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Sample records for a-site molecular switches

  1. X-ray Analyses of the Ribosomal A-Site Molecular Switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Jiro

    The aminoacyl-tRNA decoding site (A-site) on the small ribosomal subunit is an RNA molecular switch guaranteeing high translation fidelity. Due to the similarity of the secondary structure of the A-site, it has long been believed that the functional characteristics and tertiary structure of the A-site molecular switch are basically conserved in three main cell types, bacteria, mitochondria and eukaryotic cytoplasm. However, these three cell types are noticeably different in their biological properties such as life cycle, genome size, structural component of ribosome and number of tRNA species. In our structural studies, we have shown how a small difference of nucleotide sequences affects the dynamics of the A-site molecular switches underlying the decoding mechanism adapted to their biological properties and environments. The observed structural insights into the decoding process allowed us to understand molecular mechanisms of non-syndromic hearing loss and toxicity mechanism of aminoglycoside antibiotics.

  2. Crystallographic Studies of the Ribosomal A-Site Molecular Switches by Using Model RNA Oligomers.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Jiro

    2016-01-01

    An RNA molecular switch in the aminoacyl-tRNA decoding site (A site) of the ribosome plays a key role in the decoding process of the protein biosynthesis. The switch discriminates a single cognate-tRNA from near-cognate tRNAs by changing its conformation from "off" to "on" states and recognizing the first two base pairs of codon-anticodon mini-helix to check whether these base pairs are of the canonical Watson-Crick type or not. Aminoglycoside antibiotics specifically target the "on" state of the bacterial A-site molecular switch and disturb the fidelity of the decoding process, resulting to cell death. If it occurs in human who was given aminoglycosides, it can lead to undesirable side effects. In order to understand the molecular bases of the decoding and the antibacterial and toxic side effects of aminoglycosides, it is necessary to determine the three-dimensional structures of the A-site molecular switches both in the presence and absence of aminoglycosides. This chapter focuses on methods in crystallographic studies of the A-site switches by using model RNA oligomers. The methods can be utilized in crystallographic studies of any DNA/RNA oligomers.

  3. Reversible Switching of Redox-Active Molecular Orbitals and Electron Transfer Pathways in Cu(A) Sites of Cytochrome c Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Zitare, Ulises; Alvarez-Paggi, Damián; Morgada, Marcos N; Abriata, Luciano A; Vila, Alejandro J; Murgida, Daniel H

    2015-08-10

    The Cu(A) site of cytochrome c oxidase is a redox hub that participates in rapid electron transfer at low driving forces with two redox cofactors in nearly perpendicular orientations. Spectroscopic and electrochemical characterizations performed on first and second-sphere mutants have allowed us to experimentally detect the reversible switching between two alternative electronic states that confer different directionalities to the redox reaction. Specifically, the M160H variant of a native Cu(A) shows a reversible pH transition that allows to functionally probe both states in the same protein species. Alternation between states exerts a dramatic impact on the kinetic redox parameters, thereby suggesting this effect as the mechanism underlying the efficiency and directionality of Cu(A) electron transfer in vivo. These findings may also prove useful for the development of molecular electronics. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Molecular Rotors as Switches

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Mei; Wang, Kang L.

    2012-01-01

    The use of a functional molecular unit acting as a state variable provides an attractive alternative for the next generations of nanoscale electronics. It may help overcome the limits of conventional MOSFETd due to their potential scalability, low-cost, low variability, and highly integratable characteristics as well as the capability to exploit bottom-up self-assembly processes. This bottom-up construction and the operation of nanoscale machines/devices, in which the molecular motion can be controlled to perform functions, have been studied for their functionalities. Being triggered by external stimuli such as light, electricity or chemical reagents, these devices have shown various functions including those of diodes, rectifiers, memories, resonant tunnel junctions and single settable molecular switches that can be electronically configured for logic gates. Molecule-specific electronic switching has also been reported for several of these device structures, including nanopores containing oligo(phenylene ethynylene) monolayers, and planar junctions incorporating rotaxane and catenane monolayers for the construction and operation of complex molecular machines. A specific electrically driven surface mounted molecular rotor is described in detail in this review. The rotor is comprised of a monolayer of redox-active ligated copper compounds sandwiched between a gold electrode and a highly-doped P+ Si. This electrically driven sandwich-type monolayer molecular rotor device showed an on/off ratio of approximately 104, a read window of about 2.5 V, and a retention time of greater than 104 s. The rotation speed of this type of molecular rotor has been reported to be in the picosecond timescale, which provides a potential of high switching speed applications. Current-voltage spectroscopy (I-V) revealed a temperature-dependent negative differential resistance (NDR) associated with the device. The analysis of the device I–V characteristics suggests the source of the

  5. EDITORIAL: Molecular switches at surfaces Molecular switches at surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinelt, Martin; von Oppen, Felix

    2012-10-01

    In nature, molecules exploit interaction with their environment to realize complex functionalities on the nanometer length scale. Physical, chemical and/or biological specificity is frequently achieved by the switching of molecules between microscopically different states. Paradigmatic examples are the energy production in proton pumps of bacteria or the signal conversion in human vision, which rely on switching molecules between different configurations or conformations by external stimuli. The remarkable reproducibility and unparalleled fatigue resistance of these natural processes makes it highly desirable to emulate nature and develop artificial systems with molecular functionalities. A promising avenue towards this goal is to anchor the molecular switches at surfaces, offering new pathways to control their functional properties, to apply electrical contacts, or to integrate switches into larger systems. Anchoring at surfaces allows one to access the full range from individual molecular switches to self-assembled monolayers of well-defined geometry and to customize the coupling between molecules and substrate or between adsorbed molecules. Progress in this field requires both synthesis and preparation of appropriate molecular systems and control over suitable external stimuli, such as light, heat, or electrical currents. To optimize switching and generate function, it is essential to unravel the geometric structure, the electronic properties and the dynamic interactions of the molecular switches on surfaces. This special section, Molecular Switches at Surfaces, collects 17 contributions describing different aspects of this research field. They analyze elementary processes, both in single molecules and in ensembles of molecules, which involve molecular switching and concomitant changes of optical, electronic, or magnetic properties. Two topical reviews summarize the current status, including both challenges and achievements in the field of molecular switches on

  6. A Novel Molecular Switch

    PubMed Central

    Daber, Robert; Lewis, Mitchell

    2009-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation is a fundamental process for regulating the flux of all metabolic pathways. For the last several decades, the lac operon has served as a valuable model for studying transcription. More recently, the switch that controls the operon has also been successfully adapted to function in mammalian cells. Here we describe how, using directed evolution, we have created a novel switch that recognizes an asymmetric operator sequence. The new switch has a repressor with altered headpiece domains for operator recognition, and a redesigned dimer interface to create a heterodimeric repressor. Quite unexpectedly, the heterodimeric switch functions better than the natural system. It can repress more tightly than the naturally occurring switch of the lac operon; it is less leaky and can be induced more efficiently. Ultimately these novel repressors could be evolved to recognize eukaryotic promoters and used to regulate gene expression in mammalian systems. PMID:19540845

  7. Soliton switching in a site-dependent ferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senjudarvannan, R.; Sathishkumar, P.; Vijayalakshmi, S.

    2017-02-01

    Switching of soliton in a ferromagnetic medium offers the possibility of developing a new innovative approach for information storage technologies. The nonlinear spin dynamics of a site-dependent Heisenberg ferromagnetic spin chain with Gilbert damping under the influence of external magnetic field is expressed in the form of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation in the classical continuum limit. The corresponding evolution equation is developed through stereographic projection technique by projecting the unit sphere of spin onto a complex plane. The exact soliton solutions are constructed by solving the associated evolution equation through the modified extended tanh-function method. The impact of damping and external magnetic field on the magnetic soliton under the invariant inhomogeneity is investigated and finally, the magnetization switching in the form of shape changing solitons are demonstrated.

  8. Molecular wires, switches and memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jia

    Molecular electronics, an emerging field, makes it possible to build individual molecules capable of performing functions identical or analogous to present- day conductors, switches, or memories. These individual molecules, with a nano-meter scale characteristic length, can be designed and chemically synthesized with specific atoms, geometries and charge distribution. This thesis focuses on the design, and measurements of molecular wires, and related strategically engineered structures-molecular switches and memories. The experimental system relies on a thermodynamically driven self-assembling process to attach molecules onto substrate surfaces without intervention from outside. The following topics will be discussed: directed nanoscale manipulation of self-assembled molecules using scanning tunneling microscope; investigation on through-bond transport of nanoscale symmetric metal/conjugated self- assembled monolayers (SAM)/metal junctions, where non- Ohmic thermionic emission was observed to be the dominant process, with isocyanide-Pd contacts showing the lowest thermionic barrier of 0.22 eV; the first realization of robust and large reversible switching behavior in an electronic device that utilizes molecules containing redox centers as the active component, exhibiting negative differential resistance (NDR) and large on-off peak-to-valley ratio (PVR); observation of erasable storage of higher conductivity states in these redox- center containing molecular devices, and demonstration of a two-terminal electronically programmable and erasable molecular memory cell with long bit retention time.

  9. Carbon isotope controlled molecular switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Brian K.

    Single molecules represent one fundamental limit to the downscaling of electronics. As a prototype element for carbon-based nanoscale science and technology, the detailed behavior of carbon monoxide (CO) on the copper surface Cu(111) has been investigated. These investigations span from individual carbon isotope resolution, to single molecules, to compact clusters assembled by molecular manipulation via a homemade scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Sub-nanoscale devices, composed of only a few molecules, which exploit both lone CO properties and molecule-molecule interaction, have been designed and assembled. The devices function as bi-stable switches and can serve as classical bits with densities > 50 Tbits/cm2. Operated in the nuclear mass sensitive regime, each switch can also function as a molecular "centrifuge" capable of identifying the isotope of a single carbon atom in real-time. A model, based on electron-vibron couping and inelastic tunneling, has been developed and explains the dynamic behavior of the switch. The interaction between pairs of switches was also explored and it was found that their behavior ranges from completely independent to strongly coupled. Larger nanostructures, which were composed of many sub-switches organized to leverage the fully coupled interaction, link two spatially separated "bits" on the surface. Such a linked system can set or read a state non-locally, which is equivalent to bidirectional information transfer. The linked system has also exhibited logic functionality. These experiments demonstrate scalable molecular cells for information storage, and for information processing through cellular automata logic schemes.

  10. Molecular DNA switches and DNA chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabanayagam, Chandran R.; Berkey, Cristin; Lavi, Uri; Cantor, Charles R.; Smith, Cassandra L.

    1999-06-01

    We present an assay to detect single-nucleotide polymorphisms on a chip using molecular DNA switches and isothermal rolling- circle amplification. The basic principle behind the switch is an allele-specific oligonucleotide circularization, mediated by DNA ligase. A DNA switch is closed when perfect hybridization between the probe oligonucleotide and target DNA allows ligase to covalently circularize the probe. Mismatches around the ligation site prevent probe circularization, resulting in an open switch. DNA polymerase is then used to preferentially amplify the closed switches, via rolling-circle amplification. The stringency of the molecular switches yields 102 - 103 fold discrimination between matched and mismatched sequences.

  11. Molecular switches and motors on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pathem, Bala Krishna; Claridge, Shelley A; Zheng, Yue Bing; Weiss, Paul S

    2013-01-01

    Molecular switches and motors respond structurally, electronically, optically, and/or mechanically to external stimuli, testing and potentially enabling extreme miniaturization of optoelectronic devices, nanoelectromechanical systems, and medical devices. The assembly of motors and switches on surfaces makes it possible both to measure the properties of individual molecules as they relate to their environment and to couple function between assembled molecules. In this review, we discuss recent progress in assembling molecular switches and motors on surfaces, measuring static and dynamic structures, understanding switching mechanisms, and constructing functional molecular materials and devices. As demonstrative examples, we choose a representative molecule from three commonly studied classes including molecular switches, photochromic molecules, and mechanically interlocked molecules. We conclude by offering perspectives on the future of molecular switches and motors on surfaces.

  12. Switching Effects in Molecular Electronic Devices.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zihao; Ren, Shizhao; Guo, Xuefeng

    2017-06-01

    The creation of molecular electronic switches by using smart molecules is of great importance to the field of molecular electronics. This requires a fundamental understanding of the intrinsic electron transport mechanisms, which depend on several factors including the charge transport pathway, the molecule-electrode coupling strength, the energy of the molecular frontier orbitals, and the electron spin state. On the basis of significant progresses achieved in both experiments and theory over the past decade, in this review article we focus on new insights into the design and fabrication of different molecular switches and the corresponding switching effects, which is crucial to the development of molecular electronics. We summarize the strategies developed for single-molecule device fabrication and the mechanism of these switching effects. These analyses should be valuable for deeply understanding the switching effects in molecular electronic devices.

  13. An electrically actuated molecular toggle switch

    PubMed Central

    Gerhard, Lukas; Edelmann, Kevin; Homberg, Jan; Valášek, Michal; Bahoosh, Safa G.; Lukas, Maya; Pauly, Fabian; Mayor, Marcel; Wulfhekel, Wulf

    2017-01-01

    Molecular electronics is considered a promising approach for future nanoelectronic devices. In order that molecular junctions can be used as electrical switches or even memory devices, they need to be actuated between two distinct conductance states in a controlled and reproducible manner by external stimuli. Here we present a tripodal platform with a cantilever arm and a nitrile group at its end that is lifted from the surface. The formation of a coordinative bond between the nitrile nitrogen and the gold tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope can be controlled by both electrical and mechanical means, and leads to a hysteretic switching of the conductance of the junction by more than two orders of magnitude. This toggle switch can be actuated with high reproducibility so that the forces involved in the mechanical deformation of the molecular cantilever can be determined precisely with scanning tunnelling microscopy. PMID:28276442

  14. An electrically actuated molecular toggle switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, Lukas; Edelmann, Kevin; Homberg, Jan; Valášek, Michal; Bahoosh, Safa G.; Lukas, Maya; Pauly, Fabian; Mayor, Marcel; Wulfhekel, Wulf

    2017-03-01

    Molecular electronics is considered a promising approach for future nanoelectronic devices. In order that molecular junctions can be used as electrical switches or even memory devices, they need to be actuated between two distinct conductance states in a controlled and reproducible manner by external stimuli. Here we present a tripodal platform with a cantilever arm and a nitrile group at its end that is lifted from the surface. The formation of a coordinative bond between the nitrile nitrogen and the gold tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope can be controlled by both electrical and mechanical means, and leads to a hysteretic switching of the conductance of the junction by more than two orders of magnitude. This toggle switch can be actuated with high reproducibility so that the forces involved in the mechanical deformation of the molecular cantilever can be determined precisely with scanning tunnelling microscopy.

  15. An electrically actuated molecular toggle switch.

    PubMed

    Gerhard, Lukas; Edelmann, Kevin; Homberg, Jan; Valášek, Michal; Bahoosh, Safa G; Lukas, Maya; Pauly, Fabian; Mayor, Marcel; Wulfhekel, Wulf

    2017-03-09

    Molecular electronics is considered a promising approach for future nanoelectronic devices. In order that molecular junctions can be used as electrical switches or even memory devices, they need to be actuated between two distinct conductance states in a controlled and reproducible manner by external stimuli. Here we present a tripodal platform with a cantilever arm and a nitrile group at its end that is lifted from the surface. The formation of a coordinative bond between the nitrile nitrogen and the gold tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope can be controlled by both electrical and mechanical means, and leads to a hysteretic switching of the conductance of the junction by more than two orders of magnitude. This toggle switch can be actuated with high reproducibility so that the forces involved in the mechanical deformation of the molecular cantilever can be determined precisely with scanning tunnelling microscopy.

  16. The redox switch that regulates molecular chaperones.

    PubMed

    Conway, Myra E; Lee, Christopher

    2015-08-01

    Modification of reactive cysteine residues plays an integral role in redox-regulated reactions. Oxidation of thiolate anions to sulphenic acid can result in disulphide bond formation, or overoxidation to sulphonic acid, representing reversible and irreversible endpoints of cysteine oxidation, respectively. The antioxidant systems of the cell, including the thioredoxin and glutaredoxin systems, aim to prevent these higher and irreversible oxidation states. This is important as these redox transitions have numerous roles in regulating the structure/function relationship of proteins. Proteins with redox-active switches as described for peroxiredoxin (Prx) and protein disulphide isomerase (PDI) can undergo dynamic structural rearrangement resulting in a gain of function. For Prx, transition from cysteine sulphenic acid to sulphinic acid is described as an adaptive response during increased cellular stress causing Prx to form higher molecular weight aggregates, switching its role from antioxidant to molecular chaperone. Evidence in support of PDI as a redox-regulated chaperone is also gaining impetus, where oxidation of the redox-active CXXC regions causes a structural change, exposing its hydrophobic region, facilitating polypeptide folding. In this review, we will focus on these two chaperones that are directly regulated through thiol-disulphide exchange and detail how these redox-induced switches allow for dual activity. Moreover, we will introduce a new role for a metabolic protein, the branched-chain aminotransferase, and discuss how it shares common mechanistic features with these well-documented chaperones. Together, the physiological importance of the redox regulation of these proteins under pathological conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis will be discussed to illustrate the impact and importance of correct folding and chaperone-mediated activity.

  17. Organic-based molecular switches for molecular electronics.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Noelia; Martín-Lasanta, Ana; Alvarez de Cienfuegos, Luis; Ribagorda, Maria; Parra, Andres; Cuerva, Juan M

    2011-10-05

    In a general sense, molecular electronics (ME) is the branch of nanotechnology which studies the application of molecular building blocks for the fabrication of electronic components. Among the different types of molecules, organic compounds have been revealed as promising candidates for ME, due to the easy access, great structural diversity and suitable electronic and mechanical properties. Thanks to these useful capabilities, organic molecules have been used to emulate electronic devices at the nanoscopic scale. In this feature article, we present the diverse strategies used to develop organic switches towards ME with special attention to non-volatile systems.

  18. Tuning bipolar resistive switching by forming defect dipoles in A-site-deficient perovskite calcium titanate thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Wei; Hu, Wei; Zou, Lilan; Chen, Ruqi; Li, Baojun; Bao, Dinghua

    2015-04-01

    If we intentionally make the A-site in an ABO3 perovskite structure deficient, it is possible to tune the resistive switching effect by forming defect dipoles. In this study, an A-site-deficient calcium titanate (Ca0.95TiO3, CTO) thin film was fabricated on a Pt/Ti/SiO2/Si substrate as an active layer for resistive random-access memory. The Pt/CTO/Pt device exhibited stable bipolar resistive switching performance with good endurance and long retention. The resistive switching may be attributable to the formation and rupture of the conduction filaments due to the O vacancies and defect dipoles resulting from the interaction between the Ca and O vacancies.

  19. Engineered bacteriorhodopsin: a molecular scale potential switch.

    PubMed

    Patil, Amol V; Premaraban, Thenuhan; Berthoumieu, Olivia; Watts, Anthony; Davis, Jason J

    2012-04-27

    Bacteriorhodopsin, BR, is a natural, photoresponsive, biomolecule that has potential application in data storage, imaging and sensing. Being membrane-bound, however, it is coupled with metallic electronic surfaces only with some difficulty. We report herein a facile method to generate uniformly orientated, anchored and active monolayers of BR on metallic electrodes. In the present study, the cytoplasmic side of the BR is equipped with an engineered cysteine to achieve largely lipid-free, orientation-specific, highly stable, covalent immobilization on gold surfaces. By using non-invasive Kelvin probe force microscopy, it is possible to measure the light-induced proton accumulation at the extracellular protein surface at truly molecular scales. The intimate probe-BR interaction possible on lipid removal facilitates the detection of photoinduced surface potential switching substantially larger ((20.4 ± 7.5) mV) with functional single delipidated mutant BR trimers than for the wild-type protein. The proton pumping detected is also notably highly unidirectional with the orientated protein. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Molecular switches activated by electromagnetic pulses: First-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Felicissimo, Viviane Costa; Rocha Martins, Jonathan da; Boldt, Isabel Sager; Chacham, Helio

    2009-12-15

    In the present work, we investigate, through ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, the molecular switching action (a hydrogen tautomerization reaction) in porphyrazine and phthalocyanine induced by electromagnetic pulses. We find that femtosecond pulses attainable from laser sources can induce the switching mechanism in porphyrazine and phthalocyanine through several reaction pathways. We investigate the dependence of the switching mechanism on the parameters (duration, frequency, and polarization) of the electromagnetic pulse and on isotopic substitutions. We also find that the dynamics of inner hydrogen switching in phthalocyanine can be induced by weaker electromagnetic pulses than in porphyrazine. This indicates that molecules of this class with larger numbers of aromatic rings will be more efficient in displaying the pulse-induced switching.

  1. Electronic transport properties of a quinone-based molecular switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ya-Peng; Bian, Bao-An; Yuan, Pei-Pei

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we carried out first-principles calculations based on density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function to investigate the electronic transport properties of a quinone-based molecule sandwiched between two Au electrodes. The molecular switch can be reversibly switched between the reduced hydroquinone (HQ) and oxidized quinone (Q) states via redox reactions. The switching behavior of two forms is analyzed through their I- V curves, transmission spectra and molecular projected self-consistent Hamiltonian at zero bias. Then we discuss the transmission spectra of the HQ and Q forms at different bias, and explain the oscillation of current according to the transmission eigenstates of LUMO energy level for Q form. The results suggest that this kind of a quinone-based molecule is usable as one of the good candidates for redox-controlled molecular switches.

  2. Tetrapodal molecular switches and motors: synthesis and photochemistry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuang-Yen; Wezenberg, Sander J; Carroll, Gregory T; London, Gábor; Kistemaker, Jos C M; Pijper, Thomas C; Feringa, Ben L

    2014-08-01

    The design, synthesis, and dynamic behavior of a series of novel tetrapodal molecular switches and motors containing common functional groups for attachment to various inorganic and organic surfaces are presented. Using a Diels-Alder reaction, an anthracene unit with four functionalized alkyl substituents ("legs") was coupled to maleimide-functionalized molecular switches or motors under ambient conditions. Terminal functional groups at the "legs" include thioacetates and azides, making these switches and motors ideal candidates for attachment to metallic or alkyne-functionalized surfaces. UV/vis absorption spectroscopy shows that the molecular switches and motors retain their ability to undergo reversible photoinduced and/or thermally induced structural changes after attachment to the tetrapodal anthracene.

  3. Polymer Alignment Behavior with Molecular Switching of Ferroelectric Liquid Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashige, Takeshi; Fujikake, Hideo; Sato, Hiroto; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Kurita, Taiichiro; Sato, Fumio

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the molecular alignment behavior of polymer networks with switching of a ferroelectric liquid crystal (FLC) in a molecularly aligned FLC/polymer composite film. The polymer alignment in the composite film, which was slowly formed by photopolymerization-induced phase separation of a heated nematic-phase solution of FLC and monomers, was observed by polarization Raman spectral microscopy. Raman peak intensities originating from the polymers were changed with those from the FLC, when the applied voltage polarity was changed. The trace patterns of the Raman peak intensity with in-plane rotation of the composite film indicated that the formed flexible polymers can follow FLC molecular switching.

  4. Nanoscale molecular-switch devices fabricated by imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yong; Ohlberg, Douglas A. A.; Li, Xuema; Stewart, Duncan R.; Stanley Williams, R.; Jeppesen, Jan O.; Nielsen, Kent A.; Stoddart, J. Fraser; Olynick, Deirdre L.; Anderson, Erik

    2003-03-01

    Nanoscale molecular-electronic devices comprising a single molecular monolayer of bistable [2]rotaxanes sandwiched between two 40-nm metal electrodes were fabricated using imprint lithography. Bistable current-voltage characteristics with high on-off ratios and reversible switching properties were observed. Such devices may function as basic elements for future ultradense electronic circuitry.

  5. Molecular magnetic switch for a metallofullerene

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bo; Wang, Taishan; Feng, Yongqiang; Zhang, Zhuxia; Jiang, Li; Wang, Chunru

    2015-01-01

    The endohedral fullerenes lead to well-protected internal species by the fullerene cages, and even highly reactive radicals can be stabilized. However, the manipulation of the magnetic properties of these radicals from outside remains challenging. Here we report a system of a paramagnetic metallofullerene Sc3C2@C80 connected to a nitroxide radical, to achieve the remote control of the magnetic properties of the metallofullerene. The remote nitroxide group serves as a magnetic switch for the electronic spin resonance (ESR) signals of Sc3C2@C80 via spin–spin interactions. Briefly, the nitroxide radical group can ‘switch off’ the ESR signals of the Sc3C2@C80 moiety. Moreover, the strength of spin–spin interactions between Sc3C2@C80 and the nitroxide group can be manipulated by changing the distance between these two spin centres. In addition, the ESR signals of the Sc3C2@C80 moiety can be switched on at low temperatures through weakened spin–lattice interactions. PMID:25732144

  6. Electrical Conductance and Reversible Conductance Switching in Molecular Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Bert

    2009-03-01

    A technology is demonstrated to fabricate reliable molecular metal-molecule-metal junctions with unprecedented device diameters up to 100 μm. The yield of these molecular junctions is close to unity. Stability investigations have shown a shelf life of years and no deterioration upon cycling. Key ingredients are the use of a conducting polymer layer (PEDOT:PSS) sandwiched between the self-assembled monolayer (SAM) and the top electrode to prevent electrical shorts, and processing in lithographically defined vertical interconnects (vias) to prevent both parasitic currents and interaction between the environment and the SAM [1--3]. Furthermore, a fully functional solid-state molecular electronic switch is manufactured by conventional processing techniques. The molecular switch is based on a monolayer of photochromic diarylethene molecules sandwiched between two electrodes. The monolayer reversibly switches the conductance by more than one order of magnitude between the two conductance states via optical addressing. This bidirectional conductance switch operates as an electronic ON/OFF switch and as a reprogrammable data storage unit that can be optically written and electronically read [4]. [4pt] [1] Nature, 441, 69--72 (2006). [0pt] [2] Proc. Natl Acad. Sci USA, 104, 11161-11167 (2007). [0pt] [3] Nature Nanotechn., 3, December issue (2008) [0pt] [4] Adv. Mater. 20, 1467--1473.

  7. The art of building small: from molecular switches to molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Feringa, Ben L

    2007-08-31

    Molecular switches and motors are essential components of artificial molecular machines. In this perspective, we discuss progress in our design, synthesis, and functioning of photochemical and electrochemical switches and chemical and light-driven molecular motors. Special emphasis is given to the control of a range of functions and properties, including luminescence, self-assembly, motion, color, conductance, transport, and chirality. We will also discuss our efforts to control mechanical movement at the molecular level, a feature that is at the heart of molecular motors and machines. The anchoring of molecular motors on surfaces and molecular motors at work are discussed.

  8. Electrical switching in a Fe-thiacrown molecular device

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, J.; Zheng, X. H. Hao, H.; Wang, X. L.; Shi, X. Q.; Zeng, Z.

    2014-01-07

    First-principles calculations are performed to inspect the electronic and transport properties of a Fe-thiacrown molecular device, namely, a Au-Fe(9S{sub 3}){sub 2}-Au junction. It is found that the junction has a low-spin (LS) ground state and a high-spin (HS) metastable state. Further study shows that the HS state is a conducting state while the LS state is a nearly insulating one, which means that a switch between these two spin configurations results in a good electrical switching behavior and can serve as an ON/OFF state for a logic unit. Thus, it may find applications as switches or memories in molecular electronic circuits.

  9. Monitoring Gene Expression In Vivo with Nucleic Acid Molecular Switches

    SciTech Connect

    David C. Ward; Patricia Bray-Ward

    2005-01-26

    The overall objectives of this project were (1) to develop allosteric ribozymes capable of acting as molecular switches for monitoring the levels of both wild-type and mutant mRNA species in living cells and whole animals and (2) to develop highly efficient reagents to deliver nucleic acid molecular switches into living cells, tissues and animals with the ultimate goal of expression profiling specific mRNAs of diagnostic or prognostic value within tumors in animals. During the past year, we have moved our laboratory to Nevada and in the moving process we have lost electronic and paper copies of prior progress reports concerning the construction and biological properties of the molecular switches. Since there was minimal progress during the last year on molecular switches, we are relying on past project reports to provide a summary of our data on this facet of the grant. Here we are summarizing the work done on the delivery reagents and their application to inducing mutations in living cells, which will include work done during the no cost extension.

  10. Energy Aspects of Thermal Molecular Switching: Molecular Thermal Hysteresis of Helicene Oligomers.

    PubMed

    Shigeno, Masanori; Kushida, Yo; Yamaguchi, Masahiko

    2015-07-20

    Molecular switching is a phenomenon by which a molecule reversibly changes its structure and state in response to external stimuli or energy. Herein, molecular switching is discussed from thermodynamic and kinetic aspects in terms of energy supply with an emphasis on the thermal switching exhibited by helicene oligomers. It includes the inversion of relative thermodynamic stability induced by temperature changes and molecular thermal hysteresis in a closed system. The thermal phenomenon associated with the oligomers involves population/concentration changes between metastable states under nonequilibrium thermodynamic control.

  11. First-principles study of the switching mechanism of [2]catenane molecular switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Hoon; Jang, Yunhee; Jang, Seung Soon; Goddard, William A., III

    2004-03-01

    Using large-scale density-functional and matrix Greens function calculations coupled with force-field molecular dynamics, we investigate the coherent charge transport properties of Stoddart--Heath-type [2]catenane molecular devices, which consists of a cyclobis-(paraquat-p-phenylene) ring (CBPQT4+)(PF6)4 encircling a ring-shape backbone with two active sites, tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) and 1,5-dioxynaphthalene (DNP). We identify the monolayer packing configuration and present the key swtiching mechanism based on the movement of the frontier molecular orbital levels of TTF or DNP site by ring encircling. According to the switching mechanism, the ring encircling TTF/DNP configuration is the switch off/on state in agreement with the experimental interpretation.

  12. Nonlinear optical molecular switches for alkali ion identification.

    PubMed

    Plaquet, Aurélie; Champagne, Benoît; Castet, Frédéric

    2014-07-21

    This work demonstrates by means of DFT and ab initio calculations that recognition of alkali cations can be achieved by probing the variations of the second-order nonlinear optical properties along the commutation process in spiropyran/merocyanine systems. Due to the ability of the merocyanine isomer to complex metal cations, the switching between the two forms is accompanied by large contrasts in the quadratic hyperpolarizability that strongly depend on the size of the cation in presence. Exploiting the nonlinear optical responses of molecular switches should therefore provide powerful analytical tools for detecting and identifying metal cations in solution.

  13. Modeling of Switching and Hysteresis in Molecular Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samanta, Manoj P.; Partridge, Harry (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The conventional way of modeling current transport in two and three terminal molecular devices could be inadequate for certain cases involving switching and hysteresis. Here we present an alternate approach. Contrary to the regular way where applied bias directly modulates the conducting energy levels of the molecule, our method introduces a nonlinear potential energy surface varying with the applied bias as a control parameter. A time-dynamics is also introduced properly accounting for switching and hysteresis behavior. Although the model is phenomenological at this stage, we believe any detailed model would contain similar descriptions at its core.

  14. Reversible Mechanical Switching of Magnetic Interactions in a Molecular Shuttle

    PubMed Central

    Bleve, Valentina; Schäfer, Christian; Franchi, Paola; Silvi, Serena; Mezzina, Elisabetta; Credi, Alberto; Lucarini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Invited for this months cover are the groups of Professors Marco Lucarini and Alberto Credi at the University of Bologna. The cover picture shows coupled and uncoupled states of a [2]rotaxane incorporating stable nitroxide radical units in both the ring and dumbbell components. Interaction between nitroxide radicals could be switched between noncoupled (three-line electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum) and coupled (five-line EPR spectrum) upon deprotonation of the rotaxane NH2+ centers that effects a quantitative displacement of a dibenzocrown macroring to a 4,4’-bipyridinium recognition site. The complete base- and acid-induced switching cycle of the EPR pattern was repeated several times without an appreciable loss of signal, highlighting the reversibility of the process. Hence, this molecular machine is capable of switching on/off magnetic interactions by chemically driven reversible mechanical effects. For more details, see the Communication on p. 18 ff. PMID:25870780

  15. Ultrafast isomerization in a difluoroboryl-coordinated molecular switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consani, Cristina; Berberich, Martin; Würthner, Frank; Brixner, Tobias

    2017-09-01

    Molecular switches based on light-induced isomerization cycles are promising materials for sensors and biomedical applications. Understanding the details of the isomerization photocycle and identifying the nuclear coordinates involved in the photoreaction are relevant topics. Here we characterize the cis → trans and trans → cis isomerization of a new type of BF2-coordinated azo-dye molecular switch by pump-probe spectroscopy. While cis → trans isomerization is ultrafast and proceeds via a conical intersection, the trans → cis photocycle is more complex and involves at least three reaction channels. Finally, we employ the vibrational wavepackets accompanying isomerization to infer information on the nuclear degrees of freedom involved in the photoreaction.

  16. Bifocal, Electrically Switched Intraocular And Eyeglass Molecular Lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Seymour P.

    1986-05-01

    A bifocal electronic molecular lens is described which can be switched between two foci without any grossly visible change in displacement, geometry, temperature or chemical composition. The lens requires very little power to change focus (on the order of tens to hundreds of nanoamps) so that long-term remote operation is anticipated. The principle of operation is based upon electronic control of optical polarization through a birefringent lens. Switching of focus is accomplished by controlling the molecular alignment of a film of liquid crystal molecules and thereby selecting between two orthogonal optical polarizations (P1 and P2). Polarization P1 is associated with focal point S1 and P2 is associated with focal point S2 through the birefringent lens. A number of useful new products are made possible by this lens. Specifically discussed are an electronic intraocular lens and electronic eyeglasses, both of which can be powered independently.

  17. Fluorenylidene-pyrroline biomimetic light-driven molecular switches.

    PubMed

    Rivado-Casas, Laura; Sampedro, Diego; Campos, Pedro J; Fusi, Stefania; Zanirato, Vinicio; Olivucci, Massimo

    2009-07-03

    A new family of biomimetic photoactivated molecular switches based in the retinal chromophore is described. Expedient synthesis allows a library of compounds with a different substitution pattern, including chiral substituents, to be obtained. The effect of substitution, solvent, and light source on the photoisomerization step has been assessed. The absorption maximum has been red-shifted ca. 50 nm with respect to related systems and rotation is now easily achieved by using visible light.

  18. Dissipation enhanced vibrational sensing in an olfactory molecular switch

    SciTech Connect

    Chęcińska, Agata; Heaney, Libby; Pollock, Felix A.; Nazir, Ahsan

    2015-01-14

    Motivated by a proposed olfactory mechanism based on a vibrationally activated molecular switch, we study electron transport within a donor-acceptor pair that is coupled to a vibrational mode and embedded in a surrounding environment. We derive a polaron master equation with which we study the dynamics of both the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom beyond previously employed semiclassical (Marcus-Jortner) rate analyses. We show (i) that in the absence of explicit dissipation of the vibrational mode, the semiclassical approach is generally unable to capture the dynamics predicted by our master equation due to both its assumption of one-way (exponential) electron transfer from donor to acceptor and its neglect of the spectral details of the environment; (ii) that by additionally allowing strong dissipation to act on the odorant vibrational mode, we can recover exponential electron transfer, though typically at a rate that differs from that given by the Marcus-Jortner expression; (iii) that the ability of the molecular switch to discriminate between the presence and absence of the odorant, and its sensitivity to the odorant vibrational frequency, is enhanced significantly in this strong dissipation regime, when compared to the case without mode dissipation; and (iv) that details of the environment absent from previous Marcus-Jortner analyses can also dramatically alter the sensitivity of the molecular switch, in particular, allowing its frequency resolution to be improved. Our results thus demonstrate the constructive role dissipation can play in facilitating sensitive and selective operation in molecular switch devices, as well as the inadequacy of semiclassical rate equations in analysing such behaviour over a wide range of parameters.

  19. Dissipation enhanced vibrational sensing in an olfactory molecular switch.

    PubMed

    Chęcińska, Agata; Pollock, Felix A; Heaney, Libby; Nazir, Ahsan

    2015-01-14

    Motivated by a proposed olfactory mechanism based on a vibrationally activated molecular switch, we study electron transport within a donor-acceptor pair that is coupled to a vibrational mode and embedded in a surrounding environment. We derive a polaron master equation with which we study the dynamics of both the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom beyond previously employed semiclassical (Marcus-Jortner) rate analyses. We show (i) that in the absence of explicit dissipation of the vibrational mode, the semiclassical approach is generally unable to capture the dynamics predicted by our master equation due to both its assumption of one-way (exponential) electron transfer from donor to acceptor and its neglect of the spectral details of the environment; (ii) that by additionally allowing strong dissipation to act on the odorant vibrational mode, we can recover exponential electron transfer, though typically at a rate that differs from that given by the Marcus-Jortner expression; (iii) that the ability of the molecular switch to discriminate between the presence and absence of the odorant, and its sensitivity to the odorant vibrational frequency, is enhanced significantly in this strong dissipation regime, when compared to the case without mode dissipation; and (iv) that details of the environment absent from previous Marcus-Jortner analyses can also dramatically alter the sensitivity of the molecular switch, in particular, allowing its frequency resolution to be improved. Our results thus demonstrate the constructive role dissipation can play in facilitating sensitive and selective operation in molecular switch devices, as well as the inadequacy of semiclassical rate equations in analysing such behaviour over a wide range of parameters.

  20. Molecular electronics: the single-molecule switch and transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotthewes, Kai; Geskin, Victor; Heimbuch, Rene; Kumar, Avijit; Zandvliet, Harold

    2014-03-01

    In order to design and realize single-molecule devices it is essential to have a good understanding of the properties of an individual molecule. For electronic applications, the most important property of a molecule is its conductance. Here we show how a single octanethiol molecule can be connected to macroscopic leads and how the transport properties of the molecule can be measured. Based on this knowledge, we have realized two single-molecule devices: a molecular switch and a molecular transistor. The switch can be opened and closed at will by carefully adjusting the separation between the electrical contacts and the voltage drop across the contacts. This single-molecular switch operates in a broad temperature range from cryogenic temperatures all the way up to room temperature. Via mechanical gating, i.e. compressing or stretching of the octanethiol molecule, by varying the contact's interspace, we are able to systematically adjust the conductance of the electrode-octanethiol-electrode junction. This two-terminal single-molecule transistor is very robust, but the amplification factor is rather limited.

  1. Frontier orbital control of molecular conductance and its switching.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Yuta; Hoffmann, Roald

    2014-04-14

    For transmission of electrons through a π system, when the Landauer theory of molecular conductance is viewed from a molecular orbital (MO) perspective, there obtains a simple perturbation theoretic dependence, due to Yoshizawa and Tada, on a) the product of the orbital coefficients at the sites of electrode attachment, and b) the MO energies. The frontier orbitals consistently and simply indicate high or low transmission, even if other orbitals may contribute. This formalism, with its consequent reinforcement and/or interference of conductance, accounts for the (previously explained) difference in direct vs. cross conjugated transmission across an ethylene, as well as the comparative ON/OFF ratios in the experimentally investigated dimethyldihydropyrene and dithienylethene-type single-molecule switches. A strong dependence of the conductance on the site of attachment of the electrodes in a π system is an immediate extrapolation; the theory then predicts that for some specified sites the switching behavior will be inverted; i.e. the "open" molecular form of the switch will be more conductive.

  2. A chemical-induced pH-mediated molecular switch

    PubMed Central

    Jayawardhana, Dilani A.; Sengupta, Mrinal K.; Krishantha, D.M. Milan; Gupta, Jyoti; Armstrong, Daniel W.; Guan, Xiyun

    2011-01-01

    The transmembrane protein α-hemolysin pore has been used to develop ultrasensitive biosensors, study biomolecular folding and unfolding, investigate covalent and non-covalent bonding interactions, and probe enzyme kinetics. Here, we report that by addition of ionic liquid tetrakis(hydroxymethyl)phosphonium chloride solution to the α-hemolysin pore, the α-hemolysin channel can be controlled open or closed by adjusting the pH of the solution. This approach can be employed to develop a novel molecular switch to regulate molecular transport, and should find potential applications as a ‘smart’ drug delivery method. PMID:21919492

  3. Chemical-induced pH-mediated molecular switch.

    PubMed

    Jayawardhana, Dilani A; Sengupta, Mrinal K; Krishantha, D M Milan; Gupta, Jyoti; Armstrong, Daniel W; Guan, Xiyun

    2011-10-15

    The transmembrane protein α-hemolysin pore has been used to develop ultrasensitive biosensors, study biomolecular folding and unfolding, investigate covalent and noncovalent bonding interactions, and probe enzyme kinetics. Here, we report that, by addition of ionic liquid tetrakis(hydroxymethyl)phosphonium chloride solution to the α-hemolysin pore, the α-hemolysin channel can be controlled open or closed by adjusting the pH of the solution. This approach can be employed to develop a novel molecular switch to regulate molecular transport and should find potential applications as a "smart" drug delivery method.

  4. Dynamic signaling cascades: reversible covalent reaction-coupled molecular switches.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yulong; You, Lei

    2015-11-11

    The research of systems chemistry exploring complex mixtures of interacting synthetic molecules has been burgeoning recently. Herein we demonstrate for the first time the coupling of molecular switches with a dynamic covalent reaction (DCR) and the modulation of created chemical cascades with a variety of inputs, thus closely mimicking a biological signaling system. A novel Michael type DCR of 10-methylacridinium perchlorate and monothiols exhibiting excellent regioselectivity and tunable affinity was discovered. A delicate balance between the unique reactivity of the reactant and the stability of the adduct leads to the generation of a strong acid in a thermodynamically controlled system. The dynamic cascade was next created via coupling of the DCR and a protonation-induced configurational switch (E/Z isomerization) through a proton relay. Detailed examination of the interdependence of the equilibrium enabled us to rationally optimize the cascade and also shed light on the possible intermediate of the switching process. Furthermore, relative independence of the coupled reactions was verified by the identification of stimuli that are able to facilitate one reaction but suppress the other. To further enhance systematic complexity, a second DCR of electrophilic aldehydes and thiols was employed for the reversible inhibition of the binary system, thus achieving the interplay of multiple equilibria. Finally, a fluorescence switch was turned on through coupling with the DCR, showcasing the versatility of our strategy. The results described herein should pave the way for the exploitation of multifunctional dynamic covalent cascades.

  5. The Design and Measurement of Molecular Electronic Switches and Memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Mark

    2000-03-01

    Electron transport studies in molecular-scale systems have recently become possible with the utilization of advanced microfabrication and self-assembly techniques. We have performed the measurement of the conductance of a single molecule using a break junction technique [1], the demonstration of molecular diodes [2], and the systematic investigation of metal-molecule contacts in a variety of systems [3]. Most recently, we have observed [4] large and useful reversible switching behavior in an electronic device that utilizes molecules as the active component, specifically a nitroamine redox center. The molecular device exhibits negative differential resistance (NDR) and peak-to-valley ratios exceeding 1000:1 and exceeds that observed in typical solid state quantum well resonant tunneling heterostructures. The designs of molecular switches, memories, and their circuit applications will be discussed. 1. M. A. Reed et al., Science 278, 252 (1997). 2. C. Zhou et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 71, 611 (1997). 3. J. Chen et al., Chem Phys Lett 313, 741 (1999). 4. J. Chen et al., Science 286, 1550 (1999).

  6. Solid-state reversible quadratic nonlinear optical molecular switch with an exceptionally large contrast.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhihua; Luo, Junhua; Zhang, Shuquan; Ji, Chengmin; Zhou, Lei; Li, Shenhui; Deng, Feng; Hong, Maochun

    2013-08-14

    Exceptional nonlinear optical (NLO) switching behavior, including an extremely large contrast (on/off) of ∼35 and high NLO coefficients, is displayed by a solid-state reversible quadratic NLO switch. The favorable results, induced by very fast molecular motion and anionic ordering, provides impetus for the design of a novel second-harmonic-generation switch involving molecular motion.

  7. Heparan sulfate regulates ADAM12 through a molecular switch mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Hans Peter; Vivès, Romain R; Manetopoulos, Christina; Albrechtsen, Reidar; Lydolph, Magnus C; Jacobsen, Jonas; Couchman, John R; Wewer, Ulla M

    2008-11-14

    The disintegrin and metalloproteases (ADAMs) are emerging as therapeutic targets in human disease, but specific drug design is hampered by potential redundancy. Unlike other metzincins, ADAM prodomains remain bound to the mature enzyme to regulate activity. Here ADAM12, a protease that promotes tumor progression and chondrocyte proliferation in osteoarthritic cartilage, is shown to possess a prodomain/catalytic domain cationic molecular switch, regulated by exogenous heparan sulfate and heparin but also endogenous cell surface proteoglycans and the polyanion, calcium pentosan polysulfate. Sheddase functions of ADAM12 are regulated by the switch, as are proteolytic functions in placental tissue and sera of pregnant women. Moreover, human heparanase, an enzyme also linked to tumorigenesis, can promote ADAM12 sheddase activity at the cell surface through cleavage of the inhibitory heparan sulfate. These data present a novel concept that might allow targeting of ADAM12 and suggest that other ADAMs may have specific regulatory activity embedded in their prodomain and catalytic domain structures.

  8. Cholecystokinin: A multi-functional molecular switch of neuronal circuits

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo Yeun; Soltesz, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK), a peptide originally discovered in the gastrointestinal tract, is one of the most the abundant and widely distributed neuropeptides in the brain. In spite of its abundance, recent data indicate that that CCK modulates intrinsic neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission in a surprisingly cell-type specific manner, acting as a key molecular switch to regulate the functional output of neuronal circuits. The central importance of CCK in neuronal networks is also reflected in its involvement in a variety of neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders including panic attacks and epilepsy. PMID:21154912

  9. Molecular switches from benzene derivatives adsorbed on metal surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Filimonov, Sergey N.; Carrasco, Javier; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Transient precursor states are often experimentally observed for molecules adsorbing on surfaces. However, such precursor states are typically rather short-lived, quickly yielding to more stable adsorption configurations. Here we employ first-principles calculations to systematically explore the interaction mechanism for benzene derivatives on metal surfaces, enabling us to selectively tune the stability and the barrier between two metastable adsorption states. In particular, in the case of the tetrachloropyrazine molecule, two equally stable adsorption states are identified with a moderate and conceivably reversible barrier between them. We address the feasibility of experimentally detecting the predicted bistable behaviour and discuss its potential usefulness in a molecular switch. PMID:24157660

  10. Molecular epigenetic switches in neurodevelopment in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Anke; Zimmermann, Christoph A.; Spengler, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms encode information above and beyond DNA sequence and play a critical role in brain development and the long-lived effects of environmental cues on the pre- and postnatal brain. Switch-like, rather than graded changes, illustrate par excellence how epigenetic events perpetuate altered activity states in the absence of the initial cue. They occur from early neural development to maturation and can give rise to distinct diseases upon deregulation. Many neurodevelopmental genes harbor bivalently marked chromatin domains, states of balanced inhibition, which guide dynamic “ON or OFF” decisions once the balance is tilted in response to developmental or environmental cues. Examples discussed in this review include neuronal differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESC) into progenitors and beyond, activation of Kiss1 at puberty onset, and early experience-dependent programming of Avp, a major stress gene. At the genome-scale, genomic imprinting can be epigenetically switched on or off at select genes in a tightly controlled temporospatial manner and provides a versatile mechanism for dosage regulation of genes with important roles in stem cell quiescence or differentiation. Moreover, retrotransposition in neural progenitors provides an intriguing example of an epigenetic-like switch, which is stimulated by bivalently marked neurodevelopmental genes and possibly results in increased genomic flexibility regarding unprecedented challenge. Overall, we propose that molecular epigenetic switches illuminate the catalyzing function of epigenetic mechanisms in guiding dynamic changes in gene expression underpinning robust transitions in cellular and organismal phenotypes as well as in the mediation between dynamically changing environments and the static genetic blueprint. PMID:26029068

  11. Molecular switching behavior in isosteric DNA base pairs.

    PubMed

    Jissy, A K; Konar, Sukanya; Datta, Ayan

    2013-04-15

    The structures and proton-coupled behavior of adenine-thymine (A-T) and a modified base pair containing a thymine isostere, adenine-difluorotoluene (A-F), are studied in different solvents by dispersion-corrected density functional theory. The stability of the canonical Watson-Crick base pair and the mismatched pair in various solvents with low and high dielectric constants is analyzed. It is demonstrated that A-F base pairing is favored in solvents with low dielectric constant. The stabilization and conformational changes induced by protonation are also analyzed for the natural as well as the mismatched base pair. DNA sequences capable of changing their sequence conformation on protonation are used in the construction of pH-based molecular switches. An acidic medium has a profound influence in stabilizing the isostere base pair. Such a large gain in stability on protonation leads to an interesting pH-controlled molecular switch, which can be incorporated in a natural DNA tract.

  12. Benchmark Performance of Global Switching versus Local Switching for Trajectory Surface Hopping Molecular Dynamics Simulation: Cis↔Trans Azobenzene Photoisomerization.

    PubMed

    Yue, Ling; Yu, Le; Xu, Chao; Lei, Yibo; Liu, Yajun; Zhu, Chaoyuan

    2017-05-19

    A newly developed global switching algorithm that does not require calculation of nonadiabatic coupling vectors reduces computational costs significantly. However, the accuracy of this simplest nonadiabatic molecular dynamic method has not been extensively compared with the conventional Tully's fewest switches. It is necessary to demonstrate the accuracy of this global switching algorithm. An extensive comparison between local and global switching on-the-fly trajectory surface hopping molecular dynamics is performed for cis-to-trans (800 sampling trajectories) and trans-to-cis (600 sampling trajectories) azobenzene photoisomerization at the OM2/MRCI level. The global switching algorithm is coded into the Newton-X program package. Excellent agreement between the two switching algorithms is obtained not only for highly averaged quantities of quantum yields and lifetimes, but also for detailed contour patterns of product distributions, hopping spot distributions and hopping directions in terms of conical intersections between ground and the first excited states. Therefore, the global switching trajectory surface hopping method can be applied to larger complex systems in which nonadiabatic coupling is not available for excited-state molecular dynamic simulations. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Structural analyses of human thymidylate synthase reveal a site that may control conformational switching between active and inactive states.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dan; Jansson, Anna; Sim, Daniel; Larsson, Andreas; Nordlund, Pär

    2017-08-11

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) is the sole enzyme responsible for de novo biosynthesis of thymidylate (TMP) and is essential for cell proliferation and survival. Inhibition of human TS (hTS) has been extensively investigated for cancer chemotherapy, but several aspects of its activity and regulation are still uncertain. In this study, we performed comprehensive structural and biophysical studies of hTS using crystallography and thermal shift assay and provided the first detailed structural information on the conformational changes induced by ligand binding to the hTS active site. We found that upon binding of the antifolate agents raltitrexed and nolatrexed, the two insert regions in hTS, the functions of which are unclear, undergo positional shifts toward the catalytic center. We investigated the inactive conformation of hTS and found that the two insert regions are also involved in the conformational transition between the active and inactive state of hTS. Moreover, we identified a ligand-binding site in the dimer interface, suggesting that the cavity in the dimer interface could serve as an allosteric site of hTS to regulate the conformational switching between the active and inactive states. On the basis of these findings, we propose a regulatory mechanism of hTS activity that involves allosteric regulation of interactions of hTS with its own mRNA depending on cellular demands for TMP. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Nonmechanical Conductance Switching in a Molecular Tunnel Junction.

    PubMed

    Baratz, Adva; Baer, Roi

    2012-02-16

    We present a molecular junction composed of a donor (polyacetylene strands) and an acceptor (malononitrile) connected together via a benzene ring and coupled weakly to source and drain electrodes on each side, for which a gate electrode induces intramolecular charge transfer, switching reversibly the character of conductance. Using a new brand of density functional theory, for which orbital energies are similar to the quasiparticle energies, we show that the junction displays a single, gate-tunable differential conductance channel in a wide energy range. The gate field must align parallel to the displacement vector between donors and acceptor to affect their potential difference; for strong enough fields, spontaneous intramolecular electron transfer occurs. This event radically affects conductance, reversing the charge of carriers, enabling a spin-polarized current channel. We discuss the physical principles controlling the operation of the junction and find interplay of quantum interference, charging, Coulomb blockade, and electron-hole binding energy effects. We expect that this switching behavior is a generic property for similar donor-acceptor systems of sufficient stability.

  15. Molecular Mechanisms of IgE Class Switch Recombination.

    PubMed

    Tong, Pei; Wesemann, Duane R

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) E is the most tightly regulated of all Ig heavy chain (IgH) isotypes and plays a key role in atopic disease. The gene encoding for IgH in mature B cells consists of a variable region exon-assembled from component gene segments via V(D)J recombination during early B cell development-upstream of a set of IgH constant region CH exons. Upon activation by antigen in peripheral lymphoid organs, B cells can undergo IgH class switch recombination (CSR), a process in which the initially expressed IgH μ constant region exons (Cμ) are deleted and replaced by one of several sets of downstream CH exons (e.g., Cγ, Cε, and Cα). Activation of the IL-4 receptor on B cells, together with other signals, can lead to the replacement of Cμ with Cε resulting in CSR to IgE through a series of molecular events involving irreversible remodeling of the IgH locus. Here, we discuss the molecular mechanisms of CSR and the unique features surrounding the generation of IgE-producing B cells.

  16. A biomimetic molecular switch at work: coupling photoisomerization dynamics to peptide structural rearrangement.

    PubMed

    García-Iriepa, Cristina; Gueye, Moussa; Léonard, Jérémie; Martínez-López, David; Campos, Pedro J; Frutos, Luis Manuel; Sampedro, Diego; Marazzi, Marco

    2016-03-07

    In spite of considerable interest in the design of molecular switches towards photo-controllable (bio)materials, few studies focused on the major influence of the surrounding environment on the switch photoreactivities. We present a combined experimental and computational study of a retinal-like molecular switch linked to a peptide, elucidating the effects on the photoreactivity and on the α-helix secondary structure. Temperature-dependent, femtosecond UV-vis transient absorption spectroscopy and high-level hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics methods were applied to describe the photoisomerization process and the subsequent peptide rearrangement. It was found that the conformational heterogeneity of the ground state peptide controls the excited state potential energy surface and the thermally activated population decay. Still, a reversible α-helix to α-hairpin conformational change is predicted, paving the way for a fine photocontrol of different secondary structure elements, hence (bio)molecular functions, using retinal-inspired molecular switches.

  17. An Electrically Driven and Readable Molecular Monolayer Switch Based on a Solid Electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Marchante, Elena; Crivillers, Núria; Buhl, Moritz; Veciana, Jaume; Mas-Torrent, Marta

    2016-01-04

    The potential application of molecular switches as active elements in information storage has been demonstrated through numerous works. Importantly, such switching capabilities have also been reported for self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). SAMs of electroactive molecules have recently been exploited as electrochemical switches. Typically, the state of these switches could be read out through their optical and/or magnetic response. These output reading processes are difficult to integrate into devices, and furthermore, there is a need to use liquid environments for switching the redox-active molecular systems. In this work, both of these challenges were overcome by using an ionic gel as the electrolyte medium, which led to an unprecedented solid-state device based on a single molecular layer. Moreover, electrochemical impedance has been successfully exploited as the output of the system. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Collective Molecular Motion during V-Shaped Switching in a Smectic Liquid Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Byoungchoo; Seomun, San-seong; Nakata, Michi; Takahashi, Masayoshi; Takanishi, Yoichi; Ishikawa, Ken; Takezoe, Hideo

    1999-03-01

    The molecular motion during V-shaped switching in a homogeneously aligned smectic C*-like liquid crystal (LC) cell has been investigated by measuring the effective optical anisotropy Δneff, apparent tilt angle θapp, switching current, and second-harmonic generation and comparing them with the simulated results based on two extreme models, i.e., random model and collective model, where molecules switch randomly and collectively, respectively. The comparison revealed that the collective switching motion of LC molecules is more reasonable than the random motion. Moreover, it was also confirmed that the observed infrared absorption anisotropy of the phenyl stretching mode due to LC molecular distributions strongly supports the collective model. From these results, it was demonstrated that LC molecules do not switch randomly but all the LC molecules rotate collectively on a cone under the driving field.

  19. Switching behaviors of butadienimine molecular devices sandwiched between graphene nanoribbons electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Cai-Juan; Ye, Meng; Zhang, Bo-Qun; Su, Yao-Heng; Tu, Zhe-Yan

    2017-10-01

    The switching behavior of butadienimine molecule with two tautomeric forms sandwiched between different graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) electrodes are investigated by applying nonequilibrium Green’s function formalism combined with first-principles density functional theory. The calculated results show that the edge geometry of GNRs electrodes play a significant role in determining the electronic transport properties and switching behavior of the butadienimine molecular junctions. A higher current switching ratio can be obtained for the molecular junctions with zigzag edged graphene nanoribbons, which suggests that this system has a broader application in future logic and memory devices.

  20. Redox-induced configuration conversion for thioacetamide dimer can function as a molecular switch.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiying; Chen, Xiaohua; Bu, Yuxiang

    2010-11-15

    The electronic switching properties of thioacetamide dimer (TAD) were investigated using the nonequilibrium Green's function method combined with density functional theory for design of a novel molecular switch. The H-bonded TAD can be converted upon hole-trapping to a three-electron (3e)-bonded configuration with a S [symbol: see text] S linkage which could provide a more favorable channel for charge transfer than the before. The redox-induced configuration conversion between the H-bonded and the 3e-bonded TADs could govern the charge migration through the molecular junction with a considerable difference in conduction currents. The calculated I-V characteristic curves of two configurations exhibit a switching behavior with an On-Off ratio in a range of about 4.3-7.6 within the applied voltages. Clearly, this hypothetical scheme provides a potential way to explore the novel conformation-dependent molecular switch.

  1. Nonequilibrium Molecular Switching of Chiral Helicene Oligomers in Double-Helix Formation.

    PubMed

    Shigeno, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Molecular switching is the phenomenon in which a molecular structural change occurs reversibly in response to an external stimulus or energy. It plays an important role in biology, in which it is used for sensing environmental changes. In contrast to well-studied equilibrium molecular switching involving thermodynamically stable states, nonequilibrium molecular switching involving a metastable state is a notable chemical phenomenon and is the theme of this study. Sulfonamido- and aminomethylenehelicene oligomers show a reversible structural change from a double helix to a random coil in dilute solution. A metastable state consisting of random coils can be generated by heating, which shows various nonequilibrium thermodynamic properties. Molecular phenomena including molecular thermal hysteresis, molecular memory effect, and one-directional three-state molecular structural change occur, none of which is observed in an equilibrium molecular switching system. They can be applied to sensing environmental changes such as temperature increases/decreases, temperature change rates, and concentration increases, and for counting the numbers 1 and 2.

  2. Insight into the molecular switch mechanism of human Rab5a from molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing-Fang; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2009-12-18

    Rab5a is currently a most interesting target because it is responsible for regulating the early endosome fusion in endocytosis and possibly the budding process. We utilized longtime-scale molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the internal motion of the wild-type Rab5a and its A30P mutant. It was observed that, after binding with GTP, the global flexibility of the two proteins is increasing, while the local flexibility in their sensitive sites (P-loop, switch I and II regions) is decreasing. Also, the mutation of Ala30 to Pro30 can cause notable flexibility variations in the sensitive sites. However, this kind of variations is dramatically reduced after binding with GTP. Such a remarkable feature is mainly caused by the water network rearrangements in the sensitive sites. These findings might be of use for revealing the profound mechanism of the displacements of Rab5a switch regions, as well as the mechanism of the GDP dissociation and GTP association.

  3. The stochastic behavior of a molecular switching circuit with feedback

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, Supriya; Smith, Eric; Krakauer, David; Fontana, Walter

    2007-01-01

    Background Using a statistical physics approach, we study the stochastic switching behavior of a model circuit of multisite phosphorylation and dephosphorylation with feedback. The circuit consists of a kinase and phosphatase acting on multiple sites of a substrate that, contingent on its modification state, catalyzes its own phosphorylation and, in a symmetric scenario, dephosphorylation. The symmetric case is viewed as a cartoon of conflicting feedback that could result from antagonistic pathways impinging on the state of a shared component. Results Multisite phosphorylation is sufficient for bistable behavior under feedback even when catalysis is linear in substrate concentration, which is the case we consider. We compute the phase diagram, fluctuation spectrum and large-deviation properties related to switch memory within a statistical mechanics framework. Bistability occurs as either a first-order or second-order non-equilibrium phase transition, depending on the network symmetries and the ratio of phosphatase to kinase numbers. In the second-order case, the circuit never leaves the bistable regime upon increasing the number of substrate molecules at constant kinase to phosphatase ratio. Conclusion The number of substrate molecules is a key parameter controlling both the onset of the bistable regime, fluctuation intensity, and the residence time in a switched state. The relevance of the concept of memory depends on the degree of switch symmetry, as memory presupposes information to be remembered, which is highest for equal residence times in the switched states. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Artem Novozhilov (nominated by Eugene Koonin), Sergei Maslov, and Ned Wingreen. PMID:17540019

  4. Correlated rotational switching in two-dimensional self-assembled molecular rotor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasio, Natalie A.; Slough, Diana P.; Smith, Zachary C.; Ivimey, Christopher J.; Thomas, Samuel W., III; Lin, Yu-Shan; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2017-07-01

    Molecular devices are capable of performing a number of functions from mechanical motion to simple computation. Their utility is somewhat limited, however, by difficulties associated with coupling them with either each other or with interfaces such as electrodes. Self-assembly of coupled molecular devices provides an option for the construction of larger entities that can more easily integrate with existing technologies. Here we demonstrate that ordered organometallic arrays can be formed spontaneously by reaction of precursor molecular rotor molecules with a metal surface. Scanning tunnelling microscopy enables individual rotors in the arrays to be switched and the resultant switches in neighbouring rotors imaged. The structure and dimensions of the ordered molecular rotor arrays dictate the correlated switching properties of the internal submolecular rotor units. Our results indicate that self-assembly of two-dimensional rotor crystals produces systems with correlated dynamics that would not have been predicted a priori.

  5. Electrically controllable molecular spin crossover switching in Fe(phen)2 (NCS)2 thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Chaitali; Mandal, Swapan K.

    2016-10-01

    Spin crossover molecular complex Fe(phen)2(NCS)2 in thin film form (20-300 nm) is obtained by simple dip-coating technique on glass substrates. The growth of the molecular films is confirmed by optical and X-ray diffraction data. The morphology of the samples shows distributed nanocrystals with an average size ca. 12 nm. We measure the current (I)-voltage (V) characteristics of a device with 300 nm film thickness and show that application of electric field can induce spin state switching. The electric field experienced by individual nanocrystals separated by nanometric gap is supposed to be quite high and is plausibly playing the crucial role in instigating switching in molecular nanocrystals. The result is quite significant towards developing room temperature molecular spin cross-over switching devices in the nanoscale limit.

