developed recently. The different cohesive energies contributing to the overall heats of vaporisations are discussed in detail. With increasing alkyl chain length, the Coulomb contribution to the heat of vaporisation remains constant at around 80 kJ mol(-1), whereas the van der Waals interaction increases continuously. The calculated increase of about 4.7 kJ mol(-1) per CH(2)-group of the van der Waals contribution in the ionic liquid exactly coincides with the increase in the heats of vaporisation for n-alcohols and n-alkanes, respectively. The results support the importance of van der Waals interactions even in systems completely composed of ions.

  6. Ionic Liquid Fuels for Chemical Propulsion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    particular: “ Molten salts are nothing new, but these were the only ones I ever heard of that were liquid at 25°C. I’ve never found a use for the...Ethylammonium nitrate is generally regarded as the first reported room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL). Since it is a nitrate salt , it certainly...carry the advantages of engineering simplicity associated with the fuel and oxidizer residing in a single tank . However, by itself, ethylammonium

  7. Synthesis and Characterization of Ionically Crosslinked Elastomers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-12

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: In this research poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PBA) elastomers were investigated as model systems to study the thermomechanical...subject to any oenalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO...Ionically Crosslinked Elastomers Report Title In this research poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PBA) elastomers were investigated as model systems to study the

  8. Electrical screening procedure for solid ionic conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, H. E.; Singer, J.; Fielder, W. L.; Fordyce, J. S.

    1973-01-01

    An electrical screening method has been developed for preliminary evaluation of polycrystalline specimens of candidates for use as solid ionic conductive electrolytes in batteries. The procedure measures dielectric loss and capacitance, from which are calculated an ac conductivity attributed provisionally to ions and an activation energy for that conductivity. Electronic conductivity is directly measured. The screening procedure applied to sodium beta-alumina yielded acceptable values for conductivity and activation energy.

  9. Sulfur tolerant hydrophobic ionic liquid solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Luebke, David; Nulwala, Hunaid; Kail, Brian

    Exemplary embodiments relate to methods for removal of CO.sub.2 and other acid gases from gaseous fuels prior to combustion. Exemplary methods may be used for CO.sub.2 capture, H.sub.2 purification and natural gas sweetening. Exemplary methods use at least one ionic liquid that has excellent CO.sub.2 solubility, selectivity over hydrogen, low viscosity, and resistance to H.sub.2S.

  10. Solid state ionics: a Japan perspective

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Osamu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The 70-year history of scientific endeavor of solid state ionics research in Japan is reviewed to show the contribution of Japanese scientists to the basic science of solid state ionics and its applications. The term ‘solid state ionics’ was defined by Takehiko Takahashi of Nagoya University, Japan: it refers to ions in solids, especially solids that exhibit high ionic conductivity at a fairly low temperature below their melting points. During the last few decades of exploration, many ion conducting solids have been discovered in Japan such as the copper-ion conductor Rb4Cu16I7Cl13, proton conductor SrCe1–xYxO3, oxide-ion conductor La0.9Sr0.9Ga0.9Mg0.1O3, and lithium-ion conductor Li10GeP2S12. Rb4Cu16I7Cl13 has a conductivity of 0.33 S cm–1 at 25 °C, which is the highest of all room temperature ion conductive solid electrolytes reported to date, and Li10GeP2S12 has a conductivity of 0.012 S cm–1 at 25 °C, which is the highest among lithium-ion conductors reported to date. Research on high-temperature proton conducting ceramics began in Japan. The history, the discovery of novel ionic conductors and the story behind them are summarized along with basic science and technology. PMID:28804526

  11. Phytoremediation of Ionic and Methyl Mercury Pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Meagher, Richard B.

    Phytoremediation is defined as the use of plants to extract, resist, detoxify, and/or sequester toxic environmental pollutants. The long-term goal of the proposed research is to develop and test highly productive, field-adapted plant species that have been engineered for the phytoremediation of mercury. A variety of different genes, which should enable plants to clean mercury polluted sites are being tested as tools for mercury phytoremediation, first in model laboratory plants and then in potential field species. Several of these genes have already been shown to enhance mercury phytoremediation. Mercury pollution is a serious, world-wide problem affecting the health of humanmore » and wildlife populations. Environmentally, the most serious mercury threat is the production of methylmercury (CH3Hg+) by native bacteria at mercury contaminated wetland sites. Methylmercury is inherently more toxic than metallic (Hg(0)) or ionic (Hg(II)) mercury, and because methylmercury is prolifically biomagnified up the food chain, it poses the most immediate danger to animal populations. We have successfully engineered two model plants, Arabidopsis and tobacco, to use the bacterial merB gene to convert methylmercury to less toxic ionic mercury and to use the bacterial merA gene to further detoxify ionic mercury to the least toxic form of mercury, metallic mercury. Plants expressing both MerA and MerB proteins detoxify methylmercury in two steps to the metallic form. These plants germinate, grow, and set seed at normal growth rates on levels of methylmercury or ionic mercury that are lethal to normal plants. Our newest efforts involve engineering plants with several additional bacterial and plant genes that allow for higher levels of mercury resistance and mercury hyperaccumulation. The potential for these plants to hyperaccumulate mercury was further advanced by developing constitutive, aboveground, and root-specific gene expression systems.« less

  12. Enhancing grain boundary ionic conductivity in mixed ionic-electronic conductors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ye; Fang, Shumin; Su, Dong; Brinkman, Kyle S; Chen, Fanglin

    2015-04-10

    Mixed ionic-electronic conductors are widely used in devices for energy conversion and storage. Grain boundaries in these materials have nanoscale spatial dimensions, which can generate substantial resistance to ionic transport due to dopant segregation. Here, we report the concept of targeted phase formation in a Ce0.8Gd0.2O2-δ-CoFe2O4 composite that serves to enhance the grain boundary ionic conductivity. Using transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy approaches, we probe the grain boundary charge distribution and chemical environments altered by the phase reaction between the two constituents. The formation of an emergent phase successfully avoids segregation of the Gd dopant and depletion of oxygen vacancies at the Ce0.8Gd0.2O2-δ-Ce0.8Gd0.2O2-δ grain boundary. This results in superior grain boundary ionic conductivity as demonstrated by the enhanced oxygen permeation flux. This work illustrates the control of mesoscale level transport properties in mixed ionic-electronic conductor composites through processing induced modifications of the grain boundary defect distribution.

  13. Ionic Vapor Composition in Critical and Supercritical States of Strongly Interacting Ionic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Chaban, Vitaly V; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2016-05-12

    The critical point, CP (T, P), of the phase diagram quantifies the minimum amount of kinetic energy needed to prevent a substance from existing in a condensed phase. Therefore, the CP is closely related to the properties of the fluid far below the critical temperature. Approaches designed to predict thermophysical properties of a system necessarily aim to provide reliable estimates of the CP. Vice versa, CP estimation is impossible without knowledge of the vapor phase behavior. We report ab initio Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) simulations of sodium and potassium chlorides, NaCl and KCl, at and above their expected CPs. We advance the present knowledge regarding the existence of ionic species in the vapor phase by establishing significant percentages of atomic clusters: 29-30% in NaCl and 34-38% in KCl. A neutral pair of counterions is the most abundant cluster in the ionic vapors (ca. 35% of all vaporized ions exist in this form). Unexpectedly, an appreciable fraction of clusters is charged. The ionic vapor composition is determined by the vapor density, rather than the nature of the alkali ion. The previously suggested CPs of NaCl and KCl appear overestimated, based on the present simulations. The reported results offer essential insights into the ionic fluid properties and assist in development of thermodynamic theories. The ab initio BOMD method has been applied to investigate the vapor phase composition of an ionic fluid for the first time.

  14. An ionic electro-active actuator made with graphene film electrode, chitosan and ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qingsong; Yu, Min; Yang, Xu; Kim, Kwang Jin; Dai, Zhendong

    2015-06-01

    A newly developed ionic electro-active actuator composed of an ionic electrolyte layer sandwiched between two graphene film layers was investigated. Scanning electronic microscopy observation and x-ray diffraction analysis showed that the graphene sheets in the film stacked in a nearly face-to-face fashion but did not restack back to graphite, and the resulting graphene film with low sheet resistance (10 Ω sq-1) adheres well to the electrolyte membrane. Contact angle measurement showed the surface energy (37.98 mJ m-2) of the ionic electrolyte polymer is 2.67 times higher than that (14.2 mJ m-2) of the Nafion membrane, contributing to the good adhesion between the graphene film electrode and the electrolyte membrane. An electric double-layer is formed at the interface between the graphene film electrode and the ionic electrolyte membrane under the input potential, resulting in a higher capacitance of 27.6 mF cm-2. We report that this ionic actuator exhibits adequate bending strain, ranging from 0.032 to 0.1% (305 to 945 μm) as functions of voltage.

  15. Continued Monitoring of Indiana's SPS9-A Site : [Technical Summary

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-01-01

    The Indianas SPS9-A site was initiated as a part of the : SHRPs LTPP program in 1997 to study the influence : of binder grades on mixture performance. In the earlier : phase of this study entitled Development of Indianas : SPS9-A Site, five ...

  16. Osmotic Pressure in Ionic Microgel Dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, Alan R.; Tang, Qiyun

    2015-03-01

    Microgels are microscopic gel particles, typically 10-1000 nm in size, that are swollen by a solvent. Hollow microgels (microcapsules) can encapsulate cargo, such as dye molecules or drugs, in their solvent-filled cavities. Their sensitive response to environmental conditions (e.g., temperature, pH) and influence on flow properties suit microgels to widespread applications in the chemical, pharmaceutical, food, and consumer care industries. When dispersed in water, polyelectrolyte gels become charged through dissociation of counterions. The electrostatic contribution to the osmotic pressure inside and outside of ionic microgels influences particle swelling and bulk materials properties, including thermodynamic, structural, optical, and rheological properties. Within the primitive and cell models of polyelectrolyte solutions, we derive an exact statistical mechanical formula for the contribution of mobile microions to the osmotic pressure within ionic microgels. Using Poisson-Boltzmann theory, we validate this result by explicitly calculating ion distributions across the surface of an ionic microgel and the electrostatic contribution to the osmotic pressure. Within a coarse-grained one-component model, we further chart the limits of the cell model for salty dispersions. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR-1106331.

  17. Understanding SO2 Capture by Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Anirban; Balasubramanian, Sundaram

    2016-05-19

    Ionic liquids have generated interest for efficient SO2 absorption due to their low vapor pressure and versatility. In this work, a systematic investigation of the structure, thermodynamics, and dynamics of SO2 absorption by ionic liquids has been carried out through quantum chemical calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. MP2 level calculations of several ion pairs complexed with SO2 reveal its preferential interaction with the anion. Results of condensed phase MD simulations of SO2-IL mixtures manifested the essential role of both cations and anions in the solvation of SO2, where the solute is surrounded by the "cage" formed by the cations (primarily its alkyl tail) through dispersion interactions. These structural effects of gas absorption are substantiated by calculated Gibbs free energy of solvation; the dissolution is demonstrated to be enthalpy driven. The entropic loss of SO2 absorption in ionic liquids with a larger anion such as [NTf2](-) has been quantified and has been attributed to the conformational restriction of the anion imposed by its interaction with SO2. SO2 loading IL decreases its shear viscosity and enhances the electrical conductivity. This systematic study provides a molecular level understanding which can aid the design of task-specific ILs as electrolytes for efficient SO2 absorption.

  18. Aluminium electrodeposition in chloroaluminate ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lipeng; Wang, Enqi; Mu, Jiechen; Yu, Xianjin; Wang, Qiannan; Yang, Lina; Zhao, Zengdian

    2014-08-01

    An efficient microwave enhanced synthesis of ambient temperature chloroaluminate ionic liquid ([EMIM]Br) that preceeds reaction of 1-methylimidazolium with bromoethane in a closed vessel, was described in our work. The reaction time was drastically reduced as compared to the conventional methods. The electrochemical techniques of impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry were used to investigate the mechanism of Al electrodeposition from 2:1 (molar ratio) AlCl3/[EMIM]Br ionic liquid at room temperature. Results indicated that Al electrode- position from this ionic liqud was a quasi-reversible process, and the kinetic complications during the reaction was probably attributed to the electron transfer or mass transport cooperative controlled processes, instantaneous nucleation with diffusion-controlled growth was also investigated. Electrodepositon experiment was conducted using constant current density of 40 mA·cm(-2) for 20 minutes at room temperature and the qualitative analysis of the deposits were performed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscope (EDS). The deposits obtained on copper cathode were dense and compact and most Al crystal shows granular structure spherical with high purity.

  19. A Comprehensive Study of Internal Distraction Plating, an Alternative Method for Distal Radius Fractures.

    PubMed

    Jain, Mohit J; Mavani, Kinjal J

    2016-12-01

    The management of highly comminuted distal radius fractures still remains a major treatment challenge. Articular comminution and compromised bone quality are the culprits. One novel approach is the technique of Internal Distraction Plating which involves "bridging" the fracture with the use of a standard 3.5mm plate applied dorsally in distraction from the radius, proximal to the fracture, to the long finger metacarpal distally, bypassing the comminuted segment. The plate is removed once fracture union has been achieved. The present study was conducted with the aim to evaluate the role of internal dorsal distraction plating as an alternative method in the treatment of fracture distal radius in terms of special indications, technique and outcome. This study was a prospective longitudinal study on 20 patients (mean age 62 years) treated with internal distraction plating for comminuted distal radius fractures with specific indications. Regular follow-ups with standard radiographs and analysis were done upto 24 months. Functional outcome were assessed by DASH Score and the Gartland and Werley demerit score. At final follow-up, all fractures had united and X-rays showed mean palmar tilt of 7°, positive ulnar variance of 0.5mm, radial inclination of 18° and average loss of 2mm of radial height. Mean range of motion values for wrist flexion 46°, extension 50°, pronation 79° and supination 77° At final follow-up, the mean DASH score was 32. 85% patient had excellent to good result as per Gartland and Werley demerit score. This construct has yield satisfactory clinical and radiographic results with these very challenging injuries. The purpose of this study was to report the radiographic and the functional outcomes of treatment with this technique. External fixator and volar plating in communited distal end radius fractures are not always satisfactory in old age with osteoporotic bone because of complications associated with them. The current technique represents an

  20. Increased cortical area and thickness in the distal radius in subjects with SHOX-gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, A L; Hansen, S; Brixen, K; Frost, M

    2014-12-01

    Short-stature homeobox (SHOX) gene haploinsufficiency may cause skeletal dysplasia including Léri-Weill Dyschondrosteosis (LWD), a clinical entity characterised by the triad of low height, mesomelic disproportion and Madelung's deformity of the wrist. Bone microarchitecture and estimated strength in adult SHOX mutation carriers have not been examined. Twenty-two subjects with a SHOX mutation including 7 males and 15 females with a median age of 38.8 [21.1-52.2] years were recruited from five unrelated families. The control group consisted of 22 healthy subjects matched on age and sex. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Bone geometry, volumetric density, microarchitecture and finite element estimated (FEA) bone strength were measured using high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT). A full region of interest (ROI) image analysis and height-matched ROI analyses adjusting for differences in body height between the two groups were performed. Areal BMD and T-scores showed no significant differences between cases and controls. Total radius area was smaller in cases than controls (207 [176-263] vs. 273 [226-298] mm, p<0.01). Radius cortical bone area (74 ± 20 vs. 58 ± 17 mm(2), p=0.01) and thickness (1.16 ± 0.30 vs. 0.84 ± 0.26 mm, p<0.01) as well as total density (428 ± 99 vs. 328 ± 72 mg/cm(3), p<0.01) were higher in SHOX mutation carriers compared to controls. Radius trabecular bone area (119 [103-192] vs. 202 [168-247] mm(2), p<0.01) and trabecular number (1.61 [1.46-2.07] vs. 1.89 [1.73-2.08] mm(-1), p=0.01) were smaller in SHOX mutation carriers. Tibia trabecular thickness was lower in cases (0.067 ± 0.012 vs. 0.076 ± 0.012 mm, p=0.01). These results remained significant after adjustment for differences in body height and when restricting analyses to females. There were no differences in BMD, radius and tibia cortical porosity or FEA failure load between groups. A segment of cortical bone

  1. Phytoremediation of Ionic and Methyl Mercury Pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Meagher, Richard B.

    Phytoremediation is defined as the use of plants to extract, resist, detoxify, and/or sequester toxic environmental pollutants. The long-term goal of the proposed research is to develop and test highly productive, field-adapted plant species that have been engineered for the phytoremediation of mercury. A variety of different genes, which should enable plants to clean mercury polluted sites are being tested as tools for mercury phytoremediation, first in model laboratory plants and then in potential field species. Several of these genes have already been shown to enhance mercury phytoremediation. Mercury pollution is a serious, world-wide problem affecting the health of humanmore » and wildlife populations. Environmentally, the most serious mercury threat is the production of methylmercury (CH3Hg+) by native bacteria at mercury contaminated wetland sites. Methylmercury is inherently more toxic than metallic (Hg(0)) or ionic (Hg(II)) mercury, and because methylmercury is prolifically biomagnified up the food chain, it poses the most immediate danger to animal populations. We have successfully engineered two model plants, Arabidopsis and tobacco, to use the bacterial merB gene to convert methylmercury to less toxic ionic mercury and to use the bacterial merA gene to further detoxify ionic mercury to the least toxic form of mercury, metallic mercury. Plants expressing both MerA and MerB proteins detoxify methylmercury in two steps to the metallic form. These plants germinate, grow, and set seed at normal growth rates on levels of methylmercury or ionic mercury that are lethal to normal plants. Our newest efforts involve engineering plants with several additional bacterial and plant genes that allow for higher levels of mercury resistance and mercury hyperaccumulation. The potential for these plants to hyperaccumulate mercury was further advanced by developing constitutive, aboveground, and root-specific gene expression systems. Our current strategy is to engineer

  2. Analytical expressions for the closure probability of a stiff wormlike chain for finite capture radius.

    PubMed

    Guérin, T

    2017-08-01

    Estimating the probability that two monomers of the same polymer chain are close together is a key ingredient to characterize intramolecular reactions and polymer looping. In the case of stiff wormlike polymers (rigid fluctuating elastic rods), for which end-to-end encounters are rare events, we derive an explicit analytical formula for the probability η(r_{c}) that the distance between the chain extremities is smaller than some capture radius r_{c}. The formula is asymptotically exact in the limit of stiff chains, and it leads to the identification of two distinct scaling regimes for the closure factor, originating from a strong variation of the fluctuations of the chain orientation at closure. Our theory is compatible with existing analytical results from the literature that cover the cases of a vanishing capture radius and of nearly fully extended chains.