  6. Phyical and molecular characterization of a genetic switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finzi, Laura; Zurla, Chiara; Manzo, Carlo; Wang, Haowei; Dunlap, David

    2009-11-01

    The lambda bacteriophage epigenetic switch determines the growth lifestyle of the virus after infection of its host (E. coli). It is now clear that the switch consists of a ˜2.3 kbp-long DNA loop mediated by the lambda repressor protein. Using tethered particle microscopy (TPM), magnetic tweezers and AFM, our laboratory has novel, direct evidence of loop formation and breakdown by the repressor, the first characterization of the thermodynamics and kinetics of the looping reaction and its dependence on repressor non-specific binding and DNA supercoiling. These in vitro data provide insight into the different possible nucleoprotein complexes and into the lambda repressor-mediated looping mechanism which leads to predictions for that in vivo. The significance of this work consists not only of the new insight into the physical parameters at the basis of a paradigmatic epigenetic switch that governs lysogeny vs. lysis, but also the detailed mechanics of regulatory DNA loops mediated by proteins bound to multipartite operators and capable of different levels of oligomerization.

  7. Molecular dynamics study of ferroelectric domain nucleation and domain switching dynamics.

    PubMed

    Boddu, Vishal; Endres, Florian; Steinmann, Paul

    2017-04-11

    Ferroelectric materials contain domains of ordered electric dipoles, separated by domain walls, that can undergo polarisation switching under externally applied electric fields. The domain switching dynamics in ferroelectric materials plays an essential role in their application to electronic and electro-optic de- vices. Previous studies suggest that the switching occurs largely through domain wall motion which is explained from the viewpoint of statistical physics on surface growth as the behaviour of a pinned elas- tic interface. We perform molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the domain switching process and quantitatively estimate the switching speed of anti-parallel 180° domains in ferroelectric, tetragonal BaTiO3 perfect single crystals at room temperature using the core-shell model. We observe an unprece- dented, non-linear increase in the domain switching speed caused by the nucleation of new domains within the switching domain. We determine the strength of the electric field to evoke nucleation of new domains and show that the nucleated domains diffuse into nearby favourable domains when the electric field is removed. Furthermore, we discuss the prominence of domain nucleations during ferroelectric switching.

  8. Immobilizing Organic-Based Molecular Switches into Metal-Organic Frameworks: A Promising Strategy for Switching in Solid State.

    PubMed

    Gui, Bo; Meng, Yi; Xie, Yang; Du, Ke; Sue, Andrew C-H; Wang, Cheng

    2017-09-14

    Organic-based molecular switches (OMS) are essential components for the ultimate miniaturization of nanoscale electronics and devices. For practical applications, it is often necessary for OMS to be incorporated into functional solid-state materials. However, the switching characteristics of OMS in solution are usually not transferrable to the solid state, presumably because of spatial confinement or inefficient conversion in densely packed solid phase. A promising way to circumvent this issue is harboring the functional OMS within the robust and porous environment of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as their organic components. In this feature article, recent research progress of OMS-based MOFs is briefly summarized. The switching behaviors of OMS under different stimuli (e.g., light, redox, pH, etc.) in the MOF state are first introduced. After that, the technological applications of these OMS-based MOFs in different areas, including CO2 adsorption, gas separation, drug delivery, photodynamic therapy, and sensing, are outlined. Finally, perspectives and future challenges are discussed in the conclusion. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Molecular basis of the light-driven switching of the photochromic fluorescent protein Padron.

    PubMed

    Brakemann, Tanja; Weber, Gert; Andresen, Martin; Groenhof, Gerrit; Stiel, Andre C; Trowitzsch, Simon; Eggeling, Christian; Grubmüller, Helmut; Hell, Stefan W; Wahl, Markus C; Jakobs, Stefan

    2010-05-07

    Reversibly switchable fluorescent proteins can be repeatedly photoswitched between a fluorescent and a nonfluorescent state by irradiation with the light of two different wavelengths. The molecular basis of the switching process remains a controversial topic. Padron0.9 is a reversibly switchable fluorescent protein with "positive" switching characteristics, exhibiting excellent spectroscopic properties. Its chromophore is formed by the amino acids Cys-Tyr-Gly. We obtained high resolution x-ray structures of Padron0.9 in both the fluorescent and the nonfluorescent states and used the structural information for molecular dynamics simulations. We found that in Padron0.9 the chromophore undergoes a cis-trans isomerization upon photoswitching. The molecular dynamics simulations clarified the protonation states of the amino acid residues within the chromophore pocket that influence the protonation state of the chromophore. We conclude that a light driven cis-trans isomerization of the chromophore appears to be the fundamental switching mechanism in all photochromic fluorescent proteins known to date. Distinct absorption cross-sections for the switching wavelengths in the fluorescent and the nonfluorescent state are not essential for efficient photochromism in fluorescent proteins, although they may facilitate the switching process.

  10. Hydrochromic molecular switches for water-jet rewritable paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Lan; Li, Minjie; Zhu, Shaoyin; Li, Hao; Xi, Guan; Li, Yong-Gang; Wang, Yi; Li, Quanshun; Liang, Shaojun; Zhong, Ke; Zhang, Sean Xiao-An

    2014-01-01

    The days of rewritable paper are coming, printers of the future will use water-jet paper. Although several kinds of rewritable paper have been reported, practical usage of them is rare. Herein, a new rewritable paper for ink-free printing is proposed and demonstrated successfully by using water as the sole trigger to switch hydrochromic dyes on solid media. Water-jet prints with various colours are achieved with a commercial desktop printer based on these hydrochromic rewritable papers. The prints can be erased and rewritten dozens of times with no significant loss in colour quality. This rewritable paper is promising in that it can serve an eco-friendly information display to meet the increasing global needs for environmental protection.

  11. Hydrochromic molecular switches for water-jet rewritable paper.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Lan; Li, Minjie; Zhu, Shaoyin; Li, Hao; Xi, Guan; Li, Yong-Gang; Wang, Yi; Li, Quanshun; Liang, Shaojun; Zhong, Ke; Zhang, Sean Xiao-An

    2014-01-01

    The days of rewritable paper are coming, printers of the future will use water-jet paper. Although several kinds of rewritable paper have been reported, practical usage of them is rare. Herein, a new rewritable paper for ink-free printing is proposed and demonstrated successfully by using water as the sole trigger to switch hydrochromic dyes on solid media. Water-jet prints with various colours are achieved with a commercial desktop printer based on these hydrochromic rewritable papers. The prints can be erased and rewritten dozens of times with no significant loss in colour quality. This rewritable paper is promising in that it can serve an eco-friendly information display to meet the increasing global needs for environmental protection.

  12. Ultrafast Polarization Switching in a Biaxial Molecular Ferroelectric Thin Film: [Hdabco]ClO4.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Wan-Ying; Li, Peng-Fei; Ye, Heng-Yun; You, Yu-Meng; Xiong, Ren-Gen

    2016-12-07

    Molecular ferroelectrics are attracting much attention as valuable complements to conventional ceramic ferroelectrics owing to their solution processability and nontoxicity. Encouragingly, the recent discovery of a multiaxial molecular ferroelectric, tetraethylammonium perchlorate, is expected to be able to solve the problem that in the technologically relevant thin-film form uniaxial molecular ferroelectrics have been found to perform considerably more poorly than in bulk. However, it can show good polarization-electric field (P-E) hysteresis loops only at very low frequency, severely hampering practical applications such as ferroelectric random access memory. Here, we present a biaxial molecular ferroelectric thin film of [Hdabco]ClO4 (dabco = 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane) (1), where a perfect ferroelectric hysteresis loop can be observed even at 10 kHz. It is the first example of a molecular ferroelectric thin film whose polarization can be switched at such a high frequency. Moreover, using piezoresponse force microscopy, we clearly observed the coexistence of 180° and non-180° ferroelectric domains and provided direct experimental proof that 180° ferroelectric switching and non-180° ferroelastic switching are both realized; that is, a flexible alteration of the polarization axis direction can occur in the thin film by applying an electric field. These results open a new avenue for applications of molecular ferroelectrics and will inspire further exploration of high-performance multiaxial molecular ferroelectric thin films.

  13. Controlled clockwise and anticlockwise rotational switching of a molecular motor.

    PubMed

    Perera, U G E; Ample, F; Kersell, H; Zhang, Y; Vives, G; Echeverria, J; Grisolia, M; Rapenne, G; Joachim, C; Hla, S-W

    2013-01-01

    The design of artificial molecular machines often takes inspiration from macroscopic machines. However, the parallels between the two systems are often only superficial, because most molecular machines are governed by quantum processes. Previously, rotary molecular motors powered by light and chemical energy have been developed. In electrically driven motors, tunnelling electrons from the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope have been used to drive the rotation of a simple rotor in a single direction and to move a four-wheeled molecule across a surface. Here, we show that a stand-alone molecular motor adsorbed on a gold surface can be made to rotate in a clockwise or anticlockwise direction by selective inelastic electron tunnelling through different subunits of the motor. Our motor is composed of a tripodal stator for vertical positioning, a five-arm rotor for controlled rotations, and a ruthenium atomic ball bearing connecting the static and rotational parts. The directional rotation arises from sawtooth-like rotational potentials, which are solely determined by the internal molecular structure and are independent of the surface adsorption site.

  14. Controlled clockwise and anticlockwise rotational switching of a molecular motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, U. G. E.; Ample, F.; Kersell, H.; Zhang, Y.; Vives, G.; Echeverria, J.; Grisolia, M.; Rapenne, G.; Joachim, C.; Hla, S.-W.

    2013-01-01

    The design of artificial molecular machines often takes inspiration from macroscopic machines. However, the parallels between the two systems are often only superficial, because most molecular machines are governed by quantum processes. Previously, rotary molecular motors powered by light and chemical energy have been developed. In electrically driven motors, tunnelling electrons from the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope have been used to drive the rotation of a simple rotor in a single direction and to move a four-wheeled molecule across a surface. Here, we show that a stand-alone molecular motor adsorbed on a gold surface can be made to rotate in a clockwise or anticlockwise direction by selective inelastic electron tunnelling through different subunits of the motor. Our motor is composed of a tripodal stator for vertical positioning, a five-arm rotor for controlled rotations, and a ruthenium atomic ball bearing connecting the static and rotational parts. The directional rotation arises from sawtooth-like rotational potentials, which are solely determined by the internal molecular structure and are independent of the surface adsorption site.

  15. An artificial molecular switch that mimics the visual pigment and completes its photocycle in picoseconds

    PubMed Central

    Sinicropi, Adalgisa; Martin, Elena; Ryazantsev, Mikhail; Helbing, Jan; Briand, Julien; Sharma, Divya; Léonard, Jérémie; Haacke, Stefan; Cannizzo, Andrea; Chergui, Majed; Zanirato, Vinicio; Fusi, Stefania; Santoro, Fabrizio; Basosi, Riccardo; Ferré, Nicolas; Olivucci, Massimo

    2008-01-01

    Single molecules that act as light-energy transducers (e.g., converting the energy of a photon into atomic-level mechanical motion) are examples of minimal molecular devices. Here, we focus on a molecular switch designed by merging a conformationally locked diarylidene skeleton with a retinal-like Schiff base and capable of mimicking, in solution, different aspects of the transduction of the visual pigment Rhodopsin. Complementary ab initio multiconfigurational quantum chemistry-based computations and time-resolved spectroscopy are used to follow the light-induced isomerization of the switch in methanol. The results show that, similar to rhodopsin, the isomerization occurs on a 0.3-ps time scale and is followed by <10-ps cooling and solvation. The entire (2-photon-powered) switch cycle was traced by following the evolution of its infrared spectrum. These measurements indicate that a full cycle can be completed within 20 ps. PMID:19004797

  16. An artificial molecular switch that mimics the visual pigment and completes its photocycle in picoseconds.

    PubMed

    Sinicropi, Adalgisa; Martin, Elena; Ryazantsev, Mikhail; Helbing, Jan; Briand, Julien; Sharma, Divya; Léonard, Jérémie; Haacke, Stefan; Cannizzo, Andrea; Chergui, Majed; Zanirato, Vinicio; Fusi, Stefania; Santoro, Fabrizio; Basosi, Riccardo; Ferré, Nicolas; Olivucci, Massimo

    2008-11-18

    Single molecules that act as light-energy transducers (e.g., converting the energy of a photon into atomic-level mechanical motion) are examples of minimal molecular devices. Here, we focus on a molecular switch designed by merging a conformationally locked diarylidene skeleton with a retinal-like Schiff base and capable of mimicking, in solution, different aspects of the transduction of the visual pigment Rhodopsin. Complementary ab initio multiconfigurational quantum chemistry-based computations and time-resolved spectroscopy are used to follow the light-induced isomerization of the switch in methanol. The results show that, similar to rhodopsin, the isomerization occurs on a 0.3-ps time scale and is followed by <10-ps cooling and solvation. The entire (2-photon-powered) switch cycle was traced by following the evolution of its infrared spectrum. These measurements indicate that a full cycle can be completed within 20 ps.

  17. Light-induced photoisomerization of a diarylethene molecular switch on solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickel, Fabian; Bernien, Matthias; Herder, Martin; Wrzalek, Sandro; Chittas, Pantelis; Kraffert, Kai; Arruda, Lucas M.; Kipgen, Lalminthang; Krüger, Dennis; Hecht, Stefan; Kuch, Wolfgang

    2017-09-01

    Diarylethenes are molecular switches, the state of which can efficiently be controlled by illumination with ultraviolet or visible light. To use the change in the molecular properties when switching between the two states for a specific function, direct contact with solid surfaces is advantageous as it provides immobilization. Here we present a study of a diarylethene derivate (T-DAE, 1,2-bis(5-methyl-2-phenylthiazol-4-yl)cyclopent-1-ene) in direct contact with highly ordered graphite as well as with semimetallic Bi(1 1 1) surfaces by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray absorption spectroscopy and simulated spectra based on density functional theory. On both surfaces, the molecule can be switched from its open to its closed form by 325-475 nm broadband or ultraviolet illumination. On the other hand, back isomerization to the ring-open T-DAE was not possible.

  18. Cyclic conductance switching in networks of redox-active molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jianhui; Agustsson, Jon S; Wu, Songmei; Schönenberger, Christian; Calame, Michel; Leroux, Yann; Mayor, Marcel; Jeannin, Olivier; Ran, Ying-Fen; Liu, Shi-Xia; Decurtins, Silvio

    2010-03-10

    Redox-active dithiolated tetrathiafulvalene derivatives (TTFdT) were inserted in two-dimensional nanoparticle arrays to build interlinked networks of molecular junctions. Upon oxidation of the TTFdT to the dication state, we observed a conductance increase of the networks by up to 1 order of magnitude. Successive oxidation and reduction cycles demonstrated a clear switching behavior of the molecular junction conductance. These results show the potential of interlinked nanoparticle arrays as chemical sensors.

  19. A molecular switch for initiating cell differentiation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sanmartín, Maite; Sauer, Michael; Muñoz, Alfonso; Zouhar, Jan; Ordóñez, Angel; van de Ven, Wilhelmina T G; Caro, Elena; de la Paz Sánchez, María; Raikhel, Natasha V; Gutiérrez, Crisanto; Sánchez-Serrano, José J; Rojo, Enrique

    2011-06-21

    The onset of differentiation entails modifying the gene expression state of cells, to allow activation of developmental programs that are maintained repressed in the undifferentiated precursor cells [1, 2]. This requires a mechanism to change gene expression on a genome-scale. Recent evidence suggests that in mammalian stem cells, derepression of developmental regulators during differentiation involves a shift from stalled to productive elongation of their transcripts [3-5], but factors mediating this shift have not been identified and the evidence remains correlative. We report the identification of the MINIYO (IYO) gene, a positive regulator of transcriptional elongation that is essential for cells to initiate differentiation in Arabidopsis. IYO interacts with RNA polymerase II and the Elongator complex and is required to sustain global levels of transcriptional elongation activity, specifically in differentiating tissues. Accordingly, IYO is expressed in embryos, meristems, and organ primordia and not in mature tissues. Moreover, differential subcellular protein distribution further refines the domain of IYO function by directing nuclear accumulation, and thus its transcriptional activity, to cells initiating differentiation. Importantly, IYO overexpression induces premature cell differentiation and leads to meristem termination phenotypes. These findings identify IYO as a necessary and sufficient factor for initiating differentiation in Arabidopsis and suggest that the targeted nuclear accumulation of IYO functions as a transcriptional switch for this fate transition. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Temperature effect on the switching mechanism of molecular devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Ventra, M.; Kim, S.-G.; Pantelides, S. T.; Lang, N. D.

    2001-03-01

    Recent experiments have shown that benzene molecules with ligand substitutions act as switching devices when connected to gold electrodes, with enormous negative differential resistance at very low temperatures. [1] At higher temperatures, the current peak broadens, as expected, but it also shifts to substantially lower voltage, which would not be expected for phonon broadening mechanisms. [1] We show, by means of first-principles transport calculations, that such unusual behavior can be caused by the excitation of rotational modes of the ligands. [2] These modes have classical characteristics, i.e. the maximum excursion is dominant, while at the same time they have a significant effect on the energy levels responsible for resonant tunneling. [2] The proposed mechanism of ligand rotations is unique to molecules and accounts for the fact that the effect is not seen in semiconductor nanostructures. Work supported in part by DARPA/ONR Grant N00014-99-1-0351. [1] J. Chen, M.A. Reed, A.M. Rawlett, and J.M. Tour, Science 286, 1550 (1999). [2] M. Di Ventra, S.-G. Kim, S. T. Pantelides, N.D. Lang, Phys. Rev. Lett. (in press).

  1. Structure of the torque ring of the flagellar motor and the molecular basis for rotational switching

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Lawrence K.; Ginsburg, Michael A.; Crovace, Claudia; Donohoe, Mhairi; Stock, Daniela

    2010-09-13

    The flagellar motor drives the rotation of flagellar filaments at hundreds of revolutions per second, efficiently propelling bacteria through viscous media. The motor uses the potential energy from an electrochemical gradient of cations across the cytoplasmic membrane to generate torque. A rapid switch from anticlockwise to clockwise rotation determines whether a bacterium runs smoothly forward or tumbles to change its trajectory. A protein called FliG forms a ring in the rotor of the flagellar motor that is involved in the generation of torque through an interaction with the cation-channel-forming stator subunit MotA. FliG has been suggested to adopt distinct conformations that induce switching but these structural changes and the molecular mechanism of switching are unknown. Here we report the molecular structure of the full-length FliG protein, identify conformational changes that are involved in rotational switching and uncover the structural basis for the formation of the FliG torque ring. This allows us to propose a model of the complete ring and switching mechanism in which conformational changes in FliG reverse the electrostatic charges involved in torque generation.

  2. Adsorption and switching properties of a N-benzylideneaniline based molecular switch on a Au(111) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Ovari, Laszlo; Luo, Ying; Haag, Rainer; Leyssner, Felix; Tegeder, Petra; Wolf, Martin

    2010-07-28

    High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy has been employed to analyze the adsorption geometry and the photoisomerization ability of the molecular switch carboxy-benzylideneaniline (CBA) adsorbed on Au(111). CBA on Au(111) adopts a planar (trans) configuration in the first monolayer (ML) as well as for higher coverages (up to 6 ML), in contrast to the strongly nonplanar geometry of the molecule in solution. Illumination with UV light of CBA in direct contact with the Au(111) surface ({<=}1 ML) caused no changes in the vibrational structure, whereas at higher coverages (>1 ML) pronounced modifications of vibrational features were observed, which we assign to a trans{yields}cis isomerization. Thermal activation induced the back reaction to trans-CBA. We propose that the photoisomerization is driven by a direct (intramolecular) electronic excitation of the adsorbed CBA molecules in the second ML (and above) analogous to CBA in the liquid phase.

  3. A first-principles study of aryloxyanthraquinone-based optical molecular switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakili, Mohamad; Sobhkhizi, Alireza; Darugar, Vahidreza; Kanaani, Ayoub; Ajloo, Davood

    2017-10-01

    We study the transport properties of 4-((9,10-dioxo-9,10-dihydroanthracen-1-yl)oxy) benzaldehyde molecular optical switch by the first-principles calculations. Our molecule can reversibly switch between trans and ana forms by visible or UV irradiation. We studied many properties such as, I-V characteristics, the effect of electrode materials on electronic transport properties, on-off ratio and spatial distribution of molecular projected self-consistent Hamiltonian orbitals corresponding to both forms. The physical behavior of conductance interpret in terms of the HOMO-LUMO gap, the effective conjugation lengths, and size of the frontier molecular orbitals. Our results show, current through the ana form is higher than that the trans form.

  4. Thiacalix[4]arene based reconfigurable molecular switches: set-reset memorized sequential device.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Kumar, Rajesh; Bhalla, Vandana

    2011-12-21

    The fluorescent chemosensors 3, 5 and 7 based on thiacalix[4]arene bearing naphthyl groups have been designed and synthesized. The optical chemosensor 3 based on a thiacalix[4]arene of cone conformation behaves as "turn-on" optical chemosensor for Fe(3+) and F(-) ions. However, chemosensors 5 and 7 based on a thiacalix[4]arene of 1,3-alternate conformation demonstrate "turn-on" optical behaviour for Hg(2+), F(-) ions (with receptor 5 as turn-on for K(+) ions also) and "turn-off" behaviour for Fe(3+) ions. The simultaneous presence of Fe(3+) and Hg(2+) or K(+) or F(-) ions results in formulation of reversible "on-off" switches. Various molecular logic gates developed in response to molecular switching between these chemical inputs have been integrated into sequential logic circuits with memory function in a feedback loop which mimics "set-reset" molecular level information processing device.

  5. A pH-sensitive peptide-containing lasso molecular switch.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Caroline; Fournel-Marotte, Karine; Coutrot, Frédéric

    2013-09-17

    The synthesis of a peptide-containing lasso molecular switch by a self-entanglement strategy is described. The interlocked rotaxane molecular machine consists of a benzometaphenylene[25]crown-8 (BMP25C8) macrocycle surrounding a molecular axle. This molecular axle contains a tripeptidic sequence and two molecular stations: a N-benzyltriazolium and a pH-sensitive anilinium station. The tripeptide is located between the macrocycle and the triazolium station, so that its conformation can be tailored depending on the shuttling of the macrocycle from one station to the other. At acidic pH, the macrocycle resides around the anilinium moiety, whereas it shuttles around the triazolium station after deprotonation. This molecular machinery thus forces the lasso to adopt a tightened or a loosened conformation.

  6. Six States Switching of Redox-Active Molecular Tweezers by Three Orthogonal Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Doistau, Benjamin; Benda, Lorien; Cantin, Jean-Louis; Chamoreau, Lise-Marie; Ruiz, Eliseo; Marvaud, Valérie; Hasenknopf, Bernold; Vives, Guillaume

    2017-07-12

    A six level molecular switch based on terpyridine(Ni-salphen)2 tweezers and addressable by three orthogonal stimuli (metal coordination, redox reaction, and guest binding) is reported. By a metal coordination stimulus, the tweezers can be mechanically switched from an open "W"-shaped conformation to a closed "U"-shaped form. Theses two states can each be reversibly oxidized by the redox stimulus and bind to a pyrazine guest resulting in four additional states. All six states are stable and accessible by the right combination of stimuli and were studied by NMR, XRD, EPR spectroscopy, and DFT calculations. The combination of the supramolecular concepts of mechanical motion and guest binding with the redox noninnocent and valence tautomerism properties of Ni-salphen complexes added two new dimensions to a mechanical switch.

  7. The importance of the rotor in hydrazone-based molecular switches

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xin; Lessing, Timo

    2012-01-01

    Summary The pH-activated E/Z isomerization of a series of hydrazone-based systems having different functional groups as part of the rotor (R = COMe, CN, Me, H), was studied. The switching efficiency of these systems was compared to that of a hydrazone-based molecular switch (R = COOEt) whose E/Z isomerization is fully reversible. It was found that the nature of the R group is critical for efficient switching to occur; the R group should be a moderate H-bond acceptor in order to (i) provide enough driving force for the rotor to move upon protonation, and (ii) stabilize the obtained Z configuration, to achieve full conversion. PMID:23015836

  8. The importance of the rotor in hydrazone-based molecular switches.

    PubMed

    Su, Xin; Lessing, Timo; Aprahamian, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    The pH-activated E/Z isomerization of a series of hydrazone-based systems having different functional groups as part of the rotor (R = COMe, CN, Me, H), was studied. The switching efficiency of these systems was compared to that of a hydrazone-based molecular switch (R = COOEt) whose E/Z isomerization is fully reversible. It was found that the nature of the R group is critical for efficient switching to occur; the R group should be a moderate H-bond acceptor in order to (i) provide enough driving force for the rotor to move upon protonation, and (ii) stabilize the obtained Z configuration, to achieve full conversion.

  9. Single Molecule Switches and Molecular Self-Assembly: Low Temperature STM Investigations and Manipulations

    SciTech Connect

    Iancu, Violeta

    2006-08-01

    This dissertation is devoted to single molecule investigations and manipulations of two porphyrin-based molecules, chlorophyll-a and Co-popphyrin. The molecules are absorbed on metallic substrates and studied at low temperatures using a scanning tunneling microscope. The electronic, structural and mechanical properties of the molecules are investigated in detail with atomic level precision. Chlorophyll-a is the key ingredient in photosynthesis processes while Co-porphyrin is a magnetic molecule that represents the recent emerging field of molecular spintronics. Using the scanning tunneling microscope tip and the substrate as electrodes, and the molecules as active ingredients, single molecule switches made of these two molecules are demonstrated. The first switch, a multiple and reversible mechanical switch, is realized by using chlorophyll-a where the energy transfer of a single tunneling electron is used to rotate a C-C bond of the molecule's tail on a Au(111) surface. Here, the det

  10. Beyond switches: ratcheting a particle energetically uphill with a compartmentalized molecular machine.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Manashi N; Kay, Euan R; Leigh, David A

    2006-03-29

    Here we correlate chemical (covalent), physical (thermodynamic), and statistical (population distribution) descriptions of behavior with the way that two new types of simple molecular machines (the threads of rotaxanes) perform the task of transporting a Brownian substrate (the rotaxane macrocycle) between two distinguishable binding sites. The first machine-substrate ensemble is a [2]rotaxane that operates through a mechanism that intrinsically causes it to change the average position of the macrocycle irreversibly. This contrasts with the behavior of classic stimuli-responsive molecular shuttles that act as reversible molecular switches. The second system is a compartmentalized molecular machine that is able to pump its substrate energetically uphill using the energy provided by a photon by means of an olefin photoisomerization. Resetting this compartmentalized molecular machine does not undo the work it has carried out or the task performed, a significant difference to a simple molecular switch and a characteristic we recognize as "ratcheting" (see Scheme 8). The ratcheting mechanism allows the [2]rotaxane to carry out the transport function envisaged for the historical thought-machines, Smoluchowski's Trapdoor and Maxwell's Pressure Demon, albeit via an unrelated mechanism and using an input of energy. We define and exemplify the terms "ratcheting" and "escapement" in mechanical terms for the molecular level and outline the fundamental phenomenological differences that exist between what constitutes a two-state Brownian switch, a two-state Brownian memory or "flip-flop", and a (two-stroke) Brownian motor. We also suggest that considering the relationship between the parts of a molecular machine and a substrate in terms of "statistical balance" and "linkage" could be useful in the design of more complex systems and in helping to understand the role of individual amino acids and peptide fragments during the directional transport of substrates by biological pumps

  11. Reactive molecular dynamics simulations of switching processes of azobenzene-based monolayer on surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ziqi; Wen, Jin; Ma, Jing

    2013-07-01

    It is a challenge to simulate the switching process of functional self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on metal surfaces, since the systems consist of thousands of atoms and the switching is triggered by quantum-mechanical events. Herein a molecular dynamics simulation with a reactive rotation potential of N=N bond is implemented to investigate the dynamic conformational changes and packing effects on the stimuli-responsive isomerization of the terminally thiol functionalized azobiphenyls (AZOs), which are bound on the Au(111) surface. To, respectively, distinguish the time evolutions that start from cis and trans initial configurations, two different functions are established to model the potential energy curves for cis-to-trans and trans-to-cis transitions, instead of the only one cosine function used in the conventional non-reactive force fields. In order to simulate the conformation transitions of the AZO film on surface, a random switching function, depending on the N=N twisting angle, is constructed to consider both forward and backward cis/trans isomerization events and to trigger the reaction by changing the N atom types automatically. The factors that will influence the isomerization process, including the choice of ensembles and thermostat algorithms, the time intervals separating each switching, and the forms of the switching function, are systematically tested. Most AZO molecules switch from the cis to trans configuration with a coverage of 5.76 × 10-6 mol/m2 on a picosecond time scale, and a low coverage might make the switching irreversible, which is in agreement with the experiments.

  12. Understanding and controlling regime switching in molecular diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallerberg, S.; de Wijn, A. S.

    2014-12-01

    Diffusion can be strongly affected by ballistic flights (long jumps) as well as long-lived sticking trajectories (long sticks). Using statistical inference techniques in the spirit of Granger causality, we investigate the appearance of long jumps and sticks in molecular-dynamics simulations of diffusion in a prototype system, a benzene molecule on a graphite substrate. We find that specific fluctuations in certain, but not all, internal degrees of freedom of the molecule can be linked to either long jumps or sticks. Furthermore, by changing the prevalence of these predictors with an outside influence, the diffusion of the molecule can be controlled. The approach presented in this proof of concept study is very generic and can be applied to larger and more complex molecules. Additionally, the predictor variables can be chosen in a general way so as to be accessible in experiments, making the method feasible for control of diffusion in applications. Our results also demonstrate that data-mining techniques can be used to investigate the phase-space structure of high-dimensional nonlinear dynamical systems.

  13. Transport dynamics of molecular motors that switch between an active and inactive state.

    PubMed

    Pinkoviezky, I; Gov, N S

    2013-08-01

    Molecular motors are involved in key transport processes in the cell. Many of these motors can switch from an active to a nonactive state, either spontaneously or depending on their interaction with other molecules. When active, the motors move processively along the filaments, while when inactive they are stationary. We treat here the simple case of spontaneously switching motors, between the active and inactive states, along an open linear track. We use our recent analogy with vehicular traffic, where we go beyond the mean-field description. We map the phase diagram of this system, and find that it clearly breaks the symmetry between the different phases, as compared to the standard total asymmetric exclusion process. We make several predictions that may be testable using molecular motors in vitro and in living cells.

  14. Gradual molecular evolution of a sex determination switch through incomplete penetrance of femaleness.

    PubMed

    Beye, Martin; Seelmann, Christine; Gempe, Tanja; Hasselmann, Martin; Vekemans, Xavier; Fondrk, M Kim; Page, Robert E

    2013-12-16

    Some genes regulate phenotypes that are either present or absent. They are often important regulators of developmental switches and are involved in morphological evolution. We have little understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which these absence/presence gene functions have evolved, because the phenotype and fitness of molecular intermediate forms are unknown. Here, we studied the sex-determining switch of 14 natural sequence variants of the csd gene among 76 genotypes of the honeybee (Apis mellifera). Heterozygous genotypes (different specificities) of the csd gene determine femaleness, while hemizygous genotypes (single specificity) determine maleness. Homozygous genotypes of the csd gene (same specificity) are lethal. We found that at least five amino acid differences and length variation between Csd specificities in the specifying domain (PSD) were sufficient to regularly induce femaleness. We estimated that, on average, six pairwise amino acid differences evolved under positive selection. We also identified a natural evolutionary intermediate that showed only three amino acid length differences in the PSD relative to its parental allele. This genotype showed an intermediate fitness because it implemented lethality regularly and induced femaleness infrequently (i.e., incomplete penetrance). We suggest incomplete penetrance as a mechanism through which new molecular switches can gradually and adaptively evolve.

  15. Research Update: Molecular electronics: The single-molecule switch and transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Sotthewes, Kai; Heimbuch, René Kumar, Avijit; Zandvliet, Harold J. W.; Geskin, Victor

    2014-01-01

    In order to design and realize single-molecule devices it is essential to have a good understanding of the properties of an individual molecule. For electronic applications, the most important property of a molecule is its conductance. Here we show how a single octanethiol molecule can be connected to macroscopic leads and how the transport properties of the molecule can be measured. Based on this knowledge we have realized two single-molecule devices: a molecular switch and a molecular transistor. The switch can be opened and closed at will by carefully adjusting the separation between the electrical contacts and the voltage drop across the contacts. This single-molecular switch operates in a broad temperature range from cryogenic temperatures all the way up to room temperature. Via mechanical gating, i.e., compressing or stretching of the octanethiol molecule, by varying the contact's interspace, we are able to systematically adjust the conductance of the electrode-octanethiol-electrode junction. This two-terminal single-molecule transistor is very robust, but the amplification factor is rather limited.

  16. Multistimuli two-color luminescence switching via different slip-stacking of highly fluorescent molecular sheets.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Seong-Jun; Chung, Jong Won; Gierschner, Johannes; Kim, Kil Suk; Choi, Moon-Gun; Kim, Dongho; Park, Soo Young

    2010-10-06

    Color tuning and switching of the solid-state luminescence of organic materials are attractive subjects for both the fundamental research and practical applications such as optical recording. We report herein cyanostilbene-based highly luminescent molecular sheets which exhibit two-color fluorescence switching in response to pressure, temperature, and solvent vapor. The origin for the multistimuli luminescence switching is the two-directional shear-sliding capability of molecular sheets, which are formed via intermolecular multiple C-H···N and C-H···O hydrogen bonds. The resulting two distinctive crystal phases are promoted by different modes of local dipole coupling, which cause a substantial alternation of π-π overlap. These changes can be directly correlated with the subsequent intermolecular excitonic and excimeric coupling in both phases, as demonstrated by an in-depth theory-assisted spectroscopic and structural study. Finally, we have prepared a first device demonstrator for rewritable fluorescent optical recording media which showed multistimuli luminescence tuning with fast response. Our multistimuli responsive system is unique in terms of the slip-stacking of molecular sheets and thus provides a novel concept of rewritable fluorescent optical recording media.

  17. Photoisomerization of a Chiral Imine Molecular Switch Followed by Matrix-Isolation VCD Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pollok, Corina H; Riesebeck, Tim; Merten, Christian

    2017-02-06

    Characterizing the stereochemistry of transient photoisomerization products remains a big challenge for the design of molecular machines, such as unidirectional molecular motors. Often these states are not stable long enough to be characterized in detail using conventional spectroscopic tools. The structurally simple camphorquinone imine 1 serves to illustrate the advantage of combining the matrix-isolation technique with vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy for the investigation of photoisomerizations of chiral molecules. In particular, it is shown that both (E)- and (Z)-1 can be generated photochemically at cryogenic temperatures in an argon matrix, and more importantly, that the stereochemistry of both switching states can be characterized reliably.

  18. Negative differential conductance and hysteretic current switching of benzene molecular junction in a transverse electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wen-Huan; Ding, Guo-Hui; Dong, Bing

    2014-11-01

    We study charge transport through single benzene molecular junction (BMJ) directly sandwiched between two platinum electrodes by using a tight-binding model and the non-equilibrium Green's function approach. Pronounced negative differential conductance is observed at finite bias voltage, resulting from charge redistribution in BMJ and a Coulomb blockade effect at the interface of molecule-electrode contacts. In the presence of a transverse electric field, hysteretic switching behavior and large spin-polarization of current are obtained, indicating the potential application of BMJ for acting as a nanoscale current modulator or spintronic molecular device.

  19. Molecular Switches of Allosteric Modulation of the Metabotropic Glutamate 2 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Benito, Laura; Doornbos, Maarten L J; Cordomí, Arnau; Peeters, Luc; Lavreysen, Hilde; Pardo, Leonardo; Tresadern, Gary

    2017-07-05

    Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors are class C G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) crucial for CNS function and important drug discovery targets. Glutamate triggers receptor activation from an extracellular domain binding site while allosteric modulators bind in the seven-transmembrane domain. Little is known about how allosteric modulators produce their functional effects at the molecular level. Here we address this topic with combined experimental and computational approaches and reveal that mGlu receptor allosteric modulators interact with the homologous "trigger switch" and "transmission switch" amino acids as seen in class A GPCRs, in short, the characteristic hallmarks of class A agonist activation translate to the mGlu allosteric modulator. The proposed "trigger switch" for the mGlu2 involves the side chains of F643(3.36a.40c), N735(5.47a.47c), and W773(6.48a.50c), whereas the "transmission switch" involves the Y647(3.40a.44c), L738(5.50a.50c), and T769(6.44a.46c) amino acids. The work has wide impact on understanding mGlu GPCR function and for future allosteric modulator drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Nucleotide Dependent Switching in Rho GTPase: Conformational Heterogeneity and Competing Molecular Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumawat, Amit; Chakrabarty, Suman; Kulkarni, Kiran

    2017-04-01

    Ras superfamily of GTPases regulate myriad cellular processes through a conserved nucleotide (GTP/GDP) dependent switching mechanism. Unlike Ras family of GTPases, for the Rho GTPases, there is no clear evidence for the existence of “sub-states” such as state 1 & state 2 in the GTP bound form. To explore the nucleotide dependent conformational space of the Switch I loop and also to look for existence of state 1 like conformations in Rho GTPases, atomistic molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations on RhoA were performed. These studies demonstrate that both the nucleotide-free state and the GDP bound “OFF” state have very similar conformations, whereas the GTP bound “ON” state has unique conformations with signatures of two intermediate states. The conformational free energy landscape for these systems suggests the presence of multiple intermediate states. Interestingly, the energetic penalty of exposing the non-polar residues in the GTP bound form is counter balanced by the favourable hydrogen bonded interactions between the γ-phosphate group of GTP with the highly conserved Tyr34 and Thr37 residues. These competing molecular interactions lead to a tuneable energy landscape of the Switch I conformation, which can undergo significant changes based on the local environment including changes upon binding to effectors.

  1. Age-associated Cognitive Decline: Insights into Molecular Switches and Recovery Avenues

    PubMed Central

    Konar, Arpita; Singh, Padmanabh; Thakur, Mahendra K.

    2016-01-01

    Age-associated cognitive decline is an inevitable phenomenon that predisposes individuals for neurological and psychiatric disorders eventually affecting the quality of life. Scientists have endeavored to identify the key molecular switches that drive cognitive decline with advancing age. These newly identified molecules are then targeted as recovery of cognitive aging and related disorders. Cognitive decline during aging is multi-factorial and amongst several factors influencing this trajectory, gene expression changes are pivotal. Identifying these genes would elucidate the neurobiological underpinnings as well as offer clues that make certain individuals resilient to withstand the inevitable age-related deteriorations. Our laboratory has focused on this aspect and investigated a wide spectrum of genes involved in crucial brain functions that attribute to senescence induced cognitive deficits. We have recently identified master switches in the epigenome regulating gene expression alteration during brain aging. Interestingly, these factors when manipulated by chemical or genetic strategies successfully reverse the age-related cognitive impairments. In the present article, we review findings from our laboratory and others combined with supporting literary evidences on molecular switches of brain aging and their potential as recovery targets. PMID:27114845

  2. Nucleotide Dependent Switching in Rho GTPase: Conformational Heterogeneity and Competing Molecular Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kumawat, Amit; Chakrabarty, Suman; Kulkarni, Kiran

    2017-01-01

    Ras superfamily of GTPases regulate myriad cellular processes through a conserved nucleotide (GTP/GDP) dependent switching mechanism. Unlike Ras family of GTPases, for the Rho GTPases, there is no clear evidence for the existence of “sub-states” such as state 1 & state 2 in the GTP bound form. To explore the nucleotide dependent conformational space of the Switch I loop and also to look for existence of state 1 like conformations in Rho GTPases, atomistic molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations on RhoA were performed. These studies demonstrate that both the nucleotide-free state and the GDP bound “OFF” state have very similar conformations, whereas the GTP bound “ON” state has unique conformations with signatures of two intermediate states. The conformational free energy landscape for these systems suggests the presence of multiple intermediate states. Interestingly, the energetic penalty of exposing the non-polar residues in the GTP bound form is counter balanced by the favourable hydrogen bonded interactions between the γ-phosphate group of GTP with the highly conserved Tyr34 and Thr37 residues. These competing molecular interactions lead to a tuneable energy landscape of the Switch I conformation, which can undergo significant changes based on the local environment including changes upon binding to effectors. PMID:28374773

  3. FANCI phosphorylation functions as a molecular switch to turn on the Fanconi anemia pathway.

    PubMed

    Ishiai, Masamichi; Kitao, Hiroyuki; Smogorzewska, Agata; Tomida, Junya; Kinomura, Aiko; Uchida, Emi; Saberi, Alihossein; Kinoshita, Eiji; Kinoshita-Kikuta, Emiko; Koike, Tohru; Tashiro, Satoshi; Elledge, Stephen J; Takata, Minoru

    2008-11-01

    In response to DNA damage or replication fork stress, the Fanconi anemia pathway is activated, leading to monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and FANCI and their colocalization in foci. Here we show that, in the chicken DT40 cell system, multiple alanine-substitution mutations in six conserved and clustered Ser/Thr-Gln motifs of FANCI largely abrogate monoubiquitination and focus formation of both FANCI and FANCD2, resulting in loss of DNA repair function. Conversely, FANCI carrying phosphomimic mutations on the same six residues induces constitutive monoubiquitination and focus formation of FANCI and FANCD2, and protects against cell killing and chromosome breakage by DNA interstrand cross-linking agents. We propose that the multiple phosphorylation of FANCI serves as a molecular switch in activation of the Fanconi anemia pathway. Mutational analysis of putative phosphorylation sites in human FANCI indicates that this switch is evolutionarily conserved.

  4. Molecular switches under TGFβ signalling during progression from cardiac hypertrophy to heart failure.

    PubMed

    Heger, J; Schulz, R; Euler, G

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a mechanism to compensate for increased cardiac work load, that is, after myocardial infarction or upon pressure overload. However, in the long run cardiac hypertrophy is a prevailing risk factor for the development of heart failure. During pathological remodelling processes leading to heart failure, decompensated hypertrophy, death of cardiomyocytes by apoptosis or necroptosis and fibrosis as well as a progressive dysfunction of cardiomyocytes are apparent. Interestingly, the induction of hypertrophy, cell death or fibrosis is mediated by similar signalling pathways. Therefore, tiny changes in the signalling cascade are able to switch physiological cardiac remodelling to the development of heart failure. In the present review, we will describe examples of these molecular switches that change compensated hypertrophy to the development of heart failure and will focus on the importance of the signalling cascades of the TGFβ superfamily in this process. In this context, potential therapeutic targets for pharmacological interventions that could attenuate the progression of heart failure will be discussed.

  5. Transient photocurrent in molecular junctions: singlet switching on and triplet blocking.

    PubMed

    Petrov, E G; Leonov, V O; Snitsarev, V

    2013-05-14

    The kinetic approach adapted to describe charge transmission in molecular junctions, is used for the analysis of the photocurrent under conditions of moderate light intensity of the photochromic molecule. In the framework of the HOMO-LUMO model for the single electron molecular states, the analytic expressions describing the temporary behavior of the transient and steady state sequential (hopping) as well as direct (tunnel) current components have been derived. The conditions at which the current components achieve their maximal values are indicated. It is shown that if the rates of charge transmission in the unbiased molecular diode are much lower than the intramolecular singlet-singlet excitation/de-excitation rate, and the threefold degenerated triplet excited state of the molecule behaves like a trap blocking the charge transmission, a possibility of a large peak-like transient switch-on photocurrent arises.

  6. A reversible DNA-silver nanoclusters-based molecular fluorescence switch and its use for logic gate operation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhenzhen; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2012-03-01

    Molecule-like silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) with few to tens of atoms are highly sensitive to the sequence and structure of DNA stabilizers. In this paper, a novel pH-triggered reversible molecular fluorescence switch is developed by taking advantage of the DNA-dependent fluorescence pH response of AgNCs. The DNA-AgNCs fluorescence switch simultaneously addresses concerns of simple construction strategy, efficient design and organic-solvent-free operation. Moreover, the excellent photostability and biocompatibility of AgNCs provide great potential for application of the DNA-AgNCs fluorescence switch in the development of functional molecular devices. Specifically, we apply the DNA-AgNCs fluorescence switch combined with the DNA sequence-dependent pH response pattern of AgNCs for construction of molecular logic gates.

  7. All-optical integrated logic operations based on chemical communication between molecular switches.

    PubMed

    Silvi, Serena; Constable, Edwin C; Housecroft, Catherine E; Beves, Jonathon E; Dunphy, Emma L; Tomasulo, Massimiliano; Raymo, Françisco M; Credi, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Molecular logic gates process physical or chemical "inputs" to generate "outputs" based on a set of logical operators. We report the design and operation of a chemical ensemble in solution that behaves as integrated AND, OR, and XNOR gates with optical input and output signals. The ensemble is composed of a reversible merocyanine-type photoacid and a ruthenium polypyridine complex that functions as a pH-controlled three-state luminescent switch. The light-triggered release of protons from the photoacid is used to control the state of the transition-metal complex. Therefore, the two molecular switching devices communicate with one another through the exchange of ionic signals. By means of such a double (optical-chemical-optical) signal-transduction mechanism, inputs of violet light modulate a luminescence output in the red/far-red region of the visible spectrum. Nondestructive reading is guaranteed because the green light used for excitation in the photoluminescence experiments does not affect the state of the gate. The reset is thermally driven and, thus, does not involve the addition of chemicals and accumulation of byproducts. Owing to its reversibility and stability, this molecular device can afford many cycles of digital operation.

  8. Hepatitis C virus RNA: molecular switches mediated by long-range RNA–RNA interactions?

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Sumangala; Stefanovic, Snezana; Mihailescu, Mihaela Rita

    2013-01-01

    Multiple conserved structural cis-acting regulatory elements have been recognized both in the coding and untranslated regions (UTRs) of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome. For example, the cis-element 5BSL3.2 in the HCV-coding region has been predicted to use both its apical and internal loops to interact with the X RNA in the 3′-UTR, with the IIId domain in the 5′-UTR and with the Alt sequence in the coding region. Additionally, the X RNA region uses a palindromic sequence that overlaps the sequence required for the interaction with 5BSL3.2, to dimerize with another HCV genome. The ability of the 5BSL3.2 and X RNA regions to engage in multi-interactions suggests the existence of one or more molecular RNA switches which may regulate different steps of the HCV life cycle. In this study, we used biophysical methods to characterize the essential interactions of these HCV cis-elements at the molecular level. Our results indicate that X RNA interacts with 5BSL3.2 and another X RNA molecule by adopting two different conformations and that 5BSL3.2 engages simultaneously in kissing interactions using its apical and internal loops. Based on these results, we propose a mode of action for possible molecular switches involving the HCV RNA. PMID:23275555

  9. Concatenation of two molecular switches via a Fe(II)/Fe(III) couple.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xuefeng; Zhang, Deqing; Tao, Hairong; Zhu, Daoben

    2004-07-22

    [reaction: see text] Modulation of the fluorescein fluorescence in the presence of spiropyran and ferric ion by light was observed. Such fluorescence modulation was due to the low oxidation potential of complex MC.Fe(2+), which made the electron transfer from MC.Fe(2+) to Flu(+)()(*)() thermodynamically favorable. As a result, the communication between two molecular switches based on fluorescein and spiropyan, respectively, was realized via the reversible Fe(III)/Fe(II) redox couple. The communicating behavior corresponds well to the function of an INHIBIT logic gate.

  10. Molecular basis of RNA polymerase promoter specificity switch revealed through studies of Thermus bacteriophage transcription regulator

    PubMed Central

    Severinov, Konstantin; Minakhin, Leonid; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Lopatina, Anna; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2014-01-01

    Transcription initiation is the central point of gene expression regulation. Understanding of molecular mechanism of transcription regulation requires, ultimately, the structural understanding of consequences of transcription factors binding to DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP), the enzyme of transcription. We recently determined a structure of a complex between transcription factor gp39 encoded by a Thermus bacteriophage and Thermus RNAP holoenzyme. In this addendum to the original publication, we highlight structural insights that explain the ability of gp39 to act as an RNAP specificity switch which inhibits transcription initiation from a major class of bacterial promoters, while allowing transcription from a minor promoter class to continue. PMID:25105059

  11. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Phenotypic Switch in Gastrointestinal Smooth Muscle.

    PubMed

    Scirocco, Annunziata; Matarrese, Paola; Carabotti, Marilia; Ascione, Barbara; Malorni, Walter; Severi, Carola

    2016-02-01

    As a general rule, smooth muscle cells (SMC) are able to switch from a contractile phenotype to a less mature synthetic phenotype. This switch is accompanied by a loss of differentiation with decreased expression of contractile markers, increased proliferation as well as the synthesis and the release of several signaling molecules such as pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemotaxis-associated molecules, and growth factors. This SMC phenotypic plasticity has extensively been investigated in vascular diseases, but interest is also emerging in the field of gastroenterology. It has in fact been postulated that altered microenvironmental conditions, including the composition of microbiota, could trigger the remodeling of the enteric SMC, with phenotype changes and consequent alterations of contraction and impairment of gut motility. Several molecular actors participate in this phenotype remodeling. These include extracellular molecules such as cytokines and extracellular matrix proteins, as well as intracellular proteins, for example, transcription factors. Epigenetic control mechanisms and miRNA have also been suggested to participate. In this review key roles and actors of smooth muscle phenotypic switch, mainly in GI tissue, are described and discussed in the light of literature data available so far. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 295-302, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Identification of dynamical hinge points of the L1 ligase molecular switch

    PubMed Central

    Giambaşu, George M.; Lee, Tai-Sung; Sosa, Carlos P.; Robertson, Michael P.; Scott, William G.; York, Darrin M.

    2010-01-01

    The L1 ligase is an in vitro selected ribozyme that uses a noncanonically base-paired ligation site to catalyze regioselectively and regiospecifically the 5′ to 3′ phosphodiester bond ligation, a reaction relevant to origin of life hypotheses that invoke an RNA world scenario. The L1 ligase crystal structure revealed two different conformational states that were proposed to represent the active and inactive forms. It remains an open question as to what degree these two conformers persist as stable conformational intermediates in solution, and along what pathway are they able to interconvert. To explore these questions, we have performed a series of molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent of the inactive–active conformational switch in L1 ligase. Four simulations were performed departing from both conformers in both the reactant and product states, in addition to a simulation where local unfolding in the active state was induced. From these simulations, along with crystallographic data, a set of four virtual torsion angles that span two evolutionarily conserved and restricted regions were identified as dynamical hinge points in the conformational switch transition. The ligation site visits three distinct states characterized by hydrogen bond patterns that are correlated with the formation of specific contacts that may promote catalysis. The insights gained from these simulations contribute to a more detailed understanding of the coupled catalytic/conformational switch mechanism of L1 ligase that may facilitate the design and engineering of new catalytic riboswitches. PMID:20167653

  13. A molecular beacon-based DNA switch for reversible pH sensing in vesicles and live cells.

    PubMed

    Narayanaswamy, Nagarjun; Nair, Raji R; Suseela, Y V; Saini, Deepak Kumar; Govindaraju, T

    2016-07-05

    In this Communication, a molecular beacon-based DNA switch (LMB) is developed as an efficient and reversible pH sensing probe. Remarkably, LMB exhibited reversible structural transition between the closed (molecular beacon) and open (A-motif) states very efficiently in synthetic vesicles and live cells without the need for any transfection agents.

  14. Enhanced differential conductance through light induced current switching in Mn12 acetate molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, C.; Shah, S.; Hendrickson, D.; Bandaru, P. R.

    2006-11-01

    The authors have observed through electrical transport measurements enhanced differential conductance (G=dI/dV), up to 2e2/h (˜77μA/V), through the Mn12O12(O2CCH3)16(H2O)4•2CH3COOH•4H2O: "Mn12-Ac" molecule. At room temperature, under optical illumination, electrical switching, accompanied by a 60-fold increase of G through Mn12-Ac, was seen. The temperature dependence of G was used to determine the activation energy for molecular conduction to be ˜0.4eV. Their results provide evidence for the possible use of Mn12-Ac as a conducting wire, in addition to its proposed utility for information storage, for implementing multifunctional molecular electronics.

  15. A pH-sensitive lasso-based rotaxane molecular switch.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Caroline; Romuald, Camille; Brabet, Emile; Coutrot, Frédéric

    2013-02-25

    The synthesis of a pH-sensitive two-station [1]rotaxane molecular switch by self-entanglement of a non-interlocked hermaphrodite molecule, containing an anilinium and triazole moieties, is reported. The anilinium was chosen as the best template for the macrocycle benzometaphenylene[25]crown-8 (BMP25C8) and allowed the self-entanglement of the molecule. The equilibrium between the hermaphrodite molecule and the pseudo[1]rotaxane was studied by (1)H NMR spectroscopy: the best conditions of self-entanglement were found in the less polar solvent CD(2)Cl(2) and at high dilution. The triazole moiety was then benzylated to afford a benzyltriazolium moiety, which then played a dual role. On one hand, it acts as a bulky gate to trap the BMP25C8, thus to avoid any self-disentanglement of the molecular architecture. On another hand, it acts as a second molecular station for the macrocycle. At acidic pH, the BMP25C8 resides around the best anilinium molecular station, displaying the lasso [1]rotaxane in a loosened conformation. The deprotonation of the anilinium molecular station triggers the shuttling of the BMP25C8 around the triazolium moiety, therefore tightening the lasso.

  16. Simultaneous and coordinated rotational switching of all molecular rotors in a network.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Kersell, H; Stefak, R; Echeverria, J; Iancu, V; Perera, U G E; Li, Y; Deshpande, A; Braun, K-F; Joachim, C; Rapenne, G; Hla, S-W

    2016-08-01

    A range of artificial molecular systems has been created that can exhibit controlled linear and rotational motion. In the further development of such systems, a key step is the addition of communication between molecules in a network. Here, we show that a two-dimensional array of dipolar molecular rotors can undergo simultaneous rotational switching when applying an electric field from the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope. Several hundred rotors made from porphyrin-based double-decker complexes can be simultaneously rotated when in a hexagonal rotor network on a Cu(111) surface by applying biases above 1 V at 80 K. The phenomenon is observed only in a hexagonal rotor network due to the degeneracy of the ground-state dipole rotational energy barrier of the system. Defects are essential to increase electric torque on the rotor network and to stabilize the switched rotor domains. At low biases and low initial rotator angles, slight reorientations of individual rotors can occur, resulting in the rotator arms pointing in different directions. Analysis reveals that the rotator arm directions are not random, but are coordinated to minimize energy via crosstalk among the rotors through dipolar interactions.

  17. Simultaneous and coordinated rotational switching of all molecular rotors in a network

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Y.; Kersell, H.; Stefak, R.; ...

    2016-05-09

    A range of artificial molecular systems have been created that can exhibit controlled linear and rotational motion. In the development of such systems, a key step is the addition of communication between molecules in a network. Here, we show that a two-dimensional array of dipolar molecular rotors can undergo simultaneous rotational switching by applying an electric field from the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope. Several hundred rotors made from porphyrin-based double-decker complexes can be simultaneously rotated when in a hexagonal rotor network on a Cu(111) surface by applying biases above ±1 V at 80 K. The phenomenon is observedmore » only in a hexagonal rotor network due to the degeneracy of the ground state dipole rotational energy barrier of the system. Defects are essential to increase electric torque on the rotor network and to stabilize the switched rotor domains. At low biases and low initial rotator angles, slight reorientations of individual rotors can occur resulting in the rotator arms pointing in different directions. In conclusion, analysis reveals that the rotator arm directions here are not random, but are coordinated to minimize energy via cross talk among the rotors through dipolar interactions.« less

  18. Simultaneous and coordinated rotational switching of all molecular rotors in a network

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Kersell, H.; Stefak, R.; Echeverria, J.; Iancu, V.; Perera, U. G. E.; Li, Y.; Deshpande, A.; Braun, K. -F.; Joachim, C.; Rapenne, G.; Hla, S. -W.

    2016-05-09

    A range of artificial molecular systems have been created that can exhibit controlled linear and rotational motion. In the development of such systems, a key step is the addition of communication between molecules in a network. Here, we show that a two-dimensional array of dipolar molecular rotors can undergo simultaneous rotational switching by applying an electric field from the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope. Several hundred rotors made from porphyrin-based double-decker complexes can be simultaneously rotated when in a hexagonal rotor network on a Cu(111) surface by applying biases above ±1 V at 80 K. The phenomenon is observed only in a hexagonal rotor network due to the degeneracy of the ground state dipole rotational energy barrier of the system. Defects are essential to increase electric torque on the rotor network and to stabilize the switched rotor domains. At low biases and low initial rotator angles, slight reorientations of individual rotors can occur resulting in the rotator arms pointing in different directions. In conclusion, analysis reveals that the rotator arm directions here are not random, but are coordinated to minimize energy via cross talk among the rotors through dipolar interactions.

  19. Simultaneous and coordinated rotational switching of all molecular rotors in a network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Kersell, H.; Stefak, R.; Echeverria, J.; Iancu, V.; Perera, U. G. E.; Li, Y.; Deshpande, A.; Braun, K.-F.; Joachim, C.; Rapenne, G.; Hla, S.-W.

    2016-08-01

    A range of artificial molecular systems has been created that can exhibit controlled linear and rotational motion. In the further development of such systems, a key step is the addition of communication between molecules in a network. Here, we show that a two-dimensional array of dipolar molecular rotors can undergo simultaneous rotational switching when applying an electric field from the tip of a scanning tunnelling microscope. Several hundred rotors made from porphyrin-based double-decker complexes can be simultaneously rotated when in a hexagonal rotor network on a Cu(111) surface by applying biases above 1 V at 80 K. The phenomenon is observed only in a hexagonal rotor network due to the degeneracy of the ground-state dipole rotational energy barrier of the system. Defects are essential to increase electric torque on the rotor network and to stabilize the switched rotor domains. At low biases and low initial rotator angles, slight reorientations of individual rotors can occur, resulting in the rotator arms pointing in different directions. Analysis reveals that the rotator arm directions are not random, but are coordinated to minimize energy via crosstalk among the rotors through dipolar interactions.

  20. "Off-On"switching electrochemiluminescence biosensor for mercury(II) detection based on molecular recognition technology.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lin; Wei, BingGuo; He, Ling Ling; Mao, Ling; Zhang, Jie; Ceng, JinXiang; Kong, DeRong; Chen, ChaDan; Cui, HanFeng; Hong, Nian; Fan, Hao

    2017-02-01

    A novel "off-On" electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) biosensor has been developed for the detection of mercury(II) based on molecular recognition technology. The ECL mercury(II) biosensor comprises two main parts: an ECL substrate and an ECL intensity switch. The ECL substrate was made by modifying the complex of Ruthenium(II) tris-(bipyridine)(Ru(bpy)3(2+))/Cyclodextrins-Au nanoparticles(CD-AuNps)/Nafion on the surface of glass carbon electrode (GCE), and the ECL intensity switch is the single hairpin DNA probe designed according to the "molecular recognition" strategy which was functionalized with ferrocene tag at one end and attached to Cyclodextrins (CD) on modified GCE through supramolecular noncovalent interaction. We demonstrated that, in the absence of Hg(II) ion, the probe keeps single hairpin structure and resulted in a quenching of ECL of Ru(bpy)3(2+). Whereas, in the presence of Hg(II) ion, the probe prefers to form the T-Hg(II)-T complex and lead to an obvious recovery of ECL of Ru(bpy)3(2+), which provided a sensing platform for the detection of Hg(II) ion. Using this sensing platform, a simple, rapid and selective "off-On" ECL biosensor for the detection of mercury(II) with a detection limit of 0.1 nM has been developed.

  1. "Bite-and-Switch" approach using computationally designed molecularly imprinted polymers for sensing of creatinine.

    PubMed

    Subrahmanyam, S; Piletsky, S A; Piletska, E V; Chen, B; Karim, K; Turner, A P

    2001-12-01

    A method for the selective detection of creatinine is reported, which is based on the reaction between polymerised hemithioacetal, formed by allyl mercaptan, o-phthalic aldehyde, and primary amine leading to the formation of fluorescent isoindole complex. This method has been demonstrated previously for the detection of creatine using creatine-imprinted molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) Since MIPs created using traditional methods were unable to differentiate between creatine and creatinine, a new approach to the rational design of a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) selective for creatinine was developed using computer simulation. A virtual library of functional monomers was assigned and screened against the target molecule, creatinine, using molecular modelling software. The monomers giving the highest binding score were further tested using simulated annealing in order to mimic the complexation of the functional monomers with template in the monomer mixture. The result of this simulation gave an optimised MIP composition. The computationally designed polymer demonstrated superior selectivity in comparison to the polymer prepared using traditional approach, a detection limit of 25 microM and good stability. The "Bite-and-Switch" approach combined with molecular imprinting can be used for the design of assays and sensors, selective for amino containing substances.

  2. Molecular Mechanism of Switching of TrkA/p75NTR Signaling in Monocrotophos Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vivek; Gupta, Amit Kumar; Shukla, Rajendra Kumar; Tripathi, Vinay Kumar; Jahan, Sadaf; Pandey, Ankita; Srivastava, Akriti; Agrawal, Megha; Yadav, Sanjay; Khanna, Vinay Kumar; Pant, Aditya Bhushan

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the role of molecular switching of TrkA/p75NTR signaling cascade in organophosphate pesticide-Monocrotophos (MCP) induced neurotoxicity in stem cell derived cholinergic neurons and in rat brain. Our in-silico studies reveal that MCP followed the similar pattern of binding as staurosporine and AG-879 (known inhibitors of TrkA) with TrkA protein (PDB ID: 4AOJ) at the ATP binding sites. This binding of MCP to TrkA led to the conformational change in this protein and triggers the cell death cascades. The in-silico findings are validated by observing the down regulated levels of phosphorylated TrkA and its downstream molecules viz., pERK1/2, pAkt and pCREB in MCP-exposed cells. We observe that these MCP induced alterations in pTrkA and downstream signaling molecules are found to be associated with apoptosis and injury to neurons. The down-regulation of TrkA could be linked to increased p75NTR. The in-vitro studies could be correlated in the rat model. The switching of TrkA/p75NTR signaling plays a central role in MCP-induced neural injury in rBNSCs and behavioral changes in exposed rats. Our studies significantly advance the understanding of the switching of TrkA/p75NTR that may pave the way for the application of TrkA inducer/p75NTR inhibitor for potential therapeutic intervention in various neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26370177

  3. Molecular switches under TGFβ signalling during progression from cardiac hypertrophy to heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Heger, J; Schulz, R

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a mechanism to compensate for increased cardiac work load, that is, after myocardial infarction or upon pressure overload. However, in the long run cardiac hypertrophy is a prevailing risk factor for the development of heart failure. During pathological remodelling processes leading to heart failure, decompensated hypertrophy, death of cardiomyocytes by apoptosis or necroptosis and fibrosis as well as a progressive dysfunction of cardiomyocytes are apparent. Interestingly, the induction of hypertrophy, cell death or fibrosis is mediated by similar signalling pathways. Therefore, tiny changes in the signalling cascade are able to switch physiological cardiac remodelling to the development of heart failure. In the present review, we will describe examples of these molecular switches that change compensated hypertrophy to the development of heart failure and will focus on the importance of the signalling cascades of the TGFβ superfamily in this process. In this context, potential therapeutic targets for pharmacological interventions that could attenuate the progression of heart failure will be discussed. PMID:26431212

  4. Photoisomerization dynamics of a rhodopsin-based molecule (potential molecular switch) with high quantum yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Roland; Jiang, Chen-Wei; Zhang, Xiu-Xing; Fang, Ai-Ping; Li, Hong-Rong; Xie, Rui-Hua; Li, Fu-Li

    2015-03-01

    It is worthwhile to explore the detailed reaction dynamics of various candidates for molecular switches, in order to understand, e.g., the differences in quantum yields and switching times. Here we report density-functional-based simulations for the rhodopsin-based molecule 4-[4-Methylbenzylidene]-5-p-tolyl-3,4-dihydro-2H-pyrrole (MDP), synthesized by Sampedro et al. We find that the photoisomerization quantum yields are remarkably high: 82% for cis-to-trans, and 68% for trans-to-cis. The lifetimes of the S1 excited state in cis-MDP in our calculations are in the range of 900-1800 fs, with a mean value of 1270 fs, while the range of times required for full cis-to-trans isomerization are 1100-2000 fs, with a mean value of 1530 fs. In trans-MDP, the calculated S1 excited state lifetimes are 860-2140 fs, with a mean value of 1330 fs, and with the full trans-to-cis isomerization completed about 200 fs later. In both cases, the dominant reaction mechanism is rotation around the central C =C bond (connected to the pyrroline ring), and de-excitation occurs at an avoided crossing between the ground state and the lowest singlet state, near the midpoint of the rotational pathway. Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China; Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities; Robert A. Welch Foundation; National Natural Science Foundation of China.

  5. Photoisomerization dynamics of a rhodopsin-based molecule (potential molecular switch) with high quantum yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chen-Wei; Zhang, Xiu-Xing; Fang, Ai-Ping; Li, Hong-Rong; Xie, Rui-Hua; Li, Fu-Li; Allen, Roland E.

    2015-02-01

    It is worthwhile to explore the detailed reaction dynamics of various candidates for molecular switches, in order to understand, e.g., the differences in quantum yields and switching times. Here we report density-functional-based simulations for the rhodopsin-based molecule 4-[4-methylbenzylidene]-5-p-tolyl-3,4-dihydro-2H-pyrrole (MDP), synthesized by Sampedro et al We find that the photoisomerization quantum yields are remarkably high: 82% for cis-to-trans, and 68% for trans-to-cis. The lifetimes of the S1 excited state in cis-MDP in our calculations are in the range of 900-1800 fs, with a mean value of 1270 fs, while the range of times required for full cis-to-trans isomerization are 1100-2000 fs, with a mean value of 1530 fs. In trans-MDP, the calculated S1 excited state lifetimes are 860-2140 fs, with a mean value of 1330 fs, and with the full trans-to-cis isomerization completed about 200 fs later. In both cases, the dominant reaction mechanism is rotation around the central C=C bond (connected to the pyrroline ring), and de-excitation occurs at an avoided crossing between the ground state and the lowest singlet state, near the midpoint of the rotational pathway. Perhaps remarkably, but apparently because of electrostatic repulsion, the direction of rotation is the same for both reactions.

  6. Selective detection of fenaminosulf via a molecularly imprinted fluorescence switch and silver nano-film amplification.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuhuai; Yin, Guihao; Zhang, Qun; Li, Chunli; Luo, Jinhui; Xu, Zhi; Qin, Anli

    2015-09-15

    A novel fluorescence switch sensor was constructed for detecting the fungicide fenaminosulf (FM), based on a dye-doped molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) and silver nanofilm amplification. The MIP was prepared by electropolymerization of hydroquinone doped with neutral red on the silver nanofilm modified electrode. A fluorescence signal was produced by the neutral red and the fluorescence intensity was diminished by the ion pair that formed via electrostatic forces between FM and the dye. Therefore, elution and adsorption of FM by the MIP acted as a switch to control the fluorescence intensity, which was effectively amplified by the silver nanofilm. The decrease in fluorescence intensity was linear with the FM concentration, establishing a new method for FM detection. Under optimal conditions, good linear correlation was obtained for FM concentrations over the range from 2.0 × 10(-10) to 4.0 × 10(-8)mol/L, with a detection limit of 1.6 × 10(-11)mol/L. This method was utilized to determine residual FM in vegetable samples, and recoveries ranging from 92.0% to 110% were obtained.

  7. A thermodynamic molecular switch in biological systems: ribonuclease S' fragment complementation reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Chun, P W

    2000-01-01

    It is well known that essentially all biological systems function over a very narrow temperature range. Most typical macromolecular interactions show DeltaH degrees (T) positive (unfavorable) and a positive DeltaS degrees (T) (favorable) at low temperature, because of a positive (DeltaCp degrees /T). Because DeltaG degrees (T) for biological systems shows a complicated behavior, wherein DeltaG degrees (T) changes from positive to negative, then reaches a negative value of maximum magnitude (favorable), and finally becomes positive as temperature increases, it is clear that a deeper-lying thermodynamic explanation is required. This communication demonstrates that the critical factor is a temperature-dependent DeltaCp degrees (T) (heat capacity change) of reaction that is positive at low temperature but switches to a negative value at a temperature well below the ambient range. Thus the thermodynamic molecular switch determines the behavior patterns of the Gibbs free energy change and hence a change in the equilibrium constant, K(eq), and/or spontaneity. The subsequent, mathematically predictable changes in DeltaH degrees (T), DeltaS degrees (T), DeltaW degrees (T), and DeltaG degrees (T) give rise to the classically observed behavior patterns in biological reactivity, as may be seen in ribonuclease S' fragment complementation reactions. PMID:10620305

  8. A metal switch for controlling the activity of molecular motor proteins.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Jared C; Zhao, Yu Cheng; Wilcox, Dean E; Kull, F Jon

    2011-12-25

    Kinesins are molecular motors that require a divalent metal ion (for example, Mg(2+)) to convert the energy of ATP hydrolysis into directed force production along microtubules. Here we present the crystal structure of a recombinant kinesin motor domain bound to Mn(2+) and ADP and report on a serine-to-cysteine substitution in the switch 1 motif of kinesin that allows its ATP hydrolysis activity to be controlled by adjusting the ratio of Mn(2+) to Mg(2+). This mutant kinesin binds ATP similarly in the presence of either metal ion, but its ATP hydrolysis activity is greatly diminished in the presence of Mg(2+). In human kinesin-1 and kinesin-5 as well as Drosophila melanogaster kinesin-10 and kinesin-14, this defect is rescued by Mn(2+), providing a way to control both the enzymatic activity and force-generating ability of these nanomachines.

  9. Total synthesis of marinomycin A using salicylate as a molecular switch to mediate dimerization.

    PubMed

    Evans, P Andrew; Huang, Mu-Hua; Lawler, Michael J; Maroto, Sergio

    2012-07-01

    Antibiotics play a significant role in human health because of their ability to treat life-threatening bacterial infections. The growing problems with antibiotic resistance have made the development of new antibiotics a World Health Organization priority. Marinomycin A is a member of a new class of bis-salicylate-containing polyene macrodiolides, which have potent antibiotic activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium. Herein, we describe a triply convergent synthesis of this agent using the salicylate as a novel molecular switch for the chemoselective construction of the macrodiolide. This strategy raises new questions regarding the biosynthetic role of the salicylate and its potential impact on the mechanism of action of these types of agents. For instance, in contrast to penicillin, which enhances the electrophilicity of the cyclic amide through ring strain, salicylates reduce the electrophilicity of the aryl ester through an intramolecular resonance-assisted hydrogen bond to provide an amide surrogate.

  10. Photochromic Spatiotemporal Control of Bubble-Propelled Micromotors by a Spiropyran Molecular Switch.

    PubMed

    Moo, James Guo Sheng; Presolski, Stanislav; Pumera, Martin

    2016-03-22

    Controlling the environment in which bubble-propelled micromotors operate represents an attractive strategy to influence their motion, especially when the trigger is as simple as light. We demonstrate that spiropyrans, which isomerize to amphiphilic merocyanines under UV irradiation, can act as molecular switches that drastically affect the locomotion of the micrometer-sized engines. The phototrigger could be either a point or a field source, thus allowing different modes of control to be executed. A whole ensemble of micromotors was repeatedly activated and deactivated by just altering the spiropyran-merocyanine ratio with light. Moreover, the velocity of individual micromotors was altered using a point irradiation source that caused only localized changes in the environment. Such selective manipulation, achieved here with an optical microscope and a photochromic additive in the medium, reveals the ease of the methodology, which can allow micro- and nanomotors to reach their full potential of not just stochastic, but directional controlled motion.

  11. The Skap-hom dimerization and PH domains comprise a 3'-phosphoinositide-gated molecular switch.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Kenneth D; Tang, Yong; Ceccarelli, Derek F; Poy, Florence; Sliwa, Jan P; Neel, Benjamin G; Eck, Michael J

    2008-11-21

    PH domains, by binding to phosphoinositides, often serve as membrane-targeting modules. Using crystallographic, biochemical, and cell biological approaches, we have uncovered a mechanism that the integrin-signaling adaptor Skap-hom uses to mediate cytoskeletal interactions. Skap-hom is a homodimer containing an N-terminal four-helix bundle dimerization domain, against which its two PH domains pack in a conformation incompatible with phosphoinositide binding. The isolated PH domains bind PI[3,4,5]P(3), and mutations targeting the dimerization domain or the PH domain's PI[3,4,5]P(3)-binding pocket prevent Skap-hom localization to ruffles. Targeting is retained when the PH domain is deleted or by combined mutation of the PI[3,4,5]P(3)-binding pocket and the PH/dimerization domain interface. Thus, the dimerization and PH domain form a PI[3,4,5]P(3)-responsive molecular switch that controls Skap-hom function.

  12. Photoinduced reversible switching of porosity in molecular crystals based on star-shaped azobenzene tetramers.

    PubMed

    Baroncini, Massimo; d'Agostino, Simone; Bergamini, Giacomo; Ceroni, Paola; Comotti, Angiolina; Sozzani, Piero; Bassanetti, Irene; Grepioni, Fabrizia; Hernandez, Taylor M; Silvi, Serena; Venturi, Margherita; Credi, Alberto

    2015-08-01

    The development of solid materials that can be reversibly interconverted by light between forms with different physico-chemical properties is of great interest for separation, catalysis, optoelectronics, holography, mechanical actuation and solar energy conversion. Here, we describe a series of shape-persistent azobenzene tetramers that form porous molecular crystals in their E-configuration, the porosity of which can be tuned by changing the peripheral substituents on the molecule. Efficient E→Z photoisomerization of the azobenzene units takes place in the solid state and converts the crystals into a non-porous amorphous melt phase. Crystallinity and porosity are restored upon Z→E isomerization promoted by visible light irradiation or heating. We demonstrate that the photoisomerization enables reversible on/off switching of optical properties such as birefringence as well as the capture of CO2 from the gas phase. The linear design, structural versatility and synthetic accessibility make this new family of materials potentially interesting for technological applications.

  13. Total synthesis of marinomycin A using salicylate as a molecular switch to mediate dimerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, P. Andrew; Huang, Mu-Hua; Lawler, Michael J.; Maroto, Sergio

    2012-08-01

    Antibiotics play a significant role in human health because of their ability to treat life-threatening bacterial infections. The growing problems with antibiotic resistance have made the development of new antibiotics a World Health Organization priority. Marinomycin A is a member of a new class of bis-salicylate-containing polyene macrodiolides, which have potent antibiotic activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium. Herein, we describe a triply convergent synthesis of this agent using the salicylate as a novel molecular switch for the chemoselective construction of the macrodiolide. This strategy raises new questions regarding the biosynthetic role of the salicylate and its potential impact on the mechanism of action of these types of agents. For instance, in contrast to penicillin, which enhances the electrophilicity of the cyclic amide through ring strain, salicylates reduce the electrophilicity of the aryl ester through an intramolecular resonance-assisted hydrogen bond to provide an amide surrogate.

  14. Mechanistic origin of the vibrational coherence accompanying the photoreaction of biomimetic molecular switches.

    PubMed

    Léonard, Jérémie; Schapiro, Igor; Briand, Julien; Fusi, Stefania; Paccani, Riccardo Rossi; Olivucci, Massimo; Haacke, Stefan

    2012-11-26

    The coherent photoisomerization of a chromophore in condensed phase is a rare process in which light energy is funneled into specific molecular vibrations during electronic relaxation from the excited to the ground state. In this work, we employed ultrafast spectroscopy and computational methods to investigate the molecular origin of the coherent motion accompanying the photoisomerization of indanylidene-pyrroline (IP) molecular switches. UV/Vis femtosecond transient absorption gave evidence for an excited- and ground-state vibrational wave packet, which appears as a general feature of the IP compounds investigated. In close resemblance to the coherent photoisomerization of rhodopsin, the sudden onset of a far-red-detuned and rapidly blue-shifting photoproduct signature indicated that the population arriving on the electronic ground state after nonadiabatic decay through the conical intersection (CI) is still very focused in the form of a vibrational wave packet. Semiclassical trajectories were employed to investigate the reaction mechanism. Their analysis showed that coupled double-bond twisting and ring inversions, already populated during the excited-state reactive motion, induced periodic changes in π-conjugation that modulate the ground-state absorption after the non-adiabatic decay. This prediction further supports that the observed ground-state oscillation results from the reactive motion, which is in line with a biomimetic, coherent photoisomerization scenario. The IP compounds thus appear as a model system to investigate the mechanism of mode-selective photomechanical energy transduction. The presented mechanism opens new perspectives for energy transduction at the molecular level, with applications to the design of efficient molecular devices.

  15. G-quadruplex induced chirality of methylazacalix[6]pyridine via unprecedented binding stoichiometry: en route to multiplex controlled molecular switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Ai-Jiao; Shen, Meng-Jie; Xiang, Jun-Feng; Zhang, En-Xuan; Li, Qian; Sun, Hong-Xia; Wang, Li-Xia; Xu, Guang-Zhi; Tang, Ya-Lin; Xu, Li-Jin; Gong, Han-Yuan

    2015-05-01

    Nucleic acid based molecular device is a developing research field which attracts great interests in material for building machinelike nanodevices. G-quadruplex, as a new type of DNA secondary structures, can be harnessed to construct molecular device owing to its rich structural polymorphism. Herein, we developed a switching system based on G-quadruplexes and methylazacalix[6]pyridine (MACP6). The induced circular dichroism (CD) signal of MACP6 was used to monitor the switch controlled by temperature or pH value. Furthermore, the CD titration, Job-plot, variable temperature CD and 1H-NMR experiments not only confirmed the binding mode between MACP6 and G-quadruplex, but also explained the difference switching effect of MACP6 and various G-quadruplexes. The established strategy has the potential to be used as the chiral probe for specific G-quadruplex recognition.

  16. Negative differential resistance and switch behavior of T-BxNy (x, y = 5, 6, 11) molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shi-Liang; Yang, Chuan-Lu; Wang, Mei-Shan; Ma, Xiao-Guang; Xin, Jian-Guo

    2017-05-01

    The electronic transport properties of T-BxNy (x, y = 5, 6, 11) molecular junction are investigated based on first-principle density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function method. Strong negative differential resistance (NDR) behavior is observed for T-B5N6 molecule under negative and positive bias voltages, with an obvious switch effect for T-B6N5. However, only small NDR is shown for the complex of the two molecules. The projected device density of states, the spatial distribution of molecular orbitals, and the effect of transmission spectra under various bias voltages on the electronic transport properties are analyzed. The obvious effect of bias voltage on the changes in the electronic distribution of frontier molecular orbitals is responsible for the NDR or switch behavior. Therefore, different functional molecular devices can be obtained with different structures of T-BxNy.

  17. Chiral induction in phenanthroline-derived oligoamide foldamers: an acid- and base-controllable switch in helical molecular strands.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hai-Yu; Xiang, Jun-Feng; Yang, Yong; Chen, Chuan-Feng

    2008-03-20

    A series of phenanthroline-derived oligoamides bearing a chiral (R)-phenethylamino end group were synthesized that displayed chiral helical induction and subsequently formed one-hand helical foldamers in solution. Moreover, an acid- and base-controllable switch in the helical molecular strands was observed, which has been demonstrated by NMR, UV-vis, and circular dichroism spectroscopy.

  18. The Development and Study of Molecular Electronic Switches and their Field-Effect Transistor (FET) Device Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-27

    fabrication of nanostructures can serve as building blocks for molecular switching devices, organic light - emitting diodes (OLEDs), photovoltaic, field...a class of highly thermostable n-type semiconductors and have been used as building blocks for organic light - emitting diodes , light - harvesting...electrochromatic materials, light - emitting diodes (LEDs), and photovoltaic and solar cells applications. This project will secure funding to establish

  19. Threonine 209 phosphorylation on RUNX3 by Pak1 is a molecular switch for its dualistic functions.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A; Singhal, M; Chopra, C; Srinivasan, S; Surabhi, R P; Kanumuri, R; Tentu, S; Jagadeeshan, S; Sundaram, S; Ramanathan, K; Shankar Pitani, R; Muthuswamy, B; Abhijit, S; Nair, A S; Venkatraman, G; Rayala, S K

    2016-09-15

    P21 Activated Kinase 1 (Pak1), an oncogenic serine/threonine kinase, is known to have a significant role in the regulation of cytoskeleton and cellular morphology. Runx3 was initially known for its role in tumor suppressor function, but recent studies have reported the oncogenic role of Runx3 in various cancers. However, the mechanism that controls the paradoxical functions of Runx3 still remains unclear. In this study, we show that Runx3 is a physiologically interacting substrate of Pak1. We identified the site of phosphorylation in Runx3 as Threonine 209 by mass spectrometry analysis and site-directed mutagenesis, and further confirmed the same with a site-specific antibody. Results from our functional studies showed that Threonine 209 phosphorylation in Runx3 alters its subcellular localization by protein mislocalization from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and subsequently converses its biological functions. This was further supported by in vivo tumor xenograft studies in nude mouse models which clearly demonstrated that PANC-28 cells transfected with the Runx3-T209E clone showed high tumorigenic potential as compared with other clones. Our results from clinical samples also suggest that Threonine 209 phosphorylation by Pak1 could be a potential therapeutic target and of great clinical relevance with implications for Runx3 inactivation in cancer cells where Runx3 is known to be oncogenic. The findings presented in this study provide evidence of Runx3-Threonine 209 phosphorylation as a molecular switch in dictating the tissue-specific dualistic functions of Runx3 for the first time.

  20. Triple-Helix Molecular Switch Electrochemical Ratiometric Biosensor for Ultrasensitive Detection of Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Erhu; Li, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Xiaohua; Zhou, Jiawan; Yan, Xiaoxia; Liu, Yunqing; Chen, Jinhua

    2017-09-05

    Biomolecular receptors such as nucleic acids that switch between two or more conformations upon binding to a specific target can be used to build specific and sensitive biosensors. In this work, based on the electrochemical dual-signaling ratiometric strategy and triple-helix molecular switch, we developed a selective, reusable, and simple electrochemical DNA (E-DNA) biosensor for target DNA (T-DNA) detection. A hairpin DNA capture probe labeled with methylene blue (MB-DNA) self-assembles on the surface of a gold electrode (GE) through Au-S bond, and then a single-strand DNA modified with two ferrocenes (Fc-DNA) on each end to enhance the oxidation signal hybridizes with the MB-DNA to form a triple-helix conformation. When T-DNA exists, the Fc-DNA hybridizes with T-DNA disassembling the triple-helix stem and allowing the MB-DNA to revert to its hairpin structure. Hence, the Fc tags diffuse away from the GE surface while the MB tags remain affixed close to it, resulting in a decrease in the peak current of Fc (IFc) and an increase in that of MB (IMB). The linear relationship between the value of IMB/IFc and the T-DNA concentration is observed from 0.5 to 80 pM, and the limit of detection is as low as 0.12 pM. The developed E-DNA biosensor may have great potential in the electrochemical detection of a wide range of analytes and be a biosensing platform for early clinical diagnosis and biomedical research.

  1. Ultrafast in cellulo photoinduced dynamics processes of the paradigm molecular light switch [Ru(bpy)2dppz]2+

    PubMed Central

    De la Cadena, Alejandro; Davydova, Dar’ya; Tolstik, Tatiana; Reichardt, Christian; Shukla, Sapna; Akimov, Denis; Heintzmann, Rainer; Popp, Jürgen; Dietzek, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    An in cellulo study of the ultrafast excited state processes in the paradigm molecular light switch [Ru(bpy)2dppz]2+ by localized pump-probe spectroscopy is reported for the first time. The localization of [Ru(bpy)2dppz]2+ in HepG2 cells is verified by emission microscopy and the characteristic photoinduced picosecond dynamics of the molecular light switch is observed in cellulo. The observation of the typical phosphorescence stemming from a 3MLCT state suggests that the [Ru(bpy)2dppz]2+ complex intercalates with the DNA in the nucleus. The results presented for this benchmark coordination compound reveal the necessity to study the photoinduced processes in coordination compounds for intracellular use, e.g. as sensors or as photodrugs, in the actual biological target environment in order to derive a detailed molecular mechanistic understanding of the excited-state properties of the systems in the actual biological target environment. PMID:27644587

  2. Ultrafast in cellulo photoinduced dynamics processes of the paradigm molecular light switch [Ru(bpy)2dppz]2+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Cadena, Alejandro; Davydova, Dar’Ya; Tolstik, Tatiana; Reichardt, Christian; Shukla, Sapna; Akimov, Denis; Heintzmann, Rainer; Popp, Jürgen; Dietzek, Benjamin

    2016-09-01

    An in cellulo study of the ultrafast excited state processes in the paradigm molecular light switch [Ru(bpy)2dppz]2+ by localized pump-probe spectroscopy is reported for the first time. The localization of [Ru(bpy)2dppz]2+ in HepG2 cells is verified by emission microscopy and the characteristic photoinduced picosecond dynamics of the molecular light switch is observed in cellulo. The observation of the typical phosphorescence stemming from a 3MLCT state suggests that the [Ru(bpy)2dppz]2+ complex intercalates with the DNA in the nucleus. The results presented for this benchmark coordination compound reveal the necessity to study the photoinduced processes in coordination compounds for intracellular use, e.g. as sensors or as photodrugs, in the actual biological target environment in order to derive a detailed molecular mechanistic understanding of the excited-state properties of the systems in the actual biological target environment.

  3. Ultrafast all-optical switching based on indium gallium arsenic phosphide grown by helium plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Li

    We present the first experimental study of the optical properties of HELP InGaAsP (InGaAsP grown by He-plasma- assisted molecular beam epitaxy) relevant to all-optical switching, and the first demonstration of picosecond switching using this material. We observed an optical response time of 15 ps, a nonlinear index change as large as 0.077, a sharp absorption band edge, and a small absorption tail in HELP InGaAsP. The unique coexistence of ultrafast response, large interband nonlinearity, and small band-tail absorption, never before reported, makes HELP InGaAsP particularly suitable for ultrafast all-optical switching. Additionally, faster response (subpicosecond) was achieved by doping the material with beryllium, and moderate doping (up to ~1018 cm-3) did not significantly alter the absorption edge. We systematically studied the response time variations with doping concentration, annealing temperature, carrier density, and wavelength. We conclude that, (a)Be doping reduces the response time by compensating for donor-like mid-gap states, thus increasing the electron trap concentration; (b)annealing removes defects responsible for fast carrier trapping; (c)the response time increases with carrier density due to limited trap states; (d)the response time varies with wavelength due to difference in electron and hole trapping cross-sections, which were determined based on experimental results and a phenomenological two-trap- level rate equation model. We investigated two types of HELP-InGaAsP-based all- optical switching devices, the nonlinear directional coupler (NLDC) and the asymmetric Fabry-Pérot (AFP) switch. Based on numerical modelling and waveguide loss measurements, we conclude that, while HELP-InGaAsP-based passive NLDCs are in principle viable, practical devices will tend to require high switching energy, and will likely experience low contrast and high insertion loss. We demonstrated that AFP devices will outperform NLDCs in contrast ratio, throughput

  4. Inversin, the gene product mutated in nephronophthisis type II, functions as a molecular switch between Wnt signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Matias; Gloy, Joachim; Ganner, Athina; Bullerkotte, Axel; Bashkurov, Mikhail; Krönig, Corinna; Schermer, Bernhard; Benzing, Thomas; Cabello, Olga A; Jenny, Andreas; Mlodzik, Marek; Polok, Bozena; Driever, Wolfgang; Obara, Tomoko; Walz, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    Cystic renal diseases are caused by mutations of proteins that share a unique subcellular localization: the primary cilium of tubular epithelial cells1. Mutations of the ciliary protein inversin cause nephronophthisis type II, an autosomal recessive cystic kidney disease characterized by extensive renal cysts, situs inversus and renal failure2. Here we report that inversin acts as a molecular switch between different Wnt signaling cascades. Inversin inhibits the canonical Wnt pathway by targeting cytoplasmic dishevelled (Dsh or Dvl1) for degradation; concomitantly, it is required for convergent extension movements in gastrulating Xenopus laevis embryos and elongation of animal cap explants, both regulated by noncanonical Wnt signaling. In zebrafish, the structurally related switch molecule diversin ameliorates renal cysts caused by the depletion of inversin, implying that an inhibition of canonical Wnt signaling is required for normal renal development. Fluid flow increases inversin levels in ciliated tubular epithelial cells and seems to regulate this crucial switch between Wnt signaling pathways during renal development. PMID:15852005

  5. A first-principles study of overcrowded alkene-based light-driven rotary molecular motor as a possible optical molecular switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Lina; Zhao, Jingfen; Cui, Bin; Fang, Changfeng; Liu, Desheng

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the electronic transport properties of a molecular motor as an optical molecular switch by using the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism combined with first-principles density functional theory. The two main forms of this molecule during the 360° rotation, named the anti-folded isomer and the syn-folded isomer, have shown a consistent difference in the current. The current of the syn-folded isomer is larger than that of the anti-folded isomer, meaning that the conductivity of the molecules alters four times within a rotary cycle. The merit of the photo-induced conductivity tuning makes the molecule a promising candidate for optical molecular switches.

  6. Molecular Design of Ionization-Induced Proton Switching Element Based on Fluorinated DNA Base Pair.

    PubMed

    Tachikawa, Hiroto; Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2016-03-10

    To design theoretically the high-performance proton switching element based on DNA base pair, the effects of fluorine substitution on the rate of proton transfer (PT) in the DNA model base pair have been investigated by means of direct ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) method. The 2-aminopyridine dimer, (AP)2, was used as the model of the DNA base pair. One of the hydrogen atoms of the AP molecule in the dimer was substituted by a fluorine (F) atom, and the structures of the dimer, expressed by F-(AP)2, were fully optimized at the MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level. The direct AIMD calculations showed that the proton is transferred within the base pair after the vertical ionization. The rates of PT in F-(AP)2(+) were calculated and compared with that of (AP)2(+) without an F atom. It was found that PT rate is accelerated by the F-substitution. Also, the direction of PT between F-AP and AP molecules can be clearly controlled by the position of F-substitution (AP)2 in the dimer.

  7. A cytosolic carbonic anhydrase molecular switch occurs in the gills of metamorphic sea lamprey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ferreira-Martins, D.; McCormick, Stephen; Campos, A.; Lopes-Marques, M.; Osorio, H.; Coimbra, J.; Castro, L.F.C.; Wilson, Jonthan M

    2016-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase plays a key role in CO2 transport, acid-base and ion regulation and metabolic processes in vertebrates. While several carbonic anhydrase isoforms have been identified in numerous vertebrate species, basal lineages such as the cyclostomes have remained largely unexamined. Here we investigate the repertoire of cytoplasmic carbonic anhydrases in the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), that has a complex life history marked by a dramatic metamorphosis from a benthic filter-feeding ammocoete larvae into a parasitic juvenile which migrates from freshwater to seawater. We have identified a novel carbonic anhydrase gene (ca19) beyond the single carbonic anhydrase gene (ca18) that was known previously. Phylogenetic analysis and synteny studies suggest that both carbonic anhydrase genes form one or two independent gene lineages and are most likely duplicates retained uniquely in cyclostomes. Quantitative PCR of ca19 and ca18 and protein expression in gill across metamorphosis show that the ca19 levels are highest in ammocoetes and decrease during metamorphosis while ca18 shows the opposite pattern with the highest levels in post-metamorphic juveniles. We propose that a unique molecular switch occurs during lamprey metamorphosis resulting in distinct gill carbonic anhydrases reflecting the contrasting life modes and habitats of these life-history stages.

  8. Electrospun Nanofibers from a Tricyanofuran-Based Molecular Switch for Colorimetric Recognition of Ammonia Gas.

    PubMed

    Khattab, Tawfik A; Abdelmoez, Sherif; Klapötke, Thomas M

    2016-03-14

    A chromophore based on tricyanofuran (TCF) with a hydrazone (H) recognition moiety was developed. Its molecular-switching performance is reversible and has differential sensitivity towards aqueous ammonia at comparable concentrations. Nanofibers were fabricated from the TCF-H chromophore by electrospinning. The film fabricated from these nanofibers functions as a solid-state optical chemosensor for probing ammonia vapor. Recognition of ammonia vapor occurs by proton transfer from the hydrazone fragment of the chromophore to the ammonia nitrogen atom and is facilitated by the strongly electron withdrawing TCF fragment. The TCF-H chromophore was added to a solution of poly(acrylic acid), which was electrospun to obtain a nanofibrous sensor device. The morphology of the nanofibrous sensor was determined by SEM, which showed that nanofibers with a diameter range of 200-450 nm formed a nonwoven mat. The resultant nanofibrous sensor showed very good sensitivity in ammonia-vapor detection. Furthermore, very good reversibility and short response time were also observed.

  9. Temperature control of molecular circuit switch responsible for virulent phenotype expression in uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoilov, Michael

    2010-03-01

    The behavior and fate of biological organisms are to a large extent dictated by their environment, which can be often viewed as a collection of features and constraints governed by physics laws. Since biological systems comprise networks of molecular interactions, one such key physical property is temperature, whose variations directly affect the rates of biochemical reactions involved. For instance, temperature is known to control many gene regulatory circuits responsible for pathogenicity in bacteria. One such example is type 1 fimbriae (T1F) -- the foremost virulence factor in uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC), which accounts for 80-90% of all community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs). The expression of T1F is randomly `phase variable', i.e. individual cells switch between virulent/fimbriate and avirulent/afimbriate phenotypes, with rates regulated by temperature. Our computational investigation of this process, which is based on FimB/FimE recombinase-mediated inversion of fimS DNA element, offers new insights into its discrete-stochastic kinetics. In particular, it elucidates the logic of T1F control optimization to the host temperature and contributes further understanding toward the development of novel therapeutic approaches to UPEC-caused UTIs.

  10. A novel colorimetric triple-helix molecular switch aptasensor for ultrasensitive detection of tetracycline.

    PubMed

    Ramezani, Mohammad; Mohammad Danesh, Noor; Lavaee, Parirokh; Abnous, Khalil; Mohammad Taghdisi, Seyed

    2015-08-15

    Detection methods of antibiotic residues in blood serum and animal derived foods are of great interest. In this study a colorimetric aptasensor was designed for sensitive, selective and fast detection of tetracycline based on triple-helix molecular switch (THMS) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). As a biosensor, THMS shows distinct advantages including high stability, sensitivity and preserving the selectivity and affinity of the original aptamer. In the absence of tetracycline, THMS is stable, leading to the aggregation of AuNPs by salt and an obvious color change from red to blue. In the presence of tetracycline, aptamer binds to its target, signal transduction probe (STP) leaves the THMS and adsorbs on the surface of AuNPs. So the well-dispersed AuNPs remain stable against salt-induced aggregation with a red color. The presented aptasensor showed high selectivity toward tetracyclines with a limit of detection as low as 266 pM for tetracycline. The designed aptasensor was successfully applied to detect tetracycline in serum and milk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Differential submitochondrial localization of PINK1 as a molecular switch for mediating distinct mitochondrial signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Fallaize, Dana; Chin, Lih-Shen; Li, Lian

    2015-12-01

    Mutations in mitochondrial kinase PINK1 cause Parkinson disease (PD), but the submitochondrial site(s) of PINK1 action remains unclear. Here, we report that three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) enables super-resolution imaging of protein submitochondrial localization. Dual-color 3D-SIM imaging analysis revealed that PINK1 resides in the cristae membrane and intracristae space but not on the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) of healthy mitochondria. Under normal physiological conditions, PINK1 colocalizes with its substrate TRAP1 in the cristae membrane and intracristae space. In response to mitochondrial depolarization, PINK1, but not TRAP1, translocates to the OMM. The PINK1 translocation to the OMM of depolarized mitochondria is independent of new protein synthesis and requires combined action of PINK1 transmembrane domain and C-terminal region. We found that mitochondrial depolarization-induced PINK1 OMM translocation is required for recruitment of parkin to the OMM of damaged mitochondria. Our findings suggest that differential submitochondrial localization of PINK1 serves as a molecular switch for mediating two distinct mitochondrial signaling pathways in maintenance of mitochondrial homeostasis. Furthermore, our study provides evidence for the involvement of deregulated PINK1 submitochondrial localization in PD pathogenesis.

  12. Minor introns are embedded molecular switches regulated by highly unstable U6atac snRNA

    PubMed Central

    Younis, Ihab; Dittmar, Kimberly; Wang, Wei; Foley, Shawn W; Berg, Michael G; Hu, Karen Y; Wei, Zhi; Wan, Lili; Dreyfuss, Gideon

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotes have two types of spliceosomes, comprised of either major (U1, U2, U4, U5, U6) or minor (U11, U12, U4atac, U6atac; <1%) snRNPs. The high conservation of minor introns, typically one amidst many major introns in several hundred genes, despite their poor splicing, has been a long-standing enigma. Here, we discovered that the low abundance minor spliceosome’s catalytic snRNP, U6atac, is strikingly unstable (t½<2 hr). We show that U6atac level depends on both RNA polymerases II and III and can be rapidly increased by cell stress-activated kinase p38MAPK, which stabilizes it, enhancing mRNA expression of hundreds of minor intron-containing genes that are otherwise suppressed by limiting U6atac. Furthermore, p38MAPK-dependent U6atac modulation can control minor intron-containing tumor suppressor PTEN expression and cytokine production. We propose that minor introns are embedded molecular switches regulated by U6atac abundance, providing a novel post-transcriptional gene expression mechanism and a rationale for the minor spliceosome’s evolutionary conservation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00780.001 PMID:23908766

  13. A cytosolic carbonic anhydrase molecular switch occurs in the gills of metamorphic sea lamprey

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-Martins, D.; McCormick, S. D.; Campos, A.; Lopes-Marques, M.; Osório, H.; Coimbra, J.; Castro, L. F. C.; Wilson, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase plays a key role in CO2 transport, acid-base and ion regulation and metabolic processes in vertebrates. While several carbonic anhydrase isoforms have been identified in numerous vertebrate species, basal lineages such as the cyclostomes have remained largely unexamined. Here we investigate the repertoire of cytoplasmic carbonic anhydrases in the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), that has a complex life history marked by a dramatic metamorphosis from a benthic filter-feeding ammocoete larvae into a parasitic juvenile which migrates from freshwater to seawater. We have identified a novel carbonic anhydrase gene (ca19) beyond the single carbonic anhydrase gene (ca18) that was known previously. Phylogenetic analysis and synteny studies suggest that both carbonic anhydrase genes form one or two independent gene lineages and are most likely duplicates retained uniquely in cyclostomes. Quantitative PCR of ca19 and ca18 and protein expression in gill across metamorphosis show that the ca19 levels are highest in ammocoetes and decrease during metamorphosis while ca18 shows the opposite pattern with the highest levels in post-metamorphic juveniles. We propose that a unique molecular switch occurs during lamprey metamorphosis resulting in distinct gill carbonic anhydrases reflecting the contrasting life modes and habitats of these life-history stages. PMID:27703170

  14. Transition steps in peroxide reduction and a molecular switch for peroxide robustness of prokaryotic peroxiredoxins

    PubMed Central

    Kamariah, Neelagandan; Sek, Mun Foong; Eisenhaber, Birgit; Eisenhaber, Frank; Grüber, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    In addition to their antioxidant function, the eukaryotic peroxiredoxins (Prxs) facilitate peroxide-mediated signaling by undergoing controlled inactivation by peroxide-driven over-oxidation. In general, the bacterial enzyme lacks this controlled inactivation mechanism, making it more resistant to high H2O2 concentrations. During peroxide reduction, the active site alternates between reduced, fully folded (FF), and oxidized, locally unfolded (LU) conformations. Here we present novel insights into the divergence of bacterial and human Prxs in robustness and sensitivity to inactivation, respectively. Structural details provide new insights into sub-steps during the catalysis of peroxide reduction, enabling the transition from an FF to a LU conformation. Complementary to mutational and enzymatic results, these data unravel the essential role of the C-terminal tail of bacterial Prxs to act as a molecular switch, mediating the transition from an FF to a LU state. In addition, we propose that the C-terminal tail has influence on the propensity of the disulphide bond formation, indicating that as a consequence on the robustness and sensitivity to over-oxidation. Finally, a physical linkage between the catalytic site, the C-terminal tail and the oligomer interface is described. PMID:27892488

  15. The RhoA-ROCK-PTEN pathway as a molecular switch for anchorage dependent cell behavior.

    PubMed

    Yang, Seungwon; Kim, Hyun-Man

    2012-04-01

    The proliferation of anchorage-dependent cells of mesenchymal origin requires the attachment of the cells to substrates. Thus, cells that are poorly attached to substrates exhibit retarded cell cycle progression or apoptotic death. A major disadvantage of most polymers used in tissue engineering is their hydrophobicity; hydrophobic surfaces do not allow cells to attach firmly and, therefore, do not allow normal proliferation rates. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism underlying the reduced proliferation rate of cells that are poorly attached to substrates. There was an inverse relationship between the activity of the small GTPase RhoA (RhoA) and the cell proliferation rate. RhoA activity correlated inversely with the strength of cell adhesion to the substrates. The high RhoA activity in the cells poorly attached to substrates caused an increase in the activity of Rho-associated kinase (ROCK), a well-known effector of RhoA that upregulated the activity of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN). The resulting activated PTEN downregulated Akt activity, which is essential for cell proliferation. Thus, the cells that were poorly attached to substrates showed low levels of cell proliferation because the RhoA-ROCK-PTEN pathway was hyperactive. In addition, RhoA activity seemed to be related to focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activity. Weak FAK activity in these poorly attached cells failed to downregulate the high RhoA activity that restrained cell proliferation. Interestingly, reducing the expression of any component of the RhoA-ROCK-PTEN pathway rescued the proliferation rate without physico-chemical surface modifications. Based on these results, we suggest that the RhoA-ROCK-PTEN pathway acts as a molecular switch to control cell proliferation and determine anchorage dependence. In cells that are poorly attached to substrates, its inhibition is sufficient to restore cell proliferation without the need for physico-chemical modification of the material

  16. Infectious bursal disease virus capsid assembly and maturation by structural rearrangements of a transient molecular switch.

    PubMed

    Luque, Daniel; Saugar, Irene; Rodríguez, José F; Verdaguer, Nuria; Garriga, Damiá; Martín, Carmen San; Velázquez-Muriel, Javier A; Trus, Benes L; Carrascosa, José L; Castón, José R

    2007-07-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) virus belonging to the Birnaviridae family, is an economically important avian pathogen. The IBDV capsid is based on a single-shelled T=13 lattice, and the only structural subunits are VP2 trimers. During capsid assembly, VP2 is synthesized as a protein precursor, called pVP2, whose 71-residue C-terminal end is proteolytically processed. The conformational flexibility of pVP2 is due to an amphipathic alpha-helix located at its C-terminal end. VP3, the other IBDV major structural protein that accomplishes numerous roles during the viral cycle, acts as a scaffolding protein required for assembly control. Here we address the molecular mechanism that defines the multimeric state of the capsid protein as hexamers or pentamers. We used a combination of three-dimensional cryo-electron microscopy maps at or close to subnanometer resolution with atomic models. Our studies suggest that the key polypeptide element, the C-terminal amphipathic alpha-helix, which acts as a transient conformational switch, is bound to the flexible VP2 C-terminal end. In addition, capsid protein oligomerization is also controlled by the progressive trimming of its C-terminal domain. The coordination of these molecular events correlates viral capsid assembly with different conformations of the amphipathic alpha-helix in the precursor capsid, as a five-alpha-helix bundle at the pentamers or an open star-like conformation at the hexamers. These results, reminiscent of the assembly pathway of positive single-stranded RNA viruses, such as nodavirus and tetravirus, add new insights into the evolutionary relationships of dsRNA viruses.

  17. Molecular phylogeny of beetle associated diplogastrid nematodes suggests host switching rather than nematode-beetle coevolution.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Werner E; Herrmann, Matthias; Sommer, Ralf J

    2009-08-24

    host switching is observed. The molecular phylogeny of the Diplogastridae provides a framework for further examinations of the evolution of these associations, for the study of interactions within the ecosystems, and for investigations of diplogastrid genome evolution.

  18. pH-induced "off-on-off" type molecular switch behaviors of zinc and free tetraimidazophthalocyanines.

    PubMed

    Topal, Sevinc Zehra; Onal, Emel; Gürek, Ayşe Gül; Hirel, Catherine

    2013-08-28

    Herein, the design and synthesis of pH sensing fluorophores, zinc(II) tetraimidazophthalocyanine (Pc-1) and metal free tetraimidazophthalocyanine (Pc-2), which present "off-on-off" type molecular switches were described. Their pH sensing properties have been investigated in detail in dimethylsulfoxide in the pH range of 2.0-15.0. The respective three forms of the molecules: deprotonated, neutral and protonated, were characterized by absorption and emission spectra as well as apparent pKa values (Pc-1: pKa1 = 5.2 and pKa2 = 14.3, Pc-2: pKa1 = 4.9 and pKa2 = 13.8). The protonation/deprotonation stages of imidazole groups of Pc-1 and Pc-2 present fluorescence-based "off-on-off" type molecular switch properties.

  19. Programmable DNA triple-helix molecular switch in biosensing applications: from in homogenous solutions to in living cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Pinting; Zheng, Jing; Tang, Jianru; Ma, Dandan; Xu, Weijian; Li, Jishan; Cao, Zhong; Yang, Ronghua

    2017-02-21

    Herein, we demonstrated a new gold nanoparticles (AuNPs)-integrated programmable triple-helix molecular switch (THMS) to realize the biosensing of multiple targets from in homogenous solution to in living cells. The results demonstrated that this proposed programmable THMS could be successfully used for imaging multiple messenger RNA (mRNA) in living cells and it significantly extends the scope of the THMS sensing platform.

  20. Ab initio study of the role of lysine 16 for the molecular switching mechanism of Ras protein p21.

    PubMed Central

    Futatsugi, N; Hata, M; Hoshino, T; Tsuda, M

    1999-01-01

    Quantum chemical computations using the ab initio molecular orbital (MO) method have been performed to investigate the molecular switching mechanism of Ras protein p21, which has an important role in intracellular signal cascades. Lys(16) was demonstrated to be crucial to the function of Ras p21, and the hydrolysis of GTP to GDP was found to be an one-step reaction. The potential energy barrier of this hydrolysis reaction from GTP to (GDP + P) was calculated to be approximately 42 kcal/mol. The role of GAP (GTPase-activating protein) was also discussed in terms of the delivery of the water molecules required for the hydrolysis. PMID:10585950

  1. Molecular interplay between RNA polymerase and two transcriptional regulators in promoter switch.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Ana; Salas, Margarita

    2004-02-13

    Transcription regulation relies in the molecular interplay between the RNA polymerase (RNAP) and regulatory factors. Phage phi29 promoters A2c, A2b and A3 are coordinately regulated by the transcriptional regulator protein p4 and the histone-like protein p6. This study shows that protein p4 binds simultaneously to four sites: sites 1 and 2 located between promoters A2c and A2b and sites 3 and 4 between promoters A2b and A3, placed in such a way that bound p4 is equidistant from promoters A2c and A2b and one helix turn further upstream from promoter A3. The p4 molecules bound to sites 1 and 3 reorganise the binding of protein p6, giving rise to the nucleoprotein complex responsible for the switch from early to late transcription. We identify the positioning of the alphaCTD-RNAP domain at these promoters, and demonstrate that the domains are crucial for promoter A2b recognition and required for full activity of promoter A2c. Since binding of RNAP overlaps with p4 and p6 binding, repression of the early transcription relies on the synergy of the regulators able to antagonize the stable binding of the RNAP through competition for the same target, while activation of late transcription is carried out through the stabilization of the RNAP by the p4/p6 nucleoprotein complex. The control of promoters A2c and A2b by feed-back regulation is discussed.

  2. Retinoblastoma protein functions as a molecular switch determining white versus brown adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jacob B; Jørgensen, Claus; Petersen, Rasmus K; Hallenborg, Philip; De Matteis, Rita; Bøye, Hans A; Petrovic, Natasa; Enerbäck, Sven; Nedergaard, Jan; Cinti, Saverio; te Riele, Hein; Kristiansen, Karsten

    2004-03-23

    Adipocyte precursor cells give raise to two major cell populations with different physiological roles: white and brown adipocytes. Here we demonstrate that the retinoblastoma protein (pRB) regulates white vs. brown adipocyte differentiation. Functional inactivation of pRB in wild-type mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) and white preadipocytes by expression of simian virus 40 large T antigen results in the expression of the brown fat-specific uncoupling protein 1 (UCP-1) in the adipose state. Retinoblastoma gene-deficient (Rb-/-) MEFs and stem cells, but not the corresponding wild-type cells, differentiate into adipocytes with a gene expression pattern and mitochondria content resembling brown adipose tissue. pRB-deficient MEFs exhibit an increased expression of the Forkhead transcription factor Foxc2 and its target gene cAMP-dependent protein kinase regulatory subunit RIalpha, resulting in increased cAMP sensitivity. Suppression of cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity in Rb(-/-)MEFs blocked the brown adipocyte-like gene expression pattern without affecting differentiation per se. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that pRB is present in the nuclei of white but not brown adipocyte precursor cells at a developmental stage where both cell types begin to accumulate lipid and brown adipocytes express UCP-1. Furthermore, pRB rapidly undergoes phosphorylation upon cold-induced neodifferentiation and up-regulation of UCP-1 expression in brown adipose tissue. Finally, down-regulation of pRB expression accompanies transdifferentiation of white into brown adipocytes in response to beta3-adrenergic receptor agonist treatment. We propose that pRB acts as a molecular switch determining white vs. brown adipogenesis, suggesting a previously uncharacterized function of this key cell cycle regulator in adipocyte lineage commitment and differentiation.

  3. Opposing Regulation of the EGF Receptor: A Molecular Switch Controlling Cytomegalovirus Latency and Replication.

    PubMed

    Buehler, Jason; Zeltzer, Sebastian; Reitsma, Justin; Petrucelli, Alex; Umashankar, Mahadevaiah; Rak, Mike; Zagallo, Patricia; Schroeder, Joyce; Terhune, Scott; Goodrum, Felicia

    2016-05-01

    Herpesviruses persist indefinitely in their host through complex and poorly defined interactions that mediate latent, chronic or productive states of infection. Human cytomegalovirus (CMV or HCMV), a ubiquitous β-herpesvirus, coordinates the expression of two viral genes, UL135 and UL138, which have opposing roles in regulating viral replication. UL135 promotes reactivation from latency and virus replication, in part, by overcoming replication-suppressive effects of UL138. The mechanism by which UL135 and UL138 oppose one another is not known. We identified viral and host proteins interacting with UL138 protein (pUL138) to begin to define the mechanisms by which pUL135 and pUL138 function. We show that pUL135 and pUL138 regulate the viral cycle by targeting that same receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). EGFR is a major homeostatic regulator involved in cellular proliferation, differentiation, and survival, making it an ideal target for viral manipulation during infection. pUL135 promotes internalization and turnover of EGFR from the cell surface, whereas pUL138 preserves surface expression and activation of EGFR. We show that activated EGFR is sequestered within the infection-induced, juxtanuclear viral assembly compartment and is unresponsive to stress. Intriguingly, these findings suggest that CMV insulates active EGFR in the cell and that pUL135 and pUL138 function to fine-tune EGFR levels at the cell surface to allow the infected cell to respond to extracellular cues. Consistent with the role of pUL135 in promoting replication, inhibition of EGFR or the downstream phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) favors reactivation from latency and replication. We propose a model whereby pUL135 and pUL138 together with EGFR comprise a molecular switch that regulates states of latency and replication in HCMV infection by regulating EGFR trafficking to fine tune EGFR signaling.

  4. Aptamer contained triple-helix molecular switch for rapid fluorescent sensing of acetamiprid.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Li, Ying; Liang, Jing; Zhu, Wenyue; Xu, Jingyue; Su, Ruifang; Yuan, Lei; Sun, Chunyan

    2016-11-01

    In this study, an aptamer-based fluorescent sensing platform using triple-helix molecular switch (THMS) was developed for the pesticide screening represented by acetamiprid. The THMS was composed of two tailored DNA probes: a label-free central target specific aptamer sequence flanked by two arm segments acting as a recognition probe; a hairpin-shaped structure oligonucleotide serving as a signal transduction probe (STP), labeled with a fluorophore and a quencher at the 3' and 5'-end, respectively. In the absence of acetamiprid, complementary bindings of two arm segments of the aptamers with the loop sequence of STP enforce the formation of THMS with the "open" configuration of STP, and the fluorescence of THMS is on. In the presence of target acetamiprid, the aptamer-target binding results in the formation of a structured aptamer/target complex, which disassembles the THMS and releases the STP. The free STP is folded to a stem loop structure, and the fluorescence is quenched. The quenched fluorescence intensity was proportional to the concentration of acetamiprid in the range from 100 to 1200nM, with the limit of detection (LOD) as low as 9.12nM. In addition, this THMS-based method has been successfully used to test and quantify acetamiprid in Chinese cabbage with satisfactory recoveries, and the results were in full agreement with those from LC-MS. The aptamer-based THMS presents distinct advantages, including high stability, remarkable sensitivity, and preservation of the affinity and specificity of the original aptamer. Most importantly, this strategy is convenient and generalizable by virtue of altering the aptamer sequence without changing the triple-helix structure. So, it is expected that this aptamer-based fluorescent assay could be extensively applied in the field of food safety inspection.

  5. A molecular mechanism of direction switching in the flagellar motor of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Koushik; Brunstetter, Duncan; Titen, Sienna; Blair, David F.

    2011-01-01

    The direction of flagellar rotation is regulated by a rotor-mounted protein assembly, termed the “switch complex,” formed from multiple copies of the proteins FliG, FliM, and FliN. The structures of major parts of these proteins are known, and the overall organization of proteins in the complex has been elucidated previously using a combination of protein-binding, mutational, and cross-linking approaches. In Escherichia coli, the switch from counterclockwise to clockwise rotation is triggered by the signaling protein phospho-CheY, which binds to the lower part of the switch complex and induces small movements of FliM and FliN subunits relative to each other. Direction switching also must produce movements in the upper part of the complex, particularly in the C-terminal domain of FliG (FliGC), which interacts with the stator to generate the torque for flagellar rotation. In the present study, protein movements in the middle and upper parts of the switch complex have been probed by means of targeted cross-linking and mutational analysis. Switching induces a tilting movement of the FliM domains that form the middle part of the switch and a consequent rotation of the affixed FliGC domains that reorients the stator interaction sites by about 90°. In a recently proposed hypothesis for the motor mechanism, such a reorientation of FliGC would reverse the direction of motor rotation. PMID:21969567

  6. DFT-based methods in the design of two-photon operated molecular switches.

    PubMed

    Mikhailov, Ivan A; Belfield, Kevin D; Masunov, Artëm E

    2009-06-25

    Conjugated organic molecules with photochromic properties are being extensively studied as prospective optical switching and data storage materials. Among different photochromic compounds, diarylethenes demonstrate thermal stability, fatigue resistance, and high quantum yield. The mechanism of photoswitching in diarylethenes involves a symmetry-allowed conrotatory electrocyclic reaction, initiated by UV light. Replacement of one UV photon with two near-IR ones would offer a number of practical advantages, including drastic increase in storage capacity via three-dimensional multilayer design. For this purpose we designed a prototype molecule with a two-photon absorbing (2PA) pendant substituent, attached to the photochromic diarylethene moiety. However, this molecule was experimentally shown to have lost the photoswitching properties. We analyze reasons for this loss using quantum chemistry tools. Analysis of the nodal structure of the frontier Kohn-Sham orbitals, allowed us to trace the route of the problem to the lone pair orbital of the 2PA substituent falling within the HOMO-LUMO (highest occupied molecular orbital-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital) gap of the photoreactive diarylethene moiety. We suggest a chemical modification of the 2PA substituent in order to restore the order of the orbitals. Potential energy plots along the reaction coordinate at the M05-2X/6-31G* theory level for the prototype 2PA photochromic molecule before and after the modification confirm the predictive capability of the proposed orbital approach. The Slater transition state method was used to obtain geometries along the reaction pathway by the constrained optimization of excited states, whereas potential energy curves were plotted using the recently proposed (Mikhailov, I. A.; Tafur, S.; Masunov, A. E. Phys. Rev. A 2008, 77 (1), 012510) a posteriori Tamm-Dancoff approximation to the time-dependent density functional theory in second order of the external field. We show that this

  7. Rube Goldberg goes (ribo)nuclear? Molecular switches and sensors made from RNA

    PubMed Central

    SILVERMAN, SCOTT K.

    2003-01-01

    Switches and sensors play important roles in our everyday lives. The chemical properties of RNA make it amenable for use as a switch or sensor, both artificially and in nature. This review focuses on recent advances in artificial RNA switches and sensors. Researchers have been applying classical biochemical principles such as allostery in elegant ways that are influencing the development of biosensors and other applications. Particular attention is given here to allosteric ribozymes (aptazymes) that are regulated by small organic molecules, by proteins, or by oligonucleotides. Also discussed are ribozymes whose activities are controlled by various nonallosteric strategies. PMID:12649489

  8. Rube Goldberg goes (ribo)nuclear? Molecular switches and sensors made from RNA.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Scott K

    2003-04-01

    Switches and sensors play important roles in our everyday lives. The chemical properties of RNA make it amenable for use as a switch or sensor, both artificially and in nature. This review focuses on recent advances in artificial RNA switches and sensors. Researchers have been applying classical biochemical principles such as allostery in elegant ways that are influencing the development of biosensors and other applications. Particular attention is given here to allosteric ribozymes (aptazymes) that are regulated by small organic molecules, by proteins, or by oligonucleotides. Also discussed are ribozymes whose activities are controlled by various nonallosteric strategies.

  9. A sensitive SERS assay for detecting proteins and nucleic acids using a triple-helix molecular switch for cascade signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Ye, Sujuan; Wu, Yanying; Zhang, Wen; Li, Na; Tang, Bo

    2014-08-25

    A novel surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection system is developed for proteins and nucleic acids based on a triple-helix molecular switch for multiple cycle signal amplification, achieving high sensitivity, universality, rapid analysis, and high selectivity.

  10. A reversible molecular switch based on pattern-change in chlorobenzene and toluene on a Si(111)-(7x7) surface.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xuekun; Polanyi, John C; Yang, Jody S Y

    2006-04-01

    A reversible molecular switch is proposed, based on an observed change in a physisorbed pattern of chlorobenzene or toluene at Si(111)-(7x7), from "triangles" to "circles". Electronic excitation, at an applied surface voltage of Vs = -2.0 V, caused molecular migration, by one atomic site, from under the tip (switch "off"). Thereafter, the adsorbate pattern reverted thermally from circles to triangles (switch "on") across a measured activation barrier of Ea = 0.3 eV for chlorobenzene and 0.2 eV for toluene.

  11. Morphological and molecular genetic analysis of epigenetic switching of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Hnisz, Denes; Tscherner, Michael; Kuchler, Karl

    2011-01-01

    Candida albicans is a pleiomorphic fungal pathogen whose morphogenetic plasticity has long been considered as a major virulence factor. In addition to the yeast-filament transition, C. albicans cells also have the unique ability to switch between two epigenetic phases referred to as white and opaque. White and opaque cells harbor identical genomes yet they differ in cellular morphologies, gene expression profiles, mating abilities, and virulence properties. The switching process is regulated by a small network of transcription factors and is suggested to be driven by stochastic fluctuations of the regulatory components, which correlates with altered switching frequencies. Traditionally, phase variants have been identified based on cellular morphologies and expression levels of a few marker transcripts, yet it has recently become clear that several other criteria are also essential and relevant, because phase markers are regulated at multiple branching sites of transcriptional circuitry regulating switching. Here, we describe basic methods to discriminate between white and opaque switching variants, based on cellular and macroscopic morphologies, expression levels of phase-specific transcripts, Wor1 protein levels, as well as quantitative mating assays.

  12. Reversible molecular switching at a metal surface: A case study of tetra- tert-butyl-azobenzene on Au(1 1 1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Martin; Tegeder, Petra

    2009-06-01

    Molecular switches represent a fascinating class of functional molecules, whose properties can be reversibly changed between different molecular states by excitation with light or other external stimuli. Using surface science concepts like self assembly to align such molecules in a well-defined geometry at solid surfaces, new functional properties may arise, which are relevant for different fields like, e.g., molecular electronics, sensing or biocompatible interfaces. For a microscopic understanding of molecular switching at surfaces, it is essential to obtain detailed knowledge on the underlying elementary processes, for instance the excitation mechanism in photoinduced switching. Here we present a case study of a specifically designed azobenzene derivative on a metal surface, namely tetra- tert-butyl-azobenzene (TBA) adsorbed on Au(1 1 1), which is so far one of the best studied system for which reversible conformational changes have been demonstrated. TBA/Au(1 1 1) can thus be viewed as model system in order to gain deeper insights into molecular switching processes at metal surfaces. We have studied the photoinduced and thermally activated reversible switching of TBA in direct contact with a Au(1 1 1) surface using two-photon photoemission (2PPE) and high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS). The trans/cis-isomerization of TBA is accompanied by reversible changes in the geometrical and electronic structure of the molecules, allowing to gain mechanistic and quantitative insight into the switching process. In particular, the cross sections for the photoisomerization, the ratio between the cis- and trans-TBA in the photostationary state, and the activation energy for the thermally induced cis→trans reaction have been determined and are found to be strongly reduced compared to the corresponding quantities in the liquid phase. Furthermore, the mechanism of optical excitation and molecular switching of TBA on Au(1 1 1) has been identified to arise

  13. Molecular-Level Thermodynamic Switch Controls Chemical Equilibrium in Sequence-Specific Hydrophobic Interaction of 35 Dipeptide Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Paul W.

    2003-01-01

    Applying the Planck-Benzinger methodology, the sequence-specific hydrophobic interactions of 35 dipeptide pairs were examined over a temperature range of 273–333 K, based on data reported by Nemethy and Scheraga in 1962. The hydrophobic interaction in these sequence-specific dipeptide pairs is highly similar in its thermodynamic behavior to that of other biological systems. The results imply that the negative Gibbs free energy change minimum at a well-defined stable temperature, 〈Ts〉, where the bound unavailable energy, TΔSo = 0, has its origin in the sequence-specific hydrophobic interactions, are highly dependent on details of molecular structure. Each case confirms the existence of a thermodynamic molecular switch wherein a change of sign in ΔCpo(T)reaction (change in specific heat capacity of reaction at constant pressure) leads to true negative minimum in the Gibbs free energy change of reaction, ΔGo(T)reaction, and hence a maximum in the related equilibrium constant, Keq. Indeed, all interacting biological systems examined to date by Chun using the Planck-Benzinger methodology have shown such a thermodynamic switch at the molecular level, suggesting its existence may be universal. PMID:12547816

  14. Single electron bipolar conductance switch driven by the molecular Aharonov-Bohm effect.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joonhee; Tallarida, Nicholas; Rios, Laura; Perdue, Shawn M; Apkarian, Vartkess Ara

    2014-06-24

    We demonstrate a conductance switch controlled by the spin-vibronic density of an odd electron on a single molecule. The junction current is modulated by the spin-flip bistability of the electron. Functional images are provided as wiring diagrams for control of the switch's frequency, amplitude, polarity, and duty-cycle. The principle of operation relies on the quantum mechanical phase associated with the adiabatic circulation of a spin-aligned electron around a conical intersection. The functional images quantify the governing vibronic Hamiltonian.

  15. Observation of ambipolar switching in a silver nanoparticle single-electron transistor with multiple molecular floating gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Makoto; Shinohara, Shuhei; Tamada, Kaoru; Ishii, Hisao; Noguchi, Yutaka

    2016-03-01

    Ambipolar switching behavior was observed in a silver nanoparticle (AgNP)-based single-electron transistor (SET) with tetra-tert-butyl copper phthalocyanine (ttbCuPc) as a molecular floating gate. Depending on the wavelength of the incident light, the stability diagram shifted to the negative and positive directions along the gate voltage axis. These results were explained by the photoinduced charging of ttbCuPc molecules in the vicinity of AgNPs. Moreover, multiple device states were induced by the light irradiation at a wavelength of 600 nm, suggesting that multiple ttbCuPc molecules individually worked as a floating gate.