  3. The modulational instability in the extended Hasegawa-Mima equation with a finite Larmor radius

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, S.; Hnat, B.; Rowlands, G.

    2012-12-15

    The effects of the finite Larmor radius on the generation of zonal flows by the four-wave modulational instability are investigated using an extended form of the Hasegawa-Mima equation. Growth rates of the zonal mode are quantified using analytical predictions from a four-mode truncated model, as well as from direct numerical simulation of the nonlinear extended Hasegawa-Mima equation. We not only consider purely zonal flows but also examine the generic oblique case and show that, for small Larmor radii, off-axis modes may become dominant. We find a key parameter M{sub {rho}} which characterises the behaviour of the system due to changesmore » in the Larmor radius. We find that, similarly to previous results obtained by changing the driving wave amplitude, two separate dynamical regimes can be accessed. These correspond to oscillatory energy transfer between zonal flows and a driving wave and the fully saturated zonal flow.« less

  4. Reduction of radiation loss at small-radius bend using spoof surface plasmon polariton transmission line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wen Xuan; Zhang, Hao Chi; Liu, Jun Feng; Xu, Jie; Cui, Tie Jun

    2017-01-01

    Spoof surface plasmon polariton (SPP) has been realized at low frequencies through corrugated metallic structures. As two-dimensional application, the ultrathin SPP transmission lines (TLs) have been proposed with great potentials for microwave compact circuits due to the strong field confinement and enhancement, as well as controllable dispersive properties. In this paper, we examine the radiation loss at small-radius bend, which may cause severe crosstalk in highly-integrated circuits or systems, for the SPP TLs. We theoretically analyze that the SPP TL has essential merit of low radiation loss, and show better performance of SPP TL than the conventional microstrip line through numerical simulations and experiments. Both simulated and measured results demonstrate that the new type of transmission line can efficiently suppress the radiation loss at small-radius bend, and hence reduce the crosstalk in circuits and systems.

  5. Radiographic signs of static carpal instability with distal end radius fractures: is current treatment adequate?

    PubMed

    Bunker, D L J; Pappas, G; Moradi, P; Dowd, M B

    2012-01-01

    Patients presenting with distal end radius fractures may have concomitant carpal instability due to disruption of the scapholunate ligament. This study examined the incidence of static radiographic signs of carpal instability in patients with distal radial fractures before and after fracture treatment. We performed a retrospective radiographic study of 141 patients presenting to Central Middlesex Hospital, London between January 2002-May 2004 with distal end radius fractures. We used abnormal scapholunate angle as the primary indicator of possible carpal dissociation. Abnormal scapholunate angles were noted in 39% of patients at presentation and 35% of patients after treatment with no statistically significant intra-patient variability. Persistent static radiographic signs of carpal instability are high in this subset of patients. The long-term morbidity of persistent wrist instability may be avoided by early radiological diagnosis with clinical correlation to identify carpal ligament injuries and initiate treatment that addresses both the bony and ligamentous components of the injury.

  6. Radius of Curvature Measurement of Large Optics Using Interferometry and Laser Tracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagopian, John; Connelly, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The determination of radius of curvature (ROC) of optics typically uses either a phase measuring interferometer on an adjustable stage to determine the position of the ROC and the optics surface under test. Alternatively, a spherometer or a profilometer are used for this measurement. The difficulty of this approach is that for large optics, translation of the interferometer or optic under test is problematic because of the distance of translation required and the mass of the optic. Profilometry and spherometry are alternative techniques that can work, but require a profilometer or a measurement of subapertures of the optic. The proposed approach allows a measurement of the optic figure simultaneous with the full aperture radius of curvature.

  7. Analytical study of striated nozzle flow with small radius of curvature ratio throats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, D. J.; White, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical method was developed which is capable of estimating the chamber and throat conditions in a nozzle with a low radius of curvature throat. The method was programmed using standard FORTRAN 4 language and includes chemical equilibrium calculation subprograms (modified NASA Lewis program CEC71) as an integral part. The method determines detailed and gross rocket characteristics in the presence of striated flows and gives detailed results for the motor chamber and throat plane with as many as 20 discrete zones. The method employs a simultaneous solution of the mass, momentum, and energy equations and allows propellant types, 0/F ratios, propellant distribution, nozzle geometry, and injection schemes to be varied so to predict spatial velocity, density, pressure, and other thermodynamic variable distributions in the chamber as well as the throat. Results for small radius of curvature have shown good comparison to experimental results. Both gaseous and liquid injection may be considered with frozen or equilibrium flow calculations.

  8. Mercury: results on mass, radius, ionosphere, and atmosphere from mariner 10 dual-frequency radio signals.

    PubMed

    Howard, H T; Tyler, G L; Esposito, P B; Anderson, J D; Reasenberg, R D; Shapiro, I I; Fjeldbo, G; Kliore, A J; Levy, G S; Brunn, D L; Dickinson, R; Edelson, R E; Martin, W L; Postal, R B; Seidel, B; Sesplaukis, T T; Shirley, D L; Stelzried, C T; Sweetnam, D N; Wood, G E; Zygielbaum, A I

    1974-07-12

    Analysis of the radio-tracking data from Mariner 10 yields 6,023,600 +/- 600 for the ratio of the mass of the sun to that of Mercury, in very good agreement with values determined earlier from radar data alone. Occultation measurements yielded values for the radius of Mercury of 2440 +/- 2 and 2438 +/- 2 kilometers at laditudes of 2 degrees N and 68 degrees N, respectively, again in close agreement with the average equatorial radius of 2439 +/- 1 kilometers determined from radar data. The mean density of 5.44 grams per cubic centimeter deduced for Mercury from Mariner 10 data thus virtually coincides with the prior determination. No evidence of either an ionosphere or an atmosphere was found, with the data yielding upper bounds on the electron density of about 1500 and 4000 electrons per cubic centimeter on the dayside and nightside, respectively, and an inferred upper bound on the surface pressure of 10(-8) millibar.

  9. [Osteosynthesis of distal radius fractures by doral plate: advantages and disadvantages].

    PubMed

    Obert, L; Vichard, P; Garbuio, P; Tropet, Y

    2001-12-01

    Distal radius fractures remain a challenge. No one osteosynthesis procedure can solve all the problems. A method of analysis is necessary in order to choose the best tools. Open treatment of the fracture is logical but rarely performed. A review of the literature and the experience of the authors are reported in order to analyse the correct place of dorsal plating in distal radius fracture with dorsal displacement. The learning curve of the operative procedure and the design of the implants can explain the occurrence of several complications. The dorsal plate is effective against secondary dorsal displacement. This demanding procedure must be compared with other reported procedures (pining and external fixator) to define the advantages and disadvantages.

  10. Joint polarization tracking and channel equalization based on radius-directed linear Kalman filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qun; Yang, Yanfu; Zhong, Kangping; Liu, Jie; Wu, Xiong; Yao, Yong

    2018-01-01

    We propose a joint polarization tracking and channel equalization scheme based on radius-directed linear Kalman filter (RD-LKF) by introducing the butterfly finite-impulse-response (FIR) filter in our previously proposed RD-LKF method. Along with the fast polarization tracking, it can also simultaneously compensate the inter-symbol interference (ISI) effects including residual chromatic dispersion and polarization mode dispersion. Compared with the conventional radius-directed equalizer (RDE) algorithm, it is demonstrated experimentally that three times faster convergence speed, one order of magnitude better tracking capability, and better BER performance is obtained in polarization division multiplexing 16 quadrature amplitude modulation system. Besides, the influences of the algorithm parameters on the convergence and the tracking performance are investigated by numerical simulation.

  11. The core mass-radius relation for giants - A new test of stellar evolution theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joss, P. C.; Rappaport, S.; Lewis, W.

    1987-01-01

    It is demonstrated here that the measurable properties of systems containing degenerate dwarfs can be used as a direct test of the core mass-radius relation for moderate-mass giants if the final stages of the loss of the envelope of the progenitor giant occurred via stable critical lobe overflow. This relation directly probes the internal structure of stars at a relatively advanced evolutionary state and is only modestly influenced by adjustable parameters. The measured properties of six binary systems, including such diverse systems as Sirius and Procyon and two millisecond pulsars, are utilized to derive constraints on the empirical core mass-radius relation, and the constraints are compared to the theoretical relation. The possibility that the final stages of envelope ejection of the giant progenitor of Sirius B occurred via critical lobe overflow in historical times is considered.

  12. Energy balance of stellar coronae. III - Effect of stellar mass and radius

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, R.

    1984-01-01

    A homologous transformation is derived which permits the application of the numerical coronal models of Hammer from a star with solar mass and radius to other stars. This scaling requires a few approximations concerning the lower boundary conditions and the temperature dependence of the conductivity and emissivity. These approximations are discussed and found to be surprisingly mild. Therefore, the scaling of the coronal models to other stars is rather accurate; it is found to be particularly accurate for main-sequence stars. The transformation is used to derive an equation that gives the maximum temperature of open coronal regions as a function of stellar mass and radius, the coronal heating flux, and the characteristic damping length over which the corona is heated.

  13. A dynamic wicking technique for determining the effective pore radius of pregelatinized starch sheets.

    PubMed

    Kalogianni, E P; Savopoulos, T; Karapantsios, T D; Raphaelides, S N

    2004-06-01

    A dynamic wicking technique is employed for the first time for the determination of the effective mean pore radius of a thin-layer porous food: drum dried pregelatinized starch sheets. The technique consists of measuring the penetration rate of various n-alkanes in the porous matrix of the starch sheets and using this data to calculate the effective pore radius via the Washburn equation. Pore sizes in the order of a few nanometers have been determined in the starch sheets depending on the drum dryer's operating variables (drum rotation speed, steam pressure and starch feed concentration). The conditions for the application of the technique in porous foods are discussed as compared to the conditions for single capillaries and inorganic porous material measured in other studies.

  14. Finite grid radius and thickness effects on retarding potential analyzer measured suprathermal electron density and temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knudsen, William C.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of finite grid radius and thickness on the electron current measured by planar retarding potential analyzers (RPAs) is analyzed numerically. Depending on the plasma environment, the current is significantly reduced below that which is calculated using a theoretical equation derived for an idealized RPA having grids with infinite radius and vanishingly small thickness. A correction factor to the idealized theoretical equation is derived for the Pioneer Venus (PV) orbiter RPA (ORPA) for electron gasses consisting of one or more components obeying Maxwell statistics. The error in density and temperature of Maxwellian electron distributions previously derived from ORPA data using the theoretical expression for the idealized ORPA is evaluated by comparing the densities and temperatures derived from a sample of PV ORPA data using the theoretical expression with and without the correction factor.

  15. Recent advances of ionic liquids and polymeric ionic liquids in capillary electrophoresis and capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sheng; Liu, Shujuan; Guo, Yong; Liu, Xia; Jiang, Shengxiang

    2014-08-29

    Ionic liquids (ILs) and polymeric ionic liquids (PILs) with unique and fascinating properties have drawn considerable interest for their use in separation science, especially in chromatographic techniques. In this article, significant contributions of ILs and PILs in the improvement of capillary electrophoresis and capillary electrochromatography are described, and a specific overview of the most relevant examples of their applications in the last five years is also given. Accordingly, some general conclusions and future perspectives in these areas are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Citation analysis of the 100 most common articles regarding distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard; Hughes, Travis; Lawson, Kevin; DeSilva, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    Bibliometric studies are increasingly being utilized as a tool for gauging the impact of different literature within a given field. The purpose of this study was to identify the most cited articles related to the management of distal radius fractures to better understand how the evidence of this topic has been shaped and changed over time. We utilized the ISI web of science database to conduct a search for the term "distal radius fracture" under the "orthopaedics" research area heading, and sorted the results by number of times cited. The 100 most cited articles published in orthopedic journals were then analyzed for number of citations, source journal, year of publication, number of authors, study type, level of evidence, and clinical outcomes utilized. The 100 most cited articles identified were published between 1951 and 2009. Total number of citations ranged between 525 and 67, and came from ten different orthopedic journals. The largest number of articles came from J Hand Surg Am and J Bone Joint Surg Am, each with 32. Consistent with previous analyses of orthopedic literature, the articles were primarily clinical, and of these, 53/76 were case series. The vast majority were evidence level IV. Only a small percentage of articles utilized patient reported outcome measures. These data show that despite distal radius fractures being a common fracture encountered by physicians, very few of the articles were high quality studies, and only a low proportion of the studies include patient reported outcome measures. Surgeons should take this lack of high-level evidence into consideration when referencing classic papers in this field. Analysis of the 100 most cited distal radius fracture articles allows for delineation of which articles are most common in the field and if a higher level of evidence correlates positively with citation quantity.

  17. Discreteness effects in a reacting system of particles with finite interaction radius.

    PubMed

    Berti, S; López, C; Vergni, D; Vulpiani, A

    2007-09-01

    An autocatalytic reacting system with particles interacting at a finite distance is studied. We investigate the effects of the discrete-particle character of the model on properties like reaction rate, quenching phenomenon, and front propagation, focusing on differences with respect to the continuous case. We introduce a renormalized reaction rate depending both on the interaction radius and the particle density, and we relate it to macroscopic observables (e.g., front speed and front thickness) of the system.

  18. Measurements of atomic splittings in atomic hydrogen and the proton charge radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessels, E. A.

    2016-09-01

    The proton charge radius can be determined from precise measurements of atomic hydrogen spectroscopy. A review of the relevant measurements will be given, including an update on our measurement of the n=2 Lamb shift. The values obtained from hydrogen will be compared to those obtained from muonic hydrogen and from electron-proton elastic scattering measurements. This work is funded by NSERC, CRC and CFI.

  19. Ontogenetic relationships between in vivo strain environment, bone histomorphometry and growth in the goat radius

    PubMed Central

    Main, Russell P

    2007-01-01

    Vertebrate long bone form, at both the gross and the microstructural level, is the result of many interrelated influences. One factor that is considered to have a significant effect on bone form is the mechanical environment experienced by the bone during growth. The work presented here examines the possible relationships between in vivo bone strains, bone geometry and histomorphology in the radii of three age/size groups of domestic goats. In vivo bone strain data were collected from the radii of galloping goats, and the regional cortical distribution of peak axial strain magnitudes, radial and circumferential strain gradients, and longitudinal strain rates related to regional patterns in cortical growth, porosity, remodelling and collagen fibre orientation. Although porosity and remodelling decreased and increased with age, respectively, these features showed no significant regional differences and did not correspond to regional patterns in the mechanical environment. Thicker regions of the radius's cortex were significantly related to high strain levels and higher rates of periosteal, but not endosteal, growth. However, cortical growth and strain environment were not significantly related. Collagen fibre orientation varied regionally, with a higher percentage of transverse fibres in the caudal region of the radius and primarily longitudinal fibres elsewhere, and, although consistent through growth, also did not generally correspond to regional strain patterns. Although strain magnitudes increased during ontogeny and regional strain patterns were variable over the course of a stride, mean regional strain patterns were generally consistent with growth, suggesting that regional growth patterns and histomorphology, in combination with external loads, may play some role in producing a relatively ‘predictable’ strain environment within the radius. It is further hypothesized that the absence of correlation between regional histomorphometric patterns and the

  20. Mid-term functional outcome after the internal fixation of distal radius fractures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Distal radius fracture is a common injury with a variety of operative and non-operative management options. There remains debate as to the optimal treatment for a given patient and fracture. Despite the popularity of volar locking plate fixation, there are few large cohort or long term follow up studies to justify this modality. Our aim was to report the functional outcome of a large number of patients at a significant follow up time after fixation of their distal radius with a volar locking plate. Methods 180 patients with 183 fractures and a mean age of 62.4 years were followed up retrospectively at a mean of 30 months (Standard deviation = 10.4). Functional assessment was performed using the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) and modified MAYO wrist scores. Statistical analysis was performed to identify possible variables affecting outcome and radiographs were assessed to determine time to fracture union. Results The median DASH score was 2.3 and median MAYO score was 90 for the whole group. Overall, 133 patients (74%) had a good or excellent DASH and MAYO score. Statistical analysis showed that no specific variable including gender, age, fracture type, post-operative immobilisation or surgeon grade significantly affected outcome. Complications occurred in 27 patients (15%) and in 11 patients were major (6%). Conclusion This single centre large population series demonstrates good to excellent results in the majority of patients after volar locking plate fixation of the distal radius, with complication rates comparable to other non-operative and operative treatment modalities. On this basis we recommend this mode of fixation for distal radius fractures requiting operative intervention. PMID:22280557

  1. Mid-term functional outcome after the internal fixation of distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Phadnis, Joideep; Trompeter, Alex; Gallagher, Kieran; Bradshaw, Lucy; Elliott, David S; Newman, Kevin J

    2012-01-26

    Distal radius fracture is a common injury with a variety of operative and non-operative management options. There remains debate as to the optimal treatment for a given patient and fracture. Despite the popularity of volar locking plate fixation, there are few large cohort or long term follow up studies to justify this modality. Our aim was to report the functional outcome of a large number of patients at a significant follow up time after fixation of their distal radius with a volar locking plate. 180 patients with 183 fractures and a mean age of 62.4 years were followed up retrospectively at a mean of 30 months (Standard deviation=10.4). Functional assessment was performed using the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) and modified MAYO wrist scores. Statistical analysis was performed to identify possible variables affecting outcome and radiographs were assessed to determine time to fracture union. The median DASH score was 2.3 and median MAYO score was 90 for the whole group. Overall, 133 patients (74%) had a good or excellent DASH and MAYO score. Statistical analysis showed that no specific variable including gender, age, fracture type, post-operative immobilisation or surgeon grade significantly affected outcome. Complications occurred in 27 patients (15%) and in 11 patients were major (6%). This single centre large population series demonstrates good to excellent results in the majority of patients after volar locking plate fixation of the distal radius, with complication rates comparable to other non-operative and operative treatment modalities. On this basis we recommend this mode of fixation for distal radius fractures requiting operative intervention.