  16. Molecular Analysis of Base Damage Clustering Associated with a Site-Specific Radiation-Induced DNA Double-Strand Break

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Kamal; Jaruga, Pawel; Dizdaroglu, Miral; Neumann, Ronald D.; Winters, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    Base damage flanking a radiation-induced DNA double-strand break (DSB) may contribute to DSB complexity and affect break repair. However, to date, an isolated radiation-induced DSB has not been assessed for such structures at the molecular level. In this study, an authentic site-specific radiation-induced DSB was produced in plasmid DNA by triplex forming oligonucleotide-targeted 125I decay. A restriction fragment terminated by the DSB was isolated and probed for base damage with the E. coli DNA repair enzymes, endonuclease III and formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase. Our results demonstrate base damage clustering within 8 bases of the 125I-targeted base in the DNA duplex. An increased yield of base damage (purine>pyrimidine) was observed for DSBs formed by irradiation in the absence of DMSO. An internal control fragment 1354 bp upstream from the targeted base was insensitive to enzymatic probing, indicating the damage detected proximal to the DSB was produced by the 125I decay that formed the DSB. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry identified three types of damaged bases in the ~32 bp region proximal to the DSB. These base lesions were 8-hydroxyguanine, 8-hydroxyadenine, and 5-hydroxycytosine. Finally, evidence is presented for base damage >24 bp upstream from the 125I-decay site that may form via a charge migration mechanism. PMID:17067210

  17. A pentiptycene-derived molecular brake: photochemical E→Z and electrochemical Z→E switching of an enone module.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Chen; Sun, Wei-Ting; Lu, Hsiu-Feng; Chao, Ito; Huang, Guan-Jhih; Lin, Ying-Chih; Huang, Shou-Ling; Huang, Hsin-Hau; Lin, Yan-Duo; Yang, Jye-Shane

    2011-01-24

    The synthesis and brakelike performance of a new molecular system (1) consisting of a pentiptycene rotor and a 2-methyleneindanone brake are reported. The rotation kinetics of the rotor was probed by both variable-temperature (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations, and the switching between the brake-on and brake-off states was conducted by a combination of photochemical and electrochemical isomerization. Because of the greater steric hindrance between the rotor and the brake units in the Z form ((Z)-1) than in the E form ((E)-1), rotation of the rotor is slowed down 500-fold at room temperature (298 K) on going from (E)-1 to (Z)-1, corresponding to the brake-off and brake-on states, respectively. The (E)-1→(Z)-1 photoisomerization in acetonitrile is efficient and reaches an (E)-1/(Z)-1 ratio of 11:89 in the photostationary state upon excitation at 290 nm, attributable to a much larger isomerization quantum efficiency for (E)-1 versus (Z)-1. An efficient (Z)-1→(E)-1 isomerization (96%) was also achieved by electrochemical treatment through the radical anionic intermediates. Consequently, the reversibility of the E-Z switching of 1 is as high as 85%. The repeated E-Z switching of 1 with alternating photochemical and electrochemical treatments is also demonstrated. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Function of the c-Myc antagonist Mad1 during a molecular switch from proliferation to differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Cultraro, C M; Bino, T; Segal, S

    1997-01-01

    Mad-Max heterodimers have been shown to antagonize Myc transforming activity by a mechanism requiring multiple protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions. However, the mechanism by which Mad functions in differentiation is unknown. Here, we present evidence that Mad functions by an active repression mechanism to antagonize the growth-promoting function(s) of Myc and bring about a transition from cellular proliferation to differentiation. We demonstrate that exogenously expressed c-Myc blocks inducer-mediated differentiation of murine erythroleukemia cells without disrupting the induction of endogenous Mad; rather, high levels of c-Myc prevent a heterocomplex switch from growth-promoting Myc-Max to growth-inhibitory Mad-Max. Cotransfection of a constitutive c-myc with a zinc-inducible mad1 results in clones expressing both genes, whereby a switch from proliferation to differentiation can be modulated. Whereas cells grown in N'N'-hexamethylene bisacetamide in the absence of zinc fail to differentiate, addition of zinc up-regulates Mad expression by severalfold and differentiation proceeds normally. Coimmunoprecipitation analysis reveals that Mad-Max complexes are in excess of Myc-Max in these cotransfectants. Moreover, we show that the Sin-binding, basic region, and leucine zipper motifs are required for Mad to function during a molecular switch from proliferation to differentiation. PMID:9111304

  19. Emerging roles of microRNAs as molecular switches in the integrated circuit of the cancer cell

    PubMed Central

    Sotiropoulou, Georgia; Pampalakis, Georgios; Lianidou, Evi; Mourelatos, Zissimos

    2009-01-01

    Transformation of normal cells into malignant tumors requires the acquisition of six hallmark traits, e.g., self-sufficiency in growth signals, insensitivity to antigrowth signals and self-renewal, evasion of apoptosis, limitless replication potential, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis, which are common to all cancers (Hanahan and Weinberg 2000). These new cellular traits evolve from defects in major regulatory microcircuits that are fundamental for normal homeostasis. The discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs) as a new class of small non-protein-coding RNAs that control gene expression post-transcriptionally by binding to various mRNA targets suggests that these tiny RNA molecules likely act as molecular switches in the extensive regulatory web that involves thousands of transcripts. Most importantly, accumulating evidence suggests that numerous microRNAs are aberrantly expressed in human cancers. In this review, we discuss the emergent roles of microRNAs as switches that function to turn on/off known cellular microcircuits. We outline recent compelling evidence that deregulated microRNA-mediated control of cellular microcircuits cooperates with other well-established regulatory mechanisms to confer the hallmark traits of the cancer cell. Furthermore, these exciting insights into aberrant microRNA control in cancer-associated circuits may be exploited for cancer therapies that will target deregulated miRNA switches. PMID:19561119

  20. Electrostatic Switch Function in the Mechanism of Protein Kinase A Iα Activation: Results of the Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Rogacheva, Olga N.; Shchegolev, Boris F.

    2017-01-01

    We used molecular dynamics to find the average path of the A-domain H → B conformational transition in protein kinase A Iα. We obtained thirteen productive trajectories and processed them sequentially using factor and cross-correlation analyses. The conformational transition is presented as partly deterministic sequence of six events. Event B represents H → B transition of the phosphate binding cassette. Main participants of this event form electrostatic switch cAMP(O6)–A202(N-H)–G199(C=O). Through this switch, cAMP transmits information about its binding to hydrophobic switch L203–Y229 and thus triggers conformational transition of A-domain. Events C and D consist in N3A-motif displacement towards phosphate binding cassette and B/C-helix rotation. Event E involves an increase in interaction energy between Y229 and β-subdomain. Taken together, events B, E, and D correspond to the hinge movement towards β-barrel. Transition of B/C-helix turn (a.a. 229–234) from α-form to π-form accounts for event F. Event G implies that π-helical turn is replaced by kink. Emerging in the resulting conformation, electrostatic interaction R241–E200 facilitates kink formation. The obtained data on the mechanism of cAMP-dependent activation of PKA Iα may contribute to new approaches to designing pharmaceuticals based on cAMP analogs. PMID:28367443

  1. Molecular Switch for Sub-Diffraction Laser Lithography by Photoenol Intermediate-State Cis-Trans Isomerization.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Patrick; Zieger, Markus M; Richter, Benjamin; Quick, Alexander S; Fischer, Joachim; Mueller, Jonathan B; Zhou, Lu; Nienhaus, Gerd Ulrich; Bastmeyer, Martin; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher; Wegener, Martin

    2017-06-27

    Recent developments in stimulated-emission depletion (STED) microscopy have led to a step change in the achievable resolution and allowed breaking the diffraction limit by large factors. The core principle is based on a reversible molecular switch, allowing for light-triggered activation and deactivation in combination with a laser focus that incorporates a point or line of zero intensity. In the past years, the concept has been transferred from microscopy to maskless laser lithography, namely direct laser writing (DLW), in order to overcome the diffraction limit for optical lithography. Herein, we propose and experimentally introduce a system that realizes such a molecular switch for lithography. Specifically, the population of intermediate-state photoenol isomers of α-methyl benzaldehydes generated by two-photon absorption at 700 nm fundamental wavelength can be reversibly depleted by simultaneous irradiation at 440 nm, suppressing the subsequent Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction which constitutes the chemical core of the writing process. We demonstrate the potential of the proposed mechanism for STED-inspired DLW by covalently functionalizing the surface of glass substrates via the photoenol-driven STED-inspired process exploiting reversible photoenol activation with a polymerization initiator. Subsequently, macromolecules are grown from the functionalized areas and the spatially coded glass slides are characterized by atomic-force microscopy. Our approach allows lines with a full-width-at-half-maximum of down to 60 nm and line gratings with a lateral resolution of 100 nm to be written, both surpassing the diffraction limit.

  2. Understanding the On-Off Switching Mechanism in Cationic Tetravalent Group-V-Based Fluoride Molecular Sensors Using Orbital Analysis.

    PubMed

    Usui, Kosuke; Ando, Mikinori; Yokogawa, Daisuke; Irle, Stephan

    2015-12-24

    The precise control of on-off switching is essential to the design of ideal molecular sensors. To understand the switching mechanism theoretically, we selected as representative example a 9-anthryltriphenylstibonium cation, which was reported as a fluoride ion sensor. In this molecule, the first excited singlet state exhibits two minimum geometries, where one of them is emissive and the other one dark. The excited state at the geometry with bright emission is of π-π* character, whereas it is of π-σ* character at the "dark" geometry. Geometry changes in the excited state were identified by geometry optimization and partial potential energy surface (PES) mapping. We also studied Group V homologues of this molecule. A barrierless relaxation pathway after vertical excitation to the "dark" geometry was found for the Sb-containing compound on the excited-states PES, whereas barriers appear in the case of P and As. Molecular orbital analysis suggests that the σ* orbital of the antimony compound is stabilized along such relaxation and that the excited state changes its nature correspondingly. Our results indicate that the size of the central atom is crucial for the design of fluoride sensors with this ligand framework.

  3. Mechanically Interlocked Molecules (MIMs)-Molecular Shuttles, Switches, and Machines (Nobel Lecture).

    PubMed

    Stoddart, J Fraser

    2017-09-04

    Chemistry welcomes a new bond: The mechanical bond has endowed molecules with component parts whose movements can be controlled and monitored. In his Nobel Lecture, J. F. Stoddart describes how being able to template the formation of mechanically interlocked molecules has led to the design and synthesis of shuttles, switches, and machines at the nanoscale. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Azobenzenes as light-controlled molecular electronic switches in nanoscale metal-molecule-metal junctions.

    PubMed

    Mativetsky, Jeffrey M; Pace, Giuseppina; Elbing, Mark; Rampi, Maria A; Mayor, Marcel; Samorì, Paolo

    2008-07-23

    Conductance switching associated with the photoisomerization of azobenzene-based (Azo) molecules was observed in nanoscopic metal-molecule-metal junctions. The junctions were formed by using a conducting atomic force microscope (C-AFM) approach, where a metallic AFM tip was used to electrically contact a gold-supported Azo self-assembled monolayer. The measured 30-fold increase in conductance is consistent with the expected decrease in tunneling barrier length resulting from the conformational change of the Azo molecule.

  5. PEAK1 Acts as a Molecular Switch to Regulate Context-Dependent TGFβ Responses in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Agajanian, Megan; Campeau, Anaamika; Hoover, Malachia; Hou, Alexander; Brambilla, Daniel; Kim, Sa La; Klemke, Richard L.; Kelber, Jonathan A.

    2015-01-01

    Transforming Growth Factor β (TGFβ) has dual functions as both a tumor suppressor and a promoter of cancer progression within the tumor microenvironment, but the molecular mechanisms by which TGFβ signaling switches between these outcomes and the contexts in which this switch occurs remain to be fully elucidated. We previously identified PEAK1 as a new non-receptor tyrosine kinase that associates with the cytoskeleton, and facilitates signaling of HER2/Src complexes. We also showed PEAK1 functions downstream of KRas to promote tumor growth, metastasis and therapy resistance using preclinical in vivo models of human tumor progression. In the current study, we analyzed PEAK1 expression in human breast cancer samples and found PEAK1 levels correlate with mesenchymal gene expression, poor cellular differentiation and disease relapse. At the cellular level, we also observed that PEAK1 expression was highest in mesenchymal breast cancer cells, correlated with migration potential and increased in response to TGFβ-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Thus, we sought to evaluate the role of PEAK1 in the switching of TGFβ from a tumor suppressing to tumor promoting factor. Notably, we discovered that high PEAK1 expression causes TGFβ to lose its anti-proliferative effects, and potentiates TGFβ-induced proliferation, EMT, cell migration and tumor metastasis in a fibronectin-dependent fashion. In the presence of fibronectin, PEAK1 caused a switching of TGFβ signaling from its canonical Smad2/3 pathway to non-canonical Src and MAPK signaling. This report is the first to provide evidence that PEAK1 mediates signaling cross talk between TGFβ receptors and integrin/Src/MAPK pathways and that PEAK1 is an important molecular regulator of TGFβ-induced tumor progression and metastasis in breast cancer. Finally, PEAK1 overexpression/upregulation cooperates with TGFβ to reduce breast cancer sensitivity to Src kinase inhibition. These findings provide a rational

  6. The Art of Building Small: From Molecular Switches to Motors (Nobel Lecture).

    PubMed

    Feringa, Ben L

    2017-09-04

    A journey into the nano-world: The ability to design, use and control motor-like functions at the molecular level sets the stage for numerous dynamic molecular systems. In his Nobel Lecture, B. L. Feringa describes the evolution of the field of molecular motors and explains how to program and control molecules by incorporating responsive and adaptive properties. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Molecular phylogeny of the bivalve superfamily Galeommatoidea (Heterodonta, Veneroida) reveals dynamic evolution of symbiotic lifestyle and interphylum host switching

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Galeommatoidea is a superfamily of bivalves that exhibits remarkably diverse lifestyles. Many members of this group live attached to the body surface or inside the burrows of other marine invertebrates, including crustaceans, holothurians, echinoids, cnidarians, sipunculans and echiurans. These symbiotic species exhibit high host specificity, commensal interactions with hosts, and extreme morphological and behavioral adaptations to symbiotic life. Host specialization to various animal groups has likely played an important role in the evolution and diversification of this bivalve group. However, the evolutionary pathway that led to their ecological diversity is not well understood, in part because of their reduced and/or highly modified morphologies that have confounded traditional taxonomy. This study elucidates the taxonomy of the Galeommatoidea and their evolutionary history of symbiotic lifestyle based on a molecular phylogenic analysis of 33 galeommatoidean and five putative galeommatoidean species belonging to 27 genera and three families using two nuclear ribosomal genes (18S and 28S ribosomal DNA) and a nuclear (histone H3) and mitochondrial (cytochrome oxidase subunit I) protein-coding genes. Results Molecular phylogeny recovered six well-supported major clades within Galeommatoidea. Symbiotic species were found in all major clades, whereas free-living species were grouped into two major clades. Species symbiotic with crustaceans, holothurians, sipunculans, and echiurans were each found in multiple major clades, suggesting that host specialization to these animal groups occurred repeatedly in Galeommatoidea. Conclusions Our results suggest that the evolutionary history of host association in Galeommatoidea has been remarkably dynamic, involving frequent host switches between different animal phyla. Such an unusual pattern of dynamic host switching is considered to have resulted from their commensalistic lifestyle, in which they maintain filter

  8. Redox-driven conductance switching via filament formation and dissolution in carbon/molecule/TiO2/Ag molecular electronic junctions.

    PubMed

    Ssenyange, Solomon; Yan, Haijun; McCreery, Richard L

    2006-12-05

    Carbon/molecule/TiO2/Au molecular electronic junctions show robust conductance switching, in which a metastable high conductance state may be induced by a voltage pulse which results in redox reactions in the molecular and TiO2 layers. When Ag is substituted for Au as the "top contact", dramatically different current/voltage curves and switching behavior result. When the carbon substrate is biased negative, an apparent breakdown occurs, leading to a high conductance state which is stable for at least several hours. Upon scanning to positive bias, the conductance returns to a low state, and the cycle may be repeated hundreds of times. Similar effects are observed when Cu is substituted for Au and for three different molecular layers as well as "control" junctions of the type carbon/TiO2/Ag/Au. The polarity of the "switching" is reversed when the Ag layer is between the carbon and molecular layers, and the conductance change is suppressed at low temperature. Pulse experiments show very erratic transitions between high and low conductivity states, particularly near the switching threshold. The results are consistent with a switching mechanism based on Ag or Cu oxidation, transport of their ions through the TiO2, and reduction at the carbon to form a metal filament.

  9. A Nanostructured SERS Switch Based on Molecular Beacon-Controlled Assembly of Gold Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yansheng; Cheng, Yaya; Xu, Liping; Du, Hongwu; Zhang, Peixun; Wen, Yongqiang; Zhang, Xueji

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, highly purified and stable gold nanoparticle (AuNP) dimers connected at the two ends of DNA linkage were prepared by a versatile method. A nanostructured, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) switching sensor system was fabricated based on the controlled organization of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) by a DNA nanomachine through the controlled formation/deformation of SERS “hotspots”. This strategy not only opens opportunities in the precise engineering of gap distances in gold-gold nanostructures in a highly controllable and reproducible fashion, but also provides a unique ability to research the origin of SERS and sequence-specific DNA detection.

  10. Mucosal transmissibility, disease induction and coreceptor switching of R5 SHIVSF162P3N molecular clones in rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mucosally transmissible and pathogenic CCR5 (R5)-tropic simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) molecular clones are useful reagents to identity neutralization escape in HIV-1 vaccine experiments and to study the envelope evolutionary process and mechanistic basis for coreceptor switch during the course of natural infection. Results We observed progression to AIDS in rhesus macaques infected intrarectally with molecular clones of the pathogenic R5 SHIVSF162P3N isolate. Expansion to CXCR4 usage was documented in one diseased macaque that mounted a neutralizing antibody response and in another that failed to do so, with the latter displaying a rapid progressor phenotype. V3 loop envelop glycoprotein gp120 sequence changes that are predictive of a CXCR4 (X4)-using phenotype in HIV-1 subtype B primary isolates, specifically basic amino acid substations at positions 11 (S11R), 24 (G24R) and 25 (D25K) of the loop were detected in the two infected macaques. Functional assays showed that envelopes with V3 S11R or D25K mutation were dual-tropic, infecting CD4+ target cells that expressed either the CCR5 or CXCR4 coreceptor. And, consistent with findings of coreceptor switching in macaques infected with the pathogenic isolate, CXCR4-using variant was first detected in the lymph node of the chronically infected rhesus monkey several weeks prior to its presence in peripheral blood. Moreover, X4 emergence in this macaque coincided with persistent peripheral CD4+ T cell loss and a decline in neutralizing antibody titer that are suggestive of immune deterioration, with macrophages as the major virus-producing cells at the end-stage of disease. Conclusions The data showed that molecular clones derived from the R5 SHIVSF162P3N isolate are mucosally transmissible and induced disease in a manner similar to that observed in HIV-1 infected individuals, providing a relevant and useful animal infection model for in-depth analyses of host selection pressures and the env

  11. Sialic Acid-Responsive Polymeric Interface Material: From Molecular Recognition to Macroscopic Property Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yuting; Jiang, Ge; Li, Minmin; Qing, Guangyan; Li, Xiuling; Liang, Xinmiao; Sun, Taolei

    2017-01-01

    Biological systems that utilize multiple weak non-covalent interactions and hierarchical assemblies to achieve various bio-functions bring much inspiration for the design of artificial biomaterials. However, it remains a big challenge to correlate underlying biomolecule interactions with macroscopic level of materials, for example, recognizing such weak interaction, further transforming it into regulating material’s macroscopic property and contributing to some new bio-applications. Here we designed a novel smart polymer based on polyacrylamide (PAM) grafted with lactose units (PAM-g-lactose0.11), and reported carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction (CCI)-promoted macroscopic properties switching on this smart polymer surface. Detailed investigations indicated that the binding of sialic acid molecules with the grafted lactose units via the CCIs induced conformational transformation of the polymer chains, further resulted in remarkable and reversible switching in surface topography, wettability and stiffness. With these excellent recognition and response capacities towards sialic acid, the PAM-g-lactose0.11 further facilitated good selectivity, strong anti-interference and high adsorption capacity in the capture of sialylated glycopeptides (important biomarkers for cancers). This work provides some enlightenment for the development of biointerface materials with tunable property, as well as high-performance glycopeptide enrichment materials.

  12. An Evolutionarily Conserved Autoinhibitory Molecular Switch in ELMO Proteins Regulates Rac Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Manishha; Margaron, Yoran; Fradet, Nadine; Yang, Qi; Wilkes, Brian; Bouvier, Michel; Hofmann, Kay; Côté, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Summary Dedicator of cytokinesis (DOCK) proteins are guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) controlling the activity of Rac1/Cdc42 during migration, phagocytosis, and myoblast fusion [1–4]. Engulfment and cell motility (ELMO) proteins bind a subset of DOCK members and are emerging as critical regulators of Rac signaling [5–10]. Although formation of a DOCK180/ELMO complex is not essential for Rac1 activation, ELMO mutants deficient in binding to DOCK180 are unable to promote cytoskeleton remodeling [11]. How ELMO regulates signaling through DOCK GEFs is poorly understood. Here, we identify an autoinhibitory switch in ELMO presenting homology to a regulatory unit described for Dia formins. One part of the switch, composed of a Ras-binding domain (RBD) and Armadillo repeats, is positioned N-terminally while the other is housed in the C terminus. We demonstrate interaction between these fragments, suggesting autoinhibition of ELMO. Using a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer biosensor, we establish that ELMO undergoes conformational changes upon disruption of autoinhibition. We found that engagement of ELMO to RhoG, or with DOCK180, promotes the relief of autoinhibition in ELMO. Functionally, we found that ELMO mutants with impaired autoregulatory activity promote cell elongation. These results demonstrate an unsuspected level of regulation for Rac1 signaling via autoinhibition of ELMO. PMID:21035343

  13. Power of PTEN/AKT: Molecular switch between tumor suppressors and oncogenes

    PubMed Central

    XIE, YINGQIU; NAIZABEKOV, SANZHAR; CHEN, ZHANLIN; TOKAY, TURSONJAN

    2016-01-01

    An increasing amount of evidence has shown that tumor suppressors can become oncogenes, or vice versa, but the mechanism behind this is unclear. Recent findings have suggested that phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is one of the powerful switches for the conversion between tumor suppressors and oncogenes. PTEN regulates a number of cellular processes, including cell death and proliferation, through the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) pathway. Furthermore, a number of studies have suggested that PTEN deletions may alter various functions of certain tumor suppressor and oncogenic proteins. The aim of the present review was to analyze specific cases driven by PTEN loss/AKT activation, including aberrant signaling pathways and novel drug targets for clinical application in personalized medicine. The findings illustrate how PTEN loss and/or AKT activation switches MDM2-dependent p53 downregulation, and induces conversion between oncogene and tumor suppressor in enhancer of zeste homolog 2, BTB domain-containing 7A, alternative reading frame 2, p27 and breast cancer 1, early onset, through multiple mechanisms. This review highlights the genetic basis of complex drug targets and provides insights into the rationale of precision cancer therapy. PMID:27347153

  14. Sialic Acid-Responsive Polymeric Interface Material: From Molecular Recognition to Macroscopic Property Switching

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Yuting; Jiang, Ge; Li, Minmin; Qing, Guangyan; Li, Xiuling; Liang, Xinmiao; Sun, Taolei

    2017-01-01

    Biological systems that utilize multiple weak non-covalent interactions and hierarchical assemblies to achieve various bio-functions bring much inspiration for the design of artificial biomaterials. However, it remains a big challenge to correlate underlying biomolecule interactions with macroscopic level of materials, for example, recognizing such weak interaction, further transforming it into regulating material’s macroscopic property and contributing to some new bio-applications. Here we designed a novel smart polymer based on polyacrylamide (PAM) grafted with lactose units (PAM-g-lactose0.11), and reported carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction (CCI)-promoted macroscopic properties switching on this smart polymer surface. Detailed investigations indicated that the binding of sialic acid molecules with the grafted lactose units via the CCIs induced conformational transformation of the polymer chains, further resulted in remarkable and reversible switching in surface topography, wettability and stiffness. With these excellent recognition and response capacities towards sialic acid, the PAM-g-lactose0.11 further facilitated good selectivity, strong anti-interference and high adsorption capacity in the capture of sialylated glycopeptides (important biomarkers for cancers). This work provides some enlightenment for the development of biointerface materials with tunable property, as well as high-performance glycopeptide enrichment materials. PMID:28084463

  15. Information recovery in molecular biology: causal modelling of regulated promoter switching experiments.

    PubMed

    Anderssen, Robert S; Helliwell, Christopher A

    2013-07-01

    The recovery of information from indirect measurements takes different forms depending on the sophistication with which the process being researched can be modelled mathematically. The forms range from (1) the historical and classical inverse problems regularization situation where explicit models which guaranteed existence and uniqueness have been formulated, through (2) situations where model formulation is performed implicitly as a calibration-and-prediction ansatz, to (3) the exploratory (biology) situation where the underlying mechanism is unknown and constraining information about its dynamics is being sought through appropriate experimentation. Each represents a different aspect of the solution of inverse problems. It is the nature of the exploratory form that is discussed in this paper. The focus is the causal modelling of regulated promoter switching experiments performed to understand the dynamics of the genetic control of various biological developmental processes such as vernalization in plants; in particular, regulated promoter switching experiments used to examine the relationship between FLC transcription activity and the associated histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation at a vernalization-responsive gene in plants. Using a causal representation with Kohlrausch function fading memory, it is shown how such modelling can be used to quantitatively assess the closeness of the linking of one biological process with another, and, in particular, to conclude that the dynamics of FLC transcription and associated H3K27me3 activity are closely linked biologically.

  16. Voltage-Induced Switching Dynamics of a Coupled Spin Pair in a Molecular Junction.

    PubMed

    Saygun, T; Bylin, J; Hammar, H; Fransson, J

    2016-04-13

    Molecular spintronics is made possible by the coupling between electronic configuration and magnetic polarization of the molecules. For control and application of the individual molecular states, it is necessary to both read and write their spin states. Conventionally, this is achieved by means of external magnetic fields or ferromagnetic contacts, which may change the intentional spin state and may present additional challenges when downsizing devices. Here, we predict that coupling magnetic molecules together opens up possibilities for all electrical control of both the molecular spin states as well as the current flow through the system. By tuning between the regimes of ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic exchange interaction, the current can be at least an order of magnitude enhanced or reduced. The effect is susceptible to the tunnel coupling and molecular level alignment that can be used to achieve current rectification.

  17. Current-induced forces: a new mechanism to induce negative differential resistance and current-switching effect in molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Lei; Fu, Hua-Hua

    2015-12-01

    Current-induced forces can excite molecules, polymers and other low-dimensional materials, which in turn leads to an effective gate voltage through Holstein interaction. Here, by taking a short asymmetric DNA junction as an example, and using the Langevin approach, we find that when suppression of charge transport by the effective gate voltage surpasses the current increase from an elevated voltage bias, the current-voltage (I-V) curves display strong negative differential resistance (NDR) and perfect current-switching characteristics. The asymmetric DNA chain differs in mechanical stability under inverse voltages and the I-V curve is asymmetric about inverse biases, which can be used to understand recent transport experiments on DNA chains, and meanwhile provides a new strategy to realize NDR in molecular junctions and other low-dimensional quantum systems.

  18. Current-induced forces: a new mechanism to induce negative differential resistance and current-switching effect in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Gu, Lei; Fu, Hua-Hua

    2015-12-04

    Current-induced forces can excite molecules, polymers and other low-dimensional materials, which in turn leads to an effective gate voltage through Holstein interaction. Here, by taking a short asymmetric DNA junction as an example, and using the Langevin approach, we find that when suppression of charge transport by the effective gate voltage surpasses the current increase from an elevated voltage bias, the current-voltage (I-V) curves display strong negative differential resistance (NDR) and perfect current-switching characteristics. The asymmetric DNA chain differs in mechanical stability under inverse voltages and the I-V curve is asymmetric about inverse biases, which can be used to understand recent transport experiments on DNA chains, and meanwhile provides a new strategy to realize NDR in molecular junctions and other low-dimensional quantum systems.

  19. Hox and Senseless antagonism functions as a molecular switch to regulate EGF secretion in the Drosophila PNS

    PubMed Central

    Li-Kroeger, David; Witt, Lorraine M.; Grimes, H. Leighton; Cook, Tiffany A.; Gebelein, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Hox factors are key regulators of distinct cells, tissues, and organs along the body plan. However, little is known about how Hox factors regulate cell-specific gene expression to pattern diverse tissues. Here, we show an unexpected Hox transcriptional mechanism: the permissive regulation of EGF secretion, and thereby cell specification, by antagonizing the Senseless transcription factor in the peripheral nervous system. rhomboid expression in a subset of sensory cells stimulates EGF secretion to induce hepatocyte-like cell development. We identified a rhomboid enhancer that is active in these cells and show that an abdominal Hox complex directly competes with Senseless for enhancer binding with the transcriptional outcome dependent upon their relative binding activities. Thus, Hox-Senseless antagonism forms a molecular switch that integrates neural and anteriorposterior positional information. As the vertebrate senseless homologue is essential for neural development as well as hematopoiesis, we propose Hox-Senseless antagonism will broadly control cell fate decisions. PMID:18694568

  20. Light-Induced Spin State Switching and Relaxation in Spin Pairs of Copper(II)-Nitroxide Based Molecular Magnets.

    PubMed

    Tumanov, Sergey V; Veber, Sergey L; Tolstikov, Svyatoslav E; Artiukhova, Natalia A; Romanenko, Galina V; Ovcharenko, Victor I; Fedin, Matvey V

    2017-10-02

    Similar to spin-crossover (SCO) compounds, spin states of copper(II)-nitroxide based molecular magnets can be switched by various external stimuli including temperature and light. Although photoswitching and reverse relaxation of nitroxide-copper(II)-nitroxide triads were investigated in some detail, similar study for copper(II)-nitroxide spin pairs was still missing. In this work we address photoswitching and relaxation phenomena in exchange-coupled spin pairs of this family of molecular magnets. Using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy with photoexcitation, we demonstrate that compared to triad-containing compounds the photoinduced weakly coupled spin (WS) states of copper(II)-nitroxide pairs are remarkably more stable at cryogenic temperatures and relax to the ground strongly coupled spin (SS) states on the scale of days. The structural changes between SS and WS states, e.g., differences in Cu-Onitroxide distances, are much more pronounced for spin pairs than for spin triads in most of the studied copper(II)-nitroxide based molecular magnets. This results in higher energy barrier between WS and SS states of spin pairs and governs higher stability of their photoinduced WS states. Therefore, the longer-lived photoinduced states in copper(II)-nitroxide molecular magnets should be searched within the compounds experiencing largest structural changes upon thermal spin transition. This advancement in understanding of LIESST-like phenomena in copper(II)-nitroxide molecular magnets allows us to propose them as interesting playgrounds for benchmarking the basic factors governing the stability of photoinduced states in other SCO and SCO-like photoswitchable systems.

  1. Expression profiling of budding cells in colorectal cancer reveals an EMT-like phenotype and molecular subtype switching.

    PubMed

    De Smedt, Linde; Palmans, Sofie; Andel, Daan; Govaere, Olivier; Boeckx, Bram; Smeets, Dominiek; Galle, Eva; Wouters, Jasper; Barras, David; Suffiotti, Madeleine; Dekervel, Jeroen; Tousseyn, Thomas; De Hertogh, Gert; Prenen, Hans; Tejpar, Sabine; Lambrechts, Diether; Sagaert, Xavier

    2017-01-03

    Tumour budding, described as the presence of single cells or small clusters of up to five tumour cells at the invasive margin, is established as a prognostic marker in colorectal carcinoma. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the molecular signature of tumour budding cells and the corresponding tumour bulk. Tumour bulk and budding areas were microdissected and processed for RNA-sequencing. As little RNA was obtained from budding cells, a special low-input mRNA library preparation protocol was used. Gene expression profiles of budding as compared with tumour bulk were investigated for established EMT signatures, consensus molecular subtype (CMS), gene set enrichment and pathway analysis. A total of 296 genes were differentially expressed with an FDR <0.05 and a twofold change between tumour bulk and budding regions. Genes that were upregulated in the budding signature were mainly involved in cell migration and survival while downregulated genes were important for cell proliferation. Supervised clustering according to an established EMT gene signature categorised budding regions as EMT-positive, whereas tumour bulk was considered EMT-negative. Furthermore, a shift from CMS2 (epithelial) to CMS4 (mesenchymal) was observed as tumour cells transit from the tumour bulk to the budding regions. Tumour budding regions are characterised by a phenotype switch compared with the tumour bulk, involving the acquisition of migratory characteristics and a decrease in cell proliferation. In particular, most tumour budding signatures were EMT-positive and switched from an epithelial subtype (CMS2) in the tumour bulk to a mesenchymal subtype (CMS4) in budding cells.

  2. Dual origin of defect magnetism in graphene and its reversible switching by molecular doping.

    PubMed

    Nair, R R; Tsai, I-L; Sepioni, M; Lehtinen, O; Keinonen, J; Krasheninnikov, A V; Castro Neto, A H; Katsnelson, M I; Geim, A K; Grigorieva, I V

    2013-01-01

    Control of magnetism by applied voltage is desirable for spintronics applications. Finding a suitable material remains an elusive goal, with only a few candidates found so far. Graphene is one of them and attracts interest because of its weak spin-orbit interaction, the ability to control electronic properties by the electric field effect and the possibility to introduce paramagnetic centres such as vacancies and adatoms. Here we show that the magnetism of adatoms in graphene is itinerant and can be controlled by doping, so that magnetic moments are switched on and off. The much-discussed vacancy magnetism is found to have a dual origin, with two approximately equal contributions; one from itinerant magnetism and the other from dangling bonds. Our work suggests that graphene's spin transport can be controlled by the field effect, similar to its electronic and optical properties, and that spin diffusion can be significantly enhanced above a certain carrier density.

  3. Four- and Sixfold Tandem-Domino Reactions Leading to Dimeric Tetrasubstituted Alkenes Suitable as Molecular Switches.

    PubMed

    Tietze, Lutz F; Waldecker, Bernd; Ganapathy, Dhandapani; Eichhorst, Christoph; Lenzer, Thomas; Oum, Kawon; Reichmann, Sven O; Stalke, Dietmar

    2015-08-24

    A highly efficient palladium-catalyzed fourfold tandem-domino reaction consisting of two carbopalladation and two C-H-activation steps was developed for the synthesis of two types of tetrasubstituted alkenes 3 and 6 with intrinsic helical chirality starting from substrates 1 and 4, respectively. A sixfold tandem-domino reaction was also developed by including a Sonogashira reaction. 20 compounds with different substitution patterns were prepared with yields of up to 97 %. Structure elucidation by X-ray crystallography confirmed helical chirality of the two alkene moieties. Photophysical investigations of some of the compounds showed pronounced switching properties through light-controlled changes of their stereochemical configuration. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Thermal modulation of the monomer/excimer fluorescence for bispyrene molecules through the gel solution transition of an organogel: A thermo-driven molecular fluorescence switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng; Wang, Zhuo; Zhang, Deqing; Zhu, Daoben

    2006-09-01

    Reversible modulation of the monomer/excimer emission was observed for bispyrene molecules 1 and 2 through the solution-gel phase transition (with gelator 3 as the LMWG) and accordingly a thermo-driven molecular fluorescence switch can be established.

  5. Structures of the NLRP14 pyrin domain reveal a conformational switch mechanism regulating its molecular interactions

    PubMed Central

    Eibl, Clarissa; Hessenberger, Manuel; Wenger, Julia; Brandstetter, Hans

    2014-01-01

    The cytosolic tripartite NLR receptors serve as important signalling platforms in innate immunity. While the C-terminal domains act as sensor and activation modules, the N-terminal death-like domain, e.g. the CARD or pyrin domain, is thought to recruit downstream effector molecules by homotypic interactions. Such homotypic complexes have been determined for all members of the death-domain superfamily except for pyrin domains. Here, crystal structures of human NLRP14 pyrin-domain variants are reported. The wild-type protein as well as the clinical D86V mutant reveal an unexpected rearrangement of the C-terminal helix α6, resulting in an extended α5/6 stem-helix. This reordering mediates a novel symmetric pyrin-domain dimerization mode. The conformational switching is controlled by a charge-relay system with a drastic impact on protein stability. How the identified charge relay allows classification of NLRP receptors with respect to distinct recruitment mechanisms is discussed. PMID:25004977

  6. The long noncoding RNA, Jpx, is a molecular switch for X-chromosome inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Di; Sun, Sha; Lee, Jeannie T.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Once protein-coding, the X-inactivation center (Xic) is now dominated by large noncoding RNAs (ncRNA). X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) equalizes gene expression between mammalian males and females by inactivating one X in female cells. XCI requires Xist, a ncRNA that coats the X and recruits Polycomb proteins. How Xist is controlled remains unclear but likely involves negative and positive regulators. For the active X, the antisense Tsix RNA is an established Xist repressor. For the inactive X, here we identify Xic-encoded Jpx as an Xist activator. Jpx is developmentally regulated and accumulates during XCI. Deleting Jpx blocks XCI and is female-lethal. Posttranscriptional Jpx knockdown recapitulates the knockout, while supplying Jpx in trans rescues lethality. Thus, Jpx is trans-acting and functions as ncRNA. Furthermore, ΔJpx is rescued by truncating Tsix, indicating an antagonistic relationship between the ncRNAs. We conclude that Xist is controlled by two RNA-based switches – Tsix for Xa, and Jpx for Xi. PMID:21029862

  7. Structures of the NLRP14 pyrin domain reveal a conformational switch mechanism regulating its molecular interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Eibl, Clarissa; Hessenberger, Manuel; Wenger, Julia; Brandstetter, Hans

    2014-07-01

    Pyrin domains (PYDs) recruit downstream effector molecules in NLR signalling. A specific charge-relay system suggests a the formation of a signalling complex involving a PYD dimer. The cytosolic tripartite NLR receptors serve as important signalling platforms in innate immunity. While the C-terminal domains act as sensor and activation modules, the N-terminal death-like domain, e.g. the CARD or pyrin domain, is thought to recruit downstream effector molecules by homotypic interactions. Such homotypic complexes have been determined for all members of the death-domain superfamily except for pyrin domains. Here, crystal structures of human NLRP14 pyrin-domain variants are reported. The wild-type protein as well as the clinical D86V mutant reveal an unexpected rearrangement of the C-terminal helix α6, resulting in an extended α5/6 stem-helix. This reordering mediates a novel symmetric pyrin-domain dimerization mode. The conformational switching is controlled by a charge-relay system with a drastic impact on protein stability. How the identified charge relay allows classification of NLRP receptors with respect to distinct recruitment mechanisms is discussed.

  8. Ferredoxin molecular thin film with intrinsic switching mechanism for biomemory application.

    PubMed

    Yagati, Ajay Kumar; Kim, Sang-Uk; Min, Junhong; Choi, Jeong-Woo

    2010-05-01

    A biomemory device consisting of cysteine modified ferredoxin molecules which possess a memory effect via a charge transfer mechanism was developed. For achieving an efficient bioelectronic device, cysteine modified ferredoxin was developed by embodying cysteine residues in ferredoxin by site--directed mutagenesis method to directly coordinate with the gold (Au) surface without use of any additional linkers. The thin film formation of ferredoxin molecules on Au electrode is confirmed by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and open circuit potential amperometry (OCPA) methods were used to verify the memory switching characteristics of the fabricated device. The charge transfer between ferredoxin protein molecules and Au electrode enables a bi-stable electrical conductivity allowing the system to be used as a digital memory device. Data storage is achieved by applying redox voltages which are within the range of -500 mV. These results suggest that the proposed device has a function of memory and can be used for the construction of a nano-scale bioelectronic device.

  9. Porphyrinic metal-organic framework as electrochemical probe for DNA sensing via triple-helix molecular switch.

    PubMed

    Ling, Pinghua; Lei, Jianping; Ju, Huangxian

    2015-09-15

    An electrochemical DNA sensor was developed based on the electrocatalysis of porphyrinic metal-organic framework (MOF) and triple-helix molecular switch for signal transduction. The streptavidin functionalized zirconium-porphyrin MOF (PCN-222@SA) was prepared as signal nanoprobe via covalent method and demonstrated high electrocatalysis for O2 reduction. Due to the large steric effect, the designed nanoprobe was blocked for the interaction with the biotin labeled triple-helix immobilized on the surface of glassy carbon electrode. In the presence of target DNA, the assistant DNA in triple-helix will hybridize with target DNA, resulting in the disassembly of triple-helix molecular. Consequently, the end biotin away from the electrode was ''activated'' for easy access to the signal nanoprobe, PCN-222@SA, on the basis of biotin-streptavidin biorecognition. The introduction of signal nanoprobe to a sensor surface led to a significantly amplified electrocatalytic current towards oxygen reduction. Integrating with DNA recycling amplification of Exonuclease III, the sensitivity of the biosensor was improved significantly with detection limit of 0.29 fM. Moreover, the present method has been successfully applied to detect DNA in complex serum matrix. This porphyrinic MOF-based strategy has promising application in the determination of various analytes for signal transduction and has great potential in bioassays.

  10. "Molecular-Activity Painting": Switch-like, Light-Controlled Perturbations inside Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Venkatachalapathy, Muthukumaran; Kamps, Dominic; Weigel, Simone; Kumar, Ravi; Orlich, Michael; Garrecht, Ruben; Hirtz, Michael; Niemeyer, Christof M; Wu, Yao-Wen; Dehmelt, Leif

    2017-03-29

    Acute subcellular protein targeting is a powerful tool to study biological networks. However, signaling at the plasma membrane is highly dynamic, making it difficult to study in space and time. In particular, sustained local control of molecular function is challenging owing to the lateral diffusion of plasma membrane targeted molecules. Herein we present "molecular-activity painting" (MAP), a novel technology which combines photoactivatable chemically induced dimerization (pCID) with immobilized artificial receptors. The immobilization of artificial receptors by surface-immobilized antibodies blocks lateral diffusion, enabling rapid and stable "painting" of signaling molecules and their activity at the plasma membrane with micrometer precision. Using this method, we show that painting of the RhoA-myosin activator GEF-H1 induces patterned acto-myosin contraction inside living cells.

  11. Variations on a molecular switch: transport and sensory signalling by archaeal rhodopsins.

    PubMed

    Spudich, J L

    1998-06-01

    The archaeal rhodopsins are a family of seven-transmembrane-helix, visual pigment-like proteins found in Halobacterium salinarum and related halophilic Archaea. Two, bacteriorhodopsin (BR) and halorhodopsin (HR), are transport rhodopsins that carry out light-driven electrogenic translocation of protons and chloride, respectively, across the cell membrane. The other two, sensory rhodopsins I and II (SRI and SRII), are phototaxis receptors that send signals to tightly bound transducer proteins that in turn control a phosphorylation cascade modulating the cell's flagellar motors. Recent progress has cast light on how nature has modified the common design of these proteins to carry out their distinctly different functions: electrogenic ion transport and non-electrogenic signal transduction. A key shared mechanism between BR and SRII appears to be an interhelical salt bridge locked conformational switch that is released by photoisomerization of retinal. In BR disruption of the lock opens a cytoplasmic half-channel that ensures uptake of the transported proton from the cytoplasmic side of the membrane at a critical time in the pumping cycle. Transducer-free SRI uses the same mechanism to carry out light-driven proton transport, but interaction with its transducer blocks the cytoplasmic half-channel thereby interrupting the transport cycle. In SRI, transducer interaction also disrupts the salt bridge in the dark, poising the receptor in an intermediate conformation able to produce opposite signals depending on the colour of the stimulus light. A model for signalling is proposed in which the salt bridge-controlled half-channel is used to modulate interaction with the Htr proteins when the receptor signalling states are formed.

  12. Redox-responsive molecular switches based on azoterpyridine-bridged Ru/Os complexes.

    PubMed

    Akasaka, Tetsuo; Otsuki, Joe; Araki, Koji

    2002-01-04

    Three new terpyridine-based dinuclear complexes, [(tpy)Ru(azotpy)Ru(tpy)]4+ (tpy = 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine, azotpy = bis[2,6-bis(2-pyridyl)-4-pyridyl]diazene), [(tpy)Os(azotpy)Os(tpy)]4+, and [(tpy)Ru(azotpy)Os(tpy)]4+ were prepared and their electrochemical and photophysical properties investigated. The bridging ligand, azotpy, in these complexes is reduced at less negative potentials than the unsubstituted tpy ligand. These complexes exhibit absorption bands due to the metal-to-ligand charge-transfer transitions both to the unsubstituted tpy ligand and the bridging azotpy ligand, the latter absorption being observed at the lower energy side of the former. These observations are consistent with the lower lying pi* level of the azotpy ligand than that of the tpy ligand. These complexes are nonluminescent, since the excited electron is trapped in this lower lying pi* level of the azotpy ligand in the excited state. Reduction of this bridging ligand by constant potential electrolysis renders the shape of absorption spectra for these complexes nearly identical to those of the parent complexes, [M(tpy)2]2+ (M = Ru, Os). In this reduced state, the homodinuclear Os complex becomes luminescent at room temperature, whereas the homodinuclear Ru complex becomes luminescent at 77 K, thus establishing their photoswitching behavior. The reduced heterodinuclear complex exhibits luminescence from the Os center, which is sensitized by the Ru center in the same molecule as evidenced by the excitation spectra. Thus, the intramolecular energy transfer can be switched on and off by the redox reaction of the bridging component.

  13. A molecular switch based on potential-induced changes of oxidation state.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fan; He, Jin; Nuckolls, Colin; Roberts, Tucker; Klare, Jennifer E; Lindsay, Stuart

    2005-03-01

    We have measured the conductance of a hepta-aniline oligomer attached to gold electrodes held under potential control in electrolyte. It increases fifteen-fold (to 5.3+/-0.4 nS) on oxidation from the leucoemeraldine form to the emeraldine salt. The single-molecule current-voltage characteristic, linear in toluene, displays negative differential resistance in an acidic electrolyte. The negative differential resistance is accounted for by modification of the local surface potential by the applied bias. These results connect electrochemical data directly to molecular electronic behavior in a two-terminal device.

  14. The voltage-gated calcium channel functions as the molecular switch of synaptic transmission.

    PubMed

    Atlas, Daphne

    2013-01-01

    Transmitter release is a fast Ca(2+)-dependent process triggered in response to membrane depolarization. It involves two major calcium-binding proteins, the voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) and the vesicular protein synaptotagmin (syt1). Ca(2+) binding triggers transmitter release with a time response of conformational changes that are too fast to be accounted for by Ca(2+) binding to syt1. In contrast, conformation-triggered release, which engages Ca(2+) binding to VGCC, better accounts for the fast rate of the release process. Here, we summarize findings obtained from heterologous expression systems, neuroendocrine cells, and reconstituted systems, which reveal the molecular mechanism by which Ca(2+) binding to VGCC triggers exocytosis prior to Ca(2+) entry into the cell. This review highlights the molecular aspects of an intramembrane signaling mechanism in which a signal is propagated from the channel transmembrane (TM) domain to the TM domain of syntaxin 1A to trigger transmitter release. It discusses fundamental problems of triggering transmitter release by syt1 and suggests a classification of docked vesicles that might explain synchronous transmitter release, spontaneous release, and facilitation of transmitter release.

  15. Inducible molecular switches for the study of long-term potentiation.

    PubMed

    Hédou, Gaël; Mansuy, Isabelle M

    2003-04-29

    This article reviews technical and conceptual advances in unravelling the molecular bases of long-term potentiation (LTP), learning and memory using genetic approaches. We focus on studies aimed at testing a model suggesting that protein kinases and protein phosphatases balance each other to control synaptic strength and plasticity. We describe how gene 'knock-out' technology was initially exploited to disrupt the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIalpha (CaMKIIalpha) gene and how refined knock-in techniques later allowed an analysis of the role of distinct phosphorylation sites in CaMKII. Further to gene recombination, regulated gene expression using the tetracycline-controlled transactivator and reverse tetracycline-controlled transactivator systems, a powerful new means for modulating the activity of specific molecules, has been applied to CaMKIIalpha and the opposing protein phosphatase calcineurin. Together with electro-physiological and behavioural evaluation of the engineered mutant animals, these genetic methodologies have helped gain insight into the molecular mechanisms of plasticity and memory. Further technical developments are, however, awaited for an even higher level of finesse.

  16. Molecular switches of the κ opioid receptor triggered by 6'-GNTI and 5'-GNTI.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jianxin; Sun, Xianqiang; Li, Weihua; Liu, Guixia; Tu, Yaoquan; Tang, Yun

    2016-01-08

    The κ opioid receptor (κOR) is a member of G-protein-coupled receptors, and is considered as a promising drug target for treating neurological diseases. κOR selective 6'-GNTI was proved to be a G-protein biased agonist, whereas 5'-GNTI acts as an antagonist. To investigate the molecular mechanism of how these two ligands induce different behaviors of the receptor, we built two systems containing the 5'-GNTI-κOR complex and the 6'-GNTI-κOR complex, respectively, and performed molecular dynamics simulations of the two systems. We observe that transmembrane (TM) helix 6 of the κOR rotates about 4.6(o) on average in the κOR-6'-GNTI complex. Detailed analyses of the simulation results indicate that E297(6.58) and I294(6.55) play crucial roles in the rotation of TM6. In the simulation of the κOR-5'-GNTI system, it is revealed that 5'-GNTI can stabilize TM6 in the inactive state form. In addition, the kink of TM7 is stabilized by a hydrogen bond between S324(7.47) and the residue V69(1.42) on TM1.

  17. Photodynamic activation as a molecular switch to promote osteoblast cell differentiation via AP-1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Tu, Yupeng; Abu-Yousif, Adnan O.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2015-01-01

    In photodynamic therapy (PDT), cells are impregnated with a photosensitizing agent that is activated by light irradiation, thereby photochemically generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). The amounts of ROS produced depends on the PDT dose and the nature of the photosensitizer. Although high levels of ROS are cytotoxic, at physiological levels they play a key role as second messengers in cellular signaling pathways, pluripotency, and differentiation of stem cells. To investigate further the use of photochemically triggered manipulation of such pathways, we exposed mouse osteoblast precursor cells and rat primary mesenchymal stromal cells to low-dose PDT. Our results demonstrate that low-dose PDT can promote osteoblast differentiation via the activation of activator protein-1 (AP-1). Although PDT has been used primarily as an anti-cancer therapy, the use of light as a photochemical “molecular switch” to promote differentiation should expand the utility of this method in basic research and clinical applications. PMID:26279470

  18. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor structures: ligand specificity, molecular switch and interactions with regulators.

    PubMed

    Zoete, Vincent; Grosdidier, Aurelien; Michielin, Olivier

    2007-08-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) compose a family of nuclear receptors that mediate the effects of lipidic ligands at the transcriptional level. In this review, we highlight advances in the understanding of the PPAR ligand binding domain (LBD) structure at the atomic level. The overall structure of PPARs LBD is described, and important protein ligand interactions are presented. Structure-activity relationships between isotypes structures and ligand specificity are addressed. It is shown that the numerous experimental three-dimensional structures available, together with in silico simulations, help understanding the role played by the activating function-2 (AF-2) in PPARs activation and its underlying molecular mechanism. The relation between the PPARs constitutive activity and the intrinsic stability of the active conformation is discussed. Finally, the interactions of PPARs LBD with co-activators or co-repressors, as well as with the retinoid X receptor (RXR) are described and considered in relation to PPARs activation.

  19. [Chirality as a primary switch of hierarchical levels in molecular biological systems].

    PubMed

    Tverdislov, V A

    2013-01-01

    A synergetic law, being of common physicochemical and biological sense, is formulated: any evolving system that possesses an excess of free energy and elements with chiral asymmetry, while being within one hierarchical level, is able to change the type of symmetry in the process of self-organization increasing its complexity but preserving the sign of a prevailing chirality (left - L or right - D twist). The same system tends to form spontaneously a sequence of hierarchical levels with alternating chirality signs of de novo formed structures and with an increase of the structures relative scales. In living systems, the hierarchy of conjugated levels of macromolecular structures that begins from the "lowest" asymmetric carbon serves as an anti-entropic factor as well as the structural basis of "selected mechanical degrees of freedom" in molecular machines. During transition of DNA to a higher level of structural and functional organization regular alterations of the chirality sign D-L-D-L and L-D-L-D for DNA and protein structures, respectively, are observed. Sign-alternating chiral hierarchies of DNA and protein structure, in turn, form a complementary conjugated chiral pair that represents an achiral invariant, that "consummates" the molecular-biological block of living systems. The ability of a carbon atom to form choral compounds is an important factor that determined carbon basis of living systems on the Earth as well as their development though a series of chiral bifurcations. The hierarchy of macromolecular structures demarcated by the chirality sign predetermined the possibility of the "block" character of biological evolution.

  20. Plasma membranes as heat stress sensors: from lipid-controlled molecular switches to therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Török, Zsolt; Crul, Tim; Maresca, Bruno; Schütz, Gerhard J; Viana, Felix; Dindia, Laura; Piotto, Stefano; Brameshuber, Mario; Balogh, Gábor; Péter, Mária; Porta, Amalia; Trapani, Alfonso; Gombos, Imre; Glatz, Attila; Gungor, Burcin; Peksel, Begüm; Vigh, László; Csoboz, Bálint; Horváth, Ibolya; Vijayan, Mathilakath M; Hooper, Phillip L; Harwood, John L; Vigh, László

    2014-06-01

    The classic heat shock (stress) response (HSR) was originally attributed to protein denaturation. However, heat shock protein (Hsp) induction occurs in many circumstances where no protein denaturation is observed. Recently considerable evidence has been accumulated to the favor of the "Membrane Sensor Hypothesis" which predicts that the level of Hsps can be changed as a result of alterations to the plasma membrane. This is especially pertinent to mild heat shock, such as occurs in fever. In this condition the sensitivity of many transient receptor potential (TRP) channels is particularly notable. Small temperature stresses can modulate TRP gating significantly and this is influenced by lipids. In addition, stress hormones often modify plasma membrane structure and function and thus initiate a cascade of events, which may affect HSR. The major transactivator heat shock factor-1 integrates the signals originating from the plasma membrane and orchestrates the expression of individual heat shock genes. We describe how these observations can be tested at the molecular level, for example, with the use of membrane perturbers and through computational calculations. An important fact which now starts to be addressed is that membranes are not homogeneous nor do all cells react identically. Lipidomics and cell profiling are beginning to address the above two points. Finally, we observe that a deregulated HSR is found in a large number of important diseases where more detailed knowledge of the molecular mechanisms involved may offer timely opportunities for clinical interventions and new, innovative drug treatments. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Structure and Function: Relevance in the Cell's Physiology, Pathology and Therapy. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular mechanism of R-bicalutamide switching from androgen receptor antagonist to agonist induced by amino acid mutations using molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongli; Han, Rui; Li, Jiazhong; Liu, Huanxiang; Zheng, Lifang

    2016-12-01

    R-bicalutamide, a first generation antiandrogen, was used to treat prostate cancer for decades. Although it is very effective at the beginning, resistance appears after 2-3 years of treatment. Mutation of androgen receptor (AR) is considered a main reason for drug resistance. It is reported that AR W741C, W741L, W741C_T877A, T877A, F876L, F876L_T877A and L701H mutations can convert R-bicalutamide from AR antagonist to agonist, but the switching mechanisms are not clear. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations and molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA) calculations were performed to analyze the interaction mechanisms between R-bicalutamide and wild type/mutant ARs. The results indicate that helix H12, which lies on the top of AR LBD like a cover, plays a vital role in R-bicalutamide binding. When interacting with AR, the B-ring of R-bicalutamide pushes H12 aside, distorting the coactivator binding site (AF2) resulting in the inactivation of transcription. Several residue mutations appear to enlarge the distance between the B-ring of R-bicalutamide and H12, reducing steric clash, which is conducive to a closed H12 conformation, leading to the formation of the coactivator binding site AF2 and increased transcription. Hydrogen bond and per-residue free energy decomposition analyses are also investigated to explore the interacting mechanisms, and M895 is found to be a key residue in the antagonist mechanism. The obtained molecular mechanisms will aid rational screening and design of novel AR antagonists, even to mutant AR.

  2. Molecular mechanism of R-bicalutamide switching from androgen receptor antagonist to agonist induced by amino acid mutations using molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongli; Han, Rui; Li, Jiazhong; Liu, Huanxiang; Zheng, Lifang

    2016-12-01

    R-bicalutamide, a first generation antiandrogen, was used to treat prostate cancer for decades. Although it is very effective at the beginning, resistance appears after 2-3 years of treatment. Mutation of androgen receptor (AR) is considered a main reason for drug resistance. It is reported that AR W741C, W741L, W741C_T877A, T877A, F876L, F876L_T877A and L701H mutations can convert R-bicalutamide from AR antagonist to agonist, but the switching mechanisms are not clear. In this study, molecular dynamics simulations and molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA) calculations were performed to analyze the interaction mechanisms between R-bicalutamide and wild type/mutant ARs. The results indicate that helix H12, which lies on the top of AR LBD like a cover, plays a vital role in R-bicalutamide binding. When interacting with AR, the B-ring of R-bicalutamide pushes H12 aside, distorting the coactivator binding site (AF2) resulting in the inactivation of transcription. Several residue mutations appear to enlarge the distance between the B-ring of R-bicalutamide and H12, reducing steric clash, which is conducive to a closed H12 conformation, leading to the formation of the coactivator binding site AF2 and increased transcription. Hydrogen bond and per-residue free energy decomposition analyses are also investigated to explore the interacting mechanisms, and M895 is found to be a key residue in the antagonist mechanism. The obtained molecular mechanisms will aid rational screening and design of novel AR antagonists, even to mutant AR.

  3. FcRL4 acts as an adaptive to innate molecular switch dampening BCR signaling and enhancing TLR signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Hae Won; Krueger, Peter D.; Davis, Randall S.

    2011-01-01

    Fc receptor–like 4 (FcRL4) is expressed on the surface of a subset of memory B cells (MBCs) located at sites of invading pathogens in mucosal lymphoid tissues in healthy individuals. Recently, FcRL4+ MBCs were shown to be greatly increased in number in the peripheral blood of HIV-infected viremic individuals, in whom they are associated with B-cell exhaustion, and in individuals chronically reinfected with malaria. In the present study, we provide evidence that the expression of FcRL4 in human B-cell lines disrupts immune synapse formation and blocks antigen-induced BCR signaling at the point of Syk phosphorylation, blocking downstream activation of PLC-γ2 and Vav and the induction of calcium responses and CD69 expression. FcRL4 functions by ligation-independent mechanisms that require the 3 tyrosine residues in its cytoplasmic domain and involves its phosphorylation and association with the tyrosine phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2. Remarkably, FcRL4 is concentrated in endosomes after treatment with the TLR9 agonist CpG and enhances signaling through TLR9, as measured by increased expression of CD23. These findings suggest that FcRL4 may act as a molecular switch in B cells to dampen adaptive immune signaling and enhance innate signaling in response to chronic antigenic stimulation. PMID:21908428

  4. The poly dA helix: a new structural motif for high performance DNA-based molecular switches

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Saikat; Sharma, Suruchi; Maiti, Prabal K.; Krishnan, Yamuna

    2009-01-01

    We report a pH-dependent conformational transition in short, defined homopolymeric deoxyadenosines (dA15) from a single helical structure with stacked nucleobases at neutral pH to a double-helical, parallel-stranded duplex held together by AH+-H+A base pairs at acidic pH. Using native PAGE, 2D NMR, circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopy, we have characterized the two different pH dependent forms of dA15. The pH-triggered transition between the two defined helical forms of dA15 is characterized by CD and fluorescence. The kinetics of this conformational switch is found to occur on a millisecond time scale. This robust, highly reversible, pH-induced transition between the two well-defined structured states of dA15 represents a new molecular building block for the construction of quick-response, pH-switchable architectures in structural DNA nanotechnology. PMID:19279188

  5. A Molecular Switch Abrogates Glycoprotein 100 (gp100) T-cell Receptor (TCR) Targeting of a Human Melanoma Antigen*

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Valentina; Bulek, Anna; Fuller, Anna; Lloyd, Angharad; Attaf, Meriem; Rizkallah, Pierre J.; Dolton, Garry; Sewell, Andrew K.; Cole, David K.

    2016-01-01

    Human CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes can mediate tumor regression in melanoma through the specific recognition of HLA-restricted peptides. Because of the relatively weak affinity of most anti-cancer T-cell receptors (TCRs), there is growing emphasis on immunizing melanoma patients with altered peptide ligands in order to induce strong anti-tumor immunity capable of breaking tolerance toward these self-antigens. However, previous studies have shown that these immunogenic designer peptides are not always effective. The melanocyte differentiation protein, glycoprotein 100 (gp100), encodes a naturally processed epitope that is an attractive target for melanoma immunotherapies, in particular peptide-based vaccines. Previous studies have shown that substitutions at peptide residue Glu3 have a broad negative impact on polyclonal T-cell responses. Here, we describe the first atomic structure of a natural cognate TCR in complex with this gp100 epitope and highlight the relatively high affinity of the interaction. Alanine scan mutagenesis performed across the gp100280–288 peptide showed that Glu3 was critically important for TCR binding. Unexpectedly, structural analysis demonstrated that the Glu3 → Ala substitution resulted in a molecular switch that was transmitted to adjacent residues, abrogating TCR binding and T-cell recognition. These findings help to clarify the mechanism of T-cell recognition of gp100 during melanoma responses and could direct the development of altered peptides for vaccination. PMID:26917722

  6. Molecular switching fluorescence based high sensitive detection of label-free C-reactive protein on biochip.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Shahinul; Yu, Hyunung; Lee, Hee Gu; Kang, Seong Ho

    2010-11-15

    A novel detection technique on biochip for the quantification of label-free C-reactive protein (CRP) based on molecular switching of fluorescence (MSF) is demonstrated by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. It alters fluorescence intensity of fluoreseinamine isomer 1 (FAI) upon binding with its specific ligand, O-phosphorylethanolamine (PEA). In the MSF-based detection, FAI was used as an ink, printed on a 3-glycidoxypropyl-trimethoxysilane (GPTS)-coated glass coverslip. With the addition of GPTS conjugated PEA solution to the FAI-printed coverslip, the fluorescence intensity was remarkably decreased. Addition of CRP increased fluorescence intensity linearly in the range of 800 aM to 500 fM (R=0.997). The MSF-based biochip assay for the estimation of CRP in human sera showed ∼200 times increased detection sensitivity in less than a third of the time to obtain results using a conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. This biochip detection is a promising new technique for the quantification of CRP molecules from trace amounts of clinical samples.

  7. A sensitive and versatile "signal-on" electrochemical aptasensor based on a triple-helix molecular switch.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuzhong; Jiang, Aiwen; Hou, Ting; Li, Feng

    2014-12-07

    In the present study, a versatile "signal-on" electrochemical aptasensor based on a triple-helix molecular switch has been developed. An aptamer probe is designed to hybridize with the methylene blue (MB)-modified DNA capture probe immobilized on the gold electrode to form rigid triple-helix DNA, impeding the efficient electron transfer of MB to the electrode and resulting in the decreased oxidation peak current of MB. However, upon introduction of the perfectly matched target, for example, human α-thrombin (Tmb), the interaction between Tmb and the aptamer probe leads to the dissociation of the triple-helix DNA structure and thereby liberates the MB-modified end of the capture probe, allowing the MB to collide with the electrode surface and resulting in an increase of the oxidation peak currents of MB. Therefore, the sensitive signal-on detection of Tmb is realized, and the detection limit of Tmb is 0.12 nM. The proposed approach also demonstrates excellent regenerability, reproducibility and stability. Additionally, it also has the advantages of simplicity in design and easy operation. The success in the present biosensor provides a promising alternative to the electrochemical detection of a variety of analytes and may have potential applications in point-of-care testing and clinical diagnosis.

  8. Molecular Switch Controlling the Binding of Anionic Bile Acid Conjugates to Human Apical Sodium-dependent Bile Acid Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Rais, Rana; Acharya, Chayan; Tririya, Gasirat; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Polli, James E.