  2. Unitarity limits on the mass and radius of dark matter particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griest, Kim; Kamionkowski, Marc

    1989-01-01

    Using partial wave unitarity and the observed density of the Universe, it is show that a stable elementary particle which was once in thermal equilibrium cannot have a mass greater than 340 TeV. An extended object which was once in thermal equilibrium cannot have a radius less than 7.5 x 10(exp -7) fm. A lower limit to the relic abundance of such particles is also found.

  3. THE IMPACT OF SURFACE TEMPERATURE INHOMOGENEITIES ON QUIESCENT NEUTRON STAR RADIUS MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Elshamouty, K. G.; Heinke, C. O.; Morsink, S. M.

    Fitting the thermal X-ray spectra of neutron stars (NSs) in quiescent X-ray binaries can constrain the masses and radii of NSs. The effect of undetected hot spots on the spectrum, and thus on the inferred NS mass and radius, has not yet been explored for appropriate atmospheres and spectra. A hot spot would harden the observed spectrum, so that spectral modeling tends to infer radii that are too small. However, a hot spot may also produce detectable pulsations. We simulated the effects of a hot spot on the pulsed fraction and spectrum of the quiescent NSs X5 and X7 inmore » the globular cluster 47 Tucanae, using appropriate spectra and beaming for hydrogen atmosphere models, incorporating special and general relativistic effects, and sampling a range of system angles. We searched for pulsations in archival Chandra HRC-S observations of X5 and X7, placing 90% confidence upper limits on their pulsed fractions below 16%. We use these pulsation limits to constrain the temperature differential of any hot spots, and to then constrain the effects of possible hot spots on the X-ray spectrum and the inferred radius from spectral fitting. We find that hot spots below our pulsation limit could bias the spectroscopically inferred radius downward by up to 28%. For Cen X-4 (which has deeper published pulsation searches), an undetected hot spot could bias its inferred radius downward by up to 10%. Improving constraints on pulsations from quiescent LMXBs may be essential for progress in constraining their radii.« less

  4. Bone density of the radius, spine, and proximal femur in osteoporosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mazess, R.B.; Barden, H.; Ettinger, M.

    1988-02-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured in 140 normal young women (aged 20 to 39 years) and in 423 consecutive women over age 40 referred for evaluation of osteoporosis. Lumbar spine and proximal femur BMD was measured using dual-photon absorptiometry (/sup 153/Gd), whereas the radius shaft measurement used single-photon absorptiometry (/sup 125/I). There were 324 older women with no fractures, of which 278 aged 60 to 80 years served as age-matched controls. There were 99 women with fractures including 32 with vertebral and 22 with hip fractures. Subsequently, another 25 women with hip fractures had BMD measured in another laboratory;more » their mean BMD was within 2% of that of the original series. The mean age in both the nonfracture and fracture groups was 70 +/- 5 years. The BMD in the age-matched controls was 20% to 25% below that of normal young women for the radius, spine, and femur, but the Ward's triangle region of the femur showed even greater loss (35%). The mean BMD at all sites in the crush fracture cases was about 10% to 15% below that of age-matched controls. Spinal abnormality was best discriminated by spine and femoral measurements (Z score about 0.9). In women with hip fractures, the BMD was 10% below that of age-matched controls for the radius and the spine, and the BMD for the femoral sites was about 25% to 30% below that of age-matched control (Z score about 1.6). Femoral densities gave the best discrimination of hip fracture cases and even reflected spinal osteopenia. In contrast, neither the spine nor the radius reflected the full extent of femoral osteopenia in hip fracture.« less

  5. Radius of convexity of a certain class of close-to-convex functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahya, Abdullah; Soh, Shaharuddin Cik

    2017-11-01

    In the present paper, we consider and investigate a certain class of close-to-convex functions that defined in the unit disk, U = {z : |z| < 1}, which denotes as Re { ei αz/f '(z ) f (z )-f (-z ) } >δ where |α| < π, cos (α) > δ and 0 δ <1. Furthermore, we obtain preliminary result for bound f'(z) and determine result for radius of convexity.

  6. Radius Determination of Solar-type Stars Using Asteroseismology: What to Expect from the Kepler Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stello, Dennis; Chaplin, William J.; Bruntt, Hans; Creevey, Orlagh L.; García-Hernández, Antonio; Monteiro, Mario J. P. F. G.; Moya, Andrés; Quirion, Pierre-Olivier; Sousa, Sergio G.; Suárez, Juan-Carlos; Appourchaux, Thierry; Arentoft, Torben; Ballot, Jerome; Bedding, Timothy R.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Elsworth, Yvonne; Fletcher, Stephen T.; García, Rafael A.; Houdek, Günter; Jiménez-Reyes, Sebastian J.; Kjeldsen, Hans; New, Roger; Régulo, Clara; Salabert, David; Toutain, Thierry

    2009-08-01

    For distant stars, as observed by the NASA Kepler satellite, parallax information is currently of fairly low quality and is not complete. This limits the precision with which the absolute sizes of the stars and their potential transiting planets can be determined by traditional methods. Asteroseismology will be used to aid the radius determination of stars observed during NASA's Kepler mission. We report on the recent asteroFLAG hare-and-hounds Exercise#2, where a group of "hares" simulated data of F-K main-sequence stars that a group of "hounds" sought to analyze, aimed at determining the stellar radii. We investigated stars in the range 9 < V < 15, both with and without parallaxes. We further test different uncertainties in T eff, and compare results with and without using asteroseismic constraints. Based on the asteroseismic large frequency spacing, obtained from simulations of 4 yr time series data from the Kepler mission, we demonstrate that the stellar radii can be correctly and precisely determined, when combined with traditional stellar parameters from the Kepler Input Catalogue. The radii found by the various methods used by each independent hound generally agree with the true values of the artificial stars to within 3%, when the large frequency spacing is used. This is 5-10 times better than the results where seismology is not applied. These results give strong confidence that radius estimation can be performed to better than 3% for solar-like stars using automatic pipeline reduction. Even when the stellar distance and luminosity are unknown we can obtain the same level of agreement. Given the uncertainties used for this exercise we find that the input log g and parallax do not help to constrain the radius, and that T eff and metallicity are the only parameters we need in addition to the large frequency spacing. It is the uncertainty in the metallicity that dominates the uncertainty in the radius.

  7. Is Bone Grafting Necessary in the Treatment of Malunited Distal Radius Fractures?

    PubMed Central

    Disseldorp, Dominique J. G.; Poeze, Martijn; Hannemann, Pascal F. W.; Brink, Peter R. G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Open wedge osteotomy with bone grafting and plate fixation is the standard procedure for the correction of malunited distal radius fractures. Bone grafts are used to increase structural stability and to enhance new bone formation. However, bone grafts are also associated with donor site morbidity, delayed union at bone–graft interfaces, size mismatch between graft and osteotomy defect, and additional operation time. Purpose The goal of this study was to assess bone healing and secondary fracture displacement in the treatment of malunited distal radius fractures without the use of bone grafting. Methods Between January 1993 and December 2013, 132 corrective osteotomies and plate fixations without bone grafting were performed for malunited distal radius fractures. The minimum follow-up time was 12 months. Primary study outcomes were time to complete bone healing and secondary fracture displacement. Preoperative and postoperative radiographs during follow-up were compared with each other, as well as with radiographs of the uninjured side. Results All 132 osteotomies healed. In two cases (1.5%), healing took more than 4 months, but reinterventions were not necessary. No cases of secondary fracture displacement or hardware failure were observed. Significant improvements in all radiographic parameters were shown after corrective osteotomy and plate fixation. Conclusion This study shows that bone grafts are not required for bone healing and prevention of secondary fracture displacement after corrective osteotomy and plate fixation of malunited distal radius fractures. Level of evidence Therapeutic, level IV, case series with no comparison group PMID:26261748

  8. Using a Video Camera to Measure the Radius of the Earth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Joshua; Hughes, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    A simple but accurate method for measuring the Earth's radius using a video camera is described. A video camera was used to capture a shadow rising up the wall of a tall building at sunset. A free program called ImageJ was used to measure the time it took the shadow to rise a known distance up the building. The time, distance and length of…

  9. Reaction of wood radius of multiple tree species to changing environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merganicova, Katarina; Merganic, Jan; Sitkova, Zuzana; Lestianska, Adriana; Strelcova, Katarina; Valent, Peter; Jezik, Marek

    2017-04-01

    Dendrometers are frequently used to study the radial dynamics of forest trees. Since the fluctuations of tree stem radius are caused by multiple factors including changes in tree water status and the actual tree growth, the methods used to derive the radial growth from dendrometer data provide us with the estimates of diurnal radial increments rather than their precise values. In addition, dendrometers react to environmental conditions themselves, which can in some cases cause misinterpretation of measured values. In the presented study we aimed at analysing the reaction of band dendrometers and wood radius of 7 different tree species on changing environmental conditions. The data come from a controlled experiment performed in the climate chambers, in which we placed 5 stand-alone dendrometers and 30 wooden pieces representing 7 different tree species equipped with band dendrometers. Air temperature and air humidity were controlled inside the chambers and their impact on wood radius and dendrometers was analysed. The results showed that both wooden pieces and dendrometers reacted to changes in air temperature and air humidity, while the reaction was species specific and dependent on the actual water status of wooden pieces. The overall trend of measured radial changes of wooden pieces followed the changes in temperature, i.e. the increase in temperature caused the increase in the measured radii. The change in air humidity explained less than 50% of the variation in radial measurements. The obtained results indicate that although the band dendrometers applied in the study were able to measure values with the precision of one micrometre, the differences between the measurements of up to ten micrometres need not represent the actual changes in stem radius, but may only reflect the reactions of the instrument to surrounding conditions. Hence, the measurements by dendrometers must always be examined thoroughly with regard to all the multiple effects before any

  10. Radiographic Outcomes of Dorsal Distraction Distal Radius Plating for Fractures With Dorsal Marginal Impaction.

    PubMed

    Huish, Eric G; Coury, John G; Ibrahim, Mohamed A; Trzeciak, Marc A

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare radiographic outcomes of patients treated with dorsal spanning plates with previously reported normal values of radiographic distal radius anatomy and compare the results with prior publications for both external fixation and internal fixation with volar locked plates. Patients with complex distal radius fractures including dorsal marginal impaction pattern necessitating dorsal distraction plating at the discretion of the senior authors (M.A.T. and M.A.I.) from May 30, 2013, to December 29, 2015, were identified and included in the study. Retrospective chart and radiograph review was performed on 19 patients, 11 male and 8 female, with mean age of 47.83 years (22-82). No patients were excluded from the study. All fractures united prior to plate removal. The average time the plate was in place was 80.5 days (49-129). Follow-up radiographs showed average radial inclination of 20.5° (13.2°-25.5°), radial height of 10.7 mm (7.5-14 mm), ulnar variance of -0.3 mm (-2.1 to 3.1 mm), and volar tilt of 7.9° (-3° to 15°). One patient had intra-articular step-off greater than 2 mm. Dorsal distraction plating of complex distal radius fractures yields good radiographic results with minimal complications. In cases of complex distal radius fractures including dorsal marginal impaction where volar plating is not considered adequate, a dorsal distraction plate should be considered as an alternative to external fixation due to reduced risk for infection and better control of volar tilt.

  11. Ionic liquids for addressing unmet needs in healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Agatemor, Christian; Ibsen, Kelly N.; Tanner, Eden E. L.

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Advances in the field of ionic liquids have opened new applications beyond their traditional use as solvents into other fields especially healthcare. The broad chemical space, rich with structurally diverse ions, and coupled with the flexibility to form complementary ion pairs enables task‐specific optimization at the molecular level to design ionic liquids for envisioned functions. Consequently, ionic liquids now are tailored as innovative solutions to address many problems in medicine. To date, ionic liquids have been designed to promote dissolution of poorly soluble drugs and disrupt physiological barriers to transport drugs to targeted sites. Also, their antimicrobial activity has been demonstrated and could be exploited to prevent and treat infectious diseases. Metal‐containing ionic liquids have also been designed and offer unique features due to incorporation of metals. Here, we review application‐driven investigations of ionic liquids in medicine with respect to current status and future potential. PMID:29376130

  12. Solid-State Ionic Diodes Demonstrated in Conical Nanopores

    DOE PAGES

    Plett, Timothy S.; Cai, Wenjia; Le Thai, Mya; ...

    2017-02-27

    Ionic transport at the nanoscale features phenomena that are not observed in larger systems. Nonlinear current–voltage curves characteristic of ionic diodes as well as ion selectivity are examples of effects observed at the nanoscale. Many man-made nanopore systems are inspired by biological channels in a cell membrane, thus measurements are often performed in aqueous solutions. Consequently, much less is known about ionic transport in nonaqueous systems, especially in solid-state electrolytes. Here we show ionic transport through single pores filled with gel electrolyte of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) doped with LiClO 4 in propylene carbonate. The system has no liquid interface andmore » the ionic transport occurs through the porous gel structure. We demonstrate that a conically shaped nanopore filled with the gel rectifies the current and works as a solid-state ionic diode.« less

  13. Dissolution and fractionation of nut shells in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Aristides P; Rodríguez, Oscar; Macedo, Eugénia A

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this work was to study the dissolution of raw peanut and chestnut shells in ionic liquids. Dissolution of raw biomass up to 7wt% was achieved under optimized operatory conditions. Quantification of polysaccharides dissolved through quantitative 13 Cq NMR revealed extractions of the cellulosic material to ionic liquids as high as 87%. Regeneration experiments using an antisolvent mixture allowed to recover the cellulosic material and the ionic liquid. The overall mass balance presented very low loss rates (<8%), recoveries of 75% and 95% of cellulosic material from peanut and chestnut shells, respectively, and the recovery of more than 95% of the ionic liquid in both cases. These results show the high potential of using nut shells and ionic liquids for biorefining purposes. Moreover, high recovery of ionic liquids favors the process from an economical point of view. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Sun's Seismic Radius as Measured from the Fundamental Modes of Oscillations and Its Implications for the TSI Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Kiran; Tripathy, S. C.; Hill, F.

    2018-05-01

    In this Letter we explore the relationship between the solar seismic radius and total solar irradiance (TSI) during the last two solar cycles using the uninterrupted data from space-borne instruments on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SoHO) and the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The seismic radius is calculated from the fundamental (f) modes of solar oscillations utilizing the observations from SoHO/Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) and SDO/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI), and the TSI measurements are obtained from SoHO/VIRGO. Our study suggests that the major contribution to the TSI variation arises from the changes in magnetic field, while the radius variation plays a secondary role. We find that the solar irradiance increases with decreasing seismic radius; however, the anti-correlation between them is moderately weak. The estimated maximum change in seismic radius during a solar cycle is about 5 km, and is consistent in both solar cycles 23 and 24. Previous studies ;suggest a radius change at the surface of the order of 0.06 arcsec to explain the 0.1% variation in the TSI values during the solar cycle; however, our inferred seismic radius change is significantly smaller, hence the TSI variations cannot be fully explained by the temporal changes in seismic radius.

  15. Measure the Earth's Radius and the Speed of Light with Simple and Inexpensive Computer-Based Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    With new and inexpensive computer-based methods, measuring the speed of light and the Earth's radius--historically difficult endeavors--can be simple enough to be tackled by high school and college students working in labs that have limited budgets. In this article, the author describes two methods of estimating the Earth's radius using two…

  16. Molecular dynamics studies of polyethylene oxide and polyethylene glycol: hydrodynamic radius and shape anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwankyu; Venable, Richard M; Mackerell, Alexander D; Pastor, Richard W

    2008-08-01

    A revision (C35r) to the CHARMM ether force field is shown to reproduce experimentally observed conformational populations of dimethoxyethane. Molecular dynamics simulations of 9, 18, 27, and 36-mers of polyethylene oxide (PEO) and 27-mers of polyethylene glycol (PEG) in water based on C35r yield a persistence length lambda = 3.7 A, in quantitative agreement with experimentally obtained values of 3.7 A for PEO and 3.8 A for PEG; agreement with experimental values for hydrodynamic radii of comparably sized PEG is also excellent. The exponent upsilon relating the radius of gyration and molecular weight (R(g) proportional, variantM(w)(upsilon)) of PEO from the simulations equals 0.515 +/- 0.023, consistent with experimental observations that low molecular weight PEG behaves as an ideal chain. The shape anisotropy of hydrated PEO is 2.59:1.44:1.00. The dimension of the middle length for each of the polymers nearly equals the hydrodynamic radius R(h)obtained from diffusion measurements in solution. This explains the correspondence of R(h) and R(p), the pore radius of membrane channels: a polymer such as PEG diffuses with its long axis parallel to the membrane channel, and passes through the channel without substantial distortion.

  17. Sensitive zone parameters and curvature radius evaluation for polymer optical fiber curvature sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal-Junior, Arnaldo G.; Frizera, Anselmo; José Pontes, Maria

    2018-03-01

    Polymer optical fibers (POFs) are suitable for applications such as curvature sensors, strain, temperature, liquid level, among others. However, for enhancing sensitivity, many polymer optical fiber curvature sensors based on intensity variation require a lateral section. Lateral section length, depth, and surface roughness have great influence on the sensor sensitivity, hysteresis, and linearity. Moreover, the sensor curvature radius increase the stress on the fiber, which leads on variation of the sensor behavior. This paper presents the analysis relating the curvature radius and lateral section length, depth and surface roughness with the sensor sensitivity, hysteresis and linearity for a POF curvature sensor. Results show a strong correlation between the decision parameters behavior and the performance for sensor applications based on intensity variation. Furthermore, there is a trade-off among the sensitive zone length, depth, surface roughness, and curvature radius with the sensor desired performance parameters, which are minimum hysteresis, maximum sensitivity, and maximum linearity. The optimization of these parameters is applied to obtain a sensor with sensitivity of 20.9 mV/°, linearity of 0.9992 and hysteresis below 1%, which represent a better performance of the sensor when compared with the sensor without the optimization.

  18. Laser confocal measurement system for curvature radius of lenses based on grating ruler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jiwei; Wang, Yun; Zhou, Nan; Zhao, Weirui; Zhao, Weiqian

    2015-02-01

    In the modern optical measurement field, the radius of curvature (ROC) is one of the fundamental parameters of optical lens. Its measurement accuracy directly affects the other optical parameters, such as focal length, aberration and so on, which significantly affect the overall performance of the optical system. To meet the demand of measurement instruments for radius of curvature (ROC) with high accuracy in the market, we develop a laser confocal radius measurement system with grating ruler. The system uses the peak point of the confocal intensity curve to precisely identify the cat-eye and confocal positions and then measure the distance between these two positions by using the grating ruler, thereby achieving the high-precision measurement for the ROC. The system has advantages of high focusing sensitivity and anti-environment disturbance ability. And the preliminary theoretical analysis and experiments show that the measuring repeatability can be up to 0.8 um, which can provide an effective way for the accurate measurement of ROC.