    2010-01-01

    The human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (hASBT) may serve as a prodrug target for oral drug absorption. Synthetic, biological, NMR and computational approaches identified the structure-activity relationships of mono- and dianionic bile acid conjugates for hASBT binding. Experimental data combined with a conformationally-sampled pharmacophore/QSAR modeling approach (CSP-SAR) predicted that dianionic substituents with intramolecular hydrogen bonding between hydroxyls on the cholane skeleton and the acid group on the conjugate's aromatic ring increased conjugate hydrophobicity and improved binding affinity. Notably, the model predicted the presence of a conformational molecular switch, where shifting the carboxylate substituent on an aromatic ring by a single position controlled binding affinity. Model validation was performed by effectively shifting the spatial location of the carboxylate by inserting a methylene adjacent to the aromatic ring, resulting in the predicted alteration in binding affinity. This work illustrates conformation as a determinant of ligand binding affinity to a biological transporter. PMID:20504026

  9. Conducting-polymer electrochemical switching as an easy means for control of the molecular properties of grafted transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Mangeney, C; Lacroix, J C; Chane-Ching, K I; Jouini, M; Villain, F; Ammar, S; Jouini, N; Lacaze, P C

    2001-12-03

    Copper(II) 3',4'-bis(N,N'-oxamato)terthiophene has been synthesized and electropolymerized. The copper(II)-complex centers are not affected by the polymerization process, which involves coupling between Calpha carbon atoms of the terthiophene units and leads to a new conjugated polymer consisting of polythiophene chains bearing bis(oxamato)-Cu(II) groups regioregularly grafted onto the polymer backbone. The polymer is stable with respect to polythiophene electroactivity, and no demetallation or modification of the Cu oxidation state occurs over a large potential range. In this material, the two moieties exhibit direct electronic interaction, which makes it possible to use the conductive polymer backbone as a molecular wire or a nanocontact capable of inputting to the bis(oxamato)-Cu(II) groups through the polythiophene-switching reaction. FTIR, XPS, and XAS spectroscopies have been used to study the effect of the state of the conducting polymer upon the properties of the copper(II) center (electron density, ligand field strength, size of cavity, force constants of some bonds). These properties can be controlled to some extent by the potential applied to this device. From the point of view of the copper(II) center, this effect is similar to the grafting of substituents with various electronic properties.

  10. Multi-ion detection and molecular switching behaviour of reversible dual fluorescent sensor.

    PubMed

    Basheer, Sabeel M; Muralisankar, M; Anjana, T V; Aneesrahman, K N; Sreekanth, Anandaram

    2017-07-05

    The selective chemosensing behaviour of imidazole bisthiocarbohydrazone (IBTC) towards F(-) and Cu(2+) are studied via colorimetric, UV-Visible, fluorescence spectra studies, and binding constants were calculated. The (1)H NMR titration study strongly support that the deprotonation of IBTC followed by the hydrogen bond formation via N1H1 and N2H2 protons with fluoride ion. The fluorescence inactive IBTC-Cu complex became fluorescence active in the presence of perchlorate (ClO4(-)) ion. The selective detection of perchlorate ion was also explained. The F(-) sensing mechanism of IBTC has been investigated by Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) methods. The theoretical outcomes well reproduce the experimental results. And it concluded the NH protons, nearby the imine group was first captured by the added F(-) ion and then deprotonation happened followed by the formation of hydrogen bond. The IBTC found good reversibility character with the alternative addition of Ca(2+) and F(-). The multi-ion detection of IBTC was used to construct the NOR, OR and INHIBITION molecular logic gates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. "Molecular Switches" on mGluR Allosteric Ligands That Modulate Modes of Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Michael R.; Hopkins, Corey R.; Brogan, John T.; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig W.

    2013-01-01

    G-Protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the largest class of drug targets, accounting for more than 40% of marketed drugs; however, discovery efforts for many GPCRs have failed to provide viable drug candidates. Historically, drug discovery efforts have focused on developing ligands that act at the orthosteric site of the endogenous agonist. Recently, efforts have focused on functional assay paradigms and the discovery of ligands that act at allosteric sites to modulate receptor function in either a positive, negative, or neutral manner. Allosteric modulators have numerous advantages over orthosteric ligands, including high subtype selectivity; the ability to mimic physiological conditions; the lack of densensitization, downregulation, and internalization; and reduced side effects. Despite these virtues, challenging issues have now arisen for allosteric modulators of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs): shallow SAR, ligand-directed trafficking, and the identification of subtle “molecular switches” that modulate the modes of pharmacology. Here, we will discuss the impact of modest structural changes to multiple mGluR allosteric ligands scaffolds that unexpectedly modulate pharmacology and raise concerns over metabolism and the pharmacology of metabolites. PMID:21341760

  12. Multi-ion detection and molecular switching behaviour of reversible dual fluorescent sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basheer, Sabeel M.; Muralisankar, M.; Anjana, T. V.; Aneesrahman, K. N.; Sreekanth, Anandaram

    2017-07-01

    The selective chemosensing behaviour of imidazole bisthiocarbohydrazone (IBTC) towards F- and Cu2 + are studied via colorimetric, UV-Visible, fluorescence spectra studies, and binding constants were calculated. The 1H NMR titration study strongly support that the deprotonation of IBTC followed by the hydrogen bond formation via N1sbnd H1 and N2sbnd H2 protons with fluoride ion. The fluorescence inactive IBTC-Cu complex became fluorescence active in the presence of perchlorate (ClO4-) ion. The selective detection of perchlorate ion was also explained. The F- sensing mechanism of IBTC has been investigated by Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) methods. The theoretical outcomes well reproduce the experimental results. And it concluded the Nsbnd H protons, nearby the imine group was first captured by the added F- ion and then deprotonation happened followed by the formation of hydrogen bond. The IBTC found good reversibility character with the alternative addition of Ca2 + and F-. The multi-ion detection of IBTC was used to construct the NOR, OR and INHIBITION molecular logic gates.

  13. A metal–ion-responsive adhesive material via switching of molecular recognition properties

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Takashi; Takashima, Yoshinori; Hashidzume, Akihito; Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Harada, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Common adhesives stick to a wide range of materials immediately after they are applied to the surfaces. To prevent indiscriminate sticking, smart adhesive materials that adhere to a specific target surface only under particular conditions are desired. Here we report a polymer hydrogel modified with both β-cyclodextrin (βCD) and 2,2′-bipyridyl (bpy) moieties (βCD–bpy gel) as a functional adhesive material responding to metal ions as chemical stimuli. The adhesive property of βCD–bpy gel based on interfacial molecular recognition is expressed by complexation of metal ions to bpy that controlled dissociation of supramolecular cross-linking of βCD–bpy. Moreover, adhesion of βCD–bpy gel exhibits selectivity on the kinds of metal ions, depending on the efficiency of metal–bpy complexes in cross-linking. Transduction of two independent chemical signals (metal ions and host–guest interactions) is achieved in this adhesion system, which leads to the development of highly orthogonal macroscopic joining of multiple objects. PMID:25099995

  14. TOC1 functions as a molecular switch connecting the circadian clock with plant responses to drought

    PubMed Central

    Legnaioli, Tommaso; Cuevas, Juan; Mas, Paloma

    2009-01-01

    Despite our increasing knowledge on the transcriptional networks connecting abscisic acid (ABA) signalling with the circadian clock, the molecular nodes in which both pathways converge to translate the environmental information into a physiological response are not known. Here, we provide evidence of a feedback mechanism linking the circadian clock with plant responses to drought. A key clock component (TOC1, timing of CAB expression 1) binds to the promoter of the ABA-related gene (ABAR/CHLH/GUN5) and controls its circadian expression. TOC1 is in turn acutely induced by ABA and this induction advances the phase of TOC1 binding and modulates ABAR circadian expression. Moreover, the gated induction of TOC1 by ABA is abolished in ABAR RNAi plants suggesting that the reciprocal regulation between ABAR and TOC1 expression is important for sensitized ABA activity. Genetic studies with TOC1 and ABAR over-expressing and RNAi plants showed defective responses to drought, which support the notion that clock-dependent gating of ABA function is important for cellular homeostasis under dry environments. PMID:19816401

  15. The molecular circuitry regulating the switch between iron deficiency and overload in mice.

    PubMed

    Mok, Henry; Mlodnicka, Agnieszka E; Hentze, Matthias W; Muckenthaler, Martina; Schumacher, Armin

    2006-03-24

    Recent positional cloning of the radiation-induced polycythaemia (Pcm) mutation revealed a 58-bp microdeletion in the promoter region of ferroportin 1 (Fpn1), the sole cellular iron exporter identified to date. Here we report a molecular definition of the regulatory mechanisms governing the dynamic changes in iron balance in Pcm heterozygous mice between 3 and 12 weeks of age. Hepatic and/or duodenal response patterns of iron metabolism genes, such as Trfr, cybrd1, and Slc11a2, explained the transition from early postnatal iron deficiency to iron overload by 12 weeks of age. A significant delay in developmental up-regulation of hepcidin (Hamp), the pivotal hormonal regulator of iron homeostasis, correlated with high levels of Fpn1 expression in hepatic Kupffer cells and duodenal epithelial cells at 7 weeks of age. Conversely, upon up-regulation of Hamp expression at 12 weeks of age, Fpn1 expression decreased, indicative of a Hamp-mediated homeostatic loop. Hamp regulation due to iron did not appear dependent on transcription-level changes of the murine homolog of Hemojuvelin (Rgmc). Aged cohorts of Pcm mice exhibited low levels of Fpn1 expression in the context of an iron-deficient erythropoiesis and profound iron sequestration in reticuloendothelial macrophages, duodenum, and other tissues. Thus, similar to the anemia of chronic disease, these findings demonstrate decreased iron bioavailability due to sustained down-regulation of Fpn1 levels by Hamp. We conclude that regulatory alleles, such as Pcm, with highly dynamic changes in iron balance are ideally suited to interrogate the genetic circuitry regulating iron metabolism.

  16. Activation of coherent lattice phonon following ultrafast molecular spin-state photo-switching: A molecule-to-lattice energy transfer

    PubMed Central

    Marino, A.; Cammarata, M.; Matar, S. F.; Létard, J.-F.; Chastanet, G.; Chollet, M.; Glownia, J. M.; Lemke, H. T.; Collet, E.

    2015-01-01

    We combine ultrafast optical spectroscopy with femtosecond X-ray absorption to study the photo-switching dynamics of the [Fe(PM-AzA)2(NCS)2] spin-crossover molecular solid. The light-induced excited spin-state trapping process switches the molecules from low spin to high spin (HS) states on the sub-picosecond timescale. The change of the electronic state (<50 fs) induces a structural reorganization of the molecule within 160 fs. This transformation is accompanied by coherent molecular vibrations in the HS potential and especially a rapidly damped Fe-ligand breathing mode. The time-resolved studies evidence a delayed activation of coherent optical phonons of the lattice surrounding the photoexcited molecules. PMID:26798836

  17. Modification of Fluorescent Photoinduced Electron Transfer (PET) Sensors/Switches To Produce Molecular Photo-Ionic Triode Action**

    PubMed Central

    Huxley, Allen J M; Schroeder, Marc; Nimal Gunaratne, H Q; Prasanna de Silva, A

    2014-01-01

    The fluorophore-spacer1-receptor1-spacer2-receptor2 system (where receptor2 alone is photoredox-inactive) shows ionically tunable proton-induced fluorescence off-on switching, which is reminiscent of thermionic triode behavior. This also represents a new extension to modular switch systems based on photoinduced electron transfer (PET) towards the emulation of analogue electronic devices. PMID:24574178

  18. A Multistate Molecular Switch Based on the 6,8-Rearrangement in Bromo-apigeninidin Operated with pH and Host-Guest Inputs.

    PubMed

    Basílio, Nuno; Cruz, Luís; de Freitas, Victor; Pina, Fernando

    2016-07-28

    The equilibrium between 6- and 8-bromo-apigeninidin is quantitatively displaced toward the formation of the former in the presence of cucurbit[7]uril because of the selective recognition of the 6-bromo isomer by the host. This phenomenon permits us to conceive a unidirectional multistate switch addressed with host-guest inputs and enables the reversible activation and deactivation of the 6-/8-bromo-apigeninidin dynamic molecular multistate through coupled host-guest and pH inputs.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulation reveals conformational switching of water-mediated uracil-cytosine base-pairs in an RNA duplex.

    PubMed

    Schneider, C; Brandl, M; Sühnel, J

    2001-01-26

    A 4 ns molecular dynamics simulation of an RNA duplex (r-GGACUUCGGUCC)(2 )in solution with Na+ and Cl- as counterions was performed. The X-ray structure of this duplex includes two water-mediated uracil-cytosine pairs. In contrast to the other base-pairs in the duplex the water-mediated pairs switch between different conformations. One conformation corresponds to the geometry of the water-mediated UC pairs in the duplex X-ray structure with water acting both as hydrogen-bond donor and acceptor. Another conformation is close to that of a water-mediated UC base-pair found in the X-ray structure of the 23 S rRNA sarcin/ricin domain. In this case the oxygen of the water molecule is linked to two-base donor sites. For a very short time also a direct UC base-pair and a further conformation that is similar to the one found in the RNA duplex structure but exhibits an increased H3(U)...N3(C) distance is observed. Water molecules with unusually long residence times are involved in the water-mediated conformations. These results indicate that the dynamic behaviour of the water-mediated UC base-pairs differs from that of the duplex Watson-Crick and non-canonical guanine-uracil pairs with two or three direct hydrogen bonds. The conformational variability and increased flexibility has to be taken into account when considering these base-pairs as RNA building blocks and as recognition motifs. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  20. Molecular Orbital Rule for Quantum Interference in Weakly Coupled Dimers: Low-Energy Giant Conductivity Switching Induced by Orbital Level Crossing.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Daijiro; Lücke, Andreas; Schmidt, Wolf Gero

    2017-02-16

    Destructive quantum interference (QI) in molecular junctions has attracted much attention in recent years. It can tune the conductance of molecular devices dramatically, which implies numerous potential applications in thermoelectric and switching applications. There are several schemes that address and rationalize QI in single molecular devices. Dimers play a particular role in this respect because the QI signal may disappear, depending on the dislocation of monomers. We derive a simple rule that governs the occurrence of QI in weakly coupled dimer stacks of both alternant and nonalternant polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and extends the Tada-Yoshizawa scheme. Starting from the Green's function formalism combined with the molecular orbital expansion approach, it is shown that QI-induced antiresonances and their energies can be predicted from the amplitudes of the respective monomer terminal molecular orbitals. The condition is illustrated for a toy model consisting of two hydrogen molecules and applied within density functional calculations to alternant dimers of oligo(phenylene-ethynylene) and nonalternant PAHs. Minimal dimer structure modifications that require only a few millielectronvolts and lead to an energy crossing of the essentially preserved monomer orbitals are shown to result in giant conductance switching ratios.

  1. High-field EPR spectroscopy applied to biological systems: characterization of molecular switches for electron and ion transfer.

    PubMed

    Möbius, K; Savitsky, A; Schnegg, A; Plato, M; Fuchst, M

    2005-01-07

    The last decade witnessed a tremendous growth in combined efforts of biologists, chemists and physicists to understand the dominant factors determining the specificity and directionality of transmembrane transfer processes in proteins. A large variety of experimental techniques is being used including X-ray and neutron diffraction, but also time-resolved optical, infrared and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. This is done in conjunction with genetic engineering strategies to construct site-specific mutants for controlled modification of the proteins. As a general perception of these efforts, the substantial influence of weak interactions within the protein and its membrane interfaces is recognized. The weak interactions are subject to subtle changes during the reaction cycle owing to the inherent flexibility of the protein-membrane complex. Specific conformational changes accomplish molecular-switch functions for the transfer process to proceed with optimum efficiency. Characteristic examples of time varying non-bonded interactions are specific H-patterns and/or polarity effects of the microenvironment. The present perception has emerged from the coupling of newly developed spectroscopic techniques - and advanced EPR certainly deserves credit in this respect - with newly developed computational strategies to interpret the experimental data in terms of protein structure and dynamics. By now, the partners of this coupling, particularly high-field EPR spectroscopy and DFT-based quantum theory, have reached a level of sophistication that applications to large biocomplexes are within reach. In this review, a few large paradigm biosystems are surveyed which were explored lately in our laboratory. Taking advantage of the improved spectral and temporal resolution of high-frequency/high-field EPR at 95 GHz/3.4 T and 360 GHz/12.9 T, as compared to conventional X-band EPR (9.5 GHz/0.34 T), three biosystems are characterized with respect to structure and dynamics: (1) Light

  2. Opiate exposure and withdrawal induces a molecular memory switch in the basolateral amygdala between ERK1/2 and CaMKIIα-dependent signaling substrates.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Danika; de Jaeger, Xavier; Rosen, Laura G; Ahmad, Tasha; Lauzon, Nicole M; Zunder, Jordan; Coolen, Lique M; Rushlow, Walter; Laviolette, Steven R

    2013-09-11

    Opiate reward memories are powerful triggers for compulsive opiate-seeking behaviors. The basolateral amygdala (BLA) is an important structure for the processing of opiate-related associative memories and is functionally linked to the mesolimbic dopamine (DA) pathway. Transmission through intra-BLA DA D1-like and D2-like receptors independently modulates the formation of opiate reward memories as a function of opiate-exposure state. Thus, in the opiate-naive state, intra-BLA D1 transmission is required for opiate-related memory formation. Once opiate dependence and withdrawal has developed, a functional switch to a DA D2-mediated memory mechanism takes place. However, the downstream molecular signaling events that control this functional switch between intra-BLA DA D1 versus D2 receptor transmission are not currently understood. Using an unbiased place conditioning procedure in rats combined with molecular analyses, we report that opiate reward memory acquisition requires intra-BLA ERK1/2 signaling only in the previously opiate-naive state. However, following chronic opiate exposure and withdrawal, intra-BLA reward memory processing switches to a CaMKIIα-dependent memory substrate. Furthermore, the ability of intra-BLA DA D1 or D2 receptor transmission to modulate the motivational salience of opiates similarly operates through a D1-mediated ERK-dependent mechanism in the opiate-naive state, but switches to a D2-mediated CaMKIIα-dependent mechanism in the dependent/withdrawn state. Protein analysis of BLA tissue revealed a downregulation of ERK1/2 phosphorylation and a dramatic reduction in both total and phosphorylated CaMKIIα signaling, specifically in the opiate-dependent/withdrawn state, demonstrating functional control of ERK1/2-dependent versus CaMKIIα-dependent memory mechanisms within the BLA, controlled by opiate-exposure state.

  3. Effects of molecular chirality on self-assembly and switching in liquid crystals at the cross-over between rod-like and bent shapes.

    PubMed

    Ocak, Hale; Poppe, Marco; Bilgin-Eran, Belkız; Karanlık, Gürkan; Prehm, Marko; Tschierske, Carsten

    2016-09-21

    A bent-core compound derived from a 4-cyanoresorcinol core unit with two terephthalate based rod-like wings and carrying chiral 3,7-dimethyloctyloxy side chains has been synthesized in racemic and enantiomerically pure form and characterized by polarizing microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and electro-optical investigations to study the influence of molecular chirality on the superstructural chirality and polar order in lamellar liquid crystalline phases. Herein we demonstrate that the coupling of molecular chirality with superstructural layer chirality in SmCsPF domain phases (forming energetically distinct diastereomeric pairs) can fix the tilt direction and thus stabilize synpolar order, leading to bistable ferroelectric switching in the SmC* phases of the (S)-enantiomer, whereas tristable modes determine the switching of the racemate. Moreover, the mechanism of electric field induced molecular reorganization changes from a rotation around the molecular long axis in the racemate to a rotation on the tilt-cone for the (S)-enantiomer. At high temperature the enantiomer behaves like a rod-like molecule with a chirality induced ferroelectric SmC* phase and an electroclinic effect in the SmA'* phase. At reduced temperature sterically induced polarization, due to the bent molecular shape, becomes dominating, leading to much higher polarization values, thus providing access to high polarization ferroelectric materials with weakly bent compounds having only "weakly chiral" stereogenic units. Moreover, the field induced alignment of the SmCsPF(()*()) domains gives rise to a special kind of electroclinic effect appearing even in the absence of molecular chirality. Comparison with related compounds indicates that the strongest effects of chirality appear for weakly bent molecules with a relatively short coherence length of polar order, whereas for smectic phases with long range polar order the effects of the interlayer interfaces can override

  4. Two conformational states in the crystal structure of the Homo sapiens cytoplasmic ribosomal decoding A site.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Jiro; Urzhumtsev, Alexandre; Westhof, Eric

    2006-01-01

    The decoding A site of the small ribosomal subunit is an RNA molecular switch, which monitors codon-anticodon interactions to guarantee translation fidelity. We have solved the crystal structure of an RNA fragment containing two Homo sapiens cytoplasmic A sites. Each of the two A sites presents a different conformational state. In one state, adenines A1492 and A1493 are fully bulged-out with C1409 forming a wobble-like pair to A1491. In the second state, adenines A1492 and A1493 form non-Watson-Crick pairs with C1409 and G1408, respectively while A1491 bulges out. The first state of the eukaryotic A site is, thus, basically the same as in the bacterial A site with bulging A1492 and A1493. It is the state used for recognition of the codon/anticodon complex. On the contrary, the second state of the H.sapiens cytoplasmic A site is drastically different from any of those observed for the bacterial A site without bulging A1492 and A1493.

  5. ADP-ribosylation factor arf6p may function as a molecular switch of new end take off in fission yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Atsushi

    2008-02-01

    Small GTPases act as molecular switches in a wide variety of cellular processes. In fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the directions of cell growth change from a monopolar manner to a bipolar manner, which is known as 'New End Take Off' (NETO). Here I report the identification of a gene, arf6{sup +}, encoding an ADP-ribosylation factor small GTPase, that may be essential for NETO. arf6{delta} cells completely fail to undergo NETO. arf6p localizes at both cell ends and presumptive septa in a cell-cycle dependent manner. And its polarized localization is not dependent on microtubules, actin cytoskeletons and some NETO factors (bud6p, for3p, tea1p, tea3p, and tea4p). Notably, overexpression of a fast GDP/GTP-cycling mutant of arf6p can advance the timing of NETO. These findings suggest that arf6p functions as a molecular switch for the activation of NETO in fission yeast.

  6. Designs for the self-assembly of open and closed macromolecular structures and a molecular switch using DNA methyltransferases to order proteins on nucleic acid scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Steven S.

    2002-06-01

    The methyltransferase-directed addressing of fusion proteins to DNA scaffolds offers an approach to the construction of protein/nucleic acid biostructures with potential in a variety of applications. The technology is currently only limited by the yield of high occupancy structures. However, current evidence shows that DNA scaffolds that contain three or four targeted proteins can be reliably constructed. This permits a variety of macromolecular designs, several of which are given in this paper. Designs for open and closed two-dimensional and three-dimensional assemblies and a design for a molecular switch are discussed. The closed two-dimensional assembly takes the form of a square, and could find application as a component of other systems including a macromolecular rotaxane. The closed three-dimensional system takes the form of a trigonal bipyramid and could find application as a macromolecular carcerand. The molecular switch could find application as a peptide biosensor. Guidelines for the construction and structural verification of these designs are reported.

  7. What makes Ras an efficient molecular switch: a computational, biophysical, and structural study of Ras-GDP interactions with mutants of Raf.

    PubMed

    Filchtinski, Daniel; Sharabi, Oz; Rüppel, Alma; Vetter, Ingrid R; Herrmann, Christian; Shifman, Julia M

    2010-06-11

    Ras is a small GTP-binding protein that is an essential molecular switch for a wide variety of signaling pathways including the control of cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and apoptosis. In the GTP-bound state, Ras can interact with its effectors, triggering various signaling cascades in the cell. In the GDP-bound state, Ras looses its ability to bind to known effectors. The interaction of the GTP-bound Ras (Ras(GTP)) with its effectors has been studied intensively. However, very little is known about the much weaker interaction between the GDP-bound Ras (Ras(GDP)) and Ras effectors. We investigated the factors underlying the nucleotide-dependent differences in Ras interactions with one of its effectors, Raf kinase. Using computational protein design, we generated mutants of the Ras-binding domain of Raf kinase (Raf) that stabilize the complex with Ras(GDP). Most of our designed mutations narrow the gap between the affinity of Raf for Ras(GTP) and Ras(GDP), producing the desired shift in binding specificity towards Ras(GDP). A combination of our best designed mutation, N71R, with another mutation, A85K, yielded a Raf mutant with a 100-fold improvement in affinity towards Ras(GDP). The Raf A85K and Raf N71R/A85K mutants were used to obtain the first high-resolution structures of Ras(GDP) bound to its effector. Surprisingly, these structures reveal that the loop on Ras previously termed the switch I region in the Ras(GDP).Raf mutant complex is found in a conformation similar to that of Ras(GTP) and not Ras(GDP). Moreover, the structures indicate an increased mobility of the switch I region. This greater flexibility compared to the same loop in Ras(GTP) is likely to explain the natural low affinity of Raf and other Ras effectors to Ras(GDP). Our findings demonstrate that an accurate balance between a rigid, high-affinity conformation and conformational flexibility is required to create an efficient and stringent molecular switch. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd

  8. Exciter switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcpeak, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    A new exciter switch assembly has been installed at the three DSN 64-m deep space stations. This assembly provides for switching Block III and Block IV exciters to either the high-power or 20-kW transmitters in either dual-carrier or single-carrier mode. In the dual-carrier mode, it provides for balancing the two drive signals from a single control panel located in the transmitter local control and remote control consoles. In addition to the improved switching capabilities, extensive monitoring of both the exciter switch assembly and Transmitter Subsystem is provided by the exciter switch monitor and display assemblies.

  9. Switch wear leveling

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Hunter; Sealy, Kylee; Gilchrist, Aaron

    2015-09-01

    An apparatus for switch wear leveling includes a switching module that controls switching for two or more pairs of switches in a switching power converter. The switching module controls switches based on a duty cycle control technique and closes and opens each switch in a switching sequence. The pairs of switches connect to a positive and negative terminal of a DC voltage source. For a first switching sequence a first switch of a pair of switches has a higher switching power loss than a second switch of the pair of switches. The apparatus includes a switch rotation module that changes the switching sequence of the two or more pairs of switches from the first switching sequence to a second switching sequence. The second switch of a pair of switches has a higher switching power loss than the first switch of the pair of switches during the second switching sequence.

  10. On the electronic structure of neutral and ionic azobenzenes and their possible role as surface mounted molecular switches.

    PubMed

    Füchsel, Gernot; Klamroth, Tillmann; Dokić, Jadranka; Saalfrank, Peter

    2006-08-24

    We report quantum chemical calculations, mostly based on density functional theory, on azobenzene and substituted azobenzenes as neutral molecules or ions, in ground and excited states. Both the cis and trans configurations are computed as well as the activation energies to transform one isomer into the other and the possible reaction paths and reaction surfaces along the torsion and inversion modes. All calculations are done for the isolated species, but results are discussed in light of recent experiments aiming at the switching of surface mounted azobenzenes by scanning tunneling microscopes.

  11. Molecular basis of the inhibition of human aromatase (estrogen synthetase) by flavone and isoflavone phytoestrogens: A site-directed mutagenesis study.

    PubMed

    Kao, Y C; Zhou, C; Sherman, M; Laughton, C A; Chen, S

    1998-02-01

    Flavone and isoflavone phytoestrogens are plant chemicals and are known to be competitive inhibitors of cytochrome P450 aromatase with respect to the androgen substrate. Aromatase is the enzyme that converts androgen to estrogen; therefore, these plant chemicals are thought to be capable of modifying the estrogen level in women. In this study, the inhibition profiles of four flavones [chrysin (5, 7-dihydroxyflavone), 7,8-dihydroxyflavone, baicalein (5,6,7-trihydroxyflavone), and galangin (3,5,7-trihydroxyflavone)], two isoflavones [genistein (4,5,7-trihydroxyisoflavone) and biochanin A (5,7-dihydroxy-4-methoxyisoflavone)], one flavanone [naringenin (4, 5,7-trihydroxyflavanone)], and one naphthoflavone (alpha-naphthoflavone) on the wild-type and six human aromatase mutants (I133Y, P308F, D309A, T310S, I395F, and I474Y) were determined. In combination with computer modeling, the binding characteristics and the structure requirement for flavone and isoflavone phytoestrogens to inhibit human aromatase were obtained. These compounds were found to bind to the active site of aromatase in an orientation in which rings A and C mimic rings D and C of the androgen substrate, respectively. This study also provides a molecular basis as to why isoflavones are significantly poorer inhibitors of aromatase than flavones.

  12. Molecular basis of the inhibition of human aromatase (estrogen synthetase) by flavone and isoflavone phytoestrogens: A site-directed mutagenesis study.

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Y C; Zhou, C; Sherman, M; Laughton, C A; Chen, S

    1998-01-01

    Flavone and isoflavone phytoestrogens are plant chemicals and are known to be competitive inhibitors of cytochrome P450 aromatase with respect to the androgen substrate. Aromatase is the enzyme that converts androgen to estrogen; therefore, these plant chemicals are thought to be capable of modifying the estrogen level in women. In this study, the inhibition profiles of four flavones [chrysin (5, 7-dihydroxyflavone), 7,8-dihydroxyflavone, baicalein (5,6,7-trihydroxyflavone), and galangin (3,5,7-trihydroxyflavone)], two isoflavones [genistein (4,5,7-trihydroxyisoflavone) and biochanin A (5,7-dihydroxy-4-methoxyisoflavone)], one flavanone [naringenin (4, 5,7-trihydroxyflavanone)], and one naphthoflavone (alpha-naphthoflavone) on the wild-type and six human aromatase mutants (I133Y, P308F, D309A, T310S, I395F, and I474Y) were determined. In combination with computer modeling, the binding characteristics and the structure requirement for flavone and isoflavone phytoestrogens to inhibit human aromatase were obtained. These compounds were found to bind to the active site of aromatase in an orientation in which rings A and C mimic rings D and C of the androgen substrate, respectively. This study also provides a molecular basis as to why isoflavones are significantly poorer inhibitors of aromatase than flavones. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9435150

  13. New Concepts in Molecular Imaging: Non-Invasive MRI Spotting of Proteolysis Using an Overhauser Effect Switch

    PubMed Central

    Mellet, Philippe; Massot, Philippe; Madelin, Guillaume; Marque, Sylvain R. A.; Harte, Etienne; Franconi, Jean-Michel; Thiaudière, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Background Proteolysis, involved in many processes in living organisms, is tightly regulated in space and time under physiological conditions. However deregulation can occur with local persistent proteolytic activities, e.g. in inflammation, cystic fibrosis, tumors, or pancreatitis. Furthermore, little is known about the role of many proteases, hence there is a need of new imaging methods to visualize specifically normal or disease-related proteolysis in intact bodies. Methodology/Principal Findings In this paper, a new concept for non invasive proteolysis imaging is proposed. Overhauser-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (OMRI) at 0.2 Tesla was used to monitor the enzymatic hydrolysis of a nitroxide-labeled protein. In vitro, image intensity switched from 1 to 25 upon proteolysis due to the associated decrease in the motional correlation time of the substrate. The OMRI experimental device used in this study is consistent with protease imaging in mice at 0.2 T without significant heating. Simulations show that this enzymatic-driven OMRI signal switch can be obtained at lower frequencies suitable for larger animals or humans. Conclusions/Significance The method is highly sensitive and makes possible proteolysis imaging in three dimensions with a good spatial resolution. Any protease could be targeted specifically through the use of taylor-made cleavable macromolecules. At short term OMRI of proteolysis may be applied to basic research as well as to evaluate therapeutic treatments in small animal models of experimental diseases. PMID:19396361

  14. Insights into the Packing Switching of the EphA2 Transmembrane Domain by Molecular Dynamic Simulations.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fude; Xu, Lida; Chen, Peng; Wei, Peng; Qu, Jing; Chen, Jialin; Luo, Shi-Zhong

    2015-06-25

    Receptor tyrosine kinases play an important role in mediating cell migration and adhesion associated with various biology processes. With a single-span transmembrane domain (TMD), the activities of the receptors are regulated by the definite packing configurations of the TMDs. For the EphA2 receptor, increasing studies have been conducted to investigate the packing domains that induce its switching TMD dimerization. However, the inherent transformation mechanisms including the interrelations among the involved packing domains remain unclear. Herein, we applied multiple simulation methods to explore the underlying packing mechanisms within the EphA2 TMD dimer. Our results demonstrated that the G(540)xxxG(544) contributed to the formation of the right-handed configuration while the heptad repeat L(535)xxxG(539)xxA(542)xxxV(546)xxL(549)xxxG(553) motif together with the FFxH(559) region mediated the parallel mode. Furthermore, the FF(557) residues packing mutually as rigid riveting structures were found comparable to the heptad repeat motif in maintaining the parallel configuration. In addition, the H(559) residue associated definitely with the lower bilayer leaflet, which was proved to stabilize the parallel mode significantly. The simulations provide a full range of insights into the essential packing motifs or residues involved in the switching TMD dimer configurations, which can enrich our comprehension toward the EphA2 receptor.

  15. Acid/Base and H2PO4(-) Controllable High-Contrast Optical Molecular Switches with a Novel BODIPY Functionalized [2]Rotaxane.

    PubMed

    Arumugaperumal, Reguram; Srinivasadesikan, Venkatesan; Ramakrishnam Raju, Mandapati V; Lin, Ming-Chang; Shukla, Tarun; Singh, Ravinder; Lin, Hong-Cheu

    2015-12-09

    A novel multifunctional mechanically interlocked switchable [2]rotaxane R4 containing two molecular stations and rotaxane arms terminated with boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) fluorophores and its derivatives were synthesized for the first time by CuAAC click reaction. The shuttling motion of macrocycle between the dibenzylammonium and triazolium recognition sites and the distance dependent photoinduced electron transfer process of R4 is demonstrated by utilizing external chemical stimuli (acid/base). Interestingly, the reversible self-assembly process of R4 was recognized by the acid-base molecular switch strategy. Notably, two symmetrical triazolium groups acted as molecular stations, H2PO4(-) receptors, and H-bonded donors. Both [2]rotaxane R4 and thread R2 demonstrated excellent optical responses and high selectivity toward H2PO4(-) ion. The specific motion and guest-host interactions of mechanically interlocked machines (MIMs) were also further explored by quantum mechanical calculations. The thread R2 also demonstrated to enable the detection of H2PO4(-) in RAW 264.7 cells successfully.

  16. Differences between sympatric populations of Eotetranychus carpini collected from Vitis vinifera and Carpinus betulus: insights from host-switch experiments and molecular data.

    PubMed

    Malagnini, Valeria; Navajas, Maria; Migeon, Alain; Duso, Carlo

    2012-03-01

    Eotetranychus carpini (Oudemans) is an important pest of grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) in southern Europe. This mite is also found on a number of different plants, including Carpinus betulus L., which commonly occurs in stands and hedgerows bordering vineyards, where it may serve as a potential mite reservoir. The economic importance of this pest has motivated a number of studies aimed at investigating whether the mites found on V. vinifera and C. betulus are conspecific. The results obtained to date have been inconclusive. In this study, we used biological and molecular approaches to investigate this issue. First, we conducted host-switch experiments to test the ability of E. carpini to develop on an alternative host plant, using mite populations originally collected on either C. betulus or V. vinifera plants from the same area. Second, we investigated DNA-based differentiation using nucleotide sequences of the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region of the ribosomal DNA of individual E. carpini from the populations examined in our host-plant experiments. We also analyzed sequences of individuals collected in other regions (Italy and Slovenia) to estimate species variation. The results from our host-switch experiments suggest the differentiation of mites collected on the two hosts. Mites collected from C. betulus did not survive and reproduce on V. vinifera and vice versa. Our molecular work revealed significant genetic differentiation between the mites collected from the two hosts, but no evidence of genetic variation among specimens collected from the same host species. Our results indicate the existence of host races of E. carpini.

  17. Adenylyl cyclase-5 in the dorsal striatum function as a molecular switch for the generation of behavioral preferences for cue-directed food choices.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hannah; Kim, Tae-Kyung; Kim, Ji-Eun; Park, Jin-Young; Lee, Yunjin; Kang, Minkyung; Kim, Kyoung-Shim; Han, Pyung-Lim

    2014-11-07

    that the preferred food choices were switched on when either the mGluR3-AC5 pathway was inactive or the mGluR1 pathway was active, whereas the preferred food-choices were switched off when mGluR1 or its downstream pathway was suppressed. These results identify the AC5 and mGluR system in the dorsal striatum as molecular on/off switches to direct decisions on behavioral preferences for cue-oriented options.

  18. Coaxial Switch

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-23

    08-2015 Publication Coaxial Switch David J. Bamford et al Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division, Newport 1176 Howell Street, Bldg 102T, Code 00L...Distribution A A coaxial switch having a housing and a shaft extending through and rotatably mounted to the housing. The shaft extends from opposite...conductor members are electrically connected together. When the coaxial switch is engaged, the conductor members are inserted into the connector body

  19. Discovery of molecular switches within the ADX-47273 mGlu5 PAM scaffold that modulate modes of pharmacology to afford potent mGlu5 NAMs, PAMs and partial antagonists.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Jeffrey P; Engers, Darren W; Niswender, Colleen M; Rodriguez, Alice L; Venable, Daryl F; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig W

    2011-05-01

    This Letter describes a chemical lead optimization campaign directed at a weak mGlu(5) NAM discovered while developing SAR for the mGlu(5) PAM, ADX-47273. An iterative parallel synthesis effort discovered multiple, subtle molecular switches that afford potent mGlu(5) NAMs, mGlu(5) PAMs as well as mGlu(5) partial antagonists.

  20. Zeolite-supported rhodium complexes and clusters: switching catalytic selectivity by controlling structures of essentially molecular species.

    PubMed

    Serna, Pedro; Gates, B C

    2011-04-06

    Precise synthesis and characterization of site-isolated rhodium complexes and extremely small rhodium clusters supported on zeolite HY allow control of the catalyst selectivity in the conversion of ethene to n-butene or ethane, respectively, as a result of tuning the structure of the active sites at a molecular level.

  1. Hybrid MPI/OpenMP Implementation of the ORAC Molecular Dynamics Program for Generalized Ensemble and Fast Switching Alchemical Simulations.

    PubMed

    Procacci, Piero

    2016-06-27

    We present a new release (6.0β) of the ORAC program [Marsili et al. J. Comput. Chem. 2010, 31, 1106-1116] with a hybrid OpenMP/MPI (open multiprocessing message passing interface) multilevel parallelism tailored for generalized ensemble (GE) and fast switching double annihilation (FS-DAM) nonequilibrium technology aimed at evaluating the binding free energy in drug-receptor system on high performance computing platforms. The production of the GE or FS-DAM trajectories is handled using a weak scaling parallel approach on the MPI level only, while a strong scaling force decomposition scheme is implemented for intranode computations with shared memory access at the OpenMP level. The efficiency, simplicity, and inherent parallel nature of the ORAC implementation of the FS-DAM algorithm, project the code as a possible effective tool for a second generation high throughput virtual screening in drug discovery and design. The code, along with documentation, testing, and ancillary tools, is distributed under the provisions of the General Public License and can be freely downloaded at www.chim.unifi.it/orac .

  2. Molecular mechanisms of human hemoglobin switching: selective undermethylation and expression of globin genes in embryonic, fetal, and adult erythroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Mavilio, F; Giampaolo, A; Carè, A; Migliaccio, G; Calandrini, M; Russo, G; Pagliardi, G L; Mastroberardino, G; Marinucci, M; Peschle, C

    1983-01-01

    The globin chain synthetic pattern and the extent of DNA methylation within embryonic, fetal, and adult beta-like globin gene domains were evaluated in greater than or equal to 90% purified human erythroblasts from yolk sacs and fetal livers in the 6- to 12-wk gestational period as well as from adult marrows. The 6-wk erythroblasts produce essentially embryonic epsilon chains, whereas the 12-wk erythroblasts synthesize largely fetal gamma globin and the adult marrow erythroblasts synthesize almost exclusively adult beta chains. In all phases of ontogenic development, a strong correlation exists between DNA hypomethylation in the close flanking sequences of globin genes and their expression. These results suggest that modulation of the methylation pattern may represent a key mechanism for regulating expression of human globin genes during embryonic leads to fetal and fetal leads to adult Hb switches in humans. In ontogenic development this mechanism might in turn correlate with a gradual modification of chromatin structure in the non-alpha gene cluster, thus leading to a 5' leads to 3' activation of globin genes in a balanced fashion. Images PMID:6316333

  3. Molecular characterization of a new scorpion venom lipolysis activating peptide: Evidence for disulfide bridge-mediated functional switch of peptides.

    PubMed

    Zhu, S; Gao, B

    2006-12-22

    Venoms from scorpions contain extremely rich bioactive peptides that often carry diverse functions and are presumably needed to achieve synergistic effects for rapidly immobilizing prey and defending themselves. BotLVP1 is a unique heterodimer protein recently found in the scorpion Buthus occitanus tunetanus venom that is structurally related to scorpion toxins affecting sodium channels (NaScTxs) but exhibits adipocyte lipolysis activity. We have isolated and identified two cDNA clones encoding subunits alpha and beta of a BotLVP1-like peptide (named BmLVP1) from the Chinese scorpion Buthus martensii venom gland and determined the first complete gene structure of this subfamily. These results highlight a genetic link between these lipolysis activating peptides and NaScTxs. Comparison of cDNA and genomic sequences combined with protein structural and functional analysis provides evidence supporting the existence of RNA editing mechanism in scorpion venom glands, which could mediate functional switch of BmLVP1 gene, from adipocyte lipolysis to neurotoxicity, by altering the wrapper disulfide bridge (WDB) pattern of the peptides.

  4. Optical switches and switching methods

    DOEpatents

    Doty, Michael

    2008-03-04

    A device and method for collecting subject responses, particularly during magnetic imaging experiments and testing using a method such as functional MRI. The device comprises a non-metallic input device which is coupled via fiber optic cables to a computer or other data collection device. One or more optical switches transmit the subject's responses. The input device keeps the subject's fingers comfortably aligned with the switches by partially immobilizing the forearm, wrist, and/or hand of the subject. Also a robust nonmetallic switch, particularly for use with the input device and methods for optical switching.

  5. Disassembly of amphiphilic small molecular prodrug with fluorescence switch induced by pH and folic acid receptors for targeted delivery and controlled release.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhigang; Shi, Xiaoxiao; Hou, Meili; Xue, Peng; Gao, Yong-E; Liu, Shiying; Kang, Yuejun

    2017-02-01

    We develop a new type of pH-responsive amphiphilic small molecular prodrug by conjugating folic acid with anti-tumour doxorubicin via a hydrazone bond. This prodrug is featured by high and precise drug loading (55.4wt%), which can self-assemble into micellar nanoparticles in neutral environment while disassemble in the presence of tumour cells expressing folic acid receptors or the acidic tumoral endosomal environment. The prodrug nanoparticles can effectively improve anticancer efficacy due to the features of pH-triggered drug release and targeted delivery. Moreover, in vitro cell study further indicated that the resulting prodrug nanoparticles had enhanced cytotoxicity for folic-acid-positive cells (HeLa) compared to folic-acid-negative cells (MCF-7). More importantly, the induced disassembly of prodrug nanoparticles can "switch on" the inherent fluorescence of the internalized doxorubicin drug in the tumour microenvironment, which can be used for the detection of tumour cells. We believe that this strategy can pave a new way for designing small molecular drug delivery systems and facilitate tumour diagnosis and treatment simultaneously.

  6. Photoinduced switching to metallic states in the two-dimensional organic Mott insulator dimethylphenazine-tetrafluorotetracyanoquinodimethane with anisotropic molecular stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Ohkura, Masa-aki; Ishige, Yu; Nogami, Yoshio; Okamoto, Hiroshi

    2015-06-01

    A photoinduced phase transition was investigated in an organic charge-transfer (CT) complex M2P -TCNQ F4 , [M2P : 5,10-dihydro-5,10-dimethylphenazine, donor (D) molecule; TCNQ F4 : 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane, acceptor (A) molecule] by means of femtosecond pump-probe reflection spectroscopy. This is an ionic compound and has a peculiar two-dimensional (2D) molecular arrangement; the same A (or D) molecules arrange along the [100] direction, and A and D molecules alternately arrange along the [111] direction. It results in a strongly anisotropic two-dimensional electronic structure. This compound shows a structural and magnetic phase transition at 122 K below which the two neighboring molecules are dimerized along both the [100] and [111] directions. We demonstrate that two kinds of photoinduced phase transitions occur by irradiation of a femtosecond laser pulse; in the high-temperature lattice-uniform phase, a quasi-one-dimensional (1D) metallic state along the AA(DD) stack is generated, and in the low-temperature lattice-dimerized phase, a quasi-2D metallic state is initially produced and molecular dimerizations are subsequently released. Mixed-stack CT compounds consisting of DA stacks are generally insulators or semiconductors in the ground state. Here, such a dynamical metallization in the DA stack is demonstrated. The release of the dimerizations drives several kinds of coherent oscillations which play an important role in the stabilization of the lattice-dimerized phase. The mechanisms of those photoinduced phase transitions are discussed in terms of the magnitudes of the anisotropic bandwidths and molecular dimerizations along two different directions of the molecular stacks.

  7. Molecular modeling, mutational analysis and conformational switching in IL27: An in silico structural insight towards AIDS research.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Arundhati; Ray, Sujay

    2016-01-15

    The advancement in proteomics and bioinformatics provokes to discern the molecular-level probe for HIV inhibitor; human interleukin-27 (IL27). Documentation documents that tyrosine residues in IL27 play a pivotal role for interacting with HIV, causing apoptosis of the HIV+ cells. Primarily, 3D structure of human wild-type (WT) IL27 was built through manifold molecular modeling techniques after the satisfaction of stereo-chemical properties. Its essential tyrosine residues were identified. Two mutant models for IL27 were prepared following the similar protocol by first substituting the tyrosine residues with glycine (MT_G) and then with alanine (MT_A) in the WT protein. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was performed to obtain a stable conformation. Conformational alterations in WT, MT_G and MT_A (before and after MD simulation) disclosed that MT_A was the steadiest one with the best secondary structure conformation supported by statistical significances. Though huge RMSD variations were observed on superimposing the MT structures on WT individually, the MTs were examined to share similar SCOP/CATH fold with TM-score=0.8, indicating that they retained their functionality even after mutation. Electrostatic surface potential again unveiled MT_A to be the most stable one. MT_A was thereby revealed to be the potent peptide inhibitor for HIV. This probe presents a pathway to investigate and compare the bio-molecular interaction of WT IL27 and MT_A IL27 (strongest model) with HIV in the future. This is the first report regarding the structural biology of IL27 accompanied by alteration at its genetic level and delving into the unknown residue-level and functional biochemistry for bringing about an annihilation towards AIDS.

  8. The GPS motif is a molecular switch for bimodal activities of adhesion class G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Prömel, Simone; Frickenhaus, Marie; Hughes, Samantha; Mestek, Lamia; Staunton, David; Woollard, Alison; Vakonakis, Ioannis; Schöneberg, Torsten; Schnabel, Ralf; Russ, Andreas P; Langenhan, Tobias

    2012-08-30

    Adhesion class G protein-coupled receptors (aGPCR) form the second largest group of seven-transmembrane-spanning (7TM) receptors whose molecular layout and function differ from canonical 7TM receptors. Despite their essential roles in immunity, tumorigenesis, and development, the mechanisms of aGPCR activation and signal transduction have remained obscure to date. Here, we use a transgenic assay to define the protein domains required in vivo for the activity of the prototypical aGPCR LAT-1/Latrophilin in Caenorhabditis elegans. We show that the GPCR proteolytic site (GPS) motif, the molecular hallmark feature of the entire aGPCR class, is essential for LAT-1 signaling serving in two different activity modes of the receptor. Surprisingly, neither mode requires cleavage but presence of the GPS, which relays interactions with at least two different partners. Our work thus uncovers the versatile nature of aGPCR activity in molecular detail and places the GPS motif in a central position for diverse protein-protein interactions.

  9. Molecular structures and dynamics of the stepwise activation mechanism of a matrix metalloproteinase zymogen: challenging the cysteine switch dogma.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, Gabriel; Meroueh, Samy; Toth, Marta; Fisher, Jed F; Fridman, Rafael; Mobashery, Shahriar; Sagi, Irit

    2007-11-07

    Activation of matrix metalloproteinase zymogen (pro-MMP) is a vital homeostatic process, yet its molecular basis remains unresolved. Using stopped-flow X-ray spectroscopy of the active site zinc ion, we determined the temporal sequence of pro-MMP-9 activation catalyzed by tissue kallikrein protease in milliseconds to several minutes. The identity of three intermediates seen by X-ray spectroscopy was corroborated by molecular dynamics simulations and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations. The cysteine-zinc interaction that maintains enzyme latency is disrupted via active-site proton transfers that mediate transient metal-protein coordination events and eventual binding of water. Unexpectedly, these events ensue as a direct result of complexation of pro-MMP-9 and kallikrein and occur before proteolysis and eventual dissociation of the pro-peptide from the catalytic site. Here we demonstrate the synergism among long-range protein conformational transitions, local structural rearrangements, and fine atomic events in the process of zymogen activation.

  10. Role of accelerated segment switch in exons to alter targeting (ASSET) in the molecular evolution of snake venom proteins

    PubMed Central

    Doley, Robin; Mackessy, Stephen P; Kini, R Manjunatha

    2009-01-01

    Background Snake venom toxins evolve more rapidly than other proteins through accelerated changes in the protein coding regions. Previously we have shown that accelerated segment switch in exons to alter targeting (ASSET) might play an important role in its functional evolution of viperid three-finger toxins. In this phenomenon, short sequences in exons are radically changed to unrelated sequences and hence affect the folding and functional properties of the toxins. Results Here we analyzed other snake venom protein families to elucidate the role of ASSET in their functional evolution. ASSET appears to be involved in the functional evolution of three-finger toxins to a greater extent than in several other venom protein families. ASSET leads to replacement of some of the critical amino acid residues that affect the biological function in three-finger toxins as well as change the conformation of the loop that is involved in binding to specific target sites. Conclusion ASSET could lead to novel functions in snake venom proteins. Among snake venom serine proteases, ASSET contributes to changes in three surface segments. One of these segments near the substrate binding region is known to affect substrate specificity, and its exchange may have significant implications for differences in isoform catalytic activity on specific target protein substrates. ASSET therefore plays an important role in functional diversification of snake venom proteins, in addition to accelerated point mutations in the protein coding regions. Accelerated point mutations lead to fine-tuning of target specificity, whereas ASSET leads to large-scale replacement of multiple functionally important residues, resulting in change or gain of functions. PMID:19563684

  11. ION SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Cook, B.

    1959-02-10

    An ion switch capable of transferring large magnitudes of power is described. An ion switch constructed in accordance with the invention includes a pair of spaced control electrodes disposed in a highly evacuated region for connection in a conventional circuit to control the passing of power therethrough. A controllable ionic conduction path is provided directiy between the control electrodes by a source unit to close the ion switch. Conventional power supply means are provided to trigger the source unit and control the magnitude, durations and pulse repetition rate of the aforementioned ionic conduction path.

  12. Molecular switches of the κ opioid receptor triggered by 6′-GNTI and 5′-GNTI

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jianxin; Sun, Xianqiang; Li, Weihua; Liu, Guixia; Tu, Yaoquan; Tang, Yun

    2016-01-01

    The κ opioid receptor (κOR) is a member of G-protein-coupled receptors, and is considered as a promising drug target for treating neurological diseases. κOR selective 6′-GNTI was proved to be a G-protein biased agonist, whereas 5′-GNTI acts as an antagonist. To investigate the molecular mechanism of how these two ligands induce different behaviors of the receptor, we built two systems containing the 5′-GNTI-κOR complex and the 6′-GNTI-κOR complex, respectively, and performed molecular dynamics simulations of the two systems. We observe that transmembrane (TM) helix 6 of the κOR rotates about 4.6o on average in the κOR-6′-GNTI complex. Detailed analyses of the simulation results indicate that E2976.58 and I2946.55 play crucial roles in the rotation of TM6. In the simulation of the κOR-5′-GNTI system, it is revealed that 5′-GNTI can stabilize TM6 in the inactive state form. In addition, the kink of TM7 is stabilized by a hydrogen bond between S3247.47 and the residue V691.42 on TM1. PMID:26742690

  13. Tuning the temperature dependence for switching in dithienylethene photochromic switches.

    PubMed

    Kudernac, Tibor; Kobayashi, Takao; Uyama, Ayaka; Uchida, Kingo; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Feringa, Ben L

    2013-08-29

    Diarylethene photochromic switches use light to drive structural changes through reversible electrocyclization reactions. High efficiency in dynamic photoswitching is a prerequisite for applications, as is thermal stability and the selective addressability of both isomers ring-opened and -closed diarylethenes. These properties can be optimized readily through rational variation in molecular structure. The efficiency with regard to switching as a function of structural variation is much less understood, with the exception of geometric requirements placed on the reacting atoms. Ultimately, increasing the quantum efficiency of photochemical switching in diarylethenes requires a detailed understanding of the excited-state potential energy surface(s) and the mechanisms involved in switching. Through studies of the temperature dependence, photoswitching and theoretical studies demonstrate the occurrence or absence of thermal activation barriers in three constitutional isomers that bear distinct π-conjugated systems. We found that a decrease in the thermal barriers correlates with an increase in switching efficiency. The origin of the barriers is assigned to the decrease in π-conjugation that is concomitant with the progress of the photoreaction. Furthermore, we show that balanced molecular design can minimize the change in the extent of π-conjugation during switching and lead to optimal bidirectional switching efficiencies. Our findings hold implications for future structural design of diarylethene photochromic switches.

  14. Discovery of a regioselectivity switch in nitrating P450s guided by molecular dynamics simulations and Markov models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodani, Sheel C.; Kiss, Gert; Cahn, Jackson K. B.; Su, Ye; Pande, Vijay S.; Arnold, Frances H.

    2016-05-01

    The dynamic motions of protein structural elements, particularly flexible loops, are intimately linked with diverse aspects of enzyme catalysis. Engineering of these loop regions can alter protein stability, substrate binding and even dramatically impact enzyme function. When these flexible regions are unresolvable structurally, computational reconstruction in combination with large-scale molecular dynamics simulations can be used to guide the engineering strategy. Here we present a collaborative approach that consists of both experiment and computation and led to the discovery of a single mutation in the F/G loop of the nitrating cytochrome P450 TxtE that simultaneously controls loop dynamics and completely shifts the enzyme's regioselectivity from the C4 to the C5 position of L-tryptophan. Furthermore, we find that this loop mutation is naturally present in a subset of homologous nitrating P450s and confirm that these uncharacterized enzymes exclusively produce 5-nitro-L-tryptophan, a previously unknown biosynthetic intermediate.

  15. Control and manipulation of quantum spin switching and spin correlations in [Tb2] molecular magnet under a pulse magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farberovich, Oleg V.; Bazhanov, Dmitry I.

    2017-10-01

    A general study of [Tb2] molecular magnet is presented using the general spin Hamiltonian formalism. A spin-spin correlators determined for a spin wave functions in [Tb2] are analyzed numerically and compared in details with the results obtained by means of conventional quantum mechanics. It is shown that the various expectation values of the spin operators and a study of their corresponding probability distributions allow to have a novel understanding in spin dynamics of entangled qubits in quantum [Tb2] system. The obtained results reveal that the properties of spin-spin correlators are responsible for the entanglement of the spin qubit under a pulse magnetic field. It allows us to present some quantum circuits determined for quantum computing within SSNQ based on [Tb2] molecule, including the CNOT and SWAP gates.

  16. Arterial switch.

    PubMed

    Planche, C; Lacour-Gayet, F; Serraf, A

    1998-01-01

    A relatively large spectra of anatomic variations are found within the unifying features of discordant ventriculoarterial connections. Variants that lend themselves to anatomic repair by the arterial switch operation are discussed, these include transposition of the great arteries with intact ventricular septum (TGA IVS), TGA associated with a ventricular septal defect (TGA VSD), double-outlet right ventricle with subpulmonary VSD (DORV VSD), and TGA or DORV with VSD associated with coarctation. Double discordance with VSD, which is currently treated by double switch or Rastelli and atrial switch and which probably represents, in our department, the only remaining indication for atrial switch, is not discussed. Also, we exclude TGA associated with pulmonary stenosis, which is treated by Rastelli or REV operation.

  17. Magnetic switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirbie, H. C.

    1989-04-01

    Magnetic switching is a pulse compression technique that uses a saturable inductor (reactor) to pass pulses of energy between two capacitors. A high degree of pulse compression can be achieved in a network when several of these simple, magnetically switched circuits are connected in series. Individual inductors are designed to saturate in cascade as a pulse moves along the network. The technique is particularly useful when a single-pulse network must be very reliable or when a multi-pulse network must operate at a high pulse repetition frequency (PRF). Today, magnetic switches trigger spark gaps, sharpen the risetimes of high energy pulses, power large lasers, and drive high PRF linear induction accelerators. This paper will describe the technique of magnetic pulse compression using simple networks and design equations. A brief review of modern magnetic materials and of their role in magnetic switch design will be presented.

  18. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, J.P. Jr.; Devaney, H.F.; Hake, L.W.

    1979-08-29

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  19. Acceleration switch

    DOEpatents

    Abbin, Jr., Joseph P.; Devaney, Howard F.; Hake, Lewis W.

    1982-08-17

    The disclosure relates to an improved integrating acceleration switch of the type having a mass suspended within a fluid filled chamber, with the motion of the mass initially opposed by a spring and subsequently not so opposed.

  20. Nucleosome Switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, David J.; Bruinsma, Robijn F.; Rudnick, Joseph; Widom, Jonathan

    2008-06-01

    We present a statistical-mechanical model for the positioning of nucleosomes along genomic DNA molecules as a function of the strength of the binding potential and the chemical potential of the nucleosomes. We show that a significant section of the DNA is composed of two-level nucleosome switching regions where the nucleosome distribution undergoes a localized, first-order transition. The location of the nucleosome switches shows a strong correlation with the location of gene-regulation regions.

  1. Nucleosome switches.

    PubMed

    Schwab, David J; Bruinsma, Robijn F; Rudnick, Joseph; Widom, Jonathan

    2008-06-06

    We present a statistical-mechanical model for the positioning of nucleosomes along genomic DNA molecules as a function of the strength of the binding potential and the chemical potential of the nucleosomes. We show that a significant section of the DNA is composed of two-level nucleosome switching regions where the nucleosome distribution undergoes a localized, first-order transition. The location of the nucleosome switches shows a strong correlation with the location of gene-regulation regions.

  2. A novel transcription factor-like gene SbSDR1 acts as a molecular switch and confers salt and osmotic endurance to transgenic tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vijay Kumar; Mishra, Avinash; Haque, Intesaful; Jha, Bhavanath

    2016-01-01

    A salt- and drought-responsive novel gene SbSDR1 is predominantly localised to the nucleus, up-regulated under abiotic stresses and is involved in the regulation of metabolic processes. SbSDR1 showed DNA-binding activity to genomic DNA, microarray analysis revealed the upregulation of host stress-responsive genes and the results suggest that SbSDR1 acts as a transcription factor. Overexpression of SbSDR1 did not affect the growth and yield of transgenic plants in non-stress conditions. Moreover, the overexpression of SbSDR1 stimulates the growth of plants and enhances their physiological status by modulating the physiology and inhibiting the accumulation of reactive oxygen species under salt and osmotic stress. Transgenic plants that overexpressed SbSDR1 had a higher relative water content, membrane integrity and concentration of proline and total soluble sugars, whereas they showed less electrolyte leakage and lipid peroxidation than wild type plants under stress conditions. In field conditions, SbSDR1 plants recovered from stress-induced injuries and could complete their life cycle. This study suggests that SbSDR1 functions as a molecular switch and contributes to salt and osmotic tolerance at different growth stages. Overall, SbSDR1 is a potential candidate to be used for engineering salt and drought tolerance in crops without adverse effects on growth and yield. PMID:27550641

  3. LARP1 functions as a molecular switch for mTORC1-mediated translation of an essential class of mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sungki; Freeberg, Mallory A; Han, Ting; Kamath, Avani; Yao, Yao; Fukuda, Tomoko; Suzuki, Tsukasa; Kim, John K; Inoki, Ken

    2017-01-01

    The RNA binding protein, LARP1, has been proposed to function downstream of mTORC1 to regulate the translation of 5’TOP mRNAs such as those encoding ribosome proteins (RP). However, the roles of LARP1 in the translation of 5’TOP mRNAs are controversial and its regulatory roles in mTORC1-mediated translation remain unclear. Here we show that LARP1 is a direct substrate of mTORC1 and Akt/S6K1. Deep sequencing of LARP1-bound mRNAs reveal that non-phosphorylated LARP1 interacts with both 5’ and 3’UTRs of RP mRNAs and inhibits their translation. Importantly, phosphorylation of LARP1 by mTORC1 and Akt/S6K1 dissociates it from 5’UTRs and relieves its inhibitory activity on RP mRNA translation. Concomitantly, phosphorylated LARP1 scaffolds mTORC1 on the 3’UTRs of translationally-competent RP mRNAs to facilitate mTORC1-dependent induction of translation initiation. Thus, in response to cellular mTOR activity, LARP1 serves as a phosphorylation-sensitive molecular switch for turning off or on RP mRNA translation and subsequent ribosome biogenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.25237.001 PMID:28650797

  4. The Molecular Switch of Telomere Phages: High Binding Specificity of the PY54 Cro Lytic Repressor to a Single Operator Site

    PubMed Central

    Hammerl, Jens Andre; Roschanski, Nicole; Lurz, Rudi; Johne, Reimar; Lanka, Erich; Hertwig, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Temperate bacteriophages possess a molecular switch, which regulates the lytic and lysogenic growth. The genomes of the temperate telomere phages N15, PY54 and ϕKO2 harbor a primary immunity region (immB) comprising genes for the prophage repressor, the lytic repressor and a putative antiterminator. The roles of these products are thought to be similar to those of the lambda proteins CI, Cro and Q, respectively. Moreover, the gene order and the location of several operator sites in the prototype telomere phage N15 and in ϕKO2 are also reminiscent of lambda-like phages. By contrast, in silico analyses revealed the presence of only one operator (OR3) in PY54. The purified PY54 Cro protein was used for EMSA studies demonstrating that it exclusively binds to a 16-bp palindromic site (OR3) upstream of the prophage repressor gene. The OR3 operator sequences of PY54 and ϕKO2/N15 only differ by their peripheral base pairs, which are responsible for Cro specificity. PY54 cI and cro transcription is regulated by highly active promoters initiating the synthesis of a homogenious species of leaderless mRNA. The location of the PY54 Cro binding site and of the identified promoters suggests that the lytic repressor suppresses cI transcription but not its own synthesis. The results indicate an unexpected diversity of the growth regulation mechanisms in lambda-related phages. PMID:26043380

  5. Cellular Dichotomy Between Anchorage-Independent Growth Responses to bFGF and TA Reflects Molecular Switch in Commitment to Carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, Katrina M.; Tan, Ruimin; Opresko, Lee K.; Quesenberry, Ryan D.; Bandyopadhyay, Somnath; Chrisler, William B.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2009-11-01

    We have investigated gene expression patterns underlying reversible and irreversible anchorage-independent growth (AIG) phenotypes to identify more sensitive markers of cell transformation for studies directed at interrogating carcinogenesis responses. In JB6 mouse epidermal cells, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) induces an unusually efficient and reversible AIG response, relative to 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced AIG which is irreversible. The reversible and irreversible AIG phenotypes are characterized by largely non-overlapping global gene expression profiles. However, a subset of differentially expressed genes were identified as common to reversible and irreversible AIG phenotypes, including genes regulated in a reciprocal fashion. Hepatic leukemia factor (HLF) and D-site albumin promoter-binding protein (DBP) were increased in both bFGF and TPA soft agar colonies and selected for functional validation. Ectopic expression of human HLF and DBP in JB6 cells resulted in a marked increase in TPA- and bFGF-regulated AIG responses. HLF and DBP expression were increased in soft agar colonies arising from JB6 cells exposed to gamma radiation and in a human basal cell carcinoma tumor tissue, relative to paired non-tumor tissue. Subsequent biological network analysis suggests that many of the differentially expressed genes that are common to bFGF- and TPA-dependent AIG are regulated by c-Myc, SP-1 and HNF-4 transcription factors. Collectively, we have identified a potential molecular switch that mediates the transition from reversible to irreversible AIG.