  19. Assimilation of Tropical Cyclone Track and Wind Radius Data with an Ensemble Kalman Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunii, M.

    2014-12-01

    Improving tropical cyclone (TC) forecasts is one of the most important issues in meteorology, but TC intensity forecasts are a challenging task. Because the lack of observations near TCs usually results in degraded accuracy of initial fields, utilizing TC advisory data in data assimilation typically has started with an ensemble Kalman filtering (EnKF). In this study, TC intensity and position information was directly assimilated using the EnKF, and the impact of these observations was investigated by comparing different assimilation strategies. Another experiment with TC wind radius data was carried out to examine the influence of TC shape parameters. Sensitivity experiments indicated that the assimilation of TC intensity and position data yielded results that were superior to those based on conventional assimilation of TC minimum sea level pressure as a standard surface pressure observation. Assimilation of TC radius data modified TC outer circulations closer to observations. The impacts of these TC parameters were also evaluated using the case of Typhoon Talas in 2011. The TC intensity, position, and wind radius data led to improved TC track forecasts and thence to improved precipitation forecasts. These results imply that initialization with these TC-related observations benefits TC forecasts, offering promise for the prevention and mitigation of natural disasters caused by TCs.

  20. Core-powered mass-loss and the radius distribution of small exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, Sivan; Schlichting, Hilke E.; Sari, Re'em

    2018-05-01

    Recent observations identify a valley in the radius distribution of small exoplanets, with planets in the range 1.5-2.0 R⊕ significantly less common than somewhat smaller or larger planets. This valley may suggest a bimodal population of rocky planets that are either engulfed by massive gas envelopes that significantly enlarge their radius, or do not have detectable atmospheres at all. One explanation of such a bimodal distribution is atmospheric erosion by high-energy stellar photons. We investigate an alternative mechanism: the luminosity of the cooling rocky core, which can completely erode light envelopes while preserving heavy ones, produces a deficit of intermediate sized planets. We evolve planetary populations that are derived from observations using a simple analytical prescription, accounting self-consistently for envelope accretion, cooling and mass-loss, and demonstrate that core-powered mass-loss naturally reproduces the observed radius distribution, regardless of the high-energy incident flux. Observations of planets around different stellar types may distinguish between photoevaporation, which is powered by the high-energy tail of the stellar radiation, and core-powered mass-loss, which depends on the bolometric flux through the planet's equilibrium temperature that sets both its cooling and mass-loss rates.

  1. Neutron star mass-radius relation with gravitational field shielding by a scalar field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo-Jun; Zhang, Tian-Xi; Guggilla, Padmaja; Dokhanian, Mostafa

    2013-05-01

    The currently well-developed models for equations of state (EoSs) have been severely impacted by recent measurements of neutron stars with a small radius and/or large mass. To explain these measurements, the theory of gravitational field shielding by a scalar field is applied. This theory was recently developed in accordance with the five-dimensional (5D) fully covariant Kaluza-Klein (KK) theory that has successfully unified Einstein's general relativity and Maxwell's electromagnetic theory. It is shown that a massive, compact neutron star can generate a strong scalar field, which can significantly shield or reduce its gravitational field, thus making it more massive and more compact. The mass-radius relation developed under this type of modified gravity can be consistent with these recent measurements of neutron stars. In addition, the effect of gravitational field shielding helps explain why the supernova explosions of some very massive stars (e.g., 40 Msolar as measured recently) actually formed neutron stars rather than black holes as expected. The EoS models, ruled out by measurements of small radius and/or large mass neutron stars according to the theory of general relativity, can still work well in terms of the 5D fully covariant KK theory with a scalar field.

  2. Tidal Deformability from GW170817 as a Direct Probe of the Neutron Star Radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raithel, Carolyn A.; Özel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2018-04-01

    Gravitational waves from the coalescence of two neutron stars were recently detected for the first time by the LIGO–Virgo Collaboration, in event GW170817. This detection placed an upper limit on the effective tidal deformability of the two neutron stars and tightly constrained the chirp mass of the system. We report here on a new simplification that arises in the effective tidal deformability of the binary, when the chirp mass is specified. We find that, in this case, the effective tidal deformability of the binary is surprisingly independent of the component masses of the individual neutron stars, and instead depends primarily on the ratio of the chirp mass to the neutron star radius. Thus, a measurement of the effective tidal deformability can be used to directly measure the neutron star radius. We find that the upper limit on the effective tidal deformability from GW170817 implies that the radius cannot be larger than ∼13 km, at the 90% level, independent of the assumed masses for the component stars. The result can be applied generally, to probe the stellar radii in any neutron star–neutron star merger with a measured chirp mass. The approximate mass independence disappears for neutron star–black hole mergers. Finally, we discuss a Bayesian inference of the equation of state that uses the measured chirp mass and tidal deformability from GW170817 combined with nuclear and astrophysical priors and discuss possible statistical biases in this inference.

  3. Examination of the 22C radius determination with interaction cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagahisa, T.; Horiuchi, W.

    2018-05-01

    A nuclear radius of 22C is investigated with the total reaction cross sections at medium- to high-incident energies in order to resolve the radius puzzle in which two recent interaction cross-section measurements using 1H and 12C targets show the quite different radii. The cross sections of 22C are calculated consistently for these target nuclei within a reliable microscopic framework, the Glauber theory. To describe appropriately such a reaction involving a spatially extended nucleus, the multiple scattering processes within the Glauber theory are fully taken into account, that is, the multidimensional integration in the Glauber amplitude is evaluated using a Monte Carlo technique without recourse to the optical-limit approximation. We discuss the sensitivity of the spatially extended halo tail to the total reaction cross sections. The root-mean-square matter radius obtained in this study is consistent with that extracted from the recent cross-section measurement on 12C target. We show that the simultaneous reproduction of the two recent measured cross sections is not feasible within this framework.

  4. Treatment of unstable intraarticular fracture of distal radius: POP casting with external fixation.

    PubMed

    ur Rahman, Obaid; Khan, Mohammad Qadeem; Rasheed, Haroon; Ahmad, Saleem

    2012-04-01

    To compare radiological and functional outcome of external fixation and distraction with conservative Plaster of Paris (POP) cast for unstable intra-articular fractures of the distal radius. The study was conducted on 60 patients with unstable intra-articular fracture of distal radius who reported to emergency or outpatient Orthopaedic Surgery department of Benazir Bhutto Hospital, Rawalpindi, between March and August 2007. They were divided into two equal groups: Group A and Group B, treated by Plaster of Paris cast, and external fixation with distraction respectively. The functional outcome in terms of freedom from pain, range of movement, grip power and deformity, and the radiological outcome of radial length, incongruity and radio-ulnar joint position were analysed at three months follow-up using a 3-point scoring scale. In Group A, 1 (3%) patient showed excellent result, 8 (27%) patients good results, 19 (63%) patients fair results and 2 (7%) patients poor result. In Group B, 14 (47%) patients showed excellent results, 11 (37%) patients good results, 4 (13%) patients fair results and 1 (3%) patient poor result. The outcome score of the Group B patients was significantly better compared to the Group A patients (p value < 0.05). External fixation has definite advantages over conventional Plaster of Paris cast in the treatment of unstable intra-articular fractures of distal radius.

  5. Tool holder for preparation and inspection of a radiused edge cutting tool

    DOEpatents

    Asmanes, Charles

    1979-01-01

    A tool holding fixture is provided for removably holding a radiused edge cutting tool in a tool edge lapping apparatus. The fixture allows the operator to preset the lapping radius and angle before the tool holder is placed in the fixture and the holder may be removed from the lapping apparatus to inspect the tool and simply replaced in the fixture to continue lapping in accordance with a precise alignment without realignment of the tool relative to the lap. The tool holder includes a pair of self aligning bearings in the form of precision formed steel balls connected together by a rigid shaft. The tool is held by an arm extending from the shaft and the balls set in fixed position bearing cups and the holder is oscillated back and forth about a fixed axis of rotation to lap the tool radius by means of a reversibly driven belt-pulley arrangement coupled to the shaft between the bearings. To temporarily remove the holder, the drive belt is slipped over the rearward end of the holder and the holder is lifted out of the bearing cups.

  6. Incidence and clinical outcomes of tendon rupture following distal radius fracture.

    PubMed

    White, Brian D; Nydick, Jason A; Karsky, Dawnne; Williams, Bailee D; Hess, Alfred V; Stone, Jeffrey D

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate the incidence of tendon rupture after nonoperative and operative management of distal radius fractures, report clinical outcomes after tendon repair or transfer, and examine volar plate and dorsal screw prominence as a predictor of tendon rupture. We performed a retrospective chart review on patients treated for tendon rupture after distal radius fracture. We evaluated active range of motion, Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score, grip strength, and pain score, and performed radiographic evaluation of volar plate and dorsal screw prominence in both the study group and a matched control group. There were 6 tendon ruptures in 1,359 patients (0.4%) treated nonoperatively and 8 tendon ruptures in 999 patients (0.8%) treated with volar plate fixation. At the time of final follow-up, regardless of treatment, we noted that patients had minimal pain and excellent motion and grip strength. Mean Disabilities of the Shoulder, Arm, and Hand scores were 6 for patients treated nonoperatively and 4 for those treated with volar plating. We were unable to verify volar plate or dorsal screw prominence as independent risk factors for tendon rupture after distal radius fractures. However, we recommend continued follow-up and plate removal for symptomatic patients who have volar plate prominence or dorsal screw prominence. In the event of tendon rupture, we report excellent clinical outcomes after tendon repair or tendon transfer. Therapeutic IV. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Measurements of Physical Parameters of White Dwarfs: A Test of the Mass–Radius Relation

    SciTech Connect

    Bédard, A.; Bergeron, P.; Fontaine, G., E-mail: bedard@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: bergeron@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: fontaine@astro.umontreal.ca

    We present a detailed spectroscopic and photometric analysis of 219 DA and DB white dwarfs for which trigonometric parallax measurements are available. Our aim is to compare the physical parameters derived from the spectroscopic and photometric techniques, and then to test the theoretical mass–radius relation for white dwarfs using these results. The agreement between spectroscopic and photometric parameters is found to be excellent, especially for effective temperatures, showing that our model atmospheres and fitting procedures provide an accurate, internally consistent analysis. The values of surface gravity and solid angle obtained, respectively, from spectroscopy and photometry, are combined with parallax measurementsmore » in various ways to study the validity of the mass–radius relation from an empirical point of view. After a thorough examination of our results, we find that 73% and 92% of the white dwarfs are consistent within 1 σ and 2 σ confidence levels, respectively, with the predictions of the mass–radius relation, thus providing strong support to the theory of stellar degeneracy. Our analysis also allows us to identify 15 stars that are better interpreted in terms of unresolved double degenerate binaries. Atmospheric parameters for both components in these binary systems are obtained using a novel approach. We further identify a few white dwarfs that are possibly composed of an iron core rather than a carbon/oxygen core, since they are consistent with Fe-core evolutionary models.« less

  8. Conventional bone plate fixation of distal radius and ulna fractures in toy breed dogs.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, J M; Macías, C

    2016-03-01

    To describe the outcome of bone plate fixation of distal radius and ulna fractures in toy breed dogs treated with conventional bone plates. Records of 15 toy breed dogs with distal radius and ulna fractures were retrospectively reviewed for signalment, method of fixation, complications and clinical and radiographic assessments. A telephone-based owner questionnaire was conducted to determine long-term function and client satisfaction. Age ranged from 4 months to 6 years. Body weight ranged from 1 to 4 kg. Dynamic compression plates were used in 13 dogs and veterinary cuttable plates were used in 2 dogs as the means of fixation. Full radiographic and clinical follow-up data were available for 10 dogs and follow-up was performed between 6 and 8 weeks postoperatively. At that time, all fractures had healed and return to function was considered excellent in all 10 dogs. Five dogs did not return for hospital evaluation because they were judged by their owners to be free of lameness. In two cases, owners could not be contacted by telephone, but the referring veterinarians reported the dogs to be asymptomatic. No major complications occurred. Conventional bone plates are suitable choices for stabilisation of distal radius and ulna fractures in toy breed dogs and are not necessarily correlated with high rates of complication. © 2016 Australian Veterinary Association.

  9. Interior phase transformations and mass-radius relationships of silicon-carbon planets

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Hugh F.; Militzer, Burkhard, E-mail: hughfw@gmail.com

    2014-09-20

    Planets such as 55 Cancri e orbiting stars with a high carbon-to-oxygen ratio may consist primarily of silicon and carbon, with successive layers of carbon, silicon carbide, and iron. The behavior of silicon-carbon materials at the extreme pressures prevalent in planetary interiors, however, has not yet been sufficiently understood. In this work, we use simulations based on density functional theory to determine high-pressure phase transitions in the silicon-carbon system, including the prediction of new stable compounds with Si{sub 2}C and SiC{sub 2} stoichiometry at high pressures. We compute equations of state for these silicon-carbon compounds as a function of pressure,more » and hence derive interior structural models and mass-radius relationships for planets composed of silicon and carbon. Notably, we predict a substantially smaller radius for SiC planets than in previous models, and find that mass radius relationships for SiC planets are indistinguishable from those of silicate planets. We also compute a new equation of state for iron. We rederive interior models for 55 Cancri e and are able to place more stringent restrictions on its composition.« less

  10. Dependence of yield of nuclear track-biosensors on track radius and analyte concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Arellano, H.; Muñoz H., G.; Fink, D.; Vacik, J.; Hnatowicz, V.; Alfonta, L.; Kiv, A.

    2018-04-01

    In swift heavy ion track-based polymeric biosensor foils with incorporated enzymes one exploits the correlation between the analyte concentration and the sensor current, via the enrichment of charged enzymatic reaction products in the track's confinement. Here we study the influence of the etched track radius on the biosensor's efficiency. These sensors are analyte-specific only if both the track radii and the analyte concentration exceed certain threshold values of ∼15 nm and ∼10-6 M (for glucose sensing), respectively. Below these limits the sensor signal stems un-specifically from any charge carrier. In its proper working regime, the inner track walls are smoothly covered by enzymes and the efficiency is practically radius independent. Theory shows that the measured current should be slightly sub-proportional to the analyte concentration; the measurements roughly reconfirm this. Narrower tracks (∼5-15 nm radius) with reduced enzyme coverage lead to decreasing efficiency. Tiny signals visible when the tracks are etched to effective radii between 0 and ∼5 nm are tentatively ascribed to enzymes bonded to surface-near nano-cracks in the polymer foil, resulting from its degradation due to aging, rather than to the tracks. Precondition for this study was the accurate determination of the etched track radii, which is possible only by a nanofluidic approach. This holds to some extent even for enzyme-covered tracks, though in this case most of the wall charges are compensated by enzyme bonding.

  11. Contact Modelling of Large Radius Air Bending with Geometrically Exact Contact Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorkov, V.; Konyukhov, A.; Vandepitte, D.; Duflou, J. R.

    2016-08-01

    Usage of high-strength steels in conventional air bending is restricted due to limited bendability of these metals. Large-radius punches provide a typical approach for decreasing deformations during the bending process. However, as deflection progresses the loading scheme changes gradually. Therefore, modelling of the contact interaction is essential for an accurate description of the loading scheme. In the current contribution, the authors implemented a plane frictional contact element based on the penalty method. The geometrically exact contact algorithm is used for the penetration determination. The implementation is done using the OOFEM - open source finite element solver. In order to verify the simulation results, experiments have been conducted on a bending press brake for 4 mm Weldox 1300 with a punch radius of 30 mm and a die opening of 80 mm. The maximum error for the springback calculation is 0.87° for the bending angle of 144°. The contact interaction is a crucial part of large radius bending simulation and the implementation leads to a reliable solution for the springback angle.

  12. High-precision radius automatic measurement using laser differential confocal technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hongwei; Zhao, Weiqian; Yang, Jiamiao; Guo, Yongkui; Xiao, Yang

    2015-02-01

    A high precision radius automatic measurement method using laser differential confocal technology is proposed. Based on the property of an axial intensity curve that the null point precisely corresponds to the focus of the objective and the bipolar property, the method uses the composite PID (proportional-integral-derivative) control to ensure the steady movement of the motor for process of quick-trigger scanning, and uses least-squares linear fitting to obtain the position of the cat-eye and confocal positions, then calculates the radius of curvature of lens. By setting the number of measure times, precision auto-repeat measurement of the radius of curvature is achieved. The experiment indicates that the method has the measurement accuracy of better than 2 ppm, and the measuring repeatability is better than 0.05 μm. In comparison with the existing manual-single measurement, this method has a high measurement precision, a strong environment anti-interference capability, a better measuring repeatability which is only tenth of former's.

  13. The Colloidal Stability of Magnetic Nanoparticles in Ionic Liquids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-03

    Ionic Liquids 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA2386-14-1-4062 5b. GRANT NUMBER Grant 14IOA088 AOARD-144062 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT During the reporting period the development of the ionic liquid ferrofluid (ILFF) based on EMIM-NTf2 was continued. The...ferrofluids based on other high-boiling solvents. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Electric Propulsion, Ionic liquids 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION

  14. Basicity of pyridine and some substituted pyridines in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Angelini, Guido; De Maria, Paolo; Chiappe, Cinzia; Fontana, Antonella; Pierini, Marco; Siani, Gabriella

    2010-06-04

    The equilibrium constants for ion pair formation of some pyridines have been evaluated by spectrophotometric titration with trifluoroacetic acid in different ionic liquids. The basicity order is the same in ionic liquids and in water. The substituent effect on the equilibrium constant has been discussed in terms of the Hammett equation. Pyridine basicity appears to be less sensitive to the substituent effect in ionic liquids than in water.

  15. Ionic Liquids in Polymer Design: From Energy to Health

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-19

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: ACS Symposium: Ionic Liquids in Polymer Design: From Energy to Health at Fall 2015 ACS Meeting in Boston, MA The...combination of ionic liquids and polymers has emerged as an active field of exploration in polymer science, where new materials have be realized for...2016 Final Report: Ionic Liquids in Polymer Design: From Energy to Health The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of

  16. Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Ionic Polymer Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2009-4198 COARSE-GRAINED MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATION OF IONIC POLYMER NETWORKS (Postprint) T.E. Dirama, V. Varshney, K.L...GRAINED MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATION OF IONIC POLYMER NETWORKS (Postprint) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-05-D-5807-0052 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...We studied two types of networks which differ only by one containing ionic pairs that amount to 7% of the total number of bonds present. The stress

  17. Reproduction of Venezulean Equine Encephalomyelitis Virus at Low Ionic Strength

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-02-28

    AD/A-006 206 REPRODUCTION OF VENEZUELAN EQUINE ENCEPHALOMYELITIS VIRUS AT LOW IONIC STRENGTH T.M. Sokolova, et al Army Medical Research Institute of... Reproduction of Venezuelan equine encephalo- Translation myelitis virus at low ionic strength 6. PERFORM4ING ORG. REPORT NU14BER II!LTT, 0491 7. AUTHOR(a... REPRODUCTION OF VENEZUELAN EQUINE ENCEPHALOMYELITIS VIRUS AT LOW IONIC STRFNGTH Article by T. M. Sokolova, I. B. Tazulakhova, S. S. Grigoryan and F. I. e v

  18. Evidence of an enhanced nuclear radius of the α -halo state via α +12C inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Makoto

    2018-04-01

    Evidence of the enhanced nuclear radius in the Hoyle rotational state, 22+, is derived from the differential cross sections in α +12C inelastic scattering. The prominent shrinkage is observed in the differential cross section of the 22+ state in comparison to the yrast 21+ state, and this shrinkage is the first evidence of the enhanced nuclear radius which originates from the 3 α structure in the 22+ state. A diffraction formula, that is, Blair's phase rule, is applied to the differential cross sections, and the present analysis predicts an enhancement of 0.6 to 1.0 fm in the nuclear radius of the 22+ state in comparison to the radius of the yrast 21+, which is considered to have a normal nuclear radius. Constraint on the recent ab initio calculation for 3 α states in 12C is also discussed.

  19. MASS/RADIUS CONSTRAINTS ON THE QUIESCENT NEUTRON STAR IN M13 USING HYDROGEN AND HELIUM ATMOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Catuneanu, A.; Heinke, C. O.; Sivakoff, G. R.

    The mass and radius of the neutron star (NS) in low-mass X-ray binaries can be obtained by fitting the X-ray spectrum of the NS in quiescence, and the mass and radius constrains the properties of dense matter in NS cores. A critical ingredient for spectral fits is the composition of the NS atmosphere: hydrogen atmospheres are assumed in most prior work, but helium atmospheres are possible if the donor star is a helium white dwarf. Here we perform spectral fits to XMM-Newton, Chandra, and ROSAT data of a quiescent NS in the globular cluster M13. This NS has the smallestmore » inferred radius from previous spectral fitting. Assuming an atmosphere composed of hydrogen, we find a significantly larger radius, more consistent with those from other quiescent NSs. With a helium atmosphere (an equally acceptable fit), we find even larger values for the radius.« less

  20. Ionic liquid and nanoparticle hybrid systems: Emerging applications.

    PubMed

    He, Zhiqi; Alexandridis, Paschalis

    2017-06-01

    Having novel electronic and optical properties that emanate from their nano-scale dimensions, nanoparticles are central to numerous applications. Ionic liquids can confer to nanoparticle chemical protection and physicochemical property enhancement through intermolecular interactions and can consequently improve the stability and reusability of nanoparticle for various operations. With an aim to combine the novel properties of nanoparticles and ionic liquids, different structures have been generated, based on a balance of several intermolecular interactions. Such ionic liquid and nanoparticle hybrids are showing great potential in diverse applications. In this review, we first introduce various types of ionic liquid and nanoparticle hybrids, including nanoparticle colloidal dispersions in ionic liquids, ionic liquid-grafted nanoparticles, and nanoparticle-stabilized ionic liquid-based emulsions. Such hybrid materials exhibit interesting synergisms. We then highlight representative applications of ionic liquid and nanoparticle hybrids in the catalysis, electrochemistry and separations fields. Such hybrids can attain better stability and higher efficiency under a broad range of conditions. Novel and enhanced performance can be achieved in these applications by combining desired properties of ionic liquids and of nanoparticles within an appropriate hybrid nanostructure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Recent developments in biocatalysis in multiphasic ionic liquid reaction systems.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Lars-Erik; von Langermann, Jan; Kragl, Udo

    2018-06-01

    Ionic liquids are well known and frequently used 'designer solvents' for biocatalytic reactions. This review highlights recent achievements in the field of multiphasic ionic liquid-based reaction concepts. It covers classical biphasic systems including supported ionic liquid phases, thermo-regulated multi-component solvent systems (TMS) and polymerized ionic liquids. These powerful concepts combine unique reaction conditions with a high potential for future applications on a laboratory and industrial scale. The presence of a multiphasic system simplifies downstream processing due to the distribution of the catalyst and reactants in different phases.

  2. Ionic Liquids in HPLC and CE: A Hope for Future.

    PubMed

    Ali, Imran; Suhail, Mohd; Sanagi, Mohd Marsin; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2017-07-04

    The ionic liquids (ILs) are salts with melting points below 100°C. These are called as ionic fluids, ionic melts, liquid electrolytes, fused salts, liquid salts, ionic glasses, designer solvents, green solvents and solvents of the future. These have a wide range of applications, including medical, pharmaceutical and chemical sciences. Nowadays, their use is increasing greatly in separation science, especially in chromatography and capillary electrophoresis due to their remarkable properties. The present article describes the importance of ILs in high-performance liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. Efforts were also made to highlight the future expectations of ILs.

  3. Ionic liquid electrolytes for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Gorlov, Mikhail; Kloo, Lars

    2008-05-28

    The potential of room-temperature molten salts (ionic liquids) as solvents for electrolytes for dye-sensitized solar cells has been investigated during the last decade. The non-volatility, good solvent properties and high electrochemical stability of ionic liquids make them attractive solvents in contrast to volatile organic solvents. Despite this, the relatively high viscosity of ionic liquids leads to mass-transport limitations. Here we review recent developments in the application of different ionic liquids as solvents or components of liquid and quasi-solid electrolytes for dye-sensitized solar cells.

  4. Highly luminescent and color-tunable salicylate ionic liquids

    DOE PAGES

    Campbell, Paul S.; Yang, Mei; Pitz, Demian; ...

    2014-03-11

    High quantum yields of up to 40.5 % can be achieved in salicylate-bearing ionic liquids. A range of these ionic liquids have been synthesized and their photoluminescent properties studied in detail. The differences noted can be related back to the structure of the ionic liquid cation and possible interionic interactions. It is found that shifts of emission, particularly in the pyridinium-based ionic liquids, can be related to cation–anion pairing interactions. Furthermore, facile and controlled emission color mixing is demonstrated through combining different ILs, with emission colors ranging from blue to yellow.

  5. Physics of transduction in ionic liquid-swollen Nafion membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Matthew; Leo, Donald

    2006-03-01

    Ionic polymer transducers are a class of electroactive polymers that are able to generate large strains (1-5%) in response to low voltage inputs (1-5 V). Additionally, these materials generate electrical charge in response to mechanical strain and are therefore able to operate as soft, distributed sensors. Traditionally, ionic polymer transducers have been limited in their application by their hydration dependence. This work seeks to overcome this limitation by replacing the water with an ionic liquid. Ionic liquids are molten salts that exhibit very high thermal and electrochemical stability while also possessing high ionic conductivity. Results have shown that an ionic liquid-swollen ionic polymer transducer can operate for more than 250,000 cycles in air as compared to about 2,000 cycles for a water-swollen transducer. The current work examines the mechanisms of transduction in ionic liquid-swollen transducers based on Nafion polymer membranes. Specifically, the morphology and relevant ion associations within these membranes are investigated by the use of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). These results reveal that the ionic liquid interacts with the membrane in much the same way that water does, and that the counterions of the Nafion polymer are the primary charge carriers. The results of these analyses are compared to the macroscopic transduction behavior in order to develop a model of the charge transport mechanism responsible for electromechanical coupling in these membranes.

  6. Use of ionic liquids as coordination ligands for organometallic catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Li, Zaiwei [Moreno Valley, CA; Tang, Yongchun [Walnut, CA; Cheng,; Jihong, [Arcadia, CA

    2009-11-10

    Aspects of the present invention relate to compositions and methods for the use of ionic liquids with dissolved metal compounds as catalysts for a variety of chemical reactions. Ionic liquids are salts that generally are liquids at room temperature, and are capable of dissolving a many types of compounds that are relatively insoluble in aqueous or organic solvent systems. Specifically, ionic liquids may dissolve metal compounds to produce homogeneous and heterogeneous organometallic catalysts. One industrially-important chemical reaction that may be catalyzed by metal-containing ionic liquid catalysts is the conversion of methane to methanol.

  7. Lipid extraction from microalgae using a single ionic liquid

    DOEpatents

    Salvo, Roberto Di; Reich, Alton; Dykes, Jr., H. Waite H.; Teixeira, Rodrigo

    2013-05-28

    A one-step process for the lysis of microalgae cell walls and separation of the cellular lipids for use in biofuel production by utilizing a hydrophilic ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium. The hydrophilic ionic liquid both lyses the microalgae cell walls and forms two immiscible layers, one of which consists of the lipid contents of the lysed cells. After mixture of the hydrophilic ionic liquid with a suspension of microalgae cells, gravity causes a hydrophobic lipid phase to move to a top phase where it is removed from the mixture and purified. The hydrophilic ionic liquid is recycled to lyse new microalgae suspensions.

  8. Predictive thermodynamics for ionic solids and liquids.

    PubMed

    Glasser, Leslie; Jenkins, H Donald Brooke

    2016-08-21

    The application of thermodynamics is simple, even if the theory may appear intimidating. We describe tools, developed over recent years, which make it easy to estimate often elusive thermodynamic parameter values, generally (but not exclusively) for ionic materials, both solid and liquid, as well as for their solid hydrates and solvates. The tools are termed volume-based thermodynamics (VBT) and thermodynamic difference rules (TDR), supplemented by the simple salt approximation (SSA) and single-ion values for volume, Vm, heat capacity, , entropy, , formation enthalpy, ΔfH°, and Gibbs formation energy, ΔfG°. These tools can be applied to provide values of thermodynamic and thermomechanical properties such as standard enthalpy of formation, ΔfH°, standard entropy, , heat capacity, Cp, Gibbs function of formation, ΔfG°, lattice potential energy, UPOT, isothermal expansion coefficient, α, and isothermal compressibility, β, and used to suggest the thermodynamic feasibility of reactions among condensed ionic phases. Because many of these methods yield results largely independent of crystal structure, they have been successfully extended to the important and developing class of ionic liquids as well as to new and hypothesised materials. Finally, these predictive methods are illustrated by application to K2SnCl6, for which known experimental results are available for comparison. A selection of applications of VBT and TDR is presented which have enabled input, usually in the form of thermodynamics, to be brought to bear on a range of topical problems. Perhaps the most significant advantage of VBT and TDR methods is their inherent simplicity in that they do not require a high level of computational expertise nor expensive high-performance computation tools - a spreadsheet will usually suffice - yet the techniques are extremely powerful and accessible to non-experts. The connection between formula unit volume, Vm, and standard thermodynamic parameters represents a

  9. New Pyrazolium Salts as a Support for Ionic Liquid Crystals and Ionic Conductors.

    PubMed

    Pastor, María Jesús; Sánchez, Ignacio; Campo, José A; Schmidt, Rainer; Cano, Mercedes

    2018-04-03

    Ionic liquid crystals (ILCs) are a class of materials that combine the properties of liquid crystals (LCs) and ionic liquids (ILs). This type of materials is directed towards properties such as conductivity in ordered systems at different temperatures. In this work, we synthesize five new families of ILCs containing symmetrical and unsymmetrical substituted pyrazolium cations, with different alkyl long-chains, and anions such as Cl - , BF₄ - , ReO₄ - , p -CH₃-₆H₄SO₃ - (PTS) and CF₃SO₃ - (OTf). We study their thermal behavior by polarized light optical microscopy (POM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). All of them, except those with OTf as counteranion, show thermotropic mesomorphism. The observations by POM reveal textures of lamellar mesophases. Those agree with the arrangement observed in the X-ray crystal structure of [H₂pz R(4),R(4) ][ReO₄]. The nature of the mesophases is also confirmed by variable temperature powder X-ray diffraction. On the other hand, the study of the dielectric properties at variable temperature in mesomorphic (Cl - and BF₄ - ) and non-mesomorphic (OTf) salts indicates that the supramolecular arrangement of the mesophase favors a greater ionic mobility and therefore ionic conductivity.

  10. Elucidation of ionic interactions in the protic ionic liquid solutions by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Rai, Gitanjali; Kumar, Anil

    2014-04-17

    The strong hydrogen-bonded network noted in protic ionic liquids (PILs) may lead to stronger interactions of the ionic entities of PILs with solvents (water, methanol, ethylene glycol, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), N,N'-dimethylformamide (DMF)) as compared with those of aprotic ionic liquids (APILs). The PILs used in this work are 1-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, 2-methylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate, and N-methylpyrrolodinium tetrafluoroborate in comparison to 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, which is classified as an APIL. In this work, the excess partial molar enthalpy, H(E)IL obtained from isothermal calorimetric titrations at 298.15 K is used to probe the nature of interactions of the PIL cations with solvent molecules against those present in APIL-solvent systems. This work also reports interesting flip-flopping in the thermal behavior of these PIL-solvent systems depending upon the structure of the cationic ring of a PIL. In some cases, these flip-flops are the specific fingerprints for specific PILs in a common solvent environment. The excess partial molar enthalpy at infinite dilution, H(E,∞)IL, of these PILs bears a critical dependence on the solvent properties. An analysis of relative apparent molar enthalpies, ϕL, of the PIL solutions by the ion interaction model of Pitzer yields important information on ionic interactions of these systems.

  11. New Pyrazolium Salts as a Support for Ionic Liquid Crystals and Ionic Conductors

    PubMed Central

    Pastor, María Jesús; Sánchez, Ignacio; Schmidt, Rainer; Cano, Mercedes

    2018-01-01

    Ionic liquid crystals (ILCs) are a class of materials that combine the properties of liquid crystals (LCs) and ionic liquids (ILs). This type of materials is directed towards properties such as conductivity in ordered systems at different temperatures. In this work, we synthesize five new families of ILCs containing symmetrical and unsymmetrical substituted pyrazolium cations, with different alkyl long-chains, and anions such as Cl−, BF4−, ReO4−, p-CH3-6H4SO3− (PTS) and CF3SO3− (OTf). We study their thermal behavior by polarized light optical microscopy (POM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). All of them, except those with OTf as counteranion, show thermotropic mesomorphism. The observations by POM reveal textures of lamellar mesophases. Those agree with the arrangement observed in the X-ray crystal structure of [H2pzR(4),R(4)][ReO4]. The nature of the mesophases is also confirmed by variable temperature powder X-ray diffraction. On the other hand, the study of the dielectric properties at variable temperature in mesomorphic (Cl− and BF4−) and non-mesomorphic (OTf) salts indicates that the supramolecular arrangement of the mesophase favors a greater ionic mobility and therefore ionic conductivity. PMID:29614030

  12. Notre Dame Geothermal Ionic Liquids Research: Ionic Liquids for Utilization of Geothermal Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Brennecke, Joan F.

    The goal of this project was to develop ionic liquids for two geothermal energy related applications. The first goal was to design ionic liquids as high temperature heat transfer fluids. We identified appropriate compounds based on both experiments and molecular simulations. We synthesized the new ILs, and measured their thermal stability, measured storage density, viscosity, and thermal conductivity. We found that the most promising compounds for this application are aminopyridinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide based ILs. We also performed some measurements of thermal stability of IL mixtures and used molecular simulations to better understand the thermal conductivity of nanofluids (i.e., mixtures of ILsmore » and nanoparticles). We found that the mixtures do not follow ideal mixture theories and that the addition of nanoparticles to ILs may well have a beneficial influence on the thermal and transport properties of IL-based heat transfer fluids. The second goal was to use ionic liquids in geothermally driven absorption refrigeration systems. We performed copious thermodynamic measurements and modeling of ionic liquid/water systems, including modeling of the absorption refrigeration systems and the resulting coefficients of performance. We explored some IL/organic solvent mixtures as candidates for this application, both with experimentation and molecular simulations. We found that the COPs of all of the IL/water systems were higher than the conventional system – LiBr/H2O. Thus, IL/water systems appear very attractive for absorption refrigeration applications.« less

  13. Transports of ionic liquids in ionic polymer conductor network composite actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Liu, Sheng; Lin, Junhong; Wang, Dong; Jain, Vaibhav; Montazami, Reza; Heflin, James R.; Li, Jing; Madsen, Louis; Zhang, Q. M.

    2010-04-01

    We investigate the influence of ionic liquids on the electromechanical performance of Ionic Polymer Conductor Network Composite (IPCNC) bending actuators. Two imidazolium ionic liquids (ILs) with one cation, which is 1-ethyl-3- methylimidazolium ([EMI+]), and two different anions, which are tetrafluoroborate ([BF4-]) and trifluoromethanesulfonate ([Tf-]), are chosen for the study. By combining the time domain electric and electromechanical responses, we developed a new model that describes the ion transports in IPCNC actuators. The time constant of excess cation and anion migration in various composite electrodes are deduced: 6s and 25s in RuO2/Nafion; 7.9s and 36.3s in RuO2/Aquivion; 4.8s and 53s in Au/PAH, respectively. NMR is also applied to provide quantitative measures of self-diffusion coefficients independently for IL anions and cations both in pure ILs and in ILs absorved into ionomers. All the results indicate that the motion of cation, in the studied pure ionic liquids, polymer matrix and conductor network composites, is faster than that of anion. Moreover, the CNC morphology is playing a crucial role in determining the ion transport in the porous electrodes.