  6. CENP-I and Aurora B act as a molecular switch that ties RZZ/Mad1 recruitment to kinetochore attachment status

    PubMed Central

    Matson, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    The RZZ (Rod, ZW10, and Zwilch) complex and Mad1 proteins tightly associate with kinetochores to generate the spindle checkpoint signal, but they are released when a kinetochore forms mature microtubule attachments. Here we demonstrate that the centromere protein CENP-I is required to generate a stable association of RZZ and Mad1 with kinetochores. CENP-I also inhibits their removal by dynein stripping. This regulation of Mad1 and RZZ dissociation functions independently of Aurora B, which regulates their association. We show that the microtubule status of each kinetochore independently dictates the recruitment of Aurora B kinase, kinase activity on a kinetochore substrate, and loading of spindle checkpoint proteins. This dynamic regulation of Mad1 association by Aurora B is only uncovered when CENP-I is depleted, consistent with our finding that CENP-I inhibits the dissociation of Mad1. We conclude that the dual activities of Aurora B and CENP-I generate a molecular switch that maintains a robust spindle checkpoint signal at prometaphase kinetochores until they attain mature attachments to microtubules. PMID:24862574

  7. Glucosidase II β-subunit, a novel substrate for caspase-3-like activity in rice, plays as a molecular switch between autophagy and programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jing; Chen, Bing; Wang, Hongjuan; Han, Yue; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress activates unfolded protein response (UPR) and autophagy. However, prolonged, severe stresses activate programmed cell death (PCD) in both animal and plant cells. Compared to the well-studied UPR pathway, the molecular mechanisms of ER-stress-induced PCD are less understood. Here, we report the identification of Gas2, the glucosidase II β subunit in the ER, as a potential switch between PCD and autophagy in rice. MS analysis identified Gas2, GRP94, and HSP40 protein in a purified caspase-3-like activity from heat stressed rice cell suspensions. The three corresponding genes were down-regulated under DTT-induced ER stress. Gas2 and GRP94 were localized to the ER, while HSP40 localized to the cytoplasm. Compared to wild-type, a Gas2 RNAi cell line was much sensitive to DTT treatment and had high levels of autophagy. Both caspase-3 and heat-stressed cell suspension lysate could cleave Gas2, producing a 14 kDa N-terminal fragment. Conditional expression of corresponding C-terminal fragment resulted in enhanced caspase-3-like activity in the protoplasts under heat stress. We proposed that mild ER stress causes down-regulation of Gas2 and induces autophagy, while severe stress results in Gas2 cleavage by caspase-3-like activity and the cleavage product amplifies this activity, possibly participating in the initiation of PCD. PMID:27538481

  8. Crystal structure analysis, covalent docking and molecular dynamics calculations reveal a conformational switch in PhaZ7 PHB depolymerase.

    PubMed

    Kellici, Tahsin F; Mavromoustakos, Thomas; Jendrossek, Dieter; Papageorgiou, Anastassios C

    2017-04-03

    An open and a closed conformation of a surface loop in PhaZ7 extracellular poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) depolymerase were identified in two high resolution crystal structures of a PhaZ7 Y105E mutant. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations revealed high root mean square fluctuations (RMSF) of the 281-295 loop, in particular at residue Asp289 (RMSF 7.62 Å). Covalent docking between a 3-hydroxybutyric acid trimer and the catalytic residue Ser136 showed that the binding energy of the substrate is significantly more favourable in the open loop conformation compared to that in the closed loop conformation. MD simulations with the substrate covalently bound depicted 1 Å RMSF higher values for the residues 281-295 in comparison to the apo (substrate-free) form. In addition, the presence of the substrate in the active site enhanced the ability of the loop to adopt a closed form. Taken together, the analysis suggests that the flexible loop 281-295 of PhaZ7 depolymerase can act as a lid domain to control substrate access to the active site of the enzyme. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Trimethylamine-N-oxide switches from stabilizing nature: A mechanistic outlook through experimental techniques and molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, Anjeeta; Jayaraj, Abhilash; Jayaram, B.; Pannuru, Venkatesu

    2016-03-01

    In adaptation biology of the discovery of the intracellular osmolytes, the osmolytes are found to play a central role in cellular homeostasis and stress response. A number of models using these molecules are now poised to address a wide range of problems in biology. Here, a combination of biophysical measurements and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation method is used to examine the effect of trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) on stem bromelain (BM) structure, stability and function. From the analysis of our results, we found that TMAO destabilizes BM hydrophobic pockets and active site as a result of concerted polar and non-polar interactions which is strongly evidenced by MD simulation carried out for 250 ns. This destabilization is enthalpically favourable at higher concentrations of TMAO while entropically unfavourable. However, to the best of our knowledge, the results constitute first detailed unambiguous proof of destabilizing effect of most commonly addressed TMAO on the interactions governing stability of BM and present plausible mechanism of protein unfolding by TMAO.

  10. Trimethylamine-N-oxide switches from stabilizing nature: A mechanistic outlook through experimental techniques and molecular dynamics simulation

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Anjeeta; Jayaraj, Abhilash; Jayaram, B.; Pannuru, Venkatesu

    2016-01-01

    In adaptation biology of the discovery of the intracellular osmolytes, the osmolytes are found to play a central role in cellular homeostasis and stress response. A number of models using these molecules are now poised to address a wide range of problems in biology. Here, a combination of biophysical measurements and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation method is used to examine the effect of trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) on stem bromelain (BM) structure, stability and function. From the analysis of our results, we found that TMAO destabilizes BM hydrophobic pockets and active site as a result of concerted polar and non-polar interactions which is strongly evidenced by MD simulation carried out for 250 ns. This destabilization is enthalpically favourable at higher concentrations of TMAO while entropically unfavourable. However, to the best of our knowledge, the results constitute first detailed unambiguous proof of destabilizing effect of most commonly addressed TMAO on the interactions governing stability of BM and present plausible mechanism of protein unfolding by TMAO. PMID:27025561

  11. Trimethylamine-N-oxide switches from stabilizing nature: A mechanistic outlook through experimental techniques and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Rani, Anjeeta; Jayaraj, Abhilash; Jayaram, B; Pannuru, Venkatesu

    2016-03-30

    In adaptation biology of the discovery of the intracellular osmolytes, the osmolytes are found to play a central role in cellular homeostasis and stress response. A number of models using these molecules are now poised to address a wide range of problems in biology. Here, a combination of biophysical measurements and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation method is used to examine the effect of trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) on stem bromelain (BM) structure, stability and function. From the analysis of our results, we found that TMAO destabilizes BM hydrophobic pockets and active site as a result of concerted polar and non-polar interactions which is strongly evidenced by MD simulation carried out for 250 ns. This destabilization is enthalpically favourable at higher concentrations of TMAO while entropically unfavourable. However, to the best of our knowledge, the results constitute first detailed unambiguous proof of destabilizing effect of most commonly addressed TMAO on the interactions governing stability of BM and present plausible mechanism of protein unfolding by TMAO.

  12. Unraveling the effect of La A-site substitution on oxygen ion diffusion and oxygen catalysis in perovskite BaFeO3 by data-mining molecular dynamics and density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi; Baiyee, Zarah Medina; Ciucci, Francesco

    2015-10-07

    BaFeO3 (BFO) is a promising parent material for high-temperature oxygen catalysis. The effects of La substitution on the oxygen ion diffusion and oxygen catalysis in A-site La-substituted BFO are studied by combining data-driven molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The data-driven MD simulations are capable of providing atomic level information regarding oxygen jumps at different sites, bridging the resolution gap of analysis between MD and DFT. The simulations identify several effects due to the introduction of La. First, according to simple electroneutrality considerations and DFT calculations, La tends to decrease the concentration of oxygen vacancies in BFO. Second, La substitution lowers the activation energy of local oxygen migration, providing faster paths for oxygen diffusion. The MD analysis predicts a higher hopping rate through La-containing bottlenecks as well as easier oxygen jumps from the La-rich cages and lower dwell times of oxygen in those cages. DFT calculations confirm a lower migration energy through La-containing bottlenecks. Third, the electrocatalytic activity of the material decreases with La, as indicated by a lower O p-band center and higher oxygen vacancy formation energies.

  13. Monitoring and manipulation of the pH of single cells using infrared spectromicroscopy and a molecular switch.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Marilena; Zlateva, Theodora; Quaroni, Luca

    2013-04-01

    The pH of a biological system is a crucial determinant of the structures and reactivity of its components and cellular homeostasis of H(+) is critical for cell viability. Control and monitoring of cellular acidity are highly desirable for the purpose of studying biochemical processes in vivo. The effect of photolysis of a caged strong acid, the ester 1-(2-nitrophenyl)-ethylhexadecyl sulfonate (HDNS) is used to cause a controlled drop in pH in single cells. An isolated cell is selected under the IR microscope, irradiated with near-UV light and monitored by FTIR. We demonstrate the use of FTIR spectromicroscopy to monitor light-induced acidification of the cellular medium by measuring the increased concentration of CO2 and corresponding decrease of HCO3(-) in the cell and in the surrounding medium. We have demonstrated a method to control and accurately monitor the changes in pH of a cellular system by coupling a caged proton-releasing agent with FTIR spectromicroscopy detection. The overall implementation of photolysis and spectroscopic detection in a microscope optical configuration ensures single cell selectivity in both acidification and monitoring. We show the viability of monitoring of pH changes by FTIR spectromicroscopy with sensitivity comparable to that of glass electrodes, better than the existing methods for determining cell pH. Reporting the effect of small variations of cellular acidity provides a major improvement in the understanding of the interplay between molecular properties as assessed in vitro and cell physiology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Id4, a New Candidate Gene for Senile Osteoporosis, Acts as a Molecular Switch Promoting Osteoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Yzumi; Nakachi, Yutaka; Nikaido, Itoshi; Bono, Hidemasa; Ninomiya, Yuichi; Kanesaki-Yatsuka, Yukiko; Akita, Masumi; Motegi, Hiromi; Wakana, Shigeharu; Noda, Tetsuo; Sablitzky, Fred; Arai, Shigeki; Kurokawa, Riki; Fukuda, Toru; Katagiri, Takenobu; Schönbach, Christian; Suda, Tatsuo; Mizuno, Yosuke; Okazaki, Yasushi

    2010-01-01

    Excessive accumulation of bone marrow adipocytes observed in senile osteoporosis or age-related osteopenia is caused by the unbalanced differentiation of MSCs into bone marrow adipocytes or osteoblasts. Several transcription factors are known to regulate the balance between adipocyte and osteoblast differentiation. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the balance between adipocyte and osteoblast differentiation in the bone marrow have yet to be elucidated. To identify candidate genes associated with senile osteoporosis, we performed genome-wide expression analyses of differentiating osteoblasts and adipocytes. Among transcription factors that were enriched in the early phase of differentiation, Id4 was identified as a key molecule affecting the differentiation of both cell types. Experiments using bone marrow-derived stromal cell line ST2 and Id4-deficient mice showed that lack of Id4 drastically reduces osteoblast differentiation and drives differentiation toward adipocytes. On the other hand knockdown of Id4 in adipogenic-induced ST2 cells increased the expression of Pparγ2, a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation. Similar results were observed in bone marrow cells of femur and tibia of Id4-deficient mice. However the effect of Id4 on Pparγ2 and adipocyte differentiation is unlikely to be of direct nature. The mechanism of Id4 promoting osteoblast differentiation is associated with the Id4-mediated release of Hes1 from Hes1-Hey2 complexes. Hes1 increases the stability and transcriptional activity of Runx2, a key molecule of osteoblast differentiation, which results in an enhanced osteoblast-specific gene expression. The new role of Id4 in promoting osteoblast differentiation renders it a target for preventing the onset of senile osteoporosis. PMID:20628571

  15. A Gβ protein and the TupA Co-Regulator Bind to Protein Kinase A Tpk2 to Act as Antagonistic Molecular Switches of Fungal Morphological Changes

    PubMed Central

    Janganan, Thamarai K.; Chen, Gongyou; Chen, Daliang; Menino, João F.; Rodrigues, Fernando; Borges-Walmsley, Maria I.; Walmsley, Adrian R.

    2015-01-01

    The human pathogenic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb) undergoes a morphological transition from a saprobic mycelium to pathogenic yeast that is controlled by the cAMP-signaling pathway. There is a change in the expression of the Gβ-protein PbGpb1, which interacts with adenylate cyclase, during this morphological transition. We exploited the fact that the cAMP-signaling pathway of Saccharomyces cerevisiae does not include a Gβ-protein to probe the functional role of PbGpb1. We present data that indicates that PbGpb1 and the transcriptional regulator PbTupA both bind to the PKA protein PbTpk2. PbTPK2 was able to complement a TPK2Δ strain of S. cerevisiae, XPY5a/α, which was defective in pseudohyphal growth. Whilst PbGPB1 had no effect on the parent S. cerevisiae strain, MLY61a/α, it repressed the filamentous growth of XPY5a/α transformed with PbTPK2, behaviour that correlated with a reduced expression of the floculin FLO11. In vitro, PbGpb1 reduced the kinase activity of PbTpk2, suggesting that inhibition of PbTpk2 by PbGpb1 reduces the level of expression of Flo11, antagonizing the filamentous growth of the cells. In contrast, expressing the co-regulator PbTUPA in XPY5a/α cells transformed with PbTPK2, but not untransformed cells, induced hyperfilamentous growth, which could be antagonized by co-transforming the cells with PbGPB1. PbTUPA was unable to induce the hyperfilamentous growth of a FLO8Δ strain, suggesting that PbTupA functions in conjunction with the transcription factor Flo8 to control Flo11 expression. Our data indicates that P. brasiliensis PbGpb1 and PbTupA, both of which have WD/β-propeller structures, bind to PbTpk2 to act as antagonistic molecular switches of cell morphology, with PbTupA and PbGpb1 inducing and repressing filamentous growth, respectively. Our findings define a potential mechanism for controlling the morphological switch that underpins the virulence of dimorphic fungi. PMID:26334875

  16. Ferroelectric switching of elastin

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuanming; Cai, Hong-Ling; Zelisko, Matthew; Wang, Yunjie; Sun, Jinglan; Yan, Fei; Ma, Feiyue; Wang, Peiqi; Chen, Qian Nataly; Zheng, Hairong; Meng, Xiangjian; Sharma, Pradeep; Zhang, Yanhang; Li, Jiangyu

    2014-01-01

    Ferroelectricity has long been speculated to have important biological functions, although its very existence in biology has never been firmly established. Here, we present compelling evidence that elastin, the key ECM protein found in connective tissues, is ferroelectric, and we elucidate the molecular mechanism of its switching. Nanoscale piezoresponse force microscopy and macroscopic pyroelectric measurements both show that elastin retains ferroelectricity at 473 K, with polarization on the order of 1 μC/cm2, whereas coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations predict similar polarization with a Curie temperature of 580 K, which is higher than most synthetic molecular ferroelectrics. The polarization of elastin is found to be intrinsic in tropoelastin at the monomer level, analogous to the unit cell level polarization in classical perovskite ferroelectrics, and it switches via thermally activated cooperative rotation of dipoles. Our study sheds light onto a long-standing question on ferroelectric switching in biology and establishes ferroelectricity as an important biophysical property of proteins. This is a critical first step toward resolving its physiological significance and pathological implications. PMID:24958890

  17. Optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    An optical switching device (10) is provided whereby light from a first glass fiber (16) or a second glass fiber (14) may be selectively transmitted into a third glass fiber (18). Each glass fiber is provided with a focusing and collimating lens system (26, 28, 30). In one mode of operation, light from the first glass fiber (16) is reflected by a planar mirror (36) into the third glass fiber (18). In another mode of operation, light from the second glass fiber (14) passes directly into the third glass fiber (18). The planar mirror (36) is attached to a rotatable table (32) which is rotated to provide the optical switching.

  18. Optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, R.P.

    1987-11-10

    An optical switching device is provided whereby light from a first glass fiber or a second glass fiber may be selectively transmitted into a third glass fiber. Each glass fiber is provided with a focusing and collimating lens system. In one mode of operation, light from the first glass fiber is reflected by a planar mirror into the third glass fiber. In another mode of operation, light from the second glass fiber passes directly into the third glass fiber. The planar mirror is attached to a rotatable table which is rotated to provide the optical switching. 3 figs.

  19. Optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Reedy, R.P.

    1985-01-18

    An optical switching device is provided whereby light from a first glass fiber or a second glass fiber may be selectively transmitted into a third glass fiber. Each glass fiber is provided with a focusing and collimating lens system. In one mode of operation, light from the first glass fiber is reflected by a planar mirror into the third glass fiber. In another mode of operation, light from the second glass fiber passes directly into the third glass fiber. The planar mirror is attached to a rotatable table which is rotated to provide the optical switching.

  20. The Molecular Switch of Telomere Phages: High Binding Specificity of the PY54 Cro Lytic Repressor to a Single Operator Site.

    PubMed

    Hammerl, Jens Andre; Roschanski, Nicole; Lurz, Rudi; Johne, Reimar; Lanka, Erich; Hertwig, Stefan

    2015-06-02

    Temperate bacteriophages possess a molecular switch, which regulates the lytic and lysogenic growth. The genomes of the temperate telomere phages N15, PY54 and ɸKO2 harbor a primary immunity region (immB) comprising genes for the prophage repressor, the lytic repressor and a putative antiterminator. The roles of these products are thought to be similar to those of the lambda proteins CI, Cro and Q, respectively. Moreover, the gene order and the location of several operator sites in the prototype telomere phage N15 and in ɸKO2 are also reminiscent of lambda-like phages. By contrast, in silico analyses revealed the presence of only one operator (O\\(_{\\rm{R}}\\)3) in PY54. The purified PY54 Cro protein was used for EMSA studies demonstrating that it exclusively binds to a 16-bp palindromic site (O\\(_{\\rm{R}}\\)3) upstream of the prophage repressor gene. The O\\(_{\\rm{R}}\\)3 operator sequences of PY54 and ɸKO2/N15 only differ by their peripheral base pairs, which are responsible for Cro specificity. PY54 cI and cro transcription is regulated by highly active promoters initiating the synthesis of a homogenious species of leaderless mRNA. The location of the PY54 Cro binding site and of the identified promoters suggests that the lytic repressor suppresses cI transcription but not its own synthesis. The results indicate an unexpected diversity of the growth regulation mechanisms in lambda-related phages.

  1. Switching Transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation's D60T transistors are used primarily as switching devices for controlling high power in electrical circuits. It enables reduction in the number and size of circuit components and promotes more efficient use of energy. Wide range of application from a popcorn popper to a radio frequency generator for solar cell production.

  2. Switched power workshop. [Switched power electron guns

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the design of a switched power electron gun. Particular topics discussed are: vacuum photodiode switch; laser switched solid state diodes; gun performance; charging supply; and laser requirements. (LSP)

  3. The effects of threonine phosphorylation on the stability and dynamics of the central molecular switch region of 18.5-kDa myelin basic protein.

    PubMed

    Vassall, Kenrick A; Bessonov, Kyrylo; De Avila, Miguel; Polverini, Eugenia; Harauz, George

    2013-01-01

    of the peptides through altered electrostatic interactions. The results support the hypothesis that the central conserved segment of MBP constitutes a molecular switch in which the conformation and/or intermolecular interactions are mediated by phosphorylation/dephosphorylation at T92 and T95.

  4. The Effects of Threonine Phosphorylation on the Stability and Dynamics of the Central Molecular Switch Region of 18.5-kDa Myelin Basic Protein

    PubMed Central

    De Avila, Miguel; Polverini, Eugenia; Harauz, George

    2013-01-01

    structure of the peptides through altered electrostatic interactions. The results support the hypothesis that the central conserved segment of MBP constitutes a molecular switch in which the conformation and/or intermolecular interactions are mediated by phosphorylation/dephosphorylation at T92 and T95. PMID:23861868

  5. Dopamine D1A directly interacts with otoferlin synaptic pathway proteins: Ca2+ and phosphorylation underlie an NSF-to-AP2mu1 molecular switch.

    PubMed

    Selvakumar, Dakshnamurthy; Drescher, Marian J; Deckard, Nathan A; Ramakrishnan, Neeliyath A; Morley, Barbara J; Drescher, Dennis G

    2017-01-01

    Dopamine receptors regulate exocytosis via protein-protein interactions (PPIs) as well as via adenylyl cyclase transduction pathways. Evidence has been obtained for PPIs in inner ear hair cells coupling D1A to soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF) attachment protein receptor (SNARE)-related proteins snapin, otoferlin, N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF), and adaptor-related protein complex 2, mu 1 (AP2mu1), dependent on [Ca(2+)] and phosphorylation. Specifically, the carboxy terminus of dopamine D1A was found to directly bind t-SNARE-associated protein snapin in teleost and mammalian hair cell models by yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) and pull-down assays, and snapin directly interacts with hair cell calcium-sensor otoferlin. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis, competitive pull-downs, and co-immunoprecipitation indicated that these interactions were promoted by Ca(2+) and occur together. D1A was also found to separately interact with NSF, but with an inverse dependence on Ca(2+) Evidence was obtained, for the first time, that otoferlin domains C2A, C2B, C2D, and C2F interact with NSF and AP2mu1, whereas C2C or C2E do not bind to either protein, representing binding characteristics consistent with respective inclusion or omission in individual C2 domains of the tyrosine motif YXXΦ. In competitive pull-down assays, as predicted by KD values from SPR (+Ca(2+)), C2F pulled down primarily NSF as opposed to AP2mu1. Phosphorylation of AP2mu1 gave rise to a reversal: an increase in binding by C2F to phosphorylated AP2mu1 was accompanied by a decrease in binding to NSF, consistent with a molecular switch for otoferlin from membrane fusion (NSF) to endocytosis (AP2mu1). An increase in phosphorylated AP2mu1 at the base of the cochlear inner hair cell was the observed response elicited by a dopamine D1A agonist, as predicted. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  6. Gas mixtures for spark gap closing switches

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, L.G.; McCorkle, D.L.; Hunter, S.R.

    1987-02-20

    Gas mixtures for use in spark gap closing switches comprised of fluorocarbons and low molecular weight, inert buffer gases. To this can be added a third gas having a low ionization potential relative to the buffer gas. The gas mixtures presented possess properties that optimized the efficiency spark gap closing switches. 6 figs.

  7. Gas mixtures for spark gap closing switches

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, Loucas G.; McCorkle, Dennis L.; Hunter, Scott R.

    1988-01-01

    Gas mixtures for use in spark gap closing switches comprised of fluorocarbons and low molecular weight, inert buffer gases. To this can be added a third gas having a low ionization potential relative to the buffer gas. The gas mixtures presented possess properties that optimized the efficiency spark gap closing switches.

  8. Conformational choreography of a molecular switch region in myelin basic protein--molecular dynamics shows induced folding and secondary structure type conversion upon threonyl phosphorylation in both aqueous and membrane-associated environments.

    PubMed

    Polverini, Eugenia; Coll, Eoin P; Tieleman, D Peter; Harauz, George

    2011-03-01

    The 18.5 kDa isoform of myelin basic protein is essential to maintaining the close apposition of myelin membranes in central nervous system myelin, but its intrinsic disorder (conformational dependence on environment), a variety of post-translational modifications, and a diversity of protein ligands (e.g., actin and tubulin) all indicate it to be multifunctional. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of a conserved central segment of 18.5 kDa myelin basic protein (residues Glu80-Gly103, murine sequence numbering) in aqueous and membrane-associated environments to ascertain the stability of constituent secondary structure elements (α-helix from Glu80-Val91 and extended poly-proline type II from Thr92-Gly103) and the effects of phosphorylation of residues Thr92 and Thr95, individually and together. In aqueous solution, all four forms of the peptide bent in the middle to form a hydrophobic cluster. The phosphorylated variants were stabilized further by electrostatic interactions and formation of β-structures, in agreement with previous spectroscopic data. In simulations performed with the peptide in association with a dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer, the amphipathic α-helical segment remained stable and membrane-associated, although the degree of penetration was less in the phosphorylated variants, and the tilt of the α-helix with respect to the plane of the membrane also changed significantly with the modifications. The extended segment adjacent to this α-helix represents a putative SH3-ligand and remained exposed to the cytoplasm (and thus accessible to binding partners). The results of these simulations demonstrate how this segment of the protein can act as a molecular switch: an amphipathic α-helical segment of the protein is membrane-associated and presents a subsequent proline-rich segment to the cytoplasm for interaction with other proteins. Phosphorylation of threonyl residues alters the degree of membrane penetration of the

  9. Magnetic switching

    SciTech Connect

    Birx, D.; Cook, E.; Hawkins, S.; Poor, S.; Reginato, L.; Schmidt, J.; Smith, M.

    1983-06-01

    The paper discusses the development program in magnetic switching which was aimed at solving the rep-rate and reliability limitations of the ATA spark gaps. The end result has been a prototype physically very similar to the present Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) pulse power unit but vastly superior in performance. This prototype, which is easily adaptable to the existing systems, has achieved a burst rep-rate of 20 kHz and an output voltage of 500 kV. A one-on-one substitution of the existing pulse power module would result in a 100 MeV accelerator. Furthermore, the high efficiency of the magnetic pulse compression stages has allowed CW operation of the prototype at one kilohertz opening up other applications for the pulse power. Performance and design details will be described.

  10. Asymmetry in mechanical polarization switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Haidong; Liu, Shi; Ye, Ziyu; Yasui, Shintaro; Funakubo, Hiroshi; Rappe, Andrew M.; Gruverman, Alexei

    2017-05-01

    Recent demonstration of a mechanical 180° switching of ferroelectric polarization has enabled an alternative polarization control mechanism based on the flexoelectric coupling between polarization and strain gradient. Mechanical switching is a highly asymmetric phenomenon associated with the inhomogeneous strain induced by an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip pressed against the ferroelectric surface. Here, we demonstrate the asymmetric domain switching behavior in the vicinity of the 180° domain wall in PbTiO3 thin films with respect to the AFM tip scanning direction. The writing-direction-dependent asymmetric domain response has been modeled by molecular dynamics simulation showing asymmetry in domain wall displacement due to the difference in the volume of mechanically switched domains. The obtained results show that the mechanically induced switching dynamics is very different from the conventional 180° switching realized by an external electric field and has to be exploited differently. In particular, nanoscale domain engineering via the tip-induced flexoelectric effect requires careful consideration of asymmetric interaction between the existing domain structures and the strain gradient.

  11. Plasma Switch Development.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-08

    switch :9 (1) the low-pressure gas switch 17 (2) the surface flashover switch ,18 (3) the thyrtron,’ŕ (4) the high pressure...spark gap, (5) the magnetic switch .’ 9 20 and (6) the ECS. The ongoing research for both the low pressure gas and surface flashover closing- switches has... investigations into optimizing gas mixtures for opening switch applications 1 ’"’"’’’a𔃻 ; and a preliminary study of the discharge stabili-

  12. Gate-controlled conductance switching in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Limin; Palma, Julio L.; Li, Yueqi; Mujica, Vladimiro; Ratner, Mark A.; Tao, Nongjian

    2017-02-01

    Extensive evidence has shown that long-range charge transport can occur along double helical DNA, but active control (switching) of single-DNA conductance with an external field has not yet been demonstrated. Here we demonstrate conductance switching in DNA by replacing a DNA base with a redox group. By applying an electrochemical (EC) gate voltage to the molecule, we switch the redox group between the oxidized and reduced states, leading to reversible switching of the DNA conductance between two discrete levels. We further show that monitoring the individual conductance switching allows the study of redox reaction kinetics and thermodynamics at single molecular level using DNA as a probe. Our theoretical calculations suggest that the switch is due to the change in the energy level alignment of the redox states relative to the Fermi level of the electrodes.

  13. Gate-controlled conductance switching in DNA

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Limin; Palma, Julio L.; Li, Yueqi; Mujica, Vladimiro; Ratner, Mark A.; Tao, Nongjian

    2017-01-01

    Extensive evidence has shown that long-range charge transport can occur along double helical DNA, but active control (switching) of single-DNA conductance with an external field has not yet been demonstrated. Here we demonstrate conductance switching in DNA by replacing a DNA base with a redox group. By applying an electrochemical (EC) gate voltage to the molecule, we switch the redox group between the oxidized and reduced states, leading to reversible switching of the DNA conductance between two discrete levels. We further show that monitoring the individual conductance switching allows the study of redox reaction kinetics and thermodynamics at single molecular level using DNA as a probe. Our theoretical calculations suggest that the switch is due to the change in the energy level alignment of the redox states relative to the Fermi level of the electrodes. PMID:28218275

  14. Harnessing a pyrimidine based molecular switch to construct reversible test strips for F-/AcO- with respect to Al3 +: A colorimetric approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Arghyadeep; Ghosh, Soumen; Makhal, Subhash Chandra; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2017-05-01

    We report novel compound 4-nitro-2-((pyrimidin-2-ylamino) methyl) phenol (1) synthesized by the condensation of 5-nitro salicylaldehyde with 2-amino pyridine. Compound 1 serves as a dual signalling chromogenic receptor for F-/AcO- and Al3 + ions. The chromogenic response of 1 towards the aforementioned analytes is reversible with respect to either Al3 +/X (= F/AcO)- or X(F/AcO)-/Al3 +. The limit of detection of 1 for F- and AcO- are 1.0025 × 10- 7 M and 0.79 × 10- 7 M, respectively. The optical switching has been rationalized on the basis of UV-Vis titrations and 1H NMR titrations respectively. The optical switching has been successfully use by constructing reversible paper strips for detecting Al3 + as well as F-/AcO-.

  15. Switch Transcripts in Immunoglobulin Class Switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Matthias; Jung, Steffen; Radbruch, Andreas

    1995-03-01

    B cells can exchange gene segments for the constant region of the immunoglobulin heavy chain, altering the class and effector function of the antibodies that they produce. Class switching is directed to distinct classes by cytokines, which induce transcription of the targeted DNA sequences. These transcripts are processed, resulting in spliced "switch" transcripts. Switch recombination can be directed to immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) by the heterologous human metallothionein II_A promoter in mutant mice. Induction of the structurally conserved, spliced switch transcripts is sufficient to target switch recombination to IgG1, whereas transcription alone is not.

  16. An RNA molecular switch: Intrinsic flexibility of 23S rRNA Helices 40 and 68 5’-UAA/5’-GAN internal loops studied by molecular dynamics methods

    PubMed Central

    Réblová, Kamila; Střelcová, Zora; Kulhánek, Petr; Beššeová, Ivana; Mathews, David H.; Nostrand, Keith Van; Yildirim, Ilyas; Turner, Douglas H.; Šponer, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    transition towards the solution 2D structure. Free energy calculations confirm that the X-ray arrangement is less stable than the solution structure. LES, TMD and NEB provide a rather consistent pathway for interconversion between the X-ray and NMR structures. In simulations, the incomplete cWS A/U base pair of the NMR structure is water mediated and alternates with the canonical A–U base pair, which is not indicated by the NMR data. Completion of full cWS A/U base pair is prevented by the overall internal loop arrangement. In summary, the simulations confirm that the UAA/GAN internal loop is a molecular switch RNA module that adopts its functional geometry upon specific tertiary contexts. PMID:21132104

  17. Determination of trace alkaline phosphatase by affinity adsorption solid substrate room temperature phosphorimetry based on wheat germ agglutinin labeled with 8-quinolineboronic acid phosphorescent molecular switch and prediction of diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia-Ming; Gao, Hui; Li, Fei-Ming; Shi, Xiu-Mei; Lin, Chang-Qing; Lin, Li-Ping; Wang, Xin-Xing; Li, Zhi-Ming

    2010-09-01

    The 8-quinolineboronic acid phosphorescent molecular switch (abbreviated as PMS-8-QBA. Thereinto, 8-QBA is 8-quinolineboronic acid, and PMS is phosphorescent molecular switch) was found for the first time. PMS-8-QBA, which was in the "off" state, could only emit weak room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) on the acetyl cellulose membrane (ACM). However, PMS-8-QBA turned "on" automatically for its changed structure, causing that the RTP of 8-QBA in the system increased, after PMS-8-QBA-WGA (WGA is wheat germ agglutinin) was formed by reaction between -OH of PMS-8-QBA and -COOH of WGA. More interesting is that the -NH(2) of PMS-8-QBA-WGA could react with the -COOH of alkaline phosphatase (AP) to form the affinity adsorption (AA) product WGA-AP-WGA-8-QBA-PMS (containing -NH-CO- bond), which caused RTP of the system to greatly increase. Thus, affinity adsorption solid substrate room temperature phosphorimetry using PMS-8-QBA as labelling reagent (PMS-8-QBA-AA-SSRTP) for the determination of trace AP was established. The method had many advantages, such as high sensitivity (the detection limit (LD) was 2.5zgspot(-1). For sample volume of 0.40mulspot(-1), corresponding concentration was 6.2x10(-18)gml(-1)), good selectivity (the allowed concentration of coexisting material was higher, when the relative error was +/-5%), high accuracy (applied to detection of AP content in serum samples, the result was coincided with those obtained by enzyme-linked immunoassay), which was suitable for the detection of trace AP content in serum samples and the forecast of human diseases. Meanwhile, the mechanism of PMS-8-QBA-AASSRTP was discussed. The new field of analytical application and clinic diagnosis technique of molecule switch are exploited, based on the phosphorescence characteristic of PMS-8-QBA, the AA reaction between WGA and AP, as well as the relation between AP content and human diseases. The research results promote the development and interpenetrate among molecule switch

  18. Determination of trace alkaline phosphatase by affinity adsorption solid substrate room temperature phosphorimetry based on wheat germ agglutinin labeled with 8-quinolineboronic acid phosphorescent molecular switch and prediction of diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia-Ming; Gao, Hui; Li, Fei-Ming; Shi, Xiu-Mei; Lin, Chang-Qing; Lin, Li-Ping; Wang, Xin-Xing; Li, Zhi-Ming

    2010-09-01

    The 8-quinolineboronic acid phosphorescent molecular switch (abbreviated as PMS-8-QBA. Thereinto, 8-QBA is 8-quinolineboronic acid, and PMS is phosphorescent molecular switch) was found for the first time. PMS-8-QBA, which was in the "off" state, could only emit weak room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) on the acetyl cellulose membrane (ACM). However, PMS-8-QBA turned "on" automatically for its changed structure, causing that the RTP of 8-QBA in the system increased, after PMS-8-QBA-WGA (WGA is wheat germ agglutinin) was formed by reaction between -OH of PMS-8-QBA and -COOH of WGA. More interesting is that the -NH 2 of PMS-8-QBA-WGA could react with the -COOH of alkaline phosphatase (AP) to form the affinity adsorption (AA) product WGA-AP-WGA-8-QBA-PMS (containing -NH-CO- bond), which caused RTP of the system to greatly increase. Thus, affinity adsorption solid substrate room temperature phosphorimetry using PMS-8-QBA as labelling reagent (PMS-8-QBA-AA-SSRTP) for the determination of trace AP was established. The method had many advantages, such as high sensitivity (the detection limit (LD) was 2.5 zg spot -1. For sample volume of 0.40 μl spot -1, corresponding concentration was 6.2 × 10 -18 g ml -1), good selectivity (the allowed concentration of coexisting material was higher, when the relative error was ±5%), high accuracy (applied to detection of AP content in serum samples, the result was coincided with those obtained by enzyme-linked immunoassay), which was suitable for the detection of trace AP content in serum samples and the forecast of human diseases. Meanwhile, the mechanism of PMS-8-QBA-AASSRTP was discussed. The new field of analytical application and clinic diagnosis technique of molecule switch are exploited, based on the phosphorescence characteristic of PMS-8-QBA, the AA reaction between WGA and AP, as well as the relation between AP content and human diseases. The research results promote the development and interpenetrate among molecule

  19. Recurrent disruption of the Imu splice donor site in t(14;18) positive lymphomas: a potential molecular basis for aberrant downstream class switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Ruminy, Philippe; Jardin, Fabrice; Penther, Dominique; Picquenot, Jean-Michel; Parmentier, Françoise; Buchonnet, Gérard; Bertrand, Philippe; Tilly, Hervé; Bastard, Christian

    2007-08-01

    t(14;18) positive lymphomas are mature germinal center B-cell neoplasms. In agreement with this cellular origin, most have somatically mutated immunoglobulin variable genes and the IGH@ locus has almost always been reorganized by class switch recombination (CSR). However, contrasting with normal B-cells, a majority of cases still express an IgM while the constant genes are normally rearranged only on the non-productive allele. Concurrently, aberrant intra-allelic junctions involving downstream switch regions, with a lack of engagement of the switch mu (Smu), often accumulate on the functional alleles, suggesting some recurrent CSR perturbation during the onset of the disease. To clarify these surprising observations, we addressed the accessibility of the Smu to the CSR machinery in a large series of patients by characterizing the mutations that are expected to accumulate at this place upon CSR activation. Our data indicate that the Smu is mutated in a large majority of cases, often on both alleles, indicating that these cells usually reach a differentiation stage where CSR is activated and where this region remains accessible. Interestingly, we also identified a significant cluster of mutations at the splicing donor site of the first exon of the Smu germline transcripts, on the functional allele. This location suggests a possible relation with CSR perturbations in lymphoma and the clustering points to a probable mechanism of selection. In conclusion, our data suggest that an acquired mutation at the splicing donor site of the Smu transcripts may participate in the selection of lymphoma cells and play a significant role during the onset of the disease.

  20. Latching relay switch assembly

    DOEpatents

    Duimstra, Frederick A.

    1991-01-01

    A latching relay switch assembly which includes a coil section and a switch or contact section. The coil section includes at least one permanent magnet and at least one electromagnet. The respective sections are, generally, arranged in separate locations or cavities in the assembly. The switch is latched by a permanent magnet assembly and selectively switched by an overriding electromagnetic assembly.

  1. Radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1990-03-06

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction.

  2. Radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1990-01-01

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction.

  3. Novel colorimetric molecular switch based on copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction and its application for flumioxazin detection.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lidan; Zheng, Hanye; Ye, Wenmei; Qiu, Suyan; Lin, Zhenyu; Guo, Longhua; Qiu, Bin; Chen, Guonan

    2013-01-21

    A novel colorimetric switch based on the copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction has been developed. G-quadruplex-hemin DNAzyme catalyzes the oxidation of 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiozoline)-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) to form ABTS˙(+), the UV absorbance of the solution increased greatly and the color of the solution changed to dark green. However, in the presence of an azide complex, the absorbance signal decreased and the solution became light green since the catalytic ability of the hemin was inhibited by the azide groups. However, once propargylamine has been added into the above reaction system, which would react with azide groups through the CuAAC reaction, the solution becomes dark green again and the absorption intensity of the system is also increased. The proposed switch allows a good reversibility and can be identified clearly by the naked eye. In addition, the method has been applied to detect some pesticides, which have alkynyl groups (flumioxazin), with high sensitivity and selectivity, where the UV absorbance has a direct linear relationship with the logarithm of flumioxazin concentrations in the range of 0.14-14 nM, and the limit of detection was 0.056 nM (S/N = 3), which can meet the requirement of the maximum residue limits (MRLs) of United States of America (56 nM).

  4. Temporal switching jitter in photoconductive switches

    SciTech Connect

    GAUDET,JOHN A.; SKIPPER,MICHAEL C.; ABDALLA,MICHAEL D.; AHERN,SEAN M.; MAR,ALAN; LOUBRIEL,GUILLERMO M.; ZUTAVERN,FRED J.; O'MALLEY,MARTIN W.; HELGESON,WESLEY D.; ROMERO,SAMUEL P.

    2000-04-13

    This paper reports on a recent comparison made between the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) gallium arsenide, optically-triggered switch test configuration and the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) gallium arsenide, optically-triggered switch test configuration. The purpose of these measurements was to compare the temporal switch jitter times. It is found that the optical trigger laser characteristics are dominant in determining the PCSS jitter.

  5. Latching micro optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J; Polosky, Marc A

    2013-05-21

    An optical switch reliably maintains its on or off state even when subjected to environments where the switch is bumped or otherwise moved. In addition, the optical switch maintains its on or off state indefinitely without requiring external power. External power is used only to transition the switch from one state to the other. The optical switch is configured with a fixed optical fiber and a movable optical fiber. The movable optical fiber is guided by various actuators in conjunction with a latching mechanism that configure the switch in one position that corresponds to the on state and in another position that corresponds to the off state.

  6. High-frequency switching in Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Soll, D R

    1992-01-01

    Most strains of Candida albicans are capable of switching frequently and reversibly between a number of phenotypes distinguishable by colony morphology. A number of different switching systems have been defined according to the limited set of phenotypes in each switching repertoire, and each strain appears to possess a single system. Switching can affect many aspects of cellular physiology and morphology and appears to be a second level of phenotypic variability superimposed upon the bud-hypha transition. The most dramatic switching system so far identified is the "white-opaque transition." This system dramatizes the extraordinary effects switching can have on the budding cell phenotype, including the synthesis of opaque-specific antigens, the expression of white-specific and opaque-specific genes, and the genesis of unique cell wall structures. Switching has been demonstrated to occur at sites of infection and between episodes of recurrent vaginitis, and it may function to generate variability in commensal and infecting populations for adaptive reasons. Although the molecular mechanisms involved in the switch event are not understood, recent approaches to its elucidation are discussed and an epigenetic mechanism is proposed. Images PMID:1576587

  7. Heat Switches for ADRs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiPirro, M. J.; Shirron, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Heat switches are key elements in the cyclic operation of Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADRs). Several of the types of heat switches that have been used for ADRs are described in this paper. Key elements in selection and design of these switches include not only ON/OFF switching ratio, but also method of actuation, size, weight, and structural soundness. Some of the trade-off are detailed in this paper.

  8. Heat switches for ADRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiPirro, M. J.; Shirron, P. J.

    2014-07-01

    Heat switches are key elements in the cyclic operation of Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADRs). Several of the types of heat switches that have been used for ADRs are described in this paper. Key elements in selection and design of these switches include not only ON/OFF switching ratio, but also method of actuation, size, weight, and structural soundness. Some of the trade-off are detailed in this paper.

  9. Remote switch actuator

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Edwin Gerard; Beauman, Ronald; Palo, Jr., Stefan

    2013-01-29

    The invention provides a device and method for actuating electrical switches remotely. The device is removably attached to the switch and is actuated through the transfer of a user's force. The user is able to remain physically removed from the switch site obviating need for protective equipment. The device and method allow rapid, safe actuation of high-voltage or high-current carrying electrical switches or circuit breakers.

  10. Molecular and functional characterization of a CS1 (CRACC) splice variant expressed in human NK cells that does not contain immunoreceptor tyrosine-based switch motifs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Kyung; Boles, Kent S; Mathew, Porunelloor A

    2004-10-01

    CS1 (CRACC, novel Ly9) is a novel member of the CD2 family expressed on natural killer (NK), T and stimulated B cells. Although the cytoplasmic domain of CS1 contains immunoreceptor tyrosine-based switch motifs (ITSM), which enables to recruite signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP/SH2D1A), it activates NK cells in the absence of a functional SAP. CS1 is a self ligand and homophilic interaction of CS1 regulates NK cell cytolytic activity. Here we have identified a novel splice variant of CS1 (CS1-S), which lacks ITSM. Human NK cells express mRNA for both wild-type CS1 (CS1-L) and CS1-S and their expression level remained steady upon various stimulations. To determine the function of each isoform, cDNA for CS1-L and CS1-S were transfected into the rat NK cell line RNK-16 and functionally tested using redirected cytotoxicity assays and calcium flux experiments. CS1-L was able to mediate redirected cytotoxicity of P815 target cells in the presence of monoclonal antibody against CS1 and a rise in intracellular calcium within RNK-16 cells, suggesting that CS1-L is an activating receptor, whereas CS1-S showed no effects. Interestingly, SAP associated with unstimulated CS1-L and dissociated upon pervanadate stimulation. These results indicate that CS1-L and CS1-S may differentially regulate human NK cell functions.

  11. Regulated phosphorylation of the K-Cl cotransporter KCC3 is a molecular switch of intracellular potassium content and cell volume homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Adragna, Norma C.; Ravilla, Nagendra B.; Lauf, Peter K.; Begum, Gulnaz; Khanna, Arjun R.; Sun, Dandan; Kahle, Kristopher T.

    2015-01-01

    The defense of cell volume against excessive shrinkage or swelling is a requirement for cell function and organismal survival. Cell swelling triggers a coordinated homeostatic response termed regulatory volume decrease (RVD), resulting in K+ and Cl− efflux via activation of K+ channels, volume-regulated anion channels (VRACs), and the K+-Cl− cotransporters, including KCC3. Here, we show genetic alanine (Ala) substitution at threonines (Thr) 991 and 1048 in the KCC3a isoform carboxyl-terminus, preventing inhibitory phosphorylation at these sites, not only significantly up-regulates KCC3a activity up to 25-fold in normally inhibitory isotonic conditions, but is also accompanied by reversal of activity of the related bumetanide-sensitive Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter isoform 1 (NKCC1). This results in a rapid (<10 min) and significant (>90%) reduction in intracellular K+ content (Ki) via both Cl-dependent (KCC3a + NKCC1) and Cl-independent [DCPIB (VRAC inhibitor)-sensitive] pathways, which collectively renders cells less prone to acute swelling in hypotonic osmotic stress. Together, these data demonstrate the phosphorylation state of Thr991/Thr1048 in KCC3a encodes a potent switch of transporter activity, Ki homeostasis, and cell volume regulation, and reveal novel observations into the functional interaction among ion transport molecules involved in RVD. PMID:26217182

  12. LIP19, a basic region leucine zipper protein, is a Fos-like molecular switch in the cold signaling of rice plants.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hidekazu; Sato, Kazuhito; Berberich, Thomas; Miyazaki, Atsushi; Ozaki, Rei; Imai, Ryozo; Kusano, Tomonobu

    2005-10-01

    The rice low-temperature-induced lip19 gene encodes a 148-amino-acid basic region/leucine zipper (bZIP) protein, termed LIP19. In this study we characterized LIP19 and showed that it lacks the usual ability of bZIP proteins to homodimerize and to bind DNA, as does the Fos protein in mammals. Using a yeast two-hybrid system, the cDNA clones whose products interact with LIP19 were screened. This search revealed a clone termed OsOBF1 (Oryza sativa OBF1) that encodes a new bZIP protein (OsOBF1). This protein forms a homodimer and binds to the hexamer motif sequence (5'-ACGTCA-3'). The protein-protein interaction in homo- and hetero-combinations between LIP19 and OsOBF1 was confirmed in vitro and in planta. LIP19 and OsOBF1 most likely interact with each other more strongly than OsOBF1 interacts with itself, and the resulting heterodimer binds to the C/G hybrid sequence but not to the hexamer sequence. Whereas the expression patterns of lip19 and OsOBF1 in response to low temperatures were totally opposite, the locations of their expression were almost identical. Based upon the presented data, we propose a model describing the low-temperature signal switching mediated by LIP19 in rice.

  13. The lens equator: a platform for molecular machinery that regulates the switch from cell proliferation to differentiation in the vertebrate lens.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Toshiaki; Masai, Ichiro

    2014-06-01

    The vertebrate lens is a transparent, spheroidal tissue, located in the anterior region of the eye that focuses visual images on the retina. During development, surface ectoderm associated with the neural retina invaginates to form the lens vesicle. Cells in the posterior half of the lens vesicle differentiate into primary lens fiber cells, which form the lens fiber core, while cells in the anterior half maintain a proliferative state as a monolayer lens epithelium. After formation of the primary fiber core, lens epithelial cells start to differentiate into lens fiber cells at the interface between the lens epithelium and the primary lens fiber core, which is called the equator. Differentiating lens fiber cells elongate and cover the old lens fiber core, resulting in growth of the lens during development. Thus, lens fiber differentiation is spatially regulated and the equator functions as a platform that regulates the switch from cell proliferation to cell differentiation. Since the 1970s, the mechanism underlying lens fiber cell differentiation has been intensively studied, and several regulatory factors that regulate lens fiber cell differentiation have been identified. In this review, we focus on the lens equator, where these regulatory factors crosstalk and cooperate to regulate lens fiber differentiation. Normally, lens epithelial cells must pass through the equator to start lens fiber differentiation. However, there are reports that when the lens epithelium structure is collapsed, lens fiber cell differentiation occurs without passing the equator. We also discuss a possible mechanism that represses lens fiber cell differentiation in lens epithelium.

  14. CLASP1, astrin and Kif2b form a molecular switch that regulates kinetochore-microtubule dynamics to promote mitotic progression and fidelity.

    PubMed

    Manning, Amity L; Bakhoum, Samuel F; Maffini, Stefano; Correia-Melo, Clara; Maiato, Helder; Compton, Duane A

    2010-10-20

    Accurate chromosome segregation during mitosis requires precise coordination of various processes, such as chromosome alignment, maturation of proper kinetochore-microtubule (kMT) attachments, correction of erroneous attachments, and silencing of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). How these fundamental aspects of mitosis are coordinately and temporally regulated is poorly understood. In this study, we show that the temporal regulation of kMT attachments by CLASP1, astrin and Kif2b is central to mitotic progression and chromosome segregation fidelity. In early mitosis, a Kif2b-CLASP1 complex is recruited to kinetochores to promote chromosome movement, kMT turnover, correction of attachment errors, and maintenance of SAC signalling. However, during metaphase, this complex is replaced by an astrin-CLASP1 complex, which promotes kMT stability, chromosome alignment, and silencing of the SAC. We show that these two complexes are differentially recruited to kinetochores and are mutually exclusive. We also show that other kinetochore proteins, such as Kif18a, affect kMT attachments and chromosome movement through these proteins. Thus, CLASP1-astrin-Kif2b complex act as a central switch at kinetochores that defines mitotic progression and promotes fidelity by temporally regulating kMT attachments.

  15. CLASP1, astrin and Kif2b form a molecular switch that regulates kinetochore-microtubule dynamics to promote mitotic progression and fidelity

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Amity L; Bakhoum, Samuel F; Maffini, Stefano; Correia-Melo, Clara; Maiato, Helder; Compton, Duane A

    2010-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation during mitosis requires precise coordination of various processes, such as chromosome alignment, maturation of proper kinetochore–microtubule (kMT) attachments, correction of erroneous attachments, and silencing of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). How these fundamental aspects of mitosis are coordinately and temporally regulated is poorly understood. In this study, we show that the temporal regulation of kMT attachments by CLASP1, astrin and Kif2b is central to mitotic progression and chromosome segregation fidelity. In early mitosis, a Kif2b–CLASP1 complex is recruited to kinetochores to promote chromosome movement, kMT turnover, correction of attachment errors, and maintenance of SAC signalling. However, during metaphase, this complex is replaced by an astrin–CLASP1 complex, which promotes kMT stability, chromosome alignment, and silencing of the SAC. We show that these two complexes are differentially recruited to kinetochores and are mutually exclusive. We also show that other kinetochore proteins, such as Kif18a, affect kMT attachments and chromosome movement through these proteins. Thus, CLASP1–astrin–Kif2b complex act as a central switch at kinetochores that defines mitotic progression and promotes fidelity by temporally regulating kMT attachments. PMID:20852589

  16. Apollo Ring Optical Switch

    SciTech Connect

    Maestas, J.H.

    1987-03-01

    An optical switch was designed, built, and installed at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, to facilitate the integration of two Apollo computer networks into a single network. This report presents an overview of the optical switch as well as its layout, switch testing procedure and test data, and installation.

  17. Triggered plasma opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Mendel, Clifford W.

    1988-01-01

    A triggerable opening switch for a very high voltage and current pulse includes a transmission line extending from a source to a load and having an intermediate switch section including a plasma for conducting electrons between transmission line conductors and a magnetic field for breaking the plasma conduction path and magnetically insulating the electrons when it is desired to open the switch.

  18. VEGFR2 Functions As an H2S-Targeting Receptor Protein Kinase with Its Novel Cys1045–Cys1024 Disulfide Bond Serving As a Specific Molecular Switch for Hydrogen Sulfide Actions in Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Bei-Bei; Liu, Shu-Yuan; Zhang, Cai-Cai; Fu, Wei; Cai, Wen-Jie; Wang, Yi; Shen, Qing; Wang, Ming-Jie; Chen, Ying; Zhang, Li-Jia; Zhu, Yi-Zhun

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The potential receptor for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) remains unknown. Results: H2S could directly activate vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and that a small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of VEGFR2 inhibited H2S-induced migration of human vascular endothelial cells. H2S promoted angiogenesis in Matrigel plug assay in mice and this effect was attenuated by a VEGF receptor inhibitor. Using tandem mass spectrometry (MS), we identified a new disulfide complex located between Cys1045 and Cys1024 within VEGFR2 that was labile to H2S-mediated modification. Kinase activity of the mutant VEGFR2 (C1045A) devoid of the Cys1045–Cys1024 disulfide bond was significantly higher than wild-type VEGFR2. Transfection with vectors expressing VEGFR2 (C1045A) caused a significant increase in cell migration, while the migration-promoting effect of H2S disappeared in the cells transfected with VEGFR2 (C1045A). Therefore, the Cys1045–Cys1024 disulfide bond serves as an intrinsic inhibitory motif and functions as a molecular switch for H2S. The formation of the Cys1045–Cys1024 disulfide bond disrupted the integrity of the active conformation of VEGFR2. Breaking the Cys1045–Cys1024 disulfide bond recovered the active conformation of VEGFR2. This motif was prone to a nucleophilic attack by H2S via an interaction of their frontier molecular orbitals. siRNA-mediated knockdown of cystathionine γ-lyase attenuated migration of vascular endothelial cells induced by VEGF or moderate hypoxia. Innovation and Conclusion: The study provides the first piece of evidence of a molecular switch in H2S-targeting receptor protein kinase in H2S-induced angiogenesis and that may be applicable to additional kinases containing functionally important disulfide bonds in mediating various H2S actions. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 448–464. PMID:23199280

  19. Synthetic protein switches: design principles and applications.

    PubMed

    Stein, Viktor; Alexandrov, Kirill

    2015-02-01

    Protein switches are ubiquitous in biological signal transduction systems, enabling cells to sense and respond to a variety of molecular queues in a rapid, specific, and integrated fashion. Analogously, tailor-engineered protein switches with custom input and output functions have become invaluable research tools for reporting on distinct physiological states and actuating molecular functions in real time and in situ. Here, we analyze recent progress in constructing protein-based switches while assessing their potential in the assembly of defined signaling motifs. We anticipate such systems will ultimately pave the way towards a new generation of molecular diagnostics and facilitate the construction of artificial signaling systems that operate in parallel to the signaling machinery of a host cell for applications in synthetic biology.

  20. Aminoglycoside antibiotics: A-site specific binding to 16S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Erin Shammel; Dupuis, Nicholas F.; Bowers, Michael T.

    2009-06-01

    The A-site of 16S rRNA, which is a part of the 30S ribosomal subunit involved in prokaryotic translation, is a well known aminoglycoside binding site. Full characterization of the conformational changes undergone at the A-site upon aminoglycoside binding is essential for development of future RNA/drug complexes; however, the massiveness of 16S makes this very difficult. Recently, studies have found that a 27 base RNA construct (16S27) that comprises the A-site subdomain of 16S behaves similarly to the whole A-site domain. ESI-MS, ion mobility and molecular dynamics methods were utilized in this study to analyze the A-site of 16S27 before and after the addition of ribostamycin (R), paromomycin (P) and lividomycin (L). The ESI mass spectrum for 16S27 alone illustrated both single-stranded 16S27 and double-stranded (16S27)2 complexes. Upon aminoglycoside addition, the mass spectra showed that only one aminoglycoside binds to 16S27, while either one or two bind to (16S27)2. Ion mobility measurements and molecular dynamics calculations were utilized in determining the solvent-free structures of the 16S27 and (16S27)2 complexes. These studies found 16S27 in a hairpin conformation while (16S27)2 existed as a cruciform. Only one aminoglycoside binds to the single A-site of the 16S27 hairpin and this attachment compresses the hairpin. Since two A-sites exist for the (16S27)2 cruciform, either one or two aminoglycosides may bind. The aminoglycosides compress the A-sites causing the cruciform with just one aminoglycoside bound to be larger than the cruciform with two bound. Non-specific binding was not observed in any of the aminoglycoside/16S27 complexes.

  1. p53-Dependent PUMA to DRAM antagonistic interplay as a key molecular switch in cell-fate decision in normal/high glucose conditions.

    PubMed

    Garufi, Alessia; Pistritto, Giuseppa; Baldari, Silvia; Toietta, Gabriele; Cirone, Mara; D'Orazi, Gabriella

    2017-09-11

    As an important cellular stress sensor phosphoprotein p53 can trigger cell cycle arrest and apoptosis and regulate autophagy. The p53 activity mainly depends on its transactivating function, however, how p53 can select one or another biological outcome is still a matter of profound studies. Our previous findings indicate that switching cancer cells in high glucose (HG) impairs p53 apoptotic function and the transcription of target gene PUMA. Here we report that, in response to drug adriamycin (ADR) in HG, p53 efficiently induced the expression of DRAM (damage-regulated autophagy modulator), a p53 target gene and a stress-induced regulator of autophagy. We found that ADR treatment of cancer cells in HG increased autophagy, as displayed by greater LC3II accumulation and p62 degradation compared to ADR-treated cells in low glucose. The increased autophagy in HG was in part dependent on p53-induced DRAM; indeed DRAM knockdown with specific siRNA reversed the expression of the autophagic markers in HG. A similar outcome was achieved by inhibiting p53 transcriptional activity with pifithrin-α. DRAM knockdown restored the ADR-induced cell death in HG to the levels obtained in low glucose. A similar outcome was achieved by inhibition of autophagy with cloroquine (CQ) or with silencing of autophagy gene ATG5. DRAM knockdown or inhibition of autophagy were both able to re-induce PUMA transcription in response to ADR, underlining a reciprocal interplay between PUMA to DRAM to unbalance p53 apoptotic activity in HG. Xenograft tumors transplanted in normoglycemic mice displayed growth delay after ADR treatment compared to those transplanted in diabetics mice and such different in vivo response correlated with PUMA to DRAM gene expression. Altogether, these findings suggest that in normal/high glucose condition a mutual unbalance between p53-dependent apoptosis (PUMA) and autophagy (DRAM) gene occurred, modifying the ADR-induced cancer cell death in HG both in vitro and in vivo.

  2. A recurrent p.Arg92Trp variant in steroidogenic factor-1 (NR5A1) can act as a molecular switch in human sex development

    PubMed Central

    Bashamboo, Anu; Donohoue, Patricia A.; Vilain, Eric; Rojo, Sandra; Calvel, Pierre; Seneviratne, Sumudu N.; Buonocore, Federica; Barseghyan, Hayk; Bingham, Nathan; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Mulukutla, Surya Narayan; Jain, Mahim; Burrage, Lindsay; Dhar, Shweta; Balasubramanyam, Ashok; Lee, Brendan; Dumargne, Marie-Charlotte; Eozenou, Caroline; Suntharalingham, Jenifer P.; de Silva, KSH; Lin, Lin; Bignon-Topalovic, Joelle; Poulat, Francis; Lagos, Carlos F.; McElreavey, Ken; Achermann, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Cell lineages of the early human gonad commit to one of the two mutually antagonistic organogenetic fates, the testis or the ovary. Some individuals with a 46,XX karyotype develop testes or ovotestes (testicular or ovotesticular disorder of sex development; TDSD/OTDSD), due to the presence of the testis-determining gene, SRY. Other rare complex syndromic forms of TDSD/OTDSD are associated with mutations in pro-ovarian genes that repress testis development (e.g. WNT4); however, the genetic cause of the more common non-syndromic forms is unknown. Steroidogenic factor-1 (known as NR5A1) is a key regulator of reproductive development and function. Loss-of-function changes in NR5A1 in 46,XY individuals are associated with a spectrum of phenotypes in humans ranging from a lack of testis formation to male infertility. Mutations in NR5A1 in 46,XX women are associated with primary ovarian insufficiency, which includes a lack of ovary formation, primary and secondary amenorrhoea as well as early menopause. Here, we show that a specific recurrent heterozygous missense mutation (p.Arg92Trp) in the accessory DNA-binding region of NR5A1 is associated with variable degree of testis development in 46,XX children and adults from four unrelated families. Remarkably, in one family a sibling raised as a girl and carrying this NR5A1 mutation was found to have a 46,XY karyotype with partial testicular dysgenesis. These unique findings highlight how a specific variant in a developmental transcription factor can switch organ fate from the ovary to testis in mammals and represents the first missense mutation causing isolated, non-syndromic 46,XX testicular/ovotesticular DSD in humans. PMID:27378692

  3. REMOTE CONTROLLED SWITCHING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Hobbs, J.C.

    1959-02-01

    An electrical switching device which can be remotely controlled and in which one or more switches may be accurately operated at predetermined times or with predetermined intervening time intervals is described. The switching device consists essentially of a deck, a post projecting from the deck at right angles thereto, cam means mounted for rotation around said posts and a switch connected to said deck and actuated by said cam means. Means is provided for rotating the cam means at a constant speed and the switching apparatus is enclosed in a sealed container with external adjusting means and electrical connection elements.

  4. On the Switching Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balas, Valentina E.; Balas, Marius M.

    2009-04-01

    The paper is discussing the measures able to reject the instability that may unexpectedly appear in particular conditions, in switching controllers applications. The switching controllers' effect is explained by the combined effects of the unsuitable choice of the switching moments (in the first or third quadrants of the phase trajectory of the switching error) and of the temporal aliasing that can distort the digital control systems when the sampling rate is close to the frequency of the oscillations that are produced by the commutation. The correct switching moments are located into the second and fourth quadrants of the phase trajectory of the switching error, but an active preparation of the commutation may be simply achieved by using a tracking controller, that is driving the output of open loop controller to follow the output of the close loop controller, permanently minimizing the switching error. Simulations issued from a dc driver speed controller and from an aircraft are provided.

  5. Orbital order switching in molecular calculations using GGA functionals: Qualitative errors in materials modeling for electrochemical power sources and how to fix them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sk, Mahasin Alam; Chen, Yingqian; Manzhos, Sergei

    2016-08-01

    We report a qualitative difference in molecular band structures and frontier orbital nodal structures in DFT calculations using GGA vs. hybrid functionals and Hartree Fock in molecules used in electrochemical power sources. This can have a significant effect in applications sensitive to redox potentials and to orbital overlaps (excitations, electron transfer rates) but for which the use of hybrid functionals is impractical, such as solids or interfaces used in electrochemical energy conversion and storage technologies. We show that correct band structures and nodal structures (ordering) of frontier orbitals can be obtained by applying a Hubbard correction to selected atomic states.