  14. Antiferromagnetic interaction between A'-site Mn spins in A-site-ordered perovskite YMn3Al4O12.

    PubMed

    Tohyama, Takenori; Saito, Takashi; Mizumaki, Masaichiro; Agui, Akane; Shimakawa, Yuichi

    2010-03-01

    The A-site-ordered perovskite YMn(3)Al(4)O(12) was prepared by high-pressure synthesis. Structural analysis with synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data and the Mn L-edges X-ray absorption spectrum revealed that the compound has a chemical composition Y(3+)Mn(3+)(3)Al(3+)(4)O(2-)(12) with magnetic Mn(3+) at the A' site and non-magnetic Al(3+) at the B site. An antiferromagnetic interaction between the A'-site Mn(3+) spins is induced by the nearest neighboring Mn-Mn direct exchange interaction and causes an antiferromagnetic transition at 34.3 K.

  15. Synthesis and Characterization of Ionically Crosslinked Elastomers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    ionomer with a anionic monomer, and crosslinking by copolymerization with a  hydrophobic  monomer.  While these materials displayed signatures of...Therefore, these RAFT agents should have utility in the  synthesis of  super ‐soft and/or higher damping elastomers.  2. An ionic, divinyl crosslinking

  16. Ionically self-assembled monolayers (ISAMs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janik, John

    2001-04-01

    Ionically self-assembled monolayers (ISAMs), fabricated by alternate adsorption of cationic and anionic components, yield exceptionally homogeneous thin films with sub-nanometer control of the thickness and relative special location of the component materials. Using organic electrochromic materials such as polyaniline, we report studies of electrochromic responses in ISAM films. Reversible changes in the absorption spectrum are observed with the application of voltages on the order of 1.0 V. Measurements are made using both liquid electrolytes and in all-solid state devices incorporating solid polyelectrolytes such as poly(2-acylamido 2-methyl propane sulfonic acid) (PAMPS).

  17. Pycnonuclear reaction rates for binary ionic mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichimaru, S.; Ogata, S.; Van Horn, H. M.

    1992-01-01

    Through a combination of compositional scaling arguments and examinations of Monte Carlo simulation results for the interparticle separations in binary-ionic mixture (BIM) solids, we have derived parameterized expressions for the BIM pycnonuclear rates as generalizations of those in one-component solids obtained previously by Salpeter and Van Horn and by Ogata et al. We have thereby discovered a catalyzing effect of the heavier elements, which enhances the rates of reactions among the lighter elements when the charge ratio exceeds a critical value of approximately 2.3.

  18. Study of an ionic smoke sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtari, Z.; Holé, S.; Lewiner, J.

    2013-05-01

    Ionization smoke sensors are among the best smoke sensors; however, the little radioactive source they include is no longer desirable since it makes recycling more complicated. In this paper, we discuss an electrostatic system in which a corona discharge is used to generate the ions needed for smoke detection. We show how the velocity of ions is reduced in our system for a better interaction between smoke and drifting ions. The influence of smoke, temperature and moisture is studied. It is shown that the proposed sensor has good sensitivity compared with conventional ionic and optical smoke sensors.

  19. Durable electrooptic devices comprising ionic liquids

    DOEpatents

    Agrawal, Anoop; Cronin, John P.; Tonazzi, Juan C. L.; Warner, Benjamin P.; McCleskey, T. Mark; Burrell, Anthony K.

    2005-11-01

    Electrolyte solutions for electrochromic devices such as rear view mirrors and displays with low leakage currents are prepared using inexpensive, low conductivity conductors. Preferred electrolytes include bifunctional redox dyes and molten salt solvents with enhanced stability toward ultraviolet radiation. The solvents include lithium or quaternary ammonium cations, and perfluorinated sulfonylimide anions selected from trifluoromethylsulfonate (CF3SO3-), bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF3SO2)2N-), bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF3CF2SO2)2N-) and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide ((CF3SO2)3C-). Electroluminescent, electrochromic and photoelectrochromic devices with nanostructured electrodes include ionic liquids with bifunctional redox dyes.

  20. Phytoremediation of Ionic and Methyl Mercury Pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Meagher, Richard B.

    Phytoremediation is defined as the use of plants to extract, resist, detoxify, and/or sequester toxic environmental pollutants. The long-term goal of the proposed research is to develop and test highly productive, field-adapted plant species that have been engineered for the phytoremediation of mercury. A variety of different genes, which should enable plants to clean mercury polluted sites are being tested as tools for mercury phytoremediation, first in model laboratory plants and then in potential field species. Several of these genes have already been shown to enhance mercury phytoremediation. Mercury pollution is a serious, world-wide problem affecting the health of humanmore » and wildlife populations. Environmentally, the most serious mercury threat is the production of methylmercury (CH3Hg+) by native bacteria at mercury contaminated wetland sites. Methylmercury is inherently more toxic than metallic (Hg(0)) or ionic (Hg(II)) mercury, and because methylmercury is prolifically biomagnified up the food chain, it poses the most immediate danger to animal populations. We have successfully engineered two model plants, Arabidopsis and tobacco, to use the bacterial merB gene to convert methylmercury to less toxic ionic mercury and to use the bacterial merA gene to further detoxify ionic mercury to the least toxic form of mercury, metallic mercury. Plants expressing both MerA and MerB proteins detoxify methylmercury in two steps to the metallic form. These plants germinate, grow, and set seed at normal growth rates on levels of methylmercury or ionic mercury that are lethal to normal plants. Our newest efforts involve engineering plants with several additional bacterial and plant genes that allow for higher levels of mercury resistance and mercury hyperaccumulation. The potential for these plants to hyperaccumulate mercury was further advanced by developing constitutive, aboveground, and root-specific gene expression systems. Our current strategy is to engineer

  1. Purification and characterization of VDE, a site-specific endonuclease from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Gimble, F S; Thorner, J

    1993-10-15

    The 119-kDa primary translation product of the VMA1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergoes a self-catalyzed rearrangement ("protein splicing") that excises an internal 50-kDa segment of the polypeptide and joins the amino-terminal and carboxyl-terminal segments to generate the 69-kDa subunit of the vacuolar membrane-associated H(+)-ATPase. We have shown previously that the internal segment is a site-specific endonuclease (Gimble, F. S., and Thorner, J. (1992) Nature 357, 301-306). Here we describe methods for the high level expression and purification to near homogeneity of both the authentic VMA1-derived endonuclease (or VDE) from yeast (yield 18%) and a recombinant form of VDE made in bacteria (yield 29%). Detailed characterization of these preparations demonstrated that the yeast-derived and bacterially produced enzymes were indistinguishable, as judged by: (a) behavior during purification; (b) apparent native molecular mass (50 kDa); (c) immunological reactivity; and (d) catalytic properties (specific activity; cleavage site recognition; and optima for pH, temperature, divalent cation and ionic strength). The minimal site required for VDE cleavage was delimited to a 30-base pair sequence within its specific substrate (the VMA1 delta vde allele).

  2. Excimer Formation Dynamics of Dipyrenyldecane in Structurally Different Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Anita; Pandey, Siddharth

    2017-12-07

    Ionic liquids, being composed of ions alone, may offer alternative pathways for molecular aggregation. These pathways could be controlled by the chemical structure of the cation and the anion of the ionic liquids. Intramolecular excimer formation dynamics of a bifluorophoric probe, 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)decane [1Py(10)1Py], where the fluorophoric pyrene moieties are separated by a long decyl chain, is investigated in seven different ionic liquids in 10-90 °C temperature range. The long alkyl separator allows for ample interaction with the solubilizing milieu prior to the formation of the excimer. The ionic liquids are composed of two sets, one having four ionic liquids of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium cation ([bmim + ]) with different anions and the other having four ionic liquids of bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide anion ([Tf 2 N - ]) with different cations. The excimer-to-monomer emission intensity ratio (I E /I M ) is found to increase with increasing temperature in sigmoidal fashion. Chemical structure of the ionic liquid controls the excimer formation efficiency, as I E /I M values within ionic liquids with the same viscosities are found to be significantly different. The excited-state intensity decay kinetics of 1Py(10)1Py in ionic liquids do not adhere to a simplistic Birk's scheme, where only one excimer conformer forms after excitation. The apparent rate constants of excimer formation (k a ) in highly viscous ionic liquids are an order of magnitude lower than those reported in organic solvents. In general, the higher the viscosity of the ionic liquid, the more sensitive is the k a to the temperature with higher activation energy, E a . The trend in E a is found to be similar to that for activation energy of the viscous flow (E a,η ). Stokes-Einstein relationship is not followed in [bmim + ] ionic liquids; however, with the exception of [choline][Tf 2 N], it is found to be followed in [Tf 2 N - ] ionic liquids suggesting the cyclization dynamics of 1Py(10)1Py

  3. Highly efficient conductivity modulation of cinnamate-based light-responsive ionic liquids in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Wang, Huiyong; Wang, Jianji; Zhang, Yue; Guo, Zhongjia

    2014-12-11

    A new class of cinnamate-based light-responsive ionic liquids was synthesized and characterized, and these ionic liquids with longer alkyl chains showed a remarkable increase in ionic conductivity under UV light irradiation in aqueous solutions.

  4. Cation radius effects on the helix-coil transition of DNA. Cryptates and other large cations.

    PubMed Central

    Trend, B L; Knoll, D A; Ueno, M; Evans, D F; Bloomfield, V A

    1990-01-01

    Most polyelectrolyte theories of the effect of ions on the thermal melting of DNA assume that the predominant influence of the cations comes through their charge. Ion size and structure are treated, for analytic convenience, as negligible variables. We have examined the validity of this assumption by measuring the melting temperature of calf thymus DNA as a function of salt concentration with four univalent cations of different hydrated radii. These are K+ (3.3 A), (n-Pr)4N+ (4.5 A), (EtOH)4N+ (4.5 A), and C222-K+ (5 A). C222-K+ is a complex of cryptand C222 with K+. With K+ as the sole cation, Tm varies linearly with the log of ionic strength over the range 0.001-0.1 M. With all the K+ sequestered by an equimolar amount of C222, Tm is depressed by 10-20 degrees C and the slope of Tm vs. ionic strength is lower. At low ionic strength, an even greater reduction in Tm is achieved with (n-Pr)4N+; but the similar-sized (EtOH)4N+ gives a curve more similar to K+. Theoretical modeling, taking into account cation size through the Poisson-Boltzmann equation for cylindrical polyelectrolytes, predicts that larger cations should be less effective in stabilizing the double helix; but the calculated effect is less than observed experimentally. These results show that valence, cation size, and specific solvation effects are all important in determining the stability of the double-helical form of DNA. PMID:2344467

  5. Dynamics of Charged Species in Ionic-Neutral Block Copolymer and Surfactant Complexes [Structural Relaxation and Dynamics of Ionic-Neutral Block Copolymer Surfactant Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Borreguero, Jose M.; Pincus, Philip A.; Sumpter, Bobby G.

    Structure–property relationships of ionic block copolymer (BCP) surfactant complexes are critical toward the progress of favorable engineering design of efficient charge-transport materials. In this paper, molecular dynamics simulations are used to understand the dynamics of charged-neutral BCP and surfactant complexes. The dynamics are examined for two different systems: charged-neutral double-hydrophilic and hydrophobic–hydrophilic block copolymers with oppositely charged surfactant moieties. The dynamics of the surfactant head, tails, and charges are studied for five different BCP volume fractions. We observe that the dynamics of the different species solely depend on the balance between electrostatic and entropic interactions between the charged species andmore » the neutral monomers. The favorable hydrophobic–hydrophobic interactions and the unfavorable hydrophobic–hydrophilic interactions determine the mobilities of the monomers. The dynamical properties of the charge species influence complex formation. Structural relaxations exhibit length-scale dependent behavior, with slower relaxation at the radius of gyration length-scale and faster relaxation at the segmental length-scale, consistent with previous results. The dynamical analysis correlates ion-exchange kinetics to the self-assembly behavior of the complexes.« less

  6. Dynamics of Charged Species in Ionic-Neutral Block Copolymer and Surfactant Complexes [Structural Relaxation and Dynamics of Ionic-Neutral Block Copolymer Surfactant Complexes

    DOE PAGES

    Borreguero, Jose M.; Pincus, Philip A.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; ...

    2017-06-21

    Structure–property relationships of ionic block copolymer (BCP) surfactant complexes are critical toward the progress of favorable engineering design of efficient charge-transport materials. In this paper, molecular dynamics simulations are used to understand the dynamics of charged-neutral BCP and surfactant complexes. The dynamics are examined for two different systems: charged-neutral double-hydrophilic and hydrophobic–hydrophilic block copolymers with oppositely charged surfactant moieties. The dynamics of the surfactant head, tails, and charges are studied for five different BCP volume fractions. We observe that the dynamics of the different species solely depend on the balance between electrostatic and entropic interactions between the charged species andmore » the neutral monomers. The favorable hydrophobic–hydrophobic interactions and the unfavorable hydrophobic–hydrophilic interactions determine the mobilities of the monomers. The dynamical properties of the charge species influence complex formation. Structural relaxations exhibit length-scale dependent behavior, with slower relaxation at the radius of gyration length-scale and faster relaxation at the segmental length-scale, consistent with previous results. The dynamical analysis correlates ion-exchange kinetics to the self-assembly behavior of the complexes.« less

  7. Furfural production using ionic liquids: A review.

    PubMed

    Peleteiro, Susana; Rivas, Sandra; Alonso, José Luis; Santos, Valentín; Parajó, Juan Carlos

    2016-02-01

    Furfural, a platform chemical with a bright future, is commercially obtained by acidic processing of xylan-containing biomass in aqueous media. Ionic liquids (ILs) can be employed in processed for furfural manufacture as additives, as catalysts and/or as reaction media. Depending on the IL utilized, externally added catalysts (usually, Lewis acids, Brönsted acids and/or solid acid catalysts) can be necessary to achieve high reaction yields. Oppositely, acidic ionic liquids (AILs) can perform as both solvents and catalysts, enabling the direct conversion of suitable substrates (pentoses, pentosans or xylan-containing biomass) into furfural. Operating in IL-containing media, the furfural yields can be improved when the product is continuously removed along the reaction (for example, by stripping or extraction), to avoid unwanted side-reactions leading to furfural consumption. These topics are reviewed, as well as the major challenges involved in the large scale utilization of ILs for furfural production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Oxygen Extraction from Regolith Using Ionic Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrios, Elizabeth A.; Curreri, Peter A.; Karr, Laurel J.

    2011-01-01

    An important concern with long-duration manned space travel is the need to furnish enough materials to the vehicle, as well as the crew, for the duration of the mission. By extracting oxygen from the oxides present in regolith, propellant and life support could be supplied to the vehicle and the crew while in space, thereby limiting the amount of supplies needed prior to lift-off. Using a class of compounds known as ionic liquids, we have been able to lower the electrolysis operating temperature from 1600 C (molten oxide electrolysis) to less than 200 C, making this process much more feasible in terms of energy consumption and materials handling. To make this process ready for deployment into space, we have investigated what steps of the process would be affected by the low-gravity environment in space. In the lab, the solubilization of lunar regolith simulant in ionic liquid produces water vapor that is normally distilled out of solution and subsequently electrolyzed for oxygen production. This distillation is not possible in space, so we have tested a method known as pervaporation and have suggested a way this technique could be incorporated into a reactor design.

  9. Nonconvective mixing of miscible ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Frost, Denzil S; Machas, Michael; Perea, Brian; Dai, Lenore L

    2013-08-13

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are ionic compounds that are liquid at room temperature. We studied the spontaneous mixing behavior between two ILs, ethylammonium nitrate (EAN) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIM][PF6]), and observed notable phenomena. Experimental studies showed that the interface between the two ILs was unusually long-lived, despite the ILs being miscible with one another. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations supported these findings and provided insight into the micromixing behavior of the ILs. We found that not only did the ions experience slow diffusion as they mix but also exhibited significant ordering into distinct regions. We suspect that this ordering disrupted concentration gradients in the direction normal to the interface, thus hindering diffusion in this direction and allowing the macroscopic interface to remain for long periods of time. Intermolecular interactions responsible for this behavior included the O-NH interaction between the EAN ions and the carbon chain-carbon chain interactions between the [BMIM](+) cations, which associate more strongly in the mixed state than in the pure IL state.

  10. Electrotunable lubricity with ionic liquid nanoscale films.

    PubMed

    Fajardo, O Y; Bresme, F; Kornyshev, A A; Urbakh, M

    2015-01-09

    One of the main challenges in tribology is finding the way for an in situ control of friction without changing the lubricant. One of the ways for such control is via the application of electric fields. In this respect a promising new class of lubricants is ionic liquids, which are solvent-free electrolytes, and their properties should be most strongly affected by applied voltage. Based on a minimal physical model, our study elucidates the connection between the voltage effect on the structure of the ionic liquid layers and their lubricating properties. It reveals two mechanisms of variation of the friction force with the surface charge density, consistent with recent AFM measurements, namely via the (i) charge effect on normal and in-plane ordering in the film and (ii) swapping between anion and cation layers at the surfaces. We formulate conditions that would warrant low friction coefficients and prevent wear by resisting "squeezing-out" of the liquid under compression. These results give a background for controllable variation of friction.

  11. Accuracy of specimen-specific nonlinear finite element analysis for evaluation of distal radius strength in cadaver material.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Yusuke; Kuniyoshi, Kazuki; Suzuki, Takane; Ogawa, Yasufumi; Sukegawa, Koji; Rokkaku, Tomoyuki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2014-11-01

    Distal radius fracture, which often occurs in the setting of osteoporosis, can lead to permanent deformity and disability. Great effort has been directed toward developing noninvasive methods for evaluating the distal radius strength, with the goal of assessing fracture risk. The aim of this study was to evaluate distal radius strength using a finite element model and to gauge the accuracy of finite element model measurement using cadaver material. Ten wrists were obtained from cadavers with a mean age of 89.5 years at death. CT images of each wrist in an extended position were obtained. CT-based finite element models were prepared with Mechanical Finder software. Fracture on the models was simulated by applying a mechanical load to the palm in a direction parallel to the forearm axis, after which the fracture load and the site at which the fracture began were identified. For comparison, the wrists were fractured using a universal testing machine and the fracture load and the site of fracture were identified. The fracture load was 970.9 N in the finite element model group and 990.0 N in the actual measurement group. The site of the initial fracture was extra-articular to the distal radius in both groups. The finite element model was predictive for distal radius fracture when compared to the actual measurement. In this study, a finite element model for evaluation of distal radius strength was validated and can be used to predict fracture risk. We conclude that a finite element model is useful for the evaluation of distal radius strength. Knowing distal radius strength might avoid distal radius fracture because appropriate antiosteoporotic treatment can be initiated.

  12. Phytoremediation of Ionic and Methyl Mercury P

    SciTech Connect

    Meagher, Richard B.