  6. Enterovirus 71 binding to PSGL-1 on leukocytes: VP1-145 acts as a molecular switch to control receptor interaction.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Yorihiro; Lee, Hyunwook; Hafenstein, Susan; Kataoka, Chikako; Wakita, Takaji; Bergelson, Jeffrey M; Shimizu, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Some strains of enterovirus 71 (EV71), but not others, infect leukocytes by binding to a specific receptor molecule: the P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1). We find that a single amino acid residue within the capsid protein VP1 determines whether EV71 binds to PSGL-1. Examination of capsid sequences of representative EV71 strains revealed that the PSGL-1-binding viruses had either a G or a Q at residue 145 within the capsid protein VP1 (VP1-145G or Q), whereas PSGL-1-nonbinding viruses had VP1-145E. Using site-directed mutagenesis we found that PSGL-1-binding strains lost their capacity to bind when VP1-145G/Q was replaced by E; conversely, nonbinding strains gained the capacity to bind PSGL-1 when VP1-145E was replaced with either G or Q. Viruses with G/Q at VP1-145 productively infected a leukocyte cell line, Jurkat T-cells, whereas viruses with E at this position did not. We previously reported that EV71 binds to the N-terminal region of PSGL-1, and that binding depends on sulfated tyrosine residues within this region. We speculated that binding depends on interaction between negatively charged sulfate groups and positively charged basic residues in the virus capsid. VP1-145 on the virus surface is in close proximity to conserved lysine residues at VP1-242 and VP1-244. Comparison of recently published crystal structures of EV71 isolates with either Q or E at VP1-145 revealed that VP1-145 controls the orientation of the lysine side-chain of VP1-244: with VP1-145Q the lysine side chain faces outward, but with VP1-145E, the lysine side chain is turned toward the virus surface. Mutation of VP1-244 abolished virus binding to PSGL-1, and mutation of VP1-242 greatly reduced binding. We propose that conserved lysine residues on the virus surface are responsible for interaction with sulfated tyrosine residues at the PSGL-1 N-terminus, and that VP1-145 acts as a switch, controlling PSGL-1 binding by modulating the exposure of VP1-244K.

  7. Enterovirus 71 Binding to PSGL-1 on Leukocytes: VP1-145 Acts as a Molecular Switch to Control Receptor Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Yorihiro; Lee, Hyunwook; Hafenstein, Susan; Kataoka, Chikako; Wakita, Takaji; Bergelson, Jeffrey M.; Shimizu, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Some strains of enterovirus 71 (EV71), but not others, infect leukocytes by binding to a specific receptor molecule: the P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1). We find that a single amino acid residue within the capsid protein VP1 determines whether EV71 binds to PSGL-1. Examination of capsid sequences of representative EV71 strains revealed that the PSGL-1-binding viruses had either a G or a Q at residue 145 within the capsid protein VP1 (VP1-145G or Q), whereas PSGL-1-nonbinding viruses had VP1-145E. Using site-directed mutagenesis we found that PSGL-1-binding strains lost their capacity to bind when VP1-145G/Q was replaced by E; conversely, nonbinding strains gained the capacity to bind PSGL-1 when VP1-145E was replaced with either G or Q. Viruses with G/Q at VP1-145 productively infected a leukocyte cell line, Jurkat T-cells, whereas viruses with E at this position did not. We previously reported that EV71 binds to the N-terminal region of PSGL-1, and that binding depends on sulfated tyrosine residues within this region. We speculated that binding depends on interaction between negatively charged sulfate groups and positively charged basic residues in the virus capsid. VP1-145 on the virus surface is in close proximity to conserved lysine residues at VP1-242 and VP1-244. Comparison of recently published crystal structures of EV71 isolates with either Q or E at VP1-145 revealed that VP1-145 controls the orientation of the lysine side-chain of VP1-244: with VP1-145Q the lysine side chain faces outward, but with VP1-145E, the lysine side chain is turned toward the virus surface. Mutation of VP1-244 abolished virus binding to PSGL-1, and mutation of VP1-242 greatly reduced binding. We propose that conserved lysine residues on the virus surface are responsible for interaction with sulfated tyrosine residues at the PSGL-1 N-terminus, and that VP1-145 acts as a switch, controlling PSGL-1 binding by modulating the exposure of VP1-244K. PMID:23935488

  8. Optoelectronic techniques for broadband switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, S. F.; Jou, L.; Lenart, J.

    1988-01-01

    Optoelectronic switching employs a hybrid optical/electronic principle to perform the switching function and is applicable for either analog broadband or high-bit rate digital switching. The major advantages of optoelectronic switching include high isolation, low crosstalk, small physical size, light weight, and low power consumption. These advantages make optoelectronic switching an excellent candidate for on-board satellite switching. This paper describes a number of optoelectronic switching architectures. System components required for implementing these switching architectures are discussed. Performance of these architectures are evaluated by calculating their crosstalk, isolation, insertion loss, matrix size, drive power, throughput, and switching speed. Technologies needed for monolithic optoelectronic switching are also identified.

  9. Resonance Energy Transfer-Based Molecular Switch Designed Using a Systematic Design Process Based on Monte Carlo Methods and Markov Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rallapalli, Arjun

    A RET network consists of a network of photo-active molecules called chromophores that can participate in inter-molecular energy transfer called resonance energy transfer (RET). RET networks are used in a variety of applications including cryptographic devices, storage systems, light harvesting complexes, biological sensors, and molecular rulers. In this dissertation, we focus on creating a RET device called closed-diffusive exciton valve (C-DEV) in which the input to output transfer function is controlled by an external energy source, similar to a semiconductor transistor like the MOSFET. Due to their biocompatibility, molecular devices like the C-DEVs can be used to introduce computing power in biological, organic, and aqueous environments such as living cells. Furthermore, the underlying physics in RET devices are stochastic in nature, making them suitable for stochastic computing in which true random distribution generation is critical. In order to determine a valid configuration of chromophores for the C-DEV, we developed a systematic process based on user-guided design space pruning techniques and built-in simulation tools. We show that our C-DEV is 15x better than C-DEVs designed using ad hoc methods that rely on limited data from prior experiments. We also show ways in which the C-DEV can be improved further and how different varieties of C-DEVs can be combined to form more complex logic circuits. Moreover, the systematic design process can be used to search for valid chromophore network configurations for a variety of RET applications. We also describe a feasibility study for a technique used to control the orientation of chromophores attached to DNA. Being able to control the orientation can expand the design space for RET networks because it provides another parameter to tune their collective behavior. While results showed limited control over orientation, the analysis required the development of a mathematical model that can be used to determine the

  10. A Mechanochemical Switch to Control Radical Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    B12-dependent enzymes employ radical species with exceptional prowess to catalyze some of the most chemically challenging, thermodynamically unfavorable reactions. However, dealing with highly reactive intermediates is an extremely demanding task, requiring sophisticated control strategies to prevent unwanted side reactions. Using hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations, we follow the full catalytic cycle of an AdoB12-dependent enzyme and present the details of a mechanism that utilizes a highly effective mechanochemical switch. When the switch is “off”, the 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical moiety is stabilized by releasing the internal strain of an enzyme-imposed conformation. Turning the switch “on,” the enzyme environment becomes the driving force to impose a distinct conformation of the 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical to avoid deleterious radical transfer. This mechanochemical switch illustrates the elaborate way in which enzymes attain selectivity of extremely chemically challenging reactions. PMID:24846280

  11. A mechanochemical switch to control radical intermediates.

    PubMed

    Brunk, Elizabeth; Kellett, Whitney F; Richards, Nigel G J; Rothlisberger, Ursula

    2014-06-17

    B₁₂-dependent enzymes employ radical species with exceptional prowess to catalyze some of the most chemically challenging, thermodynamically unfavorable reactions. However, dealing with highly reactive intermediates is an extremely demanding task, requiring sophisticated control strategies to prevent unwanted side reactions. Using hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations, we follow the full catalytic cycle of an AdoB₁₂-dependent enzyme and present the details of a mechanism that utilizes a highly effective mechanochemical switch. When the switch is "off", the 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical moiety is stabilized by releasing the internal strain of an enzyme-imposed conformation. Turning the switch "on," the enzyme environment becomes the driving force to impose a distinct conformation of the 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical to avoid deleterious radical transfer. This mechanochemical switch illustrates the elaborate way in which enzymes attain selectivity of extremely chemically challenging reactions.

  12. Engineering a Chemical Switch into the Light-driven Proton Pump Proteorhodopsin by Cysteine Mutagenesis and Thiol Modification.

    PubMed

    Harder, Daniel; Hirschi, Stephan; Ucurum, Zöhre; Goers, Roland; Meier, Wolfgang; Müller, Daniel J; Fotiadis, Dimitrios

    2016-07-25

    For applications in synthetic biology, for example, the bottom-up assembly of biomolecular nanofactories, modules of specific and controllable functionalities are essential. Of fundamental importance in such systems are energizing modules, which are able to establish an electrochemical gradient across a vesicular membrane as an energy source for powering other modules. Light-driven proton pumps like proteorhodopsin (PR) are excellent candidates for efficient energy conversion. We have extended the versatility of PR by implementing an on/off switch based on reversible chemical modification of a site-specifically introduced cysteine residue. The position of this cysteine residue in PR was identified by structure-based cysteine mutagenesis combined with a proton-pumping assay using E. coli cells overexpressing PR and PR proteoliposomes. The identified PR mutant represents the first light-driven proton pump that can be chemically switched on/off depending on the requirements of the molecular system.

  13. Monolithic Microwave Switching Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujikawa, Gene; Ch'en, Daniel R.; Petersen, Wendell C.

    1989-01-01

    Gallium arsenide integrated-circuit chip switches any of three microwave input signals to any of three output ports. Measuring 4.9 mm on side, chip contains nine field-effect transistor (FET) crosspoint switches. Housed in custom-designed package with standard connectors for easy integration into system. FET's on chip operated as passive switches and consume no static power and insignificant amounts of switching power. Chip module cascades with similar modules into large arrays handling as many as 100 inputs and 100 outputs. Applications include switching and routing vast amounts of data between computers at extremely high speed. On communications satellite, chip switches microwave signals to and from Earth stations and other satellites.

  14. Effective switching frequency multiplier inverter

    DOEpatents

    Su, Gui-Jia; Peng, Fang Z.

    2007-08-07

    A switching frequency multiplier inverter for low inductance machines that uses parallel connection of switches and each switch is independently controlled according to a pulse width modulation scheme. The effective switching frequency is multiplied by the number of switches connected in parallel while each individual switch operates within its limit of switching frequency. This technique can also be used for other power converters such as DC/DC, AC/DC converters.

  15. The magnetoelectrochemical switch.

    PubMed

    Popa, Petru Lunca; Kemp, Neil T; Majjad, Hicham; Dalmas, Guillaume; Faramarzi, Vina; Andreas, Christian; Hertel, Riccardo; Doudin, Bernard

    2014-07-22

    In the field of spintronics, the archetype solid-state two-terminal device is the spin valve, where the resistance is controlled by the magnetization configuration. We show here how this concept of spin-dependent switch can be extended to magnetic electrodes in solution, by magnetic control of their chemical environment. Appropriate nanoscale design allows a huge enhancement of the magnetic force field experienced by paramagnetic molecular species in solutions, which changes between repulsive and attractive on changing the electrodes' magnetic orientations. Specifically, the field gradient force created within a sub-100-nm-sized nanogap separating two magnetic electrodes can be reversed by changing the orientation of the electrodes' magnetization relative to the current flowing between the electrodes. This can result in a breaking or making of an electric nanocontact, with a change of resistance by a factor of up to 10(3). The results reveal how an external field can impact chemical equilibrium in the vicinity of nanoscale magnetic circuits.

  16. The magnetoelectrochemical switch

    PubMed Central

    Lunca Popa, Petru; Kemp, Neil T.; Majjad, Hicham; Dalmas, Guillaume; Faramarzi, Vina; Andreas, Christian; Hertel, Riccardo; Doudin, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    In the field of spintronics, the archetype solid-state two-terminal device is the spin valve, where the resistance is controlled by the magnetization configuration. We show here how this concept of spin-dependent switch can be extended to magnetic electrodes in solution, by magnetic control of their chemical environment. Appropriate nanoscale design allows a huge enhancement of the magnetic force field experienced by paramagnetic molecular species in solutions, which changes between repulsive and attractive on changing the electrodes’ magnetic orientations. Specifically, the field gradient force created within a sub-100-nm-sized nanogap separating two magnetic electrodes can be reversed by changing the orientation of the electrodes’ magnetization relative to the current flowing between the electrodes. This can result in a breaking or making of an electric nanocontact, with a change of resistance by a factor of up to 103. The results reveal how an external field can impact chemical equilibrium in the vicinity of nanoscale magnetic circuits. PMID:25009179

  17. Double-Bounce Switching

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    module. Adjustments provided to investigate double- bounce switching are noted. limitation is at a higher level and occurs in the conventionally...To be presented at the 4th IEEE PUlsed Power Conference, June 6-8, 1983, Albuquerque, NM. DOUBLE- BOUNCE SWITCHING* George B. Frazier and Steven R...Ashby Physics International Company 2700 Merced Street San Leandro, California 94577 Abstract Double- bounce switching is a technique for

  18. Avalanche Photoconductive Switching

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    held off across the switch. In our case this corresponds to 70 kV/cm and is limited by surface flashover . The pulse length is determined by the...off across the gap of the switch, which in turn appears to be limited by surface flashover . There appears to be a threshold electric field of 20-60...and understand this mode of operation. Introduction Laser activated photoconductive switching in semiconductors is a promising technology for high

  19. Thermally actuated thermionic switch

    DOEpatents

    Barrus, Donald M.; Shires, Charles D.

    1988-01-01

    A thermally actuated thermionic switch which responds to an increase of temperature by changing from a high impedance to a low impedance at a predictable temperature set point. The switch has a bistable operation mode switching only on temperature increases. The thermionic material may be a metal which is liquid at the desired operation temperature and held in matrix in a graphite block reservoir, and which changes state (ionizes, for example) so as to be electrically conductive at a desired temperature.

  20. Thermally actuated thermionic switch

    DOEpatents

    Barrus, D.M.; Shires, C.D.

    1982-09-30

    A thermally actuated thermionic switch which responds to an increase of temperature by changing from a high impedance to a low impedance at a predictable temperature set point. The switch has a bistable operation mode switching only on temperature increases. The thermionic material may be a metal which is liquid at the desired operation temperature and held in matrix in a graphite block reservoir, and which changes state (ionizes, for example) so as to be electrically conductive at a desired temperature.

  1. Solid state switch

    DOEpatents

    Merritt, Bernard T.; Dreifuerst, Gary R.

    1994-01-01

    A solid state switch, with reverse conducting thyristors, is designed to operate at 20 kV hold-off voltage, 1500 A peak, 1.0 .mu.s pulsewidth, and 4500 pps, to replace thyratrons. The solid state switch is more reliable, more economical, and more easily repaired. The switch includes a stack of circuit card assemblies, a magnetic assist and a trigger chassis. Each circuit card assembly contains a reverse conducting thyristor, a resistor capacitor network, and triggering circuitry.

  2. AC magnetohydrodynamic microfluidic switch

    SciTech Connect

    Lemoff, A V; Lee, A P

    2000-03-02

    A microfluidic switch has been demonstrated using an AC Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pumping mechanism in which the Lorentz force is used to pump an electrolytic solution. By integrating two AC MHD pumps into different arms of a Y-shaped fluidic circuit, flow can be switched between the two arms. This type of switch can be used to produce complex fluidic routing, which may have multiple applications in {micro}TAS.

  3. Binding properties of ruthenium(II) complexes [Ru(bpy)2(ppn)](2+) and [Ru(phen)2(ppn)](2+) with triplex RNA: As molecular "light switches" and stabilizers for poly(U)·poly(A)*poly(U) triplex.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Sun, Yanmei; Zhu, Zhiyuan; Zhao, Hong; Tan, Lifeng

    2016-08-01

    Stable RNA triplexes play key roles in many biological processes, while triplexes are thermodynamically less stable than the corresponding duplexes due to the Hoogsteen base pairing. To understand the factors affecting the stabilization of RNA triplexes by octahedral ruthenium(II) complexes, the binding of [Ru(bpy)2(ppn)](2+) (1, bpy=2,2'-bipyridine, ppn=2,4-diaminopyrimido[5,6-b]dipyrido[2,3-f:2',3'-h]quinoxaline) and [Ru(phen)2(ppn)](2+) (2, phen=1,10-phenanthroline) to poly(U)·poly(A)*poly(U) (· denotes the Watson-Crick base pairing and * denotes the Hoogsteen base pairing) has been investigated. The main results obtained here suggest that complexes 1 and 2 can serve as molecular "light switches" and stabilizers for poly(U)·poly(A)*poly(U), while the effectiveness of complex 2 are more marked, suggesting that the hydrophobicity of ancillary ligands has a significant effect on the two Ru(II) complexes binding to poly(U)·poly(A)*poly(U). This study further advances our knowledge on the binding of RNA triplexes with metal complexes, particularly with octahedral ruthenium polypyridyl complexes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. The viral oncogene Np9 acts as a critical molecular switch for co-activating β-catenin, ERK, Akt and Notch1 and promoting the growth of human leukemia stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, T; Meng, Z; Gan, Y; Wang, X; Xu, F; Gu, Y; Xu, X; Tang, J; Zhou, H; Zhang, X; Gan, X; Van Ness, C; Xu, G; Huang, L; Zhang, X; Fang, Y; Wu, J; Zheng, S; Jin, J; Huang, W; Xu, R

    2013-07-01

    HERV-K (human endogenous retrovirus type K) type 1-encoded Np9 is a tumor-specific biomarker, but its oncogenic role and targets in human leukemia remain elusive. We first identified Np9 as a potent viral oncogene in human leukemia. Silencing of Np9 inhibited the growth of myeloid and lymphoblastic leukemic cells, whereas expression of Np9 significantly promoted the growth of leukemia cells in vitro and in vivo. Np9 not only activated ERK, AKT and Notch1 pathways but also upregulated β-catenin essential for survival of leukemia stem cells. In human leukemia, Np9 protein level in leukemia patients was substantially higher than that in normal donors (56% vs 4.5%). Moreover, Np9 protein level was correlated with the number of leukemia stem/progenitor cells but not detected in normal CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells. In addition, Np9-positive samples highly expressed leukemia-specific pol-env polyprotein, env and transmembrane proteins as well as viral particles. Thus, the viral oncogene Np9 is a critical molecular switch of multiple signaling pathways regulating the growth of leukemia stem/progenitor cells. These findings open a new perspective to understand the etiology of human common leukemia and provide a novel target for treating leukemia.

  5. Hydrophobic fluorine mediated switching of the hydrogen bonding site as well as orientation of water molecules in the aqueous mixture of monofluoroethanol: IR, molecular dynamics and quantum chemical studies.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Saptarsi; Biswas, Biswajit; Nandy, Tonima; Singh, Prashant Chandra

    2017-08-31

    The local structures between water-water, alcohol-water and alcohol-alcohol have been investigated for aqueous mixtures of ethanol (ETH) and monofluoroethanol (MFE) by the deconvolution of IR bands in the OH stretching region, molecular dynamics simulation and quantum chemical calculations. It has been found that the addition of a small amount of ETH into the aqueous medium increases the strength of the hydrogen bonds between water molecules. In an aqueous mixture of MFE, the substitution of a single fluorine induces a change in the orientation as well as the hydrogen bonding site of water molecules from the oxygen to the fluorine terminal of MFE. The switching of the hydrogen bonding site of water in the aqueous mixture of MFE results in comparatively strong hydrogen bonds between MFE and water molecules as well as less clustering of water molecules, unlike the case of the aqueous mixture of ETH. These findings about the modification of a hydrogen bond network by the hydrophobic fluorine group probably make fluorinated molecules useful for pharmaceutical as well as biological applications.

  6. The transcriptional complex between the BCL2 i-motif and hnRNP LL is a molecular switch for control of gene expression that can be modulated by small molecules.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyun-Jin; Kendrick, Samantha; Hecht, Sidney M; Hurley, Laurence H

    2014-03-19

    In a companion paper (DOI: 10.021/ja410934b) we demonstrate that the C-rich strand of the cis-regulatory element in the BCL2 promoter element is highly dynamic in nature and can form either an i-motif or a flexible hairpin. Under physiological conditions these two secondary DNA structures are found in an equilibrium mixture, which can be shifted by the addition of small molecules that trap out either the i-motif (IMC-48) or the flexible hairpin (IMC-76). In cellular experiments we demonstrate that the addition of these molecules has opposite effects on BCL2 gene expression and furthermore that these effects are antagonistic. In this contribution we have identified a transcriptional factor that recognizes and binds to the BCL2 i-motif to activate transcription. The molecular basis for the recognition of the i-motif by hnRNP LL is determined, and we demonstrate that the protein unfolds the i-motif structure to form a stable single-stranded complex. In subsequent experiments we show that IMC-48 and IMC-76 have opposite, antagonistic effects on the formation of the hnRNP LL-i-motif complex as well as on the transcription factor occupancy at the BCL2 promoter. For the first time we propose that the i-motif acts as a molecular switch that controls gene expression and that small molecules that target the dynamic equilibrium of the i-motif and the flexible hairpin can differentially modulate gene expression.

  7. The prolyl isomerase Pin1 acts as a novel molecular switch for TNF-α–induced priming of the NADPH oxidase in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Boussetta, Tarek; Gougerot-Pocidalo, Marie-Anne; Hayem, Gilles; Ciappelloni, Silvia; Raad, Houssam; Arabi Derkawi, Riad; Bournier, Odile; Kroviarski, Yolande; Zhou, Xiao Zhen; Malter, James S.; Lu, Ping K.; Bartegi, Aghleb; Dang, Pham My-Chan

    2010-01-01

    Neutrophils play a key role in host defense by releasing reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, excessive ROS production by neutrophil nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase can damage bystander tissues, thereby contributing to inflammatory diseases. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), a major mediator of inflammation, does not activate NADPH oxidase but induces a state of hyperresponsiveness to subsequent stimuli, an action known as priming. The molecular mechanisms by which TNF-α primes the NADPH oxidase are unknown. Here we show that Pin1, a unique cis-trans prolyl isomerase, is a previously unrecognized regulator of TNF-α–induced NADPH oxidase hyperactivation. We first showed that Pin1 is expressed in neutrophil cytosol and that its activity is markedly enhanced by TNF-α. Inhibition of Pin1 activity with juglone or with a specific peptide inhibitor abrogated TNF-α–induced priming of neutrophil ROS production induced by N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine peptide (fMLF). TNF-α enhanced fMLF-induced Pin1 and p47phox translocation to the membranes and juglone inhibited this process. Pin1 binds to p47phox via phosphorylated Ser345, thereby inducing conformational changes that facilitate p47phox phosphorylation on other sites by protein kinase C. These findings indicate that Pin1 is critical for TNF-α–induced priming of NADPH oxidase and for excessive ROS production. Pin1 inhibition could potentially represent a novel anti-inflammatory strategy. PMID:20956805

  8. Switching to nilotinib in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase with molecular suboptimal response to frontline imatinib: SENSOR final results and BIM polymorphism substudy.

    PubMed

    Miyamura, Koichi; Miyamoto, Toshihiro; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Yamamoto, Kazuhito; Kimura, Shinya; Kawaguchi, Tatsuya; Matsumura, Itaru; Hata, Tomoko; Tsurumi, Hisashi; Saito, Shigeki; Hino, Masayuki; Tadokoro, Seiji; Meguro, Kuniaki; Hyodo, Hideo; Yamamoto, Masahide; Kubo, Kohmei; Tsukada, Junichi; Kondo, Midori; Aoki, Makoto; Okada, Hikaru; Yanada, Masamitsu; Ohyashiki, Kazuma; Taniwaki, Masafumi

    2016-12-01

    Optimal management of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase with suboptimal molecular response (MR) to frontline imatinib is undefined. We report final results from SENSOR, which evaluated efficacy/safety of nilotinib in this setting. A substudy assessed whether BIM polymorphisms impacted response to nilotinib. In this single-arm, multicenter study, Japanese patients with suboptimal MR per European LeukemiaNet 2009 criteria (complete cytogenetic response, but not major MR [MMR]) after ≥18 months of frontline imatinib received nilotinib 400mg twice daily for 24 months. MR, BCR-ABL1 mutations/variants, and BIM polymorphisms were evaluated in a central laboratory. Primary endpoint was the MMR rate at 12 months (null hypothesis of 40%). Of 45 patients (median exposure, 22.08 months), 39 completed the study and six discontinued. At 12 and 24 months, 51.1% (95% CI, 35.8%-66.3%) and 66.7% (95% CI, 51.0%-80.0%) achieved MMR, respectively. Cumulative MMR incidence by 24 months was 75.6%. Of 40 patients analyzed, 10 of 12 (83.3%) with and 17 of 28 (60.7%) without BIM polymorphisms achieved MMR at 24 months. The safety profile was manageable with dose reductions and interruptions. Nilotinib provided clinical benefit for patients with suboptimal response to imatinib, and BIM polymorphisms did not influence MMR achievement. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01043874.

  9. Alarm toe switch

    DOEpatents

    Ganyard, Floyd P.

    1982-01-01

    An alarm toe switch inserted within a shoe for energizing an alarm circuit n a covert manner includes an insole mounting pad into which a miniature reed switch is fixedly molded. An elongated slot perpendicular to the reed switch is formed in the bottom surface of the mounting pad. A permanent cylindrical magnet positioned in the forward portion of the slot with a diameter greater than the pad thickness causes a bump above the pad. A foam rubber block is also positioned in the slot rearwardly of the magnet and holds the magnet in normal inoperative relation. A non-magnetic support plate covers the slot and holds the magnet and foam rubber in the slot. The plate minimizes bending and frictional forces to improve movement of the magnet for reliable switch activation. The bump occupies the knuckle space beneath the big toe. When the big toe is scrunched rearwardly the magnet is moved within the slot relative to the reed switch, thus magnetically activating the switch. When toe pressure is released the foam rubber block forces the magnet back into normal inoperative position to deactivate the reed switch. The reed switch is hermetically sealed with the magnet acting through the wall so the switch assembly S is capable of reliable operation even in wet and corrosive environments.

  10. Reusable fast opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Van Devender, J.P.; Emin, D.

    1983-12-21

    A reusable fast opening switch for transferring energy, in the form of a high power pulse, from an electromagnetic storage device such as an inductor into a load. The switch is efficient, compact, fast and reusable. The switch comprises a ferromagnetic semiconductor which undergoes a fast transition between conductive and metallic states at a critical temperature and which undergoes the transition without a phase change in its crystal structure. A semiconductor such as europium rich europhous oxide, which undergoes a conductor to insulator transition when it is joule heated from its conductor state, can be used to form the switch.

  11. Reusable fast opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Van Devender, John P.; Emin, David

    1986-01-01

    A reusable fast opening switch for transferring energy, in the form of a high power pulse, from an electromagnetic storage device such as an inductor into a load. The switch is efficient, compact, fast and reusable. The switch comprises a ferromagnetic semiconductor which undergoes a fast transition between conductive and insulating states at a critical temperature and which undergoes the transition without a phase change in its crystal structure. A semiconductor such as europium rich europhous oxide, which undergoes a conductor to insulator transition when it is joule heated from its conductor state, can be used to form the switch.

  12. Platform switching and bone platform switching.

    PubMed

    Carinci, Francesco; Brunelli, Giorgio; Danza, Matteo

    2009-01-01

    Bone platform switching involves an inward bone ring in the coronal part of the implant that is in continuity with the alveolar bone crest. Bone platform switching is obtained by using a dental fixture with a reverse conical neck. A retrospective study was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of conventional vs reverse conical neck implants. In the period between May 2004 and November 2007, 86 patients (55 females and 31 males; median age, 53 years) were operated and 234 implants were inserted: 40 and 194 were conventional vs reverse conical neck implants, respectively. Kaplan-Meier algorithm and Cox regression were used to detect those variables associated with the clinical outcome. No differences in survival and success rates were detected between conventional vs reverse conical neck implants alone or in combination with any of the studied variables. Although bone platform switching leads to several advantages, no statistical difference in alveolar crest resorption is detected in comparison with reverse conical neck implants. We suppose that the proximity of the implant abutment junction to the alveolar crestal bone gives no protection against the microflora contained in the micrograph. Additional studies on larger series and a combination of platform switching and bone platform switching could lead to improved clinical outcomes.

  13. Emergence of phenotype switching through continuous and discontinuous evolutionary transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Pintu; Klumpp, Stefan

    2015-07-01

    Bacterial persistence (phenotypic tolerance to antibiotics) provides a prime example of bet-hedging, where normally growing cells generate slow-growing but antibiotic-tolerant persister cells to survive through periods of exposure to antibiotics. The population dynamics of persistence is explained by a phenotype switching mechanism that allows individual cells to switch between these different cellular states with different environmental sensitivities. Here, we perform a theoretical study based on an exact solution for the case of a periodic variation of the environment to address how phenotype switching emerges and under what conditions switching is or is not beneficial for long-time growth. Specifically we report a bifurcation through which a fitness maximum and minimum emerge above a threshold in the duration of exposure to the antibiotic. Only above this threshold, the optimal phenotype switching rates are adjusted to the time scales of the environment, as emphasized by previous theoretical studies, while below the threshold a non-switching population is fitter than a switching one. The bifurcation can be of different type, depending on how the phenotype switching rates are allowed to vary. If the switching rates for both directions of the switch are coupled, the transition is discontinuous and results in evolutionary hysteresis, which we confirm with a stochastic simulation. If the switching rates vary individually, a continuous transition is obtained and no hysteresis is found. We discuss how both scenarios can be linked to changes in the underlying molecular networks.

  14. Light‐Induced Switching of Tunable Single‐Molecule Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Sendler, Torsten; Luka‐Guth, Katharina; Wieser, Matthias; Lokamani; Wolf, Jannic; Helm, Manfred; Gemming, Sibylle; Kerbusch, Jochen; Scheer, Elke; Huhn, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A major goal of molecular electronics is the development and implementation of devices such as single‐molecular switches. Here, measurements are presented that show the controlled in situ switching of diarylethene molecules from their nonconductive to conductive state in contact to gold nanoelectrodes via controlled light irradiation. Both the conductance and the quantum yield for switching of these molecules are within a range making the molecules suitable for actual devices. The conductance of the molecular junctions in the opened and closed states is characterized and the molecular level E 0, which dominates the current transport in the closed state, and its level broadening Γ are identified. The obtained results show a clear light‐induced ring forming isomerization of the single‐molecule junctions. Electron withdrawing side‐groups lead to a reduction of conductance, but do not influence the efficiency of the switching mechanism. Quantum chemical calculations of the light‐induced switching processes correlate these observations with the fundamentally different low‐lying electronic states of the opened and closed forms and their comparably small modification by electron‐withdrawing substituents. This full characterization of a molecular switch operated in a molecular junction is an important step toward the development of real molecular electronics devices. PMID:27980936

  15. Asymmetrical Switch Costs in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellefson, Michelle R.; Shapiron, Laura R.; Chater, Nick

    2006-01-01

    Switching between tasks produces decreases in performance as compared to repeating the same task. Asymmetrical switch costs occur when switching between two tasks of unequal difficulty. This asymmetry occurs because the cost is greater when switching to the less difficult task than when switching to the more difficult task. Various theories about…

  16. Quantum cryptography without switching.

    PubMed

    Weedbrook, Christian; Lance, Andrew M; Bowen, Warwick P; Symul, Thomas; Ralph, Timothy C; Lam, Ping Koy

    2004-10-22

    We propose a new coherent state quantum key distribution protocol that eliminates the need to randomly switch between measurement bases. This protocol provides significantly higher secret key rates with increased bandwidths than previous schemes that only make single quadrature measurements. It also offers the further advantage of simplicity compared to all previous protocols which, to date, have relied on switching.

  17. Power-Switching Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praver, Gerald A.; Theisinger, Peter C.; Genofsky, John

    1987-01-01

    Functions of circuit breakers, meters, and switches combined. Circuit that includes power field-effect transistors (PFET's) provides on/off switching, soft starting, current monitoring, current tripping, and protection against overcurrent for 30-Vdc power supply at normal load currents up to 2 A. Has no moving parts.

  18. Reflective HTS switch

    DOEpatents

    Martens, J.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Hohenwarter, G.K.G.

    1994-09-27

    A HTS (High Temperature Superconductor) switch includes a HTS conductor for providing a superconducting path for an electrical signal and an serpentine wire actuator for controllably heating a portion of the conductor sufficiently to cause that portion to have normal, and not superconducting, resistivity. Mass of the portion is reduced to decrease switching time. 6 figs.

  19. Reflective HTS switch

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, Jon S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Hohenwarter, Gert K. G.

    1994-01-01

    A HTS switch includes a HTS conductor for providing a superconducting path for an electrical signal and an serpentine wire actuator for controllably heating a portion of the conductor sufficiently to cause that portion to have normal, and not superconducting, resistivity. Mass of the portion is reduced to decrease switching time.

  20. Manually operated coded switch

    DOEpatents

    Barnette, Jon H.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a manually operated recodable coded switch in which a code may be inserted, tried and used to actuate a lever controlling an external device. After attempting a code, the switch's code wheels must be returned to their zero positions before another try is made.

  1. Mercury/homocysteine ligation-induced ON/OFF-switching of a T-T mismatch-based oligonucleotide molecular beacon.

    PubMed

    Stobiecka, Magdalena; Molinero, Anthony A; Chałupa, Agata; Hepel, Maria

    2012-06-05

    A molecular beacon (MB) with stem-loop (hairpin) DNA structure and with attached fluorophore-quencher pair at the ends of the strand has been applied to study the interactions of Hg(2+) ions with a thymine-thymine (T-T) mismatch in Watson-Crick base-pairs and the ligative disassembly of MB·Hg(2+) complex by Hg(2+) sequestration with small biomolecule ligands. In this work, a five base-pair stem with configuration 5'-GGTGG...CCTCC-3' for self-hybridization of MB has been utilized. In this configuration, the four GC base-pair binding energy is not sufficient to hybridize fully at intermediate temperatures and to form a hairpin MB conformation. The T-T mismatch built-in into the stem area can effectively bind Hg(2+) ions creating a bridge, T-Hg-T. We have found that the T-Hg-T bridge strongly enhances the ability of MB to hybridize, as evidenced by an unusually large MB melting temperature shift observed on bridge formation, ΔT(m) = +15.1 ± 0.5 °C, for 100 nM MB in MOPS buffer. The observed ΔT(m) is the largest of the ΔT(m) found for other MBs and dsDNA structures. By fitting the parameters of the proposed model of reversible MB interactions to the experimental data, we have determined the T-Hg-T bridge formation constant at 25 °C, K(1) = 8.92 ± 0.42 × 10(17) M(-1) from mercury(II) titration data and K(1) = 1.04 ± 0.51 × 10(18) M(-1) from the bridge disassembly data; ΔG° = -24.53 ± 0.13 kcal/mol. We have found that the biomarker of oxidative stress and cardiovascular disease, homocysteine (Hcys), can sequester Hg(2+) ions from the T-Hg-T complex and withdraw Hg(2+) ions from MB in the form of stable Hg(Hcys)(2)H(2) complexes. Both the model fitting and independent (1)H NMR results on the thymidine-Hg-Hcys system indicate also the high importance of 1:1 complexes. The high value of K(1) for T-Hg-T bridge formation enables analytical determinations of low concentrations of Hg(2+) (limit of detection LOD = 19 nM or 3.8 ppb, based on 3σ method) and Hcys

  2. Erected mirror optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Allen, James J.

    2005-06-07

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) optical switching apparatus is disclosed that is based on an erectable mirror which is formed on a rotatable stage using surface micromachining. An electrostatic actuator is also formed on the substrate to rotate the stage and mirror with a high angular precision. The mirror can be erected manually after fabrication of the device and used to redirect an incident light beam at an arbitrary angel and to maintain this state in the absence of any applied electrical power. A 1.times.N optical switch can be formed using a single rotatable mirror. In some embodiments of the present invention, a plurality of rotatable mirrors can be configured so that the stages and mirrors rotate in unison when driven by a single micromotor thereby forming a 2.times.2 optical switch which can be used to switch a pair of incident light beams, or as a building block to form a higher-order optical switch.

  3. Optical packet switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekel, Eyal; Ruschin, Shlomo; Majer, Daniel; Levy, Jeff; Matmon, Guy; Koenigsberg, Lisa; Vecht, Jacob; Geron, Amir; Harlavan, Rotem; Shfaram, Harel; Arbel, Arnon; McDermott, Tom; Brewer, Tony

    2005-02-01

    We report here a scalable, multichassis, 6.3 terabit core router, which utilizes our proprietary optical switch. The router is commercially available and deployed in several customer sites. Our solution combines optical switching with electronic routing. An internal optical packet switching network interconnects the router"s electronic line cards, where routing and buffering functions take place electronically. The system architecture and performance will be described. The optical switch is based on Optical Phased Array (OPA) technology. It is a 64 x 64, fully non-blocking, optical crossbar switch, capable of switching in a fraction of a nanosecond. The basic principles of operation will be explained. Loss and crosstalk results will be presented, as well as the results of BER measurements of a 160 Gbps transmission through one channel. Basic principles of operation and measured results will be presented for the burst-mode-receivers, arbitration algorithm and synchronization. Finally, we will present some of our current research work on a next-generation optical switch. The technological issues we have solved in our internal optical packet network can have broad applicability to any global optical packet network.

  4. Optical Circuit Switched Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monacos, Steve P. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a system and method embodied in an optical circuit switched protocol for the transmission of data through a network. The optical circuit switched protocol is an all-optical circuit switched network and includes novel optical switching nodes for transmitting optical data packets within a network. Each optical switching node comprises a detector for receiving the header, header detection logic for translating the header into routing information and eliminating the header, and a controller for receiving the routing information and configuring an all optical path within the node. The all optical path located within the node is solely an optical path without having electronic storage of the data and without having optical delay of the data. Since electronic storage of the header is not necessary and the initial header is eliminated by the first detector of the first switching node. multiple identical headers are sent throughout the network so that subsequent switching nodes can receive and read the header for setting up an optical data path.

  5. Pretilt Angle Dependence of the Switching Behavior in the Intrinsic Half-V-Shaped Switching Ferroelectric Liquid Crystal Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asao, Yasufumi; Togano, Takeshi

    2003-07-01

    The intrinsic half-V-shaped switching ferroelectric liquid crystal mode (iHV-FLC mode) which is obtained from a material with isotropic (Iso.), cholesteric (Ch) and chiral smectic C (SmC*) phase transition sequences can easily yield excellent moving pictures. There are very few reports of liquid crystal (LC) molecular alignment during the Ch-SmC* phase transition sequence although it is important to clarify the molecular alignment and switching behavior in order to improve device characteristics such as the contrast ratio. We have conducted a detailed observation of the switching behavior of a cell with a striped texture and examined the pretilt angle dependence of the alignment state.

  6. Electromechanical magnetization switching

    SciTech Connect

    Chudnovsky, Eugene M.; Jaafar, Reem

    2015-03-14

    We show that the magnetization of a torsional oscillator that, in addition to the magnetic moment also possesses an electrical polarization, can be switched by the electric field that ignites mechanical oscillations at the frequency comparable to the frequency of the ferromagnetic resonance. The 180° switching arises from the spin-rotation coupling and is not prohibited by the different symmetry of the magnetic moment and the electric field as in the case of a stationary magnet. Analytical equations describing the system have been derived and investigated numerically. Phase diagrams showing the range of parameters required for the switching have been obtained.

  7. Sleep State Switching

    PubMed Central

    Saper, Clifford B.; Fuller, Patrick M.; Pedersen, Nigel P.; Lu, Jun; Scammell, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    We take for granted the ability to fall asleep or to snap out of sleep into wakefulness, but these changes in behavioral state require specific switching mechanisms in the brain that allow well-defined state transitions. In this review, we examine the basic circuitry underlying the regulation of sleep and wakefulness, and discuss a theoretical framework wherein the interactions between reciprocal neuronal circuits enable relatively rapid and complete state transitions. We also review how homeostatic, circadian, and allostatic drives help regulate sleep state switching, and discuss how breakdown of the switching mechanism may contribute to sleep disorders such as narcolepsy. PMID:21172606

  8. Photoconductive switch package

    DOEpatents

    Ca[rasp, George J

    2013-10-22

    A photoconductive switch is formed of a substrate that has a central portion of SiC or other photoconductive material and an outer portion of cvd-diamond or other suitable material surrounding the central portion. Conducting electrodes are formed on opposed sides of the substrate, with the electrodes extending beyond the central portion and the edges of the electrodes lying over the outer portion. Thus any high electric fields produced at the edges of the electrodes lie outside of and do not affect the central portion, which is the active switching element. Light is transmitted through the outer portion to the central portion to actuate the switch.

  9. SPARK GAP SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Neal, R.B.

    1957-12-17

    An improved triggered spark gap switch is described, capable of precisely controllable firing time while switching very large amounts of power. The invention in general comprises three electrodes adjustably spaced and adapted to have a large potential impressed between the outer electrodes. The central electrode includes two separate elements electrically connected togetaer and spaced apart to define a pair of spark gaps between the end electrodes. Means are provided to cause the gas flow in the switch to pass towards the central electrode, through a passage in each separate element, and out an exit disposed between the two separate central electrode elements in order to withdraw ions from the spark gap.

  10. Photoconductive switch package

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.

    2015-10-27

    A photoconductive switch is formed of a substrate that has a central portion of SiC or other photoconductive material and an outer portion of cvd-diamond or other suitable material surrounding the central portion. Conducting electrodes are formed on opposed sides of the substrate, with the electrodes extending beyond the central portion and the edges of the electrodes lying over the outer portion. Thus any high electric fields produced at the edges of the electrodes lie outside of and do not affect the central portion, which is the active switching element. Light is transmitted through the outer portion to the central portion to actuate the switch.

  11. Solid state switch

    DOEpatents

    Merritt, B.T.; Dreifuerst, G.R.

    1994-07-19

    A solid state switch, with reverse conducting thyristors, is designed to operate at 20 kV hold-off voltage, 1,500 A peak, 1.0 [mu]s pulsewidth, and 4,500 pps, to replace thyratrons. The solid state switch is more reliable, more economical, and more easily repaired. The switch includes a stack of circuit card assemblies, a magnetic assist and a trigger chassis. Each circuit card assembly contains a reverse conducting thyristor, a resistor capacitor network, and triggering circuitry. 6 figs.

  12. Solar array switching unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Jr., Calvin L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A solar array switching (SASU) unit (22) according to the present invention includes a control system (24), a solar cell array (26) and switch circuits (28). The SASU unit (22) is associated with a power card (30) for receiving an output from the array (26). The array (26) has a number (0.5Y) of rows (38) each of which includes a pair of cell strings (42) separated by one of the switch circuits (28). Each of the strings (42) includes a number (X) of cells in electrical series. The SASU (22) switches the array (26) between a short string configuration where the array (26) effectively includes Y strings of X length, and a long string configuration where the array (26) effectively includes 0.5Y strings of 2X length. The SASU (22) thereby facilitates the use of solar power for space missions where solar intensity, operating temperature or other factors vary significantly.

  13. Plasmonic enhanced ultrafast switch.

    SciTech Connect

    Subramania,Ganapathi Subramanian; Reno, John Louis; Passmore, Brandon Scott; Harris, Tom.; Shaner, Eric Arthur; Barrick, Todd A.

    2009-09-01

    Ultrafast electronic switches fabricated from defective material have been used for several decades in order to produce picosecond electrical transients and TeraHertz radiation. Due to the ultrashort recombination time in the photoconductor materials used, these switches are inefficient and are ultimately limited by the amount of optical power that can be applied to the switch before self-destruction. The goal of this work is to create ultrafast (sub-picosecond response) photoconductive switches on GaAs that are enhanced through plasmonic coupling structures. Here, the plasmonic coupler primarily plays the role of being a radiation condenser which will cause carriers to be generated adjacent to metallic electrodes where they can more efficiently be collected.

  14. An optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, L.G.; Hunter, S.R.

    1987-04-30

    The invention is a gas mixture for a diffuse discharge switch having an electron attaching gas wherein electron attachment is brought about by indirect excitation of molecules to long live states by exposure to laser light. 3 figs.

  15. Switching and stopping antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Keks, Nicholas; Hope, Judy; Keogh, Simone

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Switching from one antidepressant to another is frequently indicated due to an inadequate treatment response or unacceptable adverse effects. All antidepressant switches must be carried out cautiously and under close observation. Conservative switching strategies involve gradually tapering the first antidepressant followed by an adequate washout period before the new antidepressant is started. This can take a long time and include periods of no treatment with the risk of potentially life-threatening exacerbations of illness. Clinical expertise is needed for more rapid or cross-taper switching as drug toxicity, including serotonin syndrome, may result from inappropriate co-administration of antidepressants. Some antidepressants must not be combined. Antidepressants can cause withdrawal syndromes if discontinued abruptly after prolonged use. Relapse and exacerbation of depression can also occur. Gradual dose reduction over days to weeks reduces the risk and severity of complications. PMID:27346915

  16. Optical fiber crossbar switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilcoyne, Michael K.; Beccue, Stephen M.; Brar, Berinder; Robinson, G.; Pedrotti, Kenneth D.; Haber, William A.

    1990-07-01

    Advances in high performance computers and signal processing systems have led to parallel system architectures. The main limitation in achieving the performance expected of these parallel systems has been the realization of an efficient means to interconnect many processors into a effective parallel system. Electronic interconnections have proved cumbersome, costly and ineffective. The Optical Fiber Crossbar Switch (OFCS) is a compact low power, multi-gigahertz bandwidth multi-channel switch which can be used in large scale computer and telecommunication applications. The switch operates in the optical domain using GaAs semiconductor lasers to transmit wideband multiple channel optical data over fiber optic cables. Recently, a 32 X 32 crossbar switching system was completed and demonstrated. Error free performance was obtained at a data bandwidth of 410 MBPS, using a silicon switch IC. The switch can be completely reconfigured in less than 50 nanoseconds under computer control. The fully populated OFCS has the capability to handle 12.8 gigabits per second (GBPS) of data while switching this data over 32 channels without the loss of a single bit during switching. GaAs IC technology has now progressed to the point that 16 X 16 GaAs based crossbar switch Ics are available which have increased the data bandwidth capability to 2.4 GBPS. The present optical interfaces are integrated GaAs transmitter drivers, GaAs lasers, and integrated GaAs optical receivers with data bandwidths exceeding 2.4 GBPS. A system using all Ill-V switching and optoelectronic components is presently under development for both NASA and DoD programs. The overall system is designed to operate at 1.3 GBPS. It is expected that these systems will find wide application in high capacity computing systems based on parallel microprocessor architecture which require high data bandwidth communication between processors. The OFCS will also have application in commercial optical telecommunication systems

  17. Cygnus PFL Switch Jitter

    SciTech Connect

    C. Mitton, G. Corrow, M. Hansen, D. Henderson, et al.

    2007-07-21

    The Cygnus Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two identical radiographic sources: Cygnus 1 and Cygnus 2. Each source has the following X-ray output: 1-mm diameter spot size, 4 rads at 1 m, 50-ns full-widthhalf-maximum. The diode pulse has the following electrical specifications: 2.25 MV, 60 kA, 60 ns. This Radiographic Facility is located in an underground tunnel test area at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The sources were developed to produce high-resolution images on subcritical tests performed at NTS. Subcritical tests are single-shot, high-value events. For this application, it is desirable to maintain a high level of reproducibility in source output. The major components of the Cygnus machines are Marx generator, water-filled pulse forming line (PFL), water-filled coaxial transmission line, threecell inductive voltage adder, and rod-pinch diode. A primary source of fluctuation in Cygnus shot-to-shot performance may be jitter in breakdown of the main PFL switch, which is a “self-break” switch. The PFL switch breakdown time determines the peak PFL charging voltage, which ultimately affects the source X-ray spectrum and dose. Therefore, PFL switch jitter may contribute to shot-to-shot variation in these parameters, which are crucial to radiographic quality. In this paper we will present PFL switch jitter analysis for both Cygnus machines and present the correlation with dose. For this analysis, the PFL switch on each machine was maintained at a single gap setting, which has been used for the majority of shots at NTS. In addition the PFL switch performance for one larger switch gap setting will be examined.

  18. uv preilluminated gas switches

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, L.P.; Orham, E.L.; Stowers, I.F.; Braucht, J.R.

    1980-06-03

    We have designed, built, and characterized uv preilluminated gas switches for a trigger circuit and a low inductance discharge circuit. These switches have been incorporated into a 54 x 76 x 150 cm pulser module to produce a 1 Ma output current rising at 5 x 10/sup 12/ amps/sec with 1 ns jitter. Twenty such modules will be used on the Nova Inertial Confinement Fusion Laser System for plasma retropulse shutters.

  19. High Power Switching Transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hower, P. L.; Kao, Y. C.; Carnahan, D. C.

    1983-01-01

    Improved switching transistors handle 400-A peak currents and up to 1,200 V. Using large diameter silicon wafers with twice effective area as D60T, form basis for D7 family of power switching transistors. Package includes npn wafer, emitter preform, and base-contact insert. Applications are: 25to 50-kilowatt high-frequency dc/dc inverters, VSCF converters, and motor controllers for electrical vehicles.

  20. Cygnus Water Switch Jitter

    SciTech Connect

    Charles V. Mitton, George D. Corrow, Mark D. Hansen, David J. Henderson, et al.

    2008-03-01

    The Cygnus Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two identical radiographic sources - Cygnus 1 and Cygnus 2. Each source has the following x-ray output: 1-mm diameter spot size, 4 rad at 1 m, 50-ns Full Width Half Max. The diode pulse has the following electrical specifications: 2.25 MV, 60 kA, 60 ns. This Radiographic Facility is located in an underground tunnel test area at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The sources were developed to produce high-resolution images on subcritical tests which are performed at NTS. Subcritical tests are single-shot, high-value events. For this application, it is desirable to maintain a high level of reproducibility in source output. The major components of the Cygnus machines are: Marx generator, water-filled pulse–forming line (PFL), water-filled coaxial transmission line, three-cell inductive voltage adder, and rod-pinch diode. A primary source of fluctuation in Cygnus shot-to-shot performance is jitter in breakdown of the main PFL switch, which is a “self-break” switch. The PFL switch breakdown time determines the peak PFL charging voltage, which ultimately affects the diode pulse. Therefore, PFL switch jitter contributes to shot-to-shot variation in source endpoint energy and dose. In this paper we will present PFL switch jitter analysis for both Cygnus machines and give the correlation with diode performance. For this analysis the PFL switch on each machine was maintained at a single gap setting which has been used for the majority of shots at NTS. In addition to this analysis, PFL switch performance for different switch gap settings taken recently will be examined. Lastly, implications of source jitter for radiographic diagnosis of subcritical shots will be discussed.

  1. Finding a stabilising switching law for switching nonlinear models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lendek, Zs.; Raica, P.; Lauber, J.; Guerra, T. M.

    2016-09-01

    This paper considers the stabilisation of switching nonlinear models by switching between the subsystems. We assume that arbitrary switching between two subsystems is possible once a subsystem has been active for a predefined number of samples. We use a Takagi-Sugeno representation of the models and a switching Lyapunov function is employed to develop sufficient stability conditions. If the conditions are satisfied, we construct a switching law that stabilises the system. The application of the conditions is illustrated in several examples.

  2. Organic solid state optical switches and method for producing organic solid state optical switches

    DOEpatents

    Wasielewski, M.R.; Gaines, G.L.; Niemczyk, M.P.; Johnson, D.G.; Gosztola, D.J.; O`Neil, M.P.

    1993-01-01

    This invention consists of a light-intensity dependent molecular switch comprised of a compound which shuttles an electron or a plurality of electrons from a plurality of electron donors to an electron acceptor upon being stimulated with light of predetermined wavelengths, and a method for making said compound.

  3. Organic solid state switches incorporating porphyrin compounds and method for producing organic solid state optical switches

    DOEpatents

    Wasielewski, Michael R.; Gaines, George L.; Niemczyk, Mark P.; Johnson, Douglas G.; Gosztola, David J.; O'Neil, Michael P.

    1996-01-01

    A light-intensity dependent molecular switch comprised of a compound which shuttles an electron or a plurality of electrons from a plurality of electron donors to an electron acceptor upon being stimulated with light of predetermined wavelengths, said donors selected from porphyrins and other compounds, and a method for making said compound.

  4. Low inductance gas switching.

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, Ray; Harjes, Henry Charles III; Wallace, Zachariah; Elizondo, Juan E.

    2007-10-01

    The laser trigger switch (LTS) is a key component in ZR-type pulsed power systems. In ZR, the pulse rise time through the LTS is > 200 ns and additional stages of pulse compression are required to achieve the desired <100 ns rise time. The inductance of the LTS ({approx}500nH) in large part determines the energy transfer time through the switch and there is much to be gained in improving system performance and reducing system costs by reducing this inductance. The current path through the cascade section of the ZR LTS is at a diameter of {approx} 6-inches which is certainly not optimal from an inductance point of view. The LTS connects components of much greater diameter (typically 4-5 feet). In this LDRD the viability of switch concepts in which the diameter of cascade section is greatly increased have been investigated. The key technical question to be answered was, will the desired multi-channel behavior be maintained in a cascade section of larger diameter. This LDRD proceeded in 2 distinct phases. The original plan for the LDRD was to develop a promising switch concept and then design, build, and test a moderate scale switch which would demonstrate the key features of the concept. In phase I, a switch concept which meet all electrical design criteria and had a calculated inductance of 150 nH was developed. A 1.5 MV test switch was designed and fabrication was initiated. The LDRD was then redirected due to budgetary concerns. The fabrication of the switch was halted and the focus of the LDRD was shifted to small scale experiments designed to answer the key technical question concerning multi-channel behavior. In phase II, the Multi-channel switch test bed (MCST) was designed and constructed. The purpose of MCST was to provide a versatile, fast turn around facility for the study the multi-channel electrical breakdown behavior of a ZR type cascade switch gap in a parameter space near that of a ZR LTS. Parameter scans on source impedance, gap tilt, gap spacing and

  5. Innovative switching technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, A.; Stabile, P. J.; Gombar, A. M.; Janton, W. M.; Gilbert, D. B.; Herczfeld, P. R.; Bahasadri, A.

    1991-03-01

    We have developed an all-semiconductor high-power optical switch. Potential uses include both military applications, such as ultra-wide-band impulse radar and high-frequency antenna couplers, and commercial use, such as high-power switching for utility companies. Under this three-year program, we have demonstrated various switching applications from dc to GHz frequencies. The generic switches comprise a 2-D semiconductor laser diode array and Si or GaAs devices. In the Si area (linear switches - no gain) and dc-biased network, a single two-sided PIN device, activated by two 1 kW laser arrays, has yielded a holding voltage of 1.3 kV and conducted 192 A. Similar devices have later yielded a holding voltage of 3.3 kV, demonstrating the capability of switching more than 500 kW with a single two-sided PIN device. The same generic technology was also demonstrated in high-power high-frequency antenna coupler applications as well as in mm-wave (60 GHz) attenuators and phase shifters. PIN devices tested in a RF circuit between 2-30 MHz yielded an isolation value of between 28 and 49 dB in the off-state, and insertion losses as low as 0.1 dB when illuminated with 280 W (peak) optical power at 808 nm. In the area of GaAs, PIN, and bulk devices under this project, we were able to deliver devices for experiments in both opening and closing switches. We have demonstrated a compact, all-semiconductor switch system that has switched up to 8.5 MW into a 38 (omega) load. The system uses a 2-D laser diode array with a peak power of 850 W to rigger a 1.5 cm long GaAs photoconductor into a high-gain combination mode known as 'lock on'. The highest power switch was pulse-charged to 55 kV and delivered 470 A to a 38 (omega) load in 160 ns long pulse. In the area of 2-D laser arrays, a peak power density of 7 kW/cm(exp 2) was achieved.

  6. A radiation hard vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, G.E.

    1988-07-19

    A vacuum switch with an isolated trigger probe which is not directly connected to the switching electrodes. The vacuum switch within the plasmatron is triggered by plasma expansion initiated by the trigger probe which travels through an opening to reach the vacuum switch elements. The plasma arc created is directed by the opening to the space between the anode and cathode of the vacuum switch to cause conduction. 3 figs.

  7. Long Life MEM Switch Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-23

    The first type of MEM switch developed was the miniature switched capacitor. This device is 150-300 times smaller than conventional MEM switches...down and the shunt capacitance to the ground is increased. The mechanical behavior of the MEM capacitor is designed using conventional mechanical...switched capacitors. It proves that by decreasing the size, miniature switched capacitors with Con/ Coff =2.8 for a single bridge and Con/ Coff =1.9 for a 3

  8. Spiers Memorial Lecture. Molecular mechanics and molecular electronics.

    PubMed

    Beckman, Robert; Beverly, Kris; Boukai, Akram; Bunimovich, Yuri; Choi, Jang Wook; DeIonno, Erica; Green, Johnny; Johnston-Halperin, Ezekiel; Luo, Yi; Sheriff, Bonnie; Stoddart, Fraser; Heath, James R

    2006-01-01

    We describe our research into building integrated molecular electronics circuitry for a diverse set of functions, and with a focus on the fundamental scientific issues that surround this project. In particular, we discuss experiments aimed at understanding the function of bistable rotaxane molecular electronic switches by correlating the switching kinetics and ground state thermodynamic properties of those switches in various environments, ranging from the solution phase to a Langmuir monolayer of the switching molecules sandwiched between two electrodes. We discuss various devices, low bit-density memory circuits, and ultra-high density memory circuits that utilize the electrochemical switching characteristics of these molecules in conjunction with novel patterning methods. We also discuss interconnect schemes that are capable of bridging the micrometre to submicrometre length scales of conventional patterning approaches to the near-molecular length scales of the ultra-dense memory circuits. Finally, we discuss some of the challenges associated with fabricated ultra-dense molecular electronic integrated circuits.

  9. Switching power pulse system

    DOEpatents

    Aaland, K.

    1983-08-09

    A switching system for delivering pulses of power from a source to a load using a storage capacitor charged through a rectifier, and maintained charged to a reference voltage level by a transistor switch and voltage comparator. A thyristor is triggered to discharge the storage capacitor through a saturable reactor and fractional turn saturable transformer having a secondary to primary turn ratio N of n:l/n = n[sup 2]. The saturable reactor functions as a soaker'' while the thyristor reaches saturation, and then switches to a low impedance state. The saturable transformer functions as a switching transformer with high impedance while a load coupling capacitor charges, and then switches to a low impedance state to dump the charge of the storage capacitor into the load through the coupling capacitor. The transformer is comprised of a multilayer core having two secondary windings tightly wound and connected in parallel to add their output voltage and reduce output inductance, and a number of single turn windings connected in parallel at nodes for the primary winding, each single turn winding linking a different one of the layers of the multilayer core. The load may be comprised of a resistive beampipe for a linear particle accelerator and capacitance of a pulse forming network. To hold off discharge of the capacitance until it is fully charged, a saturable core is provided around the resistive beampipe to isolate the beampipe from the capacitance until it is fully charged. 5 figs.

  10. Atomic Scale Plasmonic Switch.

    PubMed

    Emboras, Alexandros; Niegemann, Jens; Ma, Ping; Haffner, Christian; Pedersen, Andreas; Luisier, Mathieu; Hafner, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas; Leuthold, Juerg

    2016-01-13

    The atom sets an ultimate scaling limit to Moore's law in the electronics industry. While electronics research already explores atomic scales devices, photonics research still deals with devices at the micrometer scale. Here we demonstrate that photonic scaling, similar to electronics, is only limited by the atom. More precisely, we introduce an electrically controlled plasmonic switch operating at the atomic scale. The switch allows for fast and reproducible switching by means of the relocation of an individual or, at most, a few atoms in a plasmonic cavity. Depending on the location of the atom either of two distinct plasmonic cavity resonance states are supported. Experimental results show reversible digital optical switching with an extinction ratio of 9.2 dB and operation at room temperature up to MHz with femtojoule (fJ) power consumption for a single switch operation. This demonstration of an integrated quantum device allowing to control photons at the atomic level opens intriguing perspectives for a fully integrated and highly scalable chip platform, a platform where optics, electronics, and memory may be controlled at the single-atom level.

  11. Silicon carbide photoconductive switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saddow, Stephen E.

    1994-09-01

    The optoelectronic properties of p-type 6-H silicon carbide (6H-SiC) have been investigated in an experiment that used lateral and vertical photoconductive (PC) switches. Both photovoltaic and photoconductive effects are reported, which were observed on switches using both geometries and measured at several wavelengths near the 6H-SiC absorption edge. PC techniques were employed to measure the surface and bulk carrier lifetimes of 40 and 200 ns, respectively. The switches displayed a high-speed photovoltaic response to picosecond laser excitations in the UV and visible spectral regions. In particular, efficient subnanosecond optical absorption processes were observed in the visible region. The photovoltage was measured as a function of both laser wavelength (and hence absorption depth) and laser beam position within the switching gap. The switch response to picosecond laser pulses in the UV, violet, green, and red spectral regions was shown to have subnanosecond photovoltaic response times. Finally, since the optical absorption coefficient had not been well established for device-grade 6H-SiC, the optical absorption coefficient near the 6H-SiC bandgap energy (Eg) was also measured, and the bandgap was determined to be approximately 3.1 eV.

  12. Multiple switch actuator

    DOEpatents

    Beyer, Edward T.

    1976-01-06

    The present invention relates to switches and switch actuating devices to be operated for purposes of arming a bomb or other missile as it is dropped or released from an aircraft. The particular bomb or missile in which this invention is applied is one in which there is a plurality of circuits which are to be armed by the closing of switches upon dropping or releasing of the bomb. The operation of the switches to closed position is normally accomplished by means of a pull-out wire; that is, a wire which is withdrawn from the bomb or missile at the time of release of the bomb, one end of the wire being attached to the aircraft. The conditions to be met are that the arming switches must be positively and surely maintained in open position until the bomb is released and the arming action is effected. The action of the pull-out wire in achieving the arming action must be sure and positive with minimum danger of malfunctioning, jamming or binding.

  13. Thermionic gas switch

    DOEpatents

    Hatch, G.L.; Brummond, W.A.; Barrus, D.M.

    1984-04-05

    The present invention is directed to an improved temperature responsive thermionic gas switch utilizing a hollow cathode and a folded emitter surface area. The folded emitter surface area of the thermionic switch substantially increases the on/off ratio by changing the conduction surface area involved in the two modes thereof. The improved switch of this invention provides an on/off ratio of 450:1 compared to the 10:1 ratio of the prior known thermionic switch, while providing for adjusting the on current. In the improved switch of this invention the conduction area is made small in the off mode, while in the on mode the conduction area is made large. This is achieved by utilizing a folded hollow cathode configuration and utilizing a folded emitter surface area, and by making the dimensions of the folds small enough so that a space charge will develop in the convolutions of the folds and suppress unignited current, thus limiting the current carrying surface in the off mode.

  14. Deliberate Switching of Single Photochromic Triads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Johannes; Pärs, Martti; Weller, Tina; Thelakkat, Mukundan; Köhler, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Photochromic molecules can be reversibly converted between two bistable conformations by light, and are considered as promising building blocks in novel macromolecular structures for sensing and imaging techniques. We have studied individual molecular triads consisting of two strong fluorophores (perylene bisimide) that are covalently linked via a photochromic unit (dithienylcyclopentene) and distinguished between deliberate switching and spontaneous blinking. It was verified that the probability for observing deliberate light-induced switching of a single triad (rather than stochastic blinking) amounts to 0.8 ± 0.1. In a few exceptional cases this probability can exceed 0.95. These numbers are sufficiently large for application in sensitive biosensing, and super-resolution imaging. This opens the possibility to develop devices that can be controlled by an external optical stimulus on a truly molecular length scale.

  15. Deliberate Switching of Single Photochromic Triads

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Johannes; Pärs, Martti; Weller, Tina; Thelakkat, Mukundan; Köhler, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Photochromic molecules can be reversibly converted between two bistable conformations by light, and are considered as promising building blocks in novel macromolecular structures for sensing and imaging techniques. We have studied individual molecular triads consisting of two strong fluorophores (perylene bisimide) that are covalently linked via a photochromic unit (dithienylcyclopentene) and distinguished between deliberate switching and spontaneous blinking. It was verified that the probability for observing deliberate light-induced switching of a single triad (rather than stochastic blinking) amounts to 0.8 ± 0.1. In a few exceptional cases this probability can exceed 0.95. These numbers are sufficiently large for application in sensitive biosensing, and super-resolution imaging. This opens the possibility to develop devices that can be controlled by an external optical stimulus on a truly molecular length scale. PMID:28139764

  16. Deliberate Switching of Single Photochromic Triads.

    PubMed

    Maier, Johannes; Pärs, Martti; Weller, Tina; Thelakkat, Mukundan; Köhler, Jürgen

    2017-01-31

    Photochromic molecules can be reversibly converted between two bistable conformations by light, and are considered as promising building blocks in novel macromolecular structures for sensing and imaging techniques. We have studied individual molecular triads consisting of two strong fluorophores (perylene bisimide) that are covalently linked via a photochromic unit (dithienylcyclopentene) and distinguished between deliberate switching and spontaneous blinking. It was verified that the probability for observing deliberate light-induced switching of a single triad (rather than stochastic blinking) amounts to 0.8 ± 0.1. In a few exceptional cases this probability can exceed 0.95. These numbers are sufficiently large for application in sensitive biosensing, and super-resolution imaging. This opens the possibility to develop devices that can be controlled by an external optical stimulus on a truly molecular length scale.

  17. Manipulating Kondo temperature via single molecule switching.

    PubMed

    Iancu, Violeta; Deshpande, Aparna; Hla, Saw-Wai

    2006-04-01

    Two conformations of isolated single TBrPP-Co molecules on a Cu(111) surface are switched by applying +2.2 V voltage pulses from a scanning tunneling microscope tip at 4.6 K. The TBrPP-Co has a spin-active cobalt atom caged at its center, and the interaction between the spin of this cobalt atom and free electrons from the Cu(111) substrate can cause a Kondo resonance. Tunneling spectroscopy data reveal that switching from the saddle to a planar molecular conformation enhances spin-electron coupling, which increases the associated Kondo temperature from 130 to 170 K. This result demonstrates that the Kondo temperature can be manipulated just by changing molecular conformation without altering chemical composition of the molecule.

  18. Toehold Switches: De-Novo-Designed Regulators of Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Green, Alexander A.; Silver, Pamela A.; Collins, James J.; Yin, Peng

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Efforts to construct synthetic networks in living cells have been hindered by the limited number of regulatory components that provide wide dynamic range and low crosstalk. Here, we report a new class of de-novo-designed prokaryotic riboregulators called toehold switches that activate gene expression in response to cognate RNAs with arbitrary sequences. Toehold switches provide a high level of orthogonality and can be forward-engineered to provide average dynamic range above 400. We show that switches can be integrated into the genome to regulate endogenous genes and use them as sensors that respond to endogenous RNAs. We exploit the orthogonality of toehold switches to regulate 12 genes independently and to construct a genetic circuit that evaluates 4-input AND logic. Toehold switches, with their wide dynamic range, orthogonality, and programmability, represent a versatile and powerful platform for regulation of translation, offering diverse applications in molecular biology, synthetic biology, and biotechnology. PMID:25417166

  19. Microfabricated triggered vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Roesler, Alexander W.; Schare, Joshua M.; Bunch, Kyle

    2010-05-11

    A microfabricated vacuum switch is disclosed which includes a substrate upon which an anode, cathode and trigger electrode are located. A cover is sealed over the substrate under vacuum to complete the vacuum switch. In some embodiments of the present invention, a metal cover can be used in place of the trigger electrode on the substrate. Materials used for the vacuum switch are compatible with high vacuum, relatively high temperature processing. These materials include molybdenum, niobium, copper, tungsten, aluminum and alloys thereof for the anode and cathode. Carbon in the form of graphitic carbon, a diamond-like material, or carbon nanotubes can be used in the trigger electrode. Channels can be optionally formed in the substrate to mitigate against surface breakdown.

  20. Optical computer switching network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clymer, B.; Collins, S. A., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The design for an optical switching system for minicomputers that uses an optical spatial light modulator such as a Hughes liquid crystal light valve is presented. The switching system is designed to connect 80 minicomputers coupled to the switching system by optical fibers. The system has two major parts: the connection system that connects the data lines by which the computers communicate via a two-dimensional optical matrix array and the control system that controls which computers are connected. The basic system, the matrix-based connecting system, and some of the optical components to be used are described. Finally, the details of the control system are given and illustrated with a discussion of timing.

  1. Switching power supply

    DOEpatents

    Mihalka, A.M.

    1984-06-05

    The invention is a repratable capacitor charging, switching power supply. A ferrite transformer steps up a dc input. The transformer primary is in a full bridge configuration utilizing power MOSFETs as the bridge switches. The transformer secondary is fed into a high voltage, full wave rectifier whose output is connected directly to the energy storage capacitor. The transformer is designed to provide adequate leakage inductance to limit capacitor current. The MOSFETs are switched to the variable frequency from 20 to 50 kHz to charge a capacitor from 0.6 kV. The peak current in a transformer primary and secondary is controlled by increasing the pulse width as the capacitor charges. A digital ripple counter counts pulses and after a preselected desired number is reached an up-counter is clocked.

  2. SWITCH user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The planning program, SWITCH, and its surrounding changed-goal-replanning program, Runaround, are described. The evolution of SWITCH and Runaround from an earlier planner, DEVISER, is recounted. SWITCH's plan representation, and its process of building a plan by backward chaining with strict chronological backtracking, are described. A guide for writing knowledge base files is provided, as are narrative guides for installing the program, running it, and interacting with it while it is running. Some utility functions are documented. For the sake of completeness, a narrative guide to the experimental discrepancy-replanning feature is provided. Appendices contain knowledge base files for a blocksworld domain, and a DRIBBLE file illustrating the output from, and user interaction with, the program in that domain.

  3. Optical Computer Switching Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clymer, B.; Collins, S. A., Jr.

    1985-02-01

    In this paper we present the design for an optical switching system for minicomputers that uses an optical spatial light modulator such as a Hughes liquid crystal light valve. The switching system is designed to connect 80 minicomputers coupled to the switching system by optical fibers. The system has two major parts: the connection system that connects the data lines by which the computers communicate via a two-dimensional optical matrix array and the control system that controls which computers are connected. We first present the basic system, then describe the matrix-based connecting system and review some of the optical components to be used. Finally, the details of the control system are given and illustrated with a discussion of timing.

  4. Optical computer switching network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clymer, B.; Collins, S. A., Jr.

    1985-02-01

    The design for an optical switching system for minicomputers that uses an optical spatial light modulator such as a Hughes liquid crystal light valve is presented. The switching system is designed to connect 80 minicomputers coupled to the switching system by optical fibers. The system has two major parts: the connection system that connects the data lines by which the computers communicate via a two-dimensional optical matrix array and the control system that controls which computers are connected. The basic system, the matrix-based connecting system, and some of the optical components to be used are described. Finally, the details of the control system are given and illustrated with a discussion of timing.

  5. Optical computer switching network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clymer, B.; Collins, S. A., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The design for an optical switching system for minicomputers that uses an optical spatial light modulator such as a Hughes liquid crystal light valve is presented. The switching system is designed to connect 80 minicomputers coupled to the switching system by optical fibers. The system has two major parts: the connection system that connects the data lines by which the computers communicate via a two-dimensional optical matrix array and the control system that controls which computers are connected. The basic system, the matrix-based connecting system, and some of the optical components to be used are described. Finally, the details of the control system are given and illustrated with a discussion of timing.

  6. FAST ACTING CURRENT SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, T.H.; Cummings, D.B.; Ryan, J.F.

    1962-05-22

    A high-current, fast-acting switch is designed for utilization as a crowbar switch in a high-current circuit such as used to generate the magnetic confinement field of a plasma-confining and heat device, e.g., Pyrotron. The device particularly comprises a cylindrical housing containing two stationary, cylindrical contacts between which a movable contact is bridged to close the switch. The movable contact is actuated by a differential-pressure, airdriven piston assembly also within the housing. To absorb the acceleration (and the shock imparted to the device by the rapidly driven, movable contact), an adjustable air buffer assembly is provided, integrally connected to the movable contact and piston assembly. Various safety locks and circuit-synchronizing means are also provided to permit proper cooperation of the invention and the high-current circuit in which it is installed. (AEC)

  7. Cooperative Switching in Nanofibers of Azobenzene Oligomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Christopher; Liebig, Tobias; Gensler, Manuel; Zykov, Anton; Pithan, Linus; Rabe, Jürgen P.; Hecht, Stefan; Bléger, David; Kowarik, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Next-generation molecular devices and machines demand the integration of molecular switches into hierarchical assemblies to amplify the response of the system from the molecular level to the meso- or macro-scale. Here, we demonstrate that multi-azobenzene oligomers can assemble to form robust supramolecular nanofibers in which they can be switched repeatedly between the E- and Z-configuration. While in isolated oligomers the azobenzene units undergo reversible photoisomerization independently, in the nanofibers they are coupled via intermolecular interactions and switch cooperatively as evidenced by unusual thermal and kinetic behavior. We find that the photoisomerization rate from the Z-isomer to the E-isomer depends on the fraction of Z-azobenzene in the nanofibers, and is increased by more than a factor of 4 in Z-rich fibers when compared to E-rich fibers. This demonstrates the great potential of coupling individual photochromic units for increasing their quantum efficiency in the solid state with potential relevance for actuation and sensing.

  8. Cooperative Switching in Nanofibers of Azobenzene Oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Christopher; Liebig, Tobias; Gensler, Manuel; Zykov, Anton; Pithan, Linus; Rabe, Jürgen P.; Hecht, Stefan; Bléger, David; Kowarik, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation molecular devices and machines demand the integration of molecular switches into hierarchical assemblies to amplify the response of the system from the molecular level to the meso- or macro-scale. Here, we demonstrate that multi-azobenzene oligomers can assemble to form robust supramolecular nanofibers in which they can be switched repeatedly between the E- and Z-configuration. While in isolated oligomers the azobenzene units undergo reversible photoisomerization independently, in the nanofibers they are coupled via intermolecular interactions and switch cooperatively as evidenced by unusual thermal and kinetic behavior. We find that the photoisomerization rate from the Z-isomer to the E-isomer depends on the fraction of Z-azobenzene in the nanofibers, and is increased by more than a factor of 4 in Z-rich fibers when compared to E-rich fibers. This demonstrates the great potential of coupling individual photochromic units for increasing their quantum efficiency in the solid state with potential relevance for actuation and sensing. PMID:27161608

  9. SHOCKPROOF MAGNETIC REED SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Medal, E.

    1962-03-13

    A shockproof magnetic reed switch is described which comprises essentially a plurality of pairs of reed contacts of magnetic, electrical conducting material which are arranged generally in circumferential spaced relationship. At least two of the pairs are disposed to operate at a predetermined angle with respect to each other, and the contacts are wired in the circuit, so that the continuity, or discontinuity, of the circuit is not affected by a shock imposed on the switch. The contacts are hermetically sealed within an outer tubular jacket. (AEC)

  10. Thermionic gas switch

    DOEpatents

    Hatch, George L.; Brummond, William A.; Barrus, Donald M.

    1986-01-01

    A temperature responsive thermionic gas switch having folded electron emitting surfaces. An ionizable gas is located between the emitter and an interior surface of a collector, coaxial with the emitter. In response to the temperature exceeding a predetermined level, sufficient electrons are derived from the emitter to cause the gas in the gap between the emitter and collector to become ionized, whereby a very large increase in current in the gap occurs. Due to the folded emitter surface area of the switch, increasing the "on/off" current ratio and adjusting the "on" current capacity is accomplished.

  11. Organometallic spintronics: dicobaltocene switch.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Ke, San-Huang; Baranger, Harold U; Yang, Weitao

    2005-10-01

    A single-molecule spintronic switch and spin valve using two cobaltocene moieties is proposed. Spin-dependent transport through a lead-molecule-lead junction has been calculated using first-principles density functional and nonequilibrium Green function methods. We find that the antiparallel (singlet) configuration of the cobaltocene spins blocks electron transport near the Fermi energy, while the spin parallel (triplet) configuration enables much higher current. The energy difierence between the antiparallel and parallel states depends on the insulating spacer separating the two cobaltocenes, allowing switching through the application of a moderate magnetic field.

  12. Main electrical switch banks, plant switch house, looking to the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Main electrical switch banks, plant switch house, looking to the North - Bureau of Mines Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Original Building, Date Street north of U.S. Highway 93, Boulder City, Clark County, NV

  13. Hybrid solid state switch replaces motor- driven power switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, R. A.; Schloss, A. I.

    1967-01-01

    Hybrid solid state switch replaces existing motor-driven power switches used on spacecraft. It uses a transistor circuit to limit the open circuit voltage and allow small relay contacts to handle high transient currents at reasonable cycle life.

  14. 41. INTERIOR VIEW, GREEN SWITCH TOWER, COS COB, SHOWING SWITCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. INTERIOR VIEW, GREEN SWITCH TOWER, COS COB, SHOWING SWITCH LEVER ASSEMBLAGE AND DISPLAY BOARD - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  15. 35. END VIEW, INTERIOR, SHOWING SWITCHING LEVERS, BERK SWITCH TOWER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. END VIEW, INTERIOR, SHOWING SWITCHING LEVERS, BERK SWITCH TOWER, SOUTH NORWALK - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  16. 36. INTERIOR VIEW, BERK SWITCH TOWER, SOUTH NORWALK, SHOWING SWITCHING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. INTERIOR VIEW, BERK SWITCH TOWER, SOUTH NORWALK, SHOWING SWITCHING LEVERS FROM OPERATOR'S POSITION - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  17. 43. OBLIQUE VIEW, GREEN SWITCH TOWER, COS COB, SHOWING SWITCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. OBLIQUE VIEW, GREEN SWITCH TOWER, COS COB, SHOWING SWITCH LEVER ASSEMBLAGE AND DISPLAY BOARD - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  18. A multi-stimuli responsive switch as a fluorescent molecular analogue of transistors† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed experimental procedures and additional data on the characterization of 1. See DOI: 10.1039/c5sc03395k Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo, Iluminada; Morais, Sandy; Prats, Gemma

    2016-01-01

    Although the quantum nature of molecules makes them specially suitable for mimicking the operation of digital electronic elements, molecular compounds can also be envisioned to emulate the behavior of analog devices. In this work we report a novel fluorescent three-state switch capable of reproducing the analog response of transistors, an ubiquitous device in modern electronics. Exploiting the redox and thermal sensitivity of this compound, the amplitude of its fluorescence emission can be continuously modulated, in a similar way as the output current in a transistor is amplified by the gate-to-source voltage. PMID:28959394

  19. Photonic MEMS switch applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, Anis

    2001-07-01

    As carriers and service providers continue their quest for profitable network solutions, they have shifted their focus from raw bandwidth to rapid provisioning, delivery and management of revenue generating services. Inherently transparent to data rate the transmission wavelength and data format, MEMS add scalability, reliability, low power and compact size providing flexible solutions to the management and/or fiber channels in long haul, metro, and access networks. MEMS based photonic switches have gone from the lab to commercial availability and are now currently in carrier trials and volume production. 2D MEMS switches offer low up-front deployment costs while remaining scalable to large arrays. They allow for transparent, native protocol transmission. 2D switches enable rapid service turn-up and management for many existing and emerging revenue rich services such as storage connectivity, optical Ethernet, wavelength leasing and optical VPN. As the network services evolve, the larger 3D MEMS switches, which provide greater scalability and flexibility, will become economically viable to serve the ever-increasing needs.

  20. Kiowa Creek Switching Station

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    The Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to construct, operate, and maintain a new Kiowa Creek Switching Station near Orchard in Morgan County, Colorado. Kiowa Creek Switching Station would consist of a fenced area of approximately 300 by 300 feet and contain various electrical equipment typical for a switching station. As part of this new construction, approximately one mile of an existing 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line will be removed and replaced with a double circuit overhead line. The project will also include a short (one-third mile) realignment of an existing line to permit connection with the new switching station. In accordance with the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations for implementing the procedural provisions of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), 40 CFR Parts 1500--1508, the Department of Energy (DOE) has determined that an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required for the proposed project. This determination is based on the information contained in this environmental assessment (EA) prepared by Western. The EA identifies and evaluates the environmental and socioeconomic effects of the proposed action, and concludes that the advance impacts on the human environment resulting from the proposed project would not be significant. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Multipath star switch controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, T. O.

    1980-01-01

    Device concept permits parallel computers to scan several commonnetwork-connected data stations at maximum rate. Sequencers leap-frog to bypass ports already being serviced by another computer. Two-path system for 16-port star switch controller is cost effective if added bandwidth or increased reliability is desired. Triple-path system would be cost effective for 32-port controller.

  2. Waveguide switch protector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolbly, R. B.

    1972-01-01

    Device for detecting excessive operation of electric motors used to drive waveguide switches is described. Purpose of device is to prevent burnout of electric motor in event of waveguide stoppage at some point other than extreme limits of travel. Operation of equipment, components used to sense motor performance, and schematic diagram are included.

  3. Gas injected vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Hardin, K. Dan

    1977-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a gas injected vacuum switch comprising a housing having an interior chamber, a conduit for evacuating the interior chamber, within the chamber an anode and a cathode spaced from the anode, and a detonator for injecting electrically conductive gas into the chamber between the anode and the cathode to provide a current path therebetween.

  4. Silicon Carbide Photoconductive Switches

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    The optoelectronic properties of p-type 6-H silicon carbide (6H-SiC) have been investigated in an experiment that used lateral and vertical...and the bandgap was determined to be approximately 3.1 eV. 6H-SiC, Photoconductive, Photovoltaic, Absorption coefficient, Switch, Silicon carbide

  5. An integrated circuit switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonin, E. L.

    1969-01-01

    Multi-chip integrated circuit switch consists of a GaAs photon-emitting diode in close proximity with S1 phototransistor. A high current gain is obtained when the transistor has a high forward common-emitter current gain.

  6. An Evolutionary Perspective on Yeast Mating-Type Switching.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Sara J; Wolfe, Kenneth H

    2017-05-01

    Cell differentiation in yeast species is controlled by a reversible, programmed DNA-rearrangement process called mating-type switching. Switching is achieved by two functionally similar but structurally distinct processes in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe In both species, haploid cells possess one active and two silent copies of the mating-type locus (a three-cassette structure), the active locus is cleaved, and synthesis-dependent strand annealing is used to replace it with a copy of a silent locus encoding the opposite mating-type information. Each species has its own set of components responsible for regulating these processes. In this review, we summarize knowledge about the function and evolution of mating-type switching components in these species, including mechanisms of heterochromatin formation, MAT locus cleavage, donor bias, lineage tracking, and environmental regulation of switching. We compare switching in these well-studied species to others such as Kluyveromyces lactis and the methylotrophic yeasts Ogataea polymorpha and Komagataella phaffii We focus on some key questions: Which cells switch mating type? What molecular apparatus is required for switching? Where did it come from? And what is the evolutionary purpose of switching? Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  7. Reinforcing staying and switching while using a changeover delay.

    PubMed

    MacDonall, James S

    2003-03-01

    Performance on concurrent schedules can be decomposed to run lengths (the number of responses before switching alternatives), or visit durations (time at an alternative before switching alternatives), that are a function of the ratio of the rates of reinforcement for staying and switching. From this analysis, a model of concurrent performance was developed and examined in two experiments. The first exposed rats to variable-interval schedules for staying and for switching, which included a changeover delay for reinforcers following a switch. With the changeover delay, run lengths and visit durations were functions of the ratios of the rates of reinforcement for staying and for switching, as found by previous research not using a changeover delay. The second directly assessed the effect of a changeover delay on run lengths and visit durations. Each component of a multiple schedule consisted of equivalent stay and switch schedules but only one component included a changeover delay. Run lengths and visit durations were longer when a changeover delay was used. Because visit duration is the reciprocal of changeover rate, these results are consistent with the established finding that a changeover delay reduces the frequency of switching. Together these results support the local model of concurrent performance as an alternative to the generalized matching law as a model of concurrent performance. The local model may be preferred when accounting for more molecular aspects of concurrent performance.

  8. Reinforcing staying and switching while using a changeover delay.

    PubMed Central

    MacDonall, James S

    2003-01-01

    Performance on concurrent schedules can be decomposed to run lengths (the number of responses before switching alternatives), or visit durations (time at an alternative before switching alternatives), that are a function of the ratio of the rates of reinforcement for staying and switching. From this analysis, a model of concurrent performance was developed and examined in two experiments. The first exposed rats to variable-interval schedules for staying and for switching, which included a changeover delay for reinforcers following a switch. With the changeover delay, run lengths and visit durations were functions of the ratios of the rates of reinforcement for staying and for switching, as found by previous research not using a changeover delay. The second directly assessed the effect of a changeover delay on run lengths and visit durations. Each component of a multiple schedule consisted of equivalent stay and switch schedules but only one component included a changeover delay. Run lengths and visit durations were longer when a changeover delay was used. Because visit duration is the reciprocal of changeover rate, these results are consistent with the established finding that a changeover delay reduces the frequency of switching. Together these results support the local model of concurrent performance as an alternative to the generalized matching law as a model of concurrent performance. The local model may be preferred when accounting for more molecular aspects of concurrent performance. PMID:12822688

  9. An Evolutionary Perspective on Yeast Mating-Type Switching

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Sara J.; Wolfe, Kenneth H.

    2017-01-01

    Cell differentiation in yeast species is controlled by a reversible, programmed DNA-rearrangement process called mating-type switching. Switching is achieved by two functionally similar but structurally distinct processes in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In both species, haploid cells possess one active and two silent copies of the mating-type locus (a three-cassette structure), the active locus is cleaved, and synthesis-dependent strand annealing is used to replace it with a copy of a silent locus encoding the opposite mating-type information. Each species has its own set of components responsible for regulating these processes. In this review, we summarize knowledge about the function and evolution of mating-type switching components in these species, including mechanisms of heterochromatin formation, MAT locus cleavage, donor bias, lineage tracking, and environmental regulation of switching. We compare switching in these well-studied species to others such as Kluyveromyces lactis and the methylotrophic yeasts Ogataea polymorpha and Komagataella phaffii. We focus on some key questions: Which cells switch mating type? What molecular apparatus is required for switching? Where did it come from? And what is the evolutionary purpose of switching? PMID:28476860

  10. Exhaust Fan Temperature Switch

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, G.S.; /Fermilab

    1989-05-11

    The 13000 cfm 'emergency' vent fan must be protected from over cooling which would result in a mechanical failure. Over cooling could result from a catastrophic cryogen release from the cryostat(s) or Argon Storage Dewar. In order to protect the fan, a VPT has been calibrated for -31 C to open a switch which sends a signal to allow warm gas to enter the sump by means of a motor controlled louver installed at 'sidewalk level' in the ductwork between the assembly hall and the Argon Dewar Enclosure. The bulb of the VPT is enclosed in a thermal well and will be placed in the gas stream directly above the fan. The switching unit will be mounted nearby on the wall in order to isolate it from vibrational effects. Should the fan be activated due to a cryogen release, it should not experience any problems when operating above -40 C. The switch was set and checked in a saturated calcium chloride solution cooled to -31 C by running cold gaseous Nitrogen through a copper tube coiled in a dewar. Switching temperature was measured by a thermocouple tied to the VPT bulb. The thermocouple was checked in LN2, in an ice water bath, and against an ordinary thermometer (which was assumed to be accurate to plus or minus 0.3 C) at room temperature. The results are shown below in 'Table 1' By interpolation of the data, thermocouple error at -31.0 C was found to be 0.43 C on the warm side. Since this error was small, it was ignored. 'Table 2' shows the results of the tests. Ten readings were taken with the switch wired in the 'normally open' mode. This results in a signal at room temperature. The worst deviation was 2.5 C. Three readings were then taken from the 'normally closed' wiring arrangement (the way it will be wired for installation). The greatest deviation was 1.2 C. The next day, the switch was checked five times wired in the 'normally open' configuration. The greatest error was 1.1 C. A graph has been prepared showing the switching and resetting temperatures. The errors these

  11. Heat-transfer thermal switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedell, M. V.; Anderson, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Thermal switch maintains temperature of planetary lander, within definite range, by transferring heat. Switch produces relatively large stroke and force, uses minimum electrical power, is lightweight, is vapor pressure actuated, and withstands sterilization temperatures without damage.

  12. Automatic thermal switch. [spacecraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, J. W.; Wing, L. D. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An automatic thermal switch to control heat flow includes two thermally conductive plates and a thermally conductive switch saddle pivotally mounted to the first plate. A flexible heat carrier is connected between the switch saddle and the second plate. A phase-change power unit, including a piston coupled to the switch saddle, is in thermal contact with the first thermally conductive plate. A biasing element biases the switch saddle in a predetermined position with respect to the first plate. When the phase-change power unit is actuated by an increase in heat transmitted through the first place, the piston extends and causes the switch saddle to pivot, thereby varying the thermal conduction between the two plates through the switch saddle and flexible heat carrier. The biasing element, switch saddle, and piston can be arranged to provide either a normally closed or normally opened thermally conductive path between the two plates.

  13. Switching power pulse system

    DOEpatents

    Aaland, Kristian

    1983-01-01

    A switching system for delivering pulses of power from a source (10) to a load (20) using a storage capacitor (C3) charged through a rectifier (D1, D2), and maintained charged to a reference voltage level by a transistor switch (Q1) and voltage comparator (12). A thyristor (22) is triggered to discharge the storage capacitor through a saturable reactor (18) and fractional turn saturable transformer (16) having a secondary to primary turn ratio N of n:l/n=n.sup.2. The saturable reactor (18) functions as a "soaker" while the thyristor reaches saturation, and then switches to a low impedance state. The saturable transformer functions as a switching transformer with high impedance while a load coupling capacitor (C4) charges, and then switches to a low impedance state to dump the charge of the storage capacitor (C3) into the load through the coupling capacitor (C4). The transformer is comprised of a multilayer core (26) having two secondary windings (28, 30) tightly wound and connected in parallel to add their output voltage and reduce output inductance, and a number of single turn windings connected in parallel at nodes (32, 34) for the primary winding, each single turn winding linking a different one of the layers of the multilayer core. The load may be comprised of a resistive beampipe (40) for a linear particle accelerator and capacitance of a pulse forming network (42). To hold off discharge of the capacitance until it is fully charged, a saturable core (44) is provided around the resistive beampipe (40) to isolate the beampipe from the capacitance (42) until it is fully charged.

  14. Program to Develop an Optical Transistor and Switch.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    MATERIAL SELECTION FOR OPTICAL SWITCHES AND TRANSISTORS........ 2 2.1 Condensed Matter (Solids and Liquids)..................... 5 2 2 Molecular Gases...reviewing Condensed Matter (solids and liquids), Molecular Gases, and Free and Quasi-Free Atom Media. While gases and free atoms may seem remote from...detection. In the basic device, three atomic or ’ molecular levels are involved. The frequency of the control beam is orof resonant with the transition

  15. Transparent electrode for optical switch

    DOEpatents

    Goldhar, J.; Henesian, M.A.

    1984-10-19

    The invention relates generally to optical switches and techniques for applying a voltage to an electro-optical crystal, and more particularly, to transparent electodes for an optical switch. System architectures for very large inertial confinement fusion (ICF) lasers require active optical elements with apertures on the order of one meter. Large aperture optical switches are needed for isolation of stages, switch-out from regenerative amplifier cavities and protection from target retroreflections.

  16. Radiation sensitive solid state switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutto, R. J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A mechanically operable solid state switch suited for use in achieving a variable circuit-switching function is described. This switch is characterized by an annular array of photoresponsive switching devices, disposed in communication with an included source of radiation, and a plurality of interchangeable, mechanically operable interrupter disks. Each disk has a predetermined pattern of transparent and opaque portions. Operative displacement of each disk serves to make and break selected electrical circuits through the photo responsive devices of said array.

  17. Easily-wired toggle switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, W. T.; Stringer, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    Crimp-type connectors reduce assembly and disassembly time. With design, no switch preparation is necessary and socket contracts are crimped to wires inserted in module attached to back of toggle switch engaging pins inside module to make electrical connections. Wires are easily removed with standard detachment tool. Design can accommodate wires of any gage and as many terminals can be placed on switch as wire gage and switch dimensions will allow.

  18. Plan a Site Visit with Your Legislator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ochs, Mike

    2005-01-01

    When members of Congress head home for a recess, participants in the grassroots network have an opportunity to use one of their effective education tools: the site visit. A site visit occurs when a legislator actually visits one's business, school, or organization to see one's work firsthand. A local site visit is effective because grassroots…

  19. Dialogue as a Site of Transformative Possibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinha, Shilpi

    2010-01-01

    This article examines how affect allows us to view the relational form of dialogue, as built upon the work of Derrida and Levinas, to be a site of transformative possibility for students as they encounter and address issues of social justice and difference in the classroom. The understanding of affect that attends this form of dialogue demands…

  20. Illuminated push-button switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwagiri, T.

    1983-01-01

    An illuminated push-button switch is described. It is characterized by the fact that is consists of a switch group, an operator button opening and closing the switch group, and a light-emitting element which illuminates the face of the operator button.

  1. Illuminated push-button switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwagiri, T.

    1983-05-01

    An illuminated push-button switch is described. It is characterized by the fact that is consists of a switch group, an operator button opening and closing the switch group, and a light-emitting element which illuminates the face of the operator button.

  2. Organic Materials For Optical Switching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, Beatriz H.

    1993-01-01

    Equations predict properties of candidate materials. Report presents results of theoretical study of nonlinear optical properties of organic materials. Such materials used in optical switching devices for computers and telecommunications, replacing electronic switches. Optical switching potentially offers extremely high information throughout in compact hardware.

  3. Characterization of an upstream regulatory element of adenovirus L1 poly (A) site.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li

    2005-06-20

    The transition from early to late stage infection by adenovirus involves a change in mRNA expression from the adenovirus major late transcription unit (AdMLTU). This early to late switch centers around alternative selection of one of five poly (A) sites (L1-L5) that code for the major structural proteins of Adenovirus. During the early stage of infection, steady state mRNA is primarily derived from the L1 poly (A) site. During the late stage of infection, each of the MLTU poly (A) sites is represented in the steady state mRNA pool (Falck-Pedersen, E., Logan, J., 1989. Regulation of poly(A) site selection in adenovirus. J. Virol. 63 (2), 532-541.). Using transient transfection of a plasmid expressing Chloramphenicol Acetyl Transferase with a tandem poly (A) minigene system (L13) (DeZazzo, J.D., Falck-Pedersen, E., Imperiale, M.J., 1991. Sequences regulating temporal poly(A) site switching in the adenovirus major late transcription unit. Mol. Cell. Biol. 11 (12), 5977-5984; Prescott, J., Falck-Pedersen, E., 1994. Sequence elements upstream of the 3' cleavage site confer substrate strength to the adenovirus L1 and L3 polyadenylation sites. Mol. Cell. Biol. 14 (7), 4682-4693.), it has been demonstrated that the promoter-proximal L1 poly (A) site which is poorly recognized by the 3' end processing machinery, contains an upstream repressor element (URE) that influences steady state levels of mRNA (Prescott, J.C., Liu, L., Falck-Pedersen, E., 1997. Sequence-mediated regulation of adenovirus gene expression by repression of mRNA accumulation. Mol. Cell. Biol. 17 (4), 2207-2216.). In this study, we have further characterized the elements that mediate L1URE function. These studies indicate that the L1 upstream regulatory element (L1 URE) contains a complex RNA architecture that serves to repress gene expression through multiple sub-effectors. The L1URE functions when located upstream of a heterologous poly (A) site, and is able to strongly suppress steady state m

  4. CMOS analog switches for adaptive filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixon, C. E.

    1980-01-01

    Adaptive active low-pass filters incorporate CMOS (Complimentary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor) analog switches (such as 4066 switch) that reduce variation in switch resistance when filter is switched to any selected transfer function.

  5. High gain GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switches: Switch longevity

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, G.M.; Zutavern, F.J.; Mar, A.

    1998-07-01

    Optically activated, high gain GaAs switches are being tested for many different pulsed power applications that require long lifetime (longevity). The switches have p and n contact metallization (with intentional or unintentional dopants) configured in such a way as to produce p-i-n or n-i-n switches. The longevity of the switches is determined by circuit parameters and by the ability of the contacts to resist erosion. This paper will describe how the switches performed in test-beds designed to measure switch longevity. The best longevity was achieved with switches made with diffused contacts, achieving over 50 million pulses at 10 A and over 2 million pulses at 80 A.

  6. Immunoglobulin class-switch recombination deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Durandy, Anne; Kracker, Sven

    2012-07-30

    Immunoglobulin class-switch recombination deficiencies (Ig-CSR-Ds) are rare primary immunodeficiencies characterized by defective switched isotype (IgG/IgA/IgE) production. Depending on the molecular defect in question, the Ig-CSR-D may be combined with an impairment in somatic hypermutation (SHM). Some of the mechanisms underlying Ig-CSR and SHM have been described by studying natural mutants in humans. This approach has revealed that T cell-B cell interaction (resulting in CD40-mediated signaling), intrinsic B-cell mechanisms (activation-induced cytidine deaminase-induced DNA damage), and complex DNA repair machineries (including uracil-N-glycosylase and mismatch repair pathways) are all involved in class-switch recombination and SHM. However, several of the mechanisms required for full antibody maturation have yet to be defined. Elucidation of the molecular defects underlying the diverse set of Ig-CSR-Ds is essential for understanding Ig diversification and has prompted better definition of the clinical spectrum of diseases and the development of increasingly accurate diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.

  7. Sonic crystal acoustic switch device.

    PubMed

    Alagoz, Serkan; Alagoz, Baris Baykant

    2013-06-01

    This study reports a wave-controlled sonic crystal switch device that exhibits a destructive interference-based wave to wave reverse switching effect. By applying control waves, this acoustic device, composed of a two-dimensional square lattice sonic crystal block, reduces acoustic wave transmission from input to output. The finite difference time domain simulation and experimental results confirm the wave-to-wave reverse switching effect at the peak frequencies of the second band. The proposed sonic crystal switch prototype provides a contrast rate of 86% at 11.3 kHz frequency. This wave-to-wave switching effect is useful for controlling wave propagation for smart structure applications.

  8. Plasma opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Savage, Mark E.; Mendel, Jr., Clifford W.

    2001-01-01

    A command triggered plasma opening switch assembly using an amplification stage. The assembly surrounds a coaxial transmission line and has a main plasma opening switch (POS) close to the load and a trigger POS upstream from the main POS. The trigger POS establishes two different current pathways through the assembly depended on whether it has received a trigger current pulse. The initial pathway has both POS's with plasma between their anodes and cathodes to form a short across the transmission line and isolating the load. The final current pathway is formed when the trigger POS receives a trigger current pulse which energizes its fast coil to push the conductive plasma out from between its anode and cathode, allowing the main transmission line current to pass to the fast coil of the main POS, thus pushing its plasma out the way so as to establish a direct current pathway to the load.

  9. Future switching satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campanella, S. Joseph; Pontano, Benjamin A.; Chalmers, Harvey

    1988-01-01

    Communications satellites of the future are likely to use much narrower beams in order to increase the uplink G/T and the downlink EIRP so that small earth terminals of the VSAT class can achieve full mesh connectivity. These satellites will need onboard switches to route traffic from originating upbeams to destination downbeams. This paper presents a new approach to accomplishing this rerouting using destination-directed packets that inherently carry the information needed to control the onboard switch connections and to adjust the traffic flow among the beams and the stations. The method also inherently provides channel multiplication and DAMA advantages which result in maximally efficient utilization of the space segment resource.

  10. Switched Matrix Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Whittum, David H

    2000-10-04

    We describe a new concept for a microwave circuit functioning as a charged-particle accelerator at mm-wavelengths, permitting an accelerating gradient higher than conventional passive circuits can withstand consistent with cyclic fatigue. The device provides acceleration for multiple bunches in parallel channels, and permits a short exposure time for the conducting surface of the accelerating cavities. Our analysis includes scalings based on a smooth transmission line model and a complementary treatment with a coupled-cavity simulation. We provide also an electromagnetic design for the accelerating structure, arriving at rough dimensions for a seven-cell accelerator matched to standard waveguide and suitable for bench tests at low power in air at 91.392. GHz. A critical element in the concept is a fast mm-wave switch suitable for operation at high-power, and we present the considerations for implementation in an H-plane tee. We discuss the use of diamond as the photoconductor switch medium.

  11. Optical fiber switch

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2002-01-01

    Optical fiber switches operated by electrical activation of at least one laser light modulator through which laser light is directed into at least one polarizer are used for the sequential transport of laser light from a single laser into a plurality of optical fibers. In one embodiment of the invention, laser light from a single excitation laser is sequentially transported to a plurality of optical fibers which in turn transport the laser light to separate individual remotely located laser fuel ignitors. The invention can be operated electro-optically with no need for any mechanical or moving parts, or, alternatively, can be operated electro-mechanically. The invention can be used to switch either pulsed or continuous wave laser light.

  12. Cryogenic switched MOSFET characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Both p channel and n channel enhancement mode MOSFETs can be readily switched on and off at temperatures as low as 2.8 K so that switch sampled readout of a VLWIR Ge:Ga focal plane is electronically possible. Noise levels as low as 100 rms electrons per sample (independent of sample rate) can be achieved using existing p channel MOSFETs, at overall rates up to 30,000 samples/second per multiplexed channel (e.g., 32 detectors at a rate of almost 1,000 frames/second). Run of the mill devices, including very low power dissipation n channel FETs would still permit noise levels of the order of 500 electrons/sample.

  13. The quantum cryptographic switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinatha, N.; Omkar, S.; Srikanth, R.; Banerjee, Subhashish; Pathak, Anirban

    2014-01-01

    We illustrate the principle of a cryptographic switch for a quantum scenario, in which a third party (Charlie) can control to a continuously varying degree the amount of information the receiver (Bob) receives, after the sender (Alice) has sent her information through a quantum channel. Suppose Charlie transmits a Bell state to Alice and Bob. Alice uses dense coding to transmit two bits to Bob. Only if the 2-bit information corresponding to the choice of the Bell state is made available by Charlie to Bob can the latter recover Alice's information. By varying the amount of information Charlie gives, he can continuously alter the information recovered by Bob. The performance of the protocol as subjected to the squeezed generalized amplitude damping channel is considered. We also present a number of practical situations where a cryptographic switch would be of use.

  14. MULTIPLE SPARK GAP SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Schofield, A.E.

    1958-07-22

    A multiple spark gap switch of unique construction is described which will permit controlled, simultaneous discharge of several capacitors into a load. The switch construction includes a disc electrode with a plurality of protuberances of generally convex shape on one surface. A firing electrode is insulatingly supponted In each of the electrode protuberances and extends substantially to the apex thereof. Individual electrodes are disposed on an insulating plate parallel with the disc electrode to form a number of spark gaps with the protuberances. These electrodes are each connected to a separate charged capacitor and when a voltage ls applied simultaneously between the trigger electrodes and the dlsc electrode, each spark gap fires to connect its capacitor to the disc electrode and a subsequent load.

  15. Many-Body Switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Allan H.

    2014-03-01

    Most current electronic devices use gate voltages to switch individual electron transport channels or off. This architecture necessarily leads to operating voltages that are much larger than the temperature thermal energy, and places lower bounds on power consumption that are becoming. I will discuss strategies for achieving devices in which gates are used to collective many-electron states, in principle allowing charge transport to be switched by smaller voltage changes and both operating voltages and power consumption to reduced. I will specifically address devices based on the properties of itinerant electroninsulating magnetic systems, and devices based on bilayer exciton condensation. This work is based on work performed in collaboration with Sanjay Banerjee and Frank Register.

  16. Artificial molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Kassem, Salma; van Leeuwen, Thomas; Lubbe, Anouk S; Wilson, Miriam R; Feringa, Ben L; Leigh, David A

    2017-05-09

    Motor proteins are nature's solution for directing movement at the molecular level. The field of artificial molecular motors takes inspiration from these tiny but powerful machines. Although directional motion on the nanoscale performed by synthetic molecular machines is a relatively new development, significant advances have been made. In this review an overview is given of the principal designs of artificial molecular motors and their modes of operation. Although synthetic molecular motors have also found widespread application as (multistate) switches, we focus on the control of directional movement, both at the molecular scale and at larger magnitudes. We identify some key challenges remaining in the field.

  17. Automatic switching matrix

    DOEpatents

    Schlecht, Martin F.; Kassakian, John G.; Caloggero, Anthony J.; Rhodes, Bruce; Otten, David; Rasmussen, Neil

    1982-01-01

    An automatic switching matrix that includes an apertured matrix board containing a matrix of wires that can be interconnected at each aperture. Each aperture has associated therewith a conductive pin which, when fully inserted into the associated aperture, effects electrical connection between the wires within that particular aperture. Means is provided for automatically inserting the pins in a determined pattern and for removing all the pins to permit other interconnecting patterns.

  18. Composite Material Switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javadi, Hamid (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A device to protect electronic circuitry from high voltage transients is constructed from a relatively thin piece of conductive composite sandwiched between two conductors so that conduction is through the thickness of the composite piece. The device is based on the discovery that conduction through conductive composite materials in this configuration switches to a high resistance mode when exposed to voltages above a threshold voltage.

  19. CREE: Making the Switch

    SciTech Connect

    Grider, David; Palmer, John

    2014-03-06

    CREE, with the help of ARPA-E funding, has developed a Silicon Carbide (SIC) transistor which can be used to create solid state transformers capable of meeting the unique needs of the emerging smart grid. SIC transistors are different from common silicon computer chips in that they handle grid scale voltages with ease and their high frequency switching is well suited to the intermittent nature of renewable energy generation.

  20. CREE: Making the Switch

    ScienceCinema

    Grider, David; Palmer, John

    2016-07-12

    CREE, with the help of ARPA-E funding, has developed a Silicon Carbide (SIC) transistor which can be used to create solid state transformers capable of meeting the unique needs of the emerging smart grid. SIC transistors are different from common silicon computer chips in that they handle grid scale voltages with ease and their high frequency switching is well suited to the intermittent nature of renewable energy generation.

  1. Organic optical bistable switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jiangeng; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate an organic optical bistable switch by integrating an efficient organic photodetector on top of a transparent electrophosphorescent organic light-emitting diode (TOLED). The bistability is achieved with an external field-effect transistor providing positive feedback. In the "LOW" state, the TOLED is off and the current in the photodetector is solely its dark current. In the "HIGH" state, the TOLED emits light that is directly coupled into the integrated photodetector through the transparent cathode. The photocurrent then is fed back to the TOLED, maintaining it in the HIGH state. The green electrophosphorescent material, fac tris(2-phenylpyridine) iridium [Ir(ppy)3] doped into a 4,4'-N,N'-dicarbazole-biphenyl host was used as the luminescent material in the TOLED, while alternating thin layers of copper phthalocyanine and 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic bis-benzimidazole were used as the active region of the organic photodetector. The circuit has a 3 dB bandwidth of 25 kHz, and can be switched between HIGH and LOW using pulses as narrow as 60 ns. The bistable switch can be both electrically and optically reset, making it a candidate for image-retaining displays (e.g., electronic paper) and other photonic logic applications. The integrated organic device also has broad use as a linear circuit element in applications such as automatic brightness control.

  2. Cygnus Diverter Switch Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    G. Corrow, M. Hansen, D. Henderson, C. Mitton et al.

    2008-02-01

    The Cygnus Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two 2.25-MV, 60-kA, 50-ns x-ray sources fielded in an underground laboratory at the Nevada Test Site. The tests performed in this laboratory involve study of the dynamic properties of plutonium and are called subcritical experiments. From end-to-end, the Cygnus machines utilize the following components: Marx generator, water-filled pulse-forming line (PFL), waterfilled coaxial transmission line (WTL), 3-cell inductive voltage adder (IVA), and rod-pinch diode. The upstream WTL interface to the PFL is via a radial insulator with coaxial geometry. The downstream WTL terminates in a manifold where the center conductor splits into three lines which individually connect to each of the IVA cell inputs. There is an impedance mismatch at this juncture. It is a concern that a reflected pulse due to anomalous behavior in the IVA or diode might initiate breakdown upon arrival at the upstream PFL/WTL insulator. Therefore near the beginning of the WTL a radial diverter switch is installed to protect the insulator from over voltage and breakdown. The diverter has adjustable gap spacing, and an in-line aqueous-solution (sodium thiosulfate) resistor array for energy dissipation. There are capacitive voltage probes at both ends of the WTL and on the diverter switch. These voltage signals will be analyzed to determine diverter performance. Using this analysis the usefulness of the diverter switch will be evaluated.

  3. Ultrafast gas switching experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, C. A.; Martin, T. H.; Patterson, P. E.; Rinehart, L. F.; Rohwein, G. J.; Roose, L. D.; Aurand, J. F.; Buttram, M. T.

    1993-06-01

    Recent experiments which studied the physics of ultrafast gas breakdown under the extreme overvoltages which occur when a high pressure gas switch is pulse charged to hundreds of kV in 1 ns or less are described. The highly overvolted peaking gaps produce powerful electromagnetic pulses with risetimes less than 100 ps which can be used for ultrawideband radar systems, particle accelerators, laser drivers, bioelectromagnetic studies, electromagnetic effects testing, and for basic studies of gas breakdown physics. Pulses with 50 to 100 ps risetimes to peak levels of 75 to 160 kV at pulse repetition frequencies (PRF) to 1 kHz were produced and accurately measured. A unique gas switch was developed to hold off hundreds of kV with parasitic inductance less than 1 nH. An advanced diagnostic system using Fourier compensation was developed to measure single-shot risetimes below 35 ps. The complete apparatus is described and waveforms are presented. The measured data are compared with a theoretical model which predicts key features including dependence on gas species and pressure. This technology was applied to practical systems driving ultrawideband radiating antennas and bounded wave simulators. A thyristor/pulse transformer based system using a highly overvolted cable switch was developed. This pulser driving a Sandia-designed TEM cell, provides an ultra wideband impulse with less than 200 ps risetime to the test object at a PRF greater than 1 kHz at grater tha n 100 kV/m E field.

  4. "Platform switching": serendipity.

    PubMed

    Kalavathy, N; Sridevi, J; Gehlot, Roshni; Kumar, Santosh

    2014-01-01

    Implant dentistry is the latest developing field in terms of clinical techniques, research, material science and oral rehabilitation. Extensive work is being done to improve the designing of implants in order to achieve better esthetics and function. The main drawback with respect to implant restoration is achieving good osseointegration along with satisfactory stress distribution, which in turn will improve the prognosis of implant prosthesis by reducing the crestal bone loss. Many concepts have been developed with reference to surface coating of implants, surgical techniques for implant placement, immediate and delayed loading, platform switching concept, etc. This article has made an attempt to review the concept of platform switching was in fact revealed accidentally due to the nonavailability of the abutment appropriate to the size of the implant placed. A few aspect of platform switching, an upcoming idea to reduce crestal bone loss have been covered. The various methods used for locating and preparing the data were done through textbooks, Google search and related articles.

  5. Ultrafast gas switching experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, C.A.; Martin, T.H.; Patterson, P.E.; Rinehart, L.F.; Rohwein, G.J.; Roose, L.D.; Aurand, J.F.; Buttram, M.T.

    1993-08-01

    We describe recent experiments which studied the physics of ultrafast gas breakdown under the extreme overvoltages which occur when a high pressure gas switch is pulse charged to hundreds of kV in 1 ns or less. The highly overvolted peaking gaps produce powerful electromagnetic pulses with risetimes < 100 ps which can be used for ultrawideband radar systems, particle accelerators, laser drivers, bioelectromagnetic studies, electromagnetic effects testing, and for basic studies of gas breakdown physics. We have produced and accurately measured pulses with 50 to 100 ps risetimes to peak levels of 75 to 160 kV at pulse repetition frequencies (PRF) to 1 kHz. A unique gas switch was developed to hold off hundreds of kV with parasitic inductance less than 1 nH. An advanced diagnostic system using Fourier compensation was developed to measure single-shot risetimes below 35 ps. The complete apparatus is described and waveforms are presented. The measured data are compared with a theoretical model which predicts key features including dependence on gas species and technology to practical systems antennas and bounded wave developed a thyristor/pulse transformer based system using a highly overvolted cable switch. This pulser driving a Sandia-designed TEM cell, provides an ultra wideband impulse with < 200 ps risetime to the test object at a PRF > Khz at > 100 kV/m E field.

  6. Ultrafast gas switching experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, C.A.; Martin, T.H.; Patterson, P.E.; Rinehart, L.F.; Rohwein, G.J.; Roose, L.D.; Aurand, J.F.; Buttram, M.T.

    1996-11-01

    We describe recent experiments which studied the physics of ultrafast gas breakdown under the extreme overvoltages which occur when a high pressure gas switch is pulse charged to hundreds of kV in 1 ns or less. The highly overvolted peaking gaps produce powerful electromagnetic pulses with risetimes < 100 ps which can be used for ultrawideband radar systems, particle accelerators, laser drivers, bioelectromagnetic studies, electromagnetic effects testing, and for basic studies of gas breakdown physics. We have produced and accurately measured pulses with 50 to 100 ps risetimes to peak levels of 75 to 160 kV at pulse repetition frequencies (PRF) to I kHz. A unique gas switch was developed to hold off hundreds of kV with parasitic inductance less than I nH. An advanced diagnostic system using Fourier compensation was developed to measure single-shot risetimes below 35 ps. The complete apparatus is described and wave forms are presented. The measured data are compared with a theoretical model which predicts key features including dependence on gas species and pressure. We have applied this technology to practical systems driving ultrawideband radiating antennas and bounded wave simulators. For example, we have developed a thyristor/pulse transformer based system using a highly overvolted cable switch. This pulser driving a Sandia- designed TEM cell, provides an ultra wideband impulse with < 200 ps risetime to the test object at a PRF > 1 kHz at > 100 kV/m E field.

  7. Protein Conformational Switches: From Nature to Design

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jeung-Hoi

    2012-01-01

    Protein conformational switches alter their shape upon receiving an input signal, such as ligand binding, chemical modification, or change in environment. The apparent simplicity of this transformation—which can be carried out by a molecule as small as a thousand atoms or so—belies its critical importance to the life of the cell as well as its capacity for engineering by humans. In the realm of molecular switches, proteins are unique because they are capable of performing a variety of biological functions. Switchable proteins are therefore of high interest to the fields of biology, bio-technology, and medicine. These molecules are beginning to be exploited as the core machinery behind a new generation of biosensors, functionally regulated enzymes, and “smart” biomaterials that react to their surroundings. As inspirations for these designs, researchers continue to analyze existing examples of allosteric proteins. Recent years have also witnessed the development of new methodologies for introducing conformational change into proteins that previously had none. Herein we review examples of both natural and engineered protein switches in the context of four basic modes of conformational change: rigid-body domain movement, limited structural rearrangement, global fold switching, and folding–unfolding. Our purpose is to highlight examples that can potentially serve as platforms for the design of custom switches. Accordingly, we focus on inducible conformational changes that are substantial enough to produce a functional response (e.g., in a second protein to which it is fused), yet are relatively simple, structurally well-characterized, and amenable to protein engineering efforts. PMID:22688954

  8. Design, Synthesis, and Dynamics of a Green Fluorescent Protein Fluorophore Mimic with an Ultrafast Switching Function.

    PubMed

    Paolino, Marco; Gueye, Moussa; Pieri, Elisa; Manathunga, Madushanka; Fusi, Stefania; Cappelli, Andrea; Latterini, Loredana; Pannacci, Danilo; Filatov, Michael; Léonard, Jérémie; Olivucci, Massimo

    2016-08-10

    While rotary molecular switches based on neutral and cationic organic π-systems have been reported, structurally homologous anionic switches providing complementary properties have not been prepared so far. Here we report the design and preparation of a molecular switch mimicking the anionic p-HBDI chromophore of the green fluorescent protein. The investigation of the mechanism and dynamics of the E/Z switching function is carried out both computationally and experimentally. The data consistently support axial rotary motion occurring on a sub-picosecond time scale. Transient spectroscopy and trajectory simulations show that the nonadiabatic decay process occurs in the vicinity of a conical intersection (CInt) between a charge transfer state and a covalent/diradical state. Comparison of our anionic p-HBDI-like switch with the previously reported cationic N-alkyl indanylidene pyrrolinium switch mimicking visual pigments reveals that these similar systems translocate, upon vertical excitation, a similar net charge in the same axial direction.

  9. Resistive Switching and Memory effects in Silicon Oxide Based Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jun

    Silicon oxide (SiOx 1 < x ≦2) has long been used and considered as a passive and insulating component in the construction of electronic devices. In contrast, here the active role of SiOx in constructing a type of resistive switching memory is studied. From electrode-independent electrical behaviors to the visualization of the conducting filament inside the SiOx matrix, the intrinsic switching picture in SiOx is gradually revealed. The thesis starts with the introduction of some similar phenomenological switching behaviors in different electronic structures (Chapter 1), and then generalizes the electrode-material-independent electrical behaviors on SiOx substrates, providing indirect evidence to the intrinsic SiOx switching (Chapter 2). From planar nanogap systems to vertical sandwiched structures, Chapter 3 further discusses the switching behaviors and properties in SiOx. By localization of the switching site, the conducting filament in SiOx is visualized under transmission electron microscope using both static and in situ imaging methods (Chapter 4). With the intrinsic conduction and switching in SiO x largely revealed, Chapter 5 discusses its impact and implications to the molecular electronics and nanoelectronics where SiOx is constantly used. As comparison, another type of memory effect in semiconductors (carbon nanotubes) based on charge trapping at the semiconductor/SiO x interface is discussed (Chapter 6).

  10. Photoconductive semiconductor switches: Laser Q-switch trigger and switch-trigger laser integration

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, G.M.; Mar, A.; Hamil, R.A.; Zutavern, F.J.; Helgeson, W.D.

    1997-12-01

    This report provides a summary of the Pulser In a Chip 9000-Discretionary LDRD. The program began in January of 1997 and concluded in September of 1997. The over-arching goal of this LDRD is to study whether laser diode triggered photoconductive semiconductor switches (PCSS) can be used to activate electro-optic devices such as Q-switches and Pockels cells and to study possible laser diode/switch integration. The PCSS switches we used were high gain GaAs switches because they can be triggered with small amounts of laser light. The specific goals of the LDRD were to demonstrate: (1) that small laser diode arrays that are potential candidates for laser-switch integration will indeed trigger the PCSS switch, and (2) that high gain GaAs switches can be used to trigger optical Q-switches in lasers such as the lasers to be used in the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source and the laser used for direct optical initiation (DOI) of explosives. The technology developed with this LDRD is now the prime candidate for triggering the Q switch in the multiple lasers in the laser trigger system of the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source and may be utilized in other accelerators. As part of the LDRD we developed a commercial supplier. To study laser/switch integration we tested triggering the high gain GaAs switches with: edge emitting laser diodes, vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs), and transverse junction stripe (TJS) lasers. The first two types of lasers (edge emitting and VCSELs) did activate the PCSS but are harder to integrate with the PCSS for a compact package. The US lasers, while easier to integrate with the switch, did not trigger the PCSS at the US laser power levels we used. The PCSS was used to activate the Q-switch of the compact laser to be used in the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source.

  11. Power transistor switching characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    The switching properties of power transistors are investigated. The devices studied were housed in IO-3 cases and were of an n(+)-p-n(-)-n(+) vertical dopant structure. The effects of the magnitude of the reverse-base current and temperature on the reverse-bias second breakdown characteristics are discussed. Brief discussions of device degradation due to second breakdown and of a constant voltage turn-off circuit are included. A description of a vacuum tube voltage clamp circuit which reduces clamped collector voltage overshoot is given.

  12. Composite Thermal Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, Robert; Brawn, Shelly; Harrison, Katherine; O'Toole, Shannon; Moeller, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Lithium primary and lithium ion secondary batteries provide high specific energy and energy density. The use of these batteries also helps to reduce launch weight. Both primary and secondary cells can be packaged as high-rate cells, which can present a threat to crew and equipment in the event of external or internal short circuits. Overheating of the cell interior from high current flows induced by short circuits can result in exothermic reactions in lithium primary cells and fully charged lithium ion secondary cells. Venting of the cell case, ejection of cell components, and fire have been reported in both types of cells, resulting from abuse, cell imperfections, or faulty electronic control design. A switch has been developed that consists of a thin layer of composite material made from nanoscale particles of nickel and Teflon that conducts electrons at room temperature and switches to an insulator at an elevated temperature, thus interrupting current flow to prevent thermal runaway caused by internal short circuits. The material is placed within the cell, as a thin layer incorporated within the anode and/or the cathode, to control excess currents from metal-to-metal or metal-to-carbon shorts that might result from cell crush or a manufacturing defect. The safety of high-rate cells is thus improved, preventing serious injury to personnel and sensitive equipment located near the battery. The use of recently available nanoscale particles of nickel and Teflon permits an improved, homogeneous material with the potential to be fine-tuned to a unique switch temperature, sufficiently below the onset of a catastrophic chemical reaction. The smaller particles also permit the formation of a thinner control film layer (<50 m), which can be incorporated into commercial high-rate lithium primary and secondary cells. The innovation permits incorporation in current lithium and lithium-ion cell designs with a minimal impact on cell weight and volume. The composite thermal

  13. Distributed circuit switching starnet

    SciTech Connect

    Chuan-lin Wu; Woei Lin; Min-chang Lin

    1982-01-01

    Starnet is a communication subnet which can cost-effectively connect hundreds or thousands of processors for distributed processing. It uses distributed control and circuit switching. Starnet's communication medium includes two major components: a multistage interconnection network and a set of interface units. The interconnection network uses a destination routing scheme with no central control. The interface unit provides handshaking between the computer/data node and the interconnection network under the control of a microprocessor. Detailed design of the communication medium is described. A model for comparing cost-effectiveness among starnet, crossbar and multiple buses is included. 7 references.

  14. Neutron activated switch

    DOEpatents

    Barton, David M.

    1991-01-01

    A switch for reacting quickly to a neutron emission. A rod consisting of fissionable material is located inside a vacuum tight body. An adjustable contact is located coaxially at an adjustable distance from one end of the rod. Electrical leads are connected to the rod and to the adjustable contact. With a vacuum drawn inside the body, a neutron bombardment striking the rod causes it to heat and expand longitudinally until it comes into contact with the adjustable contact. This circuit closing occurs within a period of a few microseconds.

  15. Railway switch transport model.

    PubMed

    Horvat, Martin; Prosen, Tomaž; Benenti, Giuliano; Casati, Giulio

    2012-11-01

    We propose a simple model of coupled heat and particle transport based on zero-dimensional classical deterministic dynamics, which is reminiscent of a railway switch whose action is a function only of the particle's energy. It is shown that already in the minimal three-terminal model, where the second terminal is considered as a probe with zero net particle and heat currents, one can find extremely asymmetric Onsager matrices as a consequence of time-reversal symmetry breaking of the model. This minimalistic transport model provides a better understanding of thermoelectric heat engines in the presence of time-reversal symmetry breaking.

  16. Carbohydrate-based switch-on molecular sensor for Cu(II) in buffer: absorption and fluorescence study of the selective recognition of Cu(II) ions by galactosyl derivatives in HEPES buffer.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Nitin Kumar; Ramanujam, Balaji; Mariappanadar, Vairamani; Rao, Chebrolu Pulla

    2006-08-03

    [graph: see text] 1-(Beta-D-galactopyranosyl-1'-deoxy-1'-iminomethyl)-2-hydroxynaphthalene (L1), possessing an ONO binding core, was found to be selective for Cu2+ ions in N-[2-hydroxyethyl]piperazine-N'-[2-ethanesulfonic acid] buffer, at concentrations < or = 580 ppb, at physiological pH by eliciting switch-on behavior, whereas the other ions, viz., Mg2+, Ca2+, Mn2+, Fe2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Zn2+, and Cd2+, caused no significant change in the fluorescence. Whereas the binding characteristics were ascertained by absorption spectroscopy, the species formed were shown by Q-TOF ES MS.

  17. Switching on the Aire conditioner.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Mitsuru

    2015-12-01

    Aire has been cloned as the gene responsible for a hereditary type of organ-specific autoimmune disease. Aire controls the expression of a wide array of tissue-restricted Ags by medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs), thereby leading to clonal deletion and Treg-cell production, and ultimately to the establishment of self-tolerance. However, relatively little is known about the mechanism responsible for the control of Aire expression itself. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Haljasorg et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2015. 45: 3246-3256] have reported the presence of an enhancer element for Aire that binds with NF-κB components downstream of the TNF receptor family member, RANK (receptor activator of NF-κB). The results suggest that RANK has a dual mode of action in Aire expression: one involving the promotion of mTEC differentiation and the other involving activation of the molecular switch for Aire within mature mTECs. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Compound semiconductor optical waveguide switch

    DOEpatents

    Spahn, Olga B.; Sullivan, Charles T.; Garcia, Ernest J.

    2003-06-10

    An optical waveguide switch is disclosed which is formed from III-V compound semiconductors and which has a moveable optical waveguide with a cantilevered portion that can be bent laterally by an integral electrostatic actuator to route an optical signal (i.e. light) between the moveable optical waveguide and one of a plurality of fixed optical waveguides. A plurality of optical waveguide switches can be formed on a common substrate and interconnected to form an optical switching network.

  19. Wide Bandgap Extrinsic Photoconductive Switches

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    above band-gap wavelengths of light to trigger the switches. The performance and switch life of lateral geometry PCSS are limited by surface flashover ...Laboratory Livermore, CA 94550 Abstract Semi-insulating Silicon Carbide and Gallium Nitride are attractive materials for compact, high voltage...Introduction Previous SiC PCSS work [2-4] used high resistivity, low impurity SiC polytypes and focused on lateral geometry surface switches that used

  20. Using a Kinase-Inducible Bimolecular Switch to Control Enzyme Activity in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Sohum; Zhang, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Molecular switches have been instrumental in the development of powerful and versatile genetic tools for probing biochemical processes, such as intracellular signaling, directly within their native contexts. This protocol outlines a method for using a kinase-inducible bimolecular switch, along with live-cell fluorescence microscopy, to directly control and monitor the activity of a specific enzyme in living cells. PMID:24391085