    1999-06-01

    Our long-term goal is to enable highly productive plant species to extract, resist, detoxify, and/or sequester toxic heavy metal pollutants as an environmentally friendly alternative to physical remediation methods. We have focused this phytoremediation research on soil and water-borne ionic and methylmercury. Mercury pollution is a serious world-wide problem affecting the health of human and wild-life populations. Methylmercury, produced by native bacteria at mercury-contaminated wetland sites, is a particularly serious problem due to its extreme toxicity and efficient biomagnification in the food chain. We engineered several plant species (e.g., Arabidopsis, tobacco, canola, yellow poplar, rice) to express the bacterial genes,more » merB and/or merA, under the control of plant regulatory sequences. These transgenic plants acquired remarkable properties for mercury remediation. (1) Transgenic plants expressing merB (organomercury lyase) extract methylmercury from their growth substrate and degrade it to less toxic ionic mercury. They grow on concentrations of methylmercury that kill normal plants and accumulate low levels of ionic mercury. (2) Transgenic plants expressing merA (mercuric ion reductase) extract and electrochemically reduce toxic, reactive ionic mercury to much less toxic and volatile metallic mercury. This metal transformation is driven by the powerful photosynthetic reducing capacity of higher plants that generates excess NADPH using solar energy. MerA plants grow vigorously on levels of ionic mercury that kill control plants. Plants expressing both merB and merA degrade high levels of methylmercury and volatilize metallic mercury. These properties were shown to be genetically stable for several generations in the two plant species examined. Our work demonstrates that native trees, shrubs, and grasses can be engineered to remediate the most abundant toxic mercury pollutants. Building on these data our working hypothesis for the next grant period

  13. Catastrophic Thinking Is Associated With Finger Stiffness After Distal Radius Fracture Surgery.

    PubMed

    Teunis, Teun; Bot, Arjan G J; Thornton, Emily R; Ring, David

    2015-10-01

    To identify demographic, injury-related, or psychologic factors associated with finger stiffness at suture removal and 6 weeks after distal radius fracture surgery. We hypothesize that there are no factors associated with distance to palmar crease at suture removal. Prospective cohort study. Level I Academic Urban Trauma Center. One hundred sixteen adult patients underwent open reduction and internal fixation of their distal radius fractures; 96 of whom were also available 6 weeks after surgery. None. At suture removal, we recorded patients' demographics, AO fracture type, carpal tunnel release at the time of surgery, pain catastrophizing scale, Whiteley Index, Patient Health Questionnaire-9, and disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand questionnaire, 11-point ordinal measure of pain intensity, distance to palmar crease, and active flexion of the thumb through the small finger. At 6 weeks after surgery, we measured motion, disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand, and pain intensity. Prereduction and postsurgery radiographic fracture characteristics were assessed. Female sex, being married, specific surgeons, carpal tunnel release, AO type C fractures, and greater catastrophic thinking were associated with increased distance to palmar crease at suture removal. At 6 weeks, greater catastrophic thinking was the only factor associated with increased distance to palmar crease. Catastrophic thinking was a consistent and major determinant of finger stiffness at suture removal and 6 weeks after injury. Future research should assess if treatments that ameliorate catastrophic thinking can facilitate recovery of finger motion after operative treatment of a distal radius fracture. Prognostic Level I. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  14. Peering Into the Bondi Radius of the Supermassive Black Hole of NGC3115

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, Jimmy; Quataert, E.; Mathews, W.; Strader, J.; Brodie, J.; Bregman, J.; Larsen, S.

    2010-03-01

    Understanding accretion onto black holes remains one of the most active areas of research in astrophysics today, both for the intrinsic interest of black holes and because of their impact on larger scale problems in galaxy and structure formation. The key to understanding the accretion process lies in correctly modeling the behavior of the accreting gas once it falls within the gravitational influence of the black hole, the Bondi radius, R_B. The lack of significant observed radiation from most nearby massive black holes has prompted a significant theoretical effort aimed at explaining the very low radiative efficiencies and/or accretion rates. Determining which (if any!) of these scenarios describes low-L_X black hole systems is of fundamental importance to our understanding of accretion physics and black hole demography. Observational work has focused on using spatially unresolved spectral information to constrain theoretical models. While such studies have been successful in ruling out classical ADAF models in some instances, the main limitation has been the inability of even Chandra to resolve the accretion flow inside R_B and directly determine the temperature and density profile of the accretion flow, as it is the shape of the density profile that most strongly distinguishes the theoretical models (ADAFs, CDAFs, ADIOS). Measuring T(R) and rho(R) of an accretion flow is the only way of determining if current accretion models actually describe what is occurring inside the flow region. We present results from a deep (125 ksec) Chandra observation of the nearby S0 galaxy NGC3115, one of the very few galaxies with a resolvable Bondi radius (2"-4"). Based on these results, we discuss the possibility of deriving for the first time T(R) and rho(R) inside the Bondi radius of a black hole with an ultralong Chandra observation.

  15. Volar plate fixation failure for volar shearing distal radius fractures with small lunate facet fragments.

    PubMed

    Beck, John D; Harness, Neil G; Spencer, Hillard T

    2014-04-01

    To determine the percentage of AO B3 distal radius fractures that lose reduction after operative fixation and to see whether fracture morphology, patient factors, or fixation methods predict failure. We hypothesized that initial fracture displacement, amount of lunate facet available for fixation, plate position, and screw fixation would be significant risk factors for loss of reduction. A prospective, observational review was conducted of 51 patients (52 fractures) with AO B3 (volar shearing) distal radius fractures treated operatively between January 2007 and June 2012. We reviewed a prospective distal radius registry to determine demographic data, medical comorbidities, and physical examination findings. Radiographs were evaluated for AO classification, loss of reduction, length of volar cortex available for fixation, and adequacy of stabilization of the lunate facet fragment with a volar plate. Preoperative data were compared between patients who maintained radiographic alignment and those with loss of reduction. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was completed to determine significant predictors of loss of reduction. Volar shearing fractures with separate scaphoid and lunate facet fragments (AO B3.3), preoperative lunate subsidence distance, and length of volar cortex available for fixation were significant predictors for loss of reduction; the latter was significant in multivariate analysis. Plate position and number of screws used to stabilize the lunate facet were not statistically different between groups. Patients with AO B3.3 fractures with less than 15 mm of lunate facet available for fixation, or greater than 5 mm of initial lunate subsidence, are at risk for failure even if a volar plate is properly placed. In these cases, we recommend additional fixation to maintain reduction of the small volar lunate facet fracture fragments in the form of plate extensions, pins, wires, suture, wire forms, or mini screws. Therapeutic III. Copyright © 2014

  16. Measurement of Malrotation on Direct Radiography in Pediatric Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Duymus, Tahir Mutlu; Mutlu, Serhat; Komur, Baran; Mutlu, Harun; Yucel, Bulent; Parmaksizoglu, Atilla Sancar

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this prospective study was to test a mathematical method of measuring the malrotation of pediatric distal radius fractures (PDRFs) from direct radiographs. A total of 70 pediatric patients who presented at the Emergency Department with a distal radius fracture were evaluated. For 38 selected patients conservative treatment for PDRF was planned. Anteroposterior and lateral radiographs were taken of all of the patients for comparison before and after reduction. Radius bone diameters were measured in the coronal and sagittal planes on the healthy and fractured sides. Using the diameter values on the healthy side and the new diameter values on the fractured side in the rotation formula, the degree of malrotation between the fracture ends was calculated. The mean follow-up period was 13.5 months. Patients’ mean age was 10.00 ± 3.19 years (range, 4–12 years). The rotation degree in the sagittal plane significantly differed between the proximal (26.52°±2.84°) and distal fracture ends (20.96°±2.73°) (P = 0.001). The rotation degree in the coronal plane significantly differed between the proximal (26.70°±2.38°) and distal fracture ends (20.26°±2.86°) (P = 0.001). The net rotation deformity of the fracture line was determined to be 5.55°± 3.54° on lateral radiographs and 5.44°± 3.35° on anteroposterior radiographs, no significant difference was observed between measurements (P >0.05). The malrotation deformity in PDRF occurs with greater rotation in the proximal fragment than in the distal fragment. The net rotation deformity created between the fracture ends can be calculated on direct radiographs. Level of Evidence: Diagnostic, Level II PMID:27149480

  17. Combining ergometer exercise and artificial gravity in a compact-radius centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Ana; Trigg, Chris; Young, Laurence R.

    2015-08-01

    Humans experience physiological deconditioning during space missions, primarily attributable to weightlessness. Some of these adverse consequences include bone loss, muscle atrophy, sensory-motor deconditioning, and cardiovascular alteration, which may lead to orthostatic intolerance when astronauts return to Earth. Artificial gravity could provide a comprehensive countermeasure capable of challenging all the physiological systems at once, particularly if combined with exercise, thereby maintaining overall health during extended exposure to weightlessness. A new Compact Radius Centrifuge (CRC) platform was designed and built on the existing Short Radius Centrifuge (SRC) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The centrifuge has been constrained to a radius of 1.4 m, the upper radial limit for a centrifuge to fit within an International Space Station (ISS) module without extensive structural alterations. In addition, a cycle ergometer has been added for exercise during centrifugation. The CRC now includes sensors of foot forces, cardiovascular parameters, and leg muscle electromyography. An initial human experiment was conducted on 12 subjects to analyze the effects of different artificial gravity levels (0 g, 1 g, and 1.4 g, measured at the feet) and ergometer exercise intensities (25 W warm-up, 50 W moderate and 100 W vigorous) on the musculoskeletal function as well as motion sickness and comfort. Foot forces were measured during the centrifuge runs, and subjective comfort and motion sickness data were gathered after each session. Preliminary results indicate that ergometer exercise on a centrifuge may be effective in improving musculoskeletal function. The combination is well tolerated and motion sickness is minimal. The MIT CRC is a novel platform for future studies of exercise combined with artificial gravity. This combination may be effective as a countermeasure to space physiological deconditioning.

  18. Nearly arc-length tool path generation and tool radius compensation algorithm research in FTS turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Minghui; Zhao, Xuesen; Li, Zengqiang; Sun, Tao

    2014-08-01

    In the non-rotational symmetrical microstrcture surfaces generation using turning method with Fast Tool Servo(FTS), non-uniform distribution of the interpolation data points will lead to long processing cycle and poor surface quality. To improve this situation, nearly arc-length tool path generation algorithm is proposed, which generates tool tip trajectory points in nearly arc-length instead of the traditional interpolation rule of equal angle and adds tool radius compensation. All the interpolation points are equidistant in radial distribution because of the constant feeding speed in X slider, the high frequency tool radius compensation components are in both X direction and Z direction, which makes X slider difficult to follow the input orders due to its large mass. Newton iterative method is used to calculate the neighboring contour tangent point coordinate value with the interpolation point X position as initial value, in this way, the new Z coordinate value is gotten, and the high frequency motion components in X direction is decomposed into Z direction. Taking a typical microstructure with 4μm PV value for test, which is mixed with two 70μm wave length sine-waves, the max profile error at the angle of fifteen is less than 0.01μm turning by a diamond tool with big radius of 80μm. The sinusoidal grid is machined on a ultra-precision lathe succesfully, the wavelength is 70.2278μm the Ra value is 22.81nm evaluated by data points generated by filtering out the first five harmonics.

  19. Three-dimensional computer simulation of radiostereometric analysis (RSA) in distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Madanat, Rami; Moritz, Niko; Aro, Hannu T

    2007-01-01

    Physical phantom models have conventionally been used to determine the accuracy and precision of radiostereometric analysis (RSA) in various orthopaedic applications. Using a phantom model of a fracture of the distal radius it has previously been shown that RSA is a highly accurate and precise method for measuring both translation and rotation in three-dimensions (3-D). The main shortcoming of a physical phantom model is its inability to mimic complex 3-D motion. The goal of this study was to create a realistic computer model for preoperative planning of RSA studies and to test the accuracy of RSA in measuring complex movements in fractures of the distal radius using this new model. The 3-D computer model was created from a set of tomographic scans. The simulation of the radiographic imaging was performed using ray-tracing software (POV-Ray). RSA measurements were performed according to standard protocol. Using a two-part fracture model (AO/ASIF type A2), it was found that for simple movements in one axis, translations in the range of 25microm-2mm could be measured with an accuracy of +/-2microm. Rotations ranging from 16 degrees to 2 degrees could be measured with an accuracy of +/-0.015 degrees . Using a three-part fracture model the corresponding values of accuracy were found to be +/-4microm and +/-0.031 degrees for translation and rotation, respectively. For complex 3-D motion in a three-part fracture model (AO/ASIF type C1) the accuracy was +/-6microm for translation and +/-0.120 degrees for rotation. The use of 3-D computer modelling can provide a method for preoperative planning of RSA studies in complex fractures of the distal radius and in other clinical situations in which the RSA method is applicable.

  20. A functional outcomes survey of elderly patients who sustained distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Amorosa, Louis F; Vitale, Mark A; Brown, Shervondalonn; Kaufmann, Robert A

    2011-09-01

    This study aims to examine the subjective functional outcomes of patients 70 years or older who sustained distal radius fractures through the use of the Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) and Short Form-8 Health (SF-8) surveys. Patients at least 70 years old with a distal radius fracture between 2000 and 2004 were identified and their charts reviewed. They were contacted to answer the DASH and SF-8 surveys. The radiographic injury parameters examined were articular stepoff greater than 2 mm, dorsal tilt on the lateral radiograph, ulnar variance, and presence of an ulnar styloid fracture. Fifty-eight patients answered the DASH and SF-8 surveys. The mean age at the time of injury in the survey group was 78 years old (range 70-94 years). Mean follow-up period was 33 months (range 13-65 months). Average DASH and SF-8 scores were 22.3 (SD 22.4) and 31.5 (SD 6.9), respectively. DASH scores were inversely correlated with SF-8 scores (R = -0.65, p < 0.01). Patients who sustained an associated ulnar styloid fracture demonstrated worse DASH scores than those without an ulnar styloid fracture (presence of ulnar styloid fracture: mean DASH 26.2, no ulnar styloid fracture: mean DASH 12.9, p = 0.04). There were no significant differences in functional outcome for any other radiographic parameters assessed. Males had statistically better DASH scores than the females (males: mean DASH 6.9, females: mean DASH 24.4, p = 0.003). No difference was found in functional outcome scores among different treatment groups. In elderly patients with distal radius fractures, the only radiographic parameter we found that affects functional outcome is an associated ulnar styloid fracture. Additionally, females had worse functional outcomes than males.

  1. Distal radius geometry and skeletal strength indices after peripubertal artistic gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Dowthwaite, J N; Scerpella, T A

    2011-01-01

    Development of optimal skeletal strength should decrease adult bone fragility. Nongymnasts (NON): were compared with girls exposed to gymnastics during growth (EX/GYM: ), using peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) to evaluate postmenarcheal bone geometry, density, and strength. Pre- and perimenarcheal gymnastic loading yields advantages in indices of postmenarcheal bone geometry and skeletal strength. Two prior studies using pQCT have reported bone density and size advantages in Tanner I/II gymnasts, but none describe gymnasts' bone properties later in adolescence. The current study used pQCT to evaluate whether girls exposed to gymnastics during late childhood growth and perimenarcheal growth exhibited greater indices of distal radius geometry, density, and skeletal strength. Postmenarcheal subjects underwent 4% and 33% distal radius pQCT scans, yielding: 1) vBMD and cross-sectional areas (CSA) (total bone, compartments); 2) polar strength-strain index; 3) index of structural strength in axial compression. Output was compared for EX/GYM: vs. NON: , adjusting for gynecological age and stature (maturity and body size), reporting means, standard errors, and significance. Sixteen postmenarcheal EX/GYM: (age 16.7 years; gynecological age 3.4 years) and 13 NON: (age 16.2 years; gynecological age 3.6 years) were evaluated. At both diaphysis and metaphysis, EX/GYM: exhibited greater CSA and bone strength indices than NON; EX/GYM: exhibited 79% larger intramedullary CSA than NON: (p < 0.05). EX/GYM: had significantly higher 4% trabecular vBMD; differences were not detected for 4% total vBMD and 33% cortical vBMD. Following pre-/perimenarcheal gymnastic exposure, relative to nongymnasts, postmenarcheal EX/GYM: demonstrated greater indices of distal radius geometry and skeletal strength (metaphysis and diaphysis) with greater metaphyseal trabecular vBMD; larger intramedullary cavity size was particularly striking.

  2. Distal radius geometry and skeletal strength indices after peripubertal artistic gymnastics

    PubMed Central

    Scerpella, T. A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Development of optimal skeletal strength should decrease adult bone fragility. Nongymnasts (NON) were compared with girls exposed to gymnastics during growth (EX/GYM), using peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) to evaluate postmenarcheal bone geometry, density, and strength. Pre- and perimenarcheal gymnastic loading yields advantages in indices of postmenarcheal bone geometry and skeletal strength. Introduction Two prior studies using pQCT have reported bone density and size advantages in Tanner I/II gymnasts, but none describe gymnasts’ bone properties later in adolescence. The current study used pQCT to evaluate whether girls exposed to gymnastics during late childhood growth and perimenarcheal growth exhibited greater indices of distal radius geometry, density, and skeletal strength. Methods Postmenarcheal subjects underwent 4% and 33% distal radius pQCT scans, yielding: 1) vBMD and cross-sectional areas (CSA) (total bone, compartments); 2) polar strength-strain index; 3) index of structural strength in axial compression. Output was compared for EX/GYM vs. NON, adjusting for gynecological age and stature (maturity and body size), reporting means, standard errors, and significance. Results Sixteen postmenarcheal EX/GYM (age 16.7 years; gynecological age 3.4 years) and 13 NON (age 16.2 years; gynecological age 3.6 years) were evaluated. At both diaphysis and metaphysis, EX/GYM exhibited greater CSA and bone strength indices than NON; EX/GYM exhibited 79% larger intramedullary CSA than NON (p<0.05). EX/GYM had significantly higher 4% trabecular vBMD; differences were not detected for 4% total vBMD and 33% cortical vBMD. Conclusions Following pre-/perimenarcheal gymnastic exposure, relative to nongymnasts, postmenarcheal EX/GYM demonstrated greater indices of distal radius geometry and skeletal strength (metaphysis and diaphysis) with greater metaphyseal trabecular vBMD; larger intramedullary cavity size was particularly striking. PMID

  3. [Locked volar plating for complex distal radius fractures: maintaining radial length].

    PubMed

    Jeudy, J; Pernin, J; Cronier, P; Talha, A; Massin, P

    2007-09-01

    Maintaining radial length, likely to be the main challenge in the treatment of complex distal radius fractures, is necessary for complete grip-strength and pro-supination range recovery. In spite of frequent secondary displacements, bridging external-fixation has remained the reference method, either isolated or in association with additional percutaneous pins or volar plating. Also, there seems to be a relation between algodystrophy and the duration of traction applied on the radio-carpal joint. Fixed-angle volar plating offers the advantage of maintaining the reduction until fracture healing, without bridging the joint. In a prospective study, forty-three consecutive fractures of the distal radius with a positivated ulnar variance were treated with open reduction and fixed-angle volar plating. Results were assessed with special attention to the radial length and angulation obtained and maintained throughout treatment, based on repeated measurements of the ulnar variance and radial angulation in the first six months postoperatively. The correction of the ulnar variance was maintained until complete recovery, independently of initial metaphyseal comminution, and of the amount of radial length gained at reduction. Only 3 patients lost more than 1 mm of radial length after reduction. The posterior tilt of the distal radial epiphysis was incompletely reduced in 13 cases, whereas reduction was partially lost in 6 elderly osteoporotic female patients. There was 8 articular malunions, all of them less than 2 mm. Secondary displacements were found to be related to a deficient locking technique. Eight patients developed an algodystropy. The risk factors for algodystrophy were articular malunion, associated posterior pining, and associated lesions of the ipsilateral upper limb. Provided that the locking technique was correct, this type of fixation appeared efficient in maintaining the radial length in complex fractures of the distal radius. The main challenge remains the

  4. MRI of bone marrow in the distal radius: in vivo precision of effective transverse relaxation times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grampp, S.; Majumdar, S.; Jergas, M.; Lang, P.; Gies, A.; Genant, H. K.

    1995-01-01

    The effective transverse relaxation time T2* is influenced by the presence of trabecular bone, and can potentially provide a measure of bone density as well as bone structure. We determined the in vivo precision of T2* in repeated bone marrow measurements. The T2* measurements of the bone marrow of the distal radius were performed twice within 2 weeks in six healthy young volunteers using a modified water-presaturated 3D Gradient-Recalled Acquisition at Steady State (GRASS) sequence with TE 7, 10, 12, 20, and 30; TR 67; flip angle (FA) 90 degrees. An axial volume covering a length of 5.6 cm in the distal radius was measured. Regions of interest (ROIs) were determined manually and consisted of the entire trabecular bone cross-section extending proximally from the radial subchondral endplate. Reproducibility of T2* and area measurements was expressed as the absolute precision error (standard deviation [SD] in ms or mm2) or as the relative precision error (SD/mean x 100, or coefficient of variation [CV] in %) between the two-point measurements. Short-term precision of T2* and area measurements varied depending on section thickness and location of the ROI in the distal radius. Absolute precision errors for T2* times were between 1.3 and 2.9 ms (relative precision errors 3.8-9.5 %) and for area measurements between 20 and 55 mm2 (relative precision errors 5.1-16.4%). This MR technique for quantitative assessment of trabecular bone density showed reasonable reproducibility in vivo and is a promising future tool for the assessment of osteoporosis.

  5. Determination of recombination radius in Si for binary collision approximation codes

    DOE PAGES

    Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Foiles, Stephen M.

    2015-09-11

    Displacement damage caused by ions or neutrons in microelectronic devices can have significant effect on the performance of these devices. Therefore, it is important to predict not only the displacement damage profile, but also its magnitude precisely. Analytical methods and binary collision approximation codes working with amorphous targets use the concept of displacement energy, the energy that a lattice atom has to receive to create a permanent replacement. It was found that this “displacement energy” is direction dependent; it can range from 12 to 32 eV in silicon. Obviously, this model fails in BCA codes that work with crystalline targets,more » such as Marlowe. Marlowe does not use displacement energy; instead, it uses lattice binding energy only and then pairs the interstitial atoms with vacancies. Then based on the configuration of the Frenkel pairs it classifies them as close, near, or distant pairs, and considers the distant pairs the permanent replacements. Unfortunately, this separation is an ad hoc assumption, and the results do not agree with molecular dynamics calculations. After irradiation, there is a prompt recombination of interstitials and vacancies if they are nearby, within a recombination radius. In order to implement this recombination radius in Marlowe, we used the comparison of MD and Marlowe calculation in a range of ion energies in single crystal silicon target. As a result, the calculations showed that a single recombination radius of ~7.4 Å in Marlowe for a range of ion energies gives an excellent agreement with MD.« less

  6. Distal radius fractures result in alterations in scapular kinematics: a three-dimensional motion analysis.

    PubMed

    Ayhan, Cigdem; Turgut, Elif; Baltaci, Gul

    2015-03-01

    Scapular motion is closely integrated with arm motion. Injury to a distal segment requires compensatory changes in the proximal segments leading to alterations in scapular motion. Since the effects of distal injuries on scapular kinematics remain unknown, in the present study we investigated the influences on scapular motion in patients with distal injuries. Sixteen subjects with a history of distal radius fracture and 20 asymptomatic healthy subjects (controls) participated in the study. Three-dimensional scapular and humeral kinematic data were collected on all 3 planes of shoulder elevation: frontal, sagittal, and scapular. All testing was performed in a single session; therefore, the sensors remained attached to the participants for all testing. The position and orientation data of the scapula at 30°, 60°, 90°, and 120° humerothoracic elevation and 120°, 90°, 60°, and 30° lowering were used for statistical comparisons. Independent samples t-test was used to compare the scapular internal/external rotation, upward/downward rotation, and anterior/posterior tilt between the affected side of subjects with a distal radius fracture and the dominant side of asymptomatic subjects at the same stage of humerothoracic elevation. Scapular internal rotation was significantly increased at 30° elevation (P=0.01), 90° elevation (P=0.03), and 30° lowering (P=0.03), and upward rotation was increased at 30° and 60° elevation (P<0.001) on the affected side during frontal plane elevation. Scapular upward rotation and anterior tilt were significantly increased during 30° lowering on both the scapular (P=0.002 and 0.02, respectively) and sagittal planes (P=0.01 and 0.02. respectively). Patients with distal radius fractures exhibit altered scapular kinematics, which may further contribute to the development of secondary musculoskeletal pathologies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The Impact of Subsampling on MODIS Level-3 Statistics of Cloud Optical Thickness and Effective Radius

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oreopoulos, Lazaros

    2004-01-01

    The MODIS Level-3 optical thickness and effective radius cloud product is a gridded l deg. x 1 deg. dataset that is derived from aggregation and subsampling at 5 km of 1 km, resolution Level-2 orbital swath data (Level-2 granules). This study examines the impact of the 5 km subsampling on the mean, standard deviation and inhomogeneity parameter statistics of optical thickness and effective radius. The methodology is simple and consists of estimating mean errors for a large collection of Terra and Aqua Level-2 granules by taking the difference of the statistics at the original and subsampled resolutions. It is shown that the Level-3 sampling does not affect the various quantities investigated to the same degree, with second order moments suffering greater subsampling errors, as expected. Mean errors drop dramatically when averages over a sufficient number of regions (e.g., monthly and/or latitudinal averages) are taken, pointing to a dominance of errors that are of random nature. When histograms built from subsampled data with the same binning rules as in the Level-3 dataset are used to reconstruct the quantities of interest, the mean errors do not deteriorate significantly. The results in this paper provide guidance to users of MODIS Level-3 optical thickness and effective radius cloud products on the range of errors due to subsampling they should expect and perhaps account for, in scientific work with this dataset. In general, subsampling errors should not be a serious concern when moderate temporal and/or spatial averaging is performed.

  8. Distal Radius Volar Rim Fracture Fixation Using DePuy-Synthes Volar Rim Plate

    PubMed Central

    Kachooei, Amir Reza; Tarabochia, Matthew; Jupiter, Jesse B.

    2016-01-01

    Background To assess the results of distal radius fractures with the involvement of the volar rim fixed with the DePuy-Synthes Volar Rim Plate. Case Description We searched for the patients with volar rim fracture and/or volar rim fractures as part of a complex fracture fixed with a volar rim plate. Ten patients met the inclusion criteria: three patients with type 23B3, six patients with type 23C, and one patient with very distal type 23A. The mean follow-up was 14 months (range: 2–26). Fractures healed in all patients. Of the three patients with isolated volar rim fractures (type 23B3), two patients had no detectable deficits in motion. These patients had an average Gartland and Werley score of 9 (range: 2–14). Of the other seven patients (six with type 23C and one with type 23A fracture), three patients healed with full range of motion and four had some deficits in range of motion. Two patients had excellent results, three had good results, and two had fair results using the Gartland and Werley categorical rating. One patient healed with a shortened radius and ulnar impingement requiring a second surgery for ulnar head resection arthroplasty. Literature Review Results after nonoperative treatment of volar rim fractures are not satisfactory and often require subsequent corrective osteotomy. Satisfactory outcomes are achieved when the fragments are well reduced and secured regardless of the device type. Clinical Relevance Volar rim plates give an adequate buttress of the volar radius distal to volar projection of the lunate facet and do not interfere with wrist mobility. Furthermore, the dorsal fragments can be fixed securely through the volar approach eliminating the need for a secondary posterior incision. However, patients should be informed of the potential problems and the need to remove the plate if symptoms develop. PMID:26855829

  9. Ionic channels: natural nanotubes described by the drift diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenberg, Bob

    2000-05-01

    Ionic channels are a large class of proteins with holes down their middle that control a wide range of cellular functions important in health and disease. Ionic channels can be analysed using a combination of the Poisson and drift diffusion equations familiar from computational electronics because their behavior is dominated by the electrical properties of their simple structure.

  10. Ionic Liquids and Green Chemistry: A Lab Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Annegret; Ott, Denise; Kralisch, Dana; Kreisel, Guenter; Ondruschka, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    Although ionic liquids have been investigated as solvents for many applications and are starting to be used in industrial processes, only a few lab experiments are available to introduce students to these materials. Ionic liquids have been discussed in the context of green chemistry, but few investigations have actually assessed the degree of…

  11. Transferable Coarse-Grained Models for Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanting; Feng, Shulu; Voth, Gregory A

    2009-04-14

    The effective force coarse-graining (EF-CG) method was applied to the imidazolium-based nitrate ionic liquids with various alkyl side-chain lengths. The nonbonded EF-CG forces for the ionic liquid with a short side chain were extended to generate the nonbonded forces for the ionic liquids with longer side chains. The EF-CG force fields for the ionic liquids exhibit very good transferability between different systems at various temperatures and are suitable for investigating the mesoscopic structural properties of this class of ionic liquids. The good additivity and ease of manipulation of the EF-CG force fields can allow for an inverse design methodology of ionic liquids at the coarse-grained level. With the EF-CG force field, the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation at a very large scale has been performed to check the significance of finite size effects on the structural properties. From these MD simulation results, it can be concluded that the finite size effect on the phenomenon of ionic liquid spatial heterogeneity (Wang, Y.; Voth, G. A. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2005, 127, 12192) is small and that this phenomenon is indeed a nanostructural behavior which leads to the experimentally observed mesoscopic heterogeneous structure of ionic liquids.

  12. Dynamic dielectrophoresis model of multi-phase ionic fluids.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ying; Luo, Jing; Guo, Dan; Wen, Shizhu

    2015-01-01

    Ionic-based dielectrophoretic microchips have attracted significant attention due to their wide-ranging applications in electro kinetic and biological experiments. In this work, a numerical method is used to simulate the dynamic behaviors of ionic droplets in a microchannel under the effect of dielectrophoresis. When a discrete liquid dielectric is encompassed within a continuous fluid dielectric placed in an electric field, an electric force is produced due to the dielectrophoresis effect. If either or both of the fluids are ionic liquids, the magnitude and even the direction of the force will be changed because the net ionic charge induced by an electric field can affect the polarization degree of the dielectrics. However, using a dielectrophoresis model, assuming ideal dielectrics, results in significant errors. To avoid the inaccuracy caused by the model, this work incorporates the electrode kinetic equation and defines a relationship between the polarization charge and the net ionic charge. According to the simulation conditions presented herein, the electric force obtained in this work has an error exceeding 70% of the actual value if the false effect of net ionic charge is not accounted for, which would result in significant issues in the design and optimization of experimental parameters. Therefore, there is a clear motivation for developing a model adapted to ionic liquids to provide precise control for the dielectrophoresis of multi-phase ionic liquids.

  13. Synthesis and polymerization of vinyl triazolium ionic liquids

    DOEpatents

    Luebke, David; Nulwala, Hunaid; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Adzima, Brian

    2018-05-15

    Herein, we describe polymerized ionic liquids, demonstrate the synthesis of polymerized ionic liquids, and demonstrate the polymerization of triazolium monomers. One embodiment shows the polymeriazation of the triazolium monomers with bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide anions. In another embodiment we show the feasibility of copolymerizing with commodity monomers such as styrene using free radical polymerization techniques.

  14. The Hildebrand Solubility Parameters of Ionic Liquids—Part 2

    PubMed Central

    Marciniak, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    The Hildebrand solubility parameters have been calculated for eight ionic liquids. Retention data from the inverse gas chromatography measurements of the activity coefficients at infinite dilution were used for the calculation. From the solubility parameters, the enthalpies of vaporization of ionic liquids were estimated. Results are compared with solubility parameters estimated by different methods. PMID:21747694

  15. The Hildebrand solubility parameters of ionic liquids-part 2.

    PubMed

    Marciniak, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    The Hildebrand solubility parameters have been calculated for eight ionic liquids. Retention data from the inverse gas chromatography measurements of the activity coefficients at infinite dilution were used for the calculation. From the solubility parameters, the enthalpies of vaporization of ionic liquids were estimated. Results are compared with solubility parameters estimated by different methods.

  16. Solar disc radius determined from observations made during eclipses with bolometric and photometric instruments on board the PICARD satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuillier, G.; Zhu, P.; Shapiro, A. I.; Sofia, S.; Tagirov, R.; van Ruymbeke, M.; Perrin, J.-M.; Sukhodolov, T.; Schmutz, W.

    2017-07-01

    Context. Despite the importance of having an accurate measurement of the solar disc radius, there are large uncertainties of its value due to the use of different measurement techniques and instrument calibration. An item of particular importance is to establish whether the value of the solar disc radius correlates with the solar activity level. Aims: The main goal of this work is to measure the solar disc radius in the near-UV, visible, and near-IR regions of the solar spectrum. Methods: Three instruments on board the PICARD spacecraft, namely the Bolometric Oscillations Sensor (BOS), the PREcision MOnitoring Sensor (PREMOS), and a solar sensor (SES), are used to derive the solar disc radius using the light curves produced when the Sun is occulted by the Moon. Nine eclipses, from 2010 to 2013, resulted in 17 occultations as viewed from the moving satellite. The calculation of the solar disc radius uses a simulation of the light curve taking into account the center-to-limb variation provided by the Non-local thermodynamic Equilibrium Spectral SYnthesis (NESSY) code. Results: We derive individual values for the solar disc radius for each viewed eclipse. Tests for a systematic variation of the radius with the progression of the solar cycle yield no significant results during the three years of measurements within the uncertainty of our measurements. Therefore, we derive a more precise radius value by averaging these values. At one astronomical unit, we obtain 959.79 arcseconds (arcsec) from the bolometric experiment; from PREMOS measurements, we obtain 959.78 arcsec at 782 nm and 959.76 arcsec at 535 nm. We found 960.07 arcsec at 210 nm, which is a higher value than the other determinations given the photons at this wavelength originate from the upper photosphere and lower chromosphere. We also give a detailed comparison of our results with those previously published using measurements from space-based and ground-based instruments using the Moon angular radius

  17. Finite Larmor radius effects on the (m = 2, n = 1) cylindrical tearing mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Chowdhury, J.; Parker, S. E.; Wan, W.

    2015-04-01

    New field solvers are developed in the gyrokinetic code GEM [Chen and Parker, J. Comput. Phys. 220, 839 (2007)] to simulate low-n modes. A novel discretization is developed for the ion polarization term in the gyrokinetic vorticity equation. An eigenmode analysis with finite Larmor radius effects is developed to study the linear resistive tearing mode. The mode growth rate is shown to scale with resistivity as γ ˜ η1/3, the same as the semi-collisional regime in previous kinetic treatments [Drake and Lee, Phys. Fluids 20, 1341 (1977)]. Tearing mode simulations with gyrokinetic ions are verified with the eigenmode calculation.

  18. Jeans instability of magnetized quantum plasma: Effect of viscosity, rotation and finite Larmor radius corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Shweta, E-mail: jshweta09@gmail.com; Sharma, Prerana; Chhajlani, R. K.

    2015-07-31

    The Jeans instability of self-gravitating quantum plasma is examined considering the effects of viscosity, finite Larmor radius (FLR) corrections and rotation. The analysis is done by normal mode analysis theory with the help of relevant linearized perturbation equations of the problem. The general dispersion relation is obtained using the quantum magneto hydrodynamic model. The modified condition of Jeans instability is obtained and the numerical calculations have been performed to show the effects of various parameters on the growth rate of Jeans instability.

  19. Why three-body physics does not solve the proton-radius puzzle.

    PubMed

    Karr, Jean-Philippe; Hilico, Laurent

    2012-09-07

    The possible involvement of weakly bound three-body systems in the muonic hydrogen spectroscopy experiment, which could resolve the current discrepancy between determinations of the proton radius, is investigated. Using variational calculations with complex coordinate rotation, we show that in the pμe ion, which was recently proposed as a possible candidate, the pμ core fails to bind the outer electron tightly enough to explain the discrepancy. It is also shown that the ppμ molecular ion cannot play any role in the observed line.

  20. Every timelike geodesic in Anti-de Sitter spacetime is a circle of the same radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokołowski, Leszek M.; Golda, Zdzisław A.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we refine and analytically prove an old proposition due to Calabi and Markus on the shape of timelike geodesics of anti-de Sitter space in the ambient flat space. We prove that each timelike geodesic forms in the ambient space a circle of the radius determined by Λ, lying on a Euclidean two-plane. Then, we outline an alternative proof for AdS4. We also make a comment on the shape of timelike geodesics in de Sitter space